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The Washington Post – January 20, 2018

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Democracy Dies in Darkness
Sunny 55/36 • Tomorrow: Partly sunny 54/43 B6
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SATURDAY, JANUARY 20 , 2018
. $2
Government shuts down after GOP bill fails in Senate
A WEEKEND FIX IS POSSIBLE, LEADERS SAY
Both sides dig in for fight as blame game intensifies
M IKE D E B ONIS,
E D O ’ K EEFE,
E RICA W ERNER
AND E LISE V IEBECK
BY
The federal government shut
down for the first time in more
than four years Friday after senators rejected a temporary spending patch and bipartisan efforts to
find an alternative fell short as a
midnight deadline came and
went.
Republican and Democratic
leaders both said they would continue to talk, raising the possibility of a solution over the weekend.
Office of Management and Budget
Director Mick Mulvaney said Friday that the conflict has a “really
good chance” of being resolved
before government offices open
Monday, suggesting that a shutdown’s impacts could be limited.
But the White House drew a
MELINA MARA/THE WASHINGTON POST
Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) returns to Capitol Hill after talking with President Trump at the White House on
Friday. Schumer said the meeting did not result in a deal to prevent a partial shutdown of the U.S. government starting at midnight.
Turmoil, conflicting plans plague agencies
J ULIET E ILPERIN,
L ISA R EIN
AND D AMIAN P ALETTA
BY
As the federal government prepared to shut down late Friday,
massive
confusion
spread
throughout the bureaucracy as
senior Trump administration officials painted radically different
scenarios of whether basic governmental functions would continue or halt.
Defense Secretary Jim Mattis
said about half of the Pentagon’s
civilian employees would be sent
home without pay, maintenance
would cease and some intelligence operations overseas would
stop. The Commerce Department
sent talking points to managers,
instructing them to tell furloughed employees to set up outof-office voice-mail messages and
take their office plants home. The
Internal Revenue Service braced
13%
Towns near
Naval Base
Kitsap, Wash.
Up to 1%
Up to 5%
Up to 10%
More than 10%
Federal workers as a share
of metro-area workforce
Ogden, Utah
Chicago
New
York
D.C.
St. Louis
Albuquerque
San Diego
Tucson
16%
Naval
Air Station
Patuxent
River, Md.
Memphis
El Paso
Honolulu
San Antonio
15%
Towns near Robins
Air Force Base, Ga.
Miami
Note: The Office of Personnel Management lists the 50 metro areas with the most federal civilian
workers, not including contractors, the Postal Service or intelligence workers.
Sources: Census Bureau; Major Work Locations of the Executive
Branch, July 2017; OPM
THE WASHINGTON POST
to lose more than half its workforce just as employees are answering questions about the new
tax law.
But at the Environmental Protection Agency, Administrator
Scott Pruitt told his roughly
15,000 employees to report to
work Monday as if nothing would
change, a direct contrast to the
plan officials finalized last month
suggesting that thousands of employees would be furloughed in
the event of a shutdown. And
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson
plans to leave Monday for a trip
that will take him to Europe for
bilateral talks in Paris, London
and Warsaw. His schedule includes a stop for the World Economic Forum at the swanky
Swiss resort of Davos, where he is
to meet up with President Trump.
The disconnect highlighted
the clash between the White
AGENCIES CONTINUED ON A13
A MY G OLDSTEIN
frankfort, ky. — Gov. Matt
Bevin is exultant as his administration sets out to transform
Medicaid. Only a week ago, he
won federal permission to pursue a goal that has animated his
two years in office: making hundreds of thousands of poor Kentuckians hold jobs or engage in
their communities in other ways
to keep their health insurance. It
is an approach never tried by any
state, and it will also transform
lives.
The unorthodox plan, Bevin
has faith, will lift people into
economic self-reliance, ease Kentucky’s stubbornly high rates of
addiction and ill health, and
propel the needy to “derive a
sense of dignity by your own
power.” From this capital city in
the state’s Bluegrass region, he is
buoyed by a sense of mission.
“It’s a . . . joy that we are doing
right by people,” Bevin says.
More than a two-hour drive to
the southeast in rural Floyd
County, where one person in
three lives in poverty, word of
these coming changes has
reached 20-year-old Lakin Branham. She relied on Medicaid
when she spent part of last
summer in a residential drugtreatment program after wrecking her grandmother’s car and
serving a brief jail stint for a DUI.
Five months clean, she needs the
program to pay for medicine to
fight depression and two hours of
drug counseling every other
week.
She hopes to go back to community college part time — too
few hours to keep her insurance
once Medicaid’s new rules phase
in later this year. The changes
sound “crazy and stupid,” says
Branham, who for the moment is
adjusting to sobriety while helping her grandmother care for her
grandfather, who has pancreatic
KENTUCKY CONTINUED ON A6
Lawmakers adopt tough
stance that took root
with Trump’s election
BY S EAN
AND E D
S ULLIVAN
O ’ K EEFE
Amid the chaos and confusion
of Capitol Hill this week, one
prevailing trend emerged: Republican leaders are embracing the
party’s hard-line position on illegal immigration.
While the battle over spending
continues, GOP lawmakers have
chosen to align with the conservative posture that took root in the
party with President Trump, a
development that is causing consternation among some Republican dissenters.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch
McConnell (Ky.) and other GOP
lawmakers repeatedly cast the
spending fight as Democrats displaying more loyalty to undocu-
How did we get here?
For years, Congress has failed to
deal with the “dreamers.” A12
What’s open, what’s closed
A rundown of government services
that would be affected. A13
For D.C. region, a familiar pain
Residents, local officials know how
bad a shutdown feels. B1
mented immigrants than Americans — a wager that the nativist
leanings that propelled Trump to
power will energize their political
base in this year’s midterm elections.
“What has been shoehorned
into this discussion is an insistence that we deal with an illegalimmigration issue,” McConnell
said Friday in a speech to the
Senate.
That strategy marked the latest
chapter in a decades-long realignment for a party that championed
outreach to the fast-growing Latino population as recently as the
GOP CONTINUED ON A14
Facebook will
ask users to rank
trustworthiness
of news outlets
BY E LIZABETH
AND H AMZA
RICKY CARIOTI/THE WASHINGTON POST
Trump gets mixed reviews at March for Life
Thousands packed the Mall on Friday for the annual rally against abortion. Many celebrated
victories that President Trump delivered for the movement in his first year in office, but others
also took a stand against his immigration policies, saying they tear families apart. Story, B1
In Sunday’s post
D WOSKIN
S HABAN
Facebook unveiled major
changes Friday to the News Feed
of its 2 billion users, announcing
it will rank news organizations by
credibility based on user feedback and diminish its role as an
arbiter of the news people see.
The move comes after the company endured harsh criticism for
allowing
disinformation
to
spread on its social network and
for favoring liberal outlets over
conservative ones. In a blog post
accompanying the announcement, chief executive Mark Zuckerberg wrote that Facebook is not
“comfortable” deciding which
news sources are the most trustworthy in a “world with so much
division.”
“We decided that having the
FACEBOOK CONTINUED ON A11
Inside
Town and country Before a
D.C. entrepreneur could help
rural West Virginians with
their businesses, he had to
work on himself. Magazine
First, be happy Jewel’s
commitment to her life first
and her singing career
second have put her where
she is today. And she feels
great about that. Arts & Style
Riding free The End to End
— a thousand-mile trail from
Cornwall to the Highlands —
provides the perfect route for
a couple in their 70s to get on
their bikes and explore
Britain. Travel
RICKY CARIOTI/THE WASHINGTON POST
SHUTDOWN CONTINUED ON A12
GOP’s leaders shift
right on immigration
Fears rise as Kentucky’s
Medicaid work rule looms
BY
hard line immediately after midnight, saying it would not negotiate over a central issue — immigration — until government funding is restored.
“We will not negotiate the status of unlawful immigrants while
Democrats hold our lawful citizens hostage over their reckless
demands,” White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders
said in a statement. “This is the
behavior of obstructionist losers,
not legislators. When Democrats
start paying our armed forces and
first responders we will reopen
negotiations on immigration reform.”
Both parties confronted major
political risks with 10 months to
go until the midterm elections.
Republicans resolved not to submit to the minority party’s demands to negotiate, while
$205
EILEEN BLASS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
THE NATION
METRO
Supreme Court will
take up travel ban
Baltimore mayor ousts
police commissioner
President Trump’s attempt to
restrict travelers from eight
countries will become a major test
of executive authority. A6
“We need violence reduction,”
Mayor Catherine E. Pugh said after
replacing Kevin Davis. The interim
leader pledged quick action. B1
BUSINESS NEWS ............................................. A10
COMICS ............................................................. C5
OPINION PAGES...............................................A15
LOTTERIES.........................................................B3
OBITUARIES.......................................................B4
TELEVISION.......................................................C3
WORLD NEWS....................................................A8
CONTENT © 2018
The Washington Post / Year 141, No. 46
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B6
4 4 1 2
A2
EZ
I N CA S E Y OU M I S S ED I T
Some reports that you may have missed. Read more at washingtonpost.com.
Apple says it will bring
20,000 jobs to U.S.
Modern gospel leader
Edwin Hawkins dies
Apple, the world’s most
valuable company, said
Wednesday that it will spend
$350 billion in development and
create 20,000 jobs in the United
States in the next five years,
outlining for the first time how it
will invest in the U.S. economy
following the new tax law passed
late last year.
Edwin Hawkins, a Grammy
Award-winning gospel star best
known for the crossover hit
“Oh, Happy Day” and who was a
major force for contemporary
inspirational music, died Jan. 15
at his home in Pleasanton, Calif.
He was 74.
washingtonpost.com/business
An island lifestyle
washed away?
Months after Hurricane Irma
blazed its destructive path
through the Caribbean, the once
vibrant community on the tiny
island of Barbuda is still
struggling to rebuild a paradise
lost.
washingtonpost.com/foreign
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washingtonpost.com/obituaries
Restitution pleas leave
no rest for Georgetown
One hundred eighty years
after Jesuit priests sold slaves to
save Georgetown University
from financial ruin, a group of
descendants is calling for
restitution. The university’s
president has apologized for the
sale, and the school has taken
steps to make amends.
washingtonpost.com/local
CO R R ECTI O N
A Tom Sietsema review of the
D.C. restaurant Brothers and
Sisters in this weekend’s
Washington Post Magazine,
which was printed in advance,
misspells the last name of chef
de cuisine Harper McClure.
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magically adjustable.
Broadens protections for
health workers objecting
to certain procedures
BY
S ARAH P ULLIAM B AILEY,
A RIANA E UNJUNG C HA
AND J ULIET E ILPERIN
Citing President Trump's “prolife mission,” the Department of
Health and Human Services announced actions Friday that are
designed to roll back key healthcare policies of the Obama administration.
Roger Severino, director for the
HHS Office of Civil Rights, said a
proposed rule on “conscience
rights” will further protect healthcare workers who think they are
being punished or discriminated
against because of their moral or
religious beliefs.
Speaking as thousands of abortion opponents gathered on the
Mall for the annual March for Life,
Severino told reporters that the
division's focus would be on “actions,” as in types of medical procedures, rather than groups of people. He drew parallels with Target
refusing to sell guns. “This is not
about denying anyone health
care,” he said during a conference
call.
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The rule follows the department’s announcement Thursday
that it was creating a civil rights
division to review complaints
from doctors, nurses and others
under 25 existing statutes, most of
which allow workers to opt out of
procedures such as abortion, assisted suicide and sterilization.
The document released describes an approach to conscience
and religious protections that is
significantly broader than current
regulations. The number of entities that would be covered by the
new rule is massive — as many as
745,000 hospitals, dentists’ offices,
pharmacies, ambulance services
and others — and the steps any
entity must take to show it is in
compliance is increased.
It also adds a definition of discrimination that did not exist under a 2008 rule and lays out how
this could provide the federal government with grounds to challenge a state’s enforcement of its
own laws, such as a statute requiring abortion insurance coverage.
Under that rule of the George W.
Bush administration, which was
rescinded and replaced by the
Obama administration in 2011,
covered institutions or groups
could continue to receive federal
funding by signing a certification
that they were aware of existing
legal protections. The new regulation would incorporate elements
of the older rule but also would go
further and require entities to post
notices of the protections. Officials
say they expect them to ensure that
organization-wide safeguards are
in place, update policies as needed
and implement staff training.
HHS estimates that implementing the new rule would cost
$312.3 million in the first year and
$125.5 million annually in the second through fifth years.
In a separate action Friday, officials rescinded a guidance letter
about Medicaid, issued by the
Obama administration in 2016,
that they say limited states’ authority to regulate providers within their borders. That letter said
states attempting to disqualify
abortion providers from their
Medicaid programs could come
under federal scrutiny.
By contrast, officials said, a new
guidance letter aims to empower
states to make the most appropriate decisions for themselves. In
recent years, Indiana and other
states have blocked Medicaid
funds from Planned Parenthood
because of the abortion services it
offers. The new policy could allow
states to receive millions in federal
funding while banning abortion
providers from participating in a
family planning program for lowincome women.
A state likely to take immediate
advantage of the policy reversal is
Texas.
Last year, it submitted a waiver
petition to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services asking
to regain funding it stopped accepting for its Healthy Texas Women program when it chose to exclude providers that “perform or
promote elective abortions” or
contract or affiliate with such providers.
Some health and legal experts
are questioning whether the proposed rule on conscience rights
could be broadly interpreted and
whether, as an example, a doctor
could refuse sex-reassignment
surgery to someone who is transgender. Existing laws do not specifically address whether a doctor
can deny services related to an
individual's sexual identity. “The
statutes focus on actions providers
say they can’t do in good conscience,” Severino said.
Severino did not rule out that
LGBT-related cases could come up
once the rule becomes final. “It’s
difficult to deal with every hypothetical in a law enforcement context because we can’t prejudge every case that comes through,” he
said.
sarah.pulliambailey@washpost.com
ariana.cha@washpost.com
juliet.eilperin@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/to-your-health
Motive for Las Vegas shooting rampage is elusive
BY W ESLEY L OWERY
AND M ARK B ERMAN
Authorities have not yet determined a motive for the October 2017 Las Vegas massacre but
have concluded that there is no
evidence of a political or ideological radicalization that would
explain why Stephen Paddock
opened fire on a country music
festival from a 32nd-floor suite at
the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino.
Although the investigation remains active, the Clark County
Sheriff’s Office released a preliminary 81-page investigatory report
Friday about the Oct. 1 shooting
rampage, which left 58 people
dead and more than 850 injured.
Paddock, who had checked into
two rooms at the Mandalay and
spent days bringing in bags of assault rifles and ammunition, shot
down into the crowd for more than
10 minutes in what investigators
described as a well-planned attack.
Authorities have concluded that
Paddock acted alone, and the sheriff said police do not anticipate
bringing charges against Paddock’s girlfriend, Marilou Danley,
who received large cash transfers
from Paddock just before the
shooting and was questioned in
the days after.
“We have done a lot of work
trying to piece together what happened,” Sheriff Joe Lombardo said
at a news conference Friday. “This
report won’t answer every question, or even the biggest question,
as to why he did what he did.”
Paddock, 64, who had no previous criminal history, stockpiled
weapons in the year before the
shooting, ultimately buying 55 rifles and other guns, in addition to
scopes, cases, bump stocks and
ammunition, according to the report. It remains unclear why he
targeted the concert.
“No suicide note or manifesto
MATT MCCLAIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
Laura Rodriguez, left, embraces her daughter Sara Rivero at a Las Vegas memorial in October,
after Stephen Paddock killed 58 people attending a festival and wounded more than 850.
was found,” investigators wrote.
“There was no evidence of radicalization or ideology to support any
theory that Paddock supported or
followed any hate groups or any
domestic or foreign terrorist organizations. Despite numerous interviews with Paddock’s family, acquaintances and gambling contacts, investigators could not link
Paddock to any specific ideology.”
The report later concludes:
“Nothing was found to indicate
motive on the part of Paddock or
that he acted with anyone else.”
Court filings released late last
week showed that federal authorities concluded he had planned meticulously for both the attack and
for the investigation he knew
would follow.
A search of Paddock’s computers found an Internet search his-
tory that included queries for information about outdoor concert
venues, SWAT tactics, weapons
and the locations of various gun
stores.
Danley told investigators that
Paddock had grown distant from
her in the year before the shooting.
Other friends and family members
told police that Paddock claimed
to consistently feel ill, in pain or
fatigued, but Paddock’s physician
told investigators that Paddock’s
only major ailment was a muscle
tear from a slip-and-fall incident in
a casino three years before the
shooting.
That doctor also told police that
he thought Paddock “may have had
bipolar disorder” but that Paddock
did want to discuss his mental
health, “seemed fearful of medications” and refused antidepressant
medication. The doctor said Paddock accepted prescriptions for an
anti-anxiety drug but it was unclear whether he was taking it.
Investigators also concluded
that Paddock was not facing financial hardship at the time of the
shooting. He gambled extensively
in the last days of September —
wagering tens of thousands of dollars at the Mandalay and other Las
Vegas casinos — but he also was
traveling back to a home of his in
Mesquite, Nev., where he made
bank deposits, transferred money
to Danley and purchased more
guns.
“He was indebted to no one and
in fact paid all his gambling debts
off before the shooting,” investigators wrote.
wesley.lowery@washpost.com
mark.berman@washpost.com
GOP memo on surveillance ‘abuse’ targets dossier
BY
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
A document described by House
Republicans as a top-secret memo
about surveillance “abuse” contains talking points focused on discrediting Fusion GPS, the firm that
hired a British ex-spy to compile
intelligence reports about alleged
connections between President
Trump’s associates and the Kremlin, according to people who have
read it.
It suggests that the former spy,
Christopher Steele, lied to FBI
agents who interviewed him during their probe of the 2016 election
and that this purported lie was
included in a successful application for a federal court order to
conduct electronic surveillance on
Trump campaign adviser Carter
Page, said these individuals, who
spoke on the condition of anonymity, citing the material’s sensitivity.
The document was produced by
the House Intelligence Committee’s GOP majority, which voted
Thursday to make it available to
the entire House membership,
though not to the public. The panel’s Democrats all opposed the
move.
In a statement issued Thursday,
the committee’s ranking Democrat, Rep. Adam B. Schiff (Calif.),
called the document “profoundly
misleading,” saying it was “drafted
by Republican staff attacking the
FBI.” He did not discuss the document’s contents.
“Rife with factual inaccuracies
and referencing highly classified
materials that most Republican Intelligence Committee members
were forced to acknowledge they
had never read, this is meant only
to give Republican House members a distorted view of the FBI,”
Schiff said. “This may help carry
White House water, but it is a deep
disservice to our law enforcement
professionals.”
Conservative Republicans are
increasingly calling for the document’s public release after first declaring it should remain classified.
Several have taken to social media,
conservative television and radio
outlets, and even the House floor,
to demand the public be able to see
what they’ve read.
“Americans deserve the truth,”
said Rep. Mark Meadows (R-N.C.),
the head of the House Freedom
Caucus.
The hashtag #ReleaseTheMemo
trended shortly after Meadows and
other House conservatives tweeted
it. According to the website Hamilton 68, which tracks Russianlinked Twitter accounts, #ReleaseTheMemo was the top
hashtag being promoted Thursday
and Friday by such accounts.
Rep. K. Michael Conaway (RTex.), who heads the Intelligence
Committee’s probe of Russian
meddling in the 2016 election, described the memo as a list of “problems we have discovered with
FISA,” which is short for the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act,
the law governing the collection of
foreign intelligence on U.S. soil.
A senior committee official, who
was not authorized to speak on the
record, said the talking points,
which were based on classified material made available to the committee by the FBI and the Justice
Department, mischaracterize the
work of the intelligence community and law enforcement “in a way
that is damaging as well as false.”
One of the document’s talking
points suggests that the government’s application for a wiretap
order on Page includes a reference
to Steele assuring the FBI he did
not speak to reporters about the
allegations of collusion between
Trump associates and Russia — although Steele later acknowledged
in a separate lawsuit that he had
talked to reporters before the 2016
election, said the individuals familiar with the document.
Current and former law enforcement officials have said the surveillance application relied on far
more information than just Steele’s
research.
In testimony before the Senate
Judiciary Committee, Glenn R.
Simpson, a Fusion GPS co-founder,
said the FBI had other sources offering information about possible
Russian interference in the U.S.
election who raised concerns similar to Steele’s, according to a transcript released this month.
“We all know [the Republicans]
are engaged in complete and total
warfare against the FBI,” said the
committee official, who did not discuss the memo’s contents. “They’re
trying to tie all of that to Fusion
GPS and Christopher Steele as
some unholy seed.”
In conservative media, the document has already renewed pundits’
calls for special counsel Robert S.
Mueller III, who has taken over the
FBI’s probe, to shut down his investigation. On Thursday, Sean Hannity opened his Fox News show by
declaring the memo’s contents
would end the probe.
“I have a message tonight for the
special counsel, Robert S. Mueller
III: Your witch hunt is now over,”
Hannity said. “Time to close the
doors.”
ellen.nakashima@washpost.com
devlin.barrett@washpost.com
karoun.demirjian@washpost.com
David Weigel and Erica Werner
contributed to this report.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 20 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
RE
politics & the nation
Justice Dept. to retry Sen. Menendez
after mistrial on corruption charges
D I G ES T
TEXAS
Judge orders major
changes in foster care
A judge on Friday ordered Texas
to make sweeping changes to its
foster-care system, two years after
she found it unconstitutionally
broken.
U.S. District Judge Janis
Graham Jack told the state that
the overhaul must include
improvements in record keeping,
caseworker visits and where
children are placed. The changes
were based on recommendations
from two experts the judge
appointed to help craft a plan to
improve the lives of children in
long-term foster care.
The judge appointed the
experts after ruling in December
2015 that people labeled
permanent wards of the state
“almost uniformly leave state
custody more damaged than
when they entered.” The state has
fought Jack’s oversight and
objected to previous
recommendations made by the
experts.
The state quickly filed a notice
of appeal Friday after Jack’s latest
ruling. Texas Attorney General
Ken Paxton (R) said the judge’s
“unfunded and unrealistic
mandates” were misguided, and
he noted legislation last year that
funds improvements to the
system.
— Associated Press
WASHINGTON
Sotomayor treated
for low blood sugar
Paramedics treated Justice
Sonia Sotomayor at her home
Friday morning for symptoms
brought on by low blood sugar, but
she went to work at the Supreme
Court as usual, a court
spokeswoman said.
“She was treated by D.C.
Emergency Medical Services and
is doing fine,” court spokeswoman
Kathleen Arberg said in a
statement. “She came to work,
followed her usual schedule, and
will be participating in planned
activities over the weekend.”
Sotomayor was not hospitalized
BY D EVLIN B ARRETT
AND E D O ’ K EEFE
LUCAS JACKSON/REUTERS
Demonstrators on the Brooklyn Bridge in New York on Friday
decry disparaging remarks that President Trump reportedly made
about immigration and immigrants from Haiti and African countries.
as a result of the episode, which
was first reported by Politico. The
court met in its private conference
and decided it would hear later
this term a challenge to President
Trump’s entry ban.
Sotomayor, 63, has had diabetes
since childhood.
outcome.”
The Associated Press typically
does not identify victims of sexual
assault unless they come forward
publicly, as Prout did.
— Associated Press
MICHIGAN
— Robert Barnes
Conyers relative seeks
vacant House seat
NEW HAMPSHIRE
Democratic state Sen. Ian
Conyers said Friday that he is
running for the Michigan
congressional seat long held by his
granduncle, John Conyers Jr.
The elder Conyers, an 88-yearold Democrat, was facing sexual
harassment allegations and cited
health reasons when he resigned
in December from the 13th
Congressional District seat he
held since 1964.
A special election to fill the seat
will be held during regular
primary and general elections in
August and November.
Democratic state Sen. Coleman
Young II and lawyer Michael
Gilmore already have joined the
race. John Conyers Jr. endorsed
his son, John Conyers III, to
succeed him. Conyers III has not
said whether he will run.
Prep school settles
sexual assault lawsuit
A New Hampshire prep school
has settled a lawsuit accusing it of
failing to protect a girl who was
sexually assaulted by a fellow
student as part of a conquest
ritual.
Chessy Prout was a 15-year-old
freshman at St. Paul’s School in
Concord when she accused senior
Owen Labrie of sexually
assaulting her in 2014. Her
parents sued in 2016, and a
settlement was finalized this
week.
Prout says she hopes the
settlement motivates the school to
create a culture where student
well-being comes first. The school,
which denied the lawsuit’s claims,
called the settlement a “welcomed
— Associated Press
The Justice Department plans
to put Sen. Robert Menendez
back on trial on corruption
charges, following a mistrial last
year in which most jurors wanted to acquit the New Jersey
Democrat.
The trial in Newark federal
court of Menendez and his codefendant, Salomon Melgen,
ended in a hung jury in November. When he came back to the
Senate in December, the lawmaker said he doubted prosecutors would continue to pursue
the case — but if they did, he
added: “Bring it on.”
On Friday, public corruption
prosecutors from the Justice Department filed notice saying
they want a retrial “at the earliest possible date.”
Menendez, a senior lawmaker,
has spent years fighting the
charges. Prosecutors said he
took gifts from Melgen, including a luxury hotel stay, private
jet flights and campaign donations, in exchange for which he
tried to help Melgen get U.S.
visas for his girlfriends, intervened in the eye doctor’s
$8.9 million billing dispute with
Medicare and assisted with a
port security contract of Melgen’s in the Dominican Republic.
Menendez has long maintained that the government’s
charges are an attempt to criminalize a longtime friendship between the two men, and that
there was nothing corrupt about
his acts on Melgen’s behalf or
Melgen’s financial support of the
senator.
“We regret that the DOJ, after
spending millions and millions
of taxpayer dollars, and failing
to prove a single allegation in a
court of law, has decided to
double down on an unjust prosecution,” the senator’s office said
in a statement Friday. “Evidently, they did not hear the overwhelming voices of the New
Jerseyans who served on the jury
this fall. Senator Menendez fully
posal being pushed by Sens.
intends to be vindicated —
again.”
Lindsey O. Graham (R-S.C.) and
Richard J. Durbin (D-Ill.).
It was not immediately clear if
the Justice Department planned
After U.S. District Court Judge
William H. Walls declared a
to scale back the charges and
evidence for a second trial — a
mistrial in late November, juror
Ed Norris said the panel was
tactic frequently used by prossplit 10-2 in favor of acquittal.
ecutors preparing for a retrial.
Norris, a 49-year-old equipThe first trial lasted more than
ment operator from Morris
two months.
County, N.J., said at the time that
Randall D. Eliason, a law
the evidence was mostly emails
professor at George Washington
and that he “didn’t see a
University, said a resmoking gun. . . . I don’t
quest for a retrial was
think the government
always likely because
proved anything.’’
prosecutors would not
The mistrial was a
have brought the case in
setback for the Justice
the first place unless
Department,
whose
they felt it was strong.
grounds for bringing
“Any time you’re
public corruption cases
bringing a prosecution
have been curtailed by a
against such a high- Menendez
ranking government ofrecent Supreme Court
ficial, all eyes are on you, and the
decision.
stakes are quite high, especially
Some legal experts have said
when you’re taking a second run
an ultimate loss in the Menenat it,’’ said Eliason.
dez case could lead to a further
The political stakes also will
erosion of the Justice Departbe higher the second time, as
ment’s ability to pursue such
Menendez is up for reelection in
prosecutions.
November. The first trial already
In a December interview with
had damaged his standing in his
reporters, Menendez sharply
home state.
criticized the FBI and Justice
A Rutgers-Eagleton poll reDepartment for how they had
leased Nov. 30 — just days after
pursued him, suggesting that his
the mistrial — found a majority
Hispanic heritage — and his
of New Jersey voters said he
roots in New Jersey’s Hudson
should not be reelected. FortyCounty, an area with a history of
nine percent of respondents said
political corruption — may have
Menendez should resign.
played a role.
Despite his legal troubles, no
“We have nearly 10 different
viable Republican challenger
individuals who had nothing to
has emerged to take on Menendo with the case, who were gone
dez, who was first elected to the
to and were asked, ‘What can
Senate in 2006.
you give us on Menendez?’ ” the
After the mistrial, Menendez
senator said. “Forget about me —
quickly reengaged in his Senate
the Department of Justice is not
duties — especially on immigrasupposed to be doing that, and
tion, an issue of special imporits agents are not supposed to be
tance given that he is the doing that. The only thing I can
longest-serving Latino in the
possibly think of is that you can’t
chamber.
believe that a Latino kid who
On Wednesday, Menendez atgrew up poor and ultimately
tended a meeting with members
comes from this county that has
of the Congressional Hispanic
a history — somehow, how does
Caucus and White House Chief
he get to be a U.S. senator
of Staff John F. Kelly to discuss a
without doing things that are
potential immigration comprowrong?”
mise. He also has been a lead
devlin.barrett@washpost.com
advocate for a bipartisan proed.okeefe@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. SATURDAY,
JANUARY 20 , 2018
Mattis unveils strategy
that focuses on conflict
with Russia and China
Defense secretary
criticizes Congress for
years of budget impasses
BY
D AN L AMOTHE
The United States must build
up its military to prepare for the
possibility of conflict with Russia
and China, according to a new
Pentagon strategy released Friday by Defense Secretary Jim
Mattis as he took Congress to task
on the eve of a potential government shutdown for years of failing to reach budget deals.
Mattis described the strategy
as a “clear-eyed appraisal of our
security environment with a keen
eye of America’s place in the
world,” and said it is based on a
“fundamental precept” that
“America can afford survival.”
The strategy touches on a
range of issues, including operations in Afghanistan and the need
to counter “rogue nations” such
as North Korea, but places the
heaviest emphasis on ensuring
the United States stays ahead of
other world powers. It marks a
shift from the Obama administration’s approach, which put greater emphasis on terrorism.
“We will continue to prosecute
the campaign against terrorists,
but great-power competition —
not terrorism — is now the primary focus of U.S. national security,” Mattis said in a speech at
Johns Hopkins University’s Paul
H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies. “This strategy is fit for our time, providing
the American people the military
required to protect our way of
life, stand with our allies and live
up to our responsibility to pass
intact to the next generation
those freedoms we enjoy today.”
The new document does not
mention climate change as a
threat, as the Obama administration typically did. Deputy Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan
predicted that would be the case
last month, saying the Pentagon
focused on other priorities. Mattis has stated the department
must prepare for climate change,
while President Trump has repeatedly expressed skepticism
that it exists.
The defense secretary saved
some of his toughest words for
lawmakers as the government
approached a possible partial
shutdown at midnight, saying the
military needs Congress “back in
the driver’s seat” and making
budget decisions.
“For too long we have asked
our military to stoically carry a
‘success at any cost’ attitude, as
they worked tirelessly to accomplish the mission with inadequate and misaligned resources
simply because the Congress
could not maintain regular order,” Mattis said. “Loyalty must be
a two-way street. We expect the
magnificent men and women of
our military to be faithful in their
service, even when going in
harm’s way. We must remain
faithful to those who voluntarily
sign a blank check to the American people, payable with their
life.”
Asked by a Johns Hopkins
student about whether a government shutdown would have serious ramifications on military operations, Mattis answered bluntly: “Yes.” Then he gave an example
involving military reservists, saying some of them will be sent
home instead of completing their
monthly training.
“They’ll suck it up, and they’ll
say, ‘Okay,’ ” Mattis said. “If
they’re Navy reservists, they’ll
say, ‘Aye, aye, sir,’ cheerfully. And
when they get in their car, they
may not mutter something quite
so positive.”
GETTY IMAGES
Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, center, shown during a visit last year to a checkpoint in the Korean demilitarized zone, said Friday that a
partial government shutdown would have serious ramifications for U.S. military operations, including maintenance and intelligence.
He added that maintenance
activities will “probably pretty
much shut down” and about 50
percent of the Defense Department’s civilian workforce will be
furloughed. Some intelligence
operations abroad also will stop,
he said, without elaborating.
A Defense Department memo
distributed Friday said U.S.
troops will not be paid during a
shutdown but will work anyway,
even as some training is halted.
The department’s civilian workers who are supporting tasks that
are considered essential also will
work unpaid.
The new National Defense
Strategy describes the United
States as “emerging from a period
of strategic atrophy” and says
that the nation must make a
sustained financial investment in
the military to overcome it.
The strategy document itself is
classified, but an 11-page summary shows it calls for building a
larger, more agile military,
strengthening military alliances
from the Middle East to Asia, and
reforming the Pentagon’s acquisition programs to field weapons
equipment more quickly, with
upgrades made as needed afterward. The strategy also advocates
pursuing several options that
have long been considered, including preparing forces to fight
from smaller, dispersed bases,
investing in robotic equipment
that acts independently, and
modernizing nuclear weapons
and missile defense.
The document is likely to be
greeted warmly by those interested in spending more money on
the military and skeptically by
those who note that the Pentagon
often puts together new documents outlining strategy, only to
disregard them later.
Senior Pentagon officials cast it
as a blueprint Mattis will use to
press for change.
“I think there is much deeper
and wider appreciation for the
challenges to American military
advantage than there have been
in the past,” Elbridge Colby, the
deputy assistant secretary of defense for strategy and force development, told reporters in advance of the document’s release.
“I can certainly guarantee to you
that this is associated with big
implementation efforts that have
already started to bear fruit, and
it will continue to do so.”
Asked whether he could provide examples of efforts that already have shifted or changed,
Colby said he did not think so.
The classified document was
mandated by Congress in the 2017
National Defense Authorization
Act, which called for the defense
secretary to present a new national defense strategy in the year
following a presidential election.
The new defense strategy was
written at the same time as the
national security strategy Trump
released in December, and it
flows from the president’s vision
of “peace through strength,” Colby said. Mattis had a hand in the
formation of both.
dan.lamothe@washpost.com
Adult-film star details alleged Trump affair in transcript
In Touch publishes
2011 interview after
report of settlement
BY M ARK B ERMAN,
F RANCES S TEAD S ELLERS
AND P AUL F ARHI
Donald Trump was attending a
celebrity golf tournament at a
Lake Tahoe resort in July 2006
when he met the adult-film star
Stormy Daniels, she later said.
Daniels said she took the future
president up on his offer to ride
around the lakefront course in his
golf cart.
“That was actually my first time
on a golf course,” Daniels, whose
real name is Stephanie Clifford,
told Adult Video News, a trade
publication, “and when you’re riding around with Donald Trump in
an Escalade golf cart during your
first time out on a course, I’d say I
was doing all right.”
What happened after has become a matter of intense dispute,
stretching across the worlds of
politics, media and adult entertainment. Daniels told journalists
in interviews conducted over several years — but not made public
until this month — that she and
Trump had an affair that began at
the tournament.
The story received scant attention until the Wall Street Journal
reported last week that Trump’s
longtime personal attorney, Michael Cohen, negotiated a secret
$130,000 payment to secure her
silence days before the 2016 presidential election.
The salacious allegations echo
the tabloid coverage that was a part
of Trump’s rise as a New York developer. At the same time, they also
have refocused attention on the
president’s history with women.
The White House did not respond to a request for comment
Friday. A White House official last
week dismissed the story as “old,
recycled reports, which were published and strongly denied prior to
the election.” Cohen released a
statement signed by “Stormy Daniels” denying an affair and calling
reports of a payment “completely
false.”
But the controversy shows no
signs of abating. On Friday, the
celebrity magazine In Touch published a transcript of an interview
it said Daniels gave in 2011. Jordi
Lippe-McGraw, the reporter In
Touch said spoke with Daniels,
confirmed to The Washington
Post that the transcript accurately
ETHAN MILLER/GETTY IMAGES
The Wall Street Journal
reported that a Trump lawyer
negotiated a payment to secure
Stormy Daniels’s silence days
before the 2016 election.
reflected the interview she conducted with Daniels by phone in
May 2011.
The magazine had published
some details from the interview
earlier in the week, but the full
transcript — totaling more than
5,000 words — gave a new, expansive view of how Daniels recounted their interactions. She said the
relationship began with a sexual
encounter at the tournament and
continued with phone conversations and in-person meetings for
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about a year, some of them involving Trump’s desire to put her on
his television show, “The Apprentice,” according to the transcript.
Parts of the transcript reveal a
familiar portrait of Trump —
watching television intently, bragging about one of his daughters
and boasting about being on the
cover of a magazine. He is also
portrayed as a man of quirky fascinations, one who sat riveted by
“Shark Week” programming that
aired during her visit.
“He is obsessed with sharks,”
Daniels is quoted as saying. “Terrified of sharks. He was like: ‘I donate to all these charities and I
would never donate to any charity
that helps sharks. I hope all the
sharks die.’ ”
According to the transcript,
Daniels said that in his hotel room,
she asked Trump about his wife,
Melania, who had recently given
birth to their son, Barron. “He goes,
‘Oh, don’t worry about her’ [and]
quickly, quickly changed the subject,” Daniels is quoted as saying.
Daniels told Lippe-McGraw she
was going public about the alleged
affair years after it ended because
she was disturbed by comments
Trump had made criticizing people in the pornography business,
the transcript says. “It was very
derogatory, and that makes me
more mad than anything,” she is
quoted as saying.
Daniels could not be reached
for comment this week, and a lawyer said to be representing her did
not respond to messages seeking
comment. A receptionist at his
office said he was not there when a
reporter visited Thursday.
Daniels was not the only porn
star with a story involving Trump
and the 2006 golf tournament.
Jessica Drake worked the event
with Daniels, promoting the work
of Wicked Pictures, an adult-film
company. Days before the 2016
election, Drake said publicly that
Trump kissed her without permission and that later she was offered
$10,000 to go alone to Trump’s
hotel room, charges his campaign
denied.
Drake did not respond this
week to requests for comment.
Her publicist, Josh Ortiz, told
the Daily Beast last week that
Drake had signed a nondisclosure
agreement “covering any and every mention of Trump,” the outlet
reported. Immediately after the
story published, however, Ortiz
said that no such agreement existed and that he had “made an incorrect assumption due to a grave
misunderstanding.”
Drake’s attorney, Gloria Allred,
said in an email this week that
Drake “did not sign an NDA with
Trump and has no settlement with
him.” Allred also represents some
of the other women who came
forward before the 2016 election
to accuse Trump of sexual misconduct, one of whom is suing him for
defamation.
Daniels’s comments, as published by In Touch, match what
she told Slate in interviews conducted before the 2016 election,
said Jacob Weisberg, chairman
and editor in chief of the Slate
Group.
Weisberg published an account
Tuesday describing his interviews
with her. His account and the transcript say Daniels discussed
Trump’s unfulfilled offer to buy
her a condo in Tampa, his remarks
about featuring her on “The Apprentice” and his invitation for her
to attend the Miss USA pageant.
“It was a bit uncanny,” Weisberg
wrote in an email Friday, noting
that she also related the “Shark
Week” detail to him. “And nothing
[published by In Touch] did not
match what she told me.”
In his Slate article, Weisberg
wrote that Daniels had “worked
out an agreement for the presidential candidate to pay her a
six-figure sum to keep quiet.” She
spoke to Slate fearing that Trump
“would stall her until after the
election, and then refuse to sign or
pay up,” Weisberg wrote.
To corroborate Daniels’s account, Weisberg said he spoke to
three of her friends who “confirmed the outlines of her story.”
Also, Daniels sent Weisberg a twopage unsigned document related
to a settlement that would have
paid for her silence. The document, which Slate published,
shields the names of the other
people involved.
Daniels stopped responding to
Weisberg a week before the election, and a friend of hers told him
she had “taken the money from
Trump after all,” Weisberg wrote.
Without Daniels’s further cooperation or independent confirmation about the settlement, he opted not to publish the story at that
time. Weisberg and In Touch reevaluated after the Wall Street
Journal’s report last week. (The
Post has not independently verified that payment.)
After In Touch began posting
parts of its Daniels report online,
Cohen wrote in an email to The
Post that a sister publication of In
Touch had published “this identical piece” in 2011. He described it
as “old news that wasn’t true then
and not true now.”
The 2011 article Cohen cited
aggregated a gossip-blog report
claiming that Trump and Daniels
had an affair. That story does not
include any of Daniels’s comments
published this week by In Touch or
refer to that interview.
James Heidenry, In Touch’s editorial director, said he joined the
publication last year and was not
involved in the decision not to
publish the interview in 2011. He
said the story took on a new relevance after the Journal’s report.
“It’s a particularly strong story
now in light of the Wall Street
Journal’s story about the $130,000
payoff, and because of all the denials about an affair,” Heidenry said.
“This story now has particular significance that it wouldn’t have had
if it was published before.”
Heidenry said Daniels submitted to and passed a polygraph test
in Las Vegas as part of the magazine’s reporting, which he said was
“standard in celebrity news.” Daniels’s then-husband corroborated
her account and also took and
passed a polygraph test, Heidenry
said.
In 2009, Daniels considered
running for the U.S. Senate seat in
Louisiana then held by David Vitter, a family-values Republican
linked to a prostitution ring run by
the “D.C. Madam,” saying that voters had drafted her. “Call me what
you will, but you can’t call me a
hypocrite,” Daniels said in a 2009
interview posted on YouTube.
Bradley Beychok, then a Democratic political consultant, said he
met with Daniels during her “listening tour” in Baton Rouge. “It
was clear she was smart, prepared
and comfortable with the media
frenzy,” Beychok said.
One of her political advisers,
Andrea Dubé, told The Post on
Friday that she recalled discussions at the time about Daniels
having an affair with Trump.
In an email exchange among
Dubé and other advisers, one adviser wrote: “She says one time he
made her sit with him for three
hours watching ‘shark week.’ Another time he had her spank him
with a Forbes magazine.”
The email was first reported
Thursday by Mother Jones.
In the In Touch account published Friday, Daniels said she
came to regret the relationship
with Trump.
“At the time, I didn’t think that
much about it,” Daniels is quoted
as saying. “But now that I have a
baby that’s the same age that his
was at the time . . . I feel bad. It
didn’t occur to me at the time.”
mark.berman@washpost.com
frances.sellers@washpost.com
paul.farhi@washpost.com
Julie Tate, Beth Reinhard, Robert
O’Harrow Jr., David A. Fahrenthold,
Josh Dawsey, Jack Gillum and Alice
Crites in Washington and Rob Kuznia
in Beverly Hills, Calif., contributed to
this report.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 20 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A5
RE
ANALYSIS
Pence’s hopes for Middle East trip likely to crash into reality on the ground
Decisions on Jerusalem,
aid cuts complicate
agenda in the region
BY J ENNA J OHNSON
AND L OVEDAY M ORRIS
As Vice President Pence prepared to head to the Middle East
this weekend, he said he was hopeful that President Trump’s decision last month to formally recognize Jerusalem as the capital of
Israel will greatly help, not hinder,
efforts to broker peace between
Israelis and Palestinians.
He was hopeful the United
States can soon repair its relationship with Palestinian President
Mahmoud Abbas, who said earlier
this week that the United States
can no longer serve as a fair mediator in the peace process. He said
he was hopeful the administration’s plan to dramatically reduce
aid for Palestinian refugees will
send a strong message without
hurting “truly vulnerable populations.” And Pence said he was
hopeful that Christians in the region who denounced the Jerusalem decision will embrace his efforts to redirect aid money in Iraq
and Syria to Christians and other
religious minorities.
“My hope is that I come away
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
Vice President Pence said the Trump administration’s recognition of
Jerusalem as Israel’s capital may spur a resumption of peace talks.
from this with a message delivered in Egypt and in Jordan and in
Israel that we’re committed to
peace,” Pence said in an interview
Thursday afternoon. “As a student
of the history of this region, it is
remarkable how many times the
issue of Jerusalem as the capital of
Israel derailed peace negotiations
in the past. Now that that’s clear,
now we can move on to all of these
remaining issues, and we remain
hopeful that President Abbas and
the [Palestinian Authority] will return to the negotiating table soon.”
But Pence’s hopes could smash
into reality when he touches down
in the region on Saturday for a
four-day, three-country tour that
was originally scheduled for late
last year but was postponed because of his role in the year-end tax
debate — giving the region a few
weeks to cool down following
Trump’s Jerusalem announcement.
When Pence and other officials
talk about this trip, they usually
avoid bringing up the IsraeliPalestinian conflict, instead focusing on the issues they want to
emphasize: strengthening part-
nerships, fighting terrorism, addressing the conflict in Syria, dealing with the threat posed by Iran
and helping Christians in the region. Pence’s schedule does not
include any meetings or phone
calls with Palestinian officials or
business leaders, and he canceled
plans to visit Bethlehem.
But the Israeli-Palestinian conflict looms large over the trip —
and Palestinian leaders made
clear this week that Pence’s statements are far from aligning with
the reality on the ground.
“The situation is unbelievable,
untenable,” Nabil Abu Rudeineh, a
spokesman for Abbas, said in a
recent interview.
The only way for the United
States to regain status as a peace
broker is for Washington to reverse its decision to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, he said.
But he doesn’t expect that to happen.
For Palestinians, the past six
weeks brought one blow after another. First, Trump made his Jerusalem announcement on Dec. 6
and said the United States would
eventually move its embassy from
Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. At the time,
Trump made clear that the final
status of the city would be determined in a peace deal, and officials
said the embassy move would take
several years. Since then, Trump
and Pence have both said that the
United States has taken Jerusalem
At Mar-a-Lago, a fest for Trump fans
About 700 devotees
buy $300 tickets
to celebrate him in style
BY
“off the table” for negotiations,
further infuriating the Palestinian
leadership. There were rumblings
this week that the embassy move
could happen much sooner than
expected, although the State Department said Friday that no decision has been made.
Earlier this month, Trump
threatened to cut aid the United
States has long given to Palestinian refugees and their descendants who were pushed out of
Israel decades ago. On Tuesday,
the State Department said it
would withhold $60 million of the
$125 million it planned to contribute this month.
“If they want to starve us, it’s
okay, but if they want peace and
stability, they should review their
policies,” Abu Rudeineh said.
Pence said he strongly agrees
with the decision to withhold part
of the aid, noting the United States
is still providing tens of millions of
dollars for “truly vulnerable populations.”
Pence and other White House
officials say they fully expect the
Jerusalem decision — and its aftermath — to come up during the
trip.
In Egypt, where Pence will arrive Saturday, President Abdel Fatah al-Sissi had warned Trump not
to “complicate” matters in the
Middle East, but he has since been
cautious in publicly commenting
despite protests in Cairo.
jenna.johnson@washpost.com
loveday.morris@washpost.com
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Supporters of President Trump pose with a cardboard cutout of him Thursday night at the entrance to
the Donald J. Trump Grand Ballroom at the president’s Mar-a-Lago Club in Palm Beach, Fla.
“Many folks took their charity
events and left. Ran away with
their tails between their legs,” she
said.
The club is adapting. Once,
Mar-a-Lago was a walled paradise where money kept political
strife out. Now it uses politics to
bring in money, from groups who
like the idea that their ticket sales
put money in the president’s
pocket. Republican officials. Conservative activists. Pro-Israel
groups.
And, now, Trumpettes.
“Their hearts are so filled with
love. They’re so excited,” Toni
Holt Kramer, a Mar-a-Lago member and co-founder of the Trumpettes, said Thursday as the
crowd filtered in. She said the low
prices had brought in people who
had no hope of seeing Mar-aLago otherwise. One asked her to
hold a ticket until the visitor
could afford to pay: “I had to hold
tickets for two weeks until the
alimony check [cleared],” Kramer
said.
The Washington Post purchased a ticket. Inside the gates
of Mar-a-Lago, the event followed
the format of a Palm Beach charity ball — without the charity.
Kramer was clear that the money
would all go to the president’s
club.
It started with cocktails and
appetizers around the pool, while
a band dressed in American-flag
outfits played and servers passed
grilled-cheese bites. Then the
crowd moved into the club’s two
big ballrooms — one to see it live,
another to watch the events on a
video feed.
On the way, they passed multiple life-size cutouts of Trump
himself, placed to accommodate
the demand for selfies. But the
night was windy and unkind to
the Trumps: They kept blowing
over. “Man down!” one guest
shouted when a cardboard president fell over. A passer-by took
the cutout’s baseball hat. Another
guest propped him up again, and
two posing women pretended to
grope the president.
Many in the crowd had come
from places where Trump is unpopular.
In some cases, they met others,
who’d also left home to find allies.
“I met many neighbors, within
a couple of blocks from us,” said
Marcia Caden, a retired jeweler
who’d come all the way from
Beverly Hills, Calif. “Never knew.”
There were Palm Beach women in furs, and men in Palm
Beach’s distinctive party footwear: hyper-expensive man-slippers. But others dressed in American flag suits and Uncle Sam
hats, and still others dressed for a
Trump rally, including one woman in an “I love English” button.
Victor Del Regno, 70, a New
York transplant living in West
Palm Beach, said his table had
discussed their anger at NFL
players who’d protested police
brutality by kneeling during the
national anthem. They’d talked
about children who’d stopped
talking to their parents, because
the parents supported Trump:
“They don’t want to debate. They
want to hate,” he said.
“Do we get frustrated with
some of his tweeting? Yes,” Del
Regno said to a reporter who had
not yet asked about Trump’s
tweets. “You’ve got to separate
the message from the delivery.”
He meant: He understood what
Trump meant, even if he didn’t
say it in the right way.
The evening’s program included a strident speech by Pirro, who
praised Trump as a man with a
common touch. “He would always talk to his help,” she said,
meaning Trump’s servants. Pirro
also lauded Trump’s efforts to
stop illegal immigration and
praise his fight against the Islamic State.
She also felt a need to refute
charges that Trump might be
mentally unstable.
“This man is a genius,” Pirro
said. “He’s not unstable. He’s a
damn genius.”
Then, there was singing.
The evening featured several
musical acts, seemingly chosen
for their friendliness to Trump or
to the Trumpettes. At one point, a
speech about Trump’s work to
lower black unemployment was
followed by a female singer who
crooned “The Lady Is a Tramp.”
(A BBC crew who had watched
rehearsals said she had been
talked out of “Send in the
Clowns.”)
The crowd was less enthralled
by these acts than by Pirro. At one
point, a man singing Lee Greenwood’s classic “God Bless the
USA” used patriotism to try to get
people to pay attention to him.
“Clap! Clap for America!” he
said. The crowd kept chatting.
Later, as diners ate apple pies
adorned with small American
flags, actor and singer Robert
Davi — perhaps best known as
the bad guy from the 1985 film
“Goonies” — sang classics like
“New York, New York.”
Toward the end of his set, Davi
offered a toast: “I wish you all 500
years of Trumpism.”
As the night grew late, the
Trump supporters trickled out,
picking up their souvenirs: a
bottle of “Salute American” vodka and a red “Trump 2020” hat.
They waited in the valet area, for
cars that didn’t always match
Mar-a-Lago’s Bentley-and-Benz
stereotype.
“Ford Focus?” valets called at
one point, trying to match a
person with a car. “A silver Ford
Focus?”
Earlier in the night, Lara
Trump had told this crowd that
the president had sacrificed his
life at this place in Florida for the
good of the country.
“He would much rather be
down here every weekend, golfing, enjoying himself,” she said.
On Friday, Trump was hoping
to come back for the weekend,
although his plans were on hold
as Congress debated a short-term
spending plan to avoid a government shutdown.
Trump was reportedly planning his own celebration of his
first year in office — for Saturday
night, in the same ballrooms. But
the crowd might be different.
According to Bloomberg News,
the cheapest tickets for that event
were $100,000 per couple, raising funds for Trump’s reelection
and the GOP.
That party, Trump was expected to attend if he makes the trip.
david.fahrenthold@washpost.com
SATURDAY, February 10, 4:00 p.m.
EAGLEBANK ARENA
George Mason University, Fairfax, Va.
Doors open one hour prior to game time.
E0056 2x7
to Mar-a-Lago!” Fox News host
Jeanine Pirro said as she took the
stage. “A magnificent place . . . ”
She was smiling. That was a
setup. Here was the joke: “It sure
ain’t no shithole!” Pirro said.
The Donald J. Trump Grand
Ballroom erupted.
On Thursday night at Mar-aLago — at a first-of-its-kind event
that combined a political rally, a
1970s-style variety show and a
support group for Trump superfans — that line brought the
evening’s biggest cheer.
It was a joke about reports that
the president — the man they’d
all come to celebrate — had used
that vulgarity to insult a swath of
countries, including all of Africa.
Pirro was the keynote speaker
at an event called the Red, White
and Blue Celebration for We the
People, which was put on by a
Palm Beach group called Trumpettes USA. They had booked at
Mar-a-Lago just as other, more
mainstream charities were pulling out — reacting to President
Trump’s comments about violence in Charlottesville in August.
The Trumpettes set their ticket
price at $300, very low for Palm
Beach. And they invited anybody
who could pay. The result was an
event that brought 700-plus
Trump supporters from around
the country into the gilded sanctum of Mar-a-Lago.
It was an evening of celebration, and defensiveness. Praise
for Trump was mixed with acknowledgments that the president’s first year had left him —
and these, his biggest fans —
surrounded by critics.
“We had people in our lives
that we thought were great
friends that were nowhere to be
found” after Trump entered politics, said Eric Trump, the president’s son. He looked out at a
room of hundreds of strangers.
“As I really look around the room,
you know, these are our true
friends.”
President Trump himself did
not attend the event, which was
timed to celebrate his first year in
office. From the stage, nobody
mentioned the crisis that he was
dealing with in Washington: a
possible shutdown of the government, if Congress could not agree
on a spending bill.
The mere existence of Thursday night’s event was a sign of
how Trump’s presidency has
transformed Mar-a-Lago, which
is both his “Winter White House”
and for-profit social club that can
be rented out for galas and weddings.
In a season — really, in a day —
that banquet business was transformed, by Trump’s suggestion
that there were “very fine people”
among crowds of white supremacist marchers. Nineteen of the
club’s 25 charity events were canceled or moved. On Thursday,
Eric Trump’s wife, Lara Trump,
denounced them as cowards.
Pence on Sunday travels to Jordan, where more than 2 million
Palestinian refugees live, and
White House officials said they
expect King Abdullah II to raise
concerns about the withheld aid
money. In Israel, where Pence will
spend Monday and Tuesday, the
vice president plans to reaffirm
the Jerusalem decision during a
speech at the Knesset, the Israeli
parliament.
Originally, Pence planned to
meet with the head of the Egyptian Coptic Church, who leads the
largest Christian denomination in
the Middle East, but the meeting
was canceled after the Jerusalem
decision.
The vice president has long advocated for the United States to
directly fund Christian nongovernmental agencies in Iraq and
Syria and focus more aid dollars
on Christians and other religious
minorities in the Middle East. Earlier this month, the United States
Agency for International Development and the United Nations Development Program agreed to increase funding for religious and
ethnic minorities in Iraq and divert at least $55 million to minority communities.
“If I have a message to Christian
communities across the wider
Arab world, it is: Help is on the
way,” Pence said.
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Democracy Dies in Darkness
S0833-1 2x7
A6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. SATURDAY,
JANUARY 20 , 2018
Supreme Court to decide on the president’s powers to ban foreign travelers
Ruling expected by June;
lower panels have struck
down Trump efforts
BY
R OBERT B ARNES
The Supreme Court said Friday that it will decide whether
President Trump’s responsibility
to protect the nation grants him
authority to ban travelers from
specific countries and that it will
rule by June in the case, a major
examination of the president’s
powers.
The court will consider the
third iteration of Trump’s travel
ban, issued last fall, which bars
various travelers from eight
countries, six of them with Muslim majorities.
Lower courts have struck
down each version, but the conservative-leaning Supreme Court
has given the administration
hope that Trump may be able to
carry out one of the most significant and divisive initiatives of his
presidency.
What the president has said is
a necessary step to protect the
country from terrorism has been
characterized by his opponents
as an illegal and unconstitutional fulfillment of campaign promises to ban Muslim immigrants.
His first order, issued a week
after his inauguration, created
chaos at airports and prompted
protests in the United States and
abroad. Trump’s comments and
tweets about immigration and
terrorism have ensured that the
issue remains at the front of the
national debate.
In a short order accepting the
case for argument in April, the
justices said they will consider
the statutory justification for
Trump’s actions as well as charges from opponents that it is an
unconstitutional
restriction
based on religious discrimination.
The order would also seem to
further ensure a blockbuster
conclusion to the court’s term in
June — the Supreme Court already is considering potentially
landmark cases on partisan gerrymandering, privacy, unions
and a clash between religious
rights and gay rights.
In requesting the court provide a final answer on the travel
ban, Solicitor General Noel J.
Francisco said the high court
must reestablish the vast authority the president wields when the
nation’s security is at stake.
“The courts below have overridden the President’s judgments
on sensitive matters of national
security and foreign relations,
and severely restricted the ability of this and future Presidents to
protect the nation,” Francisco
wrote in his petition to the court.
Challengers to the ban — in
this case, the state of Hawaii and
others — say Trump has exceeded
his legal authority.
“No prior president has attempted to implement a policy
that so baldly exceeds the statutory limits on the President’s
power to exclude, or so nakedly
violates Congress’s bar on nationality-based discrimination in
the issuance of immigrant visas,”
said Hawaii’s brief asking the
court to let lower-court decisions
stand.
But there are indications that
the Supreme Court will be more
sympathetic to the administration’s claim than the lower courts
that have rejected it.
Last month, in an unsigned
opinion, the justices said the
restrictions in Trump’s latest version of the ban could go into
effect as envisioned while legal
challenges to the merits of the
decision continued.
That decision, which included
noted dissents only from liberal
Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg
and Sonia Sotomayor, in effect
discarded a compromise the justices fashioned regarding the
second version of the plan. That
compromise said the ban would
not affect those who could prove
significant connections to the
United States.
The current version of the
plan imposes various restrictions
on travelers from Syria, Libya,
Iran, Yemen, Chad, Somalia,
North Korea and Venezuela. The
first six of those countries have
Muslim-majority populations,
and the restrictions on travelers
from North Korea and Venezuela
are not part of the challenge.
The court will review a unanimous ruling from a three-judge
panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals
for the 9th Circuit in San Francisco. That panel said the third
version of the travel ban suffered
from the deficiencies of the first
“The courts below have
. . . severely restricted
the ability of this and
future Presidents to
protect the nation.”
Solicitor General Noel J. Francisco in
a brief to the Supreme Court
two — that Trump had again
exceeded his lawful authority
and that he had not made a
legally sufficient finding that entry of those blocked would be
“detrimental to the interests of
the United States.”
Another challenge to the ban
is still resting with the U.S. Court
of Appeals for the 4th Circuit in
Richmond. That full court is
considering a ruling by a Maryland judge that the ban violates
the Constitution because it is
effectively a ban on Muslims.
Judge Theodore D. Chuang considered Trump’s statements and
tweets in reaching his decision.
Despite a nudge from the Supreme Court last month to work
quickly, the 4th Circuit has yet to
rule. The case could be added,
but the Supreme Court told the
administration and Hawaii to
also argue that constitutional
question.
Trump’s moves on the issue
have been controversial from the
start. After the first version was
rejected by the courts, the administration replaced it with a
second one. It barred entry by
nationals of six overwhelmingly
Muslim countries for 90 days,
excluded all refugees for 120 days
and capped annual refugee admissions at 50,000.
Courts put that order on hold
as well. That is when the Supreme Court fashioned the compromise that permitted the ban
to go into effect but granted
entry to those with a significant
connection to the United States,
such as family members, a waiting job or an academic opportunity.
The justices were scheduled to
decide the merits of that ban last
fall. But the order expired before
oral arguments, and the administration replaced it with the
third order.
Whatever the shortcomings of
the first two orders, Francisco
told the court, the third followed
a painstaking review process to
determine which countries did
not have procedures in place to
screen out those who might intend to harm the United States.
The eight countries named in
the current ban “do not share
adequate information with the
United States to assess the risks
their nationals pose, or they
present other heightened risk
factors,”
Francisco
wrote.
“Whereas prior orders of the
President were designed to facilitate the review, the [current]
Proclamation directly responds
to the completed review and its
specific findings of deficiencies
in particular countries.”
Hawaii argued that the current ban is worse than the previous ones, because it is permanent unless the administration
takes some action to amend it.
“The President has issued a
proclamation, without precedent in this Nation’s history,
that purports to ban over
150 million aliens from this
country based on nationality
alone,” said Hawaii’s brief to the
court, written by Washington
lawyer Neal K. Katyal. “The
immigration laws do not grant
the President this power: Congress has delegated him only a
measure of its authority to exclude harmful aliens or respond
to exigencies, and it has expressly prohibited discrimination
based on nationality.”
The case is Trump v. Hawaii.
robert.barnes@washpost.com
Kentucky divided on how Medicaid work rule will play out
KENTUCKY FROM A1
cancer. “People need their Medicaid. . . . If they could work their
way out of poverty, they would
have already been there.”
This conservative Republican
governor and this young woman
struggling into adulthood reflect
the chasm of perspectives across
Kentucky as the state moves to
impose work requirements as a
condition of eligibility in the
half-century-old safety-net insurance program.
Which perspective is right —
or whether both contain shards
of truth — will become evident as
the five years of this novel experiment play out, and as researchers
and state officials scrutinize the
effects.
Whatever they learn will have
broad relevance because other
states are waiting in line. Nine
more — almost all led by Republicans — have applied to the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for permission to
adopt similar “community engagement” requirements, and
others are considering them.
There is little doubt that more
approvals lie ahead. Before becoming CMS administrator,
Seema Verma was a consultant
who helped design Kentucky’s
plan, traveling to Frankfort at
least every other week to coach
the governor’s aides.
For now, those aides are speeding to convert the plan into
action. They are starting to
strengthen coordination with local job-training offices. They are
drafting letters and text messages to try to notify notoriously
hard-to-reach people about to
become part of Kentucky
HEALTH (Helping to Engage and
Achieve Long Term Health), as
the plan is called.
Meanwhile, consumer health
advocates in Kentucky and
Washington are finalizing a lawsuit to try to block the state,
contending that its action undermines Medicaid’s purposes and is
illegal.
In the middle are an estimated
394,000 Kentuckians. That is
state officials’ most recent snapshot of how many of 1.4 million
Medicaid recipients are ablebodied people ages 19 to 64 who
will not be exempt because of
circumstances such as pregnancy, schooling, medical frailty or
disability. Officials expect that
perhaps 264,000 will not be in
compliance when the rules begin
between July and November.
The experiment unfolding
here is a dramatic about-face
from the early years of the Affordable Care Act, when a Democratic governor, Steve Beshear,
employed the 2010 law to spread
insurance more widely than in
nearly any other state.
Then Bevin, an investorbusinessman who had run a family bell-making company, took
office. Reversing Kentucky’s
Medicaid expansion under the
ACA had been a central campaign promise. But after his election, he assigned staff to design
the work requirements and premiums that many on Medicaid
soon will be charged — from $1 to
$15 a month, depending on their
income. The plan also includes a
“My Rewards” account for people
to earn extra benefits, including
PHOTOS BY CAROLYN VAN HOUTEN/THE WASHINGTON POST
TOP: Teresa Loman’s daughters Leona Hunter, 6, and Vivian Hunter, 4, play with a stethoscope and
toy needle at their home in Erlanger, Ky. Loman works two part-time jobs and fears losing health
coverage. ABOVE: Cara Stewart, left, a lawyer at the Kentucky Equal Justice Center, talks with
Pauline Creech about the cancer she again is fighting and her fears of losing health insurance.
dental and vision care that until
now has been part of basic coverage, in exchange for healthy behaviors.
In an interview last weekend,
the governor said the large drop
in uninsured Kentuckians under
the ACA “doesn’t mean squat”
because it has not translated into
less obesity, diabetes, opioid
abuse or any of the other measures that make the state among
the nation’s least healthy places.
“Guess what?” Bevin said. “As
people engage in their own
health outcomes, engage in doing for themselves, they will
remove themselves [from the
program]. I don’t need to do it.”
State officials expect that
95,000 fewer Kentuckians may
be on Medicaid by the end of the
five years as a result of the new
rules. They cannot yet predict
how many will wean themselves
through jobs and rising incomes
and how many will be locked out
for failing to comply.
Bevin projects confidence that
the plan will endure. But if it is
blocked in court, he said, he will
eliminate the Medicaid expansion, “no question, 100 percent.”
During two years of preparation, his aides have defined many
details. People covered by the
new rules will need to log 80
hours monthly of work, school,
job-training, volunteering or
caregiving — or any combina-
tion. Every month, they must
send the state proof of compliance. If they fail to do either, they
will have a month to begin following the rules, then one more
month before they lose eligibility.
Other important aspects remain in flux. The approved plan
says Kentucky will assess whether any areas of the state have too
few jobs, training opportunities
or public transportation. Adam
Meier, deputy chief of staff for
policy and the governor’s right
hand on the Medicaid changes,
said that assessment has not yet
begun. “If we see huge issues
once we roll out, we could back
off ” requirements in certain
counties.
The fiscal effects — a linchpin
of Bevin’s rationale while campaigning — are still blurry. Meier
said savings should come from
fewer enrollees, a reduction in
benefits such as transportation
for nonemergency services, the
new premiums and people’s improved health. “It’s all such a
guess at this point,” he acknowledged, “because it’s never been
done before.”
Cara Stewart, a leading critic
and lawyer at the Kentucky
Equal Justice Center, says there
are too many unknowns. She is
not even sure which parents will
fall outside the work requirements. Although state officials
say the plan’s reference to “minors” means children up to age
18, Stewart fears it might align
with a section of federal Medicaid rules that includes only children 6 and younger.
Caught in limbo are people
such as Teresa Loman, who lives
in working-class Erlanger in
northern Kentucky and juggles
two part-time bartending jobs
while raising Leona, 6, and Vivian, 4. Loman is good at her work
— friendly with customers and a
three-time winner of the Guinness Perfect Pour competition at
Molly Malone’s Irish Pub in nearby Covington.
The girls have health coverage
through her partner, Steve Hunter, and his job as a wine and beer
distributor. But Loman, 35, has
Medicaid and worries that, if she
is not exempted, she could be cut
off when Vivian is a little older
because her bartending hours do
not add up to 80 every month.
Loman knows the importance
of Medicaid. It paid thousands of
dollars in hospital bills a couple
of years ago after a pain in her
side turned out to be an inflamed
appendix that was about to burst.
When she started at her second
job, at Braxton Brewing Co., she
was full time for several months.
Working opposite shifts to avoid
day-care expenses, she and Hunter didn’t see each other much,
Leona and Vivian did not see
them together, and she had little
time for healthy cooking. Loman
does not think the new rules
should force her to choose between her insurance and being a
good mother. “I want to be there
to teach [the girls] to read and
sled and make homemade playdough,” she said. “It’s not fair to
ask someone to give that up.”
The Medicaid changes have
proponents. Goodwill Industries
of Kentucky endorsed them because they are in sync with its
mission of helping people overcome barriers and enter the
workforce, said Amy Lutrell, the
group’s president. Still, Lutrell
said, “Kentucky will need to step
up” and make sure supports are
available. And state officials
must be realistic about how long
changing lives takes, she added.
Wrinkles are common in the
lives of people scraping by. Since
she graduated from a specialeducation program in Covington,
Pauline Creech’s only job was
cleaning at a gas station long ago,
and her only volunteering was at
her now-grown son’s elementary
school. For more than two decades, Creech got Social Security
disability
payments,
which
meant that she also was on
Medicare, the federal insurance
for older and disabled Americans. Medicare covered her chemotherapy when she first got
leukemia.
Two years ago, she got a letter
from the Kentucky Lottery, saying she had won $50,000 in a
second-chance drawing she entered with tickets from friends.
She thought it was a fake, but it
was true. The next surprise was
that she suddenly had too much
money to keep getting disability
payments. Her Medicare vanished, too.
Creech, 48, now gets Medicaid,
which is the insurance she used
for an appointment just before
Christmas with her cancer doctor, who told her that blood tests
show that the leukemia has returned after seven years of remission. On Monday, after another
appointment to decide on her
new treatment, she stood in a
scuffed Covington bar called
Mr. T’s Tavern on Main and wept
as she thought about the possibility of losing her insurance. “I
don’t want to miss appointments,” she said.
Over in Dwale, her speck of a
town in Floyd County, Lakin
Branham also is unsure whether
she can keep her insurance. She
is heeding her drug counselor’s
advice not to heap stress onto her
newly won sobriety. She doesn’t
have much of a history of doing
what the state will require: She
dropped out of community college after a few months and was
fired from the only job she has
ever held — cleaning rooms at a
Super 8 hotel.
Her new goal is to be a counselor, but she knows her path will
not be quick and will be even
harder if she loses health coverage.
Losing Medicaid, she says, is
“not the way to get out of poverty
at all.”
amy.goldstein@washpost.com
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A8
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. SATURDAY,
JANUARY 20 , 2018
The World
BY L UCIEN C HAUVIN
IN PUERTO MALDONADO, PERU
P
ope Francis landed in the
Amazon on Friday, bringing his environmental
crusade to a rough-andtumble corner of Peru’s jungle
that is besieged by deforestation
and illegal mining.
The visit to Peru, the second leg
of a trip that ends Sunday and
also took him to neighboring
Chile, gave the Argentina-born
pontiff a chance to highlight the
links between the environment
and indigenous people. He met
with Mapuche people in Chile
early this week and gathered here
Friday with thousands of indigenous people decked out in traditional dress.
Arriving just after 10 a.m. in the
jungle heat, the pope was greeted
with chants of “Francis, Francis,
you are now Amazonian.”
He arrived at his first official
event aboard his popemobile and
circumvented a phalanx of men
wearing loincloths. Addressing a
crowd of indigenous people from
Peru and neighboring countries,
he stressed the environmental ills
facing the Amazon, including
agribusiness, logging, mining,
and oil and gas drilling. He also
cited “certain policies aimed at
the ‘conservation’ of nature” that
he said did not take into account
people who inhabit the rain forest.
“We have to break with the
historical paradigm that views
the Amazon as an inexhaustible
source of supplies for other countries, without concern for its inhabitants,” he said during a 20minute speech. “Defense of the
Earth has no other purpose than
the defense of life.”
He said that the Amazon is not
only about biological riches but is
a “cultural reserve” under threat
by new forms of colonialism.
“Limits have to be set that can
help preserve us from all plans for
a massive destruction of the habitat that makes us who we are,” he
said.
The visit and the meeting with
indigenous people are meant to
build on his groundbreaking treatise on the environment — the
2015 Laudato Si encyclical, passages of which were read in five
languages by indigenous leaders
— and to plan for a synod of
Amazon Basin bishops that has
been called for October 2019.
The pope’s message and the
encyclical, basically guidance to
clergy and the faithful on key
environmental issues, were applauded by the crowd. But inhabitants also expressed fear that not
enough is being done as environmental destruction in this massive sea of green continues to gain
speed.
“The Amazon is our home, but
it is also the lungs of the world.
We have to work much harder to
stop deforestation,” said the Rev.
Juan Elias, a priest in Bolivia’s
jungle state of Pando, across the
Peruvian border.
Elias echoed the pope’s concern, saying that forests are being
clear-cut to make way for largescale agribusiness, including sugar cane. He said the new fear is the
expansion of soy, which already
covers huge tracts in Bolivia’s
eastern plains. “There are plans
for soy. Can you imagine what
that will do? It would be devastating,” he said.
The pope did not make specific
references to some of the controversial issues being pushed by
indigenous peoples, such as territorial demarcation, property titles and consent, specifically the
right to veto extractive or infrastructure projects, including
roads and dams for energy projects that they say degrade the
environment.
“The church has to get our
governments to see that their
policies are destroying the environment and us with it,” said
Angeltom Arara of Brazil’s Arara
do Pará people. “We want more
support from the church, and we
Pope brings his environmental crusade to Peru
Indigenous inhabitants of the Amazon region want more control over mining, logging and oil extraction projects on their lands
ERNESTO BENAVIDES/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
People wait for the arrival of Pope Francis on Friday in the Peruvian city of Puerto Maldonado, where he was to meet with representatives of indigenous communities.
ERNESTO BENAVIDES/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Nuns await the pope. Thousands of indigenous people from Peru
and neighboring countries gathered in Puerto Maldonado.
ALESSANDRO BIANCHI/REUTERS
Pope Francis addresses members of an indigenous group. He
stressed the environmental ills facing people of the Amazon region.
want our governments to follow
what the church says.”
Wearing an ample feather
headdress and covered with red
and black body paint, Arara was
part of a delegation representing
32 indigenous peoples from Brazil who traveled to Peru to present
their case to the pope. “We can no
longer just talk. There needs to be
real action, because we are being
killed while we wait,” he said.
Brazil’s Indigenous Missionary
Council reported that more than
100 indigenous people were
killed in the country in 2016.
Brazilian authorities continue to
investigate the killing in September of 10 members of an indigenous group that lives in voluntary isolation near the border
with Peru.
The pope dedicated part of his
address to people living in isolation, who he said were the “most
vulnerable of the vulnerable” and
should not be considered a “kind
of museum of a bygone way of
life.”
The largest concentration of
people living in voluntary isolation are found along the long,
inaccessible border between Peru
and Brazil.
The World Wildlife Fund’s director for climate and energy,
Manuel Pulgar-Vidal, who previously served nearly five years as
Peru’s environment minister, said
he hoped the testimonies from
indigenous people would help
ground the encyclical in everyday
issues.
“There need to be priests who
are capable not only of talking
about the environment but anchoring it in real issues. This has
not been done, which is why the
message [of the encyclical] has
not had the impact it should
have,” he said.
Pulgar-Vidal said Puerto Maldonado and the surrounding
southeastern Amazon rain forest,
home to some of the most biologically diverse spots in the world,
offer tragic examples that could
be used to drive home the pope’s
vision.
Peru lost nearly 407,000 acres
of tropical forest in 2016, 5.2 percent more than the previous year,
according to the state’s protected
areas service. It lost nearly
4.9 million acres between 2001
and 2016 — more than the combined area of Connecticut and
Rhode Island — from deforestation caused by farming, illegal
mining and road construction.
The state of Madre de Dios —
Mother of God in English — of
which Puerto Maldonado is the
capital, lost 42,125 acres in 2016,
and initial estimates put the number at roughly the same for last
year.
The big problem in Madre de
Dios is illegal gold mining, which
not only eliminates forests but
contaminates the air, soil and
water with toxic chemicals, including mercury used to extract
river gold. Some of the large
camps where gold is extracted are
just down the road from where
the pope landed here.
They are sprawling and barren
wastelands where few plants can
return after miners move on. And
mining is big business. Madre de
Dios does not have any large-scale
formal gold mines, but the state
produced 12 million grams of gold
in the first 11 months of last year,
according to the Energy and
Mines Ministry. That represents
just shy of 9 percent of the country’s gold production. Peru is the
world’s sixth-largest gold producer. The government last year
destroyed 284 illegal mining
camps, the bulk of them in Madre
de Dios, and launched dozens of
criminal investigations, including for human trafficking.
Although he did not go after
illegal mining directly, the pope
did not avoid it.
“There exists another devastating assault on life linked to this
environmental contamination favored by illegal mining,” Pope
Francis said. “I am speaking of
human trafficking: slave labor
and sexual abuse.”
David Barbosa, an Ashaninka
indigenous leader from Peru, said
he hoped the pope would leave his
country with an understanding of
what is happening in the Amazon.
“I think what we are hearing is
good, but the church needs to do
more. It has to take a stand,” he
said.
“The issues in Madre de Dios
are the issues the pope addresses
in the encyclical,” said PulgarVidal of the World Wildlife Fund.
“The focus on the Amazon is the
opportunity to get the traction
that is needed.”
foreign@washpost.com
DIGEST
SYRIA
Turkish artillery hits
Kurdish Afrin region
Turkish artillery fired into
Syria’s Afrin region Friday in
what Ankara said was the start
of a military campaign against
the Kurdish-controlled area.
The cross-border assault took
place after days of threats from
Turkish President Recep Tayyip
Erdogan to crush the Kurdish
People’s Protection Units (YPG)
in Afrin in response to growing
Kurdish strength across a wide
stretch of northern Syria.
Turkey says the Syrian
Kurdish YPG is a branch of the
outlawed Kurdistan Workers’
Party that has waged an
insurgency in Turkey for decades
Direct military action against
territory held by the YPG would
open a new front in Syria’s civil
war and see Turkey confronting
Kurds allied to the United States
at a time when Ankara’s relations
with Washington are reaching a
breaking point.
The United States has called
on Turkey to focus on the fight
against the Islamic State and not
take military action in Afrin.
— Reuters
KASHMIR
Tensions mount amid
shelling along frontier
Tensions have soared along
the volatile frontier between
India and Pakistan in the
disputed Himalayan region of
Kashmir, as rival troops shelled
villages and border posts for a
third day Friday.
Three civilians and two
soldiers were killed in the latest
clash, the two countries said, as
each blamed the other for
initiating the violence.
Indian officials said two
civilians and two soldiers died
and at least 24 civilians and two
soldiers were wounded in
Indian-controlled Kashmir.
According to Pakistani officials,
Indian fire Friday killed a civilian
and wounded nine others in
Sialkot in Pakistan’s eastern
Punjab province.
India and Pakistan have a long
history of bitter relations over
Kashmir, which is claimed by
both in its entirety.
— Associated Press
EGYPT
Sissi says he will run
for a second term
Egyptian President Abdel
Fatah al-Sissi has announced
that he will run for a second,
four-year term in elections
planned for March.
The former general made the
announcement in televised
comments carried live Friday.
Winning the election is
virtually a foregone conclusion
for Sissi, who led the military’s
ouster in 2013 of Egypt’s first
freely elected leader, the Islamist
Mohamed Morsi, before
becoming president a year later.
None of those who declared their
intention to challenge him in the
March vote are likely to pose any
serious threat to his reelection.
peacekeepers. A senior army
source said more than 20
Congolese soldiers were also
wounded after gunmen launched
an attack in North Kivu province.
— Associated Press
Baby killed when car hits crowd
in Rio: A motorist who drove
12 soldiers killed in clashes in
Congo: At least a dozen soldiers
were killed in Congo’s volatile
eastern borderlands where the
army is battling Ugandan
Islamist rebels, Congolese
security and diplomatic sources
said. The armies of Congo and
Uganda launched a military
offensive last month against the
Allied Democratic Forces —
rebels suspected of being behind
a Dec. 8 attack on a U.N. base
that killed 15 Tanzanian
onto a crowded boardwalk along
Rio de Janiero’s famed
Copacabana beach killed a baby
and injured 17 people, Brazilian
authorities said. Rio’s municipal
health department said an
Australian was among those
injured in the Thursday night
incident. Nine people remain
hospitalized, many with broken
bones. Police said the incident
was not a terrorist attack and
have arrested the driver.
— From news services
SATURDAY, JANUARY 20 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A9
RE
After a year of Trump, Russians are still awaiting sign of a thaw
BY
A NTON T ROIANOVSKI
moscow — Russian nationalist
leader Vladimir Zhirinovsky still
fondly remembers the time he
says a Russian official working at
the United Nations arranged a
meeting for him with Donald
Trump.
“He understood that the way
Russia is portrayed in the American press does not correspond to
reality,” Zhirinovsky said of
Trump, recalling the 2002 meeting in New York. “He understood
that we were even better than the
Americans.”
But as Russia takes stock of Year
One of the Trump presidency, the
pundits and politicians here who
predicted a sea change in relations
with the United States increasingly are concluding that they bet
wrong. The first year in the White
House of the most pro-Russian
major-party presidential nominee
in recent history has brought
U.S.-Russian relations to an even
lower point than before Trump
took office.
“I thought there would be a
revolution,” said Zhirinovsky, who
hosted a champagne reception in
the Russian parliament after
Trump won. “We could not possibly have foreseen all that happened.”
In his campaign, Trump promised to improve relations with
Russia. He called Russian President Vladimir Putin “very smart.”
But in Trump’s first year as president, his administration has doubled down on President Barack
Obama’s support for Ukraine
against Russian-backed separatists and gone along with congressional sanctions against Russia.
The result: a civics lesson for
those Russians who thought that
the U.S. president could wield as
much influence as their own. The
state news media, pro-Kremlin
politicians and many commentators now accuse the Washington
establishment and the U.S. media
of spinning a fiction about Russian election interference and
blocking Trump from carrying out
his promise of a friendlier policy
toward Moscow.
Putin told reporters last month
that Trump has not been able to
improve relations with Russia
“even if he wanted to, because of
the obvious constraints.” His press
Zhirinovsky said that in the meeting, he tried to persuade Trump to
build a development in Moscow
and offered to help with contacts
in the city government.
“He was the only one who
agreed to meet with me,”
Zhirinovsky said. “Trump apparently was already on the radar
screen as someone who traveled to
Moscow and didn’t refuse meetings with those who arrived in
New York.”
Grachev, now the deputy administrative head of Russia’s Central Election Commission, confirmed in a phone interview that
he arranged the 2002 meeting as a
favor for Zhirinovsky, whom he
had long known. Grachev said
that he did so in a one-off, informal
capacity and that it came together
thanks to a mutual acquaintance
of Grachev’s and Trump’s: Tamir
Sapir, a Soviet-born real estate developer who had lived in Trump
Tower and who died in 2014.
The White House did not respond to a request for comment.
Two months after Trump declared his candidacy in 2015, Russian newspapers were already
quoting Zhirinovsky as a Trump
supporter. “We need Trump!” he
shouted on a prime-time talk
show the following year, in September 2016. “We need to fight for
a Trump victory!” And after
Trump did win, Zhirinovsky hoisted a plastic cup of champagne in
parliament and delivered a toast
to “a rapid improvement in relations between Russia and the
United States.”
A year into Trump’s term, that
improvement is nowhere in sight.
By the end of the month, the U.S.
Treasury is expected to release a
list of Russian business executives
close to the Kremlin — part of
legislation responding to Russian
election interference enacted by
Congress over the summer. Being
on the list is not tantamount to
being hit with sanctions, but it
probably will carry a stigma.
Trump has given his go-ahead
for the delivery of lethal weapons
to Ukraine for use against
Russian-backed separatists, a
step Obama avoided. And the new
U.S. National Security Strategy,
which the White House released
last month, names Russia alongside China as challenging “American power, influence, and inter-
ests.”
“If [Hillary] Clinton had won,
then the whole elite of the U.S.
wouldn’t be so set against us,” said
Zhirinovsky.
But for all the hand-wringing in
Moscow about the breakdown in
U.S.-Russian ties, there is less discussion of what many Americans
would say is one of the biggest
factors in that disintegration: the
U.S. intelligence community’s
conclusion, which the Kremlin rejects, that Russian operatives interfered in the American election.
“Not only at the top but also in
society, most [Russian] people a
year later don’t recognize how important a question this is for the
United States,” Andrey Kortunov,
director general of the Russian
International Affairs Council, said
of the allegations of Russian election interference.
Zhirinovsky said he does not
know whether the interference allegations are true. But even those
pro-Kremlin politicians who decisively reject them also sometimes
voice satisfaction that more Americans now see Russia as a force
that cannot be ignored.
MARCEL KUSCH/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Merkel, whose CDU was a weak
first-place finisher in the September vote, initially tried to forge a
“Jamaica coalition” with the business-friendly Free Democrats and
the pro-environment Greens. (The
three parties’ colors match those
of the Caribbean nation’s flag.)
That effort collapsed when the
Free Democrats unexpectedly
walked out.
With no other viable option for
a stable government, Merkel
turned to the SPD, which, under
pressure, eventually reversed an
earlier vow to stay out of coalition
talks and go into opposition.
If negotiations with the SPD
implode, analysts say new elections are likely. Merkel — whose
public image has suffered amid
the gridlock — has not said whether she would lead her party in
another campaign, and CDU lieutenants say they are not sure what
she would do.
Polls show that a new election
would not necessarily yield a different result from the one voters
delivered in September. Most parties remain at roughly the same
level as they were then, although
the SPD had fallen two points in at
least one recent survey.
The prospect of an even worse
result for the party may be one of
the most important factors arguing for a deal. A new election, said
Stegner, “would be a tough challenge for our party because the
public would say this is the fault of
the SPD that we didn’t even want
to enter negotiations. We can’t afford this.”
An election, he said, could also
favor “right-wing populists who
say these parties don’t have their
act together” — a reference to Alternative for Germany, which last
fall became the first far-right party
to enter the German Parliament in
more than half a century.
The SPD and the CDU have
reached a preliminary deal for
governing. But even if Social Democratic delegates vote Sunday to
forge ahead, that’s not the final
hurdle. There will be weeks of
additional negotiation, with any
final deal going to yet another vote
— this one by the party’s 450,000
members.
secretary, Dmitry Peskov, called
the state of U.S.-Russian relations
the main disappointment of 2017.
“This is a president whose
hands are tied,” Valery Garbuzov,
director of the Institute of U.S. and
Canada Studies at the Russian
Academy of Sciences, said at a
roundtable on Trump’s first year
hosted by a Russian state news
agency. Using a phrase that is a
favorite in Russian political circles, he added, “The Russian political elite saw the U.S. president as
being at the top of a vertical of
power, as we have it here.”
One bellwether is Zhirinovsky,
a presidential candidate and longtime firebrand who revels in racially charged and xenophobic
rhetoric. Russians often ridicule
him for his outrageous statements, but he supports Putin and
is one of the most prominent voices in Russian politics.
In an interview, Zhirinovsky
said he wanted to meet prominent
Americans, preferably politicians,
when he visited New York in 2002.
But a Russian official working at
the United Nations, Vladimir
Grachev, arranged a meeting for
Zhirinovsky with Trump instead.
Hesitant SPD faces decision
on joining German coalition
BY G RIFF W ITTE
AND L UISA B ECK
berlin — Germany’s long and
tortuous path to a new government could hit another obstacle
Sunday.
Four months after the nation’s
voters delivered a muddled message, Chancellor Angela Merkel’s
would-be coalition partners will
cast ballots on a contentious question that could determine whether an election rerun is needed.
At issue in the Sunday balloting
is an agonizing choice for the approximately 600 delegates attending the center-left Social Democratic Party’s convention in Bonn:
keep talking to Merkel about a
deal to prop up her conservativeled government, or abandon the
talks and face Germany’s disgruntled voters again.
Leaders of the party, known as
the SPD, admit that neither option
is attractive.
“Sometimes you have to choose
between bad and worse,” said Ralf
Stegner, a deputy party chairman.
“That is the choice we have now.”
Stegner, like other SPD leaders,
advocates sticking with the talks,
which are aimed at creating a
“grand coalition” between the two
traditionally dominant parties.
But the parties’ dominance is a
far cry from what it used to be, and
the popularity of the Social Democrats, in particular, has fallen precipitously during Merkel’s 12 years
in power — a stretch that has
included eight years as second fiddle to the chancellor’s Christian
Democratic Union. In the September vote, the SPD won just 20
percent, its lowest level in German
postwar history.
Given that record, opponents of
a deal within the SPD are waging
an insurgent campaign to abandon the talks. The drive has been
Social Democratic Party leader Martin Schulz, center, is pressing
to continue talks with Germany’s conservative party.
led by the party’s youth wing,
where left-leaning activists have
grown impatient with efforts to
negotiate another agreement with
conservatives.
“We need a new start,” said Annika Klose, Berlin leader of the
Young Socialists, the SPD’s youth
wing. She cited Britain’s Labour
Party and the Bernie Sanders-led
faction of America’s Democrats,
both of which have swerved left.
“The SPD needs to look at these
examples and see what they can
learn from them,” she said.
If SPD delegates do vote Sunday
against continuing the talks — and
analysts say that is possible,
though somewhat unlikely — then
Germany’s messy struggle to create a new government could
stretch well into the summer.
Already, the process has gone
on longer than ever before.
AMERICANS
& THE MEDIA
SORTING FACT FROM FAKE NEWS
anton.troianovski@washpost.com
griff.witte@washpost.com
luisa.beck@washpost.com
Bret Baier
Indira Lakshmanan
Chief Political Anchor,
Fox News
Newark Chair in
Journalism Ethics,
The Poynter Institute
Frank Newport
Jennifer Preston
Editor-In-Chief,
Gallup, Inc.
Vice President,
Journalism, John S. and
James L. Knight Foundation
Tuesday, January 23
Streamed live from 9:30 - 11:00 a.m.
The Washington Post will bring together top journalists, media
scholars and thought leaders to discuss how Americans view
the media’s role in our modern democracy.
The event will build on a survey of more than 19,000 adults
in the United States, conducted by Gallup, Inc. and the
John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, that reveals the
most comprehensive picture to date of the public’s level of
trust in the press; their changing media consumption habits;
and how their views of the news media are affected by
political polarization.
“Americans and the Media: Sorting Fact from Fake News” is
the latest program from Washington Post Live, the newsroom’s
live journalism platform.
To watch the live stream or see the full list of
speakers: wapo.st/mediaviews
Jay Rosen
Judy Woodruff
Professor of Journalism,
New York University
Anchor and Managing Editor,
PBS NewsHour
Presenting Sponsor:
Informed
and engaged
communities
Supporting Sponsor:
18-0065
A10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. SATURDAY,
JANUARY 20 , 2018
Economy & Business
DOW 26,071.72
UP 53.91, 0.2%
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UP 40.33, 0.5%
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CRUDE OIL $63.37
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10-YEAR TREASURY
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CURRENCIES
$1=110.79 YEN; EURO=$1.223
Economics may not be driving corporate generosity
Bonuses and pay raises handed out by companies after the U.S. tax cuts amount to little more than a public relations move, analysts say
BY
T ODD C . F RANKEL
R
epublicans have been
touting the number of
companies handing out
employee bonuses and
pay raises — such as Walmart and
Bank of America — as a surprising sign that the Trump administration’s tax cuts are working
their economic magic faster than
anyone expected.
“It really is unbelievable to see
just how many companies have
stepped up,” House Majority
Whip Steve Scalise (R-La.) told
Fox Business. White House chief
economic adviser Gary Cohn described it as “not even something
we expected to see.” President
Trump has tweeted eight times
on the topic, calling the bonuses
“an unexpected new source of
‘love.’ ”
And they’ve been keeping
careful count, too. Staffers in
Scalise’s office constantly update
a running list of which companies have joined in, under the
headline “Tax Reform Works.”
But a deeper look at the list of
approximately 200 companies
shows that more than economics
is probably at play, with business
experts and analysts saying that
alternative motivations are likely
to be behind the sudden flood of
corporate generosity. One major
Republican donor owns 11 of the
firms on the list. Several companies are contending with problems with regulators in Trump’s
administration. And so many
companies have settled on the
$1,000 bonus figure that it appears, to some, to be just as much
about a public relations push as
anything else.
“It’s a pretty cheap way to win
goodwill on Capitol Hill,” Daniel
Shaviro, a professor of taxation at
New York University Law School,
said of the companies. He said
there is “no plausible theory” for
rate reductions immediately resulting in bonuses. The argument for corporate tax cuts is
they spur investment, which raises productivity and should boost
wages over the long term — not
in a few weeks, he said.
“It’s salesmanship,” said Aparna Mathur, an economist with
the conservative American Enterprise Institute, who expects it
will take three to four years for
workers to see the benefits of tax
cuts.
Mihir Desai, a finance professor at Harvard Business School
whose research was used by the
White House to estimate how tax
cuts would boost workers’ wages,
said he believed the recent wave
of bonuses could reflect lower tax
rates but also an effort “to take
some of the heat off what corporations are currently feeling.”
The “heat” comes from reactions to a measure that permanently slashes corporate rates
from 35 percent to 21 percent,
while only temporarily lowering
rates for individuals. A Gallup
poll released last week found that
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
ABOVE: President Trump signs the $1.5 trillion tax overhaul package last month that prompted about 200 companies to hand
out bonuses and pay raises. The firms’ motivation, however, is being questioned. BELOW: Walmart said that it will increase its
starting wage for hourly employees in the United States to $11 and that it is looking at other possible investments.
just 33 percent approve of the tax
law.
Companies didn’t wait for
Trump to sign the bill into law to
begin touting benefits for workers.
AT&T went first, saying it
would give a $1,000 “special
bonus” to more than 200,000
U.S. workers. Several critics noted that AT&T is fighting a Justice
Department challenge to its
pending merger with Time Warner. Later that same day, Comcast
announced a $1,000 bonus for its
workers, a week after the Federal
Communications Commission
voted to repeal net neutrality, to
the cable company’s delight.
Soon, more companies chimed
in. And people began to keep
track. The American Bankers Association started a list. So did
Americans for Tax Reform. The
U.S. Chamber of Commerce has
one. California vintner John
Jordan, a major GOP donor,
launched a website called
“1 Country 1k” to encourage business owners to pledge $1,000
bonuses for workers.
The list kept by Scalise’s office
culls from these sources and
House Republicans who were
asked to help identify businesses
in their districts. Chris Bond, the
congressman’s communications
director, criticized House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.)
for describing the benefits given
to workers as “crumbs” compared with the corporate tax
savings.
“These are meaningful benefits,” Bond said.
But it remains doubtful that
many American workers will see
their employers added to the list.
A recent Morgan Stanley survey
of analysts found that only
22 percent expect companies to
direct at least some of the taxoverhaul gains to increased
worker compensation. Most analysts said the tax savings would
fund share buybacks, dividends,
and mergers and acquisitions.
For companies that made the
list, a $1,000 bonus was the most
common benefit, offered by
about 40 percent of firms — no
matter the company’s size or the
anticipated impact of the tax cut.
These bonuses are “tokens” of
appreciation, said Iwan Barankay, a management professor at
the University of Pennsylvania’s
Wharton School. Companies prefer to give bonuses to workers
because they are temporary.
Banks dominate the list, with
about 65 out of the nation’s
approximately 5,000 banks announcing plans to give workers
extra compensation.
The banking industry is expected to see earnings soar
13 percent under the new tax law,
according to S&P Global Market
Intelligence analysts. And the
total cost of worker pay raises
and bonuses is projected to
amount to just 1.75 percent of
industry expenses.
“There’s a PR element to it,”
said banking consultant Bert Ely.
At least six public utilities have
announced plans to trim power
rates because of the tax law, such
as Baltimore Gas and Electric,
which said its residential electric
customers should save $2.31 a
month.
House Speaker Paul D. Ryan
(R-Wis.) put out a news release
spotlighting how the tax law
persuaded the Assurant insurance company to alter a planned
merger that would have moved
the New York firm’s tax domicile
to Bermuda. “This is a big deal,”
Ryan wrote. “Real hardworking
Americans will keep their jobs.”
But an Assurant representative said that while the tax law
changed its plans to move on
paper to Bermuda, jobs were
never at stake: “We had no plans
to move U.S. jobs offshore as a
result of this transaction.”
Eleven companies on the list
are owned by Frank VanderSloot,
the richest man in Idaho. VanderSloot opted to give his 2,350
employees a $100 bonus for every
year they have worked for him,
up to $2,000. His largest company is Melaleuca, an online wellness shopping club based in Idaho Falls.
“This is a windfall to us. We
ought to be spreading it around,”
VanderSloot said. “I wanted to
make sure I’m not guilty of what
the ultraliberal people accuse us
of — which is sticking it all in
PATRICK T. FALLON/BLOOMBERG NEWS
your own pocket.”
He also challenged other companies in southeast Idaho to
follow suit. Seventeen signed up.
VanderSloot — directly or indirectly — is responsible for 27 of
the companies on the tax reform
list. One of them is Colling Pest
Control, which is offering a $100
bonus per quarter to each worker, office manager Marquee Rasmuson said. The firm is small,
fewer than 10 employees.
“But this is going to be beneficial to us,” Rasmuson said.
Another major Republican donor and early Trump supporter,
Roddey Dowd, announced a
$1,000 bonus for the 1,400 workers at Charlotte Pipe and Foundry, where he is chief executive.
Bradford Muller, the foundry’s
head of marketing, said the bonus was “a gesture” aimed at
getting workers to “realize that
what people do in Washington
affects their lives every day.”
Nexus Services, a firm in Verona, Va., that provides immigration detention bond services,
said last month that it was giving
a 5 percent pay raise to its 225
workers because of the tax law.
Workers said they cheered in the
office. Chief executive Mike Donovan said the pay raise — what he
called “the Trump bump” — was
“the right thing to do.”
The announcement came just
two weeks after the Consumer
Financial Protection Bureau —
with a new director appointed by
Trump — said it was suspending
its investigation of Nexus Services on allegations of “unfair,
deceptive, or abusive acts and
practices.”
Donovan said in a statement
that he “emphatically denies”
any connection between the
agency’s decision and the pay
raises.
Two federal student loan collectors, Navient and its subsidiary Pioneer Credit Recovery, announced $1,000 bonuses for
most of their workers amid ongoing lawsuits by the consumer
protection agency and attorneys
general in three states for allegedly misleading borrowers. Navient’s contract with the Education
Department expires after 2019.
“They have a lot on the line,”
said Persis Yu, a staff attorney at
the National Consumer Law Center, which has had “a lot of
problems” with Navient and Pioneer.
Pioneer was dropped by the
Education Department in 2015
from its lucrative contract collecting past-due federal student
debt after an agency audit. But
the Trump administration said
last year that it would disregard
the audit’s findings. Pioneer returned to making student loan
collections last month.
A spokeswoman for Navient
and Pioneer denied any connection between the $1,000 bonuses
and its other business with the
federal government.
todd.frankel@washpost.com
DIGEST
AIRLINES
Delta tightens rules
for service animals
Delta Air Lines is tightening
the requirements for passengers
traveling with onboard service
and emotional support animals,
the carrier said Friday, following
a sharp uptick in pet-related
safety issues.
Effective March 1, Delta, the
second-largest U.S. airline by
passenger traffic, said it will
require passengers seeking to fly
with pets to present additional
documents outlining the
passenger’s need for the animal
and proof of its training and
vaccinations, 48 hours before the
flight.
This comes in response to
what the carrier said was a
150 percent increase in service
and support animals — pets,
often dogs, that accompany
people with disabilities — carried
onboard since 2015.
Alongside that increase has
been an 84 percent spike in the
number of reported animal
incidents since 2016, including
urination and/or defecation,
biting, and a high-profile 2017
mauling of a passenger by a
70-pound emotional support dog.
Delta said that it flies about
700 service animals a day.
Customers have attempted to fly
with comfort turkeys, gliding
possums, snakes, spiders and
other unusual pets.
— Reuters
OIL INDUSTRY
Schlumberger posts
loss on charges
Schlumberger on Friday
posted a fourth-quarter loss on
charges but beat Wall Street
forecasts and gave an upbeat
outlook, predicting that its
international operations would
grow in 2018 for the first time in
four years.
Schlumberger, the largest
energy company so far to report
results, is a bellwether for oil-field
services and drilling. Its forecast
for broad improvements this year
on higher oil prices signals a
stronger recovery for producers
and service companies.
The world’s largest oil-field
services company reported
$2.7 billion in fourth quarter
charges including a $938 million
write-down of its Venezuelan
holdings and unpaid bills due to
economic turmoil there.
It also took more than
$1.1 billion in restructuring
expenses tied to its WesternGeco
seismic business, citing poor
returns. That unit will focus on
selling its seismic data and no
longer provide land and marine
seismic acquisition.
The charges widened
Schlumberger’s fourth-quarter
net loss to $2.26 billion, from
$204 million a year earlier.
Revenue rose 15 percent to
$8.18 billion.
Excluding the write downs,
profit benefited from the year’s
recovery in crude prices, rising to
48 cents a share, above the
average analyst estimate of
44 cents.
Schlumberger said quarterly
results included an additional
$76 million in taxes due to U.S.
tax reform.
For the full year, Schlumberger
reported a net loss of $1.51 billion,
down from $1.69 billion in 2016.
Revenue rose 9.5 percent to
$30.44 billion.
The company saw
international growth
underpinned by recent contract
wins in Saudi Arabia, Kuwait,
India and elsewhere.
“The international market will
return to growth for the first time
since 2014,” said Patrick Schorn,
executive vice president for new
online shopping platform.
Amazon increased the fee for its
monthly plan to $12.99 from
$10.99, while maintaining the
annual fee at $99. It also hiked
the monthly subscription fee for
college students to $6.49 from
$5.49. (Amazon chief executive
Jeffrey P. Bezos owns The
Washington Post.)
Recognizing a global waste
problem, Coca-Cola will attempt
AARON UFUMELI/EPA-EFE//SHUTTERSTOCK
Zimbabwe’s scarcity of jobs is forcing many to earn money in
informal sectors, such as this man. Tendai Chitare, 32, prepares used
motor vehicle parts Thursday for sale at a market in the high-density
suburb of Highfield, outside Harare, the capital.
ventures. “Projected activity
growth is leading us to start the
reactivation of equipment,” he
added.
— Reuters
ALSO IN BUSINESS
Amazon.com raised the monthly
fee for the U.S. version of its fast-
shipping and video-streaming
service Amazon Prime by $2 on
Friday, making the case for
subscribers to upgrade to an
annual plan. It was the first
increase of Prime fees in almost
four years and comes at the end of
another bullish year and holiday
season for Amazon’s dominant
to collect and recycle a bottle or
can for every one that it sells
within 12 years. Chief executive
James Quincey says the CocaCola Co. has a responsibility to
help solve the waste problem. A
report issued in the summer
showed that the global plastics
industry has produced 9.1 billion
tons of plastic since 1950, and
there is enough still in circulation
to bury Manhattan under more
than two miles of trash. CocaCola said Friday that it is creating
bottles with more recycled
content by developing plantbased resins; attempting to scale
back plastic used in containers;
and will attempt to produce
bottles with an average of
50 percent recycled material
by 2030.
— From news services
SATURDAY, JANUARY 20 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A11
SU
Italy probing whether Facebook surveys users on news outlets’ credibility
Apple, Samsung slowed
devices to sell new ones
FACEBOOK FROM A1
way, Apple said, will prevent the
phones from shutting down unexpectedly.
Apple started offering consumers discounted battery replacements for $29 in January and said
this week that an update will
provide an option to turn off the
phone-slowing software.
Apple chief executive Tim
Cook also underscored in an interview with ABC News this week
that Apple’s only motivation was
to ensure people’s phones were
working properly.
AGCM said in its statement
that it would investigate whether
the two companies violated parts
of the Italian consumer code that
prohibit them from misrepresenting their actions and keeping
information from consumers.
The AGCM statement did not
specifically mention iPhone batteries or offer details of why it was
also looking into Samsung. It also
did not say what penalties the
companies may face if the agency
decides they have broken the law.
AGCM could not immediately
be reached for comment.
The agency has investigated
both companies before. It tangled
with Apple in 2012 over its AppleCare warranty program, alleging
that Apple was not making it
clear that customers were paying
for perks beyond a two-year warranty. A two-year warranty is already guaranteed under Italian
law. Apple appealed the decision,
but lost and had to pay a fine of
roughly $1.2 million and place
new notices on its promotional
materials.
AGCM fined Samsung in 2017
for not being clear about an advertising promotion; Samsung
Electronics Italy settled and paid
a 3-million-euro fine.
In addition to the Italian investigation, Apple is facing more
than a dozen consumer lawsuits
in the United States and elsewhere. The company also faces a
criminal suit in France, where
“planned obsolescence” — hurting existing products to make
way for new ones — is illegal. And
a South Korean consumer advocate group has filed a complaint
with the government, but officials
there haven’t said whether they
will launch an investigation.
Consumer suspicions
fanned by iPhone
battery controversy
BY
H AYLEY T SUKAYAMA
Italian officials said this week
that they are investigating whether Apple and Samsung intentionally slowed down their older
products to get consumers to buy
new ones.
This is the first time Samsung
has faced this accusation.
The investigation by the consumer protection authority —
L’Autorità Garante della Concorrenza e del Mercato, or AGCM —
lends weight to a suspicion harbored by many smartphone owners for years: that old gadgets
seem to slow down right as new
ones come out. That smoldering
suspicion was fanned into flames
after Apple, in December, said it
had slowed down iPhones with
older batteries to preserve their
performance.
AGCM, which looks at antitrust and consumer protection
issues, said in a statement on its
website that the inquiry was
prompted by customer reports
and its preliminary research.
Both indicated that Apple and
Samsung had exploited problems
with their phones’ components to
reduce their performance and encourage people to buy new devices, it said. AGCM did not specify
which models it was looking into.
Samsung denied the accusations. “Samsung does not provide
the software updates to reduce
the product performance over the
life cycle of the device. We will
fully cooperate with Italian Authority for Market and Competition’s investigation in Italy to
clarify the facts,” the company
said in a statement Friday.
Apple declined to comment on
the investigation. The company
has repeatedly said that it didn’t
slow down older phones for the
purpose of selling new ones. In
December, it apologized for not
telling consumers its software
will slow down some iPhones if it
senses batteries have degraded.
Adjusting the performance that
hayley.tsukayama@washpost.com
“Samsung does not provide the software updates
to reduce the product performance.”
Samsung’s response to Italian consumer protection authority’s investigation
community determine which
sources are broadly trusted
would be most objective,” he
wrote.
The new trust rankings will
emerge from surveys the company is conducting. “Broadly trusted” outlets that are affirmed by a
significant cross-section of users
may see a boost in readership,
while less known organizations
or start-ups receiving poor ratings could see their web traffic
decline significantly on the social
network. The company’s changes
include an effort to boost the
content of local news outlets,
which have suffered sizable subscription and readership declines
as news consumption migrated
online.
The changes follow another
major News Feed redesign, announced last week, in which
Facebook said users would begin
to see less content from news
organizations and brands in favor of “meaningful” posts from
friends and family. Five percent
of Facebook posts are now generated by news organizations; that
number is expected to drop to 4
percent after the redesign, Zuckerberg said.
Facebook and other Silicon
Valley giants are grappling with
their roles as dominant distributors of information in an era of
foreign manipulation of social
media platforms and dwindling
revenue for many media outlets.
On Friday, Google announced it
would cancel a two-month-old
experiment, called Knowledge
Panel, that informed its users
that a news article had been
disputed by independent factchecking organizations. Conservatives had complained the
feature unfairly targeted a rightleaning outlet.
More than two-thirds of Americans now get some of their news
from social media, according to
Pew Research Center. That shift
has empowered Facebook and
Google, putting them in an uncomfortable position of deciding
what news they should distribute
to their global audiences. But it
also has led to questions about
whether these corporations
should be considered media companies.
Daniel Kreiss, a professor at
the school of media and journalism at the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill, said Facebook was now “offloading” its
responsibilities for accuracy and
quality onto its users. “Just by
putting things out to a vote in
terms of what the community
would find trustworthy undermines the role for any serious
institutionalized process to de-
DAVID PAUL MORRIS/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Facebook has struggled with “how to decide what news sources are broadly trusted,” CEO Mark
Zuckerberg wrote. It has been accused of promoting false stories and excluding conservative outlets.
termine what’s quality and what’s
not,” he said.
Facebook has also been the
target of accusations of political
partisanship. In the summer of
2016, Facebook was charged with
excluding conservative media
outlets from Trending Topics, a
list of top stories that runs on the
upper right side of Facebook pages. After conducting an investigation, the company discovered it
had left the ranking decisions up
to low-level contractors.
Ultimately, Zuckerberg ended
up inviting conservative media
figures to Facebook headquarters
in Menlo Park to apologize for the
misunderstanding.
He also fired the contractors
who served as editors of Trending
Topics, opting instead for a more
technological approach. But outsourcing the decision to software
algorithms led to further criticism that the social network had
become vulnerable to bad actors
seeking to spread disinformation.
The issue exploded during the
presidential campaign, as false
content, such as the pope endorsing Donald Trump for president,
generated more traffic than stories from mainstream news outlets, and investigators discovered
that Russian operatives were using the social network to spread
disinformation and divisive content.
Jay Rosen, a journalism professor at New York University, said
that Facebook learned the wrong
lesson from Trending Topics,
which was to try to avoid politics
at all costs. “One of the things
that can happen if you are determined to avoid politics at all costs
is you are driven to illusory solutions,” he said. “I don’t think there
is any alternative to using your
judgment. But Facebook is convinced that there is. This idea that
they can avoid judgment is part of
their problem.”
Surveys of media credibility
have varied widely over the years,
partly because political persuasion appears to shape how Americans view news organizations. A
poll conducted last year by the
Missouri School of Journalism
found BuzzFeed and Breitbart to
be among the least credible
sources, while The Economist
and “public television” were the
most trusted.
Facebook revealed few details
about how it is conducting its
trust surveys, declining to share
copies with The Washington Post.
But Zuckerberg wrote that the
decision came after substantial
internal debate.
“The hard question we’ve
struggled with is how to decide
what news sources are broadly
trusted,” Zuckerberg wrote. “We
could try to make that decision
ourselves, but that’s not some-
thing we’re comfortable with. We
considered asking outside experts, which would take the decision out of our hands but would
likely not solve the objectivity
problem. Or we could ask you —
the community — and have your
feedback determine the ranking.”
Facebook’s previous efforts to
ask its users to determine the
accuracy of news have not always
turned out well. Last year, the
company launched a feature that
allowed users to flag news stories
they felt were inaccurate. The
experiment was shuttered after
nine months.
Some
experts
wondered
whether Facebook’s latest effort
could be gamed.
Renee DiResta, head of public
policy at the nonprofit organization Data for Democracy, applauded efforts by technology
companies to come up with innovative ways to measure quality
and weed out disinformation. But
she raised concerns over whether
Facebook’s survey could be manipulated, for example, if certain
media organizations encouraged
their users to flood the surveys
with identical responses.
“This seems like a positive step
toward improving the news environment on Facebook,” DiResta
said. “That said, the potential
downside is that the survey approach unfairly penalizes emerging publications.”
THE MARKETS
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Commodities
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Consumer Finance
Industrial Conglomerates
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Health Care Technology
Weekly
% Chg
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0%
+6%
3.6
3.4
3.3
3.1
3.1
–2.0
–2.2
–4.3
–5.3
–5.5
7265
7240
7215
2810.30
S&P 500 Index
+0.9
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2812
2804
2796
2788
2780
2772
Mon.
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81,219.50
16,353.46
49,754.40
2.4
0.3
1.3
400.88
5526.51
13,434.45
7730.79
0.6
0.2
1.4
–0.6
6005.81
4285.40
32,254.89
23,808.06
1 Year % Chg
–50%
0%
+50%
Close
Weekly
% Chg
1 Year
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3M Co
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Coca-Cola
DowDuPont Inc
Exxon Mobil
GE
GoldmnSchs
Home Depot
IBM
Intel Corp
248.18
98.03
178.46
337.73
170.41
131.30
41.29
47.16
76.01
87.15
16.26
256.12
201.33
162.37
44.82
1.5
–2.9
0.8
0.5
0.1
–1.7
1.0
2.2
0.8
–0.4
–13.3
–0.4
2.5
–0.5
3.7
38.9
27.8
49.0
112.4
82.5
13.6
37.7
14.6
33.1
2.9
–47.9
10.7
48.7
–2.7
22.6
Company
Close
Weekly
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1 Year
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J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
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P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
United Tech
UnitedHealth
Verizon
Visa Inc
Wal-Mart
Walt Disney
147.36
113.01
176.12
61.28
90.00
67.21
91.07
36.94
137.85
135.90
243.35
51.91
122.70
104.59
110.59
1.1
0.3
1.5
4.5
0.4
3.9
1.6
1.1
2.3
–0.5
6.4
0.1
2.2
3.7
–1.7
29.0
35.7
44.1
1.6
44.5
27.0
7.5
16.5
16.8
22.7
53.3
–0.9
50.1
54.7
3.1
US $
EU € per
0.8179
–1.1
1.4
2.7
0.7
EU €
Japan ¥
Britain £
Brazil R$
Canada $
1.2227
0.0090
1.3869
0.3129
0.7998
0.0537
0.0074
1.1344
0.2557
0.6542
0.0439
153.6550
34.6673
88.6100
5.9524
0.2256
0.5768
0.0387
2.5559
0.1718
Japan ¥ per
110.7900
135.4500
Britain £ per
0.7211
0.8815
0.0065
Brazil R$ per
3.1964
3.9098
0.0288
4.4320
Canada $ per
1.2503
1.5286
0.0112
1.7340
0.3912
Mexico $ per
18.6128
22.7567
0.1680
25.8126
5.8240
Mexico $
Index
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DJ Total Stock Market Index 29,039.32
Russell 2000
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AES Corp
Alarm.com Holdings
Osiris Therapeutics
GP Strategies Corp
Neuralstem Inc
Altimmune Inc
Intelsat SA
CEL-SCI Corp
Intrexon Corp
comScore Inc
Close
Weekly
% Chg
$1.97
$2.40
$4.09
$16.64
$51.19
$8.00
$11.75
$38.73
$6.90
$25.10
$1.91
$1.82
$3.02
$1.96
$13.00
$24.00
22.4
13.2
9.1
8.1
7.7
6.7
6.4
6.3
–4.8
–5.1
–5.4
–7.1
–7.9
–8.8
–11.6
–17.5
week
$0
$1000
year
$3400
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Consumer Rates
Weekly % Chg
0.8
0.4
0.4
10.9
–1.0
+1.8
–1.4
–0.1
–0.5
Close
14.8875
Interest Rates
Other Measures
$3.1875
$3.5250
$63.37
$1,333.10
$3.19
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
Cross Currency Rates
US $ per
Weekly
% Chg
Local Gainers and Losers
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
Company
Close
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
7315
7290
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
0.35
0.48
0.80
1.53
2.95
5.53
4.50%
4.00%
Bank Prime
30-Year fixed mortgage
1.50%
Federal Funds
3.37%
1.74%
LIBOR 3-Month
3.46%
10-year note
Yield: 2.66
2-year note
Yield: 2.06
5-year note
Yield: 2.45
6-month bill
Yield: 1.62
15-Year fixed mortgage
1-Year ARM
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
A12
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. SATURDAY,
JANUARY 20 , 2018
GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN 2018
GOP gets
most of
blame in
new poll
SHUTDOWN FROM A1
Democrats largely unified to use
the shutdown deadline to force
concessions on numerous issues
— including protections for hundreds of thousands of young undocumented immigrants.
The standoff culminated in a
late-night Senate vote that failed
to clear a 60-vote hurdle, sending
congressional leaders and President Trump back to the starting
line after days of political posturing on all sides.
“A government shutdown was
100 percent avoidable. Completely avoidable. Now it is imminent,”
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said on the Senate
floor following the vote. “Perhaps
across the aisle, some of our Democratic colleagues are feeling
proud of themselves, but what has
their filibuster accomplished? . . .
The answer is simple: Their very
own government shutdown.”
The early contours of the blame
game appeared to cut against
Trump and the Republicans, who
control all levers of government
but cannot pass major legislation
without at least partial support
from Senate Democrats. According to a Washington Post-ABC
News poll, Americans said by a
20-point margin that they would
blame a shutdown on Trump and
the GOP rather than Democrats.
A government shutdown causing employee furloughs has never
occurred under unified party control of Congress and the White
House. Some furloughs of White
House employees began immediately early Saturday.
The midnight drama came after an unusually tranquil day inside the Capitol, where visible tensions remained at a low simmer as
various parties undertook quiet
talks to discuss ways to avoid the
shutdown.
Republicans started the day eager to show a united front: House
Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) and
McConnell met Friday morning,
determined to hold firm to a strategy they had crafted nearly a week
prior: Make Democrats an offer
they could not refuse by attaching
a long-term extension of the Children’s Health Insurance Program,
or CHIP, as well as the delay of
some unpopular health-care taxes. And if they did refuse, the
leaders believed, the public backlash would be intense — particularly in states where vulnerable
Democratic senators are seeking
reelection in November.
McConnell delivered a morning
salvo on the Senate floor, declaring that Democrats had been led
into a “box canyon” by Senate
Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.).
But by midday, McConnell’s
ASTRID RIECKEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
The Capitol’s corridors were quiet as lawmakers struggled to avoid a shutdown. Federal employees were told to prepare for furloughs.
strategy threatened to be upended
by Trump — who phoned Schumer
and invited him to the White
House for a private meeting with
no other congressional leaders.
That immediately raised Republicans’ suspicions on Capitol
Hill that Trump might be tempted
to cut a deal with his fellow New
Yorker — much as he did in the
early stages of a September standoff — that would undercut the
GOP negotiating strategy and produce a deal that congressional
conservatives could not stomach.
White House aides assured top
congressional leaders that no deal
would emerge from the meeting,
that it was merely meant to gauge
the posture of Schumer and the
Democrats. Republicans exhaled
when that turned out to be so.
“We made some progress, but
we still have a number of disagreements,” Schumer declared upon
returning to the Capitol. Much
POLL
later, after the shutdown began,
Schumer said in a floor speech
that in his meeting with the president, he even “reluctantly” offered
to fully fund construction of a wall
along the U.S.-Mexico border.
“Even that was not enough for
the president,” Schumer said.
What ensued for the remainder
of the afternoon was a silent
standoff, as it became increasingly
clear that Republicans would not
be able to lure enough Democrats
to pass their preferred funding
patch.
For a few Democratic senators,
a vote to spark a shutdown was too
tough to swallow — even for Sen.
Doug Jones of Alabama, who
faced his first major political dilemma since winning a December
special election in a campaign that
emphasized his support for CHIP.
“I have made a strong commitment in my state to 150,000 children who need health insurance,”
Washington Post-ABC News Poll
Who is responsible for a possible
government shutdown?
Q: The federal government might have to partially shut down later
this week if Trump and Republicans in Congress and Democrats in
Congress cannot agree on laws about immigration and border
security. Who do you think is mainly responsible for this situation?
Trump and Republicans
48%
Democrats
28%
Both equally (volunteered)
Neither (volunteered)
No opinion
18%
1%
5%
Source: Jan. 15-18 Washington Post-ABC News poll among 1,005
adults with an error margin of +/- 3.5 percentage points.
THE WASHINGTON POST
he said, announcing his decision
to reporters late Friday.
He joined Democratic Sens. Joe
Donnelly (Ind.), Joe Manchin III
(W.Va.), Heidi Heitkamp (N.D.)
and Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.), all
of whom face tough paths to reelection in states that supported
Trump in 2016 and voted to keep
the government open.
But Michigan Sens. Gary Peters
and Debbie Stabenow, meanwhile, announced they would
both vote against the measure,
bolstering the margin opposed to
the bill. Four Republicans were
also opposed: Sens. Jeff Flake
(Ariz.), Mike Lee (Utah), Rand
Paul (Ky.) and Lindsey O. Graham
(S.C.).
Republicans spent much of the
day attacking Democrats on several fronts — most frequently by
pointing to a litany of critical
statements Democratic leaders,
including Schumer, had made
slamming Republicans ahead of
the 2013 shutdown.
In a 2013 ABC News interview,
Schumer said, “You know we
could do the same thing on immigration. . . . We could say, ‘We’re
shutting down the government.
We’re not going to raise the debt
ceiling until you pass immigration
reform.’ It would be governmental
chaos.”
“I think the longer it goes on,
the more the American people see
the hypocrisy on the Democratic
side,” said Rep. Tom Cole (R-Okla.), a veteran of several shutdown
dramas.
Democrats, meanwhile, pointed to other parts of the historical
record — notably, a Trump tweet
from May: “Our country needs a
good ‘shutdown’ in September to
fix mess!”
Conservatives enthusiastically
promoted the notion that Democrats were taking the government
to the cusp of a shutdown to benefit undocumented immigrants,
even a largely sympathetic subset.
Democrats want legal status for
“dreamers” — young immigrants
brought to the U.S. as children
who now live here illegally — in
return for a spending agreement.
That fight was prompted by
Trump’s cancellation of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which is expected to
take effect in March barring court
challenges.
Numerous Republicans said
they were perfectly comfortable
waging the shutdown fight on
those terms, though Democrats
have sought to expand the playing
field to other issues such as funding to combat opioid abuse and
pension bailouts.
“Are Democrats going to shut
the government . . . because we
want basic reforms and enforcement measures that are going to
prevent further flows of illegal
immigrants and unskilled immigrants?” said Sen. Tom Cotton (RArk.), who is pushing for hard-line
immigration policies in return for
a DACA fix. “Seems to me like a
tough position to win in light of
the 2016 election.”
Marc Short, Trump’s director of
legislative affairs, said that the
effort by Democrats to put an immigration fix in the spending bill
was unreasonable, given that legislative text has not been drafted
and the program doesn’t expire
until March.
“There’s no DACA bill to vote
on, and there’s no emergency on
the timing,” Short said.
The posturing took place mainly in front of reporters. Missing
were the furious back-and-forth
negotiations that preceded the 16day shutdown in 2013, when Republican leaders sought to force a
rollback of the Affordable Care Act
and met several times with President Obama to seek an accommodation.
Shortly after 6 p.m., Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn (R-Tex.)
looked at his watch and vented
frustration.
“Government shuts down in
what, five hours and 40 minutes?
And there’s no solution? I don’t
know whether Sen. Schumer is
just determined to take it down,”
he said. “Obviously, we don’t want
to shut the government down either, but they seem to be determined to do so.”
Visibly, only Graham shuttled
back and forth between the Republican and Democratic leadership offices, shopping a proposal
to replace the four-week funding
extension passed by the House
with a slightly shorter one.
As the 10 p.m. vote approached,
Cornyn declared: “No deal.”
Schumer rejected a proposal
that would have extended funding
by three weeks, to Feb. 8, instead
of four. Schumer floated a 10-day
extension, which would have set
another deadline just before
Trump delivered his State of the
Union address on Jan. 30. Shortly
after midnight, McConnell closed
the vote and declared an impasse.
The Trump administration
worked up plans to keep national
parks and monuments open despite a shutdown as a way to blunt
public anger, and while the military would not cease to operate,
troops would not be paid unless
Congress specifically authorizes it.
In a sign of the preparations on
Capitol Hill, congressional staffers received formal notice Friday
morning that they may be furloughed starting at midnight. Individual lawmakers will have to
determine which aides must report for work during the impasse.
Trump postponed a scheduled
trip to his Florida resort, where he
had scheduled a pricey fundraiser
to mark his first anniversary in
office. Ryan faced the cancellation
of an official trip to Iraq, and
House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) and other lawmakers revisited plans to travel to
Switzerland for the World Economic Forum.
The latter trip drove Democratic attacks earlier in the day, especially after McCarthy floated
plans in the morning to send
House members home for a
planned week-long recess.
“They want to spend next week
hobnobbing with their elitist
friends instead of honoring their
responsibilities to the American
people,” House Minority Leader
Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) said of Republicans.
Earlier in the night, around 150
protesters gathered outside the
Capitol to hear Democrats promise not to back any spending deal
that did not grant legal status to
DACA recipients.
“This is a movement,” said Sen.
Kamala D. Harris (D-Calif.).
“We’re going to have some good
days, and we’re going to have some
bad days. And like every movement that has allowed our country
to progress, we are going to have
to fight.”
mike.debonis@washpost.com
ed.okeefe@washpost.com
erica.werner@washpost.com
elise.viebeck@washpost.com
This shutdown is at least 17 years in the making. Here’s how we got here.
The tension among
lawmakers is partly due
to immigration policy
BY
J EFF S TEIN
The federal government shut
down Friday night after congressional negotiators failed to strike a
last-minute deal to fund the government. But it’s not just the fight
over government funding that
drove Congress to impasse: It is, at
least in large part, a disagreement
over immigration.
Specifically, it’s a fight over
about 700,000 undocumented immigrants who were brought to the
United States as children. Democrats want the spending bill to
contain a guarantee that those immigrants — known as “dreamers”
— won’t be deported, and they have
shown little willingness to extend
funding for the government, even
for a short time, unless they get it.
It’s a rare moment of leverage for
Democrats, as Republicans need
help from at least nine Senate Democrats to pass a spending bill. And
Democrats are trying to use that
leverage to resolve an immigration
struggle that has been simmering
for nearly two decades.
Here are some of the key developments that brought us here.
August 2001: Sens. Richard J.
Durbin (D-Ill.) and Orrin G. Hatch
(R-Utah) introduce the Dream Act,
which creates a pathway for young
undocumented immigrants to be-
BILL CLARK/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dream Act supporters file out of the Senate Gallery after watching the bill’s defeat on a
55-to-41 vote Dec. 18, 2010. Disputes over young immigrants have continued to this day.
come permanent legal residents.
December 2010: The Dream
Act dies in the Senate in a 55-to-41
vote after passing the House.
June 2012: Under intense pressure from immigration activists,
President Obama announces hundreds of thousands of young immigrants can, if they meet certain
conditions, receive a temporary
reprieve from deportation and
have the chance to apply for a work
permit. Over the next several
years, hundreds of thousands of
the dreamers turn over their personal information to the federal
government and receive protection under the Deferred Action for
Childhood Arrivals program.
November
2016:
Donald
Trump is elected president and Republicans secure control of the
House of Representatives and Senate. Trump picks then-Sen. Jeff Ses-
sions (R-Ala.), widely seen as the
senator most hostile to Obama’s
immigration agenda, to serve as
his attorney general.
Sept. 5, 2017: Faced with several lawsuits by attorneys general
in Republican-led states challenging the constitutionality of the
DACA program, Sessions announces that the executive branch
will phase it out rather than defend
it in court. The White House calls
on Congress to find a solution for
the dreamers, but does not say it
believes the dreamers should be
deported.
Sept. 7, 2017: Congress passes
a bill that keeps the government
funded until early December and
provides emergency assistance to
the victims of Hurricane Harvey.
Every Senate Democrat votes for it,
although Rep. Luis Gutierrez (DIll.) vocally opposes it for not doing
anything to ensure protection for
the dreamers.
Sept. 13, 2017: After a meeting
at the White House, reports quickly emerge that Trump has agreed
with Senate Minority Leader
Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) and
House Minority Leader Nancy
Pelosi (D-Calif.) on the broad outlines of a deal to protect the dreamers in exchange for more money for
border security. But the White
House immediately pushes back
against reports that Trump has
agreed to leave funding for a wall
along the U.S.-Mexico border out of
a deal.
Oct. 25, 2017: Sen. Kamala D.
Harris (D-Calif.), the daughter of
two immigrants and a rumored
2020 presidential contender, becomes the first Senate Democrat to
publicly vow to vote against government spending bills that do not
protect dreamers. Sens. Bernie
Sanders (I-Vt.), Elizabeth Warren
(D-Mass.), and Kirsten Gillibrand
(D-N.Y.) soon follow Harris.
Dec. 21, 2017: Facing a government shutdown, Congress agrees
to extend existing government
funding levels. Now, 17 Senate
Democrats vote against the spend-
ing bill because it leaves the dreamers’ fate unaddressed.
Jan. 10, 2018: A federal judge
rules that the Trump administration cannot end the DACA program, saying safeguards must remain in place amid a legal dispute
over the program. The Trump administration immediately protests, with the Justice Department
taking the unusual step of petitioning for the case to be immediately
brought to the Supreme Court.
Jan. 11, 2018: A bipartisan team
spearheaded by Sens. Jeff Flake
(R-Ariz.), Lindsey O. Graham
(R-S.C.), and Dick Durin (D-Ill.)
reaches a bipartisan deal on immigration and takes it to the White
House, where it is rejected by
Trump and immigration conservatives. Trump suggests the U.S. is
taking too many immigrants from
countries such as Haiti, El Salvador
and some African nations — and
too few from places such as Norway. The comments leak and throw
the talks further into turmoil.
Jan. 18, 2018: House Republicans pass a spending bill to keep
the government open for one
month and extend the Children’s
Health Insurance Program. The
bill, which passes on a nearly partyline basis, is dead on arrival in the
Senate.
Jan. 19, 2018: Senate Democrats refuse to take up the bill
passed by the House, and they have
the votes to filibuster it, despite
McConnell’s protests.
jeffrey.stein@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/wonkblog
SATURDAY, JANUARY 20 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A13
SU
GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN 2018
Confusion over which federal employees will go on furlough
AGENCIES FROM A1
House’s determination to keep
the government as functional as
possible and a vast workforce
that typically scales back when
its congressional appropriations
expire.
In a briefing with reporters
Friday evening, senior administration officials could not identify
how many federal employees
would be furloughed and how
many agencies would be affected,
referring questions to individual
departments. Contingency plans
drawn up in recent years called
for high-percentage furloughs of
civilian employees, including 78
percent of those at the Defense
Department and 83 percent at
Labor.
Administration officials acknowledged that many federal
employees were not notified until
Thursday or Friday that they
could be affected, much later
than would be typical. In 2013,
more than 800,000 federal employees were sent home without
pay for 16 days. The reason many
weren’t given more advance
warning this time is because
senior administration officials
said they didn’t realize the shutdown threat was real until days
ago.
Budget director Mick Mulvaney told reporters at the White
House on Friday that a shutdown
— the first under Republican
control in Washington — “will
look very different than it did
under the previous administration,” which he said deliberately
exacerbated public impact.
Mulvaney said the administration was working to blunt a
shutdown’s effects by pushing
agencies to use different accounts that might allow them
more flexibility to pay employees,
though it is unclear exactly how
that would work. And it did not
appear that the government’s
largest agencies, particularly the
Defense Department, would be
able to take advantage of such a
tactic.
Pruitt told EPA employees late
Friday that the agency could continue operating through all of
next week even if spending expires. At the Interior Department, officials have gone to extraordinary lengths to keep
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
White House budget chief Mick Mulvaney, center, said the administration plans to blunt the effects of a
shutdown by pushing agencies to use accounts that might allow them more flexibility to pay employees.
things running, promising to
keep open as many parks, national monuments and other public
lands as possible — without visitors centers and with a skeleton
staff of law enforcement.
The government will spend
about $4.1 trillion this year, and
roughly 30 percent of that is
appropriated each year by Congress. About half of that money
goes to the military, and the other
half to dozens of federal agencies.
When there is a shutdown — in
this case a partial one, since
lawmakers have passed a budget
for the Veterans Health Administration — the government doesn’t
grind to a halt, but its operations
are interrupted. Many employees
deemed “essential” to the agency’s day-to-day mission remain in
their posts, often without pay,
while others are sent home indefinitely.
Agencies typically don’t stockpile money to prepare for these
types of lapses because they’re
not supposed to. Some officials
said they could maintain operations by using carry-over funding, money that remains unspent
and is either part of permanent
or multiyear appropriations.
It was unclear how this strategy differed from the approach
the Obama administration invoked in 2013, when Sylvia
Mathews Burwell, then the director of the Office of Management
and Budget, issued a Sept. 30
memo instructing heads of agencies that they could “continue to
operate under such previously
approved apportionments” from
those buckets of funding.
OMB officials wouldn’t specify
which agencies had access to this
money or how it would work,
though they said they place
greater “emphasis” on using
these funds compared to 2013.
And as late as Friday night, the
White House could not say which
agencies would continue to operate either fully or partially.
Sam Berger, who served as
OMB senior counselor and policy
adviser during the 2013 shutdown, said this funding strategy
helped Veterans Affairs and the
State Department stay open during the 16-day budget impasse.
“The Obama administration’s
sole focus was on making sure
agencies complied with the law,”
How government services would be affected by a shutdown
BENEFITS
Social Security and
other government
benefits
OPEN
Recipients of Social Security, SSI, unemployment insurance, TANF, food stamps and
some other programs would continue to receive benefits. The programs’ spending is not
dependent on Congress’s explicit funding. However, some processes related to applying
for or appealing these benefits may be stopped.
Medicare and
Medicaid
OPEN
In the last shutdown, some physician payments were slightly delayed, but the programs
continued running.
Veterans hospitals
OPEN
Congress has already explicitly funded veterans hospitals, so they wouldn’t be affected
by a shutdown.
Berger said. “And agencies made
determinations about the best
way to utilize their funding consistent with the law, including
the use of multiyear carry-over
funding when appropriate.”
But some budget experts questioned whether allowing agencies to pay employees with unused money or transfer money
into salary accounts would be
legal after the midnight deadline.
“What the administration is
doing here is using an accounting
trick to keep parts of the government open, and then it’s not a
shutdown at all,” said Bill
Hoagland, senior vice president
at the Bipartisan Policy Center
and a former budget adviser to
several Senate Republican leaders. “I would question the legality
of using those moneys when you
have no authority at all to spend
money.”
If agencies were to stay open
using the White House strategy,
he added, “You’re going to have
budget lawyers working overtime and potentially with lawsuits.”
Questions about this frenzy of
activity — such as whether agency heads would need to move
their money before midnight Friday — contributed to a sense of
chaos as the Trump administration encountered its first bureaucratic fiasco. Trump and his deputies continued to attack Democrats on Capitol Hill even as they
negotiated with them and down-
played the potential mess that
could ensue.
Employees not scheduled to
work over the weekend — the
vast majority of the government
— were told to come into work
Monday morning to put things in
order for an indefinite absence,
leaving their government-issued
cellphones and laptops at the
office. No telework is allowed
during a shutdown.
The next pay period for many
employees runs through Jan. 26,
and they will be paid for work
through this past week.
Tony Reardon, president of the
National Treasury Employees
Union, which represents 150,000
federal workers at more than 30
agencies, told reporters at 2 p.m.
that “our employees right now at
this late hour are still waiting to
get their notices.” He said they
worry that Congress will not ensure that they are paid after a
shutdown ends, even though
Congress has voted to pay them
after previous shutdowns.
After reporting Friday that
more people sought care for flulike illnesses during the second
week in January than at any
comparable period in nearly a
decade, the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention had prepared to send more than 60
percent of its employees — about
8,500 people — home. CDC
spokeswoman Kathy Harben said
the agency’s “immediate response to urgent disease outbreaks, including seasonal influenza, would continue,” through
an analysis of data being reported to the government from state
and local authorities and hospitals. But experts said the diminished staff levels could slow the
rate of analysis.
The architects of the recently
passed Republican tax law are
relying on the tens of thousands
of IRS employees to turn their
new vision for the tax code into
reality. But the agency was preparing to send home about
56 percent of its workforce, according to Treasury officials.
A prolonged impasse could affect the pace at which IRS attorneys can issue new guidelines to
resolve legal questions the law
raises and to implement computer updates to IRS software for
processing tax forms, tax experts
said.
A shutdown would halt key
rail, airline and other investigations, according to the National
Transportation Safety Board,
which said 95 percent of its more
than 400 employees would be
furloughed.
Among the work that would
stop: Investigations into an
Amtrak derailment near DuPont,
Wash., in December that killed
three people, and into a near miss
at San Francisco International
Airport in July, when an Air
Canada flight nearly landed on
the wrong runway, according to
the NTSB.
At the State Department, consular offices abroad would continue to process visas, as long as
the fees they generate pay for the
cost. Ambassadors would continue meeting government officials
around the world. Travel would
be curtailed, but is allowed to
proceed if the trips are for national security purposes, including
negotiating treaties and attending bilateral meetings, or to save
lives, as in the case of medical
emergencies or providing refugees with food and medicine.
Many training courses will be
suspended, except for classes related to diplomatic security, antiterrorism and preparing government employees to go to dangerous postings such as Afghanistan
and Iraq.
Furloughed employees across
the government will be advised to
turn off their cellphones and
have no email communications
with colleagues who continue to
work. They are prohibited from
using social media accounts, and
virtually all public speeches are
forbidden. A skeletal team of
public affairs spokesmen will be
working to communicate with
the media, but they are allowed
to discuss only issues pertaining
to national security.
The National Park Service issued a contingency plan Friday
evening that outlined how access
to public lands would be maintained to the greatest extent possible under a shutdown, even as
buildings would be locked and
visitor services would cease.
At Big Cypress National Preserve in Florida, some of the
buildings could shut as soon as
Saturday, though much of the
park’s 760,000 acres will remain
open to visitors. The park is home
to many large alligators and pythons, and there will not be as
many park rangers working to
enforce safety precautions.
“We are going to put some
information out that encourages
people to use extra caution,”
spokeswoman
Ardrianna
McLane said.
juliet.eilperin@washpost.com
lisa.rein@washpost.com
damian.paletta@washpost.com
Michael Laris, Carol Morello, Brady
Dennis, Lena Sun and Jeff Stein
contributed to this report.
GOVERNMENT FACILITIES
Local parks, schools,
libraries and city
government buildings
OPEN
Since these entities are controlled locally and not by the federal government, they would
not be affected by a shutdown.
Federal prisons
OPEN
Congress has already explicitly funded prisons, so they wouldn’t be affected.
Federal courts
OPEN
The courts have at least three more weeks of funding after a government shutdown.
Congress
OPEN
Congress would continue to work, though some low-level staffers may not get paid.
Most federal office
buildings
CLOSED
Most departments and agencies would be shut down and the employees sent home.
RECREATION
National parks and
monuments
OPEN
Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney declared at Friday’s White
House news briefing that the parks would stay open during a shutdown.
Smithsonian
museums and the
National Zoo
CLOSED
The museums and the zoo have funding to stay open through Sunday but would close
Monday. However, we assume the animals would still be fed.
National Zoo panda
cams
CLOSED
Bummer.
U.S. Postal Service
OPEN
BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
TRAVEL AND SHIPPING
Passport offices
Airports
MAYBE
OPEN
The Postal Service is an independent agency, so it would not be not affected.
Some passport offices would probably remain open. Those located inside federal
buildings would close.
Air traffic controllers, Transportation Security Administration officers and customs agents
would continue to work at airports.
OTHER
Special counsel
Mueller’s Russia
investigation
OPEN
The probe’s funding is approved by Congress outside the normal government funding
process, so it would not be affected by a shutdown.
Military operations
MAYBE
Active-duty troops would continue to work, though some training exercises would cease.
IRS customer service
CLOSED
Automated processes would continue, but all processes that require people, such as
providing customer service, would stop.
Some disasterrecovery efforts
CLOSED
Some long-term responses to hurricanes, wildfires and mudslides would pause.
ROBYN BECK/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Federal financial aid
OPEN
Though 90 percent of Education Department staff members would be sent home, people
assigned to federal financial aid would continue working.
Food inspections
OPEN
USDA inspections of meat, poultry and eggs would continue.
Many government
research operations
CLOSED
Some government research projects, such as geological and weather research, would
cease. Nongovernmental organizations that already received government grants,
however, would not be affected.
— Kim Soffen and Reuben Fischer-Baum
One thing that’s different from the last shutdown
The government shutdown that occurred in fall 2013 saw public parks and
national monuments shuttered for 16 days. This year, Trump administration
officials have made a decision to keep national parks and public land “as
accessible as possible” in the event of a shutdown, Interior Department
spokeswoman Heather Swift told The Post. TOP: A U.S. Park Police officer
directs people away after closing the Lincoln Memorial on Oct. 1, 2013. ABOVE:
National Park Service rangers stand at the closed gate to Joshua Tree National
Park, in Joshua Tree, Calif., on Oct. 2, 2013.
A14
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. SATURDAY,
JANUARY 20 , 2018
GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN 2018
ICE has detained or deported some who also are activists
They allege the agency is
unfairly targeting, trying
to intimidate people
BY M ARIA S ACCHETTI
AND D AVID W EIGEL
U.S. Immigration and Customs
Enforcement has detained or deported several prominent immigrant activists across the country,
prompting accusations from advocates that the Trump administration is improperly targeting
political opponents.
Detention Watch Network, a
nonprofit that tracks immigration enforcement, said this week
that several activists have been
targeted recently, including Maru
Mora Villalpando in Washington
state, Eliseo Jurado in Colorado,
and New York immigrant leaders
Jean Montrevil and Ravi Ragbir.
“They’re trying to intimidate
people,” said Rep. Jerrold Nadler
(N.Y.), the ranking Democrat on
the House Judiciary Committee.
“These are well-known activists
who’ve been here for decades,
and they’re saying to them: Don’t
raise your head.”
A top ICE official denied that
the agency is targeting immigrants for deportation because of
their activism. The agency says its
priorities are immigrants who
pose a threat to national and
border security and public safety.
Most, but not all, of the targeted
immigrants have criminal records.
“U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement does not target unlawfully present aliens for
arrest based on advocacy positions they hold or in retaliation
for critical comments they make,”
said Matthew Albence, ICE’s ex-
ecutive associate director for Enforcement and Removal Operations, which detains and deports
immigrants. “Any suggestion to
the contrary is irresponsible,
speculative and inaccurate.”
The accusations come as a
congressional clash on immigration policy, and after months of
rising tensions between immigrant-rights activists and the
Trump administration. In California, New York and Washington, governing Democrats have
discouraged businesses from cooperating with ICE — part of a
clash over “sanctuary status” that
has been tied up in courts.
Montrevil, who was deported
to Haiti on Jan. 16, came to the
U.S. legally in 1986 and was ordered deported in 1994. He has
multiple felony convictions related to drug possession, according
to ICE.
But in an interview with the
radio show Democracy Now, he
questioned the timing of his deportation.
“I have been under supervision
for 15 years, and I’ve never violated,” Montrevil said. “I have always
made my appointment. And I stay
out of trouble. I have volunteered,
and I work and take care of my
kids. I pay taxes every year. I did
everything right. Everything they
asked me to do, I have done it. So
why target me now?”
Ragbir, a citizen of Trinidad,
was convicted in 2000 of conspiracy to commit wire fraud and
later sentenced to 30 months in
prison and ordered to pay
$350,000 restitution. ICE said he
will be detained until he can be
deported.
Montrevil is a co-founder of the
New Sanctuary Coalition, which
advocates for immigrants, and
Ragbir is the coalition’s current
executive director. Ragbir has
lived in the United States for
“This latest tactic is something we might expect from generals in a tin-pot
dictatorship, not federal officers in a 240-year-old democracy.”
Kica Matos, spokeswoman for the Fair Immigration Reform Movement
JOE AMON/DENVER POST VIA GETTY IMAGES
Eliseo Jurado waits as his partner Ingrid Encalada Latorre talks to the media after her court hearing
in Golden, Colo., last August. Both have been detained by immigration authorities.
more than 20 years.
“We see the last few weeks as
an escalating series of actions
against New Sanctuary and our
leaders aimed at silencing those
who speak for immigrants’
rights,” said Kirk Cheyfitz, a
spokesman for the New Yorkbased group. “All this comes as
racist rhetoric from the White
House leaves no doubt about the
racial basis of the Trump administration’s immigration policies.”
Jurado, the 30-year-old hus-
band of a Peruvian citizen living
in a Boulder, Colo., church to
avoid deportation, was arrested
on Jan. 11 on suspicion of being in
the United States illegally.
ICE said he has a 2007 driving
offense in Adams County, Colo.,
and three misdemeanor convictions. He, too, is being detained
pending a hearing before an immigration judge.
Jurado’s advocates say ICE detained him in retaliation for his
wife’s public fight to avoid depor-
tation to Peru.
Maru Mora Villalpando, a Mexican national in Washington
state, said she has no criminal
record and is proof that ICE is
targeting activists.
“This latest tactic is something
we might expect from generals in
a tin-pot dictatorship, not federal
officers in a 240-year-old democracy,” said Kica Matos, a spokeswoman for the Fair Immigration
Reform Movement, the largest
network of immigrant-rights or-
ganizations in the United States.
“Arresting immigrant activists
who speak up is meant to sow fear
in immigrant communities and
stop political protest.”
ICE mailed her a letter in
December saying she may be deported. She has lived in the United States for 22 years and had met
with federal officials during the
Obama administration, when she
helped publicize detainees’ hunger strikes and other protests in
Washington state.
“There’s no way for them to
know about me except for the
work that I do,” she said. “I think
my case makes it clear that actually Ravi and Jean’s case were
politically motivated.”
ICE officials would not say how
Mora Villalpando came across
the agency’s radar, but said they
are pursuing her deportation.
“All those in violation of the
immigration laws may be subject
to enforcement proceedings, up
to and including removal from
the United States,” the agency
said in a statement.
Increasingly, Democrats are
handling that information as a
potential threat. Rep. Luis Gutierrez (D-Ill.), an advocate for the
Deferred Action for Childhood
Arrivals program who has held a
number of town halls and hearings to talk to constituents about
their immigration status, worried
that the reports from New York,
Colorado and Washington were
part of a growing trend.
“I have long suspected that
very vocal advocates were harshly
targeted after they spoke out,”
Gutierrez said. “I would go to a
hearing, an immigration hearing,
and the person who made the
biggest impression? I’d find out
that they’d been detained. And
that started last year.”
david.weigel@washpost.com
maria.sacchetti@washpost.com
In an appeal to conservative base, Republicans ramp up immigration rhetoric
GOP FROM A1
George W. Bush administration.
Those overtures vanished in the
presidential politics of 2016 as
Trump steamrolled former Florida governor Jeb Bush and Sen.
Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), who both
espoused a more welcoming approach to immigrants.
“We just had an election where
this is a key issue,” said Rep. Jim
Jordan (R-Ohio), a member of the
hard-right House Freedom Caucus. “I think the people spoke loud
and clear.”
Some Republicans worried, as
they did even before Trump’s rise,
that this will harm the party in the
long term as the country becomes
more ethnically diverse. In the
short term, it has complicated
bipartisan spending talks, revived
GOP tensions and left lawmakers
without a sweeping deal on an
issue that has long vexed Congress.
“Yeah, that’s a frustration,” Sen.
Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) said in an interview Friday. Flake, a centrist,
was lamenting that the Senate has
yet to vote on a deal to protect
immigrants brought into the
country illegally as children, despite what he said was a promise
from McConnell to do so this
month.
While the Senate has not yet
taken an immigration vote, McConnell delivered red meat for the
conservative base on immigration. He lambasted Democrats for
withholding support for a monthlong government spending bill
because talks had yet to produce a
deal to protect those immigrants,
known as “dreamers.”
McConnell repeated the term
“illegal immigration” several
times in his floor remarks — punctuating the words for emphasis. It
was unusual for the leader to use
that phrase for young undocumented immigrants. Several
times when McConnell said “illegal immigration” Thursday night,
Flake, seated a few rows behind
him, visibly grimaced.
In recent public comments,
McConnell also has used the term
“chain migration” to refer to the
practice of U.S. citizens sponsoring extended family members for
green cards. Many Democrats say
it should be dropped because they
consider it a derogatory term to
describe legal, family-based immigration.
In a tweet Friday, Trump used
similar words, saying Democrats
“want illegal immigration and
weak borders. Shutdown coming?
We need more Republican victories in 2018!”
Hours ahead of the shutdown
deadline, GOP aides, lawmakers
and other officials huddled in an
endless stream of private meetings, deciding to brand the impasse the “#SchumerShutdown”
OLIVER CONTRERAS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) derided Democrats’ “insistence that we deal with an illegal-immigration issue.”
after the top Senate Democrat,
Charles E. Schumer (N.Y.). A website launched by congressional
Republicans, SchumerShutdown.
com, features a video referencing
Democratic support for changes
in immigration policy.
The term had been hatched
earlier Thursday during a conference call of staffers for House and
Senate GOP leaders. Brendan
Buck, the top communications
adviser to House Speaker Paul D.
Ryan (Wis.), told his colleagues as
the call began that they should
start using the term.
The failure so far to produce an
immigration deal was the main
driver of the Democratic resistance to passing another shortterm spending bill, even as some
Democrats tried to emphasize
other concerns. Democrats and
Republicans have struggled to
come up with a framework to
protect dreamers in exchange for
beefing up border security and
tightening citizenship requirements.
One reason those efforts have
sputtered, some Republicans say,
is the powerful influence of hardright immigration activists on the
president, who is key to any deal.
For example, Sen. Lindsey O.
Graham (R-S.C.), who is working
with Sen. Richard J. Durbin (DIll.) to broker a compromise, has
grown frustrated with Sen. Tom
Cotton (R-Ark.), a more hawkish
figure who has Trump’s ear.
Cotton, Graham said, is becoming the “Steve King of the Senate,”
a reference to the Iowa congressman who has been at the forefront
of the hard-right movement on
immigration. “If we keep making
demands that are just not realistic
in phase one, we’ll never get
there,” he added.
Cotton shot back that King
knows how to win in Iowa but
Graham, who ran for president,
does not.
Rep. Luis V. Gutiérrez (D-Ill.), a
longtime champion of an immigration bill with a path to citizenship for the 11 million immigrants, said that when it comes to
Republicans, “immigration is the
glue that keeps them together.
And you’re going to need a powerful weapon to break that.”
In McConnell’s orbit, there is a
sense that much of the Senate
Republican Conference is closer
to Cotton and Sen. David Perdue
(R-Ga.) on immigration than it is
to Graham, even if they are not as
vocal about it.
Mark Krikorian, the executive
director of a think tank that advocates reduced immigration, said
that he has detected a change in
McConnell’s rhetoric over time.
“McConnell has definitely become more hawkish on immigration,” he said. “And I don’t think
that’s necessarily an evolution in
his own perspective as much as it
is a change in the party.”
McConnell spokesman Don
Stewart said the senator has been
an advocate of legal immigration
and strong border security for
more than a decade.
In the House, Rep. Mark Meadows (R-N.C.), the Freedom Caucus
chairman, said this week that
GOP leaders have agreed to count
votes for an immigration bill that
would allow dreamers to apply for
temporary legal status and end
the ability of new citizens to bring
relatives to the United States. No
Democrats support the legislation
The way that the Republican
Party has addressed immigration
has shifted. President George W.
Bush was a champion of immigration overhaul who carried 44 percent of the Hispanic vote in 2004,
according to exit polls.
“We worked closely with him,”
recalled Frank Sharry, the director of the pro-immigration group
America’s Voice.
In 2012, Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney shifted
from a stance as a pro-immigration governor of Massachusetts to
promoting “self-deportation” as a
means to reduce the number of
illegal immigrants. He suffered
with Latino voters at the ballot
box, winning just 27 percent.
And then came Trump in 2016,
who opened his campaign by accusing Mexican immigrants of being “rapists” and campaigned on
the promise of building a wall on
the U.S.-Mexico border.
But demographic trends, particularly in regions where the Hispanic population is booming,
could spell trouble for the GOP if
its positions alienate Latino voters.
“No one has repealed the demographic trends in the country,
which means that any party that
hopes to do well in elections in the
21st century is going to have to do
better among people who are demographically different from the
current Republican base,” said
Whit Ayres, a Republican pollster.
Ayres has worked for Rubio,
who was a central player in the
2013 immigration talks that produced an immigration bill that
failed in the House. Rubio struggled to defend his record on immigration when he ran for president
in 2016.
He has not been a principal in
any of the various groups around
the Capitol pushing an immigration plan this time around.
In Democratic politics, immigration has been a major driver,
particularly since Trump’s election. Rep. Ro Khanna (D-Calif.),
who represents a deep-blue
stretch of Northern California,
said that at a recent town hall he
had asked how many people in the
room were concerned about their
immigration status, and at least
300 people in a crowd of 500 had
raised their hands.
“It doesn’t hurt the Democrats
in the short term,” Khanna said of
the prospects of a shutdown. He
said it was a “much bigger risk for
Democrats if we don’t get DACA,”
referring to the Deferred Action
for Childhood Arrivals program
that Trump ended.
At times, Trump has sounded
open to a deal with Democrats on
immigration. On other occasions,
he has pulled back, siding with
aides and lawmakers who have
warned against.
Lawmakers have been left to
guess where he stands. Until they
figure it out, Republicans have
mostly concluded that the safest
political ground on immigration
is near to Trump.
“I don’t think it’s a narrative
that we’re trying to create,” Sen.
Tim Scott (R-S.C.) said of the argument Republican leaders are
making about a possible shutdown. “It’s a narrative that is real.”
sean.sullivan@washpost.com
ed.okeefe@washpost.com
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) has emerged as a hawkish figure on
immigration who has the ear of President Trump.
Erica Werner and David Weigel
contributed to this report.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 20 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A15
RE
Free For All
Please, use
some periods
The nuance in debating science
I applaud Tamar Haspel’s point in her Jan. 10
Unearthed column, “Corral the name-calling, please”
[Food]. Too often, private conversations and publicpolicy debates that include the phrase “science says”
mean “the science that supports my position says.”
I’m skeptical that all-too-human trait will change,
but I applaud The Post for hiring a writer who
consistently pens articles that refuse to demonize
any particular perspective. Instead, her pieces distinguish science where there’s significant agreement
from that in which there’s enough uncertainty that
reasonable people reach different conclusions.
If I want more conversations like that, there’s only
one path forward: me. I need to listen deeper and
seek to understand the values that underlie the
reasons that one scientific finding or other piece of
information resonates with the person to whom I’m
talking.
Pat Rizzuto, Alexandria
That wasn’t Rawls’s view
In his Jan. 11 op-ed, “An unfair meritocracy,”
George F. Will implied that John Rawls’s view that
“inequalities of birth and natural endowment are
undeserved” articulates a conception of meritocracy. It does not. While Rawls vigorously defended the
need for fairness in competitions for social positions and offices, he opposed meritocracy as insufficiently democratic. He also regarded meritocratic
conceptions of justice as politically unworkable, in
part because of difficulties Will mentioned: Meritocratic ideals are highly contested within our political culture, and whether a social system satisfies
any given meritocratic ideal is highly difficult to
discern.
Whatever else may be said for or against Rawls’s
conception of justice, it does not face this problem,
because it is designed so that only publicly discernible considerations are regarded as relevant to
matters of distributive justice.
Jon Garthoff, Knoxville, Tenn.
ASTRID RIECKEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
A hawk chases a squirrel on the Mall in thick fog in Washington on Jan. 9. It’s unclear whether the squirrel escaped.
What happened next?
Astrid Riecken’s photograph of a
hawk chasing a squirrel was remarkable [“A chase in the haze,” Metro,
Jan. 10]. My wife and I subscribe to
The Post. We begin or end our day
looking through the paper, and the
photographs are the first things I look
at. Always there is something strong or
rewarding to see.
I just could not let another day go by
without saying so.
William Mills, Chevy Chase
Astrid Riecken’s photograph was
exceptional for both composition and
timing, but it begged for further
information: Did the squirrel get
away?
David Cosson, Washington Grove
As a more-than-40-year subscriber to The Post, I have come to
expect clear writing, regardless of
whether I agree with the writer or
subject.
However, the third paragraph
of the Jan. 10 editorial “Hurting
many, helping no one” contained
a sentence of 79 words: “Before
the decision Monday by Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen
Nielsen to send packing Salvadorans who have lived in this country
since a pair of earthquakes crippled their homeland in 2001, the
administration took identical action last year against citizens of
the hemisphere’s two poorest
countries, Haiti and Nicaragua,
who have also lived in this country since natural disasters ravaged their own, and announced
its intention to end protections
for young undocumented immigrants known as ‘dreamers’ effective beginning in March.”
If that is not a record, surely it
is approaching one.
Why not take a breath and
phrase editorials in a more readable way? In my view, the 79-word
monstrosity prevented any clarity
of thought. It could have been
made much clearer — and certainly more readable — if it had
been several sentences instead of
one.
James Luck, Severna Park
One success story
NATI HARNIK/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Then-presidential candidate Donald Trump holds
up his Bible in Council Bluffs, Iowa, in 2015.
Hey, that’s not his mother’s name
The Jan. 7 Arts & Style article “In her
own words” cited the woefully poor
progress professional theaters are
making toward parity for women
playwrights. Of plays produced professionally, only 22 percent nationally
are by women. Professional theaters in
the District enjoy bragging rights for a
higher percentage (32 percent) of
women playwrights produced. Kudos
to D.C. theaters for that distinction.
There is, however, an even better story
to share regarding a nearby professional theater that has achieved parity
for women playwrights: the Contem-
porary American Theater Festival in
Shepherdstown, W.Va. CATF, in its
27 seasons, has produced 121 new
plays. Of those, 60 were written by
women, and 55 were directed by women. Each summer, Equity actors arrive
in this historic town — just about
100 minutes by car from Washington
and Baltimore — to produce daring
and diverse stories, so many of which
happen to be written by women.
Mary I. Bradshaw, Washington
The writer is a trustee of
the Contemporary American
Theater Festival.
In his Jan. 5 op-ed, “A ‘postliterate’ president?,”
Joe Scarborough mentioned President Trump’s
“Bible given to him by his mother.” However,
Trump’s Bible was not given to him by his mother —
even though Trump has been saying for years that it
was.
Photographs show that the Bible is inscribed to
Trump — that is, it was plainly presented to Trump
— not by his mother but by his Sunday school
(Mrs. James C. Ferro, primary superintendent). His
mother may have been there, indeed she probably
was; but she did not give him that Bible.
Jay Dillon, Monmouth Beach, N.J.
Tim Rogan (Sid Sorokin) and Britney Coleman (Babe Williams) in “The
Pajama Game” at Arena Stage in Washington.
It’s really from space this time
The show should go on
I read with interest and amusement “Scientists
zoom in on fast radio bursts, the most mysterious
signals in space” [news, Jan. 12]. A few years back,
scientists reported on such a radio burst “from
space” that turned out to be from the microwave
oven at the observatory.
Seeing as this latest burst was “on Dec. 25, 2016, in
a space of about half an hour,” perhaps the Arecibo
Observatory should check the microwave oven.
Maybe the staff overdid it when heating the Christmas party cheese dip.
James Sullivan, Bowie
MARGOT SCHULMAN
ATTA KENARE/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
A vendor displays carpets at his shop in Tehran’s Grand Bazaar in 2016.
Tell us more
How about a little more explanation
for the second photograph with the
Jan. 7 front-page article “Frustration,
anger boil over in Iran”? The small
photo appeared to illustrate an adaptation of “The Last Supper” by Giovanni Pietro Rizzoli (known as Giampietrino), painted about 1520. That was
the best I could do using Wikipedia. Perhaps even stranger, large bank
notes ($100 and 500 euros) are in the
foreground. What’s going on here? Are
these offerings to a Christian symbol
in the heart of the Islamic republic?
That was a fascinating little photo.
Sam V. Smith, Arlington
JOE PUGLIESE/NETFLIX
David Letterman with former president Barack
Obama.
They were riveting, not rusty
Wow, Hank Stuever’s review of David Letterman’s
one-hour conversation with former president Barack
Obama on Netflix missed the mark [“Letterman’s debut lacks the luster of his late-night gig,” Style,
Jan. 13]. We found the hour riveting, brilliant and
very far from flat, as Stuever described it. Certainly,
Letterman takes a somewhat different persona in a
one-hour conversation than he did in a late-night
variety entertainment show, as well he should.
It is a rare opportunity to have the privilege of
watching two brilliant, successful men in casual
conversation say so much, so clearly. We recommended the program to others, and they felt the
same as we did.
Peggy and Jerry Rose, Falls Church
Letters can be sent to letters@washpost.com.
Submissions must be exclusive to The Post and should
include the writer's address and day and evening
telephone numbers. Letters are subject to editing and
abridgment. Please do not send letters as attachments.
Because of the volume of material we receive, we are
unable to acknowledge submissions; writers whose letters
are under consideration for publication will be contacted.
CHARLES BENNETT/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Humor columnist Art Buchwald in 1977.
A fond memory of Art Buchwald
Regarding the Jan. 4 Style article
“Believing in the afterlaugh”:
I have my own Art Buchwald story
that will stay with me the rest of my life.
I have a picture of Buchwald holding my
3-year-old son; Buchwald was practically pulling his sockets out. Our family
was very fortunate to be invited to the
Camp David Accords at the White
House with then-President Jimmy Carter, Israeli Prime Minister Menachem
Begin and Egyptian President Anwar
Sadat. The president asked to have his
picture taken with my son, when Buchwald came over and grabbed my son.
We never did get the picture with the
president, but we got to know Buchwald. His wife has Irish heritage and
they adopted three children, one from
Ireland. Because I was an Irish lass, he
called me his fourth kid.
Anne Mahoney Robbins, Rockville
Regarding Peter Marks’s Jan. 7 Critic’s Notebook essay, “Out-of-step musicals” [Arts & Style]:
Is Marks lacking in historical sense?
Is he unable to perform the exercise of
viewing worthy works in historical
context without help from cowed producers?
Should we edit or ban “The Merchant of Venice” because it portrays
Jews in line with the anti-Jewish
stereotypes of Shakespeare’s day? Or
censor the Bible because of its murderous condemnation of homosexual relationships or its licensing of killing,
looting and enslaving survivors of a
siege? Are our ears and minds so
delicate that we cannot stand to hear
the sexist remarks of
an earlier day?
Marks’s “wince” at
“The Pajama Game’s”
tolerance of plant
manager Sid Sorokin’s public expression of how gorgeous
he thinks Babe is
helps the drive to
cleanse the workplace
of improper advances
against women because it reminds
theatergoers of what right-thinking
people have to accomplish in our own
day. It might even get us to think more
deeply about how men should “court”
women (or women men?) whom they
meet at work or in what circumstances
such “romances” should be outlawed
entirely. Or “what a woman!” should
do if she welcomes the initial flirtation
of a boss or fellow worker. Indeed,
“The Pajama Game” is actually a case
study of love and lust on the job,
couched in fun-loving repartee and
music. And it’s a great show!
Sue and George Driesen, Bethesda
ment, censorship is not the right way
to do it. My wife and I have been Arena
Stage (and Kennedy Center) theater
subscribers for many years. Arena
Stage brings great theater to the area,
and not infrequently, its plays tackle
controversial topics, especially in the
political arena. In the case of “The
Pajama Game” (which I recall from its
original run on Broadway), it could
not be a timelier show to revive. Not to
dumb it down by altering “offensive”
lines, which would be a form of revisionist history, but to remind us all
that in the 1950s and beyond, this was
how society functioned. What a great
discussion and teaching opportunity.
One of the “cringe-worthy” lines to
which Marks objected
vehemently was “All I
can say is that you’re
the cutest Grievance
Committee I ever had
to deal with.” Is this
sexual harassment?
Or is it flirting? (I
leave that to the reader as an exercise in
constructive discussion.) For sure, it is
absolutely essential to the story and
message of the show. Sid has underestimated Babe and assumed that, as a
woman, she was not a force to be
reckoned with, an assessment he later
comes to regret. Change lines such as
that and you gut the show.
As Oprah Winfrey emphasized at
the Golden Globe Awards show, “time
is up” for these ways of thinking.
Hurray for the movement whose time
has come, and I look forward to its
working its course of change in our
society. At the same time, I would
cringe at having dialogue police approve scripts or reject revivals because
they are “out of step” with the new
standards. This would be akin to removing “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer” from libraries because of the offensive dialogue it contains — another
educational opportunity lost.
It takes time for a society to change.
Usually that change is good. In this
case, we must not let unintended
consequences of the good change infringe on the freedom that is the
hallmark of America.
Alan Salisbury, McLean
In the case of “The
Pajama Game,” it
could not be a timelier
show to revive.
I usually enjoy Peter Marks’s critical columns about the arts. But I took
issue with “Out-of-step musicals.”
First, I cringed at the headline,
which reminded me of totalitarian
states that control the press and free
expression in the theater with an iron
hand. Being told you are “out of step”
could be a fatal experience in these
societies.
While I sympathize with Marks’s
intent to support the #MeToo move-
A16
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A call to action for democracy
EDITORIALS
Too soon to forgive
The pope wants forgiveness for widespread sexual abuse, but he hasn’t taken real action on it.
O
shred of proof against” the bishop — an assertion
that Mr. Karadima’s victims bitterly dispute.
The Vatican has long taken cover behind the
hoary defense that the church is no better or worse
than society at large. That line has long been hollow,
bordering on self-justifying; it was recently eviscerated by a royal commission in Australia that spent
five years investigating sexual abuse of children
there, dating back decades. Its findings, the most
comprehensive in any country to date, surveyed
thousands of institutions — from the military to
yoga ashrams to swimming clubs — but singled out
the Catholic Church and its institutions because
that’s where so much of the abuse occurred.
In a country where just over a fifth of the
population is Catholic, a hugely disproportionate
number of those accused of abuse were priests and
other authority figures in the church. Nearly
60 percent of victims alleged that they had been
abused by someone in a religious institution; of that
number, nearly two-thirds said the abuse involved
the Catholic Church. About 7 percent of all priests
who worked in Australia from 1950 to 2010 were
accused of sexually abusing children, the commission concluded — an incidence in line with that in
JANUARY 20 , 2018
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
N A RECENT trip to Chile, Pope Francis
apologized, once again, for clerical sex
abuse, expressing the “pain and shame,
shame I feel over the irreparable harm
caused to children by church ministers.” He then
proceeded to compound that shame by dismissing
credible accusations that a Chilean bishop was
complicit in hiding abuse committed by a priest who
was once his mentor.
The episode was emblematic of the pope’s
apparent inability to come to terms with revelations
about pedophile priests and the bishops and
cardinals who cover for them. “Is it fair to ask for
forgiveness?” he wondered, on arriving in Chile.
Well, no, it’s not fair — not when the church has
failed to fully uproot the moral rot that the abuse
scandal has planted at its core.
The case of Juan Barros, the Chilean bishop to
whose defense the pope leaped, is illustrative. He
was elevated to his current position in 2015 by the
pope, who ignored reports that Mr. Barros helped
cover up abuse committed by the Rev. Fernando
Karadima, a priest whose misdeeds were deemed
credible by the Vatican. The pope, who called the
concerns “stupid,” said in Chile “there is not one
. SATURDAY,
other countries.
Yet even in Australia, the pope turns a blind eye.
Cardinal George Pell, an Australian prelate formally
charged with sexual offenses by that country’s police
in June, continues to occupy one of the most senior
positions in Rome as Pope Francis’s czar for Vatican
finances.
At the Vatican, the pope’s tribunal to deal with
bishops implicated in child sex abuse, announced
to much fanfare in 2015, was stillborn. A commission of experts to advise the Vatican on the
protection of minors, established by the pope, was
impeded at every turn by bureaucrats, and has now
lapsed. The pope himself granted mercy to some
notorious pedophile priests, sparing them from
defrocking and ordering them to a life of prayer
and penance. And just before Christmas, the pope
dignified the late Cardinal Bernard Law, who
resigned in disgrace as archbishop of Boston and
remains the most notorious symbol of the church’s
indifference to the victims of abuse, by blessing his
coffin at an extravagant funeral in St. Peter’s
Basilica in Rome.
How can there be forgiveness in the face of such
impunity?
In light of Steven Levitsky and Daniel Ziblatt’s new
book “How Democracies Die” and the Jan. 14 Outlook review by Christian Caryl, “Can our democracy
survive Trump’s attacks on its institutions?,” I suggest that the threat democracies face comes from
something deeply rooted in ourselves. It may be that
the ideals of individual liberty and democracy that
we revere and uphold are not fundamentally in
harmony with human instinct.
The few attempts to escape the oppression of
absolute rulers by vesting power in majorities of
voting citizens have devolved to some form of
absolutism after only a few generations. Democratic
Athens became Periclean dictatorship in less than a
century; the Roman Republic gave way to the Empire; and both of these polities at their most “representative” included hosts of disenfranchised slaves.
History warns that democracy is exceptional and,
thus, inherently fragile. In the world today, only a
handful of nations can boast a truly representative
form of government, and all are threatened by
hostile forces from within. Our own originally limited constitutional republic has survived and progressed toward a universal democratic model only
by overcoming fierce opposition. Still today, every
effort to broaden the franchise and limit the influence of wealth and property is met with resistance. Realizing our democratic ideals requires constant struggle, not only against subversion by special
interests but also against natural forces that bend
human beings toward autocratic rule.
We are closer now than ever before to losing that
struggle, so this book is a call to action that must be
heeded.
Erik Sundquist, Arlington
What makes America exceptional
A human rights
worker in peril
David Bier’s dissection of the impact of rescinding
temporary protected status for Salvadorans was
excellent [“Canceling TPS for Salvadorans won’t
help U.S. workers,” Outlook, Jan. 14]. The administration unfortunately couldn’t care less about the
damage Mr. Bier outlined. Whether by design or
opportunity, canceling TPS is a pretext for this
president to demand even stronger tactics against
immigrants.
Should illegal immigration increase and should
the Department of Homeland Security and Immigration and Customs Enforcement be overwhelmed,
this president will claim he was right all along about
the alleged scourge of illegal immigration on the U.S.
economy. That the damage would be because of his
own actions in rescinding TPS would not be considered by Congress. House and Senate Republicans
look to follow his lead, even if it runs the country into
a great big wall.
Dan T. Kelly, Silver Spring
Chechnya must release Oyub Titiev.
C
HECHNYA IS a graveyard of human rights
and basic liberties. Twice in the 1990s, Russia
launched grisly military campaigns to put
down separatist rebellions. Today, Ramzan
Kadyrov, a ruthless chieftain, controls the republic
with backing from President Vladimir Putin. In the
past decade, a human rights defender was murdered,
a journalist who wrote of abuses was killed in
Moscow, and gay men in Chechnya have been rounded up, tortured and targeted for extrajudicial killings.
This grim legacy is reason enough to be worried
about the fate of Oyub Titiev, the director in Chechnya for Memorial Human Rights Center, the Moscowbased human rights organization. Mr. Titiev took
over after the previous director, Natalia Estemirova,
was kidnapped and murdered in Chechnya on July 15,
2009. Mr. Titiev pushed the organization to remain in
Chechnya, despite the dangers, as a way to honor her
memory. He led a team that has reported disappearances, torture and punitive house burnings.
On Jan. 9, he was detained in Chechnya on charges
of drug possession. The authorities in Chechnya
commonly plant drugs on people as a pretext to arrest
them. Mr. Titiev was stopped by police and his car was
searched, then he was taken to a police station.
Officers said they found a bag containing about 180
grams of marijuana in the car. On Jan. 11, a local court
remanded him to prison for two months.
The intent of this arrest appears to be to force the
human rights group out of Chechnya. Mr. Kadyrov
detests the human rights monitors and journalists
who bring to public attention his rule by violence and
fear. One of the bravest of the journalists to expose
Chechen abuse was Anna Politkovskaya, who was
killed in the elevator of her Moscow apartment block
on Oct. 7, 2006, when she was about to file a long story
about torture as practiced by Chechen security forc-
NATALIA KOLESNIKOVA/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Chechnyan leader Ramzan Kadyrov at the Kremlin in Moscow in 2016.
es. Another critic was Boris Nemtsov, the opposition
leader and onetime deputy prime minister of Russia,
gunned down on a bridge within sight of the Kremlin
walls on Feb. 27, 2015. Five Chechen men were
convicted of carrying out the Nemtsov murder, but in
neither the Nemtsov nor Politkovskaya case was the
person who ordered the killings ever identified or
prosecuted. More recently, the newspaper Novaya
Gazeta in Moscow exposed a campaign of torture and
violence against gay men in Chechnya, yet another
example of Mr. Kadyrov’s intolerant and coercive
rule.
The responsibility for this repression goes back to
the man in the Kremlin. Mr. Putin has indulged Mr.
Kadyrov, calculating cynically that a bloody fist on
his behalf is better than one raised against him.
Mr. Putin also shares Mr. Kadyrov’s disdain for
journalists and human rights workers who expose
the misrule of autocrats. The result is that Chechnya
is run as a little dictatorship with permission from
Moscow. People such as Mr. Titiev are the world’s last
eyes and ears on this landscape of misery. He must be
released unharmed to continue the work of Estemirova, Politkovskaya and Nemtsov.
Evaluating with care
The widespread problems with graduation practices in D.C. schools deserve more than a knee-jerk reaction.
A
REPORT detailing widespread problems
with graduation practices in D.C. public
schools needs to be taken seriously, and
improvements need to be made. But these
issues, not unique to the District, are complicated;
they deserve careful analysis and thoughtful debate
— not knee-jerk reaction. Officials who think that
simply firing principals and flunking students are
the answers do a disservice to public education in
the District, to the ongoing efforts to improve it —
and to the students.
An investigation commissioned by the Office of
the State Superintendent of Education found disturbing numbers of students graduating despite
chronic absenteeism; in some cases they missed
most of the academic year. The report was prompted
by allegations of wrongdoing at Ballou High School,
but, according to the report released this week,
absenteeism persists throughout the city’s public
high schools. More than 11 percent of last year’s
graduates missed much of the academic year. Even
at high-achieving Wilson High School, more than 30
percent of seniors who graduated reportedly did not
meet attendance standards.
A big failing of the report is the lack of information on what happened to the graduates after they
picked up their diplomas. Are they, as critics of the
school system are quick to assume, unable to read or
write and struggling to make a go of it? Or has their
diploma given them opportunities they would not
have had if they had summarily been dismissed —
opportunities they are prepared to benefit from?
Former Ballou principal Yetunde Reeves (curiously
the only person to have lost her job despite the
systemic issues pinpointed in the report) talked
about the need for second and third chances in an
interview with ABC7. “We would not want a school,”
she said, “where kids are told, ‘You’ve missed too
much school, we can’t help you. The streets are
waiting for you.’ ”
Investigators recognized but did not attempt to
account for the challenges facing Ballou, including
poverty, homelessness, work and child-care responsibilities and interaction with the court system.
Some of the factors cited in the indictment of Ballou
— high expectations that students graduate, encour-
aging teachers to provide makeup work and extra
credit, giving students every chance possible —
should, to our mind, be encouraged and not discouraged.
Obviously, it does not help students to push them
through the system without giving them the skills or
knowledge needed to get a job or go on to higher
learning. Also clear is that despite the notable
progress that has resulted from a decade of D.C.
school reform, there are still far too many students
— including those who have met attendance requirements — who are not being sufficiently prepared.
But then officials should focus on the underlying
issues spotlighted in this report. Why aren’t children
coming to school, and what strategies and supports
are needed to get them back to class? Do one-sizefits-all policies make sense in a district with so many
challenges? Should the grading policy be adjusted to
conform with that of other districts in which zero
grades are eliminated? Are teachers getting the help
they need? And isn’t it time to put in place a system
that tracks the outcome that matters most — how
students do after graduation?
ABCDE
LOCAL OPINIONS
FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
The collateral damage of gerrymandering
The Jan. 14 Metro article “Thousands of Virginians may have voted in the wrong state House
districts” served the public interest by identifying
important factors that raise the risk of not
assigning voters to their proper district. The article
cited “complex planning of boundaries” as the key
factor but failed to state that much of the
underlying complexity is intentional and because
of gerrymandering. This means that, while misassignment is made more likely by the scenarios
given in the article, it is also collateral damage.
Virginia lacks an honest effort to make the state’s
constitutional requirement for district compactness meaningful.
Leaving the definition of “compactness” vague
or, worse, asserting that “compactness” means
whatever a legislator wants it to mean, as was
argued in Vesilind v. Virginia State Board of
Elections last year, allows gerrymanderers to
continue cheating voters.
Tortuous boundaries designed for political effect
divide communities of interest, such as the residents of Fredericksburg, which is split into Districts 28 and 88, as shown in the article. Compact
districts can be created for Virginia. Independent
redistricting commissions in other states have
succeeded in producing more compact, hence less
error-prone, district maps.
Scott Andrew Merritt, McLean
The writer is a member of OneVirginia2021,
a group concerned about redistricting
in the commonwealth.
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In his Jan. 16 op-ed, “The GOP chooses Trump’s
racism,” Eugene Robinson asked the rhetorical
question “Who can argue against merit?,” referring
to the conservative GOP’s proposed merit-based
immigration system.
A system that favors immigration of the wealthy
or educated is, at its core, a zero-sum brain and
wealth drain. America’s gain is, say, Norway’s loss.
Encouraging the immigration of mostly onepercenters, whether from Norway or Nigeria, is a
delusional view of American aspirations and “exceptionalism.” The likelier impact of such a policy would
be for those countries viewed by the president as
fecal cavities to lose their most talented and brightest. Our immigration system ought to encourage
those who lawfully enter our country seeking opportunities denied them elsewhere.
Before attempting to craft any immigration
reform, members of Congress might consider a ferry
ride “retreat” between New York Harbor’s Liberty
Island, where the Statute of Liberty stands, and Ellis
Island, where, likely, forebears of many of those
legislators arrived with little else in terms of worldly
possessions or educational accomplishments.
Those people, my Irish grandparents included,
came to a United States that, however imperfectly,
tried to live by Emma Lazarus’s words: “Give me
your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free.”
James McKeown, Falls Church
Amid the outrage and insults over immigration
sparked by our president comes the heartening story
of Prabal Gurung from Nepal, showing us what
richness our immigrants have brought to this country [“Forming his opinions,” Style, Jan. 16].
Mr. Gurung is not only a talented fashion designer
but also an outspoken activist for positive change
that would make Lady Liberty proud. Mr. Gurung’s
“feminine feminism” philosophy shows the best of
America and the panoply of diversity that once made
the United States a beacon of hope in the world.
Committed agents of change such as Mr. Gurung
from across this rainbow nation will eventually turn
the tide of negativity and return the United States to
its roots.
Malcolm Odell, Washington
This D.C. law will curb abuse
In their Jan. 14 Local Opinions essay criticizing
the District’s recently passed Fair Elections Act,
“Giving more power to the already powerful,” David
Keating and Thomas Wheatley contended that
public financing of political campaigns will not work
perfectly and may be subject to abuse. We agree that,
as with any campaign finance system, the new act
could be subject to abuse — but the abuse is likely to
be far less than the continued abuse inherent in the
current system.
In fact, based on our study of experiences in other
jurisdictions, we are convinced that the Fair Elections Act will achieve three important purposes that
are clearly in the public interest: It will help address
the widespread perception that big donors unduly
influence decisions made by our elected officials; it
will allow our elected officials to spend more time
developing good public policy and less time raising
money; and it will encourage more residents to
become engaged in the electoral process, including
by running for office. All these benefits will help
advance democracy in the District.
Walter Smith, Washington
The writer is executive director of DC Appleseed.
Jon Bouker, Washington
The writer is chairman of the board
of DC Appleseed.
Letters to the editor: letters@washpost.com
SATURDAY, JANUARY 20 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
COLBERT I. KING
EZ
A17
RE
CHRISTINE EMBA
DRAWING BOARD
Are D.C. public
schools ‘cooking
the books’?
The Women’s
March now: Time
for solidarity
I
R
n last week’s column on the attendance and
graduation scandal at Ballou High School, I
suggested that D.C. Schools Chancellor Antwan Wilson might have a system-wide problem on his hands. How little we knew.
The full extent of the infractions wasn’t known
until an interim report on an investigation commissioned by the Office of the State Superintendent of Education was released this week. It
revealed that:
More than 1 one of every 10 students given a
diploma from a D.C. public high school last year
missed more than half of the school days.
Three-quarters of the 2,307 graduates across
the system missed at least 10 percent of the school
days.
Teachers feel pressured to push chronically
absent seniors to graduate.
Excessive passing rates for absent students
were discovered not only at Ballou High School,
the initial focus of the investigation, but also
across the city, specifically at Anacostia, Eastern,
Woodson and Roosevelt High Schools.
A statement Wednesday by Council member
Mary M. Cheh (D-Ward 3) noted that the state
superintendent’s report also showed that more
than a third of Wilson High School graduates “did
not meet attendance requirements to graduate per
DCPS policy.” Cheh declared there is “systemic
pressure to push students through the system”
and accused D.C. Public Schools of “cooking the
books or not following their own policies.”
It’s worth noting that on Dec. 15, a month before
the release of the state superintendent’s report,
Council member David Grosso (I-At Large) held a
hearing on student absenteeism and truancy at
Ballou. Grosso, the council’s education committee
chairman, concluded that Ballou did not create its
“present-day dilemma.” He chalked up the problem to Ballou’s having to operate in an inherited
public education system “that is based in segregation in the District of Columbia.” Grosso concluded that the situation cannot be adequately addressed “if we do not start to have a public, honest
conversation about institutional racism in our
public schools.”
After reading this week’s state superintendent’s
report, Grosso’s tune changed somewhat. He
called the results “extremely troubling,” and said
that the report “tells a much more harrowing tale.”
And Grosso’s evidence of “institutional racism in
our public schools”? Maybe that comes later.
Wilson said the results “disappointed” him,
noting that more than 60 percent of students
graduated with excessive absences. “We are in the
process of trying to understand what’s behind
some of the numbers there,” Wilson said.
Some of us are trying to understand how today’s
D.C. public school system functions. For example:
Wilson, in response to the report, said that
teachers have lacked proper instruction on grading and that he’s going to institute system-wide
training.
What’s that?
I have at my desk an Aug. 6, 2016, DCPS letter to
parents and legal guardians that describes the
new 68-page grading policy for grades 6 to 12
implemented in June 2015, specifically designed to
hold students in all DCPS schools to the same
standards and expectations. The policy wasn’t
universally well received, but to suggest that
teachers were ignorant of the policy and how it is
supposed to work reflects poorly on the District’s
education leaders.
Wilson’s office ignored attempts by some teachers to alert him and other city leaders about
troubles at Ballou before the school’s grading
problems hit the news. He now promises to
appoint an ombudsman to field staff complaints.
Another ombudsman? There already is an ombudsman established by the D.C. State Board of
Education.
Wilson is treating the scandal as a big misunderstanding that can be fixed with “training.”
Contrast that with Cheh’s assertion that DCPS
officials are being “protected” from accountability
for “cooking the books,” or lying and cheating to
produce false results. Which is it?
How will parents and other D.C. taxpayers learn
the truth?
The public school system’s food chain and
hierarchy (schools chancellor, deputy mayor for
education, Office of the State Superintendent of
Education, elected D.C. State Board of Education,
D.C. Council Committee on Education) were blissfully in the dark about Ballou High School’s
problems until an in-depth investigation by
WAMU and NPR hit the airwaves late last year.
The magnitude of chronically absent students
graduating grew on the watch of the mayor,
council and education bureaucracy. The problem
is systemic indeed.
BY LUCKOVICH FOR THE ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION
BY STANTIS FOR THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE
BY MARGULIES
kingc@washpost.com
emember the heady days of early
2017? One year ago, 24 hours after the
inauguration of President Trump,
more than 2.5 million women and
their allies turned out to express their disapproval at Women’s Marches across the country and around the world. They wore pink
“pussy” hats and carried subversive signs, and
the crowds grew into the largest single day of
protest in U.S. history. The sheer volume of
outrage was momentous, remarkable in and
of itself.
But it’s 2018 now, and we’ve learned
something along the way: Outrage is not
enough.
The impact of the original Women’s March
remains real and significant. With the emergence of grass-roots networks around the
country, activism has flourished and women
are organizing. They are running for offices
large and small, and the number of women in
Congress has reached an all-time high. “Indivisible” and similar movements helped to
stymie destructive legislation such as the
proposed Affordable Care Act repeal.
Outside of the political realm, it’s not hard
to draw a line from the outrage expressed en
masse to the newly emboldened voices of the
#MeToo movement. There, women have
brought down powerful abusers and opened a
frank discussion about sexual harassment
and assault. And as the visibility of women’s
anger has increased, feminism has finally
gone mainstream. More women’s stories are
being told, and by women themselves.
But not all women have shared in this
progress equally.
From the moment it was conceived, the
2017 Women’s March was inspiring but imperfect. Its attendees were mostly white; the
majority were middle class. While there was
enormous power implied in the number of
people who gathered, it wasn’t necessarily
clear to whom that power would accrue.
Critics worried that only certain women’s
issues would be taken to heart. They appear to
have been right.
Yes, today there are more women seeking
office, but the renewed interest in politics has
not yet changed the lived reality for most.
More than 1 in 8 U.S. women still live in
poverty, and looming legislation aims to chip
away at the policies that lend them support.
More women are dying of pregnancy-related
complications here than in any other developed country, and the rate is rising. Black
women are especially at risk.
Yes, #MeToo has had a real impact. Predators no longer afflict as many shining stars.
But what about women who work on factory
floors, in restaurants or in domestic settings?
Have their lives changed for the better?
And yes, feminism has gone mainstream,
but feminism for whom? Many of the concerns that are particularly relevant to women
of color — police brutality, voter disenfranchisement — are fading from view.
Outrage has served us well, but it hasn’t
served us all. So where do we go from here?
In 2017, millions marched for the cause of
“women” writ large. In 2018, those same
marchers should direct that energy toward
more specific complaints. Women who style
themselves activists should go beyond donning pink hats and raising signs, and lend
their support to causes that may be outside of
their usual sphere of interest. This should be a
year for deliberate solidarity with women of
color, with underpaid workers, with disenfranchised voters and with mothers who need
help. When it comes to issues such as racial
disparity, economic inequality and a shrinking social safety net, unfocused anger is not
enough.
While outrage changes attitudes, solidarity
is crucial to concrete policy advances. The
women helping one another run for office
should also push for policies that allow more
men and women to vote — especially those
who are fighting disenfranchisement in advance of the 2018 midterm elections. Highprofile women who now feel enabled to take
action against their abusers should take up
the cause of those with fewer resources; the
#TimesUp legal defense fund is a promising
example. And rather than reflexively discounting women with more conservative
politics, it’s time to listen — and to find
pro-women policies on which all can agree.
In 2017, women voiced their outrage. The
work of 2018 will be to support the women
whose voices still aren’t being heard.
Christine.Emba@washpost.com
ALEXANDRA PETRI
Ladies, let’s be reasonable about #MeToo or nothing will ever be sexy again
L
adies, please.
(Puts up feet on table in a sage fashion.)
Well, it has been a fun (glances at watch)
three months that we have been doing this
thing where we stop letting harassment and assault
get swept under the rug, and it has been nice,
certainly, to watch those tumbrels of condemned
men rolling through the streets toward the guillotine (or, as she is all-too-aptly termed, the Hungry
Lady!), but I think we must be reasonable now and
stop before any more good men are made to suffer.
Before all future films are robbed of that certain je ne
sais quoi, that frisson, that — other French word,
which gives them their palpable raw erotic charge.
You understand, of course, what I am saying.
I was sitting at a luncheon the other day when a
friend casually remarked, “When is this #MeToo
nonsense going to end? When will movies be sexy
again?”
“Indeed,” I said. It was not that I am clairvoyant,
although I am literally clairvoyant. But now, you see,
it is ending. Or at least, I would like it to be ending,
which is much the same thing.
When we were only coming for people who had
actually done bad things and, indeed, admitted as
much, it was fine. But now we are going into bars and
scooping up any men who have done anything, be it
ever so slight: a smile, a look, forcing a woman to live
under his desk in a secret room and refusing to tell
her what year it is, offenses of WILDLY DIFFERENT
DEGREES that I am just lumping together as though
I think all of them might be possibly acceptable if
you did them outside the office.
First they came for men I did not like, some of
whom had beards that did not look good, others of
whom were conservative media personalities and
still others of whom combined those characteristics.
But then it started to spread until we were even
ruining the careers of people who were accused of
minor offenses, such as saying “good morning” with a
weird emphasis, or eating a sandwich while maintaining eye contact with someone who wasn’t their
wife, or emailing a woman a respectful compliment.
Oh, no, have none of these things happened? My
mistake. I am worried that they will, which is just
as bad.
My point is, there is a spectrum. There are some
things that are not as bad as other things — yet these
feminists don’t agree! There is no distinction made.
(That is, there have been distinctions made, but this
could cease at any moment.)
There was an anonymous list, definitely to be used
as a weapon in the inevitable War on Men, not just as
a tool to be shared among people who wanted to
know whom to avoid when they were trying to make
their way in their chosen field. Now a small part of
the patriarchy is at risk. And let me say this for the
patriarchy: It has never done anything to me, and I
think we should consider that before we sentence it
to death.
I understand that there is a problem, but women
need to stop being victims. There are two ways for
this to happen: One is for men to stop harassing
women. Another is for women just to ignore the
problem and carry on. That second approach has
been tried for many years and was, I thought,
successful. Let’s go back to that. It is much easier for
women to stop complaining than it is for men to
change their behavior and give women the basic
respect they accord colleagues they do not want to
sleep with.
What’s worse, movies are being ruined by all this
nonsense. There is nothing less erotic, if we must be
frank, than consent (a process I assume involves a lot
of paperwork). I know “consent” cannot simply
mean that both parties demonstrably want something to be happening before they proceed, or it
would be alarming that it was not included in
everything before.
The foundation of every romantic comedy ever
made is workplace harassment. Movies are full of
women who are just trying to do their jobs and a
man won’t stop hitting on them, from “His Girl
Friday” to the present day. That is half the charm of
James Bond as a franchise.
Eros is a one-sided relationship between a man
and an object. If this is taken from us, what will
remain? Literally nothing. At least, I cannot think of
anything, which I assume is the same.
Enough is enough, I say, and mean. I read
something by a French person that said “ONE DAY
MORE,” and that is what I think men deserve. Let us
return to business as usual now, before any more
valuable masculine careers are damaged. There is
nothing brave about any of this speaking out. It is
just a mob. No one criticizes or threatens women
who speak in public, certainly not myself, right now.
Alexandra Petri writes the ComPost blog at
washingtonpost.com/blogs/compost.
A18
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
Neighbor agrees to plead guilty in assault on Rand Paul
BY
J USTIN J OUVENAL
A neighbor of Sen. Rand Paul
(R-Ky.) has agreed to plead guilty
in federal court in a November
attack that left the nation’s bestknown libertarian with six broken ribs and briefly sidelined him
during the debate over the tax
overhaul, according to court documents.
The U.S. Attorney’s Office for
the Southern District of Indiana
announced Friday that Rene
Boucher, 59, would face a count of
assaulting a member of Congress.
Authorities said he became angry
and “had enough” after seeing
Paul stack more brush on a pile
near his yard on Nov. 3.
Boucher then executed a “running tackle” on Paul, 55, in the
yard of his Bowling Green, Ky.,
home, according to court records.
Paul, who had been mowing his
lawn and was wearing headphones, did not see Boucher until
the last second.
Boucher, who had previously
been charged with a misdemean-
or in a county court and had
pleaded not guilty, denied in an
interview with police that there
was any political motivation for
the assault, according to court
documents. He said it was a property dispute that finally boiled
over.
Boucher “continues to be very
regretful and very remorseful,”
said Matthew J. Baker, an attorney for Boucher. “He’s looking
forward to gaining some closure
on this.”
Paul’s office declined to com-
ment.
Federal prosecutors will recommend a sentence of 21 months,
according to court papers. No
date has been set for a plea hearing. The U.S. attorney for the
Western District of Kentucky was
recused from handling the case,
so it was transferred to Indiana.
“Assaulting a member of Congress is an offense we take very
seriously,” U.S. Attorney Josh J.
Minkler said in a statement.
“Those who choose to commit
such an act will be held account-
. SATURDAY,
able.”
The assault, in an upscale gated community, drew widespread
media attention and generated a
political mystery, since Paul and
Boucher have personally offered
few clues about what sparked one
of the worst assaults on a sitting
senator in decades.
In late November, Baker,
Boucher’s attorney, told The
Washington Post that it was tied
to simmering disagreements between the successful doctors
about the maintenance — “or lack
of it” — of their adjacent lots.
Baker said Boucher and Paul
didn’t see eye to eye over the care
of grass, trees and other aspects of
JANUARY 20 , 2018
their properties.
Boucher, a retired anesthesiologist, and Paul, an ophthalmologist, had lived next door to each
other in the Rivergreen community for 17 years and once worked
at the same hospital.
Paul said on “Face the Nation”
that his recovery has been arduous.
“It was sort of, I guess, a living
hell for the first four or five
weeks,” Paul said. “Couldn’t get
out of bed without assistance, six
broken ribs, damage to my lungs,
two bouts of pneumonia. It was
really a tough go of it. But each
day I feel a little bit better.”
justin.jouvenal@washpost.com
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SATURDAY, JANUARY 20 , 2018
High today at
approx. 3 p.m.
8 a.m.
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4 p.m.
8 p.m.
34 47 52 43°
°
°
°
55°
Precip: 0%
Wind: SW
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.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
EZ
THE DISTRICT
THE DISTRICT
OBITUARIES
Ex-FBI director James B.
Comey will teach ethical
leadership at William &
Mary’s D.C. satellite. B3
Schools superintendent
invalidates scores in
required science exam
after discovering errors. B6
Paul Booth, a labor union
leader and activist who
organized a student
march in 1965, was 74. B4
On the brink of a government shutdown, region braces itself
BY A NTONIO O LIVO
AND R ACHEL C HASON
Washington-area
residents
and elected officials tried to prepare Friday for the effects of a
federal government shutdown, a
familiar possibility that keeps
thousands of residents from being paid, costs contractors serious
money and leaves restaurants and
businesses with far fewer customers.
While congressional leaders
B
SU
Residents, officials fear
lost paychecks, shuttered
buildings, uncertainty
and top White House officials
huddled in last-minute discussions, the people who call Washington home year-round were getting ready for the worst.
There are about 283,500 feder-
al employees in the Washington
region, according to the federal
Bureau of Labor Statistics. The
potential loss in economic activity
adds up to about $150 million per
day, said Terry Clower, director of
George Mason University’s Center for Regional Analysis.
“That’s a big thing,” Clower
said. “Do you recapture some of
that down the road? Maybe. But it
gives you an order of magnitude
of what’s happening day-to-day.”
Prince George’s County resi-
dent Wanda McClary said she has
been pulling as many extra shifts
as she can as a security guard at
the National Museum of African
American History and Culture,
knowing that a shutdown means
the museum could close and the
52-year-old and her colleagues
would face their own financial
shortfall.
“We have no idea what will
happen,” said McClary, who lives
in District Heights. “The only
thing that saves me is that I love
what I do.”
With funds already tight in a
local economy hampered by
$13 billion in federal cuts since
2013, many local and state officials expressed anger at the current budget impasse in Congress
that, for their governments, either
means shutting down programs
that rely on federal dollars or
footing the bill to keep them open.
“Marylanders are sick and tired
of Washington’s dysfunctional
SHUTDOWN CONTINUED ON B4
Uptick
in crime
prompts
ouster
BALTIMORE POLICE
CHIEF IS REPLACED
City’s homicide rate
set a record in 2017
BY
P ETER H ERMANN
AND L YNH B UI
Baltimore’s mayor on Friday
abruptly replaced Police Commissioner Kevin Davis weeks after
the city ended 2017 with a recordsetting homicide rate and amid
increased political pressure to
control crime.
Mayor Catherine E. Pugh
named a deputy commissioner,
Darryl D. DeSousa, a homegrown
veteran who over 30 years rose
through the ranks, as interim
leader of the beleaguered police
force of about 2,300.
The leadership change comes
as Davis was overseeing the department during one of its most
difficult eras. He was tasked with
driving down violent crime that
flared to historic levels after a
young man’s death in police custody while simultaneously reforming an agency the Justice
Department cited for discriminating against black residents.
In his last year, Davis had to
reckon with the federal indictment of several officers from an
elite unit accused of shaking
down drug dealers and frustration over the recent unsolved killing of a city homicide detective.
“We need violence reduction,”
Pugh said Friday at a news conference, less than a month after she
DAVIS CONTINUED ON B2
CAROLYN VAN HOUTEN/THE WASHINGTON POST
Thousands, including Joanne Caldwell of Emittsburg, Md., below, gathered on the Mall during the annual March for Life on Friday. President Trump addressed
the crowd on live video: “Under my administration, we will always defend the very first right in the Declaration of Independence, and that is the right to life.”
The many sides of March for Life
Trump gets mixed reviews after
antiabortion wins, immigration fights
‘Pro-life feminists’ straddle two
weekend events with divergent goals
BY M ICHELLE B OORSTEIN,
MICHAEL ALISON CHANDLER AND JULIE ZAUZMER
Thousands of activists at the annual March for
Life enjoyed a rare display of political firepower
Friday, with addresses by the president, vice president and House speaker all celebrating gains the
antiabortion movement has made under Donald
Trump. But the movement’s elevated status comes at
the price of much internal debate about Trump’s
other actions as president.
“Under my administration, we will always defend
the very first right in the Declaration of Independence, and that is the right to life,” Trump said in the
White House Rose Garden, in a speech that was
broadcast to the marchers gathered near the Washington Monument.
The march — which typically draws busloads of
Catholic school students, a large contingent of
evangelical Christians and poster-toting protesters
of many persuasions — falls each year around the
anniversary of the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision that
recognized a legal right to abortion, and it intends to
pressure Congress and the White House to limit legal
BY
RICKY CARIOTI/THE WASHINGTON POST
“For someone to say they’re pro-life
but display callous policies that tear
families apart is reprehensible.”
Jacek Orzechowski of Catholic Charities of Washington,
on President Trump’s policies toward immigrants
P AUL D UGGAN
Phelon Davis, a bank teller in
the District, met Ronnie Witherspoon, a homeless street vendor,
in 2014, when Witherspoon
walked into Davis’s Wells Fargo
branch in Georgetown with
roughly $40,000 in a trash bag
and said he wanted to make a
deposit.
That seemed odd.
Then matters got stranger.
Davis discovered that Witherspoon hadn’t used his account in
years and that the bank had long
ago classified it as dormant. But
being dormant didn’t mean the
account was empty. Witherspoon,
bedraggled, in his 60s, with no
fixed address, had plenty of money with Wells Fargo. Not counting
the $40,000 he was toting around
in soiled, moldy bills, his balance
TELLER CONTINUED ON B6
HOSPITAL CONTINUED ON B4
MARCH CONTINUED ON B2
was in the low six figures.
And Davis made a felonious,
life-altering decision. As the nowex-teller’s lawyer put it Friday in
court, “an opportunity came
along, and he lost sight of his
morals.”
Before the FBI arrested Davis
last year, he had gradually siphoned nearly $200,000 out of
Witherspoon’s account, authorities said, and used the money to
settle personal debts, make a
down payment on a house, and
pay for vacations in Mexico, the
Dominican Republic, Aruba and
Jamaica. He pleaded guilty in
September to one count of interstate transportation of stolen
goods.
“Pure greed,” Assistant U.S. Attorney Kondi J. Kleinman said
Friday at Davis’s sentencing in
U.S. District Court in the District.
P ETER J AMISON
“I’m truly remorseful,” Davis,
29, of District Heights, Md., told
the judge.
“Outrageous,” said Judge Emmett G. Sullivan, who imposed an
18-month prison term, to be followed by six months of home
detention.
“He hasn’t had a good night’s
sleep since he did this,” said defense attorney Bruce A. Johnson,
M ICHAEL A LISON C HANDLER
D.C. bank teller sentenced for stealing almost $200,000 from homeless man
BY
BY
A panel of D.C. lawmakers
opted Friday to hold off on a
formal investigation into the
management of United Medical
Center, the District-owned hospital that has come under growing scrutiny amid financial problems and questionable patient
deaths.
D.C. Council Health Committee Chairman Vincent C. Gray
(D-Ward 7) had sought to open a
more aggressive phase in the
council’s oversight of the public
hospital, which serves some of
the poorest and sickest people in
the nation’s capital.
A resolution Gray circulated
Friday afternoon would have authorized subpoenas for witnesses
and documents related to the
operation of the hospital, which
the consulting firm Veritas of
Washington has run since
2016 under a $300,000-permonth contract with the District
government. The company’s executive chairman, Corbett Price,
was a political donor to Mayor
Muriel E. Bowser (D).
At the last minute, Gray decided to table the resolution after it
became clear he couldn’t muster
enough votes on his five-member
committee. Calling the meeting
to order two hours late after an
ultimately fruitless bout of lastminute negotiations with other
council members, Gray said the
committee would for the time
being rely on the cooperation of
UMC’s leadership.
Gray said after the hearing
that he would move quickly to
schedule further public hearings
on the hospital but that he would
have preferred the power to
Destiny Herndon-De La Rosa made headlines last
year when her antiabortion group was removed from a
list of partner organizations for the Women’s March on
Washington. The Dallas-based founder of New Wave
Feminists went to the march anyway, sans invitation,
and had a blast.
“Women are amazing,” she said. “We can disagree,
and we can still work on what we do agree on.”
This weekend, she is back in Washington, her “I am a
Pro-Life Feminist” posters and pink velvet platform
boots packed for two events: The March for Life,
headlined by President Trump on Friday, and a Women’s March first anniversary event on Saturday.
She is more interested than ever in building a bridge
between two sides of the abortion debate by emphasizing issues that women can agree on, such as improved
maternal health care and child care. She wants to build
a culture where abortion is unthinkable rather than
illegal, she says.
Her group — which describes itself online as “Badass. Prolife. Feminist.” — is one of many that is attempting to broaden the antiabortion movement’s appeal to a
LIFE CONTINUED ON B2
D.C. leaders
hold off
on subpoenas
to hospital
B2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. SATURDAY,
JANUARY 20 , 2018
religion
‘Pro-life feminists’ seek
kinship among groups
MARCH FROM B1
CAROLYN VAN HOUTEN/THE WASHINGTON POST
Clare Van Dover sits on Ian Cease’s shoulders. The 19-year-olds rode a bus for 32 hours from the University of Mary in Bismarck, N.D.
Trump touts victories at March for Life
LIFE FROM B1
access to the procedure.
Trump said he was “really
proud to be the first president to
stand with you here at the White
House”; Ronald Reagan and
George W. Bush addressed the
march by telephone when they
were in office.
Megan Ensor, who came from
Atlanta to attend her first March
for Life, expressed her enthusiasm that Trump took the time to
speak to the marchers. “When it
comes to the greatest moral evil
of our time, the question that is
most important is that he cares
. . . When he comes today, that’s a
good thing. We don’t have to
agree with him on everything,”
she said.
Anna Rose Riccard, 25, works
for antiabortion organizations
and called the president’s appearance not a boon but an “unfortunate distraction.” Riccard, of Alexandria, said she doesn’t believe
the antiabortion cause is a priority for Trump, and she saw fellow
Catholics disagreeing on social
media about his appearance.
“I give him credit for appointing a conservative justice,” she
said, referring to Neil M. Gorsuch
on the Supreme Court.
Trump, however, touted his
administration’s
antiabortion
policies, including new orders on
Thursday and Friday establishing
an office to support medical professionals who do not want to
perform abortions and making it
easier for states to direct funding
away from Planned Parenthood.
Most leaders of the antiabortion movement don’t blame
Trump for what they perceive as a
lack of progress; they fault Republicans in Congress for inaction.
“It’s because of the Senate. I
put the blame with the Senate,”
Jeanne Mancini, president of the
March for Life, said in an interview last week. “I think that some
of our members of Congress are
afraid to be courageous on these
issues.”
Though Trump said Friday that
“Americans are more and more
pro-life; you see that all the time,”
views on abortion have remained
quite steady for decades. Since
the mid-1990s, about half of citizens, give or take a few percentage points, have said abortion
should be legal in all or most
cases, while 40-odd percent have
said it should be illegal in all or
most cases.
Last year, the March for Life
fell just days after Trump’s inauguration, and the tone was ebullient. Marchers believed they
were heralding an administration that would prioritize limiting abortion. Mancini said then
that she had four goals for policy
in the president’s first year in
office: appointing an apparently
antiabortion Supreme Court justice, defunding Planned Parenthood, codifying the annual Hyde
Amendment that restricts federal
money from funding abortions
and passing a law banning abortion in many cases after 20 weeks.
A year later, only the first of
those four goals has been accomplished.
Bills to make the Hyde Amendment permanent and to ban certain late-term abortions passed in
the House but are unlikely to pass
the Senate. Both chambers of
Congress tried to defund Planned
Parenthood in their unsuccessful
efforts to pass a health-care bill.
The White House has advanced several policies through
executive orders rather than legislation, starting with an expanded version of the Bush-era “Mexico City policy,” which bars U.S.
funding to public health organizations that promote abortion
overseas and which Trump reinstated upon taking office. On
Thursday, the day before the
march, Trump announced another policy that pleased antiabortion activists — a new office
meant to protect the rights of
medical professionals who don’t
want to participate in abortions
because of their religious beliefs.
In his speech Friday, Trump
noted those actions and boasted
about the stock market and unemployment rates as well. He
called to the podium a mother
who became pregnant at 17 and
later went on to help establish a
facility to support homeless pregnant women.
Trump repeated a claim he
made during a presidential debate against Hillary Clinton in
2016 — that a fetus in “a number
of states” can be aborted “in the
ninth month.”
“It is wrong. It has to change,”
he said about those late-term
abortions. As The Post’s Fact
Checker pointed out in 2016,
89 percent of abortions occur in
the first 12 weeks, and 1.2 percent
occur after 21 weeks of pregnancy, according to the Guttmacher
Institute. All but seven states
prohibit some abortions after a
certain point in pregnancy, making “ninth month” abortions exceptionally rare and largely
banned already.
At the marchers’ noon rally
east of the Washington Monument, the White House satellite
appearance was part of a slate of
speakers, including House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.).
The crowd gave him rock-star
treatment, with whoops and applause. “How grateful are we to
have a pro-life president back in
the White House!” Ryan said.
“One thing that gets lost is how
compassionate the pro-life movement is,” he said. “To help women
who have gone through the pain
of abortion, to help single mothers, to give them resources
through thousands of pregnancy
centers: This is the face of the
pro-life movement.”
Ahead of the march, antiabortion groups around the region
hosted events on Friday morning,
including a conference in the
basement of a downtown hotel
where the emphasis was on expanding the idea of “pro-life.”
Hundreds of people at the
Evangelicals for Life conference
wandered booths about prison
ministries and health care and
heard speakers talk about the
importance of adoption and serving refugees.
Popular evangelical author
and speaker Ann Voskamp talked
to a crowd of largely young, white
listeners about a “robust pro-life
ethic . . . We are for both humans
in utero and humans in crisis.
This is us.”
The message echoed a talk on
Capitol Hill on Thursday, in
which the Rev. Samuel Rodriguez, one of Trump’s evangelical
advisers, stood with House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi urging Congress to protect undocumented young adults. Noting that
the March for Life would be the
next day, Rodriguez said the two
topics were linked as “life” issues.
Jessica Ponce, 26, marched at
the very front of the pack with
fellow parishioners from the
Archdiocese of Mobile, Ala. She
said the experience is poignant
because she just learned she is
pregnant. A native of Mexico who
is a permanent resident in the
United States, she said that to her,
“pro-life” means taking care of all
human beings, including immigrants and refugees.
“It’s not possible to care for
people if you are separating families, and parents cannot defend
the lives of their children if they
are not able to stay together,” she
said.
In an effort to make the same
point, a group of Franciscan
priests stood near the front of the
stage during the rally. When
Trump appeared on the screen,
they raised banners saying:
“Keeping families together is prolife! Keep God’s dream alive!”
“I’m here to stand for the
integrity of my faith and of the
gospel. I’m not willing to sacrifice
that for political expediency,” said
the Rev. Jacek Orzechowski, a
community organizer with Catholic Charities of Washington. “For
someone to say they’re pro-life
but display callous policies that
tear families apart is reprehensible.”
A Catholic priest from New
York City said some in his parish
— a heavily Central American
congregation that includes many
undocumented immigrants —
didn’t come to Washington out of
fear. The priest, who said he was
afraid to use his name, still
praised Trump’s talk at the rally.
“We put our faith in no man. Our
faith is in Jesus.”
michelle.boorstein@washpost.com
michael.chandler@washpost.com
julie.zauzmer@washpost.com
Sarah Pulliam Bailey contributed to
this report.
younger generation that is less religious, more progressive on social
issues and increasingly framing
opposition to abortion in terms of
human rights, scientific language
and feminism. Many of these women have plans to attend both
marches, not as disrupters but as a
true reflection of their own perspectives.
The movement is gaining traction.
“I have never seen so much energy [for antiabortion feminism]
going into the March for Life,” said
Serrin M. Foster, president of the
Alexandria-based group Feminists
for Life that dates back to the early
1970s. She said this year she has
received requests for educational
materials and posters from all over
the country.
Many antiabortion women, who
have been ambivalent about feminism, felt emboldened last year by
the Women’s March snub to show
how their stance is inherently feminist or pro-woman.
Additionally, over the past year,
many who oppose abortion have
been compelled by discussions
started by the #MeToo movement
and disappointed to see leaders
within their communities support
Trump, who bragged about sexually assaulting women, or Roy
Moore, the Republican Senate candidate in Alabama who was accused of making unwanted advances toward female teenagers.
At a pep rally organized at Catholic University on Tuesday to kick
off the March for Life activities, a
featured speaker was Aimee Murphy, founder of a group called Rehumanize International and another prominent “pro-life feminist” voice. She encouraged the students there decorating posters to
advocate for “a consistent life ethic,” a view also promoted by Herndon-De La Rosa that says human
beings should be free from violence
throughout their lives and protected from abortion, as well as war,
nuclear weapons, the death penalty, torture and euthanasia.
Destiny
HerndonDe La Rosa
wants to
broaden the
antiabortion
movement’s
appeal.
Maria Lebron, 19, a sophomore
at Catholic University, said she has
been attracted to the antiabortion
feminist movement over the past
year and the “hip” message of Murphy and Herndon-De La Rosa.
“I want to change the face of the
pro-life movement,” she said. For
the movement to succeed, it cannot
be attached to a religion or a political party, and it cannot only be
focused on the unborn, she said.
“We can’t just stand for the baby, we
have to stand for the mother, too.”
At the March for Life, HerndonDe La Rosa led a rally of 50 abortion
opponents from New Wave Feminist, who were protesting Trump’s
address to the main crowd while
also highlighting the growing science of fetal development as evidence that life begins at conception.
As she tells it, Herndon-De La
Rosa was born to be a “pro-life
feminist.” Her mother became
pregnant with her at 19 while at the
University of Texas. Rather than
having an abortion, she had a
daughter, juggled low-wage jobs
and took 10 years to complete a
degree. “Watching her made me a
feminist,” she said.
Herndon-De La Rosa also got
pregnant — at 16. Her boyfriend
left, and she considered adoption,
but she felt like she had family
support to raise her son. Later she
got married and had three more
children.
She first started her New Wave
Feminist group in 2004 because
she wanted to help other women
who did not feel they had support
to make the choice she did, and she
wanted to raise awareness about
issues — such as the hyper-sexualization of women — that can lead to
teen pregnancy and abortion.
She worked as a sidewalk counselor outside abortion clinics and
volunteered at a crisis pregnancy
center. Sidewalk counseling
should be done without graphic
signs or bullhorns that call out and
shame women, she said, and
should offer assistance to women
who are struggling with housing or
employment, not just prayers. She
said pregnancy centers should not
only offer “pee sticks and sonograms,” but also provide annual
exams and tests for sexually-transmitted disease and birth control.
“If we care about women’s
health, we have to be there for
women when they are not pregnant.”
After the Women’s March last
year, she got 20,000 new followers
on Facebook and a slew of media
appearances, and she has had a
steady stream of speaking engagements since. She said she remains a
“black sheep” in both movements.
Among many abortion rights
advocates, “pro-life feminism” is
not a thing.
Pamela Merritt, co-founder of
Reproaction, an Arlington-based
activist group that works to expand
access to abortion, said being a
“pro-life feminist” is like saying you
are a “vegan who likes chicken.”
“It’s just not possible, if you don’t
believe a woman has the human
right to make decisions about her
body and her health care and her
future,” Merritt said.
Among antiabortion activists,
the concept of feminism remains
polarizing, said Kristan Hawkins,
president of Students for Life of
America, which counts hundreds
of affiliated groups on college campuses around the country.
In the fall, Hawkins launched a
speaking tour of eight college campuses under the banner “Lies Feminists Tell.”
To be a mainstream feminist,
you have to be “100 percent pro
abortion,” Hawkins said in an interview.
“I am primary breadwinner,” she
said. “I run a business for more
than 45 employees. My husband
stays home and cares for our children. I should be celebrated as a
victory, but I’m not welcome, because of my human-rights stance
on abortion.”
She also disagrees with broadening the focus of the movement.
“Pro-life millennials are not monolithic. We disagree on a lot of issues
but we are all united on one principal goal — to make abortion illegal.”
Even on that last point, which
most antiabortion activists deem
essential, Herndon-De La Rosa disagrees.
If abortion were made illegal
now, she expects a black market
would return for the procedure,
and many young women with unplanned pregnancies would be
shunned and sent away as they
were in the past.
“I am not seeing a woman-centered society yet that empowers
women and fights for women,” she
said. “Women need more support
first, and that’s where we can all
work together.”
michael.chandler@washpost.com
Baltimore’s new interim commissioner quickly puts more o∞cers on streets
DAVIS FROM B1
had told that city crime had begun to trend down in the most
dangerous neighborhoods. “We
need the numbers to go down
faster than they are.”
DeSousa, a New York native
who joined the Baltimore police
force in 1988, pledged to stem the
bloodshed through “real, active,
constitutional policing” and immediately sent an extra contingent of uniformed officers to the
streets.
He said the extra officers are
being sent to troubled areas and
streets with specific orders to
focus on “trigger-pullers” and
even merchants who help in the
drug trade.
“We are moving at an accelerated pace,” DeSousa, 53, said of
targeting gunmen in the city.
“The district commanders know
who they are, and we’re coming
after them. . . . The citizens of
Baltimore will see us getting
ahead of crime.”
Friday’s promises to mend a
fractured city and crackdown on
crime with a change in leadership
echoed many of the hopes expressed two and a half years ago,
when Davis took over the department after the removal of Anthony W. Batts, who had also been
replaced amid concerns over rising crime rates.
Davis became commissioner in
2015 in the aftermath of rioting
that followed the death that year
of Freddie Gray from an injury in
police custody.
The department’s tactics drew
federal scrutiny after Gray’s death
and resulted in a consent decree
with the Justice Department requiring reform.
Davis was left to balance trying
to change a culture of policing the
Justice Department called discriminatory while being tough
enough on criminals to deliver
safe streets.
Officers were not as aggressive
as they might ordinarily have
been out of fear “they, too, would
be arrested for doing their jobs,”
said Gene Ryan, a Baltimore police lieutenant who heads the
Fraternal Order of Police labor
union.
Chuck Wexler, executive director of the Police Executive Research Forum, said the average
tenure of a police chief is three or
four years but that Davis was
“really between a rock and a hard
place in trying to implement reform and deal with violent crime.”
“It’s almost like changing two
tires on a car at the same time,”
Wexler said.
Davis could not be reached to
comment.
Some Baltimore residents dismissed Davis’s ouster as a political move, saying the churn of
police leadership won’t address
systemic problems that drive vio-
lence. DeSousa will be the city’s
ninth police commissioner in 20
years.
Warren A. Brown, a Baltimore
defense attorney who has practiced in the city for 40 years, said
the city is stricken by “poverty,
lead-paint poisoning, despair and
the proliferation of handguns.”
“The root is so rotten, it doesn’t
even matter who’s at the top,”
Brown said. “Rather than deal
with this rot, this is a quick fix.”
Pugh has been under intense
pressure to lower the crime rate
after a year of sobering headlines.
Baltimore finished 2017 with a
record-setting 343 homicides,
making it one of the deadliest
cities in the country.
Last year’s killings in Baltimore included several high
school students, victims of random robberies and the bludgeoning death of a 97-year-old man in
his home. Two high-profile slayings that remain unsolved are
those of a Baltimore homicide
detective as he worked a case and
of an off-duty D.C. police sergeant
fatally shot in his car.
While Davis was sometimes
criticized as being too oriented
toward community-policing, he
spent much of his early tenure
trying to prevent a second riot
after the verdicts came in for
officers charged in the Gray case.
He sought to restore community
trust in the police after none of
the officers charged in the Gray
case were convicted.
Brown said it appeared that
Davis made visible efforts to understand Baltimore’s inner workings despite coming to the department as an outsider, having
risen through the ranks in Prince
George’s County and serving
briefly as chief in Anne Arundel
County.
“He put his heart into it, and he
was sincere about trying to make
a change to reduce violence,”
Brown said.
Ryan, the head of the police
union and a 35-year-veteran, said
he looks forward to DeSousa as “a
fresh start.”
DeSousa, who grew up with the
department, is more suited to
understanding the city, Ryan
said. The challenge will be finding
the “happy medium” between
tough and fair policing. Officers,
he said, “want the city to succeed.”
Cameron Miles, who has run a
program called Mentoring Male
Teens in the Hood since 1996, said
young men in the city still have a
deep distrust of the police.
“Some of them are made to sit
on the curbs with their pockets
turned inside out when they’re
suspected of something,” Miles
said. “I hope the new leader will
implement workshops and training that will foster mutual respect..”
peter.hermann@washpost.com
lynh.bui@washpost.com
SATURDAY, JANUARY 20 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B3
M2
THE DISTRICT
LOC AL D I GE S T
Comey to teach course
on ethical leadership
Former FBI director
will join William & Mary,
his alma mater
BY
N ICK A NDERSON
Former FBI director James B.
Comey is joining the faculty of his
alma mater, the College of William & Mary, and plans to teach a
course on ethical leadership at
the school’s Washington center
starting in the fall.
Comey,
whom
President
Trump fired last year, will have a
nontenured position as an executive professor in education, the
school announced Friday. His
course will be offered through the
W&M Washington Center to students of the public university
based in Williamsburg, Va.
Comey will teach the course in
fall 2018, spring 2019 and summer 2019 with executive assistant
professor Drew Stelljes.
“Ethical
leaders lead
by seeing
above the
short term,”
James B.
Comey said of
his new class.
“I am thrilled to have the
chance to engage with William &
Mary students about a vital topic
— ethical leadership,” Comey said
in a statement. “Ethical leaders
lead by seeing above the short
term, above the urgent or the
partisan, and with a higher loyalty to lasting values, most importantly the truth. Building and
maintaining that kind of leadership, in both the private sector
and government, is the challenge
of our time. There is no better
place to teach and learn about it
than the W&M Washington Program.”
Trump dismissed Comey in
May, contending that he had “lost
the confidence of almost everyone in Washington, Republican
and Democrat alike.” The former
FBI chief has remained in the
public spotlight as a key player in
events that special counsel Robert S. Mueller III is reviewing in
the probe of Russian interference
in the 2016 election.
The William & Mary appointment will be Comey’s second academic affiliation since he left the
government. Last summer, Comey agreed to give a convocation
speech and series of lectures at
Howard University.
In September, protesters heckled Comey when he gave a speech
welcoming students to the historically black university in the nation’s capital. “Get out, James
Comey!” the protesters yelled.
“You’re not our homie!” But many
others in the audience and Howard officials pleaded for the demonstrators to stop interrupting
Comey and let him speak.
Comey, 57, has deep ties to
William & Mary. He earned his
bachelor’s degree from the school
in 1982, with a double major in
chemistry and religion, and received an honorary doctor-oflaws degree from the school in
2008. (Comey, who also has
served as deputy U.S. attorney
general, earned his law degree
from the University of Chicago in
1985.)
Soon after William & Mary
began offering classes at its Washington center in 2006, Comey
spoke there about law and politics for two hours.
“He was terrific, and the students just loved him,” recalled
Adam Anthony, the center’s executive director. “We loved him. So
we started calling him on a regular basis. He would always make
time.”
Anthony said Comey hosted
William & Mary students at least
three times at the FBI, showing
them a firing range and other
facilities. Anthony recalled that
in March, after another appearance at the center, Comey said:
“Who knows? Maybe someday I’ll
come back and be a professor.”
“Jim Comey is among William
& Mary’s most distinguished
alumni,” the school’s president,
Taylor Reveley, said in a statement. “Over the years, he has
been deeply committed to his
alma mater. He understands to
the core of his being that our
leaders must have an abiding
commitment to ethical behavior
and sacrificial service if we are to
have good government. Our students will benefit significantly
from his experience and wisdom.”
nick.anderson@washpost.com
LOTTER I ES
VIRGINIA
Results from Jan. 19
DISTRICT
Mid-Day Lucky Numbers:
Mid-Day DC-4:
Mid-Day DC-5:
Lucky Numbers (Thu.):
Lucky Numbers (Fri.):
DC-4 (Thu.):
DC-4 (Fri.):
DC-5 (Thu.):
DC-5 (Fri.):
6-4-9
0-8-1-1
0-6-6-9-8
4-0-4
9-1-7
2-6-5-8
4-5-3-2
0-8-6-2-5
4-3-2-5-0
MARYLAND
Day/Pick 3:
6-0-9
Pick 4:
0-7-0-5
Night/Pick 3 (Thu.):
3-7-1
Pick 3 (Fri.):
4-6-5
Pick 4 (Thu.):
3-5-2-1
Pick 4 (Fri.):
9-8-4-1
Multi-Match (Thu.): 10-22-25-30-32-36
Match 5 (Thu.):
2-7-8-24-29 *34
Match 5 (Fri.):
7-15-20-28-37 *31
5 Card Cash:
5C-AC-AH-8C-7S
Day/Pick-3:
Pick-4:
Cash-5 (Fri.):
Night/Pick-3 (Thu.):
Pick-3 (Fri.):
Pick-4 (Thu.):
Pick-4 (Fri.):
Cash-5 (Thu.):
Cash-5 (Fri.):
0-0-7
9-1-6-1
2-5-6-10-17
9-4-0
9-8-0
7-2-3-7
1-8-3-7
1-2-5-17-26
6-7-9-10-11
MULTI-STATE GAMES
Cash 4 Life:
Mega Millions:
Megaplier:
Lucky for Life:
*Bonus Ball
¶Cash Ball
26-36-42-58-60 ¶1
3-17-23-49-66 **23
3x
5-15-21-28-36 ‡14
**Mega Ball
‡Lucky Ball
For late drawings and other results, check
washingtonpost.com/local/lottery
THE DISTRICT
3 men use pickup to
steal ATM at 7-Eleven
A man backed a pickup truck
through a plate-glass window of
a 7-Eleven store in the 200 block
of Cedar Street NW early Friday
and, with two others, stole the
bank machine, D.C. police said.
Surveillance video showed
three men struggling to get the
ATM onto the truck shortly
before 2 a.m.
— Peter Hermann
VIRGINIA
Washing off wintry grime
On a sunny Thursday, Don Faison, left, of Bowie and Randy Wakefield of Odenton, sprayed
off road salt, sand and mud from their cars at the Water Works Car Wash. The Washington
area saw some snow and colder weather the day before.
VIRGINIA
Bipartisan measures would
alter Dominion rate freeze
Self-Revelation Church
of Absolute Monism
Golden Lotus Temple Yoga Philosophy
Swami Premananda of India, Founder
“THE WISDOM OF SANKARA”
Customers could see
millions in refunds;
utility would face reviews
BY
G REGORY S . S CHNEIDER
richmond — Legislators unveiled bipartisan bills Friday to
overhaul the controversial utility
rate freeze that has shielded
Dominion Energy from review
since 2015 and issue rebates to
customers who overpaid during
that time.
The legislation would once
again subject the state’s largest
utility to rate reviews by the
Virginia State Corporation Commission, but it would set those
reviews every three years instead
of every other year, as had been
the state’s practice, according to
two lawmakers who are co-sponsoring the House and Senate
versions of the bill.
Utility customers would get
rebates of about $130 million in
overpayments that Dominion
collected during the years of the
rate freeze, said Sen. Richard L.
Saslaw (D-Fairfax), who is cosponsoring the Senate version of
the bill along with Sen. Frank W.
Wagner (R-Virginia Beach). Customers of the much smaller Appalachian Power in Southwest
Virginia would see about
$10 million in rebates.
Dominion customers would
also see rates reduced by a total
of $100 million a year in savings
that the utility projects from the
recent federal overhaul of corporate taxes, Saslaw said. And Dominion would no longer receive
the $25 million a year it had been
granted in credits for converting
several coal-fired plants into
woodchip-burning facilities.
If the utility is found to overcharge customers in future years,
though, the SCC would not order
rebates to customers but instead
could order Dominion to invest
Church and Sunday School Services, 11 AM
WWW.SELFREVELATIONCHURCH.ORG
301-229-3871, 4748 Western Ave., Bethesda, MD
BAPTIST
Shiloh
Shiloh Baptist Church
9th & P Streets, N.W.
Wallace Charles Smith
Senior Minister
BOB BROWN/RICHMOND TIMES-DISPATCH VIA AP
Senate Minority Leader
Richard Saslaw has chided the
GOP for complaining about the
governor’s veto of a coal tax
credit bill.
BAPTIST
UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST
MT. PLEASANT BAPTIST
ALL SOULS CHURCH, UNITARIAN
215 R.I. Ave., N.W., Wash., D.C. 202-332-5748
Office Hours: M-F 8:30-5 pm
Rev. Terry D. Streeter, Pastor
Sunday, January 21, 2018
January 21, 2018
9:30 AM
Church School for All Ages
7:45 am Doing Right When Right is Tough
II Timothy 4:5
7:45 & 10:55 AM
Rev. Wallace Charles Smith
Preaching
Interpreting Service for the Deaf & Hard of Hearing
#ShilohDC
www.shilohbaptist.org
10:20 am
Baptism
10:45 am
Extended Time in His Presence
Exodus 34:27-32
Visit our website at www.MPBCDC.org
BAPTIST
Nineteenth Street
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A 17-year-old from Fairfax
County, accused of fatally
shooting his girlfriend’s parents
in their Reston home and
wounding himself, was formally
charged Friday, police said.
He has been charged as a
juvenile with two counts of
murder in the deaths of Scott
Fricker, 48, and his wife, Buckley
Kuhn-Fricker, 43. He remains in
a hospital, and police have not
named him because of his age.
Family members and friends
of the Frickers had said that the
couple feared that the 17-yearold was a neo-Nazi and that they
asked their daughter to stop
seeing him.
— Ellie Silverman
the extra earnings in a variety of
areas, Saslaw said. Those include
alternative energy production,
hardening the grid against
cyberattacks and weatherization
programs for low-income customers.
In addition, the bill would
offer an incentive to Dominion to
invest in 4,000 megawatts of new
solar energy production.
A House version of the bill
sponsored by Del. Terry G. Kilgore (R-Scott) is substantially the
same and called the Grid Transformation and Security Act of
2018.
The complex package of legislation was immediately hailed by
Dominion, with whom lawmakers consulted as they drew up the
bill.
“Customer bills would drop
6 percent immediately,” said Dominion spokesman David Botkins, who said the plan had
“$1 billion in customer benefits”
though its long-term rate decreases.
But some consumer advocacy
groups were not pleased, citing
the way the plan would limit
future rebates and postpone future rate reviews, among other
elements.
“This is a major step backwards for consumers, further
reduces the authority and independence of the SCC, and pro-
vides only pennies on the dollar
for the excess profits already
earned in 2015 and 2016,” said
Steve Haner, lobbyist for the
Virginia Poverty Law Center.
Dominion became an issue in
last year’s races for governor and
for House of Delegates seats
because of its long history of
political influence and generous
campaign contributions.
The rate freeze, enacted in
2015 when Dominion said it
needed protection from the unpredictable costs of then-President Obama’s Clean Power Plan,
drew fierce criticism as an example of special treatment for the
regulated utility.
State Sen. Chap Petersen (DFairfax City) introduced bills last
year and earlier this week to
undo the rate freeze, but both
were shot down in committee.
On Wednesday, Del. Sam Rasoul (D-Roanoke) made a speech
on the House floor calling for an
end to the rate freeze, which he
called “a corrupt law.” He was
among more than a dozen delegates who pledged last year not
to accept donations from Dominion.
Saslaw said he expects the bill
to have broad support on both
sides of the aisle.
“I think everybody’s going to
like it,” he said, “except maybe
Sam Rasoul, because I didn’t put
Dominion out of business.”
Rasoul and Petersen held off
on reacting to the bill Friday,
saying they needed to read it
carefully to understand what’s in
it.
They sent a letter to Gov.
Ralph Northam requesting that
the SCC review the legislation
and determine its potential impact on consumers before the
legislature acts.
“We need to revisit the rate
freeze and SCC’s involvement,”
Northam said Friday. He had not
yet reviewed the legislation, he
said, but has been discussing the
issue with legislators.
4606 16th Street, NW
Church School 8:45 a.m.
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Rev. Darryl D. Roberts, Ph.D., preaching
Be sure to visit www.everyblessing.org
METAPHYSICAL
DIVINE SCIENCE CHURCH
OF THE HEALING CHRIST
2025 35th St. NW, Washington, DC 20007
202/333-7630 or Dial for Meditation 202/338-1240
Sunday, Jan. 21 - 11:00 am divinescience.org
CHRIST IN YOU
Rev. D. Gatewood
Metaphysical Book Store, Tues.-Thur., 10 am-3 pm
January 21 9:30 AM & 11:15 AM (ASL interpretation @ 11:15) n
"The World Needs Our Presence … and Our Absence"
Rev. Dr. Robert M. Hardies
16th & Harvard NW; 202.332.5266; all-souls.org
Inmate’s death ruled a
homicide, officials say
The September death of a 53year-old inmate from the Fairfax
County jail has been ruled a
homicide, Fairfax County police
said.
Henrietta Smith of the
District died of blunt-force
trauma to the head from an
injury suffered before her arrest,
a Virginia medical examiner has
ruled.
County police encountered
Smith Aug. 20, when they were
called to a home in the
Alexandria area of the county for
a reported assault, police said.
They learned that she was
wanted for a parole violation
and possessed crack cocaine,
authorities said. She was
arrested and taken to the jail.
A preliminary investigation
revealed that an acquaintance
had hit Smith in the head with
an object before officers arrived,
police said. She was offered
treatment at the scene, but
refused it, police said.
Medical staff members at the
jail evaluated her before her
admission, police said. On Aug.
31, a sheriff’s deputy was told she
needed medical attention, police
said. Aid was quickly provided
and she was taken to a hospital,
but died a week later.
— Justin Jouvenal
Hundreds of fake IDs
found in Clarendon
Buying alcohol with fake IDs
is part of many tales of growing
up, but the false documents are
also part of real life, including in
Arlington County.
The Clarendon neighborhood
includes many drinking
establishments, and “703 fake
ids were identified” there last
year, Arlington police said.
gregory.schneider@washpost.com
RELIGIOUS SERVICES DIRECTORY
ABSOLUTE MONISM
17-year-old is charged
in double slaying
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
ROMAN CATHOLIC
— Martin Weil
ROMAN CATHOLIC
Basilica of the National Shrine
of the Immaculate Conception
Reverend Monsignor Walter R. Rossi, Rector
PRESBYTERIAN
4101 NEBRASKA
AVE NW
Tenleytown Metro
Plenty of Parking
202.537.0800
“Been There,
Done That”
Dr. David Renwick
Sunday Worship:
9 A.M. | 10:50 A.M. | 11 A.M.
Sunday School:
9:30 A.M.
BROADCAST LIVE AT:
www.nationalpres.org
21 January 2018
Third Sunday in Ordinary Time
Masses 5:15 (Vigil)
7:30 , 9 , 10:30 12 (Choir)
1:30 (Spanish) & 4:30 Confessions 10 - 12 12:30 - 1:30 (Spanish) & 2 - 4 ________
Weekday Masses 7 , 7:30 , 8 , 8:30 , 12:10 & 5:15 Weekday Confessions 7:45 - 8:15 , 10 - 12 & 3:30 - 6 400 Michigan Avenue Northeast, Washington, District of Columbia
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B4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. SATURDAY,
IN MEMORIAM
O B IT U A R IES
Organized an early rally against the Vietnam War
BY
H ARRISON S MITH
Paul Booth, a progressive activist who organized one of the first
major rallies against the Vietnam
War — a 15,000-student march on
the White House in 1965 — and
who later oversaw efforts to boost
wages and preserve Social Security benefits as a top strategist for
one of the nation’s largest unions,
died Jan. 17 at a hospital in Washington. He was 74.
The cause was complications
from chronic lymphocytic leukemia, said his wife, activist
Heather Booth. On the day he
died, Mr. Booth was working on an
article for the American Prospect
and had encouraged his wife to
attend a Capitol Hill demonstration, where she was arrested while
protesting on behalf of “dreamers”
protected by the Deferred Action
for Childhood Arrivals program.
The lanky son of a left-leaning
economist and social worker, Mr.
Booth engrossed himself in organizing as a student at Swarthmore
College in Pennsylvania, where in
the early 1960s he founded a chapter of Students for a Democratic
Society — a fractious, sometimes
anarchic organization whose calls
for peace, social justice and political reform came to define the
movement known as the New Left.
“We’re really not just a peace
group,” he told the New York
Times on April 17, 1965, the day he
led the SDS-organized war protest
in Washington. “We are working
on domestic problems — civil
rights, poverty, university reform.
We feel passionately and angrily
about things in America, and we
feel that a war in Asia will destroy
what we’re trying to do here.”
Mr. Booth was described by
Alan Haber, first president of SDS,
as a rare “cheerful spirit” in the
organization, singing and telling
D.C. area
bracing for
uncertainty,
confusion
SHUTDOWN FROM B1
tired of Washington’s dysfunctional blame games,” Maryland
Gov. Larry Hogan (R) said in a
statement, echoing — but in a
bipartisan way — Democrats in
the state legislature who earlier in
the week sent a letter to President
Trump and GOP leaders in Congress declaring: “Enough is
Enough.”
“Let me be very clear to everyone in Washington, both Republicans and Democrats — stop the
finger-pointing and do your jobs,”
Hogan said.
Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam
(D) said even the talk of a shutdown is causing too much instability in the region.
“I just don’t think there’s any
excuse,” Northam told reporters
Friday afternoon.
Short-term fixes, he said, such
as a 30-day continuing resolution
are “just unacceptable.”
In 2013, when the government
shut down for 16 days, several
thousand federal employees in
the Washington area were furloughed. In addition, dozens of
government contractors laid off
employees after the subsequent
cuts in federal spending that
meant scaling down or killing
stories to maintain morale during
the contentious drafting process
that resulted in the organization’s
1962 manifesto, the Port Huron
Statement, under student leader
Tom Hayden.
Rising to the position of national secretary, the group’s de facto
leader, he worked with civil rights
and women’s groups to organize
events such as the antiwar march
on the White House and an earlier
rally at the New York headquarters of Chase Manhattan Bank,
which the coalition labeled a
“partner in apartheid” for giving
loans to the South African government.
Still, Mr. Booth was viewed as
insufficiently radical by many of
the organization’s younger members. When he espoused a policy of
“build, not burn,” recommending
that young Americans perform
volunteer work or humanitarian
service in lieu of military service
or draft-card burning, he was censured by some SDS leaders.
Sociologist Todd Gitlin, a fellow
SDS activist who helped organize
the bank and antiwar rallies, described Mr. Booth’s politics as akin
to what writer and socialist leader
Michael Harrington called “the
left wing of the possible”: “Don’t
go out on a limb, don’t break your
contact with ordinary people and
mainline institutions.”
A protege of community organizer Saul Alinsky, Mr. Booth left
SDS to become a labor organizer
in 1966. He worked on environmental efforts in Chicago before
joining the American Federation
of State, County and Municipal
Employees, the country’s largest
public-services employees union.
He went on to serve as the chief
assistant to union president Gerald W. McEntee and as an executive assistant to his successor, Lee
Saunders. His titles belied the full
range of his work, which included
behind-the-scenes efforts to support Democratic politicians and
maintain or expand social benefits
for working-class families.
In addition to leading campaigns that opposed cuts to Medicare and the privatization of Social
Security, Mr. Booth was credited
with organizing a coalition in Baltimore that successfully pressed
for the country’s first living-wage
law. Passed in 1994, the legislation
raised the base pay for city contract workers in Baltimore above
the federal minimum wage and
has since been mimicked in cities
across the country.
The law also formed the seeds of
the recent campaign for a $15 minimum wage — an issue that made
it onto the Democratic Party’s official platform at the 2016 national
convention. Mr. Booth, selected by
presidential nominee Hillary
Clinton, was a member of the committee that wrote the platform.
Paul Robert Booth was born in
Washington on June 7, 1943. His
father was a Labor Department
economist who later worked for
the International Labor Organization in Geneva; when he suffered a
heart ailment, the family returned
to the United States and became
dependent on his mother’s income as a social worker.
Mr. Booth graduated from
Woodrow Wilson High School in
the District and, in 1964, received
a bachelor’s degree in political science from Swarthmore.
He met Heather Tobis two years
later at a University of Chicago
sit-in protesting the Selective
Service, and after three days on
the floor of the school’s administration building asked her to marry him. She later formed the Midwest Academy, a Chicago-based
training center for social-justice
organizers, where Mr. Booth was a
board member.
In addition to his wife of 50
years, survivors include two sons,
Gene Booth of Chicago and Dan
Booth of Concord, Mass., named
for the socialist leaders Eugene V.
Debs and Daniel De Leon, respectively; a brother; and five grandchildren.
Mr. Booth was research director
for the United Packinghouse
Workers of America before joining
AFSCME in 1974. As the international union representative for Illinois, he secured union contracts
for state workers and city employees in Chicago — “further speeding the demise of the patronage
system,” the Chicago Tribune reported in 1988.
He retired in 2017 but remained
engaged in national politics, even
when he was hospitalized last
week. On a CaringBridge site for
Mr. Booth created shortly before
his death, his wife noted that
alongside notes or calls from wellwishers, “Paul particularly welcomes any news about more Republican retirements.”
What he really wanted, she continued, was for friends and strangers “to organize and build the resistance.”
some projects.
That translated into less disposable income for the region as a
whole, leaving restaurants, shopping malls and other businesses
with lower profits and sending
fewer tax dollars into local government coffers for schools and
other services.
“More than anything, the uncertainty and the confusion that
results from a shutdown is something we just don’t need,” said
Sharon Bulova (D), chairman of
the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors. “We’ve had enough uncertainty and difficulty with the
federal government’s cutting
back on contracting and cutting
back on federal spending, and
this on top of it is not good for our
local government’s well being.”
District officials projected a
cost to the city of about $100,000
per week as D.C. workers step in
to pick up the trash at about 126
National Park Service sites and,
potentially, maintain roads that
are normally taken care of by the
federal government, like Beach
Drive.
“I want to be perfectly clear
that Washington, D.C., is open,”
Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D) said .
“D.C. government will continue to provide services to our
residents, the services that they
expect and deserve, uninterrupted,” she said, adding that her
administration expects to be reimbursed by the federal government for whatever costs it incurs.
Prince George’s County Executive Rushern L. Baker III (D) said
he will take steps similar to what
he did during the last shutdown,
such as placing the Department
of Housing on high alert to identify households that may not be
able to pay their mortgage or rent.
“A shutdown impacts us greater than any other place in the
region,” Baker said. The county is
home to 75,000 federal workers,
27,000 federal jobs and hundreds
of small and medium-size businesses that rely on the federal
government for contract work. In
many families, both parents work
for the government and are on the
higher end of the pay scale.
At the same time, Baker expressed support for Democrats in
Congress who have refused to
agree to a spending bill that does
not include protections for young
immigrants and children at risk
of losing health insurance.
“These are critical issues that
need to be dealt with,” Baker said.
“Congress needs to do its job. This
is no way to run a government.”
Nearly as many federal workers — about 73,500 — live in
neighboring Montgomery County. “To the extent that this becomes a prolonged crisis, that
could have a very damaging effect
on the county,” said Council President Hans Riemer (D-At Large).
“Any adverse decisions they make
have an effect on us.”
In Arlington County, tourists
may be kept from visiting some
local attractions, said county
spokeswoman Jennifer K. Smith,
which in turn would affect sales
tax revenue. The Arlington National Cemetery will remain open
during any shutdown, according
to the cemetery website.
Ivonne Grande, assistant manager at the Pie Five pizzeria in the
L’Enfant Plaza food court, said a
shutdown would reduce business
at the federal government complex to a trickle. In turn, that
could lead to shorter hours for
workers or layoffs, she said.
“About 60 percent of our customers are government workers,
and the other 40 percent are
tourists,” Grande said.
Nearby, a cluster of federal
employees prepared for their
weekend uncertain about whether they would be reporting for
work on Monday.
Some gleefully hoped for a few
days off, trading notes about the
previous government shutdowns
in 2013 and 1995 and making
tentative plans to catch a movie or
visit a (nongovernment) museum
if another shutdown occurs.
Others worried about their
mortgages and how they’ll feed
their kids if they go too long
without pay.
“By the time you get to that
fifth or sixth week, you’ve got to
be real frugal,” said Grady Bryant,
who works for the Department of
Homeland Security and has been
through two shutdowns.
Dana Kegler, a management
program analyst at the Department of Homeland Security, said
she was upset about the possibility of a shutdown because political
theatrics are threatening “people’s livelihoods.”
“It’s a showdown, and what’s at
stake is folks who could be out of
work,” she said. “It’s a cat-andmouse game that isn’t cool.”
On Thursday, May sent Gray a
letter apologizing for a “misunderstanding” of her willingness to testify, adding that her
absence resulted from a scheduling conflict. She said she would
be willing to appear before the
committee later this month.
Council member Mary M.
Cheh (D-Ward 3) said May
should be given the benefit of the
doubt — and a chance to answer
the committee’s questions — before subpoenas are issued. However, Cheh said that if the committee continues to run into
roadblocks, she would support
subpoena power.
“We’re not getting the kind of
cooperation we should get,” Cheh
said. “We expect it, and we will
get it or we will proceed by way of
subpoenas.”
For decades, under both private and public management,
UMC has suffered from financial
problems and a reputation for
poor medical care. Those issues
came to a head last year. In June,
a pregnant woman died after
inappropriate delays to her care
at the hospital’s emergency
room, and in August a resident of
the hospital’s nursing home died
after crying out for help but
being left on the floor by his
nurse for an extended period.
In November, citing concerns
about patient care and allegations of mismanagement against
Veritas officials, the D.C. Council
voted not to extend the company’s contract. Then, in December,
the hospital announced that it
was in a financial emergency and
would need a $17 million subsidy
from the city to continue operating.
Next week, the hospital board
is expected to pick a management company to replace Veritas.
The board is an independent
body, although under District
law six of its 11 voting members
are appointed by the mayor, who
also picks the chairman.
Gray wants to investigate multiple issues, including the circumstances under which Veritas
was awarded a no-bid contract
by the hospital board in 2016 and
communications between Veritas officials and the mayor’s office. He said Friday that the
committee would reassess in
March whether UMC’s leadership was cooperating adequately.
KHALID NAJI-ALLAH/AFSCME
Paul Booth oversaw efforts to
boost wages and preserve
Social Security benefits as a top
strategist for a large union.
District seeks cooperation from UMC
HOSPITAL FROM B1
legally compel the production of
documents and witness testimony. “Subpoena power is very
persuasive to people,” he said.
On Tuesday, UMC Board
Chairwoman
LaRuby
May
DEATH NOTICE
GAULT
DOBBS
MARIE ELLEN GAULT
January 24, 1981 - January 20, 2002
Dr. WILLIAM HENRY DOBBS
Never forgotten, always loved
Daddy and Stepmother
PAUL BOOTH, 74
skipped a Health Committee
hearing at which Gray had requested she testify on the board’s
decision to close the UMC obstetrics ward, a decision that left
women east of the Anacostia
River without a place to give
birth or seek prenatal care.
harrison.smith@washpost.com
antonio.olivo@washpost.com
Arelis R. Hernández, Gregory
Schneider, Rachel Siegel and Patricia
Sullivan contributed to this report.
peter.jamison@washpost.com
JANUARY 20 , 2018
DEATH NOTICE
ALEXANDER
WILLIE MANESSA ALEXANDER (Age 66)
Retired Local Attorney
Willie Manessa Alexander left this life after an
extended illness on Monday, January 15, 2018.
He is survived by his daughters, Jenniffer Dawn
Bennett Alexander Jones of Athens, GA and
Anne Alexis Bennett-Alexander; grandchildren,
Makayla and Edward Jones; brothers, Benjamin
Hartonia "Tony" Alexander (China) of
Statesville, NC and Hans Kimbrel Alexander
(Patrina) of Anderson, SC, as well as a host
of other extended family members and many
friends. Service will be held on Monday,
January 22, 2018 at National City Christian
Church, 5 Thomas Circle, NW, Washington, DC.
Visitation 11 a.m. Service 12 noon. Interment
private. Arrangements by McGUIRE.
www.mcguire-services.com
ANGELL
JAMES KENNEDY ANGELL
(Age 94)
Died on January 9, 2018 at Byron House in
Potomac, Maryland.
Jim came to Washington, DC in 1956 to work
as a meteorologist at the Weather Bureau, now
the National Weather Service. He spent his
entire career, including 44 years as a federal
employee and 10 years as a contractor, at
NOAA’s Air Resources Lab.
Angell pioneered advances in the understanding of climate variability, stratospheric processes and the ozone layer.
Born in Detroit, Michigan on November 2,
1923, Jim was the son of Esther (Kennedy)
and Robert Angell. Jim is survived by his
sister, Sally Parsons of Birmingham, Michigan;
children, John, Jane Cohen, Robert, James
and Diane; 10 grandchildren and four greatgrandchildren.
Passed away January 17, 2018. Bill Dobbs was
born in Camilla, Georgia, on May 5, 1924,
where he grew up. In 1943, he enlisted in the
Army, serving as a longshoreman in Hawaii,
Okinawa, and Korea. He earned a Bronze star
supporting the front-line troops in the Ryukyu
Islands Campaign, and survived a kamikaze
attack and a typhoon. After an honorable
discharge in 1946 as a First Lieutenant, Bill
enrolled at Emory University, where he
obtained his B.A. and M.D. degrees.
Motivated by the effects of war on himself and
his fellow soldiers, Bill decided to specialize
in psychiatry. He completed an internship at
Walter Reed Army Hospital and a residency
at St. Elizabeths Hospital in ,Washington, DC
Bill spent the majority of his career at St.
Elizabeths, rising from staff psychiatrist to
Superintendent. During his tenure, St. Elizabeths patients included infamous residents
Ezra Pound and John Hinckley, Jr. Bill also
directed a methadone-based treatment program for heroin addiction, and he served for 24
years as a Captain in the Medical Corps of the
Army Reserve. Bill retired from St. Elizabeths
in 1984 and continued practicing psychiatry at
area mental health clinics for several years.
During his retirement, Bill captured his war
experience in his memoir War Journey: Witness
to the Last Campaign of World War II, completed at age 87. Bill greatly enjoyed spending
time with his family, reading, watching movies,
camping, crabbing, bird watching, and rooting
for his beloved Redskins.
All his life, Bill felt passionately about racial
equality and helping the less fortunate. His
kind and compassionate spirit was an inspiration to many. He will be greatly missed.
Bill was preceded in death by his sisters, Billie
Wimpy, Marion Edge and Vallie Dobbs; his first
wife, Dorothy Dobbs; and his second wife,
Audrea Dobbs. He is survived by his children,
DeDe Paul, Judith Hayes and Hillary Block;
grandchildren, Pamela Hayes, Alice Paul, Carla
Paul, Shane Dobbs, Lucas Dobbs and Calvin
Ruffin; and great-grandchild, Paris Hayes. He
was anticipating the birth of another greatgrandchild.
The family will receive visitors on Tuesday,
January 23, 2018 from 10 a.m. until time of
service, 11 a.m., at Marshall & March Funeral
Home in Suitland, Maryland. A graveside service with military honors will follow at Washington National Cemetery, also in Suitland.
He graduated from the Ranch School in Los
Alamos, New Mexico and the University of
Michigan and received his Ph.D. from UCLA in
meteorology. In California he met and married
Margaret McCaffrey, who predeceased him.
He was one of Arena Stage’s earliest season
ticket holders and attended hundreds of classical music concerts at the Kennedy Center. He
played tennis into his late seventies. He spent
every August in Charlevoix, Michigan at his
family’s cottage where he sailed and took long
hikes. His family will greatly miss his kindness,
intelligence, and calm presence.
Services will be held in Michigan at a later date.
When the
need arises,
let families
find you in the
Funeral Services
Directory.
To be seen in the
Funeral Services
Directory, please call
paid Death Notices
at 202-334-4122.
ERICKSON
GERARD JOHN ERICKSON
"Jerry"
On Thursday, December 21, 2017. The beloved
husband of the late JoAnn and Janet Grooms
Erickson; father of Sherri (Paul) Erickson-Savercool and John (Michelle) Erickson; grandfather
of Robert (Kyle) and Kara Savercool, Jake and
Julia Erickson, also survived by several cousins.
Friends are invited to celebrate Jerry's life on
Saturday, January 27 from 9 a.m. until his
funeral service begins at 10 a.m. at the George
P. Kalas Funeral Home, 2973 Solomons Island
Road, Edgewater, MD. A graveside service
will follow at 2 p.m. at Cedar Hill Cemetery,
4111 Pennsylvania Ave., Suitland, MD. Online
guestbook available at:
KalasFuneralHomes.com
FORQUER
MARY JULIANA FLYNN FORQUER
Mary Juliana (Flynn) Forquer of Bethesda, MD.,
died on Tuesday, January 16, 2018 from injuries
sustained in a fall at her home. Mary, whose
parents emigrated from Ireland, was born and
raised in Washington, DC. She was 98 years
and eight months young. A proud alumna of
Sacred Heart Academy on Park Road, N.W.,
Mary graduated with the Class of 1937. She
was predeceased by her husband, Leo Emmett
Forquer, and by her siblings Francis, Carroll,
Catherine, John, and Thomas Flynn. She was
the dear mother of Sharon Marie Salb, Ann
Catherine Forquer, and Michael Joseph Forquer
and the cherished "Grumpy" grandma of Brian
Michael Salb. Mary's funeral will be held on
Monday, January 22, 2018 at 11 a.m. at St.
Jane Frances de Chantal Catholic Church, 9601
Old Georgetown Rd., Bethesda, MD. Mary has
been a parishioner at De Chantal since October
1951. Interment private. In lieu of flowers, we
ask that you remember Mary in your prayers.
Ave Maria! Rest in peace.
Please view and sign the family's online guest
book at:
www.DeVolFuneralHome.com
FRANKFURT
LESLIE P. FRANKFURT
DEATH NOTICE
On January 18, 2018, Dr. Leslie P. Frankfurt
passed away peacefully in his sleep.
BOOTH
He leaves behind his wife, Naz; twin brother, George; son, Mike; daughter-in-law,
Donna; three grandsons, Kelly, Justin and
John; one granddaughter-in-law, Joy and
one great-granddaughter, Arianna.
PAUL BOOTH
Beloved and dynamic labor leader and organizer, died January 17, 2018. He was a treasured
husband of Heather Booth, a leading progressive organizer, whom he married in 1967; also
survived by sons, Dan and Gene; daughtersin-law, Katherine and Krista; grandchildren,,
Max, Sophie, Henry, Oscar and Hazel; brother
Michael Booth and sister-in-law, Christine
Booth; and brothers-in-law, John and David
Tobis.
Few people bent the arc more than Paul Booth.
He would want us to continue organizing to
make this a better world.
Those wishing to send condolences are asked,
in lieu of flowers, to contribute to:
Jobs With Justice, an organization Paul cared
deeply about and provided leadership to for
three decades.www.jwj.org/Paul
Midwest Academy Paul was on the board of
this training center for power building strategy
for justice and democracy.
https://secure.actblue.com/donate/
midwestacademy18
Restaurant Opportunities Centers United
for one fair wage for tipped workers; Paul was
on this board http://rocunited.org/donate/
On Saturday, January 20 and Sunday, January
21 from 1 to 5 p.m., there will be Shiva and
visitation at:
4620 North Park Avenue
Chevy Chase, MD
First Floor Activity Room
(near Friendship Heights Metro Station)
Dr. Frankfurt received his Ph.D. from American University, and then went on to practice psychology for more than 40 years
where his work touched the lives of countless people. He was passionate about
the art of giving back early in his life
which led him to volunteer with the Peace
Corps, serving in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
Dr. Frankfurt was also instrumental in
establishing the psychology department
at Montgomery College early in his career,
and soon after became the Chairman
of the department; something he was
particularly proud of. Leveraging his experience in personalized therapy, he was
an early leader in the field of industrial
psychology, ultimately impacting the personal and professional lives of thousands
of people at growing companies and organizations such as the Allegis group, the US
Forest Service, and the TRSA.
He was a dedicated and devoted husband,
brother, father, grandfather and greatgrandfather, who took great pride in
spending quality time with his family. He
was selfless in his dedication to spending
time with immediate and extended family,
always keeping the “main thing the main
thing”. He will be deeply missed, but never
forgotten.
Please contact the family for information
regarding the services being held this
Sunday and for paying respect to Leslie's
wishes in lieu of flowers.
LYON
as a foreign correspondent. Their life took
an unexpected turn however, when the US
entered the Second World War. Fendall
enlisted with the Army Counter Intelligence
Corps (CIC) serving in Europe during the war
while Mrs. Lyon worked briefly for the War
Department. Mrs. Lyon raised their first son
Richard in St. Paul while closely following
Fendall’s war-time odyssey in scores of letters dispatched from England, France, Belgium and Germany.
JANE MILLER LYON
Age 98
Jane M. Lyon, loving mother of three sons,
and devoted wife of Fendall Gregory Lyon,
passed away December 28, 2017 in Fairfax,
Virginia. She was 98. Mrs. Lyon was a tireless
community volunteer and an inspired creative writer.
Born in 1919 in Menomonie, Wisconsin, Mrs.
Lyon enjoyed athletics with her brother,
George Miller, and tumbling while growing
up in Kirksville, Missouri where her father
studied Osteopathic medicine. A bright student, Mrs. Lyon graduated High School at 17
and earned a Bachelor’s degree in English
from the University of Minnesota in 1939.
There she met her future husband, Fendall
Gregory Lyon, a journalism graduate while
sharing lunch on the banks of the Mississippi
River. Mrs. Lyon accepted her first job as
customer correspondence specialist for
Montgomery Ward upholding their innovative
policy of "satisfaction guaranteed or your
money back”.
Mrs. Lyon married Fendall in Mexico City
in the summer of 1941 as he began work
In the post-war years, Mrs. Lyon settled their
family in Washington, DC as Fendall joined
the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). Over
the next decade she raised three sons over
the course of several overseas assignments
in Germany and Austria, eventually settling in
McLean, Virginia in the early 1950’s. Here,
Mrs. Lyon eagerly joined in the growing
McLean community helping at schools, local
swim clubs, and the newly established St.
Dustan’s Episcopal Church. Mrs. Lyon
became a familiar member of church study
groups, youth cotillion sponsor, and a regular
visitor to the Rectory Office during her daily
walks. A valued member of the Alter Guild,
Mrs. Lyon’s needle point creations still adorn
the church chapel and sanctuary spaces.
A tireless advocate for community mental
health services, Mrs. Lyon found time to
volunteer for decades as intake coordinator
at Northwest Center for Community Mental
Health in Reston, achieving recognition as
‘Outstanding Volunteer’ in 1994 for over 15
years of service.
Mrs. Lyon is preceded in death by her husband, Fendall Gregory Lyon who died in 1983
and her son, Richard Gregory Lyon, who
passed in 2015. She is survived by son,
Thomas Lyon and wife, Kathy of Navarre,
Florida, and son, Peter Lyon and wife, Gail of
Fairfax, Virginia, along with eight grandchildren and one great-grandson.
Memorial services will be held Saturday,
February 17, 2018 at 11 a.m. at St. Dunstan’s
Episcopal Church, 1820 Kirby Road in
McLean.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 20 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
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DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
GARDINER
KACZMAREK
SHAPIRO
SUTTON
CRUTCHFIELD
REAMY
MIKE S. SUTTON
J. HAROLD GARDINER (Age 76)
On January 14, 2018, J. Harold Gardiner of
Faulkner, MD died at the University of Maryland
Charles Regional Medical Center in LaPlata,
MD. He was predeceased by his parents, W.
Ralph Gardiner and Mary Imogene Gardiner;
brother, Wayne; and sisters, Dorothy, Imogene
and Betty Ann. Harold is survived by his former
wives, Audrey Gardiner, mother of his children,
and Rosemary Gardiner; sons, E. Neal Gardiner
and R. Andrew Gardiner; daughter, Melissa
Grant; brothers, Ralph, Gerald and Randy; sisters, Mary Jean, Linda, Kay and Janice; and nine
grandchildren.
Visitation will be held at Arehart-Echols Funeral
Home, PA, 211 St. Mary’s Ave., LaPlata, MD on
Sunday, January 21, 2018 from 2 to 4 p.m.
and from 6 to 8 p.m., with Prayers and Rosary
at 7 p.m. A Mass of Christian Burial will be
held at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, 4590
St. Joseph’s Way, Pomfret, MD on Monday,
January 22, 2018 at 11 a.m. Interment to follow
in the Church Cemetery. A celebration of his
life will follow in the Church Fellowship Hall.
In lieu of flowers, donations can be made in
Harold’s memory to Alzheimer’s Foundation
of America at www.alzfdn.org or American
Diabetes Association at www.donations.diabetes.org. Online condolences to the family
can be left at arehartechols.com
CARL CASIMIR KACZMAREK "Kaz"
CDR USN (Ret)
DR. MORTON W. SHAPIRO
Age 88, of Fairfax, VA on Sunday, January
14, 2018. Beloved Husband of the late
Irene S. Kaczmarek and survived by Theresa Kaczmarek. Devoted Father of Carl (Pat)
Kaczmarek, Chris Kaczmarek, Kathy Kaczmarek, Mark (Mary Jo) Kaczmarek, Karen
(Bill) Alvarez, and Tim (Lisa) Kaczmarek. Son
of Charles and Mary Kaczmarek. Brother of
Robert Kaczmarek and the late Irene Szymczak. Mr. Kaczmarek is also survived by 10
grandchildren. He will be remembered for a
successful Navy career culminating in command of the USS Eversole (DD789), his years
as a Program Manager with Sperry/Unisys,
the countless hours supporting his Church,
and his devotion to family. Friends may call
at Fairfax Memorial Home, 9902 Braddock
Road, Fairfax, VA, on Monday, January 22,
2018 from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. A Mass
of Christian Burial will be held at Saint Mary
of Sorrows Catholic Church, 5222 Sideburn
Road, Fairfax, VA on Tuesday, January 23,
2018 at 11 a.m. Interment at the Saint
Mary of Sorrows Historic Church Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, contributions may be
made to Marian Homes, Inc., P.O. Box 7003,
Fairfax Station, VA 22039.
KIRKPATRICK
HALE
PATRICIA S. KIRKPATRICK (Age 91)
Passed away on Friday, January 12, 2018. A
memorial service will be held Monday, January
22, 2 p.m. in the chapel of Miller Funeral
Home & Crematory, Edenton, NC. Inurnment,
at a later date, will be next to her husband
in Arlington National Cemetery. Online condolences may be made to the family by visiting:
www.millerfhc.com.
Died peacefully in his sleep on Thursday, January 18, 2018. Born October 15, 1932 in
Providence, RI to Leona and Abram Shapiro, he
shared his life with Bernice (Bunny) Shapiro, his
loving wife of 62½ years. He is also survived
by his three children, Sari (Gerry), Andrea
(Robert) and Mark (Andrea); his six adoring
grandchildren, Laura, Emily, Celia, Sam, David,
and Jonathan, and two great-grandsons, Colton
and Maverick. He was predeceased by his
brother, Norris (Florence) and sister, Janice
(Irwin).
After putting himself through medical school
at the University of Maryland, Dr. Shapiro
completed his internship at Sinai Hospital in
Baltimore, MD. He served in the U.S. Airforce as
a Major at Mitchell Airforce Base in Hempstead,
NY, completing his residency at the Washington
Hospital Center. Dr. Shapiro practiced internal
medicine in Bethesda, MD for 43 years. Known
for his warmth and generous bedside manner,
Dr. Shapiro provided excellent care to all. He
had a jovial wit and an irreverent sense of
humor. He was an avid painter and enjoyed
tennis with good friends.
Dr. Shapiro was a loving, compassionate man
with great wisdom. He will be dearly remembered by family and friends. Funeral services
will be held on Sunday, January 21, 2018, 9 a.m.
at Hines-Rinaldi Funeral Home, 11800 New
Hampshire Ave., Silver Spring, MD followed
by a private burial. Shiva will be observed
Sunday and Monday, January 21 and 22, 2018
in the Shapiro residence at Riderwood Village.
His family requests that memorial donations
be made to JSSA Hospice and Montgomery
Hospice.
On Wednesday, January 17,
2018, MIKE S. SUTTON of
Rockville, MD. Born in Aleppo, Syria 94 years ago. Mike's
life story has been memorialized in his daughter's book,
"Farewell, Aleppo." He is survived by his loving wife, Cynthia; his children, S. Robert Sutton (Kathleen), Claudette
E. Sutton (Charles Brunn) and Suzanne A.
Sutton; his grandchildren, Michael, John,
Ariel and Genevieve and his brothers, Elie,
Ralph, Joseph and Morris. He was predeceased by his parents, Selim and Adele
Sutton and his siblings, Saleh, Margo and
Edgar.
Graveside services will be held on Sunday,
January 21, at 1:30 p.m. at King David
Memorial Gardens, Falls Church, VA. Shiva
will be observed at Mike's late residence
on Sunday and Monday evenings, with
Minyans at 7:30 p.m. Contributions may
be made to Jewish Federations of North
America, Hadassah, or Mazon. Arrangements by Hines-Rinaldi Funeral Home, LLC
under Jewish Funeral Practices Committee
of Greater Washington contract.
TRAIL
LINZIE CARROLL TRAIL
(Age 74)
PERLIN
ARTHUR ALBERT HALE, SR. (Age 92)
Passed away January 4, 2018 Art was born
August 15, 1925 in New York City, son of
George W. Hale and Alice (Hale) Ramm. He
lived most of his life in Virginia, and attended
Washington and Lee High School before joining
the Navy in WWII. He was stationed in Okinawa
and Pearl Harbor. He was a great salesman and
a regional manager for Encyclopedia Britannica
for many years. He was also in real estate, as
an agent and then with his own brokerage firm.
He was an upbeat and happy person, kind
and inclusive. He will be missed by many
friends, colleagues, and especially family. He
is survived by his wife of 47 years, Maureen
(Terry) Hale, daughters, Lynn Wyrick (Virgil),
Carol Hale (Ernie Banker), son, Arthur A. Hale, Jr
(Joanne), granddaughter, Lesley Slevin (Randall
Holtz), who was part of his immediate family,
three other grandchildren, five great-grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren. Art
was preceded in death by his parents, brother
Roger Ramm, sister Joan Hartshorn and granddaughter, Elizabeth Slevin Chance. Interment
Arlington National Cemetery at a later date.
On Thursday, January 18, 2018,
CAROLE SUE PERLIN of Rockville,
MD. Beloved wife of Elliott Perlin.
Loving mother of Amy (David) Posner, George (Judy), Dr. Daniel and
Samuel (Sharon) Perlin; dear sister
of Davideen (Stuart) Warner and Arthur (Eva)
Price. Cherished grandmother of Mara (Adam)
Weinstein, Shai (Miriam) Posner, Eliana Posner,
Sue Ellen (Dwayne) Sitton, Sarah, Joshua,
Joelle, Monte, Liat, Amit and Maital Perlin
and great-grandmother of Ari, Gabe, Gil, Jenna,
Jadon, Shoshi, Dakota and Stanley. Funeral
services will be held on Sunday, January 21,
2018, 1 p.m. at Congregation Har TzeonAgudath Achim , 1840 University Blvd. West,
Silver Spring, MD. Interment following at Garden of Remembrance Memorial Park, Clarksburg, MD. Shiva will be observed at the home
of Dr. Daniel Perlin. Memorial contributions
may be made to Congregation Har TzeonAgudath Achim, Hebrew Home of Greater
Washington, Alzheimer's Association or to the
charity of your choice. Arrangements entrusted to TORCHINSKY HEBREW FUNERAL HOME,
202-541-1001.
HIMELFARB
ANDREW HIMELFARB "Drew"
PAID DEATH NOTICES
BARBARA KAY
On Monday, January 15, 2018.
Loving husband of Emily;
devoted father of Michael and
Barbara; beloved brother of
Lee (Claudia) and the late
Larry; cherished son of the
late Stanley and Barbara.
Drew was a native Washingtonian who
spent the majority of his life in Maryland
but recently retired to Tennessee. Funeral
services will be held on Tuesday, January
23, 10 a.m. at Hines-Rinaldi Funeral Home,
11800 New Hampshire Ave., Silver Spring,
MD with interment to follow at King David
Memorial Gardens, Falls Church, VA. Family
will be observing shiva at the residence of
Ellen and Terry Sloan following the burial
until evening. Contributions may be made
to the American Brain Tumor Association,
www.ABTA.org. Arrangements by HinesRinaldi Funeral Home, LLC under Jewish
Funeral Practices Committee of Greater
Washington Contract.
As a high school student, Mr. Byrum won
several debate and oration competitions at
the state level and was elected treasurer
of the National (Junior) Classical Languages
League. He received the Emblem Club
National Scholarship in 1958 and did so
well in his studies that he was selected to
deliver his high school class commencement
address.
Mr. Byrum graduated Magna Cum Laude
from Harvard University in 1962 and received
a master's degree from the Graduate School
of Library Service, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey in 1966. He began his
library career as a cataloger at Princeton
University Library, where he was promoted
to head cataloger in 1968. In 1976, he joined
the Library of Congress where he served as
a chief of various divisions, while overseeing
several international cooperative cataloging
efforts. As a forceful manager during his
tenure at LC, he made an indelible mark on
the Library’s bibliographic control operations
that had national and international impact.
He retired in 2006.
Active in both national and international
professional associations, Mr. Byrum was
a substantial contributor to the theory of
bibliographic control, for which he gained
national and international renown. While
at Princeton and later at the Library of
Congress, he was the representative of the
American Library Association (ALA) to the
Joint Steering Committee for Revision
of AACR (Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules)
and chair of the ALA Resources and Technical
Services Division Catalog Code Revision
Committee. He was a founding member of
the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) Study Group
on the Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records, which resulted in the publication, Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records. As chair of IFLA's International Standard for Bibliographic Description (ISBD) Review Group, Mr. Byrum led the
continuing revision and maintenance of the
family of ISBDs for the full range of materials
in library collections. Additionally, Mr. Byrum
published and spoke widely on topics related
to bibliographic control.
Mr. Byrum received many honors for his
contributions to librarianship. In 1975, he
was awarded the ALA Esther J. Piercy Award,
given to an outstanding librarian with not
more than ten years of professional experience. He received the ALA Margaret Mann
Citation for outstanding professional
achievement in cataloging in 1998. For his
work both nationally and internationally, he
received ALA's prestigious Melvil Dewey
Medal and Citation in 2006 for creative
professional achievement in library management, training, cataloging and classification,
and the tools and techniques of librarianship.
He is a member of Beta Phi Mu.
While in "retirement," Mr. Byrum continued
his love of learning by auditing courses at
George Mason University and contributed
to his local community through volunteer
service to nursing homes and animal shelters.
STANLEY LYMAN SOMMERFIELD
Passed away January 17, 2018 at age 98. He
was born May 16, 1919 to Maurice Henry
Sommerfield and Fannie Stone Sommerfield in
Syracuse, NY and attended Syracuse University
(BA cum laude 1940, JD cum laude 1942).
He was a 1st Lt. in the US Army during
WWII, serving as a Transport Commander/
Cargo Security Officer on liberty ships and
in counter intelligence. He had a long and
successful career as an attorney with the US
Treasury from 1942 until 1980, serving as the
Director of the Office of Foreign Assets Control
from 1963 until his retirement in 1980. He
had a central role in creating the regulations
used by the US government to economically
sanction foreign governments and freeze foreign assets. For his work establishing these
vital tools of US foreign policy and his efforts
over almost four decades implementing sanctions, including freezing billions of dollars of
Iranian assets in response to the seizure of
the US embassy in 1979, he was awarded the
Meritorious Service Medal and the Exceptional
Service Medal by the Treasury. Stanley met and
married his wife, Fay Sommerfield, formerly
Fay Cario, in Hong Kong in 1954. Stanley
and Fay moved from Annandale, Virginia to
Nokomis, Florida in 1989. Stan's varied interests included boating, fishing, football, photo,
video and computer technology, tennis, travel,
and dog shows. All who knew him will forever
remember his keen intellect, wit and good
humor.
Stan is survived by his wife, Fay; son, Mark;
daughter, Sue; daughter-in-law, Evita and
granddaughter, Camille.
There will be a graveside service at King David
Memorial Gardens, 7482 Lee Hwy, Falls Church,
VA 22042 Sunday, January 21 at 3 p.m. with a
reception to follow.
On Wednesday, January 17, 2018
of Washington, DC. Beloved wife
of Ofer Khal; devoted mother of
Arielle Popovsky; loving sister of
Bonnie Prober (Rafi) and Deborah
Brooks (Matthew); cherished
daughter of Ronald and Leslie Schreiber;
and loving aunt of Zach and Elie Prober and
Samantha and Max Brooks. Lisa was born on
May 8, 1972 in Hollywood, FL to Dr. Ronald
and Leslie Schreiber.
Lisa died suddenly from acute pneumonia,
surrounded by her family.
She had been a resident of the DC area
since 1983, and cherished living very close to
her entire immediate family, whom she saw
often.
C0979 2x3
To place a notice call 202-334-4122 or 800-627-1150, ext. 44122
Lisa excelled at ballet as a child and teenager,
performing with the Washington School of
Ballet for several years. This love of ballet
Email and faxes MUST include
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of the responsible billing party.
Fax & email deadline - 3 p.m. daily
Phone-In deadline
4 p.m. M-F
3 p.m. Sa-Su
CURRENT 2018 RATES:
( PER DAY)
MONDAY-SATURDAY
Black & White
1" - $135 (text only)
2" - $306 (text only)
3" - $441
4" - $482
5" - $611
-----SUNDAY
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1"- $161 (text only)
2" - $339 (text only)
3" - $489
4" - $515
5" - $665
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$135 each additional inch wkday
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3" - $566
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5" - $834
6"+ for ALL color notices
$224 each additional inch wkday
$250 each additional inch Sunday
Notices with photos begin at 3"
(All photos add 2" to your notice.)
ALL NOTICES MUST BE PREPAID
PETER VAN NORDEN LOCKWOOD
Of Washington, DC, passed away on October
24, 2017, at his home, after a long illness.
He is survived by his wife of 43 years, Lee;
his son, John, and his daughter, Lizzie; his
granddaughter, London, and a host of first
cousins. Born in New York City, Peter was
raised in St. Louis, MO. He attended Harvard
College and Harvard Law School, graduating
in 1966. Following a clerkship on the U.S.
Court of Appeals for the First Circuit, Peter
became one of two clerks for U.S. Supreme
Court Thurgood Marshall, in that Justice's first
term. Peter then joined the Washington law
firm of Caplin & Drysdale, where he enjoyed a
multifaceted practice until retirement in 2016.
Peter will be remembered for his trenchant wit,
his tremendous intellect, and his bottomless
generosity. He loved the out-of-doors, especially hiking and diving. A special source of
pride was the role he played in co-founding
an environmental group, Clean Water Action
in the 1970's, and which is still going strong.
Peter will be missed by all who knew him. A
gathering to share favorite memories of Peter
will be held on January 22, at 11 a.m., at
St. Mark's Episcopal Church, 301 A St. SE,
Washington DC, 20003. Gifts in his name can
be made to Clean Water, at www.cleanwater.org/peter. Valet parking available.
MEMORIAL PLAQUES:
All notices over 2" include
complimentary memorial plaque
Additional plaques start at $26 each
and may be ordered.
All Paid Death Notices
appear on our website through
www.legacy.com
LEGACY.COM
Included in all death notices
Optional for In Memoriams
PLEASE NOTE:
Notices must be placed via phone, fax or
email. Photos must be emailed. You can
no longer place notices, drop off photos
and make payment in person.
Payment must be made via phone with
debit/credit card.
DEATH NOTICE
RAUSCH
SIDRA GAY RAUSCH
January 26, 1937 ~ August 14, 2017
SCHREIBER
LISA IRENE SCHREIBER
To place a notice, call:
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800-627-1150 ext 4-4122
FAX:
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EMAIL:
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“Long Beach ‘44” (Capital Fringe Festival),
recalls memories of family summers at the
beach, “How I Became a Bennington Girl”
explores the mores of such a school at the
time of her attendance, and “On the Road to
Havana” depicts a brush with Castro.
DEATH NOTICE
Services were previously held.
Military emblems are available with death notices and in-memoriams
Of Vienna, VA died on January 14, 2018, at
the Adler Care Center in Aldie, VA with her
husband at her side and surrounded by her
family.
Karlin is survived by her loving husband, Todd
Roberts, and sons, John and Thomas McIntyre,
of Vienna, VA; her parents, Dr. Melvin and
Peggy Anderson, of Williamsburg, VA; her sister, Sharon (Michael) Palmer, of Oak Hill, VA;
and her sister, Shannon (Mitch) AndersonWatney, of Lexington Park, MD. She is preceded
in death by her brother, John Anderson, of
Yorktown, VA.
Karlin was born on March 26, 1969 in Newport
News, VA to parents Dr. Melvin Anderson and
Peggy (Keiser) Anderson. She graduated from
Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1991
with a degree in Civil Engineering. She worked
as a Naval ships Structural Engineer in both the
public and private sectors ending her career at
the Naval Surface Warfare Center Cardarock,
U.S. Deptartment of the Navy.
Karlin had a profound love for family, friends,
and sports, especially field hockey playing
at both York High School and MIT. She was
an exceptional skier and shared this joy and
passion with her boys who learned quickly
to follow her to amazing powder fields and
bowls. She loved her boys and husband above
all others. Her gifts were many but her
indomitable spirit, loving optimism, adventurous heart and soul, infectious smile, and
warmth will be remembered always.
A visitation is scheduled for Thursday, January
25, 2018, at Money & King Funeral Home in
Vienna, VA, from 5 to 8 p.m. A celebration of
life memorial service is scheduled for Friday,
January 26, 2018, at Emmanuel Lutheran
Church in Vienna, VA at 2 p.m. with a reception to follow, Pastor Tarja Stevenson will
officiate. All are welcome to attend and celebrate Karlin’s life. An interment service will be
held on Saturday, January 27, 2018, at St. Mark
Lutheran Church in Yorktown, VA at 2 p.m.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to
Capital Caring, MD Anderson Cancer Center,
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, or
Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center.
DEATH NOTICE
Mr. Byrum is survived by his 43-year partner,
Billy Rivera, to whom he was married on
October 20, 2017, and will be grieved by the
many whose lives he touched.
Because your loved one served proudly...
ANDERSON
KARLIN ROBERTS ANDERSON
(Age 48)
SOMMERFIELD
BYRUM
DEATH NOTICE
On Friday, January 19, 2018
of Potomac, MD. Beloved
wife of the late Jerome Kay;
devoted mother of Alison
Pluznik and Jeff (Tracy) Kay;
cherished grandmother of
Josh and Erin Kay and Jacob
and Rachel Pluznik; partner to Barry Feldman. Graveside services will be held Sunday, January 21, 12 p.m. at King David
Memorial Gardens, 7482 Lee Hwy., Falls
Church, VA 22042. Family will be receiving
friends immediately following services at
the late residence, with shiva and minyan
services Sunday through Tuesday at 7 p.m.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions
may be made to Juvenile Diabetes
Research Foundation.
http://www.jdrf.org/donate/
www.sagelbloomfield.com
LOCKWOOD
DEATH NOTICE
JOHN DONALD BYRUM
John Donald Byrum died on Friday, January
12, 2018. Mr. Byrum was born in 1940 to
"Jack" and Helen Byrum, long-time residents
of Wenatchee, Washington, where he was
raised. A quiet and thoughtful man, he
was known for his ability to lead people
to action and for loyalty, both given and
received. Those who reported to him readily
acknowledged and expressed appreciation
for his mentoring and for challenging them to
excel in ways they had not imagined.
On Friday, January 5, 2018. Beloved wife
of Karl Shepherd, Sr.; devoted mother of
Karl Shepherd, II and Reginald Shepherd;
daughter of George Butler. She is also survived by two sisters; and a host of other
relatives and friends Mrs. Shepherd will
lie in state at Gethsemane Baptist Church,
5114 4th St. NW, from 10 a.m. until service
at 11 a.m. Interment Lincoln Memorial
Cemetery . Online condolences may be
made to:
www.stewartfuneralhome.com
POOLE
DALE PATRICK REAMY, SR.
Sadly, we lost a beautiful soul at the age of
61 on Tuesday, January 16, 2018. He went
peacefully surrounded by family and close
friends after a long battle with Glioblastoma.
He leaves behind his loving wife (Dana), five
children, Dale Jr. (Krystal), Brandi (Juan), JJ
(Julie), Brittni (Brent), Patrick (Caity). 12 grandchildren and a great-grandchild. Five siblings,
several In-laws. Dale’s parents, Jack and Joyce
Reamy, welcomed him home with open arms.
He had countless relatives and friends. Dale
unselfishly decided to donate his body to
science, in hopes he could help find a cure
for this rare form of cancer. Please join us
in honoring Dale and celebrating his life on
Thursday, January 25, 2018, at the Moose
Lodge located at 7701 Beulah St. Alexandria,
Va. 22315. The program will start at 2 p.m.
and we will be celebrating until 6 p.m. In lieu of
flowers food dishes are welcome.
MONDAY- FRIDAY 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
SHEPHERD
WILLIAM A. POOLE
Of Washington, DC, passed away on January 9,
2018 of pneumonia. Husband of Janet Tersoff;
son of Alice Poole and the late Allan K. Poole;
brother of Catherine (David) Merrihew and the
late David Poole.
Bill worked at the World Bank 1988-2016, much
of it facilitating Risk and Opportunity (COSO)
internal control workshops. Over the years, Bill
enjoyed singing at the Maryland Renaissance
Festival and in the choirs at St. Stephen Martyr
Church (Washington, DC) and The Cathedral of
St. Thomas More (Arlington, VA). He was an
avid pianist and chef throughout his life.
A memorial service will be held at DeVol
Funeral Home, 2222 Wisconsin Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20007 (Complimentary Valet Parking
Available) on Saturday, January 27 at 11 a.m. In
lieu of flowers, memorial contributions in Bill’s
name may be sent to Chapel Haven (teaching independent living to young adults with
developmental disabilities), 1040 Whaley Ave.,
New Haven CT 06515; or the Colonial Williamsburg Fund, P.O. Box 1776, Williamsburg VA
23187-1776. Please view and sign the family's
online guest book at:
www.DeVolFuneralHome.com
KAY
On Tuesday, January 16, 2018.
Beloved husband of Linda Ann
Trail for 50 years; loving father
of Michael Lynwood Trail (Lisa),
and Monet Danielle Trail; grandfather of Samantha Ann Trail,
Alyssa Danielle Lunsford and Lexi Rose Trail.
He was a loving husband, father and grandfather. He was loved by many and will be
missed by many more. Memorial donations
may be made to the American Cancer
Society, https://donate3.cancer.org/. Services private.
www.borgwardtfuneralhome.com
REGINA L. SHEPHERD
CAROLE SUE PERLIN
YVONNE ALEXANDER CRUTCHFIELD
(Age 81)
Passed away on Sunday, January 14, 2018.
Visitation, 10 a.m., Service, 11 a.m. on Tuesday,
January 23 at Fort Foote Baptist Church, 8310
Fort Foote Road, Fort Washington, MD 20774.
Interment Fort Lincoln Cemetery. Services by
H.S. Washington & Sons.
was passed on to her daughter, Arielle, who
was the shining light of Lisa's life. A devoted
animal lover, Lisa opened Wagtime Pet Spa
and Boutique in 2001, and worked tirelessly
with her co-owner, husband and soul mate,
Ofer Khal, to turn a small dog walking business into one of the region's premier dog
day care facilities, with two locations in
the District employing approximately 100
DC residents. Without any formal business
training, Lisa was a natural entrepreneur,
largely because of her genuine love for her
work, her clients and the dogs she cared
for. Lisa's and her husband Ofer's love for
animals was reflected in their extensive work
with local animal rescues, including Lucky
Dog Animal Rescue, to which Lisa committed
countless hours each month, tirelessly working to match adoption dogs with loving families, often at her own expense, because
knowing a successful match had been made
was the only payment she needed. No matter
the situation, Lisa could brighten a room and
elicit a laugh. She was carefree, lived every
moment to the fullest, and enriched the
lives of every single person who had the
good fortune of knowing her. Her family,
and specifically her daughter Arielle, were
the center of her universe, and she will
forever remain in their hearts the vibrant,
compassionate, fun-loving, and beautiful
mom, wife, daughter, and sister they all loved
and cherished.
Funeral services will be held on Sunday,
January 21, 2018, 1:30 p.m. at Adas Israel
Congregation, 2850 Quebec Street, NW,
Washington, DC 20008. Interment to follow
at King David Memorial Gardens, 7482 Lee
Highway, Falls Church, VA 22042. The family
will be receiving friends after interment at
the home of Deborah and Matt Brooks.
Memorial contributions may be made in lieu
of flowers to Lucky Dog Animal Rescue,
www.luckydoganimalrescue.org
www.sagelbloomfield.com
Always in our hearts with love
and forever that shall be.
Jim, Kathryn and Pamela
One year ago, friends and family of the
beloved playwright, singer,
songwriter,
teacher, and long-time Washingtonian, Sidra
Rausch, gathered with her to celebrate
her birthday. “People say such nice things
about you when you’re gone, “ Sidra said.
“I thought I’d have a memorial while I’m
around to hear them!”
We shared with Sidra that day the many
ways in which she enriched our lived. But
today, in her absence, we wish to say it
again and to share with the world Sidra’s
many accomplishments.
A New York City native, Sidra attended
Bennington College in Vermont and Mannes
School of Music, and earned a master’s
degree in vocal performance from Boston
University. Her recordings include a solo
album, a collection of ethno-pop songs that
reflect various aspects of Israeli culture,
called “Sidra in Concert.” Sidra taught at
Leslie College and developed a career performing in the Boston area.
Sidra received fellowships to the Aspen
Music Festival and Playwrights’ Horizons in
New York City. She developed her campy,
but earnest, super-heroine musical, “Meteor
Girl,” inspired by a conversation with Betty
Friedan, at New York City’s La MaMa. Later
she teamed with Batman cartoonist Jerry
Robinson to re-create “Meteor Girl” as
“Astra,” which was presented in the Capital
Fringe Festival with Robinson in attendance.
“Astra” was also developed into a popular
Japanese manga comic.
Among Sidra’s plays are “Stella Adler”
(Kennedy Center New Plays Festival) and
“Timberland 1961,” which won Source Theatre Festival’s H.D. Lewis Award for Best
Play. Much of Sidra’s work is semi-autobiographical. “Timberland” drew from her
childhood experiences at summer camp.
Sidra’s plays are tinged with humor, often
feminist, usually Jewish, and always generous. Several display an intimate portrayal
of a family, modeled on Sidra’s own, experiencing in a personal way the larger cultural
and political mechanisms of the time. They
all reflect their creator’s clear-eyed take on
the suffering in the world, as well as her
admonition that love and compassion are
the remedies. The ambitions of her heroes,
though they are almost exclusively heroines,
are tempered only by their gentleness.
Sidra moved to Washington, DC in 1992,
where she cultivated a lively studio. She
combined a strong background in classical
technique and performance with a Zen
approach to the art of singing, which
brought out the best in her students. Said
on, “Sidra’s spirit is larger than her physical
being. Her lessons are charged with creativity while she radiates a nurturing, patient
understanding of the student mind.”
With her friend and colleague, Karen Berman, Sidra co-founded Washington Women
in Theatre (WWIT) to promote women’s
music and theatre projects dealing with
political, social, and historical issues from
a woman’s perspective. WWIT presented
several of Sidra’s plays, including “Astra.”
Sidra was also a long-time member of the
Playwright’s Forum.
Increasing health challenges brought Sidra
to Five Star Premier Residences in Chevy
Chase, where she became practically
famous. A pass through the dining room
was not possible without multiple stops to
catch up with adoring friends and fans. Even
as her health continued to decline, Sidra
pressed on, writing and producing her final
play, “Uncle Julie.” A semi-autobiographical
tribute to Sidra’s beloved uncle, the play was
presented by WWIT at American University’s
Katzen Center for the Arts just months
before Sidra’s death.
A caring, openhearted woman, Sidra was
full of life, always working on a new project
toward a greater goal, but actively investing
in the people around her and routing for
their success. Those who knew her remember her warmth, her dry humor, her persistence, and her loving, accepting nature, her
essential faith in humanity.
Vibrant, talented, funny, brave, and devoted,
Sidra gave and received enormous love
throughout her life. Her last great love came
late in her life, a surprise and a blessing to
her. We took pleasure in witnessing her job
– the girlish delight, as well as the abiding
gratitude – in finding a true partner in Mr.
James Haahr. Although we all wish there had
been more time, Jim said, “Our four years
together were the greatest gift she could
have given me.”
B6
EZ
. SATURDAY,
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
JANUARY 20 , 2018
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
Good day, sunshine
Sunshine dominates the morning
and the afternoon as well. Any
clouds are likely to remain high
overhead throughout the day, and
there might not even be that many.
Highs should make it into the mid-50s and might
go a bit further if the temperature reaches its
potential before hitting lows in the 30s.
Meanwhile, Sunday should be another mild day.
We should see more in the way of cloudiness with
time, but the clouds shouldn’t blot out the sun.
Highs should range from near 50 to the mid-50s.
Today
Sunny
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Sunday
Partly sunny
Monday
Cloudy
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Tuesday
Rain
Wednesday
Partly sunny
55° 36
54° 43
58° 51
55° 34
50° 31
44° 29
FEELS*: 48°
FEELS: 52°
FEELS: 55°
FEELS: 51°
FEELS: 44°
FEELS: 41°
CHNCE PRECIP: 0%
P: 5%
P: 15%
P: 70%
P: 10%
P: 15%
WIND: SW 10–20 mph
W: SW 4–8 mph
W: SE 6–12 mph
W: WSW 8–16 mph
W: WNW 8–16 mph
W: WNW 6–12 mph
°
°
°
°
°
OFFICIAL RECORD
Thursday
Partly sunny
Temperatures
NATION
Hagerstown
52/33
Davis
49/36
W
High
Low
Normal
Record high
Record low
Baltimore
54/32
Dover
54/31
Washington
55/36
Tu
Weather map features for noon today.
Philadelphia
54/34
Harrisburg
51/31
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
51° 1:34 p.m.
25° 5:13 a.m.
43°/28°
71° 1951
–4° 1994
54° 2:42 p.m.
17° 6:43 a.m.
42°/24°
65° 1972
–6° 1994
52° 3:33 p.m.
20° 7:18 a.m.
41°/24°
69° 1951
–5° 1994
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: –5.7° yr. to date: –5.7°
Precipitation
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
OCEAN: 38°
OCEAN: 32°
Richmond
57/30
Norfolk
54/34
Virginia Beach
54/34
Past 24 hours
OCEAN: 35°
Total this month
Normal
Total this year
Kitty Hawk
49/36
OCEAN: 35°
Normal
Snow, past 24 hours
Pollen: Low
Air Quality: Good
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
Low
Low
Low
Totals for season
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.00"
0.67"
1.71"
0.67"
1.71"
0.0"
3.1"
0.00"
1.51"
1.59"
1.51"
1.59"
0.0"
5.0"
0.00"
0.73"
1.87"
0.73"
1.87"
0.0"
6.5"
Moon Phases
UV: Moderate
Solar system
3 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, mostly sunny, milder. High 44–51. Wind
west 6–12 mph. Tonight, mostly clear, cool. Low 32–36.
Wind northwest 4–8 mph. Sunday, partly sunny, mild
for January. High 46–50. Wind west 6–12 mph. Monday,
increasingly cloudy. High 46–50.
Atlantic beaches: Today, mostly sunny, mild. High 46–54.
Wind southwest 7–14 mph. Tonight, mostly clear. Low
30–34. Wind west 4–8 mph. Sunday, partly sunny, mild.
High 45–51. Wind southwest 4–8 mph. Monday, partly
sunny. High 46–56.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, mostly sunny, mild. Wind
southwest 5–10 knots. Waves a foot or less. Visibility unrestricted.
• Lower Potomac and Chesapeake Bay: Today, mostly sunny. Wind
southwest 7–14 knots. Waves around a foot on the lower Potomac,
1–3 feet on the Chesapeake. Visibility good.• River Stages: Today, the
stage at Little Falls will be around 3.7 feet, falling slightly to 3.6 feet
Sunday. Flood stage at Little Falls is 10 feet.
(High tides in Bold)
Washington
4:50 a.m.
10:02 a.m.
4:52 p.m.
10:13 p.m.
Annapolis
1:27 a.m.
6:54 a.m.
1:09 p.m.
7:39 p.m.
3:09 a.m.
9:33 a.m.
3:51 p.m.
9:50 p.m.
Norfolk
5:09 a.m.
11:27 a.m.
5:44 p.m.
11:44 p.m.
Point Lookout
3:07 a.m.
8:58 a.m.
3:35 p.m.
10:16 p.m.
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Clayton, NM 79°
Low: Waverly, CO –1°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
43/29/pc
59/28/c
16/4/s
56/36/pc
70/57/c
54/32/s
36/19/c
57/40/pc
37/13/pc
43/25/pc
48/33/pc
36/31/pc
42/29/pc
64/41/s
48/39/pc
56/35/s
41/21/sn
44/35/pc
47/39/sh
44/36/pc
72/57/pc
52/20/pc
Tomorrow
39/31/c
41/22/pc
10/8/pc
64/45/s
73/44/sh
50/38/pc
35/21/s
65/47/pc
29/8/c
43/34/pc
43/31/pc
38/34/sh
35/25/sf
67/44/s
53/43/c
62/37/s
25/15/sn
42/39/sh
49/45/sh
43/40/c
72/42/t
27/13/sn
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
43/33/pc
39/31/pc
68/40/pc
–4/–23/sn
36/18/pc
47/28/pc
83/71/pc
70/61/sh
45/35/sh
62/48/pc
64/42/s
47/41/sh
53/36/pc
53/49/sh
62/42/pc
50/40/sh
50/46/sh
76/67/pc
40/32/pc
40/28/c
54/42/c
66/52/c
50/36/s
54/34/s
42/33/r
37/35/sh
53/28/s
–19/–26/sn
29/17/c
43/27/pc
82/70/sh
73/53/sh
45/42/sh
70/56/pc
68/49/pc
52/34/r
53/36/s
62/49/sh
62/45/s
53/47/c
61/53/sh
78/68/c
39/36/i
38/29/sn
61/47/c
70/57/pc
48/36/pc
51/40/s
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
59/44/pc
43/28/pc
69/53/pc
54/34/s
59/38/pc
47/33/pc
44/28/pc
47/44/sh
49/30/pc
56/35/s
41/21/pc
57/30/s
54/34/pc
54/41/sh
84/74/s
34/25/sn
61/46/pc
54/46/pc
85/75/s
47/43/sh
37/30/c
39/27/pc
70/56/pc
57/38/pc
64/33/c
40/28/i
74/55/pc
48/39/pc
60/38/s
42/40/sh
40/24/pc
48/39/r
44/30/pc
60/37/s
45/35/c
58/40/s
52/46/c
60/47/sh
84/74/s
35/22/pc
62/47/s
54/52/c
84/74/s
47/41/r
38/30/c
38/32/c
78/60/pc
58/32/pc
Jan 24
First
Quarter
World
High: Walpeup, Australia 116°
Low: Agayakan, Russia –71°
Jan 31
Full
Feb 7
Last
Quarter
Today
Addis Ababa
74/47/pc
Amsterdam
40/35/sh
Athens
63/54/pc
Auckland
78/69/pc
Baghdad
61/40/pc
Bangkok
91/76/pc
Beijing
41/21/pc
Berlin
37/27/c
Bogota
67/45/r
Brussels
38/33/sh
Buenos Aires
90/68/c
Cairo
67/52/s
Caracas
72/63/s
Copenhagen
36/31/sh
Dakar
74/64/c
Dublin
40/36/r
Edinburgh
37/23/pc
Frankfurt
39/33/sn
Geneva
42/40/r
Ham., Bermuda 67/64/c
Helsinki
25/15/sn
Ho Chi Minh City 91/75/pc
Tomorrow
75/47/pc
43/37/c
61/50/r
78/69/c
66/42/s
93/78/pc
32/21/c
36/27/pc
68/45/pc
41/37/r
88/69/t
72/56/pc
73/64/s
35/31/pc
77/66/pc
55/41/r
38/37/r
40/34/c
44/42/r
67/65/c
19/8/sf
91/75/c
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
72/63/pc
75/42/pc
57/47/pc
54/42/s
88/63/pc
56/24/s
84/76/pc
77/52/pc
90/76/pc
76/68/pc
60/51/pc
41/36/sh
60/37/pc
89/74/s
71/44/pc
38/21/pc
20/18/sn
90/73/pc
81/54/pc
74/45/pc
27/24/sf
39/25/pc
50/41/r
34/26/sn
Errors in required science exam lead superintendent to drop it
P ERRY S TEIN
The science exam given annually to District students was so
error-ridden that the superintendent announced Friday that she is
throwing out scores for the past
two years and canceling this
year’s test.
The decision puts the city in
violation of federal law, and the
superintendent’s office said some
federal funding could be in jeopardy.
Under the law, school districts
must test students in science once
during their elementary school
years, once in middle school and
once in high school. Tests vary by
district, and state and local school
leaders determine how exams are
administered.
D.C. State Superintendent of
Education Hanseul Kang said she
had little choice but to cancel the
District’s $370,000 contract with
WestEd, a national education
company that developed the citywide exam known as the DC
Science Assessment. The twohour, computerized test is not
used to determine whether students can advance to the next
grade.
“We recognize that this is an
extraordinary step we are taking,
and it is not a decision we are
taking lightly,” Kang said in an
interview. “If we had gone forward with releasing these results,
we felt we would have been giving
schools an inaccurate reflection
of how students are doing, which
would have been absolutely unjust.”
While examining 2017 test results, Kang said employees in her
office noticed that eighth-graders’ scores had declined significantly over the previous year.
That result did not match trends
in other grade levels and was
inconsistent with the middleschoolers’ performance on other
standardized tests.
District officials determined
that the 2016 science exam had 70
questions; in 2017, the score reflected only 50 questions — making each question worth more
and, thus, susceptible to bigger
changes in overall results.
Eighth-grade students in 2017
were originally given a 70-question test, Kang said, but WestEd
later invalidated 20 questions
without notifying her office.
Questions can be invalidated for a
host of technical reasons: They
can be deemed unclear, or found
to not properly assess what students know. (The test is not entirely multiple choice.)
Max McConkey, chief policy
and communications officer at
WestEd, said the company is
aware of errors in the exams but
said he was surprised the superintendent’s office canceled the
contract.
“We knew there were errors,
but we thought we had put corrective measures in place,” he
said. “We want them to be happy,
we want the kids to be served, and
if that’s the direction they want to
go we will — at no expense —
work with any new vendor.”
WestEd administered its first
science exam in the District in
spring 2016. The city previously
used the DC-CAS Science Assessment, but the superintendent’s
office developed a new test in
2014 after the city passed updated
science curriculum standards.
Kang said errors existed in the
2017 tests across all grade levels,
and WestEd did not follow proto-
Sentencing
for teller who
stole from
homeless man
other items in New York, Washington, D.C., and Maryland,”
Kleinman wrote in one filing. “He
also panhandles. When he moved
from New York to Washington in
2014, he was in possession of
approximately $40,000, which he
had earned primarily through
street vending.”
That was the cash in the trash
bag.
His dormant account at Wells
Fargo had been opened years
earlier and contained money that
he apparently had made in Washington, before he moved to New
York. “He could not access his
bank account while he lived in
New York because he did not have
a current identification document,” Kleinman wrote in the
court records. So as he accumulated the $40,000 as a vendor in
New York, “he hid the money . . .
under his bed.”
By the time he showed up in
Georgetown with the cash-laden
bag, eight years had passed since
TELLER FROM B1
pleading for leniency on behalf of
his client.
As for Witherspoon, who was
reimbursed by Wells Fargo, his
thoughts on the crime remain a
mystery. Kleinman told the judge,
“I have tried to get in touch with
the victim” in recent weeks, “but I
have not had success.” The prosecutor added, “There has been
some activity in his account, so
he’s alive, he’s around.”
Court records tell the story.
“Since the 1980s, the victim has
been selling shirts, hats, toys and
MD: 301-637-2870
VA: 703-382-8505
THE DAILY QUIZ
The cover story of the Real Estate section
mentions a Freddie Mac survey of baby
boomers. According to the survey, how
many boomers plan to sell their homes
and rent?
EARN 5 POINTS: Find the answer, and then go to
washingtonpost.com/postpoints, Quizzes to enter the
correct response.
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ft. show home featuring 2018’s newest trends in design. On the Main Stage: Anthony
Carrino and John Colaneri of HGTV’s Kitchen Cousins and Jason Nixon and John Loecke
of interior design firm Madcap Cottage. See details at washingtonpost.com/postpoints,
Coupons & Discounts.
Feb 15
New
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Rise
7:23 a.m.
9:28 a.m.
7:38 a.m.
2:45 a.m.
2:12 a.m.
5:39 a.m.
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
89/75/t
68/40/s
57/48/pc
87/65/pc
86/59/pc
36/23/r
45/22/pc
49/40/c
85/76/c
30/16/sn
86/67/s
69/63/c
47/32/sh
48/40/r
40/26/c
41/29/pc
33/25/sn
Set
5:15 p.m.
8:48 p.m.
5:25 p.m.
12:46 p.m.
12:27 p.m.
3:10 p.m.
excludes Antarctica
WORLD
THE DISTRICT
BY
FORECAST
Ocean City
47/32
Lexington
52/37
Ocean City
ACTUAL
Cape May
46/32
Annapolis
52/35
Charlottesville
60/34
Today’s tides
RECORD
°
M
REGION
AVERAGE
72/64/pc
75/42/pc
53/49/r
60/46/pc
87/59/pc
57/24/s
85/76/pc
77/51/pc
89/75/s
76/69/pc
62/49/pc
51/49/r
60/36/pc
90/74/pc
74/47/pc
31/18/c
29/17/sf
90/72/pc
82/55/s
73/46/pc
27/19/pc
32/21/sn
50/47/r
33/23/sf
89/76/t
65/35/s
61/39/s
88/66/pc
84/58/s
38/24/sh
41/27/pc
51/41/r
87/76/sh
25/18/sf
84/70/s
71/63/pc
52/36/s
50/36/pc
38/31/pc
36/23/sf
32/16/sf
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
sh- showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
Allergen Extract Lab (pollen data); airnow.gov (air
quality data); National Weather Service
* AccuWeather's RealFeel Temperature®
combines over a dozen factors for an accurate
measure of how the conditions really “feel.”
col to ensure the exams could be
accurately compared year over
year.
“That is a basic function of the
tests,” she said. “There were core
industry principles that were not
followed.”
The Office of the State Superintendent of Education oversees
the administration of standardized tests for schools, and is exploring whether it will take legal
action WestEd, officials said.
Kang said her office has been in
contact with the Education Department and is working to mitigate the consequences for not
administering a science exam.
The department did not immediately reply Friday to a request for
comment.
The superintendent’s office
opened a competitive bidding
process for a new test administrator, and plans to give students the
exam in spring 2019.
“2019 will become our new
baseline because we don’t have
previous tests,” Kang said.
perry.stein@washpost.com
he had last used his account, and
it had been classified as dormant.
Davis, who reactivated the account and accepted the $40,000
deposit, admitted to the FBI that
he fraudulently opened another
account in Witherspoon’s name
by forging his signature, according to court documents related to
his guilty plea. Davis got an ATM
card and personal identification
number for the new account.
Then he gradually transferred
about $187,000 out of the existing
account and into the new one,
from which he made withdrawals.
In another filing, defense lawyer Johnson called his client “a
person who lives and supports his
family, has worked hard when he
had the opportunity and, with the
exception of this one incident, he
has lived an honorable life.”
As Davis put it, standing before
the judge, “I compromised my
integrity.”
paul.duggan@washpost.com
DID YOU KNOW?
Specially Priced Tickets to A Branch of Freshest Green: Music
of Hildegard Von Bingen on February 2 & 3 at Washington
National Cathedral
Folger Consort presents Hildegard’s mystical hymns and sequences from her landmark
Symphony of the Harmony of Celestial Revelations alongside works by living female composers
in new arrangements for female voices and medieval instruments. Selections from Susan
Botti’s Bird Songs and Kate Soper’s Songs for Nobody, and a new arrangement of Shulamit
Ran’s Credo/Ani Ma’Anim, are interspersed with music more than 800 years old in a program
on nature, spirituality and eternity. See details at washingtonpost.com/postpoints, Coupons
& Discounts.
Not a PostPoints member yet?
It’s free. Sign up and get rewarded.
washingtonpost.com/postpoints
KLMNO
Style
SATURDAY, JANUARY 20 , 2018
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/STYLE
EZ
RE
C
Douglas
responds to
harassment
allegations
BY
EDDIE ALVAREZ/THE WASHINGTON POST
S ONIA R AO
Writer Susan Braudy has publicly accused Michael Douglas of
sexual harassment, just days after the actor preemptively spoke
in his own defense.
“He thought he was the king of
the world, and that he could
humiliate me without any repercussions,” Braudy told Kate Snow
of NBC News in an interview that
aired Friday morning.
Braudy worked for Douglas
in the 1980s, a decade in which
the actor starred in “Fatal Attraction” and won an Oscar for
his performance in “Wall
Street.” She primarily worked
out of the actor’s living room to
read scripts and hire screenwriters, according to personal
notes detailed in a piece published Thursday by the Hollywood Reporter. Douglas used
crude language in one-on-one
meetings with Braudy, she said,
and would comment on her
body.
“I began wearing long, loose
layers of black,” Braudy wrote in
the notes. “He asked a producer,
‘Why does Susan dress like a
pregnant nun?’ Another time I
laughed loudly and he shouted to
a group of agents, ‘Oh yeah, she’s
a screamer! I bet she screams in
the sack.’ ”
In 1989, Braudy told Snow,
Douglas’s behavior escalated
DOUGLAS CONTINUED ON C4
Vendors are hawking gadgets to fend off sexual assault. That’s ‘incredibly exploitative of women’s fears.’
I
n the promised reckoning over sexual
assault, harassment and rape culture, a
bracelet probably wasn’t the solution the
women of 2018 were hoping for.
But here it is. Last week, a Dutch
start-up announced the sale of the Invi bracelet, the latest in a long line of odd implements
designed for fending off would-be rapists.
When the wearer gives it a tug, the Invi
releases a pungent stench that Invi’s founder,
Roel van der Kamp, likens to a skunk’s
perfume.
The tagline for the Invi, priced at about $70,
is “Provoke Independence,” which is an oddly
upbeat way of reminding us that without some
kind of protection, women’s freedom is not a
given. Guys, you get to slide your Time’s Up pin
through your lapel and call it a day. We’ll go to
work wearing a skunk bracelet just in case.
Which, well, stinks.
“If this approach was going to work, it
would have worked already,” says Jaclyn Friedman, an anti-rape activist and author of
“Unscrewed: Women, Sex, Power, and How to
Stop Letting the System Screw Us All.”
Instead, she says, these sorts of products are
Survival
gear
in the
age of
#MeToo
BY
L AVANYA R AMANATHAN
“incredibly exploitative of women’s fears, and
they sell the idea that there’s some capitalistcommerce fix to the problem of sexual violence.”
And, adds Emily May, executive director of
Hollaback!, an organization that offers resources and training to fight harassment on
the street and online, self-defense contraptions are a “cottage industry” built around
“the idea that, essentially, it’s your responsibility to protect yourself — that the people who
perpetrate these behaviors don’t have any
self-control, and you need to take control and
strap on your jacket with 110 volts of electricity.”
Van der Kamp argues that men can also
wear his bracelet to draw attention to sexual
violence. Of the burden of ending rape, he
says, “I don’t believe it’s a woman’s problem.
It’s equally a man’s problem.”
So why are so many of these “protective”
gadgets aimed at us? Here’s a shortlist of some
of the well-meaning (but often ridiculous)
defenses women have been offered against the
great boogeyman of sexual violence.
new york — Hard drives hidden
around the country. Burner
phones that couldn’t be traced. A
safe house in Los Angeles.
For the filmmakers behind
“Icarus,” a cloak-and-dagger story
of Russian Olympic doping, the
themes of the documentary have
for the past two years become the
story of their lives. The Russian
government has been increasingly trying to undermine — or, they
fear, even outright capture — the
film’s main character, the whistleblower Grigory Rodchenkov,
prompting the filmmakers to engage in improbable acts of highstakes secrecy.
Now, even as their Netflix documentary seeks an Oscar via genteel events hosted by the likes of
Rob Reiner, they are confronting
their most fraught fight yet.
With Russia facing a ban on
official participation in the upcoming Winter Olympics, the
“Icarus” filmmakers have been urgently beefing up security around
Rodchenkov — hoping to stay a
step ahead of a Kremlin that they
suspect will get its hands on the
chemist and thus stop him from
testifying at a Swiss proceeding
on Jan. 25 that could decide
whether dozens of athletes will be
permanently disqualified.
The filmmakers’ actions show
how narrow the border can be
NETFLIX
Grigory Rodchenkov, left, with Bryan Fogel in “Icarus.” Rodchenkov’s doping revelations led to
Russia being banned from the 2018 Games and a Russian campaign to discredit him (or worse).
between moviemaking and activism.
“We never thought we’d be in
this position, trying to shelter a
whistleblower and change the
world of international sports,”
said Jim Swartz, co-founder of
Impact Partners, which produced
and financed the film. But “you
hear the word ‘Olympics,’ and it
means something. And then what
you see is these guys doing everything they can to sweep doping
under the rug. We had to do something.”
While shooting “Icarus,” Rodchenkov described, on camera,
how an anti-doping lab at the 2014
Sochi Games served as the place
where the drug-tainted urine of
Russian athletes was swapped out
for clean samples, via a network of
underground tunnels. Rodchenkov knew this because, he said, he
did the swapping. He also said he
mixed cocktails of banned performance-enhancing drugs and fed
T IM C ARMAN
them to athletes.
The allegations made by Rodchenkov, who has since fled to the
United States, spawned the 2016
investigation known as the
McLaren Report. It then led to
other inquiries and ultimately
prompted the International
Olympic Committee (IOC) to issue numerous bans — the one for
the 2018 Games and lifetime bans
for several dozen Russian athletes.
Now those athletes are appealing to the international Court of
Arbitration for Sport (CAS) to be
reinstated, possibly even for the
2018 Games in PyeongChang,
South Korea, next month.
Russian authorities have
charged Rodchenkov as a drug
trafficker and sought his extradition. Without his testimony —
which lawyers are hoping he will
be allowed to give by video link —
U.S. experts say that the bans
almost certainly would be overturned.
The Impact group — Swartz
and fellow co-founders Dan Cogan and Geralyn Dreyfous, as well
as “Icarus” director Bryan Fogel
and Rodchenkov lawyer Jim
Walden — have sought to protect
the whistleblower so he can testify. Around Christmas, they say,
they learned from U.S. government sources of an increased
threat to his life and hired addiICARUS CONTINUED ON C2
STARBURST CONTINUED ON C2
PROTECTION CONTINUED ON C2
S TEVEN Z EITCHIK
BY
Donald Trump may view the
media as an enemy of the state,
but when it comes to Starburst
chews, the president and eight
feature writers and editors at The
Washington Post are as thick as
thieves. They all like the cherry
and strawberry flavors best.
Let’s see how the White House
spins this as #fakenews.
We got the semi-bright idea to
host a Starburst taste test after
reading that House Majority
Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.)
recently bought a small haul of the
fruit candies and ordered a staffer
to separate out the strawberry and
cherry flavors for the president,
who otherwise would (apparently) have to do the tedious sorting
himself.
The president’s typical diet —
maybe “stereotypical” would be a
better word, given Trump still has
a crack White House kitchen
cooking for him — wouldn’t usually inspire journalists to ignore
their deadlines and dig into a
table covered with, say, Big Macs,
Diet Cokes and well-done steaks.
But Starbursts are different.
They’re neatly wrapped gifts from
childhood: a chewy little reminder of simpler times — in the days
before your mother used
“s---hole” in casual conversations.
The problem with those neatly
wrapped candies, of course, is that
each is color-coded to its flavor,
and some tasters may share the
president’s bias for cherry and
strawberry, or have a bias of their
own. So we had to conduct a blind
tasting. Literally. We blindfolded
the tasters, gave them one unwrapped candy at a time and
asked them to judge it on a scale of
1 to 5. A “1” score would be the
presidential equivalent of “sad!”
and a “5” would be a #MAGA
moment.
Each taster tried six Starburst
flavors: the original four (strawberry, cherry, orange and lemon),
plus two more from the FaveREDs
assortment (watermelon and fruit
punch) to better blur the lines
between flavors. Their adult palates, without any visual cues, occasionally struggled to assess the
flavors. One taster found the candies so foul, she spit out half her
samples.
“It doesn’t smell like anything,”
said Matt Brooks, assignment edi-
Olympic doping documentary ‘Icarus’ flies close to danger
BY
Trump is
no square
peg with
Starbursts
C2
EZ
Designed
to protect
or exploit?
a distress message and your location to a network of contacts
you’ve selected. Then you sit and
wait for one of them to rescue
you.
PROTECTION FROM C1
The chastity belt
Researchers say there was
never an actual medieval device
intended to make a fortress of a
woman’s erogenous zones, but
the fantasy of a locked-up damsel
endures. A modern-day version
might exist in AR Wear, a crowdfunded prototype of a woman’s
panty with locks at the waist and
the legs. Tagline: “For when
things go wrong.”
The rape whistle
Sound archaic? Dozens of
these glorified noisemakers are
available on sites such as Amazon. And after the brutal, deadly
rape of a young woman in New
Delhi in 2015, an organization
called She’s Against Rape even
began distributing pink whistles
to Indian women as a defense —
along with a warning not to cry
wolf.
The self-defense movement
Urban American women first
took up jujitsu and other selfdefense training in the 1920s,
just as they were going after the
right to vote, according to the
recent book “Her Own Hero:
The Origins of the Women’s
Self-Defense Movement.” Was
the timing a coincidence? We
think not.
Pepper spray
Whip it out of your pocket or
purse and spray the rape away.
Or maybe not. “I’ve always had
this fear: What if I were in a
situation where I had to carry
[pepper spray] to protect myself, but what if it were turned
on me? What if it blew up in my
bag and ended up making me
get sick?” says Jamia Wilson,
director and publisher of the
New York-based Feminist Press.
“I’d rather have a society that
holds people accountable, that
teaches people about consent
and where rape culture doesn’t
exist.”
The Athena
The Athena is a button-like
device that when triggered sends
The antirape condom
We can thank a South African
doctor for the Rape-aXe, a female condom — never brought
to market — with rows of teeth
that would ensnare an attacker
upon penetration, trapping
him painfully until a doctor
removed it. No word on how
exactly a victim would discreetly use a condom, much less one
that looked like a killer jellyfish.
Code words
In 2016, a rape crisis center in
England encouraged bar patrons
on troubling dates to go to the bar
and “ask for Angela,” tipping bartenders to their need for help.
Date-rape nail polish
Yes, really. Undercover Colors
has developed but not yet begun
selling a nail polish that changes
color when dipped into, say,
trashcan punch loaded with
roofies. “Power,” reads the company’s website, “must be handed
back to women in what is a
devastatingly powerless situation.”
Consent apps
Swipe your consent to sex
ahead of time, so you won’t ever
actually have to discuss it. LegalFling, announced last week, offers just that, with Tinder-like
ease of use. As a bonus, your
potential partner gets a record
of that consent for posterity (or
in case of future legal action),
and if there’s “a breach” of contract, you can simply tap the app,
triggering a cease-and-desist letter. Men, naturally, are behind
this.
So, where should inventors direct their money and efforts, if
not lockable panties?
“Products that would reduce
the likelihood of men wanting to
assault,” May deadpans. Maybe
even a bracelet a man would have
to wear. “Something like, every
time a woman gets sexually assaulted, you get a tiny shock on
your wrist.”
Men wouldn’t even have to
wear it very long, she adds, to get
a very strong jolt of women’s
reality.
lavanya.ramanathan
@washpost.com
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
Reel threat
in ‘Icarus’
ICARUS FROM C1
tional security to bolster the government’s efforts.
Russia has denied allegations
of widespread doping and said
the accusations are part of a
larger Western campaign to discredit the country. A press
spokesman at the Russian Embassy in Washington did not
comment for this article.
Although Washington and
Moscow do not have an extradition agreement, “Icarus” principals say they worry that the
Trump administration’s relationship with the Kremlin could
lead the United States to accommodate the request. Neither the
State Department nor the Justice
Department would comment for
this article, nor would the CAS or
the IOC.
The “Icarus” team also fears
that Russian agents could harm
Rodchenkov on U.S. soil. Leonid
Tyagachev, a former head of Russia’s Olympic Committee, in November told a Russian radio station: “Rodchenkov should be
shot for lying, like Stalin would
have done.”
Walden says the risk of a targeted killing should not be underestimated. He cited the sudden and suspicious deaths of two
other high-ranking Russian former anti-doping officials in the
past two years. “No one expected
them to die, either,” he said.
Chew review
STARBURST FROM C1
tor for the Food team, as he examined a lemon Starburst. “It smells
like scarf.” Brooks was wearing a
scarf around his head as a blindfold.
The terms that came up most
during the tasting were waxy,
chewy, sweet, artificial and Lemon Pledge. A few tasters noted
how hard and/or “crusty” the
chews were. “It’s really hard. It’s
harder than I really thought,” said
Becky Krystal, Food staff writer.
Some tasters just used colors to
describe the flavor, borrowing a
. SATURDAY,
A dark secret
“Icarus” was not exactly designed as a flamethrower. Several
years ago, the Los Angeles-based
Fogel, known primarily for a stage
comedy titled “Jewtopia,” teamed
up with New York-based nonfiction giant Impact for a lighthearted movie in which Fogel would
attempt to become a better amateur cyclist through doping. The
director was put in touch with the
gregarious and affable Rodchenkov.
But it soon became clear that
the chemist held a far darker and
more consequential secret.
While working as an anti-doping
monitor in Russia, he told the
filmmakers, he ran a Kremlin-ordered scheme that swapped out
the unclean samples of dozens of
athletes, particularly at the 2014
Sochi Games.
As he shared these secrets on
camera, Rodchenkov received a
tip from a Russian government
friend that he was in danger.
Fogel and Impact bought him a
ticket so he could flee Russia.
In early 2016, Rodchenkov arrived in Los Angeles to meet the
director with barely a piece of
luggage. He was soon set up in a
safe house in the city. With the
Rio Games approaching and the
movie still shooting, the “Icarus”
crew went to the New York Times
with Rodchenkov and his account. The May 2016 story landed like a grenade, prompting
several commissions and dozens
of bans.
U.S. authorities placed Rodchenkov in the federal witness
protection program shortly after.
Finishing the movie that sum-
mer and fall then became a spylike operation. Cogan and Fogel
bought burner phones and hid
hard drives around the country
to back up footage.
Impact then tried to secure an
attorney for Rodchenkov. But no
one, it seemed, wanted to risk
losing Russian clients by taking
him on. Then they met Walden, a
lawyer at a New York boutique
firm, who said he “didn’t think
for a second” about turning
down Rodchenkov’s case. “We
probably lost business — in fact, I
know we did,” Walden said. “But
you don’t just do this job for the
money.”
page from the work of gastrophysicists, who have shown that diners
often equate the two. “It’s yellow,”
said Caitlin Moore, a digital editor
on the pop culture team. She hates
lemons. She spit out the candy
after two courtesy chews.
The final tally was razor close.
Strawberry and cherry topped the
journalists’ list, just as they top
the president’s. The flavors each
racked up 26 points from eight
tasters, for an average of 3.25. Not
sad, but not exactly #MAGA territory, either. We should note that
Ranker’s list also places strawberry and cherry at the top.
Incidentally, orange Starbursts, with 25 points, were just a
single point behind the front-runners in our tasting.
“That’s strawberry!” Brooks
said, enjoying the “sweet bubblegum flavors” of the candy. “It’s
why me and millions of other
Americans dig for it.”
“That’s what a Starburst is supposed to taste like,” he added.
Not everyone agreed on the superiority of the red flavors. “It’s
like the Kool-Aid Man sneezed in
my mouth,” said Book World editor Ron Charles about a cherry
Starburst. He did not mean it as a
compliment: Charles awarded the
chew only 2 points.
Entertainment reporter and
beer columnist Fritz Hahn compared the orange Starburst to a
childhood drink. “It tastes like
concentrated Donald Duck orange juice,” he said. He gave it 3
Under fire from the Kremlin
The Impact founders decided
to take up Rodchenkov’s cause.
Swartz helped found an organization, Fair Sport, which invites
anonymous sources and promises them protection and subsidized legal aid. It also enlisted
the involvement of such international sports figures as the Norwegian speedskating gold medalist Johan Koss, who has since
become an activist.
The “Icarus” crew also began
lobbying the IOC and working
with lawyers to help get together
affidavits for Rodchenkov that
would be used in various hearings.
Meanwhile, Netflix bought the
rights to “Icarus” at the Sundance Film Festival last January
for an estimated $5 million, a
whopping sum for a documentary. After warm reviews, it is
considered a leading documentary contender for an Academy
Award.
But its subject has increasing-
JANUARY 20 , 2018
ly come under fire from the
Kremlin. Last month, President
Vladimir Putin suggested that
U.S. authorities were chemically
brainwashing
Rodchenkov.
“What are they doing with him
there?” Putin said. “Are they giving him some kind of substances
so that he says what’s required?”
Russian government spokesman Dmitry Peskov in November called out Rodchenkov’s
“sponsors and those sheltering
him.”
The Kremlin’s attempt to discredit Rodchenkov is more than
a matter of image. Russia still
hopes to march in the PyeongChang Closing Ceremonies —
the IOC has left open that door.
Experts caution that anti-doping authorities may face an uphill battle at the CAS hearing.
What’s more, many neutral voices say that ordinary athletes
shouldn’t pay the price for a
system they didn’t create and
had little say over.
Cogan says he knew that taking up Rodchenkov’s cause and
helping him leave Russia were
unusual steps to take for a documentary subject. “But I felt
strongly about him as a person,
and I also thought from the first
moment he was telling the
truth.”
All of this postproduction drama could provide rich fodder for
a sequel. In the meantime, the
team is fighting for what Rodchenkov and “Icarus” began.
“If Grigory isn’t able to testify,
the bans will be overturned,”
Swartz said, “and give carte
blanche to anyone who wants to
cheat in the future.”
steven.zeitchik@washpost.com
points, so one can assume he still
thinks fondly of concentrated OJ.
At least a little.
But of all the comments, one
landed particularly hard. Brooks
casually mentioned that strawberry junkies can order their preferred flavor in a two-pound bag.
You can do that for Starburst cherry chews, too. Which makes you
realize that both McCarthy and
Trump can stop wasting all those
unwanted Starburst chews — not
to mention wasting the staff hours
and taxpayer money required to
do the sorting — and just order a
few two-pound bags for Air Force
One.
Consider it #fakenewsyoucanuse, Mr. President.
tim.carman@washpost.com
B FEATURED LISTING B
$35
A Joyful Noise…
The Rest Is
Silence
Sat., Jan. 20, 5 p.m.
Music by Britten, Mathias, Elgar and others. Featuring
Deborah Sternberg, soprano.
St. John’s Episcopal Church,
Norwood Parish
6701 Wisconsin Ave
Chevy Chase, MD
www.cantate.org
Ages
18-35
$20
Tickets available at
cantate.org
Under 17
FREE
THEATRE
Now thru January 28!
“The Humans”
Tue-Fri at 8
Sat & Sun at 2 & 8
Now Thru January 28!
“On Your Feet!”
Tue-Fri at 7:30
Sat & Sun at 1:30 & 7:30
Added matinee Jan. 25
No evening perf. Jan 28
Stephen Karam’s uproarious, hopeful, and heartbreaking
play takes place over the course of a family dinner on
Thanksgiving. As darkness falls and eerie things start to
go bump in the night, the Blake clan’s deepest fears and
greatest follies are laid bare. Our modern age of anxiety is
keenly observed in this new American classic that won the
2016 Tony Award® for Best Play. Recommended for age 15
and up,
Kennedy Center
Eisenhower Theater
kennedy-center.org
or call (202) 467-4600
Tickets
available
at the
Box Office
“What Broadway
needs more of:
extraordinary
‘Humans.’ The
best play of the
year!”—The
Washington Post
From their humble beginnings in Cuba, Emilio and Gloria
Estefan came to America and broke through all barriers to
become a crossover sensation at the very top of the pop
music world. But just when they thought they had it all, they
almost lost everything. On Your Feet! takes you inside their
real-life story, with some of the most iconic songs of the
past quarter century.
Kennedy Center
Opera House
kennedy-center.org
or call (202) 467-4600
Tickets
available
at the
Box Office
Recommended for
age 8 and up.
Dumbarton Concerts
Dumbarton United
Methodist Church
3133 Dumbarton St. NW
Washington, DC 20007
202-965-2000
$42 Adults
$39 Senior
Dumbarton
concerts.org
Rachel M. Schlesinger
Concert Hall & Arts Center
4915 East Campus Drive
Alexandria, VA 22311
703 426-4777
vgmb.com
$15
Free Parking
Ronald Reagan Building
1300 Pennsylvania Ave, NW
Tix available at ticketmaster.com
202.397.SEAT
$36
Discounts available
for groups of 10 or
more.
Call 202-312-1427
MUSIC - CHAMBER
Dumbarton Concerts
Duo Deloro:
La Buena Vida
January 27, 2018
Guitar Duo
Guitarists Adam del Monte and Mak Grgic warm up our
venue with Latin American and Spanish Music. The two
dynamic musicians perform traditional Argentinian Tangos,
original Flamenco arrangements & new works.
MUSIC - CONCERTS
Virginia Grand
Military Band
Loras John Schissel
Music Director
Saturday, January 20, 7:30
Be on hand January 20th as Maestro Schissel guides us
through a fun concert of compositions including, Whistler
and his Dog, Zampa Overture, Trombones Galorious and
Liszt's Mazeppa. We dare you to keep your feet still!
Fridays & Saturdays
at 7:30pm
A musical, political satire.
We put the MOCK in Democracy!
Info: 202.312.1555
www.capsteps.com
COMEDY
Orange is the
New Barack
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
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16-2898
SATURDAY, JANUARY 20 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C3
RE
Television
TV HIGHLIGHTS
1/20/18
7:00
7:30
8:00
Inside
NBC4
4.1 WRC (NBC)
◆ TMZ
5.1 WTTG (Fox)
◆ Wheel
◆ Jeopardy!
7.1 WJLA (ABC)
9.1 WUSA (CBS) Paid Program Paid Program
14.1 WFDC (UNI) 100 mexicanos dijieron
20.1 WDCA (MNTV) ◆ Family Feud ◆ Family Feud
22.1 WMPT (PBS) Antiques Roadshow
26.4 WETA (PBS) Doc Martin
30.1 WNVC (MHz) France 24 Programming
News
32.1 WHUT (PBS) ◆ Weekend
50.1 WDCW (CW) Mike & Molly Goldbergs
66.1 WPXW (ION) Law & Order: SVU
BROADCAST CHANNELS
8:30
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News
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Fox 5 News at 10
News
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News
On Your Side
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(7:55) Fútbol Mexicano Primera División (Live)
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◆ Anger Mgt
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Fox 5 News On the Plus
Mod Fam
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Movie: The Lady Vanishes ★★★★ (1938)
(9:37) The Witness for the Prosecution
Doc Martin
Doc Martin
(9:34) Movie: Breakfast at Tiffany’s ★★★ (1961)
Check Pls.
France 24 Programming
The Weissensee Saga
Nestor Burma
Finding Your Roots
Afropop: Cultural Exchange Independent Lens
ARTICO
◆ Seinfeld
49th NAACP Image Awards
News
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Law & Order: SVU
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◆
CABLE CHANNELS
GUY D'ALEMA/FOX
The Resident (Fox at 10 Sunday) Matt Czuchry and Emily VanCamp star in
this new drama about a young doctor learning the good and evil of the
medical industry during his final years of training.
Saturday Night Live
(NBC at 11:30) Host Jessica
Chastain, Troye Sivan performs.
Sunday Morning Futures (Fox
News at 10) Rep. David Schweikert
(R-Ariz.), Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.).
PREMIERE
Face the Nation
(CBS at 10:30)Sen. Dianne
Feinstein (D-Calif.).
Planet Earth: Blue Planet II (BBC
America at 9) The latest five-part
documentary in the award-winning
series.
SPECIAL
Abba: When All Is Said and Done
(Reelz at 8) Former band members
Agnetha Faltskog and “Frida” AnniFrid Lyngstad explain what life in
Abba was like and what led to the
band’s eventual breakup.
SUNDAY LISTINGS
Fox News Sunday (Fox at 9 a.m.)
Office of Management and Budget
Director Mick Mulvaney, Army Lt.
Gen. John Mulholland.
This Is America & the World
(WETA at 10 and WHUT at 7:30
p.m.) Tunisia’s ambassador, Faycal
Gouia.
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
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ACROSS
Color in the
brown family
Dusty trail
figure
Board that
decides without
voting
Flow hindrance
Not expected
Ducklike bird
Company that
pioneered metal
drivers in golf
Perrier units
Only one fed.
holiday falls on
it annually
A hockey player
may check
with one
Thing to get
one’s claws into
Often-glazed
delicacy
Tail of a cartoon
dog?
Actress
__-Margret
Hosp. areas
Lake Itasca,
vis-à-vis the
Mississippi
Out indefinitely
Certain
landing aid
Sara Roosevelt’s
maiden name
Gordon
Shumway’s
title alias,
in a sitcom
“I didn’t need to
know that”
Book after Exod.
Settled things
They go on
until dawn
More at the
end?
Many a boat,
to its skipper
Strong denial
Fulfill, as a
promise
Advanced
Pac-12
student
Colon, in
analogies
Parachute
fabric
Bldg. units
Pipe organ
component
SPECIAL
24th Annual Screen Actors Guild
Awards (TBS at 8) Kristen Bell
hosts this awards show during
which 13 awards for acting in film
and television are given out.
PREMIERE
Counterpart (Starz at 8) A cog
discovers that the U.N. agency he’s
working for is hiding a passage to a
parallel dimension.
Scandalous (Fox News Channel
at 8) A historical documentary
series about scandals from the
nation’s past.
— Sarah Polus
More at washingtonpost.com/tv
(5:00) Live PD
(8:06) Live PD: Rewind
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A&E
(6:30) Movie: The Day After Tomorrow ★★ (2004)
Planet Earth: Blue Planet II
Movie: The Day After Tomorrow ★★
AMC
Pit Bulls and Parolees
Pit Bulls and Parolees
Pit Bulls and Parolees
(10:08) The Vet Life
Pit Bulls and Parolees
Animal Planet
(6:30) Movie: The Single Moms Club ★★ (2014)
Madea’s Big Happy Family
A Madea
BET
(7:14) Movie: GoodFellas ★★★★ (1990)
(10:22) Movie: GoodFellas ★★★★ (1990)
Bravo
Unikitty
Cleveland
Family Guy
Rick, Morty
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Movie: Mean Girls ★★★ (2004)
E!
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(8:15) College Basketball: Florida at Kentucky (Live)
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College Basketball
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2018 Australian Open Tennis: Round of 16 (Live)
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(7:15) Movie: Big Hero 6 ★★★ (2014)
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◆
High Definition Movie Ratings (from TMS) ★★★★ Excellent ★★★ Good ★★ Fair ★ Poor No stars: not rated
Exes are ‘friends,’ but with ‘benefits.’
Their adult son can handle the news.
By Alex Bajcz
Adapted from a
recent online discussion.
Dear Carolyn:
I’m a divorced
woman in my
early 50s with a
23-year-old son,
“Dave,” whom I
am very close to. My ex-husband,
“Jim,” and I split up about 12
years ago and managed over
time to become friends again
and co-parent effectively.
I have come to see that Jim
just isn’t cut out for
commitment; I should have
known, being his third wife, but
live and learn, right? He’s single
again after yet another failed
marriage and I never remarried.
A few months ago, I took Jim
out to dinner to thank him for
throwing some business my way
— we’re in the same field — and
one thing led to another. Long
story short, we have developed a
very casual relationship — for
lack of a better term, “friends
with benefits.”
I’d like to keep this a secret
from Dave, as I don’t want to give
him the idea we might be getting
back together and the real
explanation is surely TMI for
him. The problem is that Jim
spends the night about once or
twice a week and Dave is in the
habit of dropping by my place
frequently and always
unannounced. Last Sunday
morning he missed finding his
father here by about 20 minutes.
We can’t go to Jim’s place since
I have two dogs and a cat that
can’t be left overnight. Jim also
refuses to take a cab or Uber
over. He says if Dave finds out,
we’ll just deal with it then.
I can’t imagine a worse
scenario myself. If I ask Dave to
call before he comes over, I
might as well say right out, “I’m
hiding something from you.”
Should we just keep our fingers
crossed that Dave doesn’t find
out before this thing ends, or
should I somehow find a way to
tell him upfront?
— Keeping a Secret From My Son
Carolyn
Hax
© 2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
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DOWN
OT book
Fancy
enamelwork
Endodontic
therapy
Says
Tries to pick up
Political
commentator
Navarro
Drummer’s
creations
2010 Commonwealth Games
host city
One making a
splash?
Rail stop
between Stuttgart and Munich
State in both
the Pacific and
Mountain time
zones
“A __ Fury”:
“Star Wars”
DVD segment
More than
competent
They may involve
cheap shots
Urban omnivore
Word of amore
1/20/18
25 Mob hiree
26 Show displeasure
27 Carefully timed
operation
32 Worst of the
worst
33 Flirts with
34 Lover of Geraint
36 Bad state for
sailing
37 Seat for a
priority boarder
38 Part of a
bargain,
maybe
40 Hyper
44 “__ be a
shame if ...”
45 Mediterranean
sauces
46 Do only what he
says
47 “Rescue Me”
star Denis
48 “Did I do that?”
TV nerd
49 Sitcom with a
1974 wedding
episode
53 Sporty car roof
55 A big one might
be fragile
56 Geometric suffix
57 Eighth mo. in
the old Roman
calendar
FRIDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
Keeping a Secret From My Son:
So you’re a consenting,
independent-living, single adult
sneaking around with a
consenting, independent-living,
single adult to avoid upsetting
. . . an adult son who lives
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
independently.
Not to sound jaded, but I can
think of more scandalous
scandals.
You’re casually dating your ex.
Okay then. You made the choice,
now pick your preferred
consequence: Letting your son
walk in on this news, or telling
him yourself.
Not that it’s mine to make, but
the choice seems obvious. “Just
so you know, your father stays
over here occasionally. I didn’t
want you to find out by walking
in on him one day.” When he asks
you what’s going on, you say,
“Nothing serious, we’re just
friends.” Which it isn’t, and you
are. You don’t have to explain
yourself, not even to your son.
The getting-back-together
prospect might have meant a lot
12 years ago, but surely now
Dave can handle more nuance.
He may be concerned about
your making things difficult for
yourself, and he may be right,
but you would be right to assure
him he’s not responsible for your
choices, you are.
And finally: It’ll be weird for
him, but only if he doesn’t give it
more than a moment’s thought.
You were drawn to each other
once, so why not twice?
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her
column delivered to your inbox each
morning at wapo.st/haxpost.
Join the discussion live at noon
Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com
ANNETTE
BENING
JAMIE
BELL
JULIE
WALTERS
VANESSA
REDGRAVE
“ONE OF THE YEAR’S BEST FILMS!”
-Rex Reed, NEW YORK OBSERVER
A FILM BY
WWW.SONYCLASSICS.COM
PAUL MCGUIGAN
Bethesda
ARCLIGHT BETHESDA
(301) 365-0213 arclightcinemas.com
Fairfax ANGELIKA AT MOSAIC (571) 512-3301
WWW.FILMSTARSDONTDIEINLIVERPOOL.COM
C4
EZ
Allegations
rebutted
DOUGLAS FROM C1
during a one-on-one script meeting in his apartment.
“He slid down to the floor,
unbuckled his belt and put his
hand inside his trousers,” Braudy
said. “And I could see what he
was doing. And then he began to
sort of fondle himself, and I was
very scared.”
Douglas declined a request for
comment from NBC News but
told the Hollywood Reporter
that Braudy’s story was “an unfortunate and complete fabrication.”
The actor has defended himself before. In an interview
with Deadline published Jan. 9,
two days after his father, Kirk
Douglas, and wife, Catherine
Zeta-Jones, took the stage at
the Golden Globes, Douglas
said he “felt the need to get
ahead of this.” He recalled
using “colorful language” in
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. SATURDAY,
Braudy’s presence but denied
that it was ever aimed at her.
He also referred to the 1989
incident as “a complete lie,
fabrication, no truth to it whatsoever.”
“I pride myself on my reputation in this business, not to
mention the long history of my
father and everything else,”
Douglas said. “I don’t have
skeletons in my closet, or anyone else who’s coming out or
saying this. I’m bewildered why,
after 32 years, this is coming
out, now.”
JANUARY 20 , 2018
Writer Susan Braudy, who
worked for actor Michael
Douglas in the 1980s, said in an
interview that the film star’s
behavior progressively became
more crass as she worked with
him. Douglas calls her
allegations “an unfortunate and
complete fabrication.”
sonia.rao@washpost.com
RICHARD SHOTWELL/INVISION/ASSOCIATED PRESS
MOVIE DIRECTORY
DISTRICT
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
3111 K Street N.W.
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
10:30-2:15-5:00-7:45-10:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 3:30-7:00-10:50
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG13) CC: 12:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 4:35
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 10:1012:05-4:00-6:45-10:20
The Commuter (PG-13) CC: 11:153:10-5:45-8:20-10:30
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 10:151:15-4:05-7:00
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
12:10-4:10-7:20-10:25
Molly's Game (R) CC: 12:45
All the Money in the World (R)
CC: 9:50
Proud Mary (R) CC: 1:50-5:408:00-10:55
The Post (PG-13) CC: 10:00-12:452:40-3:40-6:30-9:20
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 12:15-3:357:00-10:15
I, Tonya (R) 11:10-2:00-5:008:00-10:15
12 Strong (R) CC: 10:35AM
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
3D (PG-13) 1:45-7:35-10:20
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 11:151:05-4:10-7:15-9:20
12 Strong: The IMAX 2D Experience (R) CC: 1:10-4:20-7:30-10:40
The Post (PG-13) 11:00-1:50-4:407:30-10:20
AMC Loews Uptown 1
3426 Connecticut Avenue N.W.
The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:30-4:307:30-10:31
Back to the Future (PG) 10:30AM
AMC Mazza Gallerie
5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
12:20-2:50-5:20-7:50-10:20
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 12:40-4:00-9:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG13) CC: 7:20
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: (!) 11:10-1:10-4:107:40
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: (!) 10:1011:20-2:00-4:30-7:10-10:30
Proud Mary (R) CC: 10:40-1:003:20-5:40-8:00-10:40
12 Strong (R) CC: (!) 10:20-1:204:20-7:30-10:15-10:25
The Post (PG-13) CC: 10:25-2:105:00-7:00-9:45
Albert Einstein Planetarium National Air & Space Museum
6th Street and Independence Ave SW
To Space and Back 11:00AM
Dark Universe Space Show (NR)
11:30-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30
Journey to the Stars (NR) 12:001:00-2:00-3:00-4:00-5:00
The Stars Tonight (NR) 10:30AM
One World, One Sky: Big Bird's
Adventure (NR)
Angelika
Pop-Up at Union Market
550 Penn Street NE - Unit E
The Disaster Artist (R) 11:00-1:057:55-10:00
Gintama Live Action the Movie
(Gintama) (2017) (NR) 11:00AM
The Greatest Showman (PG) 1:454:15-7:20-9:35
The Post (PG-13) 11:30-2:00-3:154:30-5:35-7:00-9:20
Avalon Theatre
5612 Connecticut Avenue
I, Tonya (R) 2:30-5:15-8:00
The Post (PG-13) 11:30-2:155:00-7:45
Landmark
Atlantic Plumbing Cinema
807 V Street, NW
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 12:15-3:30-6:45-9:50
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 12:302:30-4:35-7:15-9:30
Molly's Game (R) CC: 1:00-4:007:00-10:00
All the Money in the World (R) CC:
11:30-2:10-4:50-7:30
The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:35-12:002:00-2:40-4:40-5:10-7:20-8:009:45-10:20-10:30
Landmark E Street Cinema
555 11th Street NW
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 10:051:05-4:05-7:05-9:55
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 10:15-12:50-3:506:50-9:50
The Final Year CC: 10:50-1:20-3:305:40-7:50-10:00
Lady Bird (R) CC: 10:40-1:10-3:205:30-7:40-9:50
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 10:001:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
10:00-12:45-3:45-6:45-9:45
I, Tonya (R) CC: 10:10-1:10-4:107:10-9:40
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 10:301:30-4:30-7:30-10:05
Landmark West End Cinema
2301 M Street NW
The Disaster Artist (R) CC: 11:004:30-7:30-9:50
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 1:30-4:00
The Florida Project (R) CC: 10:451:15-7:00-9:30
The Road Movie (NR) 11:45-1:453:45-5:45-7:45-9:45
Regal Gallery Place
Stadium 14
701 Seventh Street NW
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
12:10-3:50-7:10-10:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 2:20
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
11:00-1:50-4:40-7:40-10:40
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:15-1:454:20-7:00-9:40
12 Strong (R) 1:55-7:55-11:00
Monster Hunt 2 (Zhuo yao ji 2)
11:00-5:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 8:20
Proud Mary (R) 11:05-1:15-3:255:40-8:10-10:30
12 Strong (R) 11:10-5:15-11:10
Smithsonian - Lockheed Martin
IMAX Theater
601 Independence Avenue SW
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
2:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi An IMAX
3D Experience (PG-13) 7:00
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
Sea 3D (NR) 11:00-1:15
Dream Big: Engineering Our
World: An IMAX 3D Experience
12:25
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 10:2511:50-2:05-3:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi The
IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
4:10-9:55
MARYLAND
AFI Silver Theatre
Cultural Center
8633 Colesville Road
The Shape of Water (R) 2:15-7:05
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 4:45
The Post (PG-13) 11:30-1:50-4:106:45-9:10
Lady Bird (R) 12:15-9:30
Phantom Thread 70mm (R) 11:001:40-4:20-7:00-9:40
AMC Academy 8
6198 Greenbelt Road
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 12:35-3:55-7:15-10:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 11:45-2:30-5:158:00-10:45
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
CC: 2:45-5:15-7:45-10:15
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: (!) 11:051:35-4:05-6:30-9:00
The Commuter (PG-13) CC: (!)
11:40-2:20-5:00-7:40-10:20
Proud Mary (R) CC: (!) 10:0011:00-1:25-3:45-6:00-8:15-10:45
Den of Thieves (R) CC: (!) 10:1511:30-1:20-4:25-7:30-10:35
12 Strong (R) CC: (!) 10:00-1:004:00-7:00-10:00
AMC Center Park 8
4001 Powder Mill Rd.
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 11:00-1:45-4:457:30-10:15
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
CC: 12:15-2:45-5:30-8:00-10:30
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 11:25-2:155:00-7:45-10:15
The Commuter (PG-13) CC: 11:001:30-4:00-6:45-9:20
Proud Mary (R) CC: 11:30-2:004:30-7:00-9:30
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 11:50-3:156:30-9:45
12 Strong (R) CC: (!) 11:45-3:006:00-9:00
The Post (PG-13) CC: 12:45-3:306:15-9:15
AMC Columbia 14
10300 Little Patuxent Parkway
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
10:45-1:20-4:00-6:40-9:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
11:10-6:10-9:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D
(PG-13) 2:40
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 11:204:50-10:25
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 10:35-1:25-4:20-7:1010:05
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
CC: 10:40-1:15-3:50-6:30-9:15
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 10:50-1:304:05-6:50-9:25
The Commuter (PG-13) CC: 10:301:05-4:10-6:55-9:45
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 12:303:30-6:35
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
1:50-7:25
Molly's Game (R) CC: 9:50
Proud Mary (R) CC: 11:45-2:205:00-7:40-10:00
Den of Thieves (R) CC: (!) 11:503:20-6:50-10:10
The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:00-1:554:45-7:30-10:15
Lady Bird (R) CC: 11:30-4:40-7:10
I, Tonya (R) 11:40-2:50-6:00-9:05
12 Strong: The IMAX 2D Experience (R) (!) 10:30-1:30-4:30-7:3010:30
The Greatest Showman Sing-ALong (PG) 2:00-9:50
AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18
9811 Washingtonian Ctr.
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
Hoyt's West Nursery
Den of Thieves (R) CC: (!) 9:45Cinema 14
12:45-3:45-7:00-9:30
1591 West Nursery Road
12 Strong (R) CC: (!) 11:00-2:00The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
3:30-7:30-9:15
The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:30-12:30- 1:20-4:05-6:35-9:05
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
4:45-6:00-10:30
CC: 12:30-4:00-7:00-10:00
AMC Magic Johnson
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 12:30Capital Center 12
2:45-5:05-7:25
800 Shoppers Way
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 2:05-4:45
(PG-13) CC: 12:30-1:30-3:15-4:15Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC:
6:15-7:15-9:00-10:15
7:20-9:35
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
CC:
2:00-4:50-7:35-10:05
CC: 11:35-12:45-3:15-5:45-8:15Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 1:05-4:1011:00
6:40-9:15
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 11:10-1:45The Commuter (PG-13) CC: 1:504:10-6:45-9:15
The Commuter (PG-13) CC: 11:40- 4:40-7:20-9:50
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 12:502:20-5:05-7:40-10:10
Proud Mary (R) CC: 11:15-12:30- 4:00-6:50-9:40
Molly's Game (R) CC: 9:45
1:30-2:45-3:45-5:10-6:15-7:30Proud Mary (R) CC: 12:45-1:458:30-9:45-10:45
3:00-4:30-5:30-6:45-7:45-9:20Den of Thieves (R) CC: (!) 11:0010:20
1:00-2:00-4:00-5:00-7:00-8:00Den of Thieves (R) CC: 12:55-4:009:00-10:00-11:00
12 Strong (R) CC: 11:45-3:00-6:00 7:05-10:10
The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:05-1:40- 12 Strong (R) CC: 1:15-4:207:15-10:10
4:20-7:05-9:40
12 Strong: The IMAX 2D Experi- The Post (PG-13) CC: 12:40-3:306:30-9:10
ence (R) (!) 1:15-4:15-7:15-10:15
Landmark
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Bethesda Row Cinema
(PG-13) 11:30-2:10-4:50-7:457235 Woodmont Avenue
10:30
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 10:30ArcLight Bethesda
1:30-4:20-7:20-10:00
7101 Democracy Boulevard
The Post (PG-13) CC: 10:00The Greatest Showman (PG)
1:00-1:40-3:50-4:30-6:50-7:3011:00-2:20-4:50-7:20-9:45
9:40-10:05
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 11:30-3:25
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Missouri (R) CC: 10:50-1:50-4:40(PG-13) 11:45-2:25-5:05-7:457:25-10:00
10:25
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 10:00Paddington 2 (PG) 10:30-12:5012:50-3:40-7:00-9:50
3:15-4:20-6:45-9:00
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 10:20The Commuter (PG-13) 11:351:10-4:00-7:10-9:50
2:10-4:35-7:05-9:25
Lady Bird (R) CC: 10:25-12:50Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:45-1:30- 3:20-5:40-7:50-9:55
4:15-7:00-9:40
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
The Shape of Water (R) 10:2510:20-1:20-4:10-6:55-9:50
1:15-4:40-8:10-10:45
Old Greenbelt Theatre
Molly's Game (R) 1:40-8:25
129 Centerway
Den of Thieves (R) 11:40-2:55The
Post
(PG-13) 3:00-5:30-8:00
5:55-8:30-10:35
12 Strong (R) 11:30-2:15-5:10Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
8:00-10:50
3899 Branch Avenue
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Missouri (R) 1:45-3:20-5:40
(PG-13) 11:00-1:45-4:30-7:15Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool 10:10
(R) CC: 10:40-1:05-5:50-7:25-9:50 Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
The Post (PG-13) 11:20-12:051:00-3:15-5:30-7:45-10:20
1:55-4:30-7:15-8:15-9:10-9:55
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:40-2:10Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) 4:40-7:10-9:40
10:35-1:00-4:05-7:10-10:20
The Commuter (PG-13) 12:00All the Money in the World (R)
2:25-5:00-7:30-10:00
5:35
Proud Mary (R) 12:15-2:30-4:45Lady Bird (R) CC: 10:50-1:157:00-9:15
3:55-6:00
Den of Thieves (R) 1:05-4:05I, Tonya (R) CC: 11:25-2:40-5:15- 7:20-10:00
7:50-10:55
Regal Bowie Stadium 14
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 11:0515200 Major Lansdale Boulevard
1:50-4:45-7:30-10:15
Ferdinand (PG) 1:30-4:40-7:50
Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
The Greatest Showman (PG)
1020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
12:25-3:10-6:10-9:15
Ferdinand (PG) 10:20AM
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) 12:10-3:30-6:55-10:20
11:20-2:40-6:10-9:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 10:40(PG-13) 1:00-4:10-7:20-10:25
1:15-4:40-7:10-9:50
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 12:15-3:00-5:30-8:10-10:45
(PG-13) 11:00-2:00-4:50-7:40Paddington 2 (PG) 12:05-2:4010:25
5:15-8:00-10:35
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) The Commuter (PG-13) 1:20-3:5010:15-12:40-3:20-5:45-8:10-10:35 6:25-9:00
Paddington 2 (PG) 10:10-12:50Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:40-3:553:50-6:40-9:20
6:50-9:50
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:30Call Me by Your Name (R) 1:102:20-5:10-8:00-10:50
4:20-7:40-10:40
Proud Mary (R) 10:20-12:30-2:50- Proud Mary (R) 12:00-1:15-2:305:00-7:20-9:40
3:45-5:00-6:15-7:30-8:45-10:00
Den of Thieves (R) 10:00-1:10All the Money in the World (R)
4:20-7:30-10:40
10:35
All the Money in the World (R)
Den of Thieves (R) 12:30-3:4010:05-1:20
7:00-10:30
12 Strong (R) 1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00 12 Strong (R) 12:20-3:20-6:30-9:40
Lady Bird (R) 3:40-6:00-8:20-10:45 The Post (PG-13) 12:50-4:0012 Strong (R) 12:00-3:00-6:00-9:00 7:10-10:10
Bow Tie Harbour 9
2474 Solomons Island Road
The Greatest Showman (PG)
11:00-1:30-4:40-7:40-10:10
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:20-1:204:00-6:50-10:30
The Shape of Water (R) 12:303:30-6:40-9:30
Molly's Game (R) 9:40AM
The Post (PG-13) 10:30-1:10-4:207:10-9:50
I, Tonya (R) 10:50-1:40-4:307:20-10:20
Phantom Thread (R) 9:30-12:403:40-7:00-10:00
Regal Cinemas Majestic
Stadium 20 & IMAX
900 Ellsworth Drive
Ferdinand (PG) 11:45-2:35
The Disaster Artist (R) 12:25-3:105:50-8:30-11:00
The Greatest Showman (PG)
12:05-2:55-5:30-8:15-11:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
12:00-3:35-7:00-10:30
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 5:007:40-10:20
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:30-2:05-4:55-6:20-7:459:15-10:45
Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD Coco (PG) 12:35-3:20-5:25
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
7000 Arundel Mills Circle
11:50-2:30-5:10-8:00-10:40
Ferdinand (PG) 11:10-2:00
Paddington 2 (PG) 12:55-4:00The Greatest Showman (PG)
6:45-10:00
11:50-2:40-5:30-8:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) The Commuter (PG-13) 11:452:20-5:15-8:05-10:45
11:15-2:45-6:30-10:15
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:20-3:25Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 11:356:30-9:35
2:10-4:40-7:25-10:05
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Call Me by Your Name (R) 11:553:05-6:15-9:25
(PG-13) 11:00-12:30-3:25-4:45Molly's Game (R) 11:30-2:40
6:15-7:40-9:10
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) Proud Mary (R) 11:50-2:45-5:408:25-10:55
11:30-2:15-5:00-7:40-10:25
Den of Thieves (R) 12:50-4:05Paddington 2 (PG) 11:45-2:306:05-7:25-9:20-10:50
5:20-8:20
12 Strong (R) 11:40-3:00-6:00-9:00
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:05Forever My Girl (PG) 11:35-1:102:05-4:50-7:30-10:10
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:00-3:10- 4:25-7:05-9:45
Condorito: The Movie (Condorito:
6:25-9:35
La película) (PG) 8:10-10:30
The Shape of Water (R) 12:45The Post (PG-13) 12:55-4:153:45-6:40-9:50
7:15-10:15
Molly's Game (R) 3:40-9:55
Proud Mary (R) 11:20-12:20-1:15- I, Tonya (R) 12:30-3:40-6:35-9:30
12 Strong: The IMAX 2D Experi1:50-2:50-4:30-5:15-7:10-7:30ence (R) 1:00-4:30-7:30-10:35
7:50-9:45-10:20
Den of Thieves (R) 11:00-12:35- The Greatest Showman Sing-ALong (PG) 2:15
2:20-4:05-5:40-7:15-9:00-10:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Regal Germantown
Missouri (R) 12:15-3:15-6:00-8:45
Stadium 14
20000 Century Boulevard
12 Strong (R) 10:55-2:00-5:10-8:15
The Post (PG-13) 12:40-3:35The Greatest Showman (PG) 1:006:30-9:25
4:00-6:45-9:30
I, Tonya (R) 11:40-2:55-5:50-8:50 Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Forever My Girl (PG) 10:55-1:30- 11:30-3:00-6:30-10:00
AMC Loews
4:10-6:50-9:40
St. Charles Town Ctr. 9
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 3:15-5:4511115 Mall Circle
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 8:15-10:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) 3D (PG-13) 1:55-10:30
Thaanaa Serndha Koottam (Tamil) (PG-13) 11:15-1:30-4:30-7:30CC: 11:15-2:45-6:15-9:45
10:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (NR) 11:25-3:00-6:20-10:00
Lady Bird (R) 12:10-2:50-5:25Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
(PG-13) CC: 10:30-1:15-4:157:55-10:25
2:30-5:15-8:00-10:45
7:15-10:00
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:45-12:45Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) Along With the Gods: The Two
4:45-8:00
Worlds
3:30-6:15-9:00
CC: 10:05-1:00-4:00-6:45-10:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle The Commuter (PG-13) 2:15-5:00Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 10:003D (PG-13) 1:55-10:30
7:45-10:30
12:45-5:00-6:30-10:30
The Commuter (PG-13) CC: 9:45- Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:15-4:15(PG-13) 11:00-4:45-7:40
7:15-10:15
2:15-3:15-7:45-9:00
Call Me by Your Name (R) 12:15Proud Mary (R) CC: 10:00-12:30- 12 Strong (R) 10:55-2:00-5:103:30-6:45-9:45
3:00-5:30-8:00-10:15
8:15; 1:00-4:00-7:00-10:20
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 11:15-1:55
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
10:50-1:35-5:20-8:00-10:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 11:45-3:15-6:40-10:05
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC:
4:05-6:50
Coco (PG) CC: 10:45-1:20
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 10:55-1:50-4:457:40-10:35
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
CC: (!) 10:40-1:25-5:35-8:10-10:50
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: (!) 2:004:35-7:10-9:45
The Commuter (PG-13) CC: (!)
10:30-1:45-4:30-7:15-9:55
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC:
3:30-6:25
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
4:35-7:35
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC: (!)
10:40-12:50-4:20-7:25-10:30
Molly's Game (R) CC: 9:15
Proud Mary (R) CC: (!) 10:45-3:055:30-7:55-10:15
Den of Thieves (R) CC: (!) 11:052:20-4:00-7:30-10:45
12 Strong (R) CC: (!) 11:40-9:20
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 10:30
The Post (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:301:20-4:10-7:00-9:50
Forever My Girl (PG) CC: (!) 10:351:40-4:20-7:05-9:40
Lady Bird (R) CC: 1:05
I, Tonya (R) (!) 12:55-4:10-7:2010:20
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 11:102:15-4:15-7:20-10:25
A Better Tomorrow 2018 (!) 1:104:05-7:10-10:00
12 Strong: The IMAX 2D Experience (R) CC: (!) 1:00-4:25-7:5010:55
Proud Mary (R) 1:45-4:00-6:158:30-10:45
Den of Thieves (R) 12:30-3:457:00-10:15
12 Strong (R) 11:45-1:30-4:307:30-10:30
The Post (PG-13) 12:00-3:006:00-9:00
I, Tonya (R) 12:15-3:15-6:30-9:30
UA Snowden Square
Stadium 14
9161 Commerce Center Drive
The Greatest Showman (PG)
10:05-12:40-3:20-6:00-8:35
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
11:15-2:45-6:30-10:00
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 6:00-9:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 10:30-1:20-4:15-7:00-9:50
Regal Hyattsville Royale
Coco (PG) 12:30-3:10
Stadium 14
Paddington 2 (PG) 10:00-1:106505 America Blvd.
3:40-6:15-9:00
Ferdinand (PG) 1:00
The Commuter (PG-13) 10:00The Greatest Showman (PG)
12:30-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:45
12:30-3:05-5:45-8:25-11:00
The Shape of Water (R) 12:10Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) 3:30-6:30-9:40
12:30-4:00-7:30-10:50
Call Me by Your Name (R) 10:40Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 1:40-4:45-7:50-10:50
(PG-13) 1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
Proud Mary (R) 10:20-12:45-3:00Coco (PG) 12:45-3:25
5:45-8:15-10:40-11:05
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) Den of Thieves (R) 10:05-1:151:45-4:30-7:15-10:00
4:30-7:40-11:00
Paddington 2 (PG) 1:30-4:0512 Strong (R) 10:15-1:30-4:306:45-9:30
7:30-10:30
The Commuter (PG-13) 1:15-3:50- The Post (PG-13) 10:10-1:00-4:006:30-9:15
6:45-9:30
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 6:05-9:00 I, Tonya (R) 10:00-12:00-3:15Call Me by Your Name (R) 1:306:15-9:15
4:30-7:45-10:45
Phantom Thread (R) 10:10-12:50Proud Mary (R) 12:50-3:05-5:30- 3:50-7:15-10:20
7:45-10:15
Xscape Theatres
Den of Thieves (R) 1:15-4:25Brandywine 14
7:35-11:00
7710 Matapeake Business Drive
12 Strong (R) 12:45-3:45-7:00Ferdinand (PG) CC: 10:15-1:00
10:20
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 10:05-12:40-3:20-6:30-9:10
Missouri (R) 3:40-6:25-9:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Forever My Girl (PG) 1:45-4:30CC: 11:00-2:40-6:10-9:30
7:15-10:15
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
The Post (PG-13) 1:50-5:00-8:00- CC: (!) 11:10-2:20-5:10-7:50-10:25
10:50
Paddington 2 (PG) OC; CC: (!)
Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12 10:20-12:50-3:30-6:20-9:00
14716 Baltimore Avenue
The Commuter (PG-13) CC: 11:502:30-5:20-8:00-10:30
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Molly's Game (R) CC: (!) 12:10
10:45-1:20-4:15-7:45-10:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Proud Mary (R) CC: (!) 12:30-3:005:30-8:10-10:40
11:00-2:35-6:15-9:55
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 10:45-4:00 Den of Thieves (R) CC: (!) 3:40Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 7:00-10:10
12 Strong (R) CC: (!) 10:00-1:10(PG-13) 11:40-2:45-6:00-9:15
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) 4:10-7:10-10:20
Forever My Girl (PG) CC: (!) 11:203:15-8:15-10:50
2:00-4:50-7:20-9:50
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:15-1:50The Post (PG-13) CC: 10:30-1:154:30-6:15
3:55-6:40-9:20
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:30Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
2:05-4:45-7:30-10:05
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 1:05-6:30 (PG-13) CC: 11:30-2:50-3:50-6:00Proud Mary (R) 11:00-12:20-3:00- 6:50-8:50-9:40
Proud Mary (R) CC: (!) 11:40-2:105:30-8:00-10:30
4:40-7:30-10:00
Den of Thieves (R) 11:30-1:35iPic Pike & Rose
5:00-7:15-9:00-10:40
11830 Grand Park Avenue
12 Strong (R) 12:05-3:30-7:00Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
10:10
The Post (PG-13) 10:50-1:50-4:45- 11:00-2:45-6:45-10:40
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
7:15-10:20
I, Tonya (R) 12:30-3:45-6:45-9:45 (PG-13) 12:00-3:15-6:30-9:45
Paddington 2 (PG) (!) 11:45-3:00Regal Rockville Center
6:15-9:30
Stadium 13
The Commuter (PG-13) (!) 1:15199 East Montgomery Avenue
4:30-7:45-11:30
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Proud Mary (R) (!) 11:30-2:30-5:1511:30-2:30-5:30-8:15-11:00
8:00-11:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Den of Thieves (R) (!) 11:45-3:3011:45-3:30-7:00-10:30
7:00-10:50
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 12 Strong (R) (!) 12:15-3:45-7:30-11:00
(PG-13) 10:45-1:45-4:45-7:45The Post (PG-13) (!) 12:45-4:0010:45
7:15-10:30
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
11:45-2:15-5:00-7:45-10:15
Paddington 2 (PG) 10:45-1:30AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
4:15-7:00-9:45
2150 Clarendon Blvd.
The Commuter (PG-13) 12:00The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
2:45-5:30-8:15-11:00
11:00-1:45-4:15-6:45-9:15
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 4:30-10:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
The Shape of Water (R) 10:45CC: 10:00-1:15-4:30-7:45-11:15
1:30-7:30
Proud Mary (R) 11:00-2:15-4:45- Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 10:451:15-4:00-6:30-9:00
8:00-10:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Den of Thieves (R) 11:00-1:30(PG-13) CC: 10:30-1:30-4:154:45-7:15-10:30
7:15-10:00
12 Strong (R) 11:30-2:15-5:15Molly's Game (R) CC: 10:15-1:458:00-10:45
The Post (PG-13) 11:00-1:45-4:30- 5:00-8:00-11:00
12 Strong (R) CC: 10:00-1:00-4:007:15-10:00
I, Tonya (R) 12:00-3:15-6:30-9:45 7:00-10:00-11:15
The Ex-File 3: The Return of The The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:15-2:00Exes (Qian Ren 3) (NR) 4:00-9:30 4:45-7:30-10:15
A Better Tomorrow 2018 1:00-7:00 I, Tonya (R) 11:45-2:30-5:158:15-11:00
VIRGINIA
Regal Waugh Chapel
Stadium 12 & IMAX
1419 South Main Chapel Way
AMC Hoffman Center 22
206 Swamp Fox Rd.
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 10:40-1:15
The Disaster Artist (R) CC: 9:20
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
11:15-1:50-4:30-7:05-9:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 12:00-3:30-7:10-10:30
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC:
6:30-9:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 10:35-1:00-4:007:15-10:15
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
CC: 1:45-4:15-6:45-9:30
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 11:00-1:404:35-7:15-9:45
The Commuter (PG-13) CC: 11:201:50-4:25-7:05-9:45
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 10:501:25-4:20-7:20-10:20
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
3:15-6:05
Downsizing (R) CC: 12:30
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
12:25-3:25-6:30-9:35
Regal Westview
Molly's Game (R) CC: 6:35-9:50
Stadium 16 & IMAX
Proud Mary (R) CC: 10:30-12:005243 Buckeystown Pike
2:15-4:30-7:00-9:30-10:15
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 7:30-10:45
Ferdinand (PG) 11:30-2:15-5:00
All the Money in the World (R)
The Greatest Showman (PG)
CC: 3:30
11:45-2:30-5:15-8:15-11:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) 12 Strong (R) CC: 12:45-3:45-6:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
11:30-3:00-6:30-10:15
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 7:45-10:30 Missouri (R) CC: 3:40-9:05
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Forever My Girl (PG) CC: 12:203:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
(PG-13) 1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
Condorito: The Movie (Condorito:
Coco (PG) 12:00
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) La película) (PG) CC: 11:05-4:10
The Post (PG-13) CC: 10:30-1:3011:45-3:00-5:45-8:30-11:15
4:15-7:20-10:10
Paddington 2 (PG) 12:15-3:30Lady Bird (R) CC: 10:40-1:20-6:25
6:45-9:30
I, Tonya (R) 11:25-2:10-4:55The Commuter (PG-13) 12:307:40-10:25
3:15-6:00-9:00
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 12:05Darkest Hour (PG-13) 3:153:10-6:15-9:25
6:15-9:15
Premiere Event: Mary and the
The Shape of Water (R) 4:45Witch's Flower (PG) 4:40
7:45-10:45
Call Me by Your Name (R) 12:30- 12 Strong: The IMAX 2D Experience
(R) CC: 10:45-1:45-4:45-7:45-10:45
3:45-7:15-10:45
The Greatest Showman Sing-AMolly's Game (R) 1:15
Proud Mary (R) 12:15-2:45-5:30- Long (PG) 3:50
Ang Panday (2017)12:15-9:15
8:30-11:00
Den of Thieves (R) 11:45-3:15Den of Thieves (R) 11:30-2:456:45-10:00
6:30-9:45
12 Strong (R) 1:30-4:30-8:00-11:15 Premiere Event: Mary and the
Witch's Flower (PG) 11:30-2:00
The Post (PG-13) 12:45-4:15Mom and Dad (R) 1:20-6:20
7:30-10:30
AMC Potomac Mills 18
Phantom Thread (R) 12:45-4:152700 Potomac Mills Circle
7:15-10:15
12 Strong: The IMAX 2D Experi- Ferdinand (PG) CC: 11:00-4:15
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 10:15
ence (R) 12:00-3:30-7:00-10:00
The Greatest Showman (PG)
12:40-3:20-6:15-9:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
11:30-3:00-6:30-10:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:00-1:50-4:50-7:4510:40
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
12:00-2:40-5:20-8:00-10:40
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:20-2:004:40-7:30-10:15
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:402:30-5:15-8:00-10:45
Proud Mary (R) 12:20-3:10-5:458:15-10:35
Den of Thieves (R) 12:10-3:407:15-10:30
12 Strong (R) 11:10-2:20-5:25-8:30
The Post (PG-13) 12:30-3:306:45-9:40
I, Tonya (R) 11:50-3:20-6:30-9:30
12 Strong: The IMAX 2D Experience (R) 12:50-3:55-7:00-10:10
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
11:50-2:40-5:20-8:00-10:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 12:15-3:50-7:20-10:40
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 11:001:25-7:05
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 6:40-9:45
Coco (PG) CC: 12:00-2:35
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
CC: 11:40-2:20-5:05-7:45-10:30
Wonder (PG) CC: 2:10
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 11:15-1:454:15-6:45-9:15
The Commuter (PG-13) CC: 11:252:05-4:40-7:15-10:05
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 11:154:50-7:50
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
4:00-9:40
Molly's Game (R) CC: 9:50
Proud Mary (R) CC: 11:20-2:104:30-7:00-9:30
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 11:45-3:15
All the Money in the World (R) CC:
11:00AM
12 Strong (R) CC: 1:45-5:008:15-10:45
Forever My Girl (PG) CC: 11:252:00-4:45-7:30-10:10
The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:50-2:405:35-8:30
Lady Bird (R) CC: 5:15-7:40
I, Tonya (R) 12:00-2:50-5:45-8:40
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 12:103:10-6:15-9:20
The Greatest Showman Sing-ALong (PG) 1:40-7:10
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:30-3:30
Den of Thieves (R) 6:30-10:00
12 Strong: The IMAX 2D Experience (R) 11:30-2:45-6:00-9:15
AMC Shirlington 7
2772 South Randolph St.
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 10:00-4:00-10:05
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG13) CC: 1:00-7:00
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 10:401:30-4:20-7:20-10:10
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 10:151:15-4:15-7:20-10:15
Molly's Game (R) CC: 10:10-1:154:15-7:15-10:20
The Post (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:001:45-4:10-7:40-9:45
I, Tonya (R) (!) 10:45-1:00-4:457:00-10:30
Phantom Thread (R) CC: (!) 10:301:30-4:30-7:30-10:20
AMC Tysons Corner 16
7850e Tysons Corner Center
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 10:00-12:403:25
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
11:00-1:35-4:20-7:05-9:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 10:00-1:20-4:45-8:05-11:30
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 10:351:05-3:35-5:55-8:15-10:35
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 6:00
Coco (PG) CC: 10:50-1:25-4:156:45
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
CC: 10:20-12:50-3:20-5:50-8:2010:50-12:15
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: (!) 10:151:45-4:40-7:20-9:50
The Commuter (PG-13) CC: (!)
11:25-2:00-4:35-7:15-10:00-12:35
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 10:101:00-4:10-7:10-10:10
Molly's Game (R) CC: 9:15-12:25
Proud Mary (R) CC: (!) 10:1512:35-2:50-5:05-7:25-9:55
Den of Thieves (R) CC: (!) 10:051:15-4:50-7:55-11:00-12:20
12 Strong (R) CC: (!) 8:50-11:5012:30
The Post (PG-13) CC: 10:25-11:451:10-2:40-4:00-5:25-7:00-8:109:45-10:55-12:30
I, Tonya (R) 11:05-1:55-4:557:45-10:40
12 Strong: The IMAX 2D Experience (R) CC: (!) 10:30-1:30-4:307:30-10:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 10:55-1:50-5:00-8:0010:45
AMC Worldgate 9
13025 Worldgate Drive
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
10:00-12:30-3:10-6:00-9:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 10:30-12:15-3:35-7:00-10:25
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 10:00-2:00-4:507:40-10:30
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
CC: 12:00-2:35-5:10-7:50-9:00
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 10:10-1:003:40-6:10-10:20
Proud Mary (R) CC: (!) 1:50-4:156:35-9:05
Den of Thieves (R) CC: (!) 10:5012:50-4:10-7:20-10:30
12 Strong (R) CC: (!) 12:20-3:206:20-9:40
The Post (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:201:10-4:00-6:50-9:30
Alamo Drafthouse Cinema One Loudoun
20575 East Hampton Plaza
Zombi 3 (R) 10:00
The Greatest Showman (PG)
12:40-3:30-6:15-9:00-11:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
12:00-4:00-7:40-11:20
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:20-2:30-5:35-8:4011:45
Paddington 2 (PG) 12:00-3:106:40-9:45
The Commuter (PG-13) 10:451:45-4:30-7:15-10:50
Downsizing (R) 12:20-3:40-7:0010:20
I, Tonya (R) 10:50-1:50-4:508:00-11:45
The Post (PG-13) 11:40-2:50-6:009:00-11:55
12 Strong (R) 10:35-1:40-5:058:20-11:30
Angelika Film Center Mosaic
2911 District Ave
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 11:00-8:00
Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool
(R) (!) 11:30-2:15-4:45-7:30-9:55
Phantom Thread (R) (!) 10:10-1:054:00-7:00-10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
10:00-1:15-4:30-7:45-10:55
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:15-1:003:55-6:45-9:35
The Shape of Water (R) 11:452:30-5:15-8:15-10:50
Call Me by Your Name (R) 2:005:00-10:35
Gintama Live Action the Movie
(Gintama) (2017) (NR) 11:00AM
I, Tonya (R) 1:50-4:30-7:15-10:15
The Greatest Showman (PG)
10:25-12:55-3:30-6:00-8:30-10:55
Saturday, January 20, 2018
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
The Shape of Water (R) 6:50
Call Me by Your Name (R) 12:203:50-7:20-10:25
Proud Mary (R) 11:45-2:20-5:208:15-10:35
Den of Thieves (R) 11:55-3:407:30-10:50
The Post (PG-13) 11:15-2:15Bow Tie
Reston Town Center 11 & BTX 5:30-8:30
Phantom Thread (R) 12:30-4:0011940 Market Street
7:45-10:55
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Gohin Baluchor (NR) 9:15
11:20-2:10-5:00-7:40-10:30
Regal Countryside Stadium 20
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
45980 Regal Plaza
(PG-13) 11:30-2:20-5:30-8:3011:20
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Paddington 2 (PG) 10:40-1:1012:25-2:55-5:30-8:15
3:50-6:30-9:20
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 11:40-2:30- 11:50-3:10-6:45-10:05
5:20-8:10-11:10
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
The Shape of Water (R) 4:20-7:10 (PG-13) 1:05-4:10-7:00-10:10
Molly's Game (R) 10:30AM
Coco (PG) 1:10-4:00
12 Strong (R) 10:00-1:00-4:00Wonder (PG) 11:40-2:20
7:00-10:10
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:45-2:15Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 5:15-8:00-10:30
Missouri (R) 1:40-10:20
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:30-3:20I, Tonya (R) 11:10-2:00-4:506:15-9:30
7:50-10:50
Tiger Zinda Hai (NR) 5:20-9:05
The Commuter (PG-13) 10:50The Shape of Water (R) 12:001:50-4:40-7:20-10:00
2:50-5:50-9:00
The Post (PG-13) 10:10-12:00Call Me by Your Name (R) 1:001:20-3:00-4:30-6:00-7:30-9:004:15-7:20-10:20
10:40
Molly's Game (R) 12:55-4:05Phantom Thread (R) 10:20-1:30- 7:15-10:25
5:10-8:20-11:30
Proud Mary (R) 12:30-2:40-5:007:30-9:40
Cinema Arts Theatre
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
9650 Main St
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: Missouri (R) 12:05-2:45-5:40-8:45
Den of Thieves (R) 12:15-3:259:55-12:10-2:25-4:40-7:00-9:20
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 9:40- 6:50-10:00
12 Strong (R) 11:55-3:00-6:05-9:35
12:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-9:55
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 1:00- The Post (PG-13) 12:45-3:406:20-9:20
4:00-7:10-9:35
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Thaanaa Serndha Koottam (Tamil)
Missouri (R) CC: 9:45-12:15-2:40- (NR) 3:05-9:15
Forever My Girl (PG) 12:45-3:155:10-7:50-10:05
The Post (PG-13) CC: 9:40-12:05- 5:45-8:30
The Brawler (Mukkabaaz) (NR)
2:35-5:05-7:40-10:00
6:30-9:45
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 10:10Lady Bird (R) 12:10-2:30-5:051:15-4:15-7:20-9:55
7:45-10:15
Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
Phantom Thread (R) 12:40-3:501600 Village Market Boulevard
6:55-9:55
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Jai Simha (Jaisimha) (NR) 11:4012:10-2:40-5:10-7:40-10:10
3:00-6:20-9:50
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) Thaanaa Serndha Koottam (Tamil)
12:30-2:50-5:30-8:00-10:30
(NR) 12:15-6:00
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:45-2:10Regal Dulles Town Center 10
4:50-7:15-9:45
21100 Dulles Town Circle
Proud Mary (R) 11:25-1:35-3:50The Greatest Showman (PG) 1:306:05-8:20-10:35
3:15-6:15-8:45
Forever My Girl (PG) 11:40-2:15Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
4:45-7:25-9:55
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) 12:00-3:00-6:45-10:00
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 12:00
12:00-3:20-7:00-10:20
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 1:00-4:15-7:15-10:30
(PG-13) 11:30-2:20-5:00-7:45Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
10:25
2:30-5:30-8:00-10:50
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:50Paddington 2 (PG) 12:15-2:452:30-5:20-7:50-10:20
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:20-7:05 5:45-8:15
Molly's Game (R) CC: 3:30-10:05 The Commuter (PG-13) 12:003:30-6:30-9:15
Den of Thieves (R) 12:45-4:00Proud Mary (R) 12:45-3:45-6:007:10-10:15
The Post (PG-13) 11:20-2:00-4:40- 8:30-10:45
Den of Thieves (R) 12:40-4:007:20-10:00
7:00-10:15
12 Strong (R) 1:30-4:30-7:3012 Strong (R) 12:30-4:30-7:3010:30; 1:30-4:30-7:30-10:30
10:00
Manassas 4 Cinemas
The Post (PG-13) 12:50-2:15-5:008890 Mathis Ave.
7:45-10:40
The Post (PG-13) 11:30-1:50-4:10- Regal Fairfax Towne Center 10
6:30-8:50
4110 West Ox Road
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:30-1:50-4:10-6:30-8:50 The Greatest Showman (PG)
12:05-2:50-5:30-8:10-10:45
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:30-1:45Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
4:00-6:10-8:20
12:10-3:15-6:40-10:10
Den of Thieves (R) 11:30-2:15Paddington 2 (PG) 12:00-2:355:00-7:45
5:20-8:00-10:35
Rave Cinemas Centreville 12 Proud Mary (R) 12:10-2:40-5:156201 Multiplex Drive
7:45-10:15
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Den of Thieves (R) 12:30-3:5012:05-2:35-5:05-7:35-10:30
7:10-10:25
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) The Post (PG-13) 1:00-4:0010:05-1:20-4:35-7:50-11:05
7:00-9:50
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle I, Tonya (R) 12:20-3:45-6:50-9:40
(PG-13) 10:45-1:30-4:20-7:20Phantom Thread (R) 1:15-4:2010:25
7:30-10:30
Coco (PG) 10:10-1:00-4:00-6:50
Along With the Gods: The Two
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) Worlds 12:45-3:55-7:20-10:30
10:00-12:35-3:05-5:35-8:05-10:55 1987: When the Day Comes (NR)
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:15-1:4512:15-3:20-6:30-9:30
4:15-6:45-9:15
Regal Fox Stadium 16 & IMAX
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:5522875 Brambleton Plaza
2:25-4:55-7:30-10:00
Ferdinand (PG) 12:45-3:15-5:45
Proud Mary (R) 10:40-12:55-3:30- Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
5:45-8:00-10:40
12:00-3:30-7:00-10:30
Den of Thieves (R) 10:10-1:20The Greatest Showman (PG) 1:154:40-7:45-10:50
3:45-6:30-9:15
The Post (PG-13) 10:25-1:15-4:30- Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 8:15-10:30
7:15-10:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
12 Strong (R) 10:15-1:10-4:05(PG-13) 12:15-1:45-3:00-4:30-6:007:05-10:05
7:15-8:45-10:00
Thaanaa Serndha Koottam (Tamil) Coco (PG) 1:00-3:30-6:00
(NR) 10:20-1:35-4:45-7:55-11:05 Paddington 2 (PG) 12:00-2:30Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile
5:00-7:30-10:00
(NR) 9:50
The Commuter (PG-13) 12:15Rave Cinemas
2:45-5:15-7:45-10:15
Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme Darkest Hour (PG-13) 1:45-4:4511900 Palace Way
7:45-10:30
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Proud Mary (R) 12:45-3:15-5:3010:50-1:50-4:45-7:50-10:20
8:00-10:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Den of Thieves (R) 12:30-3:45(PG-13) 10:45-11:25-1:25-2:257:00-10:15
4:15-5:15-7:05-8:10-10:05-10:55 12 Strong (R) 12:00-3:00-6:15-9:15
Coco (PG) 11:00-1:35-7:15
Forever My Girl (PG) 12:15-2:45Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) 5:15-8:00-10:30
11:40-2:20-5:10-7:55-10:50
The Post (PG-13) 1:15-4:00The Commuter (PG-13) 11:056:45-9:30
1:55-4:50-7:30-10:10
Phantom Thread (R) 1:30-4:30The Shape of Water (R) 10:557:30-10:30
1:45-4:35-7:35-10:30
Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 11:10-2:05- (NR) 8:30
4:55-7:45-10:35
12 Strong: The IMAX 2D ExperiMolly's Game (R) 4:10-9:55
ence (R) 1:00-4:00-7:15-10:15
Call Me by Your Name (R) 10:40Regal Kingstowne
1:40-4:40-7:40-10:40
Stadium 16 & RPX
12 Strong (R) 11:15-2:10-5:055910 Kingstowne Towne Center
8:05-11:00
Ferdinand (PG) 12:15
The Post (PG-13) 11:30-2:15-5:00- The Greatest Showman (PG) 1:408:00-10:45
4:05-6:30-9:15
Lady Bird (R) 11:35-2:00-4:25Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
7:20-10:15
12:05-3:30-6:05-9:35
The Post (PG-13) XD: 10:35-1:20- Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 5:454:05-7:00-10:00
8:00-10:20
12 Strong (R) XD: 10:30-1:30-4:30- Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
7:25-10:25
(PG-13) 1:10-4:15-7:00-9:45
Regal Ballston Common
Coco (PG) 12:25-2:50
Stadium 12
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
671 N. Glebe Road
2:45-5:15-8:05-10:35
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Paddington 2 (PG) 12:00-2:3011:05-1:55-4:35-7:15-10:00
5:00-7:35-10:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:30-3:2011:30-3:10-6:45-10:10
6:45-9:20
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle The Commuter (PG-13) 12:40(PG-13) 12:15-3:30-7:00-9:55
3:05-5:50-8:15-10:45
Coco (PG) 11:00-1:40-4:15
Call Me by Your Name (R) 12:453:45-6:50-9:50
Paddington 2 (PG) 12:00-3:006:15-9:45
Proud Mary (R) 1:00-3:15-5:357:20-10:45
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:202:00-5:15-8:00-10:45
Den of Thieves (R) 12:20-3:25Darkest Hour (PG-13) 11:40-2:50- 6:35-10:00
12 Strong (R) 1:30-4:30-7:30-10:30
6:30-9:40
The Post (PG-13) 1:15-4:35-7:1510:05
Forever My Girl (PG) 12:55-3:406:15-9:05
Phantom Thread (R) 1:25-4:207:45-9:30
12 Strong (R) 12:00-3:00-6:00-9:00
Regal Manassas
Stadium 14 & IMAX
11380 Bulloch Drive
The Greatest Showman (PG) 1:103:40-6:20-9:10
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
12:30-3:50-7:10-10:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 2:00-5:10-8:00-10:50
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
2:30-5:20-8:15-10:40
Wonder (PG) 1:00
Paddington 2 (PG) 12:50-3:206:15-9:00
The Commuter (PG-13) 1:20-4:156:45-9:20
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 4:006:50-9:40
Call Me by Your Name (R) 1:154:10-7:15-10:20
Proud Mary (R) 12:45-3:10-5:508:30-10:50
Den of Thieves (R) 12:40-3:457:00-10:20
12 Strong (R) 12:30-3:30-6:30-9:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 1:40-4:20-7:20-10:00
The Post (PG-13) 1:30-4:30-7:3010:15
12 Strong: The IMAX 2D Experience (R) 1:45-4:45-7:45-10:45
Regal Potomac Yard
Stadium 16
3575 Potomac Avenue
Ferdinand (PG) 11:00-1:30-4:05
The Greatest Showman (PG)
11:15-2:05-4:45-7:25-10:20
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
11:20-3:00-6:30-10:05
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 11:002:15-4:35-6:55-9:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:05-2:00-4:55-7:4510:45
Coco (PG) 11:10-1:45-4:20-6:50
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 6:40-9:25
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
11:45-2:20-5:05-8:00-10:35
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:00-1:404:25-7:00-9:40
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:302:10-5:00-7:35-10:15
Molly's Game (R) 9:35
Call Me by Your Name (R) 11:151:25-4:30-7:50-10:50
Proud Mary (R) 11:00-12:00-1:202:25-3:35-4:50-5:55-7:15-8:109:50-10:55
Den of Thieves (R) 12:20-3:507:30-10:40
12 Strong (R) 11:00-1:10-4:107:20-10:25
Forever My Girl (PG) 11:00-1:504:20-7:05-9:45
The Post (PG-13) 11:10-1:55-4:407:40-10:30
Regal
Springfield Town Center 12
6500 Springfield Town Center
The Greatest Showman (PG)
11:35-2:10-5:20-8:00-10:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
11:20-2:40-6:10-9:45
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 2:15-5:107:50-10:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:30-3:30-6:30-9:20
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
11:15-2:00-4:40-7:40-10:20
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:00-1:404:20-7:00-9:40
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:101:50-4:30-7:10-10:00
The Shape of Water (R) 11:05AM
Proud Mary (R) 11:40-2:20-4:507:20-9:50
Den of Thieves (R) 11:30-2:506:20-9:30
12 Strong (R) 12:00-3:40-6:50-10:15
The Post (PG-13) 12:20-3:106:00-9:00
I, Tonya (R) 11:50-3:00-6:15-9:15
Regal Virginia Gateway
Stadium 14 & RPX
8001 Gateway Promenade Place
The Greatest Showman (PG)
10:25-12:55-3:30-6:15-9:20
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
11:45-3:45-7:15-10:30
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 11:30AM
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 10:45-1:30-4:15-7:00-9:45
Coco (PG) 11:55AM
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
2:15-5:15-8:15-10:50
Paddington 2 (PG) 10:50-1:103:40-6:00-9:15
The Commuter (PG-13) 10:551:20-3:50-6:30-9:10
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 3:006:20-9:50
Call Me by Your Name (R) 10:401:40-4:40-7:40-10:40
Proud Mary (R) 11:50-2:45-5:308:00-10:10
Den of Thieves (R) 10:35-1:354:35-7:45-10:45
12 Strong (R) 10:30-1:15-4:006:45-9:30
The Post (PG-13) 10:20-1:00-3:556:50-9:40
I, Tonya (R) 11:00-1:45-4:307:20-10:20
12 Strong (R) 11:15-2:00-4:457:30-10:15
Smithsonian - Airbus
IMAX Theater
14390 Air and Space Museum Parkway
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
11:10AM
Star Wars: The Last Jedi An IMAX
3D Experience (PG-13) 4:10-9:55
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 12:35
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
Sea 3D (NR) 10:20-1:30-3:10
Dream Big: Engineering Our World:
An IMAX 3D Experience 2:20
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 12:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi The
IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) 7:00
University Mall Theatre
10659 Braddock Road
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: 1:004:00-7:00-9:35-12:00
Coco (PG) CC: 12:15-2:30-4:45
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 7:15-9:40
Wonder (PG) CC: 12:05-2:404:55-7:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
9:50-12:00
The Rocky Horror Picture Show
(R) 12:00AM
SATURDAY, JANUARY 20 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
EZ
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
RE
PICKLES
C5
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
N-S VULNERABLE
NORTH (D)
J5
AJ6
AQJ32
AJ5
WEST
Q 10 8 2
Q943
87
Q 10 9
EAST
A763
10 7 5
K 10 4
K72
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH
K94
K82
965
8643
The bidding:
NORTH
EAST
SOUTH
1
Pass 1 NT
3 NT
All Pass
Opening lead — 2
WEST
Pass
“S
imple Saturday”
columns focus on
basic technique and logical
thinking.
The defenders have
the advantage of knowing
whether declarer’s key suits
will break well and whether
his finesses will win. A tenet
of deceptive defense is to let
declarer win his first try at a
repeatable finesse (unless a
compelling reason exists to
win immediately).
Against 3NT, East takes
the ace of spades and
returns the three. South
wins and leads a diamond to
dummy’s jack. If East takes
the king, the defense can
cash two spades, but South
will win the club shift, lead a
heart to his king and finesse
with the jack to win nine
tricks.
The result will be different if East ducks the first
diamond (with no revealing
pause). Declarer could still
succeed, but in practice
he will come to his king of
hearts for a second diamond
finesse.
Then East wins, and the
defense takes two spades
and leads a club. South has
no more entries to his hand
and loses a heart to West’s
queen at the end.
CLASSIC PEANUTS
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
LIO
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
CHARLES SCHULZ
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
A 7 6 3 10 7 5
K 10 4 K 7 2
The dealer, at your left,
opens one heart. Your partner doubles, and the next
player passes. What do you
say?
ANSWER: Partner asked
you to bid, no matter how
weak your hand. You would
bid one spade with this same
pattern but no points. Since
you actually have 10 points,
game is likely. Jump to two
spades to invite. Partner’s
double implied spade length;
what you are doing is “raising” his suit.
BLONDIE
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2018, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
C6
EZ
MUTTS
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
PATRICK McDONNELL
ZITS
. SATURDAY,
JANUARY 20 , 2018
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
BIRTHDAY | JANUARY 20
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
This year you open
a door in your life
that you have been
wanting to walk
through. You have found
a niche where you are
comfortable. If you are single,
you attract many different
people. Don’t feel as if you
need to make a choice this
year. If you are attached,
you will want to express
your feelings more often.
Remember, your actions and
words matter to your sweetie.
Pisces is very emotional and
makes waves in your life.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
Listen to the faraway
drumbeats. You will hear news
that makes you quite content.
Listen to what others have to
say, and weigh the information
carefully. As a result, you
might decide to hold off on
making a decision.
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
Zero in on what you want,
and do not be distracted by
others. You might find that you
are interested in enjoying the
people around you. Kick back
and make the most of the
moment.
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
You could be reaching out to
someone in the hopes that
he or she will play devil’s
advocate for you. Some of the
ideas you share might not be
your own, but you still want
WEINGARTENS & CLARK feedback. Know that some of
the responses you get could be
confusing.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
You could be touchy and
wanting to change direction.
If you stay on top of the
situation, you will be more
content than you have been
in a while. Be willing to visit
with a friend who does not live
close to you; the change of
scenery will benefit you.
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
Honor what is happening
around you. Time with a close
friend or loved one will be
appealing. Expect a fun and
meaningful time with this
person, no matter what the
plans are. You could find that
you are able to adjust what you
are doing to suit the moment.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
Your popularity soars to a new
level if you can handle all the
attention. Not everyone wants
to do the same thing, but all
of them thoroughly enjoy your
company. Sort through what
you feel is relevant, and make
choices accordingly.
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
You will want to indulge in a
favorite hobby or get some
more work done. Your focus
will be very intense, to the
point that it might frustrate
another person. Know that
you need to make time for this
person if you want to keep the
peace.
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
Your playfulness emerges.
Others often think of you as
being serious and intense,
which you are. When you
reveal your inner child,
excitement and curiosity
become the normal response.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
You’ll opt to stay close to
home. Know that someone
with whom you usually visit
over the weekend is likely to
miss you. You easily could
decide to throw a last-minute
party at your pad.
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
Reach out to someone who
has signaled in his or her own
way that he or she would like
to chat with you about certain
matters. You can’t always be
on top of everything, nor do
you want to be.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
Allow greater give-and-take
between you and someone to
whom you could be financially
tied. The two of you have very
different interests and, as a
result, might opt to go in a
different direction from what
either of you had considered.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
Listen to what is being shared
by someone who is close to
you. Don’t feel as if you must
do or say anything, just know
that this person needs your
attention. Free yourself up and
allow people to come to you.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2018, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
KLMNO
SPORTS
SATURDAY, JANUARY 20 , 2018
Beltway area
looks at risk
of missing out
this March
Maryland is
fighting for
something, at
least. Justin
Jackson walks to
and from the
Barry
locker room with
Svrluga
his left arm in a
sling. Ivan Bender
hobbles to the court on crutches.
Kevin Huerter and Anthony
Cowan Jr. have to play 35 minutes
or more for the Terrapins to have
a chance in a Big Ten game.
What the Terrapins are
fighting for is what every college
basketball team wants with
February approaching: a spot in
the NCAA tournament. Whatever
you think the odds, with Jackson
out for the year following
shoulder surgery and reserve
Bender done with a knee injury,
they would be significantly worse
without Thursday night’s 77-66
victory over even-more
shorthanded Minnesota at
Xfinity Center.
It’s that time of year when
football’s all but over, pitchers
and catchers haven’t reported yet,
but there’s a game every night in a
gym somewhere. College hoops
fans tend to see the world only
through glasses tinted with their
school colors. But tie Maryland’s
tenuous position — 15-6 overall,
4-4 in a down Big Ten — in with
Georgetown, which is three
games below .500 in the Big East.
Even look at the other Division I
programs around here, struggling
to stay afloat. And start thinking:
When was the last time the
Beltway failed to send a team to
the NCAA tournament?
Hint: There’s a chance you
weren’t born. (Unless you’re
reading this in Saturday’s printed
product. Then I’d take my
mortgage to Vegas and bet that
not only were you born, but you
could read.)
Think about it for a minute.
And consider Washington
basketball though the years.
I’ve been told often enough
that I’ve come to believe it:
Washington might be, first and
foremost, a Redskins town, as
sadistic as that might seem. But at
the soul of the sporting city, really,
basketball trumps football. This
isn’t necessarily about the
Bullets/Wizards, but about the
grass roots, about DeMatha and
SVRLUGA CONTINUED ON D3
Today’s area college basketball
St. John’s at Georgetown
Noon, Fox Sports 1
George Washington at VCU
12:30 p.m., NBCSN
George Mason at Duquesne
4:30 p.m., NBCSN
GYMNASTICS
Jordyn Wieber is the latest
Olympian to accuse Larry
Nassar of sexual abuse. D2
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
Loss in the shu±e
BY
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Capitals goaltender Philipp Grubauer, who had 23 saves, reacts to the go-ahead goal by the Canadiens’ Paul Byron in the third period.
BY
J ESSE D OUGHERTY
Philipp Grubauer spent the game
sprawling across the crease, discarding shots from near and far and
benefiting from a few attempts that
clanged against the post instead of
finding his net. But the Capitals’
goaltender faced a tough task midway through the third period.
It is hard to save a shot when you
only see it at the last second, but
that’s how the Montreal Canadiens
scored the go-ahead goal in a 3-2 loss
for Capitals on Friday night. After the
puck was played off the boards
behind his net, Grubauer lost track of
it, if only for the quickest moment,
before Canadiens center Paul Byron
slid it past his diving body. That gave
the Canadiens a one-goal lead that
stretched to two, on an empty-netter,
before Lars Eller scored with 53.1
seconds left to stop fans from exiting
Capital One Arena.
But the Capitals couldn’t punch in
another. A night of experimentation
for Capitals Coach Barry Trotz ended
in a second straight defeat, and Trotz
CANADIENS 3,
CAPITALS 2
Trotz’s rearranged lines
don’t pay off with win
and his players were highly critical of
the Capitals’ overall effort. They got
just 12 shots on goal from their
forwards and fell to a Canadiens
team that had won twice in its
previous 10 games.
“I don’t think we had any business
winning that game,” said Grubauer,
who finished with 23 saves and
handled a handful of high-danger
chances. “I think they out-competed
us, I think they out-battled us. I don’t
think we created enough chances,
and I think we have to do a better job
of managing the puck and playing 60
minutes.”
Trotz added that the Capitals “had
too many guys still on vacation” and
that he thought the Canadiens could
have scored seven goals. He also said
that half the Capitals’ players are not
where they should be right now
coming off a five-day break that
ended with a 4-3 overtime loss to the
Devils on Thursday. He again reshuffled his lines Friday, moving Tom
Wilson back up to the first line
alongside Alex Ovechkin and center
Nicklas Backstrom. That bumped
Alex Chiasson from the fourth to
second line in Wilson’s place, and
Trotz also reinserted Andre Burakovsky, a healthy scratch Thursday, for
Devante Smith-Pelly.
Friday was the 138th time in 142
games, playoffs included, that the
Capitals had the same four centers of
Backstrom, Evgeny Kuznetsov, Eller
and Jay Beagle. Last season, for the
most part, offered similar stability on
the wings. But this year has been
dotted by constant cycling of wingers, and that continued against the
Canadiens and former Capitals defenseman Karl Alzner.
Alzner is a reminder of all that has
changed for the Capitals since this
time last year, when they were also
CAPITALS CONTINUED ON D4
phenson loves the simplicity of
silver, white and black, which cover the NBA player’s 8,440-squarefoot estate.
Big, black decorative letters
spell out his nickname, “B O R N
R E A D Y,” on one wall. Two
paintings of silver Buddhas, one
upside down — Stephenson
thought they’d look cooler that
way — hang side by side. But the
pièce de résistance sits in the corner of his living room: a platinum,
life-size replica of a horse.
“Indiana, you know,” Stephenson said. “I figured a horse would
fit in here.”
The horse indeed fits Indiana,
and somehow so does Stephenson.
After several years of bouncing
around the league without a
steady home, Stephenson seems
to have found one in his second
Tom Coughlin sat in the press
box at Heinz Field on Sunday,
emotionally wrapped up in every
play as his Jacksonville Jaguars
faced the Pittsburgh Steelers in
an AFC divisional-round playoff
game.
He wasn’t on the sideline, as he
would have been this season if
he’d had his preference. He kept
his passion within the no-outbursts-permitted decorum of his
surroundings. His intensity,
though, was clear from his running commentary on the game,
muttering to himself and to nearby Jaguars officials as he was
overheard by media members
sitting near him.
And when it was done, when
the Jaguars had upset the Steelers to earn their way to their first
AFC championship game since
Coughlin was their coach, he
calmly made his way to an elevator with no outward hint of celebration. There was, after all,
more work to be done.
Coughlin’s first season as the
Jaguars’ front-office football czar
has been a rousing success. He
and first-year Coach Doug Marrone have worked with holdover
General Manager Dave Caldwell
to transform a 3-13 team into one
of the NFL’s best. The Jaguars
face the New England Patriots on
Sunday in Foxborough, Mass.,
and they’re one victory from their
first Super Bowl appearance.
Yes, it’s Coughlin against the
Patriots on a big stage — again.
The Patriots have been to seven
Super Bowls with Bill Belichick as
their coach and Tom Brady as
their quarterback, and they have
won five. The losses were to the
Coughlin-coached New York Giants to finish the 2007 and 2011
seasons. The first of those triumphs denied the Patriots a 19-0
season.
But if there are bows to be
taken for what the Jaguars have
done, the 71-year-old isn’t taking
them. If he has the magic formula
for beating the Patriots in big
games, he isn’t sharing it. Coughlin denied an interview request
through the Jaguars this week.
The Jaguars said Coughlin believes Marrone should be the face
and voice of the team during the
season.
Marrone was asked during a
midweek
news
conference
whether he would lean on
COUGHLIN CONTINUED ON D4
NFL PLAYOFFS
NFC championship game
Vikings at Eagles
Tomorrow, 6:40 p.m., Fox
Oubre, teammates heed
Brooks’s call for e≠ort
A city kid born with swagger
becomes a humble Hoosier
zionsville, ind. — Lance Ste-
M ARK M ASKE
AFC championship game
Jaguars at Patriots
Tomorrow, 3:05 p.m., CBS
Flyers at Capitals | Tomorrow, 12:30 p.m., NBC
The IOC clears nearly 400
Russians for next month’s
Games in South Korea. D2
C ANDACE B UCKNER
Coughlin
in position
to add dent
to dynasty
After twice solving
Patriots in Super Bowl,
Jaguars exec eyes upset
OLYMPICS
BY
D
M2
tour of duty with the Pacers. Now
in his second season back with the
team that drafted him in 2010, he
is the tongue-wagging, hip-gyrating, showboating guard injected
into the veins of Bankers Life
Fieldhouse.
“The energy is just contagious,”
said Bill Manlove, a season-ticket
holder in the section devoted to
Stephenson, “The Born Ready
Crew.”
Just how did a city kid bred on
the swagger of Brooklyn street ball
become so beloved in one of the
NBA’s most culturally conservative markets, where the humble
ethos of “Hoosiers” still lingers?
It’s the story of a marriage between a flyover state with an underdog mentality and a brazen,
overlooked second-round pick
made good.
Stephenson couldn’t find acceptance in five other NBA cities
but returned here to wide-open
STEPHENSON CONTINUED ON D5
WIZARDS 122,
PISTONS 112
BY
C ANDACE B UCKNER
detroit — Play hard, play for
ANDY LYONS/GETTY IMAGES
Pacers guard Lance Stephenson, above, has earned the admiration
of Indiana fans by repeatedly mixing it up with LeBron James.
one another. That was the foundation on which Scott Brooks had
built his playing career and the
philosophy he has brought to every team he has coached.
Throughout this inconsistent
season, Brooks has watched his
Washington Wizards routinely
abandon this creed. Brooks has
stomped on the sideline and vented inside the locker room, yet his
team has meandered through
bouts of detached and lethargic
play. After their third blowout
loss of the season earlier this
week, Brooks demanded change.
Although Brooks’s rotation remained the same, the Wizards’
competitiveness transformed in a
122-112 win over the Detroit Pistons.
The Wizards fell into an early
15-point deficit before responding with an effective small lineup
that created turnovers and quick
scoring jabs. By the third quarter,
Washington (26-20) played up to
its talent, scoring 45 points and
opening a large enough lead to
thwart a late rally.
“I loved the competitive spirit,”
Brooks said. “The thing I love
most, the best thing about tonight’s game, we started off slow
offensively but we didn’t hang our
heads.”
Brooks shared praise and smiles
after watching this effort — a long
way from his ire in Charlotte.
After the Wizards surrendered
WIZARDS CONTINUED ON D5
Wizards at Mavericks
Monday, 8:30 p.m., NBCSW
D2
EZ
D I G ES T
GOLF
Landry leads Challenge
but has crowd on heels
Andrew Landry topped the
crowded CareerBuilder Challenge
leader board after another lowscoring day in La Quinta, Calif.
Landry shot a 7-under-par 65
on PGA West’s Jack Nicklaus
Tournament Course to reach 16
under. He opened with a 63 at La
Quinta Country Club.
“Wind was down again,” he
said. “It’s like a dome out here.”
Jon Rahm, the first-round
leader after a 62, was a stroke
back. Jason Kokrak was at 14
under after a 67. Two-time major
champion Zach Johnson was at
13 under, along with Michael
Kim and Martin Piller. . . .
Thomas Pieters holed a
bunker shot for a closing birdie
and shot a second-round 65 to
take a one-stroke lead in the
European Tour’s Abu Dhabi
HSBC Championship in the
United Arab Emirates as Dustin
Johnson and Rory McIlroy
moved into contention.
Johnson shot a bogey-free 8under 64 and was four shots back.
McIlroy, playing his first event
since October, finished with an
eagle on the par-5 18th and was
three shots back. . . .
Colin Montgomerie shot a
second straight 7-under 65 near
Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, to take a
two-shot lead into the final round
of the Mitsubishi Electric
Championship, the PGA Tour
Champions’ season opener. . . .
U.S. Open champion Brooks
Koepka has a wrist injury that
will keep him out until the
Masters. Koepka is not sure how
he injured his left wrist.
WINTER SPORTS
Sofia Goggia won a World Cup
downhill on home snow in
Cortina d’Ampezzo, Italy, after
Lindsey Vonn made a major
mistake. Vonn was faster than
Goggia midway down the course
but had trouble landing a jump
and slowed to clear the next gate.
Goggia finished 0.47 seconds
ahead of Vonn, who was second.
Overall World Cup leader
Mikaela Shiffrin finished third,
0.84 behind. Julia Mancuso,
another American standout,
announced her retirement and
bid the circuit goodbye by
wearing a Wonder Woman suit
during a casual run.
COLLEGES
The NCAA’s five largest
conferences — the ACC, Big Ten,
Big 12, Pac-12 and Southeastern —
approved sweeping changes.
Extended medical benefits for
former athletes, a three-day break
for basketball players over the
holiday season, more money for
student hosts and no loss of
eligibility for men’s hockey
players for receiving draft advice
before enrolling were all
approved at the NCAA’s annual
convention in Indianapolis.
BASEBALL
An autopsy report said retired
star pitcher Roy Halladay had
evidence of amphetamine,
morphine and an insomnia drug
in his system when he crashed his
personal plane into the Gulf of
Mexico off the coast of New Port
Richey, Fla., and died Nov. 7. . . .
The Mets invited former
Heisman Trophy winner and NFL
quarterback Tim Tebow, 30, to
spring training. . . .
Orioles pitching prospect
Tucker Baca, the club’s 12thround draft pick last June, was
suspended for the first 60 games
of the season after a positive test
for a performance-enhancing
substance.
MISC.
Tyson Fury can return to the
ring after being told by British
boxing authorities that his drug
suspension will be lifted. The
heavyweight has not fought since
beating Wladimir Klitschko in
November 2015 to win the WBA,
IBF and WBO belts. . . .
Carla Marangoni, the last
surviving medalist from the 1928
Amsterdam Olympics, has died at
102. As a 12-year-old, Marangoni
was a member of the Italian team
that won silver in gymnastics.
— From news services
TELEVISION AND RADIO
NBA
3:30 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Cleveland » WJLA (Ch. 7), WMAR (Ch. 2)
Golden State at Houston » WJLA (Ch. 7), WMAR (Ch. 2)
NHL
3 p.m.
7 p.m.
Winnipeg at Calgary » NHL Network
Boston at Montreal » NHL Network
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. SATURDAY,
JANUARY 20 , 2018
Wieber joins accusers facing Nassar
‘Fierce Five’ teammate
Raisman also confronts
disgraced physician
BY
W ILL H OBSON
Jordyn Wieber became the latest Olympian to accuse Larry
Nassar of sexual abuse Friday,
speaking during the disgraced
physician’s sentencing hearing in
Lansing, Mich.
“I thought that training for the
Olympics would be the hardest
thing I would ever have to do. But
the hardest thing I’ve ever had to
do is process that I am a victim of
Larry Nassar,” said Wieber, 22,
who was part of the gold medalwinning team at the 2012 Summer Games in London. Wieber
became the fourth member of
that team — dubbed the “Fierce
Five” — to assert abuse by Nassar,
joining McKayla Maroney, Gabby
Douglas and Aly Raisman. Raisman joined Wieber in court Friday and also addressed Nassar.
Wieber described how Nassar
established a friendship with her
and her teammates, bringing
them coffee and food when they
were in the midst of intense dieting, which she later recognized as
grooming techniques. The abuse
started when she sought treatment for a hamstring injury, Wieber said, and continued for years,
during what she thought was
legitimate pain therapy.
“He did it time after time,
appointment after appointment.
. . . The worst part is I had no idea
he was abusing me,” Wieber said.
A Lansing-area native, Wieber
came up as a young gymnast
training at Twistars, a local club
named in dozens of lawsuits filed
by Nassar victims, along with
Michigan State University, where
Nassar worked for years, and USA
Gymnastics, where Nassar volunteered his services treating Team
USA women. Nassar was permitted to treat Wieber and other
gymnasts alone on the road at
travel events in his hotel room,
Wieber said, and often took pictures of her and her teammates.
“To this day, I still don’t know
how he could have been allowed
to do this for so long,” said Wieber, who was the latest woman to
assert oversight failures at USA
Gymnastics and Michigan State
allowed abuse to occur. Former
MATTHEW DAE SMITH/ASSOCIATED PRESS
USA Gymnastics chief executive
Steve Penny resigned last March
under criticism for his handling
of a 2015 complaint about Nassar.
On Friday — amid growing
calls from lawmakers and local
newspapers in Michigan for the
resignation of university President Lou Anna Simon — Michigan State’s board of trustees
asked the state attorney general’s
office to conduct an independent
review of the school’s culpability
for Nassar’s crimes. Michigan
State and USA Gymnastics are
contesting lawsuits filed by more
than 130 women and girls who
assert abuse by Nassar.
Raisman, the 2012 and 2016
Olympic gold medalist, also addressed Nassar on Friday morning. Like Wieber, Raisman initially had not planned to speak during Nassar’s sentencing, but she
said she changed her mind after
watching this week as other victims described their abuse and
the impact on their lives.
“Larry, you do realize now that
we, this group of women you so
heartlessly abused over a long
period of time, are now a force,
and you are nothing. . . . The
tables have turned, Larry. We are
here, we have our voices, and we
are not going away,” Raisman
said.
She was strongly critical of
USA Gymnastics — which she
said was “rotting from the inside”
Former
Olympic
gymnasts Aly
Raisman,
above left,
and Jordyn
Wieber,
above right,
sit in the
courtroom
during the
fourth day of
the
sentencing
hearing for
Larry Nassar,
right.
DALE G. YOUNG/ASSOCIATED PRESS
— and the U.S. Olympic Committee and called for an independent
investigation of the Olympic
sports organizations for their role
in Nassar’s abuse.
USA Gymnastics conducted an
independent internal review of
its child protection policies last
year but has rejected calls for any
review of the organization’s specific handling of Nassar and any
complaints or concerns about his
conduct over the years. The USOC
has said it first became aware of
potential abuse by Nassar in 2015,
when USA Gymnastics has said it
first became aware and contacted
the FBI.
“We are heartbroken that this
abuse occurred, proud of the
brave victims that have come
forward and grateful that our
criminal justice system has ensured that Nassar will never be
able to harm another young woman,” USOC spokesman Mark
Jones said in a statement.
Wieber is among more than 70
women and girls who have spoken during Nassar’s lengthy sentencing hearing, which began
Tuesday and is expected to
stretch into next week before a
judge determines his sentence.
Nassar, 54, has pleaded guilty to
seven sexual assaults and faces a
minimum 25-year term when the
hearing concludes. He also faces a
60-year term for federal child
pornography crimes, which he is
appealing.
will.hobson@washpost.com
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
3 p.m.
4 p.m.
East-West Shrine Game » NFL Network
NFLPA Collegiate Bowl » Fox Sports 1
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
12:30 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
2 p.m.
2 p.m.
2 p.m.
2 p.m.
2 p.m.
2 p.m.
2 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
3 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
4 p.m.
4 p.m.
4 p.m.
4 p.m.
4 p.m.
4 p.m.
4 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
5 p.m.
6 p.m.
6 p.m.
6 p.m.
6 p.m.
6 p.m.
7 p.m.
8 p.m.
8:15 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
10 p.m.
10:15 p.m.
Purdue at Iowa » ESPN
Florida State at Virginia Tech » ESPN2, WJFK (106.7 FM)
Villanova at Connecticut » WUSA (Ch. 9), WJZ (Ch. 13)
Ohio State vs. Minnesota » Big Ten Network
Wichita State at Houston » ESPNU
St. John’s at Georgetown » Fox Sports 1, WNEW (99.1 FM)
George Washington at VCU » NBC Sports Network
LSU at Vanderbilt » SEC Network
Rhode Island at Dayton » CBS Sports Network
Oklahoma at Oklahoma State » ESPN
Georgia Tech at North Carolina » ESPN2
Texas at West Virginia » WUSA (Ch. 9), WJZ (Ch. 13)
Penn State at Northwestern » Big Ten Network
Lafayette at American » NBC Sports Washington
Texas Tech at Iowa State » ESPNU
Butler at DePaul » Fox Sports 1
Xavier at Seton Hall » WTTG (Ch. 5), WBFF (Ch. 45)
La Salle at Richmond » NBC Sports Network
Creighton at Providence » CBS Sports Network
Mississippi at Arkansas » SEC Network
Missouri at Texas A&M » ESPN2
Notre Dame at Clemson » ESPN
Livingstone at Fayetteville State » NBC Sports Washington
Pittsburgh at Duke » WDCA (Ch. 20), WNUV (Ch. 54)
Arizona at Stanford » WUSA (Ch. 9), WJZ (Ch. 13), WTEM (980 AM)
East Carolina at Cincinnati » ESPNews
TCU at Kansas State » ESPNU
George Mason at Duquesne » NBC Sports Network
UNLV at Colorado State » CBS Sports Network
Baylor at Kansas » ESPN
Tennessee at South Carolina » ESPN2
Tulane at SMU » ESPNews
Central Florida at South Florida » ESPNU
Georgia at Auburn » SEC Network
San Diego State at New Mexico » CBS Sports Network
Memphis at Tulsa » ESPNU
Florida at Kentucky » ESPN, WTEM (980 AM)
Mississippi State at Alabama » SEC Network
Boise State at Nevada » ESPNU
UCLA at Oregon » ESPN
WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
11 a.m.
1 p.m.
4 p.m.
4 p.m.
6 p.m.
7 p.m.
La Salle at Rhode Island » CBS Sports Network
Oklahoma State at Oklahoma » MASN2
Indiana at Michigan State » Big Ten Network
Texas at Texas Tech » MASN2
Illinois at Michigan » Big Ten Network
Kansas State at Baylor » MASN2
SOCCER
7:25 a.m.
9:30 a.m.
12:30 p.m.
10 a.m.
2:35 p.m.
English Premier League: Chelsea at Brighton » NBC Sports Network
German Bundesliga: Bayer Leverkusen at Hoffenheim » Fox Sports 1
English Premier League: Newcastle United at Manchester City »
WRC (Ch. 4), WBAL (Ch. 11)
Spanish La Liga: Girona FC at Atlético Madrid » beIN Sports
Spanish La Liga: Valencia CF at UD Las Palmas » beIN Sports
TENNIS
7 p.m.
9 p.m.
Australian Open, round of 16 » Tennis Channel
Australian Open, round of 16 » ESPN2
COLLEGE HOCKEY
8 p.m.
Michigan State vs. Minnesota » Big Ten Network
GOLF
1 p.m.
3 p.m.
6 p.m.
Latin America Amateur Championship » ESPNews
PGA Tour: CareerBuilder Challenge, third round » Golf Channel
Champions Tour: Mitsubishi Electric Championship, second round »
Golf Channel
MIXED MARTIAL ARTS
8 p.m.
9 p.m.
UFC 220, prelims: Stipe Miocic vs. Francis Ngannou » Fox Sports 1
Bellator 192 » Paramount Network, CMT
AUTO RACING
10 p.m.
Monster Energy Supercross » Fox Sports 1
OLYMPICS
IOC creates pool of Russians eligible for Games
A SSOCIATED P RESS
lausanne, switzerland —
The International Olympic Committee said Friday it has created
a pool of 389 Russians who are
eligible to compete under a neutral flag at next month’s Winter
Olympics amid the country’s
doping scandal.
An IOC panel whittled down
an initial list of 500 to create
what the IOC calls “a pool of
clean athletes.”
That could potentially make it
possible for Russia to meet its
target of fielding around 200
athletes in PyeongChang —
slightly fewer than in Sochi in
2014, but more than in Vancouver in 2010.
It wasn’t immediately clear
why 111 other Russians were
rejected by the IOC. The IOC
didn’t list the athletes who were
accepted or rejected but said it
hadn’t included any of the 46 the
IOC previously banned for doping at the 2014 Olympics in
Sochi.
The IOC’s decision not to release the names of the athletes or
any specific testing data did not
sit well with members of the
National Anti-Doping Organizations, who have called for more
transparency in the IOC process.
“We all want to trust, but
history has shown we must verify,” said Travis Tygart, CEO of the
U.S. Anti-Doping Agency. “Publish the testing history of each
athlete by name, type of test, and
we can know for sure if what the
IOC says is accurate.”
Valerie Fourneyron, the former French Sports Minister leading the invitation process, said
the pool also left out any Russians who had been suspended in
the past for doping offenses.
“This means that a number of
Russian athletes will not be on
the list,” she said. “Our work was
not about numbers, but to ensure that only clean athletes
would be on the list.”
That would appear to rule out
potential Russian medal contenders like former NHL hockey
player Anton Belov and world
champion speedskater Pavel Kulizhnikov, both of whom served
bans in the past but have since
resumed competing.
“More than 80 percent of the
athletes in this pool did not
compete at the Olympic Winter
Games Sochi 2014,” the IOC said
in a statement. “This shows that
this is a new generation of Russian athletes.”
United trades its top pick, eyes win-now players
BY
S TEVEN G OFF
philadelphia — D.C. United’s
draft day ended before it began
Friday as the club traded the No. 3
pick to Los Angeles FC for
$200,000 worth of allocation
money several hours before the
festivities began. The club plans
to apply those funds toward acquiring an attacker and perhaps
an outside defender from Latin
America.
D.C. received $100,000 in general allocation money and
$100,000 in targeted allocation
money from LAFC, an expansion
team that also had the No. 1 pick
in the draft. Last week, United
collected $100,000 in general
funds and $200,000 in targeted
funds from the Los Angeles Galaxy for midfielder Perry Kitchen’s
rights.
“It’s no disrespect to the college
game, but there are some other
guys that we think can help us in a
bigger way, in a more immediate
way in the next week or two,”
Coach Ben Olsen said. “And every
dollar counts in getting these
types of deals over the line.”
Olsen and General Manager
Dave Kasper declined to identify
the targeted players. But with
training camp opening Monday
and the season opener six weeks
away, the club is aiming to finalize deals soon.
“We have resources available to
make one or two more international signings” this preseason,
Kasper said. “These funds will
certainly help in that regard.”
United will also have targeted
allocation money available to perhaps sign an additional player in
the summer transfer window
when there are more options, he
added.
United would need to acquire
international roster slots to accommodate players from abroad,
but with one or two current members set to receive green cards
soon, “it’s not going to be a problem,” Kasper said.
In relinquishing the No. 3 pick,
Kasper said, United weighed “acquiring more than likely an international [college] player and
sending him on loan versus using
money to acquire a piece that is
ready to help us now.”
United did not have a secondround pick, having dealt it to
Vancouver last week for goalkeeper David Ousted. MLS will conduct the final two rounds of the
draft by conference call Sunday.
United has three remaining selections, but the last half of the draft
rarely yields players who make
first-team rosters.
Last year, in a pre-draft move,
New York City FC acquired the
No. 3 selection from the Chicago
Fire for $250,000 in general allocation money and chose Akron
midfielder Jonathan Lewis, who
went on to play in 11 regular
season matches (four starts) and
post two goals and one assist. This
year’s draft pool, though, was not
considered as strong as last year’s.
General allocation money can
be applied toward, among other
things, signing players and softening the impact of a contract on
the salary cap. Targeted allocation money can be used in multiple ways as well, but only on
players
making
between
$500,000 and $1 million. It’s unclear how much of the two categories United has stockpiled during
the offseason.
This season, D.C. is using targeted allocation money on defender Steve Birnbaum and midfielders Luciano Acosta and Zoltan Stieber. Midfielder Paul Arriola is United’s only designated
player, a term used for highpriced talent that falls outside
standard payroll guidelines. Each
team is allowed three DPs, but in
all likelihood, United will not sign
any this winter or summer.
United has already acquired
five players this offseason: Ousted, the Danish goalkeeper;
French defender Frederic Brillant; Costa Rican midfielder Ulises Segura; Venezuelan midfielder
Junior Moreno; and Jamaican
forward Darren Mattocks. Ousted
(Vancouver), Brillant (New York
City FC) and Mattocks (Portland)
arrived via trades.
“We still have some open spots
on the roster,” Olsen said, “and we
have a little money to play with.”
With a brief preseason, United
would like to finalize signings
soon. It also plans to invite at least
one veteran MLS player who was
not selected in the reentry draft to
training camp.
“It’s important because of how
new the group is,” Olsen said.
“The more we can get into Florida, the better, just so we can get
everyone on the same page. However, the idea is to get the right
player. We’re not going to rush it if
it’s not the guy that fits us and
make sense.”
United will train in Washington next week, then move operations to Clearwater, Fla., for workouts and friendlies.
With the top pick in the draft,
LAFC selected Akron freshman
Joao Moutinho, a Portuguese defender. At No. 2, the Galaxy chose
Stanford defender Tomas Hilliard-Arce, a finalist for the Hermann Trophy. With the pick acquired from United, LAFC took
Pacific defender Tristan Blackmon.
The next two selections were
also traded for allocation money,
allowing FC Dallas to take Michigan forward Francis Atuahene
and the Chicago Fire to pick Wake
Forest forward Jon Bakero, the
Hermann Trophy winner.
steven.goff@washpost.com
SATURDAY, JANUARY 20 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
M2
Peterson is set for Spence
minus ‘weight monster’ This March
could bring
sadness to
the Beltway
BARRY SVRLUGA
BY
G ENE W ANG
Lamont Peterson is more at ease
heading into his next fight than at
any time over the past several years
— all because of seven pounds.
That’s the margin separating the
District boxer’s current weight class
from his previous division, where
he pushed his body to agonizing
extremes during the final weeks of
training to reach the 140-pound
limit for junior welterweights.
Such dramatic weight loss over
a relatively short period began taking its toll in the ring in the form of
severe cramping, sapping Peterson
of energy and power. It reached the
point where his pre-fight focus
wasn’t as much on the opponent
and strategy as simply cutting
weight. So, some two years ago,
Peterson and longtime trainer Barry Hunter decided the timing was
right to move up to 147 pounds.
The second fight of Peterson’s
career as a welterweight comes
against International Boxing Federation champion Errol Spence Jr.
on Saturday night in the main
event of a card at Brooklyn’s Barclays Center that will be televised
on Showtime.
“He’s in a good place, man,”
Hunter said last week during a
workout at Bald Eagle gym, Peterson’s regular training facility in
Southwest Washington. “Like I’ve
said before, after a while, your
body tells you exactly what you
need to do. When your body starts
failing you, then that’s a problem.
We don’t have two opponents anymore. We don’t have the weight
monster to deal with fighting at
welterweight.”
The 147-pound division is widely
regarded as the most competitive
in the sport, featuring such luminaries as Keith Thurman, Shawn
Porter, Manny Pacquiao and Danny Garcia, whom Peterson fought
in April 2015 at a catch weight of
143 pounds. Peterson lost via majority decision but had the Barclays
Center crowd on its feet cheering a
furious rally in the closing rounds.
Terence Crawford, ranked the
No. 2 pound-for-pound fighter in
the world by The Ring, is set to
make his debut at 147 pounds this
year as well. Crawford, Hunter
said, is a preferred next opponent if
Peterson (35-3-1, 17 knockouts) can
upset Spence, whom Las Vegas
oddsmakers installed as an overwhelming favorite.
Peterson, who turns 34 next
week, has thrived as an underdog.
The highlight of his decorated career came Dec. 10, 2011, when he
beat heavily favored Amir Khan at
the Walter E. Washington Convention Center to claim the IBF and
World Boxing Association junior
welterweight titles. He indicated
he doesn’t consider himself the un-
derdog heading into Saturday
night’s fight.
“I wouldn’t be getting in the ring
if I thought I was going to lose,”
Peterson said before the workout,
wearing blue jeans and a gray Tshirt, with his 1-year-old son, Lennox, by his side. “It gets easier and
easier the more championship
fights I’m in. I was in shape for all of
them, but I definitely put more
pressure on myself when I was
younger. I’ve improved each time,
and I feel like I’m really at the
perfect place in my career.”
Peterson will be fighting for the
first time since Feb. 18, when in his
147-pound debut he beat Russia’s
David Avanesyan in Cincinnati to
claim the secondary WBA welterweight title. Thurman holds the
primary WBA super world championship at welterweight.
In early October last year, Peterson relinquished his secondary
WBA belt. That cleared the way for
a showdown with Spence, who had
won the IBF title in May by traveling to Sheffield, England, the home
town of then-champion Kell
Brook, and collecting a knockout
in the 11th round. Spence, the mandatory challenger, broke Brook’s
orbital bone and sent him to the
canvas in the 10th round to run his
record to 22-0 with 19 knockouts.
“Just like any guy at the top level
in this sport, he brings a certain
level of self-confidence that he’s undefeated and he cannot be beat,”
Peterson said of Spence, 28. “He’s
not going to want to let that go
easily. I’m sure he wants to hold on
to that championship because,
when you become champion, you
get treated a whole different way.
I’m sure he’s not ready to let that go.”
Spence has been hotly courted
by the industry’s top promotional
companies. Oscar De La Hoya’s
Golden Boy Promotions offered
Spence $2.5 million to face junior
middleweight champion Miguel
Cotto this past December, tied to
an extended deal with Golden Boy
and an exclusive contract with
HBO, according to reports. But
Spence declined, instead accepting
the Peterson fight set up by adviser
Al Haymon in part because of familiarity.
The fighters have known each
other for years. Spence recently
recalled seeking advice from Peterson while training with Team USA
for the 2012 Olympics in London.
Spence lost in the quarterfinals
and shortly thereafter turned professional.
“I’m excited to be fighting a guy
like Lamont Peterson,” Spence
said. “I’m not fighting a regular
no-name fighter. He’s going to
bring the best out of me because
he’s a true fighter. It makes the
whole experience even better.”
gene.wang@washpost.com
SVRLUGA FROM D1
Gonzaga, about the Goodman
League out at Barry Farm in the
summer.
Those roots, they lead to the
colleges, most prominently
Maryland and Georgetown, each
with a national title, each with a
former coach who lives nearby
and resides in the Hall of Fame.
Remember, too, that George
Mason became a strong enough
program to earn at-large NCAA
tournament berths from a midmajor conference, not to mention
its unforgettable run to the 2006
Final Four. Shoot, George
Washington made three straight
NCAA tourney appearances
under Karl Hobbs in the midaughts, and American gained
berths with its three Patriot
League tournament titles over the
previous decade.
That’s a lot of history. Maybe
not Philadelphia’s Big Five —
debate among yourselves over a
half-smoke and a cheesesteak —
but it’s something.
So, then, figure it out yet, that
NCAA tournament without
Washington? Couldn’t be in the
heart of the Gary Williams-John
Thompson Jr. overlap in College
Park or on the Hilltop. What
about 1992-93? Maryland was
still in the post-Len Bias
doldrums, and Georgetown had
lost Alonzo Mourning and hadn’t
fully developed freshman Othella
Harrington, missing for the first
time in 15 seasons.
Oh, wait. That was the year
Yinka Dare pushed George
Washington into the Sweet 16,
where it gave Michigan’s Fab Five
a game before succumbing. D.C.
was still on the map.
Nope, the last time the Beltway
didn’t dance: Williams was a year
away from taking over — not at
Maryland. At American. The Big
East didn’t exist, much less
include (goodness) Creighton and
Butler.
Keep pondering. In the
meantime, think about this year,
because if the Terrapins don’t
unlikely run though the
conference tournament. Possible.
Don’t count on it.
While mulling this over, it’s
also worth wondering why so
many players from DMV schools
are helping other teams with
their pushes to the postseason.
Cowan, from Bowie, Md., and St.
John’s High in the District, is an
improving mainstay for the Terps.
Freshman guard Darryl Morsell,
from Baltimore, is a key piece
who’s eating minutes and often
defending the opponent’s best
perimeter player.
But why, if all the Washington
teams might be left out, is a player
like Chris Lykes (Mitchellville,
Md., Gonzaga of the WCAC)
helping Miami in its quest for a
third straight NCAA bid? Why is
6-foot-11 Luka Garza, who went to
Maret in Upper Northwest, a
freshman who’s starting at, of all
places, Iowa?
This isn’t really cherry-picking,
either. When top-ranked
Villanova throttled Georgetown
at Capital One Arena on
Wednesday, one of six Wildcats in
double figures was Phil Booth, a
starting guard — from Baltimore.
barry.svrluga@washpost.com
For more by Barry Svrluga, visit
washingtonpost.com/svrluga.
Bridges helps carry Spartans to a blowout victory
MICHIGAN STATE 85,
INDIANA 57
NEWS SERVICES
AND STAFF REPORTS
MARY ALTAFFER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
push like they did Thursday —
“We’re getting better,” Coach
Mark Turgeon said — it’ll happen
again.
We knew Patrick Ewing’s first
go-round at Georgetown would
be rough, and even History’s
Worst Nonconference Schedule
couldn’t mask that. The Hoyas
need time — much more than
they have this year.
George Mason, which hasn’t
made the NCAA tournament
since Jim Larranaga left for
Miami and since the school left
the Colonial Athletic Association
for the Atlantic 10, is 9-10 overall,
3-3 in conference. George
Washington, with one NCAA
berth in 10 seasons, beat the
Patriots on Wednesday night at
Smith Center, but that got the
Colonials only to 9-10, 2-4.
Neither is within sniffing distance
of Rhode Island, which sits atop
the A-10. With that conference
possibly sending only one team to
the tourney, the only path for GW
or Mason is almost certainly to
win the conference tournament.
American? The Eagles are 5-13
and tied for last in the Patriot
League. So the only hope is an
ROUNDUP
F ROM
Lamont Peterson, above, on undefeated IBF welterweight champion
Errol Spence Jr.: “He’s not going to want to let that go easily.”
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Darryl Morsell, a freshman from Baltimore, stayed close to home to
play for Maryland, but several talented recruits have left the area.
It’s hard not to think about
Villanova’s D.C. connections
without remembering that Kris
Jenkins (Gonzaga) and Josh Hart
(Sidwell Friends) powered the
Wildcats to a national title two
short years ago.
Those that got away also
include the No. 1 pick in last year’s
NBA draft, Markelle Fultz of
DeMatha. Maryland?
Georgetown? Nope. Washington.
(The state.) Look forward, too.
Maryland’s excellent incoming
recruiting class includes a
commitment from Jalen Smith of
Baltimore. But Gonzaga will send
Prentiss Hubb to Notre Dame and
Myles Dread to Penn State. Paul
VI in Fairfax will send Brandon
Slater to Villanova. Bishop
O’Connell in Arlington produced
Xavier Johnson for Nebraska. The
District’s Sidwell produced
Saddiq Bey for N.C. State.
That’s a lot of talent in an area
rich with it deciding to play
somewhere else.
Now, these Terrapins — and,
for that matter, these Hoyas,
Colonials, Patriots and Eagles —
don’t care much about any of that.
Each team has its own problems.
“The guys know this is our
team,” Turgeon said. “This is what
we’ve got. . . . We’ve got to get a
little bit better on the road for us
to get where we want to be.”
Where they want to be: sitting
on a couch on Selection Sunday,
comfortable their name will be
called for the fourth straight
season. A couple of weeks ago,
Cowan remembers, Turgeon told
his guys he wasn’t sure that would
be possible. Now they put behind
a potentially devastating lastsecond loss at Michigan, beat
Minnesota and have big games at
Indiana, home against Michigan
State and at Purdue — among
others — that could significantly
increase their chances.
“Even with all the injuries,”
Cowan said, “he thinks we’re a
tournament team.”
If they’re not? Well, welcome to
a world that Washington
basketball hasn’t known since . . .
1977-78. That’s 40 years ago.
That’s the last time a team from
here didn’t go to the NCAA
tournament. Maybe it’s a streak
no one knows or cares anything
about. But it represents
something to the sporting fabric
of a city. The Terrapins,
knowingly or not, have
something to say about whether it
stays alive.
Miles Bridges made a threepointer and bounced on his toes
with joy, enjoying a game he and
No. 9 Michigan State desperately
needed.
Bridges scored 22 points to
help the ninth-ranked Spartans
respond to adversity with an
85-57 win over Indiana on Friday
night in East Lansing, Mich.
The Spartans (17-3, 5-2 Big Ten)
had a confidence-boosting performance after going from a topranked team to a reeling one.
They were slumping after a 16-
IAC BOYS’ BASKETBALL
point loss at Ohio State, an overtime win over Rutgers and an
82-72 setback to Michigan at
home.
“I was just trying to prove that
we weren’t soft and that we can
compete with any team,” Bridges
said. “We were trying to prove a
point.”
Michigan State took control
with an 18-0 run midway through
the first half, led by as much as 23
and was ahead 42-23 at halftime.
“We were aggressive and
played our game,” Bridges said.
“We had a great sense of urgency.”
Nick Ward had 18 points and
13 rebounds; Cassius Winston
had 10 points, eight assists and
only one turnover; and Jaren
Jackson had 10 points, six rebounds and three blocks for the
Spartans.
The Hoosiers (11-8, 4-3) lost for
the first time in four games,
falling into a fourth-place tie
with the Wolverines and Nebraska.
Indiana’s Robert Johnson had
21 points, but his teammates
struggled offensively. Josh Newkirk scored 14 but missed 12 of 17
shots.
“If those two guys can continue
to play well, I think we’ll be okay,”
Indiana Coach Archie Miller said.
The Spartans held the Hoosiers to 34 percent shooting.
“It wasn’t a good offensive
showing, and they had a lot to do
with it,” Miller said.
Former baseball star Alex Rodriguez, who was in Detroit for
the North American International Auto Show, attended the game.
He wore an “Izzone” T-shirt while
standing in the student section
behind Coach Tom Izzo, his staff
and players.
“I’ve always been a big fan of
Izzo,” Rodriguez said.
Hoyas women cruise to win
Cynthia Petke had 26 points
and 13 rebounds to lead the
Georgetown women’s team to an
85-58 rout of Big East Conference
leader Marquette at McDonough
Arena.
Dionna White scored 17 points
and Mikayla Venson 16 for the
Hoyas (8-10, 3-5). DiDi Burton
had a game-high eight assists.
Amani Wilborn led the Golden
Eagles (13-6, 7-1) with 20 points.
Erika Davenport scored 10 points
and became the 27th player in
program history to reach the
1,000-point mark.
GIRLS’ BASKETBALL
Morse gets green light to lift Bulldogs Cunningham, Eagles make statement
BULLIS 75,
EPISCOPAL 67
Senior guard’s 30 points
spark victory in Potomac
BY
C ALLIE C APLAN
Bullis Coach Bruce Kelley
didn’t call many plays in the
No. 19 Bulldogs’ 75-67 win over
No. 9 Episcopal on Friday night.
He didn’t need to.
Vado Morse was in one of his
“little zones,” Kelley said, when
the team knows to feed off the
senior guard’s energy rather than
adhere to strict offensive sets.
So throughout the game in
Potomac, when Morse wanted to
drive, teammates gave him
space. When he saw an opening
from beyond the arc for one of
his five three-pointers, he took it.
His vision also set up looks for
the other eight Bulldogs who
scored at least one basket.
Morse scored a game-high 30
points and Bullis was in command throughout the second
half as the Bulldogs rolled to an
Interstate Athletic Conference
victory that they hope marks the
end of their recent slump.
“He has a flair for the dramatic, as you can see, and he’s done
that over the last couple of years,”
Kelley said. “We try not to get in
his way when he’s in those
zones.”
Morse’s burst was well-timed,
coming in a clash of the past two
IAC tournament champions. Kelley said that Bullis (12-6, 2-2 IAC)
needed to play with a “huge”
sense of urgency. His team came
in having lost three of its past
four.
“We knew we had to improve
because we’re better than our
record, and we’re better than
what we’ve shown,” said Bulldogs
guard Nendah Tarke, who had 14
points. “We had a wake-up call.
We can’t just walk over here and
beat teams. We actually have to
play.”
Episcopal (12-4, 3-2) also entered in the midst of a slump and
dropped its third straight.
Morse, a Mount St. Mary’s
commit, had a three-point play
and a layup off a steal in transition to spark a 16-4 Bullis run
early in the game. Morse had
eight points by the close of the
first quarter.
Morse scored nine in the third
quarter, all of them coming during Bullis’s 13-2 run to start the
second half. He added 10 points
in the fourth.
Throughout the game, Morse
defended guard Xavier Johnson,
the Maroon’s leading scorer.
Johnson finished with 15 points,
with just six coming in the second half.
“I had a lot of energy right
from the start of the game,”
Morse said. “I wanted to put on a
show a little bit.”
Perhaps the lone stretch when
Episcopal stalled Morse came in
the second quarter. As the final
seconds ticked away before halftime, Morse hadn’t scored in the
period. And when he launched a
three-point attempt, the Maroon
blocked it.
But Morse caught the deflection and hoisted another. As it
swished through the net and the
buzzer sounded, he stared down
the Episcopal bench.
“When Vado’s feeling himself,
it’s fun to watch,” Tarke said. “He
has that swag to him.”
callie.caplan@washpost.com
NAT. CHRISTIAN 71,
R.C. CHRISTIAN 53
BY
J OSHUA N EEDELMAN
With about six minutes remaining in National Christian's 71-53
win over Rock Creek Christian on
Friday night, junior Promise Cunningham rose from behind the
three-point arc and released. Cunningham had already made four
long-range jumpers, and so the
entire National Christian bench
rose in anticipation.
“If I’m not on, there’s something
wrong,” Cunningham said afterward. “You know I’m going to
shoot that three.”
The shot fell through, and Cunningham’s teammates on the sideline erupted. It was an exclamation
point on a statement win for No. 16
National Christian, which started
slow against No. 4 Rock Creek
Christian in Fort Washington but
used a strong second half to cruise.
“If you want to be a real shooter,
you have to shoot no matter what,”
said Cunningham, who scored 24
points. “Find your opportunity.”
Cunningham certainly spends a
lot of time shooting. She often stays
late after practice and takes jumpers on a side hoop while the National Christian boys’ team practices. And when that’s not enough,
she goes with her brother, Geno
Jones, to John Eager Howard Community Center in Capitol Heights
and puts up another 200 shots.
“When we step on the court, I
tell her to think ‘Nobody’s better
than me,’ ” Jones said.
That mind-set was on display
early Friday, when she scored six
first-quarter points. Rock Creek
Christian (17-5, 0-2 Capital Beltway) opened the game with six
unanswered points, but National
Christian (13-4, 1-1) ended the
frame on an 11-2 run. Cunningham
punctuated the stretch with her
first three-pointer.
Shots were hard to come by for
her last season, though. With a senior-laden group, including 2015-16
Gatorade Maryland player of the
year Mykea Gray, now a guard at
Miami, dominating playing time,
Cunningham’s minutes were sparse.
“Now she’s actually stepping up
as one of the main players,” Eagles
Coach Henry Anglin said.
The Rock Creek Christian defense couldn’t seem to solve Na-
tional Christian’s dribble-drive offense. To make matters worse,
Rock Creek Christian was without
La Salle signee Makayla Pippin,
the team’s second-leading scorer
(13.3 points). Coach James Washington’s frustration boiled over
when he was ejected midway
through the fourth quarter after
exchanging words with a referee.
National Christian players said
the win serves as a confidence
booster.
“It feels good,” senior guard Zenzele Aspemaka-Vital said. “It lets
us know we can compete against
anybody. As long as we bond together as a team, we can get it
done.”
The win pushes National Christian’s winning streak to seven. Anglin attributed the success to lessons learned from a 62-38 loss to
Rutgers Prep (N.J.) on Jan. 5.
“It was really one of the final
straws,” Anglin said. “We understood that we’re capable of playing
with anybody. We just have to play
together.”
Note: Washington said Pippin, a
senior, was removed from the roster Sunday and was considering
transferring to another school.
joshua.needelman@washpost.com
D4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. SATURDAY,
JANUARY 20 , 2018
NFL NOTES
Brady is mum on injury,
status for AFC title game
F ROM NEWS SERVICES
AND STAFF REPORTS
Tom Brady is staying mum on
his status for the AFC championship game after suffering a right
hand injury earlier in the week.
Brady said a bit contentiously
only, “We’ll see,” on Friday when
asked whether he would play in
Sunday’s conference title game
against Jacksonville.
The quarterback wore red
gloves and responded to several
other questions about how much
he practiced or how he sustained
the injury by saying, “I’m not talking about that.”
Brady is listed as questionable
for Sunday after being a limited
participant in practice Friday. He
was also limited Wednesday. He
sat out practice Thursday but
wore a glove on his injured hand
during the stretching period open
to reporters. He usually only wears
a glove on his non-throwing hand.
One thing Brady was clear
about was the test he expects from
a Jaguars unit ranked second in
the NFL in total and scoring defense.
“It’s a very unique challenge,”
Brady said. “I think their front
three, their linebackers, are very
instinctive and very fast. And
great cover guys in the secondary.
Ball-hawking defense. They strip
it off you, they sack you. . . . So
they’re a good defense.”
Brady appeared on the Patriots’
weekly injury report several times
during the latter half of this season
with injuries to both his Achilles’
tendon and his left shoulder. The
four-time Super Bowl MVP has
never missed a playoff start during
his 18-year career.
“Tom always tends to show up
in big games. This is a big game,”
wide receiver Danny Amendola
said. “[He’s] super tough. The
toughest. He’s a warrior, he’s a
competitor and there’s really only
one reason why he’s here, and
that’s to play football. “
JETS: New York wide receiver
Robby Anderson faces a slew of
charges in Florida, including
threatening a police officer’s family and saying he would rape the
officer’s wife.
A Sunrise, Fla., police report
shows the 24-year-old Anderson
was stopped early Friday in a sport
utility vehicle after it ran two red
lights and was swerving while
traveling about 105 mph.
After he was stopped, police say
he made the threats and then
boasted about how much money
NHL
Ekblad’s
goal in OT
boosts
Florida
PANTHERS 4,
GOLDEN KNIGHTS 3
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Aaron Ekblad scored 40 seconds into overtime to lift the Panthers to a 4-3 victory over the
Vegas Golden Knights on Friday
night in Sunrise, Fla., spoiling former coach Gerard Gallant’s return.
Ekblad grabbed a rebound in
the high slot and fired it past
Malcolm Subban to give Florida
its second win in six games this
month.
Aleksander Barkov scored his
league-leading fifth shorthanded
goal of the season and had two
assists, and Evgenii Dadonov and
Jamie McGinn also scored for the
Panthers. James Reimer stopped
33 shots.
Shattenkirk opts for surgery
Rangers defenseman Kevin
Shattenkirk will have surgery on
his left knee and is expected to be
out indefinitely.
The prized free-agent acquisition, who signed a four-year, $26.6
million deal to come to his hometown team, said Friday he has
been playing through an injury all
season and felt “it was the right
time to get the surgery.”
Shattenkirk has five goals and
18 assists in 43 games for the
Rangers after totaling 13 goals and
43 assists over 80 games for St.
Louis and Washington last season.
Other than the lockout-shortened
2012-13 season, he has had at least
30 assists and 40 points every year
— one of just 14 defensemen in
NHL history to accomplish the
feat in six of their first seven seasons.
he has. Jail records show Anderson faces nine charges, including
threatening harm to a public servant, resisting arrest and traffic violations.
TITANS: Tennessee has interviewed three candidates in its
search for new coach, and none
have had any NFL head coaching
experience.
Los Angeles Rams offensive coordinator Matt LaFleur became
the third to interview for the job.
VIKINGS: Minnesota wide
receiver Adam Thielen (lower
back) and safety Andrew Sendejo
(concussion) are both listed as
questionable for Sunday’s NFC title game against the Eagles.
Thielen, the Vikings’ top receiver, was a limited participant in
practice Thursday and Friday after
not practicing Wednesday. Sendejo is still in concussion protocol
after being hurt in last Sunday’s
playoff victory over the New Orleans Saints, but he was a full participant in Friday’s practice.
— Associated Press
League says Raiders complied
The NFL determined that the
Oakland Raiders complied with
the Rooney Rule, in its view, during the process that led to the
hiring of Jon Gruden as the team’s
coach.
The league reviewed the matter
after the Fritz Pollard Alliance, the
diversity group that works closely
with the NFL on its minority hiring practices, asked for an investigation based on concerns that the
Raiders had a deal with Gruden in
place before interviewing minority candidates.
“The NFL confirmed [Friday]
that its review of the hiring of
Oakland Raiders head coach Jon
Gruden complied with the Rooney
Rule and that the club conducted
bona fide interviews with minority candidates as part of its search
process,” the league said in a statement Friday. Despite the NFL’s
findings, the Fritz Pollard Alliance
said it believes the Raiders violated the rule.
“We strongly disagree with the
NFL’s conclusion that the Raiders
did not violate the Rooney Rule,”
the group said in a written statement. “We believe the facts overwhelmingly point in the other direction. In his enthusiasm to hire
Jon Gruden, Raiders’ owner Mark
Davis failed to fulfill his obligation
under the Rule and should step
forward and acknowledge he violated the Rule.”
— Mark Maske
BOB MACK/FLORIDA TIMES-UNION/ASSOCIATED PRESS
In their first season, Coach Doug Marrone and executive Tom Coughlin helped the Jaguars to 10 wins and a spot in the AFC title game.
Can Coughlin ace Patriots test again?
COUGHLIN FROM D1
Coughlin even more heavily than
usual this week because of the
opponent.
“I think I’ve leaned on Coach
pretty good from Day 1,” Marrone
said. “So I don’t think I can lean
on him any more because I’m a
big guy and, if I lean on him, it
might hurt him a little bit. No, but
honestly, it’s not something that
now all of a sudden there’s success and Coach is more involved.
It’s been the same way from Day 1
when we first started working
together. So when you say, ‘Do
you lean on him?’ I’ve leaned on
him quite a bit. We work with
each other quite a bit. So we work
the same amount of time together
and talk about the same things.”
Marrone said he hadn’t even
seen Coughlin’s Super Bowl wins
over the Patriots.
“I haven’t watched them, seriously,” he said. “If I’m not in a
Super Bowl, I usually don’t watch
it unless I have to. But David
Tyree made a great catch. He’s a
Syracuse guy [where Marrone
once coached].”
The Giants’ formula against
the Patriots was relatively simple.
They had a pass rush capable of
harassing Brady. And they had a
quarterback, Eli Manning, who
could put aside his regular season
inconsistency and make big plays
in big moments.
These Jaguars are capable of
that, boasting a fearsome defense
and a quarterback in Blake Bortles who is much maligned but
played well Sunday against the
Steelers. Whatever happens
against the Patriots, it has been a
remarkable first season back in
Jacksonville for Coughlin, who
interviewed for the team’s coaching job but ended up becoming its
executive vice president of football operations.
The new brain trust of Coughlin, Caldwell and Marrone had a
brilliant offseason, signing defensive end Calais Campbell, cornerback A.J. Bouye and safety Barry
Church to bolster an already talented defense. Running back
Leonard Fournette and left tackle
Cam Robinson arrived via the
first two rounds of the draft.
“When I decided to make the
decision to come here, I knew
there was an opportunity and just
a matter of time,” Campbell said
in the locker room Sunday in
Pittsburgh. “The talent was there
and the coaching was there and
the hard work was there. If you
have a lot of talent and you push
yourself and work as hard as you
could, you’re going to make a lot
of plays and win a lot of games.”
Campbell said he knew a quick
turnaround was possible, even
after a three-win season.
“If you watch the games last
year, they had 10 games [including eight losses] that were decided by one touchdown,” he said.
“You were in the ballgame at the
end of the day. . . .
“Coach Marrone established a
work ethic that we were going to
outwork everybody else in the
NFL, and that hard work was
going to make a difference in the
games.”
Coughlin and Marrone established a new order, and discipline
was part of it. Marrone nixed
table tennis and dominoes in the
locker room. He ran a more
demanding training camp. The
Jaguars became a tougher team
with more of an edge. They
ranked second in the league in
total defense during the regular
season.
“Coach Doug, he’s calm, cool,
collected in front of you guys —
very modest, I guess,” defensive
tackle Malik Jackson said Sunday.
“But in front of us, he lets loose.
We play just like he coaches. We
go out there. We’re quiet. But we
sock you in the mouth, and then
we step back. . . . We’re just bullies, man. [The Steelers] wanted
to talk all week about what they
wanted to do, how they’re going
to do it, how we can’t stop this,
how we can’t stop that. Ha ha. . . .
We went out there and kicked
their [butt] — plain and simple.”
This is the third AFC championship game for the Jaguars.
Coughlin coached them to the
previous two, losses to close the
1996 and ’99 seasons. That led to
Marrone being asked this week
whether Coughlin regards this
game as potential redemption, a
chance for him to take the franchise where he could not get it
while coaching.
“You don’t know him that
well,” Marrone said. “Coach
doesn’t think like that. He just
wants to do everything he can for
us to be successful and win. I
don’t think there’s anything else,
at least from my point. Maybe
someone that knows him maybe
better than I — which I think is
probably tough, except for maybe
[Coughlin’s wife] Judy or his family — but I don’t see that.
“I couldn’t speak for Coach
that way. I just see the same
person that is going to do everything he possibly can to help the
organization, help me, help the
team, help the coaches. From Day
1, that’s how he’s been.”
mark.maske@washpost.com
Trotz reshu±es lines, but Capitals fail to deliver a winning e≠ort
CAPITALS FROM D1
leading the Metropolitan Division and on their way to a second
straight Presidents’ Trophy.
Alzner, who joined the sixthplace Canadiens as a free agent
this summer, was on a list of
offseason departures that included Marcus Johansson (traded to
the Devils), Justin Williams (free
agency), Kevin Shattenkirk (free
agency), Nate Schmidt (Vegas
expansion draft) and Daniel Winnik (free agency).
Still, the Capitals were succeeding before flatlining in their
past two games.
“It was a lack of respect of the
way we should play without the
puck,” Eller said. “Too much
cheat, not enough attention to
detail. Just sloppy. Just probably
one of the sloppiest games I’ve
seen us play, if not the sloppiest,
of just not playing the right way.”
The
Capitals
stumbled
through the second period while
the Canadiens grabbed the lead.
They did so on a power-play goal
from Max Pacioretty, the winger
left wide open in the left slot with
enough space to hum a wrist shot
past Grubauer.
But the Capitals answered before the end of the period, netting a power-play goal of their
own when John Carlson buried a
slap shot from the point.
Trotz kept tinkering with his
lines at the start of the third
period, as he slid Chandler Stephenson and Burakovsky on either side of Kuznetsov on the
second line. After Canadiens
wing Alex Galchenyuk twice hit
the post on a power play, Burakovsky bounced out of the penalty box and found himself on a
breakaway. His wrist shot
whizzed past goaltender Antti
Niemi’s right arm but found the
post, too. A minute later, Canadiens winger Artturi Lehkonen
lifted a shot past Grubauer and
off the crossbar.
Only inches kept the score
knotted, until Byron tracked the
puck off the back boards and
beat a scrambling Grubauer. The
rest of the Capitals night was
defined by more line shake-ups, a
PHOTOS BY JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
C A PITA L S ’ N E X T T H R E E
vs. Philadelphia Flyers
Tomorrow
12:30 NBC
Canadiens 3, Capitals 2
MONTREAL .............................. 0
WASHINGTON ......................... 0
1
1
2 —
1 —
3
2
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: None.
SECOND PERIOD
at Florida Panthers
Thursday
7:30 NBCSW
vs. Philadelphia Flyers
Jan. 31
8 NBCSN
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM)
last-minute push and a tying goal
that never came.
“Today, I just didn’t think we
had enough guys putting in the
real full day’s work,” Trotz said.
“Like I said, too much cheat and
not enough compete in a lot of
areas.”
jesse.dougherty@washpost.com
Scoring: 1, Montreal, Pacioretty 13 (Drouin, Gallagher),
7:08 (pp). 2, Washington, Carlson 6 (Kuznetsov, Ovechkin), 13:24 (pp).
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Montreal, Byron 13 (Jerabek, Pacioretty),
10:41. 4, Montreal, Pacioretty 14 (Plekanec, Byron),
18:42. 5, Washington, Eller 10 (Niskanen, Orlov), 19:06.
SHOTS ON GOAL
MONTREAL .............................. 8
7
11 — 26
WASHINGTON ......................... 4
12
10 — 26
Power-play opportunities: Montreal 1 of 4 Goalies:
Montreal, Niemi 1-5-1 (26 shots-24 saves). Washington,
Grubauer 4-6-3 (25-23). A: 18,506 (18,277). T: 2:29.
Capitals center Lars Eller,
above, cut the lead to one late in
the third period. Winger Andre
Burakovsky, left, had one shot
on goal a day after being a
healthy scratch.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 20 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D5
M2
Brash street-ball star
home again in Indiana
STEPHENSON FROM D1
arms. In Indiana, basketball conquers all.
Indiana’s adopted son
The limelight followed him as a
teenager.
He starred in his own reality
show as a high school junior. By
his senior year, he mean-mugged
on the cover of Slam magazine. He
was a phenom in the big city,
graduating as the career leading
scorer in New York state high
school basketball history. Even after a year at Cincinnati, in which
he was named Big East rookie of
the year, he had to fly to 17 predraft workouts in search of his
NBA opportunity. He arrived in
Indianapolis as a relative unknown in June 2010 when thenPacers president Larry Bird chose
him with the 40th pick.
“Nobody had expectations for
Lance,” said Tom Lewis, founder of
Pacers fan blog Indy Cornrows.
But Indiana has a soft spot for
the overlooked. Maybe because
“Hoosiers,” a movie celebrating
the underdog, is so ingrained that
it seems to be a requirement for
state residence. “I’ve seen it 12
times,” bragged Manlove, whose
father was an extra in one of the
scenes. With Stephenson, fans had
found another stray.
Behind closed doors, he treated
Pacers practices like Game 7, causing veterans to admonish: “Rook,
you got to relax! This is just practice!” He nonetheless spent most
of his rookie season as a question
mark, fans having no clue that
such fire and energy were bottled
on the bench.
By the next season, he was becoming a cult hero, coming out of
nowhere to score 22 points in the
regular season finale against the
rival Chicago Bulls. There he was
again in the playoffs, holding a
choke sign after Miami Heat star
LeBron James missed a free throw
in Game 3 of the Eastern Conference semifinals.
“As soon as he did that, everybody was like, ‘I don’t know if the
kid can play, but that’s great,’ ” said
Scott Lagler, another longtime
fan.
In 2012-13, he started 72 games.
The next year, he averaged 13.8
points, flopping theatrically for
calls and celebrating big shots by
squatting low and wiggling his
hips.
“He’s got that type of swagger to
him. That’s how he gets himself
going, gets himself excited,” said
Cory Joseph, a current Pacer who
played against Stephenson from
2011 to 2017. “Sometimes it tends
to get under people’s skin.”
He was an irritant, but he was
Indiana’s irritant. And he was
James’s thorn.
For three straight postseasons,
the Pacers ran into Miami’s Big
Three as Stephenson conducted a
master class on how to frustrate
The King, once going so far as to
blow into James’s ear.
“Lance has swagger to go up to
the biggest, baddest dude in the
NBA and blow in his ear and let
him know he’s here,” said Dominic
Dorsey, a native Hoosier and Pacers fan. “And that’s Indiana.
“They call us Naptown: Everybody sleeps on us,” Dorsey continued. “Here’s the thing: Nobody
expects us to sneak up from behind and come away with the win.
You’ve got Lance Stephenson on
your squad, you think you might
just have a shot.”
A happy return
At first, Stephenson didn’t
know what to make of Indiana.
“It’s more country-like to me,”
Stephenson said. “I’m from the
city. I mean, there’s always something to do in New York. . . . When I
got here, I didn’t know what to do.”
He was entering a market unlike New York in other ways, too.
Indianapolis, the state capital, is a
contradiction at the crossroads of
America.
The Pacers play in downtown
Indianapolis, a rare dot of blue in a
statewide sea of Republican red.
Where Stephenson has settled, 22
miles away in quiet Boone County,
residents voted 60.4 percent for
Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election. Then-Indiana
Gov. Mike Pence was tapped as
Trump’s running mate, and, in
October, the vice president returned for a Colts game — walking
out when a handful of players
knelt during the national anthem.
A Republican state lawmaker recently announced plans to push
legislation that would force the
Colts to offer refunds to fans offended by kneeling players.
Stephenson may ooze confidence and have no problem preening on the court, but he is reluctant to wade into political waters.
“There’s been some stuff that
RICK SCUTERI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
“I do whatever I can to win for them,” Pacers guard Lance Stephenson says about the Indiana faithful.
went on, and I wanted to talk
about. I feel like . . . , ” he said, with
a pause. “My words ain’t really
going to help what’s going on. I
don’t feel like I can really
change . . . .”
Another pause.
“I feel like I would be hurting
myself more than anything, trying
to speak my own opinion and how
I feel,” he continued. “So I just stay
quiet, because I don’t want that
type of energy and that stuff
around me.”
Indianapolis has long been a
pocket of liberalism — at least by
Indiana standards. But the Pacers
long had a reputation for signing
more white players than the aver-
age team. In 2004, when asked by
ESPN whether the NBA needed
more white superstars, Bird replied, “I think it’s good for a fan
base because, as we all know, the
majority of the fans are white
America. And if you just had a
couple of white guys in there, you
might get them a little excited.”
Following a few franchise-altering events — most notably “The
Malice at the Palace” in 2004,
when Indiana players fought with
fans in the stands in Detroit, and a
2006 incident in which Stephen
Jackson fired a gun outside of a
strip club — four of the Pacers’ top
seven players were white.
“A lot of people in Indiana want
Wizards
put forth
solid e≠ort
in road win
candace.buckner@washpost.com
NBA ROUNDUP
Raptors beat the Spurs
for first time since 2015
RAPTORS 86,
SPURS 83
WIZARDS FROM D1
a season-high 133 points and lost
by 24 Wednesday, Brooks unleashed his wrath. Inside the locker room, Brooks slammed his fist
on a table and angrily told the
Wizards he needed “soldiers” to
play for him, according to a person who witnessed the tirade.
Brooks grew so animated that his
voice carried beyond the door.
“You never want to get your
coach that upset,” Kelly Oubre Jr.
said. “We’re all on the same team.
We should be lifting each other
up. Not bringing each other
down, man. That was definitely a
message we heard loud and clear.
Hopefully we’re going to take that
for the rest of the season and use
that as a chip.”
Though Brooks had hinted that
changes could be coming, the
rotation remained consistent.
But the effort changed.
Oubre starred in the nationally
televised game, scoring a careerhigh 26 points and hitting 5 of 9
from beyond the arc. With 2:36 to
play, Oubre made a momentumsapping three in the corner while
getting fouled. He completed the
four-point play.
Although Detroit scored 38
points in that frame, shots like
Oubre’s helped Washington survive its late defensive shortcomings.
“The way we closed the game
going into the fourth quarter, we
had the lead. We just let it slip
away and made it closer than the
game it was supposed to be,” John
Wall said.
Wall didn’t make his first shot
until after halftime but played a
key role in the Wizards’ breakout
third quarter. Wall scored 10
points in a flash as Washington
tallied 45 and opened a 20-point
lead. While Wall finished with 16
points and 11 assists, Bradley Beal
steadied the starters with 26
points.
Otto Porter Jr. showed consistent effort whether he was chas-
a white face for their professional
basketball franchise,” said Lagler,
who is white.
When Dorsey, a community organizer who is black, planned and
participated in more than a dozen
Black Lives Matter protests in his
home town, he read the ugly opinions posted under reports about
the events. In Dorsey’s view, a
professional athlete in Indianapolis should tread carefully before
tweeting #blacklivesmatter, so he
doesn’t blame Stephenson for his
decision to remain silent.
“The comments that you’ll see
from thumb thugs and Internet
warriors just sitting there watching the broadcast, saying, ‘How
dare you! Go get a job! Welfare
queens!’ ” Dorsey said. “[Trump]
being in office has emboldened
that type of behavior and that type
of rhetoric. If you value your fans
and you just want to make your
money and go home, why would
you step into that arena?”
Stephenson said he doesn’t censor himself because he plays in
Indiana, but he remembers how
low he was before this second
chance. He doesn’t want to risk it.
“I was going through team to
team and couldn’t figure out a
role, what team needed me,” said
Stephenson, who was cut in
March by the Minnesota Timberwolves, concluding a journey in
which he suited up for five teams
over three seasons after leaving
Indiana in free agency. “I was, like,
at my weakest.”
Then, just as Bird was stepping
down as team president in April,
he brought Stephenson home on a
three-year contract.
At Stephenson’s home debut
April 4, the ovation was so loud
that he had to stare at the rim to
keep from crying. After games,
fans followed him to his favorite
hangout, Hooters.
“He saw my shirt and wanted
it,” said Jared Beeler, who was
wearing a gold “Born Ready” Tshirt at the restaurant. “I couldn’t
say no.”
Fans would give Stephenson
the shirts off their backs because
of nights like Jan. 12. In the Pacers’
97-95 win over the Cleveland Cavaliers, Stephenson was back to
bothering James. After hitting a
three-pointer, he got in James’s
face on defense and remained
there after a whistle. When James
delivered a forearm to his chest,
Stephenson exaggerated the contact and flashed an incredulous
expression as he searched for a
referee. James got hit with a technical foul.
Indiana, of course, loved it.
“You hear about guys having a
quiet
20-point,
eight-assist
night?” Indy Cornrows’ Lewis
said, before screaming, “Lance!
Does not have a quiet night! If he
has a 10-point, five-assist night, it’s
loud!”
When he’s in Indiana, Stephenson isn’t the kid from Brooklyn.
The second-round pick with too
much swagger. The castaway forgotten by the NBA. He is their
humble Hoosier.
“I feel like I get all the energy
from all the fans, and it just goes
inside of me and I just fight for
them,” Stephenson said. “I do
whatever I can to win for them,
and I feel like the fans make me the
player that I am now. . . . I feel like
this is home to me.”
A SSOCIATED P RESS
RICK OSENTOSKI/USA TODAY SPORTS
Bradley Beal fends off Tobias Harris. Beal and Kelly Oubre Jr. each scored 26 points for the Wizards.
WIZ ARDS’ NEX T THREE
at Dallas Mavericks
Monday
8:30 NBCSW
at Oklahoma City Thunder
Thursday
8 TNT
at Atlanta Hawks
Jan. 27
7:30 NBCSW
Radio: WFED (1500 AM)
ing down a loose ball in the opening quarter or deflecting passes
along with the small front line
with Oubre and Mike Scott in the
second. He closed with 16 points,
seven rebounds and four steals.
While the Wizards’ bench finished with modest numbers, their
production was crucial. The Pistons led 29-19 after the first quarter — and owned a 10-0 record
when ahead after the opening
frame — but the reserves plus
Porter held Detroit to just two
field goals through much of the
second quarter and gave the Wizards the 35-34 advantage by the
time Brooks had made his first
substitution.
“We were alert and active,”
Brooks said. “That second unit, I
Wizards 122, Pistons 112
Washington ........................ 19
Detroit ................................ 29
WASHINGTON
Morris
Porter Jr.
Gortat
Beal
Wall
Oubre Jr.
Scott
Satoransky
Mahinmi
Meeks
TOTALS
27
17
45
28
31 — 122
38 — 112
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
31:55 4-14 4-4 3-9 2 4 13
37:52
5-9 2-2 3-7 3 3 16
18:38
4-7 2-2 0-2 2 2 10
40:20 7-12 8-9 1-3 3 2 26
37:19 6-15 2-3 0-3 11 2 16
31:23 9-14 3-3 0-5 1 4 26
15:25
2-3 3-4 1-4 2 2
7
11:38
0-1 0-0 0-1 2 0
0
7:54
1-2 0-0 0-0 0 1
2
7:36
3-5 0-0 0-0 2 0
6
240 41-82 24-27 8-34 28 20 122
Percentages: FG .500, FT .889. 3-Point Goals: 16-35, .457
(Oubre Jr. 5-9, Porter Jr. 4-5, Beal 4-7, Wall 2-5, Morris
1-5, Satoransky 0-1, Scott 0-1, Meeks 0-2). Team
Rebounds: 11. Team Turnovers: 13 (19 PTS). Blocked
Shots: 4 (Beal, Mahinmi, Morris, Satoransky). Turnovers: 13 (Wall 5, Beal 2, Mahinmi 2, Scott 2, Morris,
Oubre Jr.). Steals: 10 (Porter Jr. 4, Beal, Mahinmi,
Meeks, Morris, Satoransky, Wall). Technical Fouls: Wall,
6:29 fourth.
DETROIT
Bullock
Harris
Drummond
Bradley
I.Smith
Kennard
Tolliver
Johnson
Galloway
Buycks
Moreland
Ellenson
TOTALS
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
23:37
3-6 0-0 0-0 2 2
9
31:06 7-19 2-2 0-3 1 2 17
42:40
4-5 6-8 6-21 8 6 14
29:27 7-16 0-0 1-3 1 0 15
34:33 7-11 1-2 0-2 7 2 15
22:00
4-7 5-5 0-1 2 3 16
21:16
2-4 6-6 0-4 2 1 11
12:00
1-3 2-2 0-0 1 3
5
11:19
2-5 0-0 0-1 1 1
4
6:42
1-2 0-0 0-0 0 0
2
4:54
2-2 0-1 0-0 0 1
4
0:26
0-0 0-0 0-0 0 1
0
240 40-80 22-26 7-35 25 22 112
Percentages: FG .500, FT .846. 3-Point Goals: 10-30, .333
(Bullock 3-5, Kennard 3-5, Johnson 1-2, Bradley 1-3,
Tolliver 1-3, Harris 1-7, I.Smith 0-2, Galloway 0-3). Team
Rebounds: 8. Team Turnovers: 14 (17 PTS). Blocked
Shots: 3 (Drummond 2, Bullock). Turnovers: 14 (Drummond 5, Tolliver 3, Bradley, Buycks, Harris, I.Smith,
Johnson, Moreland). Steals: 8 (Drummond 2, Johnson 2,
Buycks, Harris, I.Smith, Moreland). Technical Fouls:
coach Pistons (Defensive three second), 4:58 third.
A: 14,744 (21,000).
thought they were as big as a part
to win this game. Otto had deflec-
tions. Jodie [Meeks] had deflections. If you play with the right
spirit and right mind-set, those
things happen for you more often
than not.”
Far too often this season, the
Wizards have not shown this spirit.
Although Washington has one
of the most talented starting lineups in the East — with an expensive core will cost ownership
$400 million — at times, the Wizards’ effort is lacking.
Before the game, when asked if
effort is something that can be
coached, Brooks replied, “I never
had to worry about that and this
year it’s definitely cropped up too
many times.”
The admission struck a chord
for Wall.
“It’s terrible,” he said. “This is
our job. This is what we get paid
to do every day. Even if we didn’t
get paid, you should be able to
wake up and play the game that
you love. It’s the easiest thing to
do is to go out there and compete.
You never know when the last ball
is going to drop and your career
can be over.
“You have to go out there and
take every game and every minute like it’s your last.”
candace.buckner@washpost.com
Kyle Lowry turned in his best
game since returning from injury,
turning it on in the fourth quarter
to help his Toronto Raptors grind
out another home win.
Lowry scored nine of his 24
points in the final period, DeMar
DeRozan added 21 and the Raptors beat visiting San Antonio,
86-83, on Friday night to snap a
four-game losing streak against
the Spurs.
Jonas Valanciunas had 15
points and 11 rebounds as the
Raptors improved to 17-3 at home,
the second-best home record in
the NBA behind San Antonio’s
mark of 19-2.
Lowry made 8 of 16 shots, going
4 of 9 from three-point range, in
his third game after missing three
with a bruised tailbone.
Raptors Coach Dwane Casey
said Lowry looked stronger than
he had in his previous two outings.
“I thought he had a lot of
bounce,” Casey said.
Lowry got the Raptors off to a
quick start, making a three-pointer on his first shot of the game.
“Just being aggressive,” he said.
“It’s that time of year when everyone is kind of hitting a little bit of a
rut, a little bit of a lull. We’ve got to
continue to get better and take the
step on the journey to making us a
better team.”
It had been more than two
years since Toronto last beat San
Antonio. The Raptors won 97-94
at home on Dec. 9, 2015.
NETS 101, HEAT 95: DeMarre Carroll scored 26 points,
Spencer Dinwiddie had 15 and
Brooklyn beat Miami at home.
Brooklyn snapped a five-game
losing skid at Barclays Center and
a seven-game home losing streak
to the Heat.
Caris LeVert and Joe Harris
each added 12 points for the Nets.
D’Angelo Russell played 14 minutes and went 0 for 5 from the
field for Brooklyn in his first action after missing 32 games following left knee surgery.
Hassan Whiteside had 21
points and 13 rebounds, and
Goran Dragic scored 17 points for
the Heat.
LeVert made an acrobatic layup
to give the Nets a 95-91 lead with
57.8 seconds remaining and then
made a step-back jumper to ice
the game at 97-91.
Carroll hit a three-pointer from
the wing to give Brooklyn an 8986 lead with 4:19 left.
GRIZZLIES 106, KINGS 88:
Dillon Brooks scored a career-best
22 points, Ben McLemore had a
season-high 21 and host Memphis
beat skidding Sacramento for its
third consecutive win.
The game marked Zach Randolph’s first return to Memphis
since spending eight years as a key
figure in the Grizzlies’ success.
The power forward received a
standing ovation when he was
introduced with the starting lineups.
The team showed a tribute video between the first and second
quarters.
Randolph finished with four
points and six rebounds for the
Kings, who have lost seven
straight.
De’Aaron Fox led the Kings
with 16 points and six assists,
while Bogdan Bogdanovic and
Vince Carter scored 15 each for
Sacramento.
SUNS
108, NUGGETS 100:
Devin Booker scored 30 points,
T.J. Warren had 25 and Phoenix
handled host Denver.
Josh Jackson and Isaiah Canaan added 16 points apiece off
the bench for Phoenix, which
snapped a seven-game losing
streak to the Nuggets.
The Suns benefited from an
earlier arrival than their last game
in Denver. Mechanical issues delayed their flight for the Jan. 3
game until five hours before the
opening tip, and the Nuggets
raced to a 134-111 win.
The extra night in Denver
helped Phoenix to its first win
against the Nuggets since Nov. 20,
2015.
D6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. SATURDAY,
JANUARY 20 , 2018
AUSTRALIAN OPEN
After 225 minutes and 48 games, Halep closes marathon match over Davis
BY
J OHN P YE
melbourne, australia — Top-
ranked Simona Halep saved
three match points and finally
fended off Lauren Davis, 4-6, 6-4,
15-13, in a 3-hour 45-minute
marathon Saturday to reach the
fourth round of the Australian
Open.
The third set took 2 hours and
22 minutes and, after wasting
three previous chances to serve
out the match, Halep converted
on her first match point when
Davis hit a forehand wide.
The No. 76th-ranked Davis,
who had two medical timeouts in
the third set for treatment on
both feet, including a break after
blowing three match points from
0-40 on Halep’s serve in the 22nd
game.
“Definitely was a very tough
match, so long,” said Halep, who
has twice reached the final at the
French Open but never won a
Grand Slam singles title. “I never
played the third set so long, so
I’m really happy I could stay and
win it. I’m almost dead.”
It equaled the longest women’s
singles match at the Australian
Open in terms of games played —
Chanda Rubin’s win over
Arantxa Sanchez Vicario in 1996
was also 48 games — but was
almost an hour shorter in duration than the record 4:44 that
Francesca Schiavone needed to
beat Svetlana Kuznetsova in
2011.
“I just feel that my muscles are
gone,” said Halep, who badly
twisted her left ankle in the first
round. “My ankle is, I don’t know
how it is because I don’t feel it
anymore, but it was nice to be on
court. It was nice to win this
match.”
Davis lost the three previous
times she’d played in the third
round of a major, but did everything possible to stay in the
match, keeping long rallies alive
to put pressure on Halep.
The 24-year-old American finished with roughly twice the
number of winners (52 to 27)
against slightly more than double the unforced errors (73-39)
and broke Halep’s serve six times.
“We were both fighting our
hearts out. Every point was super
long,” Davis said. “I got to the
point where I was so tired, I just
told myself to swing and move. I
didn’t feel any pressure.”
Halep will play the winner of
Saturday’s later match between
local hope Ashleigh Barty and
Naomi Osaka.
U.S. Open finalist Madison
Keys advanced, 6-3, 6-4 over Ana
Bogdan, and will next play No. 8
Caroline Garcia, who beat Aliaksandra Sasnovich, 6-3, 5-7, 6-2.
— Associated Press
SCOREBOARD
BA S KETBA L L
HOCKEY
TENNIS
H I GH S C HOOLS
BOYS' BASKETBALL
NBA
Trail Blazers 100, Pacers 86
NHL
Australian Open
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Late Thursday
EASTERN CONFERENCE
MEN’S SINGLES — THIRD ROUND
Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, def. Damir Dzumhur (28),
Bosnia-Herzegovina, 6-1, 6-3, 6-1; Diego Schwartzman
(24), Argentina, def. Aleksandr Dolgopolov, Ukraine, 6-7
(7-1), 6-2, 6-3, 6-3; Pablo Carreno-Busta (10), Spain, def.
Gilles Muller, Luxembourg, 7-6 (7-4), 4-6, 7-5, 7-5; Marin
Cilic (6), Croatia, def. Ryan Harrison, United States, 7-6
(7-4), 6-3, 7-6 (7-4); Grigor Dimitrov (3), Bulgaria, def.
Andrey Rublev (30), Russia, 6-3, 4-6, 6-4, 6-4; Nick
Kyrgios (17), Australia, def. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (15),
France, 7-6 (7-5), 4-6, 7-6 (8-6), 7-6 (7-5); Kyle Edmund,
Britain, def. Nikoloz Basilashvili, Georgia, 7-6 (7-0), 3-6,
4-6, 6-0, 7-5; Andreas Seppi, Italy, def. Ivo Karlovic,
Croatia, 6-3, 7-6 (7-4), 6-7 (7-3), 6-7 (7-5), 9-7.
ATLANTIC
W
Boston........................................34
Toronto ......................................31
Philadelphia ...............................21
x-New York ................................20
Brooklyn.....................................17
L
12
13
20
25
29
Pct
.739
.705
.512
.444
.370
GB
—
2
101/2
131/2
17
SOUTHEAST
W
Miami.........................................26
Washington ...............................26
Charlotte....................................18
Atlanta.......................................13
Orlando ......................................13
L
19
20
25
31
32
Pct
.578
.565
.419
.295
.289
GB
—
7
121/2
13
CENTRAL
W
Cleveland ...................................27
x-Indiana....................................24
Milwaukee .................................23
Detroit .......................................22
Chicago ......................................17
L
17
21
21
22
28
Pct
.614
.533
.523
.500
.378
GB
—
31/2
4
5
101/2
SOUTHWEST
W
Houston .....................................31
San Antonio ...............................30
New Orleans ..............................23
Memphis ....................................16
Dallas .........................................15
L
12
17
21
28
30
Pct
.721
.638
.523
.364
.333
GB
—
3
81/2
151/2
17
NORTHWEST
W
Minnesota..................................29
Oklahoma City ...........................25
Portland .....................................24
Denver........................................23
x-Utah ........................................18
L
18
20
21
23
26
Pct
.617
.556
.533
.500
.409
GB
—
3
4
51/2
91/2
PACIFIC
W
Golden State..............................37
L.A. Clippers...............................23
Phoenix ......................................17
x-L.A. Lakers..............................15
Sacramento ...............................13
L
9
21
29
29
32
Pct
.804
.523
.370
.341
.289
GB
—
13
20
21
231/2
1/
2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
x-Late game
THURSDAY’S RESULTS
Washington 122, at Detroit 112
at Toronto 86, San Antonio 83
at Brooklyn 101, Miami 95
at Memphis 106, Sacramento 88
Phoenix 108, at Denver 100
Indiana at L.A. Lakers, Late
New York at Utah, Late
12 — 86
26 — 100
INDIANA: Bogdanovic 3-10 1-2 8, T.Young 5-12 0-0 10,
Sabonis 4-9 1-1 9, Collison 9-14 0-0 23, Oladipo 9-25 4-5
23, Poythress 0-0 0-0 0, Anigbogu 0-0 0-0 0, Leaf 1-3 0-0
2, Jefferson 3-6 1-1 7, Joseph 1-4 0-2 2, J.Young 1-2 0-0
2, Stephenson 0-6 0-2 0. Totals 36-91 7-13 86.
PORTLAND: E.Turner 1-6 0-0 2, Aminu 4-11 2-2 12,
Nurkic 8-14 3-3 19, Lillard 8-21 8-8 26, McCollum 6-18
0-0 16, Davis 4-5 0-0 8, Collins 1-2 0-0 2, Napier 4-12 3-3
13, Connaughton 1-5 0-0 2. Totals 37-94 16-16 100.
Three-point Goals: Indiana 7-26 (Collison 5-6, Bogdanovic 1-4, Oladipo 1-9, Joseph 0-1, Leaf 0-1, T.Young
0-2, Stephenson 0-3), Portland 10-32 (McCollum 4-10,
Napier 2-4, Aminu 2-7, Lillard 2-8, Connaughton 0-1,
E.Turner 0-2). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Indiana 46
(T.Young 14), Portland 57 (Nurkic 17). Assists: Indiana
17 (T.Young, Oladipo, Collison, Sabonis 3), Portland 17
(Lillard 8). Total Fouls: Indiana 16, Portland 11. Technicals: Oladipo, Nurkic. A: 19,071 (19,393).
NCAA men
FRIDAY’S RESULTS
EAST
Baruch 89, York (N.Y.) 65
Brown 81, Yale 80
Emory 73, NYU 68
Hobart 91, Clarkson 78
Iona 76, Monmouth (N.J.) 73
SOUTH
Davidson 83, St. Bonaventure 73
MIDWEST
Buffalo 84, W. Michigan 74
Wisconsin 75, Illinois 50
Michigan St. 85, Indiana 57
Oklahoma City at Cleveland, 3:30
Chicago at Atlanta, 5
Memphis at New Orleans, 7
Miami at Charlotte, 7
Milwaukee at Philadelphia, 7:30
Golden State at Houston, 8:30
L.A. Clippers at Utah, 9
Toronto at Minnesota, 9
Dallas at Portland, 10
No. 9 Michigan St. 85,
Indiana 57
NCAA women
FRIDAY’S RESULTS
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Orlando at Boston, 1
New York at L.A. Lakers, 3:30
Brooklyn at Detroit, 4
Indiana at San Antonio, 7
Raptors 86, Spurs 83
19
27
23
19
23 — 83
23 — 86
SAN ANTONIO: Anderson 2-5 0-0 5, Aldridge 6-25 4-5 17,
Gasol 6-11 3-4 15, Parker 1-9 1-2 3, Green 2-8 0-0 4,
Bertans 2-5 0-0 4, Lauvergne 1-1 0-0 2, Mills 4-14 4-4 13,
Murray 4-10 2-2 10, Forbes 3-3 2-3 10. Totals 31-91
16-20 83.
TORONTO: Anunoby 0-7 0-0 0, Ibaka 2-7 0-0 4, Valanciunas 7-10 0-0 15, Lowry 8-16 4-5 24, DeRozan 9-19 3-5 21,
Miles 2-7 1-2 6, Powell 1-4 0-0 2, Siakam 2-6 0-0 6, Poeltl
1-3 1-2 3, Wright 2-6 0-0 5. Totals 34-85 9-14 86.
Three-point Goals: San Antonio 5-20 (Forbes 2-2,
Anderson 1-1, Aldridge 1-3, Mills 1-9, Green 0-2, Bertans
0-3), Toronto 9-26 (Lowry 4-9, Siakam 2-4, Valanciunas
1-1, Wright 1-1, Miles 1-4, DeRozan 0-1, Ibaka 0-3,
Anunoby 0-3). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: San Antonio
56 (Aldridge 14), Toronto 50 (Valanciunas 11). Assists:
San Antonio 18 (Parker 4), Toronto 16 (DeRozan 6).
Total Fouls: San Antonio 13, Toronto 19. A: 19,800
(19,800).
Nets 101, Heat 95
29
22
16
24
26 — 95
34 — 101
MIAMI: Richardson 4-12 3-4 12, J.Johnson 3-7 1-2 8,
Whiteside 9-17 4-5 22, Dragic 6-16 5-8 17, Jones Jr. 0-4
0-0 0, Winslow 2-6 0-0 5, Adebayo 3-5 3-4 9, Olynyk 4-6
2-2 12, Ellington 4-11 0-0 10. Totals 35-84 18-25 95.
BROOKLYN: Carroll 9-12 5-5 26, Hollis-Jefferson 2-9 3-4
7, Zeller 3-6 0-0 6, Dinwiddie 6-12 2-2 15, Crabbe 2-9 1-1
5, Acy 2-2 1-2 7, Okafor 2-2 0-0 4, Allen 2-2 2-4 6, Russell
0-5 1-2 1, Harris 4-5 2-2 12, LeVert 4-12 3-4 12. Totals
36-76 20-26 101.
Three-point Goals: Miami 7-22 (Olynyk 2-3, Ellington
2-7, Winslow 1-2, J.Johnson 1-3, Richardson 1-4, Jones
Jr. 0-1, Dragic 0-2), Brooklyn 9-32 (Carroll 3-5, Acy 2-2,
Harris 2-3, Dinwiddie 1-5, LeVert 1-6, Zeller 0-2, Russell
0-3, Crabbe 0-6). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Miami 43
(Whiteside 13), Brooklyn 44 (Allen 7). Assists: Miami 22
(Richardson 7), Brooklyn 20 (LeVert 5). Total Fouls:
Miami 22, Brooklyn 18. Technicals: Miami coach Heat
(Defensive three second). A: 17,732 (17,732).
Grizzlies 106, Kings 88
23
10
19
27
EAST
Baruch 74, York (N.Y.) 72
Brown 81, Yale 71
Drexel 69, Northeastern 58
Emory 69, NYU 64
Georgetown 85, Marquette 58
Hofstra 65, William & Mary 54
Villanova 84, DePaul 58
William Smith 67, Clarkson 53
SOUTH
Berea 63, Covenant 60
Delaware 82, UNC Wilmington 49
Elon 86, Towson 59
IUPUI 71, N. Kentucky 35
James Madison 67, Coll. of Charleston 45
Rhodes 83, Sewanee 62
MIDWEST
Bellevue 63, Viterbo 47
Butler 59, Creighton 53
Concordia (St.P) 97, SW Minnesota St. 94
Drake 81, N. Iowa 64
Illinois St. 67, Evansville 43
Indiana St. 65, Bradley 50
Minot St. 81, Bemidji St. 70
Missouri St. 83, Valparaiso 60
S. Illinois 62, Loyola of Chicago 46
Wright St. 60, UIC 50
Xavier 68, Providence 59
FAR WEST
Arizona 72, Colorado 63
UCLA 60, California 52
Utah 58, Arizona St. 56
SACRAMENTO: Jackson 1-3 0-2 3, Randolph 2-5 0-0 4,
Cauley-Stein 2-10 3-4 7, Fox 5-12 5-5 16, Bogdanovic
7-13 0-0 15, Labissiere 2-8 0-0 4, Papagiannis 0-3 0-0 0,
Hield 4-11 3-3 13, Temple 4-6 2-4 11, Carter 5-9 0-0 15.
Totals 32-80 13-18 88.
MEMPHIS: Brooks 8-13 3-4 22, Green 3-9 0-0 6, Gasol 3-6
0-0 6, Evans 4-15 5-6 14, Harrison 4-6 2-2 12, Martin 3-7
1-1 7, Rabb 2-2 0-0 4, Davis 2-3 1-4 5, Chalmers 2-8 0-0 5,
McLemore 6-13 6-6 21, Selden 2-6 0-0 4. Totals 39-88
18-23 106.
Three-point Goals: Sacramento 11-27 (Carter 5-6, Hield
2-4, Temple 1-2, Fox 1-3, Jackson 1-3, Bogdanovic 1-7,
Labissiere 0-2), Memphis 10-34 (Brooks 3-6, McLemore
3-7, Harrison 2-3, Chalmers 1-5, Evans 1-5, Martin 0-1,
Gasol 0-1, Selden 0-2, Green 0-4). Fouled Out: None.
Rebounds: Sacramento 44 (Cauley-Stein 11), Memphis
49 (Green 10). Assists: Sacramento 18 (Fox 6), Memphis
24 (Chalmers, Evans, Davis 5). Total Fouls: Sacramento
20, Memphis 17. Technicals: Sacramento coach Kings
(Defensive three second). A: 16,831 (18,119).
L
15
12
18
17
20
16
20
17
OL PTS. GF GA
4
60 145 134
8
56 141 134
3
55 126 130
5
53 141 133
3
53 141 147
8
50 132 132
4
50 161 173
8
48 126 140
ATLANTIC
Tampa Bay ....................
Boston ...........................
Toronto .........................
Florida ...........................
Montreal .......................
Detroit ..........................
Ottawa ..........................
Buffalo ..........................
W
31
26
25
19
19
18
15
11
L
11
10
17
19
21
19
19
25
OL PTS. GF GA
3
65 162 116
8
60 146 111
5
55 149 136
6
44 126 144
6
44 119 144
7
43 119 135
9
39 118 153
9
31 102 155
WESTERN CONFERENCE
CENTRAL
Nashville .......................
Winnipeg ......................
St. Louis ........................
Dallas ............................
Colorado ........................
Minnesota .....................
Chicago .........................
W
27
26
28
26
25
24
22
L
11
13
17
17
16
17
17
OL PTS. GF GA
6
60 135 116
7
59 153 127
3
59 140 124
4
56 141 128
3
53 147 129
5
53 133 131
6
50 136 123
PACIFIC
Vegas ............................
San Jose ........................
Calgary ..........................
x-Los Angeles ...............
x-Anaheim ....................
Edmonton .....................
Vancouver .....................
Arizona .........................
W
30
24
25
24
21
20
18
10
L
11
14
16
16
16
23
21
28
OL PTS. GF GA
4
64 152 122
6
54 126 119
4
54 131 125
5
53 130 110
9
51 127 128
3
43 126 147
6
42 119 147
9
29 109 166
THURSDAY’S RESULTS
PHOENIX ............................ 29
DENVER .............................. 31
31
19
25
23
23 — 108
27 — 100
PHOENIX: Warren 11-17 3-6 25, Bender 1-3 0-0 3,
T.Chandler 1-2 1-2 3, Ulis 0-5 3-4 3, Booker 11-23 4-4 30,
Dudley 1-6 0-0 3, Jackson 6-9 2-2 16, Len 1-2 1-2 3,
Canaan 6-12 0-0 16, Daniels 2-2 0-0 6. Totals 40-81 14-20
108.
DENVER: W.Chandler 1-3 0-0 2, Lyles 5-8 4-4 15, Jokic
5-12 2-2 14, Murray 10-17 5-5 30, Harris 6-16 0-0 16,
Jefferson 2-3 0-0 5, Plumlee 0-1 1-4 1, Mudiay 2-6 2-2 6,
Craig 0-0 0-0 0, Beasley 1-2 0-0 3, Barton 3-10 2-4 8.
Totals 35-78 16-21 100.
Three-point Goals: Phoenix 14-33 (Canaan 4-6, Booker
4-11, Daniels 2-2, Jackson 2-4, Bender 1-2, Dudley 1-4,
Warren 0-1, Ulis 0-3), Denver 14-36 (Murray 5-8, Harris
4-11, Jokic 2-3, Jefferson 1-1, Beasley 1-2, Lyles 1-3,
W.Chandler 0-2, Mudiay 0-2, Barton 0-4). Fouled Out:
Murray. Rebounds: Phoenix 37 (T.Chandler 9), Denver 42
(Jokic 17). Assists: Phoenix 28 (Canaan 6), Denver 23
(Jokic 5). Total Fouls: Phoenix 21, Denver 20. Technicals:
Murray, Jokic. A: 15,732 (19,155).
GOLF
PGA Tour
CAREERBUILDER CHALLENGE
FRIDAY’S RESULTS
Montreal 3, at Washington 2
at Florida 4, Vegas 3
Los Angeles at Anaheim, Late
SATURDAY’S GAMES
New Jersey at Philadelphia, 1
Dallas at Buffalo, 1
Winnipeg at Calgary, 3
N.Y. Rangers at Colorado, 3
Boston at Montreal, 7
Carolina at Detroit, 7
Toronto at Ottawa, 7
Florida at Nashville, 8
Arizona at St. Louis, 8
Pittsburgh at San Jose, 8
N.Y. Islanders at Chicago, 8:30
Tampa Bay at Minnesota, 9
Vancouver at Edmonton, 10
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Philadelphia at Washington, 12:30
Vegas at Carolina, 6
Vancouver at Winnipeg, 8
San Jose at Anaheim, 9
N.Y. Rangers at Los Angeles, 10:30
63q 65n
62q 67n
63q 67n
67q 64n
67q 64n
64n 67s
65s 67q
64q 68n
68s 64q
63n 70s
66q 67n
66n 67s
68q 65n
65q 68n
69q 64n
65s 68q
64q 69n
64q 69n
67n 67s
66q 68n
68s 66q
70q 64n
65n 69s
68n 66s
66q 68n
66q 68n
70s 64q
67q 68n
71n 64s
67s 68q
69s 66q
69n 66s
68s 67q
67n 68s
67q 68n
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
SATURDAY, JAN. 6
Tennessee 22, at Kansas City 21
Atlanta 26, at Los Angeles Rams 13
SUNDAY, JAN. 7
at Jacksonville 10, Buffalo 3
at New Orleans 31, Carolina 26
DIVISIONAL ROUND
Panthers 4,
Golden Knights 3 (OT)
1
0
1
1
0 — 3
1 — 4
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Florida, McGinn 6 (Bjugstad), 3:15. 2, Vegas,
Perron 11 (Hunt, Haula), 14:22. 3, Florida, Barkov 15
(Trocheck), 15:55 (sh).
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
at Philadelphia 15, Atlanta 10
at New England 35, Tennessee 14
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
Jacksonville 45, at Pittsburgh 42
at Minnesota 29, New Orleans 24
CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS
Utah (13-5)
Huff 6-16 4-4 16, Potter 4-10 1-1 9, Bean 0-3 0-0 0, Provo
1-6 0-0 3, Williams 2-5 4-4 10, BoClair 0-3 0-0 0, Corbin
1-1 0-1 2, Jacobs 4-7 0-2 9, Clark 4-6 1-3 9, Moore 0-1 0-0
0, 22-58 Totals 10-15 58.
Scoring: 4, Vegas, Karlsson 25 (Theodore, Smith), 6:54.
THIRD PERIOD
PRO BOWL
Scoring: 5, Florida, Dadonov 10 (Yandle, Barkov), 3:35. 6,
Vegas, Neal 20 (Haula), 17:51.
Arizona St. (13-6)
Ekmark 2-7 0-0 5, Ibis 3-14 1-2 7, Johnson-Chapman 3-9
0-0 6, Richardson 4-9 1-2 11, Ryan 6-12 2-2 16, Elenga 0-1
1-2 1, Ruden 2-8 1-2 5, Russell 2-6 1-1 5, Sanders 0-0 0-0
0, 22-66 Totals 7-11 56.
UTAH .................................. 15 10
7 26
—58
ARIZONA ST. ........................ 9 20 14 13
—56
Three-point goals: Utah 4-14 (Huff 0-2, Provo 1-3,
Williams 2-4, Jacobs 1-3, Clark 0-1, Moore 0-1), Arizona
St. 5-17 (Ekmark 1-4, Ibis 0-2, Richardson 2-4, Ryan 2-5,
Ruden 0-2). Assists: Utah 12 (Williams 3), Arizona St. 11
(Richardson 4). Fouled out: Utah Huff, Rebounds: Utah
44 (Huff 14), Arizona St. 41 (Ekmark 9). Total fouls: Utah
17, Arizona St. 17. A: 5,787.
OVERTIME
SUNDAY, JAN. 28
AT ORLANDO
AFC vs. NFC, 3 (ESPN/ABC)
Scoring: 7, Florida, Ekblad 8 (Barkov, Huberdeau), 0:40.
SUPER BOWL
SHOTS ON GOAL
SUNDAY, FEB. 4
AT MINNEAPOLIS
AFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6:30 (NBC
VEGAS ............................. 10
15
11 — 36
FLORIDA ............................ 9
8
7
2 — 26
Power-play opportunities: Vegas 0 of 3; Florida 0 of 1.
Goalies: Vegas, Subban 11-2-1 (26 shots-22 saves).
Florida, Reimer 13-12-5 (36-33). A: 17,468 (19,250). T:
2:31.
NHL
Calgary Flames: Recalled Fs Marek Hrivik and Andrew
Mangiapane from Stockton (AHL).
New Jersey Devils: Recalled G Ken Appleby from
Binghamton (AHL).
New York Islanders: Recalled F Ross Johnston from
Bridgeport (AHL).
New York Rangers: Recalled D Tony DeAngelo and F
Daniel Catenacci from Hartford (AHL).
Late Thursday
SAN JOSE ................................ 0
COLORADO .............................. 3
Atlanta United: Acquired M Ezequiel Barco from Club
Atletico Independiente (Argentine Superleague).
Chicago Fire: Acquired the first-round (No. 5) pick in the
2018 MLS SuperDraft from Minnesota for the firstround (No. 15) pick and $175,000 of allocation money and
player to be named. Acquired the first-round (No. 10)
pick in the 2018 MLS SuperDraft from Real Salt Lake for
$85,000 of allocation money.
D.C. United: Acquired $200,000 in allocation money from
Los Angeles FC for the first-round (No. 3) pick in the
2018 MLS SuperDraft.
FC Dallas: Acquired the first-round (No. 4) pick in the
2018 MLS SuperDraft from Montreal for $200,000 of
allocation money.
Houston Dynamo: Acquired M Darwin Ceren from San
Jose for $150,000 in allocation money and future
considerations.
Minnesota United FC: Acquired the first-round (No. 7)
pick in the 2018 MLS SuperDraft from Montreal for
$150,000 of allocation money. Acquired the first-round
(No. 23) pick in the 2018 MLS SuperDraft from Toronto
FC for the second-round (No. 28) pick and $50,000 of
allocation money.
New York City FC: Signed F Jo Inge Berget.
Philadelphia Union: Acquired M David Accam from
Chicago for $1.2 million in allocation money.
Portland Timbers: Signed F Foster Langsdorf.
NFL injury report
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS AT
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS
Jaguars: QUESTIONABLE: S Tashaun Gipson (foot).
Patriots: QUESTIONABLE: QB Tom Brady (right hand),
DT Alan Branch (knee), RB Rex Burkhead (knee), RB
Mike Gillislee (knee), T LaAdrian Waddle (knee).
Avalanche 5, Sharks 3
1
1
2 —
1 —
3
5
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Colorado, MacKinnon 21 (Rantanen,
Landeskog), 7:03. 2, Colorado, MacKinnon 22 (Girard,
Rantanen), 8:01 (pp). 3, Colorado, Soderberg 10
(Comeau, Nieto), 18:14.
MINNESOTA VIKINGS AT
PHILADELPHIA EAGLES
Vikings: OUT: DT Shamar Stephen (knee, ankle). QUESTIONABLE: CB Mackensie Alexander (rib, illness), S
Andrew Sendejo (concussion), WR Adam Thielen (back).
Eagles: QUESTIONABLE: LB Dannell Ellerbe (hamstring).
BOXING
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Colorado, Rantanen 16 (Barberio, MacKinnon), 1:34. 5, San Jose, Meier 9 (Vlasic, Labanc), 9:44.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 6, San Jose, Vlasic 6 (Hertl, Labanc), 0:29. 7, San
Jose, Thornton 12 (Burns, Pavelski), 4:53. 8, Colorado,
Nieto 9 (Comeau), 16:46.
SHOTS ON GOAL
SAN JOSE .............................. 10
17
21 — 48
COLORADO .............................. 9
7
6 — 22
Power-play opportunities: San Jose 0 of 7; Colorado 1 of
4. Goalies: San Jose, Jones 14-11-4 (22 shots-17 saves).
Colorado, Bernier 12-7-1 (48-45). A: 14,349 (18,007). T:
2:31.
Penguins 3, Kings 1
Late Thursday
PITTSBURGH ........................... 1
LOS ANGELES .......................... 0
0
1
2 —
0 —
3
1
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Pittsburgh, Hornqvist 14 (Hagelin), 0:43.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Los Angeles, Kempe 14 (Muzzin, Kopitar), 14:10.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Pittsburgh, Malkin 21 (Maatta, Schultz), 0:26.
4, Pittsburgh, Hornqvist 15 (Malkin, Crosby), 10:21 (pp).
SHOTS ON GOAL
PITTSBURGH ........................... 3
LOS ANGELES ........................ 11
14
8
14 — 31
10 — 29
Power-play opportunities: Pittsburgh 1 of 5; Los Angeles
0 of 2. Goalies: Pittsburgh, DeSmith 1-1-0 (29 shots-28
saves). Los Angeles, Quick 19-15-2 (31-28). A: 18,230
(18,230). T: 2:28.
HYLTON 46, FOREST PARK 39
H (9-5) Dolan 17, Moore 9, Thacker 7, Stephens 6, Rogers
2, Martin 2 Totals 4 17-25 46.
FP (7-9) Lewis 15, Cobb 9, Johnson 7, Collins 6, Johnson 2
Totals 13 13-22 39.
Halftime: Forest Park, (20-20).
Three-point goals: H 7 (Moore 1, Dolan 4, Thacker 2)
DULLES DISTRICT
STONE BRIDGE 57, ROCK RIDGE 47
RR (6-9) Doe 11, Fitch 10, Bhakta 6, Conrow 6, Larsen 6,
Wright 3, Spurlock 3, Sanderson 2 Totals 16 9-17 47.
SB (9-6) DiLuigi 18, Buckley 15, Kling 10, Rhodes 7, Ware
5, Warden 2 Totals 8 23-30 57.
Halftime: Rock Ridge, (28-24).
Three-point goals: SB 6 (Buckley 1, DiLuigi 4, Rhodes 1);
RR 2 (Bhakta 2)
GUNSTON DISTRICT
SOUTH COUNTY 111, LAKE BRADDOCK 109
LB (11-5) James 27, Grable 24, Margraf 18, Dunn 11,
O'Grady Walsh 9, Cullen 9, Hassett 8, Cobb 3 Totals 22
14-25 109.
SC (12-3) Millora-Brown 42, Dunn 15, Powe 13, Bullock
11, Kellan 11, Myles 8, Myles 7, Latta 4 Totals 38 11-15
111.
Halftime: Lake Braddock, (54-51).
Three-point goals: SC 8 (Bullock 2, Dunn 2, Powe 1,
Myles 2, Kellan 1); LB 17 (James 3, Dunn 3, Grable 5,
O'Grady Walsh 2, Cullen 2, Hassett 2)
FIGHT SCHEDULE
SATURDAY
At Barclays Center, Brooklyn, N.Y. (SHO), Errol Spence
Jr. vs. Lamont Peterson, 12, for Spence’s IBF welterweight title; Robert Easter vs. Javier Fortuna, 12, for
Easter’s IBF lightweight title; Marcus Browne vs. Francy
Ntetu, 10, light heavyweights; Adam Kownacki vs. Iago
Kiladze, 10, heavyweights; Anthony Peterson vs. Luis
Florez, 10, super lightweights.
JAN. 27
At Riga, Latvia, Oleksandr Usyk vs. Mairis Briedis, 12, for
Usyk’s WBO and Briedis’ WBC World cruiserweight
titles (World Boxing Super Series semifinals).
At The Forum, Inglewood, Calif. (HBO), Lucas Matthysse
vs. Tewa Kiram, 12, for the vacant WBA World welterweight title; Jorge Linares vs. Mercito Gesta, 12, for
Linares’ WBA World lightweight title; Yoshihiro Kamegai vs. Daquan Pauldo, 10, junior middleweights.
FEB. 2
At WinnaVegas Casino & Resort, Sloan, Iowa (SHO),
Ronald Ellis vs. Junior Younan, 10, for the vacant USBA
super middleweight title.
FEB. 3
At Alder, Russia, Murat Gassiev vs. Yunier Dorticos, 12,
for Gassiev’s IBF and Dorticos’ WBA World cruiserweight titles (World Boxing Super Series semifinals).
At Bank of America Center, Corpus Christi, Texas
(ESPN), Gilberto Ramirez vs. Habib Ahmed, 12, for
Ramirez’s WBO super middleweight titles; Jerwin Ancajas vs. Israel Gonzalez, 12, for Ancajas’ IBF super
flyweight title; Jesse Hart v Thomas Awimbono, 10,
super middleweights.
FEB. 4
At Naha, Japan, Daigo Higa vs. Moises Fuentes, 12, for
Higa’s WBC flyweight title.
FEB. 10
At Copper Box Arena, London, Zolani Tete vs. Omar
Narvaez, 12, for Tete’s WBO bantamweight title.
At Hartman Arena, Park City, Kansas (CBSSN), Tramaine Williams vs. Alexei Collado, 12, for the vacant
WBO International super bantamweight title.
At Cancun, Mexico, Miguel Berchelt vs. Cristian Mijares,
12, for Berchelt’s WBC junior lightweight title.
GI R LS ' BA S K E TBALL
TOP 20
NO. 5 HERNDON 59, WASHINGTON-LEE 53
WL (7-5) Mosley 16, Rood 11, Nigatu 11, Robinson 7,
Doolittle 5, Singh 3 Totals 12 14-22 53.
H (10-2) Newman 17, Johnson 10, Brunson 8, Kimble 7,
Montalban 6, Pearson 4, Koch 3, Owen 2, Anane 2 Totals
10 12-17 59.
Halftime: Herndon, (33-26).
Three-point goals: H 9 (Brunson 2, Koch 1, Montalban 2,
Johnson 2, Kimble 1, Newman 1); WL 5 (Mosley 4, Rood
1).
NO. 6 POOLESVILLE 57, SENECA VALLEY 16
P (14-0) Lee 11, Green 10, Magaha 10, Thompson 7,
Lemarr 6, Hobbs 4, Hobbs 3, Mullikin 2, Abrigo 2,
Haddaway 2 Totals 24 9-17 57.
SV (6-5) Oliver 8, Hines 4, Nwachukwu 2, Martinez 2
Totals 2 3-6 16.
Halftime: Poolesville, (36-8).
Three-point goals: SV 3 (Oliver 2, Hines 1).
NO. 11 RICHARD MONTGOMERY 57,
QUINCE ORCHARD 32
RM (13-0) Osborne 21, Williams 16, Rashad 12, Tounkara 3, Dunn 3, Sherman 2 Totals 13 16-19 57.
QO (5-7) Kamali 8, Michaels 7, Regan 4, Popa 4, Williams
4, Badmus 2, Blue 2, Kelley 1 Totals 10 6-8 32.
Halftime: Richard Montgomery, (26-14).
Three-point goals: QO 2 (Michaels 1, Regan 1); RM 5
(Osborne 2, Williams 2, Dunn 1).
NO. 16 NATIONAL CHRISTIAN 71,
NO. 4 ROCK CREEK CHRISTIAN 53
NC (12-4)Totals 0 0-0 71.
RCC (17-4) WASHINGTON 24, SMITH 10, RIVERA 6,
GROSS 5, KEITH 3, SKINNER 3, HAWKINS 2 Totals 14
7-10 53.
Halftime: National Christian, (27-20). Three-point goals:
RCC 6 (WASHINGTON 4, KEITH 1, GROSS 1).
EDISON 63, NO. 17 MARSHALL 31
B OY S ' B A S K E TB A L L
FIRST ROUND
Detroit at New Jersey, 7
Colorado at Toronto, 7
Ottawa at Minnesota, 8
Tampa Bay at Chicago, 8:30
Buffalo at Calgary, 9
N.Y. Islanders at Arizona, 9
VEGAS ............................... 1
FLORIDA ............................ 2
MARYLAND
Bladensburg 59, Laurel 55
Blair 61, Sherwood 34
Broadneck 57, Arundel 37
C.H. Flowers 61, Suitland 52
Crossland 43, Friendly 41
Damascus 69, Rockville 22
Douglass 71, Potomac (Md.) 18
Eleanor Roosevelt 67, Bowie 49
Largo 61, Fairmont Heights 23
Northwest 45, Blake 40
Oxon Hill 57, Gwynn Park 33
Parkdale 86, High Point 8
Poolesville 57, Seneca Valley 16
Richard Montgomery 57, Quince Orchard 32
Whitman 62, Einstein 20
Wootton 69, Gaithersburg 54
VIRGINIA
Briar Woods 73, Broad Run 51
Centreville 63, Chantilly 39
Edison 63, Marshall 31
Fairfax 53, W.T. Woodson 35
Falls Church 62, Mount Vernon 43
George Mason 66, Clarke County 40
Heritage 72, Dominion 40
Herndon 59, Washington-Lee 53
Hylton 30, Forest Park 25
Lake Braddock 42, South County 27
Loudoun County 51, Woodgrove 34
Oakton 61, Madison 41
Potomac Falls 54, Champe 38
Robinson 43, West Springfield 36
South Lakes 48, Langley 44
Stone Bridge 67, Rock Ridge 24
Yorktown 43, McLean 36
PRIVATE
Elizabeth Seton 81, Carroll 35
Episcopal 46, Georgetown Day 29
Madeira 54, Sandy Spring 26
National Cathedral 45, Holton-Arms 38
National Christian 71, Rock Creek Christian 53
Potomac School 51, Maret 27
St. John’s 72, Good Counsel 51
St. Mary's Ryken 51, Holy Cross 43
NFL playoffs
MONDAY’S GAMES
SECOND PERIOD
Arizona Cardinals: Signed LB Praise Martin-Oguike to a
future contract for the 2018 season.
Miami Dolphins: Named Dowell Loggains offensive
coordinator and Jeremiah Washburn offensive line
coach. Announced defensive backs coach Lou Anarumo,
running backs coach Danny Barrett and defensive line
coach Terrell Williams were not retained. Announced
Shawn Jefferson will become assistant head coach/offense, Ben Johnson will become wide receivers coach,
and Clyde Christensen will become director of football
and player development.
Tennessee Titans: Agreed to terms with QB Tyler
Ferguson on a reserve/futures contract.
Washington Redskins: Signed OL Orlando Franklin to a
reserve/futures contract.
-16
-15
-14
-13
-13
-13
-12
-12
-12
-11
-11
-11
-11
-11
-11
-11
-11
-11
-10
-10
-10
-10
-10
-10
-10
-10
-10
-9
-9
-9
-9
-9
-9
-9
-9
FOOTBALL
Utah 58, No. 22 Arizona St. 56
TR A N S A C TI O N S
128
129
130
131
131
131
132
132
132
133
133
133
133
133
133
133
133
133
134
134
134
134
134
134
134
134
134
135
135
135
135
135
135
135
135
CARDINAL DISTRICT
GIRLS' BASKETBALL
In La Quina, Calif.
Purse: $5.9 million
s-Stadium Course, Yardage: 7,113; Par: 72 (36-36)
q-La Quinta CC Course, 7,060; 72 (36-36)
n-Nicklaus Tournament Course, 7,159; 72 (36-36)
SECOND ROUND
Andrew Landry ..............................
Jon Rahm .......................................
Jason Kokrak .................................
Zach Johnson .................................
Michael Kim ...................................
Martin Piller ...................................
Nick Watney ..................................
Brandon Harkins ............................
Brian Gay .......................................
Austin Cook ...................................
Kevin Na .........................................
Adam Hadwin ................................
Scott Piercy ...................................
Brian Harman ................................
Russell Knox ..................................
Grayson Murray .............................
Beau Hossler ..................................
Aaron Wise ....................................
Richy Werenski ..............................
Lucas Glover ..................................
James Hahn ...................................
Peter Uihlein ..................................
Jhonattan Vegas ...........................
Bronson Burgoon ...........................
Hudson Swafford ...........................
Maverick McNealy .........................
Trey Mullinax .................................
Harris English ................................
Kevin Chappell ...............................
Rob Oppenheim .............................
Webb Simpson ...............................
Andrew Putnam .............................
Hunter Mahan ................................
Kevin Kisner ...................................
Bud Cauley .....................................
at New Jersey 4, Washington 3 (OT)
at Columbus 2, Dallas 1 (SO)
at Philadelphia 3, Toronto 2 (OT)
Boston 5, at N.Y. Islanders 2
St. Louis 4, at Ottawa 1
at N.Y. Rangers 4, Buffalo 3
Vegas 4, at Tampa Bay 1
at Nashville 3, Arizona 2 (SO)
at Colorado 5, San Jose 3
Pittsburgh 3, at Los Angeles 1
MLS
Suns 108, Nuggets 100
WOMEN’S SINGLES — THIRD ROUND
Petra Martic, Croatia, def. Luksika Kumkhum, Thailand,
6-3, 3-6, 7-5; Elise Mertens, Belgium, def. Alize Cornet,
France, 7-5, 6-4; Denisa Allertova, Czech Republic, def.
Magda Linette, Poland, 6-1, 6-4; Elina Svitolina (4),
Ukraine, def. Marta Kostyuk, Ukraine, 6-2, 6-2; Anett
Kontaveit (32), Estonia, def. Jelena Ostapenko (7), Latvia,
6-3, 1-6, 6-3; Carla Suarez-Navarro, Spain, def. Kaia
Kanepi, Estonia, 3-6, 6-1, 6-3; Magdalena Rybarikova (19),
Slovakia, def. Katerina Bondarenko, Ukraine, 7-5, 3-6, 6-1;
Simona Halep (1), Romania, def. Lauren Davis, United
States, 4-6, 6-4, 15-13; Karolina Pliskova (6), Czech
Republic, def. Lucie Safarova (29), Czech Republic, 7-6
(8-6), 7-5; Madison Keys (17), United States, def. Ana
Bogdan, Romania, 6-3, 6-4; Caroline Garcia (8), France,
def. Aliaksandra Sasnovich, Belarus, 6-3, 5-7, 6-2.
SUNDAY’S GAMES
AFC CHAMPIONSHIP
Jacksonville at New England (-7 1/2), 3:05 (CBS)
NFC CHAMPIONSHIP
Minnesota (-3) at Philadelphia, 6:40 (FOX)
NFL
29 — 88
39 — 106
W
28
24
26
24
25
21
23
20
x-Late game
Halftime: Michigan St. 42-23. Three-point goals: Indiana
8-26 (Johnson 4-6, Newkirk 4-12, Morgan 0-1, Green 0-3,
Hartman 0-4), Michigan St. 10-20 (Bridges 4-6, Jackson
2-3, McQuaid 2-4, Winston 2-4, George 0-1, Goins 0-1,
Langford 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Indiana 27
(Johnson 7), Michigan St. 44 (Ward 13). Assists: Indiana
9 (Newkirk 3), Michigan St. 23 (Winston 8). Total fouls:
Indiana 18, Michigan St. 14. A: 14,797 (16,280).
SATURDAY’S GAMES
SACRAMENTO ................... 17
MEMPHIS ........................... 30
27
22
Michigan St. (17-3)
Jackson 4-6 0-2 10, Ward 7-9 4-7 18, Winston 3-5 2-2 10,
Langford 3-12 1-2 7, Bridges 9-13 0-0 22, Goins 0-2 0-0 0,
Tillman 1-2 1-1 3, Carter 1-1 0-0 2, Schilling 0-1 2-2 2,
McQuaid 4-6 1-1 11, George 0-2 0-0 0, Nairn 0-0 0-0 0.
Totals 32-59 11-17 85.
FRIDAY’S RESULTS
MIAMI ................................ 24
BROOKLYN ......................... 21
19
23
Indiana (11-8)
Smith 3-6 3-4 9, Morgan 1-5 0-2 2, McRoberts 0-0 0-0 0,
Johnson 7-13 3-5 21, Newkirk 5-17 0-0 14, Hartman 0-5
0-0 0, McSwain 1-2 2-2 4, Moore 0-1 0-0 0, Green 1-5 0-0
2, Durham 2-5 1-1 5. 20-59 Totals 9-14 57.
at Cleveland 104, Orlando 103
Philadelphia 89, at Boston 80
at Houston 116, Minnesota 98
at Portland 100, Indiana 86
SAN ANTONIO ................... 18
TORONTO ........................... 17
INDIANA ............................. 28
PORTLAND ......................... 29
METROPOLITAN
Washington ..................
New Jersey ...................
Columbus ......................
N.Y. Rangers .................
Pittsburgh .....................
Philadelphia ..................
N.Y. Islanders ...............
Carolina .........................
MARYLAND
Bethesda-Chevy Chase 76, Wheaton 56
Broadneck 60, Arundel 59
C.H. Flowers 68, Suitland 42
Churchill 50, Walter Johnson 37
Douglass 61, Potomac (Md.) 56
Eleanor Roosevelt 59, Bowie 57
Gaithersburg 60, Wootton 54
Gwynn Park 66, Oxon Hill 64
Kennedy 64, Clarksburg 51
Meade 55, Northeast 41
Northwest 80, Blake 64
Oakland Mills 60, Centennial 45
Paint Branch 84, Northwood 61
Quince Orchard 47, Richard Montgomery 39
Sherwood 54, Blair 46
Springbrook 79, Magruder 51
Westlake 59, St. Charles 53
VIRGINIA
Fairfax 64, W.T. Woodson 57
Gar-Field 49, Potomac (Va.) 35
Hylton 46, Forest Park 39
Marshall 42, Edison 37
Osbourn 80, Stonewall Jackson 62
Potomac Falls 70, Champe 46
Robinson 55, West Springfield 41
South County 111, Lake Braddock 109
South Lakes 63, Langley 26
Stone Bridge 57, Rock Ridge 47
Stuart 70, Lee 60
Wakefield 88, Falls Church 59
Washington-Lee 61, Herndon 59
PRIVATE
Bullis 75, Episcopal 67
DeMatha 72, Carroll 54
Georgetown Day 66, Saint Anselm's 54
Georgetown Prep 68, Landon 52
Indian Creek 79, Baltimore Friends 40
Severn School 70, St. Mary's-Annapolis 58
St. John's 84, Good Counsel 32
TOP 20
NO. 3 DEMATHA 72, CARROLL 54
AC (8-5) Mohammed 27, Izay 9, Perkins Cross 5, Keyes 4,
Barnes 4, Saint Jean 3, Nynäs 2 Totals 16 10-16 54.
D (15-3) Dickinson 18, Young 15, Timberlake 10, Moore
9, Kolgenik 7, Gielen 6, Smith 5, Richmond 2 Totals 25
19-23 72.
Halftime: DeMatha, (27-23).
Three-point goals: D 1 (Moore 1); AC 4 (Saint Jean 1,
Mohammed 2, Perkins Cross 1).
NO. 6 ST. JOHN'S 84, GOOD COUNSEL 32
SJ (11-4) Wood 15, Morsell 13, Leggett 11, Maddox 11,
Naboya 8, Spooner 7, Dunn 6, Abbott 6, Hunt 3, Thomas
2, Njoku 2 Totals 25 10-14 84.
GC (4-13)Totals 0 0-0 32.
Halftime: St. John's, (51-12). Three-point goals: SJ 8
(Spooner 1, Wood 2, Hunt 1, Leggett 1, Morsell 3).
NO. 7 GEORGETOWN PREP 68, LANDON 52
GP (14-3) Desire 16, Nweke 14, Curfman 12, Offurum 10,
Somerville 8, Mulquin 8 Totals 15 11-15 68.
L (4-11) Lilly 13, Reynolds 12, Davis 10, Patterson 6,
Camphausen 5, Larosiliere 4, Ford 2 Totals 10 8-8 52.
Halftime: Georgetown Prep, (36-27). Three-point goals:
L 8 (Reynolds 4, Camphausen 1, Lilly 3); GP 9 (Somerville
2, Curfman 4, Offurum 1, Mulquin 2).
NO. 10 ELEANOR ROOSEVELT 59, BOWIE 57
ER (9-3) Bailey 14, Faulkner 13, Gross 13, Brown 6, Lewis
3, Allen 3, Butler 3, Thomas 2, Mincey 1 Totals 14 12-16
59.
B (5-7) Freeman-Davis 19, Burke 13, Mitchell 9, Toler 6,
Lewis Jr. 5, Walker 3, Joseph 2 Totals 9 6-6 57.
Halftime: Bowie, (33-26). Three-point goals: B 11 (Burke
1, Walker 1, Lewis Jr. 1, Freeman-Davis 3, Mitchell 3,
Toler 2); ER 6 (Bailey 4, Lewis 1, Butler 1).
E (13-3) Miller 12, Jewell 11, Johns 10, Lee 8, Henderson
7, Harris 7, Evans 2, Lee 2, Castma 2, Gray 2 Totals 21
12-16 63.
M (13-3) Ford 9, Soule 6, Dirkse 4, Grill 3, Leap 3, South 2,
Trivisonno 2, Donnellan 2 Totals 4 14-27 31.
Halftime: Edison, (27-13). Three-point goals: M 3 (Soule
1, Ford 2); E 3 (Johns 2, Jewell 1).
NO. 19 PARKDALE 86, HIGH POINT 8
HP (0-4)Totals 0 0-0 8.
P (8-1) Calhoun 33, Yancey 20, Johnson 11, Minnis 8,
Indianesia 8, Manful 4, Wells 2 Totals 25 6-12 86.
Halftime: Parkdale, (44-3).
Three-point goals: P 10 (Calhoun 6, Johnson 1, Yancey 3).
MONTGOMERY 4A/3A SOUTH
WOOTTON 69, GAITHERSBURG 54
G (9-4) Odom 27, Brogdon 17, Dixon 4, Kuinazah 2,
Norman 2, Ashiogwa 2 Totals 14 14-24 54.
W (6-5) Goldberg 25, Gillick 23, Rahman 11, Bennaim 8,
Bridge 2 Totals 21 15-28 69.
Halftime: Gaithersburg, (32-29).
Three-point goals: W 4 (Goldberg 1, Rahman 3); G 4
(Odom 2, Brogdon 2)
PRINCE GEORGE'S 3A/2A/1A
DOUGLASS 71, POTOMAC (MD.) 18
D (11-1) Ford 16, Riddick 15, Ford 10, Hansberry 9, Carey
5, Perry 5, Major-Taylor 4, Griffith 4, Smith 2, Carey 1
Totals 29 7-12 71.
P (3-5) Harewood 5, Felder 4, Evans 3, McDonald 2,
Pegues 2, Whittington 2 Totals 7 1-6 18.
Halftime: Douglass, (50-14).
Three-point goals: P 1 (Evans 1); D 2 (Hansberry 1, Perry
1)
DOUGLASS 61, NO. 12 POTOMAC (MD.) 56
P (11-1) Newman 14, Dyches 10, Doby 9, Grier 9,
Funderburk 6, Riddick 2, Cook 2, Mallet 2, Burton 2 Totals
15 8-14 56.
D (8-5) Isler 24, Snowden 12, Vines 11, Shingler 7, Sams
4, Keith 2, Copeland 1 Totals 19 11-15 61.
Halftime: Douglass, (0-0). Three-point goals: D 4 (Isler 1,
Vines 1, Snowden 2); P 6 (Newman 1, Grier 3, Funderburk 2).
NO. 19 BULLIS 75, NO. 9 EPISCOPAL 67
B (12-6) Morse 30, Tarke 14, Yeutter 11, Amsellem 6,
Smith 4, Matthews 3, Alexander 3, Lewis 2, Reynolds 2
Totals 18 15-21 75.
E (12-4) Shannon 18, Chenery 16, Johnson 15, Pfaffenberger 9, Steele 7, Johnson 2 Totals 17 18-22 67.
Halftime: Bullis, (40-30).
Three-point goals: E 5 (Johnson 1, Shannon 1, Chenery
3); B 8 (Morse 5, Matthews 1, Alexander 1, Yeutter 1).
MONTGOMERY 4A/3A EAST
SHERWOOD 54, BLAIR 46
B (2-8) Worrell Jr. 11, Smith-Davis 8, Tawamba 7,
Cannuscio 7, Ellis 6, Worku 5, Malone 2 Totals 13 8-16 46.
S (6-7) Lacey 15, Long 13, Riley 8, Salzar 6, Martella 6,
Lacey 4, Johnson 2 Totals 16 7-17 54.
Halftime: Sherwood, (31-23).
Three-point goals: S 5 (Riley 1, Salzar 1, Long 3); B 4
(Worku 1, Worrell Jr. 2, Cannuscio 1)
PRINCE GEORGE'S 3A/2A/1A
GWYNN PARK 66, OXON HILL 64
OH (8-3) Kane 13, Manlangit 13, Parker 10, Stephens 9,
Taylor 9, Snider 6, Gorham 2, Howerton 2 Totals 17 6-8
64.
GP (8-5) Slade 28, Jean-Pierre 11, Brooks 9, Bullock 4,
Morrow 3, Stone 3, Freeland 2, Morgan 2, Stonework 2,
Wingard 2 Totals 15 9-12 66.
Halftime: Oxon Hill, (38-36). Three-point goals: GP 9
(Brooks 1, Morrow 1, Slade 6, Stone 1); OH 8 (Snider 2,
Parker 2, Stephens 3, Manlangit 1)
LIBERTY DISTRICT
FAIRFAX 64, W.T. WOODSON 57
WTW (9-8) Urbach 31, Hennessey 11, Spurlock 10,
Mains 2, Walker 2, Nickel 1 Totals 10 16-23 57.
F (10-7) Abtew 18, Peters 17, Abousam 11, Ackerman 7,
Colbert 5, Mbangue 4, Napper 2 Totals 14 12-24 64.
Halftime: Fairfax, (21-19).
Three-point goals: F 8 (Abtew 4, Abousam 2, Ackerman
1, Peters 1); WTW 7 (Urbach 6, Hennessey 1)
CONFERENCE 21-B
HERITAGE 72, DOMINION 40
D (1-7) Christ 20, Beal 14, Montano 2, Allen 2, Kim 2
Totals 15 7-8 40.
H (9-8) Phelps 20, Sibley 16, Campion 8, Terry 7, Kaiser 6,
Gaither 5, Gray 5, Keefe 3, Berry 2 Totals 16 16-19 72.
Halftime: Heritage, (35-18). Three-point goals: H 8
(Sibley 4, Phelps 1, Kaiser 1, Terry 1, Gray 1); D 1 (Beal 1)
ISL AA
EPISCOPAL 46, GEORGETOWN DAY 29
E (8-4) Gerow 10, Giblin 6, Goree 6, Weger 5, Wood 4,
Phillips 4, Shepherd 4, Singletary 3, Shepherd 2, Jones 2
Totals 16 8-9 46.
GD (2-9) Griffith 7, Montes-Sharp 5, Zinn 4, Freedman 4,
Cox-Caceras 3, Rodriguez 2, Bergreen 2, Forman 2 Totals
8 10-20 29.
Halftime: Episcopal, (28-8). Three-point goals: GD 1
(Montes-Sharp 1); E 2 (Singletary 1, Weger 1)
WCAC
ELIZABETH SETON 81, CARROLL 35
ES (9-9) Cater 18, Clayborne 16, Gray 10, Wilson 8,
Baldwin 7, Gaines-Burns 6, Addison 5, Brown 5, Lonergan 4, Robinson 2 Totals 27 15-25 81.
AC (3-11) Sterling 13, Gakdeng 9, James 8, Jones 3,
Harris 2 Totals 11 10-15 35.
Halftime: Elizabeth Seton, (40-22). Three-point goals:
AC 1 (James 1); ES 4 (Addison 1, Wilson 2, Brown 1)
ST. MARY'S RYKEN 51, HOLY CROSS 43
HC (2-10) Fuller 23, Muzzatti 13, Beckham 5, Dent 2
Totals 11 6-10 43.
SMR (2-6) Brown 24, Dothard 12, Smith 11, Oritiz 2,
White 2 Totals 12 15-23 51.
Halftime: St. Mary's Ryken, (25-22).
Three-point goals: SMR 4 (Brown 1, Smith 1, Dothard 2);
HC 5 (Fuller 2, Muzzatti 3)
NONLEAGUE
MADEIRA 54, SANDY SPRING 26
SS (1-6) Brown 10, Fenton 9, Clouse 3, Broadway 2,
Clouse 2 Totals 7 6-15 26.
M (4-5) Williams 20, Newton 15, Grohowski 10, McClellan 4, Eley 3, Painter 2 Totals 17 5-12 54.
Halftime: Madeira, (27-7). Three-point goals: M 5 (Eley
1, Williams 2, Newton 2); SS 2 (Brown 2)
EFGHI
washingtonpost.com/classifieds
homes for sale,
commercial real estate
rentals
merchandise, garage
sales, auctions, tickets
dogs, cats, birds, fish
washingtonpost.com/jobs
cars.com
washingtonpost.com/
realestate
apartments.com
washingtonpost.com/
merchandise
washingtonpost.com/pets
602
Art
MONTGOMERY CO. ANIMAL SHELTER
If you have lost an animal in the
Washington Metro area: Please call
the Montgomery Co. Animal Shelter
at 240-773-5960 or online for found
animals at www.mchumane.org
Collectibles
Bing & Grondhal and Royal Copenhagen 15 Plates—$15 Each Mother's Day, Christmas, 703-356-7867
Comic Book & Sports Card Show—
Sunday Jan. 28 10am-3pm Tysons
Corner Va. DoubleTree Hotel
1960 Chain Bridge Rd 22102
(near Metro Silver Line Tysons stop)
shoffpromotions.com
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!—100 I
drive to you, pay CASH, and haul
them away. Call 571-830-5871
SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH
FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS.
Call Al, 301-807-3266.
Will Come to you!
245
Clothing, Shoes
& Accessories
Electronics
stereo receiver (200 watts)—$150
Pro-maintained HK 730. See Post
web ad for more. 301-452-3497
Therapy Lamp—33
NatureBright
Light and Ion Therapy Lamp $33,
Alexandria, VA, 571-431-1501
260
Furniture
Arlington/ Crystal City, VA- Must sell!
sulfur dining rooom table and chairs,
end tables, lamps, misc. all in
excellent condition. 703-888-7666
DENTAL OFFICE RECEPTION &
WAITING ROOM FURNITURE FOR
SALE-CALL 202-291-6500
265
Bulldog mix, Yorkies & more—Puppies for Sale. 304-904-6289, Cash,
CC, Easy Finance, wvpuppy.com,
59 East Rd, Martinsburg WV, exit16E
Cavachon—Charming Cava Chon
Puppies! So adorable a prefect family puppy. Raised with TLC. $1250,
703-577-1069 9wks
www.DCDogfinders.com
Cavalier King C—$1400, M, 301-4733026
Home & Garden
Car Seats—33 Generic infant $33 or
Graco child car seat $44 (70 both)
Alexandria, VA 571431-1501
Solid
Hardwood
Brazilian
Cherry Flooring - 3600 S.F.,
$2.50 per SF. 301-860-1190
275
Merchandise Wanted
GERMAN SHEPHERD- AKC registered
puppies. Working blood lines.
Grandfather is an import. 12 weeks.
$1,000.
Call 757-593-1974
GOLDEN RET AKC & GOLDEN /
LAB RET CROSS PUPS & ADULTS
8 weeks - 5 yrs. Vet checked, parents
on prem, health guar. 301-605-0543
W www.VictoriasPups.com W
Golden Retreive—Pups, AKC, Vet
checked, have both parents, family
raised $850, 434-724-7217
GOLDEN RETREIVER (English Cream)AKC puppies, vet check, shots &
wormed, family dog, very friendly.
9 weeks old. $1200. 717-314-6912
Golden Retriever—M & F pups AKC
and all certs. Call 540-896-7327 for
more info, GapViewKennel.com
Golden Retriever—AKC Wormed first
shots $900, male/femal, will be 8
wks old- ready 1/26 443-404-6968
Lab Pups—Yellow, AKC, guaranteed,
wormed/1st shots. Socialized with
kids. 703-203-0702. Check out my
website: www.belgianwayfarm.com
LABRADOR PUPS - Ready Jan 20thBlack, AKC, OFA, champion lines,
S/W, vet checked, written wrnty,
parents on site. $800.
Call 301-246-9116 or 301-751-6846.
Labrador Retriever—AKC English Yellow and Black Lab Puppies, Family
Raised, Blocky, Stocky, Gen. of
Health Clearances & Champ. Bloodlines $1500, M and F, 8 wks, 410-3743774, jewelczaja@yahoo.com
Buy Chinese furniture,Jewelry, painting,porcelain,—249 c:7039669935,
sharonantique@gmail.com
Freon R12 WANTED—Certified buyer
will pay CASH for cylinders and cases
of cans. 312-291-9169
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!—100 I
drive to you, pay CASH, and haul
them away. Call 571-830-5871
Old Bottles of Bourbon—50 Seeking
full/sealed bottles of vintage bourbon and rye. Alex 443-223-7669
Labrador Retriever farm raised puppies,AKC, 3/4 english, black, yellow,
chocolate 1st shots, vet checked
and dewormed. Ready 1-17-18.
$800 cash only. 1-540-879-2713
K
i
Radio tubes—249 WANTED ham
radios huge speakers tube hif amps
202 527 9501, vcvdc@msn.com
VINTAGE HI-FI TUBE AMPS—TUBES
BIG SPKRS MCINTOSH AMPS & MC2500 410-740-5222 50's 60's 70's
291
Sporting Goods
& Services
Men's bicycling shoes—$40 Forte
MTB bike shoes Euro size 45 / US
10, includes cleats, 703-622-6494
355
Garage Sales, VA
Market! 3410 Woodburn Rd,
Annandale, 1/20, 9-1, 75+ tables!
571-212-0058
360
MASTIFF PUPS (SOUTH AFRICAN
BOERBOELS)- Reg, Fs, S/W, health
guar, fawn w/ dark mask, ready
01/14, $1,800. 410-271-1433
OLD ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPS - 7
Males & 2 Females. Avail 01/26
Accepting deposit $50. Shots, IOEBA
registered. $850. Call 703-987-7084
Estate Sales
5828 APSLEY HOUSE CT,
ALEXANDRIA, VA – Simply Gorgeous
Estate Sale! DIR: Franconia Rd,
Wellington Commons Dr,
Apsley House Ct. Park legally or @
school. Sat 9-3; Sun 9-1.
www.FOURSALES.com
Need a Quality Sale?
703-256-8300
Springfield, VA
Fri & Sat, 10am-4pm
Sun,1pm-4pm
WELLS ESTATE SALES
Civil war swords, gorham sterling
(buttercup). Full house, LR, BR, DR
furniture plus more! 7611 Hogarth
St (Off ravenswood Rd)
See website estatesales.net.
#930 Fri. 703-536-7816.
602
maltese and morkie pups—maltese
will be ready 03/2/2018. male 1200
female 1500 CKC registry 3 male
Morkie for 800 contact 240 502 6762
latashabrown0424@yahoo.com
Mini Poodle—$800, AKC Black
Males, 16 wks, raised w/children,
beautiful, playful, 540-905-0365
Annandale—Epiphany Indoor Flea
Poodle—$790, Female,
13 weeks old, HAS HER FIRST
ROUND OF SHOTS, call only:
301-613-5193, text only: 301-5373513, email: shieldj1@umbc.edu.
CASH ONLY, First Come First Serve.
SERIOUS BUYERS ONLY.
SHELTIE PUPPIES - AKC registered,
very small parents, 2 sable white
males available. brown and blue eye
color. 9 wks. Call 540-560-5132
SHIH TZU PUPPIES- Ready to go, 1M
& 1F left, wormed/shots, mother/
father on premises, will weigh
about 9 lbs to 11 lbs. 540-406-0740
205
Antiques
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!—100 I
drive to you, pay CASH, and haul
them away. Call 571-830-5871
SF
876
Official Notices
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%) of
the sale price or ten percent (10%) of the original principal balance of
the subject Deed of Trust, whichever is lower, in the form of cash or
certified funds payable to the Substitute Trustee within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser’s deposit may be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustee. Time is of the essence. If the sale is set aside for any reason,
the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled to a return of the deposit paid.
Additional terms to be announced at the sale. Substitute Trustee: Tracy
S. Kissler, Esq., c/o: Shawn C. Whittaker, Esq., Whittaker & Associates,
PC, 1010 Rockville Pike, Suite 607, Rockville, MD 20852, (301)-838-4502
January 6, 13, 20, 27, 2018
12152937
Open House 5:30 • Public Hearing 6 p.m. • Speaker registration is on-site only
Please note that this date is subject to Metro’s inclement weather cancellation policy.
In the event of a cancellation, Metro will post information about a new hearing on wmata.com.
610
The locations for all public hearings are wheelchair accessible. Any individual who requires special assistance such as a sign language interpreter or additional
accommodation to participate in the public hearing, or who requires these materials in an alternate format, should contact Danise Peña at 202-962-2511 or
TTY: 202-962-2033 as soon as possible in order for Metro to make necessary arrangements. For language assistance, such as an interpreter or information in another
language, please call 202-962-2582 at least 48 hours prior to the public hearing date.
Based on preliminary information provided by the Federal Transit Administration
(FTA), the Washington DC Metropolitan Region expects to receive approximately
$360 million in FTA formula funding under the FAST Act in Federal FY2018. This
regional funding is distributed between WMATA, the Potomac and Rappahannock
Transportation Commission (PRTC), and the Maryland Transit Administration (MTA)
subject to a pre-existing agreement. Under this agreement, in Federal FY2017,
WMATA received approximately 86 percent of the total FTA formula funding for the
region. If WMATA’s funding share remains consistent with the prior year, WMATA will
receive approximately $310 million in federal funding.
Additionally, WMATA estimates $148.5 million will be available to the agency
through the PRIIA program in Federal FY2018. This funding partnership between the
federal government and the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia, which has
been in effect since 2009 and is authorized for ten years, provides critical resources
to WMATA for safety improvements, railcar purchases, and other important state of
good repair investments.
In accordance with Board policy, WMATA intends to apply for these grant funds
within four weeks of the Board’s adoption of the capital budget, which is currently
scheduled for March 2018. WMATA also intends to submit the final Program of
Projects to the National Capital Region Transportation Planning Board (TPB) as
input to the updated Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) for the Washington
Metropolitan area.
WMATA FY2019 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM
WMATA’s proposed FY2019 Capital Investment Plan is $1.28 billion which is
focused on safety improvements, the rebuilding of the Metro system, and improving
the effectiveness of the current rail and bus network. The vast majority of the
planned investment advances the safety, rehabilitation, and replacement of Metro’s
infrastructure, facilities, equipment, systems, railcars, buses, and paratransit
vehicles.
The proposed FY2019 program will be funded through investments from the federal
government, state and local governments, and other sources. The proposed program
assumes federal sources make up $459 million of the $1.28 billion funding plan.
The remaining portion of the program is funded with $787 million of state and local
investment (including match to federal funds, and direct local contributions), $27
million from the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority (MWAA), and $5 million
for jurisdictional projects.
The Capital Improvement Program consists of the following six major investment
categories:
• Railcars, which includes acquisition of new vehicles, maintenance and
overhaul activities on existing vehicles to ensure safe and reliable operation,
and construction and rehabilitation on railcar maintenance facilities;
• Rail Systems, which includes investment in propulsion (including
tie-breaker stations, traction power substations, power cables, and
transformers) and signals and communications systems (including radio
systems and underground wireless infrastructure);
• Track & Structures, which includes fixed rail (e.g., running rail, switches,
fasteners, crossties, etc.), structures (e.g., tunnels and bridges), and track
maintenance equipment;
• Stations & Passenger Facilities, which includes platforms and other
structures, vertical transportation (elevators and escalators), fare collection
systems, station systems, and parking facilities;
• Bus & Paratransit, which includes bus acquisition, bus overhaul
and maintenance activities to ensure safe and reliable operation, bus
maintenance facilities, bus passenger facilities, and replacement of
paratransit vehicles; and
• Business Support, which includes information technology (IT), Metro Transit
Police (MTPD) investments, and other support and equipment services.
Consideration will be given to the special needs of people with disabilities and
seniors in implementing projects. All projects conform to the comprehensive land
use and transportation plans in the Washington Metropolitan area. No significant
adverse environmental effects are anticipated as a result of these projects.
In accordance with FTA regulation 49 CFR Part 604, WMATA conducts bus
subcontracting service incidental to its mass transportation services only where
permitted by exceptions contained in those regulations. WMATA’s subcontract
operations are self-supporting with rates established to return all operational costs
whether direct or indirect. Services and charges are published in the Subcontracting
and Special Transit Service Tariff #17 of the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit
Authority, effective March 1, 2008, as amended by Board Resolution 2008-56
adopted on November 20, 2008. Copies of the Tariff and Bus Subcontracting Cost
Allocation Plan are available for public inspection from WMATA’s Department of Bus
Services.
REFERENCE MATERIAL AVAILABLE FOR REVIEW – The proposed WMATA FY2019
Capital Improvement Program is included in the WMATA FY2019 Proposed Budget,
which is available online at wmata.com/budget.
The FY2019 Proposed Budget is also available for inspection through February 5,
2018, between the hours of 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday - Friday except holidays,
at the Office of the Secretary, Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority, 600
Fifth Street, NW, Washington, DC 20001.
This public notice of the public hearing and the time established for public review
and comments on the Program of Projects satisfies the MAP-21 public participation
requirements. The program of projects outlined in the FY2019 Proposed Budget
will be the final program of projects unless modified prior to final approval by the
WMATA Board of Directors.
ARE YOUR TENANTS
MOVING OUT?
NO
Wake up
to home
delivery.
NO SUCH
LUCK
E. Howard Ave., Kensington,
MD N. on Conn., R. on Howard,
2 mi. N of Beltway (I-495)
Free Parking!
Membership is rewarding.
kes you
PostPoints ta
INSIDE THSIEC.
MU
878
Dogs for Sale
Yorkshire Terrier—AKC—$1,500, 2M
/ 2F, 9 weeks old, 434-242-8338.
Ready to go now. Charlottesville.
Mom n dad are 4 pounds. Parti-gene
622
Adopt Cats
4Paws—Adopt fr 20+ cat/
kitten $v Sun 1-4 Sterling
Petco www.fourpaws.org
571-434-6562 CFC#34517
825
Bids & Proposals
IPR Northeast is encouraging companies who are MBE/WBE qualified
through the following programs:
State DOT; SBA SDB, 8(a); EPA Certification Program to submit proposals as subcontractors in reference
to the DC Water Lower Area Trunk
Sewer. MBE/WBE Project Goals:
32% MBE, 6% WBE.
IPR Northeast is looking for
MBE/WBE qualified firms who can
self-perform within the following
areas: Permit Expediting; CCTV and
Heavy Cleaning; Scheduling; Manhole Rehabilitation, Paving/Concrete Removal and Replacement of
sidewalk and C&G; Trench Excavation; Bypass; Traffic Control.
Responses are needed by Monday,
January 29, 2017 by noon.
If interested please contact IPR
Northeast directly by Email:
IPRNEestimating@teamipr.com or
by Phone: 301-595-0312.
877
Spotsylvania County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
5106 GREEN BRANCH STREET,
PARTLOW, VA 22534.
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated June 26, 2007, in
the original principal amount of
$202,730.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Spotsylvania County, Virginia as
Instrument No. 200700019191 .
The
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction in the front of the Circuit
Court building for Spotsylvania
County, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, Virginia on February
22, 2018 , at 4:00 PM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT,
PIECE, OR PARCEL, OR PARCEL OF
LAND
WITH
IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON AND APPURTENANCES
THERETO, LYING, BEING AND SITUATE IN THE BERKELEY MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT, SPOTSYLVANIA
COUNTY, VIRGINIA AND BEING
MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED
AS LOT 52-A, GREEN BRANCH
FARMS, ON PLAT OF SURVEY ENTITLED "PLAT OF SURVEY TAX MAP
73-6-52, AS
RECORDED
IN
200300036010, KNOWN AS LOT
52, GREEN BRANCH FARMS,
BERKELEY MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT,
SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA" MADE BY WILEY & ASSOCIATES, DATED OCTOBER 5, 2002,
REVISED NOVEMBER 15, 2003 AND
JANUARY 15, 2004, A COPY OF
WHICH PLAT IS RECORDED IN THE
CLERK‘S OFFICE, CIRCUIT COURT,
SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA,
AS
INSTRUMENT
NUMBER
200400008076.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3238161.
January 20, 27, 2018
12155561
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Stafford County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
118 HYDE PARK,
STAFFORD, VA 22556
Standard Poodle — AKC, $1500, M/F,
11 wks , Black/ Brown,
solid,abstract, sable, phantom
240-417-8316
Home delivery
is convenient.
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated March 14, 2007,
in the original principal amount
of $185,250.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Stafford County, Virginia as Instrument No. LR070006198 . The
undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction
in the front of the Circuit Court
building for Stafford County, 1300
Courthouse Road, Stafford, Virginia on February 22, 2018 , at
2:00 PM, the property described
in said Deed of Trust, located at
the above address, and more particularly described as follows: UNIT
NO.. 113, PHASE 9, SUNNINGDALE
MEADOWS
CONDOMINIUM,
ESTABLISHED PURSUANT TO THE
DECLARATION RECORDED IN DEED
BOOK 705, PAGE 311 AMONG THE
LAND RECORDS OF STAFFORD
COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3242801.
January 20, 27, 2018
12155562
879
GENERAL LABOR
Swimming Pool Cleaner
18
Openings. Temp-F/T.
4/1/18 – 10/31/18. Millennium Pool Service, LLC, Springfield, VA. Tasks include open,
close, & clean residential &
commercial pools for safe
operation. Remove debris
from pool covers, pool deck
& clean pools. Fill pool &
start systems. Clean pools as
scheduled throughout season. Notify mgmt of need for
repairs. $13.54/hr, O/T varies
at $20.31/hr. 40 hrs, M-F,
possibly Sat, 8am-4pm, hrs
may fluctuate due to weather. No exp. or educ. nec.
Will train. Must be able to
lift 50 lbs, work in adverse
weather conditions & pass
post-employment drug test
paid by employer. Shared
housing available @ $100/wk
deducted from paycheck.
Inbound
transportation
(including meals &, to the
extent necessary, lodging) to
the place of employment will
be provided, or its cost to
workers reimbursed, if the
worker completes half the
employment period. Return
transportation will be provided if the worker completes
the employment period or
is dismissed early by the
employer.
Transportation
provided daily from main
office to the various work
locations within Fairfax,
Prince William, Stafford &
Loudoun County. All work
tools, supplies & equipment
provided at no cost. Apply
directly with employer, fax
resume to Hank @ 703-9405558 or apply at the nearest
VA Workforce Agency, 5520
Cherokee Ave., Alexandria,
VA 2312, ph 703-813-1300,
refer to Job Order # 1251013.
M
JOBS
MAINTENANCE
Applicant must have exp in
apartment maint & have
your own transp & tools.
Good refs & pass criminal
bckgr chk. Fax resume:
703-567-4063
Home
delivery
makes good
sense.
Culpeper County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
771 DOVE LANE,
CULPEPER, VA 22701
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated October 26, 2015,
in the original principal amount
of $176,739.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Culpeper County, Virginia as Instrument No. 150006150 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Culpeper County, at the corner
of West Davis Street and North
West Street in the Town of
Culpeper on February 8, 2018 , at
11:00 AM, the property described
in said Deed of Trust, located at
the above address, and more particularly described as follows: LOT
497, PHASE 9A, LAKEVIEW OF
CULPEPER, AS THE SAME APPEARS
DULY DEDICATED, PLATTED AND
RECORDED AS INSTRUMENT NO.
050006027, AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF CULPEPER COUNTY,
VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3210481.
January 20, 27, 2018
12156017
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Antiques
KENSINGTON
ANTIQUE ROW
YES
General Jobs
Loudoun County
In execution of a certain Deed of Trust dated February 7, 2011, in the
original principal amount of $850,000.00 recorded in the Clerk’s Office,
Circuit Court for LOUDOUN COUNTY, Virginia, as Instrument No. 201102080009324, the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property located in the COUNTY OF LOUDOUN, on
the courthouse steps in front of the Circuit Court building for the County
of Loudoun located at 18 East Market Street, Leesburg, VA 20176, on
February 1, 2018 at 9:30 A.M., the property with improvements located at
44081 Pipeline Plaza, Ste. 4-210, Ashburn, VA 20147, PIN: 087-29-7279-008,
Tax Map Number: /79/N/1P4/210/.
Notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be held by the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority
on the two dockets noted above as follows:
Hearing No. 617
Wednesday, January 31, 2018
Metro Headquarters Building, 600 Fifth Street NW, Washington, DC 20001
In accordance with Section 62 of the WMATA Compact, Metro will conduct a
public hearing at the location listed in this notice. Information on the hearing will
be provided in area libraries, in Metrorail stations, on Metrobus and MetroAccess
vehicles, and online at www.wmata.com/budget.
HOW TO REGISTER TO SPEAK – All organizations or individuals desiring to be heard
with respect to these two dockets will be afforded the opportunity to present their
views and make supporting statements and to offer alternative proposals. Public
officials will be allowed five minutes each to make their presentations. All others will
be allowed three minutes each. Relinquishing of time by one speaker to another will
not be permitted.
There will be no advance registration to speak. Those wishing to provide oral
testimony will sign up to speak at the hearing, will be called to testify in the order
they sign up, and can sign up to speak at any time prior to the close of the hearing.
Elected public officials will be allowed to provide their testimony as soon as feasible
after their registration. If you will not be able to stay to provide your testimony orally
when your name is called, staff will provide you with multiple ways to submit your
comments into the public record including the use of a digital recorder to record
your oral comments.
Please note that all comments received are releasable to the public upon request,
and may be posted on WMATA’s website, without change, including any personal
information provided.
HOW TO SUBMIT TESTIMONY NOT AT THE PUBLIC HEARING – Testimony may be
submitted online about Metro’s operating and capital budget at wmata.com/budget.
Online submission will be available by 9 a.m. on Saturday, January 13, 2018 and will
close on Monday, February 5, 2018 at 5 p.m. This is in addition to your ability to speak
at a public hearing. For those without access to computers or internet, testimony
may also be mailed to the Office of the Secretary, Washington Metropolitan Area
Transit Authority, 600 Fifth Street, NW, Washington, DC 20001. All comments must be
received by the Office of the Secretary by 5 p.m. on Monday, February 5, 2018 to be
included in the public record. The comments received by the Office of the Secretary,
along with the online submissions and public hearing comments, will be presented
to the Board and will be part of the official public hearing record. Please note all
statements are releasable to the public upon request, and may be posted on WMATA’s
website, without change, including any personal information provided.
For a detailed description of all proposals, please visit www.wmata.com/budget, or
for those who do not have access to computers or internet, note that copies of the
dockets in their entirety are also available at area libraries or can be requested from
Metro’s Office of the Secretary by calling 202-962-2511.
The Metro Board has authorized an FY2019 budget public hearing, in accordance
with the WMATA Compact and as required by the Federal Transit Administration
(FTA). The proposed budget for FY2019 is described in detail in the dockets
attached.
WMATA PROPOSAL FOR DOCKET B18-01: Proposed FY2019 Operating Budget
Overview
The General Manager’s three priorities for Metro are safety, service reliability, and
financial responsibility, with safety as the top priority. These priorities have guided
the development of Metro’s FY2019 proposed budget and informed every key
decision. Metro must rebuild trust with both its riders and its funding jurisdictions,
and this proposed budget provides the resources to achieve the priorities and
continue the rebuilding effort.
The proposed operating budget for FY2019 is $1.9 billion. The budget is funded
with $828 million of projected operating revenues, primarily from passenger
fares, parking fees, and advertising revenues, and $1,009 million of jurisdictional
contributions. The budget assumes no fare increases, no service reductions, $38
million of management actions to reduce expenses and increase business revenues,
and a $29 million increase in jurisdictional subsidy (three percent) compared to
FY2018.
Metro’s primary FY2019 budget challenge is declining passenger revenue as
ridership continues to decrease. Bus and rail ridership and revenue through the
first quarter of FY2018 were below budget, and this trend is projected to continue
throughout the fiscal year. Total estimated ridership in FY2019 for rail and bus is four
percent below the FY2018 budget, and FY2019 rail and bus revenues are projected
to be $25 million below FY2018.
While Metro estimates that some of the riders who reduced their trips on Metro
due to SafeTrack will return, the overall trends are still challenging, and it will take
time to rebuild customer trust and confidence in Metro. Rail ridership in FY2019 is
expected to equal FY2018 ridership, but below the FY2018 budget.
Metrobus is not experiencing the same stabilization. Consistent with regional and
national trends, bus ridership in FY2018 is projected to be below both last year’s
actual performance and the FY2018 budget. Further, Metrobus FY2018 revenue is
lower than estimated. Therefore, the FY2019 revenue projection has been lowered
based on the FY2018 year-end forecast. Improving the customer experience –
particularly on-time performance – is critical to reversing current trends.
To stay within the three percent subsidy growth cap, the budget funds legacy
commitments, mandates, and inflationary costs. Additional management actions
include $25 million in base cost reductions, $5 million in overtime cost controls, and
an $8 million increase in non-transit revenues.
WMATA PROPOSAL FOR DOCKET B18-02: Proposed FY2019 Capital
Improvement Program and Federal FY2018 Grant Applications
WMATA intends to apply for Federal Fiscal Year 2018 grants under the Fixing
America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act and the Passenger Rail Investment and
Improvement Act of 2008 (PRIIA) to support ongoing capital investments.
These applications will be filed under the provisions of FAST (P.L. 114-94) and
PRIIA (P.L. 110-432).
876
Loudoun County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
44081 PIPELINE PLAZA, STE. 4-210, ASHBURN, VA 20147
Purpose
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Docket B18-01: Proposed FY2019 Operating Budget and
Docket B18-02: Proposed FY2019 Capital Improvement Program and
Federal FY2018 Grant Applications
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205
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820
Official Notices
Trustee Sales
202-334-5782
If the merchandise you’re selling is priced under $250, your 3-line, 3-day ad is FREE!
Go to washingtonpostads.com for complete details and to order your free ad.
For more information please visit www.wmata.com/budget
GERMAN SHEPARD PUPSAKC registered.ready 2/18 4 M, 2 F.
taking deposits now.
703-953-8404
Hunter Boots Brown—50 202-5831279 9F 8M New OBO Retail $200
820
Official Notices
HOWARD CO. ANIMAL CONTROL
If you have lost an animal in the
Howard County/
Washington Metro area:
CALL 410-313-2780
Dogs for Sale
AURORA SLOT CARS Wanted—$100
& up, cars/sets. +Atlas, AFX, Tyco,
Cox, Monogram. 703-960-3594
Non-commercial advertisers can now place ads 24/7
by calling 202-334-6200
820
Found
Legal Notices - 202-334-7007
Auctions, Estate Sales, Furniture 202-334-7029
Biz Ops/Services - 202-334-5787
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SF
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May the Sacred Heart of Jesus by
praised and glorified now and
forever, amen. Blessed be the
Sacred heart of Jesus. Blessed be
the Immaculate heart of Mary.
Blessed by St. Jude Thaddeus in
all the world, and all eternity.
Thank you St. Jude for prayers
answered and miracles received.
Allen, Rachel, Dave, & Gary
210
SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2018
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102
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EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST . SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2018
Real Estate
When it’s time
to downsize
For some baby boomers ready to put their houses
behind them, renting might have advantages. 8
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
WHERE WE LIVE: MOUNT RAINIER
HARNEY
BUYING NEW
All the charm of tony suburbs without the sticker
shock in this Prince George’s community. 7
The tax law has restricted
but not killed HELOCS. 11
Houses and horses in
Upper Marlboro. 12
REST EASY
Laid Back Active Adult Lifestyles
Visit: CraftmarkHomes.com/CrestOfAlexandria
Brokers Warmly Welcomed. Must register and comply with policy terms.
4.04%
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It’s All In The Address
GET IN TOUCH | Lori Windsor | Sales Manager
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. SATURDAY,
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THE WASHINGTON POST
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Real Estate News & Notes
Reston townhouse under $400,000
Finding a house with the space and style
you want with a budget of $400,000 can be
difficult in the pricey Washington suburbs.
The median home price in Fairfax County
was $485,000 in November, according to
the Northern Virginia Association of
Realtors. For budget-conscious buyers, a
townhouse can be a good option.
For example, the townhouse at 11975
Greywing Ct. in Reston, priced at $398,000,
has 1,750 square feet. Homeowner
association dues are $142 per month, and
annual property taxes are $4,212. The
townhouse has an attached carport for one
car.
Built in 1972, the three-level,
contemporary-style townhouse has three
bedrooms and three bathrooms. The main
level has an open floor plan with hardwood
flooring in the living and dining area, and a
powder room. The living room has a woodburning fireplace and a sliding-glass door
to a patio. The kitchen has been updated
with stainless-steel appliances and granite
counters.
Upstairs are a laundry room, three
bedrooms and two bathrooms, both
updated. The third level is a loft for use as a
home office, play area or guest space. Both
the front and back of the townhouse have
space for outdoor entertaining.
Residents are part of the Reston
Community Association, which includes
swimming pools, tennis courts, community
centers and walking paths. The Hunters
FRANK POLLEY/NOVA VIRTUAL TOURS
The two-bedroom, two-bathroom
townhouse at 11975 Greywing Ct. in
Reston is priced at $398,000.
A seven-bedroom Shore estate
can be yours for $5.99 million
The house is listed at $5.99 million. The
main level includes a great room with three
— Michele Lerner
sets of French doors to a flagstone patio,
coffered ceilings and built-in cabinets. This
level also has a large kitchen with two islands To pass on a tip or item, contact us at
realestate@washpost.com and put “Town Square”
with marble counters, two ovens, two
in the subject line.
dishwashers, a refrigerator plus two
refrigerator drawers and a wine cooler, a
Weekly averages for popular
stand-alone ice-maker and two freezers.
The house has two master suites — one on mortgage types
the first floor with a screened-in porch, and
5%
one on the second level with a sitting room
30-YEAR FIXED 4.04
with a fireplace and a private balcony.
4
The estate is on land between Easton and
15-YEAR FIXED 3.49
St. Michaels, so residents and guests can get
to either town for shops and restaurants.
3
For more photos and information, visit
5-YEAR ARM 3.46
longandfoster.com/homes-for-sale/26849Double-Mill-Road-Easton-MD-216012
219719426 or contact real estate agent Rob
Lacaze with Long & Foster Real Estate at
1
410-310-7835.
Owners.com analyzed a variety of
factors, including home prices, the
difference between listing and sale prices,
the average number of days on the market
and the average listed inventory count. In
addition, the study looked at rent
increases, which were typically highest in
the top markets for sellers.
Here are the 10 markets where buyers
found more affordable options and less
competition for houses in 2017:
1. Chicago area
2. Virginia Beach area
3. Philadelphia area
4. Jacksonville, Fla.
5. Hartford, Conn.
6. New York area
7. Miami area
8. San Antonio
9. Birmingham, Ala., area
10. Houston
The 10 most overheated markets, where
sellers have the upper hand and residents
are paying more than 33 percent of their
household income for their mortgage,
include:
1. Kahului, Hawaii, area
2. Grants Pass, Ore.
3. San Jose area
4. San Francisco area
5. Santa Rosa, Calif.,
6. San Luis Obispo, Calif., area
7. Urban Honolulu
8. Santa Barbara area
9. Los Angeles area
10. Napa, Calif., area
For information, visit owners.com.
0
Beach meets city at Biscayne Beach
Fans of the Bravo TV show “Queer Eye
for the Straight Guy,” which ran from 2003
to 2007, are likely to remember interior
designer Thom Filicia.
His latest project, the first time he has
’17
’16
’18
Source: Freddie Mac
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE AL ESTATE
Real Estate Editor:
V. Dion Haynes, dion.haynes@washpost.com
Art Director:
Dwuan June
Advertising Manager:
Howard J.S. Bomstein,
howard.bomstein@washpost.com
To contact us:
realestate@washpost.com
Mail:
The Washington Post, Real Estate Section
1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20071
JANUARY 20, 2018
If you relish the idea of living in a resort
year-round and you have deep pockets, the
historic estate at 26849 Double Mill Rd. in
Easton, Md., might beckon.
The Eastern Shore estate rests on 10
acres that include a tennis court, a
basketball court, a skeet shooting range, a
swimming pool and a dock on the Tred
Avon River for fishing and boating. The
dock has two boat lifts, running water and
electricity. The grounds also include a
guesthouse with a water view, beamed
ceilings, a kitchen, a bedroom and a
bathroom. Two garages on the property
have space for seven cars. The parking bays
are tall enough to accommodate boats in
the offseason.
The main house, with an original
structure built in 1890, includes six
bedrooms, seven bathrooms, four
fireplaces and more than 7,500 square feet
of living space.
. SATURDAY,
Buyer-friendly housing markets
If you’re looking to buy a house, you
might want to consider Chicago.
Although sellers have the upper hand in
many markets where tight inventory
hampers prospective home buyers,
Owners.com, a real estate brokerage,
recently released its 2017 Market Recap
data study to find the best and worst
markets for home buyers.
BY HOMEVISIT
If you want to live in a resort area year-round, consider this 1890 six-bedroom,
seven-bathroom estate at 26849 Double Mill Rd. on Maryland's Eastern Shore.
ventured into a condo development, is
Biscayne Beach in Miami, where he
designed the interior finishes for the
residences, as well as common areas and
amenity spaces for residents, including the
first private beach club overlooking
Biscayne Bay.
The 52-story tower, in downtown
Miami’s Edgewater neighborhood, features
“beach chic” designs with a mix of
travertine stone, bronze metallic, gray
wood, textured walls and furniture from
the designer’s home collection.
The private Beach Club includes an Lshaped swimming pool on a beach with
cabanas, fire pits, a beach volleyball court,
an outdoor beach bar and pool, and
beachside food and beverage service.
The building also has a full-service spa, a
children’s water park and game room, an
indoor-outdoor great room with dining
and entertaining areas, a fitness center and
an outdoor kitchen.
Biscayne Beach, a joint venture of Two
Roads Development and GTIS Partners,
includes 391 units at 2900 NE Seventh Ave.
The condo development includes one-,
two- and three-bedroom units, townhousestyle beach-house units, and two-level
penthouses with private rooftop pools and
terraces.
Prices range from $400,000 to $9.4
million. The remaining units are priced
from $1.6 million to $9.4 million.
For information, visit
biscaynebeachresidences.com.
THE WASHINGTON POST
Woods shopping center is less than a halfmile from the townhouse, and the Wiehle
Avenue-Reston Metro station is about two
miles away.
Schools include Dogwood Elementary,
Langston Hughes Middle and South Lakes
High. The elementary school and high
school are rated below average by
GreatSchools.org based on test scores, and
the middle school is rated above average.
For more photos, visit slideshow.
mris.com/slideshow/slideshow.
htm?ListingKey=300217333591.
For information, contact real estate
agent Jo Haring with Weichert Realtors
at 703-850-9757.
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4
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Deals
A little research can help you save on big appliances
BY
K EVIN B RASLER
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
JANUARY 20, 2018
Unlike buying most other big-ticket
items, a lot can go wrong with appliance
purchases.
If your new tablet doesn’t work, you can
just return it and get a replacement. But you
can’t easily tote your new defective refrigerator back to the store, plus most consumers
need help with delivery and installation.
Unfortunately, the customer reviews
that nonprofit consumer group Washington Consumers’ Checkbook magazine and
Checkbook.org receives from local surveyed appliance purchasers indicate that
delivery and installation are the most problematic parts of many transactions. Delivery crews too often damage floors and
doorways, and workers frequently cause
water damage and even floods by improperly installing dishwashers and washing
machines. Screw-ups in the installation of
gas appliances are common and nerveracking.
Equally unfortunate, Checkbook finds
most stores use fake sale prices to mislead
their customers into believing they’re getting special deals when, in fact, appliances
are on constant sale, and at most stores,
buyers are paying too much.
Fortunately, Checkbook has identified
some area stores that usually serve their
WILLIE J. ALLEN JR./ASSOCIATED PRESS
When purchasing big appliances decide what models you want. Salesmen can be good
sources of advice — if the stores employ knowledgeable, helpful staff.
customers well, and by using our simple
shopping tips you’ll pay the lowest prices.
To help you separate the good stores
from the not-so-good ones, through a spe-
cial arrangement, Washington Post readers
can access Checkbook’s ratings of local
appliance stores free through Feb. 16 by
visiting checkbook.org/washingtonpost/
appliances.
Start by deciding on the models you wish
to buy. There are a few excellent sources
that provide independent buying advice.
Consumer Reports regularly evaluates appliances on quality issues, including reliability, and offers advice on the pros and
cons of configurations, designs, features
and options. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy Star program provides lists
and energy-use data on certified appliances.
Salesmen can also be fantastic sources of
buying advice — but only at stores that
employ knowledgeable, helpful staff. Unfortunately, Checkbook finds this is an
aspect of service for which many stores —
particularly big national and local chains —
rated low on our consumer surveys. Fortunately, several local stores received very
high ratings from their surveyed customers
for the advice they offer.
You want sound buying advice, careful
and prompt delivery, and a trouble-free
installation — but you don’t want to pay a
steep price for them. Fortunately, you don’t
have to. Checkbook finds highly rated
stores often quote prices as low as, or even
lower than, their low-rated competitors.
Checkbook’s undercover shoppers
checked prices at local retailers and online
outlets for 26 appliance models. Our ad-
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5
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vice:
Don’t assume sale prices are low prices.
The sale prices you’ll find at many local
stores and on most websites probably aren’t
special prices at all. Even if the sign says
“Save 60 percent,” it’s probably meaningless and probably not a good deal.
It’s worth your time to shop around. For
example, the highest price quoted by local
retailers for an LG refrigerator (model
LMXS30776S) was $3,695; the lowest price
was $3,180 — a tidy savings of $515. For a
Samsung washing machine (model
WA48H7400AW), prices ranged from $685
to $1,063, a difference of $378. Because it is
easy to obtain price quotes from salesmen
at appliance stores and company websites,
consumers willing to make four or five
phone calls could save several hundred
dollars.
Call or email stores to get price quotes. A
bad-for-consumers policy of appliance
manufacturers (and manufacturers of
many other big-ticket items) is the use of
“minimum advertised prices,” or MAP. Designed to boost profits for both manufacturers and large retailers by squelching
price competition, these policies require
retailers to advertise product prices at or
above preset minimums. Because of MAP,
you won’t obtain the best prices on most
major brands of appliances from sales circulars and websites. But MAP policies don’t
apply to prices quoted to customers in
person, over the phone or via email. Stores
WILLIE J. ALLEN JR./ASSOCIATED PRESS
Factor in the cost of an appliance’s
installation. For example, if you buy a
dishwasher, will the store provide full
service or do you need to hire a plumber?
Don’t assume sale
prices are low prices.
— particularly independent ones — often
quote appliance prices less than MAP to
close a deal.
When calling or emailing stores, mention
you’re contacting multiple stores for price
quotes. At independent stores, our shoppers found informing sales staff that they
were getting price quotes from multiple
stores often spurred discounts, waivers of
delivery and installation fees, or both. Getting big chains to be flexible took considerably more effort, but when our shoppers
waited and waited and waited on hold to
speak with appliance-department sales
managers, they sometimes secured better
deals.
You don’t have to pay more for superior
service. We found stores that rate high on
service were as likely to quote low prices as
stores that rate low for service and that the
best prices usually weren’t offered by the
big chains.
Don’t assume online-only retailers are less
expensive than local stores. Although we
often found low prices online, you can’t
count on the Internet to deliver the best
appliance deals. Our shoppers often found
better deals — sometimes much better
deals — at local retailers.
If you need delivery and installation services, nail down prices for that work along
with prices for the appliances.
Be aware that some companies won’t
install dishwashers, and others won’t connect appliances to gas lines. Some delivery
personnel won’t do anything but move
appliances into place and plug them in. If
you buy from a store that doesn’t provide
full installation services, and you aren’t
comfortable with doing it yourself, you’ll
have to hire a plumber or appliance repair
service. Most reasonably priced plumbers
charge around $100 to $150 to hook up
washing machines, gas stoves or dishwashers. When comparing appliance prices, take
these expenses into account.
Many consumers prefer to deal with
stores that offer complete installation services, and with good reason. Our view is it’s
better to have a single vendor responsible
for making sure the appliance arrives in
good condition and is properly installed. If
something goes wrong, this arrangement
eliminates disputes between the store and
the plumber over who is at fault.
If you know your installation will be
difficult or unusual, hire a trusted plumber
to do the work.
Kevin Brasler is executive editor for
Washington Consumers’ Checkbook and
Checkbook.org. Washington Consumers’
Checkbook magazine and Checkbook.org is a
nonprofit organization with a mission to help
consumers get the best service and lowest
prices. Checkbook is supported by consumers
and takes no money from the service providers it
evaluates. You can access all of Checkbook’s
ratings of appliance stores free until Feb. 16 at
checkbook.org/washingtonpost/appliances.
NEW HOME SITES NOW AVAILABLE!
THE WASHINGTON POST
Single-family homes in Fredericksburg from the upper $300s
Act Now for Best Home Site Selection! | 540-785-4663 | TollBrothers.com/Chancellorsville
Open Sun. & Mon., 12 pm–5 pm; Tues.–Sat., 10 am–5 pm. Brokers welcome. Homes available nationwide, Prices subject to change without notice. This is not an offering where prohibited by law.
JANUARY 20, 2018
For Active Adults, 55+ | Low-maintenance, single-level living
Gated community in a historic setting | Resort-style amenities
. SATURDAY,
Our final section of home sites is ready–
visit today and find the perfect one for you!
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House of the Week
A home at the center of Falls Church’s history
BY
K ATHY O RTON
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
JANUARY 20, 2018
Not long after James Wren designed the church that would give
Falls Church its name, he built this
home, using some of the bricks left
over from the church’s construction.
Wren, whose long and productive life contributed significantly
to the Falls Church community, is
far less known than his contemporaries. He dined with George
Washington and provided hospitality to Thomas Jefferson and
James Madison.
But, unlike Washington, Jefferson or Madison, Wren’s contributions were confined to a small
region in Northern Virginia. He
was a member of the Fairfax militia during the Revolutionary War.
At various points in his life, he was
an architect, a builder, a planter, a
farmer, a church vestryman, a
court justice, a sheriff, a county
official and an innkeeper.
Wren, who is thought to be the
great-grandson of noted architect
Christopher Wren, who designed
London’s St. Paul Cathedral, is perhaps best known for designing the
Falls Church.
In 1734, the Anglican Truro Parish built a wooden church on the
road to the Little Falls of the Potomac. It became known as the Falls
Church in 1759, long before the
city took that name.
2606 OGDEN ST.,
FALLS CHURCH, VA.
$1,075,000
Features: Built in 1770, Longview
was once home to James Wren. It
has been renovated many times,
most recently in 2008, but some
original features remain. The bricks
in the chimneys and foundation
are thought to be the same ones
used in the Falls Church.
Bedrooms/bathrooms: 3/3
Approximate square footage:
3,850
Lot size: 0.54 acre
Open house: Sunday, 1 to 4 p.m.
Agent: Judith Gamble, Avery-Hess
Realtors
For more photos of this home
and other houses for sale in the
area, go to washingtonpost.com/
wherewelive.
PHOTOS BY TRUPLACE
The kitchen in Longview, the home of architect James Wren, whose church gave Falls Church its name
By the mid-1760s, the community around the church had prospered, and the parish turned to
Wren to design a Georgian-style
church. Not long after it was completed, Wren built his home,
Longview.
The Falls Church was not the
only building designed by Wren.
He also designed the Fairfax
County
Courthouse,
Christ
Church in Alexandria and Pohick
Church in Colchester.
Wren bought the land for
Discover Dewey Beach’s only resort-style
condominium community
Longview in 1759 but didn’t build
the house until after the church
was completed. According to a
research paper written by Deborah A. Harsch for her 1975 Colonial
Architecture class at William &
Mary, bricks left over from the
church were used by Wren to build
his house. They can be found in
the chimneys and the foundation.
What was once a small plantation house has changed a great
deal over the years. The original
front is now the back of the house.
Additions have increased its size.
Still, echoes of the past can be
found.
“Longview’s importance in
American history lies not so much
in its architectural merit as in its
connection with the family who
built and lived in it for over a
hundred years,” Harsch wrote.
Although no documented proof
exists of Washington, Jefferson or
Madison visiting Longview, some
evidence suggests that Madison
may have spent the night there
after fleeing Washington in 1814.
Jefferson and Madison both
stopped at Wren’s tavern on Broad
Street on their way to Washington
in 1800.
After Wren died in 1815, his son
John Wren inherited Longview.
John Wren died six years later, and
the property passed to his son
Albert.
Albert Wren did not live at
Longview. He built another home
on the land. His daughter Verlinda
and her husband, Robert Darne,
moved into the house in 1843.
Their son John R. Darne, the last
of the Wren descendants to live at
Longview, died in 1903.
In 1956, Carey Construction
bought the land surrounding
Longview and developed it into
the Wren-Dale Acres subdivision.
The three-bedroom, threebathroom,
3,850-square-foot
house is listed at $1,075,000. An
open house is scheduled for Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m.
kathy.orton@washpost.com
Situated on the Rehoboth Bay with views of the Atlantic Ocean,
residents of Lighthouse Cove are able to enjoy unparalleled
amenities, including public beach access, on-site dining, a fitness
center, rooftop pool and more. New construction, 1 & 2 bedroom
homes starting at $459,900 – Call today to schedule a tour!
1301 COASTAL HIGHWAY, DEWEY BEACH, DE 19971
302-212-0002 | THERESIDENCESDE.COM
The house, built in 1770, has been renovated many times, most
recently in 2008, but still retains some of its original features.
Where We Live
7
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Mount Rainier
A Md. town
discovers
the art of
renewal
Creative types help make
an old inner suburb a hip but
still affordable destination
BY
L ESTER D AVIS
Detail
West Hyattsville
D.C.
Va.
AVONDALE
T.
R
AI
N
BRENTWOOD
R
IS
T
R
IC
B
IA
2,000 FT.
Source: maps4news.com/here
THE WASHINGTON POST
Dawn Sims, 34, a resident since childhood
Crime: In the past six months, there
have been 45 reports of stolen vehicles, 41
assaults, 27 burglaries and 17 robberies
reported in the area that includes Mount
Rainier, according to crime data provided
by the police.
realestate@washpost.com
To see more photos of Mount Rainier, go to
washingtonpost.com/real estate.
JANUARY 20, 2018
“The cultural diversity in
Mount Rainier is
a great asset.”
Transit: Several routes on the Metrobus
system and Prince George’s County’s The
Bus serve Mount Rainier. The neighborhood is a short car ride to the West
Hyattsville Station on Metro’s Green Line
and the Rhode Island Avenue-Brentwood
Station on the Red Line.
. SATURDAY,
Us National
Arboretum
M
D
50
1
U
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L
A
O
L
C
Y
WOODRIDGE
R
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A
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Schools: Mount Rainier Elementary,
Hyattsville Middle and Northwestern
High.
M
T
In the past 12 months, 40 properties
have sold in Mount Rainier, ranging from a
1,388-square-foot, three-bedroom, twobathroom Cape Cod for $191,100 to a
1,548-square-foot, five-bedroom, threebathroom Colonial for $545,000, said Anderson, the real estate agent with Exit
Deluxe Realty.
There are seven homes on the market in
Mount Rainier, Anderson said. They range
from a 1,183-square-foot, four-bedroom,
four-bathroom bungalow for $339,900 to a
1,560-square-foot, five-bedroom, fourbathroom Colonial for $539,000.
THE WASHINGTON POST
IE
1
D
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Living there: Mount Rainier is bordered
by Queens Chapel Road on the north, the
town of Brentwood to the east, the CSX rail
line to the south and Eastern Avenue at the
D.C. line to the west.
Md.
S .
EN RD
E
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QU APE
H
C
M
Craftsman-style homes, a designation that
helps combat overdevelopment and high
density, two things that can turn away
potential buyers, Anderson added.
Janet Thomas, who moved to the Washington area from Texas in 1986, said she
discovered the town by chance during a
drive. Mount Rainier’s small-town vibe
reminded Thomas of her home town of
Prairie View, and she said she thought, “If I
ever buy a house I want to live here.”
A few years later, when Thomas was
ready to purchase a house, the first neighborhood she searched was Mount Rainier,
she said.
“When I first moved here, we were kind
of off the beaten path,” said Thomas, who
lives in a 750-square-foot, two-bedroom,
two-bathroom 1920s Sears, Roebuck and
Co. catalogue house on 37th Street.
Dawn Sims, 34, who’s lived in Mount
Rainier since childhood, said she hasn’t
considered living anyplace else and is
attracted to the community’s diversity.
“The cultural diversity in Mount Rainier
is a great asset,” said Sims, who lives in a
1,000-square-foot, three-bedroom, onebathroom, two-level brick house on Wallace Road.
“Other neighborhoods in the area are
just too segregated,” she said. “This is the
perfect place to raise a family.”
E.
AV
TA
KO
DA
Artist community: Founded in the first
years of the 20th century as a streetcar
suburb of Washington, Mount Rainier has
been transformed over the past dozen
years from a sleepy community a short
distance from downtown to a lively destination with an established arts scene and
growing options for dining and shopping,
said Christian Anderson, an agent with
Exit Deluxe Realty.
The community has served as a magnet
for artists, thanks to its designation as a
Gateway Arts District, a distinction that
provides housing incentives for artists who
live and work there, Anderson said.
“Mount Rainier is perfect for people who
want to be close to D.C. but prefer a little
more land and space,” Anderson said. “A
number of investments the city made, from
a development standpoint, are beginning
to pay off as more shops and restaurants
open and help attract more people.”
The community is a historic area with a
number of mail-order houses from the
Sears, Roebuck and Co. catalogue and
JUSTIN T. GELLERSON FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Mount Rainier has a number of Sears mail-order houses and Craftsman-style homes, and its historic designation helps combat
overdevelopment and high density, a turnoff for some potential buyers, said Christian Anderson, an agent with Exit Deluxe Realty.
H
UT
SO
Beverly Perry’s reason for moving to
Mount Rainier, a bedroom community in
Prince George’s County outside the District, might not be dreamy and idyllic.
But in the 17 years since she moved to her
house on 37th Street, Perry, a retired
federal contractor with the General Services Administration, has grown quite fond
of the community.
“I moved here because I couldn’t afford
to live in Takoma Park,” said Perry as she let
out a belly laugh.
She didn’t realize it at the time, she said,
but Mount Rainier has many of the qualities that attracted her to Takoma Park —
trails and park space, established neighborhoods, and proximity to stores and
businesses. And with real estate a fraction
of the price of many houses in Takoma
Park, Mount Rainier turned out to be a
diamond in the rough that’s grown more
valuable after nearly two decades, she said.
“I live on a street with six houses and
when I look out my back yard I don’t see
anything but woods,” Perry said. “I love it
because since my neighborhood is historic,
I won’t wake up one day and find myself
staring at a massive development,” said
Perry, who lives in a 925-square-foot, threebedroom, two-bathroom Colonial that was
built in 1923.
8
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Cover Story
PHOTOS BY JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
Fred and Jill Klein in their Kennedy-Warren apartment in Northwest Washington. Before leaving their house in Potomac, Md., and
downsizing, they rented a small apartment to see whether city living would appeal to them. BELOW: The exterior of the Kennedy-Warren.
BETTER TO RENT OR TO BUY?
For downsizing baby boomers, lifestyle, mobility and finances are among the factors to consider
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
JANUARY 20, 2018
BY
A
M ICHELE L ERNER
fter 20 years of a car-centric lifestyle in a large house in Bethesda,
and nearly a decade of lobbying
her husband, Roxanne Littner
achieved her goal of moving into the
District.
“My husband was more attached to the
house than I was, and wanted to stay
longer, but when we had a plumbing issue
and the basement flooded, I put my foot
down and set a date to sell our house in a
year,” Littner says. “We started looking
downtown at different neighborhoods and
couldn’t find anything we wanted to buy
with 1,500 square feet or more that we
liked and that wasn’t outrageously expensive.”
Littner and her husband, ophthalmologist Roy Rubinfeld, opted to move into an
apartment in the Kennedy-Warren in
Cleveland Park in Northwest Washington.
They quickly discovered that the services
provided and the freedom from maintenance suited their lifestyle.
“It seems to make financial sense to
rent, because we don’t pay high condo fees
or have to pay for repairs,” Littner says.
“We own a second home in Italy, and
renting gives us the flexibility to be gone
for months at a time if we want, since we
know the Kennedy-Warren staff will take
care of our place in the city.”
The rent-or-buy decision is more commonly thought of as a dilemma for young
professionals establishing their households, not people approaching retirement.
But whether it’s a financially savvy decision or simply the only solution when they
can’t find a suitable place to buy, some
baby boomers are choosing to rent an
apartment downtown when they downsize.
“Many of our clients who are at or near
retirement like the idea of downsizing and
moving into the city or closer to the city,
and they assume it will be less expensive
than maintaining a large home,” says Laly
Kassa, managing director of financial
planning at Chevy Chase Trust in Bethesda. “The reality is that it’s just as expensive
to move closer to the city to an area that’s
walkable and close to transit. Some are
opting to buy, and some are opting to rent,
but the decision is unique to each client.”
According to a 2016 Freddie Mac survey
of boomers, the majority of those 55 and
older plan to stay in their homes during
retirement. Among those who plan to
9
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move, 1 in 5 say they will sell their
home and buy a new one, while 1
in 10 say they will sell their home
and rent when they move. Data
from TenantCloud, a property
management software service,
shows that nearly one-third of all
urban applications are for renters
older than 60.
Barbara Manard said she loved
her three-story home in Chevy
Chase, Md., but always planned to
“right-size” and move downtown
someday.
“I love the country and the city
and spent about two years looking at open houses in both environments,” Manard says. “I eventually focused on the Cathedral
Heights area in Northwest D.C.
because I was attracted by the
idea of aging in the city where it’s
easier to bump into lots of people
and establish a social network.
Living someplace walkable is
more and more attractive to me.”
Manard rented an apartment
for six months while she sold her
house and found the right condo
to buy.
“I liked renting for a while, but
eventually it started to feel like a
hotel since it wasn’t really mine,”
Manard says. “Financially, I felt it
was better to have some assets in
D.C. real estate, and I wanted the
security of knowing my housing
payment and not worrying that
the rent might increase.”
Although the District definitely draws millennials, baby boomers are also moving downtown.
According to the Census Bureau’s
American Community Survey,
there was a 3 percent jump in the
number of adults ages 55 to 64
moving into the District between
2010 and 2015, compared with a 2
percent increase among people
ages 30 to 34, and a 3 percent
decline among people ages 25 to
29 during the same period.
a better return on their investment, Kassa says, no one can
know that with certainty until
after the fact, because it depends
on real estate and stock market
fluctuations.
Fred Klein and his wife, Jill
Klein, said they were ready to
leave behind their house in Potomac, Md., to downsize and to
shorten their commute, but the
couple initially decided to rent a
small apartment to determine
whether full-time city living
would appeal to them.
“Within three days of moving
into a one-bedroom apartment in
the Kennedy-Warren, we decided
we loved it,” says Fred Klein, a
lawyer with DLA Piper Global
Law Firm in Washington. His wife
is a professor at American University.
The couple eventually sold
their house and moved into a
larger apartment in the same
building.
“We worked with our financial
planner at Chevy Chase Trust to
project the cost of buying a condo
versus renting, and we felt that
the flexibility of renting outweighed the negative financial
aspects, such as the absence of tax
benefits and paying high rent,”
Fred Klein says. “We’re planning
to renew our lease again for a year
or two because we don’t think we
can get the great location, size and
comfort level of what we have
now without spending a ton of
money.”
Laly Kassa, managing director of financial planning,
Chevy Chase Trust, Bethesda.
Renting out a suburban house
Depending on where your current house is located, you could
decide to keep it and rent it for
income. Hewitt says that renting
your home can be challenging
because there’s not significant demand for large and expensive single-family home rentals.
“You often can’t get enough
rent to cover the costs of a large
house,” Berger says. “And almost
no one wants to be a landlord.”
Berger says people who are
downsizing are looking for a lifestyle change and want to get away
from maintaining a home.
“Most of my clients want to
simplify their lives,” Kassa says.
“Some of them may keep their
suburban house for a little while,
until they make a final decision
on where to live, and then they opt
to sell it.”
Kassa recommends investing
in a real estate investment trust or
a multifamily unit rather than
trying to generate income from a
single-family home. But Edgar
says some people want to keep
their home for both income and
future appreciation and choose to
rely on property management
companies for tenant screening
and maintenance tasks to reduce
the burden of landlord duties.
For most baby boomers, downsizing to the city is a discretionary
move that can take years to accomplish, Sandler says.
“There’s no urgency to this, so
you should take your time to
make sure the smaller space will
work for you and that you’re getting the services you want, whether it’s a condo or a rental,” Berger
says.
realestate@washpost.com
JANUARY 20, 2018
“Some are opting to buy, and some are opting to
rent, but the decision is unique to each client.”
Renters’ investment options
Hewitt says that 80 percent of
his clients don’t want to rent because they don’t want to lose
control over their home to a landlord and don’t want the possibility of paying higher rent in the
future.
“Those clients that choose to
buy tend to make a large down
payment or buy with cash from
the equity from the sale of their
home and then try to cover their
property taxes, insurance and
maintenance costs with their Social Security or pension income,”
Hewitt says. “They can use their
investment income for discretionary spending.”
The 20 percent of Hewitt’s clients who are open to renting can
often find more rental properties
in the city than condos.
“Financially, real estate historically appreciates about 3 percent
per year, while the stock market
appreciates nearly 10 percent annually,” Hewitt says. “So renters
have an opportunity to invest
their cash in the market. Renting
can be particularly good for people with a smaller portfolio of
investments, because they can
use the equity from the sale of
their property and grow it for a
more comfortable retirement.”
Renting in the city offers the
advantage of convenience, without requiring a large cash investment or mortgage, says Joe Edgar,
chief executive of Tenant Cloud.
In addition, renters avoid the expense and hassle of home maintenance.
“Renting an apartment can be
the equivalent of buying an RV for
retirees so they can take advantage of the flexibility and move to
a different city every year if they
want,” Edgar says.
Kassa says that for baby boom-
. SATURDAY,
ing, it’s better to rent temporarily
until they decide if they really
want to live there full time, and to
choose the right neighborhood,”
Kassa says. “An important element of the decision is how
much flexibility they want. If
there’s short-term uncertainty
about the choice, or if they want
long-term flexibility so they can
easily move around to be near
grandchildren, renting can be
smarter.”
Tim Hewitt, a senior wealth
adviser with the Wiley Group in
Conshohocken, Pa., as well as a
licensed real estate agent with
United Real Estate in Wayne, Pa.,
says the first step for baby boomers is to understand their goals,
such as whether they want to live
near family members or buy a
vacation home for future retirement use.
“After the goals are established,
we can do a cost-benefit analysis
and determine how much equity
they have in their home, how
much it would cost to sell it and
how much equity they would
want to put into another house,”
Hewitt says. “People are often
surprised by the high cost of moving to a walkable neighborhood
close to or in Philadelphia, but
they typically still choose to
downsize because they don’t want
the space in their suburban
house, and they want the city
lifestyle.”
Although clients want to know
whether renting or buying offers
THE WASHINGTON POST
Understand your goals
Many baby boomers who think
they want to downsize into a city
condo are surprised that it will
cost them as much to buy a condo
as they would pay for a house, says
Ellen Sandler, a real estate agent
with Evers & Co. Real Estate in
Washington.
“Some decide to rent to get the
services and lifestyle they want,
especially if they have enough
assets to throw off enough income
to pay the rent,” Sandler says.
Susan Berger, Sandler’s real estate partner, says rents in the city
are so high that people are sometimes disappointed that the
amount of space they can rent is
less than expected, even though
they are avoiding condo fees and
maintenance costs.
Kassa says that some of her
clients are “testing” city life by
renting a small place in the city
while they keep their large suburban house for weekends for a few
years.
“For someone new to city liv-
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
The bar on the lobby level of the Kennedy-Warren. “Within three days of moving into a onebedroom apartment in the Kennedy-Warren, we decided we loved it,” Fred Klein said.
ers who don’t need that flexibility,
buying a place can be a good
decision because they can renovate their new home, hold onto it
as a long-term investment and
avoid the risk of rent hikes.
“There’s no right or wrong answer — you just need to line up the
choices and decide what works
for you psychologically and financially,” she says. “I do encourage
people to take their time with this
decision and to rent temporarily
if they are uncertain about their
choice of where to live.”
Some homeowners are uncomfortable with the idea of renting,
but when Kassa runs the numbers
comparing a rental and buying a
condo, they sometimes realize
that renting is the better choice.
She says about 30 percent of her
clients rent when they downsize.
“Most of our clients opt to sell
their house first and then figure
out where they can get the lifestyle they want, either in the city
or Bethesda,” Sandler says. “The
ones that rent tell us they haven’t
seen anything to buy that excites
them, so they will just wait and
make a more permanent decision
later.”
10
EZ
Home,
me?
,
s
Ye !
u
o
y
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
JANUARY 20, 2018
Looking to navigate the real estate market
for the first time? Get facts, tips and advice
from experts and our real estate writers
in The Washington Post First-Time Home
Buyers special section.
Find out:
• How to find your first home
• How to find a mortgage
• How to find a real estate agent
First-Time Home Buyers
Special Section
It’s part of the big expanded
winter edition coming February 7
in The Washington Post.
N0055 5x12
11
Market Analysis
EZ
Home equity loans may be ‘mostly dead,’ but they’re not all dead
It’s a big and confusing
question for many
homeowners in the wake
of the December tax law
changes: Are new interestdeductible home equity
The
credit lines (HELOCs) and
Nation's
second mortgages now
Housing
totally out of reach going
forward?
KENNETH R.
The new law eliminated
HARNEY
a long-standing section of
the tax code that allowed
homeowners to borrow against their
equity and use the proceeds for whatever
purposes they chose, while deducting
interest payments on their federal taxes.
That provision of the new tax law took
effect Jan. 1, so it’s logical to assume that
popular tax-deductible HELOCs no
longer will be available.
They’re dead, right? Not quite! To
borrow a phrase from Miracle Max in
“The Princess Bride,” the traditional uses
of HELOCs may be “mostly dead” — but
not all dead.
A close reading of the final language
rushed through Congress last month
reveals that interest-deductible HELOCs
and second mortgages should still be
available to homeowners provided they
qualify on two criteria: they use the
proceeds of the loan to make “substantial
improvements” to their home, and the
combined total of their first mortgage
balance and their HELOC or second
mortgage does not exceed the new
$750,000 limit on mortgage amounts
qualified for interest deductions. (The
previous ceiling was $1.1 million for the
first mortgage and home-equity debt
combined.)
“The key here is [how] you use the
proceeds” of the HELOC or second
mortgage, Ernst & Young tax partner
Greg Rosica told me in an interview. You
can’t buy a car anymore. You can’t spend
the money on student loans, business
investments, vacations or most of the
things you used to be able to do. Now, to
take deductions on the interest you pay,
you’ve got to limit expenditures to capital
improvements on your house, or — less
likely — buying or building your
principal residence.
The reason, said Rosica, a widely
recognized expert on real estate tax law,
is that although Section 11043 of the new
tax law eliminated home-equity debt
interest deductions, it left virtually
untouched interest deductions for
primary home mortgage debt
(“acquisition indebtedness”) that is used
to buy, improve or construct a new home.
As long as you follow the rules on what
constitutes a capital improvement —
spelled out in IRS Publication 530 — and
do not exceed the $750,000 total debt
limit, “it is deductible,” Rosica said.
Banks and other lenders active in
HELOCs and second-mortgage arenas
agree with this interpretation and plan to
continue offering home-equity products.
Bob Davis, executive vice president of the
American Bankers Association, told me
“HELOCs will still be in the mix,” despite
widespread concerns that they might
disappear after the elimination of the
home-equity section of the tax code.
Michael Kinane, head of TD Bank’s
extensive second-lien product offerings,
said in a statement for this column that
HELOCs and home-equity loans remain
available and popular, whether interest is
tax-deductible or not, and can be “the
best, lowest cost option for homeowners.”
In mid-January, TD’s rates for owners
with solid equity and good credit on a
$100,000 HELOC were 3.99 percent APR,
about half a percentage point below the
prime bank rate.
A survey of HELOCs and second-lien
lenders active on the LendingTree.com
loan-shopping network conducted for
this column found a “consensus” that not
only will lenders continue to offer such
financing, “but more lenders will offer
them as home prices [and] values rise,”
according to spokeswoman Megan
Greuling.
Lenders generally won’t advise you on
interest deductibility, urging instead that
you consult your tax adviser. Also, the
final word on interest deductibility will
need to come from the IRS. But the
attorneys, CPAs and legislative tax
experts consulted for this column were
unanimous in their belief that the IRS
will agree with their interpretation of the
law changes.
Bottom line: Despite rampant rumors
to the contrary, home-equity-based
lending won’t be disappearing anytime
soon. Borrowers who want to deduct
interest will need to restrict their
expenditures to qualified home
improvements. Others who simply want
to tap into their equity they’ve built up at
attractive interest rates and use the
money for whatever they choose will be
able to obtain HELOCs or second
mortgages, just as they did in the past.
And for those owners who now plan to
opt for the standard deductions of
$12,000 or $24,000, there’ll be no issue
at all. Since they will no longer be
itemizing, no big deal. They won’t be
thinking about interest deductions
anyway.
Ken Harney’s email address is
Harneycolumn@gmail.com.
You’ve Earned It
THE WASHINGTON POST
Spacious 1- to 3-bedroom condominium
residences in vibrant downtown Bethesda.
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12
EZ
Buying New
Marlboro Ridge
Greenery and horses, a half-hour from D.C.
BY
C ARISA C RAWFORD C HAPPELL
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
JANUARY 20, 2018
Horses are one of the major highlights of
Marlboro Ridge, a master-planned community in Upper Marlboro, Md., with hundreds
of acres of open space.
At the entrance to the neighborhood,
residents and guests are greeted by a stateof-the-art equestrian facility where horses
can be seen roaming the grounds.
It’s a scenic setting that makes it easy to
forget it’s less than a half-hour drive into the
city. Marlboro Ridge has spacious luxury
townhouses and single-family houses in
various sizes.
Throughout the winding community, developed by Toll Brothers, are several walking, biking and equestrian trails. More than
250 acres of natural greenery — including a
community tree-preservation area and
open space backing to Cabin Branch and
Back Branch Stream Valley — have been set
aside.
The townhouse community at Marlboro
Ridge, known as the Meadows, has three
floor plans. The builder showcases the Bradbury model floor plan with a lower-level
entry.
Wine-tasting room: The brick-front,
three-level townhouses have two-car garages and an open floor plan.
Upon entering the lower level of the
Bradbury model, there’s a 23-by-16-foot recreation room and powder room. One of the
unique features on this level is a glass-enclosed wine-tasting room featuring cabinetry, countertop space and wine storage
built-ins.
The main living level has an airy formal
living room with decorative wall and ceiling
moldings with recessed lights. Three large
windows provide plenty of natural light.
The floors are covered by dark hardwood.
Rooms have unique ceiling designs, light
fixtures and accent walls. For instance, the
model home has an octagon-shaped tray
ceiling with a sophisticated chandelier. The
centrally located dining room is partially
sectioned off with thick wall columns.
The kitchen and family room are nestled
in the back portion of the home. The kitchen
has earth-toned granite countertops and
dark cabinetry that provide an attractive
contrast to the stainless-steel appliances
and shimmery speckled tile backsplash. Although there’s plenty of space for a table and
chairs, the centerpiece of the kitchen is an
oversize curved breakfast bar that’s great
for hosting gatherings of family and friends
or casual dining. Decorative pendant light
fixtures hang above it.
The family room is adjacent to the kitchen. It has a light-colored brick wall flanked
by two windows, and there’s a fireplace for
chilly winter evenings. A glass door leads
onto a deck that stretches across the width
of the home. A privacy wall separates the
space from the neighbors. There’s more
outdoor space in the fenced-in yard below.
Vaulted ceilings: It’s unusual to find a
home in which all bedrooms come with a
soaring vaulted ceiling. This adds to the
spaciousness of the already large rooms.
The master suite measures 20 by 16 feet.
With its columned sitting area, double-
PHOTOS BY BENJAMIN C TANKERSLEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
The living area in the Bradbury Williamsburg model townhouse at Marlboro Ridge in Upper Marlboro, Md. The development
offers luxury townhouses and single-family homes amid more than 250 acres of greenery. BELOW: The exterior of the model unit.
door master bath entry and light-chocolate
accent wall, this room can serve as a retreat
at the end of a long day. The bedroom has
two walk-in closets. In the bathroom, a large
corner unit step-up soaking tub is centered
between two windows. Above is a vaulted
ceiling to which skylights can be added.
The secondary bedrooms have ample
closet space and share a hall bathroom with
a tub. This model home also has an optional
top-floor multipurpose loft with a cathedral
ceiling and skylights. The loft has an additional bedroom with a window seat, full
bathroom and recreation room.
Resort-style amenities: The equestrian
center, which offers riding lessons, has
22 stalls, an indoor arena and a full-time
barn manager. The community also has a
richly appointed clubhouse with swimming
pools, a fitness center, banquet hall and
conference rooms, miles of jogging and
biking trails, playgrounds, soccer fields and
tennis courts.
One of Marlboro Ridge’s sales associates
said that another community highlight are
the frequent social gatherings for residents
that include holiday celebrations and outdoor summer parties.
Schools: Barack Obama Elementary,
MARLBORO RIDGE
4415 Grazing Way, Upper Marlboro, Md.
The townhouses are priced from $397,995.
The single-family houses are priced from
$471,995.
Builder: Toll Bros.
Features: The residences have a top-level
loft, vaulted ceilings, skylights, fireplace, a
finished recreation room, a large soaking
tub, a kitchen with stainless-steel appliances
and granite counters, recessed lights
throughout, a sitting room in the master
suite, walk-in closets, a large deck and a
fenced-in yard.
Bedrooms/bathrooms: Townhouses: 3-4 /
3-4; single-family houses: 4/ 7
Square footage: Townhouses: 2,607 to
3,865; single-family houses: 2,497 to 5,716
View models: Mondays from noon to 5 p.m.;
Tuesdays to Saturdays 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
Sundays from noon to 5 p.m.
Sales contact: Dawn Samura, 301-7803886 or marlbororidge.com.
James Madison Middle, Wise High.
Transit: The community is close to Interstates 495 and Route 4. The closest Metro
station is Branch Avenue on the Green Line.
realestate@washpost.com
To see more photos of Marlboro Ridge, go
to washingtonpost.com/realestate.
13
Financial Advice
EZ
Before buying a home, get your savings, debt and records in order
Home buyer demand is
the strongest since
2000, according to a
new survey from
Genworth Mortgage
ILYCE GLINK
Insurance. And,
AND SAMUEL
according to the
J. TAMKIN
National Association of
Realtors, home prices have risen 40
percent over the past five years, while
income has barely budged.
That means home buyers who focus on
their personal finances are going to be the
winners, because they will have the means
to make fast, substantial offers.
But as millennials are still struggling
under the weight of massive student loans
(only 55 percent make their payments on
time, according to the latest research),
getting your finances together enough to
buy a home could be more difficult than
imagined. Mortgage lenders follow strict
guidelines that limit how much debt you
can carry relative to your income.
So as we move into 2018, and everyone
heads back to the gym and goes back on
their diets, here are some personal
financial resolutions you might want to
make:
Real
Estate
Matters
Bulk up your savings
How much do you want to save this year?
Do you have a “magic number” that will get
can cook more from scratch and bring your
lunch instead of buying it, you’ve got the
potential to save thousands of dollars a
year.
you into a home? Whatever the amount is,
write it down, and then reverse engineer
the process of saving to that specific
number. In other words, if you want to save
$1,000 by the end of the year, you’ll need to
save $2.74 each day in order to get there. If
you want to save $10,000 by the end of the
year, you’ll need to save $27.40 per day.
Understanding how numbers work is the
first step to achieving your financial goals.
It may not be as much fun as blowing a
chunk of change at a restaurant or
shopping mall, but if you learn the art of
“deferred gratification,” you’ll soon find
that the cash is piling up, which should
encourage you to keep going. Try to find
ways to save everywhere. On one of Ilyce’s
radio shows, a listener told her that she still
goes to restaurants with her family, but no
one gets a drink other than water: no
alcohol, no sodas. Doing that shaves about
one-third of her bill and helps her save
more than $1,000 every year.
Saving opportunities abound. Whether
you’re saving $5, $50 or $500, every time
you don’t spend money, you’re saving it. So
look for ways to trade out more expensive
options for less expensive or free options in
your category of expenses where you spend
the most discretionary cash. For most folks,
that’s typically your entertainment
spending, whether it’s concerts, movies,
date night or eating out as a family. If you
Pay down as much debt as you can
As long as mortgage lenders require
borrowers to follow strict rules regarding
debt-to-income ratios, you’ll need to focus
on your debt repayment strategy.
Low interest rates help. Lenders look at
how much of your gross income you spend
paying down your debt each month (called
your “debt service”), and they compare that
to your income and other required monthly
payments (such as any spousal or child
support you’re obligated to pay). When
interest rates are low, your required
payments are less, which helps your overall
debt-to-income ratios. Getting your debts
paid off as
quickly as
possible will
help, too.
Watch your
credit and
credit cards
Sign up to get Seeing charges serves
auto-alerts from as a reminder to find
your credit card ways to chop spending.
company so that
you’ll see each charge (and can help with
fraud protection in case you didn’t make a
charge) as it comes through. Seeing each
charge come through (especially those that
are on auto-renew each month or year)
gives you a sense of your spending in real
time. And it serves as a reminder to find
ways to chop down your spending.
Get your paperwork together
Lenders want to see your docs. They want
to verify tax returns (especially if you’re
self-employed) and see bank account
statements, divorce decrees and other
items. Even if you are going to provide
these in an encrypted electronic file, you’ll
want to get those copies in one place so that
when the time comes to apply for your
loan, you’re ready.
Remember this: Whether you hit your
goal exactly by the end of the year is largely
irrelevant. What you’re trying to do is build
a foundation of financial stability, with
good money habits, that will last you a
lifetime.
Ilyce Glink is the creator of an 18-part webinar
and e-book series called “The Intentional
Investor: How to Be Wildly Successful in Real
Estate,” as well as the author of many books on
real estate. She also hosts the “Real Estate
Minute” on her YouTube channel. Samuel J.
Tamkin is a Chicago-based real estate attorney.
Contact them at ThinkGlink.com.
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14
Real Estate Guide
EZ
Capitol Hill
Capitol Hill
Bethesda
Bethesda
ATTENTION ADVERTISERS:
All advertisements for the sale or rental of dwelling units
published in The Washington Post are subject to the Federal
Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise 'any
preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race,
color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin,
or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or
discrimination.' State law forbids discrimination based on
factors in addition to those protected under federal law.
H
R
The Washington Post will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons
are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available
on an equal opportunity basis.
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Luxury. Access. Value. Bethesda.
4 luxury corner residences per floor
on levels 6 through 8, from $1.5M
301.747.3899
LiveStonehall.com
Prices, financing and offers subject to change without notice.
Please see a sales representative for details.
428 3rd Street, NE
Washington, DC 20002
Bethesda
Bethesda
1-800-753-POST
SF
reward
ASPIRE
HIGHER
FIND YOUR PLACE AT THE
TALLEST CONDOMINIUM
RESIDENCES IN BETHESDA.
COMING IN EARLY 2018.
Alexandria
Alexandria
LIVE LOCAL
COMING
SOON!
Multi-Level Townhomes
<5 Minutes from Old Town
Towns at South Alex®
2-Car Garage Townhomes
Alexandria, VA 22314
(571) 349-8806
4 large corner residences per floor on
levels 12 through 17 with impressive
balconies and two-direction views.
RESERVE YOUR CLUB LEVEL
RESIDENCE FROM $1.6M
ChevalOnFairmont.com
301.476.1637
TownsAtSouthAlex.com
Brokers Warmly Welcomed.
Must register and comply with policy terms.
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
JANUARY 20, 2018
Prices, financing and offers subject to change without
notice. Please see a sales representative for details.
SLADE
GRAND OPENING
January 20 th From Noon - 4pm
townhomes
Fromdramasandmusicals tostand-up
andballet,discovergreatwaystosavemoney,
win ticketsandhavefunatthetheater.
washingtonpost.com/postpoints
Q U A L I T Y. C R A F T S M A N S H I P. D E TA I L S .
Discover what makes The Lauren
Bethesda’s Best Selling Condominium.
Notamember?It’s free! JOINTODAY.
OPEN HOUSE TODAY FROM 12PM-4PM
301.909.8846 | THEL AURENMD.COM
S2930 2x5
4901 HAMPDEN LN., BETHESDA, MD 20814
Join us celebrate from Noon - 4pm and tour our new model
residences as we officially open the doors to Slade, a new
collection of modern townhomes in the heart of Alexandria.
Learn More
703.991.7948 | SladeOldTown.com
Structured Financing
provided by
15
EZ
Real Estate Guide
Fairfax County
Fairfax County
Gainesville, VA
$674,995
Membership is rewarding.
PostPoints takes you
to special exhibits.
YOU’RE INVITED
Available for Immediate Move-in!
Brand new 3 BR, 4 BA single-family home in
Regency at Creekside – The Potomac Collection.
Join us for the Grand Opening of The Enclave
Saturday, January 27th from Noon - 4pm.
Brand new condominiums available for immediate move-in
H
H
H
H
H
Fun-Filled active-adult (55+) gated community
Modern kitchen w/granite countertops & SS appliances
Main-level master suite with large walk-in closet
Finished lower level leading to deck & patio area with fire pit
Amazing wooded and water view & so much more
13824 Long Ridge Drive, Gainesville, VA 20155
703-520-9775 - TollBrothers.com
1
RSVP TODAY
*Actual home varies from photo shown
703.348.1629 | LiveEnclaveVA.com
washingtonpost.com/postpoints
Not a member? It’s free! JOIN TODAY.
Sales Gallery: 9450 Silver King Ct., Fairfax, VA 22301
S2931 2x4
resource for home
buyers and sellers
in metro D.C.
What do today’s home buyers
and sellers have in common?
The Washington Post. The Post reaches
48% of people in the D.C. metro area who plan
to buy or sell a home in the next 12 months.
Making The Washington Post, in print and online,
the #1 resource for residential Real Estate
among local media entities.
THE WASHINGTON POST
#
From dinosaur bones and
space shuttles to panda
bears and modern art,
discover great ways to
save money, win tickets
and have fun at museums.
Put No. 1 to work for you. Contact one of us today:
Bruce Bennett
Wanda Frazer
Bruce.Bennett@washpost.com
Wanda.Frazer@washpost.com
A0615 A 5x6
. SATURDAY,
Source: Nielsen Scarborough 2016, Release 2. Washington metro market, seven-day cumulative audience of Washington Post print and washingtonpost.com net, daily and
weekly newspapers, local radio, cable television channels, local media websites, and local broadcast television stations during prime time.
JANUARY 20, 2018
16
EZ
The
Good Life
Awaits
K
LOW-MAINTENANCE LIVING | FANTASTIC AMENITIES | FIRST-FLOOR MASTER BEDROOMS
LO U D O U N CO U N T Y
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
JANUARY 20, 2018
Regency at Ashburn | For Active Adults, 55+
The Greenbrier - Luxury single-level condominiums from the mid-$300s
S P OTSY LVA N I A CO U N T Y
Regency at Chancellorsville | For Active Adults, 55+
Single-family homes from the upper $300s
P R I N C E W I L L I A M CO U N T Y
Regency at Creekside | For Active Adults, 55+
Two luxury single-family home collections from the mid-$500s
Regency at Dominion Valley – The Greenbrier | For Active Adults, 55+
Luxury condominiums from the low $300s
Dominion Valley Country Club – The Villas
Single-family homes from the low $600s
ASK ABOUT HOMES AVAILABLE FOR QUICK DELIVERY!
Let us help you find the perfect community. Call 855-298-0316 or visit TollBrothers.com/Active.
Open Sun. & Mon., 12 pm–5 pm; Tues.–Sat., 10 am–5 pm. Brokers welcome. Homes available nationwide. Prices subject to change without notice. This is not an offering where prohibited by law.
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