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The Washington Post – March 14, 2018

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Democracy Dies in Darkness
Partly sunny, windy 45/32 • Tomorrow: Partly sunny 53/31 B8
Pa. race remains
agonizingly close
Democrat holds narrow
lead in House district
that Trump won easily
BY D AVID W EIGEL
AND E LISE V IEBECK
mt. lebanon, pa. — A special
election for a U.S. House seat was
too close to call late Tuesday as
Democrat Conor Lamb and Republican Rick Saccone were separated by several hundred votes
in a race that had become a test
of President Trump’s political
clout.
With thousands of absentee
and provisional ballots outstanding, Lamb earned 49.8 percent of
votes cast and Saccone earned
49.6 percent, with 100 percent of
precincts reporting, according to
the Associated Press, which said
the race was too close to project a
winner.
A recount is possible if the
candidates are separated by 0.5
percentage points or less.
Shortly before midnight, Saccone told his supporters that “it’s
not over yet.”
At Lamb’s party, exhausted
backers groaned when told to
M2 V1 V2 V3 V4
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14 , 2018
. $2
Tillerson out at State Dept.
Trump tweets secretary’s ouster, picks CIA’s Pompeo as successor and first female nominee for CIA
keep waiting for more ballots to
be counted. Rich Fitzgerald, the
Democratic Allegheny County
executive, offered an upbeat assessment. “We like where we are,”
Fitzgerald said.
Confident that the absentee
ballots would not erase the lead
held by Lamb, the Democratic
Congressional Campaign Committee declared victory for him;
the National Republican Congressional Committee said it was
confident of a Saccone victory
“after every legal vote is counted.”
Lamb, 33, had waged an energetic campaign in the district
that Trump carried by nearly
20 points in 2016 but that opened
up after the Republican incumbent was felled by scandal. Republicans cited that scandal,
along with the lackluster campaign of their nominee, Rick
Saccone, to minimize the closeness of the race. The district itself
will disappear this year, thanks
to a court decision that struck
down a Republican-drawn map.
But led by the White House,
Republicans had elevated the
race to a high-stakes referendum
on the president and the GOP.
Trump made two appearances
with Saccone, including a SaturELECTION CONTINUED ON A10
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
Base turns: Nail-biter in GOP bastion shows a souring on Trumpism. A10
President Trump had a number of clashes with Rex Tillerson, who challenged him on the Iran nuclear deal, North Korea and other issues.
A SHLEY P ARKER,
P HILIP R UCKER,
J OSH D AWSEY
AND C AROL D . L EONNIG
BY
Via Assange, Stone
knew of emails in 2016
Ex-Trump adviser’s
associates say he claimed
he talked to WikiLeaks
T OM H AMBURGER,
J OSH D AWSEY,
C AROL D . L EONNIG
AND S HANE H ARRIS
BY
In the spring of 2016, longtime
political operative Roger Stone
had a phone conversation that
would later seem prophetic, according to the person on the other
end of the line.
Stone, an informal adviser to
then-candidate Donald Trump,
said he had learned from
WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange that his organization had
obtained emails that would torment senior Democrats such as
John Podesta, then campaign
chairman for Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton.
The conversation occurred before it was publicly known that
hackers had obtained the emails
of Podesta and of the Democratic
National Committee, documents
that WikiLeaks released in late
July and October. The U.S. intelligence community later concluded
that the hackers were working for
Russia.
STONE CONTINUED ON A5
Address on package may
add to Austin mystery
E VA R UTH M ORAVEC,
E LI R OSENBERG,
M ARK B ERMAN
AND M ATT Z APOTOSKY
BY
austin — The third package to
explode in Austin this month, severely injuring a 75-year-old woman, was addressed to a different
home nearby, according to people
familiar with the investigation —
adding a wrinkle to investigators’
efforts to identify who is responsible for leaving sophisticated
bombs on the doorsteps of unsuspecting residents.
The FBI and police have not
identified a suspect or motive behind the attacks, and the clues
revealed publicly have only deep-
ened the mystery.
The two people killed in the
explosions, a 39-year-old construction worker and a 17-year-old
high school student, had relatives
who were good friends and prominent members of Austin’s African
American community, leading
family members to speculate that
they were targeted, perhaps in
part because of their race.
But a victim in the third attack,
the 75-year-old Hispanic woman,
had no apparent connections to
the other two. The woman, Esperanza Herrera, was visiting her
AUSTIN CONTINUED ON A4
Uncommon deliveries: Bombs
bring fear to routine part of life. A4
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson
was asleep in his Nairobi hotel
room early Saturday morning
fighting a stomach bug when
White House Chief of Staff John F.
In their shoes About 7,000 pairs of footwear
were placed by the Capitol as a memorial to
children slain by guns since 2012. B1
Sick patients The House rejected a bill that
would expand experimental treatments. A3
people familiar with the conversation said. It was Tillerson’s first
trip there since Trump disparaged
parts of the continent as “shithole
countries.”
But Kelly had also warned Tillerson to possibly expect a pejorative tweet from Trump over the
weekend, a State Department official said. Tillerson failed to fully
understand that the chief of staff
was gently signaling to him that he
was about to be fired.
And so, just over four hours
after Tillerson’s government plane
touched down at Joint Base Andrews on Tuesday morning, the
secretary of state learned of his
dismissal from a tweet Trump isTILLERSON CONTINUED ON A6
President follows
gut, not advisers,
in recent moves
In Pompeo,
Trump has a
like-minded ally
BY D AVID N AKAMURA
AND D AMIAN P ALETTA
BY K AREN D E Y OUNG
AND J OHN H UDSON
For much of his tumultuous
tenure, President Trump has
made impulsive, gut-level pronouncements — about dealing
with Democrats on immigration, tearing up the Iran nuclear
deal and supporting stricter
gun control — only to be walked
back by his more cautious staff.
Those days, it appears, are
over.
In the past two weeks, Trump
has ordered tariffs on steel and
aluminum imports over the
fierce objections of his top economic adviser and agreed to an
unprecedented meeting with
North Korea’s dictator despite
concerns from national security
aides. On Tuesday, Trump fired
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson,
who had forged a tight working
relationship with Defense Secretary Jim Mattis to try to rein
in some of Trump’s most impetuous decisions.
“I made that decision by myself,” Trump told reporters at
the White House on Tuesday.
Though he was talking about
North Korea, it is a mantra that
has never rung truer in his
nearly 14 months as president.
Trump’s moves have shaken
and alarmed a West Wing staff
who fear the president has felt
TRUMP CONTINUED ON A7
IN THE NEWS
MATT MCCLAIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
Kelly called to wake him around
2 a.m. to relay a terse message
from President Trump: The boss
was not happy.
The president was so eager to
fire Tillerson that he wanted to do
so in a tweet on Friday, but Kelly
persuaded Trump to wait until his
secretary of state was back in the
United States from Africa, two
THE NATION
THE WORLD
Republicans on the
House’s Russia investigation backed off their
claim that foreign interference was not meant
to help elect Donald
Trump. A2
Interior Secretary
Ryan Zinke voiced
doubt that oil and gas
exploration will occur
off the Pacific coast as
part of the administration’s plan to expand
offshore drilling. A3
Prosecutors said they
will seek the death penalty for the man
charged with fatally
shooting 17 people at a
Florida school. A4
Russia demanded access to the British probe
of a chemical poisoning
and vowed retaliation
for any related sanctions. A11
Burma is pumping millions into rebuilding
Rakhine state, but critics say the plan does not
address root causes of
violence against Rohingya Muslims. A12
China announced it
will establish a government agency on foreign
aid as part of a push to
better project its global
influence. A13
Syrian President
Bashar al-Assad appears
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
Caught off-guard: After a rough start and denials that he would
quit, Rex Tillerson seemed to be hitting his diplomatic stride. A6
JAHI CHIKWENDIU/THE WASHINGTON POST
A new role: CIA Director Mike Pompeo, seen in May, will be
nominated to replace Rex Tillerson as secretary of state.
President Trump has chosen a
new secretary of state, untested
in diplomacy but more attuned
to the president’s views and way
of conducting foreign policy, at a
time when the United States is
facing an array of delicate and
potentially dangerous national
security challenges.
Seeking what he called “a
different mind-set, a different
thinking,” Trump said Tuesday
that he was replacing the reserved and cautious Rex Tillerson with CIA Director Mike
Pompeo, a former House of Representatives firebrand with
strong “America First” and hardline Republican credentials.
“With Mike, Mike Pompeo, we
have a very similar thought process. I think it’s going to go very
well,” Trump said as he left the
White House for a trip to California.
Both Tillerson’s departure
and the choice of Pompeo had
been rumored for months, amid
Trump’s clear unhappiness over
public disagreements with Tillerson on issues ranging from
Russia to the Middle East and
North Korea. Although he frePOMPEO CONTINUED ON A8
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE OSS SOCIETY
Complex ties: A respected agency veteran, CIA director pick Gina
Haspel was once involved with brutal interrogations. A8
to be on the cusp of a
major victory in the Damascus suburb of Eastern Ghouta. A14
THE ECONOMY
Larry Kudlow, a conservative commentator,
leads the list for new top
economist, President
Trump said. A15
Melania Trump will
meet with Facebook,
Twitter and other tech
giants to discuss cyberbullying. A16
President Trump ordered plans for tariffs
that would punish China for years of stealing
U.S. trade secrets. A16
THE REGION
A Maryland lawmaker
and a lobbyist she ac-
cused of harassing her
released security video
of their encounter, and
both declared it proves
their accounts. B1
One of the District’s
oldest charter schools
may not be able to make
payroll amid weak
finances, an official
analysis warned. B1
A Maryland school’s
barring of a transgender
student from using the
boys’ locker room is discriminatory, a federal
judge ruled. B1
OBITUARIES
Pediatrician T. Berry
Brazelton, 99, wrote
best-selling guides to
child-rearing that
soothed generations of
parents. B6
Souring on Shulkin: Trump might
boot VA secretary, some say. A8
Inside
FOOD
Mourning meals
When a beloved eatery
closes, grief and a little
guilt are in order. E1
ST YLE
Gallery grievances
Museum guards
complain of hostility. C1
BUSINESS NEWS ........................ A15
COMICS........................................C7
OPINION PAGES..........................A18
LOTTERIES ................................... B3
OBITUARIES ................................. B6
TELEVISION..................................C5
WORLD NEWS.............................A12
CONTENT © 2018
The Washington Post / Year 141, No. 99
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B2
6 8 0 5
A2
EZ
. WEDNESDAY,
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
MARCH 14 , 2018
House GOP backs off claim that Russia did not try to help Trump
Leader of intelligence
probe appears less firm
on key assertion in report
BY
K AROUN D EMIRJIAN
The leader of the House Intelligence Committee’s Russia investigation seemed to back off Tues-
day from the most surprising
finding in the GOP’s report, that
Russia was not trying to help
President Trump, as the panel’s
top Democrat trashed the product as a political gift to the White
House.
Rep. K. Michael Conaway (RTex.) told reporters Tuesday that
“it’s clear [Russian officials] were
trying to hurt Hillary [Clinton]”
by interfering in the 2016 election
and that “everybody gets to make
H A P P ENI NG TO D A Y
For the latest updates all day, visit washingtonpost.com.
All day
School walkouts across the country are expected to
take place to protest gun violence in the aftermath of the
Feb. 14 school shooting in Parkland, Fla. For
developments, visit washingtonpost.com/national.
8:30 a.m.
The Commerce Department issues retail sales for
February, which are expected to make gains at
0.4 percent after weak results in December and January.
Visit washingtonpost.com/business for details.
9:30 a.m.
The Senate Judiciary Committee holds a hearing to
examine the Parkland shooting and legislative proposals
to improve school safety. For developments, go to
washingtonpost.com/politics.
10 a.m.
The Senate Commerce Committee holds a hearing on
rebuilding U.S. infrastructure, during which
Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao and Commerce
Secretary Wilbur Ross will testify. Visit
washingtonpost.com/politics for details.
up their own mind whether they
were trying to hurt Hillary, help
Trump, it’s kind of glass half full,
glass half empty.”
That equivalence stands in
sharp contrast to the conclusions
of a 150-page GOP-drafted report
Conaway announced to the news
media on Monday that concludes
that the intelligence community
“didn’t meet the standards” of
proof necessary to determine that
Russia meddled in the 2016 election with the aim of helping
Trump.
When it comes to determining
whether Russia interfered to hurt
Clinton or help Trump, “you can
pitch that either way,” Conaway
said Tuesday.
His comments came after other panel Republicans, including
Reps. Trey Gowdy (R-S.C.) and
Thomas J. Rooney (R-Fla.) gave
interviews in which they stressed
that there was evidence that Russia had tried to damage Clinton’s
candidacy.
The report’s findings on Russia’s intentions in interfering is
just one area of the document
with which Democrats on the
panel took issue Tuesday after
being presented with it in the
morning.
The panel’s ranking Democrat,
Rep. Adam B. Schiff (D-Calif.),
who called the report “not a serious work,” said the document was
proof that Republicans were willing only to “go through the motions of an investigation . . . to
give the pretense of trying to find
the truth.”
Schiff added that the report
was “little more than another
Nunes memo in long form,” likening it to the four-page document that the panel’s GOP members, led by Rep. Devin Nunes
(R-Calif.), put out last month
alleging that the FBI and Justice
Department engaged in “surveillance abuses” to monitor the
activities of former Trump campaign adviser Carter Page. Demo-
crats accused Republicans of using the Nunes memo to undermine the Russia investigation —
a charge they also applied to
Tuesday’s GOP report.
Schiff and other Democrats on
the committee released a 22-page
“status update” Tuesday night,
listing the various witnesses,
firms and documents the panel
had declined to subpoena or otherwise examine, along with the
reasons that each would be relevant to the investigation. It also
lays out areas of inquiry that the
minority members say the GOP
abandoned by terminating the
probe earlier than Democrats
would have liked.
“There were leads and investigative paths on, from my perspective, three different and major
significant areas: first, on collusion, second, on money laundering, and third, on obstruction of
justice,” said Rep. Joaquin Castro,
a Democratic panel member from
Texas. “At this point, the majority
has chosen to ignore those.”
Democratic committee members pledged to forge ahead with
the investigation and eventually
issue their own report, although
they do not have the ability to
subpoena witnesses and other
information without the panel
chairman’s buy-in.
They reserved special vitriol
for the GOP’s decision not to more
aggressively pursue uncooperative witnesses such as former
White House strategist Stephen
K. Bannon, whom Conaway had
previously considered holding in
contempt.
“The majority has decided they
would rather shut down the investigation than find out the answers to the questions we had for
Stephen K. Bannon,” Schiff said.
“This majority doesn’t want to
know the answers, and it has set a
precedent now that will affect
future congresses’ ability to get
answers from the executive.”
karoun.demirjian@washpost.com
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KOEN VAN WEEL/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Tuesday, as it turns out, is hump day
Freja the Bactrian camel gave birth Tuesday at Amersfoort Zoo in the Netherlands. The calf, whose gender is unknown, is the zoo’s fifth camel.
On Calif. visit, Trump views wall prototypes
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President also accuses
Gov. Jerry Brown of
doing ‘a terrible job’
BY
J OHN W AGNER
san diego — Making his first trip
to California since taking office,
President Trump on Tuesday
showed off prototypes for his
long-promised border wall,
strongly condemned jurisdictions
that offer “sanctuary” to undocumented immigrants — and accused the state’s governor of doing “a terrible job.”
The visit, which drew protesters on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border, came at a time of escalating acrimony between Trump
and Democratic leaders of the nation’s most populous state, who
have sought through legislation
and lawsuits to counter Trump on
immigration and other policies.
Even against that backdrop,
Trump’s swipe at Gov. Jerry Brown
(D) was remarkable coming from
a sitting president. As Trump
toured the site of eight prototypes
of the border wall, he told onlookers that Brown “does a very poor
job of running California.”
“They have the highest taxes in
the United States,” Trump
said. “The place is totally out of
control. You have sanctuary cities
where you have criminals living in
the sanctuary cities.”
The president also noted that
he owns property in the state — a
home in Beverly Hills and a golf
club in Rancho Palos Verdes —
and predicted that people would
start to move out of California
because of taxes that are “way, way
out of whack.”
Brown responded on Twitter,
thanking Trump for the “shoutout.”
“California remains the 6th
largest economy in the world and
the most prosperous state in
America,” Brown wrote, adding:
“#Facts.”
Trump’s trip included an address to military personnel here
at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, where he was well-received
as he touted planned pay raises
and new investments in helicopters and other equipment. Trump
also floated the idea of creating a
new branch of the military to fight
in space.
The president later attended a
fundraiser in the Los Angeles area
to benefit the Republican National Committee. A few hundred people reportedly turned out to protest near the Beverly Hills residence where Trump gathered
with donors.
The border-wall prototypes
Trump visited are on display in a
dusty lot near the border. The
30-foot-tall barriers use varying
configurations of steel, concrete
and even spikes to create ramparts far more formidable than
almost anything in place along the
2,000-mile border with Mexico.
The Trump administration is
seeking $18 billion for wall construction over the next 10 years,
an amount that would pay for
roughly 300 miles of barriers
where none exist and allow the
government to replace 400 miles
of “legacy” fencing.
“We need safety, we need security at the border, and we’re getting it like we’ve never had it
before,” Trump said. “But we want
to make it perfecto.”
At one point, protesters could
be heard chanting in Spanish
from the other side of the border.
En route to the Golden State
earlier Tuesday, Trump took aim
on Twitter at its “sanctuary” laws.
“California’s sanctuary policies
are illegal and unconstitutional
and put the safety and security of
our entire nation at risk,” the president wrote, adding: “THIS MUST
STOP!”
He echoed those themes in remarks near the border and at the
Marine base here.
Tensions between Trump and
leaders of California — a state that
Democrat Hillary Clinton carried
by 30 percentage points in 2016 —
have reached a boil over immigration.
Last week, Brown accused the
Trump administration of “basically going to war against the
state” over the announcement of a
lawsuit that aims to compel California to cooperate with Trump’s
agenda of stepped-up immigrant
deportations.
The suit targets three laws
passed by the legislature last year
that prohibit local law enforcement from alerting federal immigration agents when detainees are
released from custody, make it a
crime for business owners to voluntarily help federal agents find
undocumented workers and create a state inspection program for
federal immigration detention
centers.
At a news conference in Los
Angeles before Trump’s arrival
here, California Attorney General
Xavier Becerra (D) offered a preemptive rebuttal. “Here in California in 2018, we know what actually keeps us safe,” Becerra said. “It’s
the strong relationship between
law enforcement and the communities we serve. It’s the trust we
establish with the families in
these neighborhoods, but it’s also
something beyond that. It’s good
jobs. Good schools. Access to good
health care. Education for our
families. It’s a safe and clean
neighborhood. It’s an environment with clean water and clean
air.”
Hours before Trump’s arrival at
the prototype site, a crowd of
about 200 pro-wall, pro-Trump
supporters gathered about a halfmile from the border to make
their feelings known.
Kathy Robinson, 55, from Burbank, said walls have been effective security measures in other
places. She cited Israel as an
example.
Robinson, who works as an
Uber driver and photographer,
was decked out with a U.S.-flagpatterned ski hat, a matching tote
bag and a Trump T-shirt. Around
her, people were chanting “USA!”
and waving flags and posters.
Speakers at the rally included
Tim Donnelly, a Republican running for Congress in California’s
8th Congressional District, who
called for the impeachment of
Brown and of Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf (D), whom Trump has
called a “disgrace” because of her
stance on the federal immigration
crackdown. Donnelly’s suggestion on Schaaf was met with
shouts of “Lock her up!”
A few miles west, in the neighboring border-front community
of San Ysidro, about 150 people
gathered to protest Trump and the
proposed wall at a Roman Catholic church.
Their posters ranged from
cheeky to impassioned. “Go away
Cheeto man,” one sign read.
Rep. Juan Vargas (D), whose
51st District runs along the Southern California border, including
the sites of both rallies, said
Trump is not his president.
Calling the wall “a symbol of
hate,” Vargas said its budget
would come from Social Security,
food stamp and Medicare budgets.
“We have to resist,” he
said. “They have to let him know
that California doesn’t welcome
him.”
john.wagner@washpost.com
Roxana Popescu contributed to this
report.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
SU
Politics & the Nation
Interior chief: Oil and gas exploration o≠ Pacific coast might not happen
In Senate testimony,
Zinke cites a dearth of
extractable resources
BY
D ARRYL F EARS
Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke
expressed doubt Tuesday that oil
and gas exploration will happen
off the Pacific coast as part of the
Trump administration’s proposal
to dramatically expand offshore
leasing, saying California, Oregon
and Washington have “no known
resources of any weight” for energy companies to extract.
Discussing the Atlantic coast
while testifying before the Senate
Energy Committee, the secretary
similarly described Maine as a
state with little recoverable oil
and gas.
Zinke stopped short of saying
that the three Pacific states would
be exempted from the president’s
plan to offer leases on 95 percent
of the outer continental shelf. But
in his reply to a question from
Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.), he
acknowledged her state’s deep opposition.
“I think I’m going to mark
down Washington as opposed to
drilling,” Zinke said after
Cantwell asked him to extend the
public comment period for the
drilling proposal. It is clear “the
state of Washington is deeply, passionately opposed to oil and gas
drilling off the coast,” he continued, promising that will be reflected in the next draft of the
plan.
California and Oregon also are
strongly against drilling off their
shores, as are virtually all states
along the Atlantic coast.
The secretary’s comments
came near the end of a two-hour
hearing on the Trump administration’s fiscal 2019 budget and its
effect on the Interior Department.
The president has proposed a cut
of $2 billion to the department’s
nearly $13.5 billion budget.
Among the budget’s highlights,
Zinke said, is a proposal to use
revenue from new energy production projects for an infrastructure
fund to deal with the National
Park Service’s nearly $12 billion
maintenance backlog.
Zinke was warmly received by
Republicans on the committee,
starting with Chairman Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska), who welcomed his efforts to open the
Arctic Ocean to leases and explo-
JACQUELYN MARTIN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke confers with Deputy Assistant
Secretary Olivia Barton Ferriter during his testimony Tuesday.
ration. Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah)
congratulated the secretary for
shrinking two national monuments in his state, Grand Staircase-Escalante and Bears Ears.
“You and I have worked closely
to chart a path to greater energy
security, which, as you have noted,
runs right through Alaska,” Murkowski said in her opening statement. “So I’d like to thank you for
all that you’ve done to help Alaska
and the nation this past year.”
But Democrats ripped into
Zinke, deriding his spending for
travel on military planes and private aircraft while proposing to
raise entrance fees at the most
popular national parks, virtually
eliminating the Land and Water
Conservation Fund, shrinking
several national monuments and
risking beach economies with
drilling expansion.
“During your confirmation
hearing, you mentioned Teddy
Roosevelt nine times,” recalled
Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.). “Teddy
Roosevelt understood that when
you sell off or exploit public lands,
you don’t get them back. Mr. Secretary, you don’t seem to understand that at all.”
Zinke fired back that the land
carved away from the monuments
is still under various federal protections, as wilderness areas, for
example.
Wyden wasn’t swayed. “We
talked a lot during your nomination process,” the senator said. “I
said I would support your nomination, and I did. I will tell you
right now, as of today, it is one of
the biggest regrets in my public
service.”
Although budget cuts targeted
for several Interior Department
programs also came up in questions, offshore drilling took center stage. In another brief but
heated exchange, Sen. Catherine
Cortez Masto (D-Nev.) asked
Zinke why renewable-energy
projects are the only ones being
cut when he has said he supports
an all-of-the-above energy strategy.
Zinke responded that solar energy requires hundreds of thou-
sands of acres of land that lock out
potential hunting and other uses
and that wind “chops up birds.”
Cortez Masto then pressed him
on why he doesn’t have similar
reservations about offshore drilling exploration, given its risk and
cost. “Didn’t I just hear you say
offshore has a low demand?” she
asked.
Zinke has exempted only Florida from the drilling proposal, saying the risk to beach tourism revenue driving the state’s economy
is too great. He repeated that
Florida also has a federal moratorium against oil and gas exploration that protects its coast until
2024.
That hasn’t satisfied a bipartisan group of governors, lawmakers and attorneys general of Atlantic- and Pacific-coast states
who are firmly opposed to potential drilling and the seismic testing that would precede it. Such
testing, some studies say, harms
mammals that rely on echolocation to associate and feed and
could frighten away fish that commercial and recreation fisheries
need to survive.
darryl.fears@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/energy-environment
House votes against expanding access to experimental drug treatments
Measure would have
allowed desperately ill
people to bypass the FDA
BY
L AURIE M C G INLEY
In a major setback for Republicans, the House rejected “right-totry” legislation Tuesday evening
that would have allowed seriously
ill patients to bypass the Food and
Drug Administration to get access
to experimental treatments.
The vote came after a spirited
debate in which GOP lawmakers
portrayed the measure, which was
strongly backed by President
Trump and Vice President Pence,
as a last chance at survival for
desperately ill patients. Democrats said the bill would weaken
critical FDA protections without
addressing the fundamental obstacles to experimental drugs.
Republican supporters brought
up the measure under a suspension of the rules, which does not
allow for amendments and requires approval from two-thirds
of those present to pass. The legislation failed 259 to 140.
Rep. Frank Pallone Jr. (N.J.), the
ranking Democrat of the Energy
and Commerce Committee who
vehemently opposed the bill, said
in a statement that the vote meant
the House had “protected patients
and supported the FDA’s continued role in approving experimental treatments that may help save a
patient’s life.” He said the legislation should not have been brought
to the floor under the abbreviated
process.
The Republicans pushing the
legislation, Commerce Committee
Chairman Greg Walden (R-Ore.)
and Health Subcommittee Chairman Michael C. Burgess (R-Tex.),
expressed disappointment in the
outcome. “For months we sought
to strike the right balance by allowing patients greater access to
these unapproved treatments and
therapies while also ensuring
proper patient protections,” they
said in a joint statement. “This bill
does just that.”
The vote capped an emotionally
charged debate that kicked into
high gear over the weekend after
Walden and Burgess released
their bill and said they planned a
quick floor vote. The Senate
passed a similar measure last
summer that was pushed by Sen.
Ron Johnson (R-Wis.).
On Monday, more than 75 patient groups, including the American Cancer Society Cancer Action
Network, the American Lung Association and the Cystic Fibrosis
Foundation, had sent a letter to
House leaders saying the bill
“would not increase access to
promising therapies” because it
didn’t deal with the main barriers
to experimental drugs — the cost
and company restrictions on making therapies available outside of
clinical trials.
And by skirting the FDA, the
letter added, the proposed rightto-try pathway would be “less
safe” for patients than the agency’s
existing program, called expanded access, for overseeing the use of
unapproved therapies outside of
trials.
The groups’ opposition came as
the conservative Goldwater Institute and other supporters touted
the bill as a critical lifeline for
patients who are ineligible for
clinical trials. Thirty-eight states
have passed right-to-try laws; a
federal law would block the government from preventing patients
from taking advantage of them.
“Right to Try provides a new
path for people who are out of
options,” said a letter circulated by
the Goldwater Institute and
signed by 20 groups, including the
Abigail Alliance for Better Access
to Developmental Drugs, Fire
Fighters with Parkinson’s and
Cures Within Reach. Under the
House legislation, patients first
would have had to exhaust all other treatments, and the experimental drugs would have had to complete preliminary safety testing.
The
Goldwater
Institute
blamed the legislation’s failure on
“scare tactics, falsehoods and innuendo.”
The intense, emotional debate
surrounding the issue masked a
fundamental question: Would a
federal right-to-try law have much
impact on patients?
The FDA’s expanded-access
program, which receives more
than 1,000 requests a year for experimental drugs, already approves 99 percent of the appeals.
But drug companies often balk at
providing experimental drugs
outside of clinical trials, and the
federal right-to-try legislation did
not compel them to provide
sought-after therapies.
“This is a right-to-ask bill, not a
right-to-try bill,” Holly Fernandez
Lynch, assistant professor of med-
ical ethics at the University of
Pennsylvania Perelman School of
Medicine, said of the House bill.
The House bill did include some
changes from the Senate legislation that were designed to assuage
concerns raised by critics and by
FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb. In congressional testimony in
October, Gottlieb suggested that
lawmakers limit the scope of the
legislation to avoid undercutting
the FDA’s drug-review process.
Under the Senate bill, patients
are eligible for right to try if they
have a “life-threatening disease or
condition.” Gottlieb suggested
that the category be narrowed to
the “terminally ill.” The House bill,
taking a step in that direction, said
patients would be eligible if they
are likely to die in a “matter of
months” or have a disease that
would result in “significant irreversible morbidity that is likely to
lead to severely premature death.”
Republican committee aides
said the House legislation also included more robust informedconsent requirements than the
Senate bill and would have required that doctors immediately
notify the FDA about adverse
events, something the Senate legislation does not include. Under
both chambers’ bills, the FDA
could consider adverse events as
part of a drug-approval review, but
only if such complications are
“critical to determining the safety”
of the drug.
Right-to-try advocates say the
legislation — by simplifying the
process for obtaining unapproved
drugs, and by expanding and clarifying the liability protection —
would have encouraged more patients, doctors and pharmaceutical firms to participate.
Critics celebrated its demise.
“We applaud the House members
who voted against the seriously
flawed False Hope legislation,
which would have created a dangerous, uncharted pathway for accessing experimental medications
that have not been shown to be
safe or effective,” Michael Carome,
director of Public Citizen’s Health
Research Group, said in a statement. “The bill would have exposed vulnerable patients to risks
of serious harm, including dying
earlier and more painfully than
they otherwise would have, without appropriate safeguards.”
(D) on federal bribery and fraud
charges Tuesday in a trial that
further exposed the state capital’s
culture of backroom dealmaking.
Joseph Percoco, who was once
likened to a brother by the
governor, faces up to 20 years in
prison for his conviction on
conspiracy to commit honest
services wire fraud and soliciting
bribes. Jurors who deliberated off
and on for three weeks acquitted
Percoco of extortion and one of
the bribery charges he had faced.
The jury also convicted one of
the business executives charged
with paying the bribes, Steven
Aiello, an executive at Syracusearea company Cor Development.
A second executive with the
company, Joseph Gerardi, was
acquitted on all charges.
The jury deadlocked and a
mistrial was declared in the case
of a fourth defendant, energy
company executive Peter
Galbraith Kelly. The U.S.
attorney’s office didn’t
immediately say whether it
would seek a retrial.
Prosecutors said Percoco and
his family accepted more than
$300,000 in bribes.
laurie.mcginley@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/to-your-health
DIGEST
NATIONAL SECURITY
U.S. man who joined
al-Qaeda gets 45 years
A federal judge in Brooklyn
sentenced a Texas native who
had joined al-Qaeda to 45 years
in prison following his conviction
last fall for conspiracy to murder
Americans and providing
material support to terrorists.
Muhanad Mahmoud alFarekh, 32, of Houston was
sentenced by U.S. District Judge
Brian M. Cogan of the Eastern
District of New York.
Farekh’s case renewed a
lengthy debate in the Obama
administration over whether it
was legally and morally
permissible to target and kill a
U.S. citizen overseas without a
trial. Although U.S. authorities
nominated him to be placed on a
terrorism kill list, he was
captured in Pakistan and
eventually brought to the United
States for prosecution.
“With the sentence handed
down today, al Qaeda terrorist
Muhanad Mahmoud Al Farekh is
being held accountable for his
crimes,” Assistant Attorney
General for National Security
John C. Demers said in a
statement Tuesday.
Farekh had traveled overseas,
joined al-Qaeda and conspired to
kill Americans, including
through an attack using
explosive devices on a remote
U.S. military base in Khost,
Afghanistan, in 2009,
prosecutors said.
Farekh was detained in
Pakistan in 2015, transferred to
U.S. custody, questioned and
then secretly flown to New York
to face terrorism charges. In
September, he also was convicted
of charges of conspiracy to bomb
a U.S. facility and conspiracy to
use a weapon of mass
destruction.
Farekh, who was raised in
Dubai, served in al-Qaeda’s
external operations unit from
2007 to 2014, prosecutors said.
— Ellen Nakashima
NEW YORK
Former Cuomo aide
is convicted of bribery
Jurors convicted a former top
aide to Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo
— Associated Press
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A4
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 14 , 2018
With online shopping, packages are ubiquitous, but bombs are rare
Austin incidents
bring new terror to a
now-routine part of life
BY
A MY B W ANG
The package that appeared on
the front porch of a northeast
Austin home on March 2 gained
little special notice, in part because receiving a package is such
a regular occurrence across the
United States that most people
wouldn’t think twice about retrieving one. In a culture that
increasingly shops online, packages are routine, ordinary.
This one was not. Its contents
exploded with a force strong
enough to kill 39-year-old Anthony Stephan House and alarm
many of his neighbors. At the
time, authorities said that the
blast was “suspicious” but probably “an isolated incident” that
posed no ongoing danger to the
community.
On Monday, 10 days later, packages left at two homes in other
parts of Austin also detonated,
killing a 17-year-old boy and seriously injuring two women. Police
quickly linked all the attacks to an
unknown, sophisticated bombmaker who had turned to a rare
implement of death, transforming the mundane act of picking
up a package into a terrifying
ordeal.
Austin Police Chief Brian Manley warned residents numerous
times to report suspicious or un-
expected packages.
“DO NOT open it, call 911
immediately,” he tweeted.
The bombings called to mind
the crimes committed by Theodore “Ted” Kaczynski — also
known as the Unabomber — who
during a 17-year period sent multiple explosives through the mail.
His bombs killed three people
and injured 23. After a lengthy
manhunt, the FBI finally captured Kaczynski in 1996. In the 22
years since, mail and package
bombs have largely slipped from
the public eye even as home
package delivery has soared.
Until the Austin bombings.
The warnings Monday seemed
especially foreboding at a time
when package deliveries, once
expected only on special occasions, are now ubiquitous. The
rise of Internet shopping — with
promises to ship to your doorstep
an array of items, from toilet
paper to potato chips to computers, sometimes within hours —
has threatened to overwhelm
postal workers, college campuses
and rural towns. (Jeffrey P. Bezos,
the chief executive of Amazon.com, owns The Washington
Post.)
Delivery methods have expanded to include not just the
U.S. Postal Service but also UPS,
FedEx and even independent
contractors driving their own vehicles. Someone dropping off a
package while wearing street
clothes and driving an unmarked
car is unlikely to draw much
attention.
“Decades ago, the majority of
packages were shipped through
Recent package bomb
explosions in Austin
March 2:
One man killed
35
1
290
AUSTIN
University
of Texas
at Austin
130
Monday:
One teenager killed,
one woman injured
Capitol
building
290
Monday:
One woman injured
35
Austin-Bergstrom
International Airport
Source: Maps4News/HERE
the U.S. Postal Service,” said Michael Bouchard, a former assistant director of field operations
for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.
“Now you have all kinds of delivery services,” and people by nature typically open packages that
arrive at their homes.
“There’s certainly more packages at my door than I’ve ever
seen before,” Bouchard said. “It’s
just second nature now: ‘Okay,
here’s a package, my name’s on it.’
Even if you don’t remember ordering something, if it comes in
an Amazon box or whatever box,
it looks perfectly fine.”
Previous telltale signs of a suspicious package — the stereotypi-
2 MILES
THE WASHINGTON POST
cal oil stains, protruding wires or
extra postage — don’t necessarily
apply to modern-day explosive
devices, Bouchard said.
“There’s so many different
types of explosives and chemical
mixtures you can use, and you
don’t put stamps on things anymore — they’re postage labels,”
Bouchard said. He noted that it
would be difficult for an average
person to tell that a package is
dangerous because packages are
“so common, and you can just
disguise anything in a box you
commonly get at your door.”
Suddenly, every parcel outside
an Austin home has become a
potential threat this week. By
Tuesday morning, authorities in
the city had received about 150
calls to report suspicious packages, though none turned out to be
dangerous, they said.
Police in Austin have divulged
little about the three bombs, except that they arrived at the
homes as “box-type deliveries”
and included powerful devices
constructed with “a certain level
of skill and sophistication.” In the
first and third bombings, the
explosions took place outside the
homes. In the second incident,
the package was moved inside
before it detonated and killed a
teenager, police said.
Police said they didn’t yet
know if the victims were the
intended targets or how the
homes were selected for the attacks.
The challenge for law enforcement, Bouchard said, will be trying to determine a motive when
anybody can make a bomb, given
what’s available online. (Last fall,
Amazon said it would review its
algorithms after the retailer’s
website automatically suggested
bombmaking components to customers as items “frequently
bought together.”)
“There’s certainly enough information on the Internet,”
Bouchard said, citing “thousands” of websites and YouTube
videos detailing how to put together an explosive.
Exploding package bombs are
unusual, and reports of suspicious or unattended packages are
declining despite the vast increase in package shipments, according to the ATF. In 2016, the
agency recorded 939 incidents
related to packages and parcels, a
significant decrease from 1,739
the year before.
By comparison, incidents involving backpacks and purses increased 57 percent in 2016. Figures from last year are not yet
available, an ATF spokesman
said.
Representatives for the U.S.
Postal Service and UPS said they
could not divulge what security
measures they have in place to
screen and flag suspicious packages. A FedEx spokeswoman declined to answer questions about
package security.
UPS spokesman Matthew
O’Connor encouraged customers
to track their packages online so
they know when to expect them
at their doorsteps, and to always
look for UPS-branded uniforms
and delivery trucks.
“Our drivers wear the UPS
uniform and announce themselves when making deliveries by
knocking on the door or ringing
the doorbell,” O’Connor said.
Those who send explosives
through the mail usually are trying to achieve one of two things,
Bouchard said.
“From what I’ve seen, the majority of package bombs were
specifically targeted towards an
individual, whether it’s the breaking up of a relationship or someone who burned someone in a
business deal,” Bouchard said.
“Or they’ve got a broader target.
They’re sending a message.”
amy.wang@washpost.com
Mark Berman contributed to this
report.
Austin police searching for motives in package bombings
AUSTIN FROM A1
mother’s house, and people familiar with the case said the package
she picked up was addressed to a
different home.
Investigators have been poring
over the victims’ backgrounds
and the construction of the
bombs, hoping to find a clue that
might lead them to the person or
people responsible. The FBI sent
behavioral profilers from Quantico, Va., as well as bomb technicians and evidence teams, said
Christopher Combs, special agent
in charge of the bureau’s San Antonio office.
Police warned Austin residents
to be wary when approaching
packages left at their doorsteps
and said they had received 265
calls about suspicious packages
between Monday and Tuesday afternoon. None were deemed to be
dangerous or related to the investigation.
Austin Police Chief Brian Manley said Tuesday that police were
not ruling anything out in the
case, including that the attacks
could have been motivated by
racial hatred or terrorism. He
said that whoever is behind the
attacks has been able to construct
and deliver deadly bombs without setting them off at any point
in that process, which shows
some level of bombmaking prowess.
“When the victims have picked
these packages up, they have at
that point exploded,” Manley said
during an appearance Tuesday
morning on KXAN, an Austin television station. “There’s a certain
level of skill and sophistication
that whoever is doing this has.”
He said the city would offer a
$50,000 reward for information
leading to an arrest in the investigation, on top of the $15,000 reward announced by Gov. Greg Abbott (R) a day earlier.
“We need to put a stop to this
before anybody else in our community is seriously injured or
killed,” Manley said.
The bombings come at a time
when Austin is deluged by tens of
thousands of visitors for the South
by Southwest festival. Officials
have said they do not see any
connection between the bombings and the festival, although for
some, their reassurances are hard
ILANA PANICH-LINSMAN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
A day after a package exploded at the house at left, investigators in Austin examine the roof of a neighboring home. Esperanza Herrera, 75,
who was visiting her mother when she was injured in the explosion, remained in critical condition with life-threatening injuries Tuesday.
to stomach.
After the first bomb exploded
on March 2, killing 39-year-old
Anthony Stephan House, police
said it appeared to be an isolated
incident with no continuing
threat to the community. Then, on
Monday, two more bombs went
off.
House, a construction worker,
was married with an 8-year-old
daughter. His stepfather, Freddie
Dixon, said Monday that the girl
was inside the home when the
explosion occurred. He said he
was disappointed with how police
had initially characterized it.
“Now, all of a sudden, they got
to back up,” Dixon said in an interview Monday.
During a Tuesday news conference, Manley said that law enforcement’s working theory after
House’s death was that the incident was related to a raid police
had conducted three days earlier
on an apparent drug stash house
on the street where House lived.
He said House’s home was similar in color to the house that was
raided and had similar vehicles
parked outside. Investigators believed the bomb there might have
been a “retaliatory act” for the
police raid and that the presumed
retaliator had gotten the wrong
house, Manley said.
Dixon said he was good friends
with Norman Mason, the grandfather of the 17-year-old killed in the
first explosion early Monday
morning. Mason’s grandson,
Draylen Mason, was a senior at
East Austin College Prep, where
he was well known for his love of
music. His mother was also injured in the blast, and Manley said
Tuesday that she was in stable
condition.
“He was amazing, so passionate
and very well rounded,” said junior Eli Hernandez, 17, who considered Draylen Mason something of a role model. “Everyone
could see he had a bright future
with music.”
School custodian Dennis Govea said Mason played stand-up
bass and was in a mariachi band.
In photos from the school’s 2015-
2016 yearbook, Mason is pictured
taking part in the Austin Soundwaves, a Hispanic Alliance music
education program; on a school
field trip to Thailand; and grinning in his class photo. In 10th
grade, Mason and two other classmates were named “most likely to
be famous.”
“A lot of kids are going to be
hurting,” Govea said. “We’re sure
going to miss him here.”
Doug Dempster, dean of the
University of Texas at Austin’s
College of Fine Arts, said in a
written statement that Mason
was “the very most remarkable
talent in a most remarkable
youth orchestra program,” referring to Austin Soundwaves. He
said he had watched Mason blossom for years and “knew he had
the chops to study music in college.”
Dempster said he expected Mason to attend the university in the
fall.
“He was every inch a musician,”
he said in a statement. “He carried
himself with a kind of quiet matu-
rity that belied his youth. At
Sound Waves performances one
could often see him leaning in to
lead and coach younger and more
tentative players. His gentle confidence seemed to come from a
conviction that hard work and
talent was going to work for him.
It did.”
Dixon said his stepson did not
know Mason, but he said he
couldn’t help but wonder whether
his own connection with Mason’s
grandfather was somehow important. He said he was once the
pastor at Wesley United Methodist Church, which Norman Mason
attended, and the two were longtime friends and fraternity brothers.
“It’s not just coincidental,” Dixon said. “Somebody’s done their
homework on both of us, and they
knew what they were doing.”
Asked about his theory of the
crime Monday, Dixon said: “My
diagnosis: Number one, I think
it’s a hate crime. Number two,
somebody’s got some kind of vendetta here.”
Of the bomb that injured Herrera, he said, “Is she a diversion to
throw this off and lead to something else?”
The Washington Post could not
immediately learn whether the
packages that killed Mason and
House bore any markings, such as
the address on the one that injured Herrera. Police were still
responding to the bomb that
killed Mason when another one
went off at the home Herrera was
visiting, authorities have said.
Herrera remained in critical
condition with life-threatening
injuries Tuesday, Manley said.
Relatives and neighbors said she
had been visiting her mother, Maria Moreno, and often stayed in
her home overnight to help provide care. The significance of the
package left at that home bearing
the wrong address was not immediately clear.
Jesse Barba, 77, a neighbor of
Herrera’s, said he rarely saw Herrera, because “she was always
helping out with her mother.”
“She used to come by and pick
roses from my yard to take to her
mother,” Barba said. “She loved
them so much I gave her a piece of
the bush.”
The site of the blast was still
roped off with police tape on both
ends of Galindo Street on Tuesday,
and police were not letting anyone but residents pass through.
Television trucks and reporters
amassed at the street’s west entrance, where an FBI truck and an
Austin Police Department cruiser
sat.
Community organizers said
they planned an event Friday
night to discuss what has been
happening and potentially talk
about raising money for more
cameras in east Austin.
“People are angry and afraid,”
Fatima Mann, an organizer, said
Tuesday. “I refuse for people to
have to go through life afraid because they don’t know if they’ll be
next. This is an issue that should
have been dealt with when the
first explosion went off.”
eli.rosenberg@washpost.com
mark.berman@washpost.com
matt.zapotosky@washpost.com
Berman and Zapotosky reported from
Washington. Shane Harris in Austin
and Julie Tate in Washington
contributed to this report.
Prosecutors will seek death for Nikolas Cruz, Florida shooting suspect
Attorneys for 19-year-old
charged with killing 17
are seeking life in prison
BY
M ARK B ERMAN
Prosecutors in Broward County,
Fla., said Tuesday they will seek a
death sentence for Nikolas Cruz,
the 19-year-old charged with the
shooting rampage at a Parkland
high school last month.
The announcement came nearly a week after Cruz was indicted
by a grand jury on 34 counts of
premeditated murder and attempted murder in the Feb. 14
massacre, which killed 17 people
and injured the same number.
In a notice filed Tuesday in circuit court, Michael J. Satz, the
Broward state attorney, said the
state intended to seek the death
penalty for Cruz and would prove
that the crime “was especially heinous, atrocious or cruel.”
Satz’s filing included multiple
aggravating factors he said warranted a death sentence, including
that Cruz knowingly created a risk
of death to many people and that
the killings were “a homicide . . .
committed in a cold, calculated,
and premeditated manner.”
Attorneys for Cruz do not contest his guilt and have offered to
have him plead guilty if prosecutors rule out the death penalty and
agree to life in prison.
Howard Finkelstein, the Broward public defender, has said it
would be wrong for Cruz to be
executed when authorities missed
so many red flags and warning
signs before the shooting. Finkelstein said Tuesday that the prosecutor’s announcement was not
unexpected, but he again said that
his team was ready to have Cruz
plead guilty on all counts in ex-
change for 34 consecutive life sentences with no parole.
Cruz’s attorneys had last week
filed court documents withdrawing a plea of not guilty that had
been filed on his behalf, saying
that instead he would stand mute
in response to the charges. While
they continue to acknowledge that
he carried out the rampage, they
cannot plead guilty if Cruz can be
sentenced to death, Finkelstein
said Tuesday.
This decision means that South
Florida is likely see a lengthy prosecution with emotional testimony
about what unfolded inside Marjory Stoneman Douglas High
School. Such a case would be
among the state’s highest-profile
recent prosecutions, and it also
would be a rarity following a mass
shooting — such cases usually do
not end with attackers taken into
custody.
In a comparable case, authorities prosecuted the gunman who
in 2012 opened fire in a movie
theater in Aurora, Colo., killing 12
and wounding dozens more. His
attorneys also offered a plea of
guilty in exchange for a life sentence.
George Brauchler, the district
attorney who led the Aurora prosecution, said that choosing to pur-
sue a death sentence was a difficult choice, one that he said
prompted impassioned arguments from relatives of Aurora
victims who were in favor of seeking death as well as those pushing
for a life sentence. Brauchler eventually opted to seek a death sentence, and the jury convicted gunman James Holmes and sentenced
him to life in prison.
“You get to hear all the facts,”
Brauchler said in an interview
about that trial. “The public gets to
know everything about this guy
that we’ve invested this time and
these resources in.”
mark.berman@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14 , 2018
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THE WASHINGTON POST
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A5
SU
Stone denies advance notice of hacks, contact with Assange
STONE FROM A1
The person, who spoke to The
Washington Post on the condition
of anonymity because of the ongoing federal investigation into
Russian campaign interference, is
one of two Stone associates who
say the adviser claimed to have
had contact with Assange in 2016.
The second, former Trump adviser Sam Nunberg, said in an
interview Monday that Stone told
him that he had met with Assange
— a conversation Nunberg said
investigators for special counsel
Robert S. Mueller III recently
asked him to describe.
Stone’s possible connection to
Assange has been under scrutiny
since the 2016 campaign, when he
made public claims that he was in
contact with the London-based
WikiLeaks founder. Since then,
Stone has emphatically denied
any communication with Assange
or advance knowledge of the document dumps by WikiLeaks, which
embarrassed Clinton allies and
disrupted the 2016 campaign.
WikiLeaks and Assange have also
said they never communicated
with Stone.
Potential
contacts
with
WikiLeaks have been probed by
federal investigators examining
whether allies of President Trump
coordinated with Russians seeking to tilt the 2016 race. The president has repeatedly denied any
collusion with Russia.
Peter Carr, a spokesman for
Mueller’s office, declined to comment.
Stone, a longtime Trump friend,
briefly worked for his presidential
campaign in 2015 and then remained in his orbit as an adviser.
In an interview Monday, he
again denied that he had any advance notice about the hacked
emails or any contact with Assange. He said he only recalled
having one conversation with anyone in which he alluded to meeting the WikiLeaks founder — a
comment he said he made as a joke
to a long-winded Nunberg.
“I wish him no ill will, but Sam
can manically and persistently
call you,” Stone said, recalling that
Nunberg had called him on a Friday to ask about his plans for the
weekend. “I said, ‘I think I will go
to London for the weekend and
meet with Julian Assange.’ It was a
joke, a throwaway line to get him
ANDREW HARNIK/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Roger Stone speaks to reporters in September 2017 after appearing before the House Intelligence Committee. Two of his associates,
including Sam Nunberg, also a former adviser to President Trump, said Stone claimed to have had contact with Julian Assange in 2016.
off the phone. The idea that I
would meet with Assange undetected is ridiculous on its face.’ ’’
Stone said that he does not recall any similar conversation with
anyone else.
“The allegation that I met with
Assange, or asked for a meeting or
communicated with Assange, is
provably false,” he said, adding that
he did not leave the country in 2016.
Through his attorney, Assange
— who has been living in the Ecuadoran Embassy in London since
2012 — told The Post in January
that he did not meet Stone in
spring 2016. His attorney was unable to reach Assange on Monday
evening for further comment.
WikiLeaks has denied any contact with the longtime Trump adviser.
“WikiLeaks & Assange have repeatedly confirmed that they have
never communicated with Stone,”
the organization tweeted in
March 2017.
Nunberg told The Post that the
questions he was asked by Mueller’s investigators indicated to him
that the special counsel is examining statements Stone has made
publicly about WikiLeaks.
“Of course they have to investigate this,” he said. “Roger made
statements that could be problematic.”
He said he did not recall the
exact date when Stone told him
that he had met with Assange,
adding that he did not take the
comment as a joke at the time. He
said he was glad to hear Stone told
The Post that the remark was
made in jest.
“No one connected to the president should be connected with
Julian Assange,” he added.
WikiLeaks has come under intense scrutiny from U.S. officials
for its distribution of hacked materials. Last year, CIA Director
Mike Pompeo said it was “time to
call out WikiLeaks for what it really is: a nonstate, hostile intelligence service often abetted by
state actors, like Russia.”
During the 2016 race, the organization released hacked Democratic emails at two key junctures: A cache of DNC emails landed on the eve of the party’s national nomination convention and a
collection of Podesta emails appeared on the same day in October
that The Post revealed a tape of
Trump speaking about women in
lewd terms.
Stone publicly cheered on
WikiLeaks during the race, at one
point referring to Assange as “my
hero.”
On Aug. 8, 2016, in an appearance at the Southwest Broward
Republican Organization in Flori-
da, Stone answered a question
about what he suspected would be
the campaign’s October surprise
by saying: “I actually have communicated with Assange. I believe
the next tranche of his documents
pertain to the Clinton Foundation,
but there’s no telling what the
October surprise may be.”
He later said he had not meant
that he had communicated with
Assange directly.
On Aug. 21, Stone tweeted that
something grim was looming for
Podesta.
“Trust me, it will soon [be] the
Podesta’s time in the barrel.
#CrookedHillary,” he tweeted.
On Oct. 3, he tweeted: “I have
total confidence that @wikileaks
and my hero Julian Assange will
educate the American people soon
#LockHerUp.”
“Payload
coming.
#Lockthemup,” Stone tweeted on Oct. 5.
Two days later, WikiLeaks published a cache of Podesta’s hacked
emails describing internal conflicts within the Clinton Foundation and excerpts of Clinton’s
speeches to Wall Street executives.
The release came shortly after
The Post revealed the existence of
an “Access Hollywood” tape in
which Trump described grabbing
women by the genitals.
Stone also exchanged private
Twitter messages with WikiLeaks
that month. In one Oct. 13 exchange, he described himself as a
defender of the organization and
objected to its “strategy of attacking me,” the Atlantic reported this
year. WikiLeaks replied to Stone in
a private message that “false
claims of association” were being
used by Democrats to undermine
the group.
Stone answered: “You need to
figure out who your friends are.”
Assange and Stone said that the
messages prove he did not have
any advance knowledge of
WikiLeaks’ plans.
“A message telling Roger Stone
to cease falsely suggesting contact
with WikiLeaks is now the claimed
proof that Roger Stone had contact
with WikiLeaks — when it proves
what I’ve said all along,” Assange
tweeted last month.
In a September 2017 appearance before the House Intelligence Committee, Stone also vigorously denied he had any foreknowledge of what WikiLeaks
would publish or of the hacking of
Podesta’s emails.
Stone told the committee that
his Aug. 21 tweet was meant as a
prediction that Podesta’s business
activities would come under scrutiny after Paul Manafort was
forced to resign from the Trump
campaign amid allegations about
his work for a pro-Russian party in
Ukraine.
Stone acknowledged that some
may label him a “dirty trickster,”
but he said he does not engage in
illegal activities.
“There is one ‘trick’ that is not in
my bag,” he told the committee,
“and that is treason.”
tom.hamburger@washpost.com
josh.dawsey@washpost.com
carol.leonnig@washpost.com
shane.harris@washpost.com
Rosalind S. Helderman, Ellen
Nakashima and Julie Tate contributed
to this report.
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A6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14 , 2018
Trump’s dumping of Tillerson ends 14 months of tensions
TILLERSON FROM A1
sued just minutes after The Washington Post first reported the news.
“Thank you to Rex Tillerson for
his service!” Trump tweeted, in a
message that began with congratulations for CIA Director Mike
Pompeo, Trump’s pick to become
secretary of state. The president
also nominated Gina Haspel to lead
the CIA, making her the first woman to run the spy agency, if confirmed. Both she and Pompeo are
subject to Senate confirmation.
More than three hours after his
tweet, Trump finally called Tillerson from Air Force One. The call
was brief and cordial, according to
people with knowledge of it, and
Trump decided to make it to try to
defuse more tensions. Trump reiterated that Tillerson would be happier outside the department, and
the secretary of state was diplomatic, a senior White House official
said.
For Tillerson, it was a humiliating end to a 14-month relationship
defined by mutual animosity and
frustration. In his departure statement Tuesday afternoon, Tillerson
thanked career diplomats for their
“honesty and integrity” and the
American people for “acts of kindness” — but pointedly did not thank
Trump or praise his leadership.
Tillerson’s firing was long-anticipated, yet the way it played out
stunned official Washington and
was classic Trump. The man who
made his name by declaring “You’re
fired!” on reality television is loath
to actually fire people in person,
outsourcing Tillerson’s dismissal to
Twitter.
Officials at the White House and
the State Department, who have
been at loggerheads since the beginning of the administration, offered conflicting accounts of just
how the departure occurred. And
the chaotic aftermath led to collateral damage — this time in the form
of Steve Goldstein, the undersecretary of state for public diplomacy
and public affairs, who was swiftly
fired for contradicting the White
House’s version of events.
But Tillerson perhaps should not
have been surprised by his ouster,
which has been so long in the making that recurring rumors of his
demise took on a nickname: Rexit.
“Rex and I have been talking
about this for a long time,” Trump
told reporters Tuesday morning. “I
actually got along well with Rex,
but really it was a different mindset, a different thinking.”
Trump and Tillerson have disagreed over strategy in key areas of
foreign policy, such as the 2015 Iran
nuclear deal, how to handle China
and the Middle East, the Paris climate accord, the approach to North
Korea, and the overall tone of U.S.
diplomacy. The president was disdainful of his secretary of state for
being “too establishment” in his
thinking and for disagreeing with
him in meetings.
In a sign of the tension, Trump
made one of his biggest foreign
policy gambles without so much as
consulting his secretary of state.
The president decided Thursday to
ANDREW HARNIK/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson speaks Tuesday at the State Department in Washington. The top diplomat learned of his firing Tuesday
from a tweet by President Trump, with whom he has often been at loggerheads. The president did not call Tillerson until three hours later.
accept North Korean leader Kim
Jong Un’s invitation for a face-toface meeting, but Tillerson was
traveling in Africa and was frustrated to have been excluded from the
internal deliberations, administration officials said. He clashed with
White House aides Friday over
North Korea, and word got back to
the president, fueling his decision
to pull the trigger on his firing.
Tillerson had long expressed interest in a diplomatic solution to
the nuclear standoff with North
Korea, but Trump until recently
had largely dismissed such talks as
a waste of time and opted instead
for a campaign of “maximum pressure” that included bellicose rhetoric from the president.
In the fall, Trump publicly undermined Tillerson after the secretary said he was reaching out to
Pyongyang to try to open a diplomatic channel. In a pair of tweets,
Trump wrote that Tillerson was
“wasting his time trying to negotiate with Little Rocket Man . . . Save
your energy Rex.”
Yet last week, when Trump shifted strategy to meet with Kim, Tillerson was left out of the loop. If
that angered Tillerson, it pleased
Trump, who boasted to advisers
that he enjoyed the process more
without Tillerson involved, officials
said.
Tillerson initially was regarded
by some as too cozy to Russian
President Vladimir Putin, whom he
knew from his days as an oil executive, but over time he developed a
more hard-line posture toward
Moscow than Trump.
On Monday, flying home from
Nigeria, Tillerson appeared to
break with the White House in his
assessment of the poisoning of a
former Russian spy and his daughter in Britain. He singled out Russia
as responsible for the attack, echoing the finger-pointing of the British government — something
White House press secretary Sarah
Huckabee Sanders declined to do
earlier that day.
And the deposed Tillerson made
a clear statement about Russian
aggression in his departure remarks Tuesday. “Much work remains to respond to the troubling
behavior and actions on the part of
the Russian government,” he said.
Trump for months has stewed
over what he perceived as Tillerson’s arrogance and condescension
— a grievance exacerbated by an
NBC News report, which Tillerson
did not directly deny, that he had
referred to Trump as a “moron”
following a strategy meeting at the
Pentagon.
“They fought all the time,” said
one Trump adviser, who like others
interviewed for this story spoke on
the condition of anonymity to candidly describe the relationship.
By contrast, Trump has enjoyed
a far warmer relationship with
Pompeo, who got to know the president by personally delivering his
intelligence briefings. The two men
have chemistry, though critics of
Pompeo say he is too obeisant
toward Trump.
The president had seriously entertained the idea of firing Tillerson
numerous times over the past year
— including in November, when
the White House readied a plan to
replace him with Pompeo. But
Trump ultimately held off on removing his top diplomat in part,
according to one adviser, because
he wanted to defy the news reports
saying that he planned to do so.
“FAKE NEWS!” Trump tweeted regarding those reports.
The president revived speculation in recent days about firing
Tillerson, and his eldest son, Donald Trump Jr., began telling friends
Friday that he expected his father to
oust the secretary after the weekend, according to someone familiar
with the conversations.
Trump initially was drawn to
Tillerson because of his stature as
chief executive of ExxonMobil, one
of the world’s largest companies,
and his work as a global dealmaker.
He told friends that the broadshouldered, silver-haired Tillerson
could be a diplomat out of central
casting.
Yet Trump quickly soured on Tillerson and made no secret of his
dislike. He mocked his mannerisms and Texas drawl, saying his
secretary of state talked too slowly.
In conversations with advisers and
friends, the president would often
list others he said would do a better
job than Tillerson, whom he frequently labeled “weak.”
One source of weakness, the
president felt, was Tillerson’s media profile. Trump told one adviser
he was “amazed” at how much negative press Tillerson received. “This
guy never gets a good story about
him,” Trump said, according to this
adviser.
Tillerson isolated himself from
the thousands of career diplomats
working for the State Department;
maintained a distant and at times
frosty relationship with his press
corps for most of his tenure; and
struggled to gain stature on the
world stage, as many diplomats
and foreign leaders correctly concluded that the secretary did not
speak for the president.
Inside the White House, Tillerson had few allies. He was routinely
undermined by Jared Kushner,
Trump’s son-in-law and a senior
White House adviser who took
charge of the Middle East and Mexico diplomatic portfolios. Tillerson
resented appearing subservient to
the 37-year-old, who had no foreign
policy experience. He sometimes
took days to return Kushner’s
phone calls and griped that he felt
the White House was keeping the
State Department out of the loop.
Tillerson also clashed frequently
with national security adviser H.R.
McMaster, who he thought did not
always follow protocol, and U.S.
Ambassador to the United Nations
Nikki Haley, whom he viewed as an
internal rival, according to administration officials.
State Department officials took
notice — and were chagrined —
that Pompeo did not cite Tillerson
when he appeared on television
shows Sunday to explain the North
Korea developments.
Tillerson frequently complained
to colleagues that Trump was too
mercurial and impulsive, and
voiced frustration that the president struggled to focus during meandering conversation. For example, Tillerson complained that he
had to make a trip to the Middle
East to clean up a diplomatic mess
after Trump posted negative tweets
about Qatar. But he was determined to stay in his job. Tillerson’s
stance, according to one official
who has discussed these concerns
with him, was: “If he wants me
gone, he’ll fire me.”
Tillerson also was put off by
Trump’s vulgarity. An Eagle Scout
and former national president of
the Boy Scouts of America, Tillerson told confidants he was appalled
by Trump’s freewheeling political
speech at the National Scout Jamboree in West Virginia over the
summer.
White House staffers, meanwhile, were particularly unhappy
with Margaret Peterlin, Tillerson’s
chief of staff, who kept tight control
of the secretary’s schedule and
sparred with other administration
officials. Peterlin, along with her
deputy, resigned Tuesday, a State
Department official said.
The gulf between the White
House and Foggy Bottom was apparent Tuesday morning, as officials in both buildings offered conflicting accounts of Tillerson’s removal.
White House officials said that
Kelly’s call to Tillerson last week
was a clear message that Trump
believed it was time for the secretary to leave his post, and suggested
he return to Washington as soon as
possible.
Tillerson cut his trip short by a
day, departing Monday. But Goldstein said Tuesday morning that
the secretary had intended to stay
on the job for some time to come
and was “unaware of the reason”
for his firing. He added that Kelly
told Tillerson only that “he could
expect a tweet” from the president
but that the chief of staff did not
convey that the decision to fire him
was final.
“He found out that he was terminated today,” Goldstein said.
Goldstein was soon fired himself
— just before he was scheduled to
brief reporters about the shake-up
at Foggy Bottom — for having publicly contradicted the White House
account.
West Wing officials had accused
him in recent weeks of privately
criticizing White House decisions
to reporters. Asked Tuesday about
the accusation, Goldstein said: “I
spoke for the secretary of state.
That was part of my role as the
undersecretary.”
On Monday night, as news of
Tillerson’s likely departure began
to leak, State Department officials
dismissed the chatter as simply not
true. But the secretary may have
had at least a subconscious inkling
that all was not well back in Washington.
“I felt like, look, I just need to get
back,” Tillerson told reporters
aboard his flight home. “I just felt
like I need to get back.”
ashley.parker@washpost.com
philip.rucker@washpost.com
josh.dawsey@washpost.com
carol.leonnig@washpost.com
Robert Costa, Anne Gearan, John
Hudson and Greg Jaffe contributed to
this report.
Tillerson, appearing to hit his stride at State, was surprised to get tossed
Former corporate
executive had denied
rumors he would quit
BY A NNE G EARAN
AND C AROL M ORELLO
Rex Tillerson spent a tumultuous year at the helm of the State
Department, frequently undercut
by the president he disagreed
with on key foreign policy issues
and derided by many of his employees who blamed him for marginalizing their role and diplomacy itself.
But after months of denying he
intended to resign, Tillerson was
ousted Tuesday just as he seemed
to be hitting his diplomatic stride.
In recent weeks, he grew even
more outspoken in criticizing
Russia, more confident that his
patient pressure on North Korea
was bearing fruit and more comfortable that he would outlast his
many critics in the West Wing.
In the end, no one was more
surprised that Tillerson was fired
than Tillerson himself. As recently as Monday night, while he was
flying back from a week-long trip
to Africa, an aide said Tillerson
was staying put.
In a statement from a top aide
about five hours after his plane
landed at Joint Base Andrews
about 4 a.m., Tillerson made clear
that the gulf between the methodical former corporate executive
and the mercurial president was
as wide as ever.
“The secretary did not speak to
the president, and is unaware of
the reason,” said Steve Goldstein,
the undersecretary of public di-
plomacy who was himself quickly
fired for contradicting the White
House.
Clearly shaken, his voice thin,
Tillerson appeared at a State Department podium shortly after
2 p.m. to read a statement thanking colleagues and tying up some
administrative details.
He thanked the American people “for your devotion to a free
and open society; to acts of kindness toward one another; to honesty and the quiet hard work that
you do every day.”
He did not thank President
Trump individually, or even mention him beyond saying that
Trump had called him two hours
before.
Tillerson’s firing caps a rough
couple of weeks. His father died
Feb. 25. Two days after returning
to Washington from the funeral,
he departed on his trip to Africa,
where he was sidelined for a day
by illness.
His departure followed months
of disagreements with the White
House over staffing and administrative matters at the State Department. But what may have
done him in was a fatal disconnect over what Trump saw as
Tillerson’s conventional approach to policy matters.
In picking Rex Wayne Tillerson
to head the State Department,
Trump told associates he wanted
a secretary of state who looked the
part. He liked Tillerson’s cameraready image and acerbic Texas
drawl, real as barbed wire from a
man who was named after two
1950s Western movie stars, Rex
Allen and John Wayne. He also
liked Tillerson’s résumé as chairman and chief executive of ExxonMobil.
But the two men, who did not
MARK SCHIEFELBEIN/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson’s plane arrives in Beijing in March
2017. Tillerson has no singular foreign policy cause to his credit but
had worked to open the door to talks with North Korea.
know one another before Trump’s
election, never clicked. For Tillerson, despite weekly lunches and
frequent phone calls, Trump remained unpredictable and sometimes inscrutable. For Trump, Tillerson embodied “establishment”
naysayers.
Tillerson has no singular foreign policy cause or achievement
to his credit, but he had worked to
open the door to talks with North
Korea. Although Trump dismissively said last year that Tillerson
was wasting his time trying to
reach out to “Little Rocket Man,”
as he dubbed North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, the summit that
Trump agreed to last week is partly born of Tillerson’s efforts.
Further undercutting Tillerson, several major foreign policy
endeavors, such as Israeli-Palestinian peace talks, were taken
away from the State Department
and handed to Trump adviser and
son-in-law Jared Kushner.
A part of Tillerson’s legacy is
pushback on Trump policies that
Tillerson considered unwise, battles he did not often win. He
advised Trump to keep the United
States in the Paris climate agreement and the 2015 Iran nuclear
deal, which Trump has threatened to renounce this spring.
Tillerson also opposed the unilateral decision to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital and move
the embassy there. Although he
signed documents last week authorizing the renovation of a consulate, a relatively modest step
that theoretically could be reversed in the future, he made
clear that security — not politics
— was his first concern.
There was an element of anticlimax to Tillerson’s exit. Much of
his tenure was dogged by rumors
that he was fed up and ready to
quit, or about to be pushed out.
The rumors were persistent
enough to spawn the word
“Rexit.”
Tillerson consistently and wearily denied it. In January, he told
CNN he would still be around at
the end of 2018.
His exit leaves Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, national security
adviser H.R. McMaster, White
House Chief of Staff John F. Kelly
and CIA Director Mike Pompeo as
the most prominent foreign policy voices apart from Kushner.
Trump said Tuesday that with
his nomination of Pompeo to become secretary of state, he will be
“getting close” to the Cabinet he
wants and that he hopes to have
the changes in place before his
summit with Kim Jong Un.
Tillerson emerged as one of the
administration’s strongest voices
critical of Russia.
On Monday, Tillerson told reporters traveling with him that he
was “very, very concerned” with
Russia’s growing aggression. In
his farewell address Tuesday, he
warned that Russia is headed
toward greater international isolation, “a situation which is not in
anyone’s interests.”
Tillerson was fired just two
months before Trump must decide whether to reimpose nuclear-related sanctions on Iran as he
has said he is inclined to do,
effectively withdrawing from the
multilateral agreement. Tillerson’s departure suggests that
Trump is already out the door on
the Iran nuclear deal.
“The biggest problem for Secretary Tillerson is that the president
has not been supportive of him at
key junctures,” said R. Nicholas
Burns, a former top diplomat.
“President Trump, frankly,
didn’t give him the public support
he needed to be a success,” Burns
said.
Nor did Tillerson have broad
support within the State Department. Dozens of senior officials
have retired or been edged out
since Tillerson took over, leaving
many employees feeling demoralized and adrift.
Tillerson and his small circle of
aides often found themselves at
odds with Trump aides.
Tillerson had launched a management overhaul at the State
Department that is projected to
take years, to the annoyance of
some senior White House officials
eager to dispense political patronage jobs.
Tillerson, in turn, was annoyed
at the layers of bureaucracy and
what he saw as continued chaos
and ineptitude months into the
new administration, people familiar with his thinking said.
Tillerson also complained to
friends about competing power
centers and a culture of backstabbing that is very different from the
top-down corporate culture he
left. That same corporate experience gave Tillerson a background
in the sensitivities and demands
of a large and diverse workforce,
and appeared to inform his disagreement with Trump over last
year’s white supremacist rallies in
Charlottesville.
After Trump asserted that
“many sides” were to blame for
the violence, Tillerson pointedly
remarked, “We do not honor, nor
do we promote or accept, hate
speech in any form.”
anne.gearan@washpost.com
carol.morello@washpost.com
Dan Balz contributed to this report.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A7
RE
BUY 2 WINDOWS
MANDEL NGAN/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
President Trump holds before and after photos of a border area at an inspection of wall prototypes in
California. “He’s running the White House like the Trump Organization,” said one person close to the
president, describing him as increasingly at the center of command in White House decision-making.
Impulsive moves on Tillerson, trade,
N. Korea alarm Trump’s critics, staff
TRUMP FROM A1
less restrained about acting on
his whims amid the recent departures of several longtime
aides, including communications director Hope Hicks and
staff secretary Rob Porter. Late
Monday, Trump’s personal assistant John McEntee, who had
served from the earliest days of
his campaign, was fired after
losing his security clearance, further depleting the ranks of those
the president feels he can trust.
White House allies in Washington suggested that Trump has
been liberated to manage his
administration as he did his
private business, making decisions that feel good in the moment because he believes in his
ability to win — regardless of
whether those decisions are
backed by rigorous analysis or
supported by top advisers.
This, they said, is the real
Trump — freewheeling by nature, decisive in the moment,
unafraid to chart his own course.
“He’s running the White
House like the Trump Organization,” said one person close to the
president, describing Trump as
increasingly at the center of
command in White House decision-making and checking in on
the status of projects by the hour.
While Chief of Staff John F. Kelly
is running operations, the ally
said Trump is taking a more
hands-on approach in areas including political messaging and
strategy and the management of
the Cabinet.
Other people who have
worked with Trump said his
recent moves are an indication
that he is concerned with the
state of his presidency.
“When he’s under pressure is
when he tends to do this impulsive stuff,” said Jack O’Donnell,
former president of the Trump
Plaza Hotel and Casino in Atlantic City. “That’s what I saw in the
business. When he began to have
pressure with debts, when the
[Taj Mahal casino in Atlantic
City] was underperforming, is
when he began acting very erratically.”
O’Donnell pointed to the increasing pressure on Trump with
the Russia investigation by special counsel Robert S. Mueller III
and the scandal surrounding
Trump’s alleged affair with a
pornographic film star. “I think
he likes the vision of himself
being in control,” O’Donnell said.
“I doubt he realizes the consequences of North Korea, just like
he didn’t realize the consequences in business of walking in and
firing someone at the Taj without
thinking about it. It’s Trump.”
Critics warned that Trump
was overseeing a massive consolidation of groupthink within the
West Wing, driving out top advisers who have challenged him on
national security and economic
decisions and elevating those
who confirm his protectionist
leanings — a signal, perhaps, to
Cabinet members that they must
fall in line or be the next to go.
The National Economic Council director, Gary Cohn, resigned
in protest over the tariffs decision. Tillerson, who had crossed
Trump on the Iran deal and was
more critical of Russian misbehavior than the White House has
been, was summarily fired in a
presidential tweet hours after
returning from a week-long trip
to Africa.
Attention is now focused on
the fate of national security adviser H.R. McMaster, who has
had a rocky relationship with the
president and has battled an
internal power struggle for
months.
Eliot Cohen, who served as a
State Department counselor in
the George W. Bush administration, said Tillerson was the worst
secretary of state in recent memory. But Cohen, who led one of
the two “never Trump” letters
signed by dozens of national
security experts during the campaign, said Trump’s intent to
nominate CIA Director Mike
Pompeo to replace Tillerson will
lead to even less internal debate.
Tillerson had dismissed the
idea of direct talks with North
Korea just days before Trump
announced a summit with Kim
Jong Un. By contrast, Pompeo on
Sunday lavished praise on
Trump’s strategy with Pyongyang.
“We have a very similar
thought process,” Trump said of
the CIA chief.
“This means conversations
will be more of a never-never
land than they already are,” Cohen said. “You will hear nothing
faintly resembling candid disagreements.”
The departures of Cohn and
Tillerson, in particular, also represent a move by Trump toward
his more nationalistic instincts.
Both men came to the White
House after successful careers as
top executives at international
corporations — Tillerson at
ExxonMobil and Cohn at Goldman Sachs.
They defended such things as
climate change treaties and
trade deals — positions that led
far-right critics, such as former
White House chief strategist Stephen K. Bannon, to deride them
as “globalists” — and now that
viewpoint will be far less represented in Trump’s administration.
Last week, Trump said he liked
having divergent viewpoints
within the White House. But at
Cabinet meetings, Trump has
allowed reporters in to witness a
display of unusual obsequiousness. In December, for example,
Vice President Pence commended Trump once every 12 seconds
for three minutes.
“If you are going to work for
the president, you fight it out,
and if you lose, you don’t go
behind the president’s back and
attack it, you defend the policy,”
said Stephen Moore, an economic adviser to Trump during
the 2016 campaign. “If you can’t
do that, you shouldn’t have taken
the job in the first place.”
But there are signs that aides
have fewer chances to fight for
their positions.
On Thursday, Trump decided
on the spot during a 45-minute
meeting with South Korean officials in the Oval Office that he
would accept an invitation from
Kim to meet for talks — stunning
senior aides, including Mattis
and McMaster, who warned
about moving too quickly.
Jon Wolfsthal, who served as
senior director for arms control
and nonproliferation at the National Security Council under
President Barack Obama, said
most presidents would have convened an interagency meeting
with the relevant federal agencies before making such a momentous decision.
“A president could hear from
his Cabinet about whether it was
worth the risk and, if it was
worth the risk, how they would
make the announcement, who to
inform first,” Wolfsthal said.
Trump asked his South Korean
interlocutors to announce the
news in the West Wing driveway
as he hastily tried to reach the
leaders of Japan and China. Tillerson, who was traveling in
Africa, was represented at the
Oval Office meeting by a deputy.
One of the top candidates to
replace Cohn, Larry Kudlow, a
conservative television commentator who served in the Reagan
administration, had previously
spoken out against Trump’s tariff
plan. But Trump on Tuesday said
Kudlow “now has come around
to believing in tariffs as a negotiating point.”
Trump also met recently with
former United Nations ambassador John Bolton, who is viewed
as more hawkish on Iran than
McMaster or Tillerson.
The turmoil has unsettled U.S.
allies and rivals across the globe.
“I think the Chinese are reeling from this presidency,” said
Bonnie Glaser, a China expert at
the Center for Strategic and
International Studies.
She noted that Beijing has
sought to develop ties to both
Tillerson and Trump senior adviser Jared Kushner, who has lost
standing amid questions about
his inability to gain a security
clearance and financial debts
tied to his family’s real estate
business.
“The Chinese ambassador has
been going around quietly seeing
very senior former officials and
asking them who to talk to,”
Glaser said. “How can they influence this administration? Every
day is a new surprise for them.”
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david.nakamura@washpost.com
damian.paletta@washpost.com
Robert Costa contributed to this
report.
“I think he likes the vision of himself being in control.
I doubt he realizes the consequences of North Korea,
just like he didn’t realize the consequences in business
of walking in and firing someone at the Taj
without thinking about it. It’s Trump.”
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
Trump’s CIA director pick tied to brutal interrogations
Gina Haspel, who would
be first female leader,
led ‘black site’ prison
BY G REG M ILLER
AND S HANE H ARRIS
President Trump on Tuesday
chose CIA veteran Gina Haspel to
be the spy agency’s next director,
picking a woman who spent multiple tours overseas and is respected by the workforce but is
deeply tied to the agency’s use of
brutal interrogation measures on
terrorism suspects.
Haspel, 61, would become the
first woman to lead the CIA if she
is confirmed to succeed outgoing
director Mike Pompeo, who has
been picked to serve as secretary
of state. Haspel’s selection faced
immediate opposition from some
lawmakers and human rights
groups because of her prominent
role in one of the agency’s darkest
chapters.
Haspel was in charge of one of
the CIA’s “black site” prisons
where detainees were subjected
to waterboarding and other harrowing interrogation measures
widely condemned as torture.
When those methods were exposed and their legality came
under scrutiny, Haspel was
among a group of CIA officials
involved in the decision to destroy videotapes of interrogation
sessions that left some detainees
on the brink of physical collapse.
Trump announced the move
on Twitter on Tuesday, saying that
Pompeo would move to the State
Department and that Haspel
would “become the new Director
of the CIA, and the first woman so
chosen. Congratulations to all!”
Jameel Jaffer, formerly deputy
legal director of the ACLU, said
Tuesday on his Twitter feed that
Haspel is “quite literally a war
criminal.”
But Sen. Richard Burr (R-N.C.),
chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, signaled his
support for Haspel. “I know Gina
personally, and she has the right
skill set, experience and judgment to lead one of our nation’s
most critical agencies,” he said.
“I’m proud of her work and know
that my committee will continue
its positive relationship with the
Central Intelligence Agency under her leadership. I look forward
to supporting her nomination,
ensuring its consideration without delay.”
Haspel spent much of her 33year CIA career in undercover
assignments overseas and at CIA
headquarters, including serving
as the agency’s top representative
in London and as the acting head
of its clandestine service in 2013.
Current and former U.S. intelligence officials who have worked
with Haspel praised her as an
effective leader who could be
expected to stand up to the pressures that Trump has often
placed on spy agencies — including his denunciations of the intelligence community’s conclusion
that Russia interfered in the 2016
election.
Officials described Haspel as a
consummate “insider” and said
CIA employees would greet her
appointment with some relief,
because an intelligence veteran
would be back in charge.
“The building will love the fact
that she’s an insider,” said Mark
Lowenthal, a former senior CIA
officer.
At the same time, former officials cautioned that Haspel will
face the challenge of working for
a president who rarely reads his
intelligence briefings, lashes out
publicly at his national security
team and rejects findings that
don’t comport to his views.
Former director of national
intelligence James R. Clapper Jr.
endorsed the selection of Haspel
but warned that she may be
forced at times to choose between
protecting the integrity of the
agency and pleasing Trump.
“I think Gina will be excellent
as director, as long as she is ready
to be fired at a moment’s notice,”
Clapper said in remarks posted to
CIA
Gina Haspel was nominated to
succeed Mike Pompeo.
the Cipher Brief news site.
Career CIA officers have seen
Pompeo as one of the most overtly political directors in the agency’s history and a staunch public
defender of the president.
Pompeo repeatedly played down
Russia’s interference in the U.S.
election, saying in a television
“The building will love
the fact that she’s an
insider.”
Mark Lowenthal,
a former senior CIA officer
interview Sunday that Moscow
had merely “attempted” to do so.
Haspel, by contrast, has almost
no public profile. But she is a
visible presence inside CIA headquarters, running day-to-day operations while Pompeo handled
the public-facing aspects of the
job, making speeches and media
appearances and meeting with
the president.
“This is not someone who has
sharp elbows, but she is a sharp
competitor,” said a former senior
intelligence official, who insisted
on anonymity to discuss Haspel.
Pompeo had a strong rapport
with the president, a quality that
always makes a director valuable
to the rank-and-file. But it is not
clear that Haspel has the same
close relationship with Trump.
“She does bring continuity after Pompeo,” said the former senior intelligence official, noting
the two were in accord on
strengthening the agency’s counterterrorism operations. “The
question is, how much juice does
she have in the White House?”
Her extensive involvement in a
covert program that used harrowing interrogation measures
on al-Qaeda suspects resurfaced
last year when she was named
deputy director of the CIA after
Trump had signaled as a presidential candidate that he would
consider reestablishing agency
prisons and resuming interrogation methods that President Barack Obama had banned. Trump
never followed through on that
plan, which was opposed by senior members of his administration including Defense Secretary
Jim Mattis.
Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.),
who was tortured while imprisoned in Vietnam, said Haspel’s
Senate confirmation should be
conditioned on securing a pledge
to block any plan to reintroduce
harsh interrogations. “Ms. Haspel
needs to explain the nature and
extent of her involvement in the
CIA’s interrogation program,”
McCain said.
Haspel ran one of the first CIA
black sites, a compound in Thailand code-named “Cat’s Eye,”
where al-Qaeda suspects Zayn
al-Abidin Muhammed Hussein,
better known as Abu Zubaida,
and Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri
were subjected to waterboarding
and other techniques in 2002.
An exhaustive Senate report on
the program described the frightening toll inflicted. At one point,
the report said, Zubaida was left
“completely unresponsive, with
bubbles rising through his open,
full mouth.”
Internal CIA memos cited in a
Senate report on the agency’s
interrogation program described
agency officials who witnessed
the treatment as distraught and
concerned about its legality. “Several on the team [were] profoundly affected,” one agency employee wrote, “. . . some to the
point of tears and choking up.”
Haspel later served as chief of
staff to the head of the agency’s
Counterterrorism Center, Jose
Rodriguez, when he ordered the
destruction of dozens of videotapes made at the Thailand site.
Rodriguez wrote in his memoir
that Haspel “drafted a cable”
ordering the tapes’ destruction in
2005 as the program came under
mounting public scrutiny and
that he then “took a deep breath
of weary satisfaction and
hit Send.”
The Justice Department spent
several years investigating alleged abuses in the interrogation
program and the destruction of
the tapes, but no charges were
ever filed.
When she was named deputy
CIA director last year, the agency
took the unusual step of soliciting
testimonials from seven former
top intelligence and congressional officials. Their statements
of support were included in the
agency’s release. Former CIA director Michael Hayden described
Haspel as “a trusted friend, lieutenant and guide to the sometimes opaque corridors of American espionage.”
Some believe she had been
unfairly penalized for her role in
counterterrorism operations that
were launched after the 9/11
attacks and carried out with the
legal approval of the Justice
Department.
Haspel was passed over in 2013
for a permanent assignment as
head of the CIA’s clandestine
service, although agency officials
said the decision was not driven
by her connection to the prisons
controversy.
greg.miller@washpost.com
shane.harris@washpost.com
Julie Tate contributed to this report.
In contrast to Tillerson, Pompeo thinks like the president
POMPEO FROM A1
quently derided the rumors as
“fake news,” Trump said Tuesday
that he had been considering
replacing Tillerson for “a long
time.”
But the reality of the move, and
the suddenness with which it was
done — with Tillerson returning
early from a trip to Africa, only to
learn via a Trump tweet early
Tuesday that he had been fired —
startled and confused allies
around the globe and many
throughout the government.
In an afternoon appearance
before reporters at the State Department, Tillerson’s voice quavered as he vowed to ensure an
“orderly and smooth transition”
before his formal departure on
March 31. He expressed no gratitude or good wishes to Trump,
thanked his staff, and commended the strong commitment to
diplomacy of Defense Secretary
Jim Mattis, who has often served
as his ally in battles with the
White House.
Tillerson spoke of the importance of “allies and partners” in
promoting global security, and he
thanked the American people for
their “devotion to a free and open
society, to acts of kindness towards one another, to honesty.”
Pompeo, whose once-active
Twitter account has lain dormant
since he was nominated as CIA
chief 14 months ago, said in a
statement that he was “deeply
grateful” to Trump and that he
looked “forward to representing
him and the American people to
the rest of the world to further
America’s prosperity.”
Trump also named CIA Deputy
Director Gina Haspel to succeed
Pompeo as the agency’s director.
She would become the first woman to run the spy agency and
could come under scrutiny during the Senate confirmation process over her past role in running
one of the CIA’s “black site” prisons, where detainees were subjected to interrogation methods
widely denounced as torture.
Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Bob Corker (RTenn.) said he expected to hold a
confirmation hearing for Pompeo
in April. The closely divided
chamber has stalled on confirming dozens of Trump nominees.
Reaction to the fast-moving
events varied widely. Thomas
Countryman, one of a number of
career diplomats dismissed by
Tillerson early in the administration as he gutted staff and supported Trump’s massive budget
cuts, called him “a poor advocate
for the State Department.”
But Tillerson, he said, “served
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
CIA Director Mike Pompeo has voiced support for President Trump’s positions on the Iran nuclear deal
and other issues. Outgoing Secretary of State Rex Tillerson often clashed with Trump on such matters.
as a Cabinet-level check on some
of President Trump’s worst impulses, such as wanting to ‘break’
the Iran nuclear agreement. . . . If
the new secretary of state has a
disdain for diplomacy mirroring
Trump’s, it will be bad for the
department and the country.”
Sen. Lindsey O. Graham
(R-S.C.), by contrast, said he “cannot think of a better choice” than
Pompeo.
“No one understands the
threat posed by North Korea and
Iran better than he does,” Graham
said in a statement, and “no one
has a stronger relationship with
President Trump.”
Pompeo, assuming that the
Senate confirms him in time, will
face a confluence of foreign policy
decisions and potential national
security crises this spring that
would challenge even the most
experienced diplomats.
A meeting between Trump and
North Korea’s Kim Jong Un, tentatively to be held before the end
of May, will bring two volatile
leaders face to face with the
highest stakes imaginable.
In mid-May, Trump has said, he
will decide whether to end U.S.
participation in the Iran nuclear
deal, a determination that could
profoundly change the United
States’ relationships with its closest European allies and throw
down a gauntlet before Tehran.
Even before those events,
Trump is due to host, beginning
Monday, in rapid succession, the
leaders of Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Qatar for
complicated talks on Iran, Syria
and the Israeli-Palestinian peace
process.
Depending on how those bilateral talks go, the administration
is hoping to bring the Persian
Gulf leaders together for a May
summit in Washington to broker
an end to a regional dispute
among them that has hobbled
U.S. policy across the Middle
East.
Tillerson has been deeply involved in all of those issues while
operating with a skeleton staff
that is expected to dwindle even
more with his departure. On
these and other challenges —
including Russia — he has often
been publicly at odds with
Trump’s impulsive approach to
foreign policy, counseling more
traditional diplomacy rather
than dependence on gut instinct.
Pompeo is likely to be more
amenable to Trump’s way of doing business. As a congressman
from Kansas and a tea party
leader, he sharply opposed the
Iran nuclear deal, tweeting just
before his CIA nomination his
determination to “roll back” the
agreement.
Tillerson openly acknowledged the strong disagreement
between himself and the president over Iran in early August,
telling reporters that “he and I
have differences of views on
things like JCPOA and how we
should use it,” using an acronym
for the deal, which is officially
called the Joint Comprehensive
Plan of Action.
As CIA director, Pompeo has
followed Trump’s lead in falsely
insisting that the intelligence
community concluded that Russia’s interference had not influenced the result of the 2016 presidential election. He has congratulated Trump on his boldness in
agreeing to meet with North Korea’s Kim, a leader who Pompeo
last year suggested was a good
candidate for U.S.-authored regime change.
Tillerson had led the charge for
international backing for harsh
sanctions against North Korea,
but he urged step-by-step diplomacy and was clearly taken unaware and aback by Trump’s
quick agreement to a summit
with Kim.
While battling the White
House, Tillerson also had to contend with Nikki Haley, the U.S.
ambassador to the United Nations, who publicly endorsed a
proposal not to certify Iran’s compliance with the deal based on the
notion that all of Iran’s activities,
not just nuclear, should be considered when deciding on certification. He also reportedly
clashed with Trump’s national
security adviser, H.R. McMaster,
himself a rumored short-timer in
the White House.
While Pompeo’s CIA job has
immersed him in intelligence related to North Korea, Iran and
beyond, the new secretary of state
will have no time for a diplomatic
learning curve. It remains unclear whether Mattis, who often
joined Tillerson in pressing
Trump to be more patient and
thoughtful on a range of issues,
will be willing or able to continue
in that role.
In a statement last fall, Corker
said that Tillerson, Mattis and
White House Chief of Staff John
F. Kelly “are those people that
help separate our country from
chaos.” Since then, Kelly has
come under sharp criticism in
Congress — and even in the White
House — for his conduct in the
job.
In addition to the pending
North Korea talks, the administration is involved in high-stakes
diplomacy with Turkey over its
policy in Syria, as well as upcoming trade negotiations. Most immediately, Saudi Arabian Crown
Prince Mohammed bin Salman,
known as MBS, is due to arrive
here Monday.
Tillerson, as chief executive of
ExxonMobil, had long and deep
relationships with Arab leaders
in the Persian Gulf. But his calls
for caution were sometimes challenged by presidential son-in-law
and adviser Jared Kushner, who
has formed his own ties, often
outside the purview of the State
Department, with MBS and with
Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed,
the crown prince of Abu Dhabi,
who is seen as the United Arab
Emirates’ de facto ruler.
Kushner has been counting on
the gulf leaders to support his
still-unrevealed peace plan, a
prospect that was already thrown
into doubt when Trump announced — over Tillerson’s objections — U.S. recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital and plans
to move the U.S. Embassy there
from Tel Aviv.
When the Saudis and Emiratis,
along with Bahrain and Egypt,
broke relations and instituted a
boycott of neighboring Qatar last
summer, Trump openly supported them, backing their charges
that Qatar supported extremism.
Tillerson and Mattis, who noted
the close U.S. military relationship with Qatar, quickly issued
evenhanded statements calling
for dialogue.
Eventually, after months of
openly criticizing Qatar, Trump
was persuaded to change course,
offering to broker a deal among
the nations at a summit at Camp
David, Md. Saudi Arabia and the
United Arab Emirates refused,
and Tillerson and Mattis have
spent much of the ensuing
months voicing support for Qatar
and trying to pressure the others
to come to a Trump-led negotiation.
karen.deyoung@washpost.com
john.hudson@washpost.com
Ashley Parker, Philip Rucker and
Carol D. Leonning contributed to this
report.
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 14 , 2018
VA’s Shulkin
may get boot
next, Trump
advisers say
BY L ISA R EIN
AND J OSH D AWSEY
President Trump is souring on
his embattled Veterans Affairs secretary, David Shulkin, and telling
aides he might replace him as part
of a broader shake-up of his Cabinet, according to three advisers to
the president.
As Trump seeks to widen a
changing of the guard that started
Tuesday with his firing of Secretary of State Rex Tillerson,
Shulkin could be next, the advisers said.
Senior White House officials
said Shulkin could be forced out
within days.
The president is considering
Energy Secretary Rick Perry, an
Air Force veteran, to replace
Shulkin, as the New York Times
first reported. Trump invited Perry to the White House for lunch on
Monday but did not formally offer
him the job.
A physician and former hospital executive who won unanimous
confirmation by the Senate last
year, Shulkin, 58, has been a favorite of Trump’s, racking up legislative victories and fast changes at
an agency the president railed
against on the campaign trail.
But months of turmoil in VA’s
senior ranks have roiled the
second-largest federal bureaucracy, which employs 360,000 people. Shulkin has said publicly that
high-level political appointees installed by the White House are
scheming to oust him over personality and policy differences.
Shulkin, the only Obama administration holdover in the
Trump Cabinet, has taken a moderate approach to expanding the
Choice Program, which gives veterans the option to see private
doctors outside the system. He has
advocated leaving the decision to
VA doctors, in part because private care, with expensive co-pays,
would cost
taxpayers
much more
than the current system.
But conservatives at
the agency
and in the
White
Shulkin
House,
backed by the billionaire Koch
brothers, have pushed for more
private care — and say Shulkin has
hindered that goal.
Shulkin’s security detail is also
under investigation by VA Inspector General Michael Missal, who is
expected to release a report within
weeks on alleged abuses by some
of its members.
The tensions became public in
February with the release of a
critical report by the inspector
general on a 10-day trip Shulkin
took with his top staff to Europe
last summer. The trip included
six-and-a-half days of sightseeing,
and the secretary improperly accepted a gift of tickets to a Wimbledon tennis match, the watchdog found. His chief of staff resigned after the report said she
doctored an email to justify allowing Shulkin’s wife to travel to Europe at taxpayers’ expense.
Shulkin repaid the government
for the tennis tickets and for his
wife’s airfare.
In the weeks since the report’s
release, his detractors have lobbied the White House to force
Shulkin out. After the secretary
met with White House Chief of
Staff John F. Kelly several times, it
appeared that he was safe. Shulkin
said Kelly had given him the goahead to dispatch those on his
staff he viewed as obstructionists.
A majority of key lawmakers on
Capitol Hill have rallied to his side.
As recently as last week, the president was supporting Shulkin, who
has openly discussed his conversations with Kelly with reporters.
But as of Tuesday, none of the
appointees had been fired. Senior
White House aides have mounted
an internal campaign to convince
Trump that the administration’s
priorities — chief among them his
promise to veterans that appointments with private doctors should
be more readily accessible — are at
odds with Shulkin’s.
Trump met with Shulkin in the
Oval Office last week and asked
him about his efforts to expand
the Choice Program.
The president then telephoned
Pete Hegseth, weekend co-host of
“Fox & Friends” and a former chief
executive of Concerned Veterans
for America, a conservative advocacy group backed by the Kochs.
The president wanted his views on
how to move forward.
Hegseth said he favored moving as aggressively as possible to a
private-care model, according to
someone with knowledge of his
answer. Shulkin said he favored a
more moderate approach.
lisa.rein@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A9
RE
Pompeo’s CIA tenure, Haspel’s ties to ‘black site’ will draw Senate scrutiny
K AROUN D EMIRJIAN,
S EUNG M IN K IM
AND M IKE D E B ONIS
BY
The confirmation of President
Trump’s picks for secretary of state
and CIA director is likely to be
hampered but not stymied by a
mostly partisan backlash to their
past statements and actions, and
to the decision that led to their
nominations — the termination of
Rex Tillerson for being one of the
few Cabinet members, Democrats
argued Tuesday, who was willing
to stand up to the president on
foreign policy.
Leaders of both parties predicted it could take a while to confirm
CIA Director Mike Pompeo as the
new secretary of state and Gina
Haspel as Pompeo’s replacement
at the CIA, leaving the State Department officially rudderless at a
time when the administration faces pressing challenges surrounding newly announced talks with
North Korea, looming deadlines
for continued compliance with
the Iran nuclear deal, Russian aggression in advance of the 2018
midterm elections, the rollout of
new tariffs and a deteriorating
situation in Syria.
“It’ll obviously take some time
and effort,” said Senate Majority
Whip John Cornyn (R-Tex.). “I’m
confident we’ll get them confirmed, but when there’s so much
of a backlog on nominations already, it just adds two other highprofile nominations to our workload.”
Senate Democrats excoriated
Trump, accusing him of further
confusing the White House’s often
controversial and shifting diplomatic stance. Sen. Robert Menendez (N.J.), the ranking Democrat
on the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee, called Trump “a commander in chaos,” and some of
Tillerson’s harshest Democratic
critics rushed to defend him.
“It is another sign that the
Trump administration does not
tolerate independent voices,” said
Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin (Md.), a
senior senator and former ranking
Democrat on the Foreign Relations Committee. “I had my differences with Mr. Tillerson . . . but it
is a concern to see this type of a
change and for the apparent reason that Mr. Trump demands total
loyalty.”
The widespread criticism from
Democrats ensures that GOP leaders will have difficulty confirming
Pompeo and Haspel expeditiously.
But the backlash is not expected to
upset their eventual chances of
confirmation — Senate Minority
Leader Charles E. Schumer (N.Y.)
said Tuesday that at this point he
has no plans to ask Democrats to
oppose their nominations.
The Senate approved Pompeo
last year with the support of 14
Democrats — some of whom
sounded bullish about the
chances they would vote for
Pompeo again.
“Every time he’s come in before
the [intelligence] committee, he’s
been well received, he’s been forthright, answered all the questions,”
said Sen. Joe Manchin III
(D-W.Va.).
But not all Democrats who
backed Pompeo once were willing
to commit to doing so again.
“I think there are a number of us
who voted for him last time who
are actively reconsidering based
on his service in the administration,” said Sen. Brian Schatz (DHawaii). “A lot of us gave him the
benefit of the doubt. We were told
he was going to handle everything
on the level and be nonpolitical.
And it’s not clear that that’s his
record at the CIA.”
Republicans and Democrats
also sounded warnings that Haspel would have to answer for the
time she spent in charge of a CIA
“black site” prison and for her
efforts to destroy videotapes depicting detainees being subjected
to “enhanced interrogation techniques” that have been condemned as torture.
“Ms. Haspel needs to explain
the nature and extent of her involvement in the CIA’s interrogation program during the confirmation process,” Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), an ex officio member of the Senate Intelligence
Committee, said in a statement.
But Haspel’s record is unlikely
to destroy her chances of confirmation. Though some Democratic
senators, such as Sen. Ron Wyden
(Ore.), said Haspel’s past makes
her “unsuitable to serve as CIA
director,” Sen. Dianne Feinstein
(D-Calif.), author of the report that
exposed the extent of the CIA’s
interrogation programs, appeared
to defend her.
“She has been, I believe, a good
deputy director,” Feinstein said,
stressing that the interrogation
techniques employed on Haspel’s
watch were not, at the time, explicitly illegal. “Fortunately the law,
thanks to Senator McCain, has
been changed, and torture is now
illegal in the United States,” Feinstein said.
The White House’s announcement caught many on the Hill by
surprise. Senate Foreign Relations
Trump nominees likely
to be confirmed, but
process could be rocky
Committee Chairman Bob Corker
(R-Tenn.) said that while he spoke
with Trump and Tillerson late last
week and was “aware” of their
turbulent
relationship,
he
thought “there was a reprieve”
over the past several months. The
president called Corker at 9:58
a.m. Tuesday — more than an hour
after tweeting an announcement
about the nominations.
Trump “let me know how highly he thought of Pompeo,” said
Corker, who could not recall having ever met the current CIA director but added that he had “heard
good things.” The two are expected
to meet on Capitol Hill later this
week, and Pompeo’s confirmation
hearing is expected to be held in
April.
Corker was close with Tillerson
and last year said that Tillerson
was one of only three Cabinet
members that “separate our country from chaos.” Corker has also
indicated in the past that he thinks
the Senate cannot approve a secretary of state who will simply be a
yes man for Trump. When asked
whether Pompeo would be more
willing to tell Trump what he
wanted to hear than Tillerson was,
Corker said, “I don’t know.”
Other Republican senators said
they thought Pompeo’s closeness
to Trump would be an asset. “One
of the most important jobs for the
secretary of state is to make clear
to the world the president’s policies and priorities,” said Sen.
Lindsey O. Graham (R-S.C.), who
said he “cannot think of a better
choice” than Pompeo for the role.
Pompeo promised during his
confirmation hearing for the job
of CIA director to “speak truth to
power” with Trump. But he has
come under fire in the year since
for various actions that seemed to
spin facts in the president’s favor,
such as falsely claiming that the
intelligence community conclusively determined that Russian interference “did not affect the outcome of the election.”
karoun.demirjian@washpost.com
seung-min.kim@washpost.com
mike.debonis@washpost.com
Ed O’Keefe and Sean Sullivan
contributed to this report.
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A10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 14 , 2018
ANALYSIS
Pa. vote shows Trumpism has its limits — even in Trump country
BY
R OBERT C OSTA
The neck-and-neck result in
Tuesday’s special congressional
election in a reliably Republican
Pennsylvania district revealed
that the appetite for President
Trump’s style of politics may have
its limits in the land of shuttered
steel mills and coal mines that has
been the core of his support base.
The president went all in for
Republican candidate Rick Saccone, a seemingly safe bet in a
district Trump had carried by
20 percentage points in 2016.
Trump visited there twice in
recent weeks. He dispatched his
eldest son. He sent top White
House aides. Yet, with all that
political capital on the line, the
president watched his favored
candidate finish, in effect, in a tie
in what should have been an
easy win.
The razor-thin vote count —
three months after Democrats
picked up a U.S. Senate seat in
deeply conservative Alabama and
coming on a whirlwind day when
Trump tried to wrangle control of
his administration by ousting his
secretary of state — left Republicans feeling jittery just months
ahead of the midterm elections.
And, with Democrat Conor
Lamb coming close to a once
unthinkable victory, other Democrats running this fall in Trumpfriendly districts may find a for-
mula to boost their hopes of retaking the House.
“We should be able to elect a
box of hammers in this district. If
we’re losing here, you can bet
there is a Democratic wave coming,” said veteran Republican
consultant Mike Murphy, a
Trump critic.
Uncertainty now pervades the
party that Trump leads.
Tuesday’s effective tie, coming
in the aftermath of Trump’s
aggressive push for steel and aluminum tariffs that were backed
by both Pennsylvania candidates,
suggests the power of the president’s hard-line trade stance to
rally his voters is no longer a
given.
The failure to secure an outright win also adds to an aura of
negativity surrounding the president. Political storms accumulate
seemingly by the hour, from the
exit of mainstream figures inside
the West Wing to the drip-drip
developments in the Russia investigation to new revelations in
the saga of a $130,000 hush
agreement between a porn star
and the president’s personal
lawyer.
Lamb’s vote total wasn’t a sporadic burst of liberal energy in a
blue state where faded Obama
stickers still cover bumpers and
the Trump resistance thrives. It
was a sign of weakness in the
beating heart of Trump’s political
base — a place where red “Make
America Great Again” caps were
worn proudly throughout the last
presidential campaign and where
passion for the economic protectionism that Trump has made his
creed rivals the passion for the
Pittsburgh Steelers.
But Lamb, a 33-year-old retired
Marine and attorney with a chiseled jaw and centrist pitch, was
able to peel away voters from
Saccone, 60, a Republican state
lawmaker, in Pennsylvania’s 18th
Congressional District.
Trump’s tariff plan, his raucous
rally in the district over the weekend, the Republican-authored tax
law, the blizzard of television ads
from conservative groups linking
Lamb to House Minority Leader
Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), and the
visit by Donald Trump Jr. to a
candy-making facility on Monday
— none of it was enough to secure
a victory Tuesday night for Saccone, whom Republican and White
House officials have snidely described
as
“Mr.
Generic
Republican.”
To Trump allies, the poor showing Tuesday was not a reflection
on the president, but instead a
reminder that the GOP should be
embracing candidates who emulate the unscripted former reality
TV star in the Oval Office.
“You can’t run a standard campaign,” former Trump campaign
adviser Ed Brookover vented.
“These kind of regular, Republican establishment campaigns,
running as a conservative, isn’t
going to work.”
The potential breakdown
could be a rupture point in the
Trump-Republican relationship
that has so far held together.
For months, congressional Republicans have looked on uneasily as the White House has erupted
with tensions and as Trump has
fumed at foes and friends on
Twitter and elsewhere. They have
worried that the president and
their party seemed alarmingly
adrift, lurching between one policy fight or personnel drama to
another without much legislating
or political command.
Nevertheless, most Republicans have hesitated to worry too
much, at least publicly, since the
president appeared in polls to
have a solid grip on his core voters
in areas such as Pittsburgh’s
southern suburbs — the voters
Republicans are counting on to
turn out in droves this fall and
stave off a Democratic takeover.
He had overseen the confirmation of Supreme Court Justice
Neil M. Gorsuch and signed the
sweeping tax law that they had
craved, which reassured them
along the way.
It was a bargain between Republicans and an unconventional
president to move forward armin-arm toward the November
elections, even if both sides knew
the relationship was fraught.
Trump may have been vexing, but
he was necessary for the party’s
chances. Saccone, who wrapped
himself politically around Trump
in the Pennsylvania contest, was a
case study in the survival strategy.
That bargain began to fray as
the returns came in Tuesday
night and the race in that overwhelmingly GOP district grew
tight. Republicans watched with
concern — in between frenzied
cable-news updates on Secretary
of State Rex Tillerson’s volatile
departure — as it became clear
that a Democrat was holding his
own in the middle of Trump country.
While Republicans still feel
steady about much of their argument to voters this fall — the
stock market has made gains
amid various bumps over the past
year and the latest jobs report was
strong — they no longer have
confidence that the tax cut and
the state of the economy alone
can lift them to victory if Trump’s
political brand is eroding in the
places that had been rock solid.
And if Trump is no longer able
to be counted on to yank a Republican to victory in this corner of
Pennsylvania, where will he? In
the coming months, some Republican strategists say they expect
vulnerable GOP candidates to figure out how to define their candi-
SALWAN GEORGES/THE WASHINGTON POST
People wait for election results to come in late Tuesday at a watch party for Democratic candidate
Conor Lamb in Canonsburg, Pa. Lamb, a former federal prosecutor, had a strong chance to win a seat
that Democrats had not contested as recently as 2016.
dacies in local and personal
terms.
“Everybody will run for their
district. They won’t necessarily
run away from Trump but emphasize the parts of the Trump presidency that have been wins for the
whole party — taxes, regulatory
reform, those kind of issues rather than defending every piece of
it,” said former Pennsylvania congressman Bob Walker (R).
Democrats, meanwhile, after
stumbling in several elections
last year and seeing anti-Trump
liberals dominate their ranks,
found themselves rallying behind
Lamb, a polished and decidedly
centrist candidate who said he is
personally opposed to abortion
and averse to aspects of gun
control.
Lamb often echoed Trump’s
views on trade, in effect stealing
back an issue that Democrats
have used for decades to rally
working-class voters. He raised
more money than Saccone and
deftly handled questions about
Pelosi, promising to oppose her in
a leadership race. He associated
with Democrats like former vice
president Joe Biden, who campaigned in the district.
“It’s that old, western Pennsylvania conservative Democrat that
Lamb was able to bring back,”
said Patrick Caddell, a longtime
Democratic pollster.
robert.costa@washpost.com
RICKY CARIOTI/THE WASHINGTON POST
Rick Saccone supporters cheer for the Republican candidate as they watch results at an election night
party in McKeesport, Pa. Saccone, a state legislator, hoped to win the 18th Congressional District by
linking himself tightly to President Trump.
Pa. district that Trump won easily is now closely divided
ELECTION FROM A1
day-night rally in the district,
and his son Donald Trump Jr.
stumped with Saccone on Monday. The president repeatedly
linked his brand to Saccone.
“The Economy is raging, at an
all time high, and is set to get
even better,” the president tweeted on Tuesday morning. “Jobs
and wages up. Vote for Rick
Saccone and keep it going!”
Republican campaign committees and super PACs spent
$10.7 million to help Saccone,
more than five times as much as
their Democratic rivals, according to Federal Election Commission records filed Monday night.
Thanks to the court’s scrambling of the congressional map,
both Lamb and Saccone may well
become candidates in new districts for the November midterm
election before a winner is declared in this 18th Congressional
District race. Candidates must
collect and file 1,000 signatures
for those races by March 20 — the
day that some overseas ballots in
Tuesday’s race will be counted.
The district, a stretch of suburbs and small towns that was
drawn to elect a Republican, was
not the sort of place that Democrats had been expected to make
competitive this year. Lamb’s coalition pulled together suburban
liberals, wayward Republicans
and traditional Democrats who
had drifted from the party on
cultural issues.
The tight race added to Repub-
lican woes on a day that began
with the surprise firing of Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and a
string of related dismissals. Republicans who hoped to fight the
Pennsylvania race on the growing economy, and on the president’s new tariffs on foreign steel
and aluminum, found the White
House frequently alienating
some of the voters they needed.
As voters made their decisions
Tuesday, Trump loomed large in
the minds of many.
Amelia Fletcher, a registered
independent from Moon Township, cast her first-ever ballot for
Saccone because she likes
Trump’s agenda and believes he
will support it.
“I really don’t appreciate how
he talks, but I like what he’s
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doing now to help us out,” the
18-year-old high school senior
said of Trump.
In Mount Lebanon, Dave Banyan, 65, said that he had made up
his mind on the race “as soon as
President Trump was President
Trump.” He said he did not want
Democrats to get one vote closer
to controlling the House of Representatives.
“I don’t want America to go
back to the way it was” under
President Barack Obama, said
Banyan, a retired transportation
worker. “Obamacare killed me.
Dreamers — keep dreamin’, you
know?”
However, several voters who
said they were Republicans cast
their ballots for Lamb — and
against the president.
After casting her vote in
Mount Lebanon, a suburb of
Pittsburgh, dental hygienist Janet Dellana said she had been
outraged to see Trump call for
arming teachers instead of limiting access to semiautomatic
weapons after the deadly school
shooting in Florida.
“He flip-flops on everything,
but in the end, he caters to the
extreme right,” said Dellana, 64.
“I am a registered Republican,
but as this party continues to
cater to the extreme right, they
push me left.”
Tim Lacey, a 69-year-old registered Democrat, said Saccone’s
support for Trump overcame any
loyalty to the Republican, his
fellow church member and a
former customer of his construction business.
“I know Rick Saccone,” said
Lacey, who lives in nearby Elizabeth Township. “He’s not a golfing buddy, but he’s a good man.
But anyone who supports Trump
isn’t for me.”
The district — which Saccone
himself had called “Trump country” — had been the sort of place
where Democrats struggled to
compete. While registered Democrats slightly outnumbered registered Republicans, many of
those Democrats bolted from
their national party during
Obama’s presidency.
In 2012, eight Democrats represented part of the district in
the state legislature; after 2016,
they were down to one. In 2014
and 2016, Democrats did not
even bother to field a challenger
to Tim Murphy, the Republican
congressman whose resignation
forced Tuesday’s special election.
They hoped, early on, that
Lamb could change their fortunes. A first-time candidate
from a storied local political
family, the former Marine and
federal prosecutor became a natural, if cautious, politician. He
was personally antiabortion but
opposed to new abortion restrictions; he supported the Second
Amendment but favored stronger background checks.
Saccone, a four-term state legislator with a long military and
academic résumé, struggled to
unite the Trump or Murphy coalitions. Labor unions, with more
than 80,000 members in the
district, had sometimes endorsed
Murphy. They united quickly
against Saccone, a supporter of
“right to work” legislation who
did not bother to ask the state
AFL-CIO for an endorsement.
On the ground, unions ran an
aggressive turnout operation,
winning back many members
who had backed Trump for president. Lamb’s campaign focused
on preserving Medicare and Social Security, and warning that
Republican policies would put
them at risk. The United Mine
Workers of America, which had
sat out the 2016 election, endorsed Lamb when the Democrat
promised to support legislation
“One’s a career
politician and the other
one is looking to make a
career out of politics.”
Undecided voter Gary Wilson,
on the 18th District candidates
that would fully fund their pensions.
That was one of several issues
where Saccone never tried to
meet or outflank Lamb. On Monday, as he campaigned at Canonsburg’s famous Sarris Candies
with Trump Jr., Saccone dodged a
question about the bill on miners’ pensions and accused a reporter who asked about it of
talking to “liberals” instead of
real miners.
It was not the only time that
the Republican snapped at Democrats. At the second and final
debate with Lamb, Saccone said
his opponent didn’t “even know
the difference between North
and South Korea.” At his final
rally, on Monday, Saccone said
that “the other side” was gripped
by a “hatred for our country” and
a “hatred for God.”
But Saccone’s retail and TV ad
campaigning was resoundingly
positive, clashing with the negative ads that Republicans threw
across the airwaves. Four groups
spent more than $1 million: the
National Republican Congressional Committee ($3.5 million),
the Congressional Leadership
Fund ($3.4 million), the Republican National Committee ($1.3
million) and America First Action ($1.1 million).
Most of their ads were negative, portraying Lamb as a “puppet” of House Minority Leader
Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), a foe of
middle-class tax cuts, and eventually, as a prosecutor who had
let drug dealers get light sentences.
Lamb blunted the impact of
those attacks, most notably by
saying in early January that he
would not support Pelosi for
speaker. His highest-profile surrogate, former vice president Joe
Biden, has enjoyed high approval
ratings from all voters since
passing on a 2016 presidential
bid.
david.weigel@washpost.com
elise.viebeck@washpost.com
Viebeck reported from Washington.
Scott Farwell and Kellie Gormly
contributed from Pennsylvania.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A11
RE
Russia demands access to British probe of chemical attack
Officials also pledge
retaliation for any
sanctions over poisoning
BY
M ATTHEW B ODNER
moscow — Russia vowed Tuesday to retaliate if Britain imposes
sanctions in response to a chemical attack on British soil and demanded access to samples of a
nerve agent that British investigators say they have identified as
Russian.
Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov
also said Russia does not intend to
comply with British Prime Minister Theresa May’s demand Monday for an official explanation of
how a nerve agent identified as
Novichok, which was developed
by the former Soviet Union, allegedly came to be used in the poisoning attack in southern England
that targeted a former Russian spy
and his adult daughter.
Lavrov insisted that Russian experts should be able to examine
the British evidence but again denied Russian involvement in last
week’s attack.
There has, however, been a history of Russian emigres dying in
murky and sometimes not-somurky circumstances in Britain.
And in the midst of the controversy over the chemical attack,
British counterterrorism police
said Tuesday they are investigating the unexplained death of another Russian national, Nikolai
Glushkov, 68, in London. His body
was found Monday, and police
said they see no connection between the cases.
Glushkov had been an associate
of the oligarch Boris Berezovsky,
who had fallen afoul of Russian
President Vladimir Putin and
lived in exile in Britain until his
death by strangulation in 2013.
May spoke Tuesday afternoon
with President Trump about the
assault on the former spy, Sergei
Skripal. She told him it was “highly likely that Russia was responsible for the attack,” according to a
statement released by the British
Embassy.
“President Trump stated the
United States stands in solidarity
with its closest ally and is ready to
provide any assistance the United
Kingdom requests for its investigation,” the White House stated.
“President Trump agreed with
Prime Minister May that the government of the Russian Federation must provide unambiguous
answers regarding how this chemical weapon, developed in Russia,
came to be used in the United
Kingdom.”
Earlier, though, the president
had hedged on the issue of blame.
“We’re speaking with Theresa
May today, and as soon as we get
the facts straight, if we agree with
them, we will condemn Russia or
whoever it may be,” Trump said
when asked about it by reporters
outside the White House. “It
sounds to me like it would be
Russia based on all of the evidence
they have.”
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson,
speaking en route to Washington
from Africa on Monday evening,
said the nerve agent “clearly came
from Russia,” and he warned of
consequences. Hours after Tillerson backed the British accusation,
the White House announced Tuesday that he would be replaced as
secretary of state by CIA Director
Mike Pompeo.
In Moscow, the Foreign Ministry said it presented the British
ambassador with “a strong protest
over the unfounded accusations
leveled at Russia by British authorities” and stressed that “Moscow would not respond to London’s ultimatum until the Russian
side is provided with samples of
the chemical substance.”
And it promised that Russia
would retaliate if sanctions are
imposed. “Any threats will not remain unanswered,” the ministry
said in a statement. “The British
side should be aware of that.”
May said the use of Novichok,
which is believed to be unique to
Russia, pointed to Moscow’s complicity in the poisoning of Skripal,
a former Russian double agent,
and his daughter in Salisbury,
about 90 miles southwest of Lon-
SERGEI KARPUKHIN/REUTERS
Russia’s Sergei Lavrov.
don. Both remain comatose.
In Moscow, Lavrov denied that
Russia had anything to do with
Skripal’s poisoning and reiterated
Moscow’s willingness to cooperate if information related to the
nature of the chemical agent was
shared with Russia.
Lavrov said Britain has an obligation to share forensic data under the Chemical Weapons Convention.
“Before delivering ultimatums
to report to the British government within 24 hours,” Lavrov
said at a news conference in Moscow, “it is better to comply with
your own obligations under international law — in this case, the
Convention on the Prohibition of
Chemical Weapons.”
Russia’s representative to the
Organization for the Prohibition
of Chemical Weapons, Alexander
Shulgin, told a meeting of the
group’s executive board Tuesday
that London’s allegations of Russian involvement were unfounded
and unacceptable, the Interfax
news agency reported. He called
on Britain to turn over samples to
the organization for independent
laboratory analysis.
His British counterpart, Peter
Wilson, said investigators had
concluded that Russia was responsible based on a positive identification of the chemical agents, a
history that links Novichok to
Russia, Russia’s “record of conducting state-sponsored assassinations” and a British assessment
that Russia considers some defectors to be “legitimate targets for
assassination.”
“This attempted murder, using
a weapons-grade nerve agent in a
British city, was not just a crime
against the Skripals. It was an
indiscriminate and reckless act
against the United Kingdom,
which put the lives of innocent
civilians at risk,” Wilson said.
Russia, he said, had either engaged in a direct attack against
Britain or lost control of the nerve
agent it developed.
May had given Russia one day
to provide an explanation. She
promised to return to Parliament
on Wednesday with a plan for
specific action.
May described a “reckless” and
“indiscriminate” attack against
Skripal, 66, and his daughter
Yulia, 33. A police officer also re-
mains hospitalized.
On the Russian Foreign Ministry’s verified Twitter account, the
posts carried a characteristically
flippant and sarcastic tone. It
launched a hashtag, #HighlyLikelyRussia, and portrayed May’s ultimatum as part of broader antiRussian hysteria plaguing Western discourse.
“Sincere thanks to Mrs. May for
#HighlyLikelyRussia,” a tweet
read. The post included a video of
recent intense snowfall in Britain,
mockingly suggesting that Russia
was to blame for the weather. The
video concludes with an image of a
penguin, and signs off with “at
least penguin enjoys it.”
Konstantin Kosachev, the head
of the Foreign Affairs Committee
in the Federation Council, Russia’s
upper chamber of parliament,
wrote on Facebook that May’s accusations were “despicable and
unacceptable.”
“For Britain, the Queen of
Courts, this is a complete degradation,” Kosachev wrote. “The accused has to provide the proof, not
the court or the prosecutor, without being given access either to the
evidence or the trial itself.”
Vyacheslav Volodin, speaker of
the Russian State Duma, the lower
house of parliament, asserted that
the British allegations were part of
a planned effort to interfere in
Sunday’s Russian presidential
election.
foreign@washpost.com
In Afghanistan, Mattis says some in Taliban may be willing to pursue peace
Unannounced visit
comes after Afghan
president’s offer of talks
BY
D AN L AMOTHE
kabul — Defense Secretary Jim
Mattis met with senior U.S. and
Afghan officials in Afghanistan
on Tuesday to discuss both the
military campaign and “peeling
off ” some members of the Taliban to pursue a peace deal with
the Afghan government.
Mattis’s unannounced visit
comes two weeks after Afghan
President Ashraf Ghani made
what many observers consider
an unprecedented offer, inviting
the Taliban to begin peace talks
without preconditions to end the
16-year war.
The Taliban said last month
that it is open to reaching a
political settlement and negotiating, but it has not responded to
Ghani’s offer.
Mattis, speaking on a flight to
Afghanistan from Oman, said
Tuesday that talking about a
peace settlement is “not cart
before the horse” and that it is
backed by the ongoing efforts of
the U.S. and Afghan militaries.
Some members of the Taliban
may be willing to pursue peace,
especially considering the group
has fractured over the past few
years, he said.
“All wars come to an end,”
Mattis said. “You don’t want to
miss an opportunity because you
weren’t alert to the opportunity.
So you need to have that door
open, even if you embrace the
military pressure.”
Mattis acknowledged that efforts to reconcile with the entire
Taliban have been difficult. The
effort right now, he said, is to
reach “those who are tired of
fighting” and build it out from
there.
The defense secretary and his
staff arrived at Kabul’s Hamid
Karzai International Airport on a
C-17 jet in the morning before
being whisked away on a CH-47
Chinook helicopter in damp,
chilly weather to the U.S. military headquarters in Kabul. He
met immediately with senior officials, including U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan John Bass
and Army Gen. John W. Nicholson Jr., the top U.S. officer in
Afghanistan. Afterward, he visited with Ghani and other senior
Afghan officials at the presidential palace.
Ghani said at the palace that
President Trump’s new South
Top 10 Things To Do When
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Asia strategy, adopted in August,
allows Afghan officials to tell
their people that talking about
peace with the Taliban “is not
tantamount to surrender or to
collapse.” The strategy calls for
ramping up military and diplomatic pressure on the Taliban to
force a negotiated settlement
and does not include a timetable
for U.S. military withdrawal, a
notable difference from the plan
under President Barack Obama.
Ghani noted that an offer of
peace in the 1990s ultimately led
to the collapse of the Afghan
government, “and people always
carry their memories.”
Mattis’s visit to the country
was his second since the new
strategy was unveiled. The Pentagon chief is among a small
group of senior advisers who
convinced Trump that it made
sense to not only continue the
U.S. role in the war but also
bolster it with more air power
and a modest increase in the
number of U.S. troops from
about 11,000 to 14,500.
But the Taliban remains a
powerful force in Afghanistan,
regularly carrying out highprofile attacks in and around
Kabul in addition to holding or
contesting more than a quarter
of Afghanistan’s territory.
dan.lamothe@washpost.com
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RE
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 14 , 2018
The World
Bomb targets Palestinian prime minister entering Gaza
BY H AZEM B ALOUSHA
AND L OVEDAY M ORRIS
gaza city — An explosion hit
the convoy of the Palestinian
prime minister during a rare
visit to the Gaza Strip on Tuesday, threatening to derail floundering reconciliation efforts between the two main Palestinian
parties.
The Palestinian Authority described the blast, which did not
harm Prime Minister Rami Hamdallah but caused minor injuries
to at least six bodyguards, as an
assassination attempt. It held
Hamas, the Islamist party in
control of the Gaza Strip, responsible for what it described as a
“treacherous act.”
For its part, Hamas con-
BY
demned the incident and said it
has opened an investigation,
quickly arresting several people.
It accused “Israel and its agents”
of being behind the attack in an
effort to undermine Palestinian
unity efforts.
Hamdallah was in Gaza to
meet with Hamas officials in an
attempt to restart talks between
the Palestinian Authority, controlled by his party, Fatah, and its
rival, Hamas. His convoy was just
a few hundred yards from the
Erez Crossing, which separates
Gaza from Israel, when it was
struck.
Three cars in the convoy were
damaged in the explosion.
The reconciliation talks were
canceled after the blast, but the
prime minister did go on to
Burma starts to remake Rakhine
T IMOTHY M C L AUGHLIN
IN RANGOON
Torched Rohingya villages have been bulldozed as part of a development effort targeting poverty
MARION THIBAUT/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
BURMA
CHINA
INDIA
Detail
LAOS
RAKHINE
STATE
NAM
ET
VI
Scenes of the violent military
crackdown in Burma’s Rakhine
state, a restive area that for decades has been the site of ethnic
strife, have become familiar since
the violence erupted in August:
plumes of smoke rising in the
distance, thousands of Rohingya
Muslims escaping to Bangladesh
on foot, entire villages standing
empty.
Now the Burmese government
is hoping to paint a different
picture.
Under de facto leader Aung San
Suu Kyi, the government has
pushed the nation’s most powerful business executives, many of
them previously under U.S. sanctions, to pump millions of dollars
into infrastructure projects, and
tapped others to start Rakhinefocused businesses, all while soliciting international donors.
But observers say these plans
are fraught and likely to have few
benefits for the Rohingya, nearly
700,000 of whom have fled to
Bangladesh and who continue to
cross the border even as preparations are underway for their return to Burma, which is also
known as Myanmar. The efforts
also have been insufficient in placating ethnic Rakhine Buddhists,
who are deeply distrustful of the
government’s plans.
The development push reflects
the position of successive governments that the violence in Rakhine, which the United States and
United Nations have labeled ethnic cleansing, is caused by a lack of
economic opportunity.
“From our point of view, the
issue in Rakhine is very much
related to poverty,” said Ye Min
Aung, the vice chairman of Burma’s chamber of commerce, who
has been asked by the government
to launch a rice business in Rakhine. “That is the very root cause of
the problems.”
Business executives such as
him hope to return Rakhine state
to its “former glories,” he said.
The rebuilding efforts are led
by the Union Enterprise for Humanitarian Assistance, Resettlement and Development in Rakhine (UEHRD), a group formed in
October. Suu Kyi, who chairs the
committee, said it aims to build a
“peaceful and developed Rakhine
state.”
Critics say the government’s development agenda is premature
and dodges the issues of discrimination, statelessness and violence
faced by the Rohingya for generations. Questions remain over
whether the Rohingya, who before fleeing faced severe constraints on their movement,
would benefit from infrastructure
such as roads, which they might
be barred from accessing.
“The UEHRD was formed to divert attention from violent ethnic
cleansing,” said David Mathieson,
an independent analyst in Ran-
MAHMUD HAMS/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
A bodyguard, center, and a Hamas security officer, right, escort
Palestinian Prime Minister Rami Hamdallah as he leaves Gaza City.
attend the scheduled opening of
a wastewater-treatment plant in
the northern Gaza Strip before
leaving.
At the ceremony, Hamdallah
described the incident as a “disgraceful act.”
“What happened today will
only increase our resolve to continue our work in the service of
the Gaza Strip and end the
division,” he said.
The two factions have been in
conflict for more than a decade,
fighting bloody street battles in
Gaza in 2007 after Fatah refused
to cede control when Hamas won
elections. Hamas took control of
the Gaza Strip, while the Palestinian Authority continued to
govern in the Israeli-occupied
West Bank.
THAI.
CAM.
Ind i a n
O cea n
So ut h
Ch in a
Sea
500 MILES
20 MILES
BANGLADESH
CHIN
STATE
Ukhia
Kutupalong
refugee
camp
Bay of
B eng a l
Tula Toli
B U R M A
Buthidaung
Maungdaw
Area within
Rakhine state
where Rohingya
villages have
been emptied.
RAKHINE
STATE
Rathedaung
THE WASHINGTON POST
goon. “Tasking cronies to construct
Potemkin villages won’t wash away
the stain of mass crimes. The government is either receiving very
bad advice and believes this reconstruction will work, or it’s a cynical
ploy to pretend the violence was
simply a bad dream.”
AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
TOP: An October 2017 view of the remains of burned villages near
Maungdaw, in the north of Rakhine state. ABOVE: Workers near a
new government-built “receiving center” for Rohingya who fled to
Bangladesh and want to return. Burmese business tycoons, some of
whom had faced U.S. sanctions for their ties to the former regime,
have been tapped to contribute to the Rakhine development push.
The torched Rohingya villages
have been bulldozed as part of the
development and investment
push, leading to outcries from the
United Nations that Burma is trying to cover up atrocities.
In a report released Monday,
Amnesty International said at
least three new security force bases are under construction in the
north of Rakhine, citing satellite
images and interviews with Rohingya in Bangladesh. The sites are
being built by members of the
security forces.
Amnesty International said it
was “deeply concerned that the
Myanmar authorities are reshaping the region so as to accommodate more security forces and
more non-Rohingya villagers, at
the expense of homes, agricultural lands and villages where Rohingya have lived and farmed for
generations.”
Aung Tun Thet, the UEHRD’s
chief coordinator, dismissed concerns raised by Human Rights
Watch and echoed last week by
Zeid Ra’ad al-Hussein, the U.N.
high commissioner for human
rights.
“As far as our intention, it was
not to clear up anything,” Aung
Tun Thet said. “It was just merely
to ensure that when the buildings
are being built there is clear
grounds on which the buildings
can be constructed.”
With two repatriation centers
completed, Burma is “ready to
receive them,” he said of the Rohingya. Bangladesh and Burma
signed a repatriation agreement
in January, but no Rohingya have
returned, as the implementation
of the deal has stalled.
To help carry out its ambitious
development plans, the government tapped the private sector,
including a handful of the country’s most powerful business executives, some of whom had been
sanctioned by the U.S. government for their relationships to the
former military regime.
Hopes of a detente were raised
last year when Hamas said it was
ready to dissolve its shadow
government in Gaza and hand
over power to the Palestinian
Authority, which had ramped up
pressure on Hamas by cutting
salaries and electricity supplies
to the area.
The Gaza Strip has been blockaded by Israel since Hamas took
control in 2007, with trade and
the exit and entry of civilians
strictly controlled. The border
with Egypt also has remained
largely closed.
loveday.morris@washpost.com
Morris reported from Jerusalem.
Ruth Eglash and Sufian Taha in
Jerusalem contributed to this report.
These economic strongmen
were marshaled under the previous junta for projects such as the
construction of the capital, Naypyidaw, and to broker arms deals,
often in return for lucrative contracts and business deals. This
time, some of those involved in the
development plans have grown resentful of the expensive projects.
Groups tapped to rebuild the
state include the Asia World
Foundation, the philanthropic
arm of Asia World, a conglomerate run by Steven Law, the son of a
heroin kingpin. The company is
constructing a 50-mile road
through Rakhine, according to its
website.
Law, who was branded a “top
crony” of the previous ruling junta
in a leaked U.S. diplomatic cable,
was removed from the blacklist
when the United States eased
sanctions against Burma in 2016.
The Asia World Foundation
did not respond to a request for
comment.
Other formerly sanctioned tycoons who have contributed include property developers Khin
Shwe and Zaw Zaw, whose business interests range from banking to hospitality and who traveled with Suu Kyi to Rakhine in
November.
Khin Shwe declined to comment. Zaw Zaw did not respond to
a request for comment.
A consultant on Burma investment familiar with the situation,
who spoke on the condition of
anonymity because of the sensitivity of the issue, said that some
of the business executives were
unhappy with being asked to contribute money and resources.
“Myanmar’s business tycoons
were summoned up to Naypyidaw
and were strongly urged — though
some saw no choice — to contribute to a fund to develop Rakhine
state,” the consultant said. “There
was little in the way of details or
clarity as to what the fund would
do. And it smacked of the junta
days of being summoned to do
some wacky project, but this time,
without concessions.”
For the ethnic Rakhine Buddhists, who, it appears, will be the
major beneficiaries of the development push, the government’s
efforts are insufficient and being
implemented without enough input from the Rakhine community,
they say.
“The government wants to
show the international community how they are preparing things
for the Bengalis, not for us [Rakhines],” said Soe Naing, a member
of the Rakhine Social Network, a
collection of activist groups, using
a term that implies that the Rohingya are from Bangladesh. “The
government is doing one-sided
things for the Bengalis, not for the
Rakhine people.”
foreign@washpost.com
This story was supported by a grant
from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis
Reporting.
DIGEST
IRAQ
Overseas flights return
to airports in Kurdistan
Iraq will reopen airports in the
Kurdistan region to international
flights after federal authority was
restored at the hubs, according to
a statement from Prime Minister
Haider al-Abadi on Tuesday.
The announcement came about
six months after the airports were
shut to international flights in the
wake of a controversial
referendum in the self-ruled
Kurdish region that
overwhelmingly backed
independence from Baghdad.
The airports are due to open
“within a few days,” government
spokesman Saad al-Hadithi said.
The prime minister of
Kurdistan, Nechirvan Barzani,
called Abadi’s decision “a step in
the right direction” and said he
would continue to work to resolve
issues between the region and the
central government.
The Kurdish vote in September
was rejected by Baghdad and
neighboring nations, ratcheting
up tensions in the region.
The decision to lift the flight
ban comes as Iraq is preparing for
elections in May.
— Associated Press
SYRIA
Turkish forces encircle
Kurdish-held city
Turkish forces and allied rebels
announced the encirclement of
the Syrian city of Afrin on Tuesday
in a major escalation of a weekslong offensive to oust Kurdish
militants from the area.
Britain-based Syrian
Observatory for Human Rights
confirmed that Turkish troops
and their Syrian rebel proxies had
surrounded the city.
Kurdish officials, however, said
that only parts of the city were
besieged.
The renewed push follows
rapid advances by Turkish-backed
rebels against Kurdish militants
in recent days.
Turkey, which is fighting
Kurdish insurgents at home, says
Kurdish-controlled territory in
Syria poses a threat to its national
security. Afrin has been under
Kurdish control since 2012.
— Erin Cunningham
and Heba Habib
NIGER
U.S. vehicle stolen in
attack reportedly found
A Tuareg rebel leader said
Tuesday that members of his
group have recovered a U.S.
vehicle stolen in the ambush in
Niger in which four American
troops were killed in October.
The vehicle was found on the
Malian side of the border, said
Fahad Ag al-Mahmoud, secretary
general of the rebel group known
by its French acronym GATIA.
A coalition of Tuareg rebels has
been operating for several weeks
against extremist groups active
between Mali and Niger.
Four U.S. soldiers and four
Nigerien troops were killed Oct. 4
north of Niger’s capital, Niamey,
after being attacked by as many
as 100 Islamic State-linked
extremists. Two other Americans
and eight Nigeriens were
wounded.
— Associated Press
Slovakia’s coalition to face noconfidence vote: Slovakia’s
coalition government will face a
no-confidence vote in parliament
next week amid the political
turmoil set off by the slayings of
an investigative journalist and
his fiancee. The move comes after
tens of thousands of Slovaks
joined in anti-government rallies
last week to demand a thorough
investigation of the shooting
deaths of Jan Kuciak and Martina
Kusnirova. Kuciak was writing
about ties between the Italian
mafia operating in Slovakia and
people close to Prime Minister
Robert Fico, whose party has
been linked to corruption
scandals.
Turkish parliament approves
disputed voting law: Turkey’s
parliament has approved changes
to electoral laws that critics say
are aimed at helping President
Recep Tayyip Erdogan cement his
grip on power and could lead to
election fraud. The changes,
which come as Turkey faces key
elections next year, allow parties
to gain parliamentary seats even
if they fail to pass the 10 percent
electoral threshold, as well as give
the government the right to
appoint officials to oversee ballot
places, to call in security forces
and to move ballot boxes.
— From news services
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A13
RE
China plans new foreign aid agency to enhance influence abroad
BY
S IMON D ENYER
beijing — China announced
Tuesday it will establish a new
agency to coordinate its foreign
aid program as part of an effort to
project its global influence more
effectively.
The establishment of a new
international development cooperation agency came as part of the
biggest shake-up of the government’s structure in two decades.
The changes cut the number of
ministries in China’s cabinet, the
State Council, by eight, down to
26, to streamline government and
reduce bureaucratic infighting.
But it will also strengthen the
Communist Party’s top-down control, one of President Xi Jinping’s
overriding goals, officials said.
The overhaul bolstered the role
of the country’s environment
ministry, which will now take responsibility for the fight against
climate change, and included the
merger of the banking and insurance regulatory agencies to improve supervision of the country’s
debt-laden financial sector.
The changes were announced
at a session of the National People’s Congress, the country’s rubber-stamp parliament, and will be
formally approved Saturday.
Liu He, the president’s top economic adviser and a member of
the party’s 25-member Politburo,
called the changes “profound”
and “revolutionary” in a Tuesday
article for People’s Daily, the Communist Party newspaper.
“Strengthening the party’s
overall leadership is the core issue,” he wrote, citing a famous
quote from Mao Zedong that is
also used by Xi. “Party, government, military, civilian and academic — east, west, south, north
and center — the party leads them
all.”
The new agency for international development coordination
will integrate responsibilities currently undertaken by the ministries of Commerce and Foreign
Affairs and integrate its work with
Xi’s ambitious Belt and Road project, a major effort to increase
Chinese lending for infrastructure development around the
world.
The new agency will draft foreign aid policies, grant aid and
supervise projects.
The move is designed “to give
full play to foreign aid as a key
means of major-country diplomacy,” enhance its coordination and
“better serve the nation’s diplomatic strategy,” including the Belt
and Road project, State Councilor
Wang Yong told parliament.
Li Fan, founder of the World
and China Institute think tank,
said the new body would be comparable to the U.S. Agency for
International Development and
Japan’s International Cooperation Agency and, in a similar manner, would serve China’s diplomatic objectives.
“Usually developed countries
would have a foreign aid agency
like this,” he said. “China is still a
developing country, but now it
also sees the need to set one up as
it grows more economically powerful.”
China provides few details of
its aid program but said it sent
more than half of its foreign aid of
more than $14 billion between
2010 and 2012 to Africa.
Analysis by AidData, a research
project at the College of William
& Mary in Williamsburg, Va.,
showed that U.S. official development assistance between 2000
and 2014 reached $366 billion,
dwarfing the $81 billion coming
from China. But Beijing nearly
closed the gap with a much larger
THOMAS PETER/REUTERS
Chinese President Xi Jinping appears on-screen Tuesday in a live
broadcast of a session at the National People’s Congress in Beijing.
flow of $216 billion in commercial, non-concessional lending.
The Belt and Road project may
lead to even more commercial
lending to the continent.
Last week, then-Secretary of
State Rex Tillerson warned Afri-
can nations to carefully consider
the terms of their borrowing from
China, lest they “forfeit their sovereignty.”
But China Daily said Beijing’s
investment in infrastructure such
as railways, bridges and ports was
welcomed by African nations.
“U.S. investment in the continent has been on the decline, so it
is viewed as withdrawing from
Africa while China has been increasing its engagement,” it wrote
in an editorial. “This may explain
why the U.S. cannot win consent
from African countries when it
points an accusing finger at China
for almost anything.”
China likes to boast that its
finance in Africa does not come
with political strings attached,
unlike Western aid.
Critics say that has enabled it to
lend to governments with poor
human rights records, such as
Sudan or Zimbabwe under former
president Robert Mugabe.
The same could also be said for
the United States, especially during the Cold War, when it poured
money into corrupt and autocratic regimes largely because they
were not communist.
The overhaul of government is
the largest since then-Premier
Zhu Rongji carried out a similar
streamlining in 1998. It appears to
weaken the country’s top economic policymaking body, the National Development and Reform
Commission (NDRC).
The Ministry of Environmental
Protection has been renamed the
Ministry of Ecological Environment and will take over responsibility for climate change policy
from the NDRC.
The new ministry will also supervise the work of other ministries to prevent groundwater pollution, including pollution from
agriculture and sewage, as well as
marine environmental protection
and nuclear radiation safety.
Li Shuo, a senior climate policy
expert at Greenpeace East Asia,
called the changes a “net positive”
for the environment, but warned
that moving the climate change
policy away from the powerful
NDRC into the historically weaker environmental ministry could
be a double-edged sword.
simon.denyer@washpost.com
Amber Ziye Wang and Liu Yang
contributed to this report.
KITCHENS | BATHS | ADDITIONS
Remodeling
Seminar
Japan’s Abe now out of step
with Trump on North Korea
BY
A NNA F IFIELD
tokyo — Japan’s hard-line prime
minister, Shinzo Abe, had grown
accustomed to being President
Trump’s favorite foreign leader.
But now he is suddenly scrambling to remain relevant as the
U.S. president embarks on a daring diplomatic gambit with North
Korea.
When North Korea undertook a
charm offensive linked to the
Winter Olympics a month ago,
Japan’s prime minister warned
anyone who would listen not to
fall for Kim Jong Un’s “smile diplomacy” and to keep up the “maximum pressure” campaign.
Now, with both the South Korean and American leaders planning summits with Kim, Abe is
trying to minimize the appearance of differences with Trump.
“I don’t believe North Korea is
using this opportunity simply to
buy more time,” he said after
meeting Tuesday with Suh Hoon,
the South Korean intelligence
chief who met with Kim and
Trump last week.
“North Korea now has to face
important negotiations, including the inter-Korean summit and
a summit with the United States,”
Abe told Suh, according to a readout from South Korea’s presidential Blue House.
The prime minister did not
supply the same readout. He said
simply that his basic position remained the same: that North Korea must take action to denuclearize and that the issue of Japanese
citizens abducted by the North in
the 1970s and 1980s must be dealt
with at the same time.
“It is extremely important that
North Korea take concrete steps
to turn its words into actions,” Abe
told reporters after the meeting.
Trump has said he believes
North Korea is “sincere” in its
offer to hold talks on its nuclear
program, although the White
House has said it wants a concrete
commitment to denuclearization
before any summit between the
leaders of the United States and
North Korea.
That summit is tentatively
scheduled for May, following an
inter-Korean summit at the end of
April.
Abe and Trump had been walking in lock-step on North Korea,
both promoting a strategy of applying “maximum pressure”
through sanctions on Kim’s government to force it to abandon its
nuclear weapons program.
Both voiced suspicion of efforts
led by Moon Jae-in, South Korea’s
progressive president, to use diplomatic engagement to achieve
the same outcome.
The split was starkly illustrated
at the opening of the Winter
Olympics in PyeongChang, South
Korea, just over a month ago. Abe
and Vice President Pence remained seated as the unified Korean team entered the stadium,
and both avoided interacting with
Kim’s sister.
That turned out to be an error
of judgment on Abe’s part, said
Gerald L. Curtis, a renowned Japan scholar.
The opening ceremony set off a
cascade of diplomacy, beginning
with a summit invitation from
Kim to Moon and leading to a
summit invitation from Kim to
Trump. Trump hastily accepted
that invitation last Thursday —
without warning Abe that he
would do so.
“Abe made a major mistake at
the PyeongChang Olympics by
putting on that mad, upset, angry
face,” Curtis said. “Now Japan is
not a major player. The Chinese
and the South Koreans and the
Americans are all pushing this
[pro-talks] line, and Abe is scrambling to get on board.”
Abe may not have seen which
way the winds were turning in
part because of his distrust of
Moon, as well as the Japanese
government’s general antipathy
toward South Korea.
Historical disputes, particularly over Japan’s use of Korean
women as sex slaves during World
War II, continue to shadow the
countries’ relations. Abe’s government is incensed that Moon’s administration has reopened discussion about a 2015 deal that was
supposed to be the “final and irreversible” statement on the matter.
That anger was compounded at
a state dinner for Trump in November, when Moon served
shrimp from islets that are the
subject of a festering territorial
dispute between South Korea and
Japan.
The divergence in approach between Japan and the United
States could hardly come at a
worse time for Abe.
Trump decided to accept Kim’s
invitation on the same day that he
imposed tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from countries
including Japan, despite Tokyo’s
pleas to recognize their alliance.
It also comes amid revelations
that have damaged Abe’s domestic standing and reignited doubts
about his political future.
The Finance Ministry this week
admitted to removing the name of
Abe’s wife from documents related to a heavily discounted land
deal for a controversial nationalist school in Osaka. Abe had
strongly denied any cronyism by
him or his wife, but the ministry’s
admission that it had doctored
the paperwork has raised doubts
about the process.
Abe’s support ratings have declined as a result. The latest survey from the Yomiuri Shimbun, a
paper that is generally supportive
of the prime minister, found that
his approval rating had slumped
six points, to 48 percent, the first
time it had fallen below 50 percent since parliamentary elections in October.
anna.fifield@washpost.com
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A14
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 14 , 2018
Syrian military pushes for victory in Ghouta, defying outcry
Government offensive
accelerating despite
threats from the U.S.
BY
L IZ S LY
beirut — Syrian President
Bashar al-Assad is poised for another crushing military victory
over his opponents, defying the
United Nations, the Trump administration and the appeals of
the international community by
pressing ahead with one of the
bloodiest offensives of the Syria
war.
The death toll is surging as the
Syrian army and its Russian and
militia allies seek to overrun the
Damascus suburb of Eastern Ghouta, the largest remaining rebel
stronghold in the vicinity of the
capital. Warplanes are carrying
out round-the-clock bombardment of the densely populated
cluster of towns and villages that
rose against Assad in 2011 and
have been cut off from the outside
world since 2013.
Government forces have recaptured around half of the area, and
it now seems only a matter of time
before Eastern Ghouta joins the
list of locations clawed back from
rebel control — by brute force,
negotiated cease-fire or a mixture
of the two.
As the largest rebel enclave on
the outskirts of Damascus, Eastern Ghouta has long been a military priority for the government.
Rebel artillery fired from Eastern
Ghouta has for years posed the
only real threat to the safety of
citizens in the Damascus area.
Now that loyalist forces have been
freed up from other fronts, they
appear intent on conquest.
“A cease-fire can’t happen if one
side is winning and is well down
the trajectory to victory,” said Faysal Itani of the Atlantic Council in
Washington. “It’s going to be a
tough, tough fight, but they have
no reason to give a cease-fire.”
Doctors in Eastern Ghouta
published photographs Tuesday
of children they said had been
burned by napalm. Chlorine
bombs also have allegedly been
dropped, despite warnings from
senior U.S. officials that the use of
chemical weapons might draw a
AMER ALMOHIBANY/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
A Syrian man awaits treatment at a makeshift clinic during Syrian government airstrikes in the rebel enclave of Eastern Ghouta, on the
outskirts of Damascus. Warplanes are carrying out round-the-clock bombings of the area, which has been cut off since 2013.
military response.
The allegations can’t be proved
because Eastern Ghouta is inaccessible. But “even if we cannot
verify them, we cannot ignore
them,” U.N. Secretary General
António Guterres told the U.N.
Security Council on Monday. “Syria is bleeding inside and out,” he
said.
The violence comes despite a
U.N. Security Council-mandated
cease-fire that was to take effect
over two weeks ago but instead
seemed only to accelerate the killing. The Eastern Ghouta health
authorities estimated Tuesday
that more than 1,400 people have
been killed since the Feb. 18 assault on the enclave began, with
840 of those deaths occurring
since the Security Council adopted a 30-day cease-fire Feb. 24.
Addressing the Security Council on Monday, U.S. Ambassador
Nikki Haley said the United States
is prepared to act unilaterally to
enforce the cease-fire if Russia
does not comply.
Given its large population and
distance from international borders and rebel-held territory to
which the fighters and residents
might easily escape, the only identifiable outcome seems to be outright military victory by the government.
The Assad government’s pursuit of a military solution over a
negotiated settlement to the fighting “precludes any other option,”
Sajjad Malik, the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees representative in Damascus, said in an
interview last week. “And it’s really dramatic for the people. We’re
seeing this played out in Ghouta
as never before.”
A week ago, Malik accompanied the only convoy of aid to be
allowed into Eastern Ghouta
since November and said he was
shocked by what he saw. Most
people have spent the past three
weeks hiding in basements and
crudely built underground shelters, where conditions are rapidly
deteriorating.
“There’s not enough food.
There’s not enough medicines.
There’s skin rashes because they
haven’t washed in days. These
people want either to stop the
bombing or get out,” said Malik,
who spent seven hours in Eastern
Ghouta. What he saw, he said,
“will stay with me forever.”
“The children are filled with
trauma — you can see it in their
eyes. They’re tired. They’re hungry,” he said.
As loyalist forces retake territory, civilians are being squeezed
into an ever-smaller space. About
10,000 to 15,000 people are on the
run, and local authorities say displaced people are camped out on
the streets and in parks in the
town of Douma, the area’s largest
metropolis, because they have no
other place to go.
In the basements and shelters,
the question of whether to leave
or to stay is a subject of debate.
Some residents want safe passage
out. Others would prefer a deal
such as the one that ended the
siege of Aleppo in 2016, with fighters evacuated along with any residents who wanted to depart, leaving the area under regime control.
“Our leaving the city needs assurances from the U.N. that the
regime will not put us in detention and torture us. Russia is not
enough to give these guarantees
because they are a partner of the
regime in killing our people,” Naamat, who would like to leave, said
from the basement she has shared
with 320 people from her area for
the past three weeks. She spoke on
the condition that her full name
not be used for reasons of safety.
But such guarantees aren’t likely to materialize because there are
no negotiations for any kind of
deal. Guterres told the Security
Council that Russia and the Syrian government had failed to respond to a U.N. effort to mediate
with the largest rebel group, Jaish
al-Islam, and that a separate effort with a smaller group, Faylaq
al-Rahman, had foundered because of a dispute over where
negotiations should take place.
On Tuesday, 31 chronically ill
patients were evacuated from
Eastern Ghouta under the terms
of an agreement negotiated last
year with the rebels that was never fully implemented. They were
people with diseases such as cancer, diabetes and kidney failure
who cannot be treated in the
primitive medical facilities of Ghouta, and they were joined by
around 140 relatives who took the
chance to escape. Those critically
injured by the bombardments
were not part of the deal, even
though at least 1,000 are in need
of lifesaving care, according to the
United Nations.
Humanitarian
corridors
opened by the government have
drawn few people. Some residents
told Malik that the rebels were
preventing them from leaving.
Residents say the bombardments don’t stop for long enough
for people to dare leave their basements to reach the crossing
points. But even if they dared,
residents fear what would happen
when they encountered government forces across the front line.
In at least three towns in the
area, local residents have staged
pro-government demonstrations
in recent days, waving the Syrian
flag and denouncing the anti-Assad rebellion. “We don’t want
freedom anymore. We want national unity,” a small crowd chanted Friday in the town of Kfar
Batna.
The demonstrations were held
in a bid to deter the Syrian government from bombarding the area,
said Naamat. “They did that because they want only for the
bombing to stop. They are trying
to stop the regime and save their
lives,” she said.
liz.sly@washpost.com
Zakaria Zakaria in Istanbul and Heba
Habib in Stockholm contributed to
this report.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A15
SU
Economy & Business
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After getting billions, bailout recipient poised to duck regulations
Bill intended to free up
community banks would
aid some bigger players
BY
R ENAE M ERLE
For a bank seeking relief, Regions Financial is certainly having a good year.
The Alabama-based institution
is on track to post near-record
profits. Already one of the country’s largest banks with operations in more than a dozen states
and more than $120 billion in
assets, Regions Financial is growing at a quick pace. The Republicans’ 2017 tax bill even provided
an additional boost, pushing the
bank’s effective corporate tax rate
from about 30 percent to about 20
percent.
And with Congress racing to
ease regulations on the banking
industry, Regions could soon be
doing much better. The Senate is
set to vote this week to free more
than two dozen midsize financial
institutions, including Regions,
from the toughest rules put in
place after the financial crisis
aimed at preventing another economic meltdown.
Regions has suddenly found
itself in the middle of the debate
over the bill, held up as an example of all that is right and wrong
about redrawing the lines for how
to regulate banks that many say
are too big to fail.
Supporters and banking lobbyists say the current regulatory
regime unfairly punishes regional
banks such as Regions with rules
aimed at reining in global behemoths such as JPMorgan Chase.
Citing the complaints of a Regions executive that the industry
spends $2 billion a year complying with regulations, Sen. Mike
Crapo (R-Idaho), sponsor of the
bill, said on the Senate floor last
week, “These are not just empty
numbers — there are real economic consequences.”
But this deregulatory push,
which the Trump administration
has made a priority throughout
the government, comes at an inconvenient time: Unlike coal
mines or steel mills, Regions and
the banking industry in general
are doing well.
“Banks are going around pleading poverty and begging for regulatory relief,” said Marcus Stanley,
policy director for Americans for
Financial Reform, a nonpartisan
advocacy group that advocates
for tighter rules. “That is a hard
argument to swallow when their
profits are so high.”
Democrats and the advocacy
group say the debate fails to recognize that many of the midsize
institutions that would be helped
by the Senate legislation fell into
dire financial straits less than a
decade ago and needed more than
$40 billion in taxpayer bailouts.
Regions received $3.5 billion
from the crisis-era Troubled Asset
Relief Program or TARP. It took
years for the bank to repay the
money as it struggled to regain
profitability, industry analysts
say. Regulators would later fine it
$51 million for not properly disclosing souring loans during the
financial crisis.
Even its chief executive, Grayson Hall, has appeared to waver
on whether regulatory relief was
needed. At a 2015 New Orleans
conference, Hall lamented the
tough regulatory environment
that had followed the financial
crisis, but he said the industry
should stop complaining. “Just
adapt and let’s go,” he told the
crowd, according to the New Or-
leans Times-Picayune.
In a tweetstorm Tuesday morning, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (DMass.), called such regional banks
“huge financial institutions that
wrecked the economy in 2008.”
“Regions Financial Corporation has about 1,500 branches and
1,900 ATMs. It also got $3.5 billion in taxpayer bailouts during
the 2008 crash,” Warren said. If
the Senate bill passes, it “could get
the same level of federal oversight
as a small community bank.”
Under the bill to be passed by
the Senate, dozens of banks with
between $50 billion and $250 billion in assets would be freed from
the strictest regulatory burdens
called for under 2010’s sweeping
financial overhaul package, the
Dodd-Frank Act. American Express and Ally Financial, which
both received more than $3 billion in bailout money, would find
relief in the measure, as well as
Discover Financial Services,
which received more than $1 billion in bailout funds.
That enhanced supervision
they have endured is “regulation
on steroids,” said Nathan Stovall,
senior research analyst at S&P
Global Market Intelligence. “It is
just much fiercer regulation.”
Regions declined to comment
for this report, but a company
executive told the Senate Banking
Committee in 2015 that the regulations cost the institution about
$200 million a year. About 100
bank employees actively worked
on the annual stress test to prove
to regulators that it could endure
another financial crisis, while another 150 spent at least some of
their time on compliance issues,
Deron Smithy, executive vice
president and treasurer of Regions Financial, told the committee.
“For a company like Regions,
that standard being lifted would
likely liberate as much as 10 percent additional capacity for lending, which could be $8 billion to
$10 billion,” he said.
Some of these institutions are
likely to use their new freedom to
issue more dividends to shareholders and buy back stock, industry analysts said. For some
smaller banks, the Senate bill
would allow them to grow bigger
without incurring heightened
regulations, said Erik Gordon, a
professor at the University of
Michigan’s Ross School of Business. That is important as banks
scramble to keep up with technol-
ogy, he said.
“Banks are doing well but are
facing what is likely an expensive
wave of technological change,
where scale will matter,” he said.
But altering one of the central
tenets of the post-crisis financial
regulation — that banks of a certain size should receive more
oversight — has many Democrats
and banking industry experts
worried. Lawmakers initially set
$50 billion in assets as the line
above which banks would require
additional oversight because
they’d be considered big enough
to pose a threat to the economy if
they failed.
“We didn’t give a lot of thought
to $50 billion. We had hundreds
of decisions to make, and $50 billion seemed like a large number,”
said former congressman Barney
Frank (D-Mass.), one of the authors of Dodd-Frank.
Considering the paperwork
and time involved in complying
with the enhanced regulations,
$50 billion may be too low, Frank
said. But the $250 billion threshold for the toughest regulation
being considered by the Senate is
too high, he said. “$250 billion is a
problem.”
renae.merle@washpost.com
Kudlow atop
Trump’s list for
White House post
‘Supply-side’
commentator worked
in Reagan’s budget office
BY
J EFF S TEIN
President Trump signaled
Tuesday morning that Larry
Kudlow is his leading candidate
to take the helm of the National
Economic
Council,
further
boosting the chances of a longtime conservative commentator
and self-described “supply-side”
economist who championed the
Republican tax law passed this
fall.
Gary Cohn, the current director of the council, announced
earlier this month that he will
resign amid disagreements with
Trump over the president’s
planned tariffs on steel and aluminum imports.
“I’m looking at Larry Kudlow
very strongly. I’ve known him a
long time. We don’t agree on
everything, but in this case, I
think that’s good,” Trump told
reporters outside the White
House. “He’s a very talented man,
a good man, and I think he has a
good chance [at the job].”
Trump also suggested that the
search is not over, saying he will
still be “speaking to many others”
about the opening. White House
officials have pushed Trump to
consider Christopher P. Liddell, a
former chief financial officer of
General Motors, Microsoft and
International Paper who has
served in the White House since
last year.
Cohn has favored Shahira
Knight, one of his deputies, to
take over the job, according to
multiple reports.
Kudlow, 70, spent several
years working in President Ronald Reagan’s White House budget office. He also worked for the
Wall Street firm Bear Stearns
before hosting CNBC’s “The
Kudlow Report,” a conservativeleaning show about business and
politics.
Kudlow is still a regular presence on cable news and hosts a
podcast, “The Larry Kudlow
Show,” which has been generally
complimentary of Trump on a
wide range of issues beyond
economics, including on immigration, abortion and the “scam”
Russia investigation.
Kudlow has at times publicly
criticized Trump for his policies.
Like Cohn, Kudlow has been
critical of the president’s tariff
policy. Kudlow joined two other
conservative economists to write
a CNBC piece claiming that the
plan amounted to “tax hikes.”
“Trump should also examine
the historical record on tariffs,
because they have almost never
worked as intended and almost
always deliver an unhappy ending,” he wrote with Arthur B.
Laffer and Stephen Moore.
CNBC/NBCU PHOTO BANK/GETTY IMAGES
Larry Kudlow, former host of “The Kudlow Report” on CNBC, appears to be at the head of the list of candidates to replace Gary Cohn as
director of the National Economic Council. “I think he has a good chance [at the job],” President Trump said Tuesday.
Trump sought to play down
the disagreement Tuesday, saying that Kudlow was beginning
to agree with him that the tariffs
can serve as a bargaining chip
against other countries in other
negotiations.
Kudlow “now has come around
to believing in tariffs also as a
negotiating point,” Trump told
reporters. “I’m also negotiating
trade deals, and without tariffs,
we wouldn’t do nearly as well.”
Kudlow served as an economic
adviser to Trump’s presidential
campaign, helping to craft the
then-candidate’s tax plan.
Kudlow criticized Trump after
the release of the “Access Hollywood” tape in which the president boasted of acts of sexual
assault. Kudlow said he was
reconsidering his support for the
president, but he eventually reaffirmed it.
“Larry has been a friend of
mine for a long time. He backed
me very early in the campaign —
I think the earliest; I think he
was one of my original backers,”
Trump said Tuesday.
Trump spoke over the phone
with Kudlow on Sunday and
Monday about the position, and
he has also consulted with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin
and Jared Kushner, Trump’s senior adviser and son-in-law.
During the tax debate, Kudlow
pushed for Republicans to dramatically slash the corporate tax
rate.
The new law lowers the rate
from 35 percent to 21 percent —
to Kudlow, a major win. Kudlow
helped
persuade
skeptical
Sens. Susan Collins (R-Maine)
and Bob Corker (R-Tenn.) to
support the measure, Politico
reported.
“He takes an extraordinary optimistic view that tax cuts will
create substantial growth with
little to no revenue loss,” said
Brian Riedl, a senior fellow at the
Manhattan Institute, a libertarianleaning think tank. “He’s a zealous
advocate of tax relief as the solution to a lot of problems.”
the Amazon Basics line — were
part of the recall.
Amazon has received 53
reports of these power banks
overheating, which include
incidents of battery acid burns
and property damage from fire.
Amazon chief executive Jeffrey
P. Bezos owns The Washington
Post.
experienced or witnessed sexual
misconduct at the company.
jeffrey.stein@washpost.com
DIGEST
ECONOMY
AUTO INDUSTRY
Consumer prices rose
slightly in February
VW plans 16 plants
for electric vehicles
Consumer prices increased at a
modest pace in February,
underscoring that inflation
pressures appear to be muted for
now.
The Labor Department said
Tuesday that the consumer price
index increased 0.2 percent last
month, after a sharper 0.5 percent
rise in January.
Core prices — which exclude
the volatile food and energy
categories — also climbed 0.2
percent.
Overall, consumer prices rose
2.2 percent in February from a
year earlier, while core prices rose
1.8 percent from a year ago for the
third straight month.
Inflation fears have intensified
this year after a report last month
suggested that wages were rising
more quickly, which can push up
prices.
Subsequent data have shown
that hourly pay gains remain
moderate.
Volkswagen secured
$25 billion in battery supplies to
underpin an aggressive push into
electric cars, ramping up pressure
on Tesla as it struggles with
production issues for the
mainstream Model 3.
The world’s largest carmaker
will equip 16 factories to produce
electric vehicles by the end of
2022, compared with three in
operation, Volkswagen said
Tuesday in Berlin. The German
manufacturer’s plans to build as
many as 3 million electric cars a
year by 2025 is supported by deals
with suppliers for batteries in
Europe and China.
— Associated Press
— Bloomberg News
TECHNOLOGY
Amazon recalls
portable chargers
Amazon.com has recalled some
of its portable chargers in the
United States following reports of
— Reuters
MOHAMED ABD EL GHANY/REUTERS
People shop Tuesday at Cairo’s popular Al Ataba market, which has
a campaign poster of Egyptian President Abdel Fatah al-Sissi above it
that reads: “All of us with you.”
overheating and fire, the U.S.
Consumer Product Safety
Commission said Tuesday.
The watchdog for safety and
quality of consumer products said
about 260,000 units of six kinds
of power banks — manufactured
in China by Guoguang Electric for
ALSO IN BUSINESS
Vice Media has appointed Nancy
Dubuc, the former head of A&E
Networks, to be its chief executive
as the company tries to rebound
from sexual misconduct
allegations. Dubuc had stepped
down Monday at A&E. She’s been
a Vice board member and worked
with the company to develop the
Viceland cable network. Vice cofounder Shane Smith said in a
statement Tuesday that he’ll let
Dubuc run the company while he
concentrates on making deals
and creating content. Vice
apologized for a “boy’s club”
culture that was uncovered in
December when the New York
Times said it had talked to more
than two dozen women who had
The Winklevoss twins have
taken on their next project in the
cryptocurrency world:
regulation. The brothers, who run
the Gemini exchange for trading
bitcoin and ether, have submitted
a proposal to create the Virtual
Commodity Association, a selfregulatory organization meant to
police digital-currency markets
and custodians. The nonprofit
would aim to develop industry
standards, promote transparency
and work with regulators,
including the U.S. Commodity
Futures Trading Commission, to
prevent fraud, the brothers said
in a statement Tuesday.
— From news reports
COMING TODAY
8:30 a.m.: Commerce
Department releases retail sales
data for February.
8:30 a.m.: Labor Department
releases the Producer Price Index
for February.
A16
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 14 , 2018
IRS has refunds worth $1.1 billion waiting to be claimed, but the clock is ticking
This is the giving
season.
The IRS took
your money, and
now it’s time to
give it back.
Michelle
People are
Singletary positively giddy
about getting a
THE COLOR
tax refund. Often,
OF MONEY
refunds are the
result of overwithholding, meaning you gave
the federal government more
money than you owed.
By law, taxpayers have just
three years to claim a refund. So
April 17 is the last chance to get
your money for the 2014 tax year.
The IRS says there are about
$1.1 billion in unclaimed federal
income tax refunds owed to an
estimated 1 million taxpayers.
But like the lottery, where you
have to play to win, you have to
file to collect a refund. Live in
Massachusetts and didn’t file for
2014? The median potential
refund is $935. In Maryland and
Virginia, it’s $853 and $828,
respectively. In the District, it’s
$850. Wyoming has the largest
median refund at $973.
Nationwide, the midpoint for
the potential refunds for 2014 is
$847, which means half of the
refunds are more than $847 and
half are less, according to the
IRS.
So far this year, the average
refund is $3,046 and the average
in 2014 was $2,797.
Again, the only way you can
claim your refund is by filing. By
the way, if you have not filed tax
returns for 2015 and 2016, your
refund could be held up.
“But if you can’t get the other
returns filed, make sure you file
the one that has an expiration
date on it,” IRS spokesman Eric
Smith said. And don’t worry,
there is no penalty for filing a
late return if you’re getting a
refund.
Here’s an incentive to file: If
you have an outstanding tax
debt to the federal or state
government, the IRS will snatch
the money. And that’s a good
thing.
I’ve worked with a number of
people who were scared to file a
return thinking they owed
money. They didn’t. They were
shocked to receive hundreds
and, in some cases, thousands of
dollars in refunds. These same
folks sometimes had
outstanding federal and state tax
debt. The refunds helped make a
tremendous dent in the debt
they owed. For those with state
tax debt, the IRS sent the money
directly to the taxing authority.
Refunds can go toward
unpaid child support. They can
also be used to offset student
loans.
Perhaps you’re a student or
part-time worker and didn’t
earn enough money to be
required to file. Yet your
employer still may have taken
out federal taxes. Many low- and
moderate-income workers might
have been eligible for the Earned
Income Tax Credit. In 2014, the
credit for individuals and
families with low incomes was
worth as much as $6,143,
according to the IRS.
I know what you’re thinking:
Okay, I need to file, but I don’t
have a clue where I put my W-2
or 1099 forms. Of course, you
can ask your employer for a
duplicate. Or you can order a
free wage and income transcript
from the IRS. Go to IRS.gov and
click the link for “Get Your Tax
Record.” If you can’t get your
W-2 online, file IRS Form 4506-T
to request the transcript. You
can also get prior-year tax forms
online or call toll-free 800-TAXFORM (800-829-3676). Don’t
procrastinate any further. Your
prior-year returns have to be
mailed.
You can get free taxpreparation help. Click the link
for “Free file.” If your income is
$66,000 or less, you can get help
in filing your federal return and,
in many cases, your state return.
You’ll see a list of companies
offering free software to file.
Depending on your income,
you may qualify for free taxpreparation help through
various programs. The Volunteer
Income Tax Assistance (VITA)
program offers assistance to
people who have disabilities,
speak limited English or earn
$54,000 or less. There is also the
Tax Counseling for the Elderly
(TCE) program, which is mostly
operated by the AARP
Foundation Tax-Aide program.
Despite the title, help is
available to low- to moderateincome taxpayers, not just the
elderly, and they specialize in
addressing retirement and
pension-related issues.
To find a VITA or TCE site
near you, call 800-906-9887. Or
you can search for locations at
IRS.gov. Search for “Find a
Location for Free Tax Help.”
If you’ve filed and want to
know the status of your refund,
go to the IRS website and search
for “Where’s my refund?”
So, what happens to your
money if you miss the deadline
to collect your 2014 refund?
The money goes to the
Treasury Department. Although
the government can use help in
reducing the federal deficit, I’m
sure you could put your money
to better use.
michelle.singletary@washpost.com
Melania Trump will meet with tech giants on cyberbullying
Session to be first
major push in her effort
to promote safety online
BY
JIM LO SCALZO/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK
Melania Trump first pledged to highlight and fight cyberbullying in November 2016. The first lady is
not expected to announce specific policy proposals at the meeting, set for Tuesday, sources said.
Never Clean Your
®
Gutters Again
T ONY R OMM
First lady Melania Trump
plans to convene tech giants
including Amazon, Facebook,
Google, Twitter and Snap next
week to discuss ways to combat
online harassment and promote
Internet safety, according to four
people familiar with her efforts.
The meeting at the White
House, slated for Tuesday, marks
the first major policy push in the
first lady’s long-ago-announced
campaign to combat cyberbullying. At the gathering, Trump
plans to ask top policy executives
from tech giants to detail how
they’ve sought to address digital
ills such as the rise of online
trolls and the spread of malicious
content, according to the people,
who spoke on the condition of
anonymity because they were
not authorized to discuss her
efforts on the record. (Jeffrey P.
Bezos, the chief executive of
Amazon.com, owns The Washington Post.)
The people said they don’t
expect the first lady to unveil any
specific policy proposals to combat cyberbullying — a term her
team has sought to avoid, instead
opting to focus on the need for
kindness online.
Asked about the upcoming
event, a spokeswoman for Trump
said in a statement that the first
lady had “simply asked for a
meeting to discuss one of the
many things that impacts children.” The spokeswoman declined to provide additional details.
In recent months, companies
such as Facebook, Google and
Twitter have faced criticism for
allowing the spread of hate,
harassment, conspiracy theories
and other toxic content on their
platforms. After the mass shooting last month at a high school in
Parkland, Fla., for example, videos attacking the victims proliferated wildly on YouTube, aided
by algorithms that surface similar videos on a loop.
Others fault President Trump
for contributing to the lack of
civility
online,
particularly
through his tweets attacking opponents. Some of his most popular tweets in 2017 — garnering
hundreds of thousands of replies, likes or retweets among his
roughly 49 million followers —
involved rhetorical broadsides
aimed at North Korea and CNN.
Melania Trump first pledged
to highlight and fight cyberbullying in November 2016, days before her husband won the White
House. At the time, she lamented
that “our culture has gotten too
mean and too rough, especially
to children and to teenagers.”
Following the inauguration,
however, the first lady has addressed cyberbullying only in a
few public settings. Those have
included a high-profile speech at
the United Nations in September, in which she emphasized the
need to “teach each child the
values of empathy and communication that are at the core of
kindness, mindfulness, integrity
and leadership, which can only
be taught by example.”
More recently, Trump ap-
peared to be telegraphing a policy push to come: She hired new
aides, including a director of
policy, in January. The first lady
publicly returned to the issue of
cyberbullying last month in the
wake of the Parkland shooting.
Not long after that attack,
student Lauren Hogg tweeted
Trump to express frustration
that her stepson, Donald Trump
Jr., had liked tweets suggesting
that survivors had been coached
to speak to the media and cover
for the FBI. Days later, during a
speech praising the students of
Marjory Stoneman Douglas High
School, Trump spoke about the
need for more civility online and
the importance of “positive habits with social media and technology.”
For its part, Silicon Valley has
struggled to combat abuse and
harassment online. In a study
from the Pew Research Center
last year, for example, 41 percent
of Americans said they had personally experienced some form
of harassment on the Web — for
myriad reasons including their
gender, ethnicity or physical appearance.
Along with representatives
from Amazon, Facebook, Google,
Snap and Twitter, top aides from
Microsoft and the Internet Association, a lobbying organization
for Silicon Valley, as well as
consumer groups, will be at the
first lady’s meeting, the people
said. Each of these companies
either did not respond to emails
seeking comment or declined to
comment Tuesday.
tony.romm@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
technology
Trump wants new penalties imposed
on China for thefts of trade secrets
He rejects $30 billion
tariff plan, telling adviser
to go bigger, lobbyist says
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BY
D AVID J . L YNCH
President Trump has ordered
his chief trade negotiator to
develop tougher tariff proposals
to punish China for years of
stealing U.S. trade secrets, according to industry executives
familiar with the matter.
The order came after Trump
last week rejected as inadequate
a proposal from U.S. Trade Representative Robert E. Lighthizer
to levy import taxes on $30 billion in Chinese imports, the
people said.
The president’s message to his
trade chief was “make it bigger,”
said one lobbyist familiar with
the discussion.
“The president told him it
wasn’t enough,” said a second
executive.
Both executives spoke on the
condition of anonymity to discuss confidential deliberations.
The White House meeting was
first reported Tuesday afternoon
by Politico.
The report comes amid turmoil in the administration’s senior ranks with the departure of
National Economic Council Director Gary Cohn and Secretary
of State Rex Tillerson, both of
whom have urged the president
to avoid disrupting global commerce with new trade barriers in
addition to recently announced
tariffs on steel and aluminum.
Their departures followed the
loss of Rob Porter, the White
House staff secretary, who ran
weekly trade-policy meetings in
the West Wing.
With fewer adherents of mainstream trade policy advising the
president, economic nationalists
such as Peter Navarro, a White
House economist and fierce critic of China, have encouraged the
president to follow his tariff-raising instincts.
In August, the president directed Lighthizer to investigate
whether China’s intellectualproperty policies discriminated
against U.S. companies. Beijing
often requires foreign companies
to surrender trade secrets in
return for the right to operate in
China, where rampant piracy of
products including clothes and
computer software has long bedeviled multinational corporations.
Under U.S. trade law, Lighthizer isn’t due to deliver the results
of his probe until August.
But his boss is impatient for
action, and some trade analysts
say they expect an announcement of new U.S. trade measures
next week.
Amid an intensely fluid White
House environment, specifics of
the coming crackdown on China
remain subject to change. Officials have discussed a range of
options that would cover varying
amounts of Chinese products,
including electronics and consumer goods.
The U.S. imported more than
$505 billion worth of goods from
China last year while sending
more than $130 billion in the
other direction, according to the
Census Bureau.
The administration also is
considering imposing new limits
on Chinese investment in the
United States, which topped
$29 billion last year, according to
the Rhodium Group, a New Yorkbased consultancy.
While the president is itching
for action, administration officials have been grappling with
complexities in trying to assemble an effective response to Chinese trade practices. Putting a
value on the intellectual property that Chinese individuals have
reportedly siphoned from U.S.
companies has been particularly
vexing.
A 2011 report by the International Trade Commission estimated that U.S. companies lost
more than $48 billion in one year
because of widespread Chinese
violations of intellectual property.
“They’re having trouble coming up with sufficient evidence to
document what they want to do,”
said one veteran industry executive.
Lighthizer’s office declined to
comment.
The debate over possible tariffs on China comes as the relationship between the world’s two
largest economies is fraying.
Trump on Monday blocked
Singapore-based
Broadcom’s
proposed $117 billion acquisition
of chip maker Qualcomm, citing
national security concerns believed to involve the Asian company’s ties to a Chinese telecommunications company.
The U.S. last year rejected
three major Chinese acquisitions
of U.S. technology companies,
including a semiconductor maker, an Internet services provider
and in-flight entertainment company, and a mobile ad developer.
david.lynch@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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INTELLIGENCE FOR LEADERS WASHINGTONPOST.COM/POWERPOST
In Pennsylvania, Trump’s core supporters embrace his ‘obnoxious’ personality
Daily 202
moon
township, pa. —
How could
conservatives be
so critical of
Barack Obama’s
multilateral
agreement with Iran to curtail its
nuclear program but so
supportive of Donald Trump
meeting face to face with North
Korean leader Kim Jong Un?
I posed that question to 30
supporters of the president over
three hours on Saturday night as
they waited to see Trump speak
at a rally outside the Pittsburgh
airport, where he campaigned
for Republican congressional
candidate Rick Saccone ahead of
Tuesday’s special election. The
answers had nothing to do with
ideology and everything to do
with personality.
“To me, Obama was a buttkissing liberal. Trump is Teddy
Roosevelt. He just might go in
there and kick some a--,” said
Paul Ambrose, 70, a retired
apparel manufacturer who
collects toy trains and lives by a
golf course in Canonsburg, Pa.
“It’s the fear factor. Kim’s kind of
[defecating] his pants because
Trump’s put the fear of God into
him. Obama would have come
and bowed. We’ve got a wild card
here. We’ve got a cowboy. He ain’t
on the reservation. He just may
do something. That’s why they’re
coming to the table. Now lock the
damn door. Order coffee and
doughnuts. Keep the press out.
And nobody leaves until a deal is
done. What can go wrong?”
Ambrose added that he does
not like Trump as an individual
but thinks he’s an incredibly
effective executive. “Do I like him
as a person? Hell no,” Ambrose
said of Trump. “He’s disgusting.
He’s obnoxious. I don’t know how
his wife stands him. He’s got the
worst haircut in the world. No
manners. Insolent. Arrogant.
Obnoxious. But he gets things
done. He cut taxes. He’s telling
NAFTA to go pound salt.”
Many described Trump’s
gambit to accept a meeting with
Kim, which caught even his top
JAMES
HOHMANN
JOSHUA ROBERTS/REUTERS
A supporter holds an American flag with a Purple Heart medal pinned to it as President Trump speaks
Saturday at a rally for GOP congressional candidate Rick Saccone in Moon Township, Pa.
advisers off guard, as a
masterstroke. The conversations
offered a revealing window into
why about 40 percent of
Americans approve of the job
he’s doing.
“He’s not just a good
negotiator. He’s the best
negotiator,” said Kim Shannon,
57, an ultrasound technician
from Ohio, who called Trump’s
decision to accept Kim’s offer
“brilliant.” She downloaded “The
Art of the Deal,” Trump’s 1987
book, on her Kindle and has been
eager to read it.
“Maybe I can learn something
and help my personal finances,”
she said. “He’s saved the country.
It’s not done yet, but he’s going to
become the greatest president to
ever serve in office.”
Shannon remains as confident
as ever that Trump will reverse
decades of decline in the Ohio
River Valley. When she was a kid
in East Liverpool, Ohio, a nearby
steel mill employed 6,000 people
and kept the town thriving. It’s
been shuttered for decades.
“When I grew up, it was like
Mayberry and Andy Griffith.
Now it’s junkie-ville,” she said.
“Everybody is in a holding
pattern. We’re waiting for the
factories to return, but I know
they will. . . . For the first time in
“He’s got the worst
haircut in the world. . . .
Insolent. Arrogant.
Obnoxious. But he gets
things done.”
Paul Ambrose, 70, a retired apparel
manufacturer who lives
in Canonsburg, Pa.
many, many years, I’m
optimistic. Everything didn’t
collapse at once, and it will not
return in one day. It’s going to
take a period of years to return.”
Vendors sold T-shirts that said
“Trust in Trump” and “Built
Trump Tough.” These messages
captured the sentiments that
came up repeatedly as people
waited patiently to go through
metal detectors in temperatures
just above freezing.
During his 75-minute speech
to a capacity crowd inside a
hangar, Trump promised to go
into any negotiation with clear
eyes and to drive a hard bargain.
“Who knows what’s going to
happen? I may leave fast or we
may sit down and make the
greatest deal for the world,” he
said. “Look, North Korea’s tough.
This should have been handled,
by the way, over the last 30 years
— not now. . . . But that’s okay.
Because that’s what we do: We
handle things.”
Trump urged the crowd not to
jeer Kim. “For now, we have to be
very nice,” the president said.
(Instead, he egged the audience
on as they booed NBC host
Chuck Todd.)
You couldn’t help but get the
feeling that if Trump had
negotiated the Iran deal with the
same terms, many of his
supporters would praise him for
it. He retains a deep reservoir of
credibility with his core base of
supporters. There are precedents
for this: Richard Nixon could go
to China and Ronald Reagan
could negotiate treaties reducing
the nuclear stockpile because
they were perceived as hawks.
“Instinctively, I love the man.
He won’t give away the store or
the farm,” said Paul Treese, 78,
who brought his granddaughter
to see the president. “Kim
respects his toughness. Bill
Clinton gave [North Korea] the
sun, the moon and some of the
planets. They laughed and went
right on their way. That deal was
broken before whoever
negotiated it even got home.
Same with the Iran deal. . . .
Because Obama was soft slush.”
“Because he’s a businessman,
nobody can pull wool over his
eyes when it comes to
negotiations,” said John Kotse,
68, a retired lab technician. “I
could have negotiated with Iran
better than Obama did. He got
nothing. That was just plain
stupid.”
“Obama never actually tried to
negotiate. He just apologized for
us,” said Ed Campbell, 68, a
retired airline pilot.
“I don’t think he’ll do what the
Democrats say, which is to start a
war,” said Cheryl Mantich, 65, a
retired second-grade teacher. “I
think it’s always good to talk.”
“Everyone says there’s too
much bluster, but look at the
results,” said Nick Nadeau, 25, a
mechanical engineer at a 3-D
printing plant in Harrisburg. “He
got North Korea to come to the
table. I trust him to do what’s
right.”
Rejuvenate
POV
in your
new
There’s always an eclectic cast
of characters at Trump events.
Titus North ran for Congress
twice as a Green Party candidate
against Rep. Mike Doyle (D-Pa.).
But he registered as a Republican
to vote for Trump in the 2016
primary and remains a fan. “I
liked him saying he could get
along with [Vladimir] Putin,”
said North, an insurance agent.
He thinks Trump is playing
chess while his critics play
checkers. “The foreign policy
establishment and the media just
want the status quo with North
Korea,” North said. “Trump’s
belligerence wasn’t aimed at the
North Koreans. They were
already scared. . . . This was
aimed at scaring the media and
establishment to think he was
serious. . . . If the alternative is
war, they’re going to let him
negotiate.”
Ben Safer, a junior at West
Virginia University who is
majoring in mine engineering,
was the only person I spoke with
who thought Obama might also
have been able to negotiate a good
deal with Pyongyang. He said his
first choice for the GOP
nomination in 2016 was Sen.
Marco Rubio (Fla.). His second
choice was Sen. Ted Cruz (Tex.). “I
was initially a little ‘eh’ on Trump,”
he said. “There are moments
when I look at his Twitter feed
and shake my head, but overall I
think he’s done a good job.”
The 22-year-old, who was
wearing a miner’s hat,
volunteered before I asked about
North Korea that he was
“excited” Trump agreed to a
meeting with Kim because the
president is at his best when he’s
reaching out to people who
disagree with him.
“That’s been the biggest threat
we face,” Safer said of North
Korea.
“If he keeps a cool head, I hope
he can make a deal. I will give
Obama this: He always kept a
very cool head. . . . There was a
lot I didn’t like with Obama —
especially coal-wise — but he was
pretty coolheaded.”
james.hohmann@washpost.com
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EDITORIALS
Mr. Tillerson’s final humiliation
The outgoing secretary of state was unceremoniously fired by presidential tweet.
R
Mr. Tillerson said negotiations with the regime of
Kim Jong Un might be a long way off, Mr. Trump
agreed to a summit meeting.
Most disturbingly, Mr. Trump would not back the
tough stances that Mr. Tillerson struck, with ample
reason, against the misdeeds of Russian ruler Vladimir Putin. Most recently the secretary said he agreed
with the British government that Russia should be
held responsible for an attack on British soil with
deadly nerve gas. But Mr. Trump on Tuesday was
equivocal, suggesting the administration still needed
to “get the facts straight.”
Mike Pompeo, the CIA director and former member of Congress whom Mr. Trump nominated as his
next secretary of state, is more in tune with the White
House. He shares Mr. Trump’s contempt for the Iran
nuclear deal, and he has spoken of regime change in
North Korea as an objective. He reportedly has
forged a rapport with Mr. Trump and has been better
regarded as a manager at the CIA than Mr. Tillerson
has been at State. At best, Mr. Pompeo could restore
morale and professionalism at Foggy Bottom; a good
start would be filling the dozens of important
positions that remain vacant.
Mr. Pompeo will nevertheless start with some
steep challenges. Mr. Trump is two months away
from the next deadline for renewing the suspension
of sanctions on Iran, and the summit meeting he
committed to with North Korea was said to be
possible by the end of May. Britain is looking to the
United States for support in responding to the
nerve-gas attack. On all those issues, Mr. Trump is
courting disaster — from a confrontation with
Tehran for which the United States is ill-prepared, to
a rift with its closest ally.
Meanwhile, Mr. Pompeo and Mr. Trump’s nominee
for CIA director, Gina Haspel, must still win Senate
confirmation. Senators should have hard questions
for both: Mr. Pompeo should be asked to explain how
the administration can void the nuclear deal without
triggering a breach with allies, or war with Iran, and
what it can hope to gain from a Korean summit
meeting. Ms. Haspel should account for her role in
overseeing a CIA “black site” where detainees were
tortured during the George W. Bush administration.
As Mr. Trump’s conduct of foreign policy grows
increasingly chaotic, some checking by Congress is
more needed than ever.
TOM TOLES
Trade
or Trump?
Congressional Republicans
have to make a choice.
P
RESIDENTIAL POWER over trade and tariff
policy is a little-known but crucial, and enduring, legacy of the New Deal. Reacting to the
disastrous Smoot-Hawley Tariff enacted by a
Republican Congress in 1930, the Democratic Congress under President Franklin D. Roosevelt passed
legislation empowering the executive branch to set
tariffs through reciprocal bargains with other nations.
For more than eight decades, this broad delegation of
Congress’s constitutional authority to “lay and collect” tariffs has basically remained in place. And, with
certain emergency exceptions, presidents have by and
large used it to reduce tariffs, through both bilateral
and multilateral agreements that were subject to
majority votes in both houses of Congress, rather than
the two-thirds of the Senate required for treaties.
Among many reasons President Trump’s declaration of new tariffs on steel and aluminum, ostensibly
on national security grounds, represents a potentially
radical departure in U.S. trade policy is that it shows
what can happen when this legal authority, designed
for an era of trade-promoting presidents, suddenly
falls into the hands of a protectionist. Congress needs
to respond accordingly, before the conflict with trading partners, still manageable, produces irreversible
negative consequences.
Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) has stepped forward with a
simple 2½-page bill prohibiting the enforcement of
Mr. Trump’s tariffs. It’s clearly within Congress’s purview, constitutionally; politically, though, the bill is a
non-starter, given that Mr. Trump would veto it in the
unlikely event it passed. On the very first day of the
Trump administration, Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah) —
sensing what was coming — introduced the Global
Trade Accountability Act, which would require the
president to get approval from both houses of Congress before any “unilateral trade action” could take
effect, subject to temporary exceptions for “national
emergencies.”
If Mr. Lee’s bill had been the law, Mr. Trump would
now be lobbying Capitol Hill for support of his tariffs,
rather than entertaining lobbyists from all of the
countries — and U.S. companies — that will be
disadvantaged by them. The Republican leadership of
Congress is taking a wait-and-see approach to the
president’s reckless policies, hoping that the exemptions he has offered Canada, Mexico and, more conditionally, other allies prove to have substance and
permanence.
Perhaps this is prudent, given that the president’s
thinking is malleable and that restoring all tariff-
setting power to Congress has drawbacks of its own. In
pre-New Deal times, lobbyists swarmed the halls of
Congress as members drafted minutely detailed tariff
schedules. Smoot-Hawley covered 173 pages after
18 months of drafting. A balance must be struck
between curtailing Mr. Trump’s excesses and tying the
hands of future presidents.
At some point, however, Republican defenders of
free trade will have to decide between their declared
principles and this president. It’s a faint hope, but, for
the future of international trade, possibly the best one.
An agency spokesman quits in protest of a whopper told by top federal officials.
T
which was seconded by Attorney General Jeff Sessions. “I quit because I didn’t want to perpetuate
misleading facts,” James Schwab, the ICE official,
told the San Francisco Chronicle. He said that when
he told his superiors that “the information was
wrong, they asked me to deflect, and I didn’t agree
with that.”
Ms. Schaaf issued her warning that ICE raids were
imminent on Feb. 24, just before agents fanned out
in search of some 1,000 illegal immigrants with
misdemeanor or felony records. Her action was
ill-advised; while the mayor said she objected in
principle to sweeps that would inevitably ensnare
some immigrants with unblemished records, she
might have put some agents in needless peril.
In any event, however, the ICE raids were more or
less successful, producing 232 arrests of undocumented immigrants, half of them with criminal
records. That’s roughly in line with expectations;
deportation sweeps generally net just a fraction of
the targeted suspects.
Despite that, Mr. Homan blamed the mayor’s
warning for allowing some — or even all, as he said a
day later — of 800-odd immigrants to escape
capture. Mr. Sessions then fanned the fires, asserting, “Those are 800 wanted criminals that are now at
large in that community . . . all because of one
irresponsible action.” That was plain nonsense, as
Mr. Schwab pointed out.
The broader context for the incident is the
administration’s fury at so-called sanctuary cities
such as San Francisco and Oakland, where officials
limit cooperation with ICE deportation agents in the
interest of maintaining ties with their immigrant
communities. In some cases that refusal to cooperate is ill-advised, but often even sanctuary jurisdictions hand over dangerous felons who have served
their sentences. Those who are shielded, in the sense
that they are set free after serving jail time, tend to
have committed less-serious crimes.
Heedless of such distinctions, immigration officials such as Mr. Homan appear to believe they are
involved in a sort of war. And in war, the first
casualty is invariably the truth.
ABCDE
L O CA L O P I N I O N S
Join the debate at washingtonpost.com/local-opinions
Congress: Please save the day by saving the bay
The March 6 Metro article “Chesapeake’s ‘secret
garden’ thrives, but funding threats loom” and
March 8 editorial “Don’t quit this diet” correctly
documented the progress achieved since implementation of the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint.
It is important to remember, however, that progress came after years of voluntary agreements were
broken and milestones missed. What changed?
Ten years ago, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation
and its partners issued notice of intent to sue the
Environmental Protection Agency over its failure to
enforce the Clean Water Act. The settlement to that
suit included an agreement that the EPA would
develop pollution limits by 2010 that, when
achieved, would result in a restored Chesapeake Bay.
As I read another article on a Metro incident —
“Rust problem blamed for Jan. Metro derailment”
[Metro, March 9] — it amazed me that “safety” is to
blame again. Safety is not the problem or the cause of
Metro’s problems. The problem is maintenance, or
lack thereof.
The article quoted a Metro safety officer, but we
need to hear from maintenance officials with the
Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority.
Metro should stop blaming safety and improve
maintenance and repairs.
Mike McCullion, Ashburn
So, after Metro’s train operators demonstrated
difficulty in understanding that red lights mean
“stop,” we now learn that its safety inspectors don’t
know what black means. While federal safety inspectors use black to designate a serious deficiency in the
system requiring immediate action, Metro has been
using black to call attention to routine maintenance
problems. Thus, Metro routinely downgraded urgent
federal code-black issues to ones involving routine
maintenance.
What this new knowledge shows is that the rust
problem is not just on Metro’s tracks but between the
ears of its administrators.
Paul A. McGuckian, Rockville
A delicate rebalancing act
Regarding the March 9 editorial “No way to treat a
friend”:
Through the economics lens, what President
Trump has done and is doing now is testing the
“rent” of American credit on the diplomatic stage.
“Rent” in economics means the discrepancy between what you pay now and the highest you want to
pay for the same thing.
In Mr. Trump’s eyes, U.S. allies would be willing to
pay much more for what the United States is
providing for the global order, so he wants to
rebalance the status quo and rebuild a new equilibrium on the global stage. The real crisis will come when
the push by Mr. Trump hits our allies’ warning lines.
This is only the second year of the Trump
administration. We need to worry about the frequency, degree and extent of intimidating moves in
the future. Breaking down the former equilibrium is
easy, but building up a new one is much harder,
especially if Mr. Trump is so variable.
Shuai Tang, Arlington
Glacier misinformation
Truth is a casualty at ICE
HE TOP official at Immigration and Customs Enforcement, whose stock in trade is
tough-guy double-speak on deportation, occasionally wanders into the territory of
outlandish falsehoods, often in the service of the
idea that Americans should be very afraid. That was
the case last month when Thomas D. Homan, ICE’s
deputy director (and, in the absence of a director, the
agency’s de facto No. 1) suggested that more than
800 “criminal aliens” were at large in Northern
California because the mayor of Oakland had tipped
them off.
That was a risible exaggeration apparently triggered by Mr. Homan’s wrath that the mayor, Libby
Schaaf, a Democrat, had announced that ICE
planned raids to arrest undocumented immigrants
across the Bay Area in late February. It was also the
sort of blithe fiction the Trump administration
usually peddles without public pushback from career
civil servants. Not this time.
This week, ICE’s own spokesman in San Francisco
resigned in protest of Mr. Homan’s false assertion,
MARCH 14 , 2018
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
EX TILLERSON was poorly cast as secretary
of state. The veteran oil executive never
grasped some of the essentials of diplomacy,
including the importance of public communication. He badly damaged the State Department by
ignoring its professionals, scores of whom departed,
while conducting a prolonged and ill-advised reorganization. He disregarded American principles by
playing down human rights, and he proved ineffective as a negotiator — whether with U.S. allies such as
the Persian Gulf states or adversaries such as Russia.
None of those weaknesses, however, appear to
explain why President Trump abruptly dismissed, via
tweet, Mr. Tillerson on Tuesday — the last of many
humiliations the president inflicted on his top
diplomat. Rather, Mr. Trump suggested that he and
Mr. Tillerson were “not really thinking the same” on
key foreign policy issues, which is true. Mr. Tillerson
resisted the president’s steps toward voiding the
nuclear deal with Iran and the Paris climate treaty,
and opposed moving the U.S. Embassy in Israel to
Jerusalem. When Mr. Tillerson spoke in favor of
diplomacy with North Korea, Mr. Trump tweeted
that he was wasting his time; then, the same day
. WEDNESDAY,
Those limits, coupled with state implementation
plans, two-year milestones to track progress and
consequences for failure, make up the Clean Water
Blueprint. The Trump administration is proposing
to defund the EPA’s Chesapeake Bay Program. The
program, begun during the Reagan administration
and supported by every administration since, is the
glue that holds the multistate restoration efforts
together. And it’s working.
Defunding the program would be shortsighted.
We hope bipartisan support for clean water in
Congress will save the day — and the bay.
Harry Lester, Virginia Beach
The writer is chairman of the board of trustees of
the Chesapeake Bay Foundation.
FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
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Indur Goklany’s comments on glaciers, as reported
in the March 9 PowerPost article “Trump official:
Scientists ‘beyond their wheelhouse’ with views on
glaciers,” were surreal. The science and technology
policy analyst suggested it may be good for Montana’s
economy when Glacier National Park’s iconic glaciers
are gone. Why? Warmer temperatures may mean
tourist season will expand and hiking will replace
glacier-viewing. Mr. Goklany took a real problem
(warming) and found an imaginary solution (tourism) for a problem (loss of tourism) that didn’t exist
until humanity caused warming and the loss of
glaciers. Ridiculous.
I have family living near the park. They see that
warming causes fire season to expand. Tourists don’t
like fires and smoke. They can’t bike, hike or canoe during fire season because smoky air is unpleasant, and carcinogenic particulate levels become dangerously high. Mr. Goklany’s nonscientific, pseudoeconomic solution is camouflage for his nonscientific
misinformation about human-caused climate
change’s seriousness. Glaciers aren’t only about tourism. Glaciers store water and provide water later.
Judy Weiss, Brookline, Mass.
Out of this world, for real
Christopher Mellon’s March 11 Outlook essay,
“The Pentagon isn’t taking UFOs seriously enough,”
described the refusal of the appropriate federal
agencies to deal rationally with this latest flurry of
reports of unidentified flying objects. (That is what
they are, despite hesitancy to use that loaded term.)
Any concern that potential enemies have vastly
superior military aircraft is seriously misplaced, for
flying objects having radical shapes and spectacularly superior performance have been detected visually
by military and airline pilots and confirmed by both
civil and military radar since the 1940s. Had Russia
or North Korea or Iran or anyone else possessed such
craft, there would have been multiple opportunities
to use them to our everlasting detriment.
Don Berliner, Alexandria
The writer is a former chairman of the board of the
now-defunct Fund for UFO Research.
Hunting elephants to help them
It is a pity that James Hohmann’s March 9
The Daily 202 column, “On elephants and all else,
actions speak louder than tweets,” skirted the dilemma of whether elephants should be hunted. While I
could never shoot an elephant and have never owned
a gun, I am happy that others are prepared to.
The aim must be to ensure a good population of
elephants in, say, 100 years. The most important
factor in retaining elephants in Africa is ensuring
that they and other wildlife win the race against
farming, pastoralism and ranching in maximizing
income for local people. All protected areas were
created on local people’s traditional lands on which,
by the way, elephants had survived for thousands of
years. Nowhere in Africa has this history been
forgotten.
Fundamental in sustaining elephants is sustaining
the soils and vegetation from which they will survive.
Vegetation and soils are degrading in many areas.
Overpopulation of elephants well beyond the carrying capacity typically results in vegetation diversity
decline and soil erosion from lands devoid of cover.
Hunting fees of around $50,000 per male elephant
can make a huge difference to incentives locally. You
would need several hundred tourists to match that;
in many remote areas, the game-viewing tourists will
rarely be enough. Without hunting income, farming
and livestock will win.
The simplistic mantra that “shooting elephants is
cruel” may well be their downfall, the ultimate
cruelty to the species.
Ridley Nelson, Great Falls
Letters to the editor: letters@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A19
RE
KATHLEEN PARKER
ANNE APPLEBAUM
Just stop,
Hillary.
Please.
Nerve-agent
attack exposes
Britain’s
isolation
S
he can’t let go.
She can’t stop talking about
what happened. She wrote an
entire book about it. Now she’s
telling people in other countries about
why she should have won. In India last
weekend, she told an audience that she
won in all the smart, cool places — and
then hit a pandering low that puts a
catalogue of others to shame.
Hillary Clinton just can’t quit herself.
Not then. Not now.
In case you missed it, she won the
popular vote by nearly 3 million votes
but lost the electoral college. Like it or
not, our electoral system was set up
this way — with both a popular vote
and the electoral college — ostensibly
as a bulwark against mob rule.
Americans either love or hate the
electoral college, depending on whether it benefits them. And every few
years, we want to scrap the whole thing
and let the majority have its way. Or,
should I say, let demographics and
birthrates rule the day.
Irony, meanwhile, is one happy glutton these days. Donald Trump’s unexpected victory meant that the “mob,” as
perceived by Clinton supporters,
merged with the electoral college to
pick a populist demagogue.
To say a majority of the country
awoke the morning after Election Day
shellshocked and mute is to understate
the effect not so much of Clinton’s loss
but of Trump’s win. As in, What?! On
my block in very-blue Washington on
the morning after, three neighbors
simultaneously ventured outside to
collect the newspaper or walk the dog
and stood staring at each other, wordlessly. It was as though the presidency
had died.
But life does skip right along, doesn’t
it? A triumphant President Trump
hasn’t slackened his pace as he shows
one staff member, appointee or Cabinet member after another the door.
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, the
most recent (but surely not last), was
fired Tuesday in the nick of a bad-news
cycle — a possible Republican loss in a
special congressional election in Pennsylvania and a lawsuit filed by an
alleged former lover (Windy, Snowy, or
some such) who was allegedly paid not
to tell.
No good seems to come to those who
serve in this administration. Cue Peter,
Paul and Mary: Where have all the
soldiers gone, long time passing?/
Where have all the soldiers gone, long
time ago?/ Gone to graveyards, everyone/ Oh, when will they ever learn?/
Oh, when will they ever learn?
The same song could be sung about
Clinton, if only she could hear the
music. But then, she was always a little
tone-deaf. In India last week on a
private trip with her friend and loyal
adviser Huma Abedin, Clinton gave a
few speeches as part of her ongoing
global book tour to promote, wait for it,
“What Happened.”
At least Al Gore, who suffered a
similar fate — winning the popular
vote in 2000 but losing the electoral
college to George W. Bush — went on to
only grow a beard and make documentaries about the end of the Earth.
Clinton seems committed to a personal
Groundhog Day, in which she adds not
new talents and feats of heroism but
fresh targets to blame for her destiny
denied.
She has variously blamed former
FBI director James B. Comey, Russia,
sexists, “deplorables” and, during a
speech in Mumbai, racism. In one of
her worst-yet panders — quite a distinction if you remember Clinton’s
2007 speech in Selma, Ala. — she
apparently noticed the darker pigmentation of her Indian audience and
adapted.
She started out by reiterating her
disdain for those who failed to recognize her virtues, saying that she won in
places “that are optimistic, diverse,
dynamic, moving forward,” compared
with Trump voters who are always
looking “backwards.” Then, mockingly,
talking to “those people” who voted for
him, she continued: “You know you
didn’t like black people getting rights,
you don’t like women, you know, getting jobs, you don’t want to, you know,
see Indian Americans succeeding more
than you are.”
Yikes. So, the people who voted for
Trump resent Indian Americans’ success? Funny, because surely her audience was aware that the president
selected Indian American Nikki Haley
to be the U.S. ambassador to the United
Nations. And it’s a good bet they knew
Haley had previously been serving her
second term as the governor of South
Carolina, where she was the first woman and ethnic minority to be elected
governor in the state’s history.
Such a lack of awareness, combined
with Clinton’s clear disdain for millions of Americans whom she would
have served as president, confirms she
shouldn’t have won after all. By her
insinuations, she has demonstrated a
loathsome prejudice against the poorly
educated and unemployed, as well as
rural whites, social conservatives and
women who stay home with their
children — to name a few.
What happened, you ask?
That.
kathleenparker@washpost.com
A
legal to obstruct justice. On Wednesday,
ethics laws would be suspended, allowing
government officials to boost their private businesses. On Thursday, sexual harassment and assault laws would be void.
On Friday, it would be legal for foreigners
to use nerve agents on U.S. soil.
The downside is that by Saturday,
Stormy Daniels might decide confidentiality agreements are legally nonbinding.
It’s already legal for Trump to purge
from his government anybody who has
the temerity to display independent
thought. And Tillerson did that, differing
with Trump over the Paris climate accord,
neo-Nazis in Charlottesville and dealing
with Qatar, Venezuela, Afghanistan and
Iran. Tillerson, who never exactly denied
that he had called Trump a “moron,” drew
a public rebuke from Trump for “trying to
negotiate with Little Rocket Man” Kim
Jong Un.
Their most consequential disagreement was surely about Russia. Tillerson
was reportedly stunned that Trump took
Putin’s denials of election meddling at
face value (“when he tells me that, he
means it”).
Tillerson’s designated successor, Mike
Pompeo, won’t give Trump such grief.
The CIA director auditioned for the new
job on “Fox News Sunday,” saying “the
Russians attempted to interfere” in the
election, but this was part of a “long
history” of such things also done by
“other actors.” Pompeo assured viewers
that “there’s not been a single indication”
Russia succeeded.
Ignore that guy who just called Russia
“an irresponsible force of instability in the
world.” He doesn’t work here anymore.
Russia is harmless. Putin is benign.
The Purge is working.
dd a new word to your vocabulary:
Novichok. It’s a chemical weapon developed in the Soviet Union in the late
1980s, a nerve agent reportedly
10 times more potent than its better-known
predecessors. A Russian scientist who was
accidentally exposed to a small amount reported seeing “brilliant colors and hallucinations”; he died about five years later.
Larger doses may lead to immediate
paralysis of the nervous system; that’s what
the British government believes happened to
Sergei Skripal, a Russian defense intelligence
officer who spied for Britain, as well as his
daughter, Yulia, when they were exposed to
Novichok in Salisbury, a provincial English
market town best known for its lovely cathedral. The contrast between the sinister
Russian poison and this middle-class, middleEngland backdrop is part of what has made
the story so sensational in the country.
Vladimir Putin, a man whom most Britons
know as a semi-fictional bad guy who sometimes appears on the evening news, has suddenly insinuated himself into ordinary life.
One British policeman fell gravely ill after
being exposed to the Skripals; 12 others were
hospitalized; hundreds have been warned as
well. That makes it difficult to dismiss this
story — “Russians killing Russians, and why
should we care?” — as many Britons did when
Alexander Litvinenko, another Russian
ex-spy, was murdered with radioactive polonium, another rare, highly classified poison,
in central London in 2006.
But while Litvinenko’s assassins might
have expected to go undetected, the Skripals’
would-be murderers had to know that Novichok would quickly be linked to the Russian
government. This assassination attempt represents whole new levels of defiance. It broke
the rules of spy swaps: Skripal had been
pardoned by then-Russian President Dmitry
Medvedev in 2010 and traded for a bevy of
Russian spies. It comes amid a long series of
other mysterious deaths, including that of
Nikolai Glushkov, a Putin opponent, in London on Monday. It showed no concern for
bystanders. It has been accompanied by a
loud and arrogant disinformation campaign.
Since the story broke, Russian state television
has alternately issued warnings to “traitors”
and blamed British secret services, Georgia
and Ukraine. A Russian politician appeared
on the BBC ranting about a new Reichstag fire
and comparing the British prime minister,
Theresa May, to Hitler. The Russian Foreign
Ministry and the Russian Embassy have been
openly mocking Britain, tweeting photographs of James Bond and laughing at the
evidence.
But why are they doing this? Speaking to
British politicians and officials over the past
week, I’ve heard a range of explanations. Just
like the attack on the journalist Anna
Politkovskaya more than a decade ago, the hit
may have been meant as a warning to other
potential double agents; you don’t have to
murder every journalist, or every spy, to
frighten the rest. Alternatively, it may have
been designed, in line with the old Soviet
tradition of “active measures,” to provoke an
angry response; in advance of the preordained Russian election next week, Putin can
increase sluggish turnout by shouting about
“Russophobia” in Britain.
More ominously, it may have been designed
to expose the country’s new isolation: Now
that it is leaving the European Union, Britain
no longer has a set of allies it can rely upon to
help craft a response. It has no favors it can
draw upon, either. For the past year, British
diplomacy has been focused on Brexit to the
exclusion of all else. As if to underline this
weakness, even the White House was stunningly opaque, condemning the attack without mentioning Russia. The American president, so quick to insult Meryl Streep and Alec
Baldwin, has yet to tweet a syllable.
So extraordinary does this failure seem to
the British — does the American president
believe their government or the Russian Embassy? — that here in London, many are
asking whether President Trump dismissed
Rex Tillerson because the State Department’s
statement on the Skripal poisonings used the
word “Russia.”
If the point was to expose British isolation,
it has succeeded: There is no obvious, fast
response that Britain can make, by itself, that
damages Putin. Bar some more senior Russian politicians from Britain? That hardly
matters to the Russian president. Boycott the
World Cup? No one will mind.
The responses that might really matter are
much more difficult. The British government
could initiate a cyberattack or reveal some
hacked information, and there are rumors
that it will. It could reinforce its troops on the
Russian border, in the Baltic states. It could
also decide on much more revolutionary financial actions, make full use of its own new
laws on “unexplained wealth” and investigate
and freeze the assets of any Russian officials in
Britain. It could pass laws making it difficult
or impossible for anonymous shell companies
to own British property or indeed to function
in Britain at all.
That would cut down on Russian money
laundering, and indeed international money
laundering, and would slowly drive the Russian oligarchs out of London. But it would also
cut down on the profits of the real estate
agents, yacht salesmen, couturiers, lawyers
and accountants who make their living off the
international rich who have found the city so
welcoming. For two decades, successive British governments put profits over security and
underestimated the danger of hosting unscrupulous kleptocrats. The appearance of Novichok in a quiet English town exposes the risks
of that policy — just at a moment when Brexit
Britain will find it most painful to abandon.
Twitter: @Milbank
applebaumletters@washpost.com
ZACH GIBSON/BLOOMBERG NEWS
CIA Director Mike Pompeo is President Trump’s choice to replace Rex Tillerson as secretary of state.
DAVID IGNATIUS
The axis of caution
has been broken
T
he Great Disrupter and the
Boy Scout were never comfortable partners. So there
was a sense of inevitability to
President Trump’s announcement
Tuesday that he was dumping Rex
Tillerson as secretary of state and
installing Mike Pompeo, the man he
wanted in that job back in November.
The
gregarious,
risk-taking
Pompeo has an easy rapport with
Trump that the more cautious, reticent Tillerson never achieved. A successful secretary of state needs to be
able to speak for the president —
something Tillerson could never do
and Pompeo will probably achieve
from Day One.
Trump’s tone in announcing the
reshuffle was almost that of an exultant commander picking his “war
Cabinet,” though the challenges for
now will be diplomatic. In Trump’s
face-to-face negotiations with North
Korea’s Kim Jong Un, possibly the
apex of his presidency, Pompeo will
be his key adviser and perhaps emissary.
“Tremendous energy, tremendous
intellect,” Trump said of Pompeo. “We
are always on the same wavelength.”
As for Tillerson, Trump concluded:
“We disagreed on things,” citing the
Iran nuclear deal as an example of
where the two “were not really thinking the same.”
Tillerson was at his wounded best
as he said an abrupt goodbye Tuesday
afternoon. He was dignified and generous, even as the fatigue and stress
were evident in his face. He rightly
took credit for framing the diplomatic strategy that engaged North Korea
— but also conceded his inability to
fashion clear policies for Syria, China
and Russia. He dispensed with the
usual ritual testimonial to a president who has treated him so poorly,
instead thanking his colleagues at the
State Department and the Pentagon.
Tillerson’s ouster capped a year of
humiliating treatment from Trump.
Representing a president who,
through leaks and tweets, advertised
his personal discomfort with the Eagle Scout, Tillerson was in an untenable position.
The danger is that Pompeo, so
much in sync with Trump, will remove the dampers that have sometimes tempered the president’s disruptive instincts.
Tillerson offered solid, traditional
foreign policy counsel. He opposed
gutting the Iran nuclear deal, starting
a trade war, relocating the U.S. Embassy to Jerusalem and other moves.
He operated in tandem with Defense
Secretary Jim Mattis. This axis of
caution has now been broken, perhaps leaving Mattis in a weakened
position.
Pompeo has been among the most
political CIA directors in modern
history, acting as a quasi-policy adviser in addition to intelligence chief.
CIA operators liked his gung-ho activism; analysts were warier, fearing
that Pompeo would dilute the agency’s independence. In his public appearances, Pompeo has been feisty
and even combative in supporting
the administration. That undoubtedly pleased Trump, but it made
Pompeo a more partisan figure than
the usual CIA director.
Pompeo is a smooth communicator and may fix some of the obvious
problems at State. He’ll talk more
with the press corps and State employees, both hungry for contact after
the taciturn Tillerson. Colleagues are
urging Pompeo to quickly name career ambassadors to vacant embassies, which would revive morale
among Foreign Service officers.
Tillerson’s biggest mistake was his
seeming disdain for his own agency.
He appeared to regard Foggy Bottom
as enemy territory; only one senior
aide, policy planning director Brian
Hook, spoke authoritatively for him
on policy issues. Tillerson’s tenure
produced a genuine morale crisis at
State, with precious talent walking
out the door nearly every week.
Trump nominated a career CIA
officer, Deputy Director Gina Haspel,
as Pompeo’s successor. She’s popular
with colleagues at Langley, but her
confirmation hearings will be
contentious because of her involvement in the CIA’s secret detention
and interrogation programs. Former
Obama administration intelligence
officials speak highly of her, which
may blunt Democratic criticism.
Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.), the conservative firebrand, would have been
a much more controversial choice,
giving the CIA a face even more
partisan than that of Pompeo.
The fulcrum in foreign policy has
been Mattis and Tillerson. The center-weight will now shift to Trump
and Pompeo. The policy process may
be smoother, with a chief diplomat
who knows (and shapes) the president’s mind.
But Tillerson’s demise removes a
restraint on the president’s sometimes impulsive behavior. Trump resented tutelage from a man who
privately called him a “moron,” but
Tillerson’s advice on Iran, Russia,
China and North Korea was sensible
and generally correct.
Now Trump will have a kindred
spirit at State; the White House and
Foggy Bottom will be going in the
same direction, for better or worse.
Pompeo will help in shaping the
high-level diplomacy that’s ahead.
The worry is that he may be an
accelerator when the president needs
a brake.
Twitter: @IgnatiusPost
DANA MILBANK
‘The Purge’ in the White House
I
t’s official: President Trump’s
2020 reelection slogan will be lifted
from a dystopian thriller in which a
white-nationalist U.S. government
suspends the rule of law. Variety described the film, “The Purge: Election
Year,” as “a squalid B-movie political
horror film that plays to our most reptilebrained basic instincts.”
Could there be any better description
of the Trump presidency?
Trump, at his Saturday night rally,
announced his reelection slogan: “Keep
America Great!”
Trump floated the slogan 14 months
earlier in an interview with my colleague
Karen Tumulty, and news reports at the
time pointed out that the phrase had
already been used as a tagline promoting
“The Purge: Election Year.” Trump went
ahead with it anyway, and why not?
Purging is exactly what Trump is doing.
On Tuesday, it was Secretary of State
Rex Tillerson’s turn to be purged — announced via tweet. Trump didn’t bother
to speak directly with Tillerson before he
fired the former ExxonMobil chief, who
had cut short a trip to Africa, where he
was cleaning up for Trump’s “shithole”
comments.
This was much the way Trump purged
FBI Director James B. Comey, who
learned of his firing from cable news
while giving a speech in Los Angeles. And
it’s similar to how Comey’s deputy,
Andrew McCabe, was purged, and how
Attorney General Jeff Sessions and deputy Rod J. Rosenstein likely would have
been purged if Trump had his druthers,
and how national security adviser H.R.
McMaster will probably be purged soon.
Many others whose qualifications for
service do not include sycophancy — from
the regional immigration spokesman
who quit rather than defend falsehoods
up to top economics aide Gary Cohn —
have self-purged rather than suffer more
debasement. Defense Secretary Jim
Mattis may soon be the last one standing
between Trump and his nuclear button.
A common thread among Trump’s
purge victims: discomfort with his abiding affection for Vladimir Putin. It’s probably no mere coincidence that Tillerson’s
last significant action before his firing
was to issue a statement calling Russia
“an irresponsible force of instability in the
world, acting with open disregard for the
sovereignty of other states.” Tillerson concurred with Britain’s assessment of a
nerve-agent attack, telling reporters the
attack on British soil “clearly came from
Russia.” The White House had avoided
blaming Russia, asserting Britain was still
“working through . . . some of the details.”
The Trump White House similarly
shied from criticizing Putin for saying, in
an interview broadcast over the weekend,
that the election interference may have
been done by “Jews” who have Russian
citizenship but “are not even Russians.”
Likewise, the Trump administration has
resisted imposing sanctions on Russia or
spending money designated for countering Russia’s election interference.
Each baffling capitulation to Putin revives the long-standing question: Does
Russia have some leverage over Trump? If
that’s the explanation, Trump might need
to crib more material from “The Purge.”
In the film series, the government provides a 12-hour period once a year in
which any crime, including murder, is
legal. The difficulty for Trump is that
12 hours could be too limiting. A purge
week would be more practical. On Monday, foreigners would be free to manipulate U.S. elections. On Tuesday, it would be
A20
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 14 , 2018
Huge costs, thorny politics lie in path of infrastructure initiative
versity. “The worse it gets, the
harder it gets.”
Political demands for spending
in the short run, with immediate
benefits, end up taking precedence
over calls for rebuilding costly infrastructure for the long-term
good, Forrer said. “The problem’s
gotten so bad that the traditional
solutions being offered by the individual participants won’t get at the
problem anymore. . . . We’ll need
to see more leadership on the issue, bringing together all sides.”
That disconnection between
aspiration and reality has been on
display as opponents spar over
two fundamental questions: how
much construction the Trump
plan would actually fund; and
what to do about the looming
shortfall in the nation’s Highway
Trust Fund, a major source of
federal infrastructure funding.
Trump administration officials
pressing for the president’s 10year, $200 billion infrastructure
initiative have concentrated their
sales pitch on the contours of the
plan, which they assert will
prompt $1.3 trillion in state, local
and private spending. The plan
would give governors block
grants benefiting rural areas, set
aside funds for “transformative”
projects and create a $100 billion
incentive plan.
Chao and the secretaries of energy, labor, agriculture and commerce are to appear before the
Senate Commerce Committee on
Wednesday for a hearing on the
Five Cabinet secretaries
will head to Hill to lobby
for Trump’s plan
BY
M ICHAEL L ARIS
As the Trump administration
ramps up lobbying for its infrastructure plan, with five Cabinet
secretaries making a pilgrimage
to a Senate committee on Wednesday, there is bipartisan agreement
that the nation should deal with
worsening traffic congestion, a
mountain of undone maintenance, spotty rural broadband,
long-neglected water projects
and more.
But math and politics — as
well as profound disagreements
over tax increases, the proper
roles for the government and the
private sector, and the value of
environmental checks and balances — continue to be major
impediments.
The growing nature of the challenge — Transportation Secretary
Elaine Chao recently cited approximately $4 trillion in infrastructure needs — has gummed
up the system’s ability to solve it,
outside observers said.
“This has been going on for a
long time,” said John Forrer, an
associate research professor of
strategic management and public
policy at George Washington Uni-
ZACH GIBSON/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao recently cited approximately
$4 trillion in infrastructure needs across the United States.
administration’s plan.
Critics have repeatedly dismissed the administration’s proposal as a “scam,” and last week,
Senate Democrats released their
own infrastructure initiative,
which calls for $1 trillion in federal spending. It would be paid for
by undoing major elements of the
Republican tax cuts passed last
year, as well as ditching a tax
break benefiting investment
managers.
Economists at the Penn Wharton Budget Model, citing decades
of academic research, said the
Trump plan would result in, at
most, $30 billion in new spending
on infrastructure, beyond the
$200 billion in federal funds. That
is because, they said, states and
localities would spend less of their
“The problem’s gotten
so bad that the
traditional solutions . . .
won’t get at the problem
anymore”
John Forrer, professor of public policy
at George Washington University
own money on such projects,
seeking to rely on federal money
instead, a common phenomenon
known as substitution.
Trump administration officials
accused the Wharton economists
of failing to read or understand
the plan, which would require a
state or locality to prove that it
had created a new revenue source
to be eligible for the federal incentive grants. “Just by legal and
mathematical rules, it’s impossible” to have passing out $100 billion in incentive grants lead to
anything but a minimum of
$500 billion in total new spending, an administration official
said, since the required ratio of
federal to state or local spending
is 4 to 1.
The official did say that a fairer
critique of the administration’s
approach would be that states
might not want to sign up if there
is such a tight requirement that
they come up with new revenue
themselves. The Wharton economists, in turn, responded that
other administrations have tried
over decades to create airtight
requirements that federal money
augment, not replace, local
spending, and that those efforts
have routinely failed.
A struggle over the nation’s
18.4 cent-per-gallon federal gas
tax also has hovered over the
administration’s plan. The tax
was last increased in 1993.
Starting early in Trump’s term,
some of the president’s top advis-
ers pushed for increasing the tax,
which is not indexed to inflation
and has experienced an erosion of
its value.
Trump’s budget, released last
month, projected a shortfall of
more than $120 billion in the
Highway Trust Fund.
Administration officials say
they are cognizant of the problem
but are concentrating on trying to
get support for the infrastructure
plan.
An increase in the gas tax has
support from some in Congress
from both parties and from business groups of various stripes. But
it also has vigorous opponents,
particularly among conservative
lawmakers, and an increase did
not make it into the massive tax
bill passed last year.
In a White House meeting last
month, Trump told members of
Congress that he supported a
25 cent-a-gallon increase and that
he would be willing to take political heat for the move.
Chao has said that none of the
options for paying for infrastructure are welcome or pain-free.
“Gas tax increases can be said
to be the most regressive of all
user fees or taxes . . . against the
most vulnerable within our society, and that’s the lower-waged
worker,” Chao said. But “somehow, we’ve got to pay for $1.5 trillion” in infrastructure improvements, as called for in Trump’s
plan.
michael.laris@washpost.com
A blue-state strategy to survive the Republican tax overhaul next season
Let me show you how I’m
applying the theory of what I
discussed in January. And I’ll
also tell you how you might be
able to deduct some or all of your
charitable contributions if you’re
less than 701/2 years old, the
minimum age at which you can
do what I’m doing.
Here’s what I’m doing. Instead
of sending personal checks to
charities, I send them checks
drawn on one of my Vanguard
retirement accounts. I have to
take federally taxable “required
minimum distributions” from
my retirement accounts because
I’m older than 701/2.
But by having Vanguard send
me a check drawn on my
retirement account but made out
to a charity, I reduce the
federally taxable portion of my
required distributions.
This means that I’m deducting
the donations indirectly — but
effectively. It’s annoying, and it
generates a lot of paper,
Most of the people
who are dealing
with income tax
stuff these days
are finishing up
their 2017 returns.
Deals
But in true
ALLAN SLOAN journalistic
fashion — or at
least, what’s
supposed to be true journalistic
fashion — I’m looking ahead. To
my 2018 taxes. And possibly your
2018 taxes, if, like me, you live in
a state targeted by last year’s tax
cut bill.
I’m actually following the
strategy that I suggested in
January about how some of us
who live in high-tax states with
high home values can claw back
some of the tax deductions that
President Trump and
congressional Republicans took
from us to help pay for corporate
tax cuts and special breaks they
gave to real estate people such as
. . . Trump.
including saving the statements I
get with each check. But it’s
going to save me money come
next tax season.
When I could deduct state and
local income and real estate
taxes, which ran about $30,000
last year, it made sense for my
wife and me to itemize
deductions. But with a $10,000
maximum deduction for state
and local taxes, this year, it’s
Standard Deduction City for us,
the first time I can remember
that being the case.
If you’re in a situation like
mine, it seems that my
suggestion — please note that it’s
a suggestion, as I don’t have
standing to give tax advice —
seems like a no-brainer. I get to
take the standard deduction
($26,600 for my wife and me
because of our age) and I get to
deduct our contributions
indirectly.
It’s annoying and cumbersome
to have to leap through hoops
rather than just write a check.
But I’m getting used to it — and
things have actually gotten a bit
less complicated as the year has
gone on.
For my first eight 2018
contributions, I had to call
Vanguard, get a representative
on the line, tell the rep the
charity’s name, the size of the
donation, whether I wanted
federal income tax withheld (no)
and whether I wanted state
income tax withheld (yes,
because contributions aren’t
deductible for New Jersey
income tax purposes),
I also had to listen, each time,
to the seemingly endless
disclosures that Vanguard, quite
properly, requires the rep to
recite.
But the ninth time around,
earlier this month, I could fill out
an online form rather than talk
with a rep. I suspect that
Vanguard’s competitors have
similar programs in place or
soon will.
For anyone like me who’s
taking required distributions
from retirement accounts and
who expects to take the standard
deduction in 2018, this strategy
is a no-brainer. (It’s not my
original idea, by the way. A
friend told me about this
retirement-income donation
loophole, and I checked it out
with my accountant before I
wrote my advice column 10
weeks ago.)
But what if you’re not 701/2 and
don’t expect to get full value (or
maybe any value) for your
charitable contributions this
year? You might be able to get a
break by lumping several years
of deductions together and using
them to fund a “donor-advised
fund.”
That way, you might end up
with itemized deductions high
enough above your standard
deduction to make itemizing
your donations worthwhile.
You can generally set up a
donor fund fairly simply and
quickly by using an investment
firm with which you’re doing
business or by using a
community fund.
Unlike a regular contribution,
which is deductible when you
send money to the charity, the
money you put into a donor fund
is deductible when you write the
check to the fund. When the fund
sends money to charities, it’s not
deductible.
This is a bit complicated and
could involve fees. But it may
work for you — you’ve got to
figure it out or have a tax pro
figure it out for you.
So there you are. I think
having to leap through all these
hoops to get a formerly simply
obtainable deduction for
charitable contributions is
ridiculous. But we’ve got to deal
with what we’ve got, not with
what we want. Such is life.
allan.sloan@washpost.com
THE MARKETS
6 Monitor your investments at washingtonpost.com/markets
Data and graphics by
Daily Stock Market Performance
Index
Dow Jones Industrial Average
27,250
Close
YTD
% Chg
25,007.03
–0.7
+1.2
25,500
23,750
22,000
20,250
Nasdaq Composite Index
7700
7511.01
–1.0
+8.8
Daily
% Chg
Industry Group
Water Utilities
Multiline Retail
Air Freight & Logistics
Airlines
Pharmaceuticals
Leisure Equipment & Prod
Industrial Conglomerates
Internet Software & Svcs
Diversified Consumer Svcs
Health Care Technology
0
–2.5%
+2.5%
1.03
1.01
0.94
0.83
0.56
–1.70
–1.87
–1.98
–2.12
–2.46
6700
6200
5700
S&P 500 Index
2765.31
–0.6
+3.4
2900
2700
2500
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D
J
F M
Americas
Brazil (Bovespa)
Canada (S&P/TSX Comp.)
Mexico (Bolsa)
Europe
Eurozone (DJ Stoxx 600)
France (CAC 40)
Germany (DAX)
U.K. (FTSE 100)
Asia Pacific
Australia (ASX 200)
China (CSI 300)
Hong Kong (Hang Seng)
Japan (Nikkei)
Close
Daily
% Chg
86,383.84
15,647.14
48,565.93
–0.6
0.3
–0.2
375.49
5242.79
12,221.03
7138.78
–1.0
–0.6
–1.6
–1.1
5974.71
4091.25
31,601.45
21,968.10
–0.4
–0.9
0.0
0.7
YTD % Chg
–15%
0%
+15%
3M Co
AmExp
Apple Inc
Boeing
Caterpillar
Chevron Corp
Cisco Systems
Coca-Cola
DowDuPont Inc
Exxon Mobil
GE
GoldmnSchs
Home Depot
IBM
Intel Corp
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
237.57
95.37
179.97
338.67
153.69
116.46
45.16
44.57
70.57
74.53
14.43
268.53
178.35
159.32
51.78
–0.9
–2.4
–1.0
–1.6
–0.5
–0.3
–0.9
0.1
–1.1
–0.9
–4.4
–1.8
–0.8
–0.6
0.5
0.9
–4.0
6.3
14.8
–2.5
–7.0
17.9
–2.9
–0.9
–10.9
–17.3
5.4
–5.9
3.8
12.2
Company
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
Microsoft
Nike
P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
United Tech
UnitedHealth
Verizon
Visa Inc
WalMart
Walt Disney
134.35
116.25
158.22
55.37
94.41
66.17
79.72
36.75
140.69
130.15
226.94
48.65
123.20
88.30
103.73
1.3
–1.2
0.3
0.0
–2.4
–1.0
–0.2
0.4
–0.6
–1.0
1.9
–0.3
–0.8
0.3
–1.4
–3.8
8.7
–8.1
–1.6
10.4
5.8
–13.2
1.5
3.7
2.0
2.9
–8.1
8.1
–10.6
–3.5
Cross Currency Rates
US $
US $ per
EU € per
EU €
Japan ¥
Britain £
Brazil R$
Canada $
1.2388
0.0093
1.3966
0.3068
0.7710
0.0537
0.0076
1.1273
0.2475
0.6224
0.0434
148.8150
32.6799
82.1570
5.7249
0.2197
0.5521
0.0385
0.8072
Japan ¥ per 106.5600
132.0100
Britain £ per
0.7161
0.8870
0.0067
Brazil R$ per
3.2608
4.0391
0.0306
4.5542
Canada $ per
1.2970
1.6067
0.0121
1.8114
0.3979
Mexico $ per
18.6131
23.0581
0.1750
25.9941
5.7080
Mexico $
2.5138
0.1751
0.0697
14.3501
Index
Close
DJ Total Stock Market Index 28,635.48
Russell 2000
1592.05
Post-Bloomberg DC Area Index 563.04
CBOE Volatility (VIX)
16.35
Consumer Rates
Daily % Chg
–0.6
–0.6
–0.2
3.6
YTD % Chg
3.5
3.7
3.6
48.1
Daily
% Chg
$3.1380
$3.9175
$60.71
$1,327.10
$2.79
+0.4
+0.3
–1.1
+0.5
+0.3
Orange Juice
Silver
Soybeans
Sugar
Wheat
Exchange-Traded (Ticker)
Coffee (COFF.L)
Copper (COPA.L)
Corn (CORN.L)
Cotton (COTN.L)
Crude Oil (CRUD.L)
Gasoline (UGAS.L)
Gold (BULL.L)
Natural Gas (NGAS.L)
Silver (SLVR.L)
Daily
% Chg
Close
Daily
% Chg
$1.3800
$16.63
$10.4875
$0.1262
$4.8650
–0.6
+0.6
+0.7
–2.4
–0.9
day
$900
month
$1100
$1000
1.3
0.4
0.8
–0.8
–1.0
–0.4
0.5
–0.6
0.6
Gainers
American Vanguard
DSW Inc
Veritiv Corp
PG&E Corp
Xerox Corp
Cutera Inc
MDC Holdings
Motorcar Parts
LGI Homes Inc
AK Air
Kopin Corp
Amphastar Pharma
Century Aluminum
Macy's Inc
Kirkland's Inc
Shoe Carnival
HIan Holding
InstalledBuildngPrd
Edison Intl
Cato Corp
Daily
Close % Chg
$23.15
$21.70
$39.25
$45.10
$31.34
$53.30
$29.70
$22.96
$67.26
$68.79
$3.89
$20.35
$21.58
$29.82
$9.33
$22.88
$37.75
$63.75
$62.06
$12.43
14.3
10.7
6.5
6.3
5.6
5.3
5.0
4.7
4.7
4.6
4.6
3.9
3.7
3.7
3.6
3.3
3.3
3.2
3.1
3.1
Losers
Myriad Genetics Inc
Comty Health Sys
US Steel
TeleTech Holdings
Syneos Health Inc
FTD Cos Inc
GulfIslandFabricatn
CEVA Inc
BioTelemetry Inc
Bristow Group Inc
Flotek Industries
Dine Brands Global
Providence Service
Consol Energy
Qualcomm
Alexion Pharma
AppliedOptoelctrncs
CooperTire & Rubber
General Electric
Cogent Comm
Daily
Close % Chg
$29.01
$4.49
$40.24
$35.00
$40.65
$4.34
$8.20
$38.85
$33.95
$12.85
$6.13
$70.64
$70.06
$16.25
$59.70
$121.08
$29.51
$30.75
$14.43
$43.75
–12.1
–9.8
–7.6
–7.4
–7.0
–6.9
–5.7
–5.7
–5.4
–5.4
–5.3
–5.2
–5.1
–5.1
–5.0
–4.7
–4.7
–4.7
–4.4
–4.4
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Interest Rates
Other Measures
Close
Gainers and Losers from the S&P 1500 Index
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
Company
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
7200
2300
Commodities
S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot
Daily
% Chg
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
0.34
0.51
0.80
1.63
3.37
5.90
4.50%
4.32%
Bank Prime
30-Year fixed mortgage
3.73%
1.50%
Federal Funds
15-Year fixed mortgage
2.11%
LIBOR 3-Month
1-Year ARM
3.72%
10-year note
Yield: 2.84
2-year note
Yield: 2.25
5-year note
Yield: 2.62
6-month bill
Yield: 1.89
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
KLMNO
METRO
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14 , 2018
High today at
approx. 4 p.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
8 p.m.
32 41 45 39°
°
°
°
45°
Precip: 10%
Wind: WNW
15-25 mph
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
EZ
JOHN KELLY’S WASHINGTON
VIRGINIA
OBITUARIES
Long before pink hats,
female protesters, some
on horseback, marched in
D.C. for women’s rights. B3
A man who filmed a car
striking Charlottesville
protesters last year sues
conspiracy theorists. B5
Dr. T. Berry Brazelton’s
best-selling guides to
child-rearing soothed
generations of parents. B6
Security video shows encounter in o∞cial’s harassment claim
BY
O VETTA W IGGINS
A Maryland state senator and a
lobbyist she has accused of harassment both released security camera video Tuesday of their recent
encounter in an Annapolis pub,
with each declaring the footage
proves their version of events.
The video shows lobbyist Gil
Genn approaching Sen. Cheryl C.
Kagan (D-Montgomery) near a
crowded bar at Castlebay Irish
Pub, putting his hand on Kagan’s
B
SU
Both Md. lawmaker and accused lobbyist say footage proves their cases
back and moving it around.
The physical contact is brief,
and it is hard to tell exactly when
Genn — who previously denied
touching Kagan at all — removes
his hand.
At a hastily called news conference, Kagan held up her laptop to
play the 86-second video, saying it
showed how Genn put his hand on
her back and slid “it down my
body.”
“Most women who are harassed
or sexually assaulted will not have
access to such undeniable proof,”
she said in an interview.
Genn, meanwhile, demanded
an apology from Kagan, saying in
a statement that the video shows
“beyond dispute that I did not
grab or grope her.”
“There are four-second frames
which show Gil Genn put his hand
around her waist while talking to
her,” said Genn’s attorney, Tim Maloney. “He does not ‘run his hands
down her back’ or ‘touch her tush’
at all — as Senator Kagan claimed.”
It is not clear from the video
whether Kagan reacted to the con-
tact with Genn in a negative way,
which she has said in interviews
that she did. She appears to pull
back and avoid eye contact for a
few seconds, then continues talking to Genn.
“She does not turn away or otherwise avoid him — as she claimed
— but goes on to have a friendly
and animated conversation for another 1 minute 21 seconds in which
she laughs, gives him a thumbs up
and appears engaged,” Maloney
VIDEO CONTINUED ON B4
D.C. charter
school may
have to
shut down
ABILITY TO PAY
TEACHERS IN DOUBT
Weak finances could lead
to loss of license
BY
P ERRY S TEIN
The finances of one of the first
charter schools in the nation’s
capital have grown so dire that its
survival is threatened and its
ability to pay teachers in doubt, a
financial analysis shows.
Washington Mathematics Science Technology Public Charter
High School — founded in 1998
soon after charter schools were
allowed in the District — could
lose its license if it does not
present a convincing plan to regulators demonstrating how it will
remain financially viable.
The agency that oversees such
institutions, the D.C. Public Charter School Board, voted unanimously at an emergency meeting
Monday to begin the process of
stripping the school of its operating license. Washington Mathematics, with 228 students in
grades nine through 12, has experienced dwindling enrollment
over the past five years, accelerating its financial demise.
The charter school has 15 days
to seek a public hearing before the
oversight board holds a final vote
on whether to revoke the school’s
operating license. Charter schools
are publicly funded institutions
that are privately run.
Scott Pearson, executive direcCHARTER CONTINUED ON B2
PHOTOS BY MATT MCCLAIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
‘these should be kids’
At the Capitol, about 7,000 small pairs of shoes memorialize children lost to gun violence since 2012
At the edge of a sea of shoes Tuesday
morning outside the Capitol, a little girl
stood teetering on the balls of her feet.
Eliana Malkoff, 3, wanted to run
through the rows of ruby slippers, fuzzy
boots, flip flops and sneakers. Her mother
told her that this wasn’t a place to play.
The reason these shoes were here,
Shawna Malkoff said, was serious.
But like several other parents with
young children who visited the sprawling
display, Malkoff couldn’t bring herself to
explain the reason for it.
About 7,000 pairs of shoes sat on the
southeast lawn of the Capitol as a memorial to children slain by guns since the mass
shooting in December 2012 at Sandy Hook
Elementary School in Newtown, Conn.
Avaaz, a global activist network that
organizes campaigns involving social is-
BY
M ARISSA J . L ANG
sues, solicited donations from around the
country to fill the lawn with children’s
shoes and send a message to Congress
about the toll that gun violence takes.
According to the nonprofit Gun Violence Archive, there have been 239 school
shootings nationwide since it began
tracking the shootings about a year after
the Sandy Hook attack. It defines a
school shooting as any gunfire on school
property when students, faculty or staff
are on the site.
The group also says that more than 650
children have been killed or wounded by
gunfire this year.
A March 24 rally against mass shootings
and gun violence will bring as many as
500,000 people to downtown Washington
for the March For Our Lives rally, orga-
“I want to know,
what do you want
to do? I want to
know, do you really
think we can get rid
of all the guns?”
Steve Clark
cultural change occurs. Small,
sometimes imperceptible
changes in attitudes that can be
encouraged. Deciding to buy a
target pistol instead of a militarystyle weapon to release their
inner soldier — that’s progress.
Some call this kind of
mellowing in the gun market
the “Trump slump,” meaning
that most gun owners aren’t
afraid that President Trump will
try to take away their guns, a
fear that went haywire during
the Obama years.
BY
A NN E . M ARIMOW
But another factor in the
subtle changes of heart has been
the passion shown by the
surviving students at Parkland. A
month after the tragedy, their
influence has not waned.
When students from across
the country hold their school
“walkout” on Wednesday to
protest gun violence, Clark will
be paying close attention.
“I want to listen to the kids,” he
said. That itself is worth noting.
When it comes to gun issues,
MILLOY CONTINUED ON B4
COURTS CONTINUED ON B4
SHOES CONTINUED ON B2
After Parkland, one Virginia gun store operator sees a shift in tone
referring to the AR-15
semiautomatic rifle that was
used to kill 17 people at Marjory
Stoneman Douglas High School.
“They bought other kinds of
guns — pistols, shotguns,
hunting rifles. But it wasn’t like,
‘I better get one now before they
ban them.’ It was more like, ‘I
hadn’t been thinking about
getting a gun but, yeah, I think I
want one.’ ”
Such minor shifts in gunbuying habits might seem
insignificant, but that is how
Barring of Md. student
from boys’ locker room is
called discriminatory
A Maryland high school’s policy blocking a transgender student from using the boys’ locker
room singles him out for discrimination and “harms his health
and well-being,” a federal judge in
Baltimore has ruled.
Max Brennan, a transgender
teen from the Eastern Shore, was
required to use a separate,
gender-neutral restroom to dress
for gym class, making him choose
at times between being late or
being penalized for not changing.
U.S. District Judge George L.
Russell III is the latest judge, and
the first in Maryland, to find that
the right of a transgender student
to use restrooms and locker
rooms matching his or her gender
identity is protected by federal
and state law.
The policy barring Brennan
from the boys’ locker room “does
not apply to anyone else at the
high school, and marks him as
different for being transgender,”
the judge wrote in a 40-page
opinion issued this week that
allows Brennan’s lawsuit to
move forward.
In a statement, Brennan, a
15-year-old who attends St. Michaels Middle High School, called
the decision a “great step in the
right direction.”
The decision comes after the
Trump administration last year
abandoned Obama administration guidelines that directed public schools to accommodate trans-
TOP: Gizem Kara Batterman places shoes at the Capitol in a memorial to children killed in gun violence since the 2012 school massacre in Newtown,
Conn. ABOVE: Boots of WDBJ-TV reporter Alison Parker, who was killed by a gunman on assignment in Roanoke, in 2015, also are on display.
After the Feb. 14
mass shooting at
a high school in
Parkland, Fla.,
sales increased
at Clark Brothers
Courtland Gun Shop in
Milloy
Warrenton, Va.
But there was a
difference from the usual
panic buying that ensues when
gun violence sparks talk of gun
control.
“I saw sales go up, but my ARs
not as much,” Steve Clark said,
Judge says
transgender
teen hurt by
school rules
B2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 14 , 2018
For thousands of children lost to guns, thousands of shoes
SHOES FROM B1
nized by survivors of last month’s
school shooting in Parkland, Fla.,
that left 17 dead.
But thousands of children
won’t be there, said Nell Greenberg, an Avaaz campaign director,
because they were killed.
“These should be kids. There
should be kids in these shoes. But
instead they’re just empty,” she
said. “Every pair of shoes out here
represents a child who can’t
march for themselves anymore.”
Among them were her daughter’s shoes.
Greenberg and other Avaaz
volunteers worked through the
brisk wind just before sunrise
Tuesday, pulling each pair from
plastic bags and setting them in
neat rows on the grass.
As they worked, Greenberg
said, she noticed that several had
come with messages or items
stuffed inside.
One family had put a container
of play dough inside a pair of
boots. Others rolled up notes and
letters.
Inside a pair of shoes with an
orthopedic support brace attached was a handwritten note:
“Not all children can run.”
“That just broke me,” Greenberg said.
Tom Mauser, whose son, Daniel, was killed in the 1999 massacre at Columbine High School,
was among several who put the
shoes of slain family members on
display.
Mauser, of Colorado, brought a
pair of his son’s Reebok sneakers
that he found in Daniel’s closet
after the attack.
In the past two decades, Mauser has become an advocate for
gun-control measures, traveling
the country to picket, protest and
march.
He said he is disheartened that,
so long after his son’s death, he
finds himself doing much the
same thing.
“We did this in Denver,” he said,
gesturing to the rows of shoes.
“We put shoes just like this on the
steps of the state capitol — twice.
I’m not shocked I have to keep
doing this. I’m angry. But I’m not
surprised.”
On his feet, Mauser wore the
sneakers Daniel was wearing the
day he was killed.
“I save these for special occasions,” the father said. “I want
these to last.”
This wasn’t the first time Avaaz
had tackled the issue of gun vio-
MATT MCCLAIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
Volunteers fan out early
Tuesday morning to arrange
some of the thousands of pairs
of footwear outside the Capitol.
Avaaz, a global activist network
that organizes campaigns
involving social issues, solicited
donations from around the
country to fill the lawn with
children’s shoes and try to send
a message. To see more
pictures, go to wapo.st/shoes
lence with an eye-catching display.
The group was responsible for
a recent protest targeting Sen.
Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) with three
billboards inspired by the movie,
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri,” that said in bold,
black letters on red screens:
“Slaughtered in school.”
“And still no gun control?”
“How come, Marco Rubio?”
Organizers said they hadn’t
been approached Tuesday by lawmakers or congressional staff,
who were steps away. There were,
however, several people affected
THE DISTRICT
Incumbents outraise challengers
BY
F ENIT N IRAPPIL
Incumbents seeking reelection in the District this year
have raised far more cash than
their challengers, according to
newly released campaign finance reports.
D.C. Council Chairman Phil
Mendelson (D) has catapulted
past his primary opponent in
the money race after an anemic
start, records show.
The 19-year incumbent raised
$181,000 between Feb. 1 and
March 10, while challenger Ed
Lazere brought in $40,000.
Mendelson has $229,000 on
hand to Lazere’s $79,000 with
three months to go until the
primary.
Lazere, who is on leave as
executive director of the leftleaning D.C. Fiscal Policy Institute, showed early signs of
strength when he outraised
Mendelson in the opening
weeks of the campaign.
But Mendelson picked up
steam, raking in campaign donations from a variety of
sources including real estate
developers, prominent lawyers
and former government officials. Lazere says he won’t take
money from businesses, which
have given Mendelson more
than $60,000 during his reelection campaign.
Meanwhile, Mayor Muriel E.
Bowser’s reelection campaign
has $2 million on hand after
collecting
an
additional
$234,000 in the past five weeks.
She has raised more than $2.2
million since launching her re-
election bid last summer.
Nearly two-thirds of Bowser’s
fundraising haul came from
people and entities — including
developers and city contractors
— who gave the maximum
$2,000. Half the money came
from outside the District. She
also received small donations of
$250 or less from 930 people or
businesses.
Despite a series of education
scandals in recent weeks, the
Democratic mayor seems assured of a second term, with no
serious challengers and a little
more than a week left for opponents to collect 2,000 signatures
to qualify for the primary ballot.
The June 19 Democratic primary essentially determines the
winners of local races in an
overwhelmingly blue city.
Candidates will not need to
file campaign finance reports
again until the week before the
primary.
In addition to Bowser and
Mendelson, five other D.C.
Council members are on the
primary ballot, and all have a
comfortable cash edge over
their opponents.
• Council member Anita
Bonds (D-At Large) ramped up
her fundraising efforts in recent
weeks and now has $63,000 for
her citywide race. Her best-financed opponent is Marcus
Goodwin, a real estate professional who has raised $80,000
since launching his campaign
and has $32,000 available.
Jeremiah Lowery, an activist
and favorite of some progressive
groups, has $22,800 after rais-
THE DAILY QUIZ
According to the Distilled Spirits
Council, how much has the gross
revenue for Irish whiskey gone up
since 2003?
(Hint: The answer is in today’s Food section.)
EARN 5 POINTS: Find the answer, and then go to
washingtonpost.com/postpoints, Quizzes to enter the
correct response.
ing nearly $6,000 in the latest
period. Aaron Holmes has
$13,000 after picking up $8,000
in the latest period.
• Council member Brianne K.
Nadeau (D-Ward 1) raised
$10,000 in the latest period and
has accumulated a war chest of
$144,000 to fend off three primary challengers.
The closest to her financially
is Advisory Neighborhood Commissioner Kent Boese, who has
nearly $36,000 in the bank after
loaning himself $20,000.
Former magistrate judge Lori
Parker has nearly $25,000 available after barely fundraising in
the latest period. Sheika Reid,
an architectural drafter, has
about $6,000 on hand.
• Council member Kenyan R.
McDuffie (D-Ward 5) has
$129,000 available after raising
nearly $48,000 since February.
One of his primary opponents, Advisory Neighborhood
Commissioner Gayle Hall Carley, poured $50,000 of her own
money into the campaign. The
other candidates either didn’t
file campaign finance reports or
reported little cash on hand.
• Council member Charles
Allen (D-Ward 6) has nearly
$100,000 in the bank after raising $25,000 in the latest period.
His primary opponent Lisa
Hunter has nearly $17,000 available.
• Council member Mary M.
Cheh (D-Ward 3) had $56,000
on hand. Her two opponents
hadn’t filed campaign finance
reports as of Tuesday morning.
fenit.nirappil@washpost.com
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Could you name a hundred things that make life wonderful? A thousand? How about
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as much laughter as it does tears in creating its catalogue of gratitude with a unique
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by gun violence drawn in by the
spectacle.
A mother from Parkland, Fla.,
was visiting the District with her
family to escape the pain looming
over her home town when she
happened upon the shoes.
As she stared out at them, her
voice shook.
“We all know people who were
there,” Laurie Garey, 54, said of
the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. “This
blows my mind, thinking about
how all these kids. They were all
there in their own little shoes
when it happened.”
Her two children, teenagers
who attend a private school in the
Parkland area, stood by as she
showed off the words she had
tattooed on her forearm last
week: “Never again.”
Jonathan Kriyk, 20, and Brianne Wendol, 19, said the shoes
felt personal to them. Now students at Florida universities, they
were in middle school when the
Sandy Hook massacre happened
and the reality of mass shootings
came lurching into their consciousness.
“It hits so close to home every
time, and nothing changes,” said
Wendol, who is majoring in political science at Florida State University. “I’m terrified that one of
these days it’s going to hit right at
home and it will be me or one of
my siblings.”
“We grew up in this,” added
Kriyk, who studies education at
the University of South Florida.
“This is our reality, and we’re tired
of it. Something needs to change.”
As they spoke, with heads bent
against the gusts of wind, little
Eliana leaned against her mother.
She was wearing pink snow
boots.
marissa.lang@washpost.com
D.C. charter school may lose license
CHARTER FROM B1
tor of the charter school board,
said if the panel votes to revoke
the charter — or if the school
decides to voluntarily relinquish
its license — the board will loan it
money to remain open for the rest
of the academic year.
While a drastic move, the revocation of a charter is far from
unprecedented. The District has
shuttered nearly two dozen small
and large charter schools since
2012, although some have been
able to remain open with new
leadership.
In January, the board voted to
shut down Excel Academy because of poor academic performance and because the school
showed scant evidence of improvement. D.C. Public Schools,
the traditional public system,
reached an agreement to take
over the 700-student all-girls
school in Southeast Washington.
The troubles for Washington
Mathematics emerge at a time
when the traditional school system is competing to keep families
from turning to charters. As of
October, D.C. Public Schools
counted 48,144 students, compared with 43,393 in charter
schools.
Attorney Stephen Marcus, who
represents Washington Mathematics, said Monday that the
school has plans to sell its building on the 1900 block of Bladensburg Road NE in an effort to
remain afloat.
Marcus said teachers are so
dedicated to the school’s mission
they have offered to forgo their
paychecks for the next two pay
cycles to help.
“We recognize that it has a
huge financial deficit,” Marcus
said. “The school has been working very hard to come up with a
strategy to address it.”
The school, the financial audit
found, is expected to need an
infusion of more than $830,000
between now and the end of the
fiscal year, which concludes
June 30. That jumps to more than
$1 million when taking into account pay owed to teachers
“We recognize that it
has a huge financial
deficit. The school has
been working very hard
to . . . address it.”
Stephen Marcus, attorney
through the end of the summer.
The school has a $300,000 line of
credit, which it has maxed out.
Another report from the charter board released Monday declared that the school “has engaged in a pattern of fiscal mismanagement” and said “its expense structure is not in line with
the school’s revenues.”
That report also determined
that test scores at the school have
declined over the past five years
along with enrollment. The drop
in enrollment contributed to the
school’s financial troubles because schools often plan staffing
and other budget items based on
projected enrollment.
The school expected to enroll
284 students for the 2017-2018
academic year but has only 228.
According to the report, the
school has about a third fewer
students than during the 20142015 academic year.
“The continued downward
trend in enrollment has to do
with many factors including an
increasingly competitive high
school environment, a substandard facility that the school is
seeking to change and disruptive
nearby construction projects,”
the report reads.
The head of the school did not
respond to a request Tuesday
from The Washington Post for
further comment.
If Washington Mathematics
closes, it would leave students
scrambling to find a new school
for the next academic year.
The deadline to participate in
the school lottery was March 1. If
the school’s license is revoked, the
charter board will have enrollment specialists meet with families to try to find an appropriate
school for each child.
Still, it is unclear if students
would be able to secure a slot at
the city’s most sought-after
schools. The students would also
be at a disadvantage because they
would be seeking slots as upperclassmen, and top schools with
low turnover rates do not offer
many spots to new students in the
upper grades.
Students who are not yet enrolled at Washington Mathematics but selected it as one of their
top choices in the lottery for the
next academic year will have until
Thursday to rearrange their preferences, according to Pearson.
perry.stein@washpost.com
DID YOU KNOW?
We’re Over the Moon: Free Tickets to Norman
Connors and the Starship Orchestra on March 25
at Bethesda Blues & Jazz Supper Club
The Grammy-winning jazz drummer, composer, arranger and producer released a
collection of “amazingly rendered, sweet and sensuous sessions with Peabo Bryson,
Howard Hewett, singer Christopher Williams, Norman Brown, Bobby Lyle, Ray Parker
Jr., et al. There’s a lot of Star Power here just as the title promises, but Connors
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washingtonpost.com/postpoints
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A 1913 march shook up women’s su≠rage movement
LOCA L D I G ES T
MARYL AND
Woman killed in
parking lot identified
Police have identified a
woman killed after she was
struck by an SUV as she pushed
a shopping cart through a
parking lot in Lanham, Md.
The victim, Mary Ankeney, 74,
of Bowie, Md., died at a hospital
Saturday, shortly after being hit
about 2 p.m. in the 10500 block
of Greenbelt Road, Prince
George’s County police said.
A preliminary investigation
found she had just left a store
and was pushing a shopping
cart to the parking lot when she
was struck.
The vehicle had just pulled up
in front of the store, according
to police. But the vehicle was
not in park. It moved forward
and hit Ankeney, police said.
The driver stopped, got out and
called 911, police said.
— Dana Hedgpeth
Two teens charged
in death of Va. man
Two Maryland teenagers who
are suspected gang members
have been arrested and charged
in the slaying of a 23-year-old
Virginia man.
Prince George’s County police
said they arrested Maicol
Alvarado-Baide and Erlin
Andrades-Zelaya in the fatal
stabbing of Yefrin Argueta of
Arlington last month.
The suspects are 18 years old
and from Oxon Hill. They are
charged with first- and seconddegree murder. The killing
happened around 10:45 p.m. on
Feb. 25 in the 1100 block of
Marcy Avenue in Oxon Hill.
Both of the suspects are said
to have known the victim,
according to police. Authorities
said they are trying to figure out
a motive. Officials did not
specify what gang the suspects
are believed to be members of.
— Dana Hedgpeth
VIRGINIA
Men allegedly fired
shots at complex
Two men were arrested and
charged after shots were fired at
an apartment complex for
senior citizens in Fairfax
County, police said.
The incidents happened in
February at the Goodwin House
Bailey’s Crossroads retirement
community in the 3400 block of
South Jefferson Street. Police
said the complex “was not the
On March 3, 1913,
the day before
intended target, but rather the
victim of reckless behavior.”
No one was hurt.
Police said they received calls
from residents in the Baileys
Crossroads area in February
about gunshots and damage to
the apartment complex. Three
apartments had windows that
were hit by bullets.
Nehemias Perez Escobar, 35,
and Irvin Rodriguez Perez, 23,
both from Falls Church, face
charges of discharging firearms
within or at a house and
willfully discharging firearms in
public areas, according to
police.
Woodrow
Wilson’s
— Dana Hedgpeth
School officer fires
weapon by accident
A school resource officer
accidentally discharged his
service weapon Tuesday
morning at a middle school in
Alexandria, Va., police said.
No one was injured in the
incident, which occurred at
George Washington Middle
School in the 1000 block of
Mount Vernon Avenue.
Alexandria police said the
officer discharged his weapon
inside his office at the school.
He contacted his supervisor and
school staff.
Police said classes continued.
Authorities also said the school
resource officer is a five-year
veteran of the Alexandria Police
Department.
— Dana Hedgpeth
Arrest made in slaying
of teenager in Fairfax
A suspect was arrested
Tuesday in the fatal shooting of
a teenager last month in Fairfax
County, police said.
Matthew Ortega, 17, was
found Feb. 14, in the 13500 block
of Jeb Stuart Square in the
Centreville area on Feb. 14,
police said. He had been shot
once in the upper body.
Police said Tuesday that Uriel
Josaphat Espinosa Cruz, 18, of
Fairfax was arrested “for
murder and use of a firearm in
the commission of a felony.”
No motive has been given, but
the shooting was not thought to
be a random incident, police
said. They also said their
investigation was continuing.
Ortega lived near where he
was found. In a message posted
online after his death, family
members described him as a
son, brother and uncle and said
he was loved by many.
— Martin Weil
inaugural parade,
a pair of women
John
mounted two
horses near the
Kelly's
Washington U.S. Capitol. Jane
Burleson was
astride a dark
horse, Inez Milholland atop a
white one. They were about to
lead a procession of 5,000
supporters of women’s suffrage. If
the route was straightforward —
15 blocks up Pennsylvania
Avenue — the day would not be.
For many of the thousands of
tourists who had come to
Washington to celebrate the new
president, the women’s march
was a curious sideshow. For
some, it was a provocation.
Today we might call them
counterprotesters. No sooner had
the suffragists set off when
crowds surged from the
sidewalks and into the avenue,
blocking the marchers’ way.
Photos from the time show that it
was a mostly male crowd: bowler
hats as far as the eye could see.
“Those men behaved badly,”
said Rebecca Boggs Roberts,
author of a new book, “Suffragists
in Washington, DC: The 1913
Parade and the Fight for the
Vote.”
Said Roberts, “They tripped
the women, spit on them, yelled
things.”
That included some of the
policemen who were supposedly
there to keep order but joined in
the jeering.
Ironically, march organizer
Alice Paul was delighted by the
response. The young suffragist
knew that just as well-behaved
women seldom made history,
well-executed parades rarely
made headlines. Paul had
declined a suggestion from the
District’s police chief that the
march be held on a safer
thoroughfare — 16th Street NW,
for example.
“Alice Paul said: ‘I don’t want
safe. I want to march where men
march. I want all of the
symbolism of going through the
heart of federal Washington,’ ”
Roberts said.
The parade came at a time
when suffrage efforts seemed
moribund. The movement had
been around for nearly six
decades with precious little
DISTRICT
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J USTIN W M. M OYER
Permit requests have been approved for an anti-gun-violence
rally that could bring as many as
500,000 people to downtown
Washington later this month.
The March For Our Lives rally,
planned by survivors of last
month’s school shooting in Parkland, Fla., will be held March 24
along Pennsylvania Avenue beginning at noon, although organizers expect participants will
start to gather hours earlier. More
than 700 “sibling marches” are
also being planned around the
world that day, according to the
event’s website.
National Park Service spokesman Mike Litterst said an application was approved that includes usage of sidewalks along
Pennsylvania Avenue NW between Third and 12th streets;
sidewalks along Constitution Avenue NW between First and
Ninth streets; green space be-
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success. Paul and the National
American Woman Suffrage
Association wanted to shake
things up. They borrowed some
of the confrontational style of
their counterparts in England,
where Paul had studied.
Some, but not all. Two weeks
before the parade, suffragists in
England had set off explosives in
an unoccupied country house
that was being built for
Chancellor of the Exchequer
Lloyd George.
U.S. suffragists didn’t want to
go that far, but, Roberts said, “just
being out in public and speaking
your mind was a pretty radical
thing for gently bred women to
do in 1913.”
Months of planning went into
the parade. Floats were
constructed. Orations written.
Marchers were organized either
by home state or profession. (The
writers who participated wore
matching outfits that they’d
stained with ink.)
Though the women were
united in their desire for equal
rights, there were unfortunate
divisions. A sorority from
Howard University wanted to
march with the college women,
but Paul and her committee
feared that if the members were
allowed to, Southern participants
would drop out in protest. The
black women were instructed to
march at the back of the parade.
This didn’t stop journalist Ida
B. Wells, who marched with the
delegation from Illinois.
“I have to say, the racial legacy
has some highly embarrassing
moments as seen from a 21stcentury lens,” Roberts said.
If the marchers weren’t quite
woke when it came to race, they
were modern in other ways. They
understood the power of
messaging and would have
recognized the impulses that led
hundreds of thousands of pinkhatted demonstrators to descend
on Washington 104 years later to
protest President Trump’s
treatment of women.
“Alice Paul would have loved
social media,” Roberts said. “All
those quotations on [suffragists’]
banners? Those are tweets.”
The sign that was carried at the
head of the parade in 1913 was
certainly simple and direct: “We
demand an amendment to the
Constitution of the United States
enfranchising the women of this
country.” Just 103 characters
long, leaving room for hashtags.
Creating a walking tour of
suffragist graves in Congressional
Cemetery inspired Roberts to
write the book. Given her lineage,
it was probably inevitable. Her
mother is journalist Cokie
Roberts. Lindy Boggs, the
former diplomat and Democratic
congresswoman from Louisiana,
was her grandmother.
“You don’t come from a
matriarchal family like mine
without a healthy respect for
women’s history,” she said. “My
grandmother was born in 1916,
before women got the vote, and
ended up a member of Congress.
She moved through these
changes but always made the
point that you owed something to
the generation that came before
us.”
In the end, a cavalry
detachment from Fort Myer
helped to clear the street. Even so,
it took about three hours for the
suffragist marchers to reach the
Treasury Building on that frigid
March day. Seven years later,
American women could vote.
(For information on Roberts’s
upcoming talks, go to
rebeccaroberts.org.)
john.kelly@washpost.com
Twitter: @johnkelly
For previous columns, visit
washingtonpost.com/people/john-kelly.
Anti-gun-violence rally receives permit approval
BY
VIRGINIA
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS PRINTS AND PHOTOGRAPHS DIVISION
Suffragist Inez Milholland is seen during the National American Woman Suffrage Association parade
on March 3, 1913, when 5,000 supporters of women’s suffrage marched up Pennsylvania Avenue.
THE DISTRICT
LOTTER I ES
Results from March 13
B3
M2
Locally Owned & Operated
tween Constitution Avenue,
Pennsylvania Avenue and Third
Street NW; and John Marshall
Park, the U.S. Navy Memorial and
Freedom Plaza.
D.C. police said a separate permit filed with the city also was
Organizers had hoped
to rally on the Mall, but
a film crew was first to
submit its application
for that space.
approved, although police didn’t
make the permit available on
Tuesday. Police said information
about street closures would be
released in the coming days.
The two permits were required
because the sidewalks and parks
along Pennsylvania Avenue are
under federal jurisdiction, Litterst said. The rally is planned for
Pennsylvania Avenue NW between Third and 12th streets,
which is under the city’s jurisdiction.
Organizers initially had hoped
to rally on the Mall, but a film
crew was first to submit its application for that space. The Mall
event was described in a heavily
redacted Park Service permit application as a “talent show.”
Litterst said earlier this month
that the permit was secured by a
film crew “from a student group
at a local educational institution,”
but he wouldn’t identify the institution because “applications
from educational institutions are
withheld from release for privacy
reasons.” The decision was criticized by civil liberties advocates.
“Those redactions seemed unreasonable and unjustified,” said
Art Spitzer, legal director of the
ACLU of the District of Columbia.
“It may be sensible to protect the
identity of juveniles — and the
Freedom of Information Act allows for that kind of protection of
personal privacy — but there’s no
good reason to redact the name of
the school . . . or the name of the
adult sponsor.”
Litterst said the Park Service
provided the film crew’s contact
information to March For Our
Lives organizers, as groups sometimes alter plans to accommodate
larger events. The March For Our
Lives permit application filed
with the Park Service, for example, included 14 Jumbotrons,
2,000 chairs and 2,000 portable
restrooms, while the film crew
sought approval for equipment
that included two tables, two
bikes and jump ropes.
“I don’t know whether they
ever reached out or not,” he said.
March For Our Lives organizers didn’t return requests for
comment.
justin.moyer@washpost.com
B4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 14 , 2018
Video shows encounter behind complaint against lobbyist
VIDEO FROM B1
said.
The dueling accounts escalated
a debate over workplace sexual
harassment that has burst into
public view in Maryland’s capital
in recent weeks, triggering conversations in State House hallways and offices about when a
touch can be considered inappropriate.
During her news conference,
Kagan called Genn — who served
12 years in the House of Delegates
before becoming a lobbyist — a
“serial harasser,” saying other
women have told her stories about
him since she publicly accused
him earlier this month. She did
not name those women or provide
specific details.
Kagan, a first-term senator who
served in the House from 1995 to
2003, also said Genn inappropriately touched her stomach during
a conversation in a State House
meeting room while they were
both delegates in the late 1990s.
Maloney said Genn “completely
denies” having stroked Kagan’s
stomach years ago.
“He hasn’t been in the House of
Delegates for 18 years and he has
been with Cheryl Kagan hundreds
of times since, and never once has
she complained about this. It
didn’t happen,” Maloney said.
He called Kagan’s statement
that she has heard from other
women who say they were harassed by Genn “character assassination.”
MARY F. CALVERT FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Maryland State Sen. Cheryl C.
Kagan (D-Montgomery), seen
in the Senate Chamber, has
accused lobbyist Gil Genn of
groping her.
“When and where did this supposedly happen?” Maloney said.
Kagan filed a formal complaint
against Genn in connection with
their March 1 encounter at Castlebay, in which she says the lobbyist
put his hand on her back and “ran
it down my back to my tush.”
In a statement days later, Genn
Judge sides with transgender teen in
challenge to locker room exclusion
COURTS FROM B1
gender students. The Supreme
Court last March put off ruling in
the separate case of Virginia
transgender teen Gavin Grimm,
delaying a decision about whether federal laws forbidding discrimination on the basis of sex
also extend to gender identity.
In his opinion, published Monday, Russell said that in addition
to the Equal Protection Clause of
the U.S. Constitution, Maryland’s
constitution prohibits public
schools from excluding transgender students from using the same
facilities as their non-transgender classmates.
“I am hopeful that this case will
not only help change policy for
the better but help the students
who are bound to come after me,”
Brennan said.
His attorney, Jennifer Kent of
FreeState Justice, said, “School
systems in Maryland should
know the law and should be
protecting students who are
transgender from discrimination, not singling them out for
separate and unequal treatment.”
Debbie Gardner, a spokeswoman for the Talbot County Public
Schools, the district to which St.
Michaels belongs, said she could
not comment because of the litigation.
In Virginia, the case of former
Gloucester High school student
Gavin Grimm is pending. The
Richmond-based U.S. Court of
Appeals for the 4th Circuit had
deferred to guidance issued by
the Obama administration and
overruled the Gloucester County
School Board’s policy that students must use restrooms that
correspond with their “biological
sex.” After the Supreme Court put
off ruling, the 4th Circuit sent
Grimm’s case back to a lower
court in part to determine whether Grimm — who has since graduated — has enough of a tie to his
alma mater to pursue the case.
“I am hopeful that this
case will not only help
change policy for the
better but help the
students who are bound
to come after me.”
Max Brennan, 15
Initially, Brennan’s school required him to use one of three
“gender neutral” restrooms. After
the 4th Circuit ruling, the school
allowed him to use the boys’
restrooms but prevented him
from using the boys’ locker
rooms. The designated restroom
was far away from the locker
room, according to court filings,
making Brennan late for class if
he wanted to change to gym
clothes.
Attorneys for the school board
said the policy does not violate
the Equal Protection Clause because it treated Brennan like every other student, requiring him
to use the locker room of his birth
sex. The school system also raised
concerns about the privacy of
other students changing in the
locker room with Brennan.
Russell disagreed. The judge
cited Brennan’s assertion the
locker rooms have individual
stalls for changing and for toilets.
Brennan has had to disclose
his transgender status to substitute teachers to avoid being penalized for arriving late to gym
class, and his grade suffered
when he did not change clothes
for gym class because he “did not
want to deal with the ‘stigma and
impracticality’ of changing in the
designated restroom,” Russell
wrote.
In the ruling, Russell noted
that the courts have had to step in
to stop enforcement of federal
policies that violate the rights of
transgender people.
He pointed to a recent decision
by a fellow Baltimore judge who
barred the Trump administration
from enacting a proposed ban on
military service by transgender
men and women.
The judge denied Brennan’s
request to immediately block enforcement of his school’s policy
before the broader case is resolved. Brennan is not enrolled in
gym class for the current school
year, and the judge said that for
that reason, no harm from the
policy is “imminent.”
ann.marimow@washpost.com
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strongly denied the allegation,
saying he “kept his hands to myself” and spoke to Kagan for only
about 10 seconds, while holding a
coat and umbrella.
“I did not run my hand down
her back or down to her tush,” the
statement said. “And I especially
and consciously avoided the all-
too-common Annapolis legislative ‘hug’ many legislators use to
greet one another. I did none of
that in my very brief encounter
with Senator Kagan. I am 100 percent certain of these facts.”
The security camera video
shows their conversation lasted
well over a minute. Genn does not
appear to be holding anything.
On Tuesday, Maloney sent a
new statement from Genn, in
which he acknowledges placing
his hand on Kagan’s back “for a
few seconds” but denies doing
anything inappropriate.
Kagan said hundreds of people
have thanked her in person or on
social media for coming forward
with her allegations at a time
when Maryland lawmakers are
trying to decide how best to address sexual harassment complaints.
But she said there are others
who have questioned whether the
incident took place.
“Some people doubt your honesty; some made comments on my
looks and possible sexual orientation,” she said. “But I’m glad I
spoke out.”
As part of her complaint to the
legislature, Kagan said, she plans
to provide the video to the General
Assembly’s director of Human Resources, which is the office in the
State House designated to track
and handle sexual harassment
complaints.
But the legislature’s antiharassment policy does not include adjudicating claims against
lobbyists, whose conduct is governed by the Maryland State Ethics Commission. The Ethics Commission does not investigate
claims of sexual harassment.
Del. Ariana B. Kelly (D-Montgomery), president of the Women
Legislators of Maryland caucus,
has proposed legislation that
would provide a process for deal-
The dueling accounts
escalated a debate over
workplace sexual
harassment that has
burst into public view in
Maryland’s capital
in recent weeks.
ing with allegations involving lobbyists and require an independent
investigator to handle some complaints.
Kelly — who has publicly written about her own experiences
with workplace harassment —
said Tuesday that she is hopeful
that the General Assembly will
move forward with legislation to
address those issues.
“That’s what’s in the best interest of all the parties involved,” she
said.
ovetta.wiggins@washpost.com
COURTLAND MILLOY
COURTLAND MILLOY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Steve Clark and his wife, Allison, have a 21-year-old son. When students from across the country hold a
school “walkout” on Wednesday to protest gun violence, Clark will be paying close attention.
Finding hope in a lack of panic among
gun buyers after mass shooting in Fla.
MILLOY FROM B1
listening is not what either side is
noted for.
As Clark spoke about the high
schoolers, his voice softened and
he spoke not as a gun store owner
but as a concerned father. He and
his wife, Allison, have a son who
is 21.
“I understand their
tremendous frustration,” Clark
said. “ ‘Do something. Do
something.’ I want to know, what
do you want to do? I want to
know, do you really think we can
get rid of all the guns?”
Clark said he’d also like to hear
more serious discussions about
solutions to gun violence where it
is most deadly: in urban areas,
such as Chicago.
“It would make me crazy if my
kids had to live in an
environment where you have the
equivalent of a mass shooting
every month,” Clark said. “A lot of
those victims are young and
innocent, and nobody seems
ready to fix that. How are you
supposed to make their schools
safe if the schools are in
neighborhoods that aren’t safe?”
On Saturday, a group of
students from Stoneman Douglas
met with high school students
from Chicago to share their
experiences with gun violence.
Emma González, who attends
Stoneman Douglas, tweeted
afterward: “Those who face gun
violence on a level that we have
only just glimpsed from our
gated communities have never
had their voices heard in their
entire lives the way that we have
in these few weeks alone.”
In addition to the 17 people
killed at Stoneman Douglas,
17 more were wounded. In
Chicago this year, there have
been 95 homicides — 79 of the
victims were killed by guns.
Another 341 were shot and
wounded.
It should come as no surprise
that Clark thinks that using a gun
is the best way to fight someone
with a gun. He favors training
It should come as no
surprise that Clark
thinks that using a gun
is the best way to fight
someone with a gun.
and arming teachers, at least in
the kind of semirural schools he
is familiar with.
“I know from experience that
there are teachers who keep guns
in their cars, and they have gone
out to get them and stopped a
bad situation from getting worse.
I know there are people who,
once they have fired a gun, they
say, ‘I want to be good enough at
this to protect myself, my loved
ones, my school, because I don’t
want to feel completely useless
when something happens.’ ”
“If you have a better way, I’d
like to hear it,” he said.
Clark does agree that in the
absence of fear, for whatever
reason, people tend to behave
differently. Just before the
assault rifle ban in 1994, fearful
gun owners and others
purchased hundreds of
thousands of the soon-to-beoutlawed guns.
“People were lined up at the
door for ARs” Clark recalled.
“When I’d lay a gun on the
counter, before I even put a price
tag on it, someone would ask, ‘Is
that going to be for sale? Can I
buy it?’ And they didn’t even
know what it was. Then they’d
take the guns and put them
under their beds. Just silly.”
By time the gun ban expired
10 years later and the impact on
gun crime proved to be
negligible, many of the panic
buyers had come to their senses.
“Several years ago, those guns
started coming back,” Clark said.
“They’d tell me, ‘I’ve never shot
this. . . . I never had any fun with
it. I want to sell it.’
“I got a whole bunch of them
back,” Clark said.
It’s a small sign, but
noteworthy just the same: Even
though the gun debate remains
far from settled, more and more
gun owners are simply giving up
their firearms. And the concerns
of young anti-gun protesters can
be shared by a die-hard gun
enthusiast like Clark.
courtland.milloy@washpost.com
To read previous columns, go to
washingtonpost.com/milloy.
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SF
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B5
RE
VIRGINIA
VIRGINIA
Report: Sexism is not an issue for Fairfax fire dept. Suit alleges conspiracy
theorists inspired threats
BY
J USTIN J OUVENAL
The Fairfax County fire department has problems with leadership, communication and the status of paramedics, but it does not
face widespread issues with the
treatment of women in its ranks,
according to a report released
Tuesday.
The review by county officials
comes just weeks after fire chief
Richard R. Bowers Jr. announced
his retirement amid accusations
from a top-ranking female firefighter that women face a toxic
atmosphere in the department.
Battalion Chief Kathleen Stanley’s resignation in January as
interim head of the department’s
women’s program sparked the
probe. Her resignation letter
alleged a long list of problems,
including the assertions that a
captain was retaliated against for
seeking an apology for sexual
harassment, that the department’s zero-tolerance policy for
sexual harassment is not enforced and that some men receive
special privileges.
New Fairfax County Executive
Bryan J. Hill said at a Tuesday
news conference that each of
Stanley’s allegations was thoroughly examined but that the
investigation did not substantiate
many of the complaints and that
others were handled previously.
Four issues she raised were forwarded to an internal auditor for
review.
“We have cultural issues. We
have cultural concerns, but guess
what? We deal with those,” Hill
said. “We are a fire and rescue
department that is a 24-hour operation. Things obviously happen
in a household that’s 24 hours.”
The report said Stanley was
wrong to say that the department’s zero-tolerance sexual harassment policy is hollow and
“We are a fire and
rescue department that
is a 24-hour operation.
Things obviously
happen in a household
that’s 24 hours.”
Fairfax County Executive Bryan J. Hill
that senior leadership does not
accept there is a cultural problem
at the department. The investigation found Stanley’s complaint
that she faced hostility for promoting workplace diversity did
not rise to the level of retaliation.
More generally, the report also
highlighted a survey of 161 women in the department that found
that 90 percent reported they had
not been mistreated because of
their gender in the past five years.
The report did substantiate
Stanley’s complaint that some
firefighters were using a
penis-shaped water bottle. Two
were disciplined.
Hill wrote in a memo accompanying the report that interviews
showed many firefighters were
less concerned about the treatment of women than the department’s direction and its process
for communicating. Paramedics
also said they felt overlooked.
Stanley did not return a call
seeking comment. Battalion
Chief Cheri Zosh said there are
still “pockets of resistance” within the department that don’t
want to be inclusive of women,
but she said she’s hopeful a new
chief and county executive could
make changes.
In 2016, Zosh filed a federal
lawsuit against the department
claiming she was retaliated
against for trying to stop a captain from sexually harassing a
subordinate.
“There is still no commitment
to holding people accountable,”
Zosh said.
Other female firefighters
disagreed.
“I know for myself that we’ve
been treated extremely well,” said
Jennifer Himer. “This is my
family.”
Stanley’s scathing letter is the
latest episode for a department
that has been dogged by complaints and lawsuits alleging sexual harassment, retaliation and
the failure to promote women for
years. The roughly 1,400-member
department has 171 women.
The issues were highlighted
dramatically in 2016, when firefighter Nicole Mittendorff took
her own life. Her family has not
revealed the cause of her suicide,
but it emerged after her death
that anonymous posters had
made sexually explicit and misogynistic comments about her on a
local Internet forum.
The posts appeared to be made
by people with knowledge of the
department, but an investigation
by officials was not able to determine whether firefighters were
involved.
County officials also commissioned an independent audit of
the department’s culture that was
released in February 2017 and
found widespread problems.
Nearly 40 percent of firefighters
reported experiencing or witnessing harassment, bullying and discrimination in the department.
Leadership was also criticized.
Bowers promised to change
the department’s culture, instituting a range of changes such as
fresh training, resources for firefighters suffering mental-health
crises and new policies for investigating complaints of sexual harassment.
But concerns flared anew in
January with Stanley’s resignation from the women’s program.
Hill said the county hopes to hire
a new fire chief by June.
justin.jouvenal@washpost.com
BY R ACHEL W EINER
AND A BBY O HLHEISER
A man who recorded video of a
car plowing into a crowd of protesters during last year’s neo-Nazi
rally in Charlottesville is now suing right-wing conspiracy theorists who claimed he was an undercover CIA officer who helped
stage the deadly attack.
Brennan Gilmore, a Foreign
Service officer and bluegrass musician, says he hopes to take
Alex Jones, who founded the website Infowars, and six others to
trial in Virginia federal court for
inspiring death threats and harassment.
More broadly, he and his attorneys from the Georgetown Law
Civil Rights Clinic said they hope
to show that the First Amendment does not protect Jones and
others whose sensational falsehoods have inspired vicious responses.
“We don’t think the
First Amendment
protects blatantly
defamatory speech that
inspires violence and
hatred of victims of
terrorist attacks.”
Attorney Andrew Mendrala
“We’re really trying to set a new
paradigm for how people like
Alex Jones and Infowars operate,
to inject some consequences, legal consequences into that world
and hold them accountable for
the terror they cause,” attorney
Andrew Mendrala said in an interview. “We don’t think the First
Amendment protects blatantly
defamatory speech that inspires
violence and hatred of victims of
terrorist attacks and mass shootings.”
Gilmore was using his phone to
film counterprotesters at an
Aug. 12 white-supremacist rally in
downtown Charlottesville when a
car rammed into the crowd, killing 32-year-old Heather Heyer
and wounding dozens of others.
James Fields, a self-professed
neo-Nazi, is charged with firstdegree murder in her death.
Gilmore caught the deadly assault on video. He posted it on
Twitter, calling it an act of terrorism and encouraging people to
“stay home.”
The video was widely viewed;
Gilmore was repeatedly interviewed. Then the online attacks
began. Gilmore could not have
simply caught the moment on
video by accident, Jones and the
others concluded.
Given his work for the State
Department and his past job as
chief of staff for former congressman Tom Perriello, they claimed,
he must be working for the CIA to
undermine President Trump.
Lee Stranahan, a former writer
for Breitbart, appeared in a video
on the Infowars website calling
Heyer a willing “martyr” whose
death was arranged to help provoke a coup.
Among the defendants are Jim
Hoft, who on his blog Gateway
Pundit called Gilmore a “deepstate shill,” and former Florida
congressman Allen West, who
posted an article on his website
saying the Charlottesville attack
was a “set-up.”
Gilmore said he was deluged
with death threats, hate mail and
online hacking attempts.
His parents’ address was posted online; a powdery substance
was sent to their house.
As recently as last month,
Gilmore said, someone suggested
his body would be found in the
Rivanna River, which runs by his
home.
“It’s died off significantly, but
it’s still very present,” he said. “I’m
sort of constantly having to look
over my shoulder.”
Infowars did not respond to a
request for comment, but Jones
said on his show on Tuesday that
he believed the complaint was a
“misrepresentation of what we
said about the event.”
Hoft and another defendant
also disputed the accusations;
West did not respond to a request
for comment.
Gilmore is on leave from the
Foreign Service, and he says the
smears have made his current
work in rural workforce development more challenging.
He fears that if he goes abroad
again, he will be taken as an
undercover CIA operative.
Conservative friends from the
local bluegrass music scene believe he might be one, he said.
“People really distanced themselves from me and even condemned me that I grew up playing
music with,” he said.
Mendrala said that while he
believes the defamation case is
clear-cut, there is little precedent
for how it will proceed.
Jones settled a lawsuit last year
with the yogurt company Chobani and retracted claims about its
employees.
Gilmore says he has no intention of settling; he is asking for a
jury trial.
“The motivation . . . is the
broader implications of the new
era of the saturation of these fake
news outlets,” he said. “There’s no
money that would be offered in a
settlement that would make me
drop the suit.”
rachel.weiner@washpost.com
abigail.ohlheiser@washpost.com
MATT MCCLAIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
Early bloomers
Although the Capital Weather Gang has pushed its prediction for peak cherry-blossom bloom to the week of March 30 to April 3, some
flowers around the D.C. region are already beginning to spread their petals, such as these saucer magnolias outside of the Smithsonian Castle.
THE DISTRICT
Bowser signs bill for publicly financed campaigns
BY
P ETER J AMISON
D.C. Mayor Muriel E. Bowser
(D) has signed a law that will
create publicly financed elections,
reversing her previous opposition
to a plan that advocates say will
help curb money’s influence in
District politics.
Bowser announced that she
was throwing her support behind
the Fair Elections Act, which was
approved unanimously by the D.C.
Council in February. The law,
which will first affect elections in
2020, will steer millions annually
toward the campaigns of local
candidates and is aimed at reducing their reliance on deeppocketed donors.
Bowser had previously threatened not to fund the legislation,
saying the money would be better
spent on city services than on political campaigns. But as she
signed the bill Tuesday, the mayor
indicated that she had been convinced during recent public meetings that the program has widespread support.
“Over the past few weeks at
budget engagement forums and
community meetings across the
District, residents have shown up
to share their belief that the Fair
Elections Act would strengthen
our democracy,” Bowser said in a
written statement. “I have heard
them and I have been moved by
their passion.”
The switch may help Bowser,
who is seeking a second term,
combat a perception that she
hasn’t done enough to erase a “pay
to play” culture in city government. A Washington Post poll last
summer showed that District residents rated Bowser negatively
concerning her efforts to curb the
influence of wealthy political donors, with 48 percent saying she
“I’m glad to see her sign
the bill and glad to see
her change her mind. I
think it’s a great thing
that she listened.”
D.C. Council member Charles Allen
(D-Ward 6)
was doing a poor job while 31 percent said she was doing a good or
excellent job.
The program will cost $3.8 million in 2020, the first year in which
publicly financed elections would
take place, increasing to $7.9 million in 2021. The District’s current
annual budget is roughly
$13.9 billion.
Council member Charles Allen
(D-Ward 6), one of the bill’s sponsors, praised the mayor’s aboutface.
“I’m glad to see her sign the bill
and glad to see her change her
mind,” he said. “I think it’s a great
thing that she listened not just to
the council, but that she listened
to the people.”
Allen said the law would engineer a “paradigm shift” in D.C.
politics, which for decades has
been marred by scandals involving political donors.
“It’s one way that we take big
money out of politics. It’s one way
that you take corporate contributions out of politics. And it’s a way
that you help grass-roots candidates be able to be competitive
and have their voice heard,” Allen
said.
Monica Kamen, co-director of
the D.C. Fair Budget Coalition,
said in a statement that the new
law is “a huge step forward for the
District and for our democracy.
With officials truly elected by the
people to serve the people, we can
look forward to greater investments and attention paid to all of
the pressing issues affecting District residents like housing security, economic justice, food access,
healthcare, and community safety.”
A separate bill moving through
the council’s judiciary committee
— which Allen heads — would also
limit campaign contributions by
contractors who do business with
the city.
Bowser administration officials
have declined to take a position on
such limits, saying the mayor
would wait to see the final version
of the legislation.
Advocates of election reform
have lauded the District’s efforts
to enact stronger ethics rules for
campaigns — while also criticizing
those efforts as belated.
Under Washington’s voluntary
program, candidates who accept
public financing must agree to
smaller contribution limits for
their donors. In exchange, they
receive matching funds at a rate of
$5 for every $1 raised from a District resident.
Depending on the office, candidates must also raise a threshold
sum of money from a certain number of contributors to qualify for
the program.
In a mayoral race, for example, a
candidate would have to raise
$40,000 from at least 1,000 smalldollar contributors before becoming eligible for public financing.
The candidate’s donors would
then have to abide by an individual contribution limit of $200, compared to the current $2,000 limit
for mayoral races.
A qualifying mayoral candidate
would also receive a $160,000
base grant.
The District now joins about 30
other jurisdictions — including
Montgomery County, New York
City and San Francisco — with a
public campaign finance system,
according to Demos, a left-leaning
think tank.
peter.jamison@ washpost.com
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SU
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 14 , 2018
obituaries
T. BERRY BRAZELTON, 99
Pediatrician urged generations of parents to relax
BY
E MILY L ANGER
T. Berry Brazelton, a pediatrician whose best-selling guides to
child-rearing soothed generations of parents, assuring them
that they need not seek perfection and that the answers to
many of their questions lay before them in their children’s behavior, died March 13 at his home
in Barnstable, Mass. He was 99.
His daughter-in-law, Jennifer
Brazelton, confirmed the death
but did not provide a specific
cause.
Dr. Brazelton was perhaps the
best-known American pediatrician since Benjamin Spock, who
revolutionized child-rearing by
counseling parents to rely on
their “own common sense” rather
than on commandments dispensed by purported experts.
Dr. Brazelton — who described
Spock as his “hero” and who
counted Spock’s grandchildren
among his patients — picked up
where the older physician left off.
In books such as “Infants and
Mothers” (1969), in his hit
“Touchpoints” book series, in
commentaries published in Redbook and Family Circle, and on
the Emmy Award-winning television show “What Every Baby
Knows,” Dr. Brazelton genially
coached parents to see their children’s abilities as well as their
own.
He bucked prevailing notions
of his time by arguing that babies
are not “lumps of clay” but rather
expressive beings whose behavior
conveys their needs. Rather than
instructing parents on child-rearing, he sought to help them read
their babies’ cues.
“People assumed babies were
all the same and that it was
parenting and the environment
that made the difference,” Dr.
Brazelton told USA Today in 2013.
“We were blaming parents for
everything that went wrong with
babies. I thought if I could assess
these babies early . . . we could
use this in understanding the
child more and give the parents a
better chance of understanding
the child, too.”
Dr. Brazelton spent much of
his career in Massachusetts,
where he held appointments at
Harvard Medical School and Boston Children’s Hospital and
where he maintained a private
pediatrics practice in Cambridge.
In 1973, he developed the Neonatal Behavioral Assessment
Scale, often called the Brazelton.
The now widely used test relies
on simple tools such as popcorn
kernels and a pocket flashlight to
test a newborn’s response to
sound and light. He identified
three broad categories of babies:
average, quiet and active.
Besides helping new parents
decode an infant’s needs, the test
changed adoption practices by
allowing physicians to quickly
gauge a baby’s health. Traditionally, babies awaiting adoption
were institutionalized for months
of observation before placement.
Dr. Brazelton contended that nei-
M. SPENCER GREEN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dr. T. Berry Brazelton, shown in 2006, coached parents to see their children’s abilities as well as their own. He bucked prevailing
notions of his time by arguing that babies are not “lumps of clay” but rather expressive beings whose behavior conveys their needs.
“Babies are competent to withstand ‘mistakes’ that their inexperienced parents might make,
and even to let the parents know when they are on the wrong track.”
Dr. T. Berry Brazelton
ther children nor their adoptive
parents could afford to lose those
critical early months of bonding.
Although the scale was widely
regarded as one of Dr. Brazelton’s
most significant contributions to
medicine, his reach extended far
beyond hospitals, into homes and
the most intimate decisions parents make. On his television
show, he was said to project a
“combination of Sigmund Freud,
Mister Rogers and Phil Donahue.” Mainly, he tried to persuade
parents not to worry so much.
“Parents care so much they
can’t smile,” he told an audience
in 1979. “They can’t smile and
give children a feeling of the
excitement of being a parent. I
would like to look at what can be
done to get parents to relax and
not to take [parenthood] quite so
seriously.”
He assured those with picky
eaters that “children always eat
better for people other than their
mothers.” Neither should bickering cause parents too much consternation. “Fighting,” he observed, “is how siblings learn
about each other.”
He especially sought to comfort strung-out mothers.
“Parents are surprised and
even ashamed at their own lack of
endurance with small children,”
he wrote. “But they needn’t be.
There is nothing so exhausting as
giving attention constantly to
someone else.”
Dr. Brazelton was known particularly for a series of books,
beginning in 1992, on developmental milestones that he
dubbed “touchpoints” — moments when children are on the
cusp of a great leap, such as
learning to walk, and tend to
regress by crying, refusing food
or otherwise acting out.
By anticipating and understanding touchpoints, he hoped,
parents might be better prepared
to confront them — and to celebrate the accomplishments that
follow.
“Most issues in parenting involve a spurt in the child’s autonomy and the parent’s need to
control,” he told the New York
Times. “It helps to see things from
the child’s side.”
On the contentious (and often
messy) matter of potty training,
he advocated what he described
as a “child-oriented approach,”
saying that parents should allow
their youngsters to shed the diaper when they showed signs of
readiness, rather than working
from a preestablished timetable.
It was a controversial position,
opposed by more-conservative
parenting experts who lamented
permissiveness in parenting.
John Rosemond, a child psychologist, advocated what he described as the “naked and $75”
method. (The label has resisted
inflation.) Parents who employ it
keep their child unclothed and
within easy reach of a portable
potty during training — and set
aside $75 to shampoo the carpet.
Dr. Brazelton told the Times
that the idea that a child should
be housebroken like a puppy was
“very logical — for a puppy.”
Some of his views evolved over
the years with changing social
attitudes. After long arguing that
mothers should stay home with
young children, he acknowledged
in the 1980s that some women
needed to work outside the home
and found fulfillment in their
professions. He credited his transition to his daughters, who he
said had told him, “Dad, you are
out of this century.”
He became a chief proponent
OSKAR GROENING, 96
‘Bookkeeper of Auschwitz,’
convicted of war crimes
BY
M ATT S CHUDEL
Oskar Groening, a German SS
guard known as the “Bookkeeper
of Auschwitz,” who was convicted
in 2015 of being an accessory to the
murder of 300,000 Hungarian
Jews at the Nazi death camp during World War II, died March 9
before he could serve a four-year
prison sentence. He was 96.
A spokesman for the public
prosecutor’s office in Hanover,
Germany, told German news
sources that Mr. Groening’s lawyer confirmed the death. No other
details were disclosed.
After training as a bank clerk,
Mr. Groening joined the Waffen
SS, an elite paramilitary branch
of Germany’s Nazi regime in 1939
when he was 18. He spent more
than two years at Auschwitz, a
death camp in occupied Poland,
where more than 1 million people
were killed during the war.
One of his jobs was to retrieve
the luggage of Holocaust victims
and confiscate their money. He
recorded the amounts for the
camp’s “foreign currency department,” carefully noting whether
the cash came from France, Great
Britain, Greece, Italy, the United
States or other countries. He sent
the money to SS headquarters in
Berlin.
“I do not feel myself guilty,” Mr.
Groening told the German newspaper Hannoversche Allgemeine
Zeitung in 2013, “because I didn’t
give anyone so much as a slap in
the face.”
Later, after encountering
Holocaust deniers among his fellow Germans, Mr. Groening became one of the few death-camp
guards to describe what he had
witnessed.
“I see it as my task, now at my
age, to face up to these things that I
experienced and to oppose the
Holocaust deniers who claim that
Auschwitz never happened,” he
told the BBC in 2004. “I want to tell
those deniers I have seen the gas
chambers, I have seen the crematoria, I have seen the burning pits
— and I want you to believe me
that these atrocities happened. I
was there.”
As a self-described “small cog
in the gears” who said he was not
an active participant in killing,
Mr. Groening believed he would
not be prosecuted. “Where would
you stop?” he said in 2013.
“Wouldn’t you also have to
charge the engineer who drove
the trains to Auschwitz? And the
men who ran the signal boxes?”
He had been cleared of charges
by a war-crimes tribunal in 1948,
and German authorities investigated him again in the 1970s and
1980s before determining there
JULIAN STRATENSCHULTE/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Oskar Groening, who worked at the Nazi death camp Auschwitz
during World War II, waits in court for the opening of his 2015
trial in Lueneburg, Germany. Mr. Groening was charged with
complicity in the murder of 300,000 Hungarian Jews during 1944.
was too little evidence to charge
him.
His case was reopened after
the 2011 conviction in Germany
of John Demjanjuk, a onetime
guard at the Sobibor camp in
occupied Poland who later settled
in the United States. (Demjanjuk
died in 2012 while his case was
being appealed.)
At Mr. Groening’s trial in 2015,
he was charged with complicity
in the murder of 300,000 Hungarian Jews between May and
July of 1944.
“Because of my job in Auschwitz,
I am without question morally
complicit in the killing of millions
of people, most of whom were
Jews,” he said during his first day
on the stand. “I ask them for forgiveness. Whether I am legally
guilty is a matter this court must
decide.”
He recalled scenes that remained shocking more than
70 years later. He watched as a
fellow German soldier picked up
a crying baby by its legs “and
smashed it again and again
against the iron side of a truck
until it was silent.”
Mr. Groening said he told his
superior officer about the inci-
of mandated maternity leave and
encouraged working parents to
“cheat on the workplace” so they
would have the emotional reserves to fully care for their children when they were not on the
job. The greatest gift a parent
could give, he said, was a loving
home from earliest infancy.
“Babies are competent to withstand ‘mistakes’ that their inexperienced parents might make,”
he wrote in “Infants and Mothers,” “and even to let the parents
know when they are on the wrong
track.”
Early on, a way with children
Thomas Berry Brazelton Jr.
was born in Waco, Tex., on May
10, 1918. He recalled being distant
from his father, who ran the
family lumber business but was
away for military training when
he was born. Dr. Brazelton’s
mother served on the local school
board and reportedly helped
found one of the first abortion
clinics in Texas.
Dr. Brazelton said that he “hated” his younger brother because
his mother gave him so much
attention. He felt closest to his
grandmother, who allowed him
dent the next day and requested a
transfer, but was turned down.
Some observers found him
sympathetic, and many Germans
thought it unseemly to bring
charges against a man in his 90s
who struggled to reach the witness stand with his walker. But
several survivors who lost family
members at Auschwitz also provided compelling testimony at
the trial and noted that Mr.
Groening never made a formal
apology in court.
“Any person who wore that
uniform in that place,” said 84year-old Irene Fogel Weiss, who
lost 19 family members in
Auschwitz, “represented terror
and the depths to which humanity can sink, regardless of what
function they performed.”
In July 2015, Mr. Groening was
found guilty.
“You didn’t want to stand on
the sidelines,” the judge, Franz
Kompisch, told him. “What you,
Mr. Groening, see as moral guilt is
exactly what the law sees as accessory to murder.”
Mr. Groening’s appeals were
rejected and, in November 2017, a
German court determined that
he was fit to begin serving his
four-year sentence.
Oskar Groening was born June
10, 1921, in Nienburg, Germany.
He was 4 when his mother died,
and he was raised by his father, a
to look after his many cousins —
the experience that he credited
with sparking his interest in becoming a pediatrician.
“I’d take care of 11 at a time
when my parents and aunts and
uncles were outside drinking
martinis,” he told the Chicago
Tribune. “If you’re taking care of
that many kids, you have to learn
how to get inside them and manage each one individually.”
Dr. Brazelton graduated from
Episcopal High School, a boarding school in Alexandria, Va.,
before enrolling in Princeton
University. There, he performed
with the Triangle Club and entertained the idea of entering show
business. He said he had a chance
to perform in the Cole Porter
musical “Panama Hattie,” a
Broadway show starring Ethel
Merman, but he declined after his
family threatened to not finance
his medical school if he went
forward with it.
He graduated from Princeton
in 1940 before receiving a medical degree from Columbia University in 1943, later seeking additional training in child psychiatry
under Jerome Bruner. “My goal
was to understand human beings, and we were learning mainly about diseases,” he told People
magazine in 1982.
Dr. Brazelton began his private
practice in 1950 and joined Harvard Medical School the next
year.
His books included “Toddlers
and Parents: A Declaration of
Independence” (1974) and “The
Earliest Relationship: Parents,
Infants, and the Drama of Early
Attachment” (co-written with
Bertrand G. Cramer, 1990). In
2003, with Joshua D. Sparrow, he
wrote a series of books on parenting “the Brazelton way,” covering
topics such as calming a fussy
baby, sleeping and discipline. Dr.
Brazelton’s memoir, “Learning to
Listen: A Life Caring for Children,” was published in 2013.
In 2013, President Barack
Obama awarded him a Presidential Citizens Medal, the nation’s
second-highest civilian recognition.
His wife, the former Christina
Lowell, died in 2015 after 66 years
of marriage. Survivors include
four children, Catherine “Kitty”
Brazelton of New York City, Pauline “Polly” Brazelton of Barnstable, Christina Brazelton of southern Maine, and Thomas B. Brazelton III, also a pediatrician, of
Madison, Wis.; and several
grandchildren.
Dr. Brazelton’s “simple wish,”
he said, was for parents to “have
fun with their kids.”
“At age 16 or 17, when my
patients have their last exam, I
have their charts with bowel
movements and spitups and everything in front of me, and I ask
them what they remember as
children,” he told People. “So
many have said, ‘My parents
cared so much. They always worried. They never smiled.’ For parenting to be joyless is tragic.”
adam.bernstein@washpost.com
stern factory worker and World
War I veteran.
Mr. Groening joined the Hitler
Youth group in his early teens.
After Auschwitz, he was transferred to the front lines late in
1944 and was captured by British
troops after being wounded.
He returned to Germany in
1948 and held administrative positions at a Lueneberg glass factory until his retirement in the
1980s. He was a widower and had
two sons, but complete information about survivors was not immediately available.
Mr. Groening was one of about
6,500 SS guards at Auschwitz. He
was the 50th to be convicted of
war crimes. Another former
guard, Reinhold Hanning, who
was convicted in 2016 of being an
accessory to the murder of more
than 170,000 people, died last
year without serving time in prison.
In a 2014 interview with the
Daily Mail newspaper in Britain,
Mr. Groening said he was forever
haunted by what he saw at
Auschwitz.
“Every night and every day I
remember it for the nightmare it
was,” he said. “Down the years I
have heard the cries of the dead in
my dreams and in every waking
moment. I will never be free of
them.”
matt.schudel@washpost.com
“What you, Mr. Groening, see as moral guilt is
exactly what the law sees as accessory to murder.”
Judge Franz Kompisch, who convicted Mr. Groening of war crimes after a 2015
trial in Germany
DEATH NOTICE
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
DEATH NOTICE
EZ
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
IN MEMORIAM
DEATH NOTICE
CODD
MOORE
BALDIVIA
FIUMARA
McDONALD
O'BRIEN
GISELA E. BALDIVIA (Age 90)
JOSEPH T. FIUMARA (Age 68)
JAMES PATRICK O'BRIEN, JR.
Of Forestville, MD passed away on March 8,
2018. A memorial gathering will be held on
Sunday, March 18, 2018 at Lasting Tributes
Cremation & Funeral Care, 814 Bestgate Road,
Annapolis MD 21401 from 2 to 4 p.m. Online
condolences may be made at
www.LastingTributesFuneralCare.com
Of Hyattsville, Maryland passed away on Thursday, March 8, 2018 at Suburban Hospital in
Bethesda. Born on May 3, 1949 in Washington,
DC, he was the son of the late Joseph and
Emma (Arnone) Fiumara. He was a graduate
of Northwestern High School (Hyattsville, MD),
class of 1967 and served in the U.S. Army
Military Police at Fort Dix, New Jersey. Joseph
retired from the Metropolitan Police Department in Washington, DC after 20 years of
service.
The family will receive friends on Friday, March
16 from 11 a.m. to 12 Noon at St. Timothy
Roman Catholic Church, 8651 Biggs Ford Road,
Walkersville, Maryland. A Mass of Christian
Burial at 12 Noon at the church. Interment will
follow at Resthaven Memorial Gardens.
Memorial donations may be made to St. Timothy Knights of Columbus Charitable Corporation (Kitchen Fund), c/o James Johnson, Grand
Knight, 508 Postoak Road, Frederick Maryland
21703-6052 (check payable to “STCCC”).
Arrangements have been entrusted to Stauffer
Funeral Homes, P.A. Frederick.
Expressions of sympathy may be offered to the
family at
www.staufferfuneralhome.com
ELLEN PAULINE CARTER McDONALD
"Polly" (Age 84)
BROOKING
BEAUFORD S. BROOKING
On March 1, 2018. Beloved mother of Daniel
Brooking and Danielle Drabik. Visitation, 9:30
a.m.; service, 10:30 a.m., Thursday, March 15
at Dupont Park Seventh Day Adventist, 3985
Massachusetts Ave., SE. Services by
www.johnsonandjenkinsfh.com
BUC
VIVIAN EMILY BUC
Of Alexandria, VA. Died peacefully March
11, 2018 at age 62 after a battle with
lymphoma. Much-loved sister of Nancy L.
Buc and Lawrence G. Buc (Leigh Houck);
aunt of Jason S. Buc (Hannah Murphy Buc),
Alexander D. Buc, and Leo C. Buc (Megan
Watson); and great-aunt of Samantha,
Michaela, and Ari. Memorial service will
be held on Saturday, March 17 at 11 a.m.
at Joseph Gawler’s Sons, 5130 Wisconsin
Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20016. In lieu
of flowers, please send contributions in
Vivian’s memory to Washington Nationals
Youth Baseball Academy or the ACLU.
GILLIAM
VANCE L. GILLIAM, SR. (Age 90)
On Wednesday, March 7, 2018 in McDonough,
GA. Loving and devoted father of Phyllis E.
Anderson, Jo-Lynn M. Gilliam, Vance L. Gilliam,
Jr. (Lois) and Lawrence A. Gilliam (Comilla).
He is also survived by his brothers, Louis H.
Gilliam, Charles F. Stewart, Jr. (Thelma) and Rev.
Dr. E. Allen Stewart (Angelica); a host of other
relatives and friends. Mr. Gilliam will lie in state
at the First United Methodist Church, 6201
Belcrest Rd., Hyattsville, MD, Friday, March 16
from 10 am. until funeral services at 11 a.m.
Interment Fort Lincoln Cemetery. Services by
STEWART.
Of Fredericksburg, VA, formerly of Alexandria,
VA, died March 11, 2018 after suffering from
Alzheimer’s disease. Pauline was born in Blackshear, GA on February 19, 1934 to Ellen H.
(Carter) Wheeler and Elvin Alonzo Carter who
preceded her in death.
Pauline worked in several capacities for the
Department of Agriculture including APHIS
(Animal and Planet Health Inspection Service)
and AMS (Agricultural Marketing Service). She
retired after more than 20 years of service
to the department. While living in Alexandria,
Pauline attended Hope United Church of Christ,
serving as a deacon and as treasurer for many
years. Her family and the relationships she
formed at Hope gave her great joy.
Preceded in death by her husband, Clifton
Stanton McDonald, she is survived by her four
daughters: Karen (Larry) Wirman of Stafford,
VA; Carol (David) Rickerson of Moneta, VA;
Wanda (Steven) Lindquist of Huntsville, UT; and
Tammy (Fred) Weatherholtz also of Stafford,
VA. She is also survived by her sister, Susan
(Bob) Grant, grandchildren, great grandchildren, numerous nieces and nephews, and
many extended family and friends.
Funeral services will be held, Thursday, March
15, 2018, 10 a.m. at Mullins and Thompson,
Stafford Chapel with the Rev. Amber Neuroth
officiating. The family will receive friends at the
chapel one hour prior to the service. Interment
will be private at Thomas Cemetery, Waycross,
GA.
In lieu of flowers, expressions of sympathy
may be made to The Alzheimer’s Association,
Toys For Tots at www.toysfortots.org or Hope
United Church of Christ, 6130 Old Telegraph Rd.
Alexandria, VA in memory of Pauline.
EUGENE ALLAN COXEN (Age 84)
Of Annapolis, MD on March 10, 2018. He is
survived by wife, Patricia Coxen; sons, Craig
Coxen and Sean Coxen (Rajani Polisetty);
stepdaughter, Sally Davis (Gerald); grandchildren, Ian and Anna Coxen and Thomas
and Jeremy Davis (Michele); and greatgranddaughter, Payton Davis. Friends will
be received Thursday, March 15 from 2 to
4 and 6 to 8 p.m. at Rausch Funeral Home,
P.A., Owings, MD, where a funeral service
will be held Friday, 11 a.m. Interment private. Memorial donations to Hospice of the
Chesapeake.
www.rauschfuneralhomes.com
JEAN LOWES DIGNAZIO
On March 8, 2018, JEAN LOWES DIGNAZIO,
beloved wife of Anthony J. Dignazio; devoted
mother of Lisa J. Dignazio (Troy Bradley) and
John A. D’Ignazio. Also survived by many loving
family and friends.
The family will receive friends at HARRY H.
WITZKE’S FAMILY FUNERAL HOME, 4112 Old
Columbia Pike, Ellicott City, MD 21043 on
Friday, March 16 from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to
8 p.m. A Funeral Service will be held at the
funeral home on Saturday, March 17 at 10 a.m.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to
the American Cancer Society, Gilchrist Hospice
of Howard County and Hope Hospice of Fort
Myers, FL.
www.harrywitzkefuneralhome.com
DEATH NOTICE
EATON
WARREN RUSSELL HULTS
Warren Russell Hults died peacefully on Saturday, March 3, 2018 in Springfield, VA at the age
of 90. Beloved husband of the late Helen Hults.
He is survived by his children, Diane Johnson
(Bill), Peter Hults (Judy) and Ken Hults (Lori);
and six grandchildren. He was preceded in
death by his sister, Beulah DeMeo. Family will
receive family and friends at Fairfax Memorial
Funeral Home, 9902 Braddock Rd., Fairfax, VA
on Thursday, March 15 and Friday, March 16
at 2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. Funeral service
will be held at Hope Lutheran Church, 4604
Ravensworth Rd., Annandale, VA on Saturday,
March 17 at 9:30 a.m. His burial will be at
Oakwood Cemetery in Falls Church, VA.
ECK
ETTA K. ECK
On Sunday, March 11, 2018,
Etta Kimche Eck of Chevy
Chase, MD and Glenview,
IL. Beloved wife of the late
Gerry Eck; devoted mother
of Susan Eck Perlman, and
Melvin Eck; loving sister of
Estelle Kay, the late Aaron
Kimche, the late Jeanette
Cohen. Also beloved grandmother to
Matthew (Virginia) Perlman, Cassie Perlman, Marissa Perlman, Dimitri Eck, Brynna
Eck; great-grandmother ("GG" ) to Asher
Van Perlman; many beloved nieces,
nephews,
grand-nieces
and
grandnephews. Private graveside service on Friday, March 16, 2018. Family will be receiving friends on March 16 at 12 noon at
the residence of Joann and Jim DiMeglio.
Memorial contributions may be made to
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.
Services entrusted to Sagel Bloomfield Danzansky Goldberg Funeral Care.
www.sagelbloomfield.com
DYNESTI HOPE LAZINA MARAJ
Our family chain is broken and nothing
seems the same, but as God calls us one by
one, the chain will link again.
Those we love don't go away they walk
beside us everyday unseen, unheard but
always near. Still loved, still missed and
very dear.
An angel in the Book of Life wrote down
my baby's birth July 7, 2012 and whispered
as she closed the book "Too beautiful for
Earth" Heaven was blessed on March 14,
2015.
SINGLETON
DEATH NOTICE
ALLISON
SHERMAN MERRICK, JR.
Peacefully on Monday, March 5, 2018. Family
will receive friends on Friday, March 16 at
Peace Baptist Church, 712 18th St., NE, wake,
10 a.m.; service, 11 a.m. Interment Resurrection Cemetery, Clinton, MD. Services by
FREEMAN.
DEATH NOTICE
JOHNSON
CHRISTOPHER WARD JOHNSON
(Age 69)
Of Northern Virginia passed away peacefully
on February 26, 2018. Following graduation
from the US Air Force Academy in June 1970,
he began a career of operational flying and
international political-military affairs. He spent
several years in East Asia, flying C-130 tactical
airlift during the early 1970s. By the mid-80s he
had proudly become one of the principal forces
in improving US-China strategic and military
relations that contributed to the end of the
Cold War. Survived by his brother Maxwell; five
children, Emily, Madeleine, Christopher, Elena,
and Alexander, and 10 grandchildren. Memorial
services will be held at The City Gates Church
9401 Little River Turnpike, Fairfax VA 22031,
4 p.m. on March 17, 2018. Private inurnment.
KONOSHIMA
GEORGE J. KONOSHIMA
George J. Konoshima of Bethesda, Maryland
passed suddenly on Friday, March 9, 2018.
Beloved father of Gregory and Jillian
Konoshima, Joseph Ribeiro (wife, Ashley)
and their mother, Sandra Lambert; cherished grandfather of Madison Ribeiro;
loving son of Akio Konoshima and Lida
Allen and the late Hideko Konoshima;
devoted brother of Mari Andersen and Taro
Konoshima. Our beloved “Uncle George”
is also survived by many aunts, nieces,
nephews, cousins, coworkers and wonderful friends.
Family will receive friends at PUMPRHEY’S
BETHESDA-CHEVY CHASE FUNERAL HOME,
7557 Wisconsin Ave, Bethesda, MD on
Friday, March 16 from 7 to 9 p.m. Interment
will be private.
Please view and sign the family guest book
at:
www.PumphreyFuneralHome.com
LAUNI
SPLENDORA LAUNI (Age 89)
On Monday, March 5, 2018, of
Silver Spring, MD. Beloved wife
of the late Joseph Launi; loving
mother of Dominick (Debbie)
Launi, Rose Glenny and Michael
Launi. Also survived by seven
grandchildren. Relatives
and
friends may call at Collins Funeral Home,
500 University Blvd. West, Silver Spring, MD
Thursday March 15, from 7 to 9 p.m. (Valet
Parking). Memorial Mass at St. Camillus
Church, 1600 St. Camillus Drive, Silver Spring,
MD, on Friday, March 16, 2018 at 10:30 a.m.
Interment Fort Lincoln Cemetery.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
MARCH
MARY LOU EATON (Age 77)
GAYLORD VINCENT McKOY (Age 82)
Master Chef Petty Officer, U.S. Navy (Ret.)
Passed away peacefully surrounded by his
loved ones on Saturday, March 3, 2018 of
Mitchellville, MD. He leaves to cherish his
memory daughter, Vivian Gilliam; grandson,
Aaron Gilliam. He is also survived by a host
of relatives and friends. Visitation will be held
on Saturday, March 17, 2018 from 9 a.m.
until time of service 10:30 a.m. at Epiphany
Episcopal Church, 3111 Ritchie Rd., Forestville,
MD. Interment Arlington National Cemetery. In
lieu of flowers, donations may be made to
Epiphany Episcopal Church Scholarship Fund
on his behalf.
On Wednesday, February 28, 2018, Edna
Owens of Fort Washington, MD. Loving mother
of Lorna Williamson, Diana Carr (Christopher),
Ferris Foote and Wycliffe Foote (Charlotte).
She leaves to cherish her memory a sister,
Eunice Smith; 10 grandchildren; five greatgrandchildren; a devoted niece, Elaine Francis;
granddaughter-in-law, Amy Harrison. Also survived by a host of nieces, nephews, other
relatives and friends. Family will receive friends
on Friday, March 16, 2018 at Ebenezer AME
Church, 7707 Allentown Rd., Ft. Washington,
MD from 10 a.m. until time of funeral service
at 11 a.m. Interment Mt. Olivet Cemetery,
Washington, DC. Arrangements by STRICKLAND FUNERAL SERVICES.
www.stricklandfuneralservices.com
MERRICK
LILLY ROTHWELL MARCH (Age 96)
Resident of the District of Columbia, born
on June 21, 1940, in Cleveland County, NC.
Mary departed this life on March 6, 2018,
leaving behind three devoted children - one
son, Kenneth Earl and two daughters, Sylvia
Earl-Macklin and Aettress Bowden, all from
Maryland; one brother, Ivan Thompson; two
sisters, Madge Gonzalez and Senora Thompson-Scott; and many other loved family members in North Carolina. Mary retired from Metro
Transit (WMATA). Her homegoing services will
be held at the Bible Way Church, 1100 New
Jersey Ave., N.W., Washington, DC on Friday,
March 16, viewing will be at 10 a.m.; followed
by the funeral service at 11 a.m. Funeral
arrangements by Stewart Funeral Home.
SCHUBRING
EDNA OWENS
HULTS
CRAVER
DIGNAZIO
HAYWOOD O. MOORE "George"
Departed this life in Washington, DC on March
10, 2018. George is survived by his loving wife,
Lillian; children, Perez Aughtry, Conchita and
Manuel Moore, and Carmen Moore Montue;
and stepchildren Robert and Rodney Thomas
and a host of grandchildren and many other
loving relatives. Family, friends, and others
whose lives George touched are invited to
Gethsemane Baptist Church, 5119 4th Street,
NW, on Friday, March 16 at 10 a.m. for visitation
with family and 11 a.m. for the funeral service.
Interment Fort Lincoln Cemetery.
MARAJ
OWENS
HOPE WARD CRAVER (Age 95)
On Sunday, March 11, 2018, of
Silver Spring, MD. Beloved wife
of the late George S. Craver, Jr.;
mother of Maribeth (Sam) Gourley
and Dale (Patti) Craver; grandmother of Nicole (Vince) Nguyen,
Justin (Adrienne) Craver, Jenna
(Eli) Hecox, Diane (Bradford) Boyle and Karen
Gourley; great-grandmother of Daewon and
Delainie Nguyen, and Hadley Craver. Graveside Service and Interment at Mt. Carmel
Cemetery, Sunshine, MD on Saturday, March
17, 2018 at 11 am. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to University of Maryland Hearing and Speech Clinic,
www.hespclinic.umd.edu/
or Kensington
Baptist Church.
www.kensingtonbaptistchurch.org/
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
ANNE CODD
November 24, 1961 – March 14, 2011
Our hearts are still heavy. The time without you
unfathomable. Our eyes still rove the crowds.
Forever, Your Work Family at the
Intl Bricklayers Union
DEATH NOTICE
EUGENE A. COXEN
COXEN
On March 5, 2018 of Rockville, Maryland.
Brother of Patricia Poffenberger, Maureen Chelius and Michael O’Brien; uncle of Mary Margaret (Meg) Melusen, Brien Poffenberger,
Karen Bates and Lori Chelius; grand uncle of
nine grand nieces and nephews; brother-inlaw of James Poffenberger and Nanci O’Brien.
Friends will be received at PUMPHREY’S
BETHESDA-CHEVY CHASE FUNERAL HOME,
7557 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, Maryland
20814 on Sunday March 18, 2018 from 3 to
5 and 7 to 9 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial
will be offered 10 a.m., Monday March 19,
2018 at Holy Redeemer Catholic Church, 9705
Summit Avenue, Kensington, Maryland 20895.
Interment Gate of Heaven Cemetery, 13801
Georgia Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20906. In
lieu of flowers, memorial contributions can be
made in the name of James Patrick O’Brien, Jr.
to The Mayo Foundation, 200 First Street SW,
Rochester, Minnesota 55905.
McKOY
COXEN
The members of the Retired Firefighters Association of Washington, DC regret to announce the
passing of Eugene A. Coxen on
March 10, 2018. Brother Coxen
retired December 1980.
Tom Scherer, President
B7
RE
Passed away peacefully on February 21,
2018. Lilly is preceded in death by her
husband, Francis Andrew March IV; parents, John Mears Rothwell and Lilly Steven
Rothwell; brothers, Ian Dallas Rothwell and
Henry Hampton Rothwell. Lilly is survived
by her daughter, Sheila Kester McGinnis;
step-daughter Wesley March Harrison; sonin-law Don Harrison; step-son Francis
Andrew March V; grandchildren, Corey
Alaine McGinnis, Rob Harrison, Drew Harrison; great grandchildren Eli Cristobal
Symons, Trevor Scout Symons, and Jed
Harlowe Symons as well as numerous other
friends and extended family. Lilly was a
50 year member of St. Mark’s Episcopal
Church. In lieu of flowers the family asks
that donations be made to St. Mark’s Episcopal Church or Amnesty International.
Lilly saw the worth in every human being,
without fail. Memorial service will be held
at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, 301 A St SE,
Washington, DC 20003 on Friday, March 16,
2018, at 1 p.m.
MOORE
REGINALD O. MOORE
Members of the Association of
Retired Police Officers of D.C. are
notified of the March 10, 2018
death of Reginald O. Moore. He was
an OFF with MPD-4D when retired
on March 25, 1989.
MORRIS
JAMES ANTHONY MORRIS (Age 71)
Peacefully on Tuesday, February 27, 2018.
Family will receive friends on March 16, 2018
at First National Baptist Church, 5400 D. St., SE,
Wake 10 a.m., Service 11 a.m. Interment Fort
Lincoln Cemetery, Brentwood, MD. Services by
FREEMAN.
Reverend ISRAEL B. SINGLETON
"Benni"
On the evening of Sunday, March 11, 2018,
surrounded by family and friends, Benni
entered into eternity. He was the devoted
husband of Dr. Carole Singleton and the dedicated sire of two offspring, Cheryl and Darryl.
After having out-lived his older sisters, Vyvyan
and Eugenia, he is additionally survived by
his six grandchildren. Services will be held
Friday, March 16, 2018. Viewing beginning
at 9 a.m. until time of service 11 a.m. at
Nineteenth Street Baptist Church, 4606 16th
Street NW, Washington, DC. Interment George
Washington Memorial Cemetery. Arrangements by McGuire.
www.mcguire-services.com
SUIT
OBERT
MARGARET ISABELLE OBERT
August 11, 1944 - March 7, 2018
On March 7, 2018 Margaret Isabelle Obert
(nee Board) Devoted mother of Margaret O
“Margo” Berish and her husband Thomas.
Beloved sister of Clifford Allen and his wife
Debbie, Nancy Lee Swartwout and her husband
William and the late Warren Freeland Board.
Loving grandmother of Katheryn Isabel Berish
and Lauren Margaret Berish. Dear aunt of
Arthur David Swartwout and Jill Anne Hitt
and her husband Wayne. Loving great aunt
of Nicole Elizabeth Pepitone. Also survived by
many other loving relatives and friends.
Memorial Service will be held at the Otterbein
Methodist Church, 112 W. Conway Street,
Baltimore MD 21201 on Saturday, March 17,
2018 at 10 a.m. Family will receive friends at
the church from 9:30 a.m. to 10 a.m. Interment
of cremains in Lorraine Park Cemetery immediately following services at church. Family
Request in lieu of flowers contributions be
made to the Baltimore Animal Rescue and
Care Shelter (BARCS), 301 Stockholm Street,
Baltimore, MD 21230. www.barcs.org/donate/
or the Old Otterbein United Methodist Church,
112 West Conway Street, Baltimore, MD 21201.
www.oldotterbeinumc.org/home
Additional information and Tribute site may be
viewed at
www.charleslstevensfuneralhome.com
When the
need arises,
let families
find you in the
Funeral Services
Directory.
To be seen in the
Funeral Services
Directory, please call
paid Death Notices
at 202-334-4122.
PETER SCHUBRING "Pete"
Died in his Manassas, Virginia, home from
the effects of emphysema on March 7, 2018.
Pete worked in fast food restaurants in the
Washington, DC metropolitan area from 19601998. He then semi-retired by working in the
Prince William County school system until
2002.
Pete was predeceased by his parents, Walter
and Marcella, and a sister, Wallis. He leaves
behind his wife of 55 years, Rosanne; daughters, Stephanie (Hugo) and Rosemarie (John);
four beloved grandchildren; a brother Fred,
and a nephew and nieces.
Per his wishes, Pete was cremated. A Celebration of Life will be held in Manassas on Sunday,
April 22, 2018. Please see the Pierce Funeral
Home website (www.piercefh.com) for more
information and to leave a condolence message.
C. MARVIN SUIT
C. Marvin Suit, of Charlotte Hall, MD, departed
this life March 8, 2018. Beloved husband of
the late Marie Beall Suit and son of his late
parents, Clarence M. Suit and Agnes Brady
Suit. Survived by sisters-in-law, Anne Fichera
and Dorothy Bennett (Wayne); 10 nieces and
nephews, 11 great-nieces and nephews and
10 great-great nieces and nephews. Friends
are invited to Marvin's Life Celebration at THE
GEORGE P. KALAS FUNERAL HOME, P.A. 6160
Oxon Hill Rd., Oxon Hill MD on Friday March 16,
2018 from 11 a.m. until the time of the service
at 12 noon. Interment Cedar Hill Cemetery,
Suitland MD. Memorial contributions may be
made to Good Shepherd United Methodist
Church or Charlotte Hall Veterans Home.
www.KalasFuneralHomes.com
PAID DEATH NOTICES
MONDAY- FRIDAY 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
RICHARD BERKELEY ALLISON, JR.
(Age 87)
A resident for 48 years of Montross, passed
away on Monday, March 12, 2018. Mr. Allison
was born in Washington, DC. A Civil Engineer,
Licensed, Surveyor, he owned and operated
R.B. Allison, Jr. and Associates in Montross.
He was a member and past president of
the Virginia Association of Surveyors and also
served on the Montross Planning Committee.
He is survived by his wife, Pauline “Polly”
Allison; two sons, Michael Allison (Akelia),
Gregory M. Shivok (Laura); three daughters,
Dr. Barbara A. Perlitch (Mitchell), Deborah A.
Powell and Joanne C. Allison; his sister, Judy
Gaines and eight grandchildren. Service will be
private. Memorial contributions may be made
in his memory to the Riverside Tappahannock
Hospice, 618 Hospital Road, Tappahannock, VA
22562.
BAHRS
TAYLOR
Paul Carter Taylor, age 68, on Wednesday,
February 14, 2018 at his home in Warrenton,
Virginia. Paul was preceded in death by his
father, Joseph F. Taylor in May 2013 and his
mother, Catherine Carter Taylor in April 2008.
He is survived by his brother, Charles 'Chuck'
Taylor and his wife, Kathy of Dallas, Texas; and
his niece, Cheron Taylor of Richardson, Texas.
A memorial service will be held at Moser
Funeral Home, 233 Broadview Ave., Warrenton,
VA at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, March 17, 2018.
Interment private.
www.moserfuneralhome.com
HELEN WEHBY TREVITHICK
Died on Wednesday, December 27, 2017
in assisted living in Silver Spring, MD.
Beloved wife of John Paul for 58 years,
who died in 2002. She was predeceased
by her brother, Le Vern, stepbrother,
James and oldest son, Stephen. Helen
leaves behind two children, Alan and
John; four grandchildren and two greatgrandchildren. Services previously held.
Memorial contributions may be made to
stjohnsnorwood.org or to montgomeryhospice.org.
Email and faxes MUST include
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CURRENT 2018 RATES:
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DAVID L. BAHRS (Age 88)
ALL NOTICES MUST BE PREPAID
On March 6, 2018 of Kensington, MD, died in
Potomac, MD. He is survived by his wife of 25
years, Mary Bahrs and his children from his first
marriage, Susan (David) Bristol, Ross (Lorraine)
Bahrs and Ruth (Lance) Forman. Also survived
by five grandchildren, six great-grandchildren,
his sisters, Mary LeBorde and Ma Thein Turlington; numerous nieces and nephews. Predeceased by brothers, John and Carl.
As technical director in the 1960's of GE's
Advanced Computer Development Program in
Syracuse, NY, Mr. Bahrs held 20 patents relating
to M236 & 600 line of information systems. He
also developed special systems, one of which
monitored and controlled Apollo launch.With
Computer Sciences Corporation he supported
the development of various NASA and ESA
ground data processing and control systems. In
retirement he and his wife traveled extensively,
visiting six continents. Believing the future of
society lay in educating youth, he gave financial
support for youth in Haiti and Latin America.
A celebration of his life will be held on Saturday,
April 14, at 11 a.m. at Bethesda United Church
of Christ, 10010 Fernwood Road, Bethesda,
MD.
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GHI
LUVENIA WHITE "Baylou"
Luvenia C. White peacefully transitioned
on Thursday, March 8, 2018. Beloved wife
of the late Clyde White, Sr. She is survived
by her children, other relatives and many
friends. Visitation, Thursday, March 15,
2018, 9 to 11 a.m. at Smyrna Baptist
Church, 4417 Douglas St., NE, Washington, DC 20019. Arrangements by Freeman
Funeral Service.
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C0979 2x3
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14 , 2018
B8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 14 , 2018
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
Sunny with cold winds
Winds pick back up, and it could
actually end up windier than
Tuesday. Oh, joy! Right? Sunshine is
plentiful, though, as highs rise to the
mid-40s. Winds peak about 20 to
30 mph out of the northwest, with gusts near or
past 40 mph. Tonight, partly to mostly cloudy.
Lows 25-33. Light breezes.
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Today
Partly sunny,
windy
Thursday
Partly sunny
45° 32
53° 31
44° 28
52° 33
56° 34
53° 34
FEELS*: 33°
FEELS: 47°
FEELS: 33°
FEELS: 51°
FEELS: 55°
FEELS: 54°
CHNCE PRECIP: 10%
P: 25%
P: 25%
P: 0%
P: 10%
P: 30%
WIND: WNW 15–25 mph
W: W 10–20 mph
W: NW 10–20 mph
W: W 7–14 mph
W: NW 7–14 mph
W: N 6–12 mph
°
Friday
Partly sunny
.
°
Saturday
Partly sunny
°
Sunday
Mostly sunny
°
°
Monday
Rain possible
OFFICIAL RECORD
Temperatures
NATION
Hagerstown
40/28
Davis
26/21
Charlottesville
44/30
Su
High
Low
Normal
Record high
Record low
Baltimore
43/28
Dover
43/30
Cape May
Annapolis
41/33
43/31
OCEAN: 43°
Washington
45/32
Sa
Weather map features for noon today.
Philadelphia
41/29
Harrisburg
40/29
FORECAST
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
47° 2:59 p.m.
33° 7:00 a.m.
55°/37°
87° 1990
14° 1896
47° 2:57 p.m.
30° 7:00 a.m.
54°/32°
87° 1990
16° 1998
45° 2:45 p.m.
31° 7:00 a.m.
53°/33°
85° 1990
12° 1888
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: –1.5° yr. to date: +2.1°
Precipitation
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
OCEAN: 40°
Richmond
46/29
Norfolk
46/32
Virginia Beach
45/32
Past 24 hours
OCEAN: 41°
Total this month
Normal
Total this year
Kitty Hawk
44/34
OCEAN: 44°
Normal
Snow, past 24 hours
Pollen: Moderate
Air Quality: Good
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
Moderate
Low
Low
Totals for season
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.01"
0.44"
1.30"
6.17"
6.73"
Trace
3.7"
0.00"
0.24"
1.25"
6.63"
6.67"
0.0"
6.6"
0.03"
1.03"
1.50"
7.33"
7.45"
Trace
10.5"
Moon Phases
UV: Moderate
Solar system
3 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, mostly cloudy, windy, very cold. High
22–26. Wind northwest 25–35 mph. Tonight, partly cloudy,
breezy, cold. Low 16–20. Wind northwest 8–16 mph.
Thursday, partly sunny, breezy, cold. High 35–39. Wind west
10–20 mph.
Atlantic beaches: Today, partly sunny, windy, cold, an
afternoon rain or snow shower. High 41–46. Wind west 20–
30 mph. Tonight, mostly cloudy, breezy, cold. Low 29–33.
Wind west 15–25 mph. Thursday, mostly sunny, milder. High
46–56. Wind west 10–20 mph.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, partly sunny, breezy. Wind
northwest 10–20 knots. Waves 2 feet or less. Visibility unrestricted.
• Lower Potomac and Chesapeake Bay: Today, partly sunny, breezy,
afternoon rain or snow shower. Wind west 15–30 knots. Waves
2 feet or less on the Potomac, 1–3 feet on the Bay.• River Stages:
Today, the stage at Little Falls will be 3.7 feet, holding about steady
Thursday. Flood stage at Little Falls is 10 feet.
(High tides in Bold)
Washington
ACTUAL
Ocean City
42/31
Lexington
39/27
Today’s tides
RECORD
°
F
REGION
AVERAGE
1:28 a.m.
6:58 a.m.
1:35 p.m.
7:15 p.m.
Annapolis
3:39 a.m.
10:00 a.m.
4:34 p.m.
10:35 p.m.
Ocean City
6:17 a.m.
12:37 p.m.
6:29 p.m.
none
Norfolk
2:01 a.m.
8:27 a.m.
2:36 p.m.
8:40 p.m.
Point Lookout
5:56 a.m.
12:35 p.m.
7:02 p.m.
none
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Thermal, CA 89°
Low: Saco, MT –4°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
37/28/sf
67/44/pc
35/23/sn
51/35/s
71/51/pc
43/28/pc
51/31/pc
54/35/s
37/14/s
55/36/sh
41/32/sf
33/24/sn
36/30/sn
57/33/s
37/29/sf
47/29/pc
65/32/pc
47/29/pc
41/33/pc
35/29/sf
69/51/s
69/41/pc
Tomorrow
37/23/c
64/35/s
34/30/pc
65/45/s
74/64/pc
49/28/pc
44/30/sh
67/46/s
33/13/c
50/37/sh
43/29/pc
35/21/c
38/23/sf
68/48/s
48/24/pc
65/44/s
59/29/sh
43/25/s
49/24/s
37/21/pc
79/65/pc
66/35/pc
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
61/29/s
39/27/pc
74/57/pc
29/18/sn
35/13/s
40/29/sf
79/73/sh
71/52/pc
43/30/pc
61/35/s
64/33/s
64/39/s
69/50/pc
61/40/s
64/50/c
44/37/s
56/40/s
74/51/s
47/29/pc
44/23/pc
49/38/s
65/45/s
42/31/pc
46/32/sf
52/28/pc
39/20/pc
75/50/pc
29/22/c
34/11/s
42/24/c
82/72/sh
77/66/pc
47/24/s
72/48/pc
70/38/s
64/39/pc
62/45/pc
72/52/s
63/48/c
58/31/s
69/52/s
74/57/s
39/23/s
40/19/s
68/44/s
72/56/pc
45/31/pc
57/36/s
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
64/46/s
65/28/s
71/40/s
41/29/pc
83/57/pc
35/29/sf
38/29/sf
55/36/r
41/31/sf
44/27/pc
49/30/sn
46/29/sf
57/39/sh
54/39/s
82/73/s
66/43/c
65/57/c
56/46/sh
86/73/s
53/36/r
48/33/sh
34/24/sn
67/45/s
68/45/s
73/54/s
55/31/pc
72/40/s
45/29/pc
69/50/s
40/22/c
42/24/c
57/40/sh
43/28/pc
59/40/s
45/31/c
58/30/s
53/43/r
58/35/pc
82/72/s
49/36/sh
63/53/c
57/47/c
87/73/s
55/36/c
48/32/c
35/20/c
69/47/s
77/54/s
World
High: Matam, Senegal 111°
Low: Summit Station, Greenland –66°
Mar 17
New
Mar 24
First
Quarter
Mar 31
Full
Apr 8
Last
Quarter
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Rise
7:21 a.m.
5:54 a.m.
8:04 a.m.
2:50 a.m.
12:00 a.m.
3:30 a.m.
Set
7:14 p.m.
4:33 p.m.
8:28 p.m.
12:14 p.m.
10:09 a.m.
1:02 p.m.
excludes Antarctica
WORLD
Today
Addis Ababa
76/55/pc
Amsterdam
52/37/pc
Athens
66/52/s
Auckland
71/58/pc
Baghdad
85/57/pc
Bangkok
92/77/s
Beijing
70/44/pc
Berlin
43/32/r
Bogota
72/46/pc
Brussels
54/41/pc
Buenos Aires
87/49/t
Cairo
81/59/s
Caracas
75/66/s
Copenhagen
38/29/c
Dakar
80/69/s
Dublin
48/44/r
Edinburgh
51/41/pc
Frankfurt
50/35/pc
Geneva
54/40/pc
Ham., Bermuda 67/58/sh
Helsinki
32/10/c
Ho Chi Minh City 94/77/pc
Tomorrow
76/55/sh
51/39/sh
67/51/s
70/62/c
83/60/pc
91/76/s
54/30/pc
43/33/pc
70/47/c
49/41/sh
76/53/s
74/58/c
76/67/s
34/25/c
79/68/s
50/39/sh
45/39/sh
54/40/pc
44/38/r
64/61/pc
25/7/pc
90/76/t
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
74/66/pc
76/57/t
59/48/s
69/47/s
80/58/pc
58/35/pc
84/74/sh
98/71/pc
91/79/t
77/69/pc
60/49/r
55/46/pc
55/42/r
90/75/s
76/52/pc
35/28/sn
32/24/c
95/79/pc
77/60/t
95/65/pc
35/23/c
34/24/sn
58/47/pc
44/32/sh
76/67/t
76/53/pc
57/49/pc
63/46/c
82/60/pc
60/33/s
84/75/sh
99/74/pc
90/78/t
77/69/pc
58/47/sh
54/43/r
52/39/sh
92/76/s
79/51/pc
35/21/c
31/11/sn
90/79/pc
77/62/c
90/62/pc
29/13/c
33/15/sn
56/43/r
49/37/pc
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei City
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
92/80/s
86/65/s
61/46/pc
91/69/pc
81/48/s
52/35/t
66/51/s
75/59/pc
89/78/pc
30/14/c
79/68/pc
82/66/s
66/49/s
66/52/s
35/26/c
50/38/pc
50/32/sh
96/80/s
91/69/s
58/51/t
88/68/pc
87/49/s
55/43/pc
54/38/r
76/46/sh
91/78/pc
28/14/sf
85/71/s
78/64/c
69/53/s
66/57/c
38/20/pc
53/44/pc
40/30/c
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
sh- showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
Allergen Extract Lab (pollen data); airnow.gov (air
quality data); National Weather Service
* AccuWeather's RealFeel Temperature®
combines over a dozen factors for an accurate
measure of how the conditions really “feel.”
VIRGINIA
Northam calls special session to work on budget stalled by Medicaid impasse
BY
L AURA V OZZELLA
richmond
— Gov. Ralph
Northam on Tuesday ordered
state legislators to return to Richmond in April to wrap up work on
the state budget, something that
a Medicaid fight has so far kept
them from doing.
Northam (D) called the April 11
special session three days after
the legislature adjourned its
60-day regular session without
sending a two-year budget bill to
his desk. Budget negotiations
stalled over whether to allow
more low-income Virginians to
be enrolled in Medicaid, the
federal-state health-care program for the poor.
“Virginians sent us to Rich-
mond to work together to make
life better for every family, no
matter who they are or where
they live,” said Northam, who
won office last year on a promise
to expand the program. “We can
live up to that responsibility by
passing a budget that expands
health care to hundreds of thousands of Virginians who need it.”
During the regular session, the
House passed a budget bill that
called for expanding Medicaid
eligibility to as many as 400,000
uninsured Virginians. The Senate’s budget plan did not expand
the program, which currently
covers 1 million residents.
Under the Affordable Care Act,
the federal government will pay
90 percent of the $2 billion-a-
“Speaker Cox is hopeful
that everyone is able to
return to Richmond
with clear minds and a
fresh perspective on the
budget.”
Parker Slaybaugh, spokesman for
House Speaker M. Kirkland Cox
year cost of expanding the program in Virginia. The plan passed
by the House would pay the
state’s 10 percent share by taxing
hospitals.
Republicans narrowly control
both chambers, and most Republicans staunchly opposed expansion for four years under
Northam’s predecessor, Terry
McAuliffe (D). They predicted the
state would wind up stuck with
the whole tab. They also voiced
objections to extending an entitlement program to able-bodied
adults, no matter how poor.
Expansion would be available
to people with incomes below
138 percent of the federal poverty
level, which amounts to $16,643
for an individual and $28,180 for
a family of three.
Opposition in the House softened after Democrats nearly took
control of the chamber in Novem-
THE DISTRICT
ber, picking up 15 seats in an
anti-President Trump wave. But
there has been no discernible
shift in the Senate, which did not
face voters last year.
As a result, their rival spending
plans were unusually far apart.
The Senate budget was lean,
while the House showered
$370 million in projected Medicaid savings on schools, state employees and other priorities.
Budget negotiators soon declared
themselves stuck, and legislators
went home Saturday knowing
they would have to come back to
try again. They must have a state
spending plan in place by July 1 to
avoid a government shutdown.
The two chambers could not
even agree on the mechanics of
calling the special session, which
is why it fell to Northam to order
them back to work. Northam also
directed Finance Secretary Aubrey Layne to continue working
with budget negotiators, presumably with hopes of hammering
out a deal by April 11.
“Speaker Cox is hopeful that
everyone is able to return to
Richmond with clear minds and
a fresh perspective on the budget,” said Parker Slaybaugh,
spokesman for House Speaker M.
Kirkland
Cox
(R-Colonial
Heights).
Jeff Ryer, a spokesman for
Senate Republicans said, “We are
looking forward to continuing
our work.”
laura.vozzella@washpost.com
THE DISTRICT
Council is closer to changing discipline in schools D.C. education analyst admits
BY
P ERRY S TEIN
The D.C. Council moved closer
Tuesday to overhauling school
punishment policy in a bid to
address dramatic disparities in
discipline rates among black
and white students.
The council’s education committee voted unanimously in favor of restricting the circumstances when a school can suspend or expel a student.
The five members of that committee framed the disproportionate suspensions and expulsions of black students in the
District as a civil rights issue.
The legislation will now move to
the full 13-member council.
Black students in D.C. schools
are nearly eight times more likely to receive an out-of-school
suspension than their white
peers, according to city data.
“This is not only wrong and a
question of human and civil
rights, but it also directly undercuts our efforts to close the
achievement gap in D.C.,” Council member David Grosso (I-At
Large) said before the vote. “We
need to realize that putting students out of school is putting
them behind academically.”
In kindergarten through
eighth grade, the legislation
would limit student suspension
and expulsion to incidents of
threatened or actual violence,
and emotional distress.
Under the proposed revision,
high school students would not
be suspended or expelled from
school for rule infractions such
as uniform violations or disrupting a class.
Out-of-school
suspensions
would not last longer than five
consecutive days for students in
elementary and middle school,
and 10 consecutive days for high
school students. Schools must
provide academic work for students while they are suspended.
If passed, the revised discipline policy would be phased in
over the next three years.
“It’s imperative that administrators consider alternatives to
suspensions and expulsions,”
said council member Trayon
White Sr. (D-Ward 8), who voted
to advance the bill. “We must
make sure that our discipline
policies put students first.”
The discipline policy has received support from local children’s advocacy groups, but
school system administrators
have pushed back against it and
said the restrictions could pre-
vent school leaders from fostering safe and productive learning
environments.
Antwan Wilson, the former
D.C. Public Schools chancellor,
testified against an earlier version of the bill while he still led
the system, saying teachers and
principals should have more discretion in how they discipline
students.
“In most cases, the behavioral
approach in the bill is what our
principals and school leaders
strive for in their buildings,”
Wilson said at a hearing this
year. “But sometimes in cases
unique to an individual school,
unique to a student and unique
to the day, we have to make
decisions for student safety and
to maintain a positive learning
environment that do not align
with the limitations prescribed
in the bill.”
Sharra Greer — policy director at the Children’s Law Center,
a nonprofit group that provides
free legal services to D.C. children and their families — said
the bill is necessary in a city that
suspended more than 7,000 traditional public and charter
school students, or 7.4 percent of
all students, in the 2016-2017
academic year.
According to city data, out-ofschool suspensions for behavior
that was not violent account for
more than 60 percent of all
suspensions.
The Children’s Law Center has
represented clients who have
emotional and learning disabilities and who it says have been
removed from school for nonviolent behavior out of their control.
“This is enormously important for D.C.,” Greer said. “The
link between suspensions and
bad academic outcomes is
really clear.”
A 2017 Washington Post analysis found that D.C. Public
Schools did not properly document suspensions, and at least
seven of the system’s 18 high
schools have kicked out students
for misbehaving without calling
it a suspension — and in some
cases even marked them present.
“As we grapple with high
numbers of students in high
school who are not on track to
graduate,” Grosso said, “we must
take into account the detrimental effects of these discipline
practices, which increase a student’s chance of failing class or
dropping out altogether.”
perry.stein@washpost.com
to $480,000 bribery scheme
BY
S PENCER S . H SU
A D.C. special education analyst
pleaded guilty Tuesday to plotting
with others to steer more than
$480,000 in tax dollars to two
business owners in the District
and Maryland for work that was
never done in exchange for bribes.
Shauntell Harley, 48, a management analyst for fiscal policy and
grant management in the office of
the D.C. State Superintendent of
Education, agreed to repay
$488,000 to the school agency and
to a $100,000 forfeiture judgment
in entering her guilty plea to two
counts of conspiracy to commit
bribery.
The investigation is ongoing,
prosecutors said.
Each of the bribery charges carries a maximum penalty of five
years, but in a plea deal Harley
agreed she would face a recommended prison term of between
70 and 87 months under federal
guidelines at sentencing June 7
before U.S. District Judge Randolph D. Moss of the District.
Harley’s conviction, announced
by the office of U.S. Attorney Jessie
K. Liu of the District, is the second
so far in a wider scheme whose
number of participants prosecutors have not specified.
D.C. business owner Vashawn
Strader in July admitted receiving
insider information and more
than $300,000 in payments from
the D.C. agency with the help of a
former employee, now identified
as Harley, for tutoring and real
estate services he never provided
in 2012 and 2013.
Strader, 39, paid $43,900 in cash
to Harley, who created false purchase orders for Strader’s companies, according to new court filings.
Harley admitted Tuesday to a
similar scheme with the owner of a
Prince George’s County company
that provided information technology services to federal agencies
and local public school students,
according to court filings.
That owner and firm, identified
only as Person A and Company C,
in court filings, received nearly
$180,000, while Harley received
$53,000.
The education office “cooperated fully” in the investigation and
said Harley was no longer
employed there as of last summer.
Strader awaits sentencing on one
count of conspiracy.
spencer.hsu@washpost.com
KLMNO
Style
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14 , 2018
.
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EZ
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THE RELIABLE SOURCE
CRITIC’S NOTEBOOK
THEATER REVIEWS
BOOK WORLD
Stars seen out and about
in Washington: Jennifer
Garner and the cast of
“Scandal.” C2
Toughest job in D.C.:
Telling the most powerful
man in the world that he
can’t have KFC. C3
“Adult Entertainment” and
three other comedies to
take our minds off the
stormy times we live in. C3
The month’s best sci-fi
and fantasy, plus finalists
for National Book Critics
Circle’s criticism award. C4
National Gallery guards say they’re second-class citizens
BY
P EGGY M C G LONE
There’s a serenity inside the National
Gallery of Art, where sun-dappled marble
halls connect formal galleries and visitors
enjoy masterpieces by Rembrandt, Cézanne, Picasso and Pollock under the
watchful gaze of uniformed guards.
Beneath the calm, however, simmer
long-suppressed frustration and anger on
the part of some of the security force. For
years, the museum’s gallery protection
officers have complained of a hostile work
environment fostered by managers who
rule with a take-it-or-leave-it mentality,
according to 17 current and former officers at the prestigious Washington museum.
Sexual harassment, various instances
of discrimination and retaliation are
among the top complaints, according to
these employees. They describe supervisors who are inept at scheduling, a workforce that is chronically understaffed and
managers who are not held accountable
for their actions.
“They treat us like we’re
bad people. People are
intimidated. They will
not make much noise.”
Albertus-Hugo Van den Bogaard, an
Army veteran hired 16 months ago
The chief of the division, Mark E. Wallace, said he could not comment on specific allegations or internal investigations.
“But what I can tell you is we take any
harassment or discrimination claims extremely seriously,” he said.
The Office of Protection Services is the
museum’s second-largest division, accounting for almost one-third of all employees. Several guards say that the department fosters a climate of fear and
intimidation and that those who complain — whether by emailing senior staff,
voicing concerns during daily roll call or
filing formal complaints with the gallery’s
equal employment opportunity officer —
often suffer retaliation.
“They treat us like we’re bad people,”
said Albertus-Hugo Van den Bogaard, a
65-year-old Army veteran hired 16
months ago. “People are intimidated.
They will not make much noise.”
Many guards say management is more
focused on silencing complainers than on
addressing the problems they raise: A
GUARDS CONTINUED ON C9
BOOK WORLD
Little House
should not be
abandoned
BY
Amateur uses ‘Resistance Genealogy’ to expose what she sees as anti-immigration hypocrisy
C AROLINE F RASER
Since 1954, the American Library Association has awarded a medal for lifetime
achievement in children’s literature in the
name of Laura Ingalls Wilder. The
original impetus behind the honor was
dismay. Librarians were “chagrined,”
wrote historian Leonard Marcus, that
none of Wilder’s eight critically acclaimed
Little House books had been recognized
by the ALA’s highest children’s accolade,
the Newbery.
Now, however, librarians are chagrined
again. In February, the
ALA announced that it
was reconsidering the
name of the Wilder
Award. Alluding to the
depiction of American
Indians and African
Americans in Wilder’s
work, the ALA declared that her legacy
put the group in the uncomfortable position of serving children while being unable to model values of “inclusiveness,
integrity and respect.” Wilder’s books, it
went on, “reflect racist and anti-Native
sentiments and are not universally embraced.”
True enough. But the ALA’s statement
nonetheless evokes the anodyne view of
literature it has sought to correct through
its annual Top Ten Most Challenged
Books list. Changing the name of the
Wilder Award is not an act of censorship,
but no book, including the Bible, has ever
been “universally embraced.” Mark Twain
— whose “Huckleberry Finn” often appears on the list — himself mocked the
idea that children’s books should never
cause outrage. “The mind that becomes
soiled in youth can never again be washed
clean,” he once sighed sarcastically.
Whatever the ALA decides, as a Wilder
biographer, I would argue that her work
and its reception are more complicated
than we may once have believed, shedding light on the myths that white Americans have woven about the past.
Over the past 20 years, Wilder’s most
famous novel, “Little House on the Prairie” (1935), has inspired almost as much
disapproval as devotion. The novel has
racist elements, and its portrayal of Indians has consequences when read uncritically and approvingly in schools. In 1998,
an 8-year-old girl on the Upper Sioux
Reservation of southwestern Minnesota
— only miles from the storied town of
Walnut Grove, immortalized in the 1970sera “Little House” TV show — came home
in tears after listening to her third-grade
teacher reading the novel and a charac-
JAHI CHIKWENDIU/THE WASHINGTON POST
We’re Off the same boat
BY
M ONICA H ESSE
IN BALTIMORE
O
n the morning after Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
(D-Calif.) broke a record for the longest filibuster
in the history of the House of Representatives —
an eight-hour defense of immigrants — a Baltimore amateur genealogist named Jennifer Mendelsohn sat in her home office and logged onto Ancestry.com
to begin her own form of protest. “Let’s see,” she said, typing
in the name of a Republican congressman whose anti-immigrant comments had been controversial. “I was searching
for him earlier and thought I might have found something.”
She made a few clicks, going deeper into the past of the
anti-immigrant congressman. His family? Immigrants from
Norway.
Jennifer
Mendelsohn:
“When I think of
the opportunities
afforded to me
over two
generations, it’s
nothing short of
mind-boggling.
. . . I am the
manifestation of
everything [my
ancestors] were
hoping to do.”
Mendelsohn, 49, is the creator of “Resistance Genealogy,”
a term that has suddenly brought her a considerable amount
of fame, to which she is still adjusting. It is, essentially, a
tweet-by-tweet exposé of hypocrisy, and a commentary on
the stories America tells about itself.
Resistance Genealogy. The concept began several months
ago, when Mendelsohn watched White House adviser Stephen Miller go on CNN and tell the anchor that immigrants
should be required to speak English.
Something in the statement rankled her, so Mendelsohn,
a journalist whose genealogical research had been mostly
contained to her own family tree, logged on to a few research
databases, then responded with two sentences that were
promptly retweeted 17,000 times:
“Stephen Miller favors immigrants who speak English.
GENEALOGIST CONTINUED ON C2
BOOK WORLD CONTINUED ON C4
News media shouldn’t be Trump’s bully pulpit
KYLE MAZZA/SIPA USA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Trump’s braggadocio-tinged speech in Pittsburgh was aired live by
several networks, giving him free rein to hurl insults and false statements.
Even before the 2016
presidential election,
CNN’s top honcho
admitted that his
network had given
Donald Trump too much
Margaret
free exposure in the
Sullivan
Republican primary.
“If we made any
mistake last year, it’s that we probably
did put on too many of his campaign
rallies in those early months and let
them run,” Jeff Zucker said at a talk at
the Harvard Kennedy School in October
2016.
But it made for great TV, he
explained: “Listen, because you never
knew what he would say, there was an
attraction to put those on air.”
Translation: It’s all about the ratings.
Don’t look now, but it’s happening
again. And it’s still the wrong thing to
do.
Last weekend, some cable networks
carried Trump’s rally in Pennsylvania
live for more than an hour, as the
reality-star president once again
uttered outrages and kept the focus
squarely on himself — even while
purportedly boosting Republican
congressional candidate Rick Saccone.
“To broadcast a 75-minute campaign
rally, uninterrupted, demonstrates
cable managers’ deficit of imagination,
resources, or both,” Bill Grueskin, a
professor at Columbia University’s
Graduate School of Journalism, told
me. “There’s just too much going on in
this country and in the world to justify
it.”
And Norman Ornstein, resident
scholar at the American Enterprise
Institute, chastised CNN on Twitter:
“Carrying Trump water even as he
abuses you.” (Trump has, of course,
mocked and disparaged CNN at every
turn, including urging crowds to chant
“CNN sucks!”)
The over-the-top coverage, though,
had plenty of defenders.
Chris Cillizza of CNN, formerly of
The Washington Post, put in simple
terms what many others were saying:
“Donald Trump is the president of the
United States. When he speaks, we
cover it. As we should.”
And liberal columnist Joan Walsh
agreed: Don’t air the empty podium as
CNN did during the primary campaign,
she wrote, “but when he starts talking
hate and racism, like tonight, it’s news.”
And as my colleague Philip Bump
pointed out, this is not a first. President
Barack Obama’s 30-minute speech at a
rally for Senate candidate Martha
SULLIVAN CONTINUED ON C9
C2
EZ
RE
THE WASHINGTON POST
K
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 14 , 2018
The Reliable Source
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
BRENDAN HOFFMAN/GETTY IMAGES
Movie mogul Harvey Weinstein arrives at the White House for a state dinner in
honor of British Prime Minister David Cameron in 2012.
It’s probably not the worst thing
Harvey Weinstein ever did, but . . .
T
his is philanthropy, Harvey Weinsteinstyle: The now-disgraced movie mogul
offered up, as part of a package he
donated to a charity auction for the Leonardo
DiCaprio Foundation, two tickets to last year’s
White House correspondents’ dinner.
But it’s unclear how Weinstein planned to
acquire the tickets for the White House
Correspondents’ Association’s annual splashy
affair, which are sold only to member news
organizations — and his donation of them runs
afoul of the WHCA’s anti-scalping (even for
charity!) policies, which ban buyers from raffling
or selling off their seats to the media dinner.
The rulebreaking is, to put it beyond mildly,
not the worst thing Weinstein’s been accused
of, but here’s how the ticket saga played out: A
Daily Mail report on Monday detailed
donations to the Leonardo DiCaprio
Foundation by two men now toppled by
sexual-misconduct scandals — Weinstein and
actor Kevin Spacey. Among the lavish prizes
offered for auction in 2016 was an extensive
package from Weinstein, which included,
according to the Daily Mail, sharing a table
with the famed producer at his company’s
annual dinner party on the night before the
Oscars, walking the red carpet with him at the
Met Ball, two tickets to the 2017 Super Bowl,
two invites to the White House
correspondents’ dinner and two front-row
seats to the “Project Runway” finale.
One of those items jumped out at us. Unlike
the other A-Listy events, tickets to the WHCD
aren’t typically the province of Hollywood
elite, though powerful folks have certainly
found ways to secure seats for themselves.
(Weinstein has attended the dinner before in
multiple years.) But the keepers of the oftcoveted tables are adamant that
correspondents themselves are the ones with
access. “Only WHCA members can buy tickets
to our annual dinner,” WHCA Executive
Director Steve Thomma confirms. “And it is
our policy that those tickets may not be sold at
auction or raffle to raise money for other
organizations or for any commercial purpose.”
Reps for Weinstein didn’t respond to our
requests for comment. And a rep for
DiCaprio’s charity didn’t know much that
would clear it up. Apparently, the winner of
the ultraposh package never paid up,
according to the rep. “So the lots were void and
never fulfilled,” she said.
HEY, ISN’T THAT . . .?
Jennifer Garner, fresh from
her meme-making appearance at
the Oscars this month, visiting an
early-childhood education center
in the District on Monday?
The A-list actress popped up
Monday morning on the
Instagram feed of Washington’s
makeup-artist-to-the-stars
Erwin Gomez, so we knew she
was in town, but it wasn’t until
her own Instagram post showing
her at the Educare school that we
learned what she was up to.
Garner posted a brief video of
herself (wearing jeans and tennis
shoes) and a gaggle of little kids,
all sitting cross-legged as they
apparently played a game. “Quiet
hands up!” a teacher instructs
the group, and Garner gamely
raises a hand along with the
students.
“I was reminded of the magic
of #Headstart and
#EarlyHeadstart on today’s visit
to #Educare in Washington D.C
with @savethechildren,” she
wrote in the post. “75% of the
families at this preschool/pre-K/
daycare have household incomes
at or below $9000 year! In
Metropolitan D.C.! In these
bright, cheerful, happily chaotic
classrooms you’d never know –
kids were too busy learning and
growing, not to mention showing
me the ropes.”
That wasn’t the only stop on
the D.C. agenda for Garner, who
is a trustee of Save the Children,
an organization with Washington
offices that advocates for kids’
rights and education. She
appeared Tuesday morning at a
closed panel with the Senate
Finance Committee, per a Twitter
post by Mark Shriver, the
president of Save the Children’s
political advocacy arm. “Great
morning with my friend and
@SavetheChildren trustee
Jennifer Garner testifying before
the Senate Finance Committee
with @SenatorMenendez,
@OrrinHatch,
@SenatorTimScott and later,
@RonWyden on the importance
of #homevisiting programs like
#MIECHV,” he wrote, referring to
SENATE FINANCE COMMITTEE
Jennifer Garner, with Sen. Orrin G. Hatch (R-Utah) at a closed
panel of the Senate Finance Committee on Monday afternoon.
PABLO MARTINEZ MONSIVAIS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kerry Washington, in Olivia
Pope’s famous white coat,
shooting scenes for “Scandal”
outside the White House.
the Maternal, Infant and Early
Childhood Home Visiting
program for which Congress
recently renewed funding.
“#InvestInKids.”
Other stars were spotted out
and about over the weekend,
with members of the cast of
ABC’s political drama “Scandal”
popping up all over Washington,
either at work (filming) or at play
(gallery visits!).
Cast and crew of the longrunning show, which is wrapping
up filming of its seventh and final
season, were spotted shooting
scenes along the Mall and in
front of the White House on
Saturday. Star Kerry
GOT A TIP? EMAIL US AT RELIABLESOURCE@WASHPOST.COM. FOR THE LATEST SCOOPS, VISIT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RELIABLESOURCE
Advocate’s
resistance
is rooted in
genealogy
GENEALOGIST FROM C1
The 1910 census shows his own
great-grandmother
couldn’t,”
Mendelsohn wrote. She included
a PDF of the census document,
which specified that Miller’s
grandmother spoke only Yiddish.
A few weeks later, Mendelsohn
read conservative commentator
Tomi Lahren’s assertion that the
country needed to punish the “illegal behavior” of undocumented
immigrants. Mendelsohn took to
her databases, landing on court
documents for Lahren’s greatgreat-grandfather. He’d been
born in Russia and then immigrated to North Dakota, where he
was indicted on a charge of forging his naturalization documents.
Mendelsohn went back to Twitter: “Law-abiding citizens like her
great-great-grandfather, indicted
by a grand jury for forging naturalization papers?” She went viral
again.
She wasn’t trying to stir up
trouble, she says, so much as she
was trying to point out a truth
about the history of America: Almost everyone came here from
somewhere else, whether that migration happened one generation
ago or six, whether the migration
was a hopeful choice or a forced
imprisonment. “Spending as
much time as I do looking at these
documents and looking at family
trees — all of those stories go back
to a boat.”
I
JAHI CHIKWENDIU/THE WASHINGTON POST
Jennifer Mendelsohn uses family trees as virtual switches to try to counter the arguments of
politicians, officials and pundits calling for severely tighter immigration laws.
“Stephen Miller favors immigrants who speak
English. The 1910 census shows his own
great-grandmother couldn’t.”
Mendelsohn’s tweet about White House adviser Stephen Miller, right
“Law-abiding citizens like her great-greatgrandfather, indicted by a grand jury for forging
naturalization papers?”
Mendelsohn’s tweet to conservative commentator Tomi Lahren, right
n Mendelsohn’s personal his-
tory, one of the boats in question carried her toddler grandfather. His parents, a shoemaker
and a housewife, boarded in Latvia and eventually settled in New
York. Rosie Mendelsohn, Jennifer’s great-grandmother, birthed
10 children, only one of whom
lived to adulthood. Rosie herself
died at age 36 from tuberculosis,
though when Mendelsohn managed to track down her grave
online, the cemetery informed
her regretfully that none of the
headstone’s writing was legible.
“When I think of the opportunities afforded to me over two
generations, it’s nothing short of
mind-boggling,”
Mendelsohn
“Congressman, here's your 4-year-old grandmother
arriving steerage class at Ellis Island, 1894.”
Mendelsohn’s tweet to Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa), right
says. “The fact that I can type
something on my computer and
hot food will come to my door. Or
that in 10 minutes I can be at
Johns Hopkins and have the best
medical care in the world. I am
the manifestation of everything
[my ancestors] were hoping to
do.” On Mendelsohn’s long to-do
list, she recently added: Buy Rosie
Mendelsohn a proper headstone.
Partly because her own American story began with her infant
grandfather, when Mendelsohn
saw conservative Rep. Steve King
(R-Iowa) tweet, “We can’t restore
our civilization with someone
else’s babies” — “It made me crazy.”
“Congressman,” she tweeted
back, attaching papers in the pub-
@helena_andrews @emilyaheil
lic record from King’s ancestors,
“here’s your 4-year-old grandmother arriving steerage class at
Ellis Island, 1894.”
When Fox News anchor Tucker
Carlson declared that the United
States shouldn’t accept immigrants from “failing countries,”
Mendelsohn dug up a narrative
written by his great-great-grandfather, who said he’d left Switzerland because his prospects there
were so limited.
King and Carlson never responded to her findings. Neither
did Lahren or Miller. When The
Washington Post reached out to
all of them for comment, only
Carlson called back: “The United
States is a completely different
country now,” he said. “The idea
that [having] a relative who came
150 years ago means I have to
have a specific view on immigration? It’s so dumb it’s hard to
believe you have to respond to it.”
He continued: “There’s only
one question that matters: What’s
good for the country in 2018?”
Discussions about what’s good
for the country have become a
flash point: Debates about DACA
were at the heart of the government shutdown, and the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services agency recently decided to
remove the phrase “nation of immigrants” from its mission statement. The new mission statement
prioritizes “protecting Americans, securing the homeland, and
honoring our values.”
“Part of what’s going on is this
incredibly powerful mythologizing,” Mendelsohn says. “People
are insisting that, oh, the immigrants of yore, they did everything right. That they came here
legally, and walked to school uphill both ways, and learned English immediately. But that’s B.S.!
. . . In 1751, Benjamin Franklin
was complaining that the German immigrants in Pennsylvania
would never learn to speak English.”
She wants people to interrogate their own histories. If people
are unbothered by their ancestors’ immigration but opposed to
it now — why? What deeper issues
have come into play?
Something about her work has
spoken to people — particularly
liberal armchair activists who
have no political power but who
are looking for ways to apply their
own bookish skills to the cause.
M
Washington was snapped by
onlookers wearing the white coat
that her character — dramaprone Washington “fixer” Olivia
Pope — has made a signature.
Actor Tony Goldwyn, who plays
former president Fitz Grant, was
wearing a decidedly post-Oval
Office look of jeans and a blazer.
But it wasn’t all work for the
“Scandal” gang: Visitors to the
National Portrait Gallery on
Saturday also noticed actors
Josh Malina (“Scandal’s”
resident attorney general) and
George Newbern (who plays a
lovable former spy/hit man)
among the throngs checking out
the new portraits of former
president Barack Obama and
first lady Michelle Obama. The
casually dressed duo posed for
pix with fans. (Unclear whether
they ran into fellow TV star
Stephen Colbert, who was also
spotted at the Smithsonian
museum this weekend.)
And Washington and Goldwyn
ran into some friendly faces, too,
posing for a picture with Valerie
Jarrett, the former top adviser to
President Obama, and Jarrett’s
daughter, CNN reporter Laura
Jarrett. “Look who we found!
Gonna miss seeing these two
every Thursday on
@ScandalABC,” Jarrett posted on
Twitter.
endelsohn has been con-
tacted by television producers. Book editors. People wanting her to find their relatives. People wanting to know if
they are her relatives. One local
artist sent her an email: “I feel
really inspired to create a visual
project on the work you do”; another man asked whether she
ever did “non-political, non-adversarial genealogical research,”
which she took to mean that he
basically wanted help locating
distant cousins.
“This poor girl emailed me asking me for a job,” Mendelsohn
says, scrolling past another email.
“And I’m like, I don’t even have a
job.”
Her genealogical research is all
done in her spare time, squeezed
in between paid freelance writing
work and raising two children.
Sometimes, she’ll trace a famous
family tree for hours and decide
not to post anything. Her most
successful tweets have been the
ones laden with irony.
“So Dan,” she wrote in January
to Dan Scavino, the White House
director of social media, who had
recently tweeted that it was “time
to end chain migration.” “Let’s say
Victor Scavino arrives from
Canelli, Italy in 1904, then brother Hector in 1905, brother Gildo
in 1912, sister Esther in 1913, &
sister Clotilde and their father
Giuseppe in 1916, and they live
together in NY. Do you think that
would count as chain migration?”
“Gosh, I love when you slap
people with genealogy,” responded one of the 58,000 people who
liked the tweet.
Lately, Mendelsohn has been
trying to figure out whether to
keep going. There aren’t a lot of
surprises in this work — every
line of inquiry ultimately leads
back to the same place: a boat. “I
don’t know whether the fact that
all these stories end up looking
the same is a reason not to do it or
a reason to do it,” she says. The
sameness of the stories is the
through line of America.
“I look at my great-grandmother,” Mendelsohn says. “Literally,
she got on a boat for me because
she saw something here. How can
I look at anyone else and say,
sorry, but the door is closed?”
Recently, Mendelsohn was at a
party when she learned she had at
least one high-profile fan. Former
Maryland
governor
Martin
O’Malley, also a guest, said he
knew her work — his daughter
had introduced him to Mendelsohn’s tweets, he told The Washington Post in an interview.
O’Malley and Mendelsohn talked
for a bit, and he later sent an
email: “It was an honor to meet
you,” it said. “Keep writing. Your
country needs you.” It was the
best compliment she could have
imagined.
monica.hesse@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C3
RE
THEATER REVIEWS
In the Klunch’s ‘Adult Entertainment,’ porn stars expose themselves to art
BY
N ELSON P RESSLEY
There is a divinity that shapes
our ends, and in this stormy political moment it’s giving us a distracting little porno comedy from
Elaine May called “Adult Entertainment.”
The play isn’t new; it was roundly hissed during its off-Broadway
debut in 2002, but then critics
didn’t get May’s deliriously wonderful movie “Ishtar,” either. (I
said it.) The shoe box production
by the naughty ensemble the
Klunch doesn’t retrofit jokes and
innuendo to match this month’s
headlines. In fact, like three other
fringe-size comedies by women
this week, it’s an escape. The calendar gods knew we’d need a laugh.
“Adult Entertainment” is the
winner because Joe Banno’s ensemble plays it with loopy innocence, even when characters
named Frosty Moons and Heidi
the Ho are flashing a little flesh at
you. It deals with porn stars out to
make an artier grade of movie. The
screenwriter they hire is a literary
Yale egghead who assigns them
classic texts for prep.
“Our Town,” Flaubert and Dylan
Thomas quickly blow their minds,
and the ditsy book club discussions are a riot. So are rehearsals,
and with only two rows of seats in
the round at the converted gallery
Caos on F, be warned that you’ll
pretty much be in the mix.
The retro “George — Don’t Do
That!” is not a bit risqué; it’s Catherine Flye’s tested tribute to the
midcentury British music hall performer Joyce Grenfell. The title
comes from a signature bit with
Grenfell playing a harried nursery
schoolteacher, and in addition to
observational skits that seem like
precursors to Lily Tomlin’s galleries, Grenfell warbled optimistic
tunes. At MetroStage, Flye is accompanied by pianist Joe Walsh
(Michael Lodico played at the performance I saw), with Michael Tolaydo narrating.
The English-born Flye is a comic natural and a whiz with all the
accents and personalities. The
show is about as dramatic as a tea
cozy, but it’s comfort food if you’re
craving nostalgia.
Two premieres from emerging
writer Jennifer Faletto twist old
models with mixed results. “The
Texas Homecoming Revolution of
1995” is very “Mean Girls”-y: the set
RYAN SMITH
at Best Medicine Rep is a high
school bathroom, where all the
eavesdropping, scheming and bullying go on.
The script is so full of direct
address, and director Melissa
Firlit’s cast is so generically perky,
that the types (alpha girl, mousy
Christian, etc.) don’t get distinct
personalities. But the wit and the
fast finish are off-kilter enough
that the easy-to-handle play is likely to get more productions.
Faletto’s voice is more heartfelt
in “This Little Light,” even though
its centuries-straddling characters
sail in on the fantastical wings of
Caryl Churchill’s influential “Top
Girls.” The modern 19-year-old is
trying to do without her cellphone
while camping outdoors. The 1915
cowgirl is on the lam with a stolen
map. The 1715 figure fleeing a pirate is a woman trapped in a man’s
body. There’s also a futuristic woman dressed in skintight silver vinyl.
The play begins with yearning
monologues from each character,
gets sharply funny when they all
show up in Macy’s, and waxes lyrical as the women gather under
starlight at the end. Deborah Randall’s production in Venus Theatre’s soon-to-be-abandoned Play
Shack is acted with the right philosophical breeze; Faletto’s no
Elaine May or Tina Fey, but the
actable combination of winsome
and lonesome makes “This Little
Light” one of the determined Venus’s best finds.
nelson.pressley@washpost.com
Adult Entertainment, by Elaine May.
Directed by Joe Banno. Through
March 31 at Caos on F, 923 F St. NW.
$25. Visit theklunch.com.
George — Don’t Do That!, devised
and performed by Catherine Flye.
Through March 25 at MetroStage,
1201 N. Royal St., Alexandria. $45.
Call 703-548-9044 or visit
metrostage.org.
KANEA MACDONALD
CHRISTOPHER BANKS
TOP: Paige O’Malley, left, and Ellie Nicoll in the Klunch’s “Adult
Entertainment.”
LEFT: Catherine Flye as British comedian Joyce Grenfell in
“George — Don't Do That!” at MetroStage.
ABOVE: Kira Burri, Brooke Friday and Claire Derriennic in “The
Texas Homecoming Revolution of 1995” by Best Medicine Rep.
The Texas Homecoming
Revolution of 1995, by Jennifer
Faletto. Directed by Melissa Firlit.
Through March 25 at Best Medicine
Rep, Lakeforest Mall, 701 Russell Ave.,
Gaithersburg, Md. $25. Visit
bestmedicinerep.org.
This Little Light, by Jennifer Faletto.
Directed by Deb Randall. Through
March 25 at Venus Theatre, 21 C St.,
Laurel, Md. $40. Visit venustheatre.org.
CRITIC’S NOTEBOOK
Presidential diets can be political hot potatoes for the staff
BY
T IM C ARMAN
When Ronald Reagan returned
to the White House, nearly two
weeks after he was shot in a 1981
assassination attempt, the president was put on a special diet to
help him recover from a bullet
wound to the chest. It was doctor’s
orders, say the chefs who worked
in the White House at the time.
“He was in a lot worse shape
than we knew,” recalls Mirabelle
chef Frank Ruta, a member of the
White House kitchen staff during
the Reagan administration.
“When he came back, he had to
have a diet that was fairly lean, but
had a lot of protein and iron” to
assist with his convalescence.
Fast forward 37 years: President Trump’s medical team has
recommended that he revise his
diet, too, but only because he
needs to shed some pounds, about
10 to 15 of them. The dieting advice
came straight from physician and
Navy Rear Adm. Ronny L. Jackson
during a now infamous news conference following President
Trump’s first formal medical exam
in January. You know, the news
conference in which Jackson, unprompted, announced the president was “very sharp and very
intact” mentally.
At his physical, the president
tipped the scales at 239 pounds.
This means Trump — reportedly 6
feet 3 inches tall — has a body mass
index (BMI) of 29.9, which technically makes him overweight. With
a 30 BMI, he would officially be
obese. Some, of course, have insinuated that Trump is fudging his
own numbers to keep him out of
William Howard Taft territory.
“He would benefit from a diet
that is lower in fat and carbohydrates and from a routine exercise
regime,” Jackson told reporters
during the January presser. “We
talked about diet and exercise a
lot. He’s more enthusiastic about
the diet part than the exercise
part, but we’re going to do both.”
According to a recent Bloomberg Politics report, Trump has
actually followed his doctor’s advice. Bloomberg’s sources say
Trump has scaled back his junkfood diet, which the president’s
former campaign manager Corey
Lewandowski once described this
way: “On Trump Force One there
were four major food groups: McDonald’s, Kentucky Fried Chicken, pizza and Diet Coke.”
“One person said it’s been two
weeks since he saw the president
eat a hamburger,” the Bloomberg
reporters wrote in early March.
It’s common knowledge that
Trump doesn’t dine out much, unless he visits the steakhouse inside
the D.C. hotel that bears his name,
for a well-done slab of beef with
ketchup. Or he’s dining at the restaurant inside his private Mar-aLago resort in Palm Beach, Fla.
Otherwise, the president relies on
the cooks of his White House
kitchen, led by executive chef Cristeta Comerford.
So how have the White House
cooks gone about creating the new
low-fat menus? And does Trump
still have opportunities to cheat?
These were among the questions I
wanted to ask Comerford or someone on her staff. But I couldn’t get
through the front line of defense,
the White House’s press team. I
received no responses to my
emails.
Instead, I turned to former
White House chefs for insights.
They say that the White House
kitchen enjoys a lot of freedom in
creating weekly menus, even
those with special dietary restrictions. The first family typically
gets involved with menu planning
only during special events, such as
state dinners. With that said, the
White House cooks invest a lot of
energy trying to figure out what
the president, first lady and their
children like to eat.
“This is the hardest thing when
you’re in the White House: [figuring out] what they like and dislike,” says Roland Mesnier, a
French-born pastry chef who
served five presidents. “These people that come with the president,
they think they know everything.
. . . They know nothing.”
White House cooks, Mesnier
says, have to be observant. They
must inspect the plates that come
back to the kitchen to determine
what food was a hit and what
wasn’t. They must also befriend
the White House butler, who
watches over meals to fulfill any
requests the first family may have
during lunch or dinner. The butler
can provide countless insights
into what the president and first
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
President Donald Trump hosts a lunch for GOP senators in the Cabinet Room of the White House. Chefs can keep a president’s diet on
track to a certain extent, but staffers keep favorite snacks — cookies and M&Ms seem to have bipartisan support — around.
lady really like.
Mesnier learned, for example,
that Nancy Reagan liked a small
portion of calf’s liver, mediumrare, served with balsamic reduction. She knew it was a good
source of iron, Mesnier recalls. She
often requested it when she dined
alone.
But chefs can sometimes read
too much into a comment, notes
Bill Yosses, executive pastry chef
at the White House from 2007 to
2014. George W. Bush once told
Yosses that he exercises so hard
because of the chef’s daily parade
of sweets. Yosses took the comment to heart and prepared a “spalike” unsweetened baked apple for
dessert.
“He was not happy,” Yosses says
about Bush. “Basically, he came
back to me with, ‘Don’t ever make
that again.’ ”
However they glean the first
family’s tastes, the White House
chefs will write weekly menus,
which are then submitted to the
East Wing for the first lady’s approval. She might edit them and
send them back. She might do
nothing to them. It all depends on
the first lady’s engagement in the
family’s dietary habits.
“For the most part,” Ruta remembers about the weekly menu,
“it would have no changes.”
Even when the president’s physician recommends a special diet,
like Jackson did for Trump, it’s still
up to the White House kitchen to
develop the menus that incorporate the new guidelines. During
the Obama years, Yosses remembers being told that the president
needed to lower his cholesterol. So
the pastry chef created more fruitbased desserts and low-fat confections.
Yet,
Yosses
remembers,
Obama’s “go-to dessert was pie.
That’s on the record. That was
hard to reduce the fat content.
Otherwise, what’s the point?” So
Yosses just cut smaller slices, instead, which may be one method
the current White House kitchen
uses to cut back the fat, carbs and
calories in Trump’s diet.
But what about cheating? Can a
dieting president snack between
meals with impunity? Can he just
roll downstairs to the kitchen and
raid the refrigerator?
It’s a complicated question. In
the residential side of the White
House, the kitchen doesn’t provide a lot of snacks for the first
family. There may be some fruit
and vegetables in the refrigerator
for snacking, Ruta says. But every
administration also has its preferred snacks on hand: It might be
Reagan’s jelly beans, Clinton’s bagels (yes, bagels, says Mesnier) or
every president’s apparent affection for cookies and M&Ms. These
treats could be found anywhere:
in the residence, in the Oval Office
or on Air Force One.
But mostly, say the White House
chefs, it’s hard for presidents to
cheat under their watch. The
chefs, after all, are paid to feed the
president and be mindful of his
health. They don’t see it as their
job to undermine the doctor’s orders.
The White House usher, however, is a whole ’nother story. If the
president calls up the usher and
wants a bag of Doritos and queso
dip, the usher is going to bring the
president a bag of Doritos and
queso dip. But what if the White
House doesn’t have any Doritos
and queso dip?
“Well, they’d get it,” Ruta says.
“They’d make a trip out and get it.”
tim.carman@washpost.com
C4
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THE WASHINGTON POST
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. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 14 , 2018
book world
Little House
is a social
fixer-upper
SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY
BOOK WORLD FROM C1
ter’s repetition of the infamous slur, “The
only good Indian is a dead Indian.” Indians appear alternately as thieves or
screaming warmongers, and the overall
portrait is not tempered by Laura’s childish fascination or her father’s remark
about a peaceable Indian, whom he describes as “no common trash.”
The Minnesota girl’s mother, Waziyatawin Angela Cavender Wilson, a member of the Wahpeton Dakota and a scholar
of history and American Indian studies,
complained to the school, only to discover
that her daughter’s teacher was “a fervent
Wilder fan.” Wilson devoted months to an
ultimately unsuccessful attempt to have
Wilder’s books dropped from the curriculum, prompting the American Civil Liberties Union to threaten the school board
with a lawsuit over censorship.
In recent years, Wilson’s disgust has
been echoed by other academics and
joined by demands for greater diversity in
children’s publishing, extending to editors, booksellers and librarians. Decrying
Wilder’s widespread popularity, the
scholar Debbie Reese, a member of Nambé Pueblo in New Mexico and founder of
the blog American Indians in Children’s
Literature, has pleaded for everyone to
“read more history.” (That’s a clear necessity. A few months ago New Mexico’s
education secretary warmly praised the
explicitly racial doctrine of “manifest destiny,” only to be upbraided by the All
Pueblo Council of Governors.)
Reese greeted the librarians’ reappraisal of the Wilder Award with elation,
calling it “a momentous day.” At a recent
American Booksellers Association meeting, the novelist Junot Díaz sharply criticized the book world, saying that as an
immigrant child he despaired over books
like “Little House on the Prairie.” He
admonished publishers to resist “white
supremacy’s cruelest enchantment: that
whiteness is at the heart of absolutely
everything.” To address that very concern,
the novelist Louise Erdrich has written
her Birchbark series for young adults,
telling the Indian side of the story.
Complicating the issue, other writers
and immigrants, including those of color,
prize the Little House books for their cozy
family values. In her 2014 novel, “Pioneer
Girl,” Bich Minh Nguyen, who was born in
Saigon and immigrated to the Midwest
with her family in 1975, explores Little
House fandom as a means of negotiating
assimilation. As for Walnut Grove, some
70 Hmong families — natives of Laos —
are now living in and around the town,
drawn by one Hmong girl’s devotion to
the television show. There is a mural
there, painted on the side of a brick
building, featuring a smiling Laura
alongside a Hmong woman in traditional
dress. Their integration into the community has been called “the little marvel on
the prairie.”
BY
SOUTH DAKOTA HISTORICAL SOCIETY
Whether we love Wilder or hate her, we
should know her. For decades, her legacy
has been awash in sentimentality, but
every American — including the children
who read her books — should learn the
harsh history behind her work. Vividly,
unforgettably, it still tells truths about
white settlement, homesteading and the
violent appropriation of Indian land and
culture.
Each generation revises the literary
canon. While the answer to racism is not
to impose purity retroactively or to disappear titles from shelves, no 8-year-old
Dakota child should have to listen to an
uncritical reading of “Little House on the
Prairie.” But no white American should be
able to avoid the history it has to tell. If the
books are to be read and taught today —
and it’s hard to escape them given their
Laura Ingalls
Wilder’s Little
House on the
Prairie books
feature racist
passages about
Native
Americans.
popularity — then teachers, librarians
and parents are going to have to proceed
armed with facts and sensitivity.
There’s nothing wrong with changing
the name of an award. Chagrin, however,
can be short-lived, and gatekeepers like
the ALA should encourage children to
read all our provocative classics — critically. I’d like to think that what would
matter to Wilder in this debate would be
not the institutionalized glory of an award
bearing her name but the needs of children. “I cannot bear to disappoint a child,”
she once said.
bookworld@washpost.com
Caroline Fraser is author of “Prairie Fires:
The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder”
and editor of the Library of America edition of
the Little House series.
Five voices
that deserve
your attention
BY
M ICHAEL L INDGREN
N
ext week, the National Book Critics Circle will announce the winners of awards in six categories.
Admittedly, the contenders for
the fiction and nonfiction prizes attract
the most buzz. But let’s take a moment for
the odd duck of the evening: the criticism
award. Though it may be the least ballyhooed of the NBCC categories, it is, I
would argue, the most closely attuned to
the zeitgeist. And it seems both bracing
and appropriate that this year’s criticism
finalists include no work by a white man.
The contenders do, however, include a
remarkable book called Guidebook to
Relative Strangers: Journeys Into
Race, Motherhood, and History, by Ca-
mille T. Dungy (Norton, $25,95). The
essays in Dungy’s graceful and perceptive
collection display the fluidity and finely
tuned ear one would expect from a
celebrated poet for whom “language is
home.” She is a perceptive historian,
keenly aware of how history “cross-pollinates all my interactions” and yet is
“little more than a record of disputed
erasures.” The book revolves around the
birth and infancy of Dungy’s daughter,
whom we follow from Dungy’s pregnancy all the way up to the age of 3. Dungy
navigates the complicated crosscurrents
of contemporary parenthood with honesty and insight.
Three sentences into You Play the
Girl: On Playboy Bunnies, Stepford
Wives, Train Wrecks, and Other Mixed
Messages (Mariner, $16.95) I already felt
like cheering. Carina Chocano is a firstrate cultural critic whose specialty is
constructing dead-on feminist analyses
of such sinister artifacts as the relentless
“Frozen” and the various horrifying iterations of Barbie. Chocano is unusually
skilled at dismantling the toxic underpinnings of such pop-culture mainstays,
motivated in part by her desire to help
her young daughter confront “a world
that literally never stops yelling at her
that her primary value is sexual.” And
Chocano demolishes the dismal shibboleth that feminists can’t be funny, wielding abundant wit with a devastating
sardonic edge. She refers to Elizabeth
Gilbert’s “Eat, Pray, Love” as “the Eileen
Chocano demolishes the
dismal shibboleth that
feminists can’t be funny,
referring to “Eat, Pray, Love”
as “the Eileen Fisher phase of
the fairy tale . . . tasteful,
flowing, and calming.”
Fisher phase of the fairy tale . . . tasteful,
flowing, and calming.” She describes how
a Hans Christian Andersen heroine
“throws herself” at the hero “and weeps
hot tears upon his breast” before adding,
“In real life, we know, this tactic usually
backfires.”
To move from Chocano’s quick-witted
and perceptive essays to Kevin Young’s
erudite Bunk: The Rise of Hoaxes,
Humbug, Plagiarists, Phonies, PostFacts, and Fake News (Graywolf, $30) is
a readerly change of pace. There appears
to be no format in which Young does not
shine. A fine poet and incisive critic, the
director of Harlem’s Schomburg Center
for Research in Black Culture and the
poetry editor of the New Yorker to boot,
he has produced in “Bunk” a work of
extraordinary gravity and scope. Dissecting scams from P.T. Barnum up to Rachel
Dolezal and beyond, Young journeys
“back and forth across the history of the
hoax in order to trace the hoaxing of
history.” In his skillful analysis, hoaxes
are themselves revealed as a central
strand of America’s toxic racial history —
Young calls the hoax “racism’s native
tongue” — and thus make up a “potent,
American cocktail of doubt and danger,
desire and delight.”
Depending on your emotional valence,
Valeria Luiselli’s Tell Me How It Ends:
An Essay in Forty Questions (Coffee
House, $12.95) will either break your
heart or make you very, very angry. The
40 questions of the subtitle are the
questions that undocumented and unaccompanied child immigrants (or refugees, as they should rightly be called) are
asked upon their arrival in the United
States. Their answers determine whether
they are admitted into this country or
turned away, most likely to face a cruel
fate in their homelands. Luiselli, who
spent a harrowing year as a volunteer
translator in New York City immigration
court, paints a grim portrait of a system
that abandons children to a legal netherland. She often finds herself “quietly
listening, wishing that the story I’m
hearing had a better ending.” The re-
strained eloquence of her testimony is
somehow more effective than gales of
polemical fury. Most of “Tell Me How It
Ends” was written in 2016, before the
accession of our current president, which
makes the book even more vital and
relevant.
We end, as we all must, with death:
Edwidge Danticat’s somber and beautiful
mediation The Art of Death: Writing
the Final Story (Graywolf, $14) stands as
a stirring addition to Graywolf’s thoughtful “Art of” series. (A word about Graywolf: Has any independent press in recent memory punched so far above its
weight with such astonishing consistency?) Danticat’s brief tome is both a
touching elegy for her late mother, who
comes across as a true force of nature,
and a concise survey of how death is
treated by writers ranging from Tolstoy
to Toni Morrison. All of them, Danticat
notes, “write about the dead . . . to become
less haunted, to turn ghosts into words,
to transform an absence into language.”
In doing so, we enact “our most humble,
and perhaps most arrogant, wish . . . that
our writing might help others feel less
alone.”
All of these finalists for the NBCC
criticism prize are deeply satisfying fulfillments of this deathless and profoundly human wish. The winner — along with
the winners in the fiction, nonfiction,
biography, autobiography and poetry
categories, will be announced Thursday
at a ceremony open to the public at the
New School in New York.
bookworld@washpost.com
Michael Lindgren is a frequent contributor
to The Washington Post.
E VERDEEN M ASON
The Feed (Morrow), Nick Clark
Windo’s debut, quickly establishes this
is not your typical post-apocalyptic
scenario. Readers are introduced to
Tom and Kate, a couple living in the
very near future; they are trying to
establish dominance over the Feed,
technology implanted in their brains
that allows them instant access to
social media and the Internet. The Feed
goes down, and sometimes when
people go to sleep they wake up as
someone else. The book skips forward
in time to a small, makeshift
community trying to survive after the
fall of society, desperate to raise
children who never had the Feed. When
Kate and Tom’s daughter, Bea, is
kidnapped, the couple go on a trek to
get her back and learn the truth about
the Feed and their fates. Though there
are clear similarities to “The Walking
Dead” and “The Circle,” the book offers
fresh, smart commentary about digital
dependence and its potential effect on
our minds and relationships.
In the story collection Guardian
Angels and Other Monsters (Vintage),
best-selling author Daniel H. Wilson
(“Robopocalypse,” “Robogenesis”)
explores the relationships between
humans and machines. Robots are
parents and companions; people who
otherwise would be disabled are aided
by robotic exoskeletons. Men and
robots struggle to convey their depth of
care for children, siblings and women.
In “Helmet,” a boy is forced into a suit
of armor that controls him, but he
longs to reach his brother and connect
with an armored woman marching
alongside him. “God Mode” blurs the
lines of memory and reality as the
world crumbles around a video game
designer and the stunning gamine he
meets in Australia. The highlight is
“The Blue Afternoon That Lasted
Forever,” where a scientist, who is also
a robot, muses over his love and
relationship with his daughter as they
face a catastrophic astronomical event.
The voices here ring with a
melancholia that lingers past the book’s
final pages. “Guardian Angels” is a
book about emotionally stunted
creatures that may make you cry.
Daughters of the Storm (Del Rey) by
Kim Wilkins is a twisty high fantasy
that follows five sisters as they join
forces to save their father and kingdom
— while keeping secrets from one
another. Each sister has a particular
skill or personality trait: a fierce
warrior; an impulsive young mother; a
religious and possibly depressed teen; a
nymphomaniac; and a burgeoning
magician. The use of magic is just a
small part of an otherwise Norseinspired fantasy. The author makes
room, instead, for exploring political
machinations and the relationships
between sisters; betrayal lurks at every
turn. The cliffhanger is a bit
frustrating, but if you are a fan of
palace intrigue and family drama, you
will be thrilled to hear this is the first
installment of a planned trilogy.
bookworld@washpost.com
Everdeen Mason reviews science fiction
and fantasy every month for The Washington
Post.
Literary Calendar
FRIDAY | We Need Diverse
Books co-hosts a symposium
with the Library of Congress on
diversity in children’s literature
followed by the Walter Dean
Myers Awards Ceremony. Linda
Sue Park, Jacqueline
Woodson, Jason Reynolds,
Carole Boston Weatherford
and Eric Velasquez will be in
attendance. James Madison
Building, Library of Congress,
101 Independence Ave. SE.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C5
RE
Television
TV HIGHLIGHTS
3/14/18
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For deals on meals while you’re on wheels, keep coupons, gift cards in glove box
Hints
From
Heloise
Dear Heloise: We
keep coupons and
gift cards to
various
restaurants in an
envelope in our
car’s glove compartment, just like
one of your readers suggested. We
used to pass by a place to eat and
suddenly remember that we had a
gift card for that restaurant at
home! Now, those discounts are
at our fingertips.
Nell P., Rock Hill, S.C.
Dear Heloise: Whenever I make
baked potatoes, I usually bake
additional potatoes, and the ones
not eaten are saved for the next
day to be made into twice-baked
potatoes or hash browns at
breakfast.
Lynette W., Grandview, Mo.
Dear Heloise: My slow cooker
gets very hot underneath, so to
protect my kitchen counters, I
place the slow cooker on my pizza
stone. I feel safe leaving the
house, knowing that the pizza
stone is protecting my counter
from being scorched.
Nancy H., Albuquerque
Dear Heloise: The best way to
keep cookies fresh when you put
them in a cookie jar is to first
place them in a plastic bag, then
put the bag in the cookie jar. Most
cookie jars today are pretty and
decorative, but if they lack a seal
around the lid, they aren’t
airtight.
Monica F., Lima, Ohio
potatoes. Use a paper towel,
folded two or three times, and put
the shredded potatoes on it. Then
take another two paper towels
and place over the potatoes, and
gently press out as much water as
you can. Fry them in butter for a
crispy outer crust and a tender
inside.
Maddie M., Lancaster, Pa.
Dear Heloise: If there is one
Dear Heloise: When making
thing my husband dearly loves,
it’s golden hash brown potatoes.
The secret to flawless hash
browns is to remove as much
water as possible from the
banana bread, I’ve found that
roasting the bananas in the oven
brings out the sugars, making the
bread more flavorful. Set your
oven to 350 degrees. Place the
yellow bananas on an aluminumfoil-covered baking sheet and
roast for about 18 to 20 minutes.
The skins will turn black. Let cool
to the touch before removing the
outer peel and adding the soft
inside to your banana bread
recipe.
Debby S., Salem, Ore.
Dear Heloise: I buy cheap paper
plates at the discount store and
use them whenever I need to
microwave something. I’ve even
found that when I microwave
tomato sauce or bacon, or
anything that is likely to
splatter, I make a tent over the
food using another paper plate
folded in half. It keeps the
splatters away from the sides of
my microwave, which helps to
keep it clean.
Sandra B., Lake Charles, La.
Heloise’s column appears six days a
week at washingtonpost.com/advice.
Send a hint to Heloise, P.O. Box
795000, San Antonio, TX 782795000, or email it to
Heloise@Heloise.com.
©2018, King Features Syndicate
THEATRE
Shear Madness
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Regular Schedule:
Tuesday–Friday at 8
Saturday at 6 & 9
Sunday at 3 & 7
This record-breaking interactive solve-the-crime comedy
keeps the audiences laughing as they try to outwit the
suspects and catch the killer. New clues and up to the
minute improvisation deliver “shrieks of laughter night after
night.” (Washington Post)
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Student Rush
Tickets Available
Tickets: 202-467-4600
Groups: 202-416-8400
www.shearmadness.com
Tickets
Available
at the
Box Office
Added Shows:
Mon at 8PM
Tue at 5PM
Wed at 5PM
Thu at 5PM
Great Group Rates
for 15 +
MUSIC - CHAMBER
Dumbarton Concerts
Celtic Tenors
Vocal Trio
March 17, 2018 at 4 PM
March 17, 2018 at 8 PM
Dumbarton Concerts
Dumbarton United
Methodist Church
3133 Dumbarton St. NW
Washington, DC 20007
202-965-2000
Dumbartonconcerts.org
$42 Adults
$39 Senior
202-965-2000
Hear 29 gifted violinists, violists, and celllists from all over
the world compete for $67,000 in prize money. Newly
commissioned work “Johansen” by renowned composer
Joel Phillip Friedman will be performed by all semi-finalists
Calvary Baptist Church
755 8th Streeet, NW
Washington, DC 20001
johansencomp@gmail.com
Free
Admission
Near Gallery
Place/Chinatown
metro stop
Internationally acclaimed pianist, Yuliya Gorenman
performs Johann Sebastian Bach’s masterwork The
Well-Tempered Clavier, Book I.
American University
Katzen Arts Center
http://bit.ly/GorenmanBach
$10 - $25
202-885-ARTS
Kennedy Center
Concert Hall
nationalsymphony.org
or call (202) 467-4600
Tickets
available
at the
Box Office
ForeWords, with Ted
Libbey beginning
at 6:45 p.m. before
the Sat., Mar. 17
performance and
1:45 p.m. before the
Sun., Mar. 18
performance.
Kennedy Center
Opera House
kennedy-center.org
or call (202) 467-4600
Tickets
available
at the
Box Office
Performing in venues large and small, the trio always
delights their audiences. Whether it’s the haunting Danny
Boy or exhilarating classics, they are known for their
professional, sparkling and good humored performances.
MUSIC - CONCERTS
Eighth Triennial
Johansen
International
Competition
Semi-final rounds
Thurs. & Fri. March 15-16
9-4:30
Intermission 12:40 - 1:40
for Young String Players
(ages 13-17)
Finals, Sat., March 17, 9-4
Intermission 12:40 - 1:50
The Gorenman
Bach Project
Saturday, March 24th,
7:30 pm - 8:30 pm
MUSIC - ORCHESTRAL
National Symphony
Orchestra:
Barnatan plays
Brahms
Tomorrow at 7
Saturday at 8
Sunday at 3
Gianandrea Noseda leads Inon Barnatan in Brahms's
monumental Piano Concerto No. 2 in this program that
also explores the spirit of dance in Germany, Hungary,
and the Czech Republic through dance music by Brahms,
R. Strauss, Kodály and Dvorák.
OPERA
Verdi's
"Don Carlo"
Music by Giuseppe Verdi
Libretto by Joseph Méry
and Camille du Locle
Tonight & Fri at 7:30
Sat at 7
Family ties fray and unravel in Verdi's spectacle of
forbidden passion, political intrigue, and shattering betrayal
set at the height of the Spanish Empire. More than 15 years
have passed since WNO last staged this grand masterpiece
in four acts, and now a solid-gold cast heralds its return in
this stunning new production.
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
MOVIE DIRECTORY
DISTRICT
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
3111 K Street N.W.
The Metropolitan Opera: Semiramide ENCORE 6:30
Annihilation (R) 5:35-8:35
Smithsonian - Lockheed Martin
IMAX Theater
601 Independence Avenue SW
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 2:004:30-5:15-7:15-8:30-10:10
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) CC: 12:30-1:15
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 9:55
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 1:10-4:007:00-9:45
Game Night (R) CC: 2:10-4:407:40-10:30
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 12:353:50-6:45-9:40
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
12:45-6:30
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
3:30
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) CC: 3:30-9:15
The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:15-4:107:00-10:15
Death Wish (R) CC: 2:15-5:007:45-10:25
Thoroughbreds (R) CC: 1:30-4:257:25-9:50
Annihilation (R) CC: 1:20-4:157:10-10:00
Gringo (R) CC: 2:00-4:45-7:3010:15
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) CC: 2:456:00-9:15
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:45-4:307:15-10:00
The Shape of Water (R) 2:007:05-9:30
Selma (PG-13) 2:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 11:30-4:20
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 1:50-6:45
Phantom Thread (R) 11:254:30-9:15
Liyana 5:30
Sheikh Jackson 7:15
Potato Potahto 9:15
AMC Loews Uptown 1
3426 Connecticut Avenue N.W.
AMC Academy 8
6198 Greenbelt Road
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D
(NR) 4:20
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
Seas 3D (NR) 11:00AM
Dream Big: Engineering Our
World: An IMAX 3D Experience
Please Call
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 10:2511:50-5:05
Black Panther: An IMAX 3D
Experience (PG-13)
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 12:25
MARYLAND
AFI Silver Theatre
Cultural Center
8633 Colesville Road
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 12:30- The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
4:00-7:30
CC: (!) 12:15-2:30-4:45-7:15
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 12:00AMC Mazza Gallerie
1:30-4:30-7:30
5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 1:50- Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 8:55
4:50-5:30-8:00-8:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 12:30-2:50 Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 1:003:30-6:30
Red Sparrow (R) CC: (!) 1:10Black Panther in Disney Digital
4:20-7:30
Game Night (R) CC: 12:00-2:20- 3D (PG-13) CC: 3:00-6:00
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 2:00-5:154:40-7:50
8:30
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: (!)
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: (!)
12:10-5:30-8:10
1:30-4:15
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) CC: (!) 2:50
Death Wish (R) CC: 12:00-2:35- Digital 3D (PG) CC: (!) 7:00
Death Wish (R) CC: 12:30-3:155:10
The Metropolitan Opera: Semir- 5:50-8:25
Gringo (R) CC: (!) 1:15-4:00-7:45
amide ENCORE (!) 1:00-6:30
Albert Einstein Planetarium National Air & Space Museum
6th Street and Independence Ave SW
To Space and Back 11:00AM
Dark Universe Space Show (NR)
11:30-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30
Journey to the Stars (NR) 12:001:00-2:00-3:00-4:00-5:00
Angelika
Pop-Up at Union Market
550 Penn Street NE - Unit E
The Young Karl Marx (Le jeune
Karl Marx) (NR) 12:00-4:35
Before We Vanish (Sanpo suru
shinryakusha) 12:00-4:45
The Post (PG-13) 2:15-7:00
Red Sparrow (R) 11:00-1:454:30-7:15
Avalon Theatre
5612 Connecticut Avenue
Molly's Game (R) 11:15-5:00
A Fantastic Woman (Una mujer
fantastica) (R) 12:00-2:30-7:45
Loveless (Nelyubov) (R) 2:15
Our Blood is Wine (NR) 7:00
Landmark
Atlantic Plumbing Cinema
807 V Street, NW
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 1:00-4:007:00-10:10
The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:45-2:254:55-7:25
Annihilation (R) CC: 11:30-2:004:35-7:15-9:55
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 11:0012:30-1:45-3:30-4:30-6:45-7:309:45-10:00-10:15
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: 11:251:55-4:20-7:10-9:35
Landmark E Street Cinema
555 11th Street NW
AMC Center Park 8
4001 Powder Mill Rd.
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
CC: 2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 12:003:15-6:30-9:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 1:304:15-7:00
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) CC: 1:00-4:00-7:0010:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 9:30
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 12:15-3:406:45-9:50
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
3:30-9:30
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) CC: 12:30-6:30
Death Wish (R) CC: 2:15-5:007:30-10:00
Gringo (R) CC: 12:45-3:45-6:409:20
AMC Columbia 14
10300 Little Patuxent Parkway
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
CC: 11:50-2:35-5:20-8:00-10:20
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 12:304:00-7:20-10:25
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) CC: 3:05-9:15
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 11:00-1:404:10-6:40-9:10
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 11:30-3:106:25-9:40
Game Night (R) CC: 11:40-2:154:50-7:20-9:55
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
12:00-6:15
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
3:35-9:20
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) 12:30-6:30
Death Wish (R) CC: (!) 11:00-1:354:30-7:25-10:25
Gringo (R) CC: 11:10-2:10-4:557:40-10:30
The Metropolitan Opera: Semiramide ENCORE (!) 1:00-6:30
Annihilation (R) CC: 3:50-9:50
Every Day (PG-13) 11:00-1:25
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) CC:
11:05-1:35-4:10-7:00-10:00
A Wrinkle in Time: An IMAX 2D
Experience (PG) (!) 11:15-2:004:45-7:30-10:15
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:30-3:006:30-9:40
Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr
Story 12:45-7:30
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts Animation (NR) 1:45-7:15
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts Live Action (NR) 4:30-9:30
Oh Lucy! 1:00-3:15-5:30-7:45-9:50
Lady Bird (R) CC: 3:00-5:15-9:40
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 12:50-3:506:50-9:30
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 1:004:00-7:00-9:30
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
12:40-3:40-6:40-9:20
I, Tonya (R) CC: 1:10-4:10-7:10AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18
9:35
9811 Washingtonian Ctr.
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 12:45The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
3:45-6:45-9:25
CC:
(!)
9:55
Landmark West End Cinema
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 11:202301 M Street NW
2:25-5:30-8:45
A Streetcar Named Desire (PG)
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 11:30-1:551:30-4:30-7:30
4:30-7:30
A Fantastic Woman (Una mujer
Red Sparrow (R) CC: (!) 11:15fantastica) (R) 4:30
2:25-4:20-7:00-10:10
Submission 1:00-3:15-5:30-7:30
Game Night (R) CC: (!) 11:35Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC:
2:05-8:10
1:15-7:15
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: (!)
Medal of Honor Theater 11:25-2:00-7:20
NMMC
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digi18900 Jefferson Davis Highway
tal 3D (PG) CC: (!) 4:40-10:00
We, the Marines (NR) 10:00-11:00- Death Wish (R) CC: (!) 5:35-10:30
12:00-1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) CC: 1:00-4:05Regal Gallery Place
7:10-10:15
Stadium 14
701 Seventh Street NW
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
11:50-2:30-5:15-8:00-10:45
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:3012:30-2:45-3:45-6:45-7:00-10:0010:15
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 1:10-4:30-7:45-11:00
Red Sparrow (R) 11:55-3:306:45-10:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:45-2:35
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:30-1:50-4:15
Game Night (R) 10:50
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:301:30-4:30-7:30-10:20
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) 3:30
Thoroughbreds (R) 11:45-2:155:00-7:45-10:30
Death Wish (R) 12:05-3:00
Gringo (R) 12:15-3:15-6:15-9:00
The Metropolitan Opera: Semiramide ENCORE 1:00
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
11:30-1:50-4:15-6:45-9:30
AMC Loews
St. Charles Town Ctr. 9
11115 Mall Circle
The Strangers: Prey at Night
(R) CC: 10:15-1:30-3:00-5:107:00-10:30
Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
10:30-11:45-2:00-3:15-6:00-6:459:30-10:15
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) CC: 11:00-2:45-7:309:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 10:45-1:204:00-6:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 9:00
Game Night (R) CC: 11:15-2:004:30-6:15-9:30
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 11:30-2:456:15-9:45
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: (!)
10:15-4:00-10:00
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital 3D (PG) CC: (!) 12:30-5:00-7:45
Death Wish (R) CC: 11:30-2:157:00-10:30
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
Black Panther (PG-13) 10:55-2:155:30-8:50
Black Panther in Disney Digital
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 3D (PG-13) 12:00-2:00-6:45
CC: 11:15-1:30-3:45-6:15-8:30-9:15 A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:55Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 11:00- 2:40-8:10
12:00-2:00-5:00-6:00-8:00-9:15
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney DigiBlack Panther in Disney Digital tal 3D (PG) 3:45-5:25-9:10-10:05
3D (PG-13) CC: 3:00
Hoyt's West Nursery
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 11:25-1:40Cinema 14
4:15-6:45-9:00
1591 West Nursery Road
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
(PG-13) CC: 12:30-6:10
CC: 12:00-3:00-5:20-7:40-10:10
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 11:20-1:50- Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 12:005:05-8:15
1:00-2:00-3:10-4:10-5:10-6:20Game Night (R) CC: 11:35-2:35- 7:20-8:20-9:30-10:20
5:15-7:45-10:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: 11:00- (PG-13) CC: 1:20-4:05-6:50-9:40
4:30-7:15-9:45
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 12:00-2:15Annihilation (R) CC: 3:15
4:30-6:45-9:00
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 12:10-1:00Digital 3D (PG) CC: 1:45
4:00-7:00-10:00
Death Wish (R) CC: 11:40-2:10- Game Night (R) CC: 3:10-5:354:40-7:20-9:45
8:00-10:25
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 12:40Experience (PG-13) CC: 1:00-4:00- 3:30-6:30-9:20
7:00-10:00
Gringo (R) CC: 11:30-2:00-4:30- A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
12:15-2:15-3:55-4:55-6:35-7:357:15-10:00
9:15-10:15
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) CC:
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
11:30-2:15-4:45-7:30-10:00
Digital 3D (PG) CC: 1:15
ArcLight Bethesda
Death Wish (R) CC: 12:25-2:557101 Democracy Boulevard
5:25-7:55-10:30
Black Panther (PG-13) 7:00-10:00 Gringo (R) CC: 1:30-4:20-7:10-9:45
The Greatest Showman (PG)
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) CC:
11:55-2:20-4:40-7:10-9:20
12:10-2:35-5:00-7:25-9:50
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Landmark
(PG-13) 12:00-4:35
Bethesda Row Cinema
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:05-2:40-4:557235 Woodmont Avenue
7:05-9:45
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 1:30Game Night (R) 11:30-2:05-5:55- 4:20-7:20-10:00
8:05-9:05
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
The Shape of Water (R) 3:05-8:35 1:00-9:50
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 9:30
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 12:50Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 3:50-6:50-9:30
Missouri (R) 3:20
The Leisure Seeker (R) CC: 1:20Death Wish (R) 11:20-2:25-5:50- 4:00-7:10-9:45
8:10-10:05
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Gringo (R) 11:40-2:35-5:05-7:40- Missouri (R) CC: 1:40-4:30-7:3510:10
10:05
The Post (PG-13) 1:45-6:10
Lady Bird (R) CC: 1:00-3:20-5:30Annihilation (R) 11:50-1:40-4:50- 7:40-9:50
7:35-10:15
The Party (R) CC: 1:10-3:00-5:00I, Tonya (R) CC: 12:35
7:00-9:20
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts CC: 11:25-1:15-4:10-7:25-10:25
Animation (NR) 3:45-7:50
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:15-1:15- 2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts 2:00-4:00-5:00-8:00-9:00
Live Action (NR) 5:40
Red Sparrow (R) 11:15-2:10-5:15- Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 1:508:15-9:15
4:40-7:25-10:00
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:45Old Greenbelt Theatre
2:15-4:45-7:15
129 Centerway
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) CC:
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 8:00
11:10-1:00-4:25-6:45-10:20
The Shape of Water (R) 5:15
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:25
I, Tonya (R) 2:30
Thoroughbreds (R) 11:50-3:105:10-7:20-9:25
Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:30-4:053899 Branch Avenue
5:20-6:25
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:00-1:00A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
3:00-4:00-6:00-7:00
Digital 3D (PG) 3:00-7:45
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:15-2:40Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
5:00-7:30
1020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:45Black Panther in Disney Digital 1:45-4:30-6:15-7:15
3D (PG-13) 4:10
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) Digital 3D (PG) 3:30
12:35-2:50-5:05-7:45-10:10
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:10-2:25-4:40- 1:15-3:40-5:50-8:15
6:55-9:10
Regal Bowie Stadium 14
Thoroughbreds (R) 11:00-1:3515200 Major Lansdale Boulevard
3:55-7:20-9:40
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
Black Panther (PG-13) 10:503:00-5:20-7:40-9:55
11:20-12:25-1:50-2:20-3:25-4:50Black Panther (PG-13) 1:30-2:105:20-6:25-7:55-8:20-9:25
Game Night (R) 12:50-3:10-5:35- 2:50-4:10-4:50-5:40-6:10-7:308:10-8:50-9:30
8:05-10:25
Black Panther in Disney Digital
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:153D (PG-13) 6:50-10:10
1:00-2:00-3:45-4:45-6:30-7:30Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
9:15-10:15
Death Wish (R) 12:00-2:40-5:25- (PG-13) 3:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) 2:40-5:058:00-10:35
8:00-10:30
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:10Red Sparrow (R) 3:50-7:10-10:20
7:10-10:20
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:00-2:30Bow Tie Harbour 9
5:30-7:00-8:30
2474 Solomons Island Road
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 10:15Digital 3D (PG) 4:00-10:00
12:40-3:10-5:40-8:05-10:30
Death Wish (R) 3:40-6:30-9:40
The Post (PG-13) 11:00-4:20Gringo (R) 2:25-5:10-7:50
7:10-10:20
The Metropolitan Opera: SemirThe Greatest Showman (PG)
amide ENCORE 1:00-6:30
11:30-5:10-7:40
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) 1:20Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 4:20-7:20-10:15
(PG-13) 10:10-1:00-3:40-6:30-9:20
Regal Cinemas Majestic
The Shape of Water (R) 10:00-6:40
Stadium 20 & IMAX
Call Me by Your Name (R) 12:50900 Ellsworth Drive
3:50-9:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
12:35-3:05-5:30-7:55-10:25
Missouri (R) 2:10-10:15
Gringo (R) 11:10-1:50-4:30-7:30- Black Panther (PG-13) 12:45-1:153:30-4:00-4:30-6:45-7:15-7:4510:00
10:00-10:30-10:55
Every Day (PG-13) 1:40
Black Panther in Disney Digital
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
3D (PG-13) 12:00-3:05-6:1511:20-2:00-4:40-7:20-9:50
9:10-9:30
Red Sparrow (R) 9:50-12:55-4:00Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
7:00-10:10
Annihilation (R) 10:30-1:20-4:10- (PG-13) 12:35-3:40-7:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:25-3:506:50-9:40
6:50-9:40
Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD Early Man (PG) 12:45-3:40
7000 Arundel Mills Circle
Red Sparrow (R) 12:35-3:55Black Panther (PG-13) XD: 12:30- 7:15-10:35
3:45-7:15
Game Night (R) 12:15-2:50-5:35The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 8:15-10:55
10:55-1:10-3:45-6:45-10:00
The Shape of Water (R) 12:05Black Panther (PG-13) 10:553:20-6:15
11:25-1:00-1:40-2:15-2:45-3:15- A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:205:00-5:15-5:30-6:05-8:15-8:251:20-1:55-3:10-4:10-4:45-6:008:50-9:25-10:05
7:00-7:35-9:00-10:25
Black Panther in Disney Digital A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
3D (PG-13) XD: 10:30
Digital 3D (PG) 9:50
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 2:25-8:00 Samson (PG-13) 10:25
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Thoroughbreds (R) 12:15-2:45(PG-13) 11:00AM
5:15-7:45-10:10
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:30-2:05-4:30- I, Tonya (R) 6:05-9:05
7:05-9:35
Death Wish (R) 12:00-2:40-5:30Early Man (PG) 11:00-1:30-3:55
8:20-11:00
Red Sparrow (R) 11:00-12:15Every Day (PG-13) 12:45
2:20-3:35-5:40-9:00-10:15
Gringo (R) 12:55-3:40-6:20-9:25
Game Night (R) 11:50-2:35-5:05The Metropolitan Opera: Semir7:40-10:10
amide ENCORE 1:00-6:30
The Shape of Water (R) 11:15The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) 1:205:05-10:30
3:55-6:30-9:05
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:0511:55-1:05-1:50-2:40-4:35-6:25- Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 1:00-4:107:20-8:10
7:25-10:40
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Regal Germantown
Digital 3D (PG) 5:25
Stadium 14
Thoroughbreds (R) 11:45-2:1520000 Century Boulevard
4:45-7:15-9:45
Death Wish (R) 11:20-2:10-5:00- The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
1:15-3:45-6:15-8:30-11:00
6:30-7:45-9:15-10:30
Gringo (R) 11:35-2:30-5:10-7:50- Black Panther (PG-13) 12:30-1:303:45-4:45-7:00-8:00-10:15-11:00
10:30
The Metropolitan Opera: Semir- Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 2:45-6:00-9:15
amide ENCORE 1:00-6:30
Annihilation (R) 11:10-2:00-4:55- Fifty Shades Freed (R) 9:30
7:40-10:25
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 2:00-5:15
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
11:10-1:45-4:40-7:30-10:10
Red Sparrow (R) 12:00-3:30Free! Take your Marks (PG) 7:30 6:45-10:00
Ye Mantram Vesave (NR) 11:35- Game Night (R) 12:00-2:30-5:008:15-10:45
3:00-6:10-9:20
AMC Magic Johnson
Capital Center 12
800 Shoppers Way
The Shape of Water (R) 12:003:00-6:30
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:151:45-3:15-6:00-7:15-8:45
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) 4:30-10:00
Death Wish (R) 2:00-4:45-7:3010:45
Gringo (R) 1:45-4:30-7:45-10:30
The Metropolitan Opera: Semiramide ENCORE 1:00-6:30
Annihilation (R) 8:15-11:00
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
12:00-2:30-5:00-7:45-10:30
Regal Hyattsville Royale
Stadium 14
6505 America Blvd.
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
12:45-3:00-5:30-7:45-10:00
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:30-1:001:30-3:35-4:15-4:45-6:45-7:258:00-10:00-10:30
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 7:15-10:20
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 1:30-4:25
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:30-4:156:40-9:15
Red Sparrow (R) 12:30-3:457:00-10:15
Game Night (R) 1:45-4:15-6:459:15
The Shape of Water (R) 1:154:20-7:15
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:303:30-4:30-6:15-7:15-9:00
Death Wish (R) 1:00-4:00-7:009:45
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) 1:30-10:00
Annihilation (R) 10:15
Gringo (R) 1:45-4:45-7:45-10:30
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) 1:454:30-7:15-10:00
Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12
14716 Baltimore Avenue
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
12:00-2:30-5:00-7:45-10:20
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:3012:45-1:45-2:45-4:00-5:15-6:007:30-8:30-9:15-10:35
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 3:30-9:45
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:00-3:456:15-8:45
Red Sparrow (R) 11:45-3:006:45-10:00
Game Night (R) 12:15-3:00-5:308:00-10:35
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:151:15-4:15-6:30-9:30-10:10
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) 3:15-7:15
Death Wish (R) 11:45-2:30-5:308:00-10:35
Gringo (R) 12:30-3:15-6:15-9:00
Annihilation (R) 12:30-7:00
Regal Rockville Center
Stadium 13
199 East Montgomery Avenue
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
12:45-3:00-5:15-8:00-10:15
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:0012:45-3:15-4:00-6:30-7:15-9:4510:30
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 1:30-4:45-8:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:45-4:157:00-10:00
Red Sparrow (R) 12:30-3:457:15-10:30
Game Night (R) 12:15-2:45-5:308:00-10:30
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:001:30-2:00-5:00-7:00-7:45-10:30
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) 4:15-9:45
Death Wish (R) 2:45-5:30-8:1510:45
Gringo (R) 2:00-4:45-7:30-10:15
The Metropolitan Opera: Semiramide ENCORE 1:00-6:30
Operation Red Sea 12:00-3:306:45-10:15
Regal Waugh Chapel
Stadium 12 & IMAX
1419 South Main Chapel Way
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
1:00-3:35-5:50-8:15-10:40
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:55-1:254:05-4:35-7:15-7:45-10:25
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 6:15-9:25
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:40-3:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:30-4:15-7:05
Red Sparrow (R) 12:10-3:256:40-9:50
Game Night (R) 1:40-4:20-7:109:40
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:501:20-3:40-6:30-7:00-9:20
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) 4:10-9:50
Death Wish (R) 12:00-2:35-5:107:45-10:20
Annihilation (R) 9:30
Gringo (R) 1:50-4:40-7:30-10:10
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 12:25-3:356:45-9:55
Regal Westview
Stadium 16 & IMAX
5243 Buckeystown Pike
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
12:30-3:30-6:00-8:30-11:00
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:1512:45-3:00-3:30-4:00-6:15-6:457:15-9:30-10:00-10:30
The Greatest Showman (PG)
1:15-4:00
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:00-3:15
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:30-3:156:00-9:00
Red Sparrow (R) 11:00-3:007:00-10:30
Game Night (R) 1:30-4:15-7:009:45
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:151:00-2:00-3:45-6:30-7:30-9:15
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) 4:45-10:15
Thoroughbreds (R) 11:30-2:004:30-7:15-10:00
Death Wish (R) 11:00-2:00-5:008:00-10:45
Gringo (R) 11:15-2:15-5:15-8:1511:00
Black Panther: An IMAX 3D
Experience (PG-13) 4:30-11:00
Annihilation (R) 6:15-9:30
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
11:00-1:45-4:30-7:15-10:00
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13)
6:45-9:15
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 1:15-7:45
Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
11:45-1:45-3:00-4:00-4:45-6:158:00-9:30-10:00
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) CC: 11:00-2:15-5:301:00-3:20-5:45-8:00-10:20
8:45
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:0012:30-3:10-3:40-6:30-7:00-9:40- The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
(!) 1:25-7:10
10:00
Black Panther in Disney Digital Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
3D (PG-13) 4:20-5:00-7:30-8:15- (PG-13) CC: 1:40-4:40-7:30
10:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 11:50-2:154:40-7:00-9:25
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 1:50
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Red Sparrow (R) CC: 11:20-12:302:45-3:45-6:00-7:10-9:10-9:45
(PG-13) 1:20-4:00
Game Night (R) CC: 1:10-3:50Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:50-3:206:20-9:00
6:00-8:30
Red Sparrow (R) 1:00-4:10-7:20- The Shape of Water (R) CC: 4:10
Death Wish (R) CC: 11:00-2:3010:30
5:00-7:40-10:15
Game Night (R) 9:30
Winchester (PG-13) CC: 10:20
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:40A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: 11:301:40-3:30-6:30-7:10-9:40
12:45-6:45
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) 4:30-9:50
Death Wish (R) 12:30-3:00-5:30- Digital 3D (PG) CC: 3:45-9:45
Thoroughbreds (R) CC: 11:058:00-10:25
1:30-4:05-6:30-9:05
Gringo (R) 1:10-3:50-6:45-9:30
The Metropolitan Opera: Semir- Annihilation (R) CC: 1:25-10:15
Gringo (R) CC: 11:25-2:00-4:40amide ENCORE 1:00-6:30
7:20-10:10
Annihilation (R) 6:40
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) 2:00- The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) CC:
11:10-1:50-4:30-7:15-9:50
4:40-7:40-10:10
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 2:10 A Wrinkle in Time: An IMAX 2D
Experience (PG) CC: 11:45-2:45Xscape Theatres
5:45-8:45
Brandywine 14
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:30-3:457710 Matapeake Business Drive
7:00-10:30
The Strangers: Prey at Night
AMC Shirlington 7
(R) CC: 10:40-12:50-4:20-6:102772 South Randolph St.
8:30-10:40
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 1:00Black Panther (PG-13) CC: (!)
4:00-7:00
11:00-2:00-5:00-8:00-11:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) CC: 2:30-5:30-8:30
(PG-13) CC: 2:50-6:15
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 11:20-1:45- Red Sparrow (R) CC: 1:15-4:157:15
4:15-7:10-9:10
Red Sparrow (R) CC: (!) 9:50-1:10- The Shape of Water (R) CC:
4:15-7:10
3:00-6:45-9:50
Game Night (R) CC: (!) 11:50-2:30- Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 1:15
5:20-7:50-10:15
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: (!) 4:30
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: (!)
9:40-11:10-12:20-3:20-4:40-6:00- A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) CC: (!) 1:45-7:15
7:20-8:40-9:45
Thoroughbreds (R) CC: (!) 1:30A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
4:00-6:30
Digital 3D (PG) CC: (!) 2:10
Annihilation (R) CC: 1:30-4:20Den of Thieves (R) CC: 10:10
Death Wish (R) CC: (!) 11:40-2:40- 7:00
5:30-8:10-10:45
AMC Tysons Corner 16
Gringo (R) CC: 11:30-1:50-4:507850e Tysons Corner Center
7:40-10:20
The Strangers: Prey at Night
Annihilation (R) CC: (!) 12:10
(R) CC: (!) 11:10-1:25-3:40-5:55Black Panther (PG-13) CC: (!)
8:25-10:40
9:30-10:00-10:30-12:30-1:00-1:30- Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
3:30-4:05-4:30-6:30-7:00-7:3011:00-12:00-2:25-3:30-5:40-6:409:30-10:00-10:30
8:45-9:45
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) CC: Black Panther in Disney Digital
10:10-12:40-3:10-5:40-8:20-10:50 3D (PG-13) CC: 12:45
The Greatest Showman (PG)
iPic Pike & Rose
CC: 9:40
11830 Grand Park Avenue
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 10:45-1:55-4:55(!) 2:15-5:15-8:00-10:45
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:45-3:30- 7:45-10:35
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 11:30-2:007:30-9:15-11:15
4:25-6:50-9:20
Red Sparrow (R) (!) 11:30-3:15Red Sparrow (R) CC: 10:10-1:207:15-11:00
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) (!) 11:30- 4:30-7:40-11:00
12:30-2:45-3:45-6:00-7:00-10:15 Game Night (R) CC: 10:20-12:503:15-5:35-8:00-10:20
Death Wish (R) 11:45-3:00The Shape of Water (R) CC:
6:15-9:30
Gringo (R) (!) 1:15-4:30-7:45-11:30 10:30AM
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: (!)
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) (!)
10:35-1:15-6:55
12:00-3:00-6:45-10:00
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) CC: (!) 4:00-9:35
Thoroughbreds (R) CC: (!) 10:05AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
12:25-2:50-5:10-7:35-10:05
2150 Clarendon Blvd.
Death Wish (R) CC: 11:35-2:10Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 1:30- 4:50-7:30-10:15
2:45-4:30-7:30-10:30
Gringo (R) CC: (!) 10:15-1:40-4:20Black Panther in Disney Digital 7:00-10:55
3D (PG-13) CC: 3:30-6:30-9:30
The Metropolitan Opera: SemirJumanji: Welcome to the Jungle amide ENCORE (!) 1:00-6:30
(PG-13) CC: 10:15
Black Panther: An IMAX 3D
Experience (PG-13) 10:05-1:35Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 12:454:45-7:50-10:55
3:00-7:45
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 12:45-4:00- Annihilation (R) CC: 10:003:45-9:30
7:15-10:30
Game Night (R) CC: 12:30-3:00- The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) CC:
(!) 10:00-12:30-3:10-5:45-8:155:40-8:00-10:20
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: 4:15-9:45 10:50
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digi- A Wrinkle in Time (PG) (!) 12:052:45-5:25-8:05-10:45
tal 3D (PG) CC: 1:30-5:15-7:00
Death Wish (R) CC: 12:30-3:00AMC Worldgate 9
5:30-8:00-10:30
13025 Worldgate Drive
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) CC: The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
12:30-5:15-7:45-10:15
CC: (!) 2:55-5:10-8:00
Black Panther in Disney Digital Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 2:003D (PG-13) CC: 12:30
5:00-6:50-7:35
Black Panther in Disney Digital
AMC Hoffman Center 22
206 Swamp Fox Rd.
3D (PG-13) CC: 2:45-5:40
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 7:45
CC: 11:40-2:05-4:20-6:40-9:00
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 10:30- Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 3:00-5:25
12:00-1:45-2:30-3:15-3:45-5:00- Red Sparrow (R) CC: (!) 2:005:15-7:40
6:30-7:00-8:15-9:00-9:45-10:15
Black Panther in Disney Digital Game Night (R) CC: (!) 2:154:35-7:20
3D (PG-13) CC: 11:15-5:45
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: (!)
2:00-7:30
10:40-1:15-3:50-6:25-9:05
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 10:20- Death Wish (R) CC: (!) 2:305:05-8:30
1:30-6:50
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) CC: (!) 4:45
(PG-13) CC: 3:25-6:20-9:25
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 11:05-1:35- Gringo (R) CC: (!) 2:20-5:00-8:20
4:05-6:35-9:10
Alamo Drafthouse Cinema Early Man (PG) CC: 11:20-1:40
One Loudoun
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 11:30-2:4520575 East Hampton Plaza
6:15-9:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) 10:35-1:20-4:00Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 10:30-1:00 6:40-9:20
Game Night (R) CC: 12:40-3:05- Black Panther (PG-13) 10:40-1:455:20-7:45-10:20
2:20-9:35; 10:00-4:30-8:00-11:25
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 4:10- Game Night (R) 11:20-2:50-5:257:10-10:05
8:20-11:05
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 10:00 Red Sparrow (R) 10:20-12:50Call Me by Your Name (R) CC: 12:25 4:15-6:00-10:00
12 Strong (R) CC: 11:10-4:35
Annihilation (R) 12:15-3:25A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
6:40-9:40
3:15-9:15
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:301:20-3:45-5:40-7:00-8:40-10:05
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) CC: 12:15-6:15
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) 11:40AM
Thoroughbreds (R) CC: 11:452:15-4:45-7:20-9:45
Thoroughbreds (R) 10:10-2:054:45-7:20-10:45
The Post (PG-13) CC: 4:05-9:20
Death Wish (R) CC: 12:15-2:50- 10 to Midnight (R) 7:40
5:35-8:10-10:45
Angelika Film Center Mosaic
Annihilation (R) CC: 11:00-1:452911 District Ave
4:30-7:25-10:10
The Leisure Seeker (R) (!) 10:25Gringo (R) CC: 10:45-1:40-4:30- 12:55-3:30-6:00-8:30-10:55
7:20-10:00
Lady Bird (R) 3:15
The Metropolitan Opera: Semir- National Theatre Live: Hamlet
amide ENCORE 1:00-6:30
(NR) 2:00
Lady Bird (R) CC: 2:10-7:35
The Shape of Water (R) 11:05-7:15
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) CC: A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
10:50-12:30-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30 Digital 3D (PG) (!) 11:30AM
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
Thoroughbreds (R) (!) 10:45-1:00Experience (PG-13) CC: 1:00-4:15- 3:15-5:30-7:45-10:30
7:30-10:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 10:15Missouri (R) 10:15
1:15-4:00-7:15-10:15
Death Wish (R) (!) 11:00-1:45AMC Potomac Mills 18
4:25-10:00
2700 Potomac Mills Circle
Annihilation (R) 10:05-12:35-5:45The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 8:20-10:55
CC: 1:00-3:15-5:40-8:00-10:30
Free! Take your Marks (PG) 7:00
UA Snowden Square
|Stadium 14
9161 Commerce Center Drive
VIRGINIA
"NO FOOD ALLOWED."
TO "HOW OLD ARE THESE FRIES?"
FROM
Black Panther (PG-13) 10:00-1:004:00-7:00-10:00
Red Sparrow (R) (!) 11:00-2:005:00-8:00-11:00
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) (!) 2:154:45-7:30-10:05
Bow Tie
Reston Town Center 11 & BTX
11940 Market Street
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:00-4:007:00-10:00
I, Tonya (R) 12:55
Phantom Thread (R) 9:25
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:30-3:506:30-8:50
Thoroughbreds (R) 12:20-2:405:00-7:25-10:25
The Shape of Water (R) 3:55
Gringo (R) 1:00-4:00-7:00-9:40
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) 1:104:00-7:20-10:05
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:00-3:006:00-9:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 6:45
Game Night (R) 1:40-4:30-7:30-9:55
Red Sparrow (R) 12:10-3:306:40-9:45
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:00-2:104:00-6:50-7:40-9:50
Death Wish (R) 5:00-9:55
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 14 , 2018
Wednesday, March 14, 2018
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
Thoroughbreds (R) 1:40-4:056:30-9:15
Death Wish (R) 2:00-5:00-7:45-10:25
Gringo (R) 2:10-5:20-8:15
The Metropolitan Opera: Semiramide ENCORE 1:00
Annihilation (R) 6:00-9:00
Every Day (PG-13) 12:15
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
12:15-2:40-5:20-7:50-10:20
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 9:30
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:304:15-7:00
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Regal Countryside Stadium 20 Digital 3D (PG) 9:45
45980 Regal Plaza
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
12:35-2:50-5:10-7:30-10:00
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:00-1:003:00-4:10-6:10-7:20-9:20-10:30
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 11:40-2:205:00-7:40-10:20
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:05-3:05-6:00-9:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:45-2:10-4:407:10-9:40
Red Sparrow (R) 12:40-3:506:55-10:10
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:20-3:206:25-9:30
Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi)
(NR) 11:35-3:10-6:40-10:05
Game Night (R) 1:05-3:55-6:30-9:05
The Shape of Water (R) 12:303:30-6:35-9:35
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:301:45-2:15-5:00-7:25-7:45-10:25
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) 4:35-10:15
Cinema Arts Theatre
Pad Man (Padman) (PG-13) 11:259650 Main St
2:35-5:45-8:55
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 10:15-1:15- Gringo (R) 12:50-3:45-6:50-9:45
4:15-7:10-9:55
Pari
(Hindi) (NR) 11:55-2:55The Shape of Water (R) CC: 9:40- 6:05-9:15
12:05-5:05-10:00
Sonu
Ke Titu Ki Sweety (NR)
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: 9:40- 12:10-3:35-6:45-9:50
12:00-2:15-4:35-7:00-9:20
Every
Day (PG-13) 11:45-2:25-5:05
The Leisure Seeker (R) CC: 9:45The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
12:10-2:30-4:50-7:20-9:35
11:30-2:05-4:45-7:15-9:55
The Party (R) CC: 10:00-12:00Tholiprema (Tholi Prema) (NR)
6:00
12:15-3:15-6:20-9:25
The Post (PG-13) CC: 2:35-7:40
Awe! (NR) 7:35-10:25
Gringo (R) CC: 9:50-12:15-2:40Regal Dulles Town Center 10
5:00-7:30-9:45
21100 Dulles Town Circle
Lady Bird (R) CC: 8:00-10:00
The
Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts 12:00-2:00-4:45-7:30-9:45
Animation (NR) 2:00
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts - Black Panther (PG-13) 12:00-1:003:00-4:00-6:00-7:00-9:00-10:10
Live Action (NR) 4:00
Black Panther in Disney Digital
Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
3D (PG-13) 10:45
1600 Village Market Boulevard
The Greatest Showman (PG)
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 2:30-5:15
11:35-1:45-3:55-6:05-8:15
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:30-4:15The Greatest Showman (PG) 2:50 6:45-9:15
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:00-2:20Red Sparrow (R) 12:10-3:154:40-7:00
6:30-9:30
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:1511:50-2:15-4:50-7:20
1:45-7:15-10:00
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
11:35-1:45-3:55-6:05-8:15
Digital 3D (PG) 4:30
Game Night (R) 12:10-2:45Death Wish (R) 12:00-2:45-5:305:10-7:50
8:15-10:50
Red Sparrow (R) 11:25-12:45Gringo (R) 12:45-2:15-5:00-7:45-10:30
2:40-4:00-5:45-7:15
Annihilation (R) 8:00
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Regal Fairfax Towne Center 10
Digital 3D (PG) 11:20AM
4110 West Ox Road
Death Wish (R) 11:40-2:10The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
4:45-7:35
12:05-2:20-4:35-8:05-9:50
Gringo (R) 11:45-2:25-5:00-7:40
The Metropolitan Opera: Semir- The Greatest Showman (PG)
12:20-2:55-5:30-10:45
amide ENCORE 1:00
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:30-3:30- Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:10-2:30-5:007:30-9:55
5:30-7:30
Early Man (PG) 12:05
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:20Red Sparrow (R) 12:30-3:451:55-4:30-5:20-7:10-8:00
7:10-10:20
Manassas 4 Cinemas
Game Night (R) 12:00-2:40-5:108890 Mathis Ave.
7:40-10:15
Black Panther (PG-13) 2:10-4:50- The Shape of Water (R) 3:407:30; 5:35
7:00-10:00
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:15-2:15- A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:503:25-4:30-6:45
1:50-3:50-6:50-7:50-10:40
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
1:50-4:00-6:05
Digital 3D (PG) 4:50-9:40
Rave Cinemas Centreville 12 The Metropolitan Opera: Semir6201 Multiplex Drive
amide ENCORE 1:00-6:30
Annihilation (R) 10:50
Black Panther (PG-13) 10:0010:40-11:10-1:00-1:40-2:10-4:00- The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
4:40-5:10-7:00-7:40-8:10-10:00- 12:10-2:45-5:20-8:00-10:35
10:40-11:10
Free! Take your Marks (PG) 7:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Regal Fox Stadium 16 & IMAX
(PG-13) 11:00-1:50-4:35-7:25-10:20
22875 Brambleton Plaza
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:25-1:45-4:15- The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
7:10-9:35
1:00-3:30-5:45-8:00-10:15
Red Sparrow (R) 10:20-1:25-4:30- Black Panther (PG-13) 11:457:45-11:00
12:30-3:00-4:00-6:15-7:15-9:30Game Night (R) 10:15-12:40-3:05- 10:30
5:30-7:55-10:30
Black Panther in Disney Digital
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 10:003D (PG-13) 6:45-9:45
11:15-3:10-4:45-7:30-8:20-10:55 The Greatest Showman (PG)
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digi- 3:15-6:00
tal 3D (PG) 12:35-2:00-5:45-10:15 Fifty Shades Freed (R) 8:30
Death Wish (R) 12:00-2:40-5:15- Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
8:00-10:45
(PG-13) 1:30-4:15
Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety (NR)
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:15-2:45-5:1011:45-6:00
7:45-10:15
Annihilation (R) 10:50-1:35-4:20- Red Sparrow (R) 12:15-3:307:15-9:55
6:45-10:00
Ye Mantram Vesave (NR)
Game Night (R) 12:30-3:00-5:302:55-9:30
8:15-10:45
Rave Cinemas
The Shape of Water (R) 12:45-3:45
Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:00-2:3011900 Palace Way
3:45-5:15-6:30-8:00-9:15
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
11:40-2:15-5:15-8:05-10:35
Digital 3D (PG) 11:45-10:45
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Death Wish (R) 11:45-2:15-5:004:10-7:00
7:45-10:15
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:15-2:25- Thoroughbreds (R) 2:00-4:455:35-8:45
7:15-9:45
Black Panther in Disney Digital Annihilation (R) 7:00
3D (PG-13) 12:00-3:05-6:30-9:35 Gringo (R) 12:00-2:45-5:30-8:15
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:50Every Day (PG-13) 11:45-12:45
4:40-10:25
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 9:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
(PG-13) 11:30-2:15-5:05-7:50-10:40 12:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
Red Sparrow (R) 12:25-4:25Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
7:40-10:50
Experience (PG-13) 1:15-10:00
The Shape of Water (R) 1:45-7:30 A Wrinkle in Time: An IMAX 2D
Thoroughbreds (R) 12:05-2:30Experience (PG) 4:30-7:15
5:00-7:25-9:55
Regal Kingstowne
12 Strong (R) 12:40-9:50
Stadium 16 & RPX
Death Wish (R) 11:20-1:55-4:355910 Kingstowne Towne Center
7:20-10:10
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
Gringo (R) 10:45-1:25-4:20-7:05- 12:20-2:55-5:10-7:25-9:40
10:00
Black Panther (PG-13) 9:30-12:30Annihilation (R) 11:00-2:00-4:55- 1:15-2:45-3:30-4:30-6:00-6:458:00-10:55
7:30-9:15-10:00-10:30
Black Panther (PG-13) XD: 10:30- Black Panther in Disney Digital
12:45-1:40-4:05-4:50-7:10-7:55- 3D (PG-13) 2:00-5:05-8:00
10:20-11:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:40-3:55Ye Mantram Vesave (NR) 11:50- 6:10-8:40
2:50-6:05-9:25
Early Man (PG) 12:25-2:35Regal Ballston Common
4:50-7:15
Stadium 12
Red Sparrow (R) 12:15-3:20671 N. Glebe Road
6:25-9:35
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) Game Night (R) 12:40-3:15-5:402:20-4:50-7:15-9:50
8:05-10:30
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:30-2:15- The Shape of Water (R) 12:503:00-4:30-5:30-7:00-7:30-8:303:50-7:05
10:15-10:40
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 2:15Black Panther in Disney Digital 5:00-7:45
3D (PG-13) 6:15-9:30
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
The Greatest Showman (PG) 1:50- Digital 3D (PG) 10:30
4:40-7:20-10:00
Thoroughbreds (R) 2:05-4:35Fifty Shades Freed (R) 9:45
6:55-9:20
Red Sparrow (R) 1:45-5:15-8:45 Death Wish (R) 12:55-3:356:15-9:00
Early Man (PG) 1:15-3:40
Gringo (R) 12:45-3:40-6:20-9:05
The Shape of Water (R) 1:003:50-6:45
Annihilation (R) 9:50
Regal Manassas
Stadium 14 & IMAX
11380 Bulloch Drive
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
12:45-2:50-5:20-7:45-10:15
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:50-3:104:30-6:30-7:30-9:00-9:30
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 2:10-5:30-8:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
1:00-3:40-6:50-10:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 1:15-4:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:30-3:456:10-10:45
Red Sparrow (R) 1:00-4:10-7:1510:20
Game Night (R) 6:45-9:10
The Shape of Water (R) 12:403:30-6:15
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 5:408:15-10:50
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) 3:00
Death Wish (R) 1:50-5:00-7:40-10:30
Gringo (R) 2:10-5:15-8:00-10:40
Annihilation (R) 9:40
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) 1:154:20-7:20-9:50
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 3:50-10:10
A Wrinkle in Time: An IMAX 2D
Experience (PG) 1:10-7:00
Regal Potomac Yard
Stadium 16
3575 Potomac Avenue
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
12:00-1:10-3:20-5:40-8:05-10:20
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:40-1:202:00-3:45-4:25-5:05-6:50-7:258:10-9:55-10:30
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 12:00-3:05-6:10-9:15
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 10:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:30-2:50-5:107:30-9:50
Red Sparrow (R) 12:00-3:106:25-9:40
Game Night (R) 12:35-3:00-5:308:00-10:20
The Shape of Water (R) 12:203:50-6:55
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:0012:45-3:40-5:10-6:30-7:45-9:30
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) 2:35-10:20
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 12:25-3:35-6:35-9:20
Death Wish (R) 2:25-5:10-7:5010:30
Gringo (R) 1:25-4:15-7:05-9:45
The Metropolitan Opera: Semiramide ENCORE 1:00-6:30
Every Day (PG-13) 12:00
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
12:15-2:45-5:15-7:45-10:15
Regal
Springfield Town Center 12
6500 Springfield Town Center
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
11:20-1:40-4:40-7:10-9:30
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:1011:50-3:20-6:00-6:30-9:40
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 12:30-2:50-3:50-7:009:10-10:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:40-5:10-10:05
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:55-2:305:00-7:35
Red Sparrow (R) 12:00-3:156:25-9:35
Game Night (R) 2:40-5:20-7:5010:25
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:001:00-4:00-5:00-6:40-9:20-10:45
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) 2:00-7:45
Death Wish (R) 1:50-4:50-7:4010:20
Gringo (R) 1:15-4:30-7:30-10:30
Annihilation (R) 11:30-2:20-8:1010:50
Regal Virginia Gateway
Stadium 14 & RPX
8001 Gateway Promenade Place
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
12:55-3:15-5:45-8:05-10:15
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:00-1:304:00-4:30-7:00-7:30-10:00-10:30
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 3:30-6:30-9:30
The Greatest Showman (PG)
1:50-4:20-6:50
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:50
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 1:25-4:10
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:10-3:406:00-9:00
Red Sparrow (R) 1:05-4:05-7:0510:05
Game Night (R) 1:20-3:45-6:15-9:15
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 4:50-7:45
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) 2:15-10:20
Death Wish (R) 2:20-5:30-8:1510:50
Gringo (R) 2:10-5:15-8:00-10:40
Annihilation (R) 6:55-9:50
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) 2:005:00-7:50-10:45
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 9:45
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:153:50-6:45
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) 9:20
Smithsonian - Airbus
IMAX Theater
14390 Air and Space Museum Parkway
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
11:10-2:20
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 12:35
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
Seas 3D (NR) 10:20-1:30-3:10
Dream Big: Engineering Our
World: An IMAX 3D Experience
Please Call
Journey to Space 3D (NR)
12:00-4:00
A Wrinkle in Time: An IMAX 2D
Experience (PG) 4:35-6:45-8:55
University Mall Theatre
10659 Braddock Road
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 1:00-4:00-7:00-10:05
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) CC: 7:15-10:00
Coco (PG) CC: 12:15-4:45
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 12:052:20-4:35
The Post (PG-13) CC: 2:257:30-9:55
You know us for shopping, and now
Cars.com is the site for the entire life of your
car. So for every turn, turn to Cars.com.
C3748 6x3
C6
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
EZ
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
RE
PICKLES
C7
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
N-S VULNERABLE
NORTH
J432
A
Q842
KQJ3
EAST
Q 10 9 5
10 9 8 5 2
A
975
WEST (D)
A876
KQ73
J 10 9
82
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH
K
J64
K7653
A 10 6 4
The bidding:
WEST
NORTH
EAST
Pass
1
Pass
Pass
1
Pass
Pass
3
Pass
All Pass
Opening lead — K
SOUTH
1
3
5
CLASSIC PEANUTS
CHARLES SCHULZ
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
“Y
ou know,” Cy the Cynic
said to me in the club
lounge, “I can tell you a few
things about the virtues of
procrastination.”
“Go ahead,” I shrugged.
“We’ll discuss it later,” Cy
said.
Cy’s funeral will probably
start 10 minutes late to
honor his memory, but at
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
least he knows the value
of waiting to draw trumps.
When Cy was declarer at
today’s five diamonds, he
took the ace of hearts and
saw that he needed to play
the trumps for one loser. If
the missing trumps broke
2-2, fine, but if a defender
had the singleton ace, Cy
needed to make the first
lead through him.
At Trick Two, Cy led a
LIO
sneaky jack of spades from
dummy. His “fake finesse”
didn’t work. East’s queen
covered, and the Cynic’s king
lost to West. But then Cy
knew East had the ace of diamonds: West was a passed
hand and had shown the K-Q
of hearts plus an ace.
So Cy ruffed the spade
return, ruffed a heart in
dummy and returned a
trump. When East’s ace
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
appeared, the contract was
safe. Well done, Cy.
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
KJ64
K 7 6 5 3 A 10 6 4
Your partner opens one
spade, you respond two diamonds, he rebids two hearts
and you try 2NT. Partner then
bids three spades. What do
you say?
ANSWER: Partner’s auction BLONDIE
suggests six spades, four
hearts and extra strength.
If his values were minimum,
he would have rebid two
spades. His three spades
is forcing. Bid four spades,
which should be a better
spot than 3NT. Your singleton
king is adequate support.
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2018, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
C8
EZ
MUTTS
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
PATRICK McDONNELL
ZITS
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 14 , 2018
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
BIRTHDAY | MARCH 14
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
This year you meet
many different people
and expand your
circle of associates
and friends. If you are
single, you will have several
opportunities to change your
status, should you so choose.
Balancing your romantic life
with your work life will take
some skill. If you are attached,
the two of you most prefer to
be with each other. What is
key to your bond is scheduling
trips together. Aquarius
understands you well.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
Opportunity walks hand in
hand with the unexpected.
Excitement lingers in the
air. Observe a tendency to
go to extremes, but know
that everything will turn out
fine. Understand that nearly
anything is possible.
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
You might benefit from some
fast changes that stem from
someone of significance in
your life. Your ability to ask
for more time or attention is
enhanced by others’ goodwill
and caring attitudes.
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
Eye the long term before
saying “yes” to an offer. You
might wonder what would be
best to do before coming to a
decision. Your sense of humor
mixed with your high energy
defines your day.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
WEINGARTENS & CLARK
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
You might discover that some
swift changes occur with your
mood fluctuations. Open up to
the creative process. Solutions
appear that cause different
perspectives to emerge. A
positive attitude takes you
through many different twists
and turns.
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
Defer to someone else, and
you will greet positive results
with an unexpected twist. You
might enjoy the changeability
of your plans, interactions and
results. News from a distance
could help you move past any
barriers you encounter.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
Speak your mind, and
others will listen. You seem
to be unusually lucky at the
moment. You receive unique
information when someone
gives you feedback. Be positive
and try to internalize what is
being said.
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
You will want to understand
what is going on with a
loved one. This person could
shock you with his or her
actions or words. Know that
your finances might need a
second look. Ask an expert for
feedback, as you might need
to revise your budget.
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
Your strength and knowledge
are enhanced by the natural
ups and downs of the moment.
Consider yourself lucky. You
will see how everything falls
into place. Understand the
creativity that lies within you.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
Be more in touch with your
playful and creative traits
at the present moment. You
suddenly could feel as if you
have lost your footing, but
know that it will last only
a brief while. You must act
quickly to avoid interference.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
Be aware of what is happening
behind the scenes, and you
will be able to get the results
you want. A get-together with
friends makes you smile. Their
opinions confirm a decision of
yours. Be more direct in how
you express yourself.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
You flow naturally through the
ups and downs of the day. You
could be dismayed by what
emerges, at least until you
grasp the implications. Once
you digest what is going on,
you can use this information
to better your life. The
unexpected energizes you.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
Make what you desire a reality.
At the present moment, sit
back and do some research.
Some of you might want to
finalize your specific goals
and share them with others.
Be willing to discuss different
routes to achieve your desires.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2018, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C9
RE
Gallery guards say they face retaliation, indi≠erence
GUARDS FROM C1
guard who complained about a supervisor’s scheduling error was later
formally reprimanded by that supervisor; another was told that anyone
who speaks to the media could be
fired. One female guard who accused
a supervisor of inappropriate sexual
language found herself in a training
class led by her alleged harasser,
according to the officer and two
guards who corroborated her account. Van den Bogaard said he is
being targeted for a prior medical
condition that grew worse after a
year of standing on the hard floors.
He has asked his congressman to
intervene.
“The gallery does not tolerate retribution against an employee for
having raised concerns and has strict
policies in place to prohibit retaliation,” spokeswoman Anabeth Guthrie said.
Last summer, Dennis Hairston
sent an email to Wallace with the
subject line “Another Sleeper” and a
photograph of an investigator, a
higher-level member of the Protection Service division, asleep in the
Cascade Cafe. He copied five others,
including Director Earl “Rusty” Powell III. It was not the first time Hairston had reported sleeping supervisors, and he was frustrated that management didn’t address the problem,
he said. In January, Hairston was
suspended for three days without
pay for unprofessional conduct and
going outside the chain of command
for repeatedly emailing Powell instead of following appropriate channels. Hairston, who resigned last
month, said that in a meeting with
Office of Protection Services Assistant Chief Genia Reaves, he cited a
rule that permits officers to contact
the “most senior member of an organization” in certain circumstances.
Reaves disagreed with Hairston’s
reading of the rule. “The ‘most senior
member of an organization’ refers to
the most senior member of [the Office of Protection Services], Chief
Wallace,” Reaves wrote in the letter
to Hairston affirming his suspension. “Your interpretation that this
permits you to contact Mr. Powell
with workplace concerns is not reasonable.”
G
allery protection officers are the
public face of the National Gallery of Art. Standing in the
galleries, they direct visitors to exhibitions, restrooms and restaurants
while warning them away from the
priceless artwork. Many guards say
these interactions are the highlight
of the job.
Overall, the guards describe a
stratified, uncomfortable environment with a highly paid and predominantly white senior management
team and a security force that is
mostly minority.
Although most of its employees
are federal workers, the National
Gallery of Art is not a federal institution. In 1936, financier Andrew Mellon offered to give the country his art
collection and money to build a museum to house it. His gift was accepted by Congress, and in 1941 the museum opened on the Mall. It operates
as a private nonprofit organization,
raising money from private donors
to supplement its federal appropriation. The Smithsonian Institution is
a similar private-public hybrid.
The museum’s hybrid structure
creates tensions in the workforce,
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
“There are two sets of rules — rules for them and rules for us,” one member of the National Gallery’s protection staff said of administrators.
according to several employees.
While 82 percent are federal employees — hired and paid according to
federal guidelines — the remaining
employees are paid with private
funds and therefore aren’t constrained by federal rules. Museum
executives throughout the country
earn significantly more than federal
employees, and by using private
funds to pay their salaries, the gallery
is able to hire outside the government restrictions.
The guards are federal employees,
and their average salary was $47,076
in 2016, according to FederalPay, an
independent service that tracks federal employment. The average salary
of all the gallery’s federal employees
was $76,500, according to FederalPay. The protection department’s
leaders, Wallace and Reaves, both
African American, are federal employees, too, and Wallace is among
the museum’s 100 highest-paid federal workers. He earned $169,522 in
2016.
In comparison, the gallery’s top
five earners each made significantly
more than the U.S. president. Their
average salary in 2016 was $697,185,
according to the museum’s tax filings. The salaries are comparable to
those of senior executives at other art
museums.
Several guards say the socioeconomic disparity exacerbates the
power dynamic. “Most of the guards
are trying to [support] their families,” said Clifton Leach, who worked
as a National Gallery guard for seven
years. “When they come to the point
of losing a job because they stand up,
they lay down.”
Raynard Forte resigned in October after nine years, saying the job
had no upward mobility. “I’ve seen
Rusty Powell on many occasions,”
Forte said. “He does not talk to
guards. He’ll walk right past you. It’s
cultural.”
A member of the protection staff
who said the gallery was run by
“good old boys” said that “there are
two sets of rules — rules for them and
rules for us.”
The four highest-paid executives
are men, while 19 of the 37 senior
leaders are women, according to
Guthrie.
W
orkplace concerns are not
limited to the guards, according to documents and
interviews with staffers, most of
whom requested anonymity for fear
of retaliation. More than a dozen
employees — including guards, retail
workers and others — have filed discrimination lawsuits against the museum in the past 15 years; some cases
were dropped, and some were settled. In addition, the most recent
federal employee survey revealed
museum-wide complaints regarding
merit-based promotions and policies
for improving diversity and preventing favoritism. Last year, just 43 percent of gallery employees who completed the survey agreed that “senior
leaders generate high levels of motivation and commitment.”
In 2017, gallery employees reported 17 incidents to the federal Equal
Employment Opportunity Commission, of which five continued as formal complaints, according to Guthrie. Several employees told The
Washington Post that they think the
number would be higher but that
supervisors discourage them from
filing. That’s possible, said employment attorney Kevin E. Byrnes, who
represented a gallery worker in a
lawsuit against Powell. Although not
a federal employee, Powell was defended by an assistant U.S. attorney,
according to court documents.
“The government is supposed to
be the model employer under EEO
law, but the model is broken,” said
Byrnes, who emphasized the difficulty of winning these cases. “Current
federal employment law, and the
manner in which it is enforced, is
both a steeplechase and a minefield.
As an employee you have to clear all
the hurdles, and they have to clear
one.”
In the case of Hairston, the former
gallery guard who was suspended for
reporting a sleeping supervisor, division chief Wallace said an outside
investigator was brought in to review
the allegation. The case has been
closed, but the gallery would not
disclose its outcome.
“What the officers don’t see because of the chain of command is
that we do take action,” Wallace said,
speaking in general about his handling of internal complaints. “It
wouldn’t be appropriate for management to tell the officer how a supervisor is being treated.”
Guthrie said the protection division “is a formal law enforcement
environment” and chain of command “is of utmost importance for
reasons of safety and protocol.” She
listed other ways for employees to
register complaints, including a
whistleblower hotline and an alternative dispute resolution process.
“None of these processes include
contacting the director,” she said in
an email.
High turnover and chronic understaffing are other problems, the
guards say. The attrition rate for the
entire department, including armed
security officers and supervisors,
was 18 percent last year, according to
Guthrie. In comparison, the attrition
rate for the 700 security personnel at
the Smithsonian Institution was
10 percent, a Smithsonian spokeswoman said. Both guard forces are
paid according to the same federal
guidelines.
After a≠air with your ex,
forever hold your peace
Carolyn Hax is
away. The following first appeared
Oct. 8, 2003.
Carolyn
Hax
Dear Carolyn: I
dated a girl who
had some major
problems, but I fell
in love with the
best in her and put a lot of effort
into the relationship. Eventually
we broke up, and within a few
months she was living with the
guy she had dated before me. She
quickly became unhappy with
him and made overtures to
reconcile with me — do you detect
a pattern?
At first I was receptive, and
allowed her to stay with me when
he was out of town, but grew
suspicious when she wouldn’t
move out of his home.
She gave a variety of excuses
that didn’t ring true. This went on
for months; she even lied to her
own mother to go away with me.
Finally I couldn’t stomach her
lack of integrity any longer and
stopped seeing her. She’s now
engaged to the guy she repeatedly
and enthusiastically cheated on.
I’m not surprised, because she
was desperate to settle down and
he’s probably as blind to her faults
as I was.
Should I tell him the truth
peggy.mcglone@washpost.com
MARGARET SULLIVAN
Less is more when it
comes to Trump coverage
about his trifling fiancee? I’d want
him to tell me.
— J.T.
SULLIVAN FROM C1
J.T.: If he’s “as blind to her faults”
as you were, then he knows
exactly what they are.
You not only knew; you were
complicit! You just told yourself
. . . actually, I don’t know what
line you used, but “for months”
you worked to keep her despite
the [mutual] moral decay.
Assume her fiance feels the
same way and stay out of it. His
bride sounds bad enough; the last
thing he needs is for the guy she
used to cheat with to come
galloping in to save him.
Dear Carolyn: I’m 25, a guy and a
virgin. It’s not that I don’t put a
very high premium on sex — I
actually think real and complete
intimacy with a woman is one of
the best things in life — but sex
isn’t something I want to share
with a lot of women.
I want to wait until I’m
married, or at least on the way
there. It’s not out of prudishness
or discomfort with sex but
precisely because I place such a
high value on it that I want to
wait.
My problem is that I don’t seem
to meet any women who feel the
same way, and I’m beginning to
To supplement the force, the National Gallery hired an outside security firm from late 2016, when it
reopened its renovated East Building, until January. Despite the added
staff, the guards say, their supervisors threatened them with loss of pay
if they did not report to work on
Thanksgiving and the day after. Even
those with a doctor’s note (a requirement of their collective-bargaining
agreement) were docked, according
to two employees.
Van den Bogaard, the 65-year-old
Army veteran, said he has filed the
required doctor’s forms for a lightduty post for half the workday but
instead his supervisors have sent
him home most days after four
hours, requiring him to use his leave
time until it ran out. He has not had a
full salary for weeks.
“The paperwork was approved by
HR. Everyone knows about it,” said
Van den Bogaard, who was honored
last year with a customer service
award. “This is not how you treat a
veteran.”
Van den Bogaard asked his congressman, Virginia Democrat Gerald
E. Connolly, to intervene.
“I am very concerned that a person
who has honorably served our country for 15 years in the U.S. Army,
including tours of duty in Kosovo
and Baghdad, has been unable to
have his reasonable accommodation
request approved by the National
Gallery of Art,” Connolly said in a
statement to The Post. “I call upon
the National Gallery to do the right
thing and grant this reasonable request.”
Guthrie explained that there are a
limited number of seated posts and
that they are assigned in the order
they are requested.
“The essential feature of the job is
to stand; that’s what it is,” she said.
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
wonder if there are any anymore.
I’ve met virgins, but they tend to
think of sex as a terrible sin or,
what’s worse, they tend to be
unspeakably boring (they’ve got
no FIRE).
Have I just painted myself into
a totally unreasonable corner
here? How can I figure out what
to give up?
— New York, N.Y.
New York, N.Y.: Two ideas that
strike me as easy ones to give up:
that the virgins you know can
speak for the ones you don’t —
and that virgins are the only
women who put a high value on
sex and intimacy.
There is no shortage of people
who share your conclusion on
this; some of them just made
different choices en route and
arrived there by roads different
from yours.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her column
delivered to your inbox each morning
at wapo.st/haxpost.
Coakley of Massachusetts in
2010, for example, was carried
live on some networks.
But for Trump, free TV time is
not only pure political gold but
also an opportunity to insult, to
abuse and to spread falsehoods.
On Saturday, he worked an
appalling slam of the moderator
of NBC’s “Meet the Press” into
the rally.
“Sleepy eyes Chuck Todd, he’s
a sleeping son of a bitch,” said
the president of the United
States. Trump also called for
executing drug dealers and
falsely claimed that 52 percent
of women voted for him — it
was actually 52 percent of white
women, according to exit polls.
There’s no question that
Trump’s newsworthy statements
at a campaign rally should be
covered in some form. That’s a
journalistic imperative —
although he often reverses his
public statements with little
explanation, as he did recently
in first supporting gun-control
measures and then acceding to
the National Rifle Association’s
wishes by backing down.
But covering him doesn’t have
to mean broadcasting him live
for more than an hour. That’s
nothing but an unearned gift to
his 2020 reelection campaign —
the planned slogan of which
(“Keep America Great!”) he
talked about at the rally.
Another TV executive, Les
Moonves of CBS, infamously
said during the presidential
campaign that, because of
swelling ad dollars, Trump’s
ascendancy “may not be good
for America, but it’s damn good
for CBS.”
That profits-above-all line of
thinking clearly is alive and
well.
Yes, the president’s
statements at a campaign rally,
or elsewhere, may be
newsworthy. They should be
reported on, fact-checked and
put in context — not aired in
their self-serving entirety as
though he were a dictator with
control over the state airwaves.
We’ve already seen that
episode and it didn’t end well.
An antiwar protest song
wondered, “When will they ever
learn?” The answer, apparently,
is “never.”
margaret.sullivan@washpost.com
For more by Margaret Sullivan visit
wapo.st/sullivan
C10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 14 , 2018
kidspost
CHIP SAYS
TODAY
KIDSPOST.COM
It takes more than a needle and thread to hold
together a NASA parachute. Each parachute is
handcrafted on sewing machines that use Kevlar
thread — a high-strength material similar to steel.
Winds are still going to be gusty and
clouds will often block the sun,
making it a very chilly day.
Watch a video of a
recent test of the 2020
rover parachute in the
Web version of this story.
ILLUSTRATION BY AMBER YANG, 9, BURKE
From craft store to
spacecraft: Nylon will
help us land on Mars
IMAGES FROM NASA/JPL-CALTECH
BY
H AU C HU
I
magine your body floating
weightlessly through space
— a slight push and pull
would allow you to easily
change speed and direction.
Now, imagine having to send a
7,300-pound spacecraft racing
through Mars’s atmosphere at
12,000 miles per hour. How would
you safely land it on the Red Planet?
It turns out, with a lot of trial
and error involving basic materials, such as nylon, that you can
find in a fabric store.
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
ACROSS
1 Flow back
4 “Get outta
here!”
10 Column in a
pugilist’s record
14 Congressional
auditing org.
15 Rhine wine
region
16 Stable parent
17 Door-to-door
seller’s form
19 Very smart
20 Gosling of
“Blade Runner
2049”
21 Tupperware
sound
23 Jeans label
24 Nightly TV
staple
25 Do some bargain-hunting
28 Where K-I-S-S-IN-G goes on
30 Hold the floor
31 Fabled beast
32 Brad Paisley
venue
34 Copycat
35 Text with maps
and timelines
39 Org. in Dan
Brown’s “Digital
Fortress”
40 Temps
41 “There’s an __
for that”
44 Figures on a
sports news
crawl
47 Input, as
accidentally
erased data
49 Residential
get-together
53 Aviation prefix
54 Pop __
55 Mongolia locale
56 Camp Lejeune
gp.
57 Losing
proposition
59 Game with
ringers
63 Burden
64 Smart people?
65 NBC skit show
66 2016 #1 hit for
Rihanna, which
can precede
both parts of
17-, 25-, 35-, 49and 59-Across
“A lot of the times when we fail
our parachutes [during testing],
they failed spectacularly. I mean,
it’s like you’re creating a confetti
machine of nylon,” said Ian Clark,
a NASA investigator in charge of
testing Martian conditions.
“Most of the material of the
parachute is kind of very thin stuff
— it’s very lightweight nylon — not
too dissimilar from what your
camping tent is made out of, but
actually somewhat lighter than
even that. You know, the stuff that
you could almost go into a Jo-Ann
Fabrics and buy in rolls.”
Clark’s team is part of the Advanced Supersonic Parachute Inflation Research Experiment, ASPIRE, a project within NASA’s Mars
2020 mission to search for evidence of ancient life on Mars and
store it for later return to Earth.
The main goal of ASPIRE is to
make sure the rover is able to
successfully land on the Martian
surface. The Curiosity rover that
NASA landed on Mars in 2012
weighed less than the 2020 rover,
so the team has to account for the
heavier vehicle. The key improvement to the upcoming mission is
ABOVE: Parachute
testing for the Mars 2012
rover. A lot of the
material used for the
parachute is fabric like
what you can buy in a
store, according to the
Advanced Supersonic
Parachute Inflation
Research Experiment
project team. RIGHT:
Proposed instructions
for landing on Mars.
ensuring the nylon on the parachute is stronger and lighter.
Rocket and jet propulsion carries the rover most of the way, but
the final drift onto the surface
requires a parachute to cut
through the challenging atmosphere of Mars.
ASPIRE scientists test their
rockets at a NASA facility in Wallops Island, Virginia. After collecting data and making adjustments
from a November 2017 trial run,
the team is getting ready for its
next test, scheduled for March 27.
In the test, a rocket is launched
over the Atlantic Ocean, and a
vehicle containing the parachute
and other measuring tools detaches from the rocket. The parachute
opens to slow down this vehicle as
it approaches the landing spot.
While there is not an actual rover
onboard the test vehicle, it matches the mass of the final product.
The team then recovers the scientific instruments from the
ocean and inspect the parachute.
“We look over every square inch
of the parachute. We want to see:
Were stitches beginning to fail?
Were some of the stitches popping?” Clark said. “Kind of like
you’ve seen stitches failing on your
jeans or T-shirt.”
If too many stitches fail, the
team tries to figure out what went
wrong. Problems could vary from
the stitching process to a flaw in
how the parachute opens.
While ASPIRE aims to produce
a working parachute, Clark said
the team is working on creating
the ideal test for the parachute
because there are still two test
launches to come.
One challenge with testing a
parachute on Earth is that the
speed of sound here is faster than
on our neighboring planet. Sound
causes drag, or resistance, on objects in flight. And scientists don’t
have a way to slow down sound.
“At Mars, it’s about [705 to 720
feet] per second. And at Earth, it’s
about [1,082 feet] per second — so
it’s almost 50 percent faster at
Earth,” Clark said.
So what does that mean when
the parachute is tested?
“It means it’s probably going to
actually inflate faster at Earth
than it would at Mars, and it could
be more stressing,” he said. “But
not so [much] more stressing that
we think it’s not a good test to do
anyway.”
kidspost@washpost.com
By Robin Stears
So you’re not going to quit smoking?
Then maybe quit being so judgmental.
Miss
Manners
© 2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
67 More sinewy
68 Farm area
DOWN
1 Cause of star
wars?
2 Scrubby
wastelands
3 Fragrant
shower gel
4 Setting for most
of “Charlotte’s
Web”
5 Overhead
trains
6 Volcanic __
7 Billy Blanks’
workout system
8 Become frozen
9 Aquarium fish
10 SHO sister
channel
11 Liqueur in
an espresso
martini
12 Point in the
right direction
13 Formally
withdraw
18 Point in the
right direction?
22 Ask for a hand?
24 “Empire”
actress Long
3/14/18
25 Nasal dividers
26 Deli option
27 Cookie with a
Peeps variety
29 Antarctic waters
33 Many mos.
34 “__ Road”:
Beatles album
36 QB’s mistakes
37 Mongolian tent
38 London-born
supermodel
42 Word of
interest?
43 Quid __ quo
44 Omen on
February 2
45 “Starsky &
Hutch” Ford
model
46 Highbrow
filmmaker
48 The “N”
of CSNY
50 “Get outta
here!”
51 Garlic
mayonnaise
52 Worth more
to collectors
56 KGB country
58 “Naughty,
naughty!”
60 __-fi
61 Squeeze (by)
62 Plotting
Dear Miss
Manners: When,
if ever, did
someone decide it
JUDITH
is appropriate to
MARTIN,
approach another
NICHOLAS
MARTIN AND
person and ask for
JACOBINA
an item they own?
MARTIN
I know the
dangers of
smoking; everyone does. The gall
of these people makes me want
to give them one cigarette, just to
shorten their life a little. Am I
wrong resenting them, or can
they just go on smoking without
buying?
Asking for a cigarette and
asking for your car are not
morally equivalent — unless the
request is accompanied by the
threat of force in case of
noncompliance.
The difference is not only in
the value of the requested item
but in the implication that it is
incidental to a social interaction,
such as huddling together in the
cold, 15 feet from the building
entrance. This means that
“bumming a cigarette” as you
run down the street would,
indeed, be wrong.
But even allowable requests
can be politely refused. What
puzzles Miss Manners about
your attitude is that you, too,
must be a smoker, or you would
not have a cigarette to bestow or
withhold. Given the animosity
that nonsmokers now routinely
show to smokers, Miss Manners
would have thought that some
tolerance within the group
would be a good investment.
Dear Miss Manners: My son is
about to become a bar mitzvah,
so I sat with him to start the
process of writing thank-you
notes. He’s received only a few
gifts so far, but I imagine he will
get many, many more (we are
anticipating just under 100
guests).
The one note that he managed
to finish took a really long time
and had to be redone twice. His
handwriting is not stellar, so he
has to write very slowly to make
it legible. How I wish, at times
like this, that they still stressed
penmanship in schools and
didn’t rely so strongly on
computers!
He said, “Wow, wish I could
type these. Mom, why can’t I just
type them?” Thus my question:
How strong a breach of etiquette
would it be for him to type the
notes and then sign them by
hand? I was always taught that a
handwritten thank-you note is
the only way to go about these
things, but in this case it will
take forever!
Should I just lay down the
mom-whammy and make him
write them all, or is a typed note
an acceptable option?
Gratitude should expand (or
contract) with the guest list:
Your son’s debt to thank each
guest is independent of how
many stamps you will need to
purchase — or how much time it
will take him to pen the notes.
Handwritten letters of thanks
are a way of reciprocating the
effort that guests took. So, yes,
Miss Manners would advise your
son to get to work. It is a valuable
lesson for a young adult. The
letters will get easier with
practice.
New Miss Manners columns are
posted Monday through Saturday on
washingtonpost.com/advice. You can
send questions to Miss Manners at
her website, missmanners.com.
© 2018, by Judith Martin
TUESDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
Home delivery is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
KLMNO
SPORTS
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14 , 2018
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
Cousins is expected
to sign with Vikings
Free agent will get
three-year deal for
more than $80 million
AND
BY M ARK M ASKE
K IMBERLEY A . M ARTIN
Free agent quarterback Kirk
Cousins is making arrangements
to visit the Minnesota Vikings on
Wednesday and Thursday and is
expected to complete a three-year
deal with them worth an estimated $84 million to $86 million,
according to multiple people fa-
Redskins grab a WR
but lose CB Breeland
miliar with the deliberations.
Cousins’s contract with the Vikings would be fully or nearly fully
guaranteed, one of those people
said, speaking on the condition of
anonymity because under NFL
rules teams cannot complete contracts with free agent players before Wednesday afternoon.
The Vikings have long been
considered the favorite to land
Cousins, the top free agent quarterback on the market, but the
New York Jets had also expressed
interest in the former Washington
Richardson will give
QB Smith another option;
defensive backfield in flux
BY K AREEM C OPELAND
AND K IMBERLEY A . M ARTIN
COUSINS CONTINUED ON D3
JONATHAN FERREY/GETTY IMAGES
Day of deals: TE Jimmy Graham to
Packers, WR Jordy Nelson cut. D4
D
M2
Former Seattle wide receiver Paul Richardson had 44 receptions
for 703 yards and six touchdowns in 2017, all career highs.
The Washington Redskins
stepped up their efforts to address
key roster needs Tuesday, filling
one of them by agreeing to a contract with former Seattle Seahawks wide receiver Paul Richardson. The contract, when signed,
will be for five years and $40 mil-
lion (with $20 million guaranteed), according to a person familiar with the discussions.
Washington also made overtures to defensive back Dominique
Rodgers-Cromartie and defensive
lineman Muhammad Wilkerson,
both of whom met with coaches
Tuesday after Wilkerson spent
Monday dining with team personnel. On Tuesday night, multiple
reports indicated Wilkerson had
agreed to a deal with the Green Bay
Packers, but Rodgers-Cromartie
remained on the market.
The Redskins also said goodbye
to 2014 fourth-round pick
Bashaud Breeland. The cornerREDSKINS CONTINUED ON D3
Phils add
Arrieta,
and a layer
of intrigue
Virginia’s
Hunter out
with injury
to wrist
High-profile acquisition
shows Philadelphia is
accelerating its rebuild
Versatile swingman,
ACC’s top sixth man,
will miss NCAA tourney
BY
D AVE S HEININ
BY
clearwater, fla. — The skies
are never sunnier for a baseball
team, the future never more limitless, than when the Big Free Agent
Acquisition, dozens of television
cameras and microphones pointed at him, rises from a chair and is
helped into his new, freshly
pressed jersey by the Grateful
General Manager. The fact this
ceremony typically takes place up
north in the dead of winter, the
heater humming in the background, the room strewn with
heavy coats, only heightens the
sense of imagination.
But when the Philadelphia
Phillies unveiled new ace Jake
Arrieta on Tuesday, the big moment came along the sunny Gulf
Coast of Florida, nearly a month
into spring training, 16 days from
Opening Day — a reality that added another layer of intrigue and
altered the typical atmosphere of
these ceremonies, turning parts of
Arrieta’s introduction into something more resembling a pep rally.
For one thing, some 12 to 15
uniformed Phillies players, biding
the time before their daily workout, crowded into the back of the
room in a show of support for
their newest teammate, and Arrieta was looking roughly in their
direction when he delivered the
most theatrical lines of the day:
“A message I want to send to not
only the players, but Philadelphia
in general and the entire Phillies
nation,” Arrieta, 32, said, “is that
what we’re going to do here is,
we’re going to promise a fight.
There’s no guarantee that you’re
going to feel good [each day] or
that you’re going to get a good
night’s sleep the night before. But
what we can promise is that we’re
going to have conviction, we’re
going to fight, and we’re going to
win at the end of the day.”
Though the Phillies players
somehow resisted the urge to
jump up, run through a wall and
go out and win another Grapefruit League game, it was clear the
Arrieta signing — for a three-year
contract worth a guaranteed
$75 million, plus options and escalators that could take it to five
years and up to $125 million — has
energized a franchise that has
averaged 93 losses over the past
five seasons and went 66-96 as it
PHILLIES CONTINUED ON D6
PRO BASKETBALL
For Steve Kerr, whose
father was assassinated,
gun debate is personal. D2
HOCKEY
Goalie Philipp Grubauer is
making a strong case to
be the Capitals’ starter. D3
The Virginia men’s basketball
team will be without ACC sixth
man of the year De’Andre Hunter
for the NCAA tournament after
the 6-foot-7 guard-forward broke
his left wrist, Coach Tony Bennett
announced Tuesday, dealing a
severe blow to the Cavaliers’
national championship aspirations.
The news came just three days
before Virginia, the No. 1 overall
seed in the NCAA tournament in
the South Region, plays No. 16
seed Maryland Baltimore County
on Friday night in Charlotte.
Hunter, the Cavaliers’ fourthleading scorer (9.2 points per
game), is scheduled to have surgery Monday and is expected to
be out 10 to 12 weeks.
A statement released by the
athletic department indicated
the injury happened during last
week’s ACC tournament in New
York. Virginia (31-2) captured its
second ACC tournament title in
three years by beating North
Carolina, 71-63, in the championship game Saturday night at
Barclays Center.
VIRGINIA CONTINUED ON D4
NCAA tournament
South Region, Charlotte
Virginia vs. UMBC, Friday, 9:20, TNT
UCLA out: St. Bonaventure,
Radford move on to round of 64. D5
Talented
but troubled,
Arizona is in
the spotlight
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Ian Mahinmi couldn’t do much as the Timberwolves’ Karl-Anthony Towns lined up a back-breaking three-pointer.
BY
T IM B ONTEMPS
las vegas — When Sean Miller
Wizards melt down late
BY
C ANDACE B UCKNER
A team cannot live on shots alone.
The Washington Wizards learned this
sacred principle — again — after forsaking the defensive commandments
Tuesday night against the Minnesota
Timberwolves.
The Wizards entered the final quarter with an eight-point lead. But as
their shots stopped falling, they could
not keep the Wolves from getting to
the rim or defend Minnesota’s deep
shots from the perimeter. And especially, they could not contain center
Karl-Anthony Towns.
Towns scored a game-high 37
points, including a corner three-
TIMBERWOLVES 116,
WIZARDS 111
Minnesota all-star Towns
dominates with 37 points
pointer as the shot clock was winding
down in the final 30 seconds that all
but sealed a 116-111 win in Capital One
Arena.
“We got to get stops, and we’ve got
to stop worrying about scoring,”
Coach Scott Brooks said, echoing familiar words from earlier in the sea-
BASEBALL
Barry Svrluga on the
disintegrating state of the
MLB labor situation. D6
G ENE W ANG
Wizards at Celtics | Today, 8 p.m., ESPN
son. Recently, this complaint has resurfaced over the past week.
Although a late replay review gave
the Wizards possession as they trailed
by three with 15.3 seconds remaining,
Towns showed that he’s more than
just a scorer. He succeeded where the
Wizards could not — on the defensive
end.
On the key play, Bradley Beal
caught the inbounds pass near the
baseline, then attracted the attention
of the suffocating 7-foot center. With
Towns standing as close as a dance
partner, Beal made an errant pass to
Tomas Satoransky that was intercepted by Jeff Teague.
WIZARDS CONTINUED ON D4
was hired to take over the Arizona men’s basketball program in
2009, the move was supposed to
bring stability — and a return to
prominence — for one of the most
successful programs in the sport.
For a time, it did just that. After
the final years of Hall of Famer
Lute Olson’s tenure in Tucson
were defined by his health problems and the multiple interim
coaches who took turns replacing
him, Miller quickly turned things
around, taking the Wildcats to
the Elite Eight in 2011 and reaching the second weekend of the
NCAA tournament in five of his
first eight seasons.
But chaos returned to the program over the past year. Miller
briefly left the team after ESPN
reported there was an FBI wiretap of him discussing a $100,000
payment to ensure Deandre Ayton — the team’s star freshman
center and the potential No. 1
pick in this year’s NBA draft —
would come to Arizona. Also, star
guard Allonzo Trier was ruled
ineligible by the NCAA after a
ARIZONA CONTINUED ON D5
D2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 14 , 2018
washingtonpost.com/sports
FANCY STATS
PRO BASKETBALL
SOCCER INSIDER
Looking for
Cinderella?
Target the
10s and 11s.
BY
United
could set
dubious
MLS mark
N EIL G REENBERG
BY
The conventional wisdom
among those who enter NCAA
tournament bracket pools is if
you are looking for an upset in the
round of 64, pick one of the No. 12
seeds to knock off a No. 5. Since
1985, when the tournament expanded to 64 teams, No. 5 seeds
have been upset 47 times in 132
games, so that line of thinking by
bracket pool pickers is justified.
However, this year it could be the
No. 10 and No. 11 seeds that bust
brackets the best.
According to the most recent
Pomeroy rankings, which consistently have been one of the best
metrics at predicting future wins
this season, the average No. 12
seed in this year’s tournament is
expected to outscore an average
team by 13.1 net points per 100
possessions. The No. 10 and No. 11
seeds, by comparison, would be
expected to outscore opponents
by 14.7 and 15.4 net points per 100
possessions, respectively.
That becomes more important
once you look at those teams’
first-round opponents. The average No. 5 seed has an adjusted net
efficiency rating of 21.3, which
means that on a neutral court, the
No. 5 seed would be 8.2 net points
per 100 possessions (21.3 minus
13.1) better than the No. 12 seed,
implying a 72 percent win probability for the No. 5 seed. The
average No. 6 seed has an average
rating of just 17.1, which, when
compared to a No. 11 seed, gives
them an implied win probability
of 53 percent. The No. 7 seeds
have an average rating of 17.8,
which, when compared to a No. 10
seed, gives them an implied win
probability of 57 percent. Those
last two are basically coin flips,
which can pay off big in larger
bracket pools.
According to the Data-Assisted
Victory Detector (DAViD) tool,
No. 10 seed Butler is the most
likely double-digit seed to advance past its round-of-64 matchup, followed by No. 10 Oklahoma
and No. 11 Loyola Chicago.
BEN MARGOT/ASSOCIATED PRESS
“I know what it feels like. I know how it feels,” Steve Kerr told a group of high school students in regard to gun violence.
For Kerr, gun debate is personal
BY
T IM B ONTEMPS
newark, calif. — Most people —
including the several hundred who filled
a gymnasium in this sleepy Northern
California suburb Monday afternoon —
know Steve Kerr as the two-time
champion coach of the Golden State
Warriors, the latest role in his threedecade
career
in
professional
basketball.
But when Kerr took the microphone
at Newark Memorial High as part of a
town-hall-style event held in the wake of
the recent shooting at Marjory
Stoneman Douglas High in Parkland,
Fla., he stood before the group featuring
students from several area high schools
as something else: a victim of gun
violence.
“I know what it feels like,” Kerr said. “I
know how it feels.”
Kerr’s
father,
Malcolm,
was
assassinated on Jan. 18, 1984, targeted
because he was president of the
American University of Beirut.
Kerr was 18 at the time, a freshman at
the University of Arizona, not much
older than the students he was
addressing Monday in the event held by
Rep. Ro Khanna (D-Calif.). While Kerr
has made it clear he is willing to speak
out about various issues in society, his
feelings about gun violence come from a
very personal place.
“I know how the Parkland families
feel, or the Aurora families, or Sandy
Hook,” he said, referencing other recent
mass shootings. “I met with some of the
families from the Las Vegas shooting. . . .
It’s awful. It’s devastating. It’s horrible.
“This is pretty simple: Let’s see if we
can do something about it. Let’s save
some lives.”
It was that desire to save lives, to enact
change, that led Kerr to speak at
Monday’s event. He was there because of
a chance meeting with Khanna while the
Warriors were in Washington two weeks
ago. Khanna is friends with Warriors
assistant coach Ron Adams and was
having dinner with Adams and his wife
when Kerr came over to say hello.
neil.greenberg@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/news/fancystats
QUOTABLE
“I am deeply sorry for
what happened. I had
absolutely no right to
enter the pitch the way I
did.”
IVAN SAVVIDIS,
owner of Greek soccer team PAOK,
who apologized Tuesday after he
stormed the field Sunday armed with
a holstered handgun to protest a
disallowed goal. (Via Early Lead)
Khanna brought up the idea of having
Kerr come to a town hall with students,
and Kerr agreed. When he checked in the
following day, arrangements were made.
Kerr, Khanna and Matt Deitsch, a 20year-old graduate of Stoneman Douglas
whose younger brother and sister
survived last month’s shooting that
killed 17 people, spoke for more than an
hour on gun violence.
“One person wrote in, saying, ‘What
expertise does Coach Kerr have on gun
violence?’ ” Khanna said. “Another cynic,
when they saw Matt Deitsch, said, ‘What
expertise do these young folks have
about gun violence?’
“I have a question for those folks: Who
are these experts? Because, as far as I’m
concerned, these experts don’t really
know what they are talking about when
we have mass shooting after mass
shooting and nothing changes.”
Kerr clearly feels the same way.
“I’m here because I’m a citizen of this
country,” Kerr said, “and we live in a
democracy. I feel like it’s my
responsibility to speak on some of the
things happening in the world today.”
The three men took questions from
the audience, answering queries about
everything from whether teachers
should be armed in classrooms to why
the horrific amount of gun violence in
Chicago doesn’t get as much attention as
it should to what the NBA as a whole will
do to combat the issue. The NBA has
made inroads: Miami Heat star Dwyane
Wade and his wife, actress Gabrielle
Union, donated $200,000 so inner-city
children could attend the March for Our
Lives in Washington. Kerr said he would
also be marching in the March 24 event
scheduled in San Francisco.
Deitsch was a powerful speaker,
seemingly having a data point at the
ready for every possible question that
was thrown the panel’s way. While Kerr
declined to say much to reporters
afterward, he did say, “Matt was the
man.”
“I don’t represent Congress,” Deitsch
said. “I don’t represent one of the most
stacked teams in NBA history. I’m here
to represent 17 people who died.”
Rep. Mike Thompson (D-Calif.), who
represents nearby Yountville — where a
veteran took three women hostage and
later killed them last week — also spoke
to the crowd.
But Kerr, of course, was the main
attraction. He granted every request for
a hug or a picture, and he was mobbed as
he tried to leave, taking a solid 10
minutes to exit the court as he chatted
with students and signed items for them.
He also took advantage of their rapt
attention by repeatedly imploring to
them to carry forward the momentum
he said he feels among the youth of
today, which Kerr said has changed the
paradigm of the debate.
He compared it to the way the young
people of the 1960s and ’70s rose up
against the Vietnam War, saying that
youthful energy can truly lead to change.
“Since then, I haven’t felt that same
passion,” Kerr said. “But it’s happening.
You guys have a responsibility to keep
that going.”
It’s the same responsibility that Kerr
feels that leads him to repeatedly speak
out on the issue. His life has been shaped
by gun violence. His hope is he can
prevent that from happening to
someone else.
“I don’t care if you’re conservative or
liberal or Democrat or Republican,” Kerr
said. “There are plenty of worthy issues
to discuss.
“But kids getting murdered in high
school and murdered by semiautomatic
weapons, weapons that belong in the
military . . . that should not be open to
debate.”
tim.bontemps@washpost.com
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/
sports
On Sunday, D.C. United played
in front of the largest crowd for a
stand-alone match in MLS history.
This Saturday, United might
perform before the smallest audience in the league’s 23 seasons.
By choosing to play one of two
off-site home games at Maryland
SoccerPlex while Audi Field is under construction, United was assured of a small audience against
the Houston Dynamo. (The Montgomery County venue holds about
5,000.)
But because it’s not part of the
season ticket package and individual sales are slow, the match is
threatening to break the league
mark of 3,702, set by defunct Chivas USA four years ago. No official
data was available, but multiple
people familiar with the situation
said this week that, barring a late
surge, final attendance would
probably end up between 3,000
and 3,500.
Such a figure would be more
than 20 times smaller than the
sellout crowd of 72,035 at Mercedes-Benz Stadium on Sunday
for United’s 3-1 defeat to Atlanta.
While the D.C. organization has
focused on Audi Field, a 20,000capacity stadium scheduled to
open July 14 two blocks from Nationals Park, the front office has
put little marketing efforts into
Saturday’s match and the April 14
game against the Columbus Crew
at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial
Stadium. Ticket sales for the Annapolis date are also sputtering,
one person said. (Data was not
available.)
United officials did not want to
comment about the attendance
outlook for the two early home
matches. The team said it has sold
close to 10,000 season tickets to
Audi Field (most are full packages,
the rest are partials that equal
fulls) but didn’t include the first
two home dates in the packages
because of the distances that fans
would have to travel. SoccerPlex is
in Boyds, 30 miles northwest from
downtown Washington; Navy’s
stadium is 33 miles east. Both are
beyond the reach of Metro lines.
Audi Field season ticket holders were given first priority to
purchase seats. This weekend’s
match will kick off at 1:30 p.m.
Next month’s game will start at 7
p.m.
Small attendance figures would
stand out in the blossoming
league. The regular season average has eclipsed 20,000 in three
consecutive years, with a high of
22,113 in 2017. Atlanta and Seattle
were the runaway leaders last year
at 48,200 and 43,666 in NFL stadiums, respectively. Nine others,
based in medium-sized venues,
averaged more than 20,000. D.C.
was 16th out of 22 teams at 17,904.
FC Dallas was last at 15,122 —
which was about the league average 12 years ago.
steven.goff@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/dcsportsbog
D I G ES T
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Emanuel “Book” Richardson
Pacific-12 suggests end
of one-and-done rule
among those indicted on fraud
charges. . . .
Miami standout Bruce Brown
Jr.’s left foot is healing faster
than expected. Brown won’t play
in Thursday’s NCAA tournament
opener against Loyola Chicago,
but he will be in uniform, Coach
Jim Larranaga said. . . .
The Big East Conference
extended the contract of
Commissioner Val Ackerman
through June 2021.
A Pacific-12 Conference task
force on reforming college
basketball recommended an end
to the NBA’s one-and-done rule
and allowing players to return to
school after they’re drafted.
The Pac-12 announced the
recommendations from its task
force Tuesday, and its report was
sent to the NCAA’s commission
on college basketball. The report
could be a preview of the NCAA
commission’s work; former
Stanford and California coach
Mike Montgomery is a member
of both the Pac-12’s task force
and the NCAA’s commission.
NCAA President Mark Emmert
said the commission’s
recommendations to the board
of directors are expected in
April.
The Pac-12’s recommendations
hit on the major issues identified
by the NCAA where reform is
needed in the wake of a federal
investigation into corruption in
college basketball. Two Pac-12
schools have been in the middle
of the scandal, with Southern
California assistant Tony Bland
and former Arizona assistant
Warriors coach participates
on panel to talk about issue
that hits close to home
S TEVEN G OFF
TENNIS
Venus Williams defeated
Anastasija Sevastova, 7-6 (10-8),
6-4, to reach the quarterfinals of
the BNP Paribas Open in Indian
Wells, Calif.
The 37-year-old, the oldest
woman in the draw, was coming
off a straight-sets victory over
younger sister Serena a night
earlier, ending a three-match
skid against her sibling.
Simona Halep is on track to
retain her No. 1 world ranking
after defeating Wang Qiang, 7-5,
6-1, in the fourth round.
On the men’s side, Gael
Monfils retired in the second set
with a back injury while trailing
fellow Frenchman PierreHughes Herbert, 6-2, 3-1.
Herbert next faces Philipp
TELEVISION AND RADIO
NBA
8 p.m.
10:30 p.m.
TENNIS
Washington at Boston » ESPN, WFED (1500 AM)
Los Angeles Lakers at Golden State » ESPN
NHL
8 p.m.
Pittsburgh at New York Rangers » NBC Sports Network
MLB SPRING TRAINING
1 p.m.
4 p.m.
10 p.m.
New York Yankees at Baltimore » MASN, MLB Network
Cincinnati at Arizona » MLB Network
Colorado at Los Angeles Dodgers » MLB Network
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
6:40 p.m.
7 p.m.
8 p.m.
9 p.m.
9:10 p.m.
10 p.m.
SOCCER
Sevilla reached the
Champions League quarterfinals
for the first time by beating
Manchester United, 2-1, thanks
to second-half goals from
Wissam Ben Yedder in
Manchester, England.
The French striker scored in
the 74th minute with a low shot
from 12 meters, then sent in a
header off a corner that keeper
David De Gea could only parry
into his own net in the 78th.
That left United trailing by
two goals on aggregate. Romelu
Lukaku scored from close range
in the 84th, but a late rally
couldn’t prevent United from
being eliminated. . . .
Roma overcame a poor firsthalf performance to beat
Shakhtar Donetsk, 1-0, in Rome
to reach the quarterfinals of the
Champions League on the away
goals rule after a 2-2 aggregate
score. Edin Dzeko scored the
only goal of the match early in
the second half as Roma became
the second Italian side to
progress to the final eight,
joining Juventus. . . .
Major League Soccer and Liga
MX joined in a long-term
partnership that will launch
BNP Paribas Open: ATP round of 16, WTA quarterfinals » Tennis Channel
BNP Paribas Open: ATP round of 16, WTA quarterfinals » Tennis Channel
SOCCER
Noon
1 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
Ligue 1: Paris Saint-Germain vs. Angers » beIN Sports
UEFA Champions League: Besiktas vs. Bayern Munich » Fox Sports 2
UEFA Champions League: FC Barcelona vs. Chelsea » Fox Sports 1
MEN’S COLLEGE LACROSSE
6 p.m.
North Carolina at Richmond » NBC Sports Washington Plus
WOMEN’S COLLEGE LACROSSE
4 p.m.
NCAA, First Four: N.C. Central vs. Texas Southern » truTV, WTEM (980 AM)
NIT, first round: Harvard at Marquette » ESPN2
NIT, first round: Temple at Penn State » ESPNU
NIT, first round: Nebraska at Mississippi State » ESPN2
NCAA, First Four: Arizona State vs. Syracuse » truTV, WTEM (980 AM)
NIT, first round: BYU at Stanford » ESPNU
Kohlschreiber, who upset No. 2
seed Marin Cilic, 6-4, 6-4.
2 p.m.
10 p.m.
Drexel at Penn State » Big Ten Network
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
7 p.m.
Indiana at Kentucky » SEC Network
PARALYMPICS
2 p.m.
Paralympic Games: Sled hockey, curling » NBC Sports Network
later this year when MLS Cup
champion Toronto hosts the
champion from Mexico’s top
league. The match, dubbed the
Campeones Cup, is set for
Sept. 19 at Toronto’s BMO Field.
The Liga MX opponent will be
the winner of July’s Campeon de
Campeones match between the
Apertura champion Tigres
UANL and the Clausura
champion determined in May.
MISC.
Tiger Woods and Ernie Els
are the Presidents Cup captains
for the 2019 matches in
Australia. Still to be determined
is whether either plays. . . .
Heart disease caused longtime
USA Hockey executive Jim
Johannson’s death less than
three weeks before the
PyeongChang Olympics, an
autopsy found. . . .
Olympic women’s figure
skating silver medalist Evgenia
Medvedeva withdrew from the
world championships with a foot
injury. . . .
The No. 10 Navy women’s
lacrosse team got four goals
from Meg O’Donnell but lost,
19-16, to No. 6 Florida in
Gainesville, Fla. The
Midshipmen fell to 5-2.
— From news services
and staff reports
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
M2
Redskins set to add Richardson, will lose Breeland
Grubauer makes case
to remain starting goalie
REDSKINS FROM D1
BY
I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN
It was a sweet moment between teammates, a smiling
Braden Holtby skating over to
Philipp Grubauer, standing in
front of his net. To celebrate
Grubauer’s shutout in San Jose
on Saturday, the Capitals’ first in
regulation this season, Holtby
kissed Grubauer on the mask, a
show of support from one member of Washington’s goaltending
tandem to the other. They’re
teammates first and foremost,
but internal competition exists,
and after three-plus years without any for the Capitals’ cage,
there’s some mystery as to who
will be the team’s top goaltender
going forward.
Since Coach Barry Trotz handed the net over to Grubauer in
what was billed as a “reset” period for Holtby, Grubauer has allowed just four goals in three
games, the first time he’s had
three straight starts since the
2013-14 season. He has saved 76
of the 80 shots he’s faced as
Washington
recorded
wins
against two postseason-bound
Western Conference teams and
moved back into first place in the
Metropolitan Division. The goalies are expected to split this
week’s
back-to-back
games
against the New York Islanders,
and Holtby said he now has to
“earn” his playing time.
But if Grubauer continues to
acquit himself this well as the
interim No. 1 netminder, it’s fair
to question just how temporary
this new role might be and what
it would take for Holtby to wrestle the top job back. The Capitals
insist that for the time being, the
starting goaltender will be a
game-by-game determination.
“Phil’s playing extremely well
right now,” Holtby said. “He’s
giving us the best chance to win
every night. It’s one of those
fortunate things in an unfortunate situation. He’s been able to
play extremely well. And I can
take a little time to clean up a
couple of things, and can clear
my head, clear the team’s head
with that kind of stigma that’s
kind of going on with me in net.
Those things happen, and the
biggest thing is setting the right
example to the young guys and
everyone on the team that we’re
all in this together, no matter
who is playing. We’re focused on
winning games, and that’s the
bottom line.”
The sample size isn’t so small
as just the past week. Grubauer
started the season by losing his
first six starts despite some
strong play, but in the 20 appearances since he recorded his first
win Nov. 24 against Tampa Bay,
Grubauer is 10-3-2 with a .946
save percentage and a 1.40 goals
against average. Holtby had lost
seven of his previous eight starts
before the shift to Grubauer, and
he’s been yanked from net early
four times since the start of
February. With Grubauer, 26, entering restricted free agency this
summer, this is a sort of audition
for Grubauer, an opportunity to
show how he handles a heavier
workload.
“I’m not trying to show off or
impress anybody,” Grubauer said.
Holtby carried the Capitals
throughout the start of the season, when the team was plagued
with injuries and inexperience
on defense. But while Grubauer
has surged of late, Holtby has
struggled. Going back to a Feb. 2
game in Pittsburgh, Holtby has a
3-6-2 record with an .872 save
C A P I TA L S ’ N EX T TH R EE
at New York Islanders
Tomorrow
7 NBCSW
vs. New York Islanders
Friday
7 NBCSW,
NHL Network
at Philadelphia Flyers
Sunday
5 NBCSW,
NHL Network
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM)
percentage and a 3.73 goals
against average. He has a .907
save percentage and a 3.03 goals
against average on the season,
career-worst numbers for a goaltender who was named to the
All-Star Game less than two
months ago and was a Vezina
Trophy finalist the past two seasons. He won the award in 2016
after tying Martin Brodeur’s single-season NHL mark with 48
wins. The consistency he experienced, in part because he was
surrounded by a talented team,
was a cut above his fellow goaltenders, who have all either
weathered injury or rough patches at some point during the past
three seasons. Perhaps Holtby’s
struggles seem worse because
he’s been so steady.
Brent Johnson, an NBC Sports
Washington analyst and former
NHL goaltender, suggested on
Twitter that Holtby’s recent
struggles could be related to fatigue. During Trotz’s first season
in 2014-15, Holtby started 73
games, but his workload has
steadily declined with a capable
backup like Grubauer around to
spell him. He played in 66 games
two seasons ago and then 63 last
year. Holtby said he finds it
“easier” when he’s playing regularly, and the coaching staff has
similarly downplayed suggestions that Holtby might be tired.
“He’s been such a hard worker
throughout his whole career that
I think he feels more in a rhythm
when he’s on the ice than the off
the ice,” goaltending coach Scott
Murray said. “I know he’s played
a lot of games, but he knows his
body really well, and he knows
when to gear down a little bit.”
That’s the other challenge with
a workhorse like Holtby, balancing this time off to work on his
game with keeping him sharp for
when he does get back in net.
Over Holtby’s career, if he has
more than three days of rest, he
has a 2.57 goals against average
with a .915 save percentage. His
numbers are best with one day of
rest: a .926 save percentage and a
2.18 goals against average. But no
matter the circumstance, fair or
unfair, Holtby’s next start will be
scrutinized and compared with
Grubauer’s last as the margin for
error has all but disappeared.
“A couple of things we’re working on here and there, but it’s
more just the snowball effect that
I just didn’t get rid of quick
enough,” Holtby said. “Any time
that happens, it seems that
things don’t go your way. Even
though sometimes you try too
hard or you relax a little too
much, it’s hard to find that comfortable medium where you’re
not thinking, you’re just playing.
As much as you can tell yourself
that’s it’s all talk and mental prep,
really the only way is to grind
your way and work your way
through it to get back. Because
you don’t lose things overnight.”
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
NHL ROUNDUP
Early outburst carries
Nashville past Winnipeg
PREDATORS 3,
JETS 1
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Kevin Fiala, Austin Watson
and Viktor Arvidsson scored in
the first nine minutes, and the
host Nashville Predators cruised
past the Winnipeg Jets, 3-1, in a
key Central Division matchup
Tuesday night.
The win pushed Nashville to
100 points as it improved to 11-0-1
in its past 12 games. Its lead on
second-place Winnipeg grew to
eight points. Watson’s and
Arvidsson’s goals were shorthanded and came 34 seconds
apart against Michael Hutchinson. Pekka Rinne stopped 32
shots for Nashville.
Kyle Connor scored for Winnipeg. Connor Hellebuyck stopped
30 shots in relief of Hutchinson,
who exited the game with an
upper-body injury.
BRUINS 6, HURRICANES
4: David Pastrnak scored three of
Boston’s five goals in the final
10 minutes for his first career hat
trick, and the Bruins stunned
Carolina in Raleigh, N.C.
Matt Grzelcyk, Pastrnak and
Danton Heinen scored in 77 seconds to turn a 4-1 deficit into a
4-4 tie. Pastrnak put Boston
ahead with 3:30 left and then
added an empty-net goal.
SENATORS
7, LIGHTNING
4: Mike Hoffman scored twice as
the Senators ended host Tampa
Bay’s 10-game streak without a
regulation loss.
CANADIENS
4, STARS 2:
Artturi Lehkonen scored twice,
and host Montreal beat Dallas to
snap a five-game losing streak.
AVALANCHE
5, WILD 1:
Nathan MacKinnon had his 33rd
goal as Colorado cruised to a
victory in St. Paul, Minn.
FLAMES
1,
OILERS
0:
Johnny Gaudreau scored the lone
goal, and Mike Smith made 28
saves for host Calgary.
back agreed to a deal to join the
Carolina Panthers, completing his
expected exit from Washington.
The contract is a three-year deal
worth $24 million, including $11
million guaranteed; Breeland, 26,
could earn another $2 million in
escalators and incentives, according to a person familiar with the
discussions. It was clear he wanted
to test the free agent market, and
the Redskins weren’t prepared to
pay what the player believed he was
worth.
Free agent signings and trades
do not become official until the new
league year begins at 4 p.m.
Wednesday.
The Redskins had been actively
chasing a wide receiver to line up
opposite Josh Doctson during free
agency. The 6-foot, 175-pound Richardson was arguably the top talent
remaining after the Chicago Bears
came to terms with former Jacksonville wide receiver Allen Robinson,
and the Kansas City Chiefs reached
an agreement with Sammy Watkins,
formerly of the Los Angeles Rams.
The Watkins deal is reportedly
for three years and $48 million,
with $30 million guaranteed. Reports have Robinson getting
$42 million for three years, with
$25 million guaranteed.
The addition of Richardson, who
turns 26 next month, will be a boost
for new quarterback Alex Smith.
Richardson had 44 receptions for
703 yards and six touchdowns in
2017, all career highs.
Other teams courted him, but
Richardson identified Washington
as the place he wanted to be, a
person familiar with the discussions told The Post. He wanted to
play for a contender and believes
the Redskins are in a competitive
position. The four-year veteran was
drafted by the Seahawks in the second round (45th overall) in 2014
out of Colorado. He brings a downfield-speed element to complement
Doctson, slot receiver Jamison
Crowder and tight end Jordan
Reed.
Smith had a strong connection
with speedster Tyreek Hill last season in Kansas City, shedding his
dink-and-dunk reputation to become the most accurate passer on
throws of more than 20 yards, according to Pro Football Focus, with
a 56.5 percent adjusted completion
percentage. That statistic accounts
for drops, throwaways and passes
when the quarterback is hit while
throwing. Smith led the league
with 1,344 deep passing yards and
was 11th in the league with 12.3 percent of his passes going deep.
Richardson tore his left anterior
cruciate ligament at the end of his
rookie season in the playoffs
against the Panthers. The injury
kept him out of much of the 2015
season, and then a hamstring injury suffered in his first game back
ended the rest of that campaign. He
caught 21 passes for 288 yards and a
touchdown in 2016.
The Redskins did not have a
1,000-yard receiver last season following the departures of DeSean
Jackson and Pierre Garcon in free
agency. Crowder led all Redskins
players with 789 receiving yards.
Richardson’s addition suggested wide receivers Terrelle Pryor Sr.
and Ryan Grant, both free agents,
won’t return. And Tuesday night,
Grant and the Baltimore Ravens
agreed to a four-year deal worth
$29 million, with $13 million guaranteed, a $10 million signing bonus and $3 million in incentives.
Grant played the past four seasons with the Redskins after being
selected out of Tulane in the fifth
round of the 2014 draft. He was
Washington’s third-leading receiver last year, managing 573 yards.
Pryor was one of Washington’s marquee offseason additions in 2017,
coming off a 77-catch, 1,007-yard
season with the Cleveland Browns.
But injuries and dropped balls
plagued Pryor, who recorded just
240 receiving yards in nine games.
He was placed on injured reserve in
late November with an ankle injury.
Completing a deal with RodgersCromartie would help offset the
departures of Breeland and Kendall Fuller, who was part of the trade
to bring Smith from Kansas City.
Rodgers-Cromartie was released
by the New York Giants on Sunday.
The 31-year-old played 15 games
for the Giants in 2017 and started
six. He had 48 tackles, half a sack
and no interceptions. The two-time
Pro Bowler had six interceptions in
2016 and has missed just four
games in the past six seasons. (One
of those missed games was the result of a suspension imposed by
former Giants coach Ben McAdoo.)
Rodgers-Cromartie intercepted
Kirk Cousins twice in the second
half of a 19-10 loss in the 2016 regular season finale that cost Washington a spot in the playoffs.
The 10-year veteran was the
No. 16 pick by the Arizona Cardinals
in the 2008 draft, and his 30 interceptions are eighth among active
players. His six interceptions returned for a touchdown are tied for
third most among active players.
Day 2 of the NFL’s negotiating
period was much more active for
the Redskins than Day 1, when the
team re-signed place kicker Dustin
Hopkins and applied a secondround tender to restricted free
agent tackle Ty Nsekhe. Hopkins’s
deal is for three years for $7.75 million but could increase to $10.725
million based on incentives, according to a person familiar with
the negotiations.
kareem.copeland@washpost.com
kimberley.martin@washpost.com
Cousins expected to sign three-year deal with Vikings
COUSINS FROM D1
Redskins signal caller.
Cousins’s agent, Mike McCartney, told ESPN on Tuesday that “no
final decisions have been made.
The plan is to visit Minnesota first.
That’s all we can say right now.”
Cousins’s decision to visit and
likely sign with Minnesota was the
third significant move in the NFL’s
quarterback market this offseason.
In the early hours of Tuesday morning, outgoing Vikings starter Case
Keenum lined up an agreement to
sign with the Denver Broncos. He
had a breakthrough 2017 season
with the Vikings in which he threw
for 3,547 yards with 22 touchdown
passes and only seven interceptions, playing at a near-leagueMVP level and helping Minnesota
to reach the NFC title game.
Later Tuesday morning New
Orleans Saints quarterback Drew
Brees agreed to a two-year,
$50 million contract to remain
with the Saints.
After Cousins’s intentions to
join Minnesota became public,
free agent quarterback Sam Bradford, who began the 2017 season as
the Vikings’ starter before being
placed on injured reserve with a
knee injury, also secured an agreement on a new contract. Bradford
will sign with the Arizona Cardinals on a one-year deal worth
$20 million, with an option for a
second season at $20 million.
With the NFL’s free agent signing period opening Wednesday,
the Jets remain the lone team with
uncertainty at starting quarterback. McCartney announced on
Twitter that Josh McCown would
be returning on a one-year deal
while another former Vikings
quarterback, Teddy Bridgewater,
reportedly agreed to a deal with
New York on Tuesday night.
Cousins’s pending deal with the
Vikings is said to be worth a little
more than $28 million per season.
That would surpass the current
NFL record for the highest average annual value of $27.5 million,
set by quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo’s recent five-year, $137.5 million contract to re-sign with the
San Francisco 49ers. But Cousins’s
record probably won’t last long,
with quarterback Aaron Rodgers
working on a new contract with
the Green Bay Packers.
Having the deal be fully or almost fully guaranteed would be a
significant step, given that some
observers have been critical of the
lack of guaranteed contracts in the
NFL. That puts players at the mercy of teams, critics say, who can
release those players in the middle
of contracts without having to pay
the generally non-guaranteed annual salaries for future seasons.
“Kirk Cousins is a hero for all
the young players that will follow
after him,” Seattle Seahawks wide
receiver Doug Baldwin wrote on
Twitter. “Now we need more players to bet on themselves until fully
guaranteed contracts are the
norm and not the exception.”
The NFL Players Association, at
which some of that criticism has
been aimed, has said there is nothing in the collective bargaining
agreement to prevent agents and
players from pushing for guaranteed contracts if that’s important
to them. Some within the sport
have argued over the years that
guaranteed contracts are not necessarily good for all players, given
that teams could end up paying
money to players who haven’t met
expectations at the expense of
players with better on-field results.
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
After three straight 4,000-yard passing seasons, ex-Redskin Kirk Cousins will don purple and white.
It’s unclear what the long-term
effects of a guaranteed contract
given to Cousins would be. Few
players have his leverage, as a productive quarterback who maneuvered his way into hitting the open
market in his prime. Cousins did
not sign a long-term deal with the
Redskins and twice played under
the franchise-player tag in Washington. Tagging Cousins a third
straight time this year would have
cost the Redskins an unwieldy
$34.5 million on a one-year deal.
So the Redskins moved on at quarterback, trading for Alex Smith,
and Cousins became an unrestricted free agent on the heels of
three straight 4,000-yard passing
seasons for the Redskins.
He will face the expectations
that come with that contract in
Minnesota, along with the expectation that he will be the final
piece to a Super Bowl puzzle for
the Vikings, who came up one
game short of the Super Bowl with
Keenum at quarterback.
If Cousins makes the entire
$85 million or so in Minnesota, it
would push his career earnings in
the NFL above an estimated $130
million. He’s now 29 and would be
eligible for free agency again at
age 32, with another chance for a
lucrative contract.
The Broncos, Jets and Cardinals
once were thought to be among the
teams lined up to bid for Cousins.
But by the recent NFL scouting
combine, some within the sport
had become convinced Cousins
would end up in Minnesota. It appears they are being proven right.
The contract figures to provide
the conclusion to a self-produced
documentary Cousins is making
on his free agent decision-making
process. Cousins and his family
are being followed by a video crew,
chronicling his decision-making
process on where to sign next. The
video, according to ESPN, will also
give a behind-the-scenes peek at
Cousins “living with his in-laws,
working out, fatherhood and his
life in general.” The series figures
to be similar to New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady’s
“Tom vs. Time” Facebook series,
but with a free agency focus.
Cousins has taken a novel approach to dealing with the media
since his season ended. Rather
than addressing the media at the
Redskins’ team headquarters on
the day after Washington’s final
game, Cousins held a two-hour
off-site session with fans to raise
money for charity later that week.
And flanked by an assortment of
handlers during Super Bowl week,
including his publicist, Cousins
repeatedly declined media requests, save for interviews prearranged through a sponsorship.
“We are opening up our home to
allow a behind-the-scenes look
into what really transpires before
the contract number scrolls across
the bottom line of ESPN,” Cousins
told ESPN about the documentary.
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D4
EZ
NFL NOTES
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 14 , 2018
NBA ROUNDUP
TE Graham Westbrook propels Oklahoma City with his 100th triple-double
to sign with THUNDER 119,
HAWKS 107
Green Bay;
Nelson cut
double list.
CLIPPERS
A SSOCIATED P RESS
F ROM NEWS SERVICES
AND STAFF REPORTS
Free agent tight end Jimmy
Graham intends to sign a threeyear deal with the Green Bay Packers after the free agent market
officially opens Wednesday, according to a person close to the
situation.
Graham will leave the Seattle
Seahawks and chose not to return
to the New Orleans Saints, who
also were interested in him.
Graham had 57 catches for 520
yards and 10 touchdowns last season for Seattle.
Moments after the Graham
deal came to fruition, the team cut
wide receiver Jordy Nelson, who is
third all time in receptions in
Packers history.
Nelson had 550 receptions and
69 touchdown catches in 10 seasons in Green Bay.
TITANS: Cornerback Malcolm Butler’s agent said he has
agreed to a five-year deal worth
more than $60 million with Tennessee. . . .
Former Patriots running back
Dion Lewis agreed to a four-year
deal with Tennessee. The deal has
a reported maximum value of
$23.4 million.
CHIEFS: Kansas City agreed
to deals with wide receiver Sammy
Watkins and middle linebacker
Anthony Hitchens, filling two of
its most glaring needs.
The 24-year-old Watkins intends to sign a three-year, $48 million contract with $30 million in
guarantees, while the 25-year-old
Hitchens agreed to a five-year
deal.
DOLPHINS: Former Patriots
wide receiver Danny Amendola
and ex-Chiefs wideout Albert Wilson are discussing contract offers
and are likely to sign with Miami, a
person familiar with the negotiations said.
Wilson’s contract would be a
three-year, $24 million deal, a second person said. The team also cut
linebacker Lawrence Timmons.
JAGUARS: Jacksonville is
poised to sign all-pro guard Andrew Norwell and speedy wide
receiver Donte Moncrief in free
agency, according to two people
familiar with negotiations. . . .
Veteran middle linebacker Paul
Posluszny retired after 11 NFL seasons with Buffalo and Jacksonville, calling it quits because he
can “no longer compete at a level
that I find acceptable.”
BEARS: Chicago is set to sign
Jaguars wide receiver Allen Robinson and Eagles tight end Trey
Burton.
Robinson told ESPN he plans to
sign a three-year, $42 million contract, while two people familiar
with the situation told the Associated Press that Burton is leaving
the Eagles after agreeing to a fouryear, $32 million deal.
Dolphins kicker Cody Parkey
also plans to sign with the Bears.
RAIDERS: Prosecutors say
former Oakland cornerback Sean
Smith was sentenced to serve a
year in jail after admitting he beat
his sister’s boyfriend in July.
The Los Angeles County district
attorney’s office said Smith pleaded guilty to a felony assault charge.
BILLS: Buffalo’s defensive
front quickly took shape when
Star Lotulelei agreed to a five-year
contract and Kyle Williams chose
to return for a 13th season.
RAVENS: Baltimore released
running back Danny Woodhead,
who was slowed by a hamstring
injury in his only season with the
team.
Woodhead, 33, missed eight
games in 2017.
CARDINALS: Arizona released running back Adrian Peterson after a half-season in the desert that included two impressive
games and a season-ending injury.
BUCCANEERS: Tampa Bay
finalized new contracts with wide
receiver Mike Evans and tight end
Cameron Brate.
Evans agreed to a five-year,
$82.5 million extension last week.
Brate signed a six-year, $40.8 million deal.
BROWNS:
Cleveland
reached agreement with former
Pittsburgh tackle Chris Hubbard
on a five-year contract, a person
familiar with the negotiations told
the Associated Press.
JETS: Coveted cornerback
Trumaine Johnson, 28, will sign
with New York, according to multiple reports. . . .
Running back Isaiah Crowell
agreed to a three-year deal with
the Jets, according to Pro Football
Talk.
GIANTS: New York agreed to
a contract with veteran running
back Jonathan Stewart, who was
released by the Panthers after 10
seasons.
Russell Westbrook picked up
the 100th triple-double of his career, and the Oklahoma City Thunder used a 16-0 run late in the
fourth quarter to pull away from
the Hawks for a 119-107 victory
Tuesday night in Atlanta.
Westbrook scored 32 points,
dished out 12 assists and grabbed
12 rebounds to become the thirdfastest player to reach the milestone. Only Oscar Robertson (277
games) and Magic Johnson (656)
got to No. 100 quicker than Westbrook, who accomplished the feat
in his 736th contest.
Westbrook trails only Robertson (181), Johnson (138) and Jason
Kidd (107) on the career triple-
112, BULLS 106:
DeAndre Jordan dominated with
29 points and 18 rebounds, Lou
Williams scored 26 and Los Angeles won in Chicago.
Tobias Harris added 18 points,
and the Clippers took control late
in the third quarter on the way to
their fifth win in six games.
Bobby Portis led Chicago with
19 points and nine rebounds. But
with Lauri Markkanen sidelined
by lower back spasms, the Bulls
lost for the eighth time in 11
games.
MAVERICKS
110, KNICKS
97: At Madison Square Garden,
Harrison Barnes scored 30 points
and Dallas turned around the
game in the third quarter to send
New York to its eighth straight
loss.
Dallas couldn’t stop New York
early, and then dominated the second half to win for the third time
in four games, with only a loss to
NBA-leading Houston in that
stretch.
PACERS 101, 76ERS 98:
Myles Turner scored 25 points,
including two clutch free throws
with 21.5 seconds remaining, and
visiting Indiana beat Philadelphia
in a possible Eastern Conference
playoff preview.
Joel Embiid had 29 points and
12 rebounds, and Ben Simmons
finished with 10 points, 13 rebounds and 10 assists for the 76ers
(36-30), who had won 13 straight
home games.
RAPTORS 116, NETS 102:
Jonas Valanciunas had 26 points
and 14 rebounds, and visiting Toronto won its ninth straight and
16th of 17.
DeMar DeRozan and reserve
Fred VanVleet scored 15 points
apiece, and Kyle Lowry added 11
points and 11 assists for the Eastern Conference-leading Raptors,
who held Brooklyn to 35 points
after halftime and won a franchise
record-tying seventh straight road
game.
PELICANS 119, HORNETS
115: Anthony Davis had 31 points,
14 rebounds and five blocked
shots, and host New Orleans upended struggling Charlotte.
Rajon Rondo added 12 points
and 17 assists, and Jrue Holiday
highlighted a 25-point, nine-assist
performance with 10 points in the
final 2:39, starting with a threepointer that put the Pelicans in
front.
SPURS 108, MAGIC 72: LaMarcus Aldridge scored 24 points,
and San Antonio never trailed after the opening minutes, holding
Orlando to its lowest point total in
a rout at home.
The Spurs were still without
Kawhi Leonard, who missed his
59th game of the season while
battling right quadriceps tendi-
nopathy.
JAZZ 110, PISTONS 79:
Rudy Gobert had 22 points and 12
rebounds, one of six Jazz players
who scored in double figures in
Utah’s rout in Salt Lake City.
Joe Ingles added 17 points, seven assists and seven rebounds,
and Jonas Jerebko had 16 points
and eight rebounds for the Jazz,
which won its seventh straight.
Luke Kennard scored 18 points
for the Pistons, who have lost 11 of
14.
Bradley undergoes surgery
The Los Angeles Clippers said
guard Avery Bradley could miss
the rest of the season after having
surgery to repair muscles in his
pelvic area.
The Clippers expect the recovery time to be six to eight weeks,
meaning they would need to make
the playoffs for him to play again
this season.
Wizards
fade in
loss to
Wolves
WIZARDS FROM D1
Brooks thought Towns had his
hands all over Beal. As he spoke
with reporters, Beal echoed this
belief.
“He just pushed me out of
bounds, but it’s kind of a crazy
pass for me to make just standing
alone,” Beal said of Towns’s defense. “He was forcing me out so I
had to get rid of it, but it ended up
being a bad turnover. That’s how
it was.”
There was no whistle to save
the Wizards. And they did not
help themselves with a slow response in transition as Teague
breezed to the rim for the dunk
that accounted for the final margin.
“They made some shots, they
got the momentum,” Markieff
Morris said of the Wolves’ 34point fourth quarter, “and never
looked back.”
Late in the game, the Wizards
(38-30) got one necessary stop
when Satoransky played the
lane and poked away a pass to
Towns. Then, Satoransky delivered a behind-the-back beauty
to Otto Porter Jr. for a fast-break
finish that trimmed the Wizards’
deficit to 109-106 with 1:52 left to
play.
The flashy play aside, the Wizards’ defense did not stand up on
the next possession when Wolves
guard Jamal Crawford responded
— one of several big buckets for
Minnesota (40-29).
“The most satisfying thing is
getting a ‘W,’ ” Towns said. “That
is the ultimate goal at the end of
the day. It’s not about statistics.
We got to make the playoffs, we
can’t drop a game. It’s cool to have
50 points and win, but if you have
50 and an ‘L’ then it doesn’t mean
anything. I would rather have two
points and get a ‘W’ and win for
the extra season and put ourselves in great position, rather
than average a crazy amount of
statistical numbers and not win at
all.”
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Wizards defenders trail the play as the Timberwolves’ Tyus Jones sails in for a layup. Washington led by eight entering the fourth quarter.
Minnesota made 13 of 18 shots
in the fourth quarter (72.2 percent), including five three-pointers. For the game, Towns made 13
of 17 from the field and also had 10
rebounds and two blocks.
“I thought we played a lot better in the second half,” Wolves
Coach Tom Thibodeau said. “The
group that started the fourth
played really well and that got us
back in. I thought Kat was terrific.”
Towns, an all-star for the first
time this season, has taken on an
even more significant role since
Jimmy Butler’s knee injury last
month. Towns has averaged 22.1
points since Butler went down,
and his scoring prowess continued inside Capital One Arena.
Though the Wizards had big
and capable bodies to match
against Towns, he consistently
overruled their size and effort.
In the second quarter, when
Ian Mahinmi, the defensive specialist assigned to protect the rim,
latched his 6-11, 262-pound frame
to Towns, the young center still
backed him deeper into the paint
before hitting a hook shot
through contact.
Later, before a minute had
passed in the third, Towns had
drawn two fouls on starter Marcin
Gortat. Overall, the Wizards put
Towns on the line for eight free
throws, and he made them all.
“Inside, out. He’s strong
enough to play against a five man
and quick enough to drive and
shoot threes,” Morris said. “He
had a really good game tonight.
We couldn’t control him. He kept
them in it.”
The point of fouling Towns instead of futilely watching him
score might have been a team
tactic. In the three previous
games, the Wizards had played
passive on defense. Opponents
had totaled 196 points in the
paint. As a response, Brooks
stressed fundamentals.
“The ball needs to be stopped
and then we have to have some
rim protection,” Brooks said.
“Whether you take a charge or put
the guy on the free throw line or
you block his shot, you got to do
something instead of just watch-
WIZ ARDS’ NEX T THREE
at Boston Celtics
Today
8 ESPN
vs. Indiana Pacers
Saturday
7 NBCSW
at San Antonio Spurs
March 21
9:30 NBCSW, ESPN
Radio: WFED (1500 AM)
ing it.
“Guys got to do it. I got to do a
better job of making sure they
understand that.”
Instead, the Wizards allowed
Minnesota to score 64 points in
the paint, ruining a night of solid
offensive execution (they shot
51.2 percent) that included 27
points from Morris.
“Nothing, really; we lost,” Morris responded when asked what
led to his big scoring night. “So it
really don’t matter.”
candace.buckner@washpost.com
Timberwolves 116, Wizards 111
Minnesota .......................... 25
Washington ........................ 26
MINNESOTA
Bjelica
Gibson
Towns
Teague
Wiggins
Crawford
Jones
Rose
Dieng
Aldrich
TOTALS
28
33
29
31
34 — 116
21 — 111
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
38:46 7-16 0-0 2-8 7 4 17
27:19
5-8 0-2 3-8 0 3 10
40:44 13-17 8-8 3-10 3 5 37
28:34 6-11 1-1 1-2 5 0 13
37:27 7-14 2-2 0-1 1 2 16
28:30 4-10 2-2 0-3 1 3 11
19:26
3-6 2-2 0-2 5 4
8
10:33
0-2 0-0 0-1 0 0
0
7:36
1-2 2-2 2-2 1 0
4
1:03
0-1 0-0 0-0 0 0
0
240 46-87 17-19 11-37 23 21 116
Percentages: FG .529, FT .895. 3-Point Goals: 7-21, .333
(Towns 3-3, Bjelica 3-7, Crawford 1-3, Rose 0-1, Jones
0-2, Wiggins 0-2, Teague 0-3). Team Rebounds: 7. Team
Turnovers: 10 (13 PTS). Blocked Shots: 7 (Towns 2,
Wiggins 2, Bjelica, Gibson, Teague). Turnovers: 10
(Bjelica 3, Gibson 2, Wiggins 2, Crawford, Teague,
Towns). Steals: 10 (Jones 2, Teague 2, Bjelica, Crawford,
Gibson, Rose, Towns, Wiggins). Technical Fouls: None.
WASHINGTON
Morris
Porter Jr.
Gortat
Beal
Satoransky
Mahinmi
Sessions
Oubre Jr.
Meeks
Scott
TOTALS
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
33:16 10-15 4-4 0-4 2 2 27
35:14 4-14 0-0 2-7 2 2
8
24:23
2-3 2-2 2-2 1 3
6
33:53 8-16 2-3 1-4 5 0 19
31:53
4-7 6-6 2-8 7 3 15
22:31
5-7 0-0 5-9 0 3 10
16:07
3-7 2-4 1-1 2 3
9
15:36
2-5 3-4 0-1 1 0
8
14:07
2-3 0-0 0-1 2 1
5
12:59
2-5 0-2 1-2 4 0
4
240 42-82 19-25 14-39 26 17 111
Percentages: FG .512, FT .760. 3-Point Goals: 8-20, .400
(Morris 3-5, Meeks 1-1, Satoransky 1-1, Sessions 1-1,
Oubre Jr. 1-3, Beal 1-4, Scott 0-2, Porter Jr. 0-3). Team
Rebounds: 6. Team Turnovers: 11 (15 PTS). Blocked
Shots: 4 (Gortat 2, Mahinmi, Porter Jr.). Turnovers: 11
(Beal 4, Oubre Jr. 2, Mahinmi, Meeks, Porter Jr.,
Satoransky, Sessions). Steals: 6 (Satoransky 3, Mahinmi 2, Sessions). Technical Fouls: coach Wizards (Defensive three second), 11:15 third.
Hunter’s broken wrist is costly blow for Virginia entering NCAAs
VIRGINIA FROM D1
When the injury occurred is
unclear. Hunter landed awkwardly during Friday night’s 6458 semifinal victory over Clemson, bracing his fall with both
hands as he crashed onto the
court late in the first half. He
missed two free throws shortly
thereafter and finished with nine
points. But the versatile redshirt
freshman with NBA potential
had 10 points and four rebounds
in 18 minutes in the next night’s
tournament final.
Hunter’s absence likely means
increased playing time for reserve forward Mamadi Diakite, a
6-9 redshirt sophomore who has
played in every game this season
and averages 5.3 points and three
rebounds in 15.4 minutes.
“Won’t be the same without
my brother . . . but know this. We
got you and this for you,” tweeted
Cavaliers starting guard Kyle
Guy minutes after Virginia
tweeted the announcement on its
official account.
Hunter’s injury is the latest
misfortune to plague Virginia
entering an NCAA tournament.
Last season, starting forward
STEVE HELBER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
De’Andre Hunter, the Cavaliers’ fourth-leading scorer (9.2 points
per game), will have surgery Monday and be out 10 to 12 weeks.
Isaiah Wilkins was suffering
from an illness and was limited
to five minutes in a first-round
victory over UNC Wilmington.
Wilkins sat out the next game,
and the Cavaliers lost to Florida,
65-39.
In 2015, standout wing player
Justin Anderson underwent an
emergency appendectomy late in
the season and later broke the
pinkie on his shooting hand,
leaving him less than 100 percent
for the NCAA tournament, when
the Cavaliers lost to Michigan
State, 60-54, in the second round.
Hunter made one of the most
memorable shots of this past
regular season when he banked
in a three-pointer as time expired to give Virginia an improbable 67-66 victory at Louisville.
The Cavaliers scored five points
in the final 0.9 seconds of that
game to complete a 9-0 conference road record, the first in ACC
history.
Hunter scored a career-high
22 points Feb. 13 to spark a 59-50
win against Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. He made 3 of 6 threepoint attempts and added three
rebounds in a performance Hurricanes Coach Jim Larranaga
credited largely for the outcome.
“They had De’Andre Hunter,”
Larranaga said. “He was the
answer to every one of the questions we presented to them.”
Hunter’s scoring touch was
but one of many ways in which he
contributed to Virginia’s recordsetting run through the ACC. He
also proved highly valuable as a
defender and as one of the Cavaliers’ most skilled passers.
During a 59-44 win against
Syracuse at the Carrier Dome on
Feb. 3, Hunter frequently operated out of the high post, with
Virginia running its offense
through him to attack the Orange’s challenging 2-3 zone defense.
Hunter had a season-high six
assists with just one turnover,
delivering pinpoint passes to Diakite and starting forward Isaiah
Wilkins cutting to the basket for
uncontested dunks and layups.
Hunter’s athleticism has generated other highlights this season as well, most notably a dunk
over Tar Heels senior guard Joel
Berry II on Jan. 6.
“Early in the season I was kind
of tentative and not too aggressive,” Hunter said at the time,
“and my teammates kind of got
on me for that, so as the season
went on, I just tried to get more
and more aggressive and help the
team in any way possible.”
gene.wang@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D5
M2
Xavier reaches new heights. Could its coach reach higher?
BY
A VA W ALLACE
new york — Three of the four
No. 1 seeds in the NCAA men’s
basketball tournament have
earned that designation before
under their current coaches. For
them, March Madness is where
the pressure to fulfill outsize expectations first kicks in.
For Xavier and Coach Chris
Mack, the start of the tournament
doubles as the end of a long
ascent.
The Musketeers are a No. 1
seed for the first time in program
history. It comes at the end of the
season in which they won the Big
East regular season title, becoming the first team other than
Villanova to do so since Xavier
joined the conference in 2013.
Mack, 48, was voted Big East
coach of the year. This season, he
set the career wins record for a
program that has grown since the
1980s thanks to an unbroken
streak of hiring up-and-coming
coaches who have won at the
Cincinnati school — then moved
on to win at bigger programs.
Which might cause one to
wonder: Could the start of the
tournament be the last days of an
era?
“It’s a good question to ask,”
said Pete Gillen, the former leader in coaching victories at Xavier
who now works as an analyst for
CBS Sports Network. “And at this
point, with the success they’ve
had with so many coaches, I don’t
think it’s a negative on Xavier.”
The start of the NCAA tournament is also the start of college
basketball’s hiring and firing cycle. Two high-profile jobs came
open last week when Pittsburgh
fired Kevin Stallings and Connecticut parted ways with Kevin
Ollie; at Louisville, interim head
coach David Padgett, at just 33
years old, is far from a lock to get
the job on a permanent basis. It’s
natural that Mack, for the second
year in a row, will be considered
one of the more logical options to
fill one of those slots.
Last year, his name was thrown
around for openings at Ohio State
and Indiana. So far this season,
he has been connected to the
potential job at Louisville.
Besides that, Xavier has quite a
history with good coaches moving on.
Top-seeded Musketeers have a star in Mack, but previous successes have led to bigger jobs
ELSA/GETTY IMAGES
Chris Mack was voted Big East coach of the year after his Musketeers upended Villanova to win the conference regular season title.
Gillen won 202 games from
1985 to 1994 and took Xavier to
the NCAA tournament seven
times before he left for Providence and then Virginia. He was
succeeded at the Jesuit university
in Cincinnati by Skip Prosser,
who won at least 21 games in five
of six seasons, then moved to
Wake Forest. Thad Matta claimed
three consecutive 26-win seasons
capped by an appearance in the
Elite Eight before Ohio State
came calling. Sean Miller, Mack’s
immediate predecessor, chalked
up 120 wins and an Elite Eight
appearance in five seasons, then
NCAA TOURNAMENT ROUNDUP
Bonnies break through
by holding off Bruins
ST. BONAVENTURE 65,
UCLA 58
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Courtney Stockard returned
from a hamstring injury and
scored 26 points, and Jaylen Adams made a jumper and three free
throws in the final minute Tuesday night in Dayton, Ohio, rallying
St. Bonaventure to a 65-58 play-in
victory over UCLA and its first
NCAA tournament victory in 48
years.
The 11th-seeded Bonnies (26-7)
will play sixth-seeded Florida (2012) in Dallas on Thursday night in
the East Region.
St. Bonaventure set a school
record with its 26th win. Stockard
got the Bonnies in position for the
drought-busting tournament victory by leading a late 12-0 run.
Adams — who missed 14 of his first
15 shots — closed it out in the final
49 seconds.
UCLA (21-12) bristled at having
to appear in the play-in round for
the first time in its history — the
Bruins have been to 18 Final Fours.
They had trouble against the Bonnies’ zone defense and had 20
turnovers, a disappointing ending
to a season that started with an
international incident.
Freshmen Jalen Hill, Cody Riley
and LiAngelo Ball were accused of
shoplifting during a trip to China
in November. All three were suspended for the season, and Ball
left the school.
UCLA’s Aaron Holiday led the
Pacific-12 in scoring but couldn’t
put his touch on the openinground game. He scored 20 points
but had 10 turnovers, including
two pivotal ones in the final minute when he fouled out.
RADFORD 71, LIU BROOKLYN 61: Carlik Jones had a sub-
stantial and loud cheering section
at University of Dayton Arena, a
lot of folks traveling about an hour
up Interstate 75 from his home
town of Cincinnati to see him suit
up for Radford in a play-in game.
Jones didn’t disappoint them.
The redshirt freshman guard was
the engine that drove the Highlanders, scoring 12 points to go
with career highs in rebounds
with 11 and assists with seven as
Radford beat the Blackbirds to
earn its first NCAA tournament
win.
“It’s just big to be able to come
back home and perform in front of
my family and friends that haven’t
been able to see me play,” Jones
said. “And it’s just been a good
feeling.”
Radford didn’t play its prettiest
game, but the team from rural
southwest Virginia will celebrate
briefly before heading to Pittsburgh to play No. 1 seed Villanova
on Thursday. The Big South champion Highlanders are making
their third tournament appearance and first since 2009.
Ed Polite Jr. had 13 points and 12
rebounds, and Travis Fields Jr.
also scored 13 for Radford.
Despite hitting just 7 of 23 shots
from the floor in the second half,
LIU Brooklyn managed to stay
within striking distance, even taking the lead briefly early in the
second half. The Northeast Conference champion Blackbirds got
to within a point with five minutes
left, but a 9-1 surge by the Highlanders opened up the lead.
“We remained calm,” Polite
said. “Basketball is about a game
of runs. So we knew they’re a good
team, so they’re going to make
shots. So we just had to remain
focused and go with the game
plan. And that’s to pressure them
even though they’re a fast-paced
team and don’t give them any easy
baskets.”
The Blackbirds went without a
field goal in the last seven minutes
of the game and shot 30.4 percent
in the second half. Each team committed 15 turnovers.
“I thought [Radford] did a nice
job grinding it out on the offensive
end of the floor and taking time off
the clock to where we couldn’t get
moving.” LIU Brooklyn Coach
Derek Kellogg said.
Jashaun Agosto scored 16
points and Raiquan Clark added
14 for LIU Brooklyn, winless in
seven trips to the tournament.
The Highlanders’ defense
helped limit LIU Brooklyn’s leading scorer, Joel Hernandez, to just
eight points. Averaging 20.9
points during the season, Hernandez was just 3 for 11, including 1 for
5 from the three-point line.
“He’s so strong and he can score
in a variety of ways,” Radford
Coach Mike Jones said. “We knew
we weren’t going to shut him out.”
departed for Arizona.
“The thing about that job is the
advantage is you have a small
school with a family-type atmosphere, but you play against the
big guys,” Gillen said. “For certain
people, that’s a great mix. For
others, it’s a chance to prove
yourself.
Mack, who grew up in Cincinnati and played at Xavier, said
last week at the Big East tournament in New York that he felt far
from having reached the hilltop
with the Musketeers, despite his
record success at Xavier.
Those closest to him believe his
deep connection to school and
city separate him from the coaches who came before. Associate
head coach Travis Steele, who has
been with Mack for all of his nine
seasons as Xavier’s head coach,
believes Mack wants to be Xavier’s version of what Mark Few is
at Gonzaga or Jay Wright is at
Villanova — a local product who
turns a coaching job into a career.
“I think it’s more about families,” Steele said. “He’s born and
raised in Cincinnati. His mom
and dad go to every radio show.
They’re at all the games. Look,
he’s got three kids . . . they can see
their grandparents. His wife’s
parents live in Louisville, as well,
90 minutes away. So it’s families
and relationships at Xavier and in
the community. It’s where he’s
from. He takes a lot of pride in it.
“He is Xavier. What the university stands for, we hope what our
team stands for, and what we
stand for, it all aligns.”
Mack also occupies a different
job than his predecessors, because the Musketeers compete in
the Big East, a proven high-major
conference that produced a national champion in 2016. Steele, a
primary recruiter for the pro-
gram, says high school recruits
are more aware of Xavier than
they have ever been. The team’s
facilities are modern.
“It’s a world of difference. It’s
night and day,” Gillen said. “It was
the little train that could. Now it’s
the pretty big train that can.
Xavier has raised up their program to a level now where, all
right, it’s certainly not Michigan
State, Ohio State or Louisville,
but they can compete with them.
They’re ahead of them right now,
as far as rankings go.”
Where Xavier can’t compete is
in coaching salaries. In USA Today’s most recent coaching salaries database, Mack’s paycheck
ranks 55th in the nation at just
under $1.7 million. Even Wright
at Villanova, who makes just
more than $2.5 million per year
as the highest-paid Big East
coach on USA Today’s list, is
estimated to be the 24th-highestpaid coach in the nation.
But Gillen, like Steele, doesn’t
think Mack is on his way out at
Xavier. If Mack were to leave,
Gillen believes it says more about
the individual than it does about
Xavier’s status as a program or
the quality of the job.
“If he does go, it just shows that
people just want a new challenge,” Gillen said. “They want a
big state university, they want
big-time other sports with them
to help them recruit, but I think
he could have been Ohio State’s
coach. I think he could have been
at Indiana. I mean, those are two
of the top 10 or 12 programs in the
country.”
As for Mack, he has plenty left
to achieve professionally at Xavier, beginning with the NCAA
tournament, in which the Musketeers have never made it past a
region final. Beyond that, Steele
said the coaches talk about
knocking Villanova off its pedestal in the Big East and making
Xavier the standard-bearer.
History aside, Mack made it
clear at the Big East tournament:
He feels he has unfinished business at Xavier.
“The mountaintop for us was
winning the Big East regular
season championship,” Mack
said. “And now we’ve got hopefully some more mountains to
climb.”
ava.wallace@washpost.com
A season of turmoil at Arizona reaches NCAA stage
ARIZONA FROM D1
trace amount of a banned substance was found in his system.
Even after all of that, Arizona
enters the NCAA tournament
with the kind of talent that gives
it a chance to cut down the nets in
San Antonio next month.
And that’s why there will be no
team in this year’s field of 68 with
more scrutiny and attention
heaped upon it than the fourthseeded Wildcats (27-7), who open
Thursday night against No. 13
seed Buffalo in Boise, Idaho.
“We have great kids on our
team,” Miller said last week. “We
have a lot of winners. We have
talented players that have always,
from Day One, played for the win.
And everybody on our team and
in our locker room realizes what
March Madness is.”
The cloud of the ongoing FBI
investigation has lingered over
Arizona since November, when
Miller’s
longtime
assistant,
Emanuel “Book” Richardson, was
one of four assistants nationwide
indicted in connection with the
probe into bribery and corruption in college basketball.
That exploded into a storm
over the past month. ESPN reported that the FBI had phone
recordings of Miller discussing a
$100,000 bribe to ensure Ayton
would sign. When Miller agreed
to sit out his team’s game at
Oregon on Feb. 24, it seemed he
would never again coach at Arizona.
But less than a week later,
Miller was at a microphone rebutting the allegations. He was
back on the sideline for wins over
Stanford and California to close
the regular season, then as the
Wildcats swept through three
games to win the Pacific-12 tournament championship in Las Vegas.
“We knew it was difficult in the
moment but that he would prevail and be vindicated like he
said,” senior guard Parker Jackson-Cartwright said. “It’s great to
have him back. He’s our leader,
our emotional leader — everything you can think of. He brings
along and gives us everything we
need to be our best.”
At the same time, Trier — who
was suspended for the first 19
games last season after testing
positive for a performance-enhancing substance that he maintained he ingested unknowingly
— was dealing with another suspension. He, too, was back for the
ISAAC BREKKEN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Arizona has won five in a row since Coach Sean Miller took a one-game leave of absence last month.
regular season’s final two games
after the NCAA granted Arizona’s
appeal that it was the reappearance of a trace amount of the
same substance from the previous year’s failed test.
“I’ve never done anything
wrong in the first place,” he said.
“I had to suffer that through my
sophomore year, and it was something that I couldn’t really have
control over. Then for it to happen to me again . . . it was very
frustrating.”
Perhaps the most remarkable
thing about Arizona’s season is
where it stands now. The Wildcats have as much talent as any
team in the country — led by
Ayton, who piled up 64 points
and 32 rebounds over the final
two games of the Pac-12 tournament. The 7-foot-1 freshman has
drawn comparisons to Hall of
Famers Patrick Ewing and David
Robinson, and he is widely considered the best player in college
basketball. There is also a big,
productive backcourt of Trier, a
6-5 junior, and 6-5 sophomore
Rawle Alkins, both of whom have
joined Ayton in saying they will
enter the NBA draft after the
season.
Miller is regarded as perhaps
the best college coach who has yet
to reach the Final Four. The draw
didn’t do Arizona any favors in its
quest to change that.
Despite winning the Pac-12
regular season and tournament
championships, the Wildcats
were underseeded, according to
many observers, and shipped to
the South Region. If they can
make it through a tough pair of
opening games — first against
Buffalo (26-8), the Mid-American
Conference regular season and
tournament champion, then likely against No. 5 seed Kentucky
(24-10), the Southeastern Conference tournament champion — it
will likely have to knock off overall No. 1 seed Virginia in the
Sweet 16.
Then again, after everything
the Wildcats have gone through
off the court, the idea of simply
playing games will be a welcome
distraction.
“Absolutely,”
Jackson-Cartwright said. “It’s draining. It’s
draining. At the end of the day,
we’re just kids. So dealing with all
that is extremely difficult. . . . It
comes and goes, and you have to
push through it.”
There is a school of thought
that Arizona’s path to the Final
Four was made particularly difficult by the NCAA tournament
selection committee to minimize
the possibility of scandal overshadowing the sport’s marquee
event. Three bubble teams with
ties to the scandal — Louisville,
Southern California and Oklahoma State — were left out of the
tournament field.
To Trier, though, March gives
Arizona a chance to do something
else: Put all of the strife and
turmoil of the past year behind as
the Wildcats write their own
ending to a strange and twisted
tale.
“As coach Miller says to me,
with everything that’s happened
in my career, I’m due for some
good,” Trier said. “So, you know, I
think we’re all due for some good
here, and hopefully we can just
continue to build on the season
we’ve had so far. Hopefully we
can do some great things this
March.”
One thing is for certain: After
everything that has happened to
Arizona, all eyes will be on the
Wildcats for the next few weeks.
tim.bontemps@washpost.com
D6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 14 , 2018
baseball
If MLB wants to strike out future labor unrest, there’s no time like the present
Baseball’s longest
winter ended,
finally, with Jake
Arrieta in
Philadelphia and
Mike Moustakas
Barry
back in Kansas
Svrluga
City and Carlos
Gonzalez
returning to Colorado, all for
millions of dollars less than we
figured four months ago. We’re
one Alex Cobb signing away from
having all of the significant pegs
being placed in the appropriate
holes. For those of you who
prefer baseball to the business of
such, Opening Day is two weeks
from Thursday. Play ball, finally.
Enjoy.
But even as we begin to focus
on what will be the themes of the
season — on Aaron Judge and
Giancarlo Stanton hitting backto-back in the Bronx, on Bryce
Harper and Manny Machado
trying to produce one more time
for the teams that drafted them
— there’s no way to deny that
what happened this winter (or,
rather, what didn’t happen) is
more important to the sport
going forward.
People inside baseball,
including those who work for
clubs and some who represent
players, believe the next three or
four years are a monumental
time for the sport, perhaps more
important than when it took
steps to reduce the impact of
performance-enhancing drugs a
dozen years ago. A significant
number believe the chances of a
strike at the conclusion of this
collective bargaining agreement,
which runs through the 2021
season, are very good. Some
think it’s inevitable.
That might seem a long way
off. But watch the calendar fly.
When the current deal was
struck in December 2016, the
players were not inclined to
refuse to go to work. Now they
have lived through this winter,
and now they have a different
perspective.
Review some of what
happened. It’s all within the
framework of the current CBA,
but the players are, in some
cases, stunned by how the
machinations of the agreement
worked in practice, at least for
one winter.
Arrieta, a Cy Young-winning
pitcher whose ERA over the
previous three seasons ranked
behind only Clayton Kershaw’s,
wasn’t able to secure a deal that
was even half of what Max
Scherzer landed three offseasons
earlier. Arrieta’s guarantee from
the Phillies: three years and
$75 million — four years and
$135 million short of Scherzer
(though Arrieta has an opt-out
and a club option, either of
which could be used to earn him
a bit more).
The more striking have-nots
might be Moustakas and
Gonzalez. Each has something
about which he can be happy:
He’s returning to the only team
he has ever known. Each has
something about which he could
be bitter: He turned down the
one-year qualifying offer a team
can extend to its outgoing free
agents, which this year was
worth $17.4 million. Moustakas,
coming off a season in which he
hit a Kansas City-record
38 homers, re-signed with the
Royals for one year and
$6.5 million. Gonzalez, a threetime all-star, re-signed with
Colorado for one year and
$8 million.
Some agents and players
believe this offseason was just
the start of behavior
modification by ownership, that
the way free agents were
approached this winter changed
drastically — with fewer, and in
some cases no, offers and
counteroffers exchanged.
Therefore, they believe, the way
free agents are valued (read:
paid) is going to be radically
different going forward. The
sport won’t know for sure until
another free agency period
comes and goes, and the
expected availability of both
Machado and Harper —
superstars who will be just 26
years old when they can shop
their wares — could skew that
market.
Still, “could” might be the
operative word there. For either
Machado or Harper to push past
Stanton’s record $325 million
deal, a pair of potential buyers
might be needed. There is doubt
in some corners that’ll happen.
So if baseball’s revenue is
rising — and it is — but the
players’ salaries aren’t following
along in a commensurate
manner, some see a need for
fundamental change. The
owners likely won’t offer it
because, in their minds, they’re
becoming smarter about how to
spend their dollars, and a
combination of analytics and
economics is telling them that
expensive players in their 30s
aren’t as valuable as cheap
players in their 20s.
So the players will have to
push for change. To consider
what that change might look like,
first understand the way MLB
salaries have been determined
for generations. For the first
three years of a player’s career,
the club essentially assigns him a
salary. For the next three, his
salary is determined by
arbitration — assessing his
performance against other
comparable players and coming
up with a number. After six full
seasons, barring an extension,
he’s free.
So what’s the alternative?
Would that be demanding that
free agency be granted after, say,
four years? That would, in
theory, give players access to
more money sooner in their
careers. Two potential problems:
Would small-market teams,
those that rely on drafting and
developing talent but can’t
necessarily afford to play in free
agency, approve such a plan?
And if clubs are truly laying off
the majority of free agents,
would they necessarily be more
prone to drive up bidding for
players with track records two
years shorter?
Is there any way, though, to
shift at what age a player receives
a heftier salary? Consider this:
The top pick in the NBA draft
can make roughly $44.5 million
in his first five years in the
league. Harper, the top pick in
MLB’s 2010 draft, has spent just
more than five years in the
majors. Add in his $6.25 million
signing bonus, and his total
earnings — over five-plus years —
is $32.525 million.
The players’ message, when it
comes to negotiating, will have to
be: If you’re not going to pay us
on the back end, you need to pay
us on the front. Ownership, of
course, has little incentive to do
that — without a work stoppage.
One other matter from this
spring that puts the labor strife
in focus: The players’ union has
filed a grievance accusing four
teams — Pittsburgh, Oakland,
Miami and Tampa Bay — of
failing to spend money they gain
through revenue sharing on
improving their rosters. The
complaint, as I read it, isn’t as
much intended to penalize those
teams. It’s for the union to say,
“We don’t like what’s going on,
and we want to be clear about
that” — and maybe if that opens
up discussions now, there won’t
be discussions with such gravity
in 2021.
Put this all away for a while.
The season is about to begin, and
actual baseball on the field has a
way of making us forget its
problems. But even in those
happy times — a double to the
gap, a strikeout to seal a win —
keep in mind the people who
know exactly where this sport is
headed are worried. The
solutions must be devised not in
four years, but much sooner, if
not now.
barry.svrluga@washpost.com
For more by Barry Svrluga, visit
washingtonpost.com/svrluga.
Nats assistant Dillon takes a head-first coaching approach
BY
J ORGE C ASTILLO
west palm beach, fla. — A few
weeks ago, as he explained how
he fosters relationships with
players, Washington Nationals
hitting coach Kevin Long abruptly shifted topics to Joe Dillon and
his innovative techniques.
“This guy’s amazing,” Long
said. “I’ve got the best assistant
in baseball.”
Long, for all his groundbreaking expertise and success, has
been learning from Dillon, the
Nationals’ assistant hitting
coach, over the past several
weeks. Dillon has brought revolutionary methods to the batting
cage, methods even Long hadn’t
incorporated in his lauded work
with the New York Yankees and
Mets. Rather than the standard
half-speed drills, the banal soft
tossing and tee work, Dillon is a
proponent of creating gamelike
conditions outside of actual
games. The concept is standard
across sports. It’s novel in baseball.
“We’re the only sport in the
world that doesn’t train at game
speed,” Dillon noted.
Baseball lifer
Dillon, 42, is a baseball lifer
born of conventional methods.
He reached the major leagues for
his hitting ability using conventional methods and began his
coaching career teaching conventional methods. That all
changed two years ago because of
a discussion between two scientists in Nashville.
Sometime after the 2014 NFL
draft, Scott Wylie and Brandon
Ally, two faculty members in
Vanderbilt’s neurology and neurological surgery department
and former college athletes, had
a conversation in a hallway one
day about how draft prospects
were evaluated. They realized the
measurables discussed were
nearly all physical. There were
JEFF ROBERSON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Assistant hitting coach Joe Dillon focuses on creating gamelike
conditions and running cognitive drills with the Nationals players.
40-yard dash times to determine
speed, three-cone drill results to
assess quickness and benchpress reps to gauge strength.
Cognitive skills, however, were
always deemed immeasurable,
blanketed with vague terms.
Players possessed great or poor
instincts. They played faster or
slower than their speed. They
processed information quickly or
deliberately. Nothing concrete.
No hard data. All determined by
the naked eye. The two scientists,
whose work in neighboring labs
focused on more serious matters,
spotted an opportunity to evolve
from conceptual work on diseases to the application realm.
“We’ve got ways to quantify
that,” they determined, according to Wylie.
Nearly four years later, Wylie,
a former college baseball player,
and Ally, a former track athlete at
Tennessee, are co-founders of
SportsSense, a Nashville-based
company that seeks to quantify
what was previously thought unquantifiable in evaluating athletes: the set of cognitive skills
brains utilize to perform splitsecond decisions. In 2016, the
company, which has hired four
employees, nabbed a Southeastern Conference football team as
its first client — Wylie declined to
specify partners in a telephone
conversation. The clientele has
since expanded to several college
football teams, some Division I
baseball and golf programs, two
NFL franchises and five MLB
organizations. Plans for basketball, hockey and other sports are
in the works.
“We bring cognitive principles,
and they apply it,” said Wylie,
who now serves on the University of Louisville faculty along
with Ally. “It’s taking the guesswork out of understanding what
players are seeing.”
Dillon happened to join one of
the MLB clients two years ago
when he became the Miami Marlins’ minor league hitting coordinator. There he met Paul Phillips,
then the hitting coach for Miami’s Class AAA affiliate. Before
joining the Marlins, Phillips, a
former major leaguer, was on
Lipscomb University’s coaching
staff. The Nashville school was,
by chance, SportSense’s first foray into baseball.
Phillips brought the methods
to the Marlins and converted
Dillon. Working with SportsSense, which entered an official
partnership with the Marlins,
profiles were created for each
interested player based on information derived from their tendencies — chase rate, contact
rate in the strike zone, etc. Dillon
took that data and built specific
drills based on the findings on a
trial-and-error basis to improve
their cognitive skills.
“Everybody’s brains are wired
differently,” Wylie said. “Some
athletes can just see things faster.
They can recognize, identify,
what they’re seeing faster than
others. Some guys got great control of their impulses; they can
shut down their impulses faster.
Other guys take longer. It’s a tug
of war for time between the
pitcher and the hitter. The cognitive system contributes to the
advantages and disadvantages.”
Real-life example
Dillon pointed to Isaac Galloway, a center fielder in the Marlins’ farm system, as an example
of the program’s effectiveness.
After batting .254 with 10 home
runs and a .686 on-base-plusslugging percentage across 129
games in Class AAA as a 26-yearold in 2016, Galloway batted .280
with a .909 OPS and seven home
runs in 26 games at Class AAA
during an injury-plagued 2017
campaign. Wylie, however, admitted the evidence of improvements is more anecdotal than
scientific.
This spring, Dillon had specific pitching machines, ones that
can offer different types of pitches at various planes and angles,
sent to the Nationals’ facility in
West Palm Beach. With the machines, he puts players through
voluntary drills designed to
push their brains beyond their
comfort zones. The key to the
exercises, Dillon emphasized, is
the batter doesn’t swing at every
pitch like they’re accustomed to
during a standard pregame batting practice session.
“If you think traditionally how
we train, it’s swing, swing, swing,
and then they go tell you to be
patient in the game,” Dillon said.
“So we’ll work on saying, ‘No.’
There’s a process to saying, ‘Don’t
swing,’ just like there’s a process
that says, ‘Swing.’ ”
In one drill, utility man Matt
Reynolds explained, there are
four plates in front of each other.
The machine is set up to spit
fastballs at the average big league
speed and release point. The
hitter starts at the plate 60 feet 6
inches away and moves up after
each pitch — whether he swings
or not — and back down to the
original plate. Reynolds said he
moves up and back four times
during a session. The point is to
distort the brain. Each time the
batter moves up, the perceived
velocity increases by 10 mph.
Reynolds had never done drills
like that before.
“When you first step in, you’re
like, ‘Damn, this is throwing
hard,’ ” Reynolds said. “And then
you get up to the very front plate
and you’re like, ‘All right. [Shoot].
This is way too hard.’ And then
you work your way back and get
to the back plate and you’re like,
‘This isn’t throwing as hard as I
thought it was anymore.’ And
you’re actually early now. So it’s
really slowing the ball down with
your eyes. It’s a lot of vision work
and mental process.”
While Reynolds said he’d been
seeing only fastballs in drills
with Dillon, Matt Adams, a powerful slugger whose kryptonite
since breaking into the majors
has been left-handed pitching,
explained his drills have also
included breaking balls from
left-handed slots.
“This is a whole new world for
me,” Adams said. “Everybody
says that this game is more
mental than anything because
everybody’s got the physical tools
to play this game. I think just
being able to train your mind to
have a better strike zone, pick up
pitches better, I think that’s going to be huge.”
Trea Turner also said he’s
worked with Dillon. Ryan Zimmerman recently said he hadn’t
yet, but he planned to. Dillon’s
methods aren’t for everyone,
though, at least not yet. Bryce
Harper, for example, said he
doesn’t plan on incorporating
the drills into his routine. Of
course, Harper seems to have his
cognitive skills in the batter’s box
in order.
Wylie envisions a future in
which cognitive drills will become the norm and clubs will
incorporate cognitive data into
the predictive analytic models
they’re already using to construct rosters. For now, the Nationals don’t have an official
partnership with SportsSense,
though it’s on the table. Instead,
Dillon is spreading the word
every day in the cage, pushing
batters and their brains to the
brink, and perhaps giving the
Nationals a head start in what
could be the next frontier in
baseball’s never-ending quest for
an edge.
jorge.castillo@washpost.com
High-profile Arrieta signing signals Phillies are trying to accelerate their rebuild
PHILLIES FROM D1
finished 31 games out of first place
in 2017.
“This is going to be a pretty
perfect marriage,” said Gabe Kapler, the Phillies’ rookie manager,
“[between] what our players need
from Jake and what Jake can
bring to our clubhouse.”
“We [liked] Jake’s competitiveness, the way he competes, his
work ethic,” said General Manager Matt Klentak, who, like much of
the Phillies’ brain trust, was with
the Baltimore Orioles when that
franchise drafted Arrieta in 2007.
“He’s a winner.”
While the rest of the industry
has largely turned away from free
agency as the preferred method of
acquiring players — a trend that
has inflamed labor relations and
left many players still scrambling
for jobs — the Phillies have treated
these past 41/2 months as some sort
of game-show shopping spree,
where they have to fill up their
cart with as many shiny products
as possible and get to the checkout counter just before the clock
runs out.
Arrieta, the 2015 National
League Cy Young Award winner,
was the fourth free agent signed
to a multiyear deal by the Phillies
this offseason and the fourth
eight-figure contract the team has
handed out. In both categories,
only the Chicago Cubs — who
happen to have been Arrieta’s employer for the past 41/2 years —
have exceeded Philadelphia’s totals. The Phillies are also the only
team to have inked more than one
contract of $50 million or more,
having given first baseman Carlos
Santana a three-year, $60 million
deal in December.
In spending a total of $169.2
million in guaranteed contracts
this offseason, the Phillies have
outspent the rest of the NL East
($116.245 million) by roughly 46
percent. (The first-place Washington Nationals, by comparison,
have spent just $23.3 million.)
The question on many industry
insiders’ minds is: why? And the
answer appears to be some mixture of opportunity and opportunism.
By the end of 2017, the Phillies
were at a point in their rebuild
where they had cleared the books
of almost any player making significant money. At the same time,
the team, through the play of
young building blocks such as
starting pitcher Aaron Nola and
slugger Rhys Hoskins, had gone
37-36 over their final 73 games,
which the front office took as a
signal the corner had been turned.
The Phillies could have given
their rebuild another year, waited
until next winter and — with their
strong revenue and paltry salary
commitments — gone nuts in a
historic free agent market that
will include Bryce Harper, Manny
Machado and possibly Clayton
Kershaw. (And they still might, it’s
worth pointing out.) But in the
strange, depressed free agent
market of the winter of 2017-18,
the Phillies also saw the chance to
find bargains — and perhaps put
themselves in position to contend
for a playoff spot a year early.
“We showed [last year] we had
some pretty good players,” Hoskins said. “We might just need a
piece or two or three to push us
over the top. And we’re fortunate
enough our ownership has taken
that into their hands.”
The Phillies began talking with
Scott Boras, Arrieta’s agent, in
November, back when Boras was
said to be floating names like
Justin Verlander (seven years,
$180 million) and Max Scherzer
(seven years, $210 million) as
comparables. But they waited and
waited, and by late February
heard numbers more to their liking — then needed about two
weeks to hammer out a complex
deal that includes an opt-out for
Arrieta after 2019 that the Phillies
can override by granting a twoyear extension.
“When you bring in players like
Jake,” said Boras, whose stockpile
of lofty metaphors to describe his
clients is apparently endless, “you
put the cream in the coffee where
it’s ready to drink.”
But the harsher truth is that the
thriving marketplace Boras and
Arrieta may have imagined
emerging for the pitcher’s services never materialized. The
Cubs showed little interest in resigning him and moved on with
Yu Darvish (six years, $126 million) last month.
“Tthere were a number of reasons things didn’t go in a different
direction [with the Cubs],” said
Arrieta, who spent much of the
winter training near his Texas
home, “but that wasn’t necessarily the direction that maybe I wanted to go in.”
The Nationals presented a winnow team with a need for one
more front-line starter, as well as
an owner, Ted Lerner, with whom
Boras has hammered out deals in
the past. But the Nationals were
already over the luxury-tax
threshold of $197 million and
would have forfeited two draft
picks plus international signingpool money by signing Arrieta.
The draft-pick penalties are
“restraints [on spending] that are
dramatic,” Boras said, when asked
about the Nationals, “and clubs
have reacted [by] using this as a
means to say, ‘I don’t want to give
away the draft picks.’ ”
His unexpectedly harrowing
ride through free agency behind
him, Arrieta planned to huddle
with his new manager and coaches as soon as possible and plot out
a schedule that would get him
ready to pitch by the first part of
April.
The process of finding a new
home may have taken longer than
he expected, and he may not have
gotten everything he wanted. But
the sun was shining over Clearwater, Opening Day was drawing
near, and the Phillies, with their
ace in place, were pointed due
north.
“Am I upset or frustrated? Absolutely not,” Arrieta said. “You’re
trying to figure out for your family
where you’re going to live, who
your teammates are going to be,
what uniform you’re going to
wear. [But] you can’t write the
script yourself. . . . If you’d have
asked me where I’d expect to be at
the start of the offseason, I’ll tell
you: it wouldn’t be signing on
March 12.
“But it’s exciting as hell to be
here right now.”
dave.sheinin@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D7
M2
SPRING TRAINING NOTES
Mets send Tebow down as Wright learns he will be out another two months
F ROM NEWS SERVICES
Tim Tebow was reassigned by
the New York Mets to their minor
league camp Tuesday after he
went 0 for 4 with four strikeouts in
an exhibition against the Houston
Astros.
The former NFL quarterback
and 2007 Heisman Trophy winner
hit .056 (1 for 18) with 11 strikeouts
in seven big league exhibition
games. The 30-year-old, who is not
on the Mets’ 40-man roster, has
been hampered by a left ankle
sprain.
“I’ll just continue to work in all
the areas we’ve been working and
making progress. That’s really the
focus — to continue the process
and the journey and keep working,” Tebow said to reporters following the game.
Tebow’s only hit was a hard
single to center off Washington’s
Erick Fedde on March 2. He has
been used solely as a designated
hitter or pinch hitter because of
the injury.
“The ankle was kind of disappointing. I got to put in a lot of
good work and feel like I’m im-
proving. It’s getting there,” Tebow
said.
Earlier in spring training, Mets
General Manager Sandy Alderson
said he thinks Tebow will be in the
major leagues one day. Tebow said
that was not his focus right now.
Tebow, an outfielder, can appear in games for New York but
would have to be brought over
from the minor league side.
Meanwhile, Mets captain David
Wright won’t participate in baseball activities for two months because of back and shoulder issues,
another setback in his attempt to
return from injuries that have
sidelined him for two years, and
star outfielder Yoenis Cespedes is
sidelined after hurting a wrist.
The 35-year-old Wright has
been limited to 75 regular season
games in the past three years. A
seven-time all-star, Wright is guaranteed $47 million by the Mets
over the next three seasons. New
York signed Todd Frazier in case
Wright would not be able to play.
The 32-year-old Cespedes hurt
his right wrist while swinging in a
game March 6. He was to play
Tuesday but was scratched.
YANKEES: Rookie Gleyber
Torres’s time has not come — yet.
The Yankees made that official
when they sent Torres to minor
league camp after a 2-2 tie against
the Tigers in Tampa, according to
a Newsday report.
Torres, who went 1 for 2 with a
walk, was 4 for 25 (.160) in big
league camp as he works his way
back from last year’s Tommy John
surgery on his left (non-throwing)
elbow.
The Yankees signed veteran second baseman Neil Walker on Monday. Walker is expected to make
his spring training debut Friday,
according to Manager Aaron
Boone.
PIRATES: Ivan Nova will be
Pittsburgh’s Opening Day starting
pitcher at Detroit on March 29. It
is unclear whether he will remain
with the Pirates long term.
After the offseason trades of
2013 NL MVP Andrew McCutchen
and former 19-game winner Gerrit
Cole, Nova is a veteran on a team
that has turned toward youth. He
is owed $8.5 million in each of the
next two seasons as part of a threeyear, $26 million contract.
SCOREBOARD
B A S K ETB A L L
NBA
HOCKEY
Raptors 116, Nets 102
EASTERN CONFERENCE
ATLANTIC
W
y-Toronto ...................................50
y-Boston ....................................46
Philadelphia ...............................36
New York ...................................24
Brooklyn.....................................21
L
17
21
30
44
47
Pct
.746
.687
.545
.353
.309
GB
—
4
131/2
261/2
1/
29 2
SOUTHEAST
W
Washington ...............................38
Miami.........................................36
Charlotte....................................29
Orlando ......................................20
Atlanta.......................................20
L
30
32
39
48
48
Pct
.559
.529
.426
.294
.294
GB
—
2
9
18
18
CENTRAL
W
Indiana .......................................40
x-Cleveland ................................38
Milwaukee .................................36
Detroit .......................................30
Chicago ......................................23
L
28
28
31
37
44
Pct
.588
.576
.537
.448
.343
GB
—
1
31/2
91/2
161/2
SOUTHWEST
W
y-Houston ..................................53
New Orleans ..............................39
San Antonio ...............................38
Dallas .........................................22
Memphis ....................................18
L
14
28
30
46
49
Pct
.791
.582
.559
.324
.269
GB
—
14
151/2
311/2
35
NORTHWEST
W
Portland .....................................41
Oklahoma City ...........................41
Minnesota..................................40
Utah ...........................................38
x-Denver ....................................37
L
26
29
29
30
30
Pct
.612
.586
.580
.559
.552
GB
—
11/2
2
31/2
4
PACIFIC
W
y-Golden State...........................51
L.A. Clippers...............................37
x-L.A. Lakers..............................30
Sacramento ...............................21
x-Phoenix...................................19
L
16
29
36
47
49
Pct
.761
.561
.455
.309
.279
GB
—
131/2
201/2
301/2
321/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
TORONTO ........................... 32
BROOKLYN ......................... 40
25
27
30
18
29 — 116
17 — 102
TORONTO: Powell 2-4 0-0 5, Ibaka 2-6 5-5 9, Valanciunas
12-20 2-5 26, Lowry 4-13 2-2 11, DeRozan 6-12 2-2 15,
Miles 3-7 3-3 12, Hayes 0-0 0-0 0, Miller 0-1 0-0 0, Siakam
2-5 1-1 5, Poeltl 4-7 0-1 8, Nogueira 0-0 0-0 0, Wright 4-6
0-0 10, VanVleet 5-10 2-2 15. Totals 44-91 17-21 116.
BROOKLYN: Crabbe 2-7 0-0 6, Carroll 3-7 2-3 9, Cunningham 4-9 1-1 10, Dinwiddie 2-11 2-2 7, Russell 10-22 5-5
32, Hollis-Jefferson 7-11 5-6 19, Acy 2-6 0-0 5, LeVert
4-11 2-2 11, Harris 1-2 0-0 3. Totals 35-86 17-19 102.
Three-point Goals: Toronto 11-31 (Miles 3-6, VanVleet
3-6, Wright 2-4, DeRozan 1-2, Powell 1-2, Lowry 1-8,
Valanciunas 0-1, Ibaka 0-1, Miller 0-1), Brooklyn 15-36
(Russell 7-12, Crabbe 2-5, Cunningham 1-2, Harris 1-2,
LeVert 1-3, Carroll 1-3, Dinwiddie 1-4, Acy 1-5). Fouled
Out: None. Rebounds: Toronto 53 (Valanciunas 14),
Brooklyn 38 (Hollis-Jefferson, Russell 7). Assists: Toronto 27 (Lowry 11), Brooklyn 21 (LeVert 7). Total Fouls:
Toronto 20, Brooklyn 19. A: 16,654 (17,732).
27
20
23 — 115
27 — 119
CHARLOTTE: Kidd-Gilchrist 3-9 1-2 7, Williams 1-8 0-0 2,
Howard 9-12 4-7 22, Walker 9-20 1-1 22, Batum 7-16 5-5
20, Bacon 0-1 0-0 0, Kaminsky 9-13 1-1 21, Monk 1-4 0-0 3,
Lamb 5-9 6-6 16, Graham 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 45-93 18-22 115.
NEW ORLEANS: Moore 6-14 0-0 14, Davis 13-26 5-6 31,
Okafor 7-14 0-0 14, Rondo 6-13 0-0 12, Holiday 11-21 0-0
25, Miller 0-1 0-0 0, Mirotic 4-9 0-0 11, Clark 5-6 1-2 12,
Liggins 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 52-104 6-8 119.
Three-point Goals: Charlotte 7-26 (Walker 3-7, Kaminsky 2-4, Monk 1-3, Batum 1-5, Lamb 0-1, Bacon 0-1,
Williams 0-5), New Orleans 9-22 (Holiday 3-6, Mirotic
3-6, Moore 2-4, Clark 1-2, Miller 0-1, Davis 0-3). Fouled
Out: None. Rebounds: Charlotte 45 (Howard 11), New
Orleans 50 (Davis 14). Assists: Charlotte 22 (Batum 8),
New Orleans 33 (Rondo 17). Total Fouls: Charlotte 13,
New Orleans 16. A: 15,507 (16,867).
N.C. Central (19-15) vs. Texas Southern (15-19), 6:40
Arizona State (20-11) vs. Syracuse (20-13), 9:10
EAST REGION
FIRST ROUND
THURSDAY'S GAMES
IN PITTSBURGH
Villanova (30-4) vs. Radford (23-12), 6:50
Virginia Tech (21-11) vs. Alabama (19-15), 9:20
IN DALLAS
Texas Tech (24-9) vs. Stephen F. Austin (28-6), 7:27
Florida (20-12) vs. St. Bonaventure (26-7), 9:57
FRIDAY'S GAMES
IN DETROIT
Wichita State (25-7) vs. Marshall (24-10), 1:30
West Virginia (24-10) vs. Murray State (26-5), 4
SOUTH REGION
FIRST ROUND
THURSDAY'S GAMES
IN DALLAS
Tennessee (25-8) vs. Wright State (25-9), 12:40
Miami (22-9) vs. Loyola of Chicago (28-5), 3:10
IN BOISE, IDAHO
Kentucky (24-10) vs. Davidson (21-11), 7:10
Arizona (27-7) vs. Buffalo (26-8), 9:40
FRIDAY'S GAMES
IN CHARLOTTE
Creighton (21-11) vs. Kansas State (22-11), 6:50
Virginia (31-2) vs. UMBC (24-10), 9:20
31
33
28
18
Cincinnati (30-4) vs. Georgia State (24-10), 2
Nevada (27-7) vs. Texas (19-14), 4:30
22 — 112
28 — 106
L.A. CLIPPERS: Thornwell 1-3 1-2 3, Harris 6-14 2-2 18,
Jordan 11-12 7-12 29, Rivers 4-11 3-4 12, L.Williams
6-15 13-14 26, Johnson 0-1 0-0 0, Dekker 1-1 0-0 2,
Harrell 3-4 4-7 10, Marjanovic 0-3 0-0 0, Teodosic 3-8 0-0
7, Evans 2-4 0-0 5. Totals 37-76 30-41 112.
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
Minnesota 116, at Washington 111
Indiana 101, at Philadelphia 98
Dallas 110, at New York 97
Oklahoma City 119, at Atlanta 107
Toronto 116, at Brooklyn 102
at New Orleans 119, Charlotte 115
L.A. Clippers 112, at Chicago 106
at San Antonio 108, Orlando72
at Utah 110, Detroit 79
Cleveland at Phoenix, Late
Denver at L.A. Lakers, Late
CHICAGO: Nwaba 7-11 0-0 15, Vonleh 3-11 2-2 8, Lopez
6-8 0-0 12, Dunn 6-9 6-6 18, LaVine 3-13 3-3 10,
Valentine 2-6 0-1 4, Portis 8-19 0-0 19, Felicio 2-6 0-0 4,
Payne 4-10 1-2 10, Blakeney 2-8 1-1 6. Totals 43-101
13-15 106.
Three-point Goals: L.A. Clippers 8-29 (Harris 4-8, Evans
1-2, Teodosic 1-5, Rivers 1-5, L.Williams 1-7, Johnson
0-1, Thornwell 0-1), Chicago 7-29 (Portis 3-6, Nwaba 1-2,
Payne 1-2, Blakeney 1-3, LaVine 1-5, Felicio 0-1, Valentine 0-1, Dunn 0-2, Lopez 0-2, Vonleh 0-5). Fouled Out:
None. Rebounds: L.A. Clippers 42 (Jordan 18), Chicago 45
(Portis 9). Assists: L.A. Clippers 27 (Rivers 6), Chicago
26 (Dunn 6). Total Fouls: L.A. Clippers 14, Chicago 28.
Technicals: LaVine, Chicago coach Fred Hoiberg. A:
20,912 (20,917).
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
Washington at Boston, 8
Milwaukee at Orlando, 7
Miami at Sacramento, 10
L.A. Lakers at Golden State, 10:30
ORLANDO ........................... 18
SAN ANTONIO ................... 24
Toronto at Indiana, 7
Charlotte at Atlanta, 7:30
Philadelphia at New York, 7:30
Chicago at Memphis, 8
L.A. Clippers at Houston, 8
New Orleans at San Antonio, 8:30
Detroit at Denver, 9
Phoenix at Utah, 9
Cleveland at Portland, 10
19
38
20
34
15 — 72
12 — 108
ORLANDO: Hezonja 2-7 0-0 4, Isaac 3-5 0-0 7, Vucevic
5-14 0-0 10, Augustin 3-7 2-2 9, Simmons 3-13 3-3 10,
Iwundu 2-6 0-0 4, Speights 2-6 0-0 6, Birch 2-6 0-0 4,
Biyombo 0-0 2-2 2, Mack 3-9 0-0 7, Purvis 0-3 2-2 2,
Afflalo 3-6 0-0 7. Totals 28-82 9-9 72.
FRIDAY’S GAMES
Boston at Orlando, 7
Brooklyn at Philadelphia, 7
Dallas at Toronto, 7:30
L.A. Clippers at Oklahoma City, 8
Miami at L.A. Lakers, 10:30
Sacramento at Golden State, 10:30
Mavericks 110, Knicks 97
26
12
27 — 110
25 — 97
DALLAS: Barnes 10-19 9-9 30, Nowitzki 5-10 0-0 13,
Finney-Smith 1-4 1-2 3, Smith Jr. 6-19 2-2 17, Ferrell 4-8
0-0 10, McDermott 3-6 0-0 8, Powell 1-1 4-4 7, Warney
4-7 0-1 8, Noel 1-5 0-0 2, Barea 5-10 0-0 12, Collinsworth
0-0 0-0 0. Totals 40-89 16-18 110.
NEW YORK: Hardaway Jr. 8-17 2-2 19, Thomas 1-5 0-0 3,
Kanter 1-4 1-2 3, Mudiay 4-9 0-0 10, Lee 0-1 0-0 0,
Beasley 10-13 1-1 21, Williams 3-8 1-2 7, O’Quinn 3-5 2-2
8, Ntilikina 2-8 0-0 4, Burke 6-9 1-1 16, Dotson 2-3 1-2 6.
Totals 40-82 9-12 97.
Three-point Goals: Dallas 14-35 (Nowitzki 3-7, Smith Jr.
3-8, Barea 2-4, Ferrell 2-5, McDermott 2-5, Powell 1-1,
Barnes 1-3, Finney-Smith 0-2), New York 8-25 (Burke
3-4, Mudiay 2-4, Dotson 1-2, Thomas 1-3, Hardaway Jr.
1-6, Lee 0-1, Williams 0-2, Ntilikina 0-3). Fouled Out:
None. Rebounds: Dallas 40 (Finney-Smith 9), New York
44 (Kanter 15). Assists: Dallas 22 (Barea 7), New York 19
(Ntilikina 6). Total Fouls: Dallas 15, New York 18.
Technicals: New York coach Knicks (Defensive three
second). A: 18,597 (19,812).
Thunder 119, Hawks 107
36
22
29 — 119
19 — 107
ATLANTIC
Tampa Bay ....................
Boston ...........................
Toronto .........................
Florida ...........................
Montreal .......................
Detroit ..........................
Ottawa ..........................
Buffalo ..........................
W
48
44
40
34
26
26
25
22
L
18
16
22
26
32
32
33
35
OL PTS. GF GA
4 100 257 198
8
96 232 176
7
87 228 197
7
75 205 212
12
64 179 221
11
63 180 211
11
61 193 240
12
56 165 224
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W
45
41
39
38
37
37
30
L
14
19
24
26
24
27
32
OL PTS. GF GA
10 100 225 174
10
92 230 185
7
85 217 203
6
82 200 184
8
82 220 203
5
79 191 182
8
68 199 207
PACIFIC
Vegas ............................
San Jose ........................
x-Los Angeles ...............
Calgary ..........................
Anaheim .......................
Edmonton .....................
Vancouver .....................
x-Arizona ......................
W
45
37
38
35
34
30
25
22
L
19
23
26
26
24
35
36
35
OL PTS. GF GA
5
95 235 187
9
83 203 189
5
81 200 173
10
80 198 206
12
80 195 193
4
64 193 222
9
59 183 228
11
55 163 219
x-Late game
at Washington 3, Winnipeg 2 (OT)
Vegas 3, at Philadelphia 2
at Columbus 5, Montreal 2
at N.Y. Rangers 6, Carolina 3
Ottawa 5, at Florida 3
St. Louis 4, at Anaheim 2
at San Jose 5, Detroit 3
at Los Angeles 3, Vancouver 0
Dallas at Toronto, 7
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Rangers, 8
San Jose at Edmonton, 9:30
New Jersey at Vegas, 10
Vancouver at Anaheim, 10
WEST REGION
FIRST ROUND
THURSDAY'S GAMES
IN WICHITA
IN BOISE, IDAHO
Gonzaga (30-4) vs. UNC Greensboro (27-7), 1:30
Ohio State (24-8) vs. South Dakota State (28-6), 4
FRIDAY'S GAMES
IN CHARLOTTE
Texas A&M (20-12) vs. Providence (21-13), 12:15
North Carolina (25-10) vs. Lipscomb (23-9), 2:45
NCAA women’s tournament
ALBANY REGION
FIRST ROUND
FRIDAY’S GAMES
IN COLUMBIA, S.C.
California (21-10) vs. Virginia (18-13), 5
South Carolina (26-6) vs. N.C. A&T (23-8), 7:30
SATURDAY’S GAMES
IN STORRS, CONN.
Radford (23-12)
Polite 3-10 7-8 13, Phillips 2-4 0-0 4, Jones 6-14 0-1 12,
D.Hicks 4-9 1-2 11, Bradford 2-3 0-0 4, T.Owens 0-1 0-0 0,
Butts 0-1 0-0 0, Holland 4-7 1-2 9, Bolstad 1-1 0-0 2,
Cooper 0-0 0-0 0, Cousin 0-0 0-0 0, Tanner 1-3 0-0 3, Fields
5-6 0-0 13, Saunders 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 28-59 9-13 71.
Halftime: Radford 30-28. Three-point goals: LIU Brooklyn 7-26 (Batts 3-7, Clark 1-1, van Sauers 1-3, Hernandez
1-5, Coleman 1-5, Frias 0-1, Robinson 0-2, Agosto 0-2),
Radford 6-17 (Fields 3-3, D.Hicks 2-5, Tanner 1-3, Polite
0-1, T.Owens 0-1, Bradford 0-1, Jones 0-3). Fouled out:
D.Hicks, Clark. Rebounds: LIU Brooklyn 30 (Batts 8),
Radford 35 (Polite 12). Assists: LIU Brooklyn 13 (Agosto
7), Radford 17 (Jones 7). Total fouls: LIU Brooklyn 19,
Radford 23.
U-Conn. (32-0) vs. Saint Francis (Pa.) (24-9), 11 a.m.
Miami (21-10) vs. Quinnipiac (27-5), 1:30
IN ATHENS, GA.
St. Bonaventure 65, UCLA 58
Duke (22-8) vs. Belmont (31-3), 11 a.m.
Georgia (25-6) vs. Mercer (30-2), 1:30
St. Bonaventure (26-7)
Stockard 9-20 6-8 26, Ikpeze 0-1 0-0 0, Mobley 4-12 4-4
14, Adams 2-16 4-6 8, Taqqee 2-3 1-2 5, Griffin 5-6 0-1
10, Brockington 0-1 0-0 0, Kaputo 1-1 0-0 2. 23-60 Totals
15-21 65.
IN TALLAHASSEE
Florida State (25-6) vs. Little Rock (23-9), 11 a.m.
South Florida (26-7) vs. Buffalo (27-5), 1:30
SPOKANE REGION
FIRST ROUND
FRIDAY’S GAMES
IN NOTRE DAME, IND.
Notre Dame (29-3) vs. Cal State Northridge (19-15), 5
South Dakota State (26-6) vs. Villanova (22-8), 7:30
IN COLLEGE STATION, TEX.
IN EUGENE, ORE.
Green Bay (29-3) vs. Minnesota (23-8), 5
Oregon (30-4) vs. Seattle (18-14), 7:30
LSU (19-9) vs. Central Michigan (28-4), 11 a.m.
Ohio State (27-6) vs. George Washington (19-13), 1:30
KANSAS CITY REGION
FIRST ROUND
FRIDAY’S GAMES
IN RALEIGH, N.C.
Maryland (25-7) vs. Princeton (24-5), noon
N.C. State (24-8) vs. Elon (25-7), 2:30
SATURDAY’S GAMES
IN STARKVILLE, MISS.
Syracuse (22-8) vs. Oklahoma State (20-10), 3:30
Mississippi State (32-1) vs. Nicholls (19-13), 6
UCLA (21-12)
Goloman 1-1 0-0 2, Welsh 1-5 0-0 2, Holiday 7-17 2-2 20,
Ali 5-10 1-2 13, Hands 1-4 1-2 4, Olesinski 3-4 1-2 7,
Okwarabizie 0-0 0-0 0, Wilkes 3-7 1-2 10, Smith 0-1 0-0
0, A.Wulff 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 21-50 6-10 58.
Halftime: St. Bonaventure 28-23. Three-point goals: St.
Bonaventure 4-19 (Mobley 2-7, Stockard 2-7, Adams
0-5), UCLA 10-30 (Holiday 4-11, Wilkes 3-6, Ali 2-6,
Hands 1-3, Smith 0-1, A.Wulff 0-1, Welsh 0-2). Fouled
out: Holiday. Rebounds: St. Bonaventure 30 (Taqqee 11),
UCLA 37 (Welsh 15). Assists: St. Bonaventure 7
(Mobley, Adams 3), UCLA 13 (Holiday 7). Total fouls: St.
Bonaventure 14, UCLA 18.
FIRST ROUND
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
Baylor 80, Wagner 59
Louisville 66, Northern Kentucky 58
at Middle Tennessee 91, Vermont 64
at Western Kentucky 79, Boston College 62
at Notre Dame 81, Hampton 63
at Oklahoma State 80, Florida Gulf Coast 68
at Saint Mary’s 89, SE Louisiana 45
Rider at Oregon, Late
UNC Asheville at Southern Cal, Late
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
Harvard (18-13) at Marquette (19-13), 7
Louisiana-Lafayette (27-6) at LSU (17-14), 7
Temple (17-15) at Penn State (21-13), 8
Nebraska (22-10) at Mississippi State (22-11), 9
UC Davis (22-10) at Utah (19-11), 9
BYU (24-10) at Stanford (18-15), 10
Boise State (23-8) at Washington (20-12), 10
TRANSACTIONS
Arizona State (21-12) vs. Nebraska (21-10), 3:30
Texas (26-6) vs. Maine (23-9), 6
LEXINGTON REGION
FIRST ROUND
FRIDAY’S GAMES
IN LOUISVILLE
Louisville (32-2) vs. Boise State (23-9), noon
Marquette (23-9) vs. Dayton (23-6), 2:30
IN KNOXVILLE, TENN.
Oregon State (23-7) vs. Western Kentucky (24-8), noon
Tennessee (24-7) vs. Liberty (24-9), 2:30
IN WACO, TEX.
Michigan (22-9) vs. Northern Colorado (26-6), 5
Baylor (31-1) vs. Grambling State (19-13), 7:30
SATURDAY’S GAMES
IN STANFORD, CALIF.
Missouri (24-7) vs. Florida Gulf Coast (30-4), 3:30
Stanford (22-10) vs. Gonzaga (27-5), 6
NFL
Arizona Cardinals: Released RB Adrian Peterson.
Atlanta Falcons: Signed CB Leon McFadden and OL
Austin Pasztor to one-year contract extensions.
Baltimore Ravens: Released RB Danny Woodhead.
Buffalo Bills: Agreed to terms with DT Kyle Williams on
a one-year contract.
Chicago Bears: Place right of first refusal tenders on WR
Joshua Bellamy, DB Bryce Callahan and WR Cameron
Meredith.
Detroit Lions: Re-signed S Tavon Wilson.
Green Bay Packers: Released WR Jordy Nelson.
Jacksonville Jaguars: Announced the retirement of LB
Paul Posluszny.
Miami Dolphins: Released LB Lawrence Timmons.
Philadelphia Eagles: Released TE Brent Celek.
Tampa Bay Buccaneers: Re-signed WR Mike Evans to a
five-year contract and TE Cameron Brate to a six-year
contract.
SHOTS ON GOAL
WINNIPEG ............................... 6
12
15 — 33
NASHVILLE ............................ 24
11
10 — 45
Power-play opportunities: Winnipeg 1 of 6; Nashville 0
of 3. Goalies: Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 35-11-9 (30 shots-30
saves), Hutchinson 2-0-0 (15-12). Nashville, Rinne
37-9-4 (33-32). T: 2:46.
ST. LOUIS ................................. 1
ANAHEIM ................................ 0
2
1
1 —
1 —
4
2
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, St. Louis, Bortuzzo 3 (Pietrangelo, Schenn),
17:30.
Scoring: 5, Anaheim, Grant 9 (Lindholm, Kelly), 6:15. 6,
St. Louis, Berglund 9 (Brodziak), 11:28.
SHOTS ON GOAL
1
1
1 —
2 —
3
5
Scoring: 6, San Jose, Meier 18 (DeMelo, Boedker), 5:12
(pp). 7, Detroit, Zetterberg 10 (Nyquist, Bertuzzi), 5:53.
8, San Jose, Tierney 17 (Braun, Pavelski), 18:26.
SHOTS ON GOAL
DETROIT .................................. 9
11
6 — 26
SAN JOSE .............................. 12
9
13 — 34
Power-play opportunities: Detroit 0 of 2; San Jose 1 of 3.
Goalies: Detroit, Howard 18-24-8 (33 shots-29 saves).
San Jose, Jones 23-18-6 (26-23). A: 17,199 (17,562). T:
2:25.
Kings 3, Canucks 0
Late Monday
VANCOUVER ........................... 0
LOS ANGELES .......................... 0
0
2
0 —
1 —
0
3
Scoring: 1, Los Angeles, Toffoli 22 (Muzzin, Kempe),
1:57. 2, Los Angeles, Kopitar 28 (Doughty, Forbort),
14:54.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Los Angeles, Pearson 13 (Kempe, Toffoli),
10:53.
6
4
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Boston, Marchand 30 (Ril.Nash, Pastrnak),
19:49.
SHOTS ON GOAL
VANCOUVER ........................... 5
13
17 — 35
LOS ANGELES .......................... 8
10
15 — 33
Power-play opportunities: Vancouver 0 of 3; Los Angeles
0 of 3. Goalies: Vancouver, Nilsson 7-13-3 (33 shots-30
saves). Los Angeles, Quick 27-25-2 (35-35). A: 18,230
(18,230). T: 2:28.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Carolina, Aho 25 (Teravainen, Faulk), 2:10
(pp). 3, Carolina, Teravainen 21 (Faulk, Aho), 12:06 (pp).
4, Carolina, Williams 15 (Lindholm, McGinn), 18:43.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 5, Carolina, McGinn 12 (Lindholm), 0:51 (sh). 6,
Boston, Grzelcyk 3 (Kuraly, Schaller), 10:04. 7, Boston,
Pastrnak 25 (Marchand), 11:00. 8, Boston, Heinen 13
(Krejci, Ric.Nash), 11:21. 9, Boston, Pastrnak 26 (Marchand, Grzelcyk), 16:30 (pp). 10, Boston, Pastrnak 27
(Miller, Ril.Nash), 18:26.
SHOTS ON GOAL
BOSTON ................................. 13
6
15 — 34
CAROLINA ............................... 7
18
8 — 33
Power-play opportunities: Boston 1 of 4; Carolina 2 of 5.
Goalies: Boston, T.Rask 29-11-4 (33 shots-29 saves).
Carolina, Ward 19-12-4 (33-28). A: 13,081 (18,680). T:
2:40.
Senators 7, Lightning 4
OTTAWA .................................. 3
TAMPA BAY ............................ 1
3
2
1 —
1 —
7
4
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Tampa Bay, Miller 16 (Stamkos, Kucherov),
4:19. 2, Ottawa, Paajarvi 7 (Pageau, Pyatt), 7:47. 3,
Ottawa, Dzingel 20 (Gaborik, Ceci), 10:47 (pp). 4,
Ottawa, Pyatt 7 (Ceci, Borowiecki), 11:24.
Scoring: 5, Tampa Bay, Miller 17 (Hedman, Kucherov),
2:03 (pp). 6, Ottawa, Gaborik 9 (Dzingel, Burrows), 7:18
(pp). 7, Ottawa, Hoffman 20 (Duchene, Burgdoerfer),
13:44. 8, Tampa Bay, Miller 18 (Stamkos, Hedman),
16:26 (pp). 9, Ottawa, Karlsson 8, 18:30.
MLS
EASTERN
W
Columbus .........................2
New York City FC .............2
New York .........................1
Philadelphia .....................1
New England ....................1
Atlanta United FC ............1
Orlando City .....................0
D.C. United .......................0
Chicago ............................0
Montreal ..........................0
Toronto FC .......................0
L
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
T PTS
0
6
0
6
0
3
0
3
0
3
0
3
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
GF
5
4
4
2
2
3
2
2
3
3
0
GA
2
1
0
0
3
5
3
4
4
5
2
WESTERN
W
Los Angeles FC ................2
Vancouver ........................2
Houston ...........................1
San Jose ...........................1
Minnesota United ............1
LA Galaxy .........................1
Sporting KC ......................1
Dallas ...............................0
Real Salt Lake ..................0
Colorado ...........................0
Seattle .............................0
Portland ...........................0
L
0
0
1
0
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
2
T PTS
0
6
0
6
0
3
0
3
0
3
0
3
0
3
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
GF
6
4
5
3
4
3
4
1
2
1
0
1
GA
1
2
2
2
4
3
5
1
6
2
1
6
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
SHOTS ON GOAL
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
OTTAWA ................................ 17
12
4 — 33
TAMPA BAY .......................... 17
21
8 — 46
Power-play opportunities: Ottawa 2 of 2; Tampa Bay 2 of
4. Goalies: Ottawa, Condon 5-13-5 (46 shots-42 saves).
Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 40-13-3 (29-23), Budaj 3-3-1
(4-3). A: 19,092 (19,092). T: 2:36.
at Atlanta United FC 3, D.C. United 1
at New York City FC 2, LA Galaxy 1
1
2
0 —
1 —
2
4
4
4
3
1
2
1
3
1
3
1
3
4
4
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
2
0
34 4 7
NEW YORK
WASHINGTON
Wi.Difo 2b
Rynolds 2b
T.Trner ss
M.Serra lf
B.Hrper rf
Butista pr
A.Rndon 3b
Stvnson ph
Goodwin lf
Wieters c
R.Rburn ph
V.Rbles cf
Brignac ss
Mrmljos 1b
Dmnguez 1b
Schrzer sp
Montero ph
Kieboom c
4 TOTALS
000
302
4
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
4
3
1
3
1
3
1
2
1
1
0
0
2
0
2
1
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
2
0
1
1
1
2
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
34 7 11
000
002
310
00X
—
—
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
2
1
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
7
4
7
E: Difo (2). LOB: New York 5, Washington 8. 2B: Rosario
(3), Harper (3), Stevenson (5). HR: Rosario (1). SB: den
Dekker (1), Turner 2 (2), Harper (2). SF: Rendon (1).
NEW YORK
IP
H
R
ER
BB
SO
3
1 .1
.2
1
2
7
1
0
2
1
5
0
0
2
0
5
0
0
2
0
2
1
0
1
0
3
1
0
1
2
WASHINGTON
IP
H
R
ER
BB
SO
Scherzer (W, 3-0)
Smith
Madson
Benoit
Collins (S, 1-1)
5
1
1
1
1
1
0
4
2
0
0
0
3
1
0
0
0
3
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
9
0
1
1
3
Wheeler (L, 0-1)
Lugo
Taylor
Griffin
Robles
Umpires: Home, Gary Cederstrom; First, Jerry Meals;
Second, CB Bucknor; Third, Andy Fletcher.
T: 2:52. A: 4,942
Orioles 7, Twins 5
BALTIMORE
AB R H BI MINNESOTA
Beckham 3b
Rickard cf
Mancini lf
Sntnder rf
Machado ss
Rdrguez 1b
Alvarez dh
Vlencia 1b
J.Reyes 3b
C.Gntry cf
C.Sisco c
Au.Hays rf
Presley lf
A.Wynns c
Srdinas ss
E.Velma 2b
R.Tjada 2b
3
1
3
2
3
2
4
3
2
3
1
3
0
2
1
3
1
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
2
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
1
37 7 9
BALTIMORE
MINNESOTA
0
0
0
2
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
1
AB R H BI
B.Dzier 2b
Escobar ph
J.Mauer 1b
Adranza ss
Mi.Sano 3b
M.Grver c
Mrrison dh
N.Grdon ph
Polanco ss
C.Hisey lf
J.Cstro c
Astdllo 1b
B.Stssi lf
Ni.Buss rf
LaMarre rf
Fthrstn 3b
Granite cf
La.Wade cf
7 TOTALS
000
004
2
2
3
2
2
0
2
1
2
2
3
2
1
2
2
2
2
1
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
1
1
0
1
0
33 5 9
130
010
210
000
—
—
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
2
0
1
0
5
7
5
E: Polanco (4). DP: Baltimore 0, Minnesota 2. LOB:
Baltimore 7, Minnesota 13. 2B: Machado (5), Sano (3),
Stassi (1), Buss (2), LaMarre (1). HR: Santander (3),
Wynns (3). SB: Machado (1), Mullins (1), Valencia (1),
Vielma (1), Polanco (1). SF: LaMarre (1).
BALTIMORE
IP
H
R
ER
BB
SO
Tillman
Hart
Edgin
Mesa (W, 3-1)
Yacabonis (H, 1)
Teague (S, 2-2)
2
2
1
2
1
1
3
3
2
0
0
1
4
0
1
0
0
0
4
0
1
0
0
0
6
1
0
2
1
0
1
2
1
1
1
1
MINNESOTA
IP
H
R
ER
BB
SO
3
1
1 .1
1 .2
2
0
2
4
1
2
0
1
3
2
1
0
1
2
2
1
1
0
0
0
2
5
1
0
2
2
HBP: by: Mesa (Garver), Rogers (Rickard).
WP: Rodney.
Umpires: Home, Fieldin Culbreth; First, Jeff Kellogg;
Second, Brian O’Nora; Third, Marvin Hudson.
T: 3:19. A: 8,245
TE NNI S
ATP/WTA
BNP PARIBAS OPEN
Scoring: 10, Ottawa, Hoffman 21 (Karlsson, Duchene),
3:46. 11, Tampa Bay, McDonagh 3 (Stamkos, Kucherov),
12:44.
DALLAS .................................... 1
MONTREAL .............................. 1
AB R H BI WASHINGTON AB R H BI
Lagares cf
Rosario ss
Cabrera 2b
T.Kelly 2b
Frazier 3b
Thmpson 3b
W.Flres 1b
P.Alnso 1b
Plwecki c
To.Nido c
dn Dkkr lf
Kczmrsk rf
Mazeika dh
Lynn
Rodney
Hildenberger B (S, 0-2)
Rogers L, 0-1 B (S, 0-2)
Jaye
SOCCER
at Columbus 3, Montreal 2
at New England 2, Colorado 1
Los Angeles FC 5, at Real Salt Lake 1
Sporting KC 4, at Chicago 3
Vancouver 2, at Houston 1
at New York 4, Portland 0
Minnesota United 2, at Orlando City 1
THIRD PERIOD
NEW YORK
TOTALS
SECOND PERIOD
5 —
1 —
Nationals 7, Mets 4
TOTALS
THIRD PERIOD
THIRD PERIOD
0
3
Washington 7, N.Y. Mets (ss) 4
Baltimore 7, Minnesota 5
Detroit 2, N.Y. Yankees 2, tie
Toronto 13, Atlanta 6
Philadelphia 6, Tampa Bay 3
St. Louis 11, Miami 4
Houston 6, N.Y. Mets (ss) 1
Milwaukee 4, Texas 3
San Diego 7, Chicago Cubs (ss) 5
Oakland 9, Kansas City 8
Colorado 8, Seattle 7
San Francisco at Chicago Cubs (ss), Late
Scoring: 2, St. Louis, Barbashev 7 (Pietrangelo, Soshnikov), 3:00. 3, Anaheim, Perry 15 (Montour, Getzlaf), 4:17.
4, St. Louis, Sobotka 10 (Barbashev, Schmaltz), 16:50.
Scoring: 4, San Jose, Labanc 9 (Meier, Tierney), 1:39. 5,
Detroit, Nyquist 17 (Daley, Bertuzzi), 5:05.
Bruins 6, Hurricanes 4
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
SECOND PERIOD
SECOND PERIOD
Washington at N.Y. Islanders, 7
Columbus at Philadelphia, 7
Toronto at Buffalo, 7
Pittsburgh at Montreal, 7:30
Boston at Florida, 7:30
Chicago at Winnipeg, 8
Colorado at St. Louis, 8
Detroit at Los Angeles, 10
Nashville at Arizona, 10
BOSTON ................................... 1
CAROLINA ............................... 0
Late Monday
Scoring: 1, Detroit, Daley 9 (Bertuzzi, Zetterberg), 5:01.
2, San Jose, Donskoi 13 (Pavelski, Kane), 10:55. 3, San
Jose, Fehr 1 (Dillon, DeMelo), 12:39.
Canadiens 4, Stars 2
IN AUSTIN
Scoring: 4, Winnipeg, Connor 23 (Wheeler, Laine), 1:08
(pp).
FIRST PERIOD
SECOND PERIOD
NIT
THIRD PERIOD
DETROIT .................................. 1
SAN JOSE ................................ 2
THURSDAY’S GAMES
Radford 71, LIU Brooklyn 61
LIU Brooklyn (18-17)
van Sauers 1-3 0-1 3, Hernandez 3-11 1-2 8, Batts 4-9 2-2
13, Agosto 5-9 6-8 16, Clark 3-6 7-10 14, Coleman 3-9 0-0
7, Penn 0-0 0-0 0, Frias 0-1 0-0 0, Robinson 0-2 0-0 0.
19-50 Totals 16-23 61.
Scoring: 1, Nashville, Fiala 22 (Turris, Josi), 2:48. 2,
Nashville, Watson 12 (Ellis), 8:15 (sh). 3, Nashville,
Arvidsson 26 (Forsberg), 8:49 (sh).
Late Monday
Boston6, at Carolina 4
Ottawa 7, at Tampa Bay 4
at Montreal 4, Dallas 2
at Nashville 3, Winnipeg 1
Colorado 5, at Minnesota 1
at Calgary 1, Edmonton 0
Los Angeles at Arizona, Late
Auburn (25-7) vs. College of Charleston (26-7), 7:27
Clemson (23-9) vs. New Mexico State (28-5), 9:57
1
3
Sharks 5, Red Wings 3
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
1 —
0 —
ST. LOUIS ............................... 10
9
4 — 23
ANAHEIM ................................ 7
7
8 — 22
Power-play opportunities: St. Louis 0 of 1; Anaheim 0 of
1. Goalies: St. Louis, Allen 21-20-2 (22 shots-20 saves).
Anaheim, Gibson 25-17-6 (23-19). A: 16,312 (17,174). T:
2:16.
MONDAY’S RESULTS
IN SAN DIEGO
0
0
FIRST PERIOD
Blues 4, Ducks 2
CENTRAL
Nashville .......................
Winnipeg ......................
Minnesota .....................
Dallas ............................
Colorado ........................
St. Louis ........................
Chicago .........................
Three-point Goals: Orlando 7-23 (Speights 2-5, Augustin
1-1, Afflalo 1-2, Isaac 1-2, Mack 1-4, Simmons 1-5,
Hezonja 0-1, Purvis 0-1, Vucevic 0-2), San Antonio 9-19
(Green 3-6, Forbes 2-2, Mills 2-5, Anderson 1-1, Gay 1-3,
Ginobili 0-1, Bertans 0-1). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds:
Orlando 41 (Vucevic 10), San Antonio 48 (Murray 8).
Assists: Orlando 16 (Augustin 6), San Antonio 24 (Parker
8). Total Fouls: Orlando 19, San Antonio 13. Technicals:
Orlando coach Frank Vogel. A: 18,418 (18,418).
UCLA (24-7) vs. American (26-6), 3:30
Iowa (24-7) vs. Creighton (18-12), 6
Three-point Goals: Indiana 5-24 (Turner 2-4, Sabonis
1-1, Joseph 1-2, Oladipo 1-4, T.Young 0-1, Robinson III
0-1, Booker 0-2, Collison 0-2, Stephenson 0-2, Bogdanovic 0-5), Philadelphia 10-30 (Redick 4-5, Saric 2-6,
Covington 2-7, Ilyasova 1-2, Belinelli 1-5, Embiid 0-5).
Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Indiana 45 (T.Young 10),
Philadelphia 48 (Simmons 13). Assists: Indiana 20
(Joseph 5), Philadelphia 24 (Simmons 10). Total Fouls:
Indiana 23, Philadelphia 25. Technicals: Philadelphia
coach 76ers (Defensive three second), Embiid. A: 20,531
(21,600).
Michigan State (29-4) vs. Bucknell (25-9), 7:10
TCU (21-11) vs. Arizona State-Syracuse winner, 9:40
OL PTS. GF GA
7
85 209 202
4
84 229 211
11
81 205 205
5
79 193 195
8
78 204 208
11
71 188 218
10
70 222 245
7
69 201 224
N.Y. Islanders at Washington, 7
Dallas at Ottawa, 7:30
Nashville at Colorado, 9
San Jose at Calgary, 9
Detroit at Anaheim, 10
Minnesota at Vegas, 10:30
IN LOS ANGELES
PHILADELPHIA: Covington 4-9 0-1 10, Saric 4-11 8-10
18, Embiid 11-22 7-8 29, Simmons 4-10 2-2 10, Redick
6-10 0-0 16, Johnson 0-0 0-0 0, Ilyasova 2-3 0-0 5,
McConnell 2-3 0-0 4, Belinelli 2-7 1-1 6. Totals 35-75
18-22 98.
FRIDAY'S GAMES
IN DETROIT
L
23
26
24
28
26
29
29
32
Xavier (28-5) vs. N.C. Central-Texas Southern winner, 7:20
Missouri (20-12) vs. Florida State (20-11), 9:50
SATURDAY’S GAMES
IN COLUMBUS, OHIO
INDIANA: Bogdanovic 1-11 0-1 2, T.Young 7-11 5-5 19,
Turner 9-12 5-6 25, Joseph 5-8 2-2 13, Oladipo 4-21 2-3
11, Robinson III 1-2 0-0 2, Booker 2-5 1-1 5, Jefferson 0-3
0-0 0, Sabonis 1-4 0-0 3, Collison 3-8 4-5 10, Stephenson
5-10 1-2 11. Totals 38-95 20-25 101.
Kansas (27-7) vs. Pennsylvania (24-8), 2
Seton Hall (21-11) vs. N.C. State (21-11), 4:30
W
39
40
35
37
35
30
30
31
FRIDAY’S GAMES
ATLANTA: Prince 9-20 4-4 25, Collins 5-10 0-0 10,
Dedmon 2-4 0-0 5, Schroder 6-16 5-8 18, Dorsey 2-7 0-0
5, White III 3-4 0-0 9, Muscala 2-6 2-2 7, Cavanaugh 1-3
0-0 3, Taylor 3-9 6-6 12, Lee 4-8 3-4 13. Totals 37-87
20-24 107.
Three-point Goals: Oklahoma City 16-35 (Anthony 6-11,
Patterson 2-3, Grant 2-4, George 2-5, Huestis 1-1,
Brewer 1-2, Abrines 1-3, Felton 1-6), Atlanta 13-31
(White III 3-4, Prince 3-8, Lee 2-4, Cavanaugh 1-1,
Dedmon 1-2, Muscala 1-2, Schroder 1-3, Dorsey 1-5,
Taylor 0-2). Fouled Out: Collins, Taylor. Rebounds:
Oklahoma City 38 (Westbrook 12), Atlanta 47 (Collins
9). Assists: Oklahoma City 27 (Westbrook 12), Atlanta
26 (Schroder 8). Total Fouls: Oklahoma City 21, Atlanta
25. Technicals: Atlanta coach Mike Budenholzer, Atlanta
coach Hawks (Defensive three second). A: 16,739
(19,049).
18 — 101
19 — 98
IN WICHITA
MLB spring training
WINNIPEG ............................... 0
NASHVILLE .............................. 3
METROPOLITAN
Washington ..................
Pittsburgh .....................
Philadelphia ..................
Columbus ......................
New Jersey ...................
Carolina .........................
N.Y. Islanders ...............
N.Y. Rangers .................
IN NASHVILLE
DePaul (26-7) vs. Oklahoma (16-14), noon
Texas A&M (24-9) vs. Drake (26-7), 2:30
26
26
Rhode Island (25-7) vs. Oklahoma (18-13), 12:15
Duke (26-7) vs. Iona (20-13), 2:45
BAS E BALL
Predators 3, Jets 1
SAN ANTONIO: Green 3-9 2-2 11, Anderson 2-2 0-0 5,
Aldridge 11-17 2-4 24, Murray 5-7 1-3 11, Mills 4-8 3-3
13, Gay 2-9 4-4 9, Bertans 0-2 0-0 0, Gasol 3-6 5-5 11,
Lauvergne 2-6 0-0 4, Parker 4-9 2-2 10, Forbes 2-4 0-0 6,
Paul 0-0 0-0 0, Ginobili 2-5 0-0 4. Totals 40-84 19-23 108.
OKLAHOMA CITY: George 5-12 0-1 12, Anthony 7-15 1-1
21, Johnson 1-1 1-2 3, Westbrook 12-20 8-10 32, Brewer
2-6 2-2 7, Grant 8-14 2-2 20, Huestis 1-1 0-0 3, Patterson
3-4 4-6 12, Collison 0-1 0-0 0, Felton 2-9 1-1 6, Abrines
1-4 0-0 3, Hamilton 0-0 0-0 0, Ferguson 0-2 0-0 0. Totals
42-89 19-25 119.
Pacers 101, 76ers 98
MIDWEST REGION
FIRST ROUND
THURSDAY'S GAMES
IN PITTSBURGH
Houston (26-7) vs. San Diego State (22-10), 7:20
Michigan (28-7) vs. Montana (26-7), 9:50
Spurs 108, Magic 72
THURSDAY’S GAMES
24
30
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
IN NASHVILLE
L.A. CLIPPERS .................... 31
CHICAGO ............................ 27
INDIANA ............................. 33
PHILADELPHIA .................. 23
Radford 71, LIU Brooklyn 61
St. Bonaventure 65, UCLA 58
IN SAN DIEGO
33
35
at Houston 109, San Antonio 93
Milwaukee 121, at Memphis 103
at Oklahoma City 106, Sacramento 101
at Portland 115, Miami 99
23
38
EASTERN CONFERENCE
CHARLOTTE ....................... 32
NEW ORLEANS .................. 37
Clippers 112, Bulls 106
OKLAHOMA CITY ............... 31
ATLANTA ........................... 28
FIRST FOUR
IN DAYTON, OHIO
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
Purdue (28-6) vs. Cal State Fullerton (20-11), 12:40
Arkansas (23-11) vs. Butler (20-13), 3:10
MONDAY’S RESULTS
28
29
NHL
Pelicans 119, Hornets 115
x-Late game; y-Clinched playoff spot
DALLAS .............................. 29
NEW YORK ......................... 31
NCAA men’s tournament
SATURDAY’S MATCHES
Houston at D.C. United, 1:30
Chicago at Minnesota United, 2
Columbus at Philadelphia, 2
Toronto FC at Montreal, 3
Orlando City at New York City FC, 3:30
Vancouver at Atlanta United FC, 7:30
San Jose at Sporting KC, 8:30
New York at Real Salt Lake, 9
FIRST PERIOD
SUNDAY’S MATCH
Scoring: 1, Dallas, Faksa 13 (Pitlick, Pateryn), 11:48. 2,
Montreal, Lehkonen 7 (de la Rose, Galchenyuk), 16:31.
Seattle at Dallas, 5
At The Indian Wells Tennis Garden
In Indian Wells, Calif.
Purse: Men: $7.97 million (Masters 1000)
Women: $8.65 million (Premier)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
MEN’S SINGLES — THIRD ROUND
Pierre-Hugues Herbert, France, def. Gael Monfils,
France, 6-2, 6-1; Philipp Kohlschreiber (31), Germany,
def. Marin Cilic (2), Croatia, 6-4, 6-4; Leonardo Mayer,
Argentina, def. Taro Daniel, Japan, 6-4, 6-1; Juan Martin
del Potro (6), Argentina, def. David Ferrer (29), Spain,
6-4, 7-6 (7-3); Milos Raonic (32), Canada, def. Joao
Sousa, Portugal, 7-5, 4-6, 6-2; Marcos Baghdatis, Cyprus,
def. Dudi Sela, Israel, 7-6 (7-5), 6-4; Sam Querrey (18),
United States, def. Yuki Bhambri, India, 6-7 (7-4), 6-4,
6-4.
WOMEN’S SINGLES — FOURTH ROUND
Simona Halep (1), Romania, def. Wang Qiang, China, 7-5,
6-1; Petra Martic, Croatia, def. Marketa Vondrousova,
Czech Republic, 6-3, 7-6 (7-4); Karolina Pliskova (5),
Czech Republic, def. Amanda Anisimova, United States,
6-1, 7-6 (7-2); Naomi Osaka, Japan, def. Maria Sakkari,
Greece, 6-1, 5-7, 6-1; Venus Williams (8), United States,
def. Anastasija Sevastova (21), Latvia, 7-6 (8-6), 6-4.
MEN’S DOUBLES — SECOND ROUND
Pablo Cuevas, Uruguay, and Horacio Zeballos, Argentina,
def. Pierre-Hugues Herbert and Nicolas Mahut (5),
France, 7-6 (7-5), 3-6, 13-11.
WOMEN’S DOUBLES — QUARTERFINALS
Gabriela Dabrowski, Canada, and Xu Yifan (3), China,
def. Andreja Klepac, Slovenia, and Maria Jose Martinez
Sanchez (8), Spain, 7-6 (9-7), 5-7, 12-10; Timea Babos,
Hungary, and Kristina Mladenovic (4), France, def.
Monica Niculescu, Romania, and Andrea Sestini Hlavackova (5), Czech Republic, 6-4, 6-3; Hsieh Su-wei,
Taiwan, and Barbora Strycova, Czech Republic, def.
Vania King, United States, and Katarina Srebotnik,
Slovenia, 6-4, 6-1.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Montreal, Lehkonen 8 (Petry, Drouin), 8:41
(pp). 4, Montreal, Gallagher 26 (Drouin, Galchenyuk),
9:16 (pp). 5, Dallas, Ja.Benn 24 (Shore, Radulov), 18:20
(pp).
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 6, Montreal, Scherbak 3, 9:26 (pp).
SHOTS ON GOAL
DALLAS .................................. 15
7
16 — 38
MONTREAL .............................. 8
11
7 — 26
Power-play opportunities: Dallas 1 of 4; Montreal 3 of 5.
Goalies: Dallas, Lehtonen 12-9-2 (26 shots-22 saves).
Montreal, Niemi 5-6-4 (38-36). A: 21,302 (21,288). T:
2:40.
F O O TBALL
BOXI NG
NFL calendar
Fight schedule
Wednesday: 2018 league calendar begins, free agency
opens, trades allowed.
March 25-28: Annual league meeting, Orlando, Fla.
April 2: Clubs that hired a new head coach after the end
of the 2017 regular season may begin offseason workouts.
April 16: Clubs with returning head coaches may begin
offseason workout programs.
April 20: Deadline for restricted free agents to sign offer
sheets.
SATURDAY
At Madison Square Garden Theatre, New York (ESPN),
Jose Ramirez vs. Amir Imam, 12, for the vacant WBC
World super lightweight title; Oleksandr Gvozdyk vs.
Mehdi Amar, 12, for vacant WBC interim light heavyweight title; Felix Verdejo vs Antonio Lozada Jr., 10,
lightweights; Christopher Diaz vs. Miguel Beltran Jr., 10,
super featherweights.
At Villa Dolores, Cordoba, Argentina, Javier Aristule vs.
Alberto Melian, 10, bantamweights.
EFGHI
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Section 303(d) of the federal Clean Water Act (CWA) directs States
to identify and list waters, known as water quality limited segments
(WQLSs), in which current required controls of a specified substance
are inadequate to achieve water quality standards. For each WQLS,
the State is required to establish a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL)
of the specified substance(s) that the waterbody can receive without
violating water quality standards, demonstrate that another program
or action will achieve water quality standards, or demonstrate via the
development of a Water Quality Analysis (WQA) that water quality
standards for the specified substance(s) are currently being achieved.
The Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) hereby gives
notice of the public availability of a draft TMDL documents for
Sediment for Patuxent River Middle (basin code 02131102) and
Patuxent River Lower Watersheds (basin code 02131101).
OPPORTUNITY FOR PUBLIC REVIEW AND COMMENT
for the following
areas:
Alexandria, VA
Call
703-780-1910
Notice of Intent to Submit a Total Maximum Daily Load for Sediment
in the Non-Tidal Patuxent River Middle and Patuxent River Lower
Watersheds, Anne Arundel, Calvert, Charles, Prince George’s and St.
Mary’s Counties, MD
The TMDL sets the maximum load limit for the impairing substance.
The TMDLs also reflect load allocations to point sources, nonpoint
sources and a margin of safety that accounts for uncertainty in
the procedures used to estimate the TMDLs. Once established by
the State, the TMDLs will be subject to approval by the U.S. EPA.
The approved TMDLs will support measures needed to attain water
quality standards in the Patuxent River Middle and Lower Watersheds.
The Washington
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MARYLAND DEPARTMENT
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ABC LICENSE: Nehemias O Salvador
trading as La Despensa Grocery And
Deli LLC, 13179 Occoquan Road,
Woodbridge (Prince William County) Virginia 22191-1041. The above
establishment is applying to the
VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL (ABC)
for a Wine and Beer On and Off
Premises license to sell or manufacture alcoholic beverages. Nehemias
O Salvador President NOTE: Objections to the issuance of this license
must be submitted to ABC no later
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A 30-day public comment period for the draft document will take place
from March 14, 2018 to April 12, 2018. Copies of the draft documents
have been placed in the Prince George’s County Public Library Baden
Branch, 13603 Baden-Westwood Rd, Brandywine, MD 20613; Calvert
Library - Prince Frederick, 850 Costley Way, Prince Frederick, MD
20678; Fairview Branch – 8120 Southern Maryland Blvd, Owings, MD
20736; Southern Branch - 13920 HG Trueman Rd, Solomons, MD
20688; St. Mary’s County – Charlotte Hall Library, 37600 New Market
Road, Charlotte Hall, MD 20622; and Lexington Park Library, 21677 FDR
Blvd., Lexington Park, MD 20653. The draft document is also available
on the Internet at web site http://www.mde.maryland.gov/TMDL or
by contacting Ms. Melissa Chatham by mail at MDE/WSA, 1800
Washington Boulevard, Baltimore, MD 21230, or by telephone at 410537-3937 (outside the Baltimore area, dial 1-800-633-6101 x3937).
An informational briefing will be held on March 14, 2018 at 4pm in
the Lower Conference Rooms of Maryland Department of Agriculture,
located at 50 Harry S. Truman Pkwy, Annapolis, MD 21401. Anyone
wishing to review the draft documents and supporting information
or needing technical information may contact Ms. Chatham during
normal business hours.
Written comments concerning the draft document may be submitted
to the Department on or before April 12, 2018 and should be
sent to Ms. Chatham at the above address or emailed to melissa.chatham@maryland.gov. All comments received during the comment period will be considered and the draft document may be
revised accordingly prior to its submittal to EPA for approval.
825
Bids & Proposals
820
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than 30 days from the publishing
date of the first of two required
newspaper legal notices. Objections
should be registered at www.abc.virginia.gov or 800-552-3200.
825
Bids & Proposals
Capitol Paving of D.C., Inc.
Capitol Paving is soliciting qualified
MBE/WBE subcontractors to perform DDOT - DC PLUG Feeder 308
– Undergrounding of Power Line,
DCKA-2018-B- 0025. email –
bids@capitolpaving.com ; call –
571.277.1022 or fax – 202.832.5126
– Bid Opening 3/19/2018
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
LAVETA HILTON
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-29248
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 1st
day of March, 2018 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner,
Philip S. Shriver, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 2132
SOUTH ANVIL LANE, TEMPLE HILLS,
MD 20748 and reported in the
above entitled cause, will be finally
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 2nd day
of April, 2018 next; provided a
copy of this Order be inserted
in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 2nd
day of April, 2018.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $248,422.62.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Mar 7, 14, 21, 2018
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Attention all M/W/ESB Businesses. Spiniello Companies is
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PROJECT: Low Service 66-inch Steel Water Main LOCATION: Along 8th
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Email: Estimating@spinielloco.com or contact Marlena Lawrence at
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The Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) identified the
non-tidal waters of both the Patuxent River Lower and Patuxent River
Middle Watersheds on the State’s 2014 Integrated Report as impaired
by multiple pollutants including sediments, polychlorinated biphenyls,
and nutrients. The watersheds are associated with multiple assessment units in Maryland’s Integrated Report. For more details about
these listings, please see the TMDL report being made available for
public comment. A data solicitation for TSS/sediment was conducted
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C
CLASSIFIED
D8
12169132
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
ESTATE OF LEMUEL COTTON
C/O THOMAS J KOKOIS
(SUCCESSOR) PER REP
ESTATE OF ODESSA T. SCOTT
C/O THOMAS J KOKOLIS
(SUCCESSOR)PER REP
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-14798
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 28th
day of February, 2018 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner,
Philip S. Shriver, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 6811
Pepper Street, Capitol Heights, MD
20743 and reported in the above
entitled cause, will be finally
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 28th day
of March, 2018 next; provided a
copy of this Order be inserted
in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 28th
day of March, 2018.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $191,000.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Mar 5, 12, 19, 26, 2018
12168834
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Hugh J. Green
Shannon Menapace
Christine M. Drexel
Brian Thomas
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
Natalie Williams
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF17-17859
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 26th day of February 2018,
that the foreclosure sale of the
property described in the deed of
trust docketed herein and located
at 523 Capitol Heights Boulevard,
Capitol Heights, Maryland 20743,
made and reported by James E.
Clarke, Renee Dyson, Hugh J.
Green, Shannon Menapace, Christine M. Drexel and Brian Thomas,
Substitute Trustees, be RATIFIED
and CONFIRMED, unless cause to
the contrary be shown on or
before the 26th day of March, 2018,
provided a copy of this Order be
inserted in The Washington Post
once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 26th day of
March, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $144,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Feb. 28, Mar. 7, 14, 2018 12167919
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
ERNEST F FLEMING, JR A/K/A
ERNEST F FLEMING JR A/K/A
ERNEST F FLEMING
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-27846
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 1st
day of March, 2018 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner,
Philip S. Shriver, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 5908
ACCOKEEK ROAD, Brandywine, MD
20613 and reported in the above
entitled cause, will be finally
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 2nd day
of April, 2018 next; provided a
copy of this Order be inserted
in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 2nd
day of April, 2018.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $129,000.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Mar 7, 14, 21, 2018
12169131
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
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BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
7 Butterwick Court
Gaithersburg, MD 20879
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to JOHN BURSON, Trustee(s), dated August 12,
2004, and recorded among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 28221, folio 146, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of
the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction at THE MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
MARCH 30, 2018 at 10:00AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
THE REAL PROPERTY LOCATED IN MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
MARYLAND, AND DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: LOT NUMBERED
ONE HUNDRED (100) IN A SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT
444, CANDLE RIDGE, EAST VILLAGE, MONTGOMERY VILLAGE" AS PER PLAT THEREOF DULY RECORDED AMONG
THE LAND RECORDS OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND
IN PLAT BOOK 135 AT PLAT 15655. THE IMPROVEMENT
BEING KNOWN AS: 7 BUTTERWICK COUNTY, GAITHERSBURG, MARYLAND 20879 TAX ID#: 02611001
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $13,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-01848)
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 7, 14, 21, 2018
12169188
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
851
Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
Prince Georges County 851 Prince Georges County
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher,
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
Substitute Trustees
MARYLAND
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Hugh J. Green
Shannon Menapace
Christine M. Drexel
Brian Thomas
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Hugh J. Green
Shannon Menapace
Christine M. Drexel
Brian Thomas
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
Cesar Hernandez and Sofia
Hernandez-Garcia
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF17-29230
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
v.
Eddie Trice
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF17-27862
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 26th day of February 2018,
that the foreclosure sale of the
property described in the deed of
trust docketed herein and located
at 3117 Twig Lane, Bowie, Maryland
20715, made and reported by
James E. Clarke, Renee Dyson,
Hugh J. Green, Shannon Menapace, Christine M. Drexel and Brian
Thomas, Substitute Trustees, be
RATIFIED and CONFIRMED, unless
cause to the contrary be shown on
or before the 26th day of March,
2018, provided a copy of this Order
be inserted in The Washington Post
once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 26th day of
March, 2018.
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 26th day of February 2018, that
the foreclosure sale of the property described in the deed of trust
docketed herein and located at
7206 Donnell Place, Unit 7206 C7,
District Heights, Maryland 20747,
made and reported by James E.
Clarke, Renee Dyson, Hugh J.
Green, Shannon Menapace, Christine M. Drexel and Brian Thomas,
Substitute Trustees, be RATIFIED
and CONFIRMED, unless cause to
the contrary be shown on or
before the 26th day of March, 2018,
provided a copy of this Order be
inserted in The Washington Post
once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 26th day of
March, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $353,487.95.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $55,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Feb. 28, Mar. 7, 14, 2018 12167921
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Feb. 28, Mar. 7, 14, 2018 12167920
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
v.
KENNETH BROWN
NAKHIA T. WEBB-BROWN
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-29168
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 27th
day of February 2018, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 4517 Dalton
Street, Temple Hills, MD 20748, will
be ratified and confirmed unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 27th day
of March, 2018, provided a copy
of this NOTICE be published at
least once a week in each of three
successive weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said County before the
27th day of March, 2018.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
March 7, 14, 21, 2018
12168815
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852
Anne Arundel County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
Diane S. Rosenberg, et al.
Substitute Trustees
Versus
David E. Carroll
David Edward Carroll
Defendant
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
9603 Mcwhorter Farm Court
Damascus, MD 20872
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to ROBERT N. TYSON JR, Trustee(s), dated
March 14, 2007, and recorded among the Land Records of
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 34071, folio
579, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at
the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
MARCH 30, 2018 at 10:00AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
LOT NUMBERED TWO (2) IN BLOCK LETTERED "G' IN THE
SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "WOODFIELD ESTATES" AS PER
PLAT RECORDED AT PLAT NO. 22502, AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $100,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 5.875%
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-11518)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 14, 21, 28, 2018
875
MARCH 14, 21, 28, 2018
852
12166059
Anne Arundel County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
Anne Arundel County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
MARYLAND
Robert E. Frazier, et al.
Substitute Trustees
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
Versus
ALICE L. BRASS
JOHN C. BRASS
Defendant(s)
No. C-02-CV-17-001134
Versus
Herbert Shockey, Sr., et al.
Defendants
No. C-02-CV-17-002032
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this Thursday, March 1, 2018 that the sale
of the property in the proceedings mentioned, made and reported by Thomas W Hodge, Substitute
Trustee.
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 2nd
day of April 2018 next; provided,
a copy of this Notice be inserted
in some newspaper published in
Anne Arundel County, once in each
of three successive weeks before
the 2nd day of April 2018 next. The
report states that the amount of
sale of the property at 1641 Midland
Road, Edgewater, MD 21037 to be
$153,667.00.
/S/Robert P Duckworth
Circuit Court for
Anne Arundel County, MD
Mar 9, 16, 23, 2018
12169904
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this Tuesday,
February 27, 2018, that the sale
of the property mentioned in these
proceedings, made and reported
by E. Edward Farnsworth, Jr., Substitute Trustee BE RATIFIED AND
CONFIRMED, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 29th day of March 2018
next; provided, a copy of this Notice
be inserted in some newspaper
published in Anne Arundel County,
once in each of three successive
weeks before the 29th day of March
2018 next. The report states the
amount of the sale of the property
at 7811 ELIZABETH ROAD, PASADENA, MD 21122 to be $229,400.00.
Robert P. Duckworth
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Anne Arundel County, Maryland
Mar 7, 14, 21, 2018
12169011
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NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this Friday,
February 26, 2018 that the sale
of the property in the proceedings mentioned, made and reported by Sydney Roberson, Substitute
Trustee.
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 28th
day of March 2018 next; provided,
a copy of this Notice be inserted
in some newspaper published in
Anne Arundel County, once in each
of three successive weeks before
the 28th day of March 2018 next.
The report states that the amount
of sale of the property at 7995
STONE HAVEN DRIVE, GLEN BURNIE,
MD 21060 to be $221,000.00.
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852
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1-800-753-POST
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Fauquier County
12169016
875
Fauquier County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
13114 ELK RUN ROAD,
BEALETON, VA 22712
www.hwestauctions.com
No. C-02-CV-16-003221
/S/Robert P Duckworth
Circuit Court for
Anne Arundel County, MD
Feb 28, Mar 7, 14, 2018 12168026
mypublicnotices.com/
washingtonpost/PublicNotice.asp
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ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
15811 Good Hope Road
Silver Spring, MD 20905
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from SYEDA
S. HUSSAIN AND QAMAR U. HUSSAIN, dated November
3, 2003 and recorded in Liber 26091, folio 536 among
the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD, default
having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case
No.436962V; Tax ID No.05-00258038) the Sub. Trustees
will sell at public auction at the MONTGOMERY COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
MARCH 26, 2018 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $17,800.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 577273)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$205,200.00.
1-800-753-POST
850
Trustee Sales
202-334-5782
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated June 29, 2009, in
the original principal amount of
$245,471.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Fauquier County, Virginia, in Book
1322 at Page 2231 as Instrument
No. 005551680009 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Fauquier County, 40 Culpeper
Street, Warrenton, Virginia on April
19, 2018 , at 12:00 PM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: ALL OF PARCEL C-2 CONTAINING 5.0117 ACRES MORE OR
LESS AS SHOWN ON A PLAT OF THE
RESUBDIVISION OF PARCEL C, AS
SHOWN ON PLAT OF SURVEY BY
THOMAS SURVEYS, DATED APRIL
30, 1997, SAID PLAT BEING
ATTACHED TO A DEED RECORDED
IN DEED BOOK 782, AT PAGE 1.
TOGETHER WITH THAT FIFTY (50)
FOOT INGRESS EASEMENT AS
SHOWN ON SAID PLAT.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3259811.
March 14, 21, 2018
SF
12165124
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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14, 2018
850
Montgomery County
850
EZ
Montgomery County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
19811 LARENTIA DRIVE
Germantown, MD 20874
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to PENINSULA SETTLEMENT, Trustee(s), dated
May 24, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 32438, folio
721, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at
the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
MARCH 30, 2018 at 10:00AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
LOT NUMBER FORTY SEVEN (47) IN BLOCK NUMBERED
EIGHT (8) IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT NO.
105, SECTION 5, CHURCHILL TOWN SECTOR" AS PER PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 115 AT PLAT 13605
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
MARYLAND. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 19811 LARENTIA DRIVE,
GERMANTOWN, MD 20874 TAX ID NUMBER: 02139530
TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY: LAWYERS TITLE INSURANCE
CORPORATION
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $26,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 5.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (15-07294)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 14, 21, 28, 2018
12169127
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
17000 Flatwood Drive
Derwood, MD 20855
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to FRIEDMAN & MAC FAYDEN PA,
Trustee(s), dated June 27, 2005, and recorded among the
Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber
30347, folio 362, the holder of the indebtedness secured by
this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
MARCH 30, 2018 at 10:00AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
LOT 63 IN BLOCK AA IN A SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT
16, MILL CREEK SOUTH", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 115 AT PLAT 13583 AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND. THIS IS
A NO CONSIDERATION DEED DUE TO A CORRECTION IN
CURRENT OWNERS NAME
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $55,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-08791)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris, Robert
M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
850
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
850
OPQRS
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
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www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
12169756
Montgomery County
850
D9
Montgomery County
Parker, Simon & Kokolis, LLC
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
110 North Washington Street, Suite 500
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
Rockville, MD 20850
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
(301) 656-5775
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
File No. 443205-V
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
Trustee’s Sale
KNOWN AS
of
6911 Persimmon Tree Road
Valuable Fee Simple Property
Bethesda, MD 20817
located in Montgomery County, Maryland,
known as
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed
of
Trust
to
LARRY
F. PRATT, Trustee(s), dated February 17,
9208 GLADYS FARM WAY
2006, and recorded among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY
GAITHERSBURG, MD 20878 (the “Property”)
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 31894, folio 090, MODIFIED:
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Purchase JUNE 1, 2012 IN LIBER 44848, FOLIO 077 AND MAY
Money Deed of Trust, (the “Deed of Trust”) from Akinbobola 4, 2007 IN LIBER 34316, FOLIO603 the holder of the
Akinkoye, to Craig Parker, Thomas J. Kokolis, and Michelle indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the
Simon, Trustee(s), bearing the date of December 21, 2015, undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded
recorded in Book 51574, at Page 206 among the Land Records among the aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred
of Montgomery County, Maryland, and at the request of the under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured
party secured thereby, default having occurred in the terms and thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at
conditions thereof, the Trustees named in said Deed of Trust, will public auction at THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE
sell at public auction located at 50 Maryland Avenue, Rockville, LOCATED AT 50 MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850
MD on April 2, 2018 at 1:15 p.m., some or all of the Property ON,
described in said Deed of Trust.
MARCH 30, 2018 at 10:00AM
All that Fee-Simple lot of ground and the improvements thereon
identified as Tax ID No. 01-03290616 and more fully described ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The Property is subject to an thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
IRS 120 day right of redemption.
LOT NUMBERED SEVENTEEN (17) IN BLOCK LETTERED "A" IN
TERMS OF SALE
THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "CONGRESSIONAL COUNTRY
The bid which yields the highest price for the Property will be CLUB ESTATES". AS PER PLAT THEREOF DULY RECORDED
accepted by the Trustees. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
Trustees absolutely reserve the right to postpone the sale and/or MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK 69 AT PLAT NO. 6454
cancel the sale at any time until the auctioneer announces that
the Property is "sold" and the deposit in the required amount The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
and form is received by the Trustees. A deposit in the amount without either express or implied warranty or representation,
of $50,000.00 will be required at the time of sale. Such deposit including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
must be by cashier's check or certified check or such other particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
form as the Trustees’ may determine in their sole discretion. construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
The Noteholder secured by the Deed of Trust (or any related liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merparty) shall be exempted by the Trustees from submitting any chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
bidding deposit. The Trustees will, as a condition of the sale, laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
require all potential bidders, except the Noteholder, to show subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
their deposit before any bidding begins. The retained deposit which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
of the successful purchaser shall be applied, without interest, subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
to the successful purchaser's credit at settlement, provided, record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
however, that in the event the successful purchaser fails to assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
consummate the purchase in accordance with the terms of sale TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $103,000.00 payable in certified
as herein provided, such deposit, will be forfeited. The terms check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
of sale must be complied with and settlement consummated at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
thereon within 30 days from date of final ratification of the sale final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of MONTGOMERY
by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, Maryland unless COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.625%
extended at the sole discretion of the Substitute Trustees. There on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
event settlement is delayed for any reason. TIME IS OF THE required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
ESSENCE. The balance of the purchase price over and above secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
the retained deposit, with interest thereon at a rate of 12% from the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
the date of sale through the date of receipt of the balance of of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
the purchase price, will be due at settlement in cash or certified purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
funds; and if not so paid, the Trustees reserve the right to resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
retain the deposit and resell the Property at the risk and cost of All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
the defaulting purchaser, after such advertisement and on such including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
terms as the Trustees may deem proper, and to avail themselves adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
and the Noteholder of any legal or equitable rights against the transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
defaulting purchaser.
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
The Property is sold subject to the lawful rights, if any, of and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
parties in possession, if such rights have priority over the Deed adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
of Trust, and to any and all covenants, conditions, restrictions, any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
easements, rights of way, encumbrances, liens, agreements and Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
limitations of record having priority over the Deed of Trust. The take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
Property will be sold “WHERE IS” and in “AS IS” condition or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
without any warranty as to condition, express or implied, and deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
without any representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
the information furnished to prospective bidders by the Trustees provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
or any other party and without any other representations or this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
warranty of any nature. The sale is also subject to postsale shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
audit of the status of the loan. Without limiting the generality The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
of the foregoing, the Property will be sold without representation loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
or warranty as to (i) title to the Property, (ii) the nature, into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
condition, structural integrity, or fitness for a particular use of is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
any improvements, fixtures or personal property included within interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
the Property, (iii) the environmental condition of the Property announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (15-25232)
or the compliance of the Property with federal, state and local
Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
laws and regulations concerning the presence or disposal of
Thomas W. Hodge, Robert M. Oliveri, Erin M. August,
hazardous substances, (iv) compliance of the Property with
Substitute Trustees
the Americans with Disabilities Act or any similar law, or (v)
compliance of the Property with any zoning laws or ordinances
and any and all applicable safety codes, and acceptance of the
Deed to the Property by the successful purchaser shall constitute
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a waiver of any claims against the Substitute Trustees or the
MARCH 14, 21, 28, 2018
Noteholder concerning any of the foregoing matters. Purchaser
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shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the MARCH 14, 21, 28, 2018
12168598
Property.
Conveyance shall be by Trustee’s Deed, without covenant or
warranty, express or implied, specifically including marketability
or insurability (hazard or title), unless otherwise required by
statute, court rule or the Deed of Trust. The risk of loss or damage
by fire or other casualty to the Property from and after the
ORLANS PC
date of sale will be upon the successful purchaser. Adjustment
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
of all taxes, ground rents, public charges, assessments, sewer,
LEESBURG, VA 20175
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
water, drainage and other public improvements will be made as
703-777-7101
SUITE 100
of the date of sale and are to be assumed and paid thereafter
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SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
by
the
successful
purchaser,
whether
assessments
have
been
FEBRUARY
28,
MARCH
7,
14,
2018
12164052
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
levied or not. Any condominium fees, homeowners association
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
2104 Lubar Court
dues, assessments or capital contributions, if any, payable with
Brookeville, MD 20833
respect to the Property shall be assumed after the date of sale
KNOWN AS
by the successful purchaser. All costs incident to the settlement
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from JOSE
1106 Ednor Road
and conveyancing including, without limitation, examination
A. RUIZ AND LUISA RUIZ, dated February 20, 2007 and
Silver Spring, MD 20905
of title, conveyancing, all recordation taxes and charges, all
recorded in Liber 33998, folio 680 among the Land Records
transfer taxes and charges, title insurance premiums, notary Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereSAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
fees, settlement fees and all other costs incident to settlement Deed of Trust to LORIE ALCOTT, Trustee(s), dated August 28,
under (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.440977V; Tax ID
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
shall be at the cost of the successful purchaser. In the event the 2003, and recorded among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY
No.08-03253693 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction
SUITE 100
Trustees are unable for any reason to convey title, the purchaser’s COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 25661, folio 168, the holder
at the MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
sole remedy at law or in equity shall be to request and receive a of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
return of the deposit. Upon return of the deposit, this sale shall appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
MARCH 26, 2018 at 9:30 AM
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
be void and of no effect and the purchaser shall have no further duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
KNOWN AS
claim against the Trustees. This advertisement, as amended or having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
supplemented by any oral announcements during the conduct of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee
21807 Seneca Ayr Drive
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
the sale, constitutes the entire terms upon which the Property will offer for sale at public auction at THE MONTGOMERY
Boyds, MD 20841
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain shall be offered for sale.
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the Deed of Trust to LAW OFFICES OF DANIEL A. FULCO, PLLC. ,
Craig Parker, Thomas J. Kokolis and Michelle Simon, Trustees
APRIL 2, 2018 at 1:30 PM
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Trustee(s), dated November 2, 2007, and recorded among the
Terms of Sale: A deposit $50,000.00 will be required at the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY 35067, folio 227, the holder of the indebtedness secured by
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
as follows:
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
LOT NUMBERED FOUR (4) IN BLOCK LETTERED "B" IN THE
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT ONE, PART OF BLOCKS A, B,
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COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned MARCH 14, 21, 28, 2018
12169439 C & D, CLIFTONBROOK" AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense. THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50
MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK 63 AT PLAT 5512.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
APRIL 2, 2018 at 1:30 PM
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condisale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
tion, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, mateas
follows:
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
rials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale, ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus RECORDED NOVEMBER 19, 2007 IN LIBER 35067, FOLIO
Membership is rewarding.
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid 227.
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the without either express or implied warranty or representation,
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mercertified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
the purchase price with interest at 4.125% per annum from
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan, subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect, subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps, assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
association dues and assessments that may become due after
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed the purchase price with interest at 5.375% per annum from
the
date
of
sale
to
the
date
of
payment
will
be
paid
within
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned association dues and assessments that may become due after
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity, Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 538406)
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
JAMES E. CLARKE,
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
HUGH J. GREEN,
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
Trustee's File No. (52607)
SHANNON MENAPACE,
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
From slam dunks and home runs to
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
touchdowns and goals, discover great
Trustee's File No. (20838)
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ways to save money, win tickets and
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MARCH 14, 21, 28, 2018
12164221
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
MARCH 7, 14, 21, 2018
12169187
have fun at sporting events.
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
10803 AMHERST AVENUE UNIT F
Wheaton, MD 20902
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to DOUGLAS DOUGLAS, Trustee(s), dated
April 23, 2004, and recorded among the Land Records of
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 28639, folio
143, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at
the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
MARCH 16, 2018 at 10:00AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
CONDOMINIUM UNIT NO. 10803-F IN THE TIERS AT
WHEATON, A CONDOMINIUM, MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND, AND THE COMMON ELEMENTS, APPURTENANT THERETO, PURSUANT TO THE DECLARATION, FIRST, SECOND,
THIRD, FOURTH, FIFTH, AND CORRECTIVE FIFTH AMENDMENTS, RECORDED IN LIBER 6273 AT FOLIO 115, LIBER
6306 AT FOLIO 761, LIBER 6384 AT FOLIO 812, LIBER
6414 AT FOLIO 541, LIBER 6499 AT FOLIO 796, LIBER
6557 AT FOLIO 619, LIBER 6577 T FOLIO 322 AND THE
PLATS RECORDED IN CONDOMINIUM PLAT BOOK 33, PLAT
3427 ET SEQ., CONDOMINIUM PLAT BOOK 33, PLAT 3453
ET SEQ., CONDOMINIUM PLAT BOOK 34, PLAT 3450 ET
SEQ., CONDOMINIUM PLAT BOOK 34, PLAT 3583 ET SEQ.,
AND CONDOMINIUM PLAT BOOK 36, PLAT 3727 AMONG THE
LAND RECORDS OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND. FOR
DERIVATION OF TITLE, SEE LIBER 6066 AT FOLIO 577 OF
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $13,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 6.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
12169488 interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (14-00837)
Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Thomas W. Hodge, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson,
Substitute Trustees
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
10106 Hereford Place
Silver Spring , MD 20901
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to GLEN RAMSEY WILLIAMS, Trustee(s), dated
August 24, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 33073, folio
419, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at
the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
MARCH 30, 2018 at 10:00AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
LOT NUMBERED TWENTY FIVE (25) IN BLOCK LETTERED "H",
IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "COUNTRY CLUB VIEW,
SECTION VIEW", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG
THE PLAT RECORDS OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND
IN PLAT BOOK NO. 11 AT PLAT 756.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $34,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-06785)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris, Robert
M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
washingtonpost.com/postpoints
MARCH 14, 21, 28, 2018
850
MARCH 14, 21, 28, 2018
12166960
S2935 2x6
D10
850
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
14006 GLEN MILL ROAD
Rockville, MD 20850
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to EXPRESS TITLE COMPANY, Trustee(s), dated
January 20, 2005, and recorded among the Land Records of
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 29171, folio
229, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at
the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
MARCH 16, 2018 at 10:00AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
LOT NUMBERED TWELVE (12) OF THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN
AS "SUBDIVISION RECORD PLAT, LOTS 8 THRU 12 &
PARCEL "A", BLOCK E, HUNTING HILL ESTATES" WHICH
PLAT IS RECORDED ON JUNE 28TH, 2002 AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND AS PLAT
NUMBER 22249.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $37,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-08796)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
850
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
3629 Glen Eagles Drive #3-2-D
Silver Spring, MD 20906
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to DAVID E. WATERS AND ANTHONY
B. OLMERT, SR. , Trustee(s), dated February 18, 2011, and
recorded among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
MARYLAND in Liber 41477, folio 303, the holder of the
indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the
undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded
among the aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured
thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at
public auction at THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 50 MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850
ON,
APRIL 2, 2018 at 1:30 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
RECORDED APRIL 18, 2011 IN LIBER 41477, FOLIO 303.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 4% per annum from the
date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on
all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (57759)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
850
OPQRS
Montgomery County
850
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
21313 Denit Estates Drive
Brookeville, MD 20833
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to ALLIANCE TITLE, Trustee(s), dated March 26,
2007, and recorded among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 34190, folio 702, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of
the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction at THE MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
MARCH 30, 2018 at 10:00AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
THE FOLLOWING LAND AND PREMISES SITUATED IN MONTGOMERY COUNTY, STATE OF MARYLAND, AND KNOWN AND
DESCRIBED AS: LOT 18, BLOCK C, AS SHOWN ON A PLAT
ENTITLED "DENIT ESTATES" AND PLAT THEREOF RECORDED
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
MARYLAND IN PLAT NO. 21669. FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY: THE APN IS SHOWN BY THE COUNTY ASSESSOR
AS 03317135; SOURCE OF TITLE IS BOOK 26915, PAGE 388
(RECORDED 03/22/04)
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $76,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0001%
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-08209)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
MARCH 14, 21, 28, 2018
12165744
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
8830 Piney Branch Road Unit 609
Silver Spring, MD 20903
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to DATA SEARCH INC., Trustee(s), dated April 26,
www.hwestauctions.com
2005, and recorded among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY
www.hwestauctions.com
12167791
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 29828, folio 650, the holder MARCH 14, 21, 28, 2018
FEBRUARY 28, MARCH 7, 14, 2018
12166092 of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
will offer for sale at public auction at THE MONTGOMERY
SUITE 100
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
APRIL 2, 2018 at 1:30 PM
SUITE 100
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
KNOWN AS
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
as follows:
1236 Cavendish Drive
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
Silver
Spring,
MD 20905
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
KNOWN AS
RECORDED MAY 9, 2005 IN LIBER 29828, FOLIO 650.
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
13203 Astoria Hill Court, Unit D
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition certain Deed of Trust to BUONASSISSI HENNING LASH, PC.
Germantown, MD 20874
without either express or implied warranty or representation, ATTN: CHRISTY ETTERS, Trustee(s), dated June 25, 2008, and
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain including but not limited to the description, fitness for a recorded among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
Deed of Trust to PRLAP INC. , Trustee(s), dated March 24, particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, MARYLAND in Liber 35917, folio 116, the holder of the
2008, and recorded among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 35544, folio 768, the holder liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other among the aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at
having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold public auction at THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE
the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of LOCATED AT 50 MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850
will offer for sale at public auction at THE MONTGOMERY record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA ON,
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50 MARYLAND AVENUE, assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
APRIL 2, 2018 at 1:30 PM
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
APRIL 2, 2018 at 1:30 PM
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance as follows:
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described of the purchase price with interest at 7% per annum from the LOT NUMBERED TWENTY-EIGHT (28), IN BLOCK NUMBERED
date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN SEVEN (7), IN A SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "OAK SPRINGS" AS
as follows:
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 117, AT PLAT
13825
RECORDED APRIL 10, 2008 IN LIBER 35544, FOLIO 768.
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation, association dues and assessments that may become due after without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condiconstruction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement tion, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, mateliability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for rials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
of the purchase price with interest at 7% per annum from the
the purchase price with interest at 4.125% per annum from Trustee's File No. (57158)
date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
www.hwestauctions.com
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
12165575 are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for MARCH 14, 21, 28, 2018
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (18242)
Trustee's File No. (11555)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
LEGAL
NOTICES
To place your
legal notice in the
Classified section:
Call:
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 14, 21, 28, 2018
12166396
202-334-7007
e-mail:
legalnotices@washpost.com
WP 2x3
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 14, 21, 28, 2018
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14, 2018
EZ
Montgomery County
12165741
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
22200 GARRETTS CHANCE CT.
AQUASCO, MD 20608
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
3207 31ST AVE.
TEMPLE HILLS, MD 20748
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Bettina V.
Hodges a/k/a Bettina Victoria Hodges and Spencer J. Hodges dated June
1, 2011 and recorded in Liber 32760, folio 587 among the Land Records
of Prince George's County, MD, default having occurred under the terms
thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court
for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772
(Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
APRIL 3, 2018 AT 10:55 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Francine
Steadman dated November 29, 2006 and recorded in Liber 26915, folio
435 among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at
public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main
St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.),
on
APRIL 3, 2018 AT 10:53 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #08-3713757.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $43,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 67165.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Mar 14, Mar 21 & Mar 28
12169310
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #06-0577353.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1009 CHILLUM RD., UNIT #210
HYATTSVILLE, MD 20782
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Michael
Thomas Pie dated August 29, 2008 and recorded in Liber 30021, folio 440
among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St.,
Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
APRIL 3, 2018 AT 10:54 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and
described as Unit 210, of Land Unit 3, in a Horizontal Condominium Regime
entitled The Fairmont 1009 Condominium and more fully described in the
aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #17-3755212.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $9,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 69220.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Mar 14, Mar 21 & Mar 28
12169308
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
11205 RAGING BROOK DR.
BOWIE, MD 20720
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Pamela
V. Reaves dated April 2, 2013 and recorded in Liber 35150, folio 1 among
the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro,
MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
APRIL 3, 2018 AT 10:50 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and
described as Unit 232, in the subdivision known as Phase IIIVI, Glensford
Condominium and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
Tax ID #13-1385657.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $21,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 67673.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Mar 14, Mar 21 & Mar 28
12169318
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
2415 GRANGE HALL CT.
FORT WASHINGTON, MD 20744
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Sheila
M. King dated December 7, 2012 and recorded in Liber 34931, folio 547
among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St.,
Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
APRIL 3, 2018 AT 10:49 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #12-1322494.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $22,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 66908.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Mar 14, Mar 21 & Mar 28
12169315
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $14,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 66450.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Mar 14, Mar 21 & Mar 28
12169307
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
6949 SCOTCH DR.
LAUREL, MD 20707
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Tony
M. Shannon and Monique Weathers-Shannon dated November 1, 2006
and recorded in Liber 26382, folio 121 among the Land Records of Prince
George's County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof,
the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince
George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing
entrance, located on Main St.), on
APRIL 3, 2018 AT 10:51 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #10-1130921.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $24,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 69421.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Mar 14, Mar 21 & Mar 28
12169305
GREENSPOONMARDER, P.A.
1125 West Street, Suite 265
Annapolis, MD 21401
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
11784 CARRIAGE HOUSE DRIVE
UNIT#58
SILVER SPRING, MD 20904
APRIL 2, 2018 AT 1:30 PM
By virtue of a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust
from JAPHETH K. KALUYU, dated SEPTEMBER 24, 2004,
and recorded in the Land Records of MONTGOMERY County,
Maryland, at Liber 28717, Folio 357, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Substitute Trustee will sell at public
auction, at the front of the MONTGOMERY County courthouse
located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850.
All that Fee-Simple lot of ground and the improvements
thereon, situated in MONTGOMERY County and being more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
CONDOMINIUM UNIT #58, SECTION I, IN “THE OAKS CONDOMINIUM”, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN CONDOMINIUM PLAT BOOK 26 AT PLATS 2784 THROUGH AND
INCLUDING 2787, AND BY DECLARATION RECORDED IN
LIBER 5885 AT FOLIO 540, AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the loan
and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered into by
the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale is void
and the purchaser’s deposit shall be refunded without interest.
Purchaser must obtain possession and assumes risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of the auction forward.
The property will be sold in an “as is” condition, without express
or implied warranty as to the nature and description of the
improvements as contained herein, and subject to conditions
restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, but
omitting any covenant or restriction based on race, color,
religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, if any,
and with no warranty of any kind.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $10,000.00 by cash, certified
check or cashier’s check will be required of the purchaser, if
other than the note holder, at time and place of sale, balance
in immediately available funds upon final ratification of sale by
the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY County, Maryland, interest
to be paid at the rate of 5% on unpaid purchase money from
date of sale to date of settlement. The secured party herein, if
a bidder, shall not be required to post a deposit. Third party
purchaser (excluding the secured party) will be required to
complete full settlement of the purchase of the property within
TWENTY (20) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification of the sale
by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser’s deposit shall be
forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense
of the defaulting purchaser. All other public charges and private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground
rent, taxes, if any, to be adjusted to date of sale. Cost of
all documentary stamps and transfer taxes and all other costs
incident to the settlement shall be borne by the purchaser. If
applicable, condominium and/or homeowner association dues
and assessments due pursuant to Md. Real Property Article
11-110 and those that may become due after the time of
sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Purchaser must
obtain possession and assumes the risk of loss or damage to
the property from the date of sale forward. If the sale is
rescinded or not ratified for any reason, including post sale
lender audit, or the Substitute Trustee is unable to convey good
and marketable title, or a resale is to take place for any reason,
the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to
a refund of the aforementioned deposit. The purchaser waives
all rights and claims against the Substitute Trustee whether
known or unknown. These provisions shall survive settlement.
Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be void and of no
effect, and the purchaser shall have no further claim against
Substitute Trustee. The sale is subject to post-sale review of
the status of the loan and that if any agreement to cancel the
sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior to the
sale then the sale is void and the purchaser’s deposit shall be
refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
applicable, may be announced at the time and date of sale. (File
#41583.0037/432508V)
Erin M. Shaffer,
Substitute Trustee
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 14, 21, 28, 2018
12166937
Prince Georges County
851
EZ
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
13008 BLAIRMORE ST.
BELTSVILLE, MD 20705
6307 HIL MAR DR., UNIT #10
DISTRICT HEIGHTS, MD 20747
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Yvonne M.
Davis dated January 9, 2007 and recorded in Liber 27337, folio 205 among
the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro,
MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
MARCH 20, 2018 AT 10:54 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Marcus
Smoot dated December 11, 2006 and recorded in Liber 27110, folio 187
among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St.,
Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #01-0013755.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and
described as Unit No. 1-10 of the "Westwood Park Condominium" and
more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #06-3818002.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $60,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 65442.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 28, Mar 7 & Mar 14
12166681
MARCH 27, 2018 AT 10:55 AM
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $18,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 69175.
The property will be sold subject to a 120 day right of redemption by the
Internal Revenue Service.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Mar 7, Mar 14 & Mar 21
12166678
852
Anne Arundel County
852
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #15-1716232.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $22,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 64699.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
12166682
6400 KNOLLBROOK DR.
HYATTSVILLE, MD 20783
APRIL 3, 2018 AT 10:48 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #17-1847540.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $31,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 59679.
The property will be sold subject to a 120 day right of redemption by the
Internal Revenue Service.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Mar 14, Mar 21 & Mar 28
12169314
FROM "NO
855
Charles County
855
Charles County
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Ana
Tarango and Waldemar Velez dated January 17, 2008 and recorded in Liber
6559, folio 293 among the Land Records of Charles County, MD, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at
public auction at the Circuit Court for Charles County, 200 Charles St., La
Plata, MD 20646, (Sale will be held in the breezeway between the Circuit
Court and the District Court), on
MARCH 20, 2018 AT 1:06 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #02-749-01426600.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $35,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 53704.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
Mar 14, Mar 21 & Mar 28
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Charles County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #06-155405.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $42,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Charles County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 70088.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 28, Mar 7 & Mar 14
12166686
12168812
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
7620 FAIRBANKS CT.
HANOVER, MD 21076
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Stacy
Lee Hynson dated October 27, 2006 and recorded in Liber 18502, folio
592 among the Land Records of Anne Arundel County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County, at the Court House
Door, 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
MARCH 27, 2018 AT 9:33 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #05-003-18301200.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $11,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 59077.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
Mar 7, Mar 14 & Mar 21
12168128
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Terrell D.
Walker and Kandice N. Walker dated August 1, 2007 and recorded in Liber
19391, folio 143 among the Land Records of Anne Arundel County, MD,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County, at the
Court House Door, 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
APRIL 3, 2018 AT 9:31 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #04-406-90038720.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $33,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 67781.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
Mar 14, Mar 21 & Mar 28
12169312
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Eric G.
Mills, Jr. dated May 11, 2007 and recorded in Liber 19117, folio 110 among
the Land Records of Anne Arundel County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County, at the Court House Door, 8 Church
Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
APRIL 3, 2018 AT 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and
described as Unit numbered 201, Building A-3, in an expandable Condominium Regime known as "Chestnut Gable at Piney Orchard, a
Condominium Apartment" and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed
of Trust. Tax ID #04-571-90075692.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $29,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 69854.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
Mar 14, Mar 21 & Mar 28
12169311
Charles County
855
Charles County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
16224 AND 16195 WILKERSON PL.
BRANDYWINE, MD 20613
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from James
R. Wilkerson and Christine J. Wilkerson dated May 4, 2004 and recorded
in Liber 4725, folio 24 among the Land Records of Charles County, MD,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Charles County, 200 Charles
St., La Plata, MD 20646, (Sale will be held in the breezeway between the
Circuit Court and the District Court), on
MARCH 20, 2018 AT 1:07 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Charles County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #09-011994 and Tax ID
#09-000968.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $31,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Charles County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 64872.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 28, Mar 7 & Mar 14
FOOD ALLOWED."
TO "HOW OLD ARE THESE
FRIES?"
12166692
856
Frederick County
856
D11
Frederick County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Anne Arundel County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
2458 APPLE BLOSSOM LA., UNIT #201
ODENTON, MD 21113
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from James
H. Jarrells and Emma M. Jarrells dated March 26, 2007 and recorded in
Liber 27561, folio 683 among the Land Records of Prince George's County,
MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees
will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County,
14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located
on Main St.), on
Anne Arundel County
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Kevin P.
McLaughlin and Regina Verow dated November 8, 2005 and recorded in
Liber 17172, folio 72 among the Land Records of Anne Arundel County,
MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees
will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County,
at the Court House Door, 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
APRIL 3, 2018 AT 9:32 AM
855
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
852
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
4116 BLUEBIRD DR.
WALDORF, MD 20603
5234 WASENA AVE.
BALTIMORE, MD 21225
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Joseph K.
West dated August 15, 2013 and recorded in Liber 35659, folio 114 among
the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro,
MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
MARCH 20, 2018 AT 10:55 AM
OPQRS
Anne Arundel County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
209 POPLAR RD.
RIVA, MD 21140
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
11505 MARYVALE RD.
UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
Feb 28, Mar 7 & Mar 14
852
165 Fairfield Drive
Frederick, MD 21702
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
JACQUELINE SAINT-AMOUR AND FIRMIN SAINT-AMOUR,
dated May 18, 2006 and recorded in Liber 6079, folio 0762
among the Land Records of FREDERICK COUNTY, MD, default
having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case
No.C-10-CV-17-000058; Tax ID No.02-075075 ) the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the FREDERICK COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, located at 100 W. PATRICK ST, FREDERICK,
MD 21701, on
MARCH 26, 2018 at 11:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $20,700.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for FREDERICK
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 579641)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
11185 James Run Place
La Plata, MD 20646
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to CHRIS A. HOPKINS, Trustee(s), dated April
30, 2014, and recorded among the Land Records of CHARLES
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 08548, folio 0278, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE CHARLES COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 200 CHARLES STREET ( IN THE
BREEZEWAY BETWEEN CIRCUIT AND DISTRICT COURTS ), LA
PLATA, MD 20646 ON,
MARCH 22, 2018 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in CHARLES COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
LOT NUMBERED FOUR (4) AS SHOWN ON THE PLAT ENTITLED "RECORD PLAT #2, TAX MAP 56, GRID 7 PARCEL
5, LOT 4, JAMES RUN POINTE", AS PER PLAT THEREOF
DULY RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF CHARLES
COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK 56 AT FOLIO 60; LYING
www.hwestauctions.com
AND BEING IN THE 4TH ELECTION DISTRICT OF CHARLES MARCH 7, 14, 21, 2018
12169003
COUNTY, MARYLAND BEING PREMISES KNOWN AS: 11185 857
857
Howard County
Howard County
JAMES RUN PLACE, LA PLATA MD 20646
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merRosenberg & Associates, LLC
chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
7105 COLLINGWOOD CT.
ELKRIDGE, MD 21075
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Marilyn
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $40,000.00 payable in certified D. Rawlings and Mark D. Rawlings dated November 29, 2000 and recorded
Liber 5293, folio 90 among the Land Records of Howard County, MD,
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at in
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final sell at public auction, AUCTION SALE TO BE HELD AT THE THOMAS DORSEY
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of CHARLES COUNTY, BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX ROAD, COLUMBIA, MD 21045, on
APRIL 2, 2018 AT 9:25 AM
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.875% on unpaid
THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The ALL
improvements thereon situated in Howard County, MD and more fully
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #01-286668.
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the condition
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification Terms of Sale: A deposit of $66,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
of sale by the Circuit Court for Howard County. Interest
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at ratification
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other the
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
public charges and private charges or assessments, including of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to or
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural
taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium
fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of assumed by the
purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason, documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are borne
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The Ifpurchaser's
sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be above-scheduled
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to post- deposit.
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
sale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior reselling
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if and
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 60295.
No. (17-10628)
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri,
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher,
Mar 14, Mar 21 & Mar 28
12169319
Substitute Trustees
Easy Pay keeps you in-the-know.
(And your subscription up-to-date.)
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 7, 14, 21, 2018
12166348
ENROLL TODAY
Visit sub.wpsubscribe.com/easy
or call 202-334-6100.
Democracy Dies in Darkness
Dem
S0833-1 6x2
851
You know us for shopping, and
now Cars.com is the site for the
entire life of your car. So for every
turn, turn to Cars.com.
C3748 10x4
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14, 2018
D12
857
Howard County
OPQRS
857
857
Howard County
Howard County
857
Howard County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
7944 PETTIGREW STREET
Elkridge, MD 21075
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to LYNDE SELDON, Trustee(s), dated May 27,
2015, and recorded among the Land Records of HOWARD
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 16270, folio 525, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for
sale at public auction at THE HOWARD COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT THE THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX
ROAD, COLUMBIA, MD. 21045 ON,
MARCH 16, 2018 at 12:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in HOWARD COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NO. 108, IN
THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT OF RE-SUBDIVISION
BLUE STREAM LOTS 1-125, OPEN SPACE LOTS 126 & 127
AND BUILDABLE BULK PARCEL J-1, A RE-SUBDIVISION
OF BUILDABLE BULK PARCEL J-2 "BLUE STREAM", PLATS
21737-21738, BUILDABLE BULK PARCEL K, "BLUE
STREAM", PLATS 21558-21564, AND EASEMENTS ON PARCEL J-1, "BLUE STREAM", PLATS 21737-21738", AS PER
PLATS THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
HOWARD COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT NOS. MDR 21981,
MDR 21984 AND MDR 21986. THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON BEING KNOWN AS NO.: 7944 PETTIGREW STREET.
SUBJECT TO AN ANNUAL DEFERRED WATER AND SEWER
CHARGE PAYABLE IN THE MONTH OF JULY IN EACH AND
EVERY YEAR IN THE AMOUNT OF $400.00, FOR A PERIOD OF
THIRTY (30) YEARS.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $37,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of HOWARD COUNTY,
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.875% on unpaid
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other
public charges and private charges or assessments, including
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postsale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
No. (17-05601)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher,
12154632
Substitute Trustees
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
9046 QUEEN MARIA COURT
Columbia, MD 21045
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to VALORIE KACHERIAN, Trustee(s), dated
November 18, 2005, and recorded among the Land Records of
HOWARD COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 09690, folio 295, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for
sale at public auction at THE HOWARD COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT THE THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX
ROAD, COLUMBIA, MD. 21045 ON,
MARCH 16, 2018 at 12:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in HOWARD COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NO. G-61, AS
SHOWN ON A PLAT ENTITLED "COLUMBIA, VILLAGE OF
LONG REACH, LOTS G-1 TO G-72 AND G-148 TO G-161, A
RESUBDIVISION OF PARCEL G, SECTION 1, AREA 1, SHEETS
1 OF 2 AND 2 OF 2", WHICH PLAT IS RECORDED AMONG
THE LAND RECORDS OF HOWARD COUNTY IN PLAT BOOK
NO. 22, FOLIOS 75 AND 76. THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
NOW KNOWN AS 9046 QUEEN MARIA COURT, COLUMBIA, MD
21045. TAX I.D. NO. 16-126411
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $14,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of HOWARD COUNTY,
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.98% on unpaid
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other
public charges and private charges or assessments, including
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postsale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
No. (17-11688)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri, Christine
Johnson, Melissa Alcocer, Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 28, MARCH 7, 14, 2018
Fauquier County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
7884 WELLINGTON DRIVE,
WARRENTON, VA 20186
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated August 26, 2011,
in the original principal amount
of $544,390.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Fauquier County, Virginia, in Book
1375 at Page 60 as Instrument No.
2011-00007060 . The undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for
sale at public auction in the front
of the Circuit Court building for
Fauquier County, 40 Culpeper
Street, Warrenton, Virginia on April
19, 2018, at 12:00 PM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT OR
PARCEL OF LAND LYING AND
BEING SITUATE IN MARSHALL
MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT, FAUQUIER
COUNTY, VIRGINIA, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS LOT 44,
CONTAINING 1.5570 ACRES, MORE
OR LESS, WATERLOO NORTH,
WATERLOO ESTATES, PHASE II, AS
THE SAME IS SHOWN, DESIGNATED
AND DESCRIBED ON PLAT ENTITLED "WATERLOO NORTH, WATERLOO ESTATES, PHASE II", PREPARED BY VH&D, INC., UNDER
REVISED DATE OF JANUARY 24,
1989 AND RECORDED WITH A
DEED OF DEDICATION DATED
NOVEMBER 21, 1988, RECORDED
JANUARY 31, 1989 IN DEED BOOK
612, PAGE 491 IN THE CLERK‘S
OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF FAUQUIER COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3172401.
March 14, 21, 2018
12164688
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
877
Spotsylvania County
TRUSTEE SALE
5521 Joshua Tree Circle,
Fredericksburg, VA 22407
Spotsylvania County
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $407,036.00, dated October 14,
2005 recorded in the Clerk's
Office of the Circuit Court of Spotsylvania County, Virginia, in Document No. 200500044398, default
having occurred in the payment
of the Note thereby secured and
at the request of the holder of said
Note, the undersigned Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at
the entrance to the Spotsylvania
County Judicial Center, 9107 Judicial Center Lane, Spotsylvania, on
April 10, 2018 at 12:00 PM the
property described in said deed,
located at the above address and
briefly described as:
Lot 225, Section 3-A, The Falls at
Lee's Parke, with improvements
thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust,if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (42681)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Mar 14, 21, 2018
12170378
You, too, could have
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 28, MARCH 7, 14, 2018
878
Stafford County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
201 ALBA ROAD,
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22405
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated March 25, 2016,
in the original principal amount
of $228,288.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Stafford County, Virginia as Instrument No. LR160004952. The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Stafford County, 1300 Courthouse Road, Stafford, Virginia on
April 19, 2018, at 2:00 PM, the
property described in said Deed
of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: UNIT 105F,
PHASE 2, RAPPAHANNOCK LANDING CONDOMINIUM, AS SET FORTH
IN DECLARATION FOR RAPPAHANNOCK LANDING CONDOMINIUM,
RECORDED AS INSTRUMENT NUMBER 100012402, AS AMENDED IN
INSTRUMENT
NUMBER
110014703, AND AS FURTHER
AMENDED IN INSTRUMENT NUMBER 120017477, AND ANY AND
ALL PRIOR AND/OR SUBSEQUENT
AMENDMENTS THERETO, AND AS
SHOWN OR NOTED ON ANY
PLAT(S) ATTACHED THERETO,
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
STAFFORD COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3230701.
March 14, 21, 2018
12169162
Membership is rewarding.
878
12163740
Stafford County
TRUSTEE SALE
1241 Aquia Drive,
Stafford, VA 22554
Stafford County
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$242,403.00, dated May 31, 2012
recorded in the Clerk's Office of
the Circuit Court of Stafford County, Virginia, in Document No.
120010971,
default
having
occurred in the payment of the
Note thereby secured and at the
request of the holder of said Note,
the
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at the entrance to the
Judicial Center, 1300 Courthouse
Road, Stafford, on April 10, 2018 at
11:00 AM the property described
in said deed, located at the above
address and briefly described as:
Lot 535, Section 3, Aquia Harbour,
with improvements thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust,if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (47342)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Mar 14, 21, 2018
12170379
879
Stafford County
873
Prince William County
873
Prince William County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
35 VARONE DRIVE,
STAFFORD, VA 22554
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
12505 HUNT ROAD,
CULPEPER, VA 22701.
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
15548 HORSESHOE LANE,
WOODBRIDGE, VA 22191
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated June 28, 2013, in
the original principal amount of
$332,859.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Stafford County, Virginia as Instrument No. LR130016206 . The
undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction
in the front of the Circuit Court
building for Stafford County, 1300
Courthouse Road, Stafford, Virginia on April 19, 2018, at 2:00
PM, the property described in said
Deed of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL THAT
CERTAIN LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND
TOGETHER WITH IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON, SITUATE, LYING AND
BEING IN STAFFORD COUNTY, VIRGINIA, AND MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS LOT 23, SECTION 7-B, PARK RIDGE, AS THE
SAME APPEARS DULY DEDICATED,
PLATTED AND RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 28 AT PAGES 324 AND 325,
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
STAFFORD COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3261411.
March 14, 21, 2018
12169160
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated November 9, 2006,
in the original principal amount
of $195,000.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Culpeper County, Virginia as Instrument No. 060012552 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Culpeper County, at the corner
of West Davis Street and North
West Street in the Town of
Culpeper on April 5, 2018 , at 11:00
AM, the property described in said
Deed of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: SITUATE,
LYING AND BEING IN CULPEPER
COUNTY, VIRGINIA, AND BEING
MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED
AS FOLLOWS: INCLUDING RIGHTS
OF WAY, OF THE STATE ROUTE 629
AND BEING DESCRIBED AS LOT 9
OF "HIGHLAND ESTATES" IN SALEM
MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT, CULPEPER
COUNTY, VIRGINIA, ON A PLAT OF
J. R. HUDSON, JR., CLS, DATED
NOVEMBER 21, 1977, RECORDED
IN DEED BOOK 283, PAGE 54 CONTAINING 10.9491 ACRES, MORE OR
LESS.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
March 28, 2007, and recorded at Instrument Number 200703290038418
in the Clerk's Office for the Circuit Court for Prince William County,
VA, securing a loan which was originally $171,900.00. The appointed
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, S&T Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at public
auction at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince William County,
9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas, VA 20110 on:
March 21, 2018 at 2:00 PM
879
Culpeper County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
5415 RIVERBEND LANE,
REVA, VA 22735.
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated August 26, 2016,
in the original principal amount
of $171,731.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Culpeper County, Virginia as Instrument No. 160004979 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Culpeper County, at the corner
of West Davis Street and North
West Street in the Town of
Culpeper on April 5, 2018 , at 11:00
AM, the property described in said
Deed of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL THAT
CERTAIN LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND
SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN
SALEM MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT,
CULPEPER COUNTY, VIRGINIA,
LOCATED ON RIVERBEND LANE,
AND ACCORDING TO A SURVEY
MADE BY RICHARD D. TOWNSEND,
LS, DATED JULY 29, 1990, A PLAT
OF WHICH IS RECORDED IN THE
CLERK‘S OFFICE OF CULPEPER
COUNTY VIRGINIA, IN PLAT CABINET 2, SLIDE 337, SAID LOT IS
DESIGNATED AS LOT 46A, SECTION
3, OF RIVERBEND ESTATES, CONTAINING 5.2258 ACRES, MORE OR
LESS.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3189741.
March 7, 14, 2018
12168877
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3242671.
March 7, 14, 2018
12169126
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
12232 SALT CEDAR LANE,
CULPEPER, VA 22701
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated February 27, 2013,
in the original principal amount
of $213,265.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Culpeper County, Virginia as Instrument No. 130001532 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Culpeper County, at the corner
of West Davis Street and North
West Street in the Town of
Culpeper on April 5, 2018 , at 11:00
AM, the property described in said
Deed of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL THAT
CERTAIN LOT, PIECE OR PARCEL OF
LAND, WITH ALL IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON AND ALL APPURTENANCES THERETO BELONGING,
LOCATED AND BEING IN THE
COUNTY OF CULPEPER, COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA, AND BEING
DESIGNATED AS FOLLOWS: LOT
128, PHASE I, THREE FLAGS, AS
THE SAME IS DULY DEDICATED
INSTRUMENT NUMBER 050006735
AND AS SHOWN ON A PLAT IN
PLAT CABINET 8, SLIDE(S) 571-587,
ALL RECORDED AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF CULPEPER COUNTY,
VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3260721.
March 7, 14, 2018
12169125
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Roommates
NE - Small furnished room, shr BA
& kitchen, $450 per month, utilities
are split 4 ways. Call 301-523-4772
MARYLAND
You, too,
could have
home
delivery.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14, 2018
EZ
Culpeper County
Roommates
BOWIE- Share my home, 1 large
BR, private entrance, W/D, close
to Metro. $650. 301-437-8016
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding. The
Substitute Trustee is S&T Trustees, LLC, 6802 Paragon Place, Suite 410,
Richmond, VA 23230. For information contact: Diana C. Theologou at
301-468-4990.
March 8, 14, 2018
12169365
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
14649 Red House Road,
Gainesville, VA 20155
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
March 28, 2006, and recorded at Instrument Number 200604040053117
in the Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Prince William County,
VA, securing a loan which was originally $390,000.00. The appointed
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at
public auction at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince William
County, 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas, VA 20110 on:
March 21, 2018 at 1:00 PM
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of Lot
numbered Twenty-Five (25), in the subdivision known as “Greenhill
Crossing”, Section 13, as the same appears duly dedicated, platted and
recorded in Deed Book 2862 at Page 1456, among the Land Records of
Prince William County, Virginia.
Which has an address of 14649 Red House Road, Gainesville, VA 20155,
and as more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the
time of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever
is lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE
will be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price,
with interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
Out-of-Town
Real Estate
Happy Days
Holy Spirit you who make me see
everything and showed me the way
to reach my ideals, you who gave me
the Divine gift to forgive and forget
all the wrong that is done to me, and
you who are in all instances in my
life with me. I want to thank you
for everything and confirm to you
once more that I never want to be
separated from you no matter how
great the material desire may be. I
want to be with you and my loved
ones in your perpetual Glory. Amen
Love you Holy Spirit
Anna M. Anderson
225
Collectibles
SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH
FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS.
Call Al, 301-807-3266.
Will Come to you!
265
Home & Garden
879
Culpeper County
Default having occurred in the terms of two Commercial Notes in the
combined amount of $1,214,000.00 that are secured by a Deed of
Trust dated April 12, 2012 and recorded as Instrument #120002146
among the land records of Culpeper County, Virginia, the following
parcel secured thereby will be offered for sale at public auction:
All the certain tract or parcel of land with all improvements thereon and appurtenances thereunto belonging,
situate, lying and being in Stevensburg Magisterial District of
Culpeper County, Virginia on Mountain Run, and State Road
869, containing 242.5 acres, more or less
Less and except that portion conveyed to the Commonwealth of Virginia in Deed Book 660, Page 228,
and also known as:
Virginia Land Preservation Credits now existing or hereafter
arising, resulting from any deed of gift of easement now or
hereafter granted to the Commonwealth of Virginia, Board
of Historic Resources with respect to the following real
property:
241.96 acres known as "Mountain Valley Farm", located
at 22031 Milky Way in Elkwood, Virginia and more fully
described on that certain Form LPC of the Virginia Department of Taxation, submitted by Douglas L. Mayhugh and
Janice B. Mayhugh, and all proceeds thereof (hereinafter
"Property").
Property has a street address of 22031 Milky Way, Elkwood, Virginia
and an assigned Culpeper County tax map number of 44-42A.
Property is being offered for sale via a public auction by the Substitute
Trustee, appointed via a Deed of Appointment dated January 26, 2018
and recorded as Instrument #180000442 among the land records of
Culpeper County, Virginia. Substitute Trustee to use an Auctioneer for
the sale of the Property.
Foreclosure sale will take place on Friday, March 23, 2018 at 10:00
a.m. AT THE PROPERTY.
TERMS OF SALE: 10% deposit of the final bid price in the form of cash
or good check is due at the conclusion of the foreclosure sale with the
remaining bid price, plus a 5% buyer's premium, due at settlement,
which shall occur on or before April 23, 2018; TIME BEING OF THE
ESSENCE. The Property is being sold "As-Is", "Where Is" and without
any representations or warranties of any kind. Trustee intends to
convey Property free and clear of all liens recorded among the land
records of the Culpeper County Circuit Court. Trustee will announce
at sale if this can be done. Conveyance by Trustee's Deed will be
subject to any and all covenants, conditions, easements, restrictions,
and rights of way of record, if any, affecting the same. Purchaser to
pay all closing and recordation costs, transfer taxes, past-due and pro
rata property taxes due through 3/22/2018. Additional terms to be
provided in writing to qualified bidders at foreclosure sale.
Pursuant to the Federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, the Law
Office of Robert Oliveri, PLC may be considered a debt collector. The
foreclosure sale advertised above is an attempt to collect a debt and
any information obtained will be used for that purpose.
Law Office of Robert Oliveri, PLC, Substitute Trustee
6608 Clarkes Meadow Drive, Bealeton, Virginia
For inquiries, please contact Robert Oliveri at 703-217-3379.
3/14/2018, 3/21/2018
12170526
Membership is rewarding.
PostPoints takes you
to special exhibits.
12165548
610
Dogs for Sale
DELAWARE New Move-In Ready
Homes! Low Taxes! Close to
Beaches, Gated, Olympic pool. New
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Fees. Brochures Available.
1-866-629-0770 or
www.coolbranch.com
102
Culpeper County
NOTICE of TRUSTEE'S SALE
for 241.96 acres known as "Mountain Valley Farm"
(22031 Milky Way, Elkwood, Virginia)
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of All
that certain lot or parcel of land with improvements thereon and
appurtenances thereto appertaining, lying and being situate in Prince
William County, Virginia and more particularly described as follows:
Condominium Unit No. 548, Highpointe at Rippon Landing Condominium
and the limited common elements appurtenant thereto, including limited
common element parking space(s) no. 61 and Storage unit 2D, established
by condominium instruments recorded on November 15, 2006 at Instrument number 200611150161532 among the land records of Prince William
County, Virginia and as more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold "AS IS," WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the
time of sale. A deposit of $17,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever
is lower, in cash or cashier's check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE
will be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price,
with interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted from
the date of sale at the time of settlement. If Purchaser requests counsel
for Substitute Trustee to draft any settlement documents including but
not limited to a deed, a fee of $350.00 shall be paid. Trustee shall have no
duty to obtain possession for purchaser. Seller shall not be responsible
for any costs incurred by the purchaser in connection with their purchase
or settlement, including, without limitation, state and local recording fees,
title insurance or research, or any other costs of purchaser’s acquisition.
All risks of casualty pass to the successful bidder at conclusion of bidding.
In the event the sale is legally null and void, the Purchaser’s sole remedy,
in law or equity, shall be the return of the Purchaser’s deposit without
interest.
February 21, 28, March 7, 14, 2018
879
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Food
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14 , 2018
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/FOOD
MG VA PG
E
EE
FIRST BITE
IRISH BROWN BREAD
MORE AT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RECIPES
A Tibetan refugee makes
his way to the District and
fills a small space with hot
pot and dumplings. E3
A trip to visit friends in
Ireland results in a quest to
re-create a St. Patrick’s
Day staple at home. E6
Caramelized Cabbage Soup E3
Peach Melba Bars ONLINE
Sole With Crispy Lemon-Thyme Bread
Crumbs E6
Red Wine-Braised Brisket With Aunt
Rifka’s Flying Disks ONLINE
CHAT At noon: live.washingtonpost.com
NEWSLETTER Voraciously.com
STACY ZARIN GOLDBERG FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
RECIPE
Chicken and Veg Parcels E2
Made to order,
easy cleanup.
What’s not
to like?
PHOTOS BY DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Mourning meals that will be no more
To devoted diners, the closing of a restaurant can bring grief — and maybe a side order of guilt
BY
T IM C ARMAN
Not long after Lisa Ingall gave birth to
a baby boy — after 30 punishing hours in
labor without food — she turned to her
husband, Amit Saha, and made a simple
request:
“‘Get . . . down to the Classics and get
me a Hell Burger!’” Saha recalled his wife
saying that June day in 2010. “It wasn’t so
much of a request as it was a demand.”
Next thing he knew, Saha was perched
atop a bar stool at Ray’s the Classics in
Silver Spring waiting for the hamburger
and knocking back shots with Elliott
Rattley, then director of operations for
the whole Ray’s family of restaurants.
These were celebratory toasts between
friends — one a new father and the other
a restaurant veteran quick with a free
pour for regulars.
TOP: The Classics in Silver Spring, which closed Feb. 27.
ABOVE: Co-owner Nick Lopata works the bar on the final
Friday night. He and Elliott Rattley inherited the
steakhouse in 2013 from founder Michael Landrum.
Memories like these came rushing
back to Saha the moment he heard the
Classics, as the place would later be
named, was going to close Feb. 27. He
immediately took to Facebook to pour
out his feelings: “I’m heartbroken. It
wasn’t just a fantastic steakhouse. It was
owned by my friends. So many special
moments in our lives happened there.”
To some, restaurants are just businesses, with cooks who prepare the food and
servers who bring it, a purely transactional experience. To others, restaurants
are places where friends meet, birthdays
are celebrated, special occasions toasted
and memories made. To those in the
latter group, a beloved restaurant closure
can be a blow. Therese Rando labels these
blows “disenfranchised losses,” which are
personal losses that are not publicly
MOURNING CONTINUED ON E6
If the cleanup end of a
weeknight meal is your
least favorite part, this
recipe’s for you. It uses a
time-honored technique
employed by professional
Bonnie S. chefs and camping
Benwick
enthusiasts with equal
aplomb: packet cooking,
DINNER IN
a.k.a. en papillote, al
MINUTES
cartoccio, hobo packets
and foil-packet dinners.
Foods enclosed in a parchment paper
or foil pouch essentially steam as they
bake in the oven or roast on the grill,
holding in juices, flavors and aromas. To
create that steam, added liquids are
sparingly poured, and when the pouch is
foil, some type of fat is included to keep
the contents from sticking. The packets
are typically done per individual
serving, making them custom-order for
each diner at your table without extra
steps or fuss.
Start with proteins that respond
nicely to poaching, such as chicken or
fish or tofu, and you can add on from
there. For this rendition, chicken broth,
lemon slices and a touch of honey do the
trick; a dry white wine could stand in for
the broth if you have that. The small pile
of vegetables and herbs underneath
picks up flavor from the chicken on top
as well. The chicken needs to be thin;
pound or cut the boneless, skinless
chicken breast halves in your Dinner in
Minutes Pantry or buy cutlets that are
ready to go.
You don’t have to fold the packets any
DINNER CONTINUED ON E2
For the Persian new year,
a menu full of memories
BY
Y EGANEH R EZAIAN
Special to The Washington Post
Iranians around the world are preparing to mark our new year. Nowruz means
“new day” in our native language, and the
ancient holiday’s 13 days of celebration
mark what we consider the most logical
time to start the year: spring, the annual
rebirth of nature.
For me, this time is made rich from a
lifetime of memories, as it is for most
Iranians. New clothes are purchased.
Families deep-clean their homes for
weeks in advance; we do this because the
days bring a constant parade of visits
from friends and relatives.
Joyous festivities begin on the last
Tuesday of the Iranian calendar year with
bonfires that are danced around and
RECIPES
Persian Vegetable Noodle
Soup (Ash Reshteh),
pictured at left ONLINE
Persian Pan-Fried Fish E8
Rice With Vermicelli
(Reshteh Polow) ONLINE
Pickled Garlic (Seer
Torshi) ONLINE
Persian Herbed Basmati
Rice (Sabzi Polow) E8
Olive, Pomegranate and
Walnut Dip (Zeytoon
Parvardeh) E8
jumped over. Firecrackers keep everyone
awake late into the night. Children disguise themselves and go door-to-door,
asking for treats while they make a
ruckus by banging on pots and pans —
like a mash-up of Halloween and the
Fourth of July. In my neighborhood, my
dad was always the first to make a fire.
Food plays a central role in all this, of
course, and dishes are infused with symbolic meanings. Some are prepared once
a year, only for Nowruz.
The past two years that I have been
away from Iran, I did not get to jump over
any fires. But I did make Ash Reshteh, the
hearty soup of beans, herbs and noodles
that can chase away a winter’s chill.
Garnishes of dried mint that’s fried until
blackened, fried garlic, caramelized onNOWRUZ CONTINUED ON E8
DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
March 14-20
Beef Tenderloin
Steaks & Roasts
SAVE $10 LB
USA RAISED • SALE $19.99/LB REG $29.99/LB
E2
MG
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 14 , 2018
Packet cooking seals in
the juices and flavors
The Dinner in
Minutes Pantry
DINNER FROM E1
particular way, as long as you (a)
leave some head space for steam,
and (b) make sure they’re sealed
tightly. Pop them on a baking
sheet, where it doesn’t matter
how closely they sit. When you
open them, keep your face just
far enough away to avoid the
rush of heat but close enough to
inhale the goodness.
Once the packets are emptied,
you can toss them — and have
only the dishes to wash.
Remember, all these
ingredients are in the Pantry,
which you can view online:
Voraciously.com.
Every ingredient you’ll need to
make dozens of meals in no time.
Online at Voraciously.com
Voraciously.com
Our new destination makes it
easier than ever to build kitchen
skills, get dinner on the table,
improve your equipment game
and share food with friends
bonnie.benwick@washpost.com
PHOTOS BY STACY ZARIN GOLDBERG FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Chicken and Veg Parcels
2 servings
Serve with warm bread, or over brown rice.
From deputy Food editor/recipes editor Bonnie S. Benwick
Ingredients
1 medium red bell pepper
1 celery rib
1 medium shallot
Kosher salt
Freshly ground black pepper
4 to 6 stems fresh herbs, such
as sage, thyme and/or parsley
1 lemon
2 boneless, skinless chicken
breast halves (6 ounces each)
3 tablespoons no-salt-added
chicken broth
Honey
Steps
Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Cut two 12-by-17-inch
sheets of parchment paper, fold
each one in half crosswise. Place
on a rimmed baking sheet, side
by side, and then open each one.
As you prep the next ingredi
ents, you’ll be creating two
equal piles, centered on onehalf of each parchment paper:
Cut the red bell pepper in half.
Discard the seeds and ribs, then
cut into long, thin strips. Use a
vegetable peeler to remove the
stringy bits from the celery. Cut
the ribs lengthwise into 1/2-inchwide strips, then cut them in
half so they are the same length
as the red bell pepper strips.
Mince the shallot. Season each
pile lightly with salt and pepper.
Pluck the leaves from the fresh
herbs (to taste). Cut the lemon
into very thin slices, discarding
any seeds.
Place a piece of plastic wrap on
top of the chicken breast halves
and pound each one to a thickness of no more than 1/2 inch.
Season all over with salt and
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Kiwi Fruit....................3/99¢
Clementines
3 Lb Bag ............. $4.99 Ea
Honey Crisp
Apples .................$1.49 Lb
Anjou Pears...........$1.29 Lb
Strawberries 1 Pt .. $1.59 Ea
Zima Tomatoes 1 Pt $2.69 Ea
Green Peppers ............89¢Lb
Cucumbers ................ 49¢ Ea
Sugar Snaps Or
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Idaho Potatoes
5 Lb Bag ............. $2.19 Ea
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t DC STORE & PHARMACY
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Guigal CDR Red, White, Rose.......$12.99
ITALIAN WINE SALE
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Tomaiolo Chianti & PG ..................$7.99
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Chiarlo Le Orme Barbera D’Asti ....$12.99
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RODMAN’S FOOD &
DRUG STORE
Place them on individual plates.
Carefully tear open, avoiding
the steam. Eat right out of the
packet or empty the packets
onto the plates.
t WHEATON, MD
4301 RANDOLPH RD (AT VEIRS MILL RD)
PHONE 301.946.3100
tWHITE FLINT PLAZA
Follow Us 5148 NICHOLSON LA. N. KENSINGTON, MD
@rodmansdc
PHONE 301.881.6253
FREE PARKING
AT ALL LOCATIONS
SALE DATES
03-14-18 THRU 03-27-18
IMAGES SHOWN ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION
PURPOSES ONLY. ACTUAL PRODUCTS
MAY DIFFER - NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR
TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS
Nutrition | Per serving: 290 calories, 40 g
protein, 21 g carbohydrates, 5 g fat, 1 g
saturated fat, 125 mg cholesterol, 240 mg
sodium, 3 g dietary fiber, 17 g sugar
Recipe tested by Bonnie S. Benwick; email
questions to food@washpost.com
VORACIOUSLY
Can Bubly out-cute
LaCroix at its own game?
BY
PRICES FOR
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Imported from Italy
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5.2 oz
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Corn Cakes, Cocoa Cakes
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1 Lb
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Homemade Oat Cakes,
SPECIALTIES
Crushed or Diced
17.6 oz
6 oz
$2.99
Italian Tomatoes –
over the piles, then fold over the
paper and, starting at one corner, crimp and seal tight each
packet. Roast (middle rack) for
20 to 22 minutes; the paper
packets should puff up a bit.
Antipasto
Tray
Indian
Simmer Sauces
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pepper. Place one atop each pile
of vegetables. Arrange the herb
leaves and lemon slices on each
portion.
Drizzle the broth and a little
honey (a few teaspoons each)
BERETTA
PATAK
DISCOUNT GOURMET
Packet cooking can start with a protein that respond nicely to
poaching; here, it’s boneless, skinless chicken breast halves,
pounded thin. The small pile of vegetables and herbs underneath
picks up flavor from the chicken, broth, honey and lemon.
M AURA J UDKIS
It’s been bubbling up for years,
and now here we are, in the midst
of a sparkling-water brand war.
LaCroix — the fizzy flavored drink
that comes in retro pastel souncool-they’re-cool-again cans —
is the front-runner, and as Americans drink less and less soda, every
brand is angling for its own subtly
fruit-flavored water.
Enter Bubly. PepsiCo’s new
brand of flavored sparkling water
aims to make a big splash. With its
colorful cans and cheeky marketing, it is clearly aiming to steal
millennials from LaCroix. Other
brands have tried — Poland Spring
released its own flavored sparkling water, and Dasani, owned by
Coca-Cola, has a flavored sparkling water, too — but Bubly seems
to understand the cultlike appeal
of flavored sparkling water better
than the rest. It’s not the flavors or
the price — it’s the packaging.
LaCroix’s cans have achieved
cult status. They look great on
Instagram. Bubly knows this, and
its product seems to be designed
for maximum cuteness. The cans
are nearly monochrome, with
emoji-like smiles on the side. Importantly, and like LaCroix, each
can is a different color that mimics
the origin of the “natural flavor”
fruit essence inside. It is truly a
juice box for 20-somethings.
We rounded up a few sparklingwater fans in the office — some of
whom consider themselves rideor-die LaCroix brand loyalists — to
conduct an experiment (albeit
with a very small sample pool).
Our testers were given side-byside sips of same or comparably
flavored products by LaCroix and
Bubly. In a blind taste test, would
people be able to tell the difference
between LaCroix and Bubly? And
if they drank sparkling water
without seeing the can, could they
tell what flavor it was?
The answer to both questions:
No. With the exception of the very
familiar lemon and lime, very few
people got it right.
So you might think Passionfruit
(for example) is the best flavor of
LaCroix, but you might not agree if
it were in a clear bottle — and you
probably wouldn’t be able to identify it at all. So consumers should
feel free to be relentlessly pricedriven in their selection of flavored sparkling water, unless
they’re really into Instagramming
pictures of the cans.
maura.judkis@washpost.com
MARYLAND
WINE & BEER
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BLOCKBUSTERS
WINES ARE 750ML UNLESS NOTED
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SALES DATES 03-14-18 THRU 03-27-18
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Barefoot 1.5L Chard, Cab, Merlot, PG ............. $11.99 Smithwick’s 6 PK .......$7.59
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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
E3
EE
Unlock the sweet side of cabbage without opening any windows
I have
unfortunate
childhood
memories of
cabbage and
cabbage soup.
Joe Yonan When I was a kid,
my mother’s
WEEKNIGHT
VEGETARIAN
boiled cabbage
would send me
running from the
house — from the smell. Later,
she and at least one of my older
sisters spent many unhappy
months on the then-trendy
cabbage soup diet, complaining
with every bite.
I’ve come to love the vegetable
in adulthood, thanks to my
discovery of other ways to cook it
(or not), with my favorite still
being to grill it in “steaks” until
charred.
I’ve even come around to
cabbage soup. Alana Chernila has
a great method in her new book,
“Eating From the Ground Up”
(Clarkson Potter, 2018): You cook
thinly sliced cabbage slowly with
onions (and, my addition, a hefty
dose of garlic), letting the cabbage
get sweeter and sweeter (this time
creating a gorgeous aroma) before
adding thyme, then broth, and
seasoning it generously with
tamari and sea salt.
The crowning touch is little
toasts you make from a stale
baguette and grated Parm. Float
Caramelized Cabbage Soup
8 servings (makes 11 cups), Healthy
MAKE AHEAD: The soup can be refrigerated for up to 1 week or
frozen for up to 3 months.
Adapted from “Eating From the Ground Up,” by Alana Chernila
(Clarkson Potter, 2018).
For the toasts
Ingredients
For the soup
4 tablespoons (1/2 stick)
unsalted butter
10 cups thinly sliced green
cabbage (from 1 medium-large
head)
1 medium onion, thinly sliced
8 cloves garlic, coarsely
chopped
2 tablespoons fresh thyme
leaves, plus more for garnish
8 cups homemade vegetable
broth (see related recipe)
1 tablespoon low-sodium
tamari
1 teaspoon kosher salt, or more
as needed
1 teaspoon freshly ground
black pepper
a few in each bowl and they get
soft on the bottom and chewy on
top, adding a welcome sharpness.
The dish is reminiscent of onion
soup but much lighter — not dietsoup territory, perhaps, but that’s
just as well.
joe.yonan@washpost.com
Half long, stale baguette, cut
into 1/4-inch slices (about 32
slices)
1/ cup grated Parmiggiano2
Reggiano cheese or Gruyère
Steps
For the soup: Melt the butter
over medium heat in a large pot
or Dutch oven. Once the foam
subsides, add the cabbage, onion and garlic; cook, stirring
often, until the cabbage wilts,
about 10 minutes. Reduce the
heat to medium-low, cover and
cook for 35 to 45 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the cabbage is tender and has reduced
(wilted) by at least half.
Uncover; stir in the 2 tablespoons of thyme, and cook, stirring often, until the liquid evaporates and the cabbage starts to
lightly brown, 6 to 8 minutes.
Stir in the broth. Increase the
heat to medium-high and bring
to a boil. Use a wooden spoon or
spatula to scrape any brown bits
off the bottom of the pot and
DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
incorporate them into the
broth. Reduce the heat to medium-low, cover and cook for 10
minutes so the flavors meld. Stir
in the tamari, salt and pepper.
Taste, and add more salt, as
needed.
While the soup is cooking, make
the toasts: Position an oven rack
4 to 6 inches from the broiling
element; preheat the broiler.
Arrange the baguette slices on a
baking sheet. Sprinkle them
generously with the cheese.
Broil until the cheese melts, 1 to
2 minutes, and the bread has
crisped and browned on the
edges.
Serve the soup hot, in big bowls,
with a few toasts floating in
each one. Scatter some fresh
thyme leaves in each portion.
Nutrition | Per serving (with the toasts): 200
calories, 7 g protein, 26 g carbohydrates, 9 g
fat, 5 g saturated fat, 25 mg cholesterol,
580 mg sodium, 3 g dietary fiber, 8 g sugar
Recipe tested by Joe Yonan; email questions
to food@washpost.com
A hot pot hot spot? Dorjee Momo’s Tibetan comfort-food community starts small.
Chef Dorjee
Tsering’s
restaurant near
Eastern Market
FIRST BITE
seats only 27
diners — a far cry
from the thousands (yes,
thousands) of Buddhist monks
he used to cook for in Tibet when
he was training to become one.
He would chop onions and
potatoes, stew vegetables, bake
bread and serve tea.
After 16 years working in
monasteries, he became a
refugee and crossed the
Himalayas on foot.
“A lot of our friends had no
shoes and jacket. Some people
got frostbite,” Tsering said. “But
we [didn’t] have a choice.”
He went to Dharamsala, India,
where the Dalai Lama lives, and
he worked at a bakery. There, he
met his wife, Amberjade Tsering,
an American, and the pair came
to Washington. As the former
monk worked his way through a
bad case of culture shock while
cooking at Maketto and Union
Kitchen, he realized that his new
city was in dire need of not only
Tibetan food, but also
community.
The Tserings have opened
Dorjee Momo, a tiny, welcoming
Tibetan restaurant on the top
floor of Bullfrog Bagels.
A momo is a Tibetan
dumpling, the chef’s favorite
food from his childhood and one
of the menu’s star attractions.
“They’re really popular in
Tibet for New Year’s and any
celebration,” he said. The best
part? “Sucking out the juice.”
The restaurant’s namesake
dumplings (often are filled with
lamb but had chicken inside on
the night of my visit) are plump
and juicy, and come bathed in
spicy oil and sesame seeds.
They’re a can’t-miss dish for a
walk-in — but you’d do better to
plan ahead for your visit.
The restaurant’s star
attraction is its hot pot, available
by reservation only and for three
time slots each night. For the
unfamiliar, hot pot is an
interactive meal — a boiling pot
of soup at your table, with
ingredients to dip and add to the
broth, which is complex and
layered with flavor. And it’s spicy
enough to give you the forehead
sweats, but not so fiery that you
lose your ability to taste its
nuances. Among the
components: a fermented black
bean base, chile, sesame oil, goji
berries, green and black
cardamom, cloves, ginger, garlic
and dates. It’s vegan, unless you
opt for the meat version, which
costs $45 per person.
A box — so big it could really
be called a crate — of veggies
arrives at the table, with options
aplenty. There’s potato, cabbage,
bok choy, broccoli, several types
of mushrooms (including wood
ear and enoki) and tofu,
although the options can change.
Meat-eaters get all that, plus a
bowl of tiny dumplings and some
thinly sliced pork belly and beef.
Maura
Judkis
FO O D
To contact us: E-mail:
food@washpost.com Telephone:
202-334-7575 Mail: The
Washington Post, Food, 1301 K St.
NW, Washington, D.C. 20071
PHOTOS BY DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
If you’re a hot pot first-timer,
don’t be intimidated. The team
at Dorjee Momo will gently guide
you through the experience.
Diners cook everything in the
boiling pot for about a minute,
and eat it with a bowl of rice.
Each bite is good on its own, but
is even better when dredged
through a dish of garlic and oil. A
plate of pickles, including lotus
roots and turnips, provides relief
from the heat — especially the
pickled grapes that, steeped in
star anise, hint at the flavor of
mulled wine. And the steamed
buns with crispy pork belly are
another welcome break when
you feel yourself beginning to
mop your brow. There’s a small
selection of cocktails, such as
TOP: At Dorjee Momo, near
Eastern Market, the mixed
meat and vegetable hot pot
service is available by
reservation only.
LEFT: Chef Dorjee Tsering,
who once cooked for Buddhist
monks while he was training to
be one, works in his kitchen.
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maura.judkis@washpost.com
Dorjee Momo, 317 Seventh St. SE.
dorjeemomo.com. Dishes, $8 to $16;
hot pot, $35 to $45 per person. Tom
Sietsema will return next week.
WE
GET IT
DONE:
5808&&,"%
4"-&&/%4
Estancia
aquavit infused with Tibetan
peppercorns, and litchi juice and
herbal soda for those who don’t
imbibe.
The trickiest thing about
Dorjee Momo, especially if you’re
getting the hot pot, is the size of
the tables. The restaurant is in a
tiny, narrow space, and trying to
seat as many people as it can
comfortably squeeze in. But the
hot plate and box of vegetables
take up the entire table, leaving
an approximate margin of five
inches for your drinks, sauce,
bowl of rice and any other items
you might order. With no room
for our dumpling plate, it got
stacked on top of our vegetables.
Upgrading to roomier digs is
on the Tserings’ list of goals, and
they also plan to introduce boozy
boba drinks and Himachali
Dham, a dish of several curries
and dals served on a leaf used as
a platter — a specialty of the
region in India where they once
lived. The chef’s family has also
fashioned a traditional Tibetan
tent, which the restaurant will
use for special dinners and popups.
“It’s really important for
Dorjee that people feel full,” said
Amberjade Tsering, and she
meant their stomachs. (No
problems there; the hot pot is
enormous.) But the same goes for
their spirits, which will be
nourished by this immigrant
kitchen.
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GUILD QUALIT Y
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THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 14 , 2018
There’s a whiskey resurgence on the Emerald Isle
Legend says St.
Patrick drove all
the snakes out of
M. CARRIE
Ireland. What
ALLAN
drove out the
distillers? That’s a
more complex tale. (And a truer
one, since archaeological records
indicate Ireland never had any
snakes.)
It once had more than 1,000
distillers, though, ranging from
those running tiny farm stills
making poitin (think Irish
moonshine) to some of the
largest distilleries in the world.
Despite a long history of taxation
by the British, Irish whiskey
survived, and by the mid-1800s,
Irish distilleries were making
whiskey that the world wanted
to drink.
Yet between that time and the
1940s, a series of trials and
tribulations all but crushed Irish
whiskey, dropping the number of
commercial distillers in the
country to three.
How the category not only
survived but also staged a
comeback is a story that should
Spirits
have whiskey lovers raising an
appreciative dram. New
distilleries are popping up
around the country, there is talk
of a boom and many young
makers are preserving the best
traditions while exploring new
directions.
“It’s quite incredible the
different corners of the world
that Irish whiskey was found in,”
says Carol Quinn, archivist for
Irish Distillers Pernod Ricard,
which produces some of the bestknown brands, including
Jameson, Powers and Redbreast.
“In 1905, if you’re in Cairo, you
can get a glass of Powers Irish
whiskey, no problem whatsoever.
At the same time, Jameson was
selling enough in Honolulu that
they actually had a specific label
for Honolulu printed up. We
have records from Uruguay, New
Zealand, Australia, Canada —
you name it, and Irish whiskey is
being sold there. . . . It’s a global
drink at that point.”
What’s more, Quinn says, “it
was a high-quality, high-status
drink. If you were the type of
person who enjoyed fine cognac
or a good champagne, you drank
Irish whiskey, and you expected
to pay a little more for it, because
you knew you were drinking a
luxury product.”
The early 20th century
brought major challenges:
Prohibition in America not only
closed off a major market, but it
also damaged Irish whiskey’s
reputation, Quinn says. Some
bootleggers were falsely selling
under an “Irish whiskey” label
because they knew they could
charge more. Americans who
tried this hooch probably found
it “foul, fiery and burning,”
which made it more challenging
for the real whiskey to come back
after the 18th Amendment was
repealed.
Irish whiskey hung on, but a
trade war between Ireland and
the United Kingdom in the 1930s
was disastrous, “because that’s
when you lose all the markets
associated with the British
Empire,” Quinn says.
Other whiskey-making
countries, especially Scotland,
gained market share with their
blended expressions, while in
Ireland, distillery after distillery
closed down. In 1966, the three
remaining Irish companies, John
Jameson, John Power and Cork,
merged to form Irish Distillers
and consolidated their
production; in 1988, Irish
Distillers became a subsidiary of
Pernod Ricard. That 1966 merger
and the later acquisition —
which gave the company access
to Pernod Ricard’s global
marketing capacity — did a lot to
get Irish whiskey back on a path
to survival.
So did John Teeling, who in
the late 1980s, after years of
planning and work, ended Irish
Distillers’ longtime monopoly
when he launched Cooley
Distillery. His sons, Stephen and
Jack, went on to launch Teeling
Whiskey, initially using stocks of
Cooley’s whiskey, after Cooley
sold to booze giant Beam
Suntory in 2012. Teeling is the
first new distillery in Dublin in
125 years.
Now, says Stephen Teeling,
Bethesda
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DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Jameson is the whiskey many people think of when considering
Irish versions of the liquor, but others are gaining popularity.
“we’re trying to revive some of
the heritage and innovative ways
in which Irish whiskey is made
going back generations,” while
also trying to make it relevant for
newer whiskey consumers by
innovating with different grains
(the mash bill) and aging in
different types of casks.
Irish whiskey, Teeling says,
“went from 60 percent of the
world’s whiskey market to just
1 percent in the ’80s. It was just
devastating. . . . But since Pernod
Ricard has come in and a few
other new innovations, Irish
whiskey has been the fastestgrowing grain spirit in the world,
really blazing a trail. . . . In the
U.S., it’s been growing double
digits for the last 10, 15 years.” In
fact, according to the Distilled
Spirits Council, since 2003, gross
revenue for Irish whiskey is up
more than 1,000 percent, with
the biggest gains at the high end
of the category.
Clearly, plenty of Americans
like Irish whiskey. Do you? That
depends on your tastes, of
course, but if your ideas about
what Irish whiskey is have been
shaped by sports-bar party shots
from one particularly ubiquitous
bottle, you’re in for some
surprises.
Pages of legalese and
distillerese go into defining types
of whiskey and how they’re
made, but an extremely brief
distillation: “Irish whiskey” must
be distilled and matured in
Ireland, and be aged in wood for
a minimum of three years. The
whiskeys fall into one of three
types: pot still, malt or grain (a
fourth category, blended, can be
made with these three varieties).
Pot still is made from a
combination of malted barley,
unmalted barley and other
unmalted cereals; malt is made
from 100 percent malted barley
(“single malts” are malt whiskeys
from a single distillery); grain
whiskey from malted barley and
other unmalted grains.
Beyond those legalities, as
whiskey writer Lew Bryson
points out in his book “Tasting
Whiskey,” as soon as you try to
define Irish whiskey, you notice
exceptions. Not all Irish
whiskeys are triple-distilled, not
all Irish whiskey is blended.
“Knock your head against it long
enough, and you’ll realize the
glib answer is the correct one:
Irish whiskey is whiskey that’s
made in Ireland,” Bryson writes.
But he says Irish is a great
place to start getting into the
whiskey world. “Well over half of
Irish whiskey is drunk straight,”
he says. “I think there’s a direct
reason for that: It’s the
approachability of the whiskey.
‘Smooth’ is an overused term, but
you can’t avoid it when you talk
about Irish whiskey.”
That said, “if all you’ve ever
had is Jameson, it will give you
one impression,” says Philip
Duff, a spirits educator who’s
doing some consumer education
for the Knappogue Castle line of
Irish single malts. “Think about
Tennessee whiskey. Ninety-nine
percent sold is Jack Daniel’s, but
most people drinking it don’t
know that, and don’t know what
Tennessee whiskey is, and don’t
know the other brands. It’s not
quite that extreme, but Irish
whiskey is dominated by
Jameson sales, and that defines
the category to a large degree.”
“Jamo,” as it’s often referred to
by dude-bros, is a lighter,
blended whiskey, and it’s by far
the best-selling Irish whiskey in
the world. It has helped carry the
category and been a massive
success story. Several sources
reminded me (in a way that
suggested they were really trying
to remind themselves) that
“there’s nothing wrong with
Jameson.”
But it’s a frustration to
aficionados that Jameson is the
only Irish whiskey many
Americans have tasted. Back in
the golden age, Duff says, Irish
whiskey “was all single malt or
pure-pot still, extensively aged,
and there was no pressure on
bigger producers to cut corners,
because they could charge a high
price.” Such whiskeys tend to be
bigger, deeper and richer than
the lighter Jameson blend
millions think represents Irish
whiskey.
For drinkers trying to branch
out, Bryson says, he’d start them
off on a specific bridge:
Irish whiskeys
worth trying
Along with Jameson, Tullamore
D.E.W. and Bushmills are two hugely
popular lighter Irish blends. But if
you want to go deeper in your Irish
whiskey explorations, try these:
Redbreast 12-Year-Old Single Pot
Still (40 percent alcohol by volume,
around $60-$70): The classic pot
still Irish — a big, rich, spicy whiskey
full of dried fruit notes, nuttiness
and a sherry note from the Oloroso
casks it’s aged in.
Teeling Irish Single Grain
(46 percent ABV, around $60):
Bourbon lovers might be
particularly interested in trying this
one, which has a 95 percent corn
mashbill. Aged in ex-California
Cabernet wine barrels, it has lovely
vanilla, dried fruit, pepper and
toffee notes.
Glendalough 13-Year-Old
Mizunara Finish Single Malt Irish
Whiskey (46 percent, around
$130): This whiskey spent most of
its years in ex-bourbon barrels but
was finished in rare Japanese
Mizunara oak; the result is a long,
nutty, almost chocolaty finish — just
beautiful.
Tyrconnell 16-Year-Old Single
Malt (40 percent ABV, $100): Lovely
almond and roasted pineapple
notes. Tyrconnell whiskeys are
known for green apple and citrus
flavors, which come from the even
climate and double distillation.
Green Spot Single Pot Still
(40 percent ABV, around $60):
Spicy, honeyed, caramelly —
another classic Irish pot still
whiskey.
Knappogue Castle 12-Year Single
Malt (40 percent ABV, around $45):
It’s mellow and fruity with notes of
vanilla-butter and a bit of clove and
other spices.
Connemara Peated Single Malt
(40 percent ABV, around $50): The
rare Irish whiskey that dries its barley
using peat. It combines the honeyed,
mellow spice character Irish whiskey
is known for with a smoky peat note
that it definitely isn’t.
The Dead Rabbit Irish Whiskey
(44 percent ABV, around $40):
Produced in partnership with Sean
Muldoon and Jack McGarry, the
founders of New York City’s muchloved Irish bar, this is a nice blend of
Irish single malt and grain whiskeys,
with a good hit of vanilla and spice.
— M.C.A.
Redbreast, which like Jameson is
made at Irish Distillers’ facility
in Midleton. “Jameson is a
blended whiskey. It’s a good
blended whiskey, but Redbreast
is the heart of [what] makes that
blend. Once they’ve had
Redbreast, I’d try them on
another single pot still . . .
Bushmill’s 16, the three wood.
Tullamore [D.E.W.] Phoenix, a
blended cask-strength Irish that
delivers. Almost anything
Teeling puts in a bottle.”
The whiskey boom in Ireland
and the wave of new players
make some whiskey lovers a little
nervous. They worry that the
drive to make a buck with cheap
whiskey or marketing gimmicks
will damage the category.
But overall, there’s a great deal
of excitement. “It is a bit of a gold
rush with distilleries in Ireland,”
Duff says. “We’ll see some great
innovation, and we’ll also see
tons of stupid stuff, ‘Unicorn
Tears Whiskey’! Already there
are all these absurd ‘legendary
people from Irish history’ brand
names being invented. . . . But
for every ‘Unicorn Tears
Whiskey’ or whatever, there will
be a Knappogue Castle —
something really remarkable.”
It’s very rewarding, says
Stephen Teeling, when he shares
their whiskey with someone and
they say, “Jeez, I never knew Irish
whiskey could taste like that.”
With all the new expressions
that will be popping up in the
coming years, we’ll probably be
hearing that a lot.
food@washpost.com
Allan is a Hyattsville, Md., writer and
editor. Follow her on Twitter:
@Carrie_the_Red.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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A toast to this seafood standby
This is one of
those dishes that
feels like home to
me. It is not only
similar to one
mother had in
Ellie
regular rotation
Krieger
when I was a kid
— when she
NOURISH
would roll
flounder fillets
(often fish my dad had caught off
the Long Island coast) with
bread crumbs and butter, then
sprinkle them with lemon juice
and bake it — it also happens to
be one of my daughter’s favorites
and a weeknight go-to in our
home. I put my own stamp on it,
mostly with the goal of making
the bread crumbs as crispy as
possible (because, really, who
can resist crispy bread crumbs?)
and with an eye on optimizing
the dish’s healthfulness.
Toasting dried bread crumbs
in a skillet with olive oil and a
little butter before adding them
to the fish gets the crumbs ultracrispy and browned, with just
enough buttery flavor, allowing
the focus to be on cooking the
fish just right, rather than risk
overcooking it to get the bread
crumbs well done. I use wholegrain crumbs — either
homemade from sandwich bread
or store-bought panko — and
season them with fresh garlic,
thyme leaves and lemon zest.
Keeping the fillets flat, rather
than rolling them like my mom
did, and adding the lemon juice
once everything is done lets the
crumbs stay crispier as well.
I still love flounder, and that
works well for this recipe. But I
prefer sole’s slightly firmer
texture. Either way, this is a
dinner I am happy to come back
to again and again, and I think
you will be, too.
food@washpost.com
Krieger is a registered dietitian,
nutritionist and author who hosts
public television’s “Ellie’s Real Good
Food.” She blogs and offers a weekly
newsletter at www.elliekrieger.com.
4 servings
From nutritionist and cookbook author Ellie Krieger.
Ingredients
2 teaspoons olive oil
11/2 teaspoons unsalted butter
1/2 cup whole-wheat panko
bread crumbs, or homemade
whole-grain bread crumbs (see
NOTE)
1 teaspoon chopped fresh
thyme leaves
1 teaspoon finely grated lemon
zest
1 medium clove garlic, minced
Kosher salt
4 fillets of sole, or other thin,
white-fleshed fish (11/2 pounds)
Freshly ground black pepper
Lemon wedges, for serving
Steps
Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Line a baking sheet with
parchment paper.
Combine the oil and the butter
in a small skillet over medium
heat. Once the butter has melted, add the bread crumbs,
thyme, lemon zest, garlic and
season lightly with salt; cook for
3 or 4 minutes, stirring frequently, until the garlic is fragrant and the crumbs are
crisped and a darker shade of
brown.
Arrange the fillets on the baking
sheet. Season them lightly with
GORAN KOSANOVIC FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
salt and the pepper, then scatter
the bread crumb mixture on top
of each one, pressing down
slightly so it adheres. Bake (middle rack) for about 8 minutes,
until the fish is just opaque and
flakes easily with a fork.
Serve with lemon wedges.
NOTE: To make your own
whole-grain bread crumbs, cut
off and discard the crusts from
two slices of whole-grain or
whole-wheat sandwich bread.
Place in a food processor and
recognized as such.
Rando is a clinical psychologist
and author of “How to Go On
Living When Someone You Love
Dies.” Orphaned as a teenager,
Rando has devoted her life to the
study of human grieving. Grief
can take many forms, Rando says,
some of which won’t be validated
by friends or family. Or even
Rando’s own mentor, J. William
Worden, a pioneer in the field of
grief. When contacted, Worden
called grieving closed restaurants
“a little bit of a reach.” He suggested only people like the Kardashians do such a thing.
But Rando strongly disagrees.
“It’s incorrect to believe that grief
is only after the loss of a loved
one,” she says. “It’s after any
perception of loss.” People grieve
pulse to the consistency of fine
crumbs. Spread on a quarter
baking sheet and toast in a
350-degree oven for 10 to 12
minutes. The toasted bread
crumbs can be refrigerated in
an airtight container for up to 2
weeks.
Nutrition | Per serving: 190 calories, 23 g
protein, 7 g carbohydrates, 7 g fat, 2 g
saturated fat, 80 mg cholesterol, 590 mg
sodium, 1 g dietary fiber, 0 g sugar
Recipe tested by Kara Elder; email
questions to food@washpost.com
after divorces, demotions, jobs
transfers, infidelities and, yes,
even the loss of a neighborhood
restaurant. It’s about a person’s
connection to the thing lost.
All across the country, you can
find diners in various stages of
grief, from anger to denial to a
kind of low-grade depression.
There’s the Philadelphia homicide detective who considered
stealing(!) a memento from his
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MARCH 14 , 2018
A baker in Ireland made brown bread
look simple. Then I tried it at home.
BY
L UKE P YENSON
As I settled in to my seat on a
flight to Ireland last summer, I
drifted into a gentle daydream.
Soon my girlfriend and I would
arrive in County Clare to spend a
week with our friends Ruan and
Sal. We’d reach Sal’s parents’ rural
home across the bay from Galway
City, and be immediately greeted
with a warm loaf of freshly baked
brown bread. Sal’s effusive descriptions of her home town over
the years had prepped me for this
moment, and I could almost smell
the bread.
A couple of hours later, this
scene unfolded more or less as I
had dreamed it.
During our time in Clare, we
ate a wonderful array of homecooked dishes: a traditional roast
dinner of lamb, a feast of local
shellfish, hearty Irish breakfasts
and frequent snacks. The thread
holding it all together was the
omnipresent brown bread. With a
deeply toasted exterior and
moist, pleasantly chewy interior,
it was unlike any loaf I’d had. It
was versatile, wholesome and, as
I would come to learn, easy to
make — once I figured it out.
One morning, I joined Sal’s
mom, Jan, in the kitchen as she
prepared the day’s loaves. It
couldn’t have been simpler: We
mixed oats, yogurt, baking soda, a
little flaxseed meal, an egg and a
bit of milk to form a slightly sticky
dough. This went into prepared
loaf tins and a 180-degree (Celsius) oven. I watched as she took
the golden loaves out 50 minutes
later, turned them out of their tins
and put them back in the oven
upside-down for 10 minutes to
crisp and darken. I’m a confident
cook who has always left baking
to bakers. But this, I thought, I
could do.
My first attempt was inedible:
I’d messed up the ratios. The recipe
I’d sloppily recorded on my iPhone
combined exact measurements
with vague oral instructions: 500
grams of oats, but a “good dollop”
of milk. Jan made it look so easy
that I was sure it would all just
come together. Not quite.
A restaurant’s closing can be a personal loss
MOURNING FROM E1
. WEDNESDAY,
VORACIOUSLY
Sole With Crispy
Lemon-Thyme Bread
Crumbs
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
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favorite downtown diner before it
was demolished. There’s the
Houston musician who still
hasn’t found a suitable Tex-Mex
alternative after his first option
closed down — 17 years ago.
There’s the marketing and public
relations
professional
who
launched a full-frontal assault,
via online petition, against the
owners who decided to close an
iconic pub in Menlo Park, Calif.
There are, in fact, thousands,
maybe millions, of similar stories
around the United States. They’re
easy to find. Just pose a question
on Facebook — what restaurants
do you mourn the loss of? — and
watch the responses pour in. I got
more than 150 on my page.
If there’s a constant among the
closures, it’s that most of these
restaurants weren’t temples of
gastronomy. They didn’t have Michelin stars or celebrity chefs.
They were diners, fried-chicken
stands, breakfast spots, barbecue
joints, burger bars and pizzerias.
They were neighborhood hangouts — affordable and comfortable. The kind of places you’d
patronize regularly, which is precisely why diners mourn them.
They had a connection to the
restaurants — and to the people
who ran them and dined in them.
A customer’s connection to a
restaurant can be based on something other than food or human
interaction. Take Joe Murray, a
veteran homicide detective in
Philadelphia. Little Pete’s, a beloved 24-hour diner that fell victim last year to Philadelphia’s
gentrifying downtown, was the
detective’s preferred place to kill
a couple of hours before he had to
serve a warrant at 6 a.m. The
establishment was, as he describes it, “brutally efficient.” No
speeches about the menu. No
small talk. It was a “just-thefacts” kind of diner, and it perfectly suited Murray’s daily rituals.
“They weren’t rude,” he clarifies. “It was just a diner. It was the
best.”
Philadelphia’s changing landscape makes it difficult for Murray to find a replacement. The
detective lives downtown, a short
walk from where crews have been
razing Little Pete’s to make room
for a 13-story hotel. Murray took a
photo of the wreckage and posted
it to his Twitter page. You could
almost hear the sigh. These days,
Murray is likely just to grab a cup
of coffee from Wawa and kill time
in his car. “It’s kind of pathetic,”
STACY ZARIN GOLDBERG FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Jan O’Halloran’s Brown Bread
Find this recipe and more at washingtonpost.com/recipes.
I was more distressed with my
second and third loaves. The outsides were beige, covered in rawlooking oats; the insides were
bone dry. It occurred to me that
Jan hadn’t used Greek yogurt, as I
had. And when I looked back at
my photos, I realized she hadn’t
used regular rolled oats, either.
Somehow I’d managed to mess up
the two main ingredients.
By now I was even more determined, motivated as much by the
desire to taste it again as the need
to make Ruan and Sal proud. I’d
been sending embarrassing photos of my failures to our group
chat, but after my fourth loaf
disappointed, too, it was time for
serious troubleshooting. The texture had improved with quickcooking oats (an Irish brand, obviously), and I’d even bought
fresh baking soda. But I was still
making Irish tan bread.
At this point, Ruan chimed in:
“I don’t want to sound like a big
eejit here, but it’s not a Celsius to
Fahrenheit mistake is it?” If only.
I had adjusted Jan’s 180 degrees
into the standard American 350,
but something clearly had to
change. I needed to leave the
loaves in longer, increase the temperature, or — this was the aha
moment — both.
My next two loaves were darker, but still a bit dry. And Sal’s
euphemistic response of “It looks
pretty good!!” told me I still had
work to do. So I zeroed in on the
“dollop of milk.” I measured out
what I thought would work, and
put my seventh (!) loaf in the oven
with a prayer. It came out perfect:
a rich, gorgeous brown on the
outside and marvelously closetextured on the inside.
I sent my friends another photo. When Sal replied “Oooh
mama!!!” — maternal reference
not intended but appreciated — I
knew I’d finally succeeded. Since
then, my brown breads have been
wonderfully consistent (and, yes,
easy), and I’ve gotten my family
hooked, too. Now Ruan and Sal
can try something from my tradition, and they have a standing
invitation to any Jewish holiday
at my parents’ house. Maybe
braided challah is next. Or maybe
we’ll just start eating brown
bread on Rosh Hashanah.
he says.
Erich Avinger can relate. The
guitarist and producer in Houston still misses the relaxed, living
room vibe of Leo’s Mexican Restaurant, a Tex-Mex spot with a
backstory as colorful as the combination plates once available
there. The owner claimed that he
rode with Mexican revolutionary
Pancho Villa. You could read
about it on the menu or just
examine the photos of Villa and
his revolutionaries on the wall at
Leo’s.
Leo’s was something of a musicians’ hangout. ZZ Top’s guitarist
Billy Gibbons was known to frequent the place. In fact, a couple
of overflowing, cheese-smothered plates graced the inside gatefold cover of “Tres Hombres,” ZZ
Top’s breakout album from 1973.
Avinger himself often introduced
fellow musicians to Leo’s.
“Little did they know that I was
going to break them into that hot
sauce and bring tears to their
eyes,” Avinger says.
Avinger frequented other TexMex establishments once Leo’s
closed in 2001, but they never
satisfied him. The hot sauce
wasn’t as explosive or the atmosphere was too refined. “When it
was gone, it was the end of
Tex-Mex,” Avinger says about
Leo’s.
Part of the reason diners grieve
a restaurant closure is because, as
Avinger points out, it might mark
the beginning of the end of an era.
Eateries, after all, don’t die just
because developers push them
out to make room for a mixed-use
condo project. They die because
people’s tastes change. Diners
want an authentic taste of interior Mexico now, not some bastardized combo plate covered in processed cheese and brown gravy.
Which might only compound
the grief: Diners not only lose a
cherished restaurant, but they
suddenly realize they’re part of a
marginalized community, relics
in the eyes of a younger generation. Consider the Pig Stand, a
Texas-based chain that once had
more than 100 locations in nine
states. In its prime, during the
1920s and 1930s, the Pig Stand
was considered an innovator: It
has been credited with creating
the first drive-in and drivethrough restaurants. It may have
even invented onion rings and
Texas toast.
The Pig Stand chain went under in 2006, but one owner saved
a sole location in San Antonio.
Twelve years later, Kim Hogstrom
still misses the Houston shop’s
open-faced turkey sandwich with
mashed potatoes and “that sprig
of parsley that was so perfect that
it was not found in nature.” She
misses the pig statuary, the laminated menus and the workingclass atmosphere.
“It’s how ordinary it was to me
that made it extraordinary,” says
Hogstrom, a freelance writer and
filmmaker.
Alison Perris, a PR and marketing executive, was not about to let
the Oasis Beer Garden go down
without a fight. The pub has been
a fixture in Menlo Park, Calif., for
more than 60 years, and Perris
still remembers when, as a child,
she tried to carve her name into a
wooden booth with a butter knife.
It’s a tradition at the O, as locals
call the pub. You leave your mark
on the place, literally, with a
pocket knife, butter knife or
whatever carving tool you have.
Kids and college students from
nearby Stanford University have
been doing it for decades.
On one level, Perris’s Care2
petition was enormously successful: More than 16,000 people
signed the online form asking the
“greedy” owners to reconsider
and keep the O open for generations to come. On another level,
the petition didn’t stop the inevitable: The O closed March 7,
although Perris says at least two
people are interested in working
with the landlords to open the
Oasis 2.0.
In the O’s final days, longtime
patrons flocked back to the pub
for one last burger and beer.
“Everybody’s coming from everywhere to visit,” Perris says. “Lines
are out the door to the street.”
The scene was much the same
at the Classics in Silver Spring
during the last two weeks of its
life. Customers, whether neighbors or neighbors who have
moved far away, lined up for a
chance to order one more hanger
steak. They stood two deep at the
bar. They hugged one another.
Some confessed their guilt: Maybe they could have helped save
the Classics had they dined there
more often? It’s a common feeling
among restaurant mourners.
Many also raised toasts to owners Rattley and Nick Lopata, who
inherited the steakhouse in 2013
from founder Michael Landrum.
Among those who made a final
trek to the Classics: Amit Saha
and Lisa Ingall, who now live in
Ann Arbor, Mich. They brought
their son, Devin, and crammed
into a long booth with family and
friends.
“There was just no way I could
not go back one more time,” Saha
says. “It was absolutely like
home.”
food@washpost.com
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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
E7
EE
R E C O M M E N D ATI O N S
Exceptional
Excellent
Very Good
Chestnut Oak is a young winery
north of Charlottesville that is in
distribution and showing promise.
The whites are better than the
reds, including a crisp, refreshing
bottling of vidal blanc and a richer,
tropical fruity petit manseng. Also
this week, a lovely, delicate red
from Northern Italy, a minerally
sauvignon blanc from the Loire
Valley and a tasty Oregon pinot at
a reasonable price.
— D.M.
La Capuccina Vespolina Colline
Novaresi 2015
ADAM LEE
Clarice winemaker Adam Lee, who sold his Siduri label in 2015,
samples pinot noir grapes before the 2017 harvest.
A winemaker blends
community, social media
Adam Lee wants
to shake things
up.
“Selling wine
isn’t what I like to
do,” Lee says. He’s
Wine
good at it, of
course. Lee is a
DAVE
MCINTYRE
darling of wine
writers and
consumers
because he is outspoken,
generous with his time and
thoughts, and because, well, he
makes darn good wine. Lee and
his wife, Dianna Novy Lee,
launched their Siduri label in
1994, specializing in cool-climate
pinot noirs from around
California and later from
Oregon. They sold Siduri in early
2015 to Jackson Family Wines,
becoming the first winery in the
empire that did not come with
vineyards.
With the sale, Lee agreed to
stay on at Siduri for three years.
That time has now expired, and
his official status with Siduri is
in limbo, though in a recent
interview in Santa Rosa, he said
he would like to pursue several
projects with Jackson Family
Wines.
Meanwhile, he’s launching a
project of his own, with a
marketing twist. The Clarice
Wine Company will still feature
pinot noir, from two lauded
pinot vineyards, Garys’ Vineyard
and Rosella’s Vineyard, both in
the Santa Lucia Highlands of
Central California. Lee has been
buying grapes from both
vineyards for Siduri since its
initial vintages in 1999 and 2001,
respectively. There will also be a
Santa Lucia Highlands blend of
juice from the two vineyards.
But instead of selling wine,
Lee will be offering membership
in an exclusive community built
on social media around the
wine. Membership opens this
month, limited to 625 people,
each paying $965 for a yearly
subscription. Every member will
receive a case of wine in October,
four bottles of each wine. A
members-only website will
publish two articles a month to
provide a wine education aspect.
Lee has recruited several
industry figures to write these
articles, including Scot Bilbro of
Marietta Cellars on the art of
blending wines and Virginie
Boone of Wine Enthusiast
magazine on wine writing.
There will also be a socialmedia-style chat site where
members can exchange ideas on
wines, restaurants and travel
advice.
“So many people have great
ideas about travel and wine, so it
will be great to have more than
600 like-minded wine lovers at
your fingertips,” Lee says. “We
are trying to make this wine
concept much more of a
community than ever before.”
The membership model is
Lee’s way to circumvent the
obstacles facing small wineries
in the traditional distribution
system. As wholesalers
consolidate, the market is
favoring large-production
wineries; those producing just
700 cases or so can easily get lost
in the mix.
“I don’t think the way small
wineries are selling their wine is
working very well,” Lee told me.
“We relied on tasting rooms,
then on wine writers. But there
are so many tasting rooms.” He
mentioned Los Olivos, a small
town in Santa Barbara County
that has become a wine mecca
with dozens of tasting outlets.
“And the age of the critic is
waning. The difference between
a 90-point rating and 89 points
doesn’t sell a wine anymore.”
Lee evoked the memory of
Robert Mondavi, the wine
visionary who promoted Napa
Valley, not just his own winery,
in the 1960s and beyond. “We
need someone like Mondavi for
small wineries today,” he said. To
that end, Clarice members will
be invited to at least one event
each year at another winery.
This year’s will be at Limerick
Lane, a Sonoma County
producer of top-notch zinfandel.
“Wineries are struggling to
get the attention of distributors,”
Lee says. “So we need to crossmarket each other.”
And there’s one other aspect
to the marketing. “Consumers
want the story,” Lee says. “They
want to know what’s behind the
winery, or the dogs behind the
winery.”
Behind Clarice is Lee’s
grandmother, Clarice Phears,
who helped raise him in Texas in
the mid-1960s. “She taught me a
lot about winemaking,” Lee says.
Well, sort of. Lee’s grandfather
was a farmer who came home
for dinner not at a given time
but when work was done, so
Clarice favored one-pot meals
that could just get better the
longer they simmered on the
stove or in a slow cooker.
“She always said if you put the
carrots, potatoes and spices in at
the beginning, they blend in
together better than if you add
them at the end,” Lee recalls.
Modern winemaking takes a
different view. At Siduri, Lee has
followed the current trend of
micro-vinification, fermenting
and aging different vineyard lots
or clones of pinot noir
separately, then choosing the
best to blend into the final wine.
With Clarice, he is fermenting
various clones and vineyard lots
together, then blending the best
barrels. The grapes are picked
earlier and fermented more with
whole clusters to get the tannin
and flavors from the stems. It’s
old-school California vs. modern
technology.
Lee had assembled the final
blends for the three 2017 Clarice
wines a few days before we
talked. I loved the rich, mouthfilling Garys’ Vineyard, as well as
the deeper, more restrained
Rosella’s Vineyard. They should
both get better by the time they
are released in the fall.
Traditional winemaking,
untraditional marketing. A
delicious blend.
food@washpost.com
McIntyre blogs at dmwineline.com.
On Twitter: @dmwine.
Piemonte, Italy, $26
Vespolina is a red grape that
produces a light, aromatic and
expressive wine. The La Capuccina
is the antithesis of the inky,
brawny and powerful modern ideal
of a red wine. Instead, it floats
across your palate like the scent
of a rose bush on the other side of
a garden wall. Alcohol by volume:
13 percent.
Distributed by Le Storie: Available in
Virginia at Chain Bridge Cellars in McLean,
Crystal City Wine Shop, Grape + Bean (Old
Town Alexandria, Rosemont), Oakton Wine
Shop in Oakton, Tastings of Charlottesville,
Union Market in Richmond, Vino Market in
Midlothian.
Chestnut Oak Vineyard Alba
White Table Wine 2016
Monticello, Va., $17
This crisp and delicate white wine
is made from vidal blanc, one of
the French American hybrid grape
varieties that helped viticulture
thrive in the eastern United States
before European vinifera varieties
became the fashion. But if you
think hybrids are inferior, this
delicious wine should convince
you otherwise. ABV: 12.5 percent.
Distributed by Hop & Wine: Available in the
District at Glen’s Garden Market (Dupont,
Shaw), Rodman’s, S&R Liquors. Available in
Virginia at Altura Wine & Gourmet and
Market 2 Market in Alexandria.
Virginia, $26
Petit manseng has become a
darling of Virginia’s vintners and
wine lovers because of its
delightful tropical fruit flavors and
its ability to carry both acidity and
sweetness. The Chestnut Oak is a
dry version with a rich mouthfeel
that makes it a good partner for
substantial seafood dishes or
cheeses. ABV: 13.5 percent.
Distributed by Hop & Wine: Available in the
District at Glen’s Garden Market (Dupont,
Shaw), Rodman’s, S&R Liquors. Available in
Virginia at Altura Wine & Gourmet and
Market 2 Market in Alexandria.
Domaine Ricard Le Petiot 2016
Touraine, Loire Valley, France, $15
Distributed by Well Crafted Wine &
Beverage Co.: Available in the District at
Batch 13, Crown Liquors, Paul’s of Chevy
Chase, Wardman Wines. Available in
Maryland at Chester River Wine & Cheese
Co. in Chestertown, Fairgrounds Discount
Beverages in Timonium, Pinehurst Wine
Shoppe, Spirits of Mt. Vernon and Wine
Source in Baltimore; on the list at Ava’s
Pizzeria & Wine Bar in St. Michael’s.
Available in Virginia at the Bottle Stop in
Occoquan, Cheesetique (Alexandria,
Ballston, Shirlington), Grapevine in
Warrenton, Leesburg Vintner in Leesburg,
Locke Store in Millwood, Market
Salamander in Middleburg, Union Market
in Richmond, Unwined (Alexandria,
Belleview), Vino Market in Midlothian.
This is a tight, minerally sauvignon
blanc reminiscent of Sancerre or
Pouilly-Fumé, the more prestigious
and expensive Loire appellations.
ABV: 12.5 percent.
Distributed by Simon N Cellars: Available in
the District at Calvert Woodley, MacArthur
Beverages; on the list at Brasserie Beck,
Siren. Available in Maryland at Wine Cellars
of Annapolis; on the list at Grapes Wine Bar
in Annapolis. Available in Virginia at
Leesburg Vintner in Leesburg, Unwined in
Alexandria, the Wine Outlet in Vienna,
Foods of All Nations and Tastings of
Charlottesville.
Availability information is based on
distributor records. Wines might not
be in stock at every listed store and
might be sold at additional stores.
Prices are approximate. Check
Winesearcher.com to verify
availability, or ask a favorite wine
store to order through a distributor.
Les Brebis Pinot Noir 2016
Willamette Valley, Ore., $20
This is solid, good-quality Oregon
pinot noir, at a reasonable price.
What more needs be said? Oh
yeah, the label’s cool. ABV:
13.6 percent.
FINE WINES & SPIRITS ★ LA CHEESERIE & INTERNATIONAL DELI
★ 90 Points Under $20 Sale ★
Avignonesi 3PTTPEJ.POUFQ ... 90 WS ...17.99
Badenhorst i4FDBUFVSTw$IFOJO.... 90 WS ...12.99
#BSPOEF-FZ5FNQSBOJMMP ... 90 WS ...10.99
#FDLNFOi$VWFF-F#FDw ... 90 WA ...18.99
BenMarco .BMCFD .............. 90+ WA ...16.99
Bila-Haut $ÙUFTEV3PVTTJMMPO ... 89-91 WA ...11.99
Borsao i#FSPMBw ...................... 90 WA ...12.99
Breca i#SFDBw(BSOBDIB...... 91 Vin ...14.99
Capraia $IJBOUJ$MBTTJDP ..... 91 Vin ...14.99
Carrel i-FT%BSPOTw-BOHVFEPD ... 91-93 WA ...13.99
Casa Santos Lima i$PMPTTBM3FTFSWBw ... 90 WS ...12.69
Castaño i4PMBOFSB77w .... 8" ...14.99
Castellare $IJBOUJ$MBTTJDP... 90 WA ...19.99
Cataldi Madonna i.BMBOESJOPw ... 91 Vin ...19.99
Catena i1BSBKF"MUBNJSBw.BMCFD .... 91+ WA ...17.99
Catena $BCFSOFU'SBOD ......... 91 Vin ...18.99
Catena$IBSEPOOBZ ............... 91 WA ...14.99
$FMMJFSEFT1SJODFT$IEV1BQF... 90 WS ...19.99
Cerro 7JOP/PCJMFEJ.POUFQ.... 90 Vin ...16.99
$IBLBOBi&TUBUFw.BMCFD ... 90 Vin ...19.99
%PH1PJOU4BVWJHOPO#MBOD ... 90 WS ...18.99
%VCPFVGi$IEF+VMJÏOBTw... 90 Vin ...14.99
%VCPFVGi$IEF4BJOU"NPVSw... 90 Vin ...15.99
%VCPFVGi+&%FTDPNCFTw.PSHPO ...... 91 Vin ...14.99
%VCPFVGi+BWFSOw$PUFEV1Z.PSHPO... 91 WA ...14.99
%VCPFVGi2VBUSF7FOUTw'MFVSJF .... 91 Vin ...15.99
Errázuriz i.BY3FTFSWBw$BCFSOFU ... 90 WA ...15.99
'JODB"[BZB$BTUJMMBZ-FØO ... 91 WS ...19.99
Finca La Mata *TBBD'FSOBOEF[... 91 Vin ...16.99
(BTTJFSi/PTUSF1BJTw3PVHF ... 91 WA ...17.99
(SBOE7FOFVSi$IBNQBVWJOTw$E3...8" ...15.99
(SBOE7FOFVSi4JYUFw-JSBD ... 91-93 WA ...19.99
Jaume i5SBWÏFTw$BJSBOOF$E37JMM...8" ...16.99
+JN#BSSZi8BUFSWBMFw3JFTMJOH ..... 90 WA ...17.99
La Crema .POUFSFZ$IBSEPOOBZ .... 90 WS ...14.99
-B(SBOHFEFT$PNCFT4U$IJOJBO.... 91 WS ...13.99
Lafage i5FTTFMMBFw$BSJHOBO ... 8" ...14.99
Langmeil i)BOHJO4OBLFTw ... 90 WA ...17.69
-FHBEPEFM.PODBZP(BSOBDIB0ME7JOF ... 90 Vin ...12.69
Luigi Bosca i%0$w.BMCFD.... 90 WA ...19.99
-VOB#FCFSJEF.FODÓB ... 90 WA ...14.49
Manos Negras .BMCFD ... 90 WA ...12.99
Mendoza i-B5SFNFOEBw.POBTUSFMM ... 8" ...11.99
Mordorée i%BNF3PVTTFw-JSBD... 91 WA ...18.99
.VMEFSCPTDI4BVWJHOPO#MBOD ... 93 Vin ...12.99
Nals Margreid 1JOPU#JBODP ...7JO ...19.99
Naturaliste $BCFSOFU4BVWJHOPO.... 90 WS ...17.99
Nautilus 4BVWJHOPO#MBOD ..... 90 WS ...13.99
1FDDIFOJOPi4BO-VJHJw%PMDFUUP ... 90 WA ...16.99
1FTRVJÏi5FSSBTTFTw7FOUPVY ...... 90 WA ...14.99
1VZEFWBM1BZTE0D .............. 90 WA ...12.99
2VJOUBEF$BCSJ[i%BPw ......... 90 WS ..... 9.69
3FWFSEZ4BODFSSF .................... 91 WS ...16.99
Rio Madre 3JPKB ..................... 90 Vin ..... 9.99
Santa Julia i.PVOUBJO#MFOEw.... 90 WA ...12.49
Seghesio 4POPNB;JOGBOEFM ... 90 WS ...19.99
Selvapiana $IJBOUJ3VGJOB ...... 90 WS ...17.69
Selvapiana 1FUSPHOBOP ....... 91+ WA ...18.99
Señorio de Barahonda i$BSSPw... 90 WA ..... 9.99
Shotfire i2VBSUBHFw ............. 90 Vin ...15.99
Shotfire 4IJSB[ .......................... 91 Vin ...15.99
SonVida $BCFSOFU4BVWJHOPO.... 90 WA ...18.99
SonVida .BMCFD....................... 90 WA ...18.99
4U6SCBOT)PGi&TUBUFw3JFTMJOH... 91 WS ...15.99
4VCTUBODF$BCFSOFU4BVWJHOPO..... 8" ...17.99
4VTBOB#BMCPi$SJPTw5PSSPOUÏT .. 90+ WA ...12.69
Thunevin-Calvet i$POTUBODFw ... 91 WA ...11.99
Tilia .BMCFD.................................. 90 WA ..... 7.99
Tilia 5PSSPOUÏT ............................. 90 WA ..... 7.99
Tua Rita i3PTTPEFJ/PUSJw .... 91+ WA ...18.99
Volver i5BSJNB)JMMw.POBTUSFMM.... 91 Vin ...14.99
Zuccardi i"w.BMCFD............ 91 WA ...12.99
Zuccardi 5PSSPOUÏT................. 91 WA ...12.99
Château
Clarice pinot noir comes from prime vineyards in Santa Lucia
Highlands in Central California.
Chestnut Oak Vineyard Petit
Manseng 2015
★ ★ ★ ★ PARK FREE ON OUR LOT ★ ★ ★ ★
BONUS WINE
RICHARD GREEN
DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Les Garelles
0SHBOJD
Bordeaux Supérieur
12.99
Reg. $17.99
1.75 Liter Sale
Jameson
t(MFOMJWFU
Absolut t(MFOmEEJDI 36.99
25.99 82.99
Tito’s
Chivas
Grey
Goose
Grant’s
33.33
Bushmills
%FXBShT
Regal
27.99 47.99
29.99
48.99 19.88
Johnnie
Stolichnaya 8BMLFS
26.99 #MBDL
Johnnie
8BMLFS
Red
28.99
Famous
Grouse
55.99 25.99
Smirnoff .BLFShT
17.99
Knob
$SFFL
.BSL
43.99
t-VLTVTPXB
t4WFELB Ketel One
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51.99
16.99 35.99
t4LZZ
Reb. Up To $12
t3 Olives
18.99
+BDL
Daniel’s
23.99
Reb. Up To $10
Captain
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36.99
Evan
Evan
t5BORVFSBZ Williams
Williams
t4BQQIJSF 19.88
31.99
Bombay
Jim
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$3 Reb = 16.88
Crown
Royal
21.99
Bacardi
18.99
Goslings
23.99 39.99 21.99
Beefeater
Canadian
Mist
#MBDL4FBM
Rum
Malibu
25.99 12.99 17.99
Case Beer Sale
12 OZ. CANS
Busch 3FHt-JHIU .........................30pk 15.99
#VEXFJTFSt#VELight t.JMMFSLite ... 16.99
Yuengling 3FHt-JHIUt$PPSTLight..... 16.99
Natural Light................................30pk 16.99
12 OZ. BOTTLES
Yuengling Lagert.JMMFSLite .......... 20.99
#VEXFJTFSt#VELightt,JSJOIchiban ... 23.99
#FDLT Regular ....................................... 25.99
Corona &YUSBt-JHIUt1SFNJFS........ 25.99
)FJOFLFOt"NTUFMt.JDIFMPCUltra ... 26.99
Bass Ale t%PT&RVJT-BHFSt"NCFSt4U1BVMJ(JSM... 26.99
3FEIPPL-POH)BNNFS*1"t&4# ....... 27.99
/FXDBTUMFt4UFMMB"SUPJT............. 27.99
Harp Lagert4NJUIXJDLTIrish Ale... 28.99
1FSPOJt1JMTOFS6SRVFMM ................ 30.99
Guinness 4UPVUt%SBVHIUtUI"OOJWFSTBSZ ... 32.99
#MVF.PPOt%FWJMT#BDLCPOF-BHFSt*1"... 33.99
Tastings: Thurs 4-7pm Oliver
Fri 4-7pm#FMMT
4BUQN1PSU$JUZ
Malt Scotch Sale
Irish Whiskey Sale
"CFSMPVS:FBS .................................. 46.99
"SECFH:FBS ..................................... 42.99
Balveniet%BMNPSF:FBS ............. 55.99
Caol Ila :FBS..................................... 54.99
%BMXIJOOJF:FBS ............................. 54.99
(MFOGJEEJDIt(MFOMJWFU:FBS .... 46.99
(MFOMJWFU:FBS.................................. 69.99
(MFONPSBOHJF:FBS ....................... 34.99
)JHIMBOE1BSL:FBS ................ 47.99
Lagavulin :FBS ................................ 69.99
Laphroaig :FBS................................ 39.99
Macallan:FBSt%PVCMF$BTL .......... 54.99
0CBO:FBS ......................................... 59.99
5BMJTLFS:FBS..................................... 54.99
Tomatin :FBS .............................. 29.99
Bushmills ............................................. 19.99
Bushmills Black Bush ........................... 31.99
Bushmills :FBS.BMU ........................ 37.99
(MFOEBMPVHIDouble Barrel ................ 29.99
(MFOEBMPVHI:FBS............................ 39.99
(SFFO4QPUPot Still............................. 54.99
Jameson................................................ 21.99
Jameson $BTLNBUFT ............................. 26.99
Jameson $BTLNBUFT*1"&EJUJPO ........... 26.99
Jameson Black Barrel ........................... 31.99
Jameson $PPQFST$SP[F....................... 49.99
+PIO1PXFST ....................................... 24.99
,OBQQPHVF:FBS............................. 52.99
1BEEZ ..................................................... 20.99
3FECSFBTU:FBS ............................... 54.99
3FECSFBTU:FBS ............................... 89.99
5VMMBNPSF%FX .................................. 19.99
8FTU$PSL:FBS ............................... 32.99
8FTU$PSLBarrel Proof ........................ 49.99
8FTU$PSL#PVSCPO$BTL ..................... 18.99
Yellow Spot Pot Still ........................... 89.99
Cognac Sale
)FOOFTTZVS ........................................ 35.99
)FOOFTTZVSOP .................................... 49.99
Martell Blue Swift ................................. 39.99
Martell VSOP ........................................ 29.99
3FNZ.BSUJOVSOP............................. 35.99
3FNZ.BSUJO 1738 ............................. 49.99
1.5 Liter Magnum Sale
Cavit....................................................... 10.99
$JUSBt'PMPOBSJ ....................................8.99
$PODIBZ5PSP .......................................7.49
Corbett Canyon ............................ 6.49
Fetzer..................................................... 10.99
La Vieille Ferme ................................ 11.99
-JOEFNBOT#JOT ...................................8.49
Vendange................................................6.99
Woodbridge...Reb Up To $10 .......... 8.44
Yellow Tail...Reb Up To $18.....................8.99
Champagne & Sparkling Sale
Bollinger Brut ...................................... 49.99
)FOSJ"CFMF#SVUt#SVU3PTÏ .............. 31.99
Moët *NQFSJBMtTaittinger Brut ........ 39.99
Moët %PN1FSJHOPO ................... 139.00
7FVWF$MJDRVPUBrut .......................... 45.99
Chandon #SVUt#MBODEF/PJSReb $3... 17.99
Valdo Prosecco Brut ............................... 10.99
Small Batch Bourbon & Rye Sale
#BTJM)BZEFOTt8PPEGPSE3FTFSWF... 34.99
#PPLFST ............................................... 56.99
Bulleit #PVSCPOt3ZF ........................... 29.99
High West 1SBJSJFt%PVCMF3ZF ........... 32.99
,OPC$SFFL:FBSBourbon t3ZF....... 24.99
$BUPDUJO$SFFLRye ........................... 34.99
Redemption 3ZFt#PVSCPO ............... 27.99
Templeton :FBS3ZF .......................... 35.99
8IJTUMF1JH:FBS3ZF........................ 69.99
-JRVFVSt.JYPMPHZ4BMF
#BJMFZTt%JTBSPOOPAmaretto ........ 24.99
##t%PNBJOF$BOUPO ................ 31.99
$IBNCPSEt%SBNCVJF .................. 30.99
Cointreau ............................................. 34.99
(SBOE.BSOJFS3FC ......... 31.99
,BIMVB ................................................... 17.99
Lillet Red and White........................... 14.99
4U(FSNBJOt'SBOHFMJDP.............. 27.99
Aperol ................................................... 19.99
$BNQBSJt'FSOFU#SBODB ............. 29.99
Cocchi Vermouth ................................... 16.99
%PMJOVermouth Dry & Sweet ................. 13.99
★ ★ Full Service La Cheeserie & International Deli ★ ★
Fresh
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*SJTI$IFFTFT'PS4U1BUSJDLT
Egg Salad
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Reg. $7.99
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5.99 LB
Smoked
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Reg. $9.99
Reg. $16.99
LB
Hand Sliced To Order
Genoa Salami
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Kerrygold Swiss
7.99 MC
Kerrygold Vintage Cheddar 12 Mos 9.99 MC
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Kerrygold Dubliner
9.99 MC
Salmon Spread
Kerrygold Cashel Blue 13.99 MC
Reg. $7.49 6.49 LB
Cahill’s Cheddar w/Porter Beer 14.99 MC
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Cole Slaw
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Pecorino Romano (Italy) 8.99 MC
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9.99 MC
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5.49 MC
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Bucheron Chevre (Wisconsin) 9.99MC
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11.99 MC
Reg. $7.99 6.99 LB
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Aged Old Amsterdam 24 Mos (Holland) 12.99 MC
Prosciutto
14.99 MC
Mousse Royale San
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3FH 10.99 LB ★ Cambozola 70% (Germany) Purchase 12.99MC
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t%BOJTI#SFBLGBTUt$PMPNCJBO"NBSFUUP
4339 Connecticut Ave. NW ★ Adjacent to Van Ness Metro Stop
202-966-4400 | Wineline: 202-966-0445
calvertwoodley.com | wine@calvertwoodley.com
)PVST.'t4BUt4VOEBZ
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7.98 LB
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THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
. WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14 , 2018
There won’t be a bonfire, but Nowruz will taste like home
Persian Pan-Fried
Fish
NOWRUZ FROM E1
ion and whey make it special.
My mom would make a cauldron of it on that bonfire night,
called Chaharshanbe Suri. In
some parts of the country, such
as Shiraz — one of Iran’s most
beloved cities, known for its
rich history of wine, flowers and
poetry — locals say their food
must be at the boiling point the
moment the year changes. (In
Washington, that moment will
happen shortly after midday
March 20.)
No matter what time of day
the change occurred, my grandmother had her soup set to boil
at that precise moment. It’s that
rhythm of consistency across
centuries, I think, that makes
Iranians such a proud people.
We always eat Reshteh
Polow, rice with vermicelli noodles, on the eve of the new year.
It pays homage to the notion
that life is like a mess of tangled
noodles, and eating them as the
year changes will help us take
control of our destiny. This
stems from an old proverb that
says “may life’s noodle always
be in your hand,” which seems
to make more sense in Farsi.
The dish takes some time to
make but, trust me, it is delicious.
On the day of Nowruz, we eat
rice with fresh green herbs,
which symbolize the freshness
of the new day and capture the
quintessential Iranian way of
cherishing spring’s greenness,
with fish signifying life.
My grandmother used to
reminisce about a time when
there was no way to transport
fresh fish from the Caspian Sea
in the north to Tehran. So to
enjoy fish in the rest of the
country, Tehran residents began eating smoked fish as part
of their annual feast. It is now
among the most popular Nowruz dishes throughout Iran and
among our diaspora — but I
can’t get my husband to eat it.
Shopping for the right fish —
plump with roe — and watching
my mom’s talent for bargaining
with fishmongers to make sure
she got the freshest, best fish
available are vivid childhood
memories, equal parts fun and
lesson. When I buy fish at the
Maine Avenue seafood markets
in Southwest Washington, I use
the techniques I learned long
ago. White-fleshed mahi from
the Caspian Sea region is the
preferred type of fish for the
Nowruz feast. The fish has
many bones in it, so trout has
become a popular alternative.
Pickled vegetables, jarred in
the fall, are key to the Nowruz
spread. Seer-Torshi are sweetand-sour garlic cloves, at their
best when aged for several
years. They are more than a
delicacy — they are a national
treasure. Iranians also say SeerTorshi has medicinal qualities,
and the older it gets, the more
potent those curative properties become.
My mom pickles her own and
replenishes them periodically.
Hers was one of the few possessions that accompanied her as a
new bride, arriving in my dad’s
home 40 years ago. The bottom
of that original jar is now a thick
mud. Every time she reaches
past the newer top layers to pull
from the older cloves, we know
the recipient is someone very
dear to her.
Another of our favorite Nowruz bites is an olive spread that
we call Zeytoon Parvardeh.
Most people buy it already prepared, but I’m not sure why,
because it’s so simple to make
and adds so much flavor to our
meals.
The centerpiece for Nowruz
is a ceremonial arrangement of
seven symbolic food items, because seven is a lucky number.
Each one has a name that begins with the letter S in Farsi.
Families gather around the sofreh to wait for the beginning of
the new year. The celebrations
come to an end on the 13th day,
called Nature Day. Iranian families go on picnics together, taking with us sprouted wheat or
lentils — one of the S foods from
the ceremonial setting — that
we throw into a body of flowing
water. It symbolizes a letting go
of the misfortunes and sadness
of the past year.
This year, I’ll be throwing
mine into the Potomac.
food@washpost.com
Rezaian is an Iranian-born
freelance journalist who discovered
a passion for cooking her native
cuisine after she came to the
United States in 2016. She is
married to Washington Post staff
writer Jason Rezaian. She’ll join
Wednesday’s Free Range chat at
noon: live.washingtonpost.com.
6 servings It’s traditional for Iranians to
eat fish, a symbol of life, on the
eve of their new year. The process of looking for the best fish,
buying and preparing it for the
feast is a tradition similar to an
American’s hunt for the just
right turkey on Thanksgiving.
There are two popular ways
of cooking fish for the New Year.
One is to stuff it with fresh
seasonal herbs such as cilantro,
tarragon and leeks. Herbs hold
a special place at the center of
Iranian cuisine, especially for
Nowruz. Making food without
them would be unthinkable, as
this is the time of year when all
the greens that don’t grow in
winter are available again, and
just in time for the celebration
that marks the start of spring.
Another popular way of making fish is to simply pan-fry it.
Serve with herbed rice or
fresh herbs.
Ingredients
/ teaspoon salt
l 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground
black pepper
l 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
(granulated garlic)
l 1 teaspoon ground turmeric
l 1/4 teaspoon crumbled saffron
threads
l 1/2 teaspoon ground
cinnamon
l 11/2 pounds thick, whitefleshed, skinned fish fillets,
such as sea bass, halibut or
cod
l 1/2 lemon or lime, plus lemon
wedges for serving
l 1/4 cup canola or vegetable oil
l One-inch piece unpeeled
fresh ginger root, cut
crosswise into 5 slices (may
substitute a good pinch of
ground ginger; optional)
l 14
PHOTOS BY DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Persian Herbed Basmati Rice (Sabzi Polow)
8 servings Here, steaming the rice makes shorter work of this traditionally
time-consuming dish for the Persian new year, which is often served
with fish. The rice is rinsed but not soaked.
Dried rose petals are available at spice shops and at Middle Eastern
markets.
Recipes from Washington cook Yeganeh Rezaian.
Ingredients
/ teaspoon saffron threads
/ cup hot water
l 1/4 cup canola oil
l 1 flatbread, such as lavash or a
flour tortilla
l 3 tablespoons melted unsalted
butter
l 2 cups uncooked basmati rice
l 4 cups water
l Salt
l 1 cup mixed finely chopped
fresh dill, chives, cilantro,
parsley and tarragon leaves
(may use 2 tablespoons of each
herb)
l 4 cloves garlic, minced (may
substitute 11/2 young leeks
cleaned and minced or 4
minced garlic scapes)
l Dried rose petals, for garnish
(optional)
l 12
l 14
Steps
l Place the saffron threads in the
hot water in a cup or small
bowl; cover and let this brew for
10 to 15 minutes.
l Pour half the oil into a pot, then
sprinkle 2 tablespoons of the
brewed saffron over the oil.
Place the flatbread on top, trimming to make it fit; drizzle it
with 1 tablespoon of the melted
butter.
l Pour the rice into a separate
medium pot. Use cool water to
rinse (and drain) it 3 or 4 times
until the water runs clear. After
pouring out the water for the
last time, add the 4 cups of
water, the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil, and season lightly
with salt. Bring to a boil over
high heat; once it comes to a
boil, cook for 5 to 7 minutes,
then stir in the herbs and garlic;
cook for about 5 minutes. The
RECIPE FINDER
.
l
l
l
l
rice should be softened at this
point, and the water should be
mostly absorbed. Stir well to
make sure the herbs and garlic
are evenly distributed. Turn off
the heat.
Gently transfer the herbed rice
mixture to the pot with the
flatbread, so the bread remains
in place. Use the handle end of a
spatula to create a few holes in
the rice; this will help during
steaming.
Cover and set the pot over medium-high heat; cook for 5 minutes, or until it starts to steam.
Uncover and drizzle in the remaining 2 tablespoons of
brewed saffron and the remaining 2 tablespoons of melted
butter on top of the rice. Wrap
the pot lid in a dish towel; this
will help absorb moisture inside the pot. Cover the pot tightly with the wrapped lid. Reduce
the heat to medium-low; cook
for 45 minutes, or until you can
smell the rice.
To serve, uncover and invert a
plate over the pot. Holding
them tightly together, carefully
turn the pot upside down, trying to keep the crusty tahdig
intact; you should hear the rice
hit the plate with a thump. Lift
off the pot. The rice should look
like a cake with a firm, golden
top; this is called a tahdig.
Garnish the tahdig top with
dried rose petals, if desired.
Serve warm.
Nutrition | Per serving (using one 10-inch
flour tortilla and 1 teaspoon salt): 280
calories, 4 g protein, 38 g carbohydrates,
12 g fat, 4 g saturated fat, 10 mg
cholesterol, 360 mg sodium, 0 g dietary
fiber, 0 g sugar
Steps
l Whisk together the salt, pepper, garlic powder, turmeric,
saffron and cinnamon in a
shallow bowl.
l Cut the fish into good-size
pieces (4 or 5 inches long).
Squeeze a few drops of juice
from the lime or lemon over
both sides of the fillets, so they
are evenly moistened. Working with one at a time, press
all sides of each fillet into the
spice mixture so the fish is
evenly coated. (Discard any
unused spice mixture.)
l Line a platter with paper towels. Heat the oil in a large
nonstick skillet over mediumhigh heat. Once the oil shimmers, add the ginger, if using,
and cook for a minute or two.
Add just enough pieces of fish,
skinned sides first, to avoid
overcrowding; pan-fry for
about 5 minutes, or until golden and crisped, then use two
spatulas or large forks to carefully turn over the fillets and
cook for about 3 minutes, until opaque, yet moist throughout. (The ginger stays in the
pan the whole time, if you are
using it.)
l Transfer to the paper-towellined platter to drain briefly,
then serve right away, with
lemon wedges.
Ingredients are too variable for a
meaningful analysis.
Olive, Pomegranate and Walnut Dip
(Zeytoon Parvardeh)
6 to 8 servings This dish originated in northern Iran near the Caspian Sea, where
locals make it with regional herbs. It also works well as a colorful
accompaniment on a cheese platter and can be served with thin bread
such as lavash, baguette slices or on crackers.
The mixture can be pulsed in a food processor as well.
Ground angelica has a celery-like flavor, and is available in Middle
Eastern markets.
MAKE AHEAD: The dip should be refrigerated for 1 week before
serving.
Ingredients
6 cloves garlic, minced
/ cup fresh chopped mint
l 1/3 cup fresh chopped cilantro
l 11/2 cups walnut halves,
chopped
l Salt
l Freshly ground black pepper
l 2 teaspoons ground angelica
(optional; see headnote)
l 6 tablespoons pomegranate
molasses
l 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
l One 16-ounce jar unflavored,
pitted green olives, drained
(whole or coarsely chopped)
l 1/2 cup fresh pomegranate seeds
(arils)
l
l 12
Recipes tested by Yeganeh Rezaian; email
questions to food@washpost.com
SEARCH MORE THAN 7,900 POST­TESTED RECIPES AT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RECIPES
.
Steps
l Combine the garlic, mint, cilantro and walnuts in a mixing
bowl. Season lightly with salt,
pepper and the angelica, if using. Gradually stir in the pomegranate molasses, then stir in
the oil to form a thick paste. Add
the olives and pomegranate
seeds, stirring gently to incorporate.
l Transfer to a jar with a tightfitting lid; seal and refrigerate
for 1 week.
l Bring to room temperature before serving.
DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Reshteh Polow
Find this recipe and more at washingtonpost.com/recipes.
Nutrition | Per serving (based on 8): 390
calories, 3 g protein, 18 g carbohydrates, 36
g fat, 3 g saturated fat, 0 mg cholesterol,
470 mg sodium, 2 g dietary fiber, 9 g sugar
RECIPE QUESTIONS? EMAIL FOOD@WASHPOST.COM
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