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The Washington Post – March 10, 2018

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White House
muddies prospect
of N. Korea talks
In South Korea, Olympic flame is lit again
MEETING MAY NOW HAVE CONDITIONS
Officials send mixed signals on Trump-Kim summit
BY C AROL M ORELLO
AND J OHN H UDSON
PAUL HANNA/REUTERS
Artists perform Friday at the Opening Ceremonies of the Winter Paralympics at PyeongChang Olympic Stadium.
The ceremony featured a lights display and pyrotechnics, culminating with the lighting of the Paralympic cauldron.
Unlike last month’s Winter Games, North and South Korea marched separately during the ceremonies.
The White House on Friday
sent confusing messages about
the prospects for a historic meeting between President Trump
and North Korean leader Kim
Jong Un, raising questions about
a summit announced less than
24 hours earlier.
White House officials insisted
that nothing had changed since
Trump said he had accepted an
invitation from Kim. But White
House press secretary Sarah
Huckabee Sanders appeared to
lay out new conditions, demanding “concrete, verifiable” actions
from Pyongyang.
She repeated the demand several times, saying: “They’ve got
to follow through on the promises that they’ve made, and we
want to see concrete and verifi-
able actions. The president has
accepted that invitation on the
basis that we see concrete and
verifiable steps.”
The remarks left it unclear
whether the White House was
restating the terms of the meeting, with even the timing of talks
appearing to be up in the air.
The White House insistence
on concrete actions appeared to
be a response to criticism that
Trump accepted Kim’s invitation
too quickly, without extracting
enough concessions beforehand.
With most big international
treaties, the leaders of the countries involved swoop in at the
end to cap a diplomatic success.
But that well-worn script is being
upended, despite negotiations
that would be inherently more
complicated than two previous
initiatives to get North Korea to
TALKS CONTINUED ON A6
President acts as own
Infighting overshadows the fight for veterans diplomat, negotiator
Ugly standoff atop
VA threatens to derail
a presidential priority
BY
L ISA R EIN
Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin is managing the government’s second-largest bureaucracy from a fortified bunker
atop the agency’s Washington
headquarters.
MS-13’s invasion
of a N.Y. school
reveals politics
of protection
BY
M ICHAEL E . M ILLER
brentwood, n.y. — The old
minivan appeared near the school
on a Tuesday morning, its Illinois
plates the only thing out of place
in the blue-collar suburbs of central Long Island. But as backpacktoting teenagers passed by on
their way to Brentwood High, the
van’s doors suddenly swung open.
Out sprang members of the
violent street gang MS-13, armed
with baseball bats.
They attacked three 16-yearold students they suspected of
being rivals before driving off.
When police spotted the van in
the same neighborhood the following afternoon and surrounded
it at gunpoint, the MS-13 members were in the midst of trying to
abduct a fourth.
“We were going to take him
somewhere private and beat him
to death,” said Miguel Rivera, 20,
according to a Suffolk County
indictment.
The Dec. 6 arrests of Rivera and
four others thwarted what police
say would have been the sixth
murder of a Brentwood High
MS-13 CONTINUED ON A14
He has canceled the morning
meetings once attended by several of President Trump’s political appointees — members of his
senior management team —
gathering instead with aides he
trusts not to miscast his remarks.
Access to Shulkin’s 10th-floor
executive suite was recently revoked for several people he has
accused of lobbying the White
House to oust him. He and his
public-affairs chief have not spoken in weeks.
And in a sign of how deeply the
secretary’s trust in his senior
staff has eroded, an armed guard
now stands outside his office.
Shulkin, a favorite of Trump’s
who by most accounts tallied
multiple wins in his first year
serving a crucial constituency for
the president, is fighting to regain his standing amid a mutiny.
Although those who want him
gone say their focus is fulfilling
the president’s priorities, it has
become clear that one side —
whether it’s Shulkin, who is the
only Obama administration
holdover in Trump’s Cabinet, or
his estranged management team
— is unlikely to survive the
standoff.
“The tragedy of all of this is
that Shulkin is putting points on
the scoreboard for Trump,” said
Philip Carter, a senior fellow at
the Center for a New American
Security, where he focuses on
veterans issues. “What gets lost
with the palace intrigue is that
reforms will stall. It’s the president’s agenda that suffers with
this kind of dysfunction.”
This portrait of the Department of Veterans Affairs’ leaderSHULKIN CONTINUED ON A4
Fear, empathy in German steel hub
Trump’s tariffs spark anxiety but also recognition of attempt to shield workers
BY G RIFF W ITTE
AND L UISA B ECK
IN EISENHÜTTENSTADT, GERMANY
This city was built to make
steel.
Its communist founding fathers designed Eisenhüttenstadt
in the 1950s as a vision of East
Germany’s glorious future, with
austere concrete apartments, tidy
storefronts and elaborate murals
celebrating the virtues of the
working man all arrayed around a
mega-factory that churned out
steel for use across the Eastern
Bloc.
But the future didn’t last. The
fall of the Berlin Wall brought a
rush of capitalism — and a world
of trouble for a small city on the
Polish border that struggled to
compete in a global market.
Now Eisenhüttenstadt — the
name means Iron Factory City, a
reference to steel’s precursor —
faces another potential jolt from
far beyond its borders: tariffs imposed by President Trump that
threaten to spark a trade war.
“Everyone’s a little worried,”
said Frank Balzer, a 35-year veteran of the factory and, since
January, the city’s mayor. “I just
came back from the hospital, and
the doctor asked: ‘What does this
Dearth of qualified staff,
personal risk appear
to give him little worry
BY D AVID N AKAMURA
AND A NNE G EARAN
Over the past six weeks, the
Trump administration’s roster of
Korea experts, already depleted,
grew even thinner. The White
House mysteriously dropped its
choice for ambassador to Seoul.
The State Department’s top
North Korea specialist resigned.
And the senior Asia director at
the National Security Council
was out the past two weeks on
paternity leave.
But when a high-level South
Korean delegation arrived at the
White House on Thursday afternoon for two days of meetings
over the North Korea threat, one
person swooped in to fill the
vacuum: President Trump.
In a stunning turn of events,
Trump personally intervened in
a security briefing intended for
his top deputies, inviting the
South Korean officials into the
Oval Office, where he agreed on
the spot to a historic but exceedingly risky summit with North
Korean dictator Kim Jong Un. He
then orchestrated a dramatic
public announcement on the
driveway outside the West Wing
broadcast live on cable networks.
The news shocked Washington, Seoul and everywhere in
N. KOREA CONTINUED ON A5
Trump wrote Putin to
invite him to ’13 pageant
BY S HANE H ARRIS,
R OSALIND S . H ELDERMAN
AND K AROUN D EMIRJIAN
PATRICK PLEUL/PICTURE-ALLIANCE/DEUTSCHE PRESSE-AGENTUR/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Liquid iron runs through a furnace in July at the ArcelorMittal
factory in Eisenhüttenstadt, Germany, a town founded on steel.
mean for steel? Will the factory be
closed?’ ”
Yet as much as Trump’s tariffs
have fueled anxiety, they also
have stirred empathy. Among
some current and former workers, there’s hunger for a government that protects them the way
the old East German government
used to — and the way they see
Trump trying to do for U.S. workers.
“ ‘America First’ is good,” said
Max Frenzel, a bearded and
brawny 67-year-old who recently
retired from the factory after 43
years. “Otherwise, you lose jobs.
There’s always someone who will
produce goods for less.”
STEEL CONTINUED ON A8
IN Sunday’s post
Donald Trump was so eager to
have Vladimir Putin attend the
2013 Miss Universe pageant in
Moscow that he wrote a personal
letter to the Russian president
inviting him to the event, according to multiple people familiar
with the document.
At the bottom of the typed
letter, Trump scrawled a postscript adding that he looked
forward to seeing “beautiful”
women during his trip.
Trump’s letter to Putin, which
was described by people with
knowledge of its contents, shows
how interested he was in attracting the personal attention of the
Russian president. The real estate magnate, who owned the
Miss Universe pageant, wrote the
note at a time when he was
looking to expand his brand to
Russia.
The letter, the first known
attempt at direct outreach by
Trump to Putin, has been turned
over to investigators probing
Russia’s interference in the 2016
campaign. It is unclear whether
Trump’s missive was ever delivered to the Russian president —
and if so, whether Putin responded.
John Dowd, an attorney for
President Trump, said he was not
familiar with the letter. “It’s all
nonsense,” he said. A White
House spokesman and attorneys
for the Trump Organization declined to comment.
At the time, Trump made no
secret that he hoped Putin would
attend the Miss Universe pageant, which was being held in
Russia for the first time.
In a June 18, 2013, tweet,
Trump wrote: “Do you think
Putin will be going to The Miss
PUTIN CONTINUED ON A2
Inside
Undressed, under duress
Nude scenes sometimes force
actresses to weigh conscience
against career. Arts & Style
Eager to lead, ready to win With the Obama era in the
past, black Democrats are demanding more from their
party — and an end to being taken for granted. Magazine
Drawn by decay Abandoned
factories are attracting fans of
industrial history. Travel
$216
ANDRE CHUNG FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
MARVIN JOSEPH/THE WASHINGTON POST
THE NATION
Florida enacts gun limits
The law raises the minimum age
and bans bump stocks. A3
Spring forward
Daylight saving time begins at
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your clocks ahead one hour.
BUSINESS NEWS..............................................A11
COMICS ............................................................. C5
OPINION PAGES...............................................A15
LOTTERIES.........................................................B3
OBITUARIES.......................................................B5
TELEVISION.......................................................C3
WORLD NEWS....................................................A7
CONTENT © 2018
The Washington Post / Year 141, No. 95
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EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. SATURDAY,
MARCH 10 , 2018
Sessions stepping up his attacks on jurisdictions that challenge federal law
BY S ARI H ORWITZ
AND M ATT Z APOTOSKY
Shortly after Jeff Sessions became attorney general, he dismissed Hawaii as “an island in
the Pacific” when a federal judge
there blocked President Trump’s
travel ban. He lashed out at New
York City and Philadelphia for
giving sanctuary to people in the
country illegally. Last summer,
he lambasted Chicago, tying its
policies on undocumented immigrants to its soaring crime rates.
Sessions’s fiery speech on
Wednesday excoriating California for laws he said impede immigration enforcement is the latest
in a string of such attacks on
states, cities and their leaders
whose policies he perceives as
liberal, radical and a violation of
federal law. As a Republican senator from Alabama for 20 years,
Sessions was known as an advocate for states’ rights. But, as
attorney general, observers say,
he is making an exception when
state policies bump against his
conservative agenda.
“As soon as Attorney General
Sessions is able to craft federal
policy that matches what he believes to be the interest and
values of America, he is perfectly
fine with strengthening the federal government and overcoming
states’ rights,” said Benjamin E.
Park, author of “American Nationalisms” and an assistant professor of history at Sam Houston
State University. “States’ rights
philosophies are always skindeep and work until you want a
strong federal government to
support your policies.”
Justice Department spokesman Drew Hudson said Friday
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who as a senator from Alabama was an advocate for states’ rights, has
sued to block three California laws that he alleges obstruct federal immigration enforcement.
that Sessions is taking action
against certain jurisdictions because he is committed to “the rule
of law.”
“Under the Constitution and
the principles of federalism,
there is no question that states do
not have the authority to nullify
duly enacted federal law,” Hudson said in a statement. “The
Attorney General is fulfilling his
obligation to enforce federal law,
which is indispensable to the
proper functioning of a free and
orderly society for all Ameri-
I N CA S E Y OU M I S S ED I T
Some reports that you may have missed. Read more at washingtonpost.com.
Conway found to
violate Hatch Act twice
Trump name stripped
from hotel in Panama
Kellyanne Conway, a top
adviser to President Trump,
violated federal law on two
occasions by making public
comments supportive of one
candidate and against another
ahead of a special Senate
election in Alabama last year, a
federal investigator said Tuesday.
The word ‘Trump’ was pried
from the sign in front of Trump
International Hotel Panama, the
only Trump-branded hotel in
Latin America, after the
building’s owner said he’d won a
legal fight to take control of it.
washingtonpost.com/national
Owners of Wesson and
Crisco call off merger
Deal with teachers
ends strike in W.Va.
Gov. Jim Justice (R) and the
state’s teachers reached a deal
Tuesday that would get the
teachers, and all state workers, a
5 percent pay raise. The deal
ended a nine-day strike by
educators that swept across all of
the state’s 55 counties and left
more than 277,000 public-school
students out of school.
washingtonpost.com/national
washingtonpost.com/business
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CO R R ECTI O N S
A photo caption with a March 7
Metro article about a Prince
George’s County teacher
receiving a kidney from one of
her colleagues misspelled the
first name of John Hanson
Montessori School student
Adaora Wilson.
A Feb. 17 A-section article
about the Commerce
Department recommending
metals tariffs incorrectly said
that imports account for
90 percent of U.S. aluminum
consumption. In fact, imports
account for 90 percent of
primary aluminum
consumption, according to the
department. Primary aluminum
is produced directly from mined
ore, as opposed to being made
from recycled scrap.
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impending raid by Immigration
and
Customs
Enforcement
agents.
It’s not just immigration issues that have spurred Sessions
to criticize local policies that he
believes violate federal law.
Earlier this year, Sessions took
on states across the country
that have paved the way for the
burgeoning marijuana industry, undoing Obama-era Justice
Department guidance and making it easier for U.S. prosecutors
to enforce federal marijuana
laws. Eight states and the District of Columbia have laws
allowing for recreational marijuana consumption, according
to NORML, a group that advocates legalization and tracks
after Brown’s comments.
“The Attorney General didn’t
create this issue,” Flores added
later. “But he cannot accept unconstitutional interference with
federal law enforcement from
any state.”
Although the Justice Department suing states is uncommon,
it is not unheard of. The Obama
Justice Department did so several times — over voting and
transgender rights in Texas and
North Carolina, and over a controversial immigration law in
Arizona.
But state and local leaders in
the states being criticized are
incensed by the nature of Sessions’s attacks.
Last April, Sessions appeared
on a radio show and suggested
that a federal judge in Hawaii
should not be able to strike down
Trump’s travel ban.
“I really am amazed that a
judge sitting on an island in the
Pacific can issue an order that
stops the president of the United
States from what appears to be
clearly his statutory and constitutional power,” Sessions said.
Nadine Y. Ando, president of
the Hawaii State Bar Association,
said that in criticizing the judge,
Sessions managed to “demean
the entire state.”
“Excuse me?” Ando said at the
time. “We have been a state for 58
years. We’re not just some island.”
Sen. Mazie K. Hirono (DHawaii) said in an interview Friday that although Sessions and
other Republicans posit themselves as favoring states’ rights,
they are willing to cast that
stance aside when it suits their
agenda.
“There is no consistency in
their position, so they often argue
states’ rights when it suits their
ideological purposes and positions,” she said.
washingtonpost.com/world
The owners of both Crisco and
Wesson cooking oils called off
acquisition plans Tuesday after
the Federal Trade Commission
said J.M. Smucker’s proposed
$285 million bid for Wesson,
which is owned by Conagra
Brands, would hand Smucker
and its Crisco label control of at
least 70 percent of the market for
branded canola and vegetable
oils sold in retail stores.
KLMNO
cans.”
Sessions’s rhetoric reflects his
long-held and passionate views
on immigration, a stance that
dovetails with President Trump’s
policy agenda. Sessions had targeted “sanctuary” jurisdictions
for months, although this week
he sued to block three California’s laws that he alleged obstruct
federal immigration authorities,
his most aggressive step yet.
“How dare you? How dare you
needlessly endanger the lives of
our law enforcement officers to
promote a radical open-borders
agenda?” Sessions said in a
speech, referring to Oakland
Mayor Libby Schaaf (D), whose
warning to her constituents last
month, he said, disrupted an
pot-related legislation. Many
more states permit the use of
medical marijuana.
“It is the mission of the Department of Justice to enforce the
laws of the United States,” Sessions said when he made the
January announcement.
In response, Colorado’s Republican senator, Cory Gardner,
threatened to hold up the confirmation of nominees for key Justice Department leadership
posts.
“This is a states’ rights issue,
and the federal government has
better things to focus on,” said
Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.).
Sessions’s lawsuit and comments in California this week
sparked backlash when he suggested, in his speech, that California’s actions were bucking the
Constitution.
“Federal law is the supreme
law of the land,” Sessions said. “I
would invite any doubters to go
to Gettysburg, or to the tombstones of John C. Calhoun and
Abraham Lincoln. This matter
has been settled.”
Gov. Jerry Brown said the attorney general was “basically going to war against the state of
California,” and Sen. Kamala D.
Harris (D-Calif.) said he should
have known that his Civil War
references would “be interpreted
as highly offensive.”
Supporters, though, argued
that Sessions was acting in the
name of public safety, and pointed to cases of undocumented
immigrants being released from
jail because of local jurisdictions’
policies and going on to commit
crimes.
“In fact, the only war that has
been declared by the Attorney
General and the Trump Administration is on violent crime, transnational criminal organizations,
and the drug crisis,” Justice Department spokeswoman Sarah
Isgur Flores wrote on Twitter
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JORGE SILVA/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin talk in November on the sidelines of an Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation
summit in Danang, Vietnam. Since the 1980s, Trump has repeatedly but unsuccessfully sought to build a branded tower in Russia.
Letter is first known direct Trump-Putin outreach
PUTIN FROM A1
Universe Pageant in November
in Moscow — if so, will he
become my new best friend?”
His letter to Putin was written
that month, according to the
people familiar with the document.
The pageant was part of a
years-long effort to bring the
Trump name to Russia. Trump
has repeatedly sought to build a
tower in Russia since the late
1980s, without success.
But in 2013, a new opportunity
emerged through another business he owned: the Miss Universe pageant.
Trump was approached by billionaire Moscow developer Aras
Agalarov and his pop star son,
Emin, who said they would pay
to bring Miss Universe to the
Russian capital.
Trump was eager for Putin to
attend the event, but the Russian
president canceled a planned
appearance at the last minute,
Aras Agalarov told The Washington Post in a 2016 interview.
“That was a very complicated
situation then, because I promised Trump he would meet Putin,” Agalarov said.
Instead, Putin sent a “friendly”
letter and a gift of a Russian
lacquered box, he said. “So he
was leaving with very warm
feelings,” Agalarov said. “He was
very happy.”
During the pageant, Trump
suggested that Putin was following the event and Trump’s role in
it. “I do have a relationship, and I
can tell you that he’s very interested in what we’re doing here
today,” Trump told MSNBC while
in Moscow.
Investigators for special counsel Robert S. Mueller III have
asked witnesses questions about
the Miss Universe pageant and
lawyer who the promoter said
could give him damaging information about Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton.
“If it’s what you say I love it
especially later in the summer,”
Trump Jr. responded. Days later, he met with the lawyer at
Trump Tower in New York. A
U.S.-based employee for the
Agalarovs also attended, as did
Donald Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner and then-campaign
chairman
Paul
Manafort.
“Do you think Putin will be going to The Miss
Universe Pageant in November in Moscow — if so,
will he become my new best friend?”
Donald Trump, in a June 18, 2013, tweet
Trump’s interest in having Putin
attend the event, according to
people familiar with the inquiry.
Mueller’s team also has examined Trump’s relationship with
the Agalarovs, which extended
beyond the 2013 pageant.
In June 2016, a music promoter representing Emin Agalarov
emailed one of Trump’s sons,
Donald Trump Jr., and asked if
he would meet with a Russian
Trump Jr. has said that no
information about Clinton was
provided at the meeting.
Over the years, Donald Trump
has offered inconsistent stories
about whether he met Putin
before he became president.
In October 2013, a month
before the Miss Universe pageant, he told late-night host David Letterman that Putin was
a “tough guy” and that he had
“met him once.”
During a Republican primary
debate in November 2015, Trump
said that he knew Putin “very
well.”
But in July 2016, he told a CBS
affiliate in Miami, “I have nothing to do with Russia, nothing to
do, I never met Putin, I have
nothing to do with Russia whatsoever.”
By that time, Russia was widely suspected of stealing emails
from the Democratic National
Committee, which had been published by WikiLeaks.
“I don’t know who Putin is,”
Trump said at a news conference the same day. “He said one
nice thing about me. He said
I’m a genius. . . . I never met
Putin.”
In the same news conference,
Trump called on Russia to find
and release Clinton’s emails.
The following month, at a
campaign rally in Wisconsin,
Trump defended himself from
criticism from Clinton that he
wanted to befriend Putin: “I’m
saying to myself, what’s wrong
with that? That’s good.”
shane.harris@washpost.com
rosalind.helderman@washpost.com
karoun.demirjian@washpost.com
Josh Dawsey and Tom Hamburger
contributed to this report.
SATURDAY, MARCH 10 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
RE
politics & the nation
Fla. governor breaks with NRA, signs new gun law in response to Parkland
BY
M ICHAEL S CHERER
Florida Gov. Rick Scott (R) defied his longtime allies at the National Rifle Association on Friday
to sign into law a new set of gun
regulations, more than three
weeks after a school shooting
claimed 17 lives in his state.
“I am going to do what I think
are common-sense solutions,”
Scott said after the signing. “I
think this is the beginning. There
is now going to be a real conversation about how we make our
schools safe.”
The law, passed by Republican
legislative leaders and a number
of Democrats, marks a major shift
for a state known as a laboratory
for gun rights legislation, including legal protections for people
who use guns in self-defense and
an expansive concealed-carry law.
It comes as federal efforts to
address the Feb. 14 slayings at
Marjory Stoneman Douglas High
School have sputtered, despite
calls from President Trump for
bipartisan action. The Senate has
no bill scheduled for debate, and
the only measure moving in the
House is a bill to increase shooting
response training for students and
teachers.
Scott, who is moving toward a
Senate bid against Democratic incumbent Bill Nelson, was critical
of the inaction in Washington. “If
you look at the federal government, nothing seems to have happened there,” he said. “You go elect
people, you expect them to represent you, get things done.”
The new Florida law imposes a
three-day waiting period for most
purchases of long guns, raises the
minimum age for buying those
weapons to 21 and bans the possession of bump stocks, devices
that can make semiautomatic
weapons fire like fully automatic
firearms. It does not address the
demand by many Stoneman
Douglas students for a ban on
assault weapons.
The bill does make it easier for
law enforcement and judges to
remove guns from people considered a danger to themselves or
others, and it establishes a program to arm some school personnel, along with hundreds of millions of dollars in new spending on
school security and mental health
treatment.
Before signing the bill, the governor restated his opposition to
portions of it, including the waiting period and any effort to arm
teachers.
Marion Hammer, the NRA’s
MARK WALLHEISER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Gov. Rick Scott (R) signs the gun bill. He touted himself as a gun
rights purist, and his state as a gun haven, as recently as last year.
Florida lobbyist, has denounced
the bill as an unconstitutional infringement on the Second Amendment and said it passed the state
House in “a display of bullying and
coercion.”
Shortly after Scott signed the
law, the NRA filed suit in federal
court to block raising the minimum age for purchasing long
guns, arguing that the change violates the constitutional rights of
18-, 19- and 20-year-olds.
“I have not spoken to anybody
in the NRA since this happened,”
said Scott, who previously received an A-plus rating from the
powerful group.
Opponents of the new law have
threatened to punish the governor
if he moves forward with a Senate
campaign. “By signing this bill,
Gov. Scott has demonstrated that
the support of gun owners is not
important to him,” said Eric Friday, the general counsel of Florida
Carry, a gun rights group. “I expect
it to play a large role in his Senate
race.”
After Scott came out against
arming teachers in schools, state
Republican leaders amended the
bill to exclude school employees
who work exclusively as classroom teachers from being part of
the “school marshal” program.
The program is voluntary for
school districts, and any school
employees who carry a weapon
will have to undergo 132 hours of
law enforcement training with the
county sheriff’s office, pass a background check and take additional
diversity training.
Until the Parkland shooting,
Scott was championed by the NRA
as a defender of gun rights. He
supported state laws that prohibited local governments from regulating firearms, barred doctors
from asking their patients about
gun ownership and allowed children to play with simulated guns
in school.
As recently as 2017, Scott promoted himself as a gun rights purist and boasted of Florida as a
haven for gun owners. “We love
tourists, new residents and the
Second Amendment,” he said at
the NRA annual meeting in Atlanta in April. “What does ‘shall not
infringe on the people’s right to
bear arms’ mean? It means ‘shall
not infringe.’ It’s not really very
complicated.”
Those positions are no longer
widely held in Florida, after three
mass shootings took 72 lives over
the past two years — at Orlando’s
Pulse nightclub, the international
airport in Fort Lauderdale and
Stoneman Douglas.
A Quinnipiac poll taken more
than a week after the latest shooting found that 78 percent of Florida residents supported raising the
age for all gun purchases to 21,
87 percent supported a mandatory
waiting period for all purchases,
and 56 percent supported allowing teachers and school officials to
carry guns on school grounds.
Nelson, who is preparing to face
Scott in November, has signaled
that he will make guns an issue.
“This is a first step, and if we
really want to do something to
combat gun violence, like what we
saw in Parkland, we must require
universal background checks on
the purchase of a gun and get
these assault rifles off our streets,”
Nelson said in a statement after
the bill became law.
michael.scherer@washpost.com
Released calls reveal parents’ panic, confusion of o∞cers
BY
M ARK B ERMAN
The mother’s voice was increasingly panicked. Her daughter was trapped inside Marjory
Stoneman Douglas High School
while a former student stalked
the halls with a rifle and fired
bullet after bullet. Even from
afar, she tried to comfort and
protect her daughter.
“I love you. I love you. It’s
going to be fine,” the mother said.
“Can you hide somewhere? Can
you play dead?”
Her terrified conversation was
included among a collection of
911 calls released by the Broward
County Sheriff ’s Office this week,
along with police dispatch recordings, other records and a
timeline documenting the law
enforcement response to the
massacre in Parkland, Fla., on
Feb. 14.
A review of the records, police
documents and other accounts
provides the most comprehensive picture yet of how officials
responded during and after the
shooting at Stoneman Douglas
that killed 17 students and faculty. What they reveal is that while
terror was spreading through the
community, the initial police response seemed chaotic and potentially hampered by technological failures.
The records also shed new
light on the actions of Scot
Peterson, the highly criticized
former Broward County sheriff ’s
deputy who was the school resource officer at Stoneman
Douglas. Sheriff Scott Israel, who
also has been the target of public
criticism for his department’s
handling of warning signs preceding the shooting, publicly castigated Peterson for waiting outside during the massacre rather
than rushing in. Peterson, who
retired the day he was suspended, pushed back at Israel’s comments, saying he thought the
gunfire was coming from outside.
Yet the dispatch recordings
show that Peterson — who was
elsewhere on the school’s campus when the shooting began —
quickly zeroed in on the building
where the massacre occurred,
reporting just two minutes after
the first shots that there was
possible gunfire there. He also
ordered other officers to remain
“at least 500 feet away” after the
shooting ended.
“We’re talking about the 1200
building,” Peterson said at one
point, according to the audio
recordings and written timeline
released by the sheriff ’s office.
When another officer later said
some students reported possible
firecrackers by the football field,
Peterson responded: “We also
heard it’s by, inside the 1200
building.”
An attorney for Peterson did
not respond to a message seeking
comment Friday about whether
the former deputy stands by his
earlier statement saying he
“heard gunshots but believed
that those gunshots were originating from outside of any of the
buildings on the school campus.”
The accused Parkland gunman, Nikolas Cruz, walked into
the building at 2:21 p.m. and
began to fire an AR-15 he had
legally purchased, police said. A
fire alarm was activated a minute
later, and the 911 calls began to
flood in. More than 150 calls to
911 were made, police said, many
coming from people who had
children or other relatives
trapped in the school.
“Multiple gunshots are being
fired,” a police dispatcher in
Coral Springs, Fla., a neighboring city, said in one recording.
“We can hear them in the background. Our 911 lines are blowing up.”
A woman called 911 and said
her son, a junior, told her there
was a shooting. Another mother
called to say her daughter was
hiding behind a desk. A woman
called in to say her son had called
but she could not hear him, so
they were exchanging text mes-
sages.
She said her son texted her:
“Shot, shot, shot. Mom, God.”
As these terrified calls mounted and word spread of the gunfire, police were frantically rushing to the shooting scene. Peterson had arrived near the building where the massacre was
unfolding at 2:23 p.m., just two
minutes into the shooting, the
police timeline shows. Recordings captured him giving directions, calling for officers to lock
the school down and to block
pedestrian traffic on nearby Holmberg Road.
At 2:26 p.m., the gunman
began firing rounds at a thirdfloor window, according to the
police timeline, but the glass
held. “I hear shots fired,” Peterson said over the radio.
By 2:27 p.m., six minutes after
the gunfire began, the shooting
stopped. Seventeen people had
been fatally shot and 17 others
had been wounded. Cruz was
seen on video abandoning his
gun, police said, and then walking out of the building and
heading west, blending in with
the fleeing students.
While the gunman walked
away, Peterson ordered other
officers to remain outside the
building, according to the police
timeline. How other deputies
responded has prompted scrutiny; some Coral Springs police
officers said they arrived to find
multiple Broward deputies outside. The sheriff ’s office has said
it is investigating those allegations.
Peterson’s attorney said last
week that the former deputy was
following procedures for gunfire
outdoors by seeking cover and
trying to assess the situation.
Israel, the sheriff, argued that
Peterson should have confronted
the killer inside the building. The
Broward County Sheriff ’s Office,
asked Friday about Peterson’s
directive to other officers to
remain outside, pointed to its
active-shooter protocol, which
KENTUCKY
Neighbor pleads guilty
in attack on Rand Paul
— Associated Press
At 2:32 p.m., 11 minutes after
the gunfire began, officers entered the building, the timeline
shows. The suspected shooter
was taken into custody walking
in a nearby neighborhood a little
more than an hour later.
On the day of the shooting,
while police said Cruz left the
campus by hiding among fleeing
students, terrified parents and
relatives kept calling 911 to report the shooting and find out
what was happening inside the
school.
The mother who urged her
daughter to play dead also told
her to try to remain calm while
the girl continued to hide. The
woman was with a man who
called 911 for her and put the
phone on speaker, and during
the emotional 16-minute call, the
dispatcher offered advice and
tried to follow what was happening.
The call ended when the woman’s daughter said the police
arrived and were taking students
out of the classroom. The dispatcher thanked the man who
had called 911. And then, before
disconnecting, she quietly said
to herself: “Oh, my god.”
mark.berman@washpost.com
Kevin Sullivan contributed to this
report.
TRANSFORM
YOUR SPACE
D IGE ST
Sen. Rand Paul’s neighbor
pleaded guilty Friday to a
federal charge for tackling the
lawmaker in an attack his
attorney says was triggered by a
dispute over lawn maintenance.
Rene Boucher entered the
plea of guilt in federal court in
Bowling Green, Ky., to a charge
of assaulting a member of
Congress. Paul suffered broken
ribs in the attack last year.
A judge set a June 15
sentencing date for the retired
anesthesiologist, who is in his
late 50s. Federal prosecutors
have signaled that they will seek
a 21-month prison sentence.
Boucher’s attorney, Matt Baker,
said he will ask for probation.
The charge carries up to 10 years
in prison and a $250,000 fine.
Paul (R), a former presidential
candidate, was attacked Nov. 3
while mowing his lawn.
states that deputies “may enter
the area and/or structure to
preserve life.”
Officers on the ground faced
communication issues: The sheriff ’s office said its deputies and
the Coral Springs officers were
unable to communicate on the
same radio channel during the
shooting response. Officers also
“may have been unable to transit
or receive some radio messages”
because the Broward radio system, which the county plans to
replace, can become overloaded
when too many people use it —
which the sheriff ’s office said
happened during the response to
the shooting.
Visit one of our area stores or tileshop.com to
schedule your free design consultation.
LARRY W. SMITH/EPA-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK
The South by Southwest festival opened Friday in Austin, offering
original music, independent films and emerging technologies.
County settles with family of
man killed by reserve deputy:
An Oklahoma county will pay
$6 million to settle a federal
civil rights lawsuit filed by the
family of an unarmed black
man who was fatally shot by a
white former sheriff ’s reserve
deputy, according to court
documents filed Friday. Eric
Harris was fatally shot in a
Tulsa street by then-volunteer
deputy Robert Bates during an
illegal-gun-sales sting in April
2015. Bates, 76, who said he
confused his stun gun with his
handgun, was released in
October after serving less than
half of his four-year sentence
for second-degree
manslaughter.
— Associated Press
WASHINGTON, DC
4530 Wisconsin Ave NW
Washington, DC 20016
MANASSAS
7344 Stream Walk Ln
Manassas, VA 20109
SPRINGFIELD
6715 Spring Mall Road
"rubm]C;Ѵ7ķ(ƑƑƐƔƏ
STERLING
46301 Potomac Run Plaza
Sterling, VA 20164
VIENNA
8520 Leeesburg Pike
Vienna, VA 22182
COLUMBIA
6925 Oakland Mills Road
Columbia, MD 21045
GLEN BURNIE
78 Mountain Road
Glen Burnie, MD 21060
ROCKVILLE
15142 Frederick Road
Rockville, MD 20850
TIMONIUM
2301 York Rd
Timonium, MD 21093
W W W . T I L E S H O P . C O M
A4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. SATURDAY,
MARCH 10 , 2018
Stando≠ between VA chief, senior sta≠ threatens to undermine Trump’s agenda
who will drain the swamp at VA.”
VA employs 360,000 people
and accounts for $186 billion
annually. Its sprawling healthcare and benefits system, which
Trump blasted on the campaign
trail as a wasteful, inefficient
failure, churns away. But the
dysfunction, observers say, has
jeopardized legislation to extend
the Choice program and a separate initiative to overhaul VA’s
aging electronic health-records
system.
The legislation remains deadlocked in Congress. And if
Shulkin were to leave, his allies
said, the health-records project
would face indefinite delay.
“Things have come to a grinding halt,” one senior manager
said. “It’s killing the agency. Nobody trusts each other.”
SHULKIN FROM A1
ship crisis is based on interviews
with 16 administration officials
and other observers. Most spoke
on the condition of anonymity to
offer candid views.
It is an extraordinary state of
affairs at the massive federal
agency — only the Defense Department is bigger — whose mission is etched outside its headquarters a block from the White
House: “To care for him who shall
have borne the battle.” Some of
the secretary’s aides, many of
whom spent decades following
orders in the military, have for
weeks openly defied their VA
chain of command.
“This is salacious conspiracy,
and it’s treason,” said Louis Celli,
national director of veterans affairs for the American Legion,
the country’s largest veterans
group. The organization’s leaders
recently informed the White
House that, if necessary, they will
gather members to picket outside
with signs bearing the names of
those they want removed.
Shulkin has sought to fire at
least six of his senior managers
and said as recently as Wednesday that he has assurances from
White House Chief of Staff John
F. Kelly that terminating disloyal
staffers is within his authority.
Administration officials dispute
this, however, saying Kelly has
rebuffed such efforts.
The rift has simmered for
months, driven by personality
and policy differences over shifting more health care for veterans
to the private sector. It exploded
into public view in February with
the release of an inspector general report admonishing Shulkin
and his staff for missteps surrounding a 10-day business trip
to Europe. The report so outraged veterans that some threatened Shulkin, another reason
security was enhanced outside
his office.
Shulkin continues to have
Trump’s confidence, the White
House says, but the impasse has
compelled the secretary to seek
support from those closest to the
president. Last week, he flew to
Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate in
Florida to meet with Ike Perlmutter, chief executive of Marvel
Entertainment, who advises
Trump on veterans issues. The
four-hour meeting focused largely on VA policy, but Shulkin also
sought Perlmutter’s backing in
ridding the agency of those
Shulkin considers obstacles to
further changes.
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin attends a Cabinet meeting Thursday. Shulkin has sought to
fire at least six of his senior managers in a rift that has simmered for months.
Some Trump appointees feel
the work environment at VA is
“toxic” and are said to be seeking
other jobs within the administration, but as of Thursday none had
departed, officials said.
Shulkin is a physician and
former hospital administrator
who ran VA’s massive health-care
arm for 18 months under President Barack Obama before becoming secretary. At a media
event in Washington on Wednesday, he made clear that he wants
to clean house, announcing new
leadership overseeing two dozen
troubled hospitals. While those
moves targeted career VA personnel who had failed to meet
expectations, Shulkin used the
opportunity to warn “everybody
on the political team who is not
helping.”
“It’s taken a lot of my effort not
to get distracted,” Shulkin said in
a separate interview with The
Washington Post. “But I’m hearing from veterans all over the
country saying, ‘We know VA is
moving in the right direction.’ ”
He said many members of
Congress also have shown support, telling him to “keep going.”
‘The right to choose’
Shulkin’s critics deny they are
plotting a coup. Rather, they say
they are airing differences over a
controversial policy priority for
the president — that veterans
have greater ability to choose
JOSE LUIS MAGANA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Shulkin speaks at a veterans panel in Washington in February. He
continues to have Trump’s confidence, the White House says.
private doctors at VA’s expense.
Though popular in the White
House, the effort is viewed skeptically by the American Legion
and other veterans groups that
fear it will lead to VA’s downsizing. Shulkin and his deputy,
Thomas Bowman, have backed a
bipartisan compromise in the
Senate that would remove some
restrictions on private care but
keep VA in charge of deciding
whether veterans can choose private doctors.
Their stance has been a disappointment to the White House,
Shulkin’s critics say.
“The president said he believes
veterans have the right to
choose,” said Pete Hegseth, a
former chief executive of Concerned Veterans for America, a
conservative advocacy group
backed by the billionaire industrialists Charles and David Koch.
An Iraq War veteran, Hegseth is
now co-host of “Fox & Friends
Weekend.”
“Shulkin has talked a good
game on Choice,” Hegseth said,
referring to an existing program
that allows veterans to see private doctors, but with restrictions. “But he’s sided with the
permanent bureaucracy, the traditional veterans groups and the
unions. This is a litmus test of
whether he is truly a reformer
The power struggle
Shulkin and his team saw eye
to eye at first. Some aides, such as
John Ullyot, his public-affairs
chief, arrived at VA with years of
Capitol Hill experience. Others,
including Jake Leinenkugel, a
senior aide installed as part of a
Cabinet-wide program to monitor secretaries’ loyalty, has no
prior government experience.
In Shulkin’s first year, Congress passed 11 bills to bring
change to the agency, easing the
backlog of benefit applications
and appeals and clearing a fast
path to fire employees involved
in misconduct. VA also launched
a 24-hour hotline for veterans’
complaints and began posting
wait times for appointments at
its 1,200 medical centers.
Beginning last spring, though,
the debate over private care and a
growing distrust of Shulkin’s affiliation with the Obama administration began to fuel the leadership fight. Then last fall, early in
his tenure as deputy secretary,
Bowman alienated some when he
told staffers they needed to show
respect for Shulkin, his chief of
staff and the agency’s career civil
servants, and to value their expertise, according to three people
with knowledge of the meeting.
Bowman could not be reached
for comment. A VA spokesman
said the agency does not comment on private meetings.
Shulkin, meanwhile, had concluded some of his aides had no
defined roles and were not moving his efforts forward, according
to current and former VA officials.
In February, White House
aides sought to have Bowman
removed in an effort to rattle
Shulkin. Bowman survived after
a strong show of support from
Capitol Hill, but he remains in
the crosshairs of some in the
White House and at VA.
Shulkin and his senior managers have clashed over high-level
hires, including one former
Obama administration official.
They have also argued over policies believed by Trump’s political team to be out of step with
this administration’s priorities,
with the appointees consistently
overruling the secretary.
The friction grew so intense
that Ullyot, Leinenkugel and VA’s
legislative-affairs chief, Brooks
Tucker, met regularly to plot the
ouster of Shulkin and his top
aides, according to current and
former agency employees with
knowledge of the conversations.
At one point, Leinenkugel advocated he take over as deputy
secretary until a permanent replacement could be found.
Ullyot declined to comment.
Leinenkugel has said previously
that he has routinely expressed
his “concerns and suggestions for
improvements.” He did not return messages seeking comment
for this report. Efforts to reach
Tucker were unsuccessful.
The feud reached a peak last
month with the release of the
inspector
general’s
report.
Shulkin’s chief of staff, a longtime
civil servant who was disliked by
the Trump team, stepped down
as a result, and her replacement
was installed by the White
House, a sign of the administration’s desire for more influence.
Last week, Camilo Sandoval, a
senior adviser at the Veterans
Health Administration, appeared
unexpectedly at the first meeting
between new chief of staff Peter
O’Rourke and Christopher Vojta,
VA’s new deputy undersecretary
for health, according to two agency officials. Sandoval told Vojta
he was representing the White
House, these people said.
In a move that unsettled Vojta
and others, Sandoval inquired
about Vojta’s loyalty to Shulkin
and Bowman.
“Camilo was trying to assess
whose side he was on,” said one
senior official familiar with the
encounter.
Sandoval did not respond to a
message seeking comment. Curt
Cashour, VA’s press secretary,
said the meeting never happened.
lisa.rein@washpost.com
Josh Dawsey and Alex Horton
contributed to this report.
Trump to visit Pa. to save GOP seat, but could he do more harm than good?
BY
J AMES H OHMANN
pittsburgh — If Republican
congressional candidate Rick
Saccone wins an unexpectedly
close special election here next
Tuesday, it will be on President
Trump’s coattails. On the other
hand, this race wouldn’t be competitive at all if the president
were not so polarizing — even in
a mostly blue-collar, largely rural
southwestern Pennsylvania district that he carried by 20 points
in 2016.
This race should be a gimme
for the GOP. Democrats didn’t
even bother to field a candidate
in 2016 or 2014. But public and
private polls show the contest in
the 18th District is now a toss-up,
even after Republicans have
poured in more than $10 million
— about five times what Democrats have spent.
Court-ordered reapportionment means the 18th District
will cease to exist in its present
form come November, but a
defeat here would nonetheless
represent the biggest political
humiliation for Trump since he
went all in for Senate candidate
Roy Moore in Alabama and lost
anyway last December. That’s
why the White House is sending
the cavalry.
The election is to replace Tim
Murphy (R), a congressman who
resigned last fall after admitting
to an extramarital affair (the
antiabortion and married lawmaker is also said to have
pressed his then-girlfriend to get
an abortion).
Kellyanne Conway, counselor
to the president, flew here Thursday night to stump for Saccone at
the Allegheny County GOP’s Lincoln Day dinner.
Her appearance was not
scheduled until this week. She
assured the crowd that the nominee will be “a reliable vote” for
Trump.
“This should be easy,” she said,
referring to the choice facing
voters. “The Republican Party
has shown the value of unified
government.”
Conway,
who
managed
Trump’s campaign in fall 2016,
touted the tariffs the president
formally authorized a few hours
earlier. “He’s going to make sure
we have steel and aluminum
sectors that are strong and vibrant and fully employ people,”
she said.
The crowd of 500 activists in a
DoubleTree By Hilton Hotel ballroom heartily applauded, a stark
contrast to the opposition from
most congressional Republicans.
Conway, who got standing
ovations coming and going,
called herself “the warm-up
band” for the real star: Trump
will hold a rally in a hangar at the
Pittsburgh International Airport
on Saturday night. Then the
president’s son, Donald Trump
Jr., will campaign with Saccone
on Monday.
White House officials have
said they think the new tariffs
could help tip the race their way.
The United Steelworkers union,
which endorsed Democratic candidate Conor Lamb, says that
18,000 of its members live in the
district. The president’s aides
even discussed having Trump
formally sign the tariffs during
his rally Saturday, but they concluded this would make them
look politically motivated. Afraid
Saccone will lose, other White
House aides encouraged the
president to consider canceling
his trip. But Trump wants to
come. He likes to hold rallies in
front of raucous crowds, and he’s
excited when candidates for other offices are eager to appear
with him.
Trump may help gin up just
enough base turnout to put Saccone on top, although he is such
a lightning rod that GOP strategists privately acknowledge the
president’s visit could equally
motivate his critics.
“The enthusiasm is on the
Democrats’ side, as it is all
around the country,” said Val
DiGiorgio, the chairman of the
Pennsylvania Republican Party.
“We need everybody out there
helping this weekend.”
This really is the epicenter of
Trump’s geographic base. He carried the Keystone State because
of his strength in western Pennsylvania. He got more votes from
Allegheny than any other county
in the state. This district stretches from the Pittsburgh suburbs
to the state’s borders with West
Virginia and Ohio, which were
ANTONELLA CRESCIMBENI/PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rick Saccone, GOP candidate for Congress, at a rally in Waynesburg, Pa., on Monday. Republicans
have spent over $10 million in the special election, but the 18th District contest is still a toss-up.
even more rabid for Trump two
years ago.
Trump plugged Saccone when
he came here in January to sell
the tax cuts. He was scheduled to
headline a rally in February but
canceled because of the massacre at a high school in Florida.
Vice President Pence and Ivanka Trump were able to make the
trek in February for separate
events designed to boost the GOP
candidate.
The administration has even
used old-fashioned pork to try
dragging Saccone across the finish line. Interior Secretary Ryan
Zinke came to a small town in the
district two weeks ago to announce a $301 million program
to reclaim abandoned coal mine
land. Zinke signed a huge ceremonial check as the GOP nominee looked on.
Saccone, a state representative, has returned the favors by
constantly and effusively praising Trump. The Air Force veteran
promises to be Trump’s “wingman” in Congress.
“You were President Trump
before President Trump got here,
my friend,” Mike Turzai, speaker
of the state House, told Saccone
during a speech at the dinner.
Because it is such a red district, there are few national Democrats who can effectively appear
as surrogates. An exception is
former vice president Joe Biden,
who campaigned with Lamb on
Tuesday at a union hall.
“The enthusiasm is on
the Democrats’ side. . . .
We need everybody
out there helping
this weekend.”
Val DiGiorgio, chairman of the
Pennsylvania Republican Party
“It’s about everybody getting
their base out,” said Doug Weimer, a seventh-grade teacher who
is a township supervisor in
Hempfield Township. “The Reagan Democrats here definitely
voted for Trump, and I think
they’ll continue to. . . . Conserva-
tives don’t always put their yard
signs out, but they’re still going
to vote. Signs don’t vote.”
Valerie Gaydos, a Republican
running for an open state House
seat that is partially in the congressional district, acknowledged that it’s a tough environment for the GOP. “People are
being flooded by information
and they’re confused,” she said.
“People want to see both parties
talk to each other again. People
want to see government work. I
don’t think they want to see
career politicians.”
State Sen. Scott Wagner, an
affluent businessman who is
running for governor, got to
speak at the start of the program
because he was giving Conway a
ride back to Washington on his
private plane after she finished
her speech.
Wagner told the crowd that his
campaign just conducted internal polling that showed Trump’s
approval rating at 83 percent
among Pennsylvania Republicans, up from 78 percent in
January.
He chalked it up to the tax
cuts, noting he has given bonus-
es to hundreds of his own employees since the law passed.
During a 24-minute speech,
Conway noted about a dozen
times that she was speaking in
her “personal capacity.” Federal
investigators publicly chastised
her this week for twice violating
the Hatch Act by offering support for Moore from the White
House.
“I took a vacation day today,”
she said, to knowing laughter
from the assembled partisans.
Conway spoke at length about
Lamb’s opposition to a 20-week
ban on abortion. “Amazing,”
someone in the crowd yelled.
“Yes, it is amazing,” she replied
from the stage. “That’s not the
word people use in focus groups,
but you’re eating dinner.”
This area is heavily Catholic,
and Republicans see curtailing
abortion rights as a winning
issue here.
Republicans in Washington
play down a potential defeat by
arguing that Saccone is a bad
candidate.
They say Lamb has a hard-tobeat résumé and is running a
smart campaign. The 33-year-old
was a captain in the Marine
Corps and served as a federal
prosecutor. This is his first run
for office so he doesn’t have
much of a paper trail. Saccone’s
representatives declined to respond to the criticisms from
national operatives.
Saccone has undeniably been
a bad fundraiser. Lamb outraised
Saccone about $4 million to
$1 million. But that advantage
has been offset by national GOP
groups.
This race, however, is not
really about Saccone. Saccone,
60, spoke last at Thursday’s Lincoln Day dinner. He could read
the room well enough to realize
these Republican regulars wanted to go home.
So he talked for less than five
minutes, highlighting an endorsement from the National
Rifle Association and noting that
his son serves on active duty in
South Korea.
“I don’t think southwest P.A.
needs another downtown liberal
in Congress,” he concluded. “It’s
time to close the deal.”
james.hohmann@washpost.com
SATURDAY, MARCH 10 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A5
SU
Trump’s unexpected decision on N. Korea sends diplomats, sta≠ scrambling
N. KOREA FROM A1
between. But inside the White
House, the president — whose
exchange of taunts and threats
with Kim has set Northeast Asia
on edge over a potential military
confrontation for months — was
said to be reveling in his big
reveal, which overshadowed the
growing scandal surrounding his
alleged affair with a pornographic film star and concerns with
tariffs he announced earlier in
the day.
Trump’s personal involvement
in the White House’s deliberations over the world’s most serious and vexing security situation
has placed a president who considers himself a master dealmaker into the most fraught faceoff
of his 71 years. A breakthrough
that would reduce Pyongyang’s
nuclear threat would be a legacydefining achievement. A stalemate that gives Kim a photo op
for nothing in return could fracture U.S. alliances and be seen as
a devastating embarrassment.
But what the whirlwind evening at the White House also
illustrated was that in his unorthodox presidency, which centers so singularly on his force of
personality, Trump has little worry about a dearth of qualified
staff because he considers himself to be his own diplomat,
negotiator and strategist.
“The president is the ultimate
negotiator and dealmaker when
it comes to any type of conversation,” White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders
said. “And we feel very confident
in where we are.”
The question is where exactly
is the Trump White House — and
how did it get there?
The answer wasn’t clear Friday as Trump aides struggled to
explain whether concrete steps
from Pyongyang toward denuclearization were a precondition
ahead of the summit, what the
agenda of the talks will encompass and how a president known
to disdain dense briefing books
intends to prepare for an adversary that U.S. intelligence officials don’t know much about.
In fact, it was not the details
of the planning process but
rather Trump’s impulsive, improvisational style that was the
biggest selling point as top
aides fanned out to explain why
the president had taken this
enormous gamble. Asked why
the administration did not engage in lower-level talks with
the North to build out preconditions and an agenda for a
leaders-level summit, one senior aide offered that Trump
“was elected in part because he
is willing to take approaches
very, very different from past
approaches and past presidents.”
Across Washington, foreign
policy experts tried to make
sense of the news, with many
betting that the talks would not
happen after the Trump team
heard negative feedback from
Tokyo, conservatives in Seoul
opposed to President Moon Jaein’s liberal government and some
in Congress who fear the move is
too rash.
The Japanese, who have been
wary of offering Kim a propa-
PHOTOS BY JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
South Korean national security adviser Chung Eui-yong — flanked by the country’s intelligence chief, Suh Hoon, and ambassador to
Washington, Cho Yoon-je — delivers news Thursday of the meeting between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.
President Trump has invited Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe
to visit the White House in April ahead of the summit with Kim.
President Trump orchestrated the dramatic public announcement
on the driveway outside the West Wing, broadcast live on cable TV.
ganda platform, were blindsided
by the news. Diplomats at the
Japanese Embassy in Washington, gathered for a goodbye party
for Ambassador Kenichiro Sasae
on Thursday evening, scrambled
to react when the news broke.
Trump hastily called Prime
Minister Shinzo Abe and invited
him to visit the White House in
April to confer ahead of the
summit with Kim, which officials
said will take place by the end of
May.
“Nobody thinks the North Koreans are serious in Japan,” said
Michael Green, the NSC’s Asia
director under President George
W. Bush, who is meeting with
officials in Tokyo this week. “Given how he blindsided the entire
national security team . . . I
would bet this does not happen.”
The South Koreans, who have
diplomatic dialogue.
But what was supposed to be
an hour-long briefing took an
unexpected turn when Trump
himself intervened midway
through. The Koreans had been
scheduled to see Trump on Friday, but the president had gotten
wind of the meeting and told
aides he wanted to get involved
immediately.
In the Oval Office, Chung
explained to Trump that he had
brought with him a personal
invitation from Kim for a meeting — a stunning offer given Kim
has not met with any foreign
heads of state since assuming
control of the North after his
father’s death in 2011.
Chung later told associates
that he believed the South Koreans had a strong hand to play
with Trump. The North Korean
fretted over Trump’s saberrattling over the past several
months, landed at Dulles International Airport midmorning
Thursday. Perhaps battling jet
lag after the 13-hour flight, they
arrived at the White House in
early afternoon for what they
thought was the warm-up act: a
meeting with Trump’s top aides,
including Defense Secretary Jim
Mattis, Deputy Secretary of State
John Sullivan and Director of
National Intelligence Daniel
Coats.
Led by South Korea’s national
security adviser, Chung Euiyong, the delegation’s aim was to
debrief Trump’s team on the
four-hour meeting Chung held
with Kim in Pyongyang shortly
after the Olympics, which had
provided the two Koreas a
chance to reopen a long-dormant
leader had agreed that joint
U.S.-South Korean military exercises, which had been delayed
because of the Olympics, could
go on. And Kim pledged that the
North would not take provocative actions, including missile
tests, ahead of the summit.
The risks of such a meeting,
however, were well known on the
U.S. side: The North has violated
past agreements to freeze its
nuclear program in exchange for
sanctions relief, and no sitting
American president has met
with a North Korean leader over
fears of being set up for failure.
Earlier this week, Vice President Pence, who was supposed to
meet with North Korean officials
during the Olympics to deliver a
hard-line warning, vowed that
the administration’s “posture
toward the regime will not
change until we see concrete
steps toward denuclearization.”
On Thursday, Secretary of State
Rex Tillerson, traveling in Africa,
told reporters that the administration was “a long ways from
negotiations.”
In the Oval Office, some of
Trump’s aides raised concerns,
according to a person familiar
with the discussion. But Trump,
seated in an armchair next to
Chung, with their aides arrayed
on couches, dismissed their fears
and “made the decision” on the
spot.
Korea experts were dumbstruck by Trump’s impulsiveness.
“He’s much more of a TV
personality than business person,” said Christopher R. Hill,
who led the U.S. delegation in the
six-party talks with the North
during the Bush era that produced a weapons freeze that
Pyongyang later violated. “This
is not the art of a deal here — it’s
the art of a teaser.”
The South Koreans, stunned
they had gotten done in 45
minutes what they thought
might take weeks, prepared to
depart. But a White House aide
asked them to stay because
Trump, always aware of the production value of such a moment,
had an additional request:
Would they help draft a statement and read it to the press
outside the West Wing?
Over nearly two hours, the two
teams collaborated on a brief
statement. Meanwhile, Trump
popped his head into the White
House briefing room — where he
has never made remarks since
taking office — and told reporters that the Koreans would be
making a “major announcement” at 7 p.m.
A large group of reporters,
which had spent most of the day
focused on Trump’s morning announcement of new tariffs on
steel and aluminum, assembled
on the West Wing driveway at the
“sticks” — journalist lingo for the
bank of television microphones
set up in case of impromptu
press statements from White
House visitors.
Shortly after the hour, with
cable networks talking live to
reporters in the driveway, a Marine guard opened the doors of
the West Wing and Chung
emerged, flanked by Suh Hoon,
South Korea’s intelligence chief,
and Cho Yoon-je, the South Korea ambassador to Washington.
It was dark out and the camera
lights cast a harsh light onto the
officials.
Chung delivered the news in a
245-word statement. He took no
questions.
The cable stations turned
quickly to their analytical panels.
Diplomats lit up international
phone lines. And White House
aides praised the president for
his artful turn from bellicosity to
diplomacy.
“That’s a decision the president took himself,” Tillerson said
Friday. “This is something that
he’s had on his mind for quite
some time, so it was not a
surprise in any way.”
david.nakamura@washpost.com
anne. gearan@washpost.com
Josh Dawsey contributed to this
report.
Kim Jong Un wants to be seen as Trump’s equal. A meeting would do that.
BY
A NNA F IFIELD
tokyo — Just by sitting down
with President Trump, Kim Jong
Un would get what he craves the
most: legitimacy.
He wants to be treated as an
equal by the global superpower,
and a photo opportunity with the
most powerful leader in the free
world would go a long way to
helping him achieve that.
“This is what his father and his
grandfather wanted: to be on the
same footing as the world’s greatest power,” said Van Jackson, a
former Pentagon official who now
teaches at Victoria University in
New Zealand.
A meeting with the American
president has for decades been
considered the prize at the end of
a successful denuclearization
process, not an incentive to get
the process started, and neither
Kim’s father nor grandfather
made it to that finish line. “So I
have to grudgingly take my hat off
to him because he’s played a very
poor hand brilliantly to get there,”
Jackson said.
Since inheriting power from
his father at the end of 2011, when
he was 27, Kim has been seeking
ways to stake his claim to be the
rightful heir to the world’s only
communist dynasty.
In North Korea, he has played
up the notion of having a divine
blood right to the leadership, and
he has crowed about how strong
the nation has become under his
leadership, with all those missiles
and nuclear weapons.
Now within a matter of
months, Kim’s propagandists
could fill the front pages with
news of a meeting between what
they doubtless will describe as
the two most powerful men in the
world.
“Kim wants to portray himself
as the bold leader of a normal,
peace-loving nuclear power who
can meet an American president
as equals,” said Duyeon Kim, a
senior fellow at the Korean Peninsula Future Forum in Seoul.
Trump on Thursday quickly
accepted Kim’s invitation to talks
— much more quickly than South
Korean President Moon Jae-in,
accused in Washington of being
too soft on North Korea, accepted
his own summit invitation. Preparations are now underway for a
meeting between Trump and Kim
before the end of May, on the
heels of an inter-Korean summit
due to be held in the demilitarized zone at the end of April.
That meeting would be a battle
between two mercurial and unorthodox leaders, only one of whom
has called the other a “pretty
smart cookie,” as Trump did last
year.
“The thing that they have in
common is that both of them
think that they can outsmart the
other,” said Ralph A. Cossa, president of the Honolulu-based Pacific Forum CSIS think tank and a
regular interlocutor with North
Korean officials. “We’ll have to
wait to see who’s right.”
The North Koreans will go into
this process with several advan-
tages. For one, they know a lot
more about Trump than the United States knows about Kim.
“I’m sure they’ve done their
psychological profiles of Donald
Trump, just like the CIA has
profiled Kim Jong Un,” said Cossa. “The difference is that Kim
Jong Un is a much harder nut to
crack than Donald Trump, who’s
much more transparent. So
they’re probably going to have a
much better idea of how to play
him.”
Dennis Rodman, the former
basketball star who has made
repeated visits to Pyongyang
since Kim rose to power, took a
copy of “The Art of the Deal,”
Donald Trump’s book on negotiating skills, as a gift for the North
Korean leader during his last trip.
Trump’s tactics, as outlined in
the 1987 book, include not seeming to be desperate to cut a deal —
“that makes the other guy smell
blood, and then you’re dead” —
and using “truthful hyperbole.”
Chances are the North Koreans
have read it. They definitely have
been poring over “Fire and Fury,”
the explosive book by Michael
Wolff about how Trump’s White
House is run, according to people
in touch with North Korean officials.
A second advantage: The
Trump administration has few
people with experience in dealing
with North Korea, while the apparatchiks in the North Korean
Foreign Ministry have been working on little else but the United
States.
Ri Yong Ho, North Korea’s foreign minister, was involved in
talks that resulted in the “Agreed
Framework”
denuclearization
deal with the United States in
1994.
Choe Son Hui, who was director of the Americas division in the
Foreign Ministry until being recently promoted to vice minister,
served as an interpreter and close
aide to lead negotiator Kim Gye
Gwan during the six-party talks
in the 2000s.
“They’ve
certainly
been
around the block a few times
since then,” said Robert L. Gallucci, who was the lead U.S. negotiator for the 1994 agreement. “And
we’ve given North Koreans lots of
practice in talking to us since
then,” he said, referring to rounds
of “track 1.5” talks that have taken
place in recent years.
In those talks, North Korean
officials — including Ri and Choe
— have met with Gallucci and
other American former officials
who dealt with North Korearelated issues while in government.
The talks, which took place in
locations including Mongolia,
Norway and Malaysia, have given
North Koreans an opportunity to
present ideas and test the American response to them, according
to participants.
But no serving U.S. officials
have attended the talks, and,
while aware of them, they have
generally pooh-poohed the idea
that the talks can serve any purpose in the nuclear standoff.
The talks have, however,
served a purpose for the North
Korean officials. “They’ve become substantially more sophisticated over the years,” said Gallucci, who last met them in Kuala
Lumpur, Malaysia, at the end of
2016.
During talks near Geneva this
past September — attended by
officials from all of the six parties
except the United States, which
was represented only by former
officials — the North Korean participants stunned their counterparts with their encyclopedic
knowledge of Trump’s tweets and
familiarity with the U.S. legislative process.
“They are going to be supremely prepared for this,” said Cossa,
who was at the meeting near
Geneva.
The fact that Kim is prepared
to go ahead with two summits —
one in April with Moon, and one
in May with Trump — while huge
joint military exercises take place
in the South is revealing, analysts
say.
“What Kim Jong Un wants is
very clear,” said Ryoo Kihl-jae, a
former South Korean minister of
unification who now teaches at
Ewha Womans University. “In the
short run, sanctions relief is one
of his goals.”
Trump has been pushing a
“maximum pressure” campaign
against North Korea to force it
into talks, and those sanctions,
both direct and through the United Nations, now appear to be
hurting.
But sanctions relief is just part
of Kim’s ultimate goal: ensuring
the safety of his regime.
“Kim wants the threats from
the U.S. to be resolved, and he is
ready to engage in ‘give-and-take’
negotiations with neighboring
countries,” Ryoo said.
That is where things are bound
to get tricky.
Trump is talking about denuclearization, but North Korea is
talking about “the peace and security of the Korean Peninsula” —
a phrase that it has used in the
past when insisting the United
States should withdraw its troops
from South Korea.
Pyongyang previously has insisted that its nuclear weapons —
which it considers key to the
regime’s survival — are not on the
table, while Washington has insisted that denuclearization is the
end goal.
But those challenges are still to
come. For now, with one invitation, Kim has deftly moved all
talk of military options and
“bloody noses” to the back burner.
“He’s short-circuiting all this
war talk going around in Washington, and he’s buying time to
create a stable security environment, and he’s also checking a box
on symbolism,” said Jackson, of
Victoria University. “And all without having to give up anything for
it.”
anna.fifield@washpost.com
Min Joo Kim in Seoul contributed to
this report.
A6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. SATURDAY,
MARCH 10 , 2018
U.S. now seeks ‘concrete’ actions before N. Korea talks
TALKS FROM A1
give up its nuclear weapons program in exchange for aid —
largely because North Korea now
has an arsenal of nuclear weapons in hand.
While far from complete,
plans are starting to be cobbled
together to establish the parameters of future talks.
A senior State Department
official said the planned talks
between Trump and Kim would
amount to just that: talks. Subsequently, if the conditions were
ripe, they would evolve into
formal negotiations, the official
said.
“Negotiations then are a process of writing down on paper
what both sides are willing to do,
what the commitments are, how
those commitments are going to
be fulfilled, how they’re going to
be verified, and who gets what
for making those commitments,
then actually fulfilling those
commitments,” the official said.
“That’s what a negotiation is.”
The White House and the
State Department both say the
United States will continue exerting a “maximum pressure”
campaign of strict sanctions.
If talks blossomed into negotiations, it would mark the third
time the United States and North
Korea engaged in a full-fledged
diplomatic push to denuclearize
the Korean Peninsula.
In 1994, the two countries
signed an agreement in which
Pyongyang committed to freezing a plutonium weapons program in exchange for aid. But it
collapsed in 2002.
The George W. Bush administration made a breakthrough in
2007 when Pyongyang promised
to begin dismantling its nuclear
program during six-party talks
that also included South Korea,
China, Russia and Japan. But
those discussions imploded in
2009 after North Korea launched
a satellite.
In both cases, the Clinton and
Bush administrations first tested
the waters with talks involving
lower-level officials. Trump is
now flipping the script with a
meeting of leaders at the outset
— a riskier proposition.
On Friday, Trump won cautious support from Republicans
in Congress with his bold gam-
J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
President George W. Bush looks across the demilitarized zone toward North Korea in 2002, the year that a 1994 U.S. deal with North
Korea to curb its nuclear weapons program collapsed. The Bush administration tried again, but the six-party talks were also unsuccessful.
bit, but analysts warned that the
tide could shift quickly.
Christopher R. Hill, a former
ambassador under Bush, faced
withering attacks from neoconservatives for engaging with
Pyongyang during the six-party
talks that began in 2005.
“People like John Bolton said I
was a traitor for talking to the
North Koreans,” Hill said in an
interview, referring to the former
U.S. ambassador to the United
Nations.
Hill, who met with a group of
Republican lawmakers Wednesday, including Rep. Steve King
(Iowa), said conservatives now
appear more tolerant of talks, at
least initially, than during the
Bush era.
“I must say I was struck by
“I don’t trust the North Koreans. But we
have to test this option. It’s a hell of a lot
better than allowing them to continue
with their nuclear program or having a
catastrophic war.”
Daryl Kimball, executive director of the Arms Control Association
how they want to see a solution
to this,” he said. “There’s a difference in this group than the
neoconservatives, where the
mere act of meeting with the
Koreans was considered an act of
disloyalty.”
Bolton, for his part, offered
conditioned praise for Trump,
saying Friday that he expected
the president to deliver a warning about U.S. willingness to use
military force.
If the Trump-Kim meeting is
held in May, it would coincide
with a deadline for another nuclear deal, the one forged by the
Obama administration with Iran
and other world powers in 2015.
Trump has called it the worst
deal ever negotiated. Though
international monitors have said
Iran is abiding by its commitments, Trump has threatened to
reimpose nuclear-related sanctions and withdraw from it in
May under a congressional mandate.
Talks with North Korea could
breathe new life into that deal.
“If logic prevails, this could
make it less likely that Donald
Trump unilaterally blows up the
Iran nuclear deal, which is working,” said Daryl Kimball, executive director of the Arms Control
Association.
Kimball believes that negotiations could succeed with
confidence-building measures:
North Korea maintains a halt
in its nuclear and missile testing, for example, and the United States modifies joint military exercises with South Korea
so that U.S. bombers do not
approach North Korean territory.
“What I’d say to those who are
skeptical and argue we can’t
trust the North Koreans, well,
I’m skeptical, too,” Kimball said.
“I don’t trust the North Koreans.
But we have to test this option.
It’s a hell of a lot better than
allowing them to continue with
their nuclear program or having
a catastrophic war.”
Wendy Sherman, who was the
North Korea policy coordinator
during the Clinton administration and the lead negotiator with
Iran for the nuclear deal, cautioned that an enduring relationship would depend on whether
the two sides had the same
expectations.
“The mismatch of expectations led to some of the problems
in the past,” she said. “They
thought they were getting the
normalization of relations with
the United States, which never
happened, and we thought we
were stopping their ability to
stock fissile material.”
Negotiations now are bound
to be more difficult than previous rounds, and North Korea has
more leverage than it did before.
“Everything we’ve learned is
useful but not adequate, because
at no other time did North Korea
have nuclear weapons and the
means to deliver them,” Sherman
said. “We’re at a different place
with different challenges.”
carol.morello@washpost.com
john.hudson@washpost.com
Trump pardons former Navy
sailor in case he compared
to Clinton email probe
BY
JUNG YEON-JE/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
South Korean marines take part in joint exercises with the U.S. military last April in the southeastern port of Pohang. North Korea has
typically reacted angrily to the annual drills, which it sees as preparation for an attack on Pyongyang. But this year it has changed its tune.
U.S., South Korea prepare for annual joint drills
In major shift, North
says it understands
exercises must continue
BY
D AN L AMOTHE
As the White House prepares
for what could be the first
meeting between a sitting
American president and a
North Korean leader, the U.S.
and South Korean militaries
will carry out exercises that
Pyongyang has long called provocative but now appears to
accept.
South Korea’s national security adviser, Chung Eui-yong,
announced Thursday at the
White House that in addition to
President Trump agreeing to
meet with North Korean leader
Kim Jong Un by the end of May,
Kim pledged that North Korea
will refrain from additional nuclear or missile tests and
“understands that the routine
joint military exercises between
the Republic of Korea and
the United States must continue.”
The latter acknowledgment
marked a significant shift for
the Kim regime. Each spring,
the United States and South
Korea launch military exercises known as Foal Eagle and Key
Resolve, and the Kim regime
typically has reacted angrily. In
the North, the exercises are
seen as preparation for an
attack on Pyongyang, while the
South Koreans and Americans
characterize them as defensive
in nature.
Last year, North Korea fired
four ballistic missiles toward
Japan in what was widely seen as
a response to the exercises. The
North Korean military already
had warned that if a single shell
fell in waters near the Korean
Peninsula, it immediately would
launch “merciless” counteractions.
The exercises are believed to
include rehearsals of what is
known as OPLAN 5015, in
which U.S. and South Korean
forces would carry out “decapitation” strikes aimed at
killing Kim and other senior
members of his regime. North
Korean hackers stole a trove
of classified data in 2016,
including information about
the strikes, a South Korean
lawmaker announced last
year.
Foal Eagle began last year on
March 3, with about 3,600 U.S.
troops deploying to South Korea to join others among the
28,500 U.S. forces based there to
participate in the exercises, according to U.S. Pacific Command. The exercises included
the new F-35B Joint Strike
Fighter among a fleet of aircraft, the aircraft carrier USS
Carl Vinson and other Navy
ships, and ground forces.
The exercise this year is expected to begin at the end of the
month — a delay that South
Korea requested to work around
the
now-concluded
Winter
Olympics and the Winter Paralympics, which began Friday. The
operation includes live exercises
and war games involving computer simulations.
The exercises are bookended
by another set of computersimulated exercises late each
summer known as Ulchi Freedom Guardian. Those exercises
focus on defending South Korea from attack.
dan.lamothe@washpost.com
M ATT Z APOTOSKY
President Trump on Friday pardoned a former Navy sailor whose
conviction for unauthorized retention of national defense information became a rallying cry for
conservatives who felt it showed
Hillary Clinton was treated too
leniently in the FBI’s investigation of how she handled classified
material.
Kristian Saucier, 31, of Vermont, is the second person to be
pardoned by Trump; last year, the
president controversially pardoned former Arizona sheriff Joe
Arpaio, who was convicted of
criminal contempt of court for
ignoring a judge’s order to stop
detaining people because he
merely suspected them of being
undocumented immigrants.
Kathleen Saucier, Saucier’s
mother, said in an interview Friday that she and other supporters
had waged an aggressive public
campaign for the pardon, and
that she thought that effort —
coupled with a more sympathetic
new administration — helped her
son.
“I had to sit on the floor because
I was crying so hard,” she said.
“I’m just so grateful. I’m so grateful.”
Kristian Saucier, who now
works as a garbage collector,
pleaded guilty in May 2016 to one
count of unauthorized possession
and retention of national defense
information, admitting he took
photos of classified spaces on the
USS Alexandria submarine,
where he served as a machinist’s
mate.
In announcing his plea, the
Justice Department said Saucier,
who had a secret clearance, “knew
that the photos depicted classified material and that he was not
authorized to take them.”
The photos were taken in 2009,
although they were not found until 2012. It was by chance the
images were discovered at all.
Saucier left his phone behind at a
garbage dump in Hampton,
Conn., where a supervisor powered on the device, saw the submarine photos and showed them
to a friend who had retired from
the Navy, according to a 2015
report in Navy Times.
Saucier told federal agents who
confronted him in 2012 that the
phone belonged to him, but he
denied taking the photos, according to the original criminal complaint. The FBI accused him later
of destroying evidence, saying he
returned home from an interview
with agents, smashed his computer and camera, then drove across
the state and flung the fragments
in the woods behind his grandfather’s house.
Saucier was sentenced in August 2016 to a year in prison, and
his case soon attracted the attention of Trump, who compared it to
the investigation into Clinton’s
use of a private email server while
she was secretary of state. The FBI
ultimately recommended no
charges for Clinton or her aides in
that case, even though they found
classified material had traversed
her private server.
Federal law enforcement officials have contended that Saucier,
unlike Clinton, knew he was not
supposed to take the photos and
did so anyway, and that he destroyed material to impede the
investigation.
Kathleen Saucier said her son
first applied for a pardon in the
fall of 2016 and was turned down
in part because Justice Department rules say an applicant must
wait five years before applying.
But she said her son applied again
in the fall of 2017, after Trump
took office.
“I think the new administration took a look at it through
different glasses,” she said.
A Justice Department spokesman declined to comment on its
involvement, if any, in the process.
Earlier this year, Trump referenced Saucier’s case in a tweet
about Clinton and top aide Huma
Abedin. And earlier this month,
Saucier himself appeared on “Fox
& Friends,” one of the president’s
favorite TV shows, to press his
case.
“Obviously, there’s two different sets of laws in this country, for
the political elite and for, you
know, those lower-level, individuals, Americans, like myself,” he
said, adding, “I think my case
draws a very clear example of
that.”
matt.zapotosky@washpost.com
SATURDAY, MARCH 10 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A7
RE
The World
At least 30 killed in Afghanistan, including 10 at Shiite mosque
in a burst of violence around
Afghanistan on Friday, including
10 mostly civilian victims of a
suicide bombing outside a
mosque in Kabul’s Shiite community and 18 Afghan police
officers and soldiers killed in
scattered fighting in northern
Takhar province, officials said.
The unusually deadly spate of
insurgent violence came 10 days
after a dramatic offer by President Ashraf Ghani to hold unconditional peace talks with Taliban militants, whose fighters
BY A NNA F IFIELD
IN HIRAIZUMI, JAPAN
R
apidly shrinking towns
and cities across Japan
are experiencing a population explosion. Not an
explosion of humans, though. An
explosion in wild boar numbers.
Across the country, wild boars
are moving in as Japan’s rapidly
aging population either moves
out or dies out. The boars come
for the untended rice paddies and
stay for the abandoned shelters.
“Thirty years ago, crows were
the biggest problem around
here,” said Hideo Numata, a farmer in Hiraizumi, human population 7,803, precise boar population unknown.
“But now we have these animals and not enough people to
scare them away,” he said, sitting
in a hut with a wood stove and
two farmer friends. At 67, Numata is a relative youngster around
here. His friends, Etsuro Sugawa
and Shoichi Chiba, are 69 and 70
respectively. One of their farmer
neighbors is 83.
Southern parts of Japan have
had a wild boar problem for some
years. The papers are full of
reports of boars in train stations
and parking garages, around
school dormitories and even in
the sea, swimming out to islands.
Just this month, a woman in
her 70s was attacked on Shikoku
Island by a 176-pound boar when
she opened her front door. A boar
charged into a shopping mall on
the island last October, biting five
employees
and
rampaging
through the aisles before being
captured.
In Kyoto, at least 10 wild boars
were spotted in urban areas last
year. Two charged into a high
school in December, causing panic and the students to be evacuated.
But the animals are now
wreaking havoc in northern areas
long considered too cold and
snowy for them.
Here in Iwate prefecture, only
two wild boars were caught in
2011, when local authorities started keeping statistics. In the last
fiscal year, that number had skyrocketed to 94.
The influx is the result of two
factors, experts say: declining human populations and climate
change.
Japan’s regions are struggling
to deal with dwindling numbers
of residents, the result of a superaging society — 40 percent of the
population will be older than 65
by 2050 — and a national trend
toward moving to the big cities in
the south.
Farmers are dying, and there is
no one to take over their land.
Take Sugawa and Chiba: They
MASSOUD HOSSAINI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Security personnel carry remains at the site of a suicide attack in
Kabul that targeted the country’s minority Hazara community.
succession of bombings and other attacks on Shiite mosques,
shrines and events that have
taken hundreds of lives in Ka-
bul’s minority ethnic Hazara
community since 2016.
Police said a lone bomber on
foot approached a mosque where
people were gathering to commemorate the 1995 death of
Abdul Ali Mazari, a Hazara militia leader who was killed by the
Taliban. They said security forces
stopped the man at a checkpoint,
where he detonated his explosives, killing seven people instantly, including one police officer.
Officials later put the death
toll at 10 and said 22 others were
wounded.
The attack provoked spontaneous angry protests in the
streets around the mosque. Residents denounced the government for failing to protect the
community.
The Islamic State has taken
responsibility for numerous attacks on Shiite mosques, shrines
and events over the past several
years, including a devastating
bomb blast in July 2016 that
killed 80 people at a peaceful
In Japan, a wild boar war wreaks havoc
The animals are taking over deserted northern towns as the human population moves out or dies out
KYODO NEWS/GETTY IMAGES
A wild boar runs through the grounds of Kyoto University in Kyoto, Japan, last year. Southern parts of Japan have had a wild boar
problem for some years. But the animals are now inflicting destruction in northern areas long considered too cold and snowy for them.
both have sons, but they’re salarymen in the city with no interest in
a hard life tending fields and
fending off animals heavier than
themselves.
This northern region has been
hit particularly hard by depopulation. People were forced out
when the gigantic 2011 earthquake caused a triple meltdown
at the Fukushima nuclear plant,
and after the resulting tsunami
wiped out coastal towns.
Much of the area remains inhospitable for humans but perfect for boars.
“Because of depopulation,
there are more and more abandoned fields and rice paddies.
They’re perfect places for wild
boars to hide and feed,” said
Koichi Kaji, professor of wildlife
management at Tokyo University
of Agriculture and Technology.
With reports of boars rampaging through the ghost towns
around the Fukushima plant,
some people worry if the animals
are becoming radioactive.
Wild boar (Sus scrofa) range, 2008
EUROPE
A S I A Detail
Aomori
NORTH
KOREA
Sea of Japan
(East Sea)
Shizukuishi
Sh
Hiraizumi
H
iraizumi
N
kabul — At least 30 people died
Yellow
Sea
A
BY S AYED S ALAHUDDIN
AND P AMELA C ONSTABLE
have been battling Afghan forces
in Takhar and a dozen other
provinces.
The group has not publicly
responded to Ghani’s invitation
and previously said it would
negotiate only with U.S. officials.
It has continued its armed push
in rural pockets and periodic
urban attacks, but it has put out
several feelers in recent weeks,
including a public letter that
asked “the American people” to
persuade U.S. officials to abandon the costly 16-year war.
“The Taliban has increased its
assaults in various parts of the
country,” said Taj Mohammad
Ahmadzada, an Afghan analyst.
“These attacks are a blow to the
president’s efforts to hold talks
with the Taliban and a clear
signal that they reject his offer.”
The bombing in southwest
Kabul was claimed by the Islamic
State. It was the latest in a
TH
H
SOUTH
REA
EA
KOREA
Kyoto
o
P
Deadly day came a week
after president offered
peace talks with Taliban
J
A
To
Tok
T
okyo
ok
k
Tokyo
PACIFIC
OCEAN
Shikoku
Island
East China
Sea
200 MILES
Sources: IUCN RedList, Socioeconomic
Data
economic Da
ata and Applications Center
LAUREN TIERNEY/THE WASHINGTON POST
In addition to depopulation,
another factor for the boar explosion: The winters are also getting
markedly warmer. “We used to
have much more snow than this,”
Numata said, looking out as
snowflakes fell gently on the
fields.
The boars arrived like a plague
here in 2015. “We heard rumors a
few years ago that the wild boars
were closing in on this area. And
it wasn’t long before we started
seeing them,” Sugawa said.
The boars are most evident by
the damage they cause. Farmers
wake up to find their carefully
tended rice paddies have been
trampled or their wheat and potatoes eaten.
In Hiraizumi, inland from the
coast where the massive tsunami
came ashore in 2011, the cost of
the damage caused by wild boars
rose sixfold between 2015 and
2016. Last month, farmers in
nearby Shizukuishi caught a male
that weighed a gigantic 280
pounds.
The boars have even been spotted as far north as Aomori, at the
snowy northern tip of Japan’s
main island, Honshu.
Local authorities have been
offering subsidies to help farmers
street demonstration by Hazara
students and activists. The Taliban also has claimed attacks on
the city’s Hazara community.
Both extremist groups are trying to provoke sectarian conflict
between Afghan Sunnis and Shiites, and many of their attacks
have been staged on Fridays, the
Muslim holy day for both sects,
or during Shiite periods of religious mourning and celebration.
In rural clashes Thursday
night and Friday, officials said, a
Taliban ambush killed 10 police
officers in one area of Takhar,
while eight Afghan soldiers were
killed in a separate Taliban attack. Officials said six members
of the Afghan security forces
were killed in other scattered
attacks.
pamela.constable@washpost.com
Constable reported from Islamabad,
Pakistan.
put up electric fences and keep
the boars out of their fields,
although this is a challenge given
that there are so few able-bodied
people to do the work.
The authorities have also been
encouraging locals to get the
necessary permits needed to trap
and kill the animals. The town
council even offers shuttle buses
so they can take the required tests
for permits in the prefectural
capital.
This is where Japan’s aging
population and the country’s love
of paperwork collide.
To cull the wild boars, farmers
need to obtain not just a gun
license — an exhaustive process
that involves medical certificates
and gun-storage inspections by
the local police — but also a
special license to lay traps. This
involves intensive study for a
written test — the local university
offers classes for the farmers — as
well as a practical exam for using
different kinds of traps.
Only then can the farmers capture the boars and shoot the
animals they catch.
Hiraizumi has about 10 people
with the right paperwork to take
on the boars and they catch only
one or two boars a month, and
only between November and
March. (To cull them during the
other months, they need yet another permit.)
“The lack of manpower here is
a real problem,” said Rise Suzuki,
the Hiraizumi town official in
charge of the anti-boar campaign.
“We need farmers to protect their
own land and to take action
against the boars, but it’s difficult
for them because most of them
are old.”
If it’s difficult to capture the
existing animals, it’s even more
difficult to stop them from breeding.
The wild boars have a huge
reproductive advantage over the
human population.
The average Japanese woman
gives birth to 1.44 babies in her
lifetime, but the average wild
boar has 4.5 babies a year. And
those piglets reach breeding age
in only two years, so the problem
is only going to get worse.
In Hiraizumi, officials and
farmers alike are now gearing up
for the spring, when piglets will
be born and the mothers will be
hungry.
“Local residents need to step
up and do their bit to protect
their fields and keep the boars
from coming here,” said Chiba.
But for now, the farmers are
realistic about the challenges
they face. As Sugawa put it: “Our
rural areas are in decline.”
anna.fifield@washpost.com
Yuki Oda contributed to this report.
DIGEST
KENYA
Kenyatta and Odinga
agree to unify country
Kenya’s president and top
opposition leader announced
Friday that they will work
together to unite the country,
which has been divided along
ethnic lines after last year’s
disputed election.
President Uhuru Kenyatta and
former prime minister Raila
Odinga spoke after holding talks,
the first between the two since
the presidential election sparked
widespread turmoil. Both were
candidates in that contest.
“The time has come for us to
confront and resolve our
differences,” Odinga said. They
“are becoming too entrenched.”
The two leaders agreed that
their meeting was not the result
of pressure from Western
nations, though it was welcomed
by U.S. Secretary of State Rex
Tillerson, who arrived in Nairobi
on Friday for a three-day visit.
— Associated Press
SLOVAKIA
Thousands protest
journalist’s death
Tens of thousands of Slovaks
rallied in huge anti-government
protests across the country
Friday to demand a thorough
investigation into the slayings
of an investigative reporter and
his fiancee, and changes in
government.
The protesters packed a
central square in Bratislava, and
rallies were held in dozens of
other places in Slovakia as well
as abroad, the biggest since the
1989 Velvet Revolution.
The organizers want foreign
experts to join the team probing
the killings and the creation of
“a new, trustworthy government
with no people who are
suspected of corruption.”
Jan Kuciak’s last, unfinished
story was about the activities of
Italian mafia elements and their
ties to people close to Prime
Minister Robert Fico, whose
government is alleged to be
linked to other scandals.
— Associated Press
TURKEY
2 journalists released
pending end of trial
Turkey’s state-run news
agency said a court in Istanbul
has ordered two journalists for
the opposition Cumhuriyet
newspaper released from prison
pending the conclusion of their
trial on terror charges.
The Anadolu Agency said
the court ruled Friday that
Cumhuriyet editor in chief
Murat Sabuncu and investigative
journalist Ahmet Sik are to be
released from pretrial detention.
It said the court held that the
chairman of the newspaper’s
executive board, Akin Atalay,
should remain in custody.
Prosecutors have charged
19 Cumhuriyet employees
with “sponsoring terror
organizations” that include
Kurdish militants and the
network of U.S.-based cleric
Fethullah Gulen, whom Turkey
blames for a 2016 coup attempt.
More than 150 Turkish
journalists have been jailed in
Turkey since the coup attempt.
— Associated Press
Palestinian killed in clashes
with troops: A 24-year-old
Palestinian man was killed in
clashes with Israeli forces in the
West Bank, the Palestinian
Health Ministry said. It said he
was shot in the chest and
declared dead at a Hebron
hospital. Israel’s military said
Palestinians hurled fire bombs at
troops during a protest. It said
forces shot an “instigator” as he
threw a firebomb at them.
Judge refuses to release Catalan
separatist for vote: Spain’s
Supreme Court turned down a
request from a jailed Catalan
separatist leader to attend the
region’s Parliament, where
lawmakers are due to vote on
whether to make him president
of Catalonia. Judge Pablo
Llarena ruled that there was a
risk that Jordi Sànchez would
repeat the offenses that have
landed him in jail. He ordered
Sànchez kept in preventive
detention without bail. Sànchez,
a prominent secessionist who
was elected to the region’s
Parliament in December, has
been held in a prison near
Madrid since an October
independence referendum that
Spain deemed unconstitutional.
Hippo roams loose in Mexico:
Authorities said they’re worried
about a hippopotamus that is
roaming loose in a swampy area
in southern Mexico’s Veracruz
state. Mexico’s office for
environmental protection said
experts are looking for the best
way to trap and move the 1,320pound mammal, which it said
could become aggressive. Locals
have nicknamed it “Tyson.”
— From news services
A8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. SATURDAY,
MARCH 10 , 2018
Beyond tari≠s: Silicon Valley braces for a tech trade war
BY
E LIZABETH D WOSKIN
san francisco — Forget aluminum and steel. The real trade war
may be waged in Silicon Valley.
At first blush, President
Trump’s aluminum and steel tariffs, imposed Thursday, have little
to do with the cutting-edge technologies being built in the United
States’ innovation hub.
But some Silicon Valley executives fear that the protection of an
old-school industry, one that accounts for just 2 percent of global
trade, could be a prelude for a
much broader clash with China
over the theft of technologies that
are driving the future of the global
economy. Such a conflict would
have a profound impact on how
Silicon Valley does business with
a critical, if elusive, trading partner.
The dispute is already underway. In August, the Trump administration initiated a sweeping investigation into Chinese trade
practices, including whether Chinese firms are investing in U.S.
companies to steal their technology and whether they are forcing
joint ventures, pressuring American companies that invest in China to transfer technology to a
Chinese partner, or hacking U.S.
companies’ software.
If the investigation finds that
China violated trade laws, the
executive branch could issue
sanctions against China that go
far beyond tariffs. The results of
the Trump administration’s investigation could change what many
Silicon Valley companies, striving
to do business in China, have long
seen as the price of entry.
“Everyone has their hair on fire
over the steel and aluminum
trade enforcement tariffs that are
pretty standard stuff,” said Lori
Wallach, director of Global Trade
Watch for the government watchdog group Public Citizen, which
opposes trade agreements that it
says benefit companies over people. “But the amount of money at
stake with the steel and alumi-
QILAI SHEN/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Alibaba touts its cloud computing unit, Aliyun, at a booth at a sales event in Shenzhen, China, in 2016.
Amazon operates cloud data centers in China, but its presence is dwarfed by Alibaba’s cloud operation.
num dumping looks like penny
slots compared to the claims of
China’s technology theft that the
administration is investigating.”
Michael Wessel, a member of
the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission, a
watchdog panel set up by Congress in 2000, said that “there’s no
question they will find violations.”
Experts say the resignation of
National Economic Council Director Gary Cohn — a free-trade
proponent who had taken issue
with the inquiry, known as a Section 301 investigation — could
speed things up, and the results
are expected in the next several
weeks, according to a person familiar with the matter.
Computer services were the
world’s fastest-growing service
export from 1995 to 2014, according to the World Trade Organization.
Sanctions, which are issued by
the executive branch, could go
beyond tariffs to include heightened review or possibly barring
Chinese government officials,
state-owned enterprises or any
investor receiving money from
the Chinese government from acquiring an interest in a U.S. company with sensitive technology.
Such sanctions could block the
sale or use of any technologies
that were stolen.
They could even go so far as
requiring U.S. stock exchanges to
limit who can list in a U.S. market.
Penalties would be more severe if
they found that the Chinese government was complicit in the actions of its companies.
In recent years, Chinese capital
has flooded into Silicon Valley,
infusing start-ups with muchneeded cash while raising questions about investors’ goals and
government ties. At the same
time, U.S. technology giants —
including Google, Facebook,
Amazon.com, Uber and Airbnb —
have bent over backward to enter
the massive Chinese market,
largely with limited success.
Google and Facebook do not operate in China; Uber’s Chinese operations are now controlled in part
by its Chinese competitor, Didi
Chuxing; and Amazon operates
cloud data centers there, but its
presence is dwarfed by Alibaba’s
cloud operation. (Amazon chief
executive Jeffrey P. Bezos owns
The Washington Post.)
China’s technology industry
has also exploded. Alibaba, Tencent and Baidu, often referred to
as the Amazon, Facebook and
Google of China, have become
multibillion-dollar multinationals. Each maintains a sizable investment arm in Silicon Valley.
Today, advancement in industries such as robotics, self-driving
cars and artificial intelligence is a
matter of national policy in China. The policy, called Made in
China 2025, identifies a strategy
for acquiring foreign technology
to build the capacity of Chinese
companies.
Silicon Valley entrepreneurs
say Chinese investors can be valuable partners, sometimes seen as
fixers who can offer assistance in
breaking into an alluring but
opaque market.
But doing so often requires
that the start-up engage in a complicated balancing act and navigate a minefield of security risks.
Start-ups debate whether to offer
board seats to Chinese investors,
fearing the access will give them
too much visibility into their technology, leading to the software
being copied or making its way to
the Chinese government.
Other companies have struggled with rules in China that
require American companies entering the Chinese market to form
a joint venture with a Chinese
partner to which they are required to transfer technology, as
well as requirements that data
must be stored locally on Chinese
servers. (Many countries, including Russia, Brazil and Germany,
have such laws requiring local
data storage.)
Apple recently announced it
would move iCloud accounts registered in mainland China to
state-run Chinese servers, along
with the digital encryption keys
needed to unlock them, as a concession to the Chinese government.
U.S. lawmakers and officials
have become increasingly concerned about the security risks of
Chinese investment. Last year,
the Pentagon warned in an official report that the U.S. government needed to impose stricter
controls over Chinese investment
because it was leading to the
transfer of promising military
technologies to China.
Legislation that would increase scrutiny over such deals is
Amid tari≠ talk, some
Germans are wistful for
communist protections
STEEL FROM A1
Most economists disagree that
protectionism is the answer. So
do German union, industry and
political leaders, all of whom have
spoken out in recent days against
the U.S. president’s plans to impose steep new tariffs on imported steel and aluminum.
“The actions of the U.S. breach
the rules of the World Trade Organization and endanger jobs —
not only in Germany,” Jörg Hofmann, chair of Germany’s metals
union, said in a statement this
week. “A trade war has no winner.”
European Union Trade Commissioner
Cecilia
Malmstrom and German Chancellor
Angela Merkel each said Friday
that they hoped the 28-nation
bloc would be exempt from
Trump’s tariffs, scheduled to go
into effect in two weeks.
Even if it’s not, Germany’s
vaunted steel industry has limited direct exposure. Although it is
the eighth-largest source of steel
imports for the United States, the
percentage of its steel exports
bound for the United States is in
the low single digits.
Among German producers,
“there’s no panic about it,” said
Sabine Stephan, an expert at the
Dusseldorf-based Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
But Stephan said there is concern that the tariffs — rolled out
by Trump at an announcement
with 10 American metal workers
at the White House on Thursday
— could be just the beginning of a
broader series of tit-for-tat measures that harm trade be-
tween the United States and its
allies.
“If this was just a single event —
the tariffs — no one would talk
about it,” Stephan said. “But the
signal is that something quite
fundamental could change between U.S. and E.U. importers and
exporters.”
That potential helps explain
why Balzer, the mayor of Eisenhüttenstadt, cannot be entirely
reassuring when residents ask
him if their city’s factory is at risk.
“There are no immediate consequences, especially because
most of the factory’s markets are
in Germany or Eastern Europe,”
he said, sitting in a meeting room
of Eisenhüttenstadt’s hulking city
hall. “But I can’t say what the
consequences will be in the long
term.”
City residents are used to geopolitics intruding locally. The city
got its start in 1950 because the
new nation of East Germany
needed steel plants to compensate for the ones lost behind the
border with West Germany after
the end of World War II.
What once were empty flatlands along the western bank of
the Oder River were transformed
within years into a centrally
planned city originally known as
Stalinstadt. The city’s purpose
was simple: The nations behind
the Iron Curtain needed steel, and
Stalinstadt would provide giant
coils of it for use in cars, washing
machines and more.
At its peak, the steel factory
employed more than 11,000 people. Workers were paid well, with
new employees offered signing
SEAN GALLUP/GETTY IMAGES
A worker walks among coils of galvanized steel in 2010 at the ArcelorMittal steelworks in
Eisenhüttenstadt, Germany. The country is the eighth-largest source of steel imports for the U.S.
bonuses, relocation expenses and
furniture for their freshly built
concrete-block apartments.
“They even bought you your
curtains,” said Frenzel, who started as a 16-year-old apprentice.
But when East Germany dissolved in 1990 amid the collapse
of communism across Eastern
Europe, the factory in what by
then was known as Eisenhüttenstadt was left vulnerable. After
decades inside the cocoon of a
state-run industry, it was inefficient and unprofitable.
A succession of owners — Belgian, Spanish, French and Indian
conglomerates among them —
tried to turn it around. For years,
the factory was haunted by rumors of imminent closure.
Today it’s stable — but far
smaller than in its communist
heyday, at just 2,500 employees.
The city has felt the effects, with
half of its population disappear-
GRIFF WITTE/THE WASHINGTON POST
Eisenhüttenstadt Mayor Frank Balzer worked at the steelworks for
35 years. He says he hopes his grandchildren can do so, too.
ing in the years since German
reunification.
The impact is evident. A oncegrand hotel in the heart of down-
town has become a graffitiscarred relic. Entire blocks of
apartments are being torn down
because no one wants to live in
pending in Congress. The legislation would expand the powers of
the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States, or
CFIUS, the government body that
reviews foreign mergers for potential threats to national security. CFIUS’s greater scope would
allow for review of foreign deals
beyond the military sphere and
include a broader array of cutting-edge technologies.
Last year, President Trump
made the rare move of blocking
the purchase of chipmaker Lattice Semiconductor by a Chinesebacked investor. And last week,
CFIUS held up the acquisition of
U.S. chipmaker Qualcomm by
Singapore-based Broadcom, citing security concerns related to
China’s influence over the creation of a 5G cellular network.
In restarting negotiations over
the North American Free Trade
Agreement, Wallach said, the administration has also taken issue
with laws requiring localized data
storage. She said that data storage
and other technology issues are
the new frontier for global trade
battles.
Wessel said that one challenge
for the investigation is that tech
companies are hesitant to come
forward to share information
about technology transfers, out of
concerns that a new disclosure
could prompt shareholder lawsuits.
Carmen Chang, chairman and
head for Asia investments at the
venture capital firm New Enterprise Associates, said she watched
Trump’s move closely this week
with an eye toward what might
come next for Silicon Valley. The
mounting tensions risk doing
damage to a relationship that is
critical for both sides, she said.
“Everyone in Silicon Valley is
thinking about what this might be
a precursor to,” Chang said. “It’s a
serious problem, but we are concerned that the reaction from
Washington will be like taking a
meat cleaver to it.”
elizabeth.dwoskin@washpost.com
them. Even at peak hours, the
shopping district is eerily quiet,
with sculptures of socialist icons
occasionally outnumbering the
live people.
“The factory produces three
times as much steel as it used to,”
Frenzel noted ruefully. “And the
city is empty.”
As he spoke, he clutched his
prized iPhone X — manufactured,
he pointed out, in China — and
sipped on a frothy beer in a dark,
mostly empty Irish pub alongside
his wife, Anna Neumann.
The couple said they don’t long
for the old days, noting the oppression and state control that came
with the relative stability of East
Germany’s managed economy. But
they also said they don’t see anything wrong with a president trying to protect his citizens from the
caprice of global markets that
know no national loyalties.
“I’d be happy if someone said,
‘Our country first,’ ” said Neumann, a retired English teacher.
Balzer, the mayor, said he can
understand the appeal. But it’s
not that simple.
“These days, industries and nations are so dependent on each
other,” he said.
Any attempt to erect trade barriers, he said, could mean “victims on all sides.”
But Balzer, 54 with a boyish
face and graying hair, said that
he’s not counting on that.
His grandfather helped build
the factory. His father worked in
its IT department. He personally
rose from a factory mechanic to
become a leader of the plant’s
worker council. Two of his children work there, and he fully
intends for a fifth generation to
join the family tradition — whatever changes the outside world
may bring.
“One day,” he said, “I hope that
my three grandchildren will also
work there.”
griff.witte@washpost.com
luisa.beck@washpost.com
Top E.U. trade official to seek bloc’s exemption from steel, aluminum tari≠s
BY
M ICHAEL B IRNBAUM
brussels — The European
Union’s top trade official said Friday that the 28-nation bloc will
seek to be excluded from President Trump’s steel and aluminum
tariffs, a day after he signed off on
them with the caveat that countries with a “security relationship”
could seek an exemption.
E.U. Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmstrom said that Europe
shared American concerns about
China’s support for its steel industry, but she said that the tariffs of
25 percent on steel and 10 percent
on aluminum were the wrong way
to address the issue.
“We share the concern of over-
a revised North American Free
capacity in the steel sector,” MalmTrade Agreement (NAFTA).
strom told a conference in BrusTrump has cited national secusels. “This is not the right way to
rity concerns as the legal
deal with it.”
basis for the tariffs. EuShe said that E.U. offiropean policymakers
cials were still trying to
have dismissed that as
understand Trump’s annonsensical, because
nouncement Thursday, in
most U.S. steel imports
which he slammed councome from its military
tries around the world for
allies.
unfair trade practices but
“We are friends, we
left open the door to trade
are allies, we work topartners to seek exemp- E.U. Trade
tions. Canada, which is Commissioner gether. We cannot possibly be a threat to nationthe top source for U.S. Cecilia
al security in the U.S.,”
steel imports, and Mexico Malmstrom.
Malmstrom said.
are both excluded from
“We count on being excluded,”
the tariffs.
she said, adding that the policy
Trump said these exemptions
announced by Trump was “not
were to facilitate negotiations for
crystal clear.”
Malmstrom will meet Saturday
in Brussels with U.S. Trade Representative Robert E. Lighthizer and
Japanese Trade Minister Hiroshige Seko for a meeting that was
originally scheduled to discuss cooperation about Chinese trade issues but has now transformed
into something more adversarial.
In the meeting, E.U. officials
said they will ask how to apply for
an exemption.
“This is not a trade negotiation,
now we are talking about unilateral actions against international
rules. And we want to sort it out
before it becomes a problem,” said
Jyrki Katainen, a top E.U. economic official. “We want to get as
much clarity as possible tomorrow. Most probably discussions
will continue.”
But Europeans are preparing
actions if they are ultimately hit
with tariffs.
E.U. policymakers have readied
about $3.5 billion in countermeasures that will strike against symbolically important products
from the United States — such as
bourbon, motorcycles and blue
jeans — that are manufactured in
the home districts of congressional leaders. They also plan to
file a complaint with the World
Trade Organization.
The back-and-forth risks a
broader trade war of escalating
tariffs, but many European lead-
ers think that if they do not respond, they will soon be hit again
by the White House.
German Chancellor Angela
Merkel, leader of Europe’s largest
economy, offered her support for
the E.U. measures being readied,
although she said she would prefer a broader dialogue about lowering tariffs and reaching a trade
agreement with Washington.
She told reporters Friday that
she hoped to avoid a damaging
trade fight with Washington.
“No one would win such a competition,” she said.
michael.birnbaum@washpost.com
Quentin Ariès contributed to this
report.
SATURDAY, MARCH 10 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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THE WASHINGTON POST
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. SATURDAY,
MARCH 10 , 2018
Ambassador quits, swelling exodus
John Feeley, who was the top U.S. diplomat in Panama, has come to symbolize a string of disillusioned Foreign Service officers
BY J OSHUA P ARTLOW
AND C AROL M ORELLO
panama city — In a farewell
video, the U.S. ambassador to Panama, John Feeley, filmed a scene at
a tin-roofed barbershop that sits
in a graffiti-tagged neighborhood
here under a clattering elevated
highway.
This was Feeley’s barbershop, a
place he visited regularly despite
his Panamanian driver’s insisting
he should not.
“I’ve been coming here for
months,” Feeley said in another
video last year. “I’m very loyal.”
But now, Feeley is leaving Latin
America and the State Department after quitting in protest two
months ago.
He has posted the last of a series
of videos exhibiting the goofy, extroverted demeanor that gained
him a wide viewership in Panama
over the past two years. Their
premise has the out-of-work ambassador ham-handedly applying
for jobs in Panama — as a fireman,
a taxi driver, a makeup artist to a
flamboyant transvestite TV personality — because he likes the
country so much he doesn’t want
to leave.
“It humanizes us,” he said, referring to the United States. “And
right now, we need a little humanizing.”
Feeley, 56, flew home from Panama on Friday, capping almost
three decades as a diplomat under
Republican and Democratic administrations. In the past year, he
said, he realized he was working
for a president whose policies and
tone he could no longer promote
or even explain.
“As a junior foreign service officer, I signed an oath to serve faithfully the president and his administration in an apolitical fashion,
even when I might not agree with
certain policies,” he said in his
Dec. 27 letter to President Trump,
first reported by Reuters and confirmed by Feeley as his words. “My
instructors made clear that if I
believed I could not do that, I
would be honor bound to resign.
That time has come.”
After Feeley resigned, the State
Department said it respected his
decision. “Everyone has a line that
they will not cross,” said Steve
Goldstein, the undersecretary for
diplomacy.
U.S. EMBASSY IN PANAMA
Images from a goodbye video John Feeley made before leaving Panama, where he was U.S. ambassador. He pretended to apply for regular jobs in Panama because he would no
longer be employed by the U.S. government. Feeley, 56, said his resignation “was based on a sense of my values as a citizen and a representative of broader American values.”
With Feeley’s departure, however, the department loses one of
its leading Latin Americanists.
And because of the leaked resignation letter, he has come to symbolize a string of diplomats who have
left their posts saying they feel
marginalized and unwilling to
represent an administration
whose values they reject.
State Department officials insist that policy and procedures
have not been adversely affected
by the exodus.
“I don’t lose a wink of sleep over
the fact that we may not have our
nominees in” open positions, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said
Friday in response to a question
about departures hampering diplomacy. “We have very capable,
skilled career diplomats ready to
step up and serve in those positions, and they are serving superbly, and we are moving the policies
forward.”
“Nothing is being held up,” Tillerson added. “I am very, very
proud of the work of the State
Department that we’re getting
done.’’
Nevertheless, the diplomatic
corps with experience in the
Americas has been particularly
hard hit by all the departures.
The State Department’s thirdhighest-ranking official, Thomas
Shannon, who helped shift the
U.S. focus in Latin America away
from small Cold War battlegrounds toward the region’s big
economies, announced his retirement last month. William Brownfield, a former ambassador to Co-
lombia, Venezuela and Chile,
stepped down last year, as did his
wife, Kristie Kenney, also a threetime ambassador, once in Ecuador. All of them are or were career
Foreign Service officers, not political appointees.
“With each of these people, and
many others, you are losing encyclopedic knowledge,” said Roberta
Jacobson, the U.S. ambassador to
Mexico, who will herself resign in
May.
Feeley, a former Marine Corps
helicopter pilot who grew up in
the Bronx in a family of New York
firefighters and police officers, is a
registered independent. One of
his former State Department bosses said Feeley “understood hierarchy” and “would salute and move
forward” even if given instructions with which he vigorously
disagreed.
The realization that he could
not be an emissary for Trump was
not reached easily, Feeley said.
“My decision was based on a
sense of my values as a citizen and
a representative of broader American values,” he said.
Advocating for democracy, free
trade, human rights and economic
development was a given, Feeley
said, during his tenure in many
posts, including the Dominican
Republic, Colombia and Mexico.
During Trump’s first year in office,
he said, he saw this work diminished — eclipsed by warnings and
insults from the president’s Twitter account.
“The whole idea of a rulesbased, respectful conduct of diplo-
matic relations is pretty much
what I spent my whole career doing. And we don’t do that now,” he
said. “We’ve walked off the field.
Not only are we walking off the
field, we’re taking the ball and
we’re throwing up a middle finger.”
Panama’s decision last June to
abandon its decades-long alliance
with Taiwan and establish diplomatic relations with China was
one instance in which Feeley says
he felt frustrated by the administration’s lack of response.
China had become the secondmost-frequent user of the Panama
Canal, planned to build a railroad
to the border with Costa Rica and
promised to bring billions of dollars more in investments.
Feeley says he did not fear that
China would seize control of the
canal. But he did worry that the
Trump administration had no effective commercial policy for Latin America and that the United
States was losing influence in the
hemisphere. He thought a flood of
Chinese money could worsen corruption and labor practices.
Feeley briefed Vice President
Pence about the Chinese moves
during Pence’s visit to Panama in
August. Later, he followed up on
Pence’s suggestion that Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross
could lead a trade delegation to
the region but says the department did not respond.
“I got nothing,” Feeley recalled.
Several U.S. diplomats in different countries have complained of
a lack of guidance and informa-
tion from headquarters.
In December, ahead of the U.N.
vote on whether to condemn the
United States for recognizing Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, the
U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, Nikki Haley, wrote to member countries saying that Trump
“has requested I report back on
those who voted against us.”
Feeley received angry calls from
Panamanian officials about the
letter; he said he had no idea it
existed. This type of “foreign policy by ultimatum and by intimidation,” he said, displayed “rank amateurism.”
Goldstein said Friday that the
State Department has been working to improve communications
with overseas posts.
“Rex Tillerson is not a micromanager,” he said. “He allows people to do their job. And if people
need additional support, they
need to ask for it, and should be
getting it.”
Before coming to Panama in
December 2015, Feeley spent a
decade working on Mexico issues,
as a political officer and deputy
ambassador in Mexico and as deputy assistant secretary of state for
Western Hemisphere affairs. He
had aspired to one day be ambassador there.
He said he found Trump’s campaign statements about undocumented Mexicans in the United
States — the president described
them as “criminals” and “rapists”
— to be “horribly off base, beyond
insulting.”
As ambassador, one friend said,
Feeley’s frustration grew.
“He’d say, ‘I’m not sure how
much more of this I can take,’ even
though his public persona was
completely lockstep, as it should
be,” said Edward Burris, a retired
Marine lieutenant colonel who
has known Feeley for decades.
Feeley’s breaking point came in
August with the white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, when
Trump failed to decisively condemn the neo-Nazis. Feeley said
he has long considered the civil
rights movement one of the finest
achievements in American history.
“I have spoken about those
struggles for the last 25, 30 years of
my life. I represented a country I
knew had overcome significant
structural racism,” he said. “I saw
his reaction [to Charlottesville] as
a complete negation of the positive trajectory.”
Feeley has decided to work as a
consultant for Univision, focusing
on the immigration debate in the
United States. He discussed the
plan with former Marine friends,
some of whom urged him not to
leave his ambassadorial post.
But Feeley said he could not
ignore the oath he signed requiring him to put aside his personal
misgivings to implement presidential policies.
“If you feel you can’t do that in
good faith,” he said, “the honorable thing to do is resign.”
joshua.partlow@washpost.com
carol.morello@washpost.com
Morello reported from Washington.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
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Economy & Business
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Bill could allow 2 banks to hold billions less in reserves
BY
J EFF S TEIN
A bipartisan Senate bill quickly
moving toward passage could allow two of the nation’s biggest
banks to reduce the amount of
money they must keep on hand as
a buffer against collapse by a collective $30 billion, an internal
analysis by a top banking regulator has found.
That reduction in capital could
weaken one of the safeguards Congress helped put in place after the
2008 financial crisis, some banking experts say.
The analysis by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., a government agency that helps oversee
the nation’s banking system,
found that JPMorgan Chase,
which has $2.6 trillion in assets,
could lower its required capital
stockpile by $21.4 billion if regulators decide the law applies to the
firm. Citigroup, which has
$1.9 trillion in assets, could reduce
its capital position by $8.6 billion.
The analysis was obtained by The
Washington Post.
The report comes as the Senate
is weighing legislation to scale
back banking regulations passed
as part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank
law, which was forged in response
to the 2008 financial crisis. The bill
cleared a procedural Senate hurdle this week with support from all
voting Republicans and 17 senators in the Democratic caucus,
suggesting the chamber will eventually pass it, probably next week.
Proponents say the bill reduces
regulatory burdens for midsize
banks that don’t pose a risk to the
financial system, but liberal Democrats, the Congressional Budget
Office and some banking experts
have said it could expose two of the
biggest financial firms to new
risks. That’s because it contains
language that would allow regulators to reduce how much capital
some banks are required to hold.
Banking experts widely agree
that by holding a substantial
amount of capital in recent years,
banks have been less vulnerable to
the type of crisis that nearly toppled the world financial system a
decade ago. But there’s disagreement on Capitol Hill and among
experts about whether the Senate
legislation could free JPMorgan
Chase and Citigroup to hold less
capital. Defenders of the bill, and
even some of its opponents, say the
two banks would not be subject to
lower capital requirements even if
the bill passes.
At issue is a special capital surcharge imposed by regulators on
banks holding more than $250 billion in assets. For every dollar of
assets they have on their balance
sheet, these banks are required to
keep an offsetting percentage in
capital.
The Senate bill would allow
banks to not count certain safe
assets in that ratio if the banks
were determined to be “predominantly engaged” in custodian
banking. Three banks — Bank of
New York Mellon, State Street and
the Northern Trust Corp. — would
mainly be affected by this provision.
These banks play a special role
in the financial system, where they
primarily hold on to assets on
behalf of financial institutions and
do not engage in either trading
activities of their own or provide
services to ordinary consumers.
Some experts believe that they can
be subject to less rigorous rules.
JPMorgan and Citigroup,
though they have much broader
businesses, also take part in custodian banking activities and as a
result could argue that they should
benefit from the new rules, as
critics of the bill fear.
Ultimately, the decision on how
to enforce the new law is expected
to fall to the nation’s banking regulators — the Federal Reserve, the
Office of the Comptroller of the
Currency and the FDIC.
This week, the Congressional
Budget Office gave the two Wall
Street giants even odds of getting
regulatory approval to reduce
their capital if the legislation passes. Sen. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.) proposed an amendment to the bill on
the Senate floor Thursday to make
clear that only custodian banks
would benefit from the new capital requirements.
The FDIC report was based on
the premise that JPMorgan and
Citigroup would be allowed to reduce their capital, but the agency
was not making any conclusion
about whether they would or
should be.
“It’s a significant reduction in
capital for banks that are highly
systemic. Why do we want to do
that?” said Sheila Bair, FDIC chair
under Presidents George W. Bush
and Barack Obama. Bair said it is
probable that JPMorgan and Citigroup qualify for the exemption.
“When you get into a downturn,
you need your banks to keep functioning. Highly leveraged banks —
banks overburdened with debt
themselves — will pull back, and
that will make the next recession
much, much worse.”
Some experts fear the legislation could be only the beginning of
relaxed capital standards for big
banks. “It’s a very slippery slope,”
Bair said.
“If this applies to JPMorgan, it
would allow them to fund themselves with a lot fewer resources to
handle a crisis by allowing them to
take on far more risky debt,” said
Mike Konczal, a banking expert at
the Roosevelt Institute, a left-ofcenter think tank. “It would allow
them to jack up their profits in the
short term but put everyone else at
risk, because they’d have less resources to handle a crisis in the
long run.”
As first reported by the Intercept, Citigroup has pushed Congress to broaden the new exemption, suggesting to the bill’s proponents that they would not benefit
from it as currently drafted. “As
Congress has sought to make a
common-sense change to the way
capital rules treat custody assets,
we have asked that they apply that
change to all custody banks to
maintain a level playing field in
this important business,” a spokesman for Citigroup said.
A JPMorgan spokesman did not
respond to a request for comment.
Defenders of the proposal have
adamantly denied that either JPMorgan or Citi would benefit from
the measure.
Sen. Mark R. Warner (D-Va.),
who backs the bill and was one of
the main architects of the 2010
overhaul of banking rules, said it
was part of the CBO’s job to raise
“hypothetical red flags” and said
the intention of the bill was not to
benefit JPMorgan and Citi.
“The legislation makes clear
that the [holdings requirement
change] will be granted only to
custody banks, which is because of
their unique business model,” a
spokeswoman for Warner wrote in
an email.
“I think the CBO is not exactly
the source of analysis on risk,” Sen.
Heidi Heitkamp (D-N.D.), a cosponsor of the bill, said in an
interview. “A lot of this is being
exaggerated to make the case
against this bill.”
jeff.stein@washpost.com
Renae Merle and Erica Werner
contributed to this report.
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/wonkblog
Economy beats expectations by adding 313,000 jobs, but wage growth stalls
BY
D ANIELLE P AQUETTE
The U.S. economy added
313,000 jobs in February, according to Friday’s employment report
from the Bureau of Labor Statistics,
smashing analysts’ expectations.
But the strong growth, spurred
by hiring in retail after layoffs last
year and gains in manufacturing
and construction, did not boost
wages.
The unemployment rate held
steady for the fifth straight month
at 4.1 percent, a 17-year low. Average hourly pay grew by 2.6 percent
from this time last year, a drop from
January’s year-over-year improvement of 2.9 percent.
February produced the most
jobs in a month since July 2016,
when the economy grew by
325,000 positions. Economists appeared split over what caused the
higher-than-projected surge of
jobs.
Andrew Chamberlain, chief
economist at Glassdoor, a jobs website, said the burst of new positions
probably stems from the tax law
President Trump signed in December that slashed corporate rates.
“This is a result of fiscal stimulus
— in other words: a $1.3 billion tax
cut,” he said. “Businesses are making decisions on a forward-looking
basis. Even if the dollars aren’t in
the pockets of companies yet,
they’re making plans.”
Cathy Barrera, head economist
at ZipRecruiter, an employment
site, questioned that interpretation, saying it’s too early to see an
effect from the tax measure.
“Really, for businesses, what
matters is demand for their products,” she said. “If demand for products hasn’t gone up, there’s not
more work for these companies to
be doing.”
Josh Wright, chief economist at
iCIMS, a hiring software firm, said
companies might just be ramping
up for a potentially sunnier business climate.
Construction, retail, manufacturing and health care drive most of February’s gains
MONICA ALMEIDA/REUTERS
Job seekers line up to attend TechFair in Los Angeles. The jobless rate held steady for the fifth straight month at 4.1 percent.
“It’s more about increased confidence,” he said. “They like the outlook for growth and how supportive federal policy will be for it.”
Construction, retail, manufacturing and health care drove most
of the growth in February.
Retail expanded by 50,000 jobs,
with general merchandise stores
leading the way (18,000 positions),
according to the BLS data. The
growth spurt follows a year of layoffs: About 67,000 positions disap-
peared from stores in 2017 — a
sharp drop from the 203,000 added in 2016.
Specialty trade contractors
gained 38,000 positions, while
building assembly jobs jumped by
16,000. Overall, the construction
sector has added 180,000 positions
over the past four months.
Manufacturing
maintained
steady growth, increasing by
31,000 jobs.
Still, wages in February contin-
ued to drag compared with prerecession levels.
Elise Gould, a senior economist
at the Economic Policy Institute,
which tracks average worker pay,
said the hourly increase in February’s report was “relatively disappointing.”
Year-over-year wage growth, she
said in an email, “needs to exceed
3.5 percent for a substantial
amount of time for workers to begin to claw back losses in the labor
share of income they’ve felt during
and since the Great Recession.”
February’s numbers build on the
200,000 jobs added in January, according to government figures.
Eighteen states lifted their minimum wages at the start of the year,
including Ohio, Florida, Washington and Maine.
“The 313,000 job gain is more
than triple that necessary to meet
the demand of new entrants into
the workforce, which if it is sus-
tained will continue to put downward pressure on the unemployment rate,” said Joseph Brusuelas,
chief economist at RSM US, an
international consulting firm.
But the share of Americans who
are either working or looking for
jobs remained low. The workforce
grew by 806,000 people, bringing
the labor market participation rate
up to 63 percent — a slight improvement from January's 62.7
percent, but well below pre-downturn rates.
Baby boomers are retiring faster
than young people are entering the
workforce, but economists still
don’t know why so many workers
appear to be stuck on the sidelines.
Some blame the opioid epidemic,
which, studies show, has knocked a
chunk of potential hires out of the
workforce.
One alarming example: The
number of truck drivers, commercial pilots, railroad operators and
pipeline workers who failed drug
tests in 2017 has spiked 77 percent
since 2006, according to federal
data.
Brian Krenke, president of KI, a
furniture maker in Green Bay, Wis.,
said his firm has raised wages and
expanded its recruiting efforts into
high schools but still struggles to
fill vacancies.
“In the next 90 days, we need to
identify and train 390 employees to
do skilled positions,” Krenke said.
“But individuals are failing drug
tests and that, combined with low
unemployment, makes it hard to
find people.”
Economist Heidi Hartmann,
president of the Institute for Women’s Policy Research, said the rising
price of child care, combined with a
decade of slow wage growth, keeps
some workers from seeking jobs.
“If they can’t afford child care,
they’re not going to work,” she said.
“If they can’t make enough to pay
for a car or the bus fare, they’re not
going to work.”
danielle.paquette@washpost.com
DIGEST
TECHNOLOGY
Self-driving trucks
coming to Atlanta
The race to control the future
of self-driving trucking just got
even more competitive.
Beginning next week, Waymo
— formerly known as Google’s
self-driving car project — will
roll out a pilot program in
Atlanta where the company’s
technology will power Peterbilt
Class 8 trucks to carry cargo
bound for Google’s data centers,
the company said Friday.
Waymo engineers have been
testing self-driving trucks in
California and Arizona, and a
fleet of 600 autonomous Waymo
taxis has been on Arizona’s
roads without a human driver
since November, the company
said in a blog post.
“Our software is learning to
drive big rigs in much the same
way a human driver would after
years of driving passenger cars,”
Waymo said in the post. “The
principles are the same, but
things like braking, turning, and
blind spots are different with a
fully-loaded truck and trailer.”
Waymo said the trucks will
have trained drivers in the cabs
to monitor systems and take
control if needed.
— Peter Holley
FEDERAL COURT
Doctor sentenced in
Insys kickbacks case
A Rhode Island physician was
sentenced Friday to more than
four years in prison after
admitting he took kickbacks
from Insys Therapeutics to
prescribe its fentanyl-based
cancer pain drug to people who
did not have the condition.
Jerrold Rosenberg, 63, was
sentenced to 51 months in
prison by U.S. District Judge
John McConnell in Providence,
who said the physician
effectively sold his medical
license to a pharmaceutical
company seeking to boost its
profits.
McConnell said patients were
put at risk by Rosenberg, who
has admitted the $188,000 Insys
paid him in the form of speaker
fees were a factor in his decision
to write prescriptions for
Subsys.
The Food and Drug
Administration has approved
the powerful opioid-based spray
for use only by people with
cancer, but prosecutors said
Rosenberg prescribed it to a
wider range of patients with
chronic pain.
be spun off under a bankruptcy
deal approved last year. GenOn
plans to close the Etiwanda
plant in Rancho Cucamonga as
of June 1; the Ormond Beach
facility in Oxnard as of Oct. 1;
and the Ellwood site in Goleta
by Jan. 1. California regulators
are pushing utilities to ditch
gas-fired power plants for cleanenergy projects as the state aims
to reduce greenhouse-gas
emissions.
— Reuters
curtailed activity for the first
time since January as escalating
output from shale fields stunted
a recovery in crude prices.
Explorers idled four working oil
rigs this week, bringing the total
to 796, according to Baker
Hughes data released Friday.
The benchmark for U.S. crude
has fallen about 9 percent since
touching a three-year high in
late January as ballooning
American oil production cast
doubt on the OPEC-led effort to
shrink a global oil glut.
ALSO IN BUSINESS
A mining industry group is
asking the Supreme Court to
review an Obama-era ban on
new mining claims around the
Grand Canyon. The petition,
which was filed Friday by the
American Exploration and
Mining Association, comes as
the Trump administration
reviews a portion of the ban.
The Interior Department
implemented the ban in 2012
U.S. oil explorers this week
KRISZTIAN BOCSI/BLOOMBERG NEWS
An Audi AG parks at a factory in Emden, Germany, on Friday. Audi
parent Volkswagen says it will spend $495 million to switch power
plants at its Wolfsburg headquarters to cut carbon emissions.
amid concern about possible
water contamination. A federal
law gives the Interior secretary
authority to withdraw land from
mining claims for up to 20 years
without approval from Congress.
NRG Energy plans to shutter
three old gas-fired power plants
in California, the Sierra Club
said in a statement Friday. The
plants are operated by the
GenOn unit, which is slated to
— From news reports
A12
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
MARCH 10 , 2018
Shkreli gets seven-year sentence
for defrauding investors of millions
Obamas’ talk
of streaming
on Netflix
stirs intrigue
“He is a good person, judge,
not a perfect person.”
Prosecutors were dismissive
of Shkreli’s pleas for leniency.
Shkreli doesn’t deserve a stiff
sentence for his public persona
as “the most hated man in America,” but because he was found
guilty of serious crimes, said
assistant U.S. attorney Jacquelyn
Kasulis. “This was not an isolated lapse in judgment,” said Kasulis. “This is four different fraud
schemes over five years.”
In addition to his seven-year
sentence, Matsumoto has already ordered Shkreli to forfeit
more than $7 million, including
his $5 million bond, and potentially, the only known copy of the
Wu-Tang Clan’s “Once Upon a
Time in Shaolin” and a Picasso
painting. She estimated his personal net worth at about
$27 million. Shkreli will get
credit for six months he has
already spent in jail awaiting his
sentencing. Matsumoto also sentenced him to three years of
probation after his release and
ordered him to pay an additional
$75,000 fine.
Shkreli received far less than
the 20 years he faced under the
sentencing guidelines. He may
also still appeal his conviction
and his attorney, Brafman, said
that with “good time,” he would
be likely to serve less than the
total seven years.
In the two years since FBI
agents ushered him from his
Manhattan apartment, Shkreli
has gone from a rising star in the
hedge fund world to Wall Street
bad boy. He has smirked his way
through interviews and congressional appearances, and beefed
with rappers, reporters and almost anyone else in his path.
Matsumoto said the case was
not “about Mr. Shkreli’s selfcultivated public persona . . . nor
his controversial statements
about politics or culture.” The
trial was also not about addressing the issue of rising drug prices, she said, referring to Daraprim — a 62-year-old drug primarily used to treat newborns
and HIV patients — which
Shkreli raised the price of to
$750 a pill from $13.50. “That is
Congress’ job.”
“I do wish you well,” Matsumoto said to Shkreli at the end of
the hearing, then encouraged
him to seek mental health treatment
while
incarcerated.
“Thank you very much, your
honor,” Shkreli responded, before being led out of the courtroom.
Hedge fund manager
pleads for leniency,
apologizes to victims
Former first couple are
reportedly negotiating
to create nonfiction shows
BY
. SATURDAY,
BY
R ENAE M ERLE
new york — A federal judge on
Friday sentenced Martin Shkreli,
the notorious former hedge fund
manager, to seven years in prison for defrauding his investors
of $10 million.
In imposing the sentence, U.S.
District Judge Kiyo Matsumoto
roughly split the difference between the 15 years that prosecutors asked for and the up to 18
months sought by Shkreli’s defense team. Shkreli, 34, who
delivered a tearful speech to
Matsumoto apologizing for his
conduct and pleading for leniency, did not react to the sentence.
A complicated picture of
Shkreli emerged from the trial,
said Matsumoto, who said the
case had given her a case of
insomnia. “It is more than clear
that Mr. Shkreli is a gifted individual with a passion for science,” she said. But his crimes
are serious and it is important to
send a message that such fraud
should be not tolerated, she said.
“White-collar offenders like Mr.
Shkreli use their intelligence and
acumen to elude detection,” she
said.
Shkreli, best known for raising the price of an AIDS drug by
5,000 percent when he was chief
executive of Turing Pharmaceuticals, was convicted last August
of defrauding the investors in his
hedge funds, MSMB Capital and
MSMB Healthcare. Shkreli lied
to obtain investors’ money and
then did not tell them when he
made a bad stock bet that led to
massive losses, prosecutors argued. Instead, they said, he
raised more money to pay off
other investors, or took money
and stock from Retrophin, a
drug company he founded.
“For years, Shkreli told lie
after lie in order to steal his
investors’ money, manipulate
the stock market and enrich
himself,” said U.S. attorney Richard P. Donoghue. “He will now
pay the price for repeatedly violating the trust placed in him by
his investors, his employees and
the public.”
In pleading for a short sentence, Shkreli’s defense attorney,
Benjamin Brafman, portrayed
Shkreli as a misunderstood genius suffering from depression
S TEVEN Z EITCHIK
SCOTT OLSON/GETTY IMAGES
LOS ANGELES — Will it happen? Could it happen?
The news Thursday that Barack and Michelle Obama are in
talks with Netflix to create nonfiction shows sent the intriguemeter spiking from Washington
to the West Coast.
The development, reported by
the New York Times, has the
ex-president and ex-first lady
negotiating with Netflix for issue-driven shows. The former
first couple would serve as producers and maybe even star; a
talk-show format is not out of the
question.
Netflix declined to comment.
An Obama spokesman offered a
general comment about the couple’s belief in storytelling.
Obama would come in a long
line of former presidents and vice
presidents turning to media or
art: documentaries (Al Gore),
lectures (Bill Clinton), painting
(George W. Bush) and memoirs
(pretty much all of them).
Yet he would also break significant new ground. There are traditional ways for ex-presidents to
communicate with the public. A
digital subscription service is not
one of them.
For Netflix, the strategy is
clear — if hardly a slam-dunk.
The company aims to spend
$8 billion and offer 700 original
shows this year.
Algorithms, Netflix asserts,
mean that many of them do not
need to be big to succeed.
That kind of volume thinking
would seem to argue against a
show from one of the most
recognized couples on the planet.
But a streamer cannot live on
niches alone. To attract subscribers globally — and an Obamastudded series would play big in
Europe and other growing Netflix markets — the company
needs tentpoles and pricey A-listers, too.
If you are going to sprinkle in
some blockbuster programming,
you may as well make it the most
major name brand. To use a
phrase that digital-minded Net-
With its upscale reputation and shared interest in disruption with
the former president, Netflix could be a neat fit for Barack Obama.
flix executives would surely hate,
the Obamas represent their
broadcast play.
Interestingly, as major as this
would be for Netflix, it would
almost be narrowcasting for the
Obamas. Even mid-level directors quietly grumble about exposure on Netflix, where shows and
movies have a way of sinking
with little advertising or homepage play. (Lacking box office or
ratings — the “black-box” problem — there is little data to
negate their fears.) Imagine how
a man accustomed to preempting prime time will feel.
Which raises the question of
why the Obamas would do it.
Although only they could tell
you, a Netflix series would offer
some advantages.
It is a platform that has the
potential to reach a lot of people
— 117 million and counting. That,
of course, does not mean all or
even many of them will watch.
But the very possibility is a
seriously shiny object.
That reach would also happen
cleanly — Netflix is known for its
hands-off approach.
Streaming is a simple way for
the Obamas to get back in the
discourse game, a way of shaping
the political conversation without all the messiness of jumping
back into politics.
Then there is that black box.
See, no one actually knows how
many people watch Netflix’s
shows, because it does not tell.
And that is perfect for Obama.
What could be more welcome for
a man who spent the past decade
forced to fret about approval
ratings? What could be more
appealing than a place where the
size of the audience not only does
not matter — it is not even
known? One reason ex-presidents stay out of the mainstream
TV game is the potential embarrassment of low ratings.
No such fear at Netflix.
But maybe the biggest virtue
of an Obama streaming deal is
how neatly it fits the man himself.
Every president uses the entertainment medium that suits
them, and every entertainment
medium gets the president it
deserves.
Ronald Reagan was the midcentury screen star, and he took
advantage of his 50-foot persona
to make the transition to politics.
Bill Clinton, with his colorful
past and outsized appetites, was
tailor-made for the MTV age, and
he played that card to perfection.
Donald Trump, of course, took
the national craving for brash,
blunt, love-it-or-leave-it broadcast reality TV and rode it all the
way to the White House. (There’s
an irony in Obama as an unscripted TV star while Trump sits
in the White House.)
Obama is perfect for streaming, with the platform’s upscale
reputation (or, to his/its critics,
elitist reputation); the man and
the company’s shared interest in
disruption; in their come-findus, we-are-not-going-to-shout-atyou appeal. Obama may not have
capitalized on the platform to get
into office — Netflix was still
shipping red envelopes in 2008.
But he can maximize it now.
The Obama news comes as
Oprah Winfrey presidential rumors continue to swirl. She denied them again this week . But
this has not stopped pundits
from speculating she could, or
should. That offers a tidy twist —
it means Oprah could be making
a play to be president at the same
time as Obama is trying to become a talk-show host.
Which leaves just one question: Would she try to promote
her candidacy on his couch?
steven.zeitchik@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/National-Economy
SETH WENIG/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Martin Shkreli has already
served six months of his sevenyear sentence for defrauding
investors in his hedge funds.
and anxiety conditions. Shkreli
had not defrauded vulnerable
people or spent their money on
luxury homes or cars, he said.
Instead, his victims were rich,
sophisticated investors who ultimately made a healthy profit, he
said.
“I am disappointed,” Brafman
said outside the Brooklyn courthouse. “I think it is hard to claim
victory when someone like Martin Shkreli is going to jail. . . . But
Martin’s fine, and he will be fine.”
Usually boisterous and defiant, Shkreli spent most of the
three-hour hearing, dressed in a
dark prison uniform and black
glasses, staring down into his
lap. When he finally had a
chance to address the judge, he
cried as he explained that “poor
judgment led me here. . . . The
only person to blame for me
being here is me.”
“I am not the same person I
was during the MSMB era,” he
said, referring to his now-dissolved hedge funds. “I apologize
to all of the investors. I am
terribly sorry I lost your trust.”
At one point during his statement, Shkreli was handed a box
of Kleenex.
Shkreli described the six
months he has already spent in
Metropolitan Detention Center
in Brooklyn as “heartbreaking.”
Shkreli said he has counseled
fellow inmates and taught classes on finance and mathematics.
“This is an interesting man
with great potential,” Brafman
said. But, he acknowledged, it is
not difficult to understand people’s frustration’s with Shkreli.
“There are times when I want to
hold him and hug him,” he said.
“And there are times when I want
to punch him in the face.”
renae.merle@washpost.com
THE MARKETS
6 Monitor your investments at washingtonpost.com/markets
Data and graphics by
U.S. Stock Market Performance
Index
Dow Jones Industrial Average
25,400
1 Year
% Chg
25,335.74 +3.3
+21.5
Close
25,150
24,900
24,650
24,400
Nasdaq Composite Index
7575
Commodities
S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot
Weekly
% Chg
7560.81
+4.2
+29.5
Weekly
% Chg
Industry Group
Diversified Consumer Svcs
Trading Co's & Distr
Machinery
Life Sciences
Internet & Catalog Retail
Textiles & Apparel
Food & Staples Retailing
Metals & Mining
Leisure Equipment & Prod
Multiline Retail
–15%
0%
+15%
12.2
7.8
6.6
6.2
6.2
0.5
–0.2
–0.3
–6.5
–7.4
7325
7200
2786.57
S&P 500 Index
+3.5
+17.8
2790
2750
2710
2670
Mon.
Tue.
Wed.
Thur.
Fri.
Americas
Brazil (Bovespa)
Canada (S&P/TSX Comp.)
Mexico (Bolsa)
Europe
Eurozone (DJ Stoxx 600)
France (CAC 40)
Germany (DAX)
U.K. (FTSE 100)
Asia Pacific
Australia (ASX 200)
China (CSI 300)
Hong Kong (Hang Seng)
Japan (Nikkei)
Close
Weekly
% Chg
86,371.41
15,577.81
48,586.59
0.7
1.3
2.2
378.24
5274.40
12,346.68
7224.51
3.1
2.7
3.6
2.2
5963.23
4108.87
30,996.21
21,469.20
1 Year % Chg
–40%
0%
+40%
Close
Weekly
% Chg
1 Year
% Chg
3M Co
AmExp
Apple Inc
Boeing
Caterpillar
Chevron Corp
Cisco Systems
Coca-Cola
DowDuPont Inc
Exxon Mobil
GE
GoldmnSchs
Home Depot
IBM
Intel Corp
241.35
99.05
179.98
354.52
158.25
117.22
45.37
44.82
72.23
74.56
14.94
270.77
182.16
159.31
52.19
4.8
3.6
2.1
2.9
8.1
5.0
3.0
2.5
5.6
–1.3
5.8
4.9
2.1
3.1
6.6
27.1
24.9
29.8
96.3
73.2
6.5
33.2
6.6
13.7
–8.7
–49.6
8.2
24.2
–10.1
45.7
Company
Close
Weekly
% Chg
1 Year
% Chg
J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
Microsoft
Nike
P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
United Tech
UnitedHealth
Verizon
Visa Inc
WalMart
Walt Disney
133.80
118.04
157.24
55.14
96.54
66.30
80.29
36.77
142.30
134.07
225.43
49.01
124.51
88.72
104.73
3.9
4.2
6.0
1.4
3.8
0.6
1.0
2.3
3.2
3.2
0.1
1.6
3.1
–0.1
1.7
6.2
28.9
22.7
–16.3
49.1
17.6
–11.1
8.0
16.7
19.8
34.2
–0.5
39.7
27.0
–5.7
US $
EU € per
0.6
2.3
1.3
1.4
EU €
Japan ¥
Britain £
Brazil R$
Canada $
1.2308
0.0093
1.3854
0.3071
0.7802
0.0537
0.0076
1.1256
0.2495
0.6340
0.0436
147.9230
32.7900
83.3070
5.7345
0.2217
0.5632
0.0388
0.8125
Japan ¥ per 106.7700
131.4200
Britain £ per
0.7218
0.8884
0.0068
Brazil R$ per
3.2555
4.0073
0.0305
4.5116
Canada $ per
1.2817
1.5774
0.0120
1.7756
0.3936
Mexico $ per
18.6186
22.9154
0.1740
25.7950
5.7180
Mexico $
2.5416
0.1748
0.0688
Index
Close
DJ Total Stock Market Index 28,833.40
Russell 2000
1597.14
Post-Bloomberg DC Area Index 569.73
CBOE Volatility (VIX)
14.64
1 Year % Chg
17.9
17.4
22.7
19.0
Orange Juice
Silver
Soybeans
Sugar
Wheat
Exchange-Traded
Coffee (COFF.L)
Copper (COPA.L)
Corn (CORN.L)
Cotton (COTN.L)
Crude Oil (CRUD.L)
Gasoline (UGAS.L)
Gold (BULL.L)
Natural Gas (NGAS.L)
Silver (SLVR.L)
Weekly
(Ticker) % Chg
Weekly
% Chg
$1.4035
$16.61
$10.3925
$0.1284
$4.8925
+1.3
+0.9
–3.0
–4.3
–2.2
week
$700
$1000
year
$1300
–1.3
0.8
1.7
3.4
1.9
1.5
0.1
1.0
1.1
Company
Celsion Corp
Vaxart Inc
Neuralstem Inc
Ciena Corp
Engility Holdings
Strayer Education
GTT Communications
Supernus Pharma
Discovery Comm
GSE Systems Inc
Novavax Inc
Tegna Inc
CASI Pharma
Spherix Inc
American Woodmark
Lightbridge Corp
Close
Weekly
% Chg
$2.64
$5.80
$1.70
$27.05
$25.49
$101.57
$58.95
$44.85
$24.19
$3.40
$2.06
$12.87
$3.31
$1.28
$121.75
$1.48
17.3
17.2
16.4
15.2
14.4
13.5
13.4
13.1
–1.9
–2.9
–3.7
–4.0
–4.9
–5.2
–5.3
–10.8
$0
week
year
$1000
$2600
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Consumer Rates
Weekly % Chg
3.6
4.2
3.2
–25.3
+0.4
+1.4
+1.3
0.0
+1.4
Close
14.5269
Interest Rates
Other Measures
$3.1360
$3.9050
$62.04
$1,324.00
$2.73
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
Cross Currency Rates
US $ per
Weekly
% Chg
Local Gainers and Losers
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
Company
Close
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
7450
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
0.30
0.51
0.80
1.62
3.35
5.90
4.50%
4.36%
Bank Prime
30-Year fixed mortgage
1.50%
Federal Funds
3.75%
2.07%
LIBOR 3-Month
10-year note
Yield: 2.90
2-year note
Yield: 2.26
5-year note
Yield: 2.65
6-month bill
Yield: 1.87
15-Year fixed mortgage
3.67%
1-Year ARM
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
SATURDAY, MARCH 10 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A13
M2
Fake news spreads ‘farther, faster’
than truth on Twitter, study finds
Research on millions of
tweets concluded people,
not bots, are to blame
BY
BEN MARGOT/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A hostage negotiation team’s vehicle drives through a checkpoint on Friday to get to the Veterans Home
of California-Yountville. The armed man and three people were later found dead by authorities.
Gunman, 3 hostages die in standoff
at veterans facility in California
BY
E LI R OSENBERG
A tense standoff between police and a gunman who had
stormed into a veterans home in
California and taken three employees hostage came to a grim
end Friday night when officers
entered the room the gunman
was in to find him and the three
hostages dead.
The man had shown up in the
morning at the largest veterans
home in the United States with a
rifle and exchanged gunfire with a
sheriff’s deputy. He then crashed
a farewell party for employees of
an organization that works with
recent veterans and took a number of hostages.
The confrontation stretched
throughout the day and into the
night. Officials said that a number
of hostages had been released
early on, but three employees remained in a room with the gunman. Teams of federal, state and
local law enforcement officials
and hostage negotiators from
three agencies had been unable to
make contact with the gunman or
the hostages.
But about 6 p.m. local time,
officers entered the room and
discovered the bodies of the four
people, the suspected gunman
and three women, officials said at
a briefing Friday night.
The standoff had lasted more
than eight hours at the complex,
the Veterans Home of CaliforniaYountville, as teams of heavily
armed law enforcement officers
from state and federal agencies
swarmed around the building
with worried family members
waiting outside. It was not immediately clear when the hostages were shot.
The authorities declined to
publicly identify the gunman.
The incident began about 10:20
a.m., when the gunman showed
up and exchanged fire with a
sheriff’s deputy who had arrived
to respond to an emergency call,
highway patrol officials said.
At some point, the gunman
appeared at the goodbye party for
one of the employees of Pathway
Home, a nonprofit group on site
that works to reintegrate recent
veterans back into civilian life,
including those suffering from
post-traumatic stress disorder,
said Larry Kamer, a former member of the nonprofit group’s board
of directors.
“There was a going-away party
for a couple of the staff who were
leaving today. Today was their last
day. They were having cake and
toasting and apparently he just
walked in with this rifle,” said
Kamer, who told reporters that
his wife, a Pathway Home employee, was at the event.
Kamer said his wife was one of
those allowed to leave.
The scene brought fear and
terror to the small community in
Yountville, a town of about 3,000
most famous for the upscale restaurant the French Laundry in
the heart of California’s wine
country. The winery Domaine
Chandon is less than half a mile
from the veterans home.
The complex was shut down
after the shooting, with those inside being asked to shelter in
place. Some 80 high school students visiting a theater on the
property were put in a “lockdown
situation” before being evacuated, Napa County Sheriff John R.
Robertson told reporters. Nearby
facilities, including a golf course,
also were evacuated.
Law enforcement agents from
the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco,
Firearms and Explosives and the
FBI were assisting in the response, joining deputies from the
Napa County Sheriff’s Office as
well as a SWAT team from the
highway patrol. Hostage negotiators from at least three agencies
were on the scene but could not
make contact with the gunman,
officials said.
State Sen. Bill Dodd (D), who
represents the area, told NBC that
the gunman was asked to leave
the campus’s program for recent
veterans earlier this week.
eli.rosenberg@washpost.com
B EN G UARINO
A tweet can wreak havoc in a
few hundred characters, as demonstrated in April 2013 when
someone hacked the Associated
Press Twitter account and
claimed that explosions at the
White House had injured President Barack Obama. There were
no explosions — and Obama was
fine — but the Dow Jones industrial average sank by 100 points in
two minutes. Stock markets
swiftly recovered once the truth
came out. Twitter, however, remained a breeding pool for false
information.
Some of Twitter’s rumors are
true. The discovery of the Higgs
boson leaked through Twitter before its official announcement in
2012. Others, of course, are false
and far more pernicious, such as
conspiracy theories about the
Parkland high school shooting in
Florida.
A new study in Science quantifies the spread of Twitter rumors.
Previous research tracked rumors after specific events, like the
false information that swirled
around the Boston Marathon
bombing. The study published
Thursday is more wide-ranging:
A team of researchers at MIT
tracked falsehoods and truths using a database of every tweet
written from 2006 to 2017.
False news moved through
Twitter “farther, faster, deeper
and more broadly” than the truth,
said Sinan Aral, a professor of
information technology at MIT
who studies social media networks.
The study authors aimed to be
apolitical in distinguishing what
was true or false. They deliberately did not use the phrase “fake
news,” and they outsourced
claims of veracity to Snopes.com,
Politifact.com and four other independent fact-checking organizations. “The central concept of
this paper is veracity,” Aral said. “I
say that boldly because I know it’s
difficult to make a claim like
that.”
On any given news item, the
fact-checking organizations were
in agreement between 95 and
98 percent of the time. “We don’t
know of any other way to get a
more rigorous data set,” Aral said,
than using independent factcheckers that are nearly unanimous.
Aral and his colleagues fished
through the Twitter database for
a specific type of reply tweet. If a
Twitter user had linked to a factchecking organization’s Web
page, either to support or debunk
a spreading rumor, the game was
afoot. From that link, the researchers backtracked through
the retweet chain, which they
called a cascade, to find the rumor’s origin. This method of cataloguing tweets produced 126,000
true or false cascades involving
3 million people.
By almost all metrics, false
cascades outpaced true ones.
Even the farthest-reaching true
rumors rarely spread to more
than 1,000 people. But the top
1 percent of falsehoods routinely
had audiences of 1,000 to 100,000
people, the study authors reported. Politics got the most attention
among true and false rumors,
they discovered, representing
45,000 of the 126,000 cascades.
False political rumors had a particularly high peak during the
2016 election.
A single account was responsible for starting 4,700 false rumors. Aral declined to identify it,
citing the conditions that Twitter
imposed when sharing the data
set.
But he offered some generalities about who propagates false
news: A false rumor cascade was
more likely to begin with a young,
unverified account with a small
number of followers. False news
spread farther “despite these
characteristics, not because of
them,” Aral said.
In a statistical model that kept
variables like Twitter followers
and account age equal, falsehoods were 70 percent more likely to be retweeted than the truth.
The study authors hypothesized
that falsehoods contain more
novelty than truth. To that end,
they measured the “information
uniqueness” of rumors and discovered that false rumors were
more likely to contain new, but
wrong, information.
“It’s easier to be novel when
you’re unconstrained by reality,”
Aral said. Similarly, the researchers identified common themes in
the phrasing of replies to false
rumors — users more frequently
expressed words associated with
disgust and surprise when they
commented on untruths.
“The authors are very honest
with the interpretation of their
results: They cannot claim any
causality between novelty and
endorsement, but they provide
convincing evidence that novelty
plays an important role in spreading fake information,” said Manlio De Domenico, a scientist at the
Bruno Kessler Foundation’s Center for Information Technology in
Italy who tracked how the Higgs
boson rumor spread on Twitter.
The study authors said automated Twitter accounts, or bots,
were not to blame for the faster
spread of false rumors. Using
techniques to identify bots, they
determined that software-run accounts spread falsehoods and
truths equally. Put another way,
only human activity could explain the preferential spread of
false news.
De Domenico said his recent
research, studying bot activity
during the Catalan independence
referendum, also supports the
idea that software accelerates
“true and false news at the same
rate.” He said he suspects that
“bots are designed just to increase anarchy in online social
systems.”
There are no easy fixes to solve
false news on the Internet, Aral
said. Who, for instance, would be
responsible for identifying tweets
as containing true or false information? Not Twitter, apparently,
according to one company executive who recently testified before
British officials that “We are not
the arbiters of truth.”
“We need more research,” Aral
said. “There hasn’t been any real
large-scale study of this phenomenon up until now.”
ben.guarino@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/speaking-of-science
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Trump o∞cials study death penalty
for drug dealers in opioid epidemic
BY K ATIE
AND J OSH
Z EZIMA
D AWSEY
The Trump administration is
studying new policy that could
allow prosecutors to seek the
death penalty for drug dealers,
according to people with knowledge of the discussions, a sign
that the White House wants to
make a strong statement in addressing the opioid crisis.
President Trump last week
suggested executing drug dealers
as a way to make a dent in opioid
addiction. Opioids killed nearly
64,000 people in 2016, and the
crisis is straining local health
and emergency services.
People familiar with the discussions said that the president’s
Domestic Policy Council and the
Department of Justice are studying potential policy changes and
that a final announcement could
come within weeks. The White
House has said one approach it
might take is to make trafficking
large quantities of fentanyl — a
powerful synthetic opioid — a
capital crime because even small
amounts of the drug can be fatal.
White House officials also are
studying tougher noncapital
penalties for large-scale dealers.
Trump said last week that the
administration would soon roll
out unspecified “strong” policies
on opioids. White House officials
said Trump has privately expressed interest in Singapore’s
policy of executing drug dealers.
“Some countries have a very
tough penalty, the ultimate penalty, and they have much less of a
drug problem than we do,”
Trump said during an appearance at a White House summit on
opioids last week.
Trump also has endorsed Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte’s approach to the issue;
Duterte’s “drug war” has led to
the deaths of thousands of people
by extrajudicial police killings.
Last year, Trump praised Duterte
in a phone call for doing an
“unbelievable job on the drug
problem,” according to the New
York Times.
Kellyanne Conway, counselor
to the president, is leading much
of the work on opioids for the
White House. Singaporean representatives have briefed senior
White House officials on their
country’s drug policies, which
include treatment and education, but also the death penalty,
and they provided a PowerPoint
presentation on that country’s
laws.
Singapore’s model is more in
line with the administration’s
goals for drug policy than some
other countries, a senior administration official said.
“That is seen as the holistic
approach that approximates
what this White House is trying
to do,” a senior administration
official said.
The Department of Justice declined to comment on the policy
discussion. A White House
spokesman did not respond to a
request for comment Friday.
Federal law allows for the
death penalty to be applied in
four types of drug-related cases,
according to the Death Penalty
Information Center: murder
committed during a drug-related
drive-by shooting, murder committed with the use of a firearm
during a drug trafficking crime,
murder related to drug trafficking and the death of a law
enforcement officer that relates
to drugs.
Peter H. Meyers, a professor at
the George Washington University School of Law, said he doesn’t
agree with the idea of adding
more capital crimes for drug
dealers, but he said it could be a
legal approach: “It very likely
would be constitutional if they
want to do it.”
The administration’s directives come as prosecutors nationwide are cracking down on
higher-level drug dealers and law
enforcement officials are looking
at increased penalties for fentanyl trafficking and dealing. But
at the same time, public health
officials — including those in the
Trump administration — and
many in law enforcement are
emphasizing treatment rather
than punitive measures for low-
level users and those addicted to
drugs.
Attorney General Jeff Sessions
has directed federal prosecutors
to pursue the most severe penalties for drug offenses. The Department of Justice said last year
it will aggressively prosecute
traffickers of any fentanyl-related substance.
Some argue executing drug
dealers could have a raft of
unintended consequences, such
as deterring people from calling
police when they know someone
is overdosing.
While news of capital charges
against a drug dealer would
spread quickly and possibly be a
deterrent, said Daniel Ciccarone,
a professor of family and community medicine at the University of
California at San Francisco, it
could also drive drug users underground.
“It will keep people from any
positive interface with police,
any positive interface with public
health, any interface with doctors,” he said, noting that it could
lead to fewer people receiving
treatment for their addictions.
“People will become afraid and
hide. They won’t trust the police,
and they won’t trust the doctor
either.”
Ciccarone said there is also
concern that the laws could ensnare low-level drug dealers,
many of whom do not know that
their products contain lethal
amounts of opioids and some of
whom are battling addiction.
“We’re not talking El Chapolevel people,” he said, referring to
Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán, the
former leader of the Sinaloa cartel who was extradited to the
United States last year. U.S. officials had to assure their Mexican
counterparts
that
Guzmán
would not face the death penalty
as part of extradition negotiations.
“The closer you get to the
ground, the closer you get to
people who are easy to capture
and the more unknown the fentanyl issue is,” Ciccarone said.
katie.zezima@washpost.com
josh.dawsey@washpost.com
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A14
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. SATURDAY,
MARCH 10 , 2018
Schools accused of doing too little, too much to fight MS-13
MS-13 FROM A1
School student by MS-13 in less
than two years.
But the incident also shook the
school for another reason.
All but one of those arrested
attended Brentwood, according
to Suffolk County police. Three
were unaccompanied minors who
had been caught at the border and
then placed in the community by
a federal refugee program.
From New York to Virginia to
Texas, schools in areas racked by
MS-13 violence are now struggling with a sobering question.
What to do when the gang isn’t
just in your community, but in
your classrooms?
For the past year, the Trump
administration has waged a nationwide crackdown on MS-13.
Nowhere has this effort been
more intense than in Suffolk
County, where police say the gang
has committed 27 murders since a
surge of unaccompanied minors
began arriving in 2013.
In his January State of the
Union address, Trump recounted
the story of Kayla Cuevas and Nisa
Mickens, two Brentwood High
students killed by MS-13 on Sept.
13, 2016.
“Many of these gang members
took advantage of glaring loopholes in our laws to enter the
country as unaccompanied alien
minors and wound up in Kayla
and Nisa’s high school,” the president said as the girls’ parents, who
had been invited to watch the
speech at the Capitol, wiped away
tears.
Faced with an influx of scores
of unaccompanied minors and an
uptick in gang violence, Brentwood High has been criticized
both for doing too little and too
much to address the problem.
A $110 million federal lawsuit,
filed in December by Kayla’s
mother, claims administrators
failed to protect her 16-year-old,
allowing MS-13 to create an “environment filled with fear within
the school.”
Meanwhile, a class-action suit
brought by the American Civil
Liberties Union against the
Trump administration alleges the
school went too far, hastily labeling kids as gang members and
leading to their wrongful imprisonment.
School officials say they walk a
fine line, reporting illegal activity
while respecting students’ rights.
“We can see a gang member
coming a mile away,” said Carlos
Sanchez, safety director for the
Brentwood Free Union School
District. “The problem is that it’s
not against the law to be a gang
member, even if they identify
themselves as MS.”
‘They failed my daughter’
Located 50 miles from Manhattan’s skyscrapers one way and the
Hamptons’ oceanfront estates the
other, Brentwood High School
serves a community of 60,000
that was once largely Irish and
Italian, then Puerto Rican and
now nearly half Central American.
The sprawling school’s corridors are a maze adorned with
inspirational messages like “Look
for Rainbows” and “Believe and
Succeed.” Only a few signs on
classroom doors hint at the
school’s transformation in recent
years.
“I work with and for undocumented students and families,”
one reads.
Starting in 2013, thousands of
unaccompanied minors — most
from Central America — began
entering the United States illegally from Mexico each month, many
turning themselves in to authorities. More than 200,000 have
been detained, screened and then
placed with relatives by the Office
of Refugee Resettlement. Nearly
5,000 have been sent to Suffolk
County.
Schools are required by law to
enroll and educate these students. At Brentwood High, the
student population soared to
4,500, making it one of the largest
high schools in the state.
“We had to open many more
classes and hire more teachers,”
recalled Wanda Ortiz-Rivera, the
school district’s head of bilingual
education.
But the challenge went beyond
language. Many of the new students were years behind in their
education. Some had never gone
to school and couldn’t read or
write in any language.
Brentwood had long been overwhelmingly Hispanic, but the
sudden surge in enrollment led to
new tensions.
“There were a lot of Salvadoran
people, Salvadoran people we
don’t like,” said Mabel Castaño, a
friend of Nisa’s and Kayla’s who
said she attended Brentwood
High for 18 months. “Some of
them would say they had family
members in MS-13. They’d say,
‘I’m going to get my brother or my
uncle or my cousin on you.’ ”
Sanchez, the school district
safety director, said MS-13 had
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
long been overshadowed by gangs
like the Bloods and Latin Kings.
“The last couple of years, when
we had the unaccompanied children coming, that’s when we saw
the change,” he said. By providing
vulnerable newcomers with a
sense of belonging, MS-13 “became a powerhouse.” A deadly
one.
First, a former Brentwood student was fatally shot by the gang
in November 2015, police say.
Then Brentwood students began
to go missing. A 15-year-old Ecuadoran named Miguel GarciaMoran vanished one February
evening.
Two months later, Oscar Acosta, a 19-year-old Salvadoran, left
home to play soccer and never
returned. And in June 2016, Jose
Peña-Hernandez, 18, a suspected
MS-13 member, disappeared, too.
Three missing immigrant teens
didn’t draw much attention to
Brentwood. But that would
change with the killings of Kayla
Cuevas and Nisa Mickens.
Kayla, a basketball player from
a Puerto Rican family, had first
clashed with MS-13 two years earlier at Brentwood’s Freshman
Center, where gang members spat
on her, stole or broke her things
and taunted her, according to her
mother’s lawsuit.
Things escalated in summer
school, when an MS-13 member
threatened her with a knife, then
continued to attend Brentwood
High, the lawsuit says.
“She used to tell me, ‘Ma, they
are taking over the school. It’s like
they’re everywhere,’ ” said Evelyn
Rodriguez, who has become the
face of MS-13 victims.
Rodriguez said she and her
daughter reported the bullying to
school administrators, who
promised the knife-wielding student wouldn’t be allowed back.
But when Kayla, 16, who had
exchanged online taunts with MS13, showed up for classes that fall,
he was still there, the lawsuit
alleges.
After a confrontation at Brentwood, federal prosecutors say,
MS-13 put a “greenlight” — or kill
order — on Kayla, and members
made a “throat slicing gesture”
MICHAEL NOBLE JR. FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
toward her at school, the lawsuit
says.
A week later, she was walking
home one evening with Nisa, a
basketball teammate one day shy
of her 16th birthday, when MS-13
members spotted them and attacked with a machete and baseball bats, according to prosecutors. The girls were beaten to
death.
“They failed my daughter,” Rodriguez said of school officials.
Brentwood’s principal and the
superintendent declined interview requests. The school district
has asked a federal judge to dismiss the lawsuit as baseless.
Tensions in the school and the
community quickly boiled over as
Bloods and Latin Kings banded
together to go after MS-13, police
said. Two students told The Post
that they were stopped by a car
full of people in red clothing who
asked whether they had seen anyone wearing blue, a color sometimes worn by MS-13. Another
had his blue shirt burned in front
of him, school officials announced.
Elizabeth Alvarado and
Robert Mickens, above, lost
their daughter, Nisa
Mickens, when police say
MS-13 members beat her
and fellow Brentwood High
School student Kayla
Cuevas to death. Mickens
and Alvarado and Kayla’s
parents, Evelyn Rodriguez
and Freddy Cuevas,
attended President Trump’s
State of the Union speech
in January, top, and he
highlighted their stories.
Central American child
refugees have swelled the
population of Brentwood
High on Long Island,
below, since 2013. Nearly
5,000 unaccompanied
minors have been sent to
the area, and some have
fallen in with MS-13.
A week after the murders,
while students and teachers
mourned the girls at a funeral
parlor, police discovered the remains of Acosta and GarciaMoran across town. They found
Peña-Hernandez’s body a month
later.
‘Everybody is desperate’
Arrests of alleged MS-13 members nationwide nearly doubled
during Trump’s first year in office.
In Suffolk County, 219 have been
arrested since Kayla and Nisa
were killed, according to police.
But that crackdown has led to a
backlash from activists and immigration attorneys — in Brentwood
and beyond — who accuse schools
of feeding authorities false or
flimsy allegations of gang affiliation against students.
“Schools are supposed to be a
safe haven for kids to learn,” said
Donna Lieberman, executive director of the New York Civil Liberties Union. “But they are actually
turning into dangerous places for
kids to be because they are being
branded as gang members . . . by
MICHAEL NOBLE JR. FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
virtue of spurious allegations and
unfounded, generalized and racist assumptions.”
Brentwood was the only school
mentioned by name in the ACLU’s
class-action lawsuit against the
Trump administration last year.
The suit claimed Brentwood’s
“unsubstantiated allegation of
gang affiliation” against an unaccompanied minor had led to the
then-16-year-old’s wrongful arrest and five-month imprisonment.
Bryan Johnson, the teen’s immigration attorney, said the information the school passed along to
police, and eventually Immigration and Customs Enforcement,
wasn’t just inaccurate. It may
have been illegal. Federal law protects schools from having to disclose student records, with few
exceptions.
“The school let itself be co-opted by law enforcement,” he said.
At a bond hearing, an immigration judge dismissed the gang
allegations and set the teen free.
Nearly 30 other local teens have
also been released, but ICE is still
trying to deport them, Johnson
said. His client is so afraid to
return to Brentwood High, he’s
being home-schooled.
But for some in the community,
that fear pales in comparison to
the specter of more MS-13 slayings.
“They should be a little more
careful in how they are investigating these kids,” said Barbara Medina, a crime victim advocate. “But
everybody is desperate. They
want to get these kids off the
streets.”
Of the six charged with Kayla’s
and Nisa’s killings, at least two
attended Brentwood High, according to people close to the
case.
“We’re providing the best, safest environment we can, working
with the school district,” said Suffolk County Police Deputy Inspector John M. Rowan.
Sanchez, the school district
safety director, denied that administrators improperly passed
information to the police. He said
Brentwood had doubled its security since the killings and adopted
a more “proactive” approach.
“My people know who’s who in
the school, and they know who
the shot-callers are,” he said, scoffing at the idea that innocent students had been branded as MS-13.
“If you walk like a duck and quack
like a duck, then why are you
saying you’re not a duck?”
Timothy Sini, the Suffolk County district attorney and former
police commissioner who’s made
a name for himself combating
MS-13, said schools are in a “tough
spot.”
“They are educators and caretakers. They are not police,” he
said. “But they are with the kids
all day long, so they are often in
the best position to see who’s
having problems. Who’s throwing
gang signs. Who’s writing things
in their notebook that indicate
gang activity.”
Sini said Suffolk County law
enforcement shares its criteria for
labeling someone a gang member
with schools but not the public.
“Some of it’s obvious. Some of
it’s not,” he said. “And this is when
activists get nervous. If a kid is
wearing white Adidas, does that
mean he’s a gang member? No, of
course not. But the bottom line is
that I could look at a pair of
sneakers on a kid right now and
tell you whether it’s an indicator
of gang membership. That’s a
fact.”
Activists and immigration attorneys say that attitude is dangerous. Though gang membership itself is not a crime, accusations can be enough to lead ICE to
again detain an unaccompanied
minor.
“It’s like the Salem witch trials,”
said Johnson, the immigration
attorney. “Everything is rumors
and gossip.”
Students say the suspicion can
be stifling.
One Salvadoran American honor student at Brentwood said the
school allows students to wear
Salvadoran soccer jerseys only on
special days, but even then, she
felt too scared. Her younger
brother liked Nike Cortez shoes,
she said, but couldn’t wear them
“because those are the gang’s
shoe.”
Elvin Brogsdale, 18, a recent
graduate, said he’d nearly been
suspended for unwittingly wearing a shirt with an image sometimes used by MS-13: a grim reaper.
“Everyone is so scared, so
tense,” he said. “It didn’t used to
be like this.”
A day after the four Brentwood
High students were arrested in
the December van attacks, Rodriguez received a phone call. It was
a recorded message from the
school district’s superintendent.
“Please know that it is our
number-one priority,” he said, “to
keep your sons and daughters safe
in school.”
michael.miller@washpost.com
SATURDAY, MARCH 10 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A15
RE
Free For All
What truly
had people
spooked
It’s all about perspective
The March 2 front-page article on President
Trump’s childlike take on trade [“Trump draws his
line on trade”] blithely informed us that “annual
excess steel production globally last year was
700 million tons.” Really? Says who? The article
noted that this “excess” production depressed prices, so we can safely assume that producers view
2017 production levels as excessive.
The thousands of companies that are steel consumers, however, may have a somewhat different
take.
Edward H. Crane, Falls Church
The writer is president emeritus
of the Cato Institute.
It was distressing to see the
Feb. 25 Book World headline
“Why Marshall Plan spooked Soviets and sparked Cold War.” By
the time the Marshall Plan was
drafted in mid-1947, Joseph Stalin
had incorporated into the Soviet
Union the formerly independent
Baltic states and pieces of Germany, Poland, Czechoslovakia
and Romania, and was fast making the Eastern European countries into Soviet satellites. Czechoslovakia, until February 1948, retained independence but was under Soviet influence. And the
sizable Communist parties in
France and Italy were closely allied with Moscow. It was not the
Marshall Plan that spooked the
Soviets. It was Soviet tyranny that
threatened Europe.
Peter Bridges, Arlington
The writer, a former ambassador
to Somalia, was the
State Department director of
Eastern European affairs
from 1980 to 1981.
First come, first served
I object to the characterization of the March For
Our Lives’ “move” from the Mall as it being
“bumped” [“ ‘March For Our Lives’ rally bumped
from Mall,” Metro, March 2]. The march organizers
never secured the Mall. Another group filed first.
Calling the activity a talent show with a couple of
tables and jump ropes was demeaning to those
students who prepared for this event. The subtle
message that the march is more important than this
event is typical of the disdain and disrespect The
Post shows the “locals.”
Mary Russell, Baltimore
Try a less
loaded word
JAMIE RHODES/USA TODAY SPORTS
Virginia Cavaliers forward Isaiah Wilkins celebrates in Louisville on March 1.
WANG ZHAO/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Gen. Vincent Brooks, in back, with, in front,
South Korean President Moon Jae-in, his wife,
Kim Jung-sook, and Ivanka Trump in
PyeongChang, South Korea, on Feb. 25.
A man worth naming
The photo caption with the Feb. 27 news article
“Seoul: U.S. must ‘lower its bar’ for talks with North”
did not identify Gen. Vincent Brooks, commander of
United States Forces Korea, United Nations Command and ROK-U.S. Combined Forces Command,
standing tall behind the president of South Korea
and his wife.
James W. Harkin, Fort Belvoir
The No. 1 team belongs on Page 1
The University of Virginia men’s basketball team is
ranked No. 1 in the country. It traveled to the University of
Louisville for a key Atlantic Coast Conference matchup.
Virginia won the game in stellar fashion, scoring five points
in the last 0.9 seconds of the game.
By winning the game, Virginia set an ACC record for road
wins in a season. The game was the top story of the day on
ESPN’s “SportsCenter.”
Imagine my surprise when I opened my paper on March 2
to find the story on the U-Va. game on Page D7 [“No. 1 Cavs
pull off a stunner,” Sports] and the top college basketball
story on Page D1 being yet another loss by University of
Maryland [“Terps watch it all slip away”].
How about a little respect for the best basketball team in
the area?
Greg Deaver, Gaithersburg
The Einstein of modeling?
Keep it coming
Contrary to the Feb. 24 Free for All letter “Save the
snark,” about the Feb. 11 Washington Post Magazine
article “Symposium Man,” I loved the writing style
and article written by T.M. Shine. His “facile, cutesy”
style was in fact a way to highlight how absurd even
the most serious of organizations can appear to
outsiders.
Cutesy writing can be a problem with some
columns, but so can overly serious articles written
mostly to highlight the author’s moral superiority.
Please publish more articles of Shine’s.
Patrick Husson, Camp Springs
A cheep shot at chicken owners
I was appalled to read the March 4 Business
article “The status chickens of Silicon Valley.”
This article was sensationalized journalism. I
keep chickens in the Silicon Valley and am fairly well
tapped into the chicken community here, and most
of us are nothing like the cherry-picked picture that
was painted in his article.
Why am I so worried about an article about
chickens? I’m not. I’m worried about the “us vs.
them” dynamic that is causing most of the problems
in this country right now and that this article
perpetuated.
I once trusted The Post to publish unbiased
journalism and used its articles to make political
decisions. No longer.
Jennifer Jobart, San Jose
Ready for a more advanced glance
ASTRID RIECKEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
A pedestrian in the wind on March 2 in Washington.
A wintertime Venus
The power and brilliance of the photograph by Astrid Riecken gracing the
March 3 front page [“On the wind,
danger blows in”] were immediately
striking, and even more so when reflection summons the shot’s similarity to
Sandro Botticelli’s “Birth of Venus.” This
is a wintertime Venus, of course, but with
or without the ocean venue of warmer
months, the echo of the iconic image is
unmistakable. Kudos.
Rocky Semmes, Alexandria
Presidential quantum superposition
I cannot remember the last time a “moderate” or
“extreme” “Second Glance” appeared in The Washington Post Magazine. Why not follow the crossword
puzzle guidelines and start the month with a
“moderate,” followed by a few “advanced,” and end
the month with an “extreme”? After all the grief
when The Post tried to eliminate Second Glance, it
should consider a more practical approach to bring
in new readers/glancers. At least publish an “extreme” once in a while.
Bobe Glenn Lesak, Potomac
I look forward to Saturday’s Post for the
pleasure of reading the talented Alexandra
Petri. Her ability to blend present-day politics with historical and literary references
is enlightening as well as hilarious. Her
March 3 op-ed, “Hope Hicks’s many opportunities,” did not disappoint, but her description of White House aide Hope Hicks
as a Schrödinger’s adult wasn’t a label I was
familiar with. As a curious reader seeking
Again with this pejorative term?
Semper Fi, Marine Grantham
For the second time in recent weeks, The Post
revealed its anti-union bias by using the term “union
boss,” this time in reference to the president of the
United Steelworkers union [“This Ohio steel town
needs more than tariffs can give,” front page,
March 3]. This pejorative term needs to go the way of
“career girl.”
I’m proud to serve as a democratically elected
union leader. My job is to improve members’
working conditions and ensure we receive fair
treatment so that we can live well and do our jobs to
the best of our ability. The labor movement is under
persistent attack because union membership remains one of the few ways working people can have a
powerful voice in our economy and politics.
Jennifer N. Martin, Rockville
The writer is vice president of the Montgomery
County Education Association.
Letters and Local Opinions: letters@washpost.com
Op-eds: oped@washpost.com
I wince when I come across the
word “homeland” in reference to
the United States in articles discussing such topics as the competition between the United States’
nuclear capability and other nations [“Shift in missile defense
policy,” March 3, front page]. It
sounds like antiquated European
World War II propaganda and
bears the threatening sound of
imminent conflict. No article
would suffer loss of clarity or understanding by dropping that
term.
Victor Tupitza, Burke
clarification, I Googled the phrase, and
while that yielded nothing about an adult, I
was able to glean the meaning through
reading about Shrödinger’s cat. I found this
quite fascinating, and it led me to this
question: Is Donald Trump president until
all necessary and precise measurement is
taken, and then he isn’t? Bring on the
quantum physicists.
Clare Jayne, Alexandria
Having just read Mark Bowden’s excellent book
“Hue 1968: A Turning Point of the American War in
Vietnam,” I was particularly moved by the photographs taken by Don McCullin that appeared in the
Feb. 25 Outlook section [“The battle that still haunts
me”]. One of the photographs was particularly stark;
it carried this caption: “A dying Marine is carried by
tank through the ruins of the Citadel.” A similar
photograph was taken by John Olson and appears in
Bowden’s book.
According to Bowden, the Marine was Alvin Bert
Grantham, who, although grievously wounded, survived and recovered in the 106th Army General
Hospital in Yokohama, Japan. Grantham was interviewed by Bowden for his book.
It is important to set the record straight, for as
Bowden reports in his book: “Alvin Bert Grantham,
. . . unlike so many other of his fellow marines and
soldiers, lived to tell the tale.”
I can only add to this account: Semper Fi, Marine
Grantham.
Robert C. Plumb, Potomac
reaching, and accurate journalRegarding the March 2 news
ism is important. Focusing on
article “First lady’s green card
the hypocrisy of the current
came through rare ‘extraordinary
policy proposals as opposed to
ability’ program”:
the benefits received by memAlthough a former congressbers of the administration’s imman may have called the EB-1
mediate family (instead of invisa an “Einstein visa,” that monicluding it at the very end of the
ker fails to recognize the broad
article, almost as an afternature of the EB-1 visa. It is true
thought) would have been much
that a Nobel Prize winner would
more honest.
qualify, but sports figures, entertainers and other business and
Becca Niburg, Laurel
arts professionals are also eligiThe writer is an immigration
ble. The visa is written to allow
lawyer and served as a federal
those who are tops in their field
immigration officer.
to immigrate to the United States
to ostensibly enrich our society
The discussion of Melania
overall with their
Trump’s
green
contributions.
card raised a
In my time adnumber of quesjudicating the aptions and, if not
peal of EB-1 visa
serious, would be
denials for U.S.
a source for many
Citizenship and
quips.
Immigration SerThe special crivices, I saw many
teria for the EB-1
scientific
reprogram,
also
searchers,
perknown as “the
formers and artEinstein visa,” are
ists who were far
such that only the
from household
absolute top peonames. But they
ple in their fields
JABIN
BOTSFORD/THE
WASHINGTON
POST
contributed
to
— the greatest scitheir respective First lady Melania Trump
entists for examfields in a suffiple — are eligible.
cient manner to meet the criteria
Models, even the best, are
for the EB-1 visa. Melania usually not mentioned in the
Knauss’s (now first lady Melania
same sentence as Albert Einstein.
Trump) billboard in one of the
Realistically, what special abilibusiest spaces in the United
ties do they have? Models are not
States (Times Square) indicated
generally selected for how well
recognition of her ability within
they can walk down a catwalk but
the field, as did her appearance
for their physical appearance,
in a well-known and respected
which is not a special skill.
publication such as Sports IllusModels do their jobs, but it’s
trated.
not one that should put them on
There are enough problems
the top of the visa list.
with this administration’s immiDennis Fitzgerald,
gration policy without overMelbourne, Australia
DON MCCULLIN/CONTACT PRESS IMAGES
A wounded Marine is carried through the ruins of
the Citadel in Hue, South Vietnam, in 1968.
The seven photographs taken by Don McCullin
included with his remembrance of the battle of Hue
50 years on perfectly captured the pathos of that
ferocious battle. Those few pictures portrayed a
boundless measure of agony, shock, devotion, exhaustion, resignation, suffering and fear on the faces
of a handful of Marines, a Navy corpsman and a
wounded Vietnamese father and child. What could
be more evocative of the costs of the Vietnam War?
By far, Hue was the bloodiest battle of the entire
Vietnam War. In Mark Bowden’s excellent 2017 book,
“Hue 1968,” the cost of this battle is estimated to
exceed 10,000 dead, including approximately
250 American Marines, corpsmen and soldiers;
450 South Vietnamese troops; up to 5,000 Viet Cong;
and at least 8,000 civilians, thousands of whom were
summarily executed by the communists. Fortunately, the dead did not include Alvin Bert Grantham, the
Marine identified as “dying” in the caption under
one of McCullin’s photographs. In the picture, Grantham is receiving an infusion from a Navy corpsman
on the back of a tank. Bowden described Grantham’s
recovery from a severe chest wound that required
more than a year for full recovery. In 1970, Grantham
left the Marines and “got on with his life.”
Edward Grimes, Springfield
A16
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
ABCDE
letters@washpost.com
A blow to older homeowners
EDITORIALS
Be prepared
Mr. Trump needs a well-thought-out strategy before he meets with the North Korean dictator.
P
thought. Even Secretary of State Rex Tillerson appeared taken by surprise; he had just told reporters
that negotiations might be a long way off. On Friday the
White House added to the confusion by suggesting that
Mr. Trump would insist on preliminary actions by
North Korea after all. The chaos is not surprising,
considering that the president lacks expert staff. There
is no ambassador to South Korea, and the special envoy
for North Korean issues recently retired.
If it holds, the agreement on talks will have a
short-term benefit because North Korea has agreed to
suspend what had been a constant stream of nuclear
and missile tests while negotiations continue. Administration officials contend that Pyongyang has been
moved by the pressure of sanctions, which Mr. Trump
has succeeded in intensifying in the past year. While
that may be true, the risk is that the regime will follow
its well-established pattern: capture the world’s attention with provocative acts; then agree to negotiations
to extract economic and political concessions; then
break any commitments it has made.
The challenge for Mr. Trump is avoiding another
repeat of that cycle. That means setting an achievable
goal: A realistic one might be a long-term extension of
MARCH 10 , 2018
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
RESIDENT TRUMP is right to pursue negotiations with North Korea, but his sudden decision to accept an unprecedented summit with
Kim Jong Un compounds the already high
probability of failure. Mr. Trump seemingly granted
the dictator a prize his regime has sought for decades
— a face-to-face meeting with the U.S. president, on
apparently equal terms — in exchange for none of the
actions the White House previously said were necessary, including verifiable steps toward nuclear disarmament.
A Trump-Kim summit would transfix the attention
of the world, which is probably one reason it is
appealing for Mr. Trump. Arguably, it would give him a
chance to assess a ruler who, until his planned encounter with South Korea’s president next month, will
never have met a foreign leader. But if Mr. Trump
believes that North Korea is ready to denuclearize, he
is almost certainly wrong. Which raises the question:
Does the president have a strategy for using the
meeting to U.S. advantage?
Unfortunately, the evidence suggests that the Korea
summit, like Mr. Trump’s recent decision on trade
tariffs, was embraced by the president without much
. SATURDAY,
the freezing of missile and nuclear tests in exchange
for limited U.S. concessions. Unfortunately, by agreeing to a summit, Mr. Trump has already handed over
one of the largest potential trade-offs free of charge.
Mr. Kim will use the event to portray his murderous
regime as a legitimate nuclear power able to parlay
with the United States on equal terms. He will no
doubt demand a U.S. withdrawal from South Korea
and a formal peace treaty in exchange for denuclearization, in the hope that Mr. Trump, unlike every
previous U.S. president, will swallow those terms.
Given the president’s decision, the administration’s
best course would be to use the coming weeks to hold
preliminary talks with the Kim regime that make
clear U.S. expectations and place the summit on
firmer ground. If it becomes evident that the North is
unwilling to commit to a freeze on its nuclear and
missile activities, or will make excessive demands in
exchange, Mr. Trump can step back. What he should
not do is walk blindly into an encounter with a
dictator who, we can be sure, will be well-prepared to
take advantage of this president’s well-known weaknesses — starting with his penchant for impulsive
decisions.
Regarding the March 7 Local Digest item “Fairfax
sets ceiling on real estate tax rate” [Metro]:
Every year, when Fairfax County needs additional money, it targets county homeowners. We are
again seeing a proposed increase in real estate taxes
throughout the county. Our elderly population and
retirees are on fixed incomes.
Does the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors
ever consider the effect these decisions have on our
senior citizens?
Douglas Goodgion, Falls Church
Due process must still matter
Regarding the March 8 news article “Sessions
drops rule aiding asylum seekers”:
This issue is complex, and this decision should not
be understood to totally deprive asylum seekers of
due-process rights. While it may very well have been
Attorney General Jeff Sessions’s intent to deprive
asylum seekers of these rights, as an immigration
attorney I feel strongly that we cannot and must not
concede that he has succeeded in doing so.
Regardless of whether the previous decision from
the Board of Immigration Appeals is binding, the
underlying legal principles regarding the right to be
heard still stand.
Furthermore, I was shocked and disappointed
that the article quoted as an expert someone from
the Center for Immigration Studies, which the
Southern Poverty Law Center, a widely respected
civil rights organization, has called a hate group.
Joanna Gaughan, Raleigh, N.C.
Trouble swallowing? See a specialist.
No room for error
on elephants
Regarding the Feb. 27 Health & Science article
“Swallowing problems can be a serious health risk”:
Difficulty swallowing, known as dysphagia, can
occur at any point across the life span and is best
managed by a multidisciplinary team that includes
physicians and speech-language pathologists
(SLPs). SLPs are uniquely qualified to help individuals with dysphagia because their education includes,
at a minimum, graduate-level coursework and clinical training in swallowing and swallowing disorders.
SLPs are also at the forefront of dysphagia research,
and some SLPs pursue specialization in dysphagia
through board certification in swallowing and swallowing disorders.
It is important for physicians and for people with
dysphagia to be aware of all available resources
including patient support, educational resources
and tools to help identify SLPs who have specialty
certification in this area. Awareness of and utilization of these resources by an experienced multidisciplinary team that includes SLPs will ensure that no
one with dysphagia endures a lifetime of “horrible”
treatment.
Memorie M. Gosa, Tuscaloosa, Ala.
The writer is chairperson of the American Board of
Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders.
U.S. policy on hunting trophies
must be tied to responsible
herd management.
I
N ANOTHER presidency, at a different time, the
Interior Department’s sudden re-reversal on
importing elephant trophies — the head, tusks
and other body parts of hunted game — could
make sense. But the Trump administration has
shown persistently bad judgment on conservation,
making it difficult to trust that it will do more good
than harm.
Here’s the background: The Obama administration banned elephant trophy imports from Zimbabwe several years ago, arguing that the agency did
not have strong enough reason to believe that the
country was properly regulating the trophy hunting
it permitted. Following further consultation with
the Zimbabwean government, the Trump Interior
Department moved to overturn that ban in November. Though The Post’s Juliet Eilperin and Darryl
Fears reported that career staff made the call, the
timing was colossally poor: Zimbabwe, a country
already rife with corruption, was in the middle of a
military coup. After a backlash, including from some
conservative commentators, President Trump halted the reversal pending further study.
Given the unrest, that was the obvious decision. Yet
that does not mean that elephant trophy imports
should be banned in every case. The Interior Department’s logic last November, when it tried to lift
restrictions, was that allowing limited, well-regulated
trophy hunting would pump money into local communities and conservation efforts. A few animals
might die, but local landowners would find value in
preserving the herd as a whole. Private game reserves
can charge thousands for a trophy hunt, a revenue
stream that is hard to replace with photography
tours.
YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
An elephant grazes in the Mara Triangle in southern Kenya.
Fracking helps the few
There are examples of regulated trophy hunting
working relatively well, as in Namibia. There are also
examples of it failing, as in Tanzania. In Zimbabwe,
where some wildlife reserves rely on hunting income,
the government’s Parks and Wildlife Management
Authority derives a fifth of its revenue from fees.
So last week the Interior Department announced
a new policy on trophy hunting. Instead of issuing
blanket rules, it would review requests to import
trophies on a case-by-case basis. This could make
sense: Hunters interested in importing a trophy
should have to document that they got it from a
reputable reserve, no matter where it was located.
Yet the Trump administration offered unsettlingly few details about how case-by-case decisions
would be made, and it has earned no trust on
conservation. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke’s enthu-
Regarding Charles Lane’s March 8 op-ed, “A
crude awakening”:
Left out of the equation for comparing a
technology underlying electric cars and fracking
technology is that the industry for exploiting
electric-car technology is inherently job-intensive
while the industry for exploiting fracking is not.
Much of the wealth created by an electric-car
industry will be shared by the workers required to
make the cars; most of the wealth created by
fracking is in the increased value of the gas and oil
fields made available by fracking, fields owned by
the investor class. It is hard to imagine a technology
development that is more attractive to free-market
capitalists than fracking, at least for the short term.
Mr. Lane referenced the damage to the environment that fracking technology will cause. His attack
on “wasteful subsidies to government-selected
producers such as Tesla” is to be regretted. Dean
Kamen, another of America’s most innovative
technology developers, has observed that there has
been a change in the most critical factor for
determining which technologies are developed. A
few decades ago, the critical factor was the
potential of encountering a “technology stopper.”
Now, with advances in scientific knowledge and
computational and instrumentation capabilities,
the very idea of a technology stopper is “oldfashioned.” Virtually any imagined technology can
be developed.
Today, the critical factor is the competition for
the resources necessary to accomplish the developing. Governments can and ought to claim a role in
identifying and supporting technologies that create
wealth that can shared by the workers needed to
exploit the technologies.
John McCoy, Washington
siasm for hunting, not to mention that of
Mr. Trump’s big-game-hunting sons, is only the
beginning. More generally, Mr. Trump has staffed his
administration with officials overtly hostile to sound
environmental management. Though they did not
dictate the outcome, reviewing the trophy import
policy was reportedly a priority for Interior’s political staff.
It is crucial to get this right. If countries see that
only well-run herd-management programs will result in hunting revenues, they will have an incentive
to improve their conservation. If, however, American hunters are allowed to bring back trophies from
countries where the connection between the money
they spend and the preservation of the herd is not
clear, it will encourage countries to see trophy
hunting as a corrupt revenue opportunity.
Another painful truth about opioids
The addictive drugs have wrecked countless lives yet have been found to work no better than acetaminophen.
O
PIOID OVERDOSES, both fatal and nonfatal,
increased 30 percent from July 2016 through
September 2017 in 52 areas in 45 states,
according to the latest review of emergencyroom admissions data by the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention, published Tuesday. On the
same day, the Journal of the American Medical
Association released the results of a year-long study
from Minneapolis-area Veterans Affairs clinics showing that opioids were no more effective against
common forms of back and joint pain than acetaminophen. These new findings underscore a tragic irony
of the deadly epidemic: Though it has by now
morphed into a problem of both licit substances,
such as hydrocodone and oxycodone, and illicit ones,
such as heroin, the opioid epidemic’s roots lie in a
wave of permissive prescribing of opioids that turns
out, in hindsight, to have been unjustifiable even as
good pain-management practice.
That permissiveness did not just happen. Longstanding medical caution, based on fears of addiction, had to be overcome if pharmaceutical companies were to boost sales. About two decades ago,
firms began aggressively marketing opioids, including funding ostensibly expert medical opinion and
ostensibly grass-roots “patient advocacy,” with
names such as the American Academy of Pain
Management and the U.S. Pain Foundation.
Which brings us to a recent report on chronicpain advocacy organizations, published by Claire
McCaskill (Mo.), the ranking Democrat on the
Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee. The report shows that nearly
$9 million flowed from opioid manufacturers to
some 14 nonprofits between January 2012 and
March 2017. Individual doctors affiliated with these
groups accepted more than $1.6 million in speaking
fees and other payments from the opioid industry
between 2013 and the present. Most of the groups
touted the benefits of opioid prescriptions and
raised objections to the most significant recent
federal effort to rein in excessive opioid prescribing,
the CDC’s 2016 guidelines.
Useful as it is, the McCaskill study arrives after a
quarter-century in which opioids have already killed
hundreds of thousands of people. As the backlash
has grown, including with class-action lawsuits,
opioid makers have shied away from the most
aggressive marketing tactics, such as support for
ostensibly neutral patient and professional groups.
Purdue Pharma, maker of OxyContin, recently announced it will no longer market the drug directly to
doctors. The flow of funds documented by Ms.
McCaskill probably represents only a fraction of
what went on before 2012, when opioid prescribing
seems to have peaked.
There is still no legal requirement to disclose
industry connections, only an ethical one. And the
14 organizations in the study tend to interpret that
duty minimally. Before Ms. McCaskill’s staff inquired, some disclosed no information on a regular
basis; others listed companies by name, indicating
that they gave “at least” a certain amount; but none
provided full disclosure of names, specific amounts
and purposes of the donations. The opioid-makers
and the nonprofits they supported, ostensibly on
behalf of pain patients, have lost credibility in recent
years. If they want to recover it, they are going to have
to do better.
ABCDE
LOCAL OPINIONS
FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
This would be a change for the worse
The D.C. Council’s preliminary approval of legislation that would partially overturn the District’s longstanding Tenant Opportunity to Purchase Act would
allow homeowners who rent out
their houses to sell them without giving their tenants the first
opportunity to buy them [“Bill
would let homeowners sell
without giving renters 1st dibs,”
Metro, March 7]. This is outrageous. We all bear witness to
many people being forced out of
the city by gentrification and
the soaring cost of housing. How can our elected
officials not fight for a healthy city that protects
affordability, as opposed to aiding and abetting the
developers and real estate interests that already
possess a great advantage?
Kudos to Council members Elissa Silverman (I-At
Large) and Brianne K. Nadeau (D-Ward 1) for having
the courage not only to object to
the legislation but also to offer
amendments that would preclude manipulation of current
laws by speculators while offering protection to citizens who
have lived in and maintained
their rented homes. I urge the
entire D.C. Council to amend the
legislation and consider the best
interest of its constituents.
How can our elected officials
not fight for a healthy city
that protects affordability?
Lynn C. French, Washington
The writer is executive director of
Hope and a Home Inc.
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Hypocrisy: It’s not just for liberals
In his March 7 letter, “Hypersensitive liberals,”
Michael Vann criticized liberals for their selfrighteous tactics and quoted Noam Chomsky: “The
smart way to keep people passive and obedient is to
strictly limit the spectrum of acceptable opinion.”
My response is a popular right-wing talking point:
“It is too soon following this mass-murder tragedy of
gun violence to discuss gun control.” This talking
point clearly is an example of what Mr. Chomsky
addressed and shows that the conservative pot is
calling the liberal kettle black.
Sadly, hypocrisy is not the sole domain of any
political party and is practiced freely without limit
or shame by all political parties.
Reasonable people can discuss issues without
vilifying either the opinion or the opinion holder. All
it takes is realizing that it is not about who is right
but what is right.
Criss Laubach, Montross, Va.
C OR R E C TI ON
The March 8 editorial “Don’t quit this diet”
incorrectly reported that Chesapeake Bay “nutrient
trading” was already taking place. It is still in the
planning stages in Maryland.
Letters and Local Opinions: letters@washpost.com
Op-eds: oped@washpost.com
SATURDAY, MARCH 10 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
COLBERT I. KING
EZ
A17
RE
KAREN TUMULTY
DRAWING BOARD
Why the
Stormy Daniels
case matters
A test of labor’s
mettle in
Pennsylvania
I
T
couldn’t care less whether in 2006
Donald Trump had a sexual affair with
pornographic film actress Stephanie
Clifford — known professionally as
Stormy Daniels — only months after his
wife, Melania, gave birth to their son,
Barron.
Trump’s personal lawyer Michael D. Cohen says Trump has denied the affair. But
even if it did occur, the relationship would
have taken place years before the 2016
presidential election. Thus, it is a private
matter between citizen Donald Trump and
his wife and none of my business.
I do care, however, if within one month
of the presidential election, Republican
candidate Trump’s personal lawyer Michael D. Cohen paid hush money to Clifford/Daniels to keep the affair secret. True,
the porn star is not, at least to the best of my
knowledge, a public official. She has no
public or legal duties to discharge. A
payment of hush money to her, therefore, is
unlikely to be illegal.
But campaign finance laws are there to
ensure the integrity of our elections and the
democratic process. And I do care about
those things very much. I have written
reams about end runs around our election
laws, primarily here in our nation’s capital.
I care just as much about those provisions
at the federal level.
Hush-money negotiations and payments
to Clifford, as described in the Wall Street
Journal and other publications, ought to
draw the attention — and anger — of anyone
concerned about the conduct of candidates
in the 2016 presidential campaign.
BY HALL
Trump’s alleged stifling of
information is relevant to the
issues raised by the
special counsel.
BY CLAY BENNETT FOR THE CHATTANOOGA TIMES FREE PRESS
The allegations are detailed in a complaint that watchdog Common Cause filed
with the Justice Department and the Federal Election Commission. Essentially, they
boil down to this: In October 2016, a few
weeks before voters went to the polls,
Trump’s personal lawyer Cohen arranged
the payment of $130,000 to Clifford to not
speak about any alleged encounter she had
with Trump. That payment, Common
Cause alleges, was an unreported in-kind
contribution to the Trump campaign because it was “paid for the purpose of
influencing the 2016 presidential general
election”; and, if so, it was required to be
publicly reported. Furthermore, if the
source of the $130,000 was the Trump
Organization — which Cohen has denied —
the money would represent an impermissible corporate contribution.
Lawyers will argue about whether the
payment has any legal implication for the
Trump presidency — did he know about,
was he the source of, or did he direct the
payment to Clifford? The Common Cause
complaint is designed to get at those
questions.
But there is more to this than the
potential trespassing of campaign finance
rules. It is about the possibility that the
candidate who was elected president of the
United States paid or ordered to be paid
money to someone to conceal something he
privately did — payoff money to keep
information about him secret from the
voters.
Trump’s alleged stifling of information
about his behavior is profoundly relevant
to the broad issues raised by special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s investigation into
interference in the 2016 election.
We have been learning a lot about the
45th president of the United States and
undoubtedly will be learning more in the
coming weeks and months. Things he
doesn’t want us to know about him, facts,
pesky and shameful facts he doesn’t want
to come out about how he landed where he
is and with whose help, either foreign or
domestic.
And unlike what may or may not have
happened with Stormy Daniels, what has
already emerged and may yet be disclosed
about Trump’s campaign through the special counsel’s investigation will be very
much in the public interest and is clearly
the American people’s business.
And I care very much about that.
BY DARRIN BELL
BY MATT DAVIES FOR NEWSDAY
kingc@washpost.com
moon, pa.
he surprisingly close special election to fill a
vacant House seat in this Pittsburgh-area
district is shaping up to be a test of whether
organized labor can regain its relevance — in
electoral politics, and with its own declining membership.
Unions have gone all-in for charismatic Democratic newcomer Conor Lamb, a 33-year-old former
Marine officer and federal prosecutor, who has been
running roughly even in the polls. Pennsylvania’s
18th District has not been held by a Democrat since
2002 and went for Donald Trump by nearly 20 points
in 2016.
“The unions were the first ones to believe in me,”
Lamb says. “Most of my initial fundraising was from
the unions.”
The district’s previous congressman, Tim Murphy, who resigned in October amid an adultery
scandal, was one of the rare Republicans on the Hill
on cordial terms with labor. Democrats did not even
bother to run anyone against him in 2014 and 2016.
In next Tuesday’s election, however, the unions
have found their ultimate bogeyman in four-term
state legislator Rick Saccone, 60, who has opposed
them on just about every big question. He has
supported right-to-work legislation that would allow
workers to opt out of paying fees to unions that
bargain on their behalf in the workplace and
opposed requirements that public infrastructure
projects be built by union labor.
Panicked Republican strategists say privately that
Saccone has been a disaster as a candidate, holding
few public events and exhibiting a brusque manner
that women in particular find off-putting.
To make up for Saccone’s deficiencies, Republicans are trying to bury Lamb with outside money.
One super PAC alone — the Congressional Leadership Fund, which is affiliated with House Speaker
Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) — has spent $3.5 million, and
put 50 full-time staffers on the ground.
The battle is taking place not only in a superheated midterm election environment but also at a
moment of existential significance for the labor
movement.
Across the state line in West Virginia, striking
teachers just won a spectacular victory by gaining a
5 percent pay raise for all state employees.
But public-employee unions are also bracing for
what could be a crippling blow from the Supreme
Court, if the justices decide in Janus v. AFSCME that
workers should not be required to pay an “agency
fee” to unions of which they are not members.
Nearly 90,000 people in this district live in union
households.
Nationally, union membership hovers around
11 percent of the workforce, about half of what it was
in the 1980s.
And Trump, who channels their economic grievances and social conservatism, has loosened the
Democrats’ hold on union members’ political allegiances.
Across Pennsylvania, Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton won only 55 percent of labor’s vote —
down from 78 percent for Barack Obama in 2012, and
more than enough to be the difference in a state
where she lost by less than a percentage point.
The problem was not just Clinton’s weaknesses as
a candidate, but a flaw in her strategy.
It assumed that union voters would be there for
her at the polls. So the campaign — and labor’s
national leadership — focused on demonizing
Trump, registering voters and pressing social issues
that resonated with other demographic groups, said
Richard W. Bloomingdale, president of the Pennsylvania AFL-CIO.
That ceded a lot of union-friendly ground to
Trump and his promises to restrict immigration, to
bring back jobs in coal mining and other industries,
and to protect gun ownership.
So now, “we’re doing what we used to do — which
we didn’t do in 2016 — and that is talking to our
members,” Bloomingdale said. “What people need to
understand is we’ve got to talk about jobs. Where we
have credibility, it’s on the pocketbook issues.”
Those who are closest to the ground say that this
back-to-basics approach is paying off.
Ron Demechilli, a retired member of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, figures he
has knocked on the doors of at least 600 union
households on Lamb’s behalf. He says he has found
no support for Saccone, and only three or four where
people told him they are still undecided.
Trump — whose poll numbers in Pennsylvania are
a few points higher than they are nationally — will be
back in the district Saturday for a rally with Saccone
at the Pittsburgh airport. The president’s proposal to
slap tariffs on steel and aluminum imports has
significant support from labor, and both Saccone
and Lamb have expressed qualified support for it.
For his part, Lamb has brought in former vice
president and “kid from Scranton” Joe Biden, known
among Democrats here as Pennsylvania’s third
senator and a familiar figure at Pittsburgh’s annual
Labor Day parade.
The results of all of this effort, to be revealed
Tuesday night, will be an indication of the political
path ahead for organized labor — if it has one at all.
karen.tumulty@washpost.com
ALEXANDRA PETRI
Whoa, is that a pink hat on the Washington Monument?
I’ve gotten this email six times this week. Apologies to the corporations whose cynical pink things
are at least sending their proceeds to benefit actual
feminist causes.
ear [Lady Name],
Happy International Women’s Day, ladies! ROAR! (That was a female lion, by the
way!)
We at Corporation are so pleased to honor women
and their accomplishments, which is why today with
every purchase of $78 or more (get it? You get it!
Women are just as smart as men, probably WAY
smarter), we will send you a limited-edition pink
makeup tote bag that says SHEMART, a lip-stain
called Nasty, a bottle of Jane Walker (like Johnnie,
but for her!) and a Barbie doll that doubles the
number of distinct eyebrows that Frida Kahlo had
and makes her feet much, much smaller than they
were. Don’t worry — significant historical women
D
from the past can be made to conform to impossible
beauty standards, too.
But that’s not all. Today, you will notice that our
mascot, an oil well stabbing three charismatic
megafauna to death, is now very clearly female. You
can tell because SHE is wearing lipstick. Could it be
Nasty [Female Winking Emoji]? I don’t know! She’ll
never tell [Female Winking Emoji].
[That Emoji of Two Women in Black I Guess
In-Line Skating Together, I’ve Never Been Clear on
What They’re Supposed To Be Doing]
[That Emoji of the Girl in the Red Dress Dancing]
[Some Fingernails Being Painted] [Some Queens]
Some people see us as a large, cynical corporation
focused only on our bottom line that wants to reap
benefits from giving lip service to feminism without
putting in the work, and to them we say: Look, we
have lit up Mount Rushmore so that it is now pink!
And what’s that? Yes: We have been so bold as to
DECORATE THIS STATUE OF A FEMALE INVENTOR with a stirring floral cape. Hey, it’s not Replacing Colonel Sanders with a Female Colonel Sanders,
or flipping the M for McDonald’s into a W for
Womcdonalds, but — it’s our little way of sticking it
to the man! (Our board of directors is 100 percent
men, and we have no plans for this ever to change.)
Others complain that women are not a monolith.
They are just people, and this is embarrassing. To
them we say: Whoa, is that a pink hat on the
Washington Monument? Really makes you think.
Here is a video we made where we put eight
conventionally attractive women in front of a mirror
and told them to ignore society: They were beautiful.
(They are all wearing Ain’t I a Woman, our new
concealer, inspired by Sojourner Truth, and made by
a man named Tucker using bees. Beehives have a
female in charge, which is empowering [Bee Emoji].
MayBEE they know a thing or two we don’t! [Female
Winking Emoji]. The profits don’t benefit women of
color in any way.)
You’ll weep when you see what Calvin Coolidge
would have looked like if he hadn’t been Calvin
Coolidge at all and had been, in fact, Gal Gadot.
Act now to show the man that he’s not the boss of
YOU, and we will send you a pink tote bag with a
children’s book called “Girls Who Roared,” tiny pink
shorts for your 2-year-old that say STOP OBJECTIFYING ME on the butt, and also a doll of Ruth Bader
Ginsburg that has feet so tiny they are not discernible to the naked eye. And eight pounds of chocolate.
We know that women are all individuals who want
different things, and we’ve definitely met a woman.
Today, we celebrate what you are to us: not a
woman, but a consumer!
Alexandra Petri writes the ComPost blog at
washingtonpost.com/blogs/compost.
A18
EZ
U.K. military looks into poison attack
BY
K ARLA A DAM
london — The investigation
into the poisoning of a Russian
double agent and his daughter
intensified Friday, with Britain
deploying military personnel to
assist with the probe.
Five days after police said they
were “targeted specifically” with a
nerve agent, Sergei Skripal, 66,
and his daughter Yulia, 33, remained in critical condition in the
quiet English city of Salisbury.
Skripal was jailed in Russia in
2006 for selling state secrets to
the British intelligence services
but was released in 2010 as part of
a high-profile spy swap.
Much attention was focused
Friday on Skripal’s red-brick
home. Commentators said police
were exploring the theory that the
former Russian spy and his
daughter, who was reportedly visiting from Moscow, were exposed
to the nerve agent at the house.
They were discovered in a comatose state Sunday afternoon on a
bench near a shopping center.
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
A total of 21 people have received medical treatment after
the mysterious attack, including
Nick Bailey, a British police officer
who is conscious but in serious
condition.
Ian Blair, a former London police chief, told the BBC that Bailey
had been to Skripal’s home and
had fallen ill, whereas a doctor
who had attended to the two Russians out in the open wasn’t affected.
“There may be some clues floating around in here,” he said of
Skripal’s house.
On Friday, there were cordons
around Skripal’s house, the pub
and restaurant the two visited,
and the gravestones of Skripal’s
wife, Liudmila, who died in 2012
at age 60, and son, Alexander, who
died in 2017 at 43. There are
conflicting reports on how they
died. According to the Salisbury
Journal, their deaths are being
considered part of the investigation.
About 180 military specialists
were sent to Salisbury to help with
the removal of items potentially
contaminated by the nerve agent.
“Our armed forces have
stepped up to support the police
in their investigation,” said Britain’s defense secretary, Gavin Williamson. “We have the right people with the right skills to assist
with this crucial inquiry.”
During a visit to Salisbury on
Friday, Amber Rudd, Britain’s
home secretary, warned against
jumping to conclusions.
“In terms of further options,
that will have to wait until we’re
absolutely clear what the consequences could be and what the
actual source of this nerve agent
has been,” Rudd said.
Police have not revealed which
nerve agent was involved. But
analysts say that if it is rare, that
could help to narrow down which
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. SATURDAY,
MARCH 10 , 2018
laboratory it was made in.
Bob Seely, a Conservative lawmaker and member of Parliament’s Foreign Affairs Committee, said that Britain should be
cautious about laying blame but
that circumstantial evidence raises suspicions of Russian involvement.
The Kremlin, which denies any
involvement, says it resents the
finger-pointing and suspicions
that Russia played a role.
“We are accused of everything
bad that happens in the world by
our Western partners,” Sergei
Lavrov, Russia’s foreign minister,
said at a news conference Friday.
karla.adam@washpost.com
KLMNO
METRO
SATURDAY, MARCH 10 , 2018
High today at
approx. 4 p.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
8 p.m.
36 46 52 44°
°
°
°
52°
Precip: 5%
Wind: W
7-14 mph
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
EZ
RELIGION
THE DISTRICT
OBITUARIES
How the Oscar-winning
“Coco” and its fantastical
afterlife forced us to talk
about death. B2
D.C. taxpayers can opt to
donate to a fund for at-risk
children, but the nonprofit
closed two years ago. B4
Read about the lives of
residents of the D.C. area
at washingtonpost.com/
obituaries.
Jurors
convict
youth of
murders
Va. senator
gives hope
to Medicaid
expansion
BY
L AURA V OZZELLA
richmond — As the House and
Senate remain divided over
whether to expand Medicaid eligibility to 400,000 uninsured Virginians, Senate Majority Leader
Thomas K. Norment Jr. made a
rare appearance before House Republicans to say his chamber was
dead set against the House plan.
In a closed-door gathering
Thursday with House Republicans, Norment (R-James City) said
all 21 Senate Republicans were
united against expansion.
But at the same meeting, one of
those senators, Emmett W. Hanger Jr. (Augusta) indicated that he
might support Medicaid expansion if the House plan is reshaped.
Hanger told House Republicans that if Gov. Ralph Northam
(D) worked with him to modify it
to his liking, he would provide a
crucial vote.
That sent shock waves through
the caucus because if the governor
proposes Medicaid expansion as
an amendment to the state budget, all that would be needed for
passage is one Republican in the
Senate — Hanger — to join all the
Democrats in voting for it.
Hanger predicted that if the
proposal is revamped — he wants
to scrap the tax on hospitals and
beef up work requirements for
Medicaid recipients — other Senate Republicans will follow.
“Really, I don’t intend to be the
only one,” Hanger recalled telling
them. “There will be others that
will go along with me.”
Hanger’s comments greatly
frustrated Norment, who had
hoped to present a united, antiMedicaid front that would persuade the House to give up on
expansion in state budget negotiations.
Instead, both sides remain dug
in, and legislators have given up
trying to pass a two-year budget
before Saturday, when the session
is supposed to conclude. They
need a spending plan in place by
the start of the new fiscal year
July 1 to avoid a government shutdown.
Lawmakers face several choices
if they can’t approve a budget by
Saturday. They can vote to extend
the current session, they can resolve to call a special session, or
they can wait for the governor to
call them back into session to finish the budget.
In a sign of just how high tensions were running, the Senate
passed a resolution asking
KILLER COULD
GET 2 LIFE TERMS
Guilty of shooting teen,
Secret Service officer
BY
MICHAEL ROBINSON CHAVEZ/THE WASHINGTON POST
Jacques Miango, a Maryland government employee, was beaten in August 2014 while protesting
Congolese President Joseph Kabila in Georgetown. He won a lawsuit this year against the country.
The uneasy balance between
U.S. rights and diplomatic immunity
BY
T ERRENCE M C C OY
I
t was a moment, Jacques
Miango would later think,
when safety should have
been all but assured. It was
the middle of the afternoon. The
location was outside a luxury
Georgetown hotel. Police were all
around. And this was America,
where anyone, he had always
believed, could say just about
anything they wanted without
fear of violence.
That day, in August 2014, he
stood along 31st Street NW holding a sign and shouting before the
Capella Hotel. He and two others
were protesting the president of
Congo, Joseph Kabila, who presides over a country routinely
accused of human rights abuses,
and whose motorcade had just
arrived back to the hotel, now
called the Rosewood.
Moments afterward, according to interviews, police records
and court filings, a group of at
least four Congolese security officers in business suits rushed the
protesters, all of whom were
Maryland
residents.
They
knocked Miango, a Maryland
government employee, to the
ground. They kicked him in the
throat and the face and the spine,
Md. man protesting
Congo’s president was
attacked. Protections
prevented arrests.
JACQUES MIANGO
A photograph of Jacques
Miango that was entered as
evidence in his lawsuit. Seven
of his teeth were knocked loose,
and he was kicked in the face,
spine and throat.
knocking loose seven of his teeth.
A D.C. police officer came over,
and the security forces dispersed,
heading back into the hotel, except for one man who, as the
police officer stood by, went to
Miango lying on the ground and
stomped on his head. Miango
went still.
“It wasn’t a fight,” said witness
Noah Landay, who recorded the
final kick to Miango, who has
since suffered severe back pain
and a persistent fear he and his
family in Baltimore are in danger
of further retaliation from Kabila. “It was an assault.”
The attack and aftermath, detailed in a lawsuit Miango won
this year against the Democratic
Republic of Congo, again illustrates the uneasy balance between U.S. laws and international
norms, between constitutional
rights and the leniency granted to
foreign nationals here on official
business, known as diplomatic
immunity. It protected Gambian
security forces who attacked protesters in 2014 near the White
House. And for a time, it insulated members of Turkish President
Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s security
detail, who last year assaulted
protesters outside Turkey’s emASSAULT CONTINUED ON B2
BUDGET CONTINUED ON B3
Flying pets
aren’t only
ones tense
Cargo transport can be
costly, complicated and
stressful for owners, too
BY
M ARTINE P OWERS
When Andrew Bakalar embarked on a recent 10-day business trip to Paris, he left his
beloved pooches, Jujee and Elsa
Rose, in the hands of a trusted
dog-sitter.
But when his trip was unavoidably extended for an additional
two months, he decided to send
for them to join him.
His plan: Have the dog-sitter
ship the pair as cargo from Dulles
International Airport to France.
The dogs, a schnauzer and a
terrier, are small. It couldn’t be
that hard, he thought.
The saga that ensued involved
absurdist twists and turns that
can be described only as Kafkaesque. But as the bureaucratic
hoops, logistical complexities
B
SU
K EITH L . A LEXANDER
It was Easter weekend nearly
two years ago when Maurice
Bellamy decided a youth he encountered on a Metro station
platform was staring at him.
Bellamy opened fire, killing the
15-year-old boy who had been
headed to a haircut for church
services the next morning.
Months before that, Bellamy
had fatally shot another unarmed stranger. The victim was
an off-duty U.S. Secret Service
officer who was sitting in a car
waiting for a friend.
On Friday, after more than a
week of often emotional and
graphic testimony from eyewitnesses to the killings, a D.C.
Superior Court jury convicted
Bellamy, now 19, of both murders. He faces a maximum of two
life terms in prison when he is
sentenced July 20.
On March 26, 2016, Bellamy
was at the Deanwood Metro
station when he approached
Davonte Washington, 15, as the
boy was waiting for a train with
his mother and younger sisters.
Bellamy, then 17, accused the
younger teen of “mugging” at
him, or staring at him in a
threatening manner.
In a scene captured on video
surveillance, Davonte stepped
between his family and Bellamy
and put his hands up. Davonte’s
mother, Rashida Washington,
testified that her son seemed
confused. Bellamy pulled his
.38-caliber pistol from his pocket
and shot Davonte twice before
running out of the station.
During the trial, Washington
tearfully told jurors how she
chased the shooter through the
Metro station before returning
to the platform to her dying son
and her daughters, who were
kneeling beside him.
Three months earlier, on
Dec. 15, 2015, Bellamy used the
same gun when he and two
friends tried to hold up Arthur
“A.J.” Baldwin, the off-duty offiVERDICT CONTINUED ON B5
and costs piled up, Bakalar had
an uncharacteristically unprincipled thought: He should have just
lied and passed them off as emotional-support animals, which
would have allowed them to travel in the cabin with the dog-sitter.
“It might have been cheaper,
frankly, to tell the dog-sitter,
‘You’re coming to Paris for two
days, on me,’ ” said Bakalar, 54, of
Silver Spring. The entire process
cost him about $2,000.
The world of pet transportation has changed dramatically in
recent years. With the advent of
emotional-support animals — in
some cases with questionable or
no certification — pet owners
have attempted to board planes
with everything from the typical
dog and cat to rodents and moreexotic pets, including peacocks,
spiders and snakes.
Backlash from other passengers has prompted crackdowns.
Delta Air Lines this month began
requiring advance documentation that certifies the owner’s
need and the animal’s training
before allowing an emotionalsupport animal to ride in the
cabin. United Airlines also recently changed its policy and will
require documents confirming
that an emotional-support animal is healthy and has been
trained for public settings.
The new rules are meant to
discourage people who try to pass
PET TRAVEL CONTINUED ON B4
A message from their ancestors: ‘We were here’
Likely slave cemetery
found near Annapolis
at Belvoir plantation
BY
T ARA B AHRAMPOUR
When Nancy Matthews Daniels was growing up in Laurel,
Md., her grandmother used to tell
stories about their ancestors, including some who had been
slaves “down in the country.” Daniels, 69, grew up to be a genealogy
enthusiast and researched her
relatives, some of whom were
involved in the Underground
Railroad and served prison time
for helping slaves escape.
It turned out that “down in the
country” referred to Belvoir, a
large tobacco plantation in
Crownsville, near Annapolis,
owned by relatives of Francis
Scott Key and active during the
18th and 19th centuries. In 2014,
remains of slave quarters were
discovered on the site, now
owned by a private school, and
through that project Daniels ended up connecting with other descendants of Belvoir slaves. Archaeologists found crockery, buttons and other items belonging to
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
A stone in Crownsville, Md., at the spot archaeologists believe to be
a slave burial ground on the site of the Belvoir plantation.
those who had lived there. But
one thing was missing: the ancestors themselves. What had happened to them when they died?
Where were they buried?
Two weeks ago, they got what is
very likely the answer.
“Julie called and said they
found the cemetery and she wanted us down there,” Daniels said,
referring to Julie Schablitsky,
chief archaeologist with the
Maryland Department of Trans-
portation’s State Highway Administration.
A couple of men who had
played in the area as kids in the
1970s heard about the slave quarters and the mystery of the burial
ground and remembered a particular spot in the woods where a
marble headstone lay. They contacted Schablitsky.
She gets these calls from time
to time, ever since the slave quarters were discovered as part of a
years-long state survey of Maryland Route 178, also known as
Generals Highway. Schablitsky
always follows up, though the
reports usually lead to nothing.
But when she followed the men
down a trail heading away from
the old slave quarters, the site
seemed ideal.
It was an elevated promontory
of forest, surrounded by old
trunks of cedar trees, which are
often associated with cemeteries.
After the leaves and sticks were
cleared, jagged tops of about
eight fieldstones — often used to
mark the burial spots of slaves —
jutted out of the earth at regular
intervals. Two halves of a marble
slab the size of a gravestone lay on
the site, so weatherworn that any
words etched into it are long
gone. And near one tree, a rectangular depression in the earth
faced east to west, as graves often
do.
Other signs pointed to this
being the spot. It is an uneven
hillock, not suitable for building
or farming; slave burial grounds
were often in such out-of-theway, unusable areas. And it was a
straight shot from the slave quarters, short enough for a funeral
procession that wouldn’t take
slaves away from their work for
BELVOIR CONTINUED ON B6
B2
EZ
bassy. Nearly one month after the
melee, and following intense
public backlash, a D.C. grand jury
indicted numerous Turkish security officers, who by then had
returned to Turkey.
“My freedom of speech was
violated, definitely violated,” said
a leader of the Turkish protest,
Seyid Riza Dersimi, owner of a
Virginia flooring business, who
has struggled with post-traumatic stress disorder ever since.
“They are hiding behind diplomatic immunity.”
In Miango’s case, police appeared to have agreed. Diplomatic immunity, according to
State Department emails, was all
that stopped them from arresting
and charging the Congolese security officers, who, within hours of
the incident, boarded a plane
with their president and left the
country.
D.C. police didn’t respond to
requests for comment except to
say its internal affairs division
investigated the officer who
stood by as Miango was kicked
“for his inaction during the incident.” The officer was not disciplined, police said.
The Congolese Embassy did
not respond to requests for comment about the incident, which
was scarcely reported at the time.
An official with the State Department, which failed to obtain
a waiver from Congo allowing
prosecution of its security detail,
said the department “works
closely with foreign security details to attempt to minimize the
likelihood of encounters with
protestors.” The official added:
“The United States has a strong
interest in foreign governments
recognizing the immunity of the
U.S. Secret Service when they
protect U.S. Presidents and Secretaries of State, who travel exten-
“But for immunity [D.C.
police] would prosecute
the four individuals
who were involved.”
Internal State Department email,
according to an exhibit in
Jacques Miango’s lawsuit
sively throughout the world.”
The importance of diplomatic
immunity goes beyond that, said
Ashley Deeks, a University of
Virginia associate professor and
former State Department assistant legal adviser. It’s essential for
American officials working “in
countries that aren’t the strongest on the rule of law,” otherwise
“we would be worried that the
federal police could arrest them
on any pretext.”
For Miango, himself from a
country where the rule of law
isn’t strong, his protest in
Georgetown was supposed to be
just one more in a life of dissent.
For nearly as long as he can
remember, even when he was a
young man in Kinshasa, the capital of Congo, he has been protesting.
First it was against Mobutu
Sese Seko, whose three decades of
rapacious, authoritarian rule had
ruinous consequences for Congo,
then called Zaire. Fearing for his
life, Miango moved to neighboring Congo Republic, where he
became an oppositional radio
host against Mobutu, then on to
Burkina Faso, where he applied
for and obtained political asylum
status. In 1997, he left Africa for
Baltimore.
But he couldn’t get away from
his thoughts. “I was always thinking about what is happening” in
Congo, he said. Mobutu had finally fled the country, overthrown by
the rebel leader Laurent Kabila,
whose regime Miango soon came
to view as a continuation of the
same autocracy that had preceded it. After the new leader’s assassination, by one of his body-
guards, there came the rise of his
son, Joseph Kabila, whom Miango criticizes as someone who
“came to sell” the resource-rich
country, an assessment echoed by
international observers.
“Congo possesses a geological
endowment the envy of countries
worldwide. It should be extraordinarily wealthy, but the average
Congolese person is among the
poorest on the planet,” stated an
investigation by Washingtonbased Global Witness, which
found only 6 percent of the mining exports reached the national
budget. Meanwhile, Kabila, who
has held on to power beyond his
final term in office, has crushed
dissent through his state security
forces, which has attacked and
even killed protesters.
But that was over there, in
Congo, Miango had thought, and
this was here, in the United
States, so when Kabila came to
Washington in August 2014, he
and two other protesters drove to
Georgetown. He parked near the
fancy hotel. He hoisted a sign
condemning the regime and
waited for Kabila’s return.
According to court filings,
when he finally arrived, Miango
called out to Kabila, using an
alias some Congo dissidents
claim is his real name. The two
men had eye contact. Then Kabila was inside the hotel, but his
security forces were coming back
out. They went for Miango, and
after they were done with him,
after Miango had wondered
whether they were going to kill
him, court documents allege they
went into his car, stole his computer, other electronics and at
least $1,000 in cash, before returning to the hotel.
“But for immunity [D.C. police] would prosecute the four
individuals who were involved in
this evening’s altercation with
protesters with aggravated assault, simple assault and robbery,” an internal State Department email said, according to an
exhibit in Miango’s lawsuit,
which resulted in a federal judge
awarding Miango and other
plaintiffs $563,000 in January.
“I said the President was not in
any danger and that the Congolese guards overreacted by brutally attacking and injuring the
demonstrators,” Eric Madison, a
State Department official, wrote
in an email, summarizing his
conversation with a Congolese
counterpart. “I asked the DRC
government consent to revoking
the guards’ immunity.”
But no clear answer ever came,
and later that day, the security
detail got on a plane and left for
Congo.
“Kabila was very upset by the
incident, that those officers
would be punished and reassigned upon their return home,
and that they had ‘brought
shame upon the nation,’ ” reported another State Department official, Christopher Krafft, in another email.
Miango, meanwhile, came to
believe it was the United States
that also had reason to feel
shame. In the months after the
attack, he succumbed to depression, court records show, missing
work to tend to his injuries,
which included dental surgery
and physical therapy to help with
a cervical sprain. But it was what
he realized about his adopted
country that has stuck with him
longest.
“You imagine that those kinds
of things can’t happen in America,” he said. “But after it happened to me, I know nothing is
impossible.”
That realization, however,
hasn’t stopped his protest. For
the past three years, he has gone
to New York City to protest Kabila
at the United Nations, and if the
African leader ever comes back to
Washington, Miango promises
he’ll be there, too, waiting to
greet him.
terrence.mccoy@washpost.com
. SATURDAY,
MARCH 10 , 2018
RELIGION
‘It wasn’t a fight.
It was an assault.’
ASSAULT FROM B1
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
VICTOR CRUZ/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
People march in a Día de los Muertos parade in Mexico City last year. The Day of the Dead holiday, during which Mexican people honor
deceased loved ones, was a springboard for “Coco,” the Oscar-winning animated film in which a boy enters the world of the dead.
How Oscar winner ‘Coco’ can enliven talk of afterlife
I’m not Mexican,
I’ve never
celebrated Día de
los Muertos, but I
MICHELLE
sobbed my way
BOORSTEIN
through “Coco,”
the animated film
that won at Sunday’s Oscars for
its vibrant, orange-petal-filled
depiction of the afterlife.
Having lost my mother
somewhat recently, I found it
seductive and mesmerizing to sit
in a dark room full of other
people and together, in front of a
huge screen, plunge into the
fantastical afterlife depicted in
“Coco,” a detailed world where
the dead picnic, party — and
watch over the living attentively.
My mind drifted to a skeleton
version of my mother, impeccably
dressed in a sweater-skirt set, in
her law office or at some craft
show and just as voracious and
judgey as ever, schmoozing with
the load of relatives and friends
who preceded her in death — a
possibility just too tempting. And
the closeness and the longing
between the living and the dead
in the film left me a puddle.
Yeah, yeah, I know. It’s an
animated film, a project launched
not by hospice workers and
clergy but Hollywood consultants
and focus groups. And the story
line of a family whose mourning
and loss are eased by a guitarplaying little boy, a dopey dog and
a father’s love for the chubby little
girl he left behind in death?
Sappiness defined. Even my 8year-old teased me for crying.
“But my ideas of what happens
after death are blurry; I believe
there is some type of
consciousness, but that’s all I can
say. That attribute makes me
extremely common in a country
where people are rapidly ditching
institutional religion, with its
paradigms, rules and stories.
Americans have very few, if
any, shared spiritual spaces to
talk about our beliefs about the
afterlife. That’s why “Coco” and
other mega-pop-culture
experiences may be in modern
times a kind of sanctuary, the
closest thing we have — to
“talking” about the religious or
supernatural spheres in which all
but the most hardcore
nonbelievers still dabble. For
many of us, these experiences
open a door with others, and with
ourselves, to touch the few
religious topics that still feel
widely relevant.
Questions and thoughts about
what happens to us and those we
Acts of
Faith
love after death remain, to most,
as important as ever. Even those
who feel certain there is nothing
after death crave a place to talk
openly about what this belief
means for how they live their
lives.
Beliefs about the afterlife
There is little solid data on the
wide range of beliefs Americans
have about post-death existence
and how those views are
changing. Much of what there is
has to do with the words “heaven”
and “hell” — amorphous for
many. Seventy-two percent of
Americans say they believe in
heaven, and 58 percent in hell —
numbers very slightly down since
about a decade ago, according to
the Pew Research Center.
People who work with the
dying say these beliefs are fluid.
“Death opens you up,” said
Aram Haroutunian, a longtime
hospital and hospice chaplain in
Denver. “And death is the great
unknown. People are more open.
And especially at the very end,
they are very open.”
Haroutunian said a common
experience among hospice
workers is hearing people who
are dying start to speak of the
deceased — long-dead family or
friends — in the present tense,
“like they’ve been talking with
them.” Metaphors about travel
are extremely common, he said:
I’m getting on a train, taking a
bus ride, packing my bags. “It’s
uncanny,” he added.
With Americans becoming less
religious — in an institutional
sense — Haroutunian said he
notices that the dying, and their
families, are taking concepts
about the afterlife from nature.
Many people respond to ideas
like those of Thich Nhat Hanh, a
famous Vietnamese Buddhist
monk and teacher, who describes
our lives as waves — with a
beginning and end, and a larger
ocean to which we return. “It’s
this general idea that there is
more to the story,” Haroutunian
said.
Candi Cann, a Baylor
University professor of religion
who studies death and the
afterlife, said even people who
are religious can have ill-defined
ideas about what happens after
death. In some work she did with
church-affiliated seniors, she
asked them to write one page
about the afterlife. The
descriptions varied widely.
One described a waiting room.
Another said there was a stadium
of people you know watching
pictures of your life, like a film.
Another described a nebulous
zone where one is neither
conscious nor unconscious.
“Others think it’s clouds in the
sky,” she said.
“There is a difference between
what people profess, what they
say they’re part of and the actual
ways they think about death and
the afterlife.”
Baylor, a Baptist school, is in
an evangelical part of Texas, and
Cann said she sees more and
more evangelical Protestants,
influenced by growing numbers
of residents of Mexican descent,
putting up ofrendas — ritual Day
of the Dead altars — and with no
pushback from their Baptist
neighbors. The holiday has
millennia-old roots in Aztec and
Catholic traditions, among
others.
“I think that’s why ‘Coco’ did so
well, because Americans don’t
have a clear idea of the afterlife,”
she said.
A reflection of how we lived?
While the movie’s backdrop is the
Day of the Dead, its writers said
they made up most of the world
and its theology. The core rule of
the movie is that people remain
in the brilliant, vivid afterlife on
one condition: Someone who
knew them while they were alive
remembers them and puts their
photo on the ofrenda on the
annual holiday. Once you are
forgotten, or your photo is not put
up, your full-bodied skeleton self
and your afterlife are over
forever. In other words, honoring
the dead by remembering them is
an urgent and serious
responsibility.
In a recent interview on NPR’s
“Fresh Air,” “Coco” co-writer
Adrian Molina said the
experiences of the dead in the
way station differ based on the
quality of the lives they led. This
movie is not meant to be
saccharine.
“For some this is paradise,
because they’re remembered
fondly and with love. . . . For
others, they’re straggling along.
People’s memories [of them]
aren’t fond,” Molina said. The
young Mexican boy who enters
this world and gets a glimpse of
the afterlife leaves with a focus,
Molina said: What is my part in
the legacy of my family? What
will I be remembered for? What’s
important about the
relationships I’m making
through my life?
That resonates with my
experience as a Jew. Judaism is
centered not on the afterlife but
the present. While there are rich
images and notions in Jewish
commentary over the millennia
about the idea that there is
something after death, what that
is is extremely vague. A common
Talmudic story is of an “upsidedown world,” where the values of
Earth are flipped. I had a
mainstream, traditional Jewish
education, which encourages
Jews to focus on improving the
living, present world and
working to make it as just as
possible.
Rabbi Kerrith Rosenbaum, a
Jewish educator at Adas Israel
synagogue in Washington,
recently lost her father. She said
“Coco” resonated for her not
because of the ornate afterlife but
for the story of a boy and his
family who are trying to figure
out how to honor and keep alive
through memory those who have
died.
“When I work through my own
grief, it’s not tempered by an
afterlife,” she said. Images about
death as a homecoming don’t
speak to her. The movie was a way
to speak to her children about
how her father “lives inside each
of us, and it’s on us to keep that
piece of him alive.”
Rabbi Jason Weiner, director of
spiritual care at Cedars-Sinai
Medical Center in Los Angeles,
said he hosts a class after services
every year on the holiday of Yom
Kippur. Usually about 50 people
stay after for the class. When he
held the class recently about the
afterlife, 250 people stayed.
Weiner has his own theory based
on various Judaic sources. “The
afterlife is totally just,” he
believes, a kind of reflection on
one’s life — the pains and joys —
that ends with a kind of family
reunification. “The primary
experience is of love.”
All these ideas speak to me in
different ways. I know my mother
was skeptical about an afterlife,
yet she told me that when her
own mother was dying, she still
found herself hoping that she and
my grandmother would be
together again someday. “Coco”
evoked, even if just for a few
hours, more musings than many
of my prayer hours have about
whether I would see my mother
again.
michelle.boorstein@washpost.com
Michelle Boorstein covers religion for
The Washington Post.
THE DISTRICT
Bowser accuses Rubio of hypocrisy for his efforts to repeal D.C. gun laws
BY
J ENNA P ORTNOY
Mayor Muriel E. Bowser said
Sen. Marco Rubio’s efforts to repeal the District’s gun laws despite his support for certain federal limits on the purchase of guns
are “the height of hypocrisy.”
Following a public outcry for
stricter gun control after the Parkland, Fla., school shooting last
month, Rubio (R-Fla.) proposed a
plan to strengthen background
checks and said he would explore
changes involving age limits and
reducing magazine capacity.
Last year, Rubio reintroduced a
bill he pushed previously to erase
the District’s gun-control laws,
which are among the most restrictive in the nation. One provision
would require police in the nation’s capital to issue concealedcarry permits to any resident or
visitor who meets basic criteria.
In an op-ed in Friday’s Miami
Herald, Bowser (D) said Rubio’s
position on federal and D.C. laws
is at odds and told him to back off.
“It is unconscionable for him to
tell his Florida constituents and
colleagues that he is listening to
their concerns and trying to do
better, while simultaneously
pushing legislation that would exacerbate the problem for Wash-
ingtonians,” Bowser wrote. “We
do not need more guns on our
streets; we need common-sense
gun reform. It is time for Rubio to
show real leadership and withdraw his D.C. gun bills.”
She added, “We respectfully
ask the senator to leave us alone.”
Last week, Bowser proposed
legislation that would make it
illegal to possess or sell bump
stocks, the devices that accelerate
the firing of semiautomatic weapons, in a largely symbolic move
designed to force Congress to take
a stand on them.
Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton
(D), the District’s nonvoting rep-
resentative in Congress, noted
how the families of Parkland victims have accused Rubio of being
beholden to the National Rifle
Association, a claim he has denied.
“Senator Rubio is under national attack for his straight NRA
record on guns, so he scurried to
the Senate floor with a ‘plan to
address gun violence.’ ” she said in
a statement released last week.
“That ‘plan’ is not credible because it is contradicted by his
pending D.C. gun bill.”
Through a spokeswoman, Rubio said changes to federal law
would also apply to the District.
He did not address officials’ concerns that federal limits on firearms are less strict than D.C. laws.
“If passed, this bill would bring
D.C. into compliance with federal
law,” Olivia Perez-Cubas, a spokeswoman for Rubio, said in a statement. “If federal law is changed
on the purchase age for semiautomatic rifles, then D.C. law would
be changed as well.”
Rubio first filed his D.C. legislation in 2014, when a new employee in his Capitol Hill office, a
young woman living alone, wanted to bring two legally acquired
handguns to the District for protection after a shooting occurred
near her building.
She considered the D.C. permitting process complicated
enough to require time off work to
complete it, leading Rubio to conclude that only a law-abiding citizen would undertake such a cumbersome process, according to his
office.
Bowser added that she wants
Rubio to withdraw his D.C. bill
before the March For Our Lives,
which she plans to attend
March 24 with students from
Marjory Stoneman Douglas High
School, the site of the deadly
shooting.
jenna.portnoy@washpost.com
SATURDAY, MARCH 10 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B3
M2
THE DISTRICT
LOC AL D I GE S T
Parents sentenced in death of 7-week-old daughter
Trinity Jabore suffered
from starvation, broken
ribs, authorities say
BY
K EITH L . A LEXANDER
In her 7-week life, authorities
say Trinity Jabore suffered from
starvation, 13 fractured ribs and
severe diaper rash. When paramedics were called to her Southwest Washington home on Christmas morning two years ago, her
lifeless body, strapped in a car seat
that was used as a bassinet,
weighed just slightly over four
pounds.
On Friday, a D.C. Superior Court
judge sentenced the infant’s parents, Trishelle Jabore, 27, and Jay
Crowder, 34, to 12 years in prison
in Trinity’s death. The couple
pleaded guilty last summer to voluntary manslaughter and child
abuse.
At their sentencing hearing, Assistant U.S. Attorney Cynthia
Wright described Trinity’s “slow
and painful” death as “cruel, heinous and atrocious.”
“Today, I stand here to get justice for this 7-week-old baby who
was starved to death at the hands
of her mother and her father,”
Wright said. “They deliberately
chose not to feed or take care of
MICHAEL S. WILLIAMSON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Trinity Jabore died in this home on Galveston Place SW where she
and her parents, Trishelle Jabore and Jay Allen Crowder, resided.
their infant and to instead smoke
marijuana, PCP, get high and take
selfies all day.”
According to charging documents, the postmortem exam by a
District medical examiner found
that Trinity had suffered the injuries on separate occasions before
she died of malnutrition and the
effects of consuming large
amounts of water that had been
mixed with concentrated milk.
Trinity’s death raised questions
about how the District’s child services agency had monitored the
family. Before the baby’s death, the
District’s Child and Family Ser-
vices Agency had received multiple calls about Jabore and
Crowder over the reported neglect
of other youths in their family,
according to records reviewed by
The Post last year. But the agency
was unaware of any problems involving Trinity, a spokeswoman
for the agency said at that time.
As part of their plea agreement,
Jabore faced six to 15 years in
prison and Crowder faced 10 to 12
years in prison.
Late in 2016, Jabore and
Crowder, who also were caring for
their 5-year-old and a toddler,
were getting by on $217 in month-
ly welfare payments, called Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, plus $771 a month from the
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.
During Friday’s sentencing, attorneys for the couple said they
never intended to kill their daughter and struggled with day-to-day
living.
Jabore had graduated from
high school a year early and attended a year of college, but struggled with depression and was unable to hold a job. Crowder, while
also selling drugs, peddled bottled
water and Gatorade on the streets.
According to court papers, Jabore told police that after Trinity’s
birth, the hospital gave her 16
ready-made bottles of Similac formula to take home. But within a
month, the couple was out of formula, short of money and awaiting January’s SNAP and TANF
payments.
As Judge Jose M. Lopez prepared to issue the sentences, both
parents asked for “mercy.”
“I have accepted my responsibility in my role in this. I should
have done more for my daughter,”
Crowder said. Jabore said she was
still “mourning” her daughter’s
death.
“I regret my daughter’s passing,” Jabore said. “I wish I could
have been a better mother to her
and my other kids.”
keith.alexander@washpost.com
Medicaid expansion vote may require special session
BUDGET FROM B1
Northam to call a special session,
but the House refused to take it up.
The House passed one of its own,
which the Senate likewise
snubbed. Unless one side relents
before adjourning Saturday, the
resolutions will die, leaving it to
Northam to call the session.
Norment capped off Friday
with a fiery floor speech that took
aim at House Speaker M. Kirkland
Cox (R-Colonial Heights), who
backed Medicaid expansion after
his party nearly lost control of the
House in November. Norment
noted that just 19 of 51 House
Republicans joined Democrats to
vote for a budget with expansion
and Cox was the only member of
the leadership on board.
“If I . . . was out on a position by
myself and my entire leadership
team was the other way on that
same position, I would resign,”
Norment said. “It would be an
unequivocal demonstration that I
was not providing the leadership
that was consistent with the majority of where my caucus wanted
to go. All but one of the leadership
team voted against. I won’t say
that is a reflection of a meltdown,
but it is certainly a reflection that
there is a modest chaos going [on]
down the hall.”
Cox spokesman Parker Slaybaugh declined to comment on
Norment’s remarks. “Speaker Cox
is not interested in a back and
forth,” Slaybaugh said, adding that
the speaker “believes a few weeks
away from Richmond will give us
the opportunity to bring a fresh
discussion on the next steps.”
Even some Democrats expressed shock.
“This is a time that we all need
to work together,” said Sen. Adam
P. Ebbin (D-Alexandria). “I don’t
think it would be at all conducive
to imply that the speaker, the new
speaker, should resign.”
Norment said later that he was
not saying Cox should step down,
only that he would do so were he in
that position.
Northam won office last year on
a promise to expand the federalstate health-care program. Republicans in the House and Senate
blocked expansion for four years
under Northam’s predecessor, Terry McAuliffe (D), saying the federal government would not make
good on its promise to pick up
most of the $2 billion-a-year tab.
Opposition in the House softened after Democrats picked up
15 seats in an anti-Trump wave,
but there has been no visible shift
in the Senate, where Republicans
have dismissed the work requirement in the House plan as an
“aspirational work suggestion.”
As tension over the budget impasse mounted this week, rumors
swirled that various Republican
senators were about to flip. Perhaps a senator from a rural area,
where hospitals are in desperate
need of a boost. Or a suburban
swing-district Republican, who
next year faces voters who helped
Northam win handily. Or a transactional type who might be willing
to cut a deal.
But at least so far, only Hanger
has publicly acknowledged that he
is open to some form of expansion.
That’s one reason House Republicans asked to hear from him.
They also wanted to hear from
Sen. A. Benton Chafin Jr.
(R-Russell), who represents a rural district and is close to Del. Terry G. Kilgore (R-Scott), who has
touted expansion to help the
state’s struggling southwest corner.
Chafin declined to say what he
told the group because caucus
meetings are typically private, but
he said he remains “steadfast” in
his opposition to expansion.
“I don’t think it’s sustainable,”
he said. “I think the [Affordable
Care Act] is falling apart. I think if
there was ever a time not to expand Medicaid, it’s now.”
laura.vozzella@washpost.com
THE DISTRICT
Man dies after falling
tree hit his vehicle
A man critically injured when a
tree fell on his car in the March 2
storm has died, D.C. police said.
He was identified Friday as
Paul Agbo, 50, of Burtonsville,
Md. His relatives could not be
reached; police did not say what
day he died.
The car was hit about 4 p.m. in
the 2500 block of 44th Street NW.
— Peter Hermann
Three shot, wounded
in Northeast, police say
Three men were shot and
wounded Friday night in the
Kingman Park neighborhood of
Northeast, police said.
The three were conscious and
breathing when found about
9:15 p.m. in the 700 block of 19th
Street NE, said Hugh Carew, a
police spokesman.
It was not clear who shot the
men or why. The street has houses
on one side and a school on the
other.
— Clarence Williams
and Martin Weil
MARYLAND
Elderly couple dies in
Pr. George’s house fire
An elderly couple died
Thursday in a fire in Prince
George’s County in a home
authorities said had hoarding
conditions.
The names of the husband, 75,
and wife, 80, have not been
released, pending autopsy results,
Prince George’s County Fire
officials said.
The fire began about 11:30 p.m.
in the 500 block of Round Table
Drive in Fort Washington. A
neighbor called 911, and when
firefighters arrived, the two-story,
split-level home had a “well
advanced” fire underway, a fire
spokesman said.
Firefighters found the couple
near the foyer, and they were
pronounced dead at the scene.
There was “excessive storage of
materials” inside, officials said.
The cause is unknown and
remains under investigation.
Firefighters said they could not
find a working smoke alarm.
— Dana Hedgpeth
VIRGINIA
Teen dies in gun battle
with police officers
The Spotsylvania County
Sheriff’s Office said a juvenile
runaway was killed in a gun battle
with police.
The Free Lance-Star in
Fredericksburg reported Friday
that the teen was listed as a
runaway from New Jersey. The
sheriff’s office said it was
investigating him for
involvement in two drive-by
shootings.
Sheriff Roger Harris said the
confrontation occurred Thursday
when officers approached the
juvenile at a house.
Harris said the teen initially
put down his weapon, following
officers’ orders, but picked it up
again and motioned toward
them.
Harris said the teen and one
officer exchanged fire.
— Associated Press
LOTTE R I E S
VIRGINIA
Results from March 9
DISTRICT
Mid-Day Lucky Numbers:
Mid-Day DC-4:
Mid-Day DC-5:
Lucky Numbers (Thu.):
Lucky Numbers (Fri.):
DC-4 (Thu.):
DC-4 (Fri.):
DC-5 (Thu.):
DC-5 (Fri.):
0-3-0
2-9-9-3
3-2-2-0-6
0-7-2
0-7-9
7-0-4-6
4-6-1-1
9-6-4-1-0
3-5-7-2-9
MARYLAND
Day/Pick 3:
Pick 4:
Night/Pick 3 (Thu.):
Pick 3 (Fri.):
Pick 4 (Thu.):
Pick 4 (Fri.):
Multi-Match (Thu.):
Match 5 (Thu.):
Match 5 (Fri.):
5 Card Cash:
2-3-5
0-1-0-2
1-6-9
5-2-5
0-2-3-8
2-8-6-8
1-4-15-18-30-31
7-9-22-27-30 *33
7-11-16-21-29 *34
8D-5H-10C-9S-7S
Day/Pick-3:
Pick-4:
Cash-5 (Fri.):
Night/Pick-3 (Thu.):
Pick-3 (Fri.):
Pick-4 (Thu.):
Pick-4 (Fri.):
Cash-5 (Thu.):
Cash-5 (Fri.):
9-3-5
8-6-0-0
1-5-14-21-26
8-2-8
6-8-1
8-0-9-3
3-4-2-5
3-4-26-33-34
8-17-25-28-33
MULTI-STATE GAMES
Cash 4 Life:
Mega Millions:
Megaplier:
Lucky for Life:
*Bonus Ball
¶Cash Ball
6-34-36-44-55 ¶4
7-17-18-46-66 **22
4x
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**Mega Ball
‡Lucky Ball
For late drawings and other results, check
washingtonpost.com/local/lottery
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BAPTIST
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215 R.I. Ave., N.W., Wash., D.C. 202-332-5748
Office Hours: M-F 8:30-5 pm
Rev. Terry D. Streeter, Pastor
March 11, 2018
Ethel G. Harvey Day
7:45 am The Challenge of Steadfastness
II Timothy 4:18
10:45 am Division Among the Wicked
John 10:19-23
3:00 pm Pastor to Resurrection Baptist
Visit our website at www.MPBCDC.org
9th & P Streets, N.W.
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Sunday, March 11, 2018
7:45 AM
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10:55 AM
Reverend Paul Msiza
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Noon
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March 11 9:30 AM & 11:15 AM (ASL interpretation @ 11:15) n
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in the METRO section (Saturday, March
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Sunday Worship:
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BROADCAST LIVE AT:
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. SATURDAY,
MARCH 10 , 2018
THE DISTRICT
1 killed, another gravely hurt in crash of D.C. fire engine
Crew on emergency call
involved in multivehicle
collision in NE
BY
P ETER H ERMANN
A fire engine responding to an
emergency call Friday was involved in a crash that left a
motorist dead and critically injured a pregnant pedestrian on
Rhode Island Avenue in Northeast Washington, fire officials
said.
The male driver of one vehicle
died at a hospital after being
trapped in the wreckage near a
stone sign announcing the entrance to the Brookland neighborhood at 12th Street and
Rhode Island Avenue NE.
The fire engine, a gold sedan
and a dark-colored passenger
vehicle were involved in the
collision about 12:15 p.m. Friday.
Photographs posted on social
media showed the gold car so
mangled into a pile of metal that
it was almost unrecognizable as
a vehicle.
The identities of the man who
died and of the injured woman
were not immediately made public.
Police and fire officials said it
appears the fire engine hit the
sedan.
The female pedestrian was
struck on a sidewalk, authorities
said.
It was unclear whether she
was hit by the fire engine or by
the vehicle struck by the fire
engine. It was also unclear when
the third vehicle was hit. The
person in that car declined medical attention at the scene, officials said.
Before it crashed, Engine 26
had been dispatched for a report
of a smell of smoke in a building
in the 2300 block of Fourth
Street NE, about one mile from
the site of the collision, fire
department spokesman Vito
Maggiolo said.
One firefighter suffered minor
injuries in the crash. D.C. police
from the major crash unit took
over the investigation. The intersection was closed through early
Friday evening.
D.C. Council member Kenyan
R. McDuffie (D) whose Ward 5
includes the neighborhood
where the collision occurred,
visited the scene Friday. “It’s a
horrible tragedy,” he said. “My
heart goes out to the family of the
person who was driving that
vehicle.”
McDuffie said he had not been
briefed by police or fire investigators and that he and his staff
had not been able to learn details
about the victims. “It’s a tragic
day in Brookland,” he said.
Engine 26 and Truck 15 are
quartered in a fire station in the
1300 block of Rhode Island Av-
enue NE, a block from where the
crash occurred, but Maggiolo
could not say whether the engine
had left from that station or was
coming from elsewhere when it
answered the call for the reported smell of smoke.
Maggiolo also could not say in
which direction the drivers of the
private vehicles had been traveling, or whether Engine 26 had its
emergency lights and siren activated. Those details, he said, are
part of the D.C. police investigation
Firefighters who drive the
large engines and trucks must
abide by numerous guidelines.
They must use sirens and lights
to warn other drivers and pedestrians. They also must slow down
before going through red lights
and stop signs and may exceed
the posted speed limit “so long as
it does not endanger life or
property.”
Friday’s crash is the most serious involving fire apparatus in
the District since Aug. 2, when
rookie firefighter Dane Smothers
Jr. was hit by a ladder truck at the
scene of a Capitol Hill fire.
The 28-year-old, who was on
his first fire, was near death with
a stopped heart after he was
struck and has spent months in
rehabilitation after surgeries.
A final report on the crash that
injured Smothers is nearing
completion, a fire department
spokesman said Friday.
peter.hermann@washpost.com
Airlines try to cater to
people shipping their pets
PET TRAVEL FROM B1
off their regular pets as support
animals, which are intended to
provide comfort to their owners
but do not require special training like guide dogs or other
service animals.
But for those who choose to
follow the rules, shipping an
animal can be logistically complex and emotionally harrowing,
not to mention the exorbitant
cost.
According to the International
Pet and Animal Transportation
Association, a global network of
more than 420 companies that
help coordinate animal shipments, at least 2 million pets are
transported by air annually within the United States, with another
2 million transported in other
parts of the world.
And the web of regulations,
requirements and fees, enforced
by the government or the airlines
themselves, is nearly inscrutable.
With American Airlines, United
and Delta Cargo, passengers’
ability to ship their pets can
depend on factors as wide-ranging as species and breed, weight,
age, snout shape, weather and
temperature at the departure and
destination airports, the arrival
nation’s customs policies, length
of the flight, and the make and
model of the aircraft.
Once the air carrier accepts a
pet as cargo, the next steps are —
complicated.
Typically, owners must obtain
a health certificate for their pet
within 10 days of the travel date.
They also need certification of a
rabies vaccination and, in some
cases, a “certificate of acclimation” to travel in cold weather.
Some destinations require a
letter requesting “direct airport
release” if someone other than
the owner will pick up the animal.
The animal’s crate must meet
standards set by the Agriculture
Department and the Internation-
al Air Transport Association, or
IATA. (Many of the crates sold in
pet stores do not.) Some carriers
require pet travel to be booked
through a third-party company —
you can see the fees racking up
here — which helps ensure all
requirements are met before the
animal arrives at the airport.
Things get even more complicated for international travel or
flights to Hawaii. There could be
a pet import form, which must be
notarized. The animal may need
to be quarantined before the
flight — for example, up to 120
days for Hawaii — at the owner’s
expense. The animal may require
a microchip, with documents
proving that the microchip was
implanted before the date of the
most recent rabies vaccination.
In most cases of international
travel, the animal’s health certification must be conducted by a
veterinarian approved by the
USDA, and the certificate must
then be delivered by mail or in
person to one of several USDA
offices to be endorsed, stamped
and returned to the pet owner (at
a cost of somewhere between
$100 and $200). That’s in addition to the health certificate issued upon arrival, which may
require hiring an approved veterinarian to come to an overseas
airport to conduct an inspection
once the animal is removed from
the plane.
The price for each of these
steps can be anywhere from a few
hundred dollars to a few thousand.
“It’s very cumbersome and bureaucratic,” said Andrea Gruber,
head of special cargo for the
IATA, which works with government agencies, air carriers and
veterinarians to annually update
international standards for pet
travel. “It requires good communication, proper documentation
and a lot of preparation.”
Then there are the unexpected
steps. For example, as Bakalar
orchestrated his dogs’ journey
THE DISTRICT
RIP Clark: Lover,
father, porcupine
BY
M ARTIN W EIL
An animal who died this week
at Washington’s National Zoo
seemed noteworthy for many reasons, including his place in porcupine propagation.
This was Clark, who was a
prehensile-tailed porcupine. According to the zoo, the Association of Zoos and Aquariums Species Survival Plan recommended
that Clark and the female, Bess,
should mate. Bess came here in
2015.
The pair proved adept, apparently, at porcupine propagation,
and the zoo said they produced
four youngsters.
With their covering of sharp
quills, porcupines prompt curios-
UNITED AIRLINES
United’s pet facility at O’Hare International Airport in Chicago. While airlines take more steps to aid pet owners, shipping an animal as
cargo can be complicated, requiring preflight quarantines in some instances.
from Dulles to Paris, there were
calls to five airlines, fits and
starts with several third-party pet
transportation consultants, and
an emergency trip to the USDA’s
satellite office in Richmond, because the agency’s Washington
headquarters doesn’t deal with
pet travel certification.
At one point, Bakalar had to
ship a microchip scanner to travel with the dogs to Paris, only to
realize that the batteries to operate the machine wouldn’t be allowed on the plane.
“There’s got to be a way to
reduce the red tape here,” said
Bakalar, adding that Congress or
the Federal Aviation Administration should take steps to reduce
the bureaucracy.
It’s no wonder that people are
tempted to skirt the rules and
simply ask a therapist to declare
their pet an emotional-support
animal.
“The restrictions that we have
for animals as cargo — they don’t
apply to service animals, so people have found it to be easier to go
with the ‘emotional support’ or
‘service’ route,” said Derek Huntington, president of the International Pet and Animal Transportation Association. “It’s an unfortunate situation, and we’d like to
see it change.”
And then there are the horror
stories. Animals that die of the
stress inside the cargo hold of the
plane, or succumb to hyperthermia in warehouses or trucks
waiting to be loaded on board.
Pets that arrive alive at their
destination but emerge traumatized.
“It’s a definite fear that people
do have, but it really is a lack of
awareness and understanding,”
Huntington said. “Animals unfortunately do die in cargo sometimes, but the number is extremely low compared to the number of
animals being shipped successfully. And we take every possible
precaution to ensure that animals arrive safely.”
Some airlines have sought to
capitalize on the market for safe
pet transportation options, extol-
ling the professionally trained
animal handlers stationed at the
airport, staff veterinarians and
special air-conditioned vehicles
that carry the animals from the
warehouse to the airplane.
United has a pet-specific building at O’Hare International Airport in Chicago. Lufthansa, the
German airline, brags that its
Cargo Animal Lounge at Frankfurt Airport is “the world’s most
modern airport animal facility.”
Charles Hobart, a spokesman
for United, said that while airlines take steps to ensure the
health and safety of the animals,
the onus is on pet owners to take
steps before their animal’s journey to help it stay calm and
comfortable en route.
“The overwhelming majority
of dogs and cats have no incidents, and a lot of that has to do
with proper acclimation,” Hobart
said.
He suggests that, to prepare,
owners put their pet in a crate,
put the crate in the back of a car,
and take the car through an
automated carwash.
“The experience approximates
what it’s like traveling in the
cargo hold of an aircraft,” Hobart
said.
But the most stressed-out creatures might be the owners themselves.
Tekin Yilmaz, 27, of Toronto
described the mix of excitement
and dread when his friends texted a picture of his beloved golden-retriever cocker-spaniel mix,
Theo, as his crate was strapped
onto a wooden palette, about to
be raised onto a forklift and
stored for several hours before it
was transported to a plane. The
dog would safely travel from Beirut to Qatar, and then to Montreal — a 35-hour trip that cost,
all told, about $1,500.
“I didn’t want to think about
what could happen during the
trip,” said Yilmaz, 27, who traveled to Canada from Lebanon as a
refugee. “But I had to risk it. He’s
my family, and I have to reunite
with my family.”
martine.powers@washpost.com
THE DISTRICT
ity about their means of mating.
In response to “How do porcupines breed?” wags and wits
sometimes reply: “Very carefully.”
It does seem an intricate process, in which specialists say quills
of the female are made to temporarily lie flat.
The prehensile-tailed porcupine is native to South America. It
gets its name from having a tail
that can grasp and help the animal climb the trees where it
spends most of its time.
According to the zoo, Clark was
born there in 2009 and died
Wednesday of tracheitis, an inflammation of the windpipe.
The condition was discovered
in February, and Clark was treated for it. However, it was determined Wednesday, the zoo said,
that the condition had worsened
and probably spread to the lungs,
and Clark was euthanized.
martin.weil@washpost.com
Tax donations go to closed nonprofit
More than $100,000
for at-risk youths
has been left unspent
BY
F ENIT N IRAPPIL
As District residents fill out
their tax forms this season, they
have an option to chip in part of
their refund to help at-risk children.
But the nonprofit group that is
supposed to receive those contributions dissolved two years ago,
and the money collected through
the tax donation program has not
been spent since.
The Public Fund for Drug Prevention and Children at Risk, established in 1991, is apparently in
limbo and sitting on $102,000
that can’t be used. After The Washington Post inquired about the
fund, elected officials began looking for ways to spend the money.
The name of the fund appears
on tax forms and online tax preparation services as one of three
opportunities for residents to
steer a chunk of their refund, or
their tax bill, to a preferred cause,
including the city’s efforts to lobby
for statehood and the Anacostia
River cleanup.
A decade ago, then-D.C. Council
member Harry Thomas got legislation passed to direct the money
collected to the DC Children and
Youth Investment Trust Corp., a
nonprofit meant to keep children
out of trouble by funding after-
D.C. OFFICE OF THE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER
The Public Fund for Drug Prevention and Children at Risk appears
on D.C. tax forms. The nonprofit it funds dissolved two years ago.
school programs and other initiatives.
Controversy overshadowed the
organization’s purpose.
Thomas went to prison for embezzling money from the nonprofit for a luxury SUV and other perks
for himself. Exorbitant and improper staff spending bankrupted
the DC Trust, which received millions in taxpayer funding from
various sources, including the tax
checkoff, and it dissolved in
April 2016.
No money from the fund for
drug prevention and at-risk children has been distributed since.
The law establishing the taxcheckoff fund requires annual financial reports to the mayor and
D.C. Council, a measure to make
sure taxpayers’ voluntary contributions are properly spent. Neither branch of government could
produce those reports at the re-
quest of The Post.
Council member David Grosso
(I-At Large) acknowledged he
overlooked the tax checkoff when
writing a law last year to replace
DC Trust with a new Office on
Youth Outcomes and Grants.
Natalie Wilson, a spokeswoman for the D.C. Office of the Chief
Financial Officer, said last week
that the agency was awaiting
guidance from the mayor and
council on how to spend money
earmarked for the now defunct
organization.
Olivia Dedner, a spokeswoman
for the Office of the City Administrator, said in a statement, “The
Bowser administration remains
committed to honoring the financial commitments the Trust made
to programs that support District
youth and families and will work
with the Council to enact legislation to transfer the funds to sup-
port programming in the Safer
Stronger DC Office of Neighborhood Safety and Engagement that
is in keeping with this mission.”
Grosso would like the money
for the Office of Youth Outcomes
and Grants. He also wants to know
why the finance office didn’t alert
the council to the fact that a fund
for children was sitting idle.
“We are going to try to fix it so
that it will go to the new commission on out-of-school time and can
go out the door,” Grosso said.
The $102,000 in the fund,
which does not include donations
made since the tax season began
this year, is a sliver of the additional $20 million advocates are seeking to fund the youth-outcomes
office.
But advocates say it can still
make a difference.
Maggie Riden, president and
chief executive of the DC Alliance
of Youth Advocates, said the unspent money in the fund for atrisk children could pay for afterschool programs for 100 students
for an entire school year or a sixweek summer program for 500.
“If there can be a place that
provides children with structured
activities that helps them connect
with caring adults in their community, I think we can all agree
that’s a better option than sending
a kid to sit home in front of a TV, a
video game or YouTube,” Riden
said.
This isn’t the first time the tax
checkoff for at-risk children has
come under scrutiny.
In 1998, a report in The Post
revealed how the fund operated
with little supervision and without following basic requirements
of government spending.
fenit.nirappil@washpost.com
SATURDAY, MARCH 10 , 2018
Teen guilty
of 2 killings
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
IN MEMORIAM
DEATH NOTICE
JONES
GRISSETT
RUSSELL J. JONES
6/21/1937
keith.alexander@washpost.com
ATEFI
Dr. BAHMAN ATEFI
Dr. Bahman Atefi, age 65, passed away
suddenly at his home in McLean, VA on
Monday March 5, 2018. He was born in
Tehran, Iran and came to the United States
to attend Cornell University. He completed
a PhD in Nuclear Engineering from the
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
(MIT). He recently retired from Alion Science and Technology, where he was the
CEO since 2002. Dr. Atefi loved skiing in
Vail, running, tennis and most importantly,
traveling with his family. He will always
be remembered for his kind heart, warm
laughter, and his incredible love for his
family. Dr. Atefi is survived by his wife,
Hamila, his three children Bobak, Bahram
and Yasmin, and granddaughter Beatrice.
A memorial service to honor his life will
take place at Congressional Country Club
on Sunday, March 11, 2018 from 2 to 5 p.m.
at 8500 River Road, Bethesda, MD. All are
welcome to attend and celebrate his life.
SF
McGLOON
SEIDL
NORTHROP
ELLEN JEAN GRISSETT (Age 91)
Of Ashburn, VA, died Saturday, March 3, 2018.
Born in Washington, DC, she was retired from
the Federal Government. Surviving are a
daughter and son-in-law, Nancy and Marc
Weisman of Reston, VA; a son and daughter-inlaw, Walter, Jr. and Janet Grissett of Portland,
OR; two grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. She will be interred with her late
husband, Walter, at Arlington Cemetery at a
later date.
GEORGE L.F. SEIDL
"Opa"(Age 88)
MITCHELL
HONABLEW
BARBARA ANNE
CUNNINGHAM BARNES
Barbara Anne passed away peacefully on
March 1, 2018 at her home, Baywoods of
Annapolis, at the age of 89. She was born
on June 18, 1928 in Lansford, PA to loving
parents Francis and Anna Cunningham (nee
Fries). She graduated in 1949 from Rosemont College in Bryn Mawr, PA with a BA
in Psychology. Following graduation she
worked for Sidwell Friends School and the
Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) in Washington, DC and later the School of the
Holy Child in Potomac, MD. She retired
after working at Woodward & Lothrop and
volunteering at Sibley Memorial Hospital.
Barbara Anne was an active participant in
her parish, St. Jane Frances de Chantal and
resident of Bethesda, MD for 60 years. She
also volunteered for the Christ Child Society
and the Gonzaga College High School Mothers Club. She was predeceased by her
brother Jerry and son-in-law Roy. Barbara
Anne is survived by her beloved husband
of 64 years, Edward and four children:
Anne (Roy) Colin of Cape May Court House,
NJ, Edward, Jr. (Felice) of Thornwood,
NY, Carl (Sally) of Croton on Hudson, NY
and Paul (Mary Ellen) of Annapolis, MD.
She is also survived by 10 grandchildren Nicholas, Joseph, Alex, Caroline, Madeline,
Kelly Anne, Megan, Tara, Zachary and
Phoebe and two great grandchildren - Lilliana and Grady.
There will be a visitation for family and
friends on Friday, March 16, from 5 to 7
p.m. at John M. Taylor Funeral Home, 147
Duke of Gloucester St. Annapolis, MD. A
Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated
at 9 a.m. on Saturday, March 17 at St.
Mary’s Church, 109 Duke of Gloucester St.
Annapolis MD. Memorial contributions can
be made to the Christ Child Society, 5101
Wisconsin Ave. NW Suite 304 Washington,
DC 20016 and Sibley Memorial Hospital,
5255 Loughboro Rd. NW Washington, DC
20016. Online condolences may be made
to www.johnmtaylorfuneralhome.com
BARNES
CLEVELAND ADAMS BARNES
Died on February 24, 2018. Service is at St.
Patrick's Episcopal Church at 4700 Whitehaven
Parkway NW, Washington, DC on Sunday,
March 11, 2018 at 1 p.m. with interment at
Congressional Cemetery at 4:30 p.m.
BRODY
WILLIAM MYLES HONABLEW, SR.
On Friday, March 2, 2018, William Myles
Honablew, Sr., of Temple Hills, MD. Beloved
husband of Mildred M. Honablew; loving father
of William Jr, Joseph, and Tracey Honablew;
cherished grandfather of William, III and Timothy Honablew, loving brother of Chester and
Samuel Sr., Honablew; and adored godfather
of Morgan Haynes and John Elkey. Visitation
will be held on Tuesday, March 13, 2018 from
10 to 11 a.m., followed by funeral services
at Trinity AME Zion Church, 3505 16th Street,
NW, Washington, DC, 20010. Interment will
take place at George Washington Cemetery,
Adelphi, MD on Wednesday, March 14, 2018.
Passed away on Wednesday,
March 7, 2018, surrounded by
his family at his residence in
Silver Spring, MD. Beloved husband of 61 years to Elizabeth
Seidl; loving father of Frances
E. (Brian ) Gamble, Barbara A. Bar-Haim
and George M. Seidl. Grandfather of Lauren
(Patrick ) Murphy, Alissa Aronstam, Jacklyn
Gamble, Steven Gamble, Callie Seidl, Jacob
Bar-Haim and Hailey Bar-Haim. Brother
of Catherine Seidl Catlett. Relatives and
friends may call at Collins Funeral Home,
500 University Boulevard West, Silver
Spring, MD, (Valet Parking), Sunday, March
11 from 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m.
Mass of Christian Burial at St. Andrew
Apostle Church, 11600 Kemp Mill Rd., Silver
Spring, MD on Monday, March 12 at 10
a.m. Interment Gate of Heaven Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions
may be made to Mustard Seed Community,
29 Janes Avenue, Medfield, MA 02052.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
JOHN DICKERSON MITCHELL, JR.
July 6, 1927 – March 6, 2018
SHAFFER
John Dickerson Mitchell, Jr., (Colonel US
Army, Ret.), of Hollywood, MD died following four years residence at the Arleigh
Burke Pavilion Nursing Home in Mclean,
VA. John, like his father, graduated from
the United States Military Academy (West
Point) in 1949 and served as an electrical
engineering instructor there.
JAMES E. SHAFFER, JR.
John had a lifetime interest in amateur
radio, jazz music, and musicians. He earned
graduate degrees from Stafford University
and the Virginia Institute of Marine Science.
John is survived by his brother, George,
(Mary) and nephew, David. Inurnment will
be held at Arlington National Cemetery at a
later date.
KELLEY
LEO G. KELLEY
JUNE 25, 1938 - MARCH 7, 2018
ROBERT R. POIST (Age 75)
Officers and members of Local
#26 are hereby notified of the
death of Retired Brother Leo G.
Kelley. Viewing will be held on
Sunday, March 11, 2018 from 5
p.m. to 7 p.m. at Andrews Mortuary and Crematory, 17730 Highway 17 North.
Hampstead, NC 910-270-3401. Funeral will be
held Monday, March 12 at All Saint Catholic
Church, 18737 Highway North, Hampstead,
NC.
J.F. Dabbs, F.S.
KELLEY
LORRAINE E. KELLEY
(Age 83)
Lorraine E. Kelley of Washington, DC, departed
this life after a brief illness on Thursday, March
1, 2018. She leaves to cherish her memory her
devoted daughter, Doniece Kelley and grandsons, Shaun and Dana Plummer. From a family
of 11 siblings Lorraine is survived by three
sisters, three brothers and host other relatives
and friends. A Memorial Service will be held
on Wednesday, March 14, 2018 at Church
of the Incarnation, 880 Eastern Avenue NE,
Washington, DC 20019. Visitation and Tribute
from 9:30 a.m. until 10:45 a.m. Mass to follow
at 11 a.m. Arrangements by McGuire.
www.mcguire-services.com
It is with regret that we notify
the members of Steamfitters
Local #602 of the death of Brother
Robert R. Poist. Services held by
family.
Notice #1653
Daniel W. Loveless, FST
JAMES S. PRIESTLEY
October 9, 1942 - March 4, 2018
Jim was the beloved husband of Lorraine;
loving father of Michelle Rathbun (David)
and David J. Priestley and loving grandfather
of Allison Rathbun and Eóin Priestley. A
Mass of Christian Burial will be held on
Saturday, March 10, at 11 a.m. St. Andrew
Apostle Catholic Church, 11600 Kemp Mill
Rd., Silver Spring, MD 20902. Memorial
contributions may be made in his name to
the St. Andrew Apostle Building Fund.
PETER A. LaROSA
Of Washington, DC., died on March 1, 2018,
following a brief illness. Visitation is Tuesday,
March 13, 10 a.m. followed by funeral services,
11 a.m., at Nineteenth Street Baptist Church,
4606 16th Street, NW.
WILLIAM R. WEAVER (Age 48)
It is with regret that we notify
the members of Steamfitters
Local #602 of the death of Brother
William Weaver. Services held by
family.
Notice #1652
Daniel W. Loveless, FST
ZOCCHI
Lost her valiant struggle against heart and lung
disease on Thursday, February 15, 2018. She
was born at Sibley Hospital on May 5, 1940,
the same place where she embarked on a
lifelong career as a nurse and also ended her
life there. She is survived by her three children
and their spouses, David (Mark), Joe (Christine)
and Carolyn; their father, Donald Zocchi; and
her partner in late life, Christiane Cox. She also
leaves behind three grandchildren, Gregory,
Michaela and Amanda; as well as one greatgrandchild, Bryce Anthony. A Celebration of
her Life will take place at Cedar Lane Unitarian
Universalist Church, 9601 Cedar Ln., Bethesda,
MD, Saturday, March 17 at 2 p.m. Interment at
a later date at Glenwood Cemetery. In lieu of
flowers, donations may be made in her name
to Cedar Lane UUC.
IN MEMORIAM
GENTRY
FLORENCE KONIGSBERG BRODY
In loving memory, Florence Konigsberg Brody
passed away peacefully at 92 years old on
March 8, 2018 surrounded by the love of her
family. A lifelong Washingtonian, she was
married to the late Norman Brody. Florence
is survived by her two children, Bill Brody
(Susan) and Sherry Brody Brodner (Bonnie).
Grandchildren, Deidre, David, Curtis and Eli.
Her sister, Betty Goldstein (and the late Richard
Goldstein) and many beloved nieces, nephews
and cousins. She is preceded in death by
her son, Robert. Florence was a lifelong
philanthropist and involved in many activities,
especially the archives committee through
Washington Hebrew Congregation, the WIC
program through the Children’s National Medical Center and the Norman and Florence
Brody Family Forum through the University of
Maryland. She was loved by her late sister
Louise Herman, her late brother Tolbert Konigsberg (Jean) and by her many friends and family.
The funeral will be on Sunday, March 11, at
1:30 p.m. at Washington Hebrew Congregation.
Shiva will be Monday.
Passed peacefully on Sunday, March 4, 2018 in
Georgia. He was a dedicated educator, outdoor
enthusiast and motor cycle rider. Paul was
raised in Hudson, NY by the late Joseph F. and
Margaret C. Mahota. He was brother to the late
Edward (Ned) Mahota. Paul is survived by his
beloved fiancée, Donna Bennett; his children,
Theresa Doherty, Mark Mahota, Karen Key, and
Marybeth Miller; and his grandchildren, Justin,
Kaitlyn, Patrick, Emily, Riley, Courtney, Grace,
and Abigail. A celebration of life service will
be held on March 12, 2018 from 3 to 7 p.m.
at Tusculum Farm, Laytonsville, MD. In lieu of
flowers, please make donations in his name to
St. Jude Children’s Hospital.
BURGESS
WARREN BURGESS
CONNER
THOMAS A. CONNER
The members of the Retired Firefighters Association of Washington, DC regret to announce the
passing of Thomas A. Conner on
March 7, 2018. Brother Conner
retired March 1, 1986.
Tom Scherer, President
Passed away on March 8, 2018 in Maryland.
Loving wife of John E. Goliwas; devoted
mother of Paul (Faye) Goliwas, Louis Goliwas and Regina (Allen) Weston. Also survived by five grandchildren, five greatgrandchildren, and a host of other relatives
and friends. Services will be on Tuesday,
March 13 at Fort Lincoln Funeral Home,
3401 Bladensburg Rd., Brentwood, MD.
Gathering at 12:30 p.m.; services at 1:30
p.m. Interment Fort Lincoln Cemetery.
www.fort-lincoln.com
EDWIN W. McCLURE
Edwin Wallace McClure, 73, passed away
peacefully on March 6, 2018. Edwin served
honorably in the United States Army as a
Captain. He was a veteran of the Vietnam War
and served two tours, in Vietnam, earning him
the Bronze Star Medal, the Vietnam Service
Medal, the Vietnam Campaign Medal, and
the National Defense Medal. After his service
in the Army Edwin taught mathematics at
Woodbridge Senior High School for 20 years.
Edwin then moved to the rival high school
and continued to teach mathematics at GarField Senior High School for six years before
retiring from Prince William County Public
Schools. When Edwin wasn't teaching he was
golfing; golfing was his passion and he was
a starter at the Fort Belvoir Golf Course.
Edwin loved his family and loved life. He
was always fun to be around and will be
deeply missed. Edwin leaves behind to cherish
his memories his beloved wife, Theresa; his
cherished son, Duane McClure and his wife,
Robyn; his precious grandsons, Zachary and
Justin McClure; and his brothers, Hugh, Jeffrey,
and Dan. Edwin was predeceased by his
first wife, Linda Nutt; and his parents, Hugh
and Ruth McClure. A visitation for Edwin
will be held at Mountcastle Turch Funeral
Home, 13318 Occoquan Road, Woodbridge,
Virginia 22191 on Saturday, March 10, 2018
from 12 p.m. to 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. to 8
p.m. with a celebration of life beginning at 8
p.m. Edwin will be laid to rest at Arlington
National Cemetery at a later date. In lieu of
flowers memorial contributions can be made
in Edwin's name to the American Heart Association (www.heart.org).
ROSSMEISL
KATHRYN LYNNE ROSSMEISL (Vagts)
(Age 67)
Passed away on March 6, 2018. She was
a devoted wife, mother, sister and friend.
Kathryn dedicated her time to helping
others, in both her personal and professional lives. She was born on September
29, 1950, on Long Island, NY, to William
Vagts and Eloise (Reinking) Vagts, and was
the middle of three daughters. She had a
passion for music and played a variety of
instruments including clarinet, guitar, and
piano. Originally seeking a major in French,
Kathryn chose to study speech pathology
instead, in which she earned both her
B.A. and M.S. Kathryn worked in a private
practice in upstate New York, where she
was recognized by the local paper for her
hard work and dedication to her clients.
Kathryn met her husband in 1982 at a ski
club, and they married shortly thereafter
in 1984. She and her husband moved
to Maryland in 1989, where she took a
brief hiatus from work to raise her two
children. She returned to her profession
a few short years later, working in the
Montgomery County Public School system
for the remainder of her career. After
retiring, Kathryn and her husband pursued
their other passion full-time: travel. In
between the busy days of being a mother,
wife, and traveler, she also spent ample
time volunteering at various organizations,
and enjoyed dabbling in the arts as well.
Kathryn was well-loved by all she met,
and was known for her generous, kind,
and gentle nature. She is survived by
her husband, David Rossmeisl; son, Eric
Rossmeisl and his wife, Kimberly; daughter, Amy Rossmeisl; and sisters, Janice
Kohlmeyer and Barbara Romanoff. A service to celebrate Kathryn’s life will be held
on Wednesday, March 14, 2018, at 2 p.m.,
at the Prince of Peace Lutheran Church,
11900 Darnestown Road, Gaithersburg,
MD 20878. The family requests that, in
lieu of flowers, memorial donations be
made to the Montgomery County Stroke
Association, MCSA, P.O. Box 9343, Silver
Spring, MD 20916, or Lab-Rescue.org.
Col. FRANCIS P. WIEGAND "Frank"
U.S Army Corps of Engineers passed February
27, 2018 at his Fredericksburg home. Frank is
survived by his wife of 61 years, Jean Wiegand;
five children, Francis Wiegand, Judy Witthohn,
Kathy Clarke, Patricia Fisher, and Chrissy Price;
11 grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.
Raised in Mount Kisco, NY, engineering degree
from RPI, Army Corps of Engineers service in
the Korean War, work experience in the DC and
Federal governments, and private sector, Frank
was a hardworking father who encouraged
education and strong work ethic, rewarded
with beach vacations.
The family will receive friends from 6 to 7
p.m. on Monday, March 12 at Covenant Funeral
Services, Fredericksburg. A funeral service will
be held at 12 noon Tuesday, March 13 at
Covenant Funeral Service Chapel. Interment
will follow at 2 p.m. at Quantico National
Cemetery. In lieu of flowers memorials may be
made to AMVETS.
CEMETERY LOTS
FORT LINCOLN CEMETERY- Rose garden,
Block 20, lot 520, plots 3, 4 & 5. Each plot
double depth. $6,000 each. Call 302-524-8073
National Memorial Park, Falls Church, VA
2 Crypts w/ 1 bronze memorial.
Value $12,000. Asking $9,500.
Call 703-754-7109 (Leave Message)
When the
need arises,
let families
find you in the
Funeral Services
Directory.
To be seen in the
Funeral Services
Directory, please call
paid Death Notices at
202-334-4122.
DONALD L. GENTRY, SR. "Duck"
10/22/1938 - 3/10/2004
14 years ago today, God called you home.
Happy memories of you always.
Love, wife, Mamie and Family
DEATH NOTICE
MAHOTA
PAUL V. MAHOTA (Age 76)
McCLURE
On Monday, February 19, 2018. Beloved husband of Lucretia Maxine Burgess, father of
Warren, Jr., Larren, Darren, and Syvarren; son
of Charlotte B. Burgess and the late John D.
Burgess. He is also survived by two sisters,
Susie Burgess, Annabelle Muller (Marion); three
brothers, Benjamin, Joseph, and Lawrence E.
Burgess; brother-in-law, David; other relatives
and friends. He was preceded in death by
brothers, John C. Burgess and Larry Burgess;
one sister Janice B. Atkins. Mr. Burgess will
lie in state at Greater Morning Star Apostolic,
1700 Ritchie Marlboro Rd., Upper Marlboro,
MD, Saturday, March 10, from 10 a.m. until
services at 11 a.m. Interment Fort Lincoln
Cemetery. Services by Wiseman Funeral Home
and Chapel.
SALLY A. REICHERT
On Monday, March 5, 2018, Sally A. Reichert
passed away, at her home in Burke, VA.
Sally was born in Boston, MA. Sally was
always a proud Bostonian and would
always engage in conversation with anyone
anywhere if there was any indication that
he/she was from Boston or anywhere in
Massachusetts. She graduated from Girls
Latin School in Boston and American University in Washington, DC. She retired
from the FAA. She is survived by her
husband, Earl T. Reichert. Visitation will be
Sunday March 11, 2018 from 4 to 6 p.m.,
followed by a 6 p.m. service at the Fairfax
Memorial Funeral Home, 9902 Braddock
Road Fairfax, VA 22032.
WIEGAND
SWAILES
REICHERT
Of Fort Belvoir, VA on March 7, 2018. Beloved
husband of 68 years to Mary Dorothy LaRosa;
loving father of five children; grandfather of
seven; great-grandfather of 14; brother of five.
Relatives and friends may call at Jefferson
Funeral Chapel, 5755 Castlewellan Dr., Alexandria, VA, Monday, March 12 from 4 to 7 p.m.
Mass of Christian Burial will be held at St.
Raymond of Penafort Catholic Church, 8750
Pohick Rd., Springfield, VA 22153, Tuesday,
March 13 at 11 a.m. Interment Arlington
National Cemetery at a later date. Flowers
or contributions are both appreciated. Contributions may be made to Wounded Warrior
Project at:
www.woundedwarriorproject.org
Lorine Streyle Northrop (Lorie)
of Rockville, MD, passed away
peacefully on March 5, 2018.
Lorie was born in Isabel, South Dakota,
and attended Yankton College. As a military
wife, she eventually came to Washington,
DC, and had a fulfilling career at the National Geographic Society. Lorie married Robert
Weeks Northrop (Bob) in 1976 and retired to
Sarasota, Florida, moving back to Maryland
after Bob's death. She is survived by her
sister, Verella Severtson, her only son,
Daniel Raymond Wendling and his wife,
Nina (Slowinski) Wendling, granddaughters,
Allison Carter Wendling Frels (Brian), Adrienne Streyle-Waring Wendling Gillis (Ryan),
and great-grandchildren, Brooks Andrew
Frels and Annaleigh Calvert Frels. The family will host a gathering celebrating her
life on Tuesday evening, March 13, 2018.
Contact
the
family
via
lorine.northrop.memorial@gmail.com for
additional details. Online guestbook at
www.DeVolFuneralHome.com
EDWARD EUGENE SWAILES
CHERYL BLUNT ZOCCHI
PRIESTLEY
LORINE NORTHROP
(Age 86)
The members of the Retired Firefighters Association of Washington, DC regret to announce the
passing of James E. Shaffer, Jr.
on July 19, 2017. Brother Shaffer
retired August 30, 1980 from E-1.
Services previously held.
Tom Scherer, President
WEAVER
POIST
LaROSA
MARY A. GOLIWAS
1-800-753-POST
DEATH NOTICE
BARNES
GOLIWAS
Home delivery
is convenient.
DEATH NOTICE
On Friday, March 9, 2018, of Kensington, MD. Beloved wife of the
late Bill McGloon, Sr.; mother of
Bill (Beth) McGloon Jr., Tom (Brenda) McGloon and Pat (Denise)
McGloon; grandmother of Kelsey
and Matt McGloon, Brooke and
Blair McGloon and Johnny and Eve McGloon.
Relatives and friends may call at Holy
Redeemer Church, 9705 Summit Ave, Kensington, MD, 20895 on Tuesday, March 13 from
5 to 8 pm. Mass of Christian Burial will be
celebrated at Holy Redeemer Church on
Wednesday, March 14 at 11 a.m. Interment
Gate of Heaven Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to Holy Redeemer Catholic
Church or the Washington Jesuit Academy, 900
Varnum St., NE,Washington, DC 20017.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
3/10/2016
DEATH NOTICE
cer, as he sat behind the driver’s
seat of a rental car. Prosecutors
said the trio mistakenly thought
Baldwin was a drug dealer and
had set out to rob him.
According to testimony, Bellamy grabbed the handle of the
driver’s side door and ordered
Baldwin to turn over money. As
Baldwin tried to push his way
out of the car, Bellamy fired
multiple shots. Two witnesses
who were at the scene of the
shooting, one of whom pleaded
guilty to second-degree murder,
outlined Bellamy’s role in the
shooting. Authorities also found
Bellamy’s DNA on the car door.
Prosecutors called both murders “senseless.” In her closing
arguments, veteran homicide
prosecutor Deborah Sines urged
the jury to disregard Bellamy’s
youthful age at the time of the
killings and find him guilty of
first-degree, premeditated murder.
“This wasn’t an accident. This
wasn’t self-defense. This was on
purpose. Under our laws, if you
kill someone when you are 17,
you are held responsible, just as
if you are a man,” Sines argued.
Bellamy’s attorneys, Steven
Kiersh and Kevin McCants, repeatedly argued that their client
did not plan to kill Davonte and
rejected the premeditation
charge. The attorneys also contended that one of Bellamy’s
friends, who was with him during the attempted robbery, was
the one who fired.
The jury ultimately rejected
the attorneys’ assertions and
found Bellamy guilty of two
counts of first-degree murder
while armed and robbery.
Kiersh also argued that Bellamy was not mentally responsible for his actions.
According to a Post investigation a month after his arrest,
Bellamy had struggled with his
temper since he was in grade
school. During the trial, Bellamy’s mother, Keisha Shelton,
testified that she noticed her son
began showing impulse control
issues when he was in the second
grade.
“He would do things and not
think about the consequences,”
she told the jury. A doctor prescribed a medication to help him
control his temper and reduce
his anxiety. His mother enrolled
Bellamy in a private school in
Maryland, teachers were able to
focus Bellamy’s energy into his
classwork, and he was the speaker at his eighth-grade graduation.
But in 2013, Bellamy’s family
moved to Southeast Washington.
Shelton said D.C. school officials
initially told her that Bellamy
could remain at his Maryland
school, even when she moved to
the city, but that didn’t happen.
For five weeks, Bellamy, then 15,
drifted while his mother tried to
get the school system to enroll
him at Ballou High School,
which was within walking distance of the family’s new home.
When Bellamy finally started
classes, his absences, bursts of
anger and failing grades quickly
piled up. During his freshman
year at Ballou, Bellamy was arrested on a charge of simple
assault for threatening a school
employee.
He
eventually
dropped out of school.
During cross examination,
Sines asked Shelton if she
blamed the D.C. school system
for her son’s troubles.
“They definitely played a part,”
Shelton told the prosecutor.
But Sines later rejected Shelton’s assertion. “The D.C. public
school system did not kill this
15-year-old child. Mr. Bellamy
did,” she said holding up a
poster-sized picture of Davonte.
The Bellamy case marked the
final murder trial for the 65-yearold Sines, who has been a homicide prosecutor within the U.S.
Attorney’s office since 1985 and
is retiring in April. Sines has
tried some of the city’s most
horrific murders, including the
2009 murder trial of Banita
Jacks, the Southeast Washington
woman convicted of killing her
four daughters and living with
their decomposing bodies for
months.
Outside the courtroom, Sines
hugged the victims’ families.
“This doesn’t bring them back.
This will hurt always,” she said as
Davonte’s mother and Baldwin’s
wife both hugged her.
DEATH NOTICE
SHIRLEE ENDERS McGLOON (Age 94)
How I miss you can't be said,
In just a word or two;
Eah day a thousand things remind me,
Of the friendship shared with you.
Love, Josie
VERDICT FROM B1
B5
RE
BRISCOE
PAID DEATH NOTICES
MONDAY- FRIDAY 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
To place a notice, call:
202-334-4122
800-627-1150 ext 4-4122
FAX:
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EMAIL:
deathnotices@washpost.com
Email and faxes MUST include
name, home address & home phone #
of the responsible billing party.
Fax & email deadline - 3 p.m. daily
Phone-In deadline
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3 p.m. Sa-Su
CURRENT 2018 RATES:
( PER DAY)
HELEN LUCY BRISCOE
On Saturday, March 3, 2018. Loving and devoted mother of Gloria C. Booze, Garland Booze,
Kevin Booze and the late Ronald Booze;
beloved sister of Lillian, Ruth, Hattie, Thelma
and Emma. She is also survived by a stepdaughter, Sherry Pollock; one half-brother,
Samuel Mackall; 11 grandchildren, 11 greatgrandchildren, a host of other relatives and
friends. Mrs. Briscoe will lie in state at the
Peace Baptist Church, 712 18th St., NE, Monday, March 12 from 10 a.m. until funeral
services at 11 a.m. Interment National Harmony Memorial Park. Services by STEWART.
FRANKLIN
MONDAY-SATURDAY
Black & White
1" - $135 (text only)
2" - $306 (text only)
3" - $441
4" - $482
5" - $611
-----SUNDAY
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2" - $339 (text only)
3" - $489
4" - $515
5" - $665
6"+ for ALL Black & White notices
$135 each additional inch wkday
$161 each additional inch Sunday
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-----SUNDAY
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4" - $685
5" - $834
6"+ for ALL color notices
$224 each additional inch wkday
$250 each additional inch Sunday
Notices with photos begin at 3"
(All photos add 2" to your notice.)
ALL NOTICES MUST BE PREPAID
MEMORIAL PLAQUES:
All notices over 2" include
complimentary memorial plaque
Additional plaques start at $26 each
and may be ordered.
SCHULER
ANNE SCHULER (Age 62)
On Thursday, March 8, 2018, of
Rockville, MD. Beloved daughter
of the late Adelle Z. and the late
James C. Schuler, Sr.; sister of
James C., Jr., Louis R., Mark J.,
Frank M., T. Andrew, the late John
and the late Bartley C. Schuler.
Also survived by nieces and nephews. Relatives and friends may call at Collins Funeral
Home, 500 University Boulevard West, Silver
Spring, MD, (Valet Parking), Sunday, March 11
from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Graveside Service
and interment at Gate of Heaven Cemetery,
13801 Georgia Avenue, Silver Spring, MD on
Monday, March 12 at 10:30 a.m.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
ODELL ODOM FRANKLIN (Age 80)
On Sunday, March 4, 2018, Odell went home
to our Lord. She was the beloved wife of
the late Harold L. Franklin. She is survived
by three children, Harold Lee (Faydra); Elaine
Patricia Crump, and Wanda Kay Gabriel; four
grandchildren, Angelo Crump, Jr, Evan Crump,
Jasmine Franklin, and Sean Hollingsworth; six
sisters, Lula (DuFord) Joseph, Marie Odom,
Emily Odom, Evelyn Odom, Minnie Bell (Benjamin) Brunson, and Mamie Brown; one brother-in-law; six sisters-in-law; and host of relatives and friends. On Saturday, March 10,
2018, Visitation 10 a.m., service 11 a.m. at
Union Wesley AME Zion Church, 1860 Michigan
Avenue, NE, Washington, DC 20018. Interment
Fort Lincoln Cemetery, Brentwood, MD.
www.marshallmarchfh.com
All Paid Death Notices
appear on our website through
www.legacy.com
LEGACY.COM
Included in all death notices
Optional for In Memoriams
PLEASE NOTE:
Notices must be placed via phone, fax or
email. Photos must be emailed. You can
no longer place notices, drop off photos
and make payment in person.
Payment must be made via phone with
debit/credit card.
B6
EZ
. SATURDAY,
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
MARCH 10 , 2018
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
Mostly sunny and seasonable
Early morning cloud cover will give
way to mostly sunny and seasonable
conditions by Saturday afternoon.
Temperatures should climb into the
upper 40s to around 50 degrees in
Washington, with winds out of the west at 5 to
10 mph. Cloud cover will slowly start to return in
the evening. Overnight temperatures will be
similar, if not a bit higher, than Friday night, with
lows in the upper 20s to around 32 degrees.
Today
Mostly sunny
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Sunday
Rain
Monday
Mostly cloudy
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Tuesday
Partly sunny,
chilly
Wednesday
Partly sunny,
chilly
Thursday
Partly sunny;
breezy
52° 31
48° 35
46° 31
45° 28
42° 29
51° 36
FEELS*: 48°
FEELS: 51°
FEELS: 40°
FEELS: 35°
FEELS: 33°
FEELS: 40°
CHNCE PRECIP: 5%
P: 30%
P: 25%
P: 20%
P: 20%
P: 5%
WIND: W 7–14 mph
W: NW 6–12 mph
W: NE 7–14 mph
W: NW 10–20 mph
W: WNW 8–16 mph
W: WNW 10–20 mph
°
°
°
°
°
OFFICIAL RECORD
Temperatures
NATION
Harrisburg
46/27
Hagerstown
46/25
Davis
40/15
Tu
W
High
Low
Weather map features for noon today.
Normal
Philadelphia
45/28
Record high
Record low
Baltimore
48/26
Dover
47/28
Washington
52/31
FORECAST
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
46° 2:00 p.m.
33° 5:50 a.m.
53°/36°
80° 1964
16° 1932
43° 3:06 p.m.
30° 7:00 a.m.
53°/31°
82° 2016
14° 1996
45° 12:49 p.m.
31° 5:00 a.m.
51°/31°
82° 2016
10° 1960
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: +0.1° yr. to date: +2.5°
Precipitation
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
OCEAN: 43°
Ocean City
47/31
OCEAN: 40°
Lexington
50/30
Richmond
49/32
Norfolk
49/38
Virginia Beach
48/38
Past 24 hours
OCEAN: 41°
Total this month
Normal
Total this year
Kitty Hawk
50/43
OCEAN: 45°
Normal
Snow, past 24 hours
Pollen: Moderate
Air Quality: Good
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
Moderate
Low
Low
Totals for season
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.00"
0.43"
0.88"
6.16"
6.31"
0.0"
3.7"
0.00"
0.24"
0.86"
6.63"
6.28"
0.0"
6.6"
0.00"
1.00"
1.02"
7.30"
6.97"
0.0"
10.5"
Moon Phases
UV: Moderate
Solar system
5 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, partly sunny. High 37–41. Wind
southwest 6–12 mph. Tonight, partly cloudy. Low 23–27.
Wind northwest 4–8 mph. Sunday, cloudy, cold, snow at
night. High 33–37. Wind east 4–8 mph. Monday, partly
sunny, cold. High 33–37. Wind northeast 6–12 mph.
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Thermal, CA 89°
Low: Wright, MN –10°
for the 48 contiguous states
Atlantic beaches: Today, a little rain south early, partly
sunny north. High 45–49. Wind west 7–14 mph. Tonight,
clear north, increasingly cloudy south. Low 29–38. Wind
northwest 4–8 mph. Sunday, periods of rain. High 42–46.
Wind northeast 6–12 mph.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, mostly sunny. Wind west
6–12 knots. Waves around a foot. Visibility unrestricted. • Lower
Potomac and Chesapeake Bay: Today, partly sunny. Wind southwest
7–14 knots. Waves around a foot on the lower Potomac and 1–2 feet
on the Bay.• River Stages: Today, the stage at Little Falls will be 4.1
feet, falling to around 4.0 feet on Sunday. Flood stage at Little Falls
is 10 feet.
(High tides in Bold)
Washington
2:29 a.m.
8:48 a.m.
2:42 p.m.
9:53 p.m.
Annapolis
5:27 a.m.
12:15 p.m.
6:24 p.m.
11:58 p.m.
Ocean City
1:42 a.m.
8:13 a.m.
2:03 p.m.
8:12 p.m.
Norfolk
3:50 a.m.
10:10 a.m.
4:06 p.m.
10:15 p.m.
1:08 a.m.
8:07 a.m.
3:07 p.m.
8:06 p.m.
Point Lookout
ACTUAL
Cape May
44/30
Annapolis
49/29
Charlottesville
52/30
Today’s tides
RECORD
°
M
REGION
AVERAGE
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
38/25/sf
69/39/pc
33/17/c
66/52/pc
85/58/t
48/26/s
38/18/pc
65/55/t
33/13/sn
56/35/s
44/31/pc
34/21/sf
38/30/sf
72/51/pc
48/28/pc
62/45/pc
45/19/r
43/29/pc
48/28/pc
36/21/pc
80/56/t
52/21/c
Tomorrow
39/24/pc
47/34/sh
31/18/i
61/43/r
67/46/pc
46/30/pc
36/25/s
67/38/r
30/7/s
57/35/s
46/30/s
35/22/pc
38/27/c
71/54/r
47/29/c
51/39/r
45/19/s
41/28/pc
45/26/c
38/25/pc
62/41/pc
50/21/s
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
47/31/c
39/25/s
79/56/s
29/4/pc
35/21/c
41/26/pc
79/67/s
82/67/t
45/28/pc
71/57/r
74/51/pc
55/34/c
68/56/pc
67/51/r
63/58/r
53/34/c
63/50/r
76/68/sh
40/28/pc
39/29/c
58/47/r
77/63/t
45/31/s
49/38/r
41/27/sf
41/24/s
61/42/c
27/8/pc
32/11/pc
43/25/s
80/68/c
74/48/c
43/26/c
69/37/c
77/58/r
43/27/sn
69/57/c
61/36/sh
69/58/c
49/30/r
59/36/r
82/70/t
39/29/pc
40/24/c
56/34/r
80/52/sh
45/31/pc
46/37/r
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
69/42/c
50/31/c
78/60/pc
45/28/s
80/63/pc
40/22/pc
42/29/c
60/42/s
44/29/pc
56/41/pc
56/34/c
49/32/s
64/45/c
54/36/c
82/73/pc
55/37/pc
66/60/r
60/51/c
86/76/pc
57/41/s
48/29/s
35/25/sf
75/63/pc
71/35/c
55/31/pc
40/25/c
84/65/t
45/31/pc
77/62/c
42/25/pc
44/26/pc
66/46/s
48/30/s
46/33/r
62/38/c
45/31/r
69/52/pc
41/29/sh
83/73/pc
56/38/c
71/59/c
67/54/pc
86/74/s
62/43/s
51/31/s
34/23/pc
80/69/t
50/29/pc
Mar 17
New
World
High: Matam, Senegal 110°
Low: Delyankir, Russia –50°
Mar 24
First
Quarter
Mar 31
Full
Apr 8
Last
Quarter
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Rise
6:27 a.m.
1:58 a.m.
7:08 a.m.
1:55 a.m.
11:16 p.m.
2:44 a.m.
Set
6:10 p.m.
12:02 p.m.
7:19 p.m.
11:20 a.m.
9:25 a.m.
12:16 p.m.
excludes Antarctica
WORLD
Today
Addis Ababa
80/47/s
Amsterdam
59/45/c
Athens
65/52/pc
Auckland
74/60/pc
Baghdad
74/51/pc
Bangkok
88/74/s
Beijing
57/23/s
Berlin
50/43/r
Bogota
69/48/pc
Brussels
57/48/c
Buenos Aires
93/55/s
Cairo
75/55/s
Caracas
76/66/s
Copenhagen
36/33/r
Dakar
78/68/s
Dublin
53/39/r
Edinburgh
44/38/r
Frankfurt
55/45/sh
Geneva
58/44/r
Ham., Bermuda 65/62/pc
Helsinki
32/25/sf
Ho Chi Minh City 95/73/s
Tomorrow
82/52/s
55/44/r
67/52/pc
72/63/c
76/53/pc
92/75/s
53/32/s
61/41/c
71/46/pc
59/46/r
79/53/pc
74/55/s
76/65/s
41/38/c
79/68/s
50/38/sh
52/37/c
60/46/r
54/43/t
68/63/pc
36/24/sf
95/74/s
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
69/60/s
82/56/pc
56/46/pc
60/45/pc
75/58/pc
62/39/c
85/77/pc
95/68/pc
88/79/t
77/69/pc
59/49/t
56/43/c
56/44/r
87/75/s
81/53/pc
37/27/sf
21/15/sn
91/79/pc
81/59/pc
91/62/pc
33/24/c
36/24/pc
62/49/t
55/40/c
70/65/s
85/59/pc
57/49/pc
61/46/s
75/56/t
62/41/c
85/77/s
96/72/pc
89/78/t
77/70/c
57/49/r
55/46/t
50/42/t
87/76/pc
83/53/pc
38/24/c
23/17/sn
94/81/pc
81/61/c
92/63/pc
32/30/sn
36/23/pc
61/46/t
57/40/c
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei City
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
85/74/pc
93/64/s
60/51/pc
92/69/pc
80/50/s
56/32/pc
47/31/s
61/41/s
86/78/c
33/23/c
77/63/pc
68/54/pc
66/49/s
51/43/pc
37/24/c
56/40/pc
47/38/pc
86/75/pc
91/64/s
62/49/t
93/69/pc
85/52/s
59/46/pc
50/31/pc
63/48/pc
85/78/c
36/32/r
80/63/s
73/58/s
67/48/pc
56/44/pc
39/23/pc
60/48/c
55/41/c
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
sh- showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
Allergen Extract Lab (pollen data); airnow.gov (air
quality data); National Weather Service
* AccuWeather's RealFeel Temperature®
combines over a dozen factors for an accurate
measure of how the conditions really “feel.”
Descendants visit Md. site believed to be slave cemetery
BELVOIR FROM B1
too long.
Even without scientific proof,
the facts seemed to point strongly
in the right direction.
Then on Feb. 24, a group including Schablitsky, five descendants of Belvoir slaves and one of
the local men who had identified
the site met there to see how a
team of three cadaver-sniffing
dogs would react.
“The black Lab came running
out, and as it hit the cemetery it
stopped in its track like it hit a
wall,” Schablitsky said.
“In my opinion this is
significant to prove that
we existed. If you’re not
African American,
descended from slaves,
you can’t sense the need
for us to understand
from whence we came.”
Janice Hayes-Williams, a historian
and columnist who specializes in
African American Annapolis
And the spot with the indentation? All three dogs lay down in it.
Watching them, one of the descendants, Shelley Evans, 67, of
York, Pa., felt tears well up. “I was
just in awe. I held my hand over
my mouth,” she said. “I mean,
maybe some of my ancestors were
buried there.”
Of the old plantation site, once
several thousand acres, much has
been sold and developed. The
remaining 144 acres belong to the
Rockbridge Academy, a private
Christian school that maintains
the property and sometimes uses
the archaeological findings to
supplement lessons on colonialism.
Schablitsky estimated there
could be several dozen people
buried there from 1736 to 1864,
when slaves were emancipated in
Maryland. The broken marble
headstone could belong to a 4year-old African American boy,
Joseph Grocia, who was buried
somewhere on the Belvoir property in 1913, Schablitsky said.
To Janice Hayes-Williams, a
historian and columnist who specializes in African American Annapolis, the finding represents a
crucial unpeeling of the onion
layers of history.
“A lot of us as African Americans, there’s no identifiable landmark to say that we were there,”
she said. “We hear that our greatgrandfather was on the inventory
of such and such a person. We
know where we are from, but we
don’t know where our family was
buried. . . . We weren’t allowed to
read or write, so how do we
record? In my opinion this is
significant to prove that we existed. If you’re not African American, descended from slaves, you
can’t sense the need for us to
understand from whence we
came.”
Many of the families from the
Belvoir plantation era still live in
the area, Hayes-Williams said.
“It’s like our ancestors arriving
from the ground to tell our stories,” she said, “to tell us we were
here.”
One particularly wrenching
story associated with Belvoir is
about a slave who lived there
named Cinderella. She was
around 22 and married to a free
black man named Abraham
Brogden.
In December 1848, he learned
she was going to be sold. He
helped her escape, and the two
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PHOTOS BY JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Nancy Matthews Daniels, a descendant of some of the slaves known to have lived at the Belvoir
plantation, looks over the area archaeologists believe to be a slave burial ground in Crownsville.
fled to Baltimore but were quickly
apprehended. He was sentenced
to five years in prison, and she
died before the end of December.
The cause of her death is unknown, but “I guess you can
surmise what happens to a runaway slave,” said Pam Brogden,
64, a Hanover, Md., woman who
believes she may be related to
Abraham or Cinderella. (Cinderella and her sister Eliza had the
last name Brogden, possibly
through marriage.)
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Daniels takes some of the soil.
“This is a sacred spot,” she said.
derella could be buried there,”
Brogden said. “It was just a warm
feeling that, wow, after all these
years, wow.” Her voice broke, and
she let out a sob. “Because a lot of
times it’s just difficult for black
people to go back that far. . . . I
think of that song, ‘Before I be a
slave I’ll be buried in my grave,’
and every time I hear that song I
get really emotional because I
always think of Cinderella. She
tried. She tried to get away.”
On Friday, several descendants
and others associated with the
find returned — including Daniels, who brought along a large
pill bottle to fill with soil from the
site.
“I took some of this to bring
over to the cemeteries in P.G.
County,” she said, referring to the
graves of relatives. “And I’m going
to take a little to sprinkle around
my garden. This is a sacred spot.”
Rodney Daff, 50, one of the
men who found the spot, was
there, too. He said the elders of
his family had long known about
it. “My cousin used to come back
here and squirrel hunt,” he said.
One day, as the cousin looked for
something to put out a cigarette,
he came across a stone. “He told
his father, and my uncle said, ‘It’s
the slave cemetery.’ Then, when I
read that story about the slave
quarters and I heard they were
looking for it, I said, ‘I think I
know where that is.’ ”
There are no immediate plans
to do anything with the site other
than protect it, Schablitsky said,
though in the future there could
be some analysis of what lies
under the soil if descendants are
in agreement.
For now, just standing there
was a big deal. “To me it’s the
most exciting thing other than
the birth of my son,” said Wanda
Watts, 65, of Baltimore, who is a
sister of Evans and, as she has
learned, a distant relative of Daniels through their Belvoir history.
“It gives me a feeling of peace
because we know they weren’t
just tossed away or put in unmarked graves somewhere on the
property. We know there was
some reverence, that they were
people.”
Daniels clutched her vial of soil
in the thin winter light. “To see
this right here, if I was on my
dying bed I’d get up and come,”
she said, gesturing at the burial
site. “Looks to me our past is
coming together.”
tara.bahrampour@washpost.com
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KLMNO
Style
SATURDAY, MARCH 10 , 2018
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/STYLE
EZ
SU
C
SNL alum At ‘RuPaul’s Drag Race’ viewing, Pelosi was queen for a night
made an
impression
on Trump
BY
President tweeted that
Hammond should return.
Don’t hold your breath.
BY
G EOFF E DGERS
J ESSICA C ONTRERA
The watch party was about to
begin at Nellie’s, the best-known
(to straight people) gay bar in
Washington. The TVs were set to
VH1 for the drag-queen competition show “RuPaul’s Drag Race All
Stars.” A disco ball glittered overhead — and in walked the most
powerful woman in Congress.
“Naaaancyyyy!”
someone
howled. House Minority Leader
Nancy Pelosi waved to them with
both hands. A suit-jacketed, earpieced agent shuffled behind her
as the crowd closed in on all sides.
The guests had paid $25 to the
Democratic Congressional Cam-
paign Committee to be here. They
wanted hugs and selfies and a
chance to show off their terry
cloth armbands adorned with
Pelosi’s name. The bar was so
loud, she probably couldn’t hear
most of what they were saying.
She smiled and nodded anyway.
U Street is not a regular pit stop
for the 77-year-old congresswoman, though we imagine that most
nights she is in need of a strong
drink. She was here to celebrate
her guest appearance on “Drag
Race,” a show lauded for pushing
drag culture into the mainstream.
Her moment on the program,
filmed last August and airing for
the first time on this night, was
Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) at
the “RuPaul’s Drag Race All
Stars” watch party at Nellie’s.
expected to last all of 90 seconds.
But to those gathered around her,
it was unquestionably significant.
“Back when I came out, gay
bars I went to didn’t even have
windows,” said Nellie’s owner
Doug Schantz. “Who would have
ever thought we should have
someone like Nancy come here,
and be on this show?”
Pelosi’s answer would probably
be that she would have thought.
Her appearance on “Drag Race”
was a marketing opportunity, a
PELOSI CONTINUED ON C4
CAROLYN VAN HOUTEN/THE WASHINGTON POST
Just after 6 a.m. last Friday,
Darrell Hammond woke up to
the rhythmic pinging of his cellphone. President Trump, in the
process of tweeting an attack on
actor Alec Baldwin, had invoked
the name of the master impressionist and onetime “Saturday
Night Live” star.
“Agony,” Trump described
Baldwin’s portrayal of him on
SNL. “Bring back Darrell Hammond, funnier and a far greater
talent!”
Suddenly, Hammond’s name
was blasting across the Internet.
Fans tweeted their support. Reporters wrote his assistant, trying to get interviews. TV shows
wanted to book him. But Hammond remained silent. He found
it hard to wrap his mind around
the fact that the president of the
United States had blasted him
back into the spotlight.
“You know, I’m just like fooling
around in my apartment, and the
next minute Anderson Cooper
wants to talk to me? What?”
Hammond said in a phone interview with The Washington Post,
the first he’s done since Trump’s
March 2 tweet. “Someone said to
me, you realize people in Jaipur,
India, are saying, ‘Who’s Darrell
Hammond?’ Do you realize that?
In Jaipur. It’s true.”
Hammond was one of SNL’s
greatest impressionists during
his 14-year run with the show,
pulling off more than 100 characters, from the lip-biting Bill Clinton to the foulmouthed Sean
Connery. But his Trump was so
good, SNL kept him in that role
even after he left the cast in 2009.
He made his final Trump appearance in 2016. (Taran Killam also
briefly held the role.) Then
Trump’s unlikely candidacy took
off, and SNL boss Lorne Michaels
decided he wanted a more visceral approach. He tapped Baldwin,
a Trump hater whose cartoonish
portrayal of the reality-TV-star
president would go on to earn
him an Emmy.
For Hammond, the shift was
crushing, which he detailed
when he spoke to The Post last
year. Hammond, who remains
SNL’s announcer, says he’s now at
peace with keeping his Trump in
the past. He had moved to Los
Angeles to get away from the
constant questions, taping his
intros remotely. Now he’s back in
New York and has been a regular
presence around Studio 8H. He
says he’s ready if they ever ask
him to appear again on screen.
“They call me and talk about
Hannity,” Hammond says. “You
know they called me about a
couple of other people that are on
the news. But it’s always been
like that. Just think about this
guy a little bit because I could
just sit there at the computer for
an hour and basically make a
mental map of it if I did have to
do this person. . . . I think this
week you know we talked a little
about Sam Nunberg, just a little
bit. I just made some notes on
him.”
Hammond
as
Nunberg?
Please, Lorne, make it rain.
“I don’t know what their plans
are,” Hammond says. “And I don’t
pry.”
He says Trump’s blast led
ANDREA HANKS/OFFICIAL WHITE HOUSE PHOTO
President Trump and first lady Melania Trump meet with Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School junior Kyle Kashuv in the Oval Office.
K
yle has five AP exams to take and five U.S.
senators to meet.
English, history, calculus, statistics,
physics.
Schumer, Murphy, Hatch, Rubio, Cruz.
Right now, with his life upside down, the
senators are Priority 1.
“It’s insane,” Kyle Kashuv said Wednesday at a Cosi in
downtown Washington. “This has never been my dream. I
never really wanted to get into politics. The entire thing
has been surreal.”
He had just flown in, alone, from Parkland, Fla. He’s a
16-year-old junior at the most famous high school in the
country right now, and he should be studying. Instead,
three weeks to the day since the massacre at Stoneman
Douglas, Kyle was sitting in the nation’s capital with a
rolling suitcase. His phone battery was at 9 percent. His
backpack was the size of a boulder. He has a bunch of
English essays due this month.
The D.C. trip was somewhat last minute, and still
coming together, and it was happening in the most
important semester of his high school career.
“This is, like, the worst time I could possibly do this,”
said Kyle, unaware that within 24 hours he’d be sitting in
the Oval Office with the president.
Parkland’s
other
school
of thought
A 16-year-old brings
his centrist message to
the Hill and Oval Office
BY
D AN Z AK
Kyle’s parents emigrated from Israel in the 1990s. He grew
up in leafy, placid Parkland, and aspires to get an MBA and
a job on Wall Street. The 2016 election was the first he paid
attention to. He liked what Donald Trump had to say about
immigration, the wall, the idea of “America First.”
After the shooting, Kyle joined Twitter, where he fought
for the middle ground. His second-ever tweet was a thank
you to Hillary Clinton for defending Parkland students
against smears.
In New York, a 19-year-old “influencer marketer”
named Michael Gruen saw Kyle on Twitter and — with
encouragement from conservative editor and columnist
Ben Shapiro — reached out to him last month, knowing
that he’d need support to amplify his voice.
Other Parkland students have the backing of big names
and PR agencies. Kyle has @KyleKashuv, and Gruen, and
his parents (who paid for the D.C. trip).
“As a conservative myself — and, more importantly, as a
human — I saw somebody who actually [cared],” Gruen
said. “I saw a kid who was not being recognized, for
whatever reason, and I want to help anyone who cares.”
In the days before his D.C. trip, Kyle tweeted at various
members of Congress, and some took notice. He tweeted
at Chelsea Clinton, who engaged him. He tweeted the
White House press shop. On Monday he got verified on
Twitter, that little blue check mark of virtual adulthood.
On Tuesday the first lady’s director of communications
tweeted at him a cryptic confirmation: “Done!”
And on Wednesday he was in Washington, cool as a
cucumber, intense but not excitable. He looks his age —
lanky, with sideburns coming in — but he talks like he’s
KYLE CONTINUED ON C2
HAMMOND CONTINUED ON C3
How will ‘The Americans’ wrap up its run? Probably not happily ever after.
Excerpted and edited from Post
TV critic Hank Stuever’s weekly online chat on all things TV.
“Homeland”: What are your
thoughts on the season so far?
Stuever: A bit too bonkers this
time around. The Alex Jones analogue’s storyline isn’t really doing
much for me. I feel sorry for Franny. And the sooner they get rid of
President Frowny Face, the better.
“The Americans”: Three
weeks to go. I know you have said
encouraging words about this final season (as far as you are legally
TV CHAT
allowed . . .) but I find myself wondering if there is any possible way
that this can end in a way that is
truly satisfying.
Stuever: If by “truly satisfying”
you mean that everyone walks
away clean and lives happily ever
after, then I would say (and also
hope) probably not. It’s never
been that kind of show. It was
always about a marriage and family in extreme danger — violently
and/or emotionally. But we shall
see!
Oscars: Here’s what I don’t get:
These people get these awards, it
represents fulfillment of a dream
and reaching a pinnacle in your
career. They get admonished to
take 10 seconds or less to thank
people or say something in that
one great opportunity to do so,
and meanwhile all this shtick
about Jet Skis or hot-dog guns
goes on. In the time Jimmy Kimmel took to yell at them about
keeping their speeches short, they
could all have gotten a few more
seconds. Yes, some people are
dreary and they should get the
hook. But I like how Bette Midler
told the orchestra to shut up at
the Tonys. She was getting her
moment and she wasn’t shutting
up.
Stuever: Well, this is the great
conundrum of Oscars. If you cut a
thing to make more room for
another thing, it will upset a different group of viewers. If they let
winners have as much time as we
like, then the speeches won’t get
better, they’ll simply use more
time to think of more agents to
thank. If you cut the comedy bits,
the viewers who don’t really care
about movie awards will start to
drift away. If you cut the musical
numbers, you lose another segment that’s waiting for Mary J.
Blige (or whomever) to shake the
rafters.
Here’s what I don’t get: People
who still think the show can
somehow be improved or revamped. It is what it is. Use the
parts you don’t enjoy to refill your
snack plate.
“The Alienist” and “Counterpart”: At this point, I’d be surprised if either is holding their
audience. I really wanted to like
both, but for me they’ve become a
bit of a drudgery, hoping there
will be a payoff. There will be a
payoff, right?
Stuever: I very rarely have the
answer to that question, except in
the rare cases that I’m sent the
entire season to preview.
But I’ll say what I say over and
over: If you’re not feeling it, don’t
keep watching it. There is so much
more TV out there to choose from.
There is also an off button, which
can work wonders on your free
time.
hank.stuever@washpost.com
C2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
Sis on bed rest: Expecting or assuming?
Adapted from a recent online discussion.
Dear Carolyn: My
sister is 25 weeks
pregnant and was
just put on bed
rest. She is able to
work from home,
and they don’t have any older
children or pets.
My brother-in-law asked that
we all come around when
possible on lunch hours, nights
and weekends to help keep her
company. Our aunt made a
schedule for people to stop by
complete with bringing meals.
I feel like I don’t understand
this. My sister isn’t supposed to
Carolyn
Hax
A halls-of-power
pass for a junior
from Parkland
KYLE FROM C1
aiming for valedictorian. Which
he is. He’s ranked No. 4 in the Class
of 2019, he says.
And he’s a conservative. Which
is a big deal for some people —
especially adults who build careers out of carving up the world
into right and left. Kyle’s first appointment was lunch with a Breitbart writer. Fox News has already
brought him on multiple times,
perhaps because he’s a Parkland
student who doesn’t believe gun
control is the answer.
He doesn’t consider himself an
expert, and he’s uncomfortable
with people calling him a “survivor.” He wasn’t in the freshmen
building that the gunman attacked. He’s never fired a gun. But
he’s fiercely fixated on the middle
ground, that mythical place where
change is incremental enough to
assuage conservatives and pro-
move around a lot, but my
brother-in-law is surely capable
of making dinner and doing
laundry. I’m fine hanging out
with my sister but doing it on a
schedule just feels weird.
Is this normal? It feels like
everybody is freaking out, but I
Googled it and bed rest is super
normal.
— I Don’t Understand
I Don’t Understand: It’s not
uncommon but it is extremely
isolating, so scheduling visits
might seem a little over the top
but it makes a lot of sense. That
way she doesn’t have five people
dropping in for lunch on Tuesday
followed by zero human contact
besides her husband for the next
found enough to please progressives.
“Here’s the thing, okay?” he
says, after refilling his Coke. “The
initial movement, in its purest
form, was amazing. It got corrupted because now it’s represented as
anti-gun and anti-NRA. ‘Boycott
this, boycott that.’ It’s detracting
from the actual discussions.”
He suggests achievable goals:
increasing security at schools and
deepening background checks
(particularly for mental health).
He’s also developing an app called
ReachOut, a way for students who
are struggling emotionally to connect and communicate with others in school.
Gruen helped Kyle turn his outreach into actual appointments on
the Hill. And suddenly Kyle had a
D.C. itinerary that any lobbyist
would dream of, packed into 24
hours: five senators, the speaker of
the House, the counselor to the
president, and then a special surprise at the White House.
A
fter finishing his Coke,
Kyle took an Uber to Capitol
Hill. In black slacks, a gray
20 days.
It’s easy to look at the meal
schedule also as over the top, but
a closer look reveals its
pragmatism as well. People will
be dropping by but your sister
can’t actually host them — she’s
resting. Her husband
presumably will be at work
during lunch hours, yes? So he
can’t feed the guests either, or the
patient. So it makes sense for
people to “self-host” by bringing
something, and to keep your
sister from having to get up to
feed herself.
Even if these weren’t justifiable
in practical terms, I’d still say just
to let it slide and follow any
instructions only to the extent
that you can endorse them. By
button-down, and short socks that
left his ankles bare, Kyle sat on a
couch opposite Sen. Chris Murphy
(D-Conn.), one of the most vocal
critics of the gun lobby. Boy and
man searched for middle ground,
and found it with a shared desire
to stop violent tendencies from
becoming violent actions.
“We spent a long time talking
about the fact that, in politics, you
have to reach out across the aisle
at the same time you’re getting
ready for the next election,” said
Murphy, after the meeting. “I
think he’s very concerned that this
issue is going to become political
and that there’s not going to be
sincerity from both sides.”
Kyle and Gruen then popped
down four floors to the office of
Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.). Kyle
tweeted photos of the “productive” meeting.
“Kyle you are dealing with
snakes today,” responded a
#MAGA partisan from Georgia,
but that’s the kind of noise that
Kyle doesn’t hear.
Then it was off to a coffee shop
near the White House, where Kyle
met with CNN’s Jim Acosta in the 7
o’clock hour. He tweeted photos of
that I mean, sign up for the
number of visits you think you’d
generally make on your own,
without being told to, and bring
only what you’d normally bring,
not what you’re told to. Adhere to
your principles without spelling
out that that’s what you’re doing.
Re: Schedule: It sounds like the
aunt made the schedule without
even asking people when they’re
free or what they’re able to bring.
If my sister were on bed rest, I
would gladly visit her and bring
her whatever she needed, but I
would absolutely push back
against someone telling me I had
to do it on their schedule.
— Anonymous
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
the meeting — calling it “an honor
and a privilege” — and then headed to the White House for a nighttime tour.
Before he went to bed, Kyle
tweeted criticism of students who,
earlier that day, sat on the floor of
Republican Sen. Mitch McConnell’s office and chanted for gun
reform.
“Stop this counterproductive
shouting and do real advocacy
work,” Kyle wrote.
The next morning, bright and
early, Kyle headed back to the Hill.
In the 8 o’clock hour he chatted
with Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.)
next to a crackling fire. Next he
scooted over to the D.C. headquarters of Fox News, where he met
Kellyanne Conway in the lobby
around quarter to 10.
“Two things distinguish him,”
Conway said after. “One is he
wants to have a more holistic and
fair approach to the entire conversation, and two is his app.”
“Seeing that people in Washington are real people has been unbelievable,” Kyle tweeted after the
meeting. Conway then called President Trump and told him about
Kyle, planting a seed for later in
Anonymous: It didn’t even occur
to me that the aunt assigned
times to people — because how
would that even work? Who’s
the day.
By 10:40 a.m. Kyle was armchair to armchair with Sen. Orrin
Hatch (R-Utah) about his Stop
School Violence Act.
“You’re doing the Lord’s work in
raising these issues,” Hatch told
him.
By 11:30 a.m. Kyle was showing
Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) design
mock-ups of the ReachOut app.
Then Kyle and Gruen race-walked
two floors up to the office of Sen.
Ted Cruz (R-Tex.). When asked
how he was able to wrangle such
an itinerary, Gruen said he was
“well-connected in the swamp.”
After Cruz, the pair hustled to
the street and caught a cab for the
White House. There, at 2 p.m.,
Melania Trump greeted Kyle and
sat with him in the Green Room
for about half an hour, talking
about mental health and the wellbeing of students.
Then the first lady said she
would walk Kyle out but took him
through the Colonnade and up to
the Oval Office. A few minutes
later, President Trump walked in,
fresh from his meeting with videogame executives.
“Where’s Kyle?” the president
. SATURDAY,
MARCH 10 , 2018
available to pay a visit just
because you assign them to be?
The only care schedules I’ve run
across were created and managed
by one person but based on signups by volunteers.
Re: Bed rest: If you don’t
understand, imagine this: You
can’t get out of bed for the next
three to four months. Would you
like people to visit you and help
your husband with the share of
the cooking you usually do, or
would you like them to ignore you
because your plight is one that
thousands of others have shared?
— AmyinCA
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her column
delivered to your inbox each morning
at wapo.st/haxpost.
Join the discussion live at noon
Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com
said.
“How are you, Mr. President?”
Kyle said.
They shook hands, started trading pleasantries and took a seat.
Trump asked about his classmates. Kyle talked about his app
idea. It was over in five minutes.
On the way out of the West
Wing, Kyle ran into Rubio, who
gave him a hug.
Over the course of his trip, the
people he encountered tweeted
about him.
Jim Acosta: “Kyle, you are clearly making a difference!”
The speaker of the House: “I’m
grateful to him for sharing his
story with me.”
Sen. Murphy: “You bring such
power and grace to this discussion
about how to best protect our
schools, Kyle.”
The first lady: “His message of
unity inspires us all!”
Kyle, on a high from meeting
the president, summed up his trip
in a tweet, of course: “WE CAN
CREATE CHANGE, TOGETHER.
BIPARTISANSHIP IS REAL.”
And the due date for his English
essays was pushed to April.
dan.zak@washpost.com
B FEATURED LISTING B
$35
Les Voix
Françaises
Sat., March 10, 5 p.m
Savor Maurice Duruflé’s lush, timeless Requiem with Eric
Plutz, organist; Rosa Lamoreaux, soprano; and Scott
Humburg, baritone. Also hear works by Reynaldo Hahn,
Francis Poulenc and Camille Saint-Saëns.
St. John’s Episcopal Church,
Norwood Parish
6701 Wisconsin Ave
Chevy Chase, MD
www.cantate.org
Ages
18-35
$20
Tickets available at
cantate.org
Under 17
FREE
CHILDREN'S THEATRE
VolcanO
Sat, Mar 10 &17 at 3pm
The stories of the cadejos, the magic dogs of the
volcanoes, come to life as they protect Salvadorans at
home and abroad in this fun-filled play with music.
GALA Theatre
3333 14th Street, NW
202-234-7174
Galatheatre.org
$10-$12
Bilingual
MUSIC - CHAMBER
Dumbarton Concerts
Celtic Tenors
Vocal Trio
March 17, 2018 at 4 PM
March 17, 2018 at 8 PM
Performing in venues large and small, the trio always
delights their audiences. Whether it’s the haunting Danny
Boy or exhilarating classics, they are known for their
professional, sparkling and good humored performances.
Dumbarton Concerts
Dumbarton United
Methodist Church
3133 Dumbarton St. NW
Washington, DC 20007
202-965-2000
Dumbartonconcerts.org
$42 Adults
$39 Senior
202-965-2000
St. Columba’s Church
4201 Albemarle St. NW
Washington, DC 20016
www.TheThirteenChoir.org
$30 at the
door
$25 in
advance
Post Concert
Reception!
MUSIC - CHORAL
Bach Reflections
March 17, 2018 7:30PM
Join the all-star professional choir, The Thirteen, as we
explore the music of Bach, his ancestors and those
inspired by him.
MUSIC - CONCERTS
American Music
Series Concert:
Ragtime
Amit Peled,
cellist
Sunday, March 11, 2018
4 p.m.
Dan Roberts, pianist, performs ragtime music by American
composers such as Scott Joplin and Zez Confrey. As a local
musician, Roberts has performed with his own groups and
as a sideman at many of the top jazz venues in the area,
from Blues Alley to Bohemian Caverns to the Strathmore
and the Kennedy Center.
The American Revolution
Institute – Anderson House
2118 Massachusetts Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20008
Free
Sat. March 10, 2018
7:30pm
Israeli cellist Amit Peled, a musician of profound artistry and
charismatic stage presence, is acclaimed as one of the
most exciting instrumentalists on the concert stage today.
Playing on the cello of Pablo Casals, and joined by
Bulgarian pianist and versatile collaborator Stefan Petrov,
the concert will feature works from the height of the
repertoire for cello, including composers such as Brahms,
Schubert and Poper.
Bradley Hills Church
6601 Bradley Boulevard
Bethesda, MD 20817
bradleyhillschurch.org/concerts
$25 at the
door $20 in
advance.
Ample free parking
Fridays & Saturdays
at 7:30pm
A musical, political satire.
We put the MOCK in Democracy!
Info: 202.312.1555
www.capsteps.com
$36
Discounts available
for groups of 10 or
more.
Call 202-312-1427
COMEDY
Orange is the
New Barack
Ronald Reagan Building
1300 Pennsylvania Ave, NW
Tix available at ticketmaster.com
202.397.SEAT
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
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For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
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SATURDAY, MARCH 10 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C3
RE
Television
TV HIGHLIGHTS
3/10/18
7:00
7:30
8:00
BROADCAST CHANNELS
8:30
9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
◆ Access
◆ Will & Grace ◆ Superstore
◆ Dateline NBC
◆ Saturday Night Live
◆ SNL
News
4.1 WRC (NBC)
◆ College Basketball
◆ Postgame
◆ Showtime at the Apollo
◆ Love Connect
Fox 5 News at 10
News
5.1 WTTG (Fox)
◆ Wheel
◆ Jeopardy!
◆ NBA
◆ NBA Basketball: San Antonio Spurs at Oklahoma City Thunder (Live)
News
On Your Side
7.1 WJLA (ABC)
◆ NCIS
◆ NCIS: New Orleans
◆ 48 Hours
◆ Sing Like
9 News
9.1 WUSA (CBS) ◆ College Basketball
(7:55) Fútbol Mexicano Primera División (Live)
(9:55) Fútbol Mexicano Primera División (Live)
14.1 WFDC (UNI) 100 mexicanos dijieron
◆ Anger Mgt
◆ Anger Mgt
Mod Fam
College Basketball: ACC Tournament, Final: Teams TBA (Live)
20.1 WDCA (MNTV) Mod Fam
Jimmy Buffett: Buried
Queen Rock the World
Memory Res
22.1 WMPT (PBS) Rhythm, Love & Soul (My Music)
Doo Wop Generations (My Music)
The New York Cantors
26.4 WETA (PBS) Discovering Washington
France 24 Programming
The Baantjer Mysteries
Nestor Burma
30.1 WNVC (MHz) France 24 Programming
Great Performances
Gregory Porter -- Live in Berlin
Beatles
32.1 WHUT (PBS) (6:00) The 60s Generation
◆ Seinfeld
Two Men
Two Men
Friends
Friends
News
Elementary
50.1 WDCW (CW) Mike & Molly Goldbergs
Law & Order: SVU
Law & Order: SVU
Law & Order: SVU
Law & Order: SVU
66.1 WPXW (ION) Law & Order: SVU
CABLE CHANNELS
ERIC LIEBOWITZ/ABC
American Idol (ABC at 8 Sunday) Lionel Richie, Katy Perry and Luke Bryan
judge and Ryan Seacrest (back row) hosts Season 16, which premieres
Sunday night. It’s been two years since the last season concluded.
Saturday Night Live
(NBC at 11:30) Sterling K. Brown
hosts, James Bay performs.
PREMIERE
It Happened Here (Reelz at 10)
The final moments in the lives of
celebrities such as John Lennon,
John Belushi and Joan Rivers are
examined.
RETURNING
American Dynasties: The
Kennedys (CNN at 9) How the
family rose to power and influenced
events all over the world.
Deception (ABC at 10) A Las Vegas
magician puts his skills to work for
the FBI.
RETURNING
The Arrangement (E! at 9) Season
2.
The Zoo (Animal Planet at 9)
Season 2.
The Royals (E! at 10) Season 4.
SUNDAY LISTINGS
Naked and Afraid
(Discovery at 10) Season 9.
Fox News Sunday (Fox at 9 a.m.)
Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.),
CIA Director Mike Pompeo.
White House Chronicle
(WETA at 9) SiriusXM Radio host
Joe Madison, InsideSources.com’s
Shawn McCoy.
This Is America & the World
(WETA at 10 and WHUT at 7:30
p.m.) Samuel Dossou-Aworet, CEO
of the Petrolin Group.
Face the Nation (CBS at 10:30)
Sen. Cory Gardner (R-Colo.).
PREMIERES
How Close Can I Beach?
(HGTV at 8:30) Buyers search for
homes close to the water.
Timeless (NBC at 10) Season 2.
SPECIALS
iHeartRadio Music Awards
(Various at 8) DJ Khaled and Hailey
Baldwin host.
O. J. Simpson: The Lost
Confession? (Fox at 8) Two hours
of unseen footage of Simpson’s
2006 interview with thenHarperCollins publisher Judith
Regan.
DOCUMENTARY
Pope: The Most Powerful Man in
History (CNN at 10) A look at how
popes throughout history have
used their influence.
— Sarah Polus
LEGEND: Bold indicates new or live programs
More at washingtonpost.com/tv
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
ACROSS
1 Oceanic
ecosystem
12 Common
intruders
15 Mexican sugar
substitute
16 Home Depot
purchase
17 Black-necked
flier
18 Knoxville
energy agcy.
19 Sportscaster
Andrews
20 Bradlee in
“The Post”
21 2013 Culinary
Hall of Fame
inductee
23 Key used in
shortcuts
24 Word of warning
25 Downer at a
party?
29 Waterside
accommodations
30 Not dense,
in a way
31 Lindy relative
34 Deuterium
discoverer
Harold
35 They usually
have spines
36 Ornate
metalware
37 Spots for sports
stands
39 Forks over,
formally
40 Collaborate
41 “Even so ...”
42 “Thunderball”
setting
44 Try hard (for)
45 Had taken,
as a portrait
46 Tagged,
perhaps
47 Territorial
marking
51 It may build up
gradually
52 Skeet
participant
55 Styling creations
56 Italian cooking
staple
57 Tolkien creature
58 Mall attraction
DOWN
1 Medieval
weapon
(5:00) Live PD
(8:06) Live PD: Rewind
Live PD
A&E
Pirates of the Caribbean
Movie: Contagion ★★★ (2011)
Movie: Insidious: Chapter 2 ★★ (2013)
AMC
The Zoo
The Zoo: Bronx Tales
The Zoo
(10:01) The Zoo
(11:01) The Zoo
Animal Planet
(5:00) Stomp the Yard ★★ Movie: You Got Served: Beat the World (2011)
Movie: ATL ★★ (2006)
BET
(6:40) Movie: Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Witness Protection ★★ (2012)
(9:16) Movie: Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Witness Protection ★★ (2012)
Bravo
Unikitty
Cleveland
Family Guy
Rick, Morty
Rick, Morty
Family Guy
Dragon
Dragon
Black Clover
Cartoon Network Unikitty
CNN Newsroom
The Sixties
The Sixties
The Sixties
CNN
(7:25) Movie: Rush Hour 3 ★ (2007)
Movie: Rush Hour 3 ★ (2007)
Top Five
Comedy Central Shanghai
Naked and Afraid
Naked and Afraid: Bugged Out
Naked and Afraid
Discovery
Toy Story
Movie: Toy Story 2 ★★★★ (1999)
(9:10) Jessie (9:35) Jessie Jessie
Jessie
Bunk’d
Bunk’d
Disney
Vegas
Movie: Fifty Shades of Grey ★★ (2015)
Movie: Fifty Shades of Grey ★★ (2015)
E!
College Basketball
GameDay
College Basketball
Boxing: Scott Quigg vs. Oscar Valdez
ESPN
College Basketball
College Basketball
SportsCenter (Live)
ESPN2
Spring Baking
Spring Baking
Spring Baking
Spring Baking
Spring Baking
Food Network
Fox Report
Watters’ World
Justice With Jeanine
The Greg Gutfeld Show
Watters’ World
Fox News
(6:40) Movie: The Lion King ★★★ (1994)
(8:50) Movie: Beauty and the Beast ★★★★ (1991)
(10:55) Movie: Newsies ★★
Freeform
(5:30) Movie: Transformers: Dark of the Moon ★★ (2011) Movie: Iron Man 2 ★★ (2010)
Gianni Ver
FX
Movie: My Secret Valentine (2018)
Movie: Love, Once and Always (2018)
Spring Fvr
Golden Girls
Hallmark
Murder, She Wrote
Murder, She Wrote
Murder, She Wrote
Murder, She Wrote
Hallmark M&M Murder, She Wrote
(5:50) Movie: Hidden Figures Movie: My Cousin Rachel ★★★ (2017)
(9:50) Here and Now
Crashing
Divorce
HBO
Property Brothers
Fixer Upper
Fixer Upper
House Hunters Reno
Log Cabin
Log Cabin
HGTV
American Pickers
American Pickers
The Men Who Built America: Frontiersmen
American Pickers
History
(6:00) Movie: Web Cam Girls Movie: Stalked by a Reality Star (2018)
(10:03) Movie: Seduced by a Stranger (2017)
Lifetime
Track Live
Orioles Classics
MASN
The Rachel Maddow Show
Hardball Chris Matthews
The 11th Hour
Deadline: White House
Hardball Chris Matthews
MSNBC
Blended ★
Movie: Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby ★★ (2006)
Movie: Rush Hour ★★★ (1998)
MTV
Wicked Tuna
Wicked Tuna
Wicked Tuna
Wicked Tuna
Nat’l Geographic Wicked Tuna
NBA Basketball: Washington Wizards at Miami Heat (Live)
Extra
Wizards Overtime (Live)
Wizards
NBC SportsNet WA GameTime
Henry Danger Henry Danger Thunder
Knight
Full House
Full House
Full House
Full House
Friends
Friends
Nickelodeon
(6:00) Movie: XXX ★★ (2002)
Movie: Fast Five ★★ (2011)
PARMT
Movie: Beetlejuice ★★★ (1988)
Movie: Beetlejuice ★★★ (1988)
Futurama
Futurama
Syfy
Seinfeld
Seinfeld
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Full Frontal
The Detour
TBS
(6:00) A Fistful of Dollars
Movie: Kansas City Confidential ★★★ (1952)
Movie: The Crooked Way ★★ (1949)
TCM
Say Yes to the Dress
Say Yes to the Dress
Say Yes: Wedding SOS
Hear Me, Love
(11:11) Say Yes to the Dress
TLC
(6:00) Movie: Red Dawn ★ Movie: The Hunger Games ★★★ (2012)
Catching Fire
TNT
Ghost Adventures
Ghost Adventures
Ghost Adventures
The Dead Files
The Dead Files
Travel
Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers
TruTV
Golden Girls Golden Girls Raymond
Raymond
Raymond
Raymond
Mom
Mom
King
King
TV Land
Happen. Now Happen. Now Happen. Now Happen. Now Happen. Now Happen. Now Happen. Now Happen. Now Happen. Now Happen. Now
TV One
Movie: Armageddon ★★ (1998)
Falling Water
Mod Fam
Mod Fam
USA Network
(7:05) Movie: Boyz N the Hood ★★★ (1991)
Movie: Baby Boy ★★★ (2001)
VH1
Aft.
Rep.
Government
20/20
Right
Side
ABC
News
Week.
Night.
Week.
Night.
Week.
Night.
Right
Side
WNC8
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
Person of Interest
WGN
◆
High Definition Movie Ratings (from TMS) ★★★★ Excellent ★★★ Good ★★ Fair ★ Poor No stars: not rated
By Daniel Nierenberg
JESSE DITTMAR FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
In the late 1990s and early 2000s on “Saturday Night Live,” Darrell Hammond portrayed Donald
Trump. Jim Downey, a former SNL writer, called Hammond’s Trump impression “the gold standard.”
Would Hammond reprise Trump?
© 2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
2 Seaweed
product
3 Indian palace
resident
4 One of the
Karamazovs
5 “Deliverance”
co-star of Jon,
Burt and Ronny
6 Allow
7 Cause
8 Small program
opener
9 Plains tribe
10 Classy wheels
11 Religious recluse
12 Vehicle for
some spiritual
experiences
13 Boat-lifting
device
14 Depressed area
22 Turned inside
out
23 Not feel well
24 Mrs. __, head
of the kitchen in
“Beauty and the
Beast”
25 Numb, in a way
26 Marseilles
money
27 Erratic driver’s
comeuppance,
28
29
31
32
33
35
3/10/18
perhaps
Pungent spice
__ tendinitis:
arm muscle
ailment
Two-faced deity
1997 film character getting a lot
of buzz?
Heroic adventure
1931 Oscarwinning Western
38
39
41
42
43
based on an
Edna Ferber
novel
“Raging Bull”
boxer
“Wolf” channel
Mailer, for one
Something in
back of a hit?
Packer
quarterback
Rodgers
44 Feature of
Sousa’s music
46 Deep-water fish
47 Sulk
48 Catchall survey
opción
49 Carnival draw
50 Street
adornment
53 “Preacher”
network
54 Black __
FRIDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
HAMMOND FROM C1
many to ask him a natural question: Would he return to SNL to
play some form of Trump, even
alongside Baldwin? But Hammond says there was no discussion inside 30 Rock. Michaels did
acknowledge the tweet in the
hallway one day. Michaels was
walking by with a group of his
underlings and spotted Hammond and stopped.
“The president knows your
name,” he said.
“He does,” Hammond replied.
“Yes, he knows who you are,”
Michaels replied.
“And everyone laughed,” Hammond says. “I laughed. I thought
it was kind of funny.”
Hammond’s relationship with
Trump is different from Baldwin’s. He tries to remain decidedly apolitical. There were times,
long before the White House,
when he visited with Trump in
his office, studying his movements and speech patterns. He
even had Ivanka Trump’s phone
number on his cellphone, deleting it only after he lost the part.
Last year, Jim Downey, the legendary former SNL writer, called
Hammond’s Trump impression
“the gold standard.”
But Michaels, speaking to The
Post last year, said that he wasn’t
looking for accuracy as Trump’s
candidacy began to build.
“I needed another force, on an
acting level, to have the power
that Trump was embodying
then,” Michaels said. “The Dar-
rell Trump . . . it wasn’t the
Trump that had gotten darker. It
was the Trump from ‘The Apprentice.’ ”
Hammond says that the
Trump tweet didn’t change his
mind about portraying the president. That part of his life is over.
It had to be over, he says, as it was
just too emotionally challenging
to figure out how to play the part
— with the polarized political
climate and his own trauma in
losing such a high-profile gig on
SNL. But he’s asked what he
would have said if Michaels,
strolling by one day, stopped and
suggested he throw on the wig
again.
“I would have said yes,” Hammond says.
geoff.edgers@washpost.com
A ONCE IN A LIFETIME ROADTRIP THEY WILL NEVER FORGET
“WONDERFUL. DONALD SUTHERLAND IS SO GOOD.
HELEN MIRREN, AS USUAL, IS SIMPLY SUPERB.”
How about some
home delivery.
-Pete Hammond, DEADLINE
HELEN
MIRREN
DONALD
1-800-753-POST
SUTHERLAND
A FILM BY
PAOLO VIRZÌ
SF
THE
LEISURE SEEKER
WWW.SONYCLASSICS.COM
Fairfax
Fairfax
Bethesda LANDMARK’S
BETHESDA ROW CINEMA ANGELIKA AT MOSAIC CINEMA ARTS THEATRE
(571) 512-3301
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VIEW THE TRAILER AT WWW.THELEISURESEEKERMOVIE.COM
C4
EZ
On TV, tolerance
message gets
share of spotlight
PELOSI FROM C1
chance to tout her record as a
steadfast advocate for LGBTQ
rights. When she came to Congress in 1987, she said in an interview earlier in the day, she was
criticized for even mentioning the
AIDS epidemic as a priority.
“I thought, ‘Oh my gosh, we’re
not in San Francisco anymore,’ ”
she said.
When she became majority
leader in 2003, “every time I went
on a show, the first question was
‘Do you believe in gay marriage?’ ”
she recalled. “And I would say,
‘Yes, because I don’t believe in
discrimination of any kind.’ And
that would be their ‘Ho, ho, ho,
look how liberal she is.’ ”
Pelosi has recently been the
target of a slew of Republican
attack ads, taking the place of
Hillary Clinton as the GOP’s go-to
boogeyman. But those ads have
focused on taxes and immigration; LGBTQ issues, as a rallying
cry for the right, have faded.
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
“I’ve said to people all along,
‘Say what you will, but you’ll soon
be saying what I’m saying, because this is the future,’ ” she said.
Is that future threatened, now
that the president has called for a
ban on transgender people in the
military and eliminated protections for transgender students in
public schools?
“We are very saddened about
some of the things that have happened in this administration in
rolling back protections and opportunities and the rest,” she told
the crowd at Nellie’s when she was
handed a microphone. “We are
very sad that we don’t have a
Congress that will reverse that.”
Someone shouted: “Yet!”
“Not just yet,” she concurred.
That was another reason to go on
“Drag Race.” She used the segment as an opportunity to remind
viewers, “If you don’t vote, you
don’t count.”
Off-camera, she spent a few
hours on the set, listening to the
queens’ stories, eating RuPaulbranded chocolates and having
her hair and makeup done by the
show staff. Her communications
director admitted to being slightly concerned about what they
would cake onto Pelosi’s face, given the show’s knack for grandeur.
MOVIE DIRECTORY
DISTRICT
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D
(PG) 3:30-9:30
Thoroughbreds (R) 11:45-2:15-5:007:45-10:30
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 9:45-10:30- The Metropolitan Opera: Semiramide
11:30-1:45-2:45-4:15-6:00-9:15-10:45 12:55
Death Wish (R) 12:05-3:00-5:45Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
8:40-11:30
(PG-13) CC: 1:00-5:00-7:30-8:10
Annihilation (R) 5:30-8:30-11:20
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 11:15
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 10:30-1:00-4:15- Gringo (R) 12:15-3:15-6:15-9:00
7:30-10:45
Love, Simon (PG-13) 7:00
Game Night (R) CC: 1:35-5:20-7:50The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) 11:001:30-4:15-6:45-9:30
10:15
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 1:10-4:05- A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 10:50-1:30-4:306:30-7:30-10:20
7:00-9:55
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: 10:00Smithsonian - Lockheed Martin
3:30-9:00
IMAX Theater
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC: 1:50
601 Independence Avenue SW
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
(PG) CC: 12:45-6:15
12:25-2:40
The Post (PG-13) CC: 10:50-2:40Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the Seas
5:00-9:30
3D (NR) 11:00-1:15-3:30
Death Wish (R) CC: 12:00-4:00-6:50- Dream Big: Engineering Our World: An
10:40
IMAX 3D Experience Please Call
Thoroughbreds (R) CC: 12:10-2:30Journey to Space 3D (NR) 10:254:55-7:25-9:50
11:50-2:05
Annihilation (R) CC: 10:45-1:35-4:30- Black Panther: An IMAX 3D Experience
7:20-10:10
(PG-13) 4:20-9:50
Gringo (R) CC: 11:30-2:20-5:05-7:50- Black Panther: The IMAX 2D Experi10:35
ence (PG-13) 7:05
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) CC: 12:15-3:30-6:45-10:00
Love, Simon (PG-13) CC: 7:45
AFI Silver Theatre
Black Panther (PG-13) 10:00AM
Cultural Center
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:00-1:45-4:308633 Colesville Road
7:15-10:00
The Big Lebowski (R) 9:45
AMC Loews Uptown 1
The Shape of Water (R) 2:00-7:05
3426 Connecticut Avenue N.W.
Coco (PG) 11:00AM
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 9:00-12:30- Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
4:00-7:30-10:50
Missouri (R) 4:20
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 1:50-6:45
AMC Mazza Gallerie
Phantom Thread (R) 11:25-4:30-9:15
5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW
The Metropolitan Opera: La Boheme Waithira (NR) 11:45AM
Liyana 1:30
(NR) (!) 12:55
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 10:50-1:50- The Royal Hibiscus Hotel 7:45
Potato Potahto 5:15
4:50-5:50-8:00-9:00-10:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 10:40-12:10-2:30- High Fantasy (NR) 10:00
Supa Modo (NR) 3:30
4:50-7:20-11:00
Red Sparrow (R) CC: (!) 1:10-4:20-9:30
AMC Academy 8
Game Night (R) CC: 12:00-2:20-4:406198 Greenbelt Road
7:10-10:10
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) CC: (!)
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: (!) 11:40- 11:00-1:15-3:45-6:00-8:15-10:45
2:20-5:00-7:40
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 10:30-1:30A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D 4:30-5:30-7:30-10:30-11:30
(PG) CC: (!) 10:20
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PGDeath Wish (R) CC: 12:00-2:35-5:10- 13) CC: 9:15
7:50-10:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 1:55-4:20-6:45
Love, Simon (PG-13) CC: (!) 7:30
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
Albert Einstein Planetarium - (PG-13) CC: 11:30-2:30-8:30
National Air & Space Museum Red Sparrow (R) CC: 12:45-4:006th Street and Independence Ave SW 7:15-10:25
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: (!) 10:45To Space and Back 11:00AM
Dark Universe Space Show (NR) 11:30- 11:15-4:15-9:45
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D
12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30
Journey to the Stars (NR) 12:00-1:00- (PG) CC: (!) 1:30-7:00
Death Wish (R) CC: 11:25-2:00-4:452:00-3:00-4:00-5:00
7:20-10:00
The Stars Tonight (NR) 10:30AM
Gringo (R) CC: (!) 12:00-2:45-5:20One World, One Sky: Big Bird's
8:00-11:00
Adventure (NR)
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
3111 K Street N.W.
MARYLAND
Angelika
Pop-Up at Union Market
550 Penn Street NE - Unit E
The Young Karl Marx (Le jeune Karl
Marx) (NR) 2:00-4:35
Before We Vanish (Sanpo suru
shinryakusha)12:00-9:30
The Post (PG-13) 7:00-10:00
A Fantastic Woman (Una mujer
fantastica) (R) 7:30
Red Sparrow (R) 11:00-1:45-4:307:15-9:20
Initial D: The Movie - Legend 3: Mugen
(NR) 11:00AM
Avalon Theatre
5612 Connecticut Avenue
Blue Sky Puppets 10:00AM
Molly's Game (R) 11:15-5:00
Loveless (Nelyubov) (R) 2:15-8:00
A Fantastic Woman (Una mujer fantastica) (R) 12:00-2:30-5:15-7:45
Landmark
Atlantic Plumbing Cinema
807 V Street, NW
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: 11:20-1:456:50-9:30; 4:20
The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:45-2:204:55-7:25
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 1:00-4:007:00-10:10
Annihilation (R) CC: 11:30-2:00-4:357:15-9:45
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 11:0011:15-1:50-2:05-4:40-5:00-7:30-7:4510:00-10:20-10:30
Landmark E Street Cinema
555 11th Street NW
Mind Game (NR) 11:59
Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story
12:45-7:30
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts Animation (NR) 1:45-7:15
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts - Live
Action (NR) 11:00-4:30-9:30
Oh Lucy! 10:45-1:00-3:15-5:30-7:4510:00
The Rocky Horror Picture Show
(R) 11:59
The Room (2003) (R) 11:59
Lady Bird (R) CC: 10:30-3:00-5:15-9:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 10:05-12:50-3:506:50-9:50
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 10:20-1:204:20-7:20-10:10
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC: 10:0012:45-3:45-6:45-9:30
I, Tonya (R) CC: 10:10-1:10-4:107:10-9:55
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 10:00-12:553:55-6:55-9:55
Landmark West End Cinema
2301 M Street NW
A Fantastic Woman (Una mujer fantastica) (R) 10:30-1:15-4:15-7:15-9:45
Submission 10:45-1:00-3:15-5:307:45-9:55
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 10:15-1:004:00-7:00-9:40
Medal of Honor Theater NMMC
18900 Jefferson Davis Highway
We, the Marines (NR) 10:00-11:0012:00-1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00
Regal Gallery Place
Stadium 14
701 Seventh Street NW
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 11:452:30-5:15-8:00-10:45
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:30-12:502:45-4:00-6:00-7:15-9:15-10:30
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) 10:45-1:50-5:00-8:15-11:30
Red Sparrow (R) 12:10-3:45-10:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PG13) 11:15-2:30-10:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:30-2:15-4:45-7:15
Game Night (R) 5:15-7:45-10:45
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:30
But when she appeared on the
television, dressed in a white suit
and heels, she looked the same as
the woman standing beneath the
Nellie’s disco ball. The crowd
around her hooted and applauded, drowning out RuPaul’s introduction.
Her husband, Paul Pelosi, stood
beside her, sipping a pink beverage concocted by a bartender in a
“Mean Girls” tank top. Paul said
he had never seen “Drag Race”
until he did some research on the
show. His first impression? “It’s a
little wild, but I’m from San Francisco,” he shrugged.
On the screen, a queen was
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) CC:
5:25-10:20
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) CC: 10:00-1:20-4:307:40-10:50
Black Panther (PG-13) 10:05AM
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) (!) 10:00-11:0012:15-1:40-3:05-7:00
AMC Loews
St. Charles Town Ctr. 9
11115 Mall Circle
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) CC: (!)
10:15-1:30-4:00-6:00-8:30-11:00
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 9:30-10:0012:45-2:30-4:00-6:30-7:15-10:35-10:45
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) CC: 10:30-1:30-7:50-10:05
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 10:45-1:153:50-6:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PG13) CC: 9:00
Red Sparrow (R) CC: (!) 10:45-12:153:30-10:15
Game Night (R) CC: 11:00-12:454:30-10:15
Death Wish (R) CC: (!) 9:30-1:45-4:307:15-11:00
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: (!) 11:304:45-5:45
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D
(PG) CC: (!) 2:00-3:15-8:15-9:45
Love, Simon (PG-13) CC: (!) 7:00
AMC Magic Johnson
Capital Center 12
800 Shoppers Way
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) CC:
11:15-1:45-4:00-6:15-8:30-11:00
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 11:0012:00-2:00-5:00-6:00-8:00-9:00-11:00
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) CC: 3:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 11:25-1:40-4:156:45-9:10
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PG13) CC: 12:50-6:10
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 12:30-3:40-9:45
Game Night (R) CC: 10:30-1:00-3:255:45-8:15-10:45
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: 11:15-4:307:00-9:30
Annihilation (R) CC: 3:30-9:10
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D
(PG) CC: 1:45
Death Wish (R) CC: 11:40-2:10-4:407:25-10:30
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) CC: 10:15-1:15-4:157:15-10:15
Gringo (R) CC: 11:45-2:30-5:15-7:4510:10
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) CC: 11:302:15-4:45-7:30-10:00
Black Panther (PG-13) 10:00AM
Love, Simon (PG-13) 7:00
ArcLight Bethesda
7101 Democracy Boulevard
Black Panther (PG-13) 7:00-10:00
The Greatest Showman (PG) 11:552:20-4:40-6:10-9:50
Love, Simon (PG-13) (!) 7:10
AMC Center Park 8
Jumanji:
Welcome to the Jungle (PG4001 Powder Mill Rd.
13) 12:00-4:35
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) CC: Peter Rabbit (PG) 10:10-11:35-2:4010:00-12:15-2:30-5:00-7:15-9:30
4:55-7:05-10:25
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 11:00-2:15- Game Night (R) 10:30-2:05-5:55-8:105:30-8:45
9:20-11:10
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 10:45-1:15The Shape of Water (R) 3:05-8:35
4:00-6:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
Missouri (R) 3:20
(PG-13) CC: 12:30-3:45-7:00-10:15
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 9:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PGDeath Wish (R) 11:10-2:25-5:5013) CC: 9:00
8:20-10:45
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 11:55-3:25-9:45
The Post (PG-13) 12:15
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: 10:30Annihilation
(R) 10:35-1:40-4:504:30-10:30
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D 7:35-10:15
I,
Tonya
(R)
CC:
12:35
(PG) CC: 1:30-7:30
Death Wish (R) CC: 10:15-1:00-4:00- Gringo (R) 11:40-2:35-5:05-7:40-10:10
Black
Panther
(PG-13)
10:00-11:006:45-9:45
1:00-2:00-4:00-5:00-8:00-9:00-11:00
Gringo (R) CC: 10:00-12:45-3:30The
Strangers:
Prey
at
Night (R) CC:
6:15-9:05
10:15-1:15-4:05-7:25-9:25
Love, Simon (PG-13) CC: 7:00
Red Sparrow (R) 11:15-2:10-5:15AMC Columbia 14
8:15-10:20
10300 Little Patuxent Parkway
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 2:15-4:45-7:15
The Metropolitan Opera: La Boheme The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) CC: 10:05(NR) (!) 12:55
1:45-4:25-6:45-9:05
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) CC: Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:15
11:40-2:00-4:20-7:00-9:30
Thoroughbreds (R) 11:50-2:55-5:10Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 10:207:20-9:30
11:40-1:30-4:40-5:40-7:50-11:00
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 10:50-12:20Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
1:20-3:50-6:25
(PG-13) CC: 3:05-9:00
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: 9:00 (PG) 11:45AM; 2:50-5:20-7:50
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PGBow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
13) CC: 9:55-2:10
1020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 9:30-1:40-4:10Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
6:40-9:10
4:10
(PG-13)
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 10:10-3:25-9:50
Game Night (R) CC: 10:00-12:55-3:30- The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 10:2012:35-2:50-5:05-7:45-10:10-11:00
6:00-8:25-10:50
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 12:25-6:05 Black Panther (PG-13) 10:10-1:107:10-10:20
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: 10:15Peter Rabbit (PG) 10:05-12:10-2:253:45-9:20
4:40-6:55-9:10
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D
Thoroughbreds (R) 11:00-1:35-3:55(PG) 1:00-6:30
Death Wish (R) CC: (!) 10:40-1:35-4:30- 7:20-9:40
Black Panther (PG-13) 10:50-11:207:25-10:25
Gringo (R) CC: 10:00-2:10-4:55-7:40- 12:25-1:50-2:20-3:25-4:50-5:20-6:257:55-8:20-9:25
10:30
Annihilation (R) CC: 5:00-7:50-10:40 Game Night (R) 10:15-12:50-3:10-5:358:05-10:25
Love, Simon (PG-13) CC: (!) 7:00
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 10:00-11:15Every Day (PG-13) 11:50AM
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) CC: 10:00- 1:00-2:00-3:45-4:45-6:30-7:30-9:1510:15
12:35-3:10-6:20-9:10
A Wrinkle in Time: An IMAX 2D Experi- Death Wish (R) 12:00-2:40-5:25ence (PG) (!) 11:15-2:00-4:45-7:30-10:15 8:00-10:35
Bow Tie Harbour 9
Black Panther (PG-13) 9:40-12:50-4:002474 Solomons Island Road
7:10-10:20; 11:00AM
AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18 Fifty Shades Freed (R) 10:15-12:403:10-5:40-8:05-10:30
9811 Washingtonian Ctr.
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) CC: The Post (PG-13) 11:00-4:20-10:20
The
Greatest Showman (PG) 11:3010:45-3:35-5:55-8:20-10:35
5:10-7:40
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 10:45Jumanji:
Welcome to the Jungle (PG12:00-2:05-5:15-6:00-6:55-8:25-10:05
13) 10:10-1:00-3:40-7:05-9:35
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
Call
Me
by
Your Name (R) 12:50(PG-13) CC: 3:30-9:10
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 7:45-10:00 3:50-9:30
Three
Billboards
Outside Ebbing, MisJumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PGsouri (R) 2:10-10:15
13) CC: 10:15-1:15-4:25-7:15-10:10
Gringo
(R)
11:10-1:50-4:30-7:30-10:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 10:30-12:45-2:30Love, Simon (PG-13) 7:00
4:55-7:20-9:45
Every Day (PG-13) 1:40
Early Man (PG) CC: 10:05-1:00-3:00
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) 11:20Red Sparrow (R) CC: (!) 11:20-1:052:00-4:40-7:20-9:50
4:15-7:30-10:40
Game Night (R) CC: (!) 11:25-3:10-5:35- The Shape of Water (R) 10:00-6:40
Annihilation (R) 10:30-1:20-4:108:00-10:25
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 10:40-1:35- 6:50-9:40
Red Sparrow (R) 9:50-12:55-4:004:35-7:35-10:30
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D 7:00-10:10
(PG) (!) 4:20-9:40
Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD
7000 Arundel Mills Circle
Death Wish (R) CC: (!) 10:50-1:30-4:107:10-9:50
Black Panther (PG-13) XD: 12:30The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:55-4:45-10:45 3:45-7:15
Pari (Hindi) (NR) (!) 12:10-3:20-6:30-9:35 Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety (NR) (!) 11:35- (PG-13) 12:00-5:15-6:45
2:55-6:20-9:55
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 10:55Lady Bird (R) CC: 12:35-7:55
1:10-3:30-6:00-8:25-9:15-11:00
Annihilation (R) CC: (!) 10:35-1:25-4:25- Black Panther (PG-13) 10:55-11:257:25-10:15
1:00-1:40-2:00-2:15-2:45-3:15-4:25Every Day (PG-13) (!) 1:10-4:05
5:00-5:30-6:05-7:40-8:15-8:25-8:509:25-10:05-11:00
Love, Simon (PG-13) CC: 7:00
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) XD: 10:30
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 2:25-8:10
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PG13) 11:00-7:30-10:40
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:30-2:05-4:307:05-9:35
Early Man (PG) 11:00-1:30-3:55
Red Sparrow (R) 11:00-12:15-2:203:35-5:40-9:00-10:15
Game Night (R) 11:50-2:35-5:057:40-10:10
The Shape of Water (R) 11:15-5:1010:50
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:05-1:05-1:502:45-4:20-6:25-7:20-8:15-11:00
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D
(PG) 12:00-5:30
Thoroughbreds (R) 11:45-2:15-4:457:15-9:45
The Metropolitan Opera: Semiramide
12:55
Death Wish (R) 11:20-2:10-5:00-6:307:45-10:30
Gringo (R) 11:35-2:30-5:10-7:55-10:45
Annihilation (R) 11:10-2:00-4:557:40-10:25
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) 11:101:45-4:40-7:30-10:10
Ye Mantram Vesave (NR) 11:35-3:006:10-9:20
Black Panther (PG-13) 10:55-2:155:30-8:50
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 2:45-8:15-11:00
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D
(PG) 12:00-3:45-5:30-9:10-10:05
Love, Simon (PG-13) 7:00
Hoyt's West Nursery
Cinema 14
1591 West Nursery Road
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) CC:
12:00-3:00-5:20-7:40-10:10
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 12:00-1:002:00-3:10-4:10-5:10-6:20-7:20-8:209:30-10:20
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PG13) CC: 1:20-4:05-6:50-9:40
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 12:00-2:15-4:306:45-9:00
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 12:10-1:00-4:007:00-10:00
Game Night (R) CC: 3:10-5:35-8:0010:25
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 12:403:30-6:30-9:20
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: 12:15-2:153:55-4:55-6:35-7:35-9:15-10:15
Death Wish (R) CC: 12:25-2:55-5:257:55-10:30
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D
(PG) CC: 1:15
Gringo (R) CC: 1:30-4:20-7:10-9:45
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) CC: 12:102:35-5:00-7:25-9:50
Landmark
Bethesda Row Cinema
7235 Woodmont Avenue
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 10:30-1:304:20-7:20-10:00
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC: 10:101:00-9:50
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 10:00-12:503:50-6:50-9:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (R) CC: 1:40-4:30-7:35-10:05
Lady Bird (R) CC: 10:25-1:00-3:205:30-7:40-9:50
The Party (R) CC: 11:00-1:10-3:005:00-7:00-9:20
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts Animation (NR) 3:45-7:50
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts - Live
Action (NR) 5:40
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 10:50-1:504:40-7:25-10:00
The Leisure Seeker (R) CC: 10:20-1:204:00-7:10-9:45
Old Greenbelt Theatre
129 Centerway
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 8:00
The Shape of Water (R) 5:15
I, Tonya (R) 2:30
Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
3899 Branch Avenue
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:00-1:00-3:004:00-6:00-7:00-9:15-10:15
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:15-2:40-5:007:30-9:50
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:00-12:451:45-4:30-6:15-7:15-9:00-10:00
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital
3D (PG) 3:30
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 1:153:40-5:50-8:15-10:30
Death Wish (R) 12:10-2:55-5:458:35-11:15
Every Day (PG-13) 11:05AM
Gringo (R) 11:00-1:40-4:25-7:05-10:10
Love, Simon (PG-13) 7:00
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) 10:451:20-3:55-6:30-9:05-11:45
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 10:50-2:05-5:158:30-11:45
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:00
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:30
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D
(PG) 4:45-10:15
Thoroughbreds (R) 10:00-10:30-1:003:45-6:30-9:00
Death Wish (R) 10:45-2:00-5:008:00-10:45
Gringo (R) 11:15-2:15-5:15-8:15-11:15
Black Panther: An IMAX 3D Experience
(PG-13) 4:30-11:00
Annihilation (R) 6:15-9:30
Love, Simon (PG-13) 7:00
Regal Germantown
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) 11:00Stadium 14
1:45-4:30-7:15-10:00
20000 Century Boulevard
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 11:00- The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 10:10
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D Experi1:15-3:45-6:15-8:30
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:30-1:30-3:45- ence (PG-13) 10:00-1:15-7:45
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 10:15-11:154:45-7:00-8:00-10:15-11:15
1:00-2:00-3:45-6:30-7:30-9:15
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) 11:30-2:45-6:00-9:15
UA Snowden Square
Stadium 14
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 10:00
9161 Commerce Center Drive
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PG13) 10:45-2:00-5:15
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 9:55Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:00-9:00
10:15-1:15-3:45-6:00-8:20-10:40
Red Sparrow (R) 12:00-3:30-6:45-10:00 Black Panther (PG-13) 11:00-12:0012:30-3:10-3:40-6:30-7:00-9:40-10:10
Game Night (R) 11:45-2:15-5:008:15-10:45
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) 10:15-1:00-1:30-4:15-4:45The Shape of Water (R) 12:00-3:00
7:30-8:00-10:40-11:00
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:00-12:15Fifty Shades Freed (R) 10:20AM
1:45-3:15-6:00-7:15-8:45
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PG13) 10:20-1:20
(PG) 4:30-10:00
The Metropolitan Opera: Semiramide Peter Rabbit (PG) 10:00-12:20-3:20-6:00
12:55
Red Sparrow (R) 10:10-11:40-2:50-9:50
Death Wish (R) 11:15-2:00-4:45Game Night (R) 6:40-9:20
7:30-10:45
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 10:00-12:40Gringo (R) 11:00-1:45-4:30-7:45-10:30 1:40-3:30-6:15-7:10-8:30-9:10-10:00
Annihilation (R) 8:15-11:00
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D
Love, Simon (PG-13) 7:00
(PG) 10:45-4:30
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) 11:30The Metropolitan Opera: Semiramide
2:15-5:00-7:45-10:30
12:55
Death Wish (R) 10:00-12:30-3:00-5:30Regal Hyattsville Royale
8:10-10:40
Stadium 14
Gringo (R) 10:30-1:10-3:50-6:50-9:30
6505 America Blvd.
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 11:05- Annihilation (R) 6:10-9:00
Love, Simon (PG-13) 7:00
12:00-2:15-4:45-7:00-9:30
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) 10:05Black Panther (PG-13) 10:50-11:452:00-5:00-7:50-10:20
1:20-2:00-3:00-4:30-5:15-6:15-7:45Game Night (R) 4:10
8:30-9:30-11:00
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
Xscape Theatres
(PG-13) 7:15-10:30
Brandywine 14
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PG7710 Matapeake Business Drive
13) 10:45-1:35-4:25
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) CC:
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:00-1:30-4:1510:40-12:50-4:20-6:10-8:30-10:40
6:40-9:15
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:00Red Sparrow (R) 11:45-3:15-6:30-9:45 2:00-5:00-8:00-11:00-11:30
Game Night (R) 11:15-1:45-4:15Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PG6:45-9:15
13) CC: 2:50-6:15
The Shape of Water (R) 12:15-3:35
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 11:20-1:45-4:15A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 10:45-12:15- 7:10-9:10
3:15-4:30-6:00-7:15-8:45
Red Sparrow (R) CC: (!) 9:50-1:10-3:00Death Wish (R) 11:00-1:45-4:456:45-9:50
7:30-10:15
Game Night (R) CC: (!) 11:50-2:30-5:20A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D 7:50-10:15
(PG) 1:30-10:00
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: (!)
Annihilation (R) 10:00
9:40-11:10-12:20-3:20-4:40-6:00-7:20Gringo (R) 11:15-2:15-5:00-8:00-10:45 8:40-9:45
Love, Simon (PG-13) 7:00
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 10:10
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) 12:00A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D
2:45-5:30-8:15-11:00
(PG) CC: (!) 2:10
Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12 Death Wish (R) CC: (!) 11:40-2:40-5:308:10-10:45
14716 Baltimore Avenue
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 10:30- Annihilation (R) CC: (!) 12:10
Gringo (R) CC: 11:30-1:50-4:50-7:401:00-3:15-5:45-8:25-10:45
10:20
Black Panther (PG-13) 10:30-11:1512:00-1:35-2:30-3:15-5:00-6:00-7:00- Black Panther (PG-13) CC: (!) 9:3010:00-10:30-12:30-1:00-1:30-3:30-4:058:15-9:30-10:30
4:30-6:30-7:00-7:30-9:30-10:00-10:30
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) CC: 10:10(PG-13) 3:40-10:00
12:40-3:10-5:40-8:20-10:50
Peter Rabbit (PG) 10:25-11:30-2:155:00-7:30-10:00
iPic Pike & Rose
11830 Grand Park Avenue
Red Sparrow (R) 11:30-2:50-9:45
Game Night (R) 11:00-2:15-5:15The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) (!)
8:00-10:30
2:15-5:15-8:00-10:45
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 10:45-11:45- Black Panther (PG-13) (!) 11:45-3:303:00-4:45-7:45-9:15-10:45
7:30-9:15-11:15
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D Red Sparrow (R) (!) 11:30-3:15-7:15(PG) 1:45-6:15
11:00
Death Wish (R) 10:45-1:20-4:30A Wrinkle in Time (PG) (!) 11:15-12:307:15-10:15
2:30-3:45-6:00-7:00-10:15
Gringo (R) 11:00-2:00-5:10-8:00-10:55 Death Wish (R) (!) 11:30-2:45-6:15-9:30
Annihilation (R) 12:45-6:50
Gringo (R) (!) 1:15-4:30-7:45-11:30
Love, Simon (PG-13) 7:00
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) (!) 12:003:00-6:45-10:00
Regal Rockville Center
Stadium 13
199 East Montgomery Avenue
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 10:301:30-3:45-5:30-8:00-10:15
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:00-12:453:15-4:00-6:30-7:15-9:45-10:30
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) 10:15-1:30-4:45-8:00-11:15
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:00-1:45-4:157:00-10:00
Regal Bowie Stadium 14
Red Sparrow (R) 12:30-3:45-10:30
15200 Major Lansdale Boulevard
Game Night (R) 10:15-6:15-8:45-11:15
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 12:30- A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D
3:00-5:20-7:40-9:55
(PG) 4:15-9:45
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:40-12:50The Metropolitan Opera: Semiramide
1:30-2:10-2:50-4:10-4:50-5:40-6:1012:55-12:56
7:30-8:10-8:50-9:30-10:50
Death Wish (R) 11:45-2:45-5:30Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
8:15-11:00
(PG-13) 6:50-10:10
Gringo (R) 11:00-2:00-4:45-7:30-10:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PG- Annihilation (R) 5:15-8:15-11:00
13) 12:10-3:30
Love, Simon (PG-13) 7:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:00-2:40-5:05Operation Red Sea 10:45-2:00-6:45-10:15
8:00-10:30
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 10:45-1:30-5:00Red Sparrow (R) 12:40-3:50-10:20
7:00-7:45-10:45; 11:15-2:00
Game Night (R) 6:40-9:20
Regal Waugh Chapel
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:30-1:00-2:30Stadium 12 & IMAX
5:30-7:00-8:30
1419 South Main Chapel Way
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 11:10(PG) 4:00-10:00
The Metropolitan Opera: Semiramide 1:00-3:35-5:50-8:15-10:40
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:00-11:5512:55
Death Wish (R) 12:45-3:40-6:30-9:40 2:10-3:05-5:20-7:45-8:30-10:55
Gringo (R) 11:45-2:25-5:10-7:50-10:40 Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) 6:15-9:25
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) 11:35Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PG1:20-4:20-7:20-10:15
13) 1:40-4:50
Regal Cinemas Majestic
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:15-2:00-4:25-7:10
Stadium 20 & IMAX
Red Sparrow (R) 12:05-3:25-6:45-10:00
900 Ellsworth Drive
Game Night (R) 11:25-2:05-4:30The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 10:45- 7:20-9:50
12:35-3:05-5:30-7:55-10:25
Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:00-12:25Black Panther (PG-13) 12:45-1:15-3:30- A3:15-4:40-6:05-7:30-8:55
4:00-4:30-6:45-7:15-7:45-8:50-9:30A
Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D
10:00-10:30-11:00
(PG) 1:50-10:20
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
Death
Wish (R) 12:00-2:45-5:30(PG-13) 11:45-3:00-6:15-9:10-11:55
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PG- 8:15-11:00
Annihilation
(R) 9:35
13) 10:45-1:40-6:15
Gringo (R) 11:35-2:20-5:10-8:00-10:50
Peter Rabbit (PG) 10:55-1:25-3:50Black
Panther:
The IMAX 2D Experi6:25-9:00
ence (PG-13) 12:40-3:50-7:00-10:10
Early Man (PG) 3:40
Regal Westview
Red Sparrow (R) 11:40-1:35-4:55Stadium 16 & IMAX
8:15-11:35
5243 Buckeystown Pike
Game Night (R) 12:15-2:50-5:35The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 10:158:15-10:55
12:30-3:30-6:00-8:30-11:00
The Shape of Water (R) 12:05-3:20
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 10:40-11:30- Black Panther (PG-13) 12:15-12:4512:20-1:20-2:20-3:10-4:10-5:10-6:00- 3:00-3:30-4:00-6:15-6:45-7:15-9:3010:00-10:30
7:00-8:00-8:50-10:50
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D The Greatest Showman (PG) 10:30-4:05
(PG) 9:50-11:40
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:00
Samson (PG-13) 10:05
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PGThoroughbreds (R) 10:50-12:00-2:30- 13) 12:00-3:15
5:00-7:30-9:55
Peter Rabbit (PG) 10:00-12:30-3:15The Metropolitan Opera: Semiramide 6:00-9:00
12:55
Red Sparrow (R) 11:00-3:00-7:00-10:30
Annihilation (R) 4:35-7:30-10:35
Game Night (R) 10:45-1:30-4:15I, Tonya (R) 6:05-11:25
7:00-9:45
VIRGINIA
AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
2150 Clarendon Blvd.
Gringo (R) CC: 10:45-1:40-4:30-7:2010:00
Lady Bird (R) CC: 2:10-7:35
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) CC: 10:0012:30-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) CC: 9:45-1:00-4:157:30-10:45
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 10:15-1:15-4:007:15-10:15
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D
(PG) 12:15-6:15
Love, Simon (PG-13) 7:00
AMC Potomac Mills 18
2700 Potomac Mills Circle
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) CC:
10:40-1:00-3:15-5:40-8:00-10:30
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 10:3011:45-1:45-3:00-4:00-4:45-6:15-8:009:30-10:00-11:00
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) CC: 11:00-2:15-5:30-8:45
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: 1:25
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PG13) CC: 1:40-4:40-7:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 10:50-12:002:40-5:05-7:35
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 11:20-1:10-2:454:10-6:00-7:20-9:10-10:00-10:40
Game Night (R) CC: 10:40-1:10-3:506:20-9:00
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 11:15-5:10
Death Wish (R) CC: 10:55-2:30-5:007:40-10:15-11:00
Winchester (PG-13) CC: 10:20
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: 11:3012:45-6:45
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D
(PG) CC: 3:45-9:45
Thoroughbreds (R) CC: 11:05-1:304:05-6:30-9:05
Annihilation (R) CC: 2:10-8:10
Gringo (R) CC: 11:25-2:00-4:40-7:2010:10
Love, Simon (PG-13) (!) 7:00
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) CC: 11:101:50-4:30-7:15-9:50
A Wrinkle in Time: An IMAX 2D
Experience (PG) CC: 10:45-1:45-4:457:45-10:45
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:30-3:45-7:0010:30; 10:30AM
AMC Shirlington 7
2772 South Randolph St.
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 10:00-1:004:00-7:00-10:00
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) CC: 11:30-2:30-5:30-8:30
Red Sparrow (R) CC: (!) 10:15-1:154:15-7:15-10:15
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 10:15-4:157:10-10:10
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (R) CC: 1:15
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: (!)
11:00-4:30
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D
(PG) CC: (!) 1:45-7:15-10:00
Thoroughbreds (R) CC: (!) 11:10-1:304:00-6:30-9:00
Annihilation (R) CC: 10:45-1:30-4:207:00-9:45
AMC Tysons Corner 16
7850e Tysons Corner Center
The Metropolitan Opera: La Boheme
(NR) (!) 12:55
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) CC:
(!) 11:00-1:30-3:45-6:00-8:15-10:4011:45-12:55
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 11:15-1:352:25-4:45-5:35-7:50-8:40-10:55-11:45
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) CC: 1:05-12:15
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
9:05-9:55
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PG13) CC: 9:30-12:40-3:35-6:35-9:25
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 11:35-2:00-4:256:50-9:20
Red Sparrow (R) CC: (!) 9:35-12:504:15-7:25-10:35
Game Night (R) CC: 10:10-12:45-3:105:30-8:00-10:20-12:45
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 10:30-4:20
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: (!) 10:151:15-7:00-12:20
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D
(PG) CC: (!) 4:00-9:40
Thoroughbreds (R) CC: (!) 9:45-12:252:50-5:15-7:40-10:05-12:25
Death Wish (R) CC: (!) 12:40-3:15-5:508:25-11:00
Gringo (R) CC: (!) 9:20-1:40-5:20-8:1010:50-12:25
Black Panther: An IMAX 3D Experience
(PG-13) 9:00-12:20-3:30-6:40-9:4512:50
Annihilation (R) CC: 10:20-4:10-7:059:50-12:35
Love, Simon (PG-13) CC: (!) 7:15
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) CC: (!)
9:25-12:00-2:35-5:10-7:45-10:25-12:55
Black Panther (PG-13) 10:00AM
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) (!) 9:15-12:052:45-5:25-8:05-10:45
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 11:00-1:003:00-5:00-7:00-11:00
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) CC: 10:00-2:00-4:00-8:00-10:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PG13) CC: 10:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 10:15-12:153:15-5:30-7:45
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 9:45-1:00-4:157:30-10:45
Game Night (R) CC: 10:15-12:40-6:008:30-11:00
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: 10:0012:30-4:15-10:00
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D
(PG) CC: 1:15-3:00-7:15
AMC Worldgate 9
Death Wish (R) CC: 9:45-2:45-5:1513025 Worldgate Drive
7:45-10:15
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) CC: 10:30- The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) CC: (!)
12:30-5:45-8:15-10:45
2:20-4:45-7:05-9:20
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 10:30AMC Hoffman Center 22
11:15-12:00-3:30-6:40-7:45-9:00-9:50
206 Swamp Fox Rd.
The Metropolitan Opera: La Boheme Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) CC: 1:30-4:40
(NR) 12:55
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) CC: Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PG13) CC: 6:45
11:40-2:05-4:20-6:40-9:00-11:15
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 1:45-4:20
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 10:3012:00-1:45-2:30-3:15-3:45-5:00-6:30- Red Sparrow (R) CC: (!) 11:30-2:406:10-9:25
7:00-8:15-9:00-9:45-10:15-11:30
Game Night (R) CC: 11:00-1:40-4:05Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
6:30-9:05
(PG-13) CC: 11:15-5:45
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: 10:40- A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: (!) 12:303:15-6:00
1:15-3:50-9:20
Death Wish (R) CC: (!) 11:40-2:15-4:50Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 9:50
7:25-10:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PGGringo (R) CC: (!) 10:55-1:35-4:1513) CC: 9:40-3:25-6:20-9:25
7:00-9:40
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 11:05-1:35-4:05A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D
6:35-9:10
(PG) (!) 10:45-9:30
Early Man (PG) CC: 11:20-1:40
Alamo Drafthouse Cinema Red Sparrow (R) CC: 11:30-2:45One Loudoun
6:15-9:30
20575 East Hampton Plaza
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 10:30-1:00
Game Night (R) CC: 10:20-12:40-3:05- Peter Rabbit (PG) 10:15-1:20-3:556:40-9:20
5:20-7:45-10:20
Black Panther (PG-13) 10:50-12:45The Shape of Water (R) CC: 4:101:50-6:00-9:40; 10:00-4:30-8:10-11:35
7:10-10:05
Game Night (R) 10:05-2:50-5:25Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 6:25
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC: 12:25 8:40-11:25
Red Sparrow (R) 10:25-2:25-4:1512 Strong (R) CC: 11:10-4:35-9:55
7:50-11:15
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: 10:00Annihilation (R) 12:50-3:45-6:30-9:30
3:15-9:15
A
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:30-1:20-3:455:40-7:00-9:00-10:05
(PG) CC: 9:30AM
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D
Thoroughbreds (R) CC: 11:45-2:15(PG) 11:40AM
4:45-7:20-9:45
Thoroughbreds (R) 11:20-2:05-4:45The Post (PG-13) CC: 4:10-9:40
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Mis- 7:30-10:40
Angelika Film Center Mosaic
souri (R) CC: 1:25-6:55
2911 District Ave
Death Wish (R) CC: 12:15-2:50-5:358:10-10:45
The Leisure Seeker (R) (!) 10:25-12:55Annihilation (R) CC: 11:00-1:45-4:30- 3:30-6:00-8:30-10:55
Lady Bird (R) 3:15
7:25-10:10
The Shape of Water (R) 11:05-4:30-7:15
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D
(PG) (!) 11:30AM
Thoroughbreds (R) (!) 10:45-1:00-3:155:30-7:45-10:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (R) 1:50-10:15
Annihilation (R) 5:45-8:20-10:55
Death Wish (R) (!) 12:15-3:00-5:408:15-10:45
Black Panther (PG-13) 10:00-1:00-4:007:00-10:00
Red Sparrow (R) (!) 11:00-2:00-5:008:00-11:00
Initial D: The Movie - Legend 3: Mugen
(NR) 11:00AM
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) (!) 2:15-4:457:30-10:05
. SATURDAY,
saying, “I’m dying. I just want to
say thank you to her, I want to hug
her, I want to be like, ‘Kick their
ass.’ ”
Someone turned up the volume. RuPaul’s voice blared from
the bar’s speakers. “Congresswoman Pelosi is a strong woman,”
he said, “who knows how to get
things done.”
The crowd cheered again. Pelosi’s husband turned, looking at
her affectionately. She gave a little
wave, then placed her hand on her
chin and looked back at the
screen, studying her own performance.
jessica.contrera@washpost.com
Saturday, March 10, 2018
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
Early Man (PG) 11:10-1:30-3:50
The Shape of Water (R) 11:45-3:10
Thoroughbreds (R) 11:15-1:40-4:106:45-9:15
The Metropolitan Opera: Semiramide
12:55
Death Wish (R) 11:20-2:25-5:108:00-10:45
Gringo (R) 11:30-2:20-5:15-8:15-11:10
Annihilation (R) 6:20-9:10
Love, Simon (PG-13) 7:00
6201 Multiplex Drive
Rave Cinemas
Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme
11900 Palace Way
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 11:402:15-5:15-8:05-10:35
The Greatest Showman (PG) 4:10-7:00
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:15-2:255:35-8:45
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) 12:00-3:05-6:30-9:35
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PG13) 11:30-2:15-5:05-7:50-10:40
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:50-4:40-10:25
Red Sparrow (R) 12:25-4:25-7:40-10:50
The Shape of Water (R) 1:45-7:30
12 Strong (R) 12:40-9:50
Annihilation (R) 11:00-2:00-4:558:00-10:55
Thoroughbreds (R) 12:05-2:30-5:007:25-9:55
Death Wish (R) 11:20-1:55-4:357:20-10:10
Gringo (R) 10:45-1:25-4:20-7:05-10:00
Black Panther (PG-13) XD: 10:3012:45-1:40-4:05-4:50-7:10-7:5510:20-11:00
Ye Mantram Vesave (NR) 11:50-2:506:05-9:25
Every Day (PG-13) 11:25AM
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) 11:151:50-4:25-7:10-9:55
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 9:30
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:30-4:15-7:00
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital
3D (PG) 9:45
Regal Manassas
Stadium 14 & IMAX
11380 Bulloch Drive
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 12:15-
Regal Countryside Stadium 20 2:50-5:20-7:45-10:15
45980 Regal Plaza
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:00-12:50-
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 12:352:50-5:10-7:30-10:00
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:00-1:00-3:004:10-6:10-7:20-9:20-10:30
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 11:40-2:20-5:00Bow Tie
7:40-10:20
Reston Town Center 11 & BTX Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PG11940 Market Street
13) 12:05-3:05-6:00-9:00
Black Panther (PG-13) 10:00-1:00-4:10- Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:45-2:10-4:407:30-10:30
7:10-9:40
I, Tonya (R) 10:10AM
Red Sparrow (R) 12:40-3:50-6:55-10:10
Phantom Thread (R) 9:35
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:20-3:20Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:10-1:30-3:506:25-9:30
6:30-9:00
Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi) (NR)
Thoroughbreds (R) 10:30-12:50-3:40- 11:35-3:10-6:40-10:05
6:00-8:20-10:45
Game Night (R) 1:05-3:55-6:30-9:05
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
The Shape of Water (R) 12:30-3:30Missouri (R) 6:55
6:35-9:35
Gringo (R) 10:50-1:50-4:50-7:50-10:40 A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:30-1:45-2:15Love, Simon (PG-13) 7:00
5:00-7:25-7:45-10:25
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) 10:40A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D
1:10-4:00-7:00-10:00
(PG) 4:35-10:15
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:40-3:00Pad Man (Padman) (PG-13) 11:256:20-9:30
2:35-5:45-8:55
Game Night (R) 1:40-4:30-7:10-10:10 Gringo (R) 12:50-3:45-6:50-9:45
The Shape of Water (R) 1:05-4:05
Pari (Hindi) (NR) 11:55-2:55-6:05-9:15
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 10:20-11:20- Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety (NR) 12:101:20-4:20-7:20-8:00-10:20
3:35-6:45-9:50
Death Wish (R) 2:10-5:00-10:50
Every Day (PG-13) 11:45-2:25-5:05
Red Sparrow (R) 12:00-3:30-9:50
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) 11:302:05-4:45-7:15-9:55
Cinema Arts Theatre
Tholiprema (Tholi Prema) (NR) 12:159650 Main St
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 10:15-1:15-4:15- 3:15-6:20-9:25
Awe! (NR) 7:35-10:25
7:10-9:55
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 9:40-12:05- Regal Dulles Town Center 10
5:05-10:00
21100 Dulles Town Circle
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: 9:40-12:00- The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 11:452:15-4:35-7:00-9:20
2:00-4:45-7:30-9:45
The Leisure Seeker (R) CC: 9:45-12:10- Black Panther (PG-13) 12:00-1:00-3:002:30-4:50-7:20-9:35
4:00-6:00-7:00-9:00-10:10
The Post (PG-13) CC: 2:35-7:40
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
The Party (R) CC: 10:00-12:00-6:00
(PG-13) 10:45
Lady Bird (R) CC: 8:00-10:00
The Greatest Showman (PG) 11:50Gringo (R) CC: 9:50-12:15-2:40-5:00- 2:30-5:15
7:30-9:45
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:15-1:30-4:152018 Oscar Nominated Shorts 6:45-10:15
Animation (NR) 2:00
Red Sparrow (R) 12:10-3:15-9:30
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts - Live Game Night (R) 12:30-3:30-6:15Action (NR) 4:00
8:45-11:10
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:00-1:45Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
7:15-10:00
1600 Village Market Boulevard
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 11:35- A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital
3D (PG) 4:30
1:45-3:55-6:05-8:15-10:25
Death Wish (R) 12:15-2:45-5:30The Greatest Showman (PG) 2:50
8:15-10:50
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:00-2:20-4:40Gringo (R) 11:30-2:15-5:00-7:45-10:30
7:00-9:20
Annihilation (R) 8:00
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) 11:50Love, Simon (PG-13) 7:00
2:15-4:50-7:20-9:50
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 11:35Regal
1:45-3:55-6:05-8:15-10:25
Fairfax Towne Center 10
Game Night (R) 12:10-2:45-5:104110 West Ox Road
7:50-10:10
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 12:05A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D 2:20-4:40-7:20-9:50
(PG) 11:20-9:45
The Greatest Showman (PG) 12:20Death Wish (R) 11:40-2:10-4:452:55-5:30-8:10-10:45
7:35-10:05
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:10-2:30-5:00Gringo (R) 11:45-2:25-5:00-7:40-10:15 7:30-9:55
The Metropolitan Opera: Semiramide Early Man (PG) 12:05
12:55
Red Sparrow (R) 12:30-3:45-10:20
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:30-3:30-5:30- Paddington 2 (PG) 5:25-8:05
7:30-8:30-10:30
Game Night (R) 12:00-2:40-5:10Red Sparrow (R) 11:25-12:45-2:407:40-10:15
4:00-5:45-7:15-8:45-10:20
The Shape of Water (R) 3:40-7:00-10:00
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:20-1:55-4:30- A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:50-4:50-6:505:20-7:10-8:00
7:50-10:40
Manassas 4 Cinemas
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D
8890 Mathis Ave.
(PG) 3:50-9:40
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:30-2:10-4:50- The Metropolitan Opera: Semiramide
12:55
7:30; 5:35-8:15
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:05-12:00- Annihilation (R) 10:45
Love, Simon (PG-13) 7:00
1:15-2:15-3:25-4:30-6:45-9:00
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) 12:10The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) 11:452:45-5:20-8:00-10:35
1:50-4:00-6:05-8:10
Rave Cinemas Centreville 12 A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:50
Black Panther (PG-13) 10:00-10:4011:05-1:00-1:40-2:10-4:00-4:40-5:107:05-7:40-8:10-10:05-10:40-11:10
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PG13) 2:05-4:55-7:45-10:35
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:10-1:45-4:157:10-9:35
Red Sparrow (R) 10:20-1:25-11:00
Game Night (R) 10:15-12:40-3:05-5:307:55-10:30
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 10:00-11:153:10-4:45-7:30-8:20-10:55
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D
(PG) 12:35-2:00-5:45-10:15
Death Wish (R) 12:00-2:40-5:158:00-10:45
Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety (NR) 11:45-6:00
Annihilation (R) 1:35-4:20-7:15-9:55
Ye Mantram Vesave (NR) 2:55-9:30
Love, Simon (PG-13) 7:00
MARCH 10 , 2018
3:10-4:30-6:30-7:30-9:30-10:45
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) 2:10-5:30-8:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
12:30-3:40-6:50-10:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PG13) 1:15-4:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:30-3:45-6:40-9:45
Red Sparrow (R) 1:00-4:10-7:15-10:30
Game Night (R) 6:45-9:10
The Shape of Water (R) 12:40-3:30
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 3:00-5:408:15-10:50
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D
(PG) 12:10
Death Wish (R) 12:20-2:30-5:007:40-10:20
Gringo (R) 12:00-2:40-5:15-8:00-10:40
Annihilation (R) 9:40
Love, Simon (PG-13) 7:00
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) 1:20-4:207:20-9:50
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) 3:50-10:10
A Wrinkle in Time: An IMAX 2D Experience (PG) 1:10-7:00
Regal Potomac Yard
Stadium 16
3575 Potomac Avenue
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 11:001:10-3:20-5:40-8:00-10:20-12:00
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:30-12:151:00-2:45-3:30-4:10-6:00-6:45-7:309:15-9:55-10:45
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) 11:00-1:55-5:00-8:15-11:30
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 10:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:00-1:40-4:056:35-9:00
Red Sparrow (R) 11:50-3:10-6:25-9:50
Game Night (R) 11:45-2:20-4:507:25-10:10
The Shape of Water (R) 12:30-3:50-6:55
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:00-12:403:40-4:30-6:30-7:15-9:30-12:00
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D
(PG) 1:45-10:05
The Metropolitan Opera: Semiramide
12:55
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (R) 12:10-3:15-9:45
Death Wish (R) 11:25-2:15-5:107:50-10:30
Gringo (R) 11:15-2:05-4:55-7:4510:35-11:30
Annihilation (R) 6:40-9:25
Love, Simon (PG-13) 7:00
Every Day (PG-13) 11:00AM
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) 11:001:35-4:20-7:00-9:40-12:00
Regal
Springfield Town Center 12
6500 Springfield Town Center
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 11:202:00-4:40-7:10-9:30
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:10-11:503:20-6:00-6:30-9:40
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D (PG13) 12:50-2:50-4:10-7:20-9:10-10:40
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 10:10AM
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PG13) 11:40-5:10-9:50
Peter Rabbit (PG) 10:40-1:20-3:50-8:05
Red Sparrow (R) 10:20-1:40-4:55-10:35
Game Night (R) 2:40-5:20-7:50-10:25
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:00-1:00-2:105:00-7:00-8:00-10:50
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D
(PG) 10:00-4:00-10:00
Death Wish (R) 10:50-1:50-4:507:40-10:20
Gringo (R) 10:30-1:30-4:30-7:30-10:30
Annihilation (R) 11:30-2:20-8:10-11:00
Regal Fox Stadium 16 & IMAX Love, Simon (PG-13) 7:00
22875 Brambleton Plaza
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 1:003:30-5:45-8:00-10:15
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:45-12:303:00-4:00-6:15-7:15-9:30-10:30
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) 6:45-9:45
The Greatest Showman (PG) 3:15
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 11:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PG13) 1:30-4:15
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:15-2:45-5:107:45-10:15
Red Sparrow (R) 12:15-3:30-6:45-10:00
Game Night (R) 12:30-3:00-5:308:15-10:45
The Shape of Water (R) 12:45-3:45
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:00-2:30-3:455:15-6:30-8:00-9:15
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D
(PG) 11:45-10:45
Death Wish (R) 11:45-2:15-5:007:45-10:15
Thoroughbreds (R) 2:00-4:45-7:15-9:45
Annihilation (R) 7:00
Gringo (R) 12:00-2:45-5:30-8:15-11:00
Every Day (PG-13) 11:45-12:45
Love, Simon (PG-13) 7:00
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 9:45
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) 12:002:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) 1:15-10:00
A Wrinkle in Time: An IMAX 2D Experience (PG) 4:30-7:15
Regal Kingstowne
Stadium 16 & RPX
5910 Kingstowne Towne Center
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 12:202:55-5:10-7:25-9:40
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:45-12:301:15-2:45-3:30-4:30-6:00-6:45-7:308:30-9:15-10:00
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) 2:00-5:05-10:45
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:20-1:40-3:556:10-8:40
Early Man (PG) 12:10-2:30-4:50-7:15
Red Sparrow (R) 11:55-3:10-6:20-9:25
Regal Ballston Common
Game Night (R) 12:45-3:15-5:40Stadium 12
8:10-10:35
671 N. Glebe Road
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 11:50- The Shape of Water (R) 12:50-3:50
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 2:15-5:00-7:45
2:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:00-12:00(PG) 11:30-10:30
1:00-2:15-3:15-4:15-5:30-7:00-7:45Thoroughbreds (R) 12:00-2:30-5:058:45-10:15-11:00
7:40-10:10
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
Death Wish (R) 11:50-2:25-5:25(PG-13) 6:15-9:30
8:05-10:40
The Greatest Showman (PG) 11:25Gringo (R) 11:35-2:20-5:20-8:00-10:45
2:00-4:40-7:20-9:50
Annihilation (R) 9:50
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 9:40
Red Sparrow (R) 12:20-3:45-7:15-10:30 Love, Simon (PG-13) 7:00
Regal Virginia Gateway
Stadium 14 & RPX
8001 Gateway Promenade Place
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 10:352:45-5:30-8:00-10:15
Black Panther (PG-13) 10:15-11:451:15-2:15-4:30-5:15-7:45-8:15-9:1510:45-11:15
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) 12:45-3:45-6:45
The Greatest Showman (PG) 10:301:00-3:30
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 10:25AM
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PG13) 11:00-1:45-4:40
Peter Rabbit (PG) 10:20-12:50-3:156:15-9:00
Red Sparrow (R) 11:05-12:55-3:556:55-10:00
Game Night (R) 11:10-1:35-4:056:30-10:05
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:30-7:00
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D
(PG) 10:45-4:15-9:45
Death Wish (R) 11:25-2:30-5:107:50-10:40
Gringo (R) 11:20-2:20-5:00-8:05-10:50
Annihilation (R) 7:35-10:20
Love, Simon (PG-13) 7:00
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) 10:401:10-4:00-7:15-9:50
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 9:55
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:15-2:004:45-7:30
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D
(PG) 10:30
Smithsonian - Airbus
IMAX Theater
14390 Air and Space Museum Parkway
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
11:10AM
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 12:35
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the Seas
3D (NR) 10:20-1:30
Dream Big: Engineering Our World: An
IMAX 3D Experience 2:20
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 12:00
A Wrinkle in Time: An IMAX 2D Experience (PG) 3:10-5:25-7:40-9:55
University Mall Theatre
10659 Braddock Road
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) CC:
1:00-4:00-7:00-10:05
Maze Runner: The Death Cure (PG-13)
CC: 7:15-10:00
Coco (PG) CC: 12:15-4:45
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 12:05-2:20-4:35
The Post (PG-13) CC: 2:25-7:30-9:55
The Rocky Horror Picture Show (R)
12:00AM
SATURDAY, MARCH 10 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
EZ
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
RE
PICKLES
C5
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
N-S VULNERABLE
NORTH
K5
AQ5
76542
AQ6
WEST
9876
64
K J 10 8 3
98
EAST
432
J987
Q
J 10 5 4 2
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH (D)
A Q J 10
K 10 3 2
A9
K73
The bidding:
SOUTH
WEST
NORTH
1 NT
Pass
4 NT
6 NT
All Pass
Opening lead — 9
EAST
Pass
CLASSIC PEANUTS
imple Saturday” columns focus on improving basic technique and
developing logical thinking.
Counting the distribution
of the concealed hands
is supposed to be strictly
the province of the expert
player, but nothing about it is
arcane. Anyone can do it.
You’re declarer at today’s
6NT. You count 11 tricks: four
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
spades, three hearts, three
clubs and a diamond. You
need a fourth heart trick and
want to know whether the
missing hearts are split 3-3
or whether East may hold
J-x-x-x. To get a count, you
will play the other suits and
watch the fall of the cards.
To facilitate, lead your
nine of diamonds at Trick
Two. Say East wins and leads
LIO
another spade. You take
three spades (East discards
a club), the ace of diamonds
(he discards another club)
and three clubs (West throws
a diamond).
You have a complete
count: West had four spades,
five diamonds and two clubs,
so two hearts. Take the A-Q
of hearts, and when no jack
appears, lead a heart to your
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
10. Easy!
“S
CHARLES SCHULZ
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
K5AQ5
76542AQ6
Your partner opens one
club. The next player passes.
What do you say?
ANSWER: To respond one
diamond, forcing, would not
be a grave error; you would
intend to bid notrump next.
But I believe in making the
bid that best describes a
hand. Jump to 2NT, promising a balanced 13 to 15
points with stoppers in the
unbid suits. If partner raises
to 3NT, pass. If he does
anything else, you will avoid
notrump.
BLONDIE
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2018, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
C6
EZ
MUTTS
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
PATRICK McDONNELL
ZITS
. SATURDAY,
MARCH 10 , 2018
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
BIRTHDAY | MARCH 10
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
This year you smile
from ear to ear
when you follow your
instincts. You will
need some self-discipline in
certain areas that are key
to your well-being. If you
are single, you could meet
several different potential
suitors who are unique and
intriguing. If you are attached,
consider planning a special
vacation that the two of you
often speak about. You need
to make your relationship a
high priority. You can count on
Capricorn.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
Try to resist being the authority
figure right now, and tap
into the mentality of being
the host or hostess of the
moment. Others look to you
for suggestions, but how they
are delivered can make all the
difference.
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
You could be in a difficult
position when dealing with
someone at a distance. Know
that you might have too much
on your mind to really socialize
or have a carefree discussion.
Comments spoken with
sensitivity will be heard.
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
Defer to others, and be willing
to listen to their logic and
how they got there. If you
keep your mind open, you will
be fascinated by what you
WEINGARTENS & CLARK hear. You don’t need to follow
through on a decision right
now, as what you are hearing
could color your thinking.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
You could be on top of
what needs to happen, but
you might not be aware of
someone who needs some
attention. Communication
flourishes, and you are able
to make a point clearly,
even if you do not reach an
agreement.
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
How you deal with certain
people could vary. You tend to
give friends more of your time,
but not if you judge that your
efforts are futile. A serious
conversation speaks for itself.
Let a loved one know when
would be the best time to get
together.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
You are likely to see a change
occur. A loved one could be
expressing a new attitude,
which seems to be tied to an
inner transformation. Assume
a more positive attitude than
usual. As a result, you will
discover a new openness.
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
Take charge of a domestic
matter, and do not allow
the situation to become
overwhelming. You are
centered and willing to deal
with any problems, yet others
know you want to enjoy the
day.
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
Make plans to get together
with friends or loved ones at a
favorite neighborhood haunt.
You also could decide to
entertain from home. It would
be cozier, and possibly even
more fun. Make sure to return
all calls ASAP.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
Use caution with a tendency
to let go and become
overindulgent. You can’t seem
to pull yourself back after a
certain point. Make sure that,
for your sake, you don’t have
any reason for regret.
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
You’d be wise to drop the
more serious facade and
adopt a more playful one.
Or, perhaps you simply want
to become more lighthearted
on the inside while maintaining
a serious exterior attitude.
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
Consider taking some muchneeded downtime. How you
handle a personal matter
might be judged from various
different viewpoints. Only you
can decide what works best
for you.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
You might decide to host the
mother of all parties. In any
case, plan on being around
friends and loved ones. Add
a touch of the unexpected, if
possible. Others enjoy this new
quirkiness in you.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2018, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
KLMNO
SPORTS
SATURDAY, MARCH 10 , 2018
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
Rhode Island reaches
Atlantic 10 mountaintop
Danny Hurley —
he gave up asking
people to call him
Dan after he
turned 45 in
January — stood
John
in the hallway
Feinstein
outside Rhode
Island’s locker
room inside Capital One Arena
on Friday afternoon with his
head down, clearly a little
embarrassed.
“Look at what I did,” he said,
pointing at the left pocket of his
suit pants. “My gyrations.”
Hurley is almost as active on
the bench as he was in the days
when he was Seton Hall’s point
guard. At some point during
Rhode Island’s 76-67 escape
from Virginia Commonwealth
in the Atlantic 10 tournament
quarterfinals, he tore the pants
pocket.
“I finished it off in the locker
room after we won,” he said,
pointing to the tear down to his
knee. “I figured the players
would enjoy that. Then I
remembered I have to stick
around here and scout. Bad
move.”
Hurley hasn’t made very
many bad moves this season.
The Rams won the A-10 regular
season title going away and will
next face Saint Joseph’s, an easy
68-49 winner over George
Mason, in Saturday’s first
semifinal. Rhode Island won
this tournament a year ago
when it arrived in Pittsburgh
not knowing whether it was a
lock for the NCAA tournament.
This time around, at 24-6, the
only question is where the Rams
will be seeded. And yet, it was
pretty clear Friday, they didn’t
want to lose their opening game
in the tournament before the
tournament.
Hurley’s Rams beat Mike
FEINSTEIN CONTINUED ON D4
Workmanlike Cavaliers
return to ACC title game
VIRGINIA 64,
CLEMSON 58
BY
G ENE W ANG
new york — The Virginia men’s
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
Virginia’s Jack Salt, battling for a rebound, received a standing
ovation after doubling his season average with eight points.
Championship week heats up
Atlantic 10 semifinals
Capital One Arena | TV: CBS Sports
St. Joseph’s vs. Rhode Island, 1
Davidson vs. St. Bonaventure, 3:30
Big East final
Madison Square Garden | TV: Fox
Villanova vs. Providence, 6:30
Oshie stays
optimistic
as drought
persists
ACC final
Barclays Center | TV: ESPN
Virginia vs. North Carolina , 8:30
More online: Predicting the entire
NCAA field at washingtonpost.com.
Complete TV schedule, D2
basketball team received timely
offensive contributions from one
unlikely source, highlight-reel
moments from a top reserve, and
its usual stout overall defense to
outlast Clemson, 64-58, in the
ACC tournament semifinals Friday night.
Starting center Jack Salt scored
eight points, more than double his
season average, and forward Mamadi Diakite came off the bench
to spark a 10-0 run early in the
second half that allowed the Cavaliers to gain a working margin on
the way to their ninth appearance
in the tournament final.
Top-seeded Virginia (30-2),
which also got a team-high 15
Jeff Kaplan, video game designer
Forward starts fast,
scores team-high 19
los angeles — The last time T.J.
CAPITALS CONTINUED ON D7
Capitals at Sharks
Today, 4 p.m., NBCSW
GOLF
Look who’s in the hunt at
Innisbrook: A 68 has Tiger
Woods two off the lead. D2
BASEBALL
Nationals pitching
prospect Wander Suero
exits early with injury. D2
FOOTBALL
Browns get busy, landing
WR Jarvis Landry and QB
Tyrod Taylor in trades. D3
CAVALIERS CONTINUED ON D5
WIZARDS 116,
PELICANS 97
I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN
Oshie scored, he dropped his
head back as he looked toward
the ceiling and lifted both arms, a
celebration he sheepishly admitted was “dramatic.” But it was the
picture of relief after 13 games
without a goal. The Washington
Capitals right wing had been even
more disappointed in the play of
his line with center Evgeny Kuznetsov and rookie Jakub Vrana —
“We were playing terrible,” Oshie
said — in the weeks leading up to
that goal.
“Now it feels like a while ago,”
Oshie said Thursday.
Another 17 games have passed
since Oshie’s goal and subsequent
celebration, meaning he has just
that one tally in the past 31 games.
Coming off a career season in
which Oshie scored 33 goals in 68
games, he has just 12 through 61
games this season, and his four
even-strength goals are the fewest
among Washington’s forwards.
Oshie’s play has improved of
late — he has three assists in the
past five games — but his sharp
decline in production has continued to be a concern for the Capitals, especially as the team’s record since the start of February
dropped below .500 with Thursday’s 3-1 loss at the Los Angeles
Kings. Washington has just one
goal in the past two games combined, and Oshie’s slump looks
even worse considering the 31year-old is in the first year of an
eight-year, $46 million contract
extension he signed this summer.
“When T.J. is on top of his
game, you notice him a lot around
points from guard Kyle Guy, will
face sixth-seeded North Carolina
on Saturday night. The Cavaliers
will be playing in their third ACC
final in five years.
“This was a blue-collar game
where you’re going to just have to
fight for everything,” Virginia
Coach Tony Bennett said while
sitting on the stage next to Salt
and guard Ty Jerome. “Both teams
tried to really play hard-nosed defense, but I think our fans have
appreciated how hard these guy
play, and that’s been our way.”
Redshirt senior guard Devon
Hall made 3 of 4 free throws over
the last 13 seconds for the final
margin, and soon after the whistle
to end the game, many among the
Cavaliers faithful stood and
chanted Salt’s name as he walked
off the court following Virginia’s
eighth straight victory over Clemson (23-9).
Virginia’s lead had dwindled to
Porter
healthy,
prolific
in win
“The most important story in a video game is
between the people playing the game together.”
Veteran Capitals forward
has only scored once
in his past 31 games
BY
D
M2
BY
MASON TRINCA FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
State of (video) play
Friendships, and even marriages, spawn from common bond of a game controller
BY
A VI S ELK
AND
E MILY G USKIN
Jeff Kaplan met his wife in his
20s, as many do. He was an
aspiring writer living in Los Angeles moonlighting as a Halfling
rogue in the multiplayer fantasy
video game Everquest. She was a
Dark Elf warrior at the time, and to
prove himself worthy of joining
her guild, Kaplan had to duel her
with a set of serrated bone knives.
It’s the usual, age-old story of love.
At first, they only knew each other
by their screen names and whatever
could be gleaned through the clunky
text chat programs of the 1990s. “For
years, I thought she was a male,”
Kaplan recalled.
They became close all the same,
then met, then married. At the dawn
of multiplayer video gaming, Kaplan
and his wife understood what a
Washington Post-University of Massachusetts Lowell poll made abundantly clear three decades later: The
myth of the lonely gamer is a lie.
Nearly three quarters of Americans age 14 to 21 had played or
watched an online multiplayer game
in the previous 12 months, when the
poll was conducted last fall. The
survey is among the first to gauge the
growing popularity of e-gaming and
finds 25 percent of all adults played
or watched games in the past year,
peaking at 43 percent among those
under age 40.
More than half of gamers age 14 to
21 considered friendship an essential
part of playing, the poll found.
GAMING CONTINUED ON D6
C ANDACE B UCKNER
new orleans — Otto Porter Jr.
was warming up on the Smoothie
King Center floor when his coach
delivered good news for the
Washington Wizards.
Scott Brooks noted that Porter’s hip soreness had eased after
several days of rest and that
Porter had felt fine during the
morning shoot-around. Thus, he
would play Friday night against
the New Orleans Pelicans.
“And that’s good for us,” Brooks
said.
Porter not only played in
Washington’s 116-97 win, he was
the best player on the court. He
made four of his first five shots,
then sparked a 21-4 run in the
second quarter, validating his
coach’s words. He finished with
19 points on 8-of-13 shooting and
grabbed seven rebounds.
“Things felt good,” Porter said
about his overall health. “I came
out before the game and did a
little bit more running and I felt
good. So, I was ready to go.”
Washington improved to 38-28
and maintained a tie with the
Indiana Pacers for the fourth spot
in the Eastern Conference. Washington trailed once but easily
handled the injury-ridden Pelicans, who lost for the first time in
11 games as all-star Anthony Davis sat out with a left ankle
sprain.
The Wizards escaped injury,
although Porter dodged a potenWIZARDS CONTINUED ON D3
Wizards at Heat
Today, 7:30 p.m., NBCSW
TIMOTHY C. WRIGHT FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
TOP PHOTO: Octavio Sosa, Riggie Medina and
Nick Echeveste meet up regularly to play games together.
ABOVE: Controllers hang on the wall of kungfufruitcup, a
gamer who streams online to an expansive audience.
GERALD HERBERT/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Wizards forward Kelly Oubre
Jr. shot 4 for 14 from the floor
but finished with 11 points, six
rebounds and four steals.
D2
EZ
D I G ES T
SKIING
Shiffrin earns second
overall World Cup title
Mikaela Shiffrin won her
second straight overall World Cup
title on Friday, five races before the
end of the season.
The gold medalist in the event
in last month’s Olympics finished
third in a giant slalom won by
Norway’s Ragnhild Mowinckel in
Ofterschwang, Germany.
Even before her final run,
Shiffrin was guaranteed of
winning the title because her only
remaining rival, Wendy
Holdener, failed to finish in the
top two, which she needed to
maintain her title chance. The
Swiss skier finished 14th.
“That’s really exciting, for sure,”
said Shiffrin, who turns 23 next
week and holds a 603-point lead
over Holdener in the overall
standings. “To have the overall
locked in . . . is pretty cool.”
Shiffrin is the second American
female skier to win multiple
overall titles. Lindsey Vonn won
the sport’s most coveted prize four
times.
In her first race after the
Olympics, Shiffrin was fourth after
the opening run but improved a
spot to third, 0.74 seconds behind
Mowinckel, who scored her first
career win.
Viktoria Rebensburg of
Germany finished 0.66 behind in
second and closed in on the season
title in the discipline. With one
race remaining, she leads world
giant slalom champion Tessa
Worley by 92 points in the
discipline standings with one race
remaining.
Friday’s result stretched
Rebenburg’s lead over Shiffrin to
101 points, leaving the American
out of contention for the GS title.
Friday’s race was interrupted
after Tina Robnik crashed and
had to be taken off on a sled with
an apparent knee injury. There
was no immediate update on the
Slovenian skier’s condition.
TENNIS
Petra Kvitova rallied to beat
Yulia Putintseva, 6-7 (7-4), 7-6 (73), 6-4, in the second round of the
BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells,
Calif., for her 14th consecutive
match victory.
The two-time Wimbledon
champion overcame 78 unforced
errors and 18 double faults in the
3-hour, 17-minute slugfest.
Late Thursday, Serena
Williams won her first match in
her comeback after a 14-month
layoff for the birth of her child,
posting a 7-5, 6-3 victory over
Zarina Diyas of Kazakhstan.
“It was incredible,” Williams
said after the match. “It’s been
over a year and a kid later, and I
get to go home to her now, and I’m
excited about that.”
On the men’s side, Nick Kyrgios
withdrew, citing a lingering elbow
injury that occurred in Australia’s
Davis Cup loss in February.
COLLEGES
The University of Arkansas at
Little Rock fired basketball coach
Wes Flanigan after his team lost a
school-record 25 games.
The 25 losses, against just seven
victories, were the most for the
Trojans in their 88 seasons of
playing basketball. Two seasons
ago, under Chris Beard, the team
finished 30-5 and, as a 12th seed,
beat Purdue in the NCAA
tournament. . . .
Jeff Compher is out after five
years as East Carolina’s athletic
director. The school’s board of
trustees approved a deal for
Compher to step down on May 1.
He will receive a buyout of up to
$1.2 million over five years. . . .
Iowa sophomore forward Tyler
Cook submitted paperwork for
early entry into the 2018 NBA
draft. He has not hired an agent,
meaning he could possibly return
to the Hawkeyes next season.
The 6-foot-9 Cook announced
he is seeking to gauge interest
after he led Iowa with 15.3 points
and 6.8 rebounds per game.
AUTO RACING
Martin Truex Jr. won the pole
for the NASCAR Cup Series race
Sunday at ISM Raceway in
Avondale, Ariz.
The defending series champion
turned a lap at 136.945 mph in the
last of three rounds of qualifying
on the mile oval. He edged Kyle
Larson in 84-degree afternoon
heat for his 16th career pole.
Larson was the fastest in
practice and topped the second
round. Chase Elliott was third.
— From news services
TELEVISION AND RADIO
NBA
7:30 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
Washington at Miami » NBC Sports Washington, WFED (1500 AM)
San Antonio at Oklahoma City » WJLA (Ch. 7), WMAR (Ch. 2)
NHL
4 p.m.
Washington at San Jose » NBC Sports Washington, WJFK (106.7 FM)
MLB SPRING TRAINING
1 p.m.
8 p.m.
New York Mets vs. New York Yankees » MLB Network
Seattle vs. Cincinnati » MLB Network
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
11 a.m.
12:30 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
3 p.m.
3 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
5 p.m.
6 p.m.
America East, championship: UMBC vs. Vermont » ESPN2, WTEM (980 AM)
Ivy League, semifinal: Cornell vs. Harvard » ESPNU
AAC, semifinal: Memphis vs. Cincinnati » WUSA (Ch. 9), WJZ (Ch. 13)
SEC, semifinal: Alabama vs. Kentucky » ESPN, WTEM (980 AM)
MEAC, championship: Hampton vs. North Carolina Central » ESPN
Atlantic 10, semifinal: Saint Joseph’s vs. Rhode Island » CBS Sports Network
SEC, semifinal: Tennessee vs. Arkansas » ESPN, WTEM (980 AM)
Ivy League, semifinal: Yale vs. Pennsylvania » ESPN2
AAC, semifinal: Wichita State vs. Houston » WUSA (Ch. 9), WJZ (Ch. 13)
Atlantic 10, semifinal: St. Bonaventure vs. Davidson » CBS Sports Network
SWAC, championship: Arkansas-Pine Bluff vs. Texas Southern » ESPN2
Mountain West, championship: San Diego State vs. New Mexico/Utah State
» WUSA (Ch. 9), WJZ (Ch. 13)
6 p.m.
Big 12, championship: Kansas vs. West Virginia » ESPN
6:30 p.m.
Big East, championship: Villanova vs. Providence » WTTG (Ch. 5), WBFF (Ch.
45), WTEM (980 AM)
7 p.m.
MAC, championship: Toledo vs. Buffalo » ESPN2
8 p.m.
Big Sky, championship: Montana vs. Southern Utah/Eastern Washington »
ESPNU, WTEM (980 AM)
8:30 p.m.
Conference USA, championship: Marshall vs. Western Kentucky » CBS
Sports Network
8:30 p.m.
ACC, championship: Virginia vs. North Carolina » ESPN
9 p.m.
Southland, championship: Stephen F. Austin vs. SE Louisiana » ESPN2
10 p.m.
WAC, championship: Grand Canyon vs. Seattle/New Mexico State »ESPNU
10 p.m.
Pac-12, championship: Arizona vs. Oregon/USC » FoxSports 1, WTEM (980 AM)
Midnight (Sun.) Big West, championship: CS Fullerton vs. UC Irvine/UC Santa Barbara »
ESPN2, WTEM (980 AM)
WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
11 a.m.
Mid-American, championship: Buffalo vs. C. Michigan » CBS Sports Network
GOLF
1 p.m.
PGA Tour: Valspar Championship, third round » Golf Channel
3 p.m.
PGA Tour: Valspar Championship, third round » WRC (Ch. 4), WBAL (Ch. 11)
5:30 p.m.
Champions Tour: Toshiba Classic, second round » Golf Channel
Midnight (Sun.) European Tour: Indian Open, final round » Golf Channel
TENNIS
2 p.m.
ATP/WTA: Indian Wells, second round » Tennis Channel
SOCCER
7:30 a.m.
9:20 a.m.
9:30 a.m.
10 a.m.
12:20 p.m.
12:30 p.m.
English Premier League: Liverpool at Manchester United »
NBC Sports Network
German Bundesliga: Augsburg at Hannover » Fox Sports 2
German Bundesliga: Hamburg at Bayern Munich » Fox Sports 1
English Premier League: Southampton at Newcastle » NBC Sports Network
German Bundesliga: Borussia Monchengladbach at Bayer Leverkusen » Fox
Sports 2
English Premier League: Crystal Palace at Chelsea » NBC Sports Network
AUTO RACING
Noon
1 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
4 p.m.
7 p.m.
NASCAR Cup Series: TicketGuardian 500, practice » Fox Sports 1
NASCAR Xfinity Series: DC Solar 200, qualifying » Fox Sports 1
NASCAR Cup Series: TicketGuardian 500, final practice » Fox Sports 1
NASCAR Xfinity Series: DC Solar 200 » WTTG (Ch. 5), WBFF (Ch. 45)
AMA Monster Energy Supercross » Fox Sports 1
HORSE RACING
5 p.m.
1 p.m.
Tampa Bay Derby » MASN
Santa Anita Handicap » MASN
RUGBY
3 p.m.
5 p.m.
Six Nations Championship: Ireland vs. Scotland » NBC Sports Network
Six Nations Championship: France vs. England » NBC Sports Network
BOXING
10:15 p.m.
10:30 p.m.
Sergey Lipinets vs. Mikey Garcia (junior welterweights); Rances
Barthelemy vs. Kiryl Relikh (super lightweights) » Showtime
Oscar Valdez vs. Scott Quigg (featherweights); Andy Vences vs. Erick
DeLeon » ESPN
PARALYMPICS
10 p.m.
Sled hockey: United States vs. Japan; wheelchair curling »
NBC Sports Network
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. SATURDAY,
MARCH 10 , 2018
GOLF ROUNDUP
Woods cards a 68, sits two shots o≠ Valspar lead
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Corey Conners knew Tiger
Woods had finished his second
round at Innisbrook because he
couldn’t see him. He was only
about 50 yards from the ninth
green, but there were too many
fans covering every inch of grass,
packed in a dozen deep because of
Woods.
Woods brought the Valspar
Championship to life Friday with
his best round of a comeback that
is building momentum toward
the Masters.
Conners was happy to play a
quiet round in the afternoon and
wind up with the lead.
The Canadian rookie ran off
three birdies before a careless error set him back, and he finished
with a 2-under-par 69 for a twoshot lead going into the weekend.
Right on his heels was Woods,
who kept a clean card until his
final hole and shot 68.
Conners was on the putting
green when Woods and his entourage — officials, security, media
and stragglers — walked along the
edge of the green, in front of another group waiting to tee off on
No. 1 and toward the scoring area.
“I definitely saw that,” Conners
said. “I’ve seen that the last few
days as well. Pretty cool. Hopefully, I can be in a position where I get
some followers Sunday.”
Until that moment, the closest
Conners ever got to Woods was at
the Masters three years ago when
he watched him on the range.
Conners played at Augusta National that year as the U.S. Amateur runner-up.
Conners was at 6-under 136
and will play in the final group
with Paul Casey, who had a 68.
Woods and Brandt Snedeker (68)
will be in the group in front of
MIKE CARLSON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
“Today was a good day,” said Tiger Woods, shown teeing off on the 15th hole. “I feel comfortable out there.”
them, with thousands of fans lining the fairways and surrounding
the greens.
“At least I’m there with a
chance going into the weekend,”
Woods said when he finished. “Today was a good day.”
Woods took the lead with a
drive that was heading left, struck
a cart path and caromed back into
the fairway on his 14th hole, the
par-5 fifth. That set up a long iron
into the front right bunker and a
delicate shot from the sand to
about five feet for his fourth birdie
of the round.
He saved par with a 12-foot putt
on No. 7 and was heading toward a
bogey-free round until his wedge
on the par-5 ninth rode the shifting wind to the right and into the
gallery, his ball on a woman’s bag.
After getting a drop, his chip came
out too strong and hit the flag,
leaving it only six feet away.
He missed the putt and didn’t
seem all that bothered.
The energy in the gallery was
enormous, especially for this
sleepy tournament.
“The roars are a little louder,
and there’s certainly an energy
about the gallery that you don’t
have anywhere else,” said Jordan
Spieth, who missed the cut for the
second time this year. After an
opening-round 76, he shot a 71.
“I’ve played with Tiger many
times. It’s nothing new,” Spieth
said. “It kind of feels like you’re
playing in a major championship
in a normal round.”
CHAMPIONS TOUR: Tom
Pernice Jr. shot a bogey-free 7-un-
der 64 for a three-shot lead at the
Toshiba Classic in Newport
Beach, Calif. Seven players were
three shots back: Scott Parel, Joey
Sindelar, Scott Verplank, David
Frost, Scott McCarron, Tommy
Tolles and Fran Quinn.
EUROPEAN TOUR: Emiliano Grillo took a four-stroke lead at
the Indian Open in New Delhi
after shooting a 4-under 68.
The Argentine had five birdies
and a bogey, lowering his total to
11-under 133 for the tournament.
Shubhankar Sharma made a
charge with an 8-under 64. He
had nine birdies, including six on
the last nine holes, and is seven
under through two rounds.
Pablo Larrazabal (71) and Andrew Johnston (66) were tied for
third at 6 under.
SPRING TRAINING NOTES
Clark: Marlins’ drastic tear-down bad for baseball
A SSOCIATED P RESS
AND NEWS SERVICES
Baseball players’ union head
Tony Clark claims the Marlins’
rebuilding decision is different
from the ones that led to World
Series titles for the Chicago Cubs
and Houston because Miami
broke up a competitive club.
“Those teams didn’t tear themselves down,” Clark said Friday.
“Those teams went through rough
stretches. And then they added,
too. When you start with a team
that has a number of talented
players and you tear that down,
it’s a different conversation than
starting from scratch and building up.”
The union filed a grievance two
weeks ago against Miami, Pittsburgh, Oakland and Tampa Bay,
accusing them of not properly using money received in revenue
sharing to improve their ability to
win.
After the Marlins were sold in
October to Bruce Sherman’s ownership group, the management
team headed by former New York
Yankees star Derek Jeter traded
NL MVP Giancarlo Stanton, Mar-
cell Ozuna, Christian Yelich and
Dee Gordon for prospects.
Clark said those decisions impacted the free agent market and
“can be a detriment to the industry as a whole.”
Miami went 77-85 last season
with payroll of about $117 million
for its 40-man roster. The Marlins
last had a winning season in 2009
and have not reached the playoffs
since winning the 2003 World Series.
Miami’s home attendance of
1.65 million last season was 28th
among the 30 teams, ahead of only
Oakland and Tampa Bay.
RED SOX: Boston wants
Chris Sale to go slowly this spring.
The ace left-hander is getting used
to the plan.
Sale pitched four innings of onerun ball in his first spring training
game against Miami. He allowed
two hits, struck out five and walked
none in Boston’s 5-4 loss.
The Red Sox are monitoring
Sale’s workload this spring, so he
began his preparations for the
season in minor league games on
the backfields of the team’s training complex. He got into the upper
90s in the first inning against the
Marlins, and Manager Alex Cora
and pitching coach Dana LeVangie suggested it might be a good
idea to dial it down.
“Had to change it up after that,”
Sale said. “I’m still working on
that buildup. You get out there the
first time in front of a crowd and
you want to go out there and
compete. But you have to understand the end goal. We kind of
came to that together. It’s not easy
to dial it back and trust the process.”
Sale threw 58 pitches. He allowed his only run on Justin
Bour’s sacrifice fly in his final
inning.
DODGERS: Closer Kenley
Jansen was held out of what was to
have been his first big league
spring training game this year due
to an injured upper right hamstring.
“When he was getting ready
today, his pregame stuff and kind
of getting his legs loose, it tightened up on him,” Dodgers Manager Dave Roberts said after a 6-4
win over a Kansas City split squad.
“We had the trainers look at him,
and it just made sense to just not
throw him out there.”
Jansen never warmed up in the
bullpen, and Zach Neal came out
to pitch the ninth inning for the
Dodgers. Roberts said he expects
Jansen will pitch in a minor
league game on Monday, then
hopefully work in his first big
league spring training game next
Thursday against the Royals.
ATHLETICS:
Oakland
dipped into free agency to grab
all-star catcher Jonathan Lucroy,
who reportedly will sign a oneyear deal.
MLB.com reported the A’s are
bringing in the 31-year-old to help
solve some of the team’s catching
issues the past couple of years.
Lucroy struggled with the Texas
Rangers last season before getting
dealt to the Colorado Rockies in
July, where he hit .310 in 46 games.
TIGERS: Catcher Jarrod Saltalamacchia agreed to a minor
league contract with Detroit and
will report to big league spring
training.
If added to the 40-man roster
Saltalamacchia would receive a
one-year contract with salaries of
$650,000 while in the major
leagues and $150,000 while in the
minors.
N A T I O N A L S N O TE S
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/nationals
Suero suffers setback
vying for bullpen spot
Wander Suero was sure his
opportunity would come last
season. The Nationals’ bullpen
was a mess for three months. He
was dealing in the minors.
Connecting the dots wasn’t
complicated. But Suero’s chance
to break into the majors never
surfaced because he wasn’t on
the 40-man roster and a stream
of injuries made those spots
invaluable to patch other holes.
So his two scoreless innings last
Sept. 2, which lowered his ERA
between Class AA and AAA to
1.79, were the conclusion to his
standout 2017 season. The
Nationals’ minor league pitcher
of the year then went home to
the Dominican Republic to
prepare for the nation’s winter
league.
“Imagine, those numbers that
I put up, of course [I was
surprised],” Suero said in
Spanish on Thursday morning. “I
was positive and I was ready
waiting for that call, but it never
came. What can you do?”
The answer, of course, is to
continue pitching well until the
numbers game cannot preclude
him from his first major league
call-up. He was a long shot to
break camp on the Opening Day
roster this spring — again
because other relievers remain
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
above him in the pecking order
— but the right-hander again
demonstrated his abilities with
four scoreless innings in his first
four outings. His fifth, however,
may have knocked him out of the
Wander Suero was the
Nationals’ minor league pitcher
of the year in 2017. He’s waiting
for his first big league call-up.
running.
The 26-year-old Suero
grimaced after throwing his
second pitch in the ninth inning
of the Nationals’ 8-5 win over the
Mets on Thursday. Catcher Pedro
Severino immediately jogged out
to him and signaled to the
dugout. Manager Dave Martinez
and trainer Paul Lessard then
appeared. Within a few seconds,
Suero was walking off the field.
After the game, Martinez said
Suero “complained of tightness
in his left side.” That description
indicates a potential oblique
problem. Martinez said an MRI
hadn’t been scheduled, but Suero
would be reevaluated.
Earlier in the week, Martinez
praised Suero. He called his
cutter “unbelievable” and noted
he was beginning to accumulate
confidence. That cutter, Suero
explained, was the fuel for his
breakout last season. He always
boasted one. It came naturally.
Commanding it didn’t come as
easy. Last year, he explained, that
changed.
“That was my success,” Suero
said. “I could control it and
locate it low in the zone and all
that.”
Suero faced 267 batters in 651/3
innings last season and
surrendered just three home
runs. He posted a 1.07 WHIP and
struck out nine batters per nine
innings. He performed like a
player worthy of a shot at the
majors. Barring injury, he should
get his chance in 2018.
— Jorge Castillo
SATURDAY, MARCH 10 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
M2
NFL NOTES
GM Dorsey boosts Browns with deals for Landry, Taylor
F ROM STAFF REPORTS
AND NEWS SERVICES
New General Manager John
Dorsey is wasting no time in turning the Cleveland Browns — yes,
the Cleveland Browns — into a
team with some possibilities.
The Browns agreed Friday to
trade two draft choices to the Miami Dolphins for Jarvis Landry,
the franchise-tagged wide receiver who led the NFL with 112 catches this past season. The Associated
Press, citing a person familiar with
the deal, reported that Miami will
receive a fourth-round pick this
year and a seventh-rounder in
2019.
Cleveland followed that up by
agreeing to send a third-round
pick to the Buffalo Bills for quarterback Tyrod Taylor and by agreeing to trade quarterback DeShone
Kizer to the Green Bay Packers for
cornerback Damarious Randall.
Suddenly, it appears new offensive coordinator Todd Haley
might have plenty with which to
work. The Browns can pair Landry
with Josh Gordon at wide receiver.
They have a promising young tight
end in David Njoku. They have an
all-around running back in Duke
Johnson. They have a Hall of
Fame-bound left tackle in Joe
Thomas, assuming he opts against
retirement.
And there is more to come. With
the free agent market scheduled to
open next week, the Browns are
estimated to have more than
$100 million in available salary
cap space. With preparations for
the NFL draft intensifying, they
possess five picks in the top two
rounds. They have the draft’s first
and fourth overall selections.
Taylor, 28, presumably becomes
the Browns’ temporary starter at
quarterback to go with a franchise
centerpiece-to-be who will arrive
via the draft. With the No. 1 pick,
the Browns could have their
choice of the prized quarterbacks
in this celebrated draft class, a
group that includes USC’s Sam
Darnold, UCLA’s Josh Rosen, Wyoming’s Josh Allen and Oklahoma’s
Baker Mayfield.
— Mark Maske
Seattle cut ties
with Richard Sherman, who became one of the NFL’s premier
cornerbacks during his seven seasons with the team.
SEAHAWKS:
LYNNE SLADKY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Wide receiver Jarvis Landry, traded from the Dolphins to the
Browns, has 400 catches, an NFL record for a fourth-year player.
The Seahawks informed Sherman that he would be released,
and he confirmed the decision in a
text message to the AP. The move
appeared to be more likely after he
discussed his future with the team
Wednesday. Sherman declined to
comment after the meeting.
Sherman was an overlooked
fifth-round draft pick who went
on to become a two-time all-pro
who helped anchor a defense that
was the league’s best for several
years. He has 32 interceptions.
Sherman will be 30 going into
next season and coming off an
Wizards put end to Pelicans’ 10-game winning streak
WIZARDS FROM D1
tial mishap.
Midway through the third
quarter, with the Wizards ahead
by 18, Porter hit the hardwood
while playing defense. He rose
slowly, hobbled for a few steps
before jogging to the Wizards’
offensive end. Although Brooks
looked down the bench at backup
small forward Kelly Oubre Jr.,
Porter remained in the game —
unlike the last time he had taken
a spill.
On Tuesday night, Porter left
the game in the third quarter
after a midair collision had triggered hip pain. Fortunately for
the Wizards, the team had two
days off between games, which
allowed Porter to receive treatment.
“It was very important,” Porter
said about the abbreviated break
that came after the Wizards had
played eight games in 13 days.
“You got to let your muscles
recover.”
The rehabilitation routine followed a similar pattern from previous hip ailments: Porter spent
mornings with the Wizards’
training staff and nights at home
relaxing in recovery boots.
“One thing about Otto, he does
whatever it takes,” Brooks said.
“It’s good to have him back. He’s a
big part and he’s playing some of
the best basketball of his career.”
Porter has scored in double
figures 19 straight games —
smashing his previous high of 14
from last season. And while the
Wizards have been up and down
since the all-star break, winning
five of nine games, Porter has
consistently stepped up, averaging 19 points, seven rebounds
and 2.5 assists while shooting
nearly 57 percent from the floor
as well as the three-point arc.
In New Orleans, Porter was
aggressive from the start, making
a 19-footer from the corner open
the game. Later, Porter cut to the
basket to receive a pass from
point guard Tomas Satoransky,
and it appeared that his hip was
just fine.
“I was just trying to get up and
down the court, moving a little
bit,” Porter said.
In the second quarter, as Washington recovered from a 27-26
deficit, Porter handled the ball
and flashed around a Mike Scott
screen, beating his defender and
forcing Pelicans guard Darius
Miller to foul from behind. This
move showed not only Porter’s
growing assertiveness, but also,
on a night when Bradley Beal (16
points) and Markieff Morris (17)
Achilles’ tendon injury that cost
him half of the 2017 season, but the
biggest reason for his release was
financial. Sherman was due
$13 million for the 2018 season,
and his release gives Seattle a salary cap savings of about $11 million.
BUCCANEERS: Mike Evans
agreed to a five-year, $82.5 million
extension with Tampa Bay that
makes him the NFL’s second-highest-paid wide receiver.
The deal includes $55 million
guaranteed and also makes Evans
the Bucs’ highest-paid player with
an average annual salary of
$16.5 million. That’s second to Antonio Brown’s $17 million.
Evans, 24, entered the league as
the seventh pick in the 2014 draft.
He topped 1,000 yards receiving in
each of his four pro seasons.
Tampa Bay also re-signed backup quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick
to a one-year contract. The 35year-old started three games for
injured Jameis Winston in 2017.
TRADE: The Philadelphia Eagles have agreed to trade wide
receiver Torrey Smith to the Carolina Panthers for cornerback
Daryl Worley, according to two
people familiar with the deal.
Toronto ends Houston’s
17-game winning streak
A SSOCIATED P RESS
GERALD HERBERT/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Wizards forward Markieff
Morris had 17 points, joining
Otto Porter Jr., Bradley Beal,
Mike Scott and Kelly Oubre Jr.
in double figures Friday.
WIZ ARDS’ NEX T THREE
at Miami Heat
Today
7:30 NBCSW
vs. Minnesota Timberwolves
Tuesday
7 NBCSW, NBATV
at Boston Celtics
Wednesday
8 ESPN
Radio: WFED (1500 AM)
are scoring, he would not be an
overlooked option.
“I forgot about his hip thing,”
said Beal, who noticed Porter’s
activity and not his aches. “He’s a
very key piece to our team, especially when he’s going . . . his
game has gotten better. He’s putting the ball on the floor, creating
for himself, creating for everybody else.”
On the other sideline, New
Orleans (38-27) had few options
to make up for the loss of Davis.
Nikola Mirotic started in Davis’s
place and scored just nine points
on 3-of-11 shooting. Only one
Pelicans starter finished in double figures — point guard Rajon
Rondo who scored 11 — and the
team did not come close to hitting the 110-point mark, which it
did each time during its 10-game
winning streak.
The blowout allowed four Wizards starters to sit in the final
quarter, a significant development considering how the team
will move on to Miami to play on
the second night of a back-toback.
“I thought we played good
basketball on both ends of the
floor,” Brooks said. “It was nice to
get the win with guys resting in
the fourth quarter so we can take
some more energy, because it’s
going to be a tough game [Saturday] night.”
candace.buckner@washpost.com
Washington ......................... 22
New Orleans ........................ 19
WASHINGTON
Morris
Porter Jr.
Gortat
Beal
Satoransky
Oubre Jr.
Sessions
Meeks
Scott
Frazier
Smith
Mahinmi
TOTALS
31
19
30
24
33 — 116
35 — 97
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
26:27 8-15 1-2 3-6 3 2 17
25:58 8-13 1-1 1-7 1 0 19
16:23
2-4 2-2 1-8 2 2
6
29:05 6-14 2-3 1-4 7 0 16
31:18
4-8 0-0 0-5 9 3
8
33:26 4-14 2-2 0-6 2 3 11
22:21
1-6 5-7 1-1 6 2
7
21:14
4-8 0-0 1-4 1 0 10
15:12
6-8 2-3 1-4 3 1 14
6:21
0-0 0-0 0-1 0 1
0
6:21
3-4 0-0 1-1 0 0
8
5:54
0-2 0-0 0-2 0 2
0
240 46-96 15-20 10-49 34 16 116
Percentages: FG .479, FT .750. 3-Point Goals: 9-26, .346
(Smith 2-2, Meeks 2-3, Porter Jr. 2-4, Beal 2-7, Oubre Jr.
1-5, Scott 0-1, Morris 0-2, Satoransky 0-2). Team Rebounds: 10. Team Turnovers: 12 (8 PTS). Blocked Shots: 4
(Gortat 2, Morris, Satoransky). Turnovers: 12 (Morris 3,
Beal 2, Gortat 2, Sessions 2, Mahinmi, Satoransky,
Smith). Steals: 10 (Oubre Jr. 4, Morris 2, Beal, Meeks,
Porter Jr., Satoransky). Technical Fouls: Oubre Jr., 1:43
fourth.
NEW ORLEANS
Mirotic
Moore
Okafor
Holiday
Rondo
Miller
Clark
Diallo
Liggins
Lemon Jr.
TOTALS
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
26:30 3-11 3-4 1-12 1 1
9
24:17
4-9 0-0 0-2 1 1
8
20:50
2-2 2-2 0-2 0 1
6
28:01
2-8 0-0 0-3 2 1
4
19:53
3-7 5-6 0-3 4 2 11
32:51 6-11 4-4 0-0 1 4 20
31:42 4-13 0-0 0-3 4 1
8
22:26 7-10 0-1 1-9 2 4 14
21:30
4-5 0-0 0-3 5 1 10
12:00
3-6 1-1 0-1 3 2
7
240 38-82 15-18 2-38 23 18 97
Percentages: FG .463, FT .833. 3-Point Goals: 6-20, .300
(Miller 4-8, Liggins 2-2, Holiday 0-1, Moore 0-1, Clark 0-4,
Mirotic 0-4). Team Rebounds: 5. Team Turnovers: 15 (16
PTS). Blocked Shots: 10 (Diallo 3, Holiday 3, Okafor 2,
Lemon Jr., Miller). Turnovers: 15 (Rondo 4, Miller 3,
Holiday 2, Clark, Diallo, Lemon Jr., Mirotic, Moore, Okafor). Steals: 3 (Clark, Mirotic, Rondo). Technical Fouls:
None.
— Jeremy Gottlieb
NBA ROUNDUP
RAPTORS 108,
ROCKETS 105
Wizards 116, Pelicans 97
The people spoke on the condition of anonymity because they
weren’t authorized to release the
trade information.
Smith, 29, had 36 catches for
430 yards and two touchdowns in
his first season with Philadelphia.
Worley, 23, started 25 games over
the past two seasons for Carolina.
TELEVISION: Sean McDonough is out as play-by-play
announcer for ESPN’s Monday
Night Football and will be replaced by longtime college announcer Joe Tessitore in a move
first reported by the New York
Post.
ESPN released a statement Friday night announcing McDonough’s return to calling college games after two years in the
MNF booth. The veteran broadcaster signed a multiyear deal to
stay with ESPN, where he’ll remain a part of its college basketball and Masters coverage in addition to resuming a previous role
on college football broadcasts.
The MNF analyst chair remains
vacant with Jon Gruden returning
to the NFL to coach the Oakland
Raiders.
Kyle Lowry scored 30 points,
DeMar DeRozan had 23 and the
Raptors beat Houston, 108-105, on
Friday night in Toronto, snapping
the Rockets’ 17-game winning
streak.
James Harden scored 40 points,
but the Rockets lost for the first
time since Jan. 27 at New Orleans.
Jonas Valanciunas had 14
points and 10 rebounds as the
Raptors won their seventh
straight in a matchup between the
respective conference leaders.
The Rockets shot 9 for 27 from
three-point range, matching their
fewest made three-pointers of the
season.
Clint Capela had 13 points and
13 rebounds for the Rockets. Chris
Paul and Eric Gordon each scored
14 points, and Trevor Ariza had 13
as Houston’s road winning streak
ended at 10.
The Rockets tied it at 102 on
Harden’s three-pointer with 2:10
remaining, but DeRozan restored
Toronto’s lead with a jump shot
with 1:49 left.
Paul missed a go-ahead three
with 14 seconds to play, then
fouled Lowry in the scramble for
the rebound. Lowry made both,
giving the Raptors a 106-102 lead
with 10 seconds to go.
Gordon answered with a three,
making it a one-point game. Houston fouled Valanciunas, who made
a pair to put Toronto up by three
with 5.4 seconds to go.
Harden got the final shot, but
his deep three-pointer from the
edge of the center court circle
went short, giving the Raptors the
win.
Houston trailed 58-43 at halftime. The Rockets’ only lowerscoring first half this season was a
39-point effort in a Feb. 26 win at
Utah.
JAZZ 95, GRIZZLIES 78: Jae
Crowder scored a season-high 22
points for visiting Utah, which
won its fifth straight game and
saddled Memphis with its 16th
consecutive loss.
Joe Ingles added 16 points for
the Jazz, while Ricky Rubio had 15
points and 10 rebounds.
Dillon Brooks led the Grizzlies
with 18 points and Ben McLemore
finished with 14.
BUCKS
120, KNICKS 112:
Giannis Antetokounmpo scored
13 of his 28 points in the fourth
quarter as Milwaukee turned back
visiting New York.
Khris Middleton scored 30
points for the Bucks, who took
control with a 19-7 run in the
fourth quarter to build a 16-point
lead. Tim Hardaway scored 26
points for the Knicks, who have
lost 14 of their last 15 games.
PISTONS
99, BULLS 83:
Blake Griffin had 25 points, eight
rebounds and eight assists to help
host Detroit end a four-game skid.
Reggie Bullock added 21 points
and Andre Drummond grabbed 17
rebounds for the Pistons, who had
lost 10 of 12. Cameron Payne led
Chicago with 17 points.
NUGGETS 125, LAKERS
116: Paul Millsap scored 21 points
and hit a key late three-pointer as
Denver snapped Los Angeles’
four-game road winning streak.
Millsap added six rebounds and
three blocked shots, including one
of Lonzo Ball’s layup attempt with
34 seconds left.
Jamal Murray had 22 points
and Nikola Jokic added 21 for the
Nuggets. Brook Lopez led the Lakers with 29 points. Ball had 15
points, eight rebounds and eight
assists.
Earlier in the day, the Lakers
signed forward Derrick Williams,
26, to a 10-day contract. He had
spent this season in China, averaging 20 points per game for the
Tianjin Gold Lions.
PACERS
112, HAWKS 87:
Bojan Bogdanovic scored 21
points, Cory Joseph scored 10 of
his 18 points in the opening quarter, and Indiana crushed Atlanta
in Indianapolis.
Darren Collison came off the
bench and scored 17 points for the
Pacers, and Victor Oladipo and
Myles Turner also scored 17 apiece
for Indiana, which was 14 of 27
from three-point range.
Rookie Tyler Dorsey scored all
of his career-high 18 points in the
second half for the Hawks.
Hornets’ Carter-Williams out
Charlotte Hornets point guard
Michael Carter-Williams needs
surgery on his left shoulder and
will miss the rest of the season.
He suffered a posterior labral
tear in his should on March 4 at
Toronto. Carter-Williams has appeared in 52 games, averaging 4.6
points and 2.7 rebounds in 16.1
minutes per game.
Figure skating coach suspended nearly 20 years after being accused of abuse
BY
L IZ C LARKE
Nearly 20 years after allegations of sexual misconduct were
lodged against a prominent U.S.
figure skating coach, the U.S. Center for SafeSport, the Olympic
movement’s recently launched organization charged with safeguarding athletes’ well-being, this
week suspended Richard Callaghan. U.S. Figure Skating followed with its own suspension, as
required by the USOC.
Callaghan, 72, who helped Tara
Lipinski win a gold medal at the
1998 Nagano Olympics and
played a key role in the Olympic
careers of Todd Eldredge and Nicole Bobek, was added to U.S. Figure Skating’s list of suspended
coaches Tuesday.
Callaghan, who stepped down
from a high-profile coaching job
at the Detroit Figure Skating Club
soon after the allegations first surfaced in 1999, more recently had
been coaching lower-profile skaters at a rink in Florida. He told
ABC News, which broke the story
Friday morning, that he had not
been notified of his suspension
and had no comment. Asked
about the allegations that led to
his suspension, he said: “That’s 19
or 20 years ago. I have nothing to
say.”
Callaghan could not be reached
for further comment.
Callaghan’s suspension was
spurred by renewed interest in the
allegations raised in 1999 by his
former pupil and, later, co-coach,
Craig Maurizi, according to an
official with knowledge of the
process.
Maurizi started working with
Callaghan when he was 13. According to an April 1999 report in
the New York Times, Maurizi told
U.S. Figure Skating officials in
March 1999 that Callaghan began
engaging in inappropriate sexual
conduct with him when he was 15.
A sexual relationship followed
when Maurizi was 18, the Times
reported, and continued intermittently for several years. The skater
went on to explain that it was only
as an adult that he realized the
relationship was not truly consensual, given his age when it began,
and that Callaghan had abused his
authority as a coach.
At least two other male skaters
came forward with accounts of
sexual impropriety against Callaghan over the years. U.S. Figure
Skating took no punitive action in
response to Maurizi’s 1999 grievance because the alleged incidents
had taken place roughly 14 years
prior. As a result, Callaghan was
allowed to continue coaching under the auspices of U.S. Figure
Skating.
U.S. Figure Skating officials on
Friday released a statement acknowledging Callaghan’s suspension but referred all questions to
the U.S. Center for SafeSport,
which will not comment on individual cases.
The statement read: “U.S. Fig-
ure Skating suspended the membership of Richard Callaghan on
March 6, 2018, in compliance with
the policies and procedures of the
U.S. Center for SafeSport. This action prohibits Callaghan from
participating, in any capacity, in
any activity or competition authorized by, organized by, or under
the auspices of U.S. Figure Skating, the U.S. Olympic Committee
and all USOC-member National
Governing Bodies, including U.S.
Figure Skating-member clubs
and/or organizations. As the U.S.
Center for SafeSport has exclusive
jurisdiction and adjudication of
this matter, U.S. Figure Skating
will have no further comment.”
Maurizi told ABC that he considered the suspension “a great
step in the right direction” but did
not elaborate, explaining that he
was seeking legal representation.
The Colorado-based U.S. Center for SafeSport opened after
much delay in March 2017 and
operates independently from the
USOC and national governing
bodies. There is no statute of limitations on the alleged incidents it
will investigate, but it will initiate
an investigation only after a report has been filed by a person
alleging abuse or mistreatment.
The center has the authority to
ban a coach or official for life, as
well as suspend while an inquiry is
ongoing. The names of banned or
suspended coaches and officials
are posted on its website.
liz.clarke@washpost.com
D4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. SATURDAY,
MARCH 10 , 2018
college basketball
Cold-shooting Patriots shown door in Atlantic 10 quarters
the Hawks were scoreless for more
than five minutes, Mason scored
seven straight but also missed several opportunities to draw closer.
Funk’s three-pointer with 3:15
left put the outcome to rest.
Despite the disappointing end,
the Patriots were upbeat about a
program that does not have any
scholarship seniors and will add
Virginia transfer Jarred Reuter, a
much-needed inside player.
“It’s good to know everyone will
be back,” freshman Goanar Mar
said, “and we’ve been in so many
different situations that we’ll have
that much more experience.”
Paulsen was eager to get back to
work.
“This team improved more
than any team I’ve coached in 24
years for the course of the season.
And all those guys are coming
back.
“I want them to feel good about
the growth and improvement, and
then I want them to remember the
sting and get back to work and be
consumed with getting better.”
SAINT JOSEPH’S 68,
GEORGE MASON 49
BY
S TEVEN G OFF
As time dwindled on the Atlantic 10 quarterfinal against Saint
Joseph’s on Friday, George Mason
had the final possession and an
opportunity to hoist another buzzer-beating shot against the
Hawks.
The Patriots did not bother to
shoot. Time had run out on them
long ago. And so they held the ball.
Given their accuracy rate at
Capital One Arena, they probably
would have missed anyway.
The fifth-seeded Patriots fell
hard, 68-49, in their lowest scoring output of the season. They shot
26.5 percent in the second half and
29.5 overall. They made 2 of 25
three-pointers, 1 of 17 after intermission.
And unlike in the previous two
meetings with the fourth-seeded
Hawks, no last-second shots were
going to rescue Mason this time.
In the regular season, Otis Livingston II and Ian Boyd had made
game-winners as time expired.
“We just couldn’t shoot the
ball,” Coach Dave Paulsen said. “If
you’re going to have a game like
that, you don’t want it to be in the
conference tournament.”
The Patriots (16-17) missed a
chance to advance to the semifinals for the first time since joining
the Atlantic 10 in 2013-14. Instead,
the Hawks (16-15) moved into Saturday’s 1 p.m. semifinal against
top-seeded Rhode Island, which
ousted Virginia Commonwealth
in Friday’s opener.
Saint Joseph’s was worse than
PATRICK SMITH/GETTY IMAGES
Otis Livingston II looks for an opening for George Mason, which shot just 29.5 percent to finish 16-17.
RHODE ISLAND 76, VCU
67: Jeff Dowtin, a sophomore
Mason in the first half but shot 50
percent and made 6 of 10 threepointers after the break. Nick Robinson led four double-figure scorers with 14 points, making three
three-pointers and adding nine
rebounds and four assists.
Jaire Grayer scored 12 points for
the Patriots but shot 4 of 16. He
also had 13 rebounds.
“Coach told us to just keep
shooting those shots,” said Livingston, the team’s leading scorer on
the season, who was 3 of 13 and
missed all seven three-point tries.
“You don’t want to think about
[the misses] too much, just shoot
guard from Upper Marlboro and
St. John’s High, scored 18 points
and triggered a decisive 8-0 run
with his third three-pointer as
Rhode Island (24-6) pulled away
from No. 8 seed VCU (18-15) in the
last five minutes.
Jared Terrell posted 16 points
and Stanford Robinson (Landover,
Paul VI) made two key baskets for
25th-ranked Rhode Island.
Despite foul trouble, Justin
Tillman finished with 23 points
and 15 rebounds for VCU, which
fell short of the A-10 final for the
first time since joining the conference in 2012.
VCU will also miss the NCAA
the open shot.”
The first half was brutal: Mason
shot 33 percent, Saint Joseph’s 31,
and the Patriots led by a point.
Following the high-intensity
opener between Rhode Island and
VCU, this game, played before a
smaller crowd, felt like a firstround affair.
After “the energy and the fierceness of the first game,” Hawks
Coach Phil Martelli said, “there
was a little bit of air out of the
building.”
After the pause, the Hawks
turned exclusively to a zone and
slowly pulled away. Aside from
Tar Heels earn a date with Virginia
NORTH CAROLINA 74,
DUKE 69
BY
steven.goff@washpost.com
BONAVENTURE 83,
RICHMOND 77: Matt Mobley hit
ST.
an Atlantic 10 tournament-record
nine three-pointers and scored 21
of his 29 points in the second half
as the second-seeded Bonnies
pulled away for their 13th straight
victory.
Mobley was 10-of-14 shooting
and Courtney Stockard made 8 of
9 from the field and finished with
19 points, five assists and three
steals for St. Bonaventure (25-6).
The Bonnies will play No. 3 seed
Davidson in the semifinals.
Khwan Fore led the Spiders (1220) with 25 points and Jacob Gilyard added 18, including five
three-pointers.
DAVIDSON 78, SAINT
LOUIS 60: Peyton Aldridge
scored 35 points — 22 in the first
half — to spark the Wildcats past
the sixth-seeded Billikens.
Jon Axel Gudmundsson’s threepointer gave Davidson a 39-13 lead
with 4:14 left before intermission.
Aldridge made all six of his threepoint attempts and was 8-of-12
shooting in the opening half as the
Wildcats (19-11) took a 41-23 lead
at the break.
Davidson led by double figures
throughout the second half.
Davell Roby scored 26 points
for Saint Louis (17-16) and Javon
Bess added 13.
— Associated Press
JOHN FEINSTEIN
NCAA-bound URI wants a trophy first
FEINSTEIN FROM D1
G ENE W ANG
new york — North Carolina
used a combination of strong
perimeter defense and balanced
scoring to build a big lead, then
fended off a furious rally down
the stretch to outlast Duke, 74-69,
in the ACC tournament semifinals Friday night.
The No. 6 seed Tar Heels
placed five players in double
figures and limited their contentious state rival to 6 for 23 from
beyond the arc to advance to the
conference tournament championship game for the 35th time.
North Carolina will face topseeded Virginia on Saturday
night at Barclays Center, where
the Tar Heels are seeking a 19th
tournament crown.
North Carolina senior guard
Joel Berry II, named most outstanding player in the Final Four
last season during the Tar Heels’
march to the national title,
knows the Cavaliers are a tall
task.
“We’ve just got to make sure
we’re taking good shots and making sure we’re moving them on
the defensive end. They’re great
defensively, and we’ve just got to
me sure we limit our mistakes,”
said Berry, who had 13 points and
six assists with just one turnover
in 37 minutes.
“If you make a turnover, you
know that you’re going down,
and you’re about to play defense
for 30 seconds because they keep
moving the ball until they get
what they want to get.”
Voted most improved player in
the ACC this season, junior forward Luke Maye led North Carolina (25-9) with 17 points, 10
rebounds and four assists in 33
minutes.
The Tar Heels had 24 assists on
28 made field goals and forced 18
turnovers that led to 24 points.
Second-seeded Duke (26-7),
which won this tournament last
season, collected just 14 points
off 13 North Carolina turnovers
and shot just 40.7 percent (22 of
54) for the game.
“It was really physical game,”
Duke Coach Mike Krzyzewski
said. “Congratulations to North
Carolina. Kind of a disjointed
game. It’s kind of a weird game
tonight, but the turnovers hurt
us, and their offensive rebounds.
We’re not going to win a game
against a team of that caliber if
we turn it over 18 times.”
Duke got within 72-69 in the
closing minute on Gary Trent Jr.’s
three-pointer, but Theo Pinson
made two free throws with three
seconds to play to seal the triumph.
“I thought for a big stretch in
the second half we were really,
really good,” North Carolina
Coach Roy Williams said. “We
making four of their first six threepointers, the Hawks found gaps in
George Mason’s defense and converted easy baskets.
Meanwhile, the Patriots’ shooting grew worse. They missed nine
of their first 12, several from close
range.
Consecutive three-pointers by
Robinson and Taylor Funk extended the margin to 47-34 and triggered a Paulsen timeout. Livingston followed with a basket, but
the Patriots slipped back into their
shooting rut.
They finally began to stir with
about eight minutes left. While
tournament for the first time since
2010.
Rhode Island, ranked No. 25,
led by nine in the first half and
three at intermission on Fatts Russell’s three-pointer at the horn.
The game was tight in the second half until Dowtin scored five
points and Robinson sank a threepointer.
JULIE JACOBSON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Joel Berry II, left, was one of five players in double figures for
North Carolina with 13 points. Duke shot just 40.7 percent.
were making shots. We were defending. Then all of a sudden
from the five-minute mark, we
have five turnovers. Thank goodness when we missed a bunch of
shots, we also go the rebound.
The bottom is we made enough
plays, and we’re still playing.”
In front by five at halftime,
North Carolina stretched the lead
to 56-43 with 12:02 to go in the
second half thanks to a push
featuring a two free throws by
Berry, Sterling Manley’s dunk
and a layup from Pinson. Maye
also fueled the charge with a
jumper and tip-in.
Marvin Bagley III had 19
points and 13 rebounds for the
Blue Devils, and Trent added 20
points and six rebounds. Bagley, a
projected NBA lottery pick, was
named ACC player and rookie of
the year, becoming the second
player in conference history to
win both awards in the same
season.
A knee injury to Bagley late in
the season proved somewhat of a
turning point for Duke, which
won each of the four games he
missed. During that time, Grayson Allen averaged more than 20
points, getting more shots near
the rim with the painted area less
cluttered.
But the Blue Devils also
thrived defensively while Bagley
was on the mend, holding four
straight opponents in the 50s or
fewer for the first time in the
program’s storied history.
Since Bagley rejoined the line
on Feb. 24 against Syracuse,
Duke won three of four entering
the ACC tournament semifinals
and had the look of a national
championship contender and
perhaps remains in line to be a
No. 1 seed when the NCAA tournament’s field of 68 is unveiled
on Sunday.
The Tar Heels, meanwhile,
limped into the ACC tournament
with two straight losses, including the annual regular season
finale Duke, 74-64, on March 3 at
Cameron Indoor Stadium. North
Carolina led that game by double
figures at halftime.
Playing in the ACC tournament for the first time as a sixth
seed, North Carolina opened a
34-27 lead against the Blue Devils
on Saturday with 52 seconds left
in the first half on a pair of free
throws from Garrison Brooks.
Those points followed a flagrant foul assessed to Allen for
sticking his backside out and
clipping the Tar Heels freshman
forward.
Brooks fell hard onto the court,
and officials reviewed the sequence via replay before making
their ruling that drew jeers from
North Carolina supporters with
little patience for Allen, whose
similar antics throughout his career have infuriated opponents
and their fan bases alike.
gene.wang@washpost.com
Rhoades’s Rams largely because
they are a team that knows how
to make plays when it most
needs to do so. The entire
afternoon was a struggle. VCU
was more desperate, knowing it
was win or go home. For the
first time since 2010, there
won’t be an NCAA tournament
bid forthcoming; nor are the
Rams (18-15) likely to play in the
National Invitation Tournament
or one of the third-tier pay-toplay events.
“They’re always hard to play
against,” Rhode Island point
guard Jeff Dowtin said. “We
knew exactly what kind of game
we’d get from them.”
Hurley knew it, too. He knew
it would feel like a road game
for his team because VCU’s fans
travel like no other team’s fans
in the A-10. They come in large
numbers, they’re extremely
vocal, and they’re intensely
loyal.
“They have great fans,”
Hurley said. “Doesn’t matter
where this tournament is
played; they show up.”
The larger problem for
Hurley was VCU’s desperation.
His team clinched the regular
season title with a resounding
81-56 victory over Dayton with a
week to go in the regular
season. They then cut down the
nets to celebrate.
“I will never do that again,”
Hurley said with a smile. “I cost
myself at least one game and
maybe two.” The first was a
stunning, 78-48 loss to Saint
Joseph’s on senior night; the
second was at Davidson last
Saturday, when URI blew a sixpoint lead in the final 40
seconds by missing the front
end of three one-and-ones.
For a while Friday, that trend
continued. The Rams were 3 of
11 from the free throw line
during one stretch. That was
when VCU had a chance to keep
its season alive by pulling a
major upset.
Hurley knew that a desperate
team is a dangerous team. He
also knew there was no way he
could convince his players they
were desperate — they all know
they’ll be playing next week.
So he took a different tack.
“I talked to them about
legacy,” he said. “The last two
trophies the Atlantic 10 gave out
were to Rhode Island: last year’s
tournament and this year’s
regular season. If we win this
tournament again, that’s three
straight trophies. You do that,
maybe you’ve got a little bit of a
dynasty going.”
The closest thing the A-10 has
had to a dynasty in recent years
is VCU. Under Shaka Smart and
Will Wade, the Rams reached
the past five championship
games of this tournament,
ALEX BRANDON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cyril Langevine and the Rhode Island Rams were tested by a
desperate VCU squad before advancing to the Atlantic 10 semifinals.
winning the title in 2015. They
also won the regular season title
in 2016.
This has been a different
season for VCU. The Rams lost
seven games at Siegel Center,
simply unheard-of in a building
that has been sold out for 116
straight games. Their 18-15 final
record marks the first time since
2006 — 12 years and five
coaches ago — that VCU has
failed to win at least 24 games.
Some schools would kill for
18 wins, but that’s not what is
expected at VCU. When the
Rams lost their final home game
nine days ago on a last-second
tip-in by George Mason’s Ian
Boyd, the school’s longtime
radio voice, Robby Robinson,
spent most of his postgame
show pleading with fans to not
give up on the Rams — now or
in the future.
“I felt like I had several
thousand people lying on a
couch and it was my job to tell
them everything will be all
right,” Robinson said. “It was a
long 45 minutes.”
For most of Friday’s 40
minutes, VCU played about as
well as it has all season.
Rhoades decided to throw some
zone defense at Rhode Island
just to mix up the Rams. For a
while, it did.
“I swear I watched 15 VCU
tapes, and I think I saw one
possession of zone,” Hurley said.
“It messed us up for a while.”
So did Justin Tillman, playing
in what turned out to be
probably his last college game,
giving Rhode Island’s big men
fits inside. About the only way
the Rams stopped him was by
giving him space on the
perimeter so he would shoot
from outside the three-point
line, where he finished 1 for 5.
Inside, he was 8 of 14, finishing
with 23 points and 15 rebounds.
VCU had the lead at 59-58
and the ball with under 6:30 to
go. But Khris Lane, a fifth-year
senior who never lived up to
Rhoades’s expectations, missed
a jumper. Dowtin, a product of
St. John’s High in the District
who finished with a team-high
18 points, promptly hit a threepointer for a 61-59 lead. Tillman
missed an ill-timed three, and
Dowtin scored again. Then, URI
hit its final eight free throws to
wrap up the win.
“We have to get tougher, and
we have to be more basketballaware in the future,” Rhoades
said. “They hit tough shots
down the stretch when we still
had a chance to win. That’s what
good teams do.”
Rhode Island may not be a
league dynasty yet, but it has
become the target for everyone
else in the A-10. That was
evident last month when
St. Bonaventure beat the Rams
and its student section stormed
the court.
“That’s what you want,”
Hurley said. “We didn’t play
especially well for most of the
day today, but a lot of that was
because of them. We made the
plays when we had to. That’s the
sign of a good team.”
He tugged at the tear in his
pants again and shook his head.
“Better find a new suit for
tomorrow,” he said.
At the far end of the hall,
Rhoades could only wish he had
that problem.
“Bus leaves at 3:30,” the
members of the Peppas, VCU’s
superb pep band, were told as
the players lined up for
postgame handshakes.
For VCU, It was time to go
home. For Rhode Island, the
chase for another trophy
continues.
sports@washpost.com
For more by John Feinstein, visit
washingtonpost.com/Feinstein.
SATURDAY, MARCH 10 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D5
M2
college basketball
MEN’S ROUNDUP
WOMEN’S ROUNDUP
Friars stun top-seeded, No. 3 Musketeers in Big East semifinals Coleman,
Broncos
PROVIDENCE 75,
XAVIER 72 (OT)
win title
at buzzer
They’re going dancing
Teams that have earned an automatic
berth in the NCAA tournament:
Men
Bucknell, 25-9 (Patriot)
Charleston, 26-7 (Colonial)
Gonzaga, 30-4 (West Coast)
Iona, 20-13 (MAAC)
Lipscomb, 23-9 (Atlantic Sun)
LIU Brooklyn, 18-16 (Northeast)
Loyola Chicago, 28-5 (Mo. Valley)
Michigan, 28-7 (Big Ten)
Murray State, 26-5 (Ohio Valley)
Radford, 22-12 (Big South)
South Dakota State, 28-6 (Summit)
UNC Greensboro, 27-7 (Southern)
Wright State, 25-9 (Horizon)
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Alpha Diallo hit a go-ahead
jumper with 2:22 left in overtime,
and fifth-seeded Providence rallied from a 17-point second-half
deficit and shocked top-seeded
Xavier, 75-72, in the semifinals of
the Big East tournament Friday
night in New York.
“What a win for Providence
College and the character of the
young men,” Friars Coach Ed
Cooley said. “I’m proud of them.
We played a great team, and we’re
fortunate to move on.”
Not bad for a team that a
couple of days ago was considered on the NCAA tournament
bubble. Two overtime wins in two
days has put that to bed.
“We never thought about the
bubble. We just played with confidence,” senior forward Rodney
Bullock said after Providence (2112) beat No. 3 Xavier (28-5) for
the second time in three meetings. “That’s how we play.”
The Friars did that in the final
25 minutes in advancing to the
title game against Villanova on
Saturday night.
Xavier was cruising with a
52-35 lead five minutes into the
second half, and all of a sudden
the game changed. Providence
started hitting, and the Musketeers starting missing.
Kyron Cartwright hit a clutch
jumper with 55 seconds to go and
took an offensive foul on a layup
attempt by J.P. Macura with eight
seconds to play for the Friars,
who also edged fourth-seeded
Creighton, 72-68, on Thursday.
“It’s something that we didn’t
do early on in the year,” Cartwright said. “But when we needed it most, we did.”
VILLANOVA 87, BUTLER
68: Mikal Bridges had 18 points,
and the second-ranked Wildcats
scored the first 19 points in
cruising to their fourth straight
Big East title game.
Conference player of the year
Jalen Brunson scored 17 points
and Omari Spellman had 12
points and 12 rebounds for Villanova (29-4), which won the
tournament in 2015 and 2017 and
lost to Seton Hall in 2016.
The Wildcats hit 10 of their
first 12 shots against the Bulldogs
(20-13), making for an anticlimactic final 35 minutes at Madison Square Garden.
Women
Baylor, 31-1 (Big 12)
Belmont, 31-3 (Ohio Valley)
Boise State, 23-9 (Mountain West)
Connecticut, 32-0 (American)
DePaul, 26-7 (Big East)
G. Washington, 19-13 (Atlantic 10)
Gonzaga, 27-5 (West Coast)
Green Bay, 29-3 (Horizon)
Maine, 23-9 (America East)
Mercer, 30-2 (Southern)
Ohio State, 27-6 (Big Ten)
Oregon, 30-4 (Pacific-12)
Quinnipiac, 27-5 (MAAC)
S. Carolina, 26-6 (Southeastern)
South Dakota State, 26-6 (Summit)
ELSA/GETTY IMAGES
Providence, celebrating after knocking off Xavier on Friday, erased a 17-point deficit to force overtime.
ALABAMA 81, AUBURN
63: Collin Sexton scored 31
points, and the Crimson Tide
(19-14) used a strong second half
to defeat the No. 16 Tigers (25-7)
in the quarterfinals of the Southeastern Conference tournament
in St. Louis.
Alabama will take on Kentucky
on Saturday in the semifinals.
ARKANSAS
80, FLORIDA
72: Jaylen Barford scored 27
points and matched his career
high with 10 rebounds to help
send the Razorbacks (23-10) to
the SEC semifinals with a win
over the No. 23 Gators (20-12).
Arkansas faces Tennessee on
Saturday.
TENNESSEE 62, MISSISSIPPI STATE 59: Lamonte Tur-
ner had 15 points, and the No. 13
Volunteers (24-7) locked down on
defense to beat the Bulldogs in
the SEC quarterfinals.
Mississippi State (22-11) had
an opportunity to take the lead in
the final 10 seconds, but Xavian
Stapleton missed a three-pointer
with the Bulldogs down 61-59.
ball up court, and Stevenson
resorted to a half-court shot that
would have tied the game.
WEST VIRGINIA 66, TEXAS TECH 63: Daxter Miles Jr.
poured in 22 points, Silvio De
Sousa filled in admirably for
ailing big man Udoka Azubuike,
and the ninth-ranked Jayhawks
(26-7) beat the shorthanded
Wildcats (23-10).
had 22 points for the No. 18
Mountaineers in Kansas City,
Mo., and Niem Stevenson’s halfcourt heave at the buzzer
bounced harmlessly off the iron,
propelling West Virginia into the
Big 12 tournament title game.
Jevon Carter added 17 points
and Sagaba Konate had 11 for the
third-seeded
Mountaineers
(24-9), who will play Kansas on
Saturday night in the final.
Miles had a chance to clinch
the game from the foul line with
six seconds left, but he only made
the first of two free throws. The
Red Raiders (24-9) corralled the
rebound but struggled to get the
KANSAS 83, KANSAS
STATE 67: Malik Newman
ARIZONA 78, UCLA 67
(OT): Deandre Ayton scored sev-
en of his 32 points in overtime
and grabbed 14 rebounds, lifting
the No. 15 Wildcats past the
Bruins (21-11) in the Pac-12 tournament semifinals in Las Vegas.
Arizona (26-7) labored offensively before Ayton sparked the
Wildcats in the second half. He
dominated overtime and made 13
of 16 shots overall.
CINCINNATI
61, SMU 51:
The No. 8 Bearcats (28-4) beat
the injury-depleted Mustangs
(18-16) in Orlando to advance to
the semifinals of the American
Athletic Conference tournament
against Memphis.
Kyle Washington scored 15
points and Gary Clark added 12
points and 11 rebounds for Cincinnati, which was 2 of 14 on
three-point attempts.
WICHITA STATE 89, TEMPLE 81: Landry Shamet scored
24 points as the No. 11 Shockers
defeated the Owls in the American quarterfinals. Next up for
Wichita State (25-6) is Houston.
Quinton Rose led Temple (1714) with 25 points.
HOUSTON 84, CENTRAL
FLORIDA 56: Galen Robinson
scored 18 points and Rob Gray
had 17 points, six assists and five
rebounds as the No. 21 Cougars
rolled past the Knights in the last
American quarterfinal.
Houston (25-6) led almost the
entire game, smothering UCF
(19-13) defensively.
SAN DIEGO STATE 90, NEVADA 73: Devin Watson scored
20 points as the Aztecs (21-10)
knocked off the No. 22 Wolf Pack
(27-7) in the Mountain West Conference semifinals in Las Vegas.
BOISE STATE 62,
NEVADA 60
A SSOCIATED P RESS
The best feeling in the world.
Smiling ear-to-ear with a trophy and net in front of her, it was
the only way Boise State sophomore A’Shanti Coleman could describe her emotions after draining
the biggest basket of her career.
Marta Hermida’s short jumper
from the right baseline clanked
off the rim to teammate Shalen
Shaw, who tipped the ball to Coleman, who then banked in the
game-winning buzzer beater to
give Boise State a 62-60 comefrom-behind victory over Nevada
on Friday in the Mountain West
women’s championship game in
Las Vegas.
“I felt like it was a normal shot
for me, kind of confident, because
I knew I had enough time, but I
didn’t want to rush the shot and
get it off,” Coleman said. “I felt like
when it came out of my hand it
was going to go in.”
It was Boise State’s first lead
since opening the game with a
three-pointer by the tournament’s
most outstanding player, Riley
Lupfer.
Lupfer led Boise State (23-9)
with 19 points on 6-for-17 shooting, including 5 of 13 from threepoint range.
The top-seeded Broncos won
their second straight and third
Mountain West tournament title
in four years, and get the league’s
automatic bid to the NCAA tournament.
MAINE 74, HARTFORD 65:
Blanca Millan scored 11 of her 22
points in the third quarter, and
top-seeded Maine used that one
dominant quarter to win the
American East conference tournament and earn its first NCAA
tournament berth since 2004.
Julie Brosseau scored all 16 of
her points in the first half, which
ended with the game tied at 36.
Then Maine (23-9) went to work,
making 3 of 4 three-pointers and 9
of 12 overall, to win for the 14th
time in 15 games, including six
straight.
Unheralded scorers boost Cavaliers
CAVALIERS FROM D1
PHOTOS BY JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
50-45 with 6:36 to play until the
Cavaliers got consecutive baskets
from Salt, a strapping 6-foot-10
New Zealander who added a
game-high eight rebounds in addition to several deflections and
tap-outs of missed shots to teammates.
The final minutes included Jerome’s jumper with a foot on the
three-point line that produced a
61-52 lead with 1:18 remaining,
but De’Andre Hunter and Guy
both missed front ends of oneand-ones, giving fourth-seeded
Clemson a glimmer of hope.
The Tigers made two free
throws and got Gabe DeVoe’s
layup to trim the deficit to 61-56
with 25 seconds to play before
Hall’s foul shots extended Virginia’s overall winning streak to
seven and further added to its
claim on the No. 1 overall seed in
the NCAA tournament.
“I didn’t know,” Salt said when
asked about the standing ovation
intended for him. “They were
probably surprised I was scoring
so much. It was a good game,
grinded it out, but happy at the
end of it.”
A nine-point halftime lead for
Virginia shrank to 34-30 with
16:17 left in regulation before the
Cavaliers scored 10 in a row, with
Diakite getting the first six of
those points and Guy the last four.
Two of Diakite’s field goals during the run came on dunks, including a reverse one-hander after dribbling along the baseline to
create separation from defenders.
The margin swelled to 44-30
when Guy scored on a driving
layup while drawing contact, although no foul was called.
Diakite had 10 points on 5-of-8
shooting and four rebounds for
his first game in double figures
since scoring 12 on Feb. 3 during a
59-44 win against Syracuse at the
Carrier Dome.
“Who doesn’t want to score?”
Diakite said. “I’m just trying to
help the team get to a point where
we’ve never been before, and I’ll
try my best to do that. I’m not
ABOVE: Cavaliers Coach Tony Bennett said, “This was a bluecollar game where you’re going to just have to fight for everything.”
LEFT: Virginia guard Devon Hall, who scored 10 points, powers
toward the basket against Clemson forward Elijah Thomas.
necessarily the person who has to
do it so the team can win. We’re all
aware of that. As you can see, each
night someone new steps up and
leads the team, like Jack today.”
The meeting between Virginia
and Clemson was their second
this season, with the Cavaliers
winning, 61-36, on Jan. 23 at John
Paul Jones Arena. Clemson’s point
total was the smallest the Cavaliers have permitted this season
and one of three times they have
held an opponent in the 30s.
The Tigers reached the ACC
tournament semifinals with a 9082 win against No. 12 Boston College on Thursday night and have
prospered this season despite
having lost standout senior forward Donte Grantham to a torn
anterior
cruciate
ligament
Jan. 20.
Grantham, the team’s secondleading scorer, had his college career end against Notre Dame, but
Clemson went 7-5 without him
entering Friday night on the way
to setting a program single-season
record for most ACC wins (11) and
securing its first top-four seed in
the conference tournament since
2011.
Aamir Simms has moved into
the starting lineup following the
injury, becoming the first nonredshirt freshman to start a game
for Clemson since Grantham in
2014.
Simms was part of an early rush
that gave the Tigers a 20-13 lead
with 9:32 to go in the first half, but
Virginia responded by holding
Clemson without a field goal for
the rest of the first half. Clemson’s
only points in that span came on
three free throws by guard Shelton Mitchell.
Otherwise, Clemson went 0 for
10 from the field to close the half,
and the Cavaliers reeled off 19
points to take a 32-23 lead at intermission. Guy concluded the binge
with back-to-back three-pointers,
sinking three overall in the half.
“They have a very good system,
extremely well-coached,” Clemson Coach Brad Brownell said of
the Cavaliers.
“They’re extremely big, long
and athletic. I don’t think people
realize, like they’re bigger than we
are at almost every position. Every
position, you look at their guys
and look at our guys, a couple
inches difference, five to 10
pounds strength, and that’s true of
a lot of teams that they play
against.”
gene.wang@washpost.com
D6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. SATURDAY,
MARCH 10 , 2018
Together, they play — in person or while continents apart
GAMING FROM D1
And nearly half had made at
least one friend through a game,
be it in a Call of Duty arena or one
of the countless online role-playing games that succeeded Everquest.
These friends may talk by text,
like the Kaplans in the 1990s, or
lately by voice — which has
become a standard component
in most online games — and
video, through game-streaming
websites such as Twitch. Or they
may meet in person, taking an
Xbox to a friend’s living room or
crowding into a bar with hundreds of other gamers, like NFL
fans on a football Sunday, to
catch a match from the exploding esports scene.
The medium hardly matters.
Many of these friendships deepen for years, until the bone knife
duels and death matches that
enabled them are nearly forgotten, and only bonds between
people remain.
The Kaplans are still together.
Jeff set aside his writing ambitions to help make multiplayer
games. He worked on World of
Warcraft and then as lead designer on Blizzard’s ultra-popular,
team-based shooter, Overwatch.
Both are largely designed around
in-game friendships.
Multiplayer games are more
popular than ever, and what
Kaplan and his wife knew in the
’90s is becoming something close
to an industry motto: “The most
important story in a video game
is between the people playing the
game together,” Kaplan said.
Bonding in battle
Riggie Medina and Christian
Alaniz are nearly the same age,
18 and 19. They’re both Catholic,
and both plan careers in law
enforcement. They both bowl,
work out and listen to ska and
rap in their spare time.
All their lives, they have lived a
few miles apart in neighboring
central California towns of a few
thousand people. But Medina
and Alaniz had never met until a
couple years ago, when they ended up on the same team in a Call
of Duty match and got to chatting
afterward in the game’s target
shooting arena.
“When we were all tired out
from playing against other people, we’d usually go shoot offline
bots,” Alaniz said.
It was there, in a virtual arena
that connected their separate
lives, that they found out all they
had in common.
They struck up a friendship
and now game together nearly
every weekend — one usually
driving to the other’s house to
shoot up imaginary worlds in
each other’s personal company.
The Post-UMass Lowell poll
found a 54 percent majority of
teen and young-adult gamers
said enjoying time with friends is
a major reason they play or
watch games, far more than said
they play to improve their skills
or to have a chance at winning
championships. A similar 52 percent of young gamers said they
play or watch online games with
friends they met offline, while 45
percent said they have become
friends with people they connected with while playing games
online.
None of this seems strange to
Rebecca Adams, a professor at
the University of North Carolina
at Greensboro who studies and
has written several books on the
science of friendships.
Sociologists identified the fundamentals of friend-making decades before the Internet existed,
Adams said. Two people meet
more or less accidentally, often
because they both regularly visit
the same places — a baseball field
or coffee shop or office. They
discover a few things in common,
and a relationship develops naturally, in a setting they’d frequent
regardless of the other party’s
presence.
As the friendship deepens, it
eventually transcends the place
where it started, moving from
the coffee shop to, say, dinner
parties. Or from a fantasy dungeon to a voice chat program.
In some cases with video gaming, a deep friendship can form
without ever moving off the
screen. Pearl Lee, a 21-year-old
college student who lives on
Long Island, says she could never
afford to travel overseas. Likewise, her friend who stocks
shelves in the United Kingdom
could never afford to visit New
York. And yet the pair have
known each other for years —
ever since they met on a dungeon
raid in the role-playing game
Mabinogi. Only Lee still plays
that particular game, but she and
her friend talk nearly every day
through the voice app Discord.
“I don’t think this is such a
new thing,” Adams said. In some
ways, video games might even be
more natural places to incubate
friendships than a coffee shop.
“When you’ve been through
PHOTOS BY TIMOTHY C. WRIGHT FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Marsi, who goes by the screen name kungfufruitcup, supports herself by playing video games and streaming them for fans online.
POLL
Washington Post-UMass Lowell poll
Enjoying time with friends is a major draw for
teen and young adult gamers
Percentage of 14- to 21-year-olds who say each is a “major
reason” they play or watch online video games
For entertainment and fun
80%
Enjoying time with friends
54%
Taking a break from everyday life
41%
Improving your gaming skills
38%
The challenge of the game
38%
Appreciating the visual arts within games
37%
Enjoying the competition
36%
Working together with teammates to win*
34%
Swords mingle with video game controllers, games and
other gear as they hang on a wall in kungfufruitcup’s office.
The chance to win money or championships*
14%
*Among game players only, not game watchers
Source: Washington Post-UMass Lowell poll conducted Aug. 22-Sept. 8, 2017, among a sample
of 522 teens and young adults on a probability-design online panel. Overall results have a
margin of sampling error of +/- six points.
Almost 9 in 10 young men are gamers, along
with over half of young women
Percent who played or watched online video games in the
previous 12 months
All
Male
Female
73%
89%
Age 14-21
56%
25%
30%
20%
All adults 18+
43%
56%
Age 18-39
29%
19%
19%
19%
Age 40-64
Age 65+
4%
2%
6%
Source: Washington Post-UMass Lowell poll conducted Aug. 22-Sept. 8, 2017, among a sample
of 522 teens and young adults on a probability-design online panel. Overall results have a
margin of sampling error of +/- six points. Adult results based on a telephone survey of 1,000
randomly selected adults conducted Aug. 14-21, 2017, with an error margin of +/- 3.7 points.
Teen and young adult gamers more likely than
adult gamers to see esports as a social activity
Have you become friends with anyone you met
playing/watching competitive online video games?
No
Age 14-21
Age 18+
Yes
55%
67%
45%
32%
Do you play/watch competitive online video games with
friends you met offline?
Age 14-21
Age 18+
48%
65%
52%
33%
Note: No opinion not shown.
Source: Washington Post-UMass Lowell poll conducted Aug. 22-Sept. 8, 2017, among a sample
of 522 teens and young adults on a probability-design online panel. Overall results have a
margin of sampling error of +/- six points. Adult results based on a telephone survey of 1,000
randomly selected adults conducted Aug. 14-21, 2017, with an error margin of +/- 3.7 points.
THE WASHINGTON POST
something together, it bonds
you,” she said, giving the examples of World War II soldiers in a
foxhole, and Grateful Dead fans
who saw the same concert. “It’s
going through those experiences
that make you more likely to
start talking. I can imagine this
couple that went on the raid
together probably wanted to debrief after, and that’s probably
why they started to talk.”
Doing a little ‘matchmaking’
At Blizzard, Kaplan jokes that
“game designers are amateur
psychologists. . . . We spend a lot
of time thinking about psychology and sociology with no degree
in it.”
Nevertheless, his design philosophy sounds remarkably similar to the theories of friendship
studied by Adams and her academic colleagues.
Overwatch features dozens of
characters players can use while
on teams with five other players,
often randomly selected by the
game.
One character, Pharah, flies
around the arena with a jet pack
and launches rockets from the air
— but dies quickly if targeted by
the enemy team. Another character, Mercy, can’t normally fly on
her own but can tether herself to
other players and heal their
wounds. They are more or less
made for each other, prompting
their players to communicate
and cooperate in the game.
It’s common to see a Mercy
player tethered to a Pharah player for an entire match — flying
around together, helping each
other, often chatting through the
voice lines as they play.
When the match ends, the
teammates are briefly dumped
into a sort of social lobby, where
they’re encouraged to add each
other to their “friends” list. If
they do, they can easily connect
and play together in any other
Blizzard game.
This is all intentional. Blizzard
realized that players’ friendships
were transcending the games
they formed in during the late
2000s, Kaplan said, and the company began to design around the
concept.
Overwatch has no single-play-
er story, because in a sense the
players and the connections between them are the story, and the
game mechanics are designed to
encourage those relationships.
Call of Duty’s latest iteration,
“Call of Duty: WWII,” features a
lobby where players can talk and
show off their avatar’s latest
accolades, uniforms and weaponry. The game even includes a
social score, with special gear
unlocked by greater achievement.
The social dynamic is also a
focal point of the game Destiny,
which links up players to complete various quests and battles.
M.E. Chung, a game designer
at Bungie, which publishes Destiny, told The Verge last May that
the game’s purpose was to create
challenges for players to overcome through cooperation.
“I describe that challenge as
the fuel to memories between
lifelong friends. I think a lot
about games I’ve been playing,
when you ask yourself, ‘Why am I
doing this?’ ” Chung said. “We
hope with Destiny they’re saying,
‘I’m spending time with my
friends.’ Most people don’t regret
the time they spend with their
friends.”
Kaplan would agree.
“The first time I met my wife,
she was a night elf warrior who
kicked my ass,” Kaplan said.
“That’s a more interesting story
to me than how the dragon
attacked the temple.”
Friendships in fandom
For years it has been common
for sports fans to descend on
stadiums or local bars to watch
their teams compete. Increasingly, that’s becoming more common in the world of video gaming through the rapid rise of
esports. The poll finds 38 percent
of teens and young adults say
they are fans of esports — about
the same as the 40 percent who
are fans of professional football.
And just like with football, the
elite tournaments of esports,
such as the newly formed Overwatch League, inspire communities of fans and friends around
them.
Blizzard said 10 million people
watched the Overwatch League’s
opening week. The matches
weren’t on network TV, so most
watched through streaming sites
such as Twitch.
But fans also gathered in cities
around the world to watch their
local teams. In January, Mac’s
Southside, a bar near downtown
Dallas, filled up for a watch party
to observe the local squad in the
Overwatch League, the Dallas
Fuel. Chanting and cheering with
eyes glued to a wall screen, the
crowd looked not much different
from a group of Cowboys fans.
The chief difference was that the
players they cheered were also
staring at screens.
As with an offline sport, you
don’t necessarily need to play
Overwatch (or Hearthstone or
League of Legends or any other
game with a pro scene) to become a fan. Among 14- to 21-yearolds, the poll found 58 percent
have watched people play video
games on Twitch, YouTube or
another platform, only one point
lower than the percentage who
played multiplayer video games.
Twitch (which is owned by
Amazon, whose CEO, Jeffrey
P. Bezos, also owns The Washington Post) is a website in some
ways built around this insight. It
is an online video forum where
people watch others live-stream
themselves, usually playing video
games. Friendships form between streamers and their viewers — or among the viewers
themselves as they use a chat
interface while watching the
game. Streamers with a regular
audience of even a few dozen
people can sometimes support
themselves through Twitch subscription fees.
When she was younger, Marsi
would lose herself in single-player adventure games such as Paper Mario or Kingdom Hearts. A
few years ago, she stumbled
across a Twitch streamer who
was doing speed runs of Super
Mario Sunshine — trying to complete the game as fast as possible.
She was fascinated by the
streamer’s skill but even more
captivated by his personality —
and the dozens of viewers who
watched with her and talked
among themselves in the text
channel.
“It was the first person where I
was like: ‘Oh, my gosh. I get his
jokes,’ ” she said. “It was a combination of wanting to bond with
the streamers and the viewers
were really chill, so I was attracted to the community.”
Four years later, at 27, Marsi is
friends with the speedrunner
and fell in love with streaming
enough to make a career of it. She
streams herself gaming every
night under the screen name
kungfufruitcup, building her
own audience community and
supporting herself with the subscription money.
Alex Bailey, 25, played Overwatch casually — at best — before
he stumbled across the channel
of a streamer named Dibz in
2016. He became a regular,
watching the stream in part for
Dibz’s friendly on-screen personality and in part for his community of viewers.
He learned that Dibz’s real
name is Jason Chiu. They were
about the same age, were both in
college and lived only half an
hour or so apart outside Los
Angeles. They began to chat daily
on Chiu’s Discord server. After a
few months, last July, Chiu invited Bailey to grab dinner at a
sushi restaurant between their
houses.
Chiu brought his girlfriend
and brother, and Bailey brought
his fiancee. Another regular who
lived in the area showed up, too.
A table of gamers — without the
game.
“It was kind of weird at first,”
Bailey said. “We’d played [Overwatch] a couple times. From the
Discord, we knew what we all
sounded like, but we didn’t know
what we looked like — except of
course Dibz.”
They tried to use each other’s
real names but kept falling back
on screen names. The dinner
began a bit stilted, as Bailey
recalled it. It was hard to make
the transition from the screen to
real life. But they broke the ice
with some small talk, then
moved on to more meaningful
things.
“He said he wanted to get a job
in mathematics and maybe cut
down on the streaming” after
college, Bailey recalled. In turn,
he told Chiu about his training to
become a rugby coach and move
to England or maybe Japan with
his fiancee.
They chatted, and ate, then
went home. They’ve met up in
person once since then. They still
talk, mostly through screen or
microphones, and plan to keep
doing so, even if they one day
outgrow the game.
avi.selk@washpost.com
emily.guskin@washpost.com
Scott Clement contributed to this
report.
SATURDAY, MARCH 10 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D7
M2
NHL ROUNDUP
Power-play goals boost Dallas in third
STARS 2,
DUCKS 1
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Devin Shore and Jamie Benn
scored power-play goals in the
third period, and the Dallas Stars
beat the visiting Anaheim Ducks,
2-1, on Friday night.
With the game tied at 1, Benn
tipped John Klingberg’s shot
from the top of the slot past Anaheim’s Ryan Miller for the goahead goal with 5:37 remaining.
Ryan Getzlaf scored Anaheim’s
goal in the first period.
Both teams entered with 80
points, but Dallas increased its
lead for the first wild card from
the Western Conference to three
points over Los Angeles. Anaheim
remained one point ahead of the
Kings for third place in the Pacific
Division.
Miller made 35 saves 16 days
after shutting out the Stars with
41 saves in Anaheim. Kari Lehtonen stopped 26 shots for Dallas.
FLAMES
2, SENATORS 1:
Sam Bennett and Matt Stajan
scored, and David Rittich made
29 saves to lead Calgary over host
Ottawa.
The win was the second
straight for the Flames, who ended a four-game losing streak with
a victory in Buffalo on Wednesday
night.
Jean-Gabriel Pageau spoiled
Rittich’s bid for his first career
shutout by scoring on a penalty
shot with 7:05 left in the game.
Mike Condon made 35 saves for
the Senators, including a breakaway stop on Johnny Gaudreau
with the score still 1-0 in Calgary’s
favor early in the third period.
BLUE JACKETS 3, RED
WINGS 2: Seth Jones scored
twice in the second period, and
Sergei Bobrovsky returned from
an illness to make 22 saves for the
home team in Columbus, Ohio.
Matt Calvert also scored for the
surging Blue Jackets, who have
won four in a row and remain
firmly in the Eastern Conference
playoff picture with 13 games to
go. Columbus swept a back-toback, surpassed New Jersey to
grab the first wild-card spot and
moved to within two points of
Philadelphia for third place in the
Metropolitan Division.
Two fined for embellishing
The NHL has fined Boston Bruins winger Brad Marchand and
Arizona Coyotes forward Nick
Cousins for embellishment.
Each player was docked $2,000
under the league’s program designed to discourage diving and
embellishment. A player is first
warned and then is fined $2,000
for a second violation in a season.
Marchand, who leads the Bruins with 67 points, was warned for
an incident Nov. 29 against the
Tampa Bay Lightning and fined
for embellishing a trip by Pittsburgh Penguins defenseman Olli
Maatta on March 1.
Cousins was warned for an incident Jan. 4 against the Nashville
Predators. He was fined after embellishing on interference whistled against Minnesota Wild defenseman Nick Seeler on March 1.
SABRES: Forward Kyle Okposo is out indefinitely after being diagnosed with his second
concussion in less than a year.
Okposo was hurt when he and
Senators forward Bobby Ryan
didn’t see each other and collided
early in the second period Thursday. Coach Phil Housley on Friday
said he was encouraged by how
Okposo looked on the team’s
flight home.
A head injury was an issue for
Okposo last year when concussion-related symptoms nearly derailed his career. Okposo lost
weight and had difficulty sleeping
and spent a week in the hospital
after sustaining a concussion during what he called a routine hit in
practice.
The 11-year veteran is tied for
third among Sabres with 38
points (11 goals and 27 assists) in
65 games this season.
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Kimani Benjamin goes around Patterson Mill’s Rashawn Clowney for two of his 17 points Friday.
MARYLAND 1A BOYS’ BASKETBALL
Hornets roll back into state title game
FAIRMONT HTS. 72,
PATTERSON MILL 49
BY
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
The Capitals’ T.J. Oshie missed six games with a concussion and has just two goals in 33 games since.
In forgettable year, Oshie stays hopeful
CAPITALS FROM D1
the puck,” Coach Barry Trotz said.
“He has that dogged mentality
when he’s getting to the net. He’s
keeping plays alive, he’s putting
pucks in those tough areas — he’s
just quite noticeable. He’s gotten
away from some of that a little bit,
and we need more five-on-five
[production]. . . . I know T.J.
knows his five-on-five goals are
[among] the lowest on our team,
but he does so many other things
that are good for us and is so
productive. That will come, and I
hope it comes from now into the
playoffs. T.J. is one of those guys
that, when he gets hot, he’ll score
quite a few goals.”
Oshie’s season seemed to get
derailed when his head was
crunched against the glass by San
Jose center Joe Thornton’s backside in a game against the Sharks
on Dec. 4. Oshie suffered the
fourth documented concussion of
his career, missing six games. To
that point, he had 10 goals and 13
assists in 28 games, perhaps a
little off his torrid pace of the year
before but still producing consistently, as a veteran, top-six forward is expected to.
“It was a little difficult after my
last concussion to really catch up
and feel comfortable on the ice,”
he said. “I’m not saying that was
the only reason, but that has a
good amount to do with it. . . . I
was having trouble just getting to
the right areas or reading the
right plays. I feel like that side of
my game is behind me right now.”
In the 33 games Oshie has been
back in the lineup for since the
concussion, he has two goals and
11 assists. In an interview with
106.7 The Fan last month, General
Manager Brian MacLellan indicated his greatest disappointment of the season has been the
scoring woes of some of his stars.
“Some of the forwards haven’t
found their game totally,” he said.
“We’ve had periods where the
C A P I TA L S ’ N EX T TH R EE
at San Jose Sharks
Today
4 NBCSW
vs. Winnipeg Jets
Monday
7 NBCSW
at New York Islanders
Thursday
7 NBCSW
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM)
forwards have played real well,
and some of our guys that you
would expect consistent production from haven’t been there the
whole time.”
Maybe Oshie’s league-best
23.1 shooting percentage last season wasn’t sustainable, especially
considering he had scored on just
12.2 percent of his shots in his first
eight NHL seasons. But a miserable 3.6 shooting percentage over
the past 33 games certainly isn’t
normal, either. His shot rate
(1.72 on goal per game for the
season) is the lowest of his career.
“This last probably two or three
weeks here, it’s been a lot better
for me,” Oshie said. “I’ve been
getting scoring chances. Before, I
felt like I wouldn’t get a shot on
net — not a real scoring-chance
shot on net — for a stretch of five
or six games. . . .
“You want to live up to [the new
contract] obviously. Goal-wise, I
haven’t. And maybe with my play,
I haven’t. But the real time that
counts is coming up here, so I’m
looking to keep improving and
hopefully forget about the regular
season and have a good postseason.”
Oshie’s defensive-zone turnover in the first period Thursday
led to Los Angeles’s first goal. He
had a shot bounce off the mask of
Kings goaltender Jonathan
Quick, and on Washington’s only
goal, he and Vrana swarmed the
net, with Vrana batting in the
rebound of Oshie’s initial shot.
After Oshie called his line’s play
“extremely bad” in January, he
feels it has become more cohesive,
the three players working together even if Oshie still hasn’t regained his scoring touch.
“I think you’ve just got to keep
battling, got to keep working to
get in space,” Oshie said. “I’ve
been staying pretty positive.
There was a moment there when
it was getting pretty frustrating.
But right now, I’m just trying to
play good hockey.
“There’s been a lot of moments
that goals have come or chances
have come because of stuff that
I’ve done away from the puck, so
you’ve just kind of got to look at
that stuff as positives.”
Extension for MacLellan
MacLellan has signed a multiyear contract extension, the Capitals confirmed Friday. Terms of
the deal have not been disclosed.
Extending the general manager provides some organizational
stability, because Trotz is operating in the last year of his deal.
Though the Capitals have won the
Presidents’ Trophy twice under
Trotz with stellar regular season
success, they haven’t gotten past
the second round of the playoffs
with him on the bench.
The sense is that Washington’s
front office will wait until after
the season to make a decision on
Trotz, who has the fifth-most
NHL wins (750) of all time among
coaches. Though Trotz is a lame
duck, his top assistant, associate
head coach Todd Reirden, is under contract for one more season.
MacLellan was an assistant
general manager in the organization for seven years before he was
promoted to the general manager
post after George McPhee and
coach Adam Oates were ousted
following the 2013-14 season,
when Washington missed the
playoffs.
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
C ALLIE C APLAN
Less than 10 seconds remained in the first half of Fairmont Heights’ Maryland 1A state
semifinal Friday when Hornets
forward Yearlando Reed II lofted and swished a three-pointer
and then jogged back on defense.
It ignited cheers from the
Fairmont Heights faithful and
extended the team’s lead to 17
points over Patterson Mill. But
that wasn’t enough for the defending 1A state champions.
On Patterson Mill’s final possession, forward Kimani Benjamin stole the inbound pass and
let a floater go just before the
buzzer.
The No. 10 Hornets, having
proved the dominance they
needed for a 72-49 victory and a
return trip to the state championship game to face Dunbar on
Saturday, ran into the bowels of
Xfinity Center in College Park as
fans waved silver pompoms and
the band blared its instruments.
“I knew I had to make a play.
We were running press and the
press is to get steals, so I knew it
was coming,” Benjamin said.
“We play a lot better when we’re
moving fast.”
Fairmont Heights, which has
reached consecutive state championship games for the first time
since 1970-71, has a 32-point
average margin of victory in its
five playoff games this season,
winning each by at least 20
points.
Benjamin, despite sitting out
the majority of the third quarter
in foul trouble, led the team with
17 points and seven rebounds in
15 minutes Friday.
Guard Darren Lucas-White
(14 points and six rebounds),
guard Mandell Quigley (11
points) and guard Darron Eccles
(10 points) each scored in double
digits, as well.
“To get here once takes an
incredible amount of things to
go right, to go in your favor,”
Fairmont Heights Coach Chuck
Henry said. “To get here a second time, it takes an immeasurable amount of sacrifice and
dedication from a group of teenage boys.”
The control the Hornets dis-
played wasn’t evident in the
early going. They trailed
through most of the first six
minutes of the game and had
just a 13-10 advantage after the
opening quarter.
But Fairmont Heights manufactured runs of 13-2 and 15-2 in
the remainder of the half. Patterson Mill Coach Jeroud Clark said
his players started to “get a little
excited” and pushed the pace too
quickly.
“You can’t be in a situation
where you play against a team
that good and not bring your
A-game,” Clark said. “We had 25
turnovers. When you turn the
ball over like that against a team
like that, I think you’re going to
be in a bad spot.”
Fairmont Heights, which had
15 players log minutes in the
semifinal, now turns its attention to trying to beat Dunbar for
a repeat trophy. Henry said he’s
watched about 20 of the Poets’
games on film and has seen
them play live twice this season.
“They’re really good,” Henry
said. “And to be honest, we focus
a lot on us. . . . We don’t play a
name on a jersey, we play an
opposing team.”
callie.caplan@washpost.com
MARYLAND 2A GIRLS’ SEMIFINALS
Undefeated Falcons advance to final
POOLESVILLE 61,
GWYNN PARK 49
BY
M ICHAEL E RRIGO
towson, md. — Poolesville center Erin Green caught the ball just
inside the foul line, her back to the
basket. Gwynn Park had been
playing aggressive defense in the
paint all afternoon in the 2A girls’
semifinal and Green’s defender
pressed up against her.
Without even a glance over her
shoulder, the senior spun around
and whipped a pass to the left
block. Teammate Allie Haddaway
had made a backdoor cut, and the
timing was perfect. She met the
ball at the spot and scored.
The reason Green knew her
teammate would be there was the
same reason the No. 4 Falcons
barely took any time in the locker
room at the halftime break of Friday’s semifinal: They know their
system and they’re confident they
can make it work. And why not
feel that way? Poolesville has yet
to lose a game this season.
On Friday afternoon at Towson
University, the Falcons used that
system to beat Gwynn Park, 61-49,
and punch their ticket to the first
state championship in team history.
“We’ve been playing together
for so long,” guard Kellian Lee
said. “It got a little rough there, but
we’re still making jokes and having fun and feeling comfortable.”
While the Falcons (26-0) did
lead for the entirety of the semifinal game, Gwynn Park gave them
more of a challenge than most
teams. Poolesville won every one
of their regular season games by
double digits. Same goes for two of
their three playoff games thus far.
The one exception, a 60-58 win
over Middletown in the regional
semifinals, prepared the team for
the two moments when Gwynn
Park cut the lead to three.
“People thought we wouldn’t be
able to compete as well because
we’ve been crushing all these
teams and we didn’t have any
competition,” Green said. “But I
really feel that Middletown game
proved we deserve to be here.”
Gwynn Park (20-5) didn’t score
its first points until there was 1:42
remaining in the first quarter. Yellow Jackets star Denai Bowman
was kept in check by Poolesville’s
defense, finishing with nine
points on 3-for-17 shooting. Senior
forward Jenae Dublin picked up
the slack, scoring 21 points and
grabbing 14 rebounds. For the Falcons, Lee led the way with 23
points.
Employing a disciplined offense and a textbook, three-quarter-court press, the Falcons withstood all of Gwynn Park’s final run
and extended their lead to double
digits in the fourth quarter. With
fewer than 24 hours between Friday’s final buzzer and the tip of
Saturday’s championship game,
the Falcons celebrated for a few
seconds at midcourt and then
headed to the locker room for a
brief talk and some ice.
Oakland Mills falls
In the second Maryland 2A
semifinal, Queen Anne’s took
down Oakland Mills, 57-47, and
will play Poolesville in Saturday’s
championship game. The Scorpions, led this season by a trio of
double-digit scorers, couldn’t put
a scoring run together and shot 21
percent from the field.
Junior forward Aislynn Riggs
led the team with 17 points. She is
one of four juniors on a roster that
doesn’t have a senior.
“We came this far without any
seniors. I’m happy we’re not going
to lose any pieces. All we can do is
get better,” Riggs said.
michael.errigo@washpost.com
D8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. SATURDAY,
MARCH 10 , 2018
scoreboard
B A S K ETB A L L
HOCKEY
NBA
Raptors 108, Rockets 105
EASTERN CONFERENCE
HOUSTON ........................... 16
TORONTO ........................... 32
ATLANTIC
W
y-Toronto ...................................48
y-Boston ....................................46
Philadelphia ...............................35
New York ...................................24
Brooklyn.....................................21
L
17
20
29
42
45
Pct
.738
.697
.547
.364
.318
GB
—
21/2
121/2
241/2
271/2
SOUTHEAST
W
Washington ...............................38
Miami.........................................35
Charlotte....................................28
x-Orlando ...................................20
Atlanta.......................................20
L
28
31
38
45
46
Pct
.576
.530
.424
.308
.303
GB
—
3
10
171/2
18
CENTRAL
W
x-Cleveland ................................38
Indiana .......................................38
Milwaukee .................................35
Detroit .......................................30
Chicago ......................................22
L
26
28
31
36
43
Pct
.594
.576
.530
.455
.338
GB
—
1
4
9
161/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
SOUTHWEST
W
Houston .....................................51
New Orleans ..............................38
San Antonio ...............................37
Dallas .........................................20
Memphis ....................................18
L
14
27
28
45
47
Pct
.785
.585
.569
.308
.277
GB
—
13
14
31
33
NORTHWEST
W
x-Portland..................................39
Minnesota..................................38
Oklahoma City ...........................38
Denver........................................36
Utah ...........................................36
L
26
29
29
30
30
Pct
.600
.567
.567
.545
.545
GB
—
2
2
31/2
31/2
PACIFIC
W
x-Golden State...........................51
x-L.A. Clippers ...........................34
L.A. Lakers .................................29
x-Sacramento ............................20
Phoenix ......................................19
L
14
29
36
45
48
Pct
.785
.540
.446
.308
.284
GB
—
16
22
31
33
x-Late game; y-Clinched playoff spot
27
26
32
25
30 — 105
25 — 108
HOUSTON: Ariza 5-10 3-5 13, Tucker 1-3 1-2 3, Capela
6-11 1-2 13, Paul 5-13 4-4 14, Harden 15-22 6-7 40, Mbah
a Moute 1-2 0-0 3, Nene 0-3 0-2 0, Gordon 5-14 1-1 14,
Johnson 2-3 0-0 5. Totals 40-81 16-23 105.
TORONTO: Powell 1-6 0-0 2, Ibaka 5-10 0-0 11, Valanciunas 5-8 4-4 14, Lowry 10-14 3-4 30, DeRozan 8-19 4-6 23,
Miles 2-7 0-0 6, Siakam 1-3 0-0 2, Miller 3-3 0-0 7, Poeltl
1-2 0-0 2, VanVleet 5-13 0-0 11. Totals 41-85 11-14 108.
Three-point Goals: Houston 9-27 (Harden 4-8, Gordon
3-7, Mbah a Moute 1-2, Johnson 1-2, Tucker 0-2, Ariza
0-3, Paul 0-3), Toronto 15-38 (Lowry 7-9, DeRozan 3-7,
Miles 2-7, Miller 1-1, VanVleet 1-4, Ibaka 1-5, Powell
0-5). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Houston 36 (Capela
13), Toronto 42 (Valanciunas 10). Assists: Houston 15
(Harden 4), Toronto 22 (Lowry 6). Total Fouls: Houston
13, Toronto 20. Technicals: Houston coach Rockets
(Defensive three second), Paul. A: 20,131 (19,800).
Nuggets 125, Lakers 116
L.A. LAKERS ....................... 28
DENVER .............................. 37
34
28
34
29
20 — 116
31 — 125
L.A. LAKERS: Kuzma 5-10 2-2 14, Randle 6-12 6-9 18,
Lopez 12-18 2-3 29, Ball 7-16 0-0 15, Caldwell-Pope 5-11
2-2 17, Wear 2-5 0-0 5, Zubac 0-4 0-0 0, Ennis 3-3 0-0 8,
Thomas 5-13 0-0 10. Totals 45-92 12-16 116.
DENVER: Barton 5-11 0-0 13, Millsap 8-12 3-3 21, Jokic
8-14 4-4 21, Murray 5-12 10-11 22, G.Harris 6-10 2-2 19,
Hernangomez 3-7 1-1 7, Lyles 1-6 0-0 2, Plumlee 2-4 4-6
8, D.Harris 4-7 2-3 12. Totals 42-83 26-30 125.
Three-point Goals: L.A. Lakers 14-35 (Caldwell-Pope
5-10, Lopez 3-7, Ennis 2-2, Kuzma 2-3, Wear 1-3, Ball
1-8, Thomas 0-2), Denver 15-31 (G.Harris 5-8, Barton
3-5, Millsap 2-3, D.Harris 2-3, Murray 2-5, Jokic 1-3,
Lyles 0-1, Hernangomez 0-3). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: L.A. Lakers 44 (Caldwell-Pope 9), Denver 36
(Millsap, Jokic 6). Assists: L.A. Lakers 25 (Ball 8),
Denver 30 (Murray 8). Total Fouls: L.A. Lakers 23,
Denver 16. Technicals: L.A. Lakers coach Lakers (Defensive three second), Caldwell-Pope. A: 19,807 (19,155).
THURSDAY’S RESULTS
Brooklyn 125, at Charlotte 111
at Miami 108, Philadelphia 99
Boston 117, at Minnesota 109
at Oklahoma City 115, Phoenix 87
at Golden State 110, San Antonio 107
Warriors 110, Spurs 107
Late Thursday
FRIDAY’S RESULTS
SAN ANTONIO: Anderson 5-12 2-2 12, Aldridge 11-20
8-11 30, Bertans 5-14 0-0 13, Murray 7-14 0-0 14, Mills
3-10 0-0 8, Gay 4-7 2-2 10, Lauvergne 1-3 0-0 2, Parker
4-7 3-3 11, Forbes 1-2 0-0 3, Da.Green 1-5 0-0 2, Ginobili
1-1 0-0 2. Totals 43-95 15-18 107.
SAN ANTONIO ................... 21
GOLDEN STATE .................. 28
Washington 116, at New Orleans 97
at Indiana 112, Atlanta 87
at Detroit 99, Chicago 83
at Toronto 108, Houston 105
at Milwaukee 120, New York 112
Utah 95, at Memphis 78
at Denver 125, L.A. Lakers 116
Golden State at Portland, Late
Orlando at Sacramento, Late
Cleveland at L.A. Clippers, Late
29
18
20 — 107
32 — 110
GOLDEN STATE: Durant 14-26 5-7 37, Dr.Green 4-11 2-2
11, McGee 5-8 3-3 13, Curry 0-1 2-2 2, Thompson 5-16 2-2
13, Casspi 1-2 0-0 2, Looney 2-2 0-0 4, Pachulia 1-4 3-3 5,
Cook 1-6 0-0 2, Livingston 4-10 1-2 9, Young 4-9 2-2 12.
Totals 41-95 20-23 110.
Three-point Goals: San Antonio 6-22 (Bertans 3-9, Mills
2-6, Forbes 1-2, Aldridge 0-1, Gay 0-1, Anderson 0-1,
Da.Green 0-2), Golden State 8-30 (Durant 4-7, Young
2-7, Thompson 1-5, Dr.Green 1-7, Pachulia 0-1, Cook
0-3). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: San Antonio 45
(Aldridge 17), Golden State 49 (Dr.Green 12). Assists:
San Antonio 29 (Parker 7), Golden State 30 (Dr.Green
10). Total Fouls: San Antonio 20, Golden State 18.
Technicals: McGee. A: 19,596 (19,596).
SATURDAY’S GAMES
Washington at Miami, 7:30
Phoenix at Charlotte, 5
Memphis at Dallas, 8:30
San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 8:30
Orlando at L.A. Clippers, 10:30
SUNDAY’S GAMES
NCAA men
W
39
37
34
36
34
30
29
30
L
25
23
23
28
26
27
29
32
OL PTS. GF GA
4
82 224 205
7
81 204 200
11
79 201 201
5
77 188 193
8
76 201 206
11
71 181 206
10
68 217 243
6
66 192 217
ATLANTIC
Tampa Bay ....................
Boston ...........................
Toronto .........................
Florida ...........................
Detroit ..........................
Montreal .......................
Ottawa ..........................
Buffalo ..........................
W
47
42
39
33
26
25
23
22
L
17
15
22
25
31
31
33
35
OL PTS. GF GA
4
98 250 189
8
92 218 165
7
85 223 195
7
73 198 204
11
63 177 206
11
61 171 211
11
57 181 233
11
55 164 222
Saint Joseph's (16-15)
Funk 5-9 0-0 12, Longpre 2-4 1-2 7, Robinson 4-9 3-3 14,
Clover 3-11 0-0 6, Newkirk 3-12 6-6 13, Oliva 2-3 0-2 4,
Demery 3-7 5-6 12. Totals 22-55 15-19 68.
Halftime: Saint Joseph’s 26-25. Three-point goals:
George Mason 2-25 (Grayer 2-8, Kier 0-1, Boyd 0-2,
Greene 0-3, Mar 0-4, Livingston 0-7), Saint Joseph’s
9-20 (Robinson 3-5, Funk 2-3, Longpre 2-3, Demery 1-2,
Newkirk 1-4, Oliva 0-1, Clover 0-2). Fouled out: None.
Rebounds: George Mason 33 (Grayer 13), Saint Joseph’s
39 (Funk 10). Assists: George Mason 8 (Kier 6), Saint
Joseph’s 17 (Newkirk 5). Total fouls: George Mason 16,
Saint Joseph’s 14.
WESTERN CONFERENCE
VCU (18-15)
Mobley 0-4 0-0 0, Vann 4-8 0-0 10, Tillman 8-14 6-12 23,
Jenkins 6-10 1-2 16, Williams 2-11 2-2 6, Lane 3-9 1-1 7,
Santos-Silva 0-0 0-0 0, Maye 0-0 0-0 0, Crowfield 0-2 2-2
2, Simms 1-3 0-0 3. Totals 24-61 12-19 67.
CENTRAL
Nashville .......................
Winnipeg ......................
x-Minnesota .................
Dallas ............................
Colorado ........................
St. Louis ........................
Chicago .........................
W
44
41
38
38
35
35
29
L
14
17
22
24
24
27
31
OL PTS. GF GA
9
97 220 170
9
91 226 177
7
83 210 192
6
82 197 177
8
78 210 200
5
75 180 178
8
66 192 199
PACIFIC
Vegas ............................
San Jose ........................
Anaheim .......................
Los Angeles ..................
Calgary ..........................
Edmonton .....................
x-Vancouver ..................
Arizona .........................
W
43
36
34
37
34
29
25
21
L
19
22
23
25
25
34
33
34
OL PTS. GF GA
5
91 230 184
9
81 198 184
12
80 193 189
5
79 195 166
10
78 195 201
4
62 189 220
9
59 181 219
11
53 160 214
Rhode Island (24-6)
Berry 4-5 1-2 9, Dowtin 7-10 1-3 18, Matthews 4-13 2-3
11, Robinson 2-6 2-2 7, Terrell 5-16 3-5 16, Akele 1-2 0-0
2, Langevine 1-2 0-2 2, Garrett 0-1 0-0 0, Russell 3-7 2-2
11. Totals 27-62 11-19 76.
Halftime: Rhode Island 36-33. Three-point goals: VCU
7-21 (Jenkins 3-6, Vann 2-3, Simms 1-3, Tillman 1-5,
Mobley 0-1, Williams 0-1, Crowfield 0-2), Rhode Island
11-22 (Dowtin 3-4, Terrell 3-5, Russell 3-6, Robinson 1-2,
Matthews 1-5). Fouled out: Vann. Rebounds: VCU 39
(Tillman 15), Rhode Island 37 (Robinson 8). Assists: VCU
13 (Williams 7), Rhode Island 16 (Garrett 5). Total fouls:
VCU 20, Rhode Island 17.
FRIDAY’S TOURNAMENT RESULTS
AMERICA EAST CONFERENCE
CHAMPIONSHIP
BIG SKY CONFERENCE
SEMIFINALS
Idaho 102, Portland St. 99
N. Colorado 73, Idaho St. 66
BIG SOUTH CONFERENCE
QUARTERFINALS
High Point 62, Presbyterian 60
Liberty 80, Charleston Southern 53
Radford 53, Gardner-Webb 51
UNC Asheville 47, Campbell 42
BIG WEST CONFERENCE
SEMIFINALS
CS Northridge 73, Cal Poly 50
UC Davis 49, UC Riverside 46
COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
SEMIFINALS
Drexel 58, Delaware 53
Elon 76, James Madison 53
CONFERENCE USA
SEMIFINALS
Hampton 61, Bethune-Cookman 60
NC A&T 65, Florida A&M 61
Davidson 78, Saint Louis 60
Rhode Island 76, VCU 67
Saint Joseph’s 68, George Mason 49
St. Bonaventure 83, Richmond 77
TUESDAY’S GAMES
ATLANTIC COAST CONFERENCE
SEMIFINALS
Minnesota at Washington, 7
Indiana at Philadelphia, 7
Oklahoma City at Atlanta, 7:30
Toronto at Brooklyn, 7:30
Dallas at New York, 7:30
L.A. Clippersat Chicago, 8
Charlotte at New Orleans, 8
Orlando at San Antonio, 8:30
Detroit at Utah, 9
Cleveland at Phoenix, 10
Denver at Los Angeles Lakers, 10:30
MOUNTAIN WEST CONFERENCE
CHAMPIONSHIP
Boise St. 62, Nevada 60
North Carolina 74, Duke 69
Virginia 64, Clemson 58
NCAA DIV. II
FIRST ROUND
BIG 12 CONFERENCE
SEMIFINALS
Alaska-Anchorage 65, NW Nazarene 63
Ashland 104, Hillsdale 82
Bentley 71, Jefferson 66
Bowie St. 63, Virginia Union 56
Carson-Newman 70, Anderson (SC) 62
Drury 76, Findlay 72
Edinboro 80, Virginia St. 55
Embry-Riddle 57, Eckerd 54
Fort Hays St. 78, SW Oklahoma 75
Glenville St. 118, West Chester 87
Grand Valley St. 75, Michigan Tech 54
Indiana (Pa.) 90, California (Pa.) 65
Lander 84, Limestone 53
Lee 66, North Alabama 64
Lubbock Christian 78, Tarleton St. 46
North Georgia 81, Barton 76
Sciences (Pa.) 61, LIU Post 50
St. Thomas Aquinas 61, Caldwell 45
Stonehill 70, S. Connecticut 45
UC San Diego 64, Seattle Pacific 51
Union (Tenn.) 94, Clark Atlanta 50
Valdosta St. 63, Florida Southern 60
BIG EAST CONFERENCE
SEMIFINALS
Providence 75, Xavier 72, OT
Villanova 87, Butler 68
BIG SKY CONFERENCE
SEMIFINALS
Montana 91, N. Colorado 89, OT
26
34
24 — 87
25 — 112
CONFERENCE USA
SEMIFINALS
ATLANTA: Prince 1-4 0-0 3, Collins 4-6 0-0 8, Dedmon 4-7
0-0 8, Schroder 6-14 2-2 15, Bazemore 2-10 0-0 4, White
III 1-4 0-0 3, Muscala 4-6 1-1 12, Plumlee 1-4 1-2 3, Taylor
1-2 2-2 4, Magette 0-1 0-0 0, Morris 4-9 0-0 9, Dorsey
6-15 3-3 18. Totals 34-82 9-10 87.
Marshall 85, Southern Miss. 75
W. Kentucky 57, Old Dominion 49
INDIANA: Bogdanovic 8-15 3-3 21, T.Young 2-7 0-0 4,
Turner 7-16 0-0 17, Joseph 7-13 2-2 18, Oladipo 7-9 1-1
17, Robinson III 0-2 0-0 0, Leaf 0-0 0-0 0, Booker 3-6 0-0 8,
Sabonis 1-5 1-2 4, Collison 7-10 1-2 17, J.Young 0-2 0-0 0,
Stephenson 3-6 0-0 6. Totals 45-91 8-10 112.
Buffalo 78, Kent St. 61
Toledo 64, E. Michigan 63
Three-point Goals: Atlanta 10-33 (Muscala 3-5, Dorsey
3-8, Prince 1-2, Morris 1-3, White III 1-3, Schroder 1-5,
Taylor 0-1, Dedmon 0-1, Collins 0-2, Bazemore 0-3),
Indiana 14-28 (Turner 3-5, Collison 2-2, Booker 2-2,
Bogdanovic 2-3, Joseph 2-4, Oladipo 2-4, Sabonis 1-2,
J.Young 0-1, Stephenson 0-2, T.Young 0-3). Fouled Out:
None. Rebounds: Atlanta 35 (Dedmon 7), Indiana 49
(Turner 12). Assists: Atlanta 21 (Magette 6), Indiana 21
(Collison, Oladipo 5). Total Fouls: Atlanta 13, Indiana 16.
A: 17,923 (18,500).
San Diego St. 90, Nevada 73
MID-AMERICAN CONFERENCE
SEMIFINALS
Amherst 51, Montclair St. 40
Bowdoin 66, Scranton 54
E. Texas Baptist 61, St. Thomas (Minn.) 58
Hope 68, Christopher Newport 64
Messiah 70, Tufts 39
Rochester 59, RIT 55
Thomas More 75, Gustavus 67
MID-EASTERN ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
SEMIFINALS
Hampton 96, NC A&T 86
NC Central 79, Morgan St. 70
SOUTHLAND CONFERENCE
SECOND ROUND
NCAA DIV. II
FIRST ROUND
Cent. Arkansas 54, Abilene Christian 41
Nicholls 61, Texas A&M-CC 59
Azusa Pacific 69, Dixie St. 65
Cal Baptist 81, UC San Diego 67
St. Martin’s 66, Cal Poly-Pomona 58
15
24
21 — 83
26 — 99
SOUTHWESTERN ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
SEMIFINALS
CHICAGO: Holiday 2-6 0-0 6, Markkanen 3-12 0-0 6,
Lopez 4-4 0-0 9, Dunn 6-12 0-0 13, LaVine 3-15 2-3 8,
Valentine 2-7 0-0 4, Vonleh 3-8 1-2 8, Felicio 1-3 2-2 4,
Portis 1-10 0-0 2, Payne 6-10 1-1 17, Nwaba 0-4 2-2 2,
Blakeney 2-2 0-0 4. Totals 33-93 8-10 83.
DETROIT: Ennis III 6-10 0-1 14, Griffin 9-17 4-4 25,
Drummond 2-7 1-4 5, Smith 5-10 2-2 12, Bullock 9-12 0-0
21, Moreland 4-5 0-0 8, Ellenson 0-1 0-0 0, Tolliver 0-5
0-0 0, Nelson 1-5 2-2 4, Kennard 2-9 5-5 10, Hearn 0-0 0-0
0. Totals 38-81 14-18 99.
Three-point Goals: Chicago 9-31 (Payne 4-6, Holiday 2-5,
Lopez 1-1, Dunn 1-2, Vonleh 1-3, Nwaba 0-1, Valentine
0-3, Markkanen 0-3, Portis 0-3, LaVine 0-4), Detroit 9-27
(Bullock 3-6, Griffin 3-7, Ennis III 2-3, Kennard 1-6,
Nelson 0-2, Tolliver 0-3). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds:
Chicago 42 (Valentine, Markkanen 8), Detroit 50 (Drummond 17). Assists: Chicago 19 (Valentine, Portis 5),
Detroit 22 (Griffin 8). Total Fouls: Chicago 19, Detroit 13.
Technicals: Detroit coach Pistons (Defensive three
second). A: 17,406 (21,000).
Grambling St. 66, Texas Southern 59
WESTERN ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
SEMIFINALS
Augustana (Ill.) 86, John Carroll 78
MIT 79, Middlebury 76
Nebraska Wesleyan 79, Wis.-Platteville 78
Ramapo 72, Franklin & Marshall 62
Springfield 92, Hamilton 90
Swarthmore 93, Plattsburgh 63
Whitman 65, Wis.-Stevens Pt. 55
Wis.-Oshkosh 93, Emory 72
Seattle 84, New Mexico St. 61
Arizona 78, UCLA 67, OT
SOUTHEASTERN CONFERENCE
QUARTERFINALS
Alabama 81, Auburn 63
Arkansas 80, Florida 72
Kentucky 62, Georgia 49
Tennessee 62, Mississippi St. 59
SOUTHLAND CONFERENCE
SEMIFINALS
SE Louisiana 89, Sam Houston St. 79
Stephen F. Austin 78, Nicholls 66
SOUTHWESTERN ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
SEMIFINALS
Ark.-Pine Bluff 71, Southern U. 65
Jazz 95, Grizzlies 78
26
15
21
20
24 — 95
20 — 78
UTAH: Ingles 6-10 0-0 16, Favors 5-7 2-6 12, Gobert 2-5
0-0 4, Rubio 3-10 9-11 15, Mitchell 4-15 1-1 12, Crowder
7-12 2-2 22, O’Neale 3-7 0-0 6, Niang 0-0 0-0 0, Jerebko
2-5 0-0 4, Udoh 0-0 0-0 0, Neto 1-3 2-2 4. Totals 33-74
16-22 95.
MEMPHIS: Brooks 7-16 2-2 18, Green 1-8 0-0 2, Gasol 3-7
2-4 9, Simmons 3-7 0-0 6, McLemore 5-11 2-2 14, Rabb
0-0 0-0 0, Martin 5-15 3-4 13, Johnson 0-0 0-0 0, Davis
2-5 0-0 4, Rathan-Mayes 3-9 1-2 8, Selden 2-5 0-0 4.
Totals 31-83 10-14 78.
Three-point Goals: Utah 13-32 (Crowder 6-11, Ingles 4-6,
Mitchell 3-8, Rubio 0-2, Jerebko 0-2, O’Neale 0-3),
Memphis 6-22 (McLemore 2-4, Brooks 2-6, RathanMayes 1-2, Gasol 1-4, Selden 0-2, Green 0-2, Martin 0-2).
Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Utah 48 (Rubio, Gobert 10),
Memphis 39 (Gasol 11). Assists: Utah 26 (Mitchell 6),
Memphis 16 (Gasol 6). Total Fouls: Utah 17, Memphis
22. Technicals: Utah coach Jazz (Defensive three second), Rubio, Brooks, Rathan-Mayes. A: 15,622 (18,119).
Bucks 120, Knicks 112
33
34
34
31
23 — 112
29 — 120
NEW YORK: Hardaway Jr. 10-20 2-2 26, Thomas 2-5 0-0
5, Kanter 8-11 0-0 16, Ntilikina 1-4 0-0 2, Mudiay 7-14 4-7
19, Williams 7-14 3-3 18, Beasley 2-8 0-0 4, Kornet 1-5
0-0 2, O’Quinn 6-8 2-2 14, Burke 2-6 0-0 4, Dotson 1-3 0-0
2. Totals 47-98 11-14 112.
MILWAUKEE: Middleton 11-16 6-6 30, Antetokounmpo
7-15 14-18 28, Henson 5-7 4-7 14, Bledsoe 3-6 0-2 7,
Snell 0-3 0-0 0, Parker 5-8 0-0 12, Zeller 5-9 2-2 12, Terry
0-1 0-0 0, Munford 0-0 0-0 0, Muhammad 2-3 2-2 6,
Brown 3-5 2-2 11. Totals 41-73 30-39 120.
Three-point Goals: New York 7-28 (Hardaway Jr. 4-11,
Williams 1-3, Mudiay 1-3, Thomas 1-4, O’Quinn 0-1,
Kornet 0-1, Ntilikina 0-1, Dotson 0-2, Beasley 0-2),
Milwaukee 8-18 (Brown 3-5, Parker 2-3, Middleton 2-4,
Bledsoe 1-3, Terry 0-1, Snell 0-2). Fouled Out: None.
Rebounds: New York 39 (Kanter 8), Milwaukee 42
(Antetokounmpo 10). Assists: New York 24 (O’Quinn 6),
Milwaukee 29 (Bledsoe 8). Total Fouls: New York 26,
Milwaukee 16. Technicals: New York coach Jeff Hornacek. A: 18,717 (18,717).
SUN BELT CONFERENCE
QUARTERFINALS
Georgia Southern 63, Louisiana-Monroe 55
Georgia St. 73, Troy 51
Louisiana-Lafayette 80, Texas St. 54
Texas-Arlington 84, Appalachian St. 68
WESTERN ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
SEMIFINALS
B OY S ' B A S K E T B A L L
TOP 20
NO. 10 FAIRMONT HEIGHTS 72,
PATTERSON MILL 49
Clemson .......................................... 23
Virginia ........................................... 32
CLEMSON
Simms
Thomas
DeVoe
Mitchell
Reed
Skara
Donnal
Oliver
TOTALS
35 —
32 —
MIN
FG
FT O-T
26
1-4 4-4 2-4
27
5-8 5-7 2-7
38
3-9 1-2 0-6
37 5-11 5-5 0-2
39 2-14 1-2 1-4
16
1-1 3-3 0-1
10
0-0 0-0 0-1
6
0-2 0-0 0-1
200 17-49 19-23 5-26
58
64
A PF PTS
2 0
6
0 4 15
3 5
8
1 1 18
2 0
6
0 2
5
0 1
0
0 3
0
8 16 58
Percentages: FG .347, FT .826. 3-Point Goals: 5-25, .200
(Mitchell 3-6, DeVoe 1-5, Reed 1-10, Oliver 0-2, Simms
0-2). Team Rebounds: 8. Team Turnovers: 13 (16 PTS).
Blocked Shots: 2 (Simms 2). Turnovers: 13 (Thomas 4,
DeVoe 3, Reed 3, Mitchell 2, Donnal). Steals: 5 (DeVoe 2,
Mitchell 2, Skara). Technical Fouls: None.
VIRGINIA
Wilkins
Salt
Guy
Hall
Jerome
Hunter
Diakite
Johnson
TOTALS
MIN
FG
21
2-6
22
4-5
38 6-12
36
3-7
35 3-12
20
4-6
17
5-8
10
1-4
200 28-60
at Los Angeles 3, Washington 1
at Columbus 5, Colorado 4 (OT)
Winnipeg 3, at New Jersey 2
at Boston 3, Philadelphia 2
Buffalo 4, at Ottawa 3 (SO)
at Florida 5, Montreal 0
Vegas 4, at Detroit 0
at Tampa Bay 5, N.Y. Rangers 3
at Nashville 4, Anaheim 2
Carolina 3, at Chicago 2
at Edmonton 2, N.Y. Islanders 1 (SO)
at San Jose 2, St. Louis 0
FT O-T A PF PTS
0-0 3-5 1 0
4
0-0 3-8 0 3
8
0-1 0-5 2 1 15
3-4 0-3 1 1 10
0-0 1-4 10 3
6
0-3 1-4 1 5
9
0-0 1-4 0 4 10
0-0 0-0 1 0
2
3-8 9-33 16 17 64
Percentages: FG .467, FT .375. 3-Point Goals: 5-18, .278
(Guy 3-7, Hunter 1-2, Hall 1-4, Johnson 0-1, Jerome 0-4).
Team Rebounds: 4. Team Turnovers: 7 (14 PTS). Blocked
Shots: 1 (Hunter). Turnovers: 7 (Hall 3, Guy, Hunter,
Jerome, Wilkins). Steals: 11 (Hall 3, Jerome 3, Salt 2,
Diakite, Hunter, Wilkins). Technical Fouls: None.
GF
2
2
2
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
GA
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
2
2
2
4
WESTERN
W
Houston ...........................1
San Jose ...........................1
LA Galaxy .........................1
Vancouver ........................1
Los Angeles FC ................1
Real Salt Lake ..................0
Dallas ...............................0
Colorado ...........................0
Minnesota United ............0
Portland ...........................0
Seattle .............................0
Sporting K.C. ....................0
L
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
T PTS
0
3
0
3
0
3
0
3
0
3
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
GF
4
3
2
2
1
1
1
0
2
1
0
0
GA
0
2
1
1
0
1
1
0
3
2
1
2
SATURDAY’S MATCHES
Montreal at Columbus, 1
Colorado at New England, 1:30
Los Angeles FC at Real Salt Lake, 3:30
Sporting K.C .at Chicago, 6
Vancouver at Houston, 6
Portland at New York, 7
Minnesota United at Orlando City, 7:30
SUNDAY’S MATCHES
D.C. United at Atlanta United FC, 3
LA Galaxy at New York City FC, 5
SUNDAY, MARCH 18
Seattle at Dallas, 5
CONCACAF Champions League
FRIDAY’S RESULTS
QUARTERFINALS
FIRST LEG
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
at Columbus 3, Detroit 2
Calgary 2, at Ottawa 1
at Dallas 2, Anaheim 1
Minnesota at Vancouver, Late
America (Mexico) 4, Tauro (Panama) 0
Tijuana (Mexico) 0, New York Red Bulls (United States)
2
SATURDAY’S GAMES
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
Washington at San Jose, 4
Winnipeg at Philadelphia, 1
Montreal at Tampa Bay, 1
Vegas at Buffalo, 1
Chicago at Boston, 1
Arizona at Colorado, 3
St. Louis at Los Angeles, 4
N.Y. Rangers at Florida, 7
Pittsburgh at Toronto, 7
New Jersey at Nashville, 8
Minnesota at Edmonton, 10
Seattle (United States) 1, Guadalajara (Mexico) 0
Toronto (Canada) 2, Tigres (Mexico) 1
SECOND LEG
TUESDAY’S MATCHES
New York Red Bulls (United States) vs. Tijuana (Mexico), 8
Tigres (Mexico) vs. Toronto (Canada), 10
WEDNESDAY’S MATCHES
Tauro (Panama) vs. America (Mexico), 8
Guadalajara (Mexico) vs. Seattle (United States), 10
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Boston at Chicago, 12:30
N.Y. Islanders at Calgary, 7
Dallas at Pittsburgh, 7:30
Vancouver at Arizona, 9
Europa League
THIRD ROUND
FIRST LEG
THURSDAY’S RESULTS
MONDAY’S GAMES
Winnipeg at Washington, 7
Vegas at Philadelphia, 7
Montreal at Columbus, 7
Carolina at N.Y. Rangers, 7
Ottawa at Florida, 7:30
St. Louis at Anaheim, 10
Detroit at San Jose, 10:30
Vancouver at Los Angeles, 10:30
AC Milan (Italy) 0, Arsenal (England) 2
Atletico Madrid (Spain) 3, Lokomotiv Moscow (Russia) 0
CSKA Moscow (Russia) 0, Lyon (Salzburg) 1
Dortmund (Germany) 1, Salzburg (Austria) 2
Lazio (Italy) 2, Dynamo Kiev (Ukraine) 2
Leipzig (Germany) 2, Zenit St. Petersburg (Russia) 1
Marseille (France) 3, Athletic Bilbao (Spain) 1
Sporting Lisbon (Portugal) 2, Viktoria Plzen (Czech
Republic) 0
Blue Jackets 3, Red Wings 2
DETROIT .................................. 1
COLUMBUS .............................. 1
0
2
1 —
0 —
2
3
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Columbus, Calvert 8 (Savard, Wennberg),
15:33 (sh). 2, Detroit, Helm 9 (Witkowski, Glendening),
15:54.
SECOND PERIOD
PM (0-0)Totals 0 0-0 49.
FH (22-5) Benjamin 17, Lucas-White 14, Quigley 11,
Eccles 10, Reed, II 5, Montgomery 4, Holmes 3, Miles 2,
Early 2, Anderson 1, Norman 1, Reynolds 1, George 1
Totals 22 16-26 72.
Halftime: Fairmont Heights, (38-19). Three-point goals:
FH 4 (Quigley 1, Reed, II 1, Holmes 1, Eccles 1).
G IR L S ' B A S K E T B A L L
TOP 20
NO. 4 POOLESVILLE 61, GWYNN PARK 49
GP (20-5) Dublin 21, Bowman 9, Dale 6, Landon 5,
Cardwell 4, Harkley 4 Totals 15 13-24 49.
P (26-0) Lee 23, Thompson 9, Green 9, Lemarr 6, Hobbs 6,
Mullikin 3, Abrigo 3, Haddaway 2 Totals 21 7-18 61.
Halftime: Poolesville, (31-24).
Three-point goals: P 4 (Thompson 1, Lee 1, Abrigo 1,
Green 1); GP 2 (Landon 1, Dublin 1).
BOXING
Lokomotiv Moscow (Russia) vs. Atletico Madrid (Spain),
Noon
Athletic Bilbao (Spain) vs. Marseille (France), 2
Dynamo Kiev (Ukraine) vs. Lazio (Italy), 2
Viktoria Plzen (Czech Republic) vs. Sporting Lisbon
(Portugal), 2
Zenit St. Petersburg (Russia) vs. Leipzig (Germany), 2
Arsenal (England) vs. AC Milan (Italy), 4:05
Lyon (Salzburg) vs. CSKA Moscow (Russia), 4:05
Salzburg (Austria) vs. Dortmund (Germany). 4:05
Scoring: 3, Columbus, Jones 12 (Atkinson, Panarin),
1:45. 4, Columbus, Jones 13 (Jenner, Vanek), 8:15.
TE N NI S
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 5, Detroit, Athanasiou 14 (Green, Abdelkader),
16:17.
ATP/WTA
SHOTS ON GOAL
PARIBAS OPEN
DETROIT ................................ 10
7
7 — 24
COLUMBUS .............................. 8
16
12 — 36
Power-play opportunities: Detroit 0 of 2; Columbus 0 of
2. Goalies: Detroit, Coreau 0-1-0 (36 shots-33 saves).
Columbus, Bobrovsky 29-21-5 (24-22). A: 17,284
(18,500). T: 2:22.
At The Indian Wells Tennis Garden
In Indian Wells, Calif.
Purse: Men: $7.97 million (Masters 1000)
Women: $8.65 million (Premier)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
Flames 2, Senators 1
CALGARY ................................. 1
OTTAWA .................................. 0
0
0
1 —
1 —
2
1
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Calgary, Bennett 11 (Kulak, Ferland), 4:25.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Calgary, Stajan 4 (Lazar, Gaudreau), 11:42. 3,
Ottawa, Pageau 11, 12:55.
SHOTS ON GOAL
CALGARY ............................... 15
10
12 — 37
OTTAWA .................................. 9
9
12 — 30
Power-play opportunities: Calgary 0 of 2; Ottawa 0 of 2.
Goalies: Calgary, Rittich 8-5-3 (30 shots-29 saves).
Ottawa, Condon 4-13-5 (37-35). A: 14,498 (18,572). T:
2:30.
Stars 2, Ducks 1
ANAHEIM ................................ 1
DALLAS .................................... 0
0
0
0 —
2 —
1
2
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Anaheim, Getzlaf 10 (Rakell, Perry), 17:16.
THIRD PERIOD
MEN’S SINGLES — FIRST ROUND
Gael Monfils, France, def. Matthew Ebden, Australia,
6-3, 6-3; Marcos Baghdatis, Cyprus, def. Yoshihito
Nishioka, Japan, 7-5, 3-6, 7-5; Joao Sousa, Portugal, def.
Mikhail Youzhny, Russia, 4-6, 6-4, 7-6 (7-4); Ernesto
Escobedo, United States, def. Frances Tiafoe, United
States, 7-5, 6-3; Marton Fucsovics, Hungary, def. Viktor
Troicki, Serbia, 7-6 (7-3), 6-1; Pierre-Hugues Herbert,
France, def. Gilles Simon, France, 6-7 (10-8), 7-6 (7-5),
6-3; Yuki Bhambri, India, def. Nicholas Mahut, France,
7-5, 6-3; Tennys Sandgren, United States, def. Nikoloz
Basilashvili, Georgia, 6-3, 2-1 retired; Taro Daniel, Japan,
def. Cameron Norrie, Britain, 6-3, 1-6, 6-1.
WOMEN’S SINGLES — SECOND ROUND
Marketa Vondrousova, Czech Republic, def. Johanna
Konta (11), Britain, 7-6 (7-5), 6-4; Aryna Sabalenka,
Belarus, def. Svetlana Kuznetsova (19), Russia, 6-4, 6-3;
Kristina Mladenovic (14), France, def. Sam Stosur,
Australia, 7-5, 7-5; Wang Qiang, China, def. Elise
Mertens (22), Belgium, 4-6, 6-3, 6-3; Naomi Osaka,
Japan, def. Agnieszka Radwanska (31), Poland, 6-3, 6-2;
Petra Kvitova (9), Czech Republic, def. Yulia Putintseva,
Kazakhstan, 6-7 (7-4), 7-6 (7-3), 6-4; Coco Vandeweghe
(17), United States, def. Kaia Kanepi, Estonia, 6-0, 7-6
(8-6); Petra Martic, Croatia, def. Barbora Strycova (25),
Czech Republic, 7-5, 6-4; Simoma Halep (1) Rominia, def.
Kristyna Pliskova, Czech Republic, 6-4, 6-4; Jelena
Ostapenko (6), Latvia, def. Belinda Bencic, Switzerland,
6-4, 3-6, 6-1; Zhang Shuai (32), China, def. Sofia Kenin,
United States, 6-2, 6-3; Maria Sakkari, Greece, def.
Ashleigh Barty (16), Australia, 6-4, 6-2; Karolina Pliskova (5), Czech Republic, def. Irina-Camelia Begu, Romania, 7-6 (7-4), 6-1; Caroline Dolehide, United States, def.
Dominika Cibulkova (30), Slovakia, 5-7, 6-3, 6-4.
Scoring: 2, Dallas, Shore 9 (Benn, Seguin), 8:50 (pp). 3,
Dallas, Benn 23 (Seguin, Klingberg), 14:23 (pp).
SHOTS ON GOAL
ANAHEIM .............................. 10
5
12 — 27
DALLAS .................................... 9
17
11 — 37
Power-play opportunities: Anaheim 0 of 3; Dallas 2 of 2.
Goalies: Anaheim, Miller 8-6-6 (37 shots-35 saves).
Dallas, Lehtonen 12-7-2 (27-26). A: 18,532 (18,532). T:
2:29.
Kings 3, Capitals 1
Late Thursday
WASHINGTON ......................... 0
LOS ANGELES .......................... 1
1
1
0 —
1 —
1
3
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Los Angeles, Carter 4 (Pearson, Martinez),
15:25. Penalties: None.
Grand Canyon 75, Utah Valley 60
No. 1 Virginia 64,
No. 19 Clemson 58
T PTS
0
3
0
3
0
3
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Houston at D.C. United, 1:30
Chicago at Minnesota United, 2
Columbus at Philadelphia, 2
Toronto FC at Montreal, 3
Orlando City at New York City FC, 3:30
Vancouver at Atlanta United FC, 7:30
San Jose at Sporting K.C., 8:30
New York at Real Salt Lake, 9
THURSDAY’S RESULTS
HIGH SCHOOLS
BOYS' BASKETBALL
MARYLAND
Fairmont Heights 72, Patterson Mill 49
VIRGINIA
VIRGINIA CLASS 1
Lancaster 52, Eastside 49
VIRGINIA CLASS 2
Gate City 80, Lee-Staunton 65
PRIVATE
ALHAMBRA CATHOLIC INVITATIONAL
DeMatha 72, Paul VI 50
O'Connell 63, Gonzaga 46
CAPITAL BELTWAY
Rock Creek Christian 66, Riverdale Baptist 47
GIRLS' BASKETBALL
MARYLAND
Poolesville 61, Gwynn Park 49
VIRGINIA
VIRGINIA CLASS 1
Parry McCluer 51, Surry County 42
VIRGINIA CLASS 2
Central-Wise 64, Buffalo Gap 43
BOYS' LACROSSE
PRIVATE
Bullis 16, Calverton 1
Potomac School 10, Bishop Ireton 7
St. Stephen's/St. Agnes 13, DeMatha 12
PACIFIC-12 CONFERENCE
SEMIFINALS
L
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
THURSDAY’S MATCHES
NCAA DIV. III
THIRD ROUND
MOUNTAIN WEST CONFERENCE
SEMIFINALS
NCAA DIV. III
THIRD ROUND
Pistons 99, Bulls 83
21
28
Drake 89, Valparaiso 40
S. Illinois 69, Indiana St. 67
Kansas 83, Kansas St. 67
West Virginia 66, Texas Tech 63
Pacers 112, Hawks 87
22
19
MISSOURI VALLEY CONFERENCE
QUARTERFINALS
PGA Tour
EASTERN
W
New York City FC .............1
Philadelphia .....................1
Columbus .........................1
Orlando City .....................0
D.C. United .......................0
New York .........................0
Chicago ............................0
Montreal ..........................0
Toronto FC .......................0
New England ....................0
Atlanta United FC ............0
SATURDAY, MARCH 17
x-Late game
NCAA women
GOLF
MLS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
No. 25 Rhode Island 76, VCU 67
MID-EASTERN ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
SEMIFINALS
Milwaukee at Memphis, 8
Sacramento at Oklahoma City, 8
San Antonio at Houston, 8
Miami at Portland, 10:30
NEW YORK ......................... 22
MILWAUKEE ...................... 26
METROPOLITAN
Pittsburgh .....................
Washington ..................
Philadelphia ..................
Columbus ......................
New Jersey ...................
Carolina .........................
N.Y. Islanders ...............
N.Y. Rangers .................
Buffalo 85, W. Michigan 53
Cent. Michigan 61, Miami (Ohio) 58
Cincinnati 61, SMU 51
Houston 84, UCF 56
Memphis 67, Tulsa 64
Wichita St. 89, Temple 81
ATLANTIC 10 CONFERENCE
QUARTERFINALS
UTAH .................................. 24
MEMPHIS ........................... 23
George Mason (16-17)
Mar 2-8 6-6 10, Calixte 2-2 0-0 4, Livingston 3-13 2-2 8,
Kier 4-11 0-1 8, Grayer 4-16 2-4 12, Wilson 0-1 0-0 0,
Boyd 0-3 1-2 1, Greene 3-7 0-0 6. Totals 18-61 11-15 49.
MID-AMERICAN CONFERENCE
SEMIFINALS
FRIDAY’S TOURNAMENT RESULTS
AMERICAN ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
QUARTERFINALS
MONDAY’S GAMES
CHICAGO ............................ 26
DETROIT ............................. 21
NHL
UAB 67, Rice 55
Toronto at New York, 1
Chicago at Atlanta, 3:30
Golden State at Minnesota, 3:30
Utah at New Orleans, 4
Sacramento at Denver, 5
Houston at Dallas, 7
Indiana at Boston, 7:30
Philadelphia at Brooklyn, 7:30
Cleveland at L.A. Lakers, 9
ATLANTA ........................... 15
INDIANA ............................. 34
Saint Joseph's 68,
George Mason 49
Maine 74, Hartford 65
37
32
SOCCER
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Washington, Vrana 12 (Orpik, Oshie), 5:52. 3,
Los Angeles, Lewis 14 (Carter), 9:32. Penalties: Martinez, LA, (slashing), 14:42.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Los Angeles, Clifford 5 (Forbort, Kopitar),
18:42. Penalties: Clifford, LA, served by Kempe, (roughing), 5:58; Wilson, WSH, (roughing), 5:58; Clifford, LA,
(roughing), 5:58; Mitchell, LA, (tripping), 8:01; Connolly,
WSH, (interference), 10:00.
SHOTS ON GOAL
WASHINGTON ......................... 8
13
5 — 26
LOS ANGELES ........................ 14
9
6 — 29
Power-play opportunities: Washington 0 of 3; Los
Angeles 0 of 1. Goalies: Washington, Grubauer 8-8-3 (28
shots-26 saves). Los Angeles, Quick 26-24-2 (26-25). A:
18,230 (18,230). T: 2:29.
Sharks 2, Blues 0
AU TO R AC I NG
NASCAR Cup
TICKETGUARDIAN 500 LINEUP
After Friday’s qualifying
At ISM Raceway; In Avondale, Ariz.
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (78) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 136.945 mph
2. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 136.643
3. (9) Chase Elliott, Chevrolet, 136.126
4. (88) Alex Bowman, Chevrolet, 136.080
5. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 135.947
6. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 135.900
7. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 135.870
8. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 135.864
9. (20) Erik Jones, Toyota, 135.829
10. (4) Kevin Harvick, Ford, 135.522
11. (24) William Byron, Chevrolet, 134.791
12. (12) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 134.776
13. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 135.262
14. (21) Paul Menard, Ford, 135.181
15. (19) Daniel Suarez, Toyota, 135.074
16. (38) David Ragan, Ford, 135.014
17. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 135.008
18. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 134.998
19. (14) Clint Bowyer, Ford, 134.700
20. (47) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 134.283
21. (6) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 134.238
22. (10) Aric Almirola, Ford, 134.078
23. (41) Kurt Busch, Ford, 133.764
24. (37) Chris Buescher, Chevrolet, 133.566
25. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 133.274
26. (95) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 133.215
27. (43) Darrell Wallace Jr., Chevrolet, 133.052
28. (13) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 133.013
29. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 132.920
30. (32) Matt DiBenedetto, Ford, 132.597
31. (34) Michael McDowell, Ford, 131.844
32. (23) Gray Gaulding, Toyota, 130.709
33. (72) Corey LaJoie, Chevrolet, 130.378
34. (96) DJ Kennington, Toyota, 129.697
35. (51) Timmy Hill, Chevrolet, 128.889
36. (15) Ross Chastain, Chevrolet, 128.553
37. (00) Jeffrey Earnhardt, Chevrolet, 0.000.
Late Thursday
ST. LOUIS ................................. 0
SAN JOSE ................................ 0
0
0
0 —
2 —
TR AN S AC TI ONS
0
2
THIRD PERIOD
Fight schedule
Scoring: 1, San Jose, Boedker 13 (Donskoi, DeMelo),
12:12 (pp). 2, San Jose, Hertl 16 (Burns), 19:45.
SATURDAY
SHOTS ON GOAL
At Struer, Denmark, Dina Thorslund vs. Alicia Ashley,
10, for vacant WBC interim women’s junior featherweight title; Dennis Ceylan vs. Jesus Sanchez, 10,
featherweights.
At Carson, Calif. (ESPN), Oscar Valdez vs. Scott Quigg,
12, for Valdez’s WBO featherweight title; Andy Vences
vs. Erick DeLeon, 10, junior lightweights.
ST. LOUIS ................................. 4
10
2 — 16
SAN JOSE ................................ 9
12
15 — 36
Power-play opportunities: St. Louis 0 of 1; San Jose 1 of
2. Goalies: St. Louis, Allen 19-20-2 (35 shots-34 saves).
San Jose, Jones 22-17-6 (16-16). A: 17,400 (17,562). T:
2:19.
NFL
Arizona Cardinals: Extended tender offers to exclusive
rights CB C.J. Goodwin, RB Elijhaa Penny, DL Olsen
Pierre and OL John Wetzel.
San Francisco 49ers: Promoted Paraag Marathe to
president of 49ers Enterprises. Released DE Elvis
Dumervil. Extended tender offers to exclusive rights to
RB Raheem Mostert.
Tampa Bay Buccaneers: Re-signed QB Ryan Fitzpatrick.
Tennessee Titans: Released QB Matt Cassel, S Da’Norris
Searcy and WR Eric Weems.
VALSPAR CHAMPIONSHIP
At Innisbrook Resort (Copperhead Course)
In Palm Harbor, Fla.
Purse: $6.5 million
Yardage: 7,340
Par: 71
SECOND ROUND
Corey Conners ...................................
Paul Casey .........................................
Brandt Snedeker ...............................
Tiger Woods ......................................
Ryan Palmer ......................................
Kelly Kraft .........................................
Sean O'Hair .......................................
Jason Kokrak .....................................
Justin Rose ........................................
Webb Simpson ..................................
Keegan Bradley .................................
Bob Estes ...........................................
Jimmy Walker ...................................
Tyrone Van Aswegen ........................
Trey Mullinax ....................................
Louis Oosthuizen ..............................
Patrick Reed ......................................
Blayne Barber ....................................
Sam Burns .........................................
Bill Haas ............................................
Branden Grace ...................................
Adam Hadwin ....................................
Shane Lowry ......................................
Zach Johnson .....................................
Rory Sabbatini ...................................
Luke List ............................................
William McGirt ..................................
Chris Kirk ...........................................
Steve Stricker ...................................
Nick Watney ......................................
Adam Schenk .....................................
Ryan Blaum .......................................
Lucas Glover ......................................
Brice Garnett .....................................
Whee Kim ..........................................
Stewart Cink .....................................
Sergio Garcia .....................................
Russell Knox ......................................
Cameron Smith .................................
Austin Cook .......................................
Jim Furyk ...........................................
Charl Schwartzel ...............................
Si Woo Kim ........................................
Matt Every .........................................
Ollie Schniederjans ...........................
Dominic Bozzelli ................................
T.J. Vogel ...........................................
Aaron Wise ........................................
Chris Couch ........................................
Scott Brown ......................................
Harold Varner III ................................
Fabian Gomez ....................................
David Lingmerth ................................
Rod Pampling ....................................
Adam Scott ........................................
Matt Kuchar ......................................
Aaron Baddeley .................................
J.J. Henry ...........................................
Chad Campbell ...................................
Sam Ryder .........................................
Dylan Meyer ......................................
Ben Martin ........................................
Ryan Armour .....................................
Luke Donald .......................................
Robert Garrigus .................................
Alex Cejka ..........................................
Scott Stallings ...................................
Jamie Lovemark ................................
Graeme McDowell .............................
Sung Kang .........................................
Sam Saunders ...................................
J.B. Holmes .......................................
Martin Flores .....................................
Patrick Rodgers .................................
Charles Howell III ..............................
Ernie Els .............................................
Stephan Jaeger .................................
Abraham Ancer .................................
67 69
70 68
70 68
70 68
72 66
68 70
71 68
72 67
70 69
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69 71
75 65
72 68
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70 70
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71 70
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73 68
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71 70
70 71
70 71
68 74
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73 69
70 72
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68 74
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71 72
74 69
72 71
70 73
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76 67
71 72
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70 73
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72 71
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72 72
75 69
70 74
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73 71
70 74
76 68
73 72
72 73
72 73
73 72
74 71
74 71
71 74
71 74
75 70
75 70
71 74
71 74
72 73
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-6
-4
-4
-4
-4
-4
-3
-3
-3
-3
-3
-2
-2
-2
-2
-2
-2
-2
-2
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
+1
+1
+1
+1
+1
+1
+1
+1
+1
+1
+1
+1
+1
+1
+1
+1
+1
+1
+1
+1
+1
+2
+2
+2
+2
+2
+2
+2
+3
+3
+3
+3
+3
+3
+3
+3
+3
+3
+3
+3
+3
Chez Reavie ........................................ 71 75
Brandon Harkins ................................ 72 74
Ted Potter, Jr. .................................... 76 70
Brian Stuard ....................................... 76 70
Hudson Swafford ............................... 74 72
Jimmy Stanger ................................... 71 75
Michael Kim ....................................... 74 72
Byeong Hun An ................................... 73 73
Jason Dufner ...................................... 74 72
Gary Woodland ................................... 71 75
Billy Horschel ..................................... 74 72
Zecheng Dou ....................................... 72 74
Jonathan Randolph ............................ 76 70
Kevin Tway ......................................... 75 72
Tom Hoge ........................................... 75 72
Mackenzie Hughes ............................. 73 74
Andrew Putnam ................................. 70 77
Jordan Spieth ..................................... 76 71
Sangmoon Bae ................................... 72 75
Martin Laird ....................................... 75 72
Kevin Streelman ................................ 73 74
Beau Hossler ...................................... 75 72
Ryan Moore ........................................ 74 73
Rory McIlroy ....................................... 74 73
Brian Gay ............................................ 73 74
Grayson Murray ................................. 77 70
Billy Hurley III .................................... 74 73
Ben Silverman .................................... 75 72
Matthew Fitzpatrick .......................... 76 72
Greg Chalmers .................................... 76 72
Tony Finau .......................................... 74 74
Henrik Stenson .................................. 74 74
John Huh ............................................ 75 73
Troy Merritt ....................................... 73 75
Jack Maguire ...................................... 72 76
Ian Poulter .......................................... 78 71
Geoff Ogilvy ....................................... 76 73
Padraig Harrington ............................ 76 73
Nick Taylor ......................................... 73 76
D.A. Points ......................................... 72 77
Camilo Villegas .................................. 75 74
Talor Gooch ........................................ 74 76
Tyler Duncan ...................................... 76 74
Chesson Hadley .................................. 75 75
Charley Hoffman ................................ 75 75
Robert Streb ....................................... 75 75
Harris English ..................................... 75 75
Ross Fisher ......................................... 76 74
Seamus Power ................................... 76 74
Xinjun Zhang ...................................... 73 78
Peter Malnati ..................................... 75 76
Bud Cauley .......................................... 78 73
Danny Lee ........................................... 74 77
C.T. Pan .............................................. 73 78
Tom Lovelady ..................................... 78 73
Ty Strafaci .......................................... 75 76
Derek Fathauer .................................. 75 77
Retief Goosen .................................... 75 77
Davis Love III ...................................... 77 75
Richy Werenski .................................. 76 77
Rod Perry ............................................ 76 77
Martin Piller ....................................... 76 78
Nicholas Lindheim .............................. 74 80
—
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146
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152
152
153
153
154
154
+4
+4
+4
+4
+4
+4
+4
+4
+4
+4
+4
+4
+4
+5
+5
+5
+5
+5
+5
+5
+5
+5
+5
+5
+5
+5
+5
+5
+6
+6
+6
+6
+6
+6
+6
+7
+7
+7
+7
+7
+7
+8
+8
+8
+8
+8
+8
+8
+8
+9
+9
+9
+9
+9
+9
+9
+10
+10
+10
+11
+11
+12
+12
FAILED TO MAKE THE CUT
BAS E BALL
MLB spring training
FRIDAY’S RESULTS
Toronto 8, Baltimore 5
N.Y. Mets 4, Detroit 4, tie
Pittsburgh 5, Philadelphia 4
Miami 5, Boston 4
Minnesota 4, Tampa Bay 3
Arizona 7, Kansas City (ss) 2
Oakland 2, Milwaukee 0
Chicago Cubs 6, L.A. Angels 1
L.A. Angels 6, Kansas City (ss) 4
San Francisco 10, Seattle 7
San Diego 2, Chicago White Sox 0
Cleveland 8, Colorado 5
Atlanta 3, N.Y. Yankees 1
Houston 4, St. Louis 2
Cincinnati 6, Texas 3
Blue Jays 8, Orioles 5
BALTIMORE
AB R H BI TORONTO
Presley rf
Rickard rf
Beckham 3b
Sntnder lf
Mancini lf
Mullins cf
Vlencia 1b
A.Wynns c
Alvarez dh
Mntcstl ph
C.Gntry cf
Rdrguez 1b
C.Jseph c
E.Velma 2b
Srdinas ss
A.Susac ph
R.Tjada 2b
TOTALS
3
1
3
1
3
1
3
1
3
1
3
1
3
1
3
0
4
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
2
0
0
35 5 8
BALTIMORE
TORONTO
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
2
0
1
0
AB R H BI
Grndrsn lf
Hrnndez lf
D.Trvis 2b
Dnldson 3b
Lblbjan 3b
J.Smoak 1b
Ry.Noda pr
R.Mrtin c
McGuire ph
Morales dh
Grichuk rf
R.Felds cf
K.Pllar cf
J.Davis pr
Al.Diaz ss
R.Urena ss
5 TOTALS
010
100
001
202
2
2
4
3
1
2
1
3
1
4
2
0
3
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
0
1
0
1
0
2
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
2
2
0
1
0
0
0
32 8 10
8
003
21X
1
1
1
0
0
1
1
1
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
—
—
5
8
E: Tejada (2), Lopes 2 (4), Diaz (1). DP: Baltimore 1,
Toronto 2. LOB: Baltimore 4, Toronto 5. 2B: Presley (2),
Granderson (1), Martin (1), Morales (2), Grichuk (3),
Pillar (3). 3B: Gentry (1), Vielma (1). HR: Travis (2),
Morales (1). SF: Susac (1), Grichuk (1).
BALTIMORE
IP
H
R
ER
BB
SO
Castro
Asher (L, 0-1)
Araujo
Marinez
Scott
3
2
1
1
1
2
3
2
2
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
2
2
2
1
2
0
1
0
0
1
0
2
1
1
TORONTO
IP
H
R
ER
BB
SO
Estrada (W, 1-0)
Borucki (H, 1)
Osuna (H, 1)
Clippard
Mayza
4
2
1
1
1
4
1
1
0
2
1
1
0
0
3
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
2
1
1
2
1
HBP: by: Scott (Fields).
Umpires: Home, Vic Carapazza; First, Tom Hallion;
Second, Dan Iassogna; Third, Chad Whitson.
T: 2:26. A: 4,770
EFGHI
washingtonpost.com/classifieds
CLASSIFIED
D9
SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2018
EZ
the local expert
on local jobs
new and pre-owned
cars, trucks and suvs
homes for sale,
commercial real estate
rentals
merchandise, garage
sales, auctions, tickets
dogs, cats, birds, fish
washingtonpost.com/jobs
cars.com
washingtonpost.com/
realestate
apartments.com
washingtonpost.com/
merchandise
washingtonpost.com/pets
For Jobs advertisements, go to
washingtonpost.com/recruit
or call 202-334-4100
(toll free 1-800-765-3675)
275
Appliances
Kirby Sentria Vacuum Cleaner/Shampooer—$249
Looks/Works Like
New-Cost $1800 . 571-606-0319
225
Collectibles
AURORA SLOT CARS Wanted—$100
& up, cars/sets. +Atlas, AFX, Tyco,
Cox, Revell. AMT. 703-960-3594
B&G, china, Mother's Day Plate—$15
Bing & Grondhal and Royal Copenhagen, McLean, VA, 703-356-7867
Cookie Jars/M&M Dispensers—$8.00
$8.00, DUMFRIES, VA, 703-5908262 Misc jars($8)/dispensers($4).
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!—1 I
drive to you, pay CASH, and haul
them away. Call 571-830-5871
SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH
FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS.
Call Al, 301-807-3266.
Will Come to you!
233
Computers
245
Electronics
Therapy Lamp—$29 NatureBright
Light and Ion Therapy Lamp $29,
Alexandria, VA, 571-431-1501
255
Heavy Equipment,
Machinery & Tools
TIRES TOYO VERSADO NEW—1 21570-HR15 QTY4 75.00 EACH 410740-5222 H RATED TRACTION A
265
Home & Garden
Nordic Track Exercise Skier—$195
Exc.Cond-Folds up easy to fit in
car. Cost $800 new. 571-606-0319
Non-commercial advertisers can now place ads 24/7
by calling 202-334-6200
815
Old Bottle of Bourbon—50 Seeking
full bottles of vintage bourbon and
rye. Alex 443-223-7669.
OLD HI-FI-ITEMS—1
COLLECTOR
PAYS MOST CASH PLEASE CALL
THANK YOU 410-740-5222 $$$$
Radio tubes—249 WANTED ham
radios huge speakers tube hifi amps2025279501, vcvdc@msn.com
We buy bitcoin!—1 20% above spot.
Text us today for more info.
(720) 744-2698
291
Sporting Goods
& Services
Graco car seat—$29 Generic infant
or Graco child car seat $44 (70
both) Alexandria, VA 571431-1501
Estate Sales
8000 MIDDLEWOOD PL, SPRINGFIELD,
VA – Springfield Stunner Estate Sale!
DIR: Ridge Rd, Ridge Creek Way,
Davis Field Ln, Middlewood Pl.
www.FOURSALES.com
Sat 9-3; Sun 9-1.
9207 VOLUNTEER DR, ALEXANDRIA,
VA - Fantastic Alexandria Estate Sale!
DIR: Mt Vernon Mem Hwy,
Cherrytree Dr, Volunteer Dr.
Need a Quality Sale? 703-256-8300
Arlington
Fri & Sat10am-4pm, Sun 1-4pm
WELLS ESTATE SALES
opens the door to a treasure trove
including lots of sterling, wind up
toys, furniture & china, westpointe
memorabilia plus more!
972 N. Quantico St
See website estatesales.net.
#930 Fri. 703-536-7816.
815
Legal Notices
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!—1 I
drive to you, pay CASH, and haul
them away. Call 571-830-5871
360
Scanner—$120.00 Xerox DocuMate
152, Color & B/W, seldom used,
Herndon, VA, 703-435-1586
Merchandise Wanted
830
Legal Notices
Take notice that the United States has filed a proposed Final Judgment
in a civil antitrust case in the United States District Court for the
Eastern District of Michigan, United States of America and State of
Michigan v. W.A. Foote Memorial Hospital d/b/a Allegiance Health,
Civil Action No. 15-12311 (JEL) (DRG). On June 25, 2015, the United
States and the State of Michigan filed a Complaint alleging that
Defendant W.A. Foote Memorial Hospital d/b/a Allegiance Health
(“Allegiance”) entered into an agreement with Hillsdale Community
Health Center that unlawfully allocated customers in violation of
Section 1 of the Sherman Act, 15 U.S.C. § 1, and Section 2 of
the Michigan Antitrust Reform Act, MCL 445.772. The proposed
Final Judgment, filed February 9, 2018, prohibits Allegiance from
agreeing with other healthcare providers to prohibit or limit marketing
or to divide any geographic market or territory. It also prohibits
Allegiance from communicating with competing healthcare systems
regarding its marketing plans, with limited exceptions, and requires
appointment of an antitrust compliance officer and other training
and monitoring. A Competitive Impact Statement filed by the United
States describes the Complaint, the proposed Final Judgment, the
industry, and the remedies available to private litigants who may have
been injured by the alleged violation.
877
Interested persons may address comments to Peter J. Mucchetti,
Chief, Healthcare & Consumer Products Section, Antitrust Division,
Department of Justice, 450 Fifth Street NW, Suite 4100, Washington,
DC 20530 (telephone: 202-307-0001) within 60 days of the date of this
notice. Such comments, including the name of the submitter, and
responses thereto, will be posted on the Antitrust Division’s website,
filed with the Court, and, under certain circumstances, published in
the Federal Register.
610
Found
Dogs for Sale
MONTGOMERY CO. ANIMAL SHELTER
If you have lost an animal in the
Washington Metro area: Please call
the Montgomery Co. Animal Shelter
at 240-773-5960 or online for found
animals at www.mchumane.org
610
Dogs for Sale
APBT—Friendly Blue Nose Puppies.
To right homes. Socialised, loving,
gentle. Mum is here, stud owned
by friend. $500. Both. 571-494-8982
BERNESE MTN DOG PUPS Ready now, dewormed
301-223-8702 or 301-366-5542
LABRADOR RETRIEVERS FOR SALE
PUREBRED $1800 AKC REGISTERED
BORN 1-9-2018. 917-627-4881
francinejweir@yahoo.com
Miniature Dachs—$1650.00, Male &
Female, 11 weeks old yrs old, 240454-4702
268
Medical Equipment
brass, jadite. Rosenthal, F&F, Gouda. raised indoors, parents on premises
Saarinen. Art pottery, sterl., jewelry,
540-222-9388, 540-222-9388
books, rugs, textiles, kimonos,
cloth’g. March 9-11, 10-4. 2804 Battery Pl. NW, prk on Univ. Terr.
Cocker Spaniel—AKC Champion
lines. $900, M/F, 7 weeks old,
703-586-5661. Parents on site.
ROCKVILLE, MD - 511 MANNAKEE ST.
Sat, Sun 10-6. Home Contents,
Quality Antiques Clocks, furniture, English Cream Golden Retrievers—
AKC. $1200, M& F, 6wks. Great pertoo much to list. CC accepted.
sonalities, beautiful coloring. Mom is
http://facebook.com/gotyourstuff
OFA hip & elbow cert. 804-839-3258
TEETER INVERSION TABLE—$225
Fully Assembled, rarely used, Tele- 408
phone:#301-424-5570
275
Merchandise Wanted
ALMA THOMAS Original Oil Painting,
1960-1970. Contact Sarah at
popshop4@aol.com or 310-270-3913
ELECTRONIC CLEANOUTS—1 RADIO
TUBES HI-FI AMPS PARTS MCINTOSH MOST CASH 410-740-5222
Freon R12 WANTED—Certified buyer
will pick up, pay CASH. Cylinders and
cans. 312-291-9169
GOVT SURPLUS TUBES—1
JOINT
ARMY NAVY JAN PREMIUM PAID
410-740-5222 50's 60's 70's
1370
Business /
Entrepreneurial
Opportunities
INVESTOR WANTED- experienced
DC / VA contractor looking for
investor/partner to flip houses.
GREAT returns! 202-528-4600
HandymanMastersLLC.com
1380
Partnerships Sought
DO YOU EVER NEED SHORT TERM
CASH ON A MOMENT'S NOTICE
for a deal that you cannot do
otherwise? How can we get in
on this with you? Please contact
info@oldegoodthings.com
Tickets, Sports
NATIONALS—Join season ticket
group. $69/tkt. 2 Club Level seats.
Sec. 220, Row C, 1&2. 703-864-2132
602
Found
FAIRFAX CO. ANIMAL SERVICES
ROTTW MIX M BLK/BR
FFX CO
POODL,MIN MIX F W
FFX CO
AM STAFF TER MIX M TN/W FFX CO
SHIZ TZU F GRAY/W
FFX CO
HOUND MIX M BUTTERS/CR FFX CO
DSH MIX M ORG/W
FFX CO
DSH MIX U GRAY/W
FFX CO
DSH MIX U W/BR
FFX CO
DSH MIX U GRAY/W
FFX CO
DSH MIX U BLK/W
FFX CO
FOR MORE INFO CALL (703) 830-1100
HOWARD CO. ANIMAL CONTROL
If you have lost an animal in the
Howard County/
Washington Metro area:
CALL 410-313-2780
ANTIQUES
&
AUCTIONS
French Bulldog- M, AKC reg, 8 mo, up
to date shots, dewormed, healthy,
blue brindle, pet only. $3000
Will be neutered. 410-336-1794
GERMAN SHEPHERD- AKC Pups,
excellent health and temperament,
gorgeous black and tan. $1800.
Ready 03/19. Call 410-294-6465
GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS - AKC, vet
checked, shots, wormed, black &
tan, family raised, great pets or service dogs $700 540-809-7041
GOLDEN RET AKC & GOLDEN /
LAB RET CROSS PUPS & ADULTS
8 weeks - 5 yrs. Vet checked, parents
on prem, health guar. 301-605-0543
W www.VictoriasPups.com W
LAB PUPS - Black & yellow, males
& females, champion line, 3 rounds
of worming, first 2 shots. AKC
registered, vet certified, family
raised. Ready 3/5. Call 443-952-0338
205
Antiques
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!—1 I
drive to you, pay CASH, and haul
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The D.C. Antique Photo,
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Sunday, Holiday Inn, 1900 N.
Ft.Myer Dr., Arlington:
8:30 AM-10 AM, $35
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Rosslyn Metro: 1 blk.
Info: AntiquePhotoShow.com
[antiquephotoshow.com
Canario—Import- Parents
Romanian Champs Pick Female
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Rottweiler—Puppies
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Rottweiler—German Import ADRK
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Quality Health/Hip Guarantee Serious Inquires 301-785-7897
Shih-Poo & more — Puppies on Sale.
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Finance, www.wvpuppy.com, 59
East Rd, Martinsburg WV, exit 16E
SIBERIAN HUSKY PUPPIESBlack&white, red&white, males &
females, AKC reg. 12 weeks old.
540-877-1567 timreissig@yahoo.com
Standard Poodle Puppies - Males &
females, AKC reg, black, red,
chocolate, taking deposits. Ready
May 5th Call 703-408-6027
LABRADOR RETRIEVER PUPPIES
AKC, Health guarantee,
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The Washington
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WEST HIGHLAND TERRIER PUPPIESAKC registered, M & F, white, S/W,
vet checked. 8 weeks. $900-$1000.
Call Ruby 540-645-1962
825
Bids & Proposals
Capitol Paving of D.C., Inc.
Capitol Paving is soliciting qualified
MBE/WBE subcontractors to perform DDOT - DC PLUG Feeder 308
– Undergrounding of Power Line,
DCKA-2018-B- 0025. email –
bids@capitolpaving.com ; call –
571.277.1022 or fax – 202.832.5126
– Bid Opening 3/19/2018
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N
Legal Notices
ZONING BOARD HEARING
ZB CASE NO. 1116M
April 11, 2018; 6:00 P.M.
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Elm Street Development (Petitioner)
Notice is hereby given that a public hearing as scheduled above will be held by
the Zoning Board of Howard County, at the George Howard Building, 3430
Courthouse Drive, Ellicott City, Maryland, on the petition of said Petitioner,
to rezone 34.97 acres from R-12 (Residential: Single), CAC-CLI (Corridor
Activity Center: Continuing Light Industrial Overlay), and B-1 (Business:
Local) to CEF-R (Community Enhancement Floating – Residential) for
a residential development with 127 townhomes and 281 apartments, on that land
belonging to James Edward Roberts, et al., located in the First Election District of
Howard County, containing about 34.9 acres, located at the south side of MD US 1,
approximately 500 feet southwest of Loudon Avenue, known as 6725, 6767, and
6785 Washington Boulevard (Tax Map 38, Grid 13, Parcels 279, 352 and 847), all
as shown on a plan filed in this case in the Division of Public Service and Zoning
Administration. A work session may follow the hearing if time permits.
A sign language interpreter is available for the above hearing upon request.
Call Citizen Services, at 313-6400, or TDD at 313-6401.
T:\pubserv\doc\ZB-LG.Ad.doc
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Spotsylvania County
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated August 29, 2005,
in the original principal amount
of $186,900.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Spotsylvania County, Virginia as
Instrument No. LR 200500036672
. The undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction in the front of the Circuit
Court building for Spotsylvania
County, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, Virginia on April 5,
2018 , at 4:00 PM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: LOT ONE HUNDRED SIX (106),
WINEWOOD SUBDIVISION, SECTION THREE, CHANCELLOR DISTRICT, SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY,
VIRGINIA, AS THE SAME APPEARS
DULY DEDICATED, PLATTED AND
RECORDED IN PLAT FILE 4, PAGES
253-255 AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS
OF
SPOTSYLVANIA
COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3250081.
March 3, 10, 2018
12168681
C
WHEATENS- 11wks, soft, no shed,
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merchandise@washpost.com
815
FREE UNDER $250
If the merchandise you’re selling is priced under $250, your 3-line, 3-day ad is FREE!
Go to washingtonpostads.com for complete details and to order your free ad.
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
11500 TIMBERWOOD ROAD,
LOCUST GROVE, VA 22508
Copies of the Complaint, proposed Final Judgment, and Competitive
Impact Statement are available for inspection on the Antitrust
Division’s website at http://www.justice.gov/atr and at the Office of
the Clerk of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of
Michigan.
602
Special Notices
In accordance with MD Code Health
General Sec. 4-403, this is a notice
of the death of Richard Blake, MD,
physician, who had medical practices at 1111 Spring St, Ste 300,
Silver Spring, MD 20910 and 4305
St Barnabus Rd, Temple Hills, MD
20748. Patients may email richardblakemd@gmail.com to arrange to
obtain copies of medical records
or have the records transferred.
Records will be destroyed 4/9/18.
Department of Justice
Antitrust Division
Solid
Hardwood
Brazilian
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Legal Notices - 202-334-7007
Auctions, Estate Sales, Furniture 202-334-7029
Biz Ops/Services - 202-334-5787
or call 202-334-6200
mypublicnotices.com/
washingtonpost/PublicNotice.asp
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Trustee Sales
202-334-5782
Cars
D10
AUTOMOTIVE H
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OPQRS
H Cars H Trucks, Vans & SUVs
BMW
FORD
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FORD 2015 FUSION SE LUXURY ENERGI FWD IMMACULATE ONLY $11,777
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black, loaded, 131K, VA inspection,
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7 PASS*VA INSPECTED ONLY $7,895
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like new, auto, all pwr, TSI, VA inspec.
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FORD 2015 FUSION SE FWD 1 OWNER
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CRFX*ONLY
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CHRYSLER
CHRYSLER 2008 300C BASE 4X4
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HYUNDAI
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LINCOLN
LINCOLN 2001 CONTINENTAL Like
new, loaded, leathr, 78k. MD insp.
$5700. Auto Plaza
301-340-1390
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MERCEDES-BENZ 2008 C300- Fully
loaded, runs exc., VA insp., CD/cass.,
clean
carfax,
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BMW 2006 750I CLN CRFX
IMMACULATE
ONLY
$6,998
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MGR
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ONLY
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MINI
MISTUBISHI 2017 MIRAGE ES FWD
1-OWNER CLN CRFX ONLY $8,895
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PRIUS 2014 V, loaded, 100% like new,
VA inspection, $6500 only. Call 703928-0131, 703-989-4641
1447
Commercial &
Specialized Vehicles
WHEEL CHAIR ACCESIBLE VANS
32 in stock. Starting at $7,000.
VA Dealer #12069.
1-800-420-6470
ASK FOR STEVE.
TOYOTA 2000 AVALON
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and transmission. Nice car.
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Autos Wanted
WANTED VINTAGE SPORTS CARS &
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TOYOTA 2006 PRIUS FWD MGR
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NISSAN
PORSCHE
TOYOTA 2009 YARIS 2dr hatch back,
auto , AC, MD insp, new tires $4,999
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VOLKSWAGEN 2012 GTI DSG FWD
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1480
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Trucks
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1490
Sports Utility Vehicles
1490
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FORD 2015 F-150 XL EXT CAB 8'BED
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JEEP 2011 GRAND CHEROKEE LIMITED
4X4 1-OWNER CLN CRFX $12,995
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NISSAN 2011 SENTRA 2.0SL FWD
VA
INSPECTED
ONLY
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HONDA 2003 ACCORD EX-L FWD 67K
MILES 1-OWNER CLN CRFX $7,495
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NISSAN 2012 LEAF SV FWD 1490
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FROM
"NO FOOD ALLOWED."
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"HOW OLD ARE THESE FRIES?"
C3748 6x10.5
You know us for shopping, and now Cars.com is the site for
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S0833-2 10x3
THE WASHINGTON POST . SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2018
WHERE WE LIVE: LONG BRANCH CREEK
HARNEY
BUYING NEW
Movies in this Arlington community’s parks are
popular attractions in the summer. 3
New rules for writing off
interest on HELOC loans. 13
Luxury 55+ community
in Ashburn. 4
4.46%
Mortgage rates rise. 16
Real Estate
BRIAN ADAMS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Living inside a Jimmy Buffett song
The singer is investing in the Latitude Margaritaville active-adult community in Daytona Beach. 14
2
EZ
New Homes and New Communities
MD
Chevy Chase Lake
3605 Chevy Chase Lake Drive
Chevy Chase, MD 20815
MD
6602 Eames Way
Bethesda, MD 20817
Montgomery Row
2,927 – 3,134 sq. ft.
Up to 5BR/4.5BA
From $1.375 Million
1,686 – 2,650 sq. ft.
Up to 5BR/4.5BA
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destinations. For a limited time,
enjoy special savings.
Visit our Model Homes Today
MHBR #7634
EYA.com/Post
MD
THE WASHINGTON POST
EYA.com/Post
22712 Cabin Branch Avenue
Clarksburg, MD 20871
Grosvenor Heights
301-945-7274
MD Cabin Branch Classic Series
4,554 sq. ft.
4BR/4.5BA
$749,900
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a private rooftop terrace in the
Oakley at Cabin Branch.
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This stunning stone-front
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Along with a finished lower-level
rec room and designer kitchen,
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WinchesterHomes.com
5315 Merriam Street
Bethesda, MD 20814
MD
301-273-7525
Michael Harris Homes
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SPACIOUS FLOORPLANS
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MHBR #3552
EYA.com/Post
301-683-5510
5345 Camberley Avenue
Bethesda, MD 20814
4000+ sq. ft.
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13915 Stilt Street
Clarksburg, MD 20871
2,400 sq. ft.
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301-273-7525
. SATURDAY,
MARCH 10, 2018
MD
MHBR #7472
301-658-2535
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301-978-3618
Where We Live
3
EZ
Long Branch Creek
A place
few know
is just fine
with that
A renter-heavy Arlington
neighborhood stays close while
evolving into an ‘urban village’
BY
H ARRIET E DLESON
Living there: Long Branch Creek is
D.C.
ST S
2ND Detail
Va.
Md.
Pentagon
Pentagon
City
Crystal
ARLINGTON CO.
City
RD
395
23RD ST S
Washington
National
Airport
LONG
BRANCH
CREEK
1
IN
G
ALEXANDRIA
ST
1/2 MILE
Source: Maps4News/Here
THE WASHINGTON POST
Transit buses serve the neighborhood, connecting to the Pentagon and Pentagon City
Metro stations on the Blue and Yellow
lines. There are two Capital Bikeshare
stations in the neighborhood as well as
quick access to Interstate 395.
realestate@washpost.com
Schools: Oakridge Elementary, Gunston
Middle, Wakefield High.
Transit: Metrobuses and Arlington
To see more photos of Long Branch Creek,
go to washingtonpost.com/realestate.
MARCH 10, 2018
Crime: According to the LexisNexis
Community Crime Map, in the past year
there were three aggravated assaults, three
burglaries and one robbery in the neighborhood.
. SATURDAY,
roughly bounded by 28th Street South and
24th Street South to the north, South
Arlington Ridge Road and South Lang
Street to the east, South Four Mile Run
Drive and South Glebe Road (Route 120) to
the south and 27th Road South and Army
Navy Drive to the west.
According to Tricia Hines, an agent with
American Realty Group, in the past year, 19
properties sold, ranging from a one-bedroom, one-bath condominium for
$285,000 to a three-bedroom, two-bath
duplex for $545,000.
There are six condominiums on the
market, ranging from a one-bedroom, onebath unit listing for $295,000 to a two-bedroom, two-bath unit listing for $399,000.
“There isn’t a lot of turnover,” she said.
OLD
THE WASHINGTON POST
Mix of ages: The duplexes date to the
late 1930s and 1940s. The apartments and
condominiums were built later and, in
some cases, replaced other original brick
duplexes. Affordable housing at the Berkeley is slated to undergo renovation.
The neighborhood of approximately
4,000 people is a mix in terms of age and
professions. Almost 40 percent of the residents are ages 25 to 34, yet there are
younger and older residents, including
empty-nesters and couples with children.
Rose and John Breyault moved to Long
Branch Creek in 2007 from a nearby neighborhood when they were expecting their
second child. “We wanted more space and
outdoor space,” said Rose, 41.
They enjoy the two neighborhood
schools. “It’s a huge plus to us,” she said.
Their daughters, now 10 and 13, can walk
with their friends to Oakridge Elementary
and Gunston Middle schools.
Rose either drives or rides an Arlington
Transit bus to the Metro to her paralegal
job in the Court House area. John, 40, rides
the ART bus and Metro to his work as a
consumer advocate in the District.
K
neighborhood has a low profile. But since
the Long Branch Creek Neighborhood Conservation Plan of February 2016 was drafted by the Long Branch Creek Civic Association, the area has gained attention from
Arlington County. “We’re super-aware that
people don’t know we’re here,” said Mark,
president of the association and previously
its treasurer for two years.
The Arlington County Board accepted
the Long Branch Creek Neighborhood Conservation Plan in June 2016. The neighborhood goal has been to become a “walkable
urban village.”
With its core of neighborhood retailers
and a shopping center that includes a Giant
Food store, a Starbucks, a veterinarian and
a Gold’s Gym, it is on its way. Signs
displaying the Long Branch Creek name
have been posted during the past six
months to increase awareness of the neighborhood. Activities within the community
have taken shape as well. For example,
“Movies in the Park” at Troy Park and a
community potluck dinner draw neighbors. “We get really good participation,”
Mark said. An animated movie for families
and children attracted “everyone else,” too.
“We try to stay connected,” he said.
Mark was drawn to the civic association
and became treasurer as soon as he and his
wife moved into the neighborhood. “Neighbors saw us and invited us to come to an
association meeting,” he said. His only
reservation is they don’t live closer to a
Metro station.
The Starbucks enjoy walking the Four
Mile Run Trail with their dog, Boomer, a
Cavalier King Charles spaniel, to a dog park
at the Village at Shirlington, a mile away.
They and other neighbors sometimes walk
there for festivals as well. Long Branch
Creek has three parks as well — Gunston
Park, Troy Park and Fraser Park.
BE
Movies in the park: Generally, the
JUSTIN T. GELLERSON FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Almost 75 percent of Long Branch Creek residents are renters. But the community also has condominiums, townhouses and
duplexes. Among the activities to foster a sense of community are “Movies in the Park” at Troy Park and a potluck dinner.
LE
SG
Mark and Amanda Starbuck found a
new life when they married and moved
from the Court House Metro area in Arlington, Va., where they rented, to the Long
Branch Creek neighborhood where they
bought their first home.
“In an apartment you go out into the city,
you go out and experience things. In Long
Branch Creek we’re building a home,” said
Mark, 32. “We know our neighbors. It just
feels 100 percent different.”
A mostly residential section of south
Arlington, Long Branch Creek is a diverse
community where almost 75 percent of
residents are renters. In addition, there are
condominium buildings, townhouses, duplexes and one single-family home.
Situated not far from the Pentagon and
Pentagon City, Long Branch Creek is adjacent to Four Mile Run and South Glebe
Road and South Four Mile Run Drive and
Interstate 395 as well as South Arlington
Ridge Road. Bicycling is popular. Many
residents bike to work as well as for
recreation.
As you walk along the interior streets of
Long Branch Creek on a Friday morning in
late February, the only sound is birds
chirping. “It’s quiet,” Mark said. There’s no
airplane noise here, as there was in their
previous neighborhood. “We just really
wanted to have homeownership, something we could improve,” he said. They also
wanted to stay close to the District.
Mark Starbuck drives to his job as a
manager with a technology company in
Tysons Corner, while Amanda, also 32,
bikes to work in Dupont Circle, where she
works as researcher with a nonprofit.
4
EZ
Buying New
Birchwood at Brambleton
Active-senior townhouses start at $600,990
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
MARCH 10, 2018
BY
D EBORAH K . D IETSCH
Downsizing empty-nesters Larry and
JoAnne Day quickly sold their five-bedroom house in Darnestown, Md., last year
and began renting a two-bedroom apartment in Rockville while deciding on their
next move.
“I kept seeing ads for 55-and-older
communities that caught my attention, but
we didn’t want to live in an old people’s
neighborhood,” said JoAnne Day, 62, a
retired teacher. “We want to be with active
people who like to travel and share our
interests.”
The Days decided to buy a four-bedroom
townhouse built by Van Metre Homes in
Birchwood at Brambleton, a 255-acre, 55plus development catering to aging baby
boomers in Loudoun County, Va.
“Life Refreshes at 55” is Birchwood’s
slogan and its residents will have use of a
20,000-square-foot clubhouse, starting in
spring 2019, to try new pursuits. They will
be able to attend cooking classes in a
demonstration kitchen, swim in indoor
and outdoor pools, and craft artistic creations, all while hanging out with other
seniors. Outdoor amenities include community gardens, a lake with a fishing pier,
and bicycle and walking trails.
“We like that it is not an isolated
neighborhood,” said retired IT systems
engineer Larry Day, 69. “It is close to the
Brambleton town center and our kids and
grandson.” The couple’s two grown daughters live in nearby South Riding and
Ashburn, and the Days’ two-level, nearly
3,000-square-foot home will have enough
space to accommodate the entire family
and guests.
Space for visiting grandkids: The Days
are buying Van Metre’s Grand Villa Hudson design for $630,000, with upgrades
such as a back deck overlooking the community’s lake. The four-bedroom, threebath layout is reflected in the builder’s
model home — the first to open at Birchwood.
In addition to the 79 attached villas, the
55-plus community will offer condominiums, courtyard dwellings and single-family detached houses constructed by
three builders on 1,502 total home sites.
“The villas are for folks who have an
active lifestyle, like to entertain, want a
place for their grandkids to run around,
and where stairs aren’t a problem,” Van
Metre sales manager Ernie Kyger said.
In these townhouses, the main part of
the home is set on an angle from the garage
at the front to ensure privacy from neighbors. Exterior materials combine brick
with fiber-cement board and vinyl siding.
Lots of light and 10-foot-high ceilings:
On the main level of the Hudson model,
one of two master suites is at the front
behind the garage. The Days plan to use it
as a guest room.
The rest of the ground level is a big open
space with the kitchen tucked to one side,
so the homeowner has the choice of where
to put the dining and living areas.
“The 10-foot ceilings in the great room
give it an expansive feeling,” Larry Day
said. “There is a tremendous amount of
BENJAMIN C. TANKERSLEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
The living area in the Hudson model home at Birchwood at Brambleton in Loudoun County, Va. “Life Refreshes at 55” is
Birchwood’s slogan. The Grand Villa townhouses, priced from $600,990 to $709,346, are being built next to a fishing lake.
light, both from the windows and internal
lighting fixtures.”
The model features many upgrades,
including painted wainscoting, wallpaper
and wide-plank, engineered wood flooring
in the living and dining areas.
Off the front hallway, a closet is tucked
under the staircase leading to the secondfloor bedrooms, but could become a powder room.
A generous landing at the top of the
stairs, dubbed the “retreat” by the builder,
can be used as a sitting area, a study or a TV
lounge. It divides the second-floor master
suite at the rear from two bedrooms and a
hall bathroom at the front. Ceilings on this
level extend to nine feet.
The Hudson is offered with alternative
layouts, including a second-floor master
suite at the front of the house and two
smaller bedrooms at the back. A laundry
room can be added next to the ground-level
master bedroom or second-floor hallway.
At the front of the house, an outdoor
GRAND VILLAS — BIRCHWOOD AT
BRAMBLETON
42803 Cumulus Terrace, Ashburn, Va.
In this 55-plus community, 79 Grand Villa
townhouses, ranging from $600,990 to
$709,346, are being built next to
Birchwood’s fishing lake. Seven residences
have been sold so far. The builder is also
selling condominiums in Birchwood from the
model sales office. Builder guidelines require
that there be at least one qualifying
occupant who is 55 or older, and no resident
younger than 18. Each buyer fills out an
affidavit with proof of age of everyone who
will be living in the residence.
Builder: Van Metre
Bedrooms/bathrooms: 3 to 4 / 3
Square footage: 2,642 to 2,971
Features: All houses have two-car garages
and exteriors clad in brick, Hardie-panels
and vinyl siding. Of the three designs offered,
the Hudson is the largest, with two master
suites, one on the main floor and another on
the second level. Engineered hardwood
floors in the main living area, granite
countertops in the kitchen and master baths,
GE stainless-steel kitchen appliances and
upgraded ceramic tile in all bathrooms are
among the standard features.
Homeowners association fee: $189 per
month, includes landscape maintenance,
trash and recycling removal, cable TV and
Internet services.
View model: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays,
11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays.
Contact: Grace Strother at 571-340-1150 or
gstrother@vanmetrehomes.com, or Ernie
Kyger at 703-928-8242 or
ekyger@vanmetre.homes.com.
terrace on the roof of the garage comes
standard, as shown in the model.
Two slightly smaller Grand Villa designs, the Cousteau and Cartier, offer three
bedrooms and three baths with the master
suite on the second level.
Prices for all three models range from
$600,990 to $709,346. None of the townhouses are ready for immediate occupancy,
but seven have sold, and several houses
will be ready for occupancy this summer,
according to the builder.
Shopping and amenities: Birchwood is
a short drive from Brambleton Town Center, which includes a Harris Teeter grocery
store, along with shops, restaurants and a
movie theater. A new public library in the
town center is under construction and
expected to open this summer. Birchwood
will have its own clubhouse, parks, and
walking and biking trails. Dulles Town
Center, Leesburg Premium Outlets and
Fair Oaks Mall are within short driving
distances.
Transit: Birchwood at Brambleton is
reached from the Loudoun County Parkway and is close to the Dulles Greenway
(Route 267). On weekdays, the Loudoun
County Transit Commuter Bus runs from
Brambleton to downtown Washington.
realestate@washpost.com
To see more photos of Grand Villas, go to
washingtonpost.com/realestate.
5
EZ
STEP INTO
THE SQUARE
Eisenhower Square blends the best of luxury living with the dynamic energy and walkability
of the urban landscape, just minutes from Old Town Alexandria’s historical charm.
CO M I N G S O O N !
67 sophisticated townhomes | Open floor plans | Rooftop retreats
Abundant green spaces | Walking distance to Metro, shopping, and dining
855-298-0316 | EisenhowerSquare.com/WPost
MARCH 10, 2018
Brokers welcome. Homes available nationwide. Prices subject to change without notice. This is not an offering where prohibited by law.
. SATURDAY,
Last Chance to become a VIP! Be the first to receive information,
invitations to VIP events, priority pre-sales, and more!
THE WASHINGTON POST
Discover a low-maintenance, high-experience lifestyle.
Luxury townhomes from the $900s
6
EZ
NEW HOME SITES NOW AVAILABLE!
Our final section of home sites is ready–
visit today and find the perfect one for you!
For Active Adults, 55+ | Low-maintenance, single-level living
Gated community in a historic setting | Resort-style amenities
Single-family homes in Fredericksburg from the upper $300s
Act Now for Best Home Site Selection! | 540-785-4663 | TollBrothers.com/Chancellorsville
Open Sun. & Mon., 1 pm–6 pm; Tues.–Sat., 11 am–6 pm. Brokers welcome. Homes available nationwide, Prices subject to change without notice. This is not an offering where prohibited by law.
Your Next Move is Now.
FABULOUS
FLOORPLANS
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
MARCH 10, 2018
ACTIVE ADULT
LIVING
LOW-MAINTENANCE LIVING IN 3 DESIRABLE LOCATIONS. MOVE-IN READY HOMES AVAILABLE!
COLONIAL HERITAGE
VIRGINIA HERITAGE
HERITAGE HIGHLANDS
WILLIAMSBURG, VA
FROM THE UPPER $200S
FREDERICKSBURG, VA
FROM THE MID $300S
LOVETTSVILLE, VA
FROM THE LOW $300S
Features, amenities, floor plans, elevations, square footage and designs vary per plan and are subject to changes or substitution without notice. Pursuant to the Fair Housing Act, this housing is intended for occupancy by at least one person 55 years of
age or older per home, although occupants of a Limited number of homes may be younger. Within this limited number, one member of the household must be 45 years or older with no one in permanent residence under 19 years of age. Price subject to
change without notice. Copyright©2018 Lennar Corporation. All rights reserved. Lennar, the Lennar logo, and Everything’s Included are registered service marks or service marks of Lennar Corporation and/or its subsidiaries. 3/18.
Contact us today for more details
888-795-2553
Lennar.com/Virginia
7
EZ
AN EYA NEIGHBORHOOD
Room for boomers, babies
and everyone in between.
THE EVERETT MODEL AT GROSVENOR HEIGHTS is designed to provide room for togetherness
and privacy in equal measure. This spacious floorplan includes a multi-generational suite that’s
perfect for relatives or guests. With a personal elevator and private rooftop terrace, and just
minutes from Bethesda shopping, dining, and Metro, it’s the ideal setting for modern living.
Join Us for Expert Space-Planning Tips: 2pm, Saturday, March 10
For details, visit
EYA.com/GH-event or call 301-281-6002
Model Home and Sales Center at 5315 Merriam Street, Bethesda, MD 20814
Sales by EYA Marketing LLC, agent for the Seller. | MHBR #7084
Prices subject to change without notice. Photos for illustrative purposes only.
THE WASHINGTON POST
New move-in-ready townhomes from $1.125 million
. SATURDAY,
MARCH 10, 2018
8
EZ
LIFE ON TOP
Rooftop Terraces
& Wooded Homesites
Preserve at Westfields
Luxury Townhomes
from just the upper $500s
3+ BR | 3+ BA
Chantilly, VA 20151
(703) 996-4217
WestfieldsChantilly.com
Brokers Warmly Welcomed. Must
register and comply with policy terms.
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
MARCH 10, 2018
WITHIN REACH
Spring Deliveries!
1/2 Mile from Metro &
Minutes from Downtown D.C.
Urban Multi-Level
Condominiums
from the upper $500s
Up to 3 BR & 2.5 BA
Washington, D.C. 20012
(202) 792-0057
GeorgiaRowDC.com
Brokers Warmly Welcomed. Must register
and comply with policy terms.
9
EZ
THIS IS WHAT YOU’VE
BEEN WAITING FOR
Discover our new Active Adult communities
THE
SIGNATURE
at BROADLANDS
Nestled within a wooded enclave in Broadlands,
The Signature offers modern condominiums
designed for an Active Adult lifestyle. Located
near shops, restaurants, and Dulles Airport,
residents will be able to enjoy elevator access,
community meeting rooms, a rooop terrace,
and all the amenities Broadlands has to offer.
ELEVATORTOWNHOMES&
SINGLE-FAMILYHOMES
GRANDVILLASFLATS&
ELEVATORTOWNHOMES
TWO&THREEBEDROOM
CONDOMINIUMFLATS
Pricing and availability subject to change without notice. All photos and renderings are used for illustrative purposes only and are subject to change without notice.
MARCH 10, 2018
Learn more about these communities at VanMetreHomes.com/ActiveAdult
Models open daily from am – pm
. SATURDAY,
Situated in the heart of Brambleton, this
neighborhood offers a blend of contemporary
and classically-designed townhomes with
incredible curb appeal, and just the right
balance of exclusive amenities and features.
Wide open living spaces are perfect for
entertaining friends or relaxing with family.
THE WASHINGTON POST
Moments from Old Town Alexandria, this new
Active Adult community features single-family
homes and elevator townhomes designed to
reflect a modern take on classic Tudor styling.
Walking trails, a fitness circuit, yoga spaces and
koi pond provide opportunities for fitness,
relaxation and a quiet retreat.
10
EZ
you don’t become irresistible
by resisting change.
Change is constant. From design to technology and material sciences to the environment, we are committed
and finishes and in every home we build. We welcome our clients to choose a home from our portfolio and
change it to meet their family's needs. Learn more at gulickgroup.com or call us for a private appointment.
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
MARCH 10, 2018
to create trends, not to follow them. For over 30 years we've been trendsetters in architecture, in features
Plan a visit to The Winthrop at 10331 Eclipse Lane in Great Falls to discover the possibilities from Gulick Group.
Inquiries: 703.674.0350 | gulickgroup.com | Brokers warmly welcomed.
11
EZ
The Perfect Designs for
AN ACTIVE
LIFESTYLE
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
MARCH 10, 2018
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
MARCH 10, 2018
12
EZ
13
Market Analysis
EZ
IRS says interest on home-equity loans is deductible in some cases
It’s official: Despite
widespread fears to the
contrary, the Internal
Revenue Service has
clarified that last year’s big
tax bill did not kill all
The
interest deductions on
Nation's
home equity lines of credit
Housing
(HELOCs) and equity
loans.
KENNETH R.
In a policy statement,
HARNEY
the IRS said that it has
received “many questions
. . . from taxpayers and tax professionals”
about HELOCs and equity loans in the
wake of the Tax Cut and Jobs Act of 2017,
which passed in December. That
legislation eliminated a section of the
federal tax code authorizing interest
write-offs on “home equity indebtedness”
from 2018 through 2025. But as noted in
this column in January, the law did not
curtail deductions on all HELOC and
equity-loan interest payments. It depends
on how you use the money you borrow.
Taxpayers can “often still deduct
interest on a home-equity loan, home
equity line of credit or second mortgage,
regardless of how the loan is labeled,”
said the IRS, provided the borrowed
funds are used to “buy, build or
substantially improve the taxpayer’s
home that secures the loan” and the total
debt on the house does not exceed
statutory limits. The amount of the first
mortgage on the property, combined with
the home equity or HELOC debt, cannot
exceed $750,000, the newly revised limit
for mortgage interest deductions by
taxpayers filing joint returns; married
owners filing separately have a new
ceiling of $375,000. Previously, the limits
were $1 million and $500,000.
So what does all this mean in practical
terms? Here’s a quick example. Say you
and your spouse own a $500,000 house
and have a $250,000 first mortgage with
an interest rate in the mid-3 percent
range. You want to put on a family room
addition estimated to cost $100,000 and
do bathroom upgrades estimated to run
$50,000. However, you’d prefer not to
give up your super-low interest rate by
refinancing into a new, larger first
mortgage. Another option, now fully
sanctioned by the IRS: Take out a
$150,000 HELOC that will permit you to
draw down periodic amounts to pay
contractors as they complete scheduled
construction bench marks, leaving your
first mortgage intact.
Because 100 percent of your HELOC
dollars are to be used to substantially
improve your home — and because the
2006, just before the market came
tumbling down.
Some good news: You don’t have to
spend 100 percent of your HELOC cash
on home improvements, according to
Greg A. Rosica, a tax partner with Ernst
& Young, the national accounting firm.
You can buy or do other things with the
money; you just can’t deduct the interest
you pay on them.
Quick example: Say you own a
$500,000 house with a $300,000 first
mortgage. You borrow $100,000 via a
HELOC this year. You spend $80,000 on
a new roof and master bath. You spend
the other $20,000 to pay off student
loans. Under IRS allocation rules, you
can write off interest on the $80,000 you
spend on home improvements — fourfifths of the total. But interest payments
on the student loans are not deductible.
Bottom line: Americans’ home equity
just hit a record $14.1 trillion, according
to the Federal Reserve. So there’s plenty
of cushion that could be tapped for
responsible purposes, whether
homeowners choose to deduct the
interest or not.
Ken Harney’s email address is
harneycolumn@gmail.com.
1,200
COMMUNIT Y
LISTINGS
SHOPPING FOR A
NEW HOME?
Don’t make the biggest
purchase of your life without
seeing all the choices.
combined debt load of $400,000
($250,000 plus $150,000) is well below
the statutory limit and doesn’t exceed the
value of your home — you should be able
to write off all the interest on your
HELOC.
In its policy statement, the IRS offered
examples of what you cannot do with
your HELOC or home-equity loan cash if
you want to write off the interest.
At the top: paying off credit-card bills
and other personal debts. This is
potentially a big deal for some owners
because, in past years, debt consolidation
— rolling credit-card balances and other
high-interest-rate personal expenses
together into a single, lower-cost loan —
was an important financial strategy for
many families. You can still do debt
consolidations with equity loans — you
just can’t write off the interest.
Another major use that is now cut off
from interest deductions when using
home-equity dollars: paying off student
loans.
Although the IRS didn’t specify them,
other once-popular uses for equity cash
that no longer will qualify for write-offs
are auto purchases, vacation travel
expenses and buying home furnishings.
All these were commonplace during the
home-equity borrowing binge of 2004 to
20 AREA
LOCATOR
MAPS
PL ANNED AND
ACTIVE ADULT
COMMUNITIES
only complete directory to every new
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planned community and active adult
community in the Mid-Atlantic Region.
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MARCH 10, 2018
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. SATURDAY,
INFORMATIVE
ADS FROM TOP
BUILDERS
THE WASHINGTON POST
New Homes Guide magazine is the
14
EZ
Cover Story
BRIAN ADAMS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Sunset behind the Aruba model home at the new Latitude Margaritaville Daytona Beach. Jimmy Buffett fans will be able to live on Flip Flop Court, Coral Reef Way or St.
Somewhere Drive and take their dogs to the Barkaritaville pet spa. Buffet himself is not as laid-back as his image suggests: His many ventures even include a Broadway show.
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
MARCH 10, 2018
A paradise for Parrotheads
Jimmy Buffett is investing in an active-adult community in Daytona Beach, Fla., for those 55 and older
BY M ICHELE L ERNER
IN DAYTONA BEACH, FLA.
For Don and Susan Veatch, Margaritaville is
more than just a state of mind.
Acting like “Parrotheads” — the chilled-out,
Hawaiian-shirt-wearing fan nation equivalent
to Deadheads — the couple, 62 and 60, respectively, had camped out so they could be first in
line for the object of their devotion, singersongwriter Jimmy Buffett.
But they weren’t queuing up for concert
tickets or his latest CD. They were waiting for
sales to open at the Buffett-branded Latitude
Margaritaville development here for people 55
and older.
“It was like a big party, with a band playing
and free pizza for everyone in line,” Susan
Veatch said.
In this pastel paradise, Key West-inspired
houses are being built along streets linked to
lyrics of Buffett’s 1977 hit “Margaritaville.”
Once it opens, you can live on Flip Flop
Court, Coral Reef Way or St. Somewhere Drive.
You can take your dog to the Barkaritaville pet
spa; work out in the Fins Up! Fitness Center or
the Paradise Pool; take classes or do a little
work at the Workin’ and Playin’ Center; see
shows at the Last Mango Theater; or dance at a
nightly outdoor concert at the band shell in the
Latitude Town Square.
And, yes, you can get a Cheeseburger in
Paradise at the Latitude Bar & Chill restaurant
and a margarita at the poolside Changes in
Attitude bar.
Although Latitude Margaritaville sounds
100 percent laid back, Buffett himself is clearly
driven. In addition to his empire of resort
hotels and array of products to sell, Buffett’s
first Broadway musical is opening, along with
two of a possible chain of active-adult communities this year. And, oh yes, the 71-year-old
musician is going on tour with his band.
“To quote a line from a song I wrote with
15
EZ
BRIAN ADAMS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
A bedroom in the Coconut model home at Jimmy Buffett’s Latitude Margaritaville near Daytona Beach. BELOW: A children’s bedroom in the
Aruba model home. Buffett built his business on live performances, and the development will offer live music five to seven nights a week.
BUFFET CONTINUED ON T16
MARCH 10, 2018
the band. The band agreed. Be
careful what you wish for, ha-ha.”
Now, Buffett’s bigger than a
bandleader.
Margaritavillebranded items range from rafts
and blenders to Margaritaville resorts, vacation clubs and vacation
rentals, said John Cohlan, chief
executive of Margaritaville and
Buffett’s longtime business partner.
“The best business experience
that put my attempt at being a
performer into perspective was
when I got a job as a reporter for
Billboard Magazine in Nashville,
when I couldn’t get a job singing
in local bars,” Buffett said. “Hard
. SATURDAY,
Buffett’s business chops
You might think that with a
business that brings in $1.5 billion
annually, Buffett would have an
MBA. But his MBA was earned
organically throughout his career
as a musician.
When asked whether he expected to become a business mo-
gul back in his early days as a
musician, Buffett says, “Absolutely not! I just wanted to run the
band. I did not want to be a part of
a band. Looking back now, that
was probably the best business
decision I have ever made. It was
simple to do at the time, because I
had a part-time job and credit at
the music store. When it came
time to get serious about being a
band, we had to have a PA system.
Everybody had their own amps
and guitars, but a PA system was a
big investment. I was able to buy a
PA system on credit at the music
store in New Orleans, and I figured, that made me the leader of
to believe, but at that time there
were not a lot of live gig opportunities in Music City. It was surely a
blessing in disguise, as my boss,
Bill Williams, the Nashville editor
for Billboard, taught me what the
road to success and achieving success really meant. Let’s just say
that talent was considered a disposable commodity by most record labels then, and I don’t really
think much has changed these
days. What it made apparent was
that live performing, which I had
started doing when I was in college, was a better option than
waiting for a check from the record company.”
Buffett built his business on the
foundation of live performance.
That’s just one element of Latitude Margaritaville that makes it
unusual for an active-adult community: Live music shows will be
scheduled five to seven nights a
week.
“It was important to me to be in
charge of my own destiny, not give
it away, like a lot of people do,”
Buffett said. “A lot of artists just
want to be artists. From that time
in Nashville and years on the road
traveling and playing, I feel there
is no such thing. That was when I
steered my ship in the direction
being a live performer. At that
point, it is a combination of hard
work, talent and a lot of luck that
THE WASHINGTON POST
Mac MacAnally, ‘These days I am
up about the time I used to go to
bed,’” Buffett said in an email.
“Well, that could be a little exaggerated, but that is what writers
do. I have always been an early
riser, and even more so these days.
“A usual daily routine for me is
rising around 6 a.m.,” he adds. “I
find it the best time to work, be it
creative projects or business projects; but it’s one or the other. It’s
too distracting to try and skip
around. I’ll finish up around 9
a.m. and then get some kind of
exercise, preferably outside. It all
depends on the weather. Before
whatever I do, be it paddling,
surfing, swimming, biking or
playing tennis, stretching is absolutely a requirement at my age.
That gets me to lunch and a nap.
After napping seems to be a good
time for me to catch up on calls
and emails.”
That lifestyle is just what Latitudes buyers hope to replicate —
at least the outdoor activity and
the napping.
16
EZ
Latitude Margaritaville will have about 7,000 homes
BUFFET FROM T15
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
MARCH 10, 2018
you will need to succeed at anything.”
The Margaritaville brand,
while based on fun and frivolity, is
serious business.
“As things started getting bigger, it became apparent that I
could not deal with the increased
workload alone,” Buffett said. “I
think that is when I learned to
delegate authority, like any good
ship captain has to do. I come
from a line of sailors and captains,
and it kind of came naturally. I
had a lot of help from my wife,
smart friends, early business partners, and learning from mistakes
I had made along the way. When it
became obvious that we had
somehow created a brand, those
early lessons still applied to today.”
Leaping into Latitude
The decision to expand the
Margaritaville brand into activeadult communities seems like a
natural fit, particularly because
Buffett’s fans tend to be aging
baby boomers who have followed
his career for decades.
“Latitude
Margaritaville
seemed like such an obvious idea
to us,” Cohlan said. “What better
place to enjoy the ‘back nine’ of
life than Margaritaville. We think
of Latitude Margaritaville a bit
like going back to summer camp
— where old friends, new friends,
family, numerous activities, stateof-the-art amenities, quality food
and beverages, and great music
come together. Simply put, it’s
fun.”
More than 100,000 people have
already expressed an interest in
buying a home at Latitude Margaritaville, asking for updates on the
development or requesting information, Cohlan said.
“We asked them a lot of questions about a broad range of preferences, and they indicated they
preferred a place with a focus on
RE AL ESTATE
Real Estate Editor:
V. Dion Haynes,
dion.haynes@washpost.com
Art Director:
Dwuan June
Advertising Manager:
Howard J.S. Bomstein,
howard.bomstein@washpost.com
To contact us:
realestate@washpost.com
Mail:
The Washington Post, Real Estate
Section
1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C.
20071
LATITUDE MARGARITAVILLE
Jimmy Buffett is among the developers behind the new Latitude
Margaritaville active-adult community in Daytona Beach, Fla.
‘55 and better,’ ” Cohlan said.
More than 225 of the homes at
the Daytona Beach community
sold within two months after sales
began and before models were
open. When completed a decade
from now, the community will
have about 7,000 homes.
“We expect many of the buyers
to be Parrotheads, but we’ve seen
that all buyers share a passion for
the Margaritaville lifestyle of fun
and relaxation,” Cohlan said.
Although they don’t consider
themselves rabid fans, the Veatches enjoy Buffett’s music. The couple live nearby in Ormond Beach.
About half of the buyers at Latitude Margaritaville so far plan to
live there full time; the other half
will use their residence as a vacation home until they are ready to
retire there, said Sy Wolf, a newhome sales professional at Latitude Margaritaville.
The Margaritaville Corp.'s development partner for Latitude
Margaritaville is Minto Communities USA, a Florida-based developer in business for 40 years. The
developer’s first foray outside of
Florida is the Latitude Margari-
taville Hilton Head, where a sales
office recently opened.
“We were looking to downsize
from a bigger house and when we
saw a sign for Latitude Margaritaville we checked out other
homes built by Minto Communities,” Susan Veatch said. “We love
the quality of the houses, but even
more important, we like it that all
the amenities will be included in
our homeowner’s dues. They’ll
even take care of our yard.”
Homeowners will be able to use
golf carts to get around the community, another feature Veatch
appreciates, along with the partnership with Halifax Health,
which will have an on-site professional for health checkups and
health education.
Living at Latitude
Margaritaville
Despite the “life’s a beach” atmosphere at Latitude Margaritaville, the community is about 10
miles from Daytona Beach. The
community will have shuttle bus
service for residents and their
guests to a private beach club that
will have a swimming pool, beach
umbrellas and chairs, cabanas,
shaded areas where residents can
picnic, and restrooms. The beach
itself is open to the public, but
access to the club is private.
Latitude Margaritaville is just
off Interstates 95 and 4 for easy
access to Orlando and St. Augustine. In addition, the community
is three miles from two hospitals
and a VA outpatient center.
On-site amenities at Latitude
Margaritaville will include a fitness center with an indoor lap
pool and whirlpool spa; a community center with a workshop, pet
spa, business center, meeting
rooms and arts-and-crafts rooms;
a pool with cabanas, lawn games
and Tiki huts; a restaurant with
indoor and outdoor dining; a
theater with a stage and banquet
hall; plus the town square with its
band shell. The first phase of the
town square is expected to open
by the end of this year. The development will also have walking
trails and pickleball, bocce ball
and tennis courts.
Monthly homeowner association fees range from $194 to $223
in 2018. They will rise when the
community is complete to between $260 and $289. The fees
include access to all amenities as
well as yard maintenance for all
homes.
The community doesn’t have a
golf course, but the LPGA International Golf Course is across the
street from the development, and
18 other courses are nearby.
“We found that less than 20
percent of the people interested in
living here are golfers,” Wolf said.
Eventually, the community will
also have a retail site with a grocery store, shops and another restaurant.
Buyers can choose between 15
floor plans, including the Caribbean collection villas, priced from
$235,990 to $267,490, which have
1,503 to 1,862 finished square feet.
These homes have two bedrooms,
two bathrooms, a den or hobby
room or both and a two-car garage.
For example, the Barbuda villa,
priced
from
$257,990
to
$265,990, includes a great room, a
dining area, an open kitchen and
a covered lanai off the great room.
This model also has a master suite
with a walk-in closet and a bathroom with a double-sink vanity
and a large shower, a den, a second bedroom, a second full bathroom and a laundry room.
The Beach collection single-family houses, priced from
$277,990 to $306,990, have 1,684
to 2,110 finished square feet.
These homes each have two or
three bedrooms, three bathrooms, a den and a two-car ga-
rage.
For example, the Coconut model, priced from $277,990 to
$286,990, has a center-island
kitchen open to the bay-windowed breakfast room and the
great room, which has access to a
covered lanai. This home has a
master suite with two walk-in
closets, a second bedroom, a den
and two full bathrooms.
The Island collection homes,
priced from $331,990
to
$358,990, have 2,310 to 2,564
square feet. These homes have
two or three bedrooms, three or
four bathrooms, a den and a
three-car garage.
For example, the Aruba model,
priced from $333,990 to
$342,990, includes a central great
room, an open center-island
kitchen, a dining area, a covered
lanai, a laundry room and a powder room. This model has a master suite with a bay window and
two walk-in closets, a second bedroom, a den and two full bathrooms.
Buyers can choose from eight
color schemes, including pastels
and tropical colors. Standard features include nine-foot-high ceilings, laminate counters, recessed
lighting, ceramic tile flooring in
the bathrooms, kitchen and hallway, and carpet in the bedrooms
and den.
Active-adult communities are
known for keeping residents busy,
but the music and dancing at Latitude Margaritaville is expected to
keep everyone pretty happy, too.
“Jimmy shares the excitement
of our future residents,” Cohlan
said, “so you never know when he
may pop in to say hello and play a
song or two.”
realestate@washpost.com
To see more photos of Margaritaville, go to washingtonpost.com/
realestate.
Weekly averages for popular
mortgage types
5%
4.46
3.94
4
3.63
3
2
30-YEAR FIXED
15-YEAR FIXED
1
5-YEAR ARM
0
’16
Source: Freddie Mac
THE WASHINGTON POST
’17
’18
17
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The
Good Life
Awaits
LOW-MAINTENANCE LIVING | FANTASTIC AMENITIES | FIRST-FLOOR MASTER BEDROOMS
LO U D O U N CO U N T Y
S P OTSY LVA N I A CO U N T Y
Regency at Chancellorsville | For Active Adults, 55+
Single-family homes from the upper $300s
P R I N C E W I L L I A M CO U N T Y
Dominion Valley Country Club – The Villas
Single-family homes from the low $600s
Let us help you find the perfect community. Call 855-298-0316 or visit TollBrothers.com/Active.
Open Sun. & Mon., 1 pm–6 pm; Tues.–Sat., 11 am–6 pm. Brokers welcome. Homes available nationwide. Prices subject to change without notice. This is not an offering where prohibited by law.
MARCH 10, 2018
ASK ABOUT HOMES AVAILABLE FOR QUICK DELIVERY!
. SATURDAY,
Regency at Creekside | For Active Adults, 55+
Two luxury single-family home collections
from the mid-$500s
THE WASHINGTON POST
Regency at Ashburn | For Active Adults, 55+
The Greenbrier - Luxury single-level condominiums
from the mid-$300s
18
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
MARCH 10, 2018
EZ
What’s the most attractive reason to choose Asbury Methodist Village?
Maybe it’s the opportunity to continue to satisfy your natural curiosities.
Asbury residents seem to have an insatiable thirst to learn. From our
exclusive relationship with Strathmore to our resident-run Keese School.
So, come on, learn more about living at Asbury.
©2018 Asbury Methodist Village. 201 Russell Avenue, Gaithersburg, MD
19
EZ
MODEL HOME
RE-GRAND OPENING!
LIVE HAPPIER.
Real Trilogy Member Pat P. can’t believe she’s become a fitness fanatic.
®
At Trilogy® communities, we believe that where you live can
make you happier. So we design authentic communities
where connecting with others and sharing new experiences
CALL 855.321.9528
help transform ordinary days into extraordinary lives.
RE-GRAND OPENING
OF MODEL HOME!
Sales and Construction: Shea Homes Limited Partnership (#2705152813). Homes at Trilogy at Lake Frederick are intended for occupancy by at least one person 55 years or older, with certain exceptions for younger persons as provided by law and the governing covenants,
conditions and restrictions. This is not an offer of real estate for sale, or a solicitation of an offer to buy, to residents of any state or province in which registration and other legal requirements have not been fulfilled. Trademarks are property of their respective owners. Incentives
vary and may be in the form of price reductions, credits toward the purchase of options, or credits towards closing costs. Receiving the maximum incentive may be tied to the use of Shea Mortgage Inc., an independent member of the J.F. Shea family of companies. Buyers of
Shea Homes are not required to use Shea Mortgage as their lender. Buyers may select any lending institution for the purpose of securing mortgage financing and are not limited to Shea Mortgage. State Corporation Commission Bureau of Financial Institutions License Number
MC-5849. Equal Housing Opportunity. Models are not an indication of racial preference.
MARCH 10, 2018
90 minutes from D.C. | TrilogyLife.com/LakeFrederick | NOW FROM THE LOW $300s!
. SATURDAY,
55+ TRILOGY® AT LAKE FREDERICK
THE WASHINGTON POST
MARCH 17TH -
20
EZ
Great locations.
Award-winning home designs.
Spectacular community amenities.
Luxury single-family homes,
attached homes, and condominiums
from the upper $200 to over $1 million.
855-298-0316
TollBrothers.com/Post
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
MARCH 10, 2018
An Address to Impress
Open Sun. and Mon. 1 pm–6 pm; Tues. – Sat. 11 am–6 pm.
Brokers welcome. Homes available nationwide. Prices subject
to change without notice. Photos are images
only and should not be relied upon to confirm
applicable features. MHBR# 678
Town Square
21
EZ
Real Estate News & Notes
$1,690 to $3,485 per month.
For information, call 703349-7746 or visit
liveaperture.com.
Luxury apartments
at Reston station
evoke suburban
urbanization
Aperture Apartments, a 421unit, six-story residence across
from the Wiehle-Reston East
Metro station in Reston, blur
the line between city and
suburban living, while making
space for art, nature and
technology.
Co-developed by the Bozzuto
Group and Veatch Commercial
Real Estate, and designed by
RAY CAVICCHIO
KTGY Architecture +
Planning, the apartment
The 421-unit, six-story Aperture Apartments, across from the
Wiehle-Reston East Metro station, include a lobby art installation.
building at 11410 Reston Station
Blvd. was designed with an
entry plaza to showcase an art
installation. Reston-born
Zachary Oxman’s bronze and
stainless-steel sculpture was
selected for the spot.
Indoors, the building
includes long stretches of wall
space to display contemporary
nature photography.
Aperture residents live
adjacent to the Metro station
and to the Washington & Old
Dominion Bike Trail, and less
than two miles from Reston
Town Center. Plans around
Reston station include office
buildings, restaurants, shops,
more residences and a hotel.
The lobby includes a lounge
and conference room that
function as co-working spaces,
and a library with floor-toceiling bookshelves and a twosided fireplace. The second
floor includes three courtyards:
One has a saltwater swimming
pool and grilling stations; the
second has an outdoor TV and a
fire pit; and the third is a
community dog run. The
courtyards are connected to
another lounge with a kitchen
and an outdoor yoga deck that
is part of the fitness center.
The apartments, which
include studio, one- and twobedroom units, some with a
den, range from 521 to 1,380
square feet. Some of the
apartments include balconies.
The apartments have quartz
counters, gas ranges, stainlesssteel appliances and subway tile
backsplashes. Rents range from
New D.C. condo is close to
H Street nightlife, shops
The new Linden condo
building at 1405 Staples St. NE
includes Unit No. 2, a 795square-foot residence priced at
$349,900. When looking at
condos, it’s essential to include
the monthly fee in your budget
calculation. Here, the condo fee
is $172 per month. That doesn’t
include parking.
The condo has two master
bedroom suites, one at the front
of the unit and one at the back,
with the kitchen and living
spaces in between. The unit has
hardwood flooring, recessed
lighting, a full-size washer and
dryer, stainless-steel
appliances, a gas stove, a
marble kitchen counter and
ceramic-tile flooring in the
bathrooms.
Residents can walk to the H
Street corridor’s restaurants,
shops, theater and nightlife.
Assigned schools include
Wheatley Education Campus
and Dunbar High, both rated
below-average by
GreatSchools.org.
For more photos, visit http://
bit.ly/2BxIJbR.
For information, contact real
estate agent Dana Cannon with
McEnearney Associates at 202427-3763.
— Michele Lerner
To pass on a tip or item, contact us
at realestate@washpost.com and put
“Town Square” in the subject line.
DON’T MISS OUT
on the Best Value
at Crown, from the
Low $300s
• Urban loft-inspired
architecture
NEW CONDOMINIUM HOMES FROM THE LOW $300s
Sales Gallery: 470 Copley Place, Gaithersburg, MD | Open Daily, 11am–5pm
CopleyAtCrownWP.com | 301.519.3885
Subject to errors, omissions and change without notice. See a Sales Manager for details.
• Highly appointed
courtyards with
landscaped gardens
MARCH 10, 2018
• Abundant features
and sophisticated
finishes
. SATURDAY,
• Spacious flats
and soaring,
two-story lofts
THE WASHINGTON POST
• Located in the heart
of Downtown Crown,
surrounded by top
restaurants and
specialty shops
22
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SONDERWORKS
Woodside Park in Montgomery County, Md., was known for the
quality of its architecture. This house is listed at $969,000.
Brick Colonial built in 1936
was ‘suburban ideal’ of its day
1301 COASTAL HIGHWAY | DEWEY BEACH, DE 19971
302-212-0002 | THERESIDENCESDE.COM
BY
1-800-753-POST
You, too, could have home delivery.
SF
adventure
Like many homes in Woodside
Park, this 1936 brick Colonial was
designed by a prominent local
architect.
“Exceptional architecture was
a hallmark of the development of
Woodside Park,” Robert E. Oshel
wrote in “The Montgomery Coun-
ty Story,” a quarterly publication
by the county’s historical society.
Woodside Park was formed after the heirs of Washington Evening Star owner Crosby S. Noyes
sold his 184-acre Alton Farm to
the Woodside Development
group in 1922.
When the historic preservation
planning staff of the Maryland-
WILL YOU CHOOSE?
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
MARCH 10, 2018
WHICH
K ATHY O RTON
5 5 + ACT I V E A D U LT
A L L AG E S
Private neighborhoods exclusively for
Active Adults starting from the upper $300s
Single family homes for All Ages
starting from the upper $500s
CLASSIC GROUP | RYAN HOMES
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LOVETWORIVERS.COM
1425 Two Rivers Blvd, Odenton, MD 21113
410.220.6810
23
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National Capital Park and Planning Commission recommended
that Woodside Park be designated
a historic district in 1989, they
wrote the neighborhood’s “basic
design and development is probably the purest manifestation of
the ‘20s/’30s suburban ideal to
have been built in Montgomery
County.”
Back in the 1920s, the challenge facing the developers was
persuading potential home buyers to move to what was then a far
suburb of Washington.
“They did this by promoting
Woodside Park as a unique environment for construction of welldesigned, attractive homes, and
by emphasizing both residential
architecture and landscape architecture in marketing the neighborhood,” Oshel wrote.
Jules Henri de Sibour who designed the McCormick Apartments (now the American Enterprise Institute’s offices on Massachusetts Avenue) was one of the
architects to design homes in
Woodside Park. Gilbert LaCoste
Rodier, one of the principal architects of the Longworth House
Office Building, was another. The
well-regarded architectural firm
Rodier & Kundzen also designed
homes in Woodside Park.
This Colonial was designed by
Leon Chatelain Jr., a past national
president of the American Insti-
1529 DALE DR., SILVER
SPRING, MD.
$969,000
Features: The 1936 Colonial was
designed by Leon Chatelain Jr., a
past national president of the
American Institute of Architects.
The four-level home has two woodburning fireplaces and oak
hardwood floors. The back yard
includes a pond. The detached twocar garage has a second level for
additional storage.
Bedrooms/bathrooms: 4/5
Approximate square footage:
3,759
Lot size: 0.56 acre
Open houses: Saturday and
Sunday, 1 to 4 p.m.
Agent: Melinda Schnare, Real
Living at Home
For more photos of this home
and other houses for sale in the
area, go to washingtonpost.com/
wherewelive.
tute of Architects. Despite never
completing his degree at George
Washington University’s architecture school, Chatelain began
his career in Washington in 1930
and continued it for more than 45
years. He designed the Westmoreland Congregational Church, the
Kiplinger Building, the headquarters of Washington Gas
Light, the National Broadcasting
building and the Capitol Hill
Club.
The house, which was featured
in the Evening Star’s real estate
section in May 1936, was built for
John W. and Josephine Lyles by
Moss Realty. George J. Moss, president of Moss Realty, was also the
developer of Woodmoor.
The Lyles loved to entertain.
They had New Year’s Eve parties
and a wedding reception for their
niece at the home. They also had
bridge parties. Oshel described
the get-togethers in his book,
“Home Sites of Distinction: The
History of Woodside Park.”
“Bridge was a popular activity
in Woodside Park. Among the
members of one such group were
. . . Josephine Lyles of 1529 Dale
Drive. Because their life was
largely domestic and there were
not many occasions when an evening dress could be worn, particularly during the 1940s, the women sometimes wore formal dress
to a bridge party.”
The current occupants, only
the second owners of the home,
have lived there 22 years and have
striven to maintain the home’s
integrity and original character.
The four-bedroom, five-bathroom, 3,759-square-foot house on
an 0.56-acre lot is listed at
SONDERWORKS
The sun room overlooks the back yard. The four-bedroom, fivebathroom, 3,759-square-foot house has had only two owners.
$969,000. Open houses are
scheduled for Saturday and Sun-
day from 1 to 4 p.m.
kathy.orton@washpost.com
AT LAKE MANASSAS
AWARD-WINNING
3,000 SQ. FT. TOWNHOMES
THE WASHINGTON POST
4 Bedrooms & 4.5 Bathrooms Including
Rear Veranda, Private Garden with Patio and
2-car Garage in the Gated Community of
Lake Manassas.
The Veranda Collection from $517,900
Elevators Available per Site Conditions
Immediate Availability
. SATURDAY,
8024 Turtle Creek Circle, Gainesville, Virginia 20155
Model Open Fri. - Tues., 11am - 5pm
703.727.4603
Prices subject to change without notice. For more details, see Sales Manager.
MARCH 10, 2018
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Experience the good life...
The Residences at Thomas
Circle is more than a great place
to live. It’s a neighborhood
within a neighborhood. Host to
enriching programs and
performances, gold-standard
service and a refined culture in
a welcoming atmosphere.It’s
where friendships are made
and experiences are shared.
It’s home.
PLEASE CALL 202-499-6597 FOR A PERSONAL TOUR TODAY!
BAYWOODS OF ANNAPOLIS
INTRODUCES OUR CURRENT LISTINGS
Apt#322 Magothy model, North Side
Waterfront views throughout. Beautiful
2 Br w/ den and screened in balcony.
Priced for immediate sale
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
MARCH 10, 2018
Apt#225 Magothy model, South Side
Direct waterfront views, @Br w/ den area,
hardwoods throughout, four seasons
windows on balcony
Apt#200 Chester model, North Side
1 Br hardwoods throughout, lots of direct
sunlight, very popular model
Apt#121 Wye II model, South Side
1 Br walkout unit facing direct sunlight,
easy outdoor access
Apt#313 Severn Model, South Side
2 Br model with beautiful hardwood floors
and crown molding, 2 full Baths, Very bright
sunlight during the day
Apt#515 Severn Model, South Side
2 Br model, Direct waterview of the
Chesapeake Bay, Views of the BayBridge,
2 full baths
Apt#613 Tred Avon, South Side
Our largest apartment 2500sq. feet, 2 large
enclosed balconies, Full size den, walk
through kitchen, priced for immediate sale
A Retirement Community Like No Other
What is BayWoods? BayWoods, located in Annapolis on the Chesapeake Bay, is a resident-owned
Cooperative Living Community, providing the advantages of home ownership with the convenience of
community living. BayWoods of Annapolis allows its residents tax advantages along with independent
living and the security of on-site continued care. Visit our website or call to schedule a tour.
baywoodsofannapolis.com | 443-837-1208
7101 Bay Front Drive, Annapolis, MD 21403
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New Homes and New Communities
MD
Michael Harris Homes
at King Farm
1444 Piccard Drive
Rockville, MD 20850
VA
104 Hawthorn Ct
Lake Frederick, VA 22630
Trilogy® at Lake Frederick
1,800+ sq. ft.
3+ BR/2.5+ BA
From the upper $500s
1,538-5,257 sq. ft.
2-5 Beds/2-4 Baths
From the Low $300,000s
Model Open House this weekend.
Join us for to learn how you can
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award-winning community’s finely
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spacious, open floorplans with luxury
appointments and a rooftop terrace.
Don’t miss seeing our newly released
homesites, convenient to the Shady
Grove Metro!
Join the Movement. Live
Happier™. Trilogy® at Lake
Frederick is a stunning 55+ Resort
Community in the Beautiful
Shenandoah Valley! Choose from
9 home designs starting from
the low $300s. Only 90 minutes
from D.C. Sales & Construction:
Shea Homes Limited Partnership
(#2705152813).
*For a limited time only, see the
Sales Manager for complete details.
MHBR #3552
LiveAtKingFarmWP.com
VA
Trilogy® at Lake Frederick
TrilogyLife.com/LakeFrederick
23069 Chambourcin Place
Ashburn, VA 20148
6,728 sq. ft.
4BR/4.5BA
$1,399,900
Trilogy® at Lake Frederick
is a stunning 55+ Resort
Community in the beautiful
Shenandoah Valley!
Single Family homes, open
floorplans, gourmet kitchens
starting from the low $300s!
Only 90 minutes from D.C.
Sales and Construction:
Shea Homes Limited
Partnership (#2705152813).
Experience the deluxe finishes
and striking Craftsman style of
this Move-In-Ready Bashore. With
3 bedrooms on the main level,
you’ll be close to all your favorite
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spacious great room and the
outdoor living room overlooking
the woods.
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MARCH 10, 2018
S0833-2 2x3
(Well...some of it.)
. SATURDAY,
Trilogy® at Lake Frederick
is a stunning 55+ Resort
Community in the Beautiful
Shenandoah Valley! Featuring a
36,000 Sq. Ft. Resort Club with
full restaurant & bar, culinary &
art studios, fitness and more!
Homes from the low $300s.
Sales & Construction: Shea
Homes Limited Partnership
(#2705152813).
301-273-7525
Easy Pay
104 Hawthorn Ct
Lake Frederick, VA 22630
1,538-5,257 sq. ft.
2-5 Beds/2-4 Baths
From the Low $300,000s
TrilogyLife.com/LakeFrederick 540-904-0099
Willowsford Grant
1,538-5,257 sq. ft.
2-5 Beds/2-4 Baths
From the Low $300,000s
540-904-0099
Trilogy® at Lake Frederick
VA
104 Hawthorn Ct
Lake Frederick, VA 22630
THE WASHINGTON POST
VA
TrilogyLife.com/LakeFrederick 540-904-0099
240-285-2338
26
Real Estate Guide
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Logan Circle - NW
Logan Circle - NW
Northwest - Other
Northwest - Other
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Capitol Hill
SAY HELLO
Trader Joe's
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Capitol Hill
TO A NEW FACE
ON CAPITOL HILL
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LOGAN
CIRCLE
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of f i c i a l l y o p e n t h e d o o r s to El y s i u m L o g a n .
Living at 11Park places you at the center of life. Schedule your private
appointment today and discover how you can call 11Park home.
RSVP Today | ElysiumDC .com
R E S I D E N CE S PR I C E D F ROM $1. 3M
L E A R N M O R E : 202 . 803 . 6316 | 11PA R K N W.CO M
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Northwest - Other
SCHEDULE YOUR VISIT OF OUR NEWLY
RELEASED PHASE AT BUCHANAN PARK
Northwest - Other
Bethesda
WITHIN REACH
Spring Deliveries!
1 2
/ Mile
from Metro &
Minutes to D.C.
D C A L L : . . W W W. B U C H A N A N PA R K H O M E S . C O M
TH S T R E E T S E , W D C 2 0 0 0 3
Dupont Circle - NW
Bethesda
Dupont Circle - NW
Urban Multi-Level
Condominiums
from the upper $500s
Up to 3 BR & 2.5 BA
Washington, D.C. 20012
(202) 792-0057
TOUR OUR NEWEST MODEL #403 & EXPERIENCE
BETHESDA’S PREEMINENT CONDOMINIUM RESIDENCES
GeorgiaRowDC.com
O P E N H O U S E T O D AY F R O M 1 2 P M - 4 P M
Brokers Warmly Welcomed. Must
register and comply with policy terms.
301.909.8846 | THEL AURENMD.COM
4901 HAMPDEN LN., BETHESDA, MD 20814
Northwest - Other
DISTINCTIVELY
ADDRESSED
MARCH 10, 2018
. SATURDAY,
THE WASHINGTON POST
Bethesda
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Sales Office Open Daily:
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Sat & Sun 11am-4pm
New luxury condos in a full-service building in
DC’s West End, an easy walk to Georgetown,
featuring floor-to-ceiling glass, full-size balconies, 24-hour concierge services, and much
more. Residences starting at $1.1M to $3.1M.
Four Funished Models. Sales by Mayhood.
Beautiful resort style condominiums at 8101
River Rd from $1.9-4.1M on 13 acres in
Bethesda. Stunning & spacious residences
w/the finest finishes incl. direct entry elevators. Community clubhouse, fitness center,
pool, concierge services, valet parking, gated
entry, and more. Sales by Mayhood.
QuarrySprings.com
240.762.6520
Call Today: 202-293-2501
2501 M ST. NW | 2501M.com
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
SCHEDULE YOUR TOUR TODAY:
301.747.3124
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
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Living at 930 Rose affords you exclusive access
to cutting edge hotel amenities, a vibrant
neighborhood and distinctive living.
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
LIVE930ROSE.COM
Move-In Today | From The Mid $300s | PH From $1M+
Sales Gallery Open Daily
11572 Old Georgetown Rd., N. Bethesda, MD 20852
27
Real Estate Guide
Bethesda
Bethesda
Alexandria City
BE THERE FOR
Alexandria City
T H E N E W P L AC E
YO U ’ V E A LWAYS LOV E D
THE
REVEAL
Fairfax County
Fairfax County
Coming Soon to the
Alexandria Waterfront
T H E W AT E R M A R K
211 STRAND STREET
Coming This Spring Modern Living in the Heart of Del Ray
49 New Condominium Residences
from the mid $300’s
THE GRAND OPENING OF BETHESDA’S
NEWEST CONDOMINIUM RESIDENCES
INTRODUCING 18 BOUTIQUE
LUXURY CONDOMINIUMS
IN OLD TOWN
LiveDelRayVA.com
THURSDAY, MARCH 22 I 5PM
RSVP at ChevalOnFairmont.com
FOR MORE INFORMATION
CALL 703-558-7324
1800 Mount Vernon Avenue, Alexandria, VA 22301
571.206.4166
Residences from the $700’s to $2M+
WATERMARKOLDTOWN.COM
Prices are subject to
change without notice.
Prices, financing and offers subject to change without
notice. Please see a sales representative for details.
THE IDI GROUP COMPANIES
Prince George's Co
MD
Alexandria
ANNANDALE
LIVE LOCAL
$1,195,000
STUNNING LAKEFRONT
$50,000
New home. 6BR, 5BA, 3 car garage.
Open Sat 3/10, 1-4. 5005 Montgomery St.
Mono Realty 703-627-8109
2-Car Garage Townhomes
Alexandria, VA 22314
(571) 349-8806
BUY AT THE HARBOR FOR
THE COST OF A DC RENTAL
Open Sat 1-4.
COMING
SOON!
Multi-Level Townhomes
<5 Minutes from Old Town
Towns at South Alex®
North Carolina
Property
Annandale
Alexandria
Springfield
Springfield
$575,000
STUNNING LAKEFRONT
5ac Lakefront Retreat w/ HUGE NC Blue
Ridge Views 300 +/- ft of unbeatable
shoreline. Boat Ready!
$50,000 MUST GO NOW 828-225-4481
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SF
National Harbor Condos from the Mid $200s
HavenCondominiums.com
7257 Castlefield Way, Springfield, VA 22150.
3 Bed, 3.5 Bath, 2,760 SqFt. Near Metro &
Ft. Belvoir. Comes w/ 2 car gar, gourmet
kitchen, 2 laundry rooms, storage, wi-fi
enabled HVAC, newer carpet, hardwood
floors, and crown molding.
Keller Williams Realty
Michael Nolan
703-785-8918
TownsAtSouthAlex.com
165 Waterfront Street, National Harbor, MD 20745
Brokers Warmly Welcomed.
Must register and comply with policy terms.
MHBR #8042
®
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1-800-753-POST
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Source: Scarborough 2012, Release 2. Washington Post newspaper 7-day cumulative reach; Express 5-day reach.
MARCH 10, 2018
2.1 million readers, home buyers included • 202.334.6200 • washingtonpost.com/classified • Open 24/7
Or place your ad in Express, our daily commuter read, and reach 536,000 readers.
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