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The Washington Post – March 06, 2018

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Democracy Dies in Darkness
Cloudy 46/37 • Tomorrow: Snowy/rainy 42/32 B8
TUESDAY, MARCH 6 , 2018
Subpoena of Nunberg
seeks records and
grand-jury appearance
LEADERS ON HILL
FEAR TRADE WARS
But president says he
is ‘not backing down’
J OSH D AWSEY
P HILIP R UCKER
Former Trump campaign aide
Sam Nunberg publicly defied the
Justice Department special counsel on Monday, announcing in an
extraordinary series of media interviews that he had been subpoenaed to appear in front of a federal
grand jury investigating Russia’s
interference in the 2016 presidential election but that he will refuse
to go.
“Let him arrest me,” Nunberg
told The Washington Post in his
first stop on a media blitz, saying
he does not plan to comply with a
subpoena from special counsel
Robert S. Mueller III to hand over
emails and other documents related to President Trump and nine
current and former Trump advisers.
“Mr. Mueller should understand I am not going in on Friday”
to the grand jury, he added. It is
unclear what actions Mueller
might take if Nunberg does not
appear.
In a remarkable act of rebellion,
Nunberg seized the national media spotlight for much of Monday
afternoon to denounce Mueller’s
NUNBERG CONTINUED ON A2
Abortion bills
make Down
syndrome a
focus of fight
As more live with the
disorder, it’s also easier
to detect in the womb
. $2
Trump’s
tari≠s
face GOP
pushback
Ex-Trump
aide vows
to defy
Mueller
BY
AND
M2 V1 V2 V3 V4
D AVID J L YNCH,
E RICA W ERNER
AND D AMIAN P ALETTA
BY
CORINNA KERN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Jock Godin, in red shirt, is 15 and lives in Tel Aviv after fleeing war in Sudan with his mother, brother Alam and two other siblings.
Israel’s ‘dreamers’ in limbo
Young Africans are at risk of deportation to a country they don’t know
BY
L OVEDAY M ORRIS
IN TEL AVIV
A
lam Godin fled to Israel as
a boy, escaping war in
Sudan more than a decade ago with his family. His
mother and four younger
siblings call home a squat,
gray, two-bedroom bungalow
in a downtrodden section of
Tel Aviv.
Now, he is among thousands
of African men who could be
given a choice by the Israeli
government: Take $3,500 to re-
locate to an unnamed “third
country” — widely reported to
be Uganda or Rwanda — go
back to their home country, or
go to jail.
Israel began handing out the
first deportation orders to Africans this year. The government
is scheduled next month to
relocate the first of 38,000 Sudanese and Eritrean migrants,
who entered Israel illegally in
many cases more than six years
ago. Israel had said it wouldn’t
deport women and children —
for now.
For hundreds like Godin,
who have graduated from the
Israeli education system, speak
Hebrew and know little of their
home countries, a deportation
order could turn their lives
upside down. They are Israel’s
“dreamers.”
“We have to keep them,”
urged Eli Nechama, a Tel Aviv
school principal who is campaigning on their behalf. “They
will be amazing, amazing citizens here in Israel.”
Nechama is spearheading a
campaign to prevent deportations of graduates from Israeli
schools, hoping to also secure
them a permanent status in the
country. There are estimated to
be 5,000 Sudanese and Eritrean
children in the country, and
around 600 graduates.
The parallels with the immigration debate in the United
States — and, in particular, the
undocumented
immigrants
Netanyahu visit : Trump warmly greets embattled Israeli leader. A11
ISRAEL CONTINUED ON A7
Populist wins tip Europe into ‘uncharted territory’
Republican
congressional
leaders stepped up their efforts
Monday to stop President Trump
from implementing global tariffs
on steel and aluminum imports,
warning that the protectionist
move would damage the economy
and muddle the party’s message
in the run-up to November’s midterm elections.
For much of the day, an extraordinary public debate over core
economic principles played out
between the president and leading members of his own party.
“We are extremely worried
about the consequences of a trade
war and are urging the White
House to not advance with this
plan,” said AshLee Strong, a
spokeswoman for House Speaker
Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.).
Members of the House Ways
and Means Committee circulated
TRADE CONTINUED ON A13
Tariff tit for tat: How Europe and
Canada may respond to plan. A13
Mayor knew
of transfer,
says ex-D.C.
schools chief
Contradicting Bowser,
Wilson says he told her
about action months ago
G RIFF W ITTE
M ICHAEL B IRNBAUM
BY
BY
A RIANA E UNJUNG C HA
Karianne Lisonbee stepped up
to the lectern to talk about what
she called “a terrible form of discrimination.”
The Republican state representative had just introduced a bill in
Utah that would make it a crime
for a doctor to perform an abortion if a woman is seeking one
“solely” because the fetus has
Down syndrome. “In recent years,
there has been a shocking increase
in abortions performed for no other reason than because a prenatal
test identified the potential for a
trait a parent didn’t like,” she said
at the news conference last
month.
The legislation — and similar
bills passed in North Dakota,
Ohio, Indiana and Louisiana —
has put Down syndrome front and
center in the abortion debate as
the condition is becoming more
widely understood and accepted
in the United States. In many communities, children with Down
ABORTION CONTINUED ON A4
AND
BY P ERRY S TEIN
AND P ETER J AMISON
berlin — After voters from the
snowy peaks of the Alps to the
sunny shores of Sicily delivered a
verdict so fractured and mysterious it could take months to sort
out, the banner headline Monday
in the venerable daily La Stampa
captured the state of a nation
that’s left no one in charge: “Ungovernable Italy.”
The same can increasingly be
said for vast stretches of Europe.
Across the continent, a oncedurable dichotomy is dissolving. Fueled by anger over immigration, a backlash against the
European Union and resentment
of an out-of-touch elite, antiestablishment parties are taking
votes left, right and center from
the traditional power players.
They generally aren’t winning
enough support to govern. But
they are claiming such a substantial share of the electorate that
EUROPE CONTINUED ON A10
Italy’s new epoch: Voters display
fury with old-line politicians. A10
ANDREW MEDICHINI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Luigi Di Maio, center, leader of Italy’s Five Star Movement, which won big in Sunday’s elections.
IN THE NEWS
SYRIAN RED CRESCENT/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Relief, retribution in Syria? As aid reaches
a besieged enclave, the U.S. weighs a military
response to an alleged chemical attack. A9
Seeking answers Senate staffers plan to
question Reddit and Tumblr about how
Russia may have spread disinformation. A12
Former D.C. Public Schools
chancellor Antwan Wilson said
he told Mayor Muriel E. Bowser
(D) that he had transferred his
daughter to one of the city’s most
desirable high schools in October, four months before Bowser
forced Wilson to resign when
news of the transfer became
public.
Wilson’s account is at odds
with statements by the mayor
and her top aides that they didn’t
know his daughter had been
given a coveted seat at Woodrow
Wilson High School, a campus in
Northwest Washington with a
waiting list of more than 600
students. That transfer bypassed
the lottery used to award scarce
seats in the District’s top public
schools and violated a policy that
bans preferential treatment for
the children of government
officials.
In a brief interview Monday,
THE NATION
THE WORLD
Many people with
Type 2 diabetes should
relax their blood sugar
control, an influential
doctors group concluded, but the American
Diabetes Association
disagreed. A2
Arkansas became the
third state to receive
federal permission to
impose work requirements on Medicaid
recipients. A4
Texas kicks off a
crowded Democratic
congressional primary
season with lots of enthusiasm from candidates but also meddling
by party officials. A6
North Korean leader
Kim Jong Un hosted a
South Korean presidential delegation for dinner in Pyongyang, the
latest surprising development in a burst of diplomacy. A8
The Trump name was
stripped from a Panama
City hotel after the building’s owner declared a
disputed victory in a
week-long showdown
over its management. A10
THE ECONOMY
One of Hollywood’s
most powerful women,
an executive whose stu-
dio garnered 27 Academy Award nominations
this year, could soon be
out of a job. A12
One of YouTube’s biggest draws is that anyone
can become a star, but a
study finds that creators’
odds of getting rich — or
even making a modest
living — are small. A18
The Pentagon slashed a
cloud-computing contract after the process
through which the deal
was awarded drew criticism. A18
THE REGION
An FBI informant in
MS-13 was convicted in
the killing of a teenager
thought to be in a rival
gang. B1
The deaths of a D.C.
couple in a 1985 house
fire were considered
accidental but now are
ruled homicides as the
police focus on a serial
arsonist. B1
Authorities in Fairfax
County arrested an 18year-old man accused of
posting threats directed
at a high school. B4
Inside
HEALTH & SCIENCE
Everyday stress
Even this kind can affect
your health. But your
attitude can help. E1
ST YLE
Oscar parties on
At the Vanity Fair bash, so
many stars, and not so
many gross men. C1
OBITUARIES
David Ogden Stiers,
who played Charles Winchester on the TV sitcom
“M.A.S.H” and later did
voice work for Disney
movies, died at 75. B6
SPORTS
NBA star Stephen Curry’s long-range shooting
skills inspire high school
players and are changing
the game. D1
WILSON CONTINUED ON A6
BUSINESS NEWS ........................ A12
COMICS........................................C6
OPINION PAGES ......................... A16
LOTTERIES ................................... B3
OBITUARIES ................................. B6
TELEVISION..................................C4
WORLD NEWS .............................. A8
CONTENT © 2018
The Washington Post / Year 141, No. 91
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B2
8 2 2 2
A2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
Luckily for the world, Trump’s no Xi
In the category of
small mercies, let
us file this one: As
strongmen go,
President Trump
has proved to be
Dana
blessedly weak.
Milbank
It isn’t,
WASHINGTON apparently, for
lack of ambition.
SKETCH
The president,
who has never
been stingy in praising the
world’s dictators, engaged in that
favorite pastime again Saturday
night before a friendly audience
in what was supposed to be a
private event at Mar-a-Lago.
The object of the president’s
affection this time was China’s
president, Xi Jinping, whom
Trump hailed as a “great
gentleman” who treated Trump
“tremendously well” during
Trump’s recent visit. In Trump’s
glowing assessment, Xi is the
most powerful Chinese leader “in
a hundred years.”
One hundred years! How now,
Mao?
Trump particularly admired
Xi’s successful move to abolish
term limits. “He’s now president
for life — president for life — and
he’s great,” Trump said at the
closed-door fundraiser, audio of
which leaked to CNN. “And look,
he was able to do that. I think it’s
great. Maybe we’ll have to give
that a shot someday.” His
audience cheered and applauded.
There has been debate about
whether Trump was joking. But
why? Trump’s tastes (and those of
his followers) have long skewed
toward the authoritarian. A
couple of days earlier, Trump
casually proposed suspending
the Constitution to deal with
shootings: “Take the guns first,
go through due process second.”
And Xi is just the latest of
Trump’s strongman crushes.
North Korea’s Kim Jong Un is a
“smart cookie,” Saddam Hussein
was good at killing terrorists,
Egypt’s Abdel Fatah al-Sissi is
“very close to me,” and Turkey’s
Recep Tayyip Erdogan won
Trump’s congratulations on a
power-seizing referendum.
Trump has a “great relationship”
with Rodrigo Duterte of the
Philippines and laughed when
Duterte called journalists “spies.”
Russia’s Vladimir Putin, in
Trump’s view, is “very much of a
leader” and has escaped
H A P P ENI NG TO D A Y
For the latest updates all day, visit washingtonpost.com.
8 a.m.
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is
scheduled to address the annual policy conference of the
American Israel Public Affairs Committee at the Walter E.
Washington Convention Center. Visit washingtonpost.com/
world for details.
Afternoon
President Trump meets with Swedish Prime Minister
Stefan Lofven at the White House. For coverage, visit
washingtonpost.com/politics.
Afternoon
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson departs for a trip to
Africa that is scheduled to last through March 13. Go to
washingtonpost.com/world for developments.
7 p.m.
The Washington Wizards host the Miami Heat at Capital
One Arena. Follow the game at postsports.com.
KLMNO
CO R R ECTI O N S
A March 5 Page One article
about a Texas meatpacking
plant’s difficulties in finding U.S.born workers since a 2006 federal
raid on immigrant employees in
the country illegally misspelled
the last name of the Cactus, Tex.,
city manager. He is Aldo Gallegos.
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A March 3 Page One article
about the Trump administration
expanding missile defense policy
to address threats from Russia
and China, rather than focusing
on nations such as North Korea
and Iran, incorrectly said that
ballistic missiles are slower than
cruise or hypersonic missiles.
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The Where We Live feature in
the Jan. 13 Real Estate section,
about the Forest Hills area in
Northwest Washington,
misstated when Kevin Batteh,
then a Shaw resident, decided
to start looking for a new
neighborhood for his school-age
children. It was in late 2015, not
the early 2000s.
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punishment for meddling in the
U.S. election.
Now Trump is bromancing Xi,
calling him a “very good man”
and giving China “great credit”
for taking advantage of the
United States in trade.
But here’s the good news:
Though Trump may admire the
world’s authoritarians, he has
proved to be a singularly
incompetent one himself.
Certainly, he has the requisite
bluster and demagogic instincts
for the job, but he’s been too
undisciplined to be a selfrespecting autocrat. He talks like
Mussolini but governs like Mr.
Bean.
Being a dictator is hard work,
after all, and Trump, who has
more than once remarked on
how difficult his job already is,
needs his executive time. Being a
dictator requires discipline, and
Trump thrives on chaos, his
White House lurching between
scandals and beset by constant
turnover.
I’m not complaining about
Trump’s lack of autocratic
aptitude or encouraging him to
do better. If he were more
effective in emulating those he
MARK SCHIEFELBEIN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Chinese President Xi Jinping on a Beijing billboard last week.
admires, he’d be imprisoning,
torturing and killing opponents
and journalists, banning
religions and imposing
censorship. He’d also be banning,
as China has, bitcoin, online
dating, Dr. Seuss (Ted Cruz would
never allow it), video games, the
word “Jasmine,” Snapchat,
Pinterest and Facebook.
But can anybody imagine
Trump doing the difficult
spadework needed to become a
dictator? Xi didn’t just
pronounce himself president for
life last week. He protected his
standing by barring all mentions
of Winnie the Pooh (apparently
people think they look alike),
Disney, “my emperor,” “great men
sent from heaven” and, briefly,
the letter “N” (don’t ask). Surely
Trump would benefit by banning
many of the same words and
phrases China blocked last week,
including “shameless,”
“personality cult,” “I oppose,”
“disagree,” “incapable ruler,”
“1984,” “Animal Farm” and “Brave
New World.”
There’s another reason Trump
couldn’t be a Xi-style autocrat,
and it has nothing to do with
constitutional restrictions.
The Chinese government has
banned “oversized” and “bizarre
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 6 , 2018
architecture.” Trump specialized
in that.
China bans gambling. Trump
made billions from it.
China outlaws action that
“publicizes the luxury life.”
Trump built his brand on that.
China shuts down sites that
cover celebrity gossip. Trump
made his name with it.
China forbids sensationalizing
criminal cases. Trump’s tweets
routinely do that.
China prohibits disparaging
members of the army, police or
judiciary. Trump has disparaged
all three.
China bans the defamation of
national heroes. Trump has
attacked John McCain.
China bars the display of
“unhealthy marital values” and
prohibits reference to sexual
assault. Trump has “Access
Hollywood” and Stormy Daniels.
China forbids speech that it
says confuses “truth and falsity.”
Such speech has been the basis of
Trump’s presidency.
China bans Twitter. Trump
makes it his main method of
communication.
And this is why we’re safe. For
Trump to emulate Xi, he would
need to ban all things excessive,
brash, licentious and crude. He
would have to outlaw himself.
Twitter: @Milbank
Nunberg subpoena seeks wide range of documents
NUNBERG FROM A1
investigation as a “witch hunt”
and to detail what he said he had
learned about the probe from his
private interview last month with
Mueller’s team. He at times sounded nervous and self-doubting,
openly questioning his legal fate.
And by Monday evening, he signaled a possible shift, telling the
Associated Press he might cooperate with Mueller after all.
Nunberg, a top political staffer
for Trump in the run-up to the
campaign, was fired in 2015 and
has since existed on the fringes of
Trump’s orbit as a consultant.
White House officials on Monday
attacked his credibility and characterized his media appearances
as unhinged.
Following his interview with
The Post, Nunberg called in live to
MSNBC, CNN and other networks
for lengthy phone interviews — a
spectacle reminiscent of Trump
routinely calling into cable television control rooms during the
2016 campaign.
Nunberg said repeatedly that
he believes Mueller is trying to
build a case that Trump was “the
Manchurian candidate.” He said
that he suspects Mueller has concluded that Trump “may have
done something,” based on the
questions he was asked by the
special counsel’s team.
The line of questioning, Nunberg told MSNBC anchor Katy Tur,
“insinuated to me that [Trump]
may have done something, and he
may very well have.” He added:
“Trump may have very well done
something during the election. I
don’t know what it is. I could be
wrong, by the way.”
Nunberg said that the special
counsel had sought to persuade him
to testify against another former
Trump adviser, Roger Stone, on collusion with Russians, but he said he
would not because Stone has been a
friend and mentor to him.
Nunberg nursed an old grudge
against campaign manager Corey
Lewandowski and was unsparing
in his criticism of the White House
staff and the president himself.
He complained to The Post that
Trump had treated him, as well as
Stone and others, terribly and
would eventually regret it. He later said during an in-person evening appearance on MSNBC: “I
wanted Trump to lose. I thought it
would be funny.”
In one of his CNN interviews, he
said Trump sometimes acted like
“an idiot,” noting that he met last
year with Russian leaders inside
the Oval Office, where he shared
classified intelligence.
“Granted, Donald Trump
caused this because he’s an idiot,”
Nunberg told CNN anchor Jake
Tapper. “Who the hell advised him
to allow those Russians in the Oval
Office?”
Refusing to comply with a subpoena from the special counsel
could have serious consequences.
Susan McDougal, a former business partner of Bill Clinton, spent
18 months behind bars for civil
contempt after she refused to testify before a grand jury investigating the Whitewater real estate
controversy during Clinton’s presidency.
McDougal said in an interview
Monday that she would not do
anything differently — though
Nunberg should know that being
incarcerated is no joke. She said
she was moved from facility to
facility and spent a good deal of
time in isolation.
“It is not an easy thing to do,”
McDougal said. “You don’t just go
sit and work out in the afternoons.”
McDougal questioned why
Nunberg was appearing on television suggesting he knew things
that might be of interest to Mueller. “Why would he do that and
then not cooperate?” she said.
“The difference is, I didn’t know
anything.”
At the White House, officials
quickly sought to distance the administration from Nunberg, who
has not been in Trump’s good graces since his firing in August 2015
over racially insensitive Facebook
posts. Aides in the West Wing
voiced frustration that Nunberg
had thrust Russia back into the
headlines while also laughing at
what they considered his lack of
discipline.
Asked at her afternoon press
briefing to respond to Nunberg’s
suggestion that Mueller may have
incriminating information about
Trump, White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders
said, “There was no collusion with
the Trump campaign.”
Sanders also played down Nun-
berg’s importance. “He hasn’t
worked at the White House, so I
certainly can’t speak to him or the
lack of knowledge that he clearly
has,” she said.
Nunberg fired back with a tirade about Sanders to NY1, the
New York cable news channel: “If
Sarah Huckabee wants to start
debasing me, she’s a joke. Okay,
fine, yeah, she’s unattractive. She’s
a fat slob. Fine. But that’s not
relevant. The person she works for
has a 30 percent approval rating,
okay?”
Several of Nunberg’s friends
grew concerned about him as the
day went on and tried to call him
and beg him to stop, but he was
not responsive, two of these people said.
“Trump may have very
well done something
during the election. I
don’t know what it is.
I could be wrong,
by the way.”
Sam Nunberg, former Trump
campaign aide, in an interview
with MSNBC anchor Katy Tur
This is not the first time Nunberg’s credibility has been questioned. Nunberg admitted in Politico in November that he made up a
story about then-New Jersey Gov.
Chris Christie fetching McDonald’s food for Trump to embarrass
Christie — a claim that went viral
after it was reported by the New
Yorker.
Nunberg, who lives in New
York, forwarded to The Post an
email listed as coming from Mueller’s office asking him to appear in
front of a grand jury in Washington on Friday. He also shared with
The Post a copy of what appears to
be a two-page attachment to his
grand-jury subpoena seeking documents related to Trump and nine
other people, including emails,
correspondence, invoices, telephone logs, calendars and “records of any kind.”
Among those that the subpoena
requests information about are
departing White House communications director Hope Hicks; former White House strategist Stephen K. Bannon; Trump’s longtime personal lawyer, Michael Cohen; Lewandowski; and Stone.
Also on the list are Paul Manafort,
the former campaign chairman
who faces numerous charges of
money laundering and tax evasion, and Rick Gates, a former
campaign aide and Manafort partner who has pleaded guilty to lying
and agreed to cooperate with prosecutors.
“I’m not spending 80 hours going over my emails with Roger
Stone and Steve Bannon and producing them,” Nunberg told The
Post. “Donald Trump won this
election on his own. He campaigned his a-- off. And there is
nobody who hates him more than
me.”
Nunberg added: “The Russians
and Trump did not collude. [Russian President Vladimir] Putin is
too smart to collude with Donald
Trump.”
Later Monday afternoon, Nunberg called into MSNBC for a
lengthy, live interview with Tur.
Minutes later, he called into CNN,
where Gloria Borger interviewed
him. And the next hour, Nunberg
was on CNN again, this time with
Tapper.
Relative to the restrained comments or flat-out silence of other
witnesses in Mueller’s investigation, Nunberg’s interviews were
provocative. Nunberg told Tur
that his lawyer is “probably going
to dump me,” prompting Tur to
ask, “Are you ready to go to jail?”
And as he wrapped up the
MSNBC interview, he asked Tur,
“What do you think Mueller is
going to do to me?”
Nunberg sounded similarly
skittish on the phone with Tapper
and appeared to have second
thoughts about his decision to
defy Mueller.
“Should I spend 80 hours going
over my emails, Jake?” he asked.
“If it were me,” Tapper replied,
“I would. . . . It sounds like a pain,
but he is the special counsel.”
josh.dawsey@washpost.com
philip.rucker@washpost.com
Ashley Parker and Matt Zapotosky
contributed to this report.
Many Type 2 diabetics should ease blood sugar control, doctors group says
BY
L ENNY B ERNSTEIN
Many of the nation’s 29 million
people with Type 2 diabetes
should relax their blood sugar
control, an influential physicians
group recommended Monday, arguing that the current standard is
causing substantial harm without commensurate benefits.
But the American Diabetes Association, the leading organization in the fight against the condition, said it disagrees with the
new recommendation from the
American College of Physicians
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and would not change its advice
that Type 2 diabetics pursue
tighter blood glucose control.
The conflict may prove confusing for health-care providers and
people with Type 2 diabetes, who
make up 9.3 percent of the U.S.
population.
“Yes, it will be,” said Jack Ende,
president of the American College of Physicians, which represents 152,000 doctors, most of
them internal medicine physicians. “But we really believe this is
important enough that we have to
get the message out, since we’ve
seen more harms than benefits.”
In Type 2 diabetes, the body
fails to use and store glucose
properly because it is unable to
produce enough of the hormone
insulin or does not use insulin
well. Typically, this form of diabetes develops in adulthood, especially among people who are
overweight, not physically active
or have a family history of the
disease, though it is increasingly
appearing in younger people. (In
Type 1 diabetes, which is much
less common and often occurs in
childhood, the pancreas completely stops producing insulin.)
The condition can lead to complications that include strokes,
heart problems, kidney disease,
blindness and amputations. In
2016, diabetes was the seventhlargest killer of Americans, with
80,000 deaths attributed to the
disease, according to the National
Center for Health Statistics.
For decades, a main tenet of
diabetes management has been
the importance of controlling the
amount of glucose in the blood.
That, experts say, reduces the
chances of complications. Patients have been told to aim for a
hemoglobin A1C of 6.5 to 7 percent, which is a measure of glucose over the previous two to
three months.
But prompted by what it considered conflicting advice, the
college of physicians decided to
review the research on the subject and the reasoning of other
groups. It determined that the
burdens of striving for the lowest
score outweigh the benefits. The
guidance issued Monday suggests
that most Type 2 diabetics and
their doctors aim for scores of
between 7 and 8, though all care
should be “personalized.” For older people and those with other
medical issues, the recommendation would not apply.
The physicians group said the
harms include “hypoglycemic
events,” commonly known as low
blood sugar, which, in the short
term, can cause people with diabetes to feel woozy, lose track of
their surroundings or lose consciousness. In the long run, they
can lead to cardiovascular problems, Ende said.
The group also concluded that
the burden of taking one or more
medications to achieve tight glucose control can be greater than
the benefit, in both side effects
and financial cost. Side effects
include weight gain, gastrointestinal problems, congestive heart
failure, joint pain, fractures and
genital fungal infections, according to the paper the organization
released Monday, which was published in its journal, Annals of
Internal Medicine.
Many people first try to control
Type 2 diabetes with diet and
exercise. The first medicine often
prescribed is metformin, but others are sometimes necessary, and
some people must inject themselves with insulin.
William Cefalu, chief scientific,
medical and mission officer for
the American Diabetes Association, said the organization is
“concerned” about the guidelines
offered by the physicians group.
He said the same research reviewed by the college of physicians has convinced the ADA that
tighter glucose control is preferable.
One study even showed a “legacy effect” of tight control four
years after the research was concluded, he said.
“We take exception when they
say 7 to 8 percent in most patients,” Cefalu said. The ADA has
recommended for years that Type
2 diabetics strive for a score of 7.
The organization updates its
guidelines for physicians and patients annually, he said.
leonard.bernstein@washpost.com
TUESDAY, MARCH 6 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
M2
politics & the nation
D I GE S T
JOE RAEDLE/GETTY IMAGES
MATTHEW BROWN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Canoes float through the Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument near Fort Benton, Mont.
Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke said more study was needed before allowing drilling in the area.
Zinke removes land in central
Montana from oil lease sale
Environmental groups
say drilling threatens
protected areas of state
BY D INO G RANDONI
AND J ULIET E ILPERIN
The Bureau of Land Management on Monday removed about
17,300 acres of land in central
Montana from an upcoming oil
and natural gas lease auction, just
a week before the scheduled sale.
The Interior Department,
which oversees 1 in 5 acres of
land in the United States, was set
to auction leases for 109 parcels
stretching across the Big Sky
State from the Canadian border
to Wyoming.
But Interior Secretary Ryan
Zinke, who before joining the
Trump administration represented Montana in Congress, decided
to withdraw 26 parcels from consideration, along with portions of
two others. A cadre of local and
national environmental groups
had filed formal protests of the
sale, contending that drilling
would adversely affect the Yellowstone River and other areas.
Interior will proceed starting
next Monday with the auction of
the remaining 83 parcels, which
encompass nearly 46,200 acres.
Zinke initially tweeted his decision before issuing a more detailed statement that said further
study was needed before part of
the sale could take place.
“Multiple use is about balance,”
his statement noted. “I’ve always
said there are places where it is
appropriate to develop and where
it’s not.”
The withdrawal of Montana
land from fossil-fuel development, even if temporarily, is the
latest whipsaw in Interior’s oil
and gas policy as officials push to
auction a slew of leases near
protected areas in the West.
Last week, Zinke postponed
the sale of leases covering 4,434
acres near Chaco Culture National Historical Park, a sacred tribal
site in northwestern New Mexico.
In January, he unexpectedly announced via a tweet that Florida
would be exempt from an upcoming five-year offshore oil-and-gas
development plan at the behest of
Republican Gov. Rick Scott, who
is likely to run for the Senate.
BLM is still set on March 20 to
auction 43 parcels that encompass nearly 52,000 acres in southern Utah, near Hovenweep and
Canyons of the Ancients national
monuments and Canyonlands
National Park.
“Secretary Zinke is once again
treating America’s public lands
like contestants on a reality show,
handing out roses to the places he
chooses to save while casting the
rest aside,” said Jesse PrenticeDunn, advocacy director for the
Center for Western Priorities.
A formal protest filed in January by three environmental
groups — the Wilderness Society,
Montana Wilderness Association
and Park County Environmental
Council — charged that BLM
officials had not done an adequate review of the environmental impact that drilling in Montana would have on the city of
Livingston, the Yellowstone River
and the Upper Missouri River
Breaks National Monument, as
well as on sage grouse habitat.
The groups also charged that
bureau officials improperly relied
on executive and secretarial orders adopted in the past year to
override land management plans
put in place under the Obama
administration, which required
the BLM to look for alternative
places to lease if drilling in an
area is likely to damage habitat
for sage grouse, an imperiled bird
species.
“Thus, there are reasonably
foreseeable impacts from the irreversible and irretrievable commitment represented by leasing,
and these impacts cannot be ignored,” the groups wrote. “If leases are issued now, it becomes
difficult or impossible for BLM to
change course later.”
Nada Culver, who directs the
Wilderness Society’s BLM Action
Center, said in an email that the
remaining parcels set to be auctioned next week will still “affect
greater sage-grouse habitat and
the Upper Missouri River Breaks
National Monument.”
Oil and gas industry representatives expressed concern about
Zinke’s sudden shift in priorities
in Montana and New Mexico. In
New Mexico, Zinke changed
course after tribal leaders and the
state’s two Democratic senators argued he had short-circuited an interagency review aimed
at assessing cultural, historic and
natural resources in the area.
“It seems as though Secretary
Zinke is feeling pressure from
those who do not want oil and
natural gas development,” said
Kathleen Sgamma, president of
Western Energy Alliance. “Livingston is an area that hasn’t
historically had much oil and
natural gas activity. The concerns
expressed are typical of communities that aren’t used to development and how it’s done responsibly to protect the environment
while coexisting with recreation.”
While Zinke has pressed for
greater energy exploration on
public lands since taking office,
he had often backed restrictions
on such activities in his home
state. Last summer, for example,
he called for barring new gold
mining claims on federal lands
near Yellowstone National Park.
He has recommended downsizing several national monuments established by both Democratic and Republican presidents,
in part to allow for activities such
as drilling, grazing, fishing and
logging. In December, President
Trump scaled back two national
monuments in Utah, Bears Ears
and Grand Staircase-Escalante,
sparking a furor among environmental and Native American
groups
But Zinke has also called for
the designation of a new national
monument in northwest Montana’s Badger-Two Medicine
Area, a site important to the
Blackfeet Nation that has been
targeted for energy development.
Mei-Ling Ho-Shing, 17, a survivor of the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in
Parkland, Fla., arrives Monday to speak to the media after a gun-control roundtable discussion in Sunrise,
Fla. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-Fla.) held the roundtable discussion in response to the shooting at
the high school in which 17 people were killed on Feb. 14.
MISSISSIPPI
Ole Miss admits
use of slave labor
The University of Mississippi is
acknowledging its historical
connections to slave labor, slave
owners and officials whose
policies stripped African
Americans of voting rights after
the Civil War.
The university on Friday
unveiled six plaques on its main
campus in Oxford to provide
information about the history of
the school, founded in 1848.
“These plaques are daily
reminders of our obligation to
learn from the past and commit
to an inclusive future,” Ole Miss
Chancellor Jeffrey Vitter said in a
statement.
One plaque says 10 of the
university’s original buildings
were constructed with the labor of
enslaved African Americans. Three
of the buildings, including the
university’s main administrative
center, the Lyceum, are still in use.
Mississippi’s population is
about 38 percent black, and black
students made up about 13
percent of the Ole Miss enrollment
in 2015, the most recent year for
which detailed figures were
immediately available.
— Associated Press
OHIO
Arbitrator reinstates
fired police officer
Firing was too severe a
punishment for an Ohio police
officer who subdued a restrained
suspect in a way that appeared to
show him kicking the man in the
head, an arbitrator said Monday
in a ruling that reinstated the
officer.
The decision nonetheless
criticized Columbus officer
Zachary Rosen for using an
“untrained technique” that was
too severe for the situation. The
ruling reduced the discipline
against Rosen to the equivalent of
a three-day suspension without
pay, the original punishment
recommended by the department
police chief before the city safety
director overruled her.
A video taken last year showed
a Columbus officer restraining a
prone man and preparing to
handcuff him when Rosen arrives
and appears to kick the man in
the head.
Rosen used more force than
necessary but there was no
evidence he was trying to injure
the suspect, arbitrator Mitchell
Goldberg said in a 28-page ruling.
Rosen was also involved in the
fatal shooting of a man in 2016
that led to criticism of the police
department and a lawsuit.
— Associated Press
Mayor picks Houston man to
run New York schools: New York
Mayor Bill de Blasio (D) said
Monday he has chosen Houston
schools superintendent Richard
A. Carranza to lead the nation’s
largest school system to replace
Chancellor Carmen Farina, who is
retiring. Miami’s schools
superintendent, Alberto
Carvalho, had accepted the post
but then backed out last week,
citing emotional pleas from the
Miami schools community to stay.
— From news services
dino.grandoni@washpost.com
juliet.eilperin@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 6 , 2018
Arkansas becomes third state to impose work rules on Medicaid recipients
“I don’t think it has the
support in the Senate.”
Trump administration
grants permission, but
funding is in doubt
BY
Arkansas state Sen. Gary Stubblefield
(R), on funding for the state’s
Medicaid expansion
A MY G OLDSTEIN
Arkansas on Monday became
the third state to win the Trump
administration’s permission to
compel tens of thousands of residents on Medicaid to work or
prepare for a job. But the announcement in Little Rock demonstrated the polarizing politics
that still swirl around the public
insurance program for the poor in
some conservative states.
In a paneled conference room
in the state Capitol, Gov. Asa
Hutchinson (R) smiled broadly as
he stood alongside Seema Verma,
administrator of the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid
Services, and watched her sign
the official document allowing
the work requirements.
The document, however, granted only part of what Arkansas had
sought.
While seeking new conditions
for some Arkansans to qualify for
Medicaid, the state made a novel
request last year: One of the few
Southern states to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act,
it told federal officials that it
wanted to partly retreat. Instead
of including people with incomes
up to 138 percent of the federal
poverty line, as designed in the
ACA, Arkansas wanted to set its
expansion limit at 100 percent of
poverty — a change that would
jettison an estimated 60,000 peo-
KELLY P. KISSEL/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson (R) and Seema Verma, head of the U.S. Centers for Medicare and
Medicaid Services, appear at a news conference at the state Capitol in Little Rock. Verma said the
federal government had denied the state’s request to shrink its Medicaid expansion.
ple from the program.
In their joint announcement in
Little Rock, the governor and Verma said that part of the request
was being denied. “We are continuing to work through the issues on that,” Verma said, without
elaborating on what the issues
were or whether the idea might
ever be approved.
Hutchinson focused in his remarks on a plan by Arkansas officials to begin phasing in the work
requirements more quickly than
the two other states — Kentucky
and Indiana — that have received
similar permission since the CMS
issued a new policy in January. It
invited states to add requirements for many able-bodied people to qualify for Medicaid.
And the governor did not mention that, with state lawmakers
scheduled to finish their session
this week, disputes over the Medicaid expansion are deep enough
that the state Senate may not have
enough votes to approve a budget
for the agency that runs the program.
It was the Legislature that
passed a bill requiring the idea of
shrinking the expansion to be included in the state’s federal application for the work requirements.
Roughly a half-dozen Republican
senators, who have opposed the
expansion all along, now need to
decide whether to vote to fund the
whole thing or to reject the appropriation for the state’s Department of Human Services.
Under the ACA, the federal government paid the entire cost in
the initial years for any state that
chose to expand Medicaid. The
state’s share has been creeping up
and eventually will reach 10 percent of the cost. In Arkansas, a
Democratic governor and GOP
majority in the Legislature agreed
on expansion in 2013 and created
a unique system in which the state
buys private health plans through
the ACA’s insurance marketplaces
for people in the expansion group.
Ever since, funding for the Arkansas Medicaid agency has been
a perennial legislative fight.
With the days ticking down in
this session, “I don’t think it has
the support in the Senate,” said
Republican Sen. Gary Stubblefield, a dairy farmer who wants to
freeze the expansion so no new
people could join that part of the
program.
Stubblefield said the proposed
budget for the coming year does
not include any extra money for a
pivotal element of the work requirements: workforce development to help people train for and
look for a job.
In many ways, Arkansas’ version of work requirements resem-
bles those in Kentucky and Indiana. They compel people to have a
job, be in school or volunteer for
at least 80 hours per month. The
requirements will apply to ablebodied adults unless they qualify
for an exemption because they
care for a young child, are pregnant, are medically or mentally
unfit to work, or are being treated
for addiction, among other reasons.
Arkansas is targeting people
ages 19 to 49 — a younger end
point than in the other two states.
And individuals will need to document every month that they are
fulfilling the rules — more frequently than in the other states. A
person who fails to do so for three
months will be removed from the
program and locked out until the
next year.
According to a Department of
Human Services spokeswoman,
the requirements will begin in
June for people ages 30 to 49, and
the state estimates that nearly
40,000 of the 98,000 Medicaid
expansion recipients will need to
start complying. The requirements for younger recipients will
start in 2019.
Verma met Monday with the
governor and more than a dozen
state senators and representatives who have been holdouts in
funding the Medicaid program
for the coming year.
Stubblefield said he was impressed that, by Verma’s description, the Trump administration is
open to work requirements resisted by the Obama administration.
Nonetheless, he added, “I still
have some more questions before
we vote.”
amy.goldstein@washpost.com
Fights break out at Michigan State as white nationalist gives speech
Demonstrators yelling
‘Nazis go home’ clash
with Spencer supporters
BY S IMON D . S CHUSTER
AND S USAN S VRLUGA
EAST LANSING, Mich. —
Fights broke out between white
nationalists and protesters Monday as anti-fascist activists, students and community members
converged in and around Michigan State University to counter a
speech by white nationalist Richard Spencer.
Hours before the speech began,
police blocked access to the venue
as protesters, including some anti-fascists wearing masks, gathered outside and hundreds
marched toward the venue shouting, “Nazis go home!”
As some of Spencer’s supporters and people planning to attend
the speech arrived on campus,
masked protesters shouted obscenities. A group of white nationalists marching down the road
toward the speech’s venue — the
Pavilion for Agriculture and Livestock Education — was blocked by
protesters. Shouts turned to
punches thrown at protesters, but
the group was forced by protesters away from the pavilion where
Spencer later spoke.
More law enforcement officers
arrived, lining both sides of the
road leading into the venue, snapping cuffs on people and restoring
calm.
But as others arrived to attend
the speech, which was delayed
past its planned 4:30 p.m. start, a
mob of protesters swarmed
around them. A circle of law enforcement officers protected
those wishing to go in, but two
people were pushed to the
ground. Another man wanting to
attend the event was pelted with
sticks, dirt and cans by protesters.
Two people were blocked from
entering, despite the police escort. They bowed as they retreated, to jeers from the crowd.
The Detroit Free Press showed
video of protesters screaming at
police to a steady drumbeat, one
kicking the bicycle of an officer,
screaming, “[Expletive] Nazi
cops!”
Capt. Doug Monette, a spokesman for the Michigan State police
department, said two dozen arrests were made, with charges
ranging from misdemeanors to
felonies. He said there were some
weapons charges, as well as charges of hindering and obstructing,
but that it was too soon to confirm
individual people involved.
“What happened outside was
really worrisome and heinous,”
Spencer said Monday evening.
“That was an attempt to use violence to prevent people from attending a speech that was peaceful.”
He said more than 150 tickets
had been distributed, but many
were not able to get through the
chaos outside. “In terms of suppressing attendance, they really
achieved that.”
But he was able to deliver a
speech, albeit curtailed, and there
was a good question-and-answer
session, he said.
Samantha Turner, a Michigan
State sophomore from Detroit
who attended the protest with her
parents, said, “I hope to send the
message that we’re just not going
to do whatever they want and step
all over us. I feel like showing a
presence out here today lets them
know that we do indeed care.”
Omar Karim, an MSU student
and member of the local antifascist group Solidarity & Defense,
said he was proud of the protesters. “These are my friends and
family and co-workers, my brothers and sisters, people I get coffee
with. These are people who I walk
my dog with. This is my community. And my community in here in
our home, representing our
home, fighting against fascist
ideology.”
Spencer’s National Policy Institute has sought to hold events on
college campuses throughout the
country. But several university
presidents rejected such requests
after he led a torchlight march of
people shouting slurs at the University of Virginia in August. The
next day, at a rally in Charlottesville, violent clashes with counter-
MATTHEW DAE SMITH/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A man salutes and yells “white power” after trying to attend
Richard Spencer’s speech Monday at Michigan State University.
protesters broke out, leaving one
dead and dozens injured.
Days later, MSU officials denied Spencer’s request to speak at
the public university, citing concerns about safety. But in January,
after settling a lawsuit brought by
a supporter, the school agreed to
allow an event on campus. “Michigan State is wholly dedicated to
freedom of speech, not just as a
public institution, but as an institution of higher education, ” university officials explained in a
public statement in January.
“Here, ideas — not people — are
meant to clash and to be evaluated based on their merits.”
Spencer’s speech came at a time
when tensions are raw over issues
of race and politics and national
identity, over freedom of speech
and the cultural leanings of academia. In the days before Spencer
spoke at the University of Florida,
the governor declared a state of
emergency.
At MSU, Spencer arrived on a
campus in turmoil over a sexual
abuse scandal that forced the
ouster of the university’s longtime
president and sparked numerous
investigations and lawsuits.
The MSU campus is on spring
break this week, which is not a
coincidence. The timing and the
venue of the speech were chosen
to minimize the risk of violence
and disruption to the campus,
according to university officials.
The Pavilion for Agriculture is a
small arena well south of the
campus’s developed core. Beyond
it is farmland used primarily for
research. Still, protesters gathered in the bright but chilly air, a
coalition of students, faculty and
residents called Stop Spencer at
MSU, to march on the pavilion.
Well north of the pavilion, a
broad coalition of organizations,
including the city of East Lansing,
the undergraduate and graduate
student governments, MSU’s College Democrats, College Republicans, the local chapter of Black
Lives Matter, and an interfaith
clergy group was collaborating on
a full day of activities in an effort
to ignore Spencer.
At the All Saints Episcopal
Church north of campus, the Rev.
Kit Carson, the church’s rector,
admitted she was “a little bit overwhelmed” by the magnitude of
the response to the celebration of
diversity they hosted Monday afternoon: More than 1,000 people
RSVP’d online for the fair.
“This is an opportunity to bring
the community together, reaffirm
our shared values of tolerance,
love and diversity and really try to
ignore what’s going on at the
pavilion,” Carson said.
susan.svrluga@washpost.com
Svrluga reported from Washington.
Down syndrome groups refrain from publicly taking sides in abortion debate
ABORTION FROM A1
syndrome participate in mainstream classrooms and on sports
teams. Companies including Safeway, Walgreens and Home Depot
have created programs to train
and employ adults with the condition (along with adults with other
disabilities). This year, Gerber, the
maker of baby food, lit up social
media with expressions of delight
when it announced that it had
chosen Lucas Warren — who has
Down syndrome — as its newest
“spokesbaby.”
Critics of the bills say they are
unconstitutional and designed to
restrict abortion, not protect people with Down syndrome. They
point out that there has been little
discussion by the bills’ sponsors
about increasing funding for social services, medical coverage
and other support for people with
Down syndrome. They also argue
that the bills undermine the trust
relationship between patients and
doctors, as well as the right to
privacy under the 14th Amendment. The American Civil Liberties Union, Planned Parenthood
and other organizations have
mounted challenges in court — so
far, successfully — to block the
implementation of the bills that
have been passed.
“Many parents find that having
a child with Down syndrome is the
right decision for them, but this
does not mean that their experi-
ence should lead to a law that
forces other families into the same
situation,” Karrie Galloway, president and chief executive of the
Planned Parenthood Association
of Utah, said.
Only the law in North Dakota
has taken effect; it has proved
largely unenforceable because of
the private nature of the decision.
In Ohio, a bill passed late last
year is scheduled to take effect
March 23, but abortion providers
in the state have asked a federal
court to block the law. In September, a federal judge permanently
struck down provisions of Indiana’s law, writing that they violate
due process under the Constitution and conflict with court rulings regarding a woman’s right to
seek an abortion before a fetus is
viable outside the womb.
The bills represent the latest
twist in the political debate over
abortion, which has raged since a
1973 U.S. Supreme Court ruling
recognized a woman’s right to the
procedure. Since then, antiabortion activists have constructed
what the Guttmacher Institute
calls “a lattice work of abortion
law, codifying, regulating and limiting whether, when and under
what circumstances a woman may
obtain an abortion.” Antiabortion
activists have also moved the
battleground from Washington to
the states.
In recent years, activists have
pushed an array of bills in state
legislatures to limit the procedure,
including proposals to ban abortion after 20 weeks, when, they
claim, the fetus is “pain-capable”;
to bar a woman from obtaining an
abortion based on the gender or
race of the child; and to institute
mandatory waiting periods, statemandated counseling and requirements for parental approval.
The Down syndrome bills mark
a relatively new frontier for antiabortion activists. Down syndrome advocacy groups for the
most part have stayed out of the
debate, neither endorsing the bills
nor coming out against them. The
National Down Syndrome Society
declined to comment directly on
the bills but expressed concern
that women around the world,
including in the United States, are
not receiving “accurate, up-todate information about Down
syndrome from their health-care
providers.” NDSS President Sara
Hart Weir said children and adults
with the condition “continue to
exceed expectations.”
Michelle Sie Whitten, president
of the Denver-based Global Down
Syndrome Foundation, said that
while “it is a profound issue that
needs discussion,” the group has
no position on the bills, as there
are just as many families that
identify as antiabortion as there
are abortion rights proponents
who have and support children
and adults with Down syndrome.
“The fact that there is legisla-
tion about it underscores the
passion behind it,” said Whitten, who has a daughter with the
condition.
The debate about abortion has
become intertwined with Down
syndrome in recent years because
of the availability of a noninvasive
test that can screen for Trisomy 21
— the chromosomal defect that
leads to the condition. The test
requires only a blood sample from
the mother that is analyzed for
tiny bits of DNA from the baby.
In the past, women had to undergo chorionic villus sampling,
in which cells are taken from
the placenta, or amniocentesis,
which involves removing fluid
from the womb, to test for
the chromosomal abnormality.
Those two procedures are relatively safe but not completely riskfree and are therefore recommended only for older mothers or
those at risk of having fetuses with
genetic abnormalities linked to
other causes.
The blood test is not routine in
the United States, but it is becoming so in a growing number of
other countries.
In Britain, where the National
Health Service offers a screening
for the condition in all pregnant
women and the abortion rate for
pregnancies that test positive is
estimated to be as high as 90 percent, the BBC has explored the
idea of “A World Without Down’s
Syndrome.” In Denmark, where
testing is widespread, the Copenhagen Post has reported that Denmark “could be a country without
a single citizen with Down’s syndrome in the not too distant future.” And in China, the state-run
CCTV has not so subtly reminded
would-be parents through its social media channels that “current
medical science has no effective
prevention or treatment measures” for Down syndrome — but
that the issue can be “discovered
through prenatal screening.”
The bills making their way
through U.S. state legislatures
come on the heels of a report that
aired on CBS in the summer that
Iceland is “eradicating Down syndrome.” The report created an uproar. Author Bonnie Rochman,
writing in Quartz, called the situation in Iceland a “disturbing, eugenics-like reality.” Actress Patricia Heaton tweeted: “Iceland isn’t
actually eliminating Down syndrome. They’re just killing everybody that has it. Big difference.”
In Slate, Christina Cauterucci
accused antiabortion leaders of
“hijacking this rhetoric of the disability rights movement to argue
against women’s rights to choose
their own future for their families
and bodies.”
Amid this debate, the Global
Down Syndrome Foundation’s
Whitten said it is important to
separate facts from myths about
the condition. Down syndrome,
which is characterized by the pres-
ence of three copies of chromosome 21 instead of the normal two,
was first described as a distinct
condition in 1862 by English physician John Langdon Down. For
many decades, children with the
condition were abandoned, ostracized or even killed.
But today, thanks to medical
advances and better integration
into society, many individuals
with Down syndrome live long,
productive and happy lives. The
average life span among people
with Down syndrome has more
than doubled from 25 years in
1983 to about 60 years, Whitten
said. And while most have a mild
to moderate range of intellectual
impairment, there is wide variation in their abilities, and more
and more are living independently, going to college, holding challenging jobs and getting married.
Although there is no official
estimate of the number of people
living with the condition in
the United States, the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention
has estimated that it occurs in 1 in
691 births.
Whitten said that one of the
biggest challenges people with the
condition face is a precipitous
drop in research funding over the
years from the National Institutes
of Health, a decline that, she said,
makes Down syndrome the most
poorly funded major genetic condition in the United States.
ariana.cha@washpost.com
TUESDAY, MARCH 6 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A5
SU
Students, gun-control groups team up on election e≠orts
Well-funded
organizations rush to
harness teens’ energy
T AL A BBADY
M ICHAEL S CHERER
BY
AND
weston, fla. — Young activists
mobilized by the slaying of 17
students and faculty at a high
school in Florida have begun to
focus their fury on bringing
change in November’s midterm
elections.
As gun regulation efforts continue to face obstacles in Washington and state capitols, the students are appearing at candidate
events, mounting voter registration drives and threatening to
haunt politicians who stand in the
way of their demands. And wellfunded professional organizations that have long focused on
curbing gun violence are rushing
to find ways to harness their energy for the fall election.
Dozens of high school students
showed up Friday afternoon for a
voter registration rally at a park
23 miles from Marjory Stoneman
Douglas High School, the site of
last month’s deadly attack. They
pointed to the student activists at
Stoneman Douglas, who had promoted the event amid tweets with
the hashtag #VoteThemOut, as
their inspiration.
“I saw Emma González tweet
and I came,” said Veronica Carbonell, 17, a senior at nearby Cypress
Bay High School, referring to one
of the students who has emerged
as a leader after the shooting in
Parkland. The rally was organized
by Andrew Gillum, mayor of Tallahassee and a Democratic candidate for governor, who has refocused his own primary campaign
on encouraging the student activism.
“My generation gets a lot of flak
for being lazy and being addicted
to our phones,” Carbonell said.
“Well, social media is powerful.”
The groups that have long focused on curbing gun violence are
finding ways to back the students’
efforts. They have announced
funds to encourage young voters’
mobilization around guns, including a $1 million donation
from Democratic financier Tom
SCOTT MCINTYRE FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum (D), a candidate for governor, speaks with Cypress Bay High School
students in Weston, Fla., at a voter registration rally. Groups that focus on curbing gun violence
have long coordinated, but now they are shifting to better align with the demands of student activists.
Steyer, bankrolls for student protest groups and shifts in their own
policy priorities regarding gun
control to better align with the
demands of the teenagers.
“This is going to go from what
would have been an important
issue in the 2018 election cycle to
what I think will be a defining
issue in the 2018 election cycle,”
said Peter Ambler, the executive
director of Giffords, a group
founded by former congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.),
who was shot in the head during a
2011 mass shooting that killed six.
Historical patterns suggest
that the public outrage after
school shootings tends to fade
months later, and the political
map in 2018 remains difficult for
advocates of stricter gun control,
with incumbent Senate Democrats playing defense in largely
rural states and partisan redistricting protecting House Republicans.
The National Rifle Association,
which opposes most of the student demands, including bringing back a ban on assault weapons, restricting high-capacity
magazines and raising the age to
buy a long gun to 21, has reported
significant enthusiasm among its
members.
Jennifer Baker, a spokeswoman for the NRA, said members
were heartbroken by the events in
Parkland and were supportive of
student efforts to improve school
safety. The group supports efforts
to arm school employees and increase school security.
“It’s unfortunate that the guncontrol lobby is so obsessed with
banning guns that they blame and
shame hundreds of millions of
law-abiding Americans for the
acts of a deranged lunatic,” she
said. “Second Amendment voters
live in all 50 states, come from all
walks of life, are members of all
political parties and religions.
They want their families to be safe
and their constitutional rights respected. When they feel those
rights are threatened they are
energized to vote.”
But it is unmistakable that the
uprising is having an early effect.
Florida Republican leaders aim to
pass a bill this week that would
raise the minimum age to 21 for
purchasing long guns, including
the one used in the Stoneman
Douglas shooting; add a threeday waiting period for most gun
“My generation gets a
lot of flak for being lazy
and being addicted to
our phones. Well, social
media is powerful.”
Veronica Carbonell, 17, a senior at
Cypress Bay High School in Weston,
Fla., not far from Marjory Stoneman
Douglas High School, the site of last
month’s deadly attack
purchases; and ban the possession of bump stocks. The bill also
aims to authorize the arming of
some school personnel after significant training by the county
sheriff’s office.
Monday, the state Senate approved the bill by a narrow 20-to18 vote, after adding an amendment to exclude most classroom
teachers from the plan to arm
school staff.
And eight U.S. House Republicans, mostly from suburban
swing districts in Florida or the
Northeast, have signed on to a bill
to expand background checks to
private sales at gun shows. Several
hold seats that are seen as ripe for
Democratic pickup in November,
including the exurban Philadelphia district of Rep. Ryan Costello
and the central New Jersey district of Rep. Leonard Lance.
“This is an issue that women in
suburban areas especially care
about,” said Angela Kuefler, a pollster for Global Strategy Group
who advises Everytown for Gun
Safety, a group founded by former
New York mayor Michael Bloomberg.
Entrenched political interests
and student efforts are set to come
together on March 24, when communities will hold marches to
protest gun violence. Everytown
for Gun Safety said Friday that it
would provide $2.5 million in
grants for these events.
“There are going to be hundreds of marches around the
country, including the march in
D.C.,” said John Feinblatt, the
president of Everytown.
From those and other activist
events, students hope that politicians will feel pressure. High
school students from 18 schools in
the St. Louis area are planning a
walkout April 20, the 19th anniversary of the Columbine High
School massacre. They want to
protest at the office of Missouri
Attorney General Josh Hawley, a
candidate in the Republican primary who hopes to unseat Sen.
Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.).
“Our idea is that right now Josh
Hawley is the Republican frontrunner, and that by doing this we
may be able to help Claire McCaskill maintain her seat in the Senate,” said Brian Wingbermuehle,
18, a senior at Rockwood Summit
High in Fenton, Mo. “She’s a lot
better on guns.”
Like other groups around the
country, the students are organizing themselves, connecting across
school districts on massive iMessage chats or through the
GroupMe app many students already use for school clubs. For
those too young to vote, the focus
is on persuading students who
have hit 18 to register. “We want to
mobilize seniors,” said Sunny Lu,
15, a sophomore at Ladue Horton
Watkins High School in St. Louis.
Democratic lawmakers are also
trying to harness the energy. At a
private meeting last week orga-
nized by Sen. Chris Murphy (DConn.), the Senate’s most prominent advocate for gun regulation,
lawmakers asked gun-control
groups to do a better job of coordinating on fall election campaigns.
One idea raised was for the outside groups to create a type of
“good housekeeping” seal for candidates on gun issues to counter
the NRA rating system.
The outside groups, which have
long coordinated, are shifting
their focus to better align with the
demands of the Florida students.
After years of declining to make it
a priority, Giffords will start pushing for a new sales ban on military-style weapons, with the added request that any of the banned
guns now in circulation be registered with the federal government.
“The kids in Parkland challenged everyone to view this issue
with an urgency that had been
lost,” said David Chipman, a senior policy adviser for the group.
“We have to focus on a new approach.”
Everytown has also shifted to
support the effort after the student protests in Florida. “We are
in a sea change at the moment,”
Feinblatt said. “There are lots of
proposals coming to the fore.”
While calls for tighter gun regulation usually fade after a mass
shooting, it is also true that the
bump in support for stricter gun
laws has been sharper after Parkland than other recent mass
shootings. A CNN poll taken after
the Florida shooting found that
70 percent of Americans supported stricter laws, 18 points higher
than an October poll after the Las
Vegas concert shooting.
Wingbermuehle, the high
school activist in Missouri, pointed to the “bystander effect,” a
phenomenon he learned about in
psychology class. For decades, experiments have shown that individuals are less likely to help a
victim when other people stand
by, doing nothing.
But the activism of the students
in Florida broke the social norm
of inaction for young people,
Wingbermuehle said. “It says we
can be doing things as well,” he
explained. “We have good role
models.”
michael.scherer@washpost.com
Scherer reported from Washington.
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A6
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 6 , 2018
Wilson says mayor knew of daughter’s transfer for months
WILSON FROM A1
the mayor again denied she knew
about the school transfer. “I in no
way approved of a transfer or
knew about an illegal transfer,”
she said.
The former chancellor’s allegations threaten to revive a controversy that Bowser, who is running for reelection, sought to
contain by demanding the resignations of both Wilson and Deputy Mayor for Education Jennifer
Niles. The revelation that Wilson’s daughter had skipped the
line for a spot at a sought-after
school angered parents across
the city and led seven of the
13 D.C. Council members to call
for Wilson’s resignation.
Bowser has largely avoided
blame for recent scandals swirling around DCPS, including
widespread enrollment fraud at
the city’s top performing arts
school and inflated graduation
rates that are now the subject of a
federal investigation.
Now she risks facing some of
the anger over Wilson’s evasion
of school-enrollment policies as
she confronts the contradictions
between her own statements and
those of her former schools chief.
“It seems laughable that the
mayor and the folks running our
school system believed D.C. parents would be okay with this —
both the transfer and the lie,” said
Becky Reina, a Ward 1 resident
whose oldest child went through
the lottery and was waitlisted at
the family’s top three choices. He
is a first-grader at a school that
was their fourth choice.
D.C. Council member David
Grosso (I-At Large), who chairs
the education committee, said
Monday he will hold a hearing
into the circumstances around
the school transfer and ask the
mayor, Wilson and Niles to testify
under oath. Council committees
can subpoena witnesses who
refuse to appear voluntarily.
“We will be looking to get to
the bottom of this,” Grosso said.
“I feel like it’s time for us to have a
public conversation, under oath,
about what happened.”
The mayor has repeatedly said
she first learned of the transfer
on Feb. 12, when D.C. Inspector
General Daniel W. Lucas informed her that he was looking
into the circumstances surrounding the placement of the chancellor’s daughter at Wilson High.
At a news conference one week
later where she announced Wilson’s resignation, Bowser said
the decision by Wilson and Niles
to move the girl to a new school
in the way they had was “inexplicable” and “indefensible.”
Niles — who also resigned as a
result of the scandal — was the
only senior member of her administration who knew what had
transpired, Bowser said.
“What we have is two people
with incredible credentials and
intelligence that made bad deci-
sions that for us were unpredictable and unpreventable,” the
mayor said.
But in his first interview since
resigning, Wilson told The Washington Post that he informed the
mayor at a meeting in late September that he was working with
Niles to move his daughter out of
Duke Ellington School for the
Arts, where she was unhappy. He
said he told Bowser in early
October that his daughter had
moved to Wilson High.
Anu Rangappa, Bowser’s communications director, confirmed
the mayor met with Wilson on
Sept. 20 and Oct. 11, but said
nothing related to Wilson’s
daughter was on the written
agenda for either meeting.
Wilson was initially contrite
when news of the school transfer
became public. But while he said
he has no “animosity” toward
Bowser, he has since bridled at
descriptions of himself and Niles
as rogue actors who broke the
rules without the mayor’s
knowledge.
“I’ve seen that narrative, and
I’ve been disappointed in it,”
Wilson said. “Because it’s not
accurate.”
The Post could not independently verify Wilson’s account.
Niles, who Wilson said was present for at least the initial meeting where he told Bowser of his
plans to transfer his daughter to
a new high school, declined to
comment. Wilson said his conversations with Bowser were verbal and not in a written form.
John Falcicchio, the mayor’s
chief of staff, said in a written
statement that Bowser had no
recollection of Wilson telling her
that his daughter was changing
schools and would not have approved the transfer if she had
known about it.
Wilson did not allege that the
mayor was directly involved in
his daughter’s placement at her
new school or that she knowingly
tolerated a violation of schooldistrict policy. He said he believed at the time of his conversations with Bowser that the transfer was acceptable, and that the
mayor never questioned him
about it.
He also said when he would
see Bowser on occasion, the mayor would inquire about his family
and ask how his daughter was
doing at Wilson High.
Wilson — who came to the
District from Oakland just over a
year ago — said he had tried to be
a “team player” as the Bowser
administration sought to manage
the uproar over his actions last
month, and opted not to disclose
to council members that the
mayor was aware of his daughter’s school switch.
Last week, the former chancellor signed a separation agreement that awards him $140,000,
half of his salary. In the wake of
his departure, he said, he had
decided to offer a more complete
MATT MCCLAIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
defense of his actions. “I just
want people to know that I tried
to follow the rules,” Wilson said.
A parent can request a school
transfer from the chancellor in
limited cases when it is determined to be in the best interest of
the student or school system.
However, such transfers are specifically prohibited for the children of public officials to prevent
the appearance of favoritism.
Wilson said he came to Niles in
September with a dilemma: His
daughter was miserable at Ellington and he and his wife were
considering enrolling her in private school or sending her to live
with relatives outside the District.
Wilson said he and Niles decided Wilson’s wife would handle
a transfer for the girl to another
D.C. public school — an arrangement they hoped would put the
chancellor at arm’s length and
eliminate concerns about favoritism.
The former chancellor said his
wife was presented with three
options: Wilson High and two
selective schools, Banneker High
School and School Without
Walls.
He said his daughter, a sophomore, had already passed the
admissions test for School Without Walls.
Wilson’s family lives in Langdon in Northeast Washington,
and their assigned neighborhood
high school is Dunbar, a low-performing and high-poverty school.
The former chancellor said his
family was attracted by the diverse student body at Wilson
High, which is 35 percent black,
31 percent white, 23 percent
Latino and 7 percent Asian.
The move violated a policy
Wilson himself enacted last sum-
JAHI CHIKWENDIU/THE WASHINGTON POST
mer, after the D.C. inspector
general found two other members of Bowser’s cabinet, City
Administrator Rashad M. Young
and Deputy Mayor for Greater
Economic Opportunity Courtney
Snowden, had circumvented the
school lottery to enroll their
children at top elementary
schools.
The lottery — required of any
students who wish to enroll outside their neighborhood boundaries — is designed to ensure
equal access to top public schools
regardless of money, geography
or political influence.
Conducted each spring, the
lottery is an angst-ridden ritual
for D.C. parents, most of whom
find their children waitlisted at
their chosen campuses.
Wilson insisted that while his
family did not follow the normal
enrollment process, he had not
asked for special treatment.
“I went to my bosses and had a
conversation and made no demands,” Wilson said. “We didn’t
TOP: Students sit
outside Woodrow
Wilson High, the
school that former D.C.
Public Schools
Chancellor Antwan
Wilson got his
daughter into after
bypassing the waiting
list of more than 600
students.
ABOVE: Wilson, right,
says D.C. Mayor Muriel
E. Bowser (D), left, has
known about the
school transfer since
October, which is at
odds with statements
from Bowser and her
top aides.
ask for schools by name or anything like that, we just knew that
we wanted options in DCPS and
that was important to us.”
He added, “if we were told
[Dunbar] was our only option
then we would have considered
it, but that’s not what we
were told.”
In his first meeting with Bowser and her advisers following the
news that the inspector general
was investigating the matter,
Wilson said he was shocked
when the mayor said she was
unaware his daughter had transferred from Ellington.
“To me, these were really important serious conversations. I
moved 3,000 miles, brought my
family here, it’s important stuff,”
Wilson said.
Bowser at first said she remained confident in Wilson’s
leadership and ordered him to
issue a public apology. Wilson
spent the Presidents’ Day holiday
weekend meeting with reporters
and council members in what
was ultimately a fruitless attempt
to save his job. He resigned the
following Tuesday.
He is on administrative leave
until March 7, when he will be
removed from the city payroll.
He has twins who are still
attending J.O Wilson Elementary
School, where he said they were
placed through the standard lottery process.
He would not say where his
oldest daughter is enrolled or
whether she is attending school
after she withdrew from Wilson
High on Feb. 16.
Wilson said he is unsure of
what he will do next, but he plans
to continue his career in education. “The focus needs to be put
back on making sure these kids
get a great education,” he said.
“And I’m going to go off and make
a difference in a different way.”
D.C. schools have been dogged
by scandals in recent months
that could weaken confidence in
the school system.
The Washington Post reported
last week that an internal investigation has uncovered signs of
widespread enrollment fraud at
Duke Ellington School of
the Arts.
Bowser has said her administration is trying to address such
problems in a spirit of transparency as they come to light. At her
news conference on the day of
Wilson’s resignation, she cited
the transfer of the former chancellor’s daughter as an example.
“What’s important is that
when we found out about it, that
we made the information available, did our best to investigate
and to make decisions that were
in the best interests of our children and our system,” Bowser
said.
perry.stein@washpost.com
peter.jamison@washpost.com
Fenit Nirappil contributed to this
report.
Democrats’ enthusiasm is high at primary season, but divisions can run deep
Party officials’ meddling
has caused bitterness
amid buoyant races
BY D AVID W EIGEL
AND S EAN S ULLIVAN
houston — The congressional
primary season kicks off Tuesday
with the Democratic Party facing
an unexpected question: Do they
have too much of a good thing?
Emboldened by widespread
anger with President Trump and
wins in gubernatorial and Senate
races last year, record numbers of
Democrats are running for Congress. While this cascade of candidates reflects the high level of
enthusiasm in the party out of
power, it has deepened divisions,
stoked fresh rivalries and prompted meddling by Democratic officials that has fueled controversy.
These uncomfortable developments have raised questions
about the party’s preparedness
for the next stage of the campaign.
It has also put new hurdles between Democrats and a top goal
in November: winning back the
House majority.
“The good news is that energy
is not a problem,” said former
congressman Steve Israel of New
York, who chaired the House
Democratic campaign arm. “The
bad news is you’re trying to manage the energy of a nuclear weapon — there’s so much of it.”
This election cycle, giddy Democrats watched candidates pile
into races where they had once
struggled to recruit anyone. Now
comes the weeding-out process.
And so far, it has been messy.
Nowhere has that been clearer
than here in Texas’s 7th District,
where Democrats believe they can
MICHAEL STRAVATO FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Laura Moser, center, chats with an acquaintance in Houston in
May. Moser is one of several candidates competing in Tuesday’s
Democratic primary in Texas’s 7th Congressional District.
Democrats need to pick up 24 seats to win the House. The 7th
District is the kind of moderate suburban area that party strategists
argue their path to the majority will run through in November.
knock off nine-term Republican
Rep. John Abney Culberson. It’s
the kind of moderate suburban
area that party strategists argue
their path to the majority will run
through in November.
But the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee has
branded liberal activist Laura
Moser unelectable, prompting a
backlash here that has consumed
the final week of the contest.
Texas is just the first in a series
of decisions that party officials
will need to make about how,
when, or whether to play favorites.
In California, a surplus of candidates could make it easier for a
Republican to win competitive
seats under the state’s blanket
primary, in which the two top
finishers in the primary advance
to the general, regardless of party
affiliation.
At the doorstep of the nation’s
capital is a crowded and potentially divisive primary in the district represented by Rep. Barbara
Comstock (R-Va.), a top Democratic target.
Democrats need to pick up
24 seats to win the House. Buoyed
by a series of Republican retirements, Trump’s low approval rating and the historical struggles
the president’s party experiences
in his first midterm, 1,133 candidates had filed to run as Democrats for the House by the end of
2017.
Not all are seen by Democratic
leaders as good or even passable
contenders.
The drama here in the 7th
District has turned “DCCC” into
an epithet. The committee’s intervention against Moser was con-
demned by every candidate in the
race, curdling the mood in what
had been a feisty but positive
primary.
On Saturday night, Moser
stopped by a supporter’s living
room to update backers on the
race. She had more than 1,000
volunteers and had talked to voters who had never met a Democratic candidate in person.
Still, less than two weeks before
the primary, the DCCC posted
unflattering research about her
on its website, accusing her of
opportunism.
They pointed to an item she
wrote in Washingtonian magazine in 2014 in which she wrote,
“I’d sooner have my teeth pulled
out without anesthesia” than live
in Paris, Tex. They also highlighted other controversial comments
and noted that she only recently
moved to Texas.
“That was a pretty dumb idea,”
Jason Westin, a cancer researcher
who is running in the Democratic
primary, said of the committee’s
actions. “The way they did that
offended a lot of people here in
Houston. We’re Texans. We’re going to decide who represents us.
We don’t need partisan hacks up
in D.C. meddling in this race.”
Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez distanced himself from the strategy
last week, saying he would not
have used it in an interview with
The Washington Post and USA
Today on C-SPAN’s “Newsmakers.”
“With everything I say or do,
I’ve become a symbol of something, instead of a candidate running a local race on local issues —
which I believe I am,” Moser said
in an interview.
Moser has been running an
online advertisement asking voters to reject “the system where
Washington party bosses tell us
who to choose.”
The DCCC has not picked a
favorite candidate in the race. But
the committee is not ruling out a
more aggressive stance if the contest goes to a runoff should no
candidate win a majority on Tuesday. They are taking the same
wait-and-see position throughout
the country.
“As we’ve indicated all cycle,
the DCCC is keeping all options on
the table to work with our allies
and ensure that there’s a competitive Democrat on the ballot for
voters to elect in November,” said
Meredith Kelly, the communications director for the DCCC.
Rep. Ben Ray Luján (D-N.M.),
the DCCC chairman, has said the
party may get involved in key
Democratic primaries in California. There are four Democrats
running to replace retiring Rep.
Darrell Issa (R) in his San Diegoarea district and eight Democrats
running to replace retiring Rep.
Edward R. Royce (R) east of Los
Angeles.
A fifth candidate to replace
Issa, Air Force veteran Christina
Prejean, dropped out of the race
Friday, citing her concern that the
crowded field would benefit Republicans. “We are on the same
team, and our mission is to flip the
49th [District],” she wrote in a
tweet.
Unlike the DCCC intervention
in Texas, which caused a sharp
backlash against Washington
strategists, there is broad agreement in the California Democratic Party, and among many progressive activists, that there may
need to be a further filtering of
candidates before the June 5 primary. The filing deadline is Friday
for races with incumbents, March
14 for open seats.
In Virginia’s 10th District,
where Comstock has attracted a
packed Democratic primary field,
the distance between the party’s
base and Democratic power brokers could grow in the coming
months.
“Look, there are a lot of local
elected officials who have decided
they’d like to see us take the same
route we’ve taken before,” said
Dan Helmer, an Army veteran and
Rhodes Scholar who is running
on a liberal platform and as a
change-of-pace candidate.
Texas Democrats are enthusiastic, pushing past Republicans
for the first time in the history of
Texas early voting. Just 352,963
early votes were cast in Republican primaries, which include six
open House races, while 406,302
votes were cast in Democratic
primaries — nearly double their
early vote total in 2014.
But there’s little consensus on
how to direct that energy, whether toward centrists who won’t
scare Republican voters, or
toward candidates who sound
like Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.).
“I think they aided Moser by
attacking her,” said Indy
Chakrabarti, a 42-year old software manager who attended the
Westin meet-and-greet. “I’ve seen
a groundswell of support for her
in the last week.”
The 7th District, a crescent of
suburbs heavy with immigrants
and college-educated whites, became a Democratic target as soon
as Trump won the presidency. In
2012, Barack Obama lost the district by 21.3 points; Hillary Clinton won it by 1.4 points.
Culberson, the nine-term incumbent, has remained on his
party’s right flank as his district
has moved to the center.
david.weigel@washpost.com
sean.sullivan@washpost.com
Sullivan reported from Washington.
Michael Scherer contributed to this
report.
TUESDAY, MARCH 6 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A7
SU
Uncertain
future for
‘dreamers’
in Israel
ISRAEL FROM A1
brought to the United States as
children now known as “dreamers” — are not lost on Nechama.
“When you ask the kids here,
when they first come, what they
want to be, these kids don’t
dream,” he said. “Let them
dream.”
The deportation plan has
prompted an acrimonious and
emotional debate in Israel. The
government and supporters of
the plan brand the African migrants as “infiltrators” illegally in
the country seeking employment
rather than fleeing violence. They
say they are burdening southern
Tel Aviv.
“We do what we are required to
do by law, which is to take care of
those who are seen by our law as
being in danger,” said Interior
Minister Aryeh Deri, adding
those who are not should be
deported. “As wise men have
taught us: ‘Take care of the poor
in your city before taking care of
the poor in other cities.’ ”
Critics, however, say the plan
conflicts with the values of a
Jewish state built by refugees
fleeing persecution and that the
government has not properly
considered asylum requests.
Holocaust survivors and pilots
from the national airline are
among those who have spoken
out against the plan.
PHOTOS BY CORINNA KERN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
T
he Godins were among
more than 60,000 Africans
who crossed into the country from Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula
before Israel finished a 152-mile
border fence, equipped with motion detectors and cameras, in
2013.
More than 20,000 Africans
have already taken the option to
return. But Israel says that soon it
will no longer be a choice.
Godin is a soft-spoken 21-yearold, a keen basketball player and
fan of the Cleveland Cavaliers. He
says he’d like to study nursing
but, instead, at the moment, flips
burgers at a fast-food restaurant.
He has put his plans on hold
and fears he could be handed a
deportation order whenever he
renews his visa. He says he’d
rather be jailed than deported.
His father, who is South Sudanese, was already forced out after
Israel deemed it safe enough for
him to go home in 2012. He now
lives in Rwanda.
Godin and his mother break
down at the prospect of the family being torn apart even
more. “It’s not our country, Rwanda or Uganda,” said Godin, who
speaks near fluent English, along
with Hebrew and Arabic.
His younger brother Alan, 18, is
on the cusp of graduating and
facing uncertainty.
“They can’t do anything to you
while you are at school,” said
Alan, as he flicked through Katy
Perry and Shakira music videos
on the family television. “It’s a
safe place.”
L
ocated in southern Tel Aviv,
Bialik Rogozin looks like a
normal Israeli school. Student artwork decorates its corridors, which echo with childhood
chatter in Hebrew. But while it is
a government-run school, not one
of its 1,300 children is Jewish. None of the Jewish families in
the neighborhood chooses to
send its children there.
Only 42 percent of the students
have legal residency in Israel.
“The rest we don’t know,” explains Nechama, the school’s
principal. “They might be deported, their parents might be arrested, their parents might run away
to another city, they might go to a
different country.”
So in addition to Hebrew, the
school teaches eight other languages, including Arabic and Tigrinya — which is spoken in
Eritrea — so if the children are
deported, they at least will be able
to communicate.
Despite serving one of the
country’s poorest communities,
the school’s matriculation rate is
over 90 percent.
Mikal Hagos, 17, from Eritrea,
says she celebrates Jewish holidays, has gotten to know the
country through the Israeli
scouts movement known as
Tzofim and wants to be a psychologist some day. But she added,
“It’s hard to plan.”
After the deportation plans
were announced in January,
Nechama wrote to all 120 members of Israel’s parliament, urging
them to guarantee protection
for graduates. Last week the Jewish Agency, the largest Jewish
nonprofit organization in the
world, also called on the government to grant legal status to
500 African asylum seekers who
have graduated from its education programs.
So far, the young men have no
official protection, though some
officials have offered verbal assurances.
“There is no decision yet about
this group of children educated in
schools here,” said Shlomo
Mor-Yosef, director general of
Israel’s population and immigration authority.
O
mri Gelber-Tzur, who
teaches civics at Bialik, said
he sometimes worries that
school cushions students too
much from reality.
“Older kids say, ‘It’s a bubble,
and you are practically lying to
us,’ ” he said. “One of my students
told me, ‘You are trying to build
our dreams, but you are lying.’ ”
Only a few will go on to higher education, he said, but a
clear legal status in Israel would
help more.
Among those who have managed is Usumain Baraka, who
came from the Darfur region of
Sudan as an unaccompanied minor in 2014. He studied at a
largely Jewish Israeli school before moving on to IDC Herzliya,
one of Israel’s top private colleges, located on an idyllic, eucalyptus-studded campus. He dresses
sharply, with a crisp shirt poking
out from the top of his knitted
sweatshirt as he explains how he
crammed 12 years of education
into four years.
After he graduated, he wanted
to serve in the Israeli army, but as
a noncitizen, he was prevented.
Baraka is one of about 1,000
asylum seekers from Darfur who
have been given temporary group
protection, but he still lacks refugee status.
“A lot of Israelis are saying, ‘Not
in my name,’” he said. “It gives me
hope.”
But others say they feel un-
wanted.
“I thought about it, when we
were kids,” Godin said of serving
in the army. “But there’s nothing
you can give to a country that
doesn’t want you here.”
He said there is little doubt in
his mind that Israel’s policy is
driven by racism.
“They see a black person,”
he said. “They don’t see a person. People are racist. They try to
show they aren’t racist, but inside
they are.”
It’s a charge made by critics of
the deportations — but one that
Israeli officials strongly deny.
“The claim that we are sending those with black skin away
and that we don’t do anything
to the whites is a lie,” said Deri,
the interior minister. He said
that 5,200 Ukrainians and Georgians were deported last year,
without relocation payments.
“We don’t need to apologize to
anyone,” he said.
But the language of the debate
is often inflammatory. In a heated
hearing at a parliamentary meeting last month, Deputy Foreign
Minister Tzipi Hotovely de-
scribed south Tel Aviv as being in
the grip of “terror” because of the
migrants.
South Tel Aviv is the epicenter
of the fight over African migrants,
home to around 15,000. It’s long
been a neglected area of the city,
but the influx has caused a backlash. Alam Godin and his younger
siblings say they get shouted at in
the street, told to “go home.”
“Before it was not like this,”
said Sima Shbtay, a 34-year-old
taxi dispatcher working near the
central bus station, where rundown high-rises with balconies
crammed with washing lines and
satellite dishes suggest the overcrowded conditions.
“You had Filipinos, Turkish,
Romanians, but those people
don’t do what the blacks do,” she
said. “They have diseases; it’s
dangerous. The children don’t
have inoculations.”
Shbtay
complained
that
Levinsky Park and the area
around the central bus station
become no-go zones after 8 p.m.
But not all residents agree they
need to leave.
“We need to find a solution,
but it’s not deportation,” said
Rotem Levi, 35, as she walked her
dogs with her partner at the park.
“They need jobs, schools, rights,
medicines, everything.”
Demonstrations — both for
and against — have been gaining
momentum. At one last month,
protesters raised their hands and
crossed them above their heads,
as if being handcuffed.
“Refugees are not for sale,”
they chanted. Some wore white
paint on their faces and posed the
question on a signboard: “Would
you deport me if I was white?”
At the very least, say Israel’s
refugee advocates, the government should properly consider
asylum applications.
Many of the Eritreans fled
compulsory open-ended military
service in their home country and
say they would be jailed or worse
if they return to the country, a
dictatorship that the United Nations has accused of crimes
against humanity. But Israel does
not consider that a valid grounds
for asylum.
It has accepted only 10 asylum
cases from Eritrea and just one
from Sudan over the past decade,
out of more than 14,000 applications. That compares with an
acceptance rate of more than
90 percent in Europe, according
to E.U. statistics.
“They are not looking at all at
the claims,” said Sigal Rozen, the
head of the Hotline for Migrant
Workers. “The numbers talk for
themselves.”
Deri and Mor Yosef said on
behalf of the government that
all claims are given proper consideration.
A
t the immigration center
last week, Godin waited in
line to have his twomonth visa renewed and see
whether he was also handed deportation papers.
Not long before, most of the
young African men who had appeared were given orders to leave
within 60 days.
But on this day, deportation
orders looked to have slowed.
Godin returned with good news
— for the moment. He was handed a new two-month visa.
“I gave him a big smile,” he
said. “Maybe next month I’ll
start worrying again about what’s
going to happen. But for now,
I’m good.”
loveday.morris@washpost.com
Ruth Eglash in Jerusalem contributed
to this report.
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C O N S I G N M E N T D AY
GEORGETOWN, MARCH 20
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DOYLE.COM
TOP: Usumain Baraka, center, who is 23, takes part in a demonstration last month in Tel Aviv against
deportations of African migrants. CENTER: Mikal Hagos, 17, was born in Eritrea but has grown to love
Israel. She wears her Israeli scouting uniform at Bialik Rogozin, her school in south Tel Aviv.
ABOVE: Alam Godin, in yellow, waits to renew his visa in Bnei Brak, Israel, last month. Most refugees
need to renew their visas every two months, and the 21-year-old was relieved that his was approved.
A8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 6 , 2018
The World
N. Korean leader has direct talks with S. Korean envoys
Rare dinner’s purpose
was to start preparations
for inter-Korean summit
BY
A NNA F IFIELD
tokyo — Reclusive North Korean
leader Kim Jong Un hosted a South
Korean presidential delegation
for “openhearted” talks over dinner in Pyongyang on Monday, according to the North’s state media,
the latest surprising development
in a burst of diplomacy that both
Koreas hope will stave off threats
from the United States.
The 34-year-old North Korean
leader has not met another head of
state — including the presidents of
historical allies China and Russia
— since he took over the totalitarian country after his father’s death
at the end of 2011.
But now, possibly under pressure from U.S.-led sanctions and
concerned
about
President
Trump’s unorthodox style, Kim is
suddenly willing to take the olive
branches that South Korea has
been offering him.
“This shows how desperate he
is,” said Choi Jin-wook, who was
head of the South’s Korea Institute
for National Unification until last
year. “His plan to become a nuclear
state has almost become successful, but so what? He can’t eat
nukes. So now he’s knocking on
South Korea’s door.”
South Korean President Moon
Jae-in on Monday sent a 10-member delegation to Pyongyang to
begin preparations for an inter-Korean summit, which would
be the first in 10 years and the first
since Kim took over.
This follows a frenzy of visits
linked to the PyeongChang Winter
Olympics last month, during
which Kim sent his younger sister
to Seoul to hand-deliver the summit invitation to Moon.
To prepare for the summit,
Moon dispatched a delegation led
by Chung Eui-yong, his national
security adviser, and including
Suh Hoon, chief of the South’s National Intelligence Service.
“I plan to hold in-depth discussions on various ways to continue
talks between not only the South
and the North, but also the North
and the United States and the international community,” Chung
told reporters before departing
POOL/REUTERS
A South Korean delegation leaves for Pyongyang on Monday. Both Koreas hope that their sudden burst of diplomacy will stave off threats from the United States.
Seoul on Monday afternoon.
The delegation met with officials in the afternoon before having dinner with Kim, his wife Ri Sol
Ju and his sister, Kim Yo Jong.
The South Korean Blue House
did not release contents of the
meeting but said it was “reasonable, educated speculation” to
think they discussed denuclearization.
The North’s Korean Central
News Agency said only that the
two sides reached a “satisfactory”
agreement.
Chung, who speaks fluent English and regularly talks to his
American counterpart, H.R. McMaster, was specifically chosen to
lead the delegation because he
would be viewed in Washington as
a credible and trustworthy messenger, according to people close
to the Blue House.
After returning to Seoul on
Tuesday and briefing the president, Chung will immediately travel to Washington to tell Trump
administration officials about the
meeting.
During his meetings in Pyongyang, Chung will almost certainly
bring up the issue of denuclearization, the outside world’s most
pressing concern, especially since
North Korea last year exploded
what was widely agreed to be a
hydrogen bomb.
But it is far from clear whether
North Korea will be willing to discuss this issue even in the vaguest
terms. Pyongyang has said that its
weapons are aimed only at the
United States and are not a matter
of inter-Korean concern.
But the international sanctions
imposed are approaching an economic blockade, and experts say
they are beginning to hurt North
Korea.
China said it was “a good thing”
that the South Korean delegation
had traveled to Pyongyang.
“We look forward to a positive
outcome of the meeting,” Foreign
Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang
said Monday during a news briefing, according to the Associated
Press. “We hope all sides will bear
in mind the larger picture of peninsular peace and stability.”
Moon has been increasingly
seeking ways to engage with North
Korea, diplomatically or economically, as talk in Washington about
military options has grown louder.
He has repeatedly said that the
United States must not strike
North Korea without the approval
of South Korea, where half the
population lives within North Korean artillery range.
Trump has vacillated between
threatening to “totally destroy”
North Korea and seeming open to
dialogue.
Trump said Saturday that he
“won’t rule out direct talks with
Kim Jong Un.”
“Now we’re talking. They, by the
way, called up a couple of days ago;
they said, ‘We would like to talk,’ ”
Trump said during a speech at the
Gridiron dinner. “And I said, ‘So
would we, but you have to denuke.’ ”
It was not immediately clear
what Trump was talking about
when he said that the North Koreans had called.
Vice President Pence was set to
meet the North Korean delegation
at the opening of the Olympics, but
the North Korean officials pulled
out at the last minute, the White
House said.
The White House has also said
there were no meetings surrounding the closing ceremonies, when
the National Security Council official responsible for Korea, Allison
Hooker, traveled to South Korea
with Ivanka Trump, the president’s
daughter and adviser.
anna.fifield@washpost.com
China plans increase in defense spending while reassuring wary neighbors
BY
S IMON D ENYER
beijing — China’s government
said Monday that it will boost its
defense spending by 8.1 percent
this year, the biggest increase in
three years, even as it insists that it
poses no threat to other countries.
President Xi Jinping is attempting to modernize China’s military,
vowing to turn it into a “worldclass force” capable of fighting and
winning wars.
China’s defense spending is still
about a quarter of U.S. levels, but
its long-term growth has rattled
some neighboring countries, especially given Beijing’s more assertive enforcement of territorial
claims.
In a keynote address to an annual meeting of the National People’s Congress, Premier Li Keqiang said the country faced “profound changes in the national security
environment,”
necessitating a stronger military.
As a proportion of the economy,
China spends about 1.9 percent of
FRED DUFOUR/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Military delegates leave the Great Hall of the People after the
opening session of the National People’s Congress in Beijing.
its gross domestic product on the
military, compared with about
3.3 percent for the United States,
according to the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute.
The 2018 spending increase would
outpace China’s economic growth.
Zhang Yesui, a vice foreign minister and spokesman for the National People’s Congress, said Chi-
na’s defense spending was still
lower than that of other major
countries on a per capita basis.
“China is committed to a path of
peaceful development, and China
pursues a defense policy that is
defensive in nature,” he said at a
news conference. “China’s development will not pose a threat to
other countries.”
But Andrew Erickson, a professor at the Naval War College’s China Maritime Studies Institute in
Newport, R.I., said it was revealing that military spending would
outpace China’s economic growth.
“This shows that Xi’s grand
strategy to ‘make China great
again’ includes not only a ‘China
dream’ generally but also a ‘strong
military dream’ specifically,” he
said.
Erickson said China has the
world’s second-largest defense
budget after the United States,
enabling it to achieve the biggest
and fastest shipbuilding expansion in modern history; the
world’s largest navy, coast guard
and maritime militia by number
of ships; and the world’s largest
conventional ballistic and cruise
missile force.
In its National Defense Strategy
issued at the end of last year, the
Pentagon accused China and Russia of being “revisionist powers”
that want to shape the world in
accordance with their authoritarian models of government and
pose the central challenge to U.S.
prosperity and security. It also accused China of seeking “Indo-Pacific regional hegemony,” of intimidating its neighbors while militarizing the disputed waters of the
South China Sea and of wanting to
establish global preeminence at
the expense of the United States in
the longer term.
But Chinese officials and analysts played down the threat.
Zhang said the uptick in defense
spending is partly to compensate
for past insufficient spending and
is mainly being used to upgrade
equipment, better the lives of service members and improve training
conditions for troops.
Song Xiaojun, a Beijing-based
military commentator, said the
spending increase was partly to
make up for personnel laid off as
part of a recent reduction in the
armed forces by 300,000 troops,
while Maj. Gen. Luo Yuan, vice
president of the China Strategic
Culture Promotion Association,
said the budget was normal for
maintaining the army and did not
signify a preparation for war.
“China has not had any wars in
the past 30 years,” he said. “It’s
building its military to ensure its
own safety, so foreign powers
don’t need to worry.”
Ni Lexiong, a military expert at
the Shanghai University of Political Science and Law, said the increase was modest in the face of
rising costs, tensions on the Korean Peninsula and a border
standoff with India.
Eleven other former officials
and people close to Fernández’s
government will also be tried on
charges of coverup and abuse of
power, Federal Judge Claudio
Bonadio said in a ruling released
by Argentina’s official CIJ Judicial
Information Center.
The trial date has not been set.
So far, four of the accused have
been detained. In December,
Bonadio asked lawmakers to
remove Fernández’s immunity
from prosecution, which she
gained last year when she was
sworn in as a senator. Legislators
have not acted on the request. The
immunity protects her from being
arrested, but she can still be tried.
Fernández, who was president
from 2007 to 2015, denies any
wrongdoing or involvement in any
coverup involving Argentina’s
worst terror attack. The 1994
bombing of the Argentine Israelite
Mutual Association center in
Buenos Aires killed 85 people. Iran
denies any involvement.
The judge backed prosecutor
Alberto Nisman’s 2015 assertion
that Fernández’s government
agreed to a coverup in exchange
for deals on oil and other goods.
Nisman was later found shot to
death; his case remains unsolved.
simon.denyer@washpost.com
Shirley Feng and Liu Yang contributed
to this report.
DIGEST
BRITAIN
Poisoning suspected as
ex-Russian spy falls ill
British media reported Monday
that a former Russian spy was in
critical condition after coming
into contact with an “unknown
substance,” a case that
immediately drew parallels to the
poisoning of former Russian agent
Alexander Litvinenko.
Authorities did not identify the
man, saying only that he and a
woman had been found
unconscious on a bench in a
shopping mall in Salisbury, about
90 miles west of London.
But the Press Association and
other British media outlets
identified him as Sergei Skripal,
66, who was convicted in Russia
on charges of spying for Britain
and sentenced in 2006 to 13 years
in prison. Skripal was freed in
2010 as part of a U.S.-Russian spy
swap that followed the exposure
of a ring of Russian sleeper agents
in the United States.
Wiltshire Police, the force
responsible for the Salisbury area,
said the man and the woman are
“being treated for suspected
exposure to an unknown
substance.” Both are in critical
condition in intensive care.
Skripal served with Russia’s
military intelligence, GRU, and
retired in 1999. He then worked at
the Foreign Ministry until 2003.
After his 2004 arrest in
Moscow, he confessed to having
been recruited by British
intelligence in 1995 and said he
had provided information about
GRU agents in Europe, receiving
more than $100,000 in return.
The circumstances
surrounding Monday’s incident
remain murky. Litvinenko died
after drinking radioactive tea in a
London hotel in 2006.
— Associated Press
TURKEY
4 ISIS suspects held
in U.S. Embassy threat
Turkish police detained four
Islamic State suspects as part of an
investigation into a potential
attack on the U.S. Embassy in
Ankara, the state-run news agency
reported Monday.
The arrests came as the
embassy was closed Monday over
an unspecified security threat.
The Anadolu news agency said
four Iraqi nationals were detained
in connection with the threat.
Security was high outside the
U.S. Embassy on Monday, and
police searched pedestrians
before allowing them to enter the
street where the embassy and
other buildings are located.
The embassy said late Sunday
that the mission would be closed
because of a security threat, and it
urged U.S. citizens to avoid the
embassy as well as large crowds.
An embassy spokesman said
the mission would open Tuesday
but would not offer visa services or
services to U.S. citizens, a measure
apparently aimed at limiting visits
and minimizing risk to the public.
Earlier Monday, police detained
12 Islamic State suspects in
Ankara and were searching for
eight others, Anadolu reported. It
was unclear whether these arrests
were linked to the embassy threat.
— Associated Press
ARGENTINA
Fernández to face trial
in Jewish center case
Former president Cristina
Fernández de Kirchner will face
trial on charges she covered up the
role of Iranians in a 1994 terrorist
bombing at a Jewish center in
Argentina’s capital, judicial
authorities announced Monday.
— Associated Press
Protests rock Kashmir: Tens of
thousands of people poured into
the streets in Indian-controlled
Kashmir, hurling rocks and
shouting anti-India slogans, after
troops killed four civilians and two
suspected militants in a shooting
at a military checkpoint.
Government forces responded to
the protests with tear gas.
Authorities had put parts of the
highly militarized Himalayan
region under lockdown after the
shooting. In recent years, Kashmir
has been beset by renewed rebel
attacks and protests.
— From news services
TUESDAY, MARCH 6 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
RE
A9
K
U.N. convoy begins aid distribution in Syria’s besieged Eastern Ghouta area
Activists report
continued airstrikes
on rebel-held enclave
BY
E RIN C UNNINGHAM
istanbul — A United Nations
convoy carrying lifesaving assistance entered the besieged Syrian enclave of Eastern Ghouta on
Monday, reaching civilians for
the first time in weeks amid a
punishing government assault
that has created one of the worst
humanitarian crises of the war.
Food parcels, nutritional supplements and some medical supplies were aboard the 46-truck
convoy, which was organized by
U.N. agencies, the International
Committee of the Red Cross
(ICRC) and the Syrian Arab Red
Crescent.
The Syrian government, however, stripped the convoy of
much of its medical supplies,
including surgical kits, insulin
and dialysis equipment, U.N. officials said. On Monday, Syrian
government forces continued to
pound Eastern Ghouta with airstrikes and shelling, activists and
aid workers said. Dozens of people were reported killed.
The White House also “condemned sharply the bombing in
East Ghouta” on Monday.
In a readout of a Sunday
phone call between President
Trump and British Prime Minister Theresa May, the White
House said that “the United
States and United Kingdom will
hold Russia accountable for compelling the Assad regime to halt
LOUAI BESHARA/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Afrin
TURKEY
SYRIA
Aleppo
Assad regime
control
Deir al-Zour
SYRIA
Damascus
Detail
JOR.
Syrian government
forces direct trucks
carrying aid Monday to
the rebel-held Eastern
Ghouta region on the
outskirts of Damascus.
IRAQ
Damascus Rebel-held
100 MILES
E A S T E R N
G H O U T A
LEBANON
Assad regime
control
Source: IHS Conflict Monitor as of March 5
Islamic State
control
10 MILES
THE WASHINGTON POST
attacks against civilian areas and
for granting access to humanitarian relief in East Ghouta.”
As many as 400,000 people
are trapped in the enclave,
which is suffering from severe
shortages of food and medical
supplies.
“This assistance is a drop in an
ocean of needs,” said Marwa
Awad, spokeswoman for the
World Food Program in Damascus.
Awad, who was accompanying
the convoy Monday, said the
WFP was carrying enough food
assistance for 27,500 people and
supplies to treat 300 children for
acute malnutrition.
“We’re hoping everything goes
as planned,” she said, “so that we
can reach those people in desperate need of humanitarian and
food assistance.”
The area’s already decrepit
hospitals have been overwhelmed by an influx of casualties in recent weeks, including
more than 2,500 wounded residents. Nearly 600 people had
died in Eastern Ghouta since
Feb. 18, the United Nations said
Sunday.
A doctor in Eastern Ghouta
with the Syrian American Medical Society, a nonprofit group
supporting hospitals in the area,
said that 77 people had been
killed in the enclave Monday.
Civil defense forces known as the
White Helmets said 93 bodies
had been dug from the rubble,
but it was unclear whether they
had all been killed on the same
day.
In a statement, the ICRC said
that it was able to bring in
surgical items such as dressing
materials.
“The convoy is a positive first
step and will lessen the immediate suffering of some civilians in
the Eastern Ghouta region,” said
the ICRC’s Middle East director,
Robert Mardini. “But one convoy,
however big, will never be
enough, given the dire conditions and shortages people are
facing. Repeated and continuous
humanitarian access is essential,
and more must be granted in the
coming period.”
The last time the ICRC was
able to deliver aid in Eastern
Ghouta was Nov. 12, the organization said.
Still, it remained unclear late
Monday whether the convoy
would be able to offload the aid
before the fighting resumed.
Russian President Vladimir
Putin, whose government backs
forces loyal to Syrian President
Bashar al-Assad, last week ordered a daily “humanitarian
pause” from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. for
aid distribution and medical
evacuations. Russia has blamed
the rebels for the lack of evacuations and accused them of violating the temporary cease-fire.
The United Nations has said
that five hours is an insufficient
amount of time to provide the
level of food and aid needed in
Eastern Ghouta.
Ali al-Zatari, the U.N. humanitarian coordinator for Syria, said
earlier that it would probably
take “many hours” to unload the
aid Monday, the Reuters news
agency reported. The convoy
could need to stay until “well
after nightfall,” he said.
erin.cunningham@washpost.com
Louisa Loveluck in Beirut
contributed to this report.
Trump weighs new military action against Assad after alleged gas attacks
Syrian regime’s reported
use of chemicals draws
U.S. attention again
K AREN D E Y OUNG,
M ISSY R YAN,
J OSH D AWSEY
AND C AROL D . L EONNIG
BY
The Trump administration has
considered new military action
against the Syrian government in
response to reports of ongoing
chemical weapons use, officials
said, raising the prospect of a second U.S. strike on President
Bashar al-Assad in less than a year.
President Trump requested options for punishing the Assad government after reported chlorine
gas attacks — at least seven this
year — and possibly other chemicals affecting civilians in opposition-controlled areas.
In a Feb. 25 incident, residents
and medical staffers in a rebelheld Damascus suburb, Eastern
Ghouta, described symptoms associated with chlorine exposure.
One child died, medical staffers
reported.
The president discussed potential actions early last week at a
White House meeting that included Chief of Staff John F. Kelly,
national security adviser H.R. McMaster and Defense Secretary Jim
Mattis, officials said.
One official, who like others
spoke on the condition of anonymity to address internal deliberations, said that the president
did not endorse any military action and that officials decided to
continue monitoring the situation.
Dana White, chief Pentagon
spokeswoman, denied that Mattis
took part in discussions about
military action in Syria and said
the “conversation did not happen.”
One senior administration official said that Mattis was “adamantly” against acting militarily
in response to the recent chlorine
attacks and that McMaster “was
for it.”
The prospect of renewed military action, even if tabled for now,
underscores the explosiveness of a
conflict that has become a battlefield for rivalries between Russia
and Iran on one side and the
United States and its allies on the
other.
The White House discussions
come amid a drumbeat of accusations from Trump administration
officials, who have sought to galvanize international pressure on
Syria over repeated small-scale
chemical attacks amid an escalation of widespread conventional
air and ground assaults that have
killed hundreds of civilians in recent weeks.
On Monday, the Assad government allowed a U.N. aid convoy to
deliver food and other aid, but not
certain medical supplies, to Eastern Ghouta, even as shelling and
airstrikes continued.
The Trump administration has
condemned Iran for deploying
weapons and fighters that have
helped turn the war in Assad’s
favor. It has also blamed Russia for
failing to enforce a cease-fire proposal backed by the United Nations and for allowing the use of
chemical weapons to continue.
“The civilized world must not
tolerate the Assad regime’s continued use of chemical weapons,”
White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in a
statement Sunday.
Russian and Syrian officials
have rejected reports of government chemical weapons use.
Images of Syrians suffering the
effects of chemical exposure appear to have energized the president to explore launching a new
assault, as they did before the
missile attack he authorized on a
Syrian air base in April.
Trump ordered the Pentagon to
fire Tomahawk missiles on the
Syrian facility believed to be
linked to a sarin gas attack that
killed 80 people. It was the first
direct American assault on the
Assad government, a step that
President Barack Obama had
shied away from, even after an
estimated 1,400 people were
HAMZA AL-AJWEH/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
A wounded Syrian child is treated Friday at a makeshift hospital in
the rebel-held area of Eastern Ghouta outside Damascus.
killed in a gruesome attack in
August 2013.
Administration officials say
Syria has continued to make and
employ chemical weapons despite
an internationally backed deal to
remove its stockpiles after the
2013 incident.
According to the Syrian American Medical Society (SAMS),
which tracks reports from medical staffers, patients have reported symptoms linked to chlorine
exposure seven times this year. In
November, also in Eastern Ghouta, hospitals described seeing patients with symptoms indicative
of sarin, the society said.
Unlike with earlier deadly incidents, U.S. officials say, the Assad
regime is now conducting only
small-scale attacks and is relying
mainly on chlorine, which is made
from commercially available materials and is more difficult to
detect than nerve agents such as
sarin.
“They clearly think they can get
away with this if they keep it
under a certain level,” a senior
administration official told reporters last month.
Officials also suspect Syria of
using ground-based systems rather than aerial means for delivering
chemical agents because they are
harder to track.
The Syrian government has resorted to such attacks, officials
say, to compensate for manpower
shortages and to discourage supporters of the opposition from
returning to strategic areas.
Even as the U.S. military winds
down its campaign against the
Islamic State, the Trump administration risks being more deeply
drawn into Syria’s civil war, in
which NATO ally Turkey is another important player. Many U.S.
officials say that only greater political stability can prevent the
extremists’ return.
The Pentagon has sought to
keep its mission in Syria tightly
focused on the Islamic State.
There are about 2,000 U.S. troops
in the east and north, tasked with
advising local forces who have
been battling the extremists.
Some officials also have raised
concerns about conclusively assigning responsibility for chlorine
attacks. Others express skepticism that another strike would
deter Assad when the last one did
not.
But other officials, particularly
at the White House and the State
Department, appear more open to
renewed action against Assad.
They say that a U.S. response
might deter the Assad regime
from rebuilding its chemical arsenal in a way that might eventually threaten the United States
and might demonstrate that the
United States will not be deterred
by Russia’s presence in Syria.
The discussions highlight the
gray area that chlorine has occupied in the West’s response to
chemical weapons use in Syria.
While chlorine is not a banned
substance, its use as a choking
agent is prohibited under international chemical weapons rules.
The Assad government’s reported employment of chlorine
has been much less lethal than
that of sarin, at least in recent
reported incidents in Syria. SAMS
said two people had been killed in
the seven attacks this year.
Mattis told reporters last
month that the United States was
seeking evidence of renewed sarin
use.
Fred Hof, an Obama administration official who is now at the
Atlantic Council, said the United
States would send a “deadly” message if it lashes out after chemical
attacks but does nothing when
civilians are killed with conventional arms.
“When we go out of our way to
say, in effect, the only time we will
lift a finger to protect Syrian civilians is when particularly deadly
chemical weapons are employed,
we are inadvertently — unintentionally but inevitably — encour-
aging the Assad regime, the Russians and the Iranians to attack
civilians with everything at their
disposal,” he said.
karen.deyoung@washpost.com
missy.ryan@washpost.com
josh.dawsey@washpost.com
carol.leonnig@washpost.com
Greg Jaffe in Washington and Louisa
Loveluck in Beirut contributed to this
report.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
In Europe, populists’ rise makes governing messy
EUROPE FROM A1
it has become all but impossible
for the establishment to govern
on its own. The result is a continent caught in a netherworld
between a dying political order
and a new one taking root.
“This has been a postideological result, beyond the
traditional left-right divide,” said
Luigi Di Maio, whose populist
Five Star Movement trounced its
opponents to become Italy’s largest party Monday.
Now the country has plunged
into uncertainty.
“The traditional structures of
political alignment in Europe are
breaking down,” said Josef Janning, head of the Berlin office of
the European Council on Foreign
Relations. “It started in the smaller countries. But now we see that
it’s happening everywhere.”
Even in Germany, the ultimate
postwar symbol of staid political
stability.
As Italians were voting Sunday,
Germans were learning that they
would finally have a government,
a record five months after they
went to the polls.
The establishment had hung
on. But just barely, and with no
evident enthusiasm, either from
the voters or from the centrist
politicians who will continue to
lead the country even as the public increasingly gravitates to the
margins.
A similar phenomenon can be
seen in countries from east to
west, north to south. It took the
Dutch 208 days to form an ideologically messy four-way coalition last year after an election in
which 13 parties won seats in the
parliament.
The Czechs still do not have a
functioning government after
voting in October yielded an unwieldy Parliament populated by
anti-immigrant hard-liners; promarket liberals; communists;
and a loose alliance of libertarians, anarchists and coders known
as the Pirates.
The fragmentation of European politics takes what had been
seen as one of the continent’s
great strengths and turns it on its
head. Unlike the United States
and Britain, where winners take
all, continental Europe primarily
uses proportional systems in
which the full spectrum of popular opinion is represented in office.
“This is a realignment
that is reshaping the
way politics in
European countries
looks for the next 20 or
30 years.”
That worked fairly well when
the major parties captured 80 or
90 percent of the vote, as they did
in countries across Europe for
decades after World War II.
But lately, the major parties
have been downsized.
In Germany, the “grand coalition” won just 53 percent of the
vote — hardly grand. In Italy,
neither of the traditionally dominant centrist parties cracked
20 percent. A grand coalition is
not even mathematically possible.
The trend has become selfreinforcing.
As voters vent their discontent
with sclerotic political systems
that never seem to address their
grievances, hyper-fractured election results add layers of difficulty to the process of forming governments, passing meaningful
legislation or achieving the sort of
consensus needed to reform the
European Union.
The best that most leaders can
do is to react and steer away from
crisis.
“The age of the tall European
leader is over,” Janning said. “This
political climate doesn’t breed
leaders. It breeds people who can
manipulate the situation in such
a way that things don’t derail.”
In Italy, it’s not even clear the
country will have that. Sunday’s
vote appeared to knock the foundation out of the current political
system — more than half of voters
opted for anti-establishment,
Euroskeptic parties — without
offering a clear alternative.
E.U. bigwigs in Brussels and a
section of Italy’s elite had hoped
there would be a fallback option
of a super-establishment coalition of the willing. That would
have entailed a tie-up between
former prime minister Silvio Berlusconi’s center-right Forza Ital-
AND
PIERO CRUCIATTI/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
ia, or Forward Italy, and the ruling center-left Democratic Party.
That type of alliance worked in
Germany after months of haggling.
But in Italy, the two mainstream parties together barely
managed to exceed the vote share
of the Five Star Movement — an
Internet-based movement founded by a comedian that pulls voters
from either end of the political
spectrum and didn’t even exist a
decade ago. Other votes were
sprinkled across a range of farleft and far-right forces.
“It’s a confirmation that there’s
a very strong sentiment in favor
of change,” said Roberto D’Alimonte, a professor of political
science at LUISS Guido Carli University in Rome. “We are entering
uncharted territory because the
Five Star Movement is so unusual, so unconventional. We’re going to be in for a prolonged period
of uncertainty.”
Leaders of both the Five Star
Movement and the far-right
League party claimed victory
Monday.
In yet another bombshell, the
League — whose leader once advocated segregated buses in Milan — beat its more-moderate
coalition ally, Berlusconi’s party.
That means that even if their
center-right coalition makes the
unlikely leap to power, Italy’s
prime minister will be a member
of the far right, a first for a
Western European country since
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BY A NA C ERRUD
D AVID A . F AHRENTHOLD
panama city — A worker with a
Matteo Salvini, leader of Italy’s far-right League party, once
advocated for segregated buses in Milan. His party, along with the
Five Star Movement, claimed victory in Sunday’s elections. But
despite their rhetoric, both parties have already softened their
stances on issues such as the euro and the European Union.
1945.
“This is a realignment that is
reshaping the way politics in European countries looks for the
next 20 or 30 years,” said Piero
Stanig, who teaches politics at
Bocconi University.
If there was a silver lining for
the establishment forces trying to
hold Europe together, it was that
reaction to the vote was relatively
muted.
Markets wobbled but didn’t
tank. Populists cheered — French
far-right leader Marine Le Pen
noted with satisfaction on Twitter
that the European Union was
“having a bad evening” — but
didn’t forecast the death of the
union.
The restraint reflected a more
stable footing for Europe, which
is not facing economic, migration
and security pressures with the
same intensity of recent times.
“The situation is less volatile
than three or four years ago,” said
Janis Emmanouilidis, director of
policy studies at the Brusselsbased European Policy Center.
“Back then, markets would have
gone crazy. There would have
been fear and panic.”
The mild reaction, Emmanouilidis said, also reflects something
Europe has learned about its antiestablishment forces once they
take power: Their vicious bark
turns out to be a far gentler bite.
Greece learned that after electing the far-left Syriza movement
in 2015, only to see it back down
from a fight with the country’s
creditors and adopt many of the
same positions it had long vilified.
In Italy, both Five Star and the
League have already softened
their stance on the euro and the
European Union, anticipating a
shot at power and the chance to
work within the system, rather
than rail against it from the outside.
“Some of these movements
have become demystified,” Emmanouilidis said. “They’ve become part of the establishment.”
griff.witte@washpost.com
michael.birnbaum@washpost.com
Birnbaum reported from Rome.
Stefano Pitrelli in Rome and Luisa
Beck in Berlin contributed to this
report.
MARCH 6 , 2018
Trump’s name stripped
from hotel in Panama
President’s company
disputes tower owner’s
declaration of victory
Piero Stanig, who teaches politics at
Bocconi University
. TUESDAY,
crowbar on Monday pried the
word “Trump” from the sign in
front of the only Trump-branded
hotel in Latin America, after the
building’s owner said he’d won a
legal fight to take control of it.
The removal of the Trump
name from the Trump International Hotel Panama came after a
days-long standoff between the
majority owner, Cypriot businessman Orestes Fintiklis, and the
president’s company.
But the building’s future remained uncertain: The Trump Organization said it could still retake
control of the hotel.
Fintiklis had sought to fire the
Trump Organization — which has
a management contract running
through 2031 — because he
blames the company and the
Trump brand for poor revenue.
The Trump Organization had refused to leave. There followed 10
days of confrontations, including
shoving matches, a power outage
and several appearances by police.
On Monday, a Panamanian legal official visited the hotel with
an escort of 15 police officers. After
a long session in a back room, the
legal official left without comment. The Washington Post
sought unsuccessfully to determine what, exactly, she had decided.
But, after meeting with her, Fintiklis was definitive. He said he
had won.
“Today, this dispute has been
settled by the judges and the authorities of this country,” Fintiklis
told reporters. He declared that he
was so impressed by Panama’s legal system that he would soon
become a Panamanian citizen.
“And now, as you guessed it, I
will play the piano,” Fintiklis told a
crowd of reporters. He then began
to play a tune on the piano in the
hotel lobby, repeating a ritual that
he had used to mark previous victories in the case. This time, Fintiklis played what he said was a
traditional Greek song, “Accordeon,” an anti-fascist anthem. He
sang along in Greek.
The Trump Organization, however, disputed that it had been
defeated. It issued a statement
saying that the legal official had
only shifted control of the hotel to
a third-party administrator, while
Fintiklis and the Trump Organization are still embroiled in court
fights in the United States and in
international arbitration.
“To date, there has been absolutely no determination whatsoever by any court or other tribunal
as to the status” of the hotel, the
company said in a statement from
the Trump Organization’s executive vice president, Alan Garten.
At the hotel, Fintiklis seemed
very much in control. He said he
had fired 10 employees who had
sought to block his control. Reporters saw some employees turning in Trump hotel IDs.
Then, as reporters watched, a
worker with a hammer and a
crowbar removed the Trump
name from the large sign outside
the hotel’s entrance.
For the third time since Inauguration Day, the Trump brand was
coming down from a hotel. The
cases illustrate a trend for the
president’s business: His polarizing political brand seems to have
alienated customers in liberal U.S.
cities and some foreign countries.
In the other cases — at Trumpbranded hotels in Toronto and
Manhattan — the owners struck
deals with the Trump Organization, agreeing to remove the name.
In Panama, Fintiklis chose a more
confrontational route.
Fintiklis bought 202 of the hotel’s 369 room units last year, assumed control of the hotel’s condominium owners association
and quickly moved to kick out the
Trump Organization. “We are ALL
losing money and it is getting
worse. The only ill-deserved winner here is the [Trump Organization] who continues to clip management fees whilst our hotel is
driven into the ground,” Fintiklis
wrote in a letter to fellow hotelroom owners earlier this year.
The broader hotel market in
Panama has collapsed amid overdevelopment and a slowdown in
tourism. Average occupancy for
luxury properties fell from
57.5 percent in 2012 to 40.3 percent for 2017, according to STR, a
hotel market data company. But
Trump Panama condo owners say
their units have done even more
poorly. Fintiklis said that, in 58
units, the owners had lost so much
money on rentals that they were
refusing to pay their condo fees.
The Trump Organization “continues to attach to our property
like a leach, draining our last
drops of blood,” Fintiklis wrote.
The Trump Organization refused to leave the property, saying
Fintiklis had no legal grounds to
break its contract, which lasts until 2031.
Fintiklis escalated the fight in
late February, when he showed up
in Panama and sought to fire the
Trump management in person.
That tactic failed, at first — Trump
staffers refused to allow him in,
and Fintiklis played a mournful
tune in the lobby in protest.
The Trump Organization responded that Fintiklis had ignored previous legal cases and
resorted to “mob-style” tactics.
When asked whether the president had been briefed on the dispute or had spoken to anyone in
Panama about the fate of his business, White House spokesman Hogan Gidley wrote in a brief email
response, “I’d refer you to Trump
Org.” The Trump Organization did
not immediately respond when
asked whether it had been briefing the president on this issue.
david.fahrenthold@washpost.com
Fahrenthold reported from
Washington. Jonathan O’Connell
contributed to this report.
Populists declare new epoch in Italy
Voters send a message
about their fury with
old-line parties and E.U.
BY
M ICHAEL B IRNBAUM
rome — Italy’s victorious antiestablishment forces declared a
new epoch of their country’s
political life on Monday, hours
after an election demolition of
the traditional parties that dominated the nation for decades.
Both the surging populist Five
Star Movement and the antimigrant far-right League party
(formerly
called
Northern
League) claimed a win after Italians cleared their rivals and left
them as the most potent forces in
the country. The shift all but
guarantees an anti-establishment leader for Italy and was a
powerful display of Italians’ fury
with old-line politicians and with
the European Union in Brussels.
Five Star leader Luigi Di Maio
compared the day to other monumental moments in Italian history when the old political order
was swept out the door.
“Today, for us, the third republic commences,” Di Maio said. “At
last, the republic of Italian citizens.”
With 99 percent of the vote
counted Monday evening, the
traditional center-left and center-right parties combined had
only managed to beat Five Star’s
32.6 percent vote total by a sliver
of a percentage point — an ex-
traordinary collapse for them
and a confirmation of the new
populist power.
And well over half of Italians
voted for E.U.-skeptic parties that
have questioned Italy’s use of the
euro currency and its alliance
with the West against Russia. The
League, whose leader Matteo Salvini last year signed an agreement with the political party
founded by Russian President
Vladimir Putin, claimed its own
victory Monday with 17.4 percent
of the vote. They now stand
astride a center-right coalition,
which received 37 percent of the
vote, and in which they had been
forecast as junior partners.
“I see this as a vote for the
future,” Salvini told supporters
Monday. “I am and will remain a
populist, one of those who listens
to the people and does their
duty.”
With the shattered landscape
leaving no single force with a
clear route to power, it remained
unclear Monday whether the
Five Star Movement or the
League would get the first chance
at trying to form a coalition.
Either is likely to make Europe’s
establishment nauseous. If Salvini came to power, he would be
Western Europe’s first far-right
leader since 1945. Di Maio, meanwhile, questions European integration and rules that restrict
free spending. The two parties
could also ally with each other
because they share many views
about the economy. But many
analysts say a coalition is unlikely because Five Star’s largely
left-wing voters might be re-
pelled by the League’s anti-migrant stances.
The choice of which party gets
the first chance to form a government will be made by Italian
President Sergio Mattarella.
Many here expect that the haggling will last months.
The results marked a possible
final chapter in the long political
career of Silvio Berlusconi, who
pioneered the entertainment-topolitics track later followed by
Donald Trump. The 81-year-old
former prime minister led his
center-right Forward Italy to a
surprise weak result of 14 percent.
And former center-left prime
minister Matteo Renzi, who resigned in December 2016 following a referendum defeat, abandoned his comeback attempt
Monday after his Democratic
Party won 18.7 percent of the vote
— less than half of what it received in 2014 in elections for the
European Parliament.
“A clear defeat,” Renzi said,
adding he would quit leadership
of his party.
Analysts said that even as the
results were messy, the combined
power of the anti-system candidates pointed to one clear victor:
anger.
“There are two sides of this
common root: rage and of rebellion against the political elites,”
said Massimiliano Panarari, who
teaches politics at LUISS, a university in Rome.
michael.birnbaum@washpost.com
Stefano Pitrelli contributed to this
report.
TUESDAY, MARCH 6 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A11
SU
Embattled Netanyahu gets warm welcome from Trump
President says he may
visit Jerusalem to open
new U.S. Embassy
BY R UTH E GLASH
AND A NNE G EARAN
President Trump said he may
soon visit Israel to open a new U.S.
Embassy in Jerusalem as he offered a warm welcome Monday to
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin
Netanyahu — one that did not
include any public mention of the
potentially career-ending corruption inquiry that followed the
long-serving Israeli leader to
Washington.
“I may” go for the planned May
opening of the embassy, Trump
said. “We’re looking at coming. If I
can, I will.”
Netanyahu said of Trump’s decision to move the embassy to
Jerusalem: “This will be remembered by our people through the
ages. Others talked about it. You
did it.”
The relocated embassy Trump
would inaugurate is actually a refitted office that will serve as the
vanguard U.S. diplomatic headquarters until a permanent structure is built years from now.
Trump boasted Monday that he
is building it for a mere $250,000,
instead of what he said was a
$1 billion government “order.”
He appeared to be referring
only to the initial office. The permanent structure will take roughly a decade to be built and could
easily cost $1 billion.
The two leaders, who have
formed a bond closer than any
Trump has with other world leaders, gave no sign that the corruption allegations, which Netanyahu denies, were coloring their
meeting. Trump has a cloud over
his own administration as special
counsel Robert S. Mueller III investigates his aides and others as
part of an inquiry into Russian
interference in the 2016 election.
“We have, I would say, probably
the best relationships right now
with Israel that we ever had,”
Trump said. “I think we’re as close
now as, maybe, ever before.”
Trump noted that other presidents hesitated to move the embassy from Tel Aviv and said that
RICKY CARIOTI/THE WASHINGTON POST
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu leaves on Monday after meeting with President Trump. “I have been here for nearly four
decades . . . talking, seeking to build the American-Israeli alliance,” he told Trump. “Under your leadership, it’s never been stronger.”
his decision can clear the air for an
eventual peace deal.
Palestinians disagree, saying
the embassy decision spoils
chances for peace, by appearing to
write off their claim to East Jerusalem as the capital of a future
state.
Netanyahu arrived at the White
House early Monday afternoon,
just hours after reports from Israel said a former media adviser and
confidant has turned state’s witness in a far-reaching bribery case.
In what appeared to be a sign of
the political importance of the
session to Netanyahu, the White
House changed plans Monday and
announced that reporters and
cameras would be allowed into
what had been an Oval Office
meeting closed to the media.
Netanyahu’s praise of Trump
and his upending of U.S. policy on
Jerusalem was meant as a sign of
political strength at home — it
aired during the much-watched
evening news period in Israel —
and it hinted at the stakes for the
veteran leader.
“I have been here for nearly four
decades . . . talking, seeking to
build the American-Israeli alliance,” Netanyahu said, referring
to his long career in Israeli politics. “Under your leadership, it’s
never been stronger, and the people of Israel see your position on
Jerusalem, they see your position
on Iran. They see your magnificent defense of Israel and the
truth in the United Nations.”
And as prime minister, he said,
he sees something his citizens
cannot in the deep and interdependent intelligence and defense
networks the two allies have built.
Trump nodded repeatedly as Netanyahu spoke.
“Thank you for your leadership.
And thank you for your tremendous friendship,” Netanyahu said
as Trump smiled.
Jared Kushner, Trump’s son-inlaw and Middle East adviser, attended some but not all of the
lengthy session, Netanyahu said
later. Kushner has lost his toplevel security clearance.
Kushner’s business dealings
are also under special-counsel
scrutiny.
Kushner heads an effort to broker what Trump has called “the
ultimate deal” between Israel and
the Palestinians, but the plan was
a back-burner issue at Monday’s
session. It was shelved amid fierce
Arab and allied opposition to
Trump’s decision in December to
declare that the United States considers Jerusalem to be Israel’s capital.
Asked Monday about chances
for peace, Trump seemed more
optimistic than he has in other
recent comments.
“We’re working on it very hard,”
Trump said. “It would be a great
achievement — and even from a
humanitarian standpoint — what
better if we could make peace
between Israel and the Palestinians? And I can tell you, we are
working very hard on doing that.
And I think we have a very good
chance.”
He gave no date for when the
United States might unveil its proposals.
“The Palestinians, I think, are
wanting to come back to the table
very badly,” Trump said.
Pressed as to what he meant,
given the hard line Palestinians
have taken against any U.S.-
brokered peace effort, Trump
sounded matter-of-fact.
“If they don’t, you don’t have
peace,” he said.
Speaking to the media before
setting off for Washington, Netanyahu told reporters that he
planned to reiterate Israel’s concerns over the Iran nuclear deal
and the growing prominence of
Iran in Syria, and planned
to discuss issues related to
Trump’s potential Israeli-Palestinian peace plan.
Meanwhile, Netanyahu’s political career is dogged by at least
three criminal cases at home and
seems less stable than ever.
While the country’s right-wing
coalition has mostly rallied
around the long-serving prime
minister, there are signs of weakness as the investigations progress. Additional reports Monday
of a faceoff between Netanyahu’s
coalition partners over the longrunning issue of drafting ultraOrthodox Jews into the state military seems to also suggest the
possibility of snap elections.
They could come as early as
June.
On Friday, Netanyahu was
questioned by Israeli detectives
about his role in a case involving
Nir Hefetz, the man Israeli media
refer to as Netanyahu’s “spin doctor.” Labeled Case 4000 by the
police, it is said to involve the
granting of regulatory benefits
worth millions of dollars to Israeli
telecommunications giant Bezeq
in return for positive news coverage for the Netanyahu family on
the Walla news website.
Israeli news reports Monday
said that Hefetz has agreed to turn
state’s witness; police declined to
comment.
At the center of the case is Shaul
Elovitch, Walla’s owner and a majority shareholder in Bezeq, who is
said to have made millions in the
easing of communication regulations. Netanyahu is linked to the
case because he was communications minister at that time. Shlomo Filber, the former director
general of the Communications
Ministry, recently turned state’s
witness in the case.
The new developments in Case
4000 come weeks after police recommended indicting Netanyahu
in two cases — Case 1000 and Case
2000, in police parlance. According to the police notes, Case 1000
involves gifts of cigars and jewelry
amounting to more than
$280,000 that the prime minister
and his wife are suspected of receiving from billionaire benefactors.
Case 2000, police said, involved
deals made between Netanyahu
and Arnon Mozes, publisher of the
Israeli daily Yedioth Ahronoth.
According to information leaked
to Israeli media, a deal apparently
would have allowed the prime
minister to receive more favorable
coverage from the newspaper if he
agreed to weaken the status of a
rival daily newspaper owned by
U.S. casino magnate Sheldon
Adelson.
Israel’s attorney general must
now decide whether to indict Netanyahu on those two cases.
In an additional case, dubbed
Case 3000, involving a multibillion-dollar submarine deal with
Germany, several members of Netanyahu’s inner circle have been
named as suspects, questioned or
arrested. The case has not been
linked to Netanyahu directly.
ruth.eglash@washpost.com
anne.gearan@washpost.com
A12
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 6 , 2018
Economy & Business
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At the Oscars, a possible last hurrah
Fox film CEO lassoed 27 Academy Award nominations this year, but a merger may put her out of a job
BY
S TEVEN Z EITCHIK
new york — Stacey Snider, the
chairman and chief executive of
Twentieth Century Fox Film, attended the Oscars on Sunday as
perhaps the most successful studio executive of the moment.
Fox movies — Steven Spielberg’s “The Post” as well as “The
Shape of Water” and “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
from the quasi-independent Fox
Searchlight — had gathered up 27
Oscar nominations, nine more
than the nearest competitor. “Water” won four prizes, including
best picture.
Yet the night was also deeply bittersweet, because it could represent
a last hurrah. Snider took the Fox
studio reins in 2016 with the belief
she was in for a long ride. But in
December, Rupert Murdoch announced he would sell much of 21st
Century Fox to Walt Disney for
$52.4 billion, arguing that new technologies required a scale his company didn’t possess.
“My feeling when I got the job
was that I wanted to make one more
push at a studio before considering
other things,” Snider said in one of
her first interviews since the merger
was announced. “I guess other
things happened sooner than I
thought.”
Snider, 56, has responded with a
sort of creative abandon, throwing
herself into several of Fox’s risky
bets. There’s the studio’s new Jennifer Lawrence movie, “Red Sparrow,”
a hard-R story of manipulation and
assault; “Love, Simon,” a lo-fi dramedy about a gay teen; and “Widows,”
a female-centric revenge tale from
“12 Years a Slave” director Steve McQueen.
Last year brought “The Post,”
which Snider worked on with frequent collaborator and business
partner Spielberg. A movie that
went from development to release
in less than a year, it was widely seen
as a Snider priority because of its
timely reminder of the importance
of government accountability.
But Snider says it meant something more personal. The film tells
of Katharine Graham, who reached
a crossroads when she unexpectedly took over as publisher of The
Washington Post in middle age.
Snider says she, too, had found herself at a critical life moment before
landing the Fox role and embraced
it with a similar mix of doubt and
conviction.
She has certainly seen as much
industry turbulence as Graham, including as a Universal executive
when GE bought the company in
2004 and at DreamWorks in 2008
when the firm underwent a messy
split from Paramount. “A wartime
executive. That’s what I like to call it.
That can be a thing, right?”
But she says she also maintains
no illusions. “I’m very conscious
about the difference between being
an entrepreneur and an employee.
They can pull the rug out. I mean,
it’s their rug,” she said.
A recent Hollywood parlor game
has involved guessing Snider’s next
move. Few think she’ll stay at Disney-Fox if she couldn’t run the
whole studio, a job Hollywood veteran Alan Horn would seem to have
locked down.
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CURRENCIES
DOWN $1.60 PER $1,000, 2.88% YIELD $1=106.18 YEN; EURO=$1.234
Senate set to question
Reddit and Tumblr on
Russian interference
Reports say Kremlin may
have spread election
disinformation on sites
BY
ALBERTO E. RODRIGUEZ/GETTY IMAGES
Stacey Snider and her husband, Gary Jones, attend the 90th Annual Academy Awards in Hollywood.
Snider says she’s made no decision, nor does she believe Disney
chairman and chief executive Robert Iger has, either. She says she has
not had a substantive conversation
with Iger about her future since
right after the merger was announced.
But Snider sometimes slips into
the past tense when talking about
Fox. And even if she could stay, she’s
not sure she should. Disney’s tentpole strategy differs from the oneoffs on which she’s built her career.
Producing has come up as an
option. Amy Pascal, producer of
“The Post” and a longtime ally, said
that such a shift “wouldn’t surprise
me; she’s always been very entrepreneurial.” Snider acknowledged that
“being entrepreneurial is interesting to me. I don’t really want to be
pigeonholed as a career executive.”
After introducing “Red Sparrow”
to a premiere audience of 1,100 at
Lincoln Center last week, she
walked into the after-party and
spotted the studio’s head of production, Emma Watts, and marketing
chief, Pamela Levine. (Fox is one of
the most female-led studios in Hol-
lywood.) Since the merger was announced, Snider had to rally the
troops even while she says her own
morale has flagged, and she shared
a moment of commiseration with
them.
Watts and Levine are younger
than Snider, and as she stepped
away she noted a distinction. “My
generation was just happy to be in
the room. When we stood up to
men, it was always by creating offramps,” she said. “The women coming up behind me have not been
nearly as polite.” She said she was
never a firsthand victim of harassment. “Whenever it looked like it
would go there, I would tell a man I
was a very clingy girlfriend. And he
would back right off.”
That said, maneuvering around
male executives had been tricky. “I
long for the day where I don’t have
to sit in staff meetings and say
things like, ‘It seems to me,’ ” Snider
said. “It would be like how I imagine
men feel all the time.”
One of Snider’s strengths has
been her industry hybridity. She
brings enough business fluency to
reassure the bean counters and suf-
ficient creative savvy to win over
filmmakers. “She can speak the language of anyone in any room,” said
Greg Berlanti, the TV producer who
directed “Love, Simon.”
Yet she can also be a divisive
force. When she was the No. 2 at Fox
several years ago, some smooth
courting of Lachlan Murdoch
helped her oust her boss, Jim Gianopulos, ruffling some feathers on
the lot as Gianopulos left quickly.
But rare is the Hollywood plan
that stays on track, and Snider is
now coping with a potential abrupt
departure of her own. “I was sad and
surprised when the merger was announced,” she said. “Surprised because I didn’t see [the Murdochs] as
a seller, and sad because I never
thought a 100-year-old studio could
be absorbed in this way.”
Then she hit reverse. “I have to
appreciate that this is a time of dramatic change,” she said. “There’s an
undertow in the ocean. And I don’t
want to get pulled out.”
steven.zeitchik@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
Business
T ONY R OMM
Congressional investigators
probing Russian interference
around the 2016 U.S. presidential
election plan to question Reddit
and Tumblr over reports that the
Kremlin may have helped spread
disinformation on their sites, as
lawmakers continue to explore
the ways in which Russia weaponized social media.
Staff for lawmakers on the
Senate Intelligence Committee
will hold a briefing with Tumblr
soon, while they’re seeking more
information from Reddit after it
acknowledged Monday it shuttered hundreds of suspicious accounts in 2015 and 2016, according to a person close to the panel
who was not authorized to speak
publicly.
Triggering the Senate’s new
interest is a trove of documents
first reported by the Daily Beast
last week. It found at least 21
accounts on Tumblr had ties to
the Internet Research Agency,
the Kremlin’s official troll army
that was the focus of an indictment last month by special counsel Robert S. Mueller III. Meanwhile, the agency’s content flourished on Reddit topic pages,
called subreddits, related to
then-candidate Donald Trump
and Democratic contender Hillary Clinton.
On Monday, Reddit offered an
additional detail: The company’s
chief executive, Steve Huffman,
revealed in a post on the site that
his team had “found and
removed a few hundred accounts.” He added that the “vast
majority of suspicious accounts
we have found in the past
months were banned back in
2015–2016 through our enhanced efforts to prevent abuse
of the site generally.”
Yet Huffman also acknowledged that Reddit more broadly
suffered from “indirect propaganda” that was posted and
shared by thousands of users
who are “mostly American, and
appear to be unwittingly promoting Russian propaganda.” That
includes tweets from well-documented, since-shuttered agency
accounts, such as @TEN_GOP,
which claimed to speak for Tennessee Republicans.
Spokeswomen for Reddit and
for Tumblr’s parent company,
Oath, didn’t respond to requests
for comment.
A spokeswoman for the leader
of the Senate Intelligence Committee, Sen. Richard Burr
(R-N.C.), did not immediately
respond on Monday. But the
panel’s top Democratic member,
Sen. Mark R. Warner (Va.), said
the latest reports highlight the
need for other tech companies to
study their own platforms for
potential misuse.
“We have continually seen that
the IRA’s sophisticated and extensive use of social media — not
only Twitter, Facebook and YouTube, but also other platforms —
shows a keen understanding of
the power of social media in
shaping public discourse,” he
said in a statement. “I would
encourage all of the social media
companies to take a much closer
look at how their platforms and
services could be used to manipulate their users’ trust and
attention.”
Reddit and Tumblr are the
latest tech giants to field questions from congressional investigators. Last year, House and
Senate lawmakers set their
sights on Facebook, Google and
Twitter, grilling companies’ executives at a trio of hearings in the
fall.
Over the course of the 2016
election, more than 146 million
U.S. users on Facebook and its
photo-sharing platform, Instagram, may have viewed content
posted by Russia’s IRA, Facebook
revealed at the time. Twitter has
said at least 1.4 million interacted with similar disinformation,
too. And Google flagged that
more than 300,000 visitors to
YouTube appeared to have
viewed propaganda videos.
The Daily Beast found
at least 21 accounts on
Tumblr had ties to
the Internet Research
Agency, the Kremlin’s
official troll army.
In many cases, these posts, ads
and other content touched on
racial, religious or other hot-button social and political issues,
with an apparent aim of driving
contentious debate and sowing
unrest — both online and off.
Warner, for one, expressed reservations with Reddit back in
September 2017, fearing it may
have helped amplify Russian
propaganda online. Privately,
staff for the lawmaker’s office
soon questioned the company
about the matter, the person
close to the panel said.
Otherwise, Russia is not Reddit’s only recent trouble. The site,
which allows its users to post
under cover of anonymity, has
fielded criticism for enabling everything from white supremacist
content to fake videos of celebrities having sex. Most recently, it
served as a breeding ground for
conspiracy theories about the
mass shooting in Parkland, Fla.
tony.romm@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/the-switch
DIGEST
AGRIBUSINESS
Judge to review claim
against Monsanto
Claims that the active
ingredient in the widely used
weed killer Roundup can cause
cancer have been evaluated by
international agencies, U.S. and
foreign regulators, and the
product’s manufacturer —
agribusiness giant Monsanto.
Now, a federal judge in San
Francisco is conducting his own
review during an unusual set of
court hearings that began
Monday. The review has big
stakes for Monsanto and
hundreds of farmers and others
who have sued the company.
U.S. District Judge Vince
Chhabria will spend a week
hearing from experts to help
decide whether there is valid
scientific evidence to support the
lawsuits’ claim that exposure to
Roundup can cause nonHodgkin’s lymphoma.
Chhabria is presiding over
more than 300 lawsuits against
Monsanto by cancer victims and
their families.
The plaintiffs say the company
long knew about Roundup’s
cancer risk but failed to warn
them.
The plaintiffs must first
convince Chhabria that he
should allow their
epidemiologists and physicians
to testify to a jury that Roundup
can cause cancer.
Many regulators have rejected
the link, and Monsanto
vehemently denies it and says
hundreds of studies have found
glyphosate — Roundup’s active
ingredient — is safe.
Chhabria will not determine if
the cancer connection exists but
whether the claim has been
tested, reviewed and published
and is widely accepted in the
scientific community.
RETAIL
Walmart to offer
prepared meals
— Associated Press
STEFAN WERMUTH/BLOOMBERG NEWS
FTC files complaint
against Smucker
A worker cleans a Mercedes-AMG G 63 auto at a Mercedes-Benz AG
event on Monday ahead of the Geneva International Motor Show. The
show opens to the public Thursday, and organizers said the focus
would be on electric vehicles. The first Geneva show was held in 1905.
The Federal Trade
Commission said Monday that it
had filed an administrative
complaint charging that J.M.
Smucker’s proposed purchase of
ConAgra’s Wesson cooking oil
brand would probably lessen
competition and violate antitrust
law.
Smucker owns the Crisco
brand. If it acquired the Wesson
brand, it would control at least
70 percent of the market for
branded canola and vegetable
oils sold to grocery stores and
other retailers, the FTC said in a
statement.
“The complaint alleges that
the acquisition is likely to
FOOD PRODUCTS
increase Smucker’s negotiating
leverage against retailers,
especially traditional grocers, by
eliminating the vigorous headto-head competition that exists
between the Crisco and Wesson
brands today,” the statement
said.
— Reuters
Walmart will start offering
prepared meals at its stores for
the first time, a move that could
help the nation’s biggest grocer
sell more food while siphoning
customers from restaurants.
Ten meals are available in 250
stores, and the program will
expand to 2,000 locations by
year’s end, Walmart executives
said in an interview. The
company also is introducing four
$15 meal-kit options in stores,
expanding a business that had
previously been offered only
online through outside vendors.
The move is the latest step to
improve Walmart’s grocery
business, the chain’s biggest
source of revenue. Prices of the
prepared meals will range from
$8 to $10, and varieties include
pot roast with mashed potatoes
and chicken enchiladas.
— Bloomberg News
ALSO IN BUSINESS
A judge has ordered “Pharma
Bro” Martin Shkreli to forfeit
more than $7.3 million in assets
in his securities fraud case. The
order issued Monday would
allow the government to go after
personal property that
prosecutors say includes a oneof-a-kind Wu-Tang Clan album
and other valuable collectibles
owned by the former
pharmaceutical executive. It says
the assets won’t be seized until
Shkreli has a chance to appeal.
The ride-hailing company Uber
broke Pennsylvania law when it
failed to notify potential victims,
including thousands of drivers,
for a year after it discovered
hackers had stolen their personal
information, the state’s attorney
general says. A lawsuit, filed
Monday in Philadelphia, said
hackers obtained the names and
driver’s license numbers of at
least 13,500 Pennsylvania Uber
drivers, Attorney General Josh
Shapiro said. His office did not
have details about riders who
were affected but asked
Pennsylvanians who believe they
may have been harmed by the
hack to file a complaint.
— From news services
COMING TODAY
Earnings: Target
TUESDAY, MARCH 6 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A13
RE
U.S. tari≠ plan could lead Europe and Canada to tax Harleys and bourbon
BY J AMES M C A ULEY
AND A LAN F REEMAN
paris — Slap tariffs on Kentucky
bourbon? Halt distribution of
Hollywood movies? Block U.S.
companies from bidding on foreign government contracts?
These are examples of the
measures being suggested in Europe and Canada as they face the
prospect of substantial tariffs on
their steel and aluminum industries announced last week by
President Trump.
Trade experts say that retaliation is a fine art, one in which the
goal is to inflict as much economic and political damage on
your opponent while not doing
your economy too much harm. In
economies as well-integrated as
the United States and Europe or
the United States and Canada, it
is likely to prove a challenge.
“It’s increasingly difficult to
find areas of U.S. imports that we
can do without or where we can
provide a domestically manufactured substitute,” said Royce
Mendes, a senior economist at
CIBC Capital Markets in Toronto.
Jean-Claude Juncker, the president of the European Commission, said that if Trump goes
ahead with the proposed tariffs
of 25 percent on U.S. imports of
steel and 10 percent on aluminum, the European Union would
respond by imposing tariffs on
American products such as
Harley-Davidson motorcycles,
Kentucky bourbon and Levi’s
blue jeans.
“We can also do stupid,”
Juncker said, speaking on German television.
His list hit both prime examples of classic Americana and
products manufactured in the
home states of key Republican leaders including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell
(Ky.) and House Speaker Paul D.
Ryan (Wis.).
“Those were just examples,”
said a European official, speaking on the condition of anonymity to discuss ongoing negotiations. “The list has been in
preparation for some time, and
of course more products are
potentially to be targeted. Basically, it’s more or less one-third
agricultural products, one-third
steel- and aluminum-related
products, and one-third other
products.”
Economists said those particular products nevertheless serve
a politically expedient purpose.
“It’s clear that what the E.U. at
this stage wants to do is to hit
politically sensitive areas and
districts in the U.S. in the hopes
that those districts, which have
an interest in trading with the
E.U., would then weigh on the
decision in Washington,” said
André Sapir, a trade expert and
DANIEL ACKER/BLOOMBERG NEWS
An employee moves an engine at the Harley-Davidson plant in
Menomonee Falls, Wis. Jean-Claude Juncker, president of the
European Commission, said that if President Trump’s plan to
impose tariffs on imported steel and aluminum proceeds, the
European Union will impose duties on Harleys and other products.
former adviser to the E.U.’s directorate general for economic and
financial affairs.
“It’s to try and change the
course of the decision, which has
not yet been taken.”
While Canadian companies
and governments argue for exemptions from the levies, there is
increasing recognition that Canada will not escape the tariffs
even if its industries are the
primary, if unintended, targets of
Trump’s protectionism.
Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has already called
the proposed tariffs “completely
unacceptable,” and Canada’s foreign minister, Chrystia Freeland,
has warned that Canada “will
take responsive measures to defend itself.”
The problem for the Canadian
government is to find ways to
retaliate “that will hit American
interests the most and Canadian
Economists
say tari≠s
could hurt
growth
TRADE FROM A1
a letter urging the president to
narrow the tariffs’ focus, while
high-ranking Senate Republicans
voiced their own opposition.
Sen. Orrin G. Hatch (R-Utah),
chairman of the Senate Finance
Committee, predicted that the
president ultimately will scrap
the trade levies.
“I think it would be a tragedy if
they continue on the course that
was announced,” said Hatch, who
blamed White House trade adviser Peter Navarro for steering the
president toward protectionist
policies.
The Republican lawmakers
went public after several days of
Trump airing his protectionist
views. In an early morning tweetstorm and subsequent Oval Office
remarks Monday, the president
doubled down on his trade offensive, telling reporters: “No, we’re
not backing down.”
At the White House, senior
aides like Gary Cohn, director of
the National Economic Council,
sought to persuade the president
to reconsider even as colleagues
labored over the legal work needed to implement the import taxes,
senior administration officials
said.
Trump vented his conviction
that the United States has been
“ripped off by virtually every
country in the world” on trade,
while mainstream Republicans
insisted that his tariffs would
backfire on American businesses
and consumers.
“My constituents are worried
about the cost of their beer cans,”
Sen. John Cornyn (R-Tex.) said.
“The price of cars. A tariff obviously is going to get passed on to
the consumer eventually in the
price of goods, and that ought to
WIN MCNAMEE/GETTY IMAGES
A spokeswoman for House Speaker Paul D. Ryan, at the podium above, said Ryan was “urging the
White House to not advance with this plan” for tariffs on steel and aluminum.
be everybody’s concern.”
White House tariff opponents
have warned the president that
the import levies will undermine
the buoyant stock market and sap
the strengthening economy,
which Trump routinely celebrates.
Economists at High Frequency
Economics said Monday that
Trump’s “trade warmongering” is
now the biggest danger for an
economy they expect will expand
by 3 percent this year.
“We don’t think this is a smart
economic policy decision, and [it]
could harm the economic progress that a lot of his policies have
helped bring about,” said Sen.
John Thune of South Dakota, the
No. 3 Senate Republican.
Senior Republicans hope to
persuade the president to abandon his new import tax of 25
percent on steel and 10 percent on
aluminum or at least exclude allies such as Canada.
But Trump threatened Monday
to include both Canada and Mexico in the tariffs unless they make
concessions to the United States
in talks over revising the North
American Free Trade Agreement.
“Canada must . . . treat our
farmers much better. Highly restrictive. Mexico must do much
more on stopping drugs from
pouring into the U.S. They have
not done what needs to be done.
Millions of people addicted and
dying,” he tweeted.
Hours earlier, he defended his
moves to protect the domestic
steel and aluminum industries,
declaring them “dead” otherwise.
Yet U.S. production of raw steel in
the fourth quarter of 2017 was
more than 50 percent above levels
at the depths of the 2009 recession and higher than the 25-year
average, according to Federal Reserve data.
Trump’s comments also are
likely to help countries that challenge the U.S. actions at the World
Trade Organization, according to
Edward Alden, a trade policy expert at the Council on Foreign
Relations. By stating that he
would exempt Mexico and Canada from the tariffs if they make
concessions on NAFTA, the president suggested that measures
billed as critical for U.S. national
security actually were economic
bargaining chips.
“This cuts the legs out from
under the administration’s claim
this was being done for national
security,” Alden said. “This is as
clear as signal as you can get that
the national security premise
here is a phony one.”
Trump reiterated his longstanding complaints about the
1994 NAFTA pact, labeling it a
“disaster” even as negotiators in
Mexico City were wrapping up
their latest round of talks aimed at
overhauling it. The president says
that Mexico and Canada have taken advantage of the United States
and wants any new agreement to
erase the U.S. trade deficit with
Mexico and return lost manufacturing jobs to the United States.
Negotiators in Mexico City reported limited progress. Only six
of 30 chapters have been agreed
upon, according to Robert E.
Lighthizer, the U.S. trade representative.
“We have not made the progress that many had hoped in this
round,” Lighthizer said.
Negotiations are complicated
by a crowded political calendar,
notably including the Mexican
presidential election in July.
interests the least,” said Gordon
Ritchie, who helped Canada negotiate its original free trade
agreement with the United
States in the late 1980s and was
involved in North American Free
Trade Agreement talks as well.
Even though there could be costs
to Canadian consumers, the government has no choice politically
but to hit back “very fast and very
hard.”
Ritchie compares the process
to facing down a newly arrived
schoolyard bully. You don’t want
the bully to think you’re an easy
target and repeatedly take advantage of you, he said.
Ritchie said that going after
California wine, Kentucky bourbon or Harley-Davidson motorcycles are good options because
“they’re high-profile and they’re
iconic.” And at the same time,
Canadian consumers still have a
plethora of choices for alcohol or
motorcycles. He also suggested
blocking
distribution
of
U.S.-made films in Canada, but
he acknowledged the risk of
provoking a domestic backlash.
Matthew Kronby, a Toronto
trade lawyer and former government negotiator, doubts California wine would be a good target
because it’s from a blue state. He
thinks Ottawa is looking to penalize “goods from red states
that supported Trump, that are
going to cause economic pain to
people who are close politically
to Trump.” Kronby suggested agricultural products as a probable
target.
Kronby also said that Canadian officials may have to impose
“safeguard” measures to protect
their country’s steel and aluminum industries from being flooded with products originally intended for the United States but
diverted to Canada. Those measures could include temporary
tariffs and quotas.
Another alternative would be
to ban U.S. companies from bidding on Canadian defense and
infrastructure contracts, Mendes, the economist, said. The advantage to that approach would
be that Canadian consumers
wouldn’t feel the impact in their
wallets.
When Boeing launched a complaint against Bombardier,
claiming that the Canadian company benefits from unfair government subsidies in the production of its C Series jet, the
Canadian government retaliated
by saying it wouldn’t consider
buying fighter jets from Boeing.
That dispute was effectively
settled in January, when the U.S.
International Trade Commission
voted that Boeing was not
harmed by Bombardier.
Trump’s saber-rattling will
make it harder to reach agreement, according to Jorge Guajardo, a former Mexican diplomat
now at McLarty Associates.
“Any trade deal has to be negotiated quietly, away from the spotlight,” he said. “Anytime you make
it public, you make it political. . . .
It does make things very, very
difficult.”
The president’s unconventional negotiating approach also
alarms many Republicans, who
fear it will disrupt $1.1 trillion
worth of U.S. trade with its northern and southern neighbors.
Trump last week disclosed
plans to impose the tariffs, following a Commerce Department
finding that rising volumes of inexpensive metal imports threatened national security.
The chief problem for domestic
steel and aluminum makers is
excess production by China,
which depresses global prices,
most analysts agree.
Lighthizer said he spoke to
Trump about the tariffs a couple
of days ago and the president
described a potential exemption
for Mexico and Canada as an inducement to reaching a deal.
“His view is that this will help
the process,” Lighthizer said. “It
was the president’s idea, it was not
my idea.”
Eric Miller, president of Rideau
Potomac Strategy Group, said
that the president was mistaken
in trying to address the effects of
excessive Chinese metals production via the NAFTA talks. Instead,
the United States should pursue
remedies through the 33-nation
global steel forum at the Organization for Economic Cooperation
and Development. Talks there are
scheduled to resume Wednesday
in Paris.
“The forum with the best
chance at a coordinated response
to the problem has been largely
ignored by the U.S.,” Miller said.
Trump’s proposed tariffs will
hit U.S. allies much harder than
China, according to Chad Bown, a
trade analyst with the Peterson
Institute for International Economics. Canada will lose an estimated $3.2 billion; the European
Union, $2.6 billion; South Korea,
$1.1 billion; and Mexico, $1 bil-
lion, he said, while China would
lose $689 million.
White House officials have not
decided precisely how the tariffs
will be applied, two people briefed
on the discussions said. There is
still a debate over whether Canada, Mexico and Britain should be
exempt from the measures, with
some aides arguing that these
longtime U.S. allies do not pose a
national security risk.
The tariffs would take effect at
a critical moment for economic
policymakers. After nearly a decade of historically low interest
rates, the Federal Reserve is gradually tightening monetary policy
to head off inflation. The tariffs
will nudge prices higher, and the
trend could accelerate if a cycle of
tit-for-tat retaliation takes effect
between the United States and its
trading partners.
If the Fed raises interest rates
too quickly, it could steer the
economy into its first episode of
stagflation — sluggish growth
coupled with fast-rising prices —
since the 1970s. “A round of protectionist measures can easily
turn into a stagflation due to missteps by policymakers,” High Frequency Economics economists
warned in a research note.
All major world economies are
expanding simultaneously for the
first time since the end of the
Great Recession.
In Geneva, Roberto Azevêdo,
the Brazilian diplomat who heads
the World Trade Organization,
echoed fears of a protectionist
America imperiling the global recovery.
“We now see a much higher and
real risk of triggering an escalation of trade barriers across the
globe. We cannot ignore this risk,
and I urge all parties to consider
and reflect on this situation very
carefully,” Azevêdo said. “Once we
start down this path, it will be very
difficult to reverse direction. An
eye for an eye will leave us all
blind and the world in deep recession.”
james.mcauley@washpost.com
Freeman reported from Ottawa.
david.lynch@washpost.com
erica.werner@washpost.com
damian.paletta@washpost.com
Joshua Partlow, Joshua Dawsey and
Philip Rucker contributed to this
report.
President says Canadian agricultural policies are hurting U.S. farmers
BY
C AITLIN D EWEY
President Trump fanned the
flames of a trade dispute between
the United States and Canada in a
Monday morning tweet that
claimed American farmers have
been hurt by Canada’s agricultural
policies.
“Canada must treat our farmers
much better. Highly restrictive,” he
wrote, as part of a series of tweets
about new steel and aluminum
tariffs that criticized the North
American Free Trade Agreement,
the 24-year-old deal that liberalized trade between the United
States, Canada and Mexico.
The president’s tweet appeared
to refer to a Canadian practice
known as supply management,
which protects domestic dairy, egg
and poultry producers through a
system of controlled production
and high import tariffs. The system
threatens to become a major obstacle in the renegotiation of NAFTA,
with U.S. negotiators calling for
changes — and Canadian politicians vowing that there “can be no
concession.”
U.S. dairy farmers say Canada
has abused the supply-management system to dump cheap milk
products in other markets. Thus
far in the NAFTA negotiations,
however, there has been little
movement on the dairy issue.
“From my vantage point, I don’t
even think they’ve had a significant
discussion,” said Darci Vetter, who
served as chief agricultural negotiator for the U.S. Trade Representative under the Obama administration. “And you don’t want to leave
something that is this important to
agriculture until the very end.”
The president’s tweets said Canada could not hope for relief from
steel and aluminum tariffs until
Canadian treatment of U.S. farmers is addressed in the NAFTA
negotiations.
Last April, the president tweeted
that Canada “has made business
for our dairy farmers in Wisconsin
and other border states very difficult,” and that the United States
“will not stand for this.” He told a
crowd in Wisconsin that month
that Canada’s dairy policy was a
“disgrace” and “another typical
CHRISTINNE MUSCHI/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Cows line up for milking at a farm in Granby, Quebec, last year. A
tweet by President Trump appeared to refer to dairy protections.
one-sided deal against the U.S.”
Jaime Castaneda, the senior vice
president for strategic initiatives
and trade policy at the National
Milk Producers Federation, which
represents U.S. dairy farmers and
cooperatives, is pushing for an
overhaul of Canada’s system.
“I think the president is correct
when he talks about Canada mistreating dairy farmers,” Castaneda
said. “We need to correct that.”
At issue, experts say, is an almost
50-year-old program that guarantees a stable minimum income to
Canadian farmers.
Under that system, the Canadian government limits how much
milk Canadian farmers can produce. Simultaneously, the government limits the amount of foreign
milk and other dairy products
coming into the country, slapping
excess imports with tariffs of up to
313 percent.
By controlling the milk supply,
the Canadian government can
guarantee dairy farmers good margins and unusually stable markets.
That has made the system enormously popular among Canadian
farmers.
But Canadian food manufacturers say it has inflated costs. American producers say Canada has
flooded the world market with
cheap milk powders.
That latter issue came to a head
in early 2017, when Ontario cracked
down on a loophole that allowed a
cheese-making ingredient called
ultrafiltered milk to enter the country duty-free. The move caused
dozens of Wisconsin farmers to
lose milk-processing contracts.
Dairy insiders say the change
also allowed Canadian farmers to
export large quantities of low-cost
skim milk powder. That has become a major concern to U.S. dairy
producers.
“We’re all out here in a very
competitive market for skim milk
powders,” said Michael Dykes, the
president and chief executive of the
International Dairy Foods Association. “And now we have Canada
undercutting us, when they’re the
highest-cost producers in the
world.”
Whether that can be done in the
context of NAFTA remains to be
seen. Canada has made some concessions in recent years, allowing
the European Union to ship more
cheese to the country duty-free.
But Canadian politicians have
vowed, much like Trump, to protect their farmers’ interests. Prime
Minister Justin Trudeau has argued that Canada is not to blame
for the problems of U.S. dairy farmers.
That makes it important for negotiators to come to the table, Vetter said. “We clearly have unfinished business here,” she said.
caitlin.dewey@washpost.com
A14
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 6 , 2018
Amazon tours D.C. area Chances of contempt for Bannon fade in GOP probe
in hunt for headquarters
BY
Officials visited sites in
Montgomery County,
the District, Northern Va.
BY
J ONATHAN O ’ C ONNELL
Officials from Amazon.com
toured sites in Washington, Montgomery County, Md., and Northern Virginia last week — the latest
sign that the tech giant is seriously
considering adding a second
headquarters with as many as
50,000 jobs to the D.C. area, according to officials in all three
jurisdictions.
There are at least nine sites in the
Washington area proposed for the
tech giant’s expansion, dubbed
HQ2. Officials from the firm toured
sites in Northern Virginia early in
the week, saw Washington in the
middle and Montgomery County at
the end, according to the officials,
some of whom spoke on the condition of anonymity because they had
signed agreements not to disclose
company information.
Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam (D)
said he had breakfast with Amazon
officials last week in Northern Virginia. The governor left the tours to
economic development staff, who
are pitching sites in Alexandria and
Arlington plus the Center for Innovative Technology campus on the
border of Fairfax and Loudoun
counties.
“We’ve had some really good discussions with Amazon,” Northam
said Friday in Richmond. “I think
that Amazon was impressed with
the presentation we gave them.”
D.C. Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D)
had dinner with Amazon representatives Wednesday night, according
to District officials. Bowser has proposed four fast-growing neighborhoods in the city, including behind
Union Station in Northeast, near U
Street in Northwest and straddling
the Anacostia River in Southeast. A
fourth proposal calls for razing and
rezoning a large parcel near Capitol
Hill and RFK Stadium, dubbed Hill
East.
In Maryland, Amazon.com is
considering land around the White
Flint Metro station, including the
former White Flint Mall site on
Rockville Pike, according to officials
familiar with the Montgomery
County proposal.
Three of the final 20 locations on
Amazon’s list are in the Washington
area, fueling speculation that the
company founded by Jeffrey P. Bezos, who also owns The Washington
Post, will make its second home in
the area. Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R) has proposed a $5 billion
incentive package to lure the firm,
while D.C. and Virginia officials
have made their own lucrative offers that they have not disclosed.
On Friday, Northam declined to
give details on incentives, but he
said the state’s pitch centered on
workforce development, inclusivity
and transportation, along with
quality of life.
Spokesmen for Amazon declined
to answer questions about the
search but issued a statement saying: “Amazon is working with each
HQ2 candidate city to dive deeper
on their proposals and share additional information about the company’s plans. We’re excited to visit
each location and talk about how
HQ2 could benefit our employees
and the local community.”
Whether or not Amazon chooses
a Washington-area location, its
growing interest coincides with
what appears to be gathering momentum around a permanent funding solution for Metro. Bowser has
been a stalwart supporter of a permanent solution, and on Friday —
while Amazon officials may have
still been in town — Hogan announced he would support a bill
now before the Maryland legislature to provide an additional
$150 million annually to the system.
Hogan spokesmen did not immediately respond to requests for
comment on Amazon.
Northam expressed optimism
that Virginia legislative leaders
would reach a Metro funding agreement soon as well. “I think that
whether it’s Amazon or any other
business, we need to fix Metro, that’s
the bottom line,” he said.
Amazon plans to make a selection by the end of this year. It is
seeking 8 million square feet of office space to grow into over 10 years
or more, including 500,000 square
feet beginning in 2019.
jonathan.oconnell@washpost.com
Robert McCartney and Laura Vozzella
contributed to this report.
K AROUN D EMIRJIAN
House Republicans are backing away from plans to potentially hold former White House strategist Stephen K. Bannon in contempt of Congress for refusing to
fully comply with an Intelligence
Committee subpoena, according
to people in both parties familiar
with the panel’s probe of Russian
interference in the 2016 election.
Republican leaders of the
probe emerged from a second
interview with Bannon last
month promising to take “further
steps,” potentially including a
contempt citation, to force him to
answer questions about the
Trump administration’s transition period. But in the weeks
since, people familiar with the
Labeling battle erupts
as start-ups seek
to produce meat in a lab
BY
C AITLIN D EWEY
It may be years before consumers can buy burgers grown in labs
or tenderloins cultured in test
tubes. But as investors pour funds
into the “clean meat” industry,
beef producers are petitioning
regulators to ensure that the new
products can’t bear “meat” or
“beef” labels.
Beef producers say such labels
risk obscuring the origins of these
new products — meats that are
grown from cell cultures in a lab,
not on animals. And while producers claim they aren’t concerned about future competition,
the names these products carry
could ultimately determine their
success.
“Clean meat” has a certain ring
to it, after all. “Lab-grown cultured meat product” sounds like a
cousin of pink slime. It’s the reason beef producers and clean meat
advocates are committed to a
long-term battle over the terms
used to describe cultured meat.
“We are very concerned about
truthful labeling,” said Lia Biondo,
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DAVID PARRY/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
It looks like ground meat, but it was produced in a laboratory. Beef
producers do not want new products grown from cell cultures to be
called “meat” or “beef.” Meanwhile, investors are pouring funds
into the “clean meat” industry.
a spokeswoman for the U.S. Cattlemen’s Association. “Our members
want to give consumers all of the
information they need to make
decisions.”
Last month, the Cattlemen's Association filed a petition asking
the Agriculture Department to
prevent cultured and plant-based
meat companies from using the
terms “beef” and “meat.”
Separately, the National Cattlemen's Beef Association (NCBA), a
larger industry group, has begun
meeting with the USDA and the
Food and Drug Administration to
discuss the regulation of cultured
meat and future product labels.
The organization is concerned
not only about use of the term
clean meat but also about the
potential use of USDA quality
seals and the disclosure of the fact
that cultured meat products don’t
come from conventional animals,
said Danielle Beck, NCBA’s director of governmental affairs. Beef
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answer certain questions. Lewandowski is expected to appear before the panel on Thursday, but
members are still unsure about
how much more forthcoming he
will be.
There is also a time crunch that
some believe is helping to dissuade Republicans from pursuing Bannon’s testimony further:
Republicans on the panel are
trying to roll out a final report on
its Russia probe in the coming
weeks, and Lewandowski is the
last witness currently scheduled
for an interview, according to
multiple people familiar with the
probe. Democrats are not expected to endorse the GOP’s conclusions, but issue a report of their
own instead.
karoun.demirjian@washpost.com
producers don’t want consumers
to get the impression that cultured meat undergoes the same
food safety and quality inspections as conventional beef, Beck
added.
Both organizations are reacting
to the rapid growth of a handful of
buzzy, well-funded start-ups seeking to clone meat from animal
tissue samples. Although the field
is still small, investments by the
big-meat firms Tyson and Cargill
have solidified the impression
that it could become a major force,
propelled by concerns about the
environmental costs of animal agriculture.
Beef producers say they are
worried that consumers will not
fully understand the difference
between their products and those
of their competitors.
The leading meat alternatives
on the market, such as Beyond
Meat’s Beyond Burger and Impossible Foods’ Impossible Burger,
typically use terms such as “plantbased.” Those products, which use
isolated plant proteins to mimic
beef, are essentially the second
generation of the soy- and beanbased veggie burgers that became
popular in the 1980s and ’90s.
Cultured meat will go one step
further still, and it’s unclear how
those products will brand and differentiate themselves. Ranchers
have already begun bristling at the
aggressive branding of “clean
meat” over “cultured” or “labgrown” meat that more clearly
declare the products’ origins.
“We have a big problem with
that,” said Beck, of the NCBA. “It
implies something negative about
our own product, and we don’t
believe that has a basis in science
or fact.”
But “clean meat” has no intention of giving up its name, said
Jessica Almy, policy director at the
Good Food Institute, which advocates for alternatives to conventional animal meat.
The term clean meat is intended to communicate the environmental benefits of cultured meat
products, Almy said.
Of course, the name that’s eventually given to clean meat could
have a dramatic effect on its performance in the market. Food label disclosures always carry a cost
for someone, said Glynn Tonsor, a
Kansas State agricultural economist.
Right now, clean meat is a niche
market that does not threaten beef
sales. To become a threat, clean
meat will have to win over mainstream meat-eaters — and the label it sells under will affect that.
“There are already a lot of alternative proteins out there,” Tonsor
said — including chicken and
Boca Burgers. “But this is the first
one that’s using the term ‘meat’ in
its marketing and on its labels.”
caitlin.dewey@washpost.com
4 features of the Senate’s legislation
to ease major banking regulations
WIN A PAIR OF TICKETS
Q
about the need to ensure his
compliance, but we have not been
able to get a clear answer about
when, which is concerning,” said
top panel Democrat Rep. Adam B.
Schiff (Calif.). “As they were right
to point out at the time, if you let
witnesses come in and simply
stonewall you, you can expect
more of the same and indeed we
have seen more of the same since
Bannon came in.”
Schiff, who still hopes the panel will hold Bannon in contempt,
has also pressed GOP members to
subpoena additional testimony
from witnesses such as outgoing
White House communications director Hope Hicks and former
Trump campaign manager Corey
Lewandowski, who appeared before the panel but refused to
Cattle ranchers are asking: Who has the ‘beef’?
MARCH FUN-NESS
Q
matter say, there has been zero
urgency to pursue further action
against Bannon or even discuss
the matter with House Speaker
Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.), whose
buy-in is critical to issuing such a
citation.
On Monday, K. Michael Conaway (R-Tex.), the top Republican
on the House’s Russia probe, said
he would “maybe” meet with
Ryan to discuss contempt but
offered no timeline about when
that conversation might take
place. But with committee Republicans pushing for a fast close
to the Russia probe, many panel
members doubt that Ryan and
Conaway will actually deliver on a
contempt citation for Bannon.
Republicans “made a number
of very unequivocal statements
R ENAE M ERLE
The Senate is slated to pass
sweeping legislation this week to
roll back key components of financial regulations put in place after
the global financial crisis.
The passage of the legislation
would be the most significant step
taken by the Senate to help fulfill
President Trump’s promise to loosen financial-industry regulations
that the White House has said are
holding back the economy. The bill,
which has garnered bipartisan support, takes aim at the Dodd-Frank
Act of 2010 and would free dozens
of financial institutions from the
strictest rules put in place by regulators after the financial crisis.
The legislation, sponsored by
Sen. Mike Crapo (R-Idaho), chairman of the Senate Banking Committee, faces a procedural vote as
early as Tuesday. Should it pass that
hurdle, many expect it to receive
the 60 votes necessary to pass the
full Senate given that the changes
have Democratic support. The
House has already passed legislation that would repeal larger
chunks of Dodd-Frank, so proponents’ biggest remaining challenge
may be to reconcile the House and
Senate versions.
Here are four of some of the most
significant aspects of the Senate
legislation:
How big is big? Banks with
more than $50 billion in assets are
considered “too big to fail” and
undergo the strictest regulatory
scrutiny, including a yearly stress
test to prove they could survive
another period of economic turmoil. The proposed legislation
would raise that threshold to
$250 billion in assets, potentially
allowing several high-profile financial institutions, including American Express, Ally Financial and
Barclays, to escape the extra regulatory scrutiny.
Community and regional banks
have long complained that the regulations are excessive and saddle
them with extra compliance costs
they don’t deserve. The change
would give them more control over
how much capital they keep,
whether they issue dividends to
shareholders or buy back stock.
The Federal Reserve would retain
the ability to apply extra scrutiny to
some financial institutions, but
overall the bill would reduce the
number of banks considered “too
big to fail” from 38 to 12.
Democrats and consumer
groups note that it wasn’t just the
country’s biggest banks that needed taxpayer bailouts during the financial crisis. The failure of smaller
banks also contributed to the economic turmoil that rocked the financial system, they say. Loosening
regulatory oversight of these institutions could put taxpayers at risk
again, they say.
The Volcker rule. The legislation would also offer small banks
relief from one of the most controversial aspects of Dodd-Frank. The
Volcker rule, named for former Federal Reserve chairman Paul Volcker, bars banks from making risky
wagers with their own money. The
rule has been criticized for being
too cumbersome and time-consuming.
The Senate bill would exempt
from the rule small financial institutions with less than $10 billion in
total assets. Such institutions do
not engage in the type of risky
trading that the rule aims to curb,
the industry says. But leaders of at
least one powerful banking regulator, the Federal Deposit Insurance
Corp., say the exemption could allow risks to creep back into the
financial system. “It does open a
door,” FDIC Vice Chairman Thomas Hoenig told the Wall Street Journal in an interview.
Mortgage data. The legislation
also offers small and regional banks
relief from some mortgage lending
restrictions. It would be easier, for
example, to offer a loan that meets
federal standards.
But Democrats and some advocacy groups are concerned that the
bill would also get rid of a requirement that banks report more data
on whom they lend money to. This
data helps regulators spot potential
discrimination against minorities,
they say. The Senate bill would
exempt banks that make 500 or
fewer mortgages a year from additional reporting requirements.
The Senate bill “would allow for
the return of many of the same
lending practices that caused the
mortgage meltdown,” said Yana
Miles, senior legislative counsel for
the Center for Responsible Lending, a research and policy group
that seeks to curb predatory lending.
What about the CFPB? The
Senate legislation is as significant
for what it doesn’t do as what it
does. When the House passed a
major rollback of Dodd-Frank last
year, it included measures to weaken the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. That was important to
Republicans who say the bureau,
created under Dodd-Frank, has
been too aggressive and needs to be
reined in. The House legislation, for
example, stripped the CFPB of its
power to write major rules regulating consumer financial companies,
such as debt collectors, without
getting approval from Congress.
But that legislation failed to gain
traction in the Senate, in large part
because of its attack on the CFPB.
That was a non-starter for Democrats who have lashed out at any
efforts to weaken the agency. To
attract Democratic co-sponsors in
the Senate, the Crapo bill is silent
on one of Republicans’ biggest
gripes, the power of the CFPB.
renae.merle@washpost.com
TUESDAY, MARCH 6 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A15
RE
PowerPost
INTELLIGENCE FOR LEADERS WASHINGTONPOST.COM/POWERPOST
Kushner is part of a big club when it comes to security clearance problems
If anything good
emerges from
Jared Kushner’s
predicament, it
will be sustained
improvements to
Federal
a security
Insider
clearance process
that has trapped
JOE
people who are
DAVIDSON
far more
qualified.
It wouldn’t be the first
attempt.
President Trump anointed
Kushner to a top White House
post, his main qualification
being a loyal son-in-law. But
Kushner no longer has access to
the nation’s most precious
information after he and others
lost their interim top-secret
clearances amid backgroundcheck complications.
If information is power,
Kushner now has less of both.
Although it is not unusual for
clearances to be granted and
withdrawn, Kushner’s case has
the odor of the chaotic swamp at
1600 Pennsylvania Ave. It comes
amid fallout from assault
allegations against Rob Porter, a
former Trump aide who also had
an interim clearance, and the
dizzying turnover of West Wing
personnel.
But Kushner’s situation points
to issues beyond Trump’s illadvised notion that nepotism is
okay in the White House,
particularly when the relative
has no particularly relevant
qualifications. Those same issues
led to a major revamp of the
security clearance process just
two years ago with the creation
of the National Background
Investigations Bureau (NBIB) as
a self-described “agile . . . and
robust talent acquisition” agency.
It was launched after a string
of high-profile controversies. The
Obama administration fired
USIS, a background-check firm,
amid accusations that it failed to
complete 665,000 investigations.
USIS also was roundly criticized
because its investigations cleared
Edward Snowden, the 2013
National Security Agency leaker,
and Aaron Alexis, who killed 12
people at the Washington Navy
Yard that same year.
Despite the 2016 overhaul, the
clearance process still needs
repair.
“As [Director of National
Intelligence Daniel] Coats has
stated, today’s system of granting
security clearances — essentially
the same system that was in
place in 1947 — is broken,” Sen.
Mark R. Warner (D-Va.) told the
Federal Insider by email. “The
process takes too long, costs too
much and is too complicated. It
no longer serves the government
agencies or their industry
partners.”
Mark Zaid, a Washington
national security lawyer, has
problems with the process, but “I
would disagree that the system is
broken,” he said, adding for
emphasis that “the White House
system in this administration is
broken.”
While many federal employees
and contractors face some
elements of Kushner’s situation,
other aspects point to the
favoritism he enjoyed. Calling it
a “politicization of the clearance
process,” Zaid said it is “virtually,
if not completely
unprecedented” for anyone with
an interim clearance to have
access to the presidential daily
brief, the top-secret information
provided to the president every
day, as Kushner did.
Warner is vice chairman of the
Senate Select Committee on
Intelligence, which will hold a
hearing Wednesday on security
clearance overhauls. “I hope the
Intelligence Committee’s hearing
will not only diagnose the
current maladies,” the senator
said, “but offer bold ideas to
provide the transformation
required to provide us with the
trusted workforce our nation’s
security requires.”
The Government
Accountability Office returned
the security clearance process to
its “High Risk List” in January.
That was between the regular
two-year updates. “It’s very
unusual to place an area on our
High Risk list out of cycle,” said
Brenda S. Farrell, the GAO’s
director of defense capabilities
and management. “We placed
clearances on the list out of cycle
because it represents one of the
highest management risks in the
federal government.”
Federal “agencies are unable
to investigate and process
personnel security clearances in
a timely manner, contributing to
a significant backlog of
background investigations,
totaling more than 700,000 cases
as of September 2017,” according
to a GAO news release. That is
almost four times as large as in
2014.
At Wednesday’s hearing,
Farrell will probably reiterate
issues found in two recent
reports she managed. The GAO
found a lack of long-term goals
to address the backlog and
delays in processing security
clearances.
In fiscal 2012, 59 percent of
executive-branch agencies the
GAO reviewed “reported meeting
investigation and adjudication
timeliness objectives for initial
top-secret clearances,” says its
December report. In 2016, that
percentage fell to 10 percent.
The GAO has several
recommendations, including for
the NBIB to develop a plan “for
reducing the backlog to a
‘healthy’ inventory of work,
representing approximately
6 weeks of work.”
The bureau “has taken steps to
improve the background
investigation process” but must
do more, the GAO said. It “has
not developed a plan for
reducing the backlog or
established goals for increasing
total investigator capacity.
Without such a plan and goals,
the backlog may persist and
executive branch agencies will
continue to lack the cleared
personnel needed to help
execute their respective
missions.”
Kushner, like many others, got
caught in that backlog. But it
wasn’t government bureaucracy
that doomed his top-secret
clearance. In fact, he was treated
better than other federal
employees and contractors
ensnared by the clearance
process.
“What seems to differ about
Jared Kushner’s case is that he
was allowed to access top-secret
information even though he only
had an interim clearance, and
now that his access to that topsecret information has been
denied, he’s still employed even
though his job requires access to
that information,” said Debra A.
D’Agostino, founding partner of
the Federal Practice Group.
“Most of my clients would find
themselves indefinitely
suspended.”
joe.davidson@washpost.com
Democratic committees butt heads over their roles in the 2018 primaries
The first primaries
of 2018 in Texas on
Tuesday could set
the tune for six
JAMES
months of
HOHMANN
Democratic
infighting.
The Democratic
Congressional Campaign
Committee has been taking fire
from the left since publishing
opposition research on Laura
Moser, a progressive candidate in a
crowded Democratic primary field
to take on Rep. John Abney
Culberson (R). The campaign arm
for House Democrats concluded
that Moser could not win the
general election in a suburban
Houston district Hillary Clinton
narrowly carried. Among other
things, she wrote a piece for
Washingtonian magazine in 2014
that said she’d “sooner have my
teeth pulled out without
anesthesia” than move to where
her grandparents live in rural
Texas.
Democratic National Committee
Chairman Tom Perez does not
think the DCCC should have
publicized that information. “I
wouldn’t have done it,” he told me
and USA Today’s Susan Page in an
interview that aired Sunday on CSPAN’s “Newsmakers” series.
“We’re at our best as Democrats
when we talk about the issues. . . . I
don’t believe we should be
The
Daily 202
anointing candidates. The people
in Texas are the people who should
be making the choices in Texas.”
The public split showcased the
diverging priorities of the party
committees. The DCCC is willing to
play the role of bad cop because
leaders think it’s the only way to
pick up the 24 seats needed to win
the House majority. The DNC,
which Perez has now led for a year,
is trying to restore trust that was
lost in the national party during the
contentious 2016 nominating
contest between Clinton and
Bernie Sanders.
“One thing we’ve learned at the
DNC is that when you, in fact or in
perception, are trying to put the
thumb on the scale in a spirited
primary, that can undermine
public confidence in us,” Perez said.
“That’s why we’ve been neutral.”
A constellation of liberal groups
— from Justice Democrats and
Credo Action to the Sandersaligned Our Revolution —
launched online petitions last week
telling DCCC Chairman Ben Ray
Luján to “stop attacking
progressives.”
The DCCC anticipated this
blowback. The veteran operatives
who work there could have easily
placed each of the “oppo hits” on
Moser in the news media with no
fingerprints attached. The fact that
they didn’t was as significant as the
underlying content of the message.
They were sending a signal about
their willingness to wade into
crowded primaries and were
gauging the reaction from the left
as they plot strategy for looming
primary fights.
These operatives expect that it
will be imperative to intervene in
California, where a jungle primary
system means that the top two
finishers in June will face each
other in November, regardless of
their party. If there are bunches of
Democrats splitting the vote, that
could allow two Republicans to
make it to the runoff.
“As we’ve indicated all cycle, the
DCCC is keeping all options on the
table to work with our allies and
ensure that there’s a competitive
Democrat on the ballot for voters to
elect in November,” Meredith Kelly,
the DCCC’s communications
director, said on Sunday.
Republicans are hopeful that
record numbers of Democratic
primary candidates will lead to
squabbling and push the eventual
nominees to the left in places such
as Texas’s 7th District. The
Congressional Leadership Fund, a
super PAC backed by House
Speaker Paul D. Ryan, has been
looking for opportunities to sow
division. On Friday, the group
published internal polling that
showed Moser gaining since the
DCCC’s attacks.
Talking with Democrats over the
weekend about the
appropriateness of wading into
primaries sparked a sense of deja
vu: I had almost identical
conversations with strategists at
the Republican committees and
outside groups when they were out
of the White House. Republicans
blew a lot of winnable races during
the Obama years because
unelectable candidates prevailed in
primaries, from Christine
O’Donnell and Sharron Angle in
2010 to Todd Akin and Richard
Mourdock in 2012. Allies of Mitch
McConnell became more
aggressive in 2014, and it helped
him become Senate majority
leader. On the other hand, going
after tea partyers earned the
enmity of the base — and helped
lead to the disenchantment with
the party establishment that
allowed for the rise of Donald
Trump in 2016.
Just like his GOP counterparts
used to do, Perez said heated
primaries make his party stronger.
He noted that Ralph Northam won
the Virginia governor’s race in
November despite a credible
primary challenge from former
congressman Tom Perriello on his
left. “Everybody who went to the
polls felt like they had a fair shake,
and their candidate had a fair
shake,” Perez said. “It has increased
turnout, and it has really put wind
at our back going into general
ADVERTISEMENT
GOP’s Cochran to retire from Senate
BY S EAN S ULLIVAN
AND P AUL K ANE
Sen. Thad Cochran (R-Miss.)
will resign from the Senate on
April 1, he announced Monday,
ending a four-decade congressional career and triggering a fall
election that could carve new divisions in the Republican Party and
put the GOP Senate majority at
greater risk.
Cochran, 80, has been suffering
from health problems in recent
months. He missed several weeks
in the Senate last fall while recuperating from a urinary tract infection. He has appeared frail
since his return and has been
keeping a low public profile.
“I regret my health has become
an ongoing challenge,” Cochran
said in a statement. “I intend to
fulfill my responsibilities and
commitments to the people of
Mississippi and the Senate
through the completion of the
2018 appropriations cycle, after
which I will formally retire.”
First elected to the Senate in
1978 after a stint in the House,
Cochran is one of the longest-serving members of Congress in history. He is the chairman of the
Appropriations Committee, a
powerful panel with jurisdiction
over government spending. When
he steps down, the chairmanship
is expected to pass to Sen. Richard
C. Shelby (R-Ala.), who is next in
the line of seniority.
“He’s been a good friend of mine
for 32 years, and so I wished him
well,” Shelby told reporters in the
Capitol shortly after Cochran’s announcement. He confirmed that
he would like to claim the gavel.
“I would be interested in it at
the proper time,” Shelby said.
As Cochran grew frail, the committee’s public profile shrank. Ac-
cording to the committee’s website, Cochran has not presided
over a public hearing since September. Senators and staffers are
working behind closed doors to
draw up the final details of the
annual agency budgets, with a
March 23 deadline approaching.
Beyond shaking up the Senate,
Cochran’s exit will affect the battle
for the Senate majority. It gives
Republicans another seat to defend at a moment of great uncertainty about the midterms.
Republicans hold a 51-to-49 advantage over Democrats, who are
facing a tough map on which they
are defending 10 seats in states
President Trump won. But
Trump’s unpopularity and controversies, along with headwinds any
president’s party historically faces
in a first midterm, have given
Democrats hope of seizing back
control of the upper chamber.
At the same time, recent polling
trends have shown some positive
indicators for Republicans, who
believe that passing a sweeping
tax law last year gave them a signature achievement on which to run.
There will be two Senate races
in Mississippi this year because of
Cochran’s departure. A special
election for his seat will be held on
the same day as the regularly
scheduled Nov. 6 midterms.
In the meantime, Republican
Gov. Phil Bryant will be in charge
of appointing a replacement for
Cochran. Senate Majority Leader
Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) has
asked Bryant to consider appointing himself to the seat, according
to people familiar with their conversations. But Bryant has shown
no signs he is gearing up to do that.
Unlike the regular election this
year for Republican Sen. Roger
Wicker’s seat, candidates for
Cochran’s seat would not compete
in a primary, and if no one got
more than 50 percent of the vote in
November, the top two finishers
would compete in a runoff.
Chris McDaniel, a hard-right
Republican state senator who lost
to Cochran in a nasty 2014 primary, announced last week that he
would run against Wicker. But he
left the door open to switching to a
race for Cochran’s seat if one were
to take place.
“I am currently focused on my
campaign against Roger Wicker,
but all options remain on the table
as we determine the best way to
ensure that Mississippi elects conservatives to the United States
Senate,” McDaniel said.
McDaniel represents perhaps
the last best hope for the insurgent
wing of the GOP, in which former
White House chief strategist Stephen K. Bannon and his allies
have been plotting to shake up the
Republican order by elevating
candidates hostile to McConnell.
The loss in Alabama’s special
election by Republican Roy
Moore, who faced allegations of
sexual misconduct against teenage girls when he was in his 30s,
was a blow to Bannon, who backed
Moore and hoped a victory would
provide momentum in future races. It was also a blow to Trump,
who stuck by Moore, even as many
other party leaders disavowed
him after the allegations were first
reported by The Washington Post.
Cochran’s resignation marks
another step in the passing from a
more genteel climate in the Senate
to an era of partisan frenzy. “He’s
the old school,” said Sen. Patrick J.
Leahy (Vt.), the panel’s ranking
Democrat. “He has always, always,
always kept his word, and I wish to
heck some other senators around
here would learn to do that.”
sean.sullivan@washpost.com
elections. . . . We have to be careful
not to confuse unity with
unanimity.”
Because the DNC is staying on
the sidelines, the DCCC is
becoming a sort of boogeyman on
the left. A black Democratic
candidate in Pennsylvania last
week accused the committee of
trying to nudge him out of the race
in favor of white candidates, which
the party denied.
Against the backdrop of this
intraparty wrangling, there is
growing evidence of especially
strong Democratic enthusiasm.
For example, a record number of
candidates are running for
Congress this year. Paul Kane
pulled the numbers for his Sunday
column: “By Dec. 31, 2017, more
than 2,100 people had taken at least
the first step toward running for
the House or Senate by filing the
necessary paperwork, according to
records kept by the Federal
Election Commission. For context,
that’s almost twice as many
candidates who launched
congressional campaigns in 2015. It
represents the most candidates at
this stage of the election season
since the FEC started keeping these
records, in 1977. . . .
“By Dec. 31, some 1,133
candidates had filed to run as
Democrats for House seats, easily
the largest crop either party has
ever assembled at that point of an
election cycle. . . . Even
Republicans, with 689 declared
candidates for the House in 2017,
have their second-largest field ever,
trailing only 2009. That massive
crop of 745 candidates, the secondlargest ever for any party, set the
stage for the 2010 midterm wave
that delivered Republicans the
House majority.”
In Texas alone there are 111
House candidates. For the first time
in 25 years, at least one Democrat is
running in all 36 of the state’s
congressional districts. In 2016, the
party didn’t even field a challenger
against eight GOP incumbents. “On
a state legislative level, Democrats
have candidates in 132 of the 150
state House districts and in 14 of
the 15 state Senate districts up for
election this year,” NPR’s Jessica
Taylor notes.
“Thanks largely to a huge surge
in Democratic turnout, Texans in
the 15 largest counties have
smashed the record for early voting
in a non-presidential year,”
Jonathan Tilove reports for the
Austin American-Statesman. “ . . .
While there is no necessary
correlation between primary and
general election turnout, more
than twice as many people voted
early in the Democratic primaries
in 2018 as in 2014, while
Republican early voting crept up
by 15 percent.”
james.hohmann@washpost.com
ADVERTISEMENT
Greater Transparency Essential for Improving
Access to Cancer Care
When people first receive a cancer diagnosis, they must quickly become versed in
various treatments and their potential side effects, as well as where and when they
will be treated. But that is only the start of the cancer experience. Once a cancer
patient chooses the treatment regimen that is right for him or her, the next step
is figuring out how much it all will cost, how to pay for it and whether the doctors
and treatment centers are in their coverage network – a process made even more
challenging by a healthcare system that is hard to understand. Access to treatment
and care – from affordability to proximity to quality care – is one of the more urgent
issues facing cancer patients today.
It’s no secret that the U.S. healthcare system is among the most complex in the
world. It can be dizzying to understand the vocabulary of healthcare, from health
insurance to hospital and provider care to pharmaceutical drugs and diagnostic
tests. The lack of clear, easily understandable and easily located information
disadvantages many patients from accessing the lifesaving care they need.
For example, patients are often left wondering how the cost of a particular test
or hospital visit is determined and why the same treatment might cost differently
depending on where in the country they live or what health insurer or pharmacy
benefit manager they have. Patients often face high out-of-pocket costs for their
treatments, or may find that the treatments are not covered.
It doesn’t have to be this way. We can make our healthcare system more transparent
and in turn, more accessible by improving how and what we communicate to
patients, as well as establishing policies that make it possible for patients to afford
their treatments.
The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS) is on the front lines of the fight against
cancer. We are a “patients first” organization, and are advocating for a variety
of solutions to increase transparency and access. These include: ensuring that
insurers comply with state and federal rules that require them to make formularies
easily accessible to consumers and to offer networks that contain an adequate
mix of healthcare providers; encouraging doctors to discuss the cost of various
treatment options with their patients; and pushing for public policies that will make
consumers’ cost-sharing obligations more easily understood.
If every player in the cancer ecosystem is willing to put patients first and adopt
transparency as a standard of doing business, we could help cancer patients focus
on what really matters – beating the disease and living a longer life.
To learn more about how access and transparency impact cancer patients,
visit LLS.org/CancerCost.
A16
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
ABCDE
letters@washpost.com
Lessons on protectionism
EDITORIALS
Taking aim at Dodd-Frank
The financial reform law might just ride out Republicans’ deregulatory wave.
“W
subject to stricter capital requirements and other
crisis-prevention rules would grow from $50 billion
to $250 billion. The effect of the latter change would
be to relax crisis-prevention controls on 26 of the
38 biggest banks in the United States, though the
Federal Reserve could adjust that in certain cases.
The bill will certainly please much of the financial
sector, especially politically influential community
banks; but this is not the same as saying it is wise: The
failure of one or more $200 billon banks could pose
systemic risks. Nor is it necessary. Community banks
— 92 percent of federally insured institutions — are
generally doing fine, according to the latest Federal
Deposit Insurance Corp. statistics, which show that
lending grew among these institutions during 2017,
and that fourth-quarter net income would have
increased 17 percent from a year ago but for one-time
income tax charges. Indeed, bank stability and
profitability had both recovered in recent years
under Dodd-Frank, as has the economy as a whole,
thus calling into question the bank lobby’s claim that
deregulation is vital to restored growth.
A blow to
Europe’s center
A case could be made that further toughening of
capital requirements for the largest banks is in
order and that Democrats should have insisted on it
as the price of regulatory relief for small ones.
Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis President
Neel Kashkari advocates a 38 percent equity capital
minimum — which could force the giants to break
up. You don’t have to agree with Mr. Kashkari to
worry nevertheless that the Senate bill sets a
precedent for the biggest institutions to demand
lower capital requirements the next time Congress
takes up the issue.
For now, that doesn’t seem politically possible;
the Senate bill could represent the high-water mark
of this Republican deregulatory wave. The House
financial deregulation bill, which really would gut
Dodd-Frank, has no chance of attracting enough
Democratic support to pass the Senate. Though
weakened, the basic Dodd-Frank regulatory framework might just survive two years of Republican
control of the presidency and Congress, which
certainly beats the alternative.
TOM TOLES
I
Star parties, which he called “the ultimate dream.”
Fortunately, that appears less than likely, for now; the
two parties have very different profiles, and Mr. Salvini, who is allied with Mr. Berlusconi and other
far-right parties, suggested he wasn’t interested.
At best Italy will muddle through, as it frequently
does, with a government that focuses on the country’s
deep domestic problems — such as a 35 percent youth
unemployment rate — and does not seek to blow up
the European Union or NATO. But even such a benign
outcome will raise the pressure on Europe’s remaining centrists, led by German Chancellor Angela
Merkel and French President Emmanuel Macron, to
provide solutions, both for their own restive societies
and for Europe as a whole.
The good news of the weekend was that a new
coalition government led by Ms. Merkel was finally
approved by members of her partner Social Democratic Party — the result of an election last September
in which the center was battered but not defeated. It
now falls to Ms. Merkel to seek with Mr. Macron
reforms that will promote growth in struggling E.U.
countries such as Italy, while continuing to defend
liberal democratic principles. At stake is nothing less
than the survival of the West as the world has known
it since 1945.
Mr. Hogan’s Metro breakthrough
The Maryland governor’s shift on transit broke a logjam to bail out the system. Now it’s Virginia’s turn.
A
S A MARYLAND gubernatorial candidate in
2014 appealing to exurban and rural voters,
Larry Hogan seemed to regard subways and
buses as white elephants sponging up cash
better used to build roads.
But three years into his term in office, Mr. Hogan
(R) has made a break with his past and can credibly
claim to have been the decisive factor in turning the
regional tide in favor of a workable bailout for Metro,
the national capital area’s ailing transit system.
The bailout, which would provide Metro with an
earmarked funding source for the first time in the
rail service’s 40-year history, remains in doubt
pending the outcome of negotiations this week
among Republican lawmakers who control Virginia’s state legislature. Still, it is partly thanks to Mr.
Hogan’s leadership that Richmond and Annapolis
have edged so close to putting Metro on a par with
the nation’s other major transit systems, virtually all
of which rely on a reliable stream of annual state or
local dollars that they can use as collateral to finance
major improvement projects.
On Friday, Mr. Hogan, who only last summer
adamantly opposed any additional state funding for
Metro, struck a deal with Democrats who control the
legislature in Annapolis to add $150 million to
Maryland’s annual capital subsidy for Metro. The
funds, which are contingent on an equivalent commitment from Virginia and the District, would more
than double the state’s current allotment. They
would be drawn not from new taxes but from
existing transportation projects elsewhere — including roads in rural areas that overwhelmingly backed
Mr. Hogan’s candidacy in 2014.
If matched by Virginia and the District, the new
funding would amount to $450 million annually,
10 percent short of the $500 million that Metro says
it needs to restore itself to a top-notch transit
network. Still, the governor’s evolution reflects a
clear-eyed view that the suburbs served by Metro are
a key engine driving Maryland’s growth. As Mr. Hogan evidently grasps, starving Metro of funding
would sap the region’s prosperity and likely defeat
any chance that the Washington area could land the
50,000 new jobs for which it is contending in the
sweepstakes to host Amazon’s second corporate
headquarters. (The Post is owned by Amazon founder and chief executive Jeffrey P. Bezos.)
Mr. Hogan, who dropped his opposition to new
funding last fall, moved even further in recent
weeks, agreeing to more money than he originally
proposed, accepting permanent funding rather than
the four-year plan he floated, and dropping a
demand that the state’s commitment be tied to an
increased federal subsidy (which looks iffy at best).
District officials have made it clear they will
follow suit once Maryland and Virginia finalize new
funds. Now the burden is on Republicans in Richmond, whose 66-seat majority in Virginia’s House of
Delegates was cut to 51 seats in last fall’s elections.
GOP leaders there seem to get that beggaring Metro,
or yoking new funding to labor reforms and other
demands that Maryland and the District will not
support, would ultimately strangle the commonwealth’s own prospects. They would be wise to take a
cue from Mr. Hogan’s leadership.
ABCDE
B A CK Y A R D CH I C K EN S
FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
They are pets, not a pastime
The March 4 Business article “The status chickens
of Silicon Valley” painted a rosy picture of pet chickens but overlooked a key fact: The recent rise in
backyard-chicken numbers correlates
with the rise in numbers of abandoned
chickens in parks, animal shelters and
roadsides.
Animal rescuers in the San Francisco Bay area and beyond can attest to the
uptick in dead/distressed chickens discarded by their former caretakers. This
peaks every spring, when backyardchicken owners seek to unload the “surprise” rooster in their batch of mail-order chicks or to
swap out older hens for younger models. For these
birds, there is no happy ending; animal sanctuaries
are stretched beyond capacity and the numbers of
Regarding the March 2 front-page article “Trump
draws his line on trade”:
Many people are disturbed by President Trump’s
tweets. But perhaps more disturbing may be the
inability of anyone in the White House to do simple
arithmetic. There are roughly 85,000 people employed in iron and steel mills and ferroalloy
manufacturing. There are nearly 1 million workers
employed in the manufacture of automobiles, and
if you add construction, rail and aerospace, the
number of workers who need steel for their jobs
grows enormously. Simple economics would suggest that if you raise the cost of an item, the price
will go up and less will be purchased. The last time
steel tariffs were instituted, the country lost
200,000 jobs. This tariff action was not wellconceived. Clearly, our president needs better
advisers.
Gary Simon, Potomac
Unlike my current faculty friends who do not
comment on President Trump, I am retired from
the Wharton School after teaching finance for 42
years. Although neither Mr. Trump nor Donald
Trump Jr. were my students, the former’s views on
steel tariffs and protectionism are essentially what
the founder of our school, Joseph Wharton,
professed. He was a staunch Republican, an owner
of Bethlehem Steel and president of the American
Iron and Steel Association.
When he contributed $100,000 to the University
of Pennsylvania in 1881 to found a “School of
Finance and Economy,” he requested that the new
school’s faculty advocate economic protectionism.
Although that is not the case with Wharton’s
faculty, this was obviously the case for some of its
students.
Kenneth H. Thomas, Miami
With President Trump’s decision to impose
tariffs on imported steel and aluminum, he again
shows little understanding of basic economic
principles and of second- and third-order effects of
policies, and an unwillingness to learn from
history.
Tariffs are pro-producer and anti-consumer. In
this case, the tariffs would likely help a few hundred
steel and aluminum companies and their employees but also hurt tens of thousands of consumers of
steel and aluminum, as well as millions of their
employees. Add to these the tens of millions of
ultimate consumers who will end up paying more
for their purchases.
Mr. Trump continues to remain oblivious to the
consequences of his actions and policies. Imposing
tariffs on imports will most certainly invite retaliation from our trading partners and lead to trade
wars that will hurt all nations. Several of our
prominent industries from agriculture to transportation will likely face retaliatory tariffs from others.
President George W. Bush imposed tariffs of
8 percent to 30 percent on steel imports in
March 2002. The tariffs raised steel prices for
consumers of steel, such as automobile companies,
making them less competitive in global markets.
The European Union announced it would impose
retaliatory tariffs on imports from the United
States and took the case to the World Trade
Organization. Japan, South Korea, China, Switzerland and Brazil filed similar cases with the WTO,
which ruled against the United States, and the
tariffs were withdrawn in December 2003.
Vinod K. Jain, Ashburn
Anti-establishment parties won big
in Italy’s election.
TALY’S ELECTION on Sunday delivered another
body blow to Europe’s already-wobbly democratic center. Two anti-establishment parties, including one on the xenophobic far-right, between
them captured 50 percent of the vote, far more than
traditional parties of the center-right and center-left.
Though it’s far from clear what sort of government
will emerge from what is likely to be a prolonged
post-election scrum, Italy could join Central European states that have staked out a hostile stance
toward the European Union — and liberal values
more generally.
As elsewhere in Europe, a big driver of the electoral
backlash was immigrants and refugees: More than
620,000 undocumented migrants have arrived in
Italy since 2013, most of them from sub-Saharan
Africa. Though the current center-left government
succeeded in stemming the influx, far-right parties
exploited popular hostility toward the arrivals — as
well as toward Italy’s European Union partners,
which were seen as having done little to help. The
leader of the League party, Matteo Salvini, spewed
xenophobic rhetoric and promised mass deportations; since his party outpolled that of former centerright prime minister Silvio Berlusconi, Mr. Salvini
could lead a new government.
Another claimant will be the eccentric Five Star
Movement, which won about 33 percent of the vote
and is officially led by Luigi Di Maio, a 31-year-old
with little experience. The party has softened its
anti-E.U. stance, and is less hostile to migrants than
the League. But it shares the far-right’s affection for
Russian ruler Vladimir Putin, who is looking like the
one unambiguous winner of the election. Any government that forms is likely to be hostile to Western
efforts to counter Russian aggression in Ukraine,
Syria and cyberspace.
Not surprisingly, the U.S. far-right is celebrating
the Italian results, with President Trump’s former
adviser Stephen K. Bannon calling them “crucial for
the global populist movement” in an interview with
the Corriere della Sera newspaper. Mr. Bannon is
hoping for a coalition between the League and Five
MARCH 6 , 2018
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
E’RE GOING to be doing a big number on Dodd-Frank,” President
Trump promised in the early days of
his administration, implying imminent achievement of the long-standing Republican
goal of repealing, or gutting, the signature financial
reform law of President Barack Obama’s tenure.
What Mr. Trump neglected to mention, of course, is
that the only relevant number, big or small, was 60:
That’s how many senators it would take to pass new
legislation. Republicans could change Dodd-Frank
only to the extent consistent with attracting sufficient Democratic votes.
Now we’re finding out what the lowest common
denominator may be. Judging by the bill moving
through the Senate with bipartisan support, it is to
grant regulatory relief to small banks while letting
some big ones, but not the biggest, go along for the
ride. Specifically, banks with less than $10 billion in
assets would be exempt from the Volcker rule, a ban
on trading risky securities; and the level of assets at
which banks are considered systemically risky and
. TUESDAY,
chickens euthanized in shelters is on track to rival
those of dogs and cats.
In fact, there are entire parks in San Jose populated
by abandoned pet chickens. Once they
are let loose with no food, shelter or
protection from predators, these former
pets perish within weeks, if not days.
Viewing backyard chickens as a hobby that can be taken up or discarded on
a whim does a great disservice to the
birds as well as the local rescue groups
that take on the thankless task of cleaning up after irresponsible owners. Pets
are a lifetime responsibility.
For these birds,
there is no happy
ending.
Ariana Huemer, Felton, Calif.
The writer is director of Hen Harbor,
an animal sanctuary in California.
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It keeps getting worse
Regarding the March 2 front-page article
“24 hours of chaos leave legislators, aides reeling”:
Just when I felt that President Trump couldn’t do
anything dumber, he announced that he will enact
a 25 percent tariff on steel imports and a 10 percent
tariff on aluminum imports. This would wipe out
most of the benefits from his tax bill and be
devastating for our economy. The tariff announcement, along with pulling the nation out of the
Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement and the
Paris climate accords, makes us a pariah in the eyes
of the world. Mr. Trump is a self-made wrecking
ball, and while that was fine when he ran his real
estate business, the wrecking he is doing now is
making the United States an isolated, second-rate
power. This is happening even as Russian President
Vladimir Putin depicted a nuclear attack on North
America. Special counsel Robert S. Mueller III is
taking his time, but every day Mr. Trump remains in
office is another black mark on this nation.
Henry A. Lowenstein, New York
A disappointing response
Regarding the Feb. 28 Metro article “Women say
Assembly no ‘frat house’ ”:
As a past legislative staffer, I felt both disappointed and betrayed while reading about the letter from
female legislators of the Maryland General Assembly pushing back on a recent report on sexual
harassment in Annapolis. In five short paragraphs,
these women I so admire managed to draw a clear
divide between themselves and those affected by
sexual harassment. To highlight the strides women
have made, they pointed out that women make up
one-third of sitting legislators in Maryland, as if
equity and sexual harassment are somehow mutually exclusive. However, not once in this letter is the
percentage of staffers, advocates and lobbyists in
Annapolis who have reported sexual harassment
mentioned. Not once are the women thanked who
took time off work to tell their accounts of harassment, one of which was effectively dismissed in this
letter. And not once do these lawmakers
acknowledge that while they are in positions of
power, most women who have experienced sexual
harassment in the legislature are not.
The lawmakers state that they “have come a long
way over the collective time [they] have been here —
mainly because [they] stood up.” I now implore
these women to stand up for those who have been
sexually harassed at the General Assembly who do
not have the power to stand up for themselves.
Jamie Sexton, Baltimore
Letters can be sent to letters@washpost.com.
Submissions must be exclusive to The Post and should
include the writer’s address and day and evening
telephone numbers. Because of the volume of material we
receive, we are unable to acknowledge submissions;
writers whose letters are under consideration for
publication will be contacted.
TUESDAY, MARCH 6 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
RE
Bring data
laws into
this century
MICHAEL GERSON
Our strongman wannabe
is weak and unfit
H
BY L ISA O . M ONACO
AND J OHN P . C ARLIN
H
ow should law enforcement officials deal with digital data that
happens to be stored in a different
country? If FBI agents, pursuing a
subject who committed a crime in the United States, serve a valid court order on an
American company, the government
shouldn’t have to wait a year because the
company happens to store the information
overseas. Likewise, if the London police are
investigating a local murder, the fact that
they are seeking phone records from a
communications provider located in the
United States should not block them from
doing their job.
That sounds like simple common
sense. But in the modern world, law
enforcement and national-security professionals are too often forced to use 19thcentury tools in a global, 21st-century world.
Currently, for too many cases, the only
option for police and prosecutors trying to
do their jobs is to use mutual legal assistance treaties. That cumbersome model
dates back decades and is not designed for a
digital age, when even purely local crimes
might involve evidence located overseas.
The process requires lengthy reviews at
both ends; picture layers of lawyers and
diplomats, memorandums with multiple
official seals and the occasional broken fax
machine. For example, the average response
time for a routine request to Ireland — a
country where many U.S. tech companies
store their data — is 15 to 18 months. Worse,
as data storage moves across the cloud, and
where one email can consist of data stored
in multiple places at once, it can be difficult
or impossible to determine exactly where
information resides at any given moment.
We served as law enforcement and national security professionals across multiple administrations, including in leadership roles at the FBI, the Justice Department and the White House. Both of us have
witnessed these problems firsthand. We
have seen investigations stalled, and we
have heard tech companies express concerns that they are stuck in the middle of
outdated, unclear and even contradictory
legal regimes as they do business around the
globe.
The fallout from this antiquated and
unwieldy situation is seen on multiple continents. The Supreme Court recently heard
oral arguments in a case involving whether
the U.S. government can force Microsoft to
turn over data stored overseas. How the
court will rule is unclear, but justices across
the ideological spectrum — as well as the
parties on both sides — agreed that Congress should update our laws governing
access to data held overseas. And no matter
how that case goes, it will not determine
whether U.S. companies can comply with
foreign governments’ requests for data
stored in this country. Meanwhile, the European Union is weighing legislation to require companies operating within the E.U.
to turn over data stored in another country
— even if doing so might violate that country’s laws.
This is not a tenable situation. A promising solution is the Cloud (Clarifying Lawful
Overseas Use of Data) Act, introduced by a
bipartisan coalition in the Senate last
month. The Cloud Act provides two critical
fixes: First, it enables U.S. law enforcement
agencies to access data held by U.S. companies that is stored overseas. It would do so by
amending federal law to clarify that companies served with legal process in the United
States for stored communications and related data must disclose records within the
provider’s possession, custody, or control —
regardless of where those materials happen
to be stored.
Second, it would allow our government to
enter into agreements — subject to review
by Congress — to permit U.S. companies to
respond to the same type of legal orders
from countries that share our values and
have legal systems that provide equivalent
protection for civil rights and liberties. This
provision is carefully crafted to allow companies to seek to block requests for information in situations that could threaten another country’s sovereignty and to ensure
the protections of U.S. citizens. If other
countries want data that is stored in the
United States, their requests must relate to
serious crimes and use legal processes that
share basic features of a U.S. search warrant.
U.S. officials attempting to investigate
crimes and national-security threats in the
21st century should not be required to chase
down evidence from cloud to cloud in what
one U.S. court described as a “global game of
whack-a-mole.” Our counterparts in likeminded countries should not have to face
the same problem. And tech businesses
should not be caught between conflicting
legal regimes in which one country demands data while another country’s laws
forbid providing it.
In short, only Congress can provide a
unified policy framework for addressing
this and other issues, including conflicts of
law. Without a viable solution, countries
will continue to move toward “data localization” laws requiring companies to keep
their data onshore — a requirement that is
bad for business, bad for civil liberties and
bad for public safety.
Lisa O. Monaco, a senior fellow at New York
University School of Law’s Center on Law and
Security, was homeland security and
counterterrorism adviser to President Barack
Obama from 2013 to 2017. John P. Carlin, chair
of the law firm Morrison & Foerster’s global risk
and crisis management group and the Aspen
Institute’s Cybersecurity & Technology Program,
was assistant attorney general for national
security from 2014 to 2016.
A17
K
AFP/GETTY IMAGES
An employee at a steel plant in Zouping, China, on Sunday.
CATHERINE RAMPELL
Trump’s tariffs can’t
turn back the clock
M
r. President, if you’re looking for someone to demonize for killing blue-collar
jobs in your favorite industries, don’t blame China and “bad
trade deals.”
Blame the robots.
Thirty years ago, the U.S. iron and
steel mills employed about 188,000
people. Today, that number is about
86,000. Mindful of the suffering of
tens of thousands of displaced workers, many of whom voted for him,
President Trump is trying to turn back
the clock with steel tariffs.
This will do little to help Trump’s
Forgotten Men and Women.
As others have recounted, there are
lots of reasons the Trump administration’s recently announced steel tariffs
would constitute a colossal economic
and national security mistake.
They would benefit a relatively
small industry at the expense of many
others that use steel as inputs, such as
automobile manufacturers.
They would drive up prices for the
American consumers who purchase
these products.
They’re supposedly designed to
punish China, except China is not
even among the top 10 sources of steel
imports. Instead they will primarily
alienate allies such as Canada, the
country we import the most steel
from. And those allies have threatened to retaliate by slapping tariffs on
U.S. exports, which would also hurt
lots of American workers.
On net, all of this suggests, the
tariffs would create more U.S. losers
than winners.
But it’s not even clear they’ll create
many winners in the steel industry
itself.
We’re producing about as much
steel today as we did 30 years ago. But
we’re doing it with less than half the
workers. That’s primarily because of
technological advances — or, to oversimplify, robots.
The story is the same in many
industries. As Chad Syverson, an economics professor at University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business, puts
it: “We get better and better at making
things, and we’ve needed fewer and
fewer people to make those things.”
The steel industry in particular has
been transformed in recent decades. It
shifted away from vertically integrated plants that smelted their own steel
from scratch toward more-efficient,
highly automated “mini-mills,” which
primarily recycle existing steel and
employ many fewer people.
As older, less-efficient mills closed,
jobs disappeared even if production
didn’t. There have been some effects
from trade, but they’re “definitely an
order of magnitude smaller than
what’s going on with productivity
growth,” says Allan Collard-Wexler, a
Duke University economics professor
and co-author of a 2015 paper on
mini-mills and productivity gains in
the industry.
This suggests, he says, that even if
companies themselves benefit from
tariffs, they’re just not that likely to
need many more workers to ramp up
output. If they even ramp up output
much at all, that is — the kind of steel
produced by these mini-mills is pretty
different from what we import, Collard-Wexler explains, and it’s not clear
firms here are great substitutes for
those abroad. Tariffs may just mean
we see higher prices.
Trump also announced new tariffs
on aluminum imports, of course. Like
steel, the aluminum industry has seen
big gains in productivity. But it’s also
true that jobs in this industry have
moved abroad.
Those aluminum jobs, however,
have generally not gone to China or
other low-wage countries. They’re instead going to places such as Iceland,
Canada and Norway. It takes an enormous amount of electricity to smelt
aluminum, so plants have chased after cheap geothermal or hydropower.
Slapping tariffs on aluminum is not
going to suddenly make it cheaper to
smelt aluminum here. Instead we may
see U.S. manufacturers that use aluminum as an input merely move final
assembly (and U.S. jobs) abroad, so
they can skirt the tariffs.
Same with steel, by the way.
This is hardly the first time Trump
has let nostalgia for a fading industry
get in the way of learning what caused
it to fade.
If
Trump’s
favorite
strawbogeyman for steel and aluminum
workers’ woes is “bad trade deals,”
when it comes to coal, he prefers
“environmental regulations.” He has
promised to put Appalachian miners
back to work by ripping up Obama-era
regulations and dangling subsidies to
coal power plants.
But here, too, Trump ignores the
bigger force at work: robots. Like
steel, coal extraction has seen big productivity gains. Coal has also been
displaced by natural gas, which itself
has seen gigantic technological gains
in the form of fracking.
None of this means we should
abandon those who have seen their
livelihoods destroyed by the changing economy. But sparking an unwinnable trade war in their name, or
offering false hope for jobs that will
never return, is not compassion but
cruelty.
crampell@washpost.com
PO S T P A R T I S A N
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/blogs/post-partisan
Fixing Hollywood
from the ground up
It seemed straight out of a movie. Hours
after Frances McDormand closed her
Academy Awards acceptance speech with
those two words — inclusion rider! — a
man tried to run away with her Oscar. A
similar push-and-pull defined the entire
night: At one moment, a note of progress
augured a Hollywood less hostile to women. At the next, some other sign reminded
us how far away that fantasyland still is.
Casey Affleck, who has been accused of
sexual harassment, lost out on the traditional presenting role of the previous
year’s best actor winner. But Gary Oldman, whose ex-wife accused him of assault in 2001, took home the best actor
prize. James Franco was snubbed. Kevin
Spacey disappeared. Harvey Weinstein
went from VIP to punchline. But Ryan
Seacrest traipsed the red carpet for E!
about a week after Variety published
allegations from his former stylist.
The reality is this: There are too many
bad men — or men who have done bad
things — in Hollywood right now for any
institution to determine who’s in and
who’s out in any coherent way short of
excommunicating them all. This truth is
exactly why suggestions such as the inclusion rider that McDormand mentioned are so important.
Hollywood made all those bad men,
and it’s going to keep making them unless
something changes deeper down than
the glitz and glamour of the Oscars set.
Fixing Hollywood’s culture requires replacing an existing power structure with
a more equal framework. Construction
work has to start at the foundation.
That’s going to require people outside
of the entertainment industry to butt into
it, and people in the entertainment industry to solicit their help. The idea of
inclusion riders, which allow an actor on
a project to require some measure of cast
and crew diversity, originated among
academics and made its way to the moviemakers. It takes an expert in contract
law to devise a tool that bakes fair representation into contracts.
We look to the Oscars to tell us where
Hollywood really stands on sexual harassment, but the movies are all about
showmanship, and the ceremony reveals
only what’s on the surface: who gets to
stand on that crystal-covered stage and
who doesn’t, who uses his speech to
thank the academy and who scolds silverscreen society instead. This sort of signalboosting may matter — but what happens
off-screen matters more. We can’t rely
only on a yearly television spectacle to tell
us how big Hollywood’s problem is, and
we can’t rely only on the people who are
part of the spectacle to solve it.
— Molly Roberts
ere is a question at the crossroads of psychology and political philosophy: How can a
leader so enamored of authoritarianism be so allergic to order?
Donald Trump rose to prominence
on the promise of a firm hand. “When
the students poured into Tiananmen
Square,” he once said, “the Chinese
government almost blew it. Then they
were vicious, they were horrible, but
they put it down with strength. That
shows you the power of strength.” At
another point: “I think [Vladimir]
Putin’s been a very strong leader for
Russia, he’s been a lot stronger than our
leader [President Barack Obama], that
I can tell you.” And recently, in a
reportedly joking manner, about China’s Xi Jinping: “He’s now president for
life. Maybe we’ll have to give that a shot
someday.”
But for all this, Trump seems utterly
incapable of ruling even the 18-acre
kingdom of the White House. Recent
reports describe “chaos,” “tumult,” “disarray” and “pure madness.” With the
policy process completely broken, staffers seem to occupy their time with
blood feuds, leaking and legal consultations. Trump himself — “brooding,”
“isolated and angry,” “mad as hell” —
takes it out on Jeff Sessions and Alec
Baldwin.
The president’s self-generated governing crisis is disturbing. But when
paired with authoritarian envy, it is
pathetic. An exercise in autocratic
jock-sniffing. Other would-be strongmen have turned to Karl Marx for
inspiration; for Trump, it is more like
the Marx Brothers. Absurdly stereotyped characters — Anthony Scaramucci, Sebastian Gorka, Stephen K. Bannon
— pop randomly in and out of wellappointed rooms, while the main character feeds chaos all around him. It is
the Duck Soup dictatorship.
Don’t get me wrong. Trump’s attempts to delegitimize institutions that
check his power — the FBI, the mainstream media — are doing lasting
damage. His constant lies have unleashed the irrational in American
public life. His reliance on conspiracy
theories and Fox News (but I repeat
myself ) to solidify a core of unthinking
allegiance is dangerous. It is sobering
to see how a revolt against authority
has been channeled into a movement of
docility and submission. If Trump did
not have blind support, he would have
no support at all.
But this is something different from
authoritarianism. Trump approaches
governing like a spectator, often acting
as if someone else is really in charge. He
seems most comfortable commenting
from the sidelines, like an old Fox News
viewer yelling at the television. Trump
doesn’t know how to do the actual job
of president and doesn’t seem aware
that he doesn’t know. And few people
around him know any better.
Sometimes the simplest explanations are best. As Groucho Marx said:
“[He] may talk like an idiot and look
like an idiot. But don’t let that fool you.
He really is an idiot.”
Being president, it turns out, actually requires certain skills. Presidents
gain influence through rhetorical leadership — with the tools of inspiration.
They gain influence through policy
innovation and legislative leadership.
They gain influence through motivating the permanent bureaucracy to
accept and pursue their agenda.
As a matter of rhetoric, Trump will
be remembered for an endless string of
demeaning and incoherent tweets that
force us to question his stability. As a
matter of policy, he has either deferred
to congressional priorities or acted
through executive orders that can be
easily undone. Rather than leading the
bureaucracy, he has alienated it, depopulated it and sent some of it into
resistance.
And it is worse than this. From his
first executive order on migration from
majority-Muslim countries to his recent action on tariffs, Trump and his
administration have not displayed even
minimal proficiency in making and
explaining presidential decisions. On
issues from immigration to gun control, the president has made seemingly
random and contradictory interventions that reveal his ignorance about
the basics of important policy debates.
The man who believes in “the power of
strength” exhibits a level of competence that would be embarrassing in
high school student government.
Trump’s governing approach (at
least so far) is less authoritarian than
transgressive. He views the presidency
as a performance. And he has shown a
remarkable knack for dominating the
national conversation with the outrageous and trivial. But we are seeing that
the skill set of a reality TV star — the
cultivation of melodrama and feuds —
has almost no overlap with the skill set
of a successful president. We might as
well imagine Franklin D. Roosevelt on
“Keeping Up With the Kardashians.”
Trump’s particular talents are better
suited to Page Six of the New York Post
than to the history books.
The problem is this: Though weakness and incompetence are preferable
to authoritarianism, they are unequal
to the real challenges of the nation.
michaelgerson@washpost.com
EUGENE ROBINSON
Losing the habits of democracy
A
s the saying goes, you don’t miss
the water until the well runs
dry: This deeply aberrant presidency threatens to cost the nation much more than even some of
President Trump’s harshest critics may
realize.
From 1988 to 1992, I was The Post’s
correspondent in Buenos Aires, covering
all of South America. It was a time when
countries such as Argentina, Brazil, Peru
and Chile — emerging from years of
authoritarian rule — were struggling to
reestablish democratic norms, and I
learned one important lesson: It’s easy to
lose the habits and values of democracy,
but incredibly hard to get them back.
Perhaps most difficult is to recover
lost faith in the rule of law. That is why
Trump’s very public desire to use the
legal system as a weapon against his
political opponents is so damaging.
“Lock her up” is more than a call to
imprison Hillary Clinton. It is, potentially, a tragic epitaph for the consensus
view of our legal system as a disinterested finder of fact and dispenser of justice.
In the countries I covered, military
rulers had imprisoned, exiled and assassinated their internal foes. It was understandable that democratically elected
governments would struggle — sometimes successfully, sometimes not — to
find ways to hold the murderous generals and admirals accountable. Decades
later, however, the pattern persists.
Democratically elected presidents
such as Cristina Fernández de Kirchner
of Argentina and Luiz Inácio Lula da
Silva of Brazil have been hit with serious
criminal charges since leaving office.
Alberto Fujimori of Peru was extradited
from Chile, tried and imprisoned for
years before the current president pardoned him on humanitarian grounds. In
the United States, we do not seek to jail
our out-of-power leaders. Trump, with
his repeated calls for the Justice Department to go after Clinton, is determined
to establish the custom.
Those former leaders were charged
not just with political offenses but also
with corruption — another bad habit
that Trump is trying to instill.
In most of the South American countries I covered, transparency was a joke.
Public officials were assumed to be in
the pocket of some special interest —
rewarded not just with campaign donations but also with secret offshore bank
accounts and the occasional suitcase
full of cash. I reported on a coup in
Paraguay that was led by a general — a
lifelong public servant — who, even
before seizing the presidency, had built
himself a mansion that looked like the
Petit Trianon palace at Versailles.
Trump and his family have refused to
divest themselves of their businesses or
even draw more than a flimsy veil
between their official actions and the
impact those actions have on their personal finances. Does the administration’s policy toward Panama really have
nothing to do with a bitter dispute over
the Trump-branded hotel in Panama
City? Does the administration’s tough
new attitude toward Qatar really have
nothing to do with that nation’s refusal
to invest in Jared Kushner’s debt-laden
real estate company?
It’s not the potential answers to those
questions that are so corrosive; it’s the
questions themselves. As in many countries whose governance we scoff at,
Americans must now wonder whether
policy is being tailored for our leaders’
personal gain.
When the rule of law and financial
probity can no longer be assumed, the
vacuum is filled with conspiracy theories. The president himself is a conspiratorialist par excellence; he was, after all,
the chief purveyor of the birther nonsense. Since neither his words nor those
of his press office can be believed, it is
natural — but incredibly damaging — to
assume that the real story is being
hidden from us, for reasons that must be
nefarious.
During my years in Buenos Aires,
every once in a while some renegade
military officer would make a pathetic
attempt to stage a new coup; once, when
I called home at the end of a long
reporting trip, my wife matter-of-factly
advised that from the airport I take the
long way to our house because a wouldbe generalissimo was blocking the
shortcut with a bunch of tanks, making
traffic simply a mess.
I came to cherish the long American
tradition of civilian control of the military. Now we are forced to rely on three
current or retired generals — Defense
Secretary Jim Mattis, Chief of Staff John
F. Kelly and national security adviser
H.R. McMaster — to keep an ignorant
and impetuous president from triggering Armageddon.
Despite his recent joke about making
himself president for life, Trump won’t
be around forever. But the damage he is
doing will remain — and it may take
years of hard work to repair.
eugenerobinson@washpost.com
A18
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 6 , 2018
Cloud-computing deal
slashed after bid protest
not deciding on what cloud the
customer should be on. They
can pick any cloud they want,
and our platform would support
all of that.”
An Oracle executive argued
that since the Pentagon has not
yet chosen its ultimate cloud
providers, work estimated to be
worth billions of dollars over
many years, it should not have
awarded such a large contract to
start moving its systems to the
cloud.
“If in fact you’re going to have
an open competition and an
industry day to have a multivendor opportunity for the
cloud, then how does it make
sense to spend a billion dollars
to move to Amazon’s cloud before you’ve made the decision of
what cloud you’re moving to?”
Oracle Senior Vice President
Ken Glueck said at the time.
“You would think they’d pick
what cloud they want to go to
first, then decide what migration service system needed to
move, if any.”
On Monday, the Pentagon
backed away from its initial
award, saying in a statement
that after reviewing the contract, it decided that “the agreement should be more narrowly
tailored” so that Rean would
build a prototype service for a
single agency, the U.S. Transportation Command, instead of
many agencies within the Defense Department.
The $950 million contract
initially was awarded by an arm
of the Pentagon, the Defense
Innovation Unit Experimental,
created to harness the technology and innovation of Silicon
Valley-type companies that
have shied away from Pentagon
work.
The procurement, a follow-on
to a smaller contract, was
awarded under an “other transaction authority,” a way for the
Pentagon to procure goods and
services quickly without being
subject to the bureaucratic federal acquisitions process. But
industry officials said an award
of $950 million under that authority was unusually high.
On Monday, Glueck said the
Pentagon’s move was a step in
the right direction. “I think this
gets to the right place, and this
clearly puts back the notion that
there should be a competition
for what really should be multivendor cloud services,” he said.
“And once that is over, there
should be a focus on how to deal
with migration and integration.”
Oracle had challenged
Pentagon on contract
won by Amazon partner
BY
PATRICK T. FALLON/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Susan Wojcicki is CEO of YouTube, where creative competition is fierce. The top 3 percent of channels got 90 percent of views in 2016.
The odds of striking it rich on YouTube are tiny
BY
T ODD C . F RANKEL
an views per video plummeted to 89
in 2016; a decade earlier, that number was 10,262. At the same time,
YouTube’s biggest channels are gobbling up more eyeballs. The top 3
percent of channels received 64 percent of all views in 2006. A decade
later, the top channels took 90 percent.
A YouTube spokesman said in a
statement that the service continues to see “tremendous growth” for
its content creators, with the number of channels earning at least
$100,000 a year increasing more
than 40 percent in the past year.
What’s happening on YouTube is
occurring across the Web, where
creators are finding that long odds
of success in the online world are
not so different from IRL (Internetspeak for “in real life”).
In fact, they might be worse.
In music, song-streaming services such as Spotify and Apple Music have mostly benefited superstar
acts. No one needs to fight a music
label to get their song distributed,
but getting listeners is a different
problem. Less than 1 percent of
songs represented 86 percent of the
music streamed last year, according
to the market research firm Nielsen.
And because few people buy music these days, making even a little
money from streaming requires
songs to be played millions of times.
That has hurt the music industry’s
middle-of-the-road acts the most,
One of the main attractions of
YouTube is that anyone can become
a star: There are no gatekeepers, no
talent agents and no television executives who need to be won over.
Stars can come from anywhere —
and they do.
Forbes’s recent list of the richest
YouTubers is proof: It’s filled with
people who post clips about playing
video games or kids playing with
toys. The top spot went to Daniel
Middleton, known as DanTDM. He’s
a 26-year-old British gamer — and
he earned $16.5 million last year.
But a new study finds that the
odds of striking it rich on YouTube
— or even making a modest living —
are small.
Reaching the top 3.5 percent of
YouTube’s most-viewed channels —
which means at least 1 million video
views a month — is worth only
about $12,000 to $16,000 a year in
advertising revenue, according to
Mathias Bartl, a professor at Offenburg University of Applied Sciences
in Germany whose study is one of
the first to examine YouTube data
for clues about how it works for
creators.
Bartl found that it has gotten
harder for new creators to reach the
top, as YouTube — which is owned by
Google — adds 300 hours of video
every minute and the biggest stars
become more successful. The medi-
Now, YouTube is taking steps that
make it even harder for creators at
the bottom. The company recently
said channels need to have reached
1,000 subscribers and 4,000 hours
of watch time over the past 12
months before they can earn money
from ads. YouTube said the change
is aimed at discouraging videos
with objectionable or offensive content and that it would “affect a significant number of channels.”
Bartl’s study did offer some hope
for YouTube aspirants — hints on
how to boost the chances of financial success. YouTube offers 18
genrelike categories, and selecting
the right one “is a highly significant
predictor of channel success,” Bartl
wrote. The most popular categories
over a decade were entertainment
videos, which took in 24 percent of
all views, followed by music and
gaming categories.
The chance of a channel making
into the rarefied top 3 percent was
best for comedy, entertainment,
how-to and style, and gaming. It
was worst for sports, education,
nonprofit and activist groups, people and blogs.
Bartl also noted that YouTube’s
upper echelon still featured a mix of
professional and user-generated
videos, writing that “it does give
hope that YouTube’s ‘broadcast
yourself’ rhetoric is not a complete
fiction.”
the kind of musicians who once
could eke out a decent living selling
several thousand albums a year and
touring the nation without breaking into the mainstream. Increasingly, such acts face the pressure of
going viral or going home.
In television, so many new shows
are being made that no one can
watch them all; nearly 500 scripted
original series aired last year. The
traditional networks are being challenged by cable outlets and streaming services. That has led to new
opportunities for actors and writers. But the new era has distinct
challenges, including shorter seasons and less predictable schedules.
Competition among creators on
YouTube is fierce, and that has also
led to trouble.
In February, YouTube suspended
all advertising on channels run by
Logan Paul, one of its biggest stars,
after his controversies included videos he made showing his visit to a
so-called suicide forest in Japan and
jokes about eating Tide detergent
pods.
Another star, Felix Kjellberg,
known as PewDiePie, was found to
have used a racial epithet and
made anti-Semitic jokes in some
of his gaming videos. He was
dropped from Google’s lucrative
ad service for high-performing
videos, and his planned series on
the paid-subscription channel
YouTube Red was canceled.
todd.frankel@washpost.com
C HRISTIAN D AVENPORT
AND A ARON G REGG
Faced with criticism over how
it awarded a contract to move
computer systems to the Internet cloud, the Pentagon on Monday slashed a deal awarded to
an Amazon partner, cutting the
amount from nearly $1 billion
to no more than $65 million,
while dramatically limiting the
scope of work.
When the Pentagon awarded
the $950 million contract to
Herndon, Va.-based Rean Cloud
last month, rivals cried foul,
saying the deal suggested that
Amazon Web Services might
have the inside track on future
Pentagon
cloud-computing
work. (Amazon founder Jeffrey
P. Bezos owns The Washington
Post.)
Oracle filed a bid protest with
the Government Accountability
Office last month that called the
procurement an “egregious
abuse” of the process. It argued
that Rean “serves as a front for
AWS” and that its close relationship to AWS created a conflict of
interest.
Pentagon officials rejected
the criticism but moved to pare
the value of Rean’s contract by
90 percent. An announcement
of the change came two days
before the Pentagon was set to
host an “industry day,” a chance
for companies interested in bidding on the Pentagon’s larger
cloud-computing contract to
hear from government procurement officials.
Officials with Rean and AWS,
which
already
holds
a
$600 million contract to provide cloud services for the CIA,
did not immediately respond to
requests for comment.
Last month, Rean founding
partner Sekhar Puli said that
while the vast majority of the
company's federal work has
been with AWS, the latest deal
was specifically worded to allow
his company to work with any
cloud provider that agencies
might ask for.
“There is a perception that
this is an Amazon contract, but
there is little to no truth on that
because we were very careful on
wording the contract to say it
could work with any cloud service provider,” Puli said. “We are
christian.davenport@washpost.com
aaron.gregg@washpost.com
THE MARKETS
6 Monitor your investments at washingtonpost.com/markets
Data and graphics by
Daily Stock Market Performance
Index
Dow Jones Industrial Average
27,250
Close
YTD
% Chg
24,874.76
+1.4
+0.6
25,500
23,750
22,000
20,250
Nasdaq Composite Index
7700
7330.70
+1.0
+6.2
Daily
% Chg
Industry Group
Diversified Consumer Svcs
Power Prodct & Enrgy Trdr
Professional Services
Health Care Technology
Insurance
Electrnc Eqp, Instr, Comp
Metals & Mining
Water Utilities
Textiles & Apparel
Multiline Retail
0
–5.0%
+5.0%
4.50
2.56
2.29
2.21
2.15
0.11
0.01
–0.34
–0.47
–0.74
6700
6200
5700
S&P 500 Index
2720.94
+1.1
+1.8
2900
2700
2500
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D
J
F
Americas
Brazil (Bovespa)
Canada (S&P/TSX Comp.)
Mexico (Bolsa)
Europe
Eurozone (DJ Stoxx 600)
France (CAC 40)
Germany (DAX)
U.K. (FTSE 100)
Asia Pacific
Australia (ASX 200)
China (CSI 300)
Hong Kong (Hang Seng)
Japan (Nikkei)
Close
Daily
% Chg
86,022.83
15,541.28
47,698.48
0.3
1.0
0.3
370.87
5167.23
12,090.87
7115.98
1.0
0.6
1.5
0.7
5895.03
4018.10
29,886.39
21,042.09
–0.6
0.0
–2.3
–0.7
YTD % Chg
–15%
0%
+15%
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
3M Co
AmExp
Apple Inc
Boeing
Caterpillar
Chevron Corp
Cisco Systems
Coca-Cola
DowDuPont Inc
Exxon Mobil
GE
GoldmnSchs
Home Depot
IBM
Intel Corp
232.81
96.66
176.82
352.75
151.12
113.15
44.52
43.89
69.66
76.27
14.42
263.12
181.74
156.95
49.75
1.1
1.1
0.3
2.3
3.2
1.4
1.0
0.4
1.8
1.0
2.1
1.9
1.8
1.6
1.6
–1.1
–2.7
4.5
19.6
–4.1
–9.6
16.2
–4.3
–2.2
–8.8
–17.4
3.3
–4.1
2.3
7.8
Company
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
Microsoft
Nike
P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
United Tech
UnitedHealth
Verizon
Visa Inc
WalMart
Walt Disney
129.79
115.06
151.03
54.40
93.64
65.05
80.29
36.12
139.58
131.71
228.38
48.71
121.88
89.98
103.41
0.8
1.5
1.9
0.1
0.6
–1.3
1.0
0.5
1.2
1.4
1.4
0.9
0.9
1.4
0.4
–7.1
7.6
–12.3
–3.3
9.5
4.0
–12.6
–0.3
2.9
3.2
3.6
–8.0
6.9
–8.9
–3.8
Cross Currency Rates
US $
US $ per
EU € per
EU €
Japan ¥
Britain £
Brazil R$
Canada $
1.2335
0.0094
1.3844
0.3080
0.7696
0.0532
0.0076
1.1223
0.2499
0.6239
0.0431
146.9970
32.7440
81.7130
5.6491
0.2227
0.5559
0.0384
0.8107
Japan ¥ per 106.1800
130.9700
Britain £ per
0.7223
0.8909
0.0068
Brazil R$ per
3.2430
4.0016
0.0305
4.4895
Canada $ per
1.2994
1.6028
0.0122
1.7989
0.4007
Mexico $ per
18.7952
23.1839
0.1770
26.0216
5.7960
Mexico $
2.4967
0.1727
0.0691
14.4648
Index
Close
DJ Total Stock Market Index 28,132.59
Russell 2000
1546.05
Post-Bloomberg DC Area Index 553.86
CBOE Volatility (VIX)
18.73
Consumer Rates
Daily % Chg
1.1
0.8
0.3
–4.4
YTD % Chg
1.7
0.7
1.9
69.7
Daily
% Chg
$3.1280
$3.8725
$62.57
$1,319.90
$2.70
+0.1
+0.5
+2.2
–0.3
+0.3
Orange Juice
Silver
Soybeans
Sugar
Wheat
Exchange-Traded (Ticker)
Coffee (COFF.L)
Copper (COPA.L)
Corn (CORN.L)
Cotton (COTN.L)
Crude Oil (CRUD.L)
Gasoline (UGAS.L)
Gold (BULL.L)
Natural Gas (NGAS.L)
Silver (SLVR.L)
Daily
% Chg
Close
Daily
% Chg
$1.4040
$16.41
$10.7750
$0.1356
$5.0925
+1.3
–0.3
+0.6
+1.0
+1.9
day
$900
month
$1100
$1000
–1.4
0.2
0.3
2.1
2.7
2.1
0.1
0.3
–0.2
Gainers
XL Group Ltd
FTD Cos Inc
3D Systems Corp
Tredegar Corp
Mallinckrodt PLC
RenaissanceRe
Pioneer Energy Svcs
MicroStrategy Inc
Bill Barrett Corp
Unit Corp
CF Industries
Everest Re Group
Teradata Corp
eHealth Inc
Big 5 Sprtg Goods
Core-Mark Holding
Engility Holdings
Micron Technology
Progenics Pharma
Kopin Corp
Daily
Close % Chg
$55.92
$6.85
$12.58
$17.25
$17.55
$135.75
$3.00
$134.14
$4.84
$20.56
$44.56
$254.35
$41.65
$14.51
$6.80
$21.87
$23.65
$52.03
$7.08
$3.29
29.1
11.2
9.6
9.2
7.6
7.5
7.1
6.9
6.8
6.7
6.4
6.4
6.3
6.3
6.3
6.2
6.1
5.9
5.8
5.8
Losers
United Stationers
Ebix Inc
DHI Group Inc
Akorn Inc
RH
Rayonier Adv Matrl
Century Aluminum
Comty Health Sys
Dillard's Inc
American Woodmark
Lantheus Holdings
IPG Photonics Corp
Chico's FAS Inc
Children's Place
United Therapeutics
Stamps.com Inc
Marriott
Coca-Cola Bottling
Boise Cascade Co
Tenet Healthcare
Daily
Close % Chg
$7.44
$78.00
$1.60
$17.93
$76.15
$20.38
$19.98
$4.71
$84.32
$123.80
$15.80
$235.98
$9.29
$138.40
$110.44
$194.05
$135.73
$186.00
$38.65
$21.35
–7.3
–6.1
–5.9
–5.5
–5.1
–4.6
–4.6
–4.3
–4.1
–3.7
–3.7
–3.6
–3.5
–3.1
–2.9
–2.9
–2.8
–2.7
–2.6
–2.6
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Interest Rates
Other Measures
Close
Gainers and Losers from the S&P 1500 Index
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
Company
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
7200
2300
Commodities
S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot
Daily
% Chg
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
0.30
0.53
0.80
1.60
3.33
5.87
4.50%
4.30%
Bank Prime
30-Year fixed mortgage
1.50%
Federal Funds
3.75%
2.03%
LIBOR 3-Month
10-year note
Yield: 2.88
2-year note
Yield: 2.24
5-year note
Yield: 2.65
6-month bill
Yield: 1.84
15-Year fixed mortgage
3.60%
1-Year ARM
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
KLMNO
METRO
TUESDAY, MARCH 6 , 2018
High today at
approx. 3 p.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
8 p.m.
34 43 47 40°
°
°
°
49°
Precip: 0%
Wind: NNW
10-20 mph
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
EZ
SU
K
B
JOHN KELLY’S WASHINGTON
VIRGINIA
OBITUARIES
Bird lovers aren’t
squawking over
Millennium Falcon, D.C.’s
wrongly named hawk. B3
In court, a woman
confronts the man
accused of assaulting her
nearly 23 years ago. B3
David Ogden Stiers
portrayed surgeon
Charles Winchester III on
“M.A.S.H.” He was 75. B6
Chesapeake’s ‘secret garden’ thrives, but funding threats loom 1985 fire
Underwater grass growth
shows bay's cleanup plan
is working, scientists say
BY
D ARRYL F EARS
The Chesapeake Bay restoration plan is fueling the most
robust resurgence of underwater grasses and submerged
aquatic vegetation in the world,
according to a new study.
The study credited the growth
to a federal and multistate effort
to restore the bay’s health, a
project that President Trump
plans to eliminate. The plan has
reduced nutrient pollution,
which comes from human-managed waste and runoff from
farms and cities that flow into
the nation’s largest estuary. The
region’s population has more
than doubled to 18 million since
1950, and runoff triggered a crisis by dramatically lowering the
levels of oxygen and sunlight
that vegetation needs to survive.
Scientists say submerged vegetation is the bay’s “secret garden” because it serves as a protective nursery for numerous
JONATHAN LEFCHECK
species of marine life and waterfowl.
Threatened by the loss of animals that support commercial
and recreational fishing, along
with tourism, the six states in
the bay watershed embarked on
a cleanup plan in 1984. After
that faltered, the largest federally managed cleanup of a water
body in the nation’s history followed in 2010.
The combination of cleanups
over the three decades analyzed
in the study reduced pollution
from rural farms and urban water treatment facilities by 23
Algae on eelgrass in the bay can block light for underwater grasses.
BAY CONTINUED ON B2
FBI gang
informant
guilty in
cruel death
BY
R ACHEL W EINER
The FBI had found an informant in one of Northern Virginia’s
— and the nation’s — most violent
street gangs. He secretly taped
meetings and identified leaders of
the Virginia Locos Salvatrucha, a
local arm of MS-13. He had a special agent’s number in an
FBI-issued phone.
On Monday, that informant
was convicted in a deadly kidnapping.
Dublas Lazo is one of eight
young men who helped lure Carlos Otero Henriquez to a brutal
death in a West Virginia quarry in
May 2016. Otero Henriquez was
targeted because he had been advertising his affiliation with the
rival 18th Street gang.
Four others were found guilty
Monday in connection with the
killing; three more pleaded guilty
and testified at trial. A gang associate was also convicted Monday
of lesser crimes.
Otero Henriquez’s mother and
father had attended the threeweek trial in federal court in Alexandria. Often with hands clasped
and heads bowed, they listened as
their son’s killers took the stand
and described his death in awful
detail, down to the sound his chest
made as he was repeatedly
stabbed.
The victim’s mother smiled
slightly as the verdict was read
Monday afternoon. Prosecutors
and gang task force members
hugged her.
Otero Henriquez’s death is one
of several involving MS-13 being
prosecuted across the region, as
law enforcement tries to rein in
the gang’s resurgence.
In closing arguments, Assistant
U.S. Attorney Morris Parker said
Lazo was “double dealing” and
never truly came over to the side
of the law.
Even before Lazo began wearing a wire, the gang was under
federal surveillance.
That January, a young man
named Johnny Reyes told his
brother that members of the VLS
were demanding he pay them
“rent” or die. His brother went to
the police officer at his school, and
soon Reyes was recording the extortion meetings.
Defense attorneys suggested
BONNIE JO MOUNT/THE WASHINGTON POST
O VETTA W IGGINS
Three female lawmakers told a
legislative panel in Annapolis on
Monday that they’ve experienced
sexual harassment while in office
and called for an independent
investigator to handle harassment complaints in the Maryland
General Assembly.
Dels. Angela M. Angel (D), District 25, Ariana B. Kelly (D-Mont-
BY P ETER H ERMANN
AND P AUL D UGGAN
More than three decades after
investigators concluded a fire
that killed a couple inside their
Eckington rowhouse was an accident caused by a carelessly discarded cigarette, D.C. police said
Monday the deaths have now
been ruled homicides.
While no arrest was announced in the deaths of Bessie
Mae Duncan, who was in her 40s,
and her husband, Roy R. Picott,
39, authorities said they are focusing on a serial arsonist, Thomas Sweatt, who admitted setting a
string of 45 fires in the D.C.
region and pleaded guilty in
2005.
Sweatt, now 63, is serving a
federal prison term of life with an
additional 136 years. Washington
City Paper reported in 2007 that
Sweatt confessed in a series of
letters to a reporter to setting
fires for years longer than covered in his guilty plea, including
the one that killed the Eckington
couple. The case was the focus of
television crime shows on truTV,
Investigation Discovery Channels and as part of the “Forensic
Files” series.
D.C. Police Chief Peter Newsham said Sweatt is the prime
focus of the investigation. He has
not been charged in the deaths of
FIRE CONTINUED ON B5
A police chase. A crash. And lives changed.
She never saw it
coming.
There was no boom.
No crash. No crunch
of metal on metal like
in the movies.
Petula
It was just Filsan
Dvorak
Duale and five kids in
the minivan — four of
her own plus a friend they took gokarting — heading to their home in
Northern Virginia on Dec. 27. Then
total blackness, and Duale opened
her eyes and there was blood and
broken glass everywhere.
Her 2-year-old was bleeding. The
boys were all slashed up. Her 5-yearold was dazed and cut up, too. But
the minivan’s third row was empty.
Her 12-year-old daughter was gone.
“What happened? Is everyone alive?
Amran? Where is Amran?” Duale
said she remembers thinking.
Amran Djama, her precocious,
lively sixth-grader, was crumpled on
the road, limp and scraped raw. The
impact of the pickup truck T-boning
them during a frenetic Fairfax
County police chase — one that is
now under investigation for the way
it was conducted and the damage it
has done — launched Amran
through a window, to the street,
gomery) and Marice I. Morales
(D), District 19, each spoke of
being grabbed, touched or treated
inappropriately, without giving
details or naming the perpetrators.
They asked the House Rules
Committee to approve legislation, backed by the Women Legislators of Maryland caucus, that
calls for an independent investigator, creates procedures for
complaints involving lobbyists
and requires the Office of Legislative Services to keep records on
anti-harassment training of lawmakers and legislative staff.
Currently, harassment com-
Man is
charged in
slaying of
D.C. teen
BY
The rules panel did not vote
Monday on whether to move the
bill out of committee for consideration by the full House of Delegates.
Maryland is one of many states
struggling with how to address
workplace sexual harassment in
the #MeToo era. Over the past
couple of years the General Assembly has made some policy
changes, but lawmakers, advocates and experts who testified on
Monday said more needs to be
done.
“The time is now,” said Kelly,
president of the women’s caucus
HARASS CONTINUED ON B3
SLAUGHTER CONTINUED ON B5
FAMILY PHOTO
Duale and five children were in her minivan when it was hit during a police
chase in Herndon, Va., in December. Amran was severely injured.
where she skidded down Frying Pan
Road on her face.
Her skull was fractured, her facial
bones broken. Duale, 38, who was
also cut up and had a broken wrist,
tried to lunge toward her daughter.
But the paramedics had just arrived,
and they swarmed the girl amid
plaints must be filed either with
the General Assembly’s office of
human resources or the presiding
legislative officers or their staff,
and can be referred for investigation to the Joint Legislative Committee on Ethics.
“We’re not here to shame anybody or to call names, we just
want to find an end to this,” said
Morales, a freshman lawmaker
who sounded near tears. “This
happened to me personally. . . . I
can’t tell you how many times I
have had to call a colleague out
and say ‘this is not appropriate’. ”
Del. Shane Robinson (D-Montgomery), who also spoke in favor
screams and the crunch of shattered
glass.
That was more than two months
ago.
Now her 12-year-old, who rode her
bike to school and played soccer,
grunts and sighs as she spends hours
DVORAK CONTINUED ON B4
of the bill, recalled watching a
former member of the General
Assembly “begin to fondle a
freshman delegate” in 2011, his
first year in the legislature.
He said he and another colleague, also a freshman, did not
know what to do. They asked
their female colleague if she was
okay and ultimately decided not
to do anything because they were
all worried about how speaking
up might affect the female lawmaker’s career.
Angel told the panel she refuses “to remain an accomplice” to
what she described as a pervasive
culture of misconduct.
P AUL D UGGAN
A District man was charged
with murder Monday in the slaying of 14-year-old Steven Slaughter, “an outstanding young guy
with a world of promise” who
was shot to death in a robbery
attempt while walking with
friends near his Southeast Washington home, Police Chief Peter
Newsham said.
The victim, a ninth-grader at
Friendship Collegiate Academy, a
D.C. public charter school, was
described by an uncle as “lovable” and “one of the best kids
you would ever want to meet.” In
announcing the arrest, Newsham
said the Jan. 14 killing “rocked
this community” and that “homicide detectives have been working very diligently ever since.”
A break in the investigation
came about a week after the
shooting, the chief said, when
patrol officers chased a vehicle
that had been stolen in a carjacking. After the vehicle crashed, he
said, officers found “the murder
weapon and additional forensic
evidence” in the car, which eventually led detectives to a suspect
in the killing.
Anthony D. Allen, 21, of Southeast Washington, was arrested
Monday and charged with firstdegree murder while armed. At a
news briefing, Newsham said
investigators believe at least one
other person, not yet identified,
was involved in the fatal robbery
attempt. He said police have not
determined which assailant
pulled the trigger.
Steven, remembered by relatives as a good student who
dreamed of playing football for a
major college, was headed home
from a 7-Eleven, walking with
two friends in the 1700 block of
Md. lawmakers recall harassment, call for outside investigator
BY
Serial arsonist is focus
of probe by D.C. police
Amran Djama, 12, gets assistance from her mother, Filsan Duale, and physical therapist Alissa Marzetti.
GANG CONTINUED ON B4
Three women tell panel
of inappropriate touching
deaths
ruled as
homicides
B2
EZ
THE DISTRICT
RE
THE WASHINGTON POST
K
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 6 , 2018
VIRGINIA
Shelter
Democrats cut names of 2 icons, both slave owners, from gala
residents
go without
hot water
BY
BY
F ENIT N IRAPPIL
Homeless families housed at
the shuttered D.C. General Hospital spent the weekend without hot
water, the latest indignity at the
long-troubled megashelter set to
close this year.
There’s some dispute over when
the problems began: Several residents said the hot water stopped
working on Thursday night, but
shelter officials say they weren’t
aware until about midnight Saturday.
The Department of General
Services, which manages cityowned property and handles
maintenance for the shelter,
didn’t receive a complaint about
heating problems until noon Saturday. The steam plant that heats
the shelter had gone offline; crews
restored service within two hours
of being notified, but the water
remained tepid until staff returned to fix the issues on Sunday
evening, DGS spokeswoman Joia
Jefferson Nuri said.
Temperatures dipped close to
freezing over the weekend.
Some residents fled the shelter
to bathe elsewhere or had to get
creative.
Jewel Johnson, 27, said she
filled a bucket with hot water from
a water dispenser to wash her
three children.
“I didn’t have a choice but to
stay there, that’s why I was so
frustrated,” said Johnson, who has
been in the shelter since mid-January. “I tried to call the mayor
because if I had somewhere to go
and bathe, I would. I had to go . . .
four days without hot water.”
“I didn’t have a choice
but to stay there, that’s
why I was so
frustrated.”
Jewel Johnson
Additionally, Johnson and
other residents of the main
building on the D.C. General
campus were notified on Sunday
of a confirmed case of scabies
and given a number to call if they
noticed any symptoms. Scabies
is a contagious skin infestation
by tiny mites that cause intense
itching and a rash.
Dora Taylor, a spokeswoman
for the Department of Human
Services, which oversees the
shelter, said that two confirmed
cases were “resolved immediately” and that it is not uncommon for children to enter the
shelter with scabies.
The problems at D.C. General
over the weekend were first reported by a reporter for Fox 5.
Shoddy living conditions are
common in the nearly centuryold facility. A 2014 investigation
by The Washington Post found
that residents went days, and
sometimes weeks, without heat
or hot water, and that dozens
reported health problems because of dirty bathrooms and
pest infestations.
In January, Mayor Muriel E.
Bowser (D) announced that the
city would stop housing families
at the shelter by the end of the
year, even before a new network
of smaller replacement facilities
that will be built across the city
is up and running.
But advocates for the homeless say Bowser’s plan goes
against her administration’s repeated assertions that D.C. General wouldn’t shut down until
new shelters are ready to receive
people.
If the city doesn’t have enough
shelter space, administration officials say they will place families in motels.
In a statement last week, the
Washington Legal Clinic for the
Homeless said it would keep a
close eye on whether Bowser
administration officials would
steer homeless families to inappropriate housing or turn away
applicants from shelters to fulfill the mayor’s campaign promise of shutting down D.C. General.
fenit.nirappil@washpost.com
richmond — Guess who’s not
coming to dinner?
Thomas Jefferson and Andrew
Jackson, two Democratic icons
who’ve lost some luster in some
modern eyes because they owned
slaves, are no longer welcome at
the party’s annual gala in Virginia.
The annual Jefferson-Jackson
Dinner, the party’s biggest fundraiser, has been renamed the
Blue Commonwealth Gala.
“The future of our Commonwealth will be painted in broad
went down the tubes with Democratic activists when President
Trump declared himself an admirer by hanging his portrait in
the Oval Office.
But throwing shade on Jefferson is not without peril in
Virginia, where the native son
and University of Virginia
founder remains widely admired. A statue of him went up
just a few years ago in the state
Capitol, which he designed and
where people refer to him reverentially as “Mr. Jefferson.”
“Good thing Jefferson doesn’t
have anything to do with higher
education in Virginia,” said Garren Shipley, the Republican National Committee’s Virginia
spokesman. “Can you imagine if
there was actually a statue of this
guy in the Capitol? Unreal. Let
alone some quotes literally
carved in stone? Oh, wait.”
The renaming comes as Virginia and other Southern states
have wrestled with whether to
remove Confederate monuments
from prominent public spaces.
Plans to pull a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee from a
downtown Charlottesville park
were the focus of a white nation-
BAY FROM B1
percent. Over that span, submerged aquatic vegetation in the
bay has more than quadrupled.
“Other regions have seen large
resurgences in sea grass cover
with improved water clarity,
such as Tampa Bay, Fla., or
improved sediment stability, as
in the Wadden Sea [in Northern
Europe], but the Chesapeake Bay
has seen greater total and proportional recovery than any other submerged aquatic vegetation
restoration project of which we
are aware,” according to the
study, which was published Monday in the Proceedings of the
National Academy of Sciences.
The cleanup not only helped
submerged vegetation but increased its biodiversity, said
Jonathan Lefcheck, a researcher
for the Center for Ocean Health
at the Bigelow Laboratory for
Ocean Sciences in Maine, who
was the lead author. That’s important because some species are
better than others at surviving
catastrophic events such as tropical storms that can devastate
vegetation and grass beds.
Susquehanna Flats, an area of
the bay near the Susquehanna
River, was found to have up to
14 species.
“If you get a bunch of species
together, there may be a few
species in that diverse community that can withstand that disturbance so it doesn’t wipe out
everything,”
Lefcheck
said.
“They make it hospitable for
other species to come back and
colonize. We can say beds that
have more species are more deserving of our attention.”
Anyone who scuba dives to the
vegetation and quietly lies there
will immediately realize its importance, said Bill Dennison, a
researcher at the University of
Maryland Center for Environmental Science, who was an
author of the study. “If you let
them come to you, you see sea
horses and clams and scallops
and inchworms and snails crawling up and down the blades. I’ve
come out of the water with
thousands of these snails. It’s
teeming with life.”
Among those animals are
blue crabs.
“Most of us don’t appreciate
the life cycle of the blue crab,
alist rally last summer that led to
a counterprotester’s death.
Swecker described the renaming as a way to build on
victories in November, when an
anti-Trump wave helped Democrats sweep statewide offices
for governor, lieutenant governor and attorney general, and
pick up 15 seats in the House of
Delegates.
“We are excited to rename our
signature event as we work to
make Virginia a stronger, fairer,
and more prosperous Commonwealth,” she said in a statement.
laura.vozzella@washpost.com
ROBERT ORTH
Eelgrass shown in Chesapeake Bay. Scientists say submerged vegetation is the bay’s protective nursery.
how it comes from the bay to the
plate,” said Robert Orth, a researcher at the Virginia Institute
of Marine Science at the College
of William & Mary. “These little
babies in the first 30 days of their
life stay on the coast of Virginia
near North Carolina.” Then they
make a run into the bay and its
tributaries toward shallow areas
and grass beds. “It’s their home.
. . . They support an incredible
array of other animals that act as
food for the blue crabs. The
grasses grow by themselves.
They don’t need fertilizer.”
But the expansion of vegetation could be short-lived.
Trump’s 2018 budget seeks to
eliminate the Chesapeake Bay
Program’s $73 million annual
funding. Congress is more supportive of the program: The
House approved a $13 million
cut, and the Senate voted to
restore the program’s full budget. The proposals are wrapped up
in an omnibus bill that is being
negotiated under a March 20
deadline, according to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation.
Groups that are part of the
president’s constituency — farmers, developers and the chemical
industry — oppose some restrictions on pollution from development sites and farms, including
fertilizer and animal manure
that pours into creeks, rivers and
other tributaries.
That pollution feeds enormous algae blooms that suck
away oxygen. Algae also grows
on blades of grass, then floats to
the surface as scum that blocks
light. Without light, plants die.
Submerged vegetation requires
more light to survive.
The American Farm Bureau
Federation, joined by farmers in
Pennsylvania and the National
Association of Home Builders,
lost a federal suit to stop the
program. They appealed to the
Supreme Court, which declined
to hear the case two years ago.
Trump could reverse their loss.
Dennison, who was a study
author, was also part of a group
that conducted a global analysis
of sea grasses 10 years ago. “We
called attention to a global decline that’s occurring around the
world,” he said. “We called those
coastal canaries [in a coal mine].
These high light requirements
are what makes them the canary.
When the canary goes, you still
have a little time. You get yourself and that canary out of that
mine. You act decisively. Just as
they’re the first thing to go,
they’re also going to be the
harbinger that something’s
wrong.”
Although the news is positive,
“we are not saying ‘mission accomplished,’ ” Dennison said.
Regions where animal waste is
polluting the water are lagging
behind the rest of the bay.
“This is not the time to stop,”
Orth said. “The chicken farms
are going nuts. Everywhere you
go is chicken, chicken, chicken.
Everyone likes their wings.”
darryl.fears@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/energy-environment
MARYLAND
EPA restores funding for Bay Journal amid Democrats’ pressure
BY J ULIET E ILPERIN
AND D INO G RANDONI
The Environmental Protection
Agency has agreed to restore
$325,000 in funding this year for
the Bay Journal, a publication
with a print circulation of 50,000
that has covered environmental
issues involving the Chesapeake
Bay for more than 25 years.
A Trump political appointee
who started signing off on each
EPA grant last year, public affairs
official John Konkus, made the
decision in August to cut off funding for the paper. The federal money accounts for roughly a third of
the Bay Journal’s budget. The publication challenged the move in an
appeal directly to the agency, arguing that the EPA had violated
the terms of its cooperative agreement, and Maryland’s two senators, Benjamin L. Cardin and
Chris Van Hollen, both Democrats, pressed EPA Administrator
Scott Pruitt in private and in public to reinstate the funds.
Late last week, Kerry Neal, deputy director of the EPA’s Office of
THE DAILY QUIZ
EARN 5 POINTS: Find the answer, and then go to
washingtonpost.com/postpoints, Quizzes to enter the
correct response.
blue strokes,” Susan Swecker,
chairwoman of the Democratic
Party of Virginia, said as she
announced the change over the
weekend. “The Blue Commonwealth Gala will be a celebration
of our party’s dedication to expanding opportunity for all Virginians.”
Virginia Democrats are following the lead of party chapters in several other states, who
started abandoning the name
in recent years amid a new
reckoning over Confederate
symbols. What remained of
Jackson’s reputation probably
Funding for Chesapeake Bay restoration effort faces elimination
This rare cardinal spotted in Alabama
wasn’t the usual vibrant red of most
males. Instead, it was which color?
(Hint: The answer is in today’s Health and Science section.)
L AURA V OZZELLA
Grants and Debarment, told attorneys for the Bay Journal that the
grant would be restored. “This
renders the appeal moot,” he
wrote to the newspaper’s lawyers.
“It’s been a big distraction,” said
Karl Blankenship, editor of the
Bay Journal. “It’s going to be nice
to get this behind us.”
Blankenship added he was “actually pleasantly surprised at the
way that Senators Ben Cardin and
Chris Van Hollen took up the
cause. I actually didn’t think that
our grant would rise to that type of
a level. I was actually frankly
amazed.”
In a joint statement, Cardin and
Van Hollen hailed the move as a
step toward restoring faith in the
federal government’s ability to
uphold its commitments.
“I was deeply troubled when the
EPA announced its intent to
revoke its commitment to the Bay
Journal only one year into a
five-year agreement,” Cardin said,
“in part because of the dangerous
precedent that such a move could
set for important projects and programs nationwide. Our federal
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government must be a consistent,
reliable partner if it is ever to be
fully effective.”
The EPA is obligated under the
Clean Air Act to publicize its efforts to clean up the Chesapeake
Bay, and it has long used the Bay
Journal as a way of doing that. Last
year, however, the publication began running articles criticizing
the new administration for proposing deep cuts to the cleanup
program. Nick DiPasquale, who
retired as head of the EPA’s Chesapeake Bay program in January,
has said Konkus mentioned the
critical coverage in a call focused
on the fate of the Journal’s grant.
During a hearing of the Senate
Environment and Public Works
Committee in late January, Van
Hollen asked Pruitt whether “it
was politics that killed the funding.” Pruitt replied, “The contract
is under reconsideration, and we
are taking steps to address it . . .
and we will deal with it fairly.”
Asked to elaborate on the
grant’s restoration, EPA spokeswoman Liz Bowman noted Pruitt’s
remarks during the hearing.
Advocates for the environmental restoration of the Chesapeake
Bay said they welcomed the news.
“I get about half my information about the bay from the Bay
Journal,” said Tom Pelton, who
hosts a radio show on Baltimore’s
WYPR about environmental
issues in Maryland. “This is victory for honest and good reporting.”
Neal, the EPA grant official, told
the Bay Journal he was ready to
uphold the decision to terminate
the grant. “However, the Agency’s
management has informed me of
a second change in priorities.”
In the months leading up to the
grant termination last year, the
Bay Journal published a story
scrutinizing the “wide and deep
swath” it said the White House’s
proposed budget would cut in
related environmental initiatives.
Democracy Forward, a leftleaning legal and policy shop
founded in response to the Trump
administration’s
deregulation
agenda, represented the Bay Journal in its appeal to the EPA.
Donald Boesch, a marine scientist at the University of Maryland
and president of the school’s Center for Environmental Science,
said the bay has gotten cleaner
since the implementation of the
Clean Water Act. “Oxygen conditions are improving, waters are
becoming clearer, and underwater grasses and other marine life
are returning,” he said.
In 2010, the Obama administration set strict limits on the amount
of nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment states could put into the
64,000-square-mile watershed as
part of a “pollution diet.”
But the amount of federal money that will be available for restoring the bay after years of industrial
and agricultural pollution remains in doubt. For two years, the
Trump administration has proposed drastically cutting funding
to the EPA’s Chesapeake Bay Program, a regional partnership between the federal government and
states within the bay’s watershed.
juliet.eilperin@washpost.com
dino.grandoni@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/energy-environment
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TUESDAY, MARCH 6 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B3
M2
Millennium Falcon? Really, people? Well, at least it’s not Jabba the Hawk.
I must say, the
people at the
Audubon
Naturalist Society
are taking the
erroneous name
John
given to the redKelly's
tailed hawk living
Washington atop Washington
National
Cathedral much
better than I am. In fact, they’re
shrugging off the misnomer like
water from a . . . well, you know.
In case you hadn’t heard, the
cathedral recently had an online
“name the raptor” poll. Among
the decidedly ecclesiastical
choices — Grace, Gloria, Vesper,
Deacon, etc. — was Millennium.
That’s as in Millennium
Falcon, the spaceship that Han
Solo pilots in the Star Wars
movies. The cathedral already
has a grotesque carved to look
like Darth Vader, so the name
was in keeping with George
Lucas’s oeuvre.
That’s the name a majority of
the voters picked: Millennium
Falcon, even though the bird is
not a falcon but a hawk. Hawks
have feathered “fingers” at the
ends of their wings, instead of
the tapered points that falcon
wings come to. Falcons such as
the peregrine are rarer in our
area.
This is what happens when
you let the public vote.
Sometimes, we can’t be trusted.
Look at that research vessel in
Britain, which, if the public had
had its way, would have been
christened Boaty McBoatface. (It
became RRS Sir David
Attenborough, with an
underwater vehicle it carries
bearing the BMcB moniker.)
I figured that ornithologists
and other bird-lovers would
surely share my sense of outrage.
I mean, a hawk isn’t a falcon.
With our skyscrapers, chemicals
and habitat destruction, humans
are killing millions of birds a
year. Shouldn’t we at least be
able to properly differentiate
among the victims?
But Alison Pierce at the
Audubon Naturalist Society in
Chevy Chase, Md., was more
forgiving. “Hawk Solo would
have been a more taxonomicallycorrect choice,” she wrote in an
email. “But since hawks and
falcons are both part of the
order Falconiformes, we’re
willing to give them a pass on
Millennium Falcon. As the D.C.
region’s consummate
birdwatchers and lovers, we
think it’s cool that so many area
residents appreciate the beauty
of the red-tailed hawk, which is
one of our most common
raptors.”
Alison said that at least the
cathedral’s bird hasn’t been
named after one of the bad guys
from Star Wars. They could have
gone with Jabba the Hawk, she
pointed out.
In fact, Alison said, Star Wars
villains lend themselves to all
sorts of avian appellations: Kylo
meaning”); a brake of bikes; a
stumble of bikes (“a nod to your
column”); a whir of bikes; a
flight of bikes.
I kind of like a name inspired
by the aftermath of last week’s
windstorm: a tangle of bikes.
WASHINGTON NATIONAL CATHEDRAL
The public chose the Star Wars-inspired name for the red-tailed hawk living atop Washington National
Cathedral. The Audubon Naturalist Society says it’s fine with calling the almost Jedi-like bird a falcon.
Wren instead of Kylo Ren;
Emperor Passerine instead of
Emperor Palpatine (passerines
are perching birds); Dodo Fett
instead of Boba Fett; General
Grebe-ous instead of General
Grievous, and Count Cuckoo
instead of Count Dooku.
I just thought of two: Princess
Rhea and Luke Flycatcher.
Alison said that whatever the
bird at the cathedral is named,
we should delight in the fact that
red-tailed hawks possess almost
Jedi-like powers. They have
vision eight times sharper than a
human’s and the ability to dive
at 150 mph.
May the feathers be with you.
Saddle up
Birds come in flocks, unless
they’re crows, in which case they
come in murders: a murder of
VIRGINIA
J OUVENAL
J ACKMAN
The masked intruder slipped
into the Reston apartment on June
6, 1995, ordered four young women
to strip naked at gunpoint and then
filmed the harrowing sexual assaults that followed with a camcorder.
On Monday — nearly 22 years
later — one of the victims confronted the alleged perpetrator for the
first time. The woman’s testimony
in a Fairfax County courtroom was
by turns graphic and emotional,
providing the key details that led a
judge to determine there was
enough evidence to send the case to
a grand jury.
Jude Lovchik, 49, of Ocala, Fla.,
has been charged with numerous
counts related to the assaults on
the four roommates, but authorities are also exploring whether he
was behind more than 15 sexual
assaults and attacks in Centreville
and surrounding areas in the early
and mid-1990s.
On Monday, the victim described the horrific attack and the
assailant’s methodical attempts to
cover his crimes, even vacuuming
the scene of the assaults and making off with the vacuum bag to
remove trace evidence. (The Washington Post generally does not
name victims of sexual assault.)
On that night in the summer of
1995, the woman testified, the attack began when she was woken up
sometime after 1:30 a.m. by a roommate clapping her hand over her
mouth and telling her “not to say
anything.”
The woman, then 23, and her
three roommates were aspiring
pharmacists and had been studying for the pharmacy boards shortly before going to bed that night.
Now, they were confronted by a
man dressed in black, wearing a ski
mask and gloves. He was holding a
pistol.
The woman testified that he ordered the roommates to turn over
their money because he said he was
going on a trip. He then made the
women close their eyes and herded
them all into one of the bedrooms.
“He said, ‘Shut up, don’t say
anything, don’t make me use this,’ ”
the woman told the judge.
The man ordered the women to
lie facedown on two twin beds, the
woman testified, before he blindfolded them using scarves and
scrunchies from one of their closets. He turned up a radio and TV,
presumably to mask any noise, and
told the women to disrobe.
One of the roommates panicked,
and the intruder shoved a dirty
sock in her mouth, the woman
testified. “I thought he was going to
kill us,” she said.
The women were forced to engage in sexual acts on each other,
and then the man assaulted them.
Afterward, the man vacuumed
the bedroom and took the vacuum
bag as the women waited on the
beds. He had also smashed the
women’s phones and found an address book belonging to one of
them. The woman testified he told
them he had found family members’ names.
“I will kill them” if the women
went to police, the man told the
roommates.
He then told them he had a “long
trip” ahead and was going to the
kitchen to make a sandwich, the
woman testified. About 45 minutes
later, the woman took off their
blindfolds and realized he had
gone. The door to the apartment
was wide open.
Authorities were able to recover
sperm during the initial investigation, according to testimony at the
preliminary hearing, but it did not
immediately match a perpetrator.
The case went cold in the intervening years.
After following fresh leads that
weren’t detailed in court, Fairfax
County police sought a search warrant last year to test biological samples from Lovchik, who had moved
from Fairfax County to Florida. The
DNA in the samples matched that
collected in 1995, a forensic examiner testified Monday.
Lovchik was arrested in October.
An attorney for the suspect declined to comment Monday. Police
said the investigation continues.
“As we do with all criminal investigations, our detectives are working to determine whether the suspect in this case, Jude Lovchik, is
connected to any other similar cases,” Fairfax County police spokeswoman Julie Parker wrote in an
email.
justin.jouvenal@washpost.com
tom.jackman@washpost.com
MARYLAND
Suspect arrested in double slaying, police say
BY
john.kelly@washpost.com
Twitter: @johnkelly
For previous columns, visit
washingtonpost.com/people/johnkelly.
LOTTE R I E S
L O C A L D I GE S T
Witness recounts 1995 sex assaults
BY J USTIN
AND T OM
crows. Bernie Markstein of
Silver Spring, Md., thinks a
group of dockless bike-share
bicycles all together on a
sidewalk should have a similar
name.
He suggested: a biathlon of
bikes (“sounds good, but is
clearly wrong,” Bernie wrote); a
clutch of bikes; a cabal of bikes;
a pedal of bikes; an attire of
bikes (“nice pun with little
A nice finish
From two wheels to four: John
Huber of Montgomery Village,
Md., wonders where he can get
the type of car polish he sees on
all the automakers’ TV
commercials.
“This must be some truly
wonderful stuff, since none of
the vehicles shown driving
through miles of backcountry,
snow-covered roads have any
evidence of dirt, salt spray or
slush splashes on them,” John
wrote. “They remain
immaculately clean.”
Tongue in cheek, John
wonders how mere mortals can
get their hands on this magical
stuff.
Wrote John: “I realize that the
carwash association and paint
manufacturers, among others,
may be hiding this trade secret,
but I’m sure you can get to the
bottom of it.”
Are you kidding? I’m not
going up against Big Polish. I
don’t want to get waxed.
M ARTIN W EIL
A suspect has been arrested in
the fatal shootings of a man and
woman from Virginia who were
found dead in a car in Montgomery County, Md., last month,
county police said.
They said Gregory Terrell
Jones, 24, of Raphael Court in
Martinsburg, W.Va., was charged
with two counts of murder in the
deaths of Ashley Susan Dickinson, 34, of Mallory Terrace in
Alexandria, and Joshua Michael
Frazier, 29, of Space More Circle
in Woodbridge.
A passer-by spotted them in a
car with its motor running on
Feb. 15 on Aldora Circle in Bur-
tonsville. The two were dead
when emergency personnel arrived, police said.
In a statement Monday, the
county police said Frazier had
gone to Aldora Circle to collect
money he was owed from an
earlier heroin transaction.
Police said the money was
owed to Frazier by Jones, the
suspect.
Two men were involved in the
homicide, police said. One of
them, they said, was Tyshon
Jones, of Bunker Hill, W.Va., the
police said. They identified him
as Gregory Jones’ cousin.
Two days after the bodies were
found in Montgomery County,
police said, the two cousins were
at Coco Loco, a nightclub in
Berkeley County, W.Va. Tyshon
Jones was shot and killed there,
they said.
They said a .45 caliber pistol
belonging to Tyshon Jones was
found at the nightclub. At the
nightclub, police said, shots were
also fired from another gun, a
9mm pistol. A 9mm shell casing
found at the nightclub and a 9mm
shell casing from the Burtonsville
shooting scene appeared to have
been fired by the same gun, police
said.
Gregory Jones was arrested
Monday in Gaithersburg on a
Montgomery County warrant, the
county police said.
martin.weil@washpost.com
Results from March 5
VIRGINIA
Police charge man in
Arlington sex assault
A man knocked on several
apartment doors and pretended
to be a maintenance worker,
authorities said. And when a
woman opened a door, he got
into the apartment and sexually
assaulted her, according to
Arlington County Police.
On Monday, police said they
have arrested and charged a
Washington man in that
incident on May 7, 2017.
Richard Allen Lowe, 25, is
charged with abduction with
intent to defile and malicious
wounding. He is being held
without bond in the Arlington
County jail.
The incident happened just
before 10 a.m. Police said the
man got into a residential
building in the 1500 block of
Key Boulevard and knocked on
several apartment doors,
claiming he was a maintenance
worker.
Lowe was arrested Feb. 22.
— Dana Hedgpeth
THE REGION
Friday’s windstorm
was one for the ages
The windstorm of last Friday
will go down as one of the
landmark wintertime wind
events in the WashingtonBaltimore region. At its height,
about 4 p.m. on Friday, there
were more than half a million
customers without power in the
immediate Washington region.
The storm unleashed a
relentless hammering on trees,
homes, power lines and the
frayed psyche of
Washingtonians for 18 to 24
hours.
The winds were generated by
a severe nor’easter off the MidAtlantic and New England
coasts. The storm met the
criteria of a “bomb cyclone”
because of its explosive
development off the Northeast
coast.
Not only did the storm
deepen at a rapid rate, but it
also was massive. It lingered in
the same region, close to the
coast, for nearly a day before
ejecting southeast into the open
Atlantic.
Ten states were
simultaneously under a highwind warning Friday, which was
issued for sustained winds of at
least 35 mph, or gusts exceeding
55 mph.
The storm was held in place
by an enormous high-pressure
system over Greenland.
— Jeff Halverson
Ride-hailing service
to change at airport
If you are planning to take an
Uber, Lyft or other ride-hailing
service from Reagan National
Airport, you’ll need to head to a
new spot to be picked up.
Airport officials have moved
the pickup zone to the ticketing
level upstairs at Terminals B
and C. The shift is designed to
accommodate construction of
the new security screening area
at the airport — part of the
larger $1 billion Project Journey
initiative that will also add a
new commuter terminal.
Travelers flying in on Alaska,
American, Delta, JetBlue,
United and Virgin America who
use gates 10 through 45 at the
airport will be the most affected.
Uber and Lyft service at
Terminal A will not be affected.
DISTRICT
Mid-Day Lucky Numbers:
Mid-Day DC-4:
Mid-Day DC-5:
Lucky Numbers (Sun.):
Lucky Numbers (Mon.):
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DC-4 (Mon.):
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DC-5 (Mon.):
2-0-5
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MARYLAND
Mid-Day Pick 3:
0-3-9
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Night/Pick 3 (Sun.):
3-3-2
Pick 3 (Mon.):
3-6-8
Pick 4 (Sun.):
7-9-5-7
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2-6-2-3
Multi-Match:
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Match 5 (Sun.):
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Match 5 (Mon.):
2-25-27-36-39 *38
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VIRGINIA
Day/Pick-3:
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Night/Pick-3 (Sun.):
Pick-3 (Mon.):
Pick-4 (Sun.):
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Cash-5 (Sun.):
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0-2-0
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Md. female lawmakers take on harassment
HARASS FROM B1
and the bill sponsor, who has written in The Washington Post about
being groped. “People are paying
attention like never before, and
they are going to hold us accountable.”
Kelly said legislative staffers
have told her they are afraid to
report harassment and misconduct for fear of jeopardizing not
only their own careers but also
those of the delegates and senators
they work for.
On Friday, Sen. Cheryl C. Kagan
(D-Montgomery) accused longtime lobbyist and former delegate
Gil Genn of running his hand
down her back to her buttocks
during a chance encounter a day
earlier, and former lobbyist Sara
Love alleged that Del. Charles E.
Barkley (D-Montgomery) has inappropriately hugged and kissed
her. It was the first time women
associated with the State House
have publicly accused specific men
of harassment.
Both men denied the allega-
tions. Genn, who did not respond
to requests for comment from The
Post on Friday, issued a statement
Monday reiterating the denial he
had given to the Baltimore Sun.
“I kept my hands to myself. I
didn’t even shake her hand,” Genn
said. He apologized for telling the
Sun he thought Kagan was “delusional” and said he “welcomes the
opportunity” to prove his innocence when the complaint Kagan
filed is adjudicated. Kagan stood
by her claim.
ovetta.wiggins@washpost.com
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VIRGINIA
Man jailed after threats
made to Fairfax school
BY D ANA H EDGPETH
AND J USTIN J OUVENAL
Authorities in Fairfax County
said they have arrested an 18year-old man who allegedly
threatened a high school.
In a statement, Fairfax City and
Fairfax County police said Ishmael O’Brien Lionel Harrison turned
himself in Monday afternoon.
Earlier, they said he was evading
arrest and was considered possibly armed and dangerous.
Police later said no weapon has
been found, but during a search
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
of Harrison’s home they recovered more than 200 rounds of
ammunition that could have been
used in a military-style rifle.
Harrison was transferred to
the Fairfax County jail, where he
is facing a charge of threatening
to commit serious bodily harm to
persons on school property and
possession of child pornography.
He is being held without bond.
Police said Harrison made
threats on social media Feb. 21
that were directed toward Fairfax
High School.
According to a search warrant,
on a Twitter account that featured
an image of military-style rifles,
Harrison posted: “I have been
planning this for months now
and now i am going to act. Better
watch out fairfax.”
In another tweet, detectives
claim Harrison wrote: “I am coming and no one can stop me ... I
AM COMING AND THE COPS
CAN GET IT TOO.”
It appears that the messages
were sent from Harrison’s phone
while he was at Fairfax High,
according to the search warrant.
Fairfax City Police Chief Carl
Pardiny said students and other
young people “immediately” re-
ported the threats after they were
posted.
“Had it not been for these tips
and that information, we may
have had some tragedy here,”
Pardiny said.
Pardiny said the threats were
“widely distributed” and created
a “tremendous amount of fear.”
He said Harrison turned himself in peacefully with the help of
his family and attorney about 3
p.m. on Monday.
Fairfax City police said Harrison initially was cooperative with
the investigation and interviews
turned up no evidence that he
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 6 , 2018
had firearms. While serving a
search warrant at his home, they
found the rifle ammunition.
Police said based on that information and the fact that Harrison
made threats, he was considered
armed and dangerous. Police said
security was increased at Fairfax
High and other city schools.
Authorities said they had tried
to serve the warrants but could
not find Harrison.
dana.hedgpeth@washpost.com
justin.jouvenal@washpost.com
Tom Jackman contributed to this
report.
PETULA DVORAK
A police chase over stolen cars ended in a life-altering crash for one family
DVORAK FROM B1
learning to put one foot in front
of the other again at the
Kennedy Krieger Institute in
Baltimore.
The four other kids are back
in school in Herndon, Va. They
hate being in the car, Duale said,
and they will all have scars for
the rest of their lives. But they
will recover from the physical
wounds.
Amran may never be the
same.
She spent two weeks in a
coma. Her sixth-grade teacher
came in, sat by her bedside and
painted her nails. When Amran
woke up on Jan. 10, she was
devastated that her long hair
had been shaved off, but didn’t
understand how her nails got so
pretty.
She misses school — her
friends and books and classes.
Amran, who wants to be a
teacher, was popular and chatty
and jumped rope at recess with
the other girls. She loved art
class, but her best subject was
math.
Her new curriculum, in these
long, exhausting days, covers
standing, walking and
concentrating. It takes
everything she has to take a
small beanbag from a therapist’s
hand while balancing on one leg.
Two people have to hold her
steady when she does this.
After an obstacle course of
buckets, beanbags and rings that
looks as though it’s set up for a
toddler, the tween crumples in
exhaustion. “That was hard,” she
tells her physical therapist.
“When can I ride a bike again?
I want to ride a bike!” she says,
before tipping over on a
mattress.
Amran’s skull was fractured,
but it was her brain being
slammed around that did the
real damage, said her doctor,
Michelle Melicosta.
Amran was in terrible shape
BONNIE JO MOUNT/THE WASHINGTON POST
Filsan Duale accompanies her daughter Amran Djama, who has been hospitalized since December, to a physical therapy session at the
Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore on Feb. 28. Amran was excited after beating her physical therapist in a basketball game.
after the accident, a 3 on the
Glasgow Coma Scale of 3 to 15,
which means she was as low as it
is possible to be without being
dead.
Now Melicosta said she is
“thrilled with Amran’s progress.”
Amran can’t see out of her
right eye, and she still uses a
feeding tube to eat and a
tracheotomy tube to breathe, but
she is making progress toward
getting rid of both.
Her family has been
devastated, too, every shred of
normalcy taken from them.
During the week, Duale lives at
the hospital with Amran while
her husband, Moustapha Djama,
who runs Loudoun County’s
public transportation system,
manages the three other kids.
On the weekends, they switch.
“It was just all for a truck. A
police officer was chasing a
truck that was stolen from over
at the storage place,” Duale told
me, in a whisper, outside
Kennedy Krieger’s physical
therapy room. “Everything in
our lives is different now
because of a truck.”
According to Fairfax County
police, the man driving the
truck, Brandon Stefon Vinson,
28, rang the doorbell of a
random house in Centreville on
Dec. 27 and allegedly punched
the girl who opened it.
Then he jumped into a car
that had been reported stolen
earlier that day in Hyattsville,
Md., and took off, police said.
Vinson allegedly slammed
into a pickup truck, assaulted
that driver and took off in the
truck. That’s when police
spotted him and began the
chase.
“They went through four red
lights. Four,” Duale said, holding
up four fingers to emphasize
how long and dangerous the
chase was.
“And then he hit us. I never
saw him coming,” she said. “The
light just turned green, and I
was slowly starting to roll and
then, then it just went black.”
Fairfax police said they are
still investigating whether the
chase was justified.
A couple of weeks after the
crash, the Fairfax County Board
of Supervisors began reviewing
guidelines designed to clarify
when and whether police should
be in a high-speed chase.
“Officers, controlling pursuit
supervisors, and commanders
must always balance the need
for immediate apprehension
with the dangers created by the
pursuit, especially relating to the
sanctity of preservation of all
human life,” reads the 45-page
draft the board reviewed in
January.
If they don’t think the
criminal is going to kill someone
or himself, police should end the
pursuit and get a warrant,
according to the draft policy.
The county reported 134
police pursuits in 2016, up from
119 in 2015, and 115 in 2014,
according to a WTOP report.
When I looked for national
statistics, I found an analysis
released last year by the Bureau
of Justice Statistics. It found that
an average of 355 people were
killed annually between 1996
and 2015 in crashes related to
police pursuits.
Meanwhile, Amran’s family is
struggling with medical costs
that their insurance doesn’t
cover. Those have soared to
more than $100,000, which is
why they’ve started a GoFundMe
site. The coverage for Amran’s
therapy at Kennedy Krieger will
run out in a couple of weeks.
Then Duale will bring her home,
where she’ll be in charge of her
daughter’s progress.
Someday, Duale hopes to be
able to drive again. Her husband
has been driving. But every time
she gets back into a car — even
when she is a passenger — she
flinches, shudders and
remembers the blackness, then
all that blood.
petula.dvorak@washpost.com
Twitter: @petulad
FBI informant in MS-13 gang faces mandatory life sentence after brutal killing
GANG FROM B1
that if members of the gang believed to be linked to the extortion
were arrested then, or if the FBI
had worked as closely with Lazo as
they did with Reyes, Otero Henriquez would still be alive. Prosecutors pushed back hard on
those assertions.
“It’s absurd to suggest . . . that
the FBI was supposedly responsible for the death of Carlos Otero
Henriquez,” Parker said in closing
arguments.
Lazo had been in jail that spring
and agreed to cooperate with law
enforcement. His attorney, Robert
Jenkins, said he gave useful information about the gang.
But six weeks later Lazo drove
the van that took Otero Henriquez
to his death. The 18-year-old had
been told they were going to a
party. While Otero Henriquez was
interrogated and stabbed more
than 50 times, Lazo served as
lookout.
He argued that he could not
have stopped the killing or reported it immediately, because clique
leader Wilmar Javier Viera Gonzalez had taken all the other men’s
phones.
“They just murdered a man;
they just stabbed him to death,”
Jenkins said in closing arguments. “Is he supposed to snatch
his phone from [Viera Gonzalez]
and dial 911?”
Lazo did ultimately confess, after being arrested about two
weeks after the slaying for a probation violation. While outside
the Leesburg Police Department
smoking a cigarette with the detective who recruited him as an
informant, Lazo told the story.
The others were arrested.
Lazo told the detective, T.R.
Allen, that Otero Henriquez was
not “street smart.” Andres Velasquez Guevara, a gang hangeron who helped lure Otero Henriquez to his death after seeing his
Facebook photos flashing 18th
Street signs, said he doubted the
teenager was actually in the gang.
“He just wanted to do something that he wasn’t,” Guevara tes-
tified through a Spanish interpreter. “It seemed to me he was
not behaving according to his
age.” He said some people called
Otero Henriquez “Princesa” because he was “acting like a girl.”
He also claimed that he suspected the gang “wanted to do
something” to Otero Henriquez
but had no idea his friend would
be killed.
According to Allen, Lazo said
everyone involved was well aware
Otero Henriquez would die that
night. Lazo and the others insisted they were surprised and terrified that night and acted only
under pressure from Viera Gonzalez.
“I have never liked violence,”
Lelis Ezequiel Treminio Tobar testified, also speaking Spanish. “I
was shaking; my whole body was
shaking.”
He was convicted of crimes including kidnapping resulting in
death, as were Lazo, Viera Gonzalez and four others. They all face
mandatory life sentences. Guevara was convicted of conspiracy
to commit kidnapping and faces
up to life in prison. One member
of the gang was convicted Monday
only on charges related to the
extortion.
Treminio Tobar said he came to
the United States from El Salvador
four years ago to escape MS-13.
But he became friends with a recruiter for the VLS identified in
court as “Espectro.” He got involved with the gang. On the night
of Otero Henriquez’s death, he
said he participated reluctantly.
“I did not want to grab [the
knife],” he testified. “It was all
bloody. . . . I just wanted to go
home.”
After the slaying, he later told
FBI agents, he had trouble eating
and sleeping. He and Lazo both
cried when they confessed.
Prosecutors said any such
shows of emotion were too little,
too late.
“Those tears weren’t tears of
sympathy for Carlos Otero Henriquez,” Parker said. “Those were
tears of misery and regret.”
rachel.weiner@washpost.com
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GOP hasn’t united behind candidate
to take on Sen. Tim Kaine, poll finds
BY
J ENNA P ORTNOY
More than three months ahead
of the primary for U.S. Senate,
about two-thirds of Virginia Republicans don’t have a favorite
candidate to face Sen. Tim Kaine
(D), according to a poll released
Monday morning.
The Wason Center for Public
Policy at Christopher Newport
University also found President
Trump’s approval rating in Virginia stands at 37 percent, while
52 percent of voters “strongly
disapprove” of the job he’s doing
as president.
The Wason Center surveyed
1,562 registered Virginia voters.
The poll has an overall margin of
error of 2.5 percentage points.
In the GOP Senate primary,
Corey Stewart, the self-styled
mini-Trump who nearly won the
gubernatorial nomination last
year, has a slight lead, but 66 per-
cent of voters are undecided, the
poll found. The primary is June
12.
The other candidates are evangelical pastor E.W. Jackson; Bert
Mizusawa, a retired major general in the U.S. Army Reserve and
foreign policy adviser to Trump’s
campaign; two-term state Del.
Nicholas J. “Nick” Freitas (R-Culpeper); and political newcomer
Ivan Raiklin.
Stewart enters as the most
well-known candidate with the
support of 16 percent of potential
GOP primary voters. Jackson has
7 percent, followed by Freitas
with 6 percent.
The race will be an uphill
battle for any Republican because Kaine is coming off a
national ticket that, although it
lost nationally, prevailed in Virginia.
He is seeking a second term
with a 53 percent favorability
rating and a lead of at least
20 points on potential GOP challengers.
While 57 percent of Virginians
say the state is on the right track,
only 32 percent say the same
about the nation.
The 25-point split “reflects
Democrats’ and independents’
deep dissatisfaction with President Donald Trump’s performance, a result that remains largely unchanged among Virginia
voters since he took office,” Quentin Kidd, director of the Wason
Center, said in a statement.
Trump has lost a bit of support
from Republicans who voted for
him but maintains robust support among his most loyal backers, he said.
“If Trump’s approval-disapproval is a guide,” Kidd said, “the
2018 elections are setting up to be
base elections in Virginia.”
jenna.portnoy@washpost.com
TUESDAY, MARCH 6 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B5
RE
MARYLAND
Giving dads some hands-on lessons on how to style their daughters’ hair
BY
T ALIA R ICHMAN
baltimore — Damion Champ
knew only one way to do his little
girl’s hair: a style he calls the
emergency ghetto-fabulous ponytail.
Beyond that, his only solution
for fixing up his 6-year-old
daughter’s locks was to “look for
women who already do hair and
ask them how much they charge.”
But Champ, who is 46, attended a recent workshop at EutawMarshburn Elementary School
that taught him how to do braids,
buns and twists. The event reflects a growing effort by Baltimore City Public Schools to get
fathers more involved in their
children’s lives.
“My daughter would be laughing so hard right now if she saw
me,” Champ said as he struggled
to braid the long hair of a mannequin. By the end of the two-hour
session, he had mastered a bun —
and planned to try it out over the
weekend.
Eutaw-Marshburn’s Judy Center has hosted Fatherhood Fridays once a month for the past
two years. The school brings together a small group of dads to
chat about anything and everything.
Many dads came to Kimberly
Dudley, a family service coordinator at the school, with a common
request: They wanted tips on how
to do their daughters’ hair.
“They expressed that they may
not be with their kid’s mother or
have joint custody,” she said.
“When the girls are sent over,
they don’t know what to do.”
It’s bigger than just hair, Dudley said. The time that a dad
spends brushing and styling his
daughter’s hair is time he can
spend asking about her friends,
her classes, her ambitions.
“When you’re doing your
baby’s hair, that’s quality time,”
she said.
Throughout the city, the district has been holding similar
events in schools to emphasize
the role of fathers. At a meeting
this fall, called Dads and Dialogue, a group of men discussed
how to change the narrative
around absentee fathers. They
shared tips on how to help their
children with reading and talked
about strategies to get more dads
involved in parent-teacher associations.
School district officials said
they believe that when male caregivers are involved in their chil-
PHOTOS BY KIM HAIRSTON/BALTIMORE SUN
Ashanti Langston, 16, shows Gil Nwajei how to style hair on a mannequin at a February event at Eutaw-Marshburn Elementary School in
Baltimore. She is a sophomore studying cosmetology at Carver Vocational-Technical High School. Nwajei has a 7-year-old daughter.
dren’s education, those children
do better in school and in life.
Research backs this up: The
U.S. Department of Education
found that children of highly involved fathers are 43 percent
more likely than other children to
earn mostly As, and less likely to
be suspended, expelled or repeat
a grade.
“Having fathers involved and
invested is paramount,” said Yolanda Abel, an associate professor in teaching and learning at
Johns Hopkins University’s
School of Education. Her research has focused on these family relationships. “It gives children a more solid foundation of
who they are as a person, and
therefore, they have less disruptive relationships to process and
handle.”
Every dad who attended the
workshop at Eutaw-Marshburn
— called Daddy Hair Care — was
given a copy of the children’s
book “I Love My Hair,” whose
cover art depicts a young black
girl with beaded braids.
The girl in the book is told she
Takaiah Young, 17, is a senior studying cosmetology at Carver Vocational-Technical High School. She
teaches Damion Champ how to braid hair on a mannequin. By the end of the two-hour Daddy Hair
Care session, Champ had mastered a bun and planned to try his hair skills on his 6-year-old daughter.
‘Vehicle of interest’ leads to arrest
Tiffanie Jones, Gaither said,
“This is a little bit of peace for my
sister, so maybe now she can
sleep a little.”
Shortly after the killing, Newsham said, police “identified a
vehicle of interest in the case.” It
had been stolen in the city in an
armed carjacking about a week
before the homicide, he said, and
it was the vehicle in which police
found what was believed to be
the murder weapon, a handgun,
a week later.
The three people arrested after
the car chase were charged with
unauthorized use of a motor
vehicle. Whether any of three
had been involved in the killing
“remains to be seen,” said Newsham, who would not elaborate
on the evidence found in the
vehicle. He said Allen, who was
not in the car during the chase,
was arrested by members of the
Capital Area Regional Fugitive
Task Force.
As for the robbery attempt, the
chief said that “it looks like it
happened very quickly” and that
something went wrong, causing
one of the assailants to shoot
Steven. Asked what items of
value the robbers had hoped to
steal from a trio of adolescents,
Newsham said detectives are not
sure, and neither are the surviving victims. “You’re going to have
to asked the suspects in this case
what in the heck they were
thinking,” he said.
He shook his head. “I can tell
you, in 28 years in law enforcement, one thing I’ve found about
violent crime is it’s not logical.
It’s not rational. It doesn’t make
any sense. Why they would select
these kids to take something
from — who knows?”
paul.duggan@washpost.com
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— Baltimore Sun
Serial arsonist probed in 1985 deaths
S0833-2 3x5
SLAUGHTER FROM B1
Minnesota Avenue SE about 6
p.m. that Sunday when the crime
occurred.
He suffered “multiple gunshot
wounds” and died later in the
evening in a hospital, police said.
His companions were unharmed.
“He was such a great kid,” the
uncle, Nicholas Gaither, 37, said
Monday, hours after police informed him of the arrest.
“Always did his work in school,
wasn’t going after expensive
things, never caused anybody
any trouble,” Gaither said. “And
then you think, as time passes,
maybe they won’t make an arrest,
maybe his killer’s going to be still
walking the streets. So I’m glad,
really glad, they put their feet to
the pavement and made an arrest.”
Referring to Steven’s mother,
is lucky to have her hair, because
it is “beautiful and you can wear it
in any style you choose.”
Each father also was given a
packet with tips for how to style
black children’s hair. “Your baby
girl is your pride and joy and her
hair should be her crown and
glory,” the packet reads.
The workshop was done in
partnership with Carver Vocational-Technical High School.
Students from the school’s cosmetology program taught the
class, instructing the fathers on
the right amount of moisturizer
to use and how to clip in barrettes.
To earn a state license, Carver’s
cosmetology students need to log
1,500 hours of training. Events
like Daddy Hair Care help them
chip away at that requirement
before graduation.
Kenya Griffin, 19, remembers
how her father had “not a clue”
about how to do her hair when
she was growing up. She taught
other dads how to do a braided
mohawk, laughing as they tried
to figure out the steps.
Griffin is on track to graduate
from Carver and take her cosmetology exam this spring. She
plans to take business courses at
Baltimore City Community College and eventually open her own
spa.
The education she’s receiving
at Carver, she said, will allow her
to get a job at a hair salon and
make good money as she works
toward her educational goals.
Kimberly Stevens, the cosmetology instructor at Carver, said
her students can go right into the
workforce from Carver if they
wish.
“They can work in any salon or
braiding shop,” Stevens said.
“They’ll be ready as soon as they
leave.”
Before receiving a lesson from
a “Carver Cosmo Girl,” Rodney
Wallace said he only did his 5year-old daughter’s hair if he absolutely had to.
“If her mother isn’t around to
do it, I don’t want her going
outside looking any type of way,”
he said.
But now, he said, he’s looking
forward to implementing the tips
and tricks he learned at Daddy
Hair Care.
“It’s a different bonding experience for us,” said Wallace, 32.
“This is something positive for us
to be doing. I do what makes her
happy. If she likes it, I like it.”
FIRE FROM B1
Picott and Duncan, and authorities said prosecuting a decadesold case could be difficult. Newsham said a detective in the
homicide unit’s cold-case squad
revived the inquiry that led to the
manner of death being changed
from accidental to homicide. The
fire occurred Jan. 11, 1985, in a
house on Quincy Place NW, just
off Florida Avenue. Duncan’s
body was found in a second-floor
bedroom; Picott escaped but died
at a hospital on March 5.
“It looks like those two homicides, in all likelihood, they will
close,” Newsham said.
The chief said the earlier media reports noting Sweatt’s apparent confession should have
prompted quicker action by authorities in the Quincy Place fire
investigation. “He had said something to a reporter, saying he was
involved,” Newsham said. “It was
years ago that information had
become available, and I would
suggest that, at that point, probably some additional follow-up
should have been done — and it
was not.”
Prosecutors in the District declined to comment on the case.
The U.S. attorney’s office in Maryland, which prosecuted Sweatt in
the 2005 case, did not respond to
interview requests. Sweatt’s attorney with the Federal Public
Defender’s office in Maryland
also did not respond to inquiries.
Picott’s son, Rodney Picott, a
police officer in New York, said he
was surprised by the new finding
of homicide. He was 18 when the
fire broke out and he managed to
escape the burning house along
with his sister, stepsister and
stepbrother. His sister and stepsister, both 19 at the time, suffered serious burns.
Picott said he had questioned
the D.C. fire investigation from
the beginning and noted that his
father had stopped smoking
years before the fire. He said one
investigator estimated the time
of the fire at 2:40 a.m., but Picott
recalls being up at that time and
watching a movie. He put the fire
closer to 4 a.m., the time listed by
police in Monday’s statement.
Picott, who works for the
Clarkstown Police Department,
about 35 miles north of New York
City, said fire investigators told
him that Sweatt, while negotiating a plea, told prosecutors that
he set the Quincy Place fire, but
the case was not included in the
final plea deal. He also said the
investigator told him that the
suspect had shown up at the
funeral-home viewing for his parents but did not go inside.
“There is no chance my
father woke up at two
in the morning and had
a cigarette.”
Rodney Picott, son of couple who died
in fire at D.C. home
Even without a public confession, Picott said “it was comforting to know he would spend the
rest of his days in a prison cell.”
But he said it was “heart-wrenching” that for so long the cause of
the fire was listed as an accident.
“There is no chance my father
woke up at two in the morning
and had a cigarette,” he said.
The arson fires attributed to
Sweatt didn’t appear on the police radar until the early 2000s,
and they put the region on edge.
Police arrested Sweatt in 2005 in
connection with fires in the District, Maryland and Virginia. The
former fast-food restaurant manager would light plastic jugs with
gasoline and leave them on front
porches. It often took up to a
half-hour before the fire bombs
exploded. Two people were killed
in those fires.
Investigators collected clues at
several fires in the region, including a device used to set fires, a
single strand of hair and pants
and a hat Sweatt had worn at one
of the scenes. Police linked DNA
to Sweatt and the evidence.
At his sentencing in September
2005, Sweatt apologized but did
not offer a motive. His attorney at
the time said he was “laboring
under a psychological compulsion.”
In the City Paper article, published in 2007 and titled “Letters
from an arsonist,” the man reportedly detailed how he set
Quincy Place afire and also described other fires.
“There were different reasons
for most of the fires,” one letter to
the City Paper reads. “It could be
because of one feeling the need to
have power about something or
someone. . . . I might like a particular style of a house and wish one
day to own it (but it’s only a
dream). Fire is a tool to destroy
and some house fires also becomes my fantasy of people
scrambling to exit windows and
sort-of feel like they need my help
so I stay and watch.”
peter.hermann@washpost.com
paul.duggan@washpost.com
B6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
OBITUARIES
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 6 , 2018
IN MEMORIAM
DEATH NOTICE
MOISA
DEMOSS
ALEXANDER L. MOISA
5/3/1987 ~ 3/6/2016
WAYNE A. DEMOSS (Age 86)
OF NOTE
Obituaries of residents from the
District, Maryland and Northern
Virginia.
Jean Bird,
volunteer
Jean Bird, 89, a volunteer at
the Montgomery County Rape
Crisis Center, died Dec. 14 at her
home in Silver Spring, Md. The
cause was heart disease, said a
daughter, Erin Von Nessen.
Mrs. Bird was born Jean Flaherty in Boston and accompanied her husband to Navy bases
across the country before settling in the Washington area in
1971.
David Ogden Stiers, back row at right, and other cast members at a party on the “M.A.S.H.” set. He
played Maj. Charles Emerson Winchester III, a snobby doctor who was the brunt of practical jokes.
DAVID OGDEN STIERS, 75
‘M.A.S.H.’ actor, Disney films’ voice
BY
H ARRISON S MITH
David Ogden Stiers, who
played the snobbish but sympathetic surgeon Winchester on
television’s “M.A.S.H.” and later
delighted a generation of children with voice roles in Disney
movies, including as the clock
Cogsworth in “Beauty and the
Beast,” died March 3 at his home
in Newport, Ore. He was 75.
He had bladder cancer, agent
Mitchell Stubbs wrote in a tweet
announcing the death.
Mr. Stiers, who once declared
that “villains are a slice of heaven,” lent his large stature and
booming voice to King Lear,
scheming scientists and occasionally sympathetic physicians
in more than 150 plays, movies
and television programs, including the Stephen King series “The
Dead Zone” and eight Perry Mason courtroom dramas.
He performed as the alcoholic
magician Feldman the Magnificent in the 1974 Broadway musical “The Magic Show,” appeared
in five Woody Allen films (beginning with the 1988 thriller “Another Woman”) and eventually
established a second career in
music, working as a guest conductor for orchestras and helping
found a symphony in Newport,
his home for more than two decades.
But he was best known for his
work on “M.A.S.H.,” which premiered on CBS in 1972. The series
offered comedic and caustic commentary on the Vietnam War,
which was then in its closing
stages, through its depiction of
Army surgeons in Korea 20 years
earlier.
Mr. Stiers had initially thought
his TV destiny was to play a
truculent character on the “Mary
Tyler Moore Show,” where he appeared in three episodes as a
station manager who berates the
program’s title character. “I
hoped to be the man who fired
Mary at the end of the series,” he
once joked to Canada’s Globe and
Mail newspaper. “I’d have been
the most hated man in America.”
Instead he was recruited to
“M.A.S.H.,” where beginning in
1977, he replaced the arrogant
and AWOL Frank Burns (Larry
Linville) as second-in-command
of the 4077th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital.
As the tall and balding Maj.
Charles Emerson Winchester III,
he was frequently at the receiving
end of pranks by surgeons Hawkeye Pierce (Alan Alda) and B.J.
Hunnicutt (Mike Farrell), though
his medical expertise, dry humor
and flashes of generosity and
kindness made him a more threedimensional comic foil than his
predecessor at the hospital.
Mr. Stiers, a Juilliard-trained
Midwesterner, deployed a Boston
Brahmin accent that he developed without the help of a voice
coach and supplied Winchester
with a love of Wagner and Mussorgsky that mirrored his own
affection for classical music.
In one 1980 episode, Winchester devoted himself to a patient’s leg wound before realizing
that the soldier was a concert
pianist, with a hand injury that
had largely been left untreated.
Setting aside his usual pomposity,
Mr. Stiers’s character helped the
soldier return to the piano by
giving him the sheet music of
Ravel’s “Piano Concerto for the
Left Hand.” “Each of us must
dance to his own tune,” he declared at the end of the episode.
Mr. Stiers was nominated for
two straight Emmy Awards for
outstanding supporting actor in a
comedy, and he received a third
nomination for his supporting
role in the 1984 miniseries “The
First Olympics: Athens 1896,” in
Peter Conrad,
rear admiral
Peter Conrad, 88, a Navy rear
admiral who retired in 1986 as
deputy comptroller of the Navy
after 37 years in the military, died
Dec. 10 at his home in Leonardtown, Md. The cause was prostate cancer, said a son, Paul
Conrad.
Adm. Conrad, a native Washingtonian, was commanding officer of a diesel electric submarine,
a destroyer escort and the Pearl
Harbor Naval Station. In retirement, he operated a vineyard
with his nephews in Southern
Maryland and was a founding
member of the Southern Maryland Wine Growers Cooperative,
which established the Port of
Leonardtown Winery.
KEVIN WINTER/GETTY IMAGES
Mr. Stiers voiced Cogsworth in 1991’s “Beauty and the
Beast” and became increasingly focused on music.
which he played U.S. Olympic
Committee founder William Milligan Sloane.
For years after “M.A.S.H.” ended in 1983, however, Mr. Stiers
lamented that he was known for
Winchester rather than for any of
his subsequent work. He referred
to the television program as “the
four-letter word” or “the green
show” and seemed to prefer being
identified by younger fans who
recognized his voice from Disney
movies.
In addition to his 1991 roles as
the narrator and fussy timepiece
in “Beauty and the Beast,” Mr.
Stiers played Governor Ratcliffe
and the clueless manservant Wiggins in “Pocahontas” (1995), the
friendly archdeacon in “The
Hunchback of Notre Dame”
(1996), a skeptical Smithsonian
Institution board member in “Atlantis: The Lost Empire” (2001)
and Jumba Jookiba, the self-described “evil genius” of “Lilo &
Stitch” (2002).
“The joy is to see that mouth
drop open as they try to put the
voice of that tiny clock [in ‘Beauty
and the Beast’] with this tub of
lard — me,” Mr. Stiers told the
Orlando Sentinel in 2002, describing a typical encounter with
his young fans. “It isn’t adoration;
it’s a moment of learning. And
that, to me, is a little slice of
heaven.”
He was born in Peoria, Ill., on
Oct. 31, 1942. His father was an
accountant for the manufacturer
Georgia-Pacific.
Mr. Stiers graduated from high
school in Eugene, Ore., before
beginning his acting career at the
California Shakespeare Festival
in Santa Clara. He studied acting
and voice at the Juilliard School
in Manhattan and made his
Broadway debut in December
1973, performing with actor and
producer John Houseman’s group
the Acting Company in revivals of
four plays. Months later, he appeared alongside Zero Mostel in
“Ulysses in Nighttown,” a play
adapted from James Joyce’s novel
“Ulysses.”
Mr. Stiers made his final
Broadway appearance in a 2009
revival of “Irving Berlin’s White
Christmas” — he played General
Henry Waverly, whose grandfatherly nature made him a far cry
from Winchester — and in recent
years contributed his voice to
animated movies such as the Eng-
lish-language version of Hayao
Miyazaki’s
“Spirited
Away”
(2001).
In 2009, he announced that he
was gay, telling the blog Gossip
Boy that he had kept his sexuality
secret in part to continue receiving work from studios such as
Disney. He had never married and
said he wished “to spend my life’s
twilight being just who I am.”
He had no immediate survivors, Stubbs said.
Mr. Stiers maintained a prolific
output after “M.A.S.H.,” appearing in films such as the Oscarnominated 1988 drama “The Accidental Tourist” and the comedies “Better Off Dead” (1985) and
“Doc Hollywood” (1991). But he
also became increasingly focused
on music, a childhood interest
that he pursued in earnest after
remarking at a news conference
that if he wasn’t acting, he’d like
to be conducting.
“The thing I love about the arts
— music, theater, museums, galleries — is that everybody wins,”
he told Canada’s National Post
newspaper in 2002. “You are
touched and hopefully moved,
and it is unique to each person.
Even though you may have listened to the same performance,
what you heard could be vastly
different from what anyone else
heard.”
If someone unfamiliar with
music was coming to the symphony only to see a former “M.A.S.H.”
star conduct, he added, that was
all right, too.
“If it’s a father who brings his
children to see that three-named
actor from that show, I’m fine
with that.”
harrison.smith@washpost.com
CORRECTION
Because of incorrect
information from the family, the
photograph accompanying the
Feb. 28 obituary of humor writer
Cynthia Heimel was incorrectly
captioned. The photo was taken
by Sarah Longacre in 1982, not
around 1967.
The March 4 “Of Note”
obituary of a volunteer at the
Montgomery County Rape Crisis
Center incorrectly reported her
name. It was Jean Bird, not Jane
Bird.
Peter Bartis,
folklore specialist
Peter Bartis, 68, a folklore
specialist at the Library of Congress from 1977 to 2017, died Dec.
25 at a hospice center in Washington. The cause was cancer,
said his brother, James Bartis.
Dr. Bartis, a Washington resident, was born in Pawtucket, R.I.
At the Library of Congress, he
worked on field research surveys
for the American Folklife Center
and in the development of the
Veterans History Project, which
gathers firsthand stories from
military veterans.
DEATH NOTICE
ANDERSON
On Saturday March 3, 2018 of
Silver Spring, MD, surrounded by
his family, Wayne passed away
peacefully after a long illness. He
is survived by his wife of 64 years,
Joan Norris DeMoss; his three children Gary, Scott, Denise, their
spouses; seven grandchildren and six greatgrandchildren. Visitation at Collins Funeral
Home, 500 University Blvd. West, Silver Spring,
MD (valet parking) on Thursday, March 8, from
7 to 9 p.m. Memorial Service at Good Shepherd
Episcopal Church, 818 University Blvd. West,
Silver Spring, MD on Friday March 9, at 11 a.m.
Interment private. In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made to Montgomery Hospice at
montgomeryhospice.org or to Good Shepherd
Episcopal Church at gsecmd.org.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
DOYLE
DORIS PATEROS DOYLE (Age 89)
GLINDA COPELAND ANDERSON
On Wednesday, February 28, 2018. Glinda
entered into eternal rest at the age of 74. She
leaves to cherish her memory, her husband,
Kenneth Anderson, Jr. of 49 years; two children, Kenneth Anderson, III (Stacia) and Kimberly Mason (Lloyd, III); brother, Frank Copeland
(Sandra); two sisters, Doris Young (I.C.) and
Mabel Demby; 11 grandchildren, six greatgrandchildren and a host of relatives and
friends. The family will celebrate her life with
a viewing on Wednesday, March 7, 2018 from
6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Sewell Funeral Home, 1451
Dares Beach Road, Prince Frederick, MD and a
wake on Thursday, March 8, 2018 at 10:30 a.m.
at True Deliverance Church of God, 1804 Quarter Ave., Capitol Heights, MD 20743 followed
by a Homegoing Service at 11:30 a.m.
On Saturday, March 3, 2018, of
Leisure World in Silver Spring, MD,
formerly of Kensington, MD and
Cape Cod, MA. Beloved wife of
the late Thomas F. Doyle; sister of
the late John J. Pateros; sister-inlaw of the late Margaret Pateros;
aunt of John Pateros (Deirdre), Lawrence H.
Pateros (Kathryn), Mertie Ann Pateros, Doris
VanSickle (Paul), Charles N. Pateros (Denise)
and the late Mary Jo Pateros. Also survived by
great nieces, nephews and other loving family
and friends. Relatives and friends may call at
Our Lady of Grace Church, 15661 Norbeck Blvd,
Silver Spring, MD, Friday, March 9, from 10:30
to 11 a.m.; where the Mass of Christian Burial
will follow at 11 a.m. Interment Gate of Heaven
Cemetery. In lieu of flowers contributions in her
memory may be made to Sisters of the Blessed
Sacrament, 1663 Bristol Pike, Bensalem, PA
19020.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
EXIS
BERDAK
MARGARET BERDAK (Age 92)
On Saturday, March 3, 2018, formerly of
Hyattsville, MD. Beloved wife of the late
Andrew Berdak; loving mother of Mary
Ann (Richard) Zavadowski, Michael (Barbara) Berdak, Karen (Edward) Patton and
Marlene (Romano) Mascetti; deeply cherished grandmother of Tina, Angela, Chris,
Andrew, Daniel, Heather and Rom; greatgrandmother of Kyle, Natalie and Lexi.
Friends may call at Gasch's Funeral Home,
P.A., 4739 Baltimore Avenue, Hyattsville,
MD on Thursday, March 8 from 2 to 4 and
7 to 9 p.m. A Funeral Mass will be offered
at St. Jerome's Catholic Church, 5205 43rd
Avenue, Hyattsville, MD on Friday, March
9 at 10:30 a.m. Interment Fort Lincoln
Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made in her name to the
Alzheimer's Association National Capital
Area, 3701 Pender Drive, Suite 400, Fairfax,
VA 22030.
www.gaschs.com
BIRNKRANT
HARRY BIRNKRANT
On Sunday March 4, 2018, age
91, Harry Birnkrant passed away
peacefully in the comfort of his
wife and best friend of 66 years,
Myra Birnkrant. Loving father of
Henry (Lynn Goldin), Alan (Debbie)
and Marc (Jeanne). Beloved grandfather of Reuven (Dorielle), Avi, Ron (Susana),
Aviva (Evan Blank), Beth (Ariel Shapell), and
Rachel. Great-grandfather of Zoe. Beloved
brother of the late Cynthia Stern (Michael).
Uncle to numerous nieces and nephews. His
family and friends will miss the wise counsel
and loving smile from this sweet wise man.
Funeral services at Har Shalom, Potomac, MD,
Tuesday, March 6 at 1 p.m. Interment at Garden
of Remembrance. Shiva will be observed on
March 6 and 7 at 7:30 p.m. at 8104 Hampden
Lane; and on March 8 at 7:30 p.m. at 5506
Durbin Road. Contributions may be made to
Har Shalom or a charity of your choice.
JIMMIE EXIS (Age 69)
On Tuesday, February 27, 2018, Jimmie Exis
of Silver Spring, MD and formerly of Athens,
Greece. Beloved husband of Daniela Exis; loving father of Petro, Michelle and Alexander Exis
and David Rodgers (Mihyang); dear brother of
George Exis (Diane); cherished grandfather of
two. Also survived by his mother-in-law Melitta
Stein; brother-in-law Martin Stein and family.
Preceded in death by his parents Petro and
Evanthia Exis. Jimmie was a loving family man
who enjoyed fishing in Ocean City, MD. Services
are private. Memorial contributions may be
made in his name to St.'s Constantine and
Helen Greek Orthodox Church, Silver Spring,
MD. Arrangements by Hines-Rinaldi Funeral
Home.
HALL
ROBERT F. HALL
Died February 3, 2018. Survived by daughters,
Karen Anderson and Brenda Repovich; siblings,
Kathy Aguilar, Doris Kinnamont, and James
Hall;
grandchildren;
great-grandchildren;
nieces and nephews. Memorial Service Sunday, March 25, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at VFW Post
8810, 2310 Old Washington Rd., Waldorf, MD.
HAMILTON
DELIS
NIKI K. DELIS
Dennis Haycraft,
Air Force Senior Master Sgt.
Dennis Haycraft, 70, an Air
Force senior master sergeant
from 1968 to 1994 who then
worked as a tax consultant and
financial adviser at H&R Block
before retiring in September,
died Dec. 28 at an assisted-living
center in Harrisonburg, Va. The
cause was cancer, said a sister,
Deanna McDaniel.
Mr. Haycraft, a resident of
Maurertown, Va., was born in
Madelia, Minn., and spent most
of his life in Northern Virginia.
He served in Vietnam, South
Korea and Germany, and his
decorations included the Meritorious Service Medal, Joint Service Commendation Medal and
the Air Force Commendation
Medal.
Robert Marsh,
Air Force general
Robert Marsh, 92, a four-star
Air Force general whose final
active-duty assignment, in 1984,
was as commander of Air Force
Systems Command, died Dec. 28
at a hospital in Loudoun, Va. The
cause was cardiac arrest, said a
daughter, Kathryn Monday.
Gen. Marsh, a resident of Sterling, Va., was born in Logansport,
Ind. He served in the U.S. Army
Air Forces during World War II
and joined the newly formed U.S.
Air Force in 1949. He was an
atomic weapons assembly officer
early in his career at Sandia Base,
N.M., and later worked on other
weapons systems and in the Pentagon’s research and development office. His military decorations included three awards of
the Distinguished Service Medal.
After his military retirement,
he was board chairman of the
aerospace and defense contractor Thiokol and executive director of the Air Force Aid Society. In
the late 1990s, he chaired the
President’s Commission on Critical Infrastructure Protection.
— From staff reports
On March 1, 2018, Niki K. Delis of Washington, DC passed away peacefully while surrounded by loved ones. Niki was born in
Greece and proudly became a United States
citizen in 1950. She was a devout member
of St. Sophia Greek Orthodox Cathedral since
the 1950s. She was an active member of
St. Sophia’s Philoptochos society and wholeheartedly enjoyed volunteering her time cooking for the Greek bazaars, helping to raise
money for various causes, and singing in the
church choir. She embraced her identity as a
Greek-American often writing articles on social
events for a Greek newspaper. In addition, she
taught Greek to young students in school and
at home. She is survived by Chris, her loving
husband of 57 years; George, her devoted son;
and Niki, her cherished granddaughter who
carries on her name. She will be remembered
as an active member of the community; a
woman with a zest for life expressed most
often through dance, song, and cooking; and
a matriarch who valued faith and family above
all. Niki’s viewing will be at the Joseph Gawler’s
Sons Funeral Home, located at 5130 Wisconsin
Ave NW, Washington, DC 20016 on Wednesday,
March 7, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. and 7 p.m.
to 9 p.m. Her funeral service will be at the St.
Sophia Greek Orthodox Cathedral at 11 a.m.
on March 8. In lieu of flowers, contributions
may be made to the St. Sophia Greek Orthodox
Cathedral, 2815 36th St and Massachusetts.
Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20007.
MARGARET W. HAMILTON "Marge"
Of Springfield, VA, on February 28, 2018, at
the age of 87. Predeceased by her beloved
husband of 57 years Kenneth M. Hamilton,
Capt., USN (Ret.); caring mother of Stephen
Hamilton of Burke, Susan Hamilton of Annandale, and John Hamilton of Lansdowne; loving
grandmother of Tyler Hamilton of Lansdowne;
dear sister of James Williamson of Somerset,
MA; and also survived by many nieces and
nephews.
Marge was born in East Islip, NY, before her
family moved back to Fall River, Massachusetts. She graduated from the Sacred Hearts
Academy in Fall River and then worked as an
office manager in a fabric mill prior to getting
married and raising a family. She met her
husband while he was stationed at Newport,
RI, and they were married in 1958. Marge was
a devoted Navy wife and mother who lived in
Detroit, MI; Long Beach, CA; Springfield, VA;
Sasebo Japan and Portland, ME. She was a
talented artist and seamstress. She enjoyed
flower arranging and antiquing. Marge was
also an avid animal lover. She and her husband
worked as a team remodeling their homes and
enjoyed weekend trips in the country. Marge
volunteered as a driver for members attending
the Senior Citizens Group meetings at Holy
Spirit Catholic Church.
Friends welcome on Wednesday, March 7,
2018 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Demaine Funeral
Home, Springfield, VA. A Mass of Christian
Burial will be celebrated on Friday, March 9 at 2
p.m. at Holy Spirit Catholic Church, Annandale,
VA. Interment with her husband will take place
at a later date at Arlington National Cemetery.
If desired, donations can be made in Marge’s
memory to Little Sisters of the Poor, St.
Joseph's Home, Henrico, VA.
Because your loved one served proudly...
Military emblems are available with death notices and in-memoriams
To place a notice call 202-334-4122 or 800-627-1150, ext. 44122
C0979 2x3
HUYNH/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Royal Buyer,
mechanical engineer
Royal Buyer, 94, a mechanical
engineer for the Navy Department from 1966 to 1988 whose
work included the development
of gas turbine engines for shipboard propulsion, died Nov. 13 at
his home in Rockville, Md. The
cause was cardiovascular complications, said a daughter, Janet
Buyer.
Mr. Buyer was born in New
York City. He was a mechanical
engineer in Philadelphia and
Woodbridge, N.J., before settling
in the Washington area in 1966.
He was president of a citizens
volunteer group that supported
construction of the Intercounty
Connector, a toll freeway connecting Montgomery County and
Prince George’s County.
Forever loved and remembered.
Mom, Dad, Léa, Family and Friends
TUESDAY, MARCH 6 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
DEATH NOTICE
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RE
DEATH NOTICE
IN MEMORIAM
DEATH NOTICE
DESSIN
JONES
HEIM
McKEAN
MYSKA
STOGDALE
JUNE ELWYN HEIM (Age 95)
ANGELA M. CONDON McKEAN
(Age 87)
FRANK BURTON MYSKA (Age 88)
THOMAS STANLEY STOGDALE
On Sunday, March 4, 2018, of
Silver Spring, MD. Beloved wife
of the late CWO Gordon F. Heim,
USMCR. Beloved mother of Gordon and Diane. Born in Australia
to Lilias A. and Howard C. Bebee.
Preceded in death by her brothers, Alexander Sinclair Bebee and Alan Howard
Bebee. She was a published author, and she
was an editor of a Military Newsletter. Interment private. In lieu of flowers, donations may
be sent to St. Francis Service Dogs, P.O. Box
19538, 8283 Enon Dr., Roanoke, VA 24019.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
KAZLAUSKY
HELEN ADELE SMITH KAZLAUSKY (96)
On February 15, 2018, joined her beloved husband Victor J. Kazlausky. She is survived by
children Patricia Linkous (Stan), Victoria Barron
(John) and James Kazlausky (Marina); seven
grandchildren and three great-grandsons. A
visitation March 8 from 6 to 8 p.m. at COLONIAL FUNERAL HOME, Leesburg, VA. A memorial mass March 9 at 11 a.m., St. Theresa
Church, Ashburn, VA and interment 2 p.m. at
Quantico National Cemetery. Please view and
sign the guest book at:
www.colonialfuneralhome.com
LIEBERMAN
Of Arlington, VA passed away unexpectedly
but peacefully on February 26, 2018 in Inova
Fairfax Hospital, Falls Church, VA.
Born December 9, 1930 in Cumberland, MD
she was the daughter of the late William F. and
Mary Barbara (Boch) Condon.
Mrs. McKean attended high school in Cumberland, MD graduating with the Class of 1948.
She then went on to continue her education
at Ursline College, Kentucky. Mrs. McKean then
moved to Arlington where she began working
for the United States Navy Department and
was an actuations librarian. Upon the birth of
her son, she began her new career as a fulltime homemaker.
She and her husband of 59 years, Wilbur E.
“Gene” McKean, were married September 6,
1958 in Arlington.
Mrs. McKean was an active member of the
Walker Chapel United Methodist Church,
Arlington. At the church she assisted in many
fundraising events, purchasing educational
materials, and was a member of the Allen
Terhune Circle woman’s group. She remained
active until recent years when her mobility
began to decrease.
In addition to her husband, she is survived by
one son, Eric E. McKean and one grandson,
Joseph E. McKean, both of Arlington.
According to Mrs. McKean’s wishes, there will
be no public services. She will be buried in
Green Hill Cemetery, Waynesboro, PA.
Arrangements are by Grove-Bowersox Funeral
Home, Waynesboro, PA.
In lieu of flowers memorial contributions may
be made in her memory to the Walker Chapel
United Methodist Church, 4102 N. Glebe Road,
Arlington, VA 22207.
Online condolences may be expressed at:
www.bowersoxfuneralhomes.com
McKOIN
Died of natural causes at his home in Alexandria, VA on Tuesday, February 20, 2018.
Born September 14, 1929 in Worcester, MA,
he lived in Rutland, MA; Warner-Robins, GA;
and Fairfax and Alexandria, VA. Frank had a
31-year career in the United States Air Force
Reserve, retiring with the rank of Colonel. In
this time, he flew multi-engine airlift aircraft,
was posted to Air Force Reserve Headquarters,
and completed his career in the Air Force
Plans and Operations Division at the Pentagon.
Notable events in his career included flying
during the Bay of Pigs invasion and the Cuban
Missile Crisis. Frank also spent 14 years as
a teacher and then a vice principle at David
Prouty Junior High School in Spencer, MA
and was active as an adult with Boy Scout
Troop 141 in Rutland, MA. Frank was first and
foremost devoted to his wife, Marion, and his
family.
Survivors include his sons, Frank Burton, Jr.,
Alfred William, and James Curtis; his daughters-in-law, Elizabeth and Alison; and his granddaughter, Shoshanah. He was predeceased by
his wife of 62 years, Marion, and by his siblings
Frances and Charles.
Memorial to be held at 2pm on Sunday, March
11 at Murphy Funeral Home, 4510 Wilson Blvd,
Arlington, VA 22203.
In lieu of flowers, the family requests that
memorial contributions be made to either:
Air Force Aid Society, 241 18th Street South,
Suite 202, Arlington, VA 22202; online at:
https://www.afas.org/ways-to-give/ or Fisher
House, Fisher House Foundation, 111 Rockville
Pike, Suite 420, Rockville, MD 20850; online at:
Ways To Give, www.fisherhouse.org.
O'BRIEN
ELIZABETH IVY SIMMONS LIEBERMAN
(Age 78)
Of Annandale, Virginia, passed away on March
2, 2018. She was born in Columbia, South
Carolina and raised in Arlington, Virginia and
Mamaroneck, New York. She graduated from
Duke University and embarked on a lifelong
career as a math teacher, beginning in Montgomery County public schools. After several
years of teaching middle and high school math,
Liz earned a Master’s degree in Mathematics
from the University of South Carolina. In 1968,
she joined the faculty at the new Northern
Virginia Community College (NOVA) campus in
Annandale. Liz was a mainstay of the mathematics department teaching calculus, statistics and algebra and was very active in
college wide boards and committees. She
retired in 2011 after 42 years with NOVA
and was subsequently named a Professor
Emeritus. She traveled extensively to Russia,
Egypt, Nepal, Israel, and China alongside colleagues and friends during numerous summer
trips. Liz was an active member of the Zonta
International club, a leading global organization
of professionals empowering women worldwide through service and advocacy. She is
survived by her two children, Angela “Gigi”
Dalton (James) and Jeffrey Lieberman; as well
as three grandchildren; and her sister Melva
Elmer (William). She will be missed greatly by
her family, friends, and community. A visitation
will be held on Wednesday, March 7 from 6 to
8 p.m. and funeral services will be Thursday,
March 8 at 11 a.m. at Everly-Wheatley Funeral
Home, 1500 West Braddock Rd., Alexandria,
VA. Burial will follow at Columbia Gardens
Cemetery in Arlington, VA. In lieu of flowers
contributions can be made to The Northern
Virginia Community College Educational Foundation through the Liz Lieberman Memorial
Scholarship
(www.nvcc.edu/apps/2/gift/index.html) or to
the Zonta International Foundation (http://support.zonta.org/donate).
MEADOWS
IVY WASHINGTON MEADOWS
Entered into eternal rest on Saturday, February
17, 2018. Mrs. Meadows will lie in state at St.
Barnabas Episcopal Church, 14111 Oak Grove
Rd., Upper Marlboro, MD, Saturday, March 10
from 10 a.m. until service at 11 a.m. Interment
private. www.stewartfuneralhome.com
MARKLE
ALEXANDER MICHAEL McDONALD
(Age 26)
On Wednesday, February 28, 2018, son of
the late Virginia "Bunny" McDonald and his
surviving father, Christopher T. McDonald,
passed away. He is survived by his brother,
Christopher W.; and grandmother, Virginia
Burkart. He was preceded in death by three
grandparents, Francis Burkart, William and
Mary McDonald. He is also survived by a host
of loving uncles, aunts and cousins.
Alex was a Springfield, VA resident graduating
from West Springfield in 2009. Alex worked
for Fairfax County since he was 17 years old.
Most recent years, were at the Norman M. Cole
Pollution Control Plant.
Viewing will be Thursday, March 8 from 5 to 8
p.m. at Demaine Funeral Home, 5308 Backlick
Rd., Springfield, VA. Mass will be held Friday,
March 9, 11 a.m. at Holy Spirit Catholic Church,
Annandale, VA. Burial will follow at National Cemetery, Falls Church, VA. Reception to
follow.
When the
need arises,
let families
find you in the
Funeral Services
Directory.
To be seen in the
Funeral Services
Directory, please call
paid Death Notices at
202-334-4122.
Members of the Association of
Retired Police Officers of D.C. are
notified of the March 1, 2018 death
of Robert F. Miller. He was a LT
with MPD-ID&R when retired on
December 1, 1972.
MURAVCHIK
MIRIAM MURAVCHIK
On Monday, March 5, 2018, MIRIAM MURAVCHIK of Riverdale, NY.
Beloved wife of the late Emanuel
Muravchik. Loving mother of
Joshua (Sally) and Aaron (Lindalva)
Muravchik; dear grandmother of
Stephanie (Jon Shields) and Madeline (Melvin
Marcelo) Muravchik, Valerie (Amir) Klayman,
Eben and Gerdson Muravchik; cherished greatgrandmother of Isaiah, Gabriel and Aaron
Shields, Quinn Muravchik Marcelo, Aviv, Shai,
Erez and Ariel Klayman and Samantha
Houghton. Funeral services will be held on
Wednesday, March 7, 2018, 11 a.m. at Congregation Har Tzeon-Agudath Achim, 1840 University Blvd., W Silver Spring, MD 20902. Interment
following at Mt. Lebanon Cemetery, Adelphi,
MD. Shiva will be observed at the home of
Joshua and Sally Muravchik. Memorial contributions may be made to Congregation Har
Tzeon-Agudath Achim. Arrangements entrusted to TORCHINSKY HEBREW FUNERAL HOME,
202-541-1001.
DEATH NOTICE
DeSOUZA
WHITE
In lieu of flowers, please consider donating
to The Basilica of St. Mary in Alexandria, VA
22314.
VICTOR B. DeSOUZA
On February 26, 2018 of Bethesda, Maryland
and formerly Toronto, Canada and Nairobi,
Kenya. Beloved husband of Daisy; loving father
of Daphne (Michael), Jacqueline (Neil), and
Malcolm (Mercedes); devoted grandfather of
Sarah, Erin, Charlie, Mary, Catalina, Isabela, and
Juliana; brother of Henry, Valentine, and the
late Albert DeSouza. Victor is fondly remembered by his large extended family and friends.
A Memorial Mass will be held at 11 a.m.,
March 17, 2018 at St. Bartholomew’s Catholic
Church, 6900 River Road, Bethesda, Maryland
20816. In lieu of flowers, the family encourages
donations in Victor’s name to Bethesda-Chevy
Chase Rescue Squad.
(https://donate.bccrs.org/Donate.aspx).
Died peacefully on March 1, 2018, at Cathedral
Village in Philadelphia, PA. Penny graduated
Wells College 1961. Her compassion and world
view led her to service as a Peace Corps
Volunteer, Country Desk Officer in Tunisia,
Washington DC staff member and international
economic development consultant. Retired
from US State Department 2002. Docent at
the Washington DC National Gallery. Moved to
Cathedral Village October 2016. Predeceased
by parents, John and Lillian White, and brother,
John L. White, Jr. of Middleburgh, NY. Survived
by nephew John (Jack) L. White, III; niece, Jane
L. (Aaron) White-Wilsey; sister-in-law, Patricia
L. White, great nephew, Jason L. (Heather)
White and children, great nephew Nicholas
J. Wilsey and cherished friends, Charles G.
Hitchcock and H. David Wilt. Memorial service
to be announced. Donations: All Souls Unitarian Church, 1500 Harvard St., Washington, DC
20009.
was instrumental in developing One Stop
Job Centers to provide eligibility and support
services. When she moved to Vermont, Toyo
continued her advocacy work on behalf of
refugees.
Toyo was a loving wife, sister, mother, and
grandmother and a loyal and devoted friend,
who challenged herself and all who knew her
to increase fairness and equity for people
in need. She is survived by three daughters,
Cornelia Schafer, husband Scott, and children Alex and Olivia; Ann Biddle and children
Nell and Yoshi Sanders; Christina Biddle,
husband Philip Suraci, and their daughter
Nicola Suraci; and her brother, Terry Uyeyama. Her friends remember her infectious
laugh, fierce drive and ethics, and love for a
good bridge game.
SIMPSON
Bruce Alan Smith on Saturday,
March 3, 2018 of Rockville, MD.
Beloved son of Eileen and the late
Edward Smith; loving brother of
Michael (Valerie) Smith and Larry
(Alexa) Smith; cherished uncle of Olivia,
Jackie, Carrie, Maddie, Katie, Brett, and
Lyndsey. Funeral services will Thursday,
March 8, 10:30 a.m. at B'nai Israel Congregation 6301 Montrose Rd., Rockville, MD
20852. Interment at King David Cemetery
will follow services. The family will be
observing Shiva, Thursday and Saturday
with services at 7 p.m. at the residence
of Michael and Valerie Smith. Memorial
contributions may be made to American
Heart Association.
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GHI
JOHN C. HAMILTON, JR.
“Jack” (Age 86)
Jack Hamilton of Arlington, Virginia passed
away peacefully on February 27, 2018 with
his family by his side. He is survived by his
daughters, Michele Hamilton-Gunn and Lisa
Hamilton; son-in-law, Michael L. Gunn; grandchildren, Mathew M. Gunn and Madeleine E.
Gunn; and brother, William R. Hamilton. He was
pre-deceased by his wife of 40 years, Eileen
Haynes Hamilton. A Requiem Eucharist service
will be held at Grace Episcopal Church, 3601
Russel Road, Alexandria, Virginia on Saturday,
March 10 at 2 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made in his name to the Food Pantry at
Grace Episcopal Church.
BIDDLE
CLARA ROSE SIMPSON (nee Jahner)
SMITH
POWELL
WILLIAM ARCHER POWELL
BERNICE J. RAMSEY (nee Caldron)
BRUCE A. SMITH
He was preceded in death by his parents, wife,
and brother, James, and is survived by his
son, Michael, daughter-in-law, Kim, grandson,
Timothy, and sister, Margaret Scott. Also surviving are his nieces and nephews, Terri A.
Eddy, Jay A. Scott, Lorimarie Crockett and her
husband Thomas, all of Franklin, PA, and his
great nieces and nephews, Katrina Boulant and
her son, Dillon Jordan of Oroville, CA, and Eric,
Daniel, and Michael Crockett, all of Franklin,
PA. He was 87 years old.
HAMILTON
Passed away on March 3, 2018, age 103,
of complications following surgery. Bea and
her late husband, Lt. Col. Russell W. Ramsey,
participated in the U.S. diplomatic mission to
Germany in the 1950s when he served as Air
Attache to the German Government. Following
Lt. Col Ramsey’s retirement from the Air Force
in 1969, Bea was active in real estate in
Northern Virginia, both as a realtor and as a
landowner. She purchased Shadowgate Farm
in Upperville in the 1970s, and she established
a successful horse breeding and racing business there. Bea is survived by two nephews,
Russell Taylor of Sandusky, Ohio and Barry
Boyer of East Aurora, New York. A memorial
service will be held at Royston Funeral Home
in Middleburg on Tuesday, March 6 at 6:30 p.m.
On March 2, 2018, Clara Rose nee Jahner,
formerly of Lorton, VA; beloved wife of the late
Percy Lawrence “Larry” Simpson, Jr.; mother
and grandmother of Lauree M. Schreiber,
Trevor E. Schreiber, Penny S. (David) Rader,
Annalee C. and Daniel L. Rader, Gregory F.
Simpson, sister of Steve J. (Patricia) Jahner;
sister-in-law of Carolyn F. (Ryland) Hawker,
Melanie K. (Danny) Cockram, devoted friend
Betty J. Henderson and many nieces and
nephews.
Services will be held on Saturday, March 10,
2018 at Fletcher Funeral Home. For more
information please visit
www.FLETCHERFUNERALHOME.net
THOMAS MICHAEL JONES
Col., U.S. Army (Ret. 1994)
Passed away on Saturday, March 3, 2018
following an unexpected bout with illness.
Thomas was a veteran of the Korean and
Vietnam Wars. Following his military career,
he served The Library of Congress as Head of
Security, retiring as a civilian in 1997. He was
born in Franklin, PA on June 24, 1930 to Ira T.
and Margaret E. Jones; married Catherine A.
Delanty on May 18, 1957.
The visitation will be held from 6 p.m. until 8
p.m. on Wednesday, March 7, 2018 at Demaine
Funeral Home, Old Town Alexandria. The Burial
Mass will be held at 10:30 a.m. on Thursday,
March 8, 2018 at The Basilica of St Mary, 310
S. Royal St., Alexandria, VA 22314 with the
burial to follow at St. Mary Cemetery, Old Town
Alexandria.
WALKER
DEATH NOTICE
ROBERT FRANCIS MILLER (Age 99)
MILLER
McDONALD
The officers and members of
Corinthian Lodge #18 are hereby
notified of the death of our
beloved brother John H. Tompkins.
Brother Tompkins will be funeralized Wednesday January 7, 2018
at Stewart Funeral Home, 4001
Benning Road NE, Washington, DC 20019.
Wake at 10 a.m. Craft will assemble at 10 a.m.
Masonic services 10:30 a.m. Funeral services
to follow at 11 a.m.
Leroy G. McDonald II WM
Victor E. Sherrod, Secretary
ELIZABETH A. WHITE "Penny"
RAMSEY
ROBERT F. MILLER
Love Mom, Dad, Aunt Liz and Aunt Eva
R.I.P. with Grandma and Grandpa
MARY ANN O’BRIEN
(Age 86)
Mary Ann (Mawn) O’Brien, of Alexandria, Virginia, passed away peacefully on February
5, 2018. She was born and raised in Saint
Mary’s, Pennsylvania, graduated from Seton
Hill University, and was married to her loving
husband, Harry Thomas O’Brien, for 60 years
until his death in September 2015. As a
military wife, she traveled the world with him
and their children, Kevin O’Brien, Ann Meier,
Mary (Tony) Chitwood, Franny (Mike) Curtis,
Tim (Tara) O’Brien, and Jenny (Todd) Brymer.
She is survived by her children as well as 20
grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren.
A Mass of Christian burial will be celebrated at
12 noon on Wednesday, March 7, 2018 at Good
Shepherd Catholic Church, 8710 Mount Vernon
Highway, Alexandria, Virginia 22309 followed
by a funeral service at Arlington National
Cemetery. Contributions in her memory may
be made to Poor Clare Monastery, 2505 Stone
Hedge Drive, Alexandria, VirginiaA 22306-2499.
Arrangement by Demaine Funeral Home, 520 S.
Washington Street, Alexandria, Virginia 22314
MILLER
On Thursday, March 1, 2018 of
Washington, DC and The Villages,
Florida. Beloved husband of the
late Anna F. Miller, Theodosia S.
Miller and Ellen M. Miller; father of
Joanne C. Genevish; grandfather
of Nicholas G. Genevish and Anne
M. (Brad) Matanin; great-grandfather of Reid
Robert and Avery Anne Matanin; step-father
of the late James (Diane) Henderson, late Lee
Vertuno, Suzanne Vertuno and Jay Vertuno;
brother of the late Mary (Joseph) Khuen, Norman (Peggy) Miller, Margaret (Lawrence) Hartnett, Harry (Mildred) Miller, and Catherine (Kenneth) Usilton. Forever remembered by numerous nieces, nephews, step-grandchildren,
extended family and dear friends. Born in
1918 to the late John and Margaret Miller
in the Eckington neighborhood of Northeast
Washington. A 1936 graduate of St. John's
College High School. World War II veteran from
1941 to 1945 serving in the European Theater
of Operations, United States Army from Normandy through the Battle of the Bulge. Retired
in 1972 as a Lieutenant after 27 years with the
Metropolitan Police Department. Relatives and
friends may call at Collins Funeral Home, 500
University Boulevard West, Silver Spring, MD,
(Valet Parking), on Thursday, March 8, 2018
from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m. Mass of Christian
Burial at St. Joseph's Catholic Church, 11007
Montgomery Road, Beltsville, MD, on Friday,
March 9, 2018 at 10 a.m. Interment Arlington
National Cemetery at a later date. In lieu of
flowers, contributions may be made in the
name of Robert F. Miller to the Dollard Suter
Family Fund (police), MedStar Montgomery
Medical Center or St. John's College High
School.
TOMPKINS
Brother JOHN H. TOMPKINS
BARBARA ANN WALKER
DONALD E. MARKLE (Age 86)
Of Gettysburg, PA passed away Saturday,
March 3, 2018. Born September 6, 1931 in
Hanover, PA, he was the son of the late Ira and
Ada (Stauffer) Markle. Don is survived by his
beloved wife of 37 years, Geri (O’Brien) Markle.
He was preceded in death by his first wife
Patricia, mother of their five children, who died
in 1965.
He graduated from Montgomery Blair High
School, Silver Spring, MD. Attended The Johns
Hopkins University 1949-1952. Studies interrupted by Korean War. Served in U.S. Army from
1952-1955. Upon return, he graduated from
University of Maryland. Did graduate work at
American and George Washington Universities
in areas of International Relations.
Federal employee for 34 years with The Department of Defense in area of Intelligence, predominantly with the National Security Agency.
He retired in 1986 as the Director of Foreign
Relations, Europe, for The National Security
Agency. Volunteered 25 years at the National
Gallery of Art in Washington, DC.
In addition to his wife Geri, he is survived by
his five children, Chris (Pat) and children Ian
and Sara, El Cerrito CA, Kevin, Springfield VA,
Anne (Jacqueline), Naperville IL, David (Berli)
and children Mikel and Lea, Houston, TX, and
Claire (Emily), San Jose CA; and sister, Mary
Louise Roberts of Loveland, CA.
A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at
10:30 a.m. on Saturday, March 17, 2018, at St.
Francis Xavier Church, High Street, Gettysburg.
There will be a viewing at the Monahan Funeral
Home, Gettysburg, Friday, March 16, from 6
to 8 p.m. Burial will be at a later date at
the Arlington National Cemetery. In lieu of
flowers, donations may be made to the St.
Francis Xavier School, Gettysburg, 465 Table
Rock Rd, Gettysburg PA, 17325 or Adams
County Library, 140 Baltimore St., Gettysburg,
PA 17325. Online tributes and condolences can
be made at
www.monahanfuneralhome.com
MARCEL P.L. DESSIN
3/6/1986 - 11/24/2008
Happy Heavenly 32nd Birthday!
Entered into eternal rest on Thursday, March 1,
2018. She is survived by two daughters, Denise
Walker and Michelle A. Walker-Scales (Kerby);
two sons, Vincent Walker and Kevin A. Walker
(Angela); six grandchildren, Tia R. Cox, Traci F.
Cox, Randy R. Richardson, Carlos A. Walker,
Akenya J. Phillips and Laura E. Walker; seven
sisters, Mildred V. Harris, Thelma T. Banks
(Maurice), Ruth C. Hall (Frank), Brenda L. Fisher
(Charles), Diane V. Waters, Camilla A. Wilkins
and Jean Fowler; a host of other relatives and
friends. Mrs. Walker will lie in state at St.
Stephen's Baptist Church, 5757 Temple Hills
Rd., Temple Hills, MD, Wednesday, March 7
from 10 a.m. until service at 11 a.m. Interment
Harmony Memorial Park.
www.stewartfuneralhome.com
MONEVA CLAUDIA STARKS McKOIN
Passed away on February 23, 2018, at the
age of 103, in Stamford, Connecticut. She
was predeceased by her husband of 66
years, William Dell McKoin. She was born
on June 6, 1914, in Columbus, Kentucky,
to Rosetta Bondurant Starks and Charles
Starks. She is lovingly remembered by her
daughters Claudia, Charlene, Moneva, and
Pamela; her son-in-law Laurence C. Morse;
her grandson and granddaughter, Stephan
McKoin Morse and Kristina Cary Morse, as
well as nieces, extended family members
and friends across the United States. Mrs.
McKoin had been a resident of Cleveland,
Ohio for more than 40 years and later
Silver Spring, Maryland. Most recently she
was a resident of Stamford, Connecticut.
Services will be held on March 8, 2018,
at Peoples Congregational United Church
of Christ, 4704 13th St., N.W., Washington,
DC, Viewing at 9:30 a.m. and Services at
10:30 a.m. She will be interred at Norbeck
Memorial Park in Olney, MD. Services provided by McGuire Funeral Home.
On Saturday, March 3, 2018.
Loving husband of 66 years
to Linda C. Stogdale; father of
Debra, Donna and Thomas A.;
grandfather of Lauren, Marisa,
Stephen, Brandon and Jesse;
great-grandfather of Pierce and Marshall;
brother of Ann and James. Relatives and
friends may call at BORGWARDT FUNERAL
HOME 4400 Powder Mill Road, Beltsville,
MD on Thursday, March 8, from 11 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Interment to follow with military
honors at George Washington Cemetery,
Adelphi, MD. Memorial contributions may
be made to St. Jude Children's Research
Hospital.
www.borgwardtfuneralhome.com
TOYO BIDDLE
A lifelong advocate for human rights, an
outdoor enthusiast, a jazz aficionado, and an
accomplished photographer, died February
12, 2018 in Summit, NJ of complications
related to a long illness. She began her career
in the federal government in 1968, working
to advance civil rights for disadvantaged
students, minorities, and women, including
four years as Director of Asian American
Affairs in the former Department of Health,
Education, & Welfare. For the next 20 years,
Toyo worked tirelessly to improve and, at
times, manage the Department of Health &
Human Services’ refugee resettlement and
immigrant services, focusing on helping the
Hmong population. She took that expertise
and passion to New York City, where she
Toyo attended Brown University and received
her B.A. from George Washington University
and her MSW from Catholic University. After
college, she lived in Thailand and New York
City before moving to Washington, DC. After
retiring from the federal government, Toyo
and her husband, Chuck Schultz, led an
active and engaged life in New York City
and Vermont before his death in 2005. Her
prior marriages to Stark Biddle and Steve
Cummings ended in divorce. Despite health
issues, Toyo maintained her strong connection to family and friends and an active
interest in policy and politics until her death.
A celebration of Toyo’s life will be held at a
later date. Donations in Toyo’s name may be
made to the International Rescue Committee
at www.rescue.org (tribute donation) or by
calling 1-855-973-7283.
NIEMEYER
rejoined the private sector as Vice President,
Office of Government Affairs at Goldman
Sachs, where he specialized in issues related
to financial regulatory reform, tax, and international trade.
MATT NIEMEYER
March 3, 1967 - March 2, 2018
Matthew Niemeyer, dedicated financial services lobbyist and former Bush administration official, died March 2, 2018 at his Davidsonville, MD home after a courageous battle
with cancer. His beloved wife Amy and loving
children Anna and Peter were with him.
Matt began his career in government and
politics with an internship in the office of
Senator John McCain, and then at the National Republican Congressional Committee and
as a Congressional staffer. Time spent with
relatives on an Israeli kibbutz as a young man
influenced his decision to work as Political
Director at the American Israel Public Affairs
Committee (AIPAC). Matt then moved on to
as serve as Assistant U.S. Trade Representative under President George W. Bush (20032006).
As Assistant USTR, Matt led efforts for the
passage of the Central American Free Trade
Agreement (CAFTA) and directed legislative
strategy for the successful passage of free
trade agreements with Australia, Bahrain,
Chile, Morocco, and Singapore. In 2008, Matt
went to work at The World Bank and served
as principal liaison to the U.S. Congress,
the U.S. Department of Treasury and the
Government of Canada. In 2010, Matt
Born within shouting distance of Boston’s
Fenway Park, Matt was a lifelong Red Sox
fan. His mom, Hinda Rose Niemeyer, and
dad, Edwin Brooks Niemeyer (deceased),
often took infant Matt to the ballpark when
the gates opened for the 7th inning stretch.
A native of Marblehead, MA, it was there
amidst the winding ways and historical
homes, that Matt developed an enduring
interest and love for history and American
government. Matt attended high school in
Tucson, AZ, where he was active in student
government, and graduated from Arizona
State University. Matt developed a love of
travel as a young man and often traveled to
Europe, Asia and the Middle East with work
and family.
Despite his successful career, Matt’s greatest
joy was in family life, as a loving husband to
Amy, whom he married in 2003, and devoted
father of Anna and Peter. In the last year
of his life, Matt was able to take Anna to
London and Spain and the family to Portugal
and Mexico. Matt loved nothing more than
spending time at home and he was endlessly
entertained and enchanted by his children.
Matt leaves behind many family members
and friends, including his children, Anna Rose
and Peter Donald, wife Amy Castleberry,
mother Hinda Niemeyer of Kensington, CT,
stepmother Suzanne Niemeyer of Marblehead, MA, brother Thomas Niemeyer of
Columbus, OH, uncle and aunt Daniel and
Storm Rose, in-laws Thomas and Suzanne
Castleberry, William and Erin Castleberry,
Brian and Vanessa Castleberry and numerous cousins, nieces, nephews and friends.
The family will receive visitors on Thursday,
March 8, 2018 from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8
at Hardesty Funeral Home in Annapolis. A
memorial celebration and reception will be
held in Washington, DC in the coming weeks.
Contributions in Matthew’s memory may be
made to the Cancer Support Community.
Online condolences can be made at
www.hardestyfuneralhome.com
On Saturday, February 24, 2018, WILLIAM
A. POWELL of Ft. Washington, MD. Loving
husband of Olivia T. Powell. He leaves
to cherish his memory, three daughters,
Ingrid L. Palmer (Garval), Wilgrid P. Goodwin
(Bruce D., Sr.) and Christol L. Powell; one
sister, JoAnn P. Mason; one brother, Adolph
Powell (Mary); six grandchildren, Season
N. Walker, Bruce D. Goodwin, Jr., Shalaan
K. Powell, Hollyce M. Goodwin, Corria M.
Goodwin and Summer M. Palmer; five
great-grandchildren and a host of other
relatives and friends. Family will receive
friends on Friday, March 9, 2018 at Ascension Lutheran Church, 7415 Buchanan St.,
Landover, MD from 11 a.m. until time of
funeral service at 12 noon. Interment Maryland Veterans Cemetery, Cheltenham, MD
Tuesday, March 13, 2018 at 1:45 p.m.
Arrangements by Strickland Funeral Services.
www.stricklandfuneralservices.com
PAID DEATH NOTICES
MONDAY- FRIDAY 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
To place a notice, call:
202-334-4122
800-627-1150 ext 4-4122
FAX:
202-334-7188
EMAIL:
deathnotices@washpost.com
Email and faxes MUST include
name, home address & home phone #
of the responsible billing party.
Fax & email deadline - 3 p.m. daily
Phone-In deadline
4 p.m. M-F
3 p.m. Sa-Su
CURRENT 2018 RATES:
( PER DAY)
MONDAY-SATURDAY
Black & White
1" - $135 (text only)
2" - $306 (text only)
3" - $441
4" - $482
5" - $611
-----SUNDAY
Black & White
1"- $161 (text only)
2" - $339 (text only)
3" - $489
4" - $515
5" - $665
6"+ for ALL Black & White notices
$135 each additional inch wkday
$161 each additional inch Sunday
-------------------MONDAY-SATURDAY
Color
3" - $566
4" - $609
5" - $744
-----SUNDAY
Color
3" - $599
4" - $685
5" - $834
6"+ for ALL color notices
$224 each additional inch wkday
$250 each additional inch Sunday
Notices with photos begin at 3"
(All photos add 2" to your notice.)
ALL NOTICES MUST BE PREPAID
MEMORIAL PLAQUES:
All notices over 2" include
complimentary memorial plaque
Additional plaques start at $26 each
and may be ordered.
All Paid Death Notices
appear on our website through
www.legacy.com
LEGACY.COM
Included in all death notices
Optional for In Memoriams
PLEASE NOTE:
Notices must be placed via phone, fax or
email. Photos must be emailed. You can
no longer place notices, drop off photos
and make payment in person.
Payment must be made via phone with
debit/credit card.
B8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 6 , 2018
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
The clouds before the storm
Sun might be hard to come by as the
next storm system in an active
pattern heads our way. For the most
part, we’re dealing with increasing
clouds during daylight. A chance of
showers arrives by late afternoon. Before the
rain, highs are in the mid-40s to near 50.
Today
Cloudy, p.m.
rain
Wednesday
Snow, rain
46° 37
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Thursday
Partly sunny,
breezy
Friday
Partly sunny,
breezy
Saturday
Partly sunny
42° 32
44° 30
47° 32
47° 35
46° 37
FEELS*: 44°
FEELS: 31°
FEELS: 37°
FEELS: 38°
FEELS: 44°
FEELS: 35°
CHNCE PRECIP: 55%
P: 65%
P: 10%
P: 10%
P: 10%
P: 80%
WIND: S 6–12 mph
W: NNE 10–20 mph
W: WNW 10–20 mph
W: WNW 10–20 mph
W: S 6–12 mph
W: NE 8–16 mph
°
°
°
°
°
Sunday
Cloudy, rain
OFFICIAL RECORD
Temperatures
NATION
Harrisburg
47/34
Hagerstown
43/33
Davis
40/28
F
Sa
High
Low
Normal
Record high
Record low
Weather map features for noon today.
Philadelphia
48/33
Baltimore
46/34
Dover
47/35
Washington
46/37
Su
Norfolk
49/41
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Dulles
BWI
49° 4:00 p.m.
31° 6:00 a.m.
52°/35°
83° 1976
6° 1872
46° 4:00 p.m.
27° 7:00 a.m.
52°/30°
79° 1976
7° 1978
48° 2:23 p.m.
30° 6:00 a.m.
50°/30°
83° 1976
10° 1873
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: +3.1° yr. to date: +2.9°
Precipitation
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
OCEAN: 44°
Virginia Beach
48/43
OCEAN: 48°
Past 24 hours
Total this month
Normal
Total this year
Normal
Pollen: Moderate
Air Quality: Good
Snow, past 24 hours
Totals for season
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
OCEAN: 40°
Kitty Hawk
48/44
Low
Moderate
Low
Low
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.00"
0.10"
0.47"
5.83"
5.90"
0.0"
3.3"
0.00"
0.13"
0.46"
6.52"
5.88"
0.0"
6.6"
0.00"
0.46"
0.55"
6.76"
6.50"
0.0"
8.7"
Moon Phases
UV: Low
Solar system
2 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, cloudy, showers. High 34–38. Wind
southwest 7–14 mph. Tonight, mostly cloudy, snow
showers. Low 26–30. Wind west 4–8 mph. Wednesday,
mostly cloudy, windy, rain shower, snow shower. High
33–37. Wind west–northwest 15–25 mph.
Atlantic beaches: Today, increasingly cloudy, afternoon
rain. High 43–49. Wind east–northeast 4–8 mph. Tonight,
cloudy, rain. Low 35–41. Wind east–southeast 7–14 mph.
Wednesday, mostly cloudy, rain, windy. High 44–54. Wind
north–northwest 15–25 mph.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, cloudy, afternoon rain.
Wind east–southeast 4–8 knots. Waves 1 foot or less. • Lower
Potomac and Chesapeake Bay: Today, increasingly cloudy, afternoon
rain. Wind west–southwest 6–12 knots. Waves 1 foot on the lower
Potomac and Chesapeake Bay.• River Stages: Today, the stage at
Little Falls will be 4.5 feet, falling to 4.4 feet on Wednesday. Flood
stage at Little Falls is 10 feet.
(High tides in Bold)
Washington
5:49 a.m.
11:14 a.m.
6:29 p.m.
11:48 p.m.
Annapolis
2:06 a.m.
8:28 a.m.
2:48 p.m.
8:42 p.m.
10:59 p.m.
Point Lookout
M
Reagan
OCEAN: 40°
Richmond
44/37
Ocean City
FORECAST
Ocean City
43/38
Lexington
41/33
Norfolk
ACTUAL
Cape May
42/37
Annapolis
44/36
Charlottesville
42/35
Today’s tides
RECORD
°
Th
REGION
AVERAGE
4:34 a.m.
10:35 a.m.
4:50 p.m.
12:20 a.m.
6:34 a.m.
12:39 p.m.
6:45 p.m.
4:23 a.m.
11:02 a.m.
4:42 p.m.
10:46 p.m.
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
Stationary Front
90s
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Edinburg, TX 90°
Low: Bridgeport, CA –12°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
41/28/pc
58/28/s
28/20/sn
62/40/r
71/39/pc
46/34/r
31/15/pc
66/36/r
30/12/sf
48/28/s
41/33/pc
39/27/sf
41/30/pc
69/46/r
56/35/r
51/35/r
40/19/s
43/26/sn
56/33/pc
44/32/r
68/37/s
47/20/s
Tomorrow
34/29/sn
61/36/s
30/22/c
53/34/s
64/36/s
37/30/sn
36/25/pc
55/34/s
25/2/pc
51/38/pc
38/33/sn
41/27/sn
39/29/sn
64/36/s
43/27/sn
55/30/pc
49/26/s
33/20/c
40/25/sf
39/26/sf
60/39/s
52/26/s
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
39/23/sn
41/30/sn
67/39/pc
27/14/c
28/7/sf
44/28/pc
80/68/pc
74/44/pc
53/30/sh
67/36/pc
77/51/pc
40/24/c
68/48/pc
63/32/s
78/52/pc
59/35/pc
63/34/s
80/66/pc
39/24/sn
34/15/sn
63/35/pc
66/49/t
46/34/pc
49/41/r
37/23/pc
38/25/sf
71/48/s
26/13/pc
25/11/c
35/31/sn
80/67/pc
65/41/s
37/23/sf
56/32/s
69/38/s
42/23/pc
69/48/pc
52/31/s
74/52/pc
43/28/c
51/32/s
80/55/sh
32/21/c
29/15/pc
48/32/pc
63/44/s
37/32/sn
54/36/c
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
59/28/s
34/21/sn
83/62/s
48/33/pc
79/53/pc
43/31/sn
41/28/pc
57/37/s
42/31/pc
46/37/r
48/27/pc
44/37/r
66/41/pc
47/31/pc
80/70/s
44/25/s
73/51/pc
66/48/pc
81/70/s
50/35/s
43/25/pc
41/30/c
78/62/pc
51/25/s
53/31/s
35/18/pc
72/44/r
37/30/sn
82/57/pc
37/24/sf
36/31/sn
57/42/pc
38/35/sn
54/31/c
55/39/pc
52/31/c
68/49/pc
41/27/pc
81/72/pc
49/31/s
69/53/pc
66/53/pc
83/72/pc
51/41/pc
46/35/pc
36/26/sn
69/49/r
52/27/s
World
High: Matam, Senegal 109°
Low: Summit Station, Greenland –51°
Mar 9
Last
Quarter
Mar 17
New
Mar 24
First
Quarter
Mar 31
Full
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Rise
6:33 a.m.
11:12 p.m.
7:12 a.m.
2:00 a.m.
11:32 p.m.
2:59 a.m.
Set
6:06 p.m.
9:26 a.m.
7:10 p.m.
11:26 a.m.
9:41 a.m.
12:31 p.m.
excludes Antarctica
WORLD
Today
Addis Ababa
73/53/pc
Amsterdam
49/34/pc
Athens
66/57/pc
Auckland
78/66/pc
Baghdad
83/57/pc
Bangkok
94/78/c
Beijing
42/24/pc
Berlin
43/31/r
Bogota
66/48/c
Brussels
51/38/pc
Buenos Aires
79/53/s
Cairo
85/64/s
Caracas
73/66/t
Copenhagen
39/32/c
Dakar
78/67/s
Dublin
44/33/pc
Edinburgh
41/31/r
Frankfurt
49/36/c
Geneva
43/39/sh
Ham., Bermuda 64/60/sh
Helsinki
22/14/pc
Ho Chi Minh City 96/77/pc
Tomorrow
74/49/pc
49/37/sh
69/54/pc
73/64/t
80/57/s
93/77/t
42/25/pc
39/32/sn
66/48/c
48/37/sh
82/57/s
93/76/s
74/67/pc
35/31/sn
77/67/s
45/32/pc
43/30/c
50/37/sh
44/33/sh
67/63/pc
23/15/c
97/76/s
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
73/64/pc
78/50/pc
58/54/sh
71/50/s
83/60/pc
63/37/s
82/73/s
95/69/pc
89/77/pc
77/69/pc
57/46/sh
50/38/pc
50/35/sh
93/79/s
78/53/pc
38/27/c
15/9/c
93/79/pc
78/58/c
85/58/pc
29/26/sn
37/27/pc
52/41/pc
35/30/c
73/60/pc
80/53/pc
61/53/pc
72/56/s
82/59/c
64/36/s
82/72/pc
91/66/pc
89/77/t
77/69/pc
58/54/r
49/37/sh
52/40/pc
92/77/s
71/50/pc
38/26/sn
22/10/c
90/77/pc
82/60/pc
88/59/pc
33/26/sn
37/26/sn
48/39/sh
44/32/pc
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei City
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
90/77/pc
88/66/s
57/48/r
88/67/s
90/55/s
50/34/r
48/31/pc
53/44/c
89/79/pc
31/23/sn
73/68/sh
67/62/c
69/51/pc
52/37/s
36/29/sf
36/31/c
39/32/i
90/77/t
89/61/s
58/43/t
89/64/s
84/56/s
51/35/pc
49/33/pc
52/43/r
88/78/c
31/26/c
74/67/pc
75/59/pc
64/49/pc
45/41/pc
39/28/sn
47/35/pc
44/32/r
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
sh- showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
Allergen Extract Lab (pollen data); airnow.gov (air
quality data); National Weather Service
* AccuWeather's RealFeel Temperature®
combines over a dozen factors for an accurate
measure of how the conditions really “feel.”
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Style
TUESDAY, MARCH 6 , 2018
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/STYLE
EZ
SU
THE RELIABLE SOURCE
CAROLYN HAX
THEATER REVIEW
KIDSPOST
Best supporting chef for José Andrés?
Plus, Claire McCaskill’s Oscar party. C2
Complaining to kid about husband: Bad.
Husband not pulling weight: Worse. C3
Arena Stage’s story of a Japanese
American who fought internment. C4
Storm Reid felt an instant connection
to her “Wrinkle in Time” character. C8
Getting along famously
at Hollywood’s most elite party
C
Cosby trial
prosecutors
want more
testimony
BY
M ANUEL R OIG- F RANZIA
norristown, pa. — One wom-
an said the drink Bill Cosby gave
her left her feeling like she was
“floating.”
Others said the sips they took
at the behest of the legendary
comedian made them “woozy” or
“fuzzy.” There were women who
said they felt “frozen,” “lightheaded” or “in a fog,” a prosecutor said Monday during a crucial
hearing in advance of Cosby’s
upcoming retrial on sexual assault charges.
Each of those women — 19 in
all — should be allowed to appear
before the jury that will decide
Cosby’s fate when his retrial
begins April 2, argued Montgomery County, Pa., prosecutor Adrienne Jappe. Without them,
Jappe said, prosecutors would
have a tougher time proving that
Cosby was a “predator,” a methodical abuser who “systematically engaged in a signature
pattern” of drugging and sexually assaulting young women
who looked up to him.
Prosecutors have tried this
approach before. Last year, in
advance of a trial that ended with
a hung jury, they tried to persuade the judge overseeing the
case to allow testimony from 13
previous accusers. But Judge Steven O’Neill allowed only one to
take the witness stand.
This time, however, prosecutors came armed with a different
and potentially important argument: a legal decision related to
testimony from previous accusers issued in an unrelated case
after O’Neill’s ruling last year
relied, in part, on a legal concept
known as the “Doctrine of
Chances.” The doctrine, which
prosecutors cited frequently on
Monday, essentially says that as
the number of people reporting
alleged assaults by the same
person with similar sets of cirCOSBY CONTINUED ON C3
BOOK WORLD
PHOTOS BY KEVIN MAZUR/VF18/WIREIMAGE
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: At the Vanity Fair Oscar Party, Salma Hayek and Angela Bassett; Sam Rockwell and Gary Oldman, who won the
Oscars for best supporting actor and best actor, respectively; and Kobe Bryant and Allison Janney, winners for animated short and supporting actress.
At Vanity Fair’s post-Oscars bash, a chance to see which stars actually like each other
BY
M ONICA H ESSE
beverly hills, calif. — Y’all, we have a
problem. Helllllp, we have been trying for
a good 12 minutes to get some of the
deep-fried macaroni balls everyone else is
eating at Vanity Fair’s Oscars after-party.
But the first time we tried to stop a waiter
in a white dinner jacket it turned out to be
Timothée Chalamet, and the second time
it turned out to be James Marsden, and
now we have to weigh potential embarrassment against macaroni balls, so we’ll
try one more time — tap tap tap — and the
white-jacketed figure starts to turn, and
oh dear, you know what? This particular
white material does actually not feel
waiter-like at all, does it? Pardon us,
Rashida Jones.
Vanity Fair! The Oscars ended two
hours ago, so now it’s time for the fancy
KEVIN MAZUR/VF18/WIREIMAGE
Jordan Peele and Keegan-Michael Key
at the Vanity Fair Oscar Party.
people to get away from cameras and go to
even fancier off-the-record parties — and
that is where we are, currently hiding
behind Chadwick Boseman so Jones
doesn’t see us. We are only pretending to
be fancy, standing on Hollywood’s most
exclusive square footage, all while secretly
taking notes on our iPhone.
Let’s begin at the beginning, shall we?
When Adam Rippon was ahead of us in
the security line, we did the polite thing
and complimented him on his leather
S&M harness. “Gosh, thanks!” he said,
and then we’d done it. We’d made it inside.
“Inside” is the Wallis Annenberg Center
for the Performing Arts, where a red
carpet contains every famous person you
have ever heard of and where, somewhat
incongruously, an all-male a cappella
group is performing a vigorous rendition
OSCARS CONTINUED ON C2
Making films equitable with inclusion riders
BY M AURA J UDKIS
AND S TEPHANIE M ERRY
In one of the most powerful moments
of the first #MeToo Oscars, best-actress
winner Frances McDormand invited all
the other female nominees in the room to
stand up and be recognized. Then she told
the men to look around.
“We all have stories to tell and projects
we need financed,” she said. “Invite us into
your office in a couple of days, or you can
come to ours, whichever suits you best,
and we’ll tell you all about them.”
Then she signed off with a phrase that
sent many people to Google, or MerriamWebster. “I have two words to leave with
you tonight, ladies and gentlemen: Inclusion rider.”
“‘Inclusion’ is our top search on the
night, followed by ‘cinematography,’ ‘in
memoriam,’ ‘feminism,’ and ‘rider,’ ” the
dictionary company tweeted.
What the heck is an inclusion rider? It’s
a way to make Hollywood more equitable.
Actors sign contracts when they are cast
in films, and they have the ability to
negotiate for riders, or additional provi-
sions. An inclusion rider is a stipulation
that the cast and/or crew in a film reflect
real demographics, including a proportionate number of women, minorities,
LGBTQ individuals and people with disabilities. Big-name actors who have leverage in negotiations could put this stipulation into their contracts and drastically
change representation in film.
The idea was developed by Stacy Smith,
founder and director of the University of
Southern California’s Annenberg Inclusion Initiative, and drafted with Kalpana
INCLUSION CONTINUED ON C3
Passenger’s
swallowed
note found
after 9/11
BY
B RAD M ELTZER
I love finding secrets.
As a thriller writer, I’ve taken
readers into tunnels below the
White House and the hidden labyrinth below the U.S. Capitol. But
as I was researching my new thriller, “The Escape Artist,” I never
thought I’d find anything like this.
The process started over three
years ago, when I got a glimpse of
what goes on inside Dover Air
Force Base, in Delaware, the mortuary for the government’s most
top-secret and high-profile cases.
On 9/11, the victims of the Pentagon attack were brought there.
So were the victims of the attack
on the USS Cole, the astronauts
from the space shuttle Columbia,
and the remains of well over
50,000 soldiers and CIA operatives who fought in Vietnam, Afghanistan, Iraq and every secret
location in between.
The people there know details
about hidden missions that almost no one in the world will ever
hear about. Dover is a place full of
more secrets than you can imagine. It’s the perfect setting for a
mystery. Plus, in today’s world, we
need heroes. The people here were
the real deal.
From the moment I stepped
inside, I was struck by the care put
into ensuring that our fallen service members are shown the dignity and respect their remains deserve. It is the one “no-fail mission” in the military. When a body
comes home, morticians can rebuild hands (rather than giving a
BOOK WORLD CONTINUED ON C3
C2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 6 , 2018
The Reliable Source
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
At first, D.C. chef Andrés was reluctant to take the stage at the Oscars
There he was, house left, sharing
the stage with Andra Day and
Common as the artists performed
“Stand Up for Something” from the
film “Marshall.” Washington chef,
restaurateur and disaster relief
worker José Andrés apparently was
the only one among the honored
activists to carry an item on stage,
which made him stand out from the
pack, as if he were the Left Shark of
the Academy Awards.
For the transfixing Oscar night
performance, Common and Day had
reached out to each activist,
according to Variety magazine.
Andrés said Monday that Common
had tried to call him personally, but
they could never connect because the
chef was traveling so much. Yet once
the Oscars opportunity was
presented to him, Andrés said he was
initially reluctant.
“I was thinking about not doing
it,” he said. “I’m getting more
recognition than I need or deserve.”
Andrés changed his mind because
he figured his appearance might
remind viewers that many Puerto
Ricans, months after Hurricane
Maria hit the island, continue to
struggle. “We obviously need more
and more reminders to everybody
that this is never over,” he said.
Comedian Dave Chappelle noted
in his introduction of the Oscarnominated song, “They are the
CHRIS PIZZELLO/INVISION/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Singer Andra Day and chef José Andrés clench hands onstage at the Oscars ceremony.
unsung heroes.”
Then again, these were “unsung
heroes” perhaps only in the artistic
sense. Andrés and the other activists
and justice warriors, who served as
the song’s silent chorus, have all
received untold amounts of media
McCaskill throws an Oscars party (or
is she pandering to Ebbing voters?)
Senators: They’re just like us.
They send out e-vites to dorky
themed parties and make no
apologies about it. Exhibit A:
Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.),
who hosted an Oscars potluck
Sunday night, complete with
clever costumes, a moviethemed menu and enough
photographic evidence to
embarrass a less confident
human being.
“Ok, I’m an Oscar nerd,”
McCaskill tweeted the day of the
awards show. “Have a family
Oscar get together every year.
Must wear costume and bring a
dish based on nominated movie.
coverage. Andrés was recently
named Humanitarian of the Year by
the James Beard Foundation for his
disaster relief efforts in Houston,
Haiti, Southern California and
Puerto Rico.
Andrés, of course, famously stood
I’ve included campaign staff this
year. Stay tuned for pics!”
There was the cast of “I,
Tonya,” including the senator’s
daughter-in-law dressed as
Tonya Harding’s oxygen-tanktoting mother, played by Allison
Janney, who went on to win the
Oscar for best supporting
actress. The senator’s sister
repped “All the Money in the
World” with a sweatshirt
emblazoned in dollar bills and
an inflatable globe tied to her
up to Donald Trump in the summer
of 2015, when the president was still
campaigning for the job. Andrés
decided to back out of his lease at the
Trump International Hotel after
Trump referred to some Mexicans as
drug dealers and rapists on the
head. For her part, McCaskill
found a sheriff ’s costume (maybe
she already owns one?) and
came as Bill Willoughby, the
sheriff played by Woody
Harrelson in “Three Billboards
Outside Ebbing, Missouri.”
The senator, who is in a hotly
contested race, also got her
campaign staff in on the fun —
and this being politics, things
got wonky. Staffers came to the
party with three remixed
billboards that seemed aimed at
campaign trail. The chef and the
businessman would eventually file
lawsuit over the whole messy affair,
which they settled nearly two years
later.
During his moment on the Oscars
telecast, Andrés had to remain mum,
which is not his natural state. The 10
activists were cloaked in darkness as
Common and Day launched into
their song. As Day moved into the
chorus, spotlights started to shine on
each activist, although ABC
producers did not deign to ID any of
them. Twitter was annoyed.
Even without identification, many
spotted Andrés’s mug on stage. He
was the one in a black chef’s coat,
with his sleeves rolled up, as if he
were going to work the line at the
Bazaar, his restaurant in Beverly
Hills, Calif., after the show. He was
clutching something red and rolled
up in his right hand. He later held
the item to his chest, as if it were a
sacred object.
At the end of the performance,
Andrés unfurled the Puerto Rican
flag on stage, if mostly for the
famous actors inside the Dolby
Theatre.
“The message the flag sends is
clear,” Andrés said. “That these
people have suffered a lot and that
the American people still care about
them.”
— Tim Carman
McCaskill’s Republican
opponent, Missouri Attorney
General Josh Hawley. The
makeshift signs read: “Climbing
Ladders + Breaking Promises,”
“And still running for office,”
“How come Missouri GOP?”
Hawley called McCaskill
“Hollywood’s candidate” in
February after it was announced
that Disney’s Bob Iger would
host a fundraiser for McCaskill
and other senators in Los
Angeles.
GOT A TIP? EMAIL US AT RELIABLESOURCE@WASHPOST.COM. FOR THE LATEST SCOOPS, VISIT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RELIABLESOURCE
JACQUELYN MARTIN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sen. Claire McCaskill.
@helena_andrews @emilyaheil
At Vanity Fair: Hollywood Who’s Who, and a lookie-loo, too
OSCARS FROM C1
of “Brown Eyed Girl.”
“Yaaaaaas!” screams Emily
Blunt as she enters the red carpet
and encounters the singing. (Is
Emily Blunt an a cappella fan?)
“WOOOOO,” Saoirse Ronan
yells as she, too, emerges from the
security gantlet and sees the
group. (Are . . . are they all a
cappella fans?)
“Get a load of these guys!”
Dermot Mulroney says in wonder, and — and you know what?
Just, no. No, the celebrity level of
excitement over a cappella is
starting to weird us out; it is time
to scoot into the main party,
because Jon Voight is now also
getting excessively stoked by this
rendition of Michael Jackson’s
“Billie Jean.”
We have to be honest: We had
worried about the state of the
Vanity Fair party. We used to see
Harvey Weinstein here; this was
his crowd. We once spent 20 minutes eavesdropping on Louis C.K.
After the clean sweep of grody
Hollywood men, and after celebeditor Graydon Carter’s retirement last fall, we wondered
whether the party would stagger
on.
But! Here we are, and here is
new editor Radhika Jones — my
God, she is tall — and here, in
place of the gross men, is best
actress Frances McDormand,
fresh off her barn-burning acceptance speech about gender inclusion. And, Twitter tells us, even
fresher off someone trying to
steal her Oscar at the ceremony
location. “Don’t put it down
again!” she warns the friend holding the statue now, as she slings
an arm around Willem Dafoe.
Here, in place of the gross men,
is Ronan Farrow, whose New
Yorker article about Weinstein
helped set off the original purge.
He’s holding court for a gaggle of
admirers who want to know how
he got the story.
“I was very careful about describing a lot of those people,” he
is saying. “And by the way, he
called me and threatened me,” he
is saying. And we realize he is
talking about journalism, but because that’s already our day job
the conversation is starting to feel
very office-partyish, so —
Is that Caitlyn Jenner? Is that
Caitlyn and multiple Jenners/
Kardashians?
Is that late-night host James
Corden, guffawing loudly at a
NICHOLAS HUNT/VF18/WIREIMAGE
Something about a camel: James Corden yuks it up with Ava DuVernay at the Vanity Fair Oscar Party.
joke whose punchline apparently
involved a camel.
Is that Donald Glover tête-àtête with Janelle Monáe?
This, the natural habitat of the
stars, has a way of revealing
which ones actually like each
other. Which ones are actually
excited to sit down together over
a bucket of fried chicken, which is
a real thing they pass out at this
party.
Greta Gerwig and Patricia
Clarkson: Friends.
Connie Britton and Aaron
Paul: Friends.
Faye Dunaway and someone
named Jillian: Friends, we guess,
because Dunaway keeps calling,
“Where is Jillian!” as devotees
come up to her and murmur, “a
triumph, a triumph,” about the
fact that her best-picture presentation didn’t implode this year.
Kobe Bryant is sitting on a
squashy chair with his Oscar for
best animated short when a brunette leans over and whispers,
“Allison Janney to your right.” She
has a tone of voice that makes it
sound like this was part of a plan,
as if Bryant needed to be alerted if
Janney was nearby. He starts to
leap up. “Not right now,” the
brunette says. “You don’t need to
go now.”
But it becomes apparent that
Bryant does need to go now, he
wants to go now; after less than
five seconds of impatiently jiggling his leg, he’s on his feet
again. But there are too many
people in the way — Mark Hamill
is in the way — and Bryant’s eyes
search frantically for Janney.
When he finally reaches her, he is
ecstatic and she is gracious as
they bop the heads of their Oscars
together.
“More Oscars on the way,” a
publicist-type discloses to those
within earshot, and the crowd
heaves toward the door in anticipation.
Outside, camera shutters click.
Waiting. Waiting. Waiting, and —
Benjamin Bratt? Boo.
But this is what happens:
Spend enough time around the
A-list, and you start to become
dismissive of the kind of famous
people who, if you saw them in
the grocery store, you would
spend the next four months bragging about it to your friends.
While waiting for the promised
influx of Oscars, we journey to the
ladies room, where the products
are all L’Occitane, and where a
nice woman hands us the soap,
and that woman is Tiffany Haddish.
“Love your dress,” the woman
next to her says.
“I feel grown up,” says the
“Girls Trip” star, who has changed
into something structured and
chartreuse, her third gown of the
day.
“You must be on the Bulletproof Diet,” the dress-admirer
continues. “You know. Bulletproof Diet? Butter in the coffee?”
“Butter in the coffee? WHAT!
That is CRAZY! Butter in the
coffee.” Haddish leaves the sink
area, still tickled by this recipe,
pausing to bellow, “PROSPERITY!” to a group of women waiting in the bathroom line. It makes
no sense, but somehow it makes
all the sense? Somehow now Haddish and the women are hugging
and taking selfies and talking
about female friendship?
Because ladies’ powder rooms
are places of solidarity and support, even among the rich and
famous. Because just outside the
restroom, on a velvet couch in the
ladies lounge, Emma Watson
must be having some sort of crisis
of confidence, but a friend is
holding Watson’s face in her
hands and murmuring, “You are
amazing. You are amazing. Your
face is so symmetrical.”
Suddenly, in the warm cocoon
of the powder room, we want to
offer our love and support, too.
Prosperity and symmetry for all.
Out of the restroom area, past
another white-jacketed waiter —
whoops, nope, it’s best original
screenplay winner Jordan Peele
— and out onto the patio where
Patrick Stewart is politely deflecting the slightly overzealous fandom of a woman who “saw ‘Logan’ three times. In the theater.
Three times.”
“Thank you,” he murmurs repeatedly, retreating back inside,
where he appears delighted to see
Mary J. Blige.
Finally, the promised additional Oscars have arrived, in the
form of Sam Rockwell and Gary
Oldman, but we find we can’t get
there, because we are somehow
sitting next to Kobe Bryant again,
and right in front of us, the
sausage of Hollywood is being
made:
“We were talking about doing a
new movie with an African American superhero,” a business-looking guy pitches. “So if you would
like to be a part of that . . .”
“Sure,” Bryant says.
“I could set up a lunch or
dinner with Stan Lee.”
“Sure.”
“I already took it to Leonardo
DiCaprio, and he would like to be
a part of it.”
“Sure.”
Wait? Is it this easy? Lunch or
dinner with Stan Lee? Get Frances McDormand in on that. #InclusionRiders.
Oof. It’s late. Suddenly, the
excessive Hollywoodness of it all
has worn us down.
Our phone is running out of
batteries (#TimesUp!); we can’t
take notes much longer (Get
Out!).
The big stars have all mostly
dispersed anyway, and the waiters are picking up empty glasses.
We hear a rumor of an Uber
stand. Must find the Uber stand.
We approach one of the whitecoated waiters for assistance in
this matter, and as we get closer
the white-coated figure turns to
face us, and —
Crap. It’s Laura Dern.
monica.hesse@washpost
TUESDAY, MARCH 6 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
Making
movies
mirror
society
For retrial, Bill Cosby
has a new defense team
COSBY FROM C1
INCLUSION FROM C1
Kotagal of the law firm Cohen
Milstein and the producer and
actor Fanshen Cox DiGiovanni.
Smith spoke about it in a TED talk
in 2016, and the idea has gained
ground ever since.
When Smith heard McDormand’s call-out, she was thrilled.
“How she acknowledged all the
women standing up, and indicating that they had projects and
ideas, was fantastic,” she told The
Washington Post by phone after
the Oscars.
Even though the inclusion rider might seem like an insidery
Hollywood thing, she’s glad that
the public knows about it.
“The message of the industry is
going out strong and clear that
this matters and that it’s important and there are steps we can
take to get there faster,” she said.
Of course, with every step forward, there’s inevitably some
pushback and Kotagal has already seen some of that since
McDormand’s speech, especially
as people refer to the rider as a
“quota.”
“It doesn’t say you have to hire
somebody who fits this demographic group even if you don’t
think they’re qualified,” she said
Monday. “And I think that quota
is such a loaded and dangerous
word in this society — it invokes
this sense that somehow underqualified people are going to get
my job.”
The purpose of the inclusion
rider is “to counter biases on the
casting, auditioning, interviewing and hiring process. For onscreen roles that are supporting
and minor in nature, they have to
be filled with norms that reflect
the world in which we live,” Smith
said. That means, for a contempo-
CHRIS PIZZELLO/INVISION/ASSOCIATED PRESS
In her acceptance speech for her best-actress Oscar, Frances McDormand called on her colleagues to
demand inclusion riders in their contracts to bring equity to filmmaking.
rary
drama,
approximately
50 percent women, 50 percent
minority, 20 percent people with
disabilities and 5 percent LGBTQ,
she added. Historical dramas
where this formula doesn’t make
sense would be exempt.
With a rider, the exact language is always up to the person
negotiating, and Kotagal also
wanted to stress the importance
of looking at the hiring not just of
those on camera, but the people
behind the scenes, as well.
It’s not as if this is simply
charitable work; after all, some
recent releases have proved the
value of more inclusive hiring
practices.
“I mean, I don’t even have to
mention ‘Black Panther’ or ‘Hidden Figures,’ ” she said. “Here is
what can happen when the industry truly reflects the world in
which we live.”
Since premiering in mid-February, the Marvel movie “Black
Panther” has mowed down boxoffice records, defying (yet again)
the long-held assumption that a
movie with a predominantly
black cast can’t make major bank.
The writers and director of that
movie are also people of color,
and the film’s cinematographer,
Rachel Morrison, was the first
“It doesn’t say you have
to hire somebody who
fits this demographic
group even if you don’t
think they’re qualified.”
Kalpana Kotagal, a lawyer who
helped draft inclusion riders
woman ever nominated for an
Oscar in that category, for her
work on “Mudbound.” (She lost
Sunday night to Roger Deakins,
who won his first Oscar after 14
nominations.)
Meanwhile, “Get Out” mastermind Jordan Peele became the
first black screenwriter to take
home a best original screenplay
Oscar Sunday night. Of the bestpicture nominees, his smallbudget satire about the horrors of
racism was the second most lucrative, bringing in more than
$255 million worldwide.
According to Kotagal, before
McDormand made the world
aware of the term “inclusion rider,” A-listers had already started
to use them during negotiations.
Unfortunately she can’t say who.
(“I wish I could,” she promised.)
But there’s a good possibility that
McDormand’s outspoken support
of the contract stipulations could
inspire others to be vocal as well.
“The percentage of females on
screen hasn’t changed since the
late 1940s. That’s because small
minor roles and supporting roles
are very biased [toward] straight,
white, able-bodied males,” Smith
said. “The goal is that it could
really change the entire ecosystem of what we see on screen in a
short amount of time if it’s adopted by enough actors, where they
ask for this in their contracts.”
maura.judkis@washpost.com
stephanie.merry@washpost.com
MUSIC REVIEW
Guest leads the cathedral chorus with a sure hand
BY
C HARLES T . D OWNEY
The Cathedral Choral Society
announced last fall that Steven
Fox would be its new music director, starting with the 2018-2019
season. Guest conductors have
been carrying the ensemble along
since it lost its beloved music director, J. Reilly Lewis, almost two
years ago. On Sunday, Donald Nally, conductor of the Crossing
chamber choir, led a meditative
program of music at Washington
National Cathedral.
Nally’s program was built
around an esoteric quotation
from French writer Pascal Quignard, but it added up to two hours
of predominantly slow-moving,
reflective music. Nally elicited a
focused, often soft sound from the
volunteer choir of about 150 people, well blended even though
they were seated in sections. The
amorphous textures and slow textural shifts of pieces such as the
“Sanctus” movement from Sebastian Currier’s “Night Mass”
worked well in the cavernous
space, where sound takes a long
time to decay.
Intonation issues crept up, especially with the tenors and sopra-
nos, meaning that in some unaccompanied works, organist Scott
Dettra’s shadowing was needed to
keep the choir on pitch. The most
successful pieces were those designed for this kind of venue and
ensemble, especially Herbert
Howells’s coronation anthem “Behold, O God our defender.” Dettra,
formerly the cathedral’s principal
organist, accompanied with a diverting range of registrations.
Cellist Thomas Mesa ably accompanied several of the pieces,
having his own solo turn in “Gramata Cellam” by Peteris Vasks.
The concert’s most striking mo-
‘The ultimate
message in a
bottle’ from a
victim of 9/11
BOOK WORLD FROM C1
fake prosthesis) so that a mother
can hold her son’s hand one final
time. They might spend 14
straight hours wiring together a
shattered jaw, then smoothing it
over with clay and makeup, just so
his parents can have far more ease
than they ever should expect at
their son’s funeral.
That alone inspired me to try to
create a hero worthy of such respect.
Then, during one of my research visits, a mortician gave me
a piece of information that I’ll
never forget. I was describing the
plot of my book, asking whether
there’s any way a person could
leave a hidden message inside his
body before he died.
The room went silent. The mortician told me that if you’re on a
plane that’s going down, if you
handwrite a note and eat it, the
human stomach has enough liquids to protect the note from
burning.
“The ultimate message in a bottle,” the mortician said. “And it
really happened.”
“What’re you talking about?” I
asked. “When?”
“9/11.”
Right there, the story came out.
On 9/11, the victims of the Pentagon attack were brought to Dover.
When the morticians worked on
one of the bodies, they found a
note inside. Apparently, as the
C3
SU
GRAND CENTRAL
Author Brad Meltzer signs a book for a fan during his USO trip.
plane was going down,
one of the victims on
Flight 77 actually ate a
note, which was found by
a Dover mortician.
To this day, the mortician won’t tell me what
the note said, and I appreciate the need to respect
that privacy. Since the
morticians successfully
recovered the note, I like to believe
it (or at least its message) was
delivered to its intended recipient.
For the next three years, I wrote
my two new characters: a
Dover mortician and a
female staff sergeant,
who fights for her life like
no one I’d ever created. In
the opening chapter, a
plane falls from the sky as
someone scribbles a secret note that will be
found by a Dover mortician.
But I still haven’t been able to
shake that initial story — and the
secrets of the real note. I lost a
friend on that Pentagon flight. I
assumed the note must’ve been
ment came in this piece’s second
movement, when Mesa accompanied his own voice for a haunting,
wordless melody.
Nally included two world premieres in the program. A simple
setting of a childlike Christina
Rossetti poem by Eriks Esenvalds,
“85” was saccharine in harmonic
content. Nally commissioned Alex
Berko’s “Lincoln” directly in response to the immigration controversies of the past year. Half-sung,
half-spoken, it was more difficult
to put together, but Nally led with
a sure hand.
style@washpost.com
written by someone in the military. Who else would know that
the liquid in your belly could preserve a piece of paper? I thought
the message contained information about what happened on the
plane: where the terrorists were,
the weapons they used, how many
there were.
Then, I imagined that the note
was probably personal, a last regret that needed to be confessed.
But the more I thought about it,
the more I’ve come to believe that
the note was simply one person
seeking what we all desire: connection. We want to be loved —
and tell others that we love them.
When my own parents died several years ago, I took comfort in
the fact that I was able to say
goodbye and tell them I loved
them. To this day, on every flight
I’m on, when we hit some bumpy
turbulence, I think of what I’d
scribble in my own note. I’d write
to my wife and children, letting
them know that they are the very
best parts of my existence.
In that, I am oddly filled with
hope. It’s a hope that comes from a
person I will never meet and never
know. The final secret message
from 9/11 does exactly what it was
supposed to do — from the moment it was written down. It became a message that wasn’t sent
in vain. It became a story that lives
on. And it became a symbol of
hope that when we reach out and
send a message in a bottle, we will
be heard.
bookworld@washpost.com
Brad Meltzer is the author of 12
thrillers, as well as the Ordinary
People Change the World series. His
newest thriller, “The Escape Artist,”
will be released this week. On
Thursday at 7:00 p.m., Meltzer will be
at Barnes & Noble at Tysons Corner
Center.
cumstances increases, the likelihood that the defendant was
innocently involved in those encounters decreases.
With Cosby watching from
the defense table just a few feet
away, Jappe insisted that the
80-year-old comedian assaulted women “time and time
again.” The question of fairness
was raised by Judge O’Neill,
who said to Jappe that “19 is a
lot of numbers.”
Prosecutors have a high hurdle to clear because courts
frequently frown on prosecutors presenting past allegations. They’ll have to persuade
the judge that the value of
testimony from past accusers
outweighs the possible prejudicial impact of their appearances on the witness stand as the
jury decides whether Cosby
drugged and sexually assaulted
Andrea Constand, a former
Temple University woman’s
basketball official, in 2004. Cosby has said his sexual encounter with Constand was consensual.
The previous accusers offered as possible witnesses by
the
prosecution represent
about one-third of the women
who have publicly accused Cosby of sexual harassment, sexual
assault or rape. Prosecutors
have not disclosed the names of
the possible witnesses, though
one of them — Kelley Johnson,
a former assistant to Cosby’s
personal appearances agent —
testified at his trial in June of
last year. The alleged previous
assaults span from 1965 to
1990.
On Tuesday, defense attorneys are expected to make
arguments against allowing the
women to testify. Besides covering legal ground, the pretrial
hearings have afforded a
glimpse of Cosby’s new defense
team, headed by Los Angeles
attorney Thomas Mesereau,
who won an acquittal on child
molestation charges for pop
star Michael Jackson. Cosby
had been represented by a
prominent Philadelphia defense attorney, Brian McMonagle, who withdrew without
explanation after the mistrial.
The new defense team and
the prosecutors have already
exhibited signs of tension. On
Monday, lead prosecutor Kevin
Steele called Mesereau and his
co-counsels Becky James and
Kathleen Bliss “incompetent
and unethical” and said they
have “not earned the right to
practice here in Pennsylvania.”
Steele was irked because of
defense accusations that his
prosecution team engaged in
misconduct by “destroying”
notes its investigators took during a meeting with a possible
defense witness who wants to
testify that Constand said she
could falsely accuse a celebrity
of sexual assault, then file a
lawsuit that would generate
enough of a settlement to start
a business. The prosecutors
said they did not keep notes
because the witness, whose testimony was not allowed in the
first trial, said nothing in their
interview different from an affidavit she’d filed.
The defense attempt to have
the case against Cosby dismissed because of their allegation of prosecutorial misconduct failed on Monday when
O’Neill declined to throw out
the case. The judge also rejected a defense attempt to dismiss
the case based on Cosby’s claim
that phone and travel records
prove the alleged assault could
not have happened before the
expiration of a 12-year statute
of limitations.
Cosby was mostly impassive
during the hearing, stroking his
chin or rocking his chair at the
head of the defense table. As
the hearing was beginning,
O’Neill turned to the comedian,
whose 44-year-old daughter,
Ensa, died recently after struggling with kidney problems.
“Condolences and sympathies,” the judge said.
manuel.roigfranzia@washpost.com
Overtime hours at home
for this working mother
Adapted from a
recent online discussion.
Hello, Carolyn:
I’m not doing
well at hiding
adult problems
from my child. I
work a full-time,
stressful job with long hours
while my husband is a stay-athome dad, which I never agreed
to. I thought he was going back
to work 41/2 years ago. I have
tried to hide my resentment
from my tween daughter, but
tonight I was exhausted and
frustrated after I worked 14
hours, ate cereal for dinner, did
a load of laundry, helped her
with her homework and cleaned
the litter box while my husband
sat on the couch with his phone.
When I said good night to
my daughter, I told her I
hoped she found a hardworking spouse someday who
would allow her to have a
stress-free life and spend time
with her children.
I truly meant it and I have
thought it many, many times,
but I so regret saying it to her
and now I don’t know how to
unburden her of my adult
problems that I never should
have told her. I feel awful. Ugh.
— Not Hiding
Carolyn
Hax
Not Hiding: The way to
unburden her of your adult
problems is for you to unburden
yourself of your adult problems.
You made the snide comment
because you’re just slogging
through an emotionally
untenable situation, step by
grudging step, without pursuing
some clear way to fix it. The fuel
keeping your guard up around
your daughter was finally
depleted.
Will it be easy to fix? No, of
course not. Even if you choose
divorce, it will get the inert
spouse out of your living room
only at a high emotional cost
(disrupted home, less time with
your child, possible loss of
custody) and high actual cost
(two households vs. one,
alimony, child support). Still, all
but the worst case is better than
impotent rage as you alone
work, cook, clean, parent,
repeat, from alarm to bedtime
daily.
Plus, there are other avenues
that might make that drastic a
step unnecessary. Is your
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
husband depressed? Or
otherwise limited by a
condition that has gone
undiagnosed? Would he agree
to consider that he’s addicted
to his phone? Is his behavior
passive aggression that,
although unacceptable, stems
from a grievance with you
that’s as legitimate as your
current grievance with him?
Have you gotten couples
counseling or family therapy of
any kind?
This remark to your daughter
is your dead canary — telling
you the marital environment is
too poisonous for you all to
survive it. Take emergency
measures, please, and soon.
Re: Adult Problems: Be careful,
too: You’ve demonstrated that if
your partner isn’t “partnering”
as you need him/her to, then
you shouldn’t work through it
with the other person directly —
you should grow resentful and
snippy. Part of having a great
partner is being a great partner.
— Anonymous
Anonymous: That’s fair, thanks.
Or: If a partner is genuinely not
being enough of one to make
any kind of partnership
possible, then the other needs to
be a great advocate for what’s
right, in whatever form that
must take.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her
column delivered to your inbox each
morning at wapo.st/haxpost.
C4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 6 , 2018
Television
TV HIGHLIGHTS
3/6/18
7:00
7:30
BROADCAST CHANNELS
8:30
9:00
9:30
8:00
◆ News
◆ Access
◆ The Voice
4.1 WRC (NBC)
◆ TMZ
◆ Lethal Weapon
Mod Fam
5.1 WTTG (Fox)
◆ Wheel
◆ J’pardy!
◆ The Bachelor (Live)
7.1 WJLA (ABC)
◆ ET
◆ NCIS
9.1 WUSA (CBS) Off Script
El rico y Lázaro
14.1 WFDC (UNI) ◆ La Rosa de Guadalupe
20.1 WDCA (MNTV) College Basketball: ACC Tournament
Mister Rogers: It’s You I Like
22.1 WMPT (PBS) Farm-Harvest Outdoors
Mister Rogers: It’s You I Like
26.4 WETA (PBS) PBS NewsHour
France 24 Programming
30.1 WNVC (MHz) France 24 Programming
32.1 WHUT (PBS) Age Reversed With Miranda ◆ Victoria on Masterpiece
◆ The Flash
Goldbergs
50.1 WDCW (CW) Goldbergs
Criminal Minds
66.1 WPXW (ION) Criminal Minds
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
This Is Us
◆ LA-Vegas
◆ J. Fallon
(10:01) ◆ Chicago Med
News
◆ The Mick
Fox 5 News at Ten
News
The Final 5
◆ Kevin (Probably)
◆ Kimmel
News
◆ Bull
◆ NCIS: New Orleans
◆ Colbert
9 News
◆ Noticiero
Papá a toda madre
Por amar sin ley
Noticias
Big Bang
Big Bang
The X-Files
The X-Files
Retire Safe & Secure With Ed Slott
Brain Secrets With Dr.
The Bee Gees One for All Tour -- Live In Australia 1989
Blossoms
Blood of the Vine
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Get Down Tonight: The Disco Explosion
Democracy!
◆ Black Lightning
◆ Mom
News
Seinfeld
Two Men
Criminal Minds
Criminal Minds
Private Eyes
◆
CABLE CHANNELS
ABBOT GENSER/NETFLIX
Gad Elmaleh: American Dream (Netflix streaming) The Moroccan French
comedian and actor, who’s had roles in films such as “Midnight in Paris”
and “The Valet,” performs stand-up at the Town Hall in New York.
The Voice (NBC at 8) Blind
auditions, Part 4.
The Flash (CW at 8) Barry, Jesse
Quick and Jay Garrick slow down
time when a nuclear bomb goes
off.
Lethal Weapon (Fox at 8) An
argument on a construction site
turns fatal.
L.A. to Vegas (Fox at 9) Captain
Dave tries to make Colin feel
better with a guys’ night out after
he gets divorce papers.
gold in Michigan, based on
something a lighthouse keeper
said on his deathbed in the 1890s.
SPECIAL
The Bachelor: After the Final
Rose (ABC at 8) Arie and the
ladies reunite to discuss the
season and what has happened
since Arie made his pick.
LATE NIGHT
Conan (TBS at 11) Martin Short,
Natalie Zea, Michael Longfellow.
Daily Show (Comedy Central at
11) Malcolm Jenkins.
Married at First Sight
(Lifetime at 9) The couples
celebrate their one-month
anniversaries.
The Real Housewives of Beverly
Hills (Bravo at 9) The women go to
Camille’s charity event, and the
group questions Teddi’s motives.
This Is Us (NBC at 9) Randall and
Beth have visitors.
Bethenny & Fredrik (Bravo at 10)
Bethenny confronts Fredrik about
unexpected numbers in the
renovation budget.
PREMIERE
The Curse of Civil War Gold
(History at 10) Kevin Dykstra
believes there could be Civil War
Fallon (NBC at 11:34) John Oliver,
Lucy Hale, Marshmello and AnneMarie.
Colbert (CBS at 11:35) Oprah
Winfrey, Justin Hartley.
Kimmel (ABC at 11:35) Neil
Patrick Harris, Arie Luyendyk Jr.,
Jon Pardi.
Corden (CBS at 12:37) Eric Bana,
Padma Lakshmi, Anders Holm.
Meyers (NBC at 12:37) Luke
Bryan, Los Angeles Mayor Eric
Garcetti, Zach Danziger.
— Sarah Polus
More at washingtonpost.com/tv
The First 48
The First 48
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(11:03) The First 48
A&E
(5:30) Movie: Lawless ★★
Movie: The Green Mile ★★★ (1999)
AMC
Monster Squid: The Giant Is Real
Wild Africa: Rivers of Life
Wild Costa Rica
Animal Planet
Movie: Diary of a Mad Black Woman ★★ (2005)
The Quad
The Quad
BET
Real Housewives/Beverly
Real Housewives
Real Housewives
Bethenny
Bethenny & Watch
Housewives
Bravo
Gumball
King of Hill
Amer. Dad
Cleveland
Amer. Dad
Burgers
Burgers
Family Guy
Cartoon Network Apple
Erin Burnett OutFront
Anderson Cooper 360
Anderson Cooper 360
CNN Tonight
CNN Tonight
CNN
The Office
Drunk History Drunk History Drunk History Drunk History Drunk
Period
Daily
Opposition
Comedy Central The Office
Moonshiners
Moonshiners: Outlaw Cuts Moonshiners
(10:08) Moonshiners
Shifting Gears With Aaron
Discovery
Bunk’d
Bunk’d
Bunk’d
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Bizaardvark Bizaardvark Gravity Falls Gravity Falls Stuck/Middle Bizaardvark
Disney
E! News
Movie: Step Brothers ★★ (2008)
The Kardashians
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E!
College Basketball
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Chopped
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Chopped
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(5:30) Movie: Just Go With It The Fosters
(9:01) Movie: Matilda ★★★ (1996)
The 700 Club
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Movie: Captain America: The Winter Soldier ★★★ (2014)
Baskets
Baskets
Baskets
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Full House
Full House
Full House
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The Middle
The Middle
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The Middle
Golden Girls Golden Girls
Hallmark
Psych
Movie: Murder She Wrote: A Story to Die For ★★ (2000)
Murder, She Wrote
Hallmark M&M Psych
Real Time
VICE
Movie: Alien: Covenant ★★ (2017)
Crashing
(10:35) Here and Now
Notes Field
HBO
Fixer Upper
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Fixer Upper
Hunters
Hunt Intl
Hunters
Hunters Int’l
HGTV
The Curse of Oak Island
Digging Deeper
The Curse of Oak Island
The Curse of Oak Island
History
Married at First Sight
Married-Sight Married
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Married
(10:32) Married at First Sight Married-Sight
Lifetime
MLB Preseason Baseball: Houston Astros at Washington Nationals
ESPNWS
Ballgame
Walker
Baseball
MASN
Hardball Matthews
All In With Chris Hayes
Rachel Maddow Show
The Last Word
The 11th Hour
MSNBC
Ridiculous.
Ridiculous.
Ridiculous.
Ridiculous.
The Challenge
(10:32) Fear Factor
Fear Factor
MTV
Life Below Zero
Ice Breakers
Life Below Zero
Life Below Zero
Nat’l Geographic Wild Australia
Extra
NHL Hockey: Washington Capitals at Anaheim Ducks
NBC SportsNet WA NBA Basketball: Miami Heat at Washington Wizards (Live)
Knight Squad SpongeBob Movie: The Nut Job ★ (2014)
Full House
Full House
Friends
Friends
Nickelodeon
Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
Ink Master
Movie: Pitch Perfect ★★★
PARMT
G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra
Futurama
Futurama
Futurama
Futurama
Futurama
Futurama
Futurama
Futurama
Syfy
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
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Big Bang
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Detour
Conan
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(6:30) The Black Knight
Movie: The Cobweb ★★ (1955)
(10:15) Movie: Lilith ★★★ (1964)
TCM
Fat Fabulous
Fat Fabulous
(9:02) Counting On
(10:02) Seeking Sister Wife My Big Fat Fabulous Life
TLC
(6:00) The Expendables 2
NBA Basketball: Houston Rockets at Oklahoma City Thunder (Live)
NBA Basketball: Pelicans at Clippers
TNT
Bizarre Foods America
Delicious
Delicious
Bizarre Foods/Zimmern
Bizarre Foods/Zimmern
Bizarre Foods/Zimmern
Travel
Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Hack
Inside
Carbonaro
Carbonaro
TruTV
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
Raymond
Raymond
Raymond
Raymond
Mom
Mom
King
King
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Cosby Show Cosby Show Cosby Show Cosby Show Movie: Ringside (2016)
Movie: Bad Dad Rehab
TV One
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WWE SmackDown! (Live)
Unsolved-BIG
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USA Network
America’s Next Top Model
America’s Next Model
Love & Hip Hop Miami
Love & Hip Hop
Love & Hip Hop
VH1
GE Washington
Govt. Matters On Your Side Sports
ABC News
News at 10pm
Govt. Matters On Your Side
WNC8
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Bellevue
Shoot the Messenger
WGN
LEGEND: Bold indicates new or live programs
◆
High Definition Movie Ratings (from TMS) ★★★★ Excellent ★★★ Good ★★ Fair ★ Poor No stars: not rated
THEATER REVIEW
‘Hold These Truths’ takes honest look at internment of Japanese Americans
BY
N ELSON P RESSLEY
If you’re looking for a resistance hero, Arena Stage is offering the true saga of Gordon Hirabayashi. In the panic after Pearl
Harbor, President Roosevelt ordered a dragnet locking anyone of
Japanese descent in internment
camps. Hirabayashi, born in the
United States and studying at the
University of Washington, would
not comply.
Jeanne Sakata’s “Hold These
Truths” has been around since
2007, but you can understand
why Arena would revisit Hirabayashi’s history now. Hysteria
and wholesale racism — “No
Japs” signs were features of the
American landscape even before
the war broke out — are balanced
against the principles of the nation’s founding documents, and
the argument made its way to the
Supreme Court. Hirabayashi lost,
but the government rigged the
case. Forty years later the verdict
was reversed.
What kind of play is this? “Better than I expected,” someone said
leaving Arena’s Kogod Cradle on
Thursday night, and you can un-
derstand the trepidation. Sakata’s
one-man show tells a noble tale
without creative surprise, a lot
like “Becoming Dr. Ruth” directly
tells the Ruth Westheimer story at
Theater J. Washington is a city of
history and museums, and these
solo bio-dramas fit right in.
Hirabayashi’s social justice
crusade is ultimately galvanizing,
though, even if director Jessica
Kubzansky’s staging keeps Ryun
Yu hustling like an athlete around
the empty platform stage with
only three chairs as props. When
Yu throws a baseball as one character, he dashes to the other side
of the stage to catch it as someone
else. The hyperactivity can be
distracting.
The show quickly feels like a
Frank Capra movie, particularly
“Mr. Smith Goes to Washington.”
Yu projects a Jimmy Stewart aura,
playing the young Hirabayashi as
an affable Everyman joshing with
the “fellas” and saying things like
“Jeepers!” The internment policy
makes the systemic injustice impossible to ignore, and Hirabayashi becomes a lone citizen
fighting government corruption
in an increasingly dark saga.
There are a couple great angles
to Hirabyashi’s legal odyssey, odd
comic twists that illuminate his
quirky integrity and the government’s moral and functional incoherence. Yu has a light touch in
these scenes, especially when Hirabayashi turns himself in to an
Arizona lawman who can’t figure
out why anyone would do such a
thing.
The gallery Yu portrays ranges
from Hirabayashi’s parents
(sometimes speaking Japanese)
to ACLU lawyers. The script isn’t
high art; it’s functional biography. But it’s also a timely reminder. The audience listens closely as
a baffled and increasingly bitter
Hirabayashi tries to reassure
himself that the Constitution really means what it says.
nelson.pressley@washpost.com
Hold These Truths, by Jeanne
Sakata. Directed by Jessica
Kubzansky. Set and lights, Ben
Zamora; costume design, Cierra
Coan; original costume design, Soojin
Lee; sound, John Zalewski. About 100
minutes. Through April 8 at Arena
Stage, 1101 Sixth St. SW. $40-$111.
202-488-3300 or arenastage.org.
PATRICK WEISHAMPEL/PORTLAND CENTER STAGE
In “Hold These Truths,” Ryun Yu plays Gordon Hirabayashi, a Japanese American man who fought
against the internment camps in the United States during World War II.
THEATRE
Shear Madness
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Regular Schedule:
Tuesday–Friday at 8
Saturday at 6 & 9
Sunday at 3 & 7
This record-breaking interactive solve-the-crime comedy
keeps the audiences laughing as they try to outwit the
suspects and catch the killer. New clues and up to the
minute improvisation deliver “shrieks of laughter night after
night.” (Washington Post)
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Student Rush
Tickets Available
Tickets: 202-467-4600
Groups: 202-416-8400
www.shearmadness.com
Tickets
Available
at the
Box Office
Added Shows:
Tuesday–Friday at 8
Saturday at 6 & 9
Sunday at 3 & 7
Great Group Rates
for 15 or More
MUSIC - CONCERTS
First Wednesday
Concerts presents
guitarist Mak Grgic &
organist Stephen Ackert
Wednesday, March 7th
from 12:10-12:45 p.m.
A concert of J.S. Bach’s Preludes & Fugues from the
Well-Tempered Clavier arranged for guitar & organ
St. John’s Church, Lafayette Square
at the corner of 16th & H Streets NW
Washington, D.C. 20005
( 202) 270-6265
Free
The church is
fully wheelchair
accessible
MUSIC - ORCHESTRAL
John Adams's
“The Gospel
According to the
Other Mary”
Part of
DIRECT CURRENT
Thursday at 7
Saturday at 8
In celebration of John Adams's 70th birthday year, Gianandrea
Noseda conducts Adams's expansive composition for chorus,
soloists, and orchestra depicting Jesus's final weeks as told
from the unique perspective of Mary Magdalene.
Saturday, Mar. 10 at 6:30 p.m.: ForeWords: "The Ministry
of Mary Magdalene". John Adams will take part in this farreaching, one-of-a-kind talk
Kennedy Center
Concert Hall
nationalsymphony.org
or call (202) 467-4600
Plug in at direct-current.org
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
• Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
Tickets
available
at the
Box Office
AfterWords
post-performance
discussion with
Giandrea Noseda
and John Adams
immediately
following the Thu.,
Mar. 8 performance.
16-2898
TUESDAY, MARCH 6 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C5
RE
MUSIC REVIEW
String quartet Ethel’s ‘Blue Dress’ program is as bold as the fashion runways
BY
P ATRICK R UCKER
At the end of a week when the
loudest government of my lifetime reached earsplitting decibel
levels, capped off by a freak
nor’easter, Ethel came to town.
The indie-classical quartet arrived Sunday afternoon at the
National Gallery of Art with a
program titled “Blue Dress.” It
wasn’t a moment too soon.
Founded in New York in 1998,
Ethel, whose members are violist
Ralph Farris, cellist Dorothy
Lawson and violinists Kip Jones
and Corin Lee, was a breath of
fresh air. A program anchored by
works by Julia Wolfe, Missy Mazzoli and Anna Clyne was inter-
spersed with compositions and
arrangements by the quartet
members.
Wolfe’s “Blue Dress for String
Quartet” drew on bluegrass fiddling to create a deeply moving
musical journey, requiring the
players to intone nonverbal
pitches almost from the beginning and, during the course of 17
minutes, eventually coalesced
into the spoken lyric, “Pretty
little girl with a blue dress on,
stole my heart and away she
gone.”
Two compelling pieces by
Lawson — “Chai” and “Grandmother,” the latter a result of
Ethel’s long-term involvement
with Native American music —
ERIN PATRICE O'BRIEN
Ethel members are violinists Corin Lee and Kip Jones, cellist
Dorothy Lawson and violist Ralph Farris.
MOVIE DIRECTORY
DISTRICT
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
3111 K Street N.W.
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 12:451:15-4:30-6:45-7:15-7:45-10:00
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) CC: 2:00-4:00-5:158:30-10:30
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 1:205:15-7:50-11:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 1:25-3:50-6:15
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 2:00-8:45
Game Night (R) CC: 2:30-5:007:30-10:00
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 12:503:35-6:50-9:40
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
3:45-10:25
The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:45-4:307:20-10:10
Death Wish (R) CC: 1:50-4:407:40-10:20
I, Tonya (R) CC: 12:40-7:00
Annihilation (R) CC: 1:35-4:307:20-10:10
Detective Chinatown 2 (R) 4:00-9:50
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) CC: 2:45-6:00-9:15
Red Sparrow (R) 3:45-7:00-10:15
Dream Big: Engineering Our World:
An IMAX 3D Experience Please Call
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 10:2511:50-2:05
Black Panther: An IMAX 3D Experience (PG-13) 4:20-9:50
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) 7:05
MARYLAND
AFI Silver Theatre
Cultural Center
8633 Colesville Road
The Shape of Water (R) 7:05
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 5:15
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 12:10-9:30
The Post (PG-13) 11:30-4:20
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 1:50-6:45
Lady Bird (R) 5:05
Phantom Thread (R) 2:30-9:15
Call Me by Your Name (R) 9:15
Tehran Taboo (NR) 7:15
AMC Academy 8
6198 Greenbelt Road
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 10:3012:30-1:30-3:30-4:30-6:30-7:30-9:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 1:00-3:45-7:00
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
AMC Loews Uptown 1
(PG-13) CC: (!) 11:30-2:30-5:30-8:30
3426 Connecticut Avenue N.W.
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 12:40- Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 12:00-2:004:20-6:45
4:00-7:30
Red Sparrow (R) CC: (!) 10:45-12:35AMC Mazza Gallerie
3:45-7:00-9:30
5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW
Game Night (R) CC: 2:15-4:45Black Panther (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:00- 7:15-9:45
1:50-4:00-4:50-7:00-8:00
Death Wish (R) CC: 11:45-2:25-5:15Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 2:20-4:50-7:10 8:00-9:10
Red Sparrow (R) CC: (!) 1:10AMC Center Park 8
4:20-7:30
4001 Powder Mill Rd.
Game Night (R) CC: (!) 12:50-3:10Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 12:305:30-7:50
3:45-5:00-6:45-10:00
Death Wish (R) CC: (!) 2:10-5:00-7:40
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 2:00-4:30Annihilation (R) CC: (!) 1:40-4:306:55-9:15
7:20
Black Panther in Disney Digital
Albert Einstein Planetarium - 3D (PG-13) CC: 1:30-2:00-5:30National Air & Space Museum 8:30-9:00
6th Street and Independence Ave SW Red Sparrow (R) CC: (!) 12:30-3:40To Space and Back 11:00AM
6:50-9:55
Dark Universe Space Show (NR)
Game Night (R) CC: (!) 2:30-5:0011:30-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30
7:30-10:00
Journey to the Stars (NR) 12:00Death Wish (R) CC: (!) 1:00-4:001:00-2:00-3:00-4:00-5:00
6:45-9:20
The Stars Tonight (NR) 10:30AM
Annihilation (R) CC: (!) 1:00-4:007:00-9:45
Angelika
Pop-Up at Union Market
550 Penn Street NE - Unit E
AMC Columbia 14
10300 Little Patuxent Parkway
The Young Karl Marx (Le jeune Karl
Marx) (NR) 11:30-3:15-7:30
A Fantastic Woman (Una mujer
fantastica) (R) 1:00
Have a Nice Day (Hao ji le) (NR)
11:15-5:45
The Post (PG-13) 2:00-4:20-7:00
Red Sparrow (R) 11:00-1:454:30-7:15
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 1:004:20-7:25-10:25
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) CC: 12:00-3:20-6:40-9:50
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
11:00-1:35-4:10-6:50-9:40
Maze Runner: The Death Cure (PG13) CC: 10:00
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 12:403:20-6:10-9:10
Avalon Theatre
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
5612 Connecticut Avenue
(PG-13) CC: 12:05-3:10-6:40-9:45
Molly's Game (R) 1:45-7:30
Loveless (Nelyubov) (R) 11:00-2:00- Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 11:10-1:454:20-7:00-9:30
5:00-8:00
Early Man (PG) CC: 11:30-4:30
I, Tonya (R) 4:45
Red Sparrow (R) (!) 11:30-3:00Exhibition On Screen: David
6:35-10:00
Hockney at the Royal Academy of
Game Night (R) CC: 11:40-2:15Arts 10:30AM
7:30-10:05
Landmark
Death Wish (R) CC: (!) 10:55-1:40Atlantic Plumbing Cinema
4:30-7:25-10:15
807 V Street, NW
The Post (PG-13) CC: 12:30-4:10
The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:45-2:20- Annihilation (R) CC: 11:50-3:054:55-7:25-10:00
6:50-9:50
Annihilation (R) CC: 11:30-2:00Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
4:35-7:15-9:55
(PG-13) (!) 11:20-1:50-4:20-6:55-9:25
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 11:00- The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) CC: 9:55
12:00-1:45-3:00-4:30-6:45-7:30-9:30- Premiere:The Dark Crystal (1982)
9:50-10:15
(!) 2:00-7:00
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 1:00-4:00Black Panther: The IMAX 2D Experi7:00-10:10
ence (PG-13) 11:00-2:20-6:00-9:10
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 11:10Game Night (R) 4:50
1:50-4:25-7:10
Landmark E Street Cinema
555 11th Street NW
Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story
12:45-3:00-5:15-7:30-9:45
I, Tonya (R) CC: 1:10-4:10-7:10-9:40
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts Animation (NR) 1:45-7:15
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts - Live
Action (NR) 4:30-9:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 12:50-3:506:50-9:30
The Party (R) CC: 4:30-6:30
Lady Bird (R) CC: 2:15-8:30-9:45
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 1:004:00-7:00
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
12:40-3:40-6:40-9:20
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 1:004:00-9:30
Landmark West End Cinema
2301 M Street NW
Molly's Game (R) CC: 1:00-4:00-7:00
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts Documentary (NR) 12:15-4:00-7:45
A Fantastic Woman (Una mujer
fantastica) (R) 1:30-4:30-7:30
Medal of Honor Theater NMMC
18900 Jefferson Davis Highway
We, the Marines (NR) 10:00-11:0012:00-1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00
Regal Gallery Place
Stadium 14
701 Seventh Street NW
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:35-2:456:00-9:10
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) 11:00-2:05-5:10-8:10-11:15
Red Sparrow (R) 12:00-3:30-7:0010:15
Game Night (R) 11:10-9:35
Death Wish (R) 11:00-1:50-4:307:30-10:25
Annihilation (R) 11:35-2:20
Premiere:The Dark Crystal (1982)
2:00-7:00
AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18
9811 Washingtonian Ctr.
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 11:352:05-3:45-5:15-6:55-8:25-10:05
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) CC: 12:35-2:45-5:55-9:05
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 11:302:20-5:10-7:50-10:25
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 11:00-1:50-4:50-7:4510:35
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 11:15-1:554:20-7:00-9:25
Early Man (PG) CC: 1:45-4:10
Red Sparrow (R) CC: (!) 11:25-1:004:10-7:20-10:30
Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi) (NR)
3:15-9:40
Game Night (R) CC: (!) 11:45-2:255:05-7:30-9:55
Death Wish (R) CC: (!) 11:20-2:355:20-8:00-10:35
The Post (PG-13) CC: 12:45-6:50
Pari (Hindi) (NR) (!) 12:10-3:356:40-9:45
Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety (NR) (!)
12:00-3:10-6:35-9:50
Lady Bird (R) CC: 2:10-7:10
Annihilation (R) CC: (!) 11:30-2:155:00-7:55-10:40
Every Day (Every Day Another
Day) (PG-13) (!) 11:05-2:00-4:457:15-10:10
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) CC:
11:40-4:40-9:35
Detective Chinatown 2 (R) 6:30-9:30
Nostalgia (R) CC: 11:00-1:30-4:157:25-10:15
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) CC: 1:20-4:307:35-10:40
AMC Loews
St. Charles Town Ctr. 9
11115 Mall Circle
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 9:3011:30-12:45-2:45-4:00-4:30-6:007:15-9:15-10:30
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) CC: 10:00-1:15-3:15-6:30Smithsonian - Lockheed Martin 7:45-9:45-10:45
IMAX Theater
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 10:45-1:15601 Independence Avenue SW
3:45-6:15-9:00
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
Red Sparrow (R) CC: (!) 11:00-12:3012:25-2:40
3:45-7:00-10:15
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the Game Night (R) CC: 11:45-2:15-5:00Seas 3D (NR) 11:00-1:15-3:30
7:30-10:00
prefaced Mazzoli’s richly evocative “Quartet for Queen Mab.”
Drawing on the famous speech
in “Romeo and Juliet,” “Mab”
wove dense but translucent textures into a vivid portrait of the
fairy who brings dreams to humans.
Arrangements by Ethel’s two
violinists provided the bridge to
the program’s final segment. Lee
based “The Music There” on
music by Stevie Nicks, while
Jones fashioned Aretha Franklin’s “Respect” and “A Natural
Woman” into the equivalent of a
21st-century Liszt operatic fantasy for string quartet.
Clyne’s “Roulette” was the
most ambitious item on the pro-
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC: (!)
9:15-12:15
Death Wish (R) CC: (!) 9:45-2:155:00-8:00-10:45
Annihilation (R) CC: 10:30-1:154:00-6:45-9:30
Annihilation (R) 10:55-1:45-4:407:30-10:25
Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
(PG-13) 11:05-1:50-4:25-7:05-9:40
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 12:202:50-5:20-8:00-10:30
Premiere:The Dark Crystal (1982)
AMC Magic Johnson
2:00
Capital Center 12
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:50-2:45800 Shoppers Way
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 11:00- 4:15-7:40-9:25
12:00-2:00-3:00-5:00-6:00-8:00-9:00 Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 11:50- (PG-13) 11:20-6:05
2:30-4:50-7:20-9:40
Hoyt's West Nursery
Cinema 14
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
1591 West Nursery Road
(PG-13) CC: 1:30-4:30-7:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 11:25-1:45- Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 12:004:15-6:30-9:05
12:50-1:40-2:30-3:10-4:00-4:50-5:40Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
6:20-7:10-8:00-8:50-9:30-10:20
(PG-13) CC: 12:30-3:15-6:10-9:15
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 12:10Red Sparrow (R) CC: 11:30-2:452:40-5:10-7:40-10:10
6:15-9:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Game Night (R) CC: 11:00-1:25-3:40- (PG-13) CC: 1:20-4:05-6:50-9:40
6:05-8:45
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 12:00-2:15Get Out (R) CC: 2:50-8:30
4:30-6:45-9:00
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 11:40-5:30 Red Sparrow (R) CC: 12:00-1:103:00-4:20-6:10-7:20-9:10-10:20
Annihilation (R) CC: 11:15-2:105:05-7:40
Game Night (R) CC: 12:20-2:45-5:10Death Wish (R) CC: 11:45-2:15-4:45- 7:35-10:00
7:15-9:45
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 12:55Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
6:55-9:55
Experience (PG-13) CC: 1:00-4:00- Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
7:00-10:00
Missouri (R) CC: 4:10
Death Wish (R) CC: 12:10-2:45-5:20ArcLight Bethesda
7:55-10:30
7101 Democracy Boulevard
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:30-2:30- Annihilation (R) CC: 1:30-4:157:05-9:50
5:30-8:30-10:15
The Greatest Showman (PG) 12:35- Every Day (Every Day Another
Day) (PG-13) CC: 12:15-2:35-5:002:50-5:10-6:50-9:35
7:25-9:45
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 2:10-5:05
Landmark
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Bethesda Row Cinema
(PG-13) 11:25-2:00-4:45-7:20-9:55
7235 Woodmont Avenue
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:10-1:45-4:00Phantom Thread (R) CC: 12:50-3:507:10-9:10
6:50-9:30
Early Man (PG) 11:45-3:55
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 1:30Darkest Hour (PG-13) 3:10-6:20
4:20-7:20-10:00
Game Night (R) 11:55-2:05-5:50Lady Bird (R) CC: 1:00-3:30-5:458:00-9:40
The Shape of Water (R) 1:50-8:40 7:50-10:05
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, The Insult (L'Insulte) (R) 1:20-10:05
The Party (R) CC: 1:10-3:00-5:00Missouri (R) 11:00-1:25-6:15
6:45-8:30-9:20
Death Wish (R) 11:50-2:20-5:55Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
8:20-10:10
Missouri (R) CC: 1:40-4:30-7:10-9:45
I, Tonya (R) CC: 3:50
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts The Post (PG-13) 11:15-2:40Animation (NR) 3:40-7:45
4:40-7:40
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts - Live
Annihilation (R) 11:35-1:20-4:25Action (NR) 1:15-5:30-9:50
7:05-9:20
Every Day (Every Day Another Day) Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 1:50-4:40(PG-13) 11:05-12:25-4:35-7:25-10:05 7:25-10:00
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:00-1:15- Call Me by Your Name (R) CC: 4:00
2:55-3:30-4:05-5:45-6:30-7:00-9:00
Old Greenbelt Theatre
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
129 Centerway
(PG-13) 4:30-7:30
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 5:30
Red Sparrow (R) 11:20-12:20-2:15- I, Tonya (R) 8:00
5:15-8:15-8:45-9:50
Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
3899 Branch Avenue
(PG-13) 12:30-9:30
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:00-1:00Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
2:00-3:00-4:00-5:00-6:00-7:001020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
8:00-9:00
The Room (2003) (R) 7:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D (PG-13) 11:45-2:45-5:25-8:15
(PG-13) 1:10-7:10
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:05-2:25Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
4:45-7:05
(PG-13) 11:05-1:50-4:35-7:30-10:15 Game Night (R) 12:15-2:45-5:10-7:45
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:15-12:15-2:30Regal Bowie Stadium 14
4:45-7:00-9:15
15200 Major Lansdale Boulevard
Game Night (R) 12:50-3:10-5:30Black Panther (PG-13) 1:30-2:107:50-10:10
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:00-11:30- 2:50-3:30-4:50-5:30-6:10-6:50-8:1012:20-1:40-2:10-2:40-3:20-4:40-5:10- 8:50-9:30-10:10
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
5:40-6:20-7:45-8:20-8:50-9:30
(PG-13) 1:00-4:10-7:30
Early Man (PG) 11:10AM
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 1:45-9:40 Fifty Shades Freed (R) 2:30-5:107:50-10:30
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 11:40-2:05Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
4:30-10:05
(PG-13) 3:20-6:30-9:20
Death Wish (R) 12:00-2:50-4:20Peter Rabbit (PG) 2:20-5:00-7:405:25-7:05-8:00-10:35
Black Panther (PG-13) 4:10-10:20 10:20
Red Sparrow (R) 3:50-7:00-10:15
Bow Tie Harbour 9
Game Night (R) 3:15-6:15-9:10
2474 Solomons Island Road
The Shape of Water (R) 12:50-9:55 Den of Thieves (R) 3:40-10:30
Death Wish (R) 1:10-4:10-7:10-10:00
12 Strong (R) 1:50-4:40-10:40
Annihilation (R) 3:05-6:20-9:35
Hostiles (R) 10:20-4:15
Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
Phantom Thread (R) 9:20
(PG-13) 2:00-4:30-7:05-9:45
Call Me by Your Name (R) 9:55Premiere:The Dark Crystal (1982)
3:40-6:50
2:00-7:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Regal Cinemas Majestic
Missouri (R) 9:50
Stadium 20 & IMAX
Annihilation (R) 11:10-2:00-5:00900 Ellsworth Drive
7:50-10:30
Black
Panther
(PG-13) 12:10-1:05Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
1:50-3:25-4:20-5:15-6:45-7:35-8:30(PG-13) 2:20-4:50-7:15
10:00-10:50
The Post (PG-13) 11:00-1:40-4:20Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
7:20-10:00
Nostalgia (R) 9:50-12:30-3:10-6:30 (PG-13) 12:00-1:15-3:15-4:30-6:30Premiere:The Dark Crystal (1982) 7:45-9:45-11:00
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:55-3:402:00-7:00
The Greatest Showman (PG) 10:50- 6:40-9:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
1:30-4:10-6:40-9:40
Red Sparrow (R) 10:00-10:40-11:20- (PG-13) 12:45-3:50-6:45-9:50
Coco (PG) 10:05
1:00-4:00-7:00-7:40-9:30-10:10
Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:15-4:00-6:259:00
7000 Arundel Mills Circle
Early Man (PG) 12:45-3:30-5:55Black Panther (PG-13) XD: 12:30- 8:40-11:00
3:45-7:15
Red Sparrow (R) 12:30-3:50-7:20Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D 10:40
(PG-13) 11:20-4:55-6:05-8:15
Game Night (R) 12:15-2:55-5:35Black Panther (PG-13) 10:55-12:00- 8:15-10:55
12:50-1:30-2:00-2:15-2:45-3:204:15-5:15-5:35-6:45-7:40-8:35-8:50- Samson (PG-13) 12:30-3:356:30-9:35
9:25-10:05
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D Den of Thieves (R) 12:25-3:457:00-10:50
(PG-13) XD: 10:30
The Greatest Showman (PG) 11:05- Annihilation (R) 1:25-4:20-7:1510:10
1:45-4:20-7:10-9:50
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 10:55-1:40- I, Tonya (R) 12:05-3:05-6:15-9:30
Death
Wish (R) 12:05-2:55-5:404:15-6:50-9:25
8:20-11:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Every
Day
(Every Day Another Day)
(PG-13) 11:15-2:05-5:00-7:50
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:00-1:35-4:15- (PG-13) 1:40-4:15-6:45-9:30
The
15:17
to
Paris (PG-13) 12:506:50-9:20
3:20-5:50-8:35-11:00
Early Man (PG) 11:45-2:15-4:50Black
Panther:
The IMAX 2D Experi7:20-9:45
Red Sparrow (R) 11:00-12:15-2:20- ence (PG-13) 12:35-3:50-10:30
Premiere:The
Dark
Crystal (1982)
3:35-5:40-7:00-9:00-10:15
2:00-7:00
Game Night (R) 11:50-2:30-5:05Regal Germantown
7:35-10:10
Stadium 14
Samson (PG-13) 11:20-2:05-4:5020000 Century Boulevard
7:45-10:25
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:30-1:30Den of Thieves (R) 11:30-3:053:45-4:45-7:00-8:00-10:15-11:15
6:15-9:30
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
Death Wish (R) 11:25-1:00-2:10(PG-13) 2:45-6:00-9:15
3:40-5:00-6:25-7:45-9:15-10:30
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:00-2:45Winchester (PG-13) 11:30-2:005:30-8:15-11:00
4:30-7:00-10:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety (NR)
6:30-10:00
(PG-13) 12:15-3:30-6:30-9:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:45-4:15-6:459:15
Early Man (PG) 2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
Red Sparrow (R) 12:15-4:00-7:1510:30
Game Night (R) 12:15-3:00-5:458:30-11:15
The Shape of Water (R) 12:00-3:156:15-9:30
Death Wish (R) 12:00-2:15-5:007:45-10:45
Annihilation (R) 2:00-4:45-7:3010:30
Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
(PG-13) 12:00-2:30-5:15-7:45-10:15
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 4:1511:00
Premiere:The Dark Crystal (1982)
2:00-7:00
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) 4:30-11:00
AMC Potomac Mills 18
2700 Potomac Mills Circle
UA Snowden Square
Stadium 14
9161 Commerce Center Drive
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 11:3012:00-1:00-2:00-2:45-3:30-4:15-6:007:45-8:30-9:15-10:00-10:45
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) CC: 11:00-11:45-3:00-5:156:15-9:45
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
11:20-4:30-9:40
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 12:303:20-6:15-9:10
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 11:50-2:40-5:30-8:459:15
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 10:30-11:101:45-4:20-7:00-9:30
Early Man (PG) CC: 11:15-1:40-4:10
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 11:00-2:155:30-8:50
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 9:45
Game Night (R) CC: 11:10-1:40-4:106:40-9:20
Winchester (PG-13) CC: 6:30
Death Wish (R) CC: 11:15-2:00-4:457:30-10:15
The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:10-4:30
Annihilation (R) CC: 11:10-2:105:00-7:50-10:30
Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
(PG-13) 12:10-2:50-5:10-7:40-10:10
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) CC:
1:50-7:15
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) CC: 10:45-2:155:45-9:00
Premiere:The Dark Crystal (1982)
7:00
Red Sparrow (R) 12:00-3:156:30-9:45
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:30-1:003:30-4:00-6:30-7:00-9:30-10:00
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) 1:30-2:00-4:30-5:00-7:308:15-10:30
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 1:40-4:106:45-9:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:40-3:20-6:00-9:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:50-3:306:00-8:30
Early Man (PG) 4:15-9:20
Red Sparrow (R) 12:45-4:00-7:1010:20
Regal Hyattsville Royale
Game Night (R) 1:45-4:30-7:20-9:50
Stadium 14
Death Wish (R) 12:30-3:00-5:306505 America Blvd.
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:30-1:00- 8:00-10:30
1:15-1:45-3:45-4:15-4:30-5:00-7:00- Annihilation (R) 1:50-4:40-7:4010:25
7:45-8:15-10:15-11:00-11:30
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
(PG-13) 1:15-3:45-6:15-8:50
(PG-13) 12:45-4:00-7:15-10:30
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 1:20Fifty Shades Freed (R) 1:00-3:453:50-6:15-8:40
6:30-9:15
Premiere:The Dark Crystal (1982)
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
2:00-7:00
(PG-13) 2:15-5:05-8:00-11:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:30-4:00-6:30Xscape Theatres
9:00-11:25
Brandywine 14
Red Sparrow (R) 12:45-4:00-7:157710 Matapeake Business Drive
10:30
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:00Game Night (R) 1:45-4:15-7:00-9:45 11:00-1:00-2:00-4:05-5:00-7:00-8:00Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 10:00-11:00
Missouri (R) 2:00-4:45-7:30-10:30 Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 10:10Death Wish (R) 1:30-4:15-7:00-10:00 12:45-3:15-6:15-9:00
Annihilation (R) 2:00-4:45-7:30Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
10:30
(PG-13) CC: 9:50-12:50-3:50-6:45Every Day (Every Day Another Day) 9:45
(PG-13) 1:15-3:50-6:20-9:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 10:50-1:20Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12 3:40-6:00-8:50
14716 Baltimore Avenue
Red Sparrow (R) CC: (!) 10:40-12:15Black Panther (PG-13) 12:00-2:00- 1:40-5:10-6:10-6:50-10:15-10:50
3:15-5:25-6:45-8:30-10:00
Game Night (R) CC: (!) 11:50-2:50Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D 5:15-7:45-10:10
(PG-13) 11:30-12:40-2:40-4:15-6:00- Den of Thieves (R) CC: 3:40-9:15
7:30-9:15-10:35
Death Wish (R) CC: (!) 9:40-11:15Fifty Shades Freed (R) 1:45-4:451:50-4:40-7:15-8:15-9:50
7:45-10:30
Annihilation (R) CC: (!) 10:15-1:15Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:10-2:30-5:00- 4:20-7:20-10:20
7:30-10:00
Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
Early Man (PG) 1:15-3:30-6:15-8:45 (PG-13) CC: 10:45-1:20-3:45
Red Sparrow (R) 12:20-3:45-7:15- Black Panther (PG-13) CC: (!) 9:2510:40
10:30-11:30-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30Game Night (R) 1:30-4:15-7:00-9:45 4:30-5:30-6:30-7:30-8:30-9:30-10:30
Den of Thieves (R) 12:50-4:00iPic Pike & Rose
7:15-10:20
11830 Grand Park Avenue
Death Wish (R) 11:30-2:15-5:00Black Panther (PG-13) 10:45-11:158:00-10:45
12:00-2:15-2:45-3:45-6:00-6:30-7:30Annihilation (R) 11:45-3:00-6:309:45-10:30-11:00
9:30
Fifty
Shades Freed (R) 11:30-3:00Regal Rockville Center
6:15-9:30
Stadium 13
Red Sparrow (R) (!) 11:45-3:30199 East Montgomery Avenue
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:15-12:45- 7:15-10:45
Annihilation (R) (!) 1:15-4:30-7:453:30-4:00-6:45-7:15-10:00-10:30
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D 11:15
Death Wish (R) (!) 1:30-4:45-8:00(PG-13) 11:45-3:00-6:15-9:30
11:30
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 4:25-9:45
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:00-2:30-5:00- Game Night (R) 12:45-4:00-7:0010:15
7:30-10:00
Early Man (PG) 11:45-2:15-4:307:15-9:45
Red Sparrow (R) 1:00-4:15-7:15AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
10:15
2150 Clarendon Blvd.
Game Night (R) 1:15-4:15-7:15-10:15 Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 1:00The Shape of Water (R) 3:45-9:30 1:30-2:00-4:00-5:00-6:00-7:00-10:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
Missouri (R) 1:00-6:45
(PG-13) CC: 3:00-8:00-9:00
Death Wish (R) 1:00-4:30-7:30-10:30 Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Annihilation (R) 1:15-4:15-7:15(PG-13) CC: 4:45-10:15
10:15
Detective Chinatown 2 (R) 12:45- Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 12:45-4:306:45-9:15
4:00-7:00-10:00
Premiere: The Dark Crystal (1982) Red Sparrow (R) CC: 1:00-4:157:00-10:15
2:00-7:00
Game Night (R) CC: 3:20-5:40Operation Red Sea 12:30-4:008:00-10:20
6:45-9:45
The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:45-7:30
Regal Waugh Chapel
Death Wish (R) 12:45-1:50-4:30Stadium 12 & IMAX
7:30-10:00
1419 South Main Chapel Way
VIRGINIA
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:00-1:303:10-4:40-6:20-7:50-9:30
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) 12:30-3:40-6:50-10:00
The Greatest Showman (PG) 1:204:05-6:40-9:15
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:05-2:405:15-7:50-10:25
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:15-3:15-6:30-9:20
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:50-3:306:10-8:45
Red Sparrow (R) 12:40-3:50-7:0010:20
Game Night (R) 1:15-4:20-7:10-9:45
Death Wish (R) 12:10-2:45-5:208:00-10:35
Annihilation (R) 1:10-4:15-7:3010:25
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) 1:00-4:10-7:20-10:30
Regal Westview
Stadium 16 & IMAX
5243 3Buckeystown Pike
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:45-12:451:45-3:00-4:00-5:00-6:15-7:15-8:309:30-10:30
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) 12:15-3:30-6:45-10:00
The Greatest Showman (PG) 12:303:45-6:30-9:15
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:00-3:005:45-8:30-11:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 10:30-1:30-4:30-7:30-10:45
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:45-3:156:00-9:00
Early Man (PG) 11:00-1:30-4:156:45-9:15
Red Sparrow (R) 11:30-3:15-7:0010:15
Game Night (R) 11:00-2:00-5:158:00-10:45
Death Wish (R) 11:15-2:00-4:457:30-10:30
Black Panther: An IMAX 3D Experience (PG-13) 1:15-7:45
Annihilation (R) 11:15-2:15-5:008:15-11:15
Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
(PG-13) 1:15-4:00-6:30-9:00
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 1:003:30-6:00-8:30-11:00
AMC Hoffman Center 22
206 Swamp Fox Rd.
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 11:0012:00-12:30-3:15-3:45-5:15-6:006:30-7:00-9:15-9:45-10:15
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) CC: 10:15-1:30-2:15-4:458:00-8:30
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
1:15-3:50-6:25-9:00
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 12:153:05-5:45-8:15-10:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 12:45-3:30-6:20-9:20
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 1:15-4:006:45-9:30
Early Man (PG) CC: 12:10-2:20
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 11:15-2:356:00-9:15
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 12:50-3:20
Game Night (R) CC: 10:20-12:403:00-5:20-7:45-10:20
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
1:05-6:50
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 12:206:15
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
3:15-9:05
Get Out (R) CC: 2:15-10:00
12 Strong (R) CC: 9:30
The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:40-4:257:10-10:10
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 4:05-9:40
Death Wish (R) CC: 10:20-12:152:50-5:30-8:05-10:40
Annihilation (R) CC: 11:00-1:454:30-7:20-10:05
I, Tonya (R) CC: 11:10AM
Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
(PG-13) 11:45-4:45-7:30
Lady Bird (R) CC: 12:35-3:00-5:20
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) CC:
4:40-7:05-9:35
Detective Chinatown 2 (R) 7:4010:35
Premiere:The Dark Crystal (1982)
2:00-7:00
Red Sparrow: The IMAX 2D Experience (R) 12:45-4:00-7:15-10:30
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:00-4:157:30-10:45
AMC Shirlington 7
2772 South Randolph St.
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 1:004:00-7:00
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) CC: 2:30-5:30-8:30
Red Sparrow (R) CC: (!) 1:154:15-7:15
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 1:45-6:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 4:10-7:10
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 1:10
The Party (R) CC: (!) 4:45
The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:30-7:30
Annihilation (R) CC: 1:20-4:20-7:20
I, Tonya (R) CC: 4:30
AMC Tysons Corner 16
7850e Tysons Corner Center
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 11:0012:15-2:10-3:25-5:15-6:40-8:259:05-9:45
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) CC: 11:35-2:50-5:55
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
10:35-4:20-9:45
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 10:2512:55-3:30-6:00-8:30-11:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 10:10-1:05-4:00-6:509:50
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 11:25-2:054:35-7:05-9:30
Early Man (PG) CC: 11:40-4:15
Red Sparrow (R) CC: (!) 10:05-1:154:25-7:35-10:45
Game Night (R) CC: 10:20-12:453:15-5:40-8:05-10:30
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 10:454:30-9:55
Death Wish (R) CC: (!) 10:00-12:353:10-5:45-8:20-10:55
The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:20-6:55
Black Panther: An IMAX 3D
Experience (PG-13) 10:00-1:00-4:057:15-10:20
Lady Bird (R) CC: 1:55-7:30
Annihilation (R) CC: 10:55-1:504:55-7:50-10:35
Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
(PG-13) 10:05-12:30-3:05-5:307:55-10:25
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) CC: 9:15
Premiere:The Dark Crystal (1982)
(!) 2:00-7:00
Black Panther (PG-13) 10:30-1:354:40-7:45-10:50
AMC Worldgate 9
13025 Worldgate Drive
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 2:002:45-5:00-5:45-8:00-8:45
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) CC: 4:00-7:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 2:50-5:40-8:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 3:00-5:25-7:45
Red Sparrow (R) CC: (!) 2:005:10-8:20
Game Night (R) CC: 2:30-4:50-7:10
Death Wish (R) CC: (!) 2:40-5:15-7:50
Annihilation (R) CC: 2:15-5:05-8:05
Alamo Drafthouse Cinema One Loudoun
20575 East Hampton Plaza
Black Panther (PG-13) 10:20-10:501:10-1:50
Peter Rabbit (PG) 10:10-1:00
Red Sparrow (R) 11:35-12:20
Game Night (R) 10:25-12:40
Peter Rabbit (PG) 3:40-6:20-9:05
Annihilation (R) 10:55-11:55-1:55
Black Panther (PG-13) 4:40-5:208:00-8:45-10:40
The Big Lebowski Quote-Along
(NR) 7:20
Black Panther (PG-13) 2:20-6:009:25
Game Night (R) 2:50-4:55-5:40-6:408:25-11:10
Red Sparrow (R) 3:15-3:55-7:0010:25-11:20
Annihilation (R) 3:40-7:40-9:4010:50
Angelika Film Center Mosaic
2911 District Ave
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 11:30-2:15-5:05-7:4510:45
Nostalgia (R) (!) 12:00
The Shape of Water (R) 10:454:15-9:45
The Party (R) 10:05-2:45-4:45-6:458:45-10:35
Lady Bird (R) 1:45-7:15
Death Wish (R) (!) 12:15-3:00-5:408:15-10:55
Annihilation (R) (!) 11:05-1:50-4:357:35-10:20
Black Panther (PG-13) 10:00-11:001:00-2:00-4:00-5:00-7:00-8:0010:00-11:00
Red Sparrow (R) (!) 10:30-1:30-4:307:30-10:30
gram, with its use of a recorded
tape track in coordination with
the live quartet to create a texturally complex soundscape. Farris’s
“Sweet Janis,” based on songs of
Janis Joplin, was in many ways
the most accomplished of the
afternoon’s superb series of idiomatic and compelling transcriptions, inspiring an instant
standing ovation.
Ethel’s distinction derives
from a thoroughgoing virtuosity,
a strong group identity that nevertheless encourages individuality, and the warmly inclusive
embrace of their audience. In the
hands of Ethel, American music
is alive and well.
style@washpost.com
Tuesday, March 6, 2018
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
The Greatest Showman (PG) 1:204:15-7:20-10:15
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 2:25-5:157:45-10:25
Early Man (PG) 4:35
Red Sparrow (R) 1:50-5:10-8:30
Bow Tie
Reston Town Center 11 & BTX The Shape of Water (R) 1:00-4:006:50-9:50
11940 Market Street
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:00-4:00- Death Wish (R) 1:35-4:25-7:15-10:05
Annihilation (R) 2:00-5:00-8:00
7:00-10:10
Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
The Room (2003) (R) 7:00
(PG-13) 1:05-3:50-6:30-9:10
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 4:05
The Shape of Water (R) 12:50-6:40 The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 9:40
Premiere:The Dark Crystal (1982)
I, Tonya (R) 12:40
2:00-7:00
Phantom Thread (R) 1:05-6:55
Regal Countryside Stadium 20
Peter Rabbit (PG) 2:30-4:45-7:0545980 Regal Plaza
9:20
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Black Panther (PG-13) 11:45-12:45Missouri (R) 3:50-9:30
2:55-4:00-6:00-7:05-9:10-10:10
Annihilation (R) 1:30-4:30-7:10Fifty Shades Freed (R) 11:40-2:2010:00
5:00-7:40-10:15
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 12:05
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 9:50
(PG-13) 11:35-2:40-5:30-8:30
Game Night (R) 12:10-2:40-5:10Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:05-2:35-4:557:40-10:05
7:30-9:55
The Post (PG-13) 3:30-9:40
Early Man (PG) 1:00-3:40-6:20-9:00
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:00-2:00- Red Sparrow (R) 12:25-3:353:00-5:00-6:00-8:00-9:00
6:45-9:55
Red Sparrow (R) 12:20-3:40Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:40-3:406:50-9:55
6:35-9:35
Death Wish (R) 1:10-4:10-7:20-10:20 Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi) (NR)
11:50-3:10-6:40-10:00
Cinema Arts Theatre
Game Night (R) 12:25-3:05-5:45-8:25
9650 Main St
The
Shape of Water (R) 12:30-3:25Red Sparrow (R) CC: 10:15-1:156:25-9:25
4:15-7:10-9:55
Pad
Man (Padman) (PG-13) 12:15Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 9:453:25-6:35-9:45
2:40-5:10
Samson
(PG-13) 11:25-2:15-5:05The Shape of Water (R) CC: 5:007:55-10:35
7:30-9:55
Aiyaary
(NR)
11:35-2:55-6:20-9:50
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC: 10:05
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Winchester (PG-13) 12:50-3:356:10-8:50
Missouri (R) CC: 12:15
The Post (PG-13) CC: 2:35-5:05-7:40 Pari (Hindi) (NR) 11:55-3:00-6:159:15
The Insult (L'Insulte) (R) CC:
Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety (NR) 11:309:40-10:00
2:45-5:50-9:00
The Party (R) CC: 9:55-12:00-1:45Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
3:20-7:00-8:35-10:10
(PG-13) 12:00-2:30-5:10-7:50-10:25
Lady Bird (R) CC: 9:50-12:20Tholiprema (Tholi Prema) (NR)
2:45-4:55
12:15-3:15-6:30-9:45
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts
- Animation (NR) 10:00-2:00-6:00- Awe! (NR) 12:20-3:20-6:20-9:20
Regal Dulles Town Center 10
10:00
21100 Dulles Town Circle
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts - Live
Action (NR) 12:00-4:00-8:00
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:30-1:453:45-4:45-6:45-7:45-9:45-10:45
Nostalgia (R) CC: 12:00-7:50
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
(PG-13) 11:45-2:45-5:45-8:45
1600 Village Market Boulevard
The Greatest Showman (PG) 11:45- The Greatest Showman (PG) 12:103:30-6:30-9:15
2:15-4:45-7:20
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 1:00-4:00Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:50-2:057:00-10:00
4:40-7:10
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:40-3:15The Post (PG-13) 12:15-7:40
6:00-8:30
Annihilation (R) 11:40-2:20-5:00Red Sparrow (R) 12:45-4:15-7:307:45
10:15
Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
Game Night (R) 11:50-2:15-5:15(PG-13) 3:00-5:20
8:00-10:30
Game Night (R) 12:10-2:35-5:15-7:50
Death Wish (R) 12:00-2:00-4:30Death Wish (R) 11:20-12:20-1:50- 7:15-10:50
2:50-4:20-5:25-7:00-7:55
Annihilation (R) 12:20-2:30-5:30Black Panther (PG-13) 11:30-12:30- 8:15-11:00
1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30-6:30-7:15-8:00
Regal
Red Sparrow (R) 11:35-12:50-2:40Fairfax Towne Center 10
4:10-5:45-7:30
4110
West
Ox Road
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:30The Greatest Showman (PG) 12:203:30-6:30
2:55-5:30-8:10-10:45
Manassas 4 Cinemas
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 1:20-4:158890 Mathis Ave.
7:10-9:50
Black Panther (PG-13) 2:10-4:50- Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:00-2:25-4:557:30; 2:55-5:35-8:15
7:20-9:45
Peter Rabbit (PG) 2:00-4:00-6:00Early Man (PG) 12:10-2:30
8:00
Red Sparrow (R) 12:50-4:10-7:30Game Night (R) 2:05-4:10-6:15-8:20 10:45
Rave Cinemas Centreville 12 Paddington 2 (PG) 12:05-2:40-5:206201 Multiplex Drive
8:00-10:35
Black Panther (PG-13) 10:00-10:30- Game Night (R) 12:15-2:45-5:157:50-10:30
11:00-1:00-1:30-2:00-3:00-4:004:30-5:00-7:00-7:30-8:00-9:00-10:00- Samson (PG-13) 3:55
10:30-11:00
Annihilation (R) 12:45-3:50-6:45Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D 9:40
(PG-13) 12:00-6:00
Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 10:05-12:35- (PG-13) 1:20-4:10-7:00-9:30
3:05-5:35-8:05-10:45
Premiere:The Dark Crystal (1982)
2:00-7:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:05-1:50-4:35-7:25-10:20 Golden Slumber (Goldeun SeulPeter Rabbit (PG) 11:25-1:45-4:15- reombeo) (NR) 5:00-7:40-10:20
7:10-9:35
Detective K: Secret of the Living
Red Sparrow (R) 10:35-1:40-4:45- Dead (NR) 9:40
7:50-10:55
Regal Fox Stadium 16 & IMAX
Game Night (R) 10:05-12:30-2:5522875 Brambleton Plaza
5:20-7:45-10:15
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:00-3:15Death Wish (R) 12:00-2:40-5:156:30-9:45
8:00-10:40
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety (NR) 12:20- (PG-13) 2:00-5:15-8:30
3:30-6:40-9:50
The Greatest Showman (PG) 12:30Annihilation (R) 10:50-1:35-4:203:00-6:00-8:45
7:15-10:05
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 1:45-4:15Rave Cinemas
6:45-9:15
Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
11900 Palace Way
(PG-13) 12:45-3:30-6:15-9:00
Black Panther (PG-13) 10:50-2:15- Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:15-2:45-5:153:05-5:35-9:45
7:45-10:15
The Greatest Showman (PG) 11:30- Early Man (PG) 2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
2:10-4:55-7:40-10:25
Red Sparrow (R) 12:15-3:45-7:15Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D 10:30
(PG-13) 11:45-6:25-8:55
Game Night (R) 12:30-3:00-5:30Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
8:00-10:30
(PG-13) 10:15-1:10-4:05-7:05-10:10 Death Wish (R) 12:45-3:15-5:45Fifty Shades Freed (R) 4:50-10:05 8:15-10:45
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:30Annihilation (R) 1:15-4:00-6:45-9:30
1:55-7:30
Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
Red Sparrow (R) 10:00-1:15-4:30- (PG-13) 12:00-2:15-4:45-7:15-9:45
7:45-11:00
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 12:00The Shape of Water (R) 1:00-9:20 2:30-5:00-7:45-10:15
12 Strong (R) 10:20-1:35-4:45Chalo (NR) 1:30-4:30-7:30-10:30
7:50-10:45
Tholiprema (Tholi Prema) (NR)
2018 Oscar Shorts 2:00
12:30-3:30-6:30-9:30
Annihilation (R) 10:40-1:30-4:15Black Panther: The IMAX 2D Experi7:25-10:15
ence (PG-13) 1:00-4:15-7:30-10:45
Death Wish (R) 11:20-2:00-4:40Regal Kingstowne
7:35-10:20
Stadium 16 & RPX
The Post (PG-13) 12:50-7:10
5910 Kingstowne Towne Center
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 11:25- Black Panther (PG-13) 12:15-3:307:00-9:35
6:45-10:05
Lady Bird (R) 10:35-4:00-6:50
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
Black Panther (PG-13) XD: 10:05- (PG-13) 2:10-5:15-10:30
12:35-1:20-3:55-4:35-7:15-7:55Fifty Shades Freed (R) 2:30-5:1010:35-11:05
7:50-10:25
I, Tonya (R) 4:20-10:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:30-4:20-6:509:20
Regal Ballston Common
Stadium 12
Early Man (PG) 2:20-4:40-7:20-9:35
671 N. Glebe Road
Red Sparrow (R) 12:15-3:45-7:05Black Panther (PG-13) 1:10-1:55- 10:15
2:50-4:20-5:05-6:00-7:30-8:15-9:10 Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi) (NR)
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D 1:15-3:05-6:30-9:50
(PG-13) 3:35-6:45-9:55
Game Night (R) 12:35-3:20-6:05-8:35
Samson (PG-13) 1:00-4:00-7:0010:00
Death Wish (R) 12:30-4:45-7:35-10:20
Annihilation (R) 12:50-3:50-6:359:20
Hostiles (R) 12:25-3:25-6:25-9:30
Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
(PG-13) 12:45-3:40-6:20-8:50
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 1:103:30-5:50-8:15-10:35
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:10-3:004:15-6:00-7:30-8:30-9:15
Regal Manassas
Stadium 14 & IMAX
11380 Bulloch Drive
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:10-2:104:20-5:30-7:30-8:30-10:40
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) 3:20-6:30-9:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
1:00-3:50-7:10-10:30
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 8:15-10:50
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 1:40-4:40-7:15-9:50
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:30-4:15-6:509:10
Red Sparrow (R) 3:10-6:15-9:30
Game Night (R) 12:45-2:45-5:107:40-10:15
Samson (PG-13) 1:15-4:00-7:0010:00
Death Wish (R) 12:45-2:30-5:158:00-10:45
Annihilation (R) 12:50-3:45-6:45-9:45
Hostiles (R) 1:50-5:00
Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
(PG-13) 1:30-4:10-6:40-9:00
Red Sparrow: The IMAX 2D Experience (R) 1:20-4:30-7:45-10:50
Regal Potomac Yard
Stadium 16
3575 Potomac Avenue
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:00-1:302:00-3:00-4:05-4:35-5:05-6:05-7:107:40-8:10-9:10-10:15
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) 12:30-2:30-3:35-5:35-6:408:40-9:45
The Greatest Showman (PG)
4:25-9:40
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:30-3:005:30-8:00-10:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:30-2:50-5:107:30-9:50
Early Man (PG) 1:35-4:15
Red Sparrow (R) 12:30-3:40-7:2010:30
Game Night (R) 12:40-3:05-5:307:55-10:20
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 1:40-4:20-7:10-9:50
Death Wish (R) 12:30-1:15-3:506:50-9:35
Annihilation (R) 1:45-4:25-7:2510:10
Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
(PG-13) 1:55-4:25-10:05
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 6:45-9:05
Premiere:The Dark Crystal (1982)
2:00-7:00
Regal
Springfield Town Center 12
6500 Springfield Town Center
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:30-1:103:40-4:20-7:00-7:30-10:10-10:50
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) 11:40-12:10-2:50-3:20-6:006:30-9:10-9:40
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 10:554:30-9:50
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:45-3:45-6:40-9:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:40-3:35-6:109:00
Red Sparrow (R) 12:00-3:30-7:1010:40
Game Night (R) 11:30-2:20-5:107:50-10:20
Death Wish (R) 11:00-2:00-5:008:00-11:00
Annihilation (R) 11:05-1:50-4:407:40-10:30
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 1:006:50-9:45
Premiere:The Dark Crystal (1982)
2:00-7:00
Regal Virginia Gateway
Stadium 14 & RPX
8001 Gateway Promenade Place
Black Panther (PG-13) 4:30-7:30
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) 1:30-10:30
The Greatest Showman (PG) 2:205:10-8:05-10:50
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 2:05-4:407:20-9:50
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 1:30-4:15-7:10-9:55
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:20-3:45-6:159:15
Early Man (PG) 1:50-4:05-6:20-9:10
Red Sparrow (R) 1:05-4:10-7:1510:20
Game Night (R) 1:55-4:20-6:45-9:45
Death Wish (R) 2:00-5:15-7:45-10:15
Annihilation (R) 2:15-5:00-8:00-10:45
Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
(PG-13) 1:15-3:40-6:00-9:00
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 1:105:30-8:15-10:35
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:00-2:303:30-4:00-6:30-7:00-9:30-10:00
Smithsonian - Airbus
IMAX Theater
14390 Air and Space Museum Parkway
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
11:10-2:20
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 12:35
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
Seas 3D (NR) 10:20-1:30-3:10
Dream Big: Engineering Our World:
An IMAX 3D Experience Please Call
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 12:00
Black Panther: An IMAX 3D Experience (PG-13) 4:15-9:55
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) 7:05
University Mall Theatre
10659 Braddock Road
Coco (PG) CC: 12:15-2:30-4:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 1:00-4:00-7:00-10:05
Maze Runner: The Death Cure (PG13) CC: 7:15-10:00
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 12:052:20-4:35
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 7:30-10:10
C6
EZ
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
PICKLES
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 6 , 2018
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
NEITHER SIDE VULNERABLE
NORTH
K6
QJ4
963
A8543
EAST
10 2
8
AQ87542
10 9 6
WEST
AJ97543
9653
J
K
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH (D)
Q8
A K 10 7 2
K 10
QJ72
The bidding:
SOUTH
WEST
NORTH
1
3
4
Opening lead — J
EAST
All Pass
M
y daughter was among
the kids born in the
year 2000, which means she
— and they — will never have
much trouble remembering
how old they are.
Counting at bridge is easy
in principle; anyone can
count to 13. But players
neglect to do it because of
laziness or lack of focus. In
today’s deal, West led his
singleton jack of diamonds
against four hearts, and East
took the ace and returned a
diamond. West ruffed South’s
king and cashed the ace of
spades.
Dummy’s king won the
next spade — East followed
with the 10 and deuce — and
declarer drew trumps and
next led the queen of clubs.
West’s king covered, but
East’s 10-9-6 was worth the
setting trick.
South makes his game if
he takes a moment to count.
West had four trumps and
one diamond and almost
surely started with seven
spades. Since West had 13
cards, he had only one club.
South’s only chance is to
start the clubs by leading
low from his hand, hoping
West has the singleton king.
South’s luck is good.
CLASSIC PEANUTS
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
LIO
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
CHARLES SCHULZ
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
10 2 8
A Q 8 7 5 4 2 10 9 6
Both sides vulnerable.
You deal and open three diamonds. The next player bids
three hearts, your partner
doubles and the player at
your right passes. What do
you say?
ANSWER: Assuming your
partner knows what he’s
doing, Christmastime is here.
Partner says he can beat
three hearts, and you have
an ace you might not have
held. You may even get a
spade ruff. Pass and prepare
to collect your penalty.
BLONDIE
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2018, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
TUESDAY, MARCH 6 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
MUTTS
EZ
PATRICK McDONNELL
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
C7
RE
ZITS
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
BIRTHDAY | MARCH 6
This year you seem to
express your feelings
in a way that others
can understand. Your
receptiveness to those around
you soars, and as a result, so
does your popularity. If you
are single, you could meet
several potential sweeties.
If you are attached, the two
of you seem more integrally
connected than in past years.
You might opt to take up a
new hobby together or plan
a long-dreamed-of vacation.
Scorpio might make you
uncomfortable with his or her
insights.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
Get as much feedback as
possible about the pros and
cons of a financial matter. Tap
into the moment, and know
when to reveal more of your
reasoning. Others want to
respond to you, but they might
struggle with how to make
their message clear.
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
You have the ability to
respond appropriately to
someone’s pressure. Find
out what is going on with
this person, and figure out
why he or she is being so
controlling.
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
With today being so hectic,
you’ll need to make sure you
take breaks. Your focus will be
on routine matters, but also
WEINGARTENS & CLARK keep the big picture in mind.
Plan on several meetings
not going exactly as you had
planned. Hang in there.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
Your creativity stems from your
feelings and your willingness
to experience them. Refuse
to let someone else create
unnecessary anxiety for you.
A higher-up is likely to ask you
many questions. Know that
you have grounded ideas.
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
When you get past certain
details and are willing to look
at the big picture, you might be
able to identify what is wrong
or not going well in a personal
situation. You have the power
to change the status quo.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
You could be convinced that
the only way to handle a
problem is your way. However,
after hearing what others have
to say, you’ll realize that you
have many alternatives. A talk
convinces you that a partner
knows much more than he or
she lets on.
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
You could be in a situation
that seems impossible to
resolve. This matter could be
tied to your finances as well,
causing stress for both you
and the other person involved.
The more relaxed you are, the
better off you’ll be.
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
You could hit an obstacle or
two, but you will continue
to move forward in order to
achieve certain goals. Express
your compassion in a clear
manner, and others will
respond well.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
You still might feel somewhat
off. You seem to be pushing
very hard against some
tumultuous winds. Understand
what is going on within your
inner circle.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
You might get an indication
that everything is going to
work out with a personal
matter. You can relax and
focus on what you want, be it
professional or personal. You
could change your mind about
a major expenditure.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
Your ability to get past a
problem is highlighted. You
seem resilient to many people.
You also have the power
to create more of what you
desire. Communicate more
directly with those who will
support you in moving in a new
direction.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
Your ability to gather more
information could surprise
you. You have a way of making
an impression on others with
not only your inspirational
perspective, but also your
empathy for what they
experience.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2018, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
C8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 6 , 2018
kidspost
CHIP SAYS
TODAY
KIDSPOST.COM
“A Wrinkle in Time” is the first in the Time Quintet
series from author Madeleine L’Engle. The 1962
book frequently appears on lists of banned
books because of its religious messages.
Rain is possible in the morning and
probable in the afternoon, so pack
an umbrella. Expect a high near 46.
Eight-year-old Syrian refugee
Bana al-Abed gets a star
moment at the Academy
Awards. Read our online story.
ILLUSTRATION BY MIKAELA LY, 6, ARLINGTON
Storm Reid found ‘Wrinkle’ role an easy fit
BY
More about Storm
Siblings: Two sisters and one brother,
all older. “My sisters are 28 and 24, and
my brother is 17, so I’m the baby, baby.”
S ANDIE A NGULO C HEN
Pets: Three dogs. “Prime is the boxer,
Bella is the pit bull, and Cayenne is the
red toy poodle.” Also, one betta fish.
S
torm Reid loved Meg Murry, the
main character of “A Wrinkle in
Time,” for years before she was
cast to play her in Disney’s adaptation of the award-winning children’s book.
The ninth-grader first read Madeleine
L’Engle’s 1962 science-fiction classic
when she was in the sixth grade. Storm
says she felt an immediate connection
with Meg, a brilliant but misunderstood
middle-schooler who goes on an adventure across time and space.
“She’s such a peculiar character, and I
wanted to know more about her. And I
thought it was so amazing that she
couldn’t realize how beautiful and smart
and gracious she was, but everyone
around her saw it,” the 14-year-old actress
told KidsPost. “It took her a trip around
the universe to notice that.”
Like Meg, Storm loves and excels in
science and math. But she doesn’t think
readers or viewers have to like those subjects to understand the character.
“I relate to Meg so much, and other
teenagers and kids relate to her, because
we are all trying to figure things out,”
Storm explained. “We all might have
things in our lives that are stopping us, but
Meg shows all of us that we can overcome
our challenges and we can live out our
dreams.”
So by the time, in eighth grade, that
Storm tried out for the role of Meg for
director Ava DuVernay, she was very familiar with and eager for the part. But
landing the dream role seemed nearly
impossible.
“It was nerve-racking auditioning, because I felt so invested in the role, and I
didn’t think I was going to book it,” Storm
said. “But I went into it trying to be myself,
letting go and doing my best.”
Storm said that her “best thankfully
paid off.” Storm also said that she recognizes the importance of a nonwhite girl
playing Meg, who is white in the original
book and in previous screen adaptations
Schooling: Home-schooled. “My
schedule won’t allow me to go to regular
school, but I did love public school, and I
did experience my first year of middle
school in a regular school. It has taught
me a lot of responsibility being homeschooled, but I would like to go back to
high school for a year.”
Favorite books: “The Giver” by Lois
Lowry and “Heart Talk” by Cleo Wade.
“ ‘The Giver’ is about being yourself and
having to separate yourself from people
who may not have the same morals and
values as you — and sticking up for what
you believe in . . . and ‘Heart Talk’ is a
book talking to your heart about who
you are; it’s a poetry book, and it’s an
inspiring, awesome book.”
ATSUSHI NISHIJIMA/WALT DISNEY PICTURES
In Disney’s “A Wrinkle in Time,” Storm Reid plays Meg Murry, a misunderstood middle-schooler who, along with her friend
Calvin (Levi Miller), goes on an interplanetary adventure. Storm, below, loved the character years before she got the part.
ROBYN BECK/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
of the story. In DuVernay’s version, however, Meg is biracial: Her father, Dr. Alex
Murry, is played by Chris Pine, and her
mother, Dr. Kate Murry, is played by Gugu
Mbatha-Raw.
“I am a girl of color, and Meg wasn’t
written that way originally, so for me to be
able to portray that and represent girls
who look like me and let them know they
can do anything and empower them is
very special,” she said.
On the six-month movie shoot, Storm
had the opportunity to work with some of
the most influential women in Hollywood, in addition to DuVernay. Co-stars
Oprah Winfrey, Reese Witherspoon and
Mindy Kaling play three supernatural be-
ings — Mrs. Which, Mrs. Whatsit and Mrs.
Who — who guide Meg, her genius little
brother, Charles Wallace, and her friend
Calvin on an interplanetary journey to
find her missing father, a famous scientist.
Ultimately, the legendary Winfrey (a
billionaire media boss, actress and philanthropist) gave Storm a piece of advice
she says she’ll remember forever.
“She told me, ‘Don’t waste energy on
things you can’t change in your life, when
you could be using that energy on
something else positive in your life.’ I
took that, and it’s the best advice I’ve ever
been given,” Storm said. “It’s become my
life motto.”
kidspost@washpost.com
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
1
5
9
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
23
24
25
27
30
35
36
38
40
41
42
47
48
49
51
52
53
56
62
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
ACROSS
Easy thing to do
Lobster serving
Great time
Skin opening
Tra-__: refrain
syllables
Main artery
Snapchat
co-founder
Spiegel
Cyberzine
Parakeets’
quarters
Have things
finally go one’s
way
Photo __:
media events
Charged
particles
Intl. news
broadcaster
Singer’s quavers
Recently
Harry’s pal
Weasley
Mosquito-borne
disease
Penne __ vodka
Singer Damone
Trig ratio
Engage in
hard-nosed
negotiations
“Just a __!”
Dress-for-success accessory
New York Giants
legend with 511
career home
runs
Used a bench
Location
Sponsors’ spots
Make an annual
clock adjustment ... and
what the end
of 20-, 36- and
42-Across may
literally have
Georgia state
fruit
Smell
Gold rush animal
“Orange” tea
grade
Kind of pittance?
The “A” of NEA
Drive too fast
New England
NFLers
Barnes & Noble
reader
Favorite movie: “ ‘Matilda’ is my
favorite movie of all time. It’s so funny.
It’s about this girl who’s so independent
and smart, and she has to learn how to
get through all these challenges she
faces, and she gets through them all so
well.”
Favorite song: “Lemon” by N.E.R.D and
Rihanna. “I have so many favorite songs!
But if I had to pick one, I’d say that’s the
song I consider my jam right now.”
Actor she’d most like to work with: “I
hope I get to work with Ms. Meryl Streep.
She’s so brilliant, great and gracious an
actress and person. I would love to work
with her.”
Hobbies: “I love to do gymnastics, I do
taekwondo, I love to swim,” she said. “I
am also really into arts and crafts. I feel
like I’m a really artsy person. I love to tiedye shirts and bake and just do nerdy
and fun stuff.”
By Bill Zagozewski
© 2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
DOWN
1 Job detail, for
short
2 Old Chevy
3 “I smell __!”
4 Crossword
solver’s choice
5 Remove dirt
from
6 Petting zoo
youngsters
7 Bygone apple
spray
8 Regular pay
9 “Not so close!”
10 Extended
pd. away from
work
11 Golden Fleece
ship
12 How-to
instruction
13 Soviet news
agency
21 Sanctified
22 Declare
emphatically
26 Drinks in
schooners
27 Maria von __,
family singers’
matriarch
28 Rich boy in
“Nancy” comics
3/6/18
29 Groom’s new
relative
30 Author Hoffman
31 Foot cover
32 French dispatch
boat
33 Guiding principle
34 Standing tall
37 Heinz varieties
count, to
Caesar?
39 Those in favor
43 Failed suddenly,
as a laptop
44 URL letters
45 Political fugitives
46 __ profit: make
money
50 __ Brothers:
defunct financial
firm
52 Equine outburst
53 iPhone
downloads
54 __-sea diver
55 Drink with sushi
57 Frolic in a
lively way
58 Thinking output
59 Currency named
for a continent
60 Choir voice
61 Student’s
workplace
63 Runner
Sebastian
MONDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
KLMNO
SPORTS
TUESDAY, MARCH 6 , 2018
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
D
SU
MEDIA
BOXING
BASEBALL
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Disney executive Jim Pitaro has been
chosen to be ESPN’s next president,
replacing John Skipper. D2
Canelo Alvarez fails drug tests, but his
rematch with Gennady Golovkin may
still go on as scheduled. D2
Could Paul DeJong’s new deal with the
Cardinals represent a breakthrough in
the industry’s stalemate? D5
As postseason play arrives, Duke has
rounded into form and will ride its
defense into the ACC tournament. D6
Holtby
rewards
Capitals’
faith in him
Wizards
attempting
to get Beal
some rest
Win over Maple Leafs
could lift goalie’s morale
following rough patch
BY
I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN
It started with another unlucky
bounce, a puck that glanced off
Braden Holtby’s pad and then
Zach Hyman’s skate for a Toronto
Maple Leafs goal on their first
shot of the game. Holtby didn’t
move out of his butterfly position,
looking behind him to see the
puck was indeed within the cage,
seemingly confounded as to how
it got there.
That pose defined the past
three weeks for Holtby, as one
frustrating goal after another
piled up for six straight Washington Capitals losses with him in
net. Then there was that glove
save in the second period, after a
turnover in the defensive zone left
Toronto’s Patrick Marleau all
alone in the slot. Holtby was a few
feet in front of the net, catching
the puck with his glove and doing
so with a flourish, a reminder that
he is still the same goaltender
who finished as a Vezina Trophy
finalist the past two years, winning the award in 2016.
The game ended with the rest
of the Capitals lined up in front of
Holtby, each player taking his
turn tapping the goaltender’s
mask or hugging him in congratulations. It’s a tradition after every
victory, but Washington’s 5-2 win
over Toronto in Saturday’s outdoor game at the Naval Academy
could be meaningful for Holtby’s
confidence down the stretch. In a
marquee nationally televised
NHL Stadium Series contest, Capitals Coach Barry Trotz stuck with
Holtby despite his recent struggles, and in Holtby’s first win in
nearly a month, he rewarded that
faith, playing better as the game
went on and finally moving past
CAPITALS CONTINUED ON D3
Capitals at Ducks
Today, 10 p.m., NBCSW, NBCSN
Nats may call
on Montero
to back up
behind plate
BY
C HELSEA J ANES
jupiter, fla. — Miguel Montero
walked into the Washington Nationals’ clubhouse Monday morning, his young son by his side, one
of several signs of the time that
has passed since former Arizona
Diamondbacks scouting director
Mike Rizzo’s scouts signed him for
$13,000 out of Venezuela in 2001.
His helmet hides a balding head,
and his walk betrays the effects of
years of squatting behind the
plate and the beating that comes
with it.
In the years since signing that
deal, Montero rose to the National
League catching elite, built himself into a two-time all-star,
caught at least 110 games in six of
seven seasons — then slowly slid
down the slope that makes most
well-worn catchers a victim of
their own success.
Last season, the Chicago Cubs
released him, and the then-hapless Toronto Blue Jays signed him
to take innings down the stretch.
This offseason, most teams didn’t
call. But Rizzo, Washington’s general manager, did. Now, 17 years
later, one of the few unsettled
spots on his Nationals’ roster pivots around Montero.
If he shows himself capable, he
could be the Nationals’ backup
catcher, in which case he would
supplant Pedro Severino, who has
The
Steph
E f f ec t
Curry’s long-range skills
inspire high school shooters
as they change the game
BY
J ESSE D OUGHERTY
F
rom opposite ends of the court,
and without so much as glancing at each other, Jared Bynum
and Vado Morse launched threepointer after distant three-pointer,
stretched their ranges after each attempt and painted a portrait of basketball evolution.
They were warming up for their
teams’ clash in the Interstate Athletic
Conference championship game inside
a Bethesda gym in late February. Bynum, a senior point guard for Georgetown Prep, took one dribble before
launching a 28-foot three from the right
wing. It rolled in. Morse, a senior point
guard for visiting Bullis, shot from a
step inside the center-court logo moments later. That rolled in, too.
The guards were almost completely
in sync, their long-range shots arcing
through the air one after the other. Then
the game started, Morse darted to the
right wing, bounced the ball between
his legs and buried a three from in front
of the Georgetown Prep bench, no closer than 26 feet from the rim.
This is the era of Stephen Curry-inspired point guards, and this is how
they play basketball.
“Watching Steph growing up, it sort
of made you rethink what was possible,”
said Bynum, who is set to play at Saint
Joseph’s next season. “The long shooting, the ballhandling, all of that — I
think it had a big effect on how a lot of us
play.”
Washington-area guards illustrate
Curry’s broad effect on high school
basketball, as young players across the
country are shooting more threes and,
more than ever, launching them from
well beyond the arc. Curry, the two-time
NBA champion, two-time MVP and fivetime all-star for the Golden State Warriors at 29 years old, had his major
breakout six seasons ago when he made
a league-high 272 three-pointers.
The current crop of high school
guards were 9, 10, 11 and 12 years old
that year — and many were glued to
their television screens as Curry shimmied away from defenders, buried
CURRY CONTINUED ON D5
“Watching Steph growing up, it sort of
made you rethink what was possible.
The long shooting, the ballhandling,
all of that — I think it had a big effect
on how a lot of us play.”
Georgetown Prep’s Jared Bynum
NATIONALS CONTINUED ON D4
Inside: The Nats send home Seth
Romero, their first-round pick. D4
EZRA SHAW/GETTY IMAGES; JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Washington guard tied
for NBA lead in minutes
since Wall went down
BY
C ANDACE B UCKNER
Scott Brooks issued the warning several weeks ago. The Washington Wizards coach meant it
when he spoke about the grind of
the games following the NBA allstar break. After most Wizards
enjoyed six days off, the rotational
players needed to lace up their
sneakers and prepare for a rigorous push to the postseason. Rest
be damned.
“If you didn’t get rest then,”
Brooks said after the team’s
Feb. 21 practice, “you’re not going
to get it coming up.”
True to his coach’s word, Bradley Beal, who likely had the busiest All-Star Weekend of anyone on
the Wizards’ roster, has rarely sat
in the team’s seven games since
the break. Washington has needed more of Beal because point
guard John Wall, who has missed
four weeks because of left knee
surgery, has yet to return to even
light shooting workouts on the
court. In the 16 games without
Wall, Beal is tied with fellow allstars LeBron James and Anthony
Davis for the most minutes per
game (37.9) in the league.
So, has the minutes load affected Beal’s production? On Monday
afternoon, a day after Beal logged
43 minutes and sloppily closed
the fourth quarter of a three-point
loss to the Indiana Pacers, Brooks
was asked several questions concerning the fatigue level of his one
healthy all-star.
“I have to do a better job,”
Brooks said, sharing his reaction
to Beal admitting that he was
“tired” following the 98-95 loss.
“Forty-three is a big number,
WIZARDS CONTINUED ON D3
Heat at Wizards
Today, 7 p.m., NBCSW
The FBI.
The NCAA.
This March,
it’s madness.
You have to be
willfully ignorant,
and if you’re able,
that’s fine. It is
March, and March
should be about
Barry
the kids who play
Svrluga
college basketball.
Drink in what has
already happened — say,
Radford’s buzzer-beating threepointer to beat Liberty and gain a
berth in the NCAA tournament
field. In that one shining
moment, it’s pure. How
wonderful.
If you put earplugs in and
blinders on, that can be your
world, a world in which a kid
you’ve never heard of playing for
a school you couldn’t locate
matters, and matters intensely.
Toss in a bracket and a wager,
and voila — so much fun.
The problem is: The moment
doesn’t last. And when it fades,
the reality of college sports is
what’s left, laid bare. It’s March,
and it’s ugly.
“It’s a horrible time for the
game,” Duke Coach Mike
Krzyzewski said late last month.
The NCAA tournament field
will be announced Sunday night.
I used to think of this as
Christmas morning. But only
those among us who are experts
at compartmentalization will be
able to look at the bracket and
think only of on-court matchups,
of which 12th seed might beat
what 5.
SVRLUGA CONTINUED ON D6
D2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 6 , 2018
washingtonpost.com/sports
SPORTS
D.C. SPORTS BOG
ESPN taps
Disney exec
Pitaro as
president
BY
BOXING
On target, across generations
Ex-Bullets standout Legler
watched daughter become
quite the shooter herself
R ICK M AESE
Alvarez’s
failed tests
might not
derail fight
BY
BY
ESPN has tapped a respected
Disney executive to help lead the
network through a tumultuous
period of changing viewership
habits, staff downsizings, expensive rights-holder fees and public
backlash over its perceived political leanings.
Less than three months after
John Skipper shocked the Bristol,
Conn.-based company by announcing his sudden resignation,
the network’s parent company is
handing the reins to a familiar
face: Jim Pitaro, who previously
served as Disney’s chairman of
consumer products and interactive media. Pitaro will be ESPN
president and co-chair of Disney
Media Networks.
“Jimmy is a talented and dedicated leader with the right strategic vision, relentless drive and
passion for sports required to
lead the stellar ESPN team at this
incredibly dynamic time,” Bob
Iger, Disney’s CEO, said in a statement Monday.
Skipper cited a “substance addiction” in announcing his immediate resignation Dec. 18, and
ESPN has been led on an interim
basis by George Bodenheimer, a
former network president.
ESPN has been trying to stem
the revenue losses created by
subscribers cutting the cord and
eschewing traditional cable offerings while also preparing to
launch a new direct-to-consumer
subscription service. ESPN has
lost more than 13 million subscribers from its peak of
100.13 million households in 2011,
and the company has laid off
more than 500 employees since
October 2015.
“As a passionate and lifelong
sports fan, I am honored to be
joining the ESPN team during
such a pivotal time in its storied
history,” Pitaro said in a statement. “The appetite for quality
sports content across platforms
has never been greater, and I am
looking forward to working with
the talented ESPN team as we
continue to redefine the future
fan experience.”
S COTT A LLEN
The greatest moment of Tim Legler’s
NBA career almost didn’t happen. If the
Washington Bullets guard had to
choose between flying to San Antonio
to participate in the three-point
shootout during All-Star Weekend in
1996 or being by wife Jennifer’s side for
the birth of their first child, the choice
was obvious. The league could find a
replacement shooter.
But Jennifer insisted that skipping
the event wasn’t an option and, after
consulting with her doctor, the couple
elected to induce labor a week before
the baby’s due date. Nine days after he
helped welcome Lauren Nicole to the
world, Legler shot his way to the title
and a $20,000 prize earmarked for her
college fund. For a 29-year-old who had
signed a two-year contract for slightly
more than the league minimum in 1995
after bouncing around Europe and the
CBA between brief stints in the NBA for
the first eight years of his career, the
feeling was overwhelming.
“For you, little Lauren,” Legler told
TNT’s Craig Sager after defeating
Dennis Scott in the finals. “I’ll be home.
After I get back from Milwaukee, we’re
going to share this together.”
Over the past 22 years, Legler has
shared his love and knowledge of
basketball with Lauren, who played the
final game of her college career last
month in Division III Neumann’s 71-64
loss to Cabrini in the Colonial States
Athletic
Conference
tournament
championship game. She remembers
the first time she asked her dad to
watch the video from his three-point
shootout triumph like it was yesterday.
Legler came into the contest leading
the NBA in three-point shooting at
51.3 percent. His competition included
defending champion Glen Rice, Dana
Barros, Hubert Davis, Steve Kerr,
George McCloud, Cliff Robinson and
Scott. The nerves Legler initially felt
quickly faded.
“I was nervous beforehand because it
meant so much, and I was worried I was
going to be gripping the ball too tight,”
said Legler, now an ESPN analyst. “I got
out there and I started warming up, and
I knew that I wasn’t going to be fazed by
anything that was going on. I was really
confident that I was going to win before
it even started.”
Legler put up 23 points in the first
round, which tied Larry Bird for the
fourth-highest total in shootout history,
and never cooled off. Bullets teammate
Juwan Howard joined him in
celebration after Scott came up short in
the final round.
The Bullets finished three games out
of a playoff spot that season, and Legler
tore his anterior cruciate ligament in
the penultimate game of the year. As the
reigning champion, he was invited to
Cleveland to defend his title at the 1997
All-Star Game, but his knee injury kept
him out of action into February. On the
way to his doctor in Chevy Chase to get
cleared to return, Legler heard on the
radio that Bullets Coach Jim Lynam —
the man responsible for giving him a
chance in Washington — had been
fired.
Legler was disappointed but
eventually was cleared to return and,
rick.maese@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/sports
QUOTABLE
“I am proving,
time and time again,
there’s no wrong way
to be a woman.”
SERENA WILLIAMS,
tennis star, as part of her
voice-over during a
Nike commercial that debuted
during the Academy Awards
on Sunday night.
(Via Early Lead)
D I G ES T
PRO FOOTBALL
Andraychak.
Raiders release Smith
after latest incident
Smith has been on the
suspended list since November
2015 for violating the NFL’s
policy on substance abuse. The
Raiders had signed Smith to a
two-year contract before the
2016 season, but he never was
cleared by the league to return
from suspension.
Smith set an NFL record with
331/2 sacks his first two seasons
after being drafted in the first
round by the San Francisco 49ers
in 2011. . . .
The Dallas Cowboys placed
the franchise tag on DeMarcus
Lawrence, and the Pro Bowl
defensive end quickly signed the
one-year contract that
guarantees him $17.1 million in
2018.
The Cowboys had until
Tuesday to put the tag on
Lawrence, who can still sign a
long-term deal with the club. . . .
Veteran cornerback Antonio
Cromartie announced his
retirement from the NFL. An allpro with San Diego in 2007,
when he led the league with 10
interceptions, Cromartie played
in four Pro Bowls.
The Oakland Raiders released
pass rusher Aldon Smith on
Monday after his latest run-in
with the law.
The Raiders retained Smith’s
contractual rights even as he
spent the past two seasons on the
NFL’s suspended list. But the
team decided finally to cut ties
one day after San Francisco
police said authorities were
searching for Smith in
connection with a domestic
violence allegation.
San Francisco police said
Monday an arrest warrant has
been obtained for Smith
stemming from allegations that
Smith assaulted a woman
Saturday night. Smith left before
police arrived to respond to the
911 call and authorities are
working with Smith’s attorney to
arrange a time for him to
surrender.
Smith is facing misdemeanor
charges of willful infliction of
corporal injury, assault with
force likely to produce great
bodily injury, false
imprisonment and vandalism,
according to Sgt. Michael
SOCCER
Nemanja Matic scored a
stunning long-range goal in
ADREES LATIF/REUTERS
Former Bullets guard Tim Legler honored his infant daughter after he won the
NBA All-Star Weekend’s three-point shootout in 1996: “For you, little Lauren.”
despite not appearing in a game before
the all-star break, participated in the
three-point shootout. He lost to Kerr in
the finals. Bothered by nagging
injuries, Legler was limited to 15 games
in the second half of the season and
shot only 28 percent from three-point
range. After two more injury-plagued
seasons with Washington, he was
traded to the Orlando Magic with Ben
Wallace, Terry Davis and Jeff McInnis
for Ike Austin. He retired after being
waived by the Golden State Warriors
three days after his 33rd birthday in
December 1999.
While working toward his master’s
degree
at
the
University
of
Pennsylvania’s Wharton School in
2000, Legler accepted a job as a studio
analyst at ESPN. That same year,
Lauren played her first organized
basketball game. The game was in
Lauren’s genes; Jennifer still holds the
career scoring record at New Jersey’s
Middle Township High and was a
captain of the women’s basketball team
at La Salle, where she met Tim. It didn’t
take long for Lauren to graduate from
the Little Tikes hoop in their house.
“She was really tall at a young age,”
Legler said. “She was a head taller than
like every kid in her class by age 9. At
one point, I was thinking we’re going to
have a 6-footer on our hands who can
shoot. Hey, U-Conn.”
Tim and Jennifer, who divorced in
2002, both spent time coaching
Lauren’s travel and AAU teams. Tim
typically
commuted
to
ESPN
headquarters in Bristol, Conn., early in
the week so he could be home for games
on the weekends. He also coached son
Ryan’s AAU team, often resulting in
back-to-back practices in the same gym.
“They put me in the preschool
league, and ever since then I fell in love
with it,” said Lauren, who stopped
growing five inches shy of 6 feet. “It was
never like pushing me to do it. It was
natural. It was something that I feel like
bonded us. Me and my dad would go to
the gym all the time together to shoot
and work out. It’s just something that
we’ve always had, that bond.”
That bond contributed to the
homesickness Lauren felt as a
freshman at Division III McDaniel
College in Westminster, Md. During her
first couple of months at college, she
made the four-hour drive home to
South Jersey to visit her parents and
boyfriend every chance she got.
After Lauren took her last exam of
her first semester, she transferred to
Neumann, a more manageable twohour drive from home, and was
practicing with the team the following
day. Lauren scored 16 points in her
Neumann debut, which Legler followed
on his iPad. Earlier this year, Tim and
Jennifer were in the stands when
Lauren, who averaged 11.1 points as a
senior and is No. 3 on the school’s alltime three-pointers made list, scored
the 1,000th point of her career.
“She’s got a lot to look back on and be
proud of,” Legler said. “Most important
to me, she was a 4.0 student and made
the all-conference academic team four
times.”
scott.allen@washpost.com
Miami at Washington » NBC Sports Washington, WFED (1500 AM)
Houston at Oklahoma City » TNT
New Orleans at Los Angeles Clippers » TNT
Detroit at Boston » NBC Sports Network
Washington at Anaheim » NBC Sports Network, NBCSW, WJFK (106.7 FM)
MLB SPRING TRAINING
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Houston (split squad) at Washington » MASN
Houston (split squad) at New York Mets » MLB Network
Colorado at Seattle » MLB Network
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Noon
2 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
9 p.m.
9 p.m.
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/sports
Northeast Conference, final: LIU-Brooklyn vs. Wagner » ESPN2
ACC, first round: Syracuse vs. Wake Forest » ESPNU, WDCA (Ch. 20)
West Coast, final: teams TBD » ESPN, WTEM (980 AM)
Summit League, final: South Dakota vs. South Dakota State » ESPN2
WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
NHL
7 p.m.
10 p.m.
Just two months before the
most anticipated boxing match of
the year, Canelo Alvarez has tested
positive for the performance-enhancing drug Clenbuterol. But the
May 5 rematch between Alvarez
and Gennady Golovkin could still
be on track.
“I think we’re all hopeful the
fight can still go on, but I can’t
really comment until we have
more details,” Tom Loeffler,
Golovkin’s promoter, said in an
interview Monday.
According to Alvarez’s promoter, Golden Boy Promotions, Alvarez tested positive for “trace levels”
of the drug, which is often used to
treat asthma but is on the World
Anti-Doping Agency’s list of
banned substances because it also
helps burn fat and build muscle.
The amount was consistent, the
promoter said, with “meat contamination that has impacted
dozens of athletes in Mexico over
the last years.”
“As Daniel Eichner, Director of
SMRTL, the WADA-accredited lab
that conducted the tests stated in
his letter today, ‘These values are
all within the range of what is
expected from meat contamination,’ ” Golden Boy said in a statement.
Alvarez actually failed two drug
tests, one Feb. 17 and another Feb.
20, according to Bob Bennett, the
executive director of the Nevada
State Athletic Commission.
Bennett said the positive tests
automatically triggered an independent investigation by the
state’s governing body for the
sport. While Bennett said it’s too
early to speculate on possible outcomes and any potential repercussions that Alvarez might face, Bennett said investigators would take
into consideration whether Alvarez intentionally used the drug or if
he might have accidentally ingested bad meat.
Loeffler said the boxers have
been undergoing regular testing
for the past month. Loeffler said
he had just heard the news earlier
Monday and wasn’t sure what
needed to happen for the fight to
continue as planned.
“It’s never a good thing when
there’s a positive test,” he said,
“but we’re going to rely on the
athletic commission and the sanctioning bodies.”
Loeffler said because Golovkin
(37-0-1, 33 KOs) is such a hard
puncher, the 35-year-old has always lobbied for strict testing to
ensure a level playing field. “That’s
what these tests are for,” the promoter said.
In a statement, Alvarez (49-1-2,
34 KOs) said he planned to immediately move his training camp
from Mexico to the United States.
“I am an athlete who respects
the sport, and this surprises me
and bothers me because it had
never happened to me,” he said.
rick.maese@washpost.com
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/
dcsportsbog
TELEVISION AND RADIO
NBA
7 p.m.
8 p.m.
10:30 p.m.
R ICK M AESE
Horizon League, final: Green Bay vs. Wright State » ESPNU
Summit League, final: South Dakota vs. South Dakota State » ESPNU
West Coast, final: Gonzaga vs. San Diego » ESPNU
AAC, final, Connecticut vs. South Florida » ESPN2
Big East, final, DePaul vs. Marquette » Fox Sports 1
TENNIS
2 p.m.
ATP: Indian Wells, qualifying » Tennis Channel
SOCCER
ACC, first round: Boston College vs. Georgia Tech » ESPN2, WDCA (Ch. 20)
ACC, first round: Notre Dame vs. Pittsburgh » ESPN2, WDCA (Ch. 20)
CAA, final: Northeastern vs. Charleston » CBS Sports Network, WTEM (980
AM)
Horizon League, final: Wright State vs. Cleveland State » ESPN
injury time as Manchester
United came from two goals
down to beat Crystal Palace, 3-2,
in a Premier League game.
The win lifted United back
into second place, above
Liverpool, in the race for
Champions League qualification
behind runaway leader
Manchester City.
Matic collected a loose ball
from about 25 meters out and
sent a dipping shot into the
corner for his first goal for
United, adding to strikes from
Chris Smalling and Romelu
Lukaku at Selhurst Park. . . .
American forward Charlie
Davies, whose career was
Noon
2 p.m.
4 p.m.
5 p.m.
7 p.m.
derailed by a car crash in 2009, is
retiring from soccer at age 31.
Davies scored four goals in 17
appearances for the United
States before he was a passenger
in a car crash on the George
Washington Memorial Parkway
in northern Virginia on Oct. 13,
2009, that killed another
passenger and left him with
serious injuries. The driver was
found to be drunk and pleaded
guilty to involuntary
manslaughter.
Loaned from the French club
Sochaux to D.C. United, Davies
returned to first-team soccer
March 19, 2011, with a pair of
goals against Columbus. He went
2:30 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
UEFA Champions League, round of 16, second leg:
Real Madrid at Paris Saint-Germain » Fox Sports 1
UEFA Champions League, round of 16, second leg:
Porto at Liverpool » Fox Sports 2
back to Sochaux but played just
two matches in 2011-12, then
moved to Denmark’s Randers for
2012-13 and the New England
Revolution from 2013 to 2015.
He spent the past two seasons
with the Philadelphia Union. . . .
The Ohio Attorney General
and the city of Columbus are
suing MLS and the owner of the
Columbus Crew to stop a
proposed move to Austin.
The lawsuit cites a law enacted
after the original Cleveland
Browns moved to Baltimore in
1996 that prohibits sports teams
that have received public money
from moving unless certain
conditions are met.
CYCLING
Bradley Wiggins said he is
the subject of a “malicious”
attempt to smear his name as he
strongly denied accusations
from British lawmakers that he
used banned substances to
enhance his performance while
preparing to win the 2012 Tour
de France.
Wiggins said triamcinolone
“wasn’t a medication that was
abused in order to gain an
advantage,” but instead one to
treat a medical condition —
asthma — that he said he had
diagnosed in 2003.
— From news services
and staff reports
TUESDAY, MARCH 6 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
M2
NHL ROUNDUP
Schultz’s goal gives Pittsburgh victory
PENGUINS 4,
FLAMES 3 (OT)
A SSOCIATED P RESS
NICK WASS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Braden Holtby got his first win in nearly a month with Washington’s 5-2 victory over Toronto on Saturday.
Holtby ends career-worst stretch
CAPITALS FROM D1
the worst stretch of his career.
“You always know that at some
time adversity is going to come,”
Holtby said last week. “You try to
fight it off for as long as you can,
and sometimes it’s inevitable. It’s
going to happen, and it’s just how
you react to it and how you can
build. That’s how we’ve had so
much success in the last few years,
the adversity that we went
through before that.”
As Trotz repeatedly defended
his top goalie, he compared it to a
star forward who might be in a
scoring slump and the coach opting to stick with the struggling
player because of his history of
success. Two days of practices
helped Holtby “reset,” as Trotz put
it, but windy conditions forced
the Capitals and Maple Leafs to
cancel outdoor skates in Annapolis, so the first time Holtby got a
feel for the new rink was in warmups 30 minutes before puck
drop. Trotz trusted Holtby’s experience in that less-than-ideal
situation of adjusting to unfamiliar depth perception on the fly.
Playing behind a team that has
allowed 32.4 shots on goal per
game this season, up from 27.8 a
year ago, Holtby has a .908 save
percentage and a 3.00 goals
against average this season, the
worst numbers of his career. Earlier in the season, Holtby’s strong
play had kept the Capitals afloat
in the standings, especially as the
team weathered injuries. But as
Holtby had struggled throughout
February, No. 2 goaltender
C A P I TA L S ’ N EX T TH R EE
at Anaheim Ducks
Today
10 NBCSW,
NBCSN
at Los Angeles Kings
Thursday
10:30 NBCSW
at San Jose Sharks
Saturday
4 NBCSW
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM)
Philipp Grubauer was playing behind the same roster — and with a
.933 save percentage and a 1.63
goals against average.
“Holts hasn’t lost a lot of games
in a row since I’ve been here,”
Trotz said. “And it’s difficult because you’re going into uncharted
waters and you’re wondering if it’s
you, if it’s the team. You’re looking
for answers, and sometimes the
answers are just right there.
You’ve got to just dial yourself in,
don’t doubt yourself, and also just
go out and almost steal one. But
[he] didn’t have to. I thought the
team responded real well in front
of him.”
Trotz often refers to goaltenders as the ultimate “erasers” for
their teammates, but the inverse
might have been true early in
Saturday’s game against Toronto.
Within a minute of the puck deflecting off Hyman’s skate, captain Alex Ovechkin scored to restore a Capitals lead. When
Nazem Kadri took advantage of a
screen in front of Holtby 7:22 into
the second period, sneaking a
puck in between Holtby and the
post, Washington defenseman
John Carlson scored just 43 seconds later, again taking some
pressure off Holtby.
Earlier in the season, it had
been Grubauer who was on the
wrong end of some unfortunate
bounces and some sloppy play in
front of him. He lost his first six
starts and was not in net for a win
until Nov. 24. Even though he was
largely playing well during that
stretch, he still ruminated on
what he could change or improve
after every game.
“I don’t think I’d ever had a
stretch like that,” Grubauer said.
“I don’t think Holts has ever had a
stretch like that. If you look at
that, you only get better from
making mistakes. Nobody’s perfect, and nobody plays a perfect
game for 82 games. It doesn’t
happen as a forward, and it
doesn’t happen for a goalie. I used
it as motivation. A lot of guys, they
get down on themselves, and
maybe their focus shifts a little
bit. But you’ve got to stay focused
and have a strong mental game.
You learn from the tough times.”
Said Holtby: “Mentally, you just
want to get back to not thinking,
just playing again. Focus on the
basics that way because it’s really
not that far off of where we want
to be. So it’s one of those situations that feels really bad, but it’s
really not as bad as it seems. It’s
not far off. It’s just a little tweak
here or there in a game and those
losses turn into wins.”
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
Wizards look to get Beal some rest
WIZARDS FROM D1
especially if it’s not a national
televised game. Those games are
different because it seems like
there are 10-minute timeouts. But
I think he’s comfortable with 37 to
38. [I] try to keep him at 36, but
we’re only talking about a few
minutes. Everybody’s tired. If you
play hard, you should be tired. . . .
It’s just part of playing hard. It’s
part of being on a good team. It’s
part of being in a winning environment.”
Even so, this environment is
seemingly placing Beal in precarious situations.
The Wizards had 11 available
players Sunday, including three
point guards: Tomas Satoransky,
Tim Frazier and Ramon Sessions.
Satoransky, the starter in place of
Wall, dealt with foul trouble and
didn’t play a minute in the fourth
quarter. Frazier checked out before four minutes had passed in
the final frame. Sessions, an 11year ballhandling veteran, didn’t
play for the sixth straight game.
That left Beal, a natural shooting guard, to play the lead guard
role for the final 8:22. Early in that
stretch, Beal appeared fine —
dishing two of his career-high 11
assists and nailing a step-back
jumper. But he finished the game
with two costly turnovers and five
straight misses from the field, including the potential game-tying
shot in the final seconds.
“I can do a better job of finding
some minutes late in the third
quarter or early fourth to find him
a five-minute break,” Brooks said
Monday.
Judging from Brooks’s background — an undrafted grinder in
the late 1980s who crafted a decade-long NBA career because he
outworked and cared more than
other players — he may seem to
have an unsympathetic ear if a
player dares to mention being
tired. Even last year, while speaking
generally
about
the
leaguewide trend of resting play-
ALEX BRANDON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Bradley Beal struggled at the
end of Sunday’s loss to Indiana.
WIZ ARDS’ NEX T THREE
vs. Miami Heat
Today
7 NBCSW
at New Orleans Pelicans
Friday
8 NBCSW, NBATV
at Miami Heat
Saturday
7:30 NBCSW
Radio: WFED (1500 AM)
ers late in the season, Brooks was
blunt.
“There’s certain cases and certain examples and certain players
that probably need it. But that’s
very rare in my opinion,” he said at
the time. “You’re talking basketball. It’s 32 minutes a night. This is
not hard work. This is fun. Rest, to
me, rest is a good night sleep.”
Brooks does monitor minutes
— but in another way. Brooks and
his staff place credence in a player’s overall load and will rest starters such as Beal and Otto Porter Jr.
in practices and shoot-arounds.
This practice in limiting the load,
not just game minutes, is backed
up by Tim Gabbett, an applied
sport scientist based in Australia.
“One of the biggest misconceptions around load management is
that it always means athletes play-
ing fewer minutes . . . rather than
obsessing over playing minutes,
perhaps we should focus more on
the quality and quantity of training that is performed in preparation for those minutes,” Gabbett
wrote in a recent article on his
website.
On Monday, Brooks reiterated
the team’s practice of limiting a
player on days off so he will perform his best in games.
“We’ve found ways to be more
efficient in practice without putting a lot of wear and tear and
heavy loads on the bodies. That
factors in, the shoot-arounds factor in, the days off factor in, but it’s
easy for people to look at just the
minutes. But everything is all part
of the pie,” Brooks said. “It’s just
not the game minutes. But there
are going to be nights where you
have to [play a lot]. We were down
17.”
Washington indeed trailed 8063 in the closing seconds of the
third quarter of Sunday’s game.
Beal had played all 12 minutes of
the third, and the lingering deficit
kept him on the floor from the
start of the fourth until the final
buzzer.
Without Wall, Beal remains the
team’s best play-creating and
shot-making option. And though
Brooks put the onus on himself in
“doing a better job” to clear up
minutes, the fact remains: If Beal
didn’t get rest during the all-star
break, he’s not going to get much
coming up.
Note: The team signed Sessions to a second 10-day contract
Monday.
The backup point guard has not
played in any of Washington’s six
games since he was signed Feb. 23.
“He hasn’t played but he gives
us the ability if we need an extra
point guard, ballhandler, playmaker on the floor, we will have
him,” Brooks said. “We have him
for 10 more days. My job is to try
and find him some minutes, see if
he’s the guy that can help the rest
of the way.”
candace.buckner@washpost.com
Mike Sullivan would love to
point to a coaching tactic or strategy that explains why the Pittsburgh Penguins are so good in
overtime.
Only Sullivan can’t. He has
been coaching long enough to
know that when there are just six
men on the ice and his team happens to have one of the most gifted
offensive groups in the NHL, it’s
best to just get out of the way.
“For the most part, it’s really
just about great players making
great plays, and when our guys
have the puck, they’re dynamic,”
Sullivan said.
The latest proof came midway
through the extra period Monday
night when Phil Kessel drew the
Calgary Flames’ Jon Gillies away
from the net and slipped a crossice pass to Justin Schultz, who
buried it to give the Penguins a 4-3
victory. Schultz’s fourth goal of the
season helped the two-time defending Stanley Cup champions
improve to 10-1 at home in overtime this season.
“We’ve got the players that are
so good out there with that much
ice, so we enjoy it,” Schultz said.
Evgeni Malkin scored his
37th goal for the Penguins and
added an assist. Kris Letang and
Chad Ruhwedel also scored for
Pittsburgh. The Penguins pulled
within one point of the Washington Capitals for first in the crowd-
ed Metropolitan Division. Tristan
Jarry had 35 saves, including a
breakaway stop on Calgary’s Johnny Gaudreau early in overtime.
Mark Giordano, Mikael Backlund and Troy Brouwer scored for
the Flames, who outplayed the
Penguins for long stretches before
dropping their fourth straight
game. Gillies stopped 28 shots but
had no chance when Kessel slid a
cross-ice pass to a wide-open
Schultz.
SABRES 5, MAPLE LEAFS
3: Ryan O’Reilly and Zemgus Gir-
gensons scored 2:05 apart in the
second period in Buffalo’s home
victory over Toronto, which lost
its fourth straight.
Sam Reinhart, Jason Pominville and Johan Larsson also
scored for the Sabres. Rasmus Ristolainen had two assists on consecutive shots from the right point
that were deflected in during the
opening four minutes.
Buffalo improved to 7-5-2 in its
past 14 games, a stretch in which
the Eastern Conference’s lastplace team continues playing havoc with playoff contenders.
Leo Komarov had two goals
and Mitch Marner also scored for
the Maple Leafs. Toronto dropped
to 0-2-2 in its past four to match its
longest skid of the season.
SENATORS 3, STARS 2
(OT): Erik Karlsson scored on a
breakaway with 2:19 left in overtime, and visiting Ottawa beat
Dallas.
Karlsson picked up a loose puck
after a missed Stars opportunity
and beat goalie Kari Lehtonen.
Dallas goalie Ben Bishop left
because of a lower-body injury
after making 12 saves in the first
period. Lehtonen replaced Bishop
and had 15 saves.
Ottawa’s Craig Anderson made
31 saves.
Dallas’s Tyler Seguin scored
twice, including with 1:02 left in
the third period to tie it.
Two Canadiens out injured
Montreal Canadiens forward
Max Pacioretty and defenseman
Victor Mete will miss several weeks
as they recover from injuries.
Both players were injured Friday in Montreal’s 6-3 win over the
New York Islanders. Pacioretty,
the Canadiens’ captain, suffered a
knee injury and is expected to
miss four to six weeks. Mete suffered a fractured finger and is
expected to be out six weeks.
WILD: Minnesota rookie forward Luke Kunin is out for the rest
of the season with a torn anterior
cruciate ligament in his left knee.
The Wild announced that
Kunin suffered the tear during
Sunday’s 4-1 win at Detroit. He is
expected to have surgery in the
coming weeks and return to play
in about seven months.
BLUES: Free-falling St. Louis
will be without defenseman Jay
Bouwmeester for the rest of the
season with a left hip injury.
General Manager Doug Armstrong said Bouwmeester will be
sidelined four to six months and
that forward Scottie Upshall will
be re-evaluated in four weeks after suffering a knee injury.
St. Louis has lost eight of its
past 10 games to fall out of a
playoff position in the Western
Conference.
NBA ROUNDUP
Bogdanovic sets the pace for Indiana
PACERS 92,
BUCKS 89
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Bojan Bogdanovic tied his season high with 29 points and
grabbed a key jump ball late to lift
the host Indiana Pacers over the
Milwaukee Bucks, 92-89, on Monday night.
Milwaukee’s Khris Middleton
stole Victor Oladipo’s pass with 10
seconds left and Indiana leading
90-89. He rushed to the basket,
but Cory Joseph chased him down
and got a hand on the basketball
before Middleton could attempt a
shot. The ball rolled out of bounds,
and referees called a jump ball
after video replay. Bogdanovic
came down with the tip off the
jump ball and added a pair of free
throws with six seconds left.
Thaddeus Young had 10 points
and seven rebounds, and Oladipo
finished with 14 points, five assists
and five rebounds along with 10
turnovers.
After Bogdanovic’s free throws,
Milwaukee had a chance to tie it,
but Giannis Antetokounmpo’s
three-pointer hit the front of the
rim as time expired.
Antetokounmpo had 18 points
and 12 rebounds. Eric Bledsoe led
the Bucks with 26 points.
CAVALIERS 112, PISTONS
90: LeBron James scored 31
points before taking a seat on the
bench, Larry Nance Jr. reached
career highs with 22 points and 15
rebounds in his first start for
Cleveland, and the host Cavaliers
closed a disappointing five-game
homestand on a positive note with
a win over Detroit, which hasn’t
won on the road in nearly two
months.
With Cleveland missing three
big men — all-star Kevin Love,
Tristan Thompson and Jeff Green
— because of injuries, the Cavs
needed someone to step up and
Nance came through. Wearing the
same No. 22 his father had retired
by Cleveland, the 25-year-old
Nance had the best game of his
young career.
Blake Griffin scored 25 to lead
Detroit, which has lost nine
straight away from home, where it
hasn’t won since Jan. 10.
HEAT 125, SUNS 103: Hassan Whiteside had 24 points and
14 rebounds, Goran Dragic scored
17 and Miami moved into the No. 7
spot in the Eastern Conference by
topping visiting Phoenix.
Whiteside had his highest-scoring game since Jan. 29, making 10
of his 13 shots. He averaged only
12.2 points on 48 percent shooting
in his most recent 12 games.
Kelly Olynyk scored 15 points
for the Heat, which gave four of its
starters — Whiteside included —
the entire fourth quarter off and
beat the Suns for the 18th time in
their last 20 meetings.
Dwyane Wade, Josh Richardson, Justise Winslow and Luke
Babbitt each had 12 for the Heat,
which had seven players in double
figures.
Miami is now five games clear
of No. 9 Detroit in the East, both
with 18 games remaining.
CELTICS 105, BULLS 89:
Jaylen Brown scored 21 points,
and Boston pounded Chicago at
United Center even though Kyrie
Irving sat out with a sore knee.
Even without their all-star
guard, the Celtics took control
right from the start and led by 37
en route to their fifth win in six
games.
Jayson Tatum added 14 points,
while Al Horford and Terry Rozier
scored 13 apiece for Boston.
The Bulls lost for the 14th time
in 17 games. Denzel Valentine
scored 20 points and nailed four
three-pointers for Chicago, but
that was about the only positive
for the Bulls.
This one got out of hand almost
as soon as the opening tip. After
losing to the NBA-leading Rockets
on Saturday by three points, Boston led 55-29 at halftime.
SPURS, 100, GRIZZLIES
98: Tony Parker had 23 points,
sparking San Antonio to a needed
victory over Memphis before embarking on a difficult road trip.
Memphis has lost 14 straight,
but San Antonio’s recent skid has
had a greater impact on the Western Conference playoff picture.
The Spurs had dropped eight of 10
and fallen from third to sixth in
the crowded West, putting them at
risk of missing the postseason for
the first time in 21 years.
San Antonio moved up a spot to
fifth place ahead of Minnesota
with the victory.
JAZZ 94, MAGIC 80: Rudy
Gobert had 21 points and 17 rebounds to lead host Utah over
Orlando.
Gobert made 9 of 10 attempts,
mixing in a jumper with mostly
dunks and one-handers around
the rim.
Donovan Mitchell scored 19
points and Joe Ingles added 18
points, eight assists and seven rebounds for the Jazz, which has
won three in a row and 15 of 17, but
sits 11/2 games outside the eighth
playoff spot in the Western Conference.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 6 , 2018
baseball
NOTES
Rangers’ Beltre starts his spring training by getting hits in first two at-bats
F ROM NEWS SERVICES
Held out of the Texas Rangers’
first 10 spring training games,
Adrian Beltre got hits in his first
two at-bats of spring training.
“Last year, I didn’t get a hit in
spring training,” Beltre said Monday in Surprise, Ariz. “How did
that work?”
Beltre hit .312 with 17 homers
and 71 RBI in 94 games last year
after going 0 for 12 with four walks
during the exhibition season. He
opened last season on the disabled
list with a right calf injury, injured
an ankle in July and went on the
disabled list again after pulling his
left hamstring Aug. 31.
“What happened last year with
my injuries was not fun, so they
wanted to make sure to take my
time, take it slow,” said Beltre, who
turns 39 on April 7.
Beltre hit .161 (15 for 93) in his
previous three spring trainings.
He singled in the first inning
against San Francisco’s Ty Blach
on Monday, then doubled leading
off the fourth and was removed for
a pinch runner.
“All I need is 10 days,” Beltre
said.
After sinking to a 78-84 record
last season, the Rangers hope a
healthy Beltre will help spark a
turnaround.
CUBS: Chicago ace Jon Lester
is trying a new approach when it
comes to his biggest weakness.
One bounce at a time.
Lester is working with new
third base coach Brian Butterfield
on bouncing his throw to the bases
when he has to make a play on
defense. He got a chance to use the
technique during Sunday’s 2-0
loss to Arizona in spring training,
and the ball skipped past minor
league first baseman Efren Navarro for an error.
Lester has struggled with
throwing to bases for years, but
the three-time World Series win-
ner remains one of the game’s
most effective pitchers. The lefthander, 34, is slated to start Opening Day on March 29 at Miami. . . .
In other Cubs news, Yu Darvish
— the highest-priced free agent
pitcher signed this winter — will
make his Chicago debut Tuesday
against his former team, the Los
Angeles Dodgers.
Darvish was supposed to pitch
in a spring game Thursday, but the
Cubs were worried about dehydration as Darvish had been battling stomach problems. Instead,
he threw a bullpen session and
then took batting practice.
Darvish won’t bat Tuesday, but he
should throw for two or three innings.
The Cubs signed Darvish to a
six-year, $126 million deal.
MARINERS: Ichiro Suzuki
was nearing a return Monday to
Seattle, which was working to finalize an agreement with the former franchise icon, ESPN reported.
USA Today Sports first reported
that Ichiro and the Mariners were
close to a one-year major league
deal.
Seattle announced earlier Monday that outfielder Ben Gamel will
miss four to six weeks with an
oblique injury, jeopardizing his
availability for Opening Day and
opening a potential roster spot for
Ichiro, 44.
Ichiro was a 10-time all-star
with the Mariners from 2001 to
2012. He became a free agent when
Miami declined his $2 million
club option for 2018.
METS: Oft-injured New York
right-hander Matt Harvey allowed
two hits over a pair of scoreless
innings against Detroit in Port St.
Lucie, Fla., in his second spring
training appearance.
“I was pleased with putting up
zeroes,” the 28-year-old said.
An all-star who started the 2013
game at the Mets’ Citi Field, Harvey has struggled since tearing the
ulnar collateral ligament in his
pitching elbow that August.
He wound up 5-7 with a
6.70 ERA last year, when he was
sidelined from mid-June until
September because of a stress
fracture in his scapula, which connects the arm with the collarbone.
RED SOX: David Price and
the rest of the Boston staff are
learning a whole new pitch this
spring.
Price faced Red Sox minor
leaguers on a back field in Fort
Myers, Fla., in his first camp outing, throwing three innings under
controlled circumstances.
“It’s different than any other
spring trainings,” he said. “Easing
into it has been great.”
Price expects to make his
Grapefruit League debut Saturday
against Minnesota.
The American League East
champions are slowly bringing
along Price, 32. But it’s not because
of the injury to his left elbow that
sidelined him in 2017, when he
made just 11 starts and went 6-3
with a 3.38 ERA.
New Manager Alex Cora and
first-year pitching coach Dana LeVangie are monitoring the spring
workload for some of their starting pitchers.
One of the new rules, Price said,
is that when pitchers throw bullpen sessions, they aren’t responsible for other activities that day,
such as pitchers’ fielding practice
and side drills.
RAYS: Tampa Bay traded infielder Ryan Schimpf to Atlanta
for a player to be named or cash.
The Rays announced the deal
two days after Schimpf was designated for assignment to clear
room on the 40-man roster for free
agent outfielder Carlos Gomez,
who signed a one-year, $4 million
contract.
Tampa Bay acquired Schimpf in
December from San Diego for a
minor league prospect.
N A TI O N A L S N O TE S
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/nationals
Top pick Romero sent
home for violation
The Nationals sent 2017 firstround pick Seth Romero home
from spring training for
violating a club policy, according
to a club spokesman. Romero, 21,
did not violate an MLB policy —
just an organizational one — but
no further information about the
cause of his suspension was
immediately available.
The Nationals picked Romero
25th overall in the 2017 draft,
eschewing a long-honed policy of
avoiding players with off-field
issues in favor of taking the most
talented arm available. The hardthrowing lefty, who some within
the organization felt could be
major league-ready as early as
this season, was kicked off his
team at the University of
Houston for a variety of offenses,
including a failed drug test, a
picture taken in uniform with
drug paraphernalia and a
fistfight. At the time of the pick,
General Manager Mike Rizzo
said he made clear to Romero
that the Nationals were not
afraid to send him home after a
misstep.
Romero finished last season in
short-season Class A ball in the
New York-Penn League. He
pitched to a 4.91 ERA in 22
innings, showcasing a mid-90s
fastball and a slider, as well as an
in-progress change-up and
curveball. The organization
reported no disciplinary issues
with Romero during his first
professional half-season, and his
coaches with the Auburn
Doubledays said he was just one
of the guys. Though minor
league camp officially begins this
week, Romero arrived early with
a group of more advanced minor
leaguers, many of whom have
appeared in major league
Grapefruit League games over
the last two weeks. Romero had
not appeared.
Baseball America rated
Romero as the fifth-best
prospect in the Nationals system
and the best pitching prospect
behind Erick Fedde, who made
his major league debut last
season. The Nationals have been
short on left-handed pitching
and traded a few lower-level lefthanded prospects in deals for
Brandon Kintzler and Howie
Kendrick last summer. The
duration of Romero’s exile is not
yet clear.
Jeff Passan of Yahoo Sports
first reported Romero was sent
home.
Taylor is a late scratch
Two hours before the Nationals
were scheduled to start their
game against the St. Louis
Cardinals on Monday afternoon
in Jupiter, Fla., Manager Dave
Martinez wandered into the
Nationals’ clubhouse and
delivered a message to Andrew
Stevenson. Stevenson started
packing his bag for the bus ride
from West Palm Beach to Jupiter,
a trip he hadn’t intended to
make.
Michael A. Taylor had been
scheduled to make that trip, to
hit third and start in center field.
He was a late scratch with what
the Nationals called “mild right
side tightness,” which he
revealed to Nationals coaches
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Monday morning after swinging
in the batting cage. Taylor missed
a month of the 2017 season with
a right oblique strain. “Right
side” basically equates to “right
oblique,” and oblique injuries
generally equate to “four to six
weeks.” But no one with the
Nationals has shared a prognosis
like that for Taylor yet.
“We aren’t going to take any
chances with it right now; just
take him out and let him heal up,
get better, and see where it goes,”
Martinez said. “I’ll know more
probably [Tuesday].”
While Stevenson replaced
Taylor in the lineup in the short
term, any long-term injury could
open the door for Victor Robles.
Martinez and Rizzo have made
their stances on Robles clear:
Wherever he plays, he must be
able to play every day. The
Nationals’ initial outfield plans
included Taylor in center, Adam
Eaton in left and Bryce Harper in
right. Eaton has not yet played in
a spring training game, and as of
Monday morning, Martinez
indicated he wouldn’t do so
anytime soon.
While the Nationals have
capable short-term options in
Brian Goodwin, Matt Reynolds
and even Kendrick, any longterm absence of either Eaton or
Taylor could prompt them to give
Robles a chance. Since being
called up last September, the 20year-old has played unafraid and
unabashed — and looked
entirely ready for a full-time
opportunity.
Stevenson hit his first home
run of the spring Monday as
Robles started in center field in
Taylor’s place in the Nationals’
2-1 loss to the Cardinals.
— Chelsea Janes
DENIS POROY/GETTY IMAGES
Miguel Montero won a World Series with the Cubs in 2016 before he was let go by the club last season.
Montero may fill crucial role at catcher
NATIONALS FROM D1
waited in the catching wings
through Jose Lobaton’s tenure,
through Derek Norris’s brief stay
and Matt Wieters’s arrival, too.
If he doesn’t show himself capable, that could spur the Nationals
to push harder on Miami Marlins
catcher J.T. Realmuto. So far, Miami’s asking price has not dipped
below Victor Robles, which is not
a price the Nationals are willing to
pay. Jonathan Lucroy is the best
unsigned free agent catcher,
though a person familiar with the
Nationals’ thinking said they have
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not considered him as an option.
“You think about [how] you’re
going to have a legit opportunity
to compete for a spot, and I was
willing to do that. That’s why I
accepted [the Nationals’ offer],”
Montero said. “[Rizzo] just told
me it was a legitimate opportunity.”
Montero didn’t have many of
those this offseason. Like so many
other established veterans, interest was low — so low that he
considered staying home with his
son. He decided he wouldn’t announce his retirement or anything, as that would have ended
things for good. But he was willing
to wait, or not play at all, if the
game pushed him that direction.
He hit .216 with a .656 on-baseplus-slugging percentage over 76
games with the Cubs and Blue
Jays in 2017. He knew he wouldn’t
be any team’s first catching option.
But Rizzo gave him the chance,
one that could reunite him with
Nationals Manager Dave Martinez, who was previously the
bench coach in Chicago. Montero’s Cubs tenure ended in relative
disgrace after the Nationals stole
seven bases in four innings
against Montero and Jake Arrieta
last summer. Montero, known for
speaking his mind, publicly
blamed Arrieta for the trouble.
Anthony Rizzo called him “selfish.” The Cubs released him the
next day.
“He speaks his mind, and I’m
okay with that,” Martinez said.
“He’s a great teammate. He really
is. Regardless of what happened.
That’s all forgotten about.”
Montero started behind the
plate in Monday’s 2-1 Grapefruit
League loss to the St. Louis Cardinals, by which time he had accumulated more at-bats than Wieters, Severino or any of the other
catchers on the Nationals’ spring
training roster. He went 0 for 2
and is now 2 for 12 this spring,
though exactly how much he
would need to show the Nationals
offensively is not yet clear. Severino is 3 for 10. The samples are
small, and any conclusions drawn
from them are untrustworthy.
Meanwhile, Montero caught
Tanner Roark for the third time
Monday, and Roark’s eyes lit up
when asked about throwing to
him through his four one-hit innings.
“I like the way he calls the game.
He’s been around the game a long
time. He knows a lot of these
guys,” Roark said. “It’s great when
he calls the pitch, and that’s exact-
ly the pitch that you’re thinking. It
makes you that much more confident you’re going to get this guy
out.”
Montero laughed when asked
about what his strengths are these
days, 12 years into a career that’s
included a World Series title.
“None?” he responded, as Wieters chuckled with him from the
locker next door. At this point,
Montero isn’t as agile as he once
was, and he doesn’t throw well at
all. Defensively, Severino is better.
But for a veteran pitching staff
like this one, experience yields
clout — and clout yields trust.
“What I like is he’s very intuitive. He calls a good game. He
handles a pitching staff well,”
Martinez said. “And knowing
Miguel, he’s a big-game player. He
loves big moments.”
This team can build for big
moments, and has for years now.
The Nationals build their bench
with an eye toward preserving
regulars for October — and with
an eye toward late-inning substitutions when they get there.
Montero hit the third pinch-hit
grand slam in MLB postseason
history. He is a left-handed bat
that can hit for power off the
bench. Severino has made a playoff roster, runs well and could
probably be relied on to hit .250 or
.260 with regular at-bats.
In Severino, the Nationals see
talent and energy. In Montero,
they see experience and instinct.
And while he has been assertive
with veteran starters, Montero
has been seen as much as heard in
the Nationals’ clubhouse, his locker buried deep in the back corner,
his body normally buried in a
chair with teammates around
him.
“Obviously, you don’t know all
personalities here. You’re trying
to learn in spring training, all
those personalities, so you can
help in one way or another,”
Montero said. “But right now, the
main focus is to make the team.”
Martinez and Rizzo have been
clear that they want to keep Wieters healthy, to set a games-played
target of 100 or so games for him
this season, a choice that leaves 60
or so games to whoever serves as
his backup. Besides a few spots in
the bullpen, and perhaps the fifth
starter’s role, the backup catcher’s
job is the most up-for-grabs on the
roster — and probably the most
intriguing position-player roster
battle the Nationals will watch
this spring. Montero will be a pivotal figure, one way or the other.
chelsea.janes@washpost.com
TUESDAY, MARCH 6 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D5
M2
Cardinals deal sign of things to come?
As labor chasm grows,
DeJong’s new extension
could represent a bridge
BY
DAVE SHEININ
jupiter, fla. — At first glance,
there was nothing remarkable
about the contract extension the
St. Louis Cardinals signed with
shortstop Paul DeJong and announced Monday. Locking up
talented young players well before free agency is both accepted
baseball economic strategy and a
Cardinals specialty, one they
have applied in recent years to
young stars such as Kolten
Wong, Matt Carpenter, Carlos
Martinez, Stephen Piscotty and
Allen Craig.
But a couple of things make
the DeJong contract with the
Cardinals unique — and make it
perhaps one worth studying for
the rest of the industry.
For one, DeJong, a 24-year-old
converted third baseman who
finished second to Cody Bellinger for National League rookie
of the year in 2017, didn’t make
his big league debut until last
May; thus, his six-year contract
worth a guaranteed $26 million
represents the biggest ever
signed by a player with less than
one full year of major league
service time — $1 million more
than the one signed last year by
Chicago White Sox shortstop
Tim Anderson.
The other unique aspect of the
DeJong deal, in relation to the
earlier ones the Cardinals have
signed with their young stars, is
the fact this one comes in the
midst of what appears to be an
industry-wide rethinking of the
concept of free agency — a shift
that has resulted in an unprecedented number of veteran players still available less than a
month before Opening Day, as
well as an uneasy labor atmosphere that shows no signs of
improving.
Given the fact that every
groundbreaking contract resets
the precedent for other such
deals, and given the larger context of this offseason’s strange
free agent market, it is worth
wondering whether the DeJong
deal, instead of being just a
unique case of one player and
one team motivated to make a
long-term commitment to each
other, could be seen as some sort
of template for a bridge between
the growing chasm between
what clubs and players are looking for.
Like all deals of this sort,
DeJong’s contract with the Cardinals gives both sides a sense of
security. DeJong will earn a lifechanging amount of money no
matter what happens with the
trajectory of his career, and the
Cardinals get cost certainty on
an asset that could appreciate in
value beyond what they are on
the hook to pay.
The six years of the deal
include all three of DeJong’s
arbitration-eligible
seasons,
while the Cardinals hold two
additional club options that cover his first two free agent seasons, when he will be 29 and
30 years old, and that could
reportedly push the total value to
$51.5 million.
One of the reasons for this
winter’s free agent slowdown is
the growing belief on the part of
analytics-driven front offices
that signing free agents to longterm deals well into their 30s is
generally a losing bet — because
players have typically either begun to decline by then, or will
soon.
But the Cardinals, in locking
up DeJong’s services through the
age of 30, get the entirety of his
prime — at what will likely be
regarded as bargain prices if he
performs as expected — without
having to pay for his decline
phase. And of course, depending
on DeJong’s performance and
value at the end of this deal —
and perhaps more importantly,
the state of the free agent market
at that point — he could still
strike it rich again.
Not surprisingly, none of the
principal parties in the DeJong
deal wanted to read into it
beyond what it signifies about
the relationship between one
team and one player.
“The situation between a player’s desires and a team’s desires
is so personal, it can only be seen
in individual terms,” said Burton
Rocks, DeJong’s agent. “There
was a strong desire here on both
sides to make something happen. You can’t predict trends [in
free agency].”
“Every case depends on both
sides being motivated to find
common ground,” Cardinals
General Manager Mike Girsch
told reporters. “In this case, we
wanted Paul around, and he
wanted to be around. I’m not
sure if this is the tipping point
for some change in the industry.”
“I don’t think [DeJong] was
looking at the free agent market
and worrying about where he
was going to be in six years.
That’s a really tough crystal ball,”
said John Mozeliak, the Cardinals’ president of baseball operations. “Now, if you’re looking at it
from the 50,000-foot view, could
we see more players being incentivized to do this? I don’t know
the answer.”
But Mozeliak, as the head of a
front office of a small-market,
mid-revenue team, did not deny
the lure of getting a player for the
entirety of his prime, but none of
his decline — when the alternative is finding a replacement
through free agency.
“This type of deal typically
gives a player that security and
gives the team protection from
[the question of ]: Where is that
cliff ?” Mozeliak said. “Smallmarket teams have always been
incentivized to secure their
homegrown talent because the
free agent market has never been
a great place for small- or midmarket teams to survive.”
dave.sheinin@washpost.com
JEFF ROBERSON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
St. Louis gave shortstop Paul DeJong a six-year, $26 million contract, locking him up for his prime.
MARYLAND HIGH SCHOOL WRESTLING CHAMPIONSHIPS
Podsednik earns a meaningful win
Leonardtown junior
dedicates state title
to his late friend
BY
J OSHUA N EEDELMAN
John Podsednik’s true love is
cheerleading. He wrestles because he is good at it, because he
says it gives him a pedestal to
“spread God’s word.”
The Leonardtown junior quit
wrestling when he was in sixth
grade, shortly after his best
friend committed suicide. Feeling depressed, he renewed his
relationship with religion. And
he realized the best way to honor
his friend’s memory was to compete in the sport that helped
forge their friendship, spreading
his faith to competitors and
teammates alike.
On Monday night, Podsednik
beat Old Mill’s Robbie Fleming,
7-0, in the 152-pound final at the
Maryland 4A/3A state championships at Show Place Arena in
Upper Marlboro, celebrating his
win with a corkscrew — a backflip performed on a 45-degree
angle. He said he didn't plan on
keeping his gold medal.
“I'm going to send it to [his
friend]’s dad,” said Podsednik,
one of five Raiders wrestlers to
place Monday night.
Damascus had a successful
evening competing in the 2A/1A
event for the first time since its
most recent reclassification,
placing seven wrestlers. Swarmin’ Hornets senior Ryan Lawrence won his second straight
individual title, beating Sparrows Point’s Skyler Minutelli,
11-3, at 145 pounds. Lawrence
admitted he expected more from
himself, though.
“I did what I needed to. I
definitely wanted to pin him, but
a win’s a win. I’m not going to
complain about it,” the senior
said. Johnny McLaughlin, a 126pound junior, also won a state
title for Damascus.
Huntingtown senior Tristin
Breen had a similarly tame reaction to his 4A/3A state title at
170 pounds.
In the wake of his 11-3 victory
over Linganore’s Michael Bromley, Breen pulled down the
straps of his light blue singlet,
strode over to a water cooler and
poured himself a cup.
Wake up to home delivery.
“That match took a lot out of
me,” Breen said, panting and
sweating and resting his hands
on his knees but not smiling.
Breen said he wrestles every
match as if he is competing for a
state championship, so the gravity of his win hadn’t sunk in
immediately afterward.
“Every match is just a match to
me,” he said.
Blake Jury also won a state
title for the Hurricanes at 113
pounds, beating North Hagerstown’s Tyler Cook, 10-1.
Huntingtown
145-pounder
Josh Stokes wasn’t as fortunate,
falling to Centennial junior Jason Kraisser, who earned his
third straight state championship. Bowie senior Nathaniel
White (132 pounds), Churchill
senior Jack Connolly (138
pounds), South River junior
Ka’Ron Lewis (285 pounds) and
Northwest senior Yonas Harris
(106 pounds) were the other local
wrestlers to win 4A/3A state
titles.
In 2A/1A, Glenelg crowned
two state champions — senior
Max Sotka (170 pounds) and
junior Jared Thomas (132
pounds).
joshua.needelman@washpost.com
1-800-753-POST
SF
NICK WASS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Stephen Curry’s rise to being an NBA shooting star has altered basketball, even at the high school level.
Changes to the game go deep
CURRY FROM D1
threes from unseen distances and
turned the world’s best basketball
league into his personal playground. In the seasons since, Curry has set the record for threes in a
season three times and established himself as one of the best
shooters in NBA history.
That all created a new style of
play for young players to aim for
and a puzzling equation for the
coaches tasked with molding
their games: how to let kids imitate one of their basketball idols
but not take it too far.
“Not a lot of players can shoot
like that, but most kids will try,”
said Georgetown Prep’s Ryan Eskow, who coaches Bynum. “All the
kids nowadays, they practice 29footers; that’s the fun thing to
do. Am I teaching them that? No,
it’s on their own time. I don’t want
them shooting 35-foot jumpers.
But if you take a bad shot and it
goes in, it becomes a positive play.”
The only style they’ve known
There is a lot for high schoolers
to learn from Curry as they map
out their basketball dreams. He
can shoot from anywhere, yes, but
he also dribbles as if the ball is
attached to his body by magnet or
rope. He passes as if there are no
defenders on the court. He is a
humble role model, even when he
was pressed, daily, to talk about
his meteoric ascension from experimental guard to NBA star.
But Curry’s shooting — deep
and often coming off the dribble
— is what caught on most with
this generation of high school
guards. The game, at all levels, is
following the trends atop the
NBA, as Curry and the Warriors
have revolutionized basketball
with a high volume of threes,
endless fast breaks and positionless lineups. It has led to an outpouring of social media hype, two
NBA titles in three years and copycat challengers like the Houston
Rockets, who are attempting a
league-high 42 threes per game
this season while owning the
NBA’s best record.
This three-point-heavy, spaceand-pace era is the only style that
current youth players have ever
known.
High school coaches and recruiting experts have seen this on
the varsity and junior varsity levels, on the AAU circuit in the
spring and summer, and even in
youth leagues. Damon Handon,
who runs the AAU program D.C.
Premier, recently went to a 10and-under game. “Kids were taking deep threes and holding up
their follow-through like they
were Steph Curry,” he said. “It was
crazy.”
“I’m pretty sure that the coaches are being put in a position
where they are having to reel
some guys back in and make sure
that they understand that you got
to work on this stuff,” Curry said
after the Warriors practiced at
Georgetown University last week.
“It takes time.”
Eskow and other coaches said if
a player is adding range to an
already-developed game, it is a
positive. If a player is expecting
range to be his defining skill, then
it becomes a negative. It has become the coaches’ job to teach
those players about evolved shot
selection, productive training
habits and how extending the defense is not just a sign to shoot
deeper, but also a chance to drive
into the paint and distribute to
teammates.
Coaches have to explain that
while Curry’s skill set is something to aspire to, his game is built
on fundamentals. They have to
explain that, while the Warriors
have become the NBA’s gold standard and make all those social
media-bound plays, the root of
their success is ball movement.
They have to take lofty personal
goals and temper them into a
realistic plan that doesn’t compromise a player’s development
or a team’s chemistry.
“At Davidson, when I was there,
I didn’t show up on campus doing
that,” Curry said of his three-year
college career. “I had to kind of
work my way up and evolve and
prove I could do it consistently
and get that buy-in and whatnot,
or else I would have been sitting
on the bench.”
Expanding their range
D.C.-area guards like Bynum,
Paul VI sophomore Jeremy Roach
and Theodore Roosevelt sophomore Marcus Dockery understand that balance. Bynum expands his range on his own time
and counts ballhandling as Curry’s most teachable skill. Roach,
who visited Kentucky this fall and
is ranked 19th in ESPN’s Class of
2020 rankings, gets instruction in
practice from Paul VI Coach
Glenn Farello on pull-up, transition threes — the kind of shot that,
in a past era, might have landed a
player on the bench.
Dockery does late-night pushups to extend his shooting range
— he made more than 70 threes
this season — and sees an additional benefit to pulling up from a
few (or five) feet behind the line.
“It feels really good to make
those long ones,” Dockery said,
laughing. “But it also makes you
that much closer to being back on
defense. I think coach likes that,
too.”
“I think the coaches are having
to expand the way that they coach.
Really, if you’re not, you’re going
to fall behind,” said Steve Turner,
who coaches at Gonzaga College
High in Washington. “When your
kids want to play a certain way —
maybe like the guys they are imitating on the playground, if it’s
Steph or someone else — you have
to get them to buy into what you
want but also allow them to be the
player they want to become.”
Ahead of another game at
Georgetown Prep, four nights before Bynum and Morse traded all
those warmup threes, more than
40 kids crowded under the same
hoop. They were messing around
before the teams took the court,
fighting for three basketballs that
clanged off the rim and into a bevy
of outstretched arms.
One of the balls bounced to a
12-year-old standing away from
the pack, and he dribbled out well
behind the three-point line as his
friends watched. He took two
dribbles, one more step back, and
stood smack between half court
and the top of the three-point arc.
Then he hoisted a jump shot
and yelled, “Steph!” in a highpitched voice.
The ball swished in. A perfect
imitation.
“We are in the position that
people turn on the TV and watch
us play, and we are hopefully
pushing the game to the next level
and being the mold and the model
of how kids want to play coming
up,” said Curry, who once modeled his style after point guard
Steve Nash and sharpshooter
Reggie Miller. “So it is kind of a
surreal feeling.”
jesse.dougherty@washpost.com
Samantha Pell contributed to this
report.
D6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 6 , 2018
college basketball
As postseason play arrives, the Blue Devils are into the details
With improved defense,
Duke joins Virginia as
NCAA top-seed hopefuls
BY
G ENE W ANG
When the Duke men’s basketball team began its ACC schedule
by losing two of its first three
games while surrendering an average of nearly 93 points, Coach
Mike Krzyzewski and his players
faced questions about whether
they were stout enough defensively to be a national championship contender.
Heading into this week’s ACC
tournament at Barclays Center in
Brooklyn, the No. 2-seeded Blue
Devils have put those doubts to
rest after a stretch in which they
won four consecutive games and
limited four straight opponents
to fewer than 60 points for the
first time in the program’s storied
history.
The defensive uprising combined with the scoring punch of
Marvin Bagley III (voted ACC
player of the year this season as a
freshman), Grayson Allen and
Wendell Carter Jr., among others,
have Duke squarely in the mix for
a No. 1 seed in the NCAA tourna-
ment and seeking a second
straight ACC tournament championship.
Duke (25-6) opens the ACC
tournament Thursday as one of
the top four seeds receiving double byes — a group that includes
No. 1 Virginia (28-2), the conference’s regular season champion.
The first round of the tournament
is set for Tuesday with three
games.
“Apparently we’re one of the
top two teams in the conference
defensively,” Krzyzewski said recently with a dose of sarcasm.
“Remember when you all said we
couldn’t play defense, but we
could play offense? Now you’re
saying we can play defense, but
we can’t play offense. So make up
your mind.
“If you take out the first three
conference games, we’ve played
as well as anybody on the defensive end in the conference. I
mean, just look at, even with
those three games, we’re right
there. Virginia would always be
one, but we’re two or three in
everything.”
According to advanced analytics from kenpom.com, which the
NCAA considers in its tournament selection process, Duke
ranks 10th nationally out of 351
Division I teams in defensive
efficiency and second in offensive
BEN MCKEOWN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Coach Mike Krzyzewski has directed Duke to six wins in its past
seven games, the lone shortfall being a 64-63 loss at Virginia Tech.
efficiency. The Blue Devils are the
only school in the top 10 in both
categories. The next closest is
Michigan State, which ranks
ninth in defensive efficiency and
11th in offensive efficiency.
The Cavaliers are first and
39th, respectively, in those metrics, after a regular season that
included a 65-63 signature win
against Duke at Cameron Indoor
Stadium, Virginia’s first victory at
the fabled venue since 1995.
Virginia’s only conference loss
this season came to Virginia Tech,
61-60, in overtime in Charlottesville, but the Cavaliers still became not only the first school to
win 17 ACC games but also to go
9-0 on the road in conference.
Duke is the only other school to
have an unbeaten ACC road record, going 8-0 in 2011-12.
“A really good accomplishment,” Virginia’s Tony Bennett,
announced Sunday as ACC coach
of the year, said of his team’s road
record. “To do it in this league, the
parity in this league, there’s not a
lot of separation, regardless of
record. We know that. We were in
some tough situations. It comes
down to making plays, but I’m
very thankful.”
Virginia has won one ACC
tournament under Bennett, in
2014, and owns two overall. Last
season, the Cavaliers lost in the
quarterfinals to Notre Dame, 7158, also at Barclays Center. In
2016, Virginia advanced to the
final in the nation’s capital, losing
to North Carolina, 61-57, at Capital One Arena, then known as
Verizon Center.
The Tar Heels, the defending
national champions, come into
the ACC tournament on a twogame losing streak, most recently
suffering a 74-64 defeat to archrival Duke on Saturday night in
Durham, N.C. North Carolina also
lost to Miami, 91-88, when
Ja’Quan Newton sank a running
30-footer at the buzzer on senior
day in Chapel Hill, N.C.
“We’ve got to move on from it
and go back and get better and get
ready for Brooklyn and get ready
for the tournament,” North Carolina senior guard Joel Berry II
said. “It is just as simple as that.”
The losses were North Carolina’s first since a three-game
slide in late January that began
with an 80-69 defeat to Virginia
Tech at Cassell Coliseum.
The Hokies lost two of three to
close the regular season, including a 69-68 loss to Miami at
Watsco Center on Saturday when
freshman guard Chris Lykes
made 1 of 2 free throws with three
seconds to play and Virginia Tech
missed a desperation heave at the
buzzer. But sandwiched in between those defeats was a 64-63
victory over Duke, the Blue Devils’ lone loss since Feb. 8.
With victories over Duke, Virginia, Clemson and North Carolina, the Hokies are all but assured a spot in the NCAA tournament field, several bracket projections have suggested, but they
could use another quality win in
the ACC tournament to reduce
their anxiety come Selection Sunday.
Virginia Tech reached the
quarterfinals of last season’s ACC
tournament, losing to Florida
State, 74-68, before securing its
first NCAA tournament berth in
10 years.
“We know we’re in the best
league in the country,” said
Hokies forward Chris Clarke, who
scored the decisive basket against
the Blue Devils last week, “and we
know we’re going to have to win
games if we want to go to the
[NCAA] tournament.”
gene.wang@washpost.com
BARRY SVRLUGA
Here’s one way to clean up college basketball: Just start paying the workforce
SVRLUGA FROM D1
This March, the letters F-B-I
are as important as N-C-A-A, and
it shouldn’t be that way.
Don’t let the federal
investigation into college
basketball’s inner workings
distract from the primary issue
here. It’s not about which coach
called what prospective star to
pay how much money. It’s that
those calls happened in secrecy,
that they had to be tapped by
authorities, that the sport has
what is so commonly referred to
as an “underbelly.”
Why not make the underbelly
an exoskeleton? Those calls
should be made freely: You are
worth $X, so I will pay you $X.
Now, let’s make sure we notify
the correct authorities.
And yet that’s not the system.
So we have a March in which
federal authorities could make
more news than full-court
presses.
It has to change, doesn’t it?
Not by getting assistant coaches
to stop their routine offers of
money to players and/or their
families. But by making sure
those players and their families
get money above board. The FBI’s
case — which Yahoo Sports has
helped flesh out — reportedly
touches, in ways large and small,
the most prominent programs in
the country. But look at some of
those allegations — $400 for the
parent of a Michigan State player,
a restaurant tab for the parents of
a player who ended up at Duke —
and it’s silly we’re even talking
about it.
Don’t think for one minute this
investigation isn’t tied to the
ridiculous pillars we have
propped up for generations: the
idea that a scholarship and some
meal money and, finally, a small
stipend is enough to pay back
players who generate billionswith-a-b in revenue for their
schools. We know that the NCAA
has a contract with CBS and
Turner to carry the NCAA
tournament — just the
tournament — that covers
22 years and is worth
$19.8 billion.
If there’s that much money,
and you don’t pay the workforce,
an underbelly is inevitable.
“The fact of the matter is that
when you artificially sublimate
the unpaid labor and don’t give
them a fair share and force all the
money to a small cohort of the
population — the coaches and the
administrators and the apparel
companies and the television
networks — a black market is
going to take place,” said Zach
Bohannon, a former basketball
player at the University of
Wisconsin. “This black market is
being shown now, in public. But
it was already there. There’s an
imbalance there that the NCAA
doesn’t want the public to know.”
We’re at the point when it’s
hard to watch college basketball
and see only a pick and roll and
how it’s defended or a zone
defense and how it might be
exploited. Watch the conference
tournaments this week. On the
sideline, the camera will
inevitably pan to a coach. You
know how many coaches,
according to an essential
database published by USA
Today, make at least $2 million
annually? Try 47. Forty-seven.
This model isn’t sustainable.
It’s actually remarkable it has
lasted this long, because it’s
antiquated, plain and simple.
The kids who arrive on campus to
play NCAA basketball aren’t
hoping to get to practice in time
once they have finished their
studies. They’re not dreaming of
stitching that varsity letter to
their cardigan. They are financial
engines.
“It’s disgusting,” Bohannon
said by phone Monday.
Maybe a special commission
on college basketball, chaired by
former secretary of state
Condoleezza Rice, will announce
meaningful recommendations at
some point this spring. Maybe.
Until then, it’s instructive to
remember that Bohannon and
his then-Wisconsin teammate
Nigel Hayes became the faces of
the argument that this is an
inherently unfair system. They
didn’t do so at the behest of the
NCAA. They did so on their own.
In 2014, Bohannon was a
senior, an Iowa kid who
transferred from the Air Force
Academy — where he had three
full-time jobs: student, basketball
player and cadet — and began
thinking critically about his role
in the college athletics machine.
Hayes was the highly sought
freshman who came from Ohio
and helped push the Badgers to
the Final Four. One sought the
other’s playing time. Still, they
found common ground.
“People say we’re advocating
for ‘pay-for-play,’ ” Bohannon
said. Nope. That’s a label the
NCAA-types push because it
carries a negative connotation.
Try rephrasing. “We’re
advocating for our fair share.”
Hayes, who is now in the NBA’s
development league, ended up
standing in the background of
ESPN’s “College GameDay”
broadcast from Madison wearing
a sign that read, “Broke college
athlete. Anything helps,” and
listing a Venmo address at which
he might receive money.
Together, Bohannon and Hayes
pushed the conversation further,
to places that made the stodgy
forces that run college athletics
uncomfortable.
Given all that, Bohannon
seems as reasonable a person as
any to turn to for a solution.
“I think, ultimately, it’s going
to have to come down on the
players,” Bohannon said,
“something like a boycott or a
unionization.”
Let’s brainstorm. What if, say,
the players at Kansas or North
Carolina or Virginia took their
warmups before their conference
tournament games this week,
went back to the locker room —
and then refused to report for the
tip-off?
“That can’t happen yet,”
Bohannon said. “What I’ve found
out is the public perception’s not
there yet.”
So we’re left to wonder, as
college basketball enters its best
month in its worst shape, when
public perception will get there. I
keep thinking that, at some point,
the idea of not paying college
athletes in revenue-generating
sports will seem as outdated as
prohibition. It’s not just. So it will
be fixed.
Except waiting hasn’t proved
to work. Someone, something,
needs to force change. Maybe it’s
the FBI investigation that has the
college sports world spooked.
Maybe, instead, that
investigation should be
embraced. Maybe the only way to
watch college basketball this
month isn’t with the earplugs in
and the blinders on, but
understanding that a sport that’s
in desperate need of change may
soon be forced into it. If that
happened, it would outshine any
buzzer beater as the indelible
moment of this month.
barry.svrluga@washpost.com
For more by Barry Svrluga, visit
washingtonpost.com/svrluga.
ROUNDUP
Gaels capture MAAC crown to clinch third straight NCAA tournament spot
IONA 83,
FAIRFIELD 71
F ROM NEWS SERVICES
AND STAFF REPORTS
Roland Griffin scored a careerhigh 29 points, Zach Lewis added
20, and Iona beat Fairfield, 83-71,
on Monday night in Albany, N.Y.,
to capture the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference tournament title
for the third straight time and
earn an automatic bid to the
NCAA tournament.
The Gaels (20-13), the fourth
seed, extended their league record
to 11 tournament titles. The Stags
(17-16), the sixth seed, had won
seven straight games and were
seeking their fourth title.
Tyler Nelson led Fairfield with
25 points.
Lewis was named tournament
MVP.
UNC
GREENSBORO 62,
EAST TENNESSEE STATE 47:
Jordy Kuiper and Demetrius Troy
each scored 13 points, and the
Spartans (27-7) pulled away from
the Buccaneers (25-9) to win the
Southern Conference championship in Asheville, N.C., and earn
their first NCAA tournament
berth since 2001.
UNC Greensboro avenged last
year’s title game loss to ETSU.
GONZAGA 88, SAN FRANCISCO 60: Killian Tillie scored
26 points on 10-for-11 shooting,
including connecting on all five
three-pointers, to lead the topseeded Bulldogs (29-4) past the
fourth-seeded Dons (18-15) in a
West Coast Conference tournament semifinal in Las Vegas.
U-Conn. will face No. 19 South
Florida in the final.
BAYLOR 77, TEXAS 69: Kalani Brown scored 20 points to
help the No. 3 Lady Bears (31-1)
beat the No. 7 Longhorns (26-6) in
the Big 12 championship game in
Oklahoma City.
Gonzaga, ranked No. 7 in the
nation, will be going for its sixth
consecutive WCC tournament title Tuesday. The Bulldogs awaited
the winner of the late Saint
Mary’s-BYU game.
U-Va. is unanimous No. 1
Virginia is now the unquestioned No. 1 in the Associated
Press Top 25.
The Cavaliers earned all 65
first-place votes in Monday’s poll
after finishing four games ahead
of the field in the ACC regular
season race. This was Virginia’s
fourth straight week at No. 1,
with the Cavaliers acquiring
more first-place votes each time
until claiming them all this week.
The Cavaliers (28-2, 17-1 ACC)
open ACC tournament play in
Thursday’s quarterfinals in
Brooklyn with a chance to sweep
the league regular season and
tournament titles for the second
time in five seasons.
Michigan State fell from second to fourth after losing to
Michigan in the Big Ten semifinals. Villanova hopped over
Xavier from No. 4, while the
Musketeers remained third.
Duke was fifth, followed by
Gonzaga and Michigan — which
beat Purdue to win a second
straight Big Ten tournament title.
TEXAS TECH: Red Raiders
Coach Chris Beard was rewarded
with a new $19 million contract
after leading Texas Tech to
23 wins and its best finish in the
Big 12.
The No. 14 Red Raiders (23-8)
go into this week’s Big 12 tournament as the No. 2 seed.
Beard has a 41-22 record in his
QUINNIPIAC
67, MARIST
58: Jen Fay scored 12 of her
23 points in the third quarter, and
the top-seeded Bobcats (27-5) won
their 22nd consecutive game with
a victory over the Red Foxes (2013) in Albany to claim the MAAC
championship.
Quinnipiac advances to the
NCAA tournament for the second consecutive year.
DEPAUL 85, GEORGETOWN 53: Ashton Millender had
15 points and Amarah Coleman
added 13 points, six rebounds and
six assists as the second-seeded
Blue Demons (25-7) beat the sixthseeded Hoyas (15-15) in a Big East
tournament semifinal in Chicago.
Cynthia Petke had 10 points
and eight rebounds to lead
Georgetown.
DePaul will face top-seeded
Marquette in the title game. The
Eagles beat fourth-seeded Creighton, 76-70, in the other semifinal.
AMERICAN
HANS PENNINK/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Zach Lewis scored 20 points against Jerome Segura and Fairfield
as Iona won the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference tournament.
two seasons with the Red Raiders. The new deal replaces the
five-year contract Beard initially
got from Texas Tech through the
2020-21 season.
No. 1 U-Conn. women roll
Azura Stevens had 21 points
and 13 rebounds to lead top-
ranked Connecticut to a 75-21 rout
of Cincinnati in the semifinals of
the American Athletic Conference
tournament in Uncasville, Conn.
The Huskies (31-0) have won
100 games against AAC opponents without a loss since the
league began play in 2013. Cincinnati fell to 19-12.
55,
They’re going dancing
Teams that have earned an
automatic berth in the NCAA
tournament:
Men
Murray State, 26-5 (Ohio Valley)
Radford, 22-12 (Big South)
Loyola-Chicago, 28-5 (Mo. Valley)
Lipscomb, 23-9 (Atlantic Sun)
Michigan, 28-7 (Big Ten)
Iona, 20-13 (MAAC)
UNC Greensboro, 27-7 (Southern)
Women
Belmont, 31-3 (Ohio Valley)
G. Washington, 19-13 (Atlantic 10)
Mercer, 30-2 (Southern)
Louisville, 32-2 (ACC)
S. Carolina, 26-6 (Southeastern)
Ohio State, 27-6 (Big Ten)
Oregon, 30-4 (Pacific-12)
Quinnipiac, 27-5 (MAAC)
Baylor, 31-1 (Big 12)
LAFA-
YETTE 35: Emily Kinneston had
20 points and seven assists, and
Cecily Carl added 12 points and
11 rebounds as the top-seeded Eagles (24-6) defeated the eighthseeded Leopards (11-19) in a Patriot League tournament quarterfinal at Bender Arena.
NAVY 63, LOYOLA (MD.)
55: Taylor Dunham had 13 points,
five assists and five rebounds to
guide the third-seeded Midshipmen (24-6) past the sixth-seeded
Greyhounds (9-21) in a Patriot
League quarterfinal in Annapolis.
FLORIDA A&M 69, HOWARD 64: Sarah Edmond had
24 points, six assists and five
rebounds, but the fifth-seeded Bison (12-18) lost to the 12th-seeded
Rattlers (7-23) in the first round
of the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference tournament in Norfolk.
Shakerrya Morrison had
19 points, 11 rebounds and five
steals for Florida A&M.
TUESDAY, MARCH 6 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D7
M2
scoreboard
BA S KETBA L L
NBA
NCAA MEN AP TOP 25
EASTERN CONFERENCE
ATLANTIC
W
Toronto ......................................45
Boston........................................45
Philadelphia ...............................34
New York ...................................24
Brooklyn.....................................20
L
17
20
28
40
44
Pct
.726
.692
.548
.375
.313
GB
—
11/2
11
22
26
SOUTHEAST
W
Washington ...............................36
Miami.........................................34
Charlotte....................................28
Orlando ......................................20
Atlanta.......................................20
L
28
30
36
44
44
Pct
.563
.531
.438
.313
.313
GB
—
2
8
16
16
CENTRAL
W
Cleveland ...................................37
Indiana .......................................37
Milwaukee .................................34
Detroit .......................................29
Chicago ......................................21
L
26
27
30
35
42
Pct
.587
.578
.531
.453
.333
GB
—
1/
2
31/2
81/2
16
WESTERN CONFERENCE
SOUTHWEST
W
Houston .....................................49
New Orleans ..............................36
San Antonio ...............................37
Dallas .........................................19
Memphis ....................................18
L
13
26
27
45
45
Pct
.790
.581
.578
.297
.286
GB
—
13
13
31
311/2
NORTHWEST
W
x-Portland..................................37
Minnesota..................................38
Oklahoma City ...........................37
Denver........................................35
Utah ...........................................34
L
26
28
28
28
30
Pct
.587
.576
.569
.556
.531
GB
—
PACIFIC
W
Golden State..............................49
L.A. Clippers...............................34
x-L.A. Lakers..............................28
Sacramento ...............................20
Phoenix ......................................19
L
14
28
34
44
47
Pct
.778
.548
.452
.313
.288
1/
2
1
2
GB
—
141/2
201/2
291/2
311/2
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
Atlanta 113, Phoenix 112
Indiana 98, Washington 95
Toronto 103, Charlotte 98
New Orleans 126, Dallas 109
Milwaukee 118, Philadelphia 110
L.A. Clippers 123, Brooklyn 120
Sacramento 102, New York 99
MONDAY’S RESULTS
Cleveland 112, Detroit 90
Indiana 92, Milwaukee 89
Miami 125, Phoenix 103
Boston 105, Chicago 89
San Antonio 100, Memphis 98
Utah 94, Orlando 80
Portland at L.A. Lakers, Late
Atlanta at Toronto, 7
Miami at Washington, 7
Philadelphia at Charlotte, 7
Houston at Oklahoma City, 8
Denver at Dallas, 8:30
New York at Portland, 10
Brooklyn at Golden State, 10:30
New Orleans at L.A. Clippers, 10:30
PTS
1625
1516
1510
1346
1340
1254
1231
1213
1129
1096
861
852
825
784
739
692
603
486
422
385
247
218
192
191
86
PVS
1
4
3
2
5
7
15
10
6
8
11
9
16
12
19
14
13
20
18
22
25
21
—
—
17
Others receiving votes: St. Bonaventure 72, Kentucky
66, TCU 45, Loyola of Chicago 43, Virginia Tech 15, Seton
Hall 10, Middle Tennessee 9, Creighton 8, Arkansas 4,
Kansas St. 2, Nebraska 2, NC State 2, Buffalo 1, Florida
St. 1, New Mexico St. 1, Texas A&M 1.
USA TODAY TOP 25
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
Virginia (32)
Xavier
Villanova
Duke
Michigan State
Gonzaga
Michigan
Cincinnati
Kansas
Purdue
North Carolina
Tennessee
Texas Tech
Wichita State
Auburn
Ohio State
Arizona
West Virginia
Saint Mary's
Clemson
Houston
Nevada
Florida
Rhode Island
Miami
RECORD
28-2
27-4
27-4
25-6
29-4
28-4
28-7
27-4
24-7
28-6
22-9
23-7
23-8
24-6
25-6
24-8
24-7
22-9
28-4
22-8
24-6
26-6
20-11
23-6
22-8
PTS
800
753
730
678
619
616
605
579
566
553
441
402
386
382
321
303
278
241
227
183
123
122
106
66
57
PVS
1
4
5
3
2
7
13
10
6
8
9
17
12
11
15
14
22
19
20
18
—
21
—
16
—
NCAA men
MONDAY’S TOURNAMENT RESULTS
HORIZON LEAGUE
SEMIFINALS
21
36
DETROIT: Ennis III 1-8 0-0 3, Griffin 10-22 2-5 25,
Drummond 5-5 5-5 15, I.Smith 3-7 0-0 6, Bullock 4-10 0-0
11, Johnson 3-9 2-4 9, Moreland 1-5 1-1 3, Tolliver 3-5
0-0 8, Ellenson 0-2 0-0 0, Galloway 1-5 0-0 2, Buycks 1-7
0-0 2, Kennard 2-2 0-0 6. Totals 34-87 10-15 90.
CLEVELAND: James 11-17 4-6 31, Hood 4-12 5-5 13,
Nance Jr. 9-15 4-5 22, Hill 1-5 1-1 3, J.Smith 0-3 0-0 0,
Osman 5-11 0-0 12, Zizic 3-3 0-0 6, Perrantes 0-0 0-0 0,
Calderon 1-3 0-0 3, Holland 0-2 0-0 0, Korver 4-7 0-0 11,
Clarkson 5-10 0-0 11. Totals 43-88 14-17 112.
Three-point Goals: Detroit 12-34 (Griffin 3-5, Bullock
3-7, Kennard 2-2, Tolliver 2-4, Johnson 1-3, Ennis III 1-5,
Galloway 0-1, I.Smith 0-1, Ellenson 0-2, Buycks 0-4),
Cleveland 12-33 (James 5-7, Korver 3-6, Osman 2-6,
Calderon 1-3, Clarkson 1-5, Nance Jr. 0-1, Hill 0-1,
Holland 0-1, J.Smith 0-1, Hood 0-2). Fouled Out: None.
Rebounds: Detroit 40 (Drummond 9), Cleveland 53
(Nance Jr. 15). Assists: Detroit 17 (I.Smith 6), Cleveland
29 (James 7). Total Fouls: Detroit 22, Cleveland 18.
Technicals: Drummond, Griffin. A: 20,562 (20,562).
Pacers 92, Bucks 89
29
24
23
29
20 — 89
19 — 92
MILWAUKEE: Middleton 1-7 4-5 6, Antetokounmpo 7-16
4-5 18, Henson 1-4 0-0 2, Bledsoe 10-22 4-4 26, Snell 3-5
0-0 9, Parker 7-10 0-0 15, Maker 0-4 0-0 0, Terry 4-5 0-0 9,
Brown 1-2 2-2 4, Muhammad 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 34-76
14-16 89.
INDIANA: Bogdanovic 9-13 6-8 29, T.Young 4-8 0-0 10,
Turner 1-3 3-4 5, Joseph 3-9 0-0 6, Oladipo 5-19 3-4 14,
Robinson III 1-2 0-0 2, Leaf 0-0 0-0 0, Sabonis 5-9 1-1 11,
J.Young 2-6 0-0 4, Stephenson 3-8 3-4 11. Totals 33-77
16-21 92.
Three-point Goals: Milwaukee 7-23 (Snell 3-4, Bledsoe
2-10, Parker 1-2, Terry 1-2, Middleton 0-1, Maker 0-2,
Antetokounmpo 0-2), Indiana 10-17 (Bogdanovic 5-7,
T.Young 2-3, Stephenson 2-3, Oladipo 1-2, J.Young 0-1,
Joseph 0-1). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Milwaukee 39
(Antetokounmpo 12), Indiana 37 (T.Young 7). Assists:
Milwaukee 15 (Bledsoe 4), Indiana 18 (Oladipo 5). Total
Fouls: Milwaukee 16, Indiana 15. Technicals: Milwaukee
coach Bucks (Defensive three second).
Celtics 105, Bulls 89
20
13
31
24
19 — 105
36 — 89
W
37
38
34
33
33
29
30
29
L
21
25
21
25
28
26
30
29
OL PTS. GF GA
7
81 203 193
4
80 219 203
11
79 197 193
8
74 193 199
5
71 176 186
11
69 176 198
6
66 189 209
8
66 213 237
ATLANTIC
Tampa Bay ....................
Boston ...........................
Toronto .........................
Florida ...........................
Detroit ..........................
Montreal .......................
Ottawa ..........................
Buffalo ..........................
W
45
40
39
32
26
25
23
21
L
17
15
22
25
29
29
32
34
OL PTS. GF GA
4
94 240 182
8
88 209 158
7
85 223 195
6
70 189 199
10
62 170 193
11
61 167 200
10
56 177 227
11
53 159 214
WESTERN CONFERENCE
CENTRAL
Nashville .......................
Winnipeg ......................
Minnesota .....................
Dallas ............................
Colorado ........................
St. Louis ........................
Chicago .........................
W
42
39
37
37
35
35
28
L
14
17
22
23
24
26
30
OL PTS. GF GA
9
93 214 168
9
87 220 175
7
81 204 190
6
80 195 174
6
76 205 193
5
75 180 176
8
64 188 195
PACIFIC
Vegas ............................
San Jose ........................
Anaheim .......................
Los Angeles ..................
Calgary ..........................
Edmonton .....................
x-Vancouver ..................
Arizona .........................
W
42
35
33
36
32
28
24
20
L
18
22
21
25
25
34
32
34
OL PTS. GF GA
5
89 225 180
9
79 196 184
12
78 186 183
5
77 192 165
10
74 188 199
4
60 187 219
9
57 176 214
11
51 158 213
x-late game
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
MONDAY’S RESULTS
Pittsburgh 4, Calgary 3 (OT)
Buffalo 5, Toronto 3
Ottawa 3, Dallas 2 (OT)
Edmonton 4, Arizona 3 (OT)
N.Y. Islanders at Vancouver, Late
TUESDAY’S GAMES
Winnipeg at N.Y. Rangers, 7
Vegas at Columbus, 7
Montreal at New Jersey, 7
Detroit at Boston, 7
Florida at Tampa Bay, 7:30
Carolina at Minnesota, 8
Dallas at Nashville, 8
Colorado at Chicago, 8:30
Washington at Anaheim, 10
TORONTO .............................. 14
11
16 — 41
BUFFALO ................................. 6
14
4 — 24
Power-play opportunities: Toronto 2 of 2; Buffalo 1 of 2.
Goalies: Toronto, Andersen 32-18-5 (24 shots-19 saves).
Buffalo, Johnson 7-10-3 (41-38).
SOUTHERN CONFERENCE
CHAMPIONSHIP
UNC Greensboro 62, ETSU 47
SUMMIT LEAGUE
SEMIFINALS
S. Dakota St. 78, N. Dakota St. 57
Penguins 4, Flames 3 (OT)
NCAA WOMEN AP TOP 25
CALGARY ........................... 2
PITTSBURGH ..................... 2
U-Conn. (32)
Baylor
Louisville
Mississippi St.
Notre Dame
Oregon
South Carolina
Texas
UCLA
Ohio St.
Florida St.
Tennessee
Oregon St.
Texas A&M
Stanford
Missouri
Maryland
Georgia
South Florida
Duke
N.C. State
Green Bay
Belmont
LSU
Mercer
RECORD
30-0
30-1
32-2
32-1
29-3
30-4
26-6
26-5
24-7
27-6
25-6
24-7
23-7
24-9
22-10
24-7
25-7
25-6
25-6
22-8
24-8
27-3
31-3
19-9
30-2
PTS
800
741
739
716
653
639
615
598
505
480
463
427
423
350
346
296
294
274
234
191
175
127
115
58
52
PVS
1
3
4
2
5
6
8
7
9
13
11
12
10
15
16
14
17
19
20
18
23
21
22
24
25
Others receiving votes: Arizona St. 14, Iowa 14, Gonzaga
13, Quinnipiac 10, Minnesota 9, Oklahoma St. 7, California 5, DePaul 5, Michigan 4, Cent. Michigan 3, Florida
Gulf Coast 2, West Virginia 2, Miami 1.
Scoring: 5, Pittsburgh, Letang 6 (Hagelin, Malkin), 17:01.
6, Calgary, Brouwer 5 (Brodie, Gaudreau), 19:57.
OVERTIME
Scoring: 7, Pittsburgh, Schultz 4 (Kessel, Malkin), 2:36.
SHOTS ON GOAL
CALGARY ......................... 16
8
12
2 — 38
PITTSBURGH ................... 11
11
9
1 — 32
Power-play opportunities: Calgary 0 of 2; Pittsburgh 0 of
2. Goalies: Calgary, Gillies 2-2-1 (32 shots-28 saves).
Pittsburgh, Jarry 12-5-2 (38-35).
Senators 3, Stars 2 (OT)
OTTAWA ............................ 0
DALLAS .............................. 1
Scoring: 2, Ottawa, Hoffman 19 (Duchene, Stone), 19:58
(pp).
Baylor 77, Texas 69
Spurs 100, Grizzlies 98
MEMPHIS ........................... 23
SAN ANTONIO ................... 21
22
26
27
23
26 — 98
30 — 100
MEMPHIS: Parsons 1-4 0-0 2, M.Gasol 8-13 4-5 23,
J.Green 6-12 0-0 14, Simmons 6-10 0-0 13, Brooks 9-17
1-1 21, Henry 3-5 0-0 6, Rabb 3-3 0-0 6, Davis 1-3 1-2 3,
Rathan-Mayes 4-10 0-1 8, Selden 1-3 0-0 2. Totals 42-80
6-9 98.
SAN ANTONIO: Anderson 3-5 5-7 11, Aldridge 2-8 3-4 7,
P.Gasol 0-4 2-2 2, Murray 2-5 0-0 4, Mills 3-10 2-2 9, Gay
3-5 1-2 7, Bertans 5-9 6-7 17, Lauvergne 1-2 0-0 2, Parker
10-14 3-4 23, Forbes 0-0 0-0 0, Ginobili 1-5 1-1 4, D.Green
5-9 1-2 14. Totals 35-76 24-31 100.
Three-point Goals: Memphis 8-22 (M.Gasol 3-7, J.Green
2-2, Brooks 2-5, Simmons 1-2), San Antonio 6-22
(D.Green 3-4, Ginobili 1-3, Mills 1-5, Bertans 1-5).
Rebounds: Memphis 42 (J.Green 15), San Antonio 36
(Aldridge 8). Assists: Memphis 26 (J.Green, RathanMayes 5), San Antonio 18 (Anderson, Parker, P.Gasol 4).
Total Fouls: Memphis 22, San Antonio 10. Technicals:
San Antonio coach Spurs (Defensive three second),
Parker.
1 — 3
0 — 2
SECOND PERIOD
NCAA women
Three-point Goals: Boston 12-36 (Larkin 3-3, Rozier 3-8,
Tatum 2-6, Horford 1-1, Brown 1-4, Morris 1-5, Smart
1-5, Theis 0-1, Ojeleye 0-1, Nader 0-2), Chicago 12-33
(Valentine 4-6, Grant 2-3, Payne 2-4, Markkanen 2-5,
Nwaba 1-1, Dunn 1-3, Eddie 0-1, Vonleh 0-3, Portis 0-3,
LaVine 0-4). Rebounds: Boston 53 (Monroe 9), Chicago
36 (Vonleh 9). Assists: Boston 25 (Rozier 7), Chicago 18
(Dunn 4). Total Fouls: Boston 13, Chicago 16.
Three-point Goals: Phoenix 10-24 (Booker 4-9, Bender
2-3, Chriss 2-4, Warren 1-2, Jackson 1-3, Reed 0-1,
Harrison 0-1, Peters 0-1), Miami 12-36 (Babbitt 4-11,
Richardson 2-2, Olynyk 2-4, Winslow 1-1, T.Johnson 1-3,
Wade 1-4, Dragic 1-4, Jones Jr. 0-1, Haslem 0-1,
J.Johnson 0-2, McGruder 0-3). Rebounds: Phoenix 40
(Jackson 7), Miami 51 (Whiteside 14). Assists: Phoenix
21 (Bender 6), Miami 33 (Olynyk 8). Total Fouls: Phoenix
20, Miami 14. Technicals: Richardson.
1
1
Scoring: 1, Dallas, Seguin 35 (Radulov, Klingberg), 4:36
(pp).
SHOTS ON GOAL
MIAMI: Babbitt 4-11 0-0 12, J.Johnson 3-8 0-0 6,
Whiteside 10-13 4-5 24, Dragic 7-10 2-2 17, Richardson
4-6 2-2 12, Jones Jr. 1-3 0-0 2, Winslow 4-9 3-4 12,
Haslem 0-2 0-0 0, Adebayo 0-0 2-2 2, Olynyk 5-7 3-4 15,
Wade 4-9 3-4 12, McGruder 3-6 0-0 6, T.Johnson 2-8 0-0
5. Totals 47-92 19-23 125.
1
0
FIRST PERIOD
BIG 12 CONFERENCE
CHAMPIONSHIP
PHOENIX: Warren 9-15 0-0 19, Bender 2-4 0-0 6,
Chandler 3-4 0-0 6, Payton 3-10 3-5 9, Booker 12-22 3-6
31, Jackson 1-6 0-2 3, Chriss 5-9 0-1 12, Peters 0-1 0-0 0,
Len 2-5 3-4 7, Reed 2-3 0-0 4, Harrison 3-8 0-0 6. Totals
42-87 9-18 103.
0 — 3
1 — 4
SECOND PERIOD
OVERTIME
23 — 103
32 — 125
0
0
Scoring: 1, Pittsburgh, Ruhwedel 2 (Kessel), 2:10. 2,
Pittsburgh, Malkin 37, 3:05. 3, Calgary, Giordano 11
(Brouwer, Stajan), 6:14. 4, Calgary, Backlund 13
(Hamonic, Frolik), 10:18.
South Florida 74, UCF 59
U-Conn. 75, Cincinnati 21
32
32
1
1
FIRST PERIOD
CHICAGO: Nwaba 3-7 3-6 10, Markkanen 5-10 0-0 12,
Portis 2-8 3-3 7, Dunn 3-10 0-0 7, LaVine 1-11 2-4 4, Eddie
0-1 0-0 0, Valentine 7-11 2-2 20, Vonleh 1-7 1-2 3, Felicio
4-5 0-0 8, Grant 2-4 2-3 8, Payne 4-7 0-0 10. Totals 32-81
13-20 89.
21
31
3
5
SHOTS ON GOAL
MONDAY’S TOURNAMENT RESULTS
PHOENIX ............................ 27
MIAMI ................................ 30
1 —
1 —
Scoring: 7, Buffalo, Larsson 4 (Pominville, Nolan), 9:55.
8, Toronto, Marner 18 (Carrick, Rielly), 17:57 (pp).
BOSTON: Tatum 5-12 2-2 14, Horford 6-8 0-0 13, Baynes
2-4 0-0 4, Larkin 3-3 0-0 9, Brown 9-13 2-2 21, Nader 0-3
3-4 3, Ojeleye 0-3 0-0 0, Morris 3-10 0-0 7, Theis 2-3 0-0
4, Monroe 5-7 0-0 10, Rozier 4-11 2-2 13, Smart 2-7 2-2 7.
Totals 41-84 11-12 105.
Heat 125, Suns 103
1
2
THIRD PERIOD
N.C. A&T 62, Delaware St. 61
Norfolk St. 76, Md.-Eastern Shore 62
AMERICAN ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
SEMIFINALS
BIG EAST CONFERENCE
SEMIFINALS
DePaul 85, Georgetown 53
Marquette 76, Creighton 70
BIG SKY CONFERENCE
FIRST ROUND
Idaho St. 59, S. Utah 49
Montana 87, Sacramento St. 80
Montana St. 68, North Dakota 58
HORIZON LEAGUE
SEMIFINALS
Green Bay 66, Youngstown St. 45
Wright St. 60, IUPUI 52
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Ottawa, Duchene 19 (Borowiecki, Karlsson),
6:36. 4, Dallas, Seguin 36 (Hamhuis, Janmark), 18:52.
Scoring: 5, Ottawa, Karlsson 7 (Ceci), 2:41.
OTTAWA .......................... 12
8
9
1 — 30
DALLAS .............................. 8
15
10 — 33
Power-play opportunities: Ottawa 1 of 2; Dallas 1 of 4.
Goalies: Ottawa, Anderson 19-20-5 (33 shots-31 saves).
Dallas, Bishop 26-17-4 (12-12), Lehtonen 11-6-2 (1815). A: 17,110 (18,532). T: 2:38.
ARIZONA ........................... 1
EDMONTON ....................... 3
0
0
2
0
0 — 3
1 — 4
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Arizona, Demers 6 (Stepan, Ekman-Larsson),
3:29. 2, Edmonton, Khaira 11 (Strome), 8:01 (sh). 3,
Edmonton, Lucic 10 (Draisaitl, Benning), 13:21. 4,
Edmonton, Puljujarvi 11 (Nugent-Hopkins), 17:04 (pp).
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 5, Arizona, Dvorak 12 (Panik), 11:31. 6, Arizona,
Hjalmarsson 1, 15:21.
Quinnipiac 67, Marist 58
OVERTIME
MID-AMERICAN CONFERENCE
FIRST ROUND
Scoring: 7, Edmonton, Klefbom 4 (McDavid, Draisaitl),
0:50.
MID-EASTERN ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
FIRST ROUND
Florida A&M 69, Howard 64
Morgan St. 58, Coppin St. 51
Savannah St. 51, Norfolk St. 48
MOUNTAIN WEST CONFERENCE
FIRST ROUND
Air Force 68, Utah St. 54
Nevada 95, San Diego St. 84
SHOTS ON GOAL
ARIZONA ......................... 13
12
11 — 36
EDMONTON ..................... 17
5
13
1 — 36
Power-play opportunities: Arizona 0 of 3; Edmonton 1 of
4. Goalies: Arizona, Kuemper 10-2-4 (36 shots-32
saves). Edmonton, Talbot 23-26-2 (36-33).
Blue Jackets 4, Sharks 2
Late Sunday
COLUMBUS .............................. 2
SAN JOSE ................................ 0
1
1
1 —
1 —
4
2
FIRST PERIOD
PATRIOT LEAGUE
QUARTERFINALS
Scoring: 1, Columbus, Foligno 14 (Johnson, Calvert),
9:12. 2, Columbus, Milano 11 (Jenner, Bjorkstrand),
18:01.
American U. 55, Lafayette 35
Army 62, Lehigh 60
Bucknell 67, Holy Cross 53
Navy 63, Loyola (Md.) 55
SECOND PERIOD
SUMMIT LEAGUE
SEMIFINALS
THIRD PERIOD
S. Dakota St. 80, W. Illinois 51
South Dakota 65, Oral Roberts 53
WEST COAST CONFERENCE
SEMIFINALS
Gonzaga 65, San Francisco 53
San Diego 66, Pacific 56
PLAYER
GP
Patrik Laine, Winnipeg ..................................... 65
Steven Stamkos, Tampa Bay ........................... 66
Evgeni Malkin, Pittsburgh ............................... 62
Alex Ovechkin, Washington ............................. 65
Patric Hornqvist, Pittsburgh ............................ 54
Nathan MacKinnon, Colorado .......................... 57
Ryan O'Reilly, Buffalo ...................................... 64
Tyler Seguin, Dallas ......................................... 65
Vincent Trocheck, Florida ................................. 63
Artem Anisimov, Chicago ................................ 56
Brock Boeser, Vancouver ................................. 61
Filip Forsberg, Nashville .................................. 51
Taylor Hall, New Jersey ................................... 61
Mikko Rantanen, Colorado ............................... 64
Wayne Simmonds, Philadelphia ...................... 59
Eric Staal, Minnesota ....................................... 66
Matthew Tkachuk, Calgary .............................. 64
Mika Zibanejad, N.Y. Rangers
... 57
Patrice Bergeron, Boston ................................. 55
Anthony Mantha, Detroit ................................ 63
G
40
36
35
35
34
34
33
31
31
30
30
30
29
29
29
28
28
27
27
27
A
57
56
55
53
52
50
49
49
48
48
48
47
46
44
44
43
43
43
42
42
Scoring: 3, Columbus, Panarin 19 (Cole, Atkinson), 5:32.
4, San Jose, Donskoi 12 (DeMelo, Kane), 18:22.
Scoring: 5, San Jose, Kane 21 (Pavelski), 10:04. 6,
Columbus, Panarin 20 (Dubois), 19:07.
SHOTS ON GOAL
COLUMBUS ............................ 10
6
12 — 28
SAN JOSE .............................. 10
10
15 — 35
Power-play opportunities: Columbus 0 of 2; San Jose 0 of
4. Goalies: Columbus, Bobrovsky 28-21-5 (35 shots-33
saves). San Jose, Dell 14-5-3 (14-14), M.Jones 21-17-6
(13-10).
PP
17
15
13
12
11
11
11
11
11
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
9
9
GOLF
PGA Tour
MEXICO CHAMPIONSHIP
At Club de Golf Chapultepec in Mexico City
Purse: $10 million
Yardage: 7,345
(x-won on first playoff hole)
Final — Sunday
x-Phil Mickelson (550), $1,700,000. 69-68-65-66—
Justin Thomas (315), $1,072,000.... 72-70-62-64—
Rafa Cabrera Bello (170), $510,500 66-67-69-67—
Tyrrell Hatton (170), $510,500 ....... 70-68-64-67—
Kiradech Aphibarnrat, $330,500...... 66-69-71-65—
Brian Harman (110), $330,500 ........ 68-67-68-68—
Sergio Garcia (92), $239,750 ........... 68-65-69-70—
Dustin Johnson (92), $239,750 ....... 69-66-68-69—
Adam Hadwin (78), $182,000.......... 70-71-67-66—
Shubhankar Sharma, $182,000 ....... 65-66-69-74—
Bubba Watson (78), $182,000......... 69-66-72-67—
Paul Casey (67), $150,500 ............... 73-68-68-66—
Patton Kizzire (67), $150,500 ......... 69-69-71-66—
Daniel Berger (58), $126,500 .......... 69-68-72-67—
Tommy Fleetwood (58), $126,500 .. 72-71-67-66—
Alex Noren (58), $126,500............... 69-70-71-66—
Jordan Spieth (58), $126,500 .......... 70-67-69-70—
Adam Bland, $114,500..................... 70-67-71-69—
Xander Schauffele (53), $114,500... 65-68-70-74—
Charley Hoffman (46), $104,300 ..... 70-66-70-72—
Pat Perez (46), $104,300 ................. 68-67-68-75—
Jon Rahm (46), $104,300................. 67-71-70-70—
Brendan Steele (46), $104,300........ 69-66-71-72—
Jhonattan Vegas (46), $104,300 ..... 70-68-69-71—
Francesco Molinari (39), $95,250.... 71-70-70-68—
Kyle Stanley (39), $95,250 .............. 71-65-71-72—
Jorge Campillo, $91,000 .................. 72-71-69-68—
Tony Finau (36), $91,000................. 68-70-68-74—
Kevin Kisner (33), $88,000 .............. 70-71-66-74—
Louis Oosthuizen (27), $81,429 ...... 64-71-76-71—
Dean Burmester, $81,429................ 73-70-74-65—
Patrick Cantlay (27), $81,429.......... 70-75-71-66—
Kevin Chappell (27), $81,429........... 73-70-72-67—
Matthew Fitzpatrick, $81,429......... 71-69-74-68—
Branden Grace (27), $81,429........... 72-69-73-68—
Bernd Wiesberger, $81,429 ............. 73-71-72-66—
Rickie Fowler (17), $73,000............. 68-70-70-75—
Marc Leishman (17), $73,000.......... 69-68-69-77—
Joost Luiten, $73,000 ...................... 72-71-68-72—
Chris Paisley, $73,000 ..................... 65-75-71-72—
Thomas Pieters (17), $73,000 ......... 69-68-74-72—
Patrick Reed (17), $73,000 .............. 72-74-68-69—
Justin Rose (17), $73,000................ 71-72-73-67—
Webb Simpson (17), $73,000 .......... 72-70-73-68—
Peter Uihlein (17), $73,000 ............. 74-72-70-67—
Ross Fisher (12), $67,500................ 71-68-69-76—
Yuta Ikeda, $67,500 ......................... 73-74-68-69—
David Lipsky, $65,500...................... 70-71-71-73—
Charl Schwartzel (10), $65,500....... 71-69-70-75—
Wade Ormsby, $63,500 ................... 79-67-69-71—
Gary Woodland (9), $63,500............ 74-71-73-68—
Abraham Ancer (8), $61,500 ........... 71-76-71-69—
Chez Reavie (8), $61,500................. 72-73-68-74—
Satoshi Kodaira, $60,000................. 72-73-73-70—
Jason Dufner (7), $58,000 ............... 72-72-68-79—
Paul Dunne, $58,000 ........................ 73-75-72-71—
Dylan Frittelli, $58,000.................... 73-70-71-77—
Russell Henley (6), $55,500 ............ 69-69-75-79—
Matt Kuchar (6), $55,500 ................ 74-74-73-71—
Yusaku Miyazato, $53,500 .............. 77-72-74-70—
Brandon Stone, $53,500 .................. 75-76-71-71—
Brett Rumford, $52,500................... 78-74-72-73—
HaoTong Li, $52,000 ........................ 73-79-73-73—
Gavin Kyle Green, $51,500............... 78-73-74-74—
Oilers 4, Coyotes 3 (OT)
METRO ATLANTIC ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
CHAMPIONSHIP
E. Michigan 84, N. Illinois 77
Kent St. 80, Toledo 76
Ohio 85, Akron 73
W. Michigan 85, Bowling Green 71
A PTS
52 85
43 79
49 79
55 78
46 77
50 77
47 74
56 74
53 73
32 72
42 72
44 71
57 71
48 70
49 67
POWER-PLAY GOALS
Scoring: 4, Toronto, Komarov 7 (Martin, Zaitsev), 10:48.
5, Buffalo, Girgensons 7 (O’Reilly, Reinhart), 13:30. 6,
Buffalo, O’Reilly 19, 15:35.
MID-EASTERN ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
FIRST ROUND
G
33
36
30
23
31
27
27
18
20
40
30
27
14
22
18
PLAYER
GP
Alex Ovechkin, Washington ............................. 65
Evgeni Malkin, Pittsburgh ............................... 62
William Karlsson, Vegas
... 65
Patrik Laine, Winnipeg ..................................... 65
Tyler Seguin, Dallas ......................................... 65
Eric Staal, Minnesota ....................................... 66
Nikita Kucherov, Tampa Bay ............................ 64
Anders Lee, N.Y. Islanders
... 66
Nathan MacKinnon, Colorado .......................... 57
Taylor Hall, New Jersey ................................... 61
Connor McDavid, Edmonton ............................. 65
John Tavares, N.Y. Islanders
... 66
Brock Boeser, Vancouver ................................. 61
Sean Couturier, Philadelphia ........................... 66
Sean Monahan, Calgary ................................... 65
Auston Matthews, Toronto ............................. 53
Jason Zucker, Minnesota ................................. 66
Patrice Bergeron, Boston ................................. 55
Logan Couture, San Jose .................................. 62
Rickard Rakell, Anaheim .................................. 61
SECOND PERIOD
Akron 79, W. Michigan 78
Cent. Michigan 81, Bowling Green 77, OT
Kent St. 61, N. Illinois 59
Miami (Ohio) 68, Ohio 55
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
PLAYER
GP
Nikita Kucherov, Tampa Bay ................ 64
Evgeni Malkin, Pittsburgh .................... 62
Connor McDavid, Edmonton ................. 65
Claude Giroux, Philadelphia ................. 66
Nathan MacKinnon, Colorado ............... 57
Steven Stamkos, Tampa Bay ............... 66
Phil Kessel, Pittsburgh ......................... 66
Blake Wheeler, Winnipeg ..................... 65
Johnny Gaudreau, Calgary .................... 66
Alex Ovechkin, Washington ................. 65
Taylor Hall, New Jersey ....................... 61
Anze Kopitar, Los Angeles ................... 66
Jakub Voracek, Philadelphia ................ 66
Sidney Crosby, Pittsburgh .................... 66
Mathew Barzal, N.Y. Islanders ............. 66
3 tied with 65 points
PLAYER
GP
Jakub Voracek, Philadelphia ............................ 66
Blake Wheeler, Winnipeg ................................ 65
Claude Giroux, Philadelphia ............................. 66
Johnny Gaudreau, Calgary ............................... 66
Nikita Kucherov, Tampa Bay ............................ 64
Steven Stamkos, Tampa Bay ........................... 66
Mathew Barzal, N.Y. Islanders
... 66
Connor McDavid, Edmonton ............................. 65
Josh Bailey, N.Y. Islanders
... 62
Sidney Crosby, Pittsburgh ............................... 66
John Klingberg, Dallas ..................................... 65
Phil Kessel, Pittsburgh .................................... 66
Nathan MacKinnon, Colorado .......................... 57
Anze Kopitar, Los Angeles ............................... 66
Evgeny Kuznetsov, Washington ...................... 65
Evgeni Malkin, Pittsburgh ............................... 62
Jonathan Marchessault, Vegas
... 62
David Perron, Vegas
... 59
Brent Burns, San Jose ...................................... 66
Mikko Rantanen, Colorado ............................... 64
Scoring: 1, Buffalo, Reinhart 16 (Ristolainen, Okposo),
1:53 (pp). 2, Buffalo, Pominville 11 (Larsson, Ristolainen), 3:43. 3, Toronto, Komarov 6 (Marleau, Nylander),
19:52 (pp).
MID-AMERICAN CONFERENCE
FIRST ROUND
POINTS
ASSISTS
Nashville 4, Colorado 3 (OT)
Florida 4, Philadelphia 1
Anaheim 6, Chicago 3
Vegas 3, New Jersey 2
Minnesota 4, Detroit 1
Winnipeg 3, Carolina 2
Columbus 4, San Jose 2
H I GH S C HOOLS
B OY S ' B A S K E TB A L L
MLS
GOALS
FIRST PERIOD
Iona 83, Fairfield 71
20 — 90
22 — 112
METROPOLITAN
Washington ..................
Pittsburgh .....................
Philadelphia ..................
New Jersey ...................
Columbus ......................
Carolina .........................
N.Y. Rangers .................
x-N.Y. Islanders ............
TORONTO ................................ 1
BUFFALO ................................. 2
METRO ATLANTIC ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
CHAMPIONSHIP
21
28
Through Sunday‘s games
Sabres 5, Maple Leafs 3
Cleveland St. 44, Oakland 43
Wright St. 59, Milwaukee 53
Cavaliers 112, Pistons 90
NHL leaders
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Calgary at Buffalo, 7:30
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 8
Arizona at Vancouver, 10
Coll. of Charleston 83, William & Mary 73
Northeastern 79, UNC Wilmington 52
Utah at Indiana, 7
Houston at Milwaukee, 8
Memphis at Chicago, 8
Toronto at Detroit, 8
New Orleans at Sacramento, 10
Cleveland at Denver, 10:30
Orlando at L.A. Lakers, 10:30
SOCCER
NHL
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
SEMIFINALS
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
BOSTON ............................. 35
CHICAGO ............................ 16
Virginia (65)
Villanova
Xavier
Michigan St.
Duke
Gonzaga
Michigan
Cincinnati
Kansas
Purdue
Wichita St.
North Carolina
Tennessee
Texas Tech
Arizona
Auburn
Ohio St.
West Virginia
Clemson
Saint Mary's (Calif.)
Houston
Nevada
Florida
Miami
Rhode Island
RECORD
28-2
27-4
27-4
29-4
25-6
28-4
28-7
27-4
24-7
28-6
24-6
22-9
23-7
23-8
24-7
25-6
24-8
22-9
22-8
28-4
24-6
26-6
20-11
22-8
23-6
Others receiving votes: Kentucky 41, Creighton 39,
Loyola of Chicago 30, Middle Tennessee 28, N.C. State
18, St. Bonaventure 17, TCU 17, Virginia Tech 17, Seton
Hall 14, Arizona State 8, New Mexico State 7, Arkansas
6, Florida State 5, Missouri 5, Texas A&M 5, Oklahoma 3,
Baylor 2, Kansas State 1.
TUESDAY’S GAMES
MILWAUKEE ...................... 17
INDIANA ............................. 20
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
31/2
x-late game
DETROIT ............................. 28
CLEVELAND ....................... 26
HOCKEY
World Golf Ranking
Through Sunday
1. Dustin Johnson ..........................USA
2. Justin Thomas............................USA
3. Jon Rahm.....................................ESP
4. Jordan Spieth .............................USA
5. Justin Rose................................. ENG
6. Hideki Matsuyama ......................JPN
7. Rickie Fowler ..............................USA
8. Brooks Koepka............................USA
9. Jason Day ...................................AUS
10. Tommy Fleetwood.................... ENG
11. Sergio Garcia .............................ESP
12. Rory McIlroy .............................. NIR
13. Tyrrell Hatton........................... ENG
14. Henrik Stenson........................ SWE
15. Alex Noren............................... SWE
16. Marc Leishman .........................AUS
17. Paul Casey ................................ ENG
18. Phil Mickelson ..........................USA
19. Pat Perez ..................................USA
20. Matt Kuchar .............................USA
21. Rafa Cabrera Bello.....................ESP
22. Brian Harman ...........................USA
23. Xander Schauffele....................USA
24. Francesco Molinari .................... ITA
25. Charley Hoffman ......................USA
26. Gary Woodland.........................USA
27. Patrick Reed .............................USA
28. Branden Grace .......................... SAF
29. Ross Fisher............................... ENG
30. Louis Oosthuizen...................... SAF
31. Daniel Berger............................USA
32. Matthew Fitzpatrick ................ ENG
33. Kevin Kisner .............................USA
34. Tony Finau ................................USA
35. Patrick Cantlay .........................USA
36. Kiradech Aphibarnrat ...............THA
37. Kevin Chappell..........................USA
38. Bubba Watson..........................USA
39. Brendan Steele.........................USA
40. HaoTong Li................................CHN
41. Thomas Pieters .........................BEL
42. Webb Simpson .........................USA
43. Satoshi Kodaira .........................JPN
44. Adam Hadwin ...........................CAN
45. Dylan Frittelli ........................... SAF
46. Jason Dufner ............................USA
47. Chez Reavie .............................. SAF
48. Jhonattan Vegas ......................... --49. Yuta Ikeda .................................JPN
50. Charl Schwartzel ...................... SAF
10.50
9.44
8.67
8.24
7.22
7.13
6.35
5.86
5.75
5.58
5.56
5.52
5.01
4.97
4.91
4.91
4.48
4.47
4.41
4.30
4.13
3.93
3.52
3.47
3.46
3.28
3.24
3.21
3.18
3.18
3.10
3.08
3.07
3.07
3.06
2.94
2.84
2.75
2.74
2.73
2.61
2.58
2.57
2.55
2.52
2.50
2.47
2.43
2.40
2.36
268
268
269
269
271
271
272
272
274
274
274
275
275
276
276
276
276
277
277
278
278
278
278
278
279
279
280
280
281
282
282
282
282
282
282
282
283
283
283
283
283
283
283
283
283
284
284
285
285
286
286
287
287
288
291
291
291
292
292
293
293
297
298
299
EASTERN
W
Philadelphia .....................1
Columbus .........................1
New York City FC .............1
Orlando City .....................0
D.C. United .......................0
Chicago ............................0
New York .........................0
Montreal ..........................0
New England ....................0
Toronto FC .......................0
Atlanta United FC ............0
L
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
T PTS
0
3
0
3
0
3
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
GF
2
2
2
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
GA
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
2
2
2
4
WESTERN
W
Houston ...........................1
San Jose ...........................1
LA Galaxy .........................1
Vancouver ........................1
Los Angeles FC ................1
Real Salt Lake ..................0
Dallas ...............................0
Colorado ...........................0
Minnesota United ............0
Portland ...........................0
Seattle .............................0
Sporting KC ......................0
L
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
T PTS
0
3
0
3
0
3
0
3
0
3
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
GF
4
3
2
2
1
1
1
0
2
1
0
0
GA
0
2
1
1
0
1
1
0
3
2
1
2
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
D.C. United 1, Orlando City 1, tie
Columbus 2, Toronto FC 0
Houston 4, Atlanta United FC 0
Philadelphia 2, New England 0
Real Salt Lake 1, Dallas 1, tie
San Jose 3, Minnesota United 2
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
Los Angeles FC 1, Seattle 0
Vancouver 2, Montreal 1
New York City FC 2, Sporting KC 0
LA Galaxy 2, Portland 1
SATURDAY, MARCH 10
Montreal at Columbus, 1
Colorado at New England, 1:30
Los Angeles FC at Real Salt Lake, 3:30
Sporting KC at Chicago, 6
Vancouver at Houston, 6
Portland at New York, 7
Minnesota United at Orlando City, 7:30
New York City 2, Sporting KC 0
Late Sunday
NEW YORK CITY
1
1
2
SPORTING KC
0
0
0
First half: 1, New York City, Moralez, 1 (Villa), 32nd
minute.
Second half: 2, New York City, Medina, 1 (Sweat), 53rd.
Goalies: New York City, Sean Johnson; Sporting KC, Tim
Melia.
Yellow Cards: Medina, New York City, 23rd; Ring, New
York City, 34th; Johnson, New York City, 59th.
Red Cards: Chanot, New York City, 88th.
New York City, Sean Johnson; Alexander Callens, Maxime Chanot, Ben Sweat, Anton Tinnerholm; Yangel
Herrera, Jesus Medina (Ismael Tajouri, 70th), Maxi
Moralez (Sebastien Ibeagha, 90th), Alexander Ring,
Rodney Wallace; David Villa (Ronald Matarrita, 85th).
Sporting KC, Tim Melia; Matt Besler, Ike Opara, Graham
Zusi; Yohan Croizet (Gerso Fernandes, 57th), Roger
Espinoza, Felipe Gutierrez, Cristian Lobato (Jimmy
Medranda, 73rd), Ilie Sanchez; Diego Rubio (Daniel
Salloi, 62nd), Johnny Russell.
PORTLAND
0
1
1
LOS ANGELES
2
0
2
First half: 1, Los Angeles, Kamara, 1 (Feltscher), 32nd
minute. 2, Los Angeles, Alessandrini, 1, 34th.
Second half: 3, Portland, Blanco, 1 (Adi), 66th.
Goalies: Portland, Jake Gleeson, Kendall Mcintosh; Los
Angeles, David Bingham, Justin Vom Steeg.
Yellow Cards: Alessandrini, Los Angeles, 18th; Mabiala,
Portland, 86th; Ciani, Los Angeles, 89th.
Portland, Jake Gleeson; Marco Farfan, Larrys Mabiala,
Alvas Powell (Zarek Valentin, 61st), Liam Ridgewell;
Sebastian Blanco, David Guzman, Cristhian Paredes
(Andres Flores, 84th), Diego Valeri; Fanendo Adi, Andy
Polo (Samuel Armenteros, 72nd).
Los Angeles, David Bingham; Michael Ciani, Ashley Cole,
Rolf Feltscher, Jorgen Skjelvik; Emmanuel Boateng
(Servando Carrasco, 82nd), Giovani Dos Santos (Sebastian Lletget, 72nd), Jonathan Dos Santos, Perry Kitchen;
Romain Alessandrini (Chris Pontius, 61st), Ola Kamara.
B AS E BALL
WASHINGTON AB R H BI ST. LOUIS
TOTALS
28 1 5
WASHINGTON
ST. LOUIS
SINGLES
1. Roger Federer, Switzerland, 10060
2. Rafael Nadal, Spain, 9460
3. Marin Cilic, Croatia, 4870
4. Grigor Dimitrov, Bulgaria, 4635
5. Alexander Zverev, Germany, 4540
6. Dominic Thiem, Austria, 3810
7. David Goffin, Belgium, 3280
8. Juan Martin Del Potro, Argentina, 3200
9. Kevin Anderson, South Africa, 3080
10. Jack Sock, United States, 2650
11. Stan Wawrinka, Switzerland, 2475
12. Lucas Pouille, France, 2455
13. Novak Djokovic, Serbia, 2380
14. Pablo Carreno-Busta, Spain, 2315
15. Tomas Berdych, Czech Republic, 2275
16. Roberto Bautista-Agut, Spain, 2255
17. Diego Schwartzman, Argentina, 2220
18. John Isner, United States, 2205
19. Fabio Fognini, Italy, 2190
20. Nick Kyrgios, Australia, 2125
21. Sam Querrey, United States, 2095
22. Albert Ramos-Vinolas, Spain, 1745
23. Adrian Mannarino, France, 1715
24. Kyle Edmund, Great Britain, 1642
25. Kei Nishikori, Japan, 1595
ATP World Tour Schedule
H-hard, C-clay, G-grass
Feb. 26-March 3 _ Abierto Mexicano Telcel, HO (Juan
Martin del Potro)
Feb. 26-March 4 _ Brasil Open, CO (Fabio Fognini)
March 8-18 _ BNP Paribas Open, Indian Wells, Calif., HO
March 21-April 1 _ Miami Open, Key Biscayne, Fla., HO
April 6-8 _ Davis Cup quarterfinals
April 9-15 _ Fayez Sarofim & Co. U.S. Clay Court
Championship, Houston, CO
April 9-15 _ Grand Prix Hassan II, Marrakech, Morocco,
CO
April 15-22 _ Rolex Monte-Carlo Masters, CO
April 23-29 _ Barcelona Open Banc Sabadell, CO
April 23-29 _ Gazprom Hungarian Open, Budapest, CO
WTA ranking
AB R H BI
D.Fwler rf
Arzrena rf
G.Grcia ss
Mercado pr
Y.Mlina c
M.Ozuna lf
Mrtinez 1b
J.Gyrko 3b
Lu.Voit dh
B.Vlera 2b
Ed.Sosa 2b
A.Grcia cf
1. Simona Halep, Romania, 7965
2. Caroline Wozniacki, Denmark, 7525
3. Garbine Muguruza, Spain, 6175
4. Elina Svitolina, Ukraine, 5480
5. Karolina Pliskova, Czech Republic, 5080
6. Jelena Ostapenko, Latvia, 4941
7. Caroline Garcia, France, 4625
8. Venus Williams, United States, 4277
9. Petra Kvitova, Czech Republic, 3086
10. Angelique Kerber, Germany, 3055
11. Johanna Konta, Great Britain, 2930
12. Julia Goerges, Germany, 2910
13. Sloane Stephens, United States, 2873
14. Madison Keys, United States, 2703
15. Kristina Mladenovic, France, 2605
16. Coco Vandeweghe, United States, 2433
17. Magdalena Rybarikova, Slovakia, 2405
18. Svetlana Kuznetsova, Russia, 2362
19. Daria Kasatkina, Russia, 2300
20. Anastasija Sevastova, Latvia, 2295
21. Ashleigh Barty, Australia, 2189
22. Elise Mertens, Belgium, 2185
23. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, Russia, 2125
24. Elena Vesnina, Russia, 2110
25. Barbora Strycova, Czech Republic, 1980
DOUBLES
Cardinals 2, Nationals 1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
Through Sunday
SINGLES
Late Sunday
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
ATP World Tour ranking
Through Sunday
Galaxy 2, Portland 1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
TE NNI S
1. Lukasz Kubot, Poland, 9560
2. Marcelo Melo, Brazil, 9560
3. Henri Kontinen, Finland, 6700
4. John Peers, Australia, 6700
5. Mate Pavic, Croatia, 6190
6. Oliver Marach, Austria, 6020
7. Nicolas Mahut, France, 5380
8. Jamie Murray, Great Britain, 5070
9. Bruno Soares, Brazil, 5070
10. Jean-Julien Rojer, Netherlands, 5040
D.C. United at Atlanta United FC, 3
LA Galaxy at New York City FC, 5
3
1
3
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
3
1
1
1
2
0
2
1
RCC (23-3) Harris 23, Rose 11, Baccum 11, Preston 7,
Evans 6 Totals 13 5-7 58.
D (26-5) Dickinson 31, Moore 21, Young 4, Timberlake 3,
Wallace 3, Smith 2 Totals 19 14-17 64.
Halftime: Rock Creek Christian, (29-27).
Three-point goals: D 4 (Moore 1, Dickinson 3); RCC 9
(Evans 2, Harris 3, Preston 1, Rose 2, Baccum 1).
DOUBLES
SUNDAY, MARCH 11
T.Trner ss
Brignac ss
M.Adams 1b
Johnson rf
V.Rbles cf
A.d Aza lf
Montero c
Perkins cf
M.Serra rf
J.Slano c
Mrmljos dh
T.Gshue ph
Rynolds 2b
Gterrez 3b
Stvnson lf
O.Abreu 2b
Sanchez 3b
Dmnguez 1b
TOP 20
NO. 1 DEMATHA 64,
NO. 4 ROCK CREEK CHRISTIAN 58
3
1
2
1
3
3
3
3
3
2
1
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
2
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1. Latisha Chan, Taiwan, 10130
2. Martina Hingis, Switzerland, 10130
3. Elena Vesnina, Russia, 7390
(tie) Ekaterina Makarova, Russia, 7390
5. Timea Babos, Hungary, 7130
6. Andrea Sestini Hlavackova, Czech Republic, 5735
7. Lucie Safarova, Czech Republic, 5305
8. Gabriela Dabrowski, Canada, 4910
9. Katerina Siniakova, Czech Republic, 4670
10. Casey Dellacqua, Australia, 4320
TR ANS AC TI ONS
MLB
1 TOTALS
001
000
28 2 5
000
020
000
00X
—
—
1
1
2
DP: Washington 3, St. Louis 0. LOB: Washington 5, St.
Louis 3. 2B: Adams (1), Martinez (4), Garcia (2). HR:
Stevenson (1). SB: Martinez (1), Voit (1). CS: Mercado
(1).
WASHINGTON
IP
H
R
ER
BB
SO
Roark
Benoit L, 0-1 B (S, 0-1)
Romero
Voth
Adams
4
1
1
1
1
1
3
0
0
1
0
2
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
3
1
0
2
2
ST. LOUIS
IP
H
R
ER
BB
SO
Weaver
Gomber (W, 1-0)
Lyons (H, 1)
Sherriff (H, 1)
Leone (S, 1-1)
3
3
1
1
1
3
2
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
3
1
0
0
4
2
0
0
2
HBP: by Weaver (Robles).
WP: Benoit.
Umpires: Home, Larry Vanover; First, Jerry Meals;
Second, Mike Estabrook; Third, David Rackley.
T: 2:19. A: 5,303
Chicago White Sox: Agreed to terms with LHP Robbie
Ross Jr. on a minor league contract.
Detroit Tigers: Agreed to terms with RHPs Johnny
Barbato, Buck Farmer, Artie Lewicki and Drew VerHagen; LHP Daniel Norris; Cs Grayson Greiner and John
Hicks; INFs Sergio Alcantara and Jeimer Candelario and
OFs Mikie Mahtook and Victor Reyes on one-year
contracts.
Kansas City Royals: Assigned OF Billy Burns outright to
Omaha (PCL).
Tampa Bay Rays: Traded INF Ryan Schimpf to Atlanta
Braves in for a player to be named or cash.
Arizona Diamondbacks: Agreed to terms with C Anthony
Recker on a minor league contract.
Atlanta Braves: Optioned RHPs Akeel Morris and RHP
Jason Hursh to Gwinnett (IL).
St. Louis Cardinals: Agreed to terms with INF Paul
DeJong on a six-year contract and with RHPs Matt
Bowman, John Brebbia, Jack Flaherty, John Gant, Derian
Gonzalez, Conner Greene, Dominic Leone, Josh Lucas,
Mike Mayers, Alex Reyes, Sam Tuivailala and Luke
Weaver; LHPs Austin Gomber and Ryan Sherriff; C
Carson Kelly; INFs Greg Garcia, Jose Martinez, Yario
Munoz, Edmundo Sosa, Breyvic Valera, Luke Voit and
OFs Harrison Bader, Oscar Mercado and Tyler O’Neill on
one-year contracts. Renewed the contract of OF Tommy
Pham. Reassigned RHPs Hector Mendoza, Daniel Poncedeleon and Jake Woodford; LHP Jordan Schafer; Cs
Jeremy Martinez and Dennis Ortega and INF Max
Schrock to their minor league camp.
Washington Nationals: Agreed to terms with OF Alejandro De Aza on a minor league contract.
CAN-AM LEAGUE
AU TO R AC I NG
New Jersey Jackals: Signed INF Kevin Whatley.
Quebec Capitales: Signed INF Shao-Pin Ho.
Rockland Boulders: Signed RHP Ryan Deemes.
NASCAR MONSTER ENERGY CUP SCHEDULE
FRONTIER LEAGUE
Feb. 11: x-Advance Auto Parts Clash (Brad Keselowski)
Feb. 15: x-Can-Am Duel 1 (Ryan Blaney)
Feb. 15: x-Can-Am Duel 2 (Chase Elliott)
Feb. 18: Daytona 500 (Austin Dillon)
Feb. 25: Folds of Honor QuikTrip 500 (Kevin Harvick)
March 4: Penzoil 400 (Kevin Harvick)
March 11: TicketGuardian 500, Avondale, Ariz.
March 18: Auto Club 400, Fontana, Calif.
March 25: STP 500, Ridgeway, Va.
April 8: O’Reilly Auto Parts 500, Fort Worth
April 15: Food City 500, Bristol, Tenn.
April 21: Toyota Owners 400, Richmond,
April 29: GEICO 500, Lincoln, Ala.
May 6: AAA 400 Drive for Autism, Dover, Del.
May 12: TBA, Kansas City, Kan.
May 19: x-NASCAR All-Star Open, Concord, N.C.
May 19: x-NASCAR All-Star Race, Concord, N.C.
May 27: Coca-Cola 600, Concord, N.C.
June 3: Pocono 400, Lond Pond, Pa.
June 10: FireKeepers Casino 400, Brooklyn, Mich.
June 24: Toyota/Save Mart 350, Sonoma, Calif.
July 1: Overton’s 400, Joliet, Ill.
July 7: Coke Zero 400, Daytona Beach, Fla.
July 14: Quaker State 400, Sparta, Ky.
July 22: New Hampshire 301, Loudon
July 29: Gander Outdoors 400, Long Pond, Pa.
Aug. 5: GoBowling at The Glen, Watkins Glen, N.Y.
Aug. 12: TBA, Brooklyn, Mich.
Aug. 18: Bass Pro Shops NRA Night Race, Bristol, Tenn.
Sept. 2: Bojangles’ Southern 500, Darlington, S.C.
Sept. 9: Big Machine Brickyard 400, Indianapolis
Sept. 16: South Point 400, Las Vegas
Sept. 22: Federated Auto Parts 400, Richmond
Sept. 30: Bank of America 500, Concord, N.C.
Oct. 7: TBA, Dover, Del.
Oct. 14: Alabama 500, Lincoln, Ala.
Oct. 21: Hollywood Casino 400, Kansas City, Kan.
Oct. 28: First Data 500, Ridgeway, Va.
Nov. 4: AAA Texas 500, Fort Worth
Evansville Otters: Signed RHP Luc Rennie to a contract
extension. Signed RHP Sam Thoele.
Joliet Slammers: Signed RHP Ethan Rosebeck.
MILES LED LEADERS
Through Sunday
1. Kevin Harvick .................................................. 59974
2. Ryan Blaney .................................................... 29650
3. Kurt Busch ...................................................... 12008
4. Denny Hamlin ................................................... 9504
5. Brad Keselowski ............................................... 5852
6. Joey Logano ...................................................... 4654
7. Alex Bowman .................................................... 3250
8. Kyle Busch ........................................................ 2886
9. Erik Jones ......................................................... 2750
9. Ricky Stenhouse ............................................... 2750
NBA
Atlanta Hawks: Called up G Josh Magette and F Andrew
White III from Erie (NBAGL).
Washington Wizards: Signed G Ramon Sessions to a
10-day contract.
NFL
Atlanta Falcons: Agreed to terms with K Matt Bryant on
a three-year contract extension.
Dallas Cowboys: Placed the franchise tag on DE DeMarcus Lawrence.
Oakland Raiders: Released LB Aldon Smith.
NHL
Colorado Avalanche: Reassigned G Spencer Martin to
San Antonio (AHL).
Dallas Stars: Recalled F Roope Hintz from Texas (AHL)
and reassigned him back to Texas.
Edmonton Oilers: Signed F Colin Larkin to a one-year
NHL entry level contract beginning in 2018-19.
New York Rangers: Agreed to terms with F Ty Ronning
on an entry-level contract.
AMERICAN HOCKEY LEAGUE
Bakersfield Condors: Signed F Colin Larkin and D Logan
Day to amateur tryout contracts for the remainder of the
2017-18 season.
Hartford Wolf Pack: Released D Joey Leach and G
Charles Williams from their professional tryout agreements.
San Antonio Rampage: Reassigned G Joe Cannata to
Colorado (ECHL).
ECHL
Atlanta Gladiators: Announced D Taylor Doherty and F
Lindsay Sparks were recalled by Providence (AHL).
Manchester Monarchs: Announced G Charles Williams
was returned from loan by Hartford (AHL) and D Colton
Saucerman was returned from loan by Providence
(AHL).
OLYMPIC SPORTS
Iaaf: Announced the resignation of chief executive
officer Olivier Gers.
COLLEGES
Arkansas: Dismissed men’s senior basketball F Dustin
Thomas for an unspecified violation of team rules.
Texas Tech: Signed men’s basketball coach Chris Beard
to a contract extension through the 2023-24 season.
EFGHI
washingtonpost.com/classifieds
TUESDAY, MARCH 6, 2018
EZ
the local expert
on local jobs
new and pre-owned
cars, trucks and suvs
homes for sale,
commercial real estate
rentals
merchandise, garage
sales, auctions, tickets
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washingtonpost.com/jobs
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To place an ad, go to washingtonpostads.com
For Jobs advertisements, go to
washingtonpost.com/recruit
or call 202-334-4100
(toll free 1-800-765-3675)
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C
Cars
DODGE
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asking $1900 OBO 240-645-6767
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JEEP 2000 GRAND CHEROKEE
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AIRLINES ARE HIRING
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for qualified students – Career
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CALL Aviation Institute of
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JOBS
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers are needed
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Post
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Arlington, VA
Call
703-580-7916
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Alexandria, VA
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The Washington
Post
Autos Wanted
DONATE AUTOS, TRUCKS, RV'S.
LUTHERAN MISSION SOCIETY. Your
donation helps local families with
food, clothing, shelter, counseling.
Tax deductible. MVA License
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www.LutheranMissionSociety.org
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Newspaper Delivery
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Bids & Proposals
Capitol Paving of D.C., Inc.
Capitol Paving is soliciting qualified
MBE/WBE subcontractors to perform DDOT - DC PLUG Feeder 308
– Undergrounding of Power Line,
DCKA-2018-B- 0025. email –
bids@capitolpaving.com ; call –
571.277.1022 or fax – 202.832.5126
– Bid Opening 11/01/2017
830
Special Notices
In accordance with MD Code Health
General Sec. 4-403, this is a notice
of the death of Richard Blake, MD,
physician, who had medical practices at 1111 Spring St, Ste 300,
Silver Spring, MD 20910 and 4305
St Barnabus Rd, Temple Hills, MD
20748. Patients may email richardblakemd@gmail.com to arrange to
obtain copies of medical records
or have the records transferred.
Records will be destroyed 4/9/18.
850
Montgomery County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY
MARYLAND
STEPHEN B. JACKSON and
STEVEN P. HENNE
Substituted Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
MARIAMMA ISAC
(n/k/a Mariamma Alexander)
THOMAS ALEXANDER
Defendants
Civil Action No. 435855-V
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN this
22nd day of February, 2018 by
the Circuit Court for Montgomery
County, that the sale of the property known as 11703 Cider Press
Place, Unit 9, Germantown, Maryland 20876, made by Stephen
B. Jackson and Steven P. Henne,
Substituted Trustees, to: Housing
Opportunities Commission of
Montgomery County, Maryland
and reported in the above-entitled cause, be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 26th day of March,
2018, next; provided a copy of
this Notice be inserted in some
newspaper published in said
Montgomery County, once a week
for three successive weeks on or
before the said 26th day of March,
2018.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $326,400.00.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Montgomery County, MD
Feb 27, Mar 6, 13, 2018 12167413
Wake up
to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
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N
N
JOBS
JOBS
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The Washington Post
for the following areas:
For Routes in
College Park, Lanham & Hyattsville, MD
Call Robert Garner
301-490-2032
Excellent part-time income!
Reliable transportation required.
Newspaper Delivery Carriers
815
Legal Notices
851
Legal Notices
Department of Justice
Antitrust Division
Take notice that the United States has filed a proposed Final Judgment
in a civil antitrust case in the United States District Court for the
Eastern District of Michigan, United States of America and State of
Michigan v. W.A. Foote Memorial Hospital d/b/a Allegiance Health,
Civil Action No. 15-12311 (JEL) (DRG). On June 25, 2015, the United
States and the State of Michigan filed a Complaint alleging that
Defendant W.A. Foote Memorial Hospital d/b/a Allegiance Health
(“Allegiance”) entered into an agreement with Hillsdale Community
Health Center that unlawfully allocated customers in violation of
Section 1 of the Sherman Act, 15 U.S.C. § 1, and Section 2 of
the Michigan Antitrust Reform Act, MCL 445.772. The proposed
Final Judgment, filed February 9, 2018, prohibits Allegiance from
agreeing with other healthcare providers to prohibit or limit marketing
or to divide any geographic market or territory. It also prohibits
Allegiance from communicating with competing healthcare systems
regarding its marketing plans, with limited exceptions, and requires
appointment of an antitrust compliance officer and other training
and monitoring. A Competitive Impact Statement filed by the United
States describes the Complaint, the proposed Final Judgment, the
industry, and the remedies available to private litigants who may have
been injured by the alleged violation.
Copies of the Complaint, proposed Final Judgment, and Competitive
Impact Statement are available for inspection on the Antitrust
Division’s website at http://www.justice.gov/atr and at the Office of
the Clerk of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of
Michigan.
Interested persons may address comments to Peter J. Mucchetti,
Chief, Healthcare & Consumer Products Section, Antitrust Division,
Department of Justice, 450 Fifth Street NW, Suite 4100, Washington,
DC 20530 (telephone: 202-307-0001) within 60 days of the date of this
notice. Such comments, including the name of the submitter, and
responses thereto, will be posted on the Antitrust Division’s website,
filed with the Court, and, under certain circumstances, published in
the Federal Register.
850
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
23819 LOG HOUSE ROAD
Gaithersburg, MD 20882
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to RICHARD T. CREGGER, Trustee(s), dated
October 27, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 33421, folio
795, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at
the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
MARCH 16, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
LOT NUMBERED SIX (6) IN THE SUBDIVISION KWON AS
"LOTS 5 & 6, WELSH'S ADDITION IN WOODFIELD" AS PER
PLAT THEREOF RECORDED PLAT BOOK 156 AT PLAT 17683,
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
MARYLAND.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $56,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (14-16393)
Keith M. Yacko, Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Jason L. Hamlin,
Thomas J. Gartner
Substitute Trustees
are needed to deliver
The Washington Post
for the following areas:
For Routes in
Crofton/Davidsonville
Cape St. Claire/Arnold
Millersville
Call Joe Shojamanesh
410-340-7791
Excellent part-time income!
Reliable transportation required.
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 27, MARCH 6, 13, 2018
850
Montgomery County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
MARC J. ROBINSON
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. 414909V
NOTICE
Newspapers carriers
needed to deliver
The Washington Post
in
DC, MD and VA area.
Great part-time income opportunity!
Transportation required.
To apply, go to
deliverthepost.com
Legal Notices - 202-334-7007
Auctions, Estate Sales, Furniture 202-334-7029
Biz Ops/Services - 202-334-5787
or call 202-334-6200
JOBS
MERCEDES-BENZ
C
CLASSIFIED
D8
Notice is hereby given this 22nd
day of FEBRUARY, 2018, by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, Maryland, that the sale of the
property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 15916
Green Meadow Road, Gaithersburg, MD 20878 will be ratified
and confirmed unless cause to
the contrary thereof be shown on
or before the 26th day of MARCH,
2018, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive weeks in some newspaper
of general circulation published in
said County before the 26th day
of MARCH, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$420,000.00.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Montgomery County, Maryland
Feb 27, Mar 6, 13, 2018 12167408
12165726
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
You, too, could have
home delivery.
SF
Prince Georges County
851
FREE UNDER $250
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
6307 HIL MAR DRIVE UNIT 14
District Heights , MD 20747
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to WILLIAM A. MARKWAT, Trustee(s), dated
December 12, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records
of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 27547,
folio 374, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed
of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees,
by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARCH 8, 2018 at 11:30AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
BUILDING 1 UNIT NO. 1-14 OF THE "WESTWOOD PARK
CONDOMINIUM", ACCORDING TO THE DECLARATION OF
CONDOMINIUM DATED JANUARY 6, 2006 AND RECORDED
JANUARY 17, 2006 IN LIBER 24035, FOLIO 595, AMENDED
AND RESTATED DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM DATED
JANUARY 31, 2006 AND RECORDED FEBRUARY 1, 2006
IN LIBER 24213, FOLIO 660, AMONG THE LAND RECORDS
OF THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, AND ANY
RECORDED AMENDMENTS THERETO AS OF THE DATE HEREOF, AND AS PER PLAT OF CONDOMINIUM SUBDIVISION
RECORDED IN CONDOMINIUM PLAT BOOK 210 AT PLAT
NO. 42 ET SEQ., FURTHER AMENDED AND RESTATED IN
CONDOMINIUM PLAT BOOK REP216 AT PLAT NOS. 26
THROUGH 34. WHICH HAS THE MAILING ADDRESS OF: 6307
HIL MAR DRIVE, #14, DISTRICT HEIGHTS, MD 20747 TAX ID
NO. 3818044
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $13,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.5% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-12929)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri, Christine
Johnson, Melissa Alcocer, Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
vs.
ROOSEVELT HOLLINS, JR A/K/A
ROOSEVELT HOLLINS JR
REGINA R HOLLINS
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-20081
NOTICE
TIA L STANLEY
EDWARD E STANLEY, JR A/K/A
EDWARD E STANLEY JR
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
4988 KEPPLER ROAD
Temple Hills, MD 20748
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to RONALD S. DUETCH, Trustee(s), dated May
25, 2005, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 22661, folio 276, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARCH 22, 2018 at 11:30AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED ONE-HUNDRED SIX (106) IN A SUBDIVISION
KNOWN AS "LOT 103 TO LOT 106, WOODLANE", AS PER PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK WWW 35 AT PLAT 66
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND AND HAVING A PROPERTY ADDRESS OF 4988
KEPPLER ROAD, TEMPLE HILLS, MD 20748 AND BEING
MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOW: BEGINNING
AT AN IRON PIPE ON THE NORTHERN MOST CORNER OF LOT
106 AND RUNNING ON A DIVISION LINE BETWEEN LOT 105
AND LOT 106, S 42 DEG. 30 MIN. 53 SEC. E, 109.10 FEET TO
AN IRON PIPE; THENCE WITH THE OUTLINE OF LOT 106, S
71 DEG. 22 MIN. 00 SEC, W, 73.41 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE;
THENCE THROUGH LOT 106 ON THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY
LINE OF THE NEW CAPITAL BELTWAY (SRC PLAT N. 26741)
108.70 FEET ON THE ARC OF A CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING
A RADIUS OF 3424.05 FOOT, A LONG CHORD DISTANCE OF
108.69 FEET AND A CHORD BEARING OF N 85 DEG 36 MIN.
38 SEC W TO AN IRON PIPE; THENCE WITH THE SOUTHEAST
SIDE OF KEPPLER ROAD, N. 47 DEG29 MIN 07 SEC. E
141.39 FOOT TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING
9,241 SQUARE FEET MORE OR LESS. BEING THE FEE SIMPLE
PROPERTY WHICH, BY DEED DATED OCTOBER 29, 1996,
AND RECORDED IN THE LAND RECORDS OF THE COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, MARYLAND, IN LIBER 11105, FOLIO 584,
WAS GRANTED AND CONVEYED BY CARL AUGUST HANSON
AND CAROLE JOANNE HANSON UNTO ROBERT WOODROW
MURPHY AND CRYSTAL D. MURPHY
Said property is subject to a 120 day IRS Right of
Redemption
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 10.999%
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 20, 27, MARCH 6, 2018
12164851 into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
www.hwestauctions.com
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
MARCH 6, 13, 20, 2018
12153855 851
Prince Georges County 851 Prince Georges County interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
851
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
Prince Georges County 851 Prince Georges County
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (13-24593)
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MARYLAND
MARYLAND
Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
MARYLAND
Thomas W. Hodge, Thomas J. Gartner,
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Trustee(s)
Robert M. Oliveri, David M. Williamson,
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Plaintiff(s)
Plaintiff(s)
Trustee(s)
Trustee(s)
Substitute Trustees
vs.
vs.
Plaintiff(s)
Plaintiff(s)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 14th
day of February, 2018 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner,
Philip S. Shriver, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 368
Possum Court, Capitol Heights, MD
20743 and reported in the above
entitled cause, will be finally
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 14th day
of March, 2018 next; provided a
copy of this Order be inserted
in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 14th
day of March, 2018.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
1-800-753-POST
851
mypublicnotices.com/
washingtonpost/PublicNotice.asp
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BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
3104 Varnum Street
Mount Rainier, MD 20712
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to LAWYERS TITLE INSURANCE CORPORATION,
Trustee(s), dated January 26, 2006, and recorded among the
Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
in Liber 26029, folio 670, the holder of the indebtedness
secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned
Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the
aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby,
the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
ON,
MARCH 22, 2018 at 11:30AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY SITUATE IN PRINCE GEORGE' S COUNTY, STATE OF MARYLAND DESCRIBED AS: LOT NUMBERED
SEVEN (7) AND THE WESTERLY FORTY (40) FEET OF LOT
SIX (6) IN BLOCK NUMBERED SEVENTEEN (17) IN A SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "MOUNT RAINIER" AS PER PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5 AT PLAT 658 AND RE-RECORDED
AT PLAT BOOK A AT PLAT 5 AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND; BEING IN THE 17TH
ELECTION DISTRICT OF SAID COUNTY. THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON KNOWN AS 3104 VARNUM STREET BEING THE
SAME LOT OF GROUND IN A DEED DATED 05/30/1997 AND
RECORDED 06/09/1997 AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY IN BOOK 11474, PAGE 408
FROM REX B. WINGERTER AND KERRY J. LORING TO OLIVIA
D. COOK, THE BORROWER HEREIN.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.5% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-07801)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $144,000.00.
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
Prince Georges County
Trustee Sales
202-334-5782
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Feb 20, 27, Mar 6, 2018 12165984
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
1-800-753-POST
SF
vs.
RALPH WILLIAMS
LAKIA WILLIAMS
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-14082
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 14th
day of February, 2018 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner,
Philip S. Shriver, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 10613
IGNATIUS DIGGES DR, Upper Marlboro, MD 20772 and reported in the
above entitled cause, will be finally
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 14th day
of March, 2018 next; provided a
copy of this Order be inserted
in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 14th
day of March, 2018.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $207,500.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Feb 20, 27, Mar 6, 2018 12165983
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
CIVIL NO: CAEF16-01473
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 14th
day of February, 2018 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 3400
Lottsford Vista Road, Bowie, MD
20721, and reported in the above
entitled cause, will be finally
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 14th day
of March, 2018 next; provided a
copy of this Order be inserted
in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 14th
day of March, 2018.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $221,000.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Feb 20, 27, Mar 6, 2018 12165980
ZELMARINE GILMORE
MELODY GILMORE
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF13-25160
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 14th
day of February, 2018 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, Trustees, of the Real Property
designated as 13201 FORT WASHINGTON RD, Fort Washington, MD
20744, and reported in the above
entitled cause, will be finally
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 14th day
of March, 2018 next; provided a
copy of this Order be inserted
in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 14th
day of March, 2018.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $301,000.00.
1-800-753-POST
SF
12164663
ARE YOUR
TENANTS
MOVING OUT?
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Feb 20, 27, Mar 6, 2018 12165981
You, too, could have
home delivery.
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 6, 13, 20, 2018
1-800-753-POST
SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
CLASSIFIED
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202.334.6200
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C054F 2x3
TUESDAY, MARCH 6, 2018
851
Prince Georges County
851
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
3529 DUKE STREET
College Park, MD 20740
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to QUALITY TITLE, Trustee(s), dated August
17, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 25938, folio 131, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARCH 8, 2018 at 11:30AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
SITUATE IN PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, STATE OF MARYLAND, DESCRIBED AS: BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED
AS LOT NUMBERED TWENTY-SIX (26) IN BLOCK LETTERED
"A" IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "SECTION 2, COLLEGE
PAR WOODS" AS PER PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
W.W.W. 37 AT PLAT 53, AMONG THE LAND RECORDED OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, BEING IN THE 21ST
ELECTION DISTRICT OF SAID COUNTY. BE THE SAME MORE
OR LESS, BUT SUBJECT TO ALL LEGAL HIGHWAYS.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $29,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (15-12951)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 20, 27, MARCH 6, 2018
12164685
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
5300 Lakevale Terrace
Bowie, MD 20720
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to A. BRUCE CLEVELAND AND JOHN
SCHOEMER, Trustee(s), dated May 6, 2010, and recorded
among the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND in Liber 31760, folio 609, the holder of the
indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the
undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded
among the aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARCH 22, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED FIFTY-SEVEN (57), IN BLOCK LETTERED "C",
IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT THREE, WESTVIEW",
AS PER PLAT THEREOF DULY RECORDED AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, IN
PLAT BOOK NLP 154, AT PLAT NO. 3.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 5.375% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (22385)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 6, 13, 20, 2018
OPQRS
EZ
Prince Georges County
12166769
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
10306 BEAVER KNOLL DRIVE
Upper Marlboro, MD 20772
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to STEVEN D. SILVERMAN, Trustee(s), dated
September 8, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 26348, folio
541, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARCH 8, 2018 at 11:30AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
ALL THAT LOT OF GROUND SITUATE IN PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND AND DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS, THAT IS
TO SAY: LOT NUMBERED SIXTY (60), IN BLOCK NUMBERED
THIRTY (30), IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "SECTION
NINE, HOLLOWAY ESTATES", AS PER PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, IN PLAT BOOK WWW 64
AT PLAT 5. FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY: THE
IMPROVEMENTS THEREON BEING KNOWN AS 10306 BEAVER
KNOLL DRIVE, UPPER MARLBORO, MARYLAND 20772. BEING
ALL AND THE SAME LOT OF GROUND WHICH BY DEED DATED
AUGUST 20, 2002 AND RECORDED SEPTEMBER 27, 2002,
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE%U2019S
COUNTY, MARYLAND IN LIBER NO. 16258, FOLIO 142,
WAS GRANTED AND CONVEYED BY MARGARET V. GOODALL
HUMBLES, UNTO KEVIN A. JONES. PARCEL NO.: 11-1165752.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $24,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.25% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (16-11953)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri, Christine
Johnson, Melissa Alcocer, Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
15030 Laureland Place
Laurel, MD 20707
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to FRIEDMAN & MAC FAYDEN PA, Trustee(s),
dated April 5, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 26553, folio
246, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
March 8, 2018 at 11:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT 438, AS SHOWN
ON THE PLAT ENTITLED "PLAT TWO, LOTS 391 THRU 456, A
RESUBDIVISION OF PARCEL"A" - LARIUM ESTATES SECTION
SIX ASHFORD", WHICH PLAT IS RECORDED AMONG THE
LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY IN PLAT
BOOK 127, PLAT NO. 68. BEING IN THE LAUREL (NO. 10)
ELECTION DISTRICT OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY. THE
IMPROVEMENTS THEREON BEING KNOWN AS NO. 15030
LAURELAND PLACE. TAX ID#10-1068519
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $23,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.58% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-00215)
Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Thomas W. Hodge, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson,
Substitute Trustees
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
1300 MINNESOTA WAY
Upper Marlboro, MD 20774
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to BEST TITLE AND PROCESSING LLC,
Trustee(s), dated September 27, 2005, and recorded among
the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
in Liber 23361, folio 597, RERECORDING APRIL 6, 2006
IN LIBER 24799, FOLIO 358 the holder of the indebtedness
secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned
Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the
aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby,
the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
ON,
MARCH 22, 2018 at 11:30AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NO. 31, BLOCK "A",
PLAT TWO, IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PRESIDENTIAL
HEIGHTS", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE
LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
IN PLAT BOOK VJ-167 AT PLAT NO. 6. THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON BEING KNOWN AS 1300 MINNESOTA WAY.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $30,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.5292%
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (15-07572)
Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Thomas W. Hodge, Thomas J. Gartner,
Robert M. Oliveri, Keith M. Yacko,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 6, 13, 20, 2018
12165481
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
7802 ASHDALE ROAD
Capitol Heights, MD 20743
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to DEBORAH CURRAN OR LAURA OSULLIVAN,
Trustee(s), dated October 20, 2006, and recorded among the
Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
in Liber 26304, folio 395, the holder of the indebtedness
secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned
Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the
aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby,
the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
ON,
MARCH 22, 2018 at 11:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NUMBERED FOURTEEN (14) IN BLOCK 'F', IN A SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS
"SECTION ONE, MILLWOOD" AMONG THE LAND RECORDS
OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK
W.W.W. 46 AT PLAT NO. 70, BEING IN THE 18TH ELECTION
DISTRICT. THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON BEING KNOWN AS
NO. 7802 ASHDALE ROAD.
Said property is subject to a 120 day IR Right of Redemption.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $21,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.89% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (15-18452)
Keith M. Yacko, Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Jason L.
Hamlin, Gene Jung, Glen H. Tschirgi
Substitute Trustees
Prince Georges County
851
D9
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
11703 HEARTWOOD DRIVE
Beltsville, MD 20705
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to RICHARD W. GUBER, Trustee(s), dated
September 1, 2005, and recorded among the Land Records of
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 23379, folio
614, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARCH 22, 2018 at 11:30AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NUMBERED TWENTY (20) IN BLOCK NUMBERED TWO (2) IN A SUBDIVISION
KNOWN AS "PLAT 3, BELTSVILLE HEIGHTS" AS PER PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK VJ 163 AT PLAT 90
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $49,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (16-03795)
Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Thomas W. Hodge, Thomas J. Gartner,
Robert M. Oliveri, David M. Williamson, Keith M. Yacko,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 20, 27 MARCH 6, 2018
12164062
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
www.hwestauctions.com
KNOWN AS
FEBRUARY 20, 27, MARCH 6, 2018
12164853
15614 Plantation Court
Laurel, MD 20707
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
certain Deed of Trust to SUSAN M. PESNER, Trustee(s), dated
SUITE 100
September 23, 2005, and recorded among the Land Records
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 23481,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
folio 322, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees,
by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
KNOWN AS
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
6803 Forbes Boulevard
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
District Heights, MD 20706
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
Deed of Trust to JASON HOROWITZ, Trustee(s), dated March ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
20, 2013, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
MARCH 22, 2018 at 11:30AM
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 34615, folio 263, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having described as follows:
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the LOT NUMBERED SEVEN (7) IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will AS "PLANTATIONS OF LAUREL" AS PER PLAT THEREOF
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK 196 AT
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
PLAT 63. BEING THE SAME PROPERTY AS CONVEYED IN A
DEED DATED JANUARY 31, 2005 AND RECORDED IN LIBER
MARCH 22, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements 21318 AT FOLIO 1 AMONG THE AFORESAID LAND RECORDS.
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED TWENTY (20) IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
AS "STANCLIFF'S ADDITION TO WOODSTREAM EAST", AS particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
PER THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND IN liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
PLAT BOOK VJ 175 AT PLAT 76
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
without either express or implied warranty or representation, which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $49,000.00 payable in certified
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.875%
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
of the purchase price with interest at 3.25% per annum from purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
association dues and assessments that may become due after shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
Trustee's File No. (56115)
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-03994)
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
851
MARCH 6, 13, 20, 2018
12165559
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
1304 OLD MITCHELLVILLE ROAD
Bowie , MD 20716
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to JOHN M. MERCER, Trustee(s), dated June
11, 2007, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 28160, folio 725, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARCH 22, 2018 at 11:30AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NO. "THIRTY-TWO"
(32, IN PLAT NO. "ONE (1) IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS
"FEDERAL HILL FARM", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK VJ 168 AT PLAT 93.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $50,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (15-00226)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 6, 13, 20, 2018
12166380
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 6, 13, 20, 2018
www.hwestauctions.com
12168158 MARCH 6, 13, 20, 2018
www.hwestauctions.com
12165742 MARCH 6, 13, 20, 2018
12165998
D10
851
Prince Georges County
OPQRS
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
5009 Decatur Street
Hyattsville, MD 20781
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to PRLAP, INC. , Trustee(s), dated March
17, 2004, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 19407, folio 554, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARCH 22, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
RECORDED APRIL 29, 2004 IN LIBER 19407, FOLIO 554.
THE PROPERTY IS SUBJECT TO A PRIOR MORTGAGE. IF
AVAILABLE THE AMOUNT WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT THE TIME
OF THE SALE
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 5% per annum from the
date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on
all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (55147)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
GREENSPOONMARDER, P.A.
1125 West Street, Suite 265
Annapolis, MD 21401
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
11261 RAGING BROOK DRIVE
UNIT 257
BOWIE, MD 20720
MARCH 15, 2018 AT 10:00 AM
By virtue of a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
PAULA T. FIELDS, dated JANUARY 4, 2006, and recorded in
the Land Records of Prince George's County, Maryland, at
Liber 24035, Folio 097, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, the Substitute Trustee will sell at public auction,
at the front of the Prince George's County courthouse located
at 14735 Main Street, Duval Wing Entrance, Upper Marlboro,
MD. All that FEE SIMPLE lot of ground and the improvements
thereon, situated in Prince George's County and being more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
UNIT NUMBERED 257 IN PHASE XXI IN “GLENSFORD
CONDOMINIUM” AS ESTABLISHED PURSUANT TO A CERTAIN DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM OF THE ARTERY
ORGANIZATION, INC., AS MARYLAND CORPORATION, DATED
MAY 27, 1987 AND RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS
OF PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY, MARYLAND IN LIBER
6957 AT FOLIO 583, AND SUPPLEMENTED BY FIRST SUPPLEMENT DECLARATION RECORDED JUNE 24, 1988 IN
LIBER 7007 AT FOLIO 309, AND SECOND SUPPLEMENTARY
DECLARATION RECORDED JULY 21, 1988 IN LIBER 7031
AT FOLIO 864, AND THIRD SUPPLEMENTARY DECLARATION
RECORDED AUGUST 15, 1988 IN LIBER 7057 AT FOLIO 488,
AND FOURTH SUPPLEMENTARY DECLARATION RECORDED
AUGUST 24, 1988 IN LIBER 7065 AT FOLIO 904, AND FIFTH
SUPPLEMENTARY DECLARATION RECORDED SEPTEMBER
16, 1988 IN LIBER 7088 AT FOLIO 648, AND SIXTH SUPPLEMENTARY DECLARATION RECORDED OCTOBER 3, 1988
IN LIBER 7102 AT FOLIO 868, AND SEVENTH SUPPLEMENTARY DECLARATION RECORDED OCTOBER 17, 1988 IN
LIBER 7116 AT FOLIO 618, AND EIGHT SUPPLEMENTARY
DECLARATION RECORDED OCTOBER 20, 1988 IN LIBER
7120 AT FOLIO 485, AND NINTH SUPPLEMENTARY DECLARATION RECORDED OCTOBER 27, 1988 IN LIBER 7125
AT FOLIO 924, AND TENTH SUPPLEMENTARY DECLARATION
RECORDED JANUARY 20, 1989 IN LIBER 7239 AT FOLIO 472,
AND ELEVENTH SUPPLEMENTARY DECLARATION RECORDED JANUARY 26, 1989 IN LIBER 7208 AT FOLIO 20,
AND TWELFTH SUPPLEMENTARY DECLARATION RECORDED
SEPTEMBER 6, 1990 IN LIBER 7815 AT FOLIO 617, AND
THIRTEENTH AND SUPPLEMENTARY DECLARATION RECORDED SEPTEMBER 24, 1990 IN LIBER 7766 AT FOLIO 46,
AND THE FOURTEENTH SUPPLEMENTARY DECLARATION
RECORDED SEPTEMBER 24, 1990 IN LIBER 7766 AT FOLIO
59 AND FIFTEENTH SUPPLEMENTAL DECLARATION RECORDED OCTOBER 9, 1990 IN LIBER 7780 AT FOLIO 411,
AND SIXTEENTH SUPPLEMENTARY DECLARATION RECORDED JULY 18, 1991 IN LIBER 809 AT FOLIO 581 AND
SEVENTEENTH SUPPLEMENTARY DECLARATION RECORDED
AUGUST 14, 1991 IN LIBER 8034 AT FOLIO 758 AND
EIGHTEEN SUPPLEMENTARY DECLARATION RECORDED
AUGUST 14, 1991 IN LIBER 8034 AT FOLIO 772; AND
PURSUANT TO THE APPROPRIATE PLATS DESCRIBED IN
SAID DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM, RECORDED AMONG
THE SAID LAND RECORDS IN PLAT BOOK NLP 138 AT PLATS
32 THROUGH 41, INCLUSIVE, AND PLAT BOOK NLP 139 AT
PLATS 43 THROUGH 47, INCLUSIVE, AND PLAT BOOK NLP
139 AT PLATS 87 THROUGH 91, INCLUSIVE, AND PLAT BOOK
NLP 140 AT PLATS 46 THROUGH 50, INCLUSIVE, AND PLAT
BOOK NLP 140 AT PLATS 64 THROUGH 68, INCLUSIVE, AND
PLAT BOOK NLP 141 AT PLATS 15 THROUGH 19, INCLUSIVE,
AND PLAT BOOK 141 AT PLATS 35 THROUGH 39, INCLUSIVE,
AND PLAT BOOK NLP 141 AT PLATS 47 THROUGH 51,
INCLUSIVE, AND PLAT BOOK NLP 141 AT PLATS 68 THROUGH
72, INCLUSIVE, AND PLAT BOOK NLP 141 AT PLATS 85
www.hwestauctions.com
THROUGH 89, INCLUSIVE, AND PLAT BOOK NLP 144 AT PLATS
12166375
50 THROUGH 54, INCLUSIVE, AND PLAT BOOK NLP 144 AT MARCH 6, 13, 20, 2018
PLATS 55 THROUGH 59, INCLUSIVE AND PLAT BOOK NLP
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
AT PLATS 5 THROUGH 19, INCLUSIVE AND PLAT BOOK NLP
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
155 AT PLATS 28 THROUGH 37, INCLUSIVE AND PLAT BOOK
SUITE 100
NLP 155 AT PLATS 62 THROUGH 66, INCLUSIVE AND PLAT
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
BOOK VJ 159 AT PLATS 23 THROUGH 27, INCLUSIVE AND
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
PLAT BOOK, VJ 159 AT PLATS 74 THROUGH 83, INCLUSIVE.
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
TOGETHER WITH THE IMPROVEMENTS THERETO, AND THE
KNOWN AS
RIGHTS AND APPURTENANCES THERETO BELONGING OR
5601 Parker House Terrace #210
APPERTAINING, AND PARTICULARLY THE RIGHTS IN COMHyattsville, MD 20782
MON WITH OTHER, IN THE GENERAL AND LIMITED COMMON ELEMENTS OF THE AFORESAID CONDOMINIUM AND Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
ALL OTHER RIGHTS AND PRIVILEGES OF A CONDOMINIUM Deed of Trust to SAMUEL I. WHITE, PC. , Trustee(s), dated
UNIT, SUBJECT TO CONDITIONS, LIMITATIONS, RESERVA- February 12, 2007, and recorded among the Land Records of
TIONS AND COVENANTS SET FORTH IN THE AFORESAID PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 27455, folio
DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM.
552, RE-RECORDED ON JANUARY 30, 2008 IN LIBER 29300
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the loan AND FOLIO 656, the holder of the indebtedness secured by
and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered into by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale is void Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
and the purchaser’s deposit shall be refunded without interest. Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
Purchaser must obtain possession and assumes risk of loss or at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
damage to the property from the date of the auction forward.
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
The property will be sold in an “as is” condition, without express THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED
or implied warranty as to the nature and description of the AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARCH 22, 2018 at 10:00 AM
improvements as contained herein, and subject to conditions
restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, but ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
omitting any covenant or restriction based on race, color, thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, if any, described as follows:
and with no warranty of any kind.
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $28,000.00 by cash, certified RECORDED MARCH 23, 2007 IN LIBER 27455, FOLIO 552.
check or cashier’s check will be required of the purchaser, if
other than the note holder, at time and place of sale, balance The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
in immediately available funds upon final ratification of sale by without either express or implied warranty or representation,
the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, interest including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
to be paid at the rate of 5% on unpaid purchase money from particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
date of sale to date of settlement. The secured party herein, if construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
a bidder, shall not be required to post a deposit. Third party liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merpurchaser (excluding the secured party) will be required to chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
complete full settlement of the purchase of the property within laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
TWENTY (20) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification of the sale subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser’s deposit shall be which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
of the defaulting purchaser. All other public charges and private record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
rent, taxes, if any, to be adjusted to date of sale. Cost of TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
all documentary stamps and transfer taxes and all other costs certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
incident to the settlement shall be borne by the purchaser. If NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
applicable, condominium and/or homeowner association dues of the purchase price with interest at 5.5% per annum from
and assessments due pursuant to Md. Real Property Article the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
11-110 and those that may become due after the time of TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Purchaser must on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
obtain possession and assumes the risk of loss or damage to will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
the property from the date of sale forward. If the sale is by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
rescinded or not ratified for any reason, including post sale association dues and assessments that may become due after
lender audit, or the Substitute Trustee is unable to convey good the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
and marketable title, or a resale is to take place for any reason, Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to a taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
refund of the aforementioned deposit. The purchaser waives all are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
rights and claims against the Substitute Trustee whether known the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
or unknown. These provisions shall survive settlement. Upon property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
refund of the deposit, this sale shall be void and of no effect, purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
and the purchaser shall have no further claim against Substitute mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
Trustee. The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
the loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
is void and the purchaser’s deposit shall be refunded without the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, may be convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
announced at the time and date of sale. (File #41583.0054 / purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
CAEF17-07499)
Trustee's File No. (57950)
Erin M. Shaffer,
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
Substitute Trustee
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 27, MARCH 6, 13, 2018
851
Prince Georges County
851
EZ
Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
8608 Hamlin Street
Hyattsville, MD 20785
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to LESLIE J. KEIDEL, Trustee(s), dated June
3, 2013, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 34885, folio 088, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARCH 22, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED NINETEEN (19), IN BLOCK NUMBERED
THREE (3), IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "ROYALE
GARDENS", AS PER PLAT THEREOF DULY RECORDED AMONG
THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, IN PLAT BOOK WWW 43, PLAT NO. 74.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 3.75% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (55463)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
2264 Prince Of Wales Court
Bowie, MD 20716
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to ATTY. THOMAS P. DORE, Trustee(s), dated May
22, 2007, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 28099, folio 436, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARCH 22, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-FIVE (165) IN BLOCK
NUMBERED FIFTY-FOUR (54) IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN
AS "PLAT 1 OF 2, SECTION 30, LOTS 126 THRU 165 AND
PARCEL F, BLOCK 54, LAKE VILLAGE MANOR AT LAKE
VILLAGE," AS PER PLAT RECORDED THEREOF AMONG THE
LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
IN PLAT BOOK NLP 104 AT PLATS 67 AND 68.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 4% per annum from the
date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on
all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (40511)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
851
TUESDAY, MARCH 6, 2018
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
4515 Heath Street
Capitol Heights, MD 20743
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to MARK C. MCVEARRY, Trustee(s), dated
February 6, 2008, and recorded among the Land Records of
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 29336, folio
553, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARCH 15, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
RECORDED FEBRUARY 12, 2008 IN LIBER 29336, FOLIO
553.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 2.72% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (56270)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 27, MARCH 6, 13, 2018
12165241
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 6, 13, 20, 2018
12166082
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
8206 Dellwood Court
Lanham, MD 20706
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to PRLAP, INC. , Trustee(s), dated August
21, 2009, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 30922, folio 379, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARCH 22, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED FOUR (4) AS SHOWN ON THE PLAT ENTITLED
""LOTS 1 THRU 33 AND PARCEL A GLENARDEN TOWNS"
WHICH PLAT IS RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK 183
AT PLAT 89.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 4.125% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (57554)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 6, 13, 20, 2018
12165573
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
2616 Boones Lane
District Heights, MD 20747
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to LAWYERS TITLE SERVICES, INC. ,
Trustee(s), dated December 26, 2002, and recorded among
the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
in Liber 16831, folio 123, the holder of the indebtedness
secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned
Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the
aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby,
the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
ON,
MARCH 22, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED THIRTEEN (13) IN BLOCK LETTERED "E" IN
THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "CARLSON SPRINGS" AS PER
PLAT THEREOF DULY RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK WWW 17 AT
PLAT NO. 33
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 4.375% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (57841)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
10020 Dakin Court
Cheltenham, MD 20623
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to PREMIUM TITLE & ESCROW, LLC. , Trustee(s),
dated April 8, 2016, and recorded among the Land Records of
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 38138, folio
550, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARCH 15, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED FORTY-NINE (49), IN BLOCK LETTERED "H",
IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "ROLLING ACRES", AS PER
PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK WWW 64 AT PLAT
NO. 20
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 3.75% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (50930)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
12167330 MARCH 6, 13, 20, 2018
12166376
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 6, 13, 20, 2018
FEBRUARY 27, MARCH 6, 13, 2018
12166088
12165239
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 6, 13, 20, 2018
12166045
IS YOUR OLD CAR HOLDING UP?
YES
NO
NO
8"/5504&--*5
)&.&"/4
YES
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
NJMMJPOSFBEFSTDBSTIPQQFSTJODMVEFEttXBTIJOHUPOQPTUDPNDMBTTJmFEt0QFO0SQMBDFZPVSBEJO&YQSFTTPVSEBJMZDPNNVUFSSFBEBOESFBDISFBEFST
Source: Scarborough 2012, Release 2. Washington Post newspaper 7-day cumulative reach; Express 5-day reach.
C054E 10x2
TUESDAY, MARCH 6, 2018
851
Prince Georges County
851
OPQRS
EZ
Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
7927 Mandan Road, Unit 647, Apt. 101
Greenbelt, MD 20770
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to DAVID J. ZUGHERI, Trustee(s), dated November
6, 2013, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 35447, folio 319, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARCH 15, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
RECORDED NOVEMBER 27, 2013 IN LIBER 35447, FOLIO
319.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 4.875% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (30570)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
911 Elfin Avenue
Capitol Heights, MD 20743
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to DAVID SILVERMAN, Trustee(s), dated June
13, 2014, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 36160, folio 244, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARCH 15, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
RECORDED JULY 15, 2014 IN LIBER 36160, FOLIO 244.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 4.375% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (27484)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
4009 70th Avenue
Hyattsville, MD 20784
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to SAMUEL I. WHITE, PC., Trustee(s), dated
November 10, 1998, and recorded among the Land Records
of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 12800,
folio 068, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed
of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees,
by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARCH 8, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT 21, BLOCK T, SECTION 4. LANDOVER HILLS, FILLED IN
PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 41
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 6.75% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (57402)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 27, MARCH 6, 13, 2018
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
4705 EDMONSTON ROAD
HYATTSVILLE, MD 20781
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to ANH MINH DUONG TRAN, Trustee(s), dated
April 16, 2012, and recorded among the Land Records of
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 33552, folio
167, RE-RECORDED JUNE 6, 2012 IN LIBER 33675 AND
FOLIO 119, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed
of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees,
by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARCH 8, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOTS NUMBERED FOUR (4), AND FIVE (5), IN BLOCK
LETTERED "C", IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "WHITELEY", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, IN
PLAT BOOK R. N. R. 2 AT PLAT 44.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 3.75% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (57733)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
851
Prince Georges County
851
D11
Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
3701 Forest Glen Court
Suitland, MD 20746
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust, dated March 30, 2007, and recorded among
the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
in Liber 27636, folio 360, the holder of the indebtedness
secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned
Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the
aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby,
the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
ON,
MARCH 8, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED SEVENTY-EIGHT (78), IN THE SUBDIVISION
KNOWN AS "WOOD CREST," AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK VJ 161, AT PLAT 96
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 3.5% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (50228)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
12165148
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 20, 27, MARCH 6, 2018
855
Charles County
855
12164020
Charles County
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 20, 27, MARCH 6, 2018
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 27, MARCH 6, 13, 2018
12165150
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
7403 Abbington Drive
Oxon Hill, MD 20745
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to ATTY. THOMAS P. DORE, Trustee(s), dated
August 22, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 26112, folio
562, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARCH 15, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED THIRTY-FIVE (35), IN BLOCK LETTERED "D",
IN A SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT THREE, RIVER RIDGE
ESTATES", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE
LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND,
PLAT BOOK 28, AT PAGE 77
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 2% per annum from the
date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on
all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (44620)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
7013 Mason Street
District Heights, MD 20747
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to WILLIAM A. MARKWAT, Trustee(s), dated
January 19, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 24208, folio
590, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARCH 15, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED TWENTY-TWO (22), IN BLOCK NUMBERED
FIFTY-SIX (56) IN A SUB-DIVISION KNOWN AS SECTION 3,
DISTRICT HEIGHTS, PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK BB 12 AT
FOLIO 59
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 2% per annum from the
date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on
all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (44645)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
12164057
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
6414 Gateway Boulevard
District Heights, MD 20747
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to MICHAEL LYON, Trustee(s), dated January
29, 2013, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 34990, folio 081, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARCH 15, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOTS NUMBERED THIRTY-ONE (31) AND THIRTY TWO (32),
IN BLOCK NUMBERED TWELVE (12), IN THE SUBDIVISION
KNOWN AS "SECTION 1, DISTRICT HEIGHTS", AS PER
PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, IN PLAT BOOK SDH
3, AT PLAT 21
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 3.875% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (51586)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
12164029
12165147
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 27, MARCH 6, 13, 2018
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 20, 27, MARCH 6, 2018
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 27, MARCH 6, 13, 2018
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 20, 27, MARCH 6, 2018
12164023
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
112 Gray Street
Capitol Heights, MD 20743
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to JAMES H. HUDSON, III, Trustee(s), dated May
29, 2012, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 33695, folio 383, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARCH 8, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT 23, IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS REVISION OF PM
233/17, PLAT THREE, VILLAGES AT PEPPER MILL, PER PLAT
BOOK PM 233/93
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 4% per annum from the
date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on
all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (57775)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
12165152
FEBRUARY 27, MARCH 6, 13, 2018
12164063
ARE YOUR TENANTS
MOVING OUT?
IS YOUR CAR
HOLDING UP?
COULD YOU USE
ARE YOUR TENANTS
MOVING OUT?
SOME EXTRA CASH?
CLASSIFIED
CLASSIFIED
CLASSIFIED
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
KLMNO
KLMNO
KLMNO
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054F 2x2
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054E 2x2
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054B 2x2
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054F 2x2
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
400 BLAND DRIVE
Indian Head , MD 20640
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to RICHARD T. CREGGER, Trustee(s), dated
October 19, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of
CHARLES COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 6337, folio 322, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE CHARLES COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 200 CHARLES STREET ( IN THE
BREEZEWAY BETWEEN CIRCUIT AND DISTRICT COURTS ), LA
PLATA, MD 20646 ON,
MARCH 22, 2018 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in CHARLES COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT SIX (6), BLOCK
F, SECTION TWO (2), OF THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS
"WARINGTON HILLS" PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG
THE PLAT RECORDS OF CHARLES COUNTY, MARYLAND, IN
PLAT BOOK PCM NO. 6, FOLIO 9. THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON BEING KNOWN AS 400 BLAND DRIVE.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $21,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of CHARLES COUNTY,
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.001% on unpaid
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other
public charges and private charges or assessments, including
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postsale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
No. (13-23077)
Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris, Thomas W.
Hodge, Thomas J. Grtner, Robert M. Oliveri, Keith M. Yacko,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 6, 13, 20, 2018
12166772
D12
855
Charles County
OPQRS
855
Charles County
856
Frederick County
856
856
Frederick County
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
7765 Chapel Point Road
Port Tobacco, MD 20677
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to WILLIAM J. PARISI, Trustee(s), dated August
30, 2013, and recorded among the Land Records of CHARLES
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 08339, folio 0497, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE CHARLES COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 200 CHARLES STREET ( IN THE
BREEZEWAY BETWEEN CIRCUIT AND DISTRICT COURTS ), LA
PLATA, MD 20646 ON,
MARCH 8, 2018 at 1:30PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in CHARLES COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
ALL THAT LOT, TRACT, PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND AND
PREMISES SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN THE 1ST ELECTION
DISTRICT OF CHARLES COUNTY, MARYLAND, AND MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT AN
IRON PIPE IN THE EAST LINE OF CHAPEL POINT ROAD (30
FEET WIDE) SAID POINT ALSO LYING IN THE NORTH LINE
OF THE LAND OF THE CORPORATION OF ROMAN CATHOLIC
CLERGY AND THENCE RUNNING WITH SAID EAST LINE OF
CHAPEL POINT ROAD NORTH 15 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 20
SECONDS WEST 200.00 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE; THENCE
RUNNING THROUGH THE TRACT OF WHICH THE HEREIN
DESCRIBED PARCEL IS A PART WITH A DIVISION LINE
NOW BEING ESTABLISHED THE FOLLOWING COURSES AND
DISTANCES; NORTH 42 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 30 SECONDS
EAST 78.41 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, NORTH 53 DEGREES 01
MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST 448.80 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE;
NORTH 43 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST 171.60
FEET TO AN IRON PIPE; NORTH 45 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 20
SECONDS EAST 24.42 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE; AND SOUTH
15 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST 200.00 FEET
TO AN IRON PIPE ON THE AFOREMENTIONED NORTH LINE OF
THE CORPORATION OF ROMAN CATHOLIC CLERGY; THENCE
WITH SAID NORTH LINE THE FOLLOWING COURSES AND
DISTANCES; SOUTH 45 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 20 SECONDS
WEST 24.42 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE; SOUTH 43 DEGREES 01
MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 171.60 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE;
SOUTH 53 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 448.80
FEET TO A MULBERRY TREE; AND SOUTH 42 DEGREES 27
MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 78.41 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING, CONTAINING 3.000 ACRES.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $29,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of CHARLES COUNTY,
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.75% on unpaid
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other
public charges and private charges or assessments, including
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postsale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
No. (15-07964)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
Frederick County
856
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $27,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or
marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court
for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return
of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 172674-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 27, Mar 6 & Mar 13
12166672
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
13820 PENN SHOP RD.
MOUNT AIRY, MD 21771
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated May 13,
2011 and recorded in Liber 8397, Folio 326 among the Land Records of
Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of $234,600.00,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court
House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
MARCH 16, 2018 AT 10:51 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $20,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or
marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court
for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return
of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 303942-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 27, Mar 6 & Mar 13
12166667
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
3649 BYRON CIR.
FREDERICK, MD 21704
12157315
Frederick County
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
600 BUSHYTAIL DR.
FREDERICK, MD 21703
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated
September 30, 2009 and recorded in Liber 7564, Folio 342 among the
Land Records of Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance
of $382,360.00, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the
Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick
County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701,
on
MARCH 23, 2018 AT 10:50 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $38,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or
marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court
for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return
of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 198801-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Mar 6, Mar 13 & Mar 20
12167817
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $47,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or
marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court
for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return
of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 322306-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 27, Mar 6 & Mar 13
12166671
1. Coffee
2. Paper
3. Bills
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $18,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or
marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court
for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return
of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 316212-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 27, Mar 6 & Mar 13
12166662
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
Democracy Dies in Darkness
873
Prince William County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
14452 Del Mar Drive
Dale City, VA 22193
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
SEAN O LOZANO
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 14th
day of February, 2018 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner,
Philip S. Shriver, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 7315
Wessex Drive, Temple Hills, MD
20748 and reported in the above
entitled cause, will be finally
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 14th day
of March, 2018 next; provided a
copy of this Order be inserted
in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 14th
day of March, 2018.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Visit sub.wpsubscribe.com/easy
or call 202-334-6100.
857
Howard County
879
Howard County
Feb 20, 27, Mar 6, 2018 12165982
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$400,140.20, dated February 13,
2007, recorded among the land
records of the Circuit Court for
Prince William County on February
16, 2007, as Instrument Number
200702160020878, the undersigned
appointed
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction, at the main entrance of
the courthouse for the Circuit Court
of Prince William County, 9311 Lee
Ave, Manassas, VA on March 30,
2018 at 9:30 AM, the property
described in said deed of trust,
located at the above address and
briefly described as: Lot 498, Section 6, DALE CITY, as the same
appears duly dedicated, platted
and recorded in Deed Book 435 at
Page 266, among the land records
of Prince William County, Virginia.
Tax ID: 8191-68-7607.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $13,000.00 or 10%
of the sale price, whichever is
lower, will be required in the form
of a certified or cashier’s check.
Cash will not be accepted as a
deposit. Settlement within fifteen
(15) days of sale, otherwise Trustee
may forfeit deposit. Additional
terms to be announced at sale.
This is a communication from a
debt collector. This notice is an
attempt to collect on a debt and
any information obtained will be
used for that purpose.
(Trustee # 574309)
Substitute Trustee: ALG Trustee,
LLC, C/O Orlans PC PO Box 2548,
Leesburg, VA 20177, (703) 7777101,
website:
http://www.orlans.com
The Vendor Auction.com will be
used in conjunction with this sale
Towne #: 5000.0935
Feb 27, Mar 6, 2018
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 27, MARCH 6, 13, 2018
496 GILTSPUR RD.
FREDERICK, MD 21703
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated February
10, 2012 and recorded in Liber 8816, Folio 170 among the Land Records of
Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of $208,575.00,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court
House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
MARCH 16, 2018 AT 10:50 AM
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $220,400.00.
ENROLL IN EASY PAY TODAY
857
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
851
TUESDAY, MARCH 6, 2018
EZ
Frederick County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
6275 Blue Dart Place, Columbia, MD 21045
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
premises known as 6275 Blue Dart Place, Columbia, MD
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
21045. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated August 2, 2004, and recorded in Liber 8575 at
KNOWN AS
Page 267 among the land records of the County of Howard,
103 PHOENIX COURT
in the original principal amount of $197,000.00. Upon default
Walkersville, MD 21793
and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain at public auction at the Thomas Dorsey Building, located at
Deed of Trust to NORTH STAR TITLE & ESCORW LLC, Trustee(s), 9250 Bendix Rd., Columbia MD 21045, on March 15, 2018
dated October 31, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records at 10:00 AM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust
of FREDERICK COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 6556, folio including but not limited to:
741, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by Tax ID# 06-451489
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE FREDERICK affect same, if any.
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 100 W. PATRICK ST, TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
FREDERICK, MD 21701 ON,
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 7% per annum
MARCH 7, 2018 at 10:00AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and described as TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
follows:
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
LOT 169, AS SHOWN ON A PLAT ENTITLED "FINAL PLAT, LOTS by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
148-170, PARCEL 'B' & OUTLOT 'B', PHASE ONE, PLAT TWO, association dues and assessments that may become due after
SUN MEADOW" RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
FREDERICK COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK 65, PAGE Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
151. BEING THE SAME PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN DEED taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
AND RECORDED AMONG THE AFORESAID LAND RECORDS are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
ON LIBER 2978, AT FOLIO 593. TAX ID NO. 26-442788
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
without either express or implied warranty or representation, purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, Trustee's File No. 16-260961.
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merKristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $34,000.00 payable in certified
www.hwestauctions.com
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
12165477
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final FEBRUARY 27, MARCH 6, 13, 2018
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of FREDERICK COUNTY,
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.0% on unpaid
TRUSTEE'S SALE
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
11405 HUNT CROSSING CT, Ellicott City, MD 21042
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the premises known as 11405 HUNT CROSSING CT, Ellicott City,
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification MD 21042. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's Deed of Trust, dated February 14, 2008, and recorded in Liber
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at 11095 at Page 186 among the land records of the COUNTY OF
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other HOWARD, in the original principal amount of $1,129,786.00.
public charges and private charges or assessments, including Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to offer for sale at public auction at the Thomas Dorsey Building,
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes located at 9250 Bendix Rd, Columbia MD 21045, on March
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by 15, 2018 at 10:00 AM, all that property described in said Deed
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner of Trust including but not limited to:
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of Tax ID# 05-441307
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The affect same, if any.
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be balance of the purchase price with interest at 7.1% per annum
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to post- TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
sale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if association dues and assessments that may become due after
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
No. (13-14896)
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri,
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher,
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
Substitute Trustees
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 14-243171.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
www.hwestauctions.com
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
FEBRUARY 20, 27, MARCH 6, 2018
12157261
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-26169
NOTICE
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
S0833-2 2x3
856
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated June 24,
2005 and recorded in Liber 5508, Folio 456 among the Land Records of
Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of $488,000.00,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court
House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
MARCH 16, 2018 AT 10:52 AM
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 20, 27, MARCH 6, 2018
1959 HARPERS CT.
FREDERICK, MD 21702
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated
September 26, 2005 and recorded in Liber 5628, Folio 26 among the
Land Records of Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance
of $272,000.00, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the
Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick
County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701,
on
MARCH 16, 2018 AT 10:53 AM
856
Frederick County
873
Prince William County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
16614 Reservoir Loop
Dumfries, VA 22026
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $266,250.00, with an annual
interest rate of 4.240000% dated
June 11, 2009, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF
LOUDOUN as Deed Instrument
Number 200906150039549, the
undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF
LOUDOUN, on the courthouse
steps in front of the Circuit Court
building for the County of
Loudoun located at 18 East Market Street, Leesburg Virginia on
April 4, 2018 at 9:30 AM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 082-30-7215-112
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: FHA. Reference Number
17-271865.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Feb. 27, Mar. 6, 2018
12157518
Default having been made in the
terms of a certain Deed of Trust
dated October 22, 2004, in the
original principal amount of
$280,393.00 and recorded in the
Clerk's Office of the Circuit Court
of the County of Culpeper, Virginia
in Instrument No. 040011663, the
undersigned Substitute Trustees
will sell at public auction on March
16, 2018, at 12:00 p.m., in front of
the building housing the Culpeper
County Circuit Court, Main
Entrance, 135 West Cameron
Street, Culpeper, VA 22701, the
property designated as Lot 164,
Lakeview of Culpeper, Phase 3-A,
as the same appears duly dedicated, platted and recorded in Instrument No. 020006557 and plat
recorded in Plat Cabinet 7 at Pages
480-487, among the land records
of Culpeper County, Virginia. Sale
is subject to all prior liens, easements, restrictions, covenants,
and conditions, if any, of record,
or other matters which would be
disclosed by an accurate survey or
inspection of the premises.
TERMS: CASH. A deposit of
$28,000.00 or 10% of the sale
price, whichever is lower, will be
required of the successful bidder
at time of sale. Prior to the sale,
interested bidders will be required
to register with and must present
a bid deposit which may be held
during the sale by the trustee.
The bid deposit must be certified
funds and/or cash, but no more
than $9,900.00 of cash will be
accepted. The successful bidder’s
deposit will be retained at the sale
and applied to the sale price. If
held by the trustee, all other bid
deposits will be returned to the
unsuccessful bidders. Settlement
is to be made within 15 days. The
successful bidder will be responsible for obtaining possession of the
property, and for all costs and fees
related to recording the Trustee’s
Deed, including the grantors tax.
The successful bidder will be
required to execute a Memorandum of Trustee's Sale, available for
review on the Foreclosure Sales
page of www.glasserlaw.com, outlining additional terms of sale and
settlement. A Trustee’s Deed will
be prepared by Trustee’s attorney
at high bidder’s expense. This is
a communication from a debt collector.
Glasser and Glasser, P.L.C. on behalf
of Atlantic Trustee Services, L.L.C.,
and/or REO Solutions, LLC, Substitute Trustees, Crown Center Building, Suite 600, 580 East Main
Street, Norfolk, VA 23510, File No.
207630-09, Tel: (757) 321-6465,
between 10:00 a.m. & 12:00 noon
only.
March 6, 13, 2018
12168846
881
Orange County
AUCTION!
Luxury Waterfront Villa
complete with Private Pier &
Nature Preserve – Ft. Washington,
MD; 1 ACRE – Opening
Bid - $350,000 – List
$1,000,000 – Gorgeous
5 Bdrm; 4.5 Bth;
www.PrimeAuctionSolutions.com
AUCTION March 16, 12 NOON;
OPEN HOUSE – SUN; Online &
On-Site Auction 703-889-8949
Out-of-Town
Real Estate
DELAWARE
New Move-In Ready Homes!
Low Taxes! Close to Beaches,
Gated, Olympic pool. New Homes
from low $100’s. No HOA Fees.
Brochures Available.
1-866-629-0770 or
www.coolbranch.com
225
SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH
FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS.
Call Al, 301-807-3266.
Will Come to you!
WANTED: $ FOR MILITARY: WWI,
WWII, VN. Jackets, Hats, Knives,
Medals, ETC. $100/MORE FOR SOME
OLD HELMETS, 301-657-8994
260
35460 Stefs Landing,
Locust Grove, VA 22508
aka 35460 Steffs Landing,
Locust Grove, VA 22508
Orange County
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $294,566.00, dated September
25, 2013 recorded in the Clerk's
Office of the Circuit Court of
Orange County, Virginia, in Document No. 130007877 and modified in Document No. 160007579,
default having occurred in the
payment of the Note thereby
secured and at the request of
the holder of said Note, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at
the entrance to the Circuit Court
of Orange County, 110 North
Madison Road, Orange, on April
4, 2018 at 3:30 PM the property
described in said deed, located
at the above address and briefly
described as:
Containing 3.102 acres, as shown
on a plat of survey recorded in
Deed Book 365, page 791, with
improvements thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust, if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (36805)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Feb 27, Mar 6,2018
12167436
Furniture
table
america
stainless
art—$980, Alpharetta, GA, 706572-5125
TRISTARSTAINLESS.NET
TristarStainless.Net
265
Home & Garden
Solid
Hardwood
Brazilian
Cherry Flooring - 3600 S.F.,
$2.50 per SF. 301-860-1190
Valet Self Storage—Let us do the
work. Storage starting at $99.00.
Pickup, storage and delivery.
www.closetbox.com 877-433-9636
275
Merchandise Wanted
Freon R12 WANTED—Certified buyer
will pick up, pay CASH. Cylinders,
cans. 312-291-9169
RECORDS - I pay cash for
50s, 60s, & 70s .
Categories: Jazz, Soul, R&R, R&B.
Call 703-865-6050
REDSKINS TICKETS WANTED—800296-3626 X3
366
TRUSTEE SALE
Collectibles
CASH FOR COMICS - Buying 19401970s comics & toys. The older the
better. Collectors welcome.
Will travel. Call Ed 410-262-4103.
Real Estate Auctions
AUCTION!
Luxury Waterfront Villa
complete with Private Pier &
Nature Preserve – Ft. Washington,
MD; 1 ACRE – Opening
Bid - $350,000 – List
$1,000,000 – Gorgeous
5 Bdrm; 4.5 Bth;
www.PrimeAuctionSolutions.com
AUCTION March 16, 12 NOON;
OPEN HOUSE – SUN; Online &
On-Site Auction 703-889-8949
610
Dogs for Sale
GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS - AKC, vet
checked, shots, wormed, black &
tan, family raised, great pets or service dogs $700 540-809-7041
Labrador—571-313-1099
Labrador Retriever farm raised puppies,AKC, 3/4 english, black, yellow,
1stshots, vet chcked & dewormed.
Ready now. JUST REDUCED $400
cash
only.
1-540-879-2713
Miniature Dachs—$1650.00, Male &
Female, 11 weeks old yrs old, 240454-4702
PEMBROKE WELSH CORGI PUPS
Reg, 11 week old males, tri colored,
shots, dewormed. $800.
Spotsylvania, VA. 540-538-7029
Shihchon, Puggl—304-904-6289
SIBERIAN HUSKY PUPPIESBlack&white, red&white, males &
females, AKC reg. 12 weeks old.
540-877-1567 timreissig@yahoo.com
TOY POODLES & YORKIPOO PUPPIES,
8 weeks, shots/dewormed.
Will be small, hypoallergenic.
$650. Fred., VA. 540-538-1037
WHEATENS- 11wks, soft, no shed,
"meet the parents!" Black Wheatini
blending, 8wks. Crt/ppr trnd. 1.5yr
F&M Fursonality.com 540-286-0633
Home
delivery
makes good
sense.
MARYLAND
Roommates
ADELPHI - Basement room for rent.
Furnished. Quiet neighborhood.
1 person. Call 301-887-1788
BOWIE- 3BR upstairs & finished
bsmnt avail. Share kitchen & dining rm w/ bar. Call 240-643-5523
BOWIE - Shr furn house, room for
1, pref M. Internet, near shopping,
Sat TV, kit/laun priv, conv. $650/mo.
Call 301-328-4286 or 240-687-1519
1-800-753-POST
BOWIE TOWN CENTER - BR in
townhouse with shared bath.
$550 utils not incl. 757-343-4190
Capital Heights - House to share.
Close to shopping and metro,
$165 and up 301-674-9278
SF
Cloverly— 1,000, 2 bedrm, 1 ba, 600
Marine Drive, 240-643-0693
COLLEGE PARK -1br w/ Den pvt entr
& prvt BA $875/mo. sec dep req. No
smoking. Pref male. 240-423-7923
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
3093 BRIDGETON CT,
WOODBRIDGE, VA 22192
FORT WASHINGTON- Large house to
share. Free cable. Close to MGM.
W/D. $150/wk. Call 240-882-8973
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $324,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 5.000000% dated
October 9, 2006, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the County of Prince
William as Deed Instrument Number 200610190149511, the undersigned appointed Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction all that property located
in the County of Prince William,
on the Court House steps in front
of Main Entrance for the Circuit
Court building for the County of
Prince William located at 9311
Lee Avenue, Manassas, Virginia
on April 10, 2018 at 4:00 PM, the
property with improvements to
wit:
Tax Map No. 8294-42-2703
You, too,
could have
home
delivery.
FT WASH - Furn rms, beaut house
to shr. Mbdrm $700, reg. $600 incl
utils. wifi & cable rdy. 571-283-2422
LANHAM - 2 Rooms avail, $570 &
$580/mo, Incl Utils, A/C, quiet.
240-645-2380
or
301-537-2635
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 16-261744.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
MITCHELLVILLE- Lg rm in bsmt for
rent. Cls to Wdmr Twn Cntr. M
pref. 301-335-5997 / 301-335-2782
Oxon Hill— $500.00, 1 bedrm, 5100
Glassmanor Drive, 240-486-1948, Nr
Pub Transp, Men only
OXON HILL- In nice house, cable
avail, close to shops, on bus line,
M pref. Call 202-549-0060
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
1-800-753-POST
SF
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
SF
SILVER SPRING - House to share,
furnished room, male pref, no smoking, near Sligo Creek Park & Venice
Ave. $750 utils incl. 240-462-3790
Silver Spring Large furn room, shr
kitch. pvt entr, bath. Nr transp &
shopping. Safe area. Incl cable,
utils, phone, internet $375 bi
weekly. Call Sam 240-286-5451
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Silver Spring- Furn rooms. Everything
incl. $500/$600 + $400 dep. On bus
line, close to Metro. 240-354-1254
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
Rockville- shr SFH. nr trans/shops.
N/S, N/P. Clean, quiet area. Very
private large furn BR w/ walk in
closet. Avail now. $699 + elec. Leave
voice msg for response 240-351-5150
Silver Spring-Female pref. utils incl.
$500 Close to bus. Deposit req.
Call
703-914-5555
12166716
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
You, too,
could have
home
delivery.
LAUREL- 1 Room for rent in 2BR apt.
Priv BA, cbl, internet, prkg, W/D, incl
util, quiet. $800/mo. 240-392-5245
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
Mar 6, 13, 2018
Trustee's Sale
717 Monument Lane,
Culpeper, Virginia 22701
(Tax Map No.: 40U-3-164)
12167082
12167076
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
Loudoun County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
19385 CYPRESS RIDGE TER
UNIT 102,
LEESBURG, VA 20176
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $328,774.00, dated June 25,
2009, recorded among the land
records of the Circuit Court for
Prince William County on June 30,
2009, as Instrument Number
200906300064227, the undersigned
appointed
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction, at the main entrance of
the courthouse for the Circuit Court
of Prince William County, 9311 Lee
Ave, Manassas, VA on March 30,
2018 at 9:30 AM, the property
described in said deed of trust,
located at the above address and
briefly described as: Lot 19, Section 3, Spy Glass Hill, as the same
appears duly dedicated, platted,
and recorded as Instrument No.
200307240134838, among the
land records of Prince William
County, Virginia. Tax ID: 8290 11
7364.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $12,000.00 or 10%
of the sale price, whichever is
lower, will be required in the form
of a certified or cashier’s check.
Cash will not be accepted as a
deposit. Settlement within fifteen
(15) days of sale, otherwise Trustee
may forfeit deposit. Additional
terms to be announced at sale.
This is a communication from a
debt collector. This notice is an
attempt to collect on a debt and
any information obtained will be
used for that purpose.
(Trustee # 581677)
Substitute Trustee: ALG Trustee,
LLC, C/O Orlans PC PO Box 2548,
Leesburg, VA 20177, (703) 7777101,
website:
http://www.orlans.com
Towne #: 5000.0936
Feb 27, Mar 6, 2018
12165133
876
MD Real Estate
Auctions
Culpeper County
Suitland. MD -looking for 1 roommate, $550 all inclusive. Seurity
Deposit $200 call (202) 340-6959
How about some
home delivery?
SUITLAND - Share house. Rooms for
rent. 2 blocks from Suitland Metro.
$190/week + dep. Call 301-537-5032
1-800-753-POST
SF
How about some
home delivery?
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
KLMNO
HEalth&Science
.
SECTION E
EZ
EE
TIM ROBINSON FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
TUESDAY, MARCH 6, 2018
BY
J ENNIFER B REHENY W ALLACE
When people talk about harmful stress — the kind that can affect health — they usually
point to big, life-changing events, such as the death of a loved one. A growing body of research suggests that minor, everyday stress — caused by flight delays, traffic jams, cellphones that run out of battery during an important call, etc. — can harm
health, too, and even shorten life spans. ¶ One traffic jam a week isn’t going
to kill you, of course. Psychologists say it’s the nonstop strains of everyday
life that can add up. “These hassles can have a big impact on physical health and well-being,
particularly when they accumulate and we don’t have time to recover from one problem before another hits us,” says California-based psychologist Melanie Greenberg, author of “The
Stress-Proof Brain.” ¶ Chronic daily hassles can lead to increased blood pressure, which puts
you at risk for heart disease, explains Carolyn Aldwin, director of the Center for Healthy AgSTRESS CONTINUED ON E6
ing Research at Oregon State University.
Health harmed by stress
Exposure to a continuous stream of stressors can
take a toll on your body, but how you react can help
A fitness craze Not using a
that helps the rear seat belt
environment
is quite risky
BY
A LLISON K LEIN
BY
F RAN K RITZ
Have you recently spotted people toting trash bags while jogging? Or their
hands filled with old plastic bottles? You
might soon.
Sweden’s latest fitness craze — plogging — is making its way to U.S. shores.
The term is a mash-up of “jogging” and
the Swedish “plocka upp,” meaning pick
up. In this case, litter.
Across Europe, there are plogging
groups in Scandinavia, Germany and
beyond. In the United States, it’s just
starting to catch on among exercisers
who are fed up with rubbish along their
If you’re reading this story from the
back seat of car, there’s a good chance
you’re not wearing a seat belt. A recent
survey by the Insurance Institute for
Highway Safety, or IIHS, found that
28 percent of respondents don’t always
click a seat belt when they’re in the back
of a car.
The most common reason for not
buckling up in the back, according to the
1,172 survey respondents, is that there is
no need, because the rear seat is safer
than the front. But that’s not always true.
“Adults have gotten the message that it’s
PLOGGING CONTINUED ON E5
SEAT BELT CONTINUED ON E4
In sickness and in health.
VOLCANOES
Simulating eruptions
with talcum power
and lasers. E2
NATURE
A ‘one in a million’
yellow cardinal is
caught on film. E2
MEDICINE
A pill to mimic effects
of exercise may help
the frail and obese. E3
GENDER
Transgender surgeries
are on the rise, a large
study finds. E3
Flu, crowded shelters create
perfect storm for homeless
BY
C ARMEN H EREDIA R ODRIGUEZ
The flu descended on Connie Gabaldon
like a fog, she recalled, clouding her mind
and compromising her judgment. It progressed to chest and back pain, the aches
perhaps made worse by a fall the 66-yearold had while riding the bus in Santa Fe,
N.M.
Gabaldon is homeless. When she went
to the emergency room in late January,
doctors told her she had pneumonia, a
sinus infection and the flu.
For the healthy, the flu represents a
serious health concern. But for the homeless — who deal with higher rates of
chronic illness, fewer resources and
crowded conditions in shelters — catching the flu can be a matter of life or death.
This year, the nation is experiencing a
vicious flu season that is on track to break
recent records, according to the Centers
for Disease Control and Prevention. Although the outbreak has shown signs of
decline over the past two weeks, it is still
ongoing in 45 states and the District,
thousands of people have been hospitalized and 114 children have died.
If you’re homeless, having the flu
“might mean that you can’t get up and
manage to stay warm. You can’t go get
food. And if you have a substance abuse
disorder and you need to maintain either
alcohol or opioid use, then you go into
withdrawal,” said Eowyn Rieke, a board
member of the National Health Care for
the Homeless Council.
“The gravity of the flu for people who
are homeless is enormous. And I think we
FLU CONTINUED ON E5
Better Together.
Virginia Hospital Center, Mayo Clinic and Your Family.
To find a physician who practices at Virginia Hospital Center, visit
virginiahospitalcenter.com/doctors.
E2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
Re-creating
a volcanic
eruption —
indoors
BY
MARCH 6 , 2018
S C I E NC E NE WS
Human waste from climbers en route to Denali
summit is not decomposing as expected
anchorage — Climbers on
S ARAH K APLAN
Ben Andrews never imagined
his job would involve simulating
volcanic eruptions with talcum
powder and lasers.
But in retrospect, his career
seems almost fated. In May 1980,
Mount St. Helens erupted about
50 miles from his parents’ home
in Portland, Ore. — the worst
volcanic eruption in U.S. history.
Ash rose 80,000 feet into the air
and fell onto 11 states; landslides,
mudslides and avalanches of hot
rock and gas obliterated more
than 200 square miles of forest; 57
people were killed. Andrews’s
mother was seven months pregnant with him at the time.
In a photo taken shortly after
his birth, Andrews’s father holds
him up for the camera while a
dark plume of ash darkens the sky
behind them. As he grew up, Andrews would gaze at the mountain from his bedroom window. It
was like a tiger, he said — beautiful and wonderful and dangerous.
Now Andrews is the director of
the Global Volcanism Program at
the National Museum of Natural
History in the District — far from
the seething activity of the Cascades. To understand volcanoes’
inner workings and protect people from the perils they pose, he
must create his own eruptions.
Andrews’s experimental volcanology lab, completed in 2013,
consists of a nearly 5,000-squarefoot tank made from plywood and
plastic sheeting housed in a windowless room at the Smithsonian’s Museum Support Center in
Suitland, Md. Blue, green and red
lasers are arrayed throughout the
tank, alongside cameras and temperature sensors. Outside there is
a computer, several bags of talc
and a table bearing a toaster oven.
Everything — the floor, the table,
Andrews’s clothes — is covered in
a fine layer of white powder.
The toaster oven dings. “That’s
how you know the eruption is
ready,” Andrews quips.
Wearing a respirator to keep
the grit from his lungs, he retrieves a kilogram container of
talc from the oven, where it was
just heated to 250 degrees. He
climbs a ladder to the top of the
tank and spreads the hot powder
onto a conveyor belt. A colleague
switches off the lights.
“We’re off to the races!” Andrews clambers down from the
ladder and presses his face
against one of the tank’s transparent plastic windows.
The powder on the conveyor
belt is pouring into the tank, a
. TUESDAY,
AUSTIN POST/U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
In May 1980, Mount St. Helens erupted about 50 miles from scientist Ben Andrews’s parents’
home in Portland, Ore. Ash rose 80,000 feet into the air and fell onto 11 states.
billowing river of material. The
lasers illuminate it in cross sections — a vertical green beacon
catches the rising cloud of warmer, lighter material; horizontal
blue and red beams show the flow
of powder spreading to the sides.
In this multicolored light, the eddies and swirls in the dust stream
recall the glimmer of oil on water.
The experiment is beautiful
but tame — not much like the hot,
dense currents of gas, ash and
boulders called pyroclastic flows
that Andrews is trying to understand. Those flows are among the
most deadly aspects of an eruption, blasting out of volcanoes at
speeds faster than a car can go
and exceeding temperatures of
1,000 degrees Fahrenheit. Flows
from Mount Vesuvius buried the
ancient Roman city of Pompeii;
deposits from the most recent
eruption of the Yellowstone supervolcano half a million years
ago suggest those pyroclastic
flows traveled a whopping 50
miles.
From a distance, these flows
may look like fluffy clouds. But in
reality, Andrews says, they are
“superheated, sandblasting destruction.”
“For most natural eruptions,
especially the big ones, we don’t
see them happening,” he continues. “This is a good thing” — most
witnesses to such an event don’t
live to tell the tale. “But if a
pyroclastic flow happens, we
would like to know how fast it is
going to go, where is it going to go,
how far.”
The currents in Andrews’s
chamber contain particles no
wider than a human hair. They’re
barely warmer than room
temperature, and you could easily
outrun them. But they behave
according to the same laws of
physics as a pyroclastic flow,
which makes them an ideal
model.
“Essentially, this is a scaleddown version of an eruption,” Andrews says. “A thousand times
colder, a hundred times slower, a
hundred times less dense, a hundred times safer and a hundred
times less terrifying.”
Andrews hopes his experiments will illuminate the factors
that cause a pyroclastic flow to
move swiftly over land, where it
may threaten people, or lift off
into the air, where it may engulf
planes. The results will also help
scientists understand ancient
flows based on the deposits they
left behind — essential knowledge for when those volcanoes
erupt again. In turn, that research
might help officials figure out
whom to evacuate when the next
mountain begins to rumble.
sarah.kaplan@washpost.com
North America’s tallest mountain
may have to start packing out
more of their poop after a researcher determined a glacier in
which much of it has been
dumped over the past decade
probably is not decomposing the
human waste.
Michael Loso, a glacier geologist, calculates that 36,000 climbers between 1951 and 2012 deposited 152,000 to 215,000 pounds of
feces onto Kahiltna Glacier, part
of the most popular route to
Denali’s summit.
For more than a decade, the
National Park Service has required that climbers keep waste
off the Alaska mountain’s surface.
Mountaineers captured their
poop in biodegradable bags held
by portable toilets and pitched it
into deep crevasses on the glacier.
However, Loso’s research indicates human waste never reaches
the bottom of the glacier, will
never be exposed to extreme temperatures and disintegrate, and
probably will reappear downstream as stains on Kahiltna Glacier’s surface where melting exceeds annual snowfall.
Park Service officials say the
dumping of human waste that
does not decompose is not a
practice they want to continue in
a national park and a wilderness
area. “These changes are in direct
response to the research,” Chris
Erickson, a mountain ranger, said
by phone from nearby Talkeetna.
The proposed regulations would
allow mountaineers to drop
waste in only one crevasse at high
elevation. They would have to
carry out the rest.
Human waste is a concern on
most mountains that attract multitudes of climbers, and the issue
of poop littering the routes up
Mount Everest in Nepal is welldocumented. Some mountains
are trying to minimize the human
waste problem. In Japan, bio-toilets have been set up along the
route to Mount Fuji’s summit,
and incinerator toilets are at the
top. In Tanzania, latrines have
been built for climbers making
their way to Kilimanjaro’s summit.
The waste can be more than
just bothersome. Climbers on Denali, the centerpiece of sprawling
Denali National Park, get all their
drinking water by melting snow.
And snow contaminated by human excrement can spread dangerous bacteria such as E. coli,
causing climbers intestinal distress and diarrhea leading to dehydration, a life-threatening condition at high altitude.
Each year, about 1,100 people
try to reach Denali’s summit at
20,310 feet. More than 90 percent
use a route that starts from a
landing strip for small airplanes
on Kahiltna Glacier.
Starting in 2007, the Park Service required that human waste be
collected in “Clean Mountain
Cans,” a portable toilet invented
by a Denali park ranger that looks
like an extended coffee can. Under current rules, climbers between the base camp and 15,000
feet are allowed to toss filled
liners into crevasses. Rangers
even marked safe places to do so.
For more than a decade, Loso
has studied Denali human waste
management
to
determine
whether feces broke down, and if
not, where they went. He buried
human waste, dug it up after a
year and found it remained at
temperatures just below freezing,
without undergoing temperature
extremes or ultraviolet light that
kills bacteria.
“For most bacteria, that’s a
really comfortable place to be,”
Loso said.
He forecasts that poop could
emerge soon on the glacier surface seven miles below the base
camp, where the surface melts
faster than snow accumulates.
The area is so remote, future
visitors are unlikely to see the
emerging waste, but Loso’s findings motivated the Park Service to
reexamine its rules. The agency
also doesn’t want pollution reaching the Kahiltna River, which
flows from the glacier.
Under proposed rules, all Denali excrement must be deposited
in one of two places: the ranger
station at Talkeetna or in a crevasse at “Camp Four,” a campsite
at 14,200 feet. Waste dumped
there tumbles down a huge ice
cliff and is likely to be pulverized
and rendered inert, said Erickson, the mountain ranger.
Tom Kirby, a guide for American Alpine Institute, said his
company supports any effort to
get the waste problem under control.
“I think that’s a pretty reasonable thing to do to promote cleanliness and to keep water coming
out of Kahiltna Glacier reasonably clean,” he said.
Colby Coombs, owner of Alaska Mountaineering School, which
guides visitors on Denali, said he
fully supports the Park Service
balancing the safety of climbers,
who want to move quickly
through dangerous terrain without extra weight, while protecting
a wilderness area within a national park.
“Who would like to see a big
pile of human waste?” he asked.
“That’s disgusting.
— Associated Press
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/speaking-of-science
S C I E NC E S C AN
A rare yellow cardinal is dazzling the Internet
BY
K ARIN B RULLIARD
Jeremy Black, an Alabama
wedding and wildlife photographer, recently spent five hours in
a friend’s back yard in the hope of
capturing an image of what he
called “the most captivating cardinal in Alabaster, Alabama.”
But that description sells this
bird too short. The northern cardinal that Black ended up photographing was not the usual deep
red of males but dazzlingly yellow. It could easily claim to be the
most captivating bird in the nation — or at least on the Internet.
Black’s photo, which was shared
on the Facebook page of the Natu-
EDUCATION
Got a minute? That’s enough time to listen to
an episode of a snappy, informative podcast.
ralist’s Notebook, promptly went
viral.
“As soon as it landed, I was
star-struck,” Black told National
Geographic. “It kind of took my
breath away a little bit.”
Black said in a Facebook post
that he learned about the bird
from a friend, Charlie Stephenson, a longtime birdwatcher who
had spotted the sun-hued fellow
at her feeder. At first, she told
Al.com, she figured it was a species of yellow bird she had never
seen before. Then she realized
that the creature, with its black
mask and crested head, looked
just like a cardinal — just one of a
different color.
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A yellow cardinal was recently spotted in Alabama by photographer
Jeremy Black. “As soon as it landed, I was star-struck,” he told
National Geographic. “It kind of took my breath away a little bit.”
It is “a one in a
million mutation.”
Geoffrey E. Hill, a professor at
Auburn University
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This coloration is not unique,
but it is aberrant, according to a
2003 research paper on what at
the time was said to be the firstever reported yellow northern
cardinal in the United States. It
was a specimen collected in 1989
in Baton Rouge by scientists at
Louisiana State University. Researchers who studied its feathers concluded that the bird had a
genetic mutation that impaired
the metabolic processes that
normally make red feathers out of
the carotenoid-rich yellow and
orange foods in a male cardinal’s
diet.
Geoffrey E. Hill, an Auburn
University professor who cowrote that paper, told Al.com that
the Alabama bird probably has
that genetic mutation.
It is “a one in a million mutation,” said Hill, who added that he
had never seen a live yellow cardinal in 40 years of birdwatching.
Another possible explanation,
a National Audubon Society expert told the organization’s blog,
is a dietary deficiency.
Rare though they are, yellow
northern cardinals seem a bit
more common with the advent of
digital cameras and social media.
A pair was spotted in Kentucky in
2011. Cindy Morgan, a Wynne,
Ark., resident who commented on
the Facebook post about the latest
sighting, said one had visited her
feeders in fall and winter for three
years in a row.
Stephenson, understandably,
says she would like her yellow
visitor’s fans to confine their admiration to the Internet. She told
Al.com that she’s keeping her precise location secret to prevent
birders — who are known to travel far and wide for a rare sighting
— from flocking to her back yard.
karin.brulliard@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/animalia
Busy?
That’s no excuse not to learn
about, say, next-generation antibiotics that can be turned off
before bacteria learn to outwit
them. Or how boat noise messes
up the lives of fish. Or how mosquitoes figure out what danger
smells like.
If you’ve got a minute to spare,
you could learn about all of these
things with Scientific American’s
“60-Second Science” podcast.
Think of it as a smorgasbord of
quick scientific snacks — long
enough to teach you something
you didn’t know, short enough to
fit into your life. Covering such
topics as computing, biology, cognition and chemistry, the podcast
is snappy and informative.
Perfectly bite-size, each episode features expert interviews
and just enough context to make
new research and fascinating
concepts come to life.
The show includes some sim-
ple explainers, such as a piece on
a study that suggests supermarket samples really do make money for grocers. But the show also
doesn’t shy away from more-complex topics, including the research behind the latest Nobel
honors in physics and chemistry.
And while most episodes clock
in at a little over a minute, you’ll
be so engrossed that you won’t
notice.
You can find all of the podcast’s
episodes at scientificamerican.com/podcast/60-second-science, or youcan subscribe via RSS
or iTunes. Each episode is accompanied by a transcript, too . . . and
with hundreds of back episodes,
there’s enough information to
keep you learning for a very long
time.
— Erin Blakemore
FELIPE DANA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Want to know how mosquitoes figure out what danger smells like?
Scientific American’s “60-Second Science” podcast can tell you all
about it in a perfectly bite-size episode.
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
27
Sharing sexually explicit photos, videos or
messages — or sexting — seems to be
increasingly common among teens today. About
27 percent of teens say they’ve received such an
electronic message, or sext, according to a study
in the journal JAMA Pediatrics that included
more than 110,000 teens. Nearly 15 percent
admitted to having sent a sext. About 12 percent
also said they had forwarded a sext without
permission. Boys were as likely to sext as were girls, and older teens
were more likely than younger teens to sext. Phones were used for
sexting more often than computers. The study, which assessed data
from 39 studies published from 2009 to 2016, also showed that
sexting has increased in recent years. The result of all of this? The
study’s authors warned that sexts, especially ones seen by people
other than the intended recipient, could lead to harassment and
cyberbullying — perhaps even sexual assault and suicide. The
message for parents? Talk to your kids — early and often — about the
risks and consequences of sexting. Also make sure they understand
that, once sent, a sext can live forever on the Web. Along with the
study, JAMA Pediatrics also published a guide: “What Parents Need to
Know About Sexting.”
percent
— Linda Searing
Pill may be able to mimic
the effects of exercise
Not everyone can
exercise. People
with muscleMARLENE
wasting diseases
CIMONS
and movement
disorders, the
frail, the very obese and postsurgical patients are among
those who face a significant
challenge when it comes to
working out. This can be
frustrating, considering the wellestablished benefits of exercise.
But what if a drug could
stimulate the body into
producing some of the same
effects of exercise — more
endurance and weight control,
for example — without the need
to run a single step? Such a pill
may be on the way. Several
scientists are testing compounds
that apparently can do this —
and people wouldn’t even have to
move at all to benefit.
“Our goal is to understand
these circuits,” says Ronald
Evans, director of the gene
expression laboratory at the Salk
Institute for Biological Studies in
La Jolla, Calif. “We are taking this
concept and trying to develop a
drug that can help us game the
system that is naturally activated
during exercise.”
Salk scientists have been
working since 2007 on a chemical
compound, known as 516, that
mimics the effects produced by
exercise by triggering a specific
genetic circuit, “a back door into
the exercise genetic network,”
Evans says.
The researchers built upon
earlier work that identified a
gene mechanism that encourages
the muscles to burn fat, rather
than carbohydrates, much as
highly trained elite athletes do.
“There are many reasons why
people cannot run or walk or
exercise,” Evans says. “If you can
bring them a small molecule that
can convey the benefits of
training, you can really help a lot
of people.”
Several other scientists are
studying compounds that work
differently from 516, but with the
same aim: to give the benefits of
exercise to people who aren’t able
to do it.
Ali Tavassoli, a professor of
chemical biology at Britain’s
University of Southampton, has
discovered a drug known as
compound 14 that works “by
fooling cells into thinking they
have run out of energy,” Tavassoli
says. It does this through a series
of molecular actions that spur
cells into metabolizing sugar,
which produces energy, he says.
(Harvard cell biologist Bruce
Spiegelman, who is working on
an approach using exercise
hormones, declined an interview,
saying it wouldn’t be “wise” when
“this area has been hyped so
much.”)
Any such drug would require
licensing by the Food and Drug
Administration, yet the FDA
doesn’t recognize “the inability to
exercise” as an illness in need of a
drug. So Evans has targeted 516
for young people with Duchenne
muscular dystrophy, an approach
that he believes offers the best
chance for FDA approval. “This
[disease] afflicts kids who can’t
exercise and ultimately die of
muscle wasting, often at a
relatively early age, at 15 or 16,”
Evans says. “It’s a disease with a
large unmet medical need.”
But the drug, now undergoing
a small human safety study, has
“a potentially wide application,”
he says, including for
amyotrophic lateral sclerosis,
Parkinson’s disease and
Huntington’s disease, and for
“people in wheelchairs.”
He says he also thinks it could
be a lifesaver for those rare
individuals who develop acute
kidney injury, or AKI, a potentially
fatal side effect of cardio-bypass
surgery that results in often
irreversible organ damage.
“The organ or tissue changes
AnyBODY
E3
EE
FROM CONSUMER REPORTS
TH E BI G NUM B ER
its metabolic properties and
begins to burn sugar, and
because it happens quickly, it’s
very hard to stop,” Evans says.
“Our drug helps to draw the
tissue back to a more healthy
state, returning it from a chronic
inflammatory damaged state. It
soaks up sugar. If you do this
carefully and quickly, you can
override the damage response.”
Because Tavassoli’s compound
breaks down sugar, he says he
sees it as a potential treatment
for diabetes or metabolic
syndrome, a cluster of conditions
that include obesity,
hypertension, high blood sugar,
high triglycerides and elevated
LDL, the “bad” cholesterol.
“The most startling results have
been the effect of the molecule on
glucose tolerance and body weight
in a mouse model of diet-induced
obesity,” he says. “It improves
glucose tolerance and reduces
body mass.”
Compound 14 has not yet been
tested in humans. “While our
results are promising, we are
quite a way from anything going
ISTOCK
“We are . . . trying to
develop a drug that can
help us game the system
that is naturally
activated during
exercise.”
Ronald Evans, director of the gene
expression laboratory at the Salk
Institute for Biological Studies
into the clinic,” Tavassoli says.
Any of these drugs would have
the potential for abuse. Amateur
athletes might want them to get
faster or stronger. Elite athletes
might seek them out to cheat the
system. Even the sedentary might
look for an easy way to “exercise”
without having to really do it. The
experimental 516 already is
banned by the World AntiDoping Agency, according to
Evans, and “I’m sure any [future]
version of it will be, too.”
Evans acknowledges that once
a drug is licensed, “people who
aren’t sick will want it,” he says.
“Everyone knows that whatever
exercise they get probably isn’t
enough. But we are not
developing a drug like this to
make someone run faster.”
Tavassoli agrees.
“Unfortunately, as with all other
pharmaceuticals, there is no way
to prevent abuse, but the
potential benefit to millions of
people suffering from disease
outweighs any concern about
abuse by athletes,” he says.
Evans — who hikes and plays
tennis — has never taken 516. “I
like exercising, and that’s good
enough for me,” he says, adding:
“People are designed to move.
But if they can’t, it’s not healthy
to be sedentary. That’s why we
are developing this drug. We are
trying to take science out of the
laboratory and bring it into the
clinic in a way that can change
people’s lives. If we can do that, it
would be a game-changer.”
health-science@washpost.com
Not all packaged foods are unhealthy
T
he words “convenience” and “processed” are usually shorthand for foods of less-than-ideal nutritional value. But not all
packaged foods are highly refined, vitamin-stripped or
loaded with saturated fat, sodium and added sugars.
In fact, an elite group of healthy packaged foods takes
good-for-you foods and makes them easier to use.
“If choices are made wisely, the nutritional quality of some
‘processed’ foods can be equal to or may even be greater than the fresh,”
says Alice Lichtenstein, the Gershoff Professor of Nutrition Science and
Policy at Tufts University. That includes frozen foods that let you use
only as much as you need and shelf-stable products that minimize the
need for constant grocery runs.
Here are six of our favorite healthy packaged foods.
Canned or boxed tomatoes
Tomatoes contain lycopene, an
antioxidant found to reduce the
risk of heart disease and some
cancers, and possibly strokes. A
study of more than 1,000 middleaged men found that those with
the highest blood levels of lycopene were 55 percent less likely to
have a stroke than men with the
lowest levels.
Slicing a tomato is easy, but
you’ll often get more lycopene
from tomato products. And processed tomatoes can be lower in
sodium than jarred tomato sauces.
How to use them: Sauté with a
crushed clove of garlic in a bit of
olive oil, then add leafy greens
such as spinach or kale and some
beans, or top with an egg.
Canned salmon
Wild salmon is seasonal, and
fisheries harvest more than they’re
able to sell fresh. So much of it is
funneled into frozen or shelf-stable forms. The benefit: Canned
salmon costs less, and wild salmon
is lower in calories and saturated
fat than farmed salmon.
How to use it: Mix with pasta
and a handful of greens or prepared frozen veggies along with a
dollop of pesto or olive tapenade.
Or use it as you would canned tuna.
Prepared pesto
With about 130 calories and 13
grams of fat per two-tablespoon
serving, you might not think of
pesto as a health food. But most of
the fat comes from olive oil and
pine nuts, so it’s the healthy
unsaturated type. These star ingredients, along with the basil,
cheese and garlic, pack a lot of
rich flavor and disease-fighting
power. And small amount of
pesto goes a long way in terms of
flavor.
How to use it: Use pesto as a
condiment for chicken, fish,
grains or roasted veggies.
Precooked packaged grains
Having three servings of whole
grains per day (instead of none)
may decrease the risk of heart
disease and stroke by about 20
and 12 percent, respectively, according to a 2016 BMJ study. But
boiling them from a dry state
takes time, and it’s difficult to
prepare just the right amount for
one person or two without having
leftovers, oversize portions or a
lot of waste.
Enter precooked grains, such
as farro, quinoa and more, which
can be ready in a few minutes.
You can find them in shelf-stable
microwaveable bowls or pouches,
or frozen. It’s best to buy varieties
without added salt.
How to use them: Put together
your own power bowl. Top grains
with some quick stir-fried veggies
and cooked chicken. (Also see
Consumer Reports’ review of frozen grain bowls.) Or take some out
of the package and microwave in a
bowl with some fruit, cinnamon
and milk for a healthy breakfast.
Packaged hard-boiled eggs
Boiling eggs isn’t so time-consuming, but it can be tough to get
them just right — and peeling
them can be messy. Precooked
eggs eliminate those problems,
still supply protein and are low in
saturated fat. They also contain
lutein and zeaxanthin, compounds that have antioxidant and
anti-inflammatory
properties
and may play a role in reducing
age-related macular degeneration.
As for the cholesterol in eggs,
it’s not likely to have a significant
effect on blood cholesterol levels
for healthy people.
How to use them: Make egg
salad and serve on whole-grain
toast, slice and add eggs to salads,
or chop and toss them with asparagus. Combine eggs with cooked
potatoes, olive oil and curry as a
main or side dish.
HEALTH NEWS
In the first broad demographic
study of trends in genderaffirming surgeries in the United
States, researchers found that the
number of operations increased
fourfold from 2000 to 2014. Some
of the significant rise, according
to a study published last week,
may be related to an increase in
insurance coverage for the procedures.
“Early on we recognized there’s
been a lot of work on health
disparities having to do with age,
race and so on that get collected in
health-care settings,” said Brandyn Lau, an assistant professor of
surgery and health sciences informatics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. “One
of the things we need to know is
whether [lesbian, gay and transgender] patients are getting the
same care.”
Lau and other researchers
from Johns Hopkins Medicine
and Harvard University analyzed
15 years of data from the National
Inpatient Sample, a collection of
hospital inpatient information
from across the country, and
found a total of 4,118 genderaffirming surgeries.
The surgeries took place as
LGBTQ people are finding increasing acceptance, especially
among younger generations.
The majority of the surgeries
that occurred between 2000 and
2011 involved patients not covered by health insurance. About
half of the transgender patients in
the study paid out of pocket between 2000 and 2005. That number rose to 65 percent between
2006 and 2011. However, the
trend reversed between 2012 and
2014, with the number plummeting to 39 percent. Much of that
decrease, the study’s authors say,
is because of Medicare and Medicaid. In May 2014, Medicare ended
its 33-year ban on transgender
surgeries.
Loren Schechter, who specializes in surgeries for transgender
people, says he does about 300
procedures a year, whereas it was
only about 50 in 2000. The plastic
surgeon also accepts Medicare,
which others do not.
“I would say 85 to 90 percent of
[my] procedures are covered now
by insurance,” he said.
Virtually every major medical
association in the United States
has described transition-related
surgeries as “medically necessary” for both the physical and
mental health of transgender people. They also have stipulated that
health insurance coverage for
such operations should be no less
available than it is for other types
of surgery.
In the United States, there has
been substantial growth in the
number and types of insurance
coverage for surgical procedures
for transgender people over the
past 10 years. These include not
only Medicare, but statesponsored private plans and employment insurance coverage.
Few studies have been done in
the United States looking at outcomes of surgeries for transgen-
Frozen legumes
Beans are always a healthy
option. They’re a top food source
of resistant starch, a prebiotic
fiber that bacteria in the gut use
to produce short-chain fatty acid
compounds, which may help prevent colon cancer, among other
benefits. In addition, the combination of protein, fiber and vitamins makes legumes nutrientdense and filling.
Canned beans are convenient,
but their sodium count varies.
Frozen legumes have the convenience of canned with zero salt
added. What’s more, you can take
out just as much as you need, heat
and eat.
How to use them: Defrost in
the microwave and use in salads
and soups or combine with grains
or pasta. Serve black beans with
chopped tomatoes and onion
alongside scrambled eggs. Or for
a healthy snack, toss defrosted
chickpeas in oil, sprinkle with
your favorite spices, and roast
until crispy.
© Copyright 2017, Consumer Reports Inc.
Consumer Reports is an
independent, nonprofit organization
that works side by side with
consumers to create a fairer, safer,
and healthier world. CR does not
endorse products or services, and
does not accept advertising. CR has
no financial relationship with
advertisers in this publication. Read
more at ConsumerReports.org.
HE ALTH S C AN
Gender-affirming surgeries have increased
fourfold from 2000 to 2014, study says
FOOD SAFETY
der men and women. Many more,
however, and much larger ones,
have been conducted in Europe.
In 2014, a study published in
Deutsches Arzteblatt, the German Medical Association’s official
bilingual science journal, found
that 90.2 percent of 119 transgender women said that “their expectations for life as a woman were
fulfilled postoperatively.”
Section 1557 of the Affordable
Care Act barred discrimination
on the basis of gender identity
and helped ensure that more
transgender men and women
would be covered for surgical procedures, including genital reconstruction. Health-care advocates
are concerned that the Trump
administration’s Department of
Health and Human Services will
not enforce this policy.
— Amy Ellis Nutt
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/to-your-health
Barf Blog may have a revolting name, but it is
full of information about foodborne illnesses
Listeria. Salmonella. Norovirus.
If those words aren’t enough
to make you queasy, they should:
They’re responsible for thousands of cases of foodborne illness each year. And they’re just
the tip of the nauseous iceberg at
Barf Blog, a site that brings
context to food-safety issues.
The title may be revolting, and
the subject matter is often sickening. The blog is run by a group
of food-safety experts who are
fascinated by outbreaks, infestations and, yes, vomit.
It’s not all about the gross-out,
though. Each entry brings
evidence-based perspective to issues that are often misunderstood, such as the safety of
raw-milk cheese and how norovirus spreads.
The blog updates pretty frequently, and every week or so it
Barf Blog
Safe food from farm to fork
barfblog.com
puts out Food Safety Talk, a
wide-ranging podcast that tackles the issues of the day. The blog
also offers information on big
outbreaks and food recalls, and it
gives helpful tips on how to avoid
gastrointestinal disaster.
If you’re revolted by talk of poo
and puke, you might steer away.
Better to go elsewhere if you’re
offended by the occasional curse
word, too.
That said, there’s no more
informative way to keep up to
speed on the way illness can
spread from farm to fork — even
if you can’t stomach some of the
subject matter.
— Erin Blakemore
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E4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 6 , 2018
Alien life could thrive on Saturn’s icy moon Enceladus
BY
B EN G UARINO
L
ife as we know it needs
three things: energy, water and chemistry. Saturn’s icy moon Enceladus
has them all, as NASA
spacecraft Cassini confirmed in
the final years of its mission to that
planet.
While Cassini explored the Saturnian neighborhood, its sensors
detected gas geysers that spewed
from Enceladus’s southern poles.
Within those plumes exists a
chemical buffet of carbon dioxide,
ammonia and organic compounds such as methane. Crucially, the jets also contained molecular hydrogen — two hydrogen atoms bound as one unit. This is a
coin of the microbial realm that
Earth organisms can harness for
energy.
Beneath Enceladus’s ice shell is
a liquid ocean. Astronauts looking
for a cosmic vacation destination
would be disappointed. The moon
is oxygen-poor. There is darkness
down below, too, because the
moon’s ice sheets reflect 90 percent of the incoming sunlight. Despite frigid temperatures at the
surface, the water is thought to
reach up to 194 degrees Fahrenheit at the bottom.
As harsh as the moon’s conditions are, a recent experiment suggests that Enceladus could support organisms like those that
thrive on Earth. Tiny colonies of
microbes that dwell near our planet’s hydrothermal vents can tolerate a simulated Enceladus habitat,
according to a new report by a
team of researchers in Austria and
Germany.
“We tried to reproduce the putative Enceladus-like conditions
in the lab,” said Simon Rittmann,
who studies microbes called archaea at the University of Vienna
in Austria. Archaea are microscopic, single-celled organisms.
Under magnification, they resemble bacteria. Yet archaea have
their own domain of life — they are
as closely related to humans as
they are to bacteria. Near hydrothermal vents, beyond the reach of
sunlight, their lives are fueled by
chemical nutrients.
Rittmann and his colleagues
constructed several growth chambers to simulate the Enceladus
AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
NASA’s Cassini spacecraft dives through the plume of Saturn’s moon Enceladus in 2015. Cassini’s sensors detected gas geysers that spewed carbon dioxide, ammonia and
organic compounds such as methane. Crucially, the jets also contained molecular hydrogen, which Earth organisms can harness for energy.
NASA/JPL/SPACE SCIENCE INSTITUTE
But there are some caveats. Formaldehyde was detected on
Enceladus, which can disrupt the life cycle of some microbes.
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environment. All of their recipes
included molecular hydrogen. Astrobiologists hypothesize that a
process called serpentinization
creates these hydrogen molecules,
a result of the chemical reaction
between the moon’s rocky core
and its hot ocean water.
The scientists, to reflect the uncertainty of the Enceladus environment, varied the amount of
molecular hydrogen available to
the organisms. They also altered
the pH, pressure and gas concentrations in the test habitats. “We
tried to be as broad as possible
with our assumptions,” Rittmann
said. There are no direct measurements for what exists beneath
Enceladus’s ice crust. “No one will
be able to tell if these conditions
are really occurring on Enceladus,” he said. “However, we did our
best to be as careful as possible.”
One species tested, an archaeon
called Methanothermococcus okinawensi, fared the best on faux
Enceladus. Scientists discovered
this organism at a hydrothermal
vent system near Okinawa, Japan,
3,000 feet below sea level. M. okinawensi uses carbon dioxide as a
carbon source and molecular hydrogen for energy, as a suspected
Enceladus microbe might.
Not only did M. okinawensi sur-
“No one will be able to
tell if these conditions
are really occurring on
Enceladus.”
Simon Rittmann, of the University of
Vienna in Austria, studies microbes
called archaea
vive most conditions, including
the highest pressure tested, but
also the archaeon produced methane as it grew. An organism with a
similar lifestyle might explain
methane’s presence on Enceladus,
the scientists concluded in their
study, published Wednesday in the
journal Nature Communications.
There are, however, some important caveats. Cassini detected
formaldehyde on Enceladus,
which can disrupt the life cycle of
even the hardiest archaea. Mokinawensi could resist certain concentrations of formaldehyde but
only to a point. It failed to grow at
the highest formaldehyde concentrations detected by the Cassini
probe.
The study also assumes that
hydrothermal systems exist on
Enceladus. As Rittmann emphasized, this remains an assumption.
“No evidence exists for these systems,” he said. What’s more, biology is not required to explain the
presence of methane on Enceladus. Nonbiological processes also
can create the gas.
A much-needed step, Rittmann
said, will be to identify the biomarkers that serve as telltale signs
of life in the solar system’s deep
and dark seas.
ben.guarino@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/speaking-of-science
Rear seat retains repute as safest part
of car, but not for adults, older teens
SEAT BELT FROM E1
safer for kids to ride in the back
seat properly restrained, but
when it comes to their own safety,
there is a common misperception
that buckling up is optional,” said
Jessica Jermakian, a senior research engineer at IIHS.
According to data from the
National Highway Traffic Safety
Administration, or NHTSA, in
2015, 4.3 percent of 22,441 fatalities — or 966 deaths — involved
unrestrained people in rear seats.
And IIHS research finds that unbuckled rear-seat travelers are
eight times as likely as buckled
rear-seat passengers to be injured
or killed in a crash.
“While the rear seat retains its
reputation as the safest part of
the car, in reality that is now the
front seat for adults and older
teenagers,” said Kristy Arbogast,
director of engineering at the
Center for Injury Research and
Prevention at Children’s Hospital
of Philadelphia.
The rear seat hasn’t become
more dangerous, Arbogast said,
“it’s that the front seat has become safer.” Improvements to the
front seat include lap and shoulder belts with advanced features
that reduce forces experienced in
a crash and that minimize slack
from the belt — few rear seat belts
are so designed — and new types
of air bags for the driver and
passenger, said Jason Levine, executive director of the nonprofit
Center for Auto Safety.
While some car models have
side rear air bags, these are generally expensive add-ons. People
often turn them down to save
money or to purchase other extras, such as heated seats and
music systems, Levine said.
Thirty-four states and the District have laws that allow police
officers to ticket a driver if the
driver or the front-seat passenger
is not wearing a seat belt, while
only 18 states have the same laws
for rear-seat riders. Those laws,
along with police checks, public
education campaigns, and seatbelt reminder systems, have
helped increase use of seat belts
in all seats, according to the Governors Highway Safety Association. The reminders are the annoying pinging and flashing that
occur when the driver or frontseat passenger is not buckled in.
Front seat belt reminder systems
ISTOCK
Unbuckled rear-seat travelers are eight times as likely as buckled
rear-seat passengers to be injured or killed in a crash, a study says.
became mandatory in the 1970s
for cars sold in the United States,
but those reminders are largely
missing from the back seat. Only
about 7 percent of 2018 model
cars have rear-seat reminders.
A 2012 law called for a final rule
requiring all new cars to have
such systems by 2015, Levine said.
The rear seat hasn’t
become more
dangerous. Rather “it’s
that the front seat has
become safer.”
Kristy Arbogast, director of
engineering at the Center for Injury
Research and Prevention
In October, the Center for Auto
Safety sued the U.S. Department
of Transportation to compel the
agency to publish rules on rearseat-belt reminder systems. In
reply, DOT said last month that it
will propose a rule by October.
But the nonprofit center — founded in 1970 by Consumers Union
and Ralph Nader — said it will not
drop the lawsuit because DOT has
missed publicly announced deadlines three years in a row.
There is no data on injuries
and deaths among unbelted passengers in hired cars, but in 2015,
three high-profile deaths made
the issue more prominent. CBS
correspondent Bob Simon was
killed after the chauffeur-driven
sedan he was riding in crashed.
Simon, riding in the back seat,
was unbelted. That same year,
Nobel Prize economics winner
John Nash and his wife, Alicia,
were unbelted in the back seat of
a taxi when the vehicle crashed on
the New Jersey Turnpike. Both
were killed.
The most recent data — from
2014 — from the Taxi and Limousine Commission in New York
City is that only about 38 percent
of taxi passengers buckle up.
Uber and Lyft occasionally send
reminders to members to buckle
up in the back, but the ride-sharing companies have no formal
strategy on this issue. “We take
safety very seriously . . . and . . .
are always looking for ways to
engage with riders and drivers to
encourage good safety practices,
like wearing seat belts,” said Nadia Anderson, who leads road and
traffic safety initiatives for Uber.
Until the Department of Transportation issues its rule, reminders from the driver may be among
the best strategies to get passengers in the back to buckle up. Saul
Newman, an associate dean at
American University who lives in
Silver Spring, no longer drives
carpool now that his three children are grown, but he retains a
rule from those many trips when
he gives friends a lift. “I keep my
eyes fixed on the rearview mirror,” he said, “and don’t start the
drive until each passenger in the
back is belted in.”
health-science@washpost.com
TUESDAY, MARCH 6 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
E5
EE
It’s time to rethink U.S. mental-health laws, without stigmas
BY
N ATHANIEL M ORRIS
The mass shooting at Marjory
Stoneman Douglas High School
in Parkland, Fla., has drawn attention to the nation’s mentalhealth system. In a televised
speech, President Trump said his
administration wants to “tackle
the difficult issue of mental
health.” At a town hall hosted by
CNN, Dana Loesch, a spokeswoman for the National Rifle Association, announced, “None of us support people who are crazy, who
are a danger to themselves, who
are a danger to others getting
their hands on a firearm.”
Many such conversations
about mental health and guns
tend not only to stigmatize mental illness but also to ignore the
realities of mental-health care.
Psychiatric care is filled with uncertainty. Predicting whether individuals will hurt themselves or
others can be a difficult and inexact science, even for the most
skilled mental-health providers.
While making these kinds of
predictions is guided by clinical
judgment, deciding what to do
next often is governed by laws.
And the legal frameworks around
mental-health care in the United
States give primacy to personal
liberty.
In reaction to the historical
abuses of psychiatry, such as
widespread neglect of patients in
dilapidated asylums, and to preserve patients’ freedoms, laws
across the country have introduced checks and balances at
nearly every step in psychiatric
treatment.
Elyn Saks, a mental-health expert and law professor at the
University of Southern California,
once wrote: “Law is based on a
theory of personhood; that is, the
concept of someone who can
make choices and suffer consequences, and who understands
the threat of sanction. The doctrine of informed consent (indeed, most of American political
theory) presumes that we are not
just subjects to be directed, but
rather autonomous beings capable of making independent decisions.”
The problem is that mental
illness raises challenging questions about that very autonomy,
along with uncertainties about
the kinds of decisions that unwell
people should be able to make.
Does a patient with fixed delusions about her medications have
a right to refuse them? Is it ethical
to allow a patient with an eating
disorder to starve to death?
Should someone suffering
from mental illness own a gun?
From the start of residency
training, psychiatrists must learn
to navigate this interface between
deciding what is the best care for
patients and following mentalhealth laws that are based on
principles of patient autonomy.
For example, if a patient threatening to hurt himself or others
comes into the hospital, psychiatrists often have to decide if the
patient appears to be truly dangerous and needs to be placed on
a temporary legal hold. When
patients cannot take care of themselves because of debilitating hallucinations, paranoia or other
symptoms of severe mental illness, we are supposed to stabilize
them and determine whether le-
Mental-health care in
the United States
emphasizes freedom
over treatment, liberty
over well-being.
gal action such as conservatorship is necessary to get them back
on their feet.
As psychiatrists, we have to
interpret the nuances of mentalhealth laws on matters including
homicidal threats, medication refusals, suicide risk assessments
and conservatorships. We learn
how to fill out legal documents,
work with law enforcement officials, and testify in legal hearings.
It’s not unusual for psychiatrists,
especially those working in inpatient settings, to find themselves sitting in conference rooms
or courtrooms with lawyers pre-
sent.
On the other side of those
rooms sit our patients, their lives
often in turmoil as a result of
mental-health issues. For the
sickest patients, mental illness
can still carry stark legal implications, including separation from
family and friends, loss of certain
rights and even court-mandated
supervision.
Overriding a patient’s wishes is
never desirable or straightforward in medicine, and especially not in mental-health care.
Take involuntary commitment
for mental-health treatment, one
of the more controversial aspects
of psychiatric care.
Standards for involuntary
commitment vary by state; California, where I’m training in
psychiatry, passed landmark
legislation in 1967 called the
Lanterman-Petris-Short
Act,
which went on to influence mental-health practices across the nation. The law limits psychiatric
holds to specific time frames,
such as 72 hours for an initial
evaluation, and establishes criteria for involuntary commitment, including appearing to be a
danger to self, a danger to others
or gravely disabled (unable to
care for self ) as a result of mental
illness.
These criteria seem black and
white, yet mental-health care is
rarely that clear-cut in the real
world. Patients may threaten to
kill themselves and then sudden-
ly take it back. Families may try to
hospitalize patients, such as those
suffering from mania or delusions, but patients can refuse care
and may not be ill enough to meet
the law’s criteria. There are diseases, including dementia and
alcoholism, that aren’t universally considered to be mental illness
and sometimes fall outside the
bounds of such laws.
Amid the unsettled science of
medicine, mental-health care in
the United States emphasizes
freedom over treatment, liberty
over well-being. Critics have long
denounced psychiatry for being
able to force treatment on patients and for having too much
legal power. It’s partly why protesters often gather outside meetings of the American Psychiatric
Association. (There’s a Wikipedia
page extensively detailing political abuses of psychiatry.)
Yet has the pendulum swung
too far?
During my medical training,
I’ve seen psychiatric patients living in their own feces or wandering naked in the streets, permitted to do so in the name of
independence. My colleagues and
I have hospitalized patients who
we felt posed a danger to themselves or others, but review hearings have overruled our clinical
judgment on legal technicalities,
and the patients walked out. I’ve
been spit on, threatened and
called a monster for placing patients on legal holds for safety
Shelters protect against
cold but incubate the flu
FLU FROM E1
often underestimate that.”
Avoiding the flu is just one of
many health challenges for those
who are homeless. Homelessness
worsens depression and cognitive
function, said Margot Kushel, a
professor of medicine at the Zuckerberg San Francisco General
Hospital and Trauma Center.
Chronic diseases are also harder for the homeless to manage.
Roughly two-thirds of the group
cope with a chronic condition or a
substance abuse disorder. Smoking is common. And 3 in 10 people
who are chronically homeless
have a serious mental illness, according to the Office of National
Drug Control Policy.
William Coleman, a 51-year-old
former construction worker who
has struggled with cocaine addiction problems, is in counseling
and anger management classes at
Central Union Mission shelter, located near Washington’s Union
Station. He is also accessing more
preventive health care — including the flu vaccine, which he got
earlier this year.
“I really want to take care of my
health,” he said, the pungent smell
of bleach rising beside him from
the bucket and mop that he uses
to clean the sleeping quarters in
the shelter. “I want to live as long
as possible.”
But the tight quarters at shelters make Coleman and the others
vulnerable to illnesses. Crowding
and poor hygiene create an environment primed for the flu to
spread, said Jeff Engel, executive
director of the Council of State
and Territorial Epidemiologists.
Subpar conditions among the
homeless have led other outbreaks in recent years. In Atlanta,
a drug-resistant tuberculosis
problem began in a homeless
shelter in 2008 and infected more
than 100 people in the city and
surrounding county, according to
the health department.
Last year, poor access to restrooms among the homeless community in San Diego and other
parts of Southern California fueled a rash of hepatitis A cases
that infected hundreds and killed
21 people, according to the state’s
health department.
“You’ve got very vulnerable
people, who’ve got underlying
health problems, poor access to
health care, poor environmental
conditions, crowded together,”
Kushel said. “And then you throw
in a particularly nasty flu, and
then you really got a recipe for
disaster.”
In Washington, flu activity is
two levels below the most severe
“widespread” category, according
to the CDC. However, the number
of people who have been infected
so far is the highest in five years,
with 2,150 confirmed cases as of
Feb. 17. Maryland reported 23,111
laboratory-confirmed cases as of
Feb. 17, and Virginia health officials said the state had 2,652 cases
as of last Friday.
Deborah Chambers, senior director of strategic partnerships
and community engagement at
Central Union Mission, said the
facility has been on alert all winter
for the flu. In addition to daily
cleaning of the shelter, hand sanitizers have been placed throughout the building and flu shots are
offered, she said.
These efforts are partly a response to a flu outbreak last year
that “ran through the whole building,” Chambers said. This year,
other than a few staff members
falling ill to the virus, she said, the
organization has not seen a spike
in the number of flu cases.
Nonetheless, the organization
PHOTOS BY CARMEN HEREDIA RODRIGUEZ/KAISER HEALTH NEWS
Members of the D.C. homeless community have constructed an encampment in front of the Central
Union Mission. These crowded spaces can become breeding grounds for diseases such as the flu.
held a vaccine clinic Feb. 9. The
CDC said this year’s vaccine is
36 percent effective overall, but
only about 25 percent effective
against the dominant H3N2
strain. Nevertheless, experts say it
provides some protection and is
worth getting, even at this late
date.
Unity Health Care, a nonprofit
that caters to low-income residents in Washington, also held flu
clinics Jan. 25 at two shelters for
the homeless. The health system
had promoted the vaccine in the
fall, but those events had marginal success, said Catherine Crosland, Unity’s medical director of
homeless outreach services.
To try again, she and Caroline
Garber, a Walgreens pharmacist,
arrived at one of the shelters with
a big red bag containing 50 vaccine doses. Paul Martin was their
first client. “I really don’t like
needles, but I do need the flu
shot,” he told Garber.
A steady trickle of men made
their way in to get shots. Among
Paul Martin recovers after getting a flu vaccine at a homeless
shelter. “I really don’t like needles, but I do need the flu shot,”
Martin said.
them was Robert Ford.
He had been unemployed and
homeless for about two years, he
said. He is diligent about his flu
vaccines, in part because he has
Instead of jogging, do you
want to go plogging?
PLOGGING FROM E1
route.
“I’m not going to just let litter
sit there. I’m not going to just
walk past that plastic bottle,” said
Alexandria
resident
Emily
Wright. “It’s not that I don’t think
it’s gross to pick it up. I do. But I
also think it’s gross for a person to
not take responsibility for it.”
Wright, 40, has been plogging
for several months along the Alexandria waterfront, but just a
few weeks ago learned that what
she’s been doing has a name.
Her partner used to lovingly
tease her about her habit of going
out for a run-walk for about an
hour with a trash bag and plastic
gloves.
“He used to call it my trash
runs,” said Wright, a writer and
cellist. “A few weeks ago, he said,
‘The Swedes have a name for your
trash runs!’ ”
She mostly picks up cigarette
butts, bits of plastic-foam containers, plastic bottles and bottle
caps. “There are an alarming
number of full diapers,” she said.
“They turn my stomach the most.”
Plogging not only helps the
environment, it’s also quite good
for your health. Think squats
while jogging.
According to the Swedishbased fitness app Lifesum, which
last month made it possible for
users to track plogging activity, a
half-hour of jogging plus picking
up trash will burn 288 calories for
the average person, compared
with the 235 calories burned by
jogging alone. A brisk walk will
expend about 120 calories.
“It makes me feel good for so
many reasons,” Wright said. “My
pants fit differently. I’m more
nipped in at the waist. I think it’s
because of balance and flexibility.”
In Sweden, plogger Maja Tesch,
28, said she learned about plog-
MAJA TESCH
In Sweden, Maja Tesch said she learned about plogging last year.
ging last year, when it became
popular in the Scandinavian
country. It spread through word
of mouth, and the hashtag #plogging started popping up on social
media. Tesch, a nurse, said she
regularly organizes plogging
events in which she and friends
will pluck litter for a few hours,
then spend time together around
a fire.
“I run a lot, and I love to spend
time in nature. When I find litter
out in the woods or in the archipelago it makes me sad and a bit
angry. When I heard about plogging it was a natural way to do
something about that agitation,”
Tesch said in an email. “It’s so
easy to just bring the litter and
put it in the nearest bin, and it
makes you feel that you’re doing a
difference!”
Laura Lindberg, who lives in
Hoboken, N.J., said a few weeks
ago that she learned about plog-
diabetes. He takes medication to
manage it and watches his diet. By
the end of the night, he was one of
26 men who got vaccinated.
Because the vaccine does not
ging and had what she called an
“aha moment.”
“It was a no-brainer. I knew I
could incorporate it into my
runs,” said Lindberg, 36, who
runs four or five days a week. “I
suddenly felt guilty for not doing
it for all these years I’ve been
running. All you need is a bag.”
She also takes along a pair of
gardening gloves stuffed into her
pocket.
“I try to get in my first mile
while I scope out where I see
recyclables and garbage,” she
said. On her second and third
miles, she plucks litter off sidewalks and bushes.
“I’ve yet to look back,” said
Lindberg, who works in sales for a
health insurance company. “I’ve
yet to return without a bag of
recyclables and garbage.”
Seeing litter on the street used
to upset her. “I’d be frustrated by
it,” she said. “Then it clicked:
‘Duh, I don’t have to be frustrated
about it. I can do something
about it.’ ”
Lindberg said that while she
thoroughly enjoys picking up
trash in Hoboken, she wouldn’t
attempt it where she works in
New York City.
purposes. And too many patients
have owned guns that we can’t do
anything about.
In response to the Parkland
shooting, a number of advocacy
groups and politicians are calling
for stricter regulations surrounding people with mental illness;
proposals include shoring up
background check systems to
deny firearms to people deemed
dangerous by mental-health professionals and expanding the
scope of civil commitment laws.
During a White House meeting,
Trump said, “We’re going to be
talking seriously about opening
mental-health institutions again.”
It’s sad that the country seems
to focus so much on mental
health in the wake of mass shootings. Evidence suggests that gun
availability is a far better explanation for mass shootings than mental illness and that gun regulations targeted exclusively toward
people with mental health issues
will have minimal impact on the
American epidemic of gun homicides. And when it comes to the
link between guns and mental
illness, gun-related suicides are
an overlooked issue that takes
more than 20,000 lives each year.
We need to rethink the nation’s
mental-health laws, but mass
shootings aren’t the reason.
health-science@washpost.com
Morris is a resident physician in
psychiatry at the Stanford University
School of Medicine.
completely immunize a person
from the flu, doctors say that
when someone falls ill, isolation is
one of the best ways to prevent the
spread of the virus. But that is
difficult to arrange for the homeless.
Crosland said 45 medical beds
for the more than 7,700 people
living without homes in the District are “definitely not” enough to
meet the demand.
Moreover, these beds are not
equipped to isolate a person with
the flu from the rest of the population. The women’s respite beds,
for instance, consist of 12 bottom
bunks scattered throughout the
general clients’ sleeping quarters
at Patricia Handy Place for Women.
“I think we’re going to get hit,”
said Janelle Goetcheus, chief
medical officer for Unity Health
Care, which manages medical respite beds for the homeless in the
District. “It’s only a matter of
time.”
In Santa Fe, shelters use medical respite beds for those sickened
by the flu. At the Interfaith Community Shelter, an increasing
number of clients use these accommodations to recover from
the virus and upper respiratory
infections, said Sue Carr, assistant
to the executive director.
On doctor’s orders, Gabaldon
occupied one of those beds after
being released from the hospital.
After several days, she said,
she’s “coming around.” But her
physician authorized her to extend her stay in medical respite,
for which Gabaldon is grateful.
“I still feel weak,” she said. “But
thank God the doctor gave me
four more days, because it’s freezing out there in the morning when
they put us out.”
Heredia Rodriguez is a reporter for
Kaiser Health News, a nonprofit news
service covering health issues and an
editorially independent program of
the Kaiser Family Foundation. Heidi
de Marco, a reporter and producer for
California Healthline, contributed to
this story.
“With the pace on sidewalks,
I’d be infuriating people if I started doing that here in Manhattan,”
she said.
The environmental organization Keep America Beautiful recently started promoting plogging as a way to encourage trashfree communities. Spokesman
Mike Rosen said when the group
put out the #plogging message to
its 600 affiliates, it got a surprising response.
“People started saying, ‘We do
things like this already,’ ” Rosen
said. “In Tennessee, they do an
event called Trashercize that
combines exercising with cleaning up the community.”
But he said for those people
who love to jog, going for a plog
instead might not be realistic
every time.
“I don’t think plogging replaces jogging as a daily activity,”
Rosen said. “If you turn your jog
into a plog once a week or once a
month, or turn your walk into a
palk or your hike into pike, you’ll
get personal satisfaction. You’ll
have an endorphin high from
running, and you’ll know you’re
helping your community.”
allison.klein@washpost.com
E6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
In Congo, mining
for cobalt has
hidden costs
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 6 , 2018
ABOVE: Kipushi, a traditional
mining city in the heart of
Congo’s mining sector.
LEFT: A high number of
premature births and birth
defects are linked to toxic
exposure related to mining
activity, says Tony Kayembe, a
scientist at the University of
Lubumbashi.
Writing by
Todd C. Frankel
Photography
by Lena Mucha
In Congo’s sun-scorched and
dusty south, thousands of miners
scour underground tunnels hunting for cobalt. They don’t use power tools. They don’t wear face
masks and often don’t wear
gloves. They do it because they live
in one of the poorest countries in
the world, and cobalt is valuable.
The mineral is essential for the
lithium-ion batteries found in
smartphones and many electric
vehicles. Most of the world’s cobalt supply comes from the Congo
region.
These
cobalt-laden
chunks of rock leave the country
destined for refineries in Europe
and China, where they enter the
complex supply chains of some of
the largest technology and automotive firms.
The diggers know their work is
physically dangerous. Death and
injury from tunnel collapses are
not uncommon. Children sometimes join their older brothers
and fathers in the mines.
But what’s less understood are
the environmental health risks
posed by the extensive mining.
Southern Congo holds not only
vast deposits of cobalt and copper
but also uranium. Scientists have
recorded alarming radioactivity
levels in some mining regions.
BOTTOM: A scientist at the
University of Lubumbashi is
investigating the connection
between birth defects and
mining contamination.
Mining waste often pollutes rivers
and drinking water. The dust from
the pulverized rock is known to
cause breathing problems. The
mining industry’s toxic fallout is
only now being studied by researchers, mostly in Lubumbashi,
the country’s mining capital.
Lena Mucha, 34, a German photojournalist, last year chronicled
the effects of the cobalt mining.
She met mothers who had miscarriages and photographed infants
born with deformities whose fathers worked in the mines.
“We are all using cobalt,” Mucha told The Washington Post,
“It’s difficult to not use it, but it’s
important to let people know
what is the story behind this.”
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/in-sight
Your attitude can help combat how minor stressors a≠ect your well-being
STRESS FROM E1
She adds that it can also raise
the levels of our stress hormones,
a process that affects our immune
system, and can lead to chronic
inflammation, a condition associated with a host of serious illnesses, including cancer.
It’s not necessarily the exposure to the continuous streams of
minor stressors but how we react
that can take a toll.
In a 2016 study, researchers
interviewed about 900 people
about the frequency with which
they experienced stress and had
them evaluate the severity of it.
They also tested their resting
heart rate variability, or HRV, the
variation in intervals between
heartbeats. (A higher HRV is associated with a healthy response
to stress; a lower one has been
associated with increased risk for
heart disease and death.)
The researchers found that it
wasn’t the number of stressful
events but how a person perceived their stress and then reacted to it emotionally that was
associated with lower HRV.
In a 2014 study of 1,300 men,
Aldwin and other researchers
had participants rate on a stress
scale of 0 to 4 situations they
encountered during the course of
a day. Using a list that included
such items as “your kids,” “your
garden” and “your commute to
work,” the researchers found that
men who perceived their everyday hassles as very stressful had a
similar mortality risk as people
who consistently reported more
highly stressful life events, such
as the death of a loved one.
“Men who rated daily lives as
‘extremely’ stressful were three
times more likely to die during the
study than those who reported
low levels of daily stress,” Aldwin
says. Learning to roll with the
punches, she says, can protect you.
While it’s normal to lose one’s
cool from time to time, some
people may be hard-wired to
overreact, Aldwin says. “People
who are higher in neuroticism,
meaning those who have strong
emotions that are easy aroused,
are much more likely to get upset
over minor problems,” she says.
Aldwin points to research suggesting that people who are naturally more volatile tend to have a
more reactive physiological response to perceived threats, such
as increased heart rates and cortisol levels, and can take longer to
calm down, which makes it much
harder to regulate emotions.
Sometimes, overblown reactions — such as throwing a tantrum over a train delay or dirty
dishes left in the sink — are a
matter of context. “Being late to
work may not be a major thing
unless your boss has gotten mad
at you for being late too much,”
Aldwin says. A minor spat with
your spouse might not be a big
thing, she says, unless it occurs
within the context of ongoing
problems that are continually
stressing the marriage.
Greenberg adds that being
worn down by chronic stress can
also make us more vulnerable to
day-to-day irritations, work problems or interpersonal conflicts
that can cause us to overreact.
When we’re chronically stressed
and on high-alert, Greenberg says,
“our fight, flight or freeze response
never turns off, we get a buildup of
cortisol in our bodies, and that
makes us vulnerable to diseases.”
Even for people with a propensity to sweat the small stuff, psychologists say, there are strategies
to help regulate their emotions.
Florida-based psychotherapist
Amy Morin, for instance, advises
her patients to notice physical
symptoms that indicate stress
levels are rising. “People say they
go from zero to 10, but when you
“Instead of wishing
the situation were
different . . . focus
on your reaction.”
Amy Morin, a Florida psychotherapist
really pay attention, there are
some warning signs, like clinched
fists, a flushed face or a racing
heart,” she says. Recognizing and
then managing your physiological response, by excusing yourself
from the situation or taking some
deep breaths, can stop an angry
escalation before it really gets
going, she says.
In a study published in 2016 in
the Journal of the Association for
Consumer Research, researchers
asked more than 100 university
students and staff members to
track minor annoyances they experienced (such as traffic, a dead
cellphone battery) and simple
pleasures
(socializing
with
friends, engaging in a hobby) over
the course of six days and then
record daily progress toward
goals they hoped to achieve.
The researchers found that
goal progress appeared to suffer
on days with a high number of
minor annoyances and relatively
few simple pleasures. But on days
when the participants reported a
high number of simple pleasures,
the effect of small annoyances
was buffered and didn’t get in the
way of their daily goals. Researcher Vanessa Patrick explains, “Being mindful of small, everyday
pleasures, which are readily accessible to most people at little or
no cost, can help dampen the
impact of everyday annoyances
and contribute greatly to our happiness and well-being.”
Instead of personalizing a
problem — as in “Why do these
things always happen to me?” —
it’s helpful to view annoyances
through a fact-based lens, says
Morin, author of “13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do.” For
example, reminding yourself that
there are millions of cars on the
road, she says, can help you realize that traffic jams are inevitable,
not personal. “Instead of wishing
the situation were different or
insisting the circumstances are
unfair, focus on your reaction,”
Morin says.
While you can’t control the
speed of traffic, she explains, you
can control what you do while
you’re in your car, such as listening to music or tuning in to your
favorite podcast. Morin says
thinking about the facts and refocusing your attention can help
reduce the intensity of negative
emotions, and it aids with accepting that annoyances are just a
normal part of life.
To help keep daily hassles in
perspective, Aldwin offers this
advice: “When you feel your
stress levels rising, ask yourself:
Is this really worth getting so
upset over that I’m willing harm
my health?”
Chances are, it’s not.
health-science@washpost.com
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