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The Washington Post – March 13, 2018

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Democracy Dies in Darkness
Partly sunny 49/31 • Tomorrow: Partly sunny 44/31 B8
Tex. police:
Exploding
packages
connected
TUESDAY, MARCH 13 , 2018
EX-SPY POISONED
WITH NERVE AGENT
E VA R UTH M ORAVEC,
A MY B W ANG,
M ARK B ERMAN
AND M ATT Z APOTOSKY
BY
BOMB CONTINUED ON A9
Trump blocks
Asian firm’s
$117 billion
Qualcomm bid
BY
Putin denies allegation;
Britons call for sanctions
BY
PRAKASH MATHEMA/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Rescue workers gather around the wreckage of a passenger plane that crash-landed in a field near the airport in
Kathmandu, Nepal, and then caught fire. At least 49 of the 71 people on board were killed. One survivor said the
US-Bangla Airlines flight from Bangladesh began wobbling and “behaving strangely” on its descent. Story, A11
Security plan in Ohio schools: Teachers and guns
BY
J OE H EIM
riverside, ohio — The safes
were installed last summer.
Thirty-two in all. Spread out
among the four elementary
schools, the two middle schools,
the high school and the administration building of the Mad River
Local Schools district here on the
outskirts of Dayton.
On Aug. 14, the first day of
school for the district’s 3,900 students, each safe contained the
centerpiece of the district’s new
Push to arm educators
spreads in state, but not
all districts embrace idea
security plan: a semiautomatic
pistol and a removable magazine
loaded with bullets.
The guns are not there for law
enforcement. There are no armed
security guards at the schools.
The weapons, paid for with mon-
ey from the district’s operating
budget, are for teachers and staffers who have volunteered and
trained to be part of the school’s
response team if a shooter enters
a building. Each team member
has access to a safe that can be
reached quickly in case the unthinkable happens.
Chad Wyen, the district’s softspoken, 42-year-old superintendent, thinks about the unthinkable often. He has twin daughters
in Mad River schools. To Wyen,
arming staffers and teachers will
QUALCOMM CONTINUED ON A13
make all the students in the district safer.
“A bad guy is going to do
whatever he wants in that building until someone either addresses him, or he runs out of ammunition, or he shoots and kills himself,” Wyen said in an interview in
GUNS CONTINUED ON A6
Trump’s gun plan: White House
says it’s now more realistic. A4
Lying on checks: Justice is told to
aggressively enforce law. A4
‘Buy American’? For this company, it’s complicated.
President of Mo. industrial parts firm likes Trump but says steel tariffs could put him out of business
CHRISTOPHER SMITH FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
THE NATION
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Last of the classicists Hubert de Givenchy,
whose little black dress for Audrey Hepburn
defined a generation, died at 91. B6, C1
Laboratory failures Patients who lost frozen
embryos after fertility clinic malfunctions are
heading to court to seek accountability. A3
A former intelligence
chief who was not
charged by the Navy accepted extravagant gifts
from contractor “Fat
Leonard,” investigative
files showed. A2
Researchers found significantly higher blood
pressure and blood sugar levels in American
adults after the onset of
the Great Recession. A5
Republicans are
watching Pennsylvania’s
special election to see if
the president’s influence
will keep a House seat
in their column. A7
President Trump will
be surrounded by pro-
tests when he visits California to inspect prototypes of a border wall —
whose effectiveness the
Department of Homeland Security has no way
of determining. A18
THE WORLD
In India, 25 years after
nationalists destroyed a
mosque, the Hindu
right is intensifying a
fight over the site. A10
The United States is
prepared for military action in Syria if the U.N.
doesn’t stop the bloodshed, the U.S. ambassador to the body said. A11
THE ECONOMY
The Senate is poised to
SPY CONTINUED ON A11
Republicans
in House find
‘no evidence
of collusion’
BY
K AROUN D EMIRJIAN
STEEL CONTINUED ON A14
COLLUSION CONTINUED ON A5
Wrong number: President Trump is relying on obsolete figures to gauge the trade deficit. A14
IN THE NEWS
london — Prime Minister Theresa May said Monday that British
investigators have concluded it
was “highly likely” that Russia was
responsible for the poison attack
that left a former Russian double
agent and his daughter comatose
on a park bench last week.
The British leader said police
identified the poison as a “military-grade nerve agent of a type
developed by Russia.”
She said Russia either engaged
in a direct attack against Britain or
lost control of the nerve agent it
developed. Britain will not tolerate such a “brazen attempt to murder innocent civilians on our soil,”
she warned.
As she addressed the House of
Commons, the British leader
stopped short of announcing retaliatory actions, saying she would
give Russia a chance to respond to
her government’s findings and
would return to Parliament on
Wednesday with a plan for specific
action.
But May described a “reckless”
and “indiscriminate” attack,
which not only endangered the
Scheurich already had fielded his fifth call of
the day from a metals importer trying to
determine how President Trump’s new tariffs
would work.
“It’s really confusing, tough to understand,” said Scheurich, president of CNC
Machine Products, a manufacturer of bearing
components.
For Scheurich, the perplexing thing about
Trump’s tariffs on imported steel is that, in
the name of helping U.S. steelmakers, the
president may be dooming some other American companies such as his.
In the nation’s capital, the new import
taxes are viewed as a turn by the United
States toward economic nationalism and a
chance for the president to deliver on a
promise to his working-class constituency.
For Scheurich, 69, whose production of
industrial parts depends almost entirely on
importing specialized steel from Japan and
Sweden, the restrictions on foreign-made
metals pose a direct threat to his business.
Though the president insists tariffs will force
companies such as his to “buy American,”
Scheurich confronts a more complex global-
BY
Michael James Elabed checks a steel ring last week at CNC Machine Products in Joplin,
Mo. The company has to import most of the high-quality steel its products require.
W ILLIAM B OOTH
House Intelligence Committee
Republicans say they have found
no evidence that President
Trump and his affiliates colluded
with Russian officials to sway the
2016 election or that the Kremlin
sought to help him, a conclusion
at odds with Democrats’ takeaways from the congressional
panel’s year-long probe and the
apparent trajectory of special
counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s
investigation.
The findings are part of a
150-page draft report that Rep. K.
Michael Conaway (R-Tex.), who
oversees the committee’s Russia
probe, announced on Monday. It
will probably be weeks before the
document is made public.
“We’ve found no evidence of
collusion,” Conaway told reporters Monday. He noted that the
worst the panel uncovered was
“perhaps some bad judgment, inappropriate meetings, inappropriate judgment at taking meetings” — such as a June 2016
gathering at Trump Tower in New
York City between members of
the Trump campaign and a
D AVID J . L YNCH
joplin, mo. — By 9 a.m. Friday, Greg
H AMZA S HABAN
President Trump on Monday
ordered Singapore-based Broadcom to abandon its $117 billion
hostile bid for Qualcomm, blocking what would have been one of
the biggest technology deals in
history.
In his presidential order, Trump
cited “credible evidence” that the
takeover “threatens to impair the
national security of the United
States.” The merger would have
put one of the largest U.S. mobile
chipmakers in the hands of a company based in Asia, a region that
has been racing against U.S. companies to develop the next generation of mobile technology.
The administration moved
with unusual speed in the matter
that caught many involved in the
negotiations off guard. The Com-
. $2
Britain
links
Russia
to attack
Dozens killed in plane crash in Nepal
Two dead in Austin after
three bombs go off;
authorities urge vigilance
austin — Police said Monday
that they believe three packages
that exploded at homes and
killed two people here are connected, raising fears that a
bomber is on the loose in a city
hosting tens of thousands of
people for a world-renowned
music and technology festival.
Authorities said it was too
early to say what motivated the
attacks and did not rule out the
possibility of a hate crime. The
two people killed in the explosions — a teenage boy and a
39-year-old man — were black,
and a 75-year-old Hispanic woman was seriously injured.
The first explosion occurred
March 2, when a package on the
front porch of a northeast Austin
home exploded and killed the
man. At the time, police said the
death was “suspicious” but believed it was an isolated incident
with no continuing threat to the
community.
That changed Monday morning, when a pair of packages
detonated at homes several miles
apart over a matter of hours.
Investigators were still responding to the first — which killed a
17-year-old boy and seriously injured an adult woman — when
the second blast detonated at a
house farther south, seriously
injuring the Hispanic woman.
Police confirmed soon afterward
that those cases were connected
to each other and to the March 2
death.
SU V1 V2 V3 V4
roll back rules meant to
root out discrimination
by mortgage lenders. A12
Amazon’s first Washington-area bookstore is
set to open with two
floors of books, electronics and toys — but
no price tags. A13
THE REGION
Women elected last
year to the Virginia
House of Delegates have
already produced significant operational changes, members say. B1
D.C. Public Schools is
taking over an all-girls
charter school that had
its license revoked because of poor performance. B1
D.C. Council member
Robert White pushed
for a hearing on the resignation of former
schools chancellor Antwan Wilson and the
mayor’s involvement. B1
A photo exhibition
looks at the faces of “La
Esquina” — “The Corner” that has been at the
center of Latino life in
the District’s Mount
Pleasant. B1
The board of United
Medical Center ended
its fight to keep its discussion and vote on
closing the D.C. public
hospital’s obstetrics unit
secret. B3
SPORTS
Capitals winger Alex
Ovechkin becomes 20th
player in NHL history to
score 600 goals. D1
Inside
HEALTH & SCIENCE
A stroke of relief
A brain trauma ended the
depression her mom had
suffered for decades. E1
ST YLE
Facing vitriol
Conservative pundit Mona
Charen took on the GOP
over harassment. C1
BUSINESS NEWS ........................ A12
COMICS........................................C6
OPINION PAGES ......................... A16
LOTTERIES ................................... B3
OBITUARIES ................................. B6
TELEVISION..................................C4
WORLD NEWS ............................ A10
CONTENT © 2018
The Washington Post / Year 141, No. 98
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B2
2 3 1 3
A2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 13 , 2018
The underappreciated genius of making DeVos top educator
Betsy DeVos gives
every indication
that she is, to
borrow President
Trump’s phrase, a
“low-IQ
Dana
individual.” Her
Milbank
interview with
WASHINGTON Lesley Stahl of
CBS’s “60
SKETCH
Minutes,”
broadcast Sunday
night, is being mocked as the
most disastrous televised tete-atete since Palin met Couric.
But this unabashed ignorance
is DeVos’s hidden genius — and
precisely why she is a perfect
choice to be Trump’s secretary
of education.
Whenever DeVos speaks, it
feels as though the sum total of
human knowledge is somehow
diminished. During her
confirmation hearing last year,
she was utterly defeated by
complex subjects such as
“teachers” and “students” but
was certain that schools need
guns to repel attacks by
H A P P ENI NG TO D A Y
For the latest updates all day, visit washingtonpost.com.
All day
President Trump makes his first trip as president to
California, where he will address members of the military
and view prototypes for his proposed U.S.-Mexico border
wall. For details, visit washingtonpost.com/politics.
All day
The U.S. House special election in Pennsylvania’s 18th
Congressional District takes place, with Republican Rick
Saccone and Democrat Conor Lamb vying for the seat.
Visit washingtonpost.com/politics for developments.
7 p.m.
The Irish Embassy and the Northern Ireland Bureau
host an event at the Library of Congress to
commemorate the 20th anniversary of the Good Friday
Agreement. For details, visit washingtonpost.com/world.
7 p.m.
The Washington Wizards host the Minnesota
Timberwolves at Capital One Arena. Follow the game at
postsports.com.
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“potential grizzlies.”
After a (too-quiet) first year
on the job, DeVos is back, letting
her foolish flag fly. Interviews
with DeVos broadcast Sunday
night and Monday morning by
CBS and NBC show that she’s
performing below grade level in
all subjects — and her deviation
below the mean is anything but
standard.
Have the public schools in her
home state of Michigan
improved?
“I don’t know.”
Are the number of sexual
assaults equivalent to the
number of false accusations?
“I don’t know. I don’t know.”
Why is she known as the most
hated Cabinet secretary?
“I’m not so sure exactly.”
Has she visited bad schools?
“I have not. I have not. I have
not intentionally visited schools
that are underperforming.”
Stahl offered a suggestion:
“Maybe you should.”
“Maybe I should, yes,” agreed
DeVos, who also expressed her
reluctance “to talk about all
schools in general, because
schools are made up of
individual students.”
Yes, and brains are made up
of individual brain cells, many
of which self-destruct upon
hearing DeVos speak. Listen to
her for five minutes and you will
no longer be able to complete
the New York Times crossword
puzzle. After 10 minutes of
DeVos, the human brain loses
the ability to perform simple
arithmetic. After 15 minutes,
those in the presence of DeVos
report forgetting the answers to
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
President Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos last month.
A casual observer might say DeVos has been a bust. But has she?
their security questions,
including first pet and first car.
All this proves that it is sheer
(if perhaps unintentional)
genius to have DeVos, who
married into the Amway
fortune, in her role in the
Trump administration. If this is
the caliber of the top education
official in the land, it hardly
speaks well for getting an
education. People could quite
reasonably conclude that
education isn’t all it’s cracked
up to be, and they wouldn’t go
to all the trouble of attending
school.
As it happens, this is exactly
what Trump needs to secure the
future of his political
movement. For Trump, the
fewer people who get an
education, the better off he will
be. Exit polls showed a huge
education gap in the 2016
election. College graduates
favored Hillary Clinton by nine
percentage points, while those
without college degrees favored
Trump by eight points. That 17point gap was “by far the
widest” dating to 1980,
according to the Pew Research
Center.
The danger for Trump is more
Americans are going to college.
The National Center for
Education Statistics, part of
DeVos’s Education Department,
predicts enrollment of full-time
students in degree-granting
postsecondary institutions, up
38 percent between 2000 and
2014, will climb an additional
15 percent by 2025.
Thankfully, DeVos is doing all
she can to combat this noxious
scourge of people going to
school. DeVos, who once said
traditional public education is a
“dead end,” is proving by
example as the nation’s top
educator that education
generally is a dead end.
Early on, she said she was
“confused” at her confirmation
hearing about federal disability
laws, and she didn’t seem to
know the difference between
“growth” and “proficiency.” After
her full year of on-the-job
learning, though, DeVos’s
appearance Sunday on “60
Minutes” showed no diminution
in her ineptitude.
There she was again on NBC’s
“Today” show Monday, armed
with two things to say —
“everything is on the table,” and
things are “best decided by local
communities and by states” —
and she recited these rote
phrases to Savannah Guthrie no
fewer than six times during the
brief interview, regardless of
relevance to the question.
How does such a high-level
official maintain such a low
level of learning? Well, consider
that DeVos, whose brother Erik
Prince founded the Blackwater
mercenary outfit, jettisoned the
Education Department’s usual
security in favor of round-theclock protection by U.S.
marshals for $6.5 million a year.
Apparently, this security team
has been able to create an
impermeable zone of ignorance
around DeVos. It’s downright
brilliant.
Twitter: @Milbank
Highlights from a di∞cult ‘60 Minutes’ interview
BY
V ALERIE S TRAUSS
Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, appearing Sunday on CBS’s
“60 Minutes,” stumbled when answering questions from veteran
correspondent Lesley Stahl during a pointed interview.
Stahl repeatedly challenged the
education secretary, at one point
suggesting DeVos should visit underperforming public schools to
learn about their problems. DeVos responded, “Maybe I should.”
The secretary also said she is
“not so sure exactly” how she became, as Stahl described her, “the
most hated” member of President
Trump’s Cabinet but said she believes she is “misunderstood.”
Critics savaged DeVos on social
media for being unable to respond to Stahl, and the secretary
on Monday took to Twitter to
defend herself.
It evoked comparisons to DeVos’s highly criticized performance at her January 2017 Senate
confirmation hearing, when she
became confused and couldn’t answer basic questions.
“Maybe I should.”
Education Secretary Betsy DeVos’s
response to the suggestion that she
visit underperforming public schools
to learn about their problems.
Here is some of what DeVos
said — or couldn’t answer — during the interview with Stahl:
She could not say whether the
number of false accusations of
sexual assault on school campuses is lower than the number of
rapes or assaults.
Arming teachers “should be
an option” for states and communities, she said, even though she
could not “ever imagine” her firstgrade teacher, Mrs. Zorhoff, having a gun.
DeVos said, “We have invested
billions and billions and billions
of dollars from the federal level,
and we have seen zero results.”
Stahl challenged that statement.
One comment drew particular scorn on social media: “I hesitate to talk about all schools in
general because schools are made
up of individual students attending them.”
DeVos, a Michigan billionaire
who rarely gives interviews to
journalists, is a longtime school
choice advocate who has made
clear that her top priority as the
nation’s education chief is expanding alternatives to traditional public schools. She advocates
using public money for private
and religious school education,
and critics say she is determined
to privatize public education. DeVos, who has been education secretary for a little over a year,
denies that.
DeVos tweeted that “60 Minutes” had failed to include some
information about schools in
Michigan, the secretary’s home
state, that she said she provided.
CBS did not immediately respond
to an inquiry about the secretary’s
tweets.
In one tweet, DeVos published
charts showing Michigan students’ test scores compared to
national averages, and wrote:
“Here’s what we shared with
@60Minutes, which of course
they didn’t show you: Michigan,
like much of the nation, isn’t doing well enough to prepare students. Scores are stagnant. Students need more options, and we
must rethink our approach to
education.”
Stahl noted during the interview that Michigan students were
not performing well.
DeVos also tweeted that Detroit
charter schools were doing twice
as well as traditional public
schools on standardized tests but
noted that scores for both are
“extremely low.”
valerie.strauss@washpost.com
‘Fat Leonard’ feted ex-vice admiral, records show
Navy never charged
former intelligence chief
who accepted lavish gifts
BY
C RAIG W HITLOCK
After a four-year investigation,
federal authorities concluded that
a former Navy intelligence chief
accepted extravagant meals, cigars and other illicit gifts from a
corrupt defense contractor known
as “Fat Leonard,” but they were
unable to verify allegations that he
also partied with prostitutes, new
documents show.
The documents reveal that retired Vice Adm. Ted “Twig”
Branch, a fighter pilot and aircraft
carrier commander who became
the steward of the Navy’s secrets,
had a decade-long friendship with
Leonard Glenn Francis, a Singapore-based maritime tycoon who
has pleaded guilty to bribing
scores of military officers and defrauding the Navy of $35 million.
The nature of their relationship
had been a long-running mystery.
In November 2013, the Navy announced on a Friday night that it
had suspended Branch’s access to
classified material because he was
under criminal investigation by
the Justice Department for his ties
to Francis. The contractor’s firm
held lucrative deals to provide
supplies, fuel and port services to
Navy vessels in Asia.
For years, Navy and Justice officials remained silent about the
investigation, although Navy leaders privately expressed frustration
that federal prosecutors were taking so long to review the case. In an
unusual twist, the Navy allowed
Branch to keep serving as its intelligence boss for more than 1,000
days even though he was barred
from reading, seeing or hearing
military secrets. Branch retired
from the military in October 2016,
but the investigation of his conduct continued.
In September 2017, on another
Friday night, the Navy announced
in a brief statement that the Justice Department had referred the
case to the Pentagon after finally
deciding not to charge the threestar admiral. Navy officials said
they had taken “appropriate action” against Branch for unspecified wrongdoing, but they would
not provide details and declared
the case closed.
Navy files obtained by The
Washington Post under the Freedom of Information Act shed
some light on the matter for the
first time. The Navy stripped
Branch’s name from the documents, but they contain other information that matches the admiral’s military service record.
Branch declined to comment but
confirmed that the files pertained
to his case.
The heavily redacted documents indicate Branch met Francis in 2000 when serving as an
officer aboard the USS John C.
Stennis, an aircraft carrier. During
a port visit to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Branch attended a dinner
paid for by Francis’s firm, Glenn
Defense Marine Asia, and improperly accepted a ceremonial dagger
as a gift, the documents said.
The Navy investigated allegations that Branch also attended a
private party that evening hosted
by Glenn Defense and that the
contractor gave him drinks, “the
services of a prostitute” and a Malaysian pewter tea set. In the end,
however, the Navy concluded that
there was “insufficient evidence”
to prove that Branch was at the
party with the prostitute or accepted the tea set.
Five years later, Branch and
Francis met again. This time,
Branch was the commanding officer of another aircraft carrier, the
USS Nimitz. As the ship prepared
U.S. NAVY
Retired Vice Adm. Ted “Twig”
Branch
to visit Southeast Asia, he exchanged emails with Francis. The
Navy refused to release the messages, but The Post obtained copies from other sources close to the
investigation.
“You may not believe this, but I
am no longer a California Red
Wood,” Francis wrote in a May 17,
2005, email in which he offered to
arrange dinner, drinks and “a few
rounds of great golf at the most
scenic courses” in Hong Kong and
Kuala Lumpur. “I actually lost 300
pounds since we last met in 2000
but rest assured I’m still the same
old fun loving Leonard you all
know but only in a trimmer body!”
“Good to hear from you Leonard and congrats on losing the
weight,” Branch replied. “We are
looking forward to HK and KL. It
will be good to see you.”
When the Nimitz arrived in
Hong Kong two weeks later,
Branch invited Francis on board
the aircraft carrier for a private
lunch. During the port visit, Francis returned the favor by hosting
Branch and about 20 other officers
from the Nimitz for a lavish dinner
at a restaurant overlooking Hong
Kong harbor.
The meal cost about $690 per
person and featured musical entertainment, Cohiba cigars, Château Lynch-Bages red wine and
Rémy Martin cognac, according to
a copy of the bill obtained by The
Post.
After the Nimitz left port,
Branch transmitted an official
communication from the ship
known as a Bravo Zulu message, a
Navy term meaning “well done.”
Copied to several Navy headquarters, the message praised Francis
and his company for their “outstanding” and “over the top customer service.”
The following month, Branch
and Francis met again when the
Nimitz visited Kuala Lumpur.
Once more, Navy officials investigated allegations that Francis invited Branch to a private party
with booze and prostitutes on July
5, 2005, but found “insufficient
evidence” to prove that the officer
attended the sex party, Navy documents show.
After the Nimitz departed Kuala Lumpur, Branch sent another
Bravo Zulu message extolling
Francis and his company. “True to
form Leonard, you provided absolutely the highest quality service
to my ship and crew,” Branch
wrote.
Navy officials found Branch accepted illicit gifts from Francis on
other occasions, including a coffee-table book from Singapore
and multiple gifts of cigars, according to the Navy documents.
Although the Navy cited Branch
for four counts of misconduct, it
does not appear that it imposed
any penalties.
In a Sept. 8, 2017, memo, Adm.
Philip S. Davidson — the commander assigned by the Navy to
hand out discipline in the “Fat
Leonard” scandal — stated that he
“personally addressed” the matter
with Branch “through administrative action.”
That is language the Navy typically uses when counseling a sailor
not to do something again. A Navy
spokesman declined to comment.
craig.whitlock@washpost.com
TUESDAY, MARCH 13 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
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Politics & the Nation
Patients mobilize after malfunctions at fertility clinics
Suit seeks answers
in unevenly regulated
realm of medicine
BY A MY G OLDSTEIN
AND A RIANA E UNJUNG C HA
An Ohio couple who lost both
their frozen embryos when a fertility clinic’s storage tank overheated last week are the first in a
wave of patients heading to court
to hold the facility accountable for
dashing their dreams of future
children.
Two Cleveland attorneys said
they have been inundated in the
days since the University Hospitals
Ahuja Medical Center’s Fertility
Center disclosed late last week that
it was notifying 700 patients that
their eggs or embryos may have
been damaged. The tissue was in a
tank that lost liquid nitrogen, which
is vital for temperature control.
A second clinic, the Pacific Fertility Center in San Francisco, disclosed to The Washington Post on
Sunday that it also had suffered a
malfunction last week in a steel
tank where hundreds of patients’
eggs and embryos were stored.
Members of the American Academy of Assisted Reproductive
Technology Attorneys said Monday that they were not aware of
legal action against the California
clinic but expected filings soon.
The impulse of couples to translate their anger or grief into legal
action represents a new consumer
activism in a realm of medical
technology that has been proliferating and remains unevenly regulated.
The number of embryos in cold
storage has skyrocketed since the
turn of the century. A 2002 survey
estimated the number to be almost 400,000. By 2011, it was
600,000. Fertility experts say it is
probably well over 1 million today
— more than the population of
Austin.
How often frozen eggs or cells
are damaged is unclear because
there is no central reporting
mechanism. Within the federal
government, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and
the Food and Drug Administration oversee only certain aspects
of fertility labs, and the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention
collects data about in vitro fertilization. The agencies do not inspect clinics’ storage tanks or
track reports of eggs or embryos
being damaged.
Officials at the College of American Pathologists, which accredits
more than 400 fertility laborato-
ries, said Monday that they were
aware of incidents in which frozen
eggs and embryos had been
thawed accidentally but that such
events tended to be small scale.
They characterized the malfunctions in Cleveland and San Francisco as “extremely rare” but declined to provide figures.
“Our goal with this
whole lawsuit . . . is
to focus on preventing
this from ever
happening again.”
Amber Ash, who is suing a Cleveland
fertility clinic after a problem caused
the loss of both of her frozen embryos
Denise Driscoll, the organization’s senior director of accreditation and regulatory affairs, described a rigorous biannual inspection process that involves
about 560 checklist items, including backup systems for cryopreservation tanks and 24-hour
monitoring of alarm systems.
Both the Cleveland clinic, on
April 26, 2016, and the San Francisco clinic, on Jan. 23, 2017, met
those criteria.
The oversight of fertility labs
differs by state. California, for instance, requires that they be accredited. Ohio does not.
The first lawsuit, filed Sunday
in the Cuyahoga County Court of
Common Pleas, is on behalf of
Amber and Elliot Ash, who live
just west of Cleveland.
Elliot, 37 and an engineer, said
that he had stored sperm in his
early 20s, just before he had treatment for cancer. Once he and Amber married nearly five years ago,
he drove the frozen sperm from
the Columbus facility where it had
been stored, not trusting the transit to anyone else.
“The most important drive of
your life,” he said Monday, recalling how he strapped the domed,
liquid-nitrogen filled container he
dubbed R2-D2 into the back seat.
On a third try at the Cleveland
center, Amber became pregnant
by in vitro fertilization with their
son, Ethan, now 21/2. That left two
embryos for the future.
She first learned of the facility’s
problem Thursday from her mother, who was watching television
when a news report came on. The
next day, she followed instructions
to call a hospital hotline. She spoke
with her doctor, who confirmed that
the embryos had been in the affected tank and were unusable. “My
heart just sank,” she said. “I spent
the day very, very sick.
“Obviously, something went
wrong,” said Amber, a 37-year-old
social workers. “Our goal with this
whole lawsuit . . . is to focus on
preventing this from ever happening again.”
The Ashes’ attorney, Robert DiCello, is asking the court to certify
the case as a class action. “Since
the news broke, our office phones
have been ringing,” he said.
Another Cleveland attorney,
Tom Merriman, also said that the
morning after the problem became public, he arrived at his office to find emails from 15 people
wanting him to represent them.
“I’ve been on the phone or meeting with people — women, couples
— ever since,” he said. He plans to
file his first lawsuit Tuesday.
One of his new clients, Kate
Plants, had a rushed round of fertility treatments at the University
Hospitals clinic to retrieve eggs
when, months after she and her
husband, Jeremy, married in fall
2014, a softball-sized cyst turned
out to be ovarian cancer.
“The fact I got five and we were
able to fertilize all of them was a
miracle,” said Plants, 33, who lives
in a suburb southwest of Cleveland. Then, on Valentine’s Day last
year, she was diagnosed with an
unrelated uterine cancer.
After rounds of surgery, she is
unable to carry a pregnancy, she
said, but two relatives have offered
to be surrogates once everyone is
ready. But late last week, one of her
bridesmaids texted her out of the
blue. “Oh, Kate does this affect
you?” the text said.
“With everything that has happened, I just knew our embryos
were done,” Plants said. “Them
saying sorry is not enough. They
need to fix this, and they need to be
held accountable legally.”
At in vitro fertilization clinics,
the process of creating an embryo
outside the body involves manual
steps. “I’ve been in lab medicine
for 50 years and can tell you there
has been an enormous increase in
the amount of automation and
mechanism, and it minimizes impact of human error — but it does
not eliminate it,” said Paul Bachner, an adviser to the pathology
college’s accreditation committee.
Many clinics still use older cryopreservation tanks that must be
filled with liquid nitrogen by
hand, and there is no standard
set-up for alarms. CAP officials,
investigating the Ohio and California incidents, said they have
not gotten far enough to answer
questions about the equipment
and alarms at the two clinics.
amy.goldstein@washpost.com
ariana.cha@washpost.com
DIGEST
sold at the Reeds Ferry Market in
that town for the Jan. 6 drawing.
Temple wrote he had “no
doubts whatsoever that should
Ms. Doe’s identity be revealed, she
will be subject to an alarming
amount of harassment,
solicitation and other unwanted
communications.” He said she
met her burden of showing that
her privacy interest outweighs
the public’s interest in disclosing
her name in the nation’s eighthlargest jackpot.
Last week, the commission
handed over $264 million — the
amount left after taxes were
deducted — to the woman’s
lawyers. They said she would give
$150,000 to Girls Inc. and $33,000
apiece to three chapters of End 68
Hours of Hunger in the state.
NEW YORK
Pilot blames bag
after helicopter crash
The pilot who survived a
helicopter crash in New York that
killed his five passengers told
investigators he believed that a
passenger’s bag might have hit an
emergency fuel shut-off switch in
the moments before the chopper
went down, a federal official said
Monday.
The official said the National
Transportation Safety Board also
is scrutinizing why an emergency
flotation device apparently didn’t
deploy properly when the tour
helicopter went down in the East
River. The floats are supposed
keep a helicopter upright; the
Eurocopter AS350 that crashed
Sunday overturned and
submerged.
NTSB investigators began
working Monday to determine
what caused the crash, which
killed a Texas firefighter, an
Argentine woman, a young video
journalist and two others on what
authorities said was a charter
flight to take photos.
Pilot Richard Vance, who
managed to free himself from the
rapidly sinking chopper, was the
only survivor.
— Associated Press
IOWA
Top lawmaker resigns
over video of kiss
The top leader of the Iowa
Senate resigned Monday after a
website published video and
photos showing the married
lawmaker kissing a statehouse
lobbyist.
Majority Leader Bill Dix
submitted a one-sentence
resignation letter several hours
after the liberal website Iowa
Starting Line published its report
about the Shell Rock Republican.
— Associated Press
KENTUCKY
Exonerated man wins
$7.5 million settlement
JUSTIN LANE/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK
A crane lifts the sightseeing helicopter that crashed Sunday night from the East River in New York on Monday. Five people died in the accident,
though the pilot survived, and investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board are working to determine what caused the crash.
According to investigators, the pilot said a passenger’s bag might have hit a fuel shut-off lever, resulting in engine failure, which sent the
aircraft plunging into the frigid water. Floats that were supposed to keep the helicopter upright in the water failed to do so.
Dix did not comment on the
circumstances surrounding his
resignation as majority leader
and as state senator, though GOP
Senate President Jack Whitver
alluded to the website’s
allegations in a statement.
Republicans in the GOPcontrolled chamber plan to elect a
new majority leader on
Wednesday.
The incident caps a swift
response from Senate
Republicans after Iowa Starting
Line posted video and photos on
Monday showing Dix and the
woman sitting together at a Des
Moines bar. The video shows the
two kissing. The website said the
incident was recorded March 1.
The woman was identified as a
lobbyist for the Iowa League of
Cities, an organization that seeks
to sway legislation at the state
capitol.
— Associated Press
NEW HAMPSHIRE
Powerball winner can
remain anonymous
A judge ruled Monday that a
New Hampshire woman who won
a Powerball jackpot worth nearly
$560 million can keep her
identity private, but not her home
town.
Judge Charles Temple noted
that the case’s resolution rested
on the state’s Right-to-Know law,
which governs access to public
records for the woman. She was
identified as “Jane Doe” in a
lawsuit against the New
Hampshire Lottery Commission.
“She was jumping up and
down,” said her lawyer, William
Shaheen. “She will be able to live
her life normally.”
Shaheen said the woman is from
Merrimack, 25 miles south of
Concord. The winning ticket was
A man exonerated of murder
has reached a $7.5 million
settlement with a Kentucky city
he had sued for wrongful arrest
and imprisonment.
Attorneys for Kerry Porter, now
56, who spent 11 years in prison
after being wrongfully convicted
in the 1996 slaying of Tyrone
Camp, said Monday that the
settlement against the city of
Louisville was recently finalized.
Porter was exonerated in 2011.
The lawsuit said officers
wrongfully conspired to convict
Porter by fabricating evidence,
using improper identification
procedures and hiding evidence
that would have cleared him.
The judge who dismissed the
case against Porter cited a
statement from a man who said
someone else had killed Camp
and DNA at the scene didn’t
belong to Porter. The slaying
remains unsolved.
MD 301.388.5959
VA 571.341.6202
DC 202.770.3131
— Associated Press
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 13 , 2018
With gun proposals, Trump seems to back down from his defiance of NRA
Modest plan has better
chance in Congress,
White House says
BY S EUNG M IN K IM
AND J OSH D AWSEY
Not even two weeks ago, President Trump appeared to buck the
National Rifle Association — publicly endorsing Democraticfriendly gun-control ideas while
mocking other Republicans as
“petrified” of the powerful firearms lobby.
“They have great power over
you people,” Trump said on Feb.
28, referring to the NRA while
addressing a group of lawmakers
at the White House. “They have
less power over me.”
But now Trump has retreated,
putting forward a modest package
of gun-safety measures this week
that has none of the provisions
opposed by the NRA that he
seemed to back days earlier. The
shift provides another example of
the strong influence wielded by
the NRA both at the White House
and on Capitol Hill, where most
lawmakers remain opposed to significant policy changes in the
wake of the shooting massacre
that killed 17 at a Parkland, Fla.,
high school last month.
“I think we could all see it coming. I wish the president had televised the meeting with the NRA
like he televised the meeting with
us,” Sen. Chris Murphy (D-Conn.)
said Monday, referring to a March
1 huddle between Trump and top
officials at the gun rights group.
“Clearly, the NRA was more persuasive than I was.”
In the face of such criticism,
Trump defended his plan in a series of tweets Monday morning.
“Very strong improvement and
strengthening of background
checks will be fully backed by
White House. Legislation moving
forward. Bump Stocks will soon be
out. Highly trained expert teachers will be allowed to conceal carry, subject to State Law. Armed
guards OK, deterrent!” Trump
wrote in one Twitter message.
White House officials said
Trump’s official gun plan was
drafted within the confines of
what Congress will allow — a notable contrast to Trump’s “I alone
can fix it” image as someone who
could
single-handedly
cut
through Washington gridlock.
Administration officials also
disputed that Trump’s plan
amounts to a reversal of his positions since that February meeting,
when the president surprised lawmakers of both parties by appearing to back proposals to raise the
purchase age for AR-15s and similar types of rifles and to expand
background checks. He also declared at that meeting that law
enforcement officials should “take
the guns first, go through due
process second” for those suspected of mental illness.
“He hasn’t backed away from
these things at all,” White House
press secretary Sarah Huckabee
Sanders said during a contentious
back-and-forth with reporters
Monday. “But he can’t make them
happen with a broad stroke of the
pen. You have to have some con-
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
President Trump has proposed improving the federal background
check database and toughening safety measures at schools.
gressional component to do some
of these things, and without that
support, it’s not as possible.”
Publicly, Republican senators
had dismissed Trump’s embrace of
Democratic-friendly gun measures as the negotiating tactic of a
businessman who wanted to hear
from all sides before coming to a
decision. His defenders on Capitol
Hill said much the same Monday,
arguing that Trump’s plan was
crafted in political reality.
“I’ve called the meeting we had
at the White House on TV really
more of a brainstorming session.
It was not a legislative strategy
session,” Senate Majority Whip
John Cornyn (R-Tex.) said Monday. “I think as the president and
the White House has talked to
Congress, they found out what is
achievable and what’s not.”
Yet Vice President Pence spoke
with a number of Senate Republi-
cans who privately raised serious
concerns about what Trump said
at the gun summit, according to
one White House official who was
not authorized to talk on the record and so spoke on the condition
of anonymity.
Sen. Steve Daines (Mont.) was
among the GOP lawmakers who
reached out to the administration
with worries about what was said,
conveying his concerns to the
White House’s legislative staff.
“We really reengaged and reemphasized the points I made to the
president in that meeting: First
thing we need to do to make kids
safe is to make our schools safe,”
Daines said Monday. “I’m pleased
to see that he’s moved away from a
focus on gun control and now
focused on stopping people who
have a homicidal intent.”
At a meeting on March 1, NRA
lobbyist Chris Cox told Trump that
some of his ideas, particularly
raising the age limit to buy a semiautomatic rifle from 18 to 21,
wouldn’t pass and that raising the
age wouldn’t stop crimes, according to people briefed on the meeting. Cox also said the background
check legislation being supported
by the White House would go too
far, these people said.
Trump saw the arguments as
convincing, said two people who
later spoke to him. The meeting
was warm, these people said, with
the president telling Cox that he
valued the NRA and wanted to be
on the same page.
Cox and NRA President Wayne
LaPierre, who met with Trump
earlier, made clear to the president that the NRA supported him
and did not want to be at odds.
The president was also taken
aback by how many GOP lawmakers told him that his proposals
were unlikely to pass, two senior
administration officials said. He
later told others in the White
House that he wanted to support
only legislation that could pass.
One senior administration official said Trump was never determined to pass everything he
seemed to suggest in the bipartisan summit but likes to publicly
gauge what others are thinking.
House Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows (R-N.C.) told
Trump that broad gun laws were
not going to pass, according to a
senior administration official. A
number of senior aides also told
the president that there were not
enough votes on the Hill to raise
the purchase age for some guns,
the official said.
“At first, he really wanted to do
it . . . everyone was telling him,
embrace this moment,” one
Trump adviser said. But now “he is
telling people how supportive the
NRA has been to him. He knows
they are an important ally.”
Another senior administration
official said that Trump “does
things on the fly” in sessions like
the one on guns and that they
aren’t real promises or formal positions. His team was already
drafting legislative proposals that
mirrored what eventually came
out, this official said.
Now, the Trump administration
is focused on two main pieces of
legislation: a bill to improve the
federal background check database and a measure to shore up
safety at schools, including grants
to fund violence-prevention training for teachers and students.
Both are broadly popular on Capitol Hill.
The White House also wants
states to pass bills for “risk-protection orders,” which allow law enforcement to take guns away from
people considered a public threat,
and it is establishing a Federal
Commission on School Safety that
will explore possible solutions.
Despite the White House’s comments that it was working within
the realm of the possible, some
proposals in Trump’s plan aren’t
politically achievable in Congress.
One of the most controversial
would give “rigorous firearms
training” to some teachers to protect students — an idea that would
struggle mightily to pass.
seung-min.kim@washpost.com
Philip Rucker contributed to this
report.
Vegas shooting survivor in hospital misses fund payout
Husband overlooks
notice to file claim while
focused on wife’s healing
BY
S ARAH K APLAN
Since being shot in the chest at
a country music festival on the Las
Vegas Strip in October, Rosemarie
Melanson has slept 160 nights in
hospitals and rehab facilities. She
spent two months on life support
and underwent nine surgeries to
repair her injured lungs, stomach,
liver and spleen. She vomits almost daily because of the damage
to her stomach muscles, and she
suffers from crushing anxiety
caused by the trauma of the shooting and her excruciating recovery.
She remains one of the last survivors of the massacre who is still
hospitalized, and she’ll need at
least one more surgery to remove
an infected gallbladder and
relieve her unrelenting nausea.
But when the Las Vegas Victims’ Fund began distributing
payments last week, Melanson’s
husband Steve was alarmed to
find Rosemarie wouldn’t receive
anything. Overwhelmed and
exhausted from months spent by
his wife’s hospital bed, Steve
Melanson had missed the Jan. 31
deadline to file a claim.
In an interview Monday, Scott
Nielson, chairman of the victims’
fund committee, said he was
aware of the Melansons’ situation
and was working to address it.
Though all of the $31.5 million
BRIDGET BENNETT FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Steve Melanson leaves to spend the night with his wife, Rosemarie, at a hospital in Las Vegas.
raised has already been allocated
between more than 500 claimants, Nielson said, the fund might
seek additional donations or find
other ways to meet the Melansons’ needs.
“We’re going to do everything
we can to help somebody like
this,” he said.
The nonprofit Las Vegas
Victims’ Fund was established in
the aftermath of the Oct. 1 massacre to handle donations on behalf
of those killed and wounded when
a gunman opened fire from a
high-rise hotel above the Strip.
Staffed wholly by volunteers, the
organization solicited contributions and devised a protocol to
distribute funds. Families of the
58 people killed, and 10 other
victims who suffered paralysis or
brain damage, will receive
$275,000 each. Those who were
hospitalized for 24 days or more —
as Rosemarie Melanson has been
— will receive $200,000 each.
Injured victims with shorter
hospital stays will receive smaller
amounts. An additional $2.5 million was set aside to divide among
the more than 300 claimants who
received outpatient care. That last
group would have included the
Melansons’ daughter Paige, who
was struck in the elbow during
the attack.
Nielson said the fund’s staffers
did their best to ensure that victims were aware of the claims
process in January. Notices were
issued in local newspapers, on
television news programs and on
the website for the Vegas Strong
Resiliency Center, which provides
resources for those affected by the
shooting. Emails also went out to
families of known victims.
But Steve Melanson, submerged in his wife’s agonizingly
slow recovery, missed all of the
notices. For the past five months,
he has lived at hospitals, sleeping
in an uncomfortable recliner
beside his wife’s bed. He doesn’t
get the newspaper, and he doesn’t
watch television because the
sound exacerbates her anxiety.
Going back through his email
this weekend, he found one message from the fund that was sent
in January, when Rosemarie
Melanson’s health had taken a
turn for the worse. In that time,
she was transferred from a
rehabilitation facility to the intensive care unit at University Medical Center as doctors tried to pinpoint the cause of her constant
vomiting. Another message
wound up in his spam folder.
“Just having so many complications and so many things that
have gone wrong with her . . . I
missed the boat,” he said. “I mean,
it’s my fault. It’s just there was no
follow-up to make sure.”
Steve Melanson said he
thought he was registered in
November after he and Paige had
filled out a claim application with
the National Compassion Fund, a
program run by the National Center for Victims of Crime to help
organize donations after tragedies such as the attack in Las
Vegas. Funds raised through this
program aren’t taxed, and none of
the donations are taken out to
cover administrative costs or other fees, as happens on crowdfunding sites such as GoFundMe. The
National Compassion Fund is also
handling donations to victims of
the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla. Donations to victims of
last year’s mass shooting at a
church in Sutherland Springs,
Tex., were managed by the Texas
crime victims’ compensation
program.
After the Las Vegas Victims
Fund was established as an independent nonprofit, the National
Compassion Fund partnered with
the new group to collect and distribute donations. Nielson was
not sure what happened to the
application the Melansons filled
out last fall. Representatives of
the National Compassion Fund
did not respond to requests for
comment.
After speaking with Nielson on
Monday, Steve Melanson will
need to fill out a new claim application. He said he hopes to use the
funds to take his wife to see
gastrointestinal specialists at the
Mayo Clinic in Minnesota —
something that probably will
involve costly transportation fees
and co-pays.
Kenneth Feinberg, a victim
compensation expert who oversaw the 9/11 and Boston Marathon bombing funds, said such
oversights happen periodically after a tragedy; Boston’s One Fund
set aside a small amount to
allocate to victims who filed late.
“In every case with a legitimate
claimant we’ve found ways
through charity and donor compassion to find a way to pay the
claimant,” he said. “I’d be surprised if the [Las Vegas] fund
didn’t find a way.”
sarah.kaplan@washpost.com
Sessions calls for tougher enforcement against lying on background checks
Justice Department takes
steps to support Trump’s
gun policy proposals
BY
S ARI H ORWITZ
Attorney General Jeff Sessions
announced Monday that U.S. attorneys will more aggressively enforce the law that makes it a crime
for gun buyers to lie on their federal background checks, one of several steps Justice Department officials outlined as part of the Trump
administration’s response to last
month’s deadly school shooting in
Parkland, Fla.
The Justice Department also
will increase the presence of law
enforcement officers at schools
and continue to review the way
law enforcement agencies respond to tips from the public,
Sessions said.
“No child should have to fear
going to school or walking the
streets of their neighborhood,”
Sessions said in a statement.
Lying on a federal background
check when purchasing a firearm
is a felony that can be punished by
up to five years in prison, but the
crime is rarely prosecuted, accord-
ing to current and former Justice
Department officials. Sessions ordered federal prosecutors to
“swiftly and aggressively” pursue
cases against people who are prohibited from having firearms and
lie on a federal form to pass the
background check.
The announcement comes
nearly a month after the massacre
that left 17 dead at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School and as
Trump’s administration rolls out
policy proposals that focus largely
on school safety and mental
health rather than gun control.
The White House announced Sunday that it would help provide
firearms training to some schoolteachers and establish a Federal
Commission on School Safety to
be chaired by Education Secretary
Betsy DeVos.
Neither the Justice Department
initiatives nor Trump’s plan contain significant proposals to
change gun laws. Instead, Sessions’s actions enhance existing
programs and call for more aggressively enforcing current law.
The White House has also backed
away from Trump’s initial call to
raise the minimum age to buy
some guns from 18 to 21 years old.
The National Education Association, the country’s largest teachers lobby, along with other groups
sharply oppose the idea of arming
teachers. Many of the students
who survived the Parkland shooting — along with gun control
groups — have called for tighter
restrictions on gun purchases.
Senate Minority Leader Charles E.
Schumer (D-N.Y.) said that Democrats will push for passing universal background checks, legislation
on protection orders and a debate
on banning assault-style weapons.
Such measures are opposed by
the National Rifle Association,
which endorsed Trump and spent
an estimated $30 million to get
him elected.
“Despite all the tough talk from
the president, all the televised
meetings where he talked about
significant change, the [Trump]
plan is a moral abomination that
centers on buying teachers guns,”
said Peter Ambler, executive director of Giffords, the gun control
organization founded by Gabrielle
Giffords, the former congresswoman who survived being shot
in the head in 2011.
“The idea that you can turn
schools into fortresses and protect
them like that as opposed to addressing the root cause is plain
wrong,” Ambler said. “My mom
spent most of her career as a public school teacher. And the idea of
her grabbing a handgun and try-
ing to stop someone massacring
kids with an assault weapon is
insane.”
Sessions said the Justice Department will help state, local and
tribal law enforcement agencies
hire more school resource officers,
sworn law enforcement officers
responsible for preventing crime
and protecting schools. Using existing programs, the department
will provide support for firearms
and “situational awareness training” to school and law enforcement personnel, he said.
Sessions also has taken an incremental step toward banning
“bump stocks,” the devices that
allow a shooter to fire a semiautomatic firearm as though it was an
automatic weapon. On Saturday,
the attorney general submitted to
the Office of Management and
Budget a proposed regulation on
bump stocks.
Las Vegas shooter Stephen Paddock attached a bump stock to his
semiautomatic firearm and effectively turned it into a machine gun
that left 58 people dead and hundreds more injured in a matter of
minutes. After that incident, the
NRA said that bump stocks
“should be subject to additional
regulations.”
The bump stock proposal requires the OMB’s approval and
public comments before they can
be banned.
In 2010, the Bureau of Alcohol,
Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives
concluded that it could not regulate bump stocks because such
devices did not meet the legal
definition of a machine gun. But
Sessions, recently speaking to a
group of state attorneys general,
said he believed the devices could
be banned.
The effort is likely to face lawsuits from manufacturers who cite
ATF’s original opinion from 2010.
Federal agencies are required
by law to report to the National
Instant Criminal Background
Check System (NICS) the relevant
records about individuals who are
prohibited from possessing a gun
under federal law.
Sessions is calling on the FBI
and other relevant agencies to certify within 45 days that they are in
compliance with that law or have a
plan to become fully compliant.
There is no indication that
19-year-old Nikolas Cruz, the suspect in the Parkland shooting,
would have been stopped by an
improved background check system. He legally purchased his
AR-15 and several other firearms.
But NICS has come under scrutiny after several other high-profile shootings.
Dylann Roof, who killed nine
people three years ago at a black
church in Charleston, S.C., was
able to buy his gun after errors by
the FBI and local law enforcement
led to his name not being entered
into criminal-record databases
when he was arrested and had
admitted to drug possession.
The Air Force said it failed to
follow policies for alerting the FBI
about the domestic violence conviction of Devin P. Kelley, who
killed more than two dozen
churchgoers
in
Sutherland
Springs, Tex., last year. Because his
conviction was not entered into
NICS, Kelley was allowed to buy
firearms.
Tens of thousands of people
wanted by law enforcement officials were removed last year from
the FBI criminal background
check database that prohibits fugitives from justice from buying
guns. The FBI purged the names
from the database after the Justice
Department changed its legal interpretation of “fugitive from justice” to say it pertains only to
wanted people who have crossed
state lines. That meant fugitives
previously prohibited under federal law from purchasing firearms
can buy them, unless barred for
other reasons.
sari.horwitz@washpost.com
TUESDAY, MARCH 13 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A5
SU
Top Democrat assails ‘capitulation to the executive branch’
COLLUSION FROM A1
Russian lawyer. Conaway said
that meeting “shouldn’t have
happened, no doubt about that.”
“But only Tom Clancy or Vince
Flynn or someone else like that
could take this series of inadvertent contacts with each other,
meetings, whatever, and weave
that into some sort of a fiction,
page-turner spy thriller,” Conaway said. “We’re not dealing in
fiction, we’re dealing in facts, and
we found no evidence of any
collusion.”
House Intelligence Committee
Republicans completed the draft
report without any input from
Democrats, who will be able to
see and weigh in on the document
starting Tuesday, Conaway said.
In a statement Monday night, the
panel’s top Democrat, Rep. Adam
B. Schiff (Calif.), said the sight-unseen report was a “tragic milestone” and a “capitulation to the
executive branch.”
Trump responded to the announcement on Twitter on Monday
night, writing in all capital letters
“THE HOUSE INTELLIGENCE
COMMITTEE HAS, AFTER A 14
MONTH LONG IN-DEPTH INVESTIGATION, FOUND NO EVIDENCE OF COLLUSION OR CO-
ORDINATION BETWEEN THE
TRUMP CAMPAIGN AND RUSSIA
TO INFLUENCE THE 2016 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION.” He made
no immediate mention of the Democrats’ objection.
The committee has been crippled by partisan division for
months, as GOP members accused Democrats of trying to malign Trump without adequate evidence and Democrats accused
the GOP of trying to undermine
Mueller’s investigation.
Schiff argued last month that
there was “ample evidence” of
collusion between Russia and the
Trump campaign, and in recent
weeks, Mueller’s probe has been
gathering evidence that an early
2017 meeting in Seychelles was an
effort to establish a back channel
between the incoming administration and the Kremlin.
On Monday, Schiff excoriated
House Republicans for ending
the panel’s probe before Mueller’s team or the other congressional panels looking at Russian
interference have finished their
work. Schiff predicted that “Republicans will be held accountable for abandoning a critical
investigation of such vital national importance” if new information arises from future in-
Rep. K.
Michael
Conaway (RTex.) said
there’s no need
to subpoena
previous
witnesses.
dictments and other reports.
Conaway dismissed the idea of
keeping the investigation open
any longer, saying that if Democrats expected him to “sit around
and wait with the expectation
that something might happen,”
his answer was “no.”
“We think we have the evidence that we need now to come
to the conclusion that we came
to,” Conaway said, adding that if
compelling information surfaces
down the line, he would consider
reopening the probe.
Conclusions reached by the
Republicans in their draft report represent a break with the
U.S. intelligence community,
which determined in January
2017 that part of the Kremlin’s
strategy was to help Trump’s
chances of winning. Conaway
said the panel would release a
“separate report on the analytical integrity” of the intelligence
community’s conclusions in the
weeks ahead — though he said
the panel agreed with the determination that Russia used “active measures” to affect the 2016
election season.
Democrats and Republicans
on the committee have interviewed the same 73 witnesses and
viewed the same 300,000-plus
documents, according to a tally
Republicans released Monday.
Democrats say there are thousands more pages of documents
the committee never procured
and dozens more witnesses they
need to call for interviews —
including several they say need to
be subpoenaed for testimony after refusing to fully answer the
panel’s questions.
But Conaway argued against
using subpoenas or contempt citations to compel more testimony
from witnesses who refused to
answer questions about their
time in the administration, arguing that Trump might want to
invoke executive privilege.
“You use subpoenas when you
think you can actually get something from them, and we’re not
particularly confident that the
subpoena process will get us any
more information than we had,”
Conaway said. “We’ve interviewed everyone we think we
need to interview.”
Among those Conaway listed
as unlikely to answer additional
questions from the panel is
Trump supporter and Blackwater
security group founder Erik
Prince. Democrats want to determine whether Prince lied to the
panel about his meeting with a
Kremlin representative in Seychelles in January 2017.
They’ve also been frustrated
with former White House strategist Stephen K. Bannon. Despite
signals the committee would seek
to hold him in contempt for
refusing to answer questions related to the Trump administration and the transition period,
that now appears unlikely.
Instead, Conaway said, the
committee would continue to investigate allegations of surveillance abuse the GOP highlighted
in a controversial memo earlier
this year. The panel also would
continue to examine allegations
of “unmasking,” he added, noting
claims that the Obama administration improperly revealed the
names of people and corporations in surveillance reports.
Democrats have objected to both
investigations.
“Even while they close down
the Russia investigation, they
plan to continue trying to put our
own government on trial,” Schiff
said. “This is a great service to the
President, and a profound disservice to the country.”
Schiff said the panel’s Democrats would continue aspects of
the investigation “with or without the active participation of the
majority.” Conaway stressed that
the GOP’s draft report was not
final and he would seek to incorporate Democrats’ suggestions
before turning it over to the intelligence community for redactions, but Democrats are expected to release a separate report.
GOP leaders argued that the
committee could not wait any
longer to release its findings
without doing a disservice to the
public.
“After more than a year investigating Russia’s actions in the
2016 election, we are well into
the primary season for the 2018
elections, and experts are warning that we need to safeguard
against further interference,”
said AshLee Strong, a spokeswoman for House Speaker Paul
D. Ryan (R-Wis.). “That’s what
this next phase is about, and we
hope Democrats will join us in
seeing this through.”
karoun.demirjian@washpost.com
The Great Recession raised Americans’ blood pressure, researchers find
Study shows biggest
signs of worse health
among those hit hardest
BY
W ILLIAM W AN
As if we don’t have enough to
worry about — given daily political drama, volatile stock markets
and North Korean nuclear
threats — a new study suggests
that living through such times of
instability and societal upheaval
can greatly worsen personal
health.
Using large data sets gathered
before and after the 2008-2010
Great Recession, researchers
found significantly higher blood
pressure and blood sugar levels
in American adults.
“We found some pretty big
effects, differences in blood pressure that would not be something
a doctor would sneeze at,” said
Teresa Seeman, a veteran epidemiologist at the University of
California at Los Angeles and the
study’s lead author. “It does make
you think about the times we live
in now. Things are not exactly the
most stable they’ve been. And it
will be interesting to see what the
effect will be of all the upheaval
we’re going through now.”
The study, published Monday
in the journal Proceedings of the
National Academy of Sciences,
found that those hit hardest by
the trauma of the recession
showed the greatest signs of
worse health. Those included
pre-retirement adults under 65,
who would have been most wor-
ried about losing their jobs, and
older homeowners over 65, who
were most likely see their nest
eggs shrink and home values
plummet.
Adults already on blood pressure medication also appeared to
take a bigger hit to their health,
the study found. “It appeared
that because their health was
already compromised, they were
more biologically vulnerable to
the effects of stress,” Seeman
said.
Eileen Crimmins, a demographer at the University of Southern California who was not involved in the study, said its conclusions linking the recession’s
stresses to health declines appeared credible. “If you’re working with that much data and you
get that much change, there’s
something there in terms of cau-
sation,” she said. “The more data
you have about the ‘before,’ the
more certain you are about what
caused the ‘after.’ ”
The researchers drew on unusually rich data collected every
two years in a federally funded
survey called the Multi-Ethnic
Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA),
originally designed to study cardiovascular disease. And while
they focused on the effects of
economic upheaval, other research in recent years has examined the health effects of political
upheaval.
In fact, the party and person
who occupies the White House
often have a powerful effect on
societal health, said Javier
Rodríguez, a political scientist at
Claremont Graduate University,
who researches the intersection
of politics and health. Recent
studies have suggested that the
party in power can have a noticeable impact not just on health but
on income and wealth inequality
and mortality, too.
In 2013, Rodríguez found that
U.S. infant mortality consistently
worsens during Republican
presidential
administrations
compared with Democratic presidencies. His study used data
across nine presidencies, from
1965 to 2010, and he concluded
that the higher death rates under
Republicans were likely because
of policies that worsened health
inequalities.
Given the policies enacted by
President Trump, Rodríguez said
Monday, the trend is likely to
continue.
“Weakening the welfare system and redirecting policy that
would increase even further in-
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come and wealth inequality will
add to the trend detected in my
research,” he said via email. In
coming years, he added, researchers looking back at the
current period will be particularly interested in studying the
health effects on minorities, immigrants and the poor.
Based on past studies assessing the health effects of particular events or policies, it often
takes a year for such consequences to begin showing up in the
data.
“If this is so,” Rodríguez pointed out, “we should begin to detect
the effects of Trump’s administration policies and interventions
soon.”
william.wan@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/to-your-health
A6
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 13 , 2018
In some Ohio schools, educators are already armed
GUNS FROM A1
his office. “Otherwise, you are
literally a sitting duck in a school
if you are not able to respond. And
I’m not willing to do that. I’m not
willing to put our kids at risk.”
In 10 states, schools allow
teachers and staff members to be
armed, with administrators’ permission. After the shooting that
took 17 lives at Marjory Stoneman
Douglas High School in Florida
last month, pressure is increasing
to expand that approach.
The White House said Sunday
night that it will establish a Federal Commission on School Safety, chaired by Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, and will begin
working with states to provide
“rigorous firearms training” to
some schoolteachers.
President Trump and the National Rifle Association have been
clear: Make schools fortresses.
Employ every deterrence. Fight
fire with fire. Arm teachers.
“Armed Educators (and trusted
people who work within a school)
love our students and will protect
them,” Trump tweeted last
month. “. . . Shootings will not
happen again — a big & very
inexpensive deterrent.”
Florida legislators passed a
gun bill Wednesday that includes
$67 million for the training and
arming of certain school staffers,
though it excludes full-time
teachers from those who are eligible to volunteer. Gov. Rick Scott
(R) signed it Friday.
During her visit Wednesday to
Stoneman Douglas, DeVos said
arming teachers should not be
mandated, but she pointed to gun
and safety training programs for
teachers in Texas and Polk County, Fla., as examples for schools
that want to increase security.
“I think that’s a model that can
be adopted and should be an
option for schools, for states, for
communities,” DeVos said.
But gun-control proponents
and teachers unions have also
been clear: Raise the age to buy
guns. Expand mental health access. Ban military-style weapons.
Don’t make teachers do double
duty as volunteer security guards.
“The gun lobby’s proposals to
arm teachers are a deliberate,
outrageous distraction from the
real threats we face and the serious policy discussion we need,”
said Ari Freilich, a lawyer with the
Giffords Law Center to Prevent
Gun Violence.
According to a Washington
Post analysis, it could cost more
than $1 billion to arm and train
20 percent of American teachers
— a percentage suggested by
Trump.
The White House said Sunday
that the administration will help
military veterans and retired law
enforcement transition into new
careers in education and that the
Justice Department will work
with local and state law enforcement to provide firearms training
for teachers and school staffers.
Fifty-nine percent of Americans oppose training teachers to
carry guns, according to a recent
NPR poll. And 51 percent of respondents in a Washington PostABC News poll last month said
the Stoneman Douglas shooting
could not have been prevented by
equipping teachers with guns.
Forty-two percent said it could
have.
But even as elected leaders and
national organizations weigh the
political impact of arming teachers, some school districts are already embracing programs that
put guns in the hands of educators and staffers.
‘Our children are protected’
The debate over arming teachers is now percolating nationally,
but it has been stirring in school
districts across Ohio for the past
five years. It began soon after the
2012 shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut
that left 26 students and educators dead. A number of Ohio
districts, particularly those in
more rural areas, worried that
their schools were vulnerable and
began weaponizing staff members and training them to respond to a shooter.
“Ohio is really ground zero for
this,” says Kate Way, an educator
and co-producer of the documentary “G Is for Gun: The Arming of
Teachers in America,” which airs
this month on public television in
Ohio. “My sense after following
this for three years is that the
move to arm teachers is growing
like wildfire here.”
Wyen did not sugarcoat the
potential dangers for teachers
and staffers in his district who
wanted to take part.
“We told them, you have to
understand that if you choose to
do this, you’re putting your life at
risk, and you have to be comfortable with that,” he says. They do
not get extra pay.
From his staff of 460 systemwide, 50 volunteered to take part.
All had experience with guns and
possessed concealed-weapons licenses. Each was interviewed several times. Why do you want to do
this, they were asked. Can you
move toward a threat? If a suspect is a student, can you shoot to
stop him from hurting others?
Wyen selected 32 teachers and
staff members for his team. Their
identities are known only to
PHOTOS BY LUKE SHARRETT FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
TOP: Firearms instructor Joe Eaton at Premier Shooting and
Training Center in West Chester Township, Ohio. “If someone is
murdering people in your school,” he tells the teachers he trains,
“you kill them as soon as possible and stop the killing.” ABOVE: A
Glock 19 9mm handgun in the office of Mad River School District
Superintendent Chad Wyen near Dayton, Ohio. The firearm is kept
in a locked safe. Thirty-two Mad River teachers and staffers are
authorized and trained to use guns stored in their schools.
Wyen and law enforcement. Their
anonymity is part of the district’s
security strategy. The only sign to
outsiders of their existence is one
that greets visitors at every entrance to Mad River schools:
“WARNING: Inside this building
our children are protected by an
armed and trained response
team.”
Jade Deis, a freshman at the
district’s high school, says she
feels safer knowing that teachers
are armed. “What’s a stapler going to do against a gun?” she asks.
For Deis and her friends, the new
program hasn’t been the subject
of much discussion.
“The teachers don’t talk about
it, they don’t show the guns,” she
says. “I kind of forget it’s there.”
But some parents, students
and teachers have raised concerns that having guns in school
makes it more likely that an accidental shooting — or worse —
could occur.
“It’s good that they want to
protect us, but what if a teacher
just pops off? Anyone can go
crazy, and then they have the gun
right there,” says Jalen Yarbrough, a freshman. “Or let’s say a
kid gets rowdy. The teacher could
say, ‘I feared for my life and I shot
him.’ ”
Amanda Gallagher, who has
two daughters in grade school in
the Mad River district, expressed
concerns to administrators that
not enough research has been
done about the dangers of having
guns in schools.
“They seem very concerned
with response times but not as
concerned with the rest of the
risks of having armed teachers in
school,” Gallagher says. “I can
appreciate how afraid they are.
I’m very concerned that my kids
aren’t going to come home from
school one day, but it doesn’t
make me feel better that the
teachers are armed. It just gives
me new things to worry about.”
In Ohio, the decision on whether to arm teachers is made by
school districts, and they are not
required to make that information public, so there are no figures
on how many of the state’s 610
districts have armed teachers.
Michael Hanlon, superintendent of the Chardon school district in northeast Ohio, says he is
often asked if his district arms its
teachers.
Six years ago, 17-year-old T.J.
Lane entered Chardon High
School with a .22-caliber semiautomatic handgun. He killed three
students and injured three others. In a matter of minutes, the
school joined “a club that no one
wants to be part of,” Hanlon says.
Whenever there’s a school
shooting anywhere in the country, he says, teachers and staffers
in his district feel it to their core.
“You can never escape it.”
And after every shooting, Hanlon hears renewed calls to arm
teachers. His district has chosen
not to.
“If we saw the same thing
happen in a hospital, I don’t think
we’d start saying we need to arm
doctors and nurses,” Hanlon says.
“They have important lifesaving
work to do. And the work that
teachers do is just as important.
The argument to arm teachers
once again diminishes the core
work of teachers.”
‘A serious, serious thing’
Sitting at a conference room
table at the Premier Shooting and
Training Center just north of Cincinnati, Joe Eaton says he hears
the same questions from all of the
teachers, bus drivers, cafeteria
workers and administrators who
take part in the gun and tactical
training his organization provides to schools across Ohio.
“Am I going to be able to do
this? Am I going to be able to
perform? Am I going to be out-
gunned?”
The 52-year-old grandfather,
IT professional and gun enthusiast says he also has a question for
them: If the shooter is a student
or a former student, as most
school shooters are, will you be
able to stare down the barrel of
your gun and pull the trigger?
“The rules of engagement are,
if someone is murdering people
in your school, you kill them as
soon as possible and stop the
killing,” says Eaton, the program
director for Faster Saves Lives, an
emergency-response
training
program for schools created five
years ago by the Buckeye Firearms Foundation, an Ohio nonprofit gun advocacy and training
group.
According to Eaton, roughly
1,000 of the 1,300 participants in
the Faster program have come
from more than 200 Ohio school
districts. Demand has never been
higher.
When the program began,
most participants were former
law enforcement, military or
hunters, Eaton says. But in the
past two years, that has changed:
More than half had never touched
a firearm until their schools
asked them to take part.
During a three-day course, participants study the history of active-shooter situations, engage in
tactical drills and maneuvers,
practice firearm skills and work
on trauma aid techniques.
None of the Ohio teachers
trained to use guns have been
forced to do so in a school, Eaton
says.
“We’re giving them simple,
easy, clearly defined training and
tools that they can use in the
event of the worst day possible at
their school,” he says.
One of the first Ohio districts to
arm its teachers was Sidney, a
rural community less than an
hour north of Dayton. There, the
training is extensive and participants are carefully selected, says
Superintendent John Scheu, who
launched the program five years
ago.
“This is not just giving someone a gun. It’s not a hobby. It’s a
serious, serious thing,” says a Sidney teacher who participates in
the program and asked not to be
identified because of the school’s
security protocol. “I love to train
for it, and I never, ever want to use
that training. If your mentality is
to be the cowboy, you don’t belong in this program.”
The teacher, who started his
career just before the 1999 attack
at Columbine High School in Colorado that left 15 dead, says he
understands that arming teachers isn’t for every school district.
“Teachers are nurturers,” he
says. “And now we’re protectors.”
But Lori Hedberg, who heads
the Sidney teachers union, says
that’s a choice teachers shouldn’t
have to make. She fought to keep
the school district from adopting
the program. The union lost. Hedberg continues fighting.
“This is a knee-jerk response
that won’t solve the problem,”
says Hedberg, who has been with
the district for 29 years. “Let’s
beef up our barriers so a teacher
won’t have to shoot a gun. I don’t
want a teacher to ever shoot a
gun. That is not part of your job
description.”
joe.heim@washpost.com
Democrats show little willingness to corner GOP ahead of spending deadline
BY
M IKE D E B ONIS
For months, Democrats promised to use their leverage on government spending to protect
young immigrants at risk for deportation after President Trump
canceled the program. More recently, they have demanded Congress pass universal background
checks for gun buyers in the wake
of another deadly school shooting.
Now, with Congress less than
two weeks from a funding deadline, Democrats are showing little
willingness to corner Republicans
on those issues.
Their lack of appetite to provoke
another showdown represents a
shift after two previous fights resulted in brief government shutdowns and risks alienating the party’s liberal base, which will be crucial in midterm elections. But several events have sapped the party’s
resolve. Moderate Democrats
flinched after a three-day January
shutdown fought over immigration; court decisions have left
Trump’s cancellation of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program in legal limbo;
and many Democrats are eager to
pass the next spending bill and lock
in more money for key agencies.
“The current predicament
illustrates how you really only had
one bite at the apple of taking a
stand over the funding of the government on this [DACA] issue,”
said Brian Fallon, a Democratic
consultant who is close to Senate
Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) “The previous attempt was either going to be successful, or this gambit was going to
fall apart, and what’s happened is it
has fallen apart.”
Congressional leaders are now
hashing out a $1.3 trillion “omnibus” spending package ahead of a
March 23 deadline. Despite the
lack of resolution on DACA and no
clear path forward on gun control
after a Feb. 14 shooting left 17 people dead inside a Florida high
school, party leaders are brushing
off suggestions of a fresh showdown.
House Minority Leader Nancy
Pelosi (D-Calif.), who delivered a
record-breaking eight-hour floor
speech on the DACA issue ahead of
the last spending deadline, has
said neither a DACA extension nor
a gun-control package “has to be
part of” the spending legislation
but could instead pass in separate
bills that Democrats have little
power to force through the Republican-controlled Congress.
Instead of delving into that
fight, Democrats appear trained on
battles happening within the confines of the spending bill itself —
where they feel they are on firmer
political ground trying to fend off
what they consider to be Republican overreach on controversial
policies.
On immigration, for instance,
while there is little stomach to
BRIAN SNYDER/REUTERS
Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer meets on gun violence.
Democrats have pushed less for key issues in the new spending bill.
push DACA, there is an emerging
scuffle over whether Congress will
grant additional funds to the
Trump administration to beef up
border security, fund more immigration enforcement officers and
increase the number of detention
beds for immigrants who have
been apprehended.
Democratic leaders and immigrant advocates appear to be united behind a strategy of bowing to
political reality and setting aside
the DACA fight for now to defang
what they call the “deportation machine.”
“I don’t think anyone in Wash-
ington believes that they will be
willing to withhold their votes over
DACA on another spending bill,”
said Angel Padilla, policy director
for the activist group Indivisible.
“But we’re hoping that they make it
clear to Republicans that there are
red lines on enforcement activities.”
The Congressional Hispanic
Caucus last week sent a letter to
congressional leaders, provided to
The Washington Post by a Democratic aide, calling on them to “reject any increased funding for [the
Department of Homeland Security’s] wasteful and harmful en-
forcement system.”
The pivot comes a month after
Democrats splintered on a budget
bill that delivered $151 billion in
additional funding to domestic
agencies but left DACA unaddressed. Less than two days after
Pelosi delivered her speech, 73
Democrats broke ranks and joined
Republicans to approve the deal. In
the Senate, already cowed by the
fizzled shutdown, 35 of 46 Democrats voted for it.
The pending omnibus bill will
now dole out that increased funding to specific agencies and programs, funding them through
Sept. 30.
“Democrats got a lot of what
they wanted, and immigration has
not elevated itself to that rarefied
top tier where Democrats across
the board are willing to go to the
mat,” said one Democratic aide
who closely follows immigration
issues and spoke on the condition
of anonymity to freely discuss private talks.
On guns, there has been growing public pressure for action by
Congress since the Parkland, Fla.,
school shooting, and Democrats
have previously engaged in dramatic steps on the gun issue, notably the June 2016 House sit-in that
followed the deadly attack on an
Orlando nightclub.
According to a senior Democratic aide, who spoke on the condition
of anonymity to candidly discuss
talks, Democrats are pushing for
repeal of the Dickey Amendment, a
provision dating to 1996 that has
been interpreted as preventing the
Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention from studying gun violence as a public health issue. That
fight has the backing of major organizations advocating new gun
controls but has been waged quietly, the aide said, to avoid provoking
a public fight with gun-rights advocates.
“Because of the gun lobby,
Americans are effectively blocked
from knowing even the scope of
our gun violence problem, let alone
the possible solutions to it,” said
John Feinblatt, president of Everytown for Gun Safety.”
Some Democrats are pushing to
wage these fights out in the open,
even as party leaders assert they
can achieve better results — and
play better politics — by avoiding a
high-profile confrontation.
“The caucus is unified in insisting that we deal with gun violence
and we deal with the Dream Act, so
I think everything tactically is still
on the table right now,” said Rep.
Jamie Raskin (D-Md.).
But another obstacle to Democrats hoping for action on immigration and guns are defensive battles over other provisions in the
spending bill where Republicans
are hoping to advance conservative priorities now that they have
control of both chambers of Congress and the White House.
mike.debonis@washpost.com
TUESDAY, MARCH 13 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A7
RE
Republicans see Pa. vote as test of president’s coattails
Election may have more
effect on midterm
strategy than Capitol Hill
BY D AVID W EIGEL
AND R OBERT C OSTA
waynesburg, pa. — The stakes
are high for President Trump and
congressional Republicans in
Tuesday’s special election to fill a
U.S. House seat, with GOP leaders
unnerved about the prospect of
defeat and the implications for
this year’s midterm elections.
A loss in Pennsylvania’s 18th
Congressional District — a working-class slice of the country that
Trump has cultivated as his political base — could shatter hopes
that his core voters will turn out
in droves this fall and save the
GOP’s 24-seat House majority.
And, coming days after the
president announced tariffs on
steel and aluminum imports, the
vote could raise fresh questions
about the power of Trump’s protectionist agenda to lift his party.
“It really is a test that sets
things in motion,” former Republican National Committee chairman Michael Steele said. “Does
the base have energy? Does the
party have the structure and discipline it needs?”
But the cause has divided Republicans.
Inside the White House, Trump
and his aides have dismissed suggestions that the contest is a
referendum on him and have
berated GOP candidate Rick Saccone, 60, for running a sluggish
campaign against Democrat
Conor Lamb, 33, according to
three Republicans who were not
authorized to speak publicly.
One GOP official said Saccone,
a state representative, has been a
“failure” due to his lackluster
campaigning and reliance on
Trump — and coolly added that
Lamb, a former Marine, has been
clever in sharing aspects of
Trump’s stances and running as
an outsider in courting Republican voters.
“He’s running like he’s a friend
of Trump,” former Pennsylvania
congressman Bob Walker (R)
said. “That approach, plus the
fact that some Democrats in these
PHOTOS BY DREW ANGERER/GETTY IMAGES
LEFT: Donald Trump Jr. campaigns with Republican House candidate Rick Saccone, wearing black coat, at a candy shop in Canonsburg,
Pa., on Monday. RIGHT: Saccone’s opponent, Democrat Conor Lamb, center, talks to supporters after a rally in Waynesburg, Pa., on
Sunday. Polls indicate the race, in what was thought to be a reliably red district in western Pennsylvania, is close. Saccone has embraced
President Trump’s positions, and although the White House has tried to tamp down expectations, observers are watching the race as a
possible indicator of how enthusiastically the Republican base will turn out in the November elections.
areas are coming home, makes it
competitive.”
Lamb has closed his bid with
care. At campaign stops, the
youthful former prosecutor never
mentions Trump. When former
vice president Joe Biden visited, it
was Biden, not Lamb, who took
questions.
“Let me tell you what kind of
Democrat Conor is,” Cecil Roberts, president of the United Mine
Workers of America, said at
Lamb’s rally Sunday. “He’s a Godfearing, union-supporting, gunowning, job-protecting, pensiondefending, Social Security-believing, health care-creating, and
sending-drug-dealers-to-jail
Democrat!”
Conservative groups have
spent more than $10 million in
the race, and Trump rallied a
crowd here over the weekend,
underscoring the desire to
emerge victorious and calm GOP
lawmakers who have seen a spate
of retirements and only grown
more wary of their reelection
chances since Democrats won a
U.S. Senate seat in Alabama in
December.
Republicans said Monday that
the surge of drama in what they
had expected to be a relatively
sleepy race has revealed significant issues nationally for Trump
“It should be a warning signal that Republicans
have to do a better job explaining our policies.”
Rep. Peter T. King (R-N.Y.)
and the party.
“It should wake everybody up,”
Rep. Peter T. King (R-N.Y.) said.
Win or lose, “it should be a warning signal that Republicans have
to do a better job explaining our
policies and not live in an echo
chamber. The people who hate
Trump will come out, but what
about the people who like him?”
Saccone spent the final day of
the campaign alongside Donald
Trump Jr., with the candidate and
the president’s eldest son donning hairnets for a kitchen tour of
Sarris Candies in Canonsburg.
Trump Jr., who went to high
school and college in Pennsylvania, said he wanted to spotlight a
business that had grown from
320 to 400 employees following
passage of the GOP-authored tax
law last year.
Asked about Republican criticism of Saccone’s campaign,
Trump told reporters, “God
knows, if it’s going to make it
difficult for Trump, the media’s
going to be all over it.”
At the candy plant, Tony Ross,
72, said he remained undecided.
He was intrigued by Lamb after
his former union, the United
Steelworkers, endorsed him, and
by the Democrat’s support for the
president’s new steel tariffs.
“It’s like a death in the family
when a steel plant closes down,”
Ross said. “But I haven’t seen
anything in Saccone’s record that
stands out for unemployed people.”
Darlene Bales, a 67-year-old
factory employee, pointed at Saccone during the tour. “If he
doesn’t win, lock him up!” she
said.
Polls show a close race, but
Saccone dismissed the numbers.
“You guys have been up and down
with poll numbers,” he said.
“We’re out meeting people every
day, and everywhere I go, it’s 100
to 1 for Rick Saccone.”
Trump won the district by
nearly 20 percentage points
against Democrat Hillary Clinton
in 2016. The 18th includes subur-
ban towns south of Pittsburgh
and has a mostly white electorate.
The special election was called
after representative Tim Murphy,
a Republican, resigned in disgrace last year following the disclosure of an extramarital affair
during which the antiabortion
congressman seemed to suggest
that his mistress should seek an
abortion.
“You can’t read too much into
these special elections. That’s
why they call them special,” former Trump campaign adviser Ed
Brooker said, reflecting the mood
of Trump’s political circle on the
eve of the election. “You have to
focus on what the candidates
there are doing.”
The victor will serve out the
remainder of Murphy’s term, but
the district will cease to exist in its
current form in November, due to
the Pennsylvania Supreme Court
redrawing the state’s congressional map.
Lamb’s moderate streak has
won converts. Linda Miller, 74,
said that she and her husband left
their presidential ballots blank in
2016, and that she had not voted
for a Democratic nominee since
Bill Clinton. Trump, she said, had
“brought some jobs back,” but
Lamb had won her over after
saying he would not support
House Minority Leader Nancy
Pelosi (D-Calif.) in a leadership
race.
“I haven’t seen anything she’s
done in there that’s any good,”
Miller said. “We need a young
person in there who’s going to be
honest.”
Still, veteran Pennsylvania
Democrats are cautious about
predicting an upset.
“Lamb has outraised Saccone,
but it’s the outside money where
the Republicans have the advantage,” former Pennsylvania governor Ed Rendell said. “The incredible Republican spending is going
to have an effect, even though
Lamb has been smart in not
letting the race get nationalized
like we saw in the special congressional election in Atlanta last
year.” In that vote in Georgia’s 6th
Congressional District, Democrat
Jon Ossoff was defeated by Republican Karen Handel (R).
Saccone’s pitch has been less
about touting the Republican tax
law and more about embracing
Trump at every turn. But that
hasn’t stopped outside GOP
groups such as the Congressional
Leadership Fund, a super PAC
aligned with House Speaker Paul
D. Ryan (R-Wis.), from running a
flurry of ads criticizing Lamb for
opposing the Republican tax effort and tying him to Pelosi.
At the president’s Saturday rally, many attendees said they remained steadfast in Trump’s corner despite his controversies, giving party leaders confidence that
the tariff push and Trump visit
could keep the seat red.
On stage, Trump warned them
that he could make progress only
“if we elect people who are going
to back our agenda.”
James Johnson, 42, had a oneword reason for why he planned
to vote for Saccone on Tuesday:
“Republican.”
“I think we need to keep the
country going in the direction it’s
going in,” said Johnson, a Trumpsupporting union member who
works in manufacturing. He credited Trump for his paycheck going
up about $100 a month since
Republicans passed their tax law
— and said that’s enough for him.
david.weigel@washpost.com
robert.costa@washpost.com
Jenna Johnson contributed to this
report.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 13 , 2018
Billionaire ally endeavors to keep Trump close to China
Force One with Trump for a trip to
Palm Beach, where Schwarzman
owns a palatial home 11/2 miles
from Mar-a-Lago.
Schwarzman’s plans that weekend included his 70th-birthday
party, an even more ostentatious
affair than his 60th. In honor of
Schwarzman’s China ties, the party was themed “The Silk Road,”
with three-story temples, trapeze
acrobats and “Oriental ribbon
dancers,” according to the society
magazine Avenue.
Schwarzman invited Trump,
but the president, who was meeting with Japan’s prime minister at
Mar-a-Lago, did not attend. His
daughter Ivanka Trump, her husband, Kushner, and a number of
Cabinet secretaries joined the party, where about 600 guests gathered to watch fireworks and listen
to Gwen Stefani sing “Happy
Birthday.”
Schwarzman helped halt
currency-manipulation
declaration but not tariffs
BY
M ICHAEL K RANISH
The day after President Trump
rattled world markets by suggesting a trade war that could inflame
China, he dined at his Mar-a-Lago
Club in Florida with a Palm Beach
neighbor and billionaire financier
who for more than a year had
striven to prevent such a move.
Stephen Schwarzman, chief executive of the Blackstone Group, a
private equity giant, had declined
to give Trump’s campaign money
or endorse him during the 2016
presidential race. But since the
election,
Schwarzman
has
emerged as one of Trump’s most
generous donors, as well as a key
adviser with rare and regular access to the president.
The New York investor, who has
one of the closest relationships to
Beijing of any American executive,
is in many ways the president’s de
facto China whisperer — helping
to persuade the man who said
Beijing’s leaders were “raping” the
United States not to follow
through on a campaign promise to
declare China a “currency manipulator.”
But on this night, on the patio
of the president’s estate,
Schwarzman’s pull on Trump
was being tested anew. The president said a trade war started by
new U.S. tariffs could be successful, according to a person with
knowledge of the conversation.
Through
a
spokesman,
Schwarzman declined to reveal his
response, but associates said his
main message to Trump over the
past 14 months has been consistent: Keep in mind the broader
importance of the U.S.-China relationship.
A few days later, on March 7,
Trump signaled that he was open
to a compromise with Beijing on
trade. “China has been asked to
develop a plan for the year of a One
Billion Dollar reduction in their
massive Trade Deficit with the
United States,” he tweeted. “Our
relationship with China has been a
very good one, and we look forward to seeing what ideas they
come back with.”
Trump proceeded last week to
impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imported from countries
such as China, a move met with
threats of retaliation worldwide.
However, he softened the blow by
saying he had “great respect” for
Chinese President Xi Jinping, who
has relied on Schwarzman as a
go-between since Trump’s election.
The relationship is rooted in
business: Until recently, the Chinese government had a significant
stake in Blackstone, which does
billions of dollars in business in
China. Schwarzman has said others consider him an “unofficial
ambassador” between the countries, and he endowed a Chinese
college in his name.
“Mr. Schwarzman has a good
understanding of China, China’s
polices, the complexities of the
economic relationship between us
due to this long involvement in
China,” Cui Tiankai, China’s ambassador to the United States, said
in an interview last month at the
Chinese Embassy in Washington.
A White House spokesman did
not respond to requests for comment. Schwarzman declined to
comment.
Schwarzman may have lost this
round on China. And Trump could
further strain bilateral relations
with his decision on Monday to
block Broadcom’s bid for Qualcomm on national security
grounds, apparently because of
concerns that it might give China
an edge in sensitive technologies.
But Schwarzman’s ongoing relationship with the president — particularly after the departure of
White House economic adviser
Gary Cohn — leaves him as one of
the last remaining free-trade advocates with a direct line to Trump.
“I don’t think it changes one
iota,” said Mark Weinberger, the
chief executive of the accounting
giant EY, who served on a White
House council of CEOs with
Schwarzman. “In Washington,
there will be another issue, and
you have to play the long game and
continue to be a trusted adviser.”
A late but prolific supporter
In 2007, Trump and his wife,
Melania, attended Schwarzman’s
60th-birthday party, which resembled an ostentatious scene from
“The Great Gatsby.” A Manhattan
armory was decorated to replicate
Schwarzman’s 35-room Park Avenue apartment, once owned by
John D. Rockefeller Jr. Rod Stewart and Patti LaBelle performed.
Shortly after the bash, in March
2007, Blackstone went public. Beijing Wonderful Investments, controlled by the Chinese government, bought 9.9 percent of the
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
company’s shares, a $3 billion
stake.
Schwarzman said in a Bloomberg News interview that China
had not made a stock investment
in a foreign company since World
War II. When he asked how the
deal would be arranged, he said he
was told, “The premier himself
must approve” it.
The investment was a fraction
too low to trigger a U.S. national
security review. (The Chinese had
reduced their stake to 4.5 percent
by last year, and have sold their
remaining shares since then, according to a Securities and Exchange Commission filing last
week.)
Schwarzman’s party and wealth
made him a symbol of Wall Street
excess. His stake in Blackstone
was valued in the public offering at
$7 billion. Although the 2007 financial meltdown devastated
many companies, Blackstone’s
grew significantly, boosting his
fortune.
Blackstone now says it employs
412,000 people through its ownership of dozens of firms, and it
ranks as the world’s largest private
equity firm and private real estate
investor.
Schwarzman, 71, has a net
worth of nearly $13 billion and is
ranked by Forbes Magazine as the
nation’s 35th-wealthiest man;
Trump ranks 248th. A company
filing said that Schwarzman
earned at least $800 million in
2017, one of the highest compensation levels ever for a chief executive of a publicly traded firm.
Schwarzman, a longtime Republican, informally has advised
both GOP and Democratic administrations, but his financial support has gone almost entirely to
the GOP. He contributed $100,000
in 2016 to a political action committee supporting presidential
candidate Jeb Bush, and gave
$4.7 million to committees supporting Republican congressional
candidates.
He gave nothing to Trump.
“I’ve known Donald for 40 years
and he is the P.T. Barnum of America,” Schwarzman said on CNN in
November 2015, referring to the
19th-century circus promoter, declining to endorse his friend. Still,
he said Trump’s “political incorrectness” was “good for democracy.”
A CNN interviewer asked
Schwarzman whether he could
back Trump in light of his China
position. Trump had said China’s
leaders “are the greatest currency
manipulators ever!”
Schwarzman ducked the question, saying, “It’s one thing to get a
job, it’s another thing to do a job.”
Schwarzman’s refusal to contribute to the campaign or endorse
him miffed Trump, according to
an associate who said the candidate repeatedly asked: “What
about Schwarzman?”
After the GOP primaries,
Schwarzman met privately with
Trump, but still made no endorsement, according to two people familiar with the session. During
this time, Blackstone’s real estate
division did business with Trump’s
son-in-law, Jared Kushner, lending $312 million to Kushner Cos.
and its Brooklyn partner around
the time of the Republican National Convention.
On Sept. 10, 2016, Schwarzman
went to the Beijing campus of Tsinghua University to announce a
one-year master’s program named
for him and endowed through his
donations. Schwarzman had given
$117 million and raised an additional $450 million.
At the opening ceremonies,
Schwarzman praised Xi for recog-
NICOLAS ASFOURI/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
TOP: President Trump shakes hands with Stephen Schwarzman — one of Trump’s most generous
donors, as well as a key adviser — during a meeting at the White House in February 2017. ABOVE:
Schwarzman College at Tsinghua University in Beijing in 2016, the year Schwarzman endowed
the college. Schwarzman has one of the closest relationships to Beijing of any American executive.
nizing that fear and misunderstanding can pull apart countries.
Back in the United States,
Trump was declaring on the campaign trail that Beijing’s leaders
were “raping” the United States.
But the two men came together
after the election.
It was a mutually beneficial arrangement, according to associates of both. Schwarzman called
Trump to congratulate him on his
victory and offered to help. Trump
lacked connections to corporate
leaders outside of real estate, and
he determined that Schwarzman
would be the best person to help
him develop relationships with
some of the country’s most influential chief executives. He asked
Schwarzman to head a White
House group of business advisers.
The Blackstone chief was “the
Schwarzman “is right
up there in terms of
being able to convey
pretty direct messages
in both directions.”
Kevin Rudd, former
Australian prime minister
and a Schwarzman friend
most natural choice” to assist
Trump, said Hamilton James, the
company’s executive vice chairman.
“The people Trump knew were
the people in real estate,” James
said. “Even then it wasn’t that big a
network, but even then people
were hesitant to deal with him. So
he had to turn to someone to pull
this together.”
About the same time he was
selected by Trump for the White
House post, Schwarzman contributed $250,000 to Trump’s inaugural committee — beginning a surge
in donations that has made him
one of the biggest financial supporters of the president and the
Republican National Committee.
A go-between with Xi
Schwarzman’s selection was not
well received by some in the president’s inner circle. Because of his
close ties to China, some of
Trump’s advisers considered him
the epitome of the kind of globalism the president deplored during
his campaign. And there was irritation that he had held back financial support during the 2016 race.
“At the time, he didn’t have a lot
of supporters inside the transition
because he hadn’t helped us at all,”
said a Trump confidant involved in
the discussions who spoke on the
condition of anonymity to talk
about internal matters.
Schwarzman cast his role as a
guide to the global economy for
the longtime developer and former reality television star. He noted that Trump’s “basic job” was in
real estate, telling CNN in March
2017 that “there are a lot of things
outside of that sphere which are
new and different.”
China policy was a natural area
for Schwarzman to expand
Trump’s knowledge.
Former secretary of state Henry
Kissinger, who helped open the
door to U.S. relations with China
under President Richard Nixon
and has advised Trump on China,
said in an interview that
Schwarzman has a unique standing in Beijing.
“He understands the relationship between the political and the
economic world better. . . . I have
seen his results and because he has
done so many useful things in
China, he has more access to the
Chinese.”
That access was evident when,
days after Trump’s inauguration,
Xi pulled Schwarzman aside at the
2017 World Economic Forum in
Davos, Switzerland.
The two had “an animated conversation about Trump’s perception of China,” said former Australian prime minister Kevin Rudd, a
Schwarzman friend. Schwarzman
sought to explain to Xi why Trump
believes Americans feel shortchanged by globalism and the China trade deficit, Rudd said.
Then Schwarzman returned to
the United States and briefed
Trump and Treasury Secretary
Steven Mnuchin about his talk
with the Chinese leader, according
to two people briefed on the matter. Mnuchin did not respond to a
request for comment.
Schwarzman “is right up there
in terms of being able to convey
pretty direct messages in both directions,” Rudd said.
Trump, meanwhile, faced pressure to take action against China
from a group of nationalist-oriented advisers headed by then-chief
strategist Stephen K. Bannon.
They considered Schwarzman a
rival, according to Trump associates familiar with the dynamic.
Bannon believed the United States
was at economic “war with China”
and feared that Schwarzman
would undo his efforts, the associates said. Bannon declined to comment.
More moderate administration
players supported Schwarzman,
and his influence grew as he arrived at the White House on Feb. 3,
2017, to chair the first meeting of
the President’s Strategic and Policy Forum.
Trump told the group that he
had known Schwarzman “for a
long time” and added, “He’s done a
fantastic job.”
The 16-member group included
leaders of companies such as General Motors, JPMorgan Chase,
Boeing, IBM and Walt Disney Co.
After members of the media left
the room, Trump pushed the chief
executives to accept his view that
China was a currency manipulator, according to multiple people
in attendance. Trump suggested
that the Chinese were boosting
exports at the expense of U.S. jobs.
But the executives disagreed with
Trump and pointed to contradictory evidence.
Turning to Jamie Dimon, the
chief executive of JPMorgan
Chase, Trump said, “Jamie, they
are a currency manipulator, aren’t
they?”
“No, Mr. President, they spent
$1 trillion defending their currency,” Dimon said, according to a
participant and a person briefed
on the meeting, both of whom
spoke on the condition of anonymity to describe private White
House deliberations. Dimon did
not respond to a request for comment.
Trump seemed stunned. “I
thought I had it,” he said, according to a person in the room who
spoke on the condition of anonymity to describe the conversation.
Weinberger, the CEO of EY, one
of the world’s largest professional
services and accounting firms,
said Schwarzman let others in the
meeting convince Trump.
“The discussion immediately
turned to, no . . . they are not manipulating their currency,” Weinberger said. “A trade war with China is not the best thing for us right
now. . . . He didn’t obviously
morph his position on everything,
but he understood better and he
started to modify some.”
Schwarzman then boarded Air
‘President Xi is a great guy’
Two months later, Trump prepared to meet with Xi at Mar-a-Lago. Schwarzman advised the president how to deal with the Chinese
leader. “President Xi is a great guy,”
Schwarzman told the president, as
Trump later told the Washington
Examiner.
Trump met with Xi for three
hours and avoided contentious issues, as Schwarzman had advised,
according to two people familiar
with the session. Schwarzman attended part of the meeting informally, the people said.
A few weeks later, Schwarzman
announced on CNN that “I don’t
think that there’s going to be issues
regarding China as a currency manipulator and some of the other
things.”
At the time, Schwarzman’s firm
had numerous deals with China.
Blackstone in June 2017 sold a
logistics firm, Logicor, for
$13.8 billion to the China Investment Fund, which the Chinese
government
controls.
That
prompted a Hong Kong-based
publication, Week in China, to
write that “Schwarzman has become the go-to man for Chinese
buyers.”
Separately, Schwarzman and
Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross
convened a July meeting at the
Commerce Department in Washington of 20 American and Chinese business leaders.
In August, the advisory group
that Schwarzman headed was terminated after Trump lost business
support because of his comments
about a violent protest in Charlottesville. Trump said “many
sides” were responsible for the
clash that had been sparked by
white supremacists and led to the
death of one protester.
Schwarzman stood by the president, saying he “wasn’t outraged.”
But the other chief executives convinced him that the panel should
be shut down, even though some
feared that Trump would become
more isolated by losing their advice, according to a group member.
Schwarzman, meanwhile, had
been criticized for his ties to
Trump — including complaints
from some of the scholars at
Schwarzman College in Beijing.
“In life,” Schwarzman said in an
email to the scholars, “you’ll often
find that having influence and providing sound advice is a good
thing, even if it attracts criticism
or requires some sacrifice.”
In December, the man who
hadn’t given a penny to Trump
during the campaign contributed
the maximum $344,400 to Trump
Victory, established to jointly fund
the president’s reelection campaign and the Republican National Committee, according to Federal Election Commission records.
He also held one of the year’s
most successful fundraisers at his
Park Avenue triplex, where two
dozen donors paid $100,000 each
for a lunch of grilled chicken and
asparagus and listened to Trump
give a 20-minute talk. Later that
month, Schwarzman met privately with Trump at Mar-a-Lago.
Trump has sent mixed signals
about how far he will go in accepting Schwarzman’s advice. He said
during a November visit to Beijing
that “I don’t blame China” for its
trade policies, but he has expressed alarm that the United
States had a record trade deficit
with China in 2017.
But in January, Trump went to
the ultimate globalist venue, the
Davos
summit,
where
Schwarzman had spoken with the
Chinese president a year earlier.
This time, Schwarzman and
Trump met privately at the summit, and Schwarzman publicly
praised Trump for rebuilding the
economy, presenting himself as
one of the president’s most stalwart supporters.
“It’s a time of enormous ebullience,” Schwarzman said during a
panel discussion at the Davos
summit. “You are making money
and it is really not hard.”
michael.kranish@washpost.com
Alice Crites, Josh Dawsey and Anu
Narayanswamy contributed to this
report.
TUESDAY, MARCH 13 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A9
SU
Police urge caution in approaching unexpected packages
BOMB FROM A1
Police and the FBI said they
were working to solve the mystery and urged residents to be
cautious in approaching packages left at their doorsteps unexpectedly. Officials said the packages that exploded did not come
through the mail or a standard
delivery service.
Austin Police Chief Brian
Manley described the explosives
as arriving in “box-type deliveries” but did not elaborate, citing
the ongoing investigation. He
said police did not know whether
the victims who were killed or
injured were the specific targets
of the packages.
Austin is currently hosting
South by Southwest, a festival for
which it has become famous,
though authorities said that they
did not believe the explosions
were tied to that event.
The two victims killed in the
explosions are relatives of prominent members of Austin’s African American community.
The first, 39-year-old Anthony
Stephan House, was the stepson
of Freddie Dixon, a former pastor
at a historic black church in
Austin.
“This is a real mystery, and
how all of this mystery comes
together, I have no idea,” Dixon
said.
He said he did not know of
anyone who had a grudge
against his stepson, who worked
in construction, was married and
had an 8-year-old daughter. But
Dixon said he himself is good
friends with Norman Mason, the
grandfather of the teenager who
was killed Monday. The teen has
not been formally identified.
Mason is a dentist in East
Austin who has for decades mentored African American studentathletes at the University of Texas at Austin. His wife, LaVonne
Mason, is co-founder of the Austin Area Urban League.
Dixon said he wondered
whether that might have motivated the crimes.
“Are you trying to say something to prominent African
American families?” Dixon
asked. “I don’t know who they’ve
been targeting, but for sure, they
went and got one of my best
friends’ grandson. Somebody
knew the connection.”
RICARDO B. BRAZZIELL/AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
LEFT: Isaac Machado
hides his face against
his mother, Delores,
near the scene of a
package explosion
Monday in Austin that
left a 75-year-old
woman critically
injured. Hours earlier,
another package bomb
killed a 17-year-old boy
and injured a woman.
ABOVE: Police work at
the site of Monday’s
second explosion.
But Dixon noted that he did
not know the woman injured in
the third blast, whom relatives
identified as Esperanza Herrera.
They said her mother, Maria
Moreno, suffered minor injuries.
Manley said that just as in the
other bombings, the woman who
was injured came outside her
home, found a package and
picked it up. That’s when it
detonated.
“It’s not time to panic, but it’s
time to be vigilant,” Manley said.
In the neighborhoods where
bombs went off, residents said
they were shaken.
Rianne Philips, who lives next
door to House, said her husband
was the first to find him after the
fatal blast.
She said that she was alarmed
to hear about the latest bombings but also relieved that the
police were now more focused on
House’s death.
“They’re not going to let this
slide,” Philips said. “It’s really
sad, but this means there’s a lot
of attention on this now.”
Isaiah Guerrero, 15, said he
was spending the first morning
of his spring break making music
on his computer when he heard
the third explosion go off just
before noon Monday.
“It sounded like two cars hit
each other, you know? Like,
rammed each other,” Isaiah said.
The house shook, and so did
his body, the teenager said. Within minutes, police and fire officials swarmed the scene, closing
off streets.
“I expected my spring break to
be peaceful, not harmful,” Isaiah
said.
Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R)
said his office is offering a
$15,000 reward for information
leading to the arrest of the
person or people responsible for
the “atrocious attacks.”
Manley said local and federal
law enforcement agencies would
ensure that “every stop would be
pulled out” to solve the cases.
“We are not going to tolerate
this in Austin,” he said.
amy.wang@washpost.com
mark.berman@washpost.com
matt.zapotosky@washpost.com
Spring
SERGIO FLORES/REUTERS
$
Berman, Wang and Zapotosky
reported from Washington. Shane
Harris in Austin contributed to this
report.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 13 , 2018
The World
India’s Hindu right intensifies a religious battle
25 years after nationalists destroyed the Babri mosque, a new court case brings a decades-old dispute to the fore again
BY
A NNIE G OWEN
ruins of a Hindu temple and
ordered that the site be divided
into three parcels — two for
Hindu groups and the third for
Muslims. Hindu and Muslim litigants have since said that such a
division is unacceptable.
Modi has been largely circumspect about the temple issue as
the court case goes on. But the
firebrand monk from Modi’s party who is now leader of Uttar
Pradesh state has been more
forceful, saying that authorities
could “explore other options”
outside the courts to build the
temple “in deference to widespread feelings on the issue.”
The leader, Yogi Adityanath,
who is known for making divisive
statements, has vowed to make
Ayodhya a major tourist destination, and during India’s festival of
lights in October, he threw a
grand party on its riverbank,
with thousands of twinkling
earthenware lamps and an actor
dressed as Lord Ram — in an
enormous gold crown — descending from the skies in a
helicopter.
ayodhya, india — The mob of
Hindu fundamentalists brought
down the mosque in just a few
hours, using pickaxes, rope and
their bloody, bare hands. Dust
swirled above the rubble, smoke
from nearby torched homes
soured the air, and 16 Muslims
lay dead, the first of about 2,000
people who would die in riots
across India in the days to come.
Twenty-five years ago, Hindus
tore down the Babri mosque in
this northern Indian town believed to be the birthplace of the
Hindu god Lord Ram, shaking
secular India to its foundations.
In the years since, Ayodhya — its
name now synonymous with
strife — has become a magnet for
fundamentalist Hindu leaders
who want a soaring sandstone
temple dedicated to Ram to be
built where the mosque once
stood.
They are finding new energy as
India’s Supreme Court prepares
to begin hearing arguments this
week in a decades-old title dispute over the holy site, with
Hindu leaders planning a highprofile whistle-stop campaign
and religious events across India.
And they feel they have strong
support with the party of Prime
Minister Narendra Modi, a Hindu nationalist, in office at the
state and national level.
Modi’s brand of assertive, religion-based patriotism has widespread appeal — especially
among India’s youths — but his
tenure has also coincided with a
rise in tensions between majority
Hindus on one side and Muslims
and other minorities on the other. Instances of religious violence, including lynchings, rose
16 percent last year, according to
the Ministry of Home Affairs.
“Modiji is a superman,” said
one bearded holy man, Sreesakthi Saanthananda. “They know
it’s our birthright to make a
temple in the soil of the birthplace of Lord Ram.”
Muslims say that the Hindu
leaders are inflaming old tensions for political gain. The global guru Sri Sri Ravi Shankar, who
is trying to mediate, has called on
Muslims to withdraw their claim
to the contested site, warning of
“contention and conflict for years
to come.”
Haji Mehboob, a local resident, is one of the litigants in the
court case and says the site
should be a mosque: “They’re
trying to create an environment
of polarization and communal
disharmony. There will be some
trouble.”
A protracted dispute
In a large field not far from the
site of the destroyed mosque,
supporters of the proposed Ram
Temple gathered around a flatbed truck adorned with elaborate
gold pillars, a temple on wheels
AMAN KUMAR/ASSOCIATED PRESS
RAFIQ MAQBOOL/ASSOCIATED PRESS
DOUGLAS E. CURRAN/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
TOP: Backers of a Ram Temple march in Ayodhya, India, last month. LEFT: Muslims demonstrate in Mumbai in December, on the 25th
anniversary of the Babri mosque’s destruction. RIGHT: Youths climb atop the mosque the day Hindu nationalists destroyed it in 1992.
that would carry supporters
through several states in India to
rally the faithful. At the same
time, the World Hindu Council,
or Vishwa Hindu Parishad, will
hold special religious ceremonies
in villages and towns across the
country this month, also designed to give fresh momentum
to their movement.
Smrita Tiwari, a district leader
for Modi’s Bharatiya Janata Party, said she and other devout
Hindus feel a greater sense of
freedom with a conservative gov-
ernment in office — in a country
that is about 80 percent Hindu
and 14 percent Muslim. Previous
governments dominated by the
progressive Congress Party
cosseted Muslims with special
privileges, she said.
“We used to feel that we had
come from the outside and Muslims completely controlled the
country,” she said. “Now, with
Modi in power, things are different. We can unfurl the saffron
flag for the first time.”
“Muslims are very fanatical,”
she said. “They only think about
their religion. They are not good
to us. We don’t go to Mecca and
claim a place there. Why should
they be given the land where
Lord Ram was born?”
For more than a century, Hindus and Muslims have argued
over the Babri Masjid, built to
honor the Mughal emperor
Babur in 1528. The complicated
case before the Supreme Court
dates to shortly after a December
night in 1949 when Hindu priests
sneaked into the mosque and
placed idols there, prompting
officials to lock down the complex.
On Dec. 6, 1992, hundreds of
religious volunteers — their
heads wrapped in saffron-colored bandannas — climbed the
dome and demolished the structure in a matter of hours, sparking days of rioting throughout
South Asia.
In 2010, the high court in the
state of Uttar Pradesh, where
Ayodhya is located, ruled that the
mosque had been built on the
The politics of religion
Despite the political attention,
the town of Ayodhya remains a
shabby place with bumpy roads
leading to countless shrines,
mosques and temples. As in the
rest of the state, unemployment
among youths is high, and many
have migrated elsewhere to look
for jobs.
Much of the town’s economy is
driven by Hindu pilgrims coming
from elsewhere in India to worship at the makeshift shrine that
remains at the disputed site, an
eerie place accessed by a winding, caged walkway lined with
soldiers armed with machine
guns.
Opposition leaders from the
Congress Party have accused
Modi and Adityanath’s followers
of trying to revive communal
discord as a tactic to energize
the party’s political base in coming national elections. But, they
argue, that may not work this
time, because India has moved
on, its youths born after 1992
anxious for the government to
address a growing jobs crisis
and provide other opportunities.
“They are only showing us
dreams,” said Sandip Sharma, 25,
a resident of Ayodhya. “This can
be the only way to get votes in the
next election. They don’t have
any other issue to talk about —
they haven’t given jobs or development projects.”
Sharma dreams of a government job, but he has struggled to
find work despite a college degree and scrapes by giving tours
and tutoring students. Why not
build a hospital or some other
public facility that would bring
employment, he wonders, rather
than a temple?
annie.gowen@washpost.com
DIGEST
JAPAN
Documents altered in
scandal tied to Abe wife
Japan’s Finance Ministry
acknowledged Monday that it
doctored documents in a
widening scandal linked to Prime
Minister Shinzo Abe’s wife that
has rattled his government.
Abe apologized Monday on
behalf of ministry officials but did
not mention his wife or her
suspected role in the scandal.
The altered documents relate
to the 2016 sale of state land to
school operator Moritomo
Gakuen in Osaka at one-seventh
of the appraised value, with the
alleged involvement of first lady
Akie Abe, who supported the
school’s ultranationalistic
education policy.
An investigation by the
ministry showed that the school
operator told officials that Akie
Abe encouraged the land deal and
that conservative lawmakers had
contacted the ministry about the
school plan, but it was not clear
whether any law had been
violated. The ministry said that
one document originally noted
that the school operator was
involved with a powerful pro-Abe
lobby but that comment had later
been deleted.
The scandal, which surfaced a
year ago, has smoldered despite a
big election win by Abe. It erupted
again in recent weeks after a
major newspaper reported that it
found evidence that the ministry
had altered records after the
scandal broke.
Finance Minister Taro Aso said
the investigation found 14 altered
documents. The changes were
made from February to April 2017
at the instruction of the Financial
Bureau, the ministry department
in charge of state property
transactions, Aso said.
He said the documents were
falsified to match explanations
that an official in charge of the
land deal provided to parliament
in response to opposition
lawmakers’ questions.
In a hearing Monday, Finance
Ministry officials confirmed that a
reference to Akie Abe having
recommended the land deal was
deleted from a document after the
scandal surfaced.
fire. The rebels initiated fresh
attacks just hours after the truce
ended.
BBC staff to testify at U.N. on
‘persecution’ by Iran: The BBC
said its journalists will appeal
directly to the United Nations for
the first time over what the
British broadcaster describes as
the “persecution and harassment”
by Iran of those affiliated with the
BBC’s Persian service. An Iranian
court last year froze the assets of
more than 150 people associated
with the service. While it has long
been targeted by Iranian
authorities, the BBC said the
harassment worsened recently.
Staffers’ family members were
arbitrarily detained or subject to
travel bans, it said, and female
journalists were targeted by “fake
and defamatory news.”
— Associated Press
SLOVAKIA
Interior minister quits
after reporter’s slaying
Slovakian Interior Minister
Robert Kalinak announced
Monday that he would resign
amid the crisis over the slayings
of an investigative journalist and
his fiancee.
Kalinak’s resignation was a key
requirement of a junior partner
in the government if it was going
to remain in the ruling coalition.
It is not clear, however, whether
Kalinak’s move will be enough for
the Bridge party.
Tens of thousands of protesters
across Slovakia have demanded
the resignation of the
government and a thorough
investigation into the shooting
deaths of Jan Kuciak and Martina
Bangladesh court grants bail to
former leader: Bangladesh’s high
LOUAI BESHARA/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
A woman and child in Syria have a moment of relaxation at a shelter near Damascus after the Syrian
army evacuated them from the Eastern Ghouta area, where the regime is reclaiming territory from rebels.
This week marks seven years since the uprising against President Bashar al-Assad that became a civil war.
Kusnirova.
Kuciak’s last, unfinished story
was about the activities of the
Italian mafia in Slovakia and its
ties to people close to Prime
Minister Robert Fico, whose
Direction-Social Democracy
party has also been linked to
other corruption scandals.
Kalinak is the second minister
from the Direction party to resign
since the killings; Culture
Minister Marek Madaric stepped
down earlier.
— Associated Press
Colombia renews talks with
remaining rebel group:
President Juan Manuel Santos
said he is resuming peace talks
with Colombia’s last remaining
rebel group. Santos said in a
televised broadcast that he is
sending his chief negotiator back
for a new round of talks in the
belief that “peace saves lives.”
Talks between the government
and the National Liberation
Army broke down in January
after the expiration of a cease-
court has granted bail for four
months to opposition leader and
former prime minister Khaleda
Zia, who was jailed for five years
on a corruption conviction and is
awaiting an appeal. It was not
clear, however, if or when she
would be freed. Zia was convicted
Feb. 8 on charges of misusing her
power and embezzling about
$250,000. The conviction means
that Zia, an archrival of Prime
Minister Sheikh Hasina, can be
barred from running in December
elections. The court also
sentenced one of Zia’s sons and
four others to 10 years in prison
for involvement in the case.
— From news services
TUESDAY, MARCH 13 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A11
RE
Plane crash in Nepal kills at least 49
Flight from Bangladesh
hits field near airport,
catches fire; 22 injured
BY P RADEEP B ASHYAL
AND A NNIE G OWEN
kathmandu, nepal — A survivor of a plane crash near Kathmandu’s international airport
said Monday that the US-Bangla
Airlines plane began “behaving
strangely” on descent before it
crash-landed, killing at least 49
people.
Basanta Bohara, a Nepali tour
operator, said the nearly twohour flight from Bangladesh’s
capital, Dhaka, was uneventful
until the plane began to wobble
on its descent into Kathmandu,
hitting a field near the airport
and catching fire.
“Thank God I was able to escape through a cracked window,”
Bohara said in an interview at
Norvic International Hospital,
not far from the airport, where he
was taken along with several other injured passengers. “I hope I
will survive now.”
Authorities said the 78-seat airplane caught fire after crashlanding around 2:20 p.m. Monday and breaking into large pieces. The twin-propeller Bombardier Dash 8 aircraft was carrying
67 passengers and four crew
members. A police spokesman,
Manoj Neupane, said that 49 people died and that 22 injured were
being treated at three hospitals.
NAVESH CHITRAKAR/REUTERS
Rescue personnel work at the crash site of a US-Bangla Airlines
plane near Tribhuvan International Airport in Kathmandu, Nepal.
One survivor described problems during the jet’s descent.
Raj Kumar Chhetri, general
manager of Tribhuvan International Airport, said at a news
conference Monday afternoon
that there was a “problem” with
the landing alignment of the aircraft and that when air traffic
control ordered the plane not to
land, “there was no response
from the pilot.” The plane narrowly missed hitting a parked
aircraft and crashed in the airport
compound on the eastern side, he
said.
However, the chief executive of
US-Bangla Airlines told reporters
in Dhaka that a review of the
conversation between the pilot
and air traffic control during the
plane’s last moments aloft told a
different story.
“A three-minute conversation
between the pilot and the air
traffic control before the landing
indicated that they sent wrong
signal to the pilot,” CEO Imran
Asif said, according to the news
website bdnews24.com.
The aircraft had taken off from
Dhaka. Officials said 32 Bangladeshi nationals, 33 Nepalis, one
Chinese national and one Maldivian citizen were among the 71
people aboard.
US-Bangla Airlines, a private
carrier based in Bangladesh, set
up a hotline for information on
the fate of those aboard its Flight
BS211.
At the hospital closest to the
airport, Kathmandu Medical College and Teaching Hospital,
charred bodies were arrayed on
the floor as frantic relatives tried
to guess the identities by looking
at articles of clothing and other
personal items that had escaped
incineration.
In the emergency room, a Bangladeshi woman, Almun Nahar
Ane, 20, who suffered a leg injury,
wept as she said that her husband
and 2-year-old daughter were
missing. Their bodies were not
among those at the hospital, she
had learned. She said that her
daughter, Tammana, flew from
her lap during the impact and
that she had not seen the child
since.
“Why is there no information?”
she asked despairingly, as she
pleaded with passing doctors and
nurses to help her find her family.
Witnesses described a chaotic
rescue operation at the site of the
crash, as emergency personnel
and Nepali soldiers pulled survivors from the wreckage and a
thick plume of black smoke rose
into the sky. The airport was
closed for a few hours.
Andrew Blackie, an aviation
consultant, pilot and former accident investigator for the British
government, said investigators
will be looking into all aspects of
the crash, such as mechanical
failure, weather and operational
error. The Canadian-made Bombardier Dash 8 Q400 model has
had some issues with its landing
gear in the past, he said, but has
been involved in only one previous fatal crash, a Colgan Air crash
in Buffalo in 2009 that left 50
dead.
annie.gowen@washpost.com
Gowen reported from New Delhi.
Tillerson agrees that attack appears to be from Russia
SPY FROM A1
lives of its two principal victims,
Sergei Skripal, 66, and his daughter, Yulia, 33, but also potentially
exposed scores of others, including a police officer who remains
hospitalized.
Skripal was jailed in Russia in
2006 for selling state secrets to
British intelligence for 10 years,
but he was released in 2010 as part
of a high-profile spy swap. His
daughter has been living in Russia
but has also spent periods in England. The two remain in critical
condition at a Salisbury hospital.
U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson supported the British government’s conclusion, saying, “It
appears that it clearly came from
Russia.” Speaking with reporters
aboard his aircraft returning from
Africa, he said that it was unknown “at this point” whether the
attack came “with the Russian
government’s knowledge” but noted that the substance used “is only
in the hands of a very, very limited
number of parties.”
Asked whether U.S. mutual defense on Britain’s behalf would be
triggered, he said, “It certainly will
trigger a response. I’ll leave it at
that.”
May strongly signaled that the
already frosty relations between
Britain and Russia were headed
toward lows perhaps not seen
since the Cold War. Lawmakers in
Parliament called for sanctions
and condemnations of Russia
from the United Nations, European Union and United States.
Immediately after May’s remarks, the Russian government
denounced her speech as a spectacle designed to mislead.
“It is a circus show in the British
Parliament,” the Tass news agency
quoted Russian Foreign Ministry
spokeswoman Maria Zakharova
as saying.
British authorities were forced
to cordon off a restaurant and pub
near where Skripal and his daughter were found in downtown Salis-
bury, a quiet medieval town in
southern England best known for
its nearby ruins, Stonehenge.
Over the weekend, days after
the attack on March 4, British
public health officials advised
anyone who had patronized the
businesses during a two-day window to wash their clothes, doublebag articles for dry cleaning and
wipe down items such as jewelry.
They assured the public that the
danger was “minimal,” but the
specter of a nerve agent wafting
around a pub created a wave of
anger and unease.
During her question-and-answer session in Parliament, members of May’s government and the
opposition took turns denouncing
the attack as a “murderous” assault “with impunity” by a “Russian mafia state.”
May promised it would not be
“business as usual” and that by
Wednesday, her government
would offer detailed measures, depending on what the Russians
said.
May said British investigators
have concluded that the chemical
used in the attack was part of a
group of Russian nerve agents
known as Novichok.
“Based on the positive identification of this chemical agent by
world-leading experts at Porton
Down, our knowledge that Russia
has previously produced this
agent and would still be capable of
doing so, Russia’s record of conducting state-sponsored assassinations, and our assessment that
Russia views some defectors as
legitimate targets for assassinations, the government has concluded that it is highly likely
that Russia was responsible for
the act against Sergei and Yulia
Skripal,” she said.
Novichok was developed in
Moscow in 1987 at the State Union
Scientific Research Institute for
Organic Chemistry and Technology. That government laboratory
was described by one of its top
officials in the 1990s as “the leader
in the technology of chemical destruction.”
The Soviet Union, under
Mikhail Gorbachev, renounced
the development and use of chemical weapons, but research continued in secret. In 1992, a scientist
named Vil Mirzayanov, in interviews with the Moscow News and
the Baltimore Sun, disclosed the
existence of the chemical weapons
program. The Sun later confirmed
the existence of an agent then
called Novichok No. 5. American
chemical-weapons experts had
been unaware of its existence.
In 2000, under an agreement
with the United States, a joint
program to dispose safely of all of
Russia’s chemical-weapons stock
was launched. It is unlikely that
this program succeeded in eradicating all chemical weapons.
May said she instructed Foreign
Secretary Boris Johnson to demand that Moscow “immediately
provide full and complete disclosure” of the Novichok program to
the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons.
Several lawmakers suggested
that Britain pass its own version of
America’s 2012 Magnitsky Act,
which allows the U.S. government
to impose sanctions, seize assets
and blacklist foreign officials implicated in human rights abuses.
President Vladimir Putin’s government has strongly denied any
involvement in the Skripal case
and has responded by accusing Britain of stirring anti-Russia
hysteria.
A BBC reporter quoted Putin as
saying Monday, “Get to the bottom
of things there, then we’ll discuss
this,” when asked about the poisoning.
The Russian Embassy said that
Russian nationals and others living in Britain are worried about
their future in the country and
that Russian journalists based in
Britain are receiving threats.
On Monday, a popular anchor
on Russian state TV accused Britain of masterminding the poison-
ing of the former spy and his
daughter to undermine Russia as
it prepares to host the soccer
World Cup tournament this summer.
“Why not poison him?” said the
journalist, Dmitry Kiselyov. “Is he
so valuable? And do it with his
daughter to turn it into a real
tear-jerker for the public.”
william.booth@washpost.com
Will Englund in Washington and Karla
Adam in London contributed to this
report.
U.S. is ready to act in
Syria, Haley tells U.N.
BY
C AROL M ORELLO
The United States is “prepared
to act if we must” to stop indiscriminate bombing of civilians in
Syria, the U.S. ambassador to the
United Nations, Nikki Haley,
warned Monday as she circulated
a new draft resolution demanding an immediate cease-fire.
Addressing the Security Council 16 days after it passed a resolution demanding a cease-fire that
largely has failed to stop the
bombing or allow humanitarian
access, Haley compared the situation today to last year when the
United States launched airstrikes
against a Syrian military base
after a deadly chemical weapons
attack.
“When the international community consistently fails to act,
there are times when states are
compelled to take their own action,” Haley said.
This is one of those times, she
added.
“We warn any nation determined to impose its will through
chemical attacks and inhuman
suffering, but most especially the
outlaw Syrian regime, the United
States remains prepared to act if
we must,” she said. “It is not a path
we prefer. But it is a path we have
demonstrated we will take, and
we are prepared to take again.”
French President Emmanuel
Macron also threatened targeted
strikes in Syria, telling reporters
at a news conference in India that
France would retaliate if it found
“irrefutable evidence” that chemical weapons had been used to kill
civilians.
Earlier in the Security Council,
U.N. Secretary General António
Guterres said the bombing and
bloodshed in the Damascus suburb of Eastern Ghouta, a rebel
stronghold, had increased since
the council called for a cease-fire.
Only a limited number of convoys
delivering medical supplies and
food have succeeded in reaching
civilians — and Syrian government forces confiscated most of
the equipment on one load, he
said. And not a single critically ill
person has been evacuated.
Calling the situation a calamity
that is growing more desperate by
the day, Guterres said the Syrian
government and its allies — an
oblique reference to Russia and
Iran — had intensified their offensive so much that they have increased the territory they control
in the enclave from 10 percent
barely a week ago to 60 percent
today.
“We have seen nothing but carnage in response to the Security
Council’s resolution calling for a
halt to the massacre in Eastern
Ghouta,” said Arnaud Quemin,
the Mercy Corps director of programs in Syria. “Conditions worsen each day. People are fleeing
from one shelter to another as the
front lines move.”
Last month’s cease-fire was
passed with the support of Russia, but only after modifications
were made allowing military
strikes against “terrorist” groups.
The government of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad takes an
expansive view of that designation to include not only al-Qaeda
and the Islamic State but also
rebel opposition groups.
Haley accused Syria, Russia
and Iran of using that loophole to
bomb hospitals and schools and
to “continue starving and pummeling hundreds of thousands of
innocent Syrian civilians.”
Russia’s U.N. ambassador,
Vassily Nebenzia, mocked the
number of times his country was
mentioned during the debate
Monday — counting 22 times by
Haley, 16 times by the French
envoy and 12 by the British representative.
He defended the Syrian government, saying it has “the right
to remove the threat to the safety
of its citizens. The suburbs of
Damascus cannot remain a hotbed of terrorism.”
Syria’s
U.N.
ambassador,
Bashar Jaafari, said terrorists had
conducted chemical attacks on
civilians and staged them to make
it look as if the Syrian military
were to blame. He faulted foreign
governments for supporting
some rebels.
“Isn’t it enough what they’ve
done in Vietnam, Iraq, Somalia
and Yemen, invoking very cheap
lies?” he said.
Jaafari ended by quoting Egyptian novelist Naguib Mahfouz:
“They are liars. They know they
are liars. And they know that we
know they are liars. However,
they still lie, and very loudly so.”
carol.morello@washpost.com
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EZ
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RE
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 13 , 2018
Economy & Business
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Apple’s latest buy:
Subscription app for
digital magazines
A voice of protest in New York
Acquisition increases
tech company’s role
in relaying news content
BY
HOLLY PICKETT/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Maria Rubio, a member of Make the Road New York, speaks during a Fed Up protest outside Federal Hall
in New York on Monday. Top Democratic lawmakers are putting pressure on the Federal Reserve Bank of
New York to consider a diverse slate of candidates as the search for its next president enters a critical phase.
Bill would repeal some mortgage rules
Senate measure, poised to pass, weakens government’s ability to enforce fair-lending requirements
BY
T RACY J AN
The Senate is poised to pass a
bill this week that would weaken
the government’s ability to enforce fair-lending requirements,
making it easier for community
banks to hide discrimination
against minority mortgage applicants and harder for regulators to
root out predatory lenders.
The bill rolls back banking rules
passed after the 2008 financial crisis, including a little-known part of
the Dodd-Frank Act that required
banks and credit unions to report
more detailed lending data.
The bipartisan plan would exempt 85 percent of banks and
credit unions from the requirement, according to a Consumer
Financial Protection Bureau
analysis of 2013 data.
The mortgage industry says the
expanded data requirements are
onerous and costly, especially for
small lenders. But civil rights and
consumer advocates say the information is critical to identifying
troubling patterns that warrant
further investigation by regulators.
“The data operates as a canary
in the coal mine, functioning as a
check on banks’ practices,” said
Catherine Lhamon, chair of the
U.S. Commission on Civil Rights.
“The loss of that sunlight allows
discrimination to proliferate undetected.”
For decades, banks have been
required under the 1975 Home
Mortgage Disclosure Act to report
borrowers’ race, ethnicity and Zip
code to help identify racist lending
practices such as redlining.
But discriminatory practices
continued, with the financial industry disproportionately targeting black and Hispanic borrowers
with subprime mortgages loaded
with high fees and adjustable interest rates that skyrocketed after
the stock market crashed in 2008.
“The experience of the financial
crisis taught us that we really need
to know more about the loan
terms and conditions, not just a
borrower’s race,” said Josh Silver,
senior adviser at the National
Community Reinvestment Coalition.
Lenders were supposed to start
gathering extra information
about borrowers’ ages and credit
scores, as well as interest rates and
other loan-pricing features, in
January.
Congress had charged the
CFPB, an independent watchdog
agency formed after the financial
crisis, with collecting, analyzing
and publishing the data. But
White House budget director
Mick Mulvaney, named the CFPB’s
acting director in November, said
the agency plans to reconsider the
new requirements.
The Senate bill would repeal
many of the new reporting requirements, exempting small
lenders making 500 or fewer
CURRENCIES
$1=106.40 YEN;
EURO=$1.234
mortgages a year from the expanded data disclosure.
“Banks say they don’t treat borrowers differently, but the data
shows a different story,” Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto (D-Nev.) said
on the Senate floor Thursday.
“Redlining remains a major prob-
“Lending discrimination
is occurring in real time,
and we have to have
the tools to be able to
address it.”
Vanita Gupta, Leadership Conference
on Civil and Human Rights
lem for communities of color.”
Nevada had the highest foreclosure rate during the Great Recession, especially in minority communities, said Cortez Masto, a former state attorney general. More
than 219,000 families lost their
homes, she said. “I’ve seen what
happens when you don’t have
strong enough protections against
housing discrimination.”
But 12 of her Democratic colleagues have co-sponsored the
bill, including 2016 vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine (Va.), a
former fair-housing lawyer. The
bill’s supporters say they don’t
think it would widen the door for
discriminatory lending, arguing
that mortgage data such as race
and gender would still be gathered.
The Mortgage Bankers Association estimates that expanded data
would still be collected on 95 percent of loans.
“If you want to provide some
regulatory relief, it makes sense to
do it for these institutions that
aren’t making a lot of loans,” said
Mike Fratantoni, chief economist
for the Mortgage Bankers Association. “You’re not losing much in
terms of your visibility into trends
in the market.”
Advocates say banks often
blamed racial lending discrepancies on borrowers’ credit scores or
other characteristics that were impossible to verify without additional data.
“Lending discrimination is occurring in real time, and we have
to have the tools to be able to
address it,” said Vanita Gupta, who
headed the Justice Department’s
civil rights division during the
Obama administration and now is
the president of the Leadership
Conference on Civil and Human
Rights. “It’s not just happening in
the context of big banks, it’s also
happening in community banks
and credit unions.”
tracy.jan@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
wonkblog
E LIZABETH D WOSKIN
Apple is buying Texture, a
digital-magazine subscription
app from prominent publishers
— a sign that the company is
deepening its interest in becoming a major distributor of news.
Texture — formerly known as
Next Issue Media — aims to be a
virtual newsstand that gives
readers access to roughly 200
magazines, including the Atlantic, Bon Appétit, Martha Stewart
Living and Vanity Fair, for $9.99
a month.
The infusion of cash, technology and, most importantly, a
powerful potential distribution
channel for Texture’s content
could help put it in the hands of
many more readers.
For Apple, the purchase of
Texture is also an opportunity to
highlight the company’s role as a
trusted news distributor at a
time when the American public
is worried about the credibility
of information from technology
giants.
Apple’s approach to pressing
questions of news reliability and
the role of human curation differs from rivals Google, Facebook
and Amazon. While Facebook
and YouTube rely almost exclusively on software tools to decide
what news people will see —
Facebook fired its news curators
in 2016 — Apple has a human
editorial team for Apple News,
the company’s news aggregator
app that comes pre-installed in
smartphones. Human editorial
teams also work for the company’s Podcasts app and Apple
Music.
In a statement on the company’s website, Apple emphasized
its focus on trustworthy news
sources — a subtle dig at Silicon
Valley rivals that have helped
spread
false
news
and
disinformation.
“We’re excited Texture will
join Apple, along with an impressive catalogue of magazines from
many of the world’s leading publishers,” said Eddy Cue, Apple’s
senior vice president of Internet
software and services, said in a
company news release. “We are
committed to quality journalism
from trusted sources and allowing magazines to keep producing
beautifully designed and engaging stories for users.”
With high-profile industry
backers and a collection of the
nation’s most popular titles, the
Texture app was an attempt to
help the struggling magazine
business gain footing in the
smartphone era. The joint effort
from rival publishers, which began in 2009, shortly after Apple’s
launch of the App Store, reflected a desire to save print media
from massive readership de-
clines and move the industry
toward new habits of media
consumption. The company was
based in Silicon Valley and largely backed by publishers in New
York.
In a joint statement, publishers Condé Nast, Hearst Magazines and Meredith said the
acquisition will help further
their mission.
“This new relationship with
Apple not only will deliver new
audiences and further the reach
of our collective brands, but
reflects the way consumers are
engaging with media today as
they look to discover content and
subscribe with more convenience and ease,” the statement
said. The publishers referred further questions to Apple.
An Apple spokeswoman said
the tech giant didn’t have immediate plans to integrate Texture’s content into Apple News,
and the deal had not yet closed.
The company would not disclose
the purchase price.
In recent years, publishers’
attention has largely been focused on working with Facebook
to distribute content. Roughly
two thirds of Americans get
some of their news from social
media, according to an August
2017 survey from Pew Research
Center.
“This new relationship
with Apple . . . reflects
the way consumers
are engaging with
media today.”
Condé Nast, Hearst Magazines and
Meredith, in a joint statement
But Facebook has become a
tricky and sometimes fickle partner for publishers. In January,
the company made major changes to its News Feed feature that
reduced the amount of news that
Facebook members see. The decision was frustrating to many
news publishers that had directed resources toward finding audiences on the social network.
It is not clear whether Apple
would be a better partner to
news organizations than Facebook, said Daniel Kreiss, an associate professor in the school of
media and journalism at University of North Carolina at Chapel
Hill.
Apple’s announcement suggests that the chief executives of
technology companies are deeply concerned about the rise of
disinformation and the role their
platforms have played, and that
concern has enabled publishers
to “more assertively argue for
their value” when negotiating
with powerful tech platforms
that have become the predominant way people get their news,
he said.
elizabeth.dwoskin@washpost.com
DIGEST
POWER
Johnson Controls
seeks options for unit
Johnson Controls
International PLC said on
Monday that it would explore
options for its power solutions
business that makes advanced
batteries for vehicles and focus
on its main business.
The power solutions business,
which produces and distributes
about 154 million lead-acid
batteries for passenger cars and
light trucks annually, carries
higher margins but has been
capital intensive for Johnson
Controls, analysts said.
Johnson Controls said it
expects to complete its
assessment of strategic
alternatives for the power
solutions business over the next
several months.
The power solutions business
accounted for 24 percent of the
company’s total revenue of
$30.17 billion in 2017.
Building technologies and
solutions, the Cork, Ireland-
based company’s biggest
business, had $22.8 billion in
sales in the year. The unit makes
building heating and
ventilation, air conditioning
systems, building access control
and fire detection systems.
Johnson Controls, which
moved its headquarters to
Ireland after acquiring peer
Tyco International PLC in 2016,
is benefiting from growth in
nonresidential construction in
China and North America.
— Reuters
ENERGY
EON to eliminate jobs
in Innogy takeover
EON AG will shed as many as
5,000 jobs in the deal to take
over Innogy SE, a move that
marks the biggest shake-up in
Germany’s energy business in
years.
The transaction agreed to
with its rival RWE AG values
Innogy at 22 billion euros ($27.1
billion) and will sharpen the
focus of Germany’s leading two
FRANCIS MASCARENHAS/REUTERS
A man uses a grinding tool as he works Monday on metal inside a
shop in an industrial area of Mumbai.
electricity and natural gas
providers, according to a
statement from the companies
on Monday. EON billed itself as
the first formerly integrated
utility to focus entirely on
meeting the needs of 50 million
customers throughout Europe.
RWE said it doesn’t expect any
net job losses.
EON’s target is to achieve
savings of $740 million to
$987 million by 2022. It would
become a grid manager and
power provider focused on
meeting Chancellor Angela
Merkel’s ambitious targets to
cut pollution. For RWE, which is
Europe’s biggest generator of
electricity, the deal would return
it to renewables as an
alternative to its generation
network that is focused mainly
on coal and nuclear power.
“This strategic exchange of
businesses will create two highly
focused companies,” said RWE
CEO Johannes Teyssen. “Size is
crucial” to exploit business
opportunities as subsidies for
clean energy disappear.
Merkel is seeking to phase out
coal-fired power generation in
Germany and wants to deliver a
plan by the end of this year.
RWE owns half of the nation’s
coal-fired power capacity.
EON’s voluntary takeover
offer for Innogy will probably be
completed by the middle of
2019, the companies said.
— Bloomberg News
ALSO IN BUSINESS
The longtime chief executive of
Dow Chemical, who led the
company through the financial
crisis, a merger with rival
DuPont and the planned
disassembly of the entire
enterprise, is stepping down.
DowDupont said Monday that
Andrew Liveris, 63, will give up
his executive chairmanship in
April, and his role as director in
July, when he officially retires.
Jeff Fettig, a longtime
independent director, will
become executive chairman.
Apple Inc. services chief Eddy
Cue suggested the company
won’t acquire Netflix or Walt
Disney and instead will build
out its own original video
content. Cue noted that Apple
hasn’t made huge acquisitions
in the past and said the
company aims to produce a
smaller number of quality
shows rather than focus on
quantity.
— From news services
COMING TODAY
8:30 a.m.: Labor Department
releases consumer price index
for February.
TUESDAY, MARCH 13 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A13
SU
Goldman Sachs sets up likely heir
when he said the firm should be
better positioned for Blankfein
to exit on top. The firm, Mayo
said, has been particularly weak
in its trading business, and
questions remain about its
strategy to expand into consumer lending. Putting Solomon in
the CEO seat suggests that his
more client-facing background
— Solomon led the firm’s investment banking business for a
decade, producing results Mayo
said were “one of the best
growth engines at Goldman
Sachs” over the past 10 years —
is ascendant.
“You will have a banker at the
top of Goldman Sachs, where it’s
been a trader for the last 12 years,”
he said, referring to Blankfein's
résumé. Monday’s announcement suggested that “trading is
still important but not as important at the top of the house.”
Solomon, according to media
reports, is described as an affable,
strong manager who professionalized the firm’s investment
banking unit and is known for his
efforts to improve the working
hours of its young employees and
promote diversity and inclusion
at the firm.
Clarity about a CEO’s succession is not only helpful for investors, said Noel Tichy, a professor
of management at the University
of Michigan, but also for employees.
“Getting political ambiguity
out of the way is a good thing,” he
said. “It creates all kinds of political coalitions. If employees don’t
get the right answer from one,
they can go and lobby the other.
It’s not healthy for the organization.”
Announcement quashes
speculation on who will
become the next CEO
BY
J ENA M C G REGOR
Goldman Sachs named a clear
front-runner Monday in the race
for who will succeed the bank’s
long-serving chief executive,
Lloyd Blankfein, announcing
that David Solomon will become
the firm’s sole president and chief
operating officer and that its
other co-COO and co-president,
Harvey Schwartz, will retire next
month.
The announcement did not
offer details on the timing of
Blankfein’s departure but came
just days after the Wall Street
Journal reported that he could
exit the firm as soon as year’s end.
In a tweet Friday, Blankfein, who
has led the Wall Street giant since
2006, said it was the newspaper’s
announcement, not his, and that
“I feel like Huck Finn listening to
his own eulogy.”
Analysts said the timing of the
official announcement came as a
surprise but ended speculation
that the bank could name two
people to run the firm as co-CEOs
or co-chairmen, which it has
done in the past, and signaled to
Wall Street that Solomon was the
clear heir apparent. “A press release puts to bed the succession
question in my view,” said Kenneth Leon, an equity analyst at
CFRA.
It will also help quash the
public parlor game over who will
succeed Blankfein, which has
ANDREW HARRER/BLOOMBERG NEWS
David Solomon will become Goldman Sachs’s sole president and
chief operating officer, the firm announced Monday.
drawn repeated headlines about
the
competition
between
Schwartz and Solomon.
“It was becoming a little too
much like Washington, D.C., rather than Wall Street in how this
contest was playing out, with one
contender a black belt in karate
and the other a D.J. in the Caribbean,” said Mike Mayo, an analyst
at Wells Fargo who has a buy
rating on Goldman’s shares, referring to Solomon’s hobby of
spinning music under the name
D.J. D-Sol in locations including
New York and the Bahamas. “It
was overly public.”
Mayo said “no matter what the
reason [for the timing], it’s a good
move that the board made a
decision and eliminated the uncertainty over CEO succession.”
The announcement also came
less than a week after Blankfein’s
prior deputy, former Goldman
Sachs president Gary Cohn, quit
his post as President Trump’s top
economic adviser.
When Cohn, who had previously been seen as Blankfein’s
heir, decided to leave Goldman
for the Trump administration,
the firm named Schwartz and
Solomon as his replacements in
late 2016, setting up the recent
race.
In the bank’s statement, Blankfein thanked Schwartz for his
work at the firm. Regarding Solomon, he said, “I look forward to
continuing to work closely with
David in building our franchise
around the world, serving our
expanding client base and delivering strong returns for our
shareholders.”
Mayo predicted that the CEO
transition would happen next
year, during Goldman Sachs’s
150th anniversary as a firm,
jena.mcgregor@washpost.com
Amazon’s first D.C.-area bookstore to open doors
BY
A BHA B HATTARAI
Company hopes online
loyalty translates into
in-store customers
Amazon’s first Washington-area bookstore is set to open Tuesday with two stories of books,
electronics, toys and even juicers
— but not a single price tag.
The online behemoth is hoping
its loyal Internet following will
translate into in-store customers
on Georgetown’s M Street, in the
same building that Barnes & Noble once inhabited before shutting down in 2011.
At 10,000 square feet, the store
is among the largest of Amazon.com’s 15 bookstores. It includes 5,600 book titles — all of
which are displayed with their
covers facing out — as well as
dozens of tablets and smart-home
devices on display for customers
to test. (Jeffrey P. Bezos, the
founder and chief executive of
Amazon, also owns The Washington Post.)
Instead of price tags, customers are encouraged to use Amazon’s mobile app to scan items for
their costs. Scanning machines
around the store also alert shoppers to an item’s price — which,
for Prime members, is the same as
on Amazon.com. Everyone else
pays list price.
“As you walk through the store,
you’ll see that what we’ve really
tried to do is create an extension
of Amazon.com,” said Cameron
Jones, vice president of Amazon
Books.
The opening comes amid a resurgence of independent bookstores in the Washington area.
Politics and Prose, a longtime
fixture in Chevy Chase, is opening
two new locations at the Wharf
and Union Market. A number of
other neighborhood bookstores
have also recently opened, including Solid State Books in the H
Street corridor, East City Book-
shop on Capitol Hill and Walls of
Books in Parkview.
Amazon isn’t selling just books.
A section called “New Year New
You” includes Vitamix blenders
and Breville juicers, alongside
espresso makers and wellness
items. The children’s section,
where books are organized by age
group, includes a table of magnetic toys and Fire Kids tablets. Another area, called Amazon
Launchpad, features creations
such as sous-vide cooking tools. A
small coffee bar downstairs is
operated by Allegro Coffee, which
is owned by Whole Foods Market.
(Amazon bought Whole Foods
last year for $13.7 billion.)
abha.bhattarai@washpost.com
Blocking of merger
is seen as unusual
freely about the matter, said this
strategy may have doomed the
transaction. “If there is one lesson
here, it’s don’t screw with the government,” the person said.
He described Trump’s executive
order as “brutal.” “It smacks of
anger on the part of the government to me. This feels a little more
personal to me.”
Qualcomm did not immediately respond to requests for comment Monday night. Broadcom, in
a statement, said it was reviewing
the order and “strongly disagrees
that its proposed acquisition of
Qualcomm raises any national security concerns.” In after hours
trading, shares of Qualcomm sank
as much as 4.4 percent from their
market close of $62.81. Shares of
Broadcom rose less than 1 percent.
Qualcomm and a host of other
big technology companies are racing to build a next-generation nationwide network known as “5G,”
with download speeds that could
be 100 times faster than what most
consumers experience now on
their wireless service. Once deployed, a high-definition movie
could load instantly on a smartphone. The capabilities of connected devices would vastly expand. Cable-quality service could
be provided over the air, instead of
a wireline connected to a house.
Several analysts said the U.S.
government is growing concerned
that Huawei will develop such
technologies almost as fast as
their American counterparts, narrowing the gap between Chinese
and U.S. companies.
But Rod Hunter, a partner at
Baker McKenzie and a former senior director for international economics at the National Security
Council, said it is not clear what
exactly prompted CFIUS, a notoriously secret government body, to
act so quickly.
Hunter said it could reflect “an
evolution in the thinking” of the
committee, perhaps an indication
that it’s going to approach transactions in which foreign people or
entities seek to own 5G wireless
technology with the same sensitivity and rigor that the feds currently “apply to military equipment
traditionally.”
“Typically when you’re doing
these CFIUS cases you look at
what the business is and how sensitive it is,” Hunter said. “If it’s a
Chinese investor the bar is going
to be high. A Singaporean investor
you would not normally have considered a high risk.”
QUALCOMM FROM A1
mittee on Foreign Investment in
the United States (CFIUS), an interagency panel led by the Treasury Department, had several more
weeks to render a recommendation to the president. Trump’s order cannot be appealed, legal experts said.
The move demonstrates the
high value that the administration
places on maintaining the U.S.
edge in developing micro technologies.
The administration did not detail its national security concerns,
but CFIUS sent a letter last week to
the attorneys of the two companies, saying it was concerned that
research and development at
Qualcomm might atrophy under
Broadcom’s direction, according
to a copy that was reviewed by The
Washington Post. If that happened, China’s Huawei Technologies, a rival to Qualcomm and a
major producer of mobile chips,
might become much more dominant around the world.
The tiny computer chips embedded in smartphones, smart
home gadgets and a wide range of
other connected devices are expected to become one of the most
critical technologies in the coming
years. These chipsets enable connected cars to speak to each other
as well as to stoplights. Almost
every major business and consumer electronics manufacturer
uses Qualcomm’s technology as
brains for their devices.
Trump’s order is in line with
the administration’s protectionist instincts. Last week, Trump
also cited national security concerns in announcing a series of
harsh tariffs on steel and aluminum imports, a move that hit
rivals such as China, as well as
allies such as Germany and
South Korea. And several other
technology deals fell apart after
CFIUS raised concerns. In September, Trump stopped the $1.3
billion acquisition of Portland,
Ore.-based Lattice Semiconductor by a private equity firm that
had close ties to Beijing.
One factor that may have
pushed CFIUS to move quickly
was an unusual maneuver by
Broadcom to relocate to the United States. The company had said
in a recent corporate filing that it
was finalizing its plans to become
a U.S. entity in early April. Deals
between U.S. companies fall out of
CFIUS’s jurisdiction.
A person familiar with CFIUS’s
investigation, who spoke on the
condition of anonymity to speak
hamza.shaban@washpost.com
Tony Romm contributed to this report.
THE MARKETS
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7700
7588.32
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1.52
0.97
0.80
0.77
0.74
–0.88
–1.03
–1.21
–1.78
–2.18
6700
6200
5700
S&P 500 Index
2783.02
–0.1
+4.1
2900
2700
2500
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D
J
F M
Americas
Brazil (Bovespa)
Canada (S&P/TSX Comp.)
Mexico (Bolsa)
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Asia Pacific
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% Chg
86,900.43
15,604.79
48,625.80
0.6
0.2
0.1
379.20
5276.71
12,418.39
7214.76
0.3
0.0
0.6
–0.1
5996.12
4127.67
31,594.33
21,824.03
0.6
0.5
1.9
1.7
YTD % Chg
–15%
0%
+15%
3M Co
AmExp
Apple Inc
Boeing
Caterpillar
Chevron Corp
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GE
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239.80
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344.19
154.50
116.79
45.55
44.53
71.34
75.24
15.10
273.38
179.71
160.26
51.52
–0.6
–1.4
1.0
–2.9
–2.4
–0.4
0.4
–0.6
–1.2
0.9
1.1
1.0
–1.3
0.6
–1.3
1.9
–1.7
7.4
16.7
–2.0
–6.7
18.9
–2.9
0.2
–10.0
–13.5
7.3
–5.2
4.5
11.6
Company
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
Microsoft
Nike
P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
United Tech
UnitedHealth
Verizon
Visa Inc
WalMart
Walt Disney
132.63
117.66
157.74
55.36
96.77
66.82
79.86
36.61
141.49
131.50
222.77
48.80
124.24
88.07
105.17
–0.9
–0.3
0.3
0.4
0.2
0.8
–0.5
–0.4
–0.6
–1.9
–1.2
–0.4
–0.2
–0.7
0.4
–5.1
10.0
–8.4
–1.6
13.1
6.8
–13.1
1.1
4.3
3.1
1.0
–7.8
9.0
–10.8
–2.2
Cross Currency Rates
US $
US $ per
EU € per
EU €
Japan ¥
Britain £
Brazil R$
Canada $
1.2337
0.0093
1.3905
0.3070
0.7786
0.0538
0.0076
1.1270
0.2488
0.6311
0.0436
147.9470
32.6624
82.8390
5.7243
0.2208
0.5600
0.0387
0.8105
Japan ¥ per 106.4000
131.2700
Britain £ per
0.7192
0.8873
0.0068
Brazil R$ per
3.2576
4.0196
0.0306
4.5299
Canada $ per
1.2844
1.5846
0.0120
1.7859
0.3942
Mexico $ per
18.5879
22.9336
0.1750
25.8453
5.7050
Mexico $
2.5369
0.1753
0.0691
14.4718
Index
Close
DJ Total Stock Market Index 28,815.67
Russell 2000
1601.06
Post-Bloomberg DC Area Index 564.35
CBOE Volatility (VIX)
15.78
Consumer Rates
Daily % Chg
–0.1
0.2
–0.9
7.8
YTD % Chg
4.1
4.3
3.8
42.9
Daily
% Chg
$3.1240
$3.9075
$61.36
$1,320.80
$2.78
–0.4
+0.1
–1.1
–0.2
+1.7
Orange Juice
Silver
Soybeans
Sugar
Wheat
Exchange-Traded (Ticker)
Coffee (COFF.L)
Copper (COPA.L)
Corn (CORN.L)
Cotton (COTN.L)
Crude Oil (CRUD.L)
Gasoline (UGAS.L)
Gold (BULL.L)
Natural Gas (NGAS.L)
Silver (SLVR.L)
Daily
% Chg
Close
Daily
% Chg
$1.3880
$16.54
$10.4100
$0.1293
$4.9075
–1.1
–0.4
+0.2
+0.7
+0.3
day
$900
month
$1100
$1000
–0.7
–0.6
–0.3
–2.1
–1.0
–1.5
–0.3
2.2
–1.0
Gainers
Oclaro Inc
Micron Technology
Bel Fuse Inc
AppliedOptoelctrncs
Big 5 Sprtg Goods
Surmodics Inc
Rent-A-Center
Kopin Corp
Newell Brands Inc
GulfIslandFabricatn
Avista Corp
BioTelemetry Inc
Finisar Corp
Corcept Therpt
Lantheus Holdings
Tetra Technologies
Providence Service
Cytokinetics Inc
NIC Inc
QuanexBuilding Prod
Daily
Close % Chg
$10.01
$59.37
$20.05
$30.95
$6.60
$36.40
$9.22
$3.72
$28.99
$8.70
$50.80
$35.90
$20.32
$17.40
$16.80
$4.08
$73.86
$8.70
$14.20
$18.75
27.5
8.8
8.7
7.8
7.3
7.2
7.0
6.3
6.1
6.1
5.7
5.3
5.3
5.2
5.0
4.9
4.9
4.8
4.8
4.7
Losers
NMI Holdings Inc
American Woodmark
Deckers Outdoor
USA Mobility Inc
ManTech Intl
Nektar Therapeutics
Tempur Sealy
Iridium Comm
MSA Safety Inc
Cooper Cos
PBF Energy Inc
Dorman Products Inc
Innoviva Inc
Bristow Group Inc
Fred's Inc
Dana Inc
National Presto
Cigna Corp
Fabrinet
HP Inc
Daily
Close % Chg
$18.05
$111.75
$90.28
$14.93
$55.44
$103.07
$49.12
$11.10
$83.22
$240.95
$30.57
$69.63
$15.61
$13.58
$3.08
$26.14
$94.45
$167.31
$32.67
$23.83
–10.6
–8.2
–7.4
–5.8
–5.1
–4.9
–4.6
–4.3
–4.2
–4.2
–4.1
–4.0
–3.9
–3.8
–3.8
–3.7
–3.6
–3.5
–3.5
–3.3
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Interest Rates
Other Measures
Close
Gainers and Losers from the S&P 1500 Index
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
Company
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
7200
2300
Commodities
S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot
Daily
% Chg
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
0.30
0.51
0.80
1.62
3.35
5.90
4.50%
4.34%
Bank Prime
30-Year fixed mortgage
1.50%
Federal Funds
3.76%
15-Year fixed mortgage
2.09%
LIBOR 3-Month
1-Year ARM
3.67%
10-year note
Yield: 2.86
2-year note
Yield: 2.26
5-year note
Yield: 2.63
6-month bill
Yield: 1.87
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
A14
EZ
RE
THE WASHINGTON POST
K
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 13 , 2018
The obsolete number that drives Trump’s China obsession and how to fix it
On Wednesday,
the president
announced on
Twitter that China
WONKBLOG
had been asked to
reduce its annual
trade deficit with the United
States by “One Billion” dollars.
On Thursday, the Wall Street
Journal’s Lingling Wei reported
that the request was for a
$100 billion reduction. One
source put it as high as a third of
the deficit, which has been above
$300 billion since 2014.
We have good news for China.
The deficit is already
$100 billion narrower than the
headline number the
administration obsesses over,
probably more, based on more
accurate figures that account only
for the value a country adds to the
products it exports.
Standard trade measurements
have their place, but they’re relics
of a pre-globalization age. The
measurements we report on most
are essentially based on an item’s
total value when crossing a border.
This model breaks down
because China, the world’s factory,
sits squarely in the middle of many
global supply chains.
Multinational corporations ship
components there from around
the world to be assembled into
finished goods and exported once
more.
Designed by Apple in
California, assembled in China
Apple is the canonical example
of how trade measures distort
Andrew
Van Dam
reality.
Apple imports chips, antennae
and sensors from Japan, South
Korea, Taiwan, the United States
and Europe to China, where
Foxconn, a Taiwanese firm, and
others assemble them into
iPhones.
Those phones are stamped
“Assembled in China” and count as
Chinese exports, but do they
actually add much to China’s
economy?
Apple is secretive, but available
numbers show China’s assembly
added about $6.50 per phone for
the first iPhone (Xing and Detert)
and $8 per phone for the iPhone 6,
which retailed for $749 (Bank of
America Merrill Lynch via
Financial Times).
Each phone is a valuable little
piece of hardware that crossed
China’s borders and counted as an
export from China, but
contributed only a few dollars to
China’s workers and corporations.
U.S. manufacturers of
components such as the
Bluetooth/WiFi antenna and the
audio processor probably added
more value to the first iPhone
($10.75) than China’s assembly did.
When you adjust for this
globalization distortion, the U.S.China trade deficit drops by about
a third.
Value-added figures take years
to compile, but Mary Lovely, an
economist at Syracuse University,
said other, more recent trade
figures imply that the value-added
deficit hasn’t changed in years.
Not as big as it looks
When the U.S. trade deficit with China is measured on a value-added basis, it
shrinks considerably. The U.S. typically adds more value to its exports than
does China, which specializes in assembling imported components.
U.S. trade deficit with China as a share of GDP, by two different measures
2.0%
Gross trade
balance
1.5
Value-added
balance
1.0
Estimates
0.5
0
2000
’02
’04
’06
’08
’10
’12
’14
Value added as a share of each country’s gross exports, 2014
0%
20
40
60
80
Brazil
Russia
U.S.
Japan
India
U.K.
Canada
Germany
China
Mexico
South Korea
Note: Value-added figures after 2011 are based on “Nowcast” estimates.
Sources: The World Trade Organization and Organization for Economic Cooperation and
Development’s Trade in Value Added database (value-added figures, gross trade balance until
2011); Commerce Department (gross domestic product, gross trade balance after 2011)
THE WASHINGTON POST
China adds relatively little value
to exports because it often gets
stuck with the middle step in the
global supply chain — hands-on
assembly. The United States and
other developed countries have
retained, and even added, jobs in
the higher-paying design,
engineering and ultra-high-tech
manufacturing steps, as well as in
marketing and retail.
Value that’s harder to
measure
U.S. multinationals such as
Apple, Nike and Gap have
pioneered a model that focuses on
marketing, design and
technological innovation in the
United States, and they outsource
the low-value goods-related steps
of the process.
Even the best numbers don’t
reflect the value that Apple’s U.S.
headquarters adds in this process,
said Yuqing Xing, of the National
Graduate Institute for Policy
Studies in Tokyo.
The gross profit margin on
iPhones is estimated to be about
60 percent. Apple’s main product,
therefore, isn’t the goods that cross
borders; it’s the brand value that
engineers and marketers have built
around them.
In 2015, Apple sold $139.8 billion
in iPhones, iMacs and their ilk
outside the United States. That’s
equivalent to about 9.3 percent of
U.S. exports for that year, Xing said.
It’s an American company selling a
product labeled “Designed by
Apple in California,” yet only a
sliver of its value is credited to the
United States according to
standard trade measures.
When Xing accounted for the
additional value that Apple added
to its products but wasn’t recorded,
he estimated that the trade deficit
with China would fall a further
6.7 percent.
Why every measurement
ultimately falls short
Even if the trade balance were
reported accurately, the president’s
obsession with those figures would
be misguided, said Syracuse’s
Lovely, who is also a senior fellow
at the Peterson Institute for
International Economics.
“It completely misses the
importance of global value chains
and the role multinationals play.”
About half of China’s exports —
46 percent in 2014 — are handled
by foreign companies.
Trump’s sound and fury about
the U.S. trade deficit in a globalized
economy, where such measures are
largely obsolete, ultimately harms
U.S. corporations.
The most innovative U.S.
companies have spent decades
building complex webs of trade
relationships, many of which rely
on China for critical parts of the
process. If policymakers disrupt
those webs, they put U.S.
employees in jeopardy.
“Apple doesn’t manufacture in
the United States, but they have
thousands of jobs in the United
States,” Lovely said. “Those jobs
matter just as much as the ones
on the shop floor.”
andrew.vandam@washpost.com
Tari≠s have
a Missouri
company
on edge
STEEL FROM A1
ized reality.
“What people don’t understand about the steels I use is it
doesn’t have anything to do with
price. I’ve tried to find domestic
sources,” he said. “I’m not importing it because of price. I’m
importing it because of quality
and [because] I can get it.”
Scheurich said he has to buy
from foreign companies because
decades of consolidation in the
domestic steel industry have left
few U.S. mills producing the
high-quality steel he requires.
The limited amount of American
steel he can obtain too often has
obvious flaws, he said.
The president’s 25 percent import tax will effectively cut Scheurich off from his steel suppliers
and starve his business. CNC’s
customers will buy their parts
from manufacturers outside the
United States rather than absorb
his higher costs, he said.
“If they would give me options
about where to go domestically
— no problem!” he said. “I don’t
think they understand. I got
nowhere else to go.”
CNC is among scores of U.S.
companies that depend upon
foreign steel mills for specialized
products they cannot obtain — or
cannot obtain in sufficient quantities — at home. In the weeks
ahead, they all will be lining up
at the Commerce Department to
seek relief from the president’s
new trade barriers.
For a bearing to endure the
wear and tear inside a construction vehicle, wind turbine or
even a dental drill, specific materials are required. The bars,
tubings and forgings Scheurich
uses to produce his components
are made of a specialized steel
bolstered, or alloyed, with elements such as nickel or chromium to enhance their strength
and corrosion resistance.
As the domestic steelmaking
industry has shrunk to a smaller
number of companies, such specialized production has gotten
squeezed. Only 7 percent of U.S.
production is of alloy or stainless
steel, according to Platts, a market research firm.
Oil pipeline companies, which
need special gathering lines, casings and tubing made of alloy
steel, have no choice but to look
overseas, according to John
Stoody, vice president of the
Association of Oil Pipe Lines.
“Higher production costs for a
niche market subject to cyclical
swings in the oil sector led U.S.
producers to shift to more highervolume and reliable products and
markets,” Stoody said via email.
The U.S. migration away from
such specialized production has
been spurred by intense import
competition. The United States
last year imported more than
6.3 million tons of steel alloy
products, up nearly 75 percent
since 2002, according to the
Commerce Department. That is a
far faster rate than steel imports
PHOTOS BY CHRISTOPHER SMITH FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
overall, which rose 16 percent
during the same period, to
34 million tons.
Even as U.S. demand for such
products has grown, the number
of specialty steel producers in
the United States has dropped by
half since the 1970s, Denny
Oates, chairman of an industry
trade group, testified in a Commerce Department investigation
last year. The industry blames
dumping by foreign producers,
especially from China.
“These producers have suffered from the problems of competition with subsidized and
dumped imports, abetted by excess capacity abroad,” said Ron
Lorentzen, a former Commerce
Department trade official.
In November, the Commerce
Department concluded that
companies from Russia, Belarus
and the United Arab Emirates
were guilty of dumping carbon
and alloy wire rods in the United
States and assessed duties that
exceeded 400 percent on some
products.
Over his three decades at CNC’s
helm, Scheurich has adapted to
competitive challenges.
In the late 1990s, Scheurich
bought about half of his annual
steel needs from U.S. mills. But
today, he can obtain from U.S.
mills only about 2 percent of his
$10 million in annual steel purchases.
The quality of the domestic
steel that Scheurich can acquire
is often disappointing. Showing
a visitor around his 50,000square-foot factory, Scheurich
points out the differences between immaculate steel forgings
from Japan and an American
alternative.
TOP: Augusto Herrarte checks the specifications of a steel ring
produced by CNC Machine Products in Joplin, Mo. ABOVE:
The factory manufactures bearings components, mostly using
steel imported from Japan and Sweden. “I’ve tried to find
domestic sources,” said CNC President Greg Scheurich, who
like many of his employees voted for Donald Trump in 2016.
“I’m not importing it because of price,” he said. “I’m importing
it because of quality.”
“Look at this!” he says, pointing to visible imperfections in
the surface of the U.S. product.
Along with foreign materials,
Scheurich relies upon foreign
technology to produce his customized parts.
A new $1.5 million Japanese
automated machine tool turns
generic steel bars into precisioncrafted parts. A $275,000 robot is
on order. Scheurich said he tries
to replace his equipment every
four or five years, to keep abreast
of technology — something he
says U.S. steel producers have
failed to do.
Developing CNC’s borderstraddling supply lines took time
and was not without headaches.
Scheurich’s customers require
him to use certain mills, and
securing approval for a new one
involves a cumbersome process
that takes at least six months.
He nurtured ties with his
Swedish suppliers on annual
moose-hunting excursions and
forged relationships with Japanese executives over endless
rounds of golf. When he first
turned to Japanese mills, his
father, Raymond, who fought
in the Pacific during World War
II, stopped talking to him for a
time.
Concern over the tariffs’ impact is evident on the factory
floor, where workers average
hourly wages of $16 to $20. Some
wonder about the cost of the
president’s effort to boost employment at steel mills and aluminum smelters.
“I can kind of see what they’re
trying to do — make more jobs,”
said Bobby Beyer, 21, a machine
operator. “But at the same time,
it’s also taking jobs away from
other people.”
Across the floor, machinist
Michael Elabed, 27, gestured
toward his bosses and said, “If it
hurts these guys, it hurts me.”
As the tariff imbroglio flared
over the previous week, Scheurich found himself monitoring
events in Washington, including
Swedish Prime Minister Stefan
Lofven’s visit to the White House.
Trump used the occasion to reassure his guest that he would
impose the tariffs in “a very
loving way.”
In his announcement, the
president invited U.S. trading
partners to haggle over whether
they could find other ways to
address U.S. security worries
other than paying the new import taxes. He also set in motion
a bureaucratic process that could
determine whether CNC Machine Products lives or dies.
The company’s fortunes rest
upon one paragraph in the proclamation the president signed
Thursday, authorizing Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross to
establish a process for excluding
from the tariffs any steel products “determined not to be produced in the United States in a
sufficient and reasonably available amount or of a satisfactory
quality.”
The Commerce Department
has until Sunday to determine
how to adjudicate exclusion re-
quests. In 2002, the last time the
United States imposed tariffs on
imported steel, a similar process
was established four months before the tariffs went into effect.
President George W. Bush included the first group of exempted products in the tariff proclamation, allowing Scheurich’s
production to proceed without
interruption.
Today, he has enough inventory to cover the next few months,
though less than he would like.
He suspects his next shipment
from Japan, due Thursday, will
be smaller than usual.
“It’s a bump in the road, but
it’s a big one,” Scheurich, standing in his factory, said of the
tariffs. “If I can’t figure something out, we could close her
down.”
Scheurich and many of his
employees voted for Trump and
remain supporters. He even likes
the idea of tariffs, just targeted
more narrowly at China. The
president’s policies have aided
the company, which booked
about $22 million in revenue last
year, he said.
Now, along with his son, Jeff,
the company’s vice president for
manufacturing, Scheurich is
banking on the notion that the
tariffs are just the visible element of a presidential negotiating strategy.
“I’m hoping there’s something
behind it, which I think there is,”
said Jeff, alluding to Trump’s
self-image as a master negotiator.
“We’re hoping,” Scheurich
said.
“We’re hoping,” his son repeated.
david.lynch@washpost.com
TUESDAY, MARCH 13 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A15
RE
PowerPost
INTELLIGENCE FOR LEADERS WASHINGTONPOST.COM/POWERPOST
In new ad, Democratic senator from red state highlights his a∞nity with Trump
MELINA MARA/THE WASHINGTON POST
Sen. Jon Tester, who owns an 1,800-acre farm in Big Sandy, Mont., says in the first ad of his reelection
campaign that “Washington’s a mess” but that he’s working with President Trump to get things done.
the national debt by more than
$1 trillion, and fought efforts to
repeal the Affordable Care Act
because Montana benefits from
Medicaid expansion. But he has
also voted with Trump 52 percent
of the time when the president
took a position on a bill or
nominee, according to
Congressional Quarterly.
In a phone interview from
Helena, Tester said the 30-second
spot encapsulates his approach
to the job over the past year-anda-half. He said it’s easy for him to
compartmentalize. “I try to keep
the issues separate,” he said.
“That’s politics. Your friend one
day is your enemy the next and
vice versa.”
Tester is the ranking Democrat
on the Veterans’ Affairs
Committee, and Montana has the
second-most veterans per capita
in the country, so eight of the 13
bills focused on helping
veterans: from making it easier
for the Department of Veterans
Affairs to fire poor-performing
employees to giving veterans
more access to private healthcare options when government
hospitals are far away, to
streamlining the appeals process
for disability claims and
changing the cost-of-livingadjustment formula for benefits.
Another law directs the
Defense Department to
declassify documents related to
any known incident in which at
least 100 members of the armed
forces were exposed to a toxic
substance that resulted in at
least one case of a disability.
Not all 13 of the bills referred
to in the ad are of equal
significance. One named a
mountain peak for a
conservationist who died of
cancer. Another amended the
U.S. Flag Code so governors can
Beware additional headless agencies
President Trump’s
lackadaisical
approach toward
political
appointments has
left the Social
Federal
Security
Insider
Administration
headless. It hasn’t
JOE
had a confirmed
DAVIDSON
director in five
years, and now it
doesn’t even have an acting chief.
The leadership troubles
afflicting the organization, which
provides benefits to more than
60 million Americans and affects
almost every family, also could hit
other agencies. Some have taken
inventive measures that might
allow them to escape the clutches
of the Federal Vacancies Reform
Act, which ensnared the SSA and
limits the use of “acting” titles.
The Census Bureau uses
cumbersome, sentence-fragment
titles such as “performing the nonexclusive functions and duties of
the Director.” In January, Interior
Secretary Ryan Zinke issued an
order to “temporarily redelegate
authority” for vacant positions
that require Senate confirmation.
“Some agencies purposefully do
not say a person is serving in an
acting capacity in order to avoid
triggering the vacancies act,” said
Max Stier, president and chief
executive of the Partnership for
Public Service, a good-government
group that has studied the law.
The Social Security
Administration is without a
commissioner because during his
14 months in office Trump has
nominated no one to the post.
President Barack Obama
nominated Carolyn W. Colvin, but
she was not confirmed by the
Senate. Nancy A. Berryhill held
the acting commissioner title from
January 2017, when Trump was
inaugurated, until Wednesday, the
day after the Government
Accountability Office ruled that
her service violated the law
because she had held that title
beyond the permitted time.
In a letter to Trump informing
him of Berryhill’s situation,
Thomas H. Armstrong, the GAO’s
general counsel, said he told all
agencies “to update the status of
any vacancies, acting officials, or
nominations.” The GAO is
reviewing the information to
determine whether there are
other violations.
As of Friday morning, Trump
had significantly fewer nominees
confirmed than any of the
previous four presidents. He has
nominated no one for 216 of 640
key positions requiring Senate
confirmation, according to the
online tracking service provided
by The Washington Post and the
Partnership for Public Service. It’s
not clear how many of those are
covered by the Vacancies Reform
Act.
The law is intended to prevent a
president from keeping interim
officials in charge of agencies
instead of nominating a candidate
to go through the Senate
confirmation process.
Berryhill, a well-regarded
career Social Security staffer,
started at the agency as a student
aide 41 years ago. The GAO
informed the SSA this week that
the 300 days the law allowed her
to serve as acting commissioner
expired Nov. 17.
So she ditched the title.
“Moving forward, I will
continue to lead the agency from
my position of record, Deputy
Commissioner of Operations,” she
said Wednesday in a message to
SSA employees.
Still, four days later, the SSA’s
“commissioner bio” website link
took visitors to a page with her
photo and listing her as the acting
commissioner.
Berryhill’s message sounded as
though this kerfuffle means
nothing. “Position titles come and
go,” she wrote, adding, “beyond
the change in title, there will be no
impact in our service to the
American public.”
But it isn’t that simple.
Any action she took as acting
commissioner after Nov. 17 might
be invalid.
“If an acting officer is serving
after the relevant time periods
have run, any attempt by that
officer to perform a function or
duty of an advice and consent
office will have ‘no force or effect,’ ”
Valerie C. Brannon, a legislative
attorney with the Congressional
Research Service, said Wednesday,
quoting the law in testimony
during a hearing of the Social
Security subcommittee of the
House Ways and Means
Committee.
Surely Berryhill undertook
important and significant
functions and duties between the
point her authorized time as
acting commissioner expired and
when she relinquished that title
nearly four months later. For
example, local media in
Milwaukee reported that the SSA
announced in February the
controversial closing of an office
there. If Berryhill had a role in that
decision, does it have no force or
effect?
Also, in a Dec. 7 letter, the SSA
terminated its contract,
memorandums of understanding
and supplemental agreements
with the American Federation of
Government Employees. The
letter was not signed by Berryhill,
but Dana Duggins, executive vice
president of AFGE Council 220,
which represents Social Security
employees, said, “They couldn’t do
that without her approval.”
Nonetheless, Mark Hinkle, the
SSA’s acting press officer, said,
“Since November 2017, the agency
has not taken actions that would
be void as a result of GAO’s finding
of a Vacancy Act violation.”
But who is going to decide those
important actions now?
The lack of a commissioner,
acting commissioner or even a
nominee for the top spot
generates unnecessary confusion.
Duggins said the union is
considering legal action because
of Berryhill’s muddled status.
Speaking of confusing, consider
the Census Bureau sentencefragment titles. Ron S. Jarmin’s
title is “performing the nonexclusive functions and duties of
the director of the U.S. Census
Bureau.” Enrique Lamas’s title is
“performing the non-exclusive
duties and functions of the deputy
director and chief operating
officer of the U.S. Census Bureau.”
The Census Bureau said Jarmin
and Lamas are senior civil
servants in charge of day-to-day
operations. “As indicated by the
designation in Mr. Jarmin’s title,”
the statement continued, “he is
performing only those duties that
are not exclusive to the Director as
is permitted by the Vacancies
Reform Act.”
Zinke’s order said his
delegation of authority “covers
only those functions and duties
that are not required by statute or
regulation to be performed only by
the Senate-confirmed official
occupying the position.”
Jeff Ruch, executive director of
Public Employees for
Environmental Responsibility,
which filed a complaint about
three of the Interior positions with
the department’s inspector
general, said Zinke is trying to get
around the Vacancies Reform Act,
“but it turns not on what their
titles are but what their duties
are.”
Heather Swift, the Interior
Department’s press secretary,
insisted, “There obviously was no
violation.”
There might not be a violation,
but it’s not obvious.
“This is an issue that impacts
many federal agencies,” Bruce
Delaplaine, general counsel in the
inspector general’s office, said in a
letter to Ruch, “and one that is
best resolved” by the GAO.
joe.davidson@washpost.com
order the flag lowered to halfstaff when a first responder dies
in the line of duty.
Others nod to more parochial
concerns. Trump last month
signed a bill co-sponsored by
Tester, for instance, that
establishes quality standards for
intermediaries that transmit
phone calls. The senator, who
spends a lot of time on the road
in Big Sky Country, pointed to a
study that showed 1 in 5
cellphone calls made in rural
areas are delayed, disrupted or
dropped.
Tester noted that he often
broke with President Barack
Obama in the preceding eight
years. He supported construction
of the Keystone XL pipeline,
opposed farm labor regulations
and fought against the
importation of Brazilian beef.
Accounting for Montana’s
libertarian bent, he’s been critical
of the various incarnations of the
Patriot Act and expanded federal
surveillance authorities since he
toppled Republican incumbent
Conrad Burns in 2006. He’s also
opposed federal testing
requirements and voted against
the Internet sales tax bill, both on
states’ rights grounds.
Tester’s most significant
bipartisan feat, though, is
expected to pass in the coming
weeks. As a member of the
Banking Committee, he’s
championed relaxing some of the
banking regulations that were
passed after the 2008 financial
crisis in the Dodd-Frank bill. He
says these rules have been
putting small banks in his state
out of business, and he has
forcefully defended the effort in
the face of strong criticism from
liberal colleagues such as Sen.
Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.).
Tester has always known he’d
face another tough reelection
fight. The list of stuff he’s gotten
through shows he started
preparing early. But even if he
runs a perfect campaign, and
Republicans put up an average
candidate, the race is likely to be
close.
If you need a proof point,
Republican Greg Gianforte won
a special election to replace
Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke in
the state’s sole House seat in May
despite physically assaulting a
reporter on the eve of the
election.
Tester acknowledged that
tribalism is a growing problem,
and he said some conservativeminded folks in his state are
certainly becoming more downthe-line partisan. But he
expressed confidence that this is
still a minority of voters in his
home state. “Montanans pride
themselves in being able to split
their ticket,” he said.
I heard similar comments
during interviews in early 2014
with Mark Pryor in Arkansas,
Mark Begich in Alaska and Mary
Landrieu in Louisiana. All three
lost that year because of backlash
to Obama in states that had
grown redder.
But Tester won reelection in
2012 by four points on the same
day Obama lost Montana by 14
points. And his state has a
progressive-populist tradition
dating to the backlash against
the corruption of the Copper
Kings a century ago.
Bigger picture, one of the most
interesting numbers to watch
after the November elections will
be how many split Senate
delegations remain. Until
Democratic Sen. Doug Jones’s
victory in the Alabama special
election in December, there were
only 13 states that had a
Republican and Democratic
senator. (Montana is one of
them.) That was the fewest in five
decades, going back to 1968 —
when the South was solidly
Democratic. In 1980, as a point of
comparison, 27 states had split
delegations.
Montana has had at least one
Democratic senator since 1911,
from Burton Wheeler (the New
Dealer who broke with FDR over
court packing) to Mike Mansfield
(who succeeded LBJ as majority
leader and shepherded Great
Society programs into law during
his 16 years in the post) and Max
Baucus (who served 36 years
before Obama named him
ambassador to China). The state
has also had a Democratic
governor since 2005. (Gov. Steve
Bullock, in his second term, is
likely to run for president in
2020.)
Tester, who chaired the
Democratic Senatorial Campaign
Committee last cycle, said there
are some Republican leaders
who don’t want to let him score
any legislative wins during an
election year, but he thinks his
friendships with individual GOP
colleagues can get around those
roadblocks. “I don’t want to
lower myself to the dysfunction,”
he said.
james.hohmann@washpost.com
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S0353 3x10.5
Running for
reelection in a
state Donald
Trump carried by
JAMES
21 points, Sen. Jon
HOHMANN
Tester (D-Mont.)
kicked off his 2018
campaign Monday with a
commercial highlighting the 13
pieces of legislation he’s cosponsored that the president
signed into law.
Veterans, a police officer, a
firefighter and an elderly couple
count off the bills and
resolutions. Tester, who lost
three of his fingers in a meat
grinder at age 9, then holds up
his hands.
“Washington’s a mess, but
that’s not stopping me from
getting bills to help Montana
signed into law by President
Trump,” he says to the camera.
“I’m out of fingers, but I’m not
finished getting things done for
Montana.”
During a primary season in
which many Democrats are
seeking to outdo one another in
denouncing Trump the loudest,
Tester’s debut ad — shared first
with The Daily 202 —
foreshadows what you’ll see a lot
more of in places such as North
Dakota, Missouri and Indiana.
He is one of 10 Democratic
senators up for reelection this
year in a state the president
carried in 2016. In Wisconsin,
which Trump narrowly and
unexpectedly won, Democratic
Sen. Tammy Baldwin launched a
commercial two weeks ago that
highlights a bill she has cosponsored with Sen. John
McCain (R-Ariz.) to lower
prescription drug prices.
The goal across these races is
to show voters both a willingness
to work across the aisle and an
effectiveness at breaking through
the gridlock that characterizes
the Capitol.
Tester has stuck with
Democrats on the major issues.
He opposed the tax cuts on the
rationale that they will blow up
The
Daily 202
Did you know? The Washington Post is printed using recycled fiber.
NF407 3x.5
A16
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
ABCDE
letters@washpost.com
The ‘Maxwell lesson’
EDITORIALS
Who’s afraid of the NRA?
Mr. Trump, who follows tough talk on guns with a weak plan.
“W
Yes, once again Mr. Trump’s brave words prove to
be meaningless as the White House unveils exactly
what Mr. Trump wants to do about guns.
“Tiny baby steps designed not to upset the NRA,”
said Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer
(D-N.Y.). That sums up the administration’s proposal
unveiled Sunday in response to the Feb. 14 school
shooting that killed 17 people in Parkland, Fla. The
plan, if you can call it that, is centered on a promise
(no money or details) to help provide firearms
training to school employees, a controversial idea
long favored by the National Rifle Association but
opposed by most teachers and school officials.
Mr. Trump also endorsed some modest improvements in background checks that are the subject of
bipartisan legislation now before Congress. Otherwise, nothing: not the universal background checks
that are needed, no ban on weapons of war, not even
an increase in the legal age to buy certain weapons,
something Mr. Trump had said made sense but
seems to have abandoned in the face of NRA
opposition.
“Not much political support (to put it mildly),” he
tweeted Monday. Never mind that recent polls show
public support for raising the age to 21. Or that
big-name retailers (Walmart and Dick’s Sporting
Goods) have been applauded for voluntarily making
the change. Or that even the gun-friendly state of
Florida just raised its age limit. Or that a true leader
might do the right thing and try to generate political
support.
Mr. Trump’s establishment instead of a federal
commission to study school safety would be laughable if it were not so insulting to the student
survivors and victims’ families of Marjory Stoneman
Saudis in jail
Douglas High School who have so eloquently laid out
the urgency of action. Not only has Mr. Trump made
clear his disdain for such commissions as a way to
avoid fixing problems, but also his appointment of
struggling Education Secretary Betsy DeVos as its
head doesn’t inspire confidence in the outcome.
More importantly, Mr. Trump seems not to understand that gun violence is not limited to schools, nor
that mass shootings are but one part of a problem
that also includes too many lives lost to domestic
killings, suicides and unintentional shootings.
Three women were gunned down Friday night at a
California veterans home by a gunman who then
turned the gun on himself. A 9-year-old girl in
Milwaukee died Saturday after she was accidentally
shot by her brother. And on Sunday there was a
reminder of the horror of the country’s deadliest
shooting — not in a school but at an outdoor musical
festival — with The Post’s account of a woman’s
struggle to recover from the terrible wounds she
received from a gunman using a military gun with
military bullets. Such weapons, of course, go unmentioned in Mr. Trump’s plan.
As we’ve said before, if Congress waits for leadership from this White House, it will wait forever.
TOM TOLES
S
The same goes for members of the Saudi Civil
and Political Rights Association, who called for
political reforms and the reinterpretation of Islamic law. A court dissolved the group in 2013, and
most of its members remain imprisoned. So, too, do
Mohammed al-Otaibi and Abdullah al-Attawi, who
were sentenced to long prison terms in January for
founding a human rights organization, the Union
Henry J. Kerner reported that Ms. Conway twice
violated the Hatch Act in the lead-up to Alabama’s
2017 special Senate election. Federal employees are
prohibited from using their official authority or
influence to affect the outcome of an election;
partisan remarks are permitted only when federal
employees are speaking in their personal capacity.
At issue were two television interviews in which
Ms. Conway appeared in her official capacity and
expressed political views about Democrat Doug
Jones and Republican Roy Moore. “Folks, don’t be
fooled,” she said on Fox News of Mr. Jones. “He’ll be a
vote against tax cuts. He’s weak on crime, weak on
borders. He’s strong on raising your taxes. He’s
terrible for property owners.” Somehow — and with
a straight face — the White House tried to argue that
such language (on CNN, she said Mr. Jones was
“against national security,” “against life” and “out of
for Human Rights, in 2013.
When The Post’s David Ignatius asked the crown
prince last month whether he would release some
of the political detainees before his U.S. visit, the
prince replied, “If it works, don’t fix it.” But if his
modernizing is working, why does he need to
imprison peaceful advocates of modernization? He
should fix that before he arrives in Washington.
step for Alabama voters”) was not advocating for or
against the election of any particular candidate.
Keep in mind that her unprompted harangue on
Fox News about Mr. Jones, who subsequently won
the election, came in response to a question about
tax reform and Democratic opposition. Also keep in
mind that she had received regular and repeated
Hatch Act training and guidance. Contrast her case
with those of two officials in the Obama administration — former Cabinet secretaries Kathleen Sebelius
and Julian Castro — who were found to have violated
the Hatch Act. Both cooperated with the special
counsel, explained they didn’t intend to break the
law but admitted their errors and promised to be
more careful in the future (which they were).
Once again we need to remind ourselves: Thumbing your nose at the rule of law is not normal, and it is
not okay.
ABCDE
L O CA L O P I N I O N S
FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
Unheard-of noise pollution from a wasteful FAA program
Regarding the March 9 news article “FAA
botched $36 billion effort to modernize air traffic
system, report says”:
While the Federal Aviation Administration may
have denounced the House Appropriations
Committee-ordered audit of its NextGen program,
it is time that Congress denounced NextGen. It’s a
failed program with bad design. The airlines don’t
like it, and it isn’t saving them money. More
important, NextGen is torturing hundreds of
thousands of taxpaying citizens all over the country
with noise pollution never heard before. The
concentrated flight paths over heavily populated
areas at low altitudes are causing health problems
and lowering property values.
In our area, Georgetown University has sued the
The contract dispute between Stormy Daniels and
President Trump seems to me to be rather easily
resolved [“Stormy Daniels sues Trump over nondisclosure deal,” Politics & the Nation, March 7]. The essence
of the contract appears to be an unlawful violation of
campaign finance laws. As such, it is unenforceable. It
is a fundamental principle in contract law that no
contract whose essence is an unlawful purpose can be
enforced, and it is in fact null and void.
Orin Hollander, Jamison, Pa.
An uber-effective lift for patients
It’s nice to see the Defense Department actually
paying U.S. troops properly for the risks they run in
Africa [“U.S. troops in Niger, Mali and parts of
Cameroon to receive ‘danger’ pay,” March 9, news].
Better late than never.
But it remains appalling that five months after
four soldiers were killed in Niger, no answers have
come from Defense. Considering the near-blanket
coverage of the 2012 attacks in Benghazi, Libya, the
absence of attention to these four deaths is obscene.
These four men are as forgotten as the 241 U.S. personnel killed in Beirut on Oct. 23, 1983.
The American people and the media have failed to
recognize their sacrifice and failed to hold anyone
accountable.
Joseph Lowry, Arlington
Ms. Conway violated the Hatch Act. The White House thumbs its nose.
I
Contract killer
What happened in Niger?
A presidential counselor broke the law
N THE early days of the Trump administration,
presidential counselor Kellyanne Conway ran
afoul of ethics rules when she urged the president’s supporters to buy products under his
daughter’s brand. The White House said she was
being provided with additional ethics training and
recurrence was “highly unlikely.” Some thought
stronger disciplinary action should have been taken,
but at least there was some acknowledgment of
wrongdoing and an implied promise to do better.
Unfortunately, it’s not clear the training did much
good, as the Office of Special Counsel made clear
recently in finding Ms. Conway in violation of federal
law barring the mixing of partisan politics with
official government business. More troubling than
the latest violation was the White House’s refusal to
do anything about it or even acknowledge it.
In a letter to President Trump, Special Counsel
The latest news coming out of Prince George’s
County schools — unauthorized pay raises for centraloffice employees, on the heels of grade-fixing and
graduation scandals — should come as no surprise to
those who followed schools chief Kevin M. Maxwell’s
tenure in neighboring Anne Arundel County [“School
board bloc: Pay hikes improper,” Metro, March 8].
There, he dramatically increased central-office salaries for bureaucrats and cronies who contributed
nothing to in-classroom learning. He routinely
showed disdain for parents’ concerns and the challenges faced by teachers, and he routinely sparred
with the County Council and executive over budgets.
The “Maxwell lesson” for all Marylanders is that
when there is no all-elected school board and no
accountability for school leaders, greed and ego come
before school performance.
Christopher Doherty, Tracy’s Landing
Regarding the March 2 news article “Uber, Lyft say
they can help fill a medical gap”:
Uber and Lyft are implementing policies to work
with health-care providers to provide rides to patients
for their appointments. The provider or insurer, not the
patient, will be billed for the rides, and this program
will operate both in cities and in more rural areas. The
article said some pilot studies have yielded benefits but
others did not see a drop in patient no-show rates.
Using ride-hailing companies is a great way to
provide transportation for patients who might otherwise miss their appointments. High no-show rates are
a huge problem in health care and often are caused by
limited access to cars and public transportation. In
places such as Pittsburgh, where public transportation is often unpredictable, using ride-hailing companies for patients can be a way to decrease no-show
rates and improve patient satisfaction. Many other
initiatives have been tried to combat high no-show
rates, but often the problems are out of the health-care
provider’s control. Using ride-hailing companies can
be one way that health-care providers show patients
they care while decreasing high no-show rates.
Nina Yacovoni, Pittsburgh
Before the crown prince visits
America, he should free activists
imprisoned back home.
AUDI CROWN Prince Mohammed bin Salman is on a mission to charm the West. The
32-year-old de facto leader of one of the
world’s largest oil producers paid a visit to
Britain last week and is due in the United States
next week. His supporters tout him as a bold
modernizer who is moderating the severe Saudi
version of Islam, granting greater freedoms to
women and introducing desperately needed economic reforms. While other Arab states lean
toward Russia, the crown prince appears eager to
double down on Saudi bonds with the West.
All that is true to an extent, and welcome. Saudi
women will finally be allowed to drive in June, and
guardianship rules controlling them have been
loosened. Religious police have been reined in, and
cinemas are opening. The problem is that the
liberalizing steps have been accompanied by even
bolder acts of repression. Hundreds of Saudi
businessmen and princes were arrested late last
year and forced to hand over billions of dollars in
assets to Prince Mohammed or the government
without due process. According to a report in the
New York Times, at least 17 were hospitalized for
physical abuse, and one, a major general, died.
Those in the West who support the cause of Saudi
modernization, and businesspeople who may wish
to invest in it, badly need reassurance. Fortunately,
there is a ready way for the crown prince to offer it,
even before he arrives in Washington: He can
release some of the dozens of political prisoners
who were jailed for advocating some of the very
reforms he is attempting to advance.
Prime among them is Raif Badawi, a blogger and
activist who challenged the religious establishment
and advocated women’s rights. He was arrested in
2012 and in 2014 was sentenced to 10 years in
prison and 1,000 lashes — 50 of which were cruelly
delivered in a public square three years ago. In
response to international protests, Saudi officials
have hinted that Mr. Badawi could be pardoned, but
he remains in prison. Now is the time to free him.
MARCH 13 , 2018
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
E’RE GOING to get things done.” So
said President Trump last month
assuring students, teachers and parents affected by school shootings of
his resolve to find solutions to gun violence.
“You’re afraid of the NRA.” That was Mr. Trump
the following week, chastising members of his own
party for not backing age restrictions on gun
purchases as he challenged lawmakers to pass
“comprehensive” gun control and stand up to the
gun lobby.
Now here’s Mr. Trump when it comes to backing
up his statements:
. TUESDAY,
FAA, and a lawsuit from Maryland is imminent.
Efforts across the country to negotiate fixes with
the FAA have been futile. After a year of meetings
between the DC Metroplex BWI Community
Roundtable and FAA reps, the FAA has offered
merely insignificant “notional” tweaks to flight
paths, without addressing altitudes and dispersion. Last month, the FAA suddenly required that
the roundtable submit Freedom of Information Act
requests, to be vetted by the FAA’s legal team, for
any information about redesign of our airspace.
Someone needs to remind FAA officials that they
work for us taxpayers, not for NextGen contractors
and not for the airlines. Congress should
stop throwing our good money after bad.
Barbara Deckert, Elkridge
News pages:
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China started it
The March 9 front-page article “U.S. allies express
confusion, anger and frustration” said European
officials “made the rounds of congressional offices”
and couldn’t find anyone who thought President
Trump was right to implement the tariffs. But Congress wasn’t imposing tariffs; the president was.
These European officials failed to talk to the president’s key trade advisers, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, White House trade adviser Peter Navarro
and U.S. Trade Representative Robert E. Lighthizer,
all of whom support the tariffs.
The article described the penalties as a surprise,
quoting an official with the National Trade Association of Brazil as saying the move was “impulsive.” The
tariffs were no shock. Mr. Trump began this process
last April by launching investigations into the national
security implications of steel and aluminum imports.
The Commerce Department delivered reports to him
in January, and they were made public in February.
They recommended tariffs, import quotas or both.
The article reported that foreign leaders said the
tariffs will put their citizens out of work and suggested a trade war will ensue. Tens of thousands of
unemployed American workers are the victims of a
trade war launched by China ever since it gained
entrance in the World Trade Organization in 2001.
Mr. Trump’s tariffs finally are an indication that the
United States no longer will capitulate to China’s
trade cheating.
Barbara White Stack, Wexford, Pa.
The writer is blog editor for the United Steel Workers.
Don’t helicopter these parents
Regarding the March 9 Metro article “Has the first
couple’s puppy love given way to hard-boiled resentment?”:
I’m thinking that the best way to get eagle mom
First Lady to settle down and lay some eggs is to not
hover over her nest in a helicopter. Despite District
wildlife biologist Dan Rauch’s innocent intentions,
please consider that the poor gal has had to fight off
those harlots trying to move in on her man, likely
putting a bit of a damper on her family-building
mood, and now a helicopter buzzing her nest.
I suggest leaving the beleaguered couple alone to
sort out their marital issues in private.
Rick Flowe, Manassas
E D I TOR ’ S NOTE
We inadvertently republished Tom Toles’s
March 11 cartoon in the March 12 edition. The
correct March 12 cartoon can be found online at
http://wapo.st/2FBjEPP.
TUESDAY, MARCH 13 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
Media should
shine light on
its own biases
BY
MICHAEL GERSON
Trump evangelicals
have sold their souls
W
G ARY A BERNATHY
hillsboro, ohio
N
ews organizations across the
country often highlight the
mid-March “Sunshine Week” —
created by the American Society
of News Editors to remind the public of
the press’s crucial role in ensuring open
government — by writing editorials or
commentaries about the importance of a
free press. This week, for the second
straight year, the presidency of Donald
Trump is being used as a bogeyman to
suggest that the media’s efforts are more
endangered than ever. The Associated
Press offered such an example in a
package in conjunction with this Sunshine Week.
“President Donald Trump’s campaign
to discredit the news media has spread to
officials at all levels of government, who
are echoing his use of the term ‘fake
news’ as a weapon against unflattering
stories,” according to AP reporter Ryan J.
Foley. “It’s become ubiquitous as a signal
to a politician’s supporters to ignore
legitimate reporting and hard questions,
as a smear of the beleaguered and dwindling local press corps, and as a way for
conservatives to push back against what
they call biased stories.”
It is telling that the story notes that the
claim of bias comes from conservatives,
which raises the question: Why don’t
liberals complain as much about media
bias? The obvious liberal slant to the
media is typically ignored in favor of
journalists adopting the mantle of
victimhood.
Sunshine Week is of particular interest
this year to those of us at the TimesGazette, because our small-town daily is
in the midst of celebrating its 200th
anniversary. Founded in 1818 by a businessman named Moses Carothers, the
newspaper has undergone various
names, ownerships and frequencies
(weekly, twice-weekly, daily) but continues to thrive.
Though the years, the Times-Gazette
has provided the first draft of local
history, along with holding local government officials accountable and providing
readers with in-depth analysis of important local issues. It has also regularly
highlighted the accomplishments of
young and old in the manner unique to
small community newspapers.
In his first edition, published June
1818, Carothers wrote that he hoped as
editor “to be able to continue the publication of his paper henceforth without
intermission, and also to merit by his
impartial and steady course in the discharge of his editorial duties that patronage which has been extended to him at a
risk.”
It is safe to say that Carothers never
dreamed that his little newspaper would
still be providing news and information
“without intermission” 200 years later,
not only in print but also through all the
new and evolving digital platforms. Also
impossible for Carothers to anticipate
was the national attention — and in some
cases, ridicule — his humble endeavor
would garner for its endorsement of the
Republican candidate for president in
2016.
I share the concern over the shaky
position of newspapers today, but not for
the same reason as many of my colleagues. The attacks by the president and
others cannot hurt us. They are merely
firing ammunition handed them by media outlets that have too often abandoned their “impartial and steady
course” — as Carothers put it 200 years
ago — in favor of point-of-view journalism and obvious agendas reflected in
tabloid-style, click-bait headlines and
sensationalized reporting.
While some of our most vaunted newspapers are on unstable footing, both
financially and institutionally, smaller
papers are holding their own or even
growing. The industry magazine Editor
& Publisher reported in 2016, “Small,
community newspapers across the country are not just surviving, but — in many
cases — actually thriving. Many of them
have managed to dodge the layoffs and
downsizing that larger papers have had
to face.”
Some of the reasons for that have to do
with the “hyper-local” coverage model
many small newspapers have adopted.
But “reader trust” — a crucial component
of a newspaper’s success — is stronger
among readers of local community newspapers than their big-city counterparts,
as noted in an NPR feature last year. The
reasons are many, but “one of the big
differences between larger metro newspapers and community journalism is the
staff has to face its audience every day,”
NPR’s Clay Masters noted.
Sunshine Week will be dominated by
media outlets wringing their hands over
attacks from government officials. The
media would do better to make it a week
of introspection.
Fight fiercely for open government.
Hold elected officials accountable. But
make quality journalism the only agenda, impartiality the standard and an
adherence to “just the facts” reporting
the rule, relegating agendas and viewpoints to the opinion pages. Recommitting to those benchmarks might help
maintain what Carothers called our
“steady course” for another couple of
centuries, at least.
Gary Abernathy, a contributing columnist for
The Post, is publisher and editor of the
(Hillsboro, Ohio) Times-Gazette. Follow him at
@AbernathyGary.
A17
RE
CAROLYN KASTER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Trump at a rally in Moon Township, Pa., on Saturday.
EUGENE ROBINSON
Trump’s
surrender
O
nce again, President Trump
has made a cowardly, cynical
and monumentally stupid retreat on the issue of guns. No
one should have expected otherwise.
Forget everything he said in the
wake of the Parkland, Fla., shooting
about the urgent need for meaningful
action. Trump now takes a position
that will almost surely guarantee
more gun violence in schools, not
less. It must take a lot of hard work
and concentration to be so utterly
wrong.
The president — I can’t believe I’m
writing this, but it’s true — wants to
arm “highly trained expert teachers”
with concealed weapons. Anyone
who thinks this is not one of the worst
ideas in history should conduct a
brief thought experiment. Imagine
any one of your elementary school,
middle school or high school classrooms. Imagine a loaded gun in there
somewhere. Now imagine what could
go tragically wrong.
Trump’s support for arming teachers and his refusal to back sensible
gun-control measures represent a
craven surrender to the National Rifle Association. In his made-for-TV
meeting with members of Congress
to discuss gun violence, Trump accused Republicans of being “afraid of
the NRA.” But he’s the one cringing
and cowering to keep the gun lobby’s
favor.
Trump tried to defend his meek
surrender Monday on Twitter: “If
schools are mandated to be gun free
zones, violence and danger are given
an open invitation to enter. Almost all
school shootings are in gun free
zones. Cowards will only go where
there is no deterrent!”
Can he really be that obtuse, or is
he just pretending?
One thing that should be clear by
now is that most of the perpetrators
of mass shootings, in schools and
elsewhere, do not launch their obscene attacks with the expectation of
getting away after the vile deed is
done. A few do survive, such as the
alleged Parkland shooter, but there is
almost never any indication that escape was part of the assailant’s plan.
These are not rational acts by rational
people.
It is ridiculous to think that the
fear of getting shot by a teacher would
serve as any kind of deterrent. The
most obvious foreseeable consequence is that would-be shooters will
probably decide to aim at the teachers first.
Trump is slavishly following the
NRA’s party line that “a good guy with
a gun” is the solution to mass shootings. Clearly, however, it is not. An
armed security officer was on site at
Marjory Stoneman Douglas High
School in Parkland while the shooter
went on his rampage. The officer
never went into the building; he later
said he believed the shooter was outside the school, not inside. Additional
officers who quickly arrived also did
not enter.
Where are the shots coming from?
How many shooters are there? Is that
an assailant pounding on the classroom door, or a potential victim in
imminent peril? The idea that teachers are going to be able to answer
these questions more quickly and
accurately than well-trained security
personnel is ludicrous.
In gunfights, even big-city police
officers who are regularly tested on
their firearms proficiency miss their
targets more often than they hit
them. Picture the chaos of an activeshooter situation. Hear the shots, the
shouts, the screams. Are teachers going to be able to focus in on an
assailant despite the sensory overload? Or are they more likely to fire at
innocent students? Or perhaps at one
another?
Consider another predictable
scenario: A high school class gets out
of control, to the point where the
overwhelmed teacher feels physically
threatened. Will the teacher perhaps
be tempted to display a loaded
weapon to restore order? If so, what
happens next?
The tragedy of this awful idea —
and the intent — is that it diverts the
gun-violence debate away from measures that could actually have an
impact. Chief among them would be a
ban on the military-style assault rifles
that have become the mass shooter’s
weapon of choice. Trump is too
scared of the NRA’s wrath to dare
mention this common-sense, lifesaving step.
Incredibly, the president has even
backed away from the no-brainer
idea — newly enacted by the state of
Florida — of raising the minimum
age for at least some gun purchases
from 18 to 21. He supported such a
move until the NRA slapped his little
hand.
Forming a school safety commission under hapless Education Secretary Betsy DeVos is like consigning
the issue to a gaggle of geese. Slightly
toughening background checks and
banning bump stocks hardly amount
to incremental progress. Sorry, students. Trump has wimped out.
eugenerobinson@washpost.com
PO S T P A R T I S A N
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/blogs/post-partisan
The new birtherism
Don’t let them push you around,
Sen. Warren. Please keep your spit to
yourself.
Apparently, DNA tests are the new birth
certificates. Because President Trump
continues his immature taunting of Sen.
Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) by referring
to her as “Pocahontas,” his potential
2020 Democratic rival is being asked to
take a test to determine whether she is, in
fact, descended from Native Americans, as
her family lore says.
“There are now so many commercial
DNA heritage-tracking labs in business
that they advertise on television,” the
Berkshire Eagle of Pittsfield, Mass., suggested in an editorial last week. “All the
senator needs to do is spit into a tube, wait
a few weeks and get her answer. No matter
if the test came up negative or positive, it
would constitute a plus for Warren and
her political hopes.” Now, her unwillingness to take such a test is the talk of cable
news.
But why should she? There is also no
indication that her shaky claim to Native
American ancestry ever benefited her, either during her earlier career in academia
or in politics.
Haven’t we been here before? Trump’s
political rise was fueled in part by the fact
that he was willing to purvey corrosive
conspiracy theories. After President
Barack Obama produced his birth certificate in 2011, it took Trump another five
years to say he accepted that Obama was
“born in the United States, period.”
Now, Trump is going even lower, to
pre-birtherism.
Many of us grow up with stories that
might not withstand probing. In my own
family’s case, there was a memento, a
black-and-white photo of my grandfather
dressed up in a doughboy uniform. I had
the impression — I’m not really sure where
it came from — that he had been gassed in
World War I. He never contradicted it.
Only after he died did I learn that he was
never overseas during the Great War.
The spotlight that comes with public
life often produces surprising revelations
about long-accepted family histories. Bill
Clinton was president before he discovered he had an older half brother.
It is possible Warren’s family story is
wrong; it is possible there’s a kernel of
truth that has gotten misplaced over time.
But if so, it is ridiculous to turn such a
common and understandable part of family life into a political attack.
“I get why some people think there’s hay
to be made here. You won’t find my family
members on any rolls, and I’m not enrolled in a tribe,” Warren said in a graceful
appearance last month before the National Congress of American Indians. “I respect that distinction.”
She added: “I’m here today to make a
promise: Every time someone brings up
my family’s story, I’m going to use it to lift
up the story of your families and your
communities.”
In the end, standing up to a bully will
tell us more about what Elizabeth Warren
is made of than any DNA test ever could.
— Karen Tumulty
ith their reactions to the Roy
Moore candidacy and the
Stormy Daniels scandal, the
Trump evangelicals have
scaled the heights of hypocrisy to the
summit. Family-values conservatives who
dismiss credible accusations of sexual
abuse and wink at hush money for a porn
star have ceased to represent family values in any meaningful sense. They have
made a national joke of moral standards
that were once, presumably, deeply held.
At least when a Democrat violated them.
My friend Pete Wehner proposes a
thought experiment: If a militant atheist
were to design a trap with the goal of
discrediting evangelical Christians, could
they do better than Moore and Daniels? It
would take some consideration.
But this barely scratches the surface of
the moral compromises being made. The
problem with Trumpism is not only the
transparent excuses it offers (and requires others to accept) for shoddy and
offensive behavior. As I argue in the
Atlantic, the deeper issue is the distinctly
non-Christian substance of President
Trump’s values. His unapologetic materialism. His tribalism and hatred for “the
other.” His strength-worship and contempt for “losers,” which smack more of
Nietzsche than of Christ.
Trump’s nasty mash-up of the power of
positive thinking, the Playboy philosophy
and the will to power is a naturally poor fit
for religious conservatives. Or so one
would have thought.
Trump evangelicals defend their support for the president in the pose of
political realists. A president, they argue,
is not a pastor. A certain amount of
compromise is necessary to get conservative judges and more favorable treatment
of Christian institutions. This is the way
of the world.
There are sometimes conflicted political choices in a fallen world. But this
argument would be more credible if so
many Trump evangelicals were not such
sycophants. It is one thing to point to the
difficult binary choice between Trump
and Hillary Clinton. It is another to
provide Trump political cover in every
scandal and offer preemptive absolution
of every character failure.
There is something else at work here
than weary realism — something that
Tony Perkins of the Family Research
Council recently clarified. Conservatives,
he said, “were tired of being kicked
around by Barack Obama and his leftists.
And I think they are finally glad that
there’s somebody on the playground that
is willing to punch the bully.” In this
explanation, Trump’s approach to public
discourse is actually the main selling
point. His bullying — his cruelty, crudity
and personal insults — is admired because it is directed at other bullies.
This is, perhaps, politically and psychologically understandable. But it has absolutely nothing to do with the Sermon on
the Mount. Nothing to do with any recognizable version of Christian ethics. The
very thing that should repel evangelicals
— Trump’s dehumanization of others — is
what seems to fascinate and attract some
conservative Christians. It is yet another
example of discrediting hypocrisy.
The Trump evangelicals are best understood as conservative political operatives, seeking benefits for their interest
group from politicians who are most
likely to provide them. So how good is the
quality of their political advice?
Not particularly good. Identifying
evangelicalism with Trump’s ethnopopulism may have some short-term benefits. But public influence eventually depends on the persuasiveness of public
arguments. And close ties to Trump will
eventually be disastrous to causes that
evangelicals care about. Pro-life arguments are discredited by an association
with misogyny. Arguments for religious
liberty are discredited by association with
anti-Muslim bias. Arguments for family
values are discredited by nativist disdain
for migrant families.
The damage radiates further. Trump
evangelicals are blessing the destruction
of public norms on civility, decency and
the importance of public character.
And the ultimate harm is to the reputation of faith itself. The identification of
evangelical Christianity with ethnonationalism and white grievance is a
grave matter. Evangelical Christians
hardly distinguished themselves during
the civil rights movement. Some used
Christian academies as a cover for continued segregation. Getting this issue wrong
again would be particularly damning in a
nation — and in Christian churches —
growing inexorably more diverse.
Here are the sources of hope: Evangelicals have a rich history that includes
abolitionists and social reformers to inspire them. They have a rising generation
of leaders — from Pastor Timothy Keller,
to the Southern Baptist Convention’s
Russell Moore, to Bishop Claude Alexander, to Bible teacher Beth Moore, to
anti-slavery activist Gary Haugen — who
are embracing a different and better
model of social engagement. And they
hold to a faith that for two millennia has
survived not only the wrath of its opponents but the cynicism of its advocates.
michaelgerson@washpost.com
CATHERINE RAMPELL
Don’t pin this on the Jews
M
aybe the Russians didn’t meddle
in our 2016 election. Maybe it
was the Jews.
So says President Trump’s favorite green-room buddy and shirtless
equestrian, Russian President Vladimir
Putin.
In an interview that aired Friday evening, NBC’s Megyn Kelly asked Putin
whether it bothered him that Russians had
interfered in the U.S. election.
“I couldn’t care less,” he replied. “They
do not represent the interest of the Russian state. Maybe they’re not even Russians. Maybe they’re Ukrainians, Tatars, Jews, just with Russian citizenship.”
The White House has so far remained
silent on Putin’s anti-Semitic scapegoating.
And based on a draft House Intelligence
Committee report, other Republicans are
also apparently in denial that Putin wanted Trump to win, despite the intelligence
community’s conclusions to the contrary.
So allow me to chime in instead. I can’t
speak for Ukrainians or Tatars. But as a
Jew, I find Putin’s attempt to implicate my
people to be disgusting, offensive, obviously false.
Because let’s be frank: If Jews had rigged
the election, it would have had a way
different outcome.
The Chosen People overwhelmingly did
not choose Trump. Only about a quarter of
Jewish voters cast ballots for Trump in
2016, according to exit polls, meaning he
did worse among Jewish voters than any
other religious group for which data are
available. He has since remained low in our
esteem, with just a 26 percent approval
rating among Jews, according to a January Gallup poll.
And can you blame us? Trump has clearly been Bad For The Jews.
Sure, Trump’s daughter and son-in-law
are Jewish, and some (emphasis on some)
Jews are happy with Trump’s declared
intention to move the U.S. Embassy in
Israel to Jerusalem, security issues and
Palestinian peace talks be damned. And
needless to say, some on the left have been
too cozy with anti-Semites such as Louis
Farrakhan.
But throughout the campaign and subsequent presidency, Trump has given
American Jewry more significant reasons
to be fearful for its place in this country.
Trump has regularly played footsie with
white supremacists. There was the tweet
showing a Star of David (sorry, I mean
“sheriff’s star”) superimposed on an image
of Hillary Clinton and $100 bills. Also his
hesitation to denounce an endorsement
from white supremacist David Duke.
Also his closing Elders of Zion-style
election ad, featuring famous Jews such as
George Soros and Janet Yellen alongside
dark narration about a “global power
structure” that has “robbed our working
class.” That dog whistle, invoking
centuries-old conspiracy theories about a
shadowy international Jewish cabal, was
quite audible to human ears.
And who could forget Trump’s reluctance to condemn the tiki-torch-bearing,
“Jews will not replace us”-chanting neoNazis in Charlottesville? Instead, Trump
declared, there were “very fine people”
among the attendees of the far-right rally,
which ended with the killing of a peaceful
protester.
The incident nearly cost him his National Economic Council director, Gary
Cohn. When last week Cohn finally did
resign — in response to Trump’s bigoted
comments toward aluminum, not Jews —
Trump referred to Cohn as a “globalist.”
For those unfamiliar, the term (like the
triple-parentheses “echo”) is often used in
far-right corners of the Internet as a euphemism for “Jewish.”
The slur is also a favorite of Stephen K.
Bannon, the multi-shirt-wearing former
Breitbart editor who until a recent fallingout held Trump under his spell. Since then
Bannon has been touring Europe meeting
with far-right political parties associated
with anti-Semitism and racism.
“Let them call you racists. Let them call
you xenophobes. Let them call you nativists. Wear it as a badge of honor,”
he urged France’s National Front, a party
that has sometimes tried to shed
associations with its Holocaust-denying,
fascist-sympathizing founder.
Such rhetoric has consequences.
Here in America, the number of antiSemitic incidents has been rising. From
2016 to 2017 they spiked 57 percent, the
largest single-year increase on record and
the second highest number reported since
the Anti-Defamation League began keeping track in 1979.
Schools and cemeteries have been
among the prime targets. As have journalists; in fact as I type this, I’m mentally
preparing myself for the torrent of antiSemitic abuse that likely awaits. I don’t
often talk publicly about my religion, but
when I do, I usually confront a digital
parade of Pepe the frogs, ethnic slurs and
gas-chamber memes.
So come on, Putin. You, like your recently indicted minions, must be trolling us.
The Jews are responsible for widespread
election meddling? Please, even a
400-pound basement-dweller is a more
plausible fall guy. No one could honestly
believe that a cabal of Jews — squirreled
away in Katz’s Deli, mainlining Dr. Brown’s
— would have rigged this election.
Well, maybe almost no one.
crampell@washpost.com
A18
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 13 , 2018
Trump to tour wall models but has no proof they work
DHS is still developing
tool to gauge the success
of border barriers
BY
N ICK M IROFF
More than a year after the
government’s top oversight body
urged the Department of Homeland Security to develop a way to
measure the effectiveness of fencing and barriers along the border
with Mexico, DHS has no such
tool ready, even as President
Trump prepares to pick the winning designs for his $18 billion
border wall.
Trump officials in recent weeks
have dismissed criticism of their
border security plan with a wellestablished defensive principle
and simple retort: “Walls work.”
But a February 2017 report by
the Government Accountability
Office (GAO) found DHS has no
way to measure how well they
work, where they work best or
whether less-expensive alternatives could be just as effective.
Despite the assumption that
illegal traffic enters through areas where fencing is absent,
the report identified several sectors where more arrests occur in
locations that have existing barriers.
U.S. border agents collect “geotag” data, electronic markers that
assign geographic locations, to
map illegal crossings and arrests.
But DHS has no means to gauge
the extent to which those incursions are impeded by “tactical
infrastructure,” the report noted,
undermining the agency’s ability
to avoid wasteful spending.
“An assessment of border fencing’s contributions to border security operations could help position [U.S. Customs and Border
Protection] to identify the cost
effectiveness of border fencing
compared to other assets the
agency deploys,” the report said.
DHS officials said last week
they are working with the Johns
Hopkins University Applied
Physics Laboratory to develop
such an evaluation system, and it
may be ready later this year.
Trump is moving forward anyway. His public statements have
demonstrated a keen interest in
the aesthetic properties of the
wall, along with its height. His
administration has budgeted
$1.6 billion for wall construction
this year.
Trump is scheduled to travel to
San Diego on Tuesday to view
eight prototypes and is likely to
announce one or more winning
designs. The trip will be Trump’s
first as president to California, a
state his administration is suing
for refusing to assist with federal
immigration enforcement.
Trump’s wall-building plan —
which is stalled in Congress —
would spend $18 billion over 10
MARIO TAMA/GETTY IMAGES
Barrier wall prototypes stand on the U.S. border on Thursday, as seen from Tijuana, Mexico. The Trump administration has budgeted
$1.6 billion for wall construction, even as a report last year found that more arrests occurred in locations that had existing barriers.
years to add 316 miles of new
barriers and replace aging fencing along 407 miles.
The 30-foot steel and concrete
prototypes showcased in San Diego are far taller and more formidable than anything in place
along the border. They extend six
feet underground to deter burrowing and feature an array of
anti-climbing
configurations.
One is crenelated with metal
spikes.
DHS officials say their testing
teams found the structures exceedingly difficult to scale or
break through. The prototypes
cost as much as $486,000 each to
build, and DHS has not said if the
$18 billion overall cost projection
is based on one or several of those
designs.
Instead, DHS officials have defended the expenditure by pointing to major decreases in arrests
for illegal crossings in areas
where tougher fencing was installed. In a new promotional
video titled “Walls Work,” CBP
said illegal traffic dropped 87
percent in San Diego after its
two-layered barrier system was
installed.
“Border walls have proven to
be extremely effective in preventing the flow of drugs and illegal
aliens across our borders,” DHS
spokesman Tyler Q. Houlton said
in a statement this month, after a
court victory allowing Homeland
Security officials to move forward
Border Patrol apprehensions by sector, fiscal 2017
CALIFORNIA
ARIZONA
San
Sa
an Diego El C
Centro
entro
26,086
2 ,0
26,0
,086
18,633
18,
8,63
8
, 33
TTijuana
ijuana
a
Yuma
12,847
Pacific
P
Ocean
200 MILES
NEW MEXICO
There are about 705 miles of fencing
along the 1,969-mile border
Tuc
Tucson
cs
so
s
on
38,657
38,6
657
Nogal
le
es
e
Nogales
El Paso
25,193
25,
193
Ju
uarez
Juarez
The Rio Grande
Grand
ande
e creates
crea
reates
te a
natura
nat
ura
al part
p
artit
tit
ittti
tion
o alo
along
a
ng
g
natural
partition
100ano
miles
othe
ther
herr 1
he
,2
252 mile
252
25
m
es Big
another
1,252
miles
g Bend
d
6,002
6,002
M E X I C O
T E X A S
Del Rio
o
13,476
Eagle Pass
Eagle
Laredo
L
o
25,460
2
460
0
Nuevo
Laredo
Rio Grande Valley
137,562
Source: U.S. Border Patrol
with fast-track construction
plans. “Simply put — walls work,”
he said.
But when the independent,
nonpartisan GAO launched its
study in 2015, it determined that
the efficacy of walls and fencing
varies widely across the 2,000mile border, depending on a variety of factors that include topography, proximity to urban areas,
and the ancillary presence of
tools such as cameras, sensors
and enforcement agents.
GAO researchers analyzed the
location of illegal entries between
2013 and 2015 and found sectors
of the border in California, New
Mexico and other areas where
more arrests occurred were in
places that already have fencing.
In southern Arizona, about half of
THE WASHINGTON POST
the illegal “drive-throughs”
by unauthorized vehicles occurred in places with barriers to
prevent exactly that.
Some of the most robust fencing along the border has been
installed in urban and semi-urban areas adjacent to U.S. border
cities such as Calexico, Calif.,
Nogales, Ariz., and El Paso. But
those who illegally cross the border sometimes prefer those areas
because they can quickly blend
into urban surroundings if they
manage to get through.
DHS officials recorded 9,287
breaches of border fencing between 2010 and 2015 in areas
with “pedestrian” barriers that
are designed to be more forbidding than “vehicle” fencing. Areas
with older “legacy” fencing were
nearly six times more likely to be
breached, the GAO report noted,
and presumably many of those
sections will be first to be replaced by the taller and tougher
ramparts on display in San Diego.
Tougher fortifications help
channel illegal traffic toward
more remote, isolated areas away
from U.S. cities and highways,
DHS officials say, giving agents
more time to catch up to illegal
entrants when ground sensors
and aerial surveillance tools detect suspicious activity.
Critics of the president’s border security plans say their concerns have less to do with the
physics of huge walls than with
the fiscal prudence of building
them at a time of ballooning
deficits.
“We’re spending money like a
drunken sailor,” said Sen. Thomas
R. Carper (D-Del.), a former naval
officer and one of the members of
the Senate Homeland Security
and Governmental Affairs Committee, which commissioned the
GAO report. “We cannot continue
to waste money, so we need to
find out what works and what
doesn’t.”
Trump campaigned on a promise to build a border wall and
oblige Mexico to pay for it. Top
DHS officials in the Trump administration praise the proposal.
But before Trump’s presidential run, Border Patrol agents and
officials did not say they wanted a
wall, Carper said. Instead, they
have long emphasized a flexible
“layered” approach combining
barriers, technology and personnel in configurations that can
adapt to changing security
needs.
“It’s no one thing,” Carper said.
“It’s a combination.”
In an interview, the head of the
Border Patrol’s Strategic Planning and Analysis Directorate,
Benjamin “Carry” Huffman, said
that after a career in the agency,
he doesn’t need a yardstick to
know that walls and fencing are
effective.
“Having done this for 33 years,
I can tell you a wall is essential in
gaining operational control capability,” Huffman said. “And having worked the border with a wall
and without it, I can say you want
to work the border with it.”
Look at San Diego, Huffman
continued. “It’s a pleasant place
to be, one of the finest cities in
America. In 1985, it was quite a
different place. You had 1.6 million people coming across the
southern border. . . . South San
Diego was practically uninhabitable. Property values were in the
tank,” he said.
“Fast forward a few years and
we started adding this infrastructure,” Huffman continued, describing the addition of primary
fencing backed by another “secondary” fence with Border Patrol
roadway in between, creating a
no man’s land where undocumented crossers could be
trapped.
“We changed the whole environment in that area,” said Huffman. “The U.S. government literally made millionaires and billionaires down there. They had
property that was practically unusable, and it changed dramatically.”
Last year, the number of people arrested along the border
with Mexico dropped to a 49-year
low, and Trump has touted the
decline as proof his border security strategies are working.
But illegal crossings have been
falling for most of the past decade, and migration experts say
tougher border security is only
one of several factors. Birthrates
in Mexico have plunged since the
1960s, leaving the country with
far fewer unemployed young people, while the domestic labor
demands of Mexican manufacturing have grown.
Today, the majority of unauthorized border crossers are from
Central America, not Mexico, including many families and unaccompanied minors who turn
themselves in to U.S. agents to
request asylum, citing threats of
chronic gang violence back home.
Most of the Central American
migrants cross the Rio Grande in
South Texas. DHS officials have
prioritized that area for a surge of
new wall construction along the
winding riverbanks.
nick.miroff@washpost.com
When Trump visits border wall prototypes, he’ll be surrounded by resistance
Calif. is in open revolt,
and protesters promise
to disrupt San Diego trip
BY
J OHN W AGNER
san diego — When President
Trump touches down here Tuesday, he will be landing in the
cradle of the resistance to his
presidency — and then thumbing
his nose at those who oppose him.
On his first trip to California
since taking office, Trump is
scheduled to head down to the
U.S.-Mexico border to inspect
eight prototypes for his longpromised wall.
While the move is being enthusiastically welcomed by Trump’s
supporters, it is expected to draw
protests on both sides of the
border. And it invited scorn Monday from leading Democrats here
who have sought through legislation and lawsuits to fight an array
of Trump policies, ranging from
immigration to offshore drilling
to health-care access.
“This visit is a political stunt to
rally his base around a stupid
boondoggle,” said California Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de
León, who also accused Trump of
“misogyny and bigotry” and suggested his visit to the border is an
attempt to distract voters from
the ongoing investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 election.
While in the Golden State,
Trump will also address military
personnel at the Marine Corps
Air Station Miramar here and
attend a posh Republican National Committee fundraiser in Beverly Hills. There are no plans to
meet with Gov. Jerry Brown or
other leading Democrats in a
state that Trump lost to Hillary
Clinton by more than 4 million
votes.
Despite his more than yearlong absence, Trump is no stranger to California, and it bears
markings of his success. Trump
owns a home in Beverly Hills and
a golf club in Rancho Palos
Verdes, and he moved the staging
of his reality show, “The Apprentice,” to the state after ratings
started to slump in New York.
Still — as Tuesday’s visit will
likely bear out — Trump’s relationships with state leaders have
been openly hostile and continue
to deteriorate.
“I don’t think he would be
going there if the border wall
prototypes were in Texas,” said
Barry Bennett, a Republican consultant who advised Trump during the 2016 election. “It’s incredibly out of touch with the rest of
the country. Politically, it’s not a
place to waste too many seconds.”
The last time Trump was in San
Diego, for a May 2016 campaign
rally downtown, police in riot
gear dispersed large crowds of
protesters who clashed with
Trump supporters. Thirty-five
people were arrested.
In anticipation of what could
be another unruly scene, police
last week announced a “temporary restriction area” around the
site of the border wall prototypes
and pledged to prosecute anyone
who brings in knives, bricks,
baseball bats, firearms or other
“implements of riot.”
Trump’s visit comes on the
heels of a trip last week by Attorney General Jeff Sessions to announce the Trump administration is suing California in an
attempt to block its “sanctuary”
laws. Among other things, the
administration is targeting a provision that bars local authorities
from asking about the immigra-
tion status of people during routine interactions.
At a news conference in response, Brown said it was unprecedented for an attorney general to
“act more like Fox News than a
law enforcement officer” and angrily accused the administration
of “basically going to war against
the state of California, the engine
of the American economy.”
Trump ramped up the rhetoric
further during his weekly address
on Saturday, accusing California
leaders of acting “in open defiance of federal law.”
“They don’t care about crime,”
Trump said. “They don’t care
about death and killings. They
don’t care about robberies. They
don’t care about the kind of
things that you and I care about.”
On the eve of Tuesday’s visit,
Brown and California Attorney
General Xavier Becerra — who
has sued the Trump administration 28 times — suggested additions to Trump’s itinerary, knowing full well he wasn’t likely to
listen.
No president since Franklin
Roosevelt has waited so long
since his inauguration to visit
California — and he traveled by
train.
“I’m not sure why it took him so
long given California leads the
nation in so many ways,” Becerra
told reporters during a conference call, suggesting that Trump
take time to learn about some of
the state’s policy successes, including what he called nationleading gun-control measures.
That was a not-so-subtle dig at
the White House, which on Sunday unveiled initiatives in response to the school shooting in
Parkland, Fla., that many guncontrol advocates criticized as too
feeble.
In a letter to Trump that
Brown’s office made public Mon-
day morning, the governor encouraged the president to visit
the state’s Central Valley, where
preparations are underway for a
bullet train from San Francisco to
Los Angeles — including the construction of bridges to accommodate the high-speed line.
“You see, in California we are
focusing on bridges, not walls,”
Brown said in the letter, in which
he also recounted visits by other
presidents who celebrated the
state’s diversity and recognized
its role in the U.S. economy.
“They don’t care about
death and killings.
They don’t care about
robberies. They don’t
care about the kind of
things that you and I
care about.”
President Trump,
during his weekly address Saturday
Brown and other officials are
quick to note that California on
its own represents the sixth largest economy in the world.
“California’s economy is larger
than Vladimir Putin’s Russia,” as
de León put it.
The border wall prototypes
Trump plans to visit are on display in a dusty lot near the border
east of here. The 30-foot-tall barriers use varying configurations
of steel, concrete — even spikes —
to create ramparts far more formidable than almost anything in
place along the 2,000-mile border
with Mexico.
The Trump administration is
seeking $18 billion for wall construction over the next 10 years,
an amount that would pay for
roughly 300 miles of new barriers
where none exist and allow the
government to replace 400 miles
of “legacy” fencing.
While protests of Trump’s survey of the prototypes are being
planned, at least one group is
pledging a rally in support of the
president’s vision.
Jeff Schwilk, founder of San
Diegans for Secure Borders, said
his group held a similar rally in
December that drew about 150
people. This one could be far
larger based on interest he’s seeing on Facebook, he said.
“This is way off the charts,”
Schwilk said. “Everyone wants to
come and show their support
from all over the state, and even
from Arizona.”
He said Trump supporters are
glad to finally get a glimpse of the
president in a state run by “a
rogue California government.”
“We’d kind of been left out here
hanging,” Schwilk said.
Others wish Trump would stay
away.
“He’s coming to spread his fear,
because in my view, he’s a terrible
man,” said Pablo Alvarado, executive director of the National Day
Laborer Organizing Network, a
Los Angeles-based advocacy
group.
Alvarado predicted that Trump
will also be met in the Los Angeles
area by “plenty of people protesting. He’s non-gratis. California is
a very diverse, multicultural
state. It’s the antithesis of what
Trump stands for.”
Thomas E. Mann, a senior fellow with the Brookings Institution, suggested one reason Trump
hasn’t been eager to return to
California: It almost certainly
won’t be part of his electoral
calculus in 2020.
Clinton bested Trump by 30
percentage points in 2016. While
the state produced two Republican presidents in the modern era
— Richard Nixon and Ronald
Reagan — rapid growth among
Latino and Asian voters, who lean
Democratic, have made the state
far more difficult for the GOP.
Democrats hold every statewide office and control both
chambers of the legislature by
sizable margins.
“It wasn’t that long ago California was competitive in presidential elections, so there was ample
incentive to go there,” said Mann,
who has lived for the past three
years in California, where he is
now a resident scholar at the
Institute of Governmental Studies at the University of California.
There’s really no political incentive for Trump to visit now,
Mann said. “What’s the point of
doing it if all you’re going to do is
stir up the opposition?”
When asked about the trip at
Monday’s briefing for reporters,
White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said that
isn’t Trump’s aim.
“While . . . he may not have
won that state, there are certainly
a lot of support for this president,
not just there, but across the
country, and he looks forward to
being there and presenting a lot
of those specific policies,” she
said.
De León said California “is not
Trump country. It never has been,
never will be.” But, he said, the
state has a long tradition of accepting outsiders.
“The Golden State has always
welcomed those from all over the
world, even Queens,” de León
said, referring to the borough of
New York where Trump grew up.
john.wagner@washpost.com
Nick Miroff contributed to this report.
KLMNO
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TUESDAY, MARCH 13 , 2018
High today at
approx. 3 p.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
8 p.m.
33 43 47 41°
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49°
Precip: 15%
Wind: WNW
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WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
EZ
JOHN KELLY’S WASHINGTON
THE DISTRICT
OBITUARIES
The Old Glory Bourbon
Club plaques were shiny
monuments to members’
perseverance. B3
The United Medical Center
board released an audio
recording of a contentious
closed meeting. B3
Hubert de Givenchy’s
effortlessly chic clothes
adorned European royalty
and Hollywood stars. B6
Newly elected women get credit for changes in Virginia House
BY
G REGORY S . S CHNEIDER
richmond — Judging strictly by
legislation passed, the record
number of women in this year’s
Virginia House of Delegates had
only modest impact.
Most of the new delegates are
Democrats, and most of their bills
died in Republican-controlled
committees — which is typical for
B
SU
freshmen, male or female.
But House members said that
the presence of a historic number
of women in the chamber created a fundamental shift in matters large and small, from the
tone of debate to the way the
House operates.
Two female delegates, for instance — one Republican, one
Democrat — clashed over how to
create a sexual harassment policy.
They disagreed on approach,
but the result was the House’s
first-ever requirement for a training program to prevent harassment.
Female delegates led the calls
for gun control after the school
shooting last month in Parkland, Fla. They had no luck on
gun bills, but Speaker M. Kirkland
Cox (R-Colonial Heights) eventually appointed a rare select committee to address school safety —
though only three of the 21 members are women.
It was a Virginia woman —
Del. Elizabeth Guzman (D-Prince
William) — who was selected by
national Democrats to give the
Spanish-language response to
President Trump’s State of the
Union address.
And some members credited
the greater presence of women
with influencing the issues that
did not come up this year. Most
notably, few abortion-related bills
made it to the House floor.
That’s partly because Del. Danica Roem (D-Prince William) replaced one of the House’s most
WOMEN CONTINUED ON B4
DCPS
will run
all-girls
charter
TAKEOVER FOLLOWS
LICENSE REVOCATION
Excel students lagged far
behind peers, board said
BY
P ERRY S TEIN
The District’s traditional public school system will operate the
city’s only all-girls public school
next year, taking over a charter
school in Southeast Washington
that had its license revoked for
poor performance.
Excel Academy Public Charter
School, which has 700 students in
preschool through eighth grade,
will finish the semester as a charter school and reopen as a D.C.
Public Schools campus at the
start of the academic year.
It is unclear how many administrators and teachers will remain
through the transition, but current students will be allowed to
re-enroll.
“We are thrilled that Excel is
joining the DCPS community,”
Amanda Alexander, the interim
D.C. schools chancellor, wrote in
an email. “We’re working diligentEXCEL CONTINUED ON B4
RICK REINHARD
A corner at the center
A photo exhibit looks at people who hang out at the focal point of D.C.’s Mount Pleasant neighborhood
BY
T ARA B AHRAMPOUR
El Cabo stood in the thin afternoon sunlight, looking at faces that needed identifying.
“We’re going to bring the photos here
tomorrow, if there’s no wind,” Quique Aviles
said. “Here” was the sidewalk in front of the
7-Eleven at Mount Pleasant Street and Kenyon Street NW, where El Cabo, a 63-year-old
house painter, has been hanging out for
40-odd years. The photos Aviles referred to
were portraits taken over the past six months
of the regulars who come there to meet
friends, play checkers and chat.
A photo exhibit and oral history of the spot
and its denizens titled “La Esquina” (“The
Corner” — those who hang out there are
known as “esquineros”) will open Wednesday
at GALA Hispanic Theatre in Columbia
Heights. But Aviles, the project’s director, and
Rick Reinhard, its photographer, had hoped
to set up a mini-sidewalk exhibit in advance
for the esquineros themselves, and wanted to
make sure they had everyone’s name right.
El Cabo, a Salvadoran native whose real
name is Jose Luis Marquez (many of the
regulars there have nicknames; “cabo” roughly translates as “corporal”), pointed at a
EXHIBIT CONTINUED ON B2
TARA BAHRAMPOUR/THE WASHINGTON POST
TOP: People, mainly Latinos, gather at Mount Pleasant Street and Kenyon Street NW in
the District to play checkers and talk. A photo exhibit titled “La Esquina” — “The Corner”
— looks at the regulars there. ABOVE: Photographer Rick Reinhard and ethnographer
Olivia Cadaval, who are part of the project, go over photos at Reinhard’s house.
More calls
for hearing
on Wilson
scandal
BY P ERRY S TEIN
AND F ENIT N IRAPPIL
D.C. Council member Robert C.
White Jr. (D-At Large) called on
the council’s education committee
to hold a hearing on former
schools chancellor Antwan Wilson’s resignation, pressuring the
committee’s chairman, who
backed down last week from convening what could be a contentious public airing.
The council needs to “hold government officials accountable in a
public forum” White said Monday,
adding that his constituents want
to understand Mayor Muriel E.
Bowser’s involvement in the scandal that prompted her to oust the
chancellor.
“The council is really the only
entity that can be both a voice and
microphone for residents,” White
said. “And we have to ensure we
are doing that.”
Council member David Grosso
(I-At Large), who chairs the education committee, had pledged last
Monday to hold a hearing, after
Wilson told The Washington Post
that Bowser (D) knew for months
about his daughter’s improper
transfer to a top D.C. high school
but forced him to resign only after
it became public.
HEARING CONTINUED ON B2
For D.C. teens, gun violence is old news No-perk fares catch fliers o≠ guard
One of them lost a
brother — his
twin — to gunfire.
Another lost a
boyfriend.
And a third can
Petula
count four friends
Dvorak
— four — who
were killed by
gunshots last year.
Of course, these kids I talked
to are planning to join teens
throughout the country as they
walk out of class on Wednesday
to protest America’s rampant
gun violence.
But they’re also wondering
where everyone’s been on this
kids and guns problem all these
years.
“This is happening over and
over again,” said Zion Kelly, 17,
whose brother, Zaire Kelly, died
at the hands of a robber last fall.
“Dozens of students have been
shot and killed — more than in
Florida — and we’re not getting
the same attention.”
Zaire was 16 and coming
home from a college prep course
in September when a gunman
shot him 300 feet from his front
door. It was the first time
anyone in their family
experienced gun violence, said
Zion, who shared a room with
his brother and profoundly feels
his absence.
“Gun violence and shooter
drills may be new to kids in
suburban schools, but for a lot of
kids, this has been life as they
know it,” said Robyn Lingo,
executive director at Mikva
Challenge DC, a civic
engagement group that is
helping kids in urban schools
DVORAK CONTINUED ON B2
BY
L ORI A RATANI
When Michael Zwirn recently
booked tickets for his family to
travel from Washington to Chicago to Boston, he snagged what he
thought was a great deal — until
he read the fine print. It turned out
he’d inadvertently purchased “basic economy” tickets on United
Airlines, which meant no changes, no access to the overhead
bins and, most critically, no guarantee the three of them would be
seated together.
Those “perks” were available
only with higher-priced tickets.
For Zwirn, a think-tank program director who travels frequently for work and prides himself on keeping up with the latest
in transportation trends, it was an
important lesson.
“If your first cut is on the basis
of price, you have to read very
carefully,” he said.
Call it the age of a la carte flying.
What was once exclusively the
domain of ultra-low-cost carriers
such as Spirit Airlines and Allegiant Air has also been embraced
by the nation’s biggest carriers.
Delta Air Lines was the first to
experiment with no-frills fares on
select flights in 2014. Last year,
United and American Airlines
adopted the model. Now all three
have expanded such offerings,
with American selling the fares on
some international flights.
Airlines have long worked to
differentiate themselves, encouraging loyalty by offering generous
perks for frequent fliers and those
who can afford to fly first class.
But the reality is the vast majority of the nation’s travelers fly inAIRLINES CONTINUED ON B5
B2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
A corner
that eases
newcomers’
loneliness
EXHIBIT FROM B1
picture of a middle-aged man.
“He died.”
“What? You’re serious?” Aviles
said.
“He was sick; he was diabetic
and on dialysis.”
“How old was he?” Aviles
asked. “He was young; 50, 51?”
“Yeah,” El Cabo said. “But to die
you don’t need to be old. When
your time comes, your time
comes.”
That kind of exchange — of
information and wisdom — has
taken place for decades at this
spot and mirrors similar ones
around the world. Townspeople
of a certain age sit around, exchanging news and views and
keeping an eye on the neighborhood.
The men (and a few women)
on the corner tend to be middleaged or older and hail from Spanish-speaking nations, especially
El Salvador. The Washington area
is home to the nation’s largest
community of Salvadorans, who
began coming in large numbers
in the early 1980s after their
country became engulfed in civil
war. Many were men who left
their families behind, and this
strip of small shops and restaurants became a second home.
“For most of us Salvadoreans,
landing in D.C. meant landing on
Mount Pleasant Street,” Aviles,
52, wrote in text to accompany
the exhibit. Aviles, a self-described local “poet, actor and
troublemaker,” arrived in 1980 at
age 15 and lived a few blocks from
the main strip. “If you didn’t live
there, you were told about it.
Back then, there was this notion
that ‘if you go there, you will feel
better’ — that on this street you
could find a cure for the heartbreak of being away from home.”
This continues to be true, he
wrote, even for those who have
been here for years. Many people
experience loneliness even years
after immigrating, and a regular
hangout like Mount Pleasant
Street can be a salve, Aviles wrote.
“When I go there — just walking those 8 blocks, stopping at the
beauty salon, the pharmacy, Los
Primos — I feel better. You know
Pressure
builds for
Bowser’s
testimony
HEARING FROM B1
Bowser has repeatedly said she
was not aware of the transfer.
But at the end of last week, after
speaking privately to the mayor
and one of her attorneys, Grosso
backtracked. He said his committee needed to focus on other problems in the school system.
Bowser has said she would refuse to testify under oath before
Grosso’s committee, calling it a
“political circus” and noting that
her office is cooperating with an
investigation by the D.C. inspector
general investigation.
PETULA DVORAK
‘We’re not
getting
the same
attention’
DVORAK FROM B1
mobilize against gun violence
and organize for the walkout.
For Zion and his friends at
Thurgood Marshall Academy, a
charter school in Southeast D.C.,
the urgency for action has been
there all along. Four months
after Zaire was killed, another
student at his school — Paris
RICK REINHARD
In a photo taken in December as part of the “Esquina” project, Santa Claus — a pharmacist from the neighborhood — drops by to see the
regulars who hang out at Mount Pleasant and Kenyon streets in Northwest Washington.
ing them into an ‘art exhibit,’ ”
wrote a commenter who described herself as a young woman. “However well-intentioned,
this project seems dehumanizing
and creates an ‘us’ vs ‘them’
perspective. Our neighbors aren’t
art. They are people who should
be able to hang out wherever they
want without us gawking at them
— or worse, calling the police for
no reason. This whole Mt. Pleasant thread has become rather
racist lately. Perhaps we all need
to reflect on our own privilege
before pointing fingers at (or
taking photographs of ) our
neighbors.”
Another commenter warned
against “micro-aggressive racial
bias” and urged “the necessary
prudent examination of racial
privileges in a neighborhood
that, a few decades ago, was not
predominantly white but now
happily normalizes whiteness by
differentiating others on basis of
race.”
Both commenters declined to
give their names, and both deleted their posts after being contacted by The Washington Post. But
the second one, a woman in her
late 20s who lived in Mount
Pleasant for two years but has
moved out of the District, said in
an interview that the project
“seems like it’s coming out of a
problematic place. . . . Just the
fact that it seems to be around the
basis of their race, it seems a little
bit, I don’t want to say purposely
insensitive, but culturally unaware.”
To Aviles, such critiques fell
flat. “Get to know the neighborhood? We are the neighborhood,”
he said, noting that most of the
seven-member project team has
deep roots in Mount Pleasant.
“This is coming from us; it comes
from the neighborhood. It’s an
inside job.”
To Cadaval, the controversy
isn’t a bad thing if it creates a
dialogue.
“For once, our project isn’t
invisible,” she said. “We’re putting up this incredibly dignified
exhibit. I think there’s a possibility of a conversation.”
The weekend sidewalk exhibit
ended up being canceled because
of wind. But as Aviles stood there
with his sheaf of photos, more
esquineros strolled up.
“They couldn’t get a better
picture?” Maribel Garcia, 55, one
of the few women, laughed when
she saw her photo. “I’m a ruin!”
El Cabo chuckled and promised to attend the opening at the
theater. “Claro, magnifico, bien,”
he said. “We’ll be there.”
said, “I think that they’re a contributing presence to stability on
the street.”
Reinhard, who moved into
Mount Pleasant in 1973, on President Richard M. Nixon’s Inauguration Day, also sees the esquineros as a prism through which to
look at the neighborhood and its
evolution. “How do these guys
exist in a world that’s gentrifying?” he said. “It’s not intended to
be a project about Latinos in
Mount Pleasant or Latinos in the
DMV area; this is a small-bore
look at an interesting group.”
They talk about soccer — Salvadoran and international teams.
They exchange information
about jobs or spot someone a cup
of coffee or some food when a
friend is out of cash. In interviewing them for the project, the
theme that kept coming up was
companionship, Aviles said. “A
lot of them have left their families, and they’re renters, so especially on the warm days it’s a
place to hang out with your own
people.”
The project, which is funded in
part by a grant from Humanities
DC and is sponsored by the community organization Many Languages One Voice, includes an
ethnographer, Olivia Cadaval,
who is a research associate with
the Smithsonian Center for
Folklife and Cultural Heritage.
“When you think about it,
Mount Pleasant has really established what would be an equivalent to a downtown,” said Cadaval, who is from Mexico and
moved to the neighborhood in
1985. “You don’t have this in
Maryland or Virginia. People
come here on Sundays. . . . A lot of
them are older, retired — ‘That’s
my home, that’s where I know
people.’ ”
Unlike some other 7-Elevens,
this one is not generally a place
where men wait to get hired as
day laborers, nor do they seem
particularly concerned about immigration raids, Cadaval said. “I
think most of these people have
some form of document,” she
said.
When news came of Immigration and Customs Enforcement
crackdowns at scores of 7-Elevens
across the nation during the project, “We were very worried about
it,” she said, “and they were very
relaxed.”
In working on the project,
Reinhard said he expected there
might be blowback from neighbors who didn’t like seeing the
esquineros on the corner, who
perhaps thought they made the
neighborhood look less tidy or
less affluent.
Instead, objections came from
another quarter. When Cadaval’s
husband announced the upcoming exhibit on a neighborhood
email list under the heading “Latinos in Mt Pleasant,” more than
30 comments followed. Many
were enthusiastic, but some expressed concern that the project
objectified the esquineros and
smacked of racism.
“I suggest learning more about
the history of the neighborhood
rather than intrusively documenting our neighbors and turn-
“We’re focused on finishing the
school year strong, getting ready
for the next school year and making critical investments in the
budget that the mayor will submit
next week,” said the mayor’s
spokeswoman, Anu Rangappa.
Grosso declined to comment on
Monday about White’s call.
D.C. Attorney General Karl A.
Racine (D) backs a hearing, saying
the council’s oversight of city
agencies is critical to ensuring
they are operating in the public’s
best interest.
White said he wants Bowser,
Wilson and the former deputy
mayor for education Jennifer
Niles — whom Bowser also forced
to resign for her role in transferring the chancellor’s daughter —
to testify under oath.
Niles, who has not spoken publicly about the scandal, could be
key in determining who is telling
the truth about the improper
transfer — Wilson or the mayor.
Wilson has said he would willingly testify. Niles has not indicated whether she would participate,
but the education committee can
vote to issue subpoenas to uncooperative witnesses to compel them
to appear.
“Absolutely, we have to subpoena Niles, and perhaps former
chancellor Wilson,” White said.
The law is unclear about whether the council has the power to
(D-Ward 6) said that he also supports a public hearing and that
witnesses should be subpoenaed if
necessary.
“A full airing would be an important part of rebuilding the
trust that’s broken with parents
and school communities,” Allen
said in a text message.
subpoena the mayor — and if that
would violate the separation of
powers between the legislative
and the executive branches, White
said. He said he would not push to
subpoena Bowser because it could
lead to lengthy legal proceedings.
It’s unclear if a majority of the
committee will join White’s call.
Council member Charles Allen
Council member Anita Bonds
(D-At-Large) declined to say if
she’d support a hearing.
“I do believe that there are
many questions that the people of
DC would like answered,” Bonds
said in a statement. “Moreover, the
concern that’s before the community is whether or not we are able
to put this behind us and continue
to make progress in our schools.”
Both Allen and Bonds are up for
reelection this year.
Council member Trayon White
Sr. (D-Ward 8) could not immediately be reached for comment.
A public hearing could be damaging to Bowser, who is in the
midst of a reelection campaign,
although she does not yet face any
credible challengers.
D.C. Inspector General Daniel
W. Lucas is undertaking a broad
review of multiple problems in the
public school system, including
inflated graduation rates. The
scope and complexity of that
probe mean his findings may not
be released before the Democratic
primary in June.
Wilson and Niles were forced to
resign after it became public that
Wilson’s daughter skipped a waiting list of more than 600 students
to enroll at Woodrow Wilson High
instead of enrolling in her neighborhood school, Dunbar High. In
doing so, she avoided the school
lottery other families must enter
for seats at desirable schools out-
side their neighborhoods.
Joe Weedon, a father of two
public school students and the
Ward 6 representative on the State
Board of Education, said the council needs to hold a hearing.
“The only way to restore trust is
to get to the truth and to get to the
answers of who knew what when,”
Weedon said. “More importantly, I
think we need to focus on what we
need to learn from this, why was
one of our schools not good
enough to send our children.”
Eboni-Rose Thompson, an education activist in Ward 7, said she
understood the desire to get to the
bottom of the transfer scandal, but
wasn’t sure a public hearing
would improve accountability.
“Maybe there might be a sense
of resolution for some people to
have the mayor say yes or no to
certain things and deputy mayor
Niles to say yes or no,” Thompson
said. “My question, though, is
what does that do for our path
forward?”
Brown, 19 — was shot dead.
So when the nation is riveted
by the deaths last month of the
17 people gunned down at
Marjory Stoneman Douglas High
School in Parkland, Fla., those
kids understand that pain.
And they are working hard at
leaving behind the bitterness
they have every right to feel.
“I feel like it’s also important
in D.C. for people to know about
the gun violence here,” said
Ramsey Williams, 19, a senior at
Thurgood Marshall. He’s the
young man who lost four friends
in one year.
“In D.C., they’re always
bringing up housing and real
estate [in the news.] But they
never bring up gun violence,”
Ramsey said. “And now that
people are talking about what
happened in Florida, we’re
thinking: ‘We feel like that all
the time.’ ”
Black children are killed by
guns 10 times more often than
white children in America,
according to a report, based on
data from the Centers of Disease
Control and Prevention, that
looked at gun-related homicides,
suicides and unintentional
shootings from 2002 to 2014.
Somehow, the national
conversation about gun violence
and children glosses over those
neighborhoods — mostly urban
— where innocent kids have
been killed by gunfire for years.
It takes an extraordinary
example like Parkland to spark
the reckoning in America that
these deaths — all of them — are
not okay.
And it’s profoundly painful for
kids to hear a different tone of
conversation when the gun
violence is directed at kids who
are mostly white and largely
middle-class.
“They would like to see that
kind of response here in D.C.,”
said Lingo, who has been talking
to students in the aftermath of
the Parkland shooting. “It just
feels like the deaths that happen
in urban areas to brown and
black kids don’t get the same
response.”
And when she talked to those
kids, they are also keenly aware
that when kids who look like
them are killed, the attention
lingers on how they got into that
situation, what they did wrong.
“But the students in Parkland
are seen as innocent victims,”
Lingo said. And they would like
the conversation to acknowledge
that most often, they, too, are
innocent victims.
Zaire was just walking home
when he was killed.
And that happened half a mile
from where 17-year-old Jamahri
Sydnor, a Woodrow Wilson High
graduate, was killed by a stray
bullet in August as she drove
along Saratoga Avenue NE. It
happened days before she was to
enroll at a university in Florida.
And Zaire’s killing happened
four days after another 16-yearold, MyAngelo Starnes, was
fatally shot in Southeast
Washington.
Yet there were no protests,
rallies or national news
conferences about those deaths.
“It is much harder for black
children, especially in the city, to
receive open ears when
discussing our feelings on gun
violence,” said Lauryn Renford,
16, who was Zaire’s girlfriend
when he was killed.
Zaire’s death — and especially
the silence after it — was her
catalyst for action, she said. She
started a petition to create a
mural memorializing kids killed
in gun violence in the District.
So far, she’s gotten nearly 3,800
signatures.
She and her classmates are all
planning on walking out
Wednesday, coming to the big
event on the Mall on March 24
and finding positive ways to
remind America of the pain
they’ve grown up with. It’s
nothing new to them and to
thousands of other kids
throughout America.
It’s not yet the middle of the
third month of 2018 — and
nearly 650 children have been
injured or killed by gunfire this
year, according to the Gun
Violence Archive.
Mass shooting, school
shooting, playground gunfire or
stray bullet. All of it is too much.
And it’s time for the adults to
listen to the kids — all of them —
no matter where they live.
THE DAILY QUIZ
EARN 5 POINTS: Find the answer, and then go to
washingtonpost.com/postpoints, Quizzes to enter the
correct response.
MARCH 13 , 2018
you will see people you know.
Mount Pleasant is the only place
in this city that is a small town —
un pueblito. And just like any
pueblito, you have your characters.”
From
their
street-corner
perch, the esquineros have witnessed layers of transformation,
as stores selling tamales and
tropical fruit opened in the once
largely African American neighborhood and street battles between Latinos and police gave
way to street fairs with face
painting and bake sales. Now,
rowhouses sell for more than
$1 million and gourmet cafes and
restaurants are taking root between the liquor stores and pupuserias.
To the esquineros, whether
they still live in Mount Pleasant
or have moved elsewhere in the
region and come back to socialize, the street is “a homing place,”
said Reinhard, the photographer.
“It’s where their stuff is, where
they can get their food.” As mainstays whose faces are known, he
Which branch of the military is
inYestiJatinJ the beneŵts of surŵnJ
to counteract PTSD?
(Hint: The answer is in today’s Health and Science section.)
. TUESDAY,
“The concern that’s before the community is
whether or not we are able to put this behind us
and continue to make progress in our schools.”
D.C. Council member Anita Bonds (D-At Large)
MEMBER EXCLUSIVES
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TUESDAY, MARCH 13 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B3
M2
A toast to Georgetown’s Old Glory Bourbon Club
Meredith Wells
always thought
that someday she
would bring her
grandchildren to
Old Glory, a bar on
John
M Street NW in
Kelly's
Georgetown. She’d
Washington quiet the children
and point to a
brass plaque on
the wall, just inside the door,
engraved with her name and
“2010,” the year she completed her
year-long quest to do a shot of
every different bourbon in the
place.
“Look what Grandma did,”
she’d say.
And then last month Old Glory
closed suddenly, and it looked like
Meredith’s plaque and some 700
or so other shiny monuments to
spirited and single-minded stickto-itiveness would be lost forever.
But Tim Buckley, a bartender
at Old Glory from 1993 to 2016,
was not going to let that happen.
Last week, as workers for the
previous owner, Capital
Restaurant Concepts, were
packing up inventory, Tim went
in and unscrewed and pried from
the wall as many plaques as he
could get to, about 500. And on
Saturday afternoon he had spread
them out on tables in a sunny,
wood-paneled room upstairs at
another Capital Restaurants
eatery in Georgetown, J. Paul’s.
Word had gone out on Facebook
that you could pick up your
plaque.
“We were known for bourbon
and barbecue. That was our
thing,” Tim said of Old Glory,
which opened in 1991. “We used to
get guys — big bourbon drinkers
— who would sit at the bar and
just go down the line pointing at
bottles and ordering. . . . A couple
of us who worked there, we said,
‘You know, we should make this
JOHN KELLY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Kim Adams collects a plaque with a late friend’s name on it from
Tim Buckley, a former bartender at Old Glory in Georgetown.
like a contest.’ ”
And thus was born the Old
Glory Bourbon Club: taste every
one — a number that fluctuated at
any one time from 60 to 100 —
and you’d earn a plaque, a
baseball cap and a $50 gift card.
The first to complete it was
Mathew Cortright, in 1996. He
was, Tim remembered, a
newspaper distributor who would
get up early, do his job, then come
to Old Glory in the early
afternoon. He’d drink a Lone Star
and order bourbon.
Meredith came in every
Wednesday at 7 p.m. with a group
of friends. They’d all order two —
sometimes three — shots. She was
26 at the time, a transplant from
Wilmington, N.C., and the ritual
gave some shape to her week.
“It was the best year of my life,”
she said. “I don’t know if I learned
as much about bourbon as I
should have.”
Some people would start with
great enthusiasm but peter out,
which is why Tim had to
periodically cull the box of
laminated forms that tracked
each participant’s progress, like a
big coffee shop loyalty card.
Boston native John Castle
earned his plaque in 2000. On
Saturday, he’d come to J. Paul’s
with his wife, Julie, and their
children, Alexandra, 13, and
Jason, 9.
“My daughter said, ‘Daddy, did
you get that plaque for drinking
too much?’ ” John said.
Not exactly, John explained. It
was for drinking in moderation.
“I earned it,” John said. “A lot of
blood, sweat and bourbon went
into this plaque.”
The J. Paul’s gathering was a bit
like a wake. Along with the Old
Glory regulars, a few exemployees had come. Georgetown
was different now, they all said.
People who wanted to barhop
favored other neighborhoods.
Familiar Georgetown watering
holes had vanished.
Old Glory is going to be the new
home of José Andrés’s America
Eats Tavern — nice, but not
exactly a place you can nurse your
rye.
Some plaques didn’t have
names on them, but nicknames.
They were redolent of boozy
inside jokes: Heart Attack Paul,
Fat Gordy, One Hot Disaster,
Sexual Chocolate . . .
“Who was that?” someone
asked of Sexual Chocolate (2003).
“Was that Peanut?” someone
else said. (They decided it was
Peanut, who used to tend bar at
Old Glory.)
Kim Adams had driven in from
Kent Island on Maryland’s
Eastern Shore to pick up a plaque
engraved “Gregory Savoie —
1998.” Kim worked at the
Georgetown Timberland store
with Savoie. After his untimely
death, she and other friends
decided to complete the bourbon
list in his honor.
“He was right behind the bar,”
Kim said. Savoie’s friends could
look at his name and raise a toast
in his memory. Kim held the
scratched and tarnished plaque.
“A lot of bartenders’ butts rubbed
up against this.”
Tim is a high school counselor
in Northern Virginia, a job that,
when you think of it, isn’t that
much different from being a
bartender, except without the
booze. He noticed one unclaimed
plaque, engraved “David Tyler
Cropp — 1997.”
Tim remembered that it wasn’t
David who completed the Old
Glory Bourbon Challenge. It was
two guys whose friend had just
become a father. When they
completed the list they decided to
memorialize his newborn son.
“He’s 21 now,” said Tim, doing
the math. “I don’t even know if
this kid knew he had a plaque.”
Wherever David is, he’s old
enough to do a shot of bourbon.
john.kelly@washpost.com
Twitter: @johnkelly
For previous columns, visit
washingtonpost.com/people/john-kelly.
THE DISTRICT
UMC board releases recording of ward closure vote
BY
P ETER J AMISON
The board of D.C.’s only public
hospital has relented in its fight to
keep secret its discussion and December vote to close the hospital’s
obstetrics unit.
The board of United Medical
Center last week released an archived audio recording of a closed
meeting at which members took
that vote, which left the nation’s
capital without a hospital for women to give birth or seek prenatal
care east of the Anacostia River.
The D.C. Office of Open Government ruled in January that the
board broke the law by excluding
the public from its deliberations.
However, board chairwoman LaRuby May said two weeks ago that
the hospital would go to court to
fight the ruling.
It was not clear whether such a
legal action was possible, since the
city’s Open Meetings Act does not
allow for an appeal of open-government office decisions and the office
had never been sued by a District
agency.
The board shifted course on
March 5, publishing the recording
of its closed session on its website.
The decision was first reported by
the Washington Business Journal.
“UMC has always operated with
transparency, and in that spirit, we
have agreed to share the details of
the Dec. 13 board meeting,” May
said in a statement. “We maintain
our position that there is value to
having a closed session to discuss
confidential matters that protect
UMC’s interests, but we value
JAHI CHIKWENDIU / THE WASHINGTON POST
LaRuby May, leader of United Medical Center’s board, had said the
hospital would fight a ruling that it broke the open meetings law.
transparency with the community
more.”
The December meeting came at
a time when the obstetrics ward
had been temporarily shut down
by health regulators following the
death of a pregnant woman. (Her
baby was born brain dead, according to relatives, and died days later
at another hospital.)
The recording reveals little new
information about the board’s reasons for permanently closing
UMC’s nursery and delivery rooms.
Board members and hospital executives said that both financial considerations — the obstetrics ward
made little money, with only about
30 deliveries a month, and was a
drain on hospital resources — and
concern about patients’ safety led
them to shutter the unit for good.
Then-hospital chief executive
David Boucree said fully staffing a
reopened unit would cost about
$10 million per year, in addition to
more than $14 million in capital
costs.
Hospital officials spend several
minutes on the recording fretting
aloud over the blowback from their
decision and debating how they
should frame it for the media.
“If we’re going to have political
fallout from it, we’re not going to
stop that,” May said.
Boucree suggested not dwelling
on the financial dimension of the
decision when explaining it to reporters.
“I wouldn’t put it on the money.
That has nothing to do with it,” he
said, adding that even if the hospital had a “blank check,” he did not
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believe it would be capable of reopening the obstetrics unit because of other work it simultaneously had to do.
Board member Konrad Dawson
was one of two members who voted
against closing the unit, saying the
board was “whittling away to almost nothing” what should be a
full-service hospital for the residents of Southeast Washington.
UMC dealt with crises last summer and fall. In addition to the
initial closure of the obstetrics
ward by the D.C. Department of
Health, a patient in the hospital’s
nursing home died after he repeatedly cried out for help and was left
on the floor by his nurse. The incident spawned a separate health
department investigation after it
was reported by The Washington
Post.
In November the D.C. Council
voted not to extend the contract of
the consulting firm managing the
facility for a fee of $300,000
per month.
The firm, run by campaign donors to Mayor Muriel E. Bowser
(D), had been awarded a no-bid
contract but failed to meet many of
the city’s performance standards.
It had also been accused of mismanagement by current and former hospital officials.
The hospital continues to cope
with financial problems and could
require tens of millions in taxpayer
subsidies to stay afloat this year.
A new management firm,
Mazars USA, took over at the hospital last month.
peter.jamison@washpost.com
SAVE
Cherry blossom peak
pushed back a week
Boy headed to school
was left on bus
The District’s beloved cherry
blossoms are expected to reach
peak bloom between March 27
and 31, about a week later than
initially predicted, the National
Park Service announced Monday.
Cooler temperatures have kept
the cherry blossoms from
progressing out of the green-bud
phase, the first of six phases
leading to peak bloom, said Mike
Litterst, a spokesman for NPS.
The original forecast was
announced March 1 and
anticipated the peak bloom date
to fall between March 17 and
March 20.
Models still show peak bloom
occurring March 18, but Litterst
said it doesn’t match what the
Park Service is seeing on trees.
Peak bloom is the day on
which 70 percent of the blossoms
along the Tidal Basin are open.
In 2016 and 2017, peak bloom
was March 25, according to NPS
records.
Last year, peak bloom was also
pushed back because of
unexpected cold temperatures. A
cold snap killed more than half
of the blossoms as they were
beginning to appear, Litterst
said. However, he added that this
year, because they are still in the
bud stage, they should be
protected from freezing
temperatures.
A small boy was left for hours
Monday on a Prince George’s
County school system bus that
was to take him to an early
childhood center.
The student did not get off the
bus at H. Winship Wheatley
Early Childhood Center in
Capitol Heights when the school
opened at 9:30 a.m., a school
system spokesman said. About
2 1/2 hours later, the child was
found sleeping on the bus.
The child was checked by the
school nurse, given lunch and
reunited with his parents, the
spokesman said.
It was not clear why the child
did not get off the bus, and the
school system said it was
investigating.
— Allyson Chiu
THE DISTRICT
70-year-old man’s
death is a homicide
A 70-year-old man who was
found dead in January was the
victim of a homicide, the D.C.
police said last week.
They said an autopsy
determined on Friday that Willie
Sawyer died of a blunt-force
injury.
He was found unconscious
about 3:30 a.m. on Jan. 25, inside
premises in the 5000 block of
Nannie Helen Burroughs Avenue
NE.
— Martin Weil
— Martin Weil
Fatal fire in house
with no smoke alarms
A 70-year-old man died in a
house fire in Prince George’s
County.
Fire officials said the home
where he was found had no
smoke alarms, and they used the
incident as a chance to remind
area residents to change the
batteries in their alarms.
The fire broke out just after
10 p.m. Sunday at a two-story,
split-level home in the 4200
block of Monroe Street in
Bladensburg.
Fire officials later identified
the man who died as William
Mobley.
Mark E. Brady, a spokesman
for the Prince George’s County
Fire Department, said in a
statement that the neighbors
“did everything they possibly
could, including banging on the
front door of the house, calling
911.”
“There was nothing more they
could do.”
— Dana Hedgpeth
Greenbelt resident,
31, is shot and killed
A man was shot and killed
Saturday night in Southeast
Washington, D.C. police said.
They said Davon Barnes, 28, of
Southeast was found about
10 p.m. in the 2000 block of
Savannah Terrace. He had been
shot at least twice, the police
said.
A man was shot and killed
Saturday night in Greenbelt, a
small city in Prince George’s
County, authorities said.
The man was found about
8:30 p.m. in the 6100 block of
Breezewood Court, according to
the Greenbelt police.
He was identified by the police
as Gabriel Hernandez Dreke, 31,
a Greenbelt resident. Police said
they are continuing to
investigate.
— Martin Weil
— Martin Weil
Man, 28, is fatally
shot in Southeast
LOTTE R I E S
VIRGINIA
Results from March 12
DISTRICT
Mid-Day Lucky Numbers:
Mid-Day DC-4:
Mid-Day DC-5:
Lucky Numbers (Sun.):
Lucky Numbers (Mon.):
DC-4 (Sun.):
DC-4 (Mon.):
DC-5 (Sun.):
DC-5 (Mon.):
9-8-9
9-9-6-1
0-6-2-9-7
4-9-7
6-0-6
8-0-9-0
2-1-1-2
5-1-9-7-6
0-1-7-1-5
Day/Pick-3:
Pick-4:
Cash-5:
Night/Pick-3 (Sun.):
Pick-3 (Mon.):
Pick-4 (Sun.):
Pick-4 (Mon.):
Cash-5 (Sun.):
Cash-5 (Mon.):
MULTI-STATE GAMES
Cash 4 Life:
Lucky for Life:
MARYLAND
Mid-Day Pick 3:
5-8-4
Mid-Day Pick 4:
8-7-4-3
Night/Pick 3 (Sun.):
7-3-2
Pick 3 (Mon.):
2-6-0
Pick 4 (Sun.):
4-4-0-9
Pick 4 (Mon.):
7-1-9-4
Multi-Match:
11-13-18-30-40-43
Match 5 (Sun.):
3-10-23-30-31 *25
Match 5 (Mon.):
8-14-19-23-34 *16
5 Card Cash:
QC-3D-10D-3H-QS
7-7-6
2-2-4-5
19-20-21-31-32
8-2-8
1-1-8
2-1-8-8
7-7-3-9
13-21-27-30-31
4-6-22-27-33
*Bonus Ball
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 13 , 2018
New voices
Police o∞cer accused of being heard
stealing from Walmart in Virginia
lawmaking
MARYLAND
BY
D AN M ORSE
A Maryland police officer stole
a Dyson vacuum cleaner, instant
oatmeal and two boxes of condoms during his off-duty security
job at a Walmart store, according
to Montgomery County Police officials and a statement of charges
the department filed Sunday.
The officer, Jose A. Barahona,
25, of Silver Spring, took the items
during “a continuing course of
conduct” in the store in Germantown, according to court filings,
which also state that store surveillance video shows that Barahona
took additional, unknown items
going back to late last year.
The officer, who joined the
Montgomery County force four
years ago, most recently worked
patrol in the county’s Wheaton
District. He has been suspended
from duty, with pay, pending “the
completion of this investigation
and future court action,” police
officials said in a statement.
Barahona faces three misdemeanor counts: theft scheme
ranging from $100 to $1,500; theft
in that same range; and theft
under $100.
He could not be immediately
reached for comment. It is unclear
if he has retained an attorney.
The investigation of Barahona
began in February, when a Walmart loss prevention employee,
who suspected that Barahona was
stealing, contacted Montgomery
County Police, according to court
records. Sgt. Robert Rollins went
to the store, spoke with the employee and watched surveillance
video. He recognized his colleague on the video, according to
court filings.
In the filings, Rollins said he
saw Barahona walking through
the store at 10:35 p.m. on Feb. 2, a
Friday, when he took the condoms, valued at $28.94, the Quaker oatmeal, valued at $4.33, and
something that could not be identified from the video. Video
showed the officer taking the
items to his car and returning.
Two hours later, surveillance cameras captured Barahona walking
out with a Dyson DC33 vacuum
cleaner, valued at $199, and putting it in his car’s back seat, the
court records state.
“Barahona passed all working
cash registers each time and
failed to pay for any of the items,”
Rollins wrote in court filings.
The sergeant spoke to a customer service manager at the
store, who said he saw Barahona
leaving the store with the vacuum.
Barahona noticed that he was being watched, according to court
records, and tried to hide behind a
store display. “When the manager
pretended to turn his back,” Rollins wrote, “Barahona continued
out of the store with the item.”
dan.morse@washpost.com
VIRGINIA
Judge allows McGowan
drug case to proceed
BY
R ACHEL W EINER
Attorneys for Rose McGowan
appeared in a Loudoun County
courthouse Monday morning
seeking to have a drug charge
against the actress and anti-sexualharassment advocate dismissed.
Their motion was denied.
McGowan was accused of cocaine possession after the drug
was found in her wallet, which
she left on a plane at Dulles
International Airport after the
Women’s March in January 2017.
She says she was unaware there
was a warrant out for her arrest
until October, when it was publicly reported.
Defense attorney Jessica Carmichael argued that because the
wallet was found five hours after
McGowan got off the plane, there
is no way to prove that the cocaine
was hers or that it was ever in her
possession in the state of Virginia.
“The commonwealth . . . cannot establish that the crime occurred in the commonwealth of
Virginia,” Carmichael said Monday morning.
She said McGowan is willing to
accept that all the information
contained in police reports about
the incident is true. That evidence, Carmichael said, “is not
enough to establish jurisdiction
in this case.”
Moreover, the lawyer said in a
court filing last month, the court
should consider that McGowan
has been targeted by Harvey
Weinstein after she accused the
Hollywood producer of rape. According to news reports, Weinstein hired private investigators
who spied on and pretended to
befriend McGowan in hopes of
VIANNEY LE CAER/INVISION/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Actress Rose McGowan faces
charges in Loudoun County.
discrediting her account.
Weinstein has denied raping
McGowan. She alleges that the
attack occurred 20 years ago and
that Weinstein paid her a
$100,000 settlement.
A Loudoun County District
Court judge on Monday denied
the defense motion, calling it
“premature.”
Judge Deborah Welsh said the
issues raised by McGowan’s attorneys could be revisited at a preliminary hearing March 21.
In court Monday, Prince William County Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney Rebecca Thacher said that the defense motion
included “self-serving hearsay”
from McGowan herself and that
“live evidence” was necessary.
Prosecutors from Prince William are handling the case because one of McGowan’s attorneys represents the Loudoun
commonwealth’s attorney in a
federal civil case involving social
media censorship.
McGowan did not appear in
court. She has been in Europe
filming her E! documentary series, “Citizen Rose.”
rachel.weiner@washpost.com
Rejuvenate
in your
new
WOMEN FROM B1
ardent abortion opponents,
Robert G. Marshall. And Roem,
who is also Virginia’s first transgender lawmaker, said the women
have only begun to reshape the
legislature.
“My goal is 51 percent women,”
Roem said. “Then I think you’d
fundamentally change the culture. You will have a collaborative
legislative process beyond anything in the last 399 years.”
Women made huge gains in Virginia’s House in last fall’s elections. Twelve women joined the
chamber, all replacing men and
bringing the total to an all-time
high of 28 out of 100 seats. All but
one of the 12 women were Democrats who flipped Republican
seats, bringing their party within
a hair of a majority for the first
time in years.
While many saw their bills
founder in committee, a few measures carried by freshman women
got through both the House and
the Senate. Elementary school pupils will get more time for recess,
foster parents and close relatives
won’t have to wait so long to adopt
children, and income-tax preparers will have to notify the state
right away if they detect a data
breach — all thanks to newly elected women.
“Because there are more women there are different perspectives
and thoughts when we’re talking
about bills, and just real-life [ideas
about] how something will affect
somebody,” said Del. Charniele L.
Herring (D-Alexandria), who
chairs the Democratic caucus and
is the first woman to hold such a
position.
For Del. Vivian E. Watts (DFairfax), who with 26 years in
office is the longest-serving female House member, suddenly
having so many more female colleagues has been liberating.
“I was genuinely surprised that
there was a certain freedom in my
DCPS will
run all-girls
charter
school
EXCEL FROM B1
ly to ensure the students will be
able to remain in place for at least
the next school year.”
The D.C. Public Charter School
Board voted in January to strip
Excel of its charter, saying that
students were lagging behind
their peers and that the school
was showing scant evidence of
improvement. The school’s fate
remained in limbo after the vote,
with school leaders needing to
find a new operator if they wanted Excel to remain open.
While it is rare for the traditional public system to take over a
charter school, it is not unprecedented. D.C. Public Schools assumed leadership of Petworth’s
Community Academy Public
Charter School — and renamed it
Dorothy Height Elementary
School — in 2015 after the charter
TIMOTHY C. WRIGHT FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Del. Kathy Tran (D-Fairfax), one of 12 women who are serving their first term in the Virginia House,
holds daughter Elise during the swearing-in ceremony in Richmond in January.
own expression,” Watts said. “Over
the years, having come in as I did
when there were so few women,
you were very careful about what
you said. . . . Whereas now there’s
more shared experience, that
these things have context.”
During the floor debate over
sexual harassment training, Watts
alluded to her own painful experience of abuse, something she had
long resisted talking about.
But more than tone has
changed. When Watts first joined
the House, women were shut out
of informal socializing and dealmaking because the members’
lounge was attached to the men’s
restroom.
At one point, she remembered,
free oysters were being served in
the lounge and a delegate asked
whether she wanted some. She
didn’t want the oysters but she did
want access to that lounge, so she
said yes. But instead of inviting
her in, the male delegate set a
plate outside the door — like feeding a kitten, she said.
Now, new delegates Jennifer
Carroll Foy (D-Prince William)
and Kathy Tran (D-Fairfax) have
taken the initiative to start an
informal “parents’ caucus” to help
members — male or female — deal
with the tricky issues of raising
young children while serving in
the legislature. They have worked
with Del. Eileen Filler-Corn (DFairfax) to compile lists of family
activities in Richmond and places
for day care.
“Hopefully there’ll be another
wave of women who have children
and this would . . . actually encourage them to run knowing that
we have a family-friendly atmosphere here,” said Foy, a public
defender who has taken a high
profile in criminal-justice reform
issues.
She and Tran worked with the
House clerk’s office to make arrangements for nursing mothers
— both have small children — and
to ensure that the office building
under construction for the General Assembly will have nursing
rooms and restrooms with diaperchange tables.
The new tone has been noted by
the GOP leadership. Cox kicked off
the session by announcing that he
would extend generous family
leave policies to the House of Delegates staff. And Del. S. Chris
Jones (R-Suffolk), chairman of the
Appropriations Committee, said
he welcomes the perspectives of
additional women in the chamber.
“I’ve had good interactions
with the new members,” he said.
“They’re passionate about their
legislation, but they’re willing to
listen and learn about the process,
which is what we all do as freshman.”
But change only goes so far. Del.
Kelly Convirs-Fowler (D-Virginia
Beach) introduced a resolution to
recognize the anniversary of the
Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision affirming the right to have an
abortion as a “Day of Women”
instead of “Day of Tears” — the
name chosen by the legislature
last year.
Her bill never made it out of
committee.
board voted to close the school
amid financial mismanagement.
The charter school board said
its enrollment specialists have
been meeting with Excel families,
informing them they can participate in the citywide school lottery,
enroll in their traditional neighborhood public school or remain
at Excel. The lottery deadline was
March 1.
Anacostia resident Sharese
Clayton said she opted to send her
two young daughters to Excel a
few years ago because she was
unimpressed with the traditional
public school system. She was
initially unsure she would keep
them at Excel when she learned it
would become part of the D.C.
Public Schools system, but said
she has decided to give it a chance.
“I wasn’t the biggest fan of the
DCPS system,” Clayton said. “But
after talking with the school and
different people that represent
both sides, we’re going to give it a
chance and see how things go.”
Representatives of Excel Public
Charter School declined to comment.
D.C. Public Schools opened its
first all-male school, Ron Brown
College Preparatory High School,
in 2016. The American Civil Liberties Union slammed the city for
operating a single-gender school,
saying the school system was vio-
lating federal and city laws by
excluding girls.
Monica Hopkins-Maxwell, executive director of the ACLU’s
D.C. chapter, said the inclusion of
an all-girls campus in the traditional school system does not
change the organization’s stance
on publicly funded single-gender
schools.
Hopkins-Maxwell said she
hopes families will consider legal
action if the school system rejects
their daughters from Ron Brown
or their sons from Excel.
“The issue still remains that
segregated schools reinforce single-sex stereotypes and promote
sexism,” Hopkins-Maxwell said.
Excel’s switch to a traditional
public school comes at a time
when the system is competing to
keep families from turning to
charters, which are publicly funded but privately run. As of October 2017, D.C. Public Schools
counted 48,144 students, compared with 43,393 in charter
schools.
According to data released by
the Office of the State Superintendent of Education, enrollment in
D.C. Public Schools dropped by
400 students between October
2016 and the following year,
breaking six years of growth.
Excel Academy was founded 10
years ago, and its students, who
largely come from low-income
families, have struggled to match
citywide averages on math and
English standardized tests.
In the 2016-2017 school year,
9 percent of Excel students met or
exceeded expectations in math,
compared with 27 percent citywide. In English, 19 percent met
or exceeded expectations, compared with 31 percent citywide.
Under D.C. law, the D.C. Public
Charter School Board must review a school’s charter to operate
every five years to ensure it is
meeting goals agreed to when it
received permission to open.
Excel’s operating charter stipulates it must score 45 percent on
the D.C. Public Charter School
Board’s annual assessment of performance, which takes into account attendance, test scores, reenrollment rates and more. But
over the past five years, the school
averaged 41 percent.
The charter school board said
its staff members had met with
Excel leaders during the past two
years to prepare for the five-year
review, but the school had not
reached all of its targets.
“The longer girls are at Excel,
the further they fall behind their
peers in the city,” Saba Bireda, a
member of the charter school
board, said in January.
gregory.schneider@washpost.com
perry.stein@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B5
SU
New fares offer less for your money
MARYLAND
A recent Senate report states that, in offering “basic economy” fares, three of
the largest U.S. airlines now charge fees on benefits that used to be included
in the basic ticket price. Examples of what now may not be included in a
basic economy fare:
Midshipmen face drug-related disciplinary action
Before basic economy fares,
many benefits were included as
part of the base price of a ticket.
After basic economy fares, in
most cases, many benefits have
been unbundled and are not
available, or cost extra as
ancillary fees.1
Upgrades and premiums
Change or cancel flight
Carry-on bags 2
Choose seats 3
Family seating 4
Base ticket fare
Carry-on bags
Basic economy
ticket fare
BY
S ARAH L ARIMER
Nine midshipmen at the U.S.
Naval Academy are facing disciplinary action amid an investigation into alleged drug use, a
spokesman said in a statement
Monday.
The Naval Academy has started the administrative disciplinary process against five midshipmen for “illicit drug use,” said a
statement from Cmdr. David McKinney, a public affairs officer.
That process has also begun for
four midshipmen accused of failing to report drug use.
McKinney’s statement said the
drugs allegedly used included cocaine, ketamine, ecstasy and
mushrooms.
The investigation is ongoing,
the statement said. It began after
two midshipmen made a report
to academy officials in November,
according to the statement. The
academy and the Naval Criminal
Investigative Service have been
involved in the probe.
Administrative discipline mea-
sures can include restrictions and
the loss of privileges, as well as
demerits and removal from the
academy, according to McKinney’s statement. The statement
noted that military justice proceedings were still an option for
officials, who were expected to
make a decision on that after the
NCIS review had wrapped up.
Those options could include
court-martial, a military version
of criminal proceedings.
“The United States Navy and
the Naval Academy both have a
zero tolerance policy when it
comes to the use of illegal substances and take all allegations of
misconduct seriously,” the statement said.
The academy is in Annapolis
and home to about 4,400 students.
In 2011, several midshipmen
were removed from campus for
possessing or using a synthetic
form of marijuana, which an investigation found had been widely used at the academy.
sarah.larimer@washpost.com
Upgrades and premiums
MARYLAND
Change or cancel flight
Stem cells may boost a baby’s heart
Choose seats
Family seating
1: Consumers with no elite-level airline status or credit card that offers travel benefits who
purchase a basic economy fare for domestic travel could face these restrictions.
2: Delta allows carry-on bags for basic economy flights. American and United passengers can
board with only one personal item that fits under the seat and are not allowed to use the
overhead bin space.
3: At an extra cost, seating assignments may be available during booking and before check-in
for United, or 48 hours before flights for American.
4: Though the airlines will attempt to sit families together, seating is not guaranteed unless
advance seat assignments had been purchased.
Source: Senate Commerce Committee Office of
Oversight and Investigations, minority staff report
Big airlines’
‘basic’ fares
include a seat,
not much else
AIRLINES FROM B1
frequently, and for them, price
is paramount.
That is part of what has driven
the success of bare-bones carriers
such as Spirit and Allegiant.
Airlines say basic economy fares
are about offering choice. Travelers
can pick and choose the options
that appeal to them instead of paying for things they don’t want.
“Carriers are responding to the
increased competition by offering
customers a variety of additional amenities, price combinations and service offerings to
choose from that meet individual
needs, and basic economy is an example of that,” said Alison McAfee,
spokeswoman for Airlines for
America, or A4A, a trade group that
represents several of the nation’s
largest carriers.
United spokesman Jonathan
Guerin said, “It’s a competitive
product designed to compete with
other carriers who offer unbundled
product, another opportunity to offer our customers a choice in how
they are traveling.”
What you get for the price of a
basic economy ticket varies by airline and in some cases is evolving.
Generally, though, basic economy
gets you a seat but not much else. No
changes are allowed, and if you
don’t use the ticket, you lose what
you paid.
Consumer advocates and some
members of Congress argue
that this new class of fares is simply an attempt to squeeze more
money out of travelers at a
time when airlines are making
healthy profits.
“While these basic economy
fares may seem to the average traveler to be a good deal, in reality they
may end up costing you more,” said
Sen. Bill Nelson (D-Fla.).
Nelson, the ranking Democrat
on the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation,
recently released a report that examined basic economy fares.
In a 2015 earnings call, Glen W.
Hauenstein, now Delta’s president,
emphasized that basic economy isnot necessarily a lower fare but the
lowest fare the airline has available.
“We want people to buy the products and services they want, and
this is really not about lowering
fares but allowing people to select
what features that Delta offers they
want,” Hauenstein told investors.
Said Jeff Klee, founder of
CheapAir.com, an online travel
agency: “I absolutely think this is
the new normal. It is kind of sad —
things we now consider perks used
to be given for free.” But overall, he
said, the trend is a positive one,
opening the door for cheap travel
for more people.
Others disagree.
“I don’t see an upside, to be honest,” said Zach Honig, editor at large
for the Points Guy, a travel advice
website. “It’s great for airlines and
their shareholders, either from people buying up or paying [extra fees]
later, but it’s a no-win for customers.
The airlines will suggest they have
lowered fares, but they haven’t.
They are the same economy fares as
before.”
It is hard to know how much
airlines make, since they are required to report revenue only from
baggage, cancellation and change
fees. In 2017, U.S. carriers made
$2.2 billion on those fees alone.
But there’s no denying that a la
THE WASHINGTON POST
carte flying has proved profitable.
According to the report released
by Nelson, basic economy fares contributed roughly $20 million in incremental revenue for Delta during
the first quarter of 2016. United said
it expected adding a no-frills fare
option would lead to $200 million
in incremental revenue in 2017.
For larger carriers, the shift to
charging for options that were once
included in the price of a ticket
began nearly a decade ago in
2008, when a spike in fuel prices
prompted American to begin
charging baggage fees. Other airlines followed.
Airlines soon discovered they
could charge for other services —
early boarding, extra legroom, premium seats.
Public sentiment has been
mixed.
“Providing you the option to customize your trip is a good thing, but
I also worry that airlines use this as
an excuse to give you few things for
the same price,” said District resident Maggie Brown, 33, who works
for a trade association and flies traditional and discount carriers.
The shift has made it even more
important for travelers to pay attention when booking flights, Klee
said. “It does make the process of
buying a ticket much more difficult,” he said. “It’s very hard to
make sure you’re comparing apples to apples.”
His website, CheapAir.com, does
its best to differentiate between
standard economy fares and basic
fares, listing for example whether
there are extra charges for carry-on
bags, advance seating assignments,
priority boarding or ticket changes.
A recent search for a roundtrip ticket between BaltimoreWashington International Marshall Airport and Los Angeles International via United yielded three
options: a basic economy seat
priced at $307, economy at $334
and economy flex (a refundable option) at $457. But the basic economy
price did not include the cost for
seats with more legroom ($99 to
$119 on the outbound flight; $34 to
$95 for the return flight), priority
boarding and check-in options
($88) or baggage charges ($25 for
the first bag, $35 for the second).
A passenger flying basic economy on United who brings a large
carry-on, in addition to a small
personal item, will be charged an
extra $50 — the standard fee of
$25 and an additional $25 for
checking it at the gate.
A few months ago, Smith, the
consultant from Fairfax, was headed to San Antonio to meet friends.
He used Google Flights to check
airfares and spotted a cheap ticket
on Delta and clicked “purchase.”
“I just thought it was a really
good deal,” he said. It was only when
he tried to pick his seat that he
realized it was a basic economy fare.
But it wasn’t so bad. On the way
to Atlanta, he ended up in a “premium economy” seat toward the front
of the plane. The connection to San
Antonio was fine. But on the trip
home he was assigned a middle seat
toward the back of the plane. There
was less legroom and the seat had
less cushion than those closer to the
front, he said. Given his recent experience, however, Smith said he
would book basic economy again.
“Fortunately, it worked out great
for me,” Smith said, “but I know
there are stories where people think
they’re getting a great deal and then
once they add all the other extra
fees, it’s not that great.”
As for Zwirn, he ended up rebooking the tickets so he could
guarantee his family would be seated together. The cost was nominal
— only about $60 more — so it was
worth it.
And that’s what the airlines are
counting on — that given the option, travelers will opt to pay more.
lori.aratani@washpost.com
New method attempts
to treat children with
an often fatal condition
BY
M EREDITY C OHN
baltimore — Surgeons trying a
new way to save the life of a baby
born with half a heart stood over
her open chest and waited for the
FedEx box.
Doctors in Miami had sent
overnight two small vials of stem
cells to the University of Maryland Medical Center. Now the
Baltimore surgeons would inject the cells, derived from a
donor’s bone marrow, into the
tiny, defective heart of 4-monthold Autumn.
The Hagerstown girl was born
with an often fatal condition
called hypoplastic left heart
syndrome, in which the left
half of the heart is unable to
pump blood. She is the fifth child
to get the injections into the
working right half of her heart as
part of a national study at the
U-Md. hospital aimed not only at
saving lives, but also allowing
children with the condition to
live more normally.
“Not to be superstitious, but
we liked that she was No. 5,”
Wayne Brown, Autumn’s father,
said before the surgery last
month.
Both Brown and LeeAnn
Janes, Autumn’s mother, were
born on the fifth day of the
month.
“She’s become our Lucky
No. 5,” Brown said.
After seeing promise in trials on adults who have had
heart attacks, strokes and other
cardiac problems, researchers
thought stem cells might benefit
children with heart problems.
Autumn Brown is one of 10
babies in the study receiving
cells to check for safety and
feasibility. An additional 20 will
be enrolled at the U-Md. facility
and other pediatric hospitals
across the country. Half will get
stem cells, in a trial to determine
whether the treatment helps.
About 950 babies each year
are born with hypoplastic left
heart syndrome. Left untreated,
the condition is always fatal.
For now, the lone treatment is
a course of surgery developed
30 years ago. It is performed in
three parts: at birth, at about
four months and at age 2 or 3.
Even with the surgeries, only
60 percent of the children reach
the age of 5. The overtaxed
partial heart eventually fails, necessitating a heart transplant,
which brings more risks.
Now doctors in the study are
injecting the stem cells into the
working half of the heart during
the second surgery.
Autumn is a plump and cheery
bundle. The only outward clues
that she suffers a disorder are an
oxygen line to her nose and a
port for a feeding tube.
Sunjay Kaushal, director of
pediatric and adult congenital
surgery at U-Md. and one of the
nation’s foremost surgeons
for hypoplastic left heart syndrome, said Autumn’s general health beyond the condition
and her supportive parents made
AMY DAVIS/BALTIMORE SUN
Autumn Brown was born with hypoplastic left heart syndrome, in
which the left half of the heart is unable to pump blood.
her a good candidate for the
stem-cell study.
His team of about a dozen
arrived early for the surgery in
mid-February,
draped
blue
cloths around Autumn and
hooked her up to machines that
would at times do her breathing
and pump her blood for her. Her
pacifier and stuffed monkey
were carefully stored and labeled
in a bag and set aside. Her chest
was reopened along the same
several-inch-long line used in
her first surgery.
Three doctors aimed their
headlamps down at Autumn’s
strawberry-size heart. They
worked in tandem with the nurses, anesthesiologists and other
professionals who gathered
around the table in the pediatric
operating room of the University
of Maryland Children’s Hospital.
Other
attendants
scurried
around the room, keeping track
of supplies and other needs of
those in the surgery huddle.
The heart surgery done, the
team waited for the courier delivering the stem cells.
The approximately 1.67 million cells had been in a freezer
at the biotech company Longeveron the day before. They had
largely thawed before their
scheduled arrival, so too much of
a delay could jeopardize their
viability.
The opaque liquid cells arrived at the hospital in a toastersize cooler pack about 12:15 p.m.
and were hurried into the
operating room. They were carefully unwrapped by sterile
gloved hands.
A quick examination under
the microscope showed they
were 77 percent viable, above the
70 percent threshold for use.
They were drawn into eight
small syringes, which were then
laid on a cloth-covered tray next
to the surgical team.
A member of the team held up
a diagram of a heart for Kaushal,
an associate professor of surgery
in the University of Maryland School of Medicine and
director of pediatric cardiac surgery at the medical center.
He pointed to a spot each time
he plunged a needle into Autumn’s heart.
If the cells work as they did in
Kaushal’s computer models and
lab animals during nearly a decade of research, they will boost
the strength and longevity of
Autumn’s half a heart.
Kaushal says the first four
children to receive the cells —
three at Maryland and one at the
Johns Hopkins Hospital — were
faring well.
“I think this is game-changing
for these kids,” Kaushal said. “I
believe these young hearts are
going to be the most responsive.”
In a normal heart, the right
side of the heart typically has
the less stressful job of pumping deoxygenated blood from the
body to the lungs. The left
side more powerfully pumps the
resupplied blood back out to
the body.
In babies with Autumn’s syndrome, the right side has to do
double duty.
The three surgeries change
how blood flows so deoxygenated blood goes right to the lungs
and refreshed blood is pumped
around the body by the right side
of the heart.
Kaushal has been working
with Joshua Hare, the former
Johns Hopkins researcher who
became the founding director of
the Interdisciplinary Stem Cell
Institute at the University of
Miami Miller School of Medicine. Hare formed Longeveron to
translate research into medical
use. Longeveron, U-Md. and the
state-established Maryland Stem
Cell Research Fund are sponsor-
ing the initial $1.5 million cost of
the study.
Longeveron harvested the
mesenchymal stem cells from a
young adult donor and allowed
them to multiply in a culture to
produce enough for use in every
baby in the trial. These types of
cells can become any kind of
human cell.
Once in a baby’s heart, Hare
said, they can reduce scar tissue
and inflammation, promote new
small vessels and — perhaps
most important — stimulate the
heart to grow.
Data collected on stem cells in
adults or children have not convinced everyone of the long-term
possibilities. Clinics that have
exploited loopholes to use unsanctioned stem-cell therapies
have drawn negative publicity.
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has warned consumers about unintended and
harmful consequences. The FDA
has approved stem cells only for
disorders related to blood production.
But the agency has allowed
their use in well-reviewed studies, including the heart study at
U-Md.
“In my experience, it’s a highly
promising therapy and people do
well, and we just need more data
to prove it,” Hare said.
“My ultimate hope is we can
show we can reduce the need for
transplants and kids do better,
not just by increasing the functioning of their hearts but make
them feel better and live longer,”
he said. “The goal is really to
make kids better.”
Autumn’s mother wants nothing else for her daughter. The
girl was discharged, then returned to the hospital with a
complication. She is improving
and should head soon to a relative’s home with her parents and
other family.
Janes said she sees the stem
cells as “creating a super heart.”
And for her part, Lucky No. 5
may have earned more good
energy during her surgery: The
injections of stem cells began at
12:53 and ended at 12:58 —
exactly 5 minutes.
— Baltimore Sun
<PM[]XXWZ\aW]VMML\WÅVLY]ITQ\a
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B6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 13 , 2018
obituaries
HUBERT DE GIVENCHY, 91
Classicist designer created haute couture to live in
BY
M EGAN M C D ONOUGH
Hubert de Givenchy, a French
designer whose fashions influenced haute couture in the
1950s and 1960s and transformed his close friend, actress
Audrey Hepburn, into a style
legend, died March 10 at 91.
The death was announced by
Clare Waight Keller, artistic director of Givenchy. No other
information was immediately
available.
For more than four decades,
Mr. Givenchy bridged the American and Parisian fashion
worlds, designing effortlessly
chic clothes that adorned European royalty and Hollywood
stars. He clothed Greta Garbo,
Marlene Dietrich, Grace Kelly,
Lauren Bacall, Elizabeth Taylor
and some of the world’s most
fashionable women, including first lady Jacqueline Kennedy and the socialites Rachel
“Bunny” Mellon and Catherine
“Deeda” Blair.
“Givenchy has long been a
classicist, one of the last of
the old school of haute couture, where gorgeous clothes
were made for a woman to live
in, not to decorate her,” fashion journalist Dana Thomas
wrote in The Washington Post
in 1995. “His clothes moved with
a woman’s body, rather than
restricted it.”
The precociously talented,
darkly handsome 6-foot-6 designer was only 25 when he
opened his atelier in Paris in
1952. His debut collection was
one of the earliest ready-to-wear
high-end fashion lines.
“Paris had been occupied by
the Nazis, and French fashion
had been pretty much beaten
into the ground,” said Valerie
Steele, director and chief curator of the Fashion Institute of
Technology Museum in New
York. “He was one of the leading
French couturiers in a period in
which couture made a triumphant resurgence.”
Mr. Givenchy thought mixand-match separates, including
interchangeable dresses, light
skirts and chic tops, offered
women more versatility with
their look and choices in creating their own style. Operating
on a shoestring budget, he created a handful of styles out of
inexpensive men’s shirting material for his first collection and
asked customers to select their
preferred fabric.
The crisp, embroidered, fullruffled “Bettina” blouse (named
in honor of the late model
Bettina Graziani) was an instant
hit. By the end of the first day of
business, the store reportedly
rang up 7 million francs (about
$14,000 in today’s dollars).
An account by the New York
Times called Mr. Givenchy’s
collection “one of the most
phenomenal debuts in the Paris couture.”
Mr. Givenchy’s fashioning of
and relationship with Hepburn
was often regarded as his broader cultural breakthrough. The
couturier first met Hepburn in
1953 after she had been cast in
writer-director Billy Wilder’s romantic comedy “Sabrina.” She
played a Long Island chauffeur’s
tomboy daughter who studies
abroad in Paris and returns a
chic, sophisticated woman. Hep-
2006 PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER PLEDGER/AP
LEFT: Hubert de Givenchy
poses at his Paris shop in 1952.
ABOVE: Model Romilly Collins
shows off the black Givenchy
dress that Audrey Hepburn
wore in “Breakfast at Tiffany’s.”
ASSOCIATED PRESS
burn thought it would be fitting
for her character to wear authentic Parisian couture.
When told he had the opportunity to costume Hepburn, Mr.
Givenchy was under the impression it was a different famous
Hepburn — Katharine Hepburn.
Though Audrey Hepburn had
received acclaim in the United
States for her starring role in
“Roman Holiday,” which would
eventually earn her an Oscar, the
film had not yet been released
overseas. At the time, the
waifish actress was still a relatively unknown star in Europe.
Mr. Givenchy was shocked
when the doe-eyed, gamin beauty walked into his studio. Scrambling to complete his next collection, he told Hepburn that he
was too busy to design original
pieces for her but that she could
select items from his previous
season’s collection, including
the belted ivory dress she wore
to the 1954 Academy Awards.
“She gave a life to the clothes
— she had a way of installing
herself in them that I have seen
in no one else since, except
maybe the model Dalma,”
Mr. Givenchy told Vanity Fair
in 1995.
“Sabrina” won the Oscar for
costume design, although head
designer Edith Head failed to
acknowledge Mr. Givenchy’s
contributions during her acceptance speech. According to
Head’s biographer, David Chierichetti, Head banked on the fact
Mr. Givenchy was “such a gentleman he would not make a fuss.”
He did not.
Hepburn was furious. From
that point on, she insisted Mr.
Givenchy costume her in subsequent films including “Funny
Face” (1957), “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” (1961) and “Charade”
(1963). She became his greatest
fashion ambassador on screen
and off.
“His are the only clothes in
which I am myself,” said the
actress, who died in 1993. “He is
far more than a couturier, he is a
creator of personality.”
Although Mr. Givenchy did
not invent the little black dress,
he undoubtedly crafted one
of the best remembered: the
quintessential black satin gown
worn by Hepburn in “Breakfast
at Tiffany’s.” Hepburn’s sleeveless sheath — with its striking
bateau neckline; subtle, cinched
waist; and crescent-shaped cutouts in back — was an influential fashion statement.
Paired with elbow-length silk
gloves, oversize glasses, a widebrim hat and a necklet of
pearls, the look gained worldwide renown.
“The little black dress is
the hardest thing to realize,”
Mr. Givenchy once told the Independent newspaper, “because
you must keep it simple.” In
2006, the dress sold for more
than $900,000 at a Christie’s
auction in London, one of the
highest prices paid for a film
costume.
He also created one of the first
“celebrity fragrances,” L’Interdit
(French for “forbidden”), designed initially for and later
endorsed by Hepburn. “We never had a contract, like other
designers do,” Mr. Givenchy told
the Chicago Tribune in 1989.
“We only had love, and that is
why it worked so well.”
When Hepburn was diagnosed with terminal colon cancer, he was the one who arranged her travel to Switzerland
on a private plane owned by
Mellon, the Listerine heiress
who had married financier Paul
Mellon. “Thank you for the magic carpet,” the screen star later
told her friend.
Hubert James Marcel Taffin
de Givenchy was born in Beauvais, France, on Feb. 21, 1927, to
a prosperous family of noble
lineage. He was about 2 when
his father died, and he was
raised by his mother and maternal grandparents.
His grandfather was an artistic director of France’s Gobelins
and Beauvais tapestry manufacturers. When Mr. Givenchy received good grades in school, his
grandfather would reward him
by allowing him the chance to
peruse his vast collection of rare
textiles. “I’d take piles of them
and look at them and touch
them for hours,” he told People
magazine. “I think that’s where
my vocation began.”
In defiance of his family's
wish that he pursue law, he
attended the National School of
Fine Arts in Paris. He later
apprenticed under designers including Elsa Schiaparelli before
opening his own workshop.
Mr. Givenchy also met and
befriended Cristóbal Balenciaga, a Spanish-born designer
he had admired since childhood.
Balenciaga mentored the younger couturier, even sharing his
clients and seamstresses after he
closed his fashion house in 1968.
“Balenciaga would dress
the age-old haute couture moth-
ers, while all of their daughters embraced Hubert,” said
Pamela Golbin, chief curator of
the Museum of Fashion and
Textiles in Paris. “He was a
different energy and more modern, which appealed to a different generation.”
After his retirement, Balenciaga encouraged many loyal
clients to switch their allegiances to Mr. Givenchy, going as far
as to walk Bunny Mellon over,
hand in hand, across the street
to his mentee’s salon on Avenue
George V.
Mr. Givenchy fashioned Mellon’s entire wardrobe, from
her lingerie to her gardening smocks, and she, in turn,
helped design his gardens.
The two shared weekly phone
calls, Mr. Givenchy told the
Financial Times, until her death
in 2014 at 103.
Meanwhile, Mr. Givenchy’s
collections changed with the
times, from feminine frocks in
the 1950s to higher hemlines in
the 1960s and debonair tailored
suits for men in the 1970s and
1980s. His whimsical romanticism and simple, elegant design
aesthetic remained intact.
Over time, Mr. Givenchy’s label expanded his men’s fashion
line, as well as an accessory,
sports, perfume, jewelry, furniture and makeup division.
In 1988, Mr. Givenchy sold his
design label to the French luxury
goods conglomerate LVMH for
$46 million. He continued to
pour out collections six times a
year until his official — somewhat forced — retirement in
1995. LVMH executives had
dramatically downsized his
responsibilities and voiced
their desire to bring in new
talent. His successor was the far
more radical British designer
John Galliano.
The fashion house, which
still bears Mr. Givenchy’s name,
has since been headed by Alexander McQueen, Julien Macdonald and, most recently, Keller.
“There is no continuity to any of
the DNA of what Givenchy was
doing,” Steele said.
At Mr. Givenchy’s final couture show in 1995, peers including designer Valentino, Yves
Saint Laurent, Christian Lacroix
and Oscar de la Renta paid their
respects from the front row. Mr.
Givenchy, dressed in his signature white smock, wept when
Hepburn’s son Sean Ferrer presented him with a bouquet of
white roses taken from the
60 bushes he gave to Hepburn
on her 60th birthday.
In his later years, Mr.
Givenchy led the restoration of
Louis XIV’s vegetable gardens at
Versailles, served as president of
Christie’s France, and collected
fine art, furniture and sculptures. He received the Council of
Fashion Designers award for
lifetime achievement in 1996.
Survivors include his longtime companion, couture designer Philippe Venet.
Once, when asked if his talent
was God-given or self-made, Mr.
Givenchy replied, “Maybe He
give[s] you the energy and belief, but you must yourself have
these things, too.”
God, added the designer,
“doesn’t make the collections for
you four times a year.”
megan.mcdonough@washpost.com
CHUCK CAMPION, 62
Longtime adviser to Democrats specialized in presidential campaigns
BY
E LLIE S ILVERMAN
Chuck Campion was first exposed to politics as a child, when
he campaigned for his grandfather, a representative in the Massachusetts legislature from Boston’s West Roxbury neighborhood.
“I went door to door with nominating papers for my grandfather
when I was 7 or 8 years old,” he
told The Washington Post, “and I
remember how shocked I was
when one lady said: ‘I can’t sign
that. I’m a Republican.’ I had no
idea what a Republican was.”
Mr. Campion, who died
March 7 at 62, spent his career
helping Democrats seek the highest office in the land. He was a
political and public affairs adviser
who specialized in presidential
campaigns, notably those of Walter Mondale, Michael Dukakis,
Hillary Clinton and John Kerry,
and was chairman of the Dewey
Square Group, a Boston-based po-
litical consulting and lobbying
firm that he co-founded 25 years
ago.
He turned professional while at
the University of Massachusetts,
working for Dukakis, then the
state’s governor, over summer
breaks. By the late 1970s, he was a
special assistant to Vice President
Walter Mondale.
In an interview Thursday, Mondale referred to Mr. Campion as
his “trip director” because he flew
with him on Air Force Two and
made sure everything went
smoothly, down to the details of
who had seats on the plane. Mr.
Campion later worked on Mondale’s unsuccessful 1984 presidential campaign, serving important
roles in New Hampshire, Ohio,
New Jersey and Illinois. Mostly,
he excelled as an advance man.
“You try to learn what’s going
on as soon as you can when you
get into a new location,” Mondale
said. Mr. Campion “had this uncanny ability to float around a
FAMILY PHOTO
Chuck Campion began working
on campaigns as a child.
community and come back and
tell me what was going on.”
Mr. Campion said that when he
went to a new state, he tried not
to seem like a presumptuous outsider. When he moved to New
Hampshire for Mondale, he told
The Post in 1984, “I thought about
how I’d feel if somebody from
Manchester walked into my family house and said, ‘Hi, I’m here to
run West Roxbury.’ I decided I’d
ask a lot of advice.”
Mr. Campion was familiar with
losses on the presidential campaign trail and spoke candidly
about a noted mishap during the
1984 New Hampshire primary.
Mondale, the establishment
front-runner, left the state in the
days leading up to the vote, then
lost the primary in an upset to the
grass-roots insurgent senator
Gary Hart of Colorado. Mondale
still won the Democratic nomination before losing in a landslide to
incumbent Ronald Reagan that
November.
In 2000, Democratic media
consultant Robert Shrum was
working for presidential candidate Al Gore and sought advice
from Mr. Campion, a campaign
colleague. Shrum wanted to know
what Mr. Campion thought of
Gore’s plan to give a speech on
global warming in Michigan. “He
said if we gave that speech, he
might as well just go home,”
Shrum recalled in his 2007 book,
“No Excuses: Concessions of a
Serial Campaigner.”
At first, Shrum recalled, Gore
didn’t listen, but he was later
persuaded by his chief environmental adviser to drop the speech
idea. Shrum dubbed Mr. Campion
“one of the wittiest and bluntest
political operatives in the business.”
Charles Michael Campion was
born in Boston on Aug. 20, 1955.
He graduated from the University
of Massachusetts in 1977.
Survivors include his wife of 33
years, Heather Pars Campion of
Brookline, Mass.; two children,
Maxwell Campion of Boston and
Courtney Campion of Atlanta; his
mother, Mary Richard of Fal-
mouth, Mass.; four sisters; and
one brother.
He died at a hospital in Boston
of complications from stomach
surgery, said his wife.
On Thursday, Rep. Joe Kennedy (D-Mass.) recalled that during his maiden campaign for office in 2012, he had just finished
having breakfast with a supporter
when the phone rang. It was Mr.
Campion, who was not working
for the campaign but wanted to
make a suggestion.
A friend of the consultant
was sitting next to Kennedy at
the morning meal and reported how much coffee the candidate seemed to consume in public. Mr. Campion said this conveyed the idea that he was tired,
and it might put off supporters
and voters.
“From my perspective,” said
Kennedy, who won the race, “he
was one of those godfather-type
figures in Massachusetts politics.”
ellie.silverman@washpost.com
.
TUESDAY, MARCH 13 , 2018
THE WASHINGTON POST
IN MEMORIAM
JACOBS
EZ
B7
RE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
IN MEMORIAM
DEATH NOTICE
CAPPS
McKOY
RIFE
SMITH
WOOD
MARY S. CAPPS (Age 84)
On Friday, March 9, 2018 of Fredericksburg, VA.
Loving mother of Robert Capps, Jr. (Kim) and
Russell Capps (Ken); grandmother of Stephen
and Brittany Capps. Celebration of Life service
at Salem Baptist Church, 4044 Plank Road,
Fredericksburg, VA 22407 on Sunday, March
18 at 3 p.m. Interment held privately at Mount
Comfort Cemetery in Alexandria, VA. In lieu of
flowers, memorial contributions may be made
to Salem Baptist Church or American Cancer
Society.
COLEMAN
INZA F. COLEMAN
On March 2, 2018. Loving mother of Rhoda
Williams, Wanda Hand, Alvera Thomas, Frank
T. Williams and the late Daniel D. Williams.
She is also survived by several grandchildren,
relatives and friends. Services at Stewart
Funeral Home, 4001 Benning Rd., NE, Tuesday,
March 20, 2018, wake, 10 a.m.; funeral, 11 a.m.
WILLIAM H. JACOBS
May 17, 1921 ~ March 13, 2008
Missing you and loving you.
Wife, Cornelia and Children
CONDES
MARY CONDES
Loving wife of Alberto Condes, died in her
home on March 10, 2018. She was surrounded
by the love of her daughter, Anna Maria Ashworth; her son, Albert and his wife, Jodi;
and Mary’s grandchildren, Kathryn Condes,
Albert Condes IV, Christina Ashworth, Robert
Ashworth and Thomas Ashworth.
Mary grew up in Nogales, Arizona, where she
met and married Alberto in 1958. She was
at the time employed as an insurance agent.
When she married she chose to give up her
career to devote herself to her family. She
returned to working outside the home 22 years
later, when her son went off to college.
DEATH NOTICE
BAILEY
VALDETE LESSA BAILEY
On Friday, March 9, 2018 of Asbury Village,
formerly of Bethesda, MD. Beloved wife of
Treadwell S. “Ted” Bailey; mother of Carmen
Hall, David Zielinski, Danny Zielinski, Suann
Zielinski and the late Ellen Ferguson; stepmother of Ian Bailey, Christine Mann and Alex
Bailey. Mrs. Bailey is also survived by her
14 grandchildren, 17 great-grandchildren and
by her great-great-granddaughter. Friends will
be received at PUMPHREY’S BETHESDA-CHEVY
CHASE FUNERAL HOME, 7557 Wisconsin
Avenue, Bethesda, MD on Wednesday from
7 to 9 p.m. Graveside service will be held at
Gate of Heaven Cemetery on Thursday, March
15 at 10:30 a.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made to the National
Kidney Foundation.
Throughout her life Mary was very active in
many activities. She enjoyed playing bridge,
bowling, golf and quilting. When Albert was in
the Air Force, she was active in the Officers
Wives Club. When they lived in Yuma, Arizona
she was active in her church’s religious education program. For 10 years she cared for
her mother who suffered with Alzheimers.
Her most enjoyable activity through the years
was caring for her children and grandchildren.
She was very excitable at her grandchildren’s
sporting events and made it a point not to miss
any of them.
For many years, among her charities, Mary has
helped support a Catholic home for young girls
in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico.
Viewing and Rosary will be held Wednesday
March 14, from 6 to 8 p.m. at Demaine Funeral
Home, 10565 Main Street, Fairfax, VA. Services
to follow the next day, Thursday, 10 a.m. at St.
Timothy’s Catholic Church, 13807 Poplar Tree
Rd., Chantilly, VA 20151.
JACKSON
CAPOBIANCHI
MITTIE JACKSON
JOSEPH D. CAPOBIANCHI (Age 60)
On Saturday, March 10, 2018 of
Poolesville, MD. Beloved husband
of Maria Pizzino; father of Annamaria and Gabriella Capobianchi;
brother of Anthony Capobianchi,
Josephine (Joseph) Marion and
Rita (Darrell) Bauguess; son of the
late Fernando and Anna Capobianchi. Also
survived by numerous nieces, nephews, greatnieces, great-nephews and cousins. Relatives
and friends may call at Collins Funeral Home,
500 University Boulevard West, Silver Spring,
MD, (Valet Parking), Thursday, March 15 from
2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Mass of Christian
Burial will be celebrated at the Shrine of St.
Jude, 12701 Veirs Mill Road, Rockville, MD on
Friday, March 16, 2018 at 11 a.m. Entombment
Gate of Heaven Cemetery. In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions may be made to St.
Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memorial
Giving, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
When the
need arises,
let families
find you in the
Funeral Services
Directory.
Departed this life on Sunday, March 4, 2018.
She leaves to cherish her memories her children, Rosalind Jackson and Donald Jackson;
brother, Teamer McClure; five grandchildren;
two great-grandchildren; and a host of other
relatives and friends. She was preceded in
death by her husband, Arthur Doc Jackson and
daughter, Carrol Jackson. Friends may visit
with the family on Thursday, March 15, 2018 at
Mount Sinai Baptist Church, 1615 Third Street,
NW, Washington, DC 20001, from 10 a.m. until
time of funeral services at 11 a.m. Interment
Harmony Memorial Cemetery. Flowers may be
ordered and condolences may be expressed at
www.jkjohnsonfuneralhome.com
McGINTY
GAYLORD VINCENT McKOY (Age 82)
Master Chef Petty Officer, U.S. Navy (Ret.)
Passed away peacefully surrounded by his
loved ones on Saturday, March 3, 2018 of
Mitchellville, MD. He leaves to cherish his
memory daughter, Vivian Gilliam; grandson,
Aaron Gilliam. He is also survived by a host
of relatives and friends. Visitation will be held
on Saturday, March 17, 2018 from 9 a.m.
until time of service 10:30 a.m. at Epiphany
Episcopal Church, 3111 Ritchie Rd., Forestville,
MD. Interment Arlington National Cemetery. In
lieu of flowers, donations may be made to
Epiphany Episcopal Church Scholarship Fund
on his behalf.
McNAMARA
JAMES J. McNAMARA
Members of the Association of
Retired Police Officers of D.C. are
notified of the March 9, 2018 death
of James J. McNamara. He was a
DC1 with MPD-NSID when retired
on June 30, 2014.
McNAUGHTEN
SCHMITT
CYNTHIA LeBARON
SCHOEN McNAUGHTEN (Age 89)
MARIANNE M. SCHMITT
Of Fairhaven, MA and Rockville, MD, died
Friday, March 9, 2018 at St. Luke's Hospital,
New Bedford, MA of natural causes. She was
the widow of Neal K. McNaughten and the
daughter of the late Harry H. and Mertice B.
(Shurtleff) Schoen.
Born in Elizabeth, NJ, she lived in Cranford,
NJ; Farmington and Portland, ME, Fairhaven,
Charleston, SC, Seattle, WA, Philadelphia, PA
and Los Altos, CA. After 1987 she split her
time between Rockville and Fairhaven. She
was a communicant of the Episcopal Church
of St. Mary Magdalene, Wheaton, MD and also
affiliated with St. Andrew's Episcopal Church,
Glenwood, MD and Grace Episcopal Church,
New Bedford, MA.
She attended and later taught at Ashley Hall
in Charleston, graduated from Bush School in
Seattle, and from Smith College in Northampton, MA, of which she was an active alumna.
She also taught at the Baldwin School, Bryn
Mawr, PA, edited textbooks at John C. Winston Co., Philadelphia, and was an advertising production supervisor at N.W. Ayer &
Son, Philadelphia. She was later employed in
Maryland by the Montgomery Sentinel and by
Montgomery County Public Schools.
An avid genealogy and local history researcher,
she was an active member of numerous
genealogical and historical organizations and
of many others related to her environmental,
education, and cultural interests.
She is survived by three sons, William L. McN.
Loving of Denver, CO, Neal H. McNaughten
of Wolcott, VT and Paul S. McNaughten of
Rockville, MD; two daughters, Julia M. Kerr
(McNaughten) of Keene, NH and Margaret
Elizabeth McNaughten of Sunapee, NH; a stepdaughter, Marjorie L. Stern (McNaughten) of
Shelburne, VT; six grandsons, Christopher N.
and Robert J. Kerr of New York, NY, Michael
R. Kerr of Telluride, CO, Noah K. McN. Loving
of Amherst, MA, Cole H. and Grayson B.
McNaughten of Wolcott, VT; two step-granddaughters, Abbi L. and Sarena I. Stern of Shelburne, VT; and two in-law granddaughters,
Jacqueline Christo Heiber of Washington, DC
and Marlo Silberski of Rockville, MD.
The funeral will be at Grace Church, 422 County
St., New Bedford, MA on Wednesday, March
14, 2018 at 1:30 p.m. Interment will be at
Riverside Cemetery, Fairhaven, at a later date.
In lieu of flowers, contributions in her name
may be made to the Building Fund for the
Unitarian Memorial Church, Fairhaven, MA for
preservation of the tower bells.
MOORE
PATRICK JAMES McGINTY
To be seen in the
Funeral Services
Directory, please call
paid Death Notices at
202-334-4122.
DEATH NOTICE
On Thursday, March 8, 2018 of
Darnestown, MD. Beloved son
of Lillian and Paul McGinty, Jr.;
Loving brother of Rosemarie McGinty;
grandson of James E. and Rosalie B. Vlach
and the late Paul and Marie McGinty.
Friends may call at DeVol Funeral Home,
10 East Deer Park Dr., Gaithersburg, MD
on Thursday from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. A
Memorial Mass will be offered at Our Lady
of Visitation Parish 14139 Seneca Road,
Darnestown, MD 20878 on Friday,, March
16, 2018 at 11 a.m. Interment Private.
In lieu of flowers contributions may be
made in his name to NAMI.org or LIBD.org
Please sign family guest book at:
www.DeVolFuneralHome.com
HAUB
Besides pursuing his business goals, he
also was passionate about the environment.
Inspired by his mother Elisabeth, who was
one of the first environmentalists in Germany in the late 1960’s, he embraced sustainable business practices throughout his
business enterprise long before they
became mainstream and won numerous
awards and recognition for his leadership in
this area. He went on to create the world’s
first university chair in business and the
environment at York University in Toronto,
Canada in 1991. Together with his wife he
established the Helga Otto Haub School of
Environment and Natural Resources at the
University of Wyoming in 2004.
ERIVAN HAUB (Age 85)
Of Wiesbaden, Germany, passed away
amongst family on Tuesday, March 6, 2018
in Pinedale, Wyoming. Born in 1932 in Wiesbaden, Germany to Elisabeth and Erich Haub
he became one of the most successful
German business entrepreneurs building
The Tengelmann Group into an international
retail empire spanning Europe and North
America, including The Great Atlantic and
Pacific Tea Company (A&P).
After graduating high school, he completed
his retail apprenticeship and then entered a
traineeship program in North America in the
early 1950s where he fell in love with the
country while working at several prominent
food retailers in Chicago and Los Angeles
and for an import-export company in Cuba.
Following his return home, he studied at
the University of Hamburg under famous
economist Prof. Karl Schiller and graduated
from the University of Mainz with a degree
in economics. But more importantly than his
degree, he met his future wife and love of
his life, Helga, while studying in Hamburg
and they got married in 1958. They were
blessed with three boys, Karl-Erivan, Georg
and Christian, who were all born in Tacoma,
Washington and cemented his lifelong love
for America.
Erivan entered the family business in Germany in 1963 and following the death of his
uncle in 1969, he assumed the leadership
of the Tengelmann Group in the fourth generation, and immediately began to expand
the company, which at this point was a midsized food retail business operating just in
Germany. He skillfully grew the company
by acquiring key competitors and launching innovative new concepts to become
Germany’s largest supermarket operator.
In 1979, he fulfilled his lifelong dream of
expanding to America by investing in The
Great Atlantic and Pacific Tea Company,
the country’s oldest supermarket business.
He continued to diversify The Tengelmann
Group expanding his food retail business
across Europe, investing into home improvement retail enterprise OBI in Germany and
launching the clothing discount retailer KiK.
After the fall of the Berlin Wall he entered
new markets in eastern Europe, fueling
the company’s growth culminating in The
Tengelmann Group becoming one of the
largest privately-owned retail companies in
the world.
In order to strengthen the German-American
relationship, he first established the Erivan
Karl Haub Executive Conference Center at
St. Joseph’s University in Philadelphia in
1988 followed by the Haub School of Business in 1997. He also became a lead benefactor of the The George C. Marshall International Center in Leesburg, Virginia. For his
accomplishments in fostering the GermanAmerican friendship he received the Dr.
Leo M. Goodman Award by the American
Chamber of Commerce in 1996. At Pace
University in New York, he helped to establish the Elisabeth Haub School of Law in
2016, to honor his mother and to support
their highly regarded environmental law program.
In 2004, the Federal Republic of Germany
awarded him the Federal Cross of Merit,
Germany’s highest civil award for his lifetime
achievements and contributions in business,
culture, society and especially for the environment.
At the beginning of the new millennium,
Erivan transferred the leadership of The
Tengelmann Group to his sons, Karl-Erivan
and Christian and took over the role of
Chairman of the company’s advisory board.
Following his 80th birthday and after 50
years of successful engagement in the retail
industry, he retired and retreated into private life.
Erivan Haub was a very generous philanthropist during his life supporting the wellbeing of his many tens of thousands of
employees and embracing many causes in
the communities his company served. He
was an avid collector of American Western
Art, a love he developed during the time he
spent on his ranch in Wyoming where he
raised a herd of American bison. Together
with his family he decided to donate his
collection to the Tacoma Art Museum as a
sign of gratitude towards the community he
first found a home at in America.
He passed away peacefully on his beloved
ranch in Pinedale, Wyoming and will be
thoroughly missed by all who knew him.
Erivan is survived by his wife, Helga; his
son, Karl-Erivan and his wife, Katrin with
their children, Viktoria and Erivan; his son,
Georg with his children, Robert, Alexander
and Sarina; and his son, Christian and his
wife, Liliane with their children, MarieLiliane, Maximilian, Anna-Sophia and Constantin.
The farewell will be held with immediate
family.
CURTIS MARK RIFE
On February 28, 2018, Curtis Mark Rife died
in his home with his wife and son, Scott by
his side. Born November 8, 1934, Curt was
patriarch of the Rife clan, jokester, golfer, card
player and all-around nice guy, a handy man
and problem solver whose affable good humor
belied his persistent ability to get things done.
He is survived by his loving wife of 55 years,
Janet Miller Rife, his children, Scott, Brian,
Sheri Rife Cizek, Eric and Dan, and his 10
grandchildren. With a high school education,
plus innate ability and drive, Curt found his
niche in the brand-new field of computers in
1959. He was a civilian with the Department of
Army for 30 years, including work in Belgium,
1970-73, with SHAPE, the military arm of
NATO. In retirement he enjoyed abundant golf,
travel with Janet, and time with family. Curt
was preceded in death by his parents, Eva
Mae and Rollie Rife, and his brother, Gregg.
A Celebration of Life Mass with reception
following, is planned for March 24, 11 a.m.
at the Chapel at Greenspring, 7420 Spring
Village Drive, Springfield. Please RSVP here:
www.faceook.com/events/206215173294159.
In lieu of flowers, donations to the American
Lung Association www.lung.org.
REGINALD O. MOORE
Members of the Association of
Retired Police Officers of D.C. are
notified of the March 10, 2018
death of James J. McNamara. He
was a OFF with MPD-4D when
retired on March 25, 1989.
PETERSON
On March 7, 2018, loving wife and mother,
Marianne M. Schmitt of Swansboro, NC left
behind devoted husband John Schmitt II; loving son, Damien Carrell; step-children, MIchael
Schmitt, John Schmitt III, and Janice Phillips;
and three step-grandchildren, also survive.
Services will be held at Kahlert Funeral Home,
308 Main St., Maysville, NC 28555 on Friday,
March 15, 2018 at 1 p.m. with burial following
at Pollocksville Cemetery.
SEIDELSON
PHYLLIS L. SEIDELSON
JEAN JACKSON SMITH
MARY CAROLYN WOOD (Age 84)
Happy 86th Birthday, Mom
We love and miss you.
Your children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren and your family.
Of Springfield, Virginia passed away in her
home on Friday morning, March 9, 2018.
Beloved wife of Richard W. Wood, devoted
mother of Mark, Becky, and Peter. Daughter
of Floyd H. and Mary A. Werts of Lakehurst,
New Jersey, sister of Barbara L. Schlarp. She
attended Penn State University and was a
member of Gamma Phi Beta. Having later
earned a Master’s Degree from GMU (George
Mason University), Carolyn taught special education in Fairfax County, Virginia for 20+ years.
An avid reader, card player, quilter, knitter,
sewer and puzzler. Carolyn is survived by her
husband of 64 years, Richard W. Wood and
their daughter Becky Wood-Peterson. Survived
also by daughter-in-law, Theresa Wood; six
grandchildren, Christopher, Jessica, McLean,
Molly, Ian, Madison, and two great-grandchildren, Elliott and Henry Wood.
DEATH NOTICE
BEDARD
Services will be held at Living Savior Lutheran
Church, 5500 Ox Road, Fairfax Station, VA
22039 on Wednesday, March 14, 2018 at 3 p.m.
In lieu of flowers donations can be made to
the American Diabetes Association, www.diabetes.org or Capital Caring-Hospice www.capitalcaring.org
ROBERT BEDARD "Bob"
Mr. Bedard, 67, was a long-time Capitol Hill
resident who worked on the presidential campaigns of Rep. Morris K. Udall, in 1976, and
John Anderson, in 1980. For almost 30 years,
he advised several labor unions in Philadelphia.
He semi-retired to Baltimore in 2014 where
he worked to restore the elusive Baltimore
checkerspot butterfly.
Passed away on February 2, 2018 in Rockville,
MD, a month shy of her 91st birthday. She
is survived by sons, Mark (Linda) and Paul;
granddaughters, Ava and Gina (Bret); and great
grandson Noah. Memorial service, March 23,
2018,11 a.m. at Chesapeake Room, Clubhouse
I, Leisure World, Silver Spring, MD. In lieu of
flowers, please donate to either First Church of
Christ, Scientist (christiansciencerockville.org);
or Encore Creativity for Older Adults
(encorecreativity.org).
He was born in Massachusetts and is survived
by four brothers, William Bedard of Orange,
MA, Steven and Jane Bedard of Milford, CT,
Paul and Michele Bedard of Purcellville, VA and
Joseph and Karen Bedard of Boise, ID.
WULTICH
CARR
No services will be held. Donations can be
made to the non-profit National Butterfly Center:
www.nationalbutterflycenter.org
NICHOLAS WULTICH
Beloved husband, father, and grandfather, died
at his home on March 10, 2018.
Nicholas Wultich was born on July 31, 1923
in Clairton, PA. He served in the US Army
in World War II for the 981st Field Artillery
Battalion. His unit served in combat starting
in Normandy through the end of the war in
Germany. After the war, he graduated from
Duquesne University and spent 28 years as
a special agent for the FBI, specializing in
white collar crime investigations. After retiring
from the FBI, he continued in his field of
work with US Congress and then onto special
investigations for the US State Department
before fully retiring.
After retirement, he kept busy with a 70+
softball league -- travelling throughout the
country and winning championships well into
his late 70’s.
Nicholas married Helen Kenny on November
2, 1957. He is survived by Helen, their three
children, Donna Wultich and her husband Bill
Irwin, Sharon Wultich, Tom Wultich and his wife
Ann, as well as four grandchildren.
Visitation will take place on Tuesday, March
13 at Loudoun Funeral Chapel, 158 Catoctin
Circle, SE Leesburg, VA from 6 to 8 p.m.
Services will be held at the Loudoun Funeral
Chapel on Wednesday, March 14 at 11 a.m.
Interment will held Thursday, March 15 at 12
noon at Quantico National Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made
to the American Diabetes Association 2451
Crystal Drive, Suite 900 Arlington, VA 22202.
Online condolences may be expressed at
www.loudounfuneralchapel.com
WREN
A labor and political consultant who created
ArtPAC to advocate for artists and editorial
cartoonists, died March 7, 2018 at his home in
Baltimore.
MORDACAI CARR "Rod" (Age 64)
Entered into eternal rest on Sunday, March 4, 2018. He leaves to
cherish his memory three daughters, Charese Carter, Domonique
and Aunyea Carr; two brothers,
Austin Carr Jr. and Arnold Carr
(Margaret) and a host of other
relatives and friends. He was preceded in
death by his parents, Austin Carr Sr. and Lula
Mae Carr; and one brother, Bernard Carr. On
Wednesday, March 14, 2018 from 9 a.m. until
10 a.m. the late Mr. Mordacai "Rod" Carr will
lie in state at Nativity Catholic Church, 6000
13th St., NW where Mass of Christian Burial will
be held at 10 a.m. Interment Gate of Heaven
Cemetery. Services by HUNT FUNERAL HOME.
www.huntfuneralhome.net
TERESA KARNES WREN
Of California, MD died Monday, March 5, 2018,
at Hospice House of St. Mary’s, in Callaway,
MD. She was 98.
Teresa was a native of Washington, DC, and
a graduate of Trinity College (now Trinity Washington University). Her Bachelor of Science
degree in physics put her on a career path of
working, first, for the Navy’s David Taylor Model
Basin and later for U.S. Geological Survey of
the Deptartment of the Interior. It was at the
Naval facility that she met her future husband,
Edgar Alban Wren, then a Naval officer and
later a private-practice lawyer in Washington.
Married in 1948, Teresa and Ed enjoyed traveling throughout Europe but especially to Ireland, where they owned a home for many
years. Mr. Wren died in 1992. Teresa was a
longtime and active member of the National
Association of Retired Federal Employees and
the Trinity College Alumnae Association.
Friends are invited to a celebration of Teresa
Wren’s life, a Memorial Mass at Immaculate
Heart of Mary Catholic Church, Lexington Park,
Maryland on Thursday, March 15, at 11:30 a.m.
Memorial contributions may be made to the
Missionary Servants of the Most Holy Trinity
(9001 New Hampshire Ave., Silver Spring, MD
20903) or Hospice of St. Mary’s (P.O. Box 625,
Leonardtown, MD 20650).
Condolences may be expressed at:
www.brinsfieldfuneral.com.
Arrangements by the Brinsfield Funeral Home,
P.A.
CEMETERY LOTS
FAIRFAX MEMORIAL PARK
2 plots. Great price!
256-888-3520
MASSEY
IN MEMORIAM
KWASS
WANDA EVETTE PETERSON
Passed away on Sunday, February 25, 2018 in
Washington, DC. Daughter of Mildred Peterson
and the late John Peterson. She is also survived
by a host of other relatives and friends. Services will be held on Wednesday, March 14
from 10 a.m. until time of service, 11 a.m.
at Shiloh Baptist Church, 1500 - 9th St., NW.
Interment National Harmony Memorial Park.
www.fort-lincoln.com
PAID DEATH NOTICES
MONDAY- FRIDAY 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
PRICE
JOHANNA MASSEY
STEPHEN KENNETH KWASS, M.D.
February 20, 1938 - March 13, 2008
JON FRIEDLY PRICE (Age 79)
On Saturday, March 10, 2018 of
Silver Spring, MD. Beloved son
of the late Donald F. and Gladys
Friedly Price; brother of Donna
(Carroll) Kehne, of Middletown,
MD; uncle of Kelisa (CJ) Kehne-Cliff
and Kevin (Cindy) Kehne. Jon was
a proud member of the American Legion Post
41, Silver Spring, MD for 34 years. Relatives
and friends may call at Collins Funeral Home,
500 University Boulevard West, Silver Spring,
MD, (Valet Parking), Saturday, March 17, 2018
from 12 to 1 p.m., where Funeral Service will
follow at 1 p.m. Interment Green Hill Cemetery,
Waynesboro, PA on Monday, March 19 at 1
p.m. Memorial contributions may be made to
American Legion Post 41, Baseball Fund, 905
Sligo Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20910.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
In loving memory of a devoted and caring
husband, father and grandfather. Dedicated
and empathic psychiatrist, psychoanalyst,
mentor and teacher. Missed by all who were
fortunate enough to know him as a family
member, colleague, patient, student and
friend. Though a decade has passed, dearly
remembered each and every day. Never forgotten.
Jane Mary Kwass; Children David,
Andrew and Jennifer K. Waldman;
Grandchildren Owen, Nicholas, Patrick,
Nathaniel, Sarah and Molly and
Brother-in-law Abram N. Shulsky.
DEATH NOTICE
SULLIVAN
the Balboa Bay Club, Newport, CA; the
Omaha Orchestra Decorator Show House;
and the Washington National Symphony
Show House. She volunteered at Shady
Grove Adventist Hospital (SGAH) for over
thirty years, where she started the volunteers Women’s Auxiliary and was its Board
president for many years. Pat was recognized as the Volunteer of the Year by SGAH,
Outstanding Volunteer by the Montgomery
County Council and the Governor of Maryland. She was also awarded, along with her
husband, the SGAH Lifetime Giving Award.
PATRICIA ARLENE SULLIVAN (Age 84)
On Saturday, March 10, 2018,
of Silver Spring, MD formerly of
Potomac, MD. Beloved wife for
65 years of Thiel Sullivan; loving
mother of Kevin (Linda) Sullivan,
Tim (Ellie) Sullivan, Mike Sullivan, Mark (Julie) Sullivan and
Maureen (Rumnea) Kelly. Also survived by 11
grandchildren.
DEATH NOTICE
PRICE
ROBERT PRICE, JR. "Goo-Goo"
On Saturday, March 3, 2018, son of Robert
Price and Ethel Lee Price died. He is survived by
family, relatives and countless friends from 4th
Street NW and beyond. What an extraordinary
person! All may visit with family on Thursday,
March 15 from 10 a.m. until time of service,
11 a.m. at Pope Funeral Home, 5538 Marlboro
Pike, Forestville, MD.
On Friday, March 9, 2018, at the age of 88.
Wife of the late William V. Massey. She is
survived by her nephews, Fred D. (Lynne
Edwards) Allen, Jr. and Josef (Maryann Ford)
Allen; niece, Annemarie (Werner) Neumayer; as well as her brother-in-law, Fred D.
Allen, Sr. Also surviving are many greatnieces and nephews, great-great-nieces
and nephews. She was preceded in death
by a sister and two brothers. Friends may
call at Gasch's Funeral Home, P.A., 4739
Baltimore Avenue, Hyattsville, MD on Monday, March 19 from 11 a.m. until time of
service at noon. Interment at a later date
at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington,
Virginia. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made in her name to the
American Cancer Society, 7500 Greenway
Center Drive, Suite 300, Greenbelt, MD
20770.
www.gaschs.com
Pat was born and raised in Los Angeles,
CA. She excelled at swimming, tennis, basketball, volleyball, and individual and group
singing in high school and college. Pat
attended the University of Southern California and was a member of the Kappa Kappa
Gamma sorority. She was presented to
Society at the National Charity League Los
Angeles League founder chapter Coronet
Ball.
Pat was a lifelong philanthropist including
being a Committee member of the Kappa
Gamma Decorator Show House held at
Pat sang in the St. Raphael Catholic Church
choir for twenty years, was a member of the
Potomac Women’s Club, and volunteered at
the Rockville Nursing Home and the many
schools attended by her children. She was
a member of the Board of Directors of
the Potomac Swim Club and President of
the Washington Kappa Kappa Gamma DC
Alumni Association. Pat was a member of
the Springs Club in Rancho Mirage, CA where
she enjoyed playing tennis. At Riderwood
Village, she was a member of Grace Notes
Women’s Chorus, and assisted in the weekly
sing-along at the Arbor Ridge Nursing Facility.
Relatives and friends may call at Collins
Funeral Home, 500 University Boulevard
West, Silver Spring, MD, (Valet Parking), Sunday, March 18 from 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9
p.m. Mass of Christian Burial at St. Raphael's
Church, 1513 Dunster Rd., Rockville, MD
20854, on Monday, March 19 at 11 a.m.
Interment Gate of Heaven Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions
may be made to Autism Speaks, ATTN Web
Gift, 1060 State Road, 2nd Floor, Princeton,
NJ 08540 or to Shady Grove Medical Center
Foundation, 14955 Shady Grove Road, Suite
165, Rockville, MD 20850.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
To place a notice, call:
202-334-4122
800-627-1150 ext 4-4122
FAX:
202-334-7188
EMAIL:
deathnotices@washpost.com
Email and faxes MUST include
name, home address & home phone #
of the responsible billing party.
Fax & email deadline - 3 p.m. daily
Phone-In deadline
4 p.m. M-F
3 p.m. Sa-Su
CURRENT 2018 RATES:
( PER DAY)
MONDAY-SATURDAY
Black & White
1" - $135 (text only)
2" - $306 (text only)
3" - $441
4" - $482
5" - $611
-----SUNDAY
Black & White
1"- $161 (text only)
2" - $339 (text only)
3" - $489
4" - $515
5" - $665
6"+ for ALL Black & White notices
$135 each additional inch wkday
$161 each additional inch Sunday
-------------------MONDAY-SATURDAY
Color
3" - $566
4" - $609
5" - $744
-----SUNDAY
Color
3" - $599
4" - $685
5" - $834
6"+ for ALL color notices
$224 each additional inch wkday
$250 each additional inch Sunday
Notices with photos begin at 3"
(All photos add 2" to your notice.)
ALL NOTICES MUST BE PREPAID
MEMORIAL PLAQUES:
All notices over 2" include
complimentary memorial plaque
Additional plaques start at $26 each
and may be ordered.
All Paid Death Notices
appear on our website through
www.legacy.com
LEGACY.COM
Included in all death notices
Optional for In Memoriams
PLEASE NOTE:
Notices must be placed via phone, fax or
email. Photos must be emailed. You can
no longer place notices, drop off photos
and make payment in person.
Payment must be made via phone with
debit/credit card.
B8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 13 , 2018
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
Sunnier and windy
We see mostly sunny skies today, but
the wind picks up with gusts around
35 mph. High temperatures are in
the mid-40s to around 50, although
the gusts will make it feel chillier,
especially in the shade. In the evening, skies will
be clear to partly cloudy, and it should be quite
cold with a light breeze. Low temperatures range
through the 20s.
Today
Partly sunny
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Wednesday
Partly sunny
Thursday
Partly sunny
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Friday
Partly sunny
Saturday
Mostly sunny
Sunday
Cloudy, rain
49° 31
44° 31
52° 31
45° 27
50° 31
57° 41
FEELS*: 41°
FEELS: 31°
FEELS: 46°
FEELS: 38°
FEELS: 47°
FEELS: 53°
CHNCE PRECIP: 15%
P: 20%
P: 20%
P: 0%
P: 0%
P: 55%
WIND: WNW 12–25 mph
W: WNW 15–25 mph
W: W 10–20 mph
W: WNW 10–20 mph
W: WNW 8–16 mph
W: W 7–14 mph
°
°
°
°
°
OFFICIAL RECORD
Temperatures
NATION
Harrisburg
43/28
Hagerstown
43/27
Davis
29/18
F
Sa
High
Low
Weather map features for noon today.
Normal
Philadelphia
44/29
Record high
Record low
Baltimore
46/27
Dover
46/28
Washington
49/31
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
46° 4:00 p.m.
34° 3:25 a.m.
54°/36°
89° 1990
11° 1900
42° 4:00 p.m.
28° 5:00 a.m.
54°/32°
89° 1990
18° 1969
45° 3:10 p.m.
28° 1:17 a.m.
52°/32°
86° 1990
12° 1900
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: –1.1° yr. to date: +2.2°
Precipitation
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
OCEAN: 44°
OCEAN: 41°
Richmond
50/27
Norfolk
50/32
Virginia Beach
48/33
Past 24 hours
OCEAN: 41°
Total this month
Normal
Total this year
Kitty Hawk
47/36
OCEAN: 46°
Normal
Snow, past 24 hours
Pollen: Moderate
Air Quality: Good
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
Moderate
Low
Low
Totals for season
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.00"
0.43"
1.19"
6.16"
6.62"
0.0"
3.7"
0.00"
0.24"
1.15"
6.63"
6.57"
0.0"
6.6"
0.00"
1.00"
1.38"
7.30"
7.33"
0.0"
10.5"
Moon Phases
UV: Moderate
Solar system
5 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, partly sunny, a flurry. High 26–30.
Wind west–northwest 8–16 mph. Tonight, mostly clear. Low
14–18. Wind west–northwest 8–16 mph. Wednesday, partly
sunny, windy. High 24–28. Wind 20–35 mph. Thursday,
mostly sunny. High 33–37. Wind west 10–20 mph.
Atlantic beaches: Today, partly sunny, windy. High 45–51.
Wind west–northwest 15–25 mph. Tonight, mostly clear.
Low 29–33. Wind west 10–20 mph. Wednesday, partly
sunny, a shower, windy. High 42–47. Wind west 20–30 mph.
Thursday, partly sunny. High 47–55.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, partly sunny. Wind
northwest 8–16 knots. Waves 1 foot. Visibility unrestricted. • Lower
Potomac and Chesapeake Bay: Today, partly sunny. Wind west–
northwest 15–25 knots. Waves 1–2 feet on the lower Potomac, 2–3
feet on the Chesapeake Bay.• River Stages: Today, the stage at Little
Falls will be 3.8 feet, falling to around 3.7 feet on Wednesday. Flood
stage at Little Falls is 10 feet.
(High tides in Bold)
Washington
12:39 a.m.
6:11 a.m.
12:41 p.m.
6:27 p.m.
Annapolis
2:48 a.m.
9:11 a.m.
3:52 p.m.
9:53 p.m.
Ocean City
5:32 a.m.
11:55 a.m.
5:45 p.m.
Point Lookout
FORECAST
Ocean City
45/30
Lexington
42/23
Norfolk
ACTUAL
Cape May
44/32
Annapolis
46/30
Charlottesville
48/27
Today’s tides
RECORD
°
Th
REGION
AVERAGE
11:53 p.m.
1:11 a.m.
7:42 a.m.
1:53 p.m.
7:55 p.m.
5:04 a.m.
11:53 a.m.
6:25 p.m.
11:47 p.m.
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
Stationary Front
90s
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Thermal, CA 88°
Low: Dunkirk, MT –4°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
35/27/sf
64/42/pc
36/25/pc
54/32/pc
69/42/s
46/27/pc
47/28/s
55/31/pc
35/14/pc
68/44/c
34/30/sn
33/26/sf
34/30/sn
61/36/s
39/24/sf
53/28/pc
51/26/s
36/22/pc
40/23/sf
35/24/sf
65/42/pc
56/31/s
Tomorrow
36/29/sf
67/43/pc
36/27/sn
51/34/s
70/50/pc
42/28/pc
49/30/pc
54/34/s
37/15/s
53/38/sh
41/32/sf
32/24/sf
36/29/sn
56/33/s
37/28/sf
46/28/pc
65/31/pc
46/29/pc
41/32/pc
35/29/sf
69/50/s
69/40/pc
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
43/24/pc
37/22/sf
72/48/s
35/19/pc
32/19/pc
35/26/sn
78/73/sh
70/46/s
37/22/sf
61/33/s
64/36/s
49/26/s
78/57/pc
59/31/s
67/54/sh
43/25/c
54/31/pc
73/54/pc
34/23/pc
37/23/s
49/28/c
64/46/s
42/32/sn
50/32/pc
60/30/s
40/28/pc
73/57/pc
30/15/c
36/13/s
40/29/pc
80/72/sh
71/51/pc
42/31/pc
61/32/s
63/32/s
63/42/s
69/51/pc
61/39/s
64/51/c
43/36/s
55/40/s
74/51/s
46/29/pc
44/25/pc
50/37/s
65/44/s
41/30/pc
46/32/pc
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
57/32/s
44/26/pc
69/43/s
44/29/pc
84/62/pc
36/24/sf
33/30/sn
53/42/r
35/29/sn
47/27/s
61/37/r
50/27/pc
60/44/r
44/25/pc
82/74/s
67/51/pc
69/60/c
60/48/r
87/74/s
55/43/r
61/41/c
34/27/sf
65/48/pc
56/30/s
64/46/s
65/31/s
70/40/s
41/29/pc
82/57/pc
35/27/sf
39/29/sf
54/36/r
40/31/pc
44/27/pc
47/32/sn
47/28/c
57/41/sh
52/40/s
82/73/s
67/41/c
66/55/c
56/46/sh
87/74/s
51/36/r
48/34/sh
33/25/sn
66/45/s
67/46/pc
Mar 17
New
World
High: Matam, Senegal 110°
Low: D'elind'e, Russia –53°
Mar 24
First
Quarter
Mar 31
Full
Apr 8
Last
Quarter
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Rise
7:23 a.m.
5:16 a.m.
8:05 a.m.
2:51 a.m.
12:04 a.m.
3:33 a.m.
Set
7:13 p.m.
3:35 p.m.
8:26 p.m.
12:15 p.m.
10:13 a.m.
1:05 p.m.
excludes Antarctica
WORLD
Today
Addis Ababa
77/54/pc
Amsterdam
46/37/r
Athens
67/52/pc
Auckland
70/62/c
Baghdad
81/57/s
Bangkok
91/77/s
Beijing
71/44/s
Berlin
53/36/c
Bogota
71/45/pc
Brussels
45/38/r
Buenos Aires
81/54/s
Cairo
82/60/pc
Caracas
76/66/s
Copenhagen
41/33/r
Dakar
81/69/pc
Dublin
48/44/pc
Edinburgh
49/34/pc
Frankfurt
48/38/r
Geneva
45/35/r
Ham., Bermuda 68/60/sh
Helsinki
38/24/r
Ho Chi Minh City 96/76/c
Tomorrow
77/54/pc
52/38/pc
67/50/s
71/58/s
84/59/pc
92/76/s
71/46/pc
44/34/r
71/48/pc
54/42/pc
85/51/t
81/60/s
76/67/s
37/29/c
80/68/s
49/43/r
50/40/pc
51/36/pc
53/38/pc
66/58/sh
33/12/c
93/76/pc
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
76/67/s
83/60/c
61/50/pc
66/50/pc
78/58/pc
53/40/r
85/74/sh
97/69/pc
90/78/t
76/68/pc
62/54/sh
52/40/pc
58/45/sh
89/75/s
81/52/s
33/28/sn
35/22/pc
94/77/pc
75/60/c
96/66/pc
37/17/s
33/26/sn
54/41/r
51/37/sh
75/66/pc
77/56/pc
59/48/s
68/47/s
82/57/s
56/34/c
84/74/pc
97/71/pc
89/79/t
77/69/pc
61/49/r
55/46/pc
54/42/r
90/75/s
77/53/pc
35/27/sn
30/24/c
94/81/pc
77/63/c
95/65/pc
36/21/s
34/24/sn
59/46/pc
43/32/sh
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei City
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
88/77/pc
82/61/s
60/42/pc
91/68/s
84/48/s
52/35/t
62/46/s
76/58/pc
88/78/c
37/21/sn
72/68/c
80/62/s
63/46/s
62/50/s
36/26/sf
58/42/pc
55/40/c
91/79/s
87/65/s
60/46/s
91/70/pc
82/50/s
52/35/t
65/49/s
74/58/pc
90/77/pc
32/16/c
77/68/pc
81/66/s
65/48/s
67/52/s
35/25/c
52/38/pc
51/34/sh
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
sh- showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
Allergen Extract Lab (pollen data); airnow.gov (air
quality data); National Weather Service
* AccuWeather's RealFeel Temperature®
combines over a dozen factors for an accurate
measure of how the conditions really “feel.”
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Style
TUESDAY, MARCH 13 , 2018
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/STYLE
EZ
SU
C
THE RELIABLE SOURCE
CAROLYN HAX
TV REVIEW
MUSIC REVIEW
For Stephen Colbert, an artful weekend
in D.C., with visits to the National
Portrait Gallery and Wolf Trap. C2
Her friend called a timeout on their
relationship, but at public gatherings,
she acts as if everything is dandy. C3
Think of it as “Friday Night Footlights”:
A beleaguered small town pins its hopes
on big-hearted theater kids in “Rise.” C4
The Emerson Quartet and actors such
as David Strathairn and Sean Astin in
“Shostakovich and the Black Monk.” C5
APPRECIATION
BOOK WORLD
Givenchy’s
big sway
with a little
black dress
Agatha
Christie,
shrouded
in mystery
BY
R OBIN G IVHAN
Hubert de Givenchy was that
rare designer whose work reached
everyone from fashion aficionados to the casual observer. It defined an era. It helped to create the
foundation for what it means to be
a fashion icon. His work told the
story of glamorous sophistication,
female rebellion and the complexities of beauty and desire.
He achieved this remarkable
feat with a single little black satin
dress worn by Audrey Hepburn in
the opening sequence of 1961’s
“Breakfast at Tiffany’s.” From the
front, the dress was simple
enough: sleek and sleeveless with
a flattering bateau neckline. From
the back, it was dynamic, sexy and
utterly sophisticated with its geometric cutouts and the alluring
way it framed the nape of the neck.
That moment in that dress tells
the audience a lot about Hepburn’s character, Holly Golightly.
It’s a cocktail dress — an evening
dress — and there she is standing
on the street peering into the store
window with her breakfast. She
has been out all night and she does
not look wrecked. In fact, she
looks splendid.
She has lived and partied and,
perhaps, gotten up to no good.
And she is none the worse for it.
The dress is not easy to wear. It
follows the curves of the body. It
reveals the arms. But it’s not a
dress that constrains a woman. It
requires effort but not sacrifice.
The dress is special. It makes a
woman want to slink about, controlled and teasing. It’s possible to
envision it on all sorts of shapes —
slim like Hepburn, but also curvy.
And it looks as perfect in 2018 as it
did 50 years ago.
Givenchy didn’t invent the little
black dress, but he gave it its
enduring cachet. He infused it
with meaning beyond the practical and versatile. The dress represented a lifestyle: glamorous,
reckless, defiant, urbane. It was
Holly Golightly’s dress. She was
complicated and sad, confounding and charming. She was not
Everywoman. She was exceptional, which is what every woman
wants to be. And her signature
GIVENCHY CONTINUED ON C3
BY
MARVIN JOSEPH/THE WASHINGTON POST
Pundit Mona Charen is stunned by the vitriol after CPAC
Against the grain
BY
M ANUEL R OIG- F RANZIA
Some people figure out their paths early in life.
At 22, Mona Charen knew.
Nearly four decades ago, still only a lowly magazine
editorial assistant — yet to become a familiar face on
television, a conservative tastemaker, a published author,
a columnist — she put it right there on her tax return.
PUNDIT.
One of the natural habitats of the Washington pundit is
the conference stage. Charen, now 61, has lost track of how
many she’s appeared on over the years.
“Hundreds?” she says, her slender shoulders lifting in a
shrug. “Definitely hundreds.”
She developed a routine. It wasn’t just about what she
would say, but also about fueling herself for the perform-
ance. It was about lunch. Charen doesn’t like to skip a
meal. It’s part of the way she orders her orderly life.
But a few Saturdays ago, she couldn’t take a bite.
“My stomach was in knots,” Charen says.
Charen knew she was about to get pounded. She’d
resolved to make a firm and unpopular statement at
CPAC, the annual conservative conference cum pep rally, a
gathering that she says once felt to her like “slipping into a
second skin.”
She thought it through carefully, because that’s what
she does. She didn’t want to “hijack” the panel — a
discussion of conservatives in the era of sexual harassment titled “#UsToo.” She resolved to wait, as if she were a
distance runner hanging at the back of the pack, until her
fellow panelists had had their say, until the clock was
CHAREN CONTINUED ON C2
Columnist Mona Charen was on a panel discussing conservatives in the era of sexual harassment.
COLLECTION CHRISTOPHEL/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO
Audrey Hepburn’s little black
dress in “Breakfast at Tiffany’s”
represented a lifestyle.
S ARAH W EINMAN
Agatha Christie’s work has never gone out of style, nor out of
print, in the four decades since
her death — to the tune of more
than 2 billion copies sold. But
Christie’s flame burns extra
bright in the present, thanks to
new film adaptations (“Murder
on the Orient Express”), authorized sequels (“The Monogram
Murders” and “Closed Casket,” by
Sophie Hannah) and homages
(“Magpie Murders,” by Anthony
Horowitz).
But derivative works and
adaptations
can’t fully explain
why
Christie’s work
endures.
A
splendid biog- AGATHA
raphy by Laura CHRISTIE
Thompson,
A Mysterious
however, does. Life
“Agatha Chris- By Laura
tie: A Mysteri- Thompson
ous Life” was Pegasus. 544
published in pp. $35
Britain over a
decade ago and
took an inexplicable amount of
time to cross the pond. Yet the
timing is perfect because Thompson’s thorough yet readable treatment of Christie’s life, in combination with artful critical context
on her work, arrives at the reason
for her endurance:
“As she would often do, Agatha
has used the familiarity of the
stereotype to subvert our expectations. It was one of the cleverest
tricks she would play. It was, in
fact, more than a trick: By such
means she revealed her insight,
her lightly worn understanding
of human nature.”
Christie, as Thompson details,
came by such understanding
through the traditional means of
early hardship. Born Agatha
Mary Clarissa Miller in 1890, her
middle-class
upbringing
in
Torquay was idyllic, with a fierce,
close relationship with her mother, a woman determined to shield
Agatha from a repeat of her own
childhood hurts. Young Agatha
was imaginative but practical, a
skillful nurse during World War I
who wished for a domestic life as
a wife and mother — and got it,
after marrying Archie Christie
and giving birth to their only
child, Rosalind.
But her imagination needed an
outlet. Healthy competition with
her older sister, who also published stories, spurred Christie to
write the book eventually published as “The Mysterious Affair
at Styles” (1920), the first of many
outings for her iconic Belgian
detective, Hercule Poirot.
He seemed to have emerged
from the ether, as Christie liked to
tell it, though her careful reading
of earlier detective fiction greats
— especially Émile Gaboriau’s
Monsieur Lecoq novels — was no
doubt a contributing factor. The
singular alchemy of careful plotting, ruthless character study and
her “absolute belief that each
BOOK WORLD CONTINUED ON C3
CRITIC’S NOTEBOOK
At the city gate, an artist stands up to the NRA
BY
P HILIP K ENNICOTT
Last year, the National Rifle
Association released its now infamous “The Clenched Fist of
Truth” video in which a brief clip
of Anish Kapoor’s sculpture
“Cloud Gate” appeared as a standin for Chicago and the city’s most
famous recent resident, Barack
Obama. As NRA spokeswoman
Dana Loesch chanted in a hypnotically angry voice, “they use their
ex-president to endorse the resistance,” Kapoor’s shiny steel
doughnut form, which sits like a
The ‘Clenched Fist of Truth’ video violated more than
a copyright by featuring Anish Kapoor’s ‘Cloud Gate’
bulbous arch in Millennium Park,
flashed on the screen for barely a
second. But that was more than
enough to anger Kapoor, who has
fought and failed to force the
powerful gun advocacy group to
remove it. Monday, in a statement, Kapoor condemned “the
NRA’s nightmarish, intolerant, divisive vision” that “perverts ev-
erything that Cloud Gate — and
America — stands for.”
Kapoor, one of the most significant and celebrated artists working today, holds copyright over
the commercial use of images of
“Cloud Gate,” according to the
Chicago Department of Cultural
Affairs and Special Events. Although tourists can freely photo-
graph the sculpture, advertisers
who want to film it are directed to
Kapoor’s office for permission,
which he never gave to the NRA.
But after looking at his legal options, and considering the financial and emotional cost of battling
the “extremely aggressive, legalistic” advocacy group, Kapoor has
given up hope for successful negotiation or litigation. “I decided
it wasn’t worth the effort, much to
my shame, because one does want
to defend the ethical integrity of
the work.”
KAPOOR CONTINUED ON C3
PETER J. SCHULZ/ANISH KAPOOR/GLADSTONE GALLERY
Artist Anish Kapoor’s “Cloud Gate,” the centerpiece of Chicago’s
$475 million Millennium Park, appeared in a divisive NRA video.
C2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 13 , 2018
The Reliable Source
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
Gun owners clutching their loaded weapons / They love their guns more than our children.”
— Eminem, performing a freestyle rap at the iHeartRadio Music Awards on Sunday. The lyrics called out the NRA, and Eminem was
introduced onstage by Alex Moscou, a survivor of the fatal school shooting in Parkland, Fla.
BRAD PENNER/USA TODAY SPORTS
Washington Wizards executive
Zach Leonsis
For TV’s Colbert,
a weekend to take
in the arts in D.C.
Wizards’ Leonsis
buys mansion
Zach Leonsis is not even old
enough to run for president, but
the young mogul, 29, has money
to burn — $9 million, apparently.
Leonsis, who calls sports-team
owner and Monumental Sports
chief executive Ted Leonsis dad,
just purchased a Kalorama
mansion that another boldface
Washingtonian used to call
home, according to Washington
Business Journal, UrbanTurf and
DC Curbed.
The six-bedroom, four-level
house formerly owned by
Politico founder Robert
Allbritton, who reportedly sold
it to the current owner in 2007,
was listed in October for
$9,975,000. Leonsis, the senior
vice president of strategic
initiatives for Monumental
Sports & Entertainment and
general manager of Monumental
Sports Network, purchased the
home in February, but his
identity was not reported until
recently.
Leonsis, who married his
college sweetheart, Melissa
Cook, in September, set the
record for most expensive home
sale in the District this year with
his purchase of the 6,800-squarefoot residence, which boasts
such features as a movie theater,
pool and sun deck.
Michelle Obama wasn’t the only woman
responsible for comedian Stephen Colbert’s trip to
Washington last weekend.
“The Late Show” host caused a “Hey, isn’t that
. . .?” commotion Saturday as he waited in line for
nearly 20 minutes to view the portrait of the former
first lady at the National Portrait Gallery. But
Colbert didn’t hop on the Acela down to
Washington just to check out the local art scene.
Turns out Colbert’s wife, Evelyn, is an actress
who was starring in a one-night production of
“Shostakovich and the Black Monk: A Russian
Fantasy” at Wolf Trap on Sunday night. Mrs.
Colbert’s other credits include Amazon’s “Alpha
House,” “The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug”
and “Strangers with Candy,” in which she played
her husband’s mom.
After cheering on the missus from the audience,
a tipster tells us, the comedian headed to the lobby
and “very graciously met with patrons” who’d
suddenly realized they were at a play with the
comedian. It appeared to be the cap on a busy
weekend: The talk-show host had dinner with
newly installed “CBS This Morning” co-anchor
John Dickerson at Honeysuckle on Friday evening.
Stephen Colbert and his wife,
Evie Colbert, who was
performing at Wolf Trap.
BILL O’LEARY/THE WASHINGTON POST
— Sarah Polus
GOT A TIP? EMAIL US AT RELIABLESOURCE@WASHPOST.COM. FOR THE LATEST SCOOPS, VISIT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RELIABLESOURCE
@helena_andrews @emilyaheil
‘I wanted to lay down a marker,’ Charen says of panel talk
CHAREN FROM C1
ticking down.
When her moment arrived,
she didn’t hesitate. Not unlike
the politicians she’s tracked with
such a detailed eye, she veered
away from the question she’d
been asked and hit the point she
wanted to make instead.
That’s when the boos and the
catcalls began. How dare she
criticize the occupant of the Oval
Office! She looked out at the
audience. Her eyes came to rest
on an angry woman. Screaming
at her.
“Pageboy haircut,” Charen
says. “I could see her face.”
‘A darling of the right’
In the heat of the 2016 presidential campaign, Mona Charen’s social media accounts and
email inbox filled with hate
whenever she questioned the
competency and character of the
Republican nominee, Donald
Trump.
“She’s a voice from the past in
this way — a voice from conservatism BT: Before Trump,” says Jay
Nordlinger, a National Review
editor who co-hosts a podcast
with Charen. “She has been
dumped on, attacked with gross
unfairness from the left for years.
To come under attack from the
right is surreal, wrong, ungrateful and disgusting. She was a
darling of the right. And she
should be now.”
Charen, who is Jewish, says
she was sent images of ovens at
Nazi concentration camps. She
got emails portraying her as “anti-white” for questioning what
she calls Trump’s “blood and soil
nationalism” and his remarks
about immigrants. Her tormentors — some of whom she suspects were Russian bots — accused her of wanting “the Third
World to come washing over our
shores.”
“Why don’t you go back to your
own country?” they demanded.
“By which,” Charen says, “they
meant Israel.”
Charen, in fact, grew up in
New Jersey, the daughter of a
psychologist and a physics and
chemistry professor who were
moderate Democrats. In high
school, she declared she was
becoming a conservative.
“They were dubious — more
than dubious,” Charen recalls
one recent morning at the
sprawling stone home that she
and her husband recently bought
in Arlington after years living in
Great Falls, Va.
After starting her career in
conservative magazines, Charen
wrote speeches for first lady
Nancy Reagan. She turned down
an offer to work for the campaign
of Vice President George H.W.
Bush because she considered him
too much of “a squish” and
signed on with New York Rep.
Jack Kemp.
While Charen is reminiscing,
Sullivan — a striped, flamboyantly coifed stray cat she adopted
long ago at the behest of her
exercise trainer — limps into the
kitchen and proceeds to follow
her from room to room. Their
other cat, recently deceased, was
named Gilbert — the pair being
an homage to the opera legends
Gilbert and Sullivan.
Charen, a classical music lover
who often discusses music on her
podcast, has convinced herself
that learning an instrument will
keep her mind sharp. In the front
room, a cello sits in a black case.
Charen’s husband, lawyer Bob
Parker, she says, “is more conservative than I am now, which is
funny because when we met, I
thought he had Bushite symptoms and told him so!” One son is
nonpolitical, one is a “man of the
right, and the other is a man of
the left.”
Charen’s books have such titles
as “Useful Idiots: How Liberals
Got It Wrong in the Cold War and
Still Blame America First” and
“Do-Gooders: How Liberals Hurt
Those They Claim to Help (and
the Rest of Us).” Since Trump’s
ascendence, she and her liberal
son have found more they can
agree upon.
PHOTOS COURTESY OF MONA CHAREN
‘It was almost comical’
In years past, Charen would be
asked for autographs at CPAC.
These days, familiar places have
become foreign to her.
“It’s a little like the Invasion of
the Body Snatchers,” she says.
Still, she accepted an invitation to appear on a sexual harassment panel despite concerns
about CPAC and other institutions going “full Trumpite.”
“I wanted to lay down a marker,” she says.
Charen has a book coming out
in June called “Sex Matters: How
Modern Feminism Lost Touch
With Science, Love and Common
Sense.”
Has Charen ever had a #MeToo
moment? “I got chased around
desks when I was in college — by
professors” at Barnard, she says
during a chat at her downtown
Washington office at the Ethics &
Public Policy Center, a think tank
focused on applying Judeo-Christian moral traditions to public
policy. Her face is framed in the
big window with a view of the
cupola at the Cathedral of St.
Matthew.
In her professional life, she
says, “I was a recipient of sexual
harassment — no doubt about it.”
When Charen saw the lineup
Mona Charen (at top
last year with Lance
Cpl. Nicholas Thom,
center, and Lt. Gen
John Sylvester, and
above with her son in
2012) is “a voice from
conservatism BT:
Before Trump,” says
Jay Nordlinger, a
National Review
editor.
of speakers, she was furious at
the
inclusion
of
Marion
Maréchal-Le Pen, the niece of far
right French politician Marine Le
Pen and the granddaughter of
Jean-Marie Le Pen, founder of
the National Front political party
and a convicted Holocaust denier.
That’s when Charen decided
she wasn’t going to mince words.
Onstage, she also wanted to
weigh in on Trump, whose videotaped comments boasting about
grabbing women’s genitals were
reported by The Washington Post
during the campaign, who has
been accused of harassment by
several women (which he denies), and who is now facing
allegations (also denied) of an
affair with a porn star.
“I’m disappointed in people on
our side for being hypocrites
about sexual harassers and abusers of women who are in our
party. Who are sitting in the
White House. Who brag about
their extramarital affairs. Who
brag about mistreating women,”
she said, as her fellow panelists
shifted uncomfortably. “And because he happens to have an R
after his name, we look the other
way, we don’t complain.”
Undeterred by boos, she added: “The Republican Party endorsed Roy Moore for the Senate
in the state of Alabama even
though he was a credibly accused
child molester. You cannot claim
that you stand for women and
put up with that.”
And regarding Le Pen, she
said: “I think the only reason she
was here is because she’s named
Le Pen,” Charen said. “And the Le
Pen name is a disgrace. Her
grandfather is a racist and a Nazi.
She claims that she stands for
him. And the fact that CPAC
invited her is a disgrace.”
CPAC organizers have defended the decision to invite Le Pen,
saying it is “antithetical to conservatism” to blame her for her
grandfather’s views.
When Charen left the stage,
security guards appeared. Her
Uber went to the wrong exit, and
they had to traverse the length of
the building.
“It was almost comical,” she
says.
The Twittersphere was erupting. Breitbart editor Raheem
Kassam noted that Charen was a
“never Trumper” and tweeted:
“Frankly these people have no
place at Trump-era CPACs any-
way. They had their turn at the
wheel and steered the West off
the cliff of corporatism, neoliberalism, and open borders. Charen
is done.”
Republican establishment figures, such as Bill Kristol, called
her a “heroine.”
The next day, Charen says, one
of her fellow panelists — she
won’t say which — contacted her.
“She basically wanted to unburden herself,” Charen says at
the Ethics & Public Policy Center.
“She would have liked to support
me onstage. She may still want to
out herself as the secret supporter on the panel.”
Panelist Kelsey Harkness, of
the Heritage Foundation’s Daily
Signal, had tweeted: “Do I agree
with everything she said? No, but
I agree with a lot of it. And most
importantly, I believe she represents a legitimate perspective
among conservative women that
deserves to be heard.”
Harkness declined via email to
elaborate.
Panelist
Ashley
McGuire, of the Catholic Association, did not respond to an interview request.
Since leaving that stage, Charen has been shuttling from one
television interview to another.
But the negative remarks still
sting.
“I don’t have a thick skin,” she
says. “My feelings get hurt very
easily.”
Charen’s idea of what the Republican Party ought to look like,
she acknowledges, doesn’t “get
people’s blood going.” She once
flew to Indiana and offered to
drop everything to help former
federal budget director Mitch
Daniels run for president. She
liked that he is a “total wonk.
Quiet.”
Now she thinks the only way
forward for people like her in the
Republican Party is to reach out
to Democrats — and she’s suddenly in demand for liberal women’s groups and “lefty” radio
programs.
“I don’t want to sound Kumbaya,” she says. “The poisonous
polarization we’ve seen is so
dangerous.”
The other day, something happened that had taken place only
once before in her four decades of
nonstop opining. She got an
invitation for a private meeting
— with a Democratic senator.
She’s looking forward to it.
manuel.roigfranzia@washpost.com
TUESDAY, MARCH 13 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C3
RE
Agatha Christie’s enduring mystery
BOOK WORLD FROM C1
LIONEL CIRONNEAU/ASSOCIATED PRESS
French designer Hubert de Givenchy, who died Saturday, at a 1995 show.
Hepburn was a muse for his work
GIVENCHY FROM C1
dress was wondrous.
Givenchy, who died Saturday at
age 91, was born a count. He had
an aristocratic bearing made even
grander by his 6-foot-6 frame. He
loved gardens and antiques. As a
designer, he came of age during
the 1950s and ’60s, when haute
couture dominated fashion and
Paris was the center of it all. He
apprenticed with Lucien Lelong
and Elsa Schiaparelli, but his
greatest influence was fashion’s
most famous ascetic, Cristobal
Balenciaga, who was both a mentor and friend. And when Balenciaga closed his own atelier in
1968, he directed his heartbroken
clients to Givenchy.
Givenchy dressed the grand
dames of international society, including France’s Marie-Hélène de
Rothschild and Americans Bunny
Mellon, Lee Radziwill and Jacqueline Kennedy. He didn’t just stitch
up luncheon suits and evening
gowns for them; he socialized with
them and was part of their world.
His relationship with Mellon was
such that she once sent her private
plane to fly him from Paris so that
he could design uniforms for her
entire household staff — all the
way down to the gardeners.
His work was known for the
quality of its lines. He was not the
sort of designer who would try to
dazzle the eye with elaborate embroidery or lavish beading. Instead, he focused on cut and proportion. His clothes exuded luxury, but also restraint. He didn’t
simply create clothes; he crafted a
vocabulary of style. And it was that
ability to seemingly build an entire world out of silk and satin that
made his work with Hepburn both
memorable and enduring — and
allowed it to resonate with generations of women who envisioned
themselves as gamines living fully
and self-indulgently.
Givenchy’s initial meeting with
Hepburn was famously disappointing, at least for him. He’d
expected to meet Katharine Hepburn. It was 1953 and Audrey Hepburn had been cast in “Sabrina” as
the daughter of an American
chauffeur who goes to Paris and
returns as a sophisticated young
woman. Givenchy was charged
with creating the Parisian wardrobe that would define her transformation.
They established a friendship,
and she became both a muse and
an ambassador for his work, wearing his clothes both on-screen and
in her personal life. And today,
Hepburn remains one of the most
often-cited sources of inspiration
for young designers striving to
craft attire that feels both modern
and timeless and for women aspiring to look effortlessly chic.
In 1973, Givenchy was one of
five French designers to participate in a charity fundraiser at
Versailles. The Frenchmen faced
off against five Americans. The
Americans incorporated popular
music into their presentation at a
time when it was not unusual for a
collection to be presented in silence. Their designs were also
worn by a critical mass of black
models, who dominated the runway with their personality and
theatrics. The experience made a
lasting impression on Givenchy.
Shortly afterward, he began using
contemporary music during his
shows. And he was so inspired by
the work of the black models that
he wanted to use them exclusively
in his atelier, he said in an interview several years ago. He was met
with resistance by some of his
clients, who he said refused to
wear the ensembles modeled by
the black women. But he persisted.
When Givenchy retired in 1995,
he’d already sold his company to
LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton. Over the years other designers — including John Galliano,
Julien Macdonald and Alexander
McQueen — took up the creative
reins. But it was Riccardo Tisci
who, in his decade at Givenchy,
gave the brand its contemporary
resonance — injecting it with
Gothic romance and drawing inspiration from African and Latin
cultures. Today, creative director
Clare Waight Keller has her own
ideas about what Givenchy means
for customers in 2018, which include a nod toward Brutalist architecture.
But Givenchy remains bound
up in the collective cultural memory of a single black dress, the man
who created it, the woman who
wore it. And the timeless desire for
a bright, shiny life of glamour and
ease.
person had an immutable essence, usually unknown even to
themselves” was already in evidence.
Christie’s life and work collided in 1926. She had already published “The Murder of Roger Ackroyd,” the Poirot novel that still
provokes vociferous reader debate, to modest success and critical acclaim. By December she was
infamous, the subject of constant
media scrutiny, after an 11-day
disappearance that ended when
she was discovered at a Harrogate
spa.
She never discussed the underlying reasons for the vanishing.
Thompson lays out a plausible
theory of a fugue state, brought
on by the crushing discovery that
Archie was in love with someone
else, exacerbated by terror and
shame that essentially paralyzed
Christie. The spell broke, she and
Christie divorced, she married
the archaeologist Max Mallowan
and lived a merry life of travel and
riches and hard work. But the key
enigma, this mystery story, is, as
Thompson notes, “her finest, because it cannot be solved.”
Afterward, there was the public Agatha, whose Poirots, Miss
Marples and other detective fictions reached readers at a near-annual clip. But the more private one had a creative outlet, too,
under the pseudonym of Mary
Westmacott. Thompson artfully
demonstrates how Christie revealed in the Westmacott novels
her pain about her collapsed first
marriage, her difficult relationship with Rosalind and her overwhelming love for her mother.
Christie, in essence, was the
Elena Ferrante of her day. She did
not take public ownership of the
pseudonym until the 1960s.
While “Agatha Christie” could
present herself as “the clever,
controlled, sensible woman who
knew all about human emotion
but who dealt with it, every time,
and kept chaos at bay,” Mary
Westmacott was, by contrast, the
“sensitive, secret creature who
had been born of the drifting
ghost of Harrogate . . . who could
never have existed without the
strange freedom that came from
using another woman’s name.”
While Thompson makes a
RICHARD BLOWER
Biographer Laura Thompson says Agatha Christie “used the
familiarity of the stereotype to subvert our expectations.”
good case for reading the Westmacott romances, any Christie
biography must ultimately be
about the mystery novels that
brought her such extraordinary
commercial success. Thompson
does not cheerlead when it isn’t
warranted — at least one of Christie’s novels (“The Burden”) is
deemed “diffuse and barely structured” — and she argues that
Christie’s zenith, in plot and in
prose, was during and after
World War II.
That this era of tremendous
carnage, societal upheaval and
polarization would be Christie’s
triumph is obvious in hindsight.
Her novels are the epitome of
order restored out of chaos. She,
too, needed that catharsis, and
she determined to provide it to
her readers.
But this isn’t the full explanation, or else why would we still be
reading her work now? Surely,
her brand of order cannot overcome all possible chaos caused by
contemporary ills?
An insightful quotation by P.G.
Wodehouse, in a 1969 letter to
Christie, offers a further clue. “I
don’t find it spoils an Agatha
Christie a bit ‘knowing the end,’ ”
he wrote, “because the characters
are so interesting.” As much as
Christie’s fame rests on her fiendish plotting, what girds their ironcast base are the people who
populate her stories. Poirot’s little
gray cells. Miss Marple’s near-omniscient observations. The wants,
needs, desires and grievances of
incidental players and possible
suspects.
When one wants, one is capable of murder. That’s what Agatha
Christie knew. That’s what she
wrote about so well. That’s why
we still read her — and always
will.
bookworld@washpost.com
Sarah Weinman is the editor, most
recently, of “Women Crime Writers:
Eight Suspense Novels of the 1940s
& 50s” and the author of “The Real
Lolita: The Kidnapping of Sally Horner
and the Novel That Scandalized the
World,” to be published this fall.
robin.givhan@washpost.com
The NRA has cities in its crosshairs
KAPOOR FROM C1
Instead, he has released a blistering statement in collaboration
with the gun control advocacy
group Everytown for Gun Safety.
“It plays to the basest and most
primal impulses of paranoia, conflict and violence, and uses them
in an effort to create a schism to
justify its most regressive attitudes,” wrote Kapoor, a British
sculptor born in Mumbai. “Hidden here is a need to believe in a
threatening ‘Other’ different
from ourselves.”
The video’s tone, rhetoric and
imagery suggest a troubling evolution of NRA strategy. “Cloud
Gate” appears along with other
iconic images of urban America,
including architect Frank Gehry’s
Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los
Angeles, the Lincoln Memorial in
Washington and a brief glimpse
of Spanish-born American artist
José de Creeft’s beloved “Alice in
Wonderland” sculpture in Central Park.
Some images appear to be shot
with an infrared filter, giving
them a spooky, surreal quality,
with dramatic sky effects and tree
leaves appearing bright white.
The video producers also use
time-lapse to speed up the motion
of people and cars in the foreground, a device reminiscent of
the opening sequence to the Netflix drama “House of Cards,” with
its intimation of stylish evil and
corruption in the nation’s capital.
But despite the haunted quality of the visuals, the NRA’s urban
imagery isn’t particularly scary.
Indeed all of the scenes used in
this call to arms against urban
America show successful urban
spaces. These are picture postcard sites sought out by tourists
from both red and blue states, and
they are teeming with life. Unlike
the anti-urban rhetoric of a generation ago, which stressed scenes
of urban decay — ramshackle
buildings and trash-strewn empty streets — the NRA focuses not
on blight but vibrancy. In the
language of urban designers, they
represent the city with scenes of
“activated” urban design.
Kapoor sees that as part of an
“invidious” effort to recast urban
space as threatening. Speaking
from his studio in London, he said
the NRA videos seem designed to
rebrand “emblems of liberal
America” as “foreign objects,” and
thus
threatening.
Lauren
Markowitz, a spokeswoman for
Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel,
agrees, saying, “Rather than using a picture of our great city to
sell their awful propaganda, the
NRA should use this moment to
reflect on their disgraceful efforts
to block meaningful gun reforms
that would save lives in Chicago
and across the nation.”
The NRA’s visual logic suggests
a new twist in the culture wars.
Cities, today, are thriving, and the
old rhetoric of the city as a kind of
cancer spreading into the heartland no longer works. So the NRA
has adopted a new narrative: The
city, no matter how successful, is a
pernicious collective endeavor
that will ultimately decay into
violence and oppression. The video in which “Cloud Gate” appears
is succinct in this prediction:
From its opening images of public
sculpture and architecture it
moves directly into images of protest and violence and finally an
urgent exhortation from the narrator, “The only way we save our
country and our freedom is to
fight this violence of lies with the
clenched fist of truth,” with
marked stress on the repeated use
of the word “our.”
Public sculpture is integral to
the larger claim that urban success leads inexorably to individual repression. Kapoor’s “Cloud
Gate” took years to design and
build and was mounted in an
enormously ambitious $475 million public park built over railroad tracks near the shore of Lake
Michigan. By some accounts, this
could be seen as civic folly and a
waste of public and private funds.
But “Cloud Gate” was also part of
a symbolic 21st-century act of
urban “healing” performed on
the broken, industrial landscape
of the early 20th century.
The use of time-lapse and
black-and-white images may be
designed to undermine faith in
this kind of collective action
toward better urban design and
well-structured, activated public
places. It makes crowds of people
seem spectral and vanishing,
while urban objects like “Cloud
Gate” take on ominous, fetishistic
power. The suggestion is that efforts at improving public space
aren’t just vain and “utopian,”
they are doomed to fail, dragging
the rugged libertarian ethos of
American individualism down
with them.
But there may be a message
even darker than that one: These
beloved urban icons aren’t just
symbols of a hated cosmopolitanism, but trophies to be captured.
Unlike other NRA videos, which
stress patriotism, American values and the sacrifice of veterans,
Loesch speaks explicitly of defeating an enemy. “They will perish in
the political flames of their own
fires,” she says in another video,
which juxtaposes the Golden
Gate Bridge (declared a “wonder
of the modern world”) with a
chaotic political protest.
The implication is subtle: We
won’t just defeat urban elites, we
will appropriate what they have
built. Given the stark and widening inequalities between many
red and blue states when it comes
to longevity, educational opportunity and quality of life, it’s a
disturbing but not surprising development.
Given the success of “Cloud
Gate” — the city of Chicago claims
it is the most popular tourist site
in the Midwest — it can’t easily be
recast as an oppressive urban
vanity project. But in the new
culture wars, in which one side
must win and the other must lose,
it can be held up as an object up
for grabs. Just as the NRA hopes
to pass legislation that will allow
states’ concealed carry permits to
be valid even in other states that
don’t allow concealed carry, there
is the suggestion that one day,
perhaps, these great urban icons
will belong not to the cities that
built them, but to the larger gun
culture. To its members, the organization offers through-thelooking-glass promise. When the
battle is won, you will look into
the brilliant, reflective surface of
this sculpture and see not the
hated elites, but you, triumphant.
philip.kennicott@washpost.com
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Cold shoulders and rubbing elbows
Carolyn Hax is
away. The following first appeared
Oct. 22, 2003.
Carolyn
Hax
Hi, Carolyn: A
few months back I
had a falling-out
with a friend
whom I was
extremely close to. She initiated
a “timeout” where she didn’t
want to talk to me about the
issues at hand or anything else,
because she “just didn’t have
time to deal with” me. Obviously,
I was beyond hurt that my best
friend wouldn’t make time to
talk things out.
Now when I bump into her in
social gatherings she acts all
cheery and chatty. To which I
respond with a very cold (I’d
even say Arctic) shoulder. She
then fires at me that she’s just
being civil and that I lack the
most rudimentary social skill.
And I’ll agree. But I guess I just
don’t see the point in plastering
on a smile and spraying airkisses on someone who wouldn’t
give up a half-hour to at least
attempt to straighten things out.
So where do you side, civility or
reality?
— Your Socially Heathen Fan
Your Socially Heathen Fan: I’m
surprising myself a little here
and voting civility down. Polite
cheer is for when you’ve had the
tough conversation and agreed
that things can’t be resolved. It’s
not for when someone wants you
to make it easy for her to avoid
the tough conversation.
If it makes you feel better, say,
“I find it hard to be civil to
someone who won’t even ‘deal
with’ me.”
Dear Carolyn: What is the
proper response when a business
associate or person with whom
you have a professional
relationship tells you they’re
getting a divorce?
I’ve been saying “I’m sorry” or
“What a difficult time this must
be for you.”
My friend says that most
people (men in particular) would
be put off by that, and that it
conveys pity and judgment on
their personal lives. I definitely
don’t want to do that, but there
must be something better to say
than “Oh.”
— Surely, You Wouldn’t Say
“Congratulations”
Surely, You Wouldn’t Say
“Congratulations”: I wouldn’t,
and don’t call me Shirley.
The proper response to a
divorcing colleague is “I’m sorry”
or “What a difficult time this
must be.”
Or “Ooh, tough break.” Or
“That can’t be fun.”
And, since you didn’t ask, the
proper response to someone who
sees these genuine yet safely
generic expressions of sympathy
as condescending or judgmental
or somehow more grating to men
is “Huh?”
Hi, Carolyn: Is there an
acceptable amount of time a guy
should wait before asking a
woman who recently became
unengaged (not by choice) out
for a cup of coffee? To complicate
things even more, I work with
the person practically on a daily
basis. I would like to become
better friends with her first to
see if there is as great a
connection outside of work as
during, but I don’t want to be
insensitive to her feelings. Is
there a right answer in this
situation?
— Boy
Boy: Yes. Ask her to coffee — as
long as you’re not crowding her
or hitting on her (you know if
you are) and she knows you’re
not hitting on her (I don’t know,
body language, I guess). The
most sensitive thing you can do
is like her, try to befriend her and
trust her to decide if she wants
that.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her
column delivered to your inbox each
morning at wapo.st/haxpost.
C4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 13 , 2018
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LEGEND: Bold indicates new or live programs
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High Definition Movie Ratings (from TMS) ★★★★ Excellent ★★★ Good ★★ Fair ★ Poor No stars: not rated
TV REVIEW
‘Rise’ sticks to script: Likable kids and good theater
BY
M AUREEN R YAN
As TV has aggressively expanded its scripted output, it’s begun
to lean hard on that entertainment-industry standby: Appealing kids put on a show. “Rise,” a
moderately winning drama that
follows those familiar contours,
will instantly draw comparisons
to “Glee,” though it eschews that
program’s slick sheen and barbed
sarcasm. It also contains parallels
to everything from “Lady Bird” to
the retro Netflix comedy “Everything Sucks!,” in which a motley
assortment of gawky teens make a
sci-fi movie with a few dollars and
a whole lot of determination.
Money is also an issue for the
characters of “Rise,” which is set
in a hardscrabble Pennsylvania
community where the local steel
mill shut down a few years ago.
Even without knowing there is a
“Friday Night Lights” connection
(thanks to showrunner Jason Katims), a savvy viewer would note
its influence immediately. Between the shaky-cam shooting
style and the plaintive tones emanating from the soundtrack,
there’s a lot of overlap between
the two emotionally driven NBC
dramas (and some key moments
unfold under those bright gameday lights as well).
Again, Katims — the creator of
“Rise” — has set his tale among
parents, teachers, coaches and
high schoolers just trying to figure it all out in a close-knit town
that has seen better days. This
time, however, the majority of the
action takes place not on the
football field but among members
of Stanton High School’s beleaguered theater department. And
for all its flaws — and “Rise” has a
number of them — when these
kids open their mouths to sing,
the NBC drama is nearly irresistible.
Fans of musicals will probably
be the core audience for “Rise,”
which chronicles Stanton High’s
controversial staging of the acclaimed musical “Spring Awakening.” One of the most outstanding
“Rise” cast members is Auli’i
Cravalho (“Moana”), who has an
expressive, gorgeous voice and
who is earnest and credible as the
daughter of a local waitress who
wants more than her single mother has been able to achieve.
Cravalho’s Lilette Suarez is cast as
a lead in the musical and is paired
with the hunky quarterback of
the football team, Robbie Thorne
(Damon J. Gillespie). The show’s
director knows that the chemistry between the two — also a
cornerstone of what works about
“Rise” as a TV show — will make
his theater production come
alive, despite the inexperience of
certain members of the troupe or
the financial limitations of the
production.
It’s somewhat surprising that
the 10-episode drama doesn’t
evolve into a murder mystery,
given the sheer number of people
who understandably want to
strangle Lou Mazzuchelli (Josh
Radnor), the disaffected English
teacher who decides to direct the
school play despite never having
done it before. One repetitive dynamic that the show is too enamored of involves Lou charging into
situations he has little experience
with and undermining his collaborators (lecturing the orchestra
leader, for example, or presenting
the set builders with impossible
demands). Those around him try
to get him to see reason as he
pontificates, but he is framed as a
crusading or misunderstood artiste. The problem is, for one who
believes in art as a way of allowing
people to “feel seen,” he’s not great
at observing the frustrated faces
around him, and his very slow
journey toward greater humility
is not nearly as engaging as the
show appears to think it is.
Of course, a good chunk of
“Rise” revolves around Lou get-
ting others to dream bigger and
no longer settle; that’s the flip side
of his ambitious obliviousness.
Thanks to his own newly awakened aspirations, Lou somehow
gets the community to tentatively
support their kids putting on
“Spring Awakening,” despite the
edgy and dark material in the
show. In doing so, he upstages
Tracey Wolfe (Rosie Perez), who
has been doing the heavy lifting in
the theater department for years.
That she completely refrains from
punching Lou is not quite believable, but Perez makes Tracey’s
driven forbearance work. And it is
a credit to Radnor’s quietly sincere performance that the character works some of the time. Lou is
a big-hearted guy, understanding
of a trans teen in the cast, and
truly enjoys the flowering of creativity at Stanton.
Like all ensemble dramas,
“Rise” has a lot of characters and
plotlines to service, and the level
of specificity and freshness in
each narrative isn’t consistent.
Your interest level will probably
go up and down in tandem with
the quality of certain subplots.
Rarmian Newton is terrific as
lighting tech Maashous Evers,
who, Lou discovers, is essentially
homeless. (His foster mother is
neglectful at best.) Amy Forsyth is
PETER KRAMER/NBC/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rosie Perez as Tracey Wolfe and Josh Radnor as Lou Mazzuchelli
shepherding a theater production in NBC’s new series “Rise.”
also outstanding as the guarded
and soulful Gwen Strickland,
whose parents are enduring a
rocky time in their marriage. The
story of an overbearing football
dad, however, feels derivative,
and Lilette’s mom also does not
quite work in the first half of the
season. But even if certain football story lines or moments set in
the local diner seem like faint
imitations of events in Dillon,
Tex., “Rise” offers scenes of the
kids staging “Spring Awakening”
that are often pulse-quickening.
Lou wants the students to use
art as a vessel for their hopes,
dreams and uncertainties — and
he’s doing the same for himself.
(His own troubled high schooler
is putting the family through the
wringer.) This troupe — and
“Rise” itself — treats art as “sacred,” a word that the characters
use fairly regularly. “Rise” wears
its heart unabashedly on its
sleeve, and though it rather gingerly handles matters of race,
class, gender and LGBT rights, it
does touch on these issues.
In a sense, the show itself is a
rumination on whether a song
would be enough to bridge any
number of American divides. Part
of the appeal of “Rise” is that it
sure would be nice to think so.
— Reuters via Variety
Rise (one hour) premieres Tuesday at
10 p.m. on NBC.
THEATRE
Shear Madness
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Regular Schedule:
Tuesday–Friday at 8
Saturday at 6 & 9
Sunday at 3 & 7
This record-breaking interactive solve-the-crime comedy
keeps the audiences laughing as they try to outwit the
suspects and catch the killer. New clues and up to the
minute improvisation deliver “shrieks of laughter night after
night.” (Washington Post)
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Student Rush
Tickets Available
Tickets: 202-467-4600
Groups: 202-416-8400
www.shearmadness.com
Tickets
Available
at the
Box Office
Added Shows:
Mon at 8PM
Tue at 5PM
Wed at 5PM
Thu at 5PM
Great Group Rates
for 15 +
MUSIC - ORCHESTRAL
National Symphony
Orchestra:
Bronfman plays
Brahms
Thursday at 7
Saturday at 8
Sunday at 3
Gianandrea Noseda leads Yefim Bronfman in Brahms's
monumental Piano Concerto No. 2 in this program that
also explores the spirit of dance in Germany, Hungary, and
the Czech Republic through dance music by Brahms, R.
Strauss, Kodály and Dvorák.
Kennedy Center
Concert Hall
nationalsymphony.org
or call (202) 467-4600
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
• Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
Tickets
available
at the
Box Office
ForeWords, with Ted
Libbey beginning
at 6:45 p.m. before
the Sat., Mar. 17
performance and
1:45 p.m. before the
Sun., Mar. 18
performance.
16-2898
TUESDAY, MARCH 13 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
MUSIC REVIEW
‘Shostakovich’ has its own muddle trouble
BY
A NNE M IDGETTE
The myth of Dmitri Shostakovich has entered the popular
imagination: a dissident composer constrained by the evil
regime of the Soviet Union,
bravely writing protest into his
music. The story isn’t that simple, but that hasn’t stopped the
myth from spreading, and popping up in various forms — take
Julian Barnes’s 2016 novel on
the subject, “The Noise of Time.”
The Emerson Quartet, one of
America’s leading groups, has
been very caught up in this
particular story. In 2000, after
performing Shostakovich’s complete quartets, it teamed up
with the Theatre de Complicité
for a strong and thoughtful
piece, also called “The Noise of
Time,” based on the composer’s
life and the 15th, and final,
quartet. On Sunday night, the
Emersons came to the Wolf Trap
Barns with a brand-new Shostakovich-based theater piece,
“Shostakovich and the Black
Monk,” which centered on the
14th quartet and on a short
story by Anton Chekhov that
Shostakovich, who died in 1975,
long wanted to turn into an
opera. The whole thing is interlaced with scenes from Shostakovich’s life.
James Glossman, the director
who co-created the project with
Emerson violinist Philip Setzer,
is both ambitious and didactic.
His piece hits all the familiar
stations of the Shostakovich hagiography, from the moment
when the seven featured actors
enter while saying, “Muddle instead of music” — the headline
of the infamous Pravda review
that condemned Shostakovich’s
successful opera “Lady Macbeth
of Mtsensk” and put the composer into public disfavor —
before taking up their places
around the quartet onstage.
But though the cast was more
than competent — led by David
Strathairn as Shostakovich and
MOVIE DIRECTORY
DISTRICT
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
3111 K Street N.W.
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 2:004:30-5:15-7:15-8:30-10:10
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) CC: 12:30-1:15-6:40
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 10:00
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 1:10-4:007:00-9:45
Game Night (R) CC: 2:10-4:407:40-10:30
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
12:45-3:50-6:45-9:40
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
3:30-9:00
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
3:40
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) CC: 12:45-6:15
The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:15-4:107:00-10:15
Death Wish (R) CC: 2:15-5:007:45-10:25
Thoroughbreds (R) CC: 1:304:25-7:25-9:50
Annihilation (R) CC: 1:20-4:157:10-10:00
Gringo (R) CC: 2:00-4:45-7:3010:15
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) CC: 2:456:00-9:15
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:45-4:307:15-10:00
Smithsonian - Lockheed Martin
IMAX Theater
601 Independence Avenue SW
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D
(NR) 4:20
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of
the Seas 3D (NR) 11:00AM
Dream Big: Engineering Our
World: An IMAX 3D Experience
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 10:2511:50-5:05
Black Panther: An IMAX 3D
Experience (PG-13)
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 12:25
MARYLAND
AFI Silver Theatre Cultural Ctr
8633 Colesville Road
The Shape of Water (R) 2:007:05-9:30
Selma (PG-13) 2:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (R) 4:20
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 1:509:45
Phantom Thread (R) 11:25-4:30
BPM (Beats Per Minute) (120
battements par minute) (NR)
7:00
Waithira (NR) 5:30
Razzia 7:15
High Fantasy (NR) 9:45
AMC Academy 8
6198 Greenbelt Road
AMC Loews Uptown 1
3426 Connecticut Avenue N.W.
The Strangers: Prey at Night
(R) CC: (!) 12:15-2:30-4:45Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 12:30- 7:15-9:25
4:00-7:30
Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
12:00-1:30-4:30-7:30-9:00
AMC Mazza Gallerie
Jumanji: Welcome to the
5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW
Jungle (PG-13) CC: 8:55
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 1:00- Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 1:001:50-4:00-4:50-7:00-8:00
3:30-6:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 12:40-3:00 Black Panther in Disney Digital
Red Sparrow (R) CC: (!) 1:103D
(PG-13) CC: 3:00-6:00
4:20-7:30
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 2:00Game Night (R) CC: 12:00-2:20- 5:15-8:30
4:40-7:10
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: (!)
(!) 4:15
12:10-5:30-8:10
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) CC: (!) 1:30-7:00
Digital 3D (PG) CC: (!) 2:50
Wish (R) CC: 12:30-3:15Death Wish (R) CC: 12:00-2:35- Death
5:50-8:25
5:10-7:50
Gringo (R) CC: (!) 1:15-4:00-7:45
Albert Einstein Planetarium National Air and Space Museum
6th Street and Independence Ave SW
To Space and Back 11:00AM
Dark Universe Space Show (NR)
11:30-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30
Journey to the Stars (NR) 12:001:00-2:00-3:00-4:00-5:00
The Stars Tonight (NR) 10:30AM
Angelika Pop-Up
at Union Market
550 Penn Street NE - Unit E
The Young Karl Marx (Le jeune
Karl Marx) (NR) 11:45-4:35
Before We Vanish (Sanpo suru
shinryakusha) 12:00-4:45
The Post (PG-13) 2:15-7:00
A Fantastic Woman (Una mujer
fantastica) (R) 2:30-7:30
Red Sparrow (R) 11:00-1:454:30-7:15
Avalon Theatre
5612 Connecticut Avenue
Molly's Game (R) 11:15-5:00
Loveless (Nelyubov) (R)
2:15-8:00
A Fantastic Woman (Una mujer
fantastica) (R) 12:00-2:30-5:157:45
Landmark
Atlantic Plumbing Cinema
807 V St, NW
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 1:00-4:007:00-10:10
The Post (PG-13) CC: 2:254:55-7:25
Annihilation (R) CC: 11:30-2:004:35-7:15-9:55
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 11:0012:30-1:45-3:30-4:30-6:45-7:309:45-10:00-10:15
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
11:25-1:55-4:20-7:10-9:35
Landmark E Street Cinema
555 11th Street NW
Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr
Story 12:45-7:30
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts Animation (NR) 1:45-7:15
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts Live Action (NR) 4:30-9:30
Oh Lucy! 1:00-3:15-5:30-7:459:50
Lady Bird (R) CC: 3:00-5:15-9:40
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 12:50-3:506:50-9:30
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 1:004:00-7:00-9:30
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
12:40-3:40-9:20
I, Tonya (R) CC: 1:10-4:10-7:109:35
Phantom Thread (R) CC:
12:45-3:45
The Royal Opera House: Tosca
(NR) 7:00
AMC Center Park 8
4001 Powder Mill Rd.
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
CC: 2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 12:003:15-6:30-9:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 1:304:15-7:00
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) CC: 1:00-4:00-7:1510:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 9:30
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 12:15-3:406:45-9:50
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
3:30-9:30
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) CC: 12:30-6:30
Death Wish (R) CC: 2:15-5:007:30-10:00
Gringo (R) CC: 12:45-3:456:40-9:20
AMC Columbia 14
10300 Little Patuxent Parkway
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
CC: 11:50-2:35-5:20-8:00-10:20
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 12:304:00-7:20-10:25
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) CC: 3:05-9:15
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
1:50-10:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 11:00-4:20
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 11:00-1:404:10-9:50
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 11:30-3:106:25-9:40
Game Night (R) CC: 11:40-2:154:50-7:20-9:55
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
12:00-6:15
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
3:35-9:20
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) 12:30-6:30
Death Wish (R) CC: (!) 11:00-1:354:30-7:25-10:25
Gringo (R) CC: 11:10-2:10-4:557:40-10:30
Annihilation (R) CC: 3:50-9:50
Every Day (PG-13) 11:00-1:25
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) CC:
11:05-1:35-4:10-7:00-10:00
A Wrinkle in Time: An IMAX 2D
Experience (PG) (!) 11:15-2:004:45-7:30-10:15
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:303:00-6:30-9:40
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 7:00
AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18
9811 Washingtonian Ctr.
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 11:202:25-5:30-8:45
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: (!) 11:301:40-4:30-8:10
Landmark West End Cinema Red Sparrow (R) CC: (!) 11:152:25-4:05-7:15-9:30
2301 M Street NW
Game Night (R) CC: 11:20-2:05A Fantastic Woman (Una mujer 10:25
fantastica) (R) 1:30-4:30-7:30
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: (!)
Submission 1:00-3:15-5:30-7:30 11:25-2:00-7:20
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 1:15- A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digi4:15-7:15
tal 3D (PG) CC: (!) 4:40-10:00
Medal of Honor Theater - NMMC Death Wish (R) CC: (!) 5:35-10:30
18900 Jefferson Davis Highway
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) CC: 1:00We, the Marines (NR) 10:0011:00-12:00-1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00 4:05-7:10-10:15
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) (!) 7:00
Regal Gallery Place Stadium 14
701 Seventh Street Northwest
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
11:50-2:30-5:15-8:00-10:45
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:3012:30-2:45-3:45-6:00-7:00-9:1510:15
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 1:10-4:30-7:45-11:00
Red Sparrow (R) 12:10-3:457:00-10:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:00-2:50-10:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:45-2:154:45-7:15
Game Night (R) 12:30-3:005:45-8:25
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:301:30-4:30-6:20-7:30-10:20
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) 3:30-9:10
Thoroughbreds (R) 11:45-2:155:00-7:45-10:30
Death Wish (R) 12:05-3:00-6:4010:10
Gringo (R) 12:15-3:15-6:15-9:00
Annihilation (R) 5:45-8:45
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
11:30-1:50-4:15-6:45-9:30
AMC Loews
St. Charles Town Ctr. 9
11115 Mall Circle
The Strangers: Prey at Night
(R) CC: 10:15-1:30-3:00-5:107:00-10:30
Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
10:30-11:45-2:00-3:15-6:00-6:459:30-10:15
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) CC: 11:00-2:457:30-9:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 10:45-1:204:00-6:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 9:00
Game Night (R) CC: 11:15-2:004:30-6:15-9:30
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 11:30-2:456:15-9:45
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: (!)
12:30-4:00-10:00
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) CC: (!) 5:00-7:45
Death Wish (R) CC: 11:15-2:157:00-10:30
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) (!)
10:15AM
C5
RE
Sean Astin as a burly, affable
Stalin, with Alex Glossman as a
Harry Potter-like version of Shostakovich as a young man — the
whole thing smacked a bit of a
school play, with dramatic
monologues self-consciously delivered while music played in
the background.
It is challenging to find a
balance onstage between music
and the spoken word, and the
Theatre de Complicité’s longago production did it much
better than this one did. And
while the requisite themes were
all woven together, so that the
death of Chekhov’s protagonist
became the death of Shostako-
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
Ye Mantram Vesave (NR) 11:353:00-6:10-9:20
Black Panther (PG-13) 10:552:15-5:30-8:50
The Strangers: Prey at Night
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:55(R) CC: 11:15-1:30-3:45-6:152:40-8:10
8:30-9:15
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 11:00- A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digi12:00-2:00-5:00-6:00-8:00-9:15 tal 3D (PG) 3:45-5:25-9:10-10:05
Black Panther in Disney Digital Hoyt's West Nursery Cinema 14
3D (PG-13) CC: 3:00
1591 West Nursery Road
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 11:25-1:40- The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
4:15-6:45-9:00
CC: 12:00-3:00-5:20-7:40-10:10
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 12:00(PG-13) CC: 6:10
1:00-2:00-3:10-4:10-5:10-6:20Red Sparrow (R) CC: 11:207:20-8:20-9:30-10:20
2:15-8:10
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Game Night (R) CC: 11:35-2:35- (PG-13) CC: 1:20-4:05-6:50-9:40
5:15-7:45-10:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 12:00-2:15A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
4:30-6:45-9:00
11:00-4:30-7:15-9:45
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 12:10-1:00Annihilation (R) CC: 3:15
4:00-7:00-10:00
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Game Night (R) CC: 3:10-5:35Digital 3D (PG) CC: 1:45
8:00-10:25
Death Wish (R) CC: 11:40-2:10- The Shape of Water (R) CC:
4:40-7:20-9:45
12:40-3:30-6:30-9:20
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
Experience (PG-13) CC: 1:0012:15-2:15-3:55-4:55-6:35-7:354:00-7:00-10:00
9:15-10:15
Gringo (R) CC: 11:30-2:00-4:30- A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
7:15-10:00
Digital 3D (PG) CC: 1:15
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) CC: Death Wish (R) CC: 12:25-2:5511:30-2:15-4:45-7:30-10:00
5:25-7:55-10:30
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:25Gringo (R) CC: 1:30-4:20-7:105:30
9:45
ArcLight Bethesda
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) CC:
12:10-2:35-5:00-7:25-9:50
7101 Democracy Boulevard
Black Panther (PG-13) 7:00-10:00
Landmark
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Bethesda Row Cinema
11:55-2:20-4:40-7:10-9:20
7235 Woodmont Avenue
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle The Shape of Water (R) CC: 1:30(PG-13) 12:00-4:35
4:20-7:20-10:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:00-2:40Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
4:55-7:05-9:45
1:00-9:50
Game Night (R) 11:30-2:05-5:55- Phantom Thread (R) CC: 12:508:05-9:05
3:50-6:50-9:30
The Shape of Water (R) 3:05-8:35 Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 9:30
Missouri (R) CC: 1:40-4:30Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 7:35-10:05
Missouri (R) 3:20
Lady Bird (R) CC: 1:00-3:20-5:30Death Wish (R) 11:20-2:25-5:50- 7:40-9:50
8:10-10:05
The Party (R) CC: 1:10-3:00-5:00
Gringo (R) 11:40-2:35-5:052018 Oscar Nominated Shorts 7:40-10:10
Animation (NR) 3:45-7:50
The Post (PG-13) 1:45-6:10
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts Annihilation (R) 11:50-1:40-4:50- Live Action (NR) 5:40
7:35-10:15
The Royal Opera House: Tosca
I, Tonya (R) CC: 12:35
(NR) 7:00
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 1:50CC: 11:25-1:15-4:10-7:25-10:25
4:40-7:25-10:00
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:15The Leisure Seeker (R) CC: 1:201:15-2:00-4:00-5:00-8:00-9:00
4:00-7:10-9:45
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:45Old Greenbelt Theatre
2:15-4:45-7:15
129 Centerway
Red Sparrow (R) 11:15-2:10-5:15Loving Vincent (PG-13) 8:00
8:15-9:15
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) CC: The Shape of Water (R) 5:15
11:05-1:00-4:25-6:45-10:20
Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:25
3899 Branch Ave
Thoroughbreds (R) 11:50-3:10- Black Panther (PG-13) 12:005:10-7:20-9:25
1:00-3:00-4:00-6:00-7:00
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 3:00-6:25 Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:15-2:40A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
5:00-7:30
Digital 3D (PG) 5:20
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:45The Fifth Element (PG-13) 7:30 1:45-4:30-6:15-7:15
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
Digital 3D (PG) 3:30
1020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
Black Panther in Disney Digital The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
1:15-3:40-5:50-8:15
3D (PG-13) 4:10
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
Regal Bowie Stadium 14
12:35-2:50-5:05-7:45-10:10
15200 Major Lansdale Blvd
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:10-2:25The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
4:40-6:55-9:10
3:00-5:20-7:40-9:55
Thoroughbreds (R) 11:00-1:35- Black Panther (PG-13) 1:30-2:103:55-7:20-9:40
2:50-4:10-4:50-5:40-6:10-7:30Black Panther (PG-13) 10:508:10-8:50-9:30
11:20-12:25-1:50-2:20-3:25-4:50- Black Panther in Disney Digital
5:20-6:25-7:55-8:20-9:25
3D (PG-13) 6:50-10:10
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:15Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
1:00-2:00-3:45-4:45-6:30-7:30(PG-13) 3:30
9:15-10:15
Peter Rabbit (PG) 2:40-5:05Death Wish (R) 12:00-2:40-5:25- 8:00-10:30
8:00-10:35
Red Sparrow (R) 3:50-7:10-10:20
Game Night (R) 12:50-3:10-5:35- Game Night (R) 1:10-3:55-6:408:05-10:25
9:20
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:10A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:00-2:307:10-10:20
5:30-7:00-8:30
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Bow Tie Harbour 9
Digital 3D (PG) 4:00-10:00
2474 Solomons Island Road
Death Wish (R) 3:40-6:30-9:40
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 10:15Gringo (R) 2:25-5:10-7:50
12:40-3:10-5:40-8:05-10:30
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
The Post (PG-13) 11:00-4:201:20-4:20-7:20-10:15
7:10-10:20
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Regal Cinemas Majestic
Stadium 20 & IMAX
11:30-5:10-7:40
900 Ellsworth Drive
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 10:10-1:00-3:40-6:30The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
9:20
12:35-3:05-5:30-7:55-10:25
The Shape of Water (R) 10:00Black Panther (PG-13) 12:456:40
1:15-3:30-4:00-4:30-6:45-7:15Call Me by Your Name (R) 12:50- 7:45-10:00-10:30-10:55
3:50-9:30
Black Panther in Disney Digital
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 3D (PG-13) 12:00-3:05-6:15Missouri (R) 2:10-10:15
9:10-9:30
Gringo (R) 11:10-1:50-4:30Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
7:30-10:00
(PG-13) 12:35-3:40-7:00
Every Day (PG-13) 1:40
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:25-3:50The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
6:50-9:40
11:20-2:00-4:40-7:20-9:50
Early Man (PG) 12:45-3:40
Red Sparrow (R) 9:50-12:55-4:00- Red Sparrow (R) 12:35-3:557:00-10:10
7:15-10:35
Annihilation (R) 10:30-1:20-4:10- Game Night (R) 12:15-2:50-5:356:50-9:40
8:15-10:55
Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD The Shape of Water (R) 12:053:20-6:15
7000 Arundel Mills Circle
Black Panther (PG-13) XD: 12:30- A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:201:20-1:55-3:10-4:10-4:45-6:003:45-7:15
Black Panther in Disney Digital 7:00-7:35-9:00-10:25
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
3D (PG-13) 12:00-2:00-6:45
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) Digital 3D (PG) 9:50
Samson (PG-13) 10:25
10:55-1:10-3:45-6:45-10:00
Thoroughbreds (R) 12:15-2:45Black Panther (PG-13) 10:5511:25-1:00-1:40-2:15-2:45-3:15- 5:15-7:45-10:10
Annihilation (R) 1:30-4:30-7:254:25-5:00-5:15-5:30-6:05-7:4010:35
8:15-8:25-8:50-9:25-10:05
Tonya (R) 6:05-9:05
Black Panther in Disney Digital I,Death
Wish (R) 12:00-2:40-5:303D (PG-13) XD: 10:30
8:20-11:00
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 2:25-8:00 Every Day (PG-13) 12:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Gringo (R) 12:55-3:40-6:20-9:25
(PG-13) 11:00-1:50-4:40-7:35The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
10:30
1:20-3:55-6:30-9:05
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:30-2:05Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
4:30-7:05-9:35
(PG-13) 1:00-4:10Early Man (PG) 11:00-1:30-3:55 Experience
7:25-10:40
Red Sparrow (R) 11:00-12:15Regal Germantown Stadium 14
2:20-3:35-5:40-7:00-9:00-10:15
20000 Century Boulevard
Game Night (R) 11:50-2:35-5:057:40-10:10
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
The Shape of Water (R) 11:151:15-3:45-6:15-8:30-11:00
5:05-10:30
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:30A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:051:30-3:45-4:45-7:00-8:00-10:1511:55-1:05-1:50-2:40-4:35-6:25- 11:00
7:20-8:10
Black Panther in Disney Digital
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
3D (PG-13) 2:45-6:00-9:15
Digital 3D (PG) 5:25
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 9:30
Thoroughbreds (R) 11:45-2:15- Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
4:45-7:15-9:45
(PG-13) 2:00-5:15
Death Wish (R) 11:20-2:10-5:00- Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:30-4:006:30-7:45-9:15-10:30
6:30-9:00
Gringo (R) 11:35-2:30-5:10Red Sparrow (R) 12:00-3:307:50-10:30
6:45-10:00
Annihilation (R) 11:10-2:00-4:55- Game Night (R) 12:00-2:30-5:007:40-10:25
8:15-10:45
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
The Shape of Water (R) 12:0011:10-1:45-4:40-7:30-10:10
3:00-6:30
AMC Magic Johnson
Capital Ctr 12
800 Shoppers Way
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:151:45-3:15-6:00-7:15-8:45
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) 4:30-10:00
Death Wish (R) 2:00-4:45-7:3010:45
Gringo (R) 1:45-4:30-7:45-10:30
Annihilation (R) 8:15-11:00
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
12:00-2:30-5:00-7:45-10:30
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 4:20-5:00-7:30-8:1510:30
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 1:50
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:45-3:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:50-3:206:00-8:30
Red Sparrow (R) 1:00-4:107:20-10:30
Game Night (R) 1:20-4:00-6:40Regal Hyattsville Royale
9:20
Stadium 14
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:406505 America Blvd.
1:40-3:30-6:15-7:10-9:00
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
12:45-3:00-5:30-7:45-10:00
Digital 3D (PG) 4:30-9:50
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:30Death Wish (R) 12:30-3:00-5:301:00-1:30-3:35-4:15-4:45-6:458:00-10:25
7:25-8:00-10:00-10:30
Gringo (R) 1:10-3:50-6:45-9:30
Black Panther in Disney Digital Annihilation (R) 6:15-9:10
3D (PG-13) 7:15-10:20
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 2:00-4:40-7:40-10:10
(PG-13) 1:30-4:25
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 2:10
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:30-4:15Xscape Theatres Brandywine 14
6:40-9:15
7710 Matapeake Business Dr
Red Sparrow (R) 12:30-3:45The Strangers: Prey at Night
7:00-10:15
Game Night (R) 1:45-4:15-6:45- (R) CC: 10:40-12:50-4:20-6:108:30-10:40
9:15
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: (!)
The Shape of Water (R) 1:1511:00-2:00-5:00-8:00-11:00
4:20-7:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:30(PG-13) CC: 2:50-6:15
3:30-4:30-6:15-7:15-9:00
Death Wish (R) 1:00-4:00-7:00- Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 11:20-1:454:15-7:10-9:10
9:45
Red Sparrow (R) CC: (!) 9:50A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
1:10-3:00-6:45-9:50
Digital 3D (PG) 1:30-10:00
Game Night (R) CC: (!) 11:50Annihilation (R) 10:15
Gringo (R) 1:45-4:45-7:45-10:30 2:30-5:20-7:50-10:15
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: (!)
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
9:40-11:10-12:20-3:20-4:40-6:001:45-4:30-7:15-10:00
7:20-8:40-9:45
Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12 A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
14716 Baltimore Avenue
Digital 3D (PG) CC: (!) 2:10
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) Den of Thieves (R) CC: 10:10
12:00-2:30-5:00-7:45-10:20
Death Wish (R) CC: (!) 11:40-2:40Black Panther (PG-13) 11:305:30-8:10-10:45
12:45-1:45-2:45-4:00-5:15-6:00- Gringo (R) CC: 11:30-1:50-4:507:30-8:30-9:15-10:35
7:40-10:20
Black Panther in Disney Digital Annihilation (R) CC: (!) 12:10
3D (PG-13) 3:30-9:45
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: (!)
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:00-3:459:30-10:00-10:30-12:30-1:006:15-8:45
1:30-3:30-4:05-4:30-6:30-7:00Red Sparrow (R) 11:45-3:007:30-9:30-10:00-10:30
6:45-10:00
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) CC:
Game Night (R) 12:15-3:00-5:30- 10:10-12:40-3:10-5:40-8:20-10:50
8:00-10:35
iPic Pike & Rose
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:1511830 Grand Park Avenue
1:15-4:15-6:30-9:30-10:10
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
(!) 2:15-5:15-8:00-10:45
Digital 3D (PG) 3:15-7:15
Death Wish (R) 11:45-2:30-5:30- Black Panther (PG-13) 11:453:30-7:30-9:15-11:15
8:00-10:35
Gringo (R) 12:30-3:15-6:15-9:00 Red Sparrow (R) (!) 11:30-3:157:15-11:00
Annihilation (R) 12:30-7:00
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) (!) 11:30Regal Rockville Ctr Stadium 13 12:30-2:45-3:45-6:00-7:00-10:15
199 East Montgomery Ave
Gringo (R) (!) 1:15-4:30-7:45The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 11:30
12:45-3:00-5:15-8:00-10:15
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) (!)
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:0012:00-3:00-6:45-10:00
12:45-3:15-4:00-6:30-7:15-9:45- Death Wish (R) 11:45-3:0010:30
6:15-9:30
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 1:30-4:45-8:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:45-4:15AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
7:00-10:00
2150 Clarendon Blvd.
Red Sparrow (R) 12:30-3:45Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 1:307:15-10:30
2:45-4:30-7:30-10:30
Game Night (R) 12:15-2:45Black Panther in Disney Digital
5:30-8:00
3D (PG-13) CC: 3:30-6:30-9:30
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:001:30-2:00-5:00-7:00-7:45-10:45 Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 10:15
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 12:45Digital 3D (PG) 4:15-9:45
Death Wish (R) 2:45-5:30-8:15- 3:00-7:45
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 12:45-4:0010:30
Gringo (R) 2:00-4:45-7:30-10:45 7:15-10:30
Annihilation (R) 1:00-3:45-7:30- Game Night (R) CC: 12:30-3:005:40-8:00-10:20
10:15
Operation Red Sea 12:00-3:30- A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
4:15-9:45
7:00-10:30
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney DigiRegal Waugh Chapel
tal
3D (PG) CC: 1:30-5:15-7:00
Stadium 12 & IMAX
Death Wish (R) CC: 12:30-3:001419 South Main Chapel Way
5:30-8:00-10:30
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) CC:
1:00-3:35-5:50-8:15-10:40
12:30-5:15-7:45-10:15
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:55Black Panther in Disney Digital
1:25-4:05-4:35-7:15-7:45-10:25 3D (PG-13) CC: 12:30
Black Panther in Disney Digital
AMC Hoffman Center 22
3D (PG-13) 6:15-9:25
206 Swamp Fox Rd.
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
(PG-13) 12:40-3:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:30-4:15-7:05 CC: 11:40-2:05-4:20-6:40-9:00
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 10:30Red Sparrow (R) 12:10-3:2512:00-1:45-2:30-3:15-3:45-5:006:40-9:50
Game Night (R) 1:40-4:20-7:10- 6:30-7:00-8:15-9:00-9:45-10:15
Black Panther in Disney Digital
9:40
3D (PG-13) CC: 11:15-5:45
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:50The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
1:20-3:40-6:30-7:00-9:20
10:40-1:15-3:50-6:25-9:05
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC:
Digital 3D (PG) 4:10-9:50
Death Wish (R) 12:00-2:35-5:10- 1:30-6:50
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
7:45-10:20
(PG-13) CC: 3:25-6:20-9:25
Annihilation (R) 9:30
Gringo (R) 1:50-4:40-7:30-10:10 Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 11:05-1:354:05-6:35-9:10
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 12:25-3:35- Early Man (PG) CC: 11:20-1:40
Red
Sparrow (R) CC: 11:30-2:456:45-9:55
6:15-9:30
Regal Westview
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 10:30-1:00
Stadium 16 & IMAX
Game Night (R) CC: 12:40-3:055243 Buckeystown Pike
5:20-7:45-10:20
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) The Shape of Water (R) CC:
12:30-3:30-6:00-8:30-11:00
4:10-7:10-10:05
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:15Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC:
12:45-3:00-3:30-4:00-6:15-6:45- 3:50-9:35
7:15-9:30-10:00-10:30
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
The Greatest Showman (PG)
12:25
1:15-4:00
12 Strong (R) CC: 11:10-4:35-9:55
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:00
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 3:15-9:15
(PG-13) 12:00-3:15
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:30-3:15Digital 3D (PG) CC: 12:15-6:15
6:00-9:00
Thoroughbreds (R) CC: 11:45Red Sparrow (R) 11:00-3:002:15-4:45-7:20-9:45
7:00-10:30
The Post (PG-13) CC: 4:05-9:20
Game Night (R) 1:30-4:15-7:00- Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
9:45
Missouri (R) CC: 1:05-6:45
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:15Death Wish (R) CC: 12:15-2:501:00-2:00-3:45-6:30-7:30-9:15
5:35-8:10-10:45
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Annihilation (R) CC: 11:00-1:45Digital 3D (PG) 4:45-10:15
4:30-7:25-10:10
Thoroughbreds (R) 11:30-2:00- Gringo (R) CC: 10:45-1:40-4:304:30-7:15-10:00
7:20-10:00
Death Wish (R) 11:00-2:00-5:00- Lady Bird (R) CC: 2:10-7:35
8:00-10:45
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) CC:
Gringo (R) 11:15-2:15-5:1510:50-12:30-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
8:15-11:00
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
Black Panther: An IMAX 3D
Experience (PG-13) CC: 1:00Experience (PG-13) 4:30-11:00 4:15-7:30-10:45
Annihilation (R) 6:15-9:30
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 10:15The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
1:15-4:00-7:15-10:15
11:00-1:45-4:30-7:15-10:00
AMC Potomac Mills 18
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13)
2700 Potomac Mills Circle
6:45-9:15
The Strangers: Prey at Night
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
CC:
11:30-1:00-3:15-5:40(R)
Experience (PG-13) 1:15-7:45
8:00-10:30
UA Snowden Square
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 11:45Stadium 14
1:45-3:00-4:00-4:45-6:15-8:009161 Commerce Center Drive
9:30-10:00
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) Black Panther in Disney Digital
1:00-3:20-5:45-8:00-10:20
3D (PG-13) CC: 11:00-2:15Black Panther (PG-13) 12:005:30-8:45
12:30-3:10-3:40-6:30-7:00-9:40The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
10:00
(!) 1:25-7:10
So handy. So reliable. Home delivery.
VIRGINIA
1-800-753-POST
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 1:40-4:40
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 11:50-2:154:40-7:00-9:25
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 11:2012:50-2:45-4:10-6:00-7:20-9:1010:30
Game Night (R) CC: 1:10-3:506:20-9:00
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
11:15-5:10
Death Wish (R) CC: 11:00-2:305:00-7:40-10:15
Winchester (PG-13) CC: 10:20
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
11:30-12:45-6:45
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) CC: 3:45-9:45
Thoroughbreds (R) CC: 11:051:30-4:05-6:30-9:05
Annihilation (R) CC: 2:10-8:10
Gringo (R) CC: 11:25-2:00-4:407:20-10:10
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) CC:
11:10-1:50-4:30-7:15-9:50
A Wrinkle in Time: An IMAX 2D
Experience (PG) CC: 11:45-2:455:45-8:45
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:303:45-7:00-10:30
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 7:30
AMC Shirlington 7
2772 South Randolph St.
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 1:004:00-7:00
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) CC: 2:30-5:30-8:30
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 1:154:15-7:15
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
4:15-7:10
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 1:15
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
(!) 4:30
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) CC: (!) 1:45-7:15
Thoroughbreds (R) CC: (!) 1:304:00-6:30
Annihilation (R) CC: 1:30-4:207:00
Red Sparrow (R) (!) 11:00-2:005:00-8:00-11:00
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) (!) 2:154:45-7:30-10:05
Bow Tie
Reston Town Ctr 11 & BTX
11940 Market St
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:00-4:007:00-10:00
I, Tonya (R) 12:55
Phantom Thread (R) 9:25
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:30-3:506:30-8:50
The Shape of Water (R) 3:55
Thoroughbreds (R) 12:20-2:405:00-7:25-10:25
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 6:45
Gringo (R) 1:00-4:00-7:00-9:40
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
1:10-4:00-7:20-10:05
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:003:00-6:00-9:00
Red Sparrow (R) 12:10-3:306:40-9:45
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:00-2:104:00-6:50-7:40-9:50
Death Wish (R) 5:00-9:55
Game Night (R) 1:40-4:30-7:309:55
Cinema Arts Theatre
9650 Main St
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 10:15-1:154:15-7:10-9:55
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 9:4012:05-5:05-10:00
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: 9:4012:00-2:15-4:35-7:00-9:20
The Leisure Seeker (R) CC: 9:4512:10-2:30-4:50-7:20-9:35
The Post (PG-13) CC: 2:35-7:40
The Party (R) CC: 10:00-12:006:00
Lady Bird (R) CC: 8:00-10:00
Gringo (R) CC: 9:50-12:15-2:405:00-7:30-9:45
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts Animation (NR) 2:00
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts Live Action (NR) 4:00
AMC Tysons Corner 16
7850e Tysons Corner Center
Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
1600 Village Market Boulevard
The Strangers: Prey at Night
(R) CC: (!) 11:10-1:30-3:45-5:558:25-10:40
Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
11:15-12:20-2:25-3:30-5:40-6:408:45-9:45
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) CC: 1:00
The Greatest Showman (PG)
CC: 4:35
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 10:45-1:55-4:557:45-10:35
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 11:30-2:004:25-6:50-9:20
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 10:10-1:204:30-7:40-11:00
Game Night (R) CC: 10:20-12:453:15-5:35-8:00-10:20
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
10:30-1:25-7:10-10:10
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: (!)
10:35-1:15
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) CC: (!) 4:00-9:25
Thoroughbreds (R) CC: (!) 10:0512:25-2:50-5:10-7:35-10:05
Death Wish (R) CC: 11:35-2:104:50-7:30-10:15
Gringo (R) CC: (!) 10:25-1:104:05-7:05-9:50
Black Panther: An IMAX 3D
Experience (PG-13) 10:05-1:354:45-7:50-10:55
Annihilation (R) CC: 10:15-4:107:15-10:00
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
CC: (!) 10:00-12:30-3:10-5:458:15-10:50
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) (!) 12:052:45-5:25-8:05-10:45; (!) 7:00
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
11:35-1:45-3:55-6:05-8:15
The Greatest Showman (PG) 2:50
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:00-2:204:40-7:00
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
11:50-2:15-4:50-7:20
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
11:35-1:45-3:55-6:05-8:15
Game Night (R) 12:10-2:455:10-7:50
Red Sparrow (R) 11:25-12:452:40-4:00-5:45-7:15
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) 11:20AM
Death Wish (R) 11:40-2:104:45-7:35
Gringo (R) 11:45-2:25-5:00-7:40
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:3012:30-2:30-3:30-5:30-7:30
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:201:55-4:30-5:20-7:10-8:00
2911 District Ave
Regal Ballston Common
Stadium 12
671 N. Glebe Road
Manassas 4 Cinemas
8890 Mathis Ave.
Black Panther (PG-13) 2:10-4:507:30; 5:35-8:15
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:15-2:153:25-4:30-6:45-9:00
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
1:50-6:05-8:10
Rave Cinemas Centreville 12
6201 Multiplex Drive
Black Panther (PG-13) 10:0010:40-11:10-1:00-1:40-2:10-4:004:40-5:10-7:00-7:40-8:10-10:0010:40-11:10
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:00-1:50-4:35-7:2510:20
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:25-1:454:15-7:10-9:35
AMC Worldgate 9
Red Sparrow (R) 10:20-1:25-4:3013025 Worldgate Drive
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 7:45-11:00
Game Night (R) 10:15-12:40-3:05CC: (!) 2:55-5:10-8:00
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 2:00- 5:30-7:55-10:30
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 10:005:00-6:50-7:35
Black Panther in Disney Digital 11:15-3:10-4:45-7:30-8:20-10:55
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
3D (PG-13) CC: 2:45-5:40
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Digital 3D (PG) 12:35-2:00-5:4510:15
(PG-13) CC: 7:45
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 3:00-5:25 Death Wish (R) 12:00-2:40-5:158:00-10:45
Red Sparrow (R) CC: (!) 2:00Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety (NR)
5:15-7:40
11:45-6:00
Game Night (R) CC: (!) 2:15Annihilation (R) 10:50-1:35-4:204:35-7:20
7:15-9:55
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: (!)
Ye Mantram Vesave (NR)
2:00-7:30
2:55-9:30
Death Wish (R) CC: (!) 2:305:05-8:30
Rave Cinemas
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme
Digital 3D (PG) CC: (!) 4:45
11900 Palace Way
Gringo (R) CC: (!) 2:20-5:00-8:20 The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
Alamo Drafthouse Cinema - 11:40-2:15-5:15-8:05-10:35
The Greatest Showman (PG)
One Loudoun
4:10-7:00
20575 East Hampton Plaza
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:15The Fugitive (PG-13) 7:00
2:25-5:35-8:45
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:10Black Panther in Disney Digital
11:55
3D (PG-13) 12:00-3:05-6:30-9:35
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:20AM
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:50Red Sparrow (R) 12:50
4:40-10:25
Game Night (R) 11:30AM
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 10:35(PG-13) 11:30-2:15-5:05-7:501:30
10:40
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Red Sparrow (R) 12:25-4:25Digital 3D (PG) 12:10
7:40-10:50
Thoroughbreds (R) 12:25
The Shape of Water (R) 1:45-7:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) 2:00-4:50Thoroughbreds (R) 12:05-2:307:40-10:30
5:00-7:25-9:55
Annihilation (R) 11:45AM
12 Strong (R) 12:40-9:50
Black Panther (PG-13) 3:30Death Wish (R) 11:20-1:55-4:3510:30; 4:40-6:00-9:25
Game Night (R) 2:20-4:20-7:25- 7:20-10:10
Gringo (R) 10:45-1:25-4:2010:10
7:05-10:00
Red Sparrow (R) 3:05-6:30Annihilation (R) 11:00-2:00-4:558:20-11:10
Annihilation (R) 2:55-6:20-9:35 8:00-10:55
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 2:45-5:15- Black Panther (PG-13) XD:
10:30-12:45-1:40-4:05-4:50-7:108:00-10:00
7:55-10:20-11:00
Thoroughbreds (R) 3:15-6:00Ye Mantram Vesave (NR) 11:508:40-11:30
2:50-6:05-9:25
Angelika Film Center Mosaic
The Leisure Seeker (R) (!) 10:2512:55-3:30-6:00-8:30-10:55
The Royal Opera House: Tosca
(NR) 7:00
Lady Bird (R) 3:15
The Shape of Water (R) 10:454:15
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) (!) 11:30AM
Thoroughbreds (R) (!) 10:45-1:003:15-5:30-7:45-10:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 1:35-10:45
Annihilation (R) 10:05-12:355:45-8:20-10:55
Death Wish (R) (!) 12:15-3:005:40-8:15-10:45
Black Panther (PG-13) 10:001:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
The Strangers: Prey at Night
(R) 2:20-4:50-7:15-9:50
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:302:15-3:45-4:30-5:30-7:00-7:308:30-10:15-10:40
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 6:15-9:30
The Greatest Showman (PG)
1:50-4:40-7:20-10:00
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 9:45
Red Sparrow (R) 1:45-5:158:45
Early Man (PG) 1:15-3:40
The Shape of Water (R) 1:003:50-6:45
Thoroughbreds (R) 1:40-4:056:30-9:15
vich, the evening had little to
offer in the way of insight.
What it offered, instead, came
off like the project of an earnest,
smart student, filled with selfconscious asides. Witness the
monologue of Shostakovich’s
third wife, played by Linda Setzer, which I believe was intended to be profound and a pivotal
moment in the drama. “Cliche is
death,” she concluded, “and
death is the most hackneyed of
cliches. So to hell with death,
and to hell with cliches. Except
for this one: On with the show.”
Cliche is dead. Long live cliche.
But not, perhaps, this show.
anne.midgette@washpost.com
Tuesday, March 13, 2018
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
Death Wish (R) 2:00-5:007:45-10:25
Gringo (R) 2:10-5:20-8:15
Annihilation (R) 2:30-5:45-9:00
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
12:15-2:40-5:20-7:50-10:20
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 9:30
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:30Regal Countryside Stadium 20 4:15-7:00
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
45980 Regal Plaza
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) Digital 3D (PG) 9:45
12:35-2:50-5:10-7:30-10:00
Regal Manassas
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:00Stadium 14 & IMAX
1:00-3:00-4:10-6:10-7:20-9:2011380 Bulloch Drive
10:30
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 11:4012:45-2:50-5:20-7:45-10:15
2:20-5:00-7:40-10:20
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:50Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 3:10-4:30-6:30-7:30-9:00-9:30
(PG-13) 12:05-3:05-6:00-9:00
Black Panther in Disney Digital
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:45-2:103D (PG-13) 2:10-5:30-8:30
4:40-7:10-9:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Red Sparrow (R) 12:40-3:501:00-3:40-6:50-10:00
6:55-10:10
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:20-3:20- Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 1:15-4:00
6:25-9:30
Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi) Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:30-3:456:10-10:45
(NR) 11:35-3:10-6:40-10:05
Game Night (R) 1:05-3:55-6:30- Red Sparrow (R) 1:00-4:107:15-10:20
9:05
Game Night (R) 6:45-9:10
The Shape of Water (R) 12:30The Shape of Water (R) 12:403:30-6:35-9:35
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:303:30-6:15
1:45-2:15-5:00-7:25-7:45-10:25 A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 5:40A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
8:15-10:50
Digital 3D (PG) 4:35-10:15
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Pad Man (Padman) (PG-13)
Digital 3D (PG) 3:00
11:25-2:35-5:45-8:55
Death Wish (R) 1:50-5:00-7:40Gringo (R) 12:50-3:45-6:50-9:45 10:30
Pari (Hindi) (NR) 11:55-2:55Gringo (R) 2:10-5:15-8:00-10:40
6:05-9:15
Annihilation (R) 9:40
Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety (NR)
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
12:10-3:35-6:45-9:50
1:15-4:20-7:20-9:50
Every Day (PG-13) 11:45-2:25Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
5:05
Experience (PG-13) 3:50-10:10
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
A Wrinkle in Time: An IMAX 2D
11:30-2:05-4:45-7:15-9:55
Tholiprema (Tholi Prema) (NR) Experience (PG) 1:10-7:00
12:15-3:15-6:20-9:25
Regal Potomac Yard Stadium 16
Awe! (NR) 7:35-10:25
3575 Potomac Avenue
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
Regal Dulles Town Ctr 10
12:00-1:10-3:20-5:40-8:05-10:20
21100 Dulles Town Circle
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) Black Panther (PG-13) 12:401:20-2:00-3:45-4:25-5:05-6:5012:00-2:00-4:45-7:30-9:45
7:25-8:10-9:55-10:30
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:00Black Panther in Disney Digital
1:00-3:00-4:00-6:00-7:00-9:003D (PG-13) 12:00-3:05-9:15
10:10
Black Panther in Disney Digital Fifty Shades Freed (R) 10:00
3D (PG-13) 10:45
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:30-2:50The Greatest Showman (PG)
5:10-7:30
2:30-5:15
Red Sparrow (R) 12:00-3:10Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:30-4:156:25-9:40
6:45-9:15
Game Night (R) 3:00-5:30-8:00Red Sparrow (R) 12:10-3:1510:20
6:30-9:30
The Shape of Water (R) 12:20Game Night (R) 3:30-6:15-8:45- 3:50-6:55
11:10
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:00A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:1512:45-3:40-5:10-6:30-7:45-9:30
1:45-7:15-10:00
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) 2:35-10:20
Digital 3D (PG) 4:30
Death Wish (R) 12:00-2:45-5:30- Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 12:25-4:00-6:308:15-10:50
10:00
Gringo (R) 12:45-2:15-5:00Death Wish (R) 2:25-5:10-7:507:45-10:30
10:30
Annihilation (R) 8:00
Gringo (R) 1:25-4:15-7:05-9:45
Regal Fairfax Towne Ctr 10
Annihilation (R) 1:15-6:40-9:25
4110 West Ox Road
Every Day (PG-13) 12:00
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
12:05-2:20-4:55-7:20-9:35
12:15-2:45-5:15-7:45-10:15
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Regal Springfield Town Ctr 12
12:20-2:55-5:30-8:10-10:45
6500 Springfield Town Center
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:10-2:30-5:007:30-9:55
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
Early Man (PG) 12:05
11:20-1:40-4:40-7:10-9:30
Red Sparrow (R) 12:30-3:45Black Panther (PG-13) 11:107:10-10:20
11:50-3:20-6:00-6:30-9:40
Paddington 2 (PG) 1:00-3:55-6:35 Black Panther in Disney Digital
Game Night (R) 12:00-2:40-5:10- 3D (PG-13) 12:30-2:50-3:50-7:007:40-10:15
9:10-10:00
The Shape of Water (R) 3:40Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
7:00-10:00
(PG-13) 11:40-5:10-10:05
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:50Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:55-2:301:50-4:50-6:50-7:50-10:40
5:00-7:35
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Red Sparrow (R) 12:00-3:15Digital 3D (PG) 3:50-9:40
6:25-9:35
Annihilation (R) 9:15
Game Night (R) 2:40-5:20-7:50The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
10:25
12:10-2:45-5:20-8:00-10:35
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:00Regal Fox Stadium 16 & IMAX 1:00-4:00-5:00-6:40-9:20-10:45
22875 Brambleton Plaza
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) Digital 3D (PG) 2:00-7:45
1:00-3:30-5:45-8:00-10:15
Death Wish (R) 1:50-4:50-7:40Black Panther (PG-13) 11:4510:20
12:30-3:00-4:00-6:15-7:15-9:30- Gringo (R) 1:15-4:30-7:30-10:30
10:30
Annihilation (R) 11:30-2:20Black Panther in Disney Digital 8:10-10:50
3D (PG-13) 6:45-9:45
Regal Virginia Gateway
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Stadium 14 & RPX
3:15-6:00
8001 Gateway Promenade Pl
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 8:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
(PG-13) 1:30-4:15
12:55-3:15-5:45-8:05-10:15
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:15-2:45Black Panther (PG-13) 1:00-1:305:10-7:45-10:15
4:00-4:30-7:00-7:30-10:00-10:30
Red Sparrow (R) 12:15-3:30Black Panther in Disney Digital
6:45-10:00
3D (PG-13) 3:30-6:30-9:30
Game Night (R) 12:30-3:00-5:30- The Greatest Showman (PG)
8:15-10:45
1:50-4:20-6:50
The Shape of Water (R) 12:45Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:50
3:45
Jumanji:
Welcome to the Jungle
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:00-2:30(PG-13) 1:25-4:10
3:45-5:15-6:30-8:00-9:15
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:10-3:40A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
6:00-9:00
Digital 3D (PG) 11:45-10:45
Death Wish (R) 11:45-2:15-5:00- Red Sparrow (R) 1:05-4:057:05-10:05
7:45-10:15
Game Night (R) 1:20-3:45-6:15Thoroughbreds (R) 2:00-4:459:15
7:15-9:45
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 4:50-7:45
Annihilation (R) 7:00
Gringo (R) 12:00-2:45-5:30-8:15 A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Every Day (PG-13) 11:45-12:45 Digital 3D (PG) 2:15-10:20
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 9:45 Death Wish (R) 2:20-5:30-8:15The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
10:50
12:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
Gringo (R) 2:10-5:15-8:00-10:40
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
Annihilation (R) 6:55-9:50
Experience (PG-13) 1:15-10:00 The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
A Wrinkle in Time: An IMAX 2D 2:00-5:00-7:50-10:45
Experience (PG) 4:30-7:15
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 9:45
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:15Regal Kingstowne
3:50-6:45
Stadium 16 & RPX
5910 Kingstowne Towne Ctr
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) Digital 3D (PG) 9:20
12:20-2:55-5:10-7:25-9:40
Smithsonian - Airbus
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:30IMAX Theater
1:15-2:45-3:30-4:30-6:00-6:4514390 Air and Space Museum Pkwy
7:30-9:15-10:00-10:30
D-Day:
Normandy
1944 3D (NR)
Black Panther in Disney Digital
11:10-2:20
3D (PG-13) 2:00-5:05-8:00
A
Beautiful
Planet
3D (G) 12:35
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:40-3:55Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
6:10-8:40
Seas
3D
(NR)
10:20-1:30-3:10
Early Man (PG) 12:25-2:35Dream Big: Engineering Our
4:50-7:15
World: An IMAX 3D Experience
Red Sparrow (R) 12:15-3:20Journey to Space 3D (NR)
6:25-9:35
Game Night (R) 12:40-3:15-5:40- 12:00-4:00
A Wrinkle in Time: An IMAX 2D
8:05-10:30
Experience (PG) 4:35-6:45-8:55
The Shape of Water (R) 12:503:50-7:05
University Mall Theatre
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 2:1510659 Braddock Road
5:00-7:45
Star
Wars:
The Last Jedi (PG-13)
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
CC: 1:00-4:00-7:00-10:05
Digital 3D (PG) 10:30
Maze
Runner:
The Death Cure
Thoroughbreds (R) 2:05-4:35(PG-13) CC: 7:15-10:00
6:55-9:20
Coco (PG) CC: 12:15-4:45
Death Wish (R) 12:55-3:35Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 12:056:15-9:00
Gringo (R) 12:45-3:40-6:20-9:05 2:20-4:35
The Post (PG-13) CC: 2:25Annihilation (R) 9:50
7:30-9:55
Every Day (PG-13) 12:15
washingtonpost.com/subscribe
SF
C6
EZ
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
PICKLES
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 13 , 2018
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
NEITHER SIDE VULNERABLE
NORTH
J3
K94
KJ72
A 10 9 3
EAST
A 10 8 6 4 2
76
AQ93
5
WEST (D)
KQ975
83
10 8 5
Q86
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH
None
A Q J 10 5 2
64
KJ742
The bidding:
WEST
NORTH
EAST
Pass
Pass
1
2
4
4
All Pass
Opening lead — K
SOUTH
2
5
CLASSIC PEANUTS
CHARLES SCHULZ
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
“I
know that old advice
about having patience,”
Unlucky Louie told me in the
club lounge. “‘Things may get
worse before they get better.’
But whoever said that was
assuming things have to get
better.”
Louie ascribes his bad
results to bad luck, despite
all the evidence. Declaring
at today’s five hearts, Louie
ruffed the first spade and
drew trumps with the A-K. He
took the ace of clubs and led
a second club ... and East
discarded.
That was bad, but when
Louie took his king and led
a diamond to dummy’s jack,
things got worse. East took
the queen and ace, and West
got the queen of clubs. Down
one.
Good and bad luck will
even out, but bad play won’t.
After Louie ruffs the first
spade and draws trumps, he
ruffs dummy’s last spade,
takes the king of clubs and
leads to dummy’s 10.
When East discards, Louie
has 11 tricks, but he would
be safe even if East had the
queen. East would have to
lead a spade, yielding a fatal
ruff-sluff, or give dummy a
diamond trick.
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
LIO
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
KQ97583
10 8 5 Q 8 6
Your side is vulnerable.
The dealer, at your left,
opens three diamonds. Your
partner doubles, and the
next player passes. What do
you say?
ANSWER: Your partner’s
double is for takeout, though
you might pass it occasionally with diamond length and
strength. He should have
a hand worth at least 17
points. Jump to four spades.
You have a strong five-card
suit and a side queen that
should be useful.
BLONDIE
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2018, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
TUESDAY, MARCH 13 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
MUTTS
EZ
PATRICK McDONNELL
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
C7
RE
ZITS
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
BIRTHDAY | MARCH 13
This year you
find positive
solutions to difficult
challenges. Others
might be envious of your
resourcefulness. If you are
single, you don’t need to
stress out about meeting
people -- encounters happen
naturally. If you are attached,
the two of you might debate
the pros and cons of various
issues and situations. Your
intense conversations become
more and more embedded
into your relationship.
Aquarius is a natural healer
for you.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
Continue to be as discreet
as possible about a money
matter. Know that everything
will work out, even if you
have misjudged the situation.
Refuse to stand on ceremony.
Ask questions, and listen to
the answers.
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
Your take-charge attitude
emerges at work and when
dealing with key people in your
life. Note what is going on with
a child or loved one. How you
see a situation could radically
change because of your
interactions.
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
You could greet a new
beginning, but only if you let
go of any preconceived ideas.
Be aware of a tendency to be
WEINGARTENS & CLARK negative or upset. A partner
or loved one might be off, but
ultimately only this person can
change his or her mood.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
Financial matters that involve
you and another person come
to your attention. You might
have to negotiate a bit to reach
an agreement. You could be
less than enthusiastic about
a situation involving your daily
life.
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
To achieve your goal, you
might need to defer to others.
You could resent having to
take a step back, but later you
will find that this was the right
call. You come from a place of
compassion and centering.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
Pace yourself in order to
complete everything that is
needed. Keep smiling with
confidence, even if someone
questions your motives. Your
ability to communicate is
enhanced. Why not clear the
air with a difficult situation?
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
You could be at the point
where you can’t seem to
contain yourself. Listen to
news, and decide how you feel
about what you are hearing.
New beginnings are possible
if you are willing to let go.
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
Pressure builds around your
home life. You could feel
as if you don’t have enough
funds to deal with the issue
behind the pressure. Stop,
and do something else for
now.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
Be aware of the ramifications
of what has happened. Get
to the bottom of a problem. A
conversation easily could clear
up the issue. Your instincts
take you to a new level, though
you need to verify the value of
your sixth sense.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
Follow your convictions.
You might want to do the
unexpected to help move a
cause forward. Listen to news,
especially before you make a
financial decision. Do yourself
the favor of checking out a new
idea with care.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
The moon in your sign
highlights your capabilities.
Recognize your limits
when dealing with a longterm desire. Your ability to
understand your choices helps
strengthen your position at
work.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
Listen to your inner voice, and
you will get past a problem
with ease. Your ability to
detach and see the big
picture helps you gain a fresh
perspective, no matter what
goes down. You express the
ability to get around difficult
situations.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2018, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
C8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 13 , 2018
kidspost
CHIP SAYS
TODAY
KIDSPOST.COM
The inspiration for American Girl came from
Virginia. Company founder Pleasant Rowland
was inspired to start the line of dolls after taking
a trip to Colonial Williamsburg.
The wait for warm weather goes on,
with mostly sunny skies, a light wind
and a high in the mid-40s.
Looking for something to
read? Find more stories
about books in our online
Readers’ Corner.
ILLUSTRATION BY AYDEN DANG, 9, BURKE
American Girl author launched herself into an unfamiliar world
BY
M ARY Q UATTLEBAUM
worked to develop a treatment for a rare
blood disorder called Von Willebrand disease.
When her children were born, Teagan
decided to work at home as a writer. But
she missed science and research, she said,
so she started writing about girls with
those interests. She used knowledge from
her lab experience in her first novel, “The
Friendship Experiment.” The main character has Von Willebrand disease.
“Writing is a lot like science,” Teagan
said. “Discovery and making mistakes is
part of the process.”
T
o write her recent books, Erin
Teagan decided she had to go to
Space Camp in Huntsville, Alabama.
She wanted to immerse herself in the experiences of 11-year-old Luciana “Luci” Vega, the main character in a
new American Girl series. “Luciana” and
“Braving the Deep” are the first two novels.
Luci wants to be an astronaut when she
grows up. At the U.S. Space and Rocket
Center, Space Camp gives her — and real
kids ages 9 to 11 — a chance to train like an
astronaut and learn about the work there.
Kids try on spacesuits, launch model rockets and work in teams on missions.
Teagan especially enjoyed the experience of being weightless, like an astronaut
in space. Walking on the bottom of a pool
mimics that feeling. As part of this underwater training, Teagan played catch with a
100-pound ball that she could throw with
ease.
Scientist’s ‘shadow’
Luci loves science, but Teagan did not
when she was a kid.
“Math and science were hard for me
then,” she said in a phone interview from
her home in Purcellville, Virginia.
Growing up close to Philadelphia, Teagan preferred writing stories for her two
younger sisters and brother.
But that changed in her teenage years.
As part of a school requirement, Teagan
and her classmates had to “shadow,” or
follow, a professional for a day to learn
about different careers. Teagan shadowed
a scientist at a genetics lab.
“I saw how she worked with her hands
and problem-solved with her teammates,”
Teagan said. “I began to see science and
research in a different way. I became really
interested.”
This interest led to better grades in
math and science, then to college, where
Teagan studied technology and science.
She did biochemical research in labs for
about 10 years.
At the National Institutes of Health, she
PHOTOS COURTESY OF ERIN TEAGAN
ABOVE: Erin Teagan helps kids use the scientific method to investigate soil and
rock samples from a fictional planet. BELOW: Teagan is the author of an
American Girl series about Luciana, an 11-year-old who wants to be an astronaut.
IF YOU GO
What: Erin Teagan will sign books
and chat with attendees.
Where: American Girl, 8090
Tysons Corner Center, McLean.
When: Friday, 4 to 7 p.m.
How much: Free.
Best for: Age 8 and older.
For more information: Call
877-247-5223 or go to wapo.st/
ErinTeagan.
Enter: Luciana
An editor at American Girl read Teagan’s novel. The company creates popular
historical and contemporary dolls and
books, and it was developing the Luciana
doll. It was looking for a writer who might
bring Luciana to life on the page — and
quickly.
Teagan got right to work. She went to
Space Camp twice, and she researched,
wrote and revised both books in less than
nine months. Teagan checked facts carefully with scientists to make sure all information was accurate. Megan McArthur
Behnken, an astronaut, helped her with
the precise wording for mission communication.
A challenge for Teagan became one for
her character in the second book. While
training for scuba diving, Teagan felt nervous.
“It was so quiet underwater, and I
wasn’t used to the face mask,” she said. “I
started to panic, and I had to talk to myself
to calm down.”
The third novel — “Out of This World”—
will be published in May.
“It’s a high-adventure book,” Teagan
said. “Luci has to use everything she
learned in the first two books at the Mars
habitat in Chile.”
As for Teagan, she is planning a summer trip to Space Camp — this time with
her family. Daughter Jaeda, 10, and son
Caden, 8, are eager to do all the cool space
things that their mom did.
kidspost@washpost.com
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
ACROSS
1 Kind of guitar
5 Foul-smelling
10 Bouillabaisse,
e.g.
14 Where the
Jazz play
15 Dodge
16 Weighty book
17 Signed up,
as to vote
19 Military group
20 113-gram
sandwich,
more or less
22 Sleeping woe
23 Like Oberlin
College since it
opened in 1833
24 About 1.8
meters deep
31 Watch pocket
34 Approaches
35 Mall unit
36 Word after
New or teen
38 Hidden drug
supply
40 Big gulp
41 Insurance
case
43 TV ex-military
group led
by Hannibal
Smith
45 Mario Bros.
console
46 37.9-liter
topper,
roughly
49 Fatty liver
spread
50 Hybrid pack
animals
54 Proceed
another 1.6
kilometers or so
59 Christmas tree
topper’s topper
60 Double-checked
before cutting
61 Congregation’s
“I agree!”
62 Geometry
calculations
63 Track
assignment
64 Arnaz with
two stars on
the Hollywood
Walk of Fame
65 Toy truck
brand
66 Old Russian
leader
ILLUSTRATION BY TARA MAJKIC, 8, VIENNA
KidsPost needs drawings of sunny,
cloudy, rainy and windy weather to
print alongside our daily forecasts.
Our spring forecast:
Lots of colorful
weather art by you
W
ith winter almost behind
us, the KidsPost weather
forecast wants to embrace
the
coming
warmth. But we like to show our
readers what it’s like outside, not just
tell them.
That’s where you come in. Think
about what spring looks like, and put
that image on paper. If your art fits
with the daily weather forecast, we’ll
consider publishing it in KidsPost.
Remember, we need art for days that
are sunny, cloudy, rainy and windy.
Bright colors work best. You can
use paints, markers or whatever art
supplies you have, but try to avoid
leaving a lot of white space on the
page. Be sure to include your full
name, age (5 to 13) and home town on
the back of your artwork. We also
need a note from a parent, guardian
or teacher giving permission for your
drawing to be used.
Pictures should be sent to KidsPost, The Washington Post, 1301 K
Street NW, Washington, D.C.
20071. Or have an adult fill out the
form at kidspost.com and upload
your artwork.
By Rich Proulx
© 2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
18
21
25
26
27
28
29
DOWN
Traditional
Islamic
garment
Thoroughly
delighted in
Cosmologist
Carl
Counties across
the pond
Lavish party
At any time
Firewood
protector
Logical
beginning?
Subtract
They often
have class
Softened,
as rhetoric
Kuwaiti leader
Rainy
Wood finish
We, to one who
says “oui”
Ballot markings
Deadly
Muse for
Shelley
German
industrial city
Cleveland’s lake
3/13/18
30 Govt. agency
rules
31 Something
known to
be true
32 Eye rudely
33 Tall, skinny sorts
37 Tubular pasta
39 “So there!”
42 Course with
squares and
cubes
44 What babies
create, and
vice versa?
47 Eye rudely
48 Ruckus
51 Turkish coins
52 Kagan of the
Supreme Court
53 Meal where
the 10 Plagues
of Egypt are
recalled
54 Mario Bros.,
for one
55 Architect
Saarinen
56 Magneto’s
enemies
57 Hardwood
prized for
outdoor
furniture
58 Tabula __
59 Owned
MONDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
KLMNO
SPORTS
TUESDAY, MARCH 13 , 2018
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
M2
D
Maryland has to hit the road
BY
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
“I really like our bracket, our matchups, where we’re headed. . . . Now let’s go play,” Brenda Frese said.
A VA W ALLACE
For the first time in more than a
decade, Maryland will not open
an NCAA tournament appearance
at home in College Park. But that
didn’t stop Coach Brenda Frese
and her players from leaping out
of their seats with joy at the team’s
selection show watch party in a
suite above Xfinity Center on
Monday.
The
selection
committee
placed the Terrapins as the No. 5
seed in the Kansas City Region
when it unveiled the field of 64 on
Monday, meaning Maryland
(25-7) will play No. 12 seed Princeton (24-5) on Friday at noon in
Raleigh, N.C. Frese said she is
Terps will open NCAAs
away from College Park
for first time since ’07
excited to return to a site she
knows well from Maryland’s days
in the ACC. The team is looking
forward to starting its postseason
getting to bond on a road trip.
“Of course we’d love to be at
home,” Frese said before the
bracket was announced, “but if
we go on the road — last I checked
you still had to show up and beat
Maryland.”
Said senior Kristen Confroy: “I
think when we go on the road, and
everyone’s against you, our team
comes together. This young team
comes together.”
The last time the Terps didn’t
open the NCAA tournament at
home in College Park was in 2007
as a No. 2 seed, when they fell to
No. 7 seed Mississippi in the second round. The last year they
weren’t a top-four seed — not
including the year they missed the
tournament altogether in 2010 —
is even further back, in 2005, the
MARYLAND CONTINUED ON D4
Maryland vs. Princeton
In Raleigh, N.C.
Friday, noon, ESPN2
History in the making
ALEX BRANDON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Another reminder it’s easy
to take him for granted
It shouldn’t take a number, an
arbitrary number at that, to get us
to this point of appreciation. Yet
here we are, with Kirk Cousins
headed to free agency and the
NCAA tournament starting and
Barry
the Nationals gathering steam
Svrluga
toward another playoff run. We
could be distracted by the
peripheral issues, but Alex Ovechkin grabs our
attention again, because he just scored the 600th
goal of his career.
The marker in question came in the second
period Monday night against Winnipeg at Capital
One Arena, and he was the author of the home
Back on home ice,
Ovechkin nets 600th goal
CAPITALS 3,
JETS 2 (OT)
BY
Alex Ovechkin celebrates his
second goal of Monday’s game
against Winnipeg, which was
the 600th of his career. Ovechkin
is the fourth-quickest NHL player
to reach the mark, doing so in 990
games. Only Wayne Gretzky (718),
Mario Lemieux (719) and Brett
Hull (900) hit the milestone
in fewer games.
Capitals at Islanders
Thursday, 7 p.m., NBC Sports Washington
I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN
Alex Ovechkin had already taken a seat on the
bench, but his audience stayed standing, cheering
all the while. This was his show, and Capital One
Arena has been his stage for the past 13 years. He
obliged, standing once more, waving to the crowd
and applauding it back. Chants of “O-vi!” started.
Ovechkin handed his stick to the Washington
Capitals’ equipment manager in favor of a new
one. He’d be saving the original.
“It’s going to be in history,” Ovechkin said.
“You’ve got to collect the stuff.”
In a sequence befitting one of the NHL’s most
prolific scorers of all time, Ovechkin notched his
SVRLUGA CONTINUED ON D6
CAPITALS CONTINUED ON D6
For Cousins, it’s time for due diligence Nats have impromptu pitching coach
BY LIZ CLARKE
Speculation about quarterback
Kirk Cousins’s next landing spot —
and his process for choosing it —
kicked into high gear Monday as the
NFL’s designated window for preliminary talks between teams and
free agents opened. Cousins hasn’t
ruled out making a visit, or visits, to
his potential suitors this week.
The plan, according to a person
familiar with the quarterback’s
thinking, was to discuss potential
offers Monday and Tuesday. Based
on those talks, Cousins will determine whether to visit teams and
As negotiating window
opens for free agents,
QB says goodbye to D.C.
tour their facilities, meet with the
front-office representatives, head
coaches, offensive coordinators
and other team personnel.
Before that process gets underway in earnest, Cousins posted a
note of appreciation to Washington Redskins fans, coaches and the
front office for their support dur-
ing his six years in Washington.
“After calling Washington
home for the past six years, the
team has decided to move on to
another option and, in turn, my
family and I will be moving on as
well,” Cousins wrote in his sevenparagraph blog post on his website, KirkCousins.org, that was titled, “Farewell, Washington.”
He recalled fond memories
with teammates, voiced his debt to
Mike Shanahan for his faith in
drafting him in 2012, called his
experience in Washington “a
dream come true” and wrote that
REDSKINS CONTINUED ON D5
BY
C HELSEA J ANES
west palm beach, fla. — The
Washington Nationals’ clubhouse
was nearly empty Sunday morning, save for a few players
sprawled on red chairs before the
game, as Erick Fedde stood in
front of Brandon Kintzler’s locker,
perched as if he were on the pitching rubber.
Over and over, he practiced his
delivery, from standing on his
back leg to following through as if
throwing a ball straight into Anthony Rendon’s locker a few yards
away. Each time, Kintzler would
Veteran reliever Kintzler
is sharing his thoughts
with receptive teammates
observe his form, point to something, then see what Fedde had to
say. Over and over, they would
repeat the process, a budding
pitcher and his volunteer pitching
coach working on drive and mechanics.
Bright stars and loud personalities pack the Nationals’ club-
house, which is loaded with
names and faces more familiar
than Kintzler’s. But subtly, the
33-year-old reliever has emerged
as a valued piece of the chemistry
puzzle, a veteran as eager to share
his thoughts as his teammates are
to hear them — if not occasionally
more eager than they are.
In the clubhouse, where Shawn
Kelley creates T-shirts as fast as
his teammates create memories
worth immortalizing, influence
can be measured by whether one’s
face ends up printed on 100 percent cotton. Kintzler’s likeness
NATIONALS CONTINUED ON D3
D2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 13 , 2018
washingtonpost.com/sports
EARLY LEAD
D.C. SPORTS BOG
EARLY LEAD
Big3 fires
R. Mason
for alleged
corruption
Correa,
Beltran
skip visit
with Trump
BY D ES B IELER
AND R ICK M AESE
Roger Mason Jr. did not go quietly after being fired as commissioner of the Big3 basketball
league for alleged corruption. The
ex-NBA player and high-ranking
official with the players’ union
claimed Monday that a “hostile
and racist” environment existed at
the three-on-three league, which
debuted last year as the brainchild
of actor/rapper Ice Cube.
In a statement provided to The
Washington Post, Mason said he
was fired in retaliation for accusing the Big3, and in particular
co-founder Jeff Kwatinetz, of
breaching his employment agreement. Mason added that “a former
employee of BIG3” recently told
him that Kwatinetz, an entertainment industry executive, “has repeatedly referred to black athletes
as ‘rich n-----s.’ ”
According to TMZ Sports,
which said it obtained a letter sent
to players and league employees,
Mason was fired for corrupt practices following an investigation
into his ties to a pair of Qatari
investors in the league, Ayman
Sabi and Ahmed Al-Rumaihi, who
allegedly withheld millions of dollars from the Big3. When the Big3
sued the two men, Mason allegedly refused to work on the league’s
behalf in the matter.
The Qataris were said to have
bestowed gifts and other benefits
on a few Big3 officials, per the
website, with the implication that
Mason’s integrity had been compromised. Ice Cube will reportedly
step in as commissioner until a
permanent replacement is found.
A spokesman for the Big3 told
The Post that the league would not
have “any comment at this time.”
The news about Mason overshadowed the Big3’s announcement Monday of the schedule for
its second season, which will feature some notable new names.
Former NBA stars such as Amar’e
Stoudemire, Metta World Peace
and Baron Davis are joining the
league, which starts a 10-week season in June, with games in Houston, Chicago, Oakland, Detroit,
Miami, Toronto, Boston, Atlanta,
Dallas and New York.
desmond.bieler@washpost.com
rick.maese@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
QUOTABLE
“I’m vengeful that way.
. . . Vengeful.”
RICHARD SHERMAN,
on signing a three-year contract
with the rival 49ers this past weekend
just days after the Seahawks cut the
four-time Pro Bowl player. Sherman,
who turns 30 on March 30 and is
coming off Achilles’ surgery, will be
extra motivated twice a year when the
teams meet. (Via Early Lead)
BY
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
“To me, it’s a big deal,” Joe Gibbs said of being the face of a new performance management program at Strayer University.
Gibbs to pass along knowledge
BY
S COTT A LLEN
When Joe Gibbs is asked to speak at
coaches
clinics
and
business
organizations, the former three-time
Super Bowl-winning coach of the
Washington Redskins and current
owner of Joe Gibbs Racing never has
enough time to cover all 11 of the
team-building principles he has lived
by throughout his legendary career. As
the face of the new Joe Gibbs
performance management program at
Strayer University, the Pro Football
Hall of Famer and NASCAR Hall of
Fame nominee will finally get that
chance.
“This is one of the most fun things
and most creative things I’ve ever been
a part of,” Gibbs, 77, recently told The
Washingtion Post. “I’m committed to it,
and I’m going to spend time on it. To
me, it’s a big deal.”
Gibbs’s relationship with Strayer
goes back nearly a decade. In 2010,
three years after retiring from coaching
in the NFL a second time, he partnered
with the for-profit college to offer a free
financial seminar for Redskins players.
His new business program will be
offered as both a five-course
concentration
for
Strayer’s
undergraduate bachelor in business
administration degree and a threecourse graduate certificate. The online
courses will draw upon lessons from
Gibbs’s career and feature video
vignettes. Gibbs said he plans to hold
virtual office hours, making himself
available monthly for students to call
and talk to him. Enrollment for the
program is open now, and classes begin
April 2.
Ex-Redskins coach will teach
lessons from his career
in online business program
The first of five courses in the
undergraduate
degree
program
concentration, which run $1,450 per
course, focuses on passion and purpose,
two of Gibbs’s favorite words. There was
a time when Gibbs’s passion was
playing football and his purpose was to
make a lot of money. He couldn’t
accomplish the latter by doing the
former because, as the former high
school quarterback put it, “I looked
down at my body and realized that ain’t
going to happen.” Gibbs envisioned
becoming a scientist or engineer, but he
botched the math portion of his college
entrance examination and wound up in
a remedial math class at San Diego
State, where he also played football.
Gibbs eventually changed his major to
physical education.
Gibbs loved team sports, so he
volunteered on the coaching staff at San
Diego State under head coach Don
Coryell in 1964. It was the start of a
coaching journey that would eventually
lead him to Washington as the coach of
the Redskins in 1981. Along the way,
Gibbs made stops at Florida State
under Bill Peterson (“a workaholic,”
Gibbs said), Southern California under
John McKay (“sharp, quick-witted, he
put the fear in you”) and Arkansas
under Frank Broyles (“one of the
greatest salesmen that’s ever been in
sports or business”) before landing a
job under Coryell, again, as the
offensive coordinator with the San
Diego Chargers in 1979. Gibbs chose
Coryell to present him when he was
enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of
Fame in 1996.
“Coach Coryell was totally different
from those other three guys,” Gibbs
said. “He was total passion. He got
ready to coach as if he were going to
play the game, and he could portray
that to his team. The No. 1 thing when
you start working with teams, the
collective team is going to figure you
out. They’re going to know if you’re
faking something, if you’re not telling
the truth, or not being yourself. I really
feel like your leadership style, you kind
of have to be yourself.”
Gibbs won three Super Bowls with
three different quarterbacks while
being himself during his first 12 seasons
with the Redskins. He founded Joe
Gibbs Racing in 1991, the year before he
retired from the NFL for the first time,
and has won four NASCAR Cup Series
championships as team owner.
Through his partnership with Strayer,
Gibbs hopes to impart some of the
wisdom he has gathered throughout his
career as a team-builder spanning two
sports.
“None of this came from a book or a
study of some kind,” Gibbs said. “This is
on-the-job training after 35 years of
trying to build teams. I’m thrilled that
this is going to give me a chance to kind
of lay out everything I spent my life
trying to do.”
scott.allen@washpost.com
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/
dcsportsbog
Virginia is unanimous
No. 1 in final AP poll
Virginia went from being an
unranked team that few expected
to contend in the ACC to the
unanimous No. 1 in the final
Associated Press Top 25 of the
season.
The Cavaliers (31-2) earned all
65 first-place votes in Monday’s
poll to remain on top for the fifth
straight week, the past two by
unanimous counts. That came
after Virginia completed a 20-1
run against ACC teams by
winning the league tournament,
which helped the Cavaliers secure
the No. 1 overall seed in the NCAA
tournament.
Virginia was picked in the
preseason to finish sixth in the
ACC, but climbed to No. 1 exactly
one month ago for the first time
since the Ralph Sampson era in
the early 1980s.
The top four teams in the poll
matched the selection
committee’s No. 1 seeds. Villanova
(30-4) stayed at No. 2, while
Xavier (28-5) was third and
Kansas (27-7) jumped five spots to
fourth. . . .
Lorenzo Romar is returning to
Pepperdine for a second stint as
The Houston Astros visited
President Trump at the White
House on Monday to celebrate
last year’s World Series victory.
All-star shortstop Carlos Correa
was not with them.
The Astros said Correa and
reliever Ken Giles didn’t attend
because of family reasons.
Now-retired outfielder-designated hitter Carlos Beltran also
wasn’t present. Last month, he
told reporters at an event in
New York that he would be skipping the White House visit not
because of anything Trump did or
said but because he was disappointed in the U.S. government’s
response to Hurricane Maria,
which ravaged Beltran’s home
territory of Puerto Rico last year.
“No, I’m not going to go. Honestly, I’m not going. I’m going to
stay with my family,” Beltran said.
“I’m going to be here in New York
City.”
Trump is “the president of the
United States. If sometimes we
don’t like the things that he does,
or we like the things that he does,
at the end of the day he’s the
president, so [it] have nothing to
do with that,” Beltran continued.
“Honestly, I’m not into politics. . . .
That’s something that I don’t have
a lot of opinion on that.”
Correa also hails from Puerto
Rico.
The Astros announced in January that they had accepted
Trump’s invitation to visit the
White House.
“This is a tradition and an
honor. For many people, this
might be their only time to ever
be invited to the White House,”
Reid Ryan, the Astros’ president
of business operations, told the
Houston Chronicle at the time.
“And as the representatives of
baseball and the World Series
champs, when the White House
calls and invites you to come up,
it’s something that as an organization we felt both a responsibility and an obligation to be part
of.”
A number of other championship-winning teams have stayed
away, most notably the Golden
State Warriors, who decided to
spend their recent time in Washington visiting the National Museum of African American History and Culture with local children after Trump disinvited them
from a White House visit in
September. Others, such as Clemson’s 2016-17 national championship football team and the Stanley Cup-winning Pittsburgh Penguins, accepted Trump’s invitation.
The New England Patriots visited the White House after their
2017 Super Bowl triumph, but
more than two dozen team members declined to make the trip,
with several citing political reasons.
matt.bonesteel@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
TELEVISION AND RADIO
NBA
DIG ES T
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
M ATT B ONESTEEL
men’s head coach.
Athletic Director Steve Potts
said Romar will be back in
Malibu, Calif., as soon as
Arizona’s season ends. Romar is
currently in his first season as
associate head coach with the
Wildcats, who are in the NCAA
tournament.
Romar, 59, guided the Waves
from 1996 to ’99, going 42-44 in
his first head coaching job. . . .
Connecticut finished No. 1 in
the AP women’s poll for the fifth
straight year.
The Huskies (32-0) enter the
NCAA tournament as the lone
unbeaten team and went wire-towire as the unanimous top team.
They received all 32 votes from
the national media panel.
It’s the 15th time in school
history that Connecticut is No. 1
in final poll of the season.
Baylor, Louisville, Mississippi
State and Notre Dame rounded
out the top five.
GOLF
Tiger Woods was one shot
away from a chance to win, and
the PGA Tour had its largest
television audience in five years.
NBC Sports Group said the
final round of the Valspar
Championship earned a 5.11
overnight rating, up 190 percent
over the previous year and the
highest-rated PGA Tour
broadcast, other than majors,
since Woods won the Players
Championship in 2013. . . .
Woods and Ernie Els will duel
in the Presidents Cup again, this
time as captains, according to
sources.
Two people involved in the
Presidents Cup said Woods and
Els have agreed to be captains for
the 2019 matches in Melbourne,
Australia.
SOCCER
Brad Friedel, Carlos
Bocanegra and Thierry Henry
are among first-year eligibles
nominated for the National
Soccer Hall of Fame’s class of
2018. Also on the ballot are Juan
Pablo Angel, Bobby Convey, Jay
DeMerit, Stuart Holden and
Eddie Johnson.
To be eligible, a player must
have played at least 20 full
international games for the
United States (reduced to 10 if the
games were before 1990); or have
played at least five seasons in an
American first-division
professional league and been a
postseason league all-star at least
once; or played at least five
seasons in the Major Indoor
Soccer League between the end of
the NASL in 1984 and the end of
the MISL in 1992, and been
selected as a first-team
postseason all-star in at least one
of those seasons.
The Hall of Fame facility in
Frisco, Tex., will open on Oct. 2021, and will feature induction
ceremonies, followed by FC
Dallas hosting Sporting Kansas
City in an MLS match. . . .
Greece indefinitely suspended
its soccer league Monday, a day
after Ivan Savvidis, the owner of
PAOK Thessaloniki, marched
onto the field following a
disputed goal in a match.
Savvidis walked onto the field
twice accompanied by
bodyguards, and appeared to be
carrying a pistol in a holster
around his waist. He made no
move to use the weapon.
MISC.
In Indian Wells, Calif., Roger
Federer routed Filip Krajinovic,
6-2, 6-1, at the BNP Paribas Open,
while Sloane Stephens remained
mired in her slump.
Federer improved to 65-5 since
returning from a left knee injury
last year with his third-round
victory. Stephens lost to Daria
Kasatkina, 6-4, 6-3, and fell to 2-4
in matches this year. . . .
Former NBA star Dennis
7 p.m.
10:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Washington » NBC Sports Washington, NBA TV, WFED (1500 AM)
Denver at Los Angeles Lakers » NBA TV
NHL
8:30 p.m.
Colorado at Minnesota » NBC Sports Network
MLB SPRING TRAINING
1 p.m.
4 p.m.
7 p.m.
Tampa Bay vs. Philadelphia » MLB Network
Chicago Cubs (split squad) vs. San Diego » MLB Network
Washington vs. New York Mets » MASN, WJFK (106.7 FM)
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
6:40 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
9 p.m.
9 p.m.
9 p.m.
9:10 p.m.
11 p.m.
NCAA, First Four: Radford vs. LIU-Brooklyn » truTV, WTEM (980 AM)
NIT, first round: Louisville vs. Northern Kentucky » ESPN
NIT, first round: Baylor vs. Wagner »ESPN2
NIT, first round: Notre Dame vs. Hampton »ESPN
NIT, first round: Oklahoma State vs. Florida Gulf Coast » ESPN2
NIT, first round: Saint Mary’s (Calif.) vs. Southeastern Louisiana »ESPNU
NCAA, First Four: St. Bonaventure vs. UCLA » truTV, WTEM (980 AM)
NIT, first round: USC vs. North Carolina Asheville » ESPN2
TENNIS
2 p.m.
Indian Wells: ATP third round, WTA round of 16 » Tennis Channel
SOCCER
3:30 p.m.
UEFA Champions League: Sevilla at Manchester United » Fox Sports 1
PARALYMPICS
2 p.m.
Midnight
(Wed.)
Hockey, curling » NBC Sports Network
Alpine skiing, cross-country skiing, curling » NBC Sports Network
Rodman, 56, was sentenced to
three years’ probation after
pleading guilty to two
misdemeanors stemming from a
January 13 DUI arrest in Orange
County, Calif. . . .
The WNBA draft will be held
April 12 at the Nike New York
headquarters.
The Las Vegas Aces hold the
top pick after winning the lottery.
The Aces relocated to Las Vegas
from San Antonio this winter.
The WNBA season begins May
18.
— From news services
TUESDAY, MARCH 13 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
M2
Judge and power-laden Yankees primed to win
BY
D AVE S HEININ
tampa — The New York Yankees’
dugout at George M. Steinbrenner
Field is slanted on a rise from back
to front, and Aaron Judge has
learned by now not to rise quickly
to his feet from the bench at the
back. Just after 3 p.m. Monday, he
put on his batting helmet, carefully took a crouched step forward
and only then unfurled his full
6-foot-7 frame, the top of his helmet barely clearing the cement
roof at the front of the dugout as he
stepped out into the sunshine.
Moments later, Judge, 25,
stepped into the cage for batting
practice. As he and teammates
Gary Sanchez and Giancarlo Stanton took their hacks, sending baseballs to the stadium’s outermost
regions — over scoreboards,
bleachers and quite possibly passing airplanes — hundreds of fans
pressed in around the outfield
walls.
These days, the New York Yankees’ batting practice sessions are
such a draw, the team has invited
fans to the ballpark — both at their
spring training home here and,
during the regular season, at Yankee Stadium in the Bronx — an
hour earlier than in past years, just
so they can watch the show. If the
Rolling Stones opened the gates
for soundcheck each night, who
wouldn’t want to go?
“There’s something really cool
and sexy about seeing the long ball
in practice,” new Manager Aaron
Boone told reporters.
A year ago at this time, Judge
was a strapping but little-known
rookie outfielder just hoping to
crack the Opening Day roster, and
the Yankees were a talented but
young team just hoping to take a
step forward from their fourthplace finish in 2016. If all went well
in 2017, Judge could establish himself as a legitimate big leaguer and
the Yankees could position themselves for a playoff push in 2018.
But both Judge and the Yankees
reached heights last season that
few saw coming — for him, a rookie-record 52 home runs and
American League rookie of the
year honors, and for them, a 91win season and a lengthy trip
STEVE MITCHELL/USA TODAY SPORTS
Aaron Judge, hitting the field to warm up recently, is still rounding into shape after shoulder surgery.
through the playoffs that didn’t
end until Game 7 of the AL Championship Series. They were suddenly the Baby Bombers on the
back page of the New York tabloids, and Judge was the biggest
baby of them all. In July, he was all
but anointed by his fellow all-stars
as the new face of the game.
For both player and team, naturally, the timeline and the expectations have been accelerated as the
2018 season approaches.
“No doubt, the buzz . . . is a lot
louder and more positive,” General Manager Brian Cashman said
earlier this spring. “That’s our job
— to put ourselves in position to be
relevant, to be considered a championship-caliber club.”
On Dec. 9, the team pulled off a
blockbuster trade with the Miami
Marlins to acquire Stanton, a 28year-old outfielder whose 59 homers last season were the most in
baseball in 16 years. With Stanton
joining Judge and Sanchez, the
Yankees arguably possess more
right-handed power in the middle
of their lineup than any team in
history. The 144 homers that trio
combined for in 2017 were more
than the entire San Francisco Giants hit as a team.
“It’s cool to watch him,” Judge
said of Stanton. “He fits right in
with this club. One of the first
things he said to me was, ‘I’m here
to win a championship in New
York.’ ”
With almost their entire core
returning in 2018, and with a mandate from ownership to stay below
the $197 million luxury-tax
threshold, the Yankees, typically
one of the biggest spenders in any
free agent marketplace, made only
minor tweaks to their roster the
rest of the winter.
On Monday, they were still finalizing a one-year, $4 million
contract with free agent second
baseman Neil Walker, a steady veteran who can hold down the position until prospect Gleyber Torres
— the pride of a blossoming farm
system — is ready.
All along, 2018 was the year the
Yankees had targeted as their likely breakthrough season — though
no one was too upset that it arrived a year ahead of schedule. If
they take another step forward
this season, it would be a scary
notion in places like Boston,
where the Red Sox held off the
Yankees by two games to win the
AL East title but lost in the first
round of the playoffs, and Houston, where the Astros barely
eclipsed the Yankees in the ALCS,
then won the World Series.
A step forward for Judge in his
second full big league season is
equally frightening to ponder.
Most prodigious rookie sluggers
see a drop-off in Year 2. That was
the case for the last six batters who
hit at least 36 homers as a rookie:
Mark McGwire (from 49 to 32),
Wally Berger (from 38 to 19), Frank
Robinson (38 to 29), Albert Pujols
(37 to 34), Al Rosen (37 to 24) and
Jose Abreu (36 in 2014 to 30).
Then again, with great Yankees,
the inverse is usually true. Joe
DiMaggio went from 29 homers as
a rookie in 1936 to 46 in his second
year. Mickey Mantle went from 13
as a rookie in 1951 to 23 in year two.
In 1919, Babe Ruth’s first full season as a hitter (400-plus plate
appearances), he hit 29 homers;
the next year, 54.
But before he can ponder any
sort of similar boost in 2018, Judge
needs to get his surgically repaired
left shoulder back up to full speed,
something he referred to Monday
as a “work in progress.”
Last October, at the end of the
longest, most draining year of his
career — one bisected by the left
shoulder injury that contributed
to a vicious midseason slump —
Judge repaired to his childhood
home in Linden, Calif., to decompress.
“I wanted to be with my family
and be with my dogs,” he said. “I
was mentally and physically exhausted. Usually it hits me a few
days after the season. You don’t
feel tired at the end of the season —
you’re running on adrenaline. But
once I’m home for a week, that’s
when it hits you.”
He had the surgery, an arthroscopic procedure for “loosebody removal” and “cartilage
clean-up,” on Nov. 20, with his arm
immobilized in a sling for the first
few days afterward. By that point
on the calendar, he said, he is
usually already ramping up his
offseason workouts, so the surgery
put him behind schedule by several weeks, if not a month or more
— time he is trying to make up for
this spring.
“That was tough, especially
knowing other players are already
working out,” Judge said. “I
missed a lot of swings. But that’s
what spring training is for. I come
in early, stay late after the game. I
have to get my swings in.”
He may not make it back to
100 percent until Opening Day,
Judge said Monday — which is
fine. That was the target all along.
Of course, it’s also true that
sometimes Judge and the Yankees
reach their targets on the early
side.
dave.sheinin@washpost.com
Kintzler shares pitching wisdom, and even Scherzer is listening
NATIONALS FROM D1
was on dark gray T-shirts within
weeks of his arrival at last year’s
deadline, a picture of him sprinkling salt. To a man, his teammates call him “salty,” a nod to his
willingness to express critical
opinions.
“He’s all salt,” Max Scherzer
said with a smirk. “He’s filling my
J-Dub [Jayson Werth] void. He’s
not afraid to show his frustrations
or opinions over anything.”
Kintzler has opinions about
many things and an uncommon
willingness to share them, two
qualities that do not often combine to form a beloved teammate.
For example, most players offering unsolicited critiques to ultracompetitive three-time Cy Young
Award winners such as Scherzer
would not find their advice particularly well received. But when
asked about Kintzler’s suggestions, Scherzer sighed.
“He makes some good points,”
Scherzer said. “There’s some
things I think he’s opened my eyes
to that I think I can add into my
program. He’s on to something.”
For a man as calculated as
Scherzer to concede that, especially to a teammate as new to him
as Kintzler, speaks to the credibili-
ty of the reliever’s criticism. Kintzler can be bold with his ideas
because he has spent months researching and implementing
them. He has had arm trouble and
underwent surgery for a torn tendon in his left knee after the 2014
season. He didn’t recover well. He
didn’t reestablish himself until he
joined the Minnesota Twins in
2016.
Then, last year in spring training, Kintzler started feeling symptoms of patellar tendinitis in his
other knee. Twins trainers worked
on him, but he didn’t improve. He
took medication to mask the pain
but couldn’t eradicate it.
“I was like, nope, I don’t want to
do this again. So I need to figure
out exactly why this happened,”
Kintzler said. He started mining
the Internet for answers and came
across a teaser video from a selfhelp fitness company started by
the founder of one of the earliest
CrossFit Gyms in San Francisco.
He signed up, paying the monthly
fee for a subscription to its videos.
“Then I started watching all the
[patellar] tendinitis videos, trying
to find what was the cause,” Kintzler said. “And it all started with
the feet and ankles.”
Slowly but surely, Kintzler
started amassing enough infor-
mation to address his own tendinitis trouble, then establish a
maintenance routine to prevent it
from recurring. Through the videos, he learned about the importance of big toe mobility — in
simplest terms, the ability to
move one’s big toe separate from
the others — and its effect on the
gluteal muscles so many pitchers
use to generate power.
He began putting a lacrosse ball
under his big toe to increase its
mobility, to make sure he engaged
his feet — and by extension, the
larger muscles of his legs — more
effectively. Even as he pitches
now, Kintzler thinks about pushing off his big toe until the last
possible moment.
“Obviously everything works
from the ground up. So when I had
a knee injury, my ankles and my
feet were extremely tight,” Kintzler
said. “If they don’t absorb the impact, the impact goes upstream. It
goes up to your hips. I learned a lot
about it, so I spread it around the
clubhouse when I can.”
When Sean Doolittle started
feeling tendinitis in his knee last
year, Kintzler passed along advice.
“Now [Doolittle]’s getting supple,” said Kintzler, who has a hat
from the fitness company in his
locker and wore its gear around
N A TI O N A L S N O TE S
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/nationals
Reynolds piling up
spring appearances
Players joke about spring
training titles, as none of them
are particularly coveted. “Spring
training iron man,” for example,
jokingly refers to the player who
has been in the most lineups, for
the most games, near and far.
Those contending for the title
rarely have a roster spot already
secured. Often, they are playing
every day because they are
fighting for a bench role, spelling
regulars while decision-makers
get a long look.
After starting at third base
Monday in the Washington
Nationals’ 5-4 loss to the Detroit
Tigers in Lakeland, Fla., Matt
Reynolds had appeared in 16 of
18 Grapefruit League games —
tied for second most on the team,
though he is likely to take the
lead from Moises Sierra, Jose
Marmolejos and Chris
Dominguez, all of whom have
appeared in one more game than
he has.
Reynolds has played in 115
major league games for the New
York Mets over the past two
seasons. Once heralded as their
shortstop of the future, he
simply never stuck and was
passed over for Ruben Tejada,
among others, over the past five
years. He hit .320 with an .880
on-base-plus-slugging
percentage in 33 games in Class
AAA Las Vegas last year and .230
in 68 big league games.
“I didn’t get much opportunity
to play over there, for whatever
reason. I felt like whenever I did
get an opportunity, I did well.
But for some reason, I never got
an opportunity consistently,”
Reynolds said. “I knew there was
probably a chance if they made a
few free agent signings, that
there was an opportunity that I
would get [designated for
assignment]. So I knew that
going into the offseason. I busted
my ass this offseason to make
sure I was ready for whatever
opportunity presented itself.”
Reynolds realized his fears
when the Mets signed Todd
Frazier in February and
designated him for assignment
to make room. A few days later,
the Nationals traded for him.
Nationals Manager Dave
Martinez called Reynolds the day
after the deal. He told him the
Nationals would need him all
over the field — infield, outfield,
left and right. Reynolds has
played around the infield and in
left field so far. He is hitting .227
with one home run but has
looked more comfortable at the
plate over the last few days and
went 0 for 0 with two walks and
a hit by pitch Monday.
The Nationals have a few
versatile options likely to make
their Opening Day bench, so as
of this week Reynolds looks like
the man just outside the
Opening Day roster, a position
that has morphed into “first man
called up” for these Nationals
over the years. They always
experience injuries. They can
always use a contact-first utility
type with speed. If not right
away, Reynolds seems likely to
get playing time with the
Nationals this season. He is
certainly getting plenty of it now.
— Chelsea Janes
often enough that teammates
started asking him about it. Joe
Ross always had what he described as “bad feet,” so when
Kintzler arrived with suggestions
about toe mobility, he listened.
Now he wears toe spacers in his
cleats and when he trains.
“It puts them in the right spot
so you use your ankle correctly,
and my balance gets a lot better,”
Ross said. “I’m trying to get to the
point where I don’t need them.”
Stephen Strasburg, who has
spoken extensively about the kinetic chain and the lessons he has
learned the hard way about how
leg injuries can affect his arm,
spoke to Kintzler about the program, too.
“It’s great to be able to acquire
some knowledge from him like
that, about how your body works
— if I’m feeling tight there, this is
probably why, and how I can treat
it,” Strasburg said. “. . . I’m more
along the lines of, hey, if it’s not
going to hurt me, I’m going to try
it.”
Strasburg did go on a 34-inning
scoreless streak shortly after Kintzler’s arrival last season. Then
again, as evidenced by the kinetic
chain, causation can be complicated.
Sammy Solis joked that he
sometimes has to tell Kintzler to
“stay over there” during workouts. Manager Dave Martinez
called the veteran “a quiet instigator.” But for all the jokes about his
“salt,” and all the teasing about his
many opinions, Scherzer and
many other Nationals texted Kintzler when he was deciding where
to sign this winter, pleading with
him to return. Now Kintzler and
Scherzer are throwing partners,
playing daily games of catch that
would probably be a pitching student’s delight — if they were at all
suitable for public consumption.
“We’re not afraid to say, ‘Hey,
that was a dog crap slider,’ or
‘What were you thinking here?’ ”
Scherzer said. “That’s how we are.
We’d rather just have each other
lay it on the line. We aren’t sensitive.”
Scherzer is helping Kintzler improve his slider. Kintzler is helping Scherzer improve . . . well,
Scherzer is too secretive to say.
But few baseball minds can challenge Scherzer’s enough to penetrate it. No suggestions earn genuine consideration without careful vetting. Kintzler, impromptu
pitching coach, unheralded workout guru, has passed his stringent
test.
chelsea.janes@washpost.com
SPRING TRAINING NOTES
Gonzalez
has deal
to return
to Rockies
A SSOCIATED P RESS
The Colorado Rockies finalized
a one-year, $5 million contract to
bring back three-time all-star and
popular clubhouse leader Carlos
Gonzalez.
The agreement announced
Monday includes $3 million in
bonuses based on days on the active roster.
Gonzalez, 32, had a $20 million
salary last year in the final season
of a seven-year, $80 million contract and became a free agent after
nine seasons with the Rockies.
The three-time Gold Glove outfielder struggled for most of last
season, but hit six of his 14 homers
in September, during which he
batted .377.
For his career, Gonzalez is a .288
hitter with 215 homers and 711 RBI
in 1,200 games. His 211 homers
with Colorado are the fourth most
in team history, trailing only Todd
Helton (369), Larry Walker (258)
and Vinny Castilla (239).
TWINS: Minnesota finalized
a one-year, $12 million contract
with right-hander Lance Lynn.
After missing the 2016 season
while recovering from Tommy
John surgery, Lynn, 30, went 11-8
with a 3.43 ERA in 33 starts for
St. Louis in 2017. The 6-foot-5,
280-pound Lynn has a career record of 72-47 with a 3.38 ERA.
ATHLETICS: Oakland landed a new starting catcher, finalizing a one-year, $6.5 million deal
with free agent Jonathan Lucroy.
The 31-year-old, two-time allstar batted .265 with six home
runs and 40 RBI in 123 games last
season for Texas and Colorado,
which acquired him July 30.
Oakland designated left-hander Jairo Labourt for assignment to
create roster space for Lucroy.
BREWERS:
Milwaukee
picked right-hander Chase Anderson to start on Opening Day on
March 29 at San Diego.
The 30-year-old Anderson had
the best season of his four-year
career in 2017, going 12-4 with a
2.74 ERA in 25 starts. He will be the
fifth different Opening Day starter
for the Brewers in five seasons.
RANGERS: Bartolo Colon
could be pitching his way into the
rotation at age 44 as he continues
to shut down hitters half his age.
Colon, who has 240 career wins,
no longer dominates with a fastball in the mid-90s, but he is deceptive with pinpoint control.
On Sunday against the Angels,
he allowed one unearned run, two
hits, walked none and struck out
three over four innings and threw
first-pitch strikes to all 15 hitters.
“A lot of moxie on that mound
and a lot of know-how, nothing
rattles him,” Manager Jeff Banister said.
In three appearances, Colon has
a 1.04 ERA, giving up one earned
run in 82/3 innings. He has struck
out six, walked one and allowed
nine hits.
Colon has a base salary of $1.75
million if he makes the team.
YANKEES: Hall of Famer and
team special adviser Reggie Jackson is on the disabled list.
Jackson, 71, is scheduled to have
surgery Tuesday after tripping
and falling during a walk Monday
morning.
Jackson, an instructor at spring
training, hit 563 career home
runs, including 144 with the Yankees from 1977 to ’81.
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D4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 13 , 2018
ncaa tournament
ROUND OF 64
ROUND OF 32
SWEET 16
ELITE 8
FINAL FOUR
FINAL FOUR
ELITE 8
SWEET 16
ROUND OF 32
1 U-Conn.
ROUND OF 64
Mississippi State 1
11 a.m.
16 Saint Francis (Pa.)
8 Miami
6 p.m.
MEN’S INTERACTIVE BRACKET ONLINE
washingtonpost.com/bracket
washingtonpost.com/bracket-challenge
Storrs, Conn.
Saturday-Monday
1:30 p.m.
Starkville, Miss.
Saturday-Monday
Nicholls State 16
Syracuse 8
3:30 p.m.
9 Quinnipiac
Oklahoma State 9
5 Duke
Maryland 5
11 a.m.
12 Belmont
4 Georgia
Noon
Athens, Ga.
Raleigh, N.C.
Saturday-Monday
Friday-Sunday
1:30 p.m.
Princeton 12
N.C. State 4
2:30 p.m.
13 Mercer
Elon 13
ALBANY, N.Y.
March 24, 26
6 South Florida
KANSAS CITY, Mo.
March 23, 25
Iowa 6
1:30 p.m.
11 Buffalo
3 Florida State
6 p.m.
Tallahassee
Los Angeles
Saturday-Monday
Saturday-Monday
11 a.m.
American 14
7 California
Arizona State 7
5 p.m.
2 South Carolina
UCLA 3
3:30 p.m.
14 Little Rock
10 Virginia
Creighton 11
3:30 p.m.
Columbia, S.C.
Austin
Friday-Sunday
Saturday-Monday
Nebraska 10
Texas 2
7:30 p.m.
6 p.m.
15 North Carolina A&T
March 30
1 Notre Dame
5 p.m.
16 Cal State Northridge
8 South Dakota State
Women’s national
championship
Maine 15
March 30
Louisville 1
Noon
April 1 in Columbus, Ohio
South Bend, Ind.
Louisville
Friday-Sunday
Friday-Sunday
7:30 p.m.
Boise State 16
Marquette 8
2:30 p.m.
9 Villanova
Dayton 9
5 DePaul
Missouri 5
Noon
3:30 p.m.
12 Oklahoma
College Station,
Tex.
4 Texas A&M
Friday-Sunday
Stanford, Calif.
Saturday-Monday
Fla. Gulf Coast 12
Stanford 4
2:30 p.m.
6 p.m.
13 Drake
Gonzaga 13
SPOKANE, Wash.
March 24, 26
6 LSU
LEXINGTON, Ky.
March 23, 25
Oregon State 6
11 a.m.
11 Central Michigan
3 Ohio State
Noon
Columbus, Ohio
Knoxville, Tenn.
Saturday-Monday
Friday-Sunday
1:30 p.m.
W. Kentucky 11
Tennessee 3
2:30 p.m.
14 George Washington
Liberty 14
7 Green Bay
Michigan 7
5 p.m.
10 Minnesota
2 Oregon
5 p.m.
Eugene, Ore.
Friday-Sunday
Waco, Tex.
Friday-Sunday
All first-round games are on ESPN2.
All times are Eastern. Game times are approximate.
7:30 p.m.
Northern Colo. 10
Baylor 2
7:30 p.m.
15 Seattle
Grambling 15
GW, AU, Virginia will join Maryland in NCAA tournament
MARYLAND FROM D1
year before Maryland won its only
national championship.
Even so, the Terps were nothing
less than ecstatic to finally hear
their name called in the final
region revealed during Monday’s
selection show. This is the eighth
straight NCAA tournament appearance for Maryland and the
26th overall, though it is the first
time the program has ever been a
No. 5 seed.
“I love it,” Frese said. “I really
like our bracket, our matchups,
where we’re headed, finally, to
have it revealed. Now let’s go play.”
The Terps have only met
Princeton once in the NCAA tournament, in 2015, when they beat
the Tigers, 85-70, in the second
round in College Park.
This time around, Princeton’s
leading scorer is former firstteam All-Met Bella Alarie out of
National Cathedral, a 6-foot-4
sophomore swing player who
leads the Tigers with 13.3 points
and 9.6 rebounds per game and
has 75 blocks on the season. She is
the daughter of former Washington Bullets forward Mark Alarie.
Freshman Abby Meyers, a former All-Met from Whitman High,
is another key contributor for the
Tigers.
Should Maryland advance past
Princeton, the winner of the
matchup between No. 4 seed
North Carolina State and No. 13
seed Elon awaits. Should they
proceed to the region semifinals
in Kansas City, Mo., the Terps
would likely have to go through
No. 1 seed Mississippi State (32-1)
— the team that shocked Connecticut and ended the Huskies’ record-setting 111-game winning
streak last year in the Final Four.
No. 2 seed Texas (26-6) and
No. 3 seed UCLA (24-7) loom further down the line as possible
region final opponents.
The other top seeds besides
Mississippi State are 11-time national champion Connecticut
(32-0) in the Albany Region;
Notre Dame (29-3) in the Spokane
Region; and Louisville (32-2) in
the Lexington Region. The Cardinals were national championship
runners-up in 2009 and 2013. The
Fighting Irish, which won the national title in 2001, have played in
five of the past seven Final Fours.
Maryland wasn’t the only team
from the Washington area hosting a watch party Monday — Vir-
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Coach Brenda Frese and the Terrapins, who are 25-7, will open the NCAA tournament away from College Park for the first time since 2007 and face No. 12 seed Princeton.
ginia, George Washington and
American are also headed to the
Big Dance.
Patriot League champion
American (26-6) joins Maryland
in the Kansas City Region as a
No. 14 seed and will head to Los
Angeles to play No. 3 seed UCLA
on Saturday.
George Washington (19-13) is
also a No. 14 seed and drew a
first-round matchup against
third-seeded Ohio State (27-6) on
the Buckeyes’ home court in Columbus — which also happens to
be the site of this year’s Final Four
— on Saturday afternoon in the
Spokane Region.
This is the Atlantic 10 tournament champion Colonials’ first
NCAA tournament appearance
under second-year Coach Jenni-
fer Rizzotti, who was the starting
point guard for the first national
championship team at Connecticut.
No. 10 seed Virginia (18-13) also
returns to the NCAA tournament
this year, for the first time since
2010.
The Cavaliers narrowly missed
the field of 64 last year but beefed
up their nonconference schedule
and racked up 10 conference wins,
and now Coach Joanne Boyle will
lead Virginia against No. 7 seed
California (21-10) — where Boyle
was head coach from 2005 to 2011
— in Columbia, S.C., on Friday in
the Albany Region.
“Last year just being that last
team that was out, it was a gut
punch,” Boyle said at the watch
party in Charlottesville. “We went
back to the drawing board, looked
a little bit at what we could’ve
done better. . . . It’s great. It’s not
for me. It’s always about the team
and the work that they’ve put in.
I’ve been to the tournament. I’ve
been fortunate enough to be there
with other teams. So the goal, in
this program, is let’s get this program back to where it used to be.”
ava.wallace@washpost.com
TUESDAY, MARCH 13 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D5
SU
Pair of Hurleys are in NCAAs,
and their father is a wreck
CHARLIE RIEDEL/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Devonte’ Graham originally signed with Appalachian State and spent a season at a prep school before playing at Kansas for four seasons.
Graham’s game has a voice all its own
BY
C HUCK C ULPEPPER
kansas city, mo. — As the Big 12
player of the year, Devonte’
Graham plays an interpretation of
basketball that qualifies pretty
much as beautiful, which would
make him one of the foremost
players to watch this March Madness. But that doesn’t mean he’s
going to insist you watch him.
He’s not. He can preen with the
best of them after a big shot, stalk
back down the court as the crowd
roars and the premises rattle, but
he does not crave attention. His
reasoning for not craving it is crucial in the atmosphere of 2018. It’s
not because he’s showing false
modesty, and it’s not because he’s
shy, because he isn’t. Coach Bill
Self has named Graham’s personality one of the best on all of Self’s
15 Kansas rosters.
“Lights up a room when he
comes in,” teammate Malik Newman said.
It’s because Graham, 23, aims to
practice an art that has never been
more essential: that of limiting the
voices in one’s head in an era when
there have never been more available voices, when coaches lament
how players might be altering
themselves to suit the voices from
all the analysts and the draft experts and the Twitter and the
whatnot.
So to the question of whether
people should watch the player
who just had 18 gorgeous points
and 13 lovely assists in the eyepleasing Big 12 tournament final
against West Virginia on Saturday,
Graham said: “I mean, naw. I feel
like, if anything, they’ll watch us,
just because it’s Kansas. I know I
probably get a lot of the TV promo
and stuff like that, but as a team we
can be really unstoppable sometimes. If everybody’s head’s right,
we’re a good team.”
So he’ll participate in the TV
promos because he’s generally
agreeable, even as he said: “See, I’m
not really into it. I don’t really pay
much attention to it. A lot of times
when we’re about to play, I don’t
even watch ESPN and stuff like
that, because they’ll just be promoting the team and saying whatever they want to say. And it’s a lot
of opinions that, sometimes, it can
get in your head and how you’re
thinking a certain way, so I just try
to stay away from it and stay off
social media and stuff like that.”
While we seldom know what’s
going on in the minds of the players we watch, we do know Graham
has followed a long trail to here.
He signed with Appalachian State.
He helped usher his Broughton
High team in Raleigh, N.C., into a
state final in 2013. He wanted to
alter his college decision. Appalachian State wouldn’t let him, so he
went on for a year at Brewster
Academy in New Hampshire.
By the next spring, he had it
narrowed to Virginia, North Carolina State and Kansas. In May
2014, after a new coach at Appalachian State granted him his release, and after another Brewster
player, Naadir Tharpe, transferred
out of Kansas, Graham stepped in
as the highest-ranked unsigned
prospect at that moment, 36th in
the land according to Rivals.com.
Self called the 6-foot-2 point guard
a “late bloomer” to Kansas report-
ers back then, and Graham has
made his way through four college
seasons, reaching second-team
all-Big 12 in 2016-17, then spending
these past 12 months becoming, he
said, more aggressive, more talkative and a better screen-reader.
By Saturday night, he was a
basketball symphony. Already he
had left a late mark on the first half
with his fur-flying, fast-break,
sideways lob to freshman Angolan
big man Silvio De Sousa, fetching a
bit of momentum six seconds before halftime.
Then, starting from the 13:32
mark when Kansas trailed 51-47,
Graham had a three-point shot, an
audaciously long three-point shot,
an assist for Newman’s threepoint shot, another assist, yet another assist, his own jumper, then
another assist. He then managed
to tuck into that mix a rare experience for a viewer, a sight unseen
even after watching an unhealthy
amount of basketball: He scored
after removing an article of clothing during play.
It came with 4:34 left and Kansas ahead 68-66. Graham held the
ball out in the hinterland between
the key and midcourt when suddenly he took on this agitated expression, then rather clunkily
ripped off his shooting sleeve from
his non-shooting arm and hurled
it upward over the scorer’s table
and into the crowd. “He had held
my arm and pulled it down,”
Graham said of his attentive defender. “So it was kind of just on
my hand, so I just took it right off.”
He followed that immediately by
dribbling down to the left baseline, fading and hitting a delicious
12-footer. He then added another
three and another assist, and the
Jayhawks led 76-68 with 3:17 left.
Within moments, a man who
knows as much about defense as
anyone, West Virginia Coach Bob
Huggins, was explaining the impossibility of guarding Kansas
when its shots are singing, and
when De Sousa shoots 8 for 8
largely as a result of all the space.
“Then we tried to double the ball
screen,” Huggins said. “Then you
double the ball screen. You’ve got
two guys chasing. And if y’all haven’t figured it out, Devonte’
Graham is pretty good!”
Appropriately, Graham ended
the 81-70 win with a steal, which led
him to dribble around the premises
and under the basket while taking
pains not to score so as to just drain
the clock. Kansas would enter the
NCAA tournament as a No. 1 seed,
and Graham would be a leading
reason to watch Kansas — but you
can feel free to watch Kansas and
not him, if you prefer.
“I don’t feel like I need all that
attention,” he said. “I’ve always
been kind of a low-key, under-theradar type of player. So all the
attention was never really my
thing. I just went out and hooped
and, you know, coach always
keeps saying he’s glad — ‘You’re
finally getting the attention you
deserve.’ But at the end of the day,
it’s not really big to me.”
“You don’t care,” a reply came.
“Naw,” he said. “Individual
stuff, it’s not my thing.”
That might sound like modesty,
but in the cacophony of 2018, it’s
more so a strategy.
chuck.culpepper@washpost.com
R EDS K IN S N O T ES
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/redskins
Kicker Hopkins signs
multiyear contract
The Washington Redskins resigned place kicker Dustin
Hopkins to a multiyear deal.
The team locked up the veteran
who has spent the past three
years in Washington on Monday.
He was set to become an
unrestricted free agent when the
new league year begins
Wednesday.
Hopkins’s 89.3 field goal
percentage was ninth in the NFL
in 2015, and he connected on 82.4
percent of his attempts last
season before a right hip rotator
muscle strain forced him to the
injured reserve list after eight
games.
Nick Rose filled the position for
the final eight games of the
season.
Hopkins is fifth in Redskins
history with 73 made field goals
and 13th in points (312). The 73
makes are the 28th most among
active NFL kickers.
He was a sixth-round pick by
the Buffalo Bills in 2013 but never
played a game for the
organization after going on
injured reserve as a rookie and
then being cut in 2014. Hopkins
signed with New Orleans in 2014
but never kicked for the Saints.
He joined the Redskins in 2015.
The Redskins have signed two
players of their own, preventing
them from hitting the market.
Safety Deshazor Everett was
signed last week to a multiyear
deal, keeping him from restricted
free agency.
A tender on Nsekhe
The Redskins also placed a
second-round tender on tackle Ty
Nsekhe, driving the cost up for
other teams looking to snatch
away the backup tackle.
Nsekhe was slated to become a
restricted free agent when the
league year begins. Coach Jay
For the first time,
really, as an adult,
the coach had no
team of his own, so
he could sit in the
first row behind the
Barry
bench wearing a
Svrluga
long-sleeved, blue
Rhode Island
basketball T-shirt, standing when
the other fans stood, sitting when
they sat, clapping only when the
moment proved so significant that
keeping his arms crossed would
have seemed rude. Neither the
Rhode Island Rams nor the Arizona
State Sun Devils are Bob Hurley Sr.’s
team. Try to tell his roiling gut that.
“I said to my wife that I’m more
nervous than she could ever be
because I know everything that
could go wrong,” Hurley said. “I’m
watching everything under the
sun. Nobody knows how many
things are going on. Coaches do.”
Hurley is, by definition and
profession and demeanor, a
coach. He is in the basketball Hall
of Fame. Over a career that
spanned more than 40 years, he
won 28 state championships and
more than 1,200 games at
St. Anthony High in Jersey City.
But St. Anthony closed last
spring. Hurley had no team of his
own, so he adopted the two that
made the most sense: Rhode
Island, coached by his younger
son Dan, and Arizona State,
coached by his older son Bobby.
That puts the Hurley patriarch
in a unique spot for the NCAA
tournament. On Wednesday
night, Bobby’s Sun Devils face
Syracuse for the right to enter the
main draw. Hurley Sr. is the only
man with two sons as head
coaches in the field of 68. More
than that, though, he is in
position to coach those coaches,
to father those sons, nearly
30 years after the two boys played
on the same St. Anthony team.
“But he kind of forces me to
ask,” said Dan Hurley, who played
at Seton Hall before getting into
the family business. “He stays real
positive. He would just wait for
me to open up the door — and
then I get the wisdom.”
Dan Hurley isn’t a coaching
neophyte. He is in his sixth season
at Rhode Island, where he was the
Atlantic 10’s coach of the year after
leading the Rams to the regular
season title. Before that came two
seasons at Wagner, nearly a decade
as the coach at St. Benedict’s Prep
in Newark — where he battled his
dad for in-state supremacy — and
assistant coaching stops at Rutgers
and one season under his father on
his old bench.
Bobby Hurley was, for a time, the
most famous in the family, the
point guard for back-to-back
national champions at Duke, still
the NCAA’s career leader in assists.
Because Bobby spent five seasons
in the NBA, his coaching career
came later. When it began, it did so
at Wagner on Dan’s staff. Bobby
followed Dan to Rhode Island and
then broke out on his own, landing
his first head job at Buffalo before
taking the Arizona State gig in 2015.
“The two of them together? It
was two volcanoes erupting
almost simultaneously,” Hurley Sr.
said.
Now, though, the frivolous
arguments about which play to
run or what player to insert are
over. Bob Hurley’s boys text or
talk daily. They watch each other’s
games. They live with results over
which they have no control. Need
evidence? Watch the video of Dan
Hurley, his Rams gathered round,
reacting to the news that Bobby’s
on-the-bubble Sun Devils made
the NCAA field. He punched the
air with excitement, then buried
his head in his hands, the
emotions too much.
“Just having your best friend in
the world, the person you love
each [other] the most, to have
them there to pick up the pieces,
it means so much,” Dan Hurley
said. “We need each other. In this
business, we need each other.”
What they’re finding, though,
is they also need their dad. And
their dad is available — mostly.
Bob Hurley Sr. might not have a
team of his own. But at 70, he
couldn’t put down the game
altogether. So he runs a nonprofit
in Jersey City, and from 3 to 6 p.m.
every day, he teaches kids
basketball. Bounce pass. Pivot
foot. Jump shot. Basics.
But Dan, in particular, got to
pick his brain this season. “Just
proximity,” Hurley Sr. said,
because he could close the Jersey
City gym on a given day and make
it to Kingston, R.I., for practice.
Tempe, Ariz., proved too far, so he
had to catch up with Bobby every
10 days or so by phone.
Unless asked, Bob does not
offer specific thoughts on how to
defend or attack another team.
But he knows the Rams’
personnel better than anyone not
on Dan’s staff. A few weeks ago,
when the Rams were starting to
struggle, he reminded Dan not to
give up on senior forward Andre
Berry, who was losing minutes to
sophomore Cyril Langevine. The
father’s message to son: Don’t
simultaneously wear out
Langevine physically and hurt
Berry’s confidence, because you
need them both.
“I know when we’re talking
about it,” Hurley Sr. said, “he’s
already gone through paralysis by
analysis, which coaches do. So I
try to be positive.”
It makes sense, then, that Berry
had 18 points and nine rebounds
in Saturday’s narrow victory over
Saint Joseph’s in the conference
semifinals.
When the NCAA tournament
begins, that amazing resource
will be there for two sons, two
teams traveling two paths. The
gym in Jersey City will sit closed
this week. Bob Sr. and his wife,
Chris, were poised to travel, first
to Dayton, Ohio, for Bobby’s
game, then maybe Pittsburgh for
Rhode Island or on to Detroit for
Arizona State. One legendary
coach helping two teams from
afar, maybe the best resource for
any team in the field.
barry.svrluga@washpost.com
For more by Barry Svrluga, visit
washingtonpost.com/svrluga.
Gruden specifically mentioned
Nsekhe when praising the
offensive line as the strength of
the team during the combine.
Placing a second-round tender
on the 32-year-old ensures the
Redskins won’t lose him for
nothing. The second-round
tender amount is $2.914 million,
and Nsekhe would play a single
year under that contract and
could negotiate a longer-term
deal with the team. If he signs
with a different team, the
Redskins still have the right to
match it. Should they choose not
to, Washington would receive a
second-round pick as
compensation.
— Kareem Copeland
Cousins thanks the Redskins for his ‘opportunity’
REDSKINS FROM D1
he and his family would “always
have a piece of Washington deep
in our hearts.”
Noting that he still had much to
learn and prove, Cousins wrote:
“There is no way I would be where
I am today without the leadership
of the Redskins organization . . .
Coach Gruden, Bruce Allen, Dan
Snyder. Thank you all for the opportunity you gave me.”
But it was two tags among nearly two dozen listed at the bottom of
Cousins’s blog post that drew most
comment nearly the moment it
was posted. Cousins included
“jets” and “vikings” among a list of
search terms, which are designed
to steer readers to the post via
Internet search engines. The other
tags included “faith,” “family,”
“farewell,” “kirk cousins” and
“new team.” Within an hour, the
“jets” and “vikings” tags were removed, leaving no potential destination for the quarterback among
the search terms.
Cousins is believed to have narrowed his list of landing spots to
the Minnesota Vikings, Denver
Broncos, New York Jets and Arizona Cardinals.
Cousins, 29, who led the Redskins to the NFC East title in 2015,
earned Pro Bowl honors in 2016
and threw for more than 4,000
yards in each of his three seasons
as the team’s starting quarterback,
is regarded as the most sought-after free agent among this season’s
crop. During his NFL tenure, he
has developed a reputation as a
diligent student regarding every
facet of quarterback play —
dogged about pursuing any tip,
tactic or training tool that could
help him raise his performance.
It’s difficult to imagine he would
pass on an opportunity to meet
and speak to his next employer
and coaches firsthand before
making what he called in his farewell blog post “one of the bigger
decisions of my life.”
That suggests it may be Thursday, or later, before Cousins reaches a decision on where he will play
after spending the first six years of
his career in Washington — the
first four under a rookie deal that
paid him roughly $600,000 per
year and the last two under backto-back NFL franchise tags worth
a total of roughly $44 million.
No new NFL contracts can be
signed before Wednesday at 4
p.m., the start of the NFL’s new
league year.
Interest in Cousins’s next team
has been considerable, even
among the NFL’s players. The
Ringer, a sports and pop culture
website founded by sportswriter
Bill Simmons, is posting a rolling
“Kirk Cousins free-agency thirst
index,” based in part on the number of overtures aimed at Cousins
via social media from players on
his would-be suitors’ rosters.
Denver wide receiver Emmanuel Sanders, as the site noted, tweeted in response to a Cousins tweet
soliciting advice on where he
should sign, that he, fellow wideout Demaryius Thomas and Cousins would make a “dangerous”
combination.
Broncos linebacker Von Miller
has been campaigning for Cousins
to sign with Denver almost since
the 2017 season ended, telling virtually anyone who will listen why
Cousins could change the team’s
fortunes. “I’m all in 100 percent,”
Miller said of signing Cousins, in
an interview with NFL.com. “This
is a big time for Denver and a big
time for the National Football
League. You don’t really have, especially quarterbacks, become
free like that.”
Earlier this offseason, Cousins
posted his own photo of himself
with Cardinals veteran wide receiver Larry Fitzgerald, after the
two ran into each other at Atlanta’s
airport, with a caption that read:
“Ran into Fitz in the airport yesterday. He’s a GREAT recruiter!”
liz.clarke@washpost.com
202-855-7033 DC | 301-683-7290 MD
571-429-5449 VA
Corporate Discounts Available
D6
EZ
NFL NOTES
Bills move
up in draft,
send Glenn
to Bengals
A SSOCIATED P RESS
The Buffalo Bills put themselves in better position to select a
quarterback in next month’s NFL
draft, and the Cincinnati Bengals
added protection for their franchise QB, Andy Dalton.
The Bills moved up nine spots
in the draft Monday by swapping
first-round picks with the Bengals,
who also acquired high-priced left
tackle Cordy Glenn, a person familiar with the deal told the Associated Press. The person spoke on
condition of anonymity because
teams are not allowed to announce trades until the NFL’s new
business year opens Wednesday.
Buffalo moved up to the No. 12
spot by trading the first of its two
opening-round selections, the 21st
overall. The Bills also have the
22nd pick. Buffalo also traded its
fifth-round pick (158th overall) for
the Bengals’ sixth-round selection
(187th) as part of the Bills’ second
major trade in three days. On Friday, Buffalo traded quarterback
Tyrod Taylor to Cleveland for a
third-round pick.
Glenn has been a starter since
being selected in the second round
of the 2012 draft. He was limited to
six games last year by a left foot
injury that required surgery.
CHIEFS: Kansas City released one of its career sack leaders, Tamba Hali, and a veteran
stalwart of its secondary, Ron
Parker, in moves designed to help
the team get younger and have
some financial freedom.
The Chiefs parting ways with
longtime linebacker Hali was
hardly a surprise given his decreased production. Parker, a safety who had missed one game over
the past four seasons, was waived.
Hali was due a base salary of
$5,750,000 with a salary cap hit of
more than $9 million. He had one
tackle in five games last year.
DOLPHINS: Miami is discussing releasing five-time Pro
Bowl tackle Ndamukong Suh, a
person familiar with the situation
said. The Dolphins are also expected to release veteran linebacker
Lawrence Timmons.
Suh’s release is anticipated unless he restructures his contract.
He signed a six-year, $114 million
deal in 2015; his base salary in
2018 would be $17 million.
RAVENS: Baltimore signed
offensive lineman James Hurst to
a four-year contract, providing
stability in front of Joe Flacco.
Also, safety Lardarius Webb
said goodbye to Ravens fans on
Twitter; he’s expected to be released after nine seasons.
RAIDERS: Oakland released
cornerback Sean Smith and right
tackle Marshall Newhouse to create salary cap room.
Smith was set to plead guilty
Tuesday to a felony count of assault with great bodily injury in
connection with an altercation in
Pasadena, Calif., last year, according to the attorney for the alleged
victim. Smith was accused of assaulting his sister’s then-boyfriend, Christopher Woods, on
July 4. Two witnesses testified during a preliminary hearing in December that Smith stomped
Woods’s head as he lay bleeding
and unconscious. Smith will be
sentenced to one year in jail and
five years of probation.
The Raiders also announced
the signing of defensive tackle Justin Ellis to a three-year contract
and signed wide receiver Griff
Whalen to a one-year deal.
BRONCOS: Denver defensive end Adam Gotsis was charged
with rape in Atlanta.
An incident report said a 30year-old woman went to Atlanta
police Feb. 1 and told an investigator that Gotsis raped her March 9,
2013. The Broncos said they were
aware of an incident that allegedly
took place when Gotsis was in
college at Georgia Tech. Police said
Gotsis turned himself in March 7.
Fulton County jail records show
he was released on $50,000 bond.
SAINTS: New Orleans right
tackle Zach Strief said he’s retiring
after 12 seasons. Strief was a seventh-round draft choice out of
Northwestern in 2006. He wound
up being part of the most successful era in franchise history, including a Super Bowl win in 2009.
COWBOYS: Dallas re-signed
defensive tackle Brian Price, an
exclusive-rights free agent who
played eight games last season.
Also, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram said cornerback Orlando
Scandrick requested his release.
SEAHAWKS: Seattle retained a key defender by signing
safety Bradley McDougald to a
three-year contract. NFL.com reported the deal is worth nearly
$14 million. In 2017, he had 67
tackles and four passes defensed.
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 13 , 2018
Wall takes next step toward a return in pre-practice workout
BY
C ANDACE B UCKNER
For a little more than half an
hour on Monday, John Wall joined
the Washington Wizards starters,
completing the next step in his
rehabilitation process.
Wall, who has spent the previous
five-plus weeks recovering from
left knee surgery, participated in a
pre-practice workout. Along with
four starters, Wall drilled through
the team’s offensive script when no
defenders were on the court. Wall
split time in the point guard position with Tomas Satoransky and
played off the ball in his first session working with teammates
since undergoing surgery Jan. 31.
“He looked good. A little winded, but that was expected,” Coach
Scott Brooks said about the workout, which lasted 30-35 minutes.
“This was just the next step to get
him on the court, some five-on-zero stuff, to get him on the court
with other players. Not sure how
many more days will this be before
he goes to contact. It’s definitely
progressing in that direction. Just
taking it day by day now.”
Although the Wizards (38-29)
have three games this week, Wall
is not expected to play. Before returning to the Wizards’ starting
lineup, Wall must go through a few
more steps and ultimately participate in a five-on-five scrimmage
with contact.
On Wednesday, when the Wizards play in Boston on the second
night of a back-to-back set, Wall
will reach the six-week marker of
his rehab timeline. The team will
not practice after consecutive
games, but Brooks said Wall could
WIZ ARDS’ NEX T THREE
vs. Minnesota Timberwolves
Today
7 NBCSW, NBA TV
at Boston Celtics
Tomorrow
8 ESPN
vs. Indiana Pacers
Saturday
7 NBCSW
Radio: WFED (1500 AM)
still get in another workout with
coaches and team staffers. Wall
would have to wait until Friday to
potentially practice in a five-onfive setting.
“We’ll have a practice at the end
of the week,” Brooks said, “and if
everything continues to go in the
right direction, he’ll be there.”
The number of games that Wall
will play, however, is not as certain.
Beginning Tuesday when the
Wizards host the Minnesota Timberwolves, only 15 games remain
in the regular season. Because it’s
already expected that Wall will not
return this week, he will have a
dozen games left to prepare for a
possible postseason run. To
Brooks, the number of games does
not matter — the team is more
concerned about getting Wall
comfortable again.
“I just want him to keep doing
the work that he’s put in,” Brooks
said. “We just want to make sure
we’re never going to put him out
there before he’s ready. Whenever
he’s ready — whether it’s eight
games, one game, no game — if
he’s ready to play, he’s ready to
play. But I’m not going to put a
time on it. He’s not going to. I know
he’s progressing in the right direction and he’s feeling good.”
Even if Wall needs more time
before completing his return,
Brooks expressed confidence that
his all-star point guard can quickly readjust to the action.
“A guy that’s dynamic like John,
not a lot [of time is needed to
readjust]. He’s unique,” Brooks
said. “As we all know, he can play
through a lot of things and not
touch a basketball for five straight
weeks and come out and make
shots and dribble the ball like he
sleeps with it. It’s unbelievable
that he has that type of skill set,
that type of talent. A lot of players
can’t do that.”
candace.buckner@washpost.com
Another milestone: Ovechkin scores 600th goal in overtime win
CAPITALS FROM D1
600th career goal only after multiple whacks. There was a scramble
in front of the net early in the
second period, with Winnipeg Jets
goaltender Connor Hellebuyck
sprawled across the crease. The
first shot was blocked. Hellebuyck
saved the second. Ovechkin
scored on the third, gleefully skating behind the net, dropping to a
knee with a leg kicked up as his
teammates jumped into his arms.
“I was just screaming at him,”
said Tom Wilson, who recorded
the primary assist.
Ovechkin’s two-goal game
helped the Capitals to a 3-2 overtime win and made Ovechkin just
the 20th player in NHL history
with 600 goals on his résumé. He
is just the fourth player to reach
that mark within 1,000 games,
joining Wayne Gretzky, Mario Lemieux and Brett Hull. With Washington back at its home rink for
the first time in nearly two weeks,
Ovechkin ended the much-anticipated wait for his 600th tally less
than 24 game minutes after the
puck dropped.
“When you look at those numbers, you don’t even think it’s 599,
600,” said the Capitals’ Evgeny
Kuznetsov, who scored the overtime winner. “But then when you
understand, holy f---, that’s a lot of
goals. I can’t score 20 in a year.
This is 600.”
The 599th goal was quintessential Ovechkin. Two penalties by
the Jets within 35 seconds of each
other gave the Capitals a two-man
advantage early in the first period.
Ovechkin has scored roughly
70 percent of his goals at even
strength this season, but his career highlight reel is full of onetimers from the left faceoff circle,
referred to as his office.
Taking a pass from defenseman
John Carlson, Ovechkin skated
into his sweet spot and wristed the
puck past Hellebuyck, building
even more anticipation that the
milestone 600th tally might follow by the time the night was over.
Ovechkin’s wife, Nastya, just returned from Moscow and was in
the stands. Before the game, she
told him she had a feeling he
would score two. He had a whopping eight shot attempts after the
first period, and he finished the
night with eight shots on goal, the
most dominant player on the ice.
“This morning, he was really
quiet,” Coach Barry Trotz said. “He
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
It took Alex Ovechkin several tries to knock his 600th goal past Jets goalie Connor Hellebuyck, but the Capitals’ captain got the job done.
knew he was going to get it done
today. The great thing about Ovi is,
when he puts something to it in his
mind, he was going to get it done
tonight. We were all talking as a
coaching staff about it this morning that he’s getting it tonight.”
It’s a testament to Ovechkin
that he has scored so frequently
from that same beloved location in
the left faceoff circle. Teams expect
it, plan for it, but still can’t stop it.
Earlier this season, St. Louis Blues
goaltender Carter Hutton called it
an “almost unsaveable shot.”
The threat of Ovechkin’s shot
has never been a question, but in
the past four seasons under Trotz,
his game has evolved. Trotz challenged him to be more defensively
responsible, and Ovechkin bought
into Trotz’s system while still authoring two 50-goal campaigns.
Last season was a down one by his
standards, and he scored just 33
goals, with 17 of them coming on
the power play. The Capitals challenged Ovechkin to make some
changes this summer, to trim
down so he could move quicker on
the ice in a league that’s getting
faster with the infusion of young,
BARRY SVRLUGA
Ovechkin’s brilliance counts
far more than playoff shortfalls
SVRLUGA FROM D1
team’s only two regulation goals
in what became a 3-2 overtime
victory. When considering the
accomplishment, think about the
building in which it came and its
moniker, because when Ovechkin
scored goal No. 1 — on Oct. 5,
2005 — the place on F Street was
known as MCI Center. We were
all younger then, weren’t we?
The first goal, way back when,
came via assists from Dainius
Zubrus and Jeff Halpern, Caps
from yesteryear now retired.
Ovechkin followed it with
another that same night, just like
No. 599 was followed by No. 600
Monday. This was the 990th
game of his career, so it’s worth
recounting what that means.
You’ll hear this a lot, but drink it
in. Here is the list of players who
reached 600 goals in fewer games
than Ovechkin: . Wayne Gretzky.
Mario Lemieux. Brett Hull. That’s
it. Heady stuff.
It’s instructive that Ovechkin’s
first goal feels so distant, because
it came in a different era in the
sport around here. Back then, we
saw only the potential. He
represented hockey hope in
Washington, a quantity that was
not available to the masses. The
sport was different here back
then, marked by an arena that
seemed more half-empty than
half-full.
We can fall into that trap, too,
because it’s easy to concentrate
on what Ovechkin has not
accomplished rather than what
he has. We know the spring stats,
that the three Hart Trophies as
the NHL’s most valuable player
have not been followed with even
a modicum of playoff success.
These are Ovechkin’s Caps, and
they have been for a dozen years,
so their failure to advance past
the second round of the playoffs
is his failure to advance past the
second round of the playoffs.
They’re linked, for sure.
But focusing on that
connection — even as these
current Capitals work their way
through a goaltending
controversy and try to maximize
a limited roster — also minimizes
what we have witnessed since
that first goal back at the place
then known as MCI Center. And
what we have witnessed has been
mesmerizing.
The first time I talked with
Ovechkin came in January 2006.
He was in his rookie year with the
talented stars.
Ovechkin shared the ice with
one of those members of the next
generation Monday. Winnipeg’s
Patrik Laine grew up on Ovechkin
highlights, modeling his game after the power forward. The 19year-old Finn loved how physical
Ovechkin played, and Laine developed his own dangerous shot. He
scored his 16th goal in the past 12
games early in the third period to
tie the score at 2. He was also on
the ice when Ovechkin recorded
his 600th goal.
“I was pretty close watching it,”
Laine said. “I was in a good spot.
Just behind him. I was there when
he made history, so I can maybe
watch that someday and show
that I was there getting the minus
on the ice.”
Ovechkin and Laine entered
this matchup tied for the NHL
lead with 40 goals. Asked whether
Ovechkin sees “a young Ovi” in
Laine, he countered, “Well, I’m
still young.” He then rubbed his
chin and pointed out how he had
recently shaved. By the end of the
game, Ovechkin pulled ahead of
him in the goal-scoring race with
Capitals and simultaneously
headed into his first Olympics for
his pride, his joy, his Russia. His
hair was not gray, as it is now. He
wasn’t married, as he is now. He
was 20, not 32. There was no
disappointment, only promise.
“This is fun,” he said. Each goal
was celebrated as was his 600th,
with pure, raw exuberance.
“With this kid, whatever’s good
for Alex is good for the
Washington Capitals,” Caps
owner Ted Leonsis told me back
then. “He’s made that much of an
impact in just this amount of
time.”
It’s worth remembering that
sentiment, even as we also
process the franchise’s travails
since then. Without Ovechkin,
there’s no Winter Classic in
Pittsburgh or a home date on
New Year’s Day at Nationals Park,
each among the seminal
moments in franchise history.
Without Ovechkin, there are no
star turns for the Caps on visits to
Toronto or Montreal, among his
favorite places to play, not to
mention no place in the center of
the NHL universe, with
Ovechkin’s Caps and Sidney
Crosby’s Penguins pitted against
each other both on the marquee
and on the ice.
In the same breath, it’s
understandable that people will
point out that the three players
who reached 600 goals in fewer
games than Ovechkin all won
Stanley Cups. Multiple Stanley
Cups. Six hundred goals places
C AP I TAL S ’ N E X T TH R E E
at New York Islanders
Thursday
7 NBCSW
vs. New York Islanders
Friday
7 NBCSW,
NHL Network
Capitals 3, Jets 2 (OT)
WINNIPEG ......................... 1
WASHINGTON ................... 1
0
1
1
0
0 — 2
1 — 3
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Washington, Ovechkin 41 (Backstrom, Carlson), 4:35 (pp). 2, Winnipeg, Ehlers 27, 5:33. Penalties:
Little, WPG, (hooking), 3:18; Hendricks, WPG, (tripping), 3:53; Oshie, WSH, (slashing), 5:10; Oshie, WSH,
(hooking), 14:44; Perreault, WPG, (tripping), 16:59.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Washington, Ovechkin 42 (Wilson, Kuznetsov), 3:53. Penalties: Beagle, WSH, (slashing), 12:24.
THIRD PERIOD
at Philadelphia Flyers
Sunday
5 NBCSW,
NHL Network
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM)
42 goals to Laine’s 41.
“Ovi’s still king,” Trotz said.
“I didn’t have any doubt he was
going to get the record tonight,”
owner Ted Leonsis said. “The pantheon that he’s in with Gretzky and
Lemieux and Hull is really amazing, and he’s that kind of player.
My hope is that we can win a
Stanley Cup. I have to keep doing
everything I can to try and make a
team that’s as generationally supportive and as great as Alex has
been for our franchise.”
Since his rookie season in 2005-
Ovechkin 20th on the all-time
list, with Jari Kurri just one
ahead of him in 19th. Of those
with more goals than Ovi, only
four never won a Stanley Cup —
Marcel Dionne and Jarome Iginla
(who is still active, though not
currently on a team), sure, but
Mike Gartner and Dino
Ciccarelli, too, each of those two
with deep Capitals ties.
These are the nits that people
will pick, and they’re significant,
for sure. Maybe a Stanley Cup —
or even a run to the finals, or even
advancing to the Eastern
Conference finals — would make
Ovechkin’s position as one of the
game’s greats solid, indisputable.
Monday night, he scored multiple
goals for the 119th time in his
990th game — which means
roughly once in every eight
games you had the chance to see
Ovechkin score not once, but
twice. Separate that kind of
winter wizardry from what has
happened in past springs. There’s
a lot of joy there.
So there was joy Monday, too.
The Capitals are in a precarious
position, tussling with Pittsburgh
atop the Metropolitan Division,
just back from an arduous West
Coast road trip in which goals
were hard to come by. And yet
Ovechkin scored not five minutes
in, this on a five-on-three
advantage. Child’s play, even for a
32-year-old.
The 600th goal, though, wasn’t
such a layup. It was a rebound of
a rebound, his own hard work in
Scoring: 4, Winnipeg, Laine 41 (Stastny, Byfuglien),
5:02. Penalties: None.
OVERTIME
Scoring: 5, Washington, Kuznetsov 21 (Stephenson),
4:11. Penalties: Little, WPG, (slashing), 0:19.
SHOTS ON GOAL
WINNIPEG ......................... 8
10
10 — 28
WASHINGTON ................. 14
13
9
7 — 43
Power-play opportunities: Winnipeg 0 of 3; Washington
1 of 4. Goalies: Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 35-11-9 (43
shots-40 saves). Washington, Grubauer 10-8-3 (28-26).
A: 18,506 (18,277). T: 2:43.
06, Ovechkin leads the NHL in
goals, points, power-play goals,
power-play points, game-winning
goals, overtime goals and shots.
And he’s already on to the next
goal, the next big milestone.
“Of course it’s special,” he said.
“Of course you want to do it more
and more. It’s 600. Now you have
to score another one to make 601.”
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
front of the cage. When they
build a statue of Ovechkin to
display somewhere outside MCI
Cen — uh, sorry, Capital One
Arena — it’ll be of Ovi firing from
the left circle, a slap shot that no
one can see until it rips the twine
in the back of the net. But here he
was against Winnipeg down low,
whacking at a loose puck until he
willed it in.
We can wring our hands over
what hasn’t happened, and
believe me, when the playoffs
come, I’ll be there leading the
charge. But look not just around
his sport, but around town.
Ovechkin has outlasted and
outperformed Mark Brunell and
Jason Campbell and Kirk
Cousins. He was here during
Gilbert Arenas’s rise and his fall.
He reported for work before
Stephen Strasburg or Bryce
Harper were drafted, willed the
Capitals to the playoffs while the
Nats were still losing 100 games a
year.
He’s not perfect, not by a long
shot. But to say that hockey in
this town would have reached
this level — both of achievement
and of interest — without Alex
Ovechkin is to willfully ignore the
facts of the case. What we have
seen are 600 goals from one man
in one uniform representing one
city. Don’t forget, for a single
moment, how fun that has been.
barry.svrluga@washpost.com
For more by Barry Svrluga, visit
washingtonpost.com/svrluga.
TUESDAY, MARCH 13 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
scoreboard
NBA ROUNDUP
Spurs are
no match
for red-hot
Houston
ROCKETS 109,
SPURS 93
A SSOCIATED P RESS
James Harden scored 16 of his
28 points in the third quarter, and
the Houston Rockets sailed to an
easy 109-93 home victory over the
San Antonio Spurs on Monday
night, their 19th win in 20 games.
The NBA’s leading scorer took a
little while to get going a night
after sitting out against Dallas
with a sore left knee and had just
12 points at halftime.
Despite his slow start, the Rockets had a comfortable lead in the
third when Harden took over,
scoring the next eight points to
start a 16-4 run that extended the
lead to 82-57 with about 31/2 minutes left in the quarter and had
Spurs Coach Gregg Popovich calling for a timeout.
THUNDER 106, KINGS 101:
Russell Westbrook scored 17
points and notched his 20th triple-double of the season to help
Oklahoma City beat Sacramento
at home.
Westbrook had 10 rebounds
and 11 assists in the 99th tripledouble of his career.
Paul George and Carmelo Anthony each scored 21 points for the
Thunder, which moved into
fourth place in the Western Conference.
Thunder center Steven Adams
left the game in the third quarter
with a left hip contusion and did
not return.
BUCKS
121,
GRIZZLIES
103: Khris Middleton scored 24
points, Giannis Antetokounmpo
added 20 and host Milwaukee sent
Memphis to its 18th straight loss.
Brandon Jennings, signed to a
10-day contract by the Bucks on
Saturday, finished two rebounds
short of a triple-double with 16
points and 12 assists. He scored 11
points before halftime and also
dished out nine assists.
BASKETBALL
NHL ROUNDUP
Fleury nets
400th victory
as Vegas tops
Philadelphia
GOLDEN KNIGHTS 3,
FLYERS 2
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Marc-Andre Fleury made 38
saves to become the 13th goalie in
NHL history with 400 career
wins, and Ryan Carpenter scored
the winning goal with 2:40 left to
lead the Vegas Golden Knights
past the host Philadelphia Flyers,
3-2, on Monday night.
Erik Haula and William Karlsson also scored for the Pacific
Division leaders. Fleury, who
earned his first NHL win Oct. 18,
2003, with Pittsburgh, is the third
active goalie to reach the milestone, joining Roberto Luongo
and Henrik Lundqvist.
Claude Giroux and Wayne Simmonds scored for the Flyers, who
have lost six of seven.
BLUE JACKETS 5, CANADIENS 2: Seth Jones was the
driving force behind two first-period power-play goals, and host
Columbus won its fifth straight
by beating Montreal.
Alexander Wennberg had a
goal and three assists, and Nick
Foligno, Boone Jenner and Ian
Cole also scored for Columbus.
Brendan Gallagher and Jonathan
Drouin scored for Montreal.
6,
HURRI-
CANES 3: Jimmy Vesey scored
three times, Mats Zuccarello had
two goals, and host New York beat
Carolina.
Vladislav Namestnikov also
scored for the Rangers; Pavel Buchnevich and Mika Zibanejad
each had three assists. Teuvo
Teravainen, Lee Stempniak and
Victor Rask scored for Carolina.
SENATORS 5, PANTHERS
3: Matt Duchene scored twice,
including the go-ahead goal with
three minutes left, to lift Ottawa
past Florida in Sunrise, Fla.
Coyotes’ Tocchet takes leave
Arizona granted Coach Rick
Tocchet a leave of absence while
he deals with a family illness.
Assistant John MacLean will assume head coaching duties.
HOCKEY
NBA
USA TODAY TOP 25
EASTERN CONFERENCE
The top 25 teams in the USA Today men’s college
basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses,
records through March 11, points based on 25 points for
a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote
and previous ranking:
ATLANTIC
W
y-Toronto ...................................49
y-Boston ....................................46
Philadelphia ...............................36
New York ...................................24
Brooklyn.....................................21
L
17
21
29
43
46
Pct
.742
.687
.554
.358
.313
GB
—
31/2
121/2
251/2
281/2
SOUTHEAST
W
Washington ...............................38
x-Miami......................................36
Charlotte....................................29
Orlando ......................................20
Atlanta.......................................20
L
29
31
38
47
47
Pct
.567
.537
.433
.299
.299
GB
—
2
9
18
18
CENTRAL
W
Indiana .......................................39
Cleveland ...................................38
Milwaukee .................................36
Detroit .......................................30
Chicago ......................................23
L
28
28
31
36
43
Pct
.582
.576
.537
.455
.348
GB
—
3
81/2
151/2
SOUTHWEST
W
Houston .....................................53
New Orleans ..............................38
San Antonio ...............................37
Dallas .........................................21
Memphis ....................................18
L
14
28
30
46
49
Pct
.791
.576
.552
.313
.269
GB
—
141/2
16
32
35
NORTHWEST
W
x-Portland..................................40
Oklahoma City ...........................40
Minnesota..................................39
Denver........................................37
Utah ...........................................37
L
26
29
29
30
30
Pct
.606
.580
.574
.552
.552
GB
—
11/2
2
31/2
31/2
PACIFIC
W
Golden State..............................51
L.A. Clippers...............................36
L.A. Lakers .................................30
Sacramento ...............................21
Phoenix ......................................19
L
16
29
36
47
49
Pct
.761
.554
.455
.309
.279
GB
—
14
201/2
301/2
321/2
1/
2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
x-late game, y-clinched playoff spot
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
Toronto 132, New York 106
Chicago 129, Atlanta 122
Minnesota 109, Golden State 103
Utah 116, New Orleans 99
Denver 130, Sacramento 104
Houston 105, Dallas 82
Indiana 99, Boston 97
Philadelphia 120, Brooklyn 97
L.A. Lakers 127, Cleveland 113
TUESDAY’S GAMES
Minnesota at Washington, 7
Indiana at Philadelphia, 7
Dallas at New York, 7:30
Oklahoma City at Atlanta, 7:30
Toronto at Brooklyn, 7:30
Charlotte at New Orleans, 8
L.A. Clippers at Chicago, 8
Orlando at San Antonio, 8:30
Detroit at Utah, 9
Cleveland at Phoenix, 10
Denver at L.A. Lakers, 10:30
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
Milwaukee at Orlando, 7
Washington at Boston, 8
Miami at Sacramento, 10
L.A. Lakers at Golden State, 10:30
Toronto at Indiana, 7
Charlotte at Atlanta, 7:30
Philadelphia at New York, 7:30
Chicago at Memphis, 8
L.A. Clippers at Houston, 8
New Orleans at San Antonio, 8:30
Detroit at Denver, 9
Phoenix at Utah, 9
Cleveland at Portland, 10
Thunder 106, Kings 101
24
27
39
32
22 — 101
28 — 106
SACRAMENTO: Jackson 6-10 0-0 15, Randolph 5-18 0-0
10, Koufos 3-8 0-0 6, Fox 4-12 2-3 11, Bogdanovic 6-11
4-5 19, Cauley-Stein 4-7 1-2 9, Mason 2-6 4-4 8, Carter
2-6 0-0 5, Hield 1-6 0-0 3, Temple 5-9 2-2 15. Totals 38-93
13-16 101.
OKLAHOMA CITY: George 7-18 3-4 21, Anthony 7-14 2-2
21, Adams 3-5 0-0 6, Westbrook 7-19 1-3 17, Brewer 4-8
7-7 16, Huestis 0-1 0-0 0, Grant 3-5 1-2 7, Patterson 1-5
0-0 2, Felton 3-5 0-0 7, Ferguson 1-2 0-0 3, Abrines 2-2
0-0 6. Totals 38-84 14-18 106.
Three-point Goals: Sacramento 12-33 (Temple 3-5,
Jackson 3-6, Bogdanovic 3-7, Carter 1-3, Fox 1-3, Hield
1-4, Mason 0-1, Randolph 0-4), Oklahoma City 16-36
(Anthony 5-7, George 4-9, Abrines 2-2, Westbrook 2-3,
Ferguson 1-2, Felton 1-3, Brewer 1-4, Huestis 0-1, Grant
0-1, Patterson 0-4). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds:
Sacramento 49 (Koufos 10), Oklahoma City 43 (Westbrook 10). Assists: Sacramento 21 (Fox 10), Oklahoma
City 21 (Westbrook 11). Total Fouls: Sacramento 22,
Oklahoma City 15. Technicals: Oklahoma City coach
Thunder (Defensive three second). A: 18,203 (18,203).
Bucks 121, Grizzlies 103
32
26
26
23
31 — 121
30 — 103
MILWAUKEE: Middleton 9-14 4-4 24, Antetokounmpo
7-14 5-7 20, Henson 5-8 1-4 11, Bledsoe 6-13 0-1 14,
Snell 4-7 0-0 12, Parker 3-6 0-0 6, Wilson 0-0 0-0 0,
Maker 0-0 0-0 0, Zeller 3-3 2-3 8, Terry 0-1 0-0 0,
Jennings 5-9 3-3 16, Brown 5-6 0-0 10. Totals 47-81
15-22 121.
MEMPHIS: Martin 6-11 3-4 16, Green 4-8 3-6 11, Gasol
8-17 1-3 17, Simmons 4-8 0-0 9, Brooks 7-13 0-0 16,
Parsons 1-4 0-0 3, Rabb 0-0 0-0 0, Johnson 0-0 0-0 0,
Davis 5-7 0-0 10, Rathan-Mayes 0-5 2-4 2, Selden 1-7 0-0
3, McLemore 6-9 1-2 16. Totals 42-89 10-19 103.
Three-point Goals: Milwaukee 12-25 (Snell 4-6, Jennings 3-6, Middleton 2-3, Bledsoe 2-4, Antetokounmpo
1-3, Terry 0-1, Parker 0-2), Memphis 9-27 (McLemore
3-4, Brooks 2-5, Simmons 1-1, Martin 1-2, Parsons 1-4,
Selden 1-5, Green 0-1, Rathan-Mayes 0-2, Gasol 0-3).
Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Milwaukee 47 (Jennings
8), Memphis 31 (Davis, Green, Gasol 7). Assists:
Milwaukee 33 (Jennings 12), Memphis 27 (RathanMayes, Simmons, Martin 5). Total Fouls: Milwaukee 22,
Memphis 23. A: 14,112 (18,119).
Rockets 109, Spurs 93
22
29
24
34
26 — 93
21 — 109
SAN ANTONIO: K.Anderson 2-6 2-4 6, Gay 6-15 0-0 13,
Gasol 1-5 2-2 4, Murray 3-7 1-2 7, Mills 1-3 0-0 3, Bertans
4-8 0-0 11, Lauvergne 1-4 0-0 2, Costello 1-1 0-0 2, White
4-8 2-2 14, Forbes 4-8 5-5 14, Parker 5-6 2-2 12, B.Paul
0-5 1-4 1, D.Green 1-5 1-2 4. Totals 33-81 16-23 93.
HOUSTON: Ariza 5-9 2-2 15, Tucker 2-4 0-0 5, Capela 6-7
1-3 13, C.Paul 8-11 0-0 18, Harden 6-17 14-14 28, Black
0-0 0-0 0, Mbah a Moute 4-4 0-2 9, Nene 3-4 0-0 6,
Johnson 0-3 0-0 0, Gordon 0-7 1-2 1, G.Green 5-14 0-0 14.
Totals 39-80 18-23 109.
Three-point Goals: San Antonio 11-28 (White 4-5,
Bertans 3-6, Mills 1-2, Gay 1-3, D.Green 1-4, Forbes 1-4,
B.Paul 0-2), Houston 13-44 (G.Green 4-11, Ariza 3-7,
C.Paul 2-4, Harden 2-11, Mbah a Moute 1-1, Tucker 1-3,
Johnson 0-1, Gordon 0-6). Rebounds: San Antonio 36
(Lauvergne 6), Houston 50 (Capela, G.Green 9). Assists:
San Antonio 20 (Murray, Forbes, Parker 3), Houston 24
(C.Paul 9). Total Fouls: San Antonio 17, Houston 24.
The top 25 teams in the Associated Press’ final 2017-18
college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through March 11, total points based on
25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a
25th-place vote and previous ranking:
Virginia (65)
Villanova
Xavier
Kansas
Michigan St.
Cincinnati
Michigan
Gonzaga
Duke
North Carolina
Purdue
Arizona
Tennessee
Texas Tech
West Virginia
Wichita St.
Ohio St.
Kentucky
Auburn
Clemson
Houston
Miami
Florida
Nevada
Saint Mary's (Calif.)
PTS
800
763
685
670
628
609
604
597
560
549
511
399
348
347
343
270
265
242
231
229
224
96
89
67
56
56
PVS
1
3
9
2
5
4
7
6
11
8
10
12
13
18
17
14
16
20
21
—
15
24
19
23
22
25
Others receiving votes: Arkansas 34, Creighton 19,
Loyola of Chicago 19, Providence 18, TCU 12, Middle
Tennessee 9, N.C. State 9, Virginia Tech 9, New Mexico
State 6, Florida State 5, Buffalo 4, Kansas State 4, Seton
Hall 3, St. Bonaventure 3, Butler 2, Davidson 2, South
Dakota State 2, San Diego State 1, Texas A&M 1.
SCHEDULE
FIRST FOUR
In Dayton, Ohio
Tuesday’s games
LIU Brooklyn (18-16) vs. Radford (22-12), 6:40
St. Bonaventure (25-7) vs. UCLA (21-11), 9:10
Wednesday’s games
N.C. Central (19-15) vs. Texas Southern (15-19), 6:40
Arizona State (20-11) vs. Syracuse (20-13), 9:10
RECORD
31-2
30-4
28-5
27-7
29-4
30-4
28-7
30-4
26-7
25-10
28-6
27-7
25-8
24-9
24-10
25-7
24-8
24-10
25-7
23-9
26-7
22-9
20-12
27-7
28-5
First Round
Thursday’s games
In Dallas
Tennessee (25-8) vs. Wright State (25-9), 12:40
Miami (22-9) vs. Loyola of Chicago (28-5), 3:10
In Boise, Idaho
Kentucky (24-10) vs. Davidson (21-11), 7:10
Arizona (27-7) vs. Buffalo (26-8), 9:40
Friday’s games
In Charlotte
Creighton (21-11) vs. Kansas State (22-11), 6:50
Virginia (31-2) vs. UMBC (24-10), 9:20
In Nashville
Cincinnati (30-4) vs. Georgia State (24-10), 2
Nevada (27-7) vs. Texas (19-14), 4:30
Second Round
Saturday’s games
In Dallas
Tennessee-Wright State winner vs. Miami-Loyola of
Chicago winner
In Boise, Idaho
Arizona-Buffalo winner vs. Kentucky-Davidson winner
Sunday’s games
In Charlotte
Virginia-UMBC winner vs. Creighton-Kansas State winner
In Nashville
Cincinnati-Georgia State winner vs. Nevada-Texas winner
MIDWEST REGION
First Round
Thursday’s games
In Pittsburgh
Rhode Island (25-7) vs. Oklahoma (18-13), 12:15
Duke (26-7) vs. Iona (20-13), 2:45
In Wichita
Kansas (27-7) vs. Pennsylvania (24-8), 2
Seton Hall (21-11) vs. N.C. State (21-11), 4:30
Friday’s games
In Detroit
Michigan State (29-4) vs. Bucknell (25-9), 7:10
TCU (21-11) vs. Arizona State-Syracuse winner, 9:40
In San Diego
Auburn (25-7) vs. College of Charleston (26-7), 7:27
Clemson (23-9) vs. New Mexico State (28-5), 9:57
Second Round
Saturday’s games
In Pittsburgh
Duke-Iona winner vs. Rhode Island-Oklahoma winner
In Wichita
Kansas-Pennsylvania winner vs. Seton Hall-N.C. State
winner
Sunday’s games
In Detroit
Michigan State-Bucknell winner vs. TCU—Arizona
State-Syracuse winner
In San Diego
Auburn-College of Charleston winner vs. Clemson-New
Mexico State winner
WEST REGION
First Round
Thursday’s games
In Wichita
Houston (26-7) vs. San Diego State (22-10), 7:20
Michigan (28-7) vs. Montana (26-7), 9:50
In Boise, Idaho
Gonzaga (30-4) vs. UNC Greensboro (27-7), 1:30
Ohio State (24-8) vs. South Dakota State (28-6), 4
Friday’s games
In Charlotte
Texas A&M (20-12) vs. Providence (21-13), 12:15
North Carolina (25-10) vs. Lipscomb (23-9), 2:45
In Nashville
Xavier (28-5) vs. N.C. Central-Texas Southern winner,
7:20
Missouri (20-12) vs. Florida State (20-11), 9:50
Second Round
Saturday’s games
In Wichita
Michigan-Montana winner vs. Houston-San Diego State
winner
In Boise, Idaho
Gonzaga-UNC Greensboro winner vs. Ohio State-South
Dakota State winner
Sunday’s games
In Charlotte
North Carolina-Lipscomb winner vs. Texas A&M-Providence winner
In Nashville
Xavier—N.C. Central-Texas Southern winner vs. Missouri-Florida State winner
PTS
1625
1554
1383
1379
1304
1230
1213
1199
1179
1100
1047
918
771
716
663
604
600
528
501
439
430
134
102
93
71
PVS
1
2
3
9
4
8
7
6
5
12
10
15
13
14
18
11
17
—
16
19
21
24
23
22
20
Others receiving votes: Arkansas 69, Loyola of Chicago
68, Rhode Island 66, TCU 40, Providence 22, New Mexico
St. 15, Butler 9, St. Bonaventure 8, Southern Cal 7,
Kansas St 6, Buffalo 5, Seton Hall 5, UCLA 5, Creighton 4,
South Dakota St. 3, Middle Tennessee 2, Murray St. 2,
San Diego St. 2, Virginia Tech 2, Davidson 1, Missouri 1.
SCHEDULE
First Round
Tuesday’s games
Wagner (23-9) at Baylor (18-14), 7
Northern Kentucky (22-9) at Louisville (20-13), 7
Vermont (27-7) at Middle Tennessee (24-7), 8
Boston College (19-15) at Western Kentucky (24-10), 8
Florida Gulf Coast (23-11) at Oklahoma State (19-14), 9
Hampton (19-15) at Notre Dame (20-14), 9
Rider (22-9) at Oregon (22-12), 10
SE Louisiana (22-11) at Saint Mary’s (28-5), 10
UNC Asheville (21-12) at Southern Cal (23-11), 11
Wednesday’s games
Harvard (18-13) at Marquette (19-13), 7
Louisiana-Lafayette (27-6) at LSU (17-14), 7
Temple (17-15) at Penn State (21-13), 8
Nebraska (22-10) at Mississippi State (22-11), 9
UC Davis (22-10) at Utah (19-11), 9
BYU (24-10) at Stanford (18-15), 10
Boise State (23-8) at Washington (20-12), 10
Second Round
March 16-19
Hampton-Notre Dame winner vs. Temple-Penn State
winner
Rider-Oregon winner vs. Harvard-Marquette winner
Wagner-Baylor winner vs. Nebraska-Mississippi State
winner
Vermont-Middle Tennessee winner vs. Northern Kentucky-Louisville winner
UNC Asheville-Southern Cal winner vs. Boston CollegeWestern Kentucky winner
BYU-Stanford winner vs. Florida Gulf Coast-Oklahoma
State winner
SE Louisiana-Saint Mary’s winner vs. Boise StateWashington winner
Louisiana-Lafayette--LSU winner vs. UC Davis-Utah
winner
HI GH S C HOOLS
NCAA WOMEN
USA TODAY TOP 25
NHL
The top 25 teams in the USA Today women’s college
basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses,
records through March 11, points based on 25 points for
a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote
and previous ranking:
METROPOLITAN
Washington ..................
Pittsburgh .....................
Philadelphia ..................
Columbus ......................
New Jersey ...................
Carolina .........................
N.Y. Islanders ...............
N.Y. Rangers .................
W
39
40
35
37
35
30
30
31
L
23
26
24
28
26
28
29
32
OL PTS. GF GA
7
85 209 202
4
84 229 211
11
81 205 205
5
79 193 195
8
78 204 208
11
71 184 212
10
70 222 245
7
69 201 224
ATLANTIC
Tampa Bay ....................
Boston ...........................
Toronto .........................
Florida ...........................
x-Detroit .......................
Montreal .......................
Ottawa ..........................
Buffalo ..........................
W
48
43
40
34
26
25
24
22
L
17
16
22
26
31
32
33
35
OL PTS. GF GA
4 100 253 191
8
94 226 172
7
87 228 197
7
75 205 212
11
63 177 206
12
62 175 219
11
59 186 236
12
56 165 224
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
BOY S ’ TOP 2 0
EASTERN CONFERENCE
RECORD
32-0
31-1
32-2
32-1
30-4
29-3
26-6
26-6
24-7
27-6
25-6
23-7
24-7
24-9
24-7
25-7
25-6
22-8
22-10
26-7
29-3
24-8
26-7
30-2
31-3
U-Conn. (32)
Baylor
Louisville
Mississippi State
Oregon
Notre Dame
South Carolina
Texas
UCLA
Ohio State
Florida State
Oregon State
Tennessee
Texas A&M
Missouri
Maryland
Georgia
Duke
Stanford
South Florida
Green Bay
N.C. State
DePaul
Mercer
Belmont
PTS
800
757
734
700
664
646
617
571
526
496
483
428
407
335
332
290
280
253
237
224
184
134
82
81
33
PVS
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
15
14
16
17
18
20
19
21
22
24
23
25
Others receiving votes: Florida Gulf Coast 25, Central
Michigan 13, Miami 12, Syracuse 10, LSU 9, Michigan 9,
Virginia 7, Marquette 5, Oklahoma State 5, UALR 3,
Buffalo 2, Minnesota 2, Virginia Tech 2, UCF 1, Quinnipiac 1.
SOCCER
NCAA tournament
National Invitational
Tournament
NCAA MEN AP TOP 25
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
RECORD
31-2
30-4
27-7
28-5
29-4
26-7
28-7
30-4
25-10
30-4
28-6
25-8
24-9
24-10
27-7
25-7
24-8
23-9
26-7
24-10
25-7
25-7
28-5
20-12
27-7
22-9
SOUTH REGION
THURSDAY’S GAMES
SAN ANTONIO ................... 21
HOUSTON ........................... 25
Virginia (32)
Villanova
Kansas
Xavier
Michigan State
Duke
Michigan
Gonzaga
North Carolina
Cincinnati
Purdue
Tennessee
Texas Tech
West Virginia
Arizona
Wichita State
Ohio State
Clemson
Houston
Kentucky
Auburn
Rhode Island
Saint Mary's
Florida
Nevada
Miami
First Round
Thursday’s games
In Pittsburgh
Villanova (30-4) vs. LIU Brooklyn-Radford winner, 6:50
Virginia Tech (21-11) vs. Alabama (19-15), 9:20
In Dallas
Texas Tech (24-9) vs. Stephen F. Austin (28-6), 7:27
Florida (20-12) vs. St. Bonaventure-UCLA winner, 9:57
Friday’s games
In Detroit
Purdue (28-6) vs. Cal State Fullerton (20-11), 12:40
Arkansas (23-11) vs. Butler (20-13), 3:10
In San Diego
Wichita State (25-7) vs. Marshall (24-10), 1:30
West Virginia (24-10) vs. Murray State (26-5), 4
Second Round
Saturday’s games
In Pittsburgh
Villanova—LIU Brooklyn-Radford winner vs. Virginia
Tech-Alabama winner
In Dallas
Texas Tech-Stephen F. Austin winner vs. Florida—St.
Bonaventure-UCLA winner
Sunday’s games
In Detroit
Purdue-Cal State Fullerton winner vs. Arkansas-Butler
winner
In San Diego
Wichita State-Marshall winner vs. West Virginia-Murray State winner
Houston 109, San Antonio 93
Milwaukee 121, Memphis 103
Oklahoma City 106, Sacramento 101
Miami at Portland, Late
MILWAUKEE ...................... 32
MEMPHIS ........................... 24
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
25.
EAST REGION
MONDAY’S RESULTS
SACRAMENTO ................... 16
OKLAHOMA CITY ............... 19
RANGERS
D7
M2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
CENTRAL
Nashville .......................
Winnipeg ......................
Minnesota .....................
Dallas ............................
Colorado ........................
x-St. Louis .....................
Chicago .........................
W
44
41
39
38
36
36
30
L
14
18
23
25
24
27
32
OL PTS. GF GA
10
98 222 173
10
92 229 182
7
85 216 198
6
82 198 180
8
80 215 202
5
77 187 180
8
68 199 207
PACIFIC
Vegas ............................
x-San Jose ....................
x-Anaheim ....................
x-Los Angeles ...............
Calgary ..........................
Edmonton .....................
x-Vancouver ..................
Arizona .........................
W
45
36
34
37
34
30
25
22
L
19
23
23
26
26
34
35
35
OL PTS. GF GA
5
95 235 187
9
81 198 186
12
80 193 189
5
79 197 173
10
78 197 206
4
64 193 221
9
59 183 225
11
55 163 219
x-late game
MLS
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
EASTERN
W
Columbus .........................2
New York City FC .............2
New York .........................1
Philadelphia .....................1
New England ....................1
Atlanta United FC ............1
Orlando City .....................0
D.C. United .......................0
Chicago ............................0
Montreal ..........................0
Toronto FC .......................0
L
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
T PTS
0
6
0
6
0
3
0
3
0
3
0
3
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
GF
5
4
4
2
2
3
2
2
3
3
0
GA
2
1
0
0
3
5
3
4
4
5
2
WESTERN
W
Los Angeles FC ................2
Vancouver ........................2
Houston ...........................1
San Jose ...........................1
Minnesota United ............1
LA Galaxy .........................1
Sporting KC ......................1
Dallas ...............................0
Real Salt Lake ..................0
Colorado ...........................0
Seattle .............................0
Portland ...........................0
L
0
0
1
0
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
2
T PTS
0
6
0
6
0
3
0
3
0
3
0
3
0
3
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
GF
6
4
5
3
4
3
4
1
2
1
0
1
GA
1
2
2
2
4
3
5
1
6
2
1
6
Chicago 3, Boston 1
N.Y. Islanders 5, Calgary 2
Pittsburgh 3, Dallas 1
Arizona 1, Vancouver 0
MONDAY’S RESULTS
Washington 3, Winnipeg 2 (OT)
Vegas 3, Philadelphia 2
Columbus 5, Montreal 2
N.Y. Rangers 6, Carolina 3
Ottawa 5, Florida 3
St. Louis at Anaheim, Late
Detroit at San Jose, Late
Vancouver at Los Angeles, Late
TUESDAY’S GAMES
Boston at Carolina, 7
Dallas at Montreal, 7:30
Ottawa at Tampa Bay, 7:30
Winnipeg at Nashville, 8
Colorado at Minnesota, 8:30
Edmonton at Calgary, 9
Los Angeles at Arizona, 10
Dallas at Toronto, 7
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Rangers, 8
San Jose at Edmonton, 9:30
New Jersey at Vegas, 10
Vancouver at Anaheim, 10
Columbus 3, Montreal 2
New England 2, Colorado 1
Los Angeles FC 5, Real Salt Lake 1
Sporting KC 4, Chicago 3
Vancouver 2, Houston 1
New York 4, Portland 0
Minnesota United 2, Orlando City 1
GI R LS ’ TOP 2 0
Here are the final girls’ basketball rankings of the
2017-18 season:
Rangers 6, Hurricanes 3
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
CAROLINA ............................... 1
N.Y. RANGERS ......................... 1
Atlanta United FC 3, D.C. United 1
New York City FC 2, LA Galaxy 1
1
2
1 —
3 —
3
6
FIRST PERIOD
SATURDAY’S MATCHES
Scoring: 1, N.Y. Rangers, Zuccarello 15 (Pionk, Zibanejad), 9:06. 2, Carolina, Teravainen 21 (Pesce, Aho), 14:32.
Houston at D.C. United, 1:30
Chicago at Minnesota United, 2
Columbus at Philadelphia, 2
Toronto FC at Montreal, 3
Orlando City at New York City FC, 3:30
Vancouver at Atlanta United FC, 7:30
San Jose at Sporting KC, 8:30
New York at Real Salt Lake, 9
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 3, N.Y. Rangers, Vesey 16 (Buchnevich), 1:52. 4,
Carolina, Stempniak 3 (Ryan, Skinner), 7:48. 5, N.Y.
Rangers, Namestnikov 23 (Buchnevich, Zibanejad),
11:51 (pp).
THIRD PERIOD
SUNDAY’S MATCH
Scoring: 6, Carolina, Rask 14, 8:23 (pp). 7, N.Y. Rangers,
Vesey 17 (Buchnevich), 12:15. 8, N.Y. Rangers, Zuccarello 16 (Spooner), 17:23. 9, N.Y. Rangers, Vesey 18
(Zibanejad, Fast), 19:36.
Seattle at Dallas, 5
SHOTS ON GOAL
TENNIS
CAROLINA ............................. 10
N.Y. RANGERS ......................... 9
18
6
16 — 44
8 — 23
Power-play opportunities: Carolina 1 of 3; N.Y. Rangers 1
of 3. Goalies: Carolina, Darling 11-18-7 (21 shots-17
saves). N.Y. Rangers, Georgiev 3-2-0 (44-41).
ATP/WTA
BNP PARIBAS OPEN
At The Indian Wells Tennis Garden
In Indian Wells, Calif.
Purse: Men: $7.97 million (Masters 1000)
Women: $8.65 million (Premier)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
Golden Knights 3, Flyers 2
VEGAS ..................................... 1
PHILADELPHIA ........................ 0
MEN’S SINGLES
THIRD ROUND
0
1
2 —
1 —
3
2
FIRST PERIOD
Jeremy Chardy, France, def. Adrian Mannarino (20),
France, 7-5, 4-6, 6-1; Roger Federer (1), Switzerland, def.
Filip Krajinovic (25), Serbia, 6-2, 6-1; Borna Coric,
Croatia, def. Roberto Bautista Agut (13), Spain, 6-1, 6-3;
Pablo Carreno Busta (11), Spain, def. Daniil Medvedev,
Russia, 6-1, 7-5; Taylor Fritz, United States, def.
Fernando Verdasco, Spain, 4-6, 6-2, 7-6 (7-1); Kevin
Anderson (7), South Africa, def. Nicolas Kicker, Argentina, 7-6 (7-1), 7-6 (7-3).
WOMEN’S SINGLES
THIRD ROUND
Caroline Wozniacki (2), Denmark, def. Aliaksandra
Sasnovich, Belarus, 6-4, 2-6, 6-3; Caroline Garcia (7),
France, def. Daria Gavrilova (26), Australia, 7-5, 6-4;
Angelique Kerber (10), Germany, def. Elena Vesnina
(24), Russia, 6-4, 6-4; Danielle Collins, United States,
def. Sofya Zhuk, Russia, 6-4, 6-4; Daria Kasatkina (20),
Russia, def. Sloane Stephens (13), United States, 6-4,
6-3; Anastasija Sevastova (21), Latvia, def. Julia Goerges (12), Germany, 6-3, 6-3; Carla Suarez Navarro (27),
Spain, def. Elina Svitolina (4), Ukraine, 7-5, 6-3.
Scoring: 1, Vegas, Haula 25 (Perron, Schmidt), 6:17 (pp).
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Philadelphia, Giroux 25 (Couturier, Konecny),
1:27.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Vegas, Karlsson 36 (Theodore, Hyka), 6:00
(pp). 4, Philadelphia, Simmonds 21 (Gostisbehere, Voracek), 7:06 (pp). 5, Vegas, Carpenter 8 (Bellemare,
Eakin), 17:20.
SHOTS ON GOAL
VEGAS ..................................... 9
PHILADELPHIA ........................ 9
8
16
12 — 29
15 — 40
Power-play opportunities: Vegas 2 of 2; Philadelphia 1 of
4. Goalies: Vegas, Fleury 25-9-3 (40 shots-38 saves).
Philadelphia, Mrazek 12-11-4 (29-26).
Blue Jackets 5, Canadiens 2
MEN’S DOUBLES
SECOND ROUND
Marcus Daniell, New Zealand, and Diego Schwartzman,
Argentina, def. Adrian Mannarino and Fabrice Martin,
France, 6-4, 6-2; Feliciano Lopez, Spain, and Marc Lopez,
Spain, def. Jean-Julien Rojer, Netherlands, and Horia
Tecau (6), Romania, 6-4, 7-6 (7-5); John Isner and Jack
Sock, United States, def. Roberto Bautista Agut and
David Ferrer, Spain, walkover; Gilles Muller, Luxembourg, and Sam Querrey, United States, def. Jamie
Murray, Britain, and Bruno Soares (4), Brazil, 7-5, 6-7
(4), 10-2; Oliver Marach, Austria, and Mate Pavic (3),
Croatia, def. Fabio Fognini, Italy, and Aisam-ul-Haq
Qureshi, Pakistan, 7-5, 6-2.
MONTREAL .............................. 1
COLUMBUS .............................. 3
1
1
0 —
1 —
2
5
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Montreal, Gallagher 25 (Petry), 0:34. 2,
Columbus, Foligno 15, 4:17. 3, Columbus, Jones 14
(Panarin, Atkinson), 7:51 (pp). 4, Columbus, Jones 15
(Panarin, Wennberg), 14:03 (pp).
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 5, Columbus, Jenner 8 (Wennberg, Cole), 2:34.
6, Montreal, Drouin 11 (Byron), 15:46.
THIRD PERIOD
WOMEN’S DOUBLES
SECOND ROUND
Scoring: 7, Columbus, Cole 5 (Wennberg), 17:41.
Hsieh Su-wei, Taiwan, and Barbora Strycova, Czech
Republic, def. Chan Hao-ching and Latisha Chan (2),
Taiwan, 6-4, 5-7, 10-6; Ekaterina Makarova and Elena
Vesnina (1), Russia, def. Victoria Azarenka and Aryna
Sabalenka, Belarus, 6-4, 6-3.
MONTREAL ............................ 10
COLUMBUS ............................ 11
SHOTS ON GOAL
6
9
24 — 40
5 — 25
Nationals 5, Tigers 4
OTTAWA .................................. 2
FLORIDA .................................. 0
WASHINGTON AB R H BI DETROIT
TOTALS
WASHINGTON
DETROIT
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
35 5 10
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
1
0
0
0
0
AB R H BI
Machado 2b
P.Kozma 2b
Iglsias ss
Alcntra ss
Cndlrio 3b
Rdrguez 3b
Cstllns rf
C.Gbson lf
Mrtinez dh
Amrista pr
J.Hicks c
Greiner c
Mahtook lf
V.Reyes rf
Espinal 1b
Huffman 1b
J.Jones cf
M.Grber cf
4 TOTALS
000
001
Dropped out: No. 20 Bethesda Chevy-Chase (22-4)
On the bubble: Gwynn Park (20-5), Loudoun Valley
(23-5), Richard Montgomery (23-2), Bethesda ChevyChase (22-4)
TR ANS AC TI ONS
MLB
Senators 5, Panthers 3
1
2
4
1
3
1
3
2
4
3
1
3
2
3
2
0
0
1. St. John’s (32-2) Last week: 1
The Cadets will lose five seniors, including one starter,
from this year’s championship squad.
2. Paul VI (30-4) LW: 2
Junior Ashley Owusu led the Panthers in scoring this
year (19.4 points per game), but senior Amira Collins
wasn’t far behind at 17.4.
3. Riverdale Baptist (22-5) LW: 3
Despite some roster changes and a few injuries, the
Crusaders lost to just one local opponent this season:
National Christian on Feb. 16.
4. Poolesville (27-0) LW: 4
The Falcons completed their perfect season with a
40-point rout of Queen Anne’s for the Maryland 2A title.
5. McNamara (21-7) LW: 5
The Mustangs will be one of the most dangerous teams
in the area next season with junior stars Jakia Brown-Turner and Aliyah Matharu returning.
6. Eleanor Roosevelt (25-3) LW: 6
The Raiders outlasted defending champion Catonsville
for the Maryland 4A title, the ninth state championship
in team history.
7. Georgetown Visitation (27-5) LW: 7
The Cubs’ successful season started down low, where
forwards Ellie Mitchell and Taylor Webster averaged
13.5 and 13 points, respectively.
8. Rock Creek Christian (27-8) LW: 8
Playing a rigorous, cross-country schedule, the Eagles’
only local stumbles came against National Christian and
Riverdale Baptist.
9. National Christian (25-8) LW: 9
The Eagles’ biggest obstacle next season could be
replacing senior point guard Zenzele Aspemaka-Vital,
who averaged 12.6 points.
10. Langley (21-8) LW: 12
The Saxons had more overtime drama in the Virginia
Class 6 title game, eventually falling to Cosby, 52-50.
11. Edison (23-6) LW: 13
Edison’s postseason run ended against Virginia powerhouse Princess Anne, which defeated the Eagles, 61-45,
in the Virginia Class 5 title game.
12. Long Reach (22-3) LW: 11
The Lightning’s first trip to the state playoffs ended
with a loss to Frederick in the Maryland 3A title game.
13. Woodbridge (23-5) LW: 14
Sophomore Aaliyah Pitts got Vikings fans excited for the
future this season, leading the team with 11.3 points per
game.
14. T.C. Williams (22-6) LW: 15
The Titans started fast this season, winning 13 of their
first 15 games to announce themselves as a Northern
Virginia contender.
15. North Point (22-5) LW: 10
Eighteen points from Latavia Jackson wasn’t enough to
keep the Eagles’ season alive against Eleanor Roosevelt
in the Maryland 4A semifinals.
16. Freedom-South Riding (27-4) LW: 16
Sophomore Jaelyn Batts’s superb season included a
32-point, 11-rebound performance in a victory over
Potomac Falls.
17. Howard (22-2) LW: 17
The Lions proved again this season that they are the
team to beat in Howard County.
18. Oxon Hill (23-2) LW: 18
The Clippers thrived on offense this season, finishing
with three players averaging more than 14 points.
19. Anacostia (22-5) LW: 19
The Eagles will lose the heart of their offense, guard
Mya Moye, to graduation.
20. Marshall (26-4) LW: Not ranked
Before losing to T.C. Williams in the Virginia state
playoffs, the Statesmen won 13 consecutive games.
Power-play opportunities: Montreal 0 of 2; Columbus 2
of 3. Goalies: Montreal, Lindgren 4-7-2 (25 shots-20
saves). Columbus, Bobrovsky 30-21-5 (40-38).
BASEBALL
Goodwin cf
Butista pr
Wi.Difo 2b
J.Slano c
V.Rbles rf
Kieboom 1b
M.Adams 1b
Mrmljos lf
M.Serra dh
Stvnson lf
Ju.Soto rf
Sverino c
Dmnguez 3b
Brignac ss
L.Grcia 2b
Rynolds 3b
Sanchez ss
1. DeMatha (32-5) Last week: 1
The Stags defeated St. Maria Goretti (59-48), Paul VI
(72-50) and O’Connell (69-57) to win the Alhambra
Tournament this past weekend.
2. Paul VI (33-4) LW: 2
The Panthers went 2-1 at the Alhambra Tournament,
beating Gonzaga, 65-62, in the consolation game.
3. Rock Creek Christian (25-4) LW: 5
The Eagles cruised to the Capital Beltway title by defeating Capital Christian, 67-49, in the championship.
4. Wilson (31-9) LW: 3
Ending the season as DCIAA and DCSAA champions, the
Tigers had four players score at least 11.7 points a game.
5. Georgetown Prep (21-5) LW: 4
Guard Jared Bynum, a Saint Joseph’s signee, finished his
senior year averaging 17.8 points for the IAC champions.
6. South County (28-3) LW: 7
The Stallions clinched their first Virginia state championship with a 63-47 victory over Western Branch in the
Class 6 final.
7. O’Connell (28-9) LW: 8
Despite 14 points apiece from guards Xavier Johnson
and Matt Becht, the Knights fell to DeMatha in the
Alhambra Tournament championship.
8. Gonzaga (27-9) LW: 6
After beating Baltimore’s Mount St. Joseph to open the
Alhambra Tournament, the Eagles lost to O’Connell and
Paul VI.
9. Bullis (20-9) LW: 9
Guard Vado Morse ended his senior season averaging
23.4 points per game.
10. Fairmont Heights (23-5) LW: 10
The Hornets fell short of back-to-back state championships, losing, 59-48, to Dunbar in the Maryland 1A final.
11. Friendship Tech (25-4) LW: 13
Forward Malik Miller and guard Kenneth Tyree each
finished the season averaging more than 20 points.
12. Bladensburg (15-13) LW: Not ranked
The Mustangs reenter the rankings after coming up
short against Perry Hall in the Maryland 4A state
championship game.
13. Eleanor Roosevelt (18-6) LW: 14
Senior guard Jaden Faulkner has committed to play at
Millersville next season.
14. Wise (21-5) LW: 15
Two transfer guards, Sherwyn Devonish and Fred
Crowell, led the Pumas’ offense with double-digit
scoring averages.
15. Wakefield (24-7) LW: 12
The Warriors’ upstart season ended with a 64-60 loss to
Varina in the Virginia Class 5 state championship.
16. Loudoun Valley (25-3) LW: 18
Four Vikings finished the season averaging at least
10 points a game.
17. Potomac (Md.) (21-3) LW: 19
Jason Newman led the Wolverines with about 22 points
and five assists per game.
18. Gaithersburg (20-6) LW: 11
Maryland 4A champion Perry Hall proved too dominant
against the Trojans, who lost, 82-65, in the state
semifinals.
19. Old Mill (21-5) LW: 17
The Patriots fell to Bladensburg, 69-53, in the Maryland
4A state semifinals.
20. Battlefield (19-9) LW: 20
Star guard Brayden Gault has committed to play at
Belmont Abbey after graduation.
Dropped out: No. 16 River Hill (20-5)
On the bubble: River Hill (20-5), Pallotti (24-11), St.
John’s (22-11)
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
Here are the final boys’ basketball rankings of the
2017-18 season:
010
002
2
1
3
2
3
1
3
1
3
1
3
1
3
1
2
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
2
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
35 4 9
3
031
001
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
—
—
5
4
E: Rodriguez (3). LOB: Washington 12, Detroit 7. 2B:
Soto (1), Martinez (1), Jones (3). 3B: Hicks (2). HR:
Gerber (1). CS: Sierra (1).
WASHINGTON
IP
H
R
ER
BB
SO
Jackson
Gott
Romero
Grace (W, 1-0)
Adams (H, 1)
Harper (S, 1-1)
3
2
1
1
1
1
3
1
2
1
0
2
1
0
2
0
0
1
1
0
2
0
0
1
2
0
0
1
0
0
2
2
0
2
1
0
DETROIT
IP
H
R
ER
BB
SO
Boyd
3
1
0
0
2
3
Carpenter
3
4
1
1
0
2
Montgomery B (S, 0-2)
1
0
0
0
1
2
Burgos
0
1
2
2
1
0
Reininger L, 0-1 B (S,
1
2
1
0
1
1
0-2)
Russell
.1
2
1
1
2
0
Schreiber
.2
0
0
0
0
1
HBP: by_Carpenter (Goodwin).
WP: Romero.
PB: Greiner.
Umpires: Home, Jerry Layne; First, Mark Wegner;
Second, Vic Carapazza; Third, Manny Gonzalez.
T: 3:03. A: 6,254
0
2
3 —
1 —
5
3
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Ottawa, Duchene 20 (Hoffman, Karlsson),
0:57. 2, Ottawa, Paajarvi 5 (Pyatt, Claesson), 15:16.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Florida, Dadonov 22 (Bjugstad, Barkov),
12:36. 4, Florida, Matheson 10 (Trocheck, Huberdeau),
17:28.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 5, Ottawa, Paajarvi 6 (Chabot), 0:43. 6, Florida,
Huberdeau 23 (Trocheck, Weegar), 4:23. 7, Ottawa,
Duchene 21 (Hoffman), 17:00. 8, Ottawa, Burrows 5
(Karlsson, Pageau), 18:15.
SHOTS ON GOAL
OTTAWA ................................ 12
FLORIDA .................................. 8
2
17
11 — 25
13 — 38
Power-play opportunities: Ottawa 0 of 2; Florida 0 of 1.
Goalies: Ottawa, Anderson 19-20-6 (38 shots-35 saves).
Florida, Luongo 14-7-2 (25-20).
NHL 600 Career Goals
Through Monday’s games
(a-active)
1. Wayne Gretzky ....................................................... 894
2. Gordie Howe ........................................................... 801
3. a-Jaromir Jagr ........................................................ 766
4. Brett Hull................................................................ 741
5. Marcel Dionne......................................................... 731
6. Phil Esposito........................................................... 717
7. Mike Gartner .......................................................... 708
8. Mark Messier.......................................................... 694
9. Steve Yzerman ....................................................... 692
10. Mario Lemieux...................................................... 690
11. Teemu Selanne ..................................................... 684
12. Luc Robitaille........................................................ 668
13. Brendan Shanahan ............................................... 656
14. Dave Andreychuk.................................................. 640
15. Joe Sakic ............................................................... 625
15. a-Jarome Iginla..................................................... 625
17. Bobby Hull ............................................................ 610
18. Dino Ciccarelli ....................................................... 608
19. Jari Kurri ............................................................... 601
20. a-Alex Ovechkin.................................................... 600
Houston Astros: Reassigned RHPs Rogelio Armenteros,
Brendan McCurry and Trent Thornton to their minor
league camp.
Minnesota Twins: Agreed to terms with RHP Lance Lynn
on a one-year contract.
New York Yankees: Agreed to terms with 2B Neil Walker
on a one-year contract. Released INF Danny Espinosa.
Oakland Athletics: Agreed to terms with C Jonathan
Lucroy on a one-year contract. Reassigned RHPs Grant
Holmes and Logan Shore to their minor league camp.
Colorado Rockies: Agreed to terms on a one-year
contract with OF Carlos Gonzalez. Placed RHP Rayan
Gonzalez on the 60-day DL.
Philadelphia Phillies: Agreed to terms with RHP Jake
Arrieta on a three-year contract. Designated 1B Tommy
Joseph for assignment.
Pittsburgh Pirates: Optioned OF Austin Meadows, RHP
Clay Holmes and LHP Jack Leathersich were to Indianapolis (IL). Reassigned SS Cole Tucker, OFs Bryan
Reynolds and Jason Martin, RHP Damien Magnifico and
C Christian Kelley to their minor league camp.
St. Louis Cardinals: Optioned LHP Austin Gomber, INF
Edmundo Sosa and OF Tyler O’Neill to Memphis (PCL)
and RHPs Derian Gonzalez and Conner Greene to
Springfield (Texas).
NFL
Atlanta Falcons: Placed second-round tenders on S
Ricardo Allen and G Ben Garland.
Baltimore Ravens: Signed OL James Hurst to a four-year
contract. Released CB Lardarius Webb.
Buffalo Bills: Traded OT Cordy Glenn and 2018 first- (No.
21) and fifth-round (No. 158) draft picks to Cincinnati for
a 2018 first- (No. 12) and sixth-round (No. 187) draft
picks.
Chicago Bears: Agreed to terms with OL Bradley Sowell
on a two-year contact.
Dallas Cowboys: Re-signed DT Brian Price.
Kansas City Chiefs: Released LB Tamba Hali.
Los Angeles Chargers: Re-signed LB Nick Dzubnar to a
two-year contract and WR Geremy Davis to a one-year
contract.
New Orleans Saints: Announced the retirement of OT
Zach Strief.
New York Giants: Re-signed LB Mark Herzlich and G Jon
Halapio.
Oakland Raiders: Released CB Sean Smith and OT
Marshall Newhouse. Signed DT Justin Ellis to a threeyear contract and WR Griff Whalen to a one-year
contract.
San Francisco 49ers: Signed P Jeff Locke to a one-year
contract and RB Raheem Mostert to his one-year
exclusive rights tender.
Washington Redskins: Re-signed K Dustin Hopkins.
Placed a second-round tender on OT Ty Nsekhe.
D8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 13 , 2018
high schools
BY
J ESSE D OUGHERTY
In the moment they had waited
and worked for, when history and
his team were supposed to collide
head-on, Chuck Henry’s hands
were stuffed in his pockets, his
eyes glanced at the scoreboard,
then trailed to the hardwood floor,
and his cheeks were damp from
tears.
“We’re good. We’re good,” Henry, the head coach of Fairmont
Heights boys’ basketball, said as
he pulled each of his players, silver
medals hanging around their
necks, into a bear hug Saturday
afternoon. “Keep your head up.”
At the start of the day, Fairmont
Heights had a chance to win a
second consecutive Maryland 1A
state high school championship,
for their school, for their community and, even if it were last on
their lists, for themselves. They
represent Prince George’s County,
the
basketball-crazed
area
crunched between Washington
and Maryland’s Eastern Shore,
and that means a lot to the Fairmont Heights players, and the
coaches, and the fans who
squeezed into the first 11 rows of
Xfinity Center and screamed from
the opening tip to the season’s
final buzzer.
It means a lot to the county, too.
It has been a very visible year for
Prince George’s County’s storied
basketball legacy. In June, Kevin
Durant won his first NBA championship, NBA Finals most valuable
player award and, while standing
on basketball’s grandest stage,
shouted out the Seat Pleasant
neighborhood he grew up in. Less
than two weeks later, Markelle
Fultz, a teenager who’s from Upper Marlboro, was the first pick in
the NBA draft.
But it all extends beyond the
moments carved into the sport’s
larger history. Prince George’s
County’s basketball culture was
built on the blacktop games of
long ago. The stars who made it
and the stars who didn’t. The opportunities seized and the opportunities spoiled, and how there is a
lesson to be learned either way.
And it now includes teams such
as Fairmont Heights, which exceeded expectations for two seasons, fell just short of its own and,
even when the scoreboard showed
a 59-48 win for Dunbar in Saturday’s state title game, didn’t need a
victory to extend tradition.
“It’s not about getting guys to
the NBA or even the biggest colleges,” Henry said earlier in the week.
“It’s about giving these kids something to be a part of, something
they can count on, something they
can shoot for and learn from. It’s
about being part of that tradition
‘It’s a great tradition’
In hoops-crazed Prince George’s County, one team’s run
at a second consecutive state championship falls just short
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Coach Chuck Henry and Fairmont Heights — with 13 seniors — lament the loss in the 1A final.
at our school and in the county.
“And believe me, it’s a great
tradition.”
Friday: Maryland semifinals
Henry ascended onto the yellow bus, escaping a biting afternoon wind, and set down his suit
bag before peering at his group.
“All right, fellas, it’s a business
trip now,” he said just after 2 p.m.
Friday before his team headed to
its semifinal matchup with Patterson Mill. His players, 15 of them,
poked their heads up, their eyes
hovering just above the green
seats and fixed on their bearded
coach. “As usual, no talking on the
way over. Then we talk on the way
back by doing what?”
“By getting a W,” the players
mumbled in unison, and then it
was silent aside from the sound of
the bus’s motor and wheels grinding against the uneven street.
Any drive through Prince
George’s County, short or painfully
long, can evoke the area’s basketball history. Whether it’s by passing a certain high school or recreation center or worn playground, it
is hard to avoid the past, with NBA
players Durant, Fultz and Michael
Beasley following in the footsteps
of Prince George’s County’s Jeff
Green, Ty Lawson, Delonte West
and Michael Sweetney. And that is
only the start.
Some say it all began with
Landover native Len Bias, the
Northwestern High and University
of Maryland star who died two days
after he was drafted No. 2 overall by
the Boston Celtics in June 1986.
Others say the tradition is not so
easy to track, with all the pickup
legends and careers that never fully
bloomed. But it persists, even as
budding basketball talents are
more likely to seek out a privateschool opportunity than play for
their neighborhood public school.
Four Prince George’s County
teams — the Fairmont Heights
boys, Bladensburg boys, Eleanor
Roosevelt girls and Largo girls —
played for a state championship
Saturday. Eleanor Roosevelt came
away with the 4A girls’ title, but
the Largo girls fell short in the 1A
final. Bladensburg, making its
first finals appearance since 1979,
fell four points short of defending
4A champion Perry Hall.
“You can still have pride in your
neighborhood and your school
and your county,” said Ricky Goings, a Greenbelt native who started Everyone Deserves A Shot, a
program helping area athletes ob-
BOYS’ BASKETBALL NOTES
tain college scholarships. “It may
be different and more rare now
than it used to be. But when that
pride comes out, it can be really
special.”
Fairmont Heights rolled into
College Park and, about five hours
later, exited the arena with a 72-49
win. Senior Kimani Benjamin led
the way with 17 points. Senior
point guard Darren Lucas-White
contributed 14 points, six rebounds and five assists.
It gave Fairmont Heights a
chance to win back-to-back titles
for the first time since 1971 and,
one year after revising its own
recent history, put it on the cusp of
more.
Henry led his coaches through
the bowels of the arena as 8 p.m.
passed, the black suit in his suit
bag now ruffled by two hours of
pacing along the sideline and penning plays on his court-shaped
whiteboard and pleading with his
team to take the right shots and
rotate on defense. His mind was
already shifted to Dunbar, the last
team in Fairmont Heights’ way.
“Coach,” said a woman working
the event and sitting at a table by
the exit. “Y’all gonna take this
home tomorrow?”
“Yes, ma’am,” Henry said with-
out hesitating, and the chance to
do so was only 15 hours away.
TRACK AND FIELD
Area teams
set records
in relays
Saturday: Maryland final
The shots didn’t fall. The pointblank layups rolled out. Dunbar
pressed up on Fairmont Heights at
every opportunity, Fairmont
Heights tried to press itself back
into the game but, when the 32
minutes were up, the scoreboard
showed an 11-point loss for the
Hornets.
And their faces showed sorrow
and shock that the season, set to
end either way, somehow ended
like this. They received their silver
medals, and the runner-up trophy
was handed to Lucas-White. Photographers started to snap photos
of him, Henry and a few other
teammates. He stopped them and
beckoned everyone over to come
pose, eyes swelled from tears and
mouths stuck frowning, as a team.
“I tell them this all the time, but
on the other side is an opportunity,” Henry said at the postgame
news conference with three seniors sitting to his left.
“Fifty-plus wins in two years, I
felt like we had a great run,” said
Benjamin, who will likely play Division III basketball next year. “It’s
legendary what we did these past
couple years. It’s legendary what
we did. We’ll never forget it.”
“I feel like everyone in this program grew as a man over these
past two years,” senior forward
Yearlarndo Reed II added.
Henry looked at Reed out of the
corner of his eye and smiled. That
is what he wanted all along, for his
players to see the value beyond the
court, for a group of 15 teenagers
to use a county’s time-honored
tradition to reach for something
bigger and better. He graduates 13
seniors this year and won’t spend
all spring and summer recruiting
a new team. He will bring up
young players from the junior varsity squad and start teaching them
one of his key lessons: That they
don’t only have to “not lose.” They
can also expect to win.
“To hear Yearlarndo say that, I’ll
take that over a win any day,”
Henry said. “I don’t want to say
basketball is the only thing for our
kids in Prince George’s County,
even if it is a disadvantaged area in
a lot of ways. That’s not the case.
But it gives them something to
care about, and this experience is
something they will always have.”
With that, Henry limped
through a skinny hallway, the season’s final box score in hand, and
toward a quiet locker room. Fairmont Heights soon left Xfinity
Center with a second-place
plaque, 20 some silver medals and
a whole lot more than that.
Two Washington-area track
powerhouses broke national
high school records at the New
Balance Nationals Indoor meet
this past weekend in New York.
The Bullis girls, whose sprint
and relay program has become
elite in recent years, set U.S.
standards in the 4x200-meter
relay and the 4x55-meter shuttle
hurdles.
Bullis’s Lauryn Harris, Masai
Russell, Leah Phillips and Cierra
Pyles first broke the record in the
4x55 shuttle hurdles by finishing
in 30.44 seconds Saturday.
“I was really nervous going
into it because of all the hype
built into the race,” said Harris, a
junior who ran the first leg of the
4x55. She added that she felt
strong through her portion of the
race and said she couldn’t have
been happier with how the team
performed. “When I heard that
we broke the national record, I
was just ecstatic,” she said.
Russell and Phillips joined
Shaniya Hall and Ashley Seymour on Sunday to smash their
team’s own record from earlier
this year in the 4x200 by finishing in 1:34.75.
The Bulldogs’ team of Sierra
Leonard, Hall, Russell and Phillips also finished first in the
girls’ 4x400 meters, clocking a
time of 3:39.86 that ranks No. 4
all time.
Loudoun Valley’s accomplished quartet of Connor Wells,
Jacob Hunter, Colton Bogucki
and Sam Affolder — running
under the name of “Jungle Track
Club” — set a national record in
the 4x1 mile (17:01.82) and
clocked the No. 2 all-time national finish (and high school
facility record) with their victory in the 4x800 meters (7:39.30).
Additionally, Bullis’s Eric Allen Jr. placed second in the boys’
200-meter dash (21.08) and
helped the Bulldogs to a runnerup finish in the boys’ 4x200-meter relay (1:27.44) along with
Ashton Allen, Bryce Watson and
Caleb Mauney.
Bullis’s Joe Lee was also honored as Mike Byrnes coach of the
year.
jesse.dougherty@washpost.com
sports@washpost.com
BY
M IA O ' N EILL
GIRLS’ BASKETBALL NOTES
Stags leave lull behind for No. 1 finish Raiders take charge — three of them
F ROM STAFF REPORTS
F ROM STAFF REPORTS
Standing behind the bleachers,
adjacent to Gonzaga’s court, DeMatha Coach Mike Jones reflected
on his team’s effort to upend Gonzaga in a mid-February contest
that pushed the Stags ahead of the
Eagles in the Washington Catholic
Athletic Conference standings
with just two regular season
games remaining.
DeMatha had been one of the
area’s top teams throughout the
season. The Stags boasted one of
the region’s deepest rosters,
stocked with young talent.
But they had hit a “plateau,”
Jones said, in mid-to-late January,
losing to Gonzaga, Paul VI and
O’Connell in conference play, so
the coach was especially pleased
to see renewed energy and urgency in that 57-53 victory over the
Eagles.
Less than two weeks later, Jones
had red eyes from crying tears of
happiness as he reflected on beating Gonzaga again — this time for
the No. 1 Stags’ first WCAC tournament championship since 2011,
the first title in what would become a trifecta of crowning triumphs to close the 2017-18 season.
“Our guys know that’s just a
whole different beast,” Jones said
of the postseason after the Stags’
regular season win over Gonzaga
on Feb. 13. “If we’re not going to
have energy, you won’t last in the
WCAC playoffs for very long.”
After outlasting the competition in the WCAC tournament, the
Stags powered through three wins
for the Maryland private schools
championship, using a late surge
to beat No. 3 Rock Creek Christian,
64-58, on March 5.
Then DeMatha won the Alhambra Catholic Invitational Tournament championship in western
Maryland last weekend, topping
O’Connell, 69-57, in the final with a
41-29 scoring advantage in the second half. The Stags also beat Bishop Walsh in the opening game and
Paul VI in the semifinals.
Sophomore center Hunter
Dickinson earned tournament
Thinking back on his team’s
Maryland 4A championship win
over
Catonsville,
Eleanor
Roosevelt Coach Delton Fuller remembers the physicality.
“There were a couple of plays
where you didn’t know whether it
was a rugby match or a basketball
game,” Fuller joked.
The teams shot a combined 46
free throws, with Catonsville players making 82 percent of theirs to
help the Comets stay close.
The fouls were unavoidable.
Most of the Raiders’ 60-56 win
Saturday was played at the kind of
breakneck, high-flying pace that
often produces a lot of whistles.
But the ones that Fuller enjoyed
the most were the three charges
taken by his team. Speaking a day
after his program hoisted the trophy, those charges are the first
thing he brings up.
“It just shows that these players
were going to do whatever they
had to do to win. They didn’t even
think about it,” he said.
Senior forward Nia Scott took
two of them, living up to her
season-long reputation as one of
the best charge-takers in the area.
While Scott’s charges pleased
Fuller, the one taken by point
guard Ashia McCalla shocked
him. McCalla finished with 29
points in the win but also took a
key charge in the second half.
Fuller believes it’s the first one she
has taken in her four years with
the program.
“She’s a finesse player,” Fuller
said. “So when she took that
charge, I knew. I thought, ‘Okay,
we’re going to win this game.’ ”
DANIEL KUCIN JR. FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Junior guard Justin Moore played a full season for WCAC
tournament champion DeMatha after tearing his ACL in 2017.
MVP honors with 18 points on
7-for-10 shooting in the championship, while junior guard Justin
Moore, playing a full season after
tearing his anterior cruciate ligament in January 2017, added 16
points and sophomore guard Earl
Timberlake had a double-double
with 13 points and 10 rebounds.
The Stags lose just four seniors, all
of whom played reserve roles in
games this season, and are set to
return their top five leading scorers
“It’s great knowing that we did
all we were supposed to do this
year,” Moore said. “We really went
3 for 3.”
— Callie Caplan
Gaithersburg’s bright future
Gaithersburg Coach Jeff Holda
doesn’t mean to be cocky, but he
insists he isn’t surprised the Trojans’ season lasted as long as it did.
In fact, he said, he expected it.
Never mind that the team’s best
two players — Jao Ituka and Jordan Hawkins — were freshmen.
The duo’s youth belied their poise
and athleticism, which shined as
Gaithersburg won 17 regular season games.
The Trojans overcame internal
turmoil and outside distractions
and defeated Bethesda-Chevy
Chase in the Maryland 4A West
region final, setting the stage for
the program’s run at a first state
championship since 1998.
Eventual champion Perry Hall
had other ideas, blowing out
Gaithersburg in a state semifinal,
85-62. It was a painful loss, but one
Holda believes will be a springboard for his returners.
“The next three years with [Ituka and Hawkins], they should be
living up to that standard,” Holda
said. “Anything less would be unacceptable.”
— Joshua Needelman
— Michael Errigo
Poolesville’s simple style
Fred Swick’s 18th season as
head coach of the Poolesville girls’
basketball team ended with his
370th win. When the Falcons beat
Queen Anne’s, 63-23, on Saturday
to capture the Maryland 2A title
and complete a perfect 27-0 season, they did it with Swick’s signature style: smart, simple basket-
DOUG KAPUSTIN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
“These players were going to do whatever they had to do to win,”
said Eleanor Roosevelt Coach Delton Fuller, shown with his team.
ball executed perfectly.
Swick took a direct route with
teaching his players how to take
over Montgomery County this
season. His halftime talks were
noticeably short, with the Falcons
re-emerging from the locker room
after only two or three minutes
instead of the traditional seven to
10 that most teams take.
“I go straight to the point and
we’re done,” Swick said. “My
coaching philosophy is to avoid
information overload.”
While opposing coaches often
paced the sidelines, Swick often
sat calmly in his chair, watching
as his team ran past another opponent with a strong press and a
cohesive offense.
“Teams do these ridiculous
things on the blackboard where it
takes you 20 minutes to read it
all,” Swick said. “We’re just trying
to focus on the basics.”
— Michael Errigo
Edison’s unconventional path
The Edison Eagles don’t travel.
Not for the Virginia state quarterfinals, anyway. Winners of five
straight region championships
entering the season, the Eagles
were used to starting the state
tournament on their home court.
Yet there they were March 2,
packed onto a charter bus bound
for Roanoke. Wind storms ravaged the Washington area that
day, forcing the federal government and local schools to close.
But Edison had a game to play, a
statement that needed to be
made.
It was a blowout. Playing in
front of a hostile crowd, Carole
Miller poured in 26 points to lead
Edison to an 83-65 victory over
William Fleming.
Edison then beat FreedomSouth Riding in the semifinals
before ultimately coming up
short against Princess Anne in the
Class 5 state championship.
The team remains without a
state title, but Coach Dianne Lewis said her players have nothing to
be ashamed of.
“My girls never quit. . . . It was
indicative of the entire season,”
Lewis said.
— Joshua Needelman
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Official Notices
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON PROPOSED
REVENUE BOND FINANCING BY
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY OF
THE COUNTY OF FAUQUIER, VIRGINIA
Notice is hereby given that the Economic Development
Authority of the County of Fauquier, Virginia (formerly known
as the Industrial Development Authority of the County
of Fauquier, Virginia) (the “Authority”), whose address is
10 Hotel Street, Warrenton, Virginia 20186, will hold a
public hearing on the request of Wakefield School, Inc. (the
“School”), whose address is 4439 Old Tavern Road, The
Plains, Virginia, 20198, for the issuance by the Authority of
up to $10,000,000 of its revenue bonds, to assist the School
in financing or refinancing all or a portion of the costs of
one or more of the following: (a) refunding the Authority’s
outstanding Variable Rate Revenue Bonds (Wakefield School,
Inc.) Series 2008 (the “2008 Bonds”) which were issued
for the purposes of (i) refinancing Authority bonds and a
loan previously issued to assist the School in financing
various completed capital building projects (renovations
to Archwood House comprised of three floors and approximately 5,000 square feet, parking, landscaping, tennis
courts, Robert’s Classroom Building comprised of two floors
and approximately 35,220 square feet, Upper School Building
comprised of three floors and approximately 19,800 square
feet, Science/Tech. and Library Building comprised of two
floors and approximately 19,600 square feet, Activity Center/Upper Gymnasium comprised of two floors and approximately 13,040 square feet, Arts Building comprised of two
floors and approximately 7,719 square feet) at the School’s
campus at 4439 Old Tavern Road, The Plains (Fauquier
County), Virginia (the “Campus”); (ii) financing infrastructure
improvements related to athletic field parking, emergency
access (new “East Road” construction), Campus storm water
management, water wells and reservoir ponds for athletic
field irrigation, and on Campus (Campus entrance) and off
Campus (Route 245/Old Tavern Road) traffic flow located
at the Campus; and (iii) financing certain working capital
and other expenditures associated with the foregoing to
the extent financeable including, without limitation, costs
of issuance, credit enhancement costs, liquidity costs and
a debt service reserve; (b) funding swap breakage costs in
connection with the 2008 Bonds; and (c) funding certain
costs of issuance of the proposed bonds.
The issuance of revenue bonds or notes as requested by
the School will not constitute a debt or pledge of the faith
and credit of the Commonwealth of Virginia or the County
of Fauquier, Virginia, and neither the faith and credit nor
the taxing power of the Commonwealth of Virginia or any
political subdivision thereof will be pledged to the payment
of such bonds or notes.
The public hearing, which may be continued or adjourned,
will be held at 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday, March 27, 2018, before
the Authority in the Warren Green Meeting Room (First Floor)
at 10 Hotel Street, Warrenton, Virginia 20186. Any person
interested in the issuance of the proposed revenue bonds or
notes or the proposed refinancing project may appear at the
hearing and present his or her views.
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY OF THE COUNTY OF
FAUQUIER, VIRGINIA
825
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BRAZILIAN NAVY TRAINING SHIP “BRASIL”
PUBLIC BID #001/18
OBJECT: For the supply of dry and frozen food to the Brazilian Navy
Training Ship “Brasil”, from July to December 2018, in international
ports.
PROPOSALS: The bidders shall submit their qualifying documents
and price envelopes no later than 09:30 AM of APR18, 2018, in the
following address.
QUALIFYING DOCUMENTS: It will be openned at 09:45AM of
APR18, 2018, in the same address.
ADDRESS: Base Naval do Rio de Janeiro (BNRJ), meetings room of
“Intendência” Department, Ilha de Mocanguê – 24049-900 – Niterói,
Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. Phone number: 55 21 2189 – 1553/ 2189 – 1554/
2189-1476.
ANNOUCEMENT: It can be obtained at the “Navio-Escola Brasil”
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nebrasil.secom@marinha.mil.br.
LUCIANO MORAES DE OLIVEIRA
President of the Tender Commission
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC.
5335 WISCONSIN AVENUE, N.W., SUITE 440
WASHINGTON, DC 20015
202-463-4567
www.hwestauctions.com
Pursuant to the District of Columbia Condominium Act and
the Declaration of Condominium and the
By-Laws of
Condominium recorded on September 15, 2006 as Instrument
Nos. 2006125914 and 2006125915, respectively, among the
Land Records of the District of Columbia, according to the Notice
of Foreclosure Sale of Condominium Unit for Assessments Due
filed March 2, 2018, and at the request of the Board of
Directors of the Condominium, the following real property shall
be sold at public auction On April 3, 2018 at 10:45 A.M.
within the office of: HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335
Wisconsin Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015:
Unit No. G02 in Madeline Gardens Condominium Association
as described in the aforementioned Declaration and By-Laws
of Condominium and as per Plat of Condominium Subdivision
recorded in the Condominium Book 62 at Page 32 in the office
of the Surveyor for the District Of Columbia, together with all
of the appurtenances incident to said unit as contained in the
aforementioned Declaration of Condominium and any and all
amendments thereto, subject, however, to all the provisions,
restrictions, easements and conditions as set forth in the
Declarations of Condominium, the By-Laws relating thereto, and
any and all amendments thereto. The Unit is known for taxation
and assessment purposes as Lot No. 2020 in Square No. 4055
and having a mailing address of 1230 Holbrook Terrace, N.E.,
Unit G02, Washington, DC 20002.
TERMS OF SALE: The purchase price must be paid in cash.
Unit G02 shall be sold subject to real estate taxes, if any,
and shall also be sold subject to any other superior liens,
encumbrances, and municipal assessments if any, the further
particulars of which may be announced at the time of sale. Other
oral information regarding Unit G02 may be disclosed at the
time of sale. A deposit of $10,000 will be required at time of
sale, such deposit to be in cash, certified check, or in such other
form, as the Board of Directors of the Condominium, in its sole
discretion, requires. All conveyance, recording, recordation tax,
transfer taxes, etc., shall be at purchaser’s cost. The balance
of the purchase price, together with interest at the rate of ten
(10)% per annum from date of sale to date of receipt of the
balance of the purchase price, must be paid in cash or by
cashier’s certified check and all other terms to be complied
with within 30 days. Otherwise deposit is forfeited and the
property may be re-advertised and sold at the discretion of the
Board of Directors of the Condominium at the risk and cost of
the defaulting purchaser. The Condominium Association shall
convey a deed pursuant to 42 D.C., Code Section 1903.13,
and makes no further representations of warranties as to title.
The Condominium association cannot guarantee clear title or the
purchaser's ability to obtain title insurance. For this reason,
the purchaser may not be able to obtain financing and therefore
must be able to pay the entire purchase price balance, in any
case, within 30 days. In the event of the failure on the part of the
Condominium association to convey such deed, the purchaser's
sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit.
Contact Brian D. Bichy 301-961-5253 Attorney for the Madeline Gardens Condominium
850
850
Montgomery County
12169469
851
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BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
15614 Plantation Court
Laurel, MD 20707
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to SUSAN M. PESNER, Trustee(s), dated
September 23, 2005, and recorded among the Land Records
of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 23481,
folio 322, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed
of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees,
by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARCH 22, 2018 at 11:30AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED SEVEN (7) IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN
AS "PLANTATIONS OF LAUREL" AS PER PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK 196 AT
PLAT 63. BEING THE SAME PROPERTY AS CONVEYED IN A
DEED DATED JANUARY 31, 2005 AND RECORDED IN LIBER
21318 AT FOLIO 1 AMONG THE AFORESAID LAND RECORDS.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $49,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.875%
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-03994)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
4988 KEPPLER ROAD
Temple Hills, MD 20748
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to RONALD S. DUETCH, Trustee(s), dated May
25, 2005, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 22661, folio 276, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARCH 22, 2018 at 11:30AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED ONE-HUNDRED SIX (106) IN A SUBDIVISION
KNOWN AS "LOT 103 TO LOT 106, WOODLANE", AS PER PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK WWW 35 AT PLAT 66
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND AND HAVING A PROPERTY ADDRESS OF 4988
KEPPLER ROAD, TEMPLE HILLS, MD 20748 AND BEING
MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOW: BEGINNING
AT AN IRON PIPE ON THE NORTHERN MOST CORNER OF LOT
106 AND RUNNING ON A DIVISION LINE BETWEEN LOT 105
AND LOT 106, S 42 DEG. 30 MIN. 53 SEC. E, 109.10 FEET TO
AN IRON PIPE; THENCE WITH THE OUTLINE OF LOT 106, S
71 DEG. 22 MIN. 00 SEC, W, 73.41 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE;
THENCE THROUGH LOT 106 ON THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY
LINE OF THE NEW CAPITAL BELTWAY (SRC PLAT N. 26741)
108.70 FEET ON THE ARC OF A CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING
A RADIUS OF 3424.05 FOOT, A LONG CHORD DISTANCE OF
108.69 FEET AND A CHORD BEARING OF N 85 DEG 36 MIN.
38 SEC W TO AN IRON PIPE; THENCE WITH THE SOUTHEAST
SIDE OF KEPPLER ROAD, N. 47 DEG29 MIN 07 SEC. E
141.39 FOOT TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING
9,241 SQUARE FEET MORE OR LESS. BEING THE FEE SIMPLE
PROPERTY WHICH, BY DEED DATED OCTOBER 29, 1996,
AND RECORDED IN THE LAND RECORDS OF THE COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, MARYLAND, IN LIBER 11105, FOLIO 584,
WAS GRANTED AND CONVEYED BY CARL AUGUST HANSON
AND CAROLE JOANNE HANSON UNTO ROBERT WOODROW
MURPHY AND CRYSTAL D. MURPHY
Said property is subject to a 120 day IRS Right of
Redemption
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 10.999%
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
www.hwestauctions.com
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
FEBRUARY 27, MARCH 6, 13, 2018
12165726
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
850
Montgomery County 850 Montgomery County
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
www.hwestauctions.com
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
MARCH 6, 13, 20, 2018
12168158 or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
MARYLAND
MARYLAND
852
Anne Arundel County 852 Anne Arundel County the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
STEPHEN B. JACKSON and
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
STEVEN P. HENNE
Substitute Trustees
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
Substituted Trustees
Plaintiffs
Plaintiffs
Home delivery starts this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
v.
v.
Home delivery
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
MARC J. ROBINSON
your
day
off
right.
Defendant(s)
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
is convenient.
MARIAMMA ISAC
(n/k/a Mariamma Alexander)
Civil Action No. 414909V
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
THOMAS ALEXANDER
1-800-753-POST
NOTICE
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
Defendants
Notice is hereby given this 22nd
SF
Civil Action No. 435855-V
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
day of FEBRUARY, 2018, by the Cir1-800-753-POST
NOTICE
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
cuit Court for Montgomery CounNOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN this
Home delivery is so easy.
ty, Maryland, that the sale of the
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (13-24593)
SF
22nd day of February, 2018 by
property mentioned in these pro1-800-753-POST SF
the Circuit Court for Montgomery
ceedings and described as 15916
Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
County, that the sale of the propGreen Meadow Road, Gaitherserty known as 11703 Cider Press
Thomas W. Hodge, Thomas J. Gartner,
burg, MD 20878 will be ratified
Place, Unit 9, Germantown, Maryand confirmed unless cause to
Robert M. Oliveri, David M. Williamson,
land 20876, made by Stephen
the contrary thereof be shown on
Wake up
B. Jackson and Steven P. Henne,
or before the 26th day of MARCH,
Substitute Trustees
Substituted Trustees, to: Housing
Opportunities Commission of
Montgomery County, Maryland
and reported in the above-entitled cause, be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 26th day of March,
2018, next; provided a copy of
this Notice be inserted in some
newspaper published in said
Montgomery County, once a week
for three successive weeks on or
before the said 26th day of March,
2018.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $326,400.00.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Montgomery County, MD
Feb 27, Mar 6, 13, 2018 12167413
Wake up
to home delivery.
2018, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive weeks in some newspaper
of general circulation published in
said County before the 26th day
of MARCH, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$420,000.00.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Montgomery County, Maryland
Feb 27, Mar 6, 13, 2018 12167408
852
Anne Arundel County
to home delivery.
Home
delivery
makes good
sense.
1-800-753-POST
SF
How about some
home delivery?
How about some
home delivery?
SF
SF
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
No. C-02-CV-17-002920
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this Monday, March 5, 2018 that the sale
of the property in the proceedings
mentioned, made and reported
by Stephen B. Jackson, Substitute
Trustee BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 4th day of April 2018,
next; provided a copy of this
Notice be inserted in some newspaper published in Anne Arundel
County, once in each of three
successive weeks before the 4th
day of April 2018, next. The report
states that the amount of the sale
of the property at 116 MOUNTAIN
ROAD, UNIT 2D, GLEN BURNIE, MD
21060 to be $84,000.00.
Mar 13, 20, 27, 2018
12169882
12164663
SF
SF
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
Versus
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 6, 13, 20, 2018
Wake up to
home delivery.
Stephen B. Jackson, et. al.
Substitute Trustees
Robert P. Duckworth
Clerk, Circuit Court for
Anne Arundel County, MD
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
Wake up to
home delivery.
Amy Elizabeth Acton
Defendant
SF
MARCH 13, 20, 27, 2018
Montgomery County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
23819 LOG HOUSE ROAD
Gaithersburg, MD 20882
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to RICHARD T. CREGGER, Trustee(s), dated
October 27, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 33421, folio
795, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at
the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
MARCH 16, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
LOT NUMBERED SIX (6) IN THE SUBDIVISION KWON AS
"LOTS 5 & 6, WELSH'S ADDITION IN WOODFIELD" AS PER
PLAT THEREOF RECORDED PLAT BOOK 156 AT PLAT 17683,
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
MARYLAND.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $56,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (14-16393)
Keith M. Yacko, Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Jason L. Hamlin,
Thomas J. Gartner
Substitute Trustees
1-800-753-POST
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Legal Notices - 202-334-7007
Auctions, Estate Sales, Furniture 202-334-7029
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S0833-2 2x3
washingtonpost.com/classifieds
CLASSIFIED
D9
D10
851
Prince Georges County
OPQRS
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
TUESDAY, MARCH 13, 2018
EZ
Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
GREENSPOONMARDER, P.A.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
1125 West Street, Suite 265
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
Annapolis, MD 21401
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
KNOWN AS
KNOWN
AS
11261 RAGING BROOK DRIVE
7013 Mason Street
UNIT 257
6803 Forbes Boulevard
District Heights, MD 20747
BOWIE, MD 20720
LANHAM, MD 20706
MARCH 15, 2018 AT 10:00 AM
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed
of
Trust
to
WILLIAM A. MARKWAT, Trustee(s), dated
By virtue of a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from Deed of Trust to JASON HOROWITZ, Trustee(s), dated March
PAULA T. FIELDS, dated JANUARY 4, 2006, and recorded in 20, 2013, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE January 19, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of
the Land Records of Prince George's County, Maryland, at GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 34615, folio 263, the PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 24208, folio
Liber 24035, Folio 097, default having occurred under the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having 590, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
terms thereof, the Substitute Trustee will sell at public auction, appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
at the front of the Prince George's County courthouse located duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
at 14735 Main Street, Duval Wing Entrance, Upper Marlboro, occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
MD. All that FEE SIMPLE lot of ground and the improvements party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
thereon, situated in Prince George's County and being more fully offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
UNIT NUMBERED 257 IN PHASE XXI IN “GLENSFORD
MARCH 15, 2018 at 10:00 AM
MARCH 22, 2018 at 10:00 AM
CONDOMINIUM” AS ESTABLISHED PURSUANT TO A CERTAIN DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM OF THE ARTERY ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
ORGANIZATION, INC., AS MARYLAND CORPORATION, DATED thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
MAY 27, 1987 AND RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS described as follows:
OF PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY, MARYLAND IN LIBER LOT NUMBERED TWENTY (20) IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN LOT NUMBERED TWENTY-TWO (22), IN BLOCK NUMBERED
6957 AT FOLIO 583, AND SUPPLEMENTED BY FIRST SUP- AS "STANCLIFF'S ADDITION TO WOODSTREAM EAST", AS FIFTY-SIX (56) IN A SUB-DIVISION KNOWN AS SECTION 3,
PLEMENT DECLARATION RECORDED JUNE 24, 1988 IN PER THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND DISTRICT HEIGHTS, PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
LIBER 7007 AT FOLIO 309, AND SECOND SUPPLEMENTARY RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND IN AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK BB 12 AT
DECLARATION RECORDED JULY 21, 1988 IN LIBER 7031 PLAT BOOK VJ 175 AT PLAT 76
FOLIO 59
AT FOLIO 864, AND THIRD SUPPLEMENTARY DECLARATION
RECORDED AUGUST 15, 1988 IN LIBER 7057 AT FOLIO 488, The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
AND FOURTH SUPPLEMENTARY DECLARATION RECORDED without either express or implied warranty or representation, without either express or implied warranty or representation,
AUGUST 24, 1988 IN LIBER 7065 AT FOLIO 904, AND FIFTH including but not limited to the description, fitness for a including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
SUPPLEMENTARY DECLARATION RECORDED SEPTEMBER particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
16, 1988 IN LIBER 7088 AT FOLIO 648, AND SIXTH SUP- construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
PLEMENTARY DECLARATION RECORDED OCTOBER 3, 1988 liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merIN LIBER 7102 AT FOLIO 868, AND SEVENTH SUPPLEMEN- chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
TARY DECLARATION RECORDED OCTOBER 17, 1988 IN laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
LIBER 7116 AT FOLIO 618, AND EIGHT SUPPLEMENTARY subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
DECLARATION RECORDED OCTOBER 20, 1988 IN LIBER which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
7120 AT FOLIO 485, AND NINTH SUPPLEMENTARY DECLA- subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
RATION RECORDED OCTOBER 27, 1988 IN LIBER 7125 record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
AT FOLIO 924, AND TENTH SUPPLEMENTARY DECLARATION assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
RECORDED JANUARY 20, 1989 IN LIBER 7239 AT FOLIO 472, TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
AND ELEVENTH SUPPLEMENTARY DECLARATION RECORD- certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
ED JANUARY 26, 1989 IN LIBER 7208 AT FOLIO 20, NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
AND TWELFTH SUPPLEMENTARY DECLARATION RECORDED of the purchase price with interest at 3.25% per annum from of the purchase price with interest at 2% per annum from the
SEPTEMBER 6, 1990 IN LIBER 7815 AT FOLIO 617, AND the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN
THIRTEENTH AND SUPPLEMENTARY DECLARATION RECORD- TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on
ED SEPTEMBER 24, 1990 IN LIBER 7766 AT FOLIO 46, on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
AND THE FOURTEENTH SUPPLEMENTARY DECLARATION will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
RECORDED SEPTEMBER 24, 1990 IN LIBER 7766 AT FOLIO by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
59 AND FIFTEENTH SUPPLEMENTAL DECLARATION RECORD- association dues and assessments that may become due after association dues and assessments that may become due after
ED OCTOBER 9, 1990 IN LIBER 7780 AT FOLIO 411, the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
AND SIXTEENTH SUPPLEMENTARY DECLARATION RECORD- Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
ED JULY 18, 1991 IN LIBER 809 AT FOLIO 581 AND taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
SEVENTEENTH SUPPLEMENTARY DECLARATION RECORDED are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
AUGUST 14, 1991 IN LIBER 8034 AT FOLIO 758 AND the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
EIGHTEEN SUPPLEMENTARY DECLARATION RECORDED property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
AUGUST 14, 1991 IN LIBER 8034 AT FOLIO 772; AND purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
PURSUANT TO THE APPROPRIATE PLATS DESCRIBED IN mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
SAID DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM, RECORDED AMONG said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
THE SAID LAND RECORDS IN PLAT BOOK NLP 138 AT PLATS Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
32 THROUGH 41, INCLUSIVE, AND PLAT BOOK NLP 139 AT Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
PLATS 43 THROUGH 47, INCLUSIVE, AND PLAT BOOK NLP the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
139 AT PLATS 87 THROUGH 91, INCLUSIVE, AND PLAT BOOK convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
NLP 140 AT PLATS 46 THROUGH 50, INCLUSIVE, AND PLAT purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
BOOK NLP 140 AT PLATS 64 THROUGH 68, INCLUSIVE, AND Trustee's File No. (56115)
Trustee's File No. (44645)
PLAT BOOK NLP 141 AT PLATS 15 THROUGH 19, INCLUSIVE,
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
AND PLAT BOOK 141 AT PLATS 35 THROUGH 39, INCLUSIVE,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEES
AND PLAT BOOK NLP 141 AT PLATS 47 THROUGH 51,
INCLUSIVE, AND PLAT BOOK NLP 141 AT PLATS 68 THROUGH
72, INCLUSIVE, AND PLAT BOOK NLP 141 AT PLATS 85
THROUGH 89, INCLUSIVE, AND PLAT BOOK NLP 144 AT PLATS
50 THROUGH 54, INCLUSIVE, AND PLAT BOOK NLP 144 AT
PLATS 55 THROUGH 59, INCLUSIVE AND PLAT BOOK NLP
AT PLATS 5 THROUGH 19, INCLUSIVE AND PLAT BOOK NLP
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
12165147
155 AT PLATS 28 THROUGH 37, INCLUSIVE AND PLAT BOOK MARCH 6, 13, 20, 2018
12166380 FEBRUARY 27, MARCH 6, 13, 2018
NLP 155 AT PLATS 62 THROUGH 66, INCLUSIVE AND PLAT
BOOK VJ 159 AT PLATS 23 THROUGH 27, INCLUSIVE AND
PLAT BOOK, VJ 159 AT PLATS 74 THROUGH 83, INCLUSIVE.
TOGETHER WITH THE IMPROVEMENTS THERETO, AND THE
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
RIGHTS AND APPURTENANCES THERETO BELONGING OR
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
APPERTAINING, AND PARTICULARLY THE RIGHTS IN COMSUITE 100
SUITE
100
MON WITH OTHER, IN THE GENERAL AND LIMITED COMROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
MON ELEMENTS OF THE AFORESAID CONDOMINIUM AND
ALL OTHER RIGHTS AND PRIVILEGES OF A CONDOMINIUM
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
UNIT, SUBJECT TO CONDITIONS, LIMITATIONS, RESERVAVALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
TIONS AND COVENANTS SET FORTH IN THE AFORESAID
KNOWN AS
KNOWN AS
DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM.
5601 Parker House Terrace #210
5009 Decatur Street
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the loan
Hyattsville, MD 20782
Hyattsville,
MD
20781
and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered into by
the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale is void Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
and the purchaser’s deposit shall be refunded without interest. certain Deed of Trust to PRLAP, INC. , Trustee(s), dated March Deed of Trust to SAMUEL I. WHITE, PC. , Trustee(s), dated
Purchaser must obtain possession and assumes risk of loss or 17, 2004, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE February 12, 2007, and recorded among the Land Records of
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 19407, folio 554, the PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 27455, folio
damage to the property from the date of the auction forward.
The property will be sold in an “as is” condition, without express holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having 552, RE-RECORDED ON JANUARY 30, 2008 IN LIBER 29300
or implied warranty as to the nature and description of the appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument AND FOLIO 656, the holder of the indebtedness secured by
improvements as contained herein, and subject to conditions duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, but occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
omitting any covenant or restriction based on race, color, party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, if any, offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
and with no warranty of any kind.
THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $28,000.00 by cash, certified
AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARCH 22, 2018 at 10:00 AM
check or cashier’s check will be required of the purchaser, if
MARCH 22, 2018 at 10:00 AM
other than the note holder, at time and place of sale, balance ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
in immediately available funds upon final ratification of sale by thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon
situated
in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described
as
follows:
the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, interest
to be paid at the rate of 5% on unpaid purchase money from ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST described as follows:
date of sale to date of settlement. The secured party herein, if RECORDED APRIL 29, 2004 IN LIBER 19407, FOLIO 554.
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
a bidder, shall not be required to post a deposit. Third party
RECORDED MARCH 23, 2007 IN LIBER 27455, FOLIO 552.
purchaser (excluding the secured party) will be required to THE PROPERTY IS SUBJECT TO A PRIOR MORTGAGE. IF The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
complete full settlement of the purchase of the property within AVAILABLE THE AMOUNT WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT THE TIME without either express or implied warranty or representation,
OF
THE
SALE
TWENTY (20) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification of the sale
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser’s deposit shall be The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense without either express or implied warranty or representation, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
including
but
not
limited
to
the
description,
fitness
for
a
of the defaulting purchaser. All other public charges and private
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mercharges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
rent, taxes, if any, to be adjusted to date of sale. Cost of construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
all documentary stamps and transfer taxes and all other costs liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
incident to the settlement shall be borne by the purchaser. If chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
applicable, condominium and/or homeowner association dues laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
and assessments due pursuant to Md. Real Property Article subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
11-110 and those that may become due after the time of which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Purchaser must subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
obtain possession and assumes the risk of loss or damage to record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
the property from the date of sale forward. If the sale is assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
rescinded or not ratified for any reason, including post sale TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
lender audit, or the Substitute Trustee is unable to convey good certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL of the purchase price with interest at 5.5% per annum from
and marketable title, or a resale is to take place for any reason, NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to a of the purchase price with interest at 5% per annum from the TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
refund of the aforementioned deposit. The purchaser waives all date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
rights and claims against the Substitute Trustee whether known DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
or unknown. These provisions shall survive settlement. Upon all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
refund of the deposit, this sale shall be void and of no effect, will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed association dues and assessments that may become due after
and the purchaser shall have no further claim against Substitute by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Trustee. The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of association dues and assessments that may become due after Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
the loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
is void and the purchaser’s deposit shall be refunded without taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, may be are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
announced at the time and date of sale. (File #41583.0054 / the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
CAEF17-07499)
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Erin M. Shaffer,
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Substitute Trustee
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the Trustee's File No. (57950)
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
www.hwestauctions.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
FEBRUARY 27, MARCH 6, 13, 2018
12167330 Trustee's File No. (55147)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
8608 Hamlin Street
Hyattsville, MD 20785
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to LESLIE J. KEIDEL, Trustee(s), dated June
3, 2013, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 34885, folio 088, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARCH 22, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED NINETEEN (19), IN BLOCK NUMBERED
THREE (3), IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "ROYALE
GARDENS", AS PER PLAT THEREOF DULY RECORDED AMONG
THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, IN PLAT BOOK WWW 43, PLAT NO. 74.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 3.75% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (55463)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
2264 Prince Of Wales Court
Bowie, MD 20716
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to ATTY. THOMAS P. DORE, Trustee(s), dated May
22, 2007, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 28099, folio 436, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARCH 22, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-FIVE (165) IN BLOCK
NUMBERED FIFTY-FOUR (54) IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN
AS "PLAT 1 OF 2, SECTION 30, LOTS 126 THRU 165 AND
PARCEL F, BLOCK 54, LAKE VILLAGE MANOR AT LAKE
VILLAGE," AS PER PLAT RECORDED THEREOF AMONG THE
LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
IN PLAT BOOK NLP 104 AT PLATS 67 AND 68.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 4% per annum from the
date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on
all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (40511)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 6, 13, 20, 2018
12166082
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 6, 13, 20, 2018
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
8206 Dellwood Court
Lanham, MD 20706
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to PRLAP, INC. , Trustee(s), dated August
21, 2009, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 30922, folio 379, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARCH 22, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED FOUR (4) AS SHOWN ON THE PLAT ENTITLED
""LOTS 1 THRU 33 AND PARCEL A GLENARDEN TOWNS"
WHICH PLAT IS RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK 183
AT PLAT 89.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 4.125% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (57554)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
12165573
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
2616 Boones Lane
District Heights, MD 20747
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to LAWYERS TITLE SERVICES, INC. ,
Trustee(s), dated December 26, 2002, and recorded among
the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
in Liber 16831, folio 123, the holder of the indebtedness
secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned
Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the
aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby,
the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
ON,
MARCH 22, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED THIRTEEN (13) IN BLOCK LETTERED "E" IN
THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "CARLSON SPRINGS" AS PER
PLAT THEREOF DULY RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK WWW 17 AT
PLAT NO. 33
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 4.375% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (57841)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 6, 13, 20, 2018
MARCH 6, 13, 20, 2018
12166376
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
12166375
MARCH 6, 13, 20, 2018
12166088
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 6, 13, 20, 2018
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851
Prince Georges County
851
OPQRS
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Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
1304 OLD MITCHELLVILLE ROAD
Bowie , MD 20716
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to JOHN M. MERCER, Trustee(s), dated June
11, 2007, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 28160, folio 725, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARCH 22, 2018 at 11:30AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NO. "THIRTY-TWO"
(32, IN PLAT NO. "ONE (1) IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS
"FEDERAL HILL FARM", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK VJ 168 AT PLAT 93.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $50,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (15-00226)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 6, 13, 20, 2018
12165998
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
12165559
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Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
KNOWN AS
KNOWN AS
7802 ASHDALE ROAD
1300 MINNESOTA WAY
Capitol Heights, MD 20743
Upper Marlboro, MD 20774
7403 Abbington Drive
Oxon Hill, MD 20745
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
Deed
of
Trust
to
DEBORAH
CURRAN OR LAURA OSULLIVAN,
certain Deed of Trust to BEST TITLE AND PROCESSING LLC, Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Trustee(s), dated September 27, 2005, and recorded among Deed of Trust to ATTY. THOMAS P. DORE, Trustee(s), dated Trustee(s), dated October 20, 2006, and recorded among the
the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND August 22, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
in Liber 23361, folio 597, RERECORDING APRIL 6, 2006 PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 26112, folio in Liber 26304, folio 395, the holder of the indebtedness
IN LIBER 24799, FOLIO 358 the holder of the indebtedness 562, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned
secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the
Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the
aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby,
terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby, request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public
the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE
auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
ON,
LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
ON,
MARCH 22, 2018 at 11:30 AM
MARCH 15, 2018 at 10:00 AM
MARCH 22, 2018 at 11:30AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and described as follows:
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED THIRTY-FIVE (35), IN BLOCK LETTERED "D", BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NUMBERED FOURBEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NO. 31, BLOCK "A", IN A SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT THREE, RIVER RIDGE TEEN (14) IN BLOCK 'F', IN A SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS
PLAT TWO, IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PRESIDENTIAL ESTATES", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE "SECTION ONE, MILLWOOD" AMONG THE LAND RECORDS
HEIGHTS", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK
W.W.W. 46 AT PLAT NO. 70, BEING IN THE 18TH ELECTION
LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND PLAT BOOK 28, AT PAGE 77
IN PLAT BOOK VJ-167 AT PLAT NO. 6. THE IMPROVEMENTS The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition DISTRICT. THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON BEING KNOWN AS
THEREON BEING KNOWN AS 1300 MINNESOTA WAY.
without either express or implied warranty or representation, NO. 7802 ASHDALE ROAD.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition including but not limited to the description, fitness for a Said property is subject to a 120 day IR Right of Redemption.
without either express or implied warranty or representation, particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, without either express or implied warranty or representation,
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condiliability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and tion, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, matechantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record rials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $30,500.00 payable in certified NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at of the purchase price with interest at 2% per annum from the TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $21,000.00 payable in certified
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.5292% all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.89% on
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the association dues and assessments that may become due after The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
All other public charges and private charges or assessments, property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law Trustee's File No. (44620)
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
JOHN
E.
DRISCOLL
III,
et
al
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
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loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without FEBRUARY 27, MARCH 6, 13, 2018
12165152 into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (15-07572)
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (15-18452)
Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Thomas W. Hodge, Thomas J. Gartner,
Keith M. Yacko, Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Jason L.
Robert M. Oliveri, Keith M. Yacko,
Hamlin, Gene Jung, Glen H. Tschirgi
Substitute Trustees
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
Substitute Trustees
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
KNOWN AS
MARCH 6, 13, 20, 2018
12165481
MARCH 6, 13, 20, 2018
12165742
10020 Dakin Court
Cheltenham, MD 20623
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
SUITE 100
Deed of Trust to PREMIUM TITLE & ESCROW, LLC. , Trustee(s),
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
dated April 8, 2016, and recorded among the Land Records of
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 38138, folio
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
550, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
KNOWN AS
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
SUITE 100
4515 Heath Street
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
ROCKVILLE,
MARYLAND 20852
Capitol Heights, MD 20743
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
VALUABLE
FEE
SIMPLE PROPERTY
certain Deed of Trust to MARK C. MCVEARRY, Trustee(s), dated GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
KNOWN AS
February 6, 2008, and recorded among the Land Records of ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 29336, folio
MARCH 15, 2018 at 10:00 AM
7927 Mandan Road, Unit 647, Apt. 101
553, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
Greenbelt, MD 20770
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, described as follows:
Deed of Trust to DAVID J. ZUGHERI, Trustee(s), dated November
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute LOT NUMBERED FORTY-NINE (49), IN BLOCK LETTERED "H", 6, 2013, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "ROLLING ACRES", AS PER GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 35447, folio 319, the
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK WWW 64 AT PLAT holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
NO. 20
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
MARCH 15, 2018 at 10:00 AM
without either express or implied warranty or representation, occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements including but not limited to the description, fitness for a party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
described as follows:
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
RECORDED FEBRUARY 12, 2008 IN LIBER 29336, FOLIO chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
MARCH 15, 2018 at 10:00 AM
553.
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
without either express or implied warranty or representation, which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold described as follows:
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA RECORDED NOVEMBER 27, 2013 IN LIBER 35447, FOLIO
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
319.
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance without either express or implied warranty or representation,
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record of the purchase price with interest at 3.75% per annum from including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merassessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL association dues and assessments that may become due after which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
of the purchase price with interest at 2.72% per annum from Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
association dues and assessments that may become due after mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by the purchase price with interest at 4.875% per annum from
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class Trustee's File No. (50930)
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Trustee's File No. (56270)
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
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JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
FEBRUARY 27, MARCH 6, 13, 2018
12165239 Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (30570)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
11703 HEARTWOOD DRIVE
Beltsville, MD 20705
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to RICHARD W. GUBER, Trustee(s), dated
September 1, 2005, and recorded among the Land Records of
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 23379, folio
614, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARCH 22, 2018 at 11:30AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NUMBERED TWENTY (20) IN BLOCK NUMBERED TWO (2) IN A SUBDIVISION
KNOWN AS "PLAT 3, BELTSVILLE HEIGHTS" AS PER PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK VJ 163 AT PLAT 90
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $49,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
www.hwestauctions.com
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
12165241
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without FEBRUARY 27, MARCH 6, 13, 2018
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (16-03795)
Easy Pay keeps you in-the-know.
Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Thomas W. Hodge, Thomas J. Gartner,
(And your subscription up-to-date.)
Robert M. Oliveri, David M. Williamson, Keith M. Yacko,
Substitute Trustees
MARCH 6, 13, 20, 2018
851
COULD YOU USE
SOME EXTRA CASH?
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054B 2x2
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FEBRUARY 27, MARCH 6, 13, 2018
12165150
851
Prince Georges County
851
D11
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
3104 Varnum Street
Mount Rainier, MD 20712
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to LAWYERS TITLE INSURANCE CORPORATION,
Trustee(s), dated January 26, 2006, and recorded among the
Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
in Liber 26029, folio 670, the holder of the indebtedness
secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned
Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the
aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby,
the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
ON,
MARCH 22, 2018 at 11:30AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY SITUATE IN PRINCE GEORGE' S COUNTY, STATE OF MARYLAND DESCRIBED AS: LOT NUMBERED
SEVEN (7) AND THE WESTERLY FORTY (40) FEET OF LOT
SIX (6) IN BLOCK NUMBERED SEVENTEEN (17) IN A SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "MOUNT RAINIER" AS PER PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5 AT PLAT 658 AND RE-RECORDED
AT PLAT BOOK A AT PLAT 5 AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND; BEING IN THE 17TH
ELECTION DISTRICT OF SAID COUNTY. THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON KNOWN AS 3104 VARNUM STREET BEING THE
SAME LOT OF GROUND IN A DEED DATED 05/30/1997 AND
RECORDED 06/09/1997 AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY IN BOOK 11474, PAGE 408
FROM REX B. WINGERTER AND KERRY J. LORING TO OLIVIA
D. COOK, THE BORROWER HEREIN.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.5% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-07801)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 6, 13, 20, 2018
12153855
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
6414 Gateway Boulevard
District Heights, MD 20747
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to MICHAEL LYON, Trustee(s), dated January
29, 2013, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 34990, folio 081, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARCH 15, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOTS NUMBERED THIRTY-ONE (31) AND THIRTY TWO (32),
IN BLOCK NUMBERED TWELVE (12), IN THE SUBDIVISION
KNOWN AS "SECTION 1, DISTRICT HEIGHTS", AS PER
PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, IN PLAT BOOK SDH
3, AT PLAT 21
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 3.875% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (51586)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 27, MARCH 6, 13, 2018
12164063
D12
851
Prince Georges County
OPQRS
851
Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
911 Elfin Avenue
Capitol Heights, MD 20743
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to DAVID SILVERMAN, Trustee(s), dated June
13, 2014, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 36160, folio 244, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARCH 15, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
RECORDED JULY 15, 2014 IN LIBER 36160, FOLIO 244.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 4.375% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (27484)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 27, MARCH 6, 13, 2018
855
Charles County
855
12165148
Charles County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
400 BLAND DRIVE
Indian Head , MD 20640
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to RICHARD T. CREGGER, Trustee(s), dated
October 19, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of
CHARLES COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 6337, folio 322, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE CHARLES COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 200 CHARLES STREET ( IN THE
BREEZEWAY BETWEEN CIRCUIT AND DISTRICT COURTS ), LA
PLATA, MD 20646 ON,
MARCH 22, 2018 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in CHARLES COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT SIX (6), BLOCK
F, SECTION TWO (2), OF THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS
"WARINGTON HILLS" PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG
THE PLAT RECORDS OF CHARLES COUNTY, MARYLAND, IN
PLAT BOOK PCM NO. 6, FOLIO 9. THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON BEING KNOWN AS 400 BLAND DRIVE.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $21,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of CHARLES COUNTY,
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.001% on unpaid
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other
public charges and private charges or assessments, including
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postsale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
No. (13-23077)
Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris, Thomas W.
Hodge, Thomas J. Grtner, Robert M. Oliveri, Keith M. Yacko,
Substitute Trustees
856
Frederick County
856
Frederick County
ENROLL TODAY
Visit sub.wpsubscribe.com/easy
or call 202-334-6100.
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856
EZ
Frederick County
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated June 24,
2005 and recorded in Liber 5508, Folio 456 among the Land Records of
Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of $488,000.00,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court
House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
MARCH 16, 2018 AT 10:52 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated May 13,
2011 and recorded in Liber 8397, Folio 326 among the Land Records of
Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of $234,600.00,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court
House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
MARCH 16, 2018 AT 10:51 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $20,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or
marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court
for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return
of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 303942-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $47,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or
marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court
for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return
of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 322306-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 27, Mar 6 & Mar 13
12166671
13820 PENN SHOP RD.
MOUNT AIRY, MD 21771
Feb 27, Mar 6 & Mar 13
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
496 GILTSPUR RD.
FREDERICK, MD 21703
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated February
10, 2012 and recorded in Liber 8816, Folio 170 among the Land Records of
Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of $208,575.00,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court
House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
MARCH 16, 2018 AT 10:50 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $18,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or
marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court
for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return
of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 316212-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 27, Mar 6 & Mar 13
12166662
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated
September 30, 2009 and recorded in Liber 7564, Folio 342 among the
Land Records of Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance
of $382,360.00, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the
Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick
County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701,
on
MARCH 23, 2018 AT 10:50 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $38,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or
marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court
for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return
of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 198801-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Mar 6, Mar 13 & Mar 20
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
114 CROSSTIMBER WAY
FREDERICK, MD 21702
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated June 6,
2006 and recorded in Liber 6075, Folio 280 among the Land Records of
Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of $485,000.00,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court
House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
MARCH 30, 2018 AT 10:50 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $50,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title.
If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied
by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law
or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 310815-1)
857
Howard County
857
Howard County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
6275 Blue Dart Place, Columbia, MD 21045
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 6275 Blue Dart Place, Columbia, MD
21045. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated August 2, 2004, and recorded in Liber 8575 at
Page 267 among the land records of the County of Howard,
in the original principal amount of $197,000.00. Upon default
and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale
at public auction at the Thomas Dorsey Building, located at
9250 Bendix Rd., Columbia MD 21045, on March 15, 2018
at 10:00 AM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust
including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 06-451489
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 7% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-260961.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 27, MARCH 6, 13, 2018
12165477
12166667
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
600 BUSHYTAIL DR.
FREDERICK, MD 21703
857
TRUSTEE'S SALE
11405 HUNT CROSSING CT, Ellicott City, MD 21042
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 11405 HUNT CROSSING CT, Ellicott City,
MD 21042. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a
Deed of Trust, dated February 14, 2008, and recorded in Liber
11095 at Page 186 among the land records of the COUNTY OF
HOWARD, in the original principal amount of $1,129,786.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
offer for sale at public auction at the Thomas Dorsey Building,
located at 9250 Bendix Rd, Columbia MD 21045, on March
15, 2018 at 10:00 AM, all that property described in said Deed
of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 05-441307
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 7.1% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 14-243171.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 27, MARCH 6, 13, 2018
12165133
12167817
857
Howard County
Howard County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
4625 SMOKEY WREATH WAY, Ellicott City, MD 21042
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 4625 SMOKEY WREATH WAY, Ellicott City,
MD 21042. By virtue of the power and authority contained in
a Deed of Trust, dated July 31, 2007, and recorded in Liber
10834 at Page 435 among the land records of the COUNTY
OF HOWARD, in the original principal amount of $436,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
offer for sale at public auction at the Thomas Dorsey Building,
located at 9250 Bendix Rd, Columbia MD 21045, on March
29, 2018 at 10:00 AM, all that property described in said Deed
of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 02-304457
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 14-243100.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
TRUSTEE'S SALE
9233 OSPREY COURT, Columbia, MD 21045
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 9233 OSPREY COURT, Columbia, MD
21045. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated March 15, 2005, and recorded in Liber 9069 at
Page 66 among the land records of the COUNTY OF HOWARD,
in the original principal amount of $317,000.00. Upon default
and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale
at public auction at the Thomas Dorsey Building, located at
9250 Bendix Rd., Columbia MD 21045, on March 29, 2018
at 10:00 AM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust
including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 16-099287
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-269156.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 13, 20, 27, 2018
12166771
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Mar 13, Mar 20 & Mar 27
12169320
IS YOUR CAR
HOLDING UP?
12166772
Easy Pay keeps you in-the-know.
Frederick County
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
3649 BYRON CIR.
FREDERICK, MD 21704
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 6, 13, 20, 2018
856
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 13, 20, 27, 2018
12167495
LEGAL
NOTICES
To place your
legal notice in the
Classified section:
Call:
TUESDAY, MARCH 13, 2018
MARYLAND
TRUSTEE SALE
CLASSIFIED
e-mail:
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054F 2x3
Roommates
7206 Pullen Drive,
Fredericksburg, VA 22407
Spotsylvania County
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$168,911.00, dated July 27, 2011
recorded in the Clerk's Office of
the Circuit Court of Spotsylvania
County, Virginia, in Document No.
201100012005 and modified in
Document No. 170013082, default
having occurred in the payment of
the Note thereby secured and at
the request of the holder of said
Note, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at the entrance to the
Spotsylvania County Judicial Center, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, on April 10, 2018 at
12:00 PM the property described
in said deed, located at the above
address and briefly described as:
Lot 118, Ashleigh Park South, with
improvements thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust,if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (58373)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Mar 13, 20, 2018
12169911
878
Stafford County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
91 COUNTRY MANOR DRIVE,
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22406.
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated April 6, 2005, in
the original principal amount of
$359,600.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Stafford County, Virginia as Instrument No. LR050012358. The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Stafford County, 1300 Courthouse Road, Stafford, Virginia on
April 5, 2018, at 2:00 PM, the property described in said Deed of
Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL THAT
CERTAIN LOT, PIECE OF LAND,
WITH ALL IMPROVEMENTS THEREON AND ALL APPURTENANCES
THEREUNTO BELONGING, LYING
AND BEING IN THE COUNTY OF
STAFFORD, AND THE COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA, AND BEING
FURTHER DESCRIBED AS LOT 596
OF SECTION 9, STAFFORD LAKES
VILLAGE, AS THE SAME APPEARS
DULY DEDICATED AND RECORDED
AS
INSTRUMENT
NUMBER
040011106 AND AS THE SAME IS
PLATTED AND SHOWN ON THAT
CERTAIN PLAT OF SUBDIVISION
PREPARED BY SULLIVAN, DONAHOE AND INGALLS, EDISON L. SULLIVAN, LAND SURVEYOR DATED
AUGUST 1, 2002, AS REVISED
APRIL 4, 2003, RECORDED ON
MARCH 22, 2004, IN PLAT MAP
NUMBER 040000062, AMONG THE
CLERK‘S OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF STAFFORD COUNTY,
VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3236861.
Mar 13, 20, 2018
12170389
881
Aspen Hill— $650, 1 bedrm, 1 ba,
3514 Kayson street, 301-260-8662,
DW, EIK, Form LR, Hw Flrs, Newly
Ren, porch/patio, WD, HSI, Nr Pub
Transp, pkg, AC, Elec, garbage, Heat,
water
BOWIE- Share my home, 1 large
BR, private entrance, W/D, close
to Metro. $650. 301-437-8016
BOWIE - Shr furn house, room for
1, pref M. Internet, near shopping,
Sat TV, kit/laun priv, conv. $650/mo.
Call 301-328-4286 or 240-687-1519
CAPITAL HEIGHTS - Senior home to
share. Furn rooms. $600 + $300 SD.
W/D. Prvt prkg + prvt fence. All
utils incl. Near Metro. N/S inside.
1 week free. Text/Call 202-568-0792
FT WASH - Furn rms, beaut house
to shr. Mbdrm $700, reg. $600 incl
utils. wifi & cable rdy. 571-283-2422
Hyattsville - Large Rooms.
Close to Metro. No pets/smoking.
$575 and $675. 410-263-6701
LANHAM - 2 Rooms avail, $570 &
$580/mo, Incl Utils, A/C, quiet.
240-645-2380
or
301-537-2635
Oxon Hill— $950; Furn. 1 bdrm
bsmnt, pvt bath; Nr. Nat'l Harbor,
Pub. Transp & Shopping; Util, Cable &
WiFi; 202-854-1929
ROCKVILLE - Bsmt room, share
bath and kitchen, $500/month, all
utilities included. 240-483-9184
Upper Marlboro/Perrywood- Furn rm
w/BA. N/S. Pref female. $700 + 1/3
utils, dep $200. Call 301-390-5608
Upper Marlboro- Unfurnished
basement. Near PG College, $1000
Util incl. 301-628-8926
VIRGINIA
Roommates
Germantown- lim kit priv, full BA,prvt
ent, nr Germantown rec cent, street
prkg, nr bus, pref F. 240-688-1836
Out-of-Town
Real Estate
DELAWARE New Move-In Ready
Homes! Low Taxes! Close to
Beaches, Gated, Olympic pool. New
Homes from low $100’s. No HOA
Fees. Brochures Available.
1-866-629-0770 or
www.coolbranch.com
225
Collectibles
SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH
FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS.
Call Al, 301-807-3266.
Will Come to you!
265
Home & Garden
Solid
Hardwood
Brazilian
Cherry Flooring - 3600 S.F.,
$2.50 per SF. 301-860-1190
275
Merchandise Wanted
Freon R12 WANTED—Certified buyer
will pick up, pay CASH. Cylinders and
cans. 312-291-9169
610
Dogs for Sale
APBT—Friendly Blue Nose Puppies.
To right homes. Socialised, loving,
gentle. Mum is here, stud owned
by friend. $500. Both. 571-494-8982
BERNESE MTN DOG PUPS Ready now, dewormed
301-223-8702 or 301-366-5542
Boxer—CKC. $850, M &F, 8 wks, fawn
& white, beautiful markings, family
raised indoors, parents on premises
540-222-9388, 540-222-9388
Cocker Spaniel—AKC Champion
lines. $900, M/F, 7 weeks old,
703-586-5661. Parents on site.
English Cream Golden Retrievers—
AKC. $1200, M& F, 6wks. Great personalities, beautiful coloring. Mom is
OFA hip & elbow cert. 804-839-3258
German Shepherd pups- 6 F, 3M,
black & sable $700 , S/W, par. on
prem. AKC reg. rdy 3/15 240-6063815
GERMAN SHEPHERD- AKC Pups,
excellent health and temperament,
gorgeous black and tan. $1800.
Ready 03/19. Call 410-294-6465
LAB PUPS - Black & yellow, males
& females, champion line, 3 rounds
of worming, first 2 shots. AKC
registered, vet certified, family
raised. Ready 3/5. Call 443-952-0338
Orange County
TRUSTEE SALE
201 Cumbria Street,
Gordonsville, VA 22942
Orange County
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $267,559.00, dated March 23,
2017 recorded in the Clerk's
Office of the Circuit Court of
Orange County, Virginia, in Document No. 170002142, default having occurred in the payment of
the Note thereby secured and at
the request of the holder of said
Note, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at the entrance to the
Circuit Court of Orange County,
110 North Madison Road, Orange,
on April 18, 2018 at 3:30 PM the
property described in said deed,
located at the above address and
briefly described as: Lot 20A, Coniston Manor, with improvements
thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust,if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (60517)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
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HEalth&Science
TUESDAY , MARCH 13 , 2018 . WASHINGTONPOST.COM/HEALTH-SCIENCE
EE
After a stroke, her depression vanished
ILLUSTRATION BY ZOË VAN DIJK FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
For better and for worse,
my Old Sick Mum is no
longer the person she was
Navy investigates surfing as
a way to counteract PTSD
BY
T ONY P ERRY
In song and prose, surfing has long
been celebrated as a way to soothe
the mind and invigorate the body. But
scientific evidence has been limited.
Now the Navy has embarked on a
$1 million research project to determine whether surfing has therapeutic value, especially for military personnel with post-traumatic stress disorder, depression or sleep problems.
Researchers say surfing offers
great promise as therapy. It is a
challenging exercise in an outdoor
environment; people surf individually or in groups; military surfers who
are reluctant to attend traditional
group therapy open up about their
common experiences when talking to
other surfers on the beach.
“Lots of times it becomes therapy
under the guise of recreation,” said
Helen Metzger, head of the health and
wellness department at Naval Medical
Center San Diego. “They talk about
surfing and then it gets into things
that are deeper than that, common
experiences, common traumas.”
“For many of our patients, exercise
is the best medicine, and exercise in
the natural environment is even better,” said James LaMar II, a physician
at the Naval Medical Center San Diego
and a volunteer in the hospital’s surfing program. “Surfing is a way back to
a healthy life, the kind of life they had
before they were traumatized.”
The military saw a 65 percent
increase in mental-health diagnoses
among active-duty personnel between 2001 and 2011, according to a
2013 study done by the Congressional
Research Service. Cases of PTSD
increased by 650 percent, according
to the study, and more than 900,000
individuals were diagnosed with at
SURFING CONTINUED ON E5
BY
A NTHEA R OWAN
My mother suffered from severe recurring depression for 30 years, episodes that floored her to the
point of near-catatonic inertia. She was lost to us in a mire of desolation. This happened often — once
a year, sometimes more. The worst episodes hung around for months and months. She endured hospital stays, electroconvulsive therapy, countless appointments with shrinks, dozens of varying prescrip1
tions, some akin to snake oil, none a silver bullet. ¶ Then, 2 /2 years ago, she had a stroke. It stole her
ability to read, her ability to remember names, her right-sided vision. It also stole her depression. ¶
Until the moment she had her stroke — a massive brain trauma to her left occipital lobe — Mum had
been in a major depressive episode that had endured for two years, the longest stretch ever. Yet in the
post-stroke rehab ward, I find her engaging with other patients in a way she has not done for years.
She is animated — her speech, unlike her reading, quite unaffected by her brain injury — the antithesis of the lethargy that hamstrung her for so long.
STROKE CONTINUED ON E5
ANYBODY
An MRI scan can be an ordeal
for the claustrophobic. E3
EXHIBITION
Looking at prehistoric tools as
early pieces of art. E2
Hospitals use
protons to
fight cancer
BY
GUN VIOLENCE
With little research available,
states are stepping in. E4
BEHAVIOR
Sometimes it’s better to be
direct rather than too polite. E5
B ONNIE B ERKOWITZ
Do my ‘social
prescriptions’
help patients?
BY
R ANIT M ISHORI
Tucked in a corner of the MedStar
Georgetown University Hospital
campus is the country’s 28th proton
therapy center, which is set to begin
treating patients this month. This
small but state-of-the-art system is
designed to attack tumors more
quickly than its predecessors in proton therapy, a type of radiation
treatment that spares healthy tissue.
Patients have been treated with
protons since the 1950s. But since
the first hospital-based treatment
center opened in California in 1990,
the pricey technology has grown in
popularity.
Only four proton therapy centers
existed nationwide a decade ago,
About a decade ago, a colleague
told me about a cool new initiative,
something called “Exercise Is Medicine.” The idea made total sense to
me: Rather than just tell my patients about exercising, I would
hand them an actual prescription
for exercise, just like the ones I give
patients for high blood pressure or
diabetes. The thinking behind it was
that an official “doctor’s order” for
exercise, in the form of a prescription-pad-style piece of paper, would
be taken more seriously by patients
than a mere suggestion.
I quickly started giving out these
prescriptions, going so far as to find
some official-looking templates on-
PROTON CONTINUED ON E6
PRESCRIBING CONTINUED ON E4
E
E2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
A twisted family tree: Today’s ravens
mated another species into oblivion
BY
B EN G UARINO
Most people of Eurasian descent have some DNA from Neanderthals, our close relatives,
strong in brow and nose. Some
Homo sapiens bred with Neanderthals or other species, such as the
Denisovans, who likewise shuffled their genes among ours. The
concept of species might suggest
easily sorted groups, but nature is
messy. Species can mingle and
weave and engulf one another.
We are not alone in this regard.
Just ask the ravens. The common
raven, Corvus corax, fused with a
separate raven lineage, as spelled
out in a study published in Nature
Communications. That other raven species, like the Neanderthals, no longer exists — except
within strands of DNA.
“The ghost of interbreeding
past is present in the genomes of
humans and ravens,” said Rosemary Grant, a Princeton University biologist who has been observing the evolution of Galapagos Islands finches since 1973.
Grant, who was not involved with
the raven research, said this work
adds to a “number of examples in
the literature of species exchanging genes, with important and not
trivial consequences.”
Corvus corax lives across the
Northern Hemisphere in a band
that passes through North America, Europe, Africa and Asia. Kevin
Omland, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Maryland
Baltimore County, has been studying these birds since the late
1990s. There was an oddity in the
birds in California, Omland and
his colleagues discovered early
into their investigation.
Common ravens in California
look like other ravens. But their
mitochondria contain a genetic
jumble. Mitochondria, the tiny
power-plant organs within animal cells, carry their own sets of
DNA. Animals — humans and ravens included — inherit mitochondrial DNA from mothers.
The mitochondrial DNA in ravens
revealed a “deep genetic divergence between two different lineages,” Omland said.
Somewhere along the line, this
discovery suggested, California
JOHN MARZLUFF/UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON
“The ghost of interbreeding
past is present in the genomes
of humans and ravens,” said
Rosemary Grant, a Princeton
University biologist.
Species fusion is
“probably a way more
common phenomenon
than has been
reported.”
Kevin Omland,
an evolutionary biologist
at the University of Maryland
Baltimore County
1
2
8
9
15
16
10
17
ravens came from mothers that
were unlike the rest of the world’s
common ravens.
The new study paints a clearer
picture of raven evolutionary history, thanks to the addition of
hundreds of bird samples and
more-sophisticated tools. In an
analysis led by Anna Kearns, now
a Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute research fellow, the
scientists combed through the
DNA of 441 common ravens. The
researchers pried DNA from the
cell nuclei, genetic material inherited from both father and mother
birds. By calculating the mutation
rates in the mitochondrial and
nuclear DNA, the scientists could
spin back the clock.
About 1.5 million years ago, the
birds in what is now California
split from the rest of the ravens
like a tributary that curves off
from a great river. Their ongoing
isolation allowed them to evolve
into a different species. Much later, somewhere around 440,000 to
140,000 years ago, common ravens first contacted this separate
raven species again.
11
18
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“This is definitely an ancient
speciation-reversal event,” Kearns
said. The two species fused, the
larger one swallowing the smaller.
It was as though the land between
the river and the tributary eroded,
and once again it flowed as a
single body.
The researchers compared
these common raven genes with
those of a raven species it does not
mate with, the Chihuahuan raven,
which lives in Mexico and some
parts of the desert Southwest. Chihuahuan raven ancestors also
split from Corvus corax about
1.5 million years ago. But Chihuahuan ravens still exist. The California ravens vanished after reuniting with the common ravens.
“There is no place on the planet
where you can find pure California ravens,” Omland said. The
common ravens have “swamped
out” that species.
Previous research showed that
two species could fuse within a
narrow geographic region. Polar
bears and grizzly bears can breed
to make “grolar bear” hybrids,
also called “pizzlies.” Separate
types of fish belonging to the stickleback family are known to merge,
Omland said, but their fusions
might take place in a single
stream or lake. The hundreds of
bird samples in the study represent both the old and new worlds.
“That’s one thing that differentiates our study from ones previous
— the scale of it,” Omland said.
Samples from along the American
West Coast showed evidence of
past interbreeding, with the proportion of these ancient genes decreasing the farther ravens lived
from California.
It was remarkable that the reversal took place after a millionyear separation, said Alan Brelsford, an evolutionary geneticist at
the University of California at Riverside, who was not involved with
this research. “What’s neat about
the ravens is it seems like they
were separated for quite a long
time and still managed to fuse,” he
said.
It is not clear how the birds
could reunite after being apart for
so long. There are three main barriers to species fusion: mate
choice, ecological differences and
biochemical incompatibilities,
Brelsford said.
An ice age, a few of which occurred within the first-contact
timeline of 440,000 to 140,000
years ago, might cause some of
those barriers to crumble. Perhaps a glacier isolated a pocket of
common ravens with the other
species in California. Alone
among distant relatives, the common ravens possibly mingled as
their mating instincts kicked in.
“You have no one else to breed
with, so you’re going to breed with
a raven that looks the same as
you,” Kearns said.
“The authors argue convincingly that the ranges of the previously
separated raven populations
changed as a result of a natural
change in climate,” Grant said.
“This brought them together, and
interbreeding followed.”
In the past century, scientists
had a laser-like focus on how species split, Omland said, looking
for the hatchets that drove organisms apart. Advances in genomics
changed that. In February, researchers studying the elephant
genome revealed how elephants
interbred with mastodons, Omland noted. Species fusion is
“probably a way more common
phenomenon than has been reported,” he said. In the new view,
instead of a hatchet strike, speciation is a fraying tapestry whose
threads might weave back together.
ben.guarino@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/speaking-of-science
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 13 , 2018
S C I E NC E NE WS
A Chinese export may be dumped on Europe.
Unless it lands in the U.S. Or New Zealand.
BY
A MY B W ANG
Heads up, Spain and Portugal.
And France. Maybe you, too,
Greece.
China’s 9½-ton space station,
Tiangong-1, will come falling from
space soon, and it’s predicted to
head in your general direction.
For the uninitiated, Tiangong-1
launched in 2011 as China’s first
space laboratory, a prototype for
what the country hoped would be
a permanent space station. For
about five years, it orbited Earth,
acting as a base for three missions
(two manned, one unmanned) for
the Chinese National Space Administration.
In September 2016, however,
Chinese officials announced that
they had lost control of the station,
meaning that Tiangong-1 (literally
“heavenly palace”) would eventually defy its name and come
hurtling back to Earth. Exactly
when or where was a mystery.
At first, Chinese scientists ventured that the “uncontrolled reentry” would take place sometime in
the latter half of 2017. That window was later pushed back to between October 2017 and April
2018.
In January, Aerospace, a California-based nonprofit that does
research for the Air Force and
other government and commercial clients, predicted that Tiangong-1 would reenter in midMarch, give or take two weeks.
Last week, the European Space
Agency gave a more specific time
frame — between March 29 and
April 9 — and said the landing
point would be “anywhere between 43 degrees N and 43 degrees
S (e.g. Spain, France, Portugal,
Greece, etc.).”
It is worth noting that the new
predictions come with enough caveats (see: “etc.”) to make a cable
appointment seem exacting. The
current estimated window is
“highly variable,” the ESA cautioned. Areas outside the given
latitudes could be excluded — but
the forecast is still being updated
weekly, it added.
“At no time will a precise time/
location prediction from ESA be
possible,” the agency said. Popular
Mechanics notes that, given the
station’s path of orbit, it could also
reenter the atmosphere in the
Southern Hemisphere near 43 degrees latitude.
“Parts of the United States, the
Iberian Peninsula, China, the Middle East, South America, Australia, and New Zealand are all
potential reentry locations,” the
magazine reported.
Still, there are several reasons not
to panic. First and foremost, much, if
not all, of the laboratory is expected
to disintegrate upon reentry.
“In the history of spaceflight, no
known person has ever been
harmed by reentering space debris,” Aerospace stated in January.
“Only one person has ever been
recorded as being hit by a piece of
space debris and, fortunately, she
was not injured.”
The nonprofit included a map
that illustrated zones where Tiangong-1 might fall, noting that even
for people in the “worst-case location,” the chances of being struck
by debris are “about one million
times smaller than the odds of
winning the Powerball jackpot.”
But Jonathan McDowell, an astrophysicist from Harvard University, told the Guardian that pieces
weighing up to 220 pounds could
make it to Earth’s surface. Even
slight changes in atmospheric
conditions can alter the landing
site “from one continent to the
next,” McDowell said
“You really can’t steer these
things,” he said. “Even a couple of
days before it reenters, we probably won’t know better than six or
seven hours, plus or minus, when
it’s going to come down. Not
knowing when it’s going to come
down translates as not knowing
where it’s going to come down.”
amy.wang@washpost.com
Mary Hui and J. Freedom du Lac
contributed to this report.
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/speaking-of-science
S C I E NC E S C AN
PREHISTORY
Ancient artifacts were tools, but a closer look
reveals that they had aesthetic value, too
When is an ancient tool a
sculpture? It depends on how it’s
presented.
If you display stone handaxes
with information about how they
were used tens and even hundreds of thousands of years ago —
to hunt, dig, hammer and cut —
you might think of them as tools.
If you focus on their beauty,
you might think of them as art.
Displaying beauty iswhat’s
happening in “First Sculpture:
Handaxe to Figure Stone” at the
Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas. A collaboration between anthropologist Thomas Wynn and
artist Tony Berlant, the exhibition is the first to present ancient
handaxes as artistic objects.
They were used by our prehistoric ancestors and unearthed in
places such as France, Egypt and
South Africa — and, the exhibition contends, they can be considered the first sculptures ever
made. By presenting the tools,
which were hewed throughout
the Paleolithic era, in an artistic
context, the museum challenges
BRETT ELOFF
A pebble from a South African
collection is among the exhibit’s
“figure stones.”
KEVIN TODORA
This flint Neanderthal figure
stone, found in France, is at
least 50,000 years old.
First Sculpture: Handaxe to
Figure Stone
Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas
nashersculpturecenter.org
visitors to discover an aesthetic
dimension that goes far back in
time.
The tools are presented alongside “figure stones,” rocks collected by Neanderthals, Homo erectus and even Australopithecus
africanus, a pre-human ancestor
that existed 2 million years ago.
They aren’t usually thought of as
artsy, but they did save rocks that
appealed to them.
Why? What meaning did they
see in the stones? What did they
think of as beautiful? “First
Sculpture” provokes those kinds
of questions and more.
If you can’t make it to Dallas
before the show closes on April
28, you can view the objects,
along with a series of lectures
and a teaching guide, on Nasher’s
website.
— Erin Blakemore
KEVIN TODORA
A handaxe from Niger is
thought to be hundreds of
thousands of years old.
PAUL HESTER/THE MENIL COLLECTION
Possibly just decades old, this
basalt figure resembling a
human skull came from Alaska.
TUESDAY, MARCH 13 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
17.5
A nip here, a tuck there. Altogether,
17.5 million cosmetic procedures —
surgical as well as minimally invasive
ones — were done last year in the
United States, according to a new
report from the American Society of
Plastic Surgeons. That’s 10 million
more than in 2000. In the surgical
category, the most common procedure
performed last year was breast augmentation, followed by liposuction,
nose reshaping, eyelid surgery and tummy tucks. These procedures,
though, totaled just 1.8 million, far less than minimally invasive
procedures, which came in at 15.7 million. The latter use lasers, freezing
techniques, vacuum massage, injectable medication and more to
reduce fat and tighten skin. They have increased by nearly 200 percent
since 2000. Tops in this category were Botox injections, given 7.23
million times last year. Other popular choices mentioned in the report:
soft-tissue fillers, chemical peels, laser hair removal and
microdermabrasion. Cellulite treatments were the fastest-growing
category, up nearly 20 percent from 2016 to 2017.
million
— Linda Searing
H EA LTH NEW S
NSAIDS are better than opioids for easing some
pain and as good for enabling routine activities
People in the opioid group
started therapy with fast-acting
morphine, a combination of hydrocodone and acetaminophen,
or immediate-release oxycodone.
If that wasn’t successful, patients
next got long-acting morphine or
oxycodone, and then doctors
tried fentanyl patches.
In the non-opioid group, patients first got acetaminophen
and NSAIDs. If those options
didn’t help enough, doctors tried
options such as the nerve-pain
drug gabapentin (Neurontin) and
topical painkillers such as lidocaine, followed by the nerve-pain
drug pregabalin (Lyrica) and tramadol, an opiate painkiller.
Researchers asked participants to rate how much pain
interfered with their lives at the
start of the study, and again 12
months later. By this measure,
both groups improved equally
over the course of the year, based
on an 11-point scale with higher
scores indicating worse impairment.
With opioids, scores declined
from an average of 5.4 at the start
of the study to 3.4 a year later.
With other drugs, scores dropped
from 5.5 to 3.3.
For pain intensity, non-opioid
drugs worked slightly better.
In both groups, patients initially rated their pain intensity at 5.4,
and those scores dropped to 4.0
with opioids and 3.5 on the other
drugs.
One limitation of the study is
that people knew which medications they were prescribed, which
might affect how patients reported pain severity and daily functioning, the authors note.
Even so, the results offer fresh
evidence that opioids may not be
worth the addiction risk when
treating chronic pain, said Marissa Seamans, a researcher at Johns
Hopkins Bloomberg School of
Public Health, who wasn’t involved in the study.
“There is increasing evidence
that non-opioid pain relievers are
just as (if not more) effective than
opioids for chronic non-cancer
pain,” Seamans said by email.
— Reuters
H EA LTH S CA N
WOMEN’S HEALTH
Author uses her travails to explore how
health-care providers ignore women’s pain
Something was stabbing Abby
Norman from the inside.
As she took what she would
later call the worst shower of her
life, the college sophomore experienced a wave of excruciating
abdominal pain.
It would take years for doctors
to take that pain seriously. Even
as her body withered, her hair
turned gray and she dropped out
of college because of her precarious health, Norman’s providers
insisted she was imagining
things.
Eventually she set out on her
own investigation of her symptoms, scouring through medical
literature for answers.
“Ask Me About My Uterus,”
subtitled “A Quest to Make Doctors Believe in Women’s Pain”
and published by Nation Books
this month, reveals Norman’s
struggle for a diagnosis — endometriosis — and a meditation on
how health-care providers can
ignore women’s pain.
Endometriosis, in which the
uterine lining grows outside the
uterus, is thought to affect more
than 11 percent of American
women between ages 15 and 44.
Yet it’s underdiagnosed and little
understood.
Women with endometriosis
aren’t the only ones whose pain
and other physical symptoms are
underestimated by doctors.
Women report more chronic pain
than men, and when they report
acute pain, women are more
E3
EE
FROM CONSUMER REPORTS
TH E BI G NUM B ER
Acetaminophen,
ibuprofen
and
other
nonsteroidal
anti-inflammatory
drugs
(NSAIDs) are better than opioids
at easing chronic pain in the back,
knees and hips, according to a
recent clinical trial.
And opioids are no better than
these other drugs at reducing
how much pain interferes with
such daily activities as walking,
working, sleeping and enjoying
life, the researchers report in
JAMA.
“We already knew opioids were
more dangerous than other treatment options, because they put
people at risk for accidental death
and addiction,” said lead study
author Erin Krebs of the Minneapolis VA Health Care System and
the University of Minnesota.
“This study shows that extra risk
doesn’t come with any extra benefit,” Krebs said by email.
U.S. deaths from opioids including heroin and prescription
drugs oxycodone, hydrocodone
and methadone have more than
quadrupled since 1999, according
to the Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention. Today, more than
6 in 10 drug-overdose deaths involve opioids.
The CDC has urged physicians
to use opioids only as a last resort.
Instead, doctors should talk to
patients about the potential for
exercise or physical therapy to
help ease symptoms and should
prescribe other, less addictive
drugs for pain including acetaminophen (Tylenol) and NSAIDS
such as aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil,
Motrin) and naproxen (Aleve).
NSAIDs carry their own risks,
especially at high doses, including
the potential for internal bleeding, kidney damage and heart
attacks. But they aren’t addictive.
For the JAMA study, researchers randomly assigned 240 patients seeking pain treatment to
receive either opioids or alternative medicines such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen for one year.
Back pain was the most common complaint, affecting 156 patients, or 65 percent, and the rest
had either hip or knee osteoarthritis pain.
EZ
Ask Me About My Uterus
by Abby Norman
likely to be prescribed sedatives
than pain medications.
Even when they do receive
diagnoses, women report being
dismissed as overly emotional
when they insist on appropriate
treatment. For years, scholars
and patients have cried bias, but
physical pain is often paired with
a fight to be taken seriously by
medical providers.
Norman, now a science writer,
articulates her own struggles
with clarity and calmness. She
weaves in historical context
about the diagnosis, treatment
and perception of women in
medicine, from the myth of “hysteria” to cultural perceptions
about women’s pain tolerance
and propensity for “female troubles.”
In a way, “Ask Me About My
Uterus” is an extension of Norman’s terrible shower — a torrent
of disconcerting information
about the continued struggle to
understand and value women’s
bodies. Norman hopes to use that
information to destroy misconceptions and pave the road for
change. “It is my sincerest hope,”
she writes, “that some of what is
in this book will no longer be
applicable by the time it’s in your
hands.”
— Erin Blakemore
Leafy greens may slow memory decline
I
f you’re looking for another
reason to swap out fries for
a salad, a recent study offers inspiration.
Researchers at Rush University Medical School in Chicago found that eating as little as
11/3 cups of lettuce daily — or a bit
more than half a cup of cooked
dark leafy greens — may delay
the decline in memory and
thinking skills that can occur
with age. Eaters of leafy greens
had brains that functioned as
well as people 11 years younger,
the researchers determined.
The 960 participants, ages 58
to 99, were part of an ongoing
study called the Rush Memory
and Aging Project. The researchers tracked the study volunteers’
consumption of 144 foods for
about five years, on average,
measuring their cognitive function periodically.
Even after controlling for other aspects that can affect memory — such as age, activity level,
alcohol consumption and smoking — leafy-greens intake
emerged as the most significant
factor in protecting the brain.
“This study is promising,” says
Orly Avitzur, a neurologist and
Consumer Reports’ medical director. “While cognitive disease
can stem from multiple factors —
some of them genetic — there is
evidence that modifying your
diet can have a positive impact.”
What’s so special about leafy
greens?
According to lead researcher
Martha Clare Morris, a nutritional epidemiologist at Rush who
has studied diet and dementia
for decades, leafy greens aren’t
the only food linked to better
brain health. Morris helped develop the MIND diet, which
identifies eight foods — beans,
berries, fish, nuts, olive oil, whole
grains, wine and leafy greens —
that, when made a regular part of
a diet low in saturated fat and
sugars, have been shown to potentially lower the risk of Alzheimer’s disease.
But the results of the current
study, published in the journal
Neurology, show that leafy
greens stand out, making their
connection to brain health practically undeniable.
The power of leafy greens may
lie in their combination of nutrients. For example, vitamin E has
been shown to reduce inflammation in the brain and the accumulation of amyloid plaques on
nerve cells in the brain (a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease).
And Morris points to the B
vitamin folate, which assists
with the DNA-building process
and has positive effects on the
vascular system. The researchers
also considered other nutrients
in leafy greens, such as the
antioxidant lutein and phylloquinone (a type of vitamin K).
“There aren’t many foods that
contain all of these nutrients in
the same package,” says Morris.
Despite the strong link, Morris
cautions that the study results do
not definitively prove that leafy
greens alone are responsible for
slowing brain aging. Still, there’s
no downside to ramping up your
leafy-greens consumption. Leafy
greens are among the most
nutrient-dense foods you can eat,
and other research has shown
they help cut the risk of cancer,
Type 2 diabetes and more.
pancake or muffin batters and
fruit smoothies.
Garnish sandwiches and
wraps. Consider using a liberal
amount of kale, spinach or other
dark greens to add extra nutrition to your lunch.
Sneak them in. If leafy greens
are a tough sell for you or your
family members, chop them up
finely and add to foods such as
chili, soups and casseroles.
Toss a salad. Eating a salad a
day may be the easiest way to get
your greens. But if a bowlful of
lettuce seems too boring, add
beans, nuts, whole grains and
other foods identified in the
MIND diet to make your salad
tastier and more beneficial to the
brain.
Easy ways to get more greens
The study participants were
asked about their intake of raw
lettuce and cooked collard
greens, kale and spinach. But
there are other types of greens
that have a similar nutritional
makeup. If leafy greens aren’t
already staples of your diet, it’s
not that hard to boost your
intake. Try these suggestions
from CR nutritionist Ellen Klosz.
Start your day right. Spinach
and kale go great in omelets and
other egg dishes. You can also
puree them and add that to
© Copyright 2017-2018, Consumer Reports
Inc.
Consumer Reports is an
independent, nonprofit organization
that works side by side with
consumers to create a fairer, safer,
and healthier world. CR does not
endorse products or services, and
does not accept advertising. CR has
no financial relationship with
advertisers in this publication. Read
more at ConsumerReports.org.
For some, MRI scanners are too close for comfort
The thought of an
MRI scanner, a
coffinlike, hardERIC PIANIN
plastic tube with a
ceiling just inches
above the patient’s
eyes, has long filled Patrice
Mitchell with dread.
The 64-year-old freelance
editor and former journalist from
Rochester, N.Y., has never been
afraid of small spaces such as
elevators. But she gets intensely
claustrophobic when pulling
anything — a sweater, for example
— over her face and it gets caught.
“If it gets stuck momentarily,” she
says, “I immediately start to feel
quite panicky and feel like I may
have trouble breathing.”
Short of invasive surgery to
probe for suspected cancerous
tumors, brain aneurysms, heart
problems, abdominal infections
and spinal problems, nothing is
more effective at unmasking an
ailment than cramming a patient
into a doughnut-shaped tunnel
armed with formidable magnetic
imaging capability.
But Mitchell — like many other
Americans — has had to come up
with coping mechanisms to
endure scanning to address years
of medical problems and sportsrelated injuries.
First, there were cervical spine
and herniated disc symptoms
that landed Mitchell in an MRI
scanner in 1992. A decade later,
she had scans for worsening
headaches and to rule out
metastatic breast cancer. Then
she had to deal with a shoulder
injury in 2013 from too much
swimming. And in October, she
was back in an MRI scanner for
the 11th time — checking for leaks
in a breast implant that had been
inserted after cancer surgery.
Doctors and radiology
specialists use plenty of tricks to
try to ease patients’ fears, and
Mitchell has tried many of them.
For her first two scans, her doctor
prescribed anti-anxiety
medication to calm her nerves.
The drugs helped a lot, but
Mitchell said she didn’t want to
become dependent on them to
get through an MRI.
Once, a scheduler urged
Mitchell to bring along a CD of
her favorite music, and the staff
arranged to pipe the music into
the MRI tube to help her relax.
Finally, Mitchell realized that if
she simply kept her eyes closed
throughout the session, she
would be okay or even nod off.
“It helps overall when you have
a nice, kind tech who fosters a
soothing atmosphere,” she said.
“Obviously, some are more caring
than others, asking you whether
you want a blanket or earplugs
and keeping up a gentle patter of
conversation as they are getting
you ready.”
The magnetic resonance
imaging machine is a
superconducting magnet coiled
in wire that bounces pulsing
radio waves off patients and
creates three-dimensional
pictures of their anatomy on a
computer. MRIs are especially
good at creating images of thin
slices of the brain, heart, lung,
spine and soft tissue; these
images can be studied from
different angles by radiologists.
Experts say MRIs provide a far
more revealing image than an Xray or CT scan, which use small
levels of radiation. MRI scanners
rely solely on magnetic imaging
AnyBODY
ALAMY
About 36 million MRI scans were done in the United States in 2017.
and do not emit radiation.
And while there are many
“open” MRI scanners on the
market that are far less confining
and enable patients to look out
through openings on the sides of
the machines, experts say they
aren’t nearly as accurate as the
“closed” equipment that so
unsettled Mitchell.
Some industry advocates of
“open” MRIs say that patients
with claustrophobia are far better
off using one of their products
and getting through the scan,
even if the machines produce
lesser-quality images. Yet
generally speaking, closed MRIs
are four or five times as powerful
as open MRIs, when measured by
their magnetic field strength.
“Traditional MRIs — the ones
that most people think of being a
tube — have always offered the
best image quality because they
are stronger — they have a
stronger magnetic field,” said
Dennis Agostino, the technical
imaging coordinator for Johns
Hopkins Health System in
Baltimore. “The magnetic field
within the scanner is more
homogenous. It’s smoother,
which generally gives a clearer
picture.”
About 36 million MRI
procedures were performed in
the United States in 2017, down
8 percent from the previous year,
according to a study by IMV, a
market research firm.
As many as 5 percent of
Americans may suffer from
claustrophobia in some form,
according to
HealthResearchFunding.org, and
up to 13 percent of patients who
received an MRI reported having
a panic attack.
Patients experiencing pain or
discomfort may have trouble
remaining still on a hard gurney
for as long as an hour or more,
according to physicians and
radiologists. And some are rattled
by the incessant banging sound
created by the pulsating
magnetic coils.
Sian L. Spurney, a Washington
internist, said that over the years
several of her patients have
panicked after being eased into
an MRI tunnel and tried to crawl
out. “I think people who have that
intense claustrophobic reaction
feel like they are being buried
alive,” she said.
“It’s hard to predict who is
going to have a bad experience,”
Spurney said. “It’s embarrassing
for patients, and it often jams up
the schedule for other MRIs.”
Simply worrying about the
MRI in advance of the procedure
can be enough to set a patient’s
nerves on edge. And fear of what
serious medical problems the
imaging might reveal
significantly adds to the anxiety.
“There’s a percentage of the
population that flat-out will not
be able to get an MRI, just
because the claustrophobia is so
intense,” said Mike Skok, a senior
executive at Providian Medical
Equipment, an Ohio company
that specializes in new and
refurbished MRI equipment. “So
those folks just can’t get
scanned.”
health-science@washpost.com
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E4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 13 , 2018
Jury is still out on
‘social prescribing’
PRESCRIBING FROM E1
URS FLUEELER/EPA-EFE/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
White blankets can’t stop Swiss glacier’s retreat
BY
R AFI L ETZTER
Summer’s coming, which
means that soon enough, it’ll be
time to tuck the glacier in.
This year, like every year, a
group of Swiss will traipse up
through the mountains to the
Rhone Glacier, hauling huge
white blankets. As E&E News reported in a recent article on
geoengineering, the annual hike
is part of a doomed effort to protect the massive blocks of ice from
the rising summer heat.
Earth is getting warmer, and
glaciers around the world are retreating and shrinking. As previously reported, humans appear to
have caused 69 percent of glacial
melting between 1991 and 2010 —
and warming has only accelerated
Every year, crews spread huge white blankets over portions of the
Rhone Glacier in Switzerland in an effort to protect the ice from
the summer heat. A glaciologist says that the glacier still loses three
to five inches on a hot day.
since then.
In the Rhone region, that
shrinking represents an economic
emergency as well as an environmental one.
The ice mass, which 11,500
years ago covered a large chunk of
Switzerland, is a significant tourist attraction; Agence FrancePresse reported in 2015 that an
“ice grotto” has been carved into
the ice every year since 1870 for
visitors to walk through, a tradition that is threatened by the
shrinking ice. The glacier has retreated 4,600 feet since 1856.
The blankets, their white color
chosen to reflect light before it
strikes the ice, may slow the glacier’s decline. But they won’t stop
it. Glaciologist David Volken told
Agence France-Presse that the glacier still loses three to five inches
on a hot day.
Nonetheless, this idea and others like it are becoming increasingly popular, as it grows clearer that
the world will blow through the
temperature-rise target that policymakers have set for limiting the
worst effects of climate change. If
the world’s glaciers do collapse en-
tirely, the potential for raising global sea levels is enormous, according
to research published in 2013 in the
journal Science.
As Oceans Deeply reported, scientists at the December 2017
meeting of the American Geophysical Union seriously considered proposals such as spreading
giant sheets of reflective material
on top of landlocked polar ice,
building huge mounds on the
seafloor to keep warm water away
from melting glaciers, and pumping huge amounts of ocean water
on top of sea ice in the summer to
add to its mass.
All these ideas and more are
available to read as part of an
ongoing E&E series on geoengineering.
— Live Science
States try to plug gap in research about gun violence
BY
M ICHAEL O LLOVE
As deaths from mass shootings
have mounted across the United
States, some states are moving to
collect hard data to guide their
decisions about guns — even as
the federal government has retreated from such research in the
face of pressure from pro-gun
groups.
The New Jersey legislature, for
example, is weighing a measure
that would create a gun-violence
research center at Rutgers University. The center would be modeled on the new Firearm Violence
Prevention Research Center at
the University of California at
Davis, which launched last summer with $5 million in state money over five years.
The impetus for both initiatives is a vacuum created by the
federal government’s virtual
abandonment of research into
gun violence — its causes, its
patterns, its perpetrators, its victims and the best ways, based on
scientific evidence, to curtail it.
The federal government’s reluctance to fund research has had
a ripple effect. A study published
in the Journal of the American
Medical Association last year
found that from 2004 to 2015,
research related to gun violence
was “substantially underfunded
and understudied” compared
with other leading causes of
death, based on the mortality
rates of each. The study said that
gun violence research received a
paltry 1.6 percent of the funding
($22 million) that would be predicted ($1.4 billion) based on the
number of deaths caused by guns
— 36,252 in 2015, according to the
Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention.
The influence of pro-gun
groups has also dissuaded many
private foundations from funding
such research, according to David
Hemenway, who studies gun violence and injury prevention at the
T.H. Chan School of Public Health
at Harvard University.
“If you fund gun research, you
know you’ll be attacked, and
there are so many other things
that need research,” Hemenway
said. “Funders figure they don’t
need the headaches that come
with studying gun violence.”
In California and New Jersey,
supporters of research say states
must pick up the slack.
“California essentially said
that the federal government
wasn’t fulfilling its responsibility,
so we’re going to step into the
breach, just as we have with climate change and years before
with highway safety,” said Garen
Wintemute, the director of the
MATT MCCLAIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
A memorial honors the victims of the shooting in Parkland, Fla.
There are no national studies of who owns guns, how they acquired
the weapons or the risk factors associated with gun violence.
new California center and an
emergency physician who has
studied gun violence for three
decades.
The feeling in New Jersey was
the same, according to state Sen.
Troy Singleton, a Democrat who
introduced a separate bill to fund
a $400,000 study of gun violence.
It passed out of a Senate committee this month.
“I’m dismayed over the political decision that caused the feder-
“If you fund gun
research, you know
you’ll be attacked . . . .
Funders figure they
don’t need the
headaches that come
with studying gun
violence.”
David Hemenway, who studies gun
violence and injury prevention
al government to walk away from
studying this issue, which has put
us in a dangerous situation nationally,” Singleton said. “When
we develop evidence-based solutions, that’s when we’re at our
best.”
A shift on Capitol Hill?
In the wake of the shooting at
Marjory Stoneman Douglas High
School in Florida in February, a
few congressional Republicans
have indicated a willingness to
lift federal restrictions on gun
research.
Gun-violence researchers say
such a shift would make a huge
difference. Without federally
funded research, they say, policymakers lack the basic information that would help them make
wise decisions. “What isn’t
known?” Hemenway said. “Everything. Everything.”
For instance, there are no national studies of who owns guns,
how gun owners acquired their
weapons, the theft of guns, the
number of households with guns,
the attributes of high-quality gun
training or the risk factors associated with gun violence.
Without that knowledge,
Hemenway said, “how are you
supposed to come up with effective policy?”
The federal government’s withdrawal from gun research began
in the late 1990s. Gun researchers
such as Hemenway said it was
spurred by the first studies indicating that the presence of a
firearm in the home increased
rather than decreased the
chances of gun-related fatalities,
either by suicide or homicide.
Subsequent studies confirmed
those findings.
The studies incensed pro-gun
organizations such as the National Rifle Association, which protested to congressional supporters. The result was the Dickey
Amendment, which Congress
added to the 1996 funding bill for
the CDC, and which bars the
agency from using money to “advocate or promote gun control.”
Former U.S. congressman Jay
Dickey, an Arkansas Republican
who died last year, eventually
expressed regret for the amendment that bears his name.
The Dickey Amendment does
not explicitly prohibit the CDC
from studying gun violence. But it
has had a chilling effect on such
research, especially since Congress cut the CDC’s budget by
exactly the amount that it had
been spending on gun-related research, about $2.6 million a year.
Though the National Institutes
of Health and the National Institute of Justice have continued to
hand out small grants for such
research, NIH several months ago
quietly shelved an $11.4 million
gun-violence research initiative
that President Barack Obama
launched in 2013 in response to
the Sandy Hook Elementary
School massacre in Newtown,
Conn. The initiative has funded
14 firearm-related projects over
the past three years.
Valuable research
Even if there isn’t as much gun
research as there should be, Philip Cook, a professor at the Sanford School of Public Policy at
Duke University, argues that
policymakers should be paying
attention to what is being produced.
In a December article in the
journal Science, Cook cited published research that shows an
increase in violent crime as states
replaced concealed-carry laws
with right-to-carry laws.
Concealed-carry
legislation
gave law enforcement the authority to determine whether a gun
owner had a justifiable reason to
carry a concealed weapon. Rightto-carry laws give most gun owners that right without having to
justify themselves.
Similarly, according to Cook’s
paper, research has shown that
laws preventing those with misdemeanor convictions for domestic violence from owning guns
have saved lives. Finally, he noted,
research showed that laws that
increased prison sentences for
those using a firearm in an aggravated assault or robbery has reduced the rate of robberies in
which a gun is involved.
“Despite the relative lack of
federal funding in this area, there
has been quite a lot of research
going on,” Cook said. “And it’s
productive and evidence-based,
exactly what is needed to create
effective policy.”
At UC Davis, Wintemute said
his center plans to give California
lawmakers what they need to
create effective policy. “Soon
we’re going to publish the first
large-scale epidemiological study
on gun violence in California in
30 years,” he said. “The reason I
know that is because I’m the one
who did the study 30 years ago.”
— Stateline
line and printing them out. I
wrote out “dosages” based on
each patient’s age and medical
condition, and relying on evidence-based recommendations.
For example, for a person with
diabetes, I might write a prescription that says:
Frequency: At least 3-4 days a
week.
Intensity: Exercise at a moderate level.
Time: Exercise 30-60 minutes
per day (all at once, or break it up
into a few sessions of at least 10
minutes each).
Type: Aerobic or rhythmic exercises using the large muscle
groups (walking, cycling, swimming). Weights 2x week.
We physicians often don’t have
time during a typical office visit of
15 or 20 minutes to discuss
lifestyle-related recommendations
for improving health. Many of us
tell patients, “You need to lose
weight” or “stop smoking” or “exercise more” — but in practice we
tend to skimp on the details. The
exercise-prescription idea was
supposed to help eliminate this
vagueness by giving patients morespecific information to act on.
Many doctors have now expanded the prescription approach for exercise to a whole
range of behaviors and activities
associated with a healthy lifestyle. The assumption is that if the
prescription pad can get more
people exercising, then maybe it
could also get patients doing other activities — dance lessons or an
art class or a stroll in the park —
that have been found to improve
physical and mental health. In
fact, over the past couple of years,
such prescribing efforts have really taken off:
Physicians in Vermont, for example, have been giving out prescriptions for hiking and, in general, spending time in nature.
That idea’s getting picked up elsewhere, including South Dakota,
Maine, California and New Mexico, and is supported by multiple
studies showing that people who
spend time outdoors see improvement in mood, energy, stress and
general well-being, as well as
some aspects of physical health.
The American Academy of Pediatrics has launched the Park Rx
Initiative, with the idea of helping
doctors prescribe “nature during
the routine delivery of health
care” by, among other things,
showing them parks close to
where their patients live.
Prescription programs for
healthy eating have popped up in
more than a dozen states, championed by hospitals and physicians’ offices, as a means of battling diabetes, obesity and other
conditions associated with nutrition. For example, a Chicago program called Food Rx pairs “doctor’s orders” with food coupons
and information about community resources.
In Hawaii, state lawmakers
last year considered a bill to classify homelessness as a medical
condition — multiple studies
have documented the link between homelessness, poorer
health and a lower life expectancy
— and allow doctors to write a
prescription for six months of
subsidized housing. (The bill did
not pass.)
Such interventions are known
as “social prescribing,” in which
health-care professionals are
asked to identify and recommend
interventions outside the exam
room or hospital that might help
patients adopt healthier lifestyles.
These efforts highlight what
are called the social determinants
of health and the recognition that
social factors — including where
you live, what you eat, how active
you are, your access to health
care, your income level, etc. — can
be more important to your health
than medical factors such as genetics.
Addressing these social determinants, studies have shown,
may, in fact, be more effective in
managing chronic conditions and
prolonging life than medications
and other clinical interventions.
The social prescribing trend
focuses not only on food, exercise
and housing, but also on “softer”
activities such as making art,
singing, participation in social
gatherings — and their presumptive benefits on well-being and
social connectedness. That’s because loneliness is also increasingly being thought of as a social
determinant of health that is
linked to physical- and mentalhealth conditions and even early
death.
In Britain, social prescribing is
sanctioned by the National
Health Service and is being embraced by primary-care physicians who send their patients to
community-based organizations
and activities in response to an
increase in lifestyle-associated
conditions (including diabetes,
obesity, heart disease) and social
isolation.
Research has shown that such
interventions are helpful, some
more than others. There is irrefutable data showing that exercise is good for you, regardless of
your age, gender, physical abilities or medical conditions. And
there is beginning to be
more-robust evidence for benefits
from spending time in nature,
dancing, singing, engaging socially and keeping your brain active.
And yet, as I consider the science, I ask myself: Does the act of
actually prescribing these activities make a difference in patients’
lives? Are they more likely to act on
these recommendations when
packaged as an official-looking Rx?
The evidence on that is less
clear. The literature on writing
prescriptions for exercise shows
that it may help more doctors
discuss and recommend exercise
(which is, of course, a good thing).
But evidence that it is improving
patients’ health is not really there.
A recent study concluded,
“Whether social prescribing can
contribute to the health of a nation for social and psychological
well-being is still to be determined,” while an article in the
journal Public Health noted, “Further research is required to optimize social prescribing benefits.”
The practice of social prescribing faces another kind of challenge, which I see firsthand. As a
family physician who works with
both affluent and poor patients, I
realize that my use of this approach has exposed deep inequities in their access to resources. On
the one hand, I get professional
satisfaction from recommending
hikes in Rock Creek Park, running
along the Mall or singing in a
chorus (partly because of the evidence and partly because those are
activities I do myself). But can I
really ask a patient who works two
jobs and cares for her children to
find 30 minutes a day to squeeze in
a walk in a park? Or a patient who
lives in an unsafe neighborhood to
take a daily jog around the block?
Or one who has no car to take two
buses to get to an art class on the
other side of town?
As for how successful my social
prescribing has been, so far it’s
too small a sample size to have
statistical meaning. But from a
purely anecdotal standpoint, I
will admit to mixed results so far.
Some patients have reported back
that they had taken my recommendations to heart and begun to
change their lifestyles. Others
shoved my prescription in their
bag and probably never looked at
it again. I’m waiting for a big
study or two to show me whether
this trend can make a difference.
Many trends begin as great,
well-intentioned ideas. Before we
start proselytizing, we need to
make sure that the resources are
there, that the evidence of benefits is there and that we, as
physicians, are well trained in
how to push a change without
causing any harm.
health-science@washpost.com
Mishori is a professor of family
medicine and the director of the
Health and Media Fellowship in the
Department of Family Medicine at
Georgetown University School of
Medicine.
ALAMY
TUESDAY, MARCH 13 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
New Mum is not
like my old Mum
STROKE FROM E1
Will it last, I ask her neuro as he
makes his perfunctory rounds,
striding through the ward, longlegged, angular, unsmiling. Nope,
he says, adamantly and assuredly,
with a finality I dare not argue
with. He’s the expert, after all. But
I am disappointed. And afraid.
Must Mum now learn to cope with
her depressions without her
books — her refuge when sick —
since she seems unable to process
written words?
Months pass, and Mum learns
to navigate within the confines of
her narrowed vision: She bumps
into chairs less often, knocks fewer coffee mugs flying. She relearns
to read a little. “I’m so slow,” she
says impatiently. We encourage
friends and family to write her
short, tight emails. Less overwhelming that way, I tell them.
She even begins to tackle a book.
But she doesn’t learn to remember names. In fact, I notice, her
memory loss is not limited to
names of people and places. It is
unreliable and potholed. Some
memories hold fast, others have
come quite adrift so that they
vanish.
She gazes at the tablets I count
into her pillbox. Tablets to sweep
veins of clogging debris, tablets to
keep her blood flowing, the two
work to minimize stroke risk, I
explain. “And what are these?” she
wants to know, plucking a big red
capsule from the tray. “Venlafaxine,” I say, “for your depression.”
But I don’t have depression, she
says, her eyes snapping up at me.
She cannot be sure what she had
for lunch yesterday, but she is
quite certain she does not have
depression. Never has. Today she
knows she never had depression.
Tomorrow she may remember a
little of the illness that stole decades of her life away.
I am staggered. My mother has
been on a cocktail of antidepressants and anti-anxieties for as
long as I can remember. Sometimes they may as well have been
crossed fingers, a rabbit’s foot, a
clove of garlic, for all the good they
did, but to abandon them seemed
reckless. My mother’s illness was
the knife edge upon which my
father, my siblings and I all tiptoed. I grew to know it so well I
could tell, by her appearance at
breakfast, by how late she rose, by
the tone of her voice whether
depression was sneaking up on
her again.
Six months after Mum’s stroke
and I notice a wobble. Her voice is
COURTESY OF ANTHEA ROWAN
Anthea Rowan with her
mother. “Now, 21/2 years after
her stroke,” the author writes,
“she is happier than I recall
seeing her in 40 years.”
E5
EE
teary, she lies in bed all day. I brace
myself. Oh no, I think, how will we
cope with this? On the third
morning after the first tears, she is
up and bright and smiling.
How are you? I ask nervously.
I’m fine, she says, cheerfully, in
a tone that seems to say, “Why do
you ask?,” a tone that suggests
nothing was ever wrong. “How
are you?” she adds. My Old Sick
Mum never had the energy to care
how anybody else was.
Turns out, she was just having a
bad day, a couple of bad days. My
mum, who has never had a bad
day in her life — she’s only ever
had months and months of them
at a time. And now, 21/2 years after
her stroke, she is happier than I
recall seeing her in 40 years.
Where did the depressions go?
She has never been depressionfree this long. Was her neuro
wrong?
I scour the Internet for “depression-free post-stroke,” but all I get
are hit after hit of sites that describe the inevitable depression
that seems to afflict stroke victims. Could it be, I ask Karen
Postal, a clinical instructor of neuropsychology at Harvard Medical
School and president of the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology, that the loss of memory means she can’t hang on to her
anxieties; she can no longer ruminate, gnaw on an old bone of
worries ad nauseam?
This is possible, she agrees. But
she is as confounded by my New
Sick Well Mum as I am. Postal says
she has seen patients with Alzheimer’s whose families note
they undergo a pleasant personality change, “they lose what may
have been a difficult intensity,
become oddly easier to live with.”
But she has never seen the same
sort of personality change in a
stroke victim. She takes time —
hours, she says — to review the
medical literature, she calls colleagues, but nobody has a definitive answer; there is no research
to reference.
But, she reminds me, “depression is not just an emotional state,
it’s a thinking state, it’s about
habits of thinking” — translating,
misconstruing. misreading, misunderstanding “and. yes, ruminating.” So, if my mother’s cognition was hijacked — for along with
her right-sided vision loss and
those proper nouns, her brilliant
intellect is gone, and I must explain the simplest of things to her
now, in the simplest of terms —
that means her thinking habits,
good and bad, have been derailed.
When the neuro in the poststroke rehab ward told me, with
such certainty, that Mum’s brain
injury would not oust her depression — “different part of the brain’’
— I envisioned a century-old phrenologist’s drawing mapping the
topography of the mind, as if each
cerebral slice correlates to a different mood or emotion or belief.
Our neurological knowledge
today is much more refined and
detailed. While so much of the
brain is still a mystery, we do
know it isn’t the one-dimensional,
segregated organ it was considered to be 100 years ago. “The
more sophisticated we get in our
research, the more we recognize
that brain function is holistic, interconnected by highly complicated networks working together
to produce what we label as mood,
thinking, language,” Postal says.
My mother’s neural circuit
board suffered a short. A fizz and a
pop, the lights went out and the
electricity had to be rewired. Her
depressions vanished not, it
seems, because of the part of the
brain that was affected but because the cognitive routes her
brain once took have had to deviate.
She thinks differently, so she is
different. Different without depression.
health-science@washpost.com
Navy hopes that surfing proves to be good medicine for coping with trauma
SURFING FROM E1
least one mental disorder during
that decade.
The Navy study, led by clinical
psychologist Kristen Walter, analyzes questionnaires answered by
service members before, during
and after a program of surfing
one day a week for six weeks.
The first group of 14
active-duty Marines and sailors
in the six-week surfing program
all had shown signs of major
depressive disorder, some with
signs of PTSD, researchers said.
To the researchers, the initial
results suggest that surfing can
lead to a decrease in insomnia
and feelings of anxiety, and a
decline in an overall negative
view of life and other symptoms
of depression.
The study, which began last
year, will follow up with participants to check on their sleeping
patterns and whether improvements in their mental outlook
have been long-lasting.
The study also plans to test the
hypothesis that while hiking is
beneficial, surfing is even more
so. While some patients will go
surfing, others will be taken on
hikes.
When the three-year study is
complete, there will have been
118 participants in surfing groups
and 43 in hiking groups.
For physicians who have treated service members, the initial
upbeat results are not surprising.
“I’m a believer,” said Cmdr.
Natalie Wells, preventive medicine physician and director of
military population health at the
Naval Health Research Center in
San Diego.
“It’s huge that Navy medicine
is thinking outside the box,” said
Betty Michalewicz-Kragh, an exercise physiologist at the hospital
and director of the surfing program.
Physicians in the military
medical system and the Department of Veterans Affairs are hoping the study will prove that
surfing is therapy, not just recreation.
“We all know it’s good; we can
see it,” said Capt. Eric
Stedje-Larsen, a pain management specialist who worked in
the San Diego surfing program
before being assigned to the Navy
hospital in Portsmouth, Va. “For
some folks, there is nothing like
it. But we need science to get the
administrators onboard.”
The surfing program at the
Naval Medical Center San Diego
began in 2008 when therapists
were helping an Army staff sergeant from Hawaii whose right
leg and right hand were blown off
in Iraq. He asked whether he
would ever surf again. Therapists
took him surfing and, over time,
were impressed as he regained
strength and self-confidence. A
second patient, a Coast Guard
seaman whose leg was amputated in a motorcycle accident,
joined the soldier. Soon a surfing
program was created for other
amputees and then for patients
with mental-health problems.
The idea that surfing can relieve the trauma of war is not
new. An expansive exhibit at the
California Surf Museum in
Oceanside, close to Marine Corps
Base Camp Pendleton, is titled
“China Beach: Surfing During the
Vietnam War and the Healing
Power of Wave-riding.”
“It’s peaceful, but it’s also an
adrenaline rush,” said retired Lt.
Gen. John Toolan, who led combat troops in Iraq and Afghanistan. “Surfing is great therapy for
young guys and for old guys like
me, too.”
A surfing program by the Los
Angeles-based Jimmy Miller
Foundation brings instructors
and psychologist Kevin Sousa to
Camp Pendleton twice a month.
Sousa follows service members
with physical and mental injuries
into the waves to offer surfing
instruction and look for signs of
emotional problems or distress.
When the surfing session is over,
he helps lead an informal group
discussion on the beach.
“We believe we can heal each
other one wave at a time,” said
Kris Primacio, manager for ocean
therapy at the foundation.
The foundation, along with VA
Greater Los Angeles Healthcare
System, supported an early study
of the therapeutic value of surfing. Led by occupational therapist Carly Rogers, the 2014 study
found that surfing, coupled with
individual counseling, group
therapy, other exercise programs
and medication, can help alleviate symptoms of psychological
distress.
Jonathan Sherin, director of
Los Angeles County’s mental
health department, was a physician with VA during the Rogers
study.
“Surfing exposes individuals to
the awe of nature,” he said. “It’s
good for a population that has
turned inward from people and
the outside world.”
On a recent sunny day, service
members, many of them from the
Wounded Warrior Battalion, assembled on the beach at Camp
COURTESY OF JIMMY MILLER FOUNDATION
Lt. Gen. John Toolan, now retired, surfs in 2014 with the Jimmy Miller Foundation at Marine Corps
Base Camp Pendleton. “Surfing is great therapy for young guys and for old guys like me, too,” he said.
Pendleton to listen to instructors
from the Jimmy Miller Foundation.
One of the surfers was Sgt. Maj.
Brian Fogarty, a veteran of Iraq
and Afghanistan. While Fogarty
surfed, his PTSD service dog
Blade, a 2-year-old boxer, stayed
on the beach and watched. Fogarty will retire soon and join the
PTSD Foundation of America. He
plans to sing the praises of surfing.
On most days, military members can be found on several
beaches in the San Diego area.
Nick Horin, 36, an Army staff
sergeant and Iraq combat veteran, lives in the Aspire Center, a
VA residential rehabilitation
treatment site. He has been diagnosed with PTSD.
“I had a lot of anger after Iraq; I
wanted to hurt people,” Horin
said at a beach in La Jolla. “Surfing is the only way to take the
edge off my anger without drinking or taking drugs.”
A few days later, the latest
participants in the San Diego
hospital’s surfing program and
the study met at the beach in Del
Mar.
Marine Cpl. Angel Lopez, 21,
was severely injured in a motorcycle accident. “I can’t ride anymore, but maybe I can surf,” he
said. “This is another step to keep
going.”
One of the volunteers at Del
Mar was Nico Marcolongo, a retired Marine major. Surfing, he
said, helped him overcome PTSD
after Iraq. He is convinced it will
help others.
“Overcoming a challenge gives
them a sense of empowerment,”
Marcolongo said. “They stop
thinking of their injuries and
start thinking about the waves.”
health-science@washpost.com
My problem was that I was too nice. Now I realize the downside of being polite.
BY
J AMIL Z AKI
Ryan — a brilliant, enthusiastic
young scientist — spent a two-year
layover in my neuroscience laboratory between his undergrad
studies in VanPERSPECTIVE couver, B.C.,
and graduate
school on the East Coast. On his
last day in California, we sat over
drinks, reflecting on his plans for
the future. I offered some parting
advice and then asked the question I pose to everyone who graduates from my lab: “What could I
have done better?”
He hesitated, then replied,
“You’re too nice.”
This was startling, especially
coming from a Canadian. (I’ve
omitted Ryan’s last name to protect his privacy.)
“Nice” might count as faint
praise, but is it really an insult? I
asked him to elaborate.
“Well,” he said, noticeably uncomfortable, “you’re so nice to
everyone here that we don’t really
know what you think about anyone. Some people end up assuming the worst.”
Later that night, I realized he
was right, though I would use a
different term. I was addicted to
politeness.
Not everyone shares my addiction. In fact, our culture is in the
middle of a politeness shortage.
Imagine a reader from five years
ago leafing through today’s Wash-
ington Post. She’d probably be
shocked at the vulgarity of our
national conversation. Social media is overrun with bullying. CNN
warns parents they might want to
clear the room of small children
before the president’s remarks
are broadcast. Norms are steadily
shredded. The psychologist Steven Pinker claims that modern
society is built on a foundation of
“civilizing”: people’s adherence to
common decency. If he’s right, our
house is teetering.
It’s easy to long for politeness,
but just because Archie Bunker is
over for dinner doesn’t mean we’d
be better off with Miss Manners.
Politeness often hurts more than
it helps.
For the past dozen years, I’ve
studied empathy: people’s ability
to share and understand each
other’s feelings. Empathy is a
powerful, ancient engine for
kindness. If you flinch when
someone else is shocked, you’re
more likely to step in and help
them. If you think deeply about
the suffering of homeless people,
you’re more likely to support policies that protect them.
Empathy also comes in different flavors, including distress —
an aversion to seeing others in
pain — and concern — a desire to
improve their well-being. These
pieces of empathy often split
apart. Imagine you have a friend
about to launch an ill-advised
business adventure or to marry
GETTY IMAGES
Not everyone shares my
addiction. In fact, our
culture is in the middle
of a politeness shortage.
someone you know to be unfaithful. Tell him the bad news
and he’ll feel hurt, but he’ll also
have information to make wiser
choices. Empathetic distress
motivates people to avoid causing suffering at all costs. Like the
Hippocratic oath, it inspires us
to do no harm. But it can also
encourage comforting lies over
difficult truths.
In one study, college students
privately rated a peer’s application to graduate school and were
told that the writer had suffered a
personal tragedy. They then had
the chance to re-rate her essay,
this time knowing she would see
their evaluation. Readers inflated
their assessments for the writer’s
benefit, especially when they empathized with her. Oncologists
often avoid using the word “cancer” during diagnoses, replacing
it with vague, sanitized language.
This might make conversation
easier but can also leave patients
in the dark. A physician at a
neonatal intensive care unit once
told me about a family whose
child would probably die in the
coming weeks. The medical team
had never told them this bluntly.
“They’re such nice people,” he
said, “and you don’t want to tell
them such bad news.”
This is polite, but not kind. To
truly care for people, we often
must steer them into hard feelings. Parents teach their kids to be
wary around strangers. Therapists encourage phobia patients
to confront things that terrify
them. This reflects a deeper concern for someone’s long-term
well-being. Many of us are willing
to make family and close friends
uncomfortable in the service of
helping them but don’t extend the
same courtesy to colleagues or
acquaintances. They could often
use it just as much. By protecting
my students’ feelings too forcefully, I might have been stunting
their growth.
If there’s one place that politeness seems useful, it’s the gulf
between Us and Them into which
our country has fallen. Political
discourse increasingly resembles
a live-action YouTube comment
section; to claw our way back
toward stability, niceness seems
like a crucial starting point. In the
fall, Supreme Court Justice Neil
M. Gorsuch preached the importance of politeness, joining a chorus of similar voices from across
the political spectrum. Politicians
frequently praise their opponents
for mere civility, sometimes obscuring real ideological differences between them.
But especially when one group
of people holds power over another, righteous anger is often in
order, and politeness can turn
into a Band-Aid that stops
wounds from healing. In surveys,
psychologists asked people from
historically low-power communities — black South Africans, Arab
Israelis, African Americans and
Latino Americans — how many
friendly interactions they recently had had with their higher-power counterparts. Individuals who
experienced interracial harmony
were more tolerant of their peers
from other groups. But they also
ignored systemic inequality and
expressed less support for social
change. Niceness papered over
oppression, making people less
likely to fight it.
In recent years, American
prejudice has taken off its mask.
Bigots have grown louder and
more comfortable, for instance
staging white-supremacist rallies
around the country last year.
Would we really prefer them to
bite their tongue in public while
quietly working against equality
and indoctrinating their children
with prejudice? If sunlight is the
best disinfectant, politeness casts
an unhelpful shadow. Racists, homophobes and xenophobes who
air their hatred make for an ugly
display, but they also give us a
chance to show them how outnumbered they are.
Politeness is too low a bar for
discourse. And when we want to
help people, we might consider
sparing them less. A real friend is
the one who tells you when you
have spinach in your teeth and
doesn’t mind your being embarrassed now if it will help you later.
Deepening our empathy is hard
emotional labor, but with practice we can get better at it, to the
benefit of those around us.
I now realize my politeness
stemmed from a shallow empathy. I strove to guard others — and
probably myself — from pain
rather than to enrich us. Ryan was
kind enough not to be nice to me,
and I’m trying to follow his lead.
My question for this year: Instead of doing no harm, how can I
do the most good?
health-science@washpost.com
Zaki is an assistant professor in the
Department of Psychology at
Stanford University.
E6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
. TUESDAY,
MARCH 13 , 2018
How protons attack cancer
BY BONNIE BERKOWITZ AND A ARON STECKELBERG
MedStar Georgetown’s new proton treatment center contains
a 15-ton cyclotron, which accelerates protons to two-thirds
the speed of light before hurling them at a tumor.
A LOOK INSIDE
The center takes up three floors in a four-story wing
adjacent to the Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center.
(The top floor is office space.)
Proton
accelerator
Third floor:
Open space lets
the cyclotron
move around
the patient.
AB O
VE
BEL GROU
ND
OW
GR
OU
ND
DETAIL INSIDE
PROTON CENTER
Second floor:
Waiting room
and treatment
bay
The wing is 9,300 square feet, far smaller than many other
proton centers, whose long, beam-line accelerators can
require as much space as a football field.
Gantrymounted
proton
accelerator
can rotate
190 degrees.
CREATING THE BEAM
Inside the accelerator, alternating electric fields spin the
protons on a disk. They exit when they reach top speed.
Proton
accelerator
First floor:
A concrete
bunker contains
the footings.
Proton beam
Electromagnets
steer and focus
the beam of
protons.
Counterweight
Adaptive
aperture
Counterweights
RADIATING THE TUMOR
Metal plates inside the adaptive
aperture move b
backk and
d forth.
f h
The narrowly focused beam
“paints” the tumor with
radiation.
The opening that is created
matches
h the
h contours off the
h
tumor.
The aperture changes shape
to match each section of the
tumor.
Beam
Plates
The process is repeated layer
by layer, until the whole tumor
has been treated.
Beam
SCHEMATIC
DETAIL
INSIDE
ADAPTIVE
APERTURE
Tumor
Next layer
Sources: Brian T. Collins, MedStar Georgetown’s Clinical Director of Radiation Medicine; Michael Tajima of Mevion; American Society for Radiation Oncology
according to the National Association for Proton Therapy. With
24 under construction or in development, the total may soon
exceed 50. A center at D.C.’s
Sibley Memorial Hospital is
scheduled to open in late 2019,
and the Inova Schar Cancer Institute in Fairfax plans to open one
by 2020. The Maryland Proton
Treatment Center, affiliated with
the University of Maryland, was
the area’s first, opening in Baltimore in 2015.
other side.
That means, for instance, that
radiation aimed at a tumor in one
side of the brain wouldn’t harm
the healthy side. And a beam
aimed at a spinal tumor wouldn’t
reach the heart or lungs.
“You can deliver a high dose to
where you need it and spare
normal tissues with fewer side
effects,” said Anatoly Dritschilo,
chairman of radiation oncology
at MedStar Georgetown.
Because more radiation reaches the tumor, a smaller overall
dose is required.
How it works
All types of radiation treatments break the DNA in cells,
which makes it harder for them
to multiply. Rapidly dividing cancer cells are particularly susceptible to this kind of damage, so
tumors often shrink or disappear.
The difference between traditional radiation and proton therapy is in how the radiation is
delivered.
Traditional therapy irradiates
tumors with X-ray waves, and all
tissue along the beams’ path gets
a similar dose of radiation.
Proton therapy instead uses
beams of protons, charged subatomic particles that can be controlled with magnets. A small
amount of radiation is deposited
on the way into the body, most of
it goes directly into the tumor,
and none passes through the
Creating and shaping the
beam
The compact system at MedStar Georgetown spins protons
in an accelerator called a cyclotron and releases them when
they reach two-thirds the speed
of light. This circular system
takes up much less space than
many other proton accelerators,
which propel protons through
long, linear pathways at facilities
the size of football fields.
Once the protons reach top
speed, they pass through a device
that uses adjustable plates to
focus the beam and shape it to
the contours of the tumor. This is
a refined version of “pencilbeam” technology, an innovation
that came about roughly a decade ago. Before then, proton
therapy scattered protons like
water from a fire hydrant,
Dritschilo said. Now, the beam is
PROTON FROM E1
THERAPIES COMPARED
Because protons can be controlled with magnets, proton therapy can
deliver radiation to a tumor more precisely than traditional radiation.
Traditional
radiation therapy
A beam of X-rays is
aimed at the tumor.
Beam
Amount of
radiation
Proton
therapy
A beam of protons is
aimed at the tumor.
LESS
Tumo
Tumor
Tumor
MORE
The beam irradiates all tissue
along its path, including healthy
tissue behind the tumor.
more like an easy-to-aim hose.
Treating the tumor
The beam enters the patient in
pulses, irradiating the tumor layer by layer, much as a 3-D printer
operates.
Patients must hold still for
only seconds at a time, compared
with minutes for traditional radiation and older versions of pro-
Protons deposit most of their
radiation at the tumor site,
sparing most healthy tissue.
ton therapy.
An entire treatment takes just
a couple of minutes (plus about
20 minutes to set up the machine). As with other types of
radiation, patients go for treatment once a day, five days a week,
for five to eight weeks.
Who benefits?
Children who have cancer may
benefit most from proton therapy because more of their normal
cells are developing rapidly, making them more prone to damage
that could stunt the growth of
healthy organs, Dritschilo said.
Other main beneficiaries
would be people with tumors in
the head, neck and spine, and
those who have cancers near
other very sensitive organs, such
as the left breast, which is directly over the heart. For others,
choosing proton treatment could
be a quality-of-life issue, as in the
case of a person whose lungs
would be so damaged by extra
radiation that they would need to
use an oxygen tank.
Who doesn’t benefit?
For some cancers, less precision is better. Lymphoma treatment, for instance, often requires
a wider radius around lymph
nodes because of the way the
cancer grows and spreads,
Dritschilo said. And systemic
cancers such as leukemia could
not be treated by proton therapy
alone.
Many common cancers fall
into a gray area, where doctors
and patients need to weigh risks,
costs and benefits of different
types of treatment.
Proton therapy has been controversial when used routinely to
treat some types of cancer, notably prostate cancer, because data
comparing patient outcomes
with other treatment forms is
slim and because it is much
more expensive than traditional
radiation.
Soon, both those issues may
begin to be resolved, said Brian
Kavanagh, chairman of the
American Society for Radiation
Oncology. Several large clinical
trials comparing treatment
methods should yield solid data
in the next couple of years. And,
as with all technology that has
been around awhile, the cost of
proton therapy centers is coming down, and the cost to patients should decline as well.
MedStar Georgetown said its
small center, which has one
treatment bay, cost $39.7 million, including the building. Sibley said its four-bay center will
cost at least $157 million, well
below the $200 million to $250
million that earlier facilities
have cost. Kavanagh said he
expects that tech innovations
may cut costs by half in the next
five or six years.
Meanwhile, he said, other
emerging radiation technologies may prove to be equally
precise in some cases. These
would give doctors more cancerfighting weapons and patients
more choices.
“Competition is a good thing,”
Kavanagh said. “The pressure to
improve other forms of radiation treatment technology in
recent years has led to tremendous innovation all around.”
bonnie.berkowitz@washpost.com
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