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The Washington Post – March 22, 2018

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Democracy Dies in Darkness
Partly sunny 47/31 • Tomorrow: Partly sunny 47/29 B8
SU V1 V2 V3 V4
THURSDAY, MARCH 22 , 2018
. $2
Video,
cell data
lead to
bomber
Trump
jolts aides
with o≠er
to Putin
In briefings before call,
no mention was made
of a possible meeting
EXPLOSION IN SUV
AS POLICE CLOSE IN
Authorities warn more
devices may be left behind
K AREN D E Y OUNG,
J OHN H UDSON
AND J OSH D AWSEY
BY
E VA R UTH M ORAVEC,
D EVLIN B ARRETT,
M ATT Z APOTOSKY,
M ARK B ERMAN
AND K RISTINE P HILLIPS
BY
President Trump’s senior advisers were thrown when he told
Russian President Vladimir Putin on Tuesday that he expected
to meet with him soon, as briefings before the call to Moscow
included no mention of a possible meeting, and aides have not
been instructed to prepare for
one, senior administration officials said.
Although Trump told reporters that “probably we’ll be seeing
President Putin in the not-toodistant future,” several officials
said there are no plans for the
two even to be in the same
country until November, when
both are expected to attend a
Group of 20 summit in Argentina.
Amid criticism by some lawmakers of his congratulatory call
to Putin, whose 76 percent win in
the Russian election Sunday was
denounced as a “sham” by Senate
Armed
Services
Committee
Chairman John McCain (R-Ariz.),
DIPLOMACY CONTINUED ON A11
Cracking the code
Emmanuel Macron is Trump’s
favorite European leader. A10
U.S. election pressures
Homeland Security chief faces
questions about readiness. A10
Mold, mice:
Md. shelter
long plagued
by problems
are just shocked,” said Mark’s
grandmother Mary Conditt, who
lives in Denver. “This is not the
Mark that I know or the grandson
that I know. I don’t know who this
person was that did all of this.”
But Mark Conditt’s violent
plans were revealed, police say, in
a string of bombings that terrorized Austin this month.
Cornered by police Wednesday, Mark Conditt detonated explosives inside his car before
dawn and ended a bombing cam-
austin — The FBI agents and
police investigators tasked with
identifying who was responsible
for planting a series of bombs
here seemed at times to be
chasing ghosts.
They ran down theories of
drug-dealer retaliation gone
awry and struggled to understand the significance of family
connections between the victims. All the while, the bomber
escalated his attacks — first by
using a tripwire and then by
sending explosives through FedEx.
But behind the scenes, investigators had used cell-tower data
to tie Mark Anthony Conditt, a
23-year-old from the Austin suburbs, to the bombing sites and
other relevant locations, the Texas governor said Wednesday. And
when the suspected bomber used
FedEx, law enforcement caught
an ever bigger break: He had
been captured on a store’s video
surveillance system.
The furious manhunt for Conditt culminated early Wednesday
after one of the police surveillance teams scouring the area
spotted his red SUV in a hotel
parking lot in Round Rock, about
CONDITT CONTINUED ON A9
BOMBS CONTINUED ON A8
JAY JANNER/AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Officials investigate near the vehicle, center, where Mark Anthony Conditt detonated an explosive Wednesday before dawn. Authorities
say he is responsible for the bombings that killed two people, injured several others and left Austin on edge.
Culprit appeared frustrated with life, officials say
E VA R UTH M ORAVEC,
T IM C RAIG,
S COTT W ILSON
AND M ARK B ERMAN
BY
pflugerville, tex. — He
Man, 23, left recording
on his phone police
describe as an ‘outcry’
worked with his dad around their
modest yellow house on Second
Street, fixing up a newly purchased home in an old-fashioned,
close-knit neighborhood — the
kind of place where residents
check in on one another.
Mark Anthony Conditt seemed
to fit in. Having been home-
schooled, the 23-year-old was
close to his family, including his
sisters. As he neared graduation,
he took a government course at
Austin Community College and
described himself on a class blog
as conservative but “not that po-
Mark
Anthony
Conditt
detonated
explosives
inside his car
as the police
approached.
litically inclined.”
People who knew him say Conditt was quiet and shy.
“Everyone has questions, and
everyone wants answers, and we
Data firm whistleblower is
now Facebook’s unlikely foe
Former researcher recounts ‘ticking time bomb’
BY A RELIS R . H ERNÁNDEZ
AND R ACHEL C HASON
BY C RAIG T IMBERG
AND K ARLA A DAM
Prince George’s County and the
state of Maryland have bankrolled a problem-plagued safe
house for abused women for
nearly four decades, relying on
the nonprofit group that runs the
facility despite repeated complaints about substandard services and decrepit conditions.
Government officials say they
have little control over the Safe
Passage shelter — the only one for
abused women and their children
in Prince George’s — because it is
privately operated.
But shelter residents, advocates and former employees say
the state and the county have
missed multiple opportunities to
crack down on failures, blinded
by their dependence on the facility and close ties with the Family
Crisis Center of Prince George’s
County, which operates it.
By law, marriage license fees
collected by the county must be
london — The crisis ravaging
MELINA MARA/THE WASHINGTON POST
Seasonal confusion
People gather on the banks of the Tidal Basin to see the cherry blossom trees blanketed in snow
on Wednesday, the first full day of spring. The storm caused the federal government and area
schools to shutter, with the heaviest snowfall to the north and west of the District. Story, B1
SHELTER CONTINUED ON A18
IN THE NEWS
THE NATION
THOMAS COEX/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Palestinian cause celebre An activist teen
who was filmed slapping an Israeli soldier
was sentenced to eight months in jail. A13
Listen and learn In the first example of crossspecies learning in bats, one group learned
from another that a sound indicated food. A3
Congressional leaders
clinched a $1.3 trillion
spending deal to keep
government agencies
operating through September. A4
Energy companies
paid $124.8 million for
oil and gas prospects in
the largest Gulf of Mexico lease sale ever, but
the winning bids fell
short of past sales. A2
The Supreme Court
said a Texas death-row
inmate deserves another
chance at securing
funds for evidence that
might lead to a reconsideration of his sentence. A2
The Trump administration has employed new
hurdles in the H-1B visa
program, making it
harder for firms to hire
high-skilled foreign
workers. A6
President Trump’s
pledge to pursue armscontrol talks with Russian President Vladimir
Putin spotlights possible
common ground at a
time of discord. A11
THE WORLD
One city in Hungary
showed how political rivals can set aside ideological differences and
run against one-party
rule. A12
A suicide bombing
near a shrine in Kabul
added to a growing list
of attacks against Afghanistan’s minority
Shiite Hazaras. A13
Peruvian President
Pedro Pablo Kuczynski
resigned amid a corruption scandal. A14
Britain’s new soda tax
hasn’t begun yet, but
supporters already say
it’s a huge success. A14
THE ECONOMY
A study used an Apple
Watch to try to detect a
disease, but the results
were “humbling.” A18
THE REGION
A student who opened
fire in a Maryland
school targeted a 16-
Facebook started when a young
researcher, regretful over his role
in turning data on an estimated
tens of millions of U.S. voters into a
high-tech political persuasion machine, decided to come forward
with his story. And he imagined
that Facebook, whose user profiles
were part of that effort, could be a
partner in helping to exhume this
painful truth and perhaps embrace some changes to its privacy
policy.
But instead of a joint announcement, Christopher Wylie
awoke early Saturday in London,
where he lives, to the news that
Facebook had published a blog
post announcing the suspensions
of him, his former employer and
one other person for allegedly mishandling Facebook data in an incident that happened in 2014 and
had been known to Facebook for
more than a year.
That explosive moment last
year-old girl after they
recently ended their relationship, authorities
said. The shooting has
given new urgency to
school-safety bills proposed after a Florida
rampage. B1, B3
The Virginia governor’s proposed budget
included plans to expand Medicaid, setting
up a legislative fight. B1
The D.C. mayor’s proposed budget included
tax increases on ridehailing services to help
pay for Metro. B1
A Maryland lawmaker
killed a bill to limit local
control over whether
new cellular equipment
structures may be installed in residential areas. B3
weekend turned Wylie, 28, into an
unlikely foe of one of the tech
industry’s most powerful and lucrative companies. The onetime
student of fashion trends with
pink hair and a stubborn streak
has delivered revelations that
have triggered government investigations on both sides of the Atlantic, sent Facebook’s stock price
plunging and pushed long-simmering privacy concerns to a boil.
“I didn’t set out to attack Facebook. Facebook has just been incredibly uncooperative,” Wylie
said. “It hasn’t respected the role
of the media and scrutiny and
embraced this scrutiny and
worked to improve itself.”
What happened instead, he
said, was an “own goal” — a soccer
WYLIE CONTINUED ON A16
Zuckerberg speaks on ‘breach’
Facebook will audit thousands of
apps, chief executive says. A17
Easy to hate, tough to quit
Why some people just can’t let go
of their favorite social media. C1
Inside
SPORTS
Winter All-Mets
The Post staff picks the
area’s players of the year
in a variety of sports. D7
ST YLE
Sowing trust
Michelle Obama reflects
on her garden and life in
the East Wing. C1
BUSINESS NEWS ........................ A15
COMICS........................................C6
OPINION PAGES ......................... A20
LOTTERIES ................................... B3
OBITUARIES ................................. B6
TELEVISION..................................C4
WORLD NEWS.............................A12
CONTENT © 2018
The Washington Post / Year 141, No. 107
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B2
9 5 5 3
A2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
A casualty of Trump’s
White House: Spelling
BY
D AVID N AKAMURA
President Trump boasted during the campaign that he has the
“best words.” If the past 14 months
in the White House are an indication, he and his team also have the
worst spelling.
Among the many casualties of
Washington’s protocols in the
Trump era has been a lack of rigor
to the accuracy of the printed word
— whether it’s the president’s typofilled tweets or the White House’s
error-prone news releases.
“Special Council is told to find
crimes, wether crimes exist or not,”
Trump wrote on Twitter on
Wednesday morning to start off a
posting in which he misspelled
“counsel” three times and had five
errors in the span of 280 characters.
As journalists and others poked
fun at the mistakes, the president
quickly deleted the tweet and posted an edited version. He successfully changed “wether” to “whether” and eliminated an inadvertent
repeat of the word “the” — but he
failed to correct the three inaccurate references to the title of his
nemesis, Robert S. Mueller III.
“If Trump directs Rosenstein to
fire the special ‘council,’ I think we
might be ok folks,” cracked former
U.S. attorney Preet Bharara of New
York, whom Trump fired last summer, referring to Deputy Attorney
General Rod J. Rosenstein.
Amid all the chaos in the White
House — including West Wing personnel drama, the Stormy Daniels
scandal and Mueller’s Russia investigation — some wayward spell-
ings and inaccurate honorifics
might seem minor. But the constant small mistakes — which have
dogged the Trump White House
since the president’s official Inauguration Day poster boasted that
“no challenge is to great” — have
become, critics say, symbolic of the
larger problems with Trump’s
management style, in particular
his lack of attention to detail and
the carelessness with which he
makes policy decisions.
On Monday, for example, the
White House rolled out an executive order from Trump aimed at
cutting off U.S. investment in Venezuela’s digital currency as a way to
pinch strongman Nicolás Maduro’s regime. But in the headline
on the public news release, the
White House wrote that Trump
was taking action to “address the
situation in America.”
“Freudian slip????” wondered
Rosiland Jordan, a reporter for Al
Jazeera.
“It echoes a political quote I tell
people a lot from [Ralph Waldo]
Emerson: The institution is lengthened by the shadow of one man,”
said Rick Wilson, a Republican political consultant who has been
highly critical of Trump. “The sloppiness and the looseness and the
chaos and lack of rigor across all
areas of Trump world reflects
Trump. They do not care. They
don’t give a damn. But everybody
needs an editor.”
In Trump’s world, Air Force One
became “Air Force Once” on the
president’s public schedule. The
White House sought “lasting
peach” in a news release touting
H A P P ENI NG TO D A Y
For the latest updates all day, visit washingtonpost.com.
8:30 a.m.
New jobless claims are expected to have remained
relatively stable last week at 225,000, compared with
226,000 the previous week. Visit washingtonpost.com/
business for details.
10 a.m.
Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben
Carson testifies at a Senate Banking Committee hearing
in Washington regarding oversight of his department. Visit
washingtonpost.com/politics for developments.
10 a.m.
Energy Secretary Rick Perry testifies at a Senate Armed
Services Committee hearing on challenges affecting the
department’s atomic-energy defense programs. For
developments, visit washingtonpost.com/checkpoint.
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A March 21 Food article about
German restaurants incorrectly
said that Scholz Garten in Austin
is the oldest continuously
operating business in Texas. In
fact, it is the oldest continuously
operating tavern in Texas,
according to the Texas State
Historical Association.
A March 21 Food article about
eggs at Passover misstated the
start date for the holiday this
year. It begins at sundown on
March 30, not March 23.
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The Spring Egg Drop Soup
recipe in the March 21 Food
section contained incorrect
nutritional information. The
amount of total carbohydrates
per serving is 12 grams, not 185
grams.
The John Feinstein column in
the Feb. 4 Sports section, about
the Loyola Chicago men’s
basketball team, misidentified a
Mississippi State basketball
player from the 1960s in one
reference. The player was Joe
Dan Gold, not Jay Dan Gold.
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. THURSDAY,
MARCH 22 , 2018
Court backs
inmate on
death row
Justices: Man deserves
chance to secure more
funds to gather evidence
BY
ca’s public lands and waters.”
A similar sale in August also
drew relatively tepid winning
bids totaling $121 million, about
40 percent less than the Interior
Department had hoped.
This sale drew 159 bids from
33 companies, as the biggest
firms have trimmed their capital
spending budgets from the towering levels a few years ago, when
crude prices were higher.
The biggest spenders were the
oil giants that already produce
lots of oil and gas in the gulf.
Chevron made winning bids of
$29.4 million on 24 leases, BP bid
$20 million for 27 leases, Shell
paid $22.9 million for 16 leases,
and Total paid $15.1 million for
nine leases.
In addition, many big oil companies have moved their sights to
sections of the gulf controlled by
Mexico, which after years of
protecting its state-owned oil
company has opened up leases to
foreign companies.
“Lease bids are driven by the
market rather than rhetoric,”
Bromwich said in an email, “and
so the tepid level of interest is the
product of low oil prices, the
choices that companies have to
make with their capital expenditures given the competing business opportunities, which now
include shale when that was not
the case a decade ago, and the
fact that companies have become
more focused and less profligate
about their offshore investments.”
The Supreme Court on Wednesday said a Texas death-row inmate
deserves another chance at securing funds for evidence that might
lead to a reconsideration of his
sentence.
The justices were unanimous in
ruling that the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit was too
restrictive in reading a federal law
that allows indigent defendants to
secure money for “investigative,
expert or other services.”
The federal Criminal Justice Act
allows lawyers to receive such
funds when it is “reasonably necessary” to assemble the kind of mitigating evidence that might persuade the jury to forego a sentence
of death.
But a judge denied the funds to
attorneys for Carlos Manuel Ayestas, who was convicted of the killing of 67-year-old Santiaga
Paneque during an invasion of her
Houston home in 1995.
In the 5th Circuit, which covers
Texas, Louisiana and Mississippi,
the law has been interpreted to
mean a defendant must show that
there is a “substantial need” for
such services.
Ayestas’s attorneys said that created something of a Catch-22: The
defendant would have to demonstrate that there is some relevant
evidence he could discover without first having the funding to pursue that evidence.
Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. said
the appeals court was wrong to
impose the “substantial need”
standard.
Ayestas “contends that this interpretation is more demanding
than the standard — “reasonably
necessary” — set out in the statute,”
Alito wrote. “And although the difference between the two formulations may not be great, petitioner
has a point.”
Courts deciding whether to
grant the funds — Ayestas’s attorneys asked for $20,000 — must
consider the potential merit of the
claims a petitioner wants to pursue, the likelihood that something
beneficial might be obtained and
whether the petitioner would be
able to clear any procedural hurdles to presenting the mitigating
evidence.
Ayestas wants to show that his
previous attorneys provided ineffective counsel, because they did
not present a fuller portrait of his
life that might spare him from execution. They contend he has been
diagnosed with schizophrenia and
was a regular user of cocaine and
alcohol at the time of what Justice
Ruth Bader Ginsburg at oral arguments called a “horrific” killing.
The case returns to lower courts
so that they can judge Ayestas’s
request under the proper standard.
Justice Sonia Sotomayor, joined
by Ginsburg, thought that step was
unnecessary.
“On the record before this court,
there should be little doubt that
Ayestas has satisfied” the standard, Sotomayor wrote.
The case is Ayestas v. Davis.
The court also ruled for the defendant in a second case decided
Wednesday.
The justices ruled 7 to 2 that, for
someone to be convicted of obstructing the work of the Internal
Revenue Service, a person must be
aware that he or she is under investigation or should have known that
was a reasonable possibility.
The decision, written by Justice
Stephen G. Breyer, makes it more
difficult for the federal government to obtain convictions under
an omnibus section of the tax law.
Justices Clarence Thomas and
Alito disagreed with their colleagues’ interpretation of the law.
The case is Marinello v. United
States.
steven.mufson@washpost.com
robert.barnes@washpost.com
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
President Trump signs Section 201 actions in January. Whether it’s a tweet that misspells “counsel”
three times or a news release touting “lasting peach,” typos are typical in Trump’s administration.
efforts to broker a deal between
Israel and Palestinian territories.
And another release announced
the departure of an East Wing aide
to work for Rep. Will Hurd (R-Tex.),
who was reincarnated as Rep. Hill
in the next sentence.
Last week, in a tweet, the commander in chief lauded his visit to
the “Marine Core Air Station Miramar” in San Diego, prompting “veterans everywhere to facepalm,” according to a headline in the Marine
Times.
The steady stream of errors has
prompted outlets as disparate as
People magazine and Fox News to
compile the White House’s greatest
hits — or whiffs, as the case may be.
Jason Silverstein, a political reporter, had been posting a “running list of typos” at the New York
Daily News, noting in his introduction that Trump was “elected to
lead, not to proofread.” He reached
32 entries before departing the paper last October.
Asked Wednesday whether he
had a favorite, Silverstein pointed
to Trump’s tweet in December 2016
in which the president-elect denounced the seizure of a U.S. Navy
underwater glider by a Chinese
warship as “unpresidented. ”
“I always told our [editor] that
that should be our front-page
headline if Trump gets impeached,” Silverstein said in an
email.
Inside the West Wing, however,
it was another mistake in January
2017, by a junior White House aide,
that caused the most consternation — just a week after Trump took
office. Announcing the visit to the
White House of British Prime Minister Theresa May, the official
schedule misspelled her name
three times as “Teresa May,” which
the London-based Independent
newspaper drolly noted is the stage
name of a British pornographic
movie actress whose oeuvre includes “Whitehouse: The Sex Video” and “Leather Lust.”
The mistake reverberated
throughout the West Wing and
prompted then-Chief of Staff
Reince Priebus to implement new
procedures, building in extra layers of sign-offs before news releases were made public, according to a
former White House official familiar with the fallout who spoke on
the condition of anonymity to discuss private matters. The main
change was that official announcements would have to be cleared by
the Office of the Staff Secretary, led
by Rob Porter, who resigned last
month amid accusations of abuse
from two former wives.
“There was a lot of head-desk,”
said the former official, when
asked how the White House press
office reacted to errors that became
public. Snarky reaction on Twitter
“was usually the first indication
that something got missed. Even
having the staff secretary look at it
was not foolproof. We’re humans.”
The mistakes hardly abated. The
White House mangled the titles of
foreign leaders and their countries.
It called Prime Minister Shinzo
Abe the “president” of Japan. After
Trump held a high-stakes bilateral
meeting with Chinese President Xi
Jinping at Mar-a-Lago in July, the
White House readout referred to
the “Republic of China,” which is
the official name of Taiwan. Xi is
the leader of the People’s Republic
of China.
Tepid bids from oil, gas
firms in gulf lease sale
BY
S TEVEN M UFSON
Energy
companies
paid
$124.8 million on Wednesday for
oil and gas prospects in the
largest Gulf of Mexico lease sale
ever, but the winning bids fell
well short of past sales.
The totals also appeared modest compared with the expectations raised by President Trump
in his “America-First Offshore
Energy Strategy” that was aimed
at substantially enhancing the
nation’s “energy dominance.”
Oil
companies
bid
on
148 blocks, just 1 percent of the
blocks put up for sale despite
royalty breaks the administration provided for some of the
shallower areas. The Interior Department’s Bureau of Ocean Energy Management had put
77.3 million acres up for auction.
“The results look especially
poor largely because of the exaggerated rhetoric — the ‘energy
dominance’ rhetoric — that is the
calling card of this administration’s energy policy,” said Michael Bromwich, a lawyer who
was the first director of the
Bureau of Ocean Energy Management under the Obama administration. “If they hadn’t unrealistically hyped expectations,
the results would be less disap-
pointing.”
Bromwich said the lease sale
was based on President Barack
Obama’s five-year plan for offshore development, which is still
in force.
The American Petroleum Institute said that leases in the
western and central gulf regions
were the “backbone” of U.S. energy production. The Gulf of
Mexico produced more than
1.6 million barrels a day in 2017,
about 17 percent of total U.S.
crude oil output.
But environmental groups opposed the sale, both for the risks
drilling poses to offshore areas
and because the size of the sale
was bigger than the companies’
pocketbooks. By receiving relatively modest bids, the Interior
Department failed to maximize
payments for the country’s natural resources, critics said.
Interior Secretary “Ryan Zinke
has been falling all over himself
to recklessly give our public
lands and waters away to corporate polluters,” Athan Manuel,
director of the Sierra Club’s lands
protection program, said in a
statement. “The lack of interest
at today’s lease sale should make
it clear to Zinke that he must
scrap his ill-advised offshore
drilling plan and protect Ameri-
R OBERT B ARNES
In a sign that the sloppiness
might be infecting other parts of
Washington, tickets to Trump’s address to a joint session of Congress
in January, distributed by the Office of the Sergeant at Arms and
Doorkeeper, touted the “State of
the Uniom.”
White House press secretary
Sarah Huckabee Sanders did not
respond to a request for comment.
Liz Allen, who served as White
House deputy communications director under former president Barack Obama, said in an interview
that the press office under the 44th
president sought to be as rigorous
as possible. Releases typically were
proofread for accuracy and content by at least four or five people.
Announcements that dealt with
domestic policy issues and foreign
affairs were vetted by experts at
federal agencies and the National
Security Council, she said.
“We felt a burden and responsibility to get it right,” Allen said. “We
were acutely aware of the integrity
of our platform. We took it seriously. No one should meet a higher bar
than the White House. They are the
ultimate voice.”
That voice was a bit garbled last
month when, according to the
White House daily guidance,
Trump was planning to address the
Conservative Political Action Conference at the Gaylord National
Resort & Convention Center in
“Oxen Hill.”
The proper spelling of the suburban Maryland jurisdiction is
Oxon Hill, a mistake made more
pronounced by the fact that the
Gaylord resort is the home of the
National Spelling Bee.
david.nakamura@washpost.com
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THURSDAY, MARCH 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
RE
Politics & the Nation
A weary Northeast
is clobbered with fourth
snowstorm in 3 weeks
Heavy rains in California
force evacuations
in three counties
A SSOCIATED P RESS
new york — Spring kicked off
with a wallop of wintry weather
along the East Coast as the fourth
nor’easter in three weeks rolled in
with the potential for a foot of
snow Wednesday.
The first full day of the season
included scenes of snow falling
on blooming daffodils in suburban Philadelphia, New Yorkers
twisting to fix blown-out umbrellas, tractor-trailers stuck on
snowy highways and kids making
their first snowman of spring.
“I want warm! I’m done with
the cold,” said Yana Damoiseau, a
pedestrian in New York City.
Airlines canceled more than
4,000 flights, an estimated 15,000
customers lost power from West
Virginia northward and school
districts throughout the Northeast called off classes ahead of the
storm. At least two traffic deaths
were reported in New Jersey and
on New York’s Long Island.
Up to eight inches of snow had
fallen in some Philadelphia suburbs by midafternoon, and 13
inches outside Allentown, Pa.
New York had at least five inches
ahead of the evening commute
and braced for a total of six to 12.
Forecasters said Boston could get
six inches as the storm moved
into New England.
“Winter will not relent,” said
Pancho Ortega, who was clearing
the sidewalk outside his soon-toopen restaurant in Philadelphia.
“I don’t like the shoveling part.
I’m ready for it to kind of go
away.”
The storm was just the latest to
come off the assembly line in the
Northeast since March 2. Many
people’s tolerance for wintry
weather was already worn thin
after repeated power outages and
lots of white-knuckle driving.
“I didn’t think I’d still need to
keep storm stuff in my car in late
March, but what are you going to
do?” Wilson Collins, of Toms River, N.J., said as he checked his car
trunk to make sure he had a
shovel, a blanket and other emergency items. “I just hope this is
finally it.”
On the other side of the country, a storm brought heavy rain to
California, and tens of thousands
MATT MCCLAIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
Virginia Olin and her husband, Gary, walk through Belle Haven
Park in Alexandria, Va., during Wednesday’s snowstorm.
of people in Santa Barbara and
Ventura counties were ordered to
flee their homes because of the
danger of mudslides on slopes
burned by recent wildfires.
In New Jersey, some streets
were flooded along the shore,
including one in Point Pleasant
Beach where a pair of ducks
cruised back and forth through
an intersection as a plastic garbage can bobbed in the waves.
More than 1,200 flights in the
New York City area alone were
canceled, with a ripple effect on
air travel around the country. On
the ground, Amtrak scaled back
service on the Northeast Corridor
between Washington and Boston,
and some states banned trucks
from major highways.
The storm also unloaded snow
on Virginia and West Virginia as
it pushed into the Northeast.
Virginia reported more than 240
traffic accidents since midnight.
In West Virginia, more than 6,000
customers were without power in
the afternoon.
New York Gov. Andrew M.
Cuomo (D) declared a state of
emergency for New York City and
its suburbs and said 5,500 utility
workers and 300 National Guard
members were standing by. The
state also sent generators, light
towers, plows and salt to areas
that have already endured multiday, storm-related power outages
this month.
Cuomo said he was told the
utilities were better prepared this
time.
“We have had assurances,” he
said. “Frankly, I’m not satisfied
with the assurances.”
Not everyone was sick of the
snow.
In Orwigsburg, Pa., about
90 miles outside Philadelphia,
10-year-old siblings Talia and
Miles Broadhurst made their own
fun on yet another day off from
school, climbing onto the family
SUV and sliding down the snowslicked windshield and hood before plopping onto the snow.
“If the snow keeps me away
from school, I’m fine with it,”
Miles said.
Meanwhile on the West Coast,
a strong Pacific storm came
ashore on the central coast and
spread south into the Los Angeles
region and north through San
Francisco Bay, fed by a long
plume of subtropical moisture
called an atmospheric river.
It also moved eastward, bringing the threat of flooding to the
San Joaquin Valley and Sierra
Nevada, where winter storm
warnings for new snow were in
effect on the second day of spring.
Authorities kept a close watch
on Santa Barbara County, hoping
there would not be a repeat of the
massive January debris flows
from a burn scar that ravaged the
community of Montecito and
killed 21 people.
“Right now it looks like the
storm will enter its most threatening period Thursday morning,”
the National Weather Service
said, adding that there could be a
nine-hour period of moderate to
heavy rain.
Mud and rockslides closed several roads in the region, including
Route 1 at Ragged Point near Big
Sur, not far from where the scenic
coast route is still blocked by a
massive landslide triggered by a
storm last year.
With the storm expected to last
through Thursday, there was concern about the combination of
rainfall rates and the long duration, said Suzanne Grimmesey, a
spokeswoman for Santa Barbara
County.
With the grim Montecito experience in recent memory, Santa
Barbara County ordered the evacuation of areas along its south
coast near areas burned by several wildfires dating to 2016.
“We actually do feel good about
the evacuation order,” Grimmesey said. “Law enforcement
was out in the extreme risk areas
of Montecito yesterday knocking
on doors. For those that were
home, we had a very good cooperation rate with people leaving.”
When sheriff’s deputies told
Kristine Sperling and her family
they should evacuate their home
because of the approaching storm
in January, they didn’t listen.
Sperling thought that she, her
husband and their 11-year-old
daughter would be safe. Then the
storm unleashed flash floods laden with giant boulders that blasted through town in the middle of
the night, destroying or damaging hundreds of homes. A close
friend was among those killed.
Now the Sperlings don’t question evacuation orders. They just
go.
In Los Angeles County, authorities planned to put mandatory
and voluntary evacuations into
effect at 6 p.m. Wednesday in
areas near four recent wildfires.
Observing other species, tropical bat proves to be a ‘consummate learner’
BY
S ARAH K APLAN
The fringe-lipped bat is a furrybodied, wart-faced, giant-eared
animal lighter than a golf ball and
smaller than the palm of your
hand. Its snout sports a fleshy,
unicorn-like protrusion called a
“nose leaf,” which it uses to direct
its echolocating calls. University
of Toronto Mississauga biologist
Krista Patriquin thinks it’s “cute,”
though that’s probably not the
adjective most people would use
to describe the animal.
One thing is for sure: It’s a wily
little critter.
This bat, found in tropical forests from Mexico to Brazil, can
discover new food sources by
studying the behavior of other
species. It is the first example of
cross-species learning in bats, researchers say, and it may illuminate how these tiny animals manage to survive as their environment rapidly changes.
The new find, published
Wednesday in the journal Science
Advances, is based on six months
of experiments at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
in Gamboa, Panama. Working
through the night in a giant metal
cage protected from the rain, Patriquin and her colleagues tested
whether fringe-lipped bats could
learn to associate a new sound
with food by observing a bat from
a different species.
To ensure that the experiment’s
sound really was new to the
bats, the researchers worked to
come up with something so hideous and unnatural that the animals wouldn’t tolerate it unless
they knew they'd be rewarded.
“Each pulse was a high-pitched
‘Eeee, eeee,’” Patriquin said,
squeaking into the phone. She
hated it, and the bats did too. “You
could visibly see they were not
happy because they would shake
lope found in eastern and southern Africa — will stop grazing,
look around and run for cover
when they hear the alarm call of a
white-bellied go-away bird. (Perhaps the lesson here is that we
should all be paying more attention to birds.)
And of course, humans learn
by observing the behavior of other species all the time. Our
hunter-gatherer ancestors found
new food sources by watching
what other animals ate. Today,
Douglas student gets
high bond in knife case
A higher-than-usual bond was
imposed Wednesday in a case
involving a student who allegedly
brought a knife to Marjory
Stoneman Douglas High School
in Parkland, Fla., one day after the
same judge set a $500,000 bond
in a trespassing case for the
brother of the suspect in a recent
shooting massacre at the school.
Broward County Judge Kim
Theresa Mollica ordered Jordan
Salter, 18, who is accused of
bringing a knife with a two-inch
blade to the school, held on
$12,500 bond. Authorities
arrested her after a confrontation
with another student Tuesday in
the school cafeteria.
Also Wednesday, Florida Gov.
Rick Scott (R) ordered the
highway patrol to station eight
troopers at the school to bolster
security there.
Trespassing is a misdemeanor
that normally involves only a $25
bond. But Mollica agreed with
are imperiled by climate change,
habitat destruction and disease. These bats may have to shift
their dietary habits or their home
ranges as a consequence.
If they can speed up the process of adapting by learning from
their neighbors, Patriquin said,
they may increase their chances
of survival in this changing world.
sarah.kaplan@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/speaking-of-science
KRISTA PATRIQUIN
Fringe-lipped bats, like this one eating a fish, learned by watching a
different bat species that a certain artificial sound indicated food.
their heads in response to the
sound.”
Nevertheless, the researchers
were able to train members of a
similar species, the whitethroated round-eared bat, to fly
toward the sound in exchange for
a tasty meal. By first playing the
familiar sound of a katydid’s
chirp, then gradually switching it
out for the piercing screech, the
scientists taught the whitethroated round-eared bats to associate the sound with dinner.
Then the experiment began: If
a “naive” fringe-lipped bat was
placed in the flight cage with a
trained white-throated roundeared bat, how quickly would
it pick up on the trained animal’s
food-finding trick?
Very quickly, it turns out. After
an average of about 20 exposures,
the fringe-lipped bats learned to
follow the new sound cue, even
when a white-throated roundeared bat wasn’t around.
They were able to pass the knowledge on to their buddies just as
fast; the number of exposures
required for fringe-lipped bats to
learn the meaning of the sound
from trained members of their
own species was about the same.
Only a single bat failed to learn
from observing another animal.
Fringe-lipped bats that had to
figure out the relationship between the squeaking sound and
food on their own were rarely
successful.
The fringe-lipped bat “is a consummate learner,” Patriquin and
her colleagues write, “capable of
acquiring new information about
novel, potential prey from conspecifics [members of their own
species] and heterospecifics
[members of other species].”
Past research has revealed other animals capable of heterospecific learning. Wild birds have
been shown to eavesdrop on other species’ communication. Baby
vervet monkeys learn to recognize the alarm calls of starlings
flying above — most often when
the birds are warning about a
predator that also threatens monkeys. Dik-diks — miniature ante-
D I G ES T
FLORIDA
you might start to recognize the
mail carrier’s approach from your
dog’s barking.
“From a purely scientific perspective, it’s interesting to understand how animals learn about
the world around them,” Patriquin said. “But it also tells us
how bats might learn to adapt to
changes in the landscape.”
Fringe-lipped bats aren’t considered a threatened species, but
the rain forests in which they live
and the frogs on which they feed
prosecutors that Zachary Cruz,
18, brother of school shooting
suspect Nikolas Cruz, had been
warned not to visit the school.
The shooting on Feb. 14 left 17
dead.
— Associated Press
UTAH
New birth-control law
cuts some doctor visits
Women in Utah will soon be
able to get birth control directly
from a pharmacist rather than
visiting a doctor each time they
want to obtain or renew a
prescription, an action taken by
only a few other states, many of
them liberal.
Gov. Gary R. Herbert (R)
signed a measure into law
Tuesday allowing those 18 and
older to get pills, the patch and
some other contraceptive devices,
putting Utah in line with a
handful of other states that have
passed similar laws, including
California, Colorado and Oregon.
Public health officials say
studies have shown that
unplanned births can lead to
more money being spent on social
programs like Medicaid, which
covers the costs of about onethird of all births in the state.
Utah is a Republicandominated state where most
lawmakers and an estimated
60 percent of residents are
members of the Mormon Church.
While the church generally
opposes abortion, birth control is
treated differently. The Church of
Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
encourages married couples to
have children but says specific
birth control decisions are private
between a husband and wife.
While the church is against
elective abortions, there are some
circumstances where it can be
permissible.
The new law, which
unanimously passed the
legislature, takes effect May 8. It
will require women to first fill out
a form assessing their risks of
taking birth control before
getting the medication. They also
will be required to check in with a
doctor every two years.
— Associated Press
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A4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. THURSDAY,
MARCH 22 , 2018
Congressional leaders clinch $1.3 trillion spending deal
BY M IKE D E B ONIS
AND E RICA W ERNER
Congressional leaders reached
a $1.3 trillion spending deal
Wednesday to keep government
agencies operating through September, unveiling legislation that
would make good on President
Trump’s promises to increase military funding while blocking much
of his immigration agenda.
The release of the 2,000-pluspage bill Wednesday evening, after a two-day delay, touched off a
legislative sprint as lawmakers try
to pass it before Friday night, the
deadline to avoid a government
shutdown. And with a key senator
unwilling to say whether he would
agree to accelerate the deal’s consideration, it remained uncertain
whether they would be able to
meet the challenge.
There were other plot twists as
the deal came together: As aides
hashed out its final details on
Wednesday afternoon, Trump’s
support for the emerging compromise was suddenly cast into doubt,
forcing House Speaker Paul D.
Ryan (R-Wis.) to rush to the White
House early Wednesday afternoon
to allay the president’s concerns.
After the meeting, White House
press secretary Sarah Huckabee
Sanders said in a statement that
Trump had spoken to Ryan and
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) “about their
shared priorities secured in the
omnibus spending bill” and confirmed their mutual support for
the legislation.
In the broadest strokes, the bill
gives Republicans a major win by
delivering a $78 billion increase in
military spending over 2017 levels,
while Democrats won a $52 billion
increase for domestic programs.
In many instances, large spending
increases on the domestic side
ignored budget cuts proposed by
the Trump administration, allowing lawmakers of both parties to
trumpet victories on programs
such as opioid prevention and
cleanup of the Great Lakes.
“These job-creating, life-saving
investments stand in sharp contrast to the Trump Budget,” House
Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (DCalif.), who negotiated the deal
along with Ryan, McConnell and
Senate Minority Leader Charles E.
Schumer (D-N.Y.), said in a statement.
The haggling that delayed the
legislation’s release concerned
smaller-bore provisions sprinkled
throughout the bill.
One hotly litigated matter concerned funding for Gateway, a ma-
MELINA MARA/THE WASHINGTON POST
House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.), center, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) allayed the president’s budget
concerns. Both parties can claim a win because the bill would increase military spending and money for domestic programs.
jor New York-area infrastructure
project. At Trump’s behest, Republicans succeeded in eliminating
some provisions favoring the
$30 billion project, which includes building a new rail tunnel
under the Hudson River. But project backers said it would still be
eligible for hundreds of millions of
dollars in taxpayer funds.
The dickering played out for
hours Wednesday, even after top
congressional leaders left a morning meeting on a snowy Capitol
Hill declaring that a deal was at
hand.
Democrats pressed particularly
hard to block Trump’s requests to
fund a new wall along the
U.S.-Mexico border and to beef up
immigration enforcement capacity.
The bill includes $1.6 billion in
funding for construction of a border wall, but that number is far
short of the $25 billion in longterm funding that the administration sought. Democrats also won
tight restrictions on how that
money can be spent.
Trump declared victory for his
priorities in a tweet late Wednesday: “Got $1.6 Billion to start Wall
on Southern Border, rest will be
forthcoming. Most importantly,
got $700 Billion to rebuild our
Military, $716 Billion next
year...most ever. Had to waste
money on Dem giveaways in order
to take care of military pay increase and new equipment.”
The spending bill faces opposition from many conservative Republicans, but they are unlikely to
be able to derail the legislation
given its likely support among
Democrats and more moderate
Republicans.
Rep. Mark Meadows (R-N.C.),
chairman of the House Freedom
Caucus and a Trump ally, was described by a White House official
as one of the key influencers of the
president’s position.
Meadows slammed the proposal during a Wednesday panel discussion on Capitol Hill, saying
that “wins for conservatives will
be few and far between.”
“Are we going to continue to
fund sanctuary cities? Are we going to continue to fund Planned
Parenthood? Are we going to continue to raise the debt to levels that
quite frankly are unsustainable
and bankrupt our country?” he
said. “There is really no wall funding. People will try to spin it as
there is wall funding, but the
[$1.6 billion] has been in there for
some time.”
One late-breaking deal involved gun laws. Democrats
agreed to add bipartisan legisla-
tion to improve the National Instant Criminal Background Check
System (NICS) for gun buyers,
while Republicans agreed to add
language making clear that federal funds can be spent on research
into gun violence — clarifying a
long-standing restriction that has
been interpreted as preventing
such research.
The package also includes a fix
for a provision in the new tax law
that favored farmer-owned cooperatives over traditional agriculture corporations, threatening
the viability of some corporations
by shifting sales to cooperatives.
In exchange for agreeing to the fix
sought by Republicans and farm
groups, Democrats won an increase in a low-income housing
tax credit.
Omitted was a health-care
measure sought by GOP Sens. Susan Collins (Maine) and Lamar
Alexander (Tenn.), which would
have allowed states to establish
high-risk pools to help cover costly
insurance claims while restoring
certain payments to insurers under the Affordable Care Act.
Trump, who ended the “cost-sharing reduction” payments in the
fall, supported the Collins-Alexander language. But Democrats opposed it because they claimed it
included language expanding the
These roadblocks could be built by Republicans
Senate Democrats
have created a
logjam for
PAUL KANE
President Trump’s
executive-branch
nominees. But now it’s fellow
Republicans who are causing
headaches for some of his major
Cabinet selections.
With the absence of Sen. John
McCain (R-Ariz.) as he battles
brain cancer, Senate Majority
Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.)
begins each confirmation fight
knowing that there are, at most,
50 Republican votes he can count
on. And already his home-state
colleague, Sen. Rand Paul, has
jumped out quickly to announce
his opposition to Mike Pompeo as
secretary of state and Gina
Haspel as CIA director to fill
Pompeo’s slot.
The other 49 Republican votes
aren’t guaranteed, either.
“I have a lot of questions, on
both,” Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.)
said Tuesday after his courtesy
meeting with Pompeo. He
declined to state what those were
but added that he is not yet
supportive of either nominee. “I
raised a couple of issues that I
want answers on first,” Flake
@PKCapitol
said.
Haspel, in particular, has a
bigger hurdle to clear, because
most senators know very little
about her. “I know nothing about
the CIA nominee, couldn’t pick
her out of a lineup, okay?” Sen.
Bob Corker (R-Tenn.) said
Tuesday. “Never met her. I have
no input there.”
This is a potential new
development in the TrumpSenate relationship. A few
nominees were withdrawn
because of scandal, but none have
actually reached the full Senate
for a vote and lost. Education
Secretary Betsy DeVos came
close, needing Vice President
Pence to cast a tiebreaking vote
after two Republicans defected
and left the roll call at 50 to 50.
Recently, Republicans and
White House officials have
focused their ire on Democrats
and the delay tactics they used to
stall the confirmation process,
even on nominees who eventually
received more than 80 votes.
Democrats have often forced
McConnell to burn up every hour
allowed for debate, stretching
debate on some sub-Cabinet
posts across several days and
leaving little time to do much
else.
This has created essentially a
two-tier system of nominees,
according to a senior GOP
senator familiar with the views of
leadership and White House
officials. Trump’s advisers select
those nominees who are deemed
the most important, and
McConnell devotes the
cumbersome time to get them
confirmed — letting others
languish in confirmation
purgatory.
But with this next round of
high-level confirmations, it’s not
just Democrats who are the
problem. Wavering Republicans
who might leave them short of a
majority from within the GOP
give Democrats the power to
torpedo the nominee.
Take the Haspel nomination.
Democrats have raised questions
about her role in CIA
interrogation techniques used on
suspected terrorists last decade.
Paul, an ideological libertarian on
national security, opposes her
based on her connections to
interrogation practices that he
likened to torture.
And if McCain were to return
to the Senate by the time of her
confirmation, he is not a sure yes
vote. The former prisoner of war
in Vietnam issued a statement
expressing concern about her
interrogation role.
If all 49 senators who caucus
with the Democrats vote in a bloc
against Haspel, without Paul and
McCain she would be short of the
50 votes needed for confirmation.
Democrats have voted for plenty
of Trump’s Cabinet-level picks —
but they have yet to provide the
margin of victory with fewer than
50 Republicans backing a
selection.
Some Republicans worry that
the entire nomination process,
beyond just these two Cabinetlevel posts, would get even more
partisan if Trump’s continued
public attacks on special counsel
Robert S. Mueller III’s
investigation into the 2016
presidential election escalated to
an effort to force the Justice
Department to fire Mueller.
Republicans sent veiled
warnings to Trump to steer clear
of meddling with the
investigation and to allow Deputy
Attorney General Rod J.
Rosenstein to continue
House approves ‘right to try’ experimental drugs
BY
E LISE V IEBECK
The House approved “right-totry” legislation on Wednesday
that would bypass drug regulators and give critically ill patients
access to experimental treatments, a victory for Republicans
after the same bill got sidetracked
last week.
Debate over the bill, which
passed the House 267 to 149,
pitted Republican lawmakers,
President Trump and Vice President Pence against Democrats,
patient groups and four former
commissioners of the Food and
Drug Administration.
Supporters described the
measure as a compassionate effort to provide access to treatments that could extend the lives
of the terminally ill. Opponents
argued the bill would allow bad
actors to exploit vulnerable patients using treatments with
largely unknown effectiveness
and side effects.
“It sounds condescending to
me, saying, ‘I won’t support this
because it gives false hope that
people might be taken advantage
of’ . . . It’s not false hope. It is
hope,” a key proponent of the bill,
Rep. Andy Biggs (R-Ariz.), said
during the floor debate.
Rep. Jan Schakowsky (D-Ill.),
speaking for the bill’s critics, said
it would skirt the FDA to create a
“dangerous back door for modern-day snake oil salesmen.”
“This bill strips away important safeguards in the name of
helping patients,” she said.
The legislation failed March 13
after Republicans brought it to
the floor under suspension of the
rules, an approach typically reserved for noncontroversial bills
that requires two-thirds support
for passage. The vote was 259 to
140, prompting the Wall Street
Journal’s GOP-friendly editorial
board to blame Republicans for
“political malpractice.”
Wednesday’s vote required
only a simple majority for passage. The bill now needs approval
from the Senate, which passed its
own “right-to-try” legislation over
the summer by unanimous consent. Thirty-eight states have approved similar measures, according to a national “right-to-try”
advocacy group.
A national bill seemed destined
to pass under the Trump administration. Pence enacted one such
measure in 2015 as governor of
Indiana and held a White House
meeting with patients and families during his first month as vice
president, vowing he would help
“get this done” on the federal
level.
Trump also voiced his support
— during his State of the Union
address and earlier this week, as
he remarked on the opioid crisis
during a visit to New Hampshire.
“A patient is terminal. There’s
good progress made with a certain drug. We’re going to make it
possible for that patient to get
that drug, and maybe it’s going to
work,” he said.
Still, the effort has run into
criticism from FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, a Trump nominee, who told House lawmakers
in the fall that while he would
implement the legislation if it
existing prohibition on federal
funding for abortions.
While a Democratic push to win
provisions protecting special
counsel Robert S. Mueller III did
not succeed, the bill does include
hundreds of millions of dollars to
combat potential interference
from Russia or others in the November midterm elections. The
federal Election Assistance Commission will receive $380 million
to dole out to states to improve
their election-related cybersecurity. And the FBI is set to receive
$300 million in counterintelligence funding to combat Russian
hacking.
Trump succeeded in partially
blocking efforts to direct
$900 million in planned seed
funding to the Gateway project,
which has been a key priority for
lawmakers of both parties, including Schumer and House Appropriations Committee Chairman Rodney Frelinghuysen (R-N.J.).
Still, a Democratic aide said the
project could still benefit from
hundreds of millions of dollars in
Transportation Department funding, though in some cases it would
have to compete with other projects.
In the final wall compromise,
strings are attached to the $1.6 billion that will be available for phys-
ical barriers along the Mexican
border. Most of the funding, officials said, can be used only for
repairs or for “secondary” barriers
along border stretches where
there is already a wall. The rest can
be used for 33 miles of new barriers, but there are restrictions on
the type: Only levees or existing
“bollard” fencing can be built,
rather than the concrete prototypes Trump appears to favor.
The bill also rejects a Trump
administration request for more
immigration enforcement officers
and an increase in funding for
detention facilities.
Language in the bill, two officials said, holds the level of enforcement agents flat and does not
allow the administration to add
detention beds. However, a Republican official said the administration could still move money
between accounts to fund more
enforcement.
An effort to trade a much larger
amount of border-wall money for
protections for certain young immigrants fell apart Tuesday.
Trump continued to push for a
last-minute deal as recently as
Monday, but Democrats resisted
the terms of the White House offer.
The legislation also incorporates the Taylor Force Act, named
after an American who was killed
by a Palestinian in 2016. The measure curtails certain economic assistance to the Palestinian Authority until it stops financially supporting convicted terrorists and
their families.
A House vote on the spending
bill had been tentatively expected
Thursday, but by Wednesday
night that looked as though it
could slip into Friday morning.
That would leave scant margin for
error in the Senate, where unanimous consent from all members
would be needed to waive procedural rules and set up votes
before the Friday midnight deadline.
That means any one senator
could delay the proceedings and
force a brief shutdown, much as
Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) did in February, when he held up consideration of a previous budget bill.
Paul said Wednesday that he had
not decided how he would handle
the new bill, telling reporters that
he would wait to read it first. But he
made clear that he was unlikely to
be pleased by its contents.
mike.debonis@washpost.com
erica.werner@washpost.com
Robert Costa, Ed O’Keefe, Josh
Dawsey and Seung Min Kim
contributed to this report.
overseeing it.
“The deputy attorney general
has already said, in response to a
question from me at a public
hearing, that he would not carry
out what he viewed to be an
unlawful order,” said Sen. Susan
Collins (R-Maine).
Even if there is no Mueller
fallout, Haspel faces a narrow
path to confirmation.
Democrats want to know
precisely what her role was in the
destruction of nearly 100
videotapes of the interrogations
of a captured al-Qaeda leader in
2002. If the answers are not to
their liking, it could spell her
doom.
“What role did the prospective
CIA director play in the
destruction of evidence and what
role did she play in enhanced
interrogation?” asked Sen.
Richard J. Durbin (D-Ill.). “That’s
a critical question.”
Republicans have a certain
amount of leverage if they want
to use it to extract some
concession from the
administration on other issues in
exchange for supporting Haspel.
Pompeo probably has an easier
road to confirmation, having
spent six years as a member of
the House, some with Flake and a
few other senators who first
served there. He received 66
votes, including 15 from members
of the Democratic caucus, in his
January 2017 CIA confirmation.
“My sense is there’s
Democratic support,” said Corker,
chairman of the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee.
Of the 10 Democrats now on
that committee, just two voted to
confirm Pompeo as CIA director.
There is a chance that the
committee could give a negative
recommendation to Pompeo, in
an 11 to 10 vote, after the
confirmation hearing later this
spring, but it would still probably
advance to the full Senate.
Corker remains optimistic.
“My first meeting, I will say, could
not have gone any better,” he said
of Pompeo.
Still, McConnell may need to
do something he has yet to do in
any confirmation fight in the
Trump presidency: plead for
Democratic votes because of
insufficient GOP support.
Durbin is not sure how his
more moderate Democratic
colleagues will react. They would
have the power to put Pompeo
over the top — which could be
appealing for those Democrats
running for reelection in states
Trump won.
“I don’t know what to expect,”
Durbin said.
becomes law, he opposes a federal
version of “right-to-try.”
The FDA authorizes “99 percent” of the treatment applications it receives each year under
the “expanded access” program
for seriously ill patients, Gottlieb
told a House subcommittee on
Oct. 3. He said most of these
treatments permitted under
“compassionate use” are ineffective.
“The vast majority of people
who will use a drug through
expanded access are using a drug
that doesn’t work,” he said.
The debate on Capitol Hill has
provoked strong emotions on
both sides.
During Wednesday’s floor debate, one congressman said he
would do anything, “including
injecting monkey urine,” to spend
more time with his family if he
developed a terminal disease.
“I think many people are in
that same boat, and the American
people deserve a right to try,” said
Rep. Morgan H. Griffith (R-Va.).
“. . . I don’t understand why people are afraid of letting people try
who have no other hope, whose
life is going to be cut short without taking that Hail Mary pass.”
Rep. Frank Pallone Jr. (N.J.),
the ranking Democrat on the
Energy and Commerce Committee, voiced a concern Democrats
share with some public health
advocates in calling the measure
part of a wider effort to weaken
the FDA’s regulatory powers.
“Let’s be clear as to what this
legislation is: It’s an attempt to
undermine the authority of the
expert public health agencies
charged with reviewing drugs,” he
said. “I would urge my colleagues
to oppose this grab at FDA’s authority.”
paul.kane@washpost.com
elise.viebeck@washpost.com
Laurie McGinley contributed to this
report.
THURSDAY, MARCH 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A5
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Congress passes legislation targeting
websites that host prostitution ads
BY
BILL O'LEARY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Mark Green, administrator of the United States Agency for International
Development, testified before the House Foreign Affairs Committee.
Cuts reducing USAID budget by a third
criticized by both parties during hearing
BY
C AROL M ORELLO
Lawmakers from both parties
denounced the Trump administration’s proposal to cut foreign aid,
saying it would hurt U.S. efforts to
fight terrorism and health epidemics and make military deployments more likely.
The criticisms arose as Mark
Green, the administrator of the
United States Agency for International Development, testified
Wednesday before the House Foreign Affairs Committee about a
proposed 33 percent cut in his
budget, to $16.8 billion next year.
“You’re a great pick for the job,”
said Rep. Eliot L. Engel (N.Y.), the
top Democrat on the committee.
“But with a 33 percent cut to the
budget, no one could do the job
effectively.”
Chairman Edward R. Royce (RCalif.) said the budget would
“hamstring” USAID efforts at a
time when 70 million people
worldwide have been uprooted by
conflicts and famine.
“Indeed, these proposed cuts
would impact a number of U.S.
priorities — including efforts to
combat terrorists, poachers and
human traffickers,” he said.
“These efforts shouldn’t be
shorted,” he added.
As it did last year, the Trump
administration is encountering bipartisan resistance to steep reductions for diplomacy and foreign
aid. It has proposed cutting the
State Department’s budget from
$53 billion in 2017 to $39 billion
next year. Similar cuts were on the
table last year, but lawmakers have
so far succeeded in keeping funding close to what it was through a
budget deal made in February.
Adding to the turmoil, President Trump fired Secretary of
State Rex Tillerson last week and
nominated CIA Director Mike
Pompeo to succeed him. It will fall
to Pompeo, if he is confirmed in
hearings expected in April, to balance the cuts demanded by the
White House with congressional
support for many diplomatic and
development initiatives.
Green’s hearing suggested that
lawmakers will again push back, as
most of the members appeared to
want Green to do more, not less.
“The arguments we can’t afford
it don’t fly with me,” said Engel,
noting USAID’s budget amounts to
half of 1 percent of the total federal
budget. “Especially after the president signed a tax bill that blows a
trillion-and-a-half-dollar hole in
the budget.”
Green, a former Republican
congressman from Wisconsin, is
popular among members of Con-
gress, in part because he has regularly briefed them and has been
more accessible than Tillerson.
Even the harshest critics of
Trump’s budget proposal expressed admiration for Green as he
struggled to put a good face on
what he could do with a third of his
funding gone.
“I readily admit this budget
does not allow us to do everything
we might want to do in a perfect
world, and it does not allow us to
take on every opportunity we
might see,” he said. “The president
is attempting to balance what he
sees is needed for the security of
our citizens, advancing American
leadership and our commitment
to efficiency and effectiveness.”
Several members favorably contrasted Green’s approach with
Trump’s.
Rep. Ted Deutch (D -Fla.), for
example, asked him what USAID
could do to counter Russia’s influence in other countries.
Green cited the promotion of
democracy in Ukraine as a model
for Eastern Europe. He said supporting independent journalists
would help counter the Kremlin’s
disinformation campaigns and
that helping countries achieve energy independence makes them
less reliant on Moscow.
carol.morello@washpost.com
T OM J ACKMAN
The Senate on Wednesday
passed a bill, already approved by
the House, that would enable
prosecutors to pursue websites that host advertisements for
prostitution. The bill, awaiting
President Trump’s signature, was
hailed by anti-sex-trafficking
groups and law enforcement as
an important step in fighting
online prostitution of teenagers.
Senators passed the bill, 97 to
2, without amendments, meaning it can be immediately signed
into law by the president. White
House press secretary Sarah
Huckabee Sanders said in a statement that Trump applauded the
passage of the bill, said it was “an
important step forward” and that
the president looked forward to
putting “an end to this scourge,”
but she did not explicitly say he
would sign the bill. Sens. Ron
Wyden (D-Ore.) and Rand Paul
(R-Ky.) were the only “no” votes.
The bill would amend the Communications Decency Act, which
websites such as Backpage.com
have invoked as immunity from
criminal and civil actions when
victims of online sex trafficking
have tried to stop them from
hosting ads for male and female
sex workers, some of whom are
teenagers. The act was passed in
1996, as the Internet was just
evolving.
The 1996 measure protects
website operators from content
posted by third parties, so long as
the operators have no involvement in the content, and it is
credited with enabling the Internet to flourish without excessive
regulation or legal liability for
small start-ups. When young
women who had been prostituted
on Backpage tried to sue the
website, federal appeals courts in
Chicago and Boston specifically
cited the Communications Decency Act’s Section 230 as precluding the women from holding
the websites liable.
Those rulings spurred the
move to amend the law. In Chicago, a 16-year-old girl was slain by
a customer who had found her on
Backpage in 2016. In Washington
state, a 15-year-old girl was trafficked on Backpage for more than
three months before she was res-
cued. The mothers of both girls
gave emotional testimony to Congress in support of amending
Section 230.
“It is a good day for America,”
said Nacole S., the mother of the
Washington girl, whose last name
is being withheld to protect the
girl’s identity. “The narrow focus
of this bill corrects Section 230
and keeps with the original intent
of Internet freedom and holds
bad actors accountable for trafficking our children.”
Linda Smith, founder of
Shared Hope International, an
anti-sex-trafficking group, said
she began providing research to
Congress in 2007 about online sex
trafficking but that the information wasn’t taken seriously. “People are recognizing that these
children are victims of crime and
deserve justice,” Smith said.
“That vote is, I think, historic.”
A Senate subcommittee investigated Backpage and found that
it was involved in editing prostitution ads on its site to remove
references to underage girls,
while allowing the ads to stay on
the site. A Washington Post investigation last year revealed that
Backpage representatives actively solicited ads from prostitutes
who advertised on other sites and
created ads for them on Backpage. Legislation then launched
in the House and Senate to
amend Section 230, specifying
that it did not indemnify websites
from facilitating sex trafficking.
A hybrid version of those bills
emerged from the House, under a
law proposed Rep. Ann Wagner
(R-Mo.) known as Allow States
and Victims to Fight Online Sex
Trafficking Act of 2017, or FOSTA,
and passed last month. Sen. Rob
Portman (R-Ohio) championed a
similar bill in the Senate.
Large tech companies such as
Google and Facebook initially declared their opposition to the
bills, saying they would create
massive liability for content they
simply couldn’t monitor. But law
enforcement and anti-humantrafficking groups waged an
effective campaign in support
of the bills, and Facebook
chief operating officer Sheryl
Sandberg announced her support for the bill, as did other large
tech companies.
“This is legislation that is overdue, in my view,” Portman said on
the floor Wednesday. “And it’s
required. The courts have told us
that. The district attorneys have
told us that. The attorneys general told us that. . . . They welcomed
us to pass this legislation to give
these families the justice they
deserve and to give our prosecutors the ability to go after them.”
The key section of FOSTA clarifies that Section 230 shall not
impair prosecution of anyone violating federal sex-trafficking laws
or limit civil lawsuits, and in the
sex-trafficking law defines “participation in a venture” as anyone
“knowingly assisting, supporting
or facilitating a violation” of the
law. “Now,” said Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.), “all the prosecutors in the country can go after
anyone who knowingly facilitates
sex trafficking online.”
The National Association of
Attorneys General has described
Backpage as a “hub” of human
trafficking, which involves children or adults who are forced or
coerced into prostitution. The
National Center for Missing and
Exploited Children said that
73 percent of the 10,000 child sex
trafficking reports it receives
from the public each year involve
ads on Backpage. Recently, Backpage’s ads have begun omitting
any copy with their offers of
adult services, instead showing
only photographs of the purported escorts.
Still, there was opposition to
the bill. Wyden, one of the original sponsors of Section 230 in
1996, said the Justice Department already could prosecute
Backpage for the violations revealed by the Senate investigation. He said the bill would be a
bonanza for trial lawyers, who
could sue websites for content
they weren’t aware of, and would
“dismantle the legal framework that’s given the United
States the position it holds as
a tech-economy superpower.”
Wyden said big tech companies ultimately supported the bill
because “it rolls up the ladder in
the tech world, leaving the established giants alone at the top” and
smaller companies susceptible to
punishing lawsuits.
tom.jackman@washpost.com
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A6
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
MARCH 22 , 2018
Trump has erected new barriers for foreign workers seeking jobs in U.S.
BY
T RACY J AN
President Trump has managed
to erect an “invisible wall” that
makes it increasingly difficult for
companies to hire skilled foreign
workers, according to a report from experts in immigration
law, despite the president’s call
for a merit-based immigration
system that prioritizes the admittance of people who are skilled
and want to work.
The hurdles in employmentbased immigration put in place
during Trump’s first year in office
have discouraged foreign workers from seeking jobs in the
United States and American companies from recruiting overseas.
The number of petitions for
“high-skilled” H-1B visas received
by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services has fallen for the
first time in five years, from
236,000 for the 2017 fiscal year to
199,000 for 2018, the report said.
The report by the American
Immigration Lawyers Association said businesses have been
“hit with unprecedented scrutiny
of nonimmigrant petitions for
skilled workers, managers, executives and others.”
It identified a slew of new
barriers for foreign workers, including a dramatic increase in
requests for additional evidence
and new interview requirements
in processing H-1B visa petitions;
the dismantling of Obama-era
rules to encourage immigrant
entrepreneurship; and proposals
to eliminate work authorization
for spouses of high-skilled
workers.
Immigration lawyers said the
policies are creating hardship for
businesses, which, given the low
unemployment rates, are spend-
ing substantial time and money
recruiting and hiring foreign
workers with the right skills.
“The heightened standards
and new interpretations that are
now being used by USCIS to
scrutinize and deny H-1B petitions are causing significant unpredictability for employers in
staffing important positions,”
said Marketa Lindt, a business
immigration attorney in Chicago
and a vice president of the
American Immigration Lawyers
Association.
The policies hew to Trump’s
“America First” rhetoric but contradict his stated desire, articulated during his State of the
Union address in January, to
move “toward a merit-based immigration system — one that
admits people who are skilled,
who want to work, who will
contribute to our society.”
The White House did not immediately respond to a request
for comment.
R. Carter Langston, a USCIS
spokesman, said his agency is
committed to reforming employment-based immigration programs to benefit Americans as
much as possible.
“USCIS is focused on ensuring
the integrity of the immigration
system through deliberative and
fair adjudications all while protecting the interest of U.S. workers,” Langston said.
The Trump administration last
year directed the Labor and Justice departments to step up their
monitoring of H-1B workers and
the program’s rules.
It also sought to end an
Obama-era program designed to
encourage foreign entrepreneurs
to start businesses in the United
States.
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services last March also
rescinded a 17-year-old guidance
that recognized computer programmers as qualifying for a
“specialty occupation” designation under the H-1B visa program. The agency also more
closely scrutinized the wages offered for H-1B positions to ensure
they correspond to the complexity of the position being filled.
As a result, the immigration
attorneys said, H-1B petitioners
were deluged with requests for
additional evidence across a variety of professional positions, including engineers, accountants,
lawyers and physicians. Through
the first eight months of 2017, the
agency issued 85,000 requests for
additional evidence, a 45 percent
increase from the same period in
2016, the report said.
“The added review and addi-
tional information gives the assurance we are approving petitions correctly,” Langston said.
He said the percentage of petitions that require additional evidence has remained around 20
percent for each of the last three
years, and the rate of approval
continues to be above 90 percent.
Immigration lawyers say they
expect the number of requests for
additional evidence to grow,
along with more denials of H-1B
applications and extensions, further disrupting U.S. business operations. In February, just weeks
before the opening for the 2019
H-1B lottery, U.S. Citizenship and
Immigration Services said it
would require more evidence for
all H-1B petitions involving thirdparty worksites, where the agency said significant employer violations are more likely to occur.
tracy.jan@washpost.com
Pentagon grapples with what’s next in Africa after ambush
Deadly attack in Niger
puts focus on how U.S.
counters Islamic State
BY
D AN L AMOTHE
The death of four U.S. soldiers
in a chaotic ambush in Niger
leaves the Pentagon grappling
with a thorny issue in Africa: How
should it counter the Islamic
State and other militant groups
without becoming ensnared in
conflicts on the continent?
The attack, launched Oct. 4,
also left five Nigerien soldiers
dead and prompted a two-day
search for one of the slain American soldiers.
The Pentagon is expected to
soon release the results of an
investigation that details what
went wrong and how soldiers
carrying out a routine patrol possibly ended up hunting members
of a new Islamic State offshoot, as
Nigerien officials have said.
“I have been reading the report
myself because I don’t want this
dragged out,” Defense Secretary
Jim Mattis said last Thursday,
adding he expected to see recommendations from the Pentagon’s
top officer, Marine Gen. Joseph
F. Dunford Jr.
Video released by the Islamic
State and originally captured on
the helmet camera of a U.S. soldier shows U.S. and Nigerien soldiers fighting in an open desertscape as armed militants
closed in.
The unit, which included elite
members of 3rd Special Forces
Group, did not have air support
for an hour after calling for help,
leaving it vulnerable as a larger
force of about 50 militants attacked with rifles and machine
guns.
The ambush underscores the
danger of dispersing small teams
across a vast continent where the
Pentagon does not have the same
level of support for its service
members as it does in a country
such as Iraq or Afghanistan.
Those war zones remain dangerous but, after years of U.S.
operations, have a more robust
network of fire support, aerial
surveillance, medical help and
quick-reaction rescue units when
a crisis erupts.
The attack also raises questions about what the Trump administration might do in Africa in
the future.
Senior defense officials, including Mattis, have long backed
having U.S. troops advise and
occasionally accompany local
forces on operations, calling it an
effort to prevent militant groups
from launching attacks on the
United States.
President Trump has questioned the wisdom of deploying
U.S. troops across the globe for
small counterterrorism missions
and has said little about the war
against terrorism on the continent.
STAFF SGT. JOSHUA DEWBERRY/435TH AIR EXPEDITIONARY WING
Mark E. Mitchell, a senior Pentagon official overseeing special
operations, said recently that
while the Niger operation
prompted scrutiny about the limited aircraft available to perform
intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance missions, it would
be hard to provide many more.
“Frankly, if we filled all the
needs for our combatant commanders, we would have to triple
or quadruple our force, and we
just don’t have the money to do
that,” Mitchell said, speaking in a
room of defense contractors and
Special Operations officers at a
conference near Washington.
“We don’t have the pilots, and it’s
just not going to happen.”
Across the continent on any
given day, about 6,500 U.S. troops
and 1,000 contractors are involved in U.S. military operations, Marine Gen. Thomas D.
Waldhauser, the chief of U.S. Africa Command, told the House
Armed Services Committee this
month. More than 4,000 of them
are based in East Africa in Djibouti, Somalia and Kenya.
In Somalia, the Pentagon
boosted the number of U.S. personnel last year from about 200 to
500 while carrying out airstrikes
against al-Shabab, a militant
group with ties to al-Qaeda. A
Navy SEAL became the first U.S.
service member killed in Somalia
in about 25 years last spring
during a raid on a militant compound.
Waldhauser, asked about operations in Somalia, told committee
members he would not say the
United States is at war there and
the mission is “specifically de-
GASTON DE CARDENAS/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
TOP: Airmen from the 724th Expeditionary Air Base Squadron
take down tents from the old base to move to a new site on Sept. 11.
ABOVE: Members of the 3rd Special Forces Group, 2nd battalion
salute the casket of U.S. Army Sgt. La David Johnson at his burial
in Memorial Gardens East cemetery Oct. 21, in Hollywood, Fla.
signed for us not to own that.”
Other U.S. troops are spread
out thousands of miles away, with
about 1,800 in West Africa — an
area nearly the size of the continental United States — in countries from Senegal to Nigeria. The
U.S. military trains, advises,
equips local forces and bolsters
counterterrorism efforts there in
ways that are not always transparent.
It also received approval from
Niger’s government late last year
to fly armed drones from Niamey,
the nation’s capital.
The Pentagon considered
15 African nations dangerous
enough for U.S. troops to qualify
for imminent danger pay of
$225 per month when the Niger
attacked occurred: Algeria, Burundi, Chad, Congo, Djibouti,
Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya,
Libya, Somalia, Sudan, South Sudan, Tunisia and Uganda.
It added Niger, Mali and the
northern regions of Cameroon to
the list this month.
The Trump administration acknowledged in a required report
to Congress on March 12 that U.S.
troops came under fire in Niger
again in December. The report,
posted online by the New York
Times, said U.S. troops reacted in
self-defense. No U.S. troops were
injured in the firefight.
The Niger attack marked the
largest number of deaths for the
U.S. military in a single Africa
operation since the Battle of Mogadishu in Somalia in October 1993. That mission prompted
significant changes, including
the withdrawal of U.S. forces
from Somalia within months by
President Bill Clinton and the
resignation of Defense Secretary
Les Aspin.
Army Gen. Carter Ham, who
was commander of U.S. Africa
Command from March 2011 to
June 2013, said the decisions in
the aftermath of the Battle of
Mogadishu “were understandable” at the time, but Somalia’s
security situation might be better
now if the changes had been
made gradually.
It is important, he said, to have
an ongoing assessment of whether a mission still makes sense.
“Sometimes, the knee-jerk reaction when something bad happens of, ‘Get them out of there,’
that’s not a particularly good response,” Ham said. “It may have
some longer-term consequences
if there is an abrupt withdrawal
from a particular area because
something tragic has happened.
This is where a bit of time and
distance can be helpful in the
evaluation of that.”
The small nature of the mission in Africa stems in part from a
desire among many African officials not to have a large U.S.
military presence in their countries. It also is based on assessments done at the Pentagon,
which typically prioritizes larger
combat operations elsewhere.
Waldhauser told the Armed
Services panel the vast size of
Africa challenges the U.S. mili-
tary when it comes to providing
quick-reaction rescue forces and
medical evacuation.
Still, he said, “the bottom line
is that we know we have adequate
resources to do what we are
supposed to do, and we have to
work within those right and left
limits.”
That continues a theme that
has existed almost universally
since Africom was established in
2007 to provide better oversight
of operations on the continent.
Since then, commanders have often asked for additional assistance to bolster security and
training efforts there, but often
have been overruled at the Pentagon in light of competing priorities in other regions.
“I always felt that there was a
careful calculation of the application of resources. Did I get what I
wanted? No. Did I get what I felt
was required. No,” said Ham, now
the president of the nonprofit
Association of the U.S. Army. “Did
I feel that my resource requirements were adequately and thoroughly considered in balance
with the global requirements?
The answer to that would be yes. I
never felt like I was denied the
opportunity to make the case.”
Under
President
Barack
Obama, the White House often
pressed the Pentagon to find
more surveillance flights for operations in Africa, said Brian
McKeon, who served as both a
Pentagon and White House official in the Obama administration.
The expectation in the latter
years of the Obama administration was that a withdrawal of U.S.
troops from Afghanistan would
free up some surveillance aircraft, he said, but it did not work
out that way.
“The assessment gets to a point
where it’s much more dangerous
to be out and about with the
host-nation forces, and they don’t
have the assets to provide sufficient backup and personnel recovery,” McKeon said. “Obviously,
that’s probably going to lead to a
decision where there is fewer
patrols out and about.”
The operation in Niger served
as a reminder to American citizens that U.S. troops are deployed
on their behalf in places they do
not necessarily realize, said retired Air Force Col. Erik Goepner,
a visiting research fellow at the
libertarian Cato Institute.
Those operations sometimes
create enemies, especially when
the United States kills civilians,
he said.
“I think American citizens
should rightfully ask, ‘How do we
define this mission set?’ ” he said
of Niger. “Is it building up indigenous forces, and is that the
extent of it? If so, great. Or, are we
doing kill-capture missions? Because if we’re doing kill-capture
missions, the horror of war is that
you’ll always kill the wrong guy in
some numbers.”
“That is just by definition of
what happens when you are using
military force against people.”
dan.lamothe@washpost.com
N. Korea urges critics to exercise ‘prudence’ ahead of talks with U.S., Seoul
BY
A NNA F IFIELD
North Korea has warned detractors to exercise “prudence”
ahead of planned summits with
the South Korean and American
presidents, noting there is a “dramatic atmosphere for reconciliation” between the two Koreas as
well as a “sign of change” in the
relationship between Pyongyang
and Washington.
The North’s official Korean
Central News Agency did not directly mention the summit between Kim Jong Un and President
Trump scheduled for May, but this
was still the first time it had even
obliquely acknowledged that
plans for the meeting are underway.
“We do like to remind that it is
time for all to approach everything with prudence, with selfcontrol and patience,” KCNA said
in a commentary published
Wednesday.
In a surprising turn of events
linked to the 2018 Winter Olympics, held in South Korea in February, North Korea invited South
Korean President Moon Jae-in to a
summit with Kim, planned for late
next month in the demilitarized
zone that divides the Korean Peninsula.
Then, through a South Korean
envoy, Kim invited Trump to talks.
South Korea has said denuclearization will be on the agenda, but
there has been no word from the
Kim regime that it is willing to
discuss giving up its prized nuclear weapons program.
No location has been decided
for the May talks.
There is considerable skepticism about both sets of talks, with
some analysts and conservative
politicians noting North Korea
has reneged on every deal it has
signed.
The lack of North Korean confirmation that Kim was willing to
talk about denuclearization has
only exacerbated those doubts.
However, supporters of diplomacy say even the prospect of
talks is a welcome change from the
saber-rattling of 2017, when North
Korea tested several missiles and a
nuclear bomb, and the Trump administration warned repeatedly
of military options for making
North Korea stop.
“Dishonest forces” in the United States, Japan and South Korea
are now “peddling groundless stories” about North Korea, the
KCNA commentary said.
“Thanks to the proactive measure and peace-loving proposal
made by the DPRK,” it said, using
the abbreviation for North Korea’s
official name, “a dramatic atmosphere for reconciliation has been
created in relations between the
north and the south of Korea and
there has been a sign of change
also in the DPRK-U. S. relations.”
The commentary lashed out at
“incumbent and former officials
and experts of the U.S.” who have
said that North Korea performed a
U-turn without Washington having to make any concessions, and
those who have said its willingness to talk is because Americanled sanctions are crippling the
North Korean economy.
“Such rubbish as ‘result of sanctions and pressure’ . . . spread by
the hostile forces is just as meaningless as a dog barking at the
moon,” the commentary said.
It said North Korea’s economy
is growing and Pyongyang’s willingness to talk is a sign of its
strength, not its desperation.
“It is really an expression of
small-mindedness for the riff-raffs
to spoil the atmosphere and say
this or that even before the parties
concerned are given a chance to
study the inner thoughts of the
other side and are seated at a
negotiating table,” KCNA said.
anna.fifield@washpost.com
THURSDAY, MARCH 22 , 2018
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
MARCH 22 , 2018
Cornered by police, bombing suspect sets off a final blast
BOMBS FROM A1
18 miles north of the Texas
capital.
Officers closed in, and Conditt
detonated a bomb. The bloody
confrontation brought an end to
three weeks of terror in which
investigators believe Conditt
planted at least six bombs at
homes or in the FedEx delivery
system. The devices killed two
people and wounded several others, and officials warned he could
have left more bombs elsewhere
that have yet to be found.
“This is the culmination of
three very long weeks for our
community,” said Austin interim
police chief Brian Manley, adding, “We don’t know where this
suspect has spent his last 24
hours, and therefore, we still
need to remain vigilant to ensure
that no other packages or devices
have been left through the community.”
Officials said late Wednesday
that Conditt’s motive seemed to
be frustration with his life.
Conditt made a 25-minute video recording on his cellphone
describing how he built seven
explosive devices, Manley said.
He said the video, which was
made between 9 and 11 p.m.
Tuesday, seemed to be created
because Conditt “felt like we
were getting very close to him.”
“He does not at all mention
anything about terrorism, nor
does he mention anything about
hate, but instead it is the outcry
of a very challenged young man
talking about challenges in his
personal life that led him to this
point,” he said, adding, “there
was no reason given for why he
selected” the victims.
On Wednesday, FBI officials
searched Conditt’s home for
clues about the attacks as they
advised Austin residents to remain wary. They took two of his
roommates into custody for
questioning — although they released one and said neither was
under arrest. A neighbor of a
home owned by the Conditt family said an officer with a megaphone had yelled that the FBI
was there with a search warrant,
and a young man came out of the
house and was immediately
handcuffed and led to an unmarked SUV.
Conditt attended Austin Community College between 2010
and 2012 but did not graduate,
according to the school. Mark
Roessler, 57, a neighbor, described Conditt as “quiet, introverted, polite and clean-cut,”
adding that he never had a lot of
visitors, loud parties or other
social events.
He said he last saw Conditt
about a week ago, when they
both arrived home at the same
time. “We didn’t make eye contact,” Roessler said. “In retrospect, he was certainly in the
midst of all of this.”
Eddie Harp, who has been
friends with the Conditt family
for 15 years, read a statement to
the media outside the Conditts’
home, saying: “I have a simple
and heartfelt statement from the
family. This will be their only
statement. The family is grieved
not only for their loss but also for
the loss of those affected by these
heinous actions. The family’s
present focus is on dealing with
their shock and loss and cooperating with the police investigation. If you are a praying person,
PHOTOS BY CAROLYN VAN HOUTEN/THE WASHINGTON POST
“We don’t know where
this suspect has spent
his last 24 hours, and
therefore, we still need
to remain vigilant to
ensure that no other
packages or devices
have been left through
the community.”
Brian Manley,
Austin’s interim police chief
TOP: Eddie Harp, who has been friends with the family of Mark Anthony Conditt for 15 years,
speaks to reporters in Pflugerville, Tex., on Wednesday. “The family is grieved not only for their
loss but also for the loss of those affected by these heinous actions,” he said.
ABOVE: Travis County SWAT officers walk near Conditt’s home in Pflugerville on Wednesday.
Authorities traced a purchase of a sign used with one of the bombs in Austin to a Home Depot in
Pflugerville. Conditt recorded a video late Tuesday when he felt police were closing in on him.
please join us in praying for the
families of all who have lost
loved ones.”
Agents have found components that match materials used
in the bombs inside Conditt’s
house but not completed bombs,
officials said.
ATF has been able to reconstruct all the bombs they say
Conditt made. “We know it’s the
same person who manufactured
all of these,” ATF Deputy Assistant Director Fred Milanowski
said.
Conditt had been an enigma to
law enforcement. After the first
explosion killed 39-year-old Anthony House on March 2, police
were reluctant to even call the
episode a homicide and said they
believed the incident was isolated.
“We can’t rule out that Mr.
House didn’t construct this himself and accidentally detonate it,
in which case it would be an
accidental death,” Assistant
Chief Joe Chacon said in the days
after the incident.
Investigators at first explored
a theory in which House was the
unintended recipient of a bomb
meant for a drug-dealing neighbor. Austin police had recently
raided a home nearby and seized
marijuana and hundreds of
thousands of dollars, according
to an attorney for the man who
lived there.
The attorney, Mark McCrimmon, said investigators asked his
client, whom he declined to identify, to come in for an interview
on the day the bomb went off.
They seemed convinced that the
bomb was meant for his client,
and tried to play “good cop, bad
cop,” McCrimmon said, asking
him, “Who’s trying to kill you?”
and warning him that his roommate might be in danger.
“They used the C-word, ‘cartel,’
and we kept saying, it’s not a
cartel, it’s not a cartel, it’s not a
cartel,” McCrimmon said. “It’s
just pot, and it’s the cost of doing
business sometimes.”
He added: “They’re scrambling, and they come across a
pretty good lead. I don’t blame
them for giving us the brightlight treatment.”
When two more bombs went
off 10 days later, investigators
rapidly shifted gears. More than
350 law enforcement personnel
— including FBI behavioral analysts and ATF forensic scientists
— soon descended on Austin.
They explored family ties between House and the second
victim, 17-year-old Draylen Mason, and whether the episodes
might have been racially motivated. House’s stepfather and
Mason’s grandfather were close
friends and both prominent
members of Austin’s African
American community. They
wondered whether that made
them targets.
Investigators also explored
whether the third bomb, which
injured a 75-year-old Hispanic
woman, might have been meant
for someone else, interviewing a
woman who lived on the block
with the last name Mason,
though she was no relation to
Draylen.
“The federal government
brought the full resources of
federal law enforcement here to
solve this and to stop the injuring and the killing that was
occurring,” FBI Special Agent in
Charge Christopher Combs said
Wednesday.
The bombs, though, continued. A device activated with a
tripwire injured two people in
Austin, and investigators then
discovered two packages that
had been sent through FedEx.
One of the packages exploded at
a FedEx facility in Schertz, Tex.,
while the other was recovered
from a different facility in Austin.
The company turned over that
package and extensive information, including surveillance footage, to law enforcement, which
would prove to be critical.
“That proved to be the case,”
Austin Mayor Steve Adler (D)
said early Wednesday.
Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R)
said officials tied Conditt to the
explosions first by his cellphone
— which they detected was at the
bombing sites. He said investigators then determined that Conditt’s red SUV had been at “various locations that tied him, possibly, to those crimes.”
The FedEx surveillance footage, from a south Austin store,
showed Conditt wearing a wig
and gloves, and officers soon
obtained a receipt for the disguise, Abbott said. He said they
also determined that Conditt
purchased signs, like the one
used to anchor the tripwire that
triggered an explosion, at a
Home Depot in Pflugerville.
Manley, the interim Austin
police chief, said investigators
became “very interested” in Conditt “over the past couple of
days.”
Federal prosecutors already
had charged Conditt with one
count of unlawful possession and
transfer of a destructive device
by the time officers spotted him
in his SUV.
Police said officers surrounded the hotel to take him into
custody, and he started to drive
away. Officers decided to stop
him, forcing his car onto the
shoulder of a frontage road on
Interstate 35, officials said.
As a SWAT officer banged on a
window of the SUV, Conditt detonated a bomb inside his car,
injuring the officer. At that point,
another officer fired at the suspect, police said. They found
Conditt dead inside the vehicle
with severe injuries from the
bomb, officials said.
Frank de la Fuente, who was
staying at a Red Roof Inn on
Highway 35, said he heard an
explosion at about 3:30 a.m.
followed by two gunshots.
Jeremy Lowe, who was also
staying at the Red Roof Inn, said
that “they shut down the highway and told everybody to not go
anywhere.”
While investigators continued
to explore whether someone
might have worked with Conditt
— or whether he left the potential for more destruction behind
— some said his death brought
some reassurance.
“I’m relieved for the people of
this state and the city of Austin to
know that the person who was
the author of this horrific destruction and harmed lives no
longer poses a danger,” Abbott
said.
President Trump wrote on
Twitter: “AUSTIN BOMBING
SUSPECT IS DEAD. Great job by
law enforcement and all concerned!”
devlin.barrett@washpost.com
matt.zapotosky@washpost.com
mark.berman@washpost.com
kristine.phillips@washpost.com
Barrett, Zapotosky and Berman
reported from Washington, and
Phillips reported from Pflugerville.
AIDS researcher with once-controversial views is chosen to lead CDC
BY
L ENA H . S UN
A leading AIDS researcher,
who is well-respected for his
clinical work but has no experience running a governmental
public-health
agency,
was
named Wednesday to head the
Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention.
Health and Human Services
Secretary Alex Azar said in a
statement that Robert Redfield,
a 66-year-old virologist and physician, has “dedicated his entire
life to promoting public health
and providing compassionate
care to his patients.”
Azar said Redfield’s scientific
and clinical background is “peerless” and noted that during his
two-decade tenure at the Walter
Reed Army Institute of Research, he made “pioneering
contributions to advance our
understanding of HIV/AIDS.”
The secretary also praised Redfield’s more recent work running
a treatment network in Baltimore for HIV and hepatitis C
patients, which Azar said prepares him “to hit the ground
running on one of HHS and
CDC’s top priorities, combating
the opioid epidemic.”
The statement did not address
Redfield’s
once-controversial
positions on HIV testing during
the first decade of the AIDS
crisis — which a top Senate
Democrat cited Monday in asking the White House to rethink
its choice.
The decision had been expected since Redfield emerged late
last week as the front-runner to
become CDC director, a job for
which he also was considered
when George W. Bush was president. The position does not require Senate confirmation, and
Redfield, a professor of medicine
at the University of Maryland
School of Medicine and a former
Army researcher, is expected to
be sworn in and take up his job
in only a few days.
Redfield’s main focus during
his career has been chronic human infections, especially HIV/
AIDS. He heads clinical care and
research at the medical school’s
Institute of Human Virology,
which he founded with Robert
Gallo, who co-discovered HIV as
the cause of AIDS.
He also oversees a program
providing care to more than
6,000 patients in the BaltimoreWashington region, and more
than 1.3 million patients in Africa and the Caribbean as part of
the President’s Emergency Plan
for AIDS Relief, known as PEPFAR. He served on Bush’s Presidential Advisory Council on
HIV/AIDS from 2005 to 2009
and on advisory councils at the
National Institutes of Health in
earlier years.
Maryland Democrats praised
Redfield’s selection. Rep. Elijah
E. Cummings called him a “deeply experienced and compassionate public health physician.” And
former Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, who sits on the
virology institute’s advisory
board, said, “It’s terrific to have
someone who has been such a
caring doctor, who has really
treated patients and knows what
they’re going through.”
Redfield, who has five children and nine grandchildren,
has seen the devastating impact
of the opioid epidemic from
close experience, according to
Townsend. “He knows how difficult it is to get treatment, how
hard it is to find a halfway
house,” she said.
But the policies he supported
decades ago have raised deep
concern among some AIDS advocates because they were
not considered sound public
health approaches to the epidemic. The critics believe they
also stigmatized those who were
infected and feared being fired
— and losing their health insurance.
During the 1980s, as the chief
Army AIDS researcher, Redfield
was a strong supporter of mandatory HIV screening for the
military before effective treatments were available. In 1991, he
was closely linked to a controversial and unsuccessful effort
in Congress to require HIV testing of health-care professionals
who perform invasive procedures, after a woman contracted the virus from her dentist.
In the early 1990s, while at the
Walter Reed Army Institute of
Research, he was accused of
misrepresenting data about the
effectiveness of an experimental
AIDS vaccine. The vaccine ultimately failed. An investigation
cleared him of scientific misconduct charges.
Sen. Patty Murray (Wash.), the
ranking Democrat on the Senate
Health, Education, Labor and
Pensions Committee, focused on
Redfield’s “lack of public health
credentials and his history of
controversial positions regarding the prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDs” in her letter to the White House. His
pattern of “ethically and morally
questionable behavior leads me
to seriously question whether
Dr. Redfield is qualified to be the
federal government’s chief advocate and spokesperson for public
health,” Murray wrote.
During the same period in the
1990s, Army investigators also
criticized Redfield’s close rela-
tionship with a conservative
AIDS organization that strongly
supported the vaccine and had
received scientific information
about it “to a degree that is
inappropriate,” according to a
1993 Science article based on an
extensive Army report.
The organization, Americans
for a Sound AIDS/HIV Policy, was
founded by Shepherd and Anita
Smith, a politically connected
Virginia couple who supported
abstinence-based AIDS prevention. The group later became the
Children’s AIDS Fund International and was among the first to
receive federal funds to conduct
HIV prevention work under the
Bush administration’s faithbased initiative.
Redfield, who early on was
chairman of the organization’s
advisory board, continues to
serve on its board.
James Curran, who led the
CDC’s efforts against HIV/AIDS
for 15 years, said Redfield should
be commended for his dedication in the fight against the
virus, recalling the difficult circumstances for his research during the 1980s and 1990s.
“The disease itself was new.
He was dealing with homophobia and stigma. They were big
barriers, especially in the military,” said Curran, dean of the
Rollins School of Public Health
at Emory University. “He has
remained committed to this
problem, and I give him credit
not only for working among the
poorest of the poor in this country, but also the poorest of the
poor people in the world.”
While Redfield’s supporters
point to his strong background
in infectious disease and global
health, public health experts
inside and outside the agency
say one of his biggest challenges
will be his limited governmental
public health experience, especially involving emergency responses.
The Center for Science in the
Public Interest released a harsh
statement. “What one would get
in Robert Redfield is a sloppy
scientist with a long history of
scientific misconduct and an
extreme religious agenda,” the
group said in a statement.
The job heading the country’s foremost public health
agency has been vacant since
Jan. 31, when former Georgia
public health commissioner Brenda Fitzgerald resigned
after serving only half a year.
lena.sun@washpost.com
Alice Crites contributed to this
report.
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/to-your-health
THURSDAY, MARCH 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A9
SU
Investigators say Austin bomber appeared to be frustrated with his life
CONDITT FROM A1
paign that killed two, injured several others and injected anxiety
into a city renowned for its creativity and cool. The terror began
with devices left at people’s homes
on March 2 and March 12, then
moved to an explosive rigged with
a tripwire that injured two men
this week and two explosives
shipped through FedEx.
Interim Austin police chief
Brian Manley said police believed Conditt was connected to
all of the explosions, which they
first linked to him through his
cellphone, according to Texas
Gov. Greg Abbott (R). Abbott said
authorities tracked his movements while “he was little more
than a suspect.”
Police found Conditt at a hotel
north of Austin and followed him
as he drove away and eventually
veered off the road. His red SUV
was the same vehicle that had
been seen at locations linked to
the explosions. As officers neared
Conditt’s vehicle, he detonated a
bomb that knocked back one of
the approaching Austin SWAT officers. Another officer fired his
gun at Conditt, who suffered “significant injuries from [the] blast,”
Manley said.
It was not immediately clear
whether Conditt was killed by the
explosives or the gunfire.
Police said Wednesday evening
that Conditt seemed motivated by
frustration with his life.
“We are cooperating
with law enforcement
with any pertinent
information we can find
that may be of help as
they continue their
investigation.”
John Yeng, of Austin Stone
Community Church, which
Mark Anthony Conditt once attended
Manley described a 25-minute
recording left on Conditt’s phone
as “the outcry of a very challenged
young man talking about challenges in his personal life that led
him to this point.”
Mary Conditt, 83, said she last
saw her grandson in December
when he traveled with his family
to her house for Christmas. Conditt described him as having
strong conservative political beliefs but said he wasn’t reactionary and spent considerable time
researching political viewpoints
before he took a stand.
Mark Conditt recently moved
into a house that he and his father
had renovated. He invited two
roommates to live with him, Mary
Conditt said.
“We are of course grieving, broken and disappointed,” Conditt
said. “I don’t know what else to
say. . . . I know who Mark Anthony
Conditt was to me, to his family,
for all of his life, and this is not the
Mark Anthony Conditt that we
knew.”
Earlier in the investigation, authorities said they were considering whether at least some of the
victims were targeted because of
their race. The package bombs
were left in predominantly black
and Hispanic neighborhoods of
East Austin, killing Anthony
Stephan House, 39, a money manager, and Draylen Mason, a
college-bound 17-year-old known
for his passion for music.
Another bomb severely injured
Esperanza Herrera, a 75-year-old
Hispanic woman visiting her
mother.
Relatives
also
wondered
whether a family connection
played a role: House’s stepfather
is friends with Mason’s grandfather Norman, and both are prominent fixtures in the black community.
But the tripwire bomb authorities say Mark Conditt set Sunday night appeared to target a
white neighborhood, perhaps the
children who would have been
walking to school the following
morning.
What police in part focused on
— and were assisted with by Conditt when he walked into a FedEx
office and was caught on camera
— was Austin’s affinity for online
and other home-delivery services
that made front-porch packages
something no one would think
twice about. It suggested someone with a knowledge of the city
and its habits.
“You just don’t know,” said Rey
Casanova, a 42-year-old real estate agent in Pflugerville who said
he and his wife buy “everything”
online but haven’t for the past two
weeks. “You don’t know what’s
going to come in the mail.”
But, ultimately, none of this
explains why Conditt, who attended a Christian church, veered
toward violence, how he made
bombs law enforcement officials
described as sophisticated, or why
he decided that Austin and its
residents should be a target.
Police detained two of his
roommates who might know
more about why Conditt, who
would remain inside when neighbors chatted with his dad, became
what authorities characterized as
a “serial bomber.”
“It’s a very good family,” said
Mark Roessler, 57, a neighbor.
“His father was very friendly
and very likable. You can tell he
was a loving father, just really
enjoying spending a lot of time
with his son.”
Police are interviewing those
who knew Conditt, scouring a social media footprint that seems
modest at most and tracing his
final movements, some caught on
film as he used a south Austin
FedEx office to mail his final
bombs.
The FedEx shipments offered a
significant moment because investigators were able to obtain
surveillance footage of Conditt
walking into the FedEx store
wearing a wig and gloves, Abbott
said. Investigators also determined that Conditt purchased
signs like the one used to anchor
the tripwire-rigged device that
detonated Sunday night, Abbott
said.
Conditt was not a military veteran, an early theory given the
explosives expertise. Abbott told
reporters Wednesday that he appeared to have bought the bomb
components from Home Depot,
and federal investigators are examining his Internet search history to see how self-taught his
bomb-making skills might have
been.
The public profile he left is
composed of a series of writings
on his political views, socially conservative but far from radical. He
opposed abortion and same-sex
marriage; he lived on the periphery of a Texas city known as a
liberal island in a largely red state.
But no evidence so far has
emerged of radicalization.
In 2010, Conditt enrolled in
Austin Community College, a
small campus in the large shadow
cast here by the University of Texas at Austin.
He spent two years there as a
business administration major
but did not secure a degree, according to the school. Kyle Ghedi,
who coincided with Conditt at the
school but did not recall him, said
the government and politics class
was “half in class and half online”
and that most students didn’t socialize with one another.
“You just go to class, and you
don’t really talk to anyone, and no
one really makes friends there,”
Ghedi said. “Everyone is just there
to go to class, and once class is
over, you leave there. No one is
sticking around to make friends,
like a university.”
Conditt also worked beyond
the renovation he was taking on at
home with his dad. He was employed by Crux Manufacturing, a
semiconductor
manufacturer
that occupies a set of mostly windowless buildings about four
miles from the Conditt family
home.
“We love and grieve with our
city, and we continue to pray for
the victims and their families who
were affected by these recent tragedies” said John Yeng, communications director of the Austin
Stone Community Church, which
Conditt once attended. “We are
cooperating with law enforcement with any pertinent information we can find that may be of
help as they continue their investigation.”
The house where
Mark Anthony
Conditt grew up in
Pflugerville, Tex.
Authorities say the
23-year-old was
connected to
explosions in
Austin this month.
For a video, go to
wapo.st/
austinbomber0322.
CAROLYN VAN HOUTEN/THE WASHINGTON POST
What Inspires You?
It’s the question that matters most to us.
Because we’re making something special.
The one place in the world that’s yours.
Inspiring Homeowners Since 1961.
scott.wilson@washpost.com
tim.craig@washpost.com
mark.berman@washpost.com
Craig, Wilson and Berman reported
from Washington. Kristine Phillips in
Pflugerville and Julie Tate in
Washington contributed to this report.
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A10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
MARCH 22 , 2018
Split House panel to approve GOP-drafted Russia report
Intelligence Committee
infighting risks damaging
Hill ties with spy agencies
BY
K AROUN D EMIRJIAN
The House Intelligence Committee will vote Thursday to approve a Republican-drafted report
that aims to be Congress’s first
official word on just what Russia
and the Trump campaign did during the 2016 presidential election.
Over the past year, the demand
for a detailed, public assessment of
Russian interference and the allegations of collusion surrounding
President Trump has inspired
three congressional panels to examine the actions of Trump’s affiliates during and after the election.
But where others have mounted a
bipartisan effort, the House Intelligence Committee has fractured
along party lines, earning a reputation more for sniping than as a
voice of investigative authority.
The GOP report, whose public
release remains weeks away pending redactions from the U.S. intelligence community, has come to represent the deeply partisan divisions that have overtaken the
probe. The panel’s ranking Democrat, Rep. Adam B. Schiff (Calif.),
has already denounced the document, which concludes the Republicans found no evidence of collusion and criticizes the U.S. intelligence community’s assessment
that Russia sought to help Trump.
Democrats have pledged to press
on with the investigation alone —
but Republicans say they are planning to move on to other matters,
including new probes of alleged
anti-Trump activities at federal law
enforcement agencies and the
State Department.
“We just follow the facts, and we
found no collusion,” said Rep. K.
Michael Conaway (R-Tex.), who
was deputized to run the probe last
year when an ethics inquiry forced
the panel’s chairman, Rep. Devin
Nunes (R-Calif.), to step aside. “The
report will make some people mad
and will make some people happy,
and so that’s where we’re at,” Conaway said.
With panel Republicans and
Democrats focused on separate
goals for the next several months,
some fear the political division
could infect the committee’s other
work. Already, the Russia investigation has caused many members
to stop speaking to each other outside business meetings, while
members of the intelligence community have expressed their explicit frustrations with Nunes and
the panel as a whole, according to
people familiar with the dynamic.
“What’s happening now I’ve
never seen before,” said retired
Gen. Michael Hayden, director of
the National Security Agency under presidents Bill Clinton and
George W. Bush, and director of the
CIA under presidents Bush and
Barack Obama. “What’s happening now is that many members of
the president’s party on the committee are aligned with the president to make war on the president’s own security establishments . . . . It’s taken the partisanship to a place it’s never been.”
From investigations into the
9/11 attacks to the terrorist assault
on a U.S. diplomatic compound in
Benghazi, Libya, the House Intelligence Committee has grappled
with politically divisive probes in
the past. But current and former
members of both parties say that
Trump has riven the panel as no
other matter has in decades.
“We lost our bipartisanship on
November 9,” Rep. Chris Stewart
(R-Utah) said, referring to the day
after Election Day 2016. “I just
think at its heart, that’s what’s
caused a lot of this — whether you
love Trump or you hate Trump, it is
a more partisan time, and it’s infected our committee.”
Democrats peg the start of problems to a slightly different date:
March 20, 2017, the day that thenFBI Director James B. Comey told
J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes (R-Calif.), right, and the panel’s ranking Democrat,
Adam B. Schiff (Calif.) take a break from a hearing last year featuring FBI Director James B. Comey.
the panel the bureau was running a
counterintelligence investigation
on Russian interference, and had
been looking into potential links
between Trump and the Kremlin.
“That was a huge blow to the
majority; they then decided they
were not going to do public hearings, and the next day, Nunes did
his midnight ride,” panel member
Jackie Speier (D-Calif.) said in an
interview, referring to a late-night
trip Nunes took to the White
House on March 21, 2017, to view
evidence, he said, indicating the
identities of Trump transition
team members had been improperly disclosed in intelligence reports. Those allegations would
prompt an ethics inquiry.
Nunes, who declined to comment for this report, was cleared of
wrongdoing in December.
But by the end of 2017, trust
between the parties on the committee had reached a low. Democrats charged Republicans with
loading up witnesses to overwhelm the panel and giving those
close to Trump a pass not to produce documents, accusing Nunes
of blocking their attempts to secure subpoenas for witnesses who
refused interviews. Republicans
accused Democrats of selectively
leaking parts of interviews to the
media and grandstanding on television to bias the public’s perception of the probe.
Schiff defended his public presence. “We have no other tool than
exposing what the majority’s doing
and often exposing what the majority’s not doing,” he said. “The
position they put us in is either go
along with an investigation in
name only, and be complicit in our
silence, or speak out, and that was
Macron seems to have cracked the Trump code
French President
Emmanuel
Macron had a
message for
President Trump
ANNE
when the two
GEARAN
spoke on
Wednesday on the
delicate subject of confronting
Russia.
As the lone European figure
who has seemingly cracked the
code of communicating with
Trump, Macron spoke for other
European powers when he
stressed to Trump that
Europeans are outraged by a
nerve agent attack on a former
Russian spy living in Britain. The
major European powers are
planning a coordinated response
and want American support,
starting with a firmer
condemnation of the attack than
Trump has offered.
The result of that call was the
clearest statement to date from
the White House that Trump not
only blames Russia for the
March 4 attack but also plans to
respond.
“The Presidents reiterated
their solidarity with the United
Kingdom in the wake of Russia’s
use of chemical weapons against
private citizens on British soil
and agreed on the need to take
action to hold Russia
accountable,” a White House
statement on Wednesday’s
conversation said.
Macron — also an
unconventional political figure —
has used a mixture of flattery and
man’s-man bravado to become
Trump’s favorite European leader
and a counterpoint to Trump’s
affinity for strongmen, including
Russian President Vladimir
Putin.
Macron scored the first Trump
invitation for a state visit, to be
held next month, and speaks to
Trump often. The invitation was
a mark of how Macron has come
to play the role that German
Chancellor Angela Merkel often
played for President Barack
Obama and then-British Prime
Minister Tony Blair played for
President George W. Bush —
confidant, whisperer, teller of
hard truths.
It is all the more notable that
Macron’s nation is second to
Germany in European economic
might and second to Britain in its
tight military alliance with the
United States. And that Macron
has sharply criticized Trump over
policies including the withdrawal
from the Paris climate accord.
Also remarkable is that Trump
made his pledge to Macron
rather than to British Prime
Minister Theresa May, on whose
soil the attack occurred. May is
the leading advocate for a unified
response condemning Russia for
White
House
Debrief
no choice at all.”
All remaining goodwill was
gone by the time the panel’s members began drafting dueling partisan memos about federal law enforcement’s conduct in surveilling
a Trump campaign adviser. Democrats, including Schiff, have described a situation in which committee staffers and members had
such little communication with
their Republican counterparts on
Russia that they were forced to
discern the majority’s plans from
reports appearing on Fox News
and in other conservative media.
More recently, according to people familiar with the matter, Democrats say that the panel’s Republicans have been trying to bury them
in paperwork by issuing daily updates to the GOP’s 150-page report
— but never indicating exactly how
or where they’ve amended the doc-
BY
PETER DEJONG/POOL/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
what she considers an
outrageous violation of
international law and a national
security threat.
Trump last spoke to May on
March 13. Although he had told
reporters ahead of time that he
would “take that as fact” if May
told him that Russia was behind
the attack, the White House
statement that emerged later in
the day did not go that far.
“President Trump agreed with
Prime Minister May that the
Government of the Russian
Federation must provide
unambiguous answers regarding
how this chemical weapon,
developed in Russia, came to be
used in the United Kingdom,”
that statement said. “The two
leaders agreed on the need for
consequences for those who use
these heinous weapons in
flagrant violation of
international norms.”
Since then, the signals have
been mixed. The Trump
administration levied its first
sanctions on Russia over election
interference in the United States
— something Trump had
previously declined to do — while
Trump was widely criticized for
making a congratulatory call to
Putin on Tuesday for his
March 18 reelection.
Trump’s unenthusiastic
relationship with May was on
display at their last meeting, at
the World Economic Forum in
Davos, Switzerland, in January.
“The prime minister and
myself have had a really great
relationship, although some
people don’t necessarily believe
that, but I can tell you it’s true,”
Trump said as May smiled stiffly
beside him.
French officials, meanwhile,
did not dispute reports last
month that Macron helped to put
the bug in Trump’s ear about
attending Davos as a sort of
Nixon-to-China gesture, in this
case from a protectionist to the
free-traders.
“That’s a good statement. I
hope they mean it,” former senior
State Department official Dan
Fried said of the White House
statement about the Macron call
Wednesday.
“It would have been far better
had it been coming out of the
phone call between the president
and President Putin, but I’ll take
what I can get and good for
Macron for raising it,” said Fried,
a Europe specialist at the
Atlantic Council. “It’s an
excellent argument for leaders
making a good personal
relationship with President
Trump so they can put things like
this to him.”
The Trump-Macron call
Wednesday was their second in 11
days. The two seem to have
developed a rapport since their
first firm-handshake meeting;
Trump liked the Bastille Day
military parade he attended in
Paris so much that he is calling
for a similar procession at home.
By contrast, Trump did not call
to congratulate Merkel on her
fourth term, sealed this month
with the formation of a coalition
government. The two did speak
March 1 about Syria and Russia
after an extraordinary fivemonth gap in their direct
communications. Obama was in
touch with Merkel weekly for
much of his presidency, and his
administration considered her
the central figure in European
fiscal and political stability.
A challenge for traditional U.S.
allies in Europe is how to
confront Russia without
antagonizing Trump, who
admires Putin and rails against
the special counsel investigation
into Russian interference that he
calls a “witch hunt.”
Trump’s affinity for Putin —
Trump has called the Russian
“very smart” — appears to endure
despite the abysmal state of U.S.Russia relations. Trump came
into office pledging to try to
repair ties, but Putin’s decision
last year to expel U.S. diplomats
was widely interpreted as a
signal that he had given up hope
that Trump could deliver.
As The Washington Post
reported Tuesday, briefing
materials prepared for Trump
before his call with the Russian
president warned him “DO NOT
CONGRATULATE” Putin on his
reelection; Trump did so anyway.
Trump defended himself in
tweets Wednesday, essentially
making the argument that
Russian cooperation can further
U.S. interests.
“I called President Putin of
Russia to congratulate him on his
election victory (in past, Obama
called him also). The Fake News
Media is crazed because they
wanted me to excoriate him.
They are wrong! Getting along
with Russia (and others) is a
good thing, not a bad thing,”
Trump wrote.
anne.gearan@washpost.com
karoun.demirjian@washpost.com
Nielsen faces pressure
over election readiness
In front of Senate panel,
Homeland Security chief
cites states’ resistance
French President Emmanuel Macron, seen in The Hague on Wednesday, has used flattery and man’sman bravado to become President Trump’s favorite European leader.
ument. Republican members say
their changes are a part of the
editing process.
As tensions have consumed the
committee, the stars of its two leaders have risen over dramatically
different parts of the electorate.
Nunes was recently named a “defender of freedom” by a powerful
conservative advocacy group,
while Schiff is often referred to as a
“liberal hero.” Their public personas could complicate efforts to
smooth things over — especially as
elsewhere around Washington, the
Russia probe is not fading away
anytime soon.
House Minority Leader Nancy
Pelosi (D-Calif.) has even called for
House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (RWis.) to remove Nunes as chairman. But neither leader has any
plans to replace Nunes or Schiff.
Nunes and Schiff are dissimilar
politicians: Before joining the intelligence panel, Nunes was best
known as a skilled political operative and fundraiser. Schiff had a
reputation as a technocrat and talented prosecutor. But before the
Russia probe, both had a healthy
working relationship — and panel
leaders are confident they can reclaim it.
“Once we move back into the
normal oversight work, professionalism will come back through
and we’ll go back to work,” Conaway said.
“Even through the worst of our
disagreements on Russia, we have
compartmentalized the oversight
work that we’re doing at the agencies, so all that has continued to go
on a very nonpartisan basis,” Schiff
said — noting that, unlike some
members, he and Nunes still have
occasional conversations on the
House floor.
But next year, the retirements of
several established Republicans
could make the panel’s composition more partisan by default. And,
ultimately, the committee’s ability
to conduct oversight depends on
the cooperation of an intelligence
community now skeptical of it.
K AROUN D EMIRJIAN
The Trump administration has
improved how it informs states
about voting system breaches
since the 2016 elections, but not
fast enough for lawmakers who
complained Wednesday that officials must take more urgent, comprehensive steps to deter and
publicize threats before November’s midterms.
“We know for certain that Russians were relentless in their efforts and also that those efforts
are ongoing — and yet when I
listen to your testimony, I hear no
sense of urgency to really get on
top of this issue,” Sen. Susan
Collins (R-Maine) told Homeland
Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen on Wednesday during a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing.
Nielsen appeared before the
panel alongside her predecessor
in the Obama administration, Jeh
Johnson. Both addressed missed
opportunities, challenges and developments in the government’s
efforts to counter cyberthreats
since it was determined that Russia interfered in the 2016 elections. Nielsen stressed that her
department “recognize[s] that
the 2018 midterm and future
elections are clearly potential targets for Russian hacking attempts,” saying President Trump
shared that view.
“He has said that it’s happened,
but the line that [Trump’s] drawing is that no votes were
changed,” Nielsen said. “That
doesn’t mean it’s not a threat.”
Nielsen touted policy changes
the administration has adopted,
such as identifying three election
officials in each state to receive
security clearances, allowing
them to view intelligence related
to threats. Twenty of the 150
officials identified have already
received their clearances, Nielsen
said, noting that while others go
through security review, it will be
the department’s policy to read in
state officials when threats are
detected.
“Today I can say with confidence that we know whom to
contact in every state to share
threat information,” Nielsen added.
Nielsen and Johnson said
some states remain unwilling to
fully cooperate with federal officials.
Johnson told senators that his
efforts to declare election infrastructure as critical infrastructure in 2016 — he ultimately did
so in January 2017 — had spooked
some state leaders, an assessment
with which the panel’s chairman
agreed.
“We’ve found that states do not
want a critical infrastructure designation,” said Sen. Richard Burr
(R-N.C.), noting that while the
reaction was “visceral, it’s something that can be overcome with
trust.”
Nielsen said that only 33 states
have their voting systems certified by the U.S. Elections Assistance Commission and that two
are resisting other efforts to improve cooperation with DHS.
Nielsen and Johnson said DHS
lacks recourse when states refuse
to publicize breaches, even when
DHS detects it.
“Very often the victims of a
cyberattack are very sensitive to
the disclosure of the fact they are
the victim,” Johnson said.
“When it comes to this situation, the victims stop reporting;
when they stop reporting, we’re
just not aware of the attacks,”
Nielsen added.
This did not satisfy senators,
who noted that DHS has yet to
publicly identify the 21 states
targeted in 2016 — potentially
complicating the public’s ability
to demand a response.
“America’s the victim . . . and if
there are states that have been
attacked, America should know
this,” said Sen. Dianne Feinstein
(D-Calif.), suggesting that Homeland Security’s privacy policy is
“enabling” breaches to go publicly unnoticed.
Other senators were frustrated
that DHS hasn’t put more pressure on state officials.
“Our constituents, our voters,
need to know when a state or
jurisdiction is not stepping up,”
said Sen. Mark R. Warner (D-Va.),
the committee’s vice chairman.
The senators and panelists
agreed, however, that better reporting and information-sharing
would not fix everything. Johnson said the sanctions imposed
on Russia by Obama were insufficient and would need to be followed with further measures by
the Trump administration. Several senators also urged the administration to articulate a policy
for deterring cyberattacks.
“We can patch software systems to the end of time, and we’re
not going to defeat these people,”
Sen. Angus King (I-Maine) said.
“. . . This problem is not being
treated with the urgency it deserves.”
karoun.demirjian@washpost.com
THURSDAY, MARCH 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A11
RE
President’s unscripted remarks to Putin continue a pattern
DIPLOMACY FROM A1
Trump tweeted Wednesday that
“getting along with Russia is a
good thing, not a bad thing” and
said that Moscow could help the
United States solve a range of
international problems.
Referring to his immediate
three predecessors in office,
Trump said that George W. Bush
didn’t have the “smarts” to get
along with the Russians, and that
Barack Obama and Bill Clinton
“didn’t have the energy or the
chemistry.”
Trump’s briefing materials for
the Putin call, placed in a binder
by the staff secretary’s office for
Trump’s review, did not include
any reference to a meeting, and
specifically warned against congratulating the Russian president, said a person with direct
knowledge who, like other officials, spoke on the condition of
anonymity to discuss internal
White House deliberations.
Senior White House officials
have previously opposed a bilateral meeting with the Russian
president.
Hours before the White House
even acknowledged that Trump
had spoken to Putin, the Kremlin
put its own spin on the call,
saying that Trump had called to
congratulate Putin and that “special attention was paid to making
progress on the question of holding a possible meeting at the
highest level.”
The Russian statement forced
the hand of the White House,
where advisers had disagreed on
whether to include Trump’s congratulations in the official U.S.
account, two people familiar
with the conversation said.
When the official White House
readout of the call emerged several hours later, it said Trump
had congratulated Putin but
made no mention of a discussion
of a meeting.
For Trump, such spur-of-themoment remarks to foreign leaders are not unusual, and often
have had little lasting meaning,
officials said, noting that he
often issues invitations to a meal
or a meeting.
The call to Putin was the
second time this month that
Trump has made an impromptu
announcement that he planned
to meet with a foreign leader,
although his March 8 decision to
hold talks with North Korea’s
Kim Jong Un appeared to carry
more weight and has sparked a
flurry of internal planning.
Both moves bore the hall-
SEAN GALLUP/POOL/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY
President Trump at July’s Group of 20 summit in Germany. Trump met with Vladimir Putin at that summit and at an Asia-Pacific summit
in November. Until Trump’s offer this week, the two were not to be in the same country again until this year’s G-20 summit in Argentina.
marks of an emboldened president who appears increasingly
comfortable in disregarding the
advice of his most senior advisers, and facing off with the most
implacable U.S. foes, regardless
of the potential risks.
“No one was planning on a
meeting with Putin at this point,
given all the questions about
continuing Russian interference
in our elections and the ongoing
Mueller probe, never mind the
. . . poisoning” of a former Russian double agent this month in
Britain, said Angela Stent, who
was a national intelligence officer with a focus on Russia in the
administration of President
George W. Bush. “This shows
that Trump continues to believe
that he can make a ‘deal’ with
Putin and is unconstrained by
his advisers who have been arguing for restraint and caution.”
Advocates of closer ties between the United States and
Russia also defended Trump’s
decision to dictate his own meeting with the Russian leader as
“I think he . . .
understands that if you
need to partner with
someone, you must treat
your future or current
partner with respect.”
Russian President Vladimir Putin,
on President Trump’s continued
expressions of warmth toward him,
in an interview with NBC
well within his prerogative.
“The president is signaling
that he is going to take center
spotlight as diplomat in chief,”
said Matt Rojansky, a Russia
scholar at the Wilson Center. “I
can imagine he does not want to
wait to be directed or handled by
the bureaucracy on even these
extremely difficult negotiations,
because he has spent his adult
life negotiating deals. It might
mean he gets out ahead of his
advisers, but their job is to catch
up, and they will.”
Although Trump said early in
his campaign that he and the
Russian leader were good
friends, he later acknowledged
that he had never met Putin. The
two presidents subsequently sat
down together at last summer’s
G-20 meeting in Germany, and at
an Asia-Pacific economic summit
in November.
One senior U.S. official attributed Trump’s resistance to guidance that he should distance
himself from Putin to the president’s belief that he should not
have to forfeit his pursuit of
better relations with Moscow to a
Russia investigation at home
that he thinks is illegitimate.
In an interview with NBC this
month, Putin aligned himself
with Trump’s stated belief that
good relations with Russia are a
priority. Asked why Trump was
“always so nice to you,” Putin
said that “this is not about being
nice to me personally, in my
view. I think he is an experienced person, a businessman
with very extensive experience,
and he understands that if you
need to partner with someone,
you must treat your future or
current partner with respect,
otherwise nothing will come of
it. I think this is a purely
pragmatic approach.”
Some administration officials
defended Trump’s personal approach to Putin, noting that what
he said was often different from
what he did, such as imposing
new sanctions this month
against Russia, and his decision
to send lethal U.S. weapons to
Ukraine to aid the country’s fight
against Russian-backed separatists, something President Barack
Obama had declined to do.
In his tweets Wednesday,
Trump said Russia could “help
solve problems with North Korea, Syria, Ukraine, ISIS, Iran
and even the coming Arms Race.”
In Syria and Ukraine, the United
States has been harshly critical
of Russian actions — to little
avail — and has charged that
Russia’s ongoing support for
Syrian President Bashar al-Assad
has made the final defeat of the
Islamic State more difficult.
Moscow also continues a close
relationship with Tehran, and
the United States has accused
Russia of helping North Korea
evade sanctions.
Seeking to deflect criticism of
Trump’s call to Putin, the White
House issued a statement
Wednesday noting that Obama,
too, had called Putin to congratulate him on a previous electoral
victory.
German Chancellor Angela
Merkel also congratulated Putin
this week.
Britain has accused Russia of
responsibility for the recent
nerve agent attack in Britain on
former Russian spy Sergei Skripal, who served as a double agent
for Britain before settling there.
British Foreign Secretary Boris
Johnson on Wednesday compared Putin’s promotion of this
summer’s World Cup soccer tournament in Russia to Adolf Hitler’s use of the 1936 Berlin Olympics for propaganda purposes.
White House press secretary
Sarah Huckabee Sanders said the
Skripal poisoning — about which
Trump signed a letter, along with
his counterparts in Britain, Germany and France, blaming Russia — did not come up during the
phone call with Putin.
But after a call Wednesday
with French President Emmanuel Macron, the White House
issued a statement saying, “The
Presidents reiterated their solidarity with the United Kingdom
in the wake of Russia’s use of
chemical weapons against private citizens on British soil and
agreed on the need to take action
to hold Russia accountable.”
karen.deyoung@washpost.com
john.hudson@washpost.com
joshua.dawsey@washpost.com
Anne Gearan and John Wagner in
Washington, William Booth in
London, Griff Witte in Berlin and
James McAuley in Paris contributed
to this report.
Trump’s vow to hold arms talks with Putin could signal common ground
Discussions might
reverse breakdown in
pacts limiting weapons
BY
P AUL S ONNE
President Trump’s pledge to
pursue arms-control talks with
Russian President Vladimir Putin
spotlights possible common
ground between Washington and
Moscow at a time of extreme discord and offers a remote chance
that the two leaders could revive
Cold War-era pacts that have broken down steadily in recent years.
The remarks highlighted what
appeared to be a rare and possibly
ephemeral opening in a relationship that has all but shut down,
owing to Russia’s intervention in
Syria and Ukraine and its subsequent interference in the 2016 U.S.
presidential campaign.
For the past month and a half,
Washington and Moscow have
been touting nuclear weapons
plans in what to many has seemed
like a throwback to a bygone era,
when they were in a race to develop the world’s deadliest weapons
with few signs of limits.
Six weeks ago, the Trump administration detailed plans to introduce two new types of nuclear
weapons to the U.S. arsenal in
response to Russia’s nuclear force.
At the time, the administration
also affirmed a vast modernization of U.S. nuclear weaponry that
President Barack Obama approved to the tune of an estimated
$1 trillion over 30 years.
Putin responded a month later
by announcing that Russia was
developing its own weapons, including a nuclear-propelled cruise
missile and an underwater nuclear drone. He boasted that the
arms could penetrate U.S. missile
defenses, which Russia has long
derided as a threat to its ability to
conduct a retaliatory strike in the
event of a nuclear war.
Some interpreted Putin’s show
as a veiled entreaty for new armscontrol negotiations with the
United States, talks that the Kremlin has long considered a calling
card to revitalize relations with
the White House. The Russian
leader followed up by giving an
interview to NBC’s Megyn Kelly in
which he left no doubt that Russia
stood ready to hold arms-control
talks with the United States.
Trump has long been interested
in participating in such negotiations, telling The Washington Post
in 1984 that he wanted to be the
U.S. point person in nuclear arms
limitation talks with the Soviets.
White House press secretary
Sarah Huckabee Sanders cautioned that no specific plans for
such talks have been made, despite Trump’s statements that they
would be forthcoming.
It’s unclear how much substantive progress Trump could make
with Putin on any arms-control
agreement in an atmosphere in
which the broader U.S. political
establishment has grown to mistrust his interactions with the
Russian leader, including his decision to congratulate Putin on winning what was widely considered
an unfree presidential election.
Even before relations deteriorated, Obama had to sign off on a
vast overhaul of the U.S. nuclear
arsenal to secure approval from
Republicans in Congress for the
arms-control pact he brokered
with Russia.
The United States and Russia
could potentially benefit from a
revitalization of arms-control
deals that have frayed in recent
years. Russia has been modernizing its nuclear forces and overhauling its military, but a sluggish
economy has prevented it from
substantively increasing its defense budget.
The Trump administration has
bolstered military spending after
negotiating an end to congressional budget limits, but a changeover of party control in the House
or the Senate could reverse that
trend and possibly roll back the
nuclear overhaul. Already, prominent Democrats have questioned
the addition of new weapons to
the U.S. nuclear arsenal and elements of the modernization plan
that Obama approved.
Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said in testimony to Congress in
February that the weapons the
Pentagon is developing will give
U.S. diplomats leverage in negoti-
EVAN VUCCI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Trump meets with Russia’s Vladimir Putin at the Group of 20 summit last July in Germany.
Trump’s vow comes after both countries have been touting nuclear arms plans for more than a month.
ating arms-control agreements
with Russia, suggesting that the
Pentagon also would like to see the
burgeoning arms race curtailed.
“Arms control is a vehicle by
which the United States and Russia can limit their competition and
keep it within certain constraints,”
said Steven Pifer, a retired U.S.
diplomat specializing in Russia
and Ukraine who is now a nonresident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. “You want to keep
the strategic nuclear competition
within certain limits. An open
arms race doesn’t benefit either
side.”
Although Washington and
Moscow may have reason to revitalize their arms-control commitments, any breakthrough could be
stymied by high levels of distrust
between the two governments,
resulting from what the U.S.
intelligence community called a
Kremlin-ordered campaign to influence the 2016 presidential campaign in favor of Trump.
For years, the United States and
Russia have been pulling out of
arms-control treaties and accus-
ing each other of violating them.
In 2002, the United States withdrew from the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty, which limited missile
defense systems, on account of the
George W. Bush administration’s
plans to step up missile defenses
after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.
Putin has said that decision began
the breakdown of arms-control
agreements.
Five years later, Russia suspended the Treaty on Conventional Armed Forces in Europe, or the
CFE Treaty, which limited the deployment of certain military
equipment by NATO states and
Russia on the continent. Russia
later stopped participating.
Since then, the United States
and Russia have accused each other of violating the IntermediateRange Nuclear Forces Treaty, or
INF Treaty, which bans the deployment of missiles with ranges from
500 to 5,500 kilometers.
The United States and Russia
traded barbs over compliance
with the Treaty on Open Skies,
which governs military surveillance overflights, and NATO has
said Russian military exercises are
violating the Vienna Document, a
pact that sets out transparency
standards for military operations
and exercises.
The only relatively recent armscontrol breakthrough between
Washington and Moscow came
almost a decade ago, during the
days of the “reset” in 2010, when
the Obama administration negotiated the New START accord with
then-Russian President Dmitry
Medvedev. The treaty, which limits strategic nuclear arms, expires
in 2021 but can be extended automatically for five years if the presidents of both countries sign.
When Putin brought up the
idea of extending the New START
accord during a call with Trump in
the weeks after the inauguration,
Trump lashed out at the pact, according to a Reuters report at the
time. The U.S. president has said it
is one of many bad deals the
Obama administration negotiated for the United States, including
the Iran nuclear pact.
U.S. officials said they wouldn’t
entertain the idea of new arms-
control agreements with Russia
until two things happened: They
wanted to roll out the administration’s new nuclear weapons policy
and confirm that both Washington and Moscow had met the limits of New START. Both occurred
in February.
Now the Trump administration
must decide whether it’s willing to
conclude any new arms-control
deals with Russia, or extend existing ones, while Moscow is violating current treaties.
Some lawmakers and experts
have said the administration
should refuse to renew New
START until Russia comes back
into compliance with the INF
Treaty. Others say Washington
should agree to extend New
START, regardless, if only to retain
a last bedrock of arms-control
framework and continue an inspections regime that the militaries of both countries find beneficial.
Trump could agree to the New
START accord’s extension as
a “low-hanging fruit” that satisfies
both sides, said Olga Oliker, director of the Russia and Eurasia Program at the Center for Strategic
and International Studies in
Washington.
“Everyone is in compliance
with it,” she said. “It’s a great thing
because it maintains verification
mechanisms that we’ve had for
decades.”
The Trump administration conducted “strategic stability” talks
with Russia last year that were
designed to lay the groundwork
for broader arms-control negotiations. But Russia postponed the
most recent meeting early this
month in retribution for the United States’ cancellation of talks on
cybersecurity.
Trump’s commitment to Putin
could restart those talks at a time
when relations remain tense.
“If arms control is lost as a
result of the downturn in this relationship, it’s going to cause greater
problems for a long time to come,”
Oliker said.
But she cautioned that it
wouldn’t be a panacea for the
broader relationship. “Counting
on arms control to make us friends
again? I wouldn’t.”
paul.sonne@washpost.com
A12
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
MARCH 22 , 2018
The World
Hungary’s opposition struggles to unite ahead of elections
The rival parties agree on their dislike of the prime minister, but little else. A victory in one small city may offer a blueprint for overcoming their differences.
BY GRIFF WITTE
hodmezovasarhely, hungary
— Even by the standards of a
country that has swung hard
toward one-party rule, this small
city on the fertile plains of southern Hungary is a pro-government
stronghold.
Or so it seemed.
Then came the city’s mayoral
election, when all expectations
were upended. Faced with a likely
rout by the Fidesz party of Prime
Minister Viktor Orban, the longfeuding opposition parties banded
together and put forward a single
candidate.
A month later, he sat triumphant in his classical-art-filled
city hall office and said there’s no
reason his victory can’t be replicated in the April 8 parliamentary
elections, seen by Orban’s critics as
a make-or-break moment for Hungarian democracy.
“The story of this town can be a
parable for the country,” said the
newly elected mayor, Peter MarkiZay. “If there’s an alliance of opposition voters, the people against
dictatorship, then there’s hope.
And if there’s hope, turnout will be
high and Fidesz will be defeated.”
But with just weeks to go before
the elections, the sort of coordination on display in Hodmezovasarhely remains elusive elsewhere in
Hungary.
The opposition parties may
agree that Orban represents a
grave threat to civil society, rule of
law and free expression less than
three decades after Hungary
threw off the chains of communism. But they can’t agree on a
strategy for stopping him.
The fractured nature of the opposition leaves a clear path for
Orban to claim a third consecutive
landslide victory and consolidate
control in a country where his
party faces diminishing obstacles
to absolute power.
“The opposition parties are still
acting like they don’t understand
what’s at stake,” said Marton
Gulyas, who has been trying to
encourage them to cooperate
through his grass-roots Country
for All movement, to little avail.
“Another Fidesz majority would be
a disaster for the country. But
there’s still no strong and recognizable alternative for those who are
fed up with Fidesz.”
Polls show Fidesz winning
about 50 percent of the vote nationwide. The rest of this country
of 10 million is split among four
main opposition parties, none of
which polls higher than the teens.
Under Hungary’s complex electoral system, half the vote for
Fidesz could be good enough for a
two-thirds majority in the National Assembly — wide enough to pass
virtually any legislation, including
changes to the constitution. Fidesz
has promised a law that civil society groups have said would severely limit their ability to operate.
Critics say Fidesz has already
BERNADETT SZABO/REUTERS
ABOVE: Supporters of the right-wing Jobbik opposition party attend a rally in Budapest on March 15. BELOW: Peter Marki-Zay, the
new mayor of Hodmezovasarhely, at city hall. Marki-Zay won election in the small Hungarian city — a stronghold of the prime
minister’s Fidesz party — after opposition leaders banded together and put forward a single candidate.
used its overwhelming majority
from the past eight years to tilt the
electoral playing field decisively in
its favor, gerrymandering districts
and commandeering supposedly
independent offices of government, along with much of the media.
The opposition parties could
still offer a serious challenge on
April 8 by teaming up and agreeing on a single candidate in each of
the country’s 106 electoral districts. Such a deal could be negotiated right up until the final day
before the vote.
Doing so, however, would require the parties to put aside ideological differences, personal mistrust and powerful financial incentives to keep all their candidates on the ballot. (Parties receive
funds based on the number of
votes they receive.)
On the surface, at least, the ideological divisions alone would seem
insurmountable. The two largest
opposition parties come from opposite sides of the political spectrum — the far-right Jobbik party
and the left-of-center Socialists.
Jobbik has a toxic reputation in
mainstream European political
circles, owing to a history of antiSemitic and racist remarks by its
leaders.
But as Orban has steered Fidesz
GRIFF WITTE/THE WASHINGTON POST
“The opposition parties are still acting like they
don’t understand what’s at stake. Another
Fidesz majority would be a disaster. . . . But
there’s still no strong and recognizable
alternative for those who are fed up.”
Marton Gulyas, leader of the Country for All movement
to the far right — his pitch for
reelection centers on warnings of
the coming “Muslim invasion” and
denunciations of the Hungarian
American financier and philanthropist George Soros — Jobbik
has shopped for new political real
estate.
“We gave Viktor Orban a lot of
his ideas,” said Marton Gyongyosi,
Jobbik’s foreign policy point man.
Rather than tack further right,
the party has tried to stake out
ground in the center, apologizing
for its prejudicial past and even
moving toward the left by emphasizing calls for economic justice
and equal pay.
The conversion would seem to
make possible what was once unthinkable: cooperation between
Jobbik and three smaller left-ofcenter parties, including the Socialists.
Gyongyosi said there was appetite, in theory, to team up against
the common enemy of Orban. But
he also said Jobbik was wary of
associating itself with the Socialists, a party that has not recovered
from the taint of corruption acquired during eight years in power
before being tossed out by voters
in 2010.
The ambivalence goes both
ways, a reality on display during a
desultory rally of a few thousand
Socialist voters and their allies in
Budapest for the country’s independence day last week.
“Jobbik is not part of the solution. They’re part of the problem,”
Agnes Kunhalmi, a Socialist lawmaker from Budapest, told the
crowd gathered in front of the
city’s famed Freedom Bridge.
Minutes later, she was contradicted by the party’s own candidate for prime minister, Gergely
Karacsony, who said he would reluctantly do a deal with Jobbik if it
meant a better chance at defeating
Orban.
“We have to cooperate with everyone, even with the devil,” he
said.
The rally’s relatively sparse
crowd stood in contrast to the
masses of supporters mustered by
Fidesz, which gathered well over
100,000 people outside the parliament for its own independence
day rally.
In his speech, Orban barely
mentioned the opposition except
to call it “anemic”; he trained his
fire instead on Soros and other
supposed agents of foreign influence.
The rally was an important
show of strength for Fidesz after
the humiliation of the mayoral
vote in Hodmezovasarhely last
month.
The city of 45,000, which was
Hungary’s fourth largest in the late
19th century and still boasts grand
public buildings from a long-gone
era of affluence, had been considered a rock-solid Fidesz bastion.
One of Orban’s top lieutenants,
Janos Lazar, was once the mayor,
and he remains the preeminent
local power broker.
But Marki-Zay’s successful insurgent candidacy showed that
Fidesz support may be softer than
it appears.
An economist and father of seven children, the 45-year-old had
been a Fidesz supporter himself,
and had never run for office. But he
said he grew disenchanted with
what he described as the party’s
corruption and cronyism.
Apparently he wasn’t the only
one. On election day, a record
62 percent of eligible voters cast
ballots, and Marki-Zay defeated
the heavily favored Fidesz candidate by 16 points.
“People are not happy in this
city — or in the country,” he said.
“They’re tired of the intimidation
and the corruption.”
Or perhaps a more prosaic explanation was at work, but one
equally worrisome for Fidesz. People could simply be ready for a
change.
“Everyone deserves a chance,”
said Ferencne Kiss, an 82-year-old
retiree, as she strolled the city’s
quiet lanes. “We’ve been under
Fidesz rule for some time now.
Let’s see what the new guy can do.”
griff.witte@washpost.com
Gergo Saling contributed to this
report.
DIGEST
SYRIA
EGYPT
Rebels to evacuate
besieged town in deal
Report: Crackdown
sets up long Sissi rule
Hundreds of armed rebels and
civilians will begin evacuating a
besieged town in Eastern
Ghouta, a rebel spokesman and
Syrian government media
reported Wednesday, in the first
instance of fighters leaving the
opposition stronghold east of
the capital after a deal reached
with the government.
Monther Fares, a spokesman
for the powerful Ahrar al-Sham
group, said the deal involves the
departure of opposition fighters
from his group to northern Syria
starting Thursday morning. He
said the deal negotiated with the
government gives security
guarantees for those who decide
to stay in the town after
government forces take over.
The Syria-controlled Military
Media Center said 1,500 armed
rebels and 6,000 civilians will
leave Harasta on Thursday for
the northern province of Idlib as
part of a negotiated deal. Ahrar
al-Sham, headquartered in
Harasta, is the smallest of the
rebel groups that control
Eastern Ghouta.
It is the first such deal
involving the evacuation of
opposition fighters from Eastern
Ghouta, which has been under a
ferocious government air and
ground assault for the past
month.
President Abdel Fatah al-Sissi
has overseen a crackdown on
dissent that is unprecedented in
Egypt, and an election next week
looks set to return him to power
for the long term, a Human
Rights Watch official said
Wednesday.
Sissi is expected to win the
March 26-28 balloting by a huge
margin, given that all opposition
candidates but one have
dropped out, and the sole
remaining challenger has said he
supports the president.
“The government arrested the
key challengers or intimidated
them out of the election race,”
Amr Magdi, Egypt researcher for
the human rights group, told
Reuters in Paris.
Sissi’s supporters say he has
improved security since 2013,
when as army chief he ousted
President Mohamed Morsi, an
Islamist. Critics say Sissi’s
popularity has been hurt by
austerity moves and the
crackdown on foes, activists and
independent media.
— Associated Press
“They said people should
make space for people to
recognize their children, and I
got my child.”
— Reuters
Zimbabwe’s Mnangagwa frees
STRINGER/REUTERS
Some of the newly released Dapchi schoolgirls gather in Jumbam village, in Nigeria’s northeastern Yobe
state. The kidnapping of 110 girls from Dapchi last month came almost four years after a similar Boko
Haram kidnapping of 270 schoolgirls from Chibok. About 100 of the Chibok girls have not been freed.
— Reuters
NIGERIA
Militants free scores of
abducted schoolgirls
Islamist militants freed scores
of abducted Nigerian schoolgirls
Wednesday, driving them back
into the town where they had
been captured a month ago.
The captors gave no reason
for the girls’ release, which
triggered celebrations and tears,
but the government denied that
a ransom had been paid. Several
of the girls said some of their
friends had died in captivity and
one was still being held.
The fighters from the Boko
Haram group, some shouting
“God is greatest,” drove the girls
back into the northeast town of
Dapchi in a line of trucks in the
morning and dropped them off
before leaving, witnesses said.
Aliyu Maina, reunited with his
13-year-old daughter, said the
fighters “stopped and blocked
the road, they didn’t talk to
anybody, they didn’t greet
anybody.”
thousands from prison:
Zimbabwe’s new president is
commuting death sentences for
some prisoners and releasing
thousands of people from prison,
including most women and
everyone under 18. President
Emmerson Mnangagwa’s
announcement is an effort to
ease prison crowding. He has
said he is against the death
penalty because he once
survived hanging when the
nation was still colonial
Rhodesia. Nearly 100 people are
on death row in the country of
13 million. Those on it for at
least a decade will see their
sentences commuted to life in
prison. Robert Mugabe, ousted
as president late last year, had
said he was considering
resuming executions.
1 dead, 14 missing after Chinese
dredger capsizes: A Chinese
sand-dredger capsized off
Malaysia’s southern coast,
killing a crew member and
leaving 14 others missing,
Malaysia’s coast guard said.
Three Chinese citizens out of 18
crew members were rescued, but
one was found dead after the
JBB Rong Chang 8 capsized off
southern Johor state.
— From news services
THURSDAY, MARCH 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
Violence against Shiite Hazaras grows
BY SHARIF HASSAN
AND PAMELA CONSTABLE
kabul — When a suicide bomber killed at least 30 people
Wednesday near the majestic
Sakhi shrine in west Kabul,
where worshipers had gathered
to mark the Persian new year, it
was the latest in a fast-growing
list of insurgent attacks that
have targeted the capital’s Shiite, largely ethnic Hazara community in the past two years.
Both Islamic State and Taliban extremists have claimed
more than a dozen attacks on
mosques, shrines, schools and
public rallies in the capital since
2016 — often during religious
holidays or services — in an
apparent attempt to sow divisions between Afghanistan’s majority Sunni Muslims and minority Shiite Hazaras.
Nationwide, insurgent attacks on Shiite and Hazara targets have claimed more than
300 lives and left more than 700
people wounded in the past two
years. Most have been claimed
by or are believed to have been
carried out by the Islamic State.
Wednesday’s attack, which
wounded more than 60 people,
was the second Islamic Stateclaimed assault on the Sakhi
shrine. In October 2016, gunmen
wearing Afghan security uniforms stormed the site, which
was filled with worshipers for
the Shiite day of mourning
known as Ashura. They killed 17
people and battled police for
several hours.
The latest assault came less
than two weeks after a suicide
Bomb near Kabul shrine
leaves 30 dead in latest
attack on ethnic group
attacker on foot detonated explosives outside a large public
gathering in the same area of
Kabul, killing nine. The outdoor
event was being held to commemorate a Shiite Hazara leader, Abdul Ali Mazari, who was
killed by the Taliban in 1995.
It also followed an attempted
suicide attack Monday in an
education center in nearby
Dasht-e-Barchi. Officials said a
man wearing a suicide vest entered a large classroom full of
students, tried to detonate his
explosives and then threw a
grenade that wounded six.
While Hazara and Shiite leaders insist that they will not be
intimidated and do not blame
their plight on Sunni Afghans,
the rising violence has taken a
toll on the community’s nerves.
It has also triggered rising frustration with the government of
President Ashraf Ghani, which
last year allowed local men to
arm and patrol Shiite worship
places in Kabul, a tacit admission that it could not protect
them.
“We are walking on blood on
every street,” said Jawed Kazemi, 60, a resident passing the
site of Wednesday’s blast between the shrine and the Kabul
University campus. Shoes, sandals and bits of human flesh
were strewn on the ground near-
by. He pointed to red stains on
the road.
“This is our life,” Kazemi said
angrily. “Poor people are dying.
Why doesn’t Ghani order terrorists to be hanged?”
Emotions were also high after
the March 10 suicide attack on
the ceremony for Mazari, a former militia leader. One of the
victims was Mohammad Zaki
Yawari, 16, a high school student. His friends carried his
body on their shoulders,
wrapped in a white shroud, up a
hillside graveyard the next day,
then shoveled dirt into his grave.
“It is difficult to be a Hazara
these days,” said Feraidon Hakimi, 19, one of the mourners, who
had searched for him after the
blast and found his body in a
hospital morgue, lacerated by
shrapnel. “Without doubt, we
suffer more than anyone.”
Hazaras make up about 20
percent of Afghans and are almost all Shiites. They have been
persecuted for generations,
driven from their lands and
relegated to menial jobs. After
the Taliban were overthrown in
2001, they began to flourish in
democracy, entering politics and
rallying for their rights.
Now, the widening violence of
the Islamic State, which views
all Shiites as apostates, may be
threatening that progress. Hazaras tend to be socially and
politically liberal, which is also
antithetical to hard-line Sunni
militants. In its first-known attack on the group, the Islamic
State bombed a peaceful protest
by Hazara activists in Kabul in
July 2016, killing more than 80
A13
RE
people. Since then, the pace of
its attacks has increased.
The Islamic State claims it is
targeting Hazaras because they
have been recruited to fight by
the governments of Iran and
Syria. In a propaganda video
released last week, the group
invited fighters who cannot go
to Syria and Iraq to join them in
Pakistan and Afghanistan, according to news reports.
“Enemies want to take advantage of a sectarian war,” said
Raihana Azad, a Hazara legislator from Kabul. “But ordinary
Afghans live together peacefully.”
The spirit of Nowruz, the
beginning of spring, is celebrated by Afghan Sunnis, too.
Wednesday was a national holiday, with all Afghans off from
work and school.
“Today’s egregious attack
runs counter to the meaning of
Nowruz, a time of renewal and
celebration, and a time for promoting the values of peace and
solidarity,” Tadamichi Yamamoto, the head of the U.N. mission
in Afghanistan, said in a statement. But the quickening pace
of attacks has unnerved some.
“It is dangerous for Afghanistan,” said Bashir Ahmad Ramazani, 30, a car mechanic whose
shop was damaged in the Dashte-Barchi blast. “First, they target
Hazaras, and then they go after
Sunnis.”
pamela.constable@washpost.com
Constable reported from
Islamabad. Sayed Salahuddin
contributed to this report from
Kabul.
Teen gets 8 months for
slapping Israeli soldier
BY
L OVEDAY M ORRIS
jerusalem —Ahed Tamimi, the
17-year-old who became a Palestinian cause celebre after a video
of her slapping an Israeli soldier
went viral, was sentenced to
eight months in jail on Wednesday after agreeing to a plea bargain.
The sentence includes the
three months Tamimi has served
since was denied bail, according
to her lawyer, Gaby Lasky, putting her release date in July.
The prosecution dropped eight
of the 12 charges against Tamimi,
including separate accusations of
stone throwing. She pleaded
guilty to four charges, including
assault of a soldier, reduced from
an earlier charge of aggravated
assault.
Tamimi, already a prominent
Palestinian child activist dubbed
“Shirley Temper” by some Israeli
media outlets, was catapulted to
even greater fame by the video
and her subsequent arrest. Jewish American comedian Sarah
Silverman, actor Danny Glover
and National Football League
player Michael Bennett are
among those who called for her
release.
After the plea bargain was
presented to the judge, Tamimi
addressed the court.
“There is no justice under the
occupation,” she said, according
to a news release from the campaign organized to free her.
The judge of the military court
earlier decided to close the proceedings to the news media and
other observers amid predictions
that Tamimi’s trial would raise
her profile further and draw
heightened attention to the detention of minors in Israel. He
argued that holding the trial in
secret would be in the best interests of the teenager, though her
family and lawyer said it was not.
“After the court decided to
keep the trial behind closed
doors, we understood she wasn’t
going to receive a fair trial,” Lasky
said.
The prosecution had listed 41
potential witnesses, meaning
that Tamimi would have to stay in
prison during a lengthy trial that
probably would have stretched
longer than the sentence agreed
to in the plea bargain, Lasky said.
She described the deal as the
“best decision” available.
Tamimi’s mother, Nariman
Tamimi, who faced charges related to filming the incident, also
took a plea deal for eight months
in jail. Tamimi’s cousin Nour
Tamimi, who also appeared in the
video, agreed to a plea deal for
time served — just more than
two weeks.
Lasky said that Israeli authorities were keen to make an example of Ahed Tamimi, whose family spearheads regular protests
against Israeli occupation in
their West Bank village of Nabi
Saleh. “They want to deter other
Palestinian youth from resisting
occupation,” Lasky said.
The video of the Palestinian
teen slapping and kicking the
soldiers, who refused to react,
caused a public outcry after it
was screened on Israeli television. She was arrested shortly
after the incident in a night raid
on her home. The Israeli military
filmed her being led out of her
home in handcuffs.
Israel overhauled its military
court system in 2009, creating
separate military courts for minors that officials said were
“After the court
decided to keep the
trial behind closed
doors, we understood
she wasn’t going
to receive
a fair trial.”
Gaby Lasky, lawyer for
Palestinian teen Ahed Tamimi
aimed at improving the protection of children.
However, a report by Israeli
human rights group B’Tselem
released on Tuesday, said the
changes are largely cosmetic. In
nearly all cases brought against
Palestinian minors, the defendant ends up signing a plea
bargain, said Yael Stein, research
director for B’Tselem who wrote
the report. It can take up to a year
and a half from the time a minor
is charged to the end of a trial,
according to Stein. Most minors
are held in jail, ramping up pressure on them to agree to a plea
deal, she said.
“For the minor, they are in
detention. They think, if I confess
I’ll get a lighter sentence. There
are real incentives for the minors
to sign,” she said. “Usually parents prefer plea bargains so they
know their children are coming
home.”
There are 356 Palestinian minors in detention, according to
the group.
loveday.morris@washpost.com
Israel confirms it struck
Syrian facility in 2007
OMAR SOBHANI/REUTERS
Men mourn outside a hospital compound after a suicide bombing Wednesday near a major Shiite shrine in Kabul. The Islamic State
claimed responsibility for the attack, which occurred during Persian new year celebrations and killed dozens.
How the Islamic State got a foothold in Afghanistan
Owning up to destroying
suspected nuclear site
may be warning to foes
BY
Last April, the U.S.
WorldViews military set out to
take on the
AMANDA
Islamic State in
ERICKSON
Afghanistan. At
the time, officials
estimated the group had about
700 fighters in the country. The
U.S. forces seemed confident they
could extinguish the Islamist
militants.
The United States targeted the
fighters with the “mother of all
bombs” last spring. By June, the
U.S. military said it had killed
Abu Sayed, the head of
Afghanistan’s Islamic State
affiliate, in an airstrike. A
Pentagon spokeswoman
predicted that the strike would
“significantly disrupt the terror
group’s plans to expand its
presence in Afghanistan.”
That hasn’t come to pass.
In the months since, the
terrorist organization has
managed to launch several highprofile attacks in Kabul and
beyond. In December, the group
claimed responsibility for a
suicide bombing at a Shiite
cultural center that killed 41
people. That month, Islamic State
attackers stormed two
Afghanistan intelligence service
locations in a week. In January, a
handful of gunmen claiming to
be members of the Islamic State
held up a Save the Children office
in Jalalabad, killing four people
in an hours-long siege.
And on Wednesday, a suicide
bomber detonated explosives
near a major Shiite shrine in
Kabul, killing dozens during
celebrations of the Persian
new year.
No one thinks the Islamic State
is as powerful as the Taliban, or
that it might take control of
significant swaths of
Afghanistan as it once did in Iraq
and Syria. But the group, also
known as ISIS, still has the
potential to wreak plenty of
havoc.
How long has the Islamic
State been in Afghanistan?
U.S. officials started to hear
rumors about the group
operating in Afghanistan around
2014.
James Cunningham, who was
the U.S. ambassador to
Afghanistan at the time, told the
PBS show “Frontline” that the
group was using Afghanistan and
Pakistan as a recruiting ground,
trying to find fighters who would
travel to Syria and Iraq.
But the Islamic State’s high
profile attracted dissatisfied
members of the Taliban and other
insurgent groups who were eager
for a rebrand. They were drawn
to the Islamic State, journalist
Anand Gopal told “Frontline” in
2015, because of the attention it
was getting in the media: “There’s
been increased dissatisfaction
among certain elements of the
Taliban, and with the media
talking about ISIS all the time
and the Afghan government
playing up the idea of ISIS as a
way of keeping the United States
interested, all of that sort of set
the ground for the groups to
rebrand themselves.”
What does the Islamic State
in Afghanistan look like
today?
It’s hard to say exactly how
many Islamic State fighters are in
Afghanistan right now, but it
seems their numbers have grown.
Last March, the U.S. military
estimated that about 700 ISIS
fighters were in Afghanistan. By
November, the top NATO
commander in Afghanistan said
that U.S. forces had killed more
than 1,600 fighters on the
battlefield. “It’s like a balloon,” he
said. “We squeeze them in this
area, and they’ll try to move out
elsewhere.”
Michael Kugelman, a deputy
director of the Asia Program at
the Wilson Center, has called the
group’s resilience “quite
worrying.” Its fighters’ strength,
he said, lies in their ability to
navigate Afghanistan’s
challenging terrain with ease,
which allows them to evade
strikes. The group is also aided by
“a steady supply of recruits” from
disaffected members of the
Pakistani Taliban as well as
radicalized Afghans.
The group operates mostly in
Nangahar province, near the
border of Pakistan.
What is the Islamic State’s
relationship to groups such as
the Taliban?
Tense. For one thing, the
groups have different ideologies
and goals. As Akhilesh
Pillalamarri put it in the
Diplomat magazine, “the
hostility that ISIS bears toward
the Taliban stems from the fact
that the Taliban draws its
legitimacy not from a universal
Islamic creed, but from a narrow
ethnic and nationalistic base. In
other words, while ISIS fights to
establish a Caliphate
encompassing the entire ummah
(Muslim community), the Taliban
merely seeks to establish an
Afghan state that they claim is
ruled by Islamic Law.”
The groups are also in
competition for members and
resources. Both rely, to some
extent, on money from the heroin
trade to fund their operations. As
“Frontline” put it, “the fiercest
fighting has not been between
ISIS and the government security
forces, but between ISIS and the
Taliban.”
Will the newest U.S. surge
in Afghanistan have any
impact on the Islamic State?
Probably not.
Violence in Afghanistan has
continued to increase even as the
United States has sent in more
troops, according to Emily
Winterbotham, a senior research
fellow at the Royal United
Services Institute. In fact, violent
groups have cited the increased
presence of Americans as one of
the motivations for their attacks.
“It is worth noting that violence
in Afghanistan actually increased
hand-in-hand with increased
foreign troop presence, even at
the height of the surge,” she told
Vice.
Haroun Mir, a political analyst
in Kabul, also predicts that
President Trump’s surge will lead
to a jump in insurgent violence by
the Taliban and the Islamic State.
That’s what happened when
President Barack Obama carried
out a much larger surge in 2009.
“Instead of confronting NATO
forces on the battlefield, they
opted for these low-cost terrorist
attacks,” he said, “and they have
been very effective.”
amanda.erickson@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
blogs/worldviews
A RON H ELLER
tel aviv — The Israeli military
confirmed Wednesday that it carried out the 2007 airstrike in Syria
that destroyed what was believed
to be a nuclear reactor, lifting the
veil of secrecy over one of its most
daring and mysterious operations in recent memory.
Although Israel was widely believed to have been behind the
Sept. 6, 2007, airstrike, Israeli
authorities have never before
commented publicly on it.
In a lengthy release, the military revealed that eight F-15 fighter jets carried out the airstrikes
against the facility in the Deir
al-Zour region, about 300 miles
northeast of Damascus, destroying a site that had been in development for years and was scheduled to go into operation at the
end of that year.
Israel’s involvement had been
one of its most closely held secrets, and it was not immediately
clear why Israel decided to go
public now. But the move could be
related to the upcoming memoir
of former prime minister Ehud
Olmert, who ordered the strike
and has hinted about it for years.
It could also be meant as a warning to archenemy Iran, which is
deeply involved in Syria’s conflict.
“The motivation of our enemies has grown in recent years,
but so, too, the might of the Israeli
military,” Defense Minister Avigdor Lieberman said in a statement Wednesday. “Everyone in
the Middle East would do well to
internalize this equation.”
Israel and Syria have always
been bitter enemies. Throughout
Syria’s civil war, now in its seventh year, Israel has carried out
well over 100 airstrikes, most
believed to have been aimed at
suspected weapons shipments
destined for the Iranian-backed
Hezbollah militant group. Iran
and Hezbollah are allied with
Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.
At the time of the 2007 strike,
Syria accused Israel of invading
its airspace but gave no details
about the target.
The pre-mission briefing,
made public Wednesday, stated
that the operation should not be
attributed to Israel so as to minimize the potential for an all-out
war.
The strike in Syria was reminiscent of an Israeli attack in 1981
against a reactor being built in
Iraq. That strike was later credited with preventing Saddam Hussein from acquiring weapons of
mass destruction.
“The message from the 2007
attack on the reactor is that Israel
will not tolerate construction that
can pose an existential threat,” Lt.
Gen. Gadi Eisenkot, Israel’s military chief, said in Wednesday’s
statement. “This was the message
in 1981, this is the message in
2007 and this is the future message to our enemies.”
The announcement also indicated that the Syrian facility was
much closer to completion than
previously reported.
Uzi Rabi, an expert on Iran at
Tel Aviv University, said Israel’s
confirmation might be meant as a
“warning sign” to Iran as it expands its military footprint in
Syria.
Last month, Israel shot down
an Iranian drone that entered its
airspace, triggering a clash.
In Wednesday’s statement, the
military said it began obtaining
information regarding foreign experts helping Syria develop the
Deir al-Zour site in late 2004.
Later, it discovered that North
Korea was helping Syria build a
reactor to manufacture plutonium.
— Associated Press
A14
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
MARCH 22 , 2018
Votes for Putin in presidential election surged among Russians in West
BY A NTON T ROIANOVSKI
AND M ATTHEW B ODNER
moscow — Western politicians
are condemning Russian President Vladimir Putin’s reelection
as a sham. What has gone relatively unnoticed is that Putin’s
electoral re-coronation played
out in dramatic fashion on their
home turf.
A Washington Post analysis of
precinct-level data from Russia’s
Central Election Commission
shows that support for Putin
surged in Sunday’s election
among Russians voting in the
West. Russian embassies and
consulates in the 29 member
countries of the North Atlantic
Treaty Organization reported a
total of 129,231 votes cast for
Putin at their ballot boxes, according to the Post analysis. In
the previous presidential election, in 2012, Putin got just twothirds that number of votes in
those countries.
The numbers point to Russia’s
success in mobilizing pro-Putin
votes, including by helping to bus
voters to the polls in Germany.
But the election also provides
data documenting the growing
estrangement between Russians
and the West.
In Germany, the number of
votes for Putin on Sunday nearly
tripled from 2012, to more than
27,000. In the voting precinct run
by the Russian Embassy in Washington, votes for Putin roughly
doubled, to 1,531. The overall rise
in Putin votes in NATO countries
is about double the rate in the
SERGEI SAVOSTYANOV/TASS/GETTY IMAGES
A Russian in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, prepares to vote Sunday in the Russian presidential election.
Russian election as a whole, in
which Putin’s vote tally increased
by about 24 percent from 2012.
Russian immigrants “feel uncomfortable because Russia is
blamed for everything in the
Western press,” said Yury Yeremenko, editor of Russkoye Pole,
an online portal for Russians in
Germany. “The fact that so many
people came to vote was in a way
a protest reaction to the pressure
on the Russian diaspora.”
The vote totals are small in
comparison with the millions of
Russians who live abroad, and
the many Russian emigres who
oppose Putin largely did not vote.
But the increase in Putin votes is
still significant, considering that
people had to physically go to
polling places set up by Russian
embassies and consulates to cast
ballots.
In Britain, the total number of
votes cast in Sunday’s election
was down by nearly one-fifth
from 2012. But the number of
votes for Putin nearly doubled, to
2,056. Some Russians were motivated by a get-out-the-vote campaign conducted by the Russian
Embassy and by the intensity of
British outrage at Russia over the
poisoning of former Russian spy
Sergei Skripal.
“The whole atmosphere surrounding the Skripal situation
has made it pretty scary to be a
Russian in London,” said Tonia
Samsonova, a correspondent
based in London for the Echo of
Moscow radio station. “You are
living here and see London is
now against Russia, and you feel
a little bit like a traitor. You can’t
explain to yourself who you are
now, and it is frustrating. One
way to exorcise this frustration is
going out and voting for Putin.”
The biggest increase in Putin
votes took place in Germany,
home to one of the largest Russian expatriate populations. In
2012, 10,883 Russians cast ballots
for Putin in Germany, or 51 percent of the vote in the country,
according to precinct-level figures tallied by The Post. In 2018,
the number of votes for Putin in
Germany nearly tripled, to 27,503
— or 82 percent of the number of
valid ballots cast.
Election observers across Germany reported seeing voters
bused to the polls by the hundreds. A Russian Embassy
spokesman in Berlin said that the
embassy helped Russian organizations and Jewish community
groups in far-flung cities and
towns organize transportation to
polling places.
“Many [voters] told us that
they were voting for the first time
in 20 to 30 years,” the embassy
spokesman, Denis Mikerin, said
in a statement.
Irina Revina-Hofmann, who
observed the election at the Russian Consulate in Munich on
behalf of liberal candidate Grigory Yavlinsky, said the increases in
vote totals in smaller German
cities were so large that she
suspects fraud. At the consulates
in Munich, Frankfurt and Hamburg — which also set up early
voting stations in smaller cities —
the total number of Putin votes
reported more than tripled from
2012.
Revina-Hofmann said that in
Munich, she observed that the
number of voters did sharply
increase from 2012, with many
Putin supporters in the crowd,
while the president’s critics
largely boycotted the vote. She
said the voters seemed energized
by what they saw as “the West’s
disdain for Russia.”
Putin supporters in Germany
“say they don’t want to live in
Russia,” she said. “But they like
Putin’s foreign policy.”
Mikerin rejected the fraud allegations, citing a lack of direct
evidence. He said the voting
process was “distinguished by a
maximum level of transparency”
and took place in accordance
with Russian law and international standards.
Votes for Putin also more than
doubled from 2012 in Denmark,
Italy, Hungary, France and Spain.
In the United States, their number grew 57 percent, to 5,261,
even though the total number of
votes cast fell by a quarter from
the previous election.
anton.troianovski@washpost.com
Natalia Abbakumova contributed to
this report.
Peruvian president resigns amid corruption accusations
Pedro Pablo Kuczynski
is latest to fall in scandal
sweeping Latin America
BY
S IMEON T EGEL
lima, peru — President Pedro
Pablo Kuczynski resigned from
office on Wednesday amid a corruption scandal, just weeks before President Trump is scheduled to visit the country for a
major regional summit on improved governance in the Americas.
Kuczynski announced his resignation on television. He denied
wrongdoing but said, “I don’t
want to be an obstacle to our
nation finding the unity and harmony that it so needs.”
Kuczynski is one of the most
prominent politicians to fall in a
wave of investigations across Latin America into alleged corruption linked to a Brazilian construction firm, Odebrecht.
The 79-year-old former Wall
Street banker held several top
political jobs in Peru before assuming the presidency in 2016.
Impeachment
proceedings
against him had been scheduled
to start Thursday.
His position became untenable
after revelations about his lobbying for Odebrecht. According to
local media, Kuczynski, before a
closed-door congressional hearing last week, acknowledged a
payment from an Odebrecht affiliate of nearly $700,000 in return
for “verbal” products and “contacts.” That payment took place
before he became president but
after he had served as prime
minister and economy minister.
Many Peruvians regard that as a
blatant conflict of interest, and
some are asking whether it may
have constituted the crime of
influence-peddling.
Separately, videos emerged
Tuesday of one of the president’s
few allies in Congress appearing
to offer kickbacks on public
works to lawmakers in return for
ERNESTO ARIAS/EPA-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK
Peruvian President Pedro Pablo Kuczynski leaves the government palace in Lima after announcing his resignation.
voting against impeaching Kuczynski.
The two developments appeared to have sent support for
impeachment in the singlechamber, 130-member legislature
surging past the two-thirds majority necessary to oust Kuczynski.
Kuczynski offered his resignation just three weeks before
Trump is due to visit the country
for the Summit of the Americas,
an annual gathering of the hemisphere’s leaders. The theme of
this year’s event is improving
democratic governance and fighting corruption.
Despite having one of the fastest growing economies in Latin
America and being categorized by
the World Bank as a “middle
income” country, Peru remains
plagued by stark inequality, en-
demic corruption and weak institutions. Many citizens still yearn
for the kind of simple solutions
once offered by Alberto Fujimori,
an authoritarian president whose
daughter Keiko heads the main
opposition party.
The planned impeachment trial of Kuczynski was to have been
the second in less than three
months, reflecting the president’s
prolonged battle with the opposition Popular Force party, which
dominates Congress. A similar
attempt failed just before Christmas after 10 lawmakers split from
the party — including Kenji Fujimori, Keiko’s brother.
Three days after that unsuccessful impeachment attempt,
Kuczynski pardoned the siblings’
father, Alberto Fujimori, who was
serving a 25-year sentence for
directing death squads and over-
seeing massive corruption during
his 1990-2000 presidency.
Fujimori’s children were at
odds over that pardon, with Keiko
Fujimori opposed to her father’s
liberation, apparently because
she feared it could undermine her
presidential chances and tight
control of Popular Force. Running on a hard right agenda similar to her father’s, she was a close
runner-up in the past two presidential elections and was defeated by Kuczynski in July 2016.
The pardon also appears to
have helped doom Kuczynski,
with most analysts agreeing that
the center-right president was
elected largely thanks to the votes
of millions of Peruvians, including leftists, who were aghast at
the Fujimori family’s possible return to power.
Political scientist Fernando
Tuesta, a former head of the
ONPE, Peru’s electoral agency,
suggested Kuczynski had squandered his political capital
through verbal gaffes and strategic blunders, including appeasement of Popular Force —
until he saw the chance to split
the party with the pardon.
Kuczynski “arrived in power
despite himself, in a situation
where the challenge was how to
govern in an adverse context, and
then he did everything to make it
more adverse,” Tuesta said.
Although Kuczynski was not
implicated in criminal bribetaking, the revelations about his
earnings from a company that
many view as synonymous with
graft, and his apparent ability to
profit handsomely from the contacts he had previously made as a
government minister, stuck in the
throats of many Peruvians. Kuczynski had initially denied receiving any money from Odebrecht.
Meanwhile, his reneging on his
promises never to free Alberto
Fujimori had shredded his credibility. His final approval rating
was 15 percent.
Kuczynski’s fall from grace
confirms Peru’s status as the
country, outside Brazil, most
harmed by the sprawling Odebrecht scandal.
Of the three presidents who
served between Fujimori and
Kuczynski, from 2001 to 2016, one
is in pretrial detention suspected
of receiving illicit campaign funding from the construction giant,
and another is fighting extradition from the United States on
charges he took $20 million in
kickbacks from the company.
Both say they are innocent.
The third, Alan García, has
sought to play down his ties to
Odebrecht despite his 2006-2011
government awarding the company roughly $1 billion in contracts, more than any other president.
Odebrecht has admitted to
paying $29 million in bribes to
public officials in Peru between
2005 and 2014 in exchange for
$12.5 billion in contracts.
For many Peruvians, the political landscape looks desolate, with
demonstrators regularly repeating the anti-system chant of “Get
rid of them all!”
Despite that, Walter Albán, a
former interior minister who
heads the Peruvian chapter of
anti-graft group Transparency International, believes there are
grounds for hope now that Martín Vizcarra, the vice president,
will form a new government.
“If he does what Kuczynski did
not, by really taking on the fight
against corruption, and taking a
firm line with the Fujimoristas in
Congress, then he could do well,”
Albán said.
A relatively low-profile former
governor of the small Moquegua
region on Peru’s southern coast,
Vizcarra has been serving as ambassador to Canada.
foreign@washpost.com
Britain’s new soda tax could succeed where similar levies have failed
BY
C AITLIN D EWEY
The great British soda tax
doesn’t begin for two more weeks,
but some experts are already calling it a success.
That’s because the graduated
levy, which goes into effect April 6,
has prompted some of the country’s largest soda-makers to slash
the sugar in their beverages.
Coca-Cola has changed the recipe for Fanta. San Pellegrino sodas
in Britain now have 40 percent less
sugar. The reduction has been so
dramatic that the British Treasury
has cut its revenue forecast for the
levy almost in half to reflect the
shrinking number of soft drinks
with a taxable amount of sweetener.
Politicians and public-health experts have cheered the news, which
they say will reduce obesity and
diabetes. And some are already
promoting the British soda tax —
which operates differently from
the taxes in place elsewhere — as a
model for other countries.
“Our Sugar Tax is even more
effective than hoped,” tweeted
George Osborne, the former finance minister, noting the latest
product changes.
“That means less sugar and better health,” he added. “Progressive
policy in action.”
Other countries, such as Mexico
and South Africa, and U.S. cities,
including Philadelphia and Berkeley, Calif., created their taxes with
the goal of decreasing consumption of sugary drinks.
But the British tax was designed
to encourage soda-makers to cut
the sugar in their products. It incentivizes these “reformulations,”
as they are known in the industry,
by charging two rates based on
total sugar content.
The lower rate, which applies to
drinks with roughly 12 to 19 grams
of sugar per eight-ounce can, works
out to roughly 6 cents per serving.
The higher rate, which applies to
drinks with more than 19 grams of
sugar per can, is about 8 cents per
serving.
The brilliance of this design,
from a public-health perspective, is
that it simultaneously discourages
soda consumption while nudging
soda-makers to improve the nutrition of the beverages.
In Britain, that nudge appears to
have worked: In addition to CocaCola and Nestle UK, which makes
San Pellegrino, regional sodas such
as Irn-Bru, Lucozade and Ribena
have slashed their total sugars to
amounts that fall right beneath the
level of the lowest tax. Several com-
panies, such as Nichols, the maker
of popular soda Vimto, have begun
refocusing their product development efforts on low- and no-sugar
beverages.
And restaurant chains, including Pizza Hut and TGI Fridays, have
limited the availability of some
drinks to avoid the tax, removing
full-sugar sodas from self-serve
fountains.
Of course, critics of the soda tax
are not counting these industry
moves as a victory — at least not yet.
In a recent op-ed for the Telegraph, Ryan Bourne, an economist
at the libertarian Cato Institute,
argued that it is too soon to tell if
the reformulations will reduce
overall sugar consumption, or just
the sugar amount in a handful of
popular beverages. Consumers
have other options for highly
sweetened foods besides soda. This
is part of the reason soda taxes
alone have not been shown to dent
obesity, even if they decrease soda
sales.
Industry groups also have argued that the government did not
need to resort to policy to force
them to reduce sugar. According to
the Union of European Soft Drink
Associations, the calorie count of
the average soda fell 12 percent
between 2000 and 2015 because
of voluntary industry action. And
the soft drink industry, in Europe
and the United States, has made
other, independent commitments
to reduce the calories and sugar in
their beverages.
Still, as the British Treasury has
hinted in its reports, taxes can
fuel faster and more dramatic reductions. And while it’s still too
soon to say whether those reductions will improve public health,
researchers say they have some encouraging predictions.
In 2017, a team of British researchers modeled what would
happen if the soda industry cut
sugars by between 15 and 30 percent. They found that the number
of obese people in Britain would
fall by 144,000, and the country
would see 19,000 fewer annual cases of diabetes, according to a paper
later published in the journal Lancet Public Health.
So far, several British soda-makers have reduced sugar by an even
larger percentage.
“The sugar tax has been a great
success and it has not even come in
yet,” Duncan Brewer, a partner
at consulting firm Oliver Wyman,
told the Guardian. “It’s a great example of a relatively benign intervention.”
caitlin.dewey@washpost.com
THURSDAY, MARCH 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A15
RE
Economy & Business
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Fed sets interest rate at highest level in a decade as economy strengthens
More boosts signaled,
with implications for
savers, credit card users
BY
H EATHER L ONG
The Federal Reserve on
Wednesday lifted its key interest
rate from 1.5 percent to 1.75 percent, the highest level since 2008.
The move, the central bank’s
first major decision under Chair
Jerome H. Powell, was widely expected as the U.S. economy continues to strengthen and stock markets remain near record highs.
The Fed also significant-
ly boosted its economic growth
forecast, saying the U.S. economy is on track to expand by
2.7 percent this year and 2.4 percent in 2019, a jump from the
projection issued before the Republican-backed tax cuts were finalized.
“The economic outlook has
strengthened in recent months,”
the Fed said in a statement
Wednesday.
The Fed anticipates raising interest rates two more times this
year, part of an ongoing move
away from the extraordinary measures it took to stimulate the economy during and after the Great
Recession. But the central bank
opened the door to the possibility
of three more increases in 2018.
The Fed has not raised interest rates four times in a year
since 2006.
Americans should expect even
faster growth and lower unemployment, Fed officials said.
The unemployment rate is projected to fall to 3.8 percent this
year and 3.6 percent in 2019,
which would be the lowest level since 1969.
“Fiscal policy has become more
stimulative,” Powell said in his
first news conference, which was
significantly shorter than those of
his predecessor, Janet L. Yellen.
“Ongoing job gains are boosting
incomes and confidence, [and]
foreign growth is on a firm trajectory.”
There is growing con-
cern among economists that the
Republican-backed tax cuts and
the additional boost in federal
spending could cause the U.S.
economy to overheat, requiring
the Fed to increase interest rates
more than three times this year. Of
the 15 Fed board members, six
expect that the Fed will increase
rates four times this year, and one
thinks five increases will be necessary.
“I think they will end up tightening four times this year, but they
don’t have to signal that yet,” said
Jim O’Sullivan, chief U.S. economist at High Frequency Economics.
Powell, a Republican with a reputation for bipartisan work in
Washington, was careful not to
criticize President Trump or congressional leaders, but he did say
the tax cuts are unlikely to lead to
the 3 percent growth the White
House is touting. He also noted
growing concerns about damage
to the U.S. economy should a trade
war occur.
“A number of participants of the
FOMC [Federal Open Market
Committee] did bring up the issue
of tariffs,” Powell said, adding that
the Fed is hearing from many business leaders that “trade policy has
become a concern going forward.”
But so far, Powell said, the
Fed has not altered its economic projections because of
Trump’s tariffs on aluminum and
steel or likely trade actions against
China.
Allies
are left
in tari≠
limbo
Nations unsure how to
proceed for exemptions
as deadline approaches
BY
D AVID J . L YNCH
Hours before tariffs on foreign-made steel and aluminum
were scheduled to take effect, the
Trump administration had yet to
make public detailed plans for
how the import levies will work
in practice — creating confusion
for its closest allies.
In recent days, top steel suppliers such as Brazil, South Korea
and Japan have complained that
the office of the U.S. trade representative has yet to establish a
process for countries to apply for
tariff exemptions, leaving it unclear whether any will be granted
in time to forestall billions of
dollars in border charges.
“We’re waiting for an indication of the procedure for us to
make our proposal,” said Sérgio
Amaral, Brazil’s ambassador to
the United States. “There’s no
indication by the USTR as to how
this is going to work.”
The metals tariffs remain unsettled even as the administration is preparing to take tougher
action against China.
President Trump is expected
as soon as Thursday to announce
tariffs on about $60 billion
worth of Chinese products, restrictions on Chinese investments in the United States designed to mirror limits that U.S.
investors face in China, and
tighter visa policies for Chinese
students, according to industry
executives who requested anonymity to disclose confidential
information.
The White House promised
earlier this month that countries
could ask for a waiver of the new
MAURICIO PALOS/BLOOMBERG NEWS
A worker sweeps the floor this month in front of a furnace at the Grupo Acerero SA steel processing facility in San Luis Potosi, Mexico.
President Trump exempted Mexico and Canada from his new tariffs on steel and aluminum, at least while talks aimed at renegotiating the
North American Free Trade Agreement make progress. The tariffs are set to take effect for other countries at 12:01 a.m. Friday.
import taxes of 25 percent on
steel and 10 percent on aluminum. Only countries with a U.S.
security relationship are eligible,
and they must propose alternative ways of addressing administration concerns over rising import figures.
But with time running out —
the tariffs take effect at 12:01 a.m.
Friday — no official guidance on
how to apply for exemptions has
been made public, leaving diplomats baffled.
“It’s very hard to predict what
the final outcome would be,” said
one South Korean official, who
would discuss confidential discussions only if granted anonymity. “But we will know soon. The
23rd of March is right around the
corner.”
Foreign officials this week
went to Washington in the hope
of gaining clarity about the administration’s plans. Cecilia
Malmström,
the
European
Union’s trade chief, arrived Tuesday for meetings with Commerce
Secretary Wilbur Ross and other
administration officials, vowing
in a tweet that she would “insist
that the E.U. as a whole is
excluded” from the tariffs.
The Commerce Department
said Wednesday that Ross and
Malmström would “launch immediately a process of discussion” on trade issues, including
steel and aluminum, “with a view
to identifying mutually acceptable outcomes as rapidly as possible.”
The E.U. has made public a
10-page itemized list of U.S.
products that could be targeted
for retaliatory measures.
Japan’s economy and foreign
affairs ministers have met directly with U.S. Trade Representative
Robert E. Lighthizer. But “the
specific process for obtaining a
country exemption from the tariffs established by President
Trump’s proclamation on steel
and aluminum has yet to be
disclosed,” the Japanese Embassy in Washington said.
Wednesday on Capitol Hill,
Lighthizer told the House Ways
and Means Committee that the
import taxes will not apply to
countries that have begun talks
with the United States, probably
including South Korea, Argentina, Australia and E.U. countries.
He said talks with Brazil, the No.
2 steel supplier to the United
States, may begin soon.
“Countries will get out as we
come to agreement . . . Some
countries will be in a position
where the duties will not apply to
them in the course of negotiations,” Lighthizer said in his first
public comments on the matter,
adding, “Our hope is by the end
of April we have this part of the
process resolved.”
The president’s March 8 decision to announce the measures
took aides and allies by surprise.
On a call with reporters to explain the move, a senior administration official provided conflicting statements about whether all
countries or just those with U.S.
security ties could seek waivers.
Lighthizer’s subsequent assignment to oversee the exemption process, which could involve
dozens of countries, comes at a
time when his office remains
thinly staffed.
“They want to cut deals with
everybody, but they’re not set up
Despite Wednesday’s move,
U.S. interest rates remain far lower than the historic norm of about
5 percent.
Rising interest rates are typically good for savers, who are likely to
receive higher interest on the savings they have in the bank. Borrowers, however, face higher costs
when they try to get mortgages,
auto loans or small-business
loans.
Americans with credit card
debt are especially vulnerable to
rising interest rates. The average
credit card rate is already a full
percentage point higher than it
was a year ago and is likely to jump
more this year as the Fed raises
rates further.
heather.long@washpost.com
to do that in real time,” said
William Reinsch, a former Commerce Department official.
Trump imposed the tariffs under a little-used provision in U.S.
trade law that allows such measures in the case of threats to
national security. That rationale
has irked countries such as Japan, South Korea and Germany,
which are steel suppliers and
longtime U.S. allies.
Trump exempted from the tariffs Canada, the U.S. market’s
leading source of steel, and Mexico, ranked fourth, at least while
talks aimed at renegotiating the
North American Free Trade
Agreement make progress. The
president also said that if he
allows some countries to escape
the tariffs, he may raise the
import levies on others.
Edward Alden, a trade expert
at the Council on Foreign Relations, said he doubts that many
other countries will evade
Trump’s new taxes. “If you exclude Europe, why not Japan?”
he said. “Then pretty quickly the
economic significance of the tariffs get whittled down to something more symbolic.”
Brazil offers a good illustration of the complexity involved.
The Latin American giant buys
about $1 billion worth of metallurgical coal from U.S. mines and
uses it to produce semifinished
steel, which is then sold to U.S.
customers to make finished steel
products.
“We provide inputs that make
U.S. steel more competitive,” Amaral said.
Amaral, who has met with
several members of Congress to
plead Brazil’s case, said he is
“confident” the country will be
spared from the U.S. tariffs.
“There is no argument that will
justify these measures being taken,” he said in an interview.
Officials from Hong Kong,
which accounts for 0.2 percent of
U.S. aluminum imports, said
they have tried in vain to contact
the White House, State Department and other agencies seeking
clarification.
“We are up for seeking an
exemption,” said Clement Leung,
Hong Kong commissioner for
economic and trade affairs. “But
we don’t see any specific procedures for doing so.”
david.lynch@washpost.com
DIGEST
BANKING
UBS settles New York
case for $230 million
Swiss bank UBS has agreed to
pay $230 million to New York
state in a legal settlement
stemming from the firm’s
handling of mortgage-based
securities in the lead-up to the
2008 financial crisis, State
Attorney General Eric
Schneiderman said Wednesday.
As part of the deal, UBS will
pay $41 million to the state and
an additional $189 million for
community efforts to expand
affordable housing and improve
blighted properties.
Schneiderman’s office said
that UBS sold mortgage-backed
securities to investors based
on incorrect statements and
that in many cases the mortgages
did not comply with
underwriting rules.
— Associated Press
AGRICULTURAL INDUSTRY
E.U. approves Bayer’s
purchase of Monsanto
German conglomerate Bayer
won European Union antitrust
approval Wednesday for its
$62.5 billion deal to buy U.S. peer
Monsanto. The tie-up would
create a company with control of
more than a quarter of the global
seed and pesticide market.
The European Commission
said Bayer addressed concerns
with its offer to sell a chunk of
assets to boost rival BASF.
— Reuters
ALSO IN BUSINESS
Steve Wynn plans to sell some or
all of his $2.2 billion stake in the
casino company he founded. His
plans for the 12 percent holding
in Wynn Resorts were outlined in
a regulatory filing Wednesday.
Casino regulators are looking
into the company’s handling of
harassment claims against Wynn.
A former United Auto Workers
official who served on the union’s
committee that negotiated a 2015
labor deal with Fiat Chrysler was
charged with accepting illegal
payments from the automaker. The
charges are part of a Justice
Department probe of alleged
misspending at UAW union
training centers. The U.S. attorney’s
office for the Eastern District of
RETIREMENT IS YEARS AWAY
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Get up to $600 when you open and fund an account. Visit tdameritrade.com/planning.
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Michigan said Nancy Johnson, 57,
was charged in a conspiracy in
which she and other union officials
“accepted a stream of concealed
payments and things of value from
FCA executives in the months
leading up to the 2015 collective
bargaining negotiations.”
— From news reports
COMING TODAY
10 a.m.: Freddie Mac releases
weekly mortgage rates.
A16
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. THURSDAY,
MARCH 22 , 2018
Data firm whistleblower finds foe, not friend, in Facebook
White House,” Wylie said. It is
unclear how much Cambridge Analytica contributed to Trump’s
win.
WYLIE FROM A1
term for a self-inflicted wound —
by Facebook.
In hours of interviews with The
Washington Post this week, Wylie
traced his work for the data analysis firm Cambridge Analytica, his
growing misgivings before he quit
in 2014 and his shock and horror
when the company’s most famous
client, Donald Trump, won the
presidency nearly two years later.
He also described previously
unreported contact with Corey Lewandowski, Trump’s first campaign manager, in spring 2015.
(Lewandowski denied any contact.) And Wylie shared his suspicion — though unconfirmed —
that data collected and used by
Cambridge Analytica may have
fallen into Russian hands.
But Wylie spoke with particular
passion about his own feelings of
guilt for helping to develop an
advanced new form of political
targeting that was used by people
whose conservative politics are
the opposite of his own.
Some say that Wylie is a flawed
whistleblower, that he never
should have helped collect data on
tens of millions of Facebook users
and should not have waited years
to publicly reveal his misgivings
about working for Cambridge Analytica. But he says he’s trying to
make matters right by speaking
out now.
“I literally left a ticking time
bomb,” Wylie said in his lawyer’s
London office. “I didn’t quite appreciate that I had done that. And
then it blew up.”
Data of a nation
Wylie, a Canadian citizen,
moved to London in 2010 and
started to work in 2013 for SCL
Group, which he said conducted
“information operations” around
the world and also worked on
campaigns, especially in Africa.
As research director, Wylie
helped that company give birth to
Cambridge Analytica as “an American brand” that would focus on
U.S. politics with at least $10 million from billionaire hedge fund
manager Robert Mercer. The
Cambridge Analytica office was in
the posh Mayfair neighborhood of
London, and the dozens of young
workers — many of them contractors, a number of whom were from
Eastern Europe — buzzed about
with Apple laptops.
At the helm, said Wylie, was
Mercer’s daughter Rebekah, who
was president, and conservative
strategist Stephen K. Bannon,
who was vice president. Running
day-to-day operations was a
smooth-talking upper-crust Briton, Alexander Nix.
Nix did not respond to requests
for comment on Wednesday. Cambridge Analytica suspended Nix
on Tuesday after a British television sting showed him on secret
recordings talking about employing unethical tactics to win elections, including bribery and using
sex workers for “honey pots.”
Wylie said he helped set up the
television station’s sting.
Wylie said that it was under
Nix’s direction — but with the
knowledge of Bannon and Rebekah Mercer — that Cambridge
Analytica began an ambitious data-gathering program that included tapping into the Facebook profiles of 50 million users through
the use of a personality-testing
app. The company did that with
the help of a Russian American
psychologist at Cambridge University, Aleksandr Kogan, who
also made regular visits back to
Russia, Wylie said.
Wylie said he and others at
Cambridge Analytica were initial-
JAKE NAUGHTON FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
ly skeptical of the power of this
tactic for gathering data. But
when the company approved
$1,000 for Kogan to experiment
with his app, he produced data on
1,000 people who downloaded it
and roughly 160,000 of their
friends — all in a matter of hours.
Cambridge Analytica next approved $10,000 for a second
round of testing and was rewarded with nearly a million records,
including names, home towns,
dates of birth, religious affiliations, work and educational histories, and preferences, as expressed using the popular Facebook “like” button on many social
media updates, news stories and
other online posts.
They soon married that data
with voter lists and commercial
data broker information and discovered they had a remarkably
precise portrait of a large swath of
the American electorate.
Kogan’s app, called “thisisyourdigitallife” and portrayed as being
for research purposes, gathered
data on the 270,000 people who
downloaded it and tens of millions
of their Facebook friends. It was
this data and others that Wylie
later worried might have ended up
in Russian hands.
“I’m not saying that we put it on
a drive and posted it to Vladimir
Putin on Number 1 Red Square,”
Wylie said, referring to the Russian president’s official residence.
But he said that he and others
affiliated with Cambridge Analytica briefed Lukoil, a Russian oil
company, on its research into
American voters. He said Kogan
also made regular visits to Russia
but acknowledged that he did not
know what Kogan did there.
Kogan has not replied to The
Post’s requests for comment. Kogan called the suggestions that he
was a spy “just silly” in an email,
seen by CNN, that he wrote to
colleagues at Cambridge University. “If I am Russian spy, I am the
world’s dumbest spy.”
For Wylie, a data scientist with
an avid interest in politics and
culture, the collection of Facebook
and other data did not initially
trouble him. The social media
platform made such data grabs
DAVID PAUL MORRIS/BLOOMBERG
Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg, above, has faced
calls from lawmakers to personally explain how the data of
millions of the site’s users ended up in the hands of Cambridge
Analytica, a company that employed Christopher Wylie, top.
easy for app developers — though
it began severely restricting them
in 2015 — and Wylie saw it as a
powerful way to study an entire
nation on a scale at once broad
and precise.
Combined with other data,
Cambridge Analytica hoped to
profile the entire American electorate — something it already had
done in other countries — and
determine what pitches would
work best for each voter.
The project also appeared
to excite its benefactors. One former Cambridge Analytica employee, speaking on the condition
of anonymity to discuss internal
corporate matters, described
hearing Rebekah Mercer express
over the phone excitement at the
results of 2014 congressional midterms, when Republicans made
significant gains to which Cambridge Analytica said it had contributed.
But Wylie and others clashed
with Nix, whom he called a “bully.”
Wylie also grew weary of the increasingly far-right tenor of the
politics the researchers were helping to propel. They discovered and
refined potent themes about keeping out immigrants, “draining the
swamp” and restoring an earlier
era of national greatness — as
understood mainly to mean for
white American men.
When Wylie told Nix at a London coffee shop in 2014 that he
was going to leave at the end of the
year, he heard a boast that at the
time sounded ridiculous but, in
retrospect, haunted him.
“Just you wait,” Nix told Wylie,
according to his recollection. “You’re going to leave, but
we’re going to be in the White
House.”
‘What did you do?’
But it was not clear to Wylie at
that point who might lead such an
eventual White House bid. In fact,
Cambridge Analytica worked with
Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) during the
presidential primary before signing on with the Trump campaign.
Months after he and several
other Cambridge Analytica employees quit the firm, they got a
mysterious message from somebody purporting to represent the
Trump Organization.
Wylie said he ended up speaking with Lewandowski, Trump’s
first campaign manager, in conference calls in which Lewandowski
reportedly described a forthcoming Trump run for president.
Lewandowski later met in person with several of Wylie’s former
Cambridge Analytica colleagues
at Trump Tower in spring 2015,
Wylie said in an account backed by
one of those people who did attend. But the plan to work for the
campaign doing voter analysis fizzled, in large part because the
mostly liberal former Cambridge
Analytica employees didn’t want
to wade back into conservative
politics.
Lewandowski said the campaign had been pitched by Cambridge Analytica but never hired
them and had no recollection of
meeting with any former employees. “I’ve never heard of those
guys,” Lewandowski said of Wylie
and the other former employees. “It didn’t happen.”
But the brief flirtation did have
a concrete consequence. SCL
Group threatened legal action
against Wylie for supposedly violating a “noncompete” clause he
signed before quitting. Wylie was
confused — he had no idea that the
company considered Trump a client or potential client — and began to suspect that he had been set
up. To resolve the legal dispute, he
signed a nondisclosure agreement
that would later complicate his
efforts to speak out about the work
he had done for Cambridge Analytica.
Wylie’s sense of uneasiness
about that work began building
when he heard Trump, in 2016,
start using themes that Cambridge Analytica had developed in
2014 about building walls and
draining the swamp. More than
most, Wylie knew the science behind why they might be effective.
His discomfort grew when Bannon formally joined the Trump
campaign in August 2016.
Election results on Nov. 8, 2016,
filled Wylie with a profound sense
of dread. A friend who worked on
the campaign of Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton and was familiar with Wylie’s previous work
sent him a message saying, “What
did you do?”
“Manipulating an election in a
small developing country doesn’t
have the same sort of ripple effect
of electing Donald Trump into the
Facebook strikes back
Soon after Trump’s inauguration, Wylie began talking with Observer of London reporter Carole
Cadwalladr, who had been working on stories about Cambridge
Analytica. He also retained an attorney, Tamsin Allen, and began
working directly with Britain’s Information Commissioner’s Office,
which started an investigation
into Cambridge Analytica.
Earlier this month, Wylie received a sharply worded letter
from Facebook, which demanded
access to his smartphone and
computer. He refused, saying that
he already had shared information with the British authorities
and saw no reason to do so with a
private company — especially one
whose own activities might be
called into question.
It was not Wylie’s first encounter with Facebook. The company
had sent a letter in August 2016
saying that Kogan, the Cambridge
researcher, should not have
shared the data of Facebook users.
Downloading names, home
towns, work histories and “likes”
of 50 million users was not against
the rules — at least in 2014 — but
Kogan should not have transferred the data to Cambridge Analytica, Facebook wrote. Facebook
wanted the data destroyed.
Wylie said he complied with
that request, though he does not
know if Kogan or Cambridge Analytica did. (Cambridge Analytica
has issued statements in recent
days denying any wrongdoing.)
Silicon Valley-based Facebook
posted a blog Friday evening —
early Saturday morning in London — announcing the suspension
of Kogan, Wylie and the parent
company of Cambridge Analytica.
When he was awakened by a
call around 3 a.m. from a reporter,
Wylie was furious at Facebook for
acting unilaterally and accusing
him of misdeeds when he had
come forward to authorities. Days
later, he still is.
Full-time whistleblower
Wylie’s career as Facebook critic
quickly moved to a new level. Lawmakers in the United States and
Europe began demanding that
Facebook chief executive Mark
Zuckerberg personally explain
how the data of 50 million users
reached a mysterious company
with ties to Bannon, the Mercers
and Trump. State attorneys general began investigating. So did the
Federal Trade Commission over
concerns that Facebook had violated a 2011 consent decree over
privacy issues.
When told that Wylie thought
he had been mistreated by Facebook, the social media company
responded that Cambridge Analytica and Kogan had agreed to an
audit of their servers and systems.
“Mr. Wylie thus far has declined.”
Facebook on Wednesday said it
would conduct audits of thousands of apps in response to the
“breach of trust” caused by Cambridge Analytica.
“Facebook is not the government. Facebook is not the state.
I’m working with the legal authority,” Wylie said, referring to the
Information Commissioner’s Office. “I’m not going to be bullied by
Facebook.”
craig.timberg@washpost.com
karla.adam@washpost.com
William Booth in London, Elizabeth
Dwoskin in Los Angeles and Michael
Kranish in Washington contributed to
this report.
Cambridge CEO’s boasts intensify questions about his role in Trump bid
Nix, suspended by firm,
has made conflicting
statements on issue
BY
M ICHAEL K RANISH
As a video camera secretly recorded the conversation, Cambridge Analytica chief executive
Alexander Nix boasted about his
role in Donald Trump’s election
campaign, saying that he had met
the candidate in 2016 “many
times” and suggested he was integral to the victory.
“We did all the research, all the
data, all the analytics, all the targeting, we ran all the digital campaign, the television campaign,
and our data informed all the
strategy,” Nix told a person posing
as a potential client on a recording
released this week by Britain’s
Channel 4 News.
The claims by Nix intensify
questions about the role Cambridge Analytica played in Presi-
dent Trump’s campaign and what
data the firm used. Nix was suspended this week amid allegations of unethical behavior and
reports that his company improperly obtained the Facebook data of
millions of Americans.
Nix told The Washington Post
in an October 2016 interview that
he could not be involved in the
campaign’s strategy because he
was a British citizen.
Top Trump campaign officials,
meanwhile, played down the
work of the data-science company, which was paid at least $6 million to do voter modeling and ad
buys for Trump in the 2016 general election.
Brad Parscale, who served as
the campaign’s digital director
and who helped hire Cambridge
Analytica, appeared to dismiss
Nix’s claims Wednesday. “Another
day of people taking credit for
@realDonaldTrump’s victory,” he
tweeted. “So incredibly false and
ridiculous. Let them say that under oath. Just an overblown sales
pitch.” Parscale did not respond to
a request for comment.
However, The Post reported
Tuesday that Cambridge Analytica’s voter persuasion strategy
was guided by conservative
strategist Stephen K. Bannon in
the years before he became
Trump’s strategist, according to
Chris Wylie, a former Cambridge Analytica employee. Bannon oversaw the effort to siphon
up Facebook data to create a
powerful voter targeting tool
and was a top executive at Cambridge when it tested themes
such as “drain the swamp” later
harnessed by Trump.
The White House and Trump
campaign did not respond to requests for comment. Nix did not
respond to a request for comment.
Questions about Cambridge
Analytica’s data collection resulted from news reports that an app
created by a Cambridge University psychologist, Aleksandr Kogan, accessed information from
about 50 million Facebook users.
The app not only collected data
from 270,000 Facebook users who
gave direct permission, but apparently millions of their Facebook
friends. Facebook last week
banned the parent company of
Cambridge Analytica, Kogan and
Wylie for allegedly improperly
sharing that data.
Kogan said in an interview with
BBC Radio that he did nothing
wrong and was being made a
“scapegoat.” He said he was “assured by Cambridge Analytica
that everything was perfectly legal.”
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said in a statement Wednesday that his company had “made
mistakes” in its handling of the
issue. He said that Cambridge
Analytica has agreed to a forensic
audit to confirm it deleted the
data, as the company said this
week it did.
Cambridge Analytica did not
respond to a request for comment.
In its statement this week, the
company admitted for the first
time that it had received Facebook
data from a company connected
to Kogan — something it had
repeatedly denied after the
Guardian first reported the firm’s
use of the information in 2015.
In a Feb. 2017 interview, Nix
told The Post that the Guardian
article was “fully inaccurate.”
“We do not have any historic
data,” he said.
Cambridge Analytica repeatedly insisted this week that it used
no Facebook data in the models
that it did for the Trump campaign.
“We ran a standard political
data science program with the
same kind of political preference
models used by other presidential
campaigns,” the firm tweeted this
week.
Nix, in an interview with The
Post at the company’s New York
City office two weeks before the
2016 election, discussed at length
the way the company sought to
use Facebook data. He said information gleaned from the site was
done so with permission of Facebook and its users.
“You can collect Facebook data
legally with the consent of the
Facebook users and the consent of
Facebook,” Nix told The Post, in a
portion of the interview not previously reported.
“If I were to ask you, ‘Can I use
your data?’ and you say, ‘Sure,
here’s my data,’ you can give that
to me,’” Nix said.
Nix also stressed that he was
not involved in the Trump campaign’s strategy, noting that
would violate U.S. campaign finance law.
“As a British person, I am unable to give strategic advice to
political campaigns in the U.S.,”
he said. “I’m not sitting inside the
campaign, I’m not advising. . . . I
myself [am not] inside the firewall,” Nix added, saying that U.S.
citizens employed by the company did that work.
Daniel A. Petalas, former Federal Election Commission acting
general counsel, said Wednesday
that Nix would not have been
allowed to provide substantial advice to Trump or his campaign
because of his status as a foreigner.
Nix “could play golf” with
Trump but not “talk about how
the campaign is conducting its
activities,” said Petalas, principal
of the law firm Garvey Schubert
Barer.
michael.kranish@washpost.com
Craig Timberg in London contributed
to this report.
THURSDAY, MARCH 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
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Facebook to audit thousands of apps for data security
After ‘breach of trust,’
Zuckerberg outlines
coming changes
BY
E LIZABETH D WOSKIN
Mark Zuckerberg on Wednesday said Facebook will audit thousands of apps in response to the
“breach of trust” created by Cambridge Analytica — the chief executive’s first comments since a
crisis erupted Friday over data siphoned by the political marketing
firm used by the Trump campaign.
In a post on his personal Facebook page, Zuckerberg said the
company would investigate thousands of apps that used large
amounts of data at the time. He
said Facebook will give users easier access to tools to manage how
their data is being used and
shared, and will further restrict
developers’ access to data to prevent abuse.
“I started Facebook, and at the
end of the day I’m responsible for
what happens on our platform,” he
said. “ . . . While this specific issue
involving Cambridge Analytica
should no longer happen with
new apps today, that doesn’t
change what happened in the
past. We will learn from this experience to secure our platform
further and make our community
safer for everyone going forward.”
Specifically, he said the company will restrict the data that thirdparty developers can access to just
names, profile photos and email
addresses, and will require developers to sign a contract before
being allowed to ask Facebook users for rights to their posts. The
company will post a new feature
on the top of every Facebook user’s
news feed with a list of the apps
they have used and an easy way to
revoke the app’s access.
Later Wednesday, Zuckerberg
went on a small media tour to
elaborate on his views, telling
CNN he would consider testifying
before Congress about the problems.
“The short answer is, I’m happy
to if it’s the right thing to do,” he
said. “What we try to do is send the
person at Facebook who will have
the most knowledge. If that’s me,
then I am happy to go.”
He also acknowledged making
a mistake in trusting app developers to use Facebook data properly.
“I don’t know about you, but I’m
used to when people legally certify
that they are going to do something, that they do it. But I think
this was clearly a mistake in retrospect,” he said. “We need to make
sure we don’t make that mistake
ever again.”
Until now, Facebook’s top executives have been mum on Cam-
KAREN BLEIER/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Since the revelation that a company used Facebook to improperly
access user data, a movement to quit the social network has grown.
after neither Zuckerberg nor Chief
Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg appeared at a company town
hall meeting Tuesday. News organizations published articles
asking when they would speak. A
#DeleteFacebook
campaign
gained momentum after Brian
Acton, who made millions when
Facebook purchased his app
WhatsApp in 2014, said he was
deleting the social network.
After the Tuesday meeting, employees posted on social media
about how demoralized they felt.
In an app for anonymously dis-
bridge Analytica. Zuckerberg’s
last Facebook post was from early
March, when his sister photographed him baking cookies for
the Jewish holiday Purim.
Facebook suspended Cambridge Analytica on Friday for having obtained data on as many as
50 million users in an unauthorized way. This week, Facebook said
it would audit the firm to determine whether it had deleted the
data.
But the executives’ silence
seemed to attract more attention
to Facebook’s woes — especially
cussing the workplace, Blind,
which requires a corporate email
address to join, a Facebook employee posted, “Is this how the
downfall of Myspace happened?”
Another person wrote, “I just keep
thinking about my stock going to
zero with all of this.” Others asked
for advice about whether they
should sell their stock and said
they would advise recruits against
joining the company.
Behind the scenes, Facebook
was in damage-control mode.
Lobbyists made the rounds on
Capitol Hill. Communications executives sent statements to journalists saying workers and executives, including Zuckerberg, were
“outraged” about being deceived.
Meanwhile, lawmakers reiterated calls for Zuckerberg to testify.
Congress could ultimately choose
to subpoena Zuckerberg or others
like Sandberg to press them to
speak. But lawmakers seemed to
signal they aren’t yet ready to issue
that threat.
“We haven’t crossed that bridge
yet,” said Sen. John Thune
(R-S.D.), the leader of the Commerce Committee, during an interview Tuesday. His panel recently sent Facebook a list of questions
about its dealings with Cambridge
Analytica, and staff will question
company
leaders
privately
Wednesday. A hearing has not
been formally announced.
In his post, Zuckerberg said
that steps the company had taken
to restrict developers’ access to
data in 2015 would prevent the
type of misuse that had taken
place. Through an affiliated psychologist named Aleksandr
Kogan, Cambridge Analytica in
2014 persuaded 270,000 users to
download an app that they
thought was a personality quiz.
They then took advantage of Facebook’s lax data permissions at the
time to gain data on the friend
networks of those 270,000 users.
That enabled Kogan and Cambridge to access data on potentially 50 million Facebook users.
Though Cambridge and Kogan
violated Facebook’s policies by
misrepresenting themselves — users were told the data that was
taken for political marketing was
being used for a personality quiz
app — thousands of third-party
developers benefited from Facebook’s loose rules at the time. The
list of developers who siphoned
friends’ data includes gaming
companies, dating apps, researchers and even President Barack
Obama’s reelection campaign in
2012, as The Washington Post reported on Monday.
elizabeth.dwoskin@washpost.com
Tony Romm and Drew Harwell
contributed to this report.
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/the-switch
E.U. seeks a fairer way to tax tech giants, including Google and Facebook
Focus would be on
where users live, not
headquarters location
BY
M ICHAEL B IRNBAUM
brussels — European policymakers announced a proposal
Wednesday for a new tax on tech
giants such as Google and Facebook, in a measure that could raise
$6.2 billion through what advocates say would be a fairer way of
taxing how the companies make
money.
The proposal would shift tax
revenue away from the low-tax
nations where digital titans are
often headquartered and instead
tap into companies’ revenue in
countries that have the bulk of
their users and customers.
“The digital revolution has
overturned economies and it has
profoundly affected the way businesses create value today,” said
Pierre Moscovici, the European
Union’s top economic and tax official, as he announced the proposal
in Brussels.
“Your click triggers a whole
chain of commercial transactions
and therefore generates substantial profits” that most countries do
not tax, he said. “This legal loophole is no longer acceptable.”
The initiative, which would
need several rounds of approvals,
comes amid a rapidly heating
trade conflict between Europe
and the United States. Absent action by President Trump, new U.S.
tariffs on steel and aluminum imports are set to take effect Friday,
and E.U. leaders have threatened
countermeasures to follow shortly
thereafter.
The move also comes as Facebook’s actions are under a microscope, following revelations that
the Cambridge Analytica data
firm misused information from
50 million U.S. Facebook users to
help Donald Trump win the presidency and that Russians targeted
U.S. voters on the social network.
The goal, advocates say, is fairness. In Europe, companies with
digital business models pay an
effective tax rate of 9.5 percent,
compared to 23.2 percent for companies with traditional business
models, the European Commission said.
European leaders also are concerned that the U.S. tax legislation
passed in December will divert tax
revenue away from Europe and
toward the United States. The tax
law slashed corporate rates to
21 percent and offered incentives
for companies such as Apple,
which had accumulated billions of
dollars in its European subsidiary
in Ireland, to bring home their
profits. Moscovici has said that the
European measures are not connected to actions by any other
government, but French leaders
advocated similar national plans
in reaction to the U.S. policy
changes.
The proposed E.U. tax would hit
only businesses with annual
worldwide
turnover
above
$923 billion that also make more
More broadly, E.U. regulators
have been tougher on tech companies than their U.S. counterparts,
forcing them to give users more
control over their data, imposing
antitrust fines and requiring them
to police content.
The action by the executive arm
of the 28-nation European Union
would seek to impose common tax
rules across the bloc’s vast market
of 500 million consumers.
But the measure is likely to face
skepticism from the countries that
serve as the legal homes to the
firms, as well as small tech-savvy
nations such as Estonia, where the
technology behind Skype was
born. Any E.U.-wide tax measure
would require unanimity.
The proposal released Wednesday would impose a 3 percent tax
on revenue generated from activities where users’ information
helps firms make money. Google
would face the levy for its targeted
advertising, Facebook for its sales
of user information and Amazon
for the marketplace fees it charges
one customer to sell to another.
than $62 billion of their revenue
inside the European Union. That
is being done to give small tech
start-ups room to grow, European
policymakers said. At least 120
global firms fit the criteria, Moscovici said.
Trump administration officials
have raised sharp objections to the
tax plan.
“The U.S. firmly opposes proposals by any country to single out
digital companies,” Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said in a
statement last week that did not
specifically mention the E.U. tax
plans. “Some of these companies
are among the greatest contributors to U.S. job creation and economic growth.”
Advocates of the measure said
they are not targeting U.S. companies. But the U.S.-centered reality
of the modern technology industry puts many U.S. companies in
the crosshairs, and it could hit
Amazon, Uber and others. (The
Washington Post is owned by Jeffrey P. Bezos, the founder and chief
executive of Amazon.)
One prominent tech industry
advocate said the E.U. effort was
misguided.
“We agree with the fundamental thesis of the European Commission: Today’s tax systems do
not reflect that today’s economy is
digital,” said Dean Garfield, the
president of the Information Technology Industry Council, a trade
group that includes many U.S.
tech giants. “Unfortunately, the
E.U.’s digital tax proposal threatens to undermine the progress
Europe is making in ensuring that
its firms, workers and citizens can
benefit from these technologies.”
The E.U. proposal is intended as
a temporary measure until a permanent plan is devised that would
overhaul the taxation of the profits of digital companies. But because of the difficulty of reaching
tax compromises, temporary measures have sometimes remained
in place for decades.
michael.birnbaum@washpost.com
Quentin Ariès contributed to this
report.
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7038.97
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5950.27
4061.05
31,414.52
21,380.97
0.2
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51.56
0.7
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1.1
2.2
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1.6
1.4
1.8
–0.5
–0.1
0.3
0.0
–0.5
–4.6
1.2
14.3
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15.7
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2.8
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Company
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131.19
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54.69
92.48
66.35
77.04
36.27
141.10
127.00
222.82
47.28
123.22
88.18
101.82
0.0
0.1
–0.5
0.1
–0.7
–0.7
–1.6
–0.2
–0.3
–0.1
–1.7
–0.9
–1.4
0.3
0.5
–6.1
7.3
–7.8
–2.8
8.1
6.1
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0.1
4.0
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1.1
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0.0440
149.9130
32.4104
82.1480
5.7554
0.2162
0.5480
0.0384
0.8101
Japan ¥ per 105.9600
130.7900
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0.0067
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3.2690
4.0356
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4.6259
Canada $ per
1.2899
1.5921
0.0121
1.8249
0.3945
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26.0467
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+1.4
+0.1
+0.9
+0.1
day
$900
month
$1100
$1000
0.5
0.5
–0.2
0.5
2.7
2.2
1.0
–0.8
1.7
Gainers
DXP Enterprises Inc
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$39.92
$8.72
$2.71
$18.91
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$24.71
$16.13
$3.25
$9.60
$15.40
$10.41
$7.55
$3.06
$16.32
$4.93
$4.19
$14.85
$11.06
$10.21
$24.80
21.9
15.0
9.7
8.6
8.6
8.6
8.5
8.3
8.2
7.6
7.4
7.4
7.0
6.9
6.9
6.9
6.6
6.6
6.1
6.0
Losers
General Mills Inc
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Daily
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$71.63
$120.16
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$22.80
$32.74
$47.70
$37.42
$14.02
$43.09
$35.34
$10.01
$44.05
$178.92
$54.17
$119.66
–8.9
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–4.4
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–4.0
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Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
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5.93
4.50%
4.33%
Bank Prime
30-Year fixed mortgage
1.75%
Federal Funds
3.76%
2.25%
LIBOR 3-Month
10-year note
Yield: 2.88
2-year note
Yield: 2.30
5-year note
Yield: 2.67
6-month bill
Yield: 1.93
15-Year fixed mortgage
3.66%
1-Year ARM
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
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4:30 p.m. New York time.
A18
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
MARCH 22 , 2018
Conditions festered for years at Maryland women’s shelter
SHELTER FROM A1
directed to the crisis center, guaranteeing funding for the 55-bed
shelter, last year totaling
$385,000. The center receives
hundreds of thousands of dollars
more in county and state grants
to help fund the shelter and provide other services to abuse victims, according to government
records. Its annual operating
budget, including the money
from the marriage license fees, is
$1.3 million.
The latest problems at Safe
Passage became public in December, resulting in the temporary
closure of the shelter and the
resignation of its director, Sophie
Ford.
Residents described mice scurrying from the cushions when
people sat on the sofa and fungus
blocking the bathtub drains.
Mold in the walls gave them
rashes, bedrooms were frigid at
night and donated food was often
spoiled, the women said.
“It was a living hell,” said Jane,
38, who like others interviewed
declined to give her last name, to
stay hidden from her abusive
former partner. She was part of a
group of dozens of women and
children moved from the shelter
to a hotel just before Christmas.
In written responses to questions, Ford said an inspection late
last year found no mold in the
shelter. She attributed heating
problems to ducts that were obstructed and thermostats that
were tampered with and blamed
the crisis center’s board for a lack
of financial support and “thought
leadership.”
At a hearing in February, members of the Prince George’s County Council grilled crisis-center
board members and officials
from the county’s Department of
Family Services, asking why funding was not allocated to maintain
the shelter and buy food, and how
the county failed to address problems for so long.
“This is a life-and-death kind of
situation,” said council member
Mary A. Lehman (D-District 1).
“The degree of professionalism
with which this facility is run is
paramount.”
Board members did not respond to interview requests or
declined to discuss past problems. In a statement, Family Services said the crisis center “has
neglected its responsibilities to
keep the facility clean and safe.”
The problems seemed like
“deja vu” to Tim Buffaloe, chaplain of the New Life Advocacy
Council, which helped shelter
residents air similar complaints
in 2015.
“This was a systemic problem,”
Buffaloe said. “Members of the
county [government] knew about
those issues and determined to
do nothing. They have re-victimized these families.”
An exclusive relationship
Politicians and public servants
launched the Family Crisis Center
in 1981. Elected officials and county bureaucrats took turns serving
on the board. Fundraisers drew a
who’s who of Prince George’s power brokers.
“It was like we were under the
umbrella of the county government,” said Kinaya Sokoya, a licensed social worker who ran the
nonprofit organization from 1990
to 2000. “We were very close.”
Since 2011, according to state
government data, the crisis center
has received more than $4.4 million from the Governor’s Office of
Crime Control and Prevention to
hire staffers, provide legal and
Spanish-language services to
domestic-violence victims, and
create a 24-hour emergency hotline. There were also federal housing grants and state funding bills
filed by Prince George’s lawmakers, including state Sen. Victor R.
Ramirez (D) and former state
delegate Jolene Ivey (D), who is
PHOTOS BY BONNIE JO MOUNT/THE WASHINGTON POST
now running for the county council.
Ramirez did not respond to
requests for comment. Ivey said
that as a former Family Crisis
Center board member, she knew
funding was an issue and wanted
to help address domestic violence.
While the hotline has operated
effectively, the Spanish-language
services have been intermittent,
advocates say. According to monitoring reports and current and
former shelter residents, the
promised counseling services at
times fell short or failed to materialize.
The monitoring reports, obtained by The Washington Post
through a public records request,
also show that certain areas of the
shelter were closed to inspectors
during some visits; in other cases,
monitors noted concerns but said
shelter officials had launched
plans to address them.
Ford did not respond to questions about access. In her written
responses to other questions, she
acknowledged gaps in service because of staff turnover and vacancies but said she tried to address
problems as they were brought to
her attention.
County Executive Rushern L.
Baker III (D) said he has searched
for solutions, including merging
the center with other domestic-violence organizations. But
the county can do only so much,
he said, since no one wants to see
Safe Passage shut down.
“We’ve tried to work with
them,” said Baker, who is running
for governor. “But they are a private entity.”
Baker has submitted a bill to
the Maryland General Assembly
that would allow marriage license
fees to be directed to entities other
than the Family Crisis Center — a
change that was recommended by
the county’s Office of Ethics and
Accountability in 2015 after the
complaint by Buffaloe’s group
sparked an investigation. The bill
is awaiting a committee hearing.
Family Crisis Center officials
say much of their funding is specifically allocated for personnel
costs, rather than food or repairs.
There is no dedicated funding for
maintenance, groceries or cleaning services, interim director Michele Williams said. She is seeking
permission from the state to
change that.
A spokesman for the Governor’s Coordinating Offices said
the state relies on the county to
ensure the shelter is managed
properly.
TOP: Women and children who once resided at the Family
Crisis Center of Prince George’s County are shown in early
February at the hotel where they were moved late last year
after the facility was closed for repairs. ABOVE: Residents
such as this woman were relocated from the crisis center after
inspectors found rooms that were unsanitary and poorly
heated and walls and hallways full of holes.
“Our oversight is programmatic in nature,” spokesman Robert
James said. Like other officials, he
noted that Safe Passage is “the
only shelter in the county that
provides services of its kind to
victims of domestic violence.”
Turnover and turmoil
After a fire destroyed the original Family Crisis Center shelter in
the late 1990s, the county government helped buy and renovate a
new property that became the
current safe house.
“We gutted the place and built
the house from the ground up,”
Sokoya said.
She stepped down as director
in 2000. By the time the board
hired Malinda Miles in 2009,
three more executive directors
had come and gone. The nonprofit group had hundreds of thousands of dollars in debt
Miles left the shelter in 2013. In
late 2014, Ford was hired to replace her.
Shelter residents from that era
could not be found for this report.
But their stories live on in the files
at Prince George’s County Circuit
Court, where 10 women who
sought help from Buffaloe’s group
filed suit and requested a temporary restraining order against the
shelter in early 2015. Two of the
women said they were being
kicked out of the facility; others
said they were being denied help
after trying to expose health and
safety issues.
DayStar Advanced Response
Ministerial Operations, the outreach arm of Buffaloe’s New Life
group, sent photos, affidavits and
other documents to the county
ethics office, the Maryland attorney general, state Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr.
(D-Calvert) and others.
The ethics office confirmed
fire-code violations, gaps in case
management and poor treatment
of residents by shelter employees,
according to a report the office
“This was a systemic problem. Members of the
county [government] knew about those issues
and determined to do nothing. They have
re-victimized these families.”
Tim Buffaloe, chaplain of the New Life Advocacy Council, which helped
shelter residents air similar complaints in 2015
sent to Family Services. In each
case, the report said, shelter managers attributed the problems to
staffers who had since been replaced and told county officials
that steps were being taken to
address the issues.
Betty Hager Francis, chief administrative officer in the county’s Department of Health and
Human Services, wrote a letter to
the ethics office saying she was
“confident” Ford’s leadership and
team “will help to improve outcomes.”
The crisis center hired former
state’s attorney Glenn F. Ivey to
defend the organization in court
and fight the request for a restraining order. Ivey, whose wife
is the state lawmaker who had
served on the crisis center’s board
and sponsored bills to fund it,
also sent Buffaloe a cease-and-desist letter that said the allegations
against the shelter were defamatory.
Circuit Court Judge Albert W.
Northrop asked the Women of
Safe Passage, as they called themselves, to work out a solution with
Glenn Ivey. The women soon
dropped the fight.
“We saw a big elephant in the
room and didn’t have a bigenough elephant gun to shoot it,”
Buffaloe said.
Ivey told The Post that his legal
efforts in the case centered on
freeing up beds in the shelter so
that women newly in crisis could
seek refuge. He did not respond to
later questions about why he sent
the cease-and-desist letter.
New team, new problems
Ford promised better bookkeeping, brought in new staffers
and developed a facility repair
plan. The team included shelter
manager Keiyauna Stanley, who
said Ford told her to buy kitchen
appliances, set strict protocols for
cleanliness and food preparation,
and rewrite the staff policy manual.
But Stanley — who was fired
last fall after making personal use
of a shelter vehicle — says many of
the purchases did not arrive.
Five donated computers were
taken for a software upload and
never returned, Stanley said. Water leaks and mold were painted
over. Code violations piled up,
according to monitoring reports.
By late 2017, Family Services
was having trouble reaching Ford
to schedule a quarterly site visit,
according to a monitoring report.
When monitors arrived, they
found dangerous chemicals in
reach of children and the nonworking elevator being used as a
storage bin. Ford did not allow
them into the living quarters.
“The shelter was not in good
condition,” said the Nov. 29 report. “The floors, hallways, kitchen, play area and living room
space was cluttered, dirty and
dingy.”
Ford did not respond to questions about the site visit.
Stanley said some board members reached out to her last fall,
saying their relationship with
Ford had deteriorated. Other
board members resigned. In November, board member Charlene
Jacobs suggested that Stanley
and other staff members file a
whistleblower complaint so the
board could initiate an investigation. That same week, Ford fired
Stanley.
Ford said she took that action
because Stanley made personal
use of a car that had been donated
to the shelter. Stanley acknowledges taking the car home and
allowing a shelter employee to
put Stanley’s license plates on it
after Stanley’s car was towed. But
she said Ford had allowed employees to take the car home in
the past if they were using it to
buy supplies or perform other
work-related duties.
“I know that’s not why she
really fired me,” Stanley said.
‘We were traumatized’
Once Stanley left, “everything
just fell apart,” said former shelter resident Bea, 32. “We had no
one.”
In December, the shelter residents contacted local media outlets. County and state inspectors
arrived and found rooms that
were unsanitary and poorly heated, and walls and hallways full of
holes.
Fifteen new families have been
served since the shelter reopened, with nine there as of
Wednesday, Williams said. The
shelter initially saved space in
case any of the former residents
wanted to return.
But the women at the hotel say
they do not want to go back. They
have completed interviews to receive government housing vouchers, and some have been placed in
homes or apartments of their
own.
“The conditions they were living in at the time were unacceptable, and it caused them to have a
lot of distrust,” Williams told the
council. “I wouldn’t expect them
to trust us at all.”
In interviews, the women said
their hotel feels like the refuge
Safe Passage should have been.
Church groups and members of
the public donated Christmas
gifts, meals, clothing and school
supplies. The rooms are warm,
the beds are clean.
“It’s better here,” said Jay, a
mother of two who has acted as a
de facto spokesman for the group.
“I’m not going to complain.”
But she and others said they
worry about a few women who
were at the shelter when it closed
and have since lost contact with
the rest of the group.
At the council hearing, Williams requested more funding for
Safe Passage and asked lawmakers to reallocate $108,000 awarded last year so the crisis center
could open an office in southern
Prince George’s.
Council members said the center should fundraise more seriously; just $20,000 of the current
budget came from a nonprofit
foundation, Williams said.
“We’re looking for big things
from you,” council member Andrea C. Harrison (D-District 5)
told Williams. “And we’re not
going to accept any excuses, quite
honestly.”
arelis.hernandez@washpost.com
rachel.chason@washpost.com
Ovetta Wiggins contributed to this
report.
Study uses Apple Watch to try to detect disease, but results are ‘humbling’
BY C AROLYN Y . J OHNSON
AND H AYLEY T SUKAYAMA
Imagine a smartwatch that
surreptitiously scans your body
for telltale signs of disease. Over
time, it detects a quiver in your
heartbeat — the pattern of a common heart condition. An alert
prompts you to seek out further
testing for atrial fibrillation, an
irregular heartbeat that otherwise might have lurked silently
until it caused a stroke.
That’s the tantalizing intersection of wearable consumer technology and medicine that lies in
the future. But according to a new
study that married the cuttingedge of artificial intelligence with
the Apple Watch’s sensor data,
we’re not there yet.
Researchers from the University of California at San Francisco
set out to test the viability of using
the Apple Watch to detect signs of
atrial fibrillation, which is a major cause of stroke. In the scenario
that was closest to a real-world
use of the technology, people who
tested positive for atrial fibrillation had only an 8 percent probability of carrying the condition. The results were, according
to an accompanying editorial in
JAMA Cardiology, “humbling.”
“It really just doesn’t perform,”
said Eric Topol, a cardiologist at
the Scripps Research Institute
who was not involved in the
study. “This doesn’t pass muster
for use in detection of atrial fibrillation.”
That doesn’t mean the limitations of the study can’t be overcome. The study was seen as
a proof-of-concept that screening
tools could be taken out of hospitals and deployed in people’s everyday lives, not as a failure.
Already, the UCSF researchers are
working to address the limitations and continue the work.
And the space is growing.
AliveCor, a health-tech company,
has developed a mobile electrocardiogram and watch band for
the Apple Watch that allow people to actively monitor their heart
rhythms. Apple in the fall announced it was launching
a 500,000-person clinical trial with Stanford University to test
whether the Apple Watch could
detect irregular heart rhythms
and flag signs of atrial fibrillation.
“We have to be very careful
about false positives and causing
distress when it’s really not needed or adding to health-care costs,
for example, because of unnecessary testing — which is why I do
agree more refinement is needed,” said Gregory Marcus, a cardiologist at UCSF who led the work.
“But it’ll be coming. It’s going to
get better, and it’s going to be
coming soon. This is the first
heads-up: Your smartwatches
have the capability of doing this,
so it’s coming and it’s theoretically possible.”
At a time of almost boundless
excitement around the potential
for consumer technologies to
make medicine better, the study
shows that entrepreneurs and
doctors won’t just be able to send
sensor-laden devices out into the
world to transform medicine.
They will need to figure out the
appropriate uses and improve
and tune the technology so it
won’t give false reassurance or
cause unnecessary alarm — and
figure out how to connect data
to useful interventions.
The
researchers
started
with data harvested from the
Apple Watch, from healthy peo-
ple and those with atrial fibrillation. A neural network, essentially a computer system modeled on
the human brain, was set loose on
the data, to learn the difference
between the two groups. That
allowed the researchers to develop algorithms to predict who had
atrial fibrillation and who did
not, based on the Apple Watch
sensor data.
The good news: When they put
Apple Watches on a select population of 51 atrial fibrillation patients who were about to undergo
a procedure to shock their irregular heartbeats back into rhythm,
the algorithm worked well. The
bad news: When researchers tested their algorithm on data from
about 1,600 people as they wore
Apple Watches in their daily lives,
its ability to correctly predict atrial fibrillation plummeted.
“I think this is important, not
just for the field, but to patients
and consumers to understand
that AI or wearables or sensors
are a progressively incremental
piece of the pie here,” said Mintu
Turakhia, executive director of
the Stanford Center for Digital
Health. “So the progress is going
to be incremental, no differently
than self-driving cars.”
Many cardiologists are excited
by the idea of a technology that
could passively monitor people.
However, one technology executive said there’s more value in
making electrocardiogram technology more mobile. “If a fitness
product could get an indication of
atrial fibrillation, the first thing a
doctor would call for is an EKG,”
said AliveCor chief executive Vic
Gundotra.
carolyn.johnson@washpost.com
hayley.tsukayama@washpost.com
THURSDAY, MARCH 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A19
M2
PowerPost
INTELLIGENCE FOR LEADERS WASHINGTONPOST.COM/POWERPOST
Illinois primaries show angry bases in both parties demanding more purity
The Republican
governor of
Illinois, Bruce
Rauner, held off a
JAMES
primary challenge
HOHMANN
Tuesday from a
largely unknown
state representative on his right
by just three percentage points.
A seven-term Democratic
congressman from the Chicago
suburbs, Daniel Lipinski, beat a
first-time candidate challenging
him from the left by less than
two points, or about 1,500 votes.
The powerful chairman of the
Cook County Democratic Party
went down, Bobby Kennedy’s son
lost in the Democratic
gubernatorial primary, and a
slate of candidates endorsed by
Bernie Sanders won.
The second primary night of
the year, in the country’s fifthmost-populous state, showcased
how angry the electorate
remains in this Age of
Disruption. The political
establishments in both parties
face restive grass-roots activists
who are demanding more fealty
to orthodoxy on issues such as
abortion and immigration. Two
years after Donald Trump slew
every avatar of the establishment
on his path to the presidency, the
machines continue to crumble,
more dynasties are ending, and
each party is becoming
increasingly tribal.
Rauner lost support from the
religious right by expanding
access to abortion for Medicaid
recipients last September. The
governor also angered the
nativists who are ascendant in
the GOP by signing a bill that
prohibits cops from detaining
people they suspect of being
undocumented immigrants
without a warrant. “He has
betrayed, literally, the core values
of the Republican platform,”
challenger Jeanne Ives said in
her stump speech.
Lipinski earned the enmity of
women’s groups by refusing to
budge from his staunchly
antiabortion views. He opposed
Obamacare, supported a ban on
abortions after 20 weeks and
voted for religious freedom bills
that many liberals see as giving
license for discrimination
against the LGBT community.
Challenger Marie Newman, who
has a transgender daughter,
referred to Lipinski as a “Trump
Democrat.” “I know what’s in his
heart, and it’s called hate,” she
said.
NARAL Pro-Choice America
The
Daily 202
NAM Y. HUH/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner, holding the hand of his running mate for lieutenant governor, Evelyn Sanguinetti, won Tuesday’s Republican
primary, but by only three percentage points. Rauner will face J.B. Pritzker, who won the Democratic primary by 19 points, in November.
and Emily’s List went all in for
Newman, and a few of the
incumbent’s liberal House
colleagues campaigned against
him, including Rep. Jan
Schakowsky from a nearby
district. Lipinski was dragged
across the finish line by a field
program paid for by Susan B.
Anthony List. The antiabortion
group waded into a Democratic
primary for the first time in a
decade and flooded the district
with 70 canvassers for the final
four days.
Turnout statewide surged
among Democrats but was
lackluster on the Republican
side. About twice as many
Democrats voted as Republicans.
It’s another proof point of an
enthusiasm gap that continues to
benefit the left as the midterms
approach.
Rauner’s close call is
reminiscent of what happened in
Virginia last June to Ed Gillespie.
The former chairman of the
Republican National Committee
beat firebrand Corey Stewart in
the GOP primary by only one
point, despite a massive
fundraising advantage and
overwhelming institutional
support. The unexpected
vulnerability foreshadowed
Gillespie’s struggles to unite the
right in the fall.
It’s bigger than social issues.
Illinois didn’t have a budget for
two years and its credit rating
got downgraded to nearly junk
status when Rauner was unable
to cut a deal with the Democrats
who control the state legislature.
Just as national Republicans use
Nancy Pelosi as a foil, the
governor has tried to blame all
his problems on Democratic
House Speaker Mike Madigan.
It has not worked. Polls show
that Rauner is about as popular
in his state as President Trump,
who lost the Land of Lincoln by
17 points in 2016. “Ives embraced
Trump as part of her campaign,
while Rauner said he and the
president are not ‘particularly
close,’ ” The Post’s Amber Phillips
notes.
Seeing internal polls that
showed him in trouble, Rauner
last week decided to veto a
compromise gun-control bill and
announced his decision on
conservative radio in the more
rural and conservative
downstate Illinois. He also tried
to attack his opponent from the
right on television, which didn’t
pass the laugh test and probably
elevated her profile. National
Review declared Tuesday that
“Rauner Deserves to Lose.”
“To those of you around the
state who wanted to send me a
message, let me be clear: I have
heard you,” Rauner said in a
victory speech, which began
hours later than planned on
account of the photo finish.
Like Ives against Rauner,
Newman channeled the anger of
the liberal base against Lipinski.
Even as the numbers moved
against her on Tuesday night, she
declined to concede. She told her
supporters that she “would like
Mr. Lipinski to have a very
painful evening, so we’re going to
wait.”
The labor unions stuck with
Lipinski because he’s been an
ally, and most of the business
community backed him because
he’s brought home the bacon.
But make no mistake: The
congressman’s narrow win is not
a vindication of his style of
politics. It’s a Pyrrhic victory that
shows an era coming to an end.
In the last round of
reapportionment, the district
was carefully drawn to include
heavily Catholic suburbs so that
Lipinski could hold the seat —
which he inherited from his
father, Bill, who held it for 22
years until 2005. It’s easy to see
him retiring rather than face an
even bigger onslaught from a
stronger challenger in 2020.
Outside of ruby red states such
as West Virginia and North
Dakota, the Blue Dogs have
become an endangered species.
Even then, Sen. Doug Jones (DAla.) won the special election last
December by promising to
protect the Affordable Care Act
and speaking out against a 20week abortion ban.
A Pew Research study
published Tuesday highlights the
degree to which the two parties
continue a seismic, long-term
sorting out. “The share of
Democratic voters describing
their political views as liberal has
increased steadily since 2000,”
the study found. “Currently,
nearly half of Democratic and
Democratic-leaning registered
voters (46%) say they are liberal,
while 37% identify as moderates
and 15% say they are
conservatives. A decade ago,
more Democrats described their
views as moderate (44%) than
liberal (28%), while 23% said
they were conservative.”
On the other side, Pew found
that about two-thirds of
Republicans (68 percent)
described their views as
conservative, 27 percent as
moderate and 4 percent as
liberal. “While there has been
little change in Republicans’ selfdescribed ideology in recent
years, the share calling
themselves conservatives rose
from 58% in 2000 to 65% eight
years later,” the study said.
College graduates, women,
minorities and millennials
continue moving toward
Democrats while Republicans
consolidate gains among lesseducated whites, especially men.
Pew, with a survey sample of
10,000 Americans, found that
56 percent of women identify
with Democrats, up four points
from 2015; 58 percent of college
graduates affiliate with
Democrats, the highest number
recorded since 1992; and
59 percent of millennials lean
Democratic, compared with
48 percent of both Generation
Xers and baby boomers.
Lipinski is now virtually
assured of reelection because the
only Republican who ran is a
Holocaust denier who has been
involved in anti-Semitic and
racist groups since the 1970s. The
Illinois GOP and the National
Republican Congressional
Committee both disavowed their
nominee, Arthur Jones, and said
he will get no support.
james.hohmann@washpost.com
Perry has a plan for Russia’s grid attacks. Lawmakers worry it’s not enough.
The Trump
administration
has been dinged
by critics at
DINO
GRANDONI
nearly every turn
for its response to
Russian
interference in affairs at home.
On Tuesday, Rick Perry got
his turn.
The head of the Energy
Department has an oftenoverlooked but critical role in
protecting the U.S. energy sector
from digital attacks. And
senators gave Perry an earful
after a recent report that
Russians nuzzled their way into
computer systems controlling
energy infrastructure in the
United States.
Perry responded that he is
taking the threat so seriously,
he is creating a whole new office
within the Energy Department
to handle it.
The new Office of
Cybersecurity, Energy Security
and Emergency Response
(CESER) will coordinate efforts
to protect the electric grid —
and, should the worst happen,
respond to compromises.
Russian efforts to disrupt the
2016 presidential election
through cyberattacks and fake
news have been the subject of
news stories for more than a
year. Less publicized, but also
serious, are remote intrusions
Russians have made into U.S.
power plants, confirmed by the
Department of Homeland
Security and the FBI.
“Our energy infrastructure is
under attack,” said Sen. Maria
Cantwell (D-Wash.), who is the
top Democrat on the Senate
Energy and Natural Resources
Committee and who over the
past several months has been
loudly beating the drum on the
Russian threat to the grid. “It’s
under cyberattack, and we need
to do much more to protect it as
a national critical asset. Russia
has proven its ability to disrupt
the grid.”
Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-
The
Energy 202
Alaska), chair of the committee,
backed her Democratic
colleague: “Know I share
Senator Cantwell’s concern on
this. I want to make sure that
DOE is cooperating with DHS
and the FBI with
implementation of actions in
response.”
After first alerting utility
companies in June, the DHS
and FBI last week reported that
Russian agents had gained the
access needed to shut down or
otherwise sabotage power
plants. It was the first time the
Trump administration, which
issued new sanctions against
Russians in the wake of the
revelations, pointed the finger
squarely at Russia for the
energy infrastructure hacks.
Perry tried to reassure the
senators the threat was on his
radar. “There is a clear role DOE
plays on cyber,” Perry said. “We
are committed to being as
technically advanced as
possible.”
Even before the blockbuster
report, the Energy Department
began to lay the groundwork for
the creation of a new office
meant to address the
heightened natural and manmade threats to the U.S. electric
grid.
The department first
announced it was creating
CESER last month. To ensure
the office works with scientists
at the Energy Department’s
national laboratories dotted
across the country, CESER will
report directly to Mark
Menezes, who as undersecretary
of energy is the No. 3 official in
the department. That reporting
relationship, Perry said Tuesday,
creates a “direct pipeline of
information” back to him.
The Energy Department,
already designated by
Congress as the lead federal
agency to work with utilities
on making sure their systems
protect against intrusion, can
establish the new office and
assistant-secretary post to run
it without additional
congressional approval.
Now, the Trump
administration is asking for
$470 million to prevent and
address cyberattacks on the
energy sector, $93 million of
which would be injected into
the new office.
That is not enough, Cantwell
countered. “I’ve called for a
doubling,” she said Tuesday,
“but I can see where I am wildly
underfunding what is one of the
most serious threats to us as a
nation right now.”
At least three times over the
past year, Cantwell has called on
the Trump administration to
produce a risk assessment on
Russia’s capability to hack the
grid. “We are deeply concerned
that your administration has
not backed up a verbal
commitment prioritizing
cybersecurity of energy
networks and fighting cyber
aggression with any meaningful
action,” Cantwell and other
Democratic senators wrote to
President Trump in June.
So far there has been silence
from the Trump administration
on the request, her office said.
“Do you believe that we need
a risk assessment as a nation?”
Cantwell asked Perry at the
hearing.
“I think that’s going on as we
speak,” Perry responded. “We
have three different areas in
DOE that are focused on cyber
and have been meeting and
having these conversations.”
Yet last week, Perry expressed
doubts the federal government
as a whole is doing enough to
check the threat.
“I’m not confident that the
federal government has a broad
strategy in place that is not
duplicating,” Perry told the
House Appropriations
subcommittee on energy and
water issues, “or is least
duplicative as it can be.”
Concerns over Russian
cyberattacks have animated
congressional hearings
recently. Facing grilling from
Democrats on the Senate
Armed Services Committee
last month, Adm. Michael S.
Rogers, who heads the
National Security Agency and
U.S. Cyber Command, bluntly
acknowledged that “we’re
probably not doing enough” to
counter Russia online.
“They haven’t paid a price, at
least that’s sufficient to get
them to change their behavior,”
Rogers said. He added that
Trump has not yet ordered
Cyber Command to try to
disrupt Russian threats.
ANDREW HARRER/BLOOMBERG NEWS
dino.grandoni@washpost.com
Energy Secretary Rick Perry speaks with members of the media
before a House Appropriations subcommittee hearing last week.
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A dismal report on a positive report
EDITORIALS
The great sharing machines
Social networks such as Facebook should be perfected, not impeded.
B
bridge University, then provided the data — on some
50 million people — to Cambridge Analytica, a
private firm founded by Stephen K. Bannon, the
conservative political operative; and Robert Mercer,
the wealthy financier; and another firm.
This transfer of data to a third party broke Facebook’s internal policies. In 2015, Facebook found out,
removed the app and demanded the data be destroyed. Apparently, it was not, and may have been
exploited to help Donald Trump’s 2016 campaign,
including tests of anti-establishment messages such
as “deep state” and “drain the swamp.” The transfer
may also have violated Facebook assurances about
user privacy to the Federal Trade Commission in a
2011 settlement.
Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg responded
Wednesday with an admission of “a breach of trust”
and a promise of tighter controls. Further examination of how this happened should come from Facebook, Congress and the FTC. However, users must be
realistic. Social media platforms are in business to
share. Anyone who spends time browsing online will
Let’s page doctors,
not executioners
soon discover hidden sinews that connect each click.
Consumers benefit when they get recommendations
for a product “we thought you might like.” But at the
same time, no one wants a nightmarish surveillance
state like that under construction in China, where
every citizen is being assigned a “social credit” score.
The trick is to find the right path.
Facebook and others are under enormous pressure
to behave more as publishers responsible for their
content than as neutral platforms. They should not
resist. Facebook faces a related set of questions about
manipulation of the platform in the 2016 campaign.
It is plausible that some were moved to vote for
Mr. Trump by postings or ads based on the data
Mr. Kogan gave Cambridge Analytica. That is a story
that needs to be thoroughly aired, while bearing in
mind that Democrats Barack Obama and Hillary
Clinton also harnessed big data in their campaigns.
All of this should be pursued in the spirit of
perfecting rules of the road to keep social networks
free and open. In the end, they should remain what
they are, great sharing machines.
TOM TOLES
Mr. Trump wants to kill drug
dealers. Wiser prescribing would
better fight the opioid epidemic.
T
HE OPIOID crisis is a complicated problem,
for which President Trump offered his usual
simplistic approach Monday. His comments
emphasized force and punishment, including, as expected, the death penalty for drug traffickers — as well as an attempt to link the drug crisis to
immigration by blaming it on “sanctuary cities”
supposedly swarming with foreign drug dealers. He
offered no new funding for drug treatment beyond
the welcome but still inadequate $6 billion two-year
program moving through Congress, though to his
credit he recommended repeal of a 1970s-era law that
prevents Medicaid from paying for care at large
inpatient facilities.
One reason the president’s rhetoric was so inappropriate is that the drugs at issue are not all illegal.
Illicit heroin and fentanyl use has indeed surged in
the past half-decade; those two drugs account for the
lion’s share of the 64,000 drug overdose deaths in the
United States during 2016, according to the Centers
for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). However,
if you eliminated them all, the country would still
have a massive problem. The epidemic began two
decades ago with legally prescribed opioid analgesics
such as oxycodone and hydrocodone. And those
drugs caused more than 17,000 overdose deaths in
2016.
The good news is that government, the medical
community and patients are learning the lessons of
unwise past prescription practices, especially the
widespread use of opioids for chronic, non-cancer
pain. In more recent years, opioid prescribing has
begun to decline, from the all-time peak of 782 morphine milligram equivalents (MME) per capita in
2010 to 640 MME per capita in 2015, according to a
July 2017 CDC report. That’s an 18-percent decline,
which has almost certainly continued, or even accelerated, especially since the CDC published new, more
cautious opioid prescribing guidelines in 2016.
Predictably, there is now a backlash to the backlash: Advocates for pain patients decry the lack of
access to opioids and say they are being made to
The March 19 Metro article “USDA change worries planners” contained welcome news: Agriculture
Secretary Sonny Perdue is planning to limit the
number of days his employees can telework. It is
about time that attention be paid to the abuse of this
privilege.
Using road congestion as the primary reason for
encouraging this option is outrageous. Carpools and
more federal money for buses are far better and less
costly ways for the government to address congestion. Absent employees are not the answer.
Government projects are important, employees
working together on site are far more productive,
and there should be no special privileges afforded to
employees who earn the same full salary as those
who show up for work every day. The teleworker can
also take his home time to keep doctor or dental
appointments without dipping into his sick or
vacation leave hours. How many teleworkers do just
that? Those who work at the office lose that option
and must take sick or vacation leave for personal
appointments.
Mr. Perdue obviously understands the import of
employee responsibility as a team to accomplish
government business. I hope his action will be
adopted by all government agencies.
Joan Salemi, West Springfield
A dishonorable discharge?
suffer for the mistakes of others. Such concerns need
to be taken seriously — opioids must remain available for cancer pain and other clear palliative needs.
Yet these complaints also need to be kept in
perspective. Data show wide geographic discrepancies in rates of opioid prescribing (poor, rural counties have higher rates than urban ones), which
suggests that objective medical considerations are
not the only reason for heavy usage where it occurs.
Indeed, the latest research shows that opioids are not
the most effective treatment for common forms of
non-cancer pain. Quite often, they have been dispensed precisely because more effective alternatives
been credited with avoiding greater tragedy.
But relief that more people weren’t hurt or killed
doesn’t diminish the horror of what happened in
that school corridor. Nor does it minimize the threat
that is posed by gun violence, or the damage done.
Little more than a month has passed since 17 people
were killed in the mass shooting at Marjory
Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla.
Less than two weeks ago, a 17-year-old girl who had
hoped to be a nurse was shot and killed in her
Birmingham, Ala., high school.
The casualties of gun violence extend beyond
those hit by bullets. A searing examination of the
collateral damage of gun violence by The Post’s John
Woodrow Cox and Steven Rich showed lifelong
trauma in students who attended schools where
shootings occurred. They estimated that more than
187,000 students attending at least 193 primary or
secondary schools have been affected since the 1999
shooting at Columbine High School. Shootings have
— physical therapy, for example — were not available.
Even after recent reductions, doctors in the United
States still prescribe legal opioids at three times the
1999 rate. If doctors met the goal Mr. Trump set in his
speech — a one-third reduction in opioid prescriptions by 2021 — they would still be prescribing at
double the 1999 rate. And the United States would
still be administering legal opioids far more frequently than its peer nations in the industrialized
world. This country prescribes opioid pain medicines twice as frequently as Germany does, but as
bitter experience has taught, that doesn’t make us
twice as good at treating pain.
also transformed school culture. Active-shooter
drills have become a macabre part of the school
routine, with children as young as 4 trained to
recognize the sound of gunfire and to hide in closets
and bathrooms.
“It’s no longer the default that going to school is
going to make you feel safe,” childhood trauma
expert Bruce D. Perry told the Post reporters. “Even
kids who come from middle-class and upper-middleclass communities literally don’t feel safe in schools.”
That fear — along with grief and anger and
frustration — is helping fuel the student-led movement for gun control and stronger school safety
measures. As many as 500,000 people are expected
to attend the March for Our Lives rally in Washington on Saturday, and spin-off events are planned in
other cities. Let’s hope they succeed in bringing
about the change in political climate that is needed
for meaningful reforms. No other community should
have to learn what St. Mary’s learned.
ABCDE
L O CA L O P I N I O N S
FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
Nothing exceptional about these exceptions
Last year, the District regulated house sizes to
protect people from being swamped by neighbors
who desire to “improve” things by building out and
up. People, in theory, can’t add “pop-outs” to their
houses. My neighbor can’t build a two-story, 20-foot
addition to the back of his house because it would be
triple the length of my house. He can’t block my air
and sunlight, imperil my trees and ruin the open
tree-scape that’s in the middle of our block. Actually,
he can.
The Board of Zoning Adjustment can grant a
“special exception” and allow the construction to go
ahead. Even when there’s nothing “special” or
“exceptional,” and it’s just another project to build a
family room and a bigger master-bedroom suite.
So what is the point of the regulation, designed to
Teleworking is a scam
Regarding the March 18 editorial “Ms. Haspel
owes some answers”:
Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) stated that CIA
Deputy Director Gina Haspel oversaw torture and
abuse that “had been ruled legal by Justice Department lawyers,” according to the editorial. But
Ms. Feinstein orchestrated an authoritative report
on torture and abuse that noted the CIA used torture
techniques in its secret prisons that went far beyond
the stipulations of the Justice Department’s questionable memorandums on acceptable “enhanced
interrogation techniques.”
It is simply not good enough for the senator to
argue now that Ms. Haspel “seems to have the
confidence of the agency.” Has Ms. Feinstein even
read her own report?
Melvin A. Goodman, Bethesda
A school shooting in St. Mary’s County is another reason students nationwide are marching against gun violence.
A
If Jacy Gomez was trying to demonize the D.C.
Veterans Affairs hospital in her March 18 Local
Opinions essay, “What a dismal report on the D.C.
VA facility says about the whole system,” she
accomplished just the opposite. She wrote, “Shockingly, [Inspector General Michael J.] Missal did not
find any instances of patient harm as a result of
hospital shortcomings.” Sounds like well-deserved
praise to me. Ms. Gomez went on with added
praise: “He did note, however, that this was ‘largely
due to the efforts of many dedicated health care
providers that overcame service deficiencies to
ensure patients received needed care.’ ”
After many years of care at the District’s VA
hospital, this World War II veteran agrees with the
above statement. The care I have received at the
hospital has been excellent and has been administered by caring medical professionals.
Richard Lampl, Rockville
Ms. Feinstein owes some answers
‘It can happen to anybody’
COMMON, sad sentiment was sounded in
the aftermath of Tuesday’s shooting at Great
Mills High School in Southern Maryland:
“The notion of ‘it can’t happen here’ is no
longer a notion,” said St. Mary’s County Sheriff
Timothy K. Cameron. “If you don’t think this can
happen at your school, you are sadly mistaken,” said
St. Mary’s Schools Superintendent James Scott
Smith. And from parent Shonita Somerville: “I never
thought something like this would happen here.
St. Mary’s is a small little place. Now I can say, ‘You
think it wouldn’t happen? It can happen to anybody.’ ”
Two students were injured in Tuesday’s shooting,
including a 16-year-old girl who was reported in
critical condition. The 17-year-old student who
opened fire with a Glock 9mm handgun just as
classes began died after a confrontation with a
school resource officer. It is unclear whether the
student or the officer fired the fatal shot, but the
quick action of Deputy First Class Blaine Gaskill has
MARCH 22 , 2018
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
EFORE RUSHING to judgment on the latest
surge of disclosures about Facebook data and
how it was used by Cambridge Analytica,
everyone should take a deep breath. The very
essence of Facebook and social media is to share
information, to entertain and enlighten users, and to
sustain a business model that has transformed marketing, advertising and news. Those who enter the
ecosystem of social networking should not suddenly
be shocked that information is being shared. What
they should want is transparency and a robust digital
world that does not become a hidden surveillance
state.
A key question is: Who owns personal information? Facebook allowed an outside researcher in 2013
to develop an app on the platform that paid users a
small sum to answer questions and download the
app, which then harvested private information from
their profiles and their friends. Facebook permitted
such data mining at the time. It is doubtful many
users knew what was happening or read the fine
print. The researcher, Aleksandr Kogan of Cam-
. THURSDAY,
protect people in small houses, if the BZA routinely
grants “special exceptions”?
As I’ve fought to preserve the integrity of my
house and garden, countless neighbors have spoken
to me about the need for trees and green space over
brick and concrete. Granting “special exceptions”
for routine work sets a bad precedent. The “special
exception” is governed by BZA members’ whims
(and developers’ pressure) but also, it stands to
reason, by the size of the house next door. So as one
house gets bigger, the next one can, and the next
one. People want less construction, fewer walls and
more open spaces. In passing the new regulations on
proportionality and building size, the D.C. government recognized that. Now it just has to act on it.
Alison Schafer, Washington
News pages:
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I wholeheartedly agree with the March 18 editorial
“Mr. Trump’s bullying” that President Trump’s tweet
celebrating the firing of former FBI deputy director
Andrew McCabe was nasty and small- minded. This
entire event has been handled by the president and
the attorney general in a manner that can only be
described as dishonorable, petty, vindictive and just
plain sleazy.
I was a junior officer in the Coast Guard in the 1970s
and, at least back then, you could be brought up for
disciplinary action for conduct unbecoming an officer. This is clearly a case of conduct unbecoming of the
president of the United States, but perhaps the only
recourse will be the 2020 election, when hopefully the
American people will say to Mr. Trump, “You’re fired!”
William A. Jordan, Washington
I can offer no opinion about whatever Andrew
McCabe had been doing, right or wrong, with his
assignments at the FBI. However, his firing is an
internal Justice Department issue. The attorney general fired him, and that is the attorney general’s
prerogative. It is not for Congress to second-guess. We
should assume our nation’s top law enforcement
officer is applying his professional judgment in the
matter.
More important, the Constitution puts certain
departments under the president, who appoints
heads to run them. This separation of powers means
that Congress has no authority. The last thing we need
is politics seeping into these departments. We expect
them to be free of politics so that they can focus on the
tasks of national defense and law enforcement.
Harold Knudsen, Alexandria
Of all the odious things that President Trump
and Attorney General Jeff Sessions have done, the
politically motivated firing of a longtime, dedicated
federal public servant is the most disgusting. To
deprive Andrew McCabe of his well-earned retirement pension is beyond the pale.
This was an act worthy of Russian President Vladimir Putin, but sadly we see it happen in our own
country. Mr. McCabe deserves the pension he earned.
Barbara Kernan, Rockville
Denigrating Ms. Daniels
In his March 20 op-ed, “The adult-film star and
the juvenile president,” Richard Cohen argued that
it is difficult to take sides in the conflict between
Stormy Daniels and President Trump because
“Daniels, after all, is a porn actress.” The implication that because someone works in the adult
entertainment or sex industry, her actions are on
any level comparable to the actions of our president
is shocking. Working in the adult entertainment
industry is work, and equating that to any of the
offensive and damaging actions and some alleged
nonconsensual things that our president has done
is disrespectful at best.
Anna O’Driscoll, Takoma Park
Letters to the editor: letters@washpost.com
THURSDAY, MARCH 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A21
RE
E.J. DIONNE JR.
GEORGE F. WILL
Antisocial social media?
A California
dream for
Democrats
I
n 1964, the novelist Eugene Burdick
published “The 480.” The bestselling book described, as Burdick
wrote in his preface, “people who
work with slide rules and calculating
machines and computers which can retain an almost infinite number of bits of
information as well as sort, categorize
and reproduce this information at the
press of a button.”
The title refers to 480 categories of
voters, defined by demographic characteristics, created by the Simulmatics
Corp., a real company, as a way of
targeting appeals to small subgroups.
The novel’s drama centers on data manipulation’s role in lifting a dark-horse
candidate toward the Republican presidential nomination.
We’re told of five different campaign
mailings directed “to five carefully selected groups that shared only one quality: they were likely to turn out to vote and
they had a special grievance.” I suppose
that’s two qualities, but you get Burdick’s
point. And, yes, the author’s engaging
tale was based on reality: John F.
Kennedy used Simulmatics in his 1960
presidential campaign.
“The 480” speaks to how long Americans have worried about the manipulation of our political decisions by tech
magicians with access to mounds of
information.
The Facebook/Cambridge Analytica
scandal takes our paranoia to a whole
new level. But paranoia, implying psychologically unhealthy delusions, is the
wrong word. There is nothing disordered
about the outrage created by the invasion
of an estimated 50 million Facebook
accounts for the ultimate benefit of
Donald Trump’s presidential campaign.
The upshot is that private companies
that traffic in the enormous amounts of
personal data we voluntarily give them
are not living up to their obligations both
to each of us as individuals and to the
common good.
Data mining, as Burdick’s book shows,
is not new. But today’s social media
companies do it more extensively and
more efficiently. Consider an imperfect
but instructive analogy. Any campaign
can acquire your listed landline number.
But no campaign is permitted access to
your hopes, fears, worries, passions or
day-to-day business by way of a phone
tap. Facebook’s accumulated information may not be quite like a tap. But the
company sure knows a whole lot about
you.
So we have a right to worry about the
ability of a researcher to use voluntary
answers to a survey of 270,000 Facebook
users to “scrape” information on 50 mil-
lion people, later used by Trump’s campaign. We have a right to be outraged
about Facebook’s failure to inform users
that their data had been harvested. “They
keep saying, ‘Trust us, we can take care of
our own people and our own website,’ ”
Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) told the
Minneapolis Star Tribune. “Well, that’s
not true.” She and Sen. John Neely
Kennedy (R-La.) have called for Judiciary
Committee hearings, and Sen. Mark
R. Warner (D-Va.) also called on Facebook founder and chief executive Mark
Zuckerberg to testify before Congress.
Far from obviating his need to testify,
Zuckerberg’s statement Wednesday afternoon acknowledging “mistakes” and
pledging to “work through this” largely
repeated what we already know. He’ll
have to do much more.
Warner, the vice chairman of the
Intelligence Committee investigating
Russian interference in our election, has
been properly cautious about connecting
the Cambridge Analytica story to Russia.
But as Justin Hendrix, the executive
director of NYC Media Lab, argued on
Slate, there is evidence giving plausibility
to the idea “that Cambridge Analytica
helped spur the Russian disinformation
operation during the 2016 election.” And
the close ties between Cambridge Analytica and the Trump campaign, beginning
with Stephen K. Bannon’s role as vice
president and secretary of the company,
mean that inquiries into such links are
inevitable.
The Post’s Philip Bump warned on
Wednesday of the dangers of seeking a
“Grand Theory of Russia Collusion.” Fair
enough. Let’s learn more. But we should
expect the social media giants to cooperate in helping us do this.
We must decide when Facebook and
comparable companies should be held
accountable as public utilities. And when
do they look more like publishers who
bear responsibility for the veracity of the
“information” they spread around?
We also need to confront conflicts
between the public interest and the ways
that social media companies make their
profits. Where do privacy rights come in?
Are they unduly blocking transparency
about how political campaigns are conducted and who is financing them? Were
they indifferent to their manipulation by
foreign powers?
In his preface to “The 480,” Burdick
said he hoped his book would illustrate
“the political realities of today and the
political hazards of tomorrow.” Well,
tomorrow is here, and its hazards outstrip even Burdick’s prophetic imagination.
ejdionne@washpost.com
CHARLES LANE
From the Soviet bloc
to the American South
W
hile he was still a dissident
playwright living under a
Communist system, Vaclav
Havel produced possibly the
most brilliant essay ever written on political oppression in Eastern Europe: “The
Power of the Powerless.” This year marks
the 40th anniversary of its appearance in
opposition circles in 1978, which was
followed swiftly by Havel’s arrest and
imprisonment.
Communist rule is long gone in Europe. Yet anyone who doubts the relevance of Havel’s ideas should read another thought-provoking piece of political writing, “In the Shadow of Statues,”
the newly published book by Mayor
Mitch Landrieu of New Orleans.
What could Havel’s long-ago dissection of Soviet-bloc politics have in common with a U.S. politician’s memoir
about carrying out a decision to dismantle his city’s monuments to Robert E. Lee
and other Confederate heroes?
Both explain the power of truth.
Havel memorably asked his readers to
imagine a greengrocer who obediently
posts a hackneyed slogan — “workers of
the world, unite!” — in the window of his
shop. He asks us to imagine as well all the
people who unthinkingly pass by each
day. Everyone takes the slogan for granted; it’s part of the “panorama.” Havel
defined the panorama as an ideologically
manipulated urban landscape that communicates to people “where they are
living and what is expected of them,” and
what they must do, lest they lose “their
peace and tranquility and security.” The
panorama included not only shopwindow slogans but also statues of
Joseph Stalin, Vladimir Lenin and other
Soviet heroes.
What would happen, Havel asked, if
one fine day that greengrocer stopped
going along to get along? If he started
thinking about the panorama, instead of
accepting it? Suppose he takes down the
sign and begins “to say what he really
thinks at political meetings,” or “even
finds the strength in himself to express
solidarity with those whom his conscience commands him to support.”
This “attempt to live within the truth,”
as Havel put it, might imperil the individual who makes it, but it would simultaneously, through the power of example,
lay a basis for wider change.
For Landrieu and other white New
Orleanians, the Confederate statues that
stood for decades in New Orleans were
like the placard in Havel’s greengrocer’s
window: part of the unquestioned “panorama” in his hometown. “Jefferson Davis
was there-but-not-there as we drove by,”
he recalls.
He took them for granted — until he
didn’t. Prompted by his conversations
with African American jazz legend Wynton Marsalis, and reacting to the 2015
massacre of black churchgoers by a white
supremacist in Charleston, S.C., Landrieu started to see the statuary in a
different light.
He learned the history behind them.
They had been erected in the post-Civil
War era by local authorities for
propaganda purposes: to honor the
“Lost Cause” of the Confederacy, yes, but
also to show African Americans that
white supremacy was still very much
alive, and that resistance to it would not
be tolerated.
And as Landrieu explored these truths,
he began to find it possible to express
solidarity with the city’s black residents
on the issue; he saw the Lee statue
through the eyes of African American
children, who might wonder why a warmaker on behalf of slavery should enjoy
an honored place in public space. That
“pretty much did it for me,” he writes.
One does not want to overstate the
similarities between Havel’s predicament and that of Landrieu, who, after all,
was not a powerless denizen of a dictatorial state but an elected official in a
democracy.
Yet one should not understate the
parallel, either: Landrieu’s insistence on
carrying out a city council ordinance to
dismantle the monuments, after courts
upheld it, cost him friends, personal and
political.
It also prompted threats of violence,
presumably from a stubborn handful of
people who insist on living the lie of
Confederate nobility and imposing that
lie on others. Given the threats, New
Orleans had trouble finding a contractor
willing to take down the heavy statues.
The work had to be carried out under
heavy security late at night.
New Orleans and the South function
democratically today. Yet within living
memory, for the nine decades between
the end of Reconstruction and the civil
rights revolution, the region languished
under de facto one-party rule.
During that time — which was also the
period of Confederate monument construction — it could be as dangerous to
belong to the NAACP in Louisiana as it
was to be a dissident playwright in Communist Prague. Maybe more dangerous.
Uncomfortable as it might be to think
of our country’s history in those terms,
we have to do so, if we want to live within
the truth. Landrieu has shown the way.
lanec@washpost.com
los angeles
O
staff John Kelly also is furious that a
confidential presidential briefing became
public knowledge, a White House official
said, and intends to address the matter
Wednesday as aides try to figure out who
disclosed the warning,” indicated the CNN
story. A more constructive response might
be to insist that the president of the United
States treat Putin’s Russia like the foe that
it has proved to be.
Note the narrowness of the leak that
wound up in the pages of The Post. The
congratulations were a matter of public
record in the afternoon on Tuesday. The
officials cited by The Post added that
Trump’s remarks in the call countered
briefing materials. There’s a strong public
interest in such information: Here we have
a president who has laid bare his impulsive, clueless and narcissistic ways in tweet
after tweet. If only this unhinged person
listened to his own advisers, he could
mitigate his own towering defects. He
doesn’t, as it turns out.
Another possibility: Officials are fed up
with Trump’s general nonchalance toward
briefings. They might want him to take up
reading. Yet another possibility: Officials
don’t want their buddies in and around the
Beltway to think that they advised the
president to congratulate Putin.
The motives don’t particularly matter as
much as the value of the information,
which is high. We need our whistleblowers
— or “leakers,” as the president attempts to
sully them.
n a recent Sunday evening,
Katie Hill, 30, whose father
is a police lieutenant in Beverly Hills, boarded a red-eye
flight to Washington for frenetic
fundraising and networking. She
must really want to get into the
House of Representatives. If she
does, she will have defeated a twoterm incumbent, Rep. Steve Knight,
51, who was a Los Angeles police
officer for 18 years and is the last
Republican serving any district containing a significant portion of Los
Angeles County.
California’s 25th District includes
Simi Valley, which is famous for
being the home of the Ronald
Reagan Presidential Library and
Museum and the trial of police officers charged with brutality against
Rodney King. It is home to many of
the Los Angeles police officers who
helped quell the rioting after the
accused officers’ acquittal. Hill’s
father-in-law, too, is a cop. Her husband’s uncle was an officer killed in
the line of duty; his death is currently
Orange County’s only unsolved police murder. In the June 5 primary,
Hill will be the first Democrat to
receive her father’s vote.
The 25th is at the top of a list of
seven (of 14 total) Republican-held
California seats that Democrats hope
to capture because Hillary Clinton
carried them in 2016. The seven are
almost a third of the 23 such districts nationwide. Joe Trippi, the
Democratic consultant who was media adviser to Doug Jones’s successful Alabama U.S. Senate campaign,
says Jones got votes from Republicans who still support the president
but want no more chaos. But, referring to California Democrats, he
warns that “our own enthusiasm
might get in the way.”
This is because in 2011, Democrats
— who run this almost monochrome
blue state — ignored the axiom that
improvements often make things
worse. They instituted a primary
system under which the top two
vote-getters for an office are on the
November ballots, even if both are
from the same party. This year, Democrats, fueled by fury against the
president, might produce such a profusion of candidates that the Democratic vote will be fragmented, putting weak general-election Democrats, or no Democrats, on some
November ballots.
In 2014, when Republican
Howard P. “Buck” McKeon, chairman of the House Armed Services
Committee, retired after 11 terms
representing the 25th, Republican
Tony Strickland, with nearly 30 percent of the primary vote, ran against
Knight (28 percent) in November.
Democrats were excluded because
their top performer in the primary
received only 22 percent. In 2016, a
Democrat, Bryan Caforio, ran
against Knight and lost by six points
while Clinton was winning the district by nearly seven points. Caforio
is running again. Either he or Hill
probably will be Knight’s opponent
in November.
Congressional districts drawn by
Republican state legislatures after
both the 2010 Census and that year’s
anti-Democratic wave election might
somewhat insulate Republicans
from a “blue wave” this year. But
eight years is a long time in a dynamic
region such as Southern California,
and for eight years, the 25th has been
receiving an influx of “housing refugees” — people of modest means
seeking affordable housing outside
the city, and bringing with them the
city’s political sensibility. The district
is now 39 percent Latino.
President Trump, who did not visit
California during his first 13 months
in office, did worse there in 2016
(31.6 percent of the vote) than
Herbert Hoover did against Franklin
D. Roosevelt in 1932 (37.4 percent).
Yes, Hoover was a California resident, but the national unemployment rate was 24.7 percent. The
district is more than one-third Democratic, about one-third Republican
and about one-quarter independent.
Knight’s vote for the Republican tax
bill, with its limits on the deductibility of state and local taxes, adds to his
vulnerability in high-tax California.
Being 21 years younger than
Knight is another Hill advantage. In
2008, Barack Obama carried national voters under age 45 by 15 points. In
Alabama in December, Jones carried
that age cohort by around 20 points.
Suburban women, of whom the
25th District has many, also are recoiling against Republicans. The
Economist reports that, nationally,
“around 400 women, mostly Democrats, are planning to run for the
House, at least 50 for the Senate and
79 for governor. . . . At state and local
levels, the picture is the same. In
2015 and 2016, around 900 women
consulted Emily’s List [which supports women candidates] about
standing for office; since Mr. Trump’s
election, over 26,000 have.” One of
them recently took a red-eye to get
on Emily’s List.
— Erik Wemple
georgewill@washpost.com
SCOTT OLSON/GETTY IMAGES
Demonstrators in Ferguson, Mo., in August 2014.
Gun victims of color
are going unheard
BY
M ICHAEL M C B RIDE
T
he courage and the strength of
the Parkland students are inspiring. Amid their personal
pain, they have articulated a
sense of rage, conviction and moral
clarity over the lack of action on gun
violence. Oprah Winfrey has likened
these brave students to the Freedom
Riders of the 1960s. Others have commented that such youth activism might
change the political landscape and
make progress possible at last.
While the heroism of these students
is without question, we shouldn’t forget
that the Parkland activists are part of a
broader choir of youths — from Columbine to Ferguson to Baltimore — who
have harmonized their voices to plead
for an end to gun violence in all its
forms.
Unfortunately, many of us have difficulty hearing each voice equally. The
ears of our nation have still not been
trained to hear the prophetic voices of
poor youths of color.
The “mothers and fathers” of this
ongoing legacy millennial-youth-led
movement include Florida’s own
Dream Defenders, who occupied the
Florida governor’s office in 2013 to draw
attention to the “stand your ground”
law that led police to initially refrain
from charging Trayvon Martin’s killer.
The youths of the Million Hoodies
Movement built chapters throughout
the country mobilizing young people
and advocating an end to youth violence. The protests by the youths of
Ferguson, Mo., represented years of
pent-up frustration with statesanctioned gun violence inflicted by
local police forces.
Yet, many national gun violence prevention groups fail to hear advocates
and practitioners who are closest to the
pain and have solutions that can save
lives. And many mainstream political
leaders, including progressives, can empathize with the rage of the students in
Parkland, Fla., but can’t embrace the
pain of youths of color whose communities are gripped by gun violence.
In the past decade, some have urged
us to trust the process and to leave race
and poverty out of the discussion. Broad
gun policies, the argument goes, will
most certainly reduce urban gun violence. In the aftermath of mass shootings, some leaders have counseled political pragmatism and even silence regarding gun violence in major cities,
cautioning that we might lose “white
allies” and miss the political moment.
And so, at the end of each “political
moment,” youths of color go unheard.
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.
famously said that “a riot is the lan-
guage of the unheard.” This year, many
of us are reflecting on the 50th anniversary of the Kerner Report, a study
commissioned by President Lyndon
B. Johnson to uncover the causes of the
epidemic of riots in 1967. Read through
the lens of history and justice, the
report half a century later shows that
indifference to black suffering from
both the right and left wings of the
political spectrum continue to mask
violence in American cities.
Why must a riot continue to be the
only way to get our country’s attention?
Why must the response to our worst
conditions be criminalization and
large-scale abandonment of cities? In
many ways, we tell urban America:
These problems are yours to solve — not
the country’s. Please do not bother us
with them!
While we do believe in commonsense gun reform, the debate shouldn’t
be dominated by the National Rifle
Association or gun-control advocates
who lack an anti-racism lens. Mass
shootings constitute just 3 percent of
gun homicides in this country, and, as
horrific as they are, we must also insistently push conversations about urban
gun violence, the enormous number of
gun suicides (which outnumber gun
homicides) and the toxic masculinity
that fuels domestic violence.
We must also challenge the gun violence prevention coalitions that raise
hundreds of millions of dollars but
invest little money in black- and brownled organizations doing anti-violence
and peacemaking work daily. And we
must also take every opportunity to
help the public learn to hear what
youths of color have to say about stopping the violence.
Ahead of the March for Our Lives in
Washington this weekend, black- and
brown-led organizations will host a
national town hall Thursday to retrain
the ears of our nation to hear the daily
tragedies of gun violence. We’ll discuss
effective solutions within our reach —
such as group violence interventions,
violence interrupters, hospital-based
interventions and the Operation Peacemaker Fellowship.
But most important, our town hall
will focus on all forms of gun violence by
centering on youths of color, inviting
students from Parkland and keeping in
mind the people who have lost loved
ones to suicide. We hope the nation will
join us on this listening and learning
journey.
The writer is director of the advocacy
campaign Live Free, which is part of the
PICO National Network, a faith-based
organizing group. He is pastor of The Way
Christian Center in Berkeley, Calif.
ERIK WEMPLE
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/blogs/erik-wemple
‘He did it anyway.’ Sigh.
The timeline shows that the system is
working. On Tuesday, President Trump had
a phone call with Russian President
Vladimir Putin. Early Tuesday afternoon,
he confirmed the call to reporters as he met
with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin
Salman. The White House issued a readout
of the call, which included this line: “The
two leaders discussed the state of bilateral
relations and resolved to continue dialogue
about mutual national security priorities
and challenges.” In her afternoon media
briefing, White House press secretary Sarah
Huckabee Sanders spoke about the call.
At 7:15 p.m. Tuesday, we got the real
scoop from a team of reporters at The Post.
“Trump’s national security advisers
warned him not to congratulate Putin. He
did it anyway,” reads the headline of the
story. Not only that, but also Trump “chose
not to heed talking points from aides
instructing him to condemn” the horrific
nerve-agent attack on a spy and his daughter — Sergei and Yulia Skripal — in Britain.
Briefing materials prepared for the
phone conversation used all caps to emphasize, “DO NOT CONGRATULATE,”
though it’s unclear whether the president
read those materials. Whatever the case,
the president went right ahead with his
congratulations on a reelection viewed as a
“sham” for its anti-democratic contours.
According to CNN, Trump is “furious”
over the leak, and there are countermeasures in the offing. “White House chief of
A22
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
MARCH 22 , 2018
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KLMNO
METRO
THURSDAY, MARCH 22 , 2018
High today at
approx. 4 p.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
8 p.m.
32 40 47 41°
°
°
°
47°
Precip: 0%
Wind: NW
12-25 mph
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
VIRGINIA
OBITUARIES
Krishanti Vignarajah, the
only female candidate for
governor, airs an ad of her
nursing her daughter. B4
Fairfax County approves a
plan to overhaul a portion
of Richmond Highway
near Mount Vernon. B2
Cardinal Keith O’Brien of
Scotland resigned after
other priests accused him
of sexual misconduct. B6
L AURA V OZZELLA
richmond — Gov. Ralph
Northam on Wednesday proposed essentially the same budget
plan that had the House and
Senate tied up in knots just two
weeks ago, sticking with plans to
expand Medicaid to more lowincome residents.
The budget bill from Northam
(D) is nearly identical to the one
that outgoing governor Terry
McAuliffe (D) put forward in December, including plans to let up
to 400,000 uninsured Virginians
enroll in Medicaid — no strings
B
RE
MARYLAND
Va. budget reprises Medicaid fight
BY
EZ
Northam’s proposal
mirrors one already
rejected by legislature
attached.
McAuliffe’s spending plan died
March 10, when the GOPcontrolled General Assembly
wrapped up its 60-day session
without resolving a standoff over
Medicaid expansion. The Senate
opposed expansion. The House
supported it, although with cer-
tain strings attached, such as imposing co-pays and work requirements on enrollees.
Under the Affordable Care Act,
the federal government would
pay 90 percent of the $2 billion-ayear cost of expanding Medicaid
eligibility in Virginia. Northam’s
plan would pay the state’s 10 percent share by taxing hospitals, an
idea the House has embraced.
Most Senate Republicans say
they fear that the federal government would renege on its part of
the deal, sticking the state with
the whole tab. They also voice
VIRGINIA CONTINUED ON B4
Bowser pitches Uber, Lyft tax hikes
F ENIT N IRAPPIL,
P ERRY S TEIN
AND F AIZ S IDDIQUI
BY
The District would raise taxes
on sales, commercial property
and ride-hailing services such as
Lyft and Uber to increase funding
for Metro under the 2019 budget
Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D) proposed Wednesday.
Bowser’s plan, which must be
approved by the D.C. Council,
spells out for the first time how
the city would pay for the District’s $178.5 million share of a
regional strategy to improve the
Budget blueprint funds
Metro regional plan,
raises per-pupil spending
transit system.
Her proposed $14.5 billion
budget for the fiscal year that
starts Oct. 1 increases per-pupil
funding by 3.91 percent, a source
of contention last year and higher
than what some education advocates expected.
Bower’s spending plan also in-
Snowstorm snarls travel
but delights children, adults
cludes $100 million for a trust
fund for affordable housing — as
she has proposed annually since
taking office — as well as
$300 million in starting costs for
a new hospital east of the Anacostia River and $860,000 for publicly financed campaigns approved
by the council but initially opposed by Bowser.
The mayor presented the budget in a briefing with the D.C.
Council, which will hold public
hearings and vote on the spending plan before June. The first
formal hearing is scheduled for
D.C. CONTINUED ON B4
School
shooter
targeted
girl, 16
COUPLE HAD PARTED,
OFFICIALS SAY
Teen’s gun was legally
owned by his father
BY
BONNIE JO MOUNT/THE WASHINGTON POST
Isaac Wright, 11, bottom, and Nathan Schneck, 10, fly down a sledding hill in Takoma Park, Md., on Tuesday. The storm closed the federal
government, halted commuter rail service and shuttered schools, but kids and parents didn’t seem to mind much.
Emails on eve
of past storm
show snow
day protocol
Crashes, canceled flights
as severe storm punches
Northeast Corridor
B Y A SHLEY H ALSEY III ,
D ANA H EDGPETH
AND J ULIE Z AUZMER
BY
A wintry storm that drew a
bull’s eye on more than 50 million
people from Washington to Boston — the nation’s most heavily
urbanized region — delivered
massive amounts of snowfall on
the first full day of spring.
In the Washington region, the
snow closed the federal government, halted commuter rail service, caused hundreds of crashes
and shuttered schools. Although
plows sought to sweep the runways clear, hundreds of flights
from the region’s three major airports were canceled or delayed,
and nearly three-quarters of the
flights scheduled to depart from
busy New York airports suffered
the same fate.
It was the fourth nor’easter to
hit the Interstate 95 corridor this
month.
By early afternoon, Reagan National Airport had received
four inches, the most snowfall
recorded so late in the season
since 1964, according to The
Washington Post’s Capital Weather Gang. The heaviest amounts
fell to the north and west of the
District, and the volume mounted
as the storm moved on to Philadelphia, where up to 13 inches
were expected, and New York,
where as much as 18 inches were
forecast.
SNOW CONTINUED ON B2
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Krista Davisson and Cosmo walk in Frederick, Md.
Gov. Larry Hogan urged people to stay off the roads.
P ERRY S TEIN
An early spring snowstorm
brought a day of deliverance from
tests and homework assignments
for the District’s public school students. And, true to tradition, children rejoiced Wednesday, while
frustrated parents scrambled to
coordinate child care.
With the prospect of several
inches of wet snow looming, D.C.
school leaders made the call to
cancel classes at 7 p.m. Tuesday —
a pronouncement that, much to
the surprise of parents on social
media, came hours earlier than
usual.
So just how do administrators
make the decision to halt school
because of inclement weather?
Emails obtained through a public records request open a window
into the high-wire dance administrators perform, often deep in the
night, as they decide whether to
delight students and distress parents by closing school. The emails,
requested by The Washington
Post, focus on school leaders’ decision to cancel classes during a
January nor’easter dubbed the
“bomb cyclone.”
The 120 charter schools in the
District usually follow the traditional public school system’s lead
on whether to close schools. Some
charter leaders emailed Antwan
D EBBIE T RUONG
AND L YNH B UI
A student who opened fire in
the hallway of a Maryland high
school Tuesday targeted a 16year-old girl after the couple
recently ended their relationship,
according to the St. Mary’s County Sheriff ’s Office.
Austin Wyatt Rollins, 17,
brought his father’s Glock handgun to Great Mills High School
and shot Jaelynn Willey in a
hallway just before classes began
about 7:55 a.m., according to the
sheriff ’s office and the girl’s family.
“All indications suggest the
shooting was not a random act of
violence,” the department said in
a statement Wednesday afternoon.
The gun Rollins used was legally owned by his father, the
sheriff ’s office said.
Rollins was killed after school
resource officer Blaine Gaskill
confronted the teen as students
and staff scrambled for cover. The
sheriff ’s office said Wednesday
that Gaskill fired one shot at
Rollins, “who simultaneously
fired a shot as well.”
“Rollins sustained a lifethreatening injury in the exchange,” the department said.
An autopsy on Rollins that
would determine the cause of
death — including whether the
shot that killed him came from
his own gun or was fired by the
school resource officer — was
delayed because of Wednesday’s
snowstorm, said Cpl. Julie Yingling, spokeswoman for the St.
Mary’s County Sheriff.
“Hopefully, in another day or
two, we’ll be able to release more
information, but we’re still in the
trenches of it,” Yingling said.
Details of Rollins’s life remained sparse, though the sheriff ’s office said it hadn’t “uncovered any public social media
posts/threats made by Rollins.”
There was no answer Wednesday at the home of Rollins’s
family, and attempts to reach his
parents have been unsuccessful.
Friends and neighbors described Rollins as a friendly, happy teenager who liked to play
ball, skateboard and hang out
with friends.
Newell Rand, a Great Mills
graduate who knew Rollins, said
he never expected the burst of
violence from the teen.
“He was a very intelligent guy
who had so much going for him,”
Rand said in a message on social
media.
The Enterprise newspaper in
SHOOTING CONTINUED ON B3
SNOW DAY CONTINUED ON B2
Hogan: ‘Prayers are not enough’
School shooting puts safety bills in
Annapolis on a faster track. B3
B2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
Early spring storm leaves smiles in its wake
SNOW FROM B1
Authorities in the Washington
area cautioned that roads might
refreeze by Thursday morning.
And schools took heed, with Fairfax, Prince William and Loudoun
counties and Manassas City
among those announcing early
that they would be closed for a
second day.
Paulette Jones, a spokeswoman
for the Prince George’s County
Department of Public Works and
Transportation, said crews would
work through the night. Arlington
County said a decision on whether
the government and county
schools will remain closed
wouldn’t be made until about
4:30 a.m. Thursday.
Montgomery County spokesman Patrick Lacefield said a similar decision would be made about
county offices and schools.
“Whatever we do to any of these
streets, we’re going to have to go
back over tomorrow morning, because it’s going to freeze overnight,” Lacefield said.
It was a heavy, wet snow of the
sort that normally brings down
power lines, but by midafternoon
the region’s three major power
companies reported that fewer
than 2,500 customers were without electricity.
Ridership on Metro dropped to
about one-fifth of what is normal
on a weekday. Metrobus and suburban systems curtailed service as
conditions worsened. Amtrak
said it would continue to operate
with modifications to rail service
along the Northeast Corridor on
Thursday. The railroad has canceled two dozen Acela trains and
another dozen Northeast Regional trains scheduled for Thursday
between Washington and Boston.
Officials from the National
Park Service joined the chorus of
local officials urging people to
stay off the roads.
Even with area schools and the
federal government shuttered,
NPS officials said too many vehicles were still on the roads, making it difficult for them to clear
snow from the 155 bridges and
100 miles of sidewalks they oversee in the region.
In Virginia, state police had
responded to almost 400 crashes
across the state since midnight.
Officers were also helping motorists stranded on roadways across
the region. I-95 Express Lanes
remained northbound throughout the day so crews could focus
on clearing roads instead of treating ramps to the southbound
lanes. No fatalities were reported.
Officials said they would focus
on clearing interstates, then primary roads and secondary roads
before moving into subdivisions.
In Maryland, state highway officials responded to more than
600 calls over a 48-hour period.
The number could have been
higher, but federal, state and local
governments as well as schools
were closed for business Wednesday, keeping traffic volumes relatively low.
John Schofield, spokesman for
the Maryland State Highway Administration, said the biggest
problems were caused by a number of tractor-trailers that jackknifed on area roads.
“The problem is when a tractortrailer jackknifes, it’s not like a
Honda Accord, — it takes out the
entire roadway,” he said.
Even as the snow began to
taper off in some portions of the
state, Schofield said as many as
2,400 pieces of equipment will
continue to work in shifts treating
PHOTOS BY JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
The snow made lacy patterns on the trees on the Mall. With schools and government shuttered and
officials urging people to stay off roads, a ghostlike calm settled over parts of Washington.
and clearing roads.
Highway officials said they deployed more than 1,000 people
and more than 2,300 pieces of
equipment in the effort to clear
roads. Among the major incidents
reported were jackknifed tractortrailers that closed I-95 at
Route 32 in Howard County and
Interstate 70 at Interstate 81 in
Hagerstown early Wednesday
morning. Interstate 295 at Interstate 195 was also closed Wednesday morning because of a crash.
The state also suspended
MARC commuter rail service as
well as all commuter buses. VRE
suspended service Wednesday
but planned to resume normal
operations Thursday.
Shortly before noon in Chevy
Chase, two snowplowers took a
short break in their truck in a
town parking lot as swirling flakes
fell at a steady pace.
Jesus Martinez, 34, and Jaime
Melgar, 25, said they had been on
the road since 9 p.m. the night
before, clearing and salting lots
and driveways for government
agencies in Montgomery County.
“We’ve got to keep the people
safe,” Martinez said. “We don’t
stop until the county says you can
stop.”
Plowing at night is tricky, Martinez said, with low visibility in
tight spaces. But they like the
work. It pays about $15 an hour.
In Vienna, Serghei Duminica
pulled his pickup truck into a
parking lot next to a Tesla car
dealership and let out a sigh of
relief.
Mounted on a trailer bed linked
to his pickup were two used cars
he had just driven from Chicago
overnight, navigating the snow
and darkness with just his radio to
keep him company.
“I caught some snow all the way
from Ohio,” he said, while un-
hooking a Kia SUV from the trailer bed. “This is a big storm.”
But, he said, “I’ve got to do it.
Got to make money.”
The lure of fresh fruit brought
Bill Knorr out into the snow
Wednesday.
Knorr, 77, walked a few blocks
to the Giant supermarket on EastWest Highway in Silver Spring,
regretting his decision after slipping on the way — twice.
He didn’t mind the late-season
snowstorm, though.
“I love snow,” Knorr said. “I just
don’t like to have to go out and
walk around in it.”
Although many people had fancy snow shovels, David Hernández grabbed his trusty plywood
board to clear the sidewalks outside the Money & King funeral
parlor in Vienna.
Hernandez, 56, the funeral
home’s maintenance man, pushed
into the snow like a running back
straining for an extra yard, his
legs pumping as his board cleared
away more and more snow.
“It’s actually easier,” said
Hernández, with sweat trickling
from beneath his beanie. “I save
this board for every snowstorm.
The shovels are the ones that
really hurt your back. The board
works much better.”
At Pizza and Tandoori on Leesburg Pike, Julia Groves, 22, said
calls had been coming in at a
steady pace from customers seeking deliveries.
Groves and Jose Delgado, 37,
had been handling the orders,
then heading out into the storm
with steaming pizzas in tow.
In a snowy Capitol Hill park,
big branches, thick with pale pink
magnolia blossoms and heavy
with snow, had fallen from a tree
in the park where Nikki Lowry
was walking her dog Daisy.
It was Daisy’s first snow day —
she’s a rescue dog from Puerto
Rico — and she was ecstatic.
Lowry was enjoying it, too. She
recently retired, didn’t have to
drive anywhere, so she spent
45 minutes playing with her dog
in the snowy park on Capitol Hill.
“There are days you say,
‘Aaaaaaaaaaaaah . . . I’m retired.
This is fun!’ ” Lowry said.
It always snows in Washington
in March, she said, just as the first
cherry trees begin to burst into
bloom. She wasn’t worried; spring
would be here for real — soon, she
said. “This will all be gone by
Friday.”
Wilson, who was chancellor of
D.C. Public Schools at the time,
throughout the day on Jan. 3
asking when he would decide
their fate.
“Checking on your threshold
for cold weather,” Susan Schaeffler, the chief of the charter school
network KIPP DC, wrote in an
email to Wilson the afternoon of
Jan. 3. “Feel free to send me any
intel so I can direct our 6000 child
commuters the best we can.”
Wilson responded that the
school system tries to decide on
canceling classes by 11 the night
before. Ultimately, he wrote, the
decision belongs to Mayor Muriel
E. Bowser, who takes into account
the chancellor’s recommendation. City leaders base their deci-
Richmond
Highway
overhaul
approved
sions to close school and government offices on calls with weather
experts who update them on
the forecast.
But the D.C. school system
missed its 11 p.m. deadline ahead
of the Jan. 4 storm.
“We are delayed 2 hours tomorrow and we need to get the word
out now,” Wilson wrote in an email
to his deputies just after midnight
Jan. 4. “Just got confirmation.”
The communications team
rushed to post the alert on social
media.
That day was supposed to be
students’ second day back from
winter break. The decision to
delay classes for two hours left
facilities managers working into
the early morning hours to ensure
that sidewalks were salted and
plowed so students could safely
THE POSTPOINTS HUNT
navigate campuses.
“Well, isn’t this exciting!” Carolyne Albert-Garvey, the principal
of Maury Elementary on Capitol
Hill, wrote in a 4:53 a.m. email to
employees at the school system’s
central offices. “Do the contractors who clear sidewalks know
about us?”
And then, about 6 a.m., the
school system changed course and
ruled that schools would be closed
for the entire day.
This last-minute call earned the
school system a lashing from parents, especially because the storm
didn’t live up to blustery
expectations.
“This particular day, I was frustrated by the call,” Alexander
Howard, a D.C. Public Schools
parent, told The Post at the time.
Once the call was made for
Jan. 4, it was time to figure out if
schools would be open the
next day.
“Do you know [D.C. Public
Schools’] operating status tomorrow?” Tomeika Bowden, the
spokeswoman for the D.C. Public
Charter School Board, wrote in an
email to the public school system’s
deputy chief of school operations
at 8:26 p.m. on Jan. 4.
“As of now on time,” Douglas
Hollis, the deputy chief, responded minutes later. “It does appear
the Mayor is paying attention to
neighboring districts again. No
word yet . . .”
Bowden wrote that the lastminute decision to close schools
Jan. 4 “took me and a lot of schools
for a loop” and asked Hollis what
prompted the school system to
change its mind after it had called
A NTONIO O LIVO
Fairfax County is moving forward with a plan to overhaul a
portion of Richmond Highway
that would nearly quadruple the
size of the community near
George Washington’s Mount Vernon estate, with 13,000 new
homes, office towers, hotels and a
new street grid.
The “Embark Richmond Highway” plan, which the county
Board of Supervisors approved
Tuesday in a unanimous vote,
is part of a broader effort in
Virginia’s largest jurisdiction to
revitalize a thoroughfare long
known for run-down motels, cartitle loan shops and traffic congestion.
The area, which is also home
to shopping plazas and fast-food
restaurants, is the site of an
ongoing state road-widening
project, plans for a $500 million
county bus rapid transit
route and a $40 million levee
under construction that includes
a park near the Cameron Run
waterway.
Fairfax officials hope to capitalize on those improvements by
drawing more development to
Richmond Highway, which they
say will help bring in tax revenue
the county needs to fund schools
and other services in a tepid local
economy.
But, with an estimated cost of
$750 million, plus state and federal funding needed for the
transportation improvements,
the plan will be as challenging to
pull off as other major revitalization efforts in the county, including those in Tysons Corner and
Reston, supporters say.
“This is an enormously big
financial lift for our community,”
said county Supervisor Jeff McKay (D-Lee), who represents the
area. “I’m not interested in having a plan sit on the shelf and
collect dust.”
After the plan is
finished, the area’s
population would
nearly quadruple to
about 40,000 residents,
county officials said.
for a two-hour delay.
“Mayor just decided differently,” Hollis replied.
Wednesday’s snow day marks
the D.C. system’s second of
the year.
With two snow days, students
will now have full days June 13 and
June 14, and a half-day June 15.
June 13 was scheduled to be a
half-day to mark the end of the
school year.
No matter the circumstances of
a snow day, KIPP’s Schaeffler
offered Wilson and a deputy some
timeless wisdom.
“One thing we have all learned
about calling snow days is 50% of
the people will despise you for
your inconsiderate decision,”
Schaeffler wrote, “and 50% will
love you for it.”
Under the plan, new mixeduse developments, parks and a
grid of smaller streets would be
built around nine county bus
rapid transit stations between
Metrorail’s Huntington station
and Fort Belvoir.
The plan, to be carried out over
the next decade, also includes a
3.1-mile extension of Metro’s Yellow Line that would connect the
Huntington station to the Hybla
Valley section of Richmond Highway, in hopes of creating a pedestrian-friendly urban neighborhood akin to nearby Shirlington.
In the end, the area’s population would nearly quadruple to
about 40,000 residents, county
officials said.
While the plan has broad support in the surrounding community, some local activists expressed concerns Tuesday night
about small businesses and lowincome families who may be
displaced.
The plan should “maintain the
diverse ethnic and economic nature of our community. We’re
very proud of that,” said Mary
Paden, a leader with the South
County Task Force for Human
Services, which has pushed for
more low-income homes to be
part of the development plans.
A motion approved by the
Board of Supervisors on Tuesday
authorized the creation of an
advisory panel on affordable
housing for the area. The motion
also called for creating walking
trails and bike paths as part of
the overhaul.
“This is exciting, and this is
exactly what the Route 1/Richmond Highway needs,” said
Board Chairman Sharon Bulova
(D).
perry.stein@washpost.com
antonio.olivo@washpost.com
ashley.halsey@washpost.com
dana.hedgpeth@washpost.com
julie.zauzmer@washpost.com
Nick Anderson, Lori Aratani, Moriah
Balingit, Jennifer Barrios, Rachel
Chason, Sarah Larimer, Luz Lazo,
Fenit Nirappil, Antonio Olivo, Jenna
Portnoy, Patricia Sullivan and Susan
Svrluga contributed to this report.
What does it take to call a school snow day? A lot of frantic emails.
SNOW DAY FROM B1
VIRGINIA
BY
Amanda Lariscy, 17, smooshes snow in the face of her brother, Blaze, 15, as they play on the Mall near the Washington Monument. The
family from Ochlockonee Bay, Fla., was enjoying their first-ever snowfall while in the District for spring break.
MARCH 22 , 2018
WHAT WILL YOU FIND?
Catch The Wiz, a musical feast
Starring Dorothy, Tinman and a furry beast.
With Scarecrow they meet wicked witch Evillene
In a delightful show that ought to be seen.
Ease on down the road with the Tony-winning musical The Wiz,
playing now through what date at Ford’s Theatre?
Groove to The Machine at The Hamilton Live
Performing Pink Floyd, get ready to jive.
They’ll play all the hits, like “Wish You Were Here”
And “Comfortably Numb,” a tune diehards hold dear.
Pink Floyd tribute band The Machine will perform on March 31
at The Hamilton Live. At what time will the doors open?
Head to Folger Theatre for A Winter’s Tale.
The story’s moral: forgiveness prevails
With Leontes, Perdita, Camillo and more
Played by a cast you’re sure to adore.
Who plays the part of Dorcas in A Winter’s Tale
at Folger Theatre?
(Hint: See Fords.org for the answer.)
(Hint: See TheHamiltonDC.com for the answer.)
(Hint: See Folger.edu for the answer.)
E A R N 5 P O I N T S : F i n d t h e a n s w e r, t h e n g o t o w a s h i n g t o n p o s t . c o m / p o s t p o i n t s a n d c l i c k o n “ Q u i z z e s ” t o e n t e r t h e c o r r e c t r e s p o n s e .
THURSDAY, MARCH 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B3
M2
MARYLAND
LOC AL D I GE S T
School-safety bills poised for action
Hearings set this week
on proposals after
shooting in St. Mary’s
BY R ACHEL C HASON
AND O VETTA W IGGINS
Tuesday’s shooting at a high
school in southern Maryland has
given new urgency to a package of
school-safety bills that were proposed in the General Assembly
after a deadly rampage in Parkland, Fla., and will be the focus of
hearings Thursday and Friday.
“If we didn’t take a crack at this,
then we would be derelict in our
duty,” said state Sen. Stephen M.
Waugh (R-St. Mary’s) who drafted
the four bills and whose district
includes Great Mills High School,
where the shooting took place. “If
not us, who? And if not now,
when?”
His legislation focuses on preventing attacks through up-todate background checks, anticipating threats with assessment
teams, stationing armed school
resource officers at schools and
securing classroom doors.
It does not include arming
teachers, which President Trump
proposed after the shooting at
Marjory Stoneman Douglas High
School in Florida resulted in the
deaths of 14 students and three
staff members.
With less than three weeks remaining in Maryland’s 90-day legislative session, the bills have not
been approved by either the
House of Delegates or the state
Senate, which normally would
mean they are not likely to become
law. But legislative leaders said
Wednesday that they expect the
bills to be heard quickly, and they
noted that they have bipartisan
support.
“School shootings are on everybody’s mind,” Senate President
Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr. (DCalvert) said on the Senate floor.
“And they have been on everybody’s mind.”
Miller said he expects the Senate to consider a package that
includes legislation proposed by
Gov. Larry Hogan (R) that would
require every jurisdiction in the
state to perform safety assessments and create emergency
plans for public schools.
“Prayers are not enough,” the
governor said in a statement after
Tuesday’s shooting, which left the
teenage gunman dead and two
others, ages 14 and 16, injured.
“Today’s horrible events should
not be an excuse to pause our
conversation about school safety.
Instead, it must serve as a call to
action.”
Hogan
has
committed
$125 million from casino revenue
to pay for safety features in school
buildings, including secure doors
and windows, metal detectors, security cameras and panic buttons.
He has also pledged $50 million
annually in operating funds for
new school safety grants, which
could be used for school resource
officers and counselors.
In addition, the state budget
approved by the Senate last week
restored $10 million for school
safety grants that had been cut
from Hogan’s budget proposal.
Hogan spokeswoman Amelia
Chasse said the governor’s bill and
those sponsored by senators all
“If not us, who? And if
not now, when?”
Sen. Stephen M. Waugh (R-St. Mary’s)
work toward the same goal of bolstering school safety.
“We will continue to work with
our partners in the General Assembly to ensure that the best
ideas move forward,” Chasse said.
Alexandra Hughes, chief of staff
to House Speaker Michael E.
Busch (D-Anne Arundel), said the
House of Delegates has been
working on the governor’s bill and
will review the other measures.
Waugh, a former Marine whose
sons grew up playing football
against Great Mills, said Tuesday’s
shooting was “gut-wrenching” for
him. “It was jarring, it was unnerv-
ing,” he said. “I don’t know how to
describe it to you.”
He said he hopes his bill will
help every school be prepared for
the worst, including by having
more trained, armed school resource officers like Blaine Gaskill,
the St. Mary’s County sheriff’s deputy who rushed toward the sound
of gunshots and confronted the
shooter on Tuesday.
“He absolutely saved lives because he responded within seconds,” Waugh said. “It demonstrated what an important component of it all the sworn officer is.”
Current laws on school resource
officers vary by jurisdiction, with
some counties requiring that officers be armed and others not.
Waugh said he and his colleagues are willing to make compromises to see the bills pass.
“I know we have a difficult task
in front of us,” he said on the
Senate floor. “. . . But I have great
faith in this body and in the House
that we are going to come together
and get something done.”
Waugh said he was motivated to
push the school safety legislation
in part by a video he saw of a father
whose daughter was killed in
Parkland and who came to a meeting with Trump to plead for a way
to end gun violence.
Tuesday’s shooting, Waugh
said, added “even more urgency to
the matter.”
rachel.chason@washpost.com
ovetta.wiggins@washpost.com
VIRGINIA
Four are charged
in Pr. William death
Four people have been
arrested and charged in
connection with the slaying of a
person whose body was found
inside a burning vehicle at a
park in Woodbridge.
Police in Prince William
County said they have made a
preliminary identification of the
person killed but have not
publicly released the identity
pending further DNA analysis
by the medical examiner’s office
and notification of next of kin.
The cause of the person’s
death and the fire remain under
investigation. The body was
found March 15.
In the past week, police have
arrested three men and a
teenager. Two of the suspects
were arrested in Prince William
County, and two others were
arrested in Wilson, N.C., by the
U.S. Marshals Fugitive Task
Force.
Erick Alexander Contreras
Navarro, 23, of Manassas, and
Denis Ludwin Espinal Alvares,
19, of Oxon Hill, Md., were
charged with murder. They are
awaiting extradition from North
Carolina.
Manuel Enrique Robles
Lopez, 21, of Manassas was
charged with being an accessory
after the fact to murder. A 17year-old man from Woodbridge
was charged with murder.
— Dana Hedgpeth
School shooting ‘was not a random act of violence’
SHOOTING FROM B1
December listed Rollins as a
Great Mills merit roll student.
An uncle on Wednesday identified the student injured in the
shooting as Willey, one of nine
children. She remained in critical
condition Wednesday evening after suffering life-threatening injuries.
Willey is an “amazing young
lady, whose peaceful presence
and love of her fellow students
and family” is well-known at the
school, the uncle, Timothy Cormier, said in a statement. She is a
dedicated student and swimmer,
he said.
“It is hard for us not to see her
shining, smiling face right now
and to see her light up the room
with her presence,” Cormier said,
adding that the family is requesting privacy.
As of Wednesday morning, an
online fundraiser for Willey had
collected more than $42,350 that
the uncle said will go toward
medical expenses.
A representative of the University of Maryland Prince George’s
Hospital Center, where Willey is
being treated, said details of the
teen’s condition could not be
released, citing patient privacy
rules.
A 14-year-old boy who was in
the hallway was wounded by
Rollins but was released Wednesday from MedStar St. Mary’s Hospital after surgery on his thigh,
officials said.
School officials said Wednesday that Great Mills will be closed
through the end of the week to
assist law enforcement efforts.
The school is scheduled to reopen
April 2, after spring break.
The school system offered
counseling services for students
at two nearby elementary
schools.
The shooting prompted a lockdown and evacuation at Great
Mills, which has more than 1,600
students. Authorities praised
Gaskill, who has been a school
resource officer at the high school
since August, for his quick reaction.
“This is a tough guy who closed
in quickly and took the right
action,” Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R) said Tuesday of Gaskill.
The shooting at the high
school 70 miles south of the
District thrust the close-knit
St. Mary’s County community
into the national debate over gun
control and whether teachers
should be armed and more armed
officers added to improve safety.
The shooting has prompted
calls to action from the St. Mary’s
community.
Rand and other Great Mills
students and alumni are planning to travel Saturday to the
District for the March for Our
Lives, a rally against gun violence
sparked by the Florida school
shooting last month that left
17 people dead.
“We are trying to turn a tragedy into a learning experience,”
Rand said in a message to The
Washington Post via Facebook.
“We hope that some form of
action will be taken.”
Aaron Foreman, who was a
coach at Great Mills and lives
across the street from the Rollins
family, posted a Facebook live
video Wednesday morning urging businesses and religious organizations with vans to help
take students to the D.C. rally so
they could join “their brothers
and sisters” from across the nation who are victims of school
violence.
“We need to show our children
that we believe in them and that
their voices need to be heard
downtown Saturday,” said Foreman, who added that a local Food
Lion offered to provide food and
beverages for students participating in the march so they don’t
have to spend their own money.
Foreman said his daughter recently graduated from Great
Mills.
“This could have been her,” he
said in the video urging parents
to get involved Saturday.
Students from Great Mills are
expected to meet at the Branch
Avenue Metro station in Prince
George’s County just outside the
District before heading downtown as a group, Foreman and
Rand said.
BY
K ATHERINE S HAVER
A Maryland lawmaker has
withdrawn a bill that could have
significantly curtailed local authority over where new cellular
equipment structures may be
installed in residential areas and
what they may look like.
Wireless companies and local
officials said they will continue
to try to negotiate a way to boost
Internet speeds, particularly in
cities and densely populated suburbs, without creating potential
eyesores close to homes.
State Sen. Thomas M. Middleton (D-Charles), chair of the
Senate Finance Committee, said
he canceled a Tuesday hearing on
the bill because it was too controversial. He said local governments and wireless companies
were “worlds apart” over how
and where to allow “small-cell”
technology to expand broadband
capacity and install 5G, the next
generation of wireless technology. Residents also were worried
about the potential health effects
of cellular equipment closer to
homes, he said.
“As far apart as the jurisdictions are with the telecommunications companies, it’s hard to
imagine we’d get anything resolved” before the General Assembly session ends next month,
Middleton said Wednesday.
Wireless companies are lobbying state lawmakers nationwide
to limit the scope of local zoning
allow for public hearings on
applications.
Similar legislation is pending
in about 18 states, including
Virginia, where bills recently
passed the General Assembly.
Gov. Ralph Northam (D) has not
said whether he will sign them.
Jonathan Adelstein, chief executive of the Wireless Infrastructure Association, said companies are likely to invest most in
states that have made it more
efficient and cost-effective by
standardizing local zoning rules.
“The danger is Maryland will
fall behind other states that are
streamlining their [cell facility]
siting and lose out on broadband
investment as a result,” Adelstein
said.
Jamie Hastings, of CTIA, said
the industry group will work
with Maryland lawmakers to
“find a path forward.”
As states that have passed
small-cell laws have shown,
Hastings said, “it is possible to
modernize infrastructure deployment while preserving local
authority.”
Crown Castle, one of the largest wireless infrastructure companies, said it, too, will continue
working on the issue “to bring
faster, more reliable service to
Maryland residents.”
Some Maryland counties, including Montgomery and Anne
Arundel, are already working to
update their zoning laws to make
John
Kelly's
Washington
He is away. His column will resume
when he returns.
— Justin Wm. Moyer
Southern Va. chosen
for Microsoft program
Southern Virginia is among
six regions selected for a
Microsoft program designed to
foster greater economic
opportunity and job creation.
The Roanoke Times reported
Monday that Virginia’s Halifax,
Mecklenburg, Brunswick,
Lunenburg and Charlotte
counties will receive special
attention as part of Microsoft’s
new TechSpark initiative. The
tech company had built a data
center in Mecklenburg County.
TechSpark Virginia manager
Jeremy Satterfield says the
program focuses on helping
businesses use technology to
expand, working with schools to
promote computer science,
providing job training,
expanding rural broadband
access, and supporting
nonprofit organizations with
donations and advice.
The company hasn’t disclosed
how much money it plans to
invest.
The other TechSpark regions
are El Paso; the North Central
Basin of Washington state;
Cheyenne, Wyo.; Fargo, N.D.;
and northeast Wisconsin.
— Associated Press
THE DISTRICT
Man shot in January
has died in hospital
A man who was shot in
Southeast Washington in
January has died, and on
Tuesday the death was
determined to be a homicide,
D.C. police said.
Police said Carl Gray, 25, of
Southeast was found Jan. 6 in a
house in the 3100 block of
Buena Vista Terrace SE. He was
undergoing treatment at a
hospital Friday when he died,
police said.
The city’s Office of the Chief
Medical Examiner determined
Tuesday that he died of
complications from gunshot
wounds. The death was ruled a
homicide, police said.
— Martin Weil
LOTTE R I E S
Donna St. George and Jennifer
Jenkins contributed to this report.
VIRGINIA
Results from March 21
DISTRICT
Mid-Day Lucky Numbers:
Mid-Day DC-4:
Mid-Day DC-5:
Lucky Numbers (Tue.):
Lucky Numbers (Wed.):
DC-4 (Tue.):
DC-4 (Wed.):
DC-5 (Tue.):
DC-5 (Wed.):
Lawmaker kills bill on ‘small-cell’ structures
laws for cell towers. The companies say they need more leeway
to install equipment that will be
much smaller and lower-powered but closer together and
lower to the ground than the
large towers that 1990s-era zoning rules were written for.
They say much of the new
equipment will be attached to
utility poles, streetlights and other structures, but also will require new poles, including in
neighborhoods with underground utilities.
City and county officials had
opposed the Maryland bill, saying they needed to retain their
ability to protect communities
from potentially ugly antennatopped poles that could soon line
roads and other public rights of
way.
“They got the conversation
started, and now the game is on,”
said Montgomery County Council President Hans Riemer (D-At
Large). “We’re going to spend the
next year dealing with whether
this proposal to take away our
control is needed or not. It’s far
from over.”
Riemer said local officials
want the latest wireless technology for their residents but want a
say in how tall the poles may be
and how well they blend into
communities.
“We don’t want duplicative
equipment on every street or
schlocky, junkie installations,
when we can get installations
that can integrate nicely into
neighborhoods,” Riemer said.
“That’s what this is all about.”
Since 2016, about 14 states
have passed laws allowing new
small cell poles up to 50 feet tall
to be exempted from some local
zoning laws, including those that
An Alexandria police officer
was placed on administrative
leave Friday after he was
arrested and charged with rape,
authorities said Tuesday.
On Friday, Prince William
County police began an
investigation into multiple
domestic violence incidents
alleged to have occurred in
Woodbridge, the department
said in a statement.
A 30-year-old woman
reported that in three separate
incidents between June and
January, she was sexually
assaulted, pushed, threatened
with a knife and burned with a
caustic substance, the statement
said.
The same day, 31-year-old
Khurram Abbas Chaudhary of
Woodbridge was arrested and
charged with rape, malicious
wounding by caustic substance
debbie.truong@washpost.com
lynh.bui@washpost.com
MARYLAND
Wireless firms want
to limit local authority
on 5G towers’ locations
Police officer on leave
after rape charge
and domestic assault and
battery, according to the
statement.
On Tuesday, Alexandria police
said in a statement that they
began investigating Chaudhary
when they learned of the
charges and that he has been
placed on administrative leave.
small-cell equipment easier to
install, said Natasha Mehu, of the
Maryland Association of Counties.
“Planning and zoning is a very
local thing,” Mehu said. “I really
think counties are interested in
this technology. They’re just
looking to handle things on the
local level.”
katherine.shaver@washpost.com
3-2-6
8-4-0-4
1-6-2-4-0
4-5-8
5-4-1
1-8-0-3
1-6-1-8
6-4-4-8-1
7-1-0-2-3
Day/Pick-3:
2-3-8
Pick-4:
8-4-2-2
Cash-5:
3-7-24-26-30
Night/Pick-3 (Tue.):
8-0-4
Pick-3 (Wed.):
0-6-4
Pick-4 (Tue.):
6-7-2-1
Pick-4 (Wed.):
3-3-2-2
Cash-5 (Tue.):
13-14-16-31-33
Cash-5 (Wed.):
9-12-13-17-31
Bank a Million:
10-15-23-24-36-37 *40
MULTI-STATE GAMES
MARYLAND
Mid-Day Pick 3:
Mid-Day Pick 4:
Night/Pick 3 (Tue.):
Pick 3 (Wed.):
Pick 4 (Tue.):
Pick 4 (Wed.):
Match 5 (Tue.):
Match 5 (Wed.):
5 Card Cash:
5-7-1
8-3-1-9
1-4-2
9-5-7
7-1-5-1
3-0-8-6
2-11-33-36-39 *1
7-10-15-20-24 *32
7H-7S-9C-AS-9H
Mega Millions:
Megaplier:
Powerball:
Power Play:
*Bonus Ball
14-38-51-64-70 **9
3x
3-4-18-29-61 †25
2x
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†Powerball
For late drawings and other results, check
washingtonpost.com/local/lottery
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
MARCH 22 , 2018
Bowser: ‘Our finances are in great shape in our city’
D.C. FROM B1
Friday.
The city has been flush with tax
revenue as the economy booms.
“Our finances are in great
shape in our city,” said Bowser,
who is seeking a second term
without any credible challengers
in the June Democratic primary.
“We are also positioned to make
very critical investments in all of
the areas that continue to make
our city excel.”
Maryland, Virginia and the
District are on the verge of approving a historic deal to provide
permanent funding for improvements to the beleaguered Metro
transit system.
Little more than half of the
District’s $178.5 million share
would come from savings elsewhere in the budget, and about
$80 million from higher taxes in
Bowser’s proposal.
The commercial property tax
rate would increase 2 cents from
$1.85 per $100 of assessed value.
The sales tax would rise from
5.75 percent to 6 percent, smaller
than the regional 1 percentage
point sales tax increase that District leaders proposed as a permanent Metro funding source. The
restaurant and hotels tax would
also rise by a quarter- percentage
point.
And the tax on gross receipts
on “for-hire” vehicle services,
passed onto customers as city fees
on trips, would rise from 1 percent to 4.75 percent. That would
mean a dime charge on a $10 trip
would become a 47-cent charge.
While Bowser previously said
ride-hailing companies aren’t responsible for Metro’s problems,
she defended the fee increase as
bringing ride-hailing companies
on a par with taxis, which are
taxed at 50 cents per trip. But a
spokeswoman for Lyft contended
the increase would hit low-income riders the hardest, noting
than nearly four in 10 D.C. trips
begin or end in low-income areas.
“While we are supportive of
MARVIN JOSEPH/THE WASHINGTON POST
D.C. Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D) delivers her State of the District Address on March 15. Her proposed $14.5 billion budget for the fiscal
year that starts Oct. 1 would raise taxes on sales, commercial properties and ride-hailing services to increase funding for Metro.
efforts to improve transit options,
it is also critical that ride-share
remains affordable for the tens of
thousands who rely on Lyft in
D.C. — particularly those who live
further from transit or need a ride
when public transit doesn’t operate,” Lyft spokeswoman Campbell
Matthews said.
An Uber spokesman said the
company was reviewing Bowser’s
proposal.
Bowser brushed off the possibility that customers who turned
to ride-hailing because of Metro’s
unreliability would be frustrated
by higher fees collected to fund
the transit system.
“Everyone benefits from a safe
and reliable and functioning Metro whether you ever get on a
Metro or not,” said Bowser in a
call with reporters. “Having a safe
and reliable and functioning Metro means we have less congestion
in our city, we can attract more
residents and businesses, and everyone benefits.”
Bowser’s proposal follows another major city, Chicago, that
turned to for-hire vehicle services
to fund its struggling transit sys-
tem. Last fall, Chicago Mayor
Rahm Emanuel (D), citing ridehailing’s drain on mass transit,
successfully pushed for a 15-cent
fee increase on Uber and Lyft
trips to fund a modernization
plan for the Chicago Transit Authority.
Bowser’s latest budget proposal comes at a time when the
school system is dogged by scandals over inflated graduation
rates and enrollment fraud. Her
budget proposal also boosted
funding to early child-care and
study-abroad programming.
In announcing a 3.91 percent
hike to per-pupil funding for students in traditional public and
charter schools, Bowser seemed
to skirt much of the criticism she
received last year, when advocates accused her of underfunding the schools. Under her 2019
plan, the city would spend
$10,658 per student.
“We are pushing down targeted investments at the school level
that will allow principals in coordination with the chancellor to
put in place graduation coaching,
enrollment support, home visits
Northam’s budget plan
revives Medicaid fight
VIRGINIA FROM B1
objections to extending an entitlement program to able-bodied
adults, no matter how poor.
Expansion would be available
to people with incomes below
138 percent of the federal poverty
level, which amounts to $16,643
for an individual and $28,180 for
a family of three.
Last week, Northam ordered
state legislators to return to Richmond on April 11 for a special
session to work out their differences and pass a budget. They
need to approve a spending plan
by July 1 to avoid a government
shutdown.
Northam’s bill calls for “clean”
Medicaid expansion as McAuliffe’s had, meaning it does not
include the conservative measures that had made expansion
palatable to the House. Northam
had been on board with those
measures during the regular session. And he could be again, he
said at an afternoon news conference Wednesday at a Capitol
Square office building.
“I’m still willing to work with
them and listen to their concerns,” Northam said.
But Northam, who had worked
closely with McAuliffe on his orig-
inal budget plan, said there were
practical advantages to submitting more or less the same bill. It
would be the quickest way to
resume budget negotiations, because the House and Senate had
built their own spending plans
with a series of amendments to
McAuliffe’s plan. They can easily
pick up where they left off in
negotiations if they do not have to
start from scratch.
Reverting to a clean expansion
plan also could provide political
cover for Republican Medicaid
holdouts, who could cast themselves as fiscal hawks by demanding the co-pays and work requirements in the House version.
The tactic did not work any
immediate magic on Sen. Majority Leader Thomas K. Norment
(R-James City), the chamber’s
most vocal opponent of Medicaid
expansion.
“Governor Northam’s decision
to effectively reintroduce Governor McAuliffe’s budget is an essential step in beginning the process of resolving the current budget impasse,” Norment said in a
written statement. “That he continues to make Obamacare’s Medicaid expansion integral to that
budget, and his refusal to base his
plan on a more current revenue
STEVE HELBER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam (D), right, joined by Finance Secretary Aubrey Layne, discusses his
proposed budget Wednesday.
forecast, means the current
standoff cannot be resolved
quickly.”
House Republican leaders,
who have been split on expansion,
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will lead to the adoption of a new
budget long before July 1.”
House Speaker M. Kirkland
Cox (R-Colonial Heights) and other House GOP leaders did praise
fenit.nirappil@washpost.com
perry.stein@washpost.com
faiz.siddiqui@washpost.com
Northam for resisting Norment’s
calls to hold off on budget talks
until the state determines how
Virginia tax revenue will be affected by changes in federal tax
law.
“The House always takes a conservative and responsible approach to estimating revenue,
and we are committed to utilizing
the current revenue forecast as
we craft the budget,” the House
leaders said. “It would be unwise
to conduct a revenue reforecast
considering current economic
uncertainty, recent changes in
federal tax law, and the need to
complete a budget as soon as
possible.”
Northam’s sole change to
McAuliffe’s proposal was adding a
requirement that any higherthan-expected tax revenue be
placed in a newly created reserve
fund. The measure is intended to
protect the state’s AAA bond rating. Ratings agencies have expressed concern with the state’s
habit of dipping into its existing
rainy day fund.
Republicans narrowly control
both chambers, and most Republicans staunchly opposed Medicaid expansion for four years under McAuliffe. But opposition in
the House softened after Democrats nearly took control of the
chamber in November, picking up
15 seats in an anti-President
Trump wave. But there has been
no discernible shift in the Senate,
which did not face voters last
year.
laura.vozzella@washpost.com
MARYLAND
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Complete Kitchen Remodeling
issued a statement that did not
address that aspect of Northam’s
budget proposal. They simply
noted that his plan was “the start
of a process that we are confident
and other curriculum interventions that are needed at the
school level,” Bowser said.
While some education watchdogs celebrated the per-pupil
spending increase, Marlana Wallace, a policy analyst with the D.C.
Fiscal Policy Institute, said it’s not
as high as it appears. According to
Wallace, part of that increase covers raises for teachers that came
after the union reached a contract
agreement with the city for the
first time in five years.
“It’s keeping with the status
quo,” Wallace said. “It’s too tight
to provide the resources we need
to provide a quality education.”
Bowser is also proposing
$300,000 to expedite case processing for residency fraud in D.C.
public schools. It comes after a
secret probe uncovered signs of
widespread enrollment fraud at
the Duke Ellington School of the
Arts, one of the city’s most celebrated public schools.
But Bowser says the increased
funding is because fraud is now
investigated by the Office of the
State Superintendent of Education instead of D.C. Public
Schools. “We recognize they need
more resources,” she said.
The District also benefited this
year from an unexpected
$50 million windfall under the
federal tax overhaul. Roughly half
of taxpayers are paying more to
the city because of a loss of deductions on the local level.
Bowser is also proposing tax
relief in some areas.
Residents would no longer
have to pay sales taxes on feminine hygiene products but would
still pay taxes on diapers, in accordance with a 2016 law that hasn’t
yet been implemented. Senior citizens would see smaller increases
in property taxes. And parents
can receive a $1,000 refundable
tax credit if children are enrolled
in licensed child-care facilities
without the help of city subsidies.
Candidate: It’s time for female leader
BY
P ATRICIA S ULLIVAN
Maryland’s only female gubernatorial candidate released a
campaign video Wednesday that
shows her nursing her 9-monthold daughter and claims that
states with female leaders have
“better schools, better health
care and lower incarceration
rates.”
“Some people say no man can
beat Larry Hogan,” says Krishanti
Vignarajah, referring to the Republican governor whose high
approval ratings have made him
a favorite to win a second term in
November. “Well, I’m no man. I’m
a mom, I’m a woman, and I want
to be your next governor.”
Vignarajah, one of eight Democrats competing in the June 26
primary, said she made a conscious decision to use several
images of her breast-feeding Alana in the YouTube ad, titled “A
Mother’s Promise.”
“It was no accident. It’s my
life,” she said.
To back up her claim about
better policy outcomes, her campaign cited several news articles
and studies that make the case
that teams with women in leadership outperform male-only-led
enterprises and that governments led by women enact policies that are better for women
and families. Public health
spending goes up when women
lead, said a report by the Organization for Economic Cooperation
and Development. An academic
study published by the Section
on Intergovernmental Administration and Management’s State
and Local Government Review
said female governors pay more
attention to social welfare policies than their male counterparts.
In the ad, Vignarajah — a
former policy director for Michelle Obama who has proposed
policies to address sexual assault
and harassment, paid family
leave, and improving gender equity — points out that no woman
currently holds a statewide elected position in Maryland. The
2016 retirement of Sen. Barbara
A. Mikulski (D), and the departure from office of Rep. Donna F.
Edwards (D), who lost her bid for
Mikulski’s seat, left the state
without a woman in its congressional delegation for the first
time in 77 years.
But the number of women
seeking office in Maryland has
roughly doubled this year compared with 2014, part of a national wave of female candidates that
includes the election of more
than a dozen women to the
Virginia General Assembly in November.
Vignarajah came to the United
States from Sri Lanka with her
parents when she was 9 months
old. She has selected former Baltimore Teachers Union president
Sharon Blake, who is African
American, as her running mate,
creating the first all-female gubernatorial ticket in Maryland
since 1994 and the first in state
history to include two women of
color.
patricia.sullivan@washpost.com
THURSDAY, MARCH 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B5
RE
VIRGINIA
Weather delays McGowan’s hearing
Actress is accused of
leaving cocaine on plane
after Women’s March
BY
R ACHEL W EINER
A hearing set for Wednesday in
a drug possession case against
actress Rose McGowan was postponed because two government
witnesses were unable to make it
after a snowstorm hit the Washington region.
The two witnesses were among
six scheduled to testify in the
preliminary hearing in Loudoun
County District Court. One was
caught behind an accident on the
Capital Beltway, prosecutors said,
while the other never received his
subpoena and also could not
make it in the weather. The hearing was rescheduled for May 3.
“The state of Virginia is beautiful, and I’m always happy to visit
it,” McGowan told reporters as
she left court.
The actress and anti-sexualharassment activist was in Washington for the Women’s March in
January 2017, when prosecutors
say she left a wallet with cocaine
inside it on a plane at Dulles
International Airport.
Attorneys for McGowan argue
that it would be impossible to
prove that the cocaine belonged
to the actress and that it was in
her possession when the plane
landed in Virginia. The wallet
was found five hours after she left
the plane, after she tweeted at
United Airlines that she had
lost it.
“We are very concerned at the
extraordinary weakness of the
evidence in this case and the fact
that this case has been dragging
out quite a while,” defense attorney Jessica Carmichael said in
court Wednesday. But she agreed
to the continuance.
Prosecutors said the witness
who was delayed on the Beltway
is a law enforcement officer. The
witness who did not get the
subpoena is an airline employee.
McGowan, who rose to fame on
the television show “Charmed,”
has become an outspoken figure
in the #MeToo movement. In
October, she accused Harvey
Weinstein of raping her in a hotel
room during the 1997 Sundance
Film Festival, and she has since
lashed out at those in Hollywood
who she believes were complicit
in his behavior. Weinstein has
denied accusations of rape.
She recently published a memoir, “Brave,” detailing her childhood in a cult, rise to stardom,
and experience with Weinstein
and other men she says mistreated her.
Weinstein hired private security firms to gather intelligence
on McGowan and the book before
its release, according to a report
in the New Yorker. McGowan’s
attorneys have cited that and other reports on his attempts to
silence accusers as evidence that
someone might have planted the
cocaine in McGowan’s wallet.
Weinstein’s representatives declined to comment on that
allegation.
rachel.weiner@washpost.com
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Rose McGowan, right, appears outside court Wednesday in Leesburg, Va. Two government witnesses
could not attend a preliminary hearing because of the snowstorm. The hearing is now set for May 3.
MARYLAND
Unearthing an African American graveyard from a mall
Site houses the first
nonreligious cemetery
for blacks in Baltimore
BY
C HRISTINA T KACIK
Ron Castanzo pulled up to the
parking lot of the strip mall in the
Belair-Edison neighborhood of
northeast Baltimore in his minivan a while back.
On a grassy spot near the entrance of the Belair Edison Crossing shopping center on Belair
Road, he saw the top of a white
tombstone breaking through the
ground, like a tooth coming in.
Castanzo, a professor at the
University of Baltimore who
teaches courses in anthropology
and human biology, remembers
thinking: “Wow, there was a cemetery here.”
It was the beginning of an effort
to dig up a past long paved over.
Laurel Cemetery opened in 1852
as the first nonreligious cemetery
for Baltimore’s African American
community. About 20 percent the
size of Green Mount Cemetery, it
became the final resting place for
Union soldiers, African Methodist
Episcopal bishops, civil rights
leaders, business executives and
professionals from the city’s black
middle class.
“If you were somebody of note,
the likelihood is that Laurel Cemetery is where you were buried,”
said Elgin Klugh, who chairs the
department of applied social and
political sciences at Coppin State
University.
The cemetery — or some of it, at
least — was moved in the 1950s.
Now Castanzo and Klugh have
joined forces to excavate its lost
history. They have recruited a
team of students for a simple mission: to determine whether there
are bodies still buried beneath the
shopping center. Klugh wants to
create a comprehensive list of
people who were buried there.
Their work could be bolstered
by legislation before the General
Assembly to increase protections
for local cemeteries that have
been abandoned, bulldozed or
just neglected. The House approved the legislation 138 to 0 on
Monday night. The Senate version
is scheduled for a hearing Thursday.
Joan Carter Conway, the bill’s
Senate sponsor, said the legislation could be used to increase the
visibility of sites such as Laurel
Cemetery. The Baltimore Democrat said the bill isn’t just about
African American cemeteries but
about all graveyards.
“Quite a lot of them are not
being maintained,” she said.
Conway said she is considering
offering an amendment to her bill
prohibiting the paving over of
cemeteries.
“I don’t think they should be
able to pave over cemeteries and
put a house there,” she said.
“That’s another episode of ‘Poltergeist.’ ”
Perhaps for as long as the dead
have been buried, societies have
struggled to maintain graveyards.
Across Belair Road from the Laurel Cemetery site, in the middle of
Clifton Park, is the old site of St.
Vincent’s
Cemetery,
which
opened about the same time. It
was bulldozed in the 1980s. A
group that calls itself the Friends
of St. Vincent’s Cemetery is working to landscape the area.
Neglect is particularly common
at African American cemeteries,
said Eileen McGuckian, president
PHOTOS BY LLOYD FOX/BALTIMORE SUN
One of the last headstones still visible in the old Laurel Cemetery, which opened in 1852. The graveyard was the final resting place for
Union soldiers, African Methodist Episcopal bishops, civil rights leaders, business executives and black middle-class professionals.
University of Baltimore professor Ron Castanzo holds parts of a
casket from the cemetery, some of which was moved in the 1950s.
of the Coalition to Protect Maryland Burial Sites.
A Baptist church in Bethesda
has clashed with Montgomery
County and private developers
over what is believed to be a historic African American cemetery
that was paved over years ago.
Human remains from an African
American cemetery have been
found beneath a dog park in
Washington’s Adams Morgan
neighborhood.
In New York in 1991, workers
excavating a site in Lower Manhattan for a federal building uncovered the first of an estimated
10,000 to 20,000 graves, a forgotten 18th century African American cemetery. A portion of the site
is now protected as the African
Burial Ground National Monument.
“Sometimes there are real horror stories,” McGuckian said.
Castanzo learned of the Laurel
Cemetery from a historic map of
the city. After checking out the site
in person, he contacted Coastal
Equities, which purchased the
shopping center just a few years
ago and got permission to dig in
the grassy, unpaved section.
Coastal Equities did not
respond Monday to a request for
comment.
The team began work in the
summer of 2015.
“I really did not expect there to
be lots of intact burials,” Castanzo
said.
The air was still shimmering
with tension after the death of
Freddie Gray and the demonstra-
tions that followed. Ashley Smith,
then a student at Coppin State
University, worked on the dig. As
team members excavated, she
said, the blackish soil nearest to
the asphalt gave way to a reddish
dirt thick enough to mold with
one’s hands.
In time, they found two headstones without names. Shards of
plate, a jug — antique trash, probably dumped in the 1940s. Piles
and piles of brick. There were
bones and the metal handles of
caskets. Nails of coffins. A grave,
cradled in a basket of roots.
And there, in the cemetery beneath the parking lot, Smith confronted a new type of racism: the
racism that followed black people
even after their deaths.
“Finding out that a space that
was so important to our community was just kind of discarded,”
Smith said, sent a message to the
city’s African Americans: “We’re
not human, we’re not worthy of
being remembered.”
She’d been to the strip mall. She
went to high school nearby. Yet in
all those years, she never once
heard anyone talk about the cemetery.
“So much history was buried in
that space,” she said.
To Klugh, that’s the worst thing
about this story. Of the possibly
5,000 people buried at Laurel, he
said, “their lives and contributions are gone from the collective
memory.”
Their earthly rest was not undisturbed.
Cattle
sometimes
broke
through the fence and knocked
over tombstones, the Baltimore
Afro-American reported. Weeds
and weather overtook the headstones. Neighbors dumped trash
and ashes.
“The city of the dead is also the
city of disorder and neglect,” the
Afro-American reported in 1929.
The company that owned the
cemetery said members had
stopped paying annual dues and
eventually declared bankruptcy,
the newspaper reported. Neighbors complained that the place
was an eyesore, a nuisance and a
draw for criminals.
In 1957, the General Assembly
approved legislation approving
its destruction after legislators ar-
gued that it had become a health
hazard. The prime land was later
bought and sold by men who
worked for the city’s Law Department.
“And that’s a really sad chapter
in Baltimore history,” Castanzo
said.
By November 1958, an AfroAmerican reporter wrote, “the
soft sobs of bereaved relatives
have been replaced at the Laurel
Cemetery by the roar of powerful
bulldozers ripping apart this historic but decaying burial
grounds.”
A new owner moved a few hundred burials to Carroll County. But
only a small fraction of the bodies
were probably relocated.
“You never remove them all,”
McGuckian said.
Castanzo and Klugh visited the
site one afternoon last week. Their
presence drew curiosity. Some
passersby had heard that the site
had been a cemetery, but knew
little about who was buried there.
“They need to do something
about this,” Angela Thomas said.
“Somebody’s loved one’s probably
still in there.”
The ground has eroded substantially since Castanzo and
Klugh began their work. In time,
Castanzo said, human remains
would come to the surface.
He picked up a bone, unsure
whether it was from a person.
Klugh noticed something else
in the dirt: the handle of an old
casket.
Castanzo bent to pick it up.
Tyrone Huff, 49, watched with a
mix of fascination and anger.
Why hadn’t the site been protected?
For years, he and many others
have used the grassy knoll as a
shortcut to enter the strip mall.
But now, knowing this was sacred
ground, he swore he would never
do it again.
“They’re not resting in peace,”
he said.
— Baltimore Sun
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K
IN MEMORIAM
DEATH NOTICE
HARDY
DEATH NOTICE
EDMONDSON
HORN
MARTINS
NAHAMIS
LELLIA ANN DICK EDMONDSON, SR.
JASON L. HORN (Age 39)
EBENEZER A. MARTINS
DAVID E. NAHAMIS
GIULIO NAPOLITANO/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Cardinal Keith O’Brien was
accused of acting
inappropriately toward priests.
Scottish cardinal
resigned amid
charges of
sexual misconduct
THERESA K. HARDY "Terri"
8/20/52 - 3/22/06
Missing you daily, loving you always,
Your loving family.
Husband, Tom; Children, Ricky, Kim and T.J.;
Grandchildren, Aniya, Kyla and Aiden
FOLDENAUER
HUMPHREY
ADAMS
MARK ANDREW FOLDENAUER "Andy"
(Age 56)
BETTY JEAN ADAMS (Age 69)
Entered into eternal rest on March 17, 2018
of Beltsville, MD. Beloved mother of Michael
Chambers (Raina), Jason Chambers (Mova) and
Sherronne Morrow; grandmother of Latoya
Greene, Obini Gibson, Brittney Clarke, Jalan
Chambers, Mikaaiyl Chambers, Sr. and Mikayla
Chambers; great-grandmother of two greatgrandchildren, Brihana Russell and Mikaaiyl
Chambers, Jr. Also survived by her sister,
Ethel Mae Johnson and brother, William "Ted"
Chambers of High Point, NC. Retiree of the
Department of Public Works as an Equipment
Specialist. Funeral Services will be held at Faith
AME Church, 13714 Briarwood Dr., Laurel, MD
20708, Saturday, March 24, viewing, 10 a.m.;
service, 11 a.m. Interment George Washington
Cemetery. Services entrusted to JAMES LINCOLN FUNERAL HOME.
Passed away on Monday, March 5, 2018.
Survived by daughter, Mica Gantt. Visitation
10 a.m., service 11 a.m., on Saturday March
24, at Henry S. Washington & Sons Funeral
Home, 4925-27 Nannie Helen Burroughs Ave.
NE, Washington, DC 20019. Interment Private.
GINIGER
CONSTANCE GINIGER
ZENAIDA BERNABE BARREDO (Age 70)
Passed away peacefully at her home in
Greenville, SC on March 19, 2018. Aida was the
beloved wife of Ramon Barredo III (deceased).
She is survived by her sons, Ronald of
Greenville, SC and Rodney of Woodbridge,
VA; daughters-in-law Jennifer and My Phung;
granddaughters Isabella and Vivian; siblings
Wendelina, Cecilio, Esperanza, Edgardo,
Leodegario, and Orlando.
The family will receive friends between the
hours of 1 to 4 p.m. on March 25 at the
Demaine Funeral Home, 10565 Main Street,
Fairfax, VA 22030. The Funeral Mass will be
held at 10:30 a.m. on Monday, March 26 at
St. Andrew the Apostle Catholic Church, 6720
Union Mill Rd., Clifton, VA 20124. Interment will
take place at Arlington National Cemetery at a
later date to be announced. In lieu of flowers,
the family requests memorial contributions in
her honor to the Dementia Society of America,
PO Box 600, Doylestown, PA 18901. Thanks
to the staff of Greenville Memorial Hospital
and Agape Hospice for their help and support.
Online condolences may be made at
www.dignitymemorial.com
BRILL
BESS G. BRILL
On Sunday, March 18, 2018.
Beloved wife of the late Dr.
Warren D. Brill of Chevy
Chase, MD. Loving mother of
Susan B. (Dr. Douglass) Kay,
Dr. Judith E. (Dr. Marvin
Ament) Brill and Dr. David M.
(Anne) Brill; grandmother of
Eric (Becki) and Lexi Kay, Zachary (Justin),
Michael and David Ament and Rebecca,
Daniel (Abby) and Adam Brill: great-grandmother of Eli and Ethan Kay. Funeral Services will be held on Sunday, March 25,
2018, 11:30 a.m. at Washington Hebrew
Congregation, 3935 Macomb St., NW,
Washington, DC. Interment at Memorial
Park Washington Hebrew Congregation,
Washington, DC. Following interment, the
family will receive guests. Shiva will be
held at the home of Dr. David M. Brill,
Washington, DC at 7:30 p.m. on Sunday,
March 25 and Monday, March 26 at 7:30
p.m. Services entrusted to Sagel, Bloomfield, Danzansky, Goldberg Funeral Care,
Inc.
www.sagelbloomfield.com
DiLORETO
On Monday, March 19, 2018,
CONSTANCE GINIGER of Germantown, MD. Loving wife of
the late Morton S. Giniger. Treasured mother Patricia (Adam)
Snyder and Barbara (Stan)
Cooper. The perfect grandmother of Lili and
Kasey Snyder and Grady and Lila Cooper.
Funeral services will be held on Friday,
March 23, 2018, 11 a.m. at Judean Memorial Gardens Chapel, Olney, MD, with interment immediately following the service.
Shiva will be announced. Memorial contributions may be made to Revitz House
Torah Fund. Arrangements entrusted to
TORCHINSKY HEBREW FUNERAL HOME,
202-541-1001.
GIZA
EDWARD THOMAS GIZA
On Friday, March 16, 2018, Edward Thomas
Giza of Silver Spring, MD passed away. Beloved
husband of Elinor and father of Tom, David,
Mark, and Laura. Born in Detroit, Michigan
in 1925, he and Elinor married in 1952. He
served his country in the U.S. Army’s 66th
Infantry Division in Europe during World War
II and later working for the U.S. Agency for
International Development. He was a world
traveler, loved jazz music, played the piano, and
cared about animals. He will be remembered
as a wonderful husband, a great father, and a
good, kind man. Interment private.
MILLEDGE
JANIE L. MILLEDGE (Age 73)
In lieu of flowers, please consider donating
to: USO: uso.org or Immanuel Presbyterian
Church, C/O DiLoreto Memorial, 1125 Savile
Lane, McLean, VA 22101.
Passed away on March 16, 2018 in her home
in Springfield, Virginia. She was born in 1934 in
Salinas, California, and married Wayne Pierce
in 1952. They were together for 66 wonderful
years. Carole spent her life taking loving care
of her family, and also had an avid interest
in antiques which blossomed into an antiques
sales business, Carole's Antiques, which she
and her husband ran together for many years.
Left to honor her memory are her husband
Wayne, her children Rick, Randy, Karen, and
Kathy, and her granddaughter, Brigid. A memorial service will be held at Demaine Funeral
Home on Friday, March 23, from 2 to 3 p.m.
In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made in
Carole's name to the Michael J. Fox Foundation
for Parkinson's Research.
www.demainefunerals.com
IRBY
LILLIE IRBY
Officers and members of The
Ladies First Aid Union of Churches,
Inc. are notified of the passing
of Nurse Lillie Irby. Viewing 12:30
p.m. . until time of service 1:30
p.m. on Friday, March 23, 2018 at
Fort Lincoln Funeral Home, 3401
Bladensburg Rd., Brentwood MD.
Yoshiko Johnson, President
Bobbie Best and Emma Salter,
Chairpersons of Condolences
DEATH NOTICE
MOORE
REGINALD ORLANDO MOORE, SR.
Passed away on Friday, March 16, 2018 after
a short stay at Hospice Home of Rockingham
County in Wentworth, NC.
Born in Salamanca, NY on September 7, 1926
she spent most of her early years in Rochester,
NY and graduated from Syracuse University
where she was an active member of the Delta
Gamma Sorority. While attending Syracuse she
met John Cave "Jack" Kenealy and they married
in 1951. After graduating from college, Peggy
and Jack lived in St. Louis, MO and New
Orleans, LA before landing in Kensington MD.
They raised three sons and Peggy was proud
of her work for the Prevention of Blindness
Society as the Vision Screening Program Director.
They had visited the Edenton, NC area and
loved it so upon retirement Peggy and Jack
moved to Tyner, NC in 1992 where they spent
several very happy and active years enjoying
retirement. Peggy and Jack enjoyed collecting
antiques and pottery, gardening, history, touring in the car and spending time with their
family. A particularly favorite activity for Peggy
was her volunteer work at the historic Cupola
House in Edenton, NC.
After Jack passed away she moved to Ruffin,
NC to be closer to family. She had a great love
for her three sons and their families. Peggy will
be sadly missed by all her family.
Her survivors include three sons and daughters-in-law: John Kenealy, who lives and works
over-seas, and his wife Sarah of Randolph,
Vermont; Mike and Penny Kenealy of Glenwood
Springs, Colorado and David and Annette
Kenealy of Ruffin, North Carolina; eight grandchildren: Erin, Jake, Trevor, Scotlan, Clayton,
Jesse, Dusty and Casey; and three great grandchildren. She is also survived by her brother
Charles Benjamin, and his wife Cathy, of Pinehurst, NC. She was preceded in death Jack, her
husband for 55 years.
Peggy’s wishes were to be cremated and
have her ashes buried with those of her late
husband in Edenton, NC. A Memorial Service
will be held at Saint Paul’s Episcopal Church in
Edenton later this summer.
LAWSON
DEATH NOTICE
Elois R. Lawson, of Jefferson, TX, transitioned from her earthly life to eternal rest
on March 7, 2018, at her residence in
Washington, DC. She is survived by two
nephews, Wayne (Cynthia) Jackson and
Samuel House (Bernadine); one niece, Elois
(David) Davidson; five great-nephews and
four great-nieces; sisters-in-law, Jo Frances
Jackson and Solona Jackson; loving and
devoted goddaughters, Bertina (Vincent)
Cleveland and Cassandra Pinkney; and a
host of other relatives and friends. She
was preceded in death by her mother and
father, Pollie Williams Jackson and Robert
Allen Jackson, and two brothers, Robert
Allen Jackson, Jr. and Lonnie Jackson. The
graveside burial will be celebrated on Saturday, March 24, 2018, at 12 noon; Ft.
Lincoln Cemetery, 3401 Bladensburg Rd.,
Brentwood, MD. Services entrusted to J.B.
Jenkins Funeral Home, Hyattsville, MD.
ARCHIE
Memorial June 2 at 2 p.m. held at Immanuel
Presbyterian Church, 1125 Savile Lane,
McLean, VA 22101.
On Wednesday, March 14, 2018. Preceded in
death by her parents Arthur, Sr. and Emma,
daughter Venus and siblings Arthur, Jr. and
Dorothy. She four children Margarita, Constance, Joseph and Reva, 12 grandchildren,
two great-grandchildren, two sisters Ida Bassil
and Emma Green and a host of other loving
family and friends. On Monday, March 26,
2018 family will receive friends at Bible Way
Church, 1100 New Jersey Avenue, NW, from 10
a.m. until time of service 11 a.m. Interment
Washington National Cemetery.
www.FrazierMason.com
PIERCE
CAROLE LORENE PIERCE (Age 83)
POWELL
ELOIS LAWSON
“Lois”
JOHN R. HICKEY "Jack"
Don was born on June 28, 1932 in New Britain
Connecticut, to Louis and Anna DiLoreto and
he was the eldest brother to Jerry, Louis,
LuAnn and Robert. Upon graduating from New
Britain high school, Don enlisted in the U.S.
Air Force and served in the Korean War as
a forward air controller and communications
specialist. Don earned his bachelor’s degree
in English from the University of Maryland.
He joined the US Central Intelligence Agency,
where he enjoyed a long and distinguished
career. After retiring from the CIA, Don founded
Video Scenes and produced many training and
military documentary films. His love of family
was paramount. Not only for his immediate
family, but all of those from the outside that
he brought into the fold. He passed down his
parent’s strong belief in family, to his children
and grandchildren. As a DiLoreto, he believed
that one should be a loving, caring, kind, loyal
and dependable person.
On March 20, 2018 passed away peacefully.
Beloved husband of the late Arlette McGill;
father of Christine Martin, Michelle Boyle of
Reading and John P. McGill. Also survived by
10 grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.
Relatives and friends may call at Holy
Redeemer Church, 9701 Summit Avenue,
Kensington, Md. on March 24 from 12 noon to
1 p.m. with a Mass of Christian Burial following
immediately thereafter. Private interment at
Gate of Heaven Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to St. Francis Inn, 2441
Kensington Ave., Philadelphia, PA 19125.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
On Saturday, March 10, 2018. Beloved husband
of Janet Moore. He is also survived by daughters, Dee Dee (Sean), Diane (Keith), Imani
Mynia; sons, Reginald, Jr. (Vicki) and Shawn;
brothers, Charles (Gloria), Larry, and John;
brothers-in-law, Bladen and Isaac; grandchildren; great-grandchildren; a host of nieces,
nephews, cousins, other relatives and friends.
The family will receive friends on Monday,
March 26, 2018 from 10:30 a.m. until time
of service 12 Noon at Life Covenant Christian
Ministries, 15522 Livingston Rd., Accokeek,
MD. Pastor, Ronald Bragg, Officiating. Interment Maryland Veterans Cemetery, Cheltenham, MD with military honors.
THOMAS L. POWELL
Departed this life on Saturday, March 17, 2018.
He leaves to cherish his memories, his wife,
Gloria B. Powell; children, Trina M. Powell
and Terrance L. Powell and a host of other
relatives and friends. Friends may visit with
the family on Friday, March 23, 2018 at Mt.
Ennon Baptist Church, 9832 Piscataway Road,
Clinton, MD 20735 from 10 a.m. until time of
funeral services at 11 a.m. Interment Hampton
Memorial Gardens. Flowers may be ordered
and condolences may be expressed at:
www.jkjohnsonfuneralhome.com
NAGLER
In 1958, realizing that their Dalmatian,
Sparky, needed training, Nan enrolled in a
dog obedience class offered by what was
to become the Canine Training Association
(CTA). This began a lifelong passion she and
Ken shared for raising and training dogs.
They raised eleven litters of Dalmatians and
two litters of Poodles. Nan competed in
the early days of canine freestyle and went
on to judge for the organization. Nan and
Ken taught obedience classes for CTA and,
over the years, they also worked with the
Hyattsville Dog Training Club, the Washington
Poodle Club, the Greater Washington Dalmatian Club, and the Rock Creek Kennel Club.
ANN HAMILTON NAGLER "Nan"
Ann Hamilton Nagler, 94, of Edgewater, MD,
died peacefully at home, surrounded by family, on March 17, 2018 of complications from
a stroke. Nan had a passion for athletics
and later, dog obedience training. She began
playing competitive tennis as a teenager,
something she continued into her seventies,
and was a skilled figure skater in high school
and college.
Nan met her husband, Ken, at the University
of Chicago where they were both pursuing
master’s degrees. They married in 1947, and
moved to Washington, DC where Ken began
a thirty-year career with the U.S. Weather
Service. Nan and Ken settled in Hyattsville,
MD where they raised three daughters. Nan
continued her interest in athletics, teaching
tennis and exercise classes. She taught
swimming for more than thirty years at
the Silver Spring YMCA including classes for
many disabled children and adults. She was
active in the PTA and was a Brownie and Girl
Scout leader.
Ann Blythe Hamilton was born June 1, 1923 in
Chicago, IL to Elisabeth and George Hamilton.
She attended Bryn Mawr college for a year
and transferred to the University of Chicago.
At Chicago she completed a B.S. degree in
Chemistry and began work on a master’s
degree in Microbiology. Before starting a
family, Nan worked as a laboratory technician at Billings Hospital in Chicago and
Georgetown University Hospital in Washington.
She is survived by her husband of more
than 70 years, Ken; three daughters, Betty
Smith (Greg) of Winfield, IL, Janet Nagler of
Silver Spring, MD, and Sue Beatty (Charlie) of
Edgewater, MD; and two grandchildren, Paul
Beatty of Annapolis, MD and Julia Beatty of
Millersville, MD. She was preceded in death
by her two sisters, Helen Bross and Kathie
Smith. Her Poodles, Poppy and Willy, were
also close to her heart.
A memorial gathering will be held from 12 to
2 p.m. on Saturday, March 24, at the George
P. Kalas Funeral Home, 2973 Solomons Island
Rd., Edgewater, MD, 21037. In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions may be made to
the American Kennel Club Canine Health
Foundation, P.O. Box 900061, Raleigh, NC
27675 (www.akcchf.org).
An online guestbook is available at:
www.KalasFuneralHomes.com
Father MARK A. PILON
Loving husband of Claudia, passed away
on March 18, 2018. Viewing to take place
Thursday evening, March 22 from 6 to 8
p.m. at Pierce Funeral Home, Manassas, VA.
Funeral Mass to be held on Friday, March
23, at 10:30 a.m. at Holy Trinity Church,
Gainesville, VA. Donations, in lieu of flowers,
requested to be sent to the Georgetown
Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center.
Donald H. DiLoreto resident of McLean, VA
died February 28, 2018 at Fairfax Hospital. Don
is survived by his wife Marilyn; his children
Don, Jean Marie and Steve; his grandchildren
Amanda, Ana, Don and Olivia; and brother
Jerry.
McGILL
JOHN C. McGILL (95)
David Edward Nahamis passed away at
his residence in Fairfax, Virginia on March
18, 2018. David was born December 1,
1958 in Barcelona, Spain to the late Irving
and Olwyn Nahamis. David will be lovingly
remembered by his wife and best "buddy"
Debbie who shared 37 years together, 25 of
them married. He is survived by his siblings
Bobbi Posta (Rick) and Clifford Nahamis
and by numerous nieces, nephews and
extended family.
Family will receive friends on Friday, March
23 from 4 to 8 p.m. with a memorial service
at 5:30 p.m. at Everly Funeral Home and
Cremation Services, 6161 Leesburg Pike,
Falls Church, VA.
Memorial donations in David's name may
be made to the Bladder Cancer Advocacy
Network (BCAN).
www.everlycommunity.com
PILON
HICKEY
DONALD H. DiLORETO (Age 85)
On Thursday, March 8, 2018 in Takoma
Park, MD, Ebenezer Martins transitioned
into eternal life. He is survived by his
daughters, Elizabeth Ayodele Martins and
Elizabeth Titilayo Martins; granddaughter
Daphane Martins; sister-in-law, Angela Harrison (Randolph); and a host of relatives
and friends. Services will be held on Friday,
March 23, 2018, Viewing 10 a.m.; Service
11 a.m. at Johnson & Jenkins Funeral Home,
716 Kennedy Street, NW, Washington, DC.
Interment Gate of Heaven Cemetery, 13801
Georgia Ave, Silver Spring, MD.
On March 13, 2018 of Ellerbe, NC passed
away at her residence at Carroll Manor Nursing
Home, Washington, DC. Beloved wife of the
late Rev. Nathaniel T. Humphrey. She leaves to
remember her life; four nieces, Sallie Gaddy,
Catherine E. Adams (Nathaniel), Robin Braxton
and Anne McDonald; many great-nieces, greatnephews and friends. Visitation, Monday,
March 26, 2018 from 10 a.m. until time of
funeral service, 11 a.m. at MARSHALL-MARCH
FUNERAL HOME CHAPEL, 4217-9th St. N.W,,
Washington, DC. Interment Harmony Memorial
Park, Landover, MD.
MARGARET BENJAMIN KENEALY
"Peggy" (Age 91)
GANTT
DEATH NOTICE
ETHEL F. EVERETT HUMPHREY
(Age 100)
KENEALY
PATRICIA A. GANTT
The March 20 obituary of
record cover designer Gary
Burden included an incorrect
reference to the Doors album
“Morrison Hotel.” In a photo
shoot for the cover, Mr. Burden
arranged for the band to be
photographed inside the hotel,
not outside the hotel. It also
incorrectly reported the year
Crosby, Stills & Nash’s self-titled
debut was released. It was 1969,
not 1968.
Passed away peacefully on Thursday, March
8, 2018 at Mary Washington Hospital in Fredericksburg, VA. Andy was born on June 6, 1961 to
Robert "Bob" and Sally (Schoeffel) Foldenauer.
He was a 1979 graduate of Loudoun Valley High
School. Andy owned and operated a moving
company until 2001. He then switched to the
plumbing and HVAC trades, most suited to
his talents. Andy had masterful mechanical
abilities—he could build or repair most anything, from houses to high-performance race
cars, and he worked up until May 2017 when he
was diagnosed with a brain tumor (GBM). Andy
lived life with gusto through racing his corvette
and motocross, to playing golf. His passionate
love for these sports, and outgoing personality
earned him many enduring friendships. Andy
is survived by daughter Diana E. Flannery;
siblings Carl G. Foldenauer, Paul A. Foldenauer,
and Elizabeth F. Stratton; two nieces; three
nephews; and many great friends. He will be
missed by great dog, Alex. He will forever be
remembered as the adventurous, quick witted,
kind, strong, loving brother and friend he was.
Andy's Celebration of Life Party will take place
at Autobahn Indoor Speedway in Manassas
Mall on April 6 from 7 to 10 p.m. RSVP
to Liz@Stratton.net to attend. Guest count
needed by March 31, 2018. In lieu of flowers,
please donate to braintumor.org, and choose
Defeat GBM Research Collaborative.
BARREDO
C L A RIFIC A T I ON
C O RRE C T ION
Visitation will be held on Sunday, March 25,
2018, from 5 to 8 p.m. at the Hines-Rinaldi
Funeral Home, 11800 New Hampshire Ave.,
Silver Spring, MD where funeral services
will be held on Monday, March 26, 2018
at 10 a.m. Interment to follow at George
Washington Cemetery. The family will be
observing Shiva following funeral services
at the Horn residence.
DEATH NOTICE
— Associated Press
The March 21 obituary for
financier Peter G. Peterson
omitted his role as founding
chairman of the Washingtonbased Institute for International
Economics in 1981. He remained
in that position, and was a major
benefactor, until his death. The
nonprofit research institution
was renamed the Peterson
Institute for International
Economics in 2006.
On Sunday, March 18, 2018,
Jason L. Horn of Fulton, MD
passed away after a long and
valiant fight with brain cancer. Beloved son of Henry
and Janis Horn; loving brother of Dr. Erin Leiman (David);
cherished uncle of Zev Leiman. Also survived by numerous aunts, uncles, cousins
and a large circle of dear friends. Jason was
a poet, musician and had an avid love of
physical fitness.
In lieu of flowers memorial contributions
may be made in Jason's name online at
https:\\secure.jhu.edu/form/neuro donors
should please mark the designation box
"other" and write Dr. Jaishri Blakeley.
BY D ANICA K IRKA
AND N ICOLE W INFIELD
Keith O’Brien, the first Roman
Catholic cardinal in modern history to recuse himself from a papal
election and who resigned in disgrace over charges of sexual misconduct, died March 19 in
Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England.
He was 80.
His former archdiocese in Scotland announced his death. He had
a heart ailment.
Cardinal O’Brien, once Britain’s
highest-ranking Catholic leader,
resigned as the archbishop of St.
Andrews and Edinburgh in 2013
and recused himself from the conclave that elected Francis as pope
after unidentified priests alleged
in British newspaper reports that
he had acted inappropriately
toward them.
The men said that they had
complained to church authorities
about Cardinal O’Brien’s conduct
but that the church had failed to
respond. None of the men are believed to have been minors at the
time of the purported misconduct.
After initially denying the allegations and impeding the investigation, Cardinal O’Brien eventually admitted that his sexual conduct had “fallen below the standards expected” of a priest,
archbishop and cardinal. He apologized and promised to play no
further role in the public life of the
Scottish church.
“To those I have offended, I apologize and ask forgiveness,” he said.
“To the Catholic Church and people
of Scotland, I also apologize.”
In 2015, Francis accepted Cardinal O’Brien’s resignation after he
relinquished the rights and privileges of being a cardinal. He was
allowed to retain the title, however. The decision was reached after
Cardinal O’Brien met with Francis, and after the Vatican sent its
top sex crimes investigator to
Scotland to look into the allegations against him.
A year earlier, Scottish church
officials had reported that Cardinal
O’Brien had objected to a national
church audit into how church officials had handled sexual abuse cases in the Scottish church from 1952
to 2012. Without Cardinal O’Brien’s
participation, the analysis never
got off the ground.
Cardinal O’Brien’s official Vatican biography made no mention
of the sexual misconduct charges,
the Vatican investigation or the
findings that he had impeded the
2012 sexual abuse audit. After providing information about his education, ordination and honors, the
brief biography said only that he
didn’t participate in the 2013 conclave, left Scotland for a period of
prayer and resigned being a cardinal in 2015, without saying why.
Experts said his decision not to
attend the 2013 papal conclave
was unprecedented; never before
had a cardinal stayed away from a
conclave because of personal
scandal, according to Vatican historian Ambrogio Piazzoni.
MARCH 22 , 2018
DEATH NOTICE
Lellia Ann Dick Edmondson, 90, passed
away on March 17, 2018. Born in Grimes,
VA on July 25, 1927, she was the daughter
of late John Lohr and Neva Henderson Dick.
Ann is survived by her son, Ron Rawlinson
of North Myrtle Beach, SC, and her brother
James E. “Jim” Dick Sr. of Falls Church, VA.
She was preceded in death by her husband,
Woodrow Wilson “Woody” Edmondson of
Clover, VA and her brothers, L. Mitchell Dick
of McLean, VA and James E. “Jim” Dick of
Manassas, VA. Ann served as Membership
Director for the Arlington Chamber of Commerce for 26 years. The family will hold a
private celebration of life.
KEITH O’BRIEN, 80
. THURSDAY,
TIMOTHY ROBERT ARCHIE
Timothy Robert Archie, 58, of Alexandria, VA,
loving husband to Jennifer (Carroll) Archie;
wonderful father to Duff and Ben Archie;
beloved brother to Andrew and Christopher
(Kit) Archie; and devoted uncle to Ellen,
Samuel, Jack, and Jamie Archie, Sarah Butler
and Liza Butler Arulampalam, Anna, Graham,
Audrey, Colin, and Quinn Carroll, and Siobhan
and Roy Duffy. He was the son of the late
Robert John Archie and Carol (Krebs) Archie.
Tim passed away peacefully at home on
March 19, 2018, surrounded by love, having
survived Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis for more than 20 years with wit, grit,
and a relentless focus on the thousands
of joys and blessings of his life, not the
thousands of daily struggles and insults
inflicted by a cruel disease. Tim’s sense of
humor was, first and foremost, the center
of his personality. The harder the struggle,
the better the one-liner. “Humor is best
left to the professionals,” he was fond of
commenting. If that’s the case, he was a pro
without equal.
Tim grew up in Glencoe, Illinois, where he
proudly attended New Trier East high school.
He graduated from Roanoke College in 1982,
and moved immediately to Washington, D.C.,
where he met his wife, Jenny in 1983, as
fellow staffers at the College Republican
National Committee. He worked many years
thereafter in Republican politics, for Secretary Elizabeth Dole at the Department of
Transportation, for President Reagan in the
Office of Public Liaison at The White House,
and for the 1988 presidential primary campaign of Sen. Robert Dole. In 1990, Tim
embarked upon a second successful career
in interior design, where his exceptional
taste and creativity brought beauty to many
rooms. And yet, Tim’s best role was that of
devoted father. He was inordinately proud of
his two sons, Duff (22) and Ben (17), for the
men they have already become. Through 20
years of relentless MS disease progression,
Tim never lost his razor sharp wit, warm
smile, and devotion to family and friends,
before MS. MS always came second, and
his family and way of life always came first.
Father Mark A. Pilon was born in Detroit, MI
on March 23, 1943 to Ernest and Elizabeth
Pilon. Father Pilon passed away on March
19, 2018. He is survived by his sister Eileen
DeLucia and his brothers Bernard and Paul,
and numerous nieces and nephews. He was
preceded in death by his brother David.
he was appointed Pastor of Saint Ambrose
Parish in Annandale. In 2000 he joined the
faculty of Mount Saint Mary’s Seminary. In
2009 Father Pilon was assigned as a
parochial vicar at Saint Raymond of Peñafort
Parish in Springfield, where he served until
his retirement in 2012.
Father Pilon attended Holy Trinity Seminary
at the University of Dallas and was ordained
to the priesthood by Bishop Thomas Welsh
on November 29, 1975. He was assigned
as Parochial Vicar at Saint Louis Parish in
Alexandria and then in 1977 to Bishop Denis
J. O’Connell High School in Arlington. He went
on to earn a Master’s degree in educational
administration from Catholic University of
America in Washington, DC in 1978 and was
a lecturer in philosophy of education at the
University from 1978-79. During this time he
was in residence at Our Lady of Lourdes
Parish in Arlington until 1980; at Saint Agnes
Parish in Arlington until 1983; and Saint John
the Beloved Parish in McLean until 1985.
Father Pilon was active in many Catholic
intellectual endeavors and apostolates. He
was publisher and assistant editor of Triumph
magazine from 1970-73 and contributing editor until 1975. From 1970-85, he helped
found and worked with the Institute for Study
of Catholic Culture in Spain. He taught at
Bishop Ireton High School in Alexandria from
1966-70 and at Notre Dame Institute (now
Notre Dame Graduate School of Christendom
College) from the mid-1970s until 1992. His
books include Understanding the Church
from the Teaching of Lumen Gentium and
Magnum Mysterium: The Dignity of Marriage
and the Family. Father Pilon was also a
frequent contributor to The Catholic Thing.
From 1985-87 Father Pilon studied at the
John Paul II Institute at the Pontifical Lateran
University in Rome. He was only the second
American to earn his license in sacred theology, summa cum laude, from the Institute.
He later obtained a doctorate in systematic
theology from the Pontifical University of the
Holy Cross in Rome in 1991.
A visitation and vigil will be held Thursday
March 22, 2018 from 4 to 7 p.m. at St. Raymond of Penafort Church, 8750 Pohick Road,
Springfield, VA. Mass of Christian Burial will
be offered on Friday March 23, at 10:30 a.m.,
with burial to follow at Fairfax Memorial Park.
In lieu of flowers memorial contributions may
be made to Little Sisters of the Poor, St.
Joseph’s Home for the Aged, 1503 Michaels
Road Henrico, VA 23229-4822 Arrangements
by Fairfax Memorial Funeral Home, 9902
Braddock Road Fairfax, VA 22032.
Father Pilon was then assigned as a Parochial
Vicar at Saint John the Baptist Parish in
Front Royal and professor of theology at
Christendom College in Front Royal. In 1990
Memorial service Friday, March 23, 2018, at
11 a.m. at Historic Christ Church, 118 N.
Washington Street, Alexandria, VA.
In lieu of flowers, contributions in Tim's
memory may be made to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, by clicking this link
http://main.nationalmssociety.org/goto/InMemoryofTim.Donations sent
in the mail can be made out to National
MS Society and in the memo line please
write “Team Archie”. The mailing address is:
National MS Society, 30 South 17th Street,
Suite 800, Philadelphia, PA 19103. Multiple
sclerosis is a chronic and progressive neurological illness, which severely impacted Tim’s
grandmother as well.
Because your loved one served proudly...
Military emblems are available with death notices and in-memoriams
To place a notice call 202-334-4122 or 800-627-1150, ext. 44122
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THURSDAY, MARCH 22 , 2018
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SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
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BOBBIE ROBERTS (Age 88)
On March 18, 2018 of Gainesville, VA. Beloved
husband of the late Charlene Roberts; father
of Dave Roberts (Sheri), Marla Taylor (Ken),
Betsy Strader (Jim) and the late Jeff Roberts.
Grandfather of Ian, Austin, Skyler, Kelly, Ben
and Alexis. The family will receive friends from
6 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, March 29, 2018 at
ADAMS-GREEN FUNERAL HOME, 721 Elden St.,
Herndon, VA. where a funeral service will take
place at 11 a.m. on Friday, March 30, 2018.
Interment will follow at National Memorial
Park, Falls Church, VA. Email condolences may
be made at
www.adamsgreen.com
STAMP
ELIZABETH C. STAMP
On February 7, 2018 at her residence.
Beloved mother of Allen C. Stamp, III and
Willie D. Stamp. Also survived by a brother,
Willie Coleman, Jr.; three cousins, Sara
White Jackson, Preston White, Ronald
Coleman and a host of other relatives.
Family will receive friends on Thursday,
March 22, 2018 at St. Gabriel Catholic
Church, 26 Grant Circle, NW, Washington,
DC from 9:15 a.m. until time of Mass 10
a.m. Interment private. Services entrusted
to B.K. HENRY FUNERAL HOME.
SUEANN ANASTASIA APPLEWHITE
SueAnn Anastasia Applewhite, 58, of Springfield, Virginia died at 5:06 a.m. on Monday.
March 19, 2018 at her residence in Springfield,
VA . She was born July 23, 1959 in Port of Spain
Trinidad West Indies, to Carol E .Applewhite.
She was married, then divorced and is survived
by ex-spouses, daughter Danielle K. Hines, and
son Nicholas A. Laboy, mother Carol E. Gittens,
sisters Kerra, Lynette and Lucretia, brothers
Cassius, Lloyd and Larry, many nephews and
nieces, cousins, aunt, uncles, great aunts and
uncles. In lieu of flowers the family is looking
to establish a fund in Sue Ann’s memory to
support children interested in STEM, STE”A”M
and innovation education programs provided
through the YMCA of Metropolitan Washington. No services are scheduled at this time.
www.demainefunerals.com
TEICHMAN
VINCI
ALLEAN S. MILES (Age 89)
ETHEL BELL TAYLOR SQUIRE
Peacefully went home to be with our Lord on
Friday, March 16, 2018. She is survived by two
daughters, Monica Smith (Reginald) and Rita
Bent (Paul); three grandchildren, four greatgrandchildren, one sister, one sister-in-law and
a host of nieces, nephews, other relatives
and friends. Visitation, 10 a.m. until time of
service, 11 a.m., Friday, March 23 at Second
New St. Paul Baptist Church, 2400 Franklin St.,
NE, Washington, DC 20018. Interment Lincoln
Memorial Cemetery. Services by HENRY S.
WASHINGTON & SONS FUNERAL HOME.
Ethel Bell Taylor Squire, 87, of Marco Island,
Florida, passed away peacefully at her
home on March 16, 2018. She was born
on June 21, 1930 in Flushing, New York to
George and Lillian (Peden) Taylor and grew
up in Pompton Lakes, New Jersey. Ethel
spent most of her adult life in Montgomery
County, Maryland with her family. Ethel
was predeceased by her son, Brian Taylor
Squire, James “Jack” Dixon, the love of
her life for over 30 years, and her brother,
Donald G. Taylor.
MURRAY
Ethel touched many lives with her vivacious
personality and sense of humor. She
enjoyed a good margarita and many pastimes, which included tennis, singing, dancing, sewing, quilting, and playing bridge.
She was best known for her incredible
green thumb and love of gardening. Ethel’s
hands were rarely still, but her real and
abiding passions were her family and
friends. Ethel lived her life to the fullest
and sought to instill in her children and
grandchildren the same zest for life.
FALLS
BALL
DONALD R. FALLS
Colonel, USAF (Ret.)
NONA J. TEICHMAN
On Wednesday, March 21,
2018, NONA J. TEICHMAN of
Rockville, MD. Beloved wife of
the late Solomon "Sam" Teichman. Devoted mother of Shelley (Stewart) Remer and Kevin
(Marsha) Teichman. Loving grandmother of
Marci (Eric) Skigen, Blake (Jodi) Remer, Elie
Teichman, Ari (Sara) Teichman and Reena
(Seth) Scoblionko. Dear great-grandmother
of Jack, Paige, Ariana, Noah, Brady, Jackson
and Milo. Funeral services will be held
on Friday, March 23, 2018, 10 a.m. at
Congregation Har Shalom, 11510 Falls Rd.,
Potomac, MD. Interment following at Beth
Tfiloh Cemetery, Gwynn Oak, MD. Shiva
will be observed at the home of Shelley
and Stewart Remer. Shiva minyanim will
be Sunday through Wednesday evenings
at 7:30 p.m., except Saturday evening at
8:15 p.m. Memorial contributions may be
made to Montgomery Hospice or to Magen
David Adom. Arrangements entrusted to
TORCHINSKY HEBREW FUNERAL HOME,
202-541-1001.
ALBERT DUPREE
Entered into eternal life in Christ on March
11, 2018. Beloved father of LaForest, Glenda
and Anthony; stepfather of Retta, Phyllis and
Sammy. Preceded in death by his first wife,
Jeanette and second wife, Helen. Viewing, 11
a.m., Service 12 noon, Friday, March 24, 2018
at Winterville Church of Christ, 3170 Church
Street Extension, Winterville, NC.
Reverend M. SYLVIA BALL
November 14, 1953 – March 8, 2018
On March 8, 2018, Reverend M. Sylvia Ball,
Pastor of Sweet Union Baptist Church in
Roanoke, VA, went home to be with the Lord.
A memorial service will be held Friday, March
23, 2018, from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Mount
Sinai Baptist Church, 1615 Third Street, NW,
Washington, DC 20001.
In lieu of flowers, donations in memory of
Pastor M. Sylvia Ball may be made to the
American Cancer Society to support funding
of Uterine Sarcoma Cancer Research. Arrangements are being handled by Hamlar-Curtis
Funeral Home, 1002 Moorman Avenue, N.W.,
Roanoke, VA 24016. Condolences may be sent
to
www.Hamlar-Curtis.com
Donald R. Falls, 64, of Lanham, Maryland died
peacefully at home on March 13, 2018 after
a 10 year battle with cancer. Don was born
in Seaside, Oregon. He received a Bachelor’s
degree from the University of Maryland; Master’s from Oklahoma University and the Naval
Post Graduate School and served a one year
Fellowship at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Col. Falls faithfully served in the USAF
for 31 years and later worked for the United
States Department of Defense. Don was predeceased by his parents, Frank and Joyce Falls
and granddaughter, Brianna. He is survived by
his devoted wife, Barbara of 35 years; loving
daughter, Rebecca and adoring grandchildren,
Kyle and Kahlen.
Family will receive visitors and friends on
Friday, March 23, 2018 from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to
8 p.m. at Advent Funeral & Cremation Services,
9013 Annapolis Road, Lanham, MD 20706. A
Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated on
Saturday, March 24, 2018 at St. Matthias the
Apostle Catholic Church, 9475 Annapolis Road,
Lanham, MD at 11 a.m. Interment will be held
at Arlington National Cemetery at a later date.
JOSEPH CECIL MURRAY
On Sunday, March 18, 2018.
Beloved father of Michael
Murray, Joanne Johnson, Victoria Johnson, Kevin Murray,
Margaret Sheridan, Roberta
Baer, Catherine Murray, Brian
Murray and Brendan Murray and dear brother
of Marguerite. He is also survived by 33 grandchildren; 46 great-grandchildren and countless
other relatives and friends. He was preceded
in death by his beloved wife, Anne Murray his
son, Martin Murray and his daughter, Lorraine
Sampson.
Friend may call on Saturday, March 24, from
9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Shrine of The Most
Blessed Sacrament, 3630 Quesada St. NW,
Washington, DC with a Mass of Christian Burial
to Follow at 11 a.m. Interment Gate of Heaven
Cemetery immediate to follow. Memorial Contributions may be made to SOME (So Others
May Eat), 71 O Street NW, Washington, DC
20001 or The Washington Jesuit Academy, 900
Varnum St. NE, Washington, DC 20017.
www.devolfuneralhome.com
BERG
She is survived by her son, William P. Squire,
III and wife, Thi of Redland, FL; daughter,
Jacki Ann Ellis of Marco Island, FL; daughter,
Sally Squire Jacobs of Adamstown, MD;
son-in-law, J. Mark Jacobs of Rockville, MD;
son, Scott A. Squire of Silver Spring, MD;
grandchildren, Dian Squire, Sean Squire,
Sage Squire, Stirling Squire, Christina Ellis,
Kelly Ellis-Neal and husband Bill, Casey
Ellis, Jennifer Cappello and husband Jim,
Kyle Squire and wife Lindsey, Courtney
Jacobs, Jessica Bartlett and husband Brian,
and Tyler Jacobs; great-grandchildren Jaxon
Ellis-Dunn, Cecillia Ellis-Dunn, William Neal,
Vincent Cappello, Dominic Cappello, Drew
Squire, Jordan Squire, and Micah Squire.
Ethel also leaves behind her loving cousin,
Anne Taylor, nieces, nephews and friends
whom she dearly loved.
MONDAY-SATURDAY
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(All photos add 2" to your notice.)
ALL NOTICES MUST BE PREPAID
MEMORIAL PLAQUES:
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Additional plaques start at $26 each
and may be ordered.
All Paid Death Notices
appear on our website through
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LEGACY.COM
Included in all death notices
Optional for In Memoriams
A celebration of Ethel’s life will be held
in late spring. In lieu of flowers, you may
make a donation to the organization of your
choice in memory of Ethel.
PLEASE NOTE:
Notices must be placed via phone, fax or
email. Photos must be emailed. You can
no longer place notices, drop off photos
and make payment in person.
Payment must be made via phone with
debit/credit card.
DEATH NOTICE
HARPER
PARRIS
DEATH NOTICE
CUNNINGHAM
In 1949, Bill began his diplomatic career as
a member of the United States Department
of State. His foreign service included assignments in the former Czechoslovakia, France,
Korea, Japan (twice), Vietnam, Cambodia,
Taiwan, and the United States Mission to the
United Nations.
CAROLYN VINCI
Passed away peacefully on March 19, 2018,
in Easton, MD. She was born on February 1,
1918, in Walsenburg, CO, to Sicilian immigrant
parents. The family eventually relocated to
the East Coast, and she grew up in New
Haven, CT. Carolyn moved to Washington, DC,
after graduating from high school and began
a long career with the federal government.
She relocated her family to the DC area in the
1940’s and was the matriarch of her family. She
worked for many years for the Bureau of the
Budget, US Army, at the Pentagon, while at the
same time attending college in the evening.
She graduated from The George Washington
University with honors as a member of Phi Beta
Kappa.
Carolyn worked for the National Academy of
Sciences for a few years after retiring from the
federal government. She then relocated from
Arlington, VA, to St. Michael’s, MD, where she
built a house with a breathtaking waterfront
view. Her hobbies included sewing, reading,
Japanese embroidery in which she became an
expert, and investing. She was predeceased
by her partner of many years, Earl Altizer; her
parents, Luminato and Concetta Vinci; and her
siblings, Stefano Vinci, Francis Vinci, Anthony
Vinci, Josephine V. Miller, and Rose V. Burke.
She is survived by seven nieces and nephews,
their children, brother-in-law Francis D. Burke,
and dear friend Drusilla Barnett.
The family is grateful to Talbot Hospice for the
care and comfort shown to her.
A graveside service will be held on Saturday,
March 24, 2018 at 3 p.m. at Woodlawn Memorial Park, Easton, MD.
Arrangements by Fellows, Helfenbein, and
Newnam Funeral Home in Easton.
For online condolences, please visit:
www.fhnfuneralhome.com
WELLS
ROY ALBERT BERG
September 25, 1927 – March 16, 2018
At the age of 90, after a full, productive life,
Roy Albert Berg, passed peacefully away in
Madison, WI. He is survived by his dearly
beloved wife of 67 years, Dorothy Dahlberg
Berg and his daughters from Maryland, Ellen
Marie Berg and Christine Dorothy Berg. Additionally, he is survived by his son-in-law, Cyril
W. Draffin, Jr. and his devoted grandchildren,
Emelia and Mora Gold and William and Benjamin Draffin. Roy was born in Chicago and
worked as an actuary and vice-president at
Old Republic Insurance Company in Chicago
and American Family Insurance in Madison.
He valued his Norwegian roots. He learned
Norwegian as an adult and obtained a Masters
in Scandinavian Studies in his 70’s. He
belonged to the Ygdrasil Literary Society and
the Torske Klubben in Madison. Another passion was chess which gained him membership
in The Cliff Dwellers in Chicago at which he
served a term as president. He also belonged
to the Cosmos Club in Washington, DC and
served as first board of their chess team. He
traveled internationally for the club winning in
Paris and London. Also, he was the only team
member to have a draw while the others lost
against the Capablanca Chess Club in Havana,
Cuba.
IN MEMORIAM
DANIELS
BENNIE MAE DANIELS
March 22, 1913 - October 27, 2010
Happy, Happy 105th Birthday, Mother
This is the eighth birthday that we have not
shared together. I thank God that we shared
77. My loving mother, I think of you every day.
I am so very happy that I was born on your
birthday.
Your loving daughter, Viola
CARL ARNOLD HARPER (Age 85)
Peacefully on March 16, 2018, Carl entered
eternal rest. He is survived by his devoted
wife of 63 years, Elnora E. Harper; three loving
children, Ellen Verneita, Sharon Leneise (Gerald) and Carl Edmond; one sister, Carrie Jean
Greene; four grandchildren, Gerald “JC”, Cydnee, Victoria and Christian. Celebration of Life
will be held, Friday, March 23, 2018. Viewing
9:30 a.m.; Service, 11 a.m. at Peace Baptist
Church, 712 18th Street NE, Washington, DC.
Dr. ERICA ELAINE PARRIS
On Thursday, March 15, 2018, Dr.
Erica Elaine Parris of Upper Marlboro, Maryland entered peacefully
into eternal rest. Loving daughter
of Eduardo and Eva (Eve) Parris;
devoted sister of Eduardo Jr.
(Eddie); her uncle, Alfonso Angus,
many other relatives and friends. Family will
receive friends on Saturday, March 24 from
9:15 a.m. until the time of Mass at 10:30 a.m.
at St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church,
8908 Old Branch Avenue, Clinton, Maryland.
Interment Gate of Heaven.
JONES
ROBINSON
WILLIAM JOSEPH CUNNINGHAM
William Joseph Cunningham completed his
lifelong service to God and humanity March
16, 2018 at the age of 92. His death from
cancer occurred just a few hours after he
attended the funeral of his beloved wife,
Patricia.
He was, above all, a man of peace who
built his diplomatic and educational careers
upon the principles of human understanding
and cooperation between people of different
cultures. His dual careers included 32 years
as a Foreign Service Officer of the United
States Department of State, followed by his
11-year leadership of the Center for International Studies at the University of St. Thomas
in Houston, TX.
His keen foresight led to his greatest achievement. A firmly positive response to a 1971
initiative from the People’s Republic of China
eventually resulted in the historic establishment of diplomatic relations between that
nation and the United States.
He was predeceased by his son, Eric Martin
Berg. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made
to the Eric Martin Berg Memorial Endowment
at Knox College, Box K230, Galesburg, IL 61401
or www.knox.edu/berg
Bill was born in Santa Monica, California,
the oldest son of Dr. and Mrs. William C.
Cunningham. The family soon moved to Lancaster, California, where he received most of
his elementary and high school education in
public schools.
Visitation will be in the chapel from 10:30 to 11
a.m. on Thursday, March 22, 2018 at Bethel
Lutheran Church, 312 Wisconsin Ave., Madison, WI 53703 with a memorial service to
follow at 11 a.m. A light lunch will be served
immediately following the service. Private burial will take place at Memorial Park Cemetery
in Skokie, IL.
He was sworn into the US Navy in 1943,
and became a commissioned naval officer
in 1946, serving mainly on sea duty until his
release from active service in June 1947. He
then completed undergraduate and master’s
degrees at the University of New Mexico.
Cress Funeral & Cremation Service
3325 E. Washington Ave.
Madison, WI 53704
608-249-6666
Please share your memories at
www.CressFuneralService.com
EVELYN L. WELLS
On Thursday, March 15, 2018, of LanhamSeabrook, MD. Beloved wife of Arthur Wells,
Sr.; loving mother of Arthur R. Wells, Jr.
(Susan), Renee Y. Wells, Don Juan Wells
(Sheila), and Donna M. Lee (late Alexander).
Dear sister of Pauline Snyder, Leroy
Coleman and the late Susie Fowler. Grandmother of eight grandchildren and 16 greatgrandchildren. Family will receive friends
on Monday, March 26, 2018 from 11 a.m. to
12 p.m. at the family-owned Beall Funeral
Home, 6512 NW Crain Hwy. (Rte. 3 South),
Bowie, MD, followed by a funeral service
at 12 p.m. Interment, Maryland Veterans
Cemetery, Crownsville, MD. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to St. Jude
Children's Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude
Place, Memphis, TN, 38105. Please view
and sign the family’s guestbook at:
www.beallfuneral.com
He was a member of 11 Houston organizations devoted to international cooperation
and chairman, president, or board member
of three of them. He lectured widely throughout his two careers and won numerous
awards and honors, most recently the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Houston
Chapter of the United Nations Association
October 24, 2017 and the Global Service
Award from the University of St. Thomas in
December 2017.
D'AMBROSIO
BENNIE B. JONES "Ben"
Peacefully on Wednesday, February 28, 2018
of Mitchellville, MD. Loving husband of Queen
Jones; devoted father of Celeste Denson (Gary).
Also survived by one sister, Pauline Williams;
one brother, Alonzo Jones; two grandchildren,
Morgan Walker and Deanna Denson; one greatgranddaughter, Mykhia Thomas; a host of other
relatives and friends. Visitation, 10 a.m. until
time of service, 11 a.m., Friday, March 23 at
First Baptist Church of Glenarden, 3600 Brightseat Rd., Landover, MD. Interment Maryland
Veterans Cemetery, Cheltenham, MD.
www.jbjenkinsfuneralhome.com
IDA M. ROBINSON
Viewing will be from 5 to 8 p.m., Friday,
March 23 at Earthman-Bellaire, 4525 Bissonnet St., Bellaire, TX. Funeral services are
scheduled at 10 a.m. Saturday, March 24 in
the Chapel of St. Basil on the University of
St. Thomas campus, 3800 Montrose Blvd in
Houston. He will be interred along with his
late wife at Gate of Heaven Cemetery, Silver
Spring, MD.
Flowers will not be displayed at the viewing
or at the funeral. In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made to Catholic Relief Services, or
to The University of St. Thomas’ Center for
International Studies' Distinguished Diplomat
Program, or to The University of St. Thomas’
Ann Q. Tiller Endowed Scholarship in International Studies via www.stthom.edu/give.
Donations may be mailed to:
Center for International Studies, c/o Dr. Hans
Stockton, University of St. Thomas 3800
Montrose Blvd., Houston, TX 77006. Please
indicate DDP or Tiller in the memo line.
FOSTER
On Friday, March 2, 2018 she
passed away peacefully surrounded by family and friends. She was
survived by her two sons, Alvin
Cornes and Gregory Cornes; one
daughter, LaGail Robinson; one
sister, Martha Watson; three grandchildren,
two great grandchildren and a host of other
relatives and friends. Viewing, 10 a.m. until
time of funeral services, 11 a.m., Saturday,
March 24, 2018 at R.N Horton Chapel located
at 600 Kennedy St NW Washington, DC 20011.
Internment Arlington National Cemetery at a
later date. Services entrusted to R. N. Horton's
Company Morticians Inc.
Ivan "Van"Foster, Jr., son of Major General
and Mrs. Ivan L. Foster, in Old Town Alexandria, Virginia. Allie and Van had three daughters, and traveled extensively throughout
the United States and Japan with the USAF.
Although their long term marriage ended, the
two remained friends.
Allie was part of the Greatest generation.
She saw many things during her long lifetime.
She could vividly recall the Great Depression,
World War II, the Stage Door Canteen where
she volunteered, and the ticker tape parades
in New York City on VE and VJ day.
A devoted and proud mother, grandmother
and great-grandmother, Allie considered her
family to be her greatest accomplishment
and she treasured each and every one of
their achievements.
LEWIS
ALLIE MAY SMOOT FOSTER
SHREIBER
ROSARIA D'AMBROSIO
Of Arlington, VA, peacefully passed away
March 18, 2018. Rosaria was born in Santa
Marinella, Italy to parents Sabatino De Simoni
and Maria DeSimoni (nee Venturelli). During
WWII, she and her family were displaced for
three years. In 1957, while at a dance, Rosaria
met the future love of her life, Diego. Three
years later, Rosaria and Diego were married. In
1961, they came to the US working as Embassy
staff and later became U.S. residents.
Rosaria was well known for excelling at anything she put her hand to. As a teenager,
Rosaria loved Community Theater. Later in
life, she became the bookkeeper for a family
business in Italy and was integral to the success of Diego’s Hair Salon through her bookkeeping. Rosaria and Diego had a long and
fruitful partnership in love and business.
Throughout her life, Rosaria had a great passion
for cooking, art (especially painting and sculptures), interior design, antiques, and architecture.
She is survived by her loving spouse, Diego
D’Ambrosio; sons, Marco and Fabrizio; sister,
Blandina; her brothers, Franco and Carlo, as
well as many loving cousins, nieces, and
nephews.
A visitation will be held at Murphy Funeral
Home, 4510 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA 22203
on Friday, March 23, 2018 from 6 to 8 p.m.
A funeral mass will be held at Holy Rosary
Catholic Church, 595 3rd St. NW, Washington,
DC on Saturday, March 24, 2018 at 2 p.m.
Mr. Cunningham was preceded in death
by his beloved wife, Patricia; his parents;
his infant sister, Anne-Marie Cunningham;
and his adult sister, Mary Ann Reilly. He is
survived by his brother, Carl Cunningham of
Houston, TX, his five children: Anne (Ralph)
Hedian of Cheverly, MD; Theresa (Padraig)
Doolan of Riva, MD; Marie-Claire (Earl Rix)
Cunningham of New York, NY; Peggy
“Pegeen” Bush of Corinth, TX, and William
Joseph (June) Cunningham, Jr. of Millersville,
MD; three nieces, a nephew, 11 grandchildren; and seven greatgrandchildren.
Allie May Smoot Foster passed away peacefully at home in Castleton, Virginia, on March
13, 2018 at the age of 94 years. Born January
11, 1924 in Washington, DC, Allie was the
first born child of Ernest and Martha Smoot
and granddaughter of the Honorable Reed
Smoot (R-Utah) and Mrs. Alpha Mae Smoot.
Born and raised in the District, Allie always
considered Washington, DC home.
After graduating from Woodrow Wilson High
School in the summer of 1942, she was
invited to attend the prestigious Pratt Institute, located in Brooklyn, New York. She
completed the Pratt program in 1946 with
focused studies in Book Illustration.
In 1947, Allie married West Point graduate
Preceded in death by her parents and two
younger siblings, Allie is survived by her
three daughters, Barbara Foster May, Marilyn
Foster Price (Walter) and Marianne Foster
Sodhi (Michael); nine grandchildren and 14
great-grandchildren.
Services and a celebration of her long life
will be held on March 24, 2018, beginning
at 9 a.m. at St Patrick's Orthodox Church
in Bealeton, Virginia. Interment immediately
following at St. Patrick's church cemetery.
Family and friends will gather for reflection
at the Price Farm in Castleton, Virginia.
Arrangements by Moser Funeral Home 233
Broadview Ave. Warrenton, VA 20186, 540347-3431. Online condolences can be made
at:moserfuneralhome.com
CHARLES WESLEY LEWIS
On Tuesday, March 13, 2018, Charles Wesley
Lewis went home to be with the Lord. He
was born March 17, 1935, in Orange, Virginia
to Mildred Adams and Virginaous Lewis. A
member of First Rising Mt. Zion Baptist church,
he served faithfully for 59 years. For 37 years
he served on the Trustee Board, of which 33
of those years, Charles was the chairman. His
ministry also included but was not limited to
the Deacon Board and Royal Ambassadors.
He is survived by his loving and dedicated
wife of 64 years, Irene Daniels Lewis, two
sons and two daughters, Charles (Shirleen),
Isaac, Crystal Reed (Douglas) and Inga Waring
(James). He leaves a legacy of 12 grandchildren
and 14 great-grandchildren. He is also survived
by a brother, Michaels Smith, two sisters, Lynn
Lewis and Lisa Fisher, and, a host of relatives
and friends.
Homegoing services will be held Friday, March
23, 2018, 10 a.m. at First Rising Mt. Zion Baptist
Church, 602 N. St. NW, Washington, DC 20001.
SAMUEL N SHREIBER
In his 103rd year, on March 19,
2018. Musician extraordinaire,
beloved husband of the late
Rose Rothman Shreiber, and
devoted father of Joseph (Sue)
Shreiber and Rita (Steven)
Schreiber. Loving brother of the late Martin
and Norman Shreiber. Also survived by
three grandchildren, five great-grandchildren, and one great-great-grandchild.
Graveside services will be held Friday,
March 23, 2018 at 1 p.m. at Alliance Cemetery, 970 Gershall Avenue, Norma, NJ.
Memorial contributions may be made to
the Jewish Social Service Agency at
https://www.jssa.org/ or 301-816-2633.
#HTTR
www.sagelbloomfield.com
POST YOUR
CONDOLENCES
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GHI
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EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
MARCH 22 , 2018
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
Clearing and gusty
We will wake up to partly to mostly
clear skies and a gusty north wind.
Skies trend clearer with time, and
winds head somewhat lighter. Highs
settle into the mid-40s to around 50.
Still below normal, but it should do a
number on our snow. Future flowers will drink it
up. Tonight, winds diminish, although we should
maintain a breeze from the northwest around 10
to 15 mph. Otherwise skies turn mostly clear,
with chilly lows down to the mid-20s to low 30s.
Today
Partly sunny
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Friday
Partly sunny
Saturday
Mostly sunny
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Sunday
Mostly cloudy
Monday
Sunny
Tuesday
Mostly cloudy
47° 31
47° 29
47° 31
45° 30
48° 30
53° 37
FEELS*: 39°
FEELS: 40°
FEELS: 47°
FEELS: 38°
FEELS: 45°
FEELS: 52°
CHNCE PRECIP: 0%
P: 15%
P: 0%
P: 30%
P: 0%
P: 10%
WIND: NW 12–25 mph
W: NW 10–20 mph
W: NW 7–14 mph
W: NNE 8–16 mph
W: NE 8–16 mph
W: SW 6–12 mph
°
°
°
°
°
OFFICIAL RECORD
Temperatures
NATION
Harrisburg
45/27
Hagerstown
43/23
Davis
34/20
Su
M
High
Weather map features for noon today.
Low
Normal
Philadelphia
42/28
Record high
Record low
Baltimore
45/26
Dover
44/29
Washington
47/31
RECORD
ACTUAL
FORECAST
°
Sa
REGION
AVERAGE
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
35° 4:00 p.m.
32° 8:00 a.m.
58°/39°
89° 1921
10° 1885
34° 5:00 p.m.
30° 1:00 a.m.
57°/34°
78° 2010
14° 1965
33° 3:00 p.m.
31° 1:00 a.m.
55°/35°
89° 1948
8° 1965
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: –3.4° yr. to date: +1.2°
Precipitation
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
Cape May
42/32
Annapolis
45/29
OCEAN: 45°
Charlottesville
51/30
Ocean City
44/30
OCEAN: 40°
Lexington
47/26
Richmond
51/29
Norfolk
48/33
Virginia Beach
46/34
Past 24 hours
Total this month
OCEAN: 41°
Normal
Kitty Hawk
46/35
Total this year
Normal
OCEAN: 45°
Pollen: High
Air Quality: Good
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
High
Low
Low
Dulles
BWI
0.54"
1.80"
2.26"
7.53"
7.69"
0.51"
1.48"
2.16"
7.87"
7.58"
0.49"
1.99"
2.58"
8.29"
8.53"
Moon Phases
UV: Moderate
Solar system
5 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, partly sunny, very cold, breezy. High
31–35. Wind northwest 10–20 mph. Tonight, clear, cold,
breezy. Low 18–22. Wind northwest 7–14 mph. Friday,
mostly sunny, cold. High 31–35. Wind northwest 7–14 mph.
Atlantic beaches: Today, partly sunny, windy. High 43–49.
Wind northwest 15–25 mph. Tonight, partly cloudy, breezy,
cold. Low 30–34. Wind northwest 8–16 mph. Friday, partly
sunny, chilly. High 41–48. Wind northwest 10–20 mph.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, partly sunny, breezy. Wind
northwest 12–22 knots. Waves 2 feet or less. Visibility unrestricted.
• Lower Potomac and Chesapeake Bay: Today, partly sunny, breezy.
Wind northwest 12–22 knots. Waves 2 feet or less on the Potomac,
1–3 feet on the Chesapeake.• River Stages: Today, the Little Falls
stage will be 3.5 feet, holding nearly steady at 3.5 feet Friday. Flood
stage at Little Falls is 10 feet.
Today’s tides
(High tides in Bold)
Washington
12:01 a.m.
6:50 a.m.
12:10 p.m.
7:49 p.m.
3:13 a.m.
9:42 a.m.
4:15 p.m.
9:48 p.m.
Ocean City
5:58 a.m.
11:54 a.m.
6:06 p.m.
none
Norfolk
1:27 a.m.
7:52 a.m.
1:54 p.m.
7:58 p.m.
Point Lookout
5:34 a.m.
12:36 p.m.
6:00 p.m.
11:49 p.m.
Annapolis
Reagan
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: McAllen, TX 85°
Low: Clayton Lake, ME –9°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
43/30/pc
77/53/c
33/15/s
58/39/s
81/59/pc
45/26/pc
51/38/c
62/41/s
40/29/pc
58/37/sh
42/30/c
35/25/pc
37/23/pc
61/38/pc
46/27/pc
57/32/pc
65/39/pc
49/29/s
45/26/s
39/23/pc
80/61/pc
72/49/pc
Tomorrow
42/26/sf
70/42/pc
34/19/s
63/49/pc
83/65/pc
43/24/pc
52/31/c
66/52/pc
37/28/sn
54/38/c
43/31/pc
35/23/s
38/24/pc
64/44/pc
48/27/s
60/39/pc
59/29/c
44/33/s
49/31/pc
38/22/s
81/67/pc
70/36/c
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
52/36/r
45/25/s
87/62/c
26/7/s
41/27/s
47/30/pc
81/69/c
78/61/pc
47/28/s
68/46/s
65/38/s
64/44/s
68/54/sh
68/48/pc
62/55/r
50/32/s
63/48/pc
74/53/s
43/28/s
44/29/pc
57/39/s
69/53/s
44/32/pc
48/33/pc
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
48/34/r
45/25/s
85/61/pc
31/8/s
38/28/sn
46/30/pc
80/71/c
82/68/pc
49/31/c
76/59/pc
69/44/pc
63/47/t
72/53/pc
75/60/pc
66/51/pc
53/38/c
68/59/pc
76/60/s
40/31/pc
44/28/c
57/48/pc
77/64/pc
43/31/pc
49/34/s
75/56/pc
62/39/pc
68/43/s
42/28/pc
88/65/c
39/20/pc
39/27/sn
51/38/r
44/31/c
52/30/pc
54/32/r
51/29/pc
63/38/r
50/40/sh
81/73/pc
64/45/sh
67/58/r
59/47/sh
87/75/sh
49/37/r
53/30/r
36/26/pc
66/48/s
72/52/pc
79/55/pc
55/35/r
73/48/s
41/29/pc
82/60/pc
38/17/s
43/30/pc
48/36/r
45/32/pc
57/31/s
52/34/c
52/28/s
59/44/c
51/46/c
81/72/pc
62/46/sh
64/55/pc
59/49/pc
85/74/sh
51/36/r
45/32/c
36/20/sf
72/53/s
80/50/pc
Mar 24
First
Quarter
World
High: Diffa, Niger 111°
Low: D'elind'e, Russia –45°
Mar 31
Full
Apr 8
Last
Quarter
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Apr 15
New
Today
Addis Ababa
77/54/pc
Amsterdam
48/40/r
Athens
70/54/t
Auckland
74/62/pc
Baghdad
85/57/pc
Bangkok
91/77/pc
Beijing
64/40/s
Berlin
40/33/sn
Bogota
67/48/r
Brussels
44/37/sn
Buenos Aires
77/59/s
Cairo
95/76/pc
Caracas
73/64/pc
Copenhagen
40/32/c
Dakar
78/66/s
Dublin
50/40/r
Edinburgh
50/43/c
Frankfurt
42/37/sn
Geneva
46/34/pc
Ham., Bermuda 68/61/r
Helsinki
37/16/sn
Ho Chi Minh City 88/75/t
Tomorrow
77/51/pc
48/39/pc
65/51/s
71/61/r
89/66/s
92/78/pc
67/40/pc
42/31/c
66/49/r
48/39/pc
82/57/pc
100/64/pc
73/62/pc
37/34/c
81/67/s
49/35/r
48/35/r
47/35/c
51/33/pc
65/56/pc
32/17/pc
93/74/pc
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
73/64/s
79/57/pc
56/44/sh
79/59/pc
64/54/t
65/41/pc
87/75/pc
96/76/t
89/78/t
76/68/pc
58/49/pc
53/42/c
54/36/s
87/75/c
77/49/pc
40/27/pc
32/24/c
89/75/pc
76/55/pc
88/64/pc
45/29/pc
39/25/pc
47/36/c
38/30/sn
74/67/s
83/59/c
60/44/sh
83/62/pc
60/56/sh
65/39/s
84/75/pc
95/74/pc
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THURSDAY, MARCH 22 , 2018
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WASHINGTONPOST.COM/STYLE
EZ
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THE RELIABLE SOURCE
ART
THEATER REVIEW
CAROLYN HAX
The Russians are coming!
The Season 6 premiere of
“The Americans” screens
at the Newseum. C2
Glenstone will reopen on
May 10 with an exhibition
of 30 works by feminist
artist Louise Bourgeois. C2
Nanna Ingvarsson just
has to open her mouth
to command the stage
in “The Beckett Trio.” C3
The groom backs out of
the wedding and guests
want the bride to
reimburse their airfare. C8
Will allegations
against Isabella
shift awards?
Group ponders what to do in
wake of lawsuit against chef
BY
M AURA J UDKIS
After chef and restaurateur Mike Isabella and his partners were named in a
sexual-harassment lawsuit filed Monday,
now begins the reckoning: Which businesses and organizations will cut ties
with the former “Top Chef ” contestant?
Chloe Caras, a former manager at the
chef ’s company, Mike Isabella Concepts,
alleged that Isabella and his partners
called her “bitch” and “whore,” commented on the size of her buttocks and
touched her without permission, The
Washington Post reported on Monday.
Separately, a sous chef told The Post that
Isabella kissed her without her consent.
Other allegations of misconduct include
that Isabella’s company has named cocktails after its partners’ encounters with
prostitutes.
The chef has denied the allegations.
“Simply put, the allegations of an
unwelcoming or hostile work atmosphere are false,” Isabella, his partners
and his company told The Post in a
statement prepared by the Bascietto &
Bregman law firm. “Harassment, discrimination, bullying, abuse, or unequal treatment of any kind whatsoever are not tolerated at MIC.”
But already, Isabella’s name has been
dropped from the website of José Andrés’s annual Dine ‘n’ Dash fundraiser,
according to This Family Meal, although
two of his restaurants remain listed as
participants. His longtime publicist, Jennifer Resick Williams, has scrubbed the
chef ’s name from her company’s website,
Washingtonian reports.
ISABELLA CONTINUED ON C5
THE WASHINGTON POST
Michelle Obama
looks at the row
she had to hoe
At conclave, she reflects on
the East Wing and her garden
BY
It’s easy to hate Facebook.
It’s much tougher to quit.
BY
R OBIN G IVHAN
miami beach — It was a conversation
between friends — Michelle Obama and
former presidential adviser Valerie Jarrett. Their chat Tuesday night, onstage in
front of a group that was more sisterhood than audience, had a loose, casual
ease, with Jarrett asking questions for
which she mostly knew the answers and
Obama offering plain-spoken responses
spiked with humor and a we-go-highwhen-they-go-low avoidance of uttering
a certain name.
The occasion was the opening of Leading Women Defined, a private gathering
of supremely accomplished black women
organized by Debra Lee and BET aimed
at networking and uplift. The former first
lady has made several appearances since
last spring — mostly on the lucrative
convention speaking circuit, with attendees numbering in the thousands. This
was a far more intimate crowd, perhaps a
hundred women. And as Obama spoke,
they responded with knowing nods and
understanding smiles and the occasional
exhortation of support.
What was on her mind, Jarrett wanted
to know, when she and her husband
welcomed their successors to the White
OBAMA CONTINUED ON C4
MELINA MARA/THE WASHINGTON POST
Michelle Obama’s advice to her
successors: “Take some time to know
what you care about and what you can
do in the realm of the administration.”
A BBY O HLHEISER
First, you have to know where the deactivation page lies in your account settings. To even see the page, you have to reenter your password. Then, Facebook makes its final plea: “Are you sure you want to deactivate your account?” The deactivation page displays a mosaic of your friends’ photos, each one accompanied by a message. “Susanne will miss you.
Gene will miss you. Jessica will miss you.” Instead of deactivating, Facebook suggests, would you like to send them a
message? ¶ Jessica Stapf visited this page a week ago, her cursor hovering over the deactivation button. She was tired
of watching her friends fight over gun control and felt overwhelmed and disheartened by the ugly arguments that
dominated her news feed. Facebook has brought her close to leaving before: Once, in college, Stapf even managed
to quit for a day or two, before bringing her account back online. She wished she could commit, press the button, and
disappear from Facebook for good. This time, she couldn’t. Maybe someday. She felt close to ready.
FACEBOOK CONTINUED ON C3
What’s not to like? Plenty.
Consider the plain gray
T-shirt. Or the pious talk
about connecting the
world, through a tech
platform, into one big
group hug. Or the wideMargaret
eyed references to “our
Sullivan
community.”
Mark Zuckerberg still
looks the part of the Harvard
undergraduate who invented what a
2010 movie dubbed “The Social
Network,” also known as a world-class
way to meet girls.
The same guy, with the same moral
compass, who at 19 bragged to a friend
about how he got all those college kids
to give him their photos, email
addresses and more.
“They ‘trust me’ ” he wrote in an
instant message, adding his jokey
assessment of their wisdom: “Dumb
f---s.”
Now, the Facebook founder is one of
the richest and most powerful people
on the planet, and we dummies
number in the billions.
And for some, Zuckerberg has been
accepted as a leading thinker, a
philanthropist and a political up-andcomer who could make our society ever
so much better for everyone.
Anand Giridharadas, for one, isn’t
buying it.
In part because of the way
Zuckerberg presents himself — as a
brilliant rebel (no pinstripes for him!)
— “he is able to pass through so many
of our filters.”
“The idea that we can be saved
through billionaire whims is truly
incredible,” says the author and former
New York Times foreign correspondent,
who has spent the last several years
researching a book that will be
published in late August, “Winners
Take All: The Elite Charade of
SULLIVAN CONTINUED ON C3
C2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. THURSDAY,
MARCH 22 , 2018
The Reliable Source
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
ABOUT LAST NIGHT
Intriguing parallels at a screening of ‘The Americans’
You know it’s weird times when at
one end of Pennsylvania Avenue, the
president was making headlines
for congratulating Russian President
Vladimir Putin on a victory in what’s
been called a “sham” election, and
elsewhere in Washington, multiple
investigations were looking into the
nefarious doings of our former Cold
War enemy on our shores — and
meanwhile, smack dab in the middle,
there was a red-carpet screening of a
TV show that was supposed to be just
a stylish drama about 1980s Russian
spycraft in the nation’s capital that
feels . . . well, maybe just a little
too close to home.
Joe Weisberg, the show’s creator
and executive producer (and a former
CIA officer, so he knows of what he
writes), was strolling the gantlet of
reporters and photographers lined up
to capture the Tuesday night
premiere of the sixth and final season
of FX’s “The Americans,” and he was
clearly not thrilled that his show’s
carefully crafted story lines were
colliding with chaotic cable-news
chyrons.
“This,” he said of the prospect of
running a show about Russian
meddling in the United States at the
very moment when America is
focused on Russian meddling in the
United States, “was not the plan.”
So what’s wrong with plot points
that seem ripped from the headlines?
Well, “The Americans” is supposed to
be Reagan-era fiction, not Trumpian
commentary. “Our fear is that the
audience has that feeling that the
show is being informed by the
president, which, for us, breaks the
authenticity of the show,” he said. “It
breaks that dramatic idea that you’re
living in the past, which we’ve
worked very hard to create.”
Keri Russell, the actress who plays
one half of the show’s Russian couple,
agents posing as your typical
Northern Virginia suburban couple,
said the show offers an up-close
My scrunchie collection is not
as large as my collar and glove
collections, but scrunchies are
catching up.”
— Supreme Court Justice and scrunchie
aficionado Ruth Bader Ginsburg
describing her love of the retro hair
accessory in a recent interview with the Wall
Street Journal. Ginsburg went on to map out
where the best scrunchies can be found
(because this is a global phenomenon,
people): “My best scrunchies come from
Zurich. Next best, London, and third best,
Rome.”
DAN SWARTZ
Keri Russell and Matthew Rhys with a section of the Berlin Wall at the Newseum’s screening of “The Americans.”
portrait of the humans involved in
spycraft — then and now. “It’s always
good to be reminded of the people
within a news story,” she said. But she
also seemed glad that the show’s end
meant no more comparisons to
current events. “I’m glad we’re getting
out now,” she said. “It’s a complicated
time, so it’s good that it’s done.”
Actor Matthew Rhys, Russell’s onand off-screen partner, noted that the
show’s writers are at least seeing
some silver lining in the fresh-again
news topic. “I think in some ways,
they feel vindicated, because some
press in the first season questioned —
even ridiculed — whether Russian
interest in [the] U.S. was really
relevant anymore,” he said. “So
they’re going, ‘Told you!’ ”
So when “The Americans” won’t be
on-air with new episodes, Noah
Emmerich, who plays an FBI
counterintelligence agent, suggested
that the Trump-Putin-MuellerManafort cast will more than fill the
void. “It feels like part of our show,
but the extended run,” he said with a
wry laugh of the real-life rival drama.
“Maybe it’s the spinoff. It’s ‘The
Americans, Part Two.’ ”
And it wouldn’t be a mash-up of a
Washington-set show with real-life
D.C. without some mixing of the two
worlds. We spotted cast members
across the Newseum lobby, which was
filling up with staffers from Foggy
Bottom and the Hill, apparently deep
in conversation with a knot of
lawmakers, including Rep. Scott
Peters (D-Calif.).
Peters declared himself to be a big
“Americans” fan — he works and
reads, he says, on the long
commute from his district to
Washington but binges the show on
the flights home. Turns out, “The
Americans” might be instructive,
even to a member of Congress. “It’s so
interesting that the show is so much
about protecting ourselves and how
Russia is getting into our business,”
he said. “And on a macro level, it
raises concerns about whether we’re
doing enough now, and the fear is
that we’re not.”
Emmerich noted the novelty of the
Hollywood-congressional parlay. “It’s
like inverted reality — I’m used to
watching them on TV, and now here I
am talking to them,” he said. “And I
guess they’re used to watching us on
TV — so it’s a mirror.”
GOT A TIP? EMAIL US AT RELIABLESOURCE@WASHPOST.COM. FOR THE LATEST SCOOPS, VISIT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RELIABLESOURCE
NICHOLAS KAMM/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
ERIN SCHAFF FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, at top with
President Barack Obama in 2016 and above
with Francesca Zambello of the Washington
National Opera and tenor Bryan Hymel.
@helena_andrews @emilyaheil
BOOK WORLD
The rise of the Renaissance’s high priests of science
BY
RON AMSTUTZ/EASTON FOUNDATION/VAGA
“Ste. Sébastienne” (1998) will be among the works
featured in “Louise Bourgeois: To Unravel a
Torment,” opening May 10 at Glenstone.
Glenstone announces
Louise Bourgeois show
BY
P EGGY M C G LONE
A five-decade survey of the career of groundbreaking artist Louise Bourgeois opens May 10 at Glenstone, a contemporary art museum
situated in the rolling hills of Potomac, Md.
“Louise Bourgeois: To Unravel a
Torment” will feature more than 30
works from the 20th-century feminist artist, including the museum’s
newly acquired “The Destruction of
the Father” (1974), her first installation. The exhibition showcases early wooden sculptures, drawings,
prints, textile-based works and
roomlike pieces the French-born
Bourgeois called “Cells.”
The exhibition’s title comes from
the artist’s diaries and highlights
her art’s emotional content and its
deep connection to her psyche, said
Emily Rales, director and co-founder of the private museum with her
husband, Mitch. “It could be more
than anyone else, Louise Bourgeois
is the quintessential autobiographical artist,” Rales said. “She
took memories, experiences, and
expressed them through her art.”
The exhibition, which draws
from the Glenstone collection, will
be on view as the museum opens
its much-anticipated expansion,
the Pavilions, on Oct. 4. Under
construction since 2013, the expansion features a new entry,
parking lots, two cafes, an arrival
building, 50,000 square feet of additional indoor exhibition space
and 130 acres of new landscaping.
Rales said the exhibition in the
original museum space, to be called
the Gallery, had to be powerful to
hold attention during the opening
of the expanded museum.
“I think Louise Bourgeois is a
giant. She can very easily occupy
that space and command attention,” Rales said. The exhibition will
continue through January 2020.
Rales described Bourgeois (19112010) as a “radical figure” who reinvented herself repeatedly during
her long life. She is a role model to
many artists, she said.
“Many feminists who came of
age in the ’70s and beyond, they
look to Louise Bourgeois as a trailblazer,” Rales said.
peggy.mcglone@washpost.com
Glenstone will be open Thursdays
through Sundays from 10 a.m. to 5:30
p.m. for the Bourgeois exhibition,
starting May 10. Admission is free, and
reservations may be scheduled now at
glenstone.org/visit. Same-day visits may
be scheduled, too.
M ICHAEL D IRDA
In early modern Europe —
roughly the period from 1500 to
1789 — scientists didn’t exist.
That term wasn’t coined until the
19th century. Instead, those who
probed the mysteries of what
Douglas Adams famously called
“life, the universe and everything” viewed their speculations
as either theology or “natural
philosophy.” Historically as well
as figuratively, Renaissance men
(and an occasional woman) regularly dared to take all knowledge
for their province.
As Derek K. Wilson, a prolific
popular historian, reminds us in
“A Magical World,” this meant
that people didn’t distinguish between what we now call science
and superstition. Squint a bit and
alchemy is just chemistry; any
belief in predestination makes
astrology seem almost logical. As
Wilson writes, “scientia” was a
unity because “all knowledge emanated from and found its consummation in God.” He points out
that Isaac Newton, no less, devoted as much time to biblical exegesis, alchemical experiments and
other occult matters as he did to
theorizing about gravity and
working out the principles of calculus. According to one modern
scholar, Newton should be
viewed as both a great scientist
and “the last of the magicians.”
Wilson structures “A Magical
World” as essentially a series of
lightly sketched biographies of
the era’s most prominent theologians, philosophers, physicians,
cosmographers and antiquaries.
As a result, the book resembles a
slimmed-down version of Will
and Ariel Durant’s still highly
readable, multivolume work of
intellectual history, “The Story of
Civilization.” Here are two- to
six-page portraits of — take a big
breath — Francis Bacon, Erasmus, Paracelsus, Martin Luther,
John Calvin, Tycho Brahe, Copernicus, Galileo, John Dee, Giordano Bruno, Nostradamus, Ambroise Paré, Descartes, Spinoza,
Hobbes, Robert Boyle, Leibnitz,
Voltaire, David Hume, Rousseau,
John Wesley and a dozen others.
Wilson also examines themes
that run through these 300 or so
years: For instance, people living
in this largely Christian culture
most wanted an answer to a single, fundamental question: What
must I do to be saved? During the
LITTLE BROWN U.K.
Author Derek K. Wilson’s “A
Magical World” offers quick
takes on major figures of the
Renaissance and how they were
influenced by faith and facts.
A MAGICAL
WORLD
Superstition and
Science from the
Renaissance to
the
Enlightenment
By Derek K. Wilson
Pegasus. 304 pp.
$27.95
Middle Ages, the answer was
straightforward: Obey the teachings and clergy of the Catholic
Church. But Luther and Calvin,
among others, brought about a
Reformation — the word “Protestant” was first used in 1529 — by
emphasizing instead the need for
“grace and inward faith as opposed to reliance upon rituals
and priestly intercession.” To be
saved you needed only to believe
in Jesus Christ and to read the
Scriptures and take them to
heart.
This new emphasis on personal faith grounded in the word of
God led to intense spiritual selfexamination, as well as a flowering of biblical scholarship and
translation. Yet superstitious beliefs still flourished. In the 17th
century, Wilson stresses, “religion was an amalgam of Christianity and folklore. God and the
Devil were invisible realities, as
were fairies, goblins, demons and
the saints. They manifested
themselves through objects —
holy relics, charms, herbal remedies and horoscopes — and
through people — preachers,
witches and magicians. The Reformation had removed some of
these things from the spiritual
landscape — but not all of them.
And it had added other items to
the environment — prophecy (especially the apocalyptic sort), personal interpretation of the Bible
and divine endorsement of political change.”
Before long, the breakup of a
unified Christendom coupled
with religious fanaticism — then
called “enthusiasm” — led to the
genocidal atrocities of the Thirty
Years’ War, which between 1618
and 1648 “wiped out 35 per cent of
the populations of the combatant
nations.” Belief in witchcraft resulted in the burning and hanging of thousands more. Bubonic
plague further contributed to a
zeitgeist of apocalyptic doom.
Meanwhile, throughout this
era people frequently associated
great learning with the magus Dr.
Faustus, who sold his soul to the
Devil for knowledge and power
and fleshly pleasure. By the early
18th century, moral instability
encouraged both libertinism and
chiliasm. As Wilson writes,
“While worldlings were living as
though there was no tomorrow,
fanatical preachers were warning
that there was a tomorrow — the
day of God’s fearsome judge-
ment.”
In its whirlwind survey, “A
Magical World” touches on astronomical discoveries and the development of the microscope, but
also on the activities of Thomas
Harriot’s occult “School of Night.”
Wilson discusses Pascal’s wager,
which contends that — given the
risks — believing in God is the
only sensible bet. We learn that
the word “psychology,” meaning
the study of the soul, starts its
long history in the 17th century
and that William Harvey revolutionized medicine with a sentence of consummate simplicity:
“The movement of the blood is
constantly in a circle and brought
about by the beat of the heart.”
Even as John Locke argued that
the infant mind was a blank slate
waiting to be scribbled on by the
experiences of the senses, the
skeptical philosophy of Pyrrhonism utterly “rejected all certainties and believed that neither
religious revelation nor scientific
deduction could offer irrefutable
knowledge.”
Because “A Magical World”
aims to be briskly concise, it does
risk coming across as facile and
cursory. Inexplicably, Wilson
quotes from seemingly haphazard editions — online sources, an
abridged version of Boswell’s
“Life of Johnson,” and even “The
Great Books of the Western
World” (getting the volume number for Hobbes wrong). At one
point he identifies Voltaire’s
“Candide” as a play (instead of a
short novel) and mistakenly
writes Charles, instead of John,
Maynard Keynes. The work of
several of our leading contemporary scholars of this period, most
notably Anthony Grafton, Ingrid
D. Rowland and Steven Nadler,
goes unmentioned.
So while “A Magical World”
testifies to Wilson’s intellectual
energy, it simultaneously reveals
a certain breezy amateurism.
Nonetheless, it certainly remains
worth reading if only to be reminded that zealotry and dogmatism are despicable and that few
things are more important than
free inquiry and the questioning
of authority.
mdirda@gmail.com
Michael Dirda reviews books each
Thursday for The Washington Post.
THURSDAY, MARCH 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
RE
C3
K
How to break up
with Facebook
FACEBOOK FROM C1
MARCIO JOSE SANCHEZ/ASSOCIATED PRESS
MARGARET SULLIVAN
Zuckerberg and ‘the billionaire-savior delusion’
SULLIVAN FROM C1
Changing the World.”
But last weekend’s stunning
news about Facebook and the
data-mining firm Cambridge
Analytica should tear off the
rose-colored glasses and smash
them to bits. The firm — seen as
integral to President Trump’s
election — harvested
information from as many as
50 million Facebook users
without their consent, a matter
now under federal investigation.
It’s reasonable cause for
alarm. “Now we’re talking about
whether elections are valid,”
Giridharadas told me Tuesday
by phone in something of a
sneak preview of the book,
which began in concept when
he became a fellow at the Aspen
Institute.
Then, brainstorming with
people from hedge funds,
Goldman Sachs, Facebook and
other corporations, it dawned
on him that they had no
incentive to accomplish their
assigned mission: To formulate
ideas that would change society
for the better — to go from
monetary success to
“significance.”
It turns out, Giridharadas
said, that the seductive notion
of changing the world is “a
powerful tool for keeping things
exactly the way they are.” At
most, the rich and powerful
might concoct some small-scale
charitable effort that makes
little difference — he calls this
“the side hustle of virtue.”
The basics stay the same, by
design: Progress continues to
benefit the privileged far more
than those who truly need the
help. The status quo “siphons
the gains from progress to the
top.” Growing wealth inequality
is just one measure of that.
And yet we want to believe in
what Giridharadas calls “the
billionaire-savior delusion.”
This idea is so foundational
in our society, so entrenched,
that it cuts across our deepest
political divisions.
On the right, it produces a
President Trump, whom
sufficient swaths of the country
viewed as so rich as to be
incorruptible: He couldn’t be
bought, the thinking went,
because a guy like that doesn’t
need the money.
On the left, we get
Zuckerberg, whose name has
been bandied about as a
presidential candidate because
of his purported brilliance as a
“thought leader” and his ability
to connect the whole world into
one supportive community.
Magical thinking.
“At the heart of the fantasy,”
Giridharadas said, “is the idea
that the world is best changed
privately, on high, from the rich
and powerful, not
democratically, through political
reform.”
And yet, how does change
actually happen that benefits
groups of vulnerable people?
It happens from the ground
up. Think about the civil rights
movement, the women’s
movement, the gay rights
movement. Think about the
JOSH EDELSON/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/
GETTY IMAGES
“The idea that we can be saved
through billionaire whims is
truly incredible,” says Anand
Giridharadas in reference to
Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg,
at top and above.
masses of passionate young
people and their supporters
who are about to converge in
Washington and other cities
this weekend to promote gun
control in the March for Our
Lives.
True, they may organize
through social media such as
Facebook, YouTube, Snapchat
and Twitter, using the available
tools with skill, but the energy
flows up from the earth, rather
than being delivered from the
mountaintop.
Finally, on Wednesday
afternoon, Zuckerberg emerged
from too many days of silence
to say in a lengthy Facebook
post that he had been working
to understand what had
happened and to ensure that it
wouldn’t happen again. With
plenty of references to
“community,” he admitted to a
“breach of trust” between
Facebook and its users, and
described some changes.
The revelations of the past
week, disturbing as they are, do
illuminate.
Like the cartoon of a naked
President Trump on the cover
of this week’s New Yorker
magazine, Zuckerberg seems to
have lost his protective garb:
not a pricey suit with an
overlong red tie, but a gray Tshirt that promises, “Trust me,
dummies.”
Now, if we’re paying any
attention at all, we know better.
margaret.sullivan@washpost.com
For more by Margaret Sullivan visit
wapo.st/sullivan
Work is what keeps Stapf, a
25-year-old
communications
professional in Washington, on
Facebook. “While it pains me
each day to look through my feed
(and particularly use Facebook’s
horrid search function), I’m a
captive
audience,”
Stapf
said. “I’m disappointed that a
platform that I used to really like
became something I can’t stand. I
was able to see what my friends
posted, what my family was doing, all the things I wanted. And
now it’s everything I don’t —
everything is an advertisement.
The algorithm feeds me everything it thinks I want and nothing I actually do.”
According to a recent Pew
Research Center poll, 68 percent
of U.S. adults use Facebook, three
quarters of them checking the
platform daily. When Facebook
reaches a moment of crisis — and
it has had a lot of them recently —
there’s a wave of users who
wonder why they are on the
platform in the first place. With
the news late last week that
Facebook had suspended the
data firm Cambridge Analytica
for improperly collecting data
from Facebook users, this viral
discussion about quitting for
good has started once again.
#DeleteFacebook was trending
on Twitter on Tuesday. And Brian
Acton, a co-founder of WhatsApp, was one of its supporters, tweeting, “it’s time #deletefacebook” on Tuesday night. Acton
began working for Facebook in
2014, when it acquired WhatsApp for $16 billion. He quit last
year to launch his own nonprofit
organization. As of Wednesday
morning, Acton’s Facebook account appeared to be gone.
But the idea of quitting always
seems to spread further than the
follow-through. Even as we learn
more about what Facebook does
to us, that knowledge comes into
conflict with what Facebook has
grown to do for us. For many, that
moment of hovering over the
deactivate button feels a lot
like trying to leave a store that’s
giving away candy.
“The closest I got to deleting
was maybe a year or so ago,” said
Laurel Brooks, a 27-year-old program assistant in D.C. She wanted to focus on grad school, and
the political content on her feed
was becoming draining. “I was
on the deactivation page and
then remembered I had all my
family pictures on there.”
Brooks’s mother was killed six
years ago. Some of those photos
were on her mother’s Facebook
page, which she memorialized
after her mother’s death. “I know
I could still technically view it as
a nonuser. I just couldn’t do it,”
Brooks said.
Facebook, for Brooks, is also
how she keeps in touch with
family members abroad, some of
whom are otherwise hard to
reach. She has made real friends
through
communities
and
groups on the platform. But that
reach is a double-edged sword, in
Brooks’s experience. Over the
years since she joined Facebook
in junior high school, her perception has shifted, and Facebook
now feels more like a place that
tries to “exploit” her personal
information, even as it fails to, in
her view, adequately address the
harassment and hate speech she
and her friends see on the platform.
“Quitting is a fine option. I just
don’t think it’s a realistic option
for so many people,” said Ben
Grosser, an artist and a professor
at the University of Illinois at
Urbana-Champaign who has developed several tools people can
install on Facebook to help them
realize its psychological impact — including one that hides
the number of likes on all
posts. “I’m intensely critical of
the way Facebook is designed,
but the fact is, there’s a reason 2
billion people are on Facebook
and it’s not simply advertising.”
For some, Grosser said, quitting Facebook would be “devastating,” professionally or personally. But for others, quitting is a
relief.
Steve Musal quit Facebook in
July. And once he made that
decision, he just went for it. “I
deactivated the account entirely
without prior announcement or
saving anything. If I’d spent time
going through my page for things
to save, I’d never have quit, and I
knew it,” he said.
Musal, 34, is an assistant news
editor for the Daily Hampshire
Gazette in Northampton, Mass.
He decided to quit after becoming the administrator for his
paper’s Facebook page.
“ ‘Don’t read Internet comments’ is good advice, but it’s
part of my job,” Musal said. Because those comments were
linked to his personal Facebook
account, which he used to run the
paper’s page, “it sent all those
comment notifications to my
phone, my laptop, everywhere.
. . . I spent too much of my day
reading the worst the Internet
has to offer, and I wasn’t getting
paid for it.”
Now, Musal uses a work account to do the parts of his job
that require Facebook access,
and he logs into that account
only during work hours. He’s still
on Twitter. But leaving Facebook
(and also Tumblr, which he quit
around the same time) has really
made a difference for him: “I’ve
found myself scowling less outside work, at least,” he said. “I
have more free time, and one less
platform to worry about keeping
up.”
Like Musal, Jamie Gambell,
43, also took the rip-off-the-bandage approach to leaving Facebook a few months ago. “I didn’t
tell my friends,” he said. He sent a
short message to his family, and
then followed the instructions he
found in a Wired article to delete
his account permanently.
That decision didn’t come
without some initial anxiety, just
a few days before his birthday. “I
remember having a moment of
thinking, ‘Will anyone wish me a
happy birthday if I’m not on
there?’ and actually being a little
angry at myself for thinking this,”
he said.
“I can say for me, I do not miss
it, I have not suffered in any way,
and I actually chat more with my
family than before,” Gambell
added. “I would strongly recommend quitting Facebook. . . . If
you really do feel the draw to go
back, it will still be there — but
give yourself a serious try.”
abigail.ohlheiser@washpost.com
THEATER REVIEW
In ‘The Beckett Trio,’ Nanna Ingvarsson has a pronounced e≠ect
BY
C ELIA W REN
Who needs such accoutrements
as a torso, limbs, eyes and ears? To
capture the oppressive nature of
memory and human consciousness, actress Nanna Ingvarsson
needs just her mouth. Ingvarsson
is the only visible figure in “The
Beckett Trio,” an aptly intense
showcase of three bleak, minimalist Samuel Beckett playlets directed by Robert McNamara for Scena
Theatre. In the second playlet,
“Not I,” the actress depicts the protagonist: a disembodied mouth
hovering midair, amid darkness.
The Mouth reels off recollections
of speech and silence, speaking so
fast (Beckett wanted the delivery to
be lickety-split) that you sometimes
strain to understand. Occasionally,
an image surges up from the verbal
current: cowslips, a ray of light, a
shopping bag, a buzzing sound. Periodically, the Mouth seems to hear
an interruption — “What?” she
squawks — and sometimes she editorializes with a scoffing laugh. (As
the consciousness-burdened figures in these three plays usually do,
she seems to be describing herself
in the third person.)
Over the course of the brief
piece, Ingvarsson is hidden behind a dark wall, with an aperture
revealing her frenetically moving
mouth. It’s a tour de force by the
actress, who generates welcome
bursts of humor with her squawks
and scoffs, even as her agitated
speech evokes a disquieting vision
of awareness.
It’s a tour de force by
the actress, who
generates bursts of
humor with her
squawks and scoffs.
“Not I” epitomizes Beckett’s
preference for paring away theater’s dispensable aspects. The other two playlets are nearly as austere. “Footfalls” imagines a woman
who shares a suffocating life with
her bedridden mother. A haggard
figure in a long, gray skirt and
shawl, with straggling white hair
and a numb expression, Ingvarsson’s May paces back and forth in
front of a grimy wall. Occasionally,
the disembodied voice of her mother (an entrancingly eerie Nancy
Robinette) is heard, narrating her
daughter’s movement, for instance. When May speaks — offering her mother an injection, remembering a stint of nocturnal
pacing at a church — the words can
be so unemotional that the syllables barely hold together, as if language itself were disintegrating.
Replete with incantatory repetition, the third playlet, “Rockaby,” also summons a vision of stoicism amid monotony. We see Ingvarsson’s Woman, wearing a beaded black dress and hat, rocking in a
rocking chair. Meanwhile, her
chanting voice, in voice-over, recalls a lonely, restless figure gravitating to a window. When the
voice-over pauses, the visible
Woman cries out, “More!” It’s a
glimpse of someone dying — or
maybe someone living. After all,
they’re the same thing.
style@washpost.com
The Beckett Trio, plays by Samuel
Beckett, directed by Robert
McNamara. Assistant director,
Solomon Haile Selaisse; set design,
John D. Antone; costumes, Sigrid
Johannesdottir; sound, Denise Rose;
lighting, Johnathan Alexander. One
hour. Tickets: $25-$35. Through April
8 at Atlas Performing Arts Center,
1333 H St. NE. Call 202-339-7993 or
visit atlasarts.org.
JAE YI PHOTOGRAPHY
Nanna Ingvarsson’s disembodied mouth in “Not I” — the second playlet in Scena’s “The Beckett Trio.”
C4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
MARCH 22 , 2018
Television
TV HIGHLIGHTS
3/22/18
7:00
7:30
BROADCAST CHANNELS
8:30
9:00
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8:00
10:00
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◆ News
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◆ Chicago Fire
◆ J. Fallon
News
4.1 WRC (NBC)
◆ TMZ
◆ Gotham
◆ Showtime at the Apollo
Mod Fam
Fox 5 News at Ten
News
The Final 5
5.1 WTTG (Fox)
◆ Wheel
◆ J’pardy!
◆ Grey’s Anatomy
◆ Station 19
◆ Kimmel
News
7.1 WJLA (ABC)
9.1 WUSA (CBS) ◆ 2018 NCAA Basketball Tournament: Loyola-Chicago vs Nevada (Live) ◆ 2018 NCAA Basketball Tournament: Kansas State vs Kentucky (Live)
◆ Noticiero
El rico y Lázaro
Papá a toda madre
Por amar sin ley
Noticias
14.1 WFDC (UNI) ◆ La Rosa de Guadalupe
Big Bang
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Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent
20.1 WDCA (MNTV) ◆ Family Feud ◆ Family Feud Fox 5 News ◆ Page Six
◆ Amanpour
Nick Stellino Martin Clunes
Murder in Suburbia
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22.1 WMPT (PBS) Money
Memory Rescue With Daniel Amen, MD
The Washington Cherry Blossoms
Forever
26.4 WETA (PBS) PBS NewsHour
France 24 Programming
Detective Montalbano
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30.1 WNVC (MHz) France 24 Programming
Magic Moments: The Best of 50s Pop
Democracy Now!
32.1 WHUT (PBS) Retire Safe & Secure With Ed Slott
◆ Supernatural
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Blue Bloods
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66.1 WPXW (ION) Blue Bloods
CABLE CHANNELS
MITCH HAASETH/ABC
Station 19 (ABC at 9) This spinoff of Shonda Rhimes’s “Grey’s Anatomy,”
about a team of Seattle firefighters and rescuers and featuring “Grey’s”
favorites such as Ellen Pompeo, makes its two-hour premiere Thursday.
Grey’s Anatomy (ABC at 8) Jo and
Bailey have a patient who used to
be an astronaut.
involvement.
Superstore (NBC at 8) Jeff leaves
Cloud 9 to work at Target, so in
return Glenn tries to poach
employees from Target.
RuPaul’s Drag Race (VH1 at 8)
Season 10.
A.P. Bio (NBC at 8:30) Durbin
accidentally causes drama when
he reveals whom Mary chose as
her emergency contact.
Project Runway All Stars
(Lifetime at 9) The designers must
create resort wear inspired by
Candy Crush lands.
Lip Sync Battle
(Paramount at 10) Singer Michael
Bolton and SNL cast member Pete
Davidson compete.
Music City (CMT at 10) Rachyl
struggles to tell Kerry that her ex
who recently moved back to
Nashville contacted her.
PREMIERES
Innocent (Sundance streaming)
David Collins returns home from
prison when the ruling in his wife’s
death case is overturned, but
everyone still questions his
RETURNING
Braxton Family Values (We
TV at 9) Season 6.
FINALE
Portlandia (IFC at 10) Candace
hosts a house guest who quickly
becomes her BFF.
LATE NIGHT
Daily Show (Comedy Central at
11) RuPaul.
Fallon (NBC at 11:34) Will Smith,
Fran Lebowitz, Billie Eilish.
Kimmel (ABC at 11:35) Roseanne
Barr, John Goodman, Chloe x
Halle.
Meyers (NBC at 12:37) Taraji P.
Henson, Thomas Middleditch,
Yungblud, Lil John Roberts.
Corden (CBS at 1:37) Freddie
Highmore, Eddie Kaye Thomas,
Adam Cayton-Holland.
— Sarah Polus
LEGEND: Bold indicates new or live programs
More at washingtonpost.com/tv
Obama: ‘I had to learn
how to deliver a message’
OBAMA FROM C1
House? Well, there was the sweet
chaos of the morning, with the
friends of Sasha and Malia who
had slept over one final time and
had to be shooed out of the
building amid tears and hugs as
the new first couple made their
way toward the North Portico.
There also had been tears as they
said goodbye to the staff, and she
didn’t want to look like she was
crying when she greeted the
The First 48
The First 48
The First 48
60 Days In
The First 48
A&E
(5:30) Mr. & Mrs. Smith ★★ Movie: Open Range ★★★ (2003)
Movie: A Bronx Tale ★★★
AMC
Lone Star Law
Lone Star Law
Lone Star Law
Lone Star Law
Lone Star Law
Animal Planet
(6:55) Movie: Set It Off ★★★ (1996)
Black
Mancave
Rundown
Black Card
BET
Housewives/Atl.
Movie: Sex and the City 2 ★★ (2010)
Watch
Sex & City 2
Bravo
Gumball
King of Hill
Amer. Dad
Cleveland
Amer. Dad
Burgers
Burgers
Family Guy
Family Guy
Cartoon Network Gumball
Erin Burnett OutFront
Anderson Cooper 360
Anderson Cooper 360
CNN Tonight
CNN Tonight
CNN
The Office
The Office
The Office
Tosh.0
Tosh.0
Tosh.0
Tosh.0
Daily
Opposition
Comedy Central The Office
Naked and Afraid
Naked and Afraid Pop-Up
Naked and Afraid Pop-Up
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Naked and Afraid
Discovery
Bunk’d
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Bizaardvark Bizaardvark Gravity Falls Gravity Falls Stuck/Middle Bizaardvark
Disney
E! News
Movie: What Happens in Vegas ★ (2008)
The Royals
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E!
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Dominant
30/30 Shorts Boxing: Ryan García vs. Fernando Vargas (Live)
SportsCenter (Live)
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Johnsonville Cornhole Championships
The Magazine: Dominant 20 The Draft
The Draft
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Chopped
Chopped
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Beat Flay
Beat Bobby Beat Bobby Beat Bobby
Food Network
The Story With Martha
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Hannity
The Ingraham Angle
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Fox News
Mr. Popper’s Penguins ★★ Beyond
(9:01) Movie: National Lampoon’s Vacation ★★ (1983)
The 700 Club
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(6:30) Movie: Pacific Rim ★★★ (2013)
Atlanta
(10:38) Atlanta
Atlanta
FX
Full House
Full House
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Full House
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The Middle
The Middle
Golden Girls Golden Girls
Hallmark
Psych
Movie: Hello, It’s Me (2015)
Murder, She Wrote
Hallmark M&M Psych
Snatched
VICE
Movie: Hidden Figures ★★★ (2016)
(10:10) Here and Now
High Main.
Pacific Rim
HBO
Flip or Flop
Flip or Flop
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Flip/Flop
Hunters
Hunt Intl
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HGTV
Swamp People
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Truck Night in America
(11:04) Swamp People
History
Project Runway All Stars
Project Runway
Project Runway
(10:02) Love at First Flight
Project Runway All Stars
Lifetime
MLB Preseason Baseball: Boston Red Sox at Baltimore Orioles
ESPNWS
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Jersey Shore--Vacation
Nick Cannon: Wild ’n Out
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Life Below Zero
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Movie: Spy Kids: All the Time in the World ★ (2011)
Full House
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(10:32) Movie: Rush Hour 3 ★ (2007)
PARMT
(6:00) Movie: The Happening Movie: Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides ★★ (2011)
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Tip-Off
2018 NCAA Basketball Tournament: Texas A&M vs Michigan (Live)
2018 NCAA Basketball Tournament
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(6:00) Ziegfeld Follies (1946) Movie: Sunset Boulevard ★★★★ (1950)
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TCM
My 600-Lb. Life
My 600-Lb. Life
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TLC
NCIS: New Orleans
Movie: London Has Fallen ★★ (2016)
Movie: Tron: Legacy ★★ (2010)
TNT
Mysteries at the Museum
Mysteries at the Museum
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Travel
Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Jokers
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Trumps because that would give
the media the wrong idea.
And then, of course, “she gave
me the box” — the large gift from
Tiffany that Melania Trump presented in a moment that left her
trying to figure out where to put it
now that the staff had disappeared. “It was a lovely, beautiful,
thoughtful frame,” she said. “It
was just a bit of a surprise.”
What was she thinking as she
and former president Barack
Obama waved farewell from Ma-
rine One? “Bye, Felicia!” she
joked. And she laughed.
During the wide-ranging conversation, Obama looked back on
her 2008 campaign learning
curve and how she came to realize
that her enthusiasm and passion
could easily be turned into angry
sound bites. “I couldn’t count on
my husband’s campaign to protect me,” she said. “I had to protect myself.”
“I had to learn how to deliver a
message,” she added, noting that
often meant being not so passionate and maintaining a smile as
she spoke. The audience murmured understandingly; they all
knew what it means to be called
angry when you’re just emphatic.
Once in the East Wing, she
◆
High Definition Movie Ratings (from TMS) ★★★★ Excellent ★★★ Good ★★ Fair ★ Poor No stars: not rated
spent a year sussing out the landscape, strategizing and readying
herself to roll out her Let’s Move
healthy-living initiative. She also
grappled with the public’s expectations. With two Ivy League degrees and a résumé that included
executive positions in hospital
and city management, she was
dismayed that people seemed to
question whether she could handle being first lady. “You’re
shocked that I could do this job?”
she said with a wry chuckle.
Her advice to other spouses in
her position: “Take some time to
know what you care about and
what you can do in the realm of
the administration,” she said.
“You have to know what the goals
of the administration are.” For her
husband’s administration, health
care was a priority, so she focused
on helping children get healthy.
“The garden was a subversive
act,” she said. “It was the carrot.
You can’t go in with guns blazing
until people trust you.” There
could be no reprimanding. No
finger-wagging. She knew that
her finger-wagging, a black woman’s finger-wagging, would be
amplified and resented.
So she gave herself a bit of
advice: Put down your finger and
pick up the garden hoe. “What’s
more innocent than a garden?”
Obama said.
She spent a lot of time visiting
D.C. public schools, then invited
the students to the White House.
“The second touch or third touch
is when they start believing it’s
real,” she said — when they believe that what you’ve said matters and that they, in fact, matter.
Recently, her days have been
taken up with her memoir, due
out in the fall. “Becoming” will
explore how her ordinary childhood prepared her to do extraordinary things. It’s about her parents, about growing into her role
as first lady and continuing to
evolve — and about refusing to
place herself last, which is not
just an act of self-love, but is also a
public, civic, political obligation.
“If we can’t advocate for ourselves,”
she said, “how do we pick a president
who will advocate for us?” And no,
she didn’t mention any names.
robin.givhan@washpost.com
B FEATURED LISTING B
The Apollo
Orchestra
With
WNO Young Artists
Sunday, March 25 at 4pm
The Apollo Orchestra will be joined by Washington
National Opera's Domingo Cafritz Young Artists in a free
Palm Sunday concert. Program includes works by Wagner,
Strauss and Faure.
Church of the Little Flower
5607 Massachusetts Avenue
Bethesda, MD 20816
Free
www.apollo
orchestra.com
MUSIC - CONCERTS
Friday Morning
Music Club
Calvary Baptist
Church Concert
Series
Fridays at Noon
Upcoming Concerts:
March: 23
April: 6, 13, 20, 27
The Friday Morning Music Club invites you to our series of
free concerts at the Calvary Baptist Church. Performances
are held most Fridays at noon through April. Every week a
variety of classical works are performed by accomplished
musicians. Music lovers of all ages are welcome to attend!
Calvary Baptist Church
755 Eighth Street, NW
Washington, DC 20001
(202) 347-8355
Metro: Gallery Place
Free and
open to
the public.
No tickets
required.
Randolph Road Theater
4010 Randolph Rd.
Silver Spring
www.belcantanti.com
$15 - $40
See website
Garage parking near
church. Additional
concert information
available at
www.fmmc.org
OPERA
RimskyKorsakov’s
Sadko
Fri Mar. 23 at 7:30
Sun Mar. 25 at 3:00
Set in 12th Century Novgorod, Russia. Performed in
Russian with supertitles, with Olney Ballet and Four
Seasons dancers.
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
• Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
Tickets online and
at the door
16-2898
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THURSDAY, MARCH 22 , 2018
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THE WASHINGTON POST
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C5
M2
RAMMY board contemplates criteria for Washington-area restaurant awards
ISABELLA FROM C1
Another organization grappling with a decision right now is
the Restaurant Association of
Metropolitan Washington, which
will host its annual RAMMY restaurant awards in June. Isabella’s
Arroz is nominated for best new
restaurant, and his restaurant G
by Mike Isabella is in the running
for favorite fast bites, a category
determined by public vote. Chef
Michael Rafidi is nominated for
rising culinary star for work at
Arroz and another Isabella restaurant, Requin. In 2015, George
Pagonis, the Kapnos chef who is
also named in the lawsuit, won
the rising culinary star award. In
2016, Isabella was named restau-
rateur of the year.
But the RAMMYs are still deciding what to do with Isabella
this year.
When asked whether Isabella
is still eligible for awards, RAMW
President Kathy Hollinger issued
a statement to The Washington
Post:
“Restaurant Association Metropolitan Washington condemns
harassment of any kind. The
RAMMYS judges panel and the
board of directors are separately
discussing the judges’ evaluation
A former manager alleges in a
lawsuit that celebrity chef Mike
Isabella, right, and four
partners sexually harassed her.
DIXIE D. VEREEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
MOVIE DIRECTORY
DISTRICT
Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D (PG-13)
7:45-10:45
Red Sparrow (R) 1:00-4:057:10-10:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
(PG-13) 11:55-4:50
CC: 7:00
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 1:15- Tomb Raider (PG-13) 11:30-1:002:20-4:00-5:10-7:10-8:00-10:50
2:15-4:30-7:45
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 12:50-4:00- Game Night (R) 2:45-8:10-10:35
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
7:10-9:00
Tomb Raider (PG-13) CC: 5:30- Digital 3D (PG) 5:35-10:45
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:507:40-9:25
2:30-5:05-7:40-8:10-10:15
Game Night (R) CC: 12:30Thoroughbreds (R) 11:45AM
5:15-8:20
Gringo (R) 2:05
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
Death Wish (R) 2:35
12:35-3:35-6:30
Annihilation (R) 11:50-5:15A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
8:00-10:45
12:30-3:15-4:15-6:15-10:25
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC: I Can Only Imagine (PG) 12:303:05-5:40-8:15-10:50
1:25
Love, Simon (PG-13) 12:40-3:30A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
6:30-9:30
Digital 3D (PG) CC: 1:30
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
The Post (PG-13) CC: 4:05
Thoroughbreds (R) CC: 1:30-9:40 10:10
Annihilation (R) CC: 4:30-7:15- What We Started 8:00
Tomb Raider 3D (PG-13) 10:10
10:00
National Theatre Live: Julius
I Can Only Imagine (PG) CC:
Caesar 7:30
2:00-4:50-7:40
Love, Simon (PG-13) CC: 1:35Smithsonian - Lockheed Martin
4:20-7:10-9:55
IMAX Theater
7 Days In Entebbe (PG-13) CC:
601 Independence Avenue SW
2:55-5:30-8:15-10:20
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
Tomb Raider 3D (PG-13) CC:
12:25-2:40
2:20-10:30
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
Pacific Rim: Uprising An IMAX Seas 3D (NR) 11:00-1:15-3:30
3D Experience (PG-13) 7:00
Dream Big: Engineering Our
Unsane (R) CC: 7:00-9:35
An IMAX 3D Experience
Tomb Raider: The IMAX 2D Ex- World:
Call
perience (PG-13) CC: 1:20-4:10 Please
to Space 3D (NR) 10:25Black Panther (PG-13) 3:20-9:50 Journey
11:50-2:05
Tomb Raider (PG-13) 12:30
Black Panther: An IMAX 3D
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
Experience (PG-13)
7:00
Panther: The IMAX 2D
Pacific Rim: Uprising The IMAX Black
Experience (PG-13)
2D Experience (PG-13) 9:45
A Wrinkle in Time: An IMAX 2D
AMC Loews Uptown 1
Experience (PG) Please Call
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
3111 K Street N.W.
3426 Connecticut Ave N.W.
Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
3:40-7:00
AMC Mazza Gallerie
5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
CC: (!) 7:00
Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
12:30-1:50-5:00-8:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 12:102:25-4:45
Tomb Raider (PG-13) CC: (!)
12:20
Game Night (R) CC: 3:30
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 12:15-3:20
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: (!)
1:30-4:10-6:50
Midnight Sun (PG-13) CC: (!) 7:00
Love, Simon (PG-13) CC: 12:002:30-5:10-7:40
National Theatre Live: Julius
Caesar (!) 7:30
Tomb Raider 3D (PG-13) CC:
(!) 3:10
Albert Einstein Planetarium National Air and Space Museum
6th Street and Independence Ave SW
To Space and Back 11:00AM
Dark Universe Space Show (NR)
11:30-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:305:30-6:30
Journey to the Stars (NR)
12:00-1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00-5:006:00-7:00
The Stars Tonight (NR) 10:30AM
Angelika Pop-Up
at Union Market
550 Penn St NE - Unit E
Oh Lucy! 11:30-1:30-3:30-5:307:30
Red Sparrow (R) Open Caption:
7:15
A Fantastic Woman (Una mujer
fantastica) (R) 2:50-7:00
Lady Bird (R) 11:05-1:00-5:00
Red Sparrow (R) 11:00-1:45-4:30
MARYLAND
AFI Silver Theatre Cultural Ctr
8633 Colesville Road
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 1:50
The Shape of Water (R) 2:007:05-9:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 11:30-7:30
Phantom Thread (R) 11:254:30-9:30
Casablanca (1942) (PG) 7:20
The Great Silence (Il Grande
silenzio) (NR) 9:30
The Breaking Point (NR) 5:15
AMC Academy 8
6198 Greenbelt Road
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
CC: 3:25-5:45-8:00
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 1:302:30-4:00-5:30-8:30
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
CC: (!) 7:00
Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D (PG-13)
(!) 8:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 3:30-6:00
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 5:00-8:15
Tomb Raider (PG-13) CC:
2:00-7:45
Death Wish (R) CC: 1:35-4:15
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
2:35-8:25
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) CC: 5:15
Tomb Raider 3D (PG-13) CC:
4:45
Unsane (R) CC: (!) 7:00
AMC Center Park 8
4001 Powder Mill Rd.
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
CC: 2:10-4:20-6:45-9:15
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
CC: 7:00
Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D (PG-13)
9:45
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: (!)
Avalon Theatre
12:30-3:30-6:30-9:30
5612 Connecticut Avenue
Black Panther in Disney Digital
A Fantastic Woman (Una mujer 3D (PG-13) CC: 2:00-8:00
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 2:30fantastica) (R) 1:30-4:30-7:30
In Between (Bar Bahar) 12:30- 5:45-9:00
Tomb Raider (PG-13) CC: (!)
3:00-5:30-8:00
4:15-9:45
Landmark
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: (!)
Atlantic Plumbing Cinema
12:45
807 V Street, NW
Death Wish (R) CC: 1:00-3:45
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
Midnight Sun (PG-13) CC:
CC: 7:25-10:00
7:00-9:30
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 1:00A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
4:00-7:00
Digital 3D (PG) CC: (!) 3:25
Annihilation (R) CC: 11:45-2:25- Love, Simon (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:454:55-10:10
4:30-7:15-10:00
Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
Gringo (R) CC: (!) 5:15
11:00-12:30-1:45-3:30-4:30-6:45- Tomb Raider 3D (PG-13) CC: (!)
7:30-9:45-10:15
1:30-7:00
Tomb Raider (PG-13) CC: 11:25AMC Columbia 14
2:00-4:35-7:15-9:55
10300 Little Patuxent Parkway
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
11:30-1:55-4:20-7:10-9:35
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13) (!)
7:00-10:00
Landmark E Street Cinema
Tomb Raider (PG-13) (!) 11:10AM
555 11th Street NW
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:55
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
Pacific Rim: Uprising An IMAX
1:00-4:00
Experience (PG-13) (!) 7:00
Leaning Into The Wind (PG) CC: 3D
Tomb Raider: The IMAX 2D
1:10-3:20-5:30-7:40-9:45
Experience
(PG-13) (!) 12:40-4:00
I, Tonya (R) CC: 4:00
Rim: Uprising The IMAX
7 Days In Entebbe (PG-13) CC: Pacific
2D
Experience
(PG-13) (!) 9:45
1:20-4:20-7:20-9:40
AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) CC:
9811
Washingtonian
Ctr.
7:15-9:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Pacific Rim: Uprising An IMAX
Missouri (R) CC: 1:00
3D Experience (PG-13) CC:
The Death of Stalin (R) CC:
(!) 7:00
12:30-2:00-3:00-4:30-5:30-7:00- Tomb Raider: The IMAX 2D
8:00-9:30
Experience (PG-13) CC: (!)
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 3:30
1:15-4:05
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC: Pacific Rim: Uprising The IMAX
1:00
2D Experience (PG-13) CC:
Landmark West End Cinema (!) 9:30
criteria as it pertains to RAMW’s
awards programs moving forward. Given the amount of care
and sensitivity that goes into
nominating a RAMMYS finalist,
the panel will give that same level
of input and consideration into
making any changes. As this is
not just one person’s decision, all
of the entities involved will take
the coming days to discuss how to
best address these very serious
allegations.”
The James Beard Awards
changed its criteria this year in
response to revelations of alleged
sexual misconduct at top restaurants, including accusations of
notable chefs John Besh and Mario Batali. In January, the foundation told its awards committee to
consider chefs’ character when
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
10:30-1:15-4:00
Midnight Sun (PG-13) CC:
7:00-9:30
Death Wish (R) CC: 10:45-1:304:15-7:00-9:45
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) CC: 6:30-9:15
I Can Only Imagine (PG) CC: (!)
10:45-1:45-4:30-7:15-10:00
Love, Simon (PG-13) CC: (!) 9:4512:30-3:15-6:00-9:00
Tomb Raider 3D (PG-13) CC: (!)
11:30-12:30-3:30
AMC Magic Johnson
Capital Ctr 12
800 Shoppers Way
Pacific Rim: Uprising An IMAX
3D Experience (PG-13) 7:00
Tomb Raider: The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) CC: 12:45-3:45
Pacific Rim: Uprising The IMAX
2D Experience (PG-13) 9:30
Death Wish (R) CC: 12:102:40-5:15
Gringo (R) CC: 12:40
I Can Only Imagine (PG) CC:
1:25-4:00-6:35-9:10
Love, Simon (PG-13) CC: 12:504:15-6:55-9:40
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
CC: 12:20
MLA (Manchi Lakshanalunna
Abbayi)(Telugu) (NR) CC: 6:45
Kirrak Party (Telugu) (NR) CC:
2:30
Unsane (R) CC: 7:45-10:15
Needhi Naadhi Oke Katha (Needi
Naadi Oke Katha) (NR) CC: 9:15
Landmark
Bethesda Row Cinema
7235 Woodmont Avenue
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
1:30-4:20
The Leisure Seeker (R) CC: 1:204:00-7:10-9:45
The Death of Stalin (R) CC:
ArcLight Bethesda
1:00-2:00-3:30-4:40-6:30-7:407101 Democracy Boulevard
9:10-10:05
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:15Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
12:15-1:15-3:50-4:10-7:20-10:15 Missouri (R) CC: 6:50-9:15
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Lady Bird (R) CC: 12:50
11:05-1:45-4:35-6:30
The Party (R) CC: 1:50
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:55-2:50Foxtrot (R) 1:30-4:10-7:00-9:50
5:30
7 Days In Entebbe (PG-13) CC:
Red Sparrow (R) 11:25-2:351:40-4:30-7:30-10:00
5:00-7:50-9:00
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) CC:
Game Night (R) 11:30-2:057:00-9:40
5:55-10:10
National Theatre Live: Julius
The Shape of Water (R) 12:40- Caesar 3:00
1:40-3:45-6:20
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC:
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 5:35-8:00 3:50-10:00
Thoroughbreds (R) 4:00-10:45
Old Greenbelt Theatre
Death Wish (R) 11:35AM
129 Centerway
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 7:00-8:10Black
Panther (PG-13) 5:00-8:00
9:20-10:40
Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
Gringo (R) 3:30
3899 Branch Avenue
Annihilation (R) 12:10-4:30-7:30
Love, Simon (PG-13) 11:50Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
12:30-2:20-3:15-4:50-5:507:05
7:25-9:50
Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D (PG-13)
7 Days In Entebbe (PG-13)
9:30
11:20-2:45-5:10-7:35-10:00
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:00Unsane (R) 7:15-8:15-9:10-10:25 4:00-7:00
Midnight Sun (PG-13) 7:10-9:30 Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:15-2:40A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:004:55-7:30
1:20-2:15-4:45-9:15
Tomb Raider (PG-13) 2:45A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
5:30-8:30
Digital 3D (PG) 12:35-3:05
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:45The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
2:25-4:30-7:15
CC: 1:55
Tomb Raider 3D (PG-13) 12:00
Tomb Raider 3D (PG-13)
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
1:10-4:05
1:15-3:40-5:50-8:15
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
Regal Bowie Stadium 14
7:05-9:35-10:35
15200 Major Lansdale Blvd
Tomb Raider (PG-13) 11:45-2:25The
Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
5:05-7:45-10:20
2:50-5:30
Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D (PG-13) Black
Panther (PG-13) 1:108:20
2:15-3:10-4:20-5:20-6:20-7:40Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
8:40-9:40
1020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
7:00-10:00
Tomb Raider 3D (PG-13)
Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D (PG-13)
12:00-6:15
7:30-10:30
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
7:00-9:45
Tomb Raider (PG-13) 3:00-9:15 (PG-13) 1:00-4:00
Red Sparrow (R) 3:40-6:50-10:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:10-2:25Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:00-3:50
4:40-6:55
Thoroughbreds (R) 9:10-10:45 Tomb Raider (PG-13) 1:30-2:50The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 4:30-7:30-8:40-10:20
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:4512:35-2:50-5:05-7:45-10:10
Death Wish (R) 11:05-1:40-4:25 3:20-6:10-9:20
Game Night (R) 1:00
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:001:05-2:00-3:15-4:05-5:00-7:05- A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) 4:45
8:00-9:00-10:05
Midnight Sun (PG-13) 7:45-10:20
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:101:00-1:55-3:45-4:45-7:30-10:20 Death Wish (R) 1:15-4:15-7:20Midnight Sun (PG-13) 7:00-9:25 10:15
I Can Only Imagine (PG) 1:20Love, Simon (PG-13) 11:1512:25-1:50-4:35-6:20-7:20-9:55 4:10-7:10-10:10
Tomb Raider (PG-13) 1:00-4:00 Tomb Raider 3D (PG-13) 5:50
Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D (PG-13) National Theatre Live: Julius
Caesar 7:30
10:45
Unsane (R) 7:15-10:15
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
8:00
Regal Cinemas Majestic
Bow Tie Harbour 9
2474 Solomons Island Road
Stadium 20 & IMAX
900 Ellsworth Drive
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 2:10-4:40 Game Night (R) 12:25-9:30
Tomb Raider (PG-13) 3:05-6:00The Post (PG-13) 11:00-4:30
Annihilation (R) 10:30-1:10-4:10- 10:00
National Theatre Live: Julius
7:00-9:40
Caesar 7:30
The Greatest Showman (PG)
I Can Only Imagine (PG) 12:2011:30AM
I Can Only Imagine (PG) 10:40- 3:10-6:00-9:00
Love, Simon (PG-13) 1:25-4:151:20-4:20-7:20-10:00
7:05-9:55
Game Night (R) 10:10-12:40Tomb Raider 3D (PG-13)
3:10-5:40-8:10-10:40
1:00-4:00
The Shape of Water (R) 10:00- Tomb Raider: The IMAX 2D
6:30
(PG-13) 1:00-4:00Call Me by Your Name (R) 1:40 Experience
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 7:00-10:00
Regal Germantown Stadium 14
Missouri (R) 12:50-3:30-9:30
20000 Century Boulevard
Gringo (R) 10:50AM
The Death of Stalin (R) 7:00The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
8:00-10:00
1:00-3:30-6:00-8:30-11:00
Red Sparrow (R) 9:50-12:55Black Panther (PG-13) 12:304:00-7:10-10:15
2:15-3:45-5:30-7:00-8:45-10:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
(PG-13) 12:15-3:30-6:30
1:30-3:50
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:30-4:15-6:45
7 Days In Entebbe (PG-13)
Red Sparrow (R) 12:00-3:3011:40-2:20-5:00-7:40-10:30
7:00-10:30
Unsane (R) 7:00-9:30
Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD Tomb Raider (PG-13) 12:15-3:154:45-6:15-7:45-9:15
7000 Arundel Mills Circle
Game Night (R) 2:00-4:45-11:00
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:30XD: 7:00; 8:00-11:00
2:45-4:15-7:00-9:45-11:00
Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D (PG-13) A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
XD: 10:15
Digital 3D (PG) 12:00-5:30-8:15
National Theatre Live: Julius
Death Wish (R) 2:00-4:45-7:30Caesar 7:30
10:30
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
Gringo (R) 9:15
8:00-11:00
Love, Simon (PG-13) 1:45-4:30Hoyt's West Nursery Cinema 14 7:15-10:00
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) 9:30
1591 West Nursery Road
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) Tomb Raider 3D (PG-13)
1:45-10:45
CC: 12:00-2:50-5:05-7:35-9:50
National Theatre Live: Julius
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
Caesar 7:30
CC: 7:25-10:00
Kirrak Party (Telugu) (NR) 12:002301 M Street NW
AMC Loews
Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
St. Charles Town Ctr. 9
12:00-1:00-3:10-4:10-6:20-7:20- 3:30-7:00-10:30
Goldstone (R) CC: 1:30-4:30-7:30
11115 Mall Circle
Regal Hyattsville Royale
9:30-10:20
A Fantastic Woman (Una mujer
Stadium 14
fantastica) (R) 1:15-4:15-7:15
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
6505 America Blvd.
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 1:45 CC: 10:00-2:30-4:45-7:15-9:30
(PG-13) CC: 9:35
Oh Lucy! 4:45-7:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 12:00Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
2:15-4:30
12:45-3:15-5:45-8:00-10:15
Medal of Honor Theater - NMMC 11:45-3:00-6:15-9:30
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 12:30-4:05- Black Panther (PG-13) 12:30-1:00Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
18900 Jefferson Davis Highway
7:10-10:10
CC:
(!)
9:45
1:30-3:35-4:05-4:55-6:40-7:15We, the Marines (NR) 10:00Game Night (R) CC: 2:45-5:10- 8:00-9:45-10:30
11:00-12:00-1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00 Black Panther in Disney Digital 7:40-10:05
3D (PG-13) CC: 10:00-3:45
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13) 7:15
Regal Gallery Place Stadium 14 Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D (PG-13) Tomb Raider (PG-13) CC: 12:45- Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D (PG-13)
701 Seventh Street Northwest
4:20-7:05-9:50
CC: (!) 7:00
10:00
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 3:30 Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 10:45A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
11:30-1:45-4:00-6:15-8:25-10:40 1:30-4:00
(PG-13) 1:00-3:50
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 12:15-1:15-2:15-3:50-4:50Black Panther (PG-13) 11:35Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:30-3:00-5:30
6:25-9:00
12:35-2:50-3:45-5:10-7:00-10:05 (PG-13) CC: 1:00
Red Sparrow (R) 12:30-3:45
Midnight Sun (PG-13) CC:
Black Panther in Disney Digital Tomb Raider (PG-13) CC: (!)
Game Night (R) 2:00-4:45-7:153D (PG-13) 1:10-4:30
10:00
7:00-9:15
6:45-9:45
Tomb Raider (PG-13) 1:00-1:304:00-4:30-7:00-7:30-10:30
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:45-4:154:45-7:30-10:15
Death Wish (R) 1:15-3:55-6:459:30
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) 1:30
Midnight Sun (PG-13) 7:55-10:30
Love, Simon (PG-13) 1:00-4:007:00-9:45
Tomb Raider 3D (PG-13) 10:00
I Can Only Imagine (PG) 7:0010:00
Unsane (R) 7:15-10:00
Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12
14716 Baltimore Avenue
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
12:30-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:25
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:452:15-4:10-5:30-7:20-8:45-10:30
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
7:40
Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D (PG-13)
9:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:45-2:455:05
Red Sparrow (R) 3:15-6:45-10:00
Game Night (R) 12:00
Tomb Raider (PG-13) 1:00-2:303:50-7:00-10:05
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:001:15-4:15-5:45-7:15-10:15
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) 2:45-8:30
Death Wish (R) 12:40-9:20
Gringo (R) 1:30-3:45
Midnight Sun (PG-13) 7:00-10:25
I Can Only Imagine (PG) 11:252:05-5:00-7:45-10:30
Love, Simon (PG-13) 12:15-3:306:30-9:30
Tomb Raider 3D (PG-13)
11:30-6:00
Regal Rockville Ctr Stadium 13
199 East Montgomery Ave
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
12:15-2:45-5:00
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
7:30
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:0012:30-3:15-3:45-6:30-7:15-9:4510:30
Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D (PG-13)
10:30
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 4:15-7:30-10:45
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:15-2:305:00
Red Sparrow (R) 12:30-3:457:00-10:15
Tomb Raider (PG-13) 12:15-1:003:15-4:00-6:15-7:30-9:15
Game Night (R) 4:15
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) 1:30-7:30
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:453:45-4:30-6:45-9:30-10:15
Death Wish (R) 1:15
Gringo (R) 12:15
Love, Simon (PG-13) 12:00-2:305:15-7:30
7 Days In Entebbe (PG-13)
12:00-2:30-5:15-8:00-10:45
National Theatre Live: Julius
Caesar 7:30
Tomb Raider 3D (PG-13) 10:30
I Can Only Imagine (PG) 8:0010:45
Operation Red Sea 10:15
Regal Waugh Chapel
Stadium 12 & IMAX
1419 South Main Chapel Way
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
12:00-2:20-4:35
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:401:40-3:50-4:50-7:00-8:00-10:00
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
7:30
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 6:00-9:10
Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D (PG-13)
10:20
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:10-3:10
Peter Rabbit (PG) 2:00-4:35
Game Night (R) 12:00-2:30-7:40
Tomb Raider (PG-13) 12:303:20-9:00
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:203:00-5:45-8:30
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) 1:50-7:20
Death Wish (R) 5:10-10:20
Midnight Sun (PG-13) 7:00-9:30
I Can Only Imagine (PG) 1:154:20-7:15-10:10
Love, Simon (PG-13) 12:50-3:406:45-9:30
Tomb Raider 3D (PG-13) 6:10
Pacific Rim: Uprising An IMAX
3D Experience (PG-13) 7:00
Tomb Raider: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 1:20-4:10
Pacific Rim: Uprising The IMAX
2D Experience (PG-13) 9:50
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 4:3010:10
Regal Westview
Stadium 16 & IMAX
5243 Buckeystown Pike
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
11:30-2:30-5:30-8:15-10:50
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:4512:30-1:15-3:00-3:45-4:30-6:157:00-10:15
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
8:00-11:00
Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D (PG-13)
7:30-10:30
The Greatest Showman (PG)
1:00-4:15
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:15-2:00
Red Sparrow (R) 12:45-4:008:00-11:15
Game Night (R) 12:30-3:15-5:458:30-11:00
Tomb Raider (PG-13) 12:002:45-8:15
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:0012:15-1:45-3:45-6:30-9:15
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) 4:45
Midnight Sun (PG-13) 8:15-10:45
Death Wish (R) 12:00-2:45-5:30
Thoroughbreds (R) 5:00
Gringo (R) 9:45
I Can Only Imagine (PG) 12:153:30-6:45-9:45
Annihilation (R) 9:30
Love, Simon (PG-13) 11:15-2:004:45-7:45-10:30
7 Days In Entebbe (PG-13)
11:30-2:15-5:15-8:00-10:45
Does this page look familiar?
Tomb Raider 3D (PG-13)
5:30-11:00
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) 7:15
Pacific Rim: Uprising An IMAX
3D Experience (PG-13) 7:00
Unsane (R) 7:45-10:30
Tomb Raider: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 1:00-4:00
Pacific Rim: Uprising The IMAX
2D Experience (PG-13) 10:00
Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
10:00-11:10-1:05-4:15-5:05-7:208:20-9:10-10:25-11:00
Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D (PG-13)
CC: (!) 7:30-10:30
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) CC: 3:10
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 10:05-12:55
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 10:1512:40-3:05
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 10:001:10-4:20
Tomb Raider (PG-13) CC: (!)
2:15-8:10
Game Night (R) CC: 10:05-12:302:50-5:15-7:45-10:10
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
10:20-11:05-1:00-3:40-4:356:20-9:05
Midnight Sun (PG-13) CC: (!)
7:00-9:20
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) CC: 1:55
Death Wish (R) CC: 12:50-3:35
Gringo (R) CC: 9:15
Annihilation (R) CC: 4:05
National Theatre Live: Julius
Caesar (!) 7:30
I Can Only Imagine (PG) CC: (!)
10:10-1:20-4:00-7:05-9:45
Love, Simon (PG-13) CC: (!)
10:50-1:35-4:30-7:10-9:50
7 Days In Entebbe (PG-13) CC: (!)
11:00-1:50-4:25
Tomb Raider 3D (PG-13) CC: (!)
9:55-12:10-10:20
Pacific Rim: Uprising An IMAX
3D Experience (PG-13) CC: (!)
7:00-9:40
Unsane (R) CC: (!) 7:00-9:30
Tomb Raider: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:301:15-4:10
Black Panther (PG-13) 2:05
Tomb Raider (PG-13) (!) 11:155:10
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13) (!)
8:00-10:55
maura.judkis@washpost.com
Thursday, March 22, 2018
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
Pari (Hindi) (NR) 1:10-4:20
Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety (NR)
11:45-2:55-6:05-9:10
I Can Only Imagine (PG) 11:401:00-3:50-6:30-9:15
7 Days In Entebbe (PG-13) 2:204:55-7:30-10:10
Raid (NR) 11:50-3:00-6:10-9:20
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
2:15-7:35
1600 Village Market Boulevard
Raider 3D (PG-13) 10:00
UA Snowden Square
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) Tomb
Tholiprema (Tholi Prema) (NR)
Stadium 14
11:25-1:30-3:40-5:45-7:55
12:00-3:10
9161 Commerce Center Drive
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:45-2:00Kirrak Party (Telugu) (NR) 11:254:20
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
2:30-5:35-8:50
Gringo (R) 12:10
1:10-3:30
I Can Only Imagine (PG) 11:30- Paul, Apostle of Christ (PG-13)
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:307:00
2:10-4:45-7:30
1:40-3:30-4:50-6:30-8:10-9:40
Love, Simon (PG-13) 11:50-2:25- Unsane (R) 7:15-9:55
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:355:10-7:40
7:00-10:00
Red Sparrow (R) 12:00-3:00-7:15 1:25-4:05-6:15-7:00-9:45
Black Panther in Disney Digital
Regal Dulles Town Ctr 10
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) 6:50
3D (PG-13) 1:00-4:10-7:10-10:10
21100 Dulles Town Circle
Game Night (R) 2:45-5:05-7:35
Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D (PG-13)
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:20The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
7:30-10:10
12:20-1:55-4:30-5:20-7:10-8:00
11:50-2:45-5:30-8:00-10:20
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:50-4:15
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:00Red Sparrow (R) 12:50-4:20
7:00
1:00-3:00-4:00-6:00-7:00-9:00Tomb Raider (PG-13) 12:45-1:30Black Panther (PG-13) 11:3510:00
3:40-6:50-7:20-9:45-10:15
1:00-2:35-4:00-5:30-7:20
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
Game Night (R) 3:00-5:30-8:00Death Wish (R) 2:50
7:00-9:45
10:30
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D (PG-13)
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:407:00
7:30-10:15
1:20-3:20-6:00-7:00-8:45
Tomb Raider (PG-13) 11:40-1:10- The Greatest Showman (PG)
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
2:20-3:50-5:00-7:50; 1:10-3:50
2:30-4:45
Digital 3D (PG) 4:10-9:40
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:15-4:00
Midnight Sun (PG-13) 7:10-9:50
Manassas 4 Cinemas
Red Sparrow (R) 12:10-3:15Death Wish (R) 2:10-4:40
8890 Mathis Ave.
6:30-9:45
Gringo (R) 12:30
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:30Tomb Raider (PG-13) 12:00-2:15I Can Only Imagine (PG) 1:102:10-4:50-7:30; 1:35-4:15-7:00
3:50-6:45-9:30
Tomb Raider (PG-13) 11:30-1:50- 7:45-10:30
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:45National Theatre Live: Julius
4:10-6:30-8:50
5:00
Caesar 7:30
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:00Death Wish (R) 1:30
Love, Simon (PG-13) 2:00-5:002:15-4:30-6:45-9:00
Love,
Simon (PG-13) 11:50-1:457:40-10:20
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
4:30-7:15-10:10
Tomb Raider 3D (PG-13) 4:15
11:30AM
Tomb
Raider 3D (PG-13) 5:15
Xscape Theatres Brandywine 14
Rave Cinemas Centreville 12 I Can Only Imagine (PG) 7:007710 Matapeake Business Drive
6201 Multiplex Drive
10:00
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 2:00CC: 11:00-1:40-4:20-7:00-10:30
7:00
4:15-7:30-10:15
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D (PG-13)
Regal Fairfax Towne Ctr 10
AMC Worldgate 9
CC: (!) 7:20-10:00
9:45
4110 West Ox Road
13025 Worldgate Drive
Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
Black Panther (PG-13) 10:00The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
10:50-1:50-4:50-7:50-10:50
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 12:00-1:00-4:00-7:00-10:10
12:00-2:25-4:45
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 10:35-1:30 2:30-4:45
Peter Rabbit (PG) 10:30-1:10Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
Red Sparrow (R) CC: (!) 11:30- Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
3:30
7:15-10:05
2:40-6:10-10:45
Tomb Raider (PG-13) 10:05CC: (!) 7:00-7:30-7:45
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Game Night (R) CC: 3:20
Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D (PG-13) 11:05-12:50-1:50-3:35-6:2012:10-2:50-5:30-8:10
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: (!)
7:20-9:05
CC: (!) 8:00
9:50-10:20-11:20-12:10-1:00Rajaratha (Kannada) (NR) 3:00- Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D (PG-13)
Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
7:00-9:50
2:10-2:50-4:30-7:30-9:10
6:30-10:00
2:00-4:55-7:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:05-2:30
Death Wish (R) CC: (!) 9:40A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 10:45Red Sparrow (R) CC: 2:0011:45-2:20-4:05-4:55-7:30-10:25 Red Sparrow (R) 12:35-3:50
12:50-3:40-6:40-9:40
4:35-7:30
Game Night (R) 1:30-4:20-7:10Game Night (R) 10:05-12:30I Can Only Imagine (PG) CC: (!) Tomb Raider (PG-13) CC: (!)
10:00
2:55-5:20-7:45-10:20
10:00-12:40-3:10-5:40-8:10-9:20 2:00-4:45
The Shape of Water (R) 4:55
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Midnight Sun (PG-13) CC:
Game Night (R) CC: 2:15-5:05
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:50Digital 3D (PG) 1:20
7:05-9:25
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
1:50-4:40-6:30-7:30-10:20
MLA (Manchi Lakshanalunna
Love, Simon (PG-13) CC: (!)
2:20-5:00
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Abbayi)(Telugu)
(NR)
6:0011:50-2:30-5:10-8:00-10:40
Death Wish (R) CC: 2:00-4:30Digital 3D (PG) 3:40-9:20
8:00-9:30
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) CC: 8:00
12:20-6:20
I Can Only Imagine (PG) CC: (!) Love, Simon (PG-13) 11:15-1:55- Love, Simon (PG-13) 12:00-2:405:20-8:00-10:40
4:30-7:05-9:50
Tomb Raider 3D (PG-13) CC:
2:10-4:50-7:40
7 Days In Entebbe (PG-13) 1:20Raid (NR) 10:15-1:30-4:45
(!) 2:20
Love, Simon (PG-13) CC: (!)
4:10-7:05-9:55
I
Can
Only
Imagine
(PG)
10:40Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
2:15-5:00-7:35
National Theatre Live: Julius
1:25-4:20-7:15-9:55
9:30-10:10-12:30-1:10-3:30-4:10Alamo Drafthouse Cinema Caesar 7:30
Tomb Raider 3D (PG-13)
7:10-10:10
One Loudoun
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
4:35-10:05
Tomb Raider (PG-13) CC: (!)
20575 East Hampton Plaza
10:45
Rajaratham (Telugu) (NR)
11:40-3:50-5:00-7:40-8:20-10:20Black Panther (PG-13) 11:30The Princess and the Match6:00-9:30
11:05
2:30-3:20-6:00-7:20-10:50
maker (Marital Harmony) (NR)
Kirrak Party (Telugu) (NR)
Unsane (R) CC: 8:05-10:30
Game Night (R) 11:45-2:45-5:40- 11:40-2:50
1:00-3:50-7:55-10:40
iPic Pike & Rose
8:30-11:10
Regal Fox Stadium 16 & IMAX
Rave Cinemas
11830 Grand Park Avenue
Red Sparrow (R) 12:25-4:00Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme
22875 Brambleton Plaza
Tomb Raider (PG-13) (!) 12:45- 6:20-9:55
11900
Palace
Way
The
Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
Annihilation (R) 3:20-9:20
4:00-7:30-11:00
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
1:45-4:00-6:15-8:30-10:45
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:408:00
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
3:45
Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D (PG-13) 7:00
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
XD: 10:00
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:457:00-10:10
2150 Clarendon Blvd.
1:00-3:00-4:15-6:15-7:30-9:30Tomb Raider (PG-13) 1:35-4:40- Black Panther (PG-13) 12:554:10
10:45
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
8:00-9:40-11:20
Rajaratha (Kannada) (NR) 9:55 Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D (PG-13)
CC: 9:45
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:20Midnight Sun (PG-13) 7:05-9:45 9:45
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 1:00- 12:00-3:00-6:20-9:25
The Greatest Showman (PG)
4:00-7:30-10:30
Thoroughbreds (R) 12:35-6:40 Unsane (R) 7:00-9:40
1:15-3:45
Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D (PG-13) Love, Simon (PG-13) 1:20-4:20- Rajaratham (Telugu) (NR)
6:05-9:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
CC: 7:00
7:40-10:35
Black Panther (PG-13) XD:
(PG-13) 12:45-3:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 2:30-5:00
Angelika Film Ctr Mosaic
10:45-2:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:45-3:15Red Sparrow (R) CC: 1:00-4:152911 District Ave
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
5:45-8:15
6:45-10:00
Red Sparrow (R) 12:15-3:30
Game Night (R) CC: 1:45-4:00- Foxtrot (R) (!) 10:15-12:45-3:15- XD: 7:00
5:45-8:15-10:45
Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D (PG-13) Game Night (R) 12:15-2:45-5:307:45-10:15
The Leisure Seeker (R) (!)
10:45
8:00-10:30
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
12:20-4:30
Tomb Raider (PG-13) 3:002:00-7:30-9:45
Regal Ballston Common
Isle
of
Dogs
(PG-13)
7:45-10:45
6:30-9:30
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Stadium 12
National
Theatre
Live:
Julius
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:30Digital 3D (PG) CC: 4:15
671 N. Glebe Road
Caesar 7:00
1:45-3:15-4:30-6:00-7:15-10:00
Death Wish (R) CC: 2:00-4:30
Shape of Water (R) 11:30AM The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Midnight Sun (PG-13) 7:00-9:30 The
2:15-4:45
(R) (!) 2:15-10:15
Digital
3D (PG) 8:45
Love, Simon (PG-13) CC: 1:30- Thoroughbreds
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
Annihilation (R) 3:00-10:55
Death Wish (R) 1:30-4:15-7:004:30-7:15-10:00
7:00
Panther (PG-13) 10:009:45
7 Days In Entebbe (PG-13) CC: Black
Black
Panther
(PG-13)
1:20-2:201:15-4:30-7:30-10:35
1:15-4:45-7:15-10:15
3:30-4:40-5:40-7:45-8:45-10:45 Midnight Sun (PG-13) 7:15-9:45
Red Sparrow (R) 11:00-2:00Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D (PG-13) Love, Simon (PG-13) 11:45-2:30AMC Hoffman Center 22
5:00-8:00
5:15-8:00-10:45
206 Swamp Fox Rd.
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) (!) 11:30- 10:00
7 Days In Entebbe (PG-13)
The Greatest Showman (PG)
2:15-4:45-10:20
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:3012:00-2:30-5:00-7:45-10:15
1:10-3:50-6:30
Love, Simon (PG-13) (!) 11:552:45-6:00-9:15
Red Sparrow (R) 2:25-6:00-9:30 The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
Pacific Rim: Uprising An IMAX 2:40-5:20-7:55-10:25
10:45
Tomb
Raider
(PG-13)
1:00-2:303D Experience (PG-13) CC: 7:00 Tomb Raider 3D (PG-13) (!)
Tomb Raider 3D (PG-13) 12:00
4:00-5:30-7:00-8:30
Tomb Raider: The IMAX 2D Ex- 10:00-3:30
I Can Only Imagine (PG) 7:00(R) 9:10
perience (PG-13) CC: 1:15-4:15 Tomb Raider (PG-13) (!) 12:45- Thoroughbreds
10:00
Gringo (R) 1:30
Pacific Rim: Uprising The IMAX 7:00-10:30
Kirrak Party (Telugu) (NR)
Annihilation
(R)
4:20-7:20-10:10
2D Experience (PG-13) CC: 9:30
Bow Tie
12:30-3:45
I Can Only Imagine (PG) 1:15Reston Town Ctr 11 & BTX
Tomb Raider: The IMAX 2D
AMC Potomac Mills 18
4:15-7:15-10:15
11940 Market Street
Experience (PG-13) 1:30-4:30
2700 Potomac Mills Circle
National Theatre Live: Julius
Pacific Rim: Uprising An
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:10-7:15 Tomb Raider (PG-13) 1:00-4:00 Caesar 7:30
Love, Simon (PG-13) 1:30-4:30- IMAX 3D Experience (PG-13)
Tomb Raider (PG-13) 4:15-10:30 Tomb Raider 3D (PG-13)
7:30-10:15
12:00-6:00
7:30-10:30
Pacific Rim: Uprising An IMAX
7 Days In Entebbe (PG-13) 2:15- Unsane (R) 7:00-9:30
3D Experience (PG-13) CC: 9:45 Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
5:15-8:00-10:40
Tomb Raider: The IMAX 2D Ex- 7:00-9:40
Regal Kingstowne
Stadium 16 & RPX
perience (PG-13) CC: 11:55-3:50 Tomb Raider (PG-13) 3:00-9:00 Tomb Raider 3D (PG-13) 10:00
Pacific Rim: Uprising The IMAX Game Night (R) 1:30-4:20
5910 Kingstowne Towne Ctr
Regal Countryside Stadium 20
Thoroughbreds
(R)
12:50-3:15
2D Experience (PG-13) CC: 7:00
45980 Regal Plaza
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
AMC Shirlington 7
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) 12:50-3:05-5:30-8:15-10:35
Missouri (R) 3:50-9:10
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:15-1:252772 South Randolph St.
1:40-4:00-6:25-8:40
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:303:15-4:20-6:20-7:30-9:30-10:30
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:40Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
3:30-6:40-9:40
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:30-3:50
3:50-7:05-10:10
1:00-4:00-7:00
Red Sparrow (R) 12:10-3:15Red
Sparrow (R) 12:25-3:30
Pacific
Rim:
Uprising
(PG-13)
Black Panther in Disney Digital 6:30-9:35
Tomb Raider (PG-13) 4:00
7:05-10:00
3D (PG-13) CC: 5:00-8:00
Gringo (R) 4:40-10:00
Game
Night (R) 2:20-5:00-7:45Fifty
Shades
Freed
(R)
11:55Red Sparrow (R) CC: 1:30A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:3510:20
2:35-5:15-7:55-10:25
4:00-7:10
3:25-6:35-9:15
Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D (PG-13) The Shape of Water (R) 12:40-3:35The Shape of Water (R) CC: 1:15- The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
6:25-9:15
7:35-10:15
4:40-7:40
12:20-6:45
Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:15-2:50A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
Love, Simon (PG-13) 12:40-1:50- Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle A3:55-5:25-6:45-8:00-9:35
1:35-4:25
(PG-13)
4:45-7:30
3:20-6:20-7:20-9:20
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Midnight Sun (PG-13) 7:10-10:00 Red Sparrow (R) 12:30-3:353D (PG) 12:15-10:30
6:50-9:55
Digital 3D (PG) CC: 1:30
7 Days In Entebbe (PG-13)
Midnight Sun (PG-13) 7:15-9:30
Aithe 2.0 (NR) 12:15-3:05
Thoroughbreds (R) CC: 1:45-4:15 12:55-3:40-6:50-9:30
Thoroughbreds (R) 1:50-4:45
Darkest
Hour
(PG-13)
1:25-4:15
Annihilation (R) CC: 2:00
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
Death Wish (R) 1:40-4:30-7:15-9:50
Tomb
Raider
(PG-13)
12:45Flower (R) (!) 7:00
7:40-10:20
I Can Only Imagine (PG) 12:453:45-7:00
7 Days In Entebbe (PG-13) CC: (!)
Cinema Arts Theatre
3:45-7:05-10:05
Padmaavat
(Padmavati)
(Hindi)
1:45-4:30-7:20
9650 Main St
Love, Simon (PG-13) 1:05-4:10(NR) 11:30-2:50-6:20-9:50
AMC Tysons Corner 16
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 10:15-1:15- Game Night (R) 11:35-4:55-10:15 7:20-10:15
7850e Tysons Corner Center
4:15-7:10-9:55
The Shape of Water (R) 12:25- 7 Days In Entebbe (PG-13)
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R) The Shape of Water (R) CC:
12:30-3:15
3:30-6:30-9:35
CC: 11:35-2:10-4:40
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13)
2:35-10:00
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
7:30-10:20
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: 9:40- Digital 3D (PG) 3:25-9:05
CC: (!) 7:00-10:05
Midnight Sun (PG-13) 7:25-9:45 Tomb Raider 3D (PG-13) 1:00
12:00-2:15-4:35-7:00-9:20
VIRGINIA
The Washington Post is printed using recycled fiber.
The Leisure Seeker (R) CC: 9:4512:10-2:30-4:50-7:20-9:35
The Post (PG-13) CC: 5:05-7:40
Gringo (R) CC: 5:10-9:50
Lady Bird (R) CC: 10:00-12:05
Foxtrot (R) CC: 9:50-12:15-2:405:00-7:30-9:45
Oh Lucy! 12:20-2:45-7:50
making their selections. “If you
have concerns about a chef, restaurateur or beverage professional, or about the culture around a
restaurant or restaurant group,
leave the person or business out of
your nominations,” read a directive sent to judges, Eater reported. That meant that such restaurants as the Spotted Pig, which
the New York Times reported last
year as having a “rape room,” were
out of the running. It also resulted
in a list that had more female
Beard nominees than previous
years. As for the RAMMYs, in
the six categories where people
are named individually for
awards, 10 women and 25 men are
nominated this year, about the
same breakdown as in 2017.
Tomb Raider (PG-13) 12:153:15-6:15
Unsane (R) 7:35-10:00
Tomb Raider 3D (PG-13) 9:15
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
10:15
Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D (PG-13)
7:30
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13) 7:00
Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D (PG-13)
9:45
Regal Manassas
Stadium 14 & IMAX
11380 Bulloch Drive
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
12:45-3:00
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:301:30-2:30-4:00-5:20-7:15-8:3010:15
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
7:30-10:15
Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D (PG-13)
8:00-10:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 2:45-5:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:30-4:30
Red Sparrow (R) 1:10-4:15
The Shape of Water (R) 1:504:40-7:40-10:20
Tomb Raider (PG-13) 2:205:10-8:00
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:502:10-4:50-6:15-7:30-10:10
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) 3:30-9:00
Death Wish (R) 1:15-3:45
Midnight Sun (PG-13) 7:00-9:30
Gringo (R) 10:40
Love, Simon (PG-13) 12:40-3:105:40-8:15-10:45
I Can Only Imagine (PG) 7:0010:00
7 Days In Entebbe (PG-13)
1:40-4:20
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) 8:10
Tomb Raider 3D (PG-13) 10:50
Pacific Rim: Uprising An IMAX
3D Experience (PG-13) 7:00
Unsane (R) 7:00-9:30
Tomb Raider: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 1:00-3:50
Pacific Rim: Uprising The IMAX
2D Experience (PG-13) 9:45
Regal Potomac Yard Stadium 16
3575 Potomac Avenue
National Theatre Live: Julius
Caesar 7:30
Regal Springfield Town Ctr 12
6500 Springfield Town Ctr
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
12:30-2:50-5:20-7:50-10:15
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
7:00-7:40
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:4012:10-3:00-3:40-6:10-6:50-9:3010:10
Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D (PG-13)
10:00
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 12:50-4:10-7:3010:40
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:50-4:30
Red Sparrow (R) 11:50-3:20
Tomb Raider (PG-13) 11:00-1:102:00-5:00-7:20-8:00-10:50
Game Night (R) 2:05-4:40
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:001:20-3:10-6:00-7:00-9:00
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney
Digital 3D (PG) 4:00-9:50
Death Wish (R) 11:30AM
Gringo (R) 10:30
Love, Simon (PG-13) 11:1012:20-3:30-6:40-9:40
Tomb Raider 3D (PG-13)
4:20-10:20
I Can Only Imagine (PG) 7:0010:10
Regal Virginia Gateway
Stadium 14 & RPX
8001 Gateway Promenade Pl
The Strangers: Prey at Night (R)
1:40-3:50-8:15-10:50
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13) 10:45
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:00-1:304:00-4:30-7:00-7:30-10:00-10:30
Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D (PG-13)
8:00
The Greatest Showman (PG)
1:25-3:55
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 1:45-4:35
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:05-3:40
Red Sparrow (R) 2:00-5:00-6:00
Game Night (R) 8:10-10:40
Tomb Raider (PG-13) 2:15-5:15
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:10-2:103:45-4:45-6:45-7:45-9:20
Death Wish (R) 1:20-4:05-10:10
A Wrinkle in Time in Disney Digital
3D (PG) 10:20
Midnight Sun (PG-13) 7:00
Gringo (R) 10:05
I Can Only Imagine (PG) 2:05-4:407:20-9:55
Love, Simon (PG-13) 1:50-4:257:10-9:50
The Hurricane Heist (PG-13) 9:15
Unsane (R) 7:00
Tomb Raider (PG-13) 1:15-4:15-7:15
Tomb Raider 3D (PG-13) 10:15
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13) 7:00
Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D (PG-13)
9:45
Smithsonian - Airbus
IMAX Theater
14390 Air and Space Museum Pkwy
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
11:10-2:20
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 12:35
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
Seas 3D (NR) 10:20-1:30-3:10
Dream Big: Engineering Our
World: An IMAX 3D Experience
Please Call
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 12:00
Pacific Rim: Uprising An IMAX
3D Experience (PG-13) 7:00
Tomb Raider: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 4:20
Pacific Rim: Uprising The IMAX
2D Experience (PG-13) 9:20
University Mall Theatre
10659 Braddock Road
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 7:00-10:05
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 12:00-2:30-4:507:30-9:55
Coco (PG) CC: 12:15-4:45
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 12:052:20-4:35
The Post (PG-13) CC: 2:257:15-9:35
NF407 6x.5
C6
EZ
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
PICKLES
. THURSDAY,
MARCH 22 , 2018
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
BOTH SIDES VULNERABLE
NORTH
832
AQ7532
AQ5
9
EAST
4
K J 10 8
10 8 6 3
A Q 10 5
WEST
765
94
J972
KJ64
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH (D)
A K Q J 10 9
6
K4
8732
The bidding:
SOUTH
WEST
NORTH
1
Pass
2
2
Pass
3
4
Pass
6
Opening lead — 7
EAST
Pass
Pass
All Pass
CLASSIC PEANUTS
CHARLES SCHULZ
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
“I
have no doubt,” Unlucky
Louie told me, “that
they’ll strike oil when they’re
digging my grave.”
Louie attributes his bad
results to bad luck, despite
all the evidence to the contrary. When he was declarer
at today’s six spades, West
led a trump. Louie won and
led a club at the second
trick. When West won and
led another trump, Louie
had only 11 tricks. He tried a
heart finesse with dummy’s
queen, but when East produced the king, the result
was down one.
“Without that trump lead,”
Louie grumbled, “I could
have ruffed two clubs in
dummy.”
Louie could make the slam
by setting up a long suit (my
topic this week). After he
wins the second trump, he
leads a heart to dummy’s
ace, ruffs a heart, ruffs a
club and ruffs a heart.
When West discards,
Louie draws the missing
trump, overtakes his king of
diamonds with the ace and
ruffs a heart. He gets back
to dummy with the queen of
diamonds to discard his last
two clubs on the good hearts
at Tricks 12 and 13.
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
LIO
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
4 K J 10 8
10 8 6 3 A Q 10 5
The dealer, at your left,
opens one spade, and two
passes follow. What do you
say?
ANSWER: If right-hand
opponent had opened one
spade, some players would
double. Others would want
more in high cards. In the
“balancing” position, though,
to double is clear. You may
have a game, and you
mustn’t let the opponents
buy the deal cheaply when
your partner surely has some
points. “Balancing” actions
may be shaded.
BLONDIE
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2018, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
THURSDAY, MARCH 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
MUTTS
EZ
PATRICK McDONNELL
C7
RE
ZITS
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
BIRTHDAY | MARCH 22
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
This year you are
full of energy, and
experience your life in
a new light. You will
focus on your communication
with friends and loved ones. If
you are single, the person you
choose to relate to now might
not be so appealing in a year.
Stay open to others, and try
not to commit for a while. If
you are attached, the two of
you seem to enjoy each other
even more. You will see a
change in how the two of you
relate. Gemini often pops in
and out of your life.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
You could be more in tune
with what is going on than
you realize. Return calls,
schedule meetings and push
forward any matters involving
communication. Later in the
day, misunderstandings might
dominate.
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
You can be possessive. If you
find this tendency emerging,
try to figure out what triggers
it. Going within yourself
usually works, as you can root
out the cause. Be careful,
as misunderstandings run
rampant.
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
Speak your mind. Your words
will help clear up a problem.
Your ruling planet, Mercury,
goes retrograde today. Expect
some misunderstandings.
WEINGARTENS & CLARK A blast from the past easily
could appear.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
You might feel tense with
all the activity around you.
Be more direct in how you
discuss a problem, but don’t
hit anyone below the belt. A
change within your community
or at work could cause some
stress.
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
You are flying high. Matters
involving long-term goals will
be tossed into the limelight.
You might want to reflect
on what you have taken for
granted. You have changed,
so your desires could have
changed as well.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
You are in the limelight,
and others appreciate your
efforts. However, finding a
point of agreement could be
challenging. You might find
the process long and tedious.
Push this matter aside for a
while, as your ruling planet,
Mercury, goes backward.
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
The more reflective you are,
the more likely you will be
to find out why others are
being secretive. Say little,
and listen a lot. Check out all
the information that is being
shared before taking action;
otherwise, a problem could
occur.
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
Keep your day and plans
intact. Don’t be surprised if
you need to make a lastminute adjustment. Be as
clear with a loved one as
possible, especially when
discussing your relationship.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
You are full of energy, but
try not to direct it toward
a grumpy associate or
roommate. You inadvertently
might set off a quarrel, which
won’t be easy to resolve. Be
smart and distance yourself.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
You might not have the
answers you seek, but you
do have information. Take
time to make some calls
for yourself, even if just to
schedule a routine checkup.
You might be concerned about
a health-related issue.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
You hear good news that you
might want to share. Know
that you are heading in the
right direction. Both attached
and single Aquarians could
find relating to loved ones
stressful in the next few weeks.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
Your sense of direction
will help push a project
forward. Listen carefully to
what those you are working
with have to say. Remain
open to the possibility of
change. Refuse to stand on
ceremony if you experience a
misunderstanding.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2018, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
C8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
MARCH 22 , 2018
kidspost
CHIP SAYS
TODAY
KIDSPOST.COM
When the NCAA men’s basketball championship was
first awarded in 1939, only eight teams competed in
the tournament. It wasn’t until 2011 that the current
field of 68 schools was established.
The snow was fun — for most of us,
anyway — but now it’s back to chilly
temperatures and blustery winds.
See more photos of the
Washington area blanketed
in white during this wintry
first week of spring.
ILLUSTRATION BY MILES ELY, 7, ARLINGTON
Retrievers proved they can be great underdogs
It’s the same in all college sports. I
know about this in part because my
son, Liam, is the associate head
baseball coach at UMBC. The
school’s facilities and recruiting
budget are more modest than at big
colleges.
But lots of things in sports and
life are not fair. Still, it doesn’t help
to complain that the sides aren’t
even or that the other team has all
the advantages.
Instead, work hard to improve so
that you are ready when your chance
comes. That’s what’s great about the
NCAA tournament. The mid-major
teams get a chance — not a big
chance, but still a chance — to play
against the major-conference teams,
typically on a neutral court.
The important lesson that kids
should learn from the UMBCVirginia game is to be ready. The ball
went up and . . . Wow! The kids from
UMBC were ready. They outplayed
Virginia from start to finish.
Of course, the underdog does not
always triumph: UMBC lost in the
next round and is out of the
tournament.
But if you work hard and are
ready when your moment arrives,
it’s possible to do something
unbelievable.
Sometimes sports
reminds us of the
possibilities in life.
FRED BOWEN
The University of
Maryland Baltimore
County (UMBC) shocked the
basketball world last week by
beating the University of Virginia in
the first round of the NCAA men’s
tournament. UMBC won even
though the team was a 16th seed,
meaning it was considered one of
the weakest teams, while Virginia
was not just a Number 1 seed in its
bracket but also the top-rated team
in the nation.
Before the big upset, a bottomseeded team had played a Number 1
seed 135 times and had never won a
game.
UMBC didn’t just beat Virginia:
The Retrievers crushed the Cavaliers
by 20 points, 74-54. Talk about a
surprise.
College basketball is not really
fair. Teams in the major conferences
— the Atlantic Coast Conference
(ACC), Big East, Big Ten, Big 12,
Pacific-12 and Southeastern
Conference — have huge advantages
over what some call the mid-major
teams such as UMBC. The big
schools have better sports facilities,
they travel across the country to
look for new players, and their
games are shown on television more
often. (Virginia is in the ACC.)
These advantages allow the
major-conference teams to recruit
better players. Better players usually
mean better teams.
It’s as though you were picking
teams for some playground
basketball games. There were 20
kids, and two teams — the major
teams — got to pick the first 10
players. The other two teams — the
mid-major teams — got the kids who
were left over. Who do you think
would win when a major team plays
a mid-major team?
The Score
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
ACROSS
1 Fall face first
while skiing, say
6 Mighty silly
11 Part of ROM:
abbr.
14 Longest-serving
prime minister
of India
15 Austrian
actress Berger
16 Kanye West’s
“I __ God”
17 Soda fountain
come-on?
19 Monarch
catcher
20 Brooklyn
Dodgers legend
Campanella
21 In questionable
taste
22 All excited
24 Radiant glow
25 Italian
cheese
26 Earthquake
coverage?
31 Aids in illegal
activity
32 Roberts of
“That ’70s Show”
33 Comic Martha
34 One-named
singer with
15 Grammys
36 Neeson of
“Love Actually”
40 Continue
gabbing
42 Ship’s seepage
43 List in a quiz
program recap?
47 Latin ballroom
dances
48 Berlin octet
49 One of a
Dumas trio
50 Civil rights
leader Chavez
52 __-tip steak
55 Barnyard sound
56 Lower hulls
fortified?
59 Directional
suffix
60 Missouri tribe
61 Not-giving-up
phrase
62 Completed
63 Fishing boot
64 Taboos, and a
hint to the four
longest puzzle
answers
kidspost@washpost.com
Bowen writes the sports opinion column
for KidsPost. He is the author of 23 kids
sports books, including seven about
basketball.
Max Curran and the rest of the
UMBC Retrievers seemed
outmatched by Jack Salt and the
other Cavaliers of the University of
Virginia. But when the two teams
met on March 16, the underdogs
took the upper hand.
TOD AY ’ S NE WS
SAUL LOEB/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Kids celebrate a day off school
Wednesday with a slide down the
hill next to the Capitol.
Schools chief would
ban snow rituals
Mother Nature saw your snow
dances, ice cubes in the toilet and
pajamas turned inside out, and
responded with Washington’s first
major snowstorm of the year on
Wednesday.
But one New Jersey county was less
excited about the snowfall and
jokingly banned all rituals to bring
heavy winter weather.
“This is an order from your
Superintendent! No Inside/
OutBackward PJ’s, Spoons Under
Pillows, Snow Dances, White Crayons
in the Freezer, Ice Cubes on the Porch
or in the Toilet, or Running Around
the Dining Table 5 Times tonite!”
tweeted Robert McGarry,
superintendent of Holmdel Township
Public Schools.
The “order” was backed up by a
government agency in a nearby New
Jersey county, which quickly reversed
its position after facing tough criticism
— from one official’s own child.
“[Ocean County Prosecutor’s
Office] forced to cancel ban of grade
school snow making shenanigans
after huge backlash from teachers
and one very angry daughter,”
tweeted the office’s communications
director, Al Della Fave.
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
— Hau Chu
By Robert and Marlea Ellis
Jilted by groom, then guilted by guests
Adapted from a recent online discussion.
Dear Carolyn: My
daughter was
engaged to a
young man who
wanted a big
wedding. They
both saved to pay for it, but in
practice the burden of organizing
and paying deposits fell on my
daughter, with the expectation
that later they would either join
the finances or he would
reimburse her.
Well, two months before the
wedding he ran off with a
pregnant girlfriend. My daughter
is overwhelmed by the emotional
fallout and the financial
obligations. I volunteered to
notify the guests about the
cancellation.
Some guests, especially on our
side of the family, complained
about their own nonrefundable
plane tickets and demanded that
we reimburse them.
What is our obligation to these
people? We are not in dire
financial straits, but neither are
they, and I feel that all financial
support I can muster should be
going to my daughter.
Emotionally, I am appalled so
many relatives and friends saw it
fit to complain and demand more
from us with only perfunctory
words of support for my daughter
(“I am sorry about your
engagement, but can I have a few
hundred dollars to cover my plane
cancellation and my new dress?”).
I cannot see this situation as
anything other them showing
their true colors, and I don’t want
to have any relationship with
them anymore.
— Canceled
Carolyn
Hax
© 2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
18
23
24
25
DOWN
Career for
a sci. major
Flight-related
prefix
Unspecified
folks
Sportswriter
Berkow
Clucks of
disapproval
__ School: art
movement
featuring NYC
scenes
Top out
Very dark
Abbr. in
some Québec
addresses
Contributes
Oscar-nominated
“Flashdance”
song
Arise
San __, California
Asian dress
Contender
for the crown
Steve Rogers,
for Captain
America
Composer of the
opera “Alfred”
3/22/18
26 At a distance
27 Chicago-based
law org.
28 Illegal fwy.
maneuver
29 Court
worker
30 Co. that
merged with
Continental
34 Queen’s
subjects
35 “And how!”
37 Sort
38 Sit in a cellar,
maybe
39 Club __
41 Base
entertainment
42 Persian Gulf
monarchy
43 Persian Gulf
native
44 Release
45 Egyptian leader
for whom a lake
is named
46 Union foe
47 Gained control of
50 Dressed
51 Advantage
52 1982 sci-fi film
53 Defaulter’s risk
54 Time to beware
57 Spanish she-bear
58 Frat letter
WEDNESDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
Canceled: Wow. I can’t see it as
anything else either.
So, yeah, you don’t need me —
you’ve got this. You have seen
their true colors, and you are free
not to have any relationship with
them anymore.
If you’d like, you can give them
the runaway fiance’s number to
see about reimbursement.
Re: Canceled Wedding: My
sympathies to the bride. And
perhaps it should be suggested to
the complainers, since they have
those tickets, that they use them
and come to offer THEIR
sympathetic support to your
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
daughter, who has just had the
rug pulled out from under her.
— Anonymous
Anonymous: This would be
ingenious, except that it means
inviting people to visit who just
revealed themselves to be
butthats.
I guess if it would involve a
complete transformation of
perspective — “Huh! I was just
asking a horrifically jilted bride
for my money back, when in fact
my first impulse ought to have
been an ounce or two of
compassion” — then their
showing up to console the bride
might work.
Dear Carolyn: My best friend of
decades started yelling, “Dye your
hair! It’s embarrassing to be seen
with you!” the last time I saw her.
What makes her think my value
as a friend is whether I’m the
wrong color accessory? Haven’t
seen or spoken to her since.
— Harassed Over Gray Hair
Harassed Over Gray Hair: It
makes no sense to me whatsoever,
to the extent that I can’t find any
way to empathize with someone
who’d say that. There is some
satisfying symmetry, though, to
the (apparent) end of this
friendship: Now you’d both be
embarrassed to be seen with each
other.
I knew someone who started
commenting on everyone’s
weight; plenty of people grow
warmer and more compassionate
as they age, or more focused on
certain interests, or more
emotionally liberated, so it makes
sense, I guess, that others would
change in less likable ways.
Or maybe she’s just loopy.
Forgive or not as you see fit.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her column
delivered to your inbox each morning
at wapo.st/haxpost.
Join the discussion live at noon
Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com
KLMNO
O
KLMN
TER
2018 WIN
ALL -ME
T PLA YER
SPORTS
YEA R
S OF THE
THURSDAY, MARCH 22 , 2018
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
M2
D
WINTER ALL-MET
FOOTBALL
ON THE WEB
The season’s finest, including boys’ and
girls’ basketball players of the year. D7-10
Ex-NFL players in class-action concussion suit
have not been paid, lawyers contend. D3
Last night’s Wizards game ended late. For
coverage, visit us online at WASHINGTONPOST.COM.
For NHL
players,
it’s a matter
of degree
BY
I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN
T.J. Oshie left the University of
North Dakota after three years to
pursue his professional hockey
career, so he once tried to take an
online class and inch closer
toward finishing his degree. He
was promptly booted from the
course because of his checkered
past on campus.
“I don’t think I looked at the
emails, but apparently I still have
unpaid parking tickets, and I got
kicked out of the class,” Oshie
admitted sheepishly. “I must have
missed the email. I didn’t think
they were that serious, but they’re
serious.”
Thirty percent of NHL players
(283) went to college for at least
one season, and 71 percent of that
group played at least three seasons of college hockey before
turning pro. And while a professional hockey career tends to
translate into a more-than-comfortable living, many players who
left school early continue to work
toward their degrees years later.
Their
motivations
range
from preparing for a life after
hockey to fulfilling a promise
made to a parent or coach to just
wanting to finish what they started.
“I’ve got three boys,” said Columbus Blue Jackets forward
Thomas Vanek, who played two
seasons at the University of Minnesota. “It’s a good example for
them to set.”
But with an 82-game schedule
that has players regularly traveling across North America for
more than six months, not including the playoffs, finding the time
for college coursework can be
tricky.
The Boston Bruins recently
signed forward Ryan Donato,
who just finished his junior season at Harvard and was Team
USA’s top scorer at the Winter
Olympics. After he scored a goal
and recorded two assists in his
NHL debut Monday, he missed
CAPITALS CONTINUED ON D3
Capitals at Red Wings
Today, 7:30 p.m., NBCSN
Gonzalez
enters season
with plenty
to accomplish
BY
SCOTT MCINTYRE FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
PITINO MAKES HIS CASE
J ORGE C ASTILLO
west palm beach, fla. — Earlier this month, on one of those
Grapefruit League game days that
blend together after about a
week, Gio Gonzalez unpacked a
massive boombox at his locker. It
came with shoulder strap so, naturally, after linking it to his phone
via Bluetooth, the Washington
Nationals left-hander threw the
retro sound machine over his
shoulder and lugged it around.
He connected it to a microphone
and had Wilmer Difo perform
karaoke to reggaeton in the middle of the clubhouse at Ballpark of
the Palm Beaches. Teammates,
clubbies and General Manager
Mike Rizzo laughed and rolled
their eyes at the unusual sight and
thumping bass.
The show, about an hour before
first pitch, was evidence of a veteran comfortable in his surroundings. Gonzalez is a proud son of
Hialeah, Fla., but Washington has
become home. He arrived via
blockbuster trade in the prime of
his career at 26. Off the field, he
started a family and lives in the
area year-round. On the field, he
is one of just four remaining Nationals to play for each of the
club’s four playoff teams; he
tossed the first pitch by a National
in playoff history in 2012; and he
nearly won the Cy Young Award
that same season, which probably
NATIONALS CONTINUED ON D4
Murphy to miss Opening Day
Second baseman, still limited after
knee surgery, will remain in Fla. D4
Defiant and wounded, the ex-Louisville coach insists he did nothing wrong — and wants back in
BY
W ILL H OBSON IN
W
MIAMI
hen the NCAA basketball tournament
games tipped off last Thursday, Rick
Pitino was sitting in a lounge chair on
the patio of his palatial, waterfront
home on a tiny island dubbed the “billionaire bunker.” He had just finished a round of golf.
His son, owner of a margarita salt company, watched
the early games with him but left in the afternoon
because his children were in the school play, “Mary
Poppins.” Pitino’s wife went, too, leaving him alone at
home, where he watched the late games in bed.
“I went to the rehearsal,” Pitino said, in apparent
effort to head off any criticism of absentee grandfathering. “It was grandparents’ day.”
Pitino’s celebrated tenure at Louisville ended in
September amid accusations, in court documents
sworn to by an FBI agent and approved by federal
prosecutors, that he had knowledge of a $100,000
payment from Adidas to the father of a recruit. Since
then, the 65-year-old coaching legend has been leading a quiet, inconspicuous life of quasi-retirement.
He spends his days in the gym and on the golf
course. He has been doing more reading; concerned
friends have sent along self-help books. When he
wants solitude, Pitino takes his boat, The Floating
PITINO CONTINUED ON D6
Amid the hoops hoopla, Loyola Chicago is more than a good sport
BY
C HUCK C ULPEPPER
chicago — Yes, but what exactly
is this Loyola University Chicago?
Is it small? (Not really. It has
16,673 students.)
Is it urban-grimy? (No, it’s
urban-gorgeous, with a rectangular West Quad and, just in case
you didn’t fancy that quad, an
egg-shaped East Quad.)
Where is it? (It’s umpteen
stops up the “L” red line from
downtown, north enough that
you start to think about Northwestern even if you disembark
before reaching Northwestern
which, like many places, has one
fewer men’s basketball national
title than Loyola.)
Is it near Lake Michigan? (Yes,
it backs right up to that beast,
which snarled Tuesday, when
some wind gusts felt merely frigid, while others felt just plainly
rude, while others felt barbarously, sadistically, ruthlessly, inhumanely, vilely disgusting.)
Has it any recent sports glory?
(Yes, the men’s volleyball team
won back-to-back national titles
in 2014 and 2015.)
Why is the sudden presence of
this LUC in the Sweet 16 of the
LOYOLA CONTINUED ON D5
NCAA TOURNAMENT SWEET 16
Today’s games
11 Loyola vs. 7 Nevada, 7:07, CBS
7 Texas A&M vs. 3 Mich., 7:37, TBS
9 Kan. St. vs. 5 Kentucky, 9:37, CBS
9 Fla. St. vs. 4 Gonzaga, 10:07, TBS
Tomorrow’s games
5 Clemson vs. 1 Kansas, 7:07, CBS
5 W.Va. vs. 1 Villanova, 7:27, TBS
11 Syracuse vs. 2 Duke, 9:37, CBS
3 Texas Tech vs. 2 Purdue, 9:57, TBS
Higher power: For Texas A&M Coach Billy Kennedy, faith trumps all. D4
Blackistone: Revisiting 1963’s Loyola-Miss. St. Game of Change. D5
D2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
MARCH 22 , 2018
washingtonpost.com/sports
D.C. SPORTS BOG
BASEBALL
EARLY LEAD
Oshie uses
his head
for timely
celebration
BY
Williams
gets into
marijuana
business
S COTT A LLEN
T.J. Oshie is b-b-b-b-b-b-back.
After going 19 games without a
goal, the Washington Capitals forward scored for the fourth time in
his past four games during Tuesday’s 4-3 win over the Dallas Stars
and debuted a fantastic celebration. As Oshie skated to the bench
after his second-period tally, NBC
Sports Washington showed him
wobbling his head back and forth,
imitating the bobblehead of himself that was given to all fans at
Capital One Arena that night.
“I’ll have to blame Tom [Wilson] for that one,” Oshie told reporters when asked about his celebration after the game. “I think
me and him were the first two guys
in the locker room when we got
here to the game. He had mentioned something about it, so if
you see it, it’s kind of embarrassing
that you guys saw that. I was looking right at Tom when I did it.”
Oshie is the latest Capitals player to play well on his bobblehead
night. Last March, Braden Holtby
had 29 saves on 31 shots in a 4-2
win over the Calgary Flames. In
February 2015, Alex Ovechkin had
a goal and an assist in a 5-1 win
over the Winnipeg Jets. Back in
November 2013, Troy Brouwer
had an assist in a 6-2 win over the
New York Islanders. (Perhaps the
Caps should do more giveaways.)
Did Oshie feel any added pressure to score on his bobblehead
night?
“Not really,” Oshie said. “There’s
maybe a little extra pressure just
to go out there and work hard.
Other than that, this time of year is
the exciting time, so the bobblehead night just amplifies it just a
little.”
Thanks to his recent surge, Oshie is up to 16 goals on the season
after scoring 33 last year.
“I’m feeling better, definitely,”
Oshie said when Jason Rogers of
Japers’ Rink asked him whether
it’s fair to say he’s back. “. . . The
puck is starting to find the net a
little bit for me. I don’t know if
‘back’ is the right term, but I do
feel good, and I think a lot of guys
are feeling it right now.”
scott.allen@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/dcsportsbog
QUOTABLE
“If I care about
something I’m going to
commit to it 100
percent, so . . . you’ll get
the best I got this week.”
TONY ROMO,
former NFL quarterback and current
CBS broadcaster, who will play in a
PGA Tour event this week in the
Dominican Republic. (Via Early Lead)
BY
CHRIS O'MEARA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Orioles signed right-hander Alex Cobb for a reported $57 million, the biggest deal for a pitcher in franchise history.
O’s aren’t throwing in the towel
BY
D AVE S HEININ
The Baltimore Orioles were doing
spring training free agent deals long
before all the other kids thought it was
cool. The strategy of waiting out the
winter and seeing who was desperate in
February and March brought them the
likes of Nelson Cruz, Ubaldo Jimenez
and Yovani Gallardo the past few years
and Andrew Cashner and Chris Tillman
just last month.
But in this offseason’s strange and
meandering talent market, the Orioles
had lots of company in the hunt for
late-spring bargains, with former allstars Mike Moustakas and Lance Lynn
agreeing to one-year deals with the
Kansas City Royals and Minnesota
Twins, respectively, in the past two
weeks.
It is within this context, as the third
week of March continues and Opening
Day creeps ever closer, that the Orioles
reached agreement Tuesday night with
free agent right-hander Alex Cobb on a
four-year contract worth a reported
$57 million. The deal became official
Wednesday after Cobb passed a
physical.
But this one, for the Orioles, was no
bargain — and by all indications it was
Cobb who, by waiting out the market
until he was essentially the last top-shelf
pitcher remaining, scored big. While
other players, including Moustakas and
Lynn, had to settle for one-year deals or
even take pay cuts to find a team, Cobb
got more or less what he would have
expected in November.
The Orioles, meanwhile, dished out
Signing of right-hander Cobb
shows Baltimore isn’t tanking
despite challenges ahead
the largest free agent contract for a
pitcher in franchise history, surpassing
the ill-fated one they gave Jimenez four
years ago. Like that one, this deal has its
risks; Cobb had Tommy John surgery in
2015 that cost him all of that season and
almost all of the next one. He had a
strong bounce-back season in 2017,
going 12-10 with a 3.66 ERA for the
Tampa Bay Rays.
In the age of tanking, with as many as
10 teams taking the rebuilding route,
the Orioles — who, by virtue of playing
in the top-heavy AL East and coming off
a last-place finish, actually have more
incentive than most to undertake a
tank-job — should be applauded for still
trying. The Major League Baseball
Players Association is undoubtedly
thankful for them.
The Orioles had one glaring
weakness, starting pitching, and they
went out and fixed it this winter, oldschool style. They signed three starters
out of a depressed free agent market —
Cashner, Tillman and Cobb — a trio who,
along with Kevin Gausman and Dylan
Bundy, give them a rotation at least to
compete in their treacherous division.
(Cobb, however, has almost no chance of
being ready for the first week of the
season, given the late signing date.)
They aren’t the Boston Red Sox or
New York Yankees, and those teams —
the former a two-time defending
division champion, the latter coming
within one win of the World Series last
fall and both making major upgrades to
their lineups this winter — are still
capable of steamrolling the rest of the
division. But the Orioles, who made the
playoffs three times between 2012 and
2016, at least have the makings of a
competitive team again.
It may be a foolhardy mission, given
their environs, and there is still a good
argument to be made that the Orioles
should have started a major teardown
last July by trading closer Zach Britton
and third baseman (now shortstop)
Manny Machado, when a contender
could have had either of them (or both)
for two stretch runs.
No number of late-spring signings
will obscure the reality that this sets up
as a transitional year for the Orioles,
with Machado almost certainly heading
into a historic free agent market next
winter — when he and Bryce Harper will
be the biggest prizes — and with both
Manager Buck Showalter and General
Manager Dan Duquette unsigned
beyond this season.
But if that’s the case, the Cobb signing
can be looked at as a sort of bridge,
signaling the Orioles’ hopes of
contending one last time at the end of
the Machado era and staying
competitive well into whatever the next
era in Baltimore will be called.
dave.sheinin@washpost.com
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/
sports
Rusty Serena Williams
ousted in first round
Serena Williams lost in the
first round of the Miami Open on
Wednesday, still rusty in her
comeback from pregnancy and
unable to overcome a tough draw
against Naomi Osaka, who won,
6-3, 6-2, in Key Biscayne, Fla.
The 20-year-old Osaka, who
earned her first career title
Sunday at Indian Wells in
California, showed no signs of
letup and overpowered the
erratic Williams. Osaka had the
stronger serve and wore Williams
down in rallies, working her from
side to side.
The matchup worthy of a final
came about because both players
are unseeded. Osaka is ranked a
career-best 22nd, while Williams
is ranked 491st after a layoff of
more than a year.
Williams has endured a firstround defeat only four other
times, most recently at the 2012
French Open. . . .
Jack Sock, Sam Querrey,
John Isner, Ryan Harrison and
Steve Johnson were picked for
the U.S. Davis Cup team that will
face Belgium in the quarterfinals
next month in Nashville.
Ricky Williams, whose NFL career was marked by marijuana use
and advocacy — leading to occasional public ridicule — knows
that times have changed with regard to weed’s public perception,
and he is now moving into the
marijuana business himself.
But he is no ordinary pot purveyor. Forget the “Harold and Kumar” images you may have of the
running back, who failed four
drug tests during his career. Williams, like many former NFL players, has long claimed familiarity
with the medicinal benefits of cannabis and cannabinoids. It’s just
that everyone else is catching on
now, with even some NFL leaders
signaling that they’re open to researching whether to change
medical marijuana’s banned status.
Now the former running back is
launching his own brand, Real
Wellness by Ricky Williams, featuring salves, vape cartridges and
tonics that contain “either hempderived cannabidiol [CBD], tetrahydrocannabinol [THC] or both.”
Williams, 40, always was ahead
of many of his colleagues in exploring alternative methods for
healing and treating pain. And
now, as the Cannabist points out,
broader attitudes are changing
about pot, with a recent Quinnipiac poll showing that 91 percent of
voters favor legalization of medicinal marijuana.
The journey for Williams included teaching meditation after
his NFL career; he also took a 2004
football sabbatical during which
he studied Pranic healing in California. Perhaps it would have been
surprising if Williams had not
gone into the marijuana business.
“I’m a healer now,” the 1998
Heisman Trophy winner told the
Cannabist. “I’m excited for that
world to converge with cannabis.”
Real Wellness, which is launching in California, has products
designed for daily use and includes herbal extracts.
“I am known as a professional
football player,” Williams told
South Florida’s Sun Sentinel. “In
the last 14 years, I have been educating myself and training as a
health care practitioner.”
Williams’s products are being
developed with OutCo, a Southern
California medical marijuana dispensary and consulting firm, and
will be sold in dispensaries in California, where Williams lives and
where marijuana is decriminalized. Prices for the products, according to the Sun Sentinel, range
from $35 to $70.
“Surprisingly enough, our research found that the main demographic coming into the [cannabis] market are women ages 35 to
60,” Williams told the Sun Sentinel. “Cannabis coming on the
scene is a reemerging of herbalism
back into our culture.”
cindy.boren@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
TELEVISION AND RADIO
NHL
DIG ES T
TENNIS
C INDY B OREN
GOLF
Rory McIlroy played a
flawless back nine in the World
Golf Championships Match Play
in Austin, running off five
straight birdies. It wasn’t enough.
Former U.S. Amateur champion
Peter Uihlein built a 5-up lead
against McIlroy and held off his
late charge with enough key shots
of his own in a 2-and-1 victory.
In another surprise, defending
champion Dustin Johnson hit
two shots out of bounds on the
same hole and another tee shot in
the hazard and couldn’t make the
putts that he couldn’t afford to
miss on the back nine. He lost on
the 17th hole to Bernd
Wiesberger.
COLLEGES
Louisville parted ways with
interim men’s basketball coach
David Padgett less than 24 hours
after the Cardinals’ season ended.
The former Louisville player,
brought in to bring calm amid
turmoil after the school placed
coach Rick Pitino on unpaid
administrative leave following its
acknowledgment that it was
being investigated in a federal
corruption probe, went 22-14. . . .
Arizona big man Deandre
Ayton is leaving for the NBA after
one dominating season.
The 7-foot-1, 260-pound Ayton
was named the Pacific-12 player
of the year in 2017-18 after
averaging 20.1 points and
11.6 rebounds. . . .
North Carolina State Coach
Kevin Keatts said sophomore
Omer Yurtseven intends to
pursue a professional career or
transfer. Keatts said in a
statement that the Turkish 7footer notified him of his plans
and that the program would
grant Yurtseven’s release. . . .
Cincinnati fired women’s
basketball coach Jamelle Elliott
after a season in which the
Bearcats went 19-13 — their best
record in 15 years. They were 113162 in nine seasons under the
H.D. Woodson High graduate. . . .
Paige Petty had five goals and
two assists and Tristan
McGinley also scored five times
as the No. 16 Virginia Tech
women’s lacrosse team routed
VCU, 22-7, at the indoor practice
facility in Blacksburg, Va.
PRO BASKETBALL
Hall of Famer Nancy
Lieberman will coach a team in
the BIG3 this season. Lieberman,
a former basketball star who has
coached in the NBA, WNBA and
NBA Development League, will
lead the Power team.
PRO FOOTBALL
The Denver Broncos are
staying in the Bowlen family after
the team announced an
agreement to buy back a portion
of John Bowlen’s minority stake
in the franchise. The brother of
majority owner Pat Bowlen
announced his intention late last
year to sell his nonvoting interest
in the team, believed to be about
33 percent.
SOCCER
Manchester United has
applied to set up a professional
women’s team for the first time. If
the English Football Association
accepts the request, United
would enter it in the second tier
of the Women’s Super League.
Ed Woodward, United’s
executive vice-chairman, said the
women’s team must be built in
the image and with the same
principles as the storied Premier
League team.
7:30 p.m.
10 p.m.
NBA
7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Orlando » NBA TV
MLB SPRING TRAINING
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
4 p.m.
Baltimore vs. Boston » MASN
New York Yankees vs. Minnesota » ESPN2
Kansas City vs. Milwaukee » MLB Network
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7:25 p.m.
9:30 p.m.
9:30 p.m.
9:55 p.m.
NCAA Division II, semifinal: West Texas A&M vs. Ferris State »
CBS Sports Network
NCAA, round of 16: Loyola Chicago vs. Nevada » WUSA (Ch. 9), WJZ (Ch. 13),
WTEM (980 AM)
NCAA, round of 16: Texas A&M vs. Michigan » TBS, WTEM (980 AM)
NCAA Division II, semifinal: Northern State (S.D.) vs. Queens (N.C.) »
CBS Sports Network
NCAA, round of 16: Kansas State vs. Kentucky » WUSA (Ch. 9), WJZ (Ch. 13),
WTEM (980 AM)
NCAA, round of 16: Florida State vs. Gonzaga » TBS, WTEM (980 AM)
GOLF
10:30 a.m.
2 p.m.
PGA Tour: Corales Puntacana Resort & Club Championship, first round »
Golf Channel
PGA Tour: WGC Match Play, Day 2 » Golf Channel
TENNIS
11 a.m.
Miami Open: ATP, first round; WTA, second round » Tennis Channel
BOXING
9 p.m.
FIGURE SKATING
Home favorite Carolina
Kostner skated a perfectly
executed and evocative program
to take a surprise lead over
Olympic champion Alina
Zagitova of Russia in the short
program at the world
championships in Assago, Italy.
Washington at Detroit » NBC Sports Network, WJFK (106.7 FM)
Vegas at San Jose » NBC Sports Network
Ryan Garcia vs. Fernando Vargas (junior lightweights) » ESPN
OBITUARY
Leo Brown, Ohio State’s first
black football captain, died at 84.
Ohio State confirmed the
death through Brown’s nephew,
Henry Brown, saying the former
player died last weekend at his
home in Lakewood, Colo.
Brown was a two-way end for
the Buckeyes, captaining coach
Woody Hayes’s 1957 national
championship team.
— From news services
and staff reports
THURSDAY, MARCH 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
M2
Lawyers say NFL is not paying claims
Filings contend league
has impeded process
for ailing former players
BY
PATRICK SMITH/GETTY IMAGES
T.J. Oshie’s first effort to finish college was foiled by unpaid parking tickets, but he might try again.
NHL players go after degrees
CAPITALS FROM D1
practice the next day to attend
class.
Vancouver Canucks star rookie
Brock Boeser played two seasons
at North Dakota, and though he
just left the campus last year, he
already knows he will be finishing
his degree and probably will be
taking classes again next year.
“My mom will get me on that
soon,” he said.
Some players, such as former
Capitals defenseman Taylor
Chorney, are able to take advantage of online classes. Chorney
left North Dakota needing two
semesters worth of coursework to
finish his degree, and he has
taken one online class a semester
for the past three years. He typically will email the professor at
the start of the semester, explaining his profession and the hectic
schedule that accompanies it to
gain a little flexibility on due
dates.
“We have so much free time,”
said Chorney, now with the Columbus Blue Jackets. “I rarely do
any homework or anything when
I’m at home. It’s always on road
trips. You know, you have the nice
desk in your hotel room. You
bring your computer and lock it
down for a couple hours. You’ve
got to make a few sacrifices. I’m
kind of a procrastinator, so especially with homework, if I’ve got
something due, sometimes you go
on the road trip and the guys are
going to dinner, but I’ve got to say
no and order room service and
hunker down. . . .
“I’m in a position where I’m
fortunate to be playing in the
NHL, and you get to lead a pretty
good life. But at the same time,
eventually I’m going to have to get
a real job. Not everybody’s in that
position — some guys make
enough money where you can
just kind of retire and are good to
go — but I’ll have to find something that I want to do after I’m
C A P I TA L S ’ N EX T TH R EE
at Detroit Red Wings
Today
7:30 NBCSN
at Montreal Canadiens
Saturday
7 NBCSW,
NHL Network
at New York Rangers
Monday
7:30 NBCSN
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM)
done playing hockey. The first
step is going to get some sort of
degree.”
Vanek has taken online classes
during past seasons, but the 34year-old said that, because he
lives near the University of Minnesota during the summer, he
plans to just wait until his playing
career is over and then be the “old
man back on campus.”
Active players who recently
finished their degrees include the
Los Angeles Kings’ Alec Martinez,
the St. Louis Blues’ Colton
Parayko, the Boston Bruins’ David Backes and Torey Krug, the
Detroit Red Wings’ Justin Abdelkader and the New York Rangers’ Chris Kreider.
Like Vanek, Winnipeg Jets forward Andrew Copp has the benefit of living near his old college
campus during the offseason.
Copp went to Michigan for two
years, and the Ann Arbor native
said he isn’t a fan of online classes
because he doesn’t feel as mentally engaged as when he’s sitting in
a classroom.
“It’s funny that this interview is
happening because I kind of had
a little bit of a meltdown yesterday,” Copp said last month. “Not
like an actual meltdown but kind
of about rounding out myself as a
person. . . . It’s really important to
me, and I feel like education
really does that for you. Hockey
doesn’t last forever.”
Capitals defenseman Brooks
Orpik used to have the convenience of living close to Boston
College, taking night classes there
for three summers. But then he
moved to Massachusetts’s South
Shore, and considering rush hour
traffic, it would be inconvenient
for him to get to campus for a
night class during the summer.
With just a handful of elective
classes left for him to take, his
online options are limited, so he
and longtime Boston College
men’s hockey Coach Jerry York
have a sort of agreement that
when Orpik’s NHL career is over,
he will serve as a graduate assistant with the Eagles. He would be
able to finish his degree while
also getting some coaching experience.
“I remember when I left,
[York] wasn’t pushing me out
the door, but he told me, ‘We’ll
be happy either way, and we’d
love to have you back. But for
hockey development-wise, it’s
probably better off that you turn
pro,’ ” Orpik said. “At the same
time, though, he said, ‘If you do
make that decision, you’ve just
got to promise me you’ll finish
your degree.’ Every summer
when I see him, he brings it up.
He’s not going to forget anytime
soon.”
A bachelor’s degree is required
to coach college hockey, another
reason graduating is important to
Orpik.
Oshie signed an eight-year,
$46 million contract with Washington last season, so he’s in no
rush to try to take another class
after the old unpaid parking tickets foiled his first attempt. But it’s
something he has considered because he, too, hopes to coach
when his playing days are over.
“If I don’t go to that college
level, then we’ll see,” Oshie said.
“Right now, with two young kids
and a career, it’s kind of hard to
jam it in.”
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
R ICK M AESE
Former NFL players who have
made medical claims under the
settlement agreement of their
class-action concussion lawsuit
are not being paid because the
league is muddling the claims
process, lawyers representing
the players have asserted in multiple court filings.
The latest 21-page filing, submitted Tuesday by a class counsel, says the agreement “is failing
to provide a fraction of what the
NFL promised” and the league
“will argue virtually anything to
evade payments.”
While the players argue the
NFL is trying to manipulate the
settlement process, the league
insists it lacks such influence
and that the claims are administered by an independent thirdparty firm appointed by the
court.
“The NFL seeks to rig the
Settlement system. This is part of
the League’s DNA,” said the filing, written by Gene Locks, a
Philadelphia-based attorney who
represents 1,100 players in the
case and has asked the court to
grant him more authority for the
entire class. “Historically, it has
always engaged in scorchedearth litigation, and that is what
the League is doing here, making
it a Settlement in name only.”
The NFL vehemently denied
the claims.
“The notion the NFL is throwing sand in the gears and trying
to block and obstruct, nothing
can be further from the truth,”
said a league official familiar
with the case but not authorized
to discuss it publicly.
BrownGreer, a Richmondbased firm that previously oversaw high-profile cases such as
Vioxx and the BP oil spill, is in
charge of reviewing claims and
administering the settlement,
which became final Jan. 7, 2017,
and was projected to cost the
league as much as $1 billion. The
company’s founding partner, Orran Brown, said the NFL doesn’t
have any role in that process and
pointed to several nuanced reasons for the delays many former
players experienced.
Still, many former players,
whose claims have lingered for
several months, point a finger
directly at the NFL and say the
ex-players need more help to
fight for their claims.
Dementia claims represent by
far the largest segment under the
settlement, and they have gone
virtually
unpaid.
Out
of
1,712 claims made in the first year
of the settlement, 1,113 cite a
diagnosis of neurocognitive impairment. And of those, just six
have received a check — for a
total payout of $4.85 million.
These numbers, which come
from the settlement’s latest report issued Monday, fall well
short of the NFL’s own projections, which were filed with the
court in 2014. At the time, the
league’s analysis anticipated paying out 430 dementia claims in
Year 1 of the settlement for a total
of $72.3 million.
Despite a slow start to the
claims process, in all, 183 explayers have received money under the settlement — a total of
$150 million. The NFL’s first-year
projections anticipated awarding 665 claims for a total of
$243 million. According to the
most recent settlement report,
JULIO CORTEZ/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Former NFL player Mark Gastineau, shown in 2012, has criticized
the league’s handling of former players who have health problems.
another 143 claims have been
approved but not yet paid out —
$198 million — though some are
still subject to appeal.
“We are exceeding expectations in every respect except for
one, and that’s dementia,” said
Christopher Seeger, the co-lead
class counsel. “The only reason
we’re not — and we’re starting to
catch up — is because the courtappointed claims administrator
had identified hundreds of suspicious claims. I think we have now
worked through a lot of that, and
we’re back on track.”
According to the most recent
report, some of the claims that
have been awarded thus far fall
closely in line with the NFL’s
initial projections, including
those related to death by chronic
traumatic
encephalopathy
(CTE), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Parkinson’s disease — a total of 95 claims that
have been awarded. But the three
largest categories all significantly trail the league’s projections.
In addition to the dementia numbers, 55 Alzheimer’s claims have
been paid ($24.4 million), compared with a projection of 153
($70.7 million).
“To me, it’s pretty obvious that
it’s a numbers game,” said Liz
Nicholson, an advocate for wives
and family members of ex-players and whose husband, Gerry
Sullivan, played eight seasons
with the Cleveland Browns.
“They’re saying, ‘Okay, we’ve got
to pay out the ALS cases. We’ve
got to pay Parkinson’s. But where
we can really fudge things are the
dementia cases’ — which is the
bulk of the claims.”
Scrutiny of claims
Under terms of the settlement,
the NFL has no say in approving
or denying claims, but it does
have the ability to appeal. The
latest settlement report counts
35 cases in which BrownGreer
has approved a financial award
but the NFL then appealed. Most
of those are still being processed,
but 10 have been upheld and two
overturned.
“Ninety-four percent of the
claims rewards have not been
challenged on appeal,” the league
official said. “In the overwhelming bulk of the awards made so
far, the NFL has not filed an
appeal. I just don’t think the
statistics lie, and there’s certainly
been an emphasis on the few
disappointed players and their
representatives to try to suggest
something — mainly that the
league is obstructing the settlement process — when the actual
facts are completely the opposite.”
Brown said the dementia
claims have been particularly
troublesome. Around 75 percent,
he said, were lacking required
documentation and records, apparently over some confusion of
the requirements. Brown said
the settlement administrators
weren’t able to explicitly spell
out the requisites until Dec. 8,
nearly 10 months after it began
accepting claims.
“We do it as fast as we can. We
do it as transparently as we can.
We get all the input we can. But
taking from March until December is actually pretty fast,” Brown
said. “. . . Nothing is fast enough
when you’re injured or you have
an injured family member and
you want a result. It’s never fast
enough. We understand that. We
get that. That’s why we push.”
Even as the NFL and BrownGreer say the league has limited
say in the process, Locks said in
Tuesday’s filing the league has
implemented a schedule “to create a labyrinth of changing standards of review, secret procedures, audits, appeals and innumerable technical readings of
the Agreement to delay and defeat claims and payments.”
League spokesman Brian McCarthy said in a statement Tuesday that the “process of review
and payment is becoming more
streamlined and claims will be
processed even more efficiently
going forward.”
“We are ensuring that legitimate claims are processed and
paid in a timely way to those
individuals and families who deserve these benefits,” McCarthy
said. “We believe that it is entirely appropriate to continue to
oppose fraudulent and unsupported claims. No legitimate
claim has been rejected.”
While nearly 600 of the pending claims have been kicked back
to players requesting additional
information, court filings suggest that nearly half the claims
have been referred to audit, redflagged and forwarded for indefinite further review. Locks called
it a “black hole.” Many attorneys
in the case feel the audit is being
used systemically to delay, deny
or complicate claims.
The principals in the case say
the vetting is rigorous for good
reason, and the dementia claims
have been particularly suspect.
According to Brown, 60 percent
— 670 — of the dementia claims
have been red-flagged and sent
into the audit process. By comparison, 17 percent of the claims
from the settlement’s other four
diagnoses have been in audit.
Seeger, who is also the subject
of ire from many players frustrated with the process, said that
while he has not noticed the NFL
involved with anything untoward, the league’s motivations are
clear.
“When the settlement became
uncapped, effectively what’s happened is the NFL has interpreted
that as now they’re going to
litigate each and every potential
claim in the settlement,” he said.
rick.maese@washpost.com
NHL ROUNDUP
Crosby notches 700th assist in victory
PENGUINS 5,
CANADIENS 3
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Sidney Crosby ignited a rally
with a highlight-reel goal and became the third active player with
700 career assists in the Pittsburgh Penguins’ 5-3 victory over
the visiting Montreal Canadiens
on Wednesday night.
Crosby picked up his 24th goal
of the season when he knocked a
pass from Jake Guentzel out of the
air, deflected it toward the front of
his stick and smacked it by Carey
Price to tie it at 3 late in the second
period.
Derick Brassard put the Penguins in front to stay, beating Price
early in the third period as Pittsburgh avoided dropping both
games of a back-to-back against
also-rans Montreal and the New
York Islanders.
Guentzel had a goal and two
assists. His 21st goal of the season
came off an assist from Crosby, the
700th of Crosby’s career.
Evgeni Malkin and Patric Hornqvist also scored for the Penguins,
who drew within two points of the
first-place Washington Capitals in
the Metropolitan Division.
BLUES
2, BRUINS 1 (OT):
Jaden Schwartz scored his second
goal of the game 30 seconds into
overtime to lift host St. Louis.
Schwartz skated up the middle
and fired a shot past Anton Khudobin. The Blues won for the fifth
time in six games to move within a
point of the final Western Conference wild-card spot.
Boston clinched a playoff spot
and moved within four points of
the Tampa Bay Lightning for the
Eastern Conference lead.
The Bruins’ Ryan Donato, who
played for the U.S. Olympic team
last month, scored his second goal
in his second NHL game.
COYOTES
4, SABRES 1:
Clayton Keller had two assists to
set the Arizona franchise record
for points by a rookie in a matchup
of the NHL’s two worst teams in
Buffalo. Keller has 55 points, one
more than Peter Mueller had in
2007-08.
Coyotes rookie Dylan Strome
scored in his first game after being
called up from the minors.
GMs seek challenge change
With the goal of refining the
consistency of goalie interference
challenges, NHL general managers
recommended shifting the decision from on-ice officials to the
league’s situation room in Toronto.
The change could go into effect
as soon as the playoffs, which begin
April 11, if approved by the board of
governors and the NHL/NHL Players’ Association competition committee. The recommendation came
out of the annual GMs meeting in
Boca Raton, Fla., this week.
HURRICANES: Carolina announced that defenseman Brett
Pesce and forward Victor Rask
will miss the rest of the season
with shoulder injuries.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
N AT IO N A L S N O T ES
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/nationals
Still limited, Murphy
won’t play in opener
Daniel Murphy won’t be in the
Washington Nationals’ Opening
Day lineup. He acknowledged
that Wednesday, when someone
pointed out that it would be hard
to see him advance from running
only on a treadmill to playing in
games in the eight days before the
regular season begins March 29.
“I think it’s reasonable to
expect I won’t be in the Opening
Day lineup,” Murphy said with a
hint of sarcasm that implied he,
like his team, had known that for
quite some time.
Murphy is mostly fielding
groundballs hit right at him, plus
a few that require minor lateral
movement. He is hitting on the
field but hasn’t seen live pitching
since October. And when he hits,
he can’t put his weight in his legs
as he usually does, still easing into
the lower-body part of his efforts.
Without the ability to practice his
whole swing, Murphy has had to
focus more on contact — seeing
the ball, then centering it on the
bat.
On Oct. 20, Murphy had
microfracture surgery on his
right knee, which he didn’t know
he would need until shortly
before he had it. He had leg
trouble in the last month or so of
the season, but all indications
were the issue was muscular. Now
his surgically repaired knee is
healed but needs strength.
“We want him to be
100 percent healthy and ready.
We don’t want him to come back
and play three days and, if his
knee swells up, he can’t play for
two,” Manager Dave Martinez
said. “We want him to be
comfortable out there and make
sure when he joins us he’s ready
to play every day.”
So Murphy will wait. He will
remain in West Palm Beach, Fla.,
when his teammates head home.
He will train there until he is
ready for games, though he can
play plenty of those in extended
spring training, too. But because
Murphy has not begun running
on the field or even taking at-bats
in minor league games without
running, it seems his absence will
best be measured in weeks.
“Naturally, for any athlete, I’m
going to come back later than I
wanted to,” Murphy said. “I think
whenever I do come back, from
my personal perspective, it’ll be
later [than hoped for], but that
doesn’t mean it’ll be wrong.”
Strain slows Benoit
Joaquin Benoit, the right-handed
reliever the Nationals signed
early in spring training, will not
be on the Opening Day roster. He
has a forearm strain in his
throwing arm and is not
throwing. Neither he nor
Martinez is sure when he will
throw again.
“We’re going to be relatively
slow,” Martinez said. “He’s an
older guy, so we have to make sure
he’s good.”
The Nationals signed the 40year-old when they realized Koda
Glover would not be a viable
Opening Day option because of
shoulder inflammation. Now they
will have to dip into their limited
relief depth to fill out that bullpen
anyway.
As things stand, Sean Doolittle,
Ryan Madson, Brandon Kintzler
and Shawn Kelley are bullpen
locks, barring injury. The
Nationals probably will carry two
more lefties, and Sammy Solis
and Matt Grace seem likeliest. If
those assumptions hold, the
Nationals will probably need a
right-hander to complement
Kelley, both in terms of stuff and
relative durability.
Trevor Gott seems to have a
slight edge for that role, although
Austin Adams and Chris Smith
also are in the mix.
— Chelsea Janes
Gonzalez wants to make his time count
NATIONALS FROM D1
will go down as the best of his
career. Now, at 32, he is entering
his seventh season as a National.
With free agency looming this
fall, it also could be his final one.
“I would love to have a big year
with the team and with everything that’s going around, I would
love to do that,” Gonzalez said. “I
just got to stay healthy. That’s all I
got to do.”
Staying healthy is Gonzalez’s
most exceptional ability. Since
joining Washington, Gonzalez
ranks in the top 20 among baseball’s starting pitchers in starts
(tied for eighth) and innings
pitched (19th). He has been
placed on the disabled list once in
his career — in 2014, with shoulder inflammation, and he still
managed to make 27 starts that
season. While he is perhaps
known more, fairly or not, for his
laborious outings and playoff
troubles in a Nationals uniform,
Gonzalez also quietly became one
of baseball’s most durable hurlers
in an era when durability from
pitchers is gold. For $53 million
over the past six seasons and
another $12 million due in 2018,
that gold came at a bargain.
There isn’t a magic formula to
the durability, according to Gonzalez. As he explained it, he believes sticking to a routine, which
he said includes more stretching
but has changed little otherwise
over the years, and knowing how
far to push himself have allowed
for the consistency. But he did
credit Livan Hernandez, the first
ace in Nationals history, for helping instill the foundation for his
endurance.
Gonzalez said he began working out with Hernandez, who led
baseball in innings pitched in
three different seasons, and Hernandez’s older brother, Orlando,
in Miami when he was 18. Along
with several other ballplayers,
they would run hills in the early
morning at Tropical Park — the
only hilly terrain in South Florida,
Gonzalez noted — and Hernandez
advised him to begin his offseason throwing program as late as
possible. Gonzalez kept that in
mind. Fourteen years later, he has
made at least 31 starts in seven of
his eight full major league seasons.
Instead, Gonzalez’s most significant recent adjustment has
transpired between the lines.
Once a hard thrower who could
get away with blowing fastballs
by hitters, Gonzalez has seen his
average fastball velocity steadily
diminish since it was 94.2 mph,
according to FanGraphs, in his
first season with Washington. But
he said it wasn’t until last season,
when his average fastball dipped
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Left-hander Gio Gonzalez is entering his seventh season with the Nationals, which could be his last.
to 90.4 mph, that he began modifying his approach.
“Last year was a huge adjustment point,” Gonzalez said. “Last
year I was actually pitching. I
wasn’t trying to throw it. I understand that I have to be a pitcher.
And that’s what it was. I don’t
have to throw hard to get outs,
and last year proved it. You just
have to locate.”
The renewed approach, which
included an increased use of his
change-up and curveball, translated to Gonzalez’s best season
since his first in Washington. After having his ERA escalate each
of the four previous seasons, Gonzalez posted a 2.96 ERA, a careerbest 150 ERA+ and a 1.179 walks
plus hits per inning pitched in
201 innings across 32 starts dur-
ing the 2017 regular season. A
walk rate of 3.54 per nine innings,
a 4.24 expected fielding independent pitching and a minuscule .175 batting average against
with runners in scoring position
suggest he was the recipient of
some good fortune. But results
are results, and Gonzalez was one
of the National League’s best at
run prevention last season. The
performance culminated in a
sixth-place finish in the NL Cy
Young race for the newly crafty
lefty.
“I don’t know what kind of lefty
I am,” Gonzalez said with a chuckle. “I just want to be a healthy
lefty. That’s it.”
He was, based on his regular
season production, one of the best
No. 3 starters in the majors. But
he stumbled in the playoffs again,
allowing three runs over three
innings in Game 5 of the NL
Division Series against the Chicago Cubs in October. The performance — and his impending free
agency — left some wondering
whether the Nationals would acquire a starter to slot in behind
Max Scherzer and Stephen Strasburg for this postseason and beyond.
But Washington settled last
week for signing Jeremy Hellickson, who occupies a tier below
and will compete for the No. 5
spot. For now, Gonzalez will occupy the same role, seeking to duplicate the results from last season
in what could be the end at home
in Washington.
jorge.castillo@washpost.com
Hall of Fame plans to halt use of Chief Wahoo logo
A SSOCIATED P RESS
The baseball Hall of Fame says
it no longer will use the Cleveland
Indians’ Chief Wahoo logo for
plaques of new members.
In a statement, the Hall said
Wednesday that it “concurs with
the commissioner’s sentiment
and acknowledges the shifting societal view of Native American
logos in baseball.”
Former Cleveland slugger Jim
Thome was elected in January and
said he wanted a block C logo on
his plaque when it is unveiled in
July. Thome said it was “the right
thing to do.”
Major League Baseball announced this year that the Chief
Wahoo logo won’t appear on
Cleveland uniforms starting in the
2019 season.
For years, groups of Native
Americans and their supporters
have protested outside Cleveland’s stadium before the home
opener, saying Chief Wahoo is an
offensive depiction of their race.
The Hall said that while the
Chief Wahoo logo appears on Early Wynn’s 1972 bronze plaque and
other exhibits in the museum, it
won’t be used on future plaques.
PADRES: San Diego will posthumously induct Kevin Towers
into its Hall of Fame on May 12 as
part of a celebration of the
20th anniversary of its 1998 National League championship
team.
Towers, who spent 14 seasons as
San Diego’s general manager, died
Jan. 30 of complications from can-
cer. He was 56.
The Padres won the NL West
four times under Towers, reaching
the World Series in 1998 before
being swept by the Yankees.
TIGERS: Detroit announced
that right-hander Matt Manning,
a first-round draft pick in 2016,
has an oblique strain. The Tigers
said Manning will rest until he is
pain free and then resume his
throwing program. He is expected
to be in extended spring training
for a couple of weeks before joining Class A West Michigan.
DIAMONDBACKS: An even
quieter than usual Zack Greinke
declared his return to the mound
Wednesday as simply “all right.”
The Arizona right-hander
threw 60 pitches in an intrasquad
game on a back field at the team’s
spring training facility.
It was the first time Greinke had
thrown in a game situation since
he left a spring training game a
week earlier after feeling tightness
in his right groin.
“My groin’s pretty good at the
moment,” he said of his health
issue.
CUBS: Yu Darvish faced Texas
for the first time since he signed a
six-year, $126 million contract
with Chicago last month, and the
four-time all-star limited his former team to three hits, including
Juan Centeno’s home run, over six
innings in the Cubs 5-1 win in
Surprise, Ariz.
YANKEES: Aaron Judge had
two homers and four RBI as New
York handled the Baltimore Orioles, 9-4, in Tampa.
MARCH 22 , 2018
Texas A&M’s Kennedy
continues to keep faith
BY
T IM B ONTEMPS
los angeles — In the aftermath
of Texas A&M’s dominant 86-65
victory over North Carolina on
Sunday afternoon in Charlotte, a
victory that allowed the Aggies to
advance to the Sweet 16, Kyle
Keller was celebrating in the locker room with Coach Billy Kennedy.
Keller had worked under Kennedy during Kennedy’s first five
years in College Station, Tex., before leaving in 2016 to take over
Stephen F. Austin’s program and
had flown to Charlotte to watch
his former team after his Lumberjacks were bounced in the first
round of the NCAA tournament.
But when Keller tried to credit
Kennedy’s coaching decisions
during the game — in particular
switching to a zone that helped
coax the Tar Heels into going 6 for
31 from three-point range — for
leading the Aggies to the victory,
Kennedy would have none of it.
“He said, ‘Oh, man. God must
have been in those rims when they
were missing those three-pointers,’” Keller said with a laugh over
the phone Wednesday afternoon.
“He takes no credit. . . . He’s the
most selfless man ever.
“It’s just like, ‘It ain’t me. It’s
God.’ And it’s not fake. It’s real.”
Following one of the biggest
wins in program history, such conversations about faith can engender a laugh from a friend. But that
devotion on a day-in, day-out basis
has allowed Kennedy not only to
survive the past seven years at a
power conference job but to do so
while dealing with a diagnosis of
early-onset Parkinson’s disease
before he had coached a single
game for the Aggies.
“It’s the biggest thing,” Kennedy
said Wednesday in a quiet moment in the bowels of Staples Center after his seventh-seeded Aggies practiced ahead of Thursday’s
game against No. 3 seed Michigan.
“It’s the most important thing. It
keeps me balanced. It keeps me
focused on the priorities of life.
“My relationship with Jesus
Christ is the most important thing
to me, and it helps me be a good
husband and a good father and a
good coach.”
Kennedy was hired by Texas
A&M in May 2011. Unlike with his
two predecessors in College Station (Mark Turgeon and Billy Gillispie), this wasn’t a steppingstone
job for Kennedy.
For a basketball lifer who had
hopped from Centenary to Southeastern Louisiana to Murray State,
coaching at Texas A&M was a
dream job — and one Kennedy,
when he was introduced, said he
hoped to hold until he retired.
Then came the diagnosis that
October. He took a leave of absence to sort out his health situation, and in that moment, it appeared his dream could be over
before it began.
But Kennedy did what he has
long done — he turned to his faith.
By mid-November, he was back on
the sidelines.
“I’m not preaching to you,” Kennedy said. “But if you ask me something, I’m going to tell you.
“Job 23:10 says, ‘But he knoweth
the way that I take: when he hath
tried me, I shall come forth as
gold.’ I held on to verse, and that
verse helped get me through it.
That was a big part. I knew we
were tasting gold when we won
the SEC championship two years
ago, and we’ve been blessed ever
since.”
That title came in Kennedy’s
fifth season on the job — and there
were plenty of tough times before
then. Opposing coaches viciously
recruited against Kennedy and his
health status, something Keller
had noticed on the recruiting trail
but that didn’t come out into the
open until Alex Robinson, a top
point guard recruit, spoke about it
publicly in 2013. The Aggies didn’t
make the NCAA tournament during Kennedy’s first four seasons.
But then came a breakthrough
in 2016, when Texas A&M won
that Southeastern Conference title and advanced to a region semifinal for the first time in nine years
and only the fourth time in school
history. Now, two years later, the
Aggies find themselves back here
again — a win away from the
school’s first Elite Eight birth.
“That’s our goal, and I think
we’re very capable of it,” Kennedy
said. “We’ll continue to show the
faithfulness of what I believe in
and what the program believes in:
doing the right things and having
faith in great things.”
That faith has served Kennedy
well when it comes to his illness,
and it also helped him keep things
steady during what only can be
described as a tumultuous season
in College Station. After winning
11 of its first 12, Texas A&M moved
to No. 5 in the country heading
into its opening game of SEC play
against Alabama on Dec. 30.
The Aggies proceeded to get
their doors blown off, losing by 22,
the first of five straight losses to
open conference play and seven in
nine games. It looked as if Texas
A&M’s once-promising season
was going to come to a crashing
halt — and with it, according to
some rumors that began to circulate during the team’s struggles,
Kennedy’s job.
But the Aggies, who had been
battling injuries, rallied to win
seven of their final 10 regular season games to earn an NCAA bid.
And after beating Providence in
their opening game Friday in
Charlotte, the Aggies upset the Tar
Heels.
“During tough times, I lean on
Romans 8:28: And we know that
all things work together for good
to them that love God, to them
who are the called according to his
purpose,” Kennedy said. “When
we were losing, and we had the
injuries, I said, ‘All right, guys, all
things are going to be good.’
“I didn’t see it, but I believed in
it. I’m glad to see that God is
faithful, and we’ve been rewarded
with some success now.”
Some would say there is success
in him even being in the job at this
point. Kennedy credits massage
therapy and acupuncture for helping him deal with his illness, and
he said he works out every day. His
players joke that Kennedy’s assistants do the yelling for him —
though assistant Isaac Chew, who
worked with Kennedy at Murray
State, says he was never a yeller,
anyway.
“He’s not going to change who
he is based on what people say on
the outside,” Chew said. “He’s going to be the same guy every day.
He’s not going to be a yeller or
screamer. He’s going to be about
his faith.
“And you respect him because
circumstances don’t allow him to
change. He’s going to stick with
what his gut tells him to be.”
tim.bontemps@washpost.com
NBA ROUNDUP
LeBron and Love team up
to halt Toronto’s road streak
CAVALIERS 132,
RAPTORS 129
A SSOCIATED P RESS
SPRING TRAINING NOTES
. THURSDAY,
LeBron James scored 35 points
and added 17 assists, his last setting up a late three-pointer by
Kevin Love, and the undermanned Cleveland Cavaliers ended Toronto’s nine-game road winning streak with a 132-129 victory
over the Eastern Conference-leading Raptors on Wednesday.
The Cavaliers were without five
rotational players and Coach Tyronn Lue, who missed his second
straight game because of health
reasons. But they had James.
James didn’t have a turnover in
40 minutes, and he made three
free throws in the final 7.8 seconds. He missed one with 3.9 seconds left, giving Toronto a final
shot, but DeMar DeRozan’s threepointer was wide left.
Love finished with 23 points
and 12 rebounds. Kyle Lowry
scored 24 for the Raptors, who
scored 79 points in the first half.
CLIPPERS
127, BUCKS 120:
DeAndre Jordan had 25 points
and 22 rebounds to lead Los Ange-
les past host Milwaukee, which
lost all-star forward Giannis Antetokounmpo to a right ankle sprain
late in the second quarter.
Antetokounmpo appeared to
get hurt when he tripped over
teammate Shabazz Muhammad
under the basket. He went to the
locker room with about four minutes left and did not return.
HORNETS
111, NETS 105:
Dwight Howard had 32 points and
30 rebounds, becoming the first
player with a 30-30 game against
the Nets since 1978, and visiting
Charlotte stormed back to beat
Brooklyn in New York.
PELICANS
96, PACERS 92:
Anthony Davis capped a 28-point,
13-rebound performance with a
fadeaway, a putback and two free
throws in the final minute as host
New Orleans outlasted Indiana.
76ERS 119, GRIZZLIES 105:
Robert Covington, J.J. Redick and
Dario Saric each had 15 points as
host Philadelphia beat Memphis.
HEAT 119, KNICKS 98: Kelly
Olynyk scored 22 points and handed out 10 assists as host Miami
handled New York.
NUGGETS
135, BULLS 102:
Nikola Jokic had 21 points, seven
rebounds and five assists as visiting Denver routed Chicago.
THURSDAY, MARCH 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D5
SU
Despite the mythmaking, Game of Change had negligible impact o≠ the court
“It is no accident
that the birth of
this slogan [Black
Power] in the
civil rights
movement took place in
Mississippi — the state
symbolizing the most blatant
abuse of white power. In
Mississippi, the murder of civil
rights workers is still a popular
pastime. In that state, more than
forty Negroes and whites have
either been lynched or murdered
over the last three years, and not
a single man has been punished
for these crimes. More than fifty
Negro churches have been
burned or bombed in Mississippi
in the last two years, yet the
bombers still walk the streets
surrounded by the halo of
adoration. This is white power in
its most brutal, coldblooded and
vicious form.”
Martin Luther King Jr. penned
those words in his book “Where
Do We Go From Here: Chaos or
Community?” It was 1967 — four
years, the college basketball
world would be surprised to
learn this March Madness, after
the so-called and muchcelebrated Game of Change.
Loyola Chicago, which faces
Nevada in a round-of-16 game
Thursday, played in that nowstoried game in March 1963. Its
opponent was Mississippi State.
Kevin B.
Blackistone
Loyola featured four,
sometimes five, black players in
its starting five. Mississippi State
was all-white.
The latter was banned by its
segregationist state government
from playing sporting contests
against teams that suited up any
black players. So it sneaked out
of its racially recalcitrant
confines under the cover of
darkness to meet Loyola in an
opening-round game of the
NCAA tournament 55 years ago
in Michigan State’s gym.
If you didn’t hear or read
about the event last week as
Loyola advanced through the
2018 tournament as an
underdog, you undoubtedly will
get another chance by Thursday’s
game. It will be bandied as it has
under headlines such as these
last week: “The March Madness
game that altered history” and
“Loyola Chicago’s 1963 NCAA
tournament game at MSU was
‘defining moment’ for
integration.” It has been lionized
in a handful of books, such as
“And The Walls Came Tumbling
Down,” and documented in a film
made by the son of one of
Loyola’s black players then. It’s
titled “Game of Change.”
But as King pointed out four
years after Loyola’s black squad
beat Mississippi State’s all-white
team, 61-51, nothing changed on
the civil rights front in
Mississippi or elsewhere in the
immediate wake of the game. In
June 1963, then-Mississippi
NAACP director Medgar Evers
was assassinated in his Jackson,
Miss., driveway. The next
summer, three civil rights
workers — James Chaney, a black
Mississippian, and Michael
Schwerner and Andrew
Goodman, white men from the
North — were found murdered
outside Philadelphia, Miss.
In January 1966, a black civil
rights activist, Vernon Dahmer,
died of injuries suffered in the
firebombing of his Hattiesburg,
Miss., home. In summer 1966,
James Meredith, the first black
student admitted to the
University of Mississippi, was
shot on a March Against Fear
near Hernando, Miss. Even on
the edge of Loyola’s home town
of Chicago that summer, King
was attacked by a white mob as
he marched against de facto
segregation in housing,
education and employment in
the North.
But we in sports are often not
in the business of truth-telling so
much as we are in mythmaking,
particularly when it comes to the
role sports has played or does
play in social change.
“Sport plays an especially
powerful role in shared myths
and collective memory about
race,” said C. Richard King, a
cultural anthropologist at
Washington State who has
written extensively on sport and
culture. “The Game of Change, as
a myth, plays a similar sort of
role: It points to change, marking
a key moment, affirms the
goodness of values and
associations to come after, and
allows us to say something about
ourselves as good people beyond
or after the ugliness of race and
racism. The myth is more
important than the game, for it is
in the retelling that we give it
and ourselves meaning.”
“These stories . . . allow us to
celebrate an event and the future
without having to deal with the
hard past and also without
having to acknowledge
structural barriers still exist,”
said Louis Moore, a Grand Valley
State (Mich.) professor and
author of “We Will Win the Day:
The Civil Rights Movement, the
Black Athlete, and the Quest for
Equality.”
Not to cast aspersions upon
authors, journalists and
filmmakers who have
championed Loyola vs.
Mississippi State 1963, but in the
end, they often served to
whitewash history rather than
preserve it. Such storytelling
almost always centralizes white
figures as heroes and people of
color as beneficiaries of that
perceived bravery and
benevolence. Branch Rickey with
Jackie Robinson. Howard Cosell
with Muhammad Ali. White
players who dared ally with Colin
Kaepernick, which led to a much
unnecessary question: Would
Kaepernick be better off if white
NFL stars stood at his side? As if
the struggles of people of color
need the validation of others.
“In 2012, the NCAA produced a
documentary about the game,
and I was one of the ‘talking
heads,’ ” Mississippi State
professor James Giesen recalled
Wednesday. “The triumphant
narrative of the overall
documentary made me
uncomfortable.”
Giesen allowed that the game
did leave some positive dent on
the school and the state.
Students took agency, he noted,
to protest at the university
president’s residence to let the
team play in the NCAA
tournament, though that may
have been because students
thought it was a chance to show
that white men were superior to
black men. And the university
dared buck the state’s
segregationist stance, which very
well could have damaged its
public funding.
“To be clear, this was not an
act of heroism on the level even
of a single black Mississippian
trying to register to vote at the
time,” Giesen said.
Giesen said what made him
queasy about the documentary
was “endless evidence that
challenges this notion that the
game changed the minds of
white Mississippians about race.”
“Indeed, in the 18 months
surrounding that game, white
Mississippians murdered
Chaney, Schwerner and
Goodman; they repeatedly
bombed Freedom Summer
schools and churches; they shot,
arrested and harassed [Student
Nonviolent Coordinating
Committee] volunteers and local
African American activists again
and again,” Giesen pointed out.
“And perhaps most germane to
the Game of Change myth is that
the state passed a ‘freedom of
choice’ plan as an attempt to put
off, yet again, public school
integration even after passage of
the 1964 Civil Rights Act.”
Those are facts that need to get
in the way of this feel-good story.
sports@washpost.com
Kevin B. Blackistone, ESPN panelist
and visiting professor at the Philip
Merrill College of Journalism at the
University of Maryland, writes sports
commentary for The Washington
Post.
Take a tour of Loyola Chicago, which was not a sports school — until last week
LOYOLA FROM D1
NCAA men’s basketball tournament so charming?
(How much time do you have?)
‘Donte just hit that shot’
It’s that the announced home
attendances this year included
1,135, 1,289, 1,133, 1,904, 1,914 and
1,501. It’s that as 2016 graduate
Rachel Kelso worked in an Indianapolis sports bar a few months
ago and somebody pointed out
that Loyola was on TV, she replied, “What? What are we doing
on TV?”
It’s that when graduate and
graduate student David Holmes
and three friends watched Loyola’s 63-62 win over Tennessee in a
downtown sports bar Saturday,
they were the lone clump of
Loyola supporters in a St. Patrick’s Day swarm.
It’s that the last time Loyola so
much as reached an NCAA tournament, in 1985, it exited nobly
with a 65-53 Sweet 16 loss to
Georgetown, which got 21 points
and 14 rebounds from Patrick
Ewing. It’s that if you walk
through a silent gumdrop of a
gym, 22-year-old Joseph J. Gentile Arena, you might yearn to
take a bleacher seat for a game
night no matter how it impacted
your spine.
It’s that this school is sportsunaddicted enough that student
upon student will tell you they
never even heard of Loyola’s 1963
basketball national title, one of
the all-time March Madness
doozies, with all-American Jerry
Harkness, Les Hunter, Vic Rouse,
Ron Miller and John Egan, the
60-58 overtime upset of Cincinnati from a 45-30 second-half
deficit.
It’s that that title always warrants revisiting in part for its
significance related to race, as in
the arena lobby display case with
the section about coach George
Ireland, touting how his “demanding nature and insistence
on excellence and effort from his
players earned him the nickname, ‘The Man,’ ” while noting,
“He was also ahead of his time in
his attitudes on race within the
college game, including defying
the unwritten rule of playing
only two black players at a time.”
It’s that Mike Ross, a senior
Illinoisan biophysics major and
the student president of Ireland’s, the stylish student-run
pub beneath the Damen Student
Center, said this: “We don’t even
open the bar on the weekend,
and that’s why I was a little bit
hesitant to open the bar Saturday
because I was worried nobody
was going to show up.” (People
did, in packed droves.) It’s a
certain intimacy, as when Donte
Ingram hit the winning shot last
Thursday against Miami and one
of the Ireland’s staff members
said, as Ross recalled it, “Oh,
wow, Donte just hit that shot. He
was in my business class yesterday.”
It’s that Ireland’s bartender
Drew Vola, a junior international
studies major from Rockford,
worked distributing beer to the
VIP section in the arena beginning in January, with sparse
crowds, but began to notice those
crowds thicken steadily. It’s that
when, on Feb. 24, the Missouri
Valley Conference champions
closed the regular season with a
win over Illinois State, a capacity
crowd of 4,963 showed up at
Joseph J. Gentile Arena, the larg-
BRIAN CASSELLA/CHICAGO TRIBUNE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Loyola guard Clayton Custer was the toast of his Chicago campus after hitting the game-winning shot Saturday to beat Tennessee.
est since a renovation in 2011,
such that when Carol Gentile
learned of this down in Boca
Raton, Fla., she spent the day
teary. It’s that, by last Thursday,
when Vola reached Ireland’s, he
said, “I could barely get through”
to work.
Then: “Every instant there was
a new song, from, ‘Go, Ramblers,
Go,’ and ‘defense’ chants. Seriously. It was kind of funny because, you know, they can’t hear
you [in Dallas, where Loyola
played]. But they were acting like
it.”
By Saturday, when Clayton
Custer’s winning shot against
Tennessee made its quirky trip,
glancing off the left side of the
rim before finding its way in, the
pub had a hush and then a roar.
Some of it, of course, owes to
Sister Jean, the 98-year-old nun
who has become a fresh phenomenon, who has been a steadfast
fixture of the Loyola student
experience and who appears in a
large arena-lobby mural with a
huddle of basketball players and
a John Wooden quote: “Make
Each Day Your Masterpiece.”
Kelso: “You first hear about
her during your orientation.
You’re like, ‘What?’ ”
And then, Kelso said: “You
can’t find anyone [among Loyola
students and alumni] who has
anything negative or even ambivalent to say about her. Everyone
adores her because she’s just
such a light in people’s lives. She’s
such a light of Loyola.”
And then, this oddball charm
owes something to the way student life works here, a way different from most snow-globe Sweet
16 campuses, a way Kelso explained here: “We’re all over the
city. We’re all over. Absolutely. It’s
a unique college experience that I
think is extremely valuable because real life isn’t isolated on
college campuses. . . . There is
what we call a ‘Loyola bubble,’
and there are ways to stay very
sheltered and stay on campus
and stay active, doing stuff, staying on campus. But it’s almost
like you have to try hard to do
that because the Ventra [city
transit] passes are part of our
tuition, and so we’re able to get
on the train, get on the bus and
go anywhere. You can get into the
Art Institute for no admission if
you show your Loyola ID.
“They make an effort to get us
out into the world and doing
things and experiencing some-
TONY GUTIERREZ/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Custer’s shot in the closing seconds against the Volunteers in Dallas
glanced off the left side of the rim before finding its way in.
thing that’s not just campus, and
that’s such a great experience to
have as a brand-new 18-year-old
or even a 22-year-old about to
graduate because that’s what real
life is, is seeing the world and
experiencing things that are out
of your comfort zone.”
Yet, suddenly, through the
still-inexplicable magic of sports,
this diffuse, dispersed group . . .
“It feels like we’re more of a
unit,” Ross said.
“Everybody is more happy, has
a little bit more pep in their step,”
Vola said.
“On Thursday night,” Holmes
said, “I was walking around, I
had finished up a group project, I
was walking around with this
goofy smile on my face, and I’m
high-fiving strangers for no reason and everybody’s just in this
amazing mood and no words
needed to be spoken.”
‘He would be elated’
Further, it’s that this kind of
thing always hearkens to the past
and to those both missed and
missing a giddy present. Joseph
J. Gentile (1923-2011), the arena
namesake, earned a wealth of
descriptions from his widow,
Carol, all of them vivid. “A big
voice and a big heart.” And: “Oh,
boy, very boisterous, and have a
little cigar hanging out his
mouth, with a little mustache.”
And: “He was loud, really loud,
and he’d be the first to get
everybody excited.” And: “If he
met you at an event, he would put
a business card in your pocket
every time he saw you.”
His father had been a barber
for 50 years on Van Buren and
Racine streets. When the World
War II veteran and 1948 Loyola
graduate son wanted to stop
teaching psychology at Loyola
and switch careers, his father
wailed, “You’re going to quit
teaching and go sell cars?” He
sold cars with a rarefied expertise in Chicago’s suburbs. A local
media personality named him
“the Baron of Barrington.” He
became “the top Buick salesman
in the United States for 10 con-
secutive years,” Carol said.
He loved charities, causes. Carol used to ask him jokingly
whether he ran “the Joseph J.
Gentile Chrysler dealership or
the Joseph J. Gentile charitable
organization.” Each year, he took
a batch of students from his
beloved high school, St. Ignatius,
to Wrigley Field for the Cubs.
After he donated a reported
$3.5 million for Loyola’s arena,
he and Carol made the commute
to all the games until they
couldn’t. They went there to
graduations and “cried our eyes
out,” she said. Loyola once let
him help coach an exhibition,
and Joe “just lit up like a Christmas tree,” she said.
“He loved life,” she said. “He
loved life.”
He also bought a radio station
in 1994, loved talking on the air,
and talked Loyola on it. He just
couldn’t get other radio stations
to report the Loyola scores in a
town of Bears and Bulls and Cubs
and Sox and Blackhawks. He
yearned for more Loyola students to attend games, wondered
whether somebody should go
classroom to classroom pitching
the experience.
Look now. Reporters converge.
Sister Jean is a national star who
irresistibly reminds she’s an international star. Carol sees Sister
Jean on “Good Morning America” and marvels. “Oh my gosh,”
Carol Gentile said. “If he could be
on the air when this happened, it
would be Loyola 24-7. He’d be
gloating, and he’d be cheering.
There’s thunder up there going
on because he would be elated,
just elated, with what’s happened.”
chuck.culpepper@washpost.com
202-855-7033 DC | 301-683-7290 MD
571-429-5449 VA
Corporate Discounts Available
D6
EZ
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THE WASHINGTON POST
K
. THURSDAY,
MARCH 22 , 2018
Pitino says
prosecutors
named him
for publicity
PITINO FROM D1
Cardinal — “I know, I’m going to
change the name,” he said — on a
short trek over to Shuckers, a
dockside bar attached to the back
of a Best Western where the locals
tend to leave him be as he sits at
the bar, orders a salad and watches a game.
It’s a life of extreme comfort,
Pitino acknowledges. He’s miserable.
This is the first time he has
been unemployed during the
NCAA tournament since 2001
and just the second time since he
graduated from college in 1974.
After initially claiming he was
done with coaching last fall, Pitino wants back in.
“I miss it terribly,” Pitino said.
“I don’t know how to explain it in
words. . . . There’s just this emptiness.”
Last Friday, over a breakfast of
oatmeal, blueberries and raisins
at the Four Seasons here, Pitino
discussed the FBI’s investigation
into college basketball for more
than two hours, offering his most
detailed explanation to date of
the whirlwind recruitment of a
player last summer that, on the
heels of a prior scandal involving
an assistant who hired strippers
to entertain Louisville recruits,
has threatened to end his career
in disgrace.
Pitino allowed a reporter to
review what he and his lawyers
said are transcripts of hundreds
of text messages he exchanged
with every major figure in the
alleged pay-for-play scheme, records he says he provided voluntarily to federal prosecutors in an
effort to clear his name.
At turns defiant, combative
and wounded, Pitino lashed out
at federal prosecutors, whom he
accused of including him in court
documents because of his renown.
“I’m not on any wiretap.
There’s not a shred of evidence
that I did anything wrong. . . .
They basically blew up my life . . .
for one reason: publicity,” Pitino
said. “I have my faults, like we all
do . . . but I’ve never cheated to
get a player.”
A spokesman for the U.S. attorney’s office in the Southern District of New York declined to
comment, and a spokeswoman
for the FBI in New York did not
respond to a request to comment.
Whether Pitino can return to
college coaching will hinge, in
part, on whether he can convince
someone that he’s right and the
FBI and federal prosecutors are
wrong. Pitino says he knew nothing about payments from an Adidas executive to a recruit’s father.
An aspiring NBA agent was lying
when he claimed during a sting
operation that Pitino was instrumental in arranging the payment,
Pitino said.
And a Louisville assistant
coach in the room during that
same sting operation, according
to the FBI, was there without
Pitino’s knowledge or approval,
he said.
It’s similar to the explanation
Pitino has offered since 2015,
when a local escort alleged a
Louisville assistant had paid her
for years to bring strippers to a
campus dormitory to entertain
recruits.
Pitino knows, to many, it
strains credulity.
“I hired the wrong people,” he
said. “I understand the perception. . . . I have to take ownership,
as the leader of the team. . . .
There’s two assistant coaches
who didn’t do the right thing . . .
but they were taught to do the
right thing. But people just don’t
want to believe that.”
To Pitino’s many disciples
across the coaching community,
pieces of the case against him
don’t add up. The aspiring NBA
agent has credibility issues. He
made similar claims on wiretapped phone calls, they note,
about Miami Coach Jim Larranaga, who also has not been charged
with a crime and also has adamantly denied allegations.
And then there’s the pride Pitino derives from his reputation
as a coach who doesn’t need to
cheat or chase one-and-done NBA
lottery picks because he can mold
modestly talented teams into
championship contenders.
“It would shock me. . . . I just
couldn’t fathom that he would
arrange for someone to pay a
player,” said Ralph Willard, the
former head coach of Holy Cross
who also served as an assistant to
Pitino at Kentucky and Louisville.
“It was always really important to
him that nobody in his program
broke the rules. . . . Now, every
paper you look up, he’s the biggest
cheater in the world. It’s unbelievable.”
STREETER LECKA/GETTY IMAGES
Though Louisville had to vacate its 2013 championship because of rules violations, Rick Pitino hopes to land another college job. “It doesn’t have to be at a high level,” he said.
Wheelers and dealers
The recruitment that would
become the centerpiece of a
sprawling FBI investigation began with a text message Pitino
received just before 9:30 p.m.
May 23.
“Coach, this is Christian Dawkins. I dealt with you on Jaylen
Johnson. Would you have an interest in Brian Bowen, or are you
done recruiting?”
Dawkins, 24, is a Michigan
native who had acquired a reputation as a bit of a hustler as he
tried to break into the NBA agent
industry by working as a runner,
someone who serves as a point of
contact between agents or shoe
companies and a prospective
player — with hopes of landing a
payday when the player turns pro.
In 2016, Cleveland-based International Management Advisors
sued NBA agent Andy Miller because, according to a complaint,
Dawkins had been working as a
runner for both at the same time,
charging more than $60,000 in
travel expenses to IMA while he
actually steered clients to Miller.
(The agencies settled the case.)
Last May, Dawkins was fired by
Miller for running up more than
$40,000 in Uber charges on a
client’s credit card.
Pitino did not know about
Dawkins’s agent connections, he
claims, which would have raised a
red flag. To him, Dawkins was
someone he knew for a vague role
with a travel basketball team
called Dorian’s Pride that had
produced several college players,
including Johnson, who played at
Louisville from 2014 to 2017.
“He called himself the general
manager,” Pitino said. “I barely
knew the guy.”
The text messages Pitino
“There’s not a shred
of evidence that I did
anything wrong. . . .
I have my faults, like
we all do . . . but I’ve
never cheated to get
a player.”
Rick Pitino
shared appear to support this
claim. From 2013 through 2017,
Dawkins texted Pitino periodically, often reintroducing himself for
his association with Dorian’s
Pride, as he pushed players.
Dawkins never mentioned an association with agents or money,
Pitino’s records show.
A minute after he received
Dawkins’s text, Pitino texted his
assistant, David Padgett. “Who is
Brian Bowen,” he wrote.
Padgett replied, “Top ranked
uncommitted player left in the
2017 class.”
“We would love to have him,”
Pitino texted Dawkins, and then
the two had a 13-minute phone
call in which Pitino said they
discussed Bowen’s background,
his parents and what they were
looking for in a college. Dawkins
was a family friend of Bowen, who
had played on Dorian’s Pride.
Dawkins, through his attorney,
did not dispute Pitino’s recollection of their phone conversations
or his summary of text messages.
Dawkins scheduled a visit for
the Bowen family to Louisville for
the following week. The day before the visit, May 27, Pitino got a
phone call from a contact at Adidas, who left a voice mail.
“Coach, Jim Gatto with Adidas.
Hope all is well. Sorry to bother
you over the weekend, but I just
got a call about a player I want to
discuss with you,” Gatto said, according to a transcript of the
voice mail provided by Pitino’s
lawyers. Gatto, through his attorney, also did not dispute Pitino’s
recollection of phone conversations and summary of text messages.
Pitino called back, and the two
spoke for two minutes, Pitino
said. Gatto asked Pitino whether
he was interested in Bowen, Pitino recalled.
“I said, ‘Yeah . . . why do you
ask?’ He said, ‘Because I know
some of the people in the family,
and I could put in some good
words for you.’ . . . That was it,”
Pitino said.
The conversation struck Pitino
as unusual for a few reasons.
Bowen had played for Nike-sponsored youth teams, so Pitino felt it
unlikely an Adidas executive
would have much sway. And, despite their long-running financial
relationship — Adidas paid Pitino
$1.5 million annually — Pitino
claims he had actually long felt
Adidas ignored him and Louisville and steered more top recruits in the company’s grassroots leagues toward UCLA and
Kansas.
Regarding this instance with
Bowen, Pitino felt Gatto was trying to take credit for a recruit
Louisville was about to land on its
own.
“I already knew we had the
kid,” Pitino said. “So I just felt like
he was trying to take a bow, so to
speak.”
‘The luckiest thing’
The night of May 28, a Sunday,
Pitino, the Bowen family and
Dawkins had dinner at Griff’s, a
Southern comfort food restaurant in Louisville. Over chicken
fingers and fries, Pitino said, he
asked questions about something
that bothered him: Why was such
a good player still uncommitted
this late in the year?
Many schools had given all of
their basketball scholarships for
the following year, and Louisville
had only one left. Louisville also
had used up all of its official visits
allotted by the NCAA, so the
Bowens had to pay for their visit.
Bowen had considered Michigan State and Arizona, he and his
parents explained, but both
teams had players they had hoped
would leave for the NBA who
decided to remain in school, making it unlikely Bowen would start
as a freshman.
“That made complete sense to
me, so my antennas came back
down,” Pitino said. When the
meal ended, Pitino said, he paid
for his chicken fingers, Dawkins
and the Bowens paid for theirs,
and the coach headed home brimming with confidence that he had
just landed perhaps the missing
piece for his eighth Final Four
team.
“I felt like he was running out
of time, didn’t have a scholarship,
and I was the last guy on the
block. . . . This was the luckiest
thing that had ever happened to
me in recruiting,” Pitino said.
On June 1, news that Bowen
was committing to Louisville began to circulate. Gatto, the Adidas
executive, left Pitino a voice mail.
“Heard the good news. Um, it’s
going to be great, and I’m excited
for you guys,” Gatto said, according to Pitino’s records. Pitino
didn’t call back, instead texting
the next day, asking for a pair of
Yeezys, Kanye West’s shoe line
with Adidas.
“For recruiting,” Pitino explained. “My longest conversations with Gatto have been about
the Yeezys, which he could never
get for me.”
In interviews and text messages after Bowen’s announcement,
Pitino repeatedly expressed
amazement that he had landed a
five-star recruit who paid for his
own visit.
“Never spent a penny,” he texted Willard, his former assistant.
“Most athletic talent I’ve had
since 96 UK.”
Unbeknown to him, Pitino
claims, someone had agreed to
spend some money to get Bowen
to Louisville. According to the
FBI, while he was helping the
Bowen family navigate the college recruitment process, Dawkins also had been negotiating
with Gatto, who agreed to pay
$100,000, in four installments, to
Bowen’s father to ensure his son
played for one of Adidas’s premier
endorsed teams.
On July 13, Dawkins made a
phone call to Bowen’s father, Brian Sr., that was recorded via
wiretap, according to the FBI.
The two discussed an upcoming
trip in which Bowen’s father
would drive to New Jersey to pick
up $19,500 in cash. Left unexplained is what happened with
the remaining $5,500 in Adidas
money that was supposed to go to
Bowen’s father.
On Sept. 13, according to a
complaint, Gatto was recorded on
a wiretapped call with another
Adidas official discussing arrangements for the next $25,000
payment. The money never got to
Bowen’s father.
On Sept. 26, the FBI arrested
Gatto, Dawkins and eight others,
including assistant coaches at
four schools. While no coaches at
Louisville or Miami were arrest-
ed, criminal complaints alleged
coaches at both schools knew of
Adidas agreeing to pay for recruits.
That morning, Pitino was sitting in his office on campus at
Louisville with David Novak, the
former chief executive of fast food
conglomerate Yum! Brands, recording a podcast about motivation and leadership. Pitino was in
an especially good mood, he recalled, and a conversation scheduled for 40 minutes had topped
two hours when Pitino’s executive
assistant threw open the door.
“Coach, we got a problem,” his
assistant said. “The FBI just
stopped [Louisville assistant]
Jordan Fair at the airport.”
“The FBI?” Pitino replied.
“What are you talking about?”
Competing theories
Pitino was not recorded speaking to either Dawkins or Gatto
when the FBI had their phones
wiretapped, according to his attorney, Marc Mukasey.
“There’s no case against him”
Mukasey said. “He’s got nothing
to fear.”
This is not necessarily exonerating information, however. It appears, in court records, that the
FBI didn’t begin recording Dawkins’s phone until June 19 and
Gatto’s until Aug. 7 — both well
after Bowen’s recruitment.
“I wish I was on a wiretap
because that would declare my
innocence, 100 percent,” Pitino
said.
Even if Pitino avoids charges,
however, the most difficult evidence for him to explain to a
prospective employer will be
what took place in a Las Vegas
hotel room July 27, when Fair was
in town to scout the Adidas summer championships. According
to the FBI, Fair attended a sting
operation in which Dawkins and
several other men, including an
undercover FBI agent, discussed
paying another recruit’s family.
Fair, whom Louisville fired last
fall, has not returned multiple
phone calls, and neither has his
attorney. According to Pitino, in
two brief phone calls in September, Fair claimed he had made an
innocent mistake. He ran into an
old friend — Brad Augustine, who
managed an Orlando-area travel
team sponsored by Adidas — and
decided to have a drink at a hotel.
Augustine invited Fair to a meeting in a hotel room, and Fair
pleaded ignorance to Pitino
about the nature of the meeting.
“He said to me . . . I saw an
envelope in the table, so I left the
room right away. That’s what he
told me. And I screamed at him,”
Pitino said.
The FBI’s description of that
meeting in a criminal complaint
suggests Fair was more involved.
At one point, an FBI agent asserted, as Dawkins discussed paying
the mother of a high school player
from Florida to ensure her son
attended Louisville in 2019, Fair
said, “We’ve got to be very lowkey” because Louisville was on
probation for the stripper party
scandal.
Later in the meeting, an undercover FBI agent handed Augustine an envelope containing
$12,700 cash that was meant for
the mother of a recruit.
Fair had left the room, however, when Dawkins made a claim
that the FBI has repeated in court
documents: that a few months
before, when Dawkins was running the recruiting process for
Bowen, another shoe company
had briefly outbid Adidas, and he
urged Pitino to make a phone call
to Gatto to get more money.
“The reason he did that was the
assistant of mine would have
gone berserk,” Pitino said. “He
waited for him to leave the room.”
In the various factions that
have formed around this case,
there are several theories about
what actually happened, based
on the evidence made public so
far.
Those skeptical of Pitino note
that he could be lying and escaping criminal charges not because
he wasn’t involved in arranging
the payments for Bowen’s father
but because the FBI didn’t have
wiretaps on Dawkins and Gatto
during Bowen’s recruitment.
Those supporting Pitino,
meanwhile, offer a theory that
could explain why, in addition to
Louisville, no one at Miami has
been arrested, even though the
FBI also has asserted Miami
coaches were involved in arranging an Adidas payment for a
recruit, also based on statements
made by Dawkins: Maybe Dawkins was lying, boasting about Pitino and Larranaga to establish
his bona fides as a legitimate
dealmaker on the college sports
black market.
As the FBI was listening to
Dawkins’s phone calls last summer, he was trying to start his
own professional sports agency.
During that meeting in Las Vegas,
the undercover FBI agent was
posing as a potential investor in
Dawkins’s new company.
In their meetings with prosecutors in New York, Marcos
Jimenez — one of Pitino’s lawyers,
also a former federal prosecutor
— said he floated this theory.
“I told them this case is just
Dawkins shooting his mouth off,”
Jimenez said. The prosecutors
“reacted like I hit a nerve. Like
they were concerned it might be
true.”
An uncertain future
In the weeks after Louisville
fired him in October, Pitino told
family and friends he was done
coaching. This sentiment did not
last.
“When you’re somebody who’s
been at the height of this game for
so long, you certainly want to be
able to go out on your terms,” said
Richard Pitino, Rick’s son and
head coach at Minnesota. “This
would be the exact opposite of
that.”
His children want him to work
in the NBA, while his wife would
like him to return to the college
ranks. He has hired an agent and
had preliminary discussions with
a few schools, Pitino said, declining to specify which ones.
He acknowledged his next job
offer may not come from a school
at the level of Kentucky or Louisville and said that doesn’t bother
him.
“It doesn’t have to be for a lot of
money. It doesn’t have to be at a
high level,” he said. “But I want
you to believe in me and what I
teach, how I mentor, how I motivate. If you believe in me, I’ll
consider it.”
will.hobson@washpost.com
THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2018
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2018 WINTER ALL-MET PLAYERS OF THE YEAR
GIRLS’ BASKETBALL
WRESTLING
GIRLS’ SWIMMING AND DIVING
BOYS’ BASKETBALL
BOYS’ SWIMMING AND DIVING
HOCKEY
BOYS’ INDOOR TRACK AND FIELD
Azzi Fudd
St. John’s, Fr.
River Curtis
Battlefield, Sr.
Victoria Huske
Yorktown, Fr.
Jermaine Harris
Rock Creek Christian, Sr.
Sean Conway
Loudoun Valley, Jr.
Jack Taylor
Churchill, Sr.
Eric Allen Jr.
Bullis, Sr.
TOP: Girls’ indoor track and field player of the year Hannah Waller, a South Lakes sophomore. (Photos by Marvin Joseph; Illustrations by Allie Ghaman /The Washington Post)
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THE WASHINGTON POST
players o
Compiled by The Washingto
Jack Taylor HOCKEY (CHURCHILL, SR.)
An imposing player capable of contributing from any of the forward positions, Taylor had 29 goals and 23 assists in
23 games as a senior as he captained Churchill to its fourth straight Maryland Student Hockey League championship.
Standing 6-foot-5 before he steps into skates, Taylor covers open ice with long strides and navigates tight spaces with
footwork mastered as a lacrosse defenseman. He is Churchill’s all-time leading goal scorer, with 102 in 100 games. He will
play lacrosse at Brown.
Azzi Fudd GIRLS’ BASKETBALL (ST. JOHN’S, FR.)
One of the most hyped freshmen in recent high school basketball history, Fudd exceeded expectations in her
Conference play, she averaged 24 points, which ranked third in the area. In January, she put up back-to-back
that let her get to the basket at will. The Cadets won the WCAC title for the second consecutive season and th
River Curtis WRESTLING (BATTLEFIELD, SR.)
A powerful thrower with a penchant for racking up quick pins, the Battlefield star joined rare company by winning his fourth
Virginia state title. The 138-pounder placed fifth at Escape the Rock and seventh at Powerade before helping Battlefield
claim its first state team title. He balanced supreme expectations with unshakable confidence. “He never really gets
rattled,” Coach Brian Shaffer said. He will wrestle at the Naval Academy.
Sean Conway BOYS’ SWIMMING (LOUDOUN VALLEY, JR.)
Jermaine Harris BOYS’ BASKETBALL (ROCK CREEK CH
The versatile 6-foot-6 junior had a season to remember, claiming top area times in the 100-yard freestyle (44.81 seconds)
and 200 individual medley (1:47.22), both of which are automatic all-American times. He also swam the area’s secondfastest 50 free in 20.77. At the Virginia Class 4 state championships, he broke his own record in the 200 IM and set the
mark in the 100 free.
The Rhode Island signee was the anchor of Rock Creek Christian’s undefeated run through the Capital Beltwa
starring role — and constant double-teams — to average 21.3 points, 12.1 rebounds and 2.1 blocks. Four time
led Rock Creek Christian to the Capital Beltway League title and a runner-up finish in the Maryland private sch
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THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2018
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of the year
on Post’s high school sports staff
Eric Allen Jr. BOYS’ INDOOR TRACK (BULLIS, SR.)
The Tennessee signee was dominant in his final high school indoor season. He clocked the nation’s top time in the
200 meters (20.91 seconds at the University of Kentucky High School Invitational) and the second-best time in the
300 meters (32.84 at the VA Showcase), and he finished second in the 55-meter dash at the Millrose Games with a
personal-best time of 6.36. Allen helped Bullis set a meet record at the Millrose Games in the 4x200 (1:27.16) and was part
of the Bulldogs’ area-best 4x400 team that finished in 3:19.42 at the Dr. Sander Invitational.
r first year at St. John’s. Facing some of the best defenders in the area throughout Washington Catholic Athletic
k 41-point games. She led the region in three-pointers with 102 and paired her outside game with a quick first step
he DCSAA championship for the fourth time in five years.
Hannah Waller GIRLS’ INDOOR TRACK (SOUTH LAKES, SO.)
A sophomore competing in her first indoor season, the South Lakes sprinting star has made tremendous strides since she
finished third in the 100 meters as a freshman at last year’s Virginia 6A outdoor state championships. At this year’s Class 6
indoor state meet, she had among the top times in the nation in the 300 (38.50 seconds) and the 55 (6.87), earning state
titles in both and tying a facility record with the latter. Waller also was the Class 6 Region D champion in the long jump
(18 feet 8 inches) and finished fifth in the 200 at New Balance Nationals (24.41).
HRISTIAN, SR.)
ay League. When the Eagles lost two of their top guards before the season, the 6-foot-8 senior forward took on the
es, he had at least 20 points and 20 rebounds. The only returning selection from the 2016-17 All-Met first team
chools championship.
Victoria Huske GIRLS’ SWIMMING (YORKTOWN, FR.)
The first freshman, male or female, to earn All-Met Swimmer of the Year honors, Huske burst onto the scene for Yorktown
with the area’s fastest times in the 50-yard freestyle (22.39 seconds) and 100 butterfly (52.64). Both are automatic
all-American times and rank second all time for an area high school swimmer, trailing only NCAA champion (and former
All-Met Swimmer of the Year) Janet Hu. She also had the third-fastest time in the 100 freestyle (50.60).
PHOTOS BY MARVIN JOSEPH/THE WASHINGTON POST; ILLUSTRATIONS BY ALLIE GHAMAN/THE WASHINGTON POST
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MARCH 22 , 2018
basketball first teams
Compiled by The Washington Post’s high school sports staff
The boys’ team, from
left: South County
forward Quentin
Millora-Brown,
Wilson guard Ayinde
Hikim, Wilson Coach
of the Year Angelo
Hernandez, Rock
Creek Christian Player
of the Year Jermaine
Harris, Georgetown
Prep guard Jared
Bynum, Bladensburg
forward Daniel
Oladapo, DeMatha
guard Justin Moore,
O’Connell guard
Xavier Johnson and
Gonzaga guard Myles
Dread. Top: Paul VI
guard Jeremy Roach.
Above: Loudoun Valley
guard Jordan Miller.
The girls’ team, from
left: Marshall forward
Clara Ford, Riverdale
Baptist forward
Shakira Austin,
Paul VI guard Ashley
Owusu, St. John’s
Player of the Year Azzi
Fudd, McNamara
forward Jakia BrownTurner, Long Reach
Coach of the Year Kelli
Cofield, Herndon
guard Devyne
Newman, Langley
guard Jordyn
Callaghan, Anacostia
guard Mya Moye and
Eleanor Roosevelt
guard Ashia McCalla.
Above: Paul VI
forward Amira
Collins.
PHOTOS BY MARVIN JOSEPH/THE WASHINGTON POST
winter all-mets
For write-ups on all first-teamers and on the coaches of the year, visit washingtonpost.com/sports/highschools.
BOYS’ BASKETBALL
FIRST TEAM
Jared Bynum, G, Sr., Georgetown Prep
Myles Dread, G, Sr., Gonzaga
Ayinde Hikim, G, Sr., Wilson
Xavier Johnson, G, Sr., O’Connell
Jordan Miller, G, Sr., Loudoun Valley
Quentin Millora-Brown, F, Sr., South
County
Justin Moore, G, Jr., DeMatha
Daniel Oladapo, F, Sr., Bladensburg
Jeremy Roach, G, So., Paul VI
COACH OF THE YEAR
Angelo Hernandez, Wilson
SECOND TEAM
Sherwyn Devonish, G, Sr., Wise
Brayden Gault, G, Sr., Battlefield
Malik Miller, F, Sr., Friendship Tech
Vado Morse, G, Sr., Bullis
Brandon Slater, G, Sr., Paul VI
Donovann Toatley, G, Sr., Riverdale Baptist
Kenneth Tyree, G, Sr., Friendship Tech
Marquis Washington, F, Sr., Edison
Elijah Wood, G, So., Bethesda-Chevy
Chase
Tre Wood, G, Sr., St. John’s
GIRLS’ BASKETBALL
FIRST TEAM
Shakira Austin, F, Sr., Riverdale Baptist
Jakia Brown-Turner, F, Jr., McNamara
Jordyn Callaghan, G, Sr., Langley
Amira Collins, F, Sr., Paul VI
Clara Ford, F, Sr., Marshall
Ashia McCalla, G, Sr., Eleanor Roosevelt
Mya Moye, G, Sr., Anacostia
Devyne Newman, G, Sr., Herndon
Ashley Owusu, G, Jr., Paul VI
FIRST TEAM
Andrew Foos, Madison
COACH OF THE YEAR
THIRD TEAM
Chris Tappis, Churchill
SECOND TEAM
Michael Hughes, T.C. Williams
Kelliann Lee, G, Sr., Poolesville
Carole Miller, F, Jr., Edison
Ellie Mitchell, F, Jr., Georgetown Visitation
Honesty Scott-Grayson, G, Sr., Riverdale
Baptist
Natalie Villaflor, G, Sr., Loudoun County
SECOND TEAM
Erika Chen, So., Stone Ridge
Hailey Fisher, Sr., Mount Vernon
Abby Harter, So., Briar Woods
Hannah Kannan, Sr., Blair
Allison Kopac, So., Riverside
Elizabeth Kuhlkin, So., Madison
Anna Landon, Sr., Falls Church
Madeline LaPorte, Sr., Madison
Brooke Matthias, Sr., Stone Bridge
Mackenzie McConagha, Fr., Briar Woods
RELAYS
Drew Calhoun, G, Sr., Parkdale
Akunna Konkwo, F, Jr., Bishop Ireton
Paris McBride, G, Sr., Woodbridge
Malu Tshitenge-Mutombo, F, Jr., St.
John’s
Taleah “Noo” Washington, G, Sr., Rock
Creek Christian
Matt Becht, G, Sr., O’Connell
Kimani Benjamin, G/F, Sr., Fairmont
Heights
Mazae Blake, G, So., Seneca Valley
Elijah Bowens, G, Sr., Maret
Cameron Brown, G, Jr., Eleanor Roosevelt
Evan Buckley, G, Jr., Stone Bridge
Stephen Cannady, G, Sr., Pallotti
Amari Cooper, F, Sr., Wakefield
Daniel Deaver, F, Jr., Marshall
Marcus Dockery, G, So., Theodore
Roosevelt
Bryce Douglas, G, Jr., Centreville
Richard Dudley, G, Jr., Paint Branch
Corey Dyches, G, So., Potomac (Md.)
Jaden Faulkner, G, Sr., Eleanor Roosevelt
Alex Fitch, G, Jr., Rock Ridge
Devon Flowers, F, Sr., Potomac School
Andres Frye, G, So., McLean School
Savion Gallion, G, Sr., Thurgood Marshall
Gordon Gibson, F, Sr., Bethesda-Chevy
Chase
Jason Gibson, G, Jr., Sidwell Friends
Jordan Gibson, G/F, Sr., Stonewall Jackson
Jordan Hairston, G, Jr., Westfield
Anthony Harris, G, Jr., Paul VI
Jordan Hawkins, G, Fr., Gaithersburg
Jay Heath Jr., G, Jr., Wilson
Darius Hines, G, Sr., Bishop Ireton
Curtis Holland III, G, Sr., Southern
Jao Ituka, G, Fr., Gaithersburg
Kahleem Jennings, G, Sr., Meade
Xavier Johnson, G, Jr., Episcopal
Christian Jones, G, Sr., Annapolis
Jordan Lampman, G, Sr., Marshall
Ricardo Lindo, G, Sr., Wilson
Jaden Martin, G, Sr., River Hill
Aminu Mohammed, G/F, Fr., Carroll
Isaiah Moore, G, Sr., Flint Hill
Richard Njoku, F, Sr., St. John’s
Ike Nweke, F, Sr., Georgetown Prep
Mezie Offurum, G, Sr., Georgetown Prep
LJ Owens, G, Sr., Severn School
Mikey Parker, G, Sr., Sandy Spring Friends
Xavier Reeves, F, Sr., Paint Branch
Avion Robinson, G, Jr., Old Mill
Cam Rucker, F, Sr., Springbrook
Alex Sanson, G, Sr., Whitman
Wynston Tabbs, G, Sr., St. Mary’s Ryken
Nendah Tarke, G, Jr., Bullis
FIRST TEAM
BOYS’ INDOOR
TRACK AND FIELD
COACH OF THE YEAR
SECOND TEAM
HONORABLE MENTION
GIRLS’ SWIMMING
AND DIVING
Lena Redisch, Sr., Whitman
Mary Kate Reicherter, So., Yorktown
Sophia Ryan, Jr., Sherwood
Rachel Schlemmer, So., Dominion
Livi Schmid, Sr., Robinson
Sarah Shackelford, Jr., Lake Braddock
Dorothy Shapiro, Jr., National Cathedral
Jing-E Tan, Jr., Holton-Arms
Genevieve Thibodeau, So., Stone Ridge
Amanda Wenhold, So., Sherwood
Jordan Wenner, Jr., Briar Woods
Caroline Wittich, Sr., West Springfield
COACH OF THE YEAR
Kelli Cofield, Long Reach
Zyan Collins, G, Sr., Freedom-South Riding
Hunter Dickinson, C, So., DeMatha
Casey Morsell, G, Jr., St. John’s
Jason Newman, G, Sr., Potomac (Md.)
Terrance Williams, F, So., Gonzaga
Matthew Balanc, G, Sr., Springbrook
Saddiq Bey, F, Sr., Sidwell Friends
Darren Lucas-White, G, Sr., Fairmont
Heights
Earl Timberlake, G, So., DeMatha
Qudus Wahab, F, Jr., Flint Hill
BOYS’ SWIMMING
AND DIVING
Jack Rose, Sr., Richard Montgomery
Jacob Rosner, So., Landon
Noah Rutberg, So., Churchill
John Sita, Sr., Bullis
Aaron Stanton, Sr., Blake
Carson Stevens, Sr., Park View
Aleksander Tarczynski, Jr., West Springfield
Kai Vilbig, Sr., Seneca Valley
Trace Wall, So., Rock Ridge
Nathan Watts, Jr., Rockville
Daniel Wong, Jr., Patriot
Kyle Wu, Jr., Madison
Sam Affolder, Jr., Loudoun Valley
Decker Barborek, Sr., Fairfax
Jabari Bennett, Sr., Washington-Lee
Caden Billak, Sr., Centreville
Colton Bogucki, Sr., Loudoun Valley
Chauncey Chambers, Sr., Lee
Ethan Fogle, Sr., Archbishop Carroll
Joshua Prince Gilliard, Sr., Colgan
Ryan Lockett, Sr., Poolesville
Donovan Louis, Sr., Potomac (Va.)
Eldon Phillips, Sr., Northwood
Brendon Stewart, Sr., DeMatha
Daniel Whitfield, Sr., Wise
COACH OF THE YEAR
THIRD TEAM
FOURTH TEAM
Peyton Perine, C, Sr., Oakton
Jahnaya Peterson, G, Sr., Suitland
Nusaibah Rashad, F, Sr., Richard Montgomery
Danyelle Riddick, F, Sr., Douglass
Gabbi San Diego, G, So., South County
Tatiana Seymour, G, Sr., Bell
Lyric Swann, G, Jr., Long Reach
Natalie Terwilliger, F, Sr., West Potomac
Iyanna Warren, G, Jr., Oxon Hill
Taylor Webster, F, So., Georgetown Visitation
Lexi Weger, F, Sr., Episcopal
Tania White, F, Sr., Largo
Brooke Worrell, G, Sr., Chesapeake
FOURTH TEAM
Jaelyn Batts, F, Jr., Freedom-South Riding
Aliyah Matharu, G, Jr., McNamara
Brie Perpignan, G, Sr., O’Connell
Kiana Williams, G, Sr., Long Reach
Sydney Wood, F, Sr., St. John’s
HONORABLE MENTION
Taylor Addison, F, Sr., Howard
Zenzele Aspemaka-Vital, G, Sr., National
Christian
Annie Boasberg, G, Sr., Sidwell Friends
Denai Bowman, G, Jr., Gwynn Park
Mallory Brodnik, F, Jr., Jefferson
Kayla Brooks, G, Sr., Bladensburg
Jakayla Brown, G, Sr., St. Mary’s Ryken
Maqui Carrillo, G, Sr., Bullis
Courtlynne Caskin, G, Sr., Potomac School
Chloe Chapman, G, Jr., Good Counsel
Jackie Christ, F, Jr., Dominion
Caitlyn Clendenin, F, Sr., Bethesda-Chevy
Chase
Promise Cunningham, G, Jr., National
Christian
Jada Dapaa, F, Sr., Holy Child
Sydney Faulcon, F, Jr., Old Mill
Laila Grant, G, Jr., Magruder
Zoey Goldberg, G, Sr., Wootton
Kayla Goldring, F, Sr., Leonardtown
Erin Green, F, Sr., Poolesville
Marley Grenway, G, Jr., Oakland Mills
Carrie Gross, F, Sr., Rock Creek Christian
Sha’lynn Hagans, G, Jr., Osbourn Park
Morgann Harden, G, Jr., Loudoun County
Latavia Jackson, G, Jr., North Point
Ragan Johnson, F, Sr., Parkdale
Synia Johnson, G, So., North Point
Kate Klimkiewicz, G, Sr., Paul VI
Trinity Klock, F, So., Clarksburg
Alayna McFadden, G, Sr., Blair
Nicole McNamara, G, Sr., Westfield
Kennedy Middleton, F, Sr., Tuscarora
Mariah Mitchell, G, Sr., Dunbar
Amele Ngwafang, F, Sr., Paint Branch
Jordan Odom, G, Sr., Gaithersburg
Melanie Osborne, F, Sr., Richard Montgomery
Trinity Palacio, G, Jr., T.C. Williams
Haley Pasqualone, F, Jr., Loudoun Valley
FIRST TEAM
Conor Casey, Sr., W.T. Woodson
Eli Fouts, Sr., Quince Orchard
Anthony Grimm, Fr., Oakton
Daniel Gyenis, Jr., Oakton
Philip Manoff, Sr., Battlefield
Jonathan Pollock, Sr., Jefferson
Corey Shepard, Sr., Osbourn Park
Casey Storch, Sr., Langley
Ryan Vipavetz, Jr., Good Counsel
Tyler Zuyus, Sr., Langley
Kyle Barker, Sr., Champe
Ryan Catron, So., Gonzaga
Alex Colson, Jr., Wheaton
Noah Desman, Sr., Centreville
Brett Feyerick, Fr., Georgetown Prep
Adam Fischer, Jr., St. Stephen’s/St. Agnes
Max Flory, Jr., Robinson
Jack Galbraith, Sr., Madison
Peter Makin, So., Fairfax
Steven Thalblum, Sr., Stone Bridge
RELAYS
200 freestyle: Shane Morison, Sr., Robert
Schultz, Sr., Steven Butler, Jr., Corey
Shepard, Sr. (Osbourn Park): 1:24.80
200 IM: Anthony Grimm, Fr., Nick Highman, Jr., Daniel Gyenis, Jr., Devin Gardner,
Sr. (Oakton): 1:33.10
400 freestyle: Will Koeppen, Jr., Darius
Truong, So., Casey Storch, Sr., Tyler Zuyus,
Sr. (Langley): 3:07.31
HONORABLE MENTION
Manuel Borowski, Fr., McLean
Steven Butler, Jr., Osbourn Park
Danny Calder, Jr., Whitman
Diego Cruzado, Jr., Potomac School
Miguel Davis, Sr., St. John’s
Sam Duncan, So., Madison
Jack Edgemond, Sr., South Lakes
Timmy Ellett, Jr., Walter Johnson
Chris Emerson, Sr., St. Albans
Kai Green, Jr., Washington-Lee
Steve Han, So., McLean
Collin Hughes, Sr., Loudoun County
Reid Hussey, Sr., Severna Park
Jaya Kambhampaty, Sr., Washington-Lee
Paul Kinsella, Jr., O’Connell
Will Koeppen, Jr., Langley
Max Kuranda, Jr., Westfield
Gabriel Laracuente, Jr., Good Counsel
Fletcher Madsen, Sr., Chantilly
Ryan Mathis, So., Georgetown Prep
Steven Mendley, Jr., Churchill
Oliver Mills, So., Flint Hill
Jack Moore, So., Briar Woods
Thomas Moore, Sr., Briar Woods
Jack Mowery, So., Washington-Lee
Anthony Nguyen, So., Robinson
Samuel Oliver, So., Champe
Max Powell, Jr., South County
Stuart Pliuskaitis, Sr., Briar Woods
Henry Radzikowski, So., Battlefield
Andrew Revers, Sr., St. Stephen’s/St. Agnes
TJ Roche, Jr., George Mason
Phoebe Bacon, So., Stone Ridge
Cassidy Bayer, Sr., West Potomac
Lexi Cuomo, Jr., Centreville
Maddie Donohoe, Jr., O’Connell
Izzy Gati, Sr., Madeira
Jasmine Hellmer, Sr., Flint Hill
Emily Hetzer, Sr., Battlefield
Holly Jansen, Sr., West Potomac
Anna Keating, So., Madison
Maddy Pfaff, Sr., Bethesda-Chevy Chase
RELAYS
200 freestyle: Izzy Gati, Sr., Giovi Moriarty, Sr., Sofie Davis, So., Maddie Heilbrun,
Sr. (Madeira): 1:35.20
200 IM: Mary Kate Reicherter, So., Kayle
Park, Jr., Victoria Huske, Fr., Emily Brooks,
Sr. (Yorktown): 1:43.02
400 freestyle: Makenzie Higgins, So., Erika
Chen, So., Tia Thomas, Fr., Phoebe Bacon,
So. (Stone Ridge): 3:27.07
HONORABLE MENTION
Athena Aravantinou, Sr., Walter Johnson
Catherine Belyakov, So., Quince Orchard
Molly Benson, So., Walter Johnson
Jill Berger, Fr., Bethesda-Chevy Chase
Sarah Boyle, Jr., Westfield
Keyla Brown, Jr., St. John’s
Abby Carr, Fr., Washington Christian
Academy
Missy Cundiff, Sr., Tuscarora
Brynn Curtis, So., Oakton
Grace Cutrell, Jr., Herndon
Kyrsten Davis, Jr., South County
Sofie Davis, So., Madeira
Andrea Ducar, Jr., Falls Church
Sinead Eksteen, Sr., McLean
Olivia French, Sr., Good Counsel
Shelby Gerving, So., Tuscarora
Grace Giddings, Sr., Sherwood
Sammie Grant, Sr., Blair
Kaitlin Gravell, Jr., Sherwood
Sarah Gurley, So., Paul VI
Sydney Harrington, Sr., Jefferson
Erica Hjelle, Jr., Sherwood
Rachael Holp, Sr., Madison
Olivia Jubin, Jr., Holton-Arms
Olivia Masterson, So., Westfield
Hannah Montau, Sr., Seneca Valley
Julia Moser, Jr., Fairfax
Elise Mozeleski, Jr., Chantilly
Claire Nguyen, Jr., Riverside
Kayle Park, Jr., Yorktown
Janika Perezous, Fr., Potomac Falls
Catherine Purnell, So., Stonewall Jackson
Erin Quinn, Jr., Osbourn
Anna Redican, So., South Lakes
4x800: Loudoun Valley (Connor Wells, Jacob Hunter, Colton Bogucki, Sam Affolder), 7:39.30
4x400: Bullis (Eric Allen Jr., Austin Allen,
Ashton Allen, Sydney Peal), 3:19.42
4x200: Bullis (Eric Allen Jr., Ashton Allen,
Bryce Watson, Caleb Mauney), 1:26.77
HONORABLE MENTION
Marcus Abrams, Sr., Arundel
Elian Ahmar, Sr., Broadneck
Bryan Ahouman, So., Potomac (Va.)
Ashton Allen, So., Bullis
Michael Altenburg, Sr., Robinson
Peter Antonetti, Sr., Gaithersburg
Blaine Ashton, Sr., Lee
Ibrahim Bangura, Jr., T.C. Williams
Andrew Birgin, Sr., Walter Johnson
Rawle Brebnor Jr., Sr., Potomac (Va.)
Casey Buckley, Sr., Westfield
Edward Cerne, Jr., Lake Braddock
Garrison Clark, Jr., Severna Park
Kai Cole, Sr., T.C. Williams
Nick Cross, Jr., DeMatha
Andrew Delvecchio, Sr., Lake Braddock
Justin Diehl, Jr., Calvert
Clark Edwards, Sr., Rock Ridge
Clarence Foote-Talley, Jr., Northwest
Daniel George, Sr., Oxon Hill
David Giannini, Jr., Gonzaga
Aaron Hackett, Sr., Largo
Jacob Hunter, Jr., Loudoun Valley
Jaedon Joyner, Jr., Bowie
Arno Landry-Fonkoue, Sr., Phelps
Andrew Lang, Jr., South County
Alex Loukili, Sr., South Lakes
Mathew Mckiver, Sr., Annandale
Ratez McLaurin, Sr., Westlake
Sam McLendon, Sr., South County
Khaloni Mganga, Sr., Northwest
Matthew Mitchell, Jr., Potomac (Va.)
Peter Morris, Sr., Loudoun Valley
Sean Murphy, Sr., Woodgrove
Divinus Muteba, Sr., Northwest
Adam Nakasaka, Sr., Bethesda-Chevy
Chase
Brandon Osazuwa, Sr., St John’s
Chase Osborne, Sr., Northwest
Jay Pendarvis Jr., So., Annandale
Terrence Sakyi, Sr., T.C. Williams
Zackary Sampson, Jr., Oxon Hill
Randy Serville, Sr., Oxon Hill
Xavier Shirley, Jr., South River
Alex Strong, Sr., La Plata
Garrett Suhr, So., Richard Montgomery
Brandon Tunson, Sr., C.H. Flowers
Cameron Vereen, Sr., Oakland Mills
Jordan Walker, Sr., St. Stephen/St. Agnes
Trevor Walker, Sr., Battlefield
Daniel Walsh, Sr., T.C. Williams
Connor Wells, Jr., Loudoun Valley
Jacob Westerfield, Jr., Battlefield
GIRLS’ INDOOR
TRACK AND FIELD
FIRST TEAM
Destiny Ball, Sr., Battlefield
Sydney Banks, Jr., Osbourn Park
Sarah Coleman, Jr., West Springfield
Olivia Duston, Sr., Herndon
Kasey Ebb, Sr., Bullis
Abigail Green, Sr., Walter Johnson
Taylor Grimes, Sr., Bishop McNamara
Isabelle Gulgert, Jr., South Lakes
Leah Phillips, So., Bullis
Hannah Robertson, Sr., West Springfield
Masai Russell, Sr., Bullis
Alahna Sabbakhan, Jr., St. John’s
Nyla Ward, Jr., T.C. Williams
Taylor Wright, Jr., Northwest
COACH OF THE YEAR
Joe Lee, Bullis
RELAYS
4x800: West Springfield (Anna Marcucci,
Chase Kappeler, Lillian Stephens, Sarah
Coleman), 9:12.50
4x400: Bullis (Masai Russell, Kasey Ebb,
Sierra Leonard, Shaniya Hall), 3:39.60
4x200: Bullis (Shaniya Hall, Leah Phillips,
Ashley Seymour, Masai Russell), 1:34.75
HONORABLE MENTION
Nafisat Adeyemi, Sr., Bladensburg
Cecelia Bacon, Sr., Chantilly
Natalie Barnes, Jr., Stone Bridge
Marisa Bermudez, Sr., Woodbridge
Antoinette Bradley, Sr., Friendly
Melady Brown, Jr., McKinley Tech
Kelisa Cain, Sr., St. Mary’s Ryken
Morgan Casey, Sr., Blair
Arihant Chadda, Sr., Landon
Anna Coffin, Jr., Annapolis
Madison Depry, So., Wheaton
Sarah Deresky, Sr., Northern
Dejah Grant, Jr., C.H. Flowers
Mary Gregory, So., South Lakes
Shaniya Hall, So., Bullis
Lauryn Harris, Jr., Bullis
Serena Harrison, So., Blake
Courtney Hawkins, Sr., Lackey
Ziyah Holman, So., Georgetown Day
Alexandria Jackson, Jr., Eastern
Olivia Janke, Sr., Broadneck
Dominique Jeffery, Sr., Lackey
Lenea Johnson, Jr., Dunbar
Ja’Tae Joyner, Sr., Bowie
Michelle Kamara, Jr., Gaithersburg
Chase Kappeler, Jr., West Springfield
Emily Knight, Jr., Severna Park
Merrill Leak, Sr., James Madison
Sierra Leonard, Jr., Bullis
Olivia McGill, Sr., Battlefield
Caliyah McKeithan, Jr., McKinley Tech
Natalie Morris, Sr., Loudoun Valley
Victoria Perrow, Fr., Archbishop Carroll
Editta Pessima, Sr., Northwest
Noelani Phillips, Jr., Blake
Cierra Pyles, Sr., Bullis
Nicole Re, Jr., Chantilly
Skyler Reynolds, Jr., Osbourn Park
Hannah Richardson, So., Langley
Ashley Seymour, Sr., Bullis
Abby Sweeney, Sr., Northern
Rebecca Thompson, Sr., Hylton
JaneAnne Tvedt, Jr., McLean
Seneca Willen, Jr., Robinson
Ariana Wright, Fr., Bullis
Grace Yeboah-Kodie, Sr., Colgan
Lauren Yeboah-Kodie, So., Colgan
Lindsay Yentz, Sr., Patriot
WRESTLING
FIRST TEAM
Jonathan Birchmeier, 285-pounder, Jr.,
Broad Run
Tristin Breen, 170-pounder, Sr., Huntingtown
Jack Connolly, 138-pounder, Sr., Churchill
Zac Feight, 152-pounder, Sr., Battlefield
Yonas Harris, 106-pounder, Sr., Northwest
Aaron Howell, 113-pounder, Sr., Robinson
Jason Kraisser, 145-pounder, Jr., Centennial
Tyler Matheny, 182-pounder, Sr., Lake
Braddock
Johnny McLaughlin, 126-pounder, Jr., Damascus
Thomas Mukai, 220-pounder, Jr., Robinson
Paul Purkey, 195-pounder, Sr., Damascus
King Sandoval, 120-pounder, Sr., St.
Mary’s Ryken
Nathan Thacker, 160-pounder, Sr., Gonzaga
Nathaniel White, 132-pounder, Sr., Bowie
Brandon Wittenberg, 120-pounder, Jr.,
Battlefield
Anthony Martin, 120-pounder, So., W.T.
Woodson
Gabe McAndrew, 182-pounder, Sr.,
Bethesda-Chevy Chase
Joshua Mix, 113-pounder, Jr., Paul VI
Syed Moaz, 132-pounder, Jr., Potomac
(Va.)
Joe Murray, 160-pounder, So., Lake Braddock
Najim Murshidi, 113-pounder, Sr., Briar
Woods
Nick Nordhausen, 285-pounder, Sr., Mt.
Hebron
John Podsednik, 152-pounder, Jr., Leonardtown
Bobby Quinones, 120-pounder, Sr., Westfield
Loranzo Rajaonarivelo, 160-pounder, Jr.,
Wakefield
Aidan Rocha, 138-pounder, Jr., St. John’s
Seamus Selmi, 170-pounder, Jr., St. John’s
Sam Smirnoff, 126-pounder, So., Spalding
Chris St. George, 126-pounder, Sr., O’Connell
Jared Thomas, 132-pounder, Jr., Glenelg
Matthew Wright, 152-pounder, Jr., Paul VI
COACH OF THE YEAR
HOCKEY
Milton Yates, Gonzaga
FIRST TEAM
SECOND TEAM
Lacey Eden, F, So., Spalding
Victor Musoke, F, So., O’Connell
Mitch Rebholz, F, Sr., Broad Run
Jack Stanley, D, Sr., Washington-Lee
Andrew Takacs, G, Jr., DeMatha
Chase Vallese, D, Sr., Gonzaga
Cole Vallese, F, So., Gonzaga
Sam Alsheimer, 182-pounder, Jr., Glenelg
Garrett Fisk, 152-pounder, Jr., Spalding
Luke Kowalski, 106-pounder, So., St.
John’s
Ryan Lawrence, 145-pounder, Sr., Damascus
Ka’Ron Lewis, 285-pounder, Jr., South River
Matthew Liechty, 195-pounder, Sr., Hayfield
Ron Miller, 160-pounder, Sr., Battlefield
James Momon, 220-pounder, Sr., South
County
Max Sotka, 170-pounder, Sr., Glenelg
Devin Sweeney, 113-pounder, Sr., Potomac
P.J. Truntich, 120-pounder, Jr., Spalding
HONORABLE MENTION
Abdelrahman Abdelghany, 182-pounder,
Sr., Wilson
Elijah Baisden, 285-pounder, Jr., Damascus
Sean Billups, 170-pounder, Jr., Atholton
Steven Bybee, 152-pounder, Sr., Robinson
Garrett Cashion, 120-pounder, Jr., Wilson
Clay Chadwick, 285-pounder, Sr., Yorktown
Jalen Dickerson, 285-pounder, Sr., St.
John’s
Isaiah Edmond, 132-pounder, Sr., North
Point
Michael Emerick, 106-pounder, Fr., Damascus
Kyle Farace, 126-pounder, Sr., Oakland
Mills
Alejandro Figueiras, 126-pounder, Jr., St.
Mary’s Ryken
Timothy Furgeson, 160-pounder, So., Damascus
Brendon Gallagher, 145-pounder, Sr.,
Landon
Ryan Garretson, 145-pounder, Sr., Spalding
Nik Gerard, 132-pounder, Sr., Robinson
Alex Green, 195-pounder, Sr., Leonardtown
Kyonte Hamilton, 195-pounder, Fr.,
Georgetown Prep
John-Luke Iglesias, 220-pounder, Sr.,
Whitman
Blake Jury, 113-pounder, So., Huntingtown
Mikey Keen, 220-pounder, Fr., St. John’s
Allen Kokilananda, 145-pounder, Sr., Annandale
Will Lisenby, 113-pounder, Sr., Westfield
Lorenzo Lopez, 126-pounder, So., Landon
Sam Lu, 195-pounder, Sr., Potomac School
COACH OF THE YEAR
Bill Slater, Gonzaga
SECOND TEAM
Dominic Basse, G, Jr. Gonzaga
Dylan Healy, D, Sr., Churchill
Reid Leibold, F, So., Riverside
Collin Mercier, F, Sr., DeMatha
Joshua Phelps, F, Jr. Arundel
Justin Robinson, D, Sr., Northern
Curtis Rodkey, F, Sr., Glenelg
David Stephens, D, Sr., Marriotts Ridge
HONORABLE MENTION
Payton Andrews, F, Jr., W.T. Woodson
Hunter Band, F, Jr., Wootton
Evan Benedek, G, Sr., River Hill
Kristen Bitsberger, F, Sr., Holton-Arms
Tiger Bjornlund, D, Sr., Whitman
Luke Borostovik, F, Sr., Colgan
Riley Burch, G, So., Lake Braddock/Park
View
Colin Bray, F, Sr., Sherwood
Grace Campbell, G, Fr., Walter Johnson
Alex Delaney, D, Sr., St. Mary’s Ryken
Trevor Drake, F, So., Damascus
Liam Eden, F, Sr., Spalding
Kailey Fitzgerald, D, Jr., Visitation
James Flannery, F, Jr., Georgetown Prep
Ryan Giles, F, So., Landon
James Jones, D, Sr., Lake Braddock/Park
View
Dimitry Kebreau, F, Fr., Blair
Tommy Krisztinicz, F, Jr., Gonzaga
Sam Kukulich, G, Sr., Stone Bridge
James Lang, G, Sr., Briar Woods
Jack Larrick, G, Sr., West Potomac
Jack MacKinnon, G, Jr., O’Connell
Cole Maner, F, Sr., St. John’s
Jeremy Marino, F, So., Yorktown
Tyler Middledorf, F, Sr., Northern
Bryce Montgomery, D, Fr., DeMatha
Ellen Montgomery, G, Fr., Stone Ridge
Billy Murray, D, Sr., Broad Run
Jack Murray, F, Sr., Patriot
Sam Nyman, D, Sr., Huntingtown
Alex Plastrik, G, Sr., Churchill
Kevin Scott, D, Fr. Briar Woods
Jason Townsend, F, So., T.C. Williams
Drew Tsakounis, D, Fr., St. John’s
Alex Vouras, F, So., O’Connell
Drew Wellington, F, Sr., Landon
William Yao, F, Jr., Robinson
THURSDAY, MARCH 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D11
M2
SCOREBOARD
B A S K ET B A L L
NBA
EASTERN
W
y-Toronto ...................................53
y-Boston ....................................48
Cleveland ...................................42
x-Washington............................40
Philadelphia ...............................40
Indiana .......................................41
Miami.........................................39
Milwaukee .................................37
Detroit .......................................32
Charlotte....................................31
New York ...................................26
Chicago ......................................24
Brooklyn.....................................23
Orlando ......................................21
Atlanta.......................................21
L
19
23
29
30
30
31
33
34
39
41
46
47
49
50
50
Pct
.736
.676
.592
.571
.571
.569
.542
.521
.451
.431
.361
.338
.319
.296
.296
GB
—
41/2
101/2
12
12
12
14
151/2
201/2
22
27
281/2
30
311/2
311/2
WESTERN
W
z-Houston ..................................57
z-Golden State...........................53
Portland .....................................44
Oklahoma City ...........................43
New Orleans ..............................42
x-San Antonio............................41
Minnesota..................................41
Utah ...........................................40
Denver........................................39
L.A. Clippers...............................38
L.A. Lakers .................................31
Sacramento ...............................23
Dallas .........................................22
Memphis ....................................19
Phoenix ......................................19
L
14
18
27
30
30
30
31
31
33
33
39
49
49
52
53
Pct
.803
.746
.620
.589
.583
.577
.569
.563
.542
.535
.443
.319
.310
.268
.264
GB
—
4
13
15
1/
15 2
16
161/2
17
181/2
19
251/2
341/2
35
38
381/2
x-Late game; y-Clinched playoff spot
z-Clinched division
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
Toronto 93, at Orlando 86
at New Orleans 115, Dallas 105
at Minnesota 123, L.A. Clippers 109
at Boston 100, Oklahoma City 99
Atlanta 99, at Utah 94
Detroit 115, at Phoenix 88
Houston 115, at Portland 111
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
Washington at San Antonio, Late
at Philadelphia 119, Memphis 105
at Cleveland 132, Toronto 129
at Miami 119, New York 98
Charlotte 111, at Brooklyn 105
Denver 135, at Chicago 102
at New Orleans 96, Indiana 92
L.A. Clippers 127, at Milwaukee 120
NHL
ALBANY REGION
SECOND ROUND
SUNDAY’S RESULT
IN COLUMBIA, S.C.
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Villanova 81, Alabama 58
South Carolina 66, Virginia 56
20
34
30 — 129
34 — 132
TORONTO: Anunoby 2-4 0-0 5, Ibaka 2-8 2-2 6, Valanciunas 6-6 2-3 15, Lowry 7-10 4-4 24, DeRozan 6-15 9-10 21,
Powell 2-3 0-0 4, Siakam 4-9 0-0 9, Poeltl 8-13 1-2 17,
VanVleet 6-13 0-0 16, Wright 4-6 2-2 12. Totals 47-87
20-23 129.
CLEVELAND: James 11-19 12-14 35, Green 4-9 5-6 15,
Love 8-15 3-4 23, Calderon 5-7 0-0 14, Hill 10-11 0-0 22,
Zizic 2-3 2-2 6, Clarkson 2-7 0-0 4, Holland 1-1 1-2 3,
Smith 4-6 0-0 10. Totals 47-78 23-28 132.
Three-point Goals: Toronto 15-34 (Lowry 6-9, VanVleet
4-9, Wright 2-3, Valanciunas 1-1, Anunoby 1-1, Siakam
1-3, Powell 0-1, DeRozan 0-3, Ibaka 0-4), Cleveland
15-24 (Calderon 4-4, Love 4-6, Hill 2-2, Smith 2-3, Green
2-4, James 1-3, Clarkson 0-2). Fouled Out: None.
Rebounds: Toronto 33 (Valanciunas, Poeltl 8), Cleveland
32 (Love 12). Assists: Toronto 32 (Lowry 7), Cleveland
28 (James 17). Total Fouls: Toronto 23, Cleveland 18. A:
20,562 (20,562).
Nuggets 135, Bulls 102
DENVER .............................. 39
CHICAGO ............................ 25
38
21
36
24
22 — 135
32 — 102
DENVER: Chandler 6-9 2-2 19, Millsap 8-9 5-6 22, Jokic
9-11 1-1 21, Murray 5-14 3-3 16, Barton 7-9 0-0 16,
Jefferson 0-0 0-0 0, Lyles 4-10 0-0 10, Arthur 1-2 0-0 3,
Plumlee 2-2 0-1 4, D.Harris 5-8 1-1 14, Beasley 1-3 0-0 3,
Craig 3-6 1-2 7. Totals 51-83 13-16 135.
Minnesota at Philadelphia, 6
Chicago at Detroit, 7
Phoenix at Orlando, 7
L.A. Lakers at Memphis, 8
New Orleans at Houston, 8
Charlotte at Dallas, 8:30
SUNDAY’S GAMES
New York at Washington, 6
Cleveland at Brooklyn, 1
San Antonio atMilwaukee, 3:30
Miami at Indiana, 5
L.A. Clippers at Toronto, 6
Boston at Sacramento, 6
Portland at Oklahoma City, 7
Atlanta aty Houston, 8
Utah at Golden State, 8:30
76ers 119, Grizzlies 105
25
32
25
41
36 — 105
20 — 119
MEMPHIS: Martin 1-7 6-8 8, Green 5-10 3-4 14, Gasol 2-8
0-0 5, Harrison 1-4 0-0 2, Brooks 6-9 1-2 14, Parsons 1-6
0-0 2, B.Johnson 4-6 1-1 9, Davis 8-14 0-0 16, Weber 1-5
0-0 2, Chalmers 4-8 0-0 10, Selden 5-12 5-5 18,
McLemore 2-10 0-0 5. Totals 40-100 16-20 105.
PHILADELPHIA: Covington 6-9 0-0 15, Saric 5-9 2-3 15,
Embiid 4-10 6-6 14, B.Simmons 6-9 1-1 13, Redick 5-9 2-2
15, Ilyasova 3-7 0-0 6, A.Johnson 1-2 0-0 2, Holmes 3-4
2-5 8, Jackson 2-3 0-0 4, McConnell 2-2 0-0 4, Anderson
2-8 2-2 6, Belinelli 6-10 1-1 15, Young 1-2 0-0 2. Totals
46-84 16-20 119.
Three-point Goals: Memphis 9-27 (Selden 3-6, Chalmers
2-4, Gasol 1-3, Brooks 1-3, Green 1-3, McLemore 1-4,
Parsons 0-1, Harrison 0-1, Martin 0-2), Philadelphia
11-31 (Covington 3-4, Redick 3-6, Saric 3-6, Belinelli 2-6,
Ilyasova 0-1, Holmes 0-1, Embiid 0-2, Anderson 0-5).
Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Memphis 47 (Davis 11),
Philadelphia 38 (B.Simmons, Embiid 7). Assists: Memphis 25 (Chalmers 5), Philadelphia 32 (B.Simmons 9).
Total Fouls: Memphis 20, Philadelphia 21. A: 10,411
(21,600).
Heat 119, Knicks 98
21
37
30
35
21 — 98
20 — 119
NEW YORK: Hardaway Jr. 5-15 1-1 12, Beasley 10-15 0-0
22, Kanter 8-13 7-9 23, Mudiay 3-10 2-2 8, Lee 2-7 0-0 5,
Williams 0-1 0-0 0, Hicks 0-3 0-0 0, O’Quinn 3-4 0-0 6,
Burke 6-11 0-0 16, Ntilikina 1-5 0-0 3, Dotson 1-5 0-0 3.
Totals 39-89 10-12 98.
MIAMI: Richardson 5-6 0-0 12, J.Johnson 1-2 1-2 3,
Adebayo 3-4 0-0 6, Dragic 5-11 4-4 14, T.Johnson 9-13
0-1 22, Winslow 6-14 2-3 15, Babbitt 0-1 0-0 0, Haslem
0-2 0-0 0, Olynyk 8-11 4-5 22, Mickey 0-1 0-0 0, Walton
Jr. 0-0 2-2 2, Ellington 6-12 0-0 16, McGruder 2-4 1-2 7.
Totals 45-81 14-19 119.
Three-point Goals: New York 10-31 (Burke 4-7, Beasley
2-3, Lee 1-3, Ntilikina 1-3, Dotson 1-4, Hardaway Jr. 1-8,
Hicks 0-1, Mudiay 0-2), Miami 15-34 (T.Johnson 4-6,
Ellington 4-7, Richardson 2-3, McGruder 2-3, Olynyk 2-4,
Winslow 1-6, Haslem 0-1, Babbitt 0-1, Dragic 0-3).
Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: New York 40 (Kanter 13),
Miami 32 (Olynyk, J.Johnson 5). Assists: New York 21
(Mudiay 4), Miami 31 (Olynyk 10). Total Fouls: New York
16, Miami 17. A: 19,600 (19,600).
Pelicans 96, Pacers 92
25
27
19
16
23 — 92
29 — 96
INDIANA: Bogdanovic 4-10 0-0 9, T.Young 3-12 3-4 9,
Turner 4-15 5-5 13, Collison 4-11 1-1 11, Oladipo 7-16 4-4
21, Robinson III 0-0 2-2 2, Booker 5-8 0-0 10, Jefferson
1-3 2-2 4, Joseph 4-11 0-0 8, Stephenson 2-7 0-0 5. Totals
34-93 17-18 92.
NEW ORLEANS: E.Moore 10-15 0-0 23, Davis 9-14 9-9
28, Okafor 0-4 0-0 0, Rondo 1-6 0-0 2, Holiday 4-10 1-4 10,
Miller 1-3 0-0 3, Diallo 2-3 5-5 9, Mirotic 6-16 1-2 15,
Drew II 0-1 0-0 0, Clark 1-7 4-4 6. Totals 34-79 20-24 96.
Three-point Goals: Indiana 7-22 (Oladipo 3-7, Collison
2-4, Stephenson 1-3, Bogdanovic 1-3, Joseph 0-1, Turner
0-2, T.Young 0-2), New Orleans 8-23 (E.Moore 3-4,
Mirotic 2-9, Davis 1-1, Holiday 1-3, Miller 1-3, Clark 0-1,
Rondo 0-2). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Indiana 48
(Turner, T.Young 10), New Orleans 50 (Davis 13).
Assists: Indiana 15 (Collison 6), New Orleans 15 (Rondo
6). Total Fouls: Indiana 21, New Orleans 19. Technicals:
Indiana coach Pacers (Defensive three second). A:
14,148 (16,867).
Buffalo 86, Florida State 65
REGION SEMIFINALS
IN BOSTON
FRIDAY’S GAMES
REGION SEMIFINALS
SATURDAY’S GAMES
IN ALBANY, N.Y.
Villanova (32-4) vs. West Virginia (26-10), 7:27
Purdue (30-6) vs. Texas Tech (26-9), 9:57
South Carolina (28-6) vs. Buffalo (29-5), 11:30 a.m.
U-Conn. (34-0) vs. Duke (24-8), 2
REGION CHAMPIONSHIP
SUNDAY’S GAME
REGION CHAMPIONSHIP
MONDAY’S GAME
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Semifinal winners
Semifinal winners, 7
SPOKANE REGION
SECOND ROUND
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
IN NOTRE DAME, IND.
Kentucky 95, Buffalo 75
Notre Dame 98, Villanova 72
IN DALLAS
IN COLLEGE STATION, TEX.
W
48
44
41
40
40
38
30
L
14
19
24
25
28
28
35
OL PTS. GF GA
10 106 236 178
10
98 242 190
8
90 227 210
8
88 236 210
5
85 203 194
8
84 212 201
9
69 209 228
Late Tuesday
SOUTH REGION
SECOND ROUND
SATURDAY'S RESULTS
IN BOISE, IDAHO
CENTRAL
y-Nashville ....................
Winnipeg ......................
Minnesota .....................
Colorado ........................
St. Louis ........................
Dallas ............................
Chicago .........................
PACIFIC
Vegas ............................
San Jose ........................
Los Angeles ..................
x-Anaheim ....................
x-Calgary .......................
Edmonton .....................
Arizona .........................
Vancouver .....................
W
47
41
40
37
35
32
25
25
L
21
23
27
24
29
36
37
39
OL PTS. GF GA
5
99 248 200
9
91 225 201
7
87 212 186
12
86 206 197
10
80 204 222
5
69 208 234
11
61 179 231
9
59 187 240
SECOND PERIOD
Central Michigan 95, Ohio State 78
REGION SEMIFINALS
IN ATLANTA
THURSDAY’S GAMES
REGION SEMIFINALS
SATURDAY’S GAMES
IN SPOKANE, WASH.
Nevada (29-7) vs. Loyola of Chicago (30-5), 7:07
Kansas State (24-11) vs. Kentucky (26-10), 9:37
Notre Dame (31-3) vs. Texas A&M (26-9), 4
Oregon (32-4) vs. Central Michigan (30-4), 6:30
REGION CHAMPIONSHIP
SATURDAY’S GAME
REGION CHAMPIONSHIP
MONDAY’S GAME
Semifinal winners
Semifinal winners, 9
Oregon 101, Minnesota 73
MIDWEST REGION
SECOND ROUND
SATURDAY'S RESULTS
IN PITTSBURGH
Duke 87, Rhode Island 62
Kansas 83, Seton Hall 79
MONDAY’S RESULTS
IN STARKVILLE, MISS.
SUNDAY'S RESULTS
IN DETROIT
Mississippi State 71, Oklahoma State 56
UCLA 86, Creighton 64
Arizona 4, at Buffalo 1
at Pittsburgh 5, Montreal 3
at St. Louis 2, Boston 1 (OT)
Anaheim at Calgary, Late
IN AUSTIN
THURSDAY’S GAMES
IN LOS ANGELES
Syracuse 55, Michigan State 53
IN SAN DIEGO
Clemson 84, Auburn 53
Texas 85, Arizona State 65
REGION SEMIFINALS
IN OMAHA
FRIDAY’S GAMES
Kansas (29-7) vs. Clemson (25-9), 7:07
Duke (28-7) vs. Syracuse (23-13), 9:37
N.C. State (26-8) vs. Mississippi State (34-1), 6:30
UCLA (26-7) vs. Texas (28-6), 9
REGION CHAMPIONSHIP
SUNDAY’S GAME
REGION CHAMPIONSHIP
SUNDAY’S GAME
Semifinal winners
Semifinal winners, 7:30
Gonzaga 90, Ohio State 84
LEXINGTON REGION
SECOND ROUND
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
IN LOUISVILLE
IN WICHITA
Louisville 90, Marquette 72
IN KNOXVILLE, TENN.
Oregon State 66, Tennessee 59
Texas A&M 86, North Carolina 65
Baylor 80, Michigan 58
IN NASHVILLE
PHOENIX: J.Jackson 6-19 3-6 15, Bender 4-13 0-0 9, Len
9-11 1-1 19, Payton 2-6 0-2 4, Daniels 6-9 2-3 18, Dudley
2-5 0-0 4, Chriss 3-10 3-4 10, Peters 1-4 0-0 3, Ulis 0-3 2-2
2, Harrison 1-6 2-2 4, Reed 0-4 0-0 0. Totals 34-90 13-20
88.
Florida State 75, Xavier 70
MONDAY’S RESULT
IN STANFORD, CALIF.
Three-point Goals: Detroit 15-36 (Kennard 3-6, Griffin
3-7, Bullock 2-3, Ennis III 2-4, Tolliver 2-5, Ellenson 1-2,
R.Jackson 1-2, Smith 1-3, Johnson 0-4), Phoenix 7-34
(Daniels 4-5, Chriss 1-4, Peters 1-4, Bender 1-8, Payton
0-1, Dudley 0-1, Ulis 0-2, Harrison 0-3, J.Jackson 0-3,
Reed 0-3). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Detroit 50
(Drummond 10), Phoenix 49 (Len 12). Assists: Detroit 22
(Griffin 10), Phoenix 22 (Ulis, Payton 5). Total Fouls:
Detroit 16, Phoenix 16. Technicals: Phoenix coach Suns
(Defensive three second). A: 17,400 (18,055).
Texas A&M (22-12) vs. Michigan (30-7), 7:37
Florida State (22-11) vs. Gonzaga (32-4), 10:07
Oregon State (25-7) vs. Baylor (33-1), 6:30
Louisville (34-2) vs. Stanford (24-10), 9
REGION CHAMPIONSHIP
SATURDAY'S GAME
REGION CHAMPIONSHIP
SUNDAY’S GAME
Semifinal winners
Penn State 73, Notre Dame 63
PGA Tour
Mississippi State 78, Baylor 77
Marquette 101, Oregon 92
Louisville 84, Middle Tennessee 68
WGC MATCH PLAY
MONDAY’S RESULTS
At Austin Country Club; In Austin
Yardage: 7,108
Par: 71
Oklahoma State 71, Stanford 65
Utah 95, LSU 71
Saint Mary’s 85, Washington 81
Western Kentucky 79, Southern Cal 75
ARIZONA ................................. 2
BUFFALO ................................. 1
QUARTERFINALS
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
Penn State 85, Marquette 80
Mississippi State 79, Louisville 56
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
Western Kentucky 92, Oklahoma State 84
Utah at Saint Mary’s, Late
SEMIFINALS
IN NEW YORK
TUESDAY’S GAMES
Penn State (24-13) vs. Mississippi State (25-11), 7 or
9:30
Western Kentucky vs. Utah-St. Mary’s winner, 7 or 9:30
CHAMPIONSHIP
THURSDAY, MARCH 29
EASTERN
W
New York City FC .............3
Columbus .........................2
Atlanta United FC ............2
Philadelphia .....................1
New York .........................1
Montreal ..........................1
New England ....................1
D.C. United .......................0
Orlando City .....................0
Chicago ............................0
Toronto FC .......................0
L
0
0
1
0
1
2
1
1
2
2
2
T PTS
0
9
1
7
0
6
1
4
0
3
0
3
0
3
2
2
1
1
0
0
0
0
GF
6
5
7
2
4
4
2
4
2
4
0
GA
1
2
6
0
1
5
3
6
5
6
3
WESTERN
W
Los Angeles FC ................2
Minnesota United ............2
Sporting KC ......................2
Vancouver ........................2
Houston ...........................1
Dallas ...............................1
Real Salt Lake ..................1
San Jose ...........................1
LA Galaxy .........................1
Colorado ...........................0
Seattle .............................0
Portland ...........................0
L
0
1
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
1
2
2
T PTS
0
6
0
6
0
6
0
6
1
4
1
4
1
4
0
3
0
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
GF
6
6
7
5
7
4
3
5
3
1
0
1
GA
1
5
7
6
4
1
6
5
3
2
4
6
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
Houston 2, at D.C. United 2
Columbus 0, at Philadelphia 0
at Minnesota United 2, Chicago 1
at Montreal 1, Toronto FC 0
at New York City FC 2, Orlando City 0
at Atlanta United FC 4, Vancouver 1
at Sporting KC 3, San Jose 2
at Real Salt Lake 1, New York 0
Semifinal winners, 7
Women’s National
Invitation Tournament
SECOND ROUND
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
SUNDAY’S RESULT
at FC Dallas 3, Seattle 0
TCU 86, Missouri State 51
James Madison 62, Radford 35
SATURDAY’S MATCHES
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
D.C. United at Columbus, 6
New York City FC at New England, 1:30
Portland at Dallas, 3:30
Minnesota United at New York, 7
Sporting KC at Colorado, 9
LA Galaxy at Vancouver, 10
Indiana 74, Milwaukee 54
Purdue 77, Ball State 72
Virginia Tech 78, George Mason 69
South Dakota 74, Colorado State 49
Georgia Tech 91, UAB 47
West Virginia 79, Saint Joseph’s 51
Alabama 80, UCF 61
UC Davis 74, Wyoming 64
Fordham 63, Drexel 60
Kansas State 74, Utah 57
TRANSACTIONS
MONDAY’S RESULTS
Michigan State 68, Toledo 66
Duquesne 69, Georgetown 66
St. John’s 53, Penn 48
NFL
Atlanta Falcons: Agreed to terms with TE Logan Paulsen
on a one-year contract.
Detroit Lions: Signed TE Luke Willson and DT Sylvester
Williams.
Indianapolis Colts: Re-signed CB Pierre Desir and OT-G
Jack Mewhort.
Kansas City Chiefs: Signed DT Xavier Williams.
Minnesota Vikings: Signed LS Nick Dooley, K Kai Forbath
and TE Josiah Price. Waived LB Shaan Washington.
New England Patriots: Re-signed WR Matthew Slater.
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
New Mexico 93, Rice 73
THIRD ROUND
THURSDAY’S GAMES
Purdue (20-13) at Indiana (19-14), 7
James Madison (23-10) at West Virginia (23-11), 7
Fordham (24-9) at Virginia Tech (20-13), 7
Duquesne (25-7) at St. John’s (18-14), 7
Georgia Tech (20-13) at Alabama (19-13), 8
Michigan State (19-13) at South Dakota (28-6), 8
TCU (21-12) at New Mexico (25-10), 9
NHL
NHL: Fined Tampa Bay F Steven Stamkos $5,000 for a
dangerous trip against Toronto D Morgan Rielly during a
March 20 game.
Arizona Coyotes: Named Mike Berry vice president,
corporate partnerships.
FRIDAY’S GAME
UC Davis (27-6) at Kansas State (18-15), 8
0
0
2 —
0 —
4
1
FIRST PERIOD
MLS
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
Scoring: 1, Arizona, Strome 2 (Perlini, Goligoski), 3:38
(pp). 2, Buffalo, Nolan 3 (Beaulieu, Rodrigues), 11:42. 3,
Arizona, Stepan 13 (Keller, Ekman-Larsson), 17:44 (pp).
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Arizona, Panik 10 (Keller, Stepan), 6:32. 5,
Arizona, Domi 8 (Chychrun), 19:50.
1
4
Scoring: 1, Vegas, Marchessault 23 (McNabb, Karlsson),
3:56. 2, Vegas, Eakin 10 (Tuch, Theodore), 4:53. 3, Vegas,
Bellemare 6 (Reaves, Nosek), 19:27.
Scoring: 4, Vegas, Tatar 18 (Schmidt, Haula), 14:21.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 5, Vancouver, Sutter 7 (Pouliot, Biega), 8:27.
SHOTS ON GOAL
VANCOUVER ........................... 7
11
12 — 30
VEGAS ................................... 15
7
6 — 28
Power-play opportunities: Vancouver 0 of 1; Vegas 0 of
3. Goalies: Vancouver, Markstrom 18-26-6 (28 shots-24
saves). Vegas, Fleury 27-11-3 (7-7), Subban 11-3-1
(23-22). A: 18,214 (17,367). T: 2:25.
Carina Witthoeft, Germany, def. Tatjana Maria, Germany, 6-3, 6-4; Zarina Diyas, Kazakhstan, def. Jennifer
Brady, United States, 7-5, 7-6 (10-8); Ekaterina Makarova, Russia, def. Timea Bacsinszky, Switzerland, 6-2, 2-6,
6-4; Monica Niculescu, Romania, def. Yulia Putintseva,
Kazakhstan, 6-2, 6-4; Alize Cornet, France, def. Bethanie
Mattek-Sands, United States, 6-2, 7-5; Alison Riske,
United States, def. Magda Linette, Poland, 1-6, 6-0, 6-2;
Wang Yafan, China, def. Marketa Vondrousova, Czech
Republic, 6-2, 4-6, 7-6 (7-0); Hsieh Su-wei, Taiwan, def.
Katie Boulter, Britain, 6-4, 7-5; Victoria Azarenka,
Belarus, def. CiCi Bellis, United States, 6-3, 6-0; Oceane
Dodin, France, def. Veronica Cepeda Royg, Paraguay, vs.
Oceane Dodin, France, 6-4, 6-7 (7-3), 6-3; Danielle
Collins, United States, def. Irina-Camelia Begu, Romania, 6-1, 6-1; Naomi Osaka, Japan, def. Serena Williams,
United States, 6-3, 6-2; Varvara Lepchenko, United
States, def. Viktorija Golubic, Switzerland, 6-4, 5-7, 7-5;
Natalia Vikhlyantseva, Russia, def. Rebecca Peterson,
Sweden, 7-5, 6-1; Aryna Sabalenka, Belarus, def. Madison Brengle, United States, 6-1, 6-4; Andrea Petkovic,
Germany, def. Polona Hercog, Slovenia, 6-2, 6-0; Sofia
Kenin, United States, def. Stefanie Voegele, Switzerland, 6-4, 6-4; Donna Vekic, Croatia, def. Camila Giorgi,
Italy, 6-0, 7-5; Petra Martic, Croatia, def. Lauren Davis,
United States, 6-1, 7-5.
WOMEN’S SINGLES — SECOND ROUND
Garbine Muguruza, Spain, def. Amanda Anisimova,
United States, walkover.
SHOTS ON GOAL
ARIZONA ............................... 15
5
9 — 29
BUFFALO ............................... 13
11
6 — 30
Power-play opportunities: Arizona 2 of 3; Buffalo 0 of 4.
Goalies: Arizona, Raanta 17-16-6 (30 shots-29 saves).
Buffalo, Ullmark 1-1-0 (13-12), Johnson 8-12-3 (15-13).
A: 17,029 (19,070). T: 2:31.
Penguins 5, Canadiens 3
MONTREAL .............................. 1
PITTSBURGH ........................... 2
2
1
0 —
2 —
3
5
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Pittsburgh, Malkin 41 (Hagelin), 9:53. 2,
Pittsburgh, Hornqvist 23 (Kessel, Malkin), 17:31 (pp). 3,
Montreal, Drouin 12 (Byron, Benn), 19:30.
SECOND PERIOD
BAS E BALL
MLB spring training
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
Houston 8, Washington 3
N.Y. Yankees 9, Baltimore 4
St. Louis 13, Miami 6
Philadelphia 7, Toronto 7
Boston 8, Tampa Bay 3
Chicago Cubs 5, Texas 1
Milwaukee 4, Oakland 3
San Diego 4, Chicago White Sox 3
Atlanta 3, Detroit 2
Minnesota 3, Pittsburgh 1
Kansas City vs. Cleveland, Late
San Francisco vs. Arizona, Late
Milwaukee vs. Seattle, Late
Scoring: 4, Montreal, Scherbak 4 (Hudon, Lernout), 8:19
(sh). 5, Montreal, de la Rose 4 (Gallagher), 14:24. 6,
Pittsburgh, Crosby 24 (Rust, Guentzel), 15:02.
Astros 8, Nationals 3
THIRD PERIOD
HOUSTON
Scoring: 7, Pittsburgh, Brassard 20 (Maatta, Guentzel), 2:38
(pp). 8, Pittsburgh, Guentzel 21 (Crosby, Kessel), 18:27.
Sprnger rf
D.Fsher ph
Bregman 3b
To.Kemp ph
J.Altve 2b
O.Darte 2b
C.Crrea ss
M.Serra ss
Gnzalez dh
R.Cstro pr
Tr-nndz ph
Reddick lf
T.White 1b
J.Davis 1b
Mrsnick cf
B.McCnn c
SHOTS ON GOAL
MONTREAL .............................. 9
12
9 — 30
PITTSBURGH ......................... 16
12
11 — 39
Power-play opportunities: Montreal 0 of 3; Pittsburgh 2
of 3. Goalies: Montreal, Price 15-23-6 (39 shots-34
saves). Pittsburgh, DeSmith 5-4-1 (30-27). A: 18,574
(18,387). T: 2:37.
Red Wings 5, Flyers 4 (SO)
Late Tuesday
PHILADELPHIA .................. 0
DETROIT ............................ 0
1 —
0 —
WOMEN’S SINGLES — FIRST ROUND
Coyotes 4, Sabres 1
SOCCER
SECOND ROUND
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
0
1
FIRST PERIOD
Joao Sousa, Portugal, def. Ryan Harrison, United States,
7-6 (7-4), 7-6 (7-4); Robin Haase, Netherlands, def.
Yuichi Sugita, Japan, 6-4, 3-6, 6-1; Jiri Vesely, Czech
Republic, def. Lukas Lacko, Slovakia, 7-6 (7-2), 6-3;
Mikael Ymer, Sweden, def. Jan-Lennard Struff, Germany, 3-6, 7-5, 6-1; Maximilian Marterer, Germany, def.
Marton Fucsovics, Hungary, 6-4, 6-4; Pierre-Hugues
Herbert, France, def. Taylor Fritz, United States, 7-6
(7-4), 6-4; Matthew Ebden, Australia, def. Gilles Simon,
France, 6-3, 6-7 (7-2), 7-5; John Millman, Australia, def.
Peter Gojowczyk, Germany, 2-6, 6-4, 6-4; Michael Mmoh,
United States, def. Christopher Eubanks, United States,
4-6, 6-4, 6-4; Jeremy Chardy, France, def. Rogerio Dutra
Silva, Brazil, 6-3, 7-6 (7-2); Nicolas Jarry, Chile, def.
Cameron Norrie, Britain, 7-6 (7-3), 6-2; Benoit Paire,
France, def. Mischa Zverev, Germany, 1-6, 6-1, 6-2;
Vasek Pospisil, Canada, def. Ivo Karlovic, Croatia, 7-6
(7-4), 7-6 (7-5); Liam Broady, Britain, def. Bjorn Fratangelo, United States, 7-6 (7-5), 6-3; Mikhail Youzhny,
Russia, def. Guido Pella, Argentina, 7-6 (7-3), 7-6 (7-2);
Jared Donaldson, United States, def. Marcos Baghdatis,
Cyprus, 6-3, 6-4.
Semifinal winners, noon
Men’s National Invitation Tournament
VANCOUVER ........................... 0
VEGAS ..................................... 3
MEN’S SINGLES — FIRST ROUND
Washington at Montreal, 7
Vegas at Colorado, 3
Calgary at San Jose, 4
Chicago at N.Y. Islanders, 7
Buffalo at N.Y. Rangers, 7
Detroit at Toronto, 7
Arizona at Florida, 7
Tampa Bay at New Jersey, 7
Carolina at Ottawa, 7
St. Louis at Columbus, 7
Nashville at Minnesota, 8
Los Angeles at Edmonton, 10
REGION SEMIFINALS
FRIDAY’S GAMES
IN LEXINGTON, KY.
BOSTON ............................. 9
8
5 — 22
ST. LOUIS ........................... 5
9
5
1 — 20
Power-play opportunities: Boston 1 of 2; St. Louis 0 of 2.
Goalies: Boston, Khudobin 15-6-5 (20 shots-18 saves).
St. Louis, Allen 24-21-2 (22-21). A: 18,423 (19,150). T:
2:25.
At Tennis Center at Crandon Park
In Key Biscayne, Fla.
Purse: Men, $8.9 million (Masters 1000)
Women, $7.97 million (Premier)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
SATURDAY’S GAMES
Stanford 90, Florida Gulf Coast 70
REGION SEMIFINALS
IN LOS ANGELES
THURSDAY’S GAMES
SHOTS ON GOAL
MIAMI OPEN
Montreal at Buffalo, 7
New Jersey at Pittsburgh, 7
Anaheim at Winnipeg, 8
Vancouver at St. Louis, 8
Boston at Dallas, 8:30
IN WACO, TEX.
Scoring: 3, St. Louis, Schwartz 22 (Parayko), 0:30.
ATP/WTA
FRIDAY’S GAMES
SUNDAY'S RESULTS
IN CHARLOTTE
OVERTIME
TE NNI S
Washington at Detroit, 7:30
N.Y. Rangers at Philadelphia, 7
Arizona at Carolina, 7
Florida at Columbus, 7
Tampa Bay at N.Y. Islanders, 7
Edmonton at Ottawa, 7:30
Toronto at Nashville, 8
Vancouver at Chicago, 8:30
Los Angeles at Colorado, 9
Vegas at San Jose, 10
REGION SEMIFINALS
FRIDAY’S GAMES
IN KANSAS CITY, MO.
Michigan 64, Houston 63
(Seedings in parentheses)
Pat Perez (15), United States, halved with Si Woo Kim
(50), South Korea.
Gary Woodland (24), United States, halved with Webb
Simpson (37), United States.
Justin Thomas (2), United States, def. Luke List (60),
United States, 2 up.
Francesco Molinari (21), Italy, def. Patton Kizzire (48),
United States, 3 and 1.
Tyrrell Hatton (12), England, def. Alexander Levy (55),
France, 3 and 2.
Brendan Steele (36), United States, def. Charley Hoffman (22), United States, 1 up.
Hideki Matsuyama (5), Japan, def. Yusaku Miyazato
(53), Japan, 2 and 1.
Cameron Smith (46), Australia, def. Patrick Cantlay
(30), United States, 2 up.
Alex Noren (13), Sweden, def. Kevin Na (61), United
States, 4 and 2.
Tony Finau (29), United States, def. Thomas Pieters
(39), Belgium, 2 and 1.
Jordan Spieth (4), United States, def. Charl Schwartzel
(49), South Africa, 2 and 1.
Patrick Reed (19), United States, def. Li Haotong (34),
China, 3 and 2.
Ian Poulter (58), England, def. Tommy Fleetwood (9),
England, 3 and 2.
Kevin Chappell (33), United States, def. Daniel Berger
(26), United States, 3 and 2.
Jason Day (8), Australia, def. James Hahn (56,) United
States, 4 and 2.
Louis Oosthuizen (25), South Africa, def. Jason Dufner
(42), United States, 1 up.
Matt Kuchar (16), United States, halved with Zach
Johnson (54), United States.
Yuta Ikeda (47), Japan, def. Ross Fisher (27), England, 2
and 1.
Bernd Wiesberger (52), Austria, def. Dustin Johnson (1),
United States, 3 and 1.
Kevin Kisner (32), United States, halved with Adam
Hadwin (38), Canada.
Julian Suri (64), United States, def. Marc Leishman (11),
Australia, 3 and 2.
Bubba Watson (35), United States, def. Branden Grace
(23), South Africa, 5 and 3.
Peter Uihlein (57), United States, def. Rory McIlroy (6),
Northern Ireland, 2 and 1.
Brian Harman (18), United States, halved with Jhonattan Vegas (44), Venezuela.
Charles Howell III (59), United States, def. Phil Mickelson (14), United States, 3 and 2.
Rafa Cabrera Bello (17), Spain, def. Satoshi Kodaira (40),
Japan, 2 and 1.
Jon Rahm (3), Spain, halved with Keegan Bradley (63),
United States.
Kiradech Aphibarnrat (28), Thailand, def. Chez Reavie
(43), United States, 3 and 2.
Paul Casey (10), England, def. Russell Henley (51),
United States, 1 up.
Kyle Stanley (45), United States, def. Matt Fitzpatrick
(31), United States, 1 up.
Sergio Garcia (7), Spain, def. Shubhankar Sharma (62),
India, 1 up.
Xander Schauffele (20), United States, def. Dylan
Frittelli (41), South Africa, 1 up.
at Washington 4, Dallas 3
Columbus 5, at N.Y. Rangers 3
at N.Y. Islanders 4, Pittsburgh 1
Edmonton 7, at Carolina 3
Florida 7, at Ottawa 2
at Detroit 5, Philadelphia 4 (SO)
at Tampa Bay 4, Toronto 3
at Winnipeg 2, Los Angeles 1 (OT)
Colorado 5, at Chicago 1
at Vegas 4, Vancouver 1
at San Jose 6, New Jersey 2
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
DETROIT: Johnson 2-12 1-2 5, Griffin 9-15 5-5 26,
Drummond 4-9 2-3 10, R.Jackson 3-7 0-0 7, Bullock 4-9
2-2 12, Ennis III 4-9 0-0 10, Tolliver 3-7 1-1 9, Ellenson 2-3
0-0 5, Moreland 1-2 0-0 2, Buycks 0-0 0-0 0, Smith 5-13
2-2 13, Kennard 6-11 1-1 16. Totals 43-97 14-16 115.
FIRST ROUND
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
N.C. State 74, Maryland 60
IN WICHITA
Scoring: 2, St. Louis, Schwartz 21 (Schenn, Steen), 9:36.
Golden Knights 4, Canucks 1
x-Late game; y-Clinched playoff spot
KANSAS CITY REGION
SECOND ROUND
SUNDAY’S RESULT
IN RALEIGH
WEST REGION
SECOND ROUND
SATURDAY'S RESULTS
IN BOISE, IDAHO
GOLF
OL PTS. GF GA
4 104 264 205
10 100 240 186
7
93 246 208
7
81 219 218
11
65 189 228
12
64 185 237
11
63 199 251
12
58 173 240
IN TALLAHASSEE
Nevada 75, Cincinnati 73
35 — 115
24 — 88
L
19
17
23
27
35
36
35
38
0 — 1
1 — 2
THIRD PERIOD
West Virginia 94, Marshall 71
IN NASHVILLE
36
26
W
50
45
43
37
27
26
26
23
0
1
Scoring: 1, Boston, Donato 2, 10:12 (pp).
IN SAN DIEGO
Three-point Goals: Denver 20-35 (Chandler 5-7, D.Harris
3-6, Murray 3-6, Jokic 2-2, Barton 2-3, Lyles 2-5, Millsap
1-1, Beasley 1-2, Arthur 1-2, Craig 0-1), Chicago 13-38
(Vonleh 4-6, Payne 3-4, Zipser 2-7, Valentine 2-8,
Holiday 1-4, Portis 1-4, Blakeney 0-1, Nwaba 0-2, Grant
0-2). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Denver 45 (Millsap 8),
Chicago 34 (Vonleh, Portis 8). Assists: Denver 34
(Murray 7), Chicago 29 (Grant 7). Total Fouls: Denver 13,
Chicago 22. A: 20,671 (20,917).
25
19
ATLANTIC
y-Tampa Bay .................
Boston ...........................
Toronto .........................
Florida ...........................
Detroit ..........................
Montreal .......................
Ottawa ..........................
Buffalo ..........................
0
0
FIRST PERIOD
Duke 66, Georgia 40
MONDAY’S RESULT
IN COLUMBUS, OHIO
DETROIT ............................. 19
PHOENIX ............................ 19
OL PTS. GF GA
7
91 229 217
5
89 243 225
5
87 210 206
12
86 222 220
8
82 219 221
11
73 197 232
8
72 211 236
10
72 235 263
Purdue 76, Butler 73
IN ATHENS, GA.
Kansas State 50, UMBC 43
Pistons 115, Suns 88
Late Tuesday
L
24
27
28
25
28
31
33
32
U-Conn. 71, Quinnipiac 46
IN EUGENE, ORE.
30 — 127
37 — 120
W
42
42
41
37
37
31
32
31
SUNDAY'S RESULTS
IN DETROIT
Texas A&M 80, DePaul 79
33
26
BOSTON ............................. 1
ST. LOUIS ........................... 0
METROPOLITAN
Washington ..................
Pittsburgh .....................
Columbus ......................
Philadelphia ..................
New Jersey ...................
Carolina .........................
N.Y. Rangers .................
N.Y. Islanders ...............
MONDAY’S RESULTS
IN STORRS, CONN.
SUNDAY'S RESULTS
IN CHARLOTTE
26
33
Blues 2, Bruins 1 (OT)
Texas Tech 69, Florida 66
Loyola of Chicago 63, Tennessee 62
Three-point Goals: L.A. Clippers 15-30 (Rivers 5-9,
Teodosic 4-5, Harris 3-5, L.Williams 2-6, Johnson 1-4,
Thornwell 0-1), Milwaukee 8-26 (Middleton 3-5, Terry
2-6, Brown 1-1, Jennings 1-1, Bledsoe 1-4, Maker 0-1,
Antetokounmpo 0-1, Snell 0-3, Parker 0-4). Fouled Out:
None. Rebounds: L.A. Clippers 47 (Jordan 22), Milwaukee 33 (Henson 7). Assists: L.A. Clippers 26 (L.Williams
8), Milwaukee 33 (Bledsoe 8). Total Fouls: L.A. Clippers
16, Milwaukee 20. A: 17,916 (18,717).
SATURDAY’S GAMES
IN DALLAS
CHICAGO: Valentine 4-13 0-2 10, Zipser 2-9 0-0 6, Felicio
7-9 2-2 16, Payne 4-7 0-0 11, Holiday 1-5 0-0 3, Vonleh
5-8 0-0 14, Portis 5-11 4-4 15, Grant 3-7 4-4 10, Blakeney
3-9 0-0 6, Nwaba 5-11 1-2 11. Totals 39-89 11-14 102.
MILWAUKEE: Middleton 9-17 2-2 23, Antetokounmpo
5-9 2-3 12, Henson 4-5 2-2 10, Bledsoe 7-15 4-8 19, Terry
2-6 0-0 6, Parker 9-15 2-2 20, Maker 2-4 0-0 4, Zeller 1-3
0-0 2, Jennings 1-1 0-0 3, Brown 3-4 0-0 7, Snell 1-4 0-0 2,
Muhammad 6-8 0-0 12. Totals 50-91 12-17 120.
Denver at Washington, 7
L.A. Clippers at Indiana, 7
Brooklyn at Toronto, 7:30
Minnesota at New York, 7:30
Phoenix at Cleveland, 7:30
Miami at Oklahoma City, 8
Milwaukee at Chicago, 8
Utah at San Antonio, 8:30
Boston at Portland, 10
Atlanta at Golden State, 10:30
INDIANA ............................. 25
NEW ORLEANS .................. 24
NCAA women’s tournament
EAST REGION
SECOND ROUND
SATURDAY'S RESULTS
IN PITTSBURGH
41
22
L.A. CLIPPERS: Johnson 2-9 2-2 7, Harris 6-14 3-3 18,
Jordan 9-13 7-12 25, Rivers 8-17 1-2 22, Teodosic 5-8 1-2
15, Thornwell 1-2 0-0 2, Dekker 2-2 2-2 6, Harrell 6-10 1-1
13, Evans 0-0 0-0 0, L.Williams 6-11 5-5 19. Totals 45-86
22-29 127.
FRIDAY’S GAMES
NEW YORK ......................... 26
MIAMI ................................ 27
NCAA men’s tournament
TORONTO ........................... 38
CLEVELAND ....................... 42
L.A. CLIPPERS .................... 38
MILWAUKEE ...................... 24
Memphis at Charlotte, 7
Philadelphia at Orlando, 7
Detroit at Houston, 8
L.A. Lakers at New Orleans, 8
Utah at Dallas, 8:30
Atlanta at Sacramento, 10
MEMPHIS ........................... 19
PHILADELPHIA .................. 26
Cavaliers 132, Raptors 129
Clippers 127, Bucks 120
THURSDAY’S GAMES
HOC K E Y
1
3
3
1
AB R H BI WASHINGTON AB R H BI
2
1
2
1
4
1
3
2
2
0
1
3
1
3
4
4
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
2
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
2
0
0
3
0
0
1
0
0 — 4
0 — 5
TOTALS
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Detroit, Larkin 10 (Helm), 6:08. 2, Detroit,
Glendening 9 (Daley), 7:59 (sh). 3, Philadelphia, Couturier 30 (Giroux, Gostisbehere), 8:53 (pp). 4, Detroit,
Svechnikov 1 (Frk, Larkin), 9:57.
THIRD PERIOD
34 8 9
HOUSTON
WASHINGTON
7 TOTALS
3
1
3
1
3
0
3
1
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
1
2
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
2
0
0
0
0
0
31 3 5
230
000
000
201
3
—
—
8
3
E: Turner (1), Reynolds (1). DP: Houston 3, Washington
1. LOB: Houston 6, Washington 5. 3B: Reddick (1). HR:
Reddick (1), Stevenson (2), Reynolds (2). SF: Davis (1).
HOUSTON
McCullers Jr. (W, 3-0)
Devenski
Rondon
Giles
SHOOTOUT
WASHINGTON
Philadelphia 0 (Voracek NG, Weal NG, Patrick NG),
Detroit 1 (Nielsen G, Nyquist NG, Larkin NG).
Gonzalez (L, 1-1)
Romero
Fedde
Milone
Smith
PHILADELPHIA .................. 9
5
16
1 — 31
DETROIT .......................... 13
9
4
5 — 31
Power-play opportunities: Philadelphia 2 of 4; Detroit 0
of 1. Goalies: Philadelphia, Mrazek 13-12-4 (19 shots-16
saves), Lyon 3-2-1 (12-11). Detroit, Howard 19-25-8
(31-27). A: 19,515 (20,000). T: 2:44.
A.Eaton lf
Sverino ph
T.Trner ss
M.Serra rf
B.Hrper rf
Brignac ss
M.Adams 1b
Dmnguez 1b
Montero c
Kieboom pr
Goodwin cf
Stvnson cf
Rynolds 3b
J.Wlson 3b
Gnzalez sp
Wi.Difo ph
R.Rburn lf
Sanchez 2b
030
000
Scoring: 5, Philadelphia, Read 1 (Lehtera, Laughton),
7:46. 6, Philadelphia, Gostisbehere 13 (Voracek, Giroux),
9:40 (pp). 7, Detroit, Larkin 11 (Mantha), 14:06. 8,
Philadelphia, Konecny 20 (Couturier, Giroux), 14:34.
SHOTS ON GOAL
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
4
0
1
0
0
IP
H
R
ER
BB
SO
5 .1
1 .2
1
1
2
2
0
1
0
2
0
1
0
2
0
1
2
0
1
0
6
2
1
3
IP
H
R
ER
BB
SO
4 .2
.1
2
1
1
6
1
1
0
1
8
0
0
0
0
4
0
0
0
0
2
0
2
0
1
2
0
1
0
0
HBP: by: Devenski (Montero), Gonzalez (Springer).
WP: McCullers Jr. Umpires: Home, Mike Estabrook;
First, CB Bucknor; Second, Chris Conroy; Third, Lance
Barksdale. T: 2:49. A: 5,399
EFGHI
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THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2018
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1490
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If only you had home delivery.
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LEGAL NOTICES
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BUICK 2004 LESABRE Golden / beige,
good condition, practically new
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Call 202-726-1931
WP 2x1
BUICK
1447
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1405
CARS • TRUCKS • SUVS & MORE
Sports Utility Vehicles
JEEP 2001 CHEROKEE 4WD- Blue w/
gray int, very good cond, runs excellent, 161k miles, new emissions
& insp. $4,200/obo. 703-598-1447
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Appliances
416
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Kirby Sentria G10 Vacuum Cleaner &
Shampooer—$249 Like New-Cost
$1800 . 571-606-0319
Books, Music & Movies
Martin Luther King Jr.—7.95 50 Years
Later Why Dr. King's Murder Still
Hurts. hutchinsonreport@aol.com
Non-commercial advertisers can now place ads 24/7
by calling 202-334-6200
815
Tickets, Wanted
Season Tickets Wanted.
Buying all locations. Top $ paid.
Please call 1-800-786-8425
Dogs for Sale
American Akita—Puppies! $700 each
3males/2females, 6weeks old, dark
brindles. vet checked & healthy
540-521-1944
Bassett Hound—Cute lovable long
eared tri-colored $750, 3-male/
4-female, 9 weeks old, will text
pictures.303-667-8825
Collectibles
AURORA SLOT CARS Wanted—$100
& up, cars/sets. +Atlas, AFX, Tyco,
Cox, Strombecker 703-960-3594
BERNESE MOUNTAIN PUPPIES- AKC,
females avail now, dewormed & first
vaccinations. $1200/obo. Call 717CHRISTMAS VILLAGE—$75
FOUR 765-6820 for pics. Please no Sun calls
LARGE CERAMIC HOUSES AlexanBichon Frise Puppy,
dria, VA, 703-941-8206
AKC reg, available 4/09,
Comic Book & Sports Card
female, hypo allergenic.
www.bichonoasis.com
Show—Sunday March 25 10am-3pm
Call 540-348-4212
Annandale Va. Fire House Expo Hall
7128
Columbia
Pike
22003
Info:shoffpromotions.com Adm. $3 ,
12 under free. $1 Off adm. with ad
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!—1 I
drive to you, pay CASH, and haul
them away. Call 571-830-5871
MOTOROLA RADIO—$20 Vintage in
cabinet. Does not work. Call for
info. Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
RAILROAD MISC—$20, McLean, VA,
703-356-0170, Set of AMTRAK system timetables 1971-2016
DOBERMAN PINSCHER PUPPIESEuropean working lines, all shots,
10 weeks old, ready for their new
homes. Call 443-336-6840
TEDDY BEAR TEA SET—$20 VINTAGE
MINIATURE PORCELAIN. PERFECT.
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
245
Car Seats—$29 Generic infant or
Graco child car seat $44 (70 both)
Alexandria, VA 571431-1501
265
Home & Garden
Solid
Hardwood
Brazilian
Cherry Flooring - 3600 S.F.,
$2.50 per SF. 301-860-1190
VARIETY OF ITEMS FOR SALE—$5 UP.
PLEASE CALL FOR MORE INFO.
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
275
Merchandise Wanted
ELECTRONIC CLEANOUTS—1 RADIO
TUBES HI-FI AMPS PARTS MCINTOSH MOST CASH 410-740-5222
GOVT SURPLUS TUBES—1
JOINT
ARMY NAVY JAN PREMIUM PAID
420-740-5222 50's 60's 70's
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!—1 I
drive to you, pay CASH, and haul
them away. Call 571-830-5871
Old Bottles of Bourbon—50 Seeking
full bottles of vintage bourbon and
rye. Alex 443-223-7669.
OLD HI--FI---ITEMS—1 COLLECTOR
PAYS MOST CASH PLEASE CALL
THANK YOU 410-740-5222
FRENCH BULLDOGS - 10 weeks,
2 Males, brindle & white,
black & white. $2,500 each.
301-252-9213 or visit:
www.windsoroakfarm.com
FRENCH BULLDOG PUPPIES-Black
& Fawn, Ready now. Champ
bloodlines, Starting at $3,000 240793-7503
jushara@hotmail.com
GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS 4 F, 3 M, black & sable. $700, S/W,
parents on premises. AKC reg.
Ready 3/15. Call 240-606-3815
GOLDEN RETREIVER PUPS - AKC,
absolutely gorgeous, must see the
pups to appreciate them, M & F,
parents on site, 9 weeks old.
$1,000-$1,200. Call 804-221-5485
LAB PUPS- AKC, OFA, top champ
lines, S/W, written warr, yellow,
parents on site. Ready 4/6. $850.
301-246-9116
or
301-751-6846
Labradoodle—wavy, curly and cute!
f1b S&W Hlth. guar. Goldendoodle
pups rdy 4/18 $1200 540-729-6365
www.doodledogpups.com
IN THE MATTER OF
GIORGI KOIAVA
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
GIORGI GOGIASHVILI
FAMILY LAW: 151870FL
Alexandre Gogiashvili
Petitioner
IN THE MATTER OF
LUCAS LEYKUN
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
LUCAS FISSHAYE LEYKUN
FAMILY LAW: 151791FL
Leykun G. Fisshaye
Petitioner
PUBLICATION NOTICE
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name of a
Minor in which he/she seeks to
change his/her name from Giorgi
Koiava to Giorgi Gogiashvili. The
petitioner is seeking a name change
because: After the court order that
proved that Giorgi Koiava is my son,
I want Giorgi to have my last name.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 6th
day of April, 2018. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 22nd day of
March, 2018.
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name of a
Minor in which he/she seeks to
change his/her name from Lucas
Leykun to Lucas Fisshaye Leykun.
The petitioner is seeking a name
change because: Want to add a
middle name.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 6th
day of April, 2018. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 22nd day of
March, 2018.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
REDSKINS TICKETS WANTED—
Call 1-800-296-3626 X3
WANTED
PRE
1975
COMIC
BOOKS—TOYS, SPORTS & NON
SPORTS CARDS, ORIG ART, MOVIE
MEM. COLLECTOR IN TOWN. WILL
PAY CASH. CALL MIKE 800-273-1621
MIKECARBO@GMAIL.COM
284
Office & Business
Equipment
23" CHALLENGE PAPER CUTTER w/
new blade. $500. 1 HAND 8X10 LETTERPRESS W/ MOTOR $300. Call 202544-6400, Mon-Fri btwn noon-5pm.
291
Sporting Goods
& Services
Nordic Track Exercise Skier—$195
Exc.Cond-Folds up easy to fit in
car. Cost $800 new. 571-606-0319
Old Eng Bulldog—$800, 3M & 4F,
12wks, CKC & IOEBA Papers &
Pedigree, 1st Shots & Dewormed,
Dame & Sire on Site, 240-920-1261
Pomski f, Malshih & more—Puppies
for Sale. 304-904-6289, Cash, CC,
Easy Finance, www.wvpuppy.com,
59 East Rd, Martinsburg WV, exit 16E
POMSKY (Siberian Husky by Pom)
1 F, 6 M, , ICA reg., blue eyed-ready
$2500 Call 717-278-8343
www.heritagehillpomskies.com
PUG PUPS - 3 black M, up to date
on vaccines & worming, has been
vet check with health records. Short
stocky built, 10 wks. 540-778-5658
ShiChon—Cute little Shi Chon Teddybears! Raised in our home with
TLC. 703-577-1069 $750-850
www.DCDogFinders.com
Whoodles—$1000, Males & Females,
10 Weeks old, 3 Females and 2 Males
HOT WHEELS CARS—$10, McLean, Registered Papers Included Updated
VA, 703-356-0170, Two Sets 22 cars Shots 301-320-6340
in all.
815
295
Toys
Toy trucks and cars—$20, McLean,
VA, 703-356-0170, two semi-truck
trailers with 48 cars
350
Garage Sales, MD
Darnestown — Garage/Moving
14824 Keeneland Cir, N.Potomac,
03/24, 8:30-1:00, 301-908-7653
ROCKVILLE - Japanese Christian
Community Center, Yard Sale.
1099 Rockville Pike,
Rockville, MD 20852
Sat 3/24, 10:30- 2:30.
Furniture, appls, clothing, toys,
books, Japanese food, etc.
SILVER SPRING, MD - 408 Southview
Ave. Sat 3/24 10am-4pm. Furniture,
household & garden items, toys,
garden tools and free items
SILVER SPRING - 8810 Lanier Dr Apt
201. Sat 3/24, 11-3. Furn, antiques,
misc figurines, clothes, etc
355
Garage Sales, VA
Annandale—Moving/Garage
Sale. 8432 Briar Creek Dr. 22003,
03/24, 8 am to 1, 571-235-2755.
358
Moving Sale
CLIFTON, VA 12326 FFX. STA. RD.
Sat 3/24, 9-3 & Sun 3/25, 10-2
Household items and more!
360
Estate Sales
COOL & ECLECTIC ESTATE SALE
Dirty Dig purchases. Plants, art,
antiques, statues, furniture.
Cash Only 13507 Reid Circle,
Ft. Washington MD . CASH ONLY.
MAKE OFFERS & bring own
shovel. Sat March 24th 9am-5pm.
Silver Spring - Estate sale at 3141
Gershwin ln, silver spring from 9-4
on 3/24 and 1-4 on 3/25. Sale items
include wicker, antique Furn, never
used sleeper sofa, framed travel
posters/books, 33 1/3 records, Vera
Bradley, longerberger bskts, Fenton
art glass, area rugs, Amish pottery,
Christmas
entertaining
pieces,
framed artwork, gardening items,
much much more. Cash only.
Silver Spring, MD
Sun 3/18-Sat 3/24
15520 Thompson Rd
ESTATE SALE
Items to be sold include:
Dolls, Brik-A-Brak, A Few Toys, Furniture Items, Cookware, Dinner
Ware, Some Exercise Equipment,
Tools, Lawn & Garden Equipment,
Power Tools, Police Figurines, DC
Metropolitan Police Memorabilia,
including Three Call Boxes (1
Restored, 1 Unrestored, 1 on a
Stand in Back Yard), etc.
Legal Notices
FAMILY COURT FOR THE STATE OF
DELAWARE
NOTICE OF FAMILY COURT ACTION
TO: Nokomis Hunter, Respondent
Petitioner, Malika Williams has filed
a Custody petition against you in
the Family Court of the State of
Delaware for Sussex County on
11.16.2017. If you do not file an
answer with the Family Court within
20 days after publication of this
notice, exclusive of the date of
publication, as required by statute,
this action will be heard in Family
Court without further notice.
Petition# 17-34771
2/15/2018
Date
Malika K. Williams
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
SHERIDONNA WILSON-BEDELL
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
SHERIDONNA FIONA WILSON
FAMILY LAW: 151783FL
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from Sheridonna Wilson-Bedell to Sheridonna Fiona Wilson. The petitioner is seeking a
name change because: I am now
divorced since July 1, 2016 and my
name was not changed as part of
the divorce.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 6th
day of April, 2018. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 22nd day of
March, 2018.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Wake up
to home delivery.
There will be signs posted at intersections in the vicinity of the area
of the sale to direct customers
where to come, including two signs
directly in front of the location of
the sale.
1-800-753-POST
Cash & Checks are acceptable as
methods of payment for items.
Sorry, No Credit.
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
Springfield,VA - 8123 Ainsworth Ave
Fri - Sun, 10-3. Full House Sale
www.caringtransitionsnova.com
for pics and details.
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
SF
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
PUBLICATION NOTICE
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
ANTHONY CHUKA DOUGLAS
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
ANTHONY CHUKA-DOUGLAS
FAMILY LAW: 151676FL
IN THE MATTER OF
BEKA AMANUEL MULATU
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
BEKA AMANUEL GEMECHU
FAMILY LAW: 151774FL
Amanuel Mulatu Gemechu
Petitioner
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from Anthony Chuka
Douglas to Anthony Chuka-Douglas.
The petitioner is seeking a name
change because: distance self from
father and to keep maternal grandfather's name in the family.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 6th
day of April, 2018. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 22nd day of
March, 2018.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
OLUWAKEMI BOLANLE AYANBIOLA
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
KEMI BOLA AYANBIOLA
FAMILY LAW: 151826FL
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from Oluwakemi
Bolanle Ayanbiola to Kemi Bola
Ayanbiola. The petitioner is seeking
a name change because: Easier to
pronounce and shorter.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 6th
day of April, 2018. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 22nd day of
March, 2018.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE MATTER OF
KAYLA JUSTINE VALDIVIA
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
KAYLA JUSTINE BURRISS
FAMILY LAW: 151840FL
Carola Geraldine Valdivia
Petitioner
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name of a
Minor in which he/she seeks to
change his/her name from Kayla
Justine Valdivia to Kayla Justine Burriss. The petitioner is seeking a
name change because: of paternity.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 6th
day of April, 2018. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 22nd day of
March, 2018.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name of a
Minor in which he/she seeks to
change his/her name from Beka
Amanuel Mulatu to Beka Amanuel
Gemechu. The petitioner is seeking
a name change because: To have
the same last name with his family.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 6th
day of April, 2018. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 22nd day of
March, 2018.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
ROBERT SAMUEL TURNER
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
PETRA ACKERMAN TURNER
FAMILY LAW: 151973FL
Barbara A. Turner
Petitioner
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name of a
Minor in which he/she seeks to
change his/her name from Robert
Samuel Turner to Petra Ackerman
Turner. The petitioner is seeking
a name change because: Petra
believes she should be female.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 6th
day of April, 2018. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 22nd day of
March, 2018.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
SF
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Wilmington Savings Fund Society,
FSB, as trustee for Stanwich Mortgage Loan Trust A
Plaintiff
v.
Getachew
Defendant
Case No. 2015 CA 007230 R(RP)
Yodit
By Oral Ruling Granting Plaintiff’s
Motion for Service of Process by
Publication entered in the above
referenced case on February 20,
2018 the Plaintiff, by undersigned
counsel, hereby inform interested
parties as follows:
“There is now pending before the
District of Columbia Superior Court
an action case number 2015 CA
007230 R(RP) seeking to affect title
to the property now or formerly
owned by located at 3322 Oxon
Run Road SE, Washington, DC
20032. A copy of the action is
available in the Clerk’s office of the
Court. A written answer, including
any claims or defenses must be
filed with the District of Columbia
Superior Court Civil Branch, 500
Indiana Ave. Washington, DC
20001 on or before the 1st day
of June 2018.”
Samuel I White PC
600 Rockville Pike, Suite 100
Rockville MD 20852
Attorney for Plaintiff
301-804-3400
Mar 8, 15, 22, 2018
12169420
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
1-800-753-POST
SF
No. l:17-cv-1368 (LMB/JFA)
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name of a
Minor in which he/she seeks to
change his/her name from Lidya
Leykun to Lidya Fisshaye Leykun.
The petitioner is seeking a name
change because: Want to add a
middle name.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 6th
day of April, 2018. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 22nd day of
March, 2018.
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
v.
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from Faven Habte
Mesfin to Faven Mesfin Habte. The
petitioner is seeking a name change
because: My parents incorrectly
filled out my birth certificate and
switched the last and middle name.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 6th
day of April, 2018. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 22nd day of
March, 2018.
PUBLICATION NOTICE
Labrador Retriever—$800,
FOX RED 3 Males, 10
weeks old, 540-223-0406
LATHAM & WATKINS LLP,
Plaintiff,
IN THE MATTER OF
LIDYA LEYKUN
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
LIDYA FISSHAYE LEYKUN
FAMILY LAW: 151791FL
Leykun G. Fisshaye
Petitioner
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
1-800-753-POST
SF
815
Legal Notices
IN THE UNITED STATES
DISTRICT COURT FOR THE
EASTERN DISTRICT OF
VIRGINIA
Alexandria Division
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
K
i
Radio tubes—249 WANTED ham
radios huge speakers tube hifi amps2025279501, vcvdc@msn.com
815
Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
PUBLICATION NOTICE
Therapy Lamp—$29 NatureBright
Light and Ion Therapy Lamp $29,
Alexandria, VA, 571-431-1501
Furniture
815
Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
FAVEN HABTE MESFIN
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
FAVEN MESFIN HABTE
FAMILY LAW: 151554FL
Electronics
Apple iPhone X—249 Apple iPhone
X256G, $800, Email: amasystems@
outlook.com, 323 250 6503
260
Legal Notices - 202-334-7007
Auctions, Estate Sales, Furniture 202-334-7029
Biz Ops/Services - 202-334-5787
or call 202-334-6200
REDSKINS
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BISSELL CARPET CLEANER—25 Used
but works well. Alexandria, VA,
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THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2018
the local expert
on local jobs
For Jobs advertisements, go to
washingtonpost.com/recruit
or call 202-334-4100
(toll free 1-800-765-3675)
208
CLASSIFIED
D12
SF
hiring-lw.com,
Defendant.
ORDER
Before the Court is plaintiff’s
Motion to Waive Service by Publication [Dkt. No. 10], in which
plaintiff asks the Court to waive
the publication requirement in
15 U.S.C. § 1125(d)(2)(A)(ii)(II)(bb).
The Court has reviewed the
Motion and finds that the public
interest requires public notice of
the asserted claims, both for the
benefit of the registrant of the
domain name and to alert any
potential claimants of the res to
the pending action. Accordingly,
plaintiff’s Motion to Waive Service by Publication is DENIED,
and it is hereby
ORDERED that a copy of this
Order be published in the Washington Post or the Washington
Times within fourteen (14) days
after entry of this Order and that
a declaration be filed on plaintiffs
behalf no later than twenty (20)
days after entry of this Order
describing the steps that have
been taken to comply with this
Order; and it is further
ORDERED that plaintiff shall
serve a copy of this Order on
the registrant of the defendant
domain name by sending it via
FedEx Priority Mail to Perfect
Privacy LLC, 12808 Gran Bay
Parkway West, Jacksonville,
Florida
32258
and
to
5felv03raug3i88j53b2k4frj7
@domaindiscreet.com; and it is
further
ORDERED that the registrant of
defendant domain name is hereby advised that plaintiff has filed
a Complaint alleging that defendant is identical or confusingly
similar to, or dilutive of, plaintiffs
trademarks, in violation of the
Anticybersquatting
Consumer
Protection Act, 15 U.S.C. §
1125(d)(2)(A). A copy of the Complaint may be obtained from
plaintiffs counsel, Bert Reiser,
Latham & Watkins LLP, 555
Eleventh Street NW, Suite 1000,
Washington, DC 20004, telephone (202) 637-1026. If plaintiff
prevails in its claims, remedies
could include injunctive relief
ordering the transfer of defendant domain name to plaintiff
and directing the registry of
defendant domain name to
change the registrar of record to
a registrar of plaintiffs selection,
as well as interest, fees, and
costs, including attorney's fees.
Any answer or other response
to the Complaint should be filed
with the Clerk of Court, United
States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia, Alexandria
Division, 401 Courthouse Square,
Alexandria, Virginia 22314-5798
within twenty-one (21) days from
the date of publication of this
Order in the Washington Post
or the Washington Times. If no
appearance or pleading is filed as
required by this Order, this Court
may render a judgment against
defendant; and it is further
ORDERED that the foregoing
steps shall be deemed to constitute service of the Complaint
on defendant pursuant to the
Federal Rules of Civil Procedure
and 15 U.S.C. § 1125(d)(2)(A).
The Clerk is directed to forward
copies of this Order to counsel of
record.
Entered this 16th day of March,
2018.
Alexandria, Virginia
/s/
Leonie M. Brinkema
United States District Judge
RE: ESTATE OF Gilbert L Maton
NOTICE is hereby given pursuant
to Virginia state law, that it is the
intention of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.
to pay over and deliver to Courtenay
T. Maton, personal representative
of the Estate of Gilbert L. Maton,
deceased, of Pennsylvania said
state being the domicile of said
decedent at the time of his death,
money held at Wells Fargo Bank,
N.A. to which Gilbert L. Maton,
deceased, was entitled, and which
money is in the possession of Wells
Fargo Bank, N.A., said money having a value of more than Twentyfive Thousand Dollars ($25,000.00),
and such payment and delivery to
be made after a lapse of thirty (30)
days from the completion of due
publication of this notice, provided
at the time of such payment the
undersigned has no actual knowledge of the appointment within this
state of a personal representative
for such decedent.
RE: ESTATE OF
Avery Elisabeth Glize-Kane
NOTICE is hereby given pursuant
to Virginia state law, that it is the
intention of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.
to pay over and deliver to Ferney
Elisabeth Glize-Santini, personal
representative of the Estate Avery
Elisabeth Glize-Kane, deceased, of
France said state being the domicile
of said decedent at the time of his
death, money held at Wells Fargo
Bank, N.A. to which Avery Elisabeth
Glize-Kane, deceased, was entitled,
and which money is in the possession of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.,
said money having a value of more
than Twenty-five Thousand Dollars
($25,000.00), and such payment
and delivery to be made after a
lapse of thirty (30) days from the
completion of due publication of
this notice, provided at the time
of such payment the undersigned
has no actual knowledge of the
appointment within this state of
a personal representative for such
decedent.
STATE OF CONNECTICUT
Superior Court/Juvenile Matters
ORDER OF NOTICE
NOTICE TO: John Doe, father of
said minor child born on 3/15/17 to
mother Crystal V. in Bronx, NY
of parts unknown
A petition has been filed seeking:
Commitment of minor child(ren) of
the above named or vesting of custody and care of said child(ren) of
the above named in a lawful, private
of public agency or a suitable and
worthy person.
The petition, whereby the court’s
decision can affect your parental
rights, if any, regarding minor
child(ren) will be heard on 4/25/18
at 10:00 a.m. at SCJM, 7 Kendrick
Ave., 3rd Fl., Waterbury, CT 06702.
Therefore, ORDERED, that notice of
the hearing of this petition be given
by publishing this Order of Notice
once, immediately upon receipt, in
the Washington Post, a newspaper
having a circulation in the town/city
of Washington, DC
Honorable John Turner
Judge
B. Petitti, ACl
3/15/18
Wake up to
home delivery.
815
Legal Notices
820
Legal Notices
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2018 ADM 000223
MARIAN RANDALL
PRO SE
JOSEPH N. BROWN
Ryan Quinn, Esq.
777 6th Street NW #520
Washington, DC 20001
RUTH NAOMI ANDERSON
PRO SE
Keith Hooks, whose address is 3413
Highwood Drive SE, Washington, DC
20020, was appointed personal representative of the estate of Marian
Randall, who died on January 25,
2018 without a will and will service
without Court supervision.
All
unknown heirs and heirs whose
whereabouts are unknown shall
enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such
appointment (or to the probate of
decedent's Will) shall be filed with
the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, NW, Building A, 3rd Floor,
Washington DC 20001, on or before
September 8, 2018. Claims against
the decedent shall be presented
to the undersigned with a copy to
the Register of Wills or filed with
the Register of Wills with a copy
to the undersigned, on or before
September 8, 2018, or be forever
barred. Persons believed to be
heirs or legatees of the decedent
who do not receive a copy of this
notice by mail within 25 days of its
first publication shall so inform the
Register of Wills, including name,
address and relationship.
Keith Hooks
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
Crystal Adams, whose address is
604 Cabin Branch Dr., Capitol
Heights, MD 20743, was appointed Personal Representative of the
estate of Joseph N. Brown, who died
on February 17, 2014 without a will
and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs
whose whereabouts are unknown
shall enter their appearance in this
proceeding. Objections to such
appointment shall be filed with the
Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, NW, Building A, 3rd Floor,
Washington DC 20001, on or before
September 8, 2018. Claims against
the decedent shall be presented
to the undersigned with a copy to
the Register of Wills or filed with
the Register of Wills with a copy
to the undersigned, on or before
September 8, 2018, or be forever
barred. Persons believed to be
heirs or legatees of the decedent
who do not receive a copy of this
notice by mail within 25 days of its
first publication shall so inform the
Register of Wills, including name,
address and relationship.
Crystal Adams
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2018 ADM 000151
IRENE H. SMITH
PRO SE
SUPERIOR COURT OF
THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2018 FEP 000029
January 6,2018 - Date of Death
Emanuel Smith, whose address is
15300 Johnstone Lane, Bowie, MD
20721, was appointed Personal
Representative of the estate of
Irene H. Smith, who died on December 14, 2017 with a will and will
service without Court supervision.
All unknown heirs and heirs whose
whereabouts are unknown shall
enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such
appointment (or to the probate of
decedent's Will) shall be filed with
the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, NW, Building A, 3rd Floor,
Washington DC 20001, on or before
September 8, 2018. Claims against
the decedent shall be presented
to the undersigned with a copy to
the Register of Wills or filed with
the Register of Wills with a copy
to the undersigned, on or before
September 8, 2018, or be forever
barred. Persons believed to be
heirs or legatees of the decedent
who do not receive a copy of this
notice by mail within 25 days of its
first publication shall so inform the
Register of Wills, including name,
address and relationship.
Emanuel Smith
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2018 ADM 000158
FANNIE ETHEL WEBB TAYLOR
PRO SE
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT OF
FOREIGN PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE AND
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
Veronica Norman, whose address
is 7232 Watkins Ct. Ruther Glen,
VA 22546 was appointed personal
representative of the estate of Keith
Norman, deceased, by the Orphans'
Court for Prince George's County,
State of Maryland, on January 26,
2018. Service of process may be
made upon Veronica Norman 3411
Brothers Pl SE Washington, DC
20032 whose designation as District of Columbia agent has been
filed with the Register of Wills, DC.
The decedent owned District of
Columbia personal property. Claims
against the decedent may be presented to the undersigned and filed
with the Register of Wills for the
District of Columbia, Building A,
515 5th, NW, 3rd Floor, Washington
DC 20001 within 6 months from
the date of first publication of this
notice.
Veronica Norman
Personal Representative
Anne Meister
Register of Wills
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2018 ADM 000189
SHIRLEY LOUISE DIXON
Clifford M. Cohen
Law Offices of Clifford M. Cohen
5335 Wisconsin Ave. NW Suite 440
Washington, DC 20015
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
Tonda Taylor Bean, whose address
is 12714 Rigdale Terrace, Silver
Spring, MD 20904, was appointed Personal Representative of the
estate of Fannie Ethel Webb Taylor,
who died on December 18, 2017
with a will and will serve without
Court supervision. All unknown
heirs and heirs whose whereabouts
are unknown shall enter their
appearance in this proceeding.
Objections to such appointment (or
to the probate of decedent's Will)
shall be filed with the Register of
Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, NW, Building A, 3rd Floor, Washington DC
20001, on or before September 8,
2018. Claims against the decedent
shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register
of Wills or filed with the Register
of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before September 8,
2018, or be forever barred. Persons
believed to be heirs or legatees of
the decedent who do not receive a
copy of this notice by mail within 25
days of its first publication shall so
inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship.
Bruce Taliferrio Dixon, whose
address is 5720 Nannie H. Burroughs Ave., NE Washington DC
20019, was appointed Personal
Representative of the estate of
Shirley Louise Dixon, who died on
January 16, 2018 with a will and
will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs
whose whereabouts are unknown
shall enter their appearance in this
proceeding. Objections to such
appointment (or to the probate of
decedent's Will) shall be filed with
the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, NW, Building A, 3rd Floor,
Washington DC 20001, on or before
September 15, 2018.
Claims
against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a
copy to the Register of Wills or
filed with the Register of Wills with
a copy to the undersigned, on or
before September 15, 2018, or be
forever barred. Persons believed to
be heirs or legatees of the decedent
who do not receive a copy of this
notice by mail within 25 days of its
first publication shall so inform the
Register of Wills, including name,
address and relationship.
Tonda Taylor Bean
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
Bruce Taliferrio Dixon
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2018 ADM 000156
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
1986 ADM 11440
MILTON TIMMONS
PRO SE
WILLIAM F. KEOUGH A/K/A
WILLIAM F. KEOUGH, JR.
Vernon W. Johnson III
Nixon Peabody LLP
799 9th Street NW, Suite 500
Washington, DC 20001
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
Anjelious Farmer, whose address is
16213 Emory Lane, Rockville MD
20853, was appointed Personal
Representative of the estate of Milton Timmons, who died on January
1, 2018 with a will and will serve
without Court supervision.
All
unknown heirs and heirs whose
whereabouts are unknown shall
enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such
appointment (or to the probate of
decedent's Will) shall be filed with
the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, NW, Building A, 3rd Floor,
Washington DC 20001, on or before
September 8, 2018. Claims against
the decedent shall be presented
to the undersigned with a copy to
the Register of Wills or filed with
the Register of Wills with a copy
to the undersigned, on or before
September 8, 2018, or be forever
barred. Persons believed to be
heirs or legatees of the decedent
who do not receive a copy of this
notice by mail within 25 days of its
first publication shall so inform the
Register of Wills, including name,
address and relationship.
Anjelious Farmer
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
Wake up
to home delivery.
Stephen J. Keough, whose address
is 522 N. Main Avenue, Apt. 202,
Sioux Falls, SD 57104 , was appointed personal representative of the
estate of William F. Keough a/k/a
William F. Keough, Jr., who died on
November 27, 1985 with a will and
will serve with Court supervision.
All unknown heirs and heirs whose
whereabouts are unknown shall
enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such
appointment (or to the probate of
decedent's Will) shall be filed with
the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, NW, 3rd Floor, Washington,
D.C. 20001, on or before September
8, 2018. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the
undersigned with a copy to the
Register of Wills or filed with the
Register of Wills with a copy to the
undersigned, on or before September 8, 2018, or be forever barred.
Persons believed to be heirs or
legatees of the decedent who do
not receive a copy of this notice by
mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register
of Wills, including name, address
and relationship.
Stephen J. Keough
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
Wake up to
home delivery.
SF
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
SF
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2018 ADM 000233
CHANDRA PRASAD GURUNG
PRO SE
Notice is hereby given that a petition has been filed in this Court
by Sumitra Manandhar Gurung and
Matthew Handley for standard probate, including the appointment of
one or more personal representatives. Unless a responsive pleading in the form of a complaint or
an objection in accordance with
Superior Court Probate Division
Rule 407 is filed in this Court within
30 days from the date of first publication of this notice, the Court may
take the action hereinafter set
forth.
In the absence of a will or proof
satisfactory to the Court of due
execution, enter an order determining that the decedent died intestate appoint a supervised personal
representative.
Sumitra Manandhar Gurung
Matthew Handley
PETITIONERS
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 935
GORHAM H. GILES
William R. Voltz
2120 L Street, NW, Suite 700
Washington DC 20037
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
Alanda Marshall, whose address is
2738 Heron Hills Drive, Wolverine
Lake, Michigan 48390 was appointed personal representative of the
estate of Gorham H. Giles, who
died on May 6, 2017 without a
will and will serve without Court
supervision. All unknown heirs and
heirs whose whereabouts are
unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections
to such appointment (or to the
probate of decedent's Will) shall be
filed with the Register of Wills, D.C.,
Building A, 515 5th Street, N.W.,
3rd Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001,
on or before September 8, 2018.
Claims against the decedent shall
be presented to the undersigned
with a copy to the Register of Wills
or filed with the Register of Wills
with a copy to the undersigned, on
or before September 8, 2018, or be
forever barred. Persons believed to
be heirs or legatees of the decedent
who do not receive a copy of this
notice by mail within 25 days of its
first publication shall so inform the
Register of Wills, including name,
address and relationship.
Alanda Marshall
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2018 ADM 000199
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
Donna Marie Wilson, whose addres
is 402 Jeanwood Court, Bowie, MD
20721 was appointed personal representative of the estate of Gladys
Louise Wilson, who died on December 24, 2017 without a will and will
service without Court supervision.
All unknown heirs and heirs whose
whereabouts are unknown shall
enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such
appointment shall be filed with the
Register of Wills, D.C., Building A,
515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor,
Washington, D.C. 20001, on or
before September 22, 2018. Claims
against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a
copy to the Register of Wills or
filed with the Register of Wills with
a copy to the undersigned, on or
before September 22, 2018, or be
forever barred. Persons believed to
be heirs or legatees of the decedent
who do not receive a copy of this
notice by mail within 25 days of its
first publication shall so inform the
Register of Wills, including name,
address and relationship.
Donna Marie Wilson
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
To: UNKNOWN UNKNOWN,
DOB:UNKNOWN
You are hereby notified that an
Adoption case has been filed in the
Circuit Court for Prince George's
County Case no. CAA 16-24459. All
persons who believe themselves to
be parents of a Female child born
on 12/08/2000 in Alexandria, VA to
Maria G. Molina, DOB:08/28/1978
and
UNKNOWN
UNKNOWN,
DOB:UNKNOWN shall file a written
response. A copy of the show cause
order may be obtained from the
clerk's office at:
Prince George's County
Court House
14735 Main Street
Upper Marlboro, MD 20772
301-952-3318
If you do not file a written objection
with the clerk’s office listed above
by 05/15/2018, you will have agreed
to the permanent loss of your
parental rights to this child.
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Teresa E. Peel
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
GLADYS LOUISE WILSON
PRO SE
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
1-800-753-POST
Teresa E. Peel, whose addres is
3146 Forest Run Drive, Forestville,
Maryland 20747 was appointed personal representative of the estate
of Ruth Naomi Anderson, who died
on September 17, 2017 without a
will and will service without Court
supervision. All unknown heirs and
heirs whose whereabouts are
unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections
to such appointment shall be filed
with the Register of Wills, D.C.,
Building A, 515 5th Street, N.W.,
3rd Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001,
on or before September 22, 2018.
Claims against the decedent shall
be presented to the undersigned
with a copy to the Register of Wills
or filed with the Register of Wills
with a copy to the undersigned, on
or before September 22, 2018, or be
forever barred. Persons believed to
be heirs or legatees of the decedent
who do not receive a copy of this
notice by mail within 25 days of its
first publication shall so inform the
Register of Wills, including name,
address and relationship.
NOTICE OF STANDARD PROBATE
KEITH NORMAN
Name of Decedent
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
1-800-753-POST
SF
FREE UNDER $250
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2018 ADM 000161
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
mypublicnotices.com/
washingtonpost/PublicNotice.asp
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SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2018 ADM 000122
1-800-753-POST
RIGHT TO COUNSEL: Upon proof of
inability to pay for a lawyer, the
court will provide one for you at
court expense. Any such request
should be made immediately at the
court office where your Hearing is
to be held.
1-800-753-POST
815
Legal Notices
Trustee Sales
202-334-5782
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
820
Official Notices
Official Notices
NOTICE OF ADOPTION
CHARTER RESOLUTION 18-CR-01
CITY OF COLLEGE PARK, MD 20740
Amended Charter Resolution of the Mayor and Council of the City
of College Park, Amending Article VI, Meetings, § C6-2, Quorum and
Voting Requirements, to repeal a Super Majority Requirement for
Amendment of the Charter and Clarify Voting Requirements.
This Charter Resolution was introduced on February 13, 2018 and a
Public Hearing was held on February 27, 2018. The Charter Resolution
was then amended and adopted on February 27, 2018. It will
become effective on April 18, 2018 unless petitioned to referendum in
accordance with §4-304 of the Local Government Article, Annotated
Code of Maryland by April 8, 2018.
Copies of this Charter Resolution may be obtained from the City
Clerk’s Office, 4500 Knox Road, College Park, MD 20740, call 240-4873501, or visit www.collegeparkmd.gov.
Janeen S. Miller
City Clerk
NOTICE OF COMMISSIONER’S
HEARING
TO ALL PERSONS WITH CLAIMS OR
POTENTIAL CLAIMS AGAINST
VILLANOVA INSURANCE COMPANY
Villanova Insurance Company (“Villanova”) has been determined to be insolvent, has been ordered liquidated and has
had its license to write insurance in the Commonwealth of
Virginia terminated. The Treasurer of the Commonwealth
of Virginia holds a special deposit or deposits made by
Villanova, which deposit(s) is subject to liens in favor of any
creditor of Villanova or any other person having a claim
against Villanova and any person who has sustained a loss
as a result of the insolvency of Villanova.
Notice is hereby given that a Commissioner’s hearing will
be held on Tuesday, May 22, 2018 at 9:30 a.m. before C.
Thomas Ebel, Commissioner in Chancery for the Circuit
Court of the City of Richmond, Virginia, in the offices of
Sands Anderson, Suite 2400, 1111 East Main St., Richmond,
Virginia, 23219 with respect to the following case currently
pending in the Circuit Court of the City of Richmond:
Virginia Property and Casualty Insurance Guaranty Association v. Manju Ganeriwala, Treasurer of Virginia, and Villanova Insurance Company, Case No. CL17-5934-7
Any creditor of Villanova or any other person having a claim
against it or any person who has sustained a loss as a result
of the insolvency of Villanova may appear at the hearing
and present evidence of such claim.
Only persons who appear at that time and present evidence
of their claim will be entitled to any part of the proceeds
of the deposit(s) held by the Treasurer for the benefit of
creditors of Villanova.
815
815
Legal Notices
VIRGINIA:
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF 31ST
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
SANTOS TITO BENITEZ MOLINA
Plaintiff
v.
SAIDA LEONOR LIZAMA RODRIGUEZ
Defendant
CL No. 17-7922
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
The object of suit is to obtain a
divorce. And, it appearing by affidavit filed according to law that
the defendant is not a resident of
the State of Virginia. It is therefore
ORDERED, the defendant appear on
or before the 30th day of March,
2018 before this Court and do what
is necessary to protect his interest.
And, it is further ORDERED that this
order be published once a week
for four successive weeks in the
"The Washington Post" a newspaper of general circulation in the
County/City of Virginia; that a copy
of this order be posted at the front
door of the courthouse wherein this
court is held; and that a copy of this
order be mailed to the defendant at
the address shown by the aforesaid
affidavit.
Entered this 8th day of February,
2018
Tammy E. Ramsey
Deputy Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Prince William County
VIRGINIA:
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY
IN RE: SHAUN MICHAEL GREEN
D.O.B. 6/27/2011
KENNETH MICHAEL REISER
AND JEANNIE ROSE REISER
Petitioners,
AD NO. CA18-17
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
The object of the above styled matter is the adoption of Shaun Michael
Green by Kenneth Michael Reiser
and Jeannie Rose Reiser. And it
appearing by Affidavit filed according to the law that the natural
father of the subject child, Shaun
Green is not a resident of Virginia
and is a resident of North Carolina
whose last known address was 605
N. Pear Street, Gastonia, North Carolina 28054 and whose current
address is unknown and that due
diligence has been used without
effect to ascertain the whereabouts
of Shaun Green, identified as the
birth father of the above named
child, it is ORDERED, that Shaun
Green appear on or before April
13th, 2018, in the Clerk's Office of
this Court and do what is necessary
to protect his interest; and it is
further ORDERED that this Order
be published once a week for four
successive weeks in The Washington Post (Prince William Extra)
Newspaper of general circulation in
the County of Prince William; that
a copy of this Order be posted at
the front door of the Courthouse
wherein this Court is held.
Entered this 22nd day of February,
2018.
Tammy E. Ramsey
Deputy Clerk
Donald E. Coulter, Esq.
PURNELL, McKENNET & MENKE, P.C.
Counsels for Petitioners
9214 Center Street, Suite 101
Manassas, Virginia 20110
703-368-9196
Fax Number 703-361-0092
VA BAR NO. 14886
dcoulter@manassaslawyers.com
VIRGINIA:
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY
IN RE: Kanchana Duangsam
Date of Birth 10/8/***
Petitioners:
Sutasinee Rudd and
William Nicholas Rudd
AD NO. CA17-90
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
The object of the above styled matter is the adoption of Kanchana
Duangsam by William Nicholas
Rudd. And it appearing by Affidavit
filed according to the law that the
natural father of the subject child,
Chai-anan Sae Ngaeo is not a resident of Virginia and is a resident
of Thailand whose address is
unknown and that due diligence
has been used without effect to
ascertain the whereabouts of Chaianan Sae Ngaeo, identified as the
birth father of the above named
child, it is ORDERED, that Chai-anan
Sae Ngaeo appear on or before April
23rd, 2018, in the Clerk's Offie of
this Court and do what is necessary
to protect his interest and it is
further ORDERED that this Order
be published once a week for four
successive weeks in The Washington Post (Prince William Extra) a
newspaperof general circulation in
the County of Prince William; that
a copy of this Order be posted at
the front door of the Courthouse
wherein this Court is held.
Entered this 2nd day of March, 2018
Tammy E. Ramsey
Deputy Clerk
Donald E. Coulter, Esq.
PURNELL, McKENNET & MENKE, P.C.
Counsels for Petitioners
9214 Center Street, Suite 101
Manassas, Virginia 20110
703-368-9196
Fax Number 703-361-0092
VA BAR NO. 14886
dcoulter@manassaslawyers.com
Legal Notices
VIRGINIA:
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY
IN RE: CALYSTA LOVE GREEN
D.O.B. 10/4/2007
KENNETH MICHAEL REISER
AND JEANNIE ROSE REISER
Petitioners,
AD NO. CA18-16
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
The object of the above styled matter is the adoption of Calysta Love
Green by Kenneth Michael Reiser
and Jeannie Rose Reiser. And it
appearing by Affidavit filed according to the law that the natural
father of the subject child, Shaun
Green is not a resident of Virginia
and is a resident of North Carolina
whose last known address was 605
N. Pear Street, Gastonia, North Carolina 28054 and whose current
address is unknown and tha t due
diligence has been used without
effect to ascertain the whereabouts
of Shaun Green, identified as the
birth father of the above named
child, it is ORDERED ,that Shaun
Green appear on or before April
13th, 2018, in the Clerk's Office of
this Court and do what is necessary
to protect his interest; and it is
further ORDERED that this Order
be published once a week for four
successive weeks in The Washington Post (Prince William Extra)
Newspaper of general circulation in
the County of Prince William; that
a copy of this Order be posted at
the front door of the Courthouse
wherein this Court is held.
Entered this 22nd day of February,
2018.
Tammy E. Ramsey
Deputy Clerk
Donald E. Coulter, Esq.
PURNELL, McKENNET & MENKE, P.C.
Counsels for Petitioners
9214 Center Street, Suite 101
Manassas, Virginia 20110
703-368-9196
Fax Number 703-361-0092
VA BAR NO. 14886
dcoulter@manassaslawyers.com
820
Official Notices
Notification is given that Capital
Bank NA located at One Church
Street, Suite 300, Rockville Maryland 20850 has filed an application
with the Comptroller of the Currency on March 20, 2018, as specified in 12 CFR 5 for permission
to relocate its Main Office to 2275
Research Blvd, Suite 600, Rockville
Maryland 20850.
Any person wishing to comment on
this application may file comments
in writing with the Licensing Manager, Office of Comptroller of the
Currency, 340 Madison Avenue 5th
Floor New York, New York 10173
within 30 days of the date of this
publication.
825
Bids & Proposals
Capitol Paving of D.C., Inc.
Capitol Paving is soliciting qualified
MBE/WBE subcontractors to perform DDOT - CITYWIDE CALVERT
MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR DCKA2018-B-0016. email – bids@capitolpaving.com ; call – 571.277.1022 or
fax – 202.832.5126 – Bid Opening
3/22/2018.
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THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2018
820
820
Official Notices
MARYLAND HEALTH AND HIGHER
EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES AUTHORITY
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
CONCERNING ISSUANCE OF BONDS
A public hearing will be held at 10:00 a.m. on Friday, April 6, 2018, at
the offices of Maryland Health and Higher Educational Facilities
Authority (the “Authority”), 401 East Pratt Street, Suite 1224, Baltimore, Maryland 21202 by the Authority for the proposed issuance of
its revenue bonds, notes or other obligations (the “Bonds”), at one
time or from time to time, pursuant to the Maryland Health and Higher
Educational Facilities Authority Act.
The purpose of the public hearing is to permit any person to testify
orally or in writing concerning the issuance of the Bonds or the
location and nature of the facilities to be financed or refinanced with
the proceeds of the Bonds.
The proceeds of the Bonds will be loaned by the Authority to one or
more of The Johns Hopkins Health System Corporation or its affiliates,
each a nonprofit Maryland corporation, to finance or refinance
the acquisition, construction, renovation, expansion and equipping
of health care and related facilities, including (without limitation):
I. to refinance the Authority’s Revenue Bonds, The Johns Hopkins
Health System Issue, Series 2013A, the proceeds of which were used:
A. to refund the Authority’s Revenue Bonds, The Johns Hopkins
Health System Obligated Group Issue, Series 2008B, the proceeds
of which were used by The Johns Hopkins Hospital (“JHH”) for
the financing of the construction and equipping of two 18-story
medical towers (15 above ground floors) encompassing approximately
1,553,000 square feet in the aggregate and located on JHH’s existing
East Baltimore Medical Campus, one tower used as a Cardiovascular
& Critical Care Unit (the “Critical Care Tower”) and the second used
as a Children’s Unit (the “Children’s Tower”) (the “JHH Project”); and
B. to refund the Authority’s Revenue Bonds, Howard County General
Hospital Issue, Series 2008, the proceeds of which were used in
order to finance or refinance for Howard County General Hospital, Inc.
(“Howard County General”) the acquisition, construction, renovation
or equipping of healthcare facilities, including (without limitation) (a)
a five-story, approximately 110,686 gross square foot clinical medical
pavilion, (b) a five-level, above ground parking garage of approximately
176,420 gross square feet and (c) renovations to existing facilities
(collectively, the “Howard County General Project”).
The JHH Project and the Howard County General Project are collectively referred to herein as the “2013 Project.”
The JHH Project is located on the campus of JHH headquartered
at 600 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (consisting
generally of the blocks bounded by East Madison Street, Caroline
Street, Orleans Street and North Washington Street). The Howard
County General Project is located on the campus of Howard County
General headquartered at 5755 Cedar Lane, Columbia, Maryland
21044.
JHH is the initial operator of the JHH Project. Howard County General
is the initial owner and operator of the Howard County General
Project.
II. to refinance the Authority’s Revenue Bonds, The Johns Hopkins
Health System Issue, Series 2015B, the proceeds of which were
used to refinance the Authority’s Revenue Bonds, The Johns Hopkins
Health System Obligated Group Issue Series 2008B, the proceeds of
which were originally issued to finance and refinance the acquisition,
construction, renovation and equipping of certain healthcare facilities
located at 600 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21287, including
(without limitation) the financing of the construction and equipping of
the Critical Care Tower and the Children’s Tower (the “2015 Project”).
The 2013 Project and the 2015 Project are sometimes collectively
referred to herein as the “Project.” The Project is located at the
addresses set forth above. The initial owner or operator of the 2013
Project is set forth above. JHH is the initial owner and operator of the
2015 Project.
The maximum aggregate principal amount of the Bonds issued with
respect to the Project will not exceed $140,000,000. The Bonds will
be issued pursuant to a plan of financing for the Project that may
entail the financing or refinancing from time to time by the Bonds
including the financing and refinancing of the Bonds. Because of the
possible inclusion of original issue discount bonds (some of which
may be capital appreciation bonds) the total amount of Bonds payable
at maturity may exceed the initial stated principal amount of the
Bonds.
The public hearing will be held to meet the requirements imposed by
Section 147(f) of the Internal Revenue Code to the extent applicable to
the Bonds. For additional information or to submit written testimony,
contact the Executive Director of the Authority at the address set
forth above.
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC OF A PETITION
FOR RULEMAKING TO REVISE
REQUIREMENTS FOR TRENCHLESS
EXCAVATION SET FORTH IN RULE
20 VAC 5-309-150 OF THE STATE
CORPORATION COMMISSION'S RULES
FOR ENFORCEMENT OF THE
UNDERGROUND UTILITY DAMAGE
PREVENTION ACT
CASE NO. URS-2018-00005
On January 23, 2018, Columbia Gas of Virginia, Inc.
("Petitioner"), filed a Petition for Rulemaking ("Petition")
requesting that the State Corporation Commission
("Commission") initiate a rulemaking for the limited purpose
of revising
20 VAC 5-309-150 ("Rule 150") of the
Commission's Rules for Enforcement of the Underground
Utility Damage Prevention Act that prescribes requirements
for trenchless excavation.
The Petitioner states that the proposed revisions ("Proposed
Rule") would (1) provide for greater flexibility when
conducting trenchless excavation that crosses gravity fed
sewer mains and combination storm/sanitary sewer system
utility lines; and (2) enhance the safety and efficiency of
conducting such excavations.
The Petitioner asserts that technological advancements
have enabled the precise location of gravity fed sewer
mains and storm drains without exposing those facilities,
as required by Rule 150 (6). The Petition states that
video cameras designed to pass through these underground
facilities are able to communicate with locating equipment
at ground level to provide the precise location, depth, and
diameter of these utility lines. Video images also show
the condition of the facilities, revealing conditions such as
cross bores and root damage. According to the Petitioner,
this technology enables the precise knowledge of depth,
diameter, location, and condition of gravity fed sewer mains
and storm drains to be known without exposing those
facilities by hand digging.
The Petitioner states that the Proposed Rule would allow
trenchless excavation crossing gravity fed sewer mains and
combination storm/sanitary sewer systems to occur without
exposing those utility lines if the enumerated steps are
taken to ensure proper notification, documentation, and
safety precautions. The steps set forth in the Proposed
Rule include: (1) the receipt of documentation that the
utility line operator has been notified of the excavation;
(2) that the excavator has determined the depth, diameter,
and condition of the utility lines using appropriate locating
technology and a sewer system camera; (3) that a clearance
of at least three feet is maintained between the bore path
and the utility lines; (4) that the post-bore condition of the
utility lines is reviewed using a sewer system camera; (5)
that the excavator notify the utility line operator(s) of any
damage found; and (6) that the excavator maintain all video
documentation for 12 months and make it available to the
utility line operator(s) and the Division of Utility and Railroad
Safety.
The Petitioner asserts that modifications in the Proposed
Rule ensure that the use of camera technology to locate
gravity fed sewer mains and combination storm/sanitary
sewer systems is as safe and effective as exposing such
utility lines by hand digging. It is further asserted that the
use of camera technology where feasible is more efficient
and allows excavators to maintain a safe distance from
vehicular traffic by eliminating the need for hand digging in
road ways.
Copies of the Petition and the Commission's Order
Establishing Proceeding entered in this case may be
obtained by submitting a written request to counsel for
the Petitioner, Bryan D. Stogdale, Senior Counsel, NiSource
Corporate Services Company, 1809 Coyote Drive, Chester,
Virginia 23836. If acceptable to the requesting party, the
Company may provide the documents by electronic means.
Copies of these documents also shall be available for
interested persons to review in the Commission's Document
Control Center, located on the First Floor of the Tyler
Building, 1300 East Main Street, Richmond, Virginia 23219,
between the hours of 8:15 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through
Friday, excluding holidays. Interested persons also may
download unofficial copies from the Commission’s website:
http://www.scc.virginia.gov/case.
On or before May 17, 2018, any interested person may
file written comments on the Petition with Joel H. Peck,
Clerk, State Corporation Commission c/o Document Control
Center, P.O. Box 2118, Richmond, Virginia 23218-2118. In
the alternative, comments may be submitted with the
Clerk of the Commission electronically by following the
instructions found on the Commission's website:
http://www.scc.virginia.gov/case. Compact discs or any
other form of electronic storage medium may not be filed
with the comments. All comments shall refer to Case No.
URS-2018-00005.
On or before May 17, 2018, any interested person may
request that the Commission convene a hearing on the
Proposed Rule. If not filed electronically, an original and
fifteen (15) copies of such request for hearing shall be filed
with the Clerk of the Commission at the address set forth
above. Requests for hearing shall refer to Case No. URS2018-00005 and shall include: (i) a precise statement of the
filing party's interest in the proceeding; (ii) a statement of
the specific action sought to the extent then known; (iii) a
statement of the legal basis for such action; and (iv) a precise
statement why a hearing should be conducted in this matter.
A copy of any written comments and requests for hearing
simultaneously shall be sent to counsel to the Petitioner at
the address set forth above.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The City of Gaithersburg will hold three public meetings, scheduled for
April 5th and 10th from 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm, and a daytime meeting
on April 12th from noon to 2:00 pm. These public meetings are to
invite comments on the use of Community Development Block Grant
funding, available to the City through the U.S. Department of Housing
and Urban Development.
The City is preparing its Five-Year Consolidated Plan for the period
July 2018- June 2023 including an Annual Action Plan for the oneyear period July 2018 – June 2019. These meetings are to introduce
the CDBG program, describe how funds must benefit low-moderate
income households, and review the requirements of the Analysis of
Impediments to Fair Housing to encourage meaningful community
participation.
April 5th (7 – 9 pm)
Casey Community Center
810 S Frederick Avenue
Gaithersburg, MD 20877
OPQRS
EZ
Official Notices
April 12, 2018 (noon – 2:00 pm)
Gaithersburg City Hall
31 South Summit Avenue
Gaithersburg, MD 20877
April 10th (7 – 9 pm)
Community Services Division Office
Wells/Robertson House
1 Wells Avenue
Gaithersburg, MD 20877
A Spanish-speaking interpreter will be available. The meetings
are open to the public, and public input is encouraged. For
further
information,
contact
Louise
Kauffmann
at
louise.kauffmann@gaithersburgmd.gov or (240) 805-1022/1023.
Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any
person requiring reasonable accommodation related to a disability
is asked to advise the City at least 48 hours in advance. Contact
Human Resources Department at hr@gaithersburgmd.gov or 301258-6327.
Louise Kauffmann
Housing and Community Development Chief
820
Official Notices
820
Official Notices
MARYLAND DEPARTMENT OF THE
ENVIRONMENT
WATER & SCIENCE ADMINISTRATION
NOTICE OF TENTATIVE DETERMINATION
& PUBLIC HEARING
General Permit for the Discharge of Composting Toilet
Wastewater to Groundwater by Land Application
General Discharge Permit No. 18-CT is a new general
permit. The Maryland Department of the Environment
proposes to issue this permit for the discharge of compost
toilet liquids (wastewater) from composting toilets to
groundwater – via land application. Land application means
that the wastewater is discharged directly onto vegetated
ground and is considered a beneficial reuse of the wastewater. The permit will be valid for five years from the
date of issuance. Currently only individual Discharge Permit
coverage is available for compost toilet liquids discharges
to groundwater via land application. Compost toilet liquids
that are land applied at private dwellings and other types
of facilities that use composting toilet technology may apply
for this permit coverage. The method of discharge is by lowpressure manual methods.
Facilities will have the choice to obtain individual or general
permit coverage. This proposed permit includes similar
operation and maintenance requirements and requires the
same pollutant testing as in current individual permits for the
discharge of compost toilet liquids. Testing will be required
prior to every land application event.
The Department will hold a public hearing concerning the
tentative determination on Thursday, April 26, 2018 in
the Aeries Conference Room from 1 to 3 PM, at the
Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE), 1800
Washington Blvd, Baltimore, MD 21230. Any hearing
impaired person, may request an interpreter at the hearing
by contacting Elaine Sykes, Office of Fair Practices at
(410) 537-3152 at least ten working days prior to the
scheduled hearing date. TTY users should contact the
Maryland Relay Service at 1 800 201-7165.
Written comments concerning the tentative determination
will also be considered in the preparation of a final determination if received by Michael Eisner at the above address,
on or before May 3, 2018. The draft permit and fact sheet
is available on MDE’s website (www.mde.maryland.gov)
and can be found under “Notices and Alerts” through the
comment period. Any questions regarding this tentative
determination, including the draft permit and fact sheet
should be directed to Michael Eisner or Tracy Rocca-Weikart
at the Maryland Department of the Environment, Water
Management Administration, at mike.eisner@maryland.gov,
or tracy.rocca-weikart@maryand.gov or by telephone at 410537-3778 between the hours from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.,
Monday through Friday. Copies of the document may be
obtained at a cost of $0.36 per page.
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
5010 SEDGWICK STREET, NW
WASHINGTON, DC 20016
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of the
District of Columbia recorded on March 5, 1996, as Instrument
Number 9600013394, and in accordance Judgment filed on
October 19, 2017 in case 2016 CA 008732 R(RP) and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the office
of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 WISCONSIN
AVENUE, NW, SUITE 440, WASHINGTON, DC 20015-2034 on,
MARCH 27, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
5010 SEDGWICK STREET, NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20016,
LOT NUMBERED TWO (2) IN SQUARE NUMBERED FOURTEEN
HUNDRED SEVENTY-ONE (1471)
Sale Subject to 1st Lien Deed of Trust:
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (3.5%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 45459
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET AL,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING
KNOWN AS:
5304 4TH STREET
WASHINGTON, DC 20011
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of
the District of Columbia recorded on October 20, 2004, as
Instrument Number 2004146202, and in accordance Judgment
filed on December 18, 2017 in case 2016 CA 005475 R(RP)
and at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within
the office of HARVEY WEST on AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335
WISCONSIN AVENUE, NW, SUITE 440, WASHINGTON, DC
20015-2034
MARCH 27, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
5304 4TH STREET, WASHINGTON, DC 20011, LOT 74, IN
SQUARE 3258
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
FEBRUARY 15, 22, MARCH 1, 8, 15, 22, 2018
12159731
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (7% per
annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
Samuel I. White, P.C.
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE, SUITE 100
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
PUBLIC AUCTION SALE
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
SHARES OF CAPITAL STOCK
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
"MEMBERSHIP SHARES" OF
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
HARBOUR SQUARE OWNERS INC.
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
a cooperative housing corporation, entitling the owner
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
thereof to possession of a dwelling unit
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
KNOWN AS
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
560 N STREET, SW UNIT N113, WASHINGTON, DC 20024
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
SALE ON MARCH 27, 2018 at 3:00 PM
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the By virtue of the power and authority contained in a certain
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser Security Agreement from Marian G. Gaynor, default having
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit occurred under the terms thereof, the secured creditor, by
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all its undersigned attorney will sell at Public Auction AT THE
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall OFFICE OF HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., LOCATED AT
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service 5335 WISCONSIN AVENUE, NW, Suite 440, WASHINGTON,
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address DC 20015.
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of All the membership shares described in said Security Agreement
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause being HARBOUR SQUARE OWNERS INC. shares of Capital
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be Stock of the HARBOUR SQUARE OWNERS INC., allocated
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even to 560 N Street, SW Unit N113, Washington, DC 20024,
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by together with all rights, duties and obligations under the
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit terms of a certain Occupancy Agreement dated September 2,
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but 2004 between Marian G. Gaynor and the HARBOUR SQUARE
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered OWNERS INC. Subject to the terms, provisions and conditions
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan contained in the Articles of Incorporation, By-Laws, Occupancy
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the Agreement, Co-Operative Ownership Contract and House Rules
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest. of the HARBOUR SQUARE OWNERS INC.
Trustee’s File No. 24763
The membership shares will be sold subject to their proportionSAMUEL I. WHITE, III ET. AL.,
ate share of certain underlying purchase money mortgages, the
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
exact amount due thereon will be announced at time of sale and
subject to all conditions, liens restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same, and subject to any assessments including
assessments pursuant to D.C. Code Sections 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY
BY certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale.
CASH WILL NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT.
FERBRUARY 15, 22, MARCH 1, 8, 15, 22, 2018 12163605 The balance of the purchase price with interest at 5.875%
per annum from the date of sale to the date of settlement.
Settlement within TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the
sale. "[t]here will be no abatement of interest due from the
purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason" and
that "[t]axes . . . [and] Co-Op dues, if any, shall be assumed by
the purchaser from the date of sale." Adjustments on all taxes,
Membership is rewarding.
public charges and special or regular assessments will be made
as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If
applicable, Co-Op dues and assessments that may become due
after the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
DANIEL J. PESACHOWITZ, ESQUIRE
Attorney
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840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
1527 42ND STREET, SE
WASHINGTON, DC 20020
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of the
District of Columbia recorded on September 28, 2007, as
Instrument Number 2007126651, and in accordance Judgment
filed on October 21, 2016 in case 2015 CA 000176 R(RP)
and at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within
the office of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335
WISCONSIN AVENUE, NW, SUITE 440, WASHINGTON, DC
20015-2034 on
MARCH 27, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
1527 42ND STREET, SE, WASHINGTON, DC 20020, LOT
NUMBERED TWELVE (12), IN SQUARE NUMBERED FIFTY
THREE HUNDRED SEVENTY (5370).
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (2% per
annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 24160
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET AL,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
D13
Trustees Sale - DC
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
44 49TH STREET, SE, UNIT 101
WASHINGTON, DC 20019
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of the
District of Columbia recorded on March 15, 2007, as Instrument
Number 2007036707, and in accordance Judgment filed on
January 23, 2018 in case 2016 CA 009177 R(RP) and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the office
of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 WISCONSIN
AVENUE, NW, SUITE 440, WASHINGTON, DC 20015-2034 on,
MARCH 27, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
44 49TH STREET, SE, UNIT 101, WASHINGTON, DC 20019,
LOT 2002 IN SQUARE 5331.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (6.875%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 48773
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET. AL.,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
FEBRUARY 15, 22, MARCH 1, 8, 15, 22, 2018
FEBRUARY 15, 22, MARCH 1, 8, 15, 22, 2018
12164860
12164202
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
2549 ALABAMA AVENUE, SE
WASHINGTON, DC 20020
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of the
District of Columbia recorded on July 5, 2006, as Instrument
Number 2006088743, and in accordance Judgment filed on
November 6, 2017 in case 2017 CA 000959 R(RP) and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the office of
HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin Avenue,
NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
MARCH 27, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
2549 ALABAMA AVENUE, SE, WASHINGTON, DC 20020,
SQUARE 5730, LOT 0885 AND SQUARE 5730, LOT 0887.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (2.05%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 46743
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET. AL.,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
4709 JAY STREET NE
WASHINGTON, DC 20019
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of
the District of Columbia recorded on December 18, 2007, as
Instrument Number 2007156188, and in accordance Judgment
filed on February 7, 2018 in case 2016 CA 002318 R(RP) and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within
the office of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335
WISCONSIN AVENUE, NW, SUITE 440, WASHINGTON, DC
20015-2034 on,
MARCH 27, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
4709 JAY STREET NE, WASHINGTON, DC 20019, LOT NUMBERED ONE HUNDRED FORTY-SIX (146) IN SQUARE NUMBERED FIFTY-ONE HUNDRED FIFTY (5150).
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (6% per
annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 34608
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET. AL.,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
FEBRUARY 15, 22, MARCH 1, 8, 15, 22, 2018
FEBRUARY 22, MARCH 1, 8, 15, 22, 2018
12164275
12166729
OPQRS
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
736 BRANDYWINE STREET, SE UNIT 103
WASHINGTON, DC 20032
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of
the District of Columbia recorded on December 18, 2007, as
Instrument Number 2007156112, and in accordance Judgment
filed on January 31, 2018 in case 2016 CA 002570 R(RP)
and at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within
the office of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335
WISCONSIN AVENUE, NW, SUITE 440, WASHINGTON, DC
20015-2034 on,
MARCH 27, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
736 BRANDYWINE STREET, SE UNIT 103, WASHINGTON, DC
20032, LOT 117, IN SQUARE 6163
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (6.75%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 23583
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET. AL.,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
FEBRUARY 22, MARCH 1, 8, 15, 22, 2018
850
Montgomery County
850
12166728
Montgomery County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
3102 Gaylor Place
Silver Spring, MD 20906
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
ALFREDO VILLEGAS HERNANDEZ, dated June 27, 2006 and
recorded in Liber 32598, folio 182 among the Land Records
of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD, default having occurred
thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.424502V;
Tax ID No.13-01193655 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at
public auction at the MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850,
on
APRIL 9, 2018 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $47,500.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 571619)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
BRIAN THOMAS,
ERIN M. AUGUST,
HUGH J. GREEN,
PATRICK M. A. DECKER,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
850
850
Montgomery County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
14608 ANTIETAM CT.
SILVER SPRING, MD 20905
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Lilian
Ivette Calderon dated July 27, 2007 and recorded in Liber 34878, folio
410 among the Land Records of Montgomery County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, at the Court House
Door, 50 Maryland Ave., Rockville, MD 20850, on
APRIL 11, 2018 AT 11:14 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Montgomery County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #05-03234371.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $54,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, to be adjusted
to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. Condominium fees
and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the
purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property
from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the
time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 63445.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Mar 22, Mar 29 & Apr 5
12170343
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
2109 WALSH VIEW TERR., UNIT #12-202
SILVER SPRING, MD 20902
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from James G.
Hunter and Cheryl M. Hunter dated September 1, 2006 and recorded in
Liber 33049, folio 150 among the Land Records of Montgomery County,
MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees
will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Montgomery County,
at the Court House Door, 50 Maryland Ave., Rockville, MD 20850, on
APRIL 11, 2018 AT 11:15 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Montgomery County, MD and described
as Unit numbered 12-202 in a plan of condominium subdivision styled
"Plan of Condominium Subdivision Americana Finmark Condominium"
and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #1301663282.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $9,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, to be adjusted
to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. Condominium fees
and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the
purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property
from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the
time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 55963.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Mar 22, Mar 29 & Apr 5
12170344
12171042
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
To place your legal notice in
the Classified section:
Call: 202-334-7007
To place your legal notice in
the Classified section:
Call: 202-334-7007
WP 2x1
850
EZ
Montgomery County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
210 Virginia Avenue
Rockville, MD 20850
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from BOBBY
J. JEWETT, dated June 6, 2007 and recorded in Liber 34433,
folio 427 among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case
docketed as Case No.414208V ; Tax ID No.04-01778031 ) the
Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
APRIL 2, 2018 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $50,000.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 562192)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
BRIAN THOMAS,
BRIAN M. COHEN,
HUGH J. GREEN,
PATRICK M.A. DECKER,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 22, 29, APRIL 5, 2018
12169749
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
5541 Burnside Drive
Rockville, MD 20853
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from MARILYN
SEIDLER, dated March 24, 2006 and recorded in Liber 32170,
folio 586 among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case
docketed as Case No.443159V ; Tax ID No.13-02450597 ) the
Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
APRIL 2, 2018 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $12,400.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 576957)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
e-mail: legalnotices@washpost.com
850
Montgomery County
850
850
Montgomery County
THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2018
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
68 SILVER MOON DR.
SILVER SPRING, MD 20904
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
13713 PARKLAND DR.
ROCKVILLE, MD 20853
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Rochelle
M. Fashaw dated January 28, 2009 and recorded in Liber 36537, folio
1 among the Land Records of Montgomery County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, at the Court House
Door, 50 Maryland Ave., Rockville, MD 20850, on
APRIL 4, 2018 AT 11:00 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Jose
I. Chavez and Maria I. Morales dated July 7, 2005 and recorded in Liber
30658, folio 103 among the Land Records of Montgomery County, MD,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, at the
Court House Door, 50 Maryland Ave., Rockville, MD 20850, on
APRIL 4, 2018 AT 10:58 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Montgomery County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #05-02733610.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Montgomery County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #13-01270550.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $39,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, to be adjusted
to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. Condominium fees
and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the
purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property
from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the
time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 69811.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $28,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, to be adjusted
to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. Condominium fees
and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the
purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property
from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the
time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 65102.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Mar 15, Mar 22 & Mar 29
12169465
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
13823 DOWLAIS DR.
ROCKVILLE, MD 20853
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Barbara L.
Carlson and Michael W. Carlson dated July 20, 2005 and recorded in Liber
30397, folio 169 among the Land Records of Montgomery County, MD,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, at the
Court House Door, 50 Maryland Ave., Rockville, MD 20850, on
APRIL 4, 2018 AT 10:59 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Montgomery County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #13-01384838.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $29,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, to be adjusted
to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. Condominium fees
and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the
purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property
from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the
time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 67218.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Mar 15, Mar 22 & Mar 29
12169463
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Mar 15, Mar 22 & Mar 29
12169461
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
5500 Friendship Boulevard, Unit 1107 N
Chevy Chase, MD 20815
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to BUONASSISSI, HENNING, LASH,
PC, Trustee(s), dated June 4, 2012, and recorded among the
Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber
44278, folio 412, the holder of the indebtedness secured by
this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
APRIL 2, 2018 at 1:30 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
RECORDED JUNE 27, 2012 IN LIBER 44278, FOLIO 412.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 3.625% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (55510)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
23723 Clarksmead Drive
Clarksburg, MD 20871
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to LAWYERS TITLE SERVICES INC. ,
Trustee(s), dated December 27, 2006, and recorded among the
Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber
33592, folio 200, the holder of the indebtedness secured by
this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
APRIL 2, 2018 at 1:30 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
www.hwestauctions.com
12169339
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST MARCH 15, 22, 29, 2018
RECORDED JANUARY 5, 2007 IN LIBER 33592, FOLIO 200.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 6.375% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
202.334.6200
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
washingtonpost.com/classified
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
Open 24/7
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
C054E 2x3
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
Membership is rewarding.
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (55486)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
IS YOUR CAR
HOLDING UP?
CLASSIFIED
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kes you
PostPoints ta
INSIDE THSIEC.
MU
12169730
ARE YOUR TENANTS
MOVING OUT?
12171044 MARCH 22, 29, APRIL 5, 2018
e-mail: legalnotices@washpost.com
Montgomery County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
19610 Blue Smoke Way
Gaithersburg, MD 20879
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from MARIA
E. CANALES, dated February 15, 2007 and recorded in Liber
33941, folio 590 among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure
Case docketed as Case No.439510V; Tax ID No.09-02064241
) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND
AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
APRIL 9, 2018 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $27,900.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 579531)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
www.hwestauctions.com
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
MARCH 15, 22, 29, 2018
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 22, 29, APRIL 5, 2018
Montgomery County
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054F 2x2
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 15, 22, 29, 2018
12168403
Easy Pay keeps you in-the-know.
(And your subscription up-to-date.)
ENROLL TODAY
Visit sub.wpsubscribe.com/easy
or call 202-334-6100.
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S2929 2x4
850
Trustees Sale - DC
S0833-1 6x2
840
WP 2x1
D14
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Anne Arundel County
852
OPQRS
EZ
Anne Arundel County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
701 Caleb Lane
Annapolis, MD 21401
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to DAVID E. WATERS AND ANTHONY B. OLMERT,
SR. , Trustee(s), dated April 27, 2015, and recorded among the
Land Records of ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber
28467, folio 385, the holder of the indebtedness secured by
this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8
CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401 ON,
APRIL 9, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT 168, AS SHOWN ON A PLAT OF SUBDIVISION ENTITLED
"KLNGSPORT" RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND ON APRIL 19, 2002 IN
PLAT BOOK 245, AT PAGES 31 THROUGH 50, AS PLAT 12808
THROUGH 12827.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 4.125% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (53307)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
852
Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
101 Water Fountain Way, Unit 202
Baltimore, MD 21060
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to LESLIE J. KEIDEL, Trustee(s), dated October
6, 2009, and recorded among the Land Records of ANNE
ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 21661, folio 055, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction at THE ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8 CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD
21401 ON,
APRIL 9, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
RECORDED OCTOBER 16, 2009 IN LIBER 21661, FOLIO
055.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 4.5% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (54070)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
MARCH 22, 29, APRIL 5, 2018
12167984
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
8121A Armiger Drive
Pasadena, MD 21122
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to PRLAP, INC. , Trustee(s), dated February
23, 2007, and recorded among the Land Records of ANNE
ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 18882, folio 124, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction at THE ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8 CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD
21401 ON,
APRIL 9, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
RECORDED MARCH 15, 2007 IN LIBER 18882, FOLIO 124.
THE PROPERTY IS SUBJECT TO A PRIOR MORTGAGE. IF
AVAILABLE THE AMOUNT WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT THE TIME
OF THE SALE
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 8.44% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (40425)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
MARCH 22, 29, APRIL 5, 2018
12168009
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
416 Rose Avenue
Glen Burnie, MD 21061
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to DAVID E. WATERS AND ANTHONY B. OLMERT,
SR. , Trustee(s), dated March 5, 2010, and recorded among the
Land Records of ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber
22090, folio 429, the holder of the indebtedness secured by
this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8
CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401 ON,
APRIL 9, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NOS. 51, 52 AND 53, BLOCK TT, AS SHOWN ON THE
PLAT ENTITLED, "REVISED LAYOUT AND ADDITION TO GLEN
BURNIE HEIGHTS", WHICH PLAT IS RECORDED AMONG THE
LAND RECORDS OF ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND IN
PLAT BOOK 16, FOLIO 19, PLAT NO. B-237.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 4.375% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (43223)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 22, 29, APRIL 5, 2018
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
12168011
12169764 MARCH 22, 29, APRIL 5, 2018
ARE YOUR TENANTS
MOVING OUT?
IS YOUR CAR
HOLDING UP?
CLASSIFIED
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
KLMNO
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054F 2x2
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054E 2x2
856
Frederick County
856
Frederick County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
2125 WAINWRIGHT CT., UNIT BB
FREDERICK, MD 21702
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Caswan
M. Lewis and Amanda Kinna dated October 25, 2006 and recorded in
Liber 6283, folio 727 among the Land Records of Frederick County, MD,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court
House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
APRIL 11, 2018 AT 1:06 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and described
as Unit BB, in building 4200, in Old Farm Condominium and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #02-162199.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $14,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 69161.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Mar 22, Mar 29 & Apr 5
12170894
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1412 ROLLINGHOUSE DR.
FREDERICK, MD 21703
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Dean
A. Bunch dated November 12, 2007 and recorded in Liber 7494, folio 97
among the Land Records of Frederick County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick
St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
APRIL 11, 2018 AT 1:05 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #02-090635.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $27,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 67619.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Mar 22, Mar 29 & Apr 5
12170893
Buonassissi, Henning & Lash, P.C.
1861 Wiehle Avenue, Suite 300
Reston, Virginia 20190
(703) 796-1341
TRUSTEE'S SALE
6893 Arbor Court
Frederick, MD 21703
In execution of the Deed of Trust dated February 13, 2009 and recorded
February 26, 2009 in Liber 7199, folio 0239, among the Frederick County
land records, the undersigned Substitute Trustees, any of whom may act,
will offer for sale at public auction on April 11, 2018, at 1:15 PM, at the
front of the Circuit Court for Frederick County, 100 West Patrick Street,
Frederick, Maryland, the following property
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, Maryland and more
fully described in the aforementioned Deed of Trust.
TAX ID: 28-553668
The property and improvements will be sold in "as is" physical condition
without warranty of any kind and subject to all conditions, restrictions and
agreements of record affecting the same.
TERMS OF SALE: A non-refundable bidder's deposit of $16,000.00 by
cashier's/certified check required at time of sale except for the party
secured by the Deed of Trust. Risk of loss on purchaser from date and
time of auction. The balance of the purchase price together with interest
thereon at 5.375% per annum from date of sale to receipt of purchase
price by Trustees must be paid by cashier's check within 10 days after
final ratification of sale. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason.
All real estate taxes and other public charges and/or assessments to be
adjusted as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
If applicable, any condominium and/or homeowners association dues
and assessments that may become due after the date of sale shall be
purchaser’s responsibility. Purchaser shall pay all transfer, documentary
and recording taxes/fees and all other settlement costs. Purchaser
is responsible for obtaining possession of the property. If purchaser
defaults, deposit will be forfeited and property resold at the risk and cost
of the defaulting purchaser who shall be liable for any deficiency in the
purchase price and all costs, expenses and attorney’s fees of both sales.
If Trustees do not convey title for any reason, purchaser's sole remedy is
return of deposit without interest. This sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan secured by the Deed of Trust including but not
limited to determining whether prior to sale a bankruptcy was filed; a
forbearance, repayment or other agreement was entered into; or the loan
was reinstated or paid off. In any such event this sale shall be null and void
and purchaser’s sole remedy shall be return of deposit without interest.
This communication is from a debt collector. (81424)
Richard A. Lash, David A. Rosen, Douglas W. Callabresi, and Robert E.
Kelly, Substitute Trustees
Auctioneers:
Alex Cooper Auctioneers
908 York Road
Towson, MD 21204
410-828-4838
Mar 22, Mar 29 & Apr 5
12171468
Stern & Eisenberg Mid-Atlantic, P.C.
9920 Franklin Square Dr., Suite 100
Baltimore, MD 21236
410-635-5127
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
501 E. CHURCH ST.
FREDERICK, MD 21701
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Robert N.
Staley, dated August 30, 2007 and recorded in Liber 6728, folio 219 among
the Land Records of Frederick County, MD, default having occurred under
the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit
Court for Frederick County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick St.,
Frederick, MD 21701, on
APRIL 11, 2018 AT 12:59 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully described in
the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling.
The property, will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions,
restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any and with
no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $26,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within 10 days of final ratification
of the sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County. TIME IS OF THE
ESSENCE. If the purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid ten (10)
days of ratification, the purchaser relinquishes their deposit and the Sub.
Trustees may file an appropriate motion with the court to resell the
property. Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order issued
by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper
or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to the address provided
by the purchaser and as recorded on the documents executed by the
purchaser at the time of the sale. Service shall be deemed effective upon
the purchaser 3 days after postmarked by the United States Post Office.
It is expressly agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified
mail is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Sub. Trustees and
all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees and full commission
on the gross sales price of the sale) shall be charged against and paid
from the forfeited deposit. In the event of resale the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from
any resale of the property regardless of any improvements made to the
real property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at
the rate of 7.50% per annum from the date of sale to the date the
funds are received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. Taxes, ground
rent, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association dues,
all public charges/assessments payable on an annual basis, including
sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if applicable, to be adjusted
for the current year to date of sale and assumed thereafter by the
purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for the costs of all transfer
taxes, (including agricultural transfer taxes, if applicable), documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser shall be
responsible for physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes
the risk of loss from the date of sale forward. The sale is subject to post
sale audit by the Noteholder to determine whether the borrower entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid off prior to
the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees that upon notification by
the Sub. Trustees of such event the sale is null and void and of no legal
effect and the deposit returned without interest. If the Sub. Trustees are
unable to convey either insurable or good and marketable title, or the sale
is not ratified for any reason by the Circuit Court including errors made by
the Sub. Trustees, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be
limited to a refund of the deposit without any interest.
Steven K. Eisenberg, Paul J. Moran, Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Mar 22, Mar 29 & Apr 5
12170891
856
856
Frederick County
856
Frederick County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
10221 Royal St. Andrews Place
Ijamsville, MD 21754
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
LOURDES VIDANGOS AND JAMIME PATINO AND DIGNA
CEVILLANO, dated June 29, 2006 and recorded in Liber
6630, folio 0265 among the Land Records of FREDERICK
COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure
Case docketed as Case No.10C17001566; Tax ID No.09280715 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at
the FREDERICK COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 100 W.
PATRICK ST, FREDERICK, MD 21701, on
APRIL 9, 2018 at 1:15 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $50,000.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for FREDERICK
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 561390)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
BRIAN THOMAS,
KHALID D. WALKER,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 22, 29, APRIL 5, 2018
12171038
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1328 Hampshire Drive 7D
Frederick, MD 21702
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
AGAPIT KAMGA, dated July 7, 2007 and recorded in Liber
6750, folio 0703 among the Land Records of FREDERICK
COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure
Case docketed as Case No.C-10-CV-18-000073; Tax ID No.02207575 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at
the FREDERICK COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 100 W.
PATRICK ST, FREDERICK, MD 21701, on
APRIL 9, 2018 at 1:15 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $20,000.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for FREDERICK
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 581188)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
Frederick County
856
D15
Frederick County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
830 E HEATHER RIDGE DR.
FREDERICK, MD 21702
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Ronny Lee
Kline and Mary Elizabeth Kline dated December 29, 1995 and recorded in
Liber 2152, folio 1128 and re-recorded in Liber 2177, folio 390 among the
Land Records of Frederick County, MD, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit
Court for Frederick County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick St.,
Frederick, MD 21701, on
APRIL 4, 2018 AT 1:20 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and described
as Unit 22 E, in a horizontal property regime known as "Ambertowne
Condominium" and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
Tax ID #02-139774.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $5,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 69179.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Mar 15, Mar 22 & Mar 29
12169798
McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC
312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800
Laurel, Maryland 20707
www.mwc-law.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
19 S. PENDLETON CT.
FREDERICK, MD 21703
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Dawn N.
Scheffer, dated September 24, 1999 and recorded in Liber 2635, folio 1234
among the Land Records of Frederick County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof and at the request of the parties secured thereby,
the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at public auction at
the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court House Door, 100 W.
Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
APRIL 4, 2018 AT 1:15 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON situated in Frederick County, Maryland and more fully described
in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of
record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any
kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier's or certified check, or
in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their
sole discretion, for $8,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or
servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived.
Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of
the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County,
Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate
of 6.125% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received
in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by
an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the
balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will
be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the
defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from
the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes,
ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments
payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, and front foot benefit charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the
current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be
responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost
of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges
shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable
to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser.
Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and
the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk of
loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #2011-08897).
Laura H. G. O'Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Mar 15, Mar 22 & Mar 29
857
Howard County
857
12169780
Howard County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
6920 Deer Pasture Drive
Columbia, MD 21045
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
RICHARD L. KOLESAR, dated July 17, 2006 and recorded in
Liber 10162, folio 290 among the Land Records of HOWARD
COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure
Case docketed as Case No.13C17111192 ; Tax ID No.16115150 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
HOWARD COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at THE THOMAS
DORSEY BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX ROAD, COLUMBIA, MD.
21045, on
APRIL 2, 2018 at 11:15 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in HOWARD COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $35,300.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within
ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for
HOWARD COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 576621)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 22, 29, APRIL 5, 2018
12171034
Easy Pay keeps you in-the-know.
(And your subscription up-to-date.)
ENROLL TODAY
Visit sub.wpsubscribe.com/easy
or call 202-334-6100.
Democracy Dies in Darkness
Dem
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 15, 22, 29, 2018
12169753
LEGAL NOTICES
To place your legal notice in
the Classified section:
Call: 202-334-7007
e-mail: legalnotices@washpost.com
WP 2x1
852
S0833-1 6x2
THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2018
OPQRS
857
Howard County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
9129 Bryant Avenue
Laurel, MD 20723
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from SARA
DEKERY, dated April 28, 2006 and recorded in Liber 10417,
folio 181 LOAN MODIFICATION IN LIBER 11842, FOLIO
119 ; HOME AFFORDABLE MODIFICATION IN LIBER 17302,
FOLIO 34, among the Land Records of HOWARD COUNTY, MD,
default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed
as Case No.13C17113651 ; Tax ID No.06-492290 ) the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the HOWARD COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, located at THE THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING,
9250 BENDIX ROAD, COLUMBIA, MD. 21045, on
APRIL 2, 2018 at 11:15 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in HOWARD COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $49,300.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within
ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for
HOWARD COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 576083)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 15, 22, 29, 2018
12169751
872
City of Alexandria
Fairfax County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
5911 EDSALL ROAD, APT. PH-9,
ALEXANDRIA, VA 22304
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
5914 ERVING STREET,
SPRINGFIELD, VA 22150
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated January 18, 2007,
in the original principal amount
of $180,000.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Alexandria City, Virginia as Instrument No. 070001806 , re-recorded
as Instrument No. 070003868,. The
undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction
in the front of the Circuit Court
building for the City of Alexandria,
520 King Street, Alexandria, Virginia on April 13, 2018, at 9:00
AM, the property described in said
Deed of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL THAT LOT
OF GROUND SITUATE IN VIRGINIA
AND DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS,
THAT IS TO SAY: CONDOMINIUM
UNIT NO. PH9, HIGHPOINT CONDOMINIUM, IN ACCORDANCE WITH
THE DECLARATION OF THE CONDOMINIUM
AND
EXHIBITS
ATTACHED THERETO, RECORDED
IN DEED BOOK 1577 AT PAGE 693,
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
THE CITY OF ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. TOGETHER WITH THE "COMMON ELEMENTS INTEREST" OF
SAID UNIT AS MORE PARTICULARLY SET FORTH IN THE AFORESAID
DECLARATION; AND TOGETHER
WITH THE ASSIGNMENT OF PARKING SPACE NO(S) 87 AT THE
AFORESAID CONDOMINIUM AS A
LIMITED COMMON ELEMENT FOR
THE EXCLUSIVE USE OF ROLAND
ALLEN, SUBJECT TO AND CONSISTENT WITH THE CONDOMINIUM
INSTRUMENTS.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3255191.
March 22, 29, 2018
12172339
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $400,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 6.500000% dated
September 23, 2005, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 17798,
Page 1918, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on April 18, 2018 at 2:30 PM,
the property with improvements
to wit:
Tax Map No. 0803 02200008
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-270174.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
March 15, 22, 2018
873
12167909
Prince William County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
5518 Hillsman Farm Lane
Haymarket, VA 20169
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$603,860.00, dated May 14, 2014,
recorded among the land records
of the Circuit Court for Prince William County on May 15, 2014,
as
Instrument
Number
201405150032075, the undersigned
appointed
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction, at the main entrance of
the courthouse for the Circuit Court
of Prince William County, 9311 Lee
Ave, Manassas, VA on April 27, 2018
at 9:30 AM, the property described
in said deed of trust, located at
the above address and briefly
described as: Lot Twenty (20), Section Thirty-Five (35), DOMINION
VALLEY COUNTRY CLUB, as the
same appears shown on that certain Deed of Subdivision, Easement and Vacation, as set forth
and recorded as Instrument Number 200504220064233 with plat
recorded at Instrument Number
200504220064234, among the
land records of Prince William
County, Virginia. Tax ID: 7298-999680.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $15,000.00 or 10%
of the sale price, whichever is
lower, will be required in the form
of a certified or cashier’s check.
Cash will not be accepted as a
deposit. Settlement within fifteen
(15) days of sale, otherwise Trustee
may forfeit deposit. Additional
terms to be announced at sale.
This is a communication from a
debt collector. This notice is an
attempt to collect on a debt and
any information obtained will be
used for that purpose.
(Trustee # 578866)
Substitute Trustee: ALG Trustee,
LLC, C/O Orlans PC PO Box 2548,
Leesburg, VA 20177, (703) 7777101,
website:
http://www.orlans.com
Towne #: 5000.0149
SF
March 22, 29, 2018
872
Fairfax County
873
Fairfax County
Prince William County
873
THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2018
EZ
Prince William County
878
Stafford County
878
N
Stafford County
N
JOBS
JOBS
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE
Tax Map # 012-3-17-0047
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
15663 Sedgefield Oaks Court,
Gainesville, VA 20155
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
5 Creekway Lane,
Fredericksburg, VA 22405
Pursuant to Virginia Code § 55-516, and by virtue of a Deed of
Appointment of Trustee dated February 19, 2018 and recorded in the
Land Records Office of the Fairfax County Circuit Court on February 21,
2018 as Instrument No. 2018009904.001, Great Falls Crossing Community
Association, Inc. (“Association”), by its appointed Trustee, Mazin I. Elias
will offer for sale at public auction to the highest bidder on April 20,
2018 at 11:30 a.m., at the main entrance to the Courthouse for the
Circuit Court of Fairfax County, Virginia, 4110 Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax,
Virginia 22030, the real property improvements, along with any limited
common elements appurtenant thereto, located at the street address of
10851 Murray Downs Court, Reston, Virginia 20194, legally described as:
Lot 47, Section 4, Parcel A, “CRIPPENS CORNER”, as the same is duly
dedicated, platted and recorded in Deed Book 9968, Page 323 among the
land records of Fairfax County, Virginia (“Property”).
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
October 23, 2006, and recorded at Instrument Number 200610310155222
in the Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Prince William County,
VA, securing a loan which was originally $960,000.00. The appointed
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at
public auction at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince William
County, 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas, VA 20110 on:
April 3, 2018 at 1:00 PM
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
December 23, 2004, and recorded at Instrument Number LR050000338 in
the Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Stafford County, VA, securing
a loan which was originally $332,800.00. The appointed SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at public auction
at the front steps of the Judicial Bldg, Circuit Court for Stafford County,
1300 Courthouse Road, Stafford, VA on:
April 9, 2018 at 10:00 AM
Newspaper Delivery Carriers
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of Lot 43,
THE REGENTS AT LAKE MANASSAS, as the same appears duly dedicated,
platted and recorded as Instrument Numbers 200402200029773 and
200402200029774, and as supplemented by Instrument Number
200409160158727, among the Land Records of Prince William County,
Virginia, and as more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold subject to a 120 day right of
redemption by the Internal Revenue Service. The property will be sold
“AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND
SUBJECT TO conditions, restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of
way, and all other matters of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust
to be announced at the time of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of
the sale price, whichever is lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to
the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will be required at the time of sale. The balance
of the purchase price, with interest at the rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date said funds are received
in the office of the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15)
days of sale. In the event of default by the successful bidder, the entire
deposit shall be forfeited and applied to the costs and expenses of sale
and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other public charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, whether incurred prior to or after the sale,
and all other costs incident to settlement to be paid by the purchaser. In
the event taxes, any other public charges have been advanced, a credit
will be due to the seller, to be adjusted from the date of sale at the time of
settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay the seller's attorneys at settlement,
a fee of $445.00 for review of the settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of All
that certain lot or parcel of land with all buildings and improvements
thereon, situate, lying and being in Stafford County, Virginia, described
as Lot 77, Section 2, Ridge Pointe Subdivision, as shown on Plat entitled
“Ridge Pointe Subdivision-Section Two,” prepared by Sullivan, Donahoe
and Ingalls, dated January 26, 1990, and recorded in the Clerk’s Office of
the Circuit Court of Stafford County, Virginia, in Plat Book 20, at Pages
127 and 128, and as more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
For Routes in
Crofton/Davidsonville
Cape St. Claire/Arnold
Millersville
The sale of the Property is being conducted in order to satisfy the liens
securing unpaid assessments as perfected by the memoranda of liens
recorded in the Land Records Office of the Fairfax County Circuit Court on
(i) July 14, 2014 as Instrument No. 2014018184.001; (ii) June 23, 2015 as
Instrument No. 2015020692.001; and (iii) March 8, 2017 as Instrument No.
2017014979.001 (“Lien(s)”).
The Property will be sold in “AS IS” condition and without any warranty
either expressed or implied, as to any aspect or condition of the property,
including, but not limited to the conditions, restrictions, rights of ways,
easements, reservations, community association instruments, any other
instruments and/or amendments thereto and subject to all liens, existing
housing and zoning code violations, filed or unfiled mechanic’s and/or
materialmen’s liens, if any, and all matters of record taking priority over the
Association’s Lien(s), including, but not limited to any deeds of trusts. The
sale is further subject to all provisions, restrictions, easements, covenants,
and conditions as contained in the aforementioned Association’s original,
if applicable, amended, instruments, Declaration, and Bylaws and or any
other governing instrument.
The successful bidder at the foreclosure sale shall assume all risk of loss
and shall be responsible for any damage to the Property immediately upon
the conclusion of bidding on the date of sale. A nonrefundable deposit in
the amount of ten percent (10%) of the sale price to be paid by certified or
cashier’s check will be required of the successful bidder at the time and
place of the sale. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the Association reserves
the right to waive the requirements of the deposit. The successful bidder
shall be required to sign a Memorandum of Sale at the conclusion of the
bidding incorporating all terms of sale. Settlement in full must be made
within thirty (30) days from the date of the sale, time being of the essence.
In the event the purchaser fails to settle in full as required and within
the required time period, the aforementioned deposit shall be forfeited
by purchaser and will be retained by Trustee, the purchaser’s contract
rights shall also be forfeited, and the Property may be resold at the risk,
cost and expense of the purchaser with the deposit applied to the costs
and expenses of sale, including trustees' fees. At settlement the deposit
retained by Trustee, without interest, shall be applied to the purchase
price and the balance shall be paid in cash or its equivalent. All costs
of the conveyance, which shall be by special warranty deed, examination
of title, state and local recordation taxes, grantor taxes, recording and
clerk's fees, notary fees, settlement fees, including preparation of deed,
etc., to be at the cost of the purchaser. Taxes, water, rent and all
other municipal charges and assessments payable and including, but not
limited to, sanitary and/or city charges, if any, shall be adjusted for the
current year to the date of sale and assumed therein by the purchaser.
Trustee shall not have a duty to deliver possession of the Property to the
successful bidder. Interest to be paid by the purchaser at a rate of ten
percent (10%) per annum from the date of the sale to the date of the
settlement. The Association, if a bidder, shall not be required to post the
deposit or pay interest.
If Trustee is unable for any reason, in his sole discretion, to convey title
to the Property, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy at law
or in equity shall be the return of its deposit, without interest, and upon
the return of the deposit the sale shall be void and of no effect. To the
extent permitted by the applicable law, Trustee reserves the right, in his
sole discretion, to (1) announce additional terms at the time of sale, (2)
waive or modify the requirement with respect to the bidder's deposit,
(3) accept or reject any or all bids, (4) extend the time to receive bids,
(5) withdraw the Property from the sale at any time, and (6) postpone
settlement following sale for a reasonable period of time as determined
by Trustee. The information contained herein was obtained by sources
deemed to be reliable, but is offered for information purposes only. The
Association cannot make any representations or warranties with respect
to the accuracy of this information.
Inquiries should be directed to counsel for the Association, Joseph
Shannon Esq., Rees Broome, PC, 1900 Gallows Road, Suite 700, Vienna,
Virginia 22182, (703) 790-1911 or Mazin I. Elias, Trustee, 4800 Montgomery
Lane, 9th, Bethesda, MD 20814 (240) 507-1700.
March 22, 29, April 5, 12
12172551
873
Prince William County
873
Prince William County
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
7421 Courtland Circle,
Manassas, VA 20111
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
June 24, 2005, and recorded at Instrument Number 200506300107621
in the Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Prince William County,
VA, securing a loan which was originally $255,000.00. The appointed
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at
public auction at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince William
County, 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas, VA 20110 on:
April 3, 2018 at 1:00 PM
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of Lot 20,
Section 1, QUAIL HOLLOW, as the same appears duly dedicated, platted
and recorded in Deed Book 1583, at Page 329, among the Land Records
of Prince William County, Virginia, and as more fully described in the
aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
March 15, 22, 2018
873
12168120
Prince William County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
13722 Greenwood Drive
Woodbridge, VA 22193
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $200,000.00, dated October 14,
2005, recorded among the land
records of the Circuit Court for
Prince William County on October
20, 2005, as Instrument Number
200510200181432, the undersigned
appointed
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction, at the main entrance of
the courthouse for the Circuit Court
of Prince William County, 9311 Lee
Ave, Manassas, VA on April 20, 2018
at 9:30 AM, the property described
in said deed of trust, located at
the above address and briefly
described as: Lot 422, Section 8,
DALE CITY, as the same is duly
dedicated, platted and recorded
in Deed Book 514 at Page 289,
among the land records of Prince
William County, Virginia. Tax ID:
8192-43-6712/RPC 029548.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $11,000.00 or 10%
of the sale price, whichever is
lower, will be required in the form
of a certified or cashier’s check.
Cash will not be accepted as a
deposit. Settlement within fifteen
(15) days of sale, otherwise Trustee
may forfeit deposit. Additional
terms to be announced at sale.
This is a communication from a
debt collector. This notice is an
attempt to collect on a debt and
any information obtained will be
used for that purpose.
(Trustee # 581796)
Substitute Trustee: ALG Trustee,
LLC, C/O Orlans PC PO Box 2548,
Leesburg, VA 20177, (703) 7777101,
website:
http://www.orlans.com
Towne #: 5000.0979
March 15, 22, 2018
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12168875
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FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
March 15, 22, 2018
874
12167327
874
Clarke County
Clarke County
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
January 16, 2007, and recorded in Deed Book 474, Page 93 in the
Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Clarke County, VA, securing a loan
which was originally $525,000.00. The appointed SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE,
Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at public auction at main
entrance of the Circuit Court for Clarke County located at 102 N. Church
Street Berryville, VA 22611-0189 on:
April 12, 2018 at 11:00 AM
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TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
for the following
areas:
877
12168586
879
Spotsylvania County
Culpeper County
TRUSTEE SALE
6206 Salisbury Drive,
Spotsylvania, VA 22553
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
760 AMANDA COURT,
CULPEPER, VA 22701
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$285,090.00, dated June 19, 2015
recorded in the Clerk's Office of
the Circuit Court of Spotsylvania
County, Virginia, in Document No.
150009882,
default
having
occurred in the payment of the
Note thereby secured and at the
request of the holder of said Note,
the
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at the entrance to the
Spotsylvania County Judicial Center, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, on April 10, 2018 at
12:00 PM the property described
in said deed, located at the above
address and briefly described as:
Lot 10, Phase 4, Crown Grant, with
improvements thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust, if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
In execution of a certain Deed of
Trust dated September 25, 2013,
in the original principal amount
of $198,979.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Culpeper County, Virginia as Instrument No. 130006578 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Culpeper County, at the corner
of West Davis Street and North
West Street in the Town of
Culpeper on April 5, 2018 , at 11:00
AM, the property described in said
Deed of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL THAT
CERTAIN LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND
SITUATE IN EAST FAIRFAX MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT, CULPEPER COUNTY, VIRGINIA, DESIGNATED AS LOT
16, SECTION 11 ON THE "PLAT
OF THE MEADOWS OF CULPEPER",
ATTACHED TO DEED OF SUBDIVISION, DEDICATION AND IMPOSITION OF COVENANTS, CONDITIONS
AND
RESTRICTIONS,
RECORDED IN DEED BOOK 462 AT
PAGE 409, FILED IN PLAT CABINET
3, SLIDES 59-61, IN THE CLERK‘S
OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
CULPEPER COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3265851.
Mar 15, 22, 2018
12170730
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (60671)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Mar 15, 22, 2018
12170762
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12169298
Beginning at an iron pin (found) in the Southern Boundary Line of Route
653, a corner to the Michael Land, running with the said Southern
Boundary Line S 68 degrees 02’ 18” E-196.23 ft. to an iron pin (found)
corner to the Hay Land; thence with the Northwestern Line of the said Land
S 36 degrees 52’ 24” W-457.79 ft. to an iron pin (found) in the Northern
Line of the Armal Land; thence with the said Line N 65 degrees 35’ 43” W196.50 ft. to an iron pin (found) corner to the said Michael Land; thence
with the Southeastern Line of the said Land N 36 degrees 57’ 38” E-456.39
ft. to the beginning. Containing --- 2.010 acres, and as more fully described
in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
March 22, 29, 2018
Excellent part-time income!
Reliable transportation required.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of The
following described real estate, to-wit:
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
Call Joe Shojamanesh
410-340-7791
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Career Training - Emp Svcs
3223 Kimble Road,
Berryville, VA 22611
for the following areas:
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
March 22, 29, 2018
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
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THE DISTRICT EDITION
THE WASHINGTON POST
THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2018
Local Living
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Home Experts recommend five stylish
and effective umbrellas that will help you
stay dry during those April showers. 6
Home Bothered by
artificial scents? They
can be tough to avoid.
8
Wellness Why being
kind to yourself is good
for your health. 14
On Parenting How to deal
with a 9-year-old’s online
game obsession. 15
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the washington post . thursday, march 22 , 2018
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Splurge or Save
Home sales
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Illustration by
Malina Omut for The
Washington Post
LOCAL LIVING
STAFF
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His column will resume
when he returns.
HOW TO
Repair an improperly glued wooden sculpture
BY
J EANNE H UBER
Q: I have a statue that my father
carved out of redwood in the
1930s. It is about 18 inches high
and 10 inches across. My brother
inherited it. He dropped it, and it
broke in two. He tried to glue it
back together but did a horrible
job. He later gave it to me, and I
want to have it properly
repaired. My father was a fine
artist, and this piece is one of the
very few of his works that I have.
How can I find someone to do
this work?
Arlington
A: When sculpture or other
artwork is valuable — or has high
sentimental value, as this piece
clearly does for you — the safest
option is to consult a
professional conservator. These
people are trained to examine an
object carefully, analyze the base
material and the type of finish on
it, undo damage caused by faulty
repairs, and make appropriate
repairs.
To find one of these experts
near you, use the “find a
conservator” feature on the
website of the American
Institute for Conservation of
Historic and Artistic Works,
conservation-us.org. Enter your
Zip code and search for experts
who deal with “objects” or
“wooden artifacts.” Then scan
the results for people who work
on wooden sculptures and do
“treatment,” rather than provide
disaster recovery or other
services not relevant to your
needs. Rule out those who work
for museums; you need a
conservator who takes on
independent work.
Conservators typically do a
free general appraisal if you
bring an object to them. Before
READER PHOTO
A reader wants to know how to
repair this wooden artwork
that was carved by her father.
they do any repair work, they
provide a written report stating
options and costs so you can
decide whether to proceed and
how much work you want done.
Conservators document what
they do, and they aim to use
reversible methods and
materials so that any repairs
they do can be undone. They’ve
seen too many botched repairs.
One conservator near you who
works on wooden sculptures is
Alec Graham (301-320-7719;
woodobjectcare.com), based in
Glen Echo, Md.
If a conservator turns out to
be too pricey, ask antiques stores
to recommend woodworkers
who do excellent repairs. You can
also look at the websites of repair
companies; good ones often list
past jobs, which allows you to
check references and gauge the
caliber of their work.
When a piece doesn’t warrant
a professional repair, it’s usually
possible for a reasonably handy
person to glue parts back
together far more successfully
than your brother did. The most
important thing is to figure out
how to clamp the pieces while
the glue dries, and to do this
before you apply the glue. With
curved, irregular pieces such as
your father’s sculpture,
traditional woodworking clamps
may not work. Try stretchable
tape that adheres only to itself
and won’t stick to or damage
wood, such as Titebond Titewrap
($5.99 at Woodcraft). Test the
clamping setup before you add
glue. If the pieces slip when they
are dry, they will slide around
even more on wet glue.
When a narrow piece breaks
across the wood grain, as your
father’s sculpture appears to
have done, it’s sometimes
necessary to insert a thin
wooden pin to align the pieces
and fortify the joint.
Repairing a wooden object
that was previously repaired
badly is a bigger challenge
because you need to start by
getting the pieces apart. If the
first repair was done long ago,
try moistening the joint with
water. Wait a bit and then see
whether the joint comes apart. If
the original repair was done with
hide glue, it will.
But you probably won’t be that
lucky. More recent repairs
usually involve a modern wood
glue, either the standard white
type or a yellow glue such as
Titebond Original, Titebond II or
Titebond III. The Roman
numerals identify levels of water
resistance, but you don’t need to
figure out the type because all of
these wood glues weaken when
exposed to heat. Taking care not
to burn the wood, you can use a
heat gun, a blow dryer or even a
steam iron.
If heat doesn’t get the joint
apart, the old glue might be a
cyanoacrylate adhesive, such as
Super Glue. That comes undone
with acetone, found in
traditional nail polish removers
and also sold along with other
solvents at paint and hardware
stores.
Once the joint comes apart,
pick away all of the remaining
glue without also removing wood
fibers. Micro tools, such as
dental picks, can be a big help.
For the new glue, select one
that dries to a color that blends
in. Titebond II Dark, which dries
dark brown, is a good choice for
redwood, as is Titebond III,
which dries light brown.
Repairing a wooden
object that was
previously repaired
badly is a challenge.
Titebond Original and Titebond
II dry yellow, which works well
for light-colored woods, such as
maple or birch.
Redwood, used in your father’s
sculpture, often has a surface
layer of oil or tannic acid that
keeps glue from bonding well,
which might help explain why
the first repair turned out so
poorly. Avoid this by wiping the
wood with acetone just before
you apply the glue. (Cedar and
teak often need similar
treatment.)
Have a problem in your home?
Send questions to
localliving@washpost.com. Put “How
To” in the subject line, tell us where
you live and try to include a photo.
3
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the washington post . thursday, march 22 , 2018
4
the washington post . thursday, march 22 , 2018
DC
Home
SPLURGE OR SAVE
A style that works wonders in small spaces
BY MEGAN MCDONOUGH
Gabrielle Savoie
There’s something about Scandinavian interior design that sings in small spaces. The style’s signature clean lines, soft colors,
functional furnishings and simple silhouettes can inject warmth and light into a cramped living area and create the illusion of
additional square footage. ¶ “I love the Scandinavian minimal look — partly because my studio apartment in New York City is
so small that I need clean lines in my design to make it feel layered but not cluttered,” says Gabrielle Savoie, design blogger at
Savvy Home and MyDomaine editor. ¶ We asked Savoie to recommend some of her favorite Scandinavian furniture finds. ¶
“When I was decorating my own space, I started looking for budget alternatives to Scandinavian design classics to furnish my
space without spending a ton,” she said. Here are her top picks.
megan.mcdonough@washpost.com
$1,695
$100
Suede storage stool in navy
by Michael Verheyden
(theline.com)
Tall storage ottoman
in Loyal Blue (kvellhome.com)
$5,125
$499
PK22 Easy Chair (suiteny.com)
Black woven leather chair
(cb2.com)
$931
$299
5-by-7-foot Catania rug
in Midnight (trnk-nyc.com)
5-by-8-foot Divvy
dusty-indigo rug (cb2.com)
$3,950
$1,595.99
Ether sofa (jonathanadler.com)
Hewitt velvet sofa in gray
(allmodern.com)
$995
$39.99
Taccia small table lamp
by Achille and Pier Giacomo
Castiglioni for Flos
(lumens.com)
PS table lamp in white
with LED bulb (ikea.com)
PRODUCT PHOTOS FROM RETAILERS
DC
5
the washington post . thursday, march 22 , 2018
6
the washington post . thursday, march 22 , 2018
DC
Home
You’ll love being under the weather
BY
L INDSEY M . R OBERTS
Buying an umbrella is like buying a pair of shoes, says Bella Umbrella owner Jodell Egbert. “You can have incredible
shoemakers using the same materials, but it all comes down to functionality for you. Does the umbrella need to be compact? Do you put it in your purse, or does it need to have a strap on the back?” Personal preference is key. ¶ Egbert is one
of only a small number of umbrella manufacturers in the world — and the only one in the United States — that handmake their products. She says buyers should consider even the type of rain they encounter when choosing an umbrella:
In New Orleans, where her shop is located, the rain can be hard and wet, but in Seattle, “it’s a misty rain.” On her list of
musts: higher-quality metal, such as steel, in the frame; automatic open and close features; waterproof fabric with a UV
coating; and a warranty, “because things happen.” Above all, Egbert says, “buy quality first, and it will last.”
localliving@washpost.com
“Knirps is the Mercedes-Benz of umbrellas,” says
Whitney Robinson, editor in chief of Elle Decor. “It’s
super sturdy, built to last and has just the right amount
of flash.” He likes the T2 Duomatic model with the
Check539 tartan pattern ($109, knirps.com).
The weather in
England, where
Alys Colayera lives,
is notoriously fickle
— it could be rainy
in the morning and
sunny in the
afternoon, “with
rain and fog par for
the course,” says
the travel expert for
Black Tomato, a
luxury tour and
adventure company. She keeps herself prepared with
Hunter’s Original Striped Bubble Umbrella ($65,
urbanoutfitters.com). “I arm myself with this mod
umbrella because it’s fun, has a bit of ’60s glamour to
it . . . and can withstand strong gusts,” she says.
Hunter also makes a travel umbrella that Colayera
likes.
PRODUCT PHOTOS FROM RETAILERS
With her eye for umbrella
craftsmanship (and the largest
collection of vintage umbrellas in
the world), Egbert gives a thumbsup to ShedRain, a company in
Oregon. “The design is spot on,
with an extra amount of really good
ribs,” she says. The Auto Open
Clear Bubble Umbrella With
Black Crook Handle ($25,
shedrain.com) is clear for extra
visibility.
Babatunde umbrellas ($39.47, babatunde.co.za) are
hand-made in South Africa, with vibrant wax-print patterns
that attracted the eye of Joshua Greene, co-founder of
Hernandez Greene, an interior design firm in New York. With
his background in fashion, as a former ready-to-wear and
textiles editor for Women’s Wear Daily, he likes the
umbrella’s colors. “They’re super cool and super unusual,”
he says. “I wear a lot of dark, solid colors, so I like to add
bright colors.” The frame is metal, and the handle is wooden.
“We keep it pretty classic,” says
Atlanta-based style blogger Mattie
James about her family’s umbrella
preference. “We need it oversize
and black. I don’t like hook
handles; it looks good in theory, but
for function, I need something with
a grip.” Her family likes the
oversize Totes Stormbeater
vented auto-open umbrella, with
its fiberglass frame and doublevented canopy ($26.61,
amazon.com). “My husband got
three of them: one of them for the
car, two for the house, so that we
make sure we’re good to go.”
Chat Thursday
at 11 a.m. Marc
Hottenroth, executive
director of industrial
design at GE
Appliances, joins staff
writer Jura Koncius for
our weekly online Q&A
on decorating and
household advice.
Submit questions at
live.washingtonpost.
com.
At Home
newsletter Go to the
Home & Garden page
to subscribe to our
email newsletter,
delivered every
Thursday.
7
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the washington post . thursday, march 22 , 2018
DC
Home
ISTOCK
More than a third of Americans surveyed reported experiencing health problems when exposed to artificial fragrances, a study found.
War of the noses: When fragrances o≠end
BY
E LISABETH L EAMY
“More and more, I walk into
homes, stores and businesses and
am greeted with an immediate
blast of perfumed air. . . . And
what is added scent but a chemical? Why breathe that in constantly?”
When a Washington Post reader wrote the comments above and
implored me to write an article
about how to avoid scented products, I was an easy sell. I find
artificially perfumed products so
distracting that I have trouble
concentrating in their presence. I
can’t stand to have certain brands
of dryer sheets in my house, even
in an unopened box in the basement. And I confess that I once
sneaked an air freshener out of an
Uber and tossed it in the trash!
A growing stink
Despite negative reactions
from some consumers, scented
products seem to be gaining popularity. For example, plastic garbage bags never used to be scented, but an industry blog says that
many now are and that “the market is a fiercely competitive one,
so the battle to win the noses of
consumers is on.”
As manufacturers make more
of their products smell, consumers are putting up more of a stink.
Dozens of blogs rail against scented products, including one called
“Fragrance Free Living” and another called “Think Before You
Stink.” These bloggers call fragrance “the new secondhand
smoke.” They’re not crazy. The
Environmental Protection Agen-
cy says indoor air pollution is real,
partly because of fragrances, and
that our homes and offices “can
be more seriously polluted than
the outdoor air in even the largest
and most industrialized cities.”
Health effects
The people who suffer the most
from fragrances are those with
multiple chemical sensitivity, or
MCS. “Fragrances rank high
among the chemical exposures I
find problematic,” said Alison
Johnson, who has MCS and
founded the Chemical Sensitivity
Foundation. “One thing that
alarms me is that in the last few
years, the phone calls and emails
I’m receiving are now predominantly from people in a panic
because exposure to fragrances in
the workplace is making it impossible for them to keep a job.”
Johnson produced an educational video and is lobbying lawmakers to mandate fragrance-free
workplaces.
But artificial fragrances aren’t
just a problem for certain groups.
More than a third of Americans
surveyed reported experiencing
health problems when exposed to
them, according to a study by
Anne Steinemann of the University of Melbourne. “All fragranced
products that I tested . . . emitted
chemicals classified as hazardous
air pollutants,” Steinemann said
in an email. “You may not realize
you’re being affected until it’s too
late.”
The Canadian Center for Occupational Health and Safety lists
the following possible symptoms
of exposure to fragrances: “headaches, dizziness, nausea, fatigue,
weakness, insomnia, numbness,
upper respiratory symptoms,
shortness of breath, skin irritation, malaise, confusion and difficulty with concentration.”
Labeling confusion
If you’re allergic to nuts or
sensitive to gluten, you usually
can read the ingredients on a food
package and steer clear. By contrast, fragrances have long been
considered trade secrets, so the
federal government doesn’t require manufacturers to print
what’s in them. The Food and
Drug Administration requires
manufacturers to list the ingredients in personal-care products,
but they are allowed to just state
“fragrance” as an ingredient,
rather than spelling out what
chemicals are in the fragrance.
Federal regulations for household cleaning products are even
looser. Manufacturers are not required to list any of these products’ ingredients. A few big companies have begun disclosing
their ingredients voluntarily, including SC Johnson, Clorox and
Reckitt Benckiser, maker of Lysol.
Two states, California and New
York, recently took matters into
their own hands, passing laws
requiring manufacturers to divulge the ingredients in their
cleaning products.
Here’s another confusing labeling issue involving fragrances:
The terms “unscented” and “fragrance-free” sound the same but
are totally different. Unscented
means that a product doesn’t
have a detectable odor — but it
does not mean that it contains no
artificial scents. Manufacturers
are allowed to use artificial scents
in “unscented” products if they
are there to cover up the smell of
other ingredients.
By contrast, “fragrance-free” is
the label to look for if you are
bothered by chemical fragrances,
as it means no artificial smells
have been added to a product. You
can double-check this claim, if
there are ingredients listed, by
looking for the words “perfume,”
“parfum” or “fragrance” on the list.
Resources for consumers
Here are some resources for
finding fragrance-free products.
EPA Safer Choice-certified
products: The EPA scrutinizes
product ingredients for safety
and certifies those that meet its
criteria. When you search the
Safer Choice database, you can
check a box to look for fragrancefree products only. I found 860
when I looked. You can also look
for the Safer Choice label on
products at the store. Those that
have no chemical scents are
marked “fragrance free” in the
upper left-hand corner of the
label.
Environmental
Working
Group guides: The EWG pro-
vides easy-to-use online databases where you can search for what
it deems healthy cleaners and
healthy personal-care products.
You can then check those products’ ingredients, if provided, to
see whether “fragrance” or “perfume” is listed.
New York state’s asthmafriendly guide: Because people
with asthma suffer more than
most from exposure to chemicals
and fragrances, New York created
a list of green cleaning products
for them that could be useful to
you, too. If you type “fragrance
free” into the keyword box, the
site returns a page full of options.
DIY cleaning product recipes:
Women’s Voices for the Earth has
been working for better cleaningproduct disclosures. Meanwhile,
the group provides several recipes to make your own cleaning
products. Note: The essential oils
used as fragrance are considered
more natural but still bother
some people. If they bother you,
skip them!
Non-perfumed magazines: If
you’re subscribed to a magazine
with perfume inserts that bother
you, contact the publisher. Most
large publishers have programs
in place to send you magazines
without the scented pages.
localliving@washpost.com
Elisabeth Leamy hosts the podcast
“Easy Money.” She is a 13-time Emmy
winner and a 25-year consumer
advocate for programs such as
“Good Morning America.” Connect
with her at leamy.com and
@ElisabethLeamy.
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the washington post . thursday, march 22 , 2018
ATTENTION
TO DETAIL
10
the washington post . thursday, march 22 , 2018
DC
Home
A dose of reality: The bathroom and kitchen
aren’t the best places to store your pills
BY
J URA K ONCIUS
Just about every household has
pills. Where’s the best place to
keep them? It’s not the medicine
cabinet — or your kitchen counter.
About 82 percent of American
adults take at least one prescription medication, according to statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A
2017 survey by the Council for
Responsible Nutrition found that
76 percent of Americans take dietary supplements, whether vitamins, botanicals or others.
“Dietary supplements are like a
food; they are sensitive to light,
heat and moisture,” says Duffy
MacKay, senior vice president at
the Council for Responsible Nutrition. “We recommend consumers store their supplements in a
dry place in their original containers with the lids tightly closed, in a
location that doesn’t get a lot of
sunlight or humidity.”
Beyond safety concerns, bottles
of pills are a real decorating buzzkill. (Whether the bottles bring
you “joy” may be something you
discuss with your doctor.) Designers and professional organizers
are often tasked with helping clients find convenient yet discreet
places to stash them. “Please, no
baskets of pills on the kitchen
counter,” says Alex Papachristidis,
a New York interior designer.
“Don’t have anything out there
except a basket of fruit.”
You should keep your pills in a
place where you will remember to
take them. Here are some do’s and
don’ts from experts.
Yes, it’s called the medicine
cabinet. Don’t use it for medicine. Showers and faucets can
create a humid atmosphere,
which can be a problem for the
potency of vitamins and medications.
Do keep pills in your bedroom.
A bedroom is the ideal choice for
medications, says Mohamed Jalloh, spokesman for the American
Pharmacists Association. “Don’t
leave them on the counter; a bedroom drawer is a better choice. It’s
dry and cool. If someone comes
into your room, they won’t see
them, so this gives you privacy as
well.”
Don’t keep pill bottles out on
the kitchen counter. There are a
host of reasons not to keep your
pills out in the kitchen. First, it
BECCA RISA LUNA/PORT AND POLISH
Port and Polish pill organizers ($15) are cellphone-size, hold a week’s worth of pills and
are touted as being “designed to look as good at brunch as they do on your nightstand.”
makes them accessible to children
and pets. Fluctuations in temperature near stoves and dishwashers may affect the condition of
supplements and prescription
meds. And: It’s nobody’s business
but yours to know whether you’re
popping turmeric, B12 or Xanax.
If you are going to keep your
pills in the kitchen, do come up
with creative ways to store them
safely. It’s best to keep pills a fair
distance from your dishwasher,
oven, stove or microwave. MacKay suggests that next to a coffee
maker, a place where you might
start your day, could be a good
spot for your pill organizer. Washington designer Mary Douglas
Drysdale has been outfitting
kitchens with custom spice drawers for years and is using this type
of drawer for vitamins and supplements. She is renovating her
own small kitchen, putting in vitamin drawers instead of racks for
cinnamon and cloves. “I don’t
need spice drawers,” she says.
“Cooking for one is a lot of work.”
Washington designer Pamela
Gaylin Ryder says appliance garages or charging drawers are
good places to make room for
vitamins.
Don’t toss original contain-
ers. Even if you use a weekly pill
organizer, you should always
hang on to the original bottle for
instructions on dosage and how to
take the medication or supplement. Also be aware that some
medications and supplements are
packaged in opaque or dark bottles for a reason: to prevent them
from being exposed to sunlight or
humidity, conditions that could
make them lose potency over
time.
Do keep your pills organized.
Compartmentalize your vitamins
and other pills using bins on a
shelf, says Joy Cho, founder of the
Oh Joy lifestyle brand and website. You can also repurpose interesting containers you find online.
“I like using things like old cardcatalogue bins that I see at flea
markets or on eBay,” Cho says.
“You can tuck vitamins or medications into each drawer to organize
them and keep them stored away.”
She likes modular flip-out bins,
clear plastic cabinet organizers
and white plastic storage bins
with handles, all at the Container
Store. She also recommends the
Crafty Things Bins, metal organizers with compartments available
in pastel colors from Crate & Kids
(formerly Land of Nod).
Do upgrade your ugly drugstore pill organizer. It’s worth
bringing a little joy to even a mundane task such as pill-taking. If
you prefer sorting them into a
seven-day container, make it a
nicely designed one. One Kings
Lane sells chrome-plated pill boxes that look like silver ($29, onekingslane.com), and Annies Hours’
silver and gold pill boxes ($13.50
to $22.50, annieshours.com) are
even engravable. The sleek $15
weekly pill organizers from Port
and Polish (portandpolish.com),
about the size of a cellphone, tout
themselves as “designed to look as
good at brunch as they do on your
nightstand.” The pills you don’t
need for the week, D.C. designer
Caryn Cramer says, can be put in a
wood or woven box in a cabinet or
closet.
Don’t just pop all vitamins and
meds in your fridge. Consumers
should read storage instructions
on supplement or prescription
bottles. It’s best to keep them in
the refrigerator only if the instructions say so. Jalloh encourages
patients to check with their pharmacist if they have any questions
about the proper way to store a
medication.
jura.koncius@washpost.com
11
Home
DC
Spring Spruce Up
Is your home or office in dire
need of a spring refresh? Spring
Spruce Up, the annual fundraising event for the Washington-area
chapter of the American Society
of Interior Designers, starts Thurs-
day. During the event, which runs
until March 31 or until all available slots are full, individuals can
hire a professional designer for
one or two hours at a promotional
rate of $125 an hour. Proceeds
raised will support the ASID chap-
ter’s educational initiatives.
If interested, go to dcmetro.
asid.org and answer a few questions about your project, and the
association will match you with a
designer.
— Megan McDonough
A Spring
Spruce Up
project done
for the 2015
event.
BOB NAROD
Metal by Richard
Kolb
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the washington post . thursday, march 22 , 2018
250+
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the washington post . thursday, march 22 , 2018
DC
Home Sales
D I S T RIC T OF C OL UMBIA
These sales data recorded by the
D.C. Office of Tax and Revenue
were provided by Black Knight Inc.
For information about other
residential real estate
transactions, visit
washingtonpost.com/homesales.
NORTHEAST
Baker St., 3421-Federal National
Mortgage Association to
Alexandria Bianca Coan and Robyn
Renee Garrett-Coan, $253,000.
Bryant St., 1866-Federal National
Mortgage Association to Adewale
A. Mustapha, $300,000.
Capitol St. E., 1360-Paul S. and
Dawn C. Watzlavick to Daniel and
Karin Lips, $1.16 million.
Clinton St., 3049-Stacey M.
Jensen to Yousaf Butt, $565,000.
Crittenden St., 1608-Brenda
Saxon to Arthur Richon and Cherryl
Bradley, $519,900.
Dix St., 3438-Todd W. Norris to
Laura Anne Harrington and Ryan
Frederick Lauer, $385,000.
E St., 2415-Lorin Hancock to
Melissa L. Yeakley and Matthew
Martin, $605,000.
Emerson St., 1245-Corey C.
Coward to Erik D. and Zoe Emdur,
$500,000.
Grant St., 4020-Calvin J. Cooley
and Patrick C. Horrell to Sanjeewa
Wickramasekera, $206,000.
Hawthorne Dr., 3157-Frank K.
Bryant to Noel Sesay, $354,500.
I St., 628-628 I Street NE Corp. to
Melanie A. Horsford and Harry C.
Morgan, $800,000.
K St., 605, No. 1-David Swift to
Logan C. Dobson, $549,900.
Maryland Ave., 1226-Clifford M.
Luhn and Micheline A. Mendelsohn
to Joshua Stephen and Rebecca
Sarah Flyer, $970,000.
Polk St., 4312-Levi Corp. to Emma
A. Williams and Kevin N. Williams,
$182,610.
Rhode Island Ave., 1230Lambros Bisbikis to Patrick J. and
Donna J. Daniels, $792,500.
Simms Pl., 1274-GPD Corp. to
Cecilia Ivet Montano, $335,000.
Trinidad Ave., 1432-Mary V.
Lockard and William J. Flowe Sr. to
Maxwell Lang Greninger and Jenna
Elizabeth Munnelly, $535,000.
Ninth St., 1015-Damon B.
Gatewood to Mark S. Lenhart and
Genilson Brandao, $830,000.
14th Pl., 237-Melissa K. Kass to
Benjamin E. Johnson and Amy K.
Helms, $620,000.
17th St., 3005-Brad H. Warner to
Karim Claude Sarr and Donya
Rahimi, $719,900.
25th Pl., 500, No. 203-David A.
Harrison to Yolanda McGill,
$294,500.
45th St., 553-Marquitta T. Love to
Weldemariam Mezghebe,
$230,000.
51st St., 849-Mamani Silvio to
Kenneth D. Brown, $334,900.
NORTHWEST
Argyle Terr., 4315-Charles E. and
Patty L. Donegan to Taiya M. Smith
and Robert B. Blair, $995,000.
Belmont Rd., 1831, No. 103-Jesse
R. and Martha B. Hamilton to
Rupert Robinson Jennings,
$349,950.
Buchanan St., 640, No. 202Coneff Jennifer to Shanika L.
Booth, $206,000.
California St., 2229-Michael
Marriott to Shahriar Etiminani,
$1.9 million.
Cathedral Ave., 4100, No. 802Mary Susan Riecken to John J.
Lively, $695,000.
Cathedral Ave., 4201, No. 722WBarbara Adams and Michael Gill to
Yolanda Darricarrere, $247,500.
Champlain St., 2380, No. 14Sergio J. Pimenta to Alexandra and
William Iverson-Day, $710,000.
Columbia Rd., 595-Timothy
Chabail to Gomiluk John and
Nneka Vivian Otokwala, $770,000.
Connecticut Ave., 2725, No. 309Elisabeth Michelle Rubenstein to
Hari Shroff and Suzanne Liia
Sacher, $571,500.
Connecticut Ave., 3446, No. 401Matthew B. Nelson to Martha Anne
Cox, $293,900.
Connecticut Ave., 4740, No. 916John Klingenberg and Molly Suda
to Song Yi and Kai Hung,
$100,000.
Corcoran St., 1752, No. 3B-David
M. Evans to Benjamin E. Payes and
Ilona M. Price, $515,000.
Davis Pl., 3925, No. 104-Joanna
Arlene Ward to Brian Stickles,
$289,000.
Euclid St., 1123-Per Egil Wam and
Yasmin Tayyab to Karl C. Horne
and Harriet A. Walker,
$1.33 million.
F St., 912, No. 408-Joshua
Gottheimer to Jonathan F. and
Julie R. Ganter, $711,500.
Foxhall Cres., 4611-John
Kirkpatrick and Christiana Frances
Diamond to Zhen Zhang and Nan
Geng, $1.56 million.
Georgetown Ct., 3968-Jeremiah
and Anne Mullane to Laura Taber
Symcak, $1.34 million.
Hanover Pl., 12-Deanna Santoro
and Devin A. Zibut-Sky to Peter
Lundkvist, $650,000.
Irving St., 743-Esther Irene Baez
to Samuel Watt Withers,
$640,000.
Jefferson St., 700, No. 303Ashton Cherubin to Claude McKay,
$222,000.
Kenyon St., 623-623 Kenyon
Corp. to Vincent M. Brinly and
Hallie A. Shuffler, $839,000.
Kenyon St., 1390, No. 323-Aya
Hamano to Jaspreet K. Saini,
$500,000.
Lamont St., 732, No. 201-Nicholas
J. and Samantha B. Ackerson to
James McDonald, $387,000.
M St., 602-H&T General
Partnership to Day Bang and Lynn
L. Quach, $841,510.
Marietta Pl., 736-Diane S.
Rosenberg and Susan Scott to
Deana D. Williams, $353,000.
Massachusetts Ave., 4315Martha Denisse Pierola Castro and
Andrew John Kitchen to Jan
Randolph and Howard R. Carr,
$549,000.
Mintwood Pl., 1869-Ann Lion to
Joe and Evelyn Grundy, $391,000.
N St., 1300, No. 16-Bernard H.
Denis III to Philip H. and Kelsey
Meredith Glatfelter, $475,000.
New Hampshire Ave., 1316, No.
305-William Upshur to Juan Pablo
Lopez Gross, $369,900.
New Jersey Ave., 1423-Gregory J.
and Jennifer Susan Bowles to
Derek Christopher Azar, $760,000.
New York Ave., 437, No. 405-Karl
W. Hamill and Joni J. Mayfield to
Jennifer Gilhooly Sokolower,
$476,000.
Oglethorpe St., 607-Charles L.
Harper Sr. and Consuella Harper to
Joel L. Steinberg and Paola A.
Acuna Rivera, $599,900.
Ordway St., 2733, No. 4-Anne
Marie and Brian Michael Frere to
Daniel Williams, $509,000.
Park Pl., 3114-Todd Klein to
Lindsay North and Lauren
Kraemer, $699,000.
Park Rd., 1752, No. B-Aaron Dial
to Emerald Becker, $510,000.
Phelps Pl., 1827-Peter D. Cleary
and Katherine D. Darcy to Mitchell
A. Silk, $2.05 million.
Q St., 2500, No. 326-Monica
Pampell to Gene Tien, $405,000.
Quesada St., 3606-Heather Lyn
Fath to Joseph W. Hardee and
Christopher A. Henley,
$1.45 million.
R St., 3010, No. 2-Emily E. Lange
to Matthew E. and Katelyn E.
Blumenthal, $620,000.
S St., 2107, No. J-Allison Botos
Schilz to Daniel John Kaniewski,
$710,000.
Sherman Ave., 3318, No. 108Stephano C. Clermont to Joseph
Aaron Compton, $367,500.
Tuckerman St., 606-Viola Dixon
to Brandon Cowan and Marianna
Stell, $415,000.
Upland Terr., 3318-Janet B.
McIntyre and Jana M. Phillips to
Aram Parsa and Solmaz Tabtabaei,
$971,620.
Varnum St., 901-Mezgebu
Gebeyahu to Maria Martchouk and
Sean P. Burke, $900,000.
W St., 1407, No. 201-William
Marshall and Janice Kay Adams to
Christina Kuhn, $733,000.
Whittier St., 311-Jennifer A.
Regnault to Rebecca Erin Askin,
$614,250.
Winfield Lane, 3727-Rosa A.
Valdiveso to Daniel and Jennifer
Heflin, $1.22 million.
Wisconsin Ave., 3217, No. 7DRudhir Bakulesh Krishtel to Kelly
Dalton Zeh, $227,500.
Woodley Rd., 3108-William F. and
Theresa A. Conroy to Sanjay Kalra
and Nandini Oomman,
$1.18 million.
First St., 2307-Christian F. Callieri
and Farah D. Ahmed to Reid
Gordon Zaritsky and Natallie
Stevens Douglas, $1.3 million.
Third St., 1419-Benjamin J. Hunt
to Anne B. Healy, $610,000.
Fourth St., 6827, No. 210-Jennifer
Gray to Kimberly M. Lewis,
$340,000.
Seventh St., 777, No. 936-Citibank
and NRZ Pass-Through Trust VI to
Matthew Beck, $490,000.
Eighth St., 4514-Charles Gordon
Jackson to Christopher S. Sloan
and Suzannah M. Hoover,
$652,500.
Ninth St., 1806-1806 9th Street
NW Corp. to Stephen B. and Allison
Smith, $1.35 million.
Ninth St., 7529-Latifa Hall to
Jason Williams and Sarah Burns,
$485,000.
11th St., 1404, No. 402-Winston
Floyd to Brian Ohlhausen and
Andrew Coulson, $659,000.
12th St., 2020, No. 410-Rosemary
C. Vuong to Alexandra A. Minoff,
$679,900.
13th St., 1209-Jonathan L.
Stephenson to Nicole R. and Irving
W. McConnell, $590,000.
14th St., 1324, No. 2-Robert Bailer
to Max Fenkell, $849,000.
15th St., 2032, No. 7-James
Hendrickson and Alanna Miel to
Kiel Lee Chesley, $360,000.
16th St., 2440, No. 412-Lara S.
Friedman to Aman E. Kapoor,
$365,000.
17th St., 2422, No. 202-Adams2424 17th Corp. to Kathryn T.
Dougherty, $449,900.
Your official Washington Post T-shirts
Now available washingtonpost.com/tshirts
18th St., 1601, No. 201-Lisa Rae
Stine to James P. Walsh and
Thomas A. Key, $339,500.
20th St., 1301, No. 517-Richard A.
and Kenneth L. Morford to Richard
J. Kutchey, $282,000.
21st St., 1260, No. 215-Elizabeth
A. Lietz to Huda Petra Shamayleh,
$260,000.
33rd St., 1561-Matthew F. and
Daniel J. Swayze to Benjamin P.
and Barbara Levy, $1.41 million.
39th Pl., 2215-Seamus
McCullough to Margaret Tickner
and John Carroccio, $795,000.
41st St., 4750, No. 308-David and
Ayla Simon to Peter J. and Cynthia
Cox Roman, $1.33 million.
46th St., 4330-Robert E.
Bleimeister and Elise McKenna to
Paul A. and Autria Godfrey Lindsay,
$1.09 million.
SOUTHEAST
B St., 5008-Dap Homes Corp. to
Estrella Lopez, $375,000.
C St., 808-Jane M. Walsh and Brett
Topping to Casey Becker and
Rebecca Marcus, $1.19 million.
Douglass Rd., 2601, No. 302Renee Marshall to Kerry King,
$220,000.
Easy Pl., 4608-Dap Homes Corp.
to Ariel Berroa and Maribel Rosa
Mayi, $398,000.
Howard Rd., 1532-Doris JamesSaxton to Gail M. Saxton,
$215,000.
Kentucky Ave., 407-Morgan and
Allison Gold to Samuel Upton and
Alexandra Nicole Baker,
$824,000.
Massachusetts Ave., 1611-Jenifer
A. Dooley to Robert Neil and
Kathryn Bowers Kuhlman,
$549,000.
R St., 2228-2228 R Street Corp. to
Julie Trute, $490,000.
Savannah Pl., 2013-Jeffrey J.
Toney Jr. to Ryantonio S. Scriven,
$259,999.
Valley Terr., 1803-Cathy M.
Bouknight and Charlotte L.
Anderson to Catrina Sumter,
$290,000.
32nd St., 2007-Andre Peterson to
Maria B. Earley and Carol Pilson,
$575,000.
40th St., 1654-Bettie L. and James
A. Sanders to Priscilla A. Settle and
Tonya L. Lambright, $250,000.
SOUTHWEST
Delaware Ave., 739, No. 189Nancy J. Wartow to Stephen J. and
Daria Scala, $669,500.
M St., 300, No. N303-Peter Tung
to Gentry Schaffer, $224,900.
Fourth St., 1425, No. A301-Lloyd
R. Reinhold to Thejuanie Reone
Brown, $220,000.
M1336 5x1
12
13
Home
DC
HOME FRONT
A professional organizer’s pointers on taming household clutter
Nicole Anzia
Professional
organizer Nicole Anzia
joined staff
writer Jura
Koncius last
week on our
Home Front
online chat.
Here is an edit-
Q: Our kitchen pantry is a closet
(I’m guessing about three feet
wide). It has standard wire
shelving — which I hate — and I
have not been successful in
finding a source for slide-out
drawers that fit this
configuration. Because it’s a
closet and the sides are not flush
with the door frame, I guess we’d
have to build out the sides. Any
sources or ideas?
A: I would recommend using
containers such as the
Container Store’s Linus Deep
Drawer bins. They come in a
variety of sizes. They work well
in drawers, but they also work
well to keep like items together
and upright in a pantry. You can
pull them in and out pretty
easily to get items in the back.
Labels on the front (“rice and
pasta,” “snacks,” “canned
vegetables”) also help keep
things organized.
ed excerpt.
Q: My house has reached a level
Q: Is there a solution to
organizing those pesky plastic
containers and lids? It is the one
cabinet that gives me anxiety
every time I open it.
A: I use bins inside my deep
drawers to organize plastic
containers and lids. I keep all the
lids in one container, where they
mostly sit upright, and then
another bin for small containers.
The remaining space has a few of
the larger containers. Also, keep
the number of containers to a
minimum and clear out those
without lids every few months.
Q: My husband and I are moving
ISTOCK
Hanging knives from a magnetic strip can save countertop space.
Q: What if you don’t have a lot of
drawer or cabinet space in your
kitchen? What are the main
items you should keep on the
counter?
A: The things on your
countertop should be those you
use most often, such as a coffee
maker, a toaster and the cooking
utensils you use frequently. If
you’re short on cabinet and
drawer space, get creative. Can
pots and pans be hung from a
wall-mounted or ceilingmounted pot rack? Can knives be
hung on a magnetic strip? Can
wine glasses be hung on underthe-cabinet racks?
Q: Where should you store paper
towels?
A: I prefer under-the-cabinet
paper towel holders because
they make access easy and save
counter space.
Q: What’s your best advice on
organizing spices in a very small
kitchen?
A: Risers inside cabinets help
maximize space and allow you to
see your spices. Measure your
cabinets before you buy one. If
you’re really tight on storage
space, it’s okay to keep your most
frequently used spices out near
the stove. Lastly, go through your
spices a couple of times a year
and toss those that are expired
or that you never use. Many of us
use the same eight to 10 spices,
and the others that we bought to
cook one thing sit there for
years.
Q: I’m moving, and my new
kitchen is larger than the old one
and includes a pantry. Any
advice on how to set up the
kitchen for the most
functionality? Any common
mistakes I should avoid?
A: My advice is to put things
where you’ll use them. I know
that sounds obvious, but your
spices should be near the stove.
Your glasses should be near the
sink and refrigerator. Plates and
silverware should be easy to
access and close to the space
where you’ll be eating. And, as a
rule, like things should be put
with like things (i.e., plates with
plates, mugs with mugs, glasses
with glasses). However, there are
exceptions. Martini glasses you
use only a couple of times a year
don’t need to be placed with
other glasses. And don’t feel as if
you need to fill every space just
because you have it. Also,
labeling shelves, bins and
drawers can help you keep
things organized over time.
soon and plan to get rid of things
as we pack. I want to come up
with an organizational system
that I can stick to. Most of my
plans (especially in the kitchen
and pantry) end up falling by the
wayside within a few weeks.
A: One major tip is to not put
things away for the sake of
putting them somewhere. Of
course, it’s great to get things off
the floor and into storage spaces,
but once you put things away,
they may not ever get truly
organized — as they say, “Out of
sight, out of mind.” Also, don’t
feel as though everything has to
be perfect immediately. It will
take a few weeks or months for
you to settle in and know how
you want to make use of various
spaces. That being said, as you
bring new things in, be
conscious of where things belong
and make it a habit to put things
in their place as soon as possible.
Last, don’t feel as if you have to
fill every space. It’s okay to have
unfilled spaces.
Q: If you were building a
kitchen, where would you put
big things such as the stove,
microwave, fridge and sink/
dishwasher in relation to one
another and storage?
A: The concept of the “kitchen
work triangle” is still what I
think most kitchen designers use
to guide their design.
Q: I have a small kitchen and
haven’t found a good place to
store summer and outdoor
supplies. I have the smaller grill
tools shoved in a drawer, but
there is so much stuff that will be
used often, starting in a couple
Q: Papers are my kitchen
organization nemesis. It seems
to be everyone’s drop spot, and I
feel as if I’ve tried everything.
A: In my house, I have a rule that
our kitchen “peninsula” needs to
be cleared off at the end of each
night. My kids and husband
know that in general, this is not
their dumping ground. But if you
know that family members will
continually put their things
there — and if their things are
getting in the way of making
your countertops useful — think
about using wall pockets and
giving each family member one
of the slots. That way, there is an
alternative, easy-to-access place
for people to put their things.
Make a rule that they be emptied
at the end of each month.
Q: I have lots of photos to
organize, and I need a way to
scan them. Can you recommend
easy-to-use scanners or multiuse
machines?
A: My first question is do you
really want to scan all of those
photos yourself? If not, you
could contact your local photo
shop to see whether they offer a
scanning service. Another option
is use legacybox.com. You ship
them your photos, and they scan
them and send them back.
Q: I have a small kitchen with a
table and two chairs in one
corner. We never sit there
because the table and chairs
have stuff piled on them. You
have inspired me to install a
couple of shelves on the wall
above the table. I’m thinking of
those vinyl-coated wire shelves.
Are they hard to keep clean?
A: They are not too hard to keep
clean, but I would recommend
something with a lip on the front
to keep things from falling off.
And maybe consider something
colorful. Spring is right around
the corner.
localliving@washpost.com
Also at washingtonpost.com
Read the rest of this transcript and
submit questions to the next chat,
Thursday at 11 a.m., at
live.washingtonpost.com.
the washington post . thursday, march 22 , 2018
of domestic chaos that I didn’t
think was possible. We have a
decent-size house with plenty of
storage space, but we cannot
seem to put things away. Add to
this the fact that my father
recently died and we are clearing
out his house. I’m not keeping all
of his things, but I am keeping
some of them. The thought of
integrating a slew of new
possessions into our current
mess is sending me into panic
mode. Any thoughts on how to
manage the mess?
A: Inheriting things from
parents can be a blessing and a
curse. Often, when clients tell me
that things don’t get put away,
it’s because things don’t have a
designated space or there’s no
room. Does everyone in your
household know where office
supplies should be, for example,
or where to put hats and gloves,
shoes, and incoming mail? I
would start by designating
spaces for things and then
making sure there is ample room
within that space to put things
away. Involve your whole family
to see what makes sense to them
and how everyone can pitch in.
For your father’s things, I would
sort out and organize your home
first and then deal with that.
Don’t try to do it all at once. Also,
set small, achievable goals. Don’t
plan to spend a whole weekend
organizing your house. Spend
one hour Saturday cleaning out
the pantry or the coat closet.
Getting started is the hardest
part. And if you need help, call in
a friend or a professional. Good
luck.
of months. Any ideas are
appreciated.
A: Are you talking about kitchen
items only? If so, I wonder
whether you could use some
clear plastic bins with tops (and
labels, if possible) to corral all
your summer entertaining
supplies and store them
elsewhere for six to eight months
of the year. Maybe on a shelf in
your basement or in a guest
closet?
14
the washington post . thursday, march 22 , 2018
DC
Wellness
Take it easy on yourself, and be healthier
BY
C ARRIE D ENNETT
passion can increase motivation
to change, possibly because it
allows us to objectively evaluate
areas for improvement and make
changes without the threat of
self-criticism. Let’s say you have
Type 2 diabetes and your latest
bloodwork shows that you haven’t been managing your blood
sugar well. Self-compassion will
help you use that information to
make changes to support better
control going forward. Self-criticism can paralyze you, leaving
you unable to change — and
possibly ashamed to return to
your doctor — leading to bigger
health problems.
If you think you need to channel your inner drill sergeant to eat
your vegetables and get to the
gym, think again. Research shows
that a healthy dose of self-compassion actually helps us form
habits that support good health.
In the past decade or so, numerous studies have shown that
self-compassion is important for
mental and emotional health and
well-being. Newer research is also
finding that self-compassion
plays a role in physical health.
What is self-compassion?
According to self-compassion
researcher Kristin Neff, author of
“Self-Compassion: The Proven
Power of Being Kind to Yourself,”
there are three elements to selfcompassion:
•Mindfulness, which is being
aware of negative thoughts, feelings and experiences without
judging them or dwelling on
them.
•Common humanity, or recognizing that we are all imperfect
and that we all suffer.
•Self-kindness, which is showing yourself care and understanding when you experience those
all-too-human imperfections.
The opposite of self-compassion is emotional reactivity, isolation, self-judgment and unhealthy perfectionism, all of
which have been linked to depression, stress and reduced quality of
life.
The stress connection
A 2017 study published in
Health Psychology Open found
that people who have higher levels of self-compassion tend to
handle stress better — they have
less of a physical stress response
when they are stuck in traffic,
have an argument with their
spouse or don’t get that job offer
— and they spend less time reactivating stressful events by dwelling on them. That’s important,
because not only does chronic
stress directly harm health — the
physical responses to stress include spikes in blood pressure
and blood sugar, along with suppression of the immune system —
but if you also react strongly to
stress, you’re more likely to use
unhealthy short-term coping
mechanisms such as smoking or
ISTOCK
numbing your feelings with food
or alcohol.
The study also found that selfcompassionate people are more
likely to adopt health-promoting
behaviors and maintain them
even if they don’t appear to be
paying off in the short term. This
may be especially important in
the face of a health-related setback, such as injury, illness or a
disappointing lab result, because
self-compassion takes the edge
off negative emotions — fear, frustration and disappointment —
that might arise. This helps you
continue to take good care of
yourself instead of getting derailed.
Myths about self-compassion
Self-compassion often gets
painted as selfish, lazy or indulgent, but nothing could be further
from the truth. People who are
caregivers — by nature or circum-
When you make
changes out of
self-compassion,
those changes are
more sustainable
than ones you make
because you feel as if
you are unacceptable
the way you are.
stance — often find it difficult to
offer themselves the compassion
they freely give to others. However, connection with the rest of
humanity is a core component of
self-compassion, so to fully give to
others, you need to give to yourself.
Are you a perfectionist? You
may fear that if you are too nice to
yourself, you’ll accomplish nothing. The truth is that when
you make changes out of selfcompassion, those changes are
more sustainable than ones you
make because you feel as if you
are unacceptable the way you are.
You’re also more likely to make
daily choices that support longterm well-being, rather than indulging in short-term impulses.
That may mean going for a walk
instead of crashing on the couch,
or putting down your fork when
you’re satisfied, not stuffed.
Research shows that self-com-
Becoming self-compassionate
Self-compassion should be
easy, because we all want to be
happy. Unfortunately — at least in
some cases — we also want to
avoid danger. In the face of true
danger, we go into fight, flight or
freeze mode. But when the “danger” is the uncomfortable emotions that rise from our inevitable
mistakes or failures, our response
can be self-criticism, self-isolation and self-absorption, which
gets in the way of doing the things
that will make us happier and
healthier in the long run. Selfcompassion helps us view uncomfortable emotions as less of a
threat.
So how do you cultivate selfcompassion? Start with mindfulness. Unless you pay attention,
you may be unaware of the
thoughts that play and replay in
your head. Practice observing
your thoughts — are they compassionate or critical? Be curious and
nonjudgmental — criticizing
yourself for being self-critical
adds insult to injury. Remind
yourself often that to err is human, and to forgive, divine. Finally, show yourself kindness in ways
that nurture mind, body and spirit. Take time to go for a walk, do
some yoga or prepare a nutritious
meal. Incorporate activities that
bring you joy, such as reading a
novel, puttering in the garden or
listening to your favorite music.
Strengthen connections with
people important to you. Think
love, not tough love.
localliving@washpost.com
Dennett is a registered dietitian
nutritionist and owner of Nutrition by
Carrie.
Family
15
DC
ON PARENTING
Boy’s obsession with online games leads to lies and apologies
BY
M EGHAN L EAHY
Q: Our son, age 9, has been
sneaking screen time so he
can play an online game
that he’s obsessed with. He’s
managed to learn our
passwords and override our
protections. Yesterday I was
charging my phone and in
10 minutes while I was
upstairs he installed a game
on my phone and deleted an
app to make room for it. He
has repeatedly lied to us.
When caught, he’s full of
apologies and visibly
ashamed. We’ll have to up
the security ante, and there
were consequences for each
incident, but I’m more
concerned with his ability to
control his impulses and
helping him develop into a
trustworthy person. Middle
school is just 11/2 years away.
How can we help him? If it’s
relevant, he has been
diagnosed with attentiondeficit/hyperactivity
disorder and impulse
control issues and was
found to be highly gifted.
standard or recommendation. In
essence, we are full of data
points, but have no road map for
what to do. A quick visit to the
American Academy of Pediatrics
website yields good data, but no
conclusive recommendations for
parents whose school-age
children use screens.
Even as I write this, there is
more anecdotal research
showing that school-age children
are experiencing withdrawal-like
symptoms when cut off from
gaming and social media. So
much so, in fact, that
rehabilitation centers have been
created to help teens acclimate to
life without gaming. It is a real,
debilitating and chronic problem
for many parents. You are not
alone.
But what has really piqued my
interest is that emerging research
is revealing a strong correlation
between people with executive
function issues and negative
screen time use/abuse.
Essentially, if you have a
neurotypical brain, chances are
good that you use screen time to
have fun, connect with others
and take a break. You are also
able to put down the screens and
interact in the real world without
any significant withdrawal
symptoms. Lovely, right?
But if you have executive
function issues, your screen use
can take on obsessive qualities,
negatively affect your ability to
function in the world, feed
depression and anxiety, and
hinder healthy relationships.
For better or worse, we know
that your son has a special brain.
He has been diagnosed with
ADHD (his ability to focus is
compromised), and he is gifted
(his brain is churning through
data at a faster rate or may have a
different perspective than most
children). He is a prime
candidate for screen addiction,
because the ADHD brain often
feels really good when it is
gaming. The quick decisionmaking, the frenetic screen
action, the multiplayer aspect
and the fact that the game never
ends can feel normal and good
for the ADHD and gifted brain.
The lying, the sneaking, the
hacking of passwords, the
downloading of apps (and
deleting yours) are behaviors
driven by the reality that when he
stops gaming his brain doesn’t
feel safe. Why do I think this? You
report he is truly sorry and
ashamed. Your son doesn’t want
to sneak around and feel
obsessed with gaming; he is
literally compelled to do this (like
an addiction). I have a lot of
empathy for him. When I binge
on social media, it feels good in
the moment, but I can say that I
rarely feel better for having done
it. Like gorging on sugar or
alcohol or heroin or sex, our
brain feeds on the anticipation of
the feeling, but then it never feels
satisfied.
What should you do?
I turned to my friend Adam
Pletter for some ideas. He is a
child psychologist and runs an
online class for parents who need
support with handling screens
and children. He suggests a clear
family contract, with every rule
spelled out for parent and child.
Because your son is both gifted
and ADHD, we need a contract
that emphasizes the agreed-upon
rules and building trust through
the son’s increasingly
trustworthy and appropriate
behavior. It also needs to spell out
the consequences of breaking the
rules (increased restriction, etc).
While I am not usually a
proponent of too many
consequences (when used
haphazardly, they create more
resistance), your son needs clear
boundaries, rewards and
consequences to help focus him
and promote responsibility.
Pletter also suggests a more
comprehensive online-control
system to prevent hacking and
stealing, such as Circle from
Disney. There is no perfect
answer for keeping children off
technology, and we are not going
for a scorched-earth solution
here. But we absolutely can stop
the purchasing of apps and
decrease the sneaking by having
the games blocked.
I am also a big fan of “cell-free”
Saturdays or Sundays. This
means that every family member
stays off their screens for the day.
Yes, it is hard to get used to and
yes, you can make exceptions for
sports games or something else
special that the whole family can
enjoy. But in general, this is a fun
way to reconnect, get outside,
play board or card games, or
simply laze about and read.
Finally, because he is so bright,
you are going to have to find
other things to occupy his mind.
Of course I want him to
experience some boredom. You
are not expected to entertain
your son night and day. You
would go mad. But if he loves
games and screens, is there a
coding class or camp he could
attend? Can he attach to the tech
person at school? Could he even
mentor younger children in
understanding the fun side of
some games? Keep an open mind
and look for options.
This is hard work. You will
probably be managing behaviors
that are highly provocative, and
holding these boundaries will
test your patience on every level.
Please find a safe place to unload
your big feelings — a partner, a
friend, a therapist, anyone who
will offer compassion and a
nonjudgmental ear. Your main
goal is to keep some of the
technology at bay while you give
your son’s brain a chance to
mature. We need to let time do its
work. Do not get so stuck in the
ugly little details that you lose
focus on the bigger picture. Time
equals brain maturity. Your son
needs to grow up to better handle
the onslaught of digital media.
Good luck.
Also at washingtonpost.com
Read the transcript of a recent live
Q&A with Leahy at
washingtonpost.com/advice, where
you can also find past columns. Her
next chat is scheduled for April 11.
Send questions about parenting
to meghan@mlparentcoach.com.
the washington post . thursday, march 22 , 2018
A: You have my full empathy. For
the parent with an average child,
there is an endless source of
stress associated with keeping
boundaries on screen time. We
are flying blind when it comes to
a parenting playbook for this. We
are the first generation of parents
to grapple with this
phenomenon, and we (our
culture at large) do not know
what we are doing.
I say this not to panic you;
rather, I want you to take some
solace in knowing that parents
worldwide share your confusion
and exasperation. You intuitively
feel that too much screen time is
unhealthy for your son (commonsense parenting), and you know
that the early neuroscience is
showing that gaming affects
some parts of children’s brains,
but this common sense and
neuroscience have not come
together to create a cohesive
WASHINGTON POST ILLUSTRATION/ISTOCK
16
the washington post . thursday, march 22 , 2018
DC
Family
MALINA OMUT FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
A more positive kind of popularity
Seven steps parents can take to ensure their children value kindness and likability over status
BY
P HYLLIS F AGELL
In elementary school, Nadia
and Rosie walked home together
every day. They would play with
Nadia’s dog and swing on Nadia’s
hammock. In sixth grade, that all
changed. Rosie felt suffocated by
Nadia and dodged her after
school. She’d hide in the bathroom until her new friends said
the coast was clear. Nadia was
hurt and confused, and her mother, Dana, was conflicted. “They’ve
been best friends forever,” she
told me. “But Rosie is in a faster
crowd and constantly gets in
trouble. I want Nadia to move on,
but instead she’s become obsessed with who’s popular. I’m
not sure what, if anything, I
should say to Rosie’s mom.”
The leap from elementary to
middle school is a vulnerable
time. Kids start to care more
about their standing among peers
than their role in the family.
Eileen Kennedy-Moore, a psychologist and co-author of “Growing Friendships, A Kid’s Guide to
Making and Keeping Friends,”
notes that only 75 percent of
middle-schoolers’
friendships
last from fall to spring. “For some
kids, it’s a positive thing and a
chance to branch out or reinvent
themselves,” she says. For others,
it’s an opportunity to chase status. Boys may be even more likely
than girls to jockey for position,
she says. “They tend to challenge
kids they think they can beat, who
are near them in social rank.”
Although parents may want to
downgrade the importance of
popularity, they shouldn’t discount it entirely. “I’ve been surprised by how enduring the ef-
fects are 30 to 40 years later,” says
Mitch Prinstein, author of “Popular, the Power of Likability in a
Status-Obsessed World.” He says
that early experiences can change
the expression of our DNA, our
marriages and even our children’s
popularity. “We have a give-andtake with our environment, and if
you’re popular, you’re given more
opportunities to practice social
skills or gain access to new information,” he explains. The flip side
is that unpopular kids don’t get
the same advantages.
That said, when it comes in the
17
DC
form of likability and making
others feel included and welcomed, popularity leads to good
outcomes. Adolescents, however,
are wired to chase the more aggressive, status-seeking variety
depicted in movies like “Mean
Girls.” “That kind is about being
cool, visible, influential and dominant, and kids who trade on
status may vie for it as adults and
fail to develop other important
skills,” Prinstein says. As a result,
they may be more likely to experience depression, anxiety, relationship difficulties or addiction.
Here are seven steps parents
can take to ensure kids develop
the right skills, focus on likability,
and value authenticity over power and status.
Address their desire
for popularity
When kids are unhappy with
their place in the pecking order,
offer extra love, acknowledge
their feelings and share your values. You can’t persuade them to
not care, but you can try to
understand why this matters to
them.
“Ask them what they think it
means and how it’s going to
change their life, then examine
the reality of their social circle,”
says Mary Alvord, a psychologist
in Rockville, Md. Remind them
what they’d lose if they sacrificed
Focus on what they can
control, such as being kind
“In every community, there are
things that make you popular,”
Prinstein says. “If it’s a wealthy
community, it might have to do
with your level of wealth. If it’s a
religious community, it might be
about your parent’s status in the
religion.” You can teach skills that
will make a child more likable,
but helping them attain status is
trickier. When you’re able to attribute kids’ lack of conventional
popularity to external factors,
they’ll be less likely to suffer from
depression or conclude they’re
not worthy. By encouraging them
to focus on what they can control,
including being kind, you’ll increase the odds that they land the
right friends.
Turn outward to find new
friends and activities
There’s a primal social impulse
to be part of the pack, but kids
thrive when they think less about
themselves and more about others. “Don’t focus on ‘I,’ ” says
Claire Shipman, author of “The
Confidence Code for Girls.” “Move
outward to ‘What am I doing to be
involved in a cause or to do for
others?’ If your son or daughter
comes home and says, ‘No one
likes me’ or ‘Everyone is walking
to lunch without me,’ turn the
tables,” she says. Encourage them
to invite that new kid to lunch or
to tutor a younger student. When
kids transcend the self, they feel
empowered and confident. Engaging in something bigger than
themselves also helps them stop
ruminating about unreturned
texts or their social position.
Cultivate good matches
The unspoken rule of adolescence is that you’re supposed to
interact with the people closest to
you in the social hierarchy, Prinstein explains. The culture may
value physical attractiveness or
athletic ability, but your child
may thrive in a setting that values
academic achievement or community service. Look for activities
that align with your child’s interests.
Use school resources, too. Your
child’s teachers and counselors
can suggest good friend matches,
invite students to group lunches,
pair them on projects and reinforce social skills. But stay involved and don’t outsource everything. Talk to your kid, get to
know your child’s friends and
connect with other parents.
Teach them skills they need
to be more likable
Kennedy-Moore urges parents
to help struggling kids practice
basic skills such as asking questions. “We need to help them
focus on connecting instead of
impressing.” She encourages kids
to identify common ground. “If
you’re talking about something
that only pertains to you, it’s
irrelevant to the friendship,” she
“We have a give-and-take
with our environment, and if
you’re popular, you’re given
more opportunities to
practice social skills or gain
access to new information.”
Mitch Prinstein, author of “Popular, the Power
of Likability in a Status-Obsessed World”
says. Are they wearing a shirt
from a music group you like? Did
they watch the same football
game last night?
Some kids may not know how
to join a conversation. Show them
how to slide into action without
interrupting, and match the emotional tone of the group. “If everyone is complaining about the
social studies test and one girl
says it was easy, it’s like a sour
note in the melody of the conversation,” Kennedy-Moore says.
“When we look at videos of kids
who end up being the most liked,
they listen to others and try to
build on and shape what they’re
doing instead of saying ‘No, that’s
stupid, let’s do it this way,’ ” Prinstein says.
Learn from children
who pivot often
Children from military families may move seven or eight
times before they hit middle
school. School counselor Rebecca
Best, who runs groups for military kids, says that other students
can learn from their openness.
They may be more likely to approach a stranger in a crowded
cafeteria or to appreciate positivity over status.
“These kids have figured out
what works for them,” Best says.
“They’re not trying to find a forever friend or a best friend.
There’s a freedom to take risks on
new friendships when you live in
the moment.” When the goal is to
befriend people who are nice, the
burden of popularity is lifted.
During a phase defined by social
churn, everyone benefits from
some social flexibility.
Dana decided not to contact
Rosie’s mom. She knew the
friendship had run its course and
took a more personal approach. “I
told Nadia how my best friend
dumped me when a sophisticated
new girl transferred to our tiny
school,” she recalls. “I found real
friends instead of clinging to the
edge of a group that wanted
nothing to do with me.”
Dana drew from that experience to help her daughter form
new bonds. She fanned the flames
on Nadia’s emerging friendships,
offering to drive groups of girls to
the movies or the mall. She understood that the best antidote to
craving the wrong friends is finding the right ones.
localliving@washpost.com
Phyllis L. Fagell is the school
counselor at the Sheridan School in
the District and a licensed clinical
professional counselor at the
Chrysalis Group in Bethesda. She
tweets @pfagell.
the washington post . thursday, march 22 , 2018
Move the focus away
from status
Prinstein urges parents to
watch their own behavior. “Do
you say, ‘I’m so proud of you
because everyone wants to be
you,’ or ‘I’m proud of how you
helped someone else feel better
about themselves?’ Do you talk
about how many likes your posts
get on Facebook?” He recently
saw a teen magazine that featured an instruction manual for
getting likes and followers. “It
talked about how so-and-so was
sad and lonely, but now she has a
million followers on Vine,” he
says. “We could end up with a
generation of kids who know how
to curate their image and are
obsessed with status.”
Make sure your kids understand that life isn’t about likes,
says Sue Scheff, author of “Shame
Nation.” “Stop liking, liking, liking, and counting your likes,” she
says. “Ask questions that encourage kids to target real, quality
friends rather than fly-by-nights.”
Offline, don’t convey to your kids
that they need to be in a particular club or clique. When you focus
on ephemeral popularity, kids
won’t learn how to identify
healthy, reciprocal relationships.
their existing friendships to pursue popularity.
“It’s so difficult when a kid
wants to be popular, and there are
no easy answers,” Prinstein says.
Adults can point out that the
most popular kids may be actively
disliked. “Kids might assume they
have it all, but they may be lonely
and lack trusting, reliable friendships,” he says.
Julia Guillen Williams, a pupil
personnel worker in Montgomery County, also encourages students to think more expansively.
“A girl may be thin and dress
perfectly, but do we know her or
what’s really happening in her
life?”
18
the washington post . thursday, march 22 , 2018
DC
Crime Report
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
These were among incidents
reported by D.C. police. For
information, call 202-727-9099.
NORTHEAST
HOMICIDE
Nannie Helen Burroughs Ave.,
5000 block, 7 p.m. March 8.
ASSAULTS
Benning Rd., 1500 block, 6:48
p.m. March 6. With knife.
Benning Rd., 1500 block, 4:49
p.m. March 8. With gun.
Eads St., 6000 block, 5:49 p.m.
March 6.
Fort Totten Dr., 4800-4999
blocks, 6:14 p.m. March 11. With
knife.
Hunt Pl., 4200-4399 blocks, 1:01
a.m. March 12. With gun.
I St., 2100 block, 8:14 p.m. March
8. With gun.
Fourth St., 1300 block, 10:40 a.m.
March 10.
16th St., 2200 block, 3:02 p.m.
March 11.
19th St., 700 block, 9 p.m. March
9. With gun.
54th St., 300 block, 10:23 a.m.
March 12. With knife.
ROBBERIES
Benning Rd., 1500-1699 blocks,
9:23 a.m. March 9.
H St., 2100-2399 blocks, 2:19 p.m.
March 11.
Kenilworth Ave., 700-899 blocks,
7:19 a.m. March 11.
Morse St., 1100 block, 4:25 a.m.
March 7. With gun.
11th St., 700 block, 7:37 p.m.
March 7.
16th St., 600 block, 6:50 p.m.
March 10.
BREAK-INS
Quarles St., 4900 block, 8:38 p.m.
March 6.
51st St., 200 block, 11:27 a.m.
March 7.
THEFTS
Benning Rd., 1500-1699 blocks,
8:33 a.m. March 9. From vehicle.
Benning Rd., 1500 block, 11:30
a.m. March 9. From vehicle.
Benning Rd., 3400 block, 3:21
p.m. March 8.
Bladensburg Rd., 1900 block,
3:11 a.m. March 8.
Bladensburg Rd., 2800-3200
blocks, 3:31 a.m. March 8. From
vehicle.
Blair Rd., 5400 block, 8:02 a.m.
March 12. From vehicle.
Brentwood Rd., 1000-1249
blocks, 4:34 p.m. March 7.
Channing St., 3100 block, 6:32
a.m. March 7. From vehicle.
Douglas St., 2000-2199 blocks,
12:30 a.m. March 9. From vehicle.
Downing St., 1300 block, 3:17
a.m. March 10. From vehicle.
Downing St., 1400 block, 12:32
p.m. March 9.
Eads Pl., 4900 block, 11:07 p.m.
March 6.
Eastern Ave., 900-1099 blocks,
1:05 p.m. March 9.
Eastern Ave., 900-1099 blocks,
5:38 p.m. March 11.
Eastern Ave., 900-1099 blocks,
8:55 a.m. March 12.
Eastern Ave., 5100 block, 6:41
p.m. March 7.
Edgewood St., 500 block, 7:02
a.m. March 9. From vehicle.
Florida Ave., 1300 block, 2:42
p.m. March 12.
Fort Totten Dr., 4500 block, 9:55
a.m. March 10. From vehicle.
Fort Totten Dr., 4800-4999
blocks, 5:40 a.m. March 9. From
vehicle.
Gallaudet St., 2000 block, 6:25
a.m. March 9.
H St., 300 block, 5:14 p.m. March
11. From vehicle.
H St., 700 block, 1:06 p.m. March
9.
H St., 1300 block, 5:33 p.m. March
11. From vehicle.
H St., 1900 block, 4:35 p.m. March
10.
Hawaii Ave., unit block, 3:08 a.m.
March 12. From vehicle.
Hunt St., 5000 block, 1:35 a.m.
March 11.
I St., 1000 block, 1:03 p.m. March
12.
Jay St., 4800 block, 4:27 a.m.
March 11.
Kearny St., 1200 block, 12:05
p.m. March 11. From vehicle.
Lawrence Ave., 2000-2299
blocks, 12:53 p.m. March 9.
Lawrence St., 900 block, 4:41
p.m. March 7. From vehicle.
Lawrence St., 1400 block, 11:40
a.m. March 11. From vehicle.
Lincoln Rd., 1600 block, 5:27 a.m.
March 9. From vehicle.
Lincoln Rd., 2100-2399 blocks,
8:17 a.m. March 11. From vehicle.
Linden Pl., 1200 block, 9:38 a.m.
March 11. From vehicle.
M St., unit block, 3:28 a.m. March
7.
Market St., 2400 block, 1:28 p.m.
March 12.
Maryland Ave., 1600 block, 10:40
a.m. Feb. 13.
Maryland Ave., 1600 block, 6:32
a.m. March 9.
Maryland Ave., 1600 block, 6:05
p.m. March 12.
Michigan Ave., 1100 block, 3:26
a.m. March 11.
Minnesota Ave., 3800 block, 2:57
p.m. March 10.
Minnesota Ave., 4000-4121
blocks, 11:38 a.m. March 6. From
vehicle.
Minnesota Ave., 4000-4121
blocks, 11:35 p.m. March 8.
Monroe St., 600 block, 7:08 a.m.
March 10.
Mount Olivet Rd., 1200 block,
8:37 p.m. March 9.
Nannie Helen Burroughs Ave.,
4200-4399 blocks, 10:57 p.m.
March 6.
New Hampshire Ave., 6200
block, 3:10 p.m. March 10. From
vehicle.
New York Ave., 1200-1399 blocks,
4:35 a.m. March 8.
New York Ave., 1200-1399 blocks,
4:48 a.m. March 8.
New York Ave., 1800-2299 blocks,
10:02 p.m. March 9. From vehicle.
New York Ave., 1800-2299 blocks,
11:57 p.m. March 10. From vehicle.
New York Ave., 1800-2299 blocks,
5:12 p.m. March 11.
New York Ave., 1800-2299 blocks,
7:03 p.m. March 12.
Okie St., 1300 block, 8:22 p.m.
March 10. From vehicle.
Otis St., 1000-1199 blocks, 4:13
a.m. March 9.
Queens Chapel Rd., 2600 block,
10:37 p.m. March 8. From vehicle.
Rhode Island Ave., 3000-3133
blocks, 7:02 p.m. March 10.
Riggs Rd., 300 block, 3:07 a.m.
March 7. From vehicle.
Riggs Rd., 300 block, 4:23 a.m.
March 7. From vehicle.
Taussig Pl., 100 block, 10:52 a.m.
March 12. From vehicle.
Tennessee Ave., 300 block, 4:56
p.m. March 11.
Todd Pl., unit block, 8:27 a.m.
March 11. From vehicle.
Trinidad Ave., 1700 block, 9:21
a.m. March 11.
Varnum St., 1000-1199 blocks,
4:26 p.m. March 7.
Victor St., unit block, March 8.
From vehicle.
Washington Pl., 2300-2499
blocks, 3:18 p.m. March 7.
Washington Pl., 2300-2499
blocks, 3:46 p.m. March 7. From
vehicle.
Webster St., unit block, 7:09 p.m.
March 12. From vehicle.
First St., 1200 block, 6:27 p.m.
March 12.
Third St., 5900 block, 7:12 p.m.
March 12.
Third St., 6100 block, 3:56 p.m.
March 10. From vehicle.
Fourth St., 1900 block, 10:33 a.m.
March 11.
Fifth St., 1200 block, 6:44 p.m.
March 12. From vehicle.
Eighth St., 2700-2999 blocks,
5:17 a.m. March 12. From vehicle.
Ninth St., 900 block, 8:10 a.m.
March 12. From vehicle.
10th St., 3400 block, 9:35 a.m.
March 7. From vehicle.
11th St., 200 block, 6:34 a.m.
March 12. From vehicle.
12th St., 3100 block, 9:19 a.m.
March 7. From vehicle.
12th St., 3700 block, 7:52 p.m.
March 12.