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The Washington Post – March 23, 2018

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Democracy Dies in Darkness
Partly sunny, breezy 48/30 • Tomorrow: Mostly cloudy 49/31 B8
M2 V1 V2 V3 V4
FRIDAY, MARCH 23 , 2018
. $2
McMaster is out, Bolton is in as adviser Trump pursues
China tari≠s, fuels
fears of trade war
BY G REG J AFFE
AND J OSH D AWSEY
President Trump said Thursday that he was naming former
ambassador John Bolton, a Fox
News commentator and conservative firebrand, as his new
national security adviser, replacing Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster.
The president announced the
news in a tweet, saying that Bol-
ton would take the job starting
April 9, making him Trump’s
third national security adviser in
the first 14 months of his presidency. In dismissing McMaster
from the job, Trump praised the
Army general for his “outstanding job” and said he would “always remain my friend.”
Despite the kind words, Trump
and McMaster never clicked on a
personal basis and often seemed
at odds on matters of policy related to Iran and North Korea.
The appointment of Bolton,
which doesn’t require Senate confirmation, could lead to dramatic
changes in the administration’s
approach to crises around the
world.
His appointment is certain to
scramble the White House’s preparations for a proposed summit
MCMASTER CONTINUED ON A8
McMaster
Bolton
$60 BILLION IN GOODS TARGETED
Dowd departs: Trump is having
trouble enticing attorneys. A6
Stocks undergo biggest one-day drop in six weeks
BY
Smith & Wesson was considered just a solid corporate citizen in its home town —
until people learned it made the rifle used in the Parkland school shooting
D AVID J . L YNCH
President Trump embarked
Thursday on the sharpest trade
confrontation with China in
nearly a quarter-century, moving
toward imposing tariffs on
$60 billion in Chinese goods and
limiting China’s freedom to invest in the U.S. technology industry.
The Chinese government fired
back hours later, threatening to
hit $3 billion in U.S. goods with
tariffs. Trump’s announcement
was “typical unilateralism and
protectionism,” China’s Commerce Ministry said in a statement, and it had set a “very bad
precedent.”
“China does not want to fight a
trade war, but it is absolutely not
afraid of a trade war,” it said in a
statement issued Friday morning
in Beijing. “We are confident and
capable of meeting any challenge. It is hoped that the U.S.
side will be able to make a swift
decision and not to drag bilateral
economic and trade relations
into danger.”
Trump’s actions — which sent
stocks to their biggest one-day
drop in six weeks — followed a
government finding that China
had treated U.S. companies unfairly by coercing them into surrendering trade secrets for market access.
“We’re doing things for this
country that should have been
done for many, many years,” the
president said at the White
House.
Trump directed U.S. Trade
Representative Robert E. Lighthizer to propose within 15 days
tariff increases designed to compensate the United States for lost
profits and jobs. After a comment period, the list, targeting
Chinese products that benefited
from U.S. technology, will be
made public.
But even as he confronted
TARIFFS CONTINUED ON A17
A reprieve: Some U.S. allies will be
initially exempt from tariffs. A17
Tariffs hit markets: After a shaky
few weeks, stocks dive again. A15
Congress passes budget
with little time to spare
PHOTOS BY KEVIN HAGEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Distant shots echo in a gunmaking capital
BY T ODD C . F RANKEL
IN SPRINGFIELD, MASS.
Hussein Abdi, 19, had never given
much thought to the gunmaker down
the street from his high school. He
often passed the Smith & Wesson factory and its flashing marquee touting
the company’s deep ties to the city,
“Since 1852.” Nyasia Jordan, 18, knew it
only as the place where her mom used
to work. It’s one of the city’s largest
employers. Others saw Smith & Wesson’s presence as another detail central to Springfield’s identity, the place
where basketball was invented, Dr.
Seuss was born and guns are made.
But this once-easy relationship between city and gunmaker has been
rattled by the discovery that the firearm
used to kill 17 people at a Parkland, Fla.,
high school last month was made here.
The gun was a Smith & Wesson M&P15,
a version of the controversial AR-15
military-style rifle. And that weapon
had been used in mass shootings before, including in Aurora, Colo., and San
Bernardino, Calif.
TOP: Students march to Smith & Wesson
headquarters in Springfield, Mass.,
on March 14 to protest gun violence.
ABOVE: The gunmaker’s headquarters.
SPRINGFIELD CONTINUED ON A16
Gun-control march: Parkland students
arrive in D.C. for Saturday’s rally. A3
BY E RICA W ERNER
AND M IKE D E B ONIS
Congress cleared a sweeping
$1.3 trillion spending bill early
Friday that doles out enormous
increases to military and domestic
programs alike, as Republicans
and Democrats joined to block
most of President Trump’s proposed budget cuts and place obstacles in the way of his immigration agenda.
The House passed the 2,232page bill Thursday on a wide bipartisan vote. And after a day of
maneuvering — including a bizarre dispute involving a senator
upset about the renaming of a
wilderness area after a deceased
political rival — the Senate followed suit early Friday morning,
passing the legislation 65 to 32.
The bill abandons GOP claims
of fiscal discipline in a stark reversal of the promises many Republicans ran on in capturing control of
the House in 2010 and the Senate
in 2014 as they railed against what
they described as a profligate President Barack Obama.
And in another about-face,
House GOP leaders tossed aside
their own rules and past complaints about Democrats to rush
the legislation through the House
ahead of a Friday night government shutdown deadline. Lawmakers of both parties seethed,
saying they had scant time to read
BUDGET CONTINUED ON A4
Ethos abandoned: House GOP
has a “read the bill” moment. A4
Facebook played down
ties to Analytica figure
E LIZABETH D WOSKIN,
D REW H ARWELL
AND C RAIG T IMBERG
BY
The psychologist who disseminated Facebook user data to an
analytics firm working for the
Trump campaign had a closer relationship with the social network
than it has let on, co-authoring a
research paper based on a massive
amount of data that Facebook provided to him.
Facebook last week accused
Cambridge University psychologist Aleksandr Kogan of obtaining
data on at least 30 million Facebook users and inappropriately
sharing it with Cambridge Analyt-
Tillerson’s
farewell
Secretary of State Rex
Tillerson waves after
giving remarks to
State Department
employees in his final
public appearance
before stepping down
at the end of the
month. “This can be a
very mean-spirited
town,” he said. “But
you don’t have to
choose to participate
in that.” Story, A20
ica, the data analytics firm. Facebook has said little about Kogan
besides asserting that he lied
when he claimed his data-gathering would be used only for academic research.
Two of Facebook’s own data
scientists worked with Kogan between 2013 and 2015, according to
the paper. As part of the research,
which was separate from Kogan’s
work for Cambridge Analytica,
Facebook provided Kogan with
data on 57 billion Facebook friendships, according to the paper.
FACEBOOK CONTINUED ON A18
‘No way to get it back’: Data from
the site is out there for good. A18
ALEX WONG/GETTY IMAGES
In THE NEWS
bank to wade into the
gun debate. A15
THE NATION
Energy Secretary Rick
Perry promised to meet
Pentagon demands for
more triggers for
nuclear weapons. A7
THE WORLD
PABLO MARTINEZ MONSIVAIS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Metro deal Maryland will give the transit
agency its full share of $167 million a year in
new, permanent funding, lawmakers said. B1
Police shooting Stephon Clark’s family called
for justice after video footage was released. A2
Travel to the United
States is declining, but
Canada is bucking the
trend, and experts
aren’t sure why. A10
French railway workers
and air traffic controllers protested proposed
labor changes with nationwide strikes. A10
A day after resigning as
Peru’s president, Pedro
Pablo Kuczynski was
asked to stay in the
country until a corruption probe is done. A11
THE ECONOMY
The “grocery wars”
have claimed their first
two casualties: Tops
Markets and Southeastern Grocers. A14
The billionaire maker
of Bratz dolls is seeking
$800 million through
crowdfunding to save
Toys R Us. A15
Citigroup became the
first major Wall Street
THE REGION
A 16-year-old girl shot
Tuesday in a Southern
Maryland high school
by a fellow student was
brain dead and set to be
taken off life support
Thursday night, her
family said. B1
With new DACA applications blocked by
the Trump administration, young immigrants
who had planned to apply for “dreamer” protections feel in limbo. B1
Students from a Southeast Washington school
joined with those from
Parkland, Fla., in calling for stricter guncontrol laws. B1
A program that helps
D.C. residents attend
college is set to receive
full federal funding despite a White House bid
to eliminate it. B1
About 50 senior citizens will gather Saturday near the White
House in a show of support for the student-led
March for Our Lives. B2
A medical marijuana
dispensary in Maryland
banned customers for
online complaints, possibly violating state
rules for the emerging
industry. B3
Inside
WEEKEND
Bibimbap boom
A 24-hour Korean food
marathon? Hit Annandale.
ST YLE
State of their union
Why do we obsess over
presidential marriages’
ups and downs? C1
BUSINESS NEWS ........................ A14
COMICS........................................C5
OPINION PAGES..........................A21
LOTTERIES ................................... B3
OBITUARIES ................................. B5
TELEVISION..................................C4
WORLD NEWS ............................ A10
CONTENT © 2018
The Washington Post / Year 141, No. 108
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B2
9 8 2 0
A2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 23 , 2018
Democrats: Wall not a priority for border agents
N ICK M IROFF
BY
U.S. agents asked to identify
security gaps at the border do not
view the construction of a wall as
a priority, according to a report
published Thursday by the Democratic staff of the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and
Governmental Affairs.
Citing internal survey data collected by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), which queries border agents annually as to
what they view as the agency’s
priorities, the report found far
more requests for additional investments in technology, training
and personnel.
But of the 902 “capability gaps”
border agents identified in last
year’s survey, only 34 included
requests for additional fencing.
Just three — fewer than 1 percent
— referenced a “wall,” according
to the Democratic staffers’ report.
President Trump is seeking
$18 billion in border-wall funding
over a decade, and in public statements, Department of Homeland
Security officials have repeatedly
said “frontline operators” will determine where the barriers will be
built.
More often, border agents cited
a need for better sensors, cameras
and other technology, along with
low-tech tools such as horse pa-
H A P P ENI NG TO D A Y
For the latest updates all day, visit washingtonpost.com.
All day
U.S. tariffs of 25 percent on imported steel and
10 percent on imported aluminum are set to go into effect.
Visit washingtonpost.com/business for details.
All day
Former president Barack Obama is in Australia until
Sunday to meet with Australian Prime Minister Malcolm
Turnbull and participate in a conversation hosted by the
New Zealand-United States Council in Sydney. For details,
visit washingtonpost.com/world.
Afternoon
President Trump travels to Palm Beach, Fla., for the
weekend and is expected to return the White House on
Sunday. Visit washingtonpost.com/politics for
developments.
7 p.m.
The Washington Wizards host the Denver Nuggets at
Capital One Arena. Follow the game at postsports.com.
KLMNO
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trols, all-terrain vehicles and
“better vegetation management,”
as keys to improved security.
“With finite resources, federal
funding for border security must
be allocated in the most effective
and efficient manner possible,”
the report states. “At a minimum,
funding decisions should reflect
the operational requirements of
frontline agents and Border Patrol section chiefs — and should
not be based on a desire to fulfill
campaign promises made by the
President.”
DHS officials assailed the Democratic staffers’ report Thursday
as a “false narrative.”
“As I’m sure committee minority staff are aware, the method
discussed in the report is not for
determining solutions to problems but instead is focused on
identifying gaps in border security,” DHS spokeswoman Katie
Waldman said in a statement.
“They have unfortunately conflated two distinctly different items.”
“Despite their fundamental
misunderstanding of the materials they read — and numerous
briefings on the same topic — we
need to take immediate action to
secure our border by building a
border wall system, that includes
physical barriers, technology, and
personnel,” Waldman said.
A copy of the survey questionnaire reviewed by The Washington Post, however, includes fields
specifically asking border agents
to propose solutions for the security shortcomings they identify.
The latest version of the
$1.3 trillion spending bill for the
remainder of this fiscal year
would provide $1.6 billion for
barriers along the U.S.-Mexico
border, but it would require the
use of “operationally effective designs” that have already been deployed. That all but disqualifies
the 30-foot-tall border-wall prototypes developed at Trump’s behest for new barriers that would
be imposing and aesthetically
pleasing.
Benjamine “Carry” Huffman,
MANDEL NGAN/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
President Trump’s motorcade makes its way along the border in
San Diego during his California trip earlier this month.
the head of strategic planning for
U.S. Border Patrol, also took aim
at the Senate staff report, calling a
border wall “essential to gaining
operational control.”
“The fact is, when it comes to
border security, the border wall
system works,” Huffman said in a
statement. “Suggestions that the
Border Patrol believes otherwise
are false.”
The Government Accountability Office, the government’s top
oversight agency, has urged DHS
officials to develop tools to measure the effectiveness of walls,
fencing and other barriers to
avoid wasteful spending. Department officials say such metrics
are in development and will be
available by January.
nick.miroff@washpost.com
CO R R ECTI O N
A March 20 Page One article
about slain Brazilian politician
Marielle Franco misidentified
Ana Amélia as a Rio de Janeiro
state senator. She is a national
senator from the state of Rio
Grande do Sul.
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RENEE C. BYER/SACRAMENTO BEE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lashunda Britt, a cousin of Stephon Clark, stands Tuesday near where Clark was fatally shot by police two days earlier in Sacramento.
Video shows Sacramento police killing black man
Body cameras captured
shooting of 22-year-old
who was holding phone
BY W ESLEY L OWERY
AND A LEX H ORTON
The family of Stephon Clark
renewed its calls for justice Thursday, hours after police in Sacramento released body-camera and
helicopter video footage of a fatal
shooting by officers that activists
say raises new questions about the
officers’ actions.
Clark, 22, was killed Sunday
after two officers, responding to a
call about someone breaking windows with a crowbar, confronted
him outside his grandmother’s
home. In video footage, Clark can
be seen running to the back yard,
where an officer is heard yelling at
Clark to “show me your hands”
and then exclaiming “Gun!” The
two officers fired 20 times at
Clark, killing him. The only thing
in his hands, police have since
said, was a white iPhone.
“He was at the wrong place at
the wrong time in his own back
yard?” Sequita Thompson, Clark’s
grandmother, told the Sacramento Bee. “Come on, now — they
didn’t have to do that.”
The video’s audio also captured
one of the officers seeming to suggest that they turn their cameras
off.
“Hey mute?” an officer says to
another about seven minutes after
the shooting. The audio goes silent, and shortly after, the videos
end.
“It clearly implies to me that
they’re on the scene trying to figure out the coverup,” said the Rev.
Al Sharpton, who spoke with
Clark’s mother Wednesday and
whose civil rights group is helping
the family find legal representation. “You’re standing over a dead
body that you thought had a gun,
you find out he had no gun, and
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Adriene Ludd and the September
2017 shooting of Eric Arnold were
the only two of the six fatal Sacramento police shootings in which the
person killed was armed with a gun.
Police say Ludd fled after a
traffic stop and fired at officers
before he was killed.
Arnold, a suspect in a double
homicide, shot two police officers
before he was fatally shot.
Matt Coates was holding a plastic BB gun when he was fatally
shot by police in Sacramento in
May 2015. His girlfriend would
later tell reporters that she had
told the officers that the gun
wasn’t real. In two of the cases —
the fatal shootings of Dazion
Flenaugh and Joseph Mann —
Sacramento police killed people
alleged to have been armed with a
knife.
The Clark video’s relatively
quick release came as the result of
policy changes implemented after
the 2016 shooting of Mann, a black
man said to suffer from mental
illness. The new policies require
all patrol officers to wear body
cameras and mandate that videos
of critical incidents be released
within 30 days.
Still, for some in Sacramento
and across the country, watching
the video raised as many questions as it answered. “Even if he
did what they say was done,” said
Les Simmons, a pastor and community activist in Sacramento, “at
the end of the day it does not
justify his life being taken.”
wesley.lowery@washpost.com
alex.horton@washpost.com
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your immediate impulse is to
mute the sound.”
Clark is one of at least 230
people who have been fatally shot
by police in 2018, according to The
Washington Post’s database of fatal police shootings. Of them, he is
the 38th black man.
“I know there could have been
another way,” Clark’s brother Stevante told CBS News. “He didn’t
have to die.”
“You’re going to know his name
forever,” he added before reciting
the names of several black men
who were killed by police. “You’re
going to remember it, like how you
know . . . Mike Brown, Eric Garner, Tamir Rice. You’re going to
know him. You’re going to remember this.”
Sacramento Mayor Darrell
Steinberg offered his condolences
to Clark’s family and said in a
statement that he was “heartbroken” for the city. “The questions
raised by the community and
council members are appropriate
and must be answered during the
investigation,” Steinberg said,
though he noted that he had reviewed the police videos carefully
and said, “Based on the videos
alone, I cannot second-guess the
split-second decisions of our officers, and I’m not going to do that.”
Clark is at least the sixth person
fatally shot by the Sacramento
Police Department since the beginning of 2015, according to a
Post analysis. Five of them were
black men; the other was a white
man.
The October 2015 shooting of
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FRIDAY, MARCH 23 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
RE
Politics & the Nation
Warm coats, dress shoes and a message: Parkland students head to D.C.
BY L ORI R OZSA
AND K ATIE Z EZIMA
fort lauderdale, fla. — Early
Thursday, dozens of bleary-eyed
teenagers wearing matching maroon T-shirts gathered in an airport terminal here to head out of
town, even though schoolwork
was piling up at the end of the
academic quarter.
The Floridians fretted about
how cold it would be at their
destination — one teen was chided for showing up in flip-flops.
They hugged their parents goodbye and excitedly talked about
their trip to Washington, a place
many had visited before as tourists — but this time would be
different.
About 200 students, teachers
and chaperons from Marjory
Stoneman Douglas High School —
where a former student is accused
of killing 17 people last month —
and other schools in Broward
County flew to Washington on
Thursday to lobby legislators and
participate in Saturday’s March
for Our Lives. Organizers are expecting up to 500,000 participants in Washington. More than
800 marches are planned worldwide, according to the group Everytown for Gun Safety.
The students’ trip to the District was organized by Giffords, a
gun-control group that is also
bringing in students from Boston;
Baltimore; Chicago; Irvington,
N.J.; Omaha; New York City and
Tucson, where then-Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.) was shot at
a constituent event in 2011. The
organization has arranged for injured students and family members of shooting victims to come
to Washington on the private
plane of New England Patriots
owner Robert Kraft.
“Not only did their friends and
teachers get shot and killed, other
friends shot and injured . . . most
of them they had bullets flying
over their heads,” said Mark Kelly,
a retired astronaut and Navy veteran who founded Giffords with
his wife. “This is not fair that they
have to deal with something like
this at their age. They wanted to
go to Washington and be heard,
and so I felt it was our obligation
to help them.”
The students, who spent the
week packing while juggling
homework and school projects,
said they are still grappling with
trauma and survivor’s guilt. But in
interviews they said sharing their
stories and views was too important an opportunity not to take.
“I want to tell people, honestly,
that they don’t know what we
went through,” said Einav Cohen,
a 15-year-old Stoneman Douglas
student. “We’re the only ones who
can explain how it was.”
Cohen said she can’t escape the
shootings. She returns every day
to the place where they happened.
Students are pulled out of class for
counseling, and school workloads
have been lightened for the month
so students are not overly stressed
— something that will end with
the start of the fourth quarter.
Cohen said she leans on her
friends from school — the only
other people who can fully understand what she is going through.
“It’s been difficult,” she said.
“It’s been hard to go back to a
normal routine.”
The specter of mass shootings
can be hard to escape — the students flew out of the Fort Lauderdale airport, where five people
were killed last year when a gunman opened fire in the baggageclaim area.
Florence Yared, 17, said she will
keep the reason she is making the
trip at the front of her mind — to
honor the 17 people who were
killed at her school. Yared said she
once eschewed politics but has
become politically active since the
shooting. She hopes to start a
dialogue with politicians who do
CHARLOTTE KESL FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Alondra Gittleson of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School takes part in a gun-policy discussion last
month in Tallahassee. She said she “kind of got some peace” after lobbying state lawmakers there.
not agree with her call for gun
control.
“I kind of want to understand
people’s opinions, why they think
the way they do, and explain my
point of view to help them understand why I think the way that I
do,” she said.
Yared said she feels an obligation to push for gun control because she feels as though no one
else is doing so right now.
“Even though we’re teenagers,
we’re still American citizens,” she
said.
Alondra Gittleson, 16, has lobbied lawmakers before — she was
one of a group of Stoneman Douglas students who went to Tallahassee as the Florida legislature
weighed, and ultimately voted
down, an assault-weapons ban.
The body ultimately passed a new
set of gun regulations signed into
law by Gov. Rick Scott (R), marking a major shift in a state known
as a laboratory for gun rights.
“It was good when we talked to
the state lawmakers,” Gittleson
said. “Now we want to take it to
the federal level. We all want to
explain our stories.”
During the Feb. 14 shooting,
she was hunkered down in the
school’s auditorium.
“I feel survivor’s guilt sometimes. I wasn’t in that building. I
didn’t experience the horrors they
heard. I didn’t hear the gunshots,”
she said. “I just remember the
yelling, and the SWAT teams with
their guns.”
Gittleson said she has spoken
with therapists at school and is
seeing a private therapist with her
mother.
She said what also helps is being active in the #NeverAgain
movement.
“After I went to Tallahassee, I
kind of got some peace, I kind of
calmed down,” she said. “I wanted
to do something so badly, to speak
to someone who could actually do
something. Now we’re doing it
again in Washington, and I really
hope they listen to us and that it
makes a difference.”
This is Gittleson’s first trip to
Washington, and while she is
ready to talk with lawmakers and
join the march Saturday, she is
less confident about the weather.
She brought a quilted coat, something she doesn’t need often in
Parkland.
“I hope it’s enough,” she said.
“They’re saying it’s going to be
really cold.”
One girl showed up to the airport in sandals.
“You brought other shoes,
right?” said Debby Miller, the lead
chaperon. “Listen to me — I’m
such a mother.”
Miller is also a Broward County
teacher. She reminded the students that they need to dress professionally when they visit the
Capitol — no jeans — and that they
need to stay cool if someone disagrees with them and keep their
language appropriate.
Miller said the shooting at
Stoneman had a powerful impact
on her. She attended a rally at the
courthouse in Fort Lauderdale
three days after the shooting and
was inspired by the students’
speeches. She volunteered to help
with the bus trip to Tallahassee,
and the trip to Washington.
“The day after it happened, I
was standing in front of my class
and I cried,” she said. “This is one
of those moments where you have
to choose whether you want to be
on the right side of history or the
wrong side. It’s a moral choice.”
She’s been impressed by the
students, whom she describes as
poised and mature in light of the
tragedy they experienced. And
while the trip’s itinerary has some
leisure activities built into it —
such as a trip to the National
Museum of African American History and Culture — the main reason for it is never far from the
students’ minds.
“The kids are super-excited,”
Miller said. “They’re really determined. At the end of the day,
they’re 15 and 16 years old, and
they’re excited about all these opportunities, and their sad about
all these opportunities, because of
the reason they’re doing it.”
katie.zezima@washpost.com
Zezima reported from Washington.
DIGEST
ALABAMA
Nitrogen gas approved
for use in executions
Alabama will become the third
state to authorize the untested
use of nitrogen gas to execute
prisoners, under legislation
signed into law Thursday by Gov.
Kay Ivey (R).
As lethal injection drugs
become difficult to obtain, states
have begun looking at alternative
ideas for carrying out death
sentences. While lethal injection
would remain the state’s primary
execution method, the new law
would allow the state to
asphyxiate condemned inmates
with nitrogen gas if lethal
injection drugs are unavailable or
lethal injection is ruled
unconstitutional.
Lawmakers who supported the
change suggested that it would be
more humane.
The Death Penalty Information
Center, a group that compiles
death penalty statistics, says no
state has carried out an execution
by nitrogen gas. Two other states
— Oklahoma and Mississippi —
have voted to authorize execution
by nitrogen gas as a backup
method of execution, according
to the center.
Oklahoma announced last
week that it will begin using
nitrogen for executions when the
state resumes death sentences,
because of difficulty obtaining
lethal injection drugs.
— Associated Press
NORTH CAROLINA
Mother charged with
giving pot to 1-year-old
A North Carolina mother
helped her 1-year-old daughter
smoke marijuana in videos of the
child puffing on a cigarillo that
garnered millions of views online,
according to an arrest warrant.
Authorities were alerted
Wednesday by concerned social
media users after two videos of
the girl smoking stirred outrage.
One of the videos showed the
hand of an adult off-screen
holding the cigarillo to the girl’s
lips. The child makes a cooing
sound, appears to inhale and lets
out a puff of smoke before
turning toward the adult with an
expressionless look.
The newly released warrant
said the mother inflicted harm by
having the child inhale
marijuana smoke from a blunt
more than once over a two-month
period starting last December.
The girl has been placed with
county child protective services.
The mother, Brianna Ashanti
Lofton, 20, was held on charges of
child abuse, marijuana
possession and contributing to
the delinquency of a minor.
During a brief court hearing
Thursday, a Wake County judge
set Lofton’s bond at $100,000 and
ordered her to have no contact
with her daughter.
Police issued a thank-you on
Facebook on Wednesday to
members of the public who
alerted them to the video.
— Associated Press
MICHIGAN
Police raid church
buildings in Saginaw
Police in Michigan raided the
Catholic Diocese of Saginaw, the
residence of the bishop and a
rectory Thursday following the
recent arrest of a priest accused
of committing sex crimes.
Saginaw County Assistant
JOHN WALKER/FRESNO BEE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A powerful storm spread more rain across California on Thursday,
flooding streets in the community of Tarpey Village, above, and
threatening to unleash mud and debris flows into areas burned bare
by wildfires. The National Weather Service said there were numerous
reports of flooding in the Central Valley cities of Fresno and Clovis.
Prosecutor Mark Gaertner said
he could not disclose what
officers were after in the searches
at the diocesan offices, the home
of Bishop Joseph Cistone and the
rectory at the Cathedral of Mary
of the Assumption in Saginaw.
Cistone and the diocese have
not carried through on promises
to support investigators looking
into sexual abuse allegations
against the Rev. Robert DeLand
and others in the diocese, the
prosecutor said.
Earlier t0his month,
prosecutors formed a team to
coordinate and investigate
allegations of abuse within the
diocese.
DeLand, 71, pastor at St. Agnes
Church in Freeland, was charged
Feb. 26 with criminal sexual
conduct for allegedly assaulting
two males, aged 21 and 17.
DeLand has pleaded not guilty.
DeLand has been suspended
JOIN US AT ONE OF
THESE OPEN HOUSES!
The state will hold a series of Open Houses in April which will:
• Provide the public with an introduction and overview of the study.
• Introduce staff who can answer study-related questions.
• Welcome public comment on the study scope, including the purpose and
need, potential alternatives to be studied, environmental impacts to be
considered, and evaluation methods to be used.
Note: The meetings will be an Open House format, allowing attendees to
review display boards and dialogue with MDOT SHA Study Team staff.
Can’t Attend?
Meeting materials, including an online meeting presentation,
will be available on the study website at 495-270-P3.com.
— Associated Press
Man dies while crashing
through gate of Air Force base:
A driver has died after going
through the main gate at Travis
Air Force Base in northern
California without authorization
and crashing his car, the base said
early Thursday. The driver, who
has not been identified, died at
the scene after driving through
the gate at the Air Force base
gate, about 50 miles northeast of
San Francisco, about 7 p.m. on
Wednesday, the post’s public
affairs office said. The office said
there was no threat to the
community or the base.
— Reuters
Tuesday, April 17, 2018
6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
Dr. Henry Wise Jr. High School
12650 Brook Lane, Upper Marlboro, MD 20772
The National Capital region is one of the most congested in the nation with some of the highest commuting times. That’s why the Maryland Department of
Transportation has introduced an innovative Traffic Relief Plan to reduce congestion on two of the state’s most heavily traveled highways, I-270 and I-495.
The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and the Maryland Department of Transportation State Highway Administration (MDOT SHA) are preparing an
Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the I-495 & I-270 Managed Lanes Study to identify innovative transportation solutions to reduce congestion.
This Study is the first element of a broader Traffic Relief Plan which considers
improvements along the entire length of I-495, as well as I-270. The first phase
limits extend along I-495 from south of the American Legion Bridge to east of
the Woodrow Wilson Bridge and along I-270 from I-495 to I-370, including the
east and west I-270 spurs. The study will include a review of existing and future
traffic, roadway, and environmental conditions to identify alternatives.
from the priesthood while legal
proceedings against him
continue. He also is prohibited
from having contact with anyone
under age 21. He’s free on bond
with a GPS tether.
Wednesday, April 18, 2018
6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
Clarksburg High School
22500 Wims Road, Clarksburg, MD 20871
Thursday, April 19, 2018
6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
Bethesda Chevy Chase High School
4301 East West Highway, Bethesda, MD 20814
Tuesday, April 24, 2018
OPEN
HOUSE
6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
Eleanor Roosevelt High School
7601 Hanover Parkway, Greenbelt, MD 20770
REQUEST FOR ASSISTANCE: The Maryland Relay Service can
assist teletype users at 7-1-1. Persons requiring assistance to
participate, such as an interpreter for hearing/speech difficulties
or assistance with the English language, should contact the
project toll-free number at 833-858-5960 by April 10, 2018.
A4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 23 , 2018
Congress races to pass bill before shutdown deadline With vote on budget,
House GOP has its own
‘read the bill’ moment
BUDGET FROM A1
the mammoth bill, which was released less than 17 hours before
they voted.
Nonetheless, House leaders of
both parties declared victory following the 256-to-167 vote, and at
the White House, Office of Management and Budget Director
Mick Mulvaney said Trump would
sign the bill.
“Is it perfect? No. Is it exactly
what we asked for in the budget?
No. Were we ever going to get that?
No. That’s not how the process
works,” Mulvaney said. “This is
what a bill looks like when you
have 60 votes in the Senate and the
Democrats get a chance to take
their pound of flesh.”
The legislation funds the federal government for the remainder
of the 2018 budget year, through
Sept. 30, directing $700 billion
toward the military and $591 billion to domestic agencies. The military spending is a $66 billion
increase over the 2017 level, and
the nondefense spending is
$52 billion more than last year.
The spending bill is widely expected to be the last major legislation that Congress will pass before
the November midterm elections,
which had increased pressure to
jam the bill full of odds and ends.
For hours after House passage,
the legislation stalled in the Senate, where the chamber’s rules
grant a single senator significant
latitude to hold up a vote. Attention was initially focused on Sen.
Rand Paul (R-Ky.), who forced the
government into a brief shutdown
last month when he objected to a
budget bill that set the parameters
for the legislation that is now
pending.
Paul spent much of Thursday
broadcasting his opposition to the
spending bill via Twitter while
keeping his colleagues in suspense
about whether he would slowwalk the process past 12:01 a.m.
Saturday and send the government into its third shutdown this
year.
Paul’s tweetstorm highlighted
what he views as wasteful spending in the bill, and he posted a
picture of himself holding the
hefty bill, while glaring balefully
at the camera. “Shame, shame. A
pox on both Houses — and parties.
Here’s the 2,232 page, $1.3 trillion,
budget-busting Omnibus spending bill,” the caption read.
Finally, late Thursday night,
Paul spoke on the phone with Majority Leader Mitch McConnell
(R-Ky.), and subsequently relented, telling The Washington Post
that he’d been successful in drawing attention to problems with the
bill, and was prepared to allow
votes to go forward.
But just as Paul stood down, it
emerged that he was not the only
Republican senator objecting to
the bill. Even as Paul was railing
publicly against the bill, Sen.
James E. Risch (R-Idaho) had been
complaining behind the scenes,
demanding that congressional
leaders remove a provision in the
bill naming the White Clouds Wilderness after former Democratic
governor Cecil D. Andrus, according to two congressional aides familiar with the dispute.
Risch and Andrus had clashed
when both served in state government. The renaming provision
passed the House in February and
has the support of Rep. Mike
Simpson (R-Idaho), chairman of a
House Appropriations subcommittee.
The Senate passed a standalone measure making the change
he sought, which apparently satisfied Risch, who declined to comment.
“No. What part of ‘no’ don’t you
understand? . . . Do I have a problem with my English? I don’t have
any comment,” he told reporters
outside the Senate floor.
Throughout the maneuvering,
the ultimate outcome was not in
question: The legislation would
pass, bringing budget increases to
federal agencies large and small,
from the National Institutes of
Health to the National Park Service to the Election Assistance
Commission.
“Sometimes you save the president from himself,” said Rep. Tom
Cole (R-Okla.), arguing the administration would not want to be in
the position of cutting the NIH
budget if a new pandemic comes
along. “Look, a new administration always runs on things, and
may or may not know government
intimately.”
Conservatives fumed at the
generous increases for many agencies, with some arguing it undercut their party’s claims to fiscal
restraint.
“I don’t understand why when
President Obama does what we’re
about to do, it’s bad for the country, but when we do it, it’s good for
the country,” said Sen. John Neely
Kennedy (R-La.). “This bill is going to need a lot of Democratic
support, and I suspect it’ll get it.
They’re just as happy as kids at
Christmas.”
Other Republicans, including
House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (RWis.), argued the legislation fulfilled Trump’s governing agenda,
including increasing military
spending and funding a wall along
the U.S.-Mexico border.
“This bill starts construction on
the wall,” he told reporters. “It
funds our war on opioids. It invests in infrastructure. It funds
school safety and mental health.
But what this bill is ultimately
AARON P. BERNSTEIN/REUTERS
Sen. Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) shares notes with Rep. Nancy
Pelosi (D-Calif.) ahead of a news conference Wednesday. Pelosi
called the bill “a tremendous victory for the American people.”
about, what we’ve fought for so
long, is finally giving our military
the tools and the resources it
needs to do the job.”
House Minority Leader Nancy
Pelosi (D-Calif.) called the bill “a
tremendous victory for the American people,” one that keeps domestic agencies robustly funded
while turning away Trump’s push
for even more money for the border wall and immigration enforcement.
“If you want to think you’re
getting a wall, just think it, and
sign the bill,” she said.
The bill includes $1.6 billion in
funding for construction of a border wall, but that number is far
short of the $25 billion in longterm funding that the administration sought, and Democrats also
won tight restrictions on how that
money can be spent.
Despite weeks of negotiations,
Democrats were unable to secure
protections for young undocumented immigrants brought to
the country as children who had
been granted reprieves from deportation under an Obama-era directive. Trump announced in September he would end that program, known as Deferred Action
for Childhood Arrivals, by March
5. That deadline was effectively
nullified by recent court actions.
The legislation includes in-
“This is what a bill looks like when you have
60 votes in the Senate and the Democrats get a
chance to take their pound of flesh.”
White House budget director Mick Mulvaney
creased funding for priorities as
diverse as arts agencies, the FBI,
the IRS and federal apprenticeship programs. It greatly boosts
funding to fight the opioid epidemic and orders the Army Corps
of Engineers to keep working on
trying to keep Asian carp, an invasive species, out of the Great
Lakes.
Prodded by Trump, Republicans eliminated some provisions
favoring the $30 billion Gateway
project, a major New York-area
infrastructure program backed by
Senate Minority Leader Charles E.
Schumer (D-N.Y.). The legislation
also includes a fix for a provision
in the new GOP tax law that favored grain cooperatives over traditional agricultural corporations. And it incorporates bipartisan legislation meant to improve
the National Instant Criminal
Background Check System (NICS)
for gun buyers.
There were grumbles in all corners of Capitol Hill about the rapid
process that has left lawmakers
and aides poring through text to
see exactly what the bill will do.
House GOP leaders waived their
own rules requiring any bill coming to the floor to be posted for at
least three days, and none of more
than a dozen lawmakers surveyed
Thursday said they had read the
entire bill.
“There’s no way humanly possible to read 2,232 pages,” said Rep.
Thomas Massie (R-Ky.), who opposed the bill. “Sometimes they
jam you, but they pretend to give
you three days to read it. All the
veneer is off now.”
mike.debonis@washpost.com
erica.werner@washpost.com
Karoun Demirjian and John Wagner
contributed to this report.
Agreement preserves protection for wild horses in West
BY
K ARIN B RULLIARD
Among the winners in the
$1.3 trillion spending bill congressional leaders agreed to
Thursday: wild horses.
Negotiators said nay to a
House proposal to allow the culling of tens of thousands of horses
and burros that roam the West or
are held in government-funded
corrals and ranches. Proponents
of the proposal, including its
sponsor, Rep. Chris Stewart (RUtah), described “humane euthanization” as a last-ditch tool for
controlling a growing equine
population that is degrading
public land and causing horses
to starve.
The proposal was vigorously
opposed by wild-horse advocacy
groups, which have long resisted
attempts to limit the federally
protected animals, which have
become symbols of the American
West. The groups accuse the
Bureau of Land Management,
Negotiators reject
provision that would
allow culling of herds
which manages the wild horse
and burro populations, of bowing to demands from cattle
ranchers who view equine herds
as competitors on grazing land.
“We are thrilled that Congress
has rejected this sick horse
slaughter
plan,”
Marilyn
Kroplick, president of the animal
rights group In Defense of Animals, said in a statement.
The 1971 Wild Free-Roaming
Horses and Burros Act gave the
animals federal protections, and
it also permitted the interior
secretary to sell or euthanize older and unadoptable animals. But for much of the past
three decades, Congress has used
annual appropriations bill riders
On March 21,
2010, House
Republicans
PAUL KANE
found a mantra
that would be
part of their
sweeping victory in that year’s
midterm elections.
“Read the bill, read the bill,”
GOP lawmakers chanted that
night as then-Speaker Nancy
Pelosi (D-Calif.) called for a vote
on the Affordable Care Act.
They accused Democrats of
moving too quickly for members
to fully understand its impact.
House Republicans
abandoned their “read the bill”
ethos late Wednesday night —
on the eight-year anniversary of
the House passage of the ACA.
They unveiled a budget-busting
bill to fund every federal agency
and demanded lightning-fast
consideration.
It passed the House less than
17 hours later, at 1 p.m.
Thursday.
Already uncomfortable with
the policy — the $1.3 trillion
legislation includes massive
spending hikes that contradict
prior GOP complaints about the
debt — many Republicans were
left dumbfounded by a process
that looked a lot like one they
had won office criticizing.
“One of the things that we
criticized Ms. Pelosi about was:
What, we have to pass it, then
we’ll read it? So it just seems to
me that maybe it doesn’t matter
who it is that’s in the majority.
This is kind of the same
argument all the time,” said
Rep. Mike Kelly (R-Pa.).
“I just haven’t — 2,200 pages
— I just haven’t had a chance to
read it,” said Rep. James B.
Renacci (R-Ohio).
What’s more troubling, the
hypocrisy on the national debt
or on the process that led to
Thursday’s vote?
“Equal surprise for both,” said
Rep. Tom Reed (R-N.Y.).
In 2010, Kelly, Reed and
Renacci all claimed seats
previously held by Democrats,
railing against the policy and
the process that created the law
they derisively call
“Obamacare.” All three voted
against the spending bill
Thursday, citing the hyper-fast
process as the biggest factor.
Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.), who
also first won in 2010, served as
this group’s biggest ally in the
process argument. He mocked
how big the bill was by tweeting
that it was still printing in his
office, more than two hours
after he first hit print.
The legislation — combining
12 funding bills that were
supposed to have been approved
six months ago — won on a
sweeping bipartisan vote. A
healthy majority of Republicans,
as well as Democrats, supported
the plan.
Those conservative principles
went only so far when they were
measured against the unleashed
spigots of federal funds, which
had been tightly held since the
2011 Budget Control Act had
placed strict spending caps.
A bipartisan compromise last
month gave a nearly
$120 billion boost over the
original 2018 spending limit, a
massive 10 percent hike.
House Speaker Paul D. Ryan
(R-Wis.) mounted a vigorous
defense of the legislation,
focusing on it representing the
largest spike in military funding
since the start of the
Afghanistan and Iraq wars.
He explained that the House
had done its part in September,
approving all 12 of the funding
bills, while the Senate dithered.
So members should have been
able to read those earlier bills to
have a sense of what would be
in the final draft.
“This isn’t as if it was a oneweek process. This has been a
months-long process,” Ryan told
reporters at his weekly
@PKCapitol
to prohibit the killing of healthy
animals and any “sale that results
in their destruction for processing into commercial products.”
In July, however, the House
Appropriations Committee voted
to remove Interior Department
budget language banning culls.
Stewart said at the time that the
proposal would not permit horse
sales for commercial processing
— including for meat. The last
U.S. horse slaughterhouse closed
in 2007, but meat-processing
plants in Mexico and Canada
slaughter tens of thousands of
American horses each year for
export to Europe and Asia.
Although the spending bill
negotiated this week keeps horses off the chopping block, it does
not put forward solutions to
what people on all sides of the
heated issue agree is a problem.
About 46,000 wild horses and
burros are in corrals that cost the
BLM nearly $50 million to maintain each year, and 73,000 others
run free in Western states. That’s
nearly three times the 27,000
animals the bureau says the land
can sustain. Horse advocacy
groups say reducing the freeroaming herds that much
would risk their extinction.
Adoptions, which have been
the bureau’s primary tool for
shrinking the population, totaled
just 3,517 in 2017.
The House passed the spending bill Thursday, and the Senate
has until midnight Friday to give
its approval and avoid another
government shutdown. But the
battle over the nation’s wild horses will continue. The Trump administration’s fiscal 2019 budget
calls for doing away with the
usual rider that prevents their
sale or killing in favor of allowing
the bureau to use a “full suite of
tools” to manage the herds.
karin.brulliard@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/animalia
Thursday briefing. He noted
that Friday’s funding deadline
made it necessary to move
quickly and also pointed to the
need to allow several dozen
lawmakers to leave early Friday
morning to attend the funeral of
Rep. Louise M. Slaughter (D) in
Rochester, N.Y.
Pelosi, now minority leader,
has long made a similar defense
of the process of passing the
health law, which transpired
over nine months in 2009 and
2010, with multiple versions of
the law publicly approved by
different committees by the
House and Senate.
Ryan originally hoped to
release the bill last week and
hold a vote early this week,
allowing the Senate several days
to consider it. Instead, the talks
dragged on and on, pushing up
closer against the Friday
deadline.
And all the explanations fell
flat to some Republicans.
In last month’s vote on the
budget framework, 167
Republicans supported
leadership, about two-thirds of
the caucus. On Thursday, just
145 Republicans backed Ryan, a
sharp drop that many attributed
to the rushed process. Kelly was
one of those who went from yes
to no.
“I keep hearing about the
process being broken,” Kelly
said. “Then why don’t we fix it?”
In 2010, when John A.
Boehner (R-Ohio) was minority
leader, GOP leaders made
process a central plank of the
“Pledge to America”, a
campaign-style platform that
gave voters a loose blueprint for
how they would govern.
Boehner believed that bad
processes led to bad policy, a
theme that Ryan echoed in his
2015 victory speech after he won
the vote to succeed Boehner.
So Republicans created the
“three-day rule,” which
mandated that a bill should not
be voted on until the third day
after its unveiling. Over the past
seven years, both Boehner and
Ryan have violated that rule
because of imminent deadlines
and potential doom of delay.
But Republicans had never
broke the rule on something of
this magnitude — legislation
funding every corner of the
federal government. Even before
they held a final vote, GOP
leaders gaveled shut a
procedural vote, 211 to 207,
while some Democrats were
waiting in the back not having
voted.
The whole scene brought
criticism from some predictable
rank-and-file Republicans who
have always chafed under
Boehner and Ryan.
“I never thought I would see
the day when my party had a
worse process than Obamacare
did, but this was a worse
process,” Rep. Louie Gohmert
(R-Tex.) said after the spending
bill vote.
But the class of 2010, whose
campaigns were fueled with
promises of legislative
transparency, seemed most
perplexed by the haphazard
process.
“For me, a 2,200-page bill is
very tough to understand and
read,” Renacci said. “And I was
in the business world for 30
years. I wouldn’t sign a 100page bill — I wouldn’t sign a
100-page contract on 24-hour
notice.”
These Republicans worry that
voters are fed up with process
arguments to explain strange
outcomes, particularly now that
the GOP holds the White House
and Congress.
“It’s a harder thing to explain
back home than here. Here, it’s
kind of an accepted process,
that’s just the way it is,” Kelly
said. “At what point does it
change?”
paul.kane@washpost.com
House spending bill would increase funding for national parks and wildfire suppression
Environmentalists cheer
the bipartisan measure,
which rejects some cuts
BY
AND
D ARRYL F EARS
D INO G RANDONI
The spending bill passed by
the House of Representatives on
Thursday would increase funding the National Park Service
needs to address its nearly
$12 billion maintenance and repair backlog.
The Park Service would re-
ceive a 9 percent increase to its
budget, which contrasts sharply
with the 8 percent cut proposed
by the Trump administration.
The bill would also provide
new funding to the U.S. Forest
Service and the Interior Department to fight wildfires. In past
fire seasons, the Forest Service
was forced to borrow money
from programs meant to prevent
fires, manage forests and improve recreation to pay for more
firefighters and equipment as
fires grew larger.
Key members of both political
parties agreed the practice of
siphoning money from other Forest Service accounts, called “fire
borrowing,” creates a vicious cycle that fueled even worse forest
fires and needed to be addressed
in the latest spending bill.
Starting in 2020, firefighting
agencies would be able to tap an
additional $2 billion to nearly
$3 billion to put out fires, should
they become particularly bad, on
top of the $1.4 billion allotted for
firefighting every year.
“Common sense has finally
prevailed when it comes to how
the Forest Service pays to fight
record-breaking forest fires,” Sen.
Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) said in a
statement.
Environmentalists hailed the
bipartisan spending bill. “The
funding bill will provide a major
boost for important road, bridge,
and trail repair projects and for
fixing historic sites — just as the
National Park Service is preparing for another busy summer
travel season,” Kristen Brengel,
vice president for government
affairs for the National Parks
Conservation Association, said in
a statement.
The fix to fire borrowing is
“possibly the most important bipartisan natural resources accomplishment in years,” said Collin O’Mara, head of the National
Wildlife Federation. “These
things don’t happen every day.”
The spending bill also includes
provisions that some groups say
will enable more logging on public lands.
“We’re very grateful to Democrats for keeping many of the
worst riders out of this bill.
Unfortunately, there are still
some pretty nasty provisions in
there for the environment,” said
Brett Hartl, government affairs
director at the Center for Biological Diversity.
The spending bill allows the
Forest Service to clear underbrush and small trees — fuel for
forest fires during dry years — on
plots of land smaller than 3,000
acres without having to go
through a lengthy environmental
review.
Some Republicans, including
House Natural Resources Committee Chairman Rob Bishop (RUtah), lamented that the bill did
not give agencies broader authority to thin trees on federal
lands.
“The fire-funding fix slightly
improves the Forest Services’
flexibility, but the bill is not as
aggressive as it should have been
in restoring the health of our
nation’s forests,” Bishop said.
darryl.fears@washpost.com
dino.grandoni@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/energy-environment
FRIDAY, MARCH 23 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A5
RE
House spending bill rejects DeVos’s school choice priorities and budget cuts
Legislators want to boost
education funding
instead of slashing it
BY M ORIAH B ALINGIT AND
D ANIELLE D OUGLAS- G ABRIEL
Congress dealt a blow to Education Secretary Betsy DeVos’s
school choice agenda in a tentative spending bill released late
Wednesday, rejecting her attempt
to spend more than $1 billion
promoting choice-friendly policies and private school vouchers.
The House on Thursday approved the $1.3 trillion federal
spending package, which includes a $3.9 billion boost for the
Education Department. It heads
to the Senate for a vote.
DeVos had sought to cut Education Department funding by
$3.6 billion — about 5 percent.
She wanted to eliminate money
for after-school programs for
needy youth and ax a grant program that helps low-income students go to college in favor of
spending more than $1 billion to
promote charter schools, magnet
schools and private-school vouchers. Her proposal also outlined
cuts to the Office for Civil Rights
because it had grown more efficient, she said, a move that outraged Democrats, who accused
DeVos of ignoring the needs of
minority students.
Her budget would have eliminated grant programs that supported mental health services for
students — a move that received
scrutiny in the wake of the school
shooting in Parkland, Fla. DeVos
said her budget reflected her policy priorities and her attempts to
lessen the federal government’s
role in schools.
“It sharpens and hones the purpose of our mission: serving students by meeting their needs,”
DeVos said Tuesday before a
House Appropriations subcommittee. “President Trump is committed to reducing the federal
footprint in education, and that is
reflected in this budget.”
Instead, Congress is on track to
increase department funding,
with no funding for the school
choice program DeVos envisioned. The secretary succeeded
in increasing funding for charter
schools by $58 million, to
$400 million, though she had
hoped Congress would allocate
$500 million for the grant program.
DeVos’s spokeswoman said the
secretary was disappointed that
Congress rejected her efforts to
expand school choice.
“Too many students are stuck
in a school that isn’t meeting their
needs, through no fault of their
own,” spokeswoman Elizabeth
Hill said. “We must end the system
JOSHUA ROBERTS/REUTERS
Education Secretary Betsy DeVos proposed cutting her budget by
5 percent but spending over $1 billion to promote school choice.
that forces students into schools
based on their Zip code or family
income.”
The spending bill, which must
be passed by Friday to avoid another government shutdown,
boosts investments in student
mental health, increasing funding
by $700 million for a wide-ranging grant program that schools
can use for violence prevention,
counseling and crisis management. The bill calls for an additional $22 million for a program
to reduce school violence and
$25 million for a Department of
Health and Human Services program that supports mental health
services in schools.
“There is no question that improving mental health is a critical
priority, and Secretary DeVos is
pleased Congress will provide additional funds to help students,”
Hill said.
The spending bill provides
$40 million for the popular D.C.
Tuition Assistance Grant, which
gives city students — who don’t
have access to a robust in-state
university system — affordable
college options. The White House
had proposed cutting one-fourth
of the budget in fiscal 2018 and all
federal funding for fiscal 2019.
It also increases funding for the
Office for Civil Rights and for
after-school programs.
It was the second year in a row
Congress rejected her proposals.
The bill includes additional investments in early-childhood education, including $610 million in
new funding for Head Start.
“After more than a year on the
job, I would have hoped Secretary
DeVos would have learned by now
that her extreme ideas to privatize
our nation’s public schools and
dismantle the Department of
Education do not have support
among parents or in Congress, but
unfortunately that does not seem
to be the case,” said Sen. Patty
Murray (Wash.), the ranking Democrat on the Health, Education,
Labor and Pensions Committee.
A number of higher education
programs received a boost from
appropriators, in a repudiation of
the Trump administration’s plans
to reduce the federal role.
Congress rejected DeVos’s proposal to freeze the maximum Pell
grant to low-income students at
$5,920, a ceiling that would have
remained in place for the foreseeable future without any directive
to adjust the award for inflation.
Instead, lawmakers raised the
maximum by $175 to help an estimated 8 million low-income college students who rely on the
program to pay for school.
Rather than eliminate the
$732 million federal supplemental educational opportunity grant
as DeVos proposed, congressional
Republicans and Democrats
agreed to pour an additional
$107 million into the program.
Seventy-one percent of the
1.6 million recipients of the grant
hail from households earning less
than $30,000 a year.
The Trump administration also
wanted to halve funding for federal work-study programs that
help more than 300,000 students
work their way through college.
Congress decided to increase its
allocation by $140 million, for a
total of $1.1 billion.
Lawmakers have also created a
$350 million discretionary relief
fund to support the public service
loan forgiveness program, which
wipes away federal student debt
for people who take jobs in the
public sector after they have made
10 years worth of payments. The
spending bill expands the program to borrowers who were enrolled in an ineligible repayment
plan but otherwise working in the
public sector.
It includes a combined increase
of $106 million for programs supporting historically black colleges
and universities as well as other
institutions serving minorities.
The bill also sets aside $1.01 billion, a $60 million increase, for
programs that help disadvantaged students enter and complete college.
douglasd@washpost.com
moriah.balingit@washpost.co
Bill targets troop, civilian use of official charge cards in strip clubs, casinos
BY
D AN L AMOTHE
The omnibus spending bill
pending approval in Congress
includes language that would explicitly ban U.S. troops and civilians working for the Defense
Department from using government funding on expenses incurred in casinos or strip clubs.
The language states that no
federal money “may be used for
Government Travel Charge Card
expenses by military or civilian
personnel of the Department of
Defense for gaming, or for entertainment that includes topless or
nude entertainers or participants.”
It follows the release of a
Defense Department inspector
general’s report in 2015 that said
that in a 12-month period ending
June 30, 2014, $952,258 was improperly spent using government
charge cards in casinos and that
$96,576 was spent in “adult entertainment establishments.”
The numbers would have been
higher, but some transactions
were declined by credit card companies, the watchdog found.
Using government charge
cards in such establishments is
already prohibited under Defense Department regulations. A
Pentagon spokesman, Navy
Cmdr. Patrick Evans, said Thursday that the department was
reviewing the matter.
The language was included in
the spending bill after the inspector general issued a follow-up
report in August 2016 at the
request of the Senate Armed
Services Committee that found
more problems in the Pentagon’s
travel-card program. The watchdog found then that commanders
and officials overseeing travel
cards did not take appropriate
action when notified by the Defense Department inspector general of findings in the first audit,
and the inspector general detailed specific examples of misuse. The travel card program, the
inspector general said, “remained vulnerable to continued
misuse.”
In one case, the inspector general flagged five potential travelcard transactions involving casinos by a civilian employee at the
Defense Threat Reduction Agency. During an investigation, the
cardholder “stated that he
thought personal use was acceptable as long as the bill was paid,”
the report said.
The agency issued the employee a letter of reprimand in
May 2014, but the inspector general found afterward that the
same person continued to violate
the rules. Those violations included withdrawing between
$104.50 and $504.50 on three
occasions near casinos in Charles
Town, W.Va., and twice at a casino
in Black Hawk, Colo.
The cardholder was allowed
continued access to classified information despite the ongoing
misuse of his travel card and after
being reprimanded, the watchdog found. The Defense Threat
Reduction Agency was not aware
of the continued misuse until
notified by the inspector general,
a fact that the watchdog later
attributed in part to the Defense
Department monitor being required to oversee thousands of
transactions each month on
more than 1,300 accounts.
The employee ultimately lost
access to classified information
in November 2015 and was
placed on administrative leave;
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his current employment status
was not immediately clear on
Thursday.
A senior defense official, Anthony M. Kurta, responded to the
inspector general’s second report
in August 2016, stating in a memo
that while the Defense Department concurred with recommendations to improve oversight, it
was important to note that most
of the problems flagged could be
attributed to a single employee.
The $8,500 in spending flagged
in the second audit “amounts to
less than .001 percent of the total
DoD travel spend, which averages approximately $8 million per
year,” he wrote.
dan.lamothe@washpost.com
A6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 23 , 2018
The Biden vs. Trump exchange signals there is no bottom for political discourse
At a time when
the tone of
American politics
seems to be at
rock bottom,
something
Dan Balz
happens to
remind everyone
THE TAKE
it can go lower
still. Case in
point: the latest schoolyard
exchange between the president
of the United States and the
former vice president of the
United States over who is the
tougher tough guy.
Did former vice president Joe
Biden really say if he and
President Trump were still in
high school, “I’d take him behind
the gym and beat the hell out of
him” for the way he has treated
women? Did he really compare
Trump to the “fattest, ugliest
SOB” in the locker room? Did the
president really tweet in
response that Biden is “weak,
both mentally and physically”?
Did he call him “Crazy Joe”? Did
he write, “He doesn’t know me,
but he would go down fast and
hard, crying all the way.”?
That is what passes for
political discourse these days,
two grown men acting like
macho little boys. It would be
easy to dismiss it all as so much
catnip for the cable networks,
which of course it is. It also is a
reminder of what has happened
since Trump came onto the
political scene, the extent to
which he has defined politics
down and the degree to which
others seem unable to resist
playing at that level.
There are any number of
unsavory aspects to the
exchange. One obviously is the
sheer idiocy of this kind of talk
between politicians at the level
of Trump and Biden.
People do expect more of their
leaders. Another is the apparent
glorification of violence, reveling
in the equivalent of a political
Fight Club.
Biden said what he said in the
context of Trump’s treatment of
women, the infamous “grab ‘em
by the” you-know-what from the
infamous “Access Hollywood”
video. Michelle Obama once said,
“When they go low, we go high.”
So much for that admonition.
Apparently, it is now, “When they
go low, we go there, too.” Who
would have guessed that is
where things would be today?
This is the trap the president
has laid for his opponents. The
question for so long, when he
was a candidate and then when
he was the nominee and then
when he took the oath of office,
was whether he would become
more presidential as the weight
of the responsibility settled on
his shoulders. After all, he once
bragged that, with the exception
of Abraham Lincoln, he could be
“more presidential than any
JEFF SWENSEN/GETTY IMAGES
Former Vice President Joe Biden, left, with Pennsylvania Democrat
Conor Lamb, engaged in a schoolyard clash with President Trump.
president who’s ever held this
office.”
That is not what suits him,
and he knows it. Being
presidential in the traditional
definition of the term is not what
helped him win the Republican
nomination or the presidency.
Instead it was his willingness to
operate with a cruder style and
at a baser level than what is
customarily assumed as
appropriate or effective. He
rewrote the rules. He understood
something about the nature of
politics today and of at least a
portion of the electorate that
others did not.
No one likes his most
outrageous tweets. Yet he
continues to use the platform to
communicate all manner of
thoughts, whether commentary
on policy or events or to attack
and denigrate his opponents. He
breaks through partly because he
continues to go places no other
president has gone and in a
vernacular uncommon to
political speak, one that does
find an audience. If
congressional leaders cringe at
his worst, they still refuse to
stand up to him.
The Trumpian style has
flummoxed political opponents.
His Republican rivals tried
different ways of countering him.
Some tried to be “manly,”
demanding indignantly that he
apologize for things he had said
or done. They fell by the wayside.
Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) tried
to play Trump’s game and ended
up as “Little Marco,” diminished
by a rival he could not best in the
how-low-can-they-go game of tit
for tat.
For Democrats contemplating
a 2020 campaign against the
president, there are lessons but
no clear answers as to how best
to counter him. Hillary Clinton
tried a combination of
approaches. She preferred to
ignore him. She wanted to avoid
getting showered by the chaff of
his campaign style. She also
systematically tried to declare
him unfit to be president, to
disqualify him in the eyes of the
voters.
Many voters bought the
argument. More than half the
electorate on Election Day said
he was not qualified to be
president. Some of them still
voted for him, which is why he
now is president. Other factors
had greater salience when
people cast their ballots. Clinton
had her own baggage, which
other Democrats thinking of
running in 2020 assume they
would not have. Still, they will be
dealing with an uncommon foe.
This was not the first time
Biden has used some brio and
bravado to talk about Trump.
After all, he likes to operate in
his own distinctive style. He is
Bidenesque to the president’s
Trumpian style. He plays the
folksy neighbor, the nonelite,
blue-collar kid who projects he
cannot quite believe he made it
to the highest echelons of
American politics (though he has
harbored dreams of being
president as long as he has been
in elective office). Had he been
the Democratic nominee in 2016,
might he have been president?
He must believe in his heart he
could have won against Trump.
Still, the question is, what
possessed him to do what he did
in Miami? Does he really believe
fighting at that level is either
becoming or effective? Is that the
kind of campaign he or other
Democrats who seriously seek
the presidency really want to
run? That is the dilemma for all
of them as they get ready for
2020. Can they beat Trump at his
own game? Or better, can they
beat Trump by playing another
game?
The Biden-Trump exchange
should be mostly a throwaway. It
is meaningless. Everyone can
laugh it off. Except for what it
says about politics today. That is
where the smiling stops.
dan.balz@washpost.com
Trump has trouble finding attorneys as top Russia lawyer leaves legal team
C AROL D . L EONNIG,
J OSH D AWSEY
AND A SHLEY P ARKER
BY
President Trump, whose top attorney handling the Russia probe
resigned Thursday, is struggling to
find top-notch defense lawyers
willing to represent him in the
case, according to multiple Trump
advisers familiar with the negotiations.
Some law firms have signaled
that they do not want the controversy of representing a divisive
and unpopular president, while
others have told Trump advisers
they have clients with conflicting
interests, according to several lawyers and three of the president’s
advisers. Several prominent
white-collar lawyers also have declined requests to sign on with the
president in recent weeks, including former solicitor general Theodore B. Olson.
The difficulties in finding representation come as the investigation by special counsel Robert S.
Mueller III intensifies its focus on
Trump’s actions. John Dowd, the
president’s chief lawyer in handling the Mueller probe since last
year, quit Thursday morning after
several strategy disputes with the
president, who ultimately lost
confidence in the veteran lawyer,
three Trump aides said.
Dowd had been the president’s
main point of contact with Mueller’s office, which is investigating
Russian interference in the 2016
presidential election and contacts
with Trump campaign members.
Dowd also had been negotiating
the terms for the president to sit
for an interview with Mueller’s
team as it examines whether
Trump obstructed justice by seeking to shut down the investigation.
Despite overtures by Trump’s
aides and Trump himself in the
past weeks, several lawyers have
passed on taking on the president
as a client. Olson’s law firm, Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, publicly
rebuffed the idea of him representing Trump on Tuesday
through a statement from one of
his partners — less than 24 hours
after a Trump ally had asked him
to consider the job. Several weeks
YANA PASKOVA/GETTY IMAGES
John Dowd, seen in New York in 2011, resigned from President Trump’s legal team after clashing on
strategy about special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s probe of Russian interference.
earlier, the Trump team reached
out to Robert J. Giuffra Jr., a partner at Sullivan & Cromwell, who
also declined, according to a person familiar with the talks, who
spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss internal deliberations.
Two weeks ago, Trump also interviewed Williams & Connolly
partner Emmet T. Flood, a Republican defense lawyer who helped
President Bill Clinton during impeachment proceedings, and
asked him to consider joining his
legal team in some capacity. As of
Dowd’s resignation Thursday, the
discussions were still preliminary,
people familiar with the talks said.
Trump and his advisers are eyeing
one high-profile lawyer to take the
lead on his legal team, but neither
the president nor the lawyer have
decided whether to begin the representation, according to three
people familiar with the discussion.
The struggles are reminiscent
of Trump’s difficulties in the
spring of 2017 when the president
was first seeking new attorneys to
represent him in the Russia probe.
He interviewed a half-dozen highprofile legal stars in the white-collar defense bar, including Flood,
Brendan V. Sullivan Jr. and A.B.
Culvahouse Jr.; all of them declined.
“These major law firms have
spent millions of dollars on their
image,” said one Trump adviser,
who also spoke on the condition of
anonymity. “It’s political. They are
saying that representing this president is just too controversial.”
Ty Cobb, who joined the White
House last summer as an internal
lawyer handling the Mueller case,
originally had been offered the job
of serving as Trump’s lawyer working alongside Dowd. But two people familiar with his hiring said
leaders at Cobb’s law firm, Hogan
Lovells, had expressed reservations about Cobb representing
Trump personally; some firm
leaders were more amenable to
Cobb representing the White
House instead.
Aside from being controversial,
aides said Trump has proved to be
a difficult client, as Dowd learned
firsthand.
Dowd complained to colleagues
that Trump had ignored his advice
and tweeted attacks on Mueller
and other topics hours after Dowd
and other advisers urged him not
to, those colleagues said. Dowd
also said he was personally insulted by the president’s efforts to hire
other lawyers. One person familiar with the dynamics said Trump
frequently praised his legal team
to their faces but criticized them
when they were not around.
Dowd declined to discuss his
decision when reached Thursday.
“I love the President and wish him
well,” he wrote in an email.
But privately, Dowd was “blindsided” when the president interviewed Flood and again when
Trump announced he was adding
conservative lawyer and attackdog Joseph diGenova to the team
last week.
He and the president had been
increasingly disagreeing over
strategy, but especially so on Saturday. One Trump adviser said the
president berated Dowd for not
doing enough to, in the president’s
view, highlight corruption and political bias in the FBI to undercut
the legitimacy of the Mueller
probe. Trump told Dowd he wanted to tweet that the firing of deputy FBI director Andrew McCabe
was another reason the Mueller
probe should be shut down, the
adviser said.
At Trump’s insistence, Dowd issued an emailed statement saying
the investigation was corrupted
by political bias, according to a
Trump adviser. Dowd called on
Deputy Attorney General Rod J.
Rosenstein, who oversees that
probe, to shut it down.
“I pray that Acting Attorney
General Rosenstein will follow the
brilliant and courageous example
of the FBI Office of Professional
Responsibility and Attorney General Jeff Sessions and bring an end
to alleged Russia Collusion investigation manufactured by McCabe’s boss James Comey based upon
a fraudulent and corrupt Dossier,”
Dowd said.
Dowd told The Washington
Post that he was speaking for himself and not on Trump’s behalf.
Earlier Saturday, Dowd had told
the Daily Beast that he was speaking on behalf of the president and
in his capacity as the president’s
attorney. After the Daily Beast
published its story, Dowd emailed
the publication and said he was
not speaking on the president’s
behalf.
At 10 a.m. Thursday, Dowd resigned without consulting Trump,
three advisers said. Aides said they
were unsuccessful in asking him
to hold off until they could confer
with the president and prepare a
statement.
A huge bone of contention between Trump and his team has
been over testifying in front of
Mueller’s team, these people said.
Trump wants to do so, thinking he
can talk his way out of it, while his
lawyers are far more wary, these
people said. Dowd and Marc Kasowitz, Trump’s former lawyer
whom he still occasionally consults, have told Trump he could
damage himself by testifying. His
chief White House counsel, Donald McGahn, also has chafed at
Trump granting an interview and
has criticized others on the team.
Trump has groused to friends
and aides that he thinks his lawyers are weak and that his New
York attorneys are tougher and
better.
Earlier this month, Trump
dubbed news reports of trouble on
his legal team as inaccurate.
“The Failing New York Times
purposely wrote a false story stating that I am unhappy with my
legal team on the Russia case and
am going to add another lawyer to
help out,” Trump tweeted
March 11. “Wrong. I am VERY
happy with my lawyers, John
Dowd, Ty Cobb and Jay Sekulow.
They are doing a great job.”
Eight days later, the president
hired diGenova, and Dowd is now
off the team.
Sekulow was in the White
House meeting with Trump about
the case and his legal team Thursday afternoon, White House officials said. He and diGenova were
spotted at the White House again
late Thursday.
Sen. Lindsey O. Graham
(R-S.C.) said Thursday that he
feels confident the president eventually will find good counsel and
that he is more worried about how
focused Trump seems to be on the
probe.
“The model should be the Bill
Clinton model,” Graham said.
“You can go after the special counsel, like he did with Ken Starr, and
ask about impartiality, but the
president should focus on being
president. I’m not worried about
him finding good lawyers. He’ll
find them. I’m worried about him
and his day job, not being distracted. Clinton, for all his problems,
never lost sight of being president.
Clinton let other people go after
the so-called witch hunt.”
carol.leonnig@washpost.com
joshua.dawsey@washpost.com
ashley.parker@washpost.com
Rosalind S. Helderman and Robert
Costa contributed to this report.
House committee approves GOP report finding no Trump-Russia collusion
BY
K AROUN D EMIRJIAN
The House Intelligence Committee voted Thursday to approve
a Republican-authored report
stating there is no evidence that
President Trump or his affiliates
colluded with the Russian government during the 2016 U.S. election.
“It went through,” Rep. K. Michael Conaway (R-Tex.), who has
led the panel’s Russia investigation, said while exiting the committee’s secure facilities on Capitol Hill.
While the vote ends the Russia
probe for the panel’s GOP majority, it only stoked the fury of Democrats, who have denounced their
colleagues’ findings. The document — whose public release
probably remains weeks away —
also criticizes the U.S. intelligence
community’s assessment that
Russia sought to help Trump win
the presidency.
The committee’s Republicans
released a list of the 44 findings
and 26 recommendations outlined in their report, which Conaway estimated to be 250 pages
with annexes. It will be sent to the
intelligence community for redactions on Monday at the earliest, he
added — that being the deadline
for Democrats to submit a statement of the minority’s view, which
will be included in the final product.
Conaway said Thursday he
hopes the intelligence community
can complete its redactions within
two weeks so the panel can release
the report when Congress returns
to Washington in April following a
two-week recess.
The findings “show a pattern of
Russian active measures in the
United States, both through cyber
attacks and their use of social media to sow discord,” Conaway said
in a written statement, characterizing the threat to future U.S. elections as “serious.” The document
also maintains that the intelli-
gence community “did not employ
proper analytic tradecraft” in assessing that the Russian government intended to help Trump’s
campaign.
There was “no evidence that
meetings between Trump associates — including Jeff Sessions —
and official representatives of the
Russian government — including
Ambassador [Sergey] Kislyak —
reflected collusion, coordination,
or conspiracy,” the findings state,
referring to the attorney general,
an adviser to Trump during the
campaign.
The document says that “possible Russian efforts to set up a ‘back
channel’ with Trump associates
after the election suggest the absence of collusion during the campaign.” That finding contradicts
what Kislyak told Moscow, which
is that the president’s son-in-law
Jared Kushner proposed the back
channel with Russia during a
meeting in early December 2016.
Trump donor and Blackwater se-
curity group founder Erik Prince
traveled to the Seychelles in January 2017 for a meeting with a Russian official close to President
Vladimir Putin, an encounter brokered by the United Arab Emirates.
The report acknowledges that
some Trump affiliates had contact
with outfits such as WikiLeaks
that were “ill-advised,” and that
campaign officials such as George
Papadopoulos and Carter Page
had attempted to make contacts
with Russian officials. But the
findings put some blame on “the
Republican national security establishment’s opposition to candidate Trump” for “creat[ing] opportunities for two less-experienced
individuals with pro-Russia
views” to join the campaign.
The committee also recommended that Congress “consider
repealing the Logan Act,” a law
that states it is a crime for anyone
without authorization to negotiate on behalf of the United States.
The law is intended to preserve the
United States’ ability to speak with
one voice on foreign policy matters but has never been successfully used in court.
The panel’s top Democrat, Rep.
Adam B. Schiff (D-Calif.), complained that the GOP insisted on
holding the meeting in a closed
session, which, he said afterward,
was not the practice when the
committee voted to release other
documents pending declassification. Transcripts of those meetings were later made public.
Democrats, who opposed adoption of the report, have accused
Republicans of prematurely shuttering the committee’s year-long
Russia investigation — and willfully disregarding evidence, they
argue, demonstrates there was
collusion.
“This is not how you run an
investigation,” Schiff said in his
opening remarks, according to a
statement he later released to the
media. “This is how you hobble an
investigation.”
Schiff said that Democrats
made more than a dozen motions
during the meeting attempting to
issue subpoenas for various witnesses and to hold former White
House strategist Stephen K. Bannon in contempt for not fully complying with the committee’s subpoena to answer its questions.
They sought summonses for Sessions, Prince and the president’s
son Donald Trump Jr., plus former
White House communications director Hope Hicks and former
Trump campaign director Corey
Lewandowski. All those motions
were denied.
“There is no escaping the fact
that any report at this stage is
grossly premature when so many
key witnesses have yet to be interviewed,” Schiff said in his opening
statement, concluding that the investigation was “too difficult politically” and “too perilous” for Republicans to continue.
karoun.demirjian@washpost.com
FRIDAY, MARCH 23 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A7
RE
House bill says CDC can study gun violence, but critics call funding unlikely
BY W ILLIAM W AN
AND S EAN S ULLIVAN
Accompanying the $1.3 trillion spending bill that the
House passed Thursday afternoon is language that may open
the door slightly to restoring
federal funding for gun research.
The language, which is still
pending passage in the Senate,
clarifies that the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention
can indeed conduct research into
gun violence. For more than two
decades, a 1996 rule that Congress passed under pressure
from gun lobbyists — known as
the Dickey Amendment — has
essentially killed federal funding
for such research.
In the wake of recent mass
shootings in schools, churches
and concert venues, however,
lawmakers have come under
renewed pressure to act on
gun-related legislation.
The Dickey Amendment states
that no CDC funds “may be used
to advocate or promote gun control,” banning the public health
agency from lobbying for gun
control though not explicitly prohibiting gun research. But the
rule has had a dramatic chilling
effect at CDC as well as throughout other federal agencies, resulting in a near blackout of
funding and new data about gun
violence.
Gun researchers, gun rights
advocates and public-health experts were largely dismissive
Thursday of how significant the
clarification might be. The language is included in a report,
attached to the spending bill,
that is intended as guidance to
federal agencies. The new wording makes lawmakers’ intent
clear that the text of the Dickey
Amendment does not prevent
research into gun violence. Even
so, the report does not mean that
Congress will suddenly divert
funds to gun research that it has
refused to give for years.
The omnibus bill also includes
a provision to improve the National Instant Criminal Background Check System for gun
buyers, action that has broad
bipartisan support. It marks the
only substantive change to gun
laws that congressional Republican leaders have brought to a
vote since the Feb. 14 shooting at
Marjory Stoneman Douglas High
School in Parkland, Fla., when 17
students and staff were killed.
Together, some Democrats
said, the two efforts mark a move
in the right direction — but a
modest one.
“I welcome them, but I think
they were baby steps,” said Rep.
Gerald E. Connolly (D-Va.). “How
many more massacres of children do we need in the country
before we kind of bite into the
apple in a serious way?”
Connolly said he is not anticipating the Republican-controlled Congress will be willing
to pass more gun-control laws
before the elections in Novem-
MATT MCCLAIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
A candlelight vigil last month honored the victims of the Feb. 14
high school shooting in Parkland, Fla. Lawmakers have come under
renewed pressure to act on gun-related legislation.
ber.
“I believe if we want serious
action by Congress, it’s going to
be in the 116th Congress, not this
one,” he said.
Some researchers also believe the wording change around
funding signals a small shift and
an opening, especially among
Republican lawmakers who have
staunchly opposed any funding
for gun-related research.
“It’s recognition by Congress
after all these years that, ‘Yes, we
want to know what the science
has to tell us,’ ” said Mark
Rosenberg, who directed re-
search on firearm violence at the
CDC in 1997 when the Dickey
Amendment was passed and saw
his staff and research projects
slashed almost immediately. “It
recognizes that science has a
tremendous amount to contribute, and that science can be a
common ground where both
sides come together.”
Others are more skeptical.
“It means they’ve done nothing,” said David Hemenway, director of the Harvard Injury
Control Research Center. “The
Dickey Amendment has always
been a symbolic gesture to scare
away research. This doesn’t
change that one bit.”
Garen Wintemute, a leading
gun-violence researcher at the
University of California at Davis,
feels much the same. “There’s no
agreement on funding. There’s
no funding. There isn’t even
encouragement,” he said.
The National Rifle Association
says nothing would be different.
“The Dickey Amendment is
unchanged. It’s what it always
has been,” spokeswoman Jennifer Baker said. “It’s only clarifying maybe for people who can’t
read because it’s already been
written in the original language.”
Baker pointed out that the
new wording doesn’t even cast
Congress as the one doing the
clarifying. Instead, it quotes
Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar’s recent testimony that “the CDC has the authority to conduct research on the
causes of gun violence.”
The race to pass the omnibus
bill came just before the March
for Our Lives, a rally against gun
violence that could draw as many
as 500,000 protesters to Washington this weekend.
House Minority Leader Nancy
Pelosi (D-Calif.) said Thursday
that she thinks congressional
GOP leaders were “rushing” the
omnibus bill ahead because
“they wanted to get out of town
before the march.” And Senate
Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) predicted the march
would “galvanize action” in the
House and Senate. He challenged leaders to put a bill
expanding background checks to
a vote.
In a speech on the Senate floor
Thursday, Majority Leader Mitch
McConnell (R-Ky.) cast the gun
provisions as a positive step.
“Thanks to the dogged efforts
of Senator Cornyn, the ‘Fix NICS’
provision to repair and improve
firearm background checks is
also included,” he said. “Both of
these bipartisan accomplishments are the direct result of
tireless work by those who have
been most tragically affected by
violence in America’s schools.”
Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.),
who embraced new positions on
guns in the wake of the Parkland
shooting, would not commit to
participating
in
Saturday's
march or observing it in any way.
“I don’t know where I’m going
to be on Saturday,” Rubio said.
He added: “I’m a legislator. I pass
public policy. Instead of marching, I should be acting.”
Following the tragedy in Parkland, Rubio had said he would
consider embracing limits on the
capacity of ammunition magazines and endorsed raising the
age requirement for buying a
rifle. So far, he has not offered
specific policy proposals on either front.
william.wan@washpost.com
sean.sullivan@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/to-your-health
Energy chief promises
more nuclear triggers
BY
P AUL S ONNE
The U.S. military is concerned
that the government isn’t moving
quickly enough to ramp up production of the plutonium cores
that trigger nuclear warheads, as
the Trump administration proceeds with a $1 trillion overhaul
of the nation’s nuclear force.
Energy Secretary Rick Perry,
the Cabinet official who oversees
the nation’s nuclear labs, promised in testimony to the Senate
Armed Services Committee on
Thursday that he would meet the
Pentagon’s demands, even though
the only lab capable of producing
the triggers hasn’t made one suitable for a nuclear weapon in years.
“It is important for us to be able
to send a clear message that we
can get it done, we can get it done
on a timely basis and get it done in
a way that taxpayers respect is
thoughtful about their concerns,”
Perry said in a rare appearance by
the nation’s top energy official at
the Senate body overseeing the
military.
Known as “plutonium pits” because they rest inside nuclear
bombs like a pit inside a stone
fruit, the roughly grapefruit-size
spheres are a critical component
of nuclear weapons because they
trigger nuclear fission when
squeezed by explosives. They require replacement as they degrade
over time or end up destroyed
during regular checks of the nation’s nuclear weapons.
At issue is the Pentagon’s demand that the National Nuclear
Security Administration (NNSA)
— overseen by the Energy Department — be able to produce 30
plutonium pits a year by 2026 and
80 a year by 2030 to sustain the
military’s plans for its nuclear
weapons.
The Los Alamos National Laboratory is just coming back on line
after suspending pit production years ago because of safety
concerns. The lab recently restarted its operation but is still producing only research-and-development pits that are unsuitable for
U.S. weapons. The lab would require a sizable expansion to ramp
up to 80 pits a year.
Air Force Gen. John E. Hyten,
who oversees U.S. nuclear forces
as the head of Strategic Command,
said he was worried about whether the nation’s nuclear establishment will be able to meet the
requirement, despite assurances
from officials at the Energy Department and the NNSA.
“I still have concerns,” Hyten
said in a Senate testimony earlier
this week. He said he was “very
nervous” that the requirement
might be met only “just in time.”
Hyten warned that the nuclear
weapons the Pentagon is developing — new bombers, submarines,
ICBMs, low-yield submarinelaunch ballistic missiles, airlaunch and sea-launch cruise missiles — all require reliable warheads. He expressed concern
about the age of some plutonium
pits being used.
Nearly all current pits were produced between 1978 and 1989, according to the Pentagon. There is
some debate about how long they
can last and whether the military
in fact needs such high production
levels. In 2006, a study by two of
the nation’s nuclear labs concluded that the majority of plutonium
pits for most nuclear weapons
have minimum lifetimes of at least
85 years.
Since the fall of the Soviet
Union, the United States has discontinued many of the nuclear
weapons capabilities the nation
built up during the Cold War. The
country began to rely largely on
dismantling existing nuclear
weapons for plutonium pits
and stockpile management, particularly as defense spending priorities shifted to the global war
against terrorism.
Now the United States is facing
a reckoning as Russia and China
also race to advance their nuclear
arsenals and much of the infrastructure the military relies on to
support its nuclear capabilities
ages out. The United States no
longer operates the full range of
facilities capable of producing nuclear weapons and for nearly two
decades stopped producing plutonium pits altogether.
Perry highlighted the Trump
administration’s decision to seek
more funding for the NNSA for
that purpose in his testimony
Thursday. The 2018 spending bill
that the House approved Thursday allocates $10.6 billion to
weapons activities within the
NNSA — which includes infrastructure updates, maintenance
and repairs — an increase from
$9.2 billion in 2017 and $8.85 billion in 2016. The administration
has requested $11 billion in 2019.
But doubts persist about
whether the agency charged with
stewarding the country’s nuclear
weapons can achieve such a complex task, while escaping a past
marred by cost overruns and safety incidents.
The administration faces billions of dollars in backlogged repairs to aging facilities. At one
point in recent years, chunks of
the ceiling were falling out at the
Y-12 complex in Oak Ridge, Tenn.,
a facility established during the
Manhattan Project to enrich uranium for the first atomic bombs.
“When I go to Oak Ridge, and
I’m in facilities that were built in
some cases before I was born, and
that’s a spell ago, then it becomes
abundantly clear to me,” Perry,
who is 68, said Thursday.
For the first 13 months of the
Trump administration, the NNSA
lacked a Senate-confirmed director chosen by President Trump,
resulting in lost time on some of
the most pressing political decisions to be made on nuclear matters.
Lisa E. Gordon-Hagerty, a former health physicist at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, was sworn in to administer
the agency on Feb. 22. The Trump
administration had kept in place
an Obama-era appointee, retired
Air Force Lt. Gen. Frank Klotz, in
the meantime.
Gordon-Hagerty has promised
to prioritize resolving the plutonium-pit issue and escape the past
problems at the NNSA, where big
projects have resulted in cost overruns and mismanagement.
paul.sonne@washpost.com
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EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 23 , 2018
Bolton appointment likely to lead to hawkish turn in approach to world crises
MCMASTER FROM A1
by the end of May between Trump
and North Korean leader Kim
Jong Un. Bolton is a fierce North
Korea hawk who, in his prolific
writings and television commentary, has said that preemptive war
would likely be the only way to
stop North Korea from obtaining
the capability to attack the United
States with a nuclear missile.
Bolton has touted “the legal
case for striking North Korea
first” in an editorial in the Wall
Street Journal. In a subsequent
interview with Breitbart News,
Bolton warned that the North
was on the cusp of being able to
strike the continental United
States and raised the specter of
Pyongyang selling nuclear devices to other hostile actors such as
Iran, the Islamic State or
al-Qaeda.
“We have to ask ourselves
whether we’re prepared to take
preemptive action, or live in a
world where North Korea — and a
lot of other people — have nuclear
weapons,” he said.
Bolton, who had dismissed negotiations with North Korea as a
waste of time, moderated his
views slightly after Trump announced he would sit down with
Kim. He described Trump’s decision as “diplomatic shock and
awe” and suggested that the encounter between the two leaders
would be short and largely devoid
of traditional diplomacy.
“Tell me you have begun total
denuclearization, because we’re
not going to have protracted negotiations,” he imagined Trump
telling the North Korean. “You
can tell me right now or we’ll start
thinking of something else.”
Bolton has been even more
hawkish than Trump on Iran,
pushing for the president to withdraw from the nuclear agreement
that the United States and five
other world powers reached with
Tehran during the Obama administration.
In January, Bolton told Fox
News that Trump should dump
the nuclear deal, reimpose economic sanctions on Tehran, and
work toward an overthrow of the
government there.
“There’s a lot we can do, and we
should do it,” Bolton said. “Our
goal should be regime change in
Iran.” He similarly called for
bombing Iran in a New York
Times editorial in 2015.
McMaster’s departure and Bolton’s ascension will come about
one month before a deadline for
Trump to decide whether the
United States will remain a party
to the deal.
Bolton, 69, served in the
George W. Bush administration
in a key arms-control job. ThenSecretary of State Colin Powell
said he was strongly encouraged
to take Bolton by Vice President
Richard B. Cheney, who shared
Bolton’s belief in American military power.
Bolton required a recess appointment for his next position as
U.S. ambassador to the United
Nations after Democrats and several Republicans blocked his
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
National security adviser H.R. McMaster, right, with Vice President Pence and Energy Secretary Rick Perry in the Oval Office, never clicked on a personal basis with
President Trump and often seemed at odds with him on matters of policy related to Iran and North Korea.
nomination in 2005.
His critics cited a brusque and
sometimes belittling manner
with colleagues and underlings
and his many put-downs of the
United Nations itself. Those included an oft-quoted remark that
no one would notice if the highrise U.N. building lost several of
its floors. He resigned the following year after Democrats had taken control of Congress and it was
clear he could not be confirmed.
During his brief run at the U.N.,
Bolton was often at odds with
then-Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice. She told colleagues
that Bolton undermined her and
went behind her back to Cheney,
his old friend and patron.
Those old grievances resurfaced before Trump took office,
when as president-elect he considered selecting Bolton as deputy secretary of state. That job
would have been subject to Senate confirmation, and opposition
to the potential choice was swift
and bipartisan. Sen. Rand Paul
(R-Ky.) vowed to block it, and the
nomination never materialized.
Trump’s selection of Bolton as
his national security adviser drew
raves from more hawkish members of Congress. “Selecting John
Bolton as national security adviser is good news for America’s
allies and bad news for America’s
enemies,” said Sen. Lindsey O.
Graham (R-S.C.).
Democrats and some Republicans reacted with concern that
Bolton’s hawkish positions could
lead to more conflict. Bolton’s
positions on Iran and North Korea “are overly aggressive at best
and downright dangerous at
worst,” said. Sen. Christopher A.
Coons (D-Del.).
White House officials said that
Trump made the final offer to
Bolton on Thursday afternoon
and then called McMaster a few
minutes later and thanked him
for his service.
A senior White House official
said that Trump did not want to
embarrass McMaster publicly as
he had done with Secretary of
State Rex Tillerson, who learned
of his dismissal through a presidential tweet.
McMaster thanked Trump for
the opportunity to serve in the
White House, though his tenure
has been dogged by recent rumors that he would be soon fired.
“Everyone in the White House
knew that,” said a senior official
who spoke on the condition of
anonymity. “It was the same as
Rex. Everyone knew their days
were numbered, so people didn’t
take them seriously.”
McMaster came to the Trump
administration with a highly accomplished combat record in
Iraq and a reputation as one of
the Army’s best thinkers on the
subject of battling insurgents and
the future of war.
“There’s a lot we can
do, and we should do it.
Our goal should be
regime change in Iran.”
John Bolton, on Fox News in January
His struggles with Trump were
often personal. When the president would receive his morning
schedule and see that he was
expected to spend 30 minutes or
longer with McMaster outside of
his intelligence briefing, Trump
would complain and ask aides to
cut it back, according to two
people familiar with the matter,
who, like others, spoke on the
condition of anonymity to discuss
internal deliberations.
At times, Trump would tell
McMaster that he understood an
issue largely to make him stop
talking, these people said. “I get
it, general, I get it,” Trump would
say, according to two people who
were present at the time.
Some days, Trump would tell
his staff that he did not want to
see McMaster at all, one of these
people said.
McMaster’s biggest win — and
area of greatest influence — was
the war in Afghanistan, where he
persuaded the president to nearly
double the size of the U.S. force to
15,000 troops. But Trump, who
said he went against his instincts
when he approved the surge, never seemed to buy into the new
strategy and resented McMaster
for pushing it on him, U.S. officials said.
McMaster is credited with improving morale and bringing order to the National Security
Council following the forced departure of his predecessor, Michael Flynn, early last year. But at
the NSC, McMaster often struggled to steer the foreign policy
debate. He lacked the backing of
Trump and had a tense relationship with Defense Secretary Jim
Mattis. Efforts to push Mattis to
produce military options that
Trump had requested for Iran and
North Korea often went unan-
swered from the Pentagon.
One big question going forward is how Bolton will work
with Mattis, who has often tried
to restrain Trump’s more impulsive and unconventional instincts
on foreign policy matters.
White House Chief of Staff
John F. Kelly and Mattis both
pushed Trump to remove McMaster, with Kelly leading the effort.
But Kelly and Mattis are said to be
skeptical of Bolton, according to a
senior White House official who
spoke on the condition of anonymity.
Trump often praised Bolton’s
commentary and defense of the
president on Fox News even as he
expressed skepticism about the
pundit’s mustache.
In a Fox News interview minutes after the president’s tweet
announcing his appointment,
Bolton said he was surprised to
receive the offer from Trump on
Thursday.
“I think I still am a Fox News
contributor,” Bolton told the host.
“No, you’re not apparently,” she
replied.
greg.jaffe@washpost.com
josh.dawsey@washpost.com
Anne Gearan, John Hudson, Karen
DeYoung and Robert Costa
contributed to this report.
Saudi prince says relationship with Kushner is friendly but not improper
BY
K AREN D E Y OUNG
Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman said Thursday
that it would be “really insane”
for him to trade classified information with presidential son-inlaw and White House adviser
Jared Kushner, or to try to use
Kushner to promote Saudi aims
within the Trump administration.
That kind of relationship “will
not help us” and does not exist, he
said. Speaking in a meeting with
Washington Post editors and reporters, Mohammed denied U.S.
media reports that he had
claimed Kushner was “in his
pocket,” or that, when the two
met in Riyadh in October, he had
sought or received a green light
from Kushner for massive arrests
of allegedly corrupt members of
the royal family and Saudi businessmen that took place in the
kingdom shortly afterward.
The detentions were solely a
domestic issue and had been in
the works for years, the prince
said.
While “we work together as
friends, more than partners,” Mohammed said, his relationship
with Kushner was within the
normal context of governmentto-government contacts. He noted that he also had good relations
with Vice President Pence and
others in the White House.
In the 75-minute meeting at
The Post on the last day of his
four-day stay in Washington, Mohammed was animated and engaged, fielding questions on a
range of topics, from the war in
Yemen to the Middle East peace
process, Iran, his domestic reform agenda, human rights and
Saudi Arabia’s nuclear plans.
Although the meeting, conducted in English, was held off
the record, the Saudi Embassy
later agreed that specified portions could be used in an article
about the session.
The son of King Salman and
heir to the Saudi throne, Mohammed, 32, met with President
Trump on Tuesday in the Oval
Office and over lunch. He also
spoke with a number of congressional leaders — many of whom
have been critical of the U.S.aided Saudi war in Yemen. On
Thursday, he visited Defense Secretary Jim Mattis at the Pentagon.
The crown prince also serves as
Saudi Arabia’s defense minister.
But the centerpiece of his nearly three-week tour of the United
States will come in subsequent
stops in Boston, New York, Seattle, Silicon Valley, Los Angeles
and Houston.
Even as Trump has said he is
seeking increased investment
and purchases of U.S. military
equipment and other products
from Saudi Arabia, Mohammed
has made clear that his primary
mission here is to win U.S. investor confidence in his country,
along with technological and
education assistance in his efforts
to reform the ultraconservative
kingdom.
China and Russia are vying
with the United States to build
components of new nuclear power plants in the kingdom, amid
concerns here over a Saudi desire
for uranium enrichment capability. In an interview with CBS’s
“60 Minutes” broadcast last Sunday, Mohammed said that his
country would build a nuclear
weapon if Iran did.
CLIFF OWEN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Mohammed bin Salman at a meeting Thursday with Defense Secretary Jim Mattis at the Pentagon. The
Saudi crown prince is on a nearly three-week visit that will take him across the United States.
At The Post, he said his primary concern was being able to
enrich and use Saudi Arabia’s
own uranium for use in power
reactors, rather than buying it
abroad. His country has more
than 5 percent of the world’s
uranium reserves, and “if we
don’t use it, it’s like telling us
don’t use oil.” The United States,
he said, would be invited to put in
place laws and structures to make
sure enriched uranium is not
misused.
Mohammed spoke at length
about the prospects for economic
growth in the Middle East, saying
it could be “the next Europe” if a
series of problems can be resolved.
One of those is the decadeslong Israeli-Palestinian dispute.
Trump has designated Kushner to
come up with a peace plan, and
Kushner met here with Mohammed this week, along with Jason
Greenblatt, a Trump Organization lawyer brought into the
White House to help with the
effort.
Once the U.S. plan is ready,
Kushner is said to want the Saudis and other leading Arab countries to help persuade the Pales-
tinians to accept it.
The official Saudi position is
that any peace agreement must
recognize a Palestinian state
within specified borders, with
East Jerusalem as its capital. Arab
leaders have said that Trump’s
recent recognition of Jerusalem
as Israel’s capital — a move that
Mohammed called “painful” —
has made a deal under U.S. auspices far more difficult.
On the Yemen war, Mohammed said that Saudi Arabia had
not passed up “any opportunity”
to improve the humanitarian situation, although human rights
organizations and U.S. lawmakers have said Saudi bombing
has caused many of the more than
5,000 estimated civilian deaths in
the war.
“There are not good options
and bad options. The options are
between bad and worse,” he said
of the Yemen conflict with Iranbacked Houthi rebels who overthrew the Saudi-recognized government.
Discussing his reform efforts at
home, including giving women
the right to drive and have more
rights outside the home, Mohammed said he has worked hard to
convince conservative religious
leaders such restrictions are not
part of Islamic doctrine.
“I believe Islam is sensible,
Islam is simple, and people are
trying to hijack it,” he said.
Lengthy discussions with clerics,
he said, have been positive and
are “why we have more allies in
the religious establishment, day
by day.”
Asked about the Saudi-funded
spread of Wahhabism, the austere faith that is dominant in the
kingdom and that some have
accused of being a source of
global terrorism, Mohammed
said that investments in mosques
and madrassas overseas were
rooted in the Cold War, when
allies asked Saudi Arabia to use
its resources to prevent inroads
in Muslim countries by the Soviet
Union.
Successive Saudi governments
lost track of the effort, he said,
and now “we have to get it all
back.” Funding now comes largely from Saudi-based “foundations,” he said, rather than from
the government.
karen.deyoung@washpost.com
FRIDAY, MARCH 23 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A9
SU
Ex-Playboy model gives emotional account of alleged a≠air with Trump
Karen McDougal, in
a CNN interview, says
she felt guilty about it
E LI R OSENBERG,
E MMA B ROWN
AND M ARK B ERMAN
BY
Former Playboy model Karen
McDougal gave her first televised
interview Thursday about the affair she says she had with Donald
Trump, speaking emotionally
about a romantic relationship she
says lasted for 10 months shortly
after the birth of Trump’s youngest
child.
The interview marked a remarkable moment both for the president, whose romantic past has begun to draw more scrutiny as McDougal and adult-film star Stormy
Daniels have sought to free themselves from confidentiality agreements signed before the election,
and the media, for whom the intensely personal interview was a
prime-time event on CNN.
In the more than hour-long interview with host Anderson Cooper, McDougal spoke about a relationship she says she had with
Trump in 2006 and 2007, choking
up as she recounted the guilt she
felt for being a party to the affair,
reflecting about the connection
she developed in hotel rooms and
restaurants with the “sweet” man
she said she fell in love with and
unflinchingly recounting the affair’s most intimate details.
“When I look back where I was
back then, I know it’s wrong,” McDougal said, choking back tears.
“I’m really sorry for that.”
The affair began around June
2006, McDougal said, which would
have been just a few months after
the birth of Trump’s youngest son,
Barron.
In her telling, the two met during a filming for “The Apprentice”
at the Playboy Mansion, where McDougal, who was Playmate of the
Year in 1998, was working.
“He said hello and then throughout the night it was kind of obvious
that there was an attraction,” Mc-
Dougal said.
She said Trump asked her for
her phone number, and by the time
of his next visit to Los Angeles,
around his June 12 birthday, they
had been speaking on the phone.
That night, they had a “date,” she
said, for dinner at the Beverly Hills
Hotel. Trump’s bodyguard, Keith
Schiller, picked her up and drove
her to a rear entrance at the hotel,
she said.
“I’m thinking to myself, ‘Are we
going to a room because I thought
we were having dinner,’” McDougal said. The two did have dinner —
in a private bungalow that she said
Trump liked to stay in at the hotel.
“Then as the night ended,” she
told Cooper, “we were intimate.”
The night ended, she said, with a
faux-pas made by Trump. McDougal said he tried to hand her cash —
an experience that she had never
had before and one that left her
crying in the car ride home.
“The look on my face must have
been so sad,” she said. “I looked at
him and said, ‘That’s not me. I’m
not that kind of girl.’ ”
The experience made her feel
DIMITRIOS KAMBOURIS/
GETTY IMAGES FOR PLAYBOY
Karen McDougal says the
relationship lasted 10 months.
“terrible” about herself, she said.
“I cried a lot,” she said. “I got over
it, but it did hurt.”
Still the relationship between
the two continued, McDougal said.
For the 10 months that they were
together, McDougal said, they saw
each other a minimum of five times
a month.
Earlier this week, McDougal
filed a lawsuit against American
Media Inc. (AMI), the publisher of
the National Enquirer, which
bought the rights to her story three
months before the 2016 election
but did not publish it. The suit
claims that her former attorney,
Keith Davidson, worked secretly
with AMI and Trump attorney Michael Cohen as “part of a broad
effort to silence and intimidate”
her.
The complaint also alleges,
without providing specifics, that
Davidson had helped “catch and
kill” other stories that would have
been damaging to Trump.
Hours before the CNN interview, Davidson demanded that McDougal stop accusing him of mishandling her case and said he was
poised to defend himself publicly.
In a letter to her new attorney,
Peter K. Stris, Davidson said, “The
complaint and various media appearances portray an incomplete
and misleading depiction of the
facts, circumstances and communications related to my prior representation of Karen.” Any further
disclosures, Davidson said, “will
be deemed to be a complete express waiver of the attorney-client
privilege.”
Stris responded Thursday in
writing: “We disagree with multiple statements in your letter, but
are writing to acknowledge that we
have received it. We hope that you
will comply with your ethical responsibilities.”
AMI has denied any wrongdoing and has said the contract with
McDougal is valid.
McDougal is asking the court to
declare her contract with AMI
void, saying her story about Trump
“is core political speech entitled to
the highest protection under the
law.”
The lawsuit, filed in Los Angeles
Superior Court, comes two weeks
after Daniels sued Trump to invalidate her own confidentiality agreement. Daniels’s deal was with Cohen, who has said he “facilitated” a
payment of $130,000, using his
own money. Cohen has sought to
keep Daniels quiet through private
arbitration, alleging in a court filing that she could owe as much as
$20 million for violating the agreement.
eli.rosenberg@washpost.com
emma.brown@washpost.com
mark.berman@washpost.com
Video shows autonomous Uber, backup driver failing to protect pedestrian
Vehicle operator
repeatedly took her eyes
off road, evidence shows
BY M ICHAEL L ARIS
AND F AIZ S IDDIQUI
Video released by Tempe, Ariz.,
police graphically underscores
how both an autonomous Uber
SUV and its backup driver failed to
protect a pedestrian who was
struck and killed as she walked a
bike across a spottily lit thoroughfare.
The pedestrian, 49-year-old
Elaine Herzberg, was crossing the
street outside of the crosswalk
Sunday night when she was hit,
according to police.
Behind the wheel was a human
chaperon who was supposed to be
backstopping Uber’s developing
technology. But the Uber employee, Rafaela Vasquez, 44, repeatedly took her eyes off the road
in the run-up to the deadly collision, onboard video shows, raising
questions about whether any distractions might have been at play.
Police have said the Volvo XC90
was traveling at about 40 mph
when it struck Herzberg. It is the
first known death involving the
testing of driverless vehicles, and
the National Transportation Safety Board is investigating.
Uber would not say Thursday
whether Vasquez was on a cellphone, whether she was following
company procedures before the
collision or whether she remains
an Uber employee. Testing of the
company’s driverless fleet remains suspended, an Uber spokeswoman said, “so no vehicle operators, including this one, are on the
road.”
Vasquez pleaded guilty to attempted armed robbery in 2000,
according to Maricopa County Superior Court records. Uber declined to comment.
The video shows Vasquez with a
sudden look of shock on her face
before hitting Herzberg, and she
tenses up, apparently trying to
seize control of the vehicle. Police
have said there were no “significant signs of the vehicle slowing
down.” Uber would not say if or
when the sensor-packed SUV’s
multiple laser, camera and computer systems detected Herzberg
or if the car’s brakes were applied.
Uber declined to comment on
the video, saying it did not want to
prejudge the investigation.
Tempe police said the investigation is continuing and would not
say whether Vasquez was distracted by something in the vehicle.
Self-driving Uber vehicles with
backup drivers have carried passengers on 50,000 rides in Arizona
and Pittsburgh, the company said.
Customers call for a car with the
app as usual and are notified if
they happen to be selected for an
autonomous ride. They are
charged the normal UberX fare
and can decline the self-driving
experience if they want a human
to do the driving.
Uber would not comment on
the precise procedures and in-
structions for backup drivers but
said “the standard protocol is to be
hovering and be ready to intervene as needed.” Backup drivers
have three weeks of training in
classrooms, on closed courses and
on public roads with a back-seat
driver coaching them, the company said.
But that training can butt up
against human nature and personal responsibility.
Many developers of driverless
technology say humans can easily
be lulled into a false sense of security as they putter along city
streets, leaving them mentally unprepared to suddenly seize control
of the wheel if they are needed.
“If humans become overreliant on the technology, and yet
they still have a role to play in safe
operations of the vehicle, that is
absolutely a risk factor,” said Deborah A.P. Hersman, president of
the National Safety Council and
former chairman of the National
Transportation Safety Board.
Some tech firms and carmakers
are pushing for cars with no steer-
ing wheels to avoid this middle
ground where people are expected
to backstop technology. California
has required the presence of such
safety drivers, although starting
next month firms can apply for a
permit not to use them if certain
requirements are met.
Arizona, which has touted its
limited regulations as a competitive advantage in the burgeoning
industry, does not require the
drivers. Uber had used them in
Arizona anyway because, some
outside observers said, the company wanted an extra layer of safety
as its technology matured.
The vehicle that hit Herzberg
“was being supervised. There’s a
reason there’s a safety driver there
— because Uber wasn’t confident
of the performance of that vehicle
under those conditions at that
time,” said Bryant Walker Smith,
an assistant professor of law at the
University of South Carolina and
an expert on autonomous cars.
In a marketing video issued in
October, Uber boasted of its rigorous operator training and the safe-
ty capabilities of its vehicles.
“Our vehicle operators are extensively trained to handle everything from a thunderstorm to a
gaggle of geese crossing the road,
so you can ride comfortably knowing that our team is committed to
keeping you safe,” said the narrator of the video.
It noted the value of these human chaperons.
“Then there’s Ryan,” the video
continued. “He’s what we call a
vehicle operator, and he’s here to
make sure the vehicle does exactly
what it’s supposed to do. But before Ryan could hit the road, he
had to hit the books. He’s one of
hundreds of vehicle operators
who’ve passed test after test in the
classroom and out on the track.
These tests teach operators and
vehicles to expect the unexpected
— like swinging car doors, pedestrians and unusual roadways.”
michael.laris@washpost.com
faiz.siddiqui@washpost.com
Magda Jean-Louis and Eddy Palanzo
contributed to this report.
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. FRIDAY,
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The World
Strikes disrupt travel in first salvo against Macron labor plans
BY
J AMES M C A ULEY
paris — Railway workers and
air traffic controllers led strikes
across France on Thursday,
opening a bitter showdown over
labor overhauls sought by
French President Emmanuel Macron.
The strikes — which disrupted
travel across the country, as
well as transatlantic flights —
signal a critical test for Macron
as his government seeks to challenge France’s tightly controlled
public-sector labor markets and
stimulate a stagnant economy.
Macron, a 40-year-old former
investment banker, faced only
minimal resistance last fall to the
first wave of workplace changes,
which included broader rules on
hiring and firing employees.
But France’s powerful public
sector, which employs more than
5 million people, is putting its
foot down against the next stage:
proposals to cut 120,000 publicsector jobs, hire more contract
workers and slash budgets
across the board.
Rail workers planned to go
for the jugular with a “rolling”
protest: a two-day strike every
three days, causing major upheaval to a transport system
that handles millions of passengers every day.
Many high-speed trains — including the renowned TGV service — were canceled between
Paris and other French cities in
Thursday’s opening salvo. Commuter train service within the
capital was also suspended.
The Eurostar, connecting Paris with London, canceled some
runs through the English Channel tunnel.
Meanwhile, striking air traffic
controllers forced the grounding
of many short-haul flights at the
Paris-area airports of Orly, Beauvais and Charles de Gaulle.
Air travel disruption is expected to worsen Friday.
Air France said 30 percent of
long-haul flights would be affected, as would 20 percent of shorthaul flights.
Teachers, nurses and other
French rail workers, air traffic controllers launch showdown over effort to overhaul the public sector
CHRISTOPHE ARCHAMBAULT/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESS/GETTY IMAGES
Protesters gather in Paris as part of strikes across France led by rail workers and air traffic controllers. Teachers and nurses also joined in.
workers also joined the strike.
Some schools across the country
were forced to close.
So far, Macron has been
spared the kind of devastating
strikes that have unraveled previous French governments.
The public-sector plans —
which still need parliamentary
approval — may prove to be a
different story.
Macron seeks to forge ahead
with these changes without the
same level of calculated exchange with labor leaders as he
engaged in ahead of the first
round of labor revisions.
Élisabeth Borne, Macron’s
transport minister, defended the
labor plans as crucial to ensure
the strength and survival of
France’s state-owned railway
company.
“This is a necessary, indispensable reform,” Borne said, appearing on France’s BFM TV on
Thursday. “My hope is not a test
of strength; my hope is for negotiations.”
But these changes — particu-
larly with regard to the railways
— strike at the heart of a system
that has long been a model of the
French state’s collective commitments, both to transport and to
those who run it.
Railway workers have long
enjoyed expansive benefits, including generous pensions and,
for some employees, the option
of retirement at age 52, a full
decade before the official retirement age of 62.
These benefits stem from an
era when the job entailed intense
manual labor, including the
shoveling of coal — a time Macron has said is long gone.
“How old are you?” the young
president responded to a railway
worker at an agricultural fair last
month, when asked about the
proposals.
“You do not have the same
work rhythm as my grandfather,
who was a railway man,” Macron
added. Macron’s grandfather,
André Macron, worked for
France’s state-owned railway
company in the northern Somme
region.
Political scientists see this as a
watershed moment that could
determine the future of the
French welfare system in a time
when Macron has already succeeded in bringing France slightly closer to Anglo-American visions of the state.
“If the government succeeds
in revising the legal status of the
railway and other workers, it’s
really the end of an era,” said
Gérard Grunberg, an expert on
the French political left and an
emeritus professor at Sciences Po
university in Paris.
In the past, governments have
quickly backed down in the face
of massive protests.
In 1995, the center-right government of Alain Juppé, the
prime minister of President
Jacques Chirac, withdrew proposals to overhaul railway pensions after a strike brought the
country to a standstill.
Union leaders are threatening
much the same this year, said
Jean-Marc Canon, secretary general of UGFF-CGT, a large publicsector union.
There is also symbolism at
work. Thursday marked the 50th
anniversary of a 1968 student
uprising that grew into the largest public protest in modern
French history.
“Either they listen to us and it
will have been just a warning
shot,” Canon said on French
radio Thursday. “Or they don’t
listen to us and then, let me tell
you that public-sector workers
are very mobilized.”
The question is whom the
French will blame when the
inevitable disruptions to public
life occur, Grunberg said.
Opinion polls suggest most
French voters agree with Macron’s proposals, but few French
citizens will be unaffected by the
planned strikes, which have yet
to take their full toll.
“In the end, is it the fault of the
unions? Or the fault of the government?” Grunberg said. “The
French are contradictory on
this.”
james.mcauley@washpost.com
Tourists around the world may be spurning visits to U.S., but not Canadians
WorldViews
toronto —
When President
Trump issued his
AMANDA
first executive
COLETTA
order banning
nationals from some majorityMuslim countries from entering
the United States, some
Canadians reacted by vowing to
boycott traveling south of the
border.
Within days, Canadians of all
stripes — academics, school
board superintendents, thriller
writers, even Girl Scouts —
followed through on those
pledges, abruptly canceling trips
to the United States.
Travel and tourism officials
feared the ban would dent the
United States’ image as a
foreigner-friendly country and
lead to a “Trump slump,” dealing
a blow to an industry that had
only just recovered from a
$600 billion loss between
Sept. 11, 2001, and 2010,
according to the U.S. Travel
Association.
There has been a slump. While
international tourism arrivals
worldwide increased 7 percent in
2017 — a seven-year high — the
United States is missing out on
that boom, according to the U.N.
World Tourism Organization.
Data from the Commerce
Department’s National Travel
and Tourism Office shows
international arrivals to the
United States fell 3.8 percent
during the first three quarters of
2017, compared with the same
period in 2016.
Travel to the United States
from every region of the world is
declining, but one country is
bucking the trend: Canada.
Despite the frantic calls for
boycotts, overnight trips from
Canada rose 4.8 percent to
20.2 million in 2017, reversing a
three-year decline, according to
Statistics Canada.
Experts say the factor that has
traditionally had the strongest
influence on the travel habits of
globe-trotting Canadians is the
relative value of their currency,
making it possible that the
weakening U.S. dollar is
providing an incentive for their
cross-border travel.
But many remain puzzled
because the U.S. dollar slumped
against a number of currencies in
2017, such as the euro, and there
has been no increase in travel to
the United States from Europe.
“It is difficult for us to pinpoint
exactly why the Canadian arrival
data has diverged from the rest of
the world,” said Seth Borko, a
senior research analyst with
Skift, a travel market research
and industry intelligence
company. Proximity and ease of
travel between the two countries
may also be driving the trend, he
said.
Concern abounded in the wake
of the entry ban that Canadians
were cooling on U.S. destinations
— so much so that some
American tourism officials
traveled to Canada multiple
times in an unprecedented effort
to combat the rhetoric coming
from the White House.
“It’s rare that we go up to
Canada and do two events in the
same year,” said Chris Heywood,
the senior vice president of global
communications with NYC &
Company, New York City’s official
tourism organization. “But last
year was one of those years.”
Matt Noble, the president of
EF Educational Tours Canada, a
travel company that organizes
trips for students, said that he
expects annual growth in trips to
U.S. destinations to hit doubledigit percentages in 2019.
“While we are definitely
fielding more questions about
how the experience of crossing
the border might be changing
with new regulations, we are not
seeing any meaningful decline in
demand for our U.S. itineraries,”
he said.
After the entry ban was
announced, the Girl Guides — the
Canadian counterparts of the
Girl Scouts — called off all trips
to the United States indefinitely,
citing a “commitment to
inclusivity.” A number of
Canadian school boards, authors
and academics did the same.
“I refused to enter apartheid
South Africa, too,” Jen
Marchbank, a professor at Simon
Fraser University in British
Columbia told the Toronto Star.
“I see little difference between
the U.S. today and apartheid
South Africa in terms of ethics
and morals.”
The Girl Guides still prohibit
U.S.-bound travel. Last month,
the Toronto District School
Board — Canada’s largest school
board — slightly eased
restrictions on student travel to
the United States to allow for
professional development and
academic competitions, after
students complained that they
were missing out on events that
would bolster their college
applications.
Travel and tourism officials are
careful not to lay the blame for
the slump in travel to the United
States on Trump’s entry ban or on
any of the policies his
administration has advanced to
toughen border security or
immigration law. They point out
that while the decline in
international visits accelerated in
2017, it began in 2015, and note
that the strength of the U.S.
dollar in the first half of 2017
made the country less affordable
for some travelers.
Tourism is the United States’
second-largest export and a
$1.54 trillion-a-year industry. The
drop in international arrivals to
U.S. destinations translated to
$4.6 billion in lost spending and
40,000 jobs in November 2017,
compared with the year before,
according to research from the
U.S. Travel Association.
It announced this year that a
collection of industry groups
including the National
Restaurant Association and the
U.S. Chamber of Commerce were
banding together to form the
Visit U.S. Coalition in an attempt
to reverse the downward trend.
plans to run for president, is
regarded by many as a national
hero and a symbol of resistance
against Russia. She was captured
by rebels in eastern Ukraine in
2014 while serving in a volunteer
battalion. She then landed in a
Russian prison. In March 2016, a
Russian court sentenced her to
prison. President Vladimir Putin
pardoned her shortly afterward.
worked for other outlets but was
most recently managing the news
site Enlace Informativo Regional.
Vázquez is at least the second
journalist slain in Mexico this
year. In 2017, 10 were killed.
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/news/
worldviews
DIGEST
NIGERIA
President: 1 girl still in
Boko Haram captivity
Just one Nigerian schoolgirl is
still held by Boko Haram after
the extremist group released 104
classmates seized in a mass
abduction and she “will not be
abandoned,” President
Muhammadu Buhari said
Thursday, with no word on five
girls still unaccounted for who
are said to be dead and buried.
The president’s statement calls
Leah Sharibu, 15, “the only
Dapchi schoolgirl still in
captivity” after the extraordinary
release of the girls on Wednesday.
Freed girls and Leah’s mother
have said she is Christian and is
still captive because she refused
to convert to Islam.
Also Thursday, the father of
one of the five schoolgirls still
unaccounted for said he has been
told that his daughter and the
others are dead and buried.
Inuwa Garba said friends of his
daughter who were freed told him
that the 16-year-old died of
injuries suffered in the stampede
that ensued during the mass
abduction in Dapchi a month ago.
On Wednesday, Boko Haram
extremists freed the girls and
warned: “Don’t ever put your
daughters in school again.” Boko
Haram means “Western
education is forbidden” in the
Hausa language.
— Associated Press
UKRAINE
War hero is accused
of plotting a coup
Ukraine’s parliament on
Thursday stripped a celebrated
former military pilot and
presidential hopeful of her
immunity as a lawmaker,
sanctioning her arrest on
charges of plotting an attack on
parliament.
Nadiya Savchenko was served
a summons minutes after the
parliamentary session, where she
accused the government of
“killing and dividing” the people.
Critics say the charges against
Savchenko are part of authorities’
efforts to get rid of a powerful
challenger ahead of next year’s
presidential vote.
Prosecutor General Yuriy
Lutsenko has accused Savchenko
of plotting an attack on
— Associated Press
14 dead in Mogadishu blast: At
KHAM/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
South Korea’s President Moon Jae-in, left, and Vietnam’s Vice
President Dang Thi Ngoc Thinh attend a groundbreaking ceremony
for the Vietnam-Korea Institute of Science and Technology in Hanoi.
Moon is on a three-day state visit to Vietnam.
parliament with hand grenades,
automatic weapons and even
heavy mortars. Lutsenko said
Savchenko was acting in cahoots
with Russia-backed rebels in
eastern Ukraine to stage a
“terrorist coup.” He presented
wiretapped recordings in which
Savchenko is heard discussing
smuggling weapons from the east
and going over attack plans.
Savchenko said that she was
aware of being wiretapped and
that she talked about the attacks
as a “surrealist political
provocation” to mock the
government.
Savchenko, who has declared
least 14 people were killed and 10
were wounded in a car bombing
in Somalia’s capital, Mogadishu,
officials said. Capt. Mohamed
Hussein said the explosion
occurred on the busy Makkah
Almukarramah road. Somaliabased al-Shabab claimed the
blast. The Horn of Africa nation
continues to struggle against the
Islamist extremist group.
Journalist killed in Mexico:
Mexican police said a journalist
who ran a local news website was
fatally shot in the Gulf Coast state
of Veracruz. Police said Leobardo
Vázquez was found dead in the
town of Gutierrez Zamora,
located in an area known for drug
cartel activity. He previously
State of emergency in Maldives
is lifted: The Maldives president
has lifted a 45-day state of
emergency declared amid
turmoil that followed a Supreme
Court order that some of Yameen
Abdul Gayoom’s main political
opponents be freed from prison
and retried. They were
imprisoned after trials criticized
as violating due process.
Slovakia gets new government:
Slovakia’s president has
appointed a new government to
replace the one that resigned
amid a political crisis triggered
by the slayings of investigative
journalist Jan Kuciak and his
fiancee. Prime Minister Robert
Fico’s coalition stepped down
last week after protests sparked
by the Feb. 25 shooting deaths.
Kuciak had been reporting on
alleged Italian Mafia ties to
associates of Fico and corruption
scandals linked to Fico’s party.
— From news services
FRIDAY, MARCH 23 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A11
SU
Scandal threatens third Peru leader
BY
S IMEON T EGEL
lima, peru — A day after tendering his resignation, Pedro Pablo
Kuczynski, the third Peruvian president to fall victim to Latin America’s rumbling corruption megascandal, appeared to be facing increasing legal jeopardy.
According to local reports, prosecutors have requested that Kuczynski be barred from leaving the
country until they finalize their
investigations into his dealings
with the Brazilian construction
company Odebrecht SA, which has
admitted paying about $800 million in bribes to win public contracts in a dozen countries, mostly
in Latin America.
The move marks yet another
humiliation for the 79-year-old
center-right economist, whose surprise election in July 2016 was
widely hailed as an advance for
Peruvian governance. Elected in
part on his promises to tackle rampant corruption, the Oxford- and
Princeton-educated former senior
World Bank official was regarded
as a distinguished technocrat unconnected from most of Peru’s unpopular political class.
But his downfall, over allegations of using his government contacts to lobby for Odebrecht in the
past — including indirectly receiving six-figure payments for work
reportedly carried out during a
previous stint as economy minister
— appears to have left Peru’s democracy in a more fragile state
than ever. Kuczynski has said he is
innocent, having placed a “Chinese
wall” between his public work and
his consulting firm, and said that
the payments were for work done
by business partners of which he
was unaware. That explanation
hasn’t convinced many Peruvians.
Kuczynski had been facing an
impeachment vote Thursday on allegations of “permanent moral incapacity,” which he was expected to
lose. But lawmakers instead debated Kuczynski's resignation. They
appeared likely to accept his resignation letter on Friday, rather than
having an impeachment trial.
Odebrecht is at the center of
what has become Latin America’s
biggest corruption scandal, with
politicians across the region facing
allegations of graft. Almost no major political figure in Peru has escaped the crisis. In recent weeks,
Odebrecht executives have testified about undeclared campaign
funding to various presidential
candidates, including $1.2 million
for the 2011 presidential run of
Chaotic
vote looms
in Pakistan
BY P AMELA C ONSTABLE
AND S HAIQ H USSAIN
islamabad, pakistan — In the
past, Pakistan’s Senate has often
functioned as a debating club
with numerous perks, a grandiloquent echo chamber where
little of importance takes place.
Its 104 members are elected to
six-year terms by provincial legislators,
a
low-key
process that rarely produces a ripple
in the nation’s political scene.
This month’s Senate elections,
however, produced a firestorm.
For two weeks, an extraordinary drama unfolded in the Senate, full of spectacle and allegations of skulduggery. There were
passionate pleas to save democracy and reports of secret payments made to secure seats. It all
ended March 12 in a shocking if
symbolic defeat for the governing Pakistan Muslim League-N,
striking a new blow against the
party as it struggles to retain
power in elections slated for this
summer and raising concerns
about political interference by
the country’s security agencies.
The frenzied machinations
also saw the departure of the
Senate’s
respected
chairman, Raza Rabbani, a liberal lion
from the Pakistan People’s Party
and veteran of national anti-dictatorship campaigns, who retired and was replaced by a
little-known independent politician from remote Baluchistan
province by the name of Sadiq
Sanjrani. His ascent from obscurity was allegedly engineered in a
tumultuous shake-up of the Baluchistan legislature.
Much of the action occurred in
full view, with blanket TV coverage of chaotic Senate goings-on.
But critics alleged that the process was also influenced by lessvisible forces, including security
agencies, to weaken the Muslim
League, headed by former prime
minister Nawaz Sharif. The party
has been fighting for its life since
Sharif was ousted by the Supreme Court last year in a corruption case.
“Did you see the spectacle,
MARIANA BAZO/REUTERS
A man reads a newspaper with headlines about Pedro Pablo
Kuczynski, the Peruvian president who resigned Wednesday, as
police guard an area near the Government Palace in Lima.
Keiko Fujimori, the leader of the
opposition Popular Force.
Some analysts are now comparing Peru’s plight with that of Brazil’s, where the Odebrecht scandal
has tarnished virtually the entire
political class and left the country
with an unelected and unpopular
chief executive after the 2016 impeachment of former president
Dilma Rousseff.
Kuczynski’s successor, Vice President Martín Vizcarra, was due to
be sworn in to the top job on Friday
and faces the urgent task of forming a cabinet just three weeks before Lima hosts the Summit of the
Americas, to be attended by President Trump and other Western
Hemisphere leaders. The meeting’s theme, proposed by Kuczynski’s administration, is “democratic
governance against corruption.”
A mild-mannered former regional governor who has been serving as Peru’s ambassador to Canada, Vizcarra was reported to have
fallen out with the president y after
the lobbying revelations.
Despite leaving office with an
81 percent disapproval rating, Kuczynski was just about as unpopular
as the Congress that forced him
out. Its disapproval rating is
82 percent, according to a new survey by polling firm GFK, an indication of how generalized corruption, and the Odebrecht scandal in
particular, have ravaged Peruvians’
faith in their elected leaders. Nearly half the electorate wants an immediate general election, according to polls.
One previous president of Peru,
Ollanta Humala, is in pretrial detention for allegedly receiving illegal campaign funding from Odebrecht, Latin America’s largest engineering firm, while another, Ale-
jandro Toledo, a former visiting
lecturer at Stanford University, is
fighting extradition from the United States on charges that he took
millions of dollars in bribes. They
both deny wrongdoing.
In court in New York, Odebrecht
and an affiliate agreed in 2016 to
pay a $3.5 billion fine, thought to be
a global record in a graft case, for
paying bribes in various countries
to get contracts. The United States
claimed jurisdiction because some
of the bribes flowed through its
financial system.
Here in Peru, Kuczynski is
hardly the only politician who has
been seriously damaged in the
last few days. Keiko Fujimori’s
estranged younger brother, Kenji,
is facing expulsion from Congress
after being caught on video apparently offering kickbacks to
legislators in return for voting
against impeachment.
He and nine other lawmakers
had split from Popular Force in
December after breaking with the
party during a previous impeachment vote. Three days after they
saved Kuczynski’s political career,
the president pardoned Alberto
Fujimori, the 1990s strongman
president serving a jail sentence
for embezzlement and serious human rights violations. That move is
said to have infuriated Keiko, who
has opposed her father’s liberation,
which threatened to harm her own
presidential ambitions.
The video of Kenji Fujimori was
taped clandestinely by a lawmaker
loyal to his sister. For many Peruvians, the surreptitious recording
brought back painful memories of
the corruption and blackmail techniques used by the Fujimori regime
two decades ago.
how the Senate was turned into a
marketplace where votes were
bought and sold?” Maryam
Nawaz, Sharif ’s daughter, complained angrily at a rally of
supporters Sunday.
Beyond partisan politics, critics denounced these developments as a serious setback to
Pakistan’s wobbly democracy,
which has endured repeated cycles of military intervention in
civilian governance since the
country was founded in 1947.
The army overthrew Sharif in his
previous term as prime minister
in 1999 after growing uneasy
with his insistence on civilian
supremacy and outreach to rival
India. Full electoral democracy
was not restored until 2008 after
months of protests.
“The transition that started in
2008 is getting derailed, and the
whole democratic project is now
at stake,” said Afrasiab Khattak, a
former senator from the Awami
National Party. In an essay in the
Nation
newspaper
Sunday, Khattak asserted that Pakistan’s “real rulers” in the military
and civilian bureaucracy had
gained control over the electoral
process, then used pressure, rivalries and “dirty deals” to get an
inexperienced, malleable individual named to head the Senate.
“Everything smacked of mala
fide,” he wrote.
Babar Sattar, a lawyer and
analyst in Islamabad, was equally euphemistic — and equally
blunt. Writing in the News International, he said the Senate elections showed how Pakistan’s unnamed “gamekeeper” was holding the country’s democracy on a
“very short leash.” With money
and pressure used to tear the
Baluchistan legislature apart, he
wrote, Sanjrani “was plucked out
of thin air,” while Rabbani, a man
of candor and courage who had
turned the Senate chair into a
pulpit for justice, was “cut to
size.”
The surprising winner of the
unseemly brawl was former
president Asif Ali Zardari, the
widower of two-time prime minister Benazir Bhutto and the
current co-chair of the Pakistan
People’s Party. Zardari, though
aloof in public, is known as a
shrewd politician. He made a
deal with his party’s archrival,
former cricket star Imran Khan,
to form an alliance against Sharif
in the Senate elections. Even
though Sharif ’s party won a
majority of seats, the Zardari-
Khan pact created enough opposition votes to choose the new
chair.
It seems unlikely that this pact
between two bitter rivals could
survive the pressures of the coming national electoral campaign,
but with Sharif politically weakened and still facing corruption
charges, the contest is up for
grabs.
Pakistan’s military leader,
Army Gen. Qamar Javed Bajwa,
has repeatedly vowed not to
interfere in civilian rule or politics, but Sharif and his allies
claim that a shadow campaign by
anti-democratic forces within
the state helped unite Sharif ’s
opponents in the Senate. Some
said they fear similar manipulation could influence the general
election and block the Muslim
League — still the country’s most
popular party — from winning.
Control of the Senate matters
for other reasons as well. As
“custodian” of Pakistan’s federation, it has power over decisions
on how much federal funding to
disburse among the four provinces. Its chairman is third in
line to replace the prime minister. Also, its ratification is needed
to pass most significant legislation passed by the National Assembly.
In 2010, the Senate’s support
was crucial to passage of the 18th
amendment to the constitution,
a milestone law that reversed
some authoritarian excesses of
past military rule — provisions
that some in the security establishment reportedly want to see
restored.
One senator who pushed for
that law was Farhatullah Babar,
74, a longtime official of the
Pakistan People’s Party and one
of the body’s most eloquent orators.
This month, Babar’s term in
the Senate ended, but not before
he delivered an impassioned
farewell speech.
“I am deeply concerned about
the continuous erosion of parliamentary sovereignty, about the
judicialization of politics and
politicization of the judiciary,
about the security establishment
growing into a state within
state,” Babar said. “I have become a stranger to this House,
but I will never become a stranger to the causes which I have
been fighting. The fight will go
on . . . and the voices raised in
this House will never be stifled.”
foreign@washpost.com
pamela.constable@washpost.com
2018 BOBBLES
APRIL 13
Sean Doolittle
Presented by M&M’s
First 25,000 Fans
MAY 4
Max Scherzer
Presented by PNC Bank
First 25,000 Fans
JUNE 8
Ryan Zimmerman
Presented by Delta Air Lines
First 25,000 Fans
ALSO COMING THIS SEASON:
JULY 6 - Bryce Harper Patriotic Bobblehead
Presented by SAIC
AUGUST 3 - Anthony Rendon Bobblehead
Presented by PNC Bank
nationals.com
A12
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FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 2018
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MARCH 23 , 2018
Economy & Business
DOW 23,957.89
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‘Time Warner would be
a weapon for AT&T,’ court
is told in merger case
BY
SAUL MARTINEZ/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Southeastern Grocers, which owns more than 600 Winn-Dixie, Harveys and BI-LO stores across seven states in the Southeast, announced
a refinancing agreement this month and said it will file for bankruptcy by April.
Chains fall victim to the ‘grocery wars’
Tops Markets, Southeastern Grocers are hurting financially in shifting, extremely competitive market
BY
C AITLIN D EWEY
Less than a year after Amazon
bought Whole Foods, the “grocery wars” have racked up their
first two casualties: Tops Markets and Southeastern Grocers.
Tops, a 56-year-old chain with
169 stores in New York, Pennsylvania and Vermont, filed for
bankruptcy late last month following years of mounting debt.
Southeastern, which owns more
than 600 Winn-Dixie, Harveys
and BI-LO stores across seven
states in the Southeast, announced a refinancing agreement March 15 and says it will
file for bankruptcy by April.
The back-to-back filings have
fanned fears that some chains
won’t make it through the industry’s turmoil. The grocery business is in the midst of a radical
disruption, squeezed by new
competitors including Dollar
General and Amazon.com. (Amazon chief executive Jeffrey P.
Bezos owns The Washington
Post.)
Already, Winn-Dixie has said
it will close 94 stores, and Tops
has left open the possibility that
it could shutter its weakest locations.
“I think we’re going to see a lot
of chains fail,” said Phil Lempert,
an independent food retail analyst at Supermarket Guru and
the author of several books about
the grocery business. “There are
some retailers who have innovated and stayed ahead of the
trends. But they have been the
exception.”
Tops and Southeastern carry
enormous debt loads, the result
of management by private equity
firms.
The chains are also in highly
competitive grocery markets,
challenged by strong regional
chains, such as Wegmans and
Publix, as well as major national
and discount retailers.
As those companies have invested in new technologies, store
formats and product lines to stay
competitive, Tops and Southeastern have been largely unable to
do so because they are saddled by
high interest payments, analysts
said. In its bankruptcy filing,
Tops said that it could neither
afford to offer the organic, premium products its high-end
competitors are pushing nor
make the price cuts that would
attract a Walmart or Aldi shopper.
The pressure to evolve on so
many fronts, Tops said, made it
“increasingly difficult for the
company to compete” with other
retailers. Tops declined to comment for this article, and Southeastern did not respond to requests for interviews.
“That is the trend now,” said
Bill Urda, a senior retail analyst
at Boston Consulting Group.
“There is enormous pressure to
charge a value price while also
providing quality and service
and the exact products that people want, when and where they
want them.”
Grocery has always been a
low-margin business, with stores
eking out one to three cents of
profit from every dollar spent.
And for decades, the United
States’ largest chains, harried by
the growth of Walmart and other
supercenters, have targeted midsize and regional players for
acquisition.
But a perfect storm of social
and industry trends seems to
have made things worse. Consumers are spending more of
their food budget on restaurant
meals and takeout.
Discount retailers such as Lidl
and Target have squeezed onto
the scene. Amazon’s 2017 acquisition of Whole Foods deepened
anxieties that online retailers
could soon be a major force, as
well.
“We are operating in a different world,” said Peter Larkin,
chief executive of the National
Grocers Association, which represents independently owned
stores. “We now have club stores.
Supercenters. Dollar stores.
Drugstores. Click and deliver.
Click and collect. Meal kits. Even
Home Depot and Lowe’s sell food
now. . . . The competition has
always been intense, but it used
to be supermarket-to-supermarket. Now it’s supermarket-to-allthose-other-channels.”
Some observers worry that
consumers may not fare well in
this new world, where midsize
chains and small mom-and-pop
stores are increasingly under
attack. Patty Lovera, the assistant director of Food and Water
Watch, a nonprofit advocacy
group that has monitored consolidation in the grocery industry, said midsize operations are
more likely to stock foods from
small farmers and producers because they aren’t locked into
centralized buying contracts like
larger chains.
But for now, Lempert said,
most consumers are benefiting
from lower prices and better
service as stores vie for their
grocery dollars.
Lempert points to Hy-Vee, an
Iowa-based retailer with 245
locations across the Midwest.
The company’s newest store, a
food-court-like format in downtown Des Moines, has become so
popular that it has begun eating
into the business of nearby restaurants.
He also likes Wegmans, an
upscale chain headquartered
near Tops in Upstate New York
that has invested heavily in its
customers’ experience, adding
sushi bars, juice shops and even
tequila bars in some of its 96 locations.
Regional chains like these will
be able to fend off the competition, said Burt Flickinger, managing director of the business
consulting firm Strategic Resource Group.
Flickinger points out that
sales at Whole Foods’ first Buffalo location — where it competes with Wegmans, Tops and a
strong local chain, Dash’s — have
been “disastrous.”
caitlin.dewey@washpost.com
B RIAN F UNG
When the University of Maryland-Baltimore County delivered
a historic upset over the University of Virginia men’s college basketball team last week, the game
was carried on a cable channel
owned by a company AT&T is
trying to buy for $85 billion — and
which is at the center of a landmark antitrust lawsuit between
the telecom giant and the Department of Justice.
Government attorneys said
Thursday that the game was an
example of the kind of popular
content that could become more
expensive to watch if AT&T is
allowed to purchase Time Warner, one of the world’s biggest
entertainment companies.
“Time Warner would be a
weapon for AT&T because AT&T’s
competitors need that programming,” said government attorney
Craig Conrath.
Speaking in front of a full federal courtroom in Washington on
the third day of the trial, Conrath
claimed that AT&T’s merger is a
“frontal attack” on the law because it threatens competition in
the TV industry. The judge overseeing the case, Richard Leon, sat
impassively and nodded along.
At issue is a “vertical merger” in
which one company involved in
one line of business, telecommunications, is purchasing a company in another line of business,
media and entertainment. The
combination would turn AT&T
into a seller of entertainment content produced by brands such as
HBO, CNN and Warner Bros. The
government argues that the deal
could allow AT&T to raise the
price that other cable companies
must pay for that content — and
give itself a discount. The result
would be an unfair advantage for
AT&T’s legacy TV subscription
business as well as its streaming
video service, DirecTV Now, Conrath said.
The government’s court battle
to block the AT&T deal is the first
of its kind since the Nixon administration.
Antitrust economist Carl Shapiro, an expert for the Justice Department,
has
estimated
that Americans’ cable bills could
go up as much as $436 million a
year, or about 45 cents per month
per subscriber. Shapiro used what
is known as a Nash bargaining
model.
But AT&T disputed the economic model in arguments
Thursday, spending much of its 45
minutes of opening testimony
seeking to undercut Shapiro’s
analysis. AT&T and Time Warner’s attorney, Daniel Petrocelli,
said Shapiro based much of it on a
flawed assumption: that a substantial portion of customers belonging to AT&T’s rivals would
switch from their TV providers if
they were unable to watch Time
Warner content on those networks or if they had to pay more
for it.
Petrocelli called Shapiro’s assumption that AT&T’s rivals could
lose 12.5 percent of their customers “an astronomical number that
has never happened in the history
of pay TV before.” It is “preposterous,” he argued, that AT&T would
seek to harm competitors in the
rapidly growing streaming video
space because the company itself
offers a streaming video app.
Petrocelli also argued that antitrust officials deliberately overlooked evidence that would have
disproved their case: consumer
prices in the aftermath of Comcast’s
2011
purchase
of
NBCUniversal, a similar deal.
That vertical merger did not trigger hikes in consumer prices, he
said, so it is unreasonable to claim
that AT&T’s merger will.
AT&T said its own analysis using the government’s economic
model showed that the merger
would lead to a $500 million annual drop in consumer prices. It
also said the deal could benefit
consumers by adding programming for mobile devices and increasing competition against tech
titans such as Facebook, Google
and Netflix.
The government’s first witness
Thursday was Suzanne Fenwick,
an executive from Cox Communications. Cox is a rival of AT&T’s
pay-TV business that could face
higher prices for Time Warner
content — some of which would
be passed on to consumers, according to regulators. But while
the Justice Department used its
time with Fenwick mostly to establish basic facts about the media industry, AT&T wasted no
time grilling her.
Petrocelli sought to undercut
Fenwick’s credibility as a knowledgeable market expert, asking
questions about Cox’s competition that Fenwick had difficulty
answering. She was unable to cite,
for example, the number of channels offered by SlingTV, a streaming video service from Dish Network. She also could not say how
many top-ranked shows are produced by Turner Broadcasting,
one of Time Warner’s premier assets, despite previously describing Turner’s cable programming
as “must-have” content.
Fenwick also said that she had
not calculated an estimate of how
many customers Cox might lose in
a programming dispute with Turner but that she believed it would
be “a large number.”
Petrocelli argued that Fenwick’s beliefs did not constitute
hard evidence.
“You think you can just come in
here and give your opinion . . . and
you’ve never done a single bit of
quantitative analysis?” he said.
AT&T’s aggressive questioning
followed a number of probing
questions days earlier from Leon,
who reminded antitrust regulators to think carefully about
whether their witnesses could
back up their assertions with data.
The last time the Justice Department went to court to block a
vertical deal was in 1972, when the
government stopped Ford’s purchase of Autolite, a spark plug
maker, over concerns that the acquisition could prevent new manufacturers from entering the market.
brian.fung@washpost.com
DIGEST
MEDIA
dismissed with prejudice,
meaning it cannot be filed again.
Failla dismissed an earlier
version of the case in 2016.
Chipotle was linked to
outbreaks of salmonella, E. coli
and norovirus in 2014 and 2015.
RETAIL
Weather Channel sold
Nike shares rise
to comedian’s company on earnings report
Comedian and producer Byron
Allen has acquired the Weather
Channel TV network as he looks
to expand his film and TV
production company into a major
media business.
Allen’s Entertainment Studios
bought the network from
Blackstone Group, Bain Capital
and Comcast, according to a
statement Thursday. The price
was not publicly announced. The
deal includes the famous cable TV
network but not the online assets
such as the website Weather.com
and related mobile apps, which
were acquired by IBM in 2016.
“Snowstorms, rain, mudslides,
our lives and our families’ safety
depend on this info,” Allen said in
an interview. “When a big storm
happens, it’s the Super Bowl of
weather. As many as 30 million
people watch.”
Allen’s company produces and
syndicates TV shows and has
released films, such as last year’s
thriller 47 Meters Down.” It also
owns Comedy.tv and Cars.tv.
Nike’s quarterly revenue and
profit beat analysts’ estimates on
Thursday, helped by robust
demand in its international
markets and initiatives such as
selling directly to consumers.
Shares rose nearly 2 percent in
extended trading. They had
closed down 3 percent at $64.42
in regular trading, primarily after
reports that investor William
Ackman’s Pershing Square had
exited the company with a profit
of about $100 million.
Sales jumped 24.3 percent in
China in the third quarter, which
ended Feb. 28, while they rose
19.4 percent in Europe.
The strong showing in global
markets helped offset a 6 percent
drop in sales in North America,
where Nike is battling rival
Adidas. However, Nike reported a
net loss of $921 million, or 57
cents per share, compared with a
profit of $1.14 billion, or 68 cents
per share, a year earlier.
Revenue rose 6.5 percent to
$8.98 billion.
— Bloomberg News
— Reuters
— Reuters
GIAN EHRENZELLER/EPA-EFE/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
“Frost candles” are lit Thursday in a vineyard in Flaesch, Switzerland.
In 2016 and 2017, frosty weather damaged crops, so a local
agricultural school is conducting trials to determine the value of
taking preventive measures such as this.
RESTAURANT INDUSTRY
Chipotle investors’
lawsuit is dismissed
Chipotle Mexican Grill on
Thursday won dismissal of an
investor lawsuit claiming it
concealed food safety risks and
caused its stock to drop after
outbreaks of foodborne illnesses
in 2014 and 2015.
U.S. District Judge Katherine
Polk Failla in Manhattan said that
while the outbreaks were cause
for concern, the suit failed to
support its claim that Chipotle
defrauded investors. The suit was
ALSO IN BUSINESS
Crafts retailer Michaels will
shut down 94 Aaron Brothers
framing and art supplies stores,
company said on Thursday. The
world’s largest arts and crafts
retailer said it plans to make
Aaron Brothers a store-within-astore and provide custom
framing in all Michaels stores.
Michaels owns and operates
about 1,300 stores in the United
States and Canada. Aaron
Brothers shops are located largely
on the West Coast, and offer
custom framing and painting and
drawing tools.
U.S. recorded music sales
climbed 17 percent to $8.7 billion
last year, the second straight gain
in domestic revenue, the
Recording Industry Association
of America said. Subscription
services such as Spotify and
Apple Music led the charge, with
sales from paid streaming
climbing 63 percent to
$4.09 billion. Streaming services,
including Internet radio, account
for almost two-thirds of industry
revenue. Sales of CDs and other
physical formats are second at 17
percent.
Olive Garden is dropping its
popular “Buy One Take One” offer
this quarter, according to the
Italian chain’s parent, Darden
Restaurants. The Buy One deal
had let customers order one meal
to eat at the table and receive a
second one for later at home. “It
may have a short-term impact on
traffic,” Darden chief executive
Gene Lee said Thursday. In all,
Olive Garden is cutting its
promotional offers from nine to
six this fiscal year.
— From news reports
COMING TODAY
8:30 a.m.: Commerce
Department releases durable
goods for February.
10 a.m.: Commerce Department
releases new-home sales for
February.
FRIDAY, MARCH 23 , 2018
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Tariffs drag down stocks, raising fears on Fed rate and bull market’s future
Investors say volatility is
part of earlier correction
BY
T HOMAS H EATH
Markets plunged Thursday
amid fears President Trump’s
new tariffs would start a global
trade war, with the Dow Jones
industrial average closing 724
points down as the Nasdaq Composite and the Standard & Poor’s
500 index also nose-dived.
Markets have been shaky for
several weeks since the president
announced a 25 percent tariff on
imported steel and a 10 percent
tariff on imported aluminum.
Trump on Thursday announced
about $50 billion in annual tariffs
on a variety of goods from China.
The Chinese are preparing a titfor-tat response by placing tariffs
on U.S. agricultural products
such as soybeans that have big
markets in China.
Investors are fearful that the
trade policies and their fallout
could upset a robust global economy and hamper the nine-year
bull market.
“Trade tariffs are starting to
emerge as a bigger market head
wind than originally thought,”
said Ivan Feinseth, director of
research at Tigress Financial
Partners. “The strong U.S. and
global economic and fiscal policy
tail winds are starting to be
overtaken by the proposed tariffs,
the Fed’s softer-than-expected
economic outlook for 2018 and
the fallout from the Facebook
issue.”
The bellwether Dow, encompassing 30 large publicly traded
companies, plunged nearly 3 percent and is now in negative territory for 2018, closing at 23,957
Thursday. Caterpillar, Boeing, 3M
and JP Morgan Chase were
among the big drags on the Dow
as trade worries deepened.
The broader S&P 500 dropped
2.52 percent Thursday and is now
more than 1 percent in negative
territory for 2018. The technology-heavy Nasdaq Composite
dropped 2.43 percent Thursday
but is still up nearly 4 percent on
the year.
Investors cautioned that this
week’s volatility is not a signal
that the nearly decade-long stock
boom has come to a close.
“It’s not the end of the bull
market,” said Jeff Schulze, Investment Strategist at ClearBridge
Investments. “The U.S. economy
is still strong. Global growth is
accelerating. The earnings picture is still healthy. This is just
part of the correction that started
in early February. A longer-term
investor would be wise to buy the
dip.”
The Federal Reserve on
Wednesday gave markets more
bad news when it announced it
would hike a key interest rate, as
Executive seeks millions from public to save Toys R Us
BY
A BHA B HATTARAI
Isaac Larian, the billionaire
toy executive behind Bratz, Little
Tikes and L.O.L. Surprise! dolls,
wants to save Toys R Us.
But first, he wants you to pony
up.
Larian, the chief executive
of toy giant MGA Entertainment,
says he and other investors have
raised $200 million to acquire
parts of the bankrupt retailer.
Now they want the public to
contribute $800 million through
the crowdfunding site Go Fund
Me.
The campaign, which runs
through May 28, is being pitched
as a “historic opportunity to
#SaveToysRUs.” Ten hours in,
Larian had raised $2,000, mostly
in $5 and $10 increments. Just
$799,998,000 to go.
“One billion dollars may seem
like a staggering goal, but it
would take a very large sum to
create a successful bid for the
acquisition of such a large entity,”
Larian said on the site. He added
that he will contribute 10 percent of Little Tikes proceeds over
the next two months to his cam-
paign.
Toys R Us announced last
week that it would sell or close all
735 of its remaining U.S. stores.
The company’s going-out-ofbusiness sales are expected to
begin Friday, and executives said
they expect to wind down the
business by this summer.
Larian — who last week made
an offer to buy Toys R Us Canada
— says he hopes to swoop in
before then.
“Children need a place to play,”
he said. “I can’t imagine a world
where that doesn’t exist anymore.”
Larian has a soft spot for Toys
R Us, he says. He sold his first toy,
a walkie-talkie, to the megaretailer in 1979, and now relies
on the company for about 20
percent of his sales. But what’s in
it for investors? Contributions of
$5 to $49 get you a #SaveToysRUs
bumper sticker, while $1 million
gets you, among other things, a
signed letter from Larian (but no
stake in the company). Have
more than $10 million to give?
Larian promises to give you toys
for life (though the fine print says
he’ll ultimately decide what toys,
and how many).
Toys R Us, which at one time
was the nation’s preeminent toy
retailer, had lost much of its
luster in recent years. A 2005
leveraged buyout left it saddled
with billions in debt, and changing customer preferences quickened its demise. Ultimately, analysts said the retailer couldn’t
compete with big-box rivals on
price or convenience, or offer
the fun-filled experience smaller
specialty stores could. Toys R Us
owes $7.9 billion to more than
100,000 creditors, including
Mattel, Hasbro, Lego and Crayola, according its bankruptcy filing.
Larian, though, says he still
sees a business worth saving. The
company’s sprawling stores have
for decades been a steppingstone
for small toy makers looking for a
break, or larger outfits hoping to
test out a new product before a
broad release.
“There is no toy business without Toys R Us,” Larian told The
Washington Post last week. “It’s a
big deal, and I’m going to try to
salvage as much of it as possible.”
abha.bhattarai@washpost.com
the central bank continues to
move away from the extraordinary efforts it has taken in the
past decade to stimulate economic growth. The stimulus
moves have greatly boosted
stocks since the 2008 financial
crisis and ensuing Great Recession.
The Fed also increased its projections for economic growth on
Wednesday, bumping them up
from previous estimates done before Republicans passed their tax
bill. But the projections fall short
of the sharp growth Republicans
promised the tax cuts would create.
Tech stocks have contributed
to the recent market slide, with
Facebook, reeling from a data
privacy leak, helping drag the
sector down.
The F in the vaunted FAANG
stocks — Facebook, Apple,
Amazon.com, Netflix, Google —
dropped 2.7 percent Thursday,
and its losses are bleeding across
the technology sector. Apple was
down 1.42 percent Thursday,
Amazon.com (whose chairman,
Jeffrey P. Bezos, owns The Washington Post) was down 2.39 percent, and Google parent Alphabet
dove 3.73 percent.
Facebook, with over 2 billion
monthly active users, has seen
10 percent of its market capitalization, about $50 billion, vaporized this week on reports that its
vast trove of personal data had
been misused by Cambridge Analytica, a data mining and political
communications firm that was
used by the Trump presidential
campaign.
Facebook shares have been a
key driver of the recent boom in
technology, but it and other technology stocks have dropped on
fears that regulators could impose rules that hinder their business models.
The social media giant came
under heavy fire from lawmakers
in the United States and Britain
over the weekend after news reports raised questions about
whether it allowed third-party
developers to access the data of
users without their permission —
a potential violation of its privacy
agreement with the U.S. government.
On Thursday the House Energy and Commerce Committee
requested that Facebook cofounder and chief executive Mark
Zuckerberg testify at an upcoming hearing in response to the
reports that Cambridge Analytica
had improperly accessed the
names, “likes” and other personal
information of about 50 million
Facebook users.
Democratic Sens. Edward J.
Markey (Mass.) and Amy Klobuchar (Minn.) said this week that
they want Zuckerberg to testify to
Congress under oath about his
company. Zuckerberg told CNN
on Wednesday that he would be
“happy” to address Congress.
thomas.heath@washpost.com
Citigroup first major bank to take a stand in gun debate
BY
R ACHEL S IEGEL
Setting itself apart from other
major Wall Street banks, Citigroup took a stance in America’s
renewed debate on gun control
through a commercial firearms
policy announced Thursday.
Citi is now mandating that the
bank’s new retail sector clients or
partners restrict the sale of firearms for people younger than 21
and not sell bump stocks, which
accelerate the firing of semiautomatic weapons, or high-capacity
magazines. The policy also requires those clients not to sell
firearms to someone who has not
passed a background check, including those whose background
checks have not returned after the
federally mandated three-day
waiting period.
Ed Skyler, Citi’s executive vice
president for global public affairs,
said in a statement that clients
choosing not to adhere to the policy will have their businesses transitioned away from Citi.
The announcement was not
spurred by calls to “rid the world
of firearms,” Skyler said in the
statement. Rather, he said, it’s a
Selling bump stocks,
high-capacity magazines
off limits to new clients
response to the fact that grief in
the wake of mass shootings rarely
inspires lasting action to prevent
firearms from falling into the
wrong hands.
“We know our clients also care
about these issues, and we have
begun to engage with them in the
hope that they will adopt these
best practices over the coming
months,” Skyler’s statement said.
Citi noted that the bank has
limited relationships with firearm
manufacturers. But for those few
clients, the bank will look at what
products those companies make,
what markets and retailers they
sell to and what sales practices
those manufacturers follow.
Citi’s announcement came
ahead of Saturday’s March for Our
Lives, which is expected to draw
hundreds of thousands of protesters to Washington in support of
gun-control measures.
The new policy also follows a
swell of announcements from corporations in the weeks after the
mass shooting at a high school in
Parkland, Fla., that left 17 dead. As
survivors and others across the
country demanded action from
companies with ties to the gun
industry or the National Rifle Association, many businesses responded by dropping certain partnerships and discount programs.
Dick’s Sporting Goods, Walmart and Kroger, for example, all
made changes to their firearms
sales policies.
But Citi’s move is notable within Wall Street. Last month, the
asset management firm BlackRock said it had contacted gun
manufacturers and distributors to
gauge their strategies for preventing mass shootings. And the First
National Bank of Omaha discontinued its NRA-branded Visa card.
“We would like to convene
those in the financial services industry and other stakeholders to
tackle these challenges together
and see what we can do,” Skyler
wrote.
rachel.siegel@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 23 , 2018
Role of
gunmaker
challenged
by residents
SPRINGFIELD FROM A1
In the weeks since the Parkland
shooting, as companies like Delta
Air Lines severed promotional
ties with the National Rifle Association and Dick’s Sporting Goods
stopped selling AR-15s, Smith &
Wesson has found itself increasingly drawn into the public debate over gun violence. Now, for
perhaps the first time in its long
history, the gunmaker is also being attacked at home. Last week,
protesters gathered outside the
factory gates. Local students
launched a letter-writing campaign directed at the company.
They also plan to target the gunmaker this weekend during the
city’s “March for Our Lives” rally.
The gun debate is different in
Springfield, where talk of gun
control collides with concerns
about jobs and the role of a local
company in a national tragedy.
Student activists, energized by
the Parkland survivors’ call for
new gun laws, are struggling to
balance their demands with the
fact that guns support the local
community and their parents’
jobs. Some older residents are
starting to question their high
regard for the gunmaker.
“They’ve always been viewed as
a major employer, but they are
also viewed now as making weapons used in mass shootings,” said
the Rev. Douglas Fisher, bishop of
the Episcopal Diocese of Western
Massachusetts, based in Springfield, whose parishioners work at
the gunmaker.
Not everyone supports the idea
of taking on Smith & Wesson — or
even wants to wade into the debate. Both the city’s Democratic
mayor and its only trauma hospital, where most gunshot victims
are treated, declined to discuss
the role of Smith & Wesson in the
gun-violence debate.
“This is a town where guns are
interwoven into the economic
story,” said Tara Parrish, director
of the Pioneer Valley Project, a
Springfield-based community advocacy group. “Gun manufacturing is just part of the fabric here.”
But now some are seeing an old
industry in new ways.
Abdi grew up in Springfield,
worried about gun violence. A
Kenyan refugee who has spent
more than half his life here, Abdi
lives in the city’s south end where,
he said, shootings are common.
But those deaths happen one by
one. The intense focus on one
mass shooting and a single gunmaker has provided an opening
for his own long-simmering concern.
“I feel a special responsibility
on this one,” Abdi said, standing
just outside Smith & Wesson’s
gates after school. “I feel like we’re
the people who can do it. Because
look, it’s right there.”
A pillar of the community
Springfield can seem like an
unlikely home for the nation’s
second-largest firearms manufacturer. Massachusetts has some of
the nation’s most stringent gun
laws, including a ban on most
AR-15s. Smith & Wesson can’t
even sell its M&P15 in the state.
But Springfield sits in the heart
of “Gun Valley,” named for the
massive armory that for almost
two centuries produced most of
the U.S. military’s small firearms,
spurring other gunmakers to locate nearby. The armory’s closure
in 1968 devastated the local economy.
Today, Smith & Wesson is
among the city’s largest employers, behind MassMutual and the
Big Y supermarket chain. And
those jobs are needed. The unemployment rate in Springfield, the
state’s third-largest city, stands at
6.7 percent, almost three points
higher than in the state overall.
The gunmaker also contributes to
local charities and sponsors local
events, including the “Garden of
Peace” at the city’s annual holiday
lights display — which some residents find a little ironic.
About 1,400 people worked at
Smith & Wesson as recently as
three years ago, when the firearms industry was booming amid
worries about gun policy under
President Barack Obama. Firearms sales have plummeted since
then.
Smith & Wesson has been hit
hard. Today it has 25 percent fewer manufacturing workers than a
year ago, according to an earnings
conference call for analysts earlier this month with the gunmaker’s parent company, American
Outdoor Brands. Its stock price is
down 60 percent since President
Trump was elected. Still, Smith &
Wesson — which did not respond
to multiple requests for comment
— reported selling $773 million in
guns last year.
PHOTOS BY KEVIN HAGEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
TOP: Boston-area high school student Ekran Sharif, 17, speaks during a protest across the street from Smith & Wesson’s
headquarters in Springfield, Mass., on March 14. ABOVE LEFT: Hussein Abdi, 19, lives in Springfield’s south end where, he said,
shootings are common, which has motivated him to protest. “I feel a special responsibility on this one,” he said. ABOVE RIGHT:
Jamison Rohan, 16, takes part in the protest. A dinnertime conversation led her father, an avid hunter, to join her at the protest.
Good will toward gunmaker
It was just one gun that
changed the conversation in
Springfield. Dean Rohan heard
about it from his daughter.
They were eating dinner at
home in the Springfield suburbs
when Jamison, 16, said she wanted to join the local gun-control
protests, in part because a Smith
& Wesson gun had been used in
the Parkland massacre. They were
a family comfortable with guns.
Dean Rohan used to be an avid
hunter. Jamison had a Daisy Red
Ryder BB gun when she was
younger.
“Smith & Wesson has been here
my whole life,” Dean Rohan recalled. “I’ve never looked at them
in a bad way.”
But listening to his daughter
made him think. He was reluctant
to blame the gunmaker. He
blamed a lack of gun control. He
saw no need for bump stocks or
AR-15s. But he felt this kind of
nuance is often lost in the all-ornothing politics of the national
gun debate.
Springfield — because it is a
major gunmaker in a state with
tight regulation — is home to
seeming contradictions about
guns. Carolyn Goldstein, a pediatrician in Springfield, said she
hates gun violence but doesn’t
blame the local gunmaker for
causing it.
“We don’t think about Smith &
Wesson. It doesn’t come back to
them,” Goldstein said.
She’s married to Mike Weisser,
who for years ran a gun shop in a
nearby suburb. Both favor a federal ban on AR-15s, at least.
“The only way you’re going to
end gun violence is to get rid of
guns,” Weisser said.
Now, a group of students is
working toward that.
At a Dunkin’ Donuts in the
suburb of East Longmeadow, four
students plotted how to target
AR-15 rifles on display at the Springfield Armory Museum in Springfield, Mass. The armory was
the primary center for manufacturing U.S. military firearms from 1777 until 1968.
Smith & Wesson. They had mailed
a letter to the company the day
before to “call on you to rise above
these politicians and cease the
sale of assault weapons to the
public such as the AR-15 that was
used in the Parkland shooting.”
“I think the gun companies
should support us,” said Sarah
Reyes, 16.
“Why would they?” asked
Amelia Ryan, 18. “Smith & Wesson is all guns. What else are they
going to do?”
In the days after the Parkland
shooting, Ryan found herself
searching for “How to survive a
mass shooting” videos online. She
devoured the social media clips
posted by Parkland students
while the shooting was still going
on. She read the victims’ obituaries and was struck by the photo of
one boy wearing a sweatshirt with
the name of the college where he’d
been accepted but would never
attend.
Still, the teens were reluctant
to go too hard after the company.
“They employ a lot of people,”
Ryan said.
The students also discussed
their plans for a local version of
the national “March for Our
Lives,” which they hoped to take
past the front gates of Smith &
Wesson. But they decided against
it. They worried about attacking
Smith & Wesson too directly. They
had friends whose parents
worked there. They didn’t want to
see it shut down. They wanted it
to stop selling AR-15s.
“I kind of see Smith & Wesson
like MassMutual,” said Trevaughn
Smith, 17. “If they close down, that
would be detrimental . . .”
“. . . to the economy at least,”
Ryan finished.
But not everyone in the city felt
as energized to protest gun violence as the students meeting at
Dunkin’ Donuts. Anthony, a former Smith & Wesson employee
who now works at a local gun
shop, said he supported the students’ right to protest, even if he
disagreed with their message. Anthony, who declined to give his
last name, said he didn’t feel that
the 17 deaths in Florida were the
fault of Smith & Wesson.
“It’s not their fault that a lone
individual did something evil,” he
said, comparing it to a drunk
driver killing someone. “Do we
stop selling cars then?”
At New O’Brien’s Corner bar, a
few blocks from Smith & Wesson,
a nurse offered a defense of the
gunmaker.
“I love Smith & Wesson,” said
Lauren Townley, enjoying a postshift drink with two co-workers.
She owns a Smith & Wesson handgun, an M&P Shield.
Tammy Pouliot looked at her.
Pouliot had been working at a
hospital in Danbury, Conn., in
2012 when just a few miles away
the Sandy Hook Elementary
School shooting resulted in the
death of 20 children and six
adults. The shooter used a Bushmaster AR-15-style rifle.
“Why should you or anyone
else have access to an AR?” Pouliot
asked.
Townley softened briefly, then
said again she didn’t support new
gun laws. “The problem is society,” she said.
“I still feel like there needs to be
more limits,” said Pouloit.
‘Something’s got to be done’
Later that day, there was a
small protest outside Smith &
Wesson — the first, many believed, in at least a generation.
Five city police cars blocked off
the main gate, supplementing
Smith & Wesson’s private security
force.
“Oh my God,” said Hussein
Abdi. “What do they think is going
to happen? We’re going to rush in
there?”
About 100 people stood on a
small spit of land next to a fourlane road across from the gunmaker. The Pioneer Valley Project helped organize the protest.
Some people had taken buses
down from Boston and Holyoke.
But most were locals. Episcopal
leaders, dressed in purple
scarves and cloaks, stood with
other local clergy. Jamison Rohan had persuaded her father to
drive her down.
Now she stood holding a sign
reading, “#NEVER AGAIN,” while
he stood off to the side, watching
and taking photos. Two Springfield students were joined by their
grandfather wearing a “Vietnam
Vet” baseball cap.
“Something’s got to be done,”
Tom Wyrostek, 68, said.
Abdi peeked at his cellphone to
study the short speech he was
about to give. He was senior class
president at Springfield Central
High, but he’d never done something like this before.
“Smith & Wesson needs to see
us and know they can’t hide from
us,” Abdi said into a microphone.
The protest ended with a letter
delivered to the front gate demanding that Smith & Wesson
executives meet with city residents to talk about gun violence. A
week later, the gunmaker had not
responded.
todd.frankel@washpost.com
FRIDAY, MARCH 23 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A17
SU
Rejecting predecessors’ tactics, Trump seeks China tari≠s
TARIFFS FROM A1
China over technology, Trump
weakened a new tariff meant to
protect U.S. production of industrial metals, potentially exempting the European Union, Brazil
and other countries accounting
for two-thirds of steel imports
and more than half of foreignmade aluminum.
By challenging China, Trump
rejected the approach of his
Republican and Democratic
predecessors, gambling that China will bend before he does. “We
don’t know how this is going to
turn out,” said Scott Kennedy,
director of the project on Chinese business at the Center for
Strategic and International Studies. “It could be resolved in a few
months, or it could spiral out of
control into a broader strategic
rivalry.”
Early reviews were not good.
On Wall Street, the benchmark
Dow Jones industrial average
plunged more than 700 points, or
almost 3 percent, as investors
blanched at the prospect of a
trade war between the world’s
two largest economies.
“There’s a lot of concern about
this administration’s shoot-first
approach,” said Josh Bolten,
president of the Business Roundtable. “The victims of the actions
that the administration is proposing to take are principally
Americans.”
Hours after Trump’s announcement, China’s commerce
ministry gave the first indication
of potential targets for retaliation, saying it had compiled a list
of 120 products worth nearly
$1 billion, including fresh fruit
and wine, upon which it would
impose a 15 percent tariff if the
two countries fail to resolve their
trade differences “within a stipulated time.”
The department did not specify a deadline and said that a
25 percent tariffs on other goods,
including pork and aluminum,
could be imposed “after further
evaluating the impact of U.S.
measures on China.”
Trump is betting that disrupting the traditional U.S. approach
to China will yield a better
commercial bargain for American businesses and workers than
the status quo that he blames for
hollowing out American industry.
Among U.S. politicians and
business leaders, there is broad
agreement that China has violated U.S. intellectual property
rights through restrictive licensing arrangements in China and
outright cybertheft in the United
States.
But Thursday’s actions threaten to unravel global supply
chains, increase costs for consumers and open the door to
Chinese retaliation against U.S.
farmers and businesses.
“The biggest and most powerful American companies are
stuck in the middle,” said James
McGregor, APCO Worldwide’s
chairman for greater China.
“They’re schizophrenic now.
They don’t want today’s business
to be eliminated. But they know
China’s plan for tomorrow is to
eliminate them in the Chinese
market and then take them on
globally.”
At $60 billion in affected products, Trump’s China actions carry
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
President Trump signs a memorandum targeting China’s trade policies Thursday at the White House. The president is seeking tariffs on $60 billion in Chinese goods, marking
the sharpest trade confrontation with the country in nearly a quarter-century and opening the door to Chinese retaliation against U.S. businesses. “We’re doing things for this
country that should have been done for many, many years,” the president said. Vice President Pence, right, said “The era of economic surrender is over.”
a bigger punch than the tariffs on
$46 billion in steel and aluminum imports that he announced
March 8.
The impact of those earlier
levies may shrink further: Lighthizer told the Senate Finance
Committee on Thursday that
products from the European
Union, Australia, Argentina,
South Korea and Brazil will not
be affected when the tariffs go
into effect on Friday while negotiations over potential exemptions continue.
Trump already had exempted
Canada and Mexico from the
import levies for the duration of
talks aimed at renegotiating the
North American Free Trade
Agreement.
The United States last adopted
this sort of uncompromising approach in a 1995 dispute over
intellectual property rights. China ultimately acceded to U.S.
demands, but today its economy
is almost 17 times as big, making
it less vulnerable to American
pressure.
A Sino-U.S. trade war would
affect economies that account for
roughly 40 percent of global
output, which explains the
mounting apprehension on Wall
Street.
“Trump’s economics team
blew it,” economist Chris Rupkey
of MUFG Union Bank wrote in a
research note. “Tariffs mean a
trade war and the news has the
world’s investors running for the
exits.”
The president blamed China
for the loss of 60,000 factories
and 6 million jobs, a number that
most economists say blends the
impact on U.S. employment of
both Chinese competition and
automation.
Trump said that unfair Chinese trade practices are responsible for the yawning U.S. trade
deficit with China, which has
reached a record $375 billion on
his watch.
“Any way you look at it, it’s the
largest of any country in the
history of our world,” the president said. “It’s out of control.”
The White House expects the
new taxes, which could reach up
to 1,300 specific imports, will
have a “minimal impact” upon
consumers. But even business
groups that support the goal of
requiring changes in Chinese
industrial policy voiced opposition to the tariffs.
“There is no way to impose
$50 billion in tariffs on Chinese
imports without it having a negative impact on American consumers,” said Hun Quach, vice
president for international trade
at the Retail Industry Leaders
Association.
Trump and his aides provided
varying estimates of the value of
the Chinese goods at issue. The
president referred in his
Roosevelt Room remarks to
“about $60 billion,” while a senior White House aide who
briefed reporters two hours before the president put the figure
at “about $50 billion.”
The official cannot be identified under the ground rules for
such White House briefings.
Trump also ordered Lighthizer
to complain to the World Trade
Organization about China’s discriminatory licensing practices
for foreign companies, an effort
that U.S. officials hope will draw
support from American allies in
Europe and Japan.
The president described the
actions against China as part of a
broader reappraisal of U.S. global relationships, featuring a willingness to use tariff threats to
force concessions from trading
partners.
“We will end up negotiating
these things rather than fighting over them,” Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said, in an
apparent reference to fears of a
trade war.
The president also alluded to
political calculations, saying that
voter concerns over economic
losses from bad trade deals was
“maybe one of the main reasons”
he won the White House.
“The era of economic surrender is over,” Vice President Pence
added.
Trump’s actions won plaudits
from Democrats such as Sen.
Sherrod Brown (Ohio). But they
drew fire from the conservative
National Taxpayers Union’s Bryan Riley, who called the proposed
China tariffs “self-destructive
and reckless.”
Under the measures targeting
Beijing announced Thursday,
Treasury
Secretary
Steven
Mnuchin will draw up new investment restrictions to address
concerns about Chinese investors, including state-sponsored
investment funds acquiring U.S.
companies to gain access to their
technology.
“It’s out of control.”
President Trump, on the U.S. trade
deficit with China, which has reached
a record $375 billion on his watch.
Since the president took office
14 months ago, his remarks on
China have swung between effusive praise for Chinese President
Xi Jinping and tough talk about
its trade practices. In recent
months, Trump has adopted an
increasingly bellicose tone, with
the White House billing Thursday’s actions as “targeting China’s economic aggression” and
the president’s trade agenda released in February labeling the
country a “hostile” economic
power.
“China is engaged in practices
which harm this country,” said
Peter Navarro, director of the
White House Office of Trade and
Manufacturing Policy.
Trump’s trade moves potentially mark a sharp break with
decades of growing U.S. economic engagement with China,
which began in the late 1970s as
the country emerged from
Maoist autarky.
Years of commercial delegations and diplomatic dialogue
saw trade between the two countries mushroom to $635 billion
from $116 billion in 2000. Yet at
the same time, U.S. companies
complained about strict restraints on their operations in
the Chinese market. Government regulations typically limited them to a minority stake
alongside a local partner.
The administrations of George
W. Bush and Barack Obama
sought to persuade the Chinese
to embrace more fully a marketoriented policy. Through 2013,
when a high-level Communist
Party conclave proclaimed a “decisive role” for the market and
officials promised to pare back
the state’s role in the economy,
U.S. officials believed China was
headed in the right direction.
“That process has failed,” Navarro said.
Trump administration officials say that China’s economic
policies are distorting global
markets for key products such as
steel and threaten to have the
same effect on more advanced
industries such as semiconductors and artificial intelligence.
“China benefits far more from
the U.S.-China relationship than
the U.S. does,” Navarro said.
david.lynch@washpost.com
Simon Denyer and Luna Lin in
Beijing contributed to this report.
U.S. allies relieved to be exempted from tari≠s on metals, at least for now
Decision announced as
E.U. summit discussed
countermoves
BY
M ICHAEL B IRNBAUM
brussels — U.S. allies expressed
cautious relief Thursday after the
Trump administration issued a
temporary reprieve on tariffs on
steel and aluminum, hours before
they were set to begin.
The decision to exclude some
of the United States’ closest trading partners from the import tariffs gave some space to those
countries as they sought to negotiate permanent exemptions. Argentina, Australia, Brazil, the European Union and South Korea
are on the list U.S. Trade Representative Robert E. Lighthizer announced at a Senate hearing. Canada and Mexico already had been
exempted.
But the wide scope of the exemptions — which now encompass more than half of the steel
imported by the United States —
raised questions about whether
the tariffs would actually make a
difference in supporting U.S. metal industries. The countries hit
hardest by the steel tariffs when
they take effect Friday will be
Russia, Turkey and Japan.
It was not immediately clear
why Japan, a U.S. ally with a
similar trade relationship as the
countries with exemptions, was
not included. The tariff was sure
to set off a furious scramble in
Tokyo.
Some European leaders hailed
the decision to exempt them, even
as it remained uncertain how
they could win a permanent
carve-out.
“Only reasonable that EU
seems to be omitted from tariffs
based on national security
grounds given that EU and US are
close allies,” Danish Prime Minister Lars Loekke Rasmussen wrote
on Twitter. “Rather than threatening to raise tariffs against one
another EU and US should work
together to solve the real problem
of overcapacity.”
The leaders of the 28-nation
European Union had gathered in
Brussels, the E.U. capital, for a
previously scheduled summit
that was taken over by fears of a
trade war with the United States.
They were already locked behind
closed doors when word reached
them that Lighthizer had announced temporary clemency for
them during a Senate hearing.
The European Union negotiates
international trade relationships
as a single bloc.
World leaders had subjected
Washington to a furious lobbying
effort to remove the tariffs, announced by President Trump this
month; they had warned of a
JOSHUA ROBERTS/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Trade Representative Robert E. Lighthizer told a Senate committee
Thursday that impending tariffs against some U.S. allies’ exports of
steel and aluminum would be suspended.
trade war and said that they did
not see why long-standing military allies should face the import
taxes on national security
grounds, the professed basis for
Trump’s action.
The E.U. leaders had been set to
run through a list of potential
counter-tariffs against U.S. products, including Kentucky bourbon (from the home state of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell) and motorcycles (significant because Harley-Davidson is
based in Wisconsin, the home
state of House Speaker Paul D.
Ryan).
But European leaders have
said all along that they have no
interest in an escalating backand-forth with Washington.
“We need to avoid protectionism at the global level,” European
Council President Donald Tusk
said after the exemption announcement. “This is a major risk
for jobs, not only in Europe. In
this respect, dialogue with the
U.S. is key.”
They held back from issuing a
stronger statement as they awaited more clarity on White House
plans. Some diplomats said they
wouldn’t believe anything until
they saw it on Trump’s Twitter
feed.
The real problem in international trade, E.U. officials say, is
China, and officials have embraced joint efforts with Washington to address what they say
are Beijing’s unfair supports for
its manufacturing industries.
Such supports are what Trump
says he is trying to tackle with a
separate and far more sweeping
$60 billion set of tariffs against
China, which he announced
Thursday.
Trump, however, has said the
suspensions of the steel and aluminum tariffs are only temporary
and that he is willing to enact
them if he is unable to attain
better trade deals with U.S. partners.
U.S. officials have demanded
commitments from their trading
partners that they will take steps
to reduce U.S. trade deficits and
agree to work on pushing China
to engage in fairer trade practices.
“The idea that the president
has is that, based on a certain set
of criteria, that some countries
should get out,” Lighthizer told
the Senate hearing.
“What he has decided to do is to
pause the imposition of the tariffs
with respect to those countries,”
he said.
Permanent exemptions are expected to be resolved by the end of
April, Lighthizer said Wednesday.
But some European leaders
were cautious about whether the
E.U. and the White House could
strike a deal that would stick.
“The question on exemptions
is whether they are linked to
conditions,” Belgian Prime Minister Charles Michel told reporters.
He had little sympathy for
Trump’s broader agenda. “Is it up
to the rest of the world to resolve
the issue of the United States’
trade deficit because there might
have been brutal threats of protectionism?” Michel asked.
At the E.U. summit, leaders
were also set to discuss the nerve
agent attack on a former Russian
spy in Salisbury, England. Despite
European splits about how aggressively to respond, all 28 leaders said there was “no plausible
alternative explanation” other
than the Kremlin being culpable
for the attack. Diplomats said
they were likely to recall the E.U.
ambassador to Moscow for consultations, and some countries
were considering expulsions of
Russian diplomats to match Britain’s actions.
The attack, which targeted Sergei Skripal, is believed to be the
first chemical weapons assault on
NATO soil since the 1949 founding of the alliance.
michael.birnbaum@washpost.com
Quentin Ariès contributed to this
report.
A18
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
Facebook provided data to academic Kogan for research project
FACEBOOK FROM A1
Interviews and emails between
Kogan and his Cambridge Analytica colleagues, provided by Cambridge Analytica whistleblower
Christopher Wylie to The Washington Post, reveal Kogan as an
ambitious academic who traveled
the world to lecture and made
inroads in some of the most elite
universities in the United States
and Europe as he sought new
opportunities to build more elaborate databases and profit from his
work, such as by working with
for-profit firms such as Cambridge Analytica.
During his contract with Cambridge Analytica, the psychologist
tried to acquire medical and genetic records of Americans to
combine with troves of online
data he claimed to have obtained.
To that end, Kogan tried to create a
partnership with Harvard Medical School and with the Harvard
T.H. Chan School of Public Health
to merge his data sets with medical and genetic data, according to
emails.
“One of the people I met with at
Harvard medical said he might be
able to get us millions of medical
records and also genetic data to
link up to everything. Can you
imagine the possibilities then?”
Kogan wrote to Cambridge Analytica data scientists in a February
2014 email. “It’s going to be
AMAZING.”
Two Harvard professors cited
in Kogan’s emails said Kogan
voiced interest in working together, but they say they never supplied him with any medical data.
In an interview Thursday, Kogan said he feels that his work for
Cambridge Analytica was in full
compliance with Facebook’s data
policies at the time. He said he
always assumed the medical data
would be anonymous and was intended to be used for an academic
project unrelated to his Cambridge Analytica work.
“Tech companies and developers like myself have been given a
wake-up call that things we think
are okay are not okay to people,
and people feel angry and violated,” Kogan said. “And that is on
myself, on Cambridge Analytica,
on developers of that era, on Facebook, and on tech companies, because this is the culture that does
exist.”
Partnerships with academics
such as Kogan, 31, have been an
integral part of Facebook’s broader effort to demonstrate that the
social network is a potent force in
society and a tool of social insight.
Many academics partner with
Facebook because the social network will not give them access to
the data they seek unless the research is conducted jointly, and
some researchers have raised concerns that Facebook is creating a
conflict of interest for them.
But Kogan’s academic association with Facebook, around the
same time that he was taking data
to hand off to Cambridge Analytica, raises questions about how
user consent was obtained, the
line between academic research
and corporate marketing — and
how scholars can sometimes use
DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Aleksandr Kogan did work for Cambridge Analytica, which has offices in this building in London.
data for commercial and political
ends.
“We are strongly committed to
protecting people’s information,”
Facebook said in a statement. “We
know there’s more that we could
have done, and as [chief executive] Mark Zuckerberg said this
week, we are working hard to
tackle past abuse and are continuing to investigate.”
Facebook’s chief executive on
Wednesday said that Cambridge
Analytica’s grab led to a “breach of
trust” with Facebook’s users, and
that the company will investigate
and audit thousands of third-party app developers.
Kogan, who is co-founder of a
start-up called Philometrics,
which conducts surveys, was integral to Cambridge Analytica’s obtaining at least 30 million Facebook user profiles, an issue that
erupted into a crisis for Facebook
last week. In 2013, he created a
personality quiz app that collected
Facebook profiles for an academic
study. (Kogan also goes by his
married name, Aleksandr Spectre.) It was from what he says was a
related app that he was able to
gain access to the 30 million profiles, because it included the
friend networks of people who
used the app.
Facebook suspended Kogan,
Cambridge Analytica and Wylie
last week, claiming they had illegitimately shared the data. Facebook ordered that they destroy the
data. But deleting it in one database — as Facebook has asked
Kogan to do — may not actually
make it go away if it was shared
more widely, privacy experts say.
Kogan, Wylie and Cambridge Analytica say they have deleted all the
data.
But Facebook had a collaboration with Kogan that was not disclosed in a company blog post
describing the abuse of the company’s systems, or in a timeline
that Zuckerberg posted on his
Facebook wall on Wednesday.
Kogan co-authored a paper
with 10 others that was funded by
Cambridge University and the
University of St. Petersburg in
Russia in addition to Facebook.
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Titled “On wealth and the diversity of friendships: High social class
people around the world have fewer international friends,” it studied the social ties between wealthy
people around the world and was
published in the journal Personality and Individual Differences in
2015.
Two Facebook data scientists
were among the authors, in addition to Kogan and some prominent academics. One of the authors, Berkeley researcher Emiliana Simon-Thomas, said that Kogan had invited her to join the
study but that she did not remember many details about it. The two
were colleagues in the years during his doctoral studies at Berkeley.
The methodology of the study
has similarities to the collection
methods used when Kogan
worked with Cambridge Analytica, and it also makes reference to
an app built by Kogan. To conduct
the study, the researchers recruited freelance workers on Amazon’s
Mechanical Turk crowdsourced
labor program and paid them $1
each to participate. Of that group,
857 participants authorized Kogan to gather some information
from their Facebook profiles automatically, the study said.
The authors obtained the friend
networks of those participants,
calculating the current location
and the percentage who lived outside the United States. Facebook
then provided the authors with
data “on every friendship formed
in 2011 in every country in the
world at the national aggregate
level.” The data set included a total
of 57,457,192,520 friendships, according to the paper.
The paper says that participants signed a consent form that
detailed all parts of the study. “No
deception was used,” the researchers added.
Facebook already had an agreement with the Federal Trade Commission, dating to 2011, in which
Facebook promised to get people’s
permissions before their data was
shared. But privacy experts say
Facebook’s developer policies at
the time allowed programmers to
access locations and other data
such as relationship status, photos
and likes from friends’ profiles
without notifying them.
“Researchers should not have
received user identified data,” said
Marc Rotenberg, president and
executive director of the privacy
advocacy group Electronic Privacy Information Center. “The users
never consented to the use of their
data in this way.”
While Kogan was conducting
the study with Facebook, he was
also approached for more-commercial opportunities for his data.
At the time, Cambridge University colleagues who worked for
Cambridge Analytica introduced
Kogan to officials of the parent
company, SCL, he said. He
launched a company called GSR
that partnered with SCL and
aimed to gather a wide range of
personal data, according to emails
and to Kogan and Wylie.
In a June 2014 email, a director
of Cambridge’s Psychometrics
Center, which employed Kogan,
wrote to Cambridge Analytica
chief executive Alexander Nix saying that “the University is concerned, amongst other things,
about any issues which may arise
from any commercial use” of the
personality data and models,
which the director said were
strictly for academic use.
Kogan also approached Michal
Kosinski, an expert in data-driven
psychology, to request access to
Kosinski’s popular Facebook personality database, but after negotiations, Kogan was turned down,
Kosinski said.
Facebook severed ties with Kogan in December 2015 and demanded that he delete the data
obtained through the survey on
the app. Facebook says that he
deceived the company and its users when he commercialized data
that was taken for legitimate research purposes and gave it to
Cambridge Analytica.
Kogan says that none of the
data that was taken for research
purposes in 2013 was provided to
Cambridge Analytica. He says that
after he contracted with Cambridge Analytica, he sent out a
new survey to Facebook users,
with new terms of service that
allowed for broad uses of the data.
That new survey app collected
data from nearly 300,000 Facebook users and captured data on
30 million of their friends. He says
he has deleted all the data that he
obtained from Facebook.
‘I did not offer any data’
Kogan, who was born in what
was then the Soviet Union, traveled several times to Russia,
where he worked with St. Petersburg university researchers and
gave lectures on data and social
media.
Kogan also tried to partner with
other academics to make use of
the online data he had obtained,
emails and interviews show. He
wrote to his Cambridge Analytica
colleagues in February 2014 that
he had met or intended to meet
roughly a dozen professors from
Cambridge, Harvard, Yale University and the University of California at Berkeley, and that everyone
was “extremely enthusiastic”
about collaborating.
Kogan wrote in the email that
he wanted to create statistical
models that could accurately identify people at risk for various diseases and illnesses by examining
their Web browsing and purchase
behaviors, and combine that with
medical data from Harvard. In the
emails, he said he had “sign-ons”
from two professors at the schools.
Wylie, the whistleblower, told
The Post on Thursday that Kogan
was looking for as much data as he
could find to inform research that
could help model human behavior. “We were looking for a total
picture, from your genes to your
likes,” Wylie said.
Kogan said he went to Harvard
as an academic, in the hopes of
starting up a big-data institute
that was separate from his work
for Cambridge Analytica. He
wrote the emails to SCL because
the company was planning to support that effort.
One of the professors listed in
Kogan’s emails was Ichiro Kawachi, chair of the Department of
Social and Behavioral Sciences at
the Harvard School of Public
Health. He told The Post that he
met Kogan in his Harvard office to
discuss potentially collaborating
on a project looking at how people’s use of emoticons in social
media correlated with their mood.
“I did not offer any data to
share, nor do I possess any medical data to share,” Kawachi said.
He said that they did not work on
any projects together and that he
had “no idea” about Kogan’s claim
of an offer from Harvard Medical
School for millions of medical records.
Gil Alterovitz, a Harvard Medical School professor listed in Kogan’s email, told The Post that he
was introduced to Kogan by a
friend he knew from the Harvard
School of Public Health, who suggested Kogan offered a potential
academic collaboration. Alterovitz said he later met Kogan for
lunch, where he “was surprised to
hear about the size of data [Kogan] claimed to working on. It was
big data. . . . I recall asking how he
got the data — and thinking it was
surprising that he got so much
data, so quickly.”
‘A conflict of interest’
In the past six years, Facebook
has partnered with many academics and research institutions to
examine Facebook’s effect on the
world and relationships, which
Facebook-backed research overwhelmingly concludes is positive.
Facebook requires researchers
who want large amounts of data to
partner with the social network on
the research, which has presented
ethical questions for researchers,
said Robert Kraut, a social psychologist at Carnegie Mellon University.
“It definitely presents a conflict
of interest,” he said. “In order to
get access to instruments to understand the world, you need to
contract with these companies.
Lots of important social interactions are happening online and
being captured by social media
companies; the only way to understand certain elements of human
behavior is with these partnerships.”
Simon-Thomas, who co-authored the international friendships study with Facebook and
Kogan, said that Kogan was
known as a trustworthy a researcher and mathematician and
that she was surprised to see him
in the news. “I would never have
pinned it on him,” she said in an
interview. “People want to earn
more income where they can, and
academics is a competitive community.”
elizabeth.dwoskin@washpost.com
drew.harwell@washpost.com
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. FRIDAY,
MARCH 23 , 2018
Facebook
users’ data
is out there
— forever
BY D REW H ARWELL
AND E LIZABETH D WOSKIN
The data on millions of Facebook users that a firm wrongfully
swiped from the social network
probably has spread to other
groups, databases and the “dark”
Web, experts said, making Facebook’s pledge to safeguard its
users’ privacy hard to enforce.
Facebook chief executive Mark
Zuckerberg said Wednesday that
the company will notify users
whose data may have been taken
by Cambridge Analytica, a political marketing firm that worked
for the Trump campaign. Cambridge Analytica obtained the
data of an estimated 50 million
users in 2014 and 2015 under
false pretenses, breaking Facebook’s rules. Zuckerberg said that
Facebook, the world’s biggest social network, has taken steps to
ensure that data on millions of its
users does not get into the wrong
hands.
But Paul-Olivier Dehaye, a privacy expert and co-founder of
PersonalData.IO, said he suspects the data has already proliferated far beyond Cambridge’s
reach. “It is the whole nature of
this ecosystem,” Dehaye said.
“This data travels. And once it has
spread, there is no way to get it
back.”
Zuckerberg said Facebook will
investigate and audit thousands
of third-party developers. Thirdparty apps could access data on
Facebook users and their friends
until 2015, when Facebook
changed its rules. Experts question whether the network’s push
to investigate and audit thousands of third-party developers
will merit any true results. Dehaye questioned how Facebook
would define which apps merit
investigation and what would
constitute “suspicious activity.”
Facebook said that it conducts
manual and automated checks to
make sure that developers are
complying with its policies. It
also plans to expand its bug
bounty program to report misuse
of data.
Zuckerberg said in interviews
Wednesday that the company is
investigating reports that independent researchers and darkWeb data brokers are trading
user data grabbed by the firm
Cambridge Analytica.
Frank Pasquale, a professor at
the University of Maryland who
specializes in algorithms and
technology ethics, called this “the
runaway-data problem” and said
there is no way to return the
genie to the bottle when it comes
to securing data that has been
released. Location and demographic information, which was
taken from Facebook, can often
be used to tie someone to other
data points for which the identity
was previously unclear.
“The larger [the] data sets you
get about individuals, the easier
it is to use those to re-identify
them in data sets where they
think
they’re
anonymous,”
Pasquale said. “With a relatively
small amount of data points, you
can infer an incredible amount of
very personal information about
people.”
Facebook does not know
whether other companies have
shared or mishandled user data,
and a forensic audit is ongoing,
Zuckerberg told Wired magazine.
Asked by Wired how confident he
was that Facebook data had not
gotten into the hands of Russian
operatives or other groups, Zuckerberg said: “I can’t really say
that. I hope that we will know
that more certainly after we do an
audit.”
For many of Facebook’s prime
growth years, the company gave
outside developers access to virtually everything that users who
authorized an app, or their
friends, had posted on the social
network — home town, current
city, events and location checkins; interests, groups and all the
pages they had liked; relationship statuses with romantic partners, friends and family; birthdays, activities, work histories
and political and religious affiliations; and photos, notes and videos.
Facebook changed its rules in
2015 amid concerns over how the
data was being used. But for
years, other developers had the
power to construct the same
kinds of massive micro-targeted
databases that had helped make
Facebook so prominent. It is unclear how many other services
used that power or what they
have done with the data pulled.
drew.harwell@washpost.com
elizabeth.dwoskin@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/the-switch
FRIDAY, MARCH 23 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
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% Chg
$1.3600
$16.39
$10.2975
$0.1277
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month
$1100
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Gainers
Guess? Inc
Five Below Inc
DXP Enterprises Inc
Washington Prime
CBL & Associates
Cato Corp
PG&E Corp
Dine Brands Global
Harmonic Inc
Quorum Health Corp
Fred's Inc
Synchronoss
PA REIT
Scholastic Corp
HealthEquity Inc
Ventas Inc
Edison Intl
SPS Commerce Inc
PotlatchDeltic Corp
Ramco-Gershenson
Daily
Close % Chg
$19.91
$69.96
$41.48
$6.45
$4.33
$13.60
$44.13
$66.98
$3.90
$7.13
$2.51
$10.61
$9.66
$37.67
$66.82
$49.32
$62.92
$64.65
$53.05
$12.02
28.3
4.2
3.9
3.7
3.1
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2.4
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2.1
2.1
2.1
1.8
1.6
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1.5
1.5
Losers
Century Aluminum
Herman Miller
AbbVie Inc
Commercial Metals
G-III Apparel
US Steel
Pioneer Energy Svcs
CARBO Ceramics
AK Steel Holding
Acuity Brands Inc
Winnebago Indst
Darden Restaurants
Michaels Cos Inc
Steel Dynamics
TimkenSteel Corp
Accenture PLC
WisdomTree Invst
REX American Res
Bank of the Ozarks
Pinnacle Financial
Daily
Close % Chg
$16.76
$32.15
$98.10
$20.91
$33.01
$34.50
$2.95
$7.92
$4.50
$134.66
$38.40
$85.94
$19.55
$42.92
$15.84
$150.23
$9.16
$80.19
$47.35
$63.65
–17.8
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–7.8
–7.5
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–7.2
–7.0
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–6.7
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Interest Rates
Other Measures
Close
$3.0200
$3.7600
$64.30
$1,333.20
$2.62
Gainers and Losers from the S&P 1500 Index
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
Company
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
7200
2300
Commodities
S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot
Daily
% Chg
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
0.35
0.53
0.80
1.65
3.43
6.05
4.36%
4.75%
Bank Prime
30-Year fixed mortgage
3.79%
1.75%
Federal Funds
10-year note
Yield: 2.82
2-year note
Yield: 2.28
5-year note
Yield: 2.62
6-month bill
Yield: 1.92
15-Year fixed mortgage
2.27%
LIBOR 3-Month
3.42%
1-Year ARM
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
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For complete market coverage, go to washingtonpost.com/markets
A20
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 23 , 2018
PowerPost
INTELLIGENCE FOR LEADERS WASHINGTONPOST.COM/POWERPOST
Once more, Congress
dodges a DACA deal
Politicians from both
parties disappoint bases
on immigration issues
BY D AVID N AKAMURA
AND S EUNG M IN K IM
KEVIN LAMARQUE/REUTERS
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson waves to State Department employees as he leaves the agency for the final time Thursday. Tillerson, who
was fired by President Trump last week, will formally step down at the end of the month after leading the department for about 14 months.
Tillerson bids farewell to a ‘mean-spirited town’
BY
C AROL M ORELLO
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson
appealed to State Department
employees on Thursday to maintain their integrity and to be kind
in a “mean-spirited town” as he
bid farewell to the staff he led for
barely a year.
Tillerson urged a few hundred
employees gathered in the main
lobby of the Harry S. Truman
Building to show respect for each
other and to undertake one act of
kindness a day. He drew sustained applause when he added:
“This can be a very mean-spirited
town. But you don’t have to
choose to participate in that.
Each of us get to choose the
person we want to be, and the way
we want to be treated, and the
way we will treat others.”
Tillerson, 66, was fired by Pres-
ident Trump on March 13. He
officially learned of his dismissal
through a Trump tweet saying
that CIA Director Mike Pompeo
would be his replacement.
Tillerson had rebuffed suggestions he would resign amid a
series of White House leaks over
the previous months, apparently
calculated to shame him into
leaving, and lately had insisted he
would be at the State Department
through the end of the year, if not
longer.
In his speech, Tillerson did not
mention Trump by name but invoked the values of respect, integrity, honesty and accountability,
all core attributes he cited at
meet-and-greet gatherings with
embassy employees around the
world.
“Never lose sight of your most
valuable asset, the most valuable
ADVERTISEMENT
asset you possess: your personal
integrity,” Tillerson said. “Only
you can relinquish it or allow it to
be compromised. Once you’ve
done so, it is very, very hard to
regain it.”
“I hope you will continue to
treat each other with respect,” he
continued. “Regardless of the job
title, the station in life or your
role, everyone is important to the
State Department. We’re all just
human beings trying to do our
part.”
Tillerson officially remains secretary of state until March 31, but
he has turned over the day-to-day
running of the agency to his
deputy, John Sullivan. In a
speech, Sullivan said Tillerson
was returning to his ranch in
Texas later in the day.
“His work for our country,
leading the department, his voice
ADVERTISEMENT
This weekend, students from across the nation will
travel to Washington to march against gun violence.
We, the leaders of our region’s institutions of higher
education, stand with these young people in calling
for common sense solutions.
School shootings and gun violence are far too prevalent in the United States,
affecting many communities across our nation, including institutions of higher
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our students can flourish. Just as institutions of higher education are affected by gun violence, we can be part
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We recognize that the young people who are marching this weekend may be further
developing their talents at our institutions in the coming years. We wish you a safe,
productive visit to our region, we stand with you, and thank you for making your
voices heard.
John Garvey
President,
Catholic University of America
Chair, Consortium of Universities
Dr. Matthew D. Shank
President, Marymount University
Vice Chair, Consortium of Universities
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President, American University
Roberta Cordano
President, Gallaudet University
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President, George Mason University
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The George Washington University
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Community College
Patricia A. McGuire
President,
Trinity Washington University
Dr. Ronald F. Mason, Jr.
President, University of the
District of Columbia
Dr. Wallace D. Loh
President, University of Maryland
College Park
Dr. John C. Cavanaugh
President and CEO, Consortium
of Universities of the Washington
4L[YVWVSP[HU(YLH*LU[YHS6ɉJL
for peace, for humanitarian assistance has been an inspiration for
me,” Sullivan said. “And I was
honored — have been honored to
work for him, to have been selected by him to serve as deputy
secretary of state.”
All secretaries of state make
their ritual arrival and farewell
speeches in the lobby of the building where Tillerson spoke the day
he first entered it on Feb. 2, 2017,
and again on Thursday.
Many speak from the stairway
to a mezzanine so they can be
viewed by all in the jam-packed
room. But Tillerson addressed
the crowd from the lobby floor,
standing in front of a wall plaque
dedicated to State Department
employees who have been killed
in the line of duty. It was a
poignant nod to Tillerson’s concern for the safety of his staff. He
often spoke of waking up in the
morning wondering whether everyone was safe.
The crowd of assembled of
employees Thursday was noticeably sparser than usual. A large
number of senior officials have
resigned or taken early retirement, in part because they did not
want to serve the Trump administration but also because they considered Tillerson remote and instrumental in their being sidelined in U.S. foreign policy.
Among those in the crowd was
Steve Goldstein, the undersecretary who was fired when he contradicted the White House version of Tillerson’s dismissal.
Goldstein told reporters that his
boss had not spoken to the president that morning and had no
idea why he was being replaced.
Although some had mixed
views of Tillerson’s brief tenure —
and some were highly critical —
many thought he had been treated shabbily by the White House.
Aaron David Miller, a Middle
East expert who served under six
secretaries of state, tweeted that
Tillerson, who had the shortest
tenure of any top diplomat in
modern U.S. history, “never had a
chance and was treated in a cruel/
humiliating manner.”
But criticism still followed Tillerson as he walked out the door.
John Kirby, a former State Department spokesman who now
works as an analyst on CNN,
tweeted, “Tillerson deserves credit for being a gentleman & a man
of integrity. But we should not
forget the degree to which he
failed to: advance a cohesive foreign policy . . . promote & respect
the expertise of career diplomats
. . . and fight for the resources the
State Dept sorely needs.”
Tillerson’s 14 months at the
helm of State Department were
marked by several disagreements
with the president he served. Tillerson urged Trump not to withdraw the United States from international commitments made
by the previous administration,
such as the Paris climate accord
and the Iran nuclear deal, which
Trump is contemplating leaving.
Trump in turn repeatedly undercut Tillerson, often contradicting his top diplomat’s measured statements with a breezy
tweet. Their relationship never
seemed to recover after Tillerson
reportedly was overheard referring to Trump as a “moron,” a
remark Tillerson never denied,
calling it beneath his dignity.
Trump later offered to compare
IQ test results.
carol.morello@washpost.com
www.consortium.org
John Hudson contributed to this
report.
Chances of an immigration
deal in Congress appeared dead
Thursday after the House approved a $1.3 trillion spending
bill with no protections for
young undocumented immigrants and only a minor down
payment on President Trump’s
proposed border wall, prompting a Washington blame game
that could have ramifications in
November.
The White House aggressively
tried to deflect responsibility for
the failure even though it was
Trump who ended the Obamaera Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program
last fall. Trump aides accused
Democrats of rejecting White
House proposals in order to use
the issue as “a political weapon”
ahead of the midterm elections.
Democrats want to use immigrants “as pawns in their game,”
White House Legislative Affairs
Director Marc Short told reporters. “They do not want a solution
to this problem.”
Democrats and immigration
advocates fiercely rejected those
charges, noting that Trump created the crisis in the first place.
They argued that the White
House scuttled any hopes of a
deal on DACA by adding demands for excessive border control resources in return for providing a legal status to “dreamers” who have lived in the country without documents since
they were children.
During months of negotiations, Republicans, at the White
House’s urging, sought $25 billion for the wall on the border
with Mexico, along with cuts to
legal immigration programs.
After the Senate defeated four
bills last month, the White
House and Democrats sought to
narrow the scope of the talks, but
the president’s proposal for the
wall money to extend DACA for
just three years proved a dealbreaker.
The upshot was that Trump
stood to win just $1.6 billion in
the spending bill that the White
House said would go toward 110
miles of border wall. But Democrats disputed that interpretation, saying the funding would
mostly be dedicated to upgrading and replacing existing fencing and building some levees, not
for construction of parts of the
wall the president has promoted.
Trump’s stated goal is to build
700 miles of border barriers.
Democrats predicted that the
failure on Trump’s side would
harm him with his conservative
base.
“He would’ve actually fulfilled
one of his goals, even though I
abhor that goal,” Sen. Robert
Menendez (D-N.J.) said. “He
would have solved a major immigration question that’s going to
tug at his administration moving
in the days ahead.”
Meanwhile, an estimated
690,000 immigrants on DACA,
which offers renewable two-year
work visas, remain in limbo after
more than six months of promises by the president and members
of Congress that a deal was
possible. Thousands more who
have reached the age of eligibility
for the program cannot apply.
Two federal judges have issued
temporary injunctions blocking
the administration from making
good on plans to let DACA work
permits begin expiring this
month, but advocates said the
uncertainty around the program
has left participants fretful.
The legal fight over the program is expected to wind
through the appellate courts
and, potentially, reach the Supreme Court in the fall.
For dreamers, the outcome is
the latest crushing disappointment after years of promises
from Democrats, and some Republicans, that the political atmosphere in Washington was
conducive to a legislative solution to provide them permanent
legal status.
Advocates said immigrant
communities blame Trump’s
hard-line immigration stance for
the collapse of the talks, but they
acknowledged there continues to
be frustration with Democrats
for not putting up a stiffer fight.
“There’s no doubt that Trump
is the number one person to
blame,” said Lorella Praeli, direc-
tor of immigration policy and
campaigns at the American Civil
Liberties Union. She served as an
adviser to Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign. “But I also
think Democrats have to put up a
fight over and over again, especially as we get closer to the 2018
midterms and shift into a presidential election cycle.”
At least tactically, Democrats
have done a complete turnaround in just a few months.
In January, enough caucus
members were willing to vote
against spending measures without protections for dreamers
that the federal government endured a three-day shutdown over
the deadlock on immigration.
But now, a healthy number of
Democrats are supporting the
spending bill without those protections.
Senior Democrats rationalize
their shift with two main arguments: They fended off other
Trump-backed
immigration
measures they said were harmful, and the 2,232-page spending
bill contains several other policy
victories for the party.
For instance, the number of
detention beds funded in the
spending package is about
10,000 fewer than what the
White House had first sought in
its budget request for this fiscal
year. The Trump administration
had also demanded $25 billion
for his long-prized wall, but
secured $1.6 billion — a pot of
cash that came with strings attached on how it could be spent.
“It turned out to be, we’re
largely successful on the deportation side, and certainly on the
wall side of this equation,” Sen.
Richard J. Durbin (D-Ill.) said.
“But we couldn’t reach an agreement with Trump and the Republicans on the DACA and
dreamers side.
“There are terrific wins. It
really makes it a difficult vote,”
he added. “But the biggest single
loss is the failure to deal with
DACA and dreamers.”
Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard
(Calif.), the top Democrat on the
House panel overseeing homeland security funding, also acknowledged the internal struggle for the party between using
scorched-earth
tactics
for
dreamers and advancing other
Democratic priorities.
“I think what happened is that
once we got the caps, that there
was so much more money for the
other programs. Education,
health care, all this,” she said. “It
was very difficult for a lot of
folks, and there was a lot of
weighing the pros and cons.”
That is doing little to sate the
fury among immigration advocates, who have forcefully pressured both Democratic and Republican lawmakers for a permanent fix since Trump announced
in September that he would wind
down the Obama-era program.
Rep. Luis V. Gutiérrez (D-Ill.)
said Democrats “failed” because
immigrants are not a priority.
“They’re not going to stand up
unequivocally for immigrants,”
he said. “It’s really almost despicable that people are now talking
about [how] the dreamers are
protected by the courts, we can
wait this out until November and
get a better deal.”
Meanwhile, conservatives and
Trump allies vented about how
Republicans weren’t able to secure more immigration enforcement resources demanded by
their base, given that the GOP
controls both houses of Congress
and the White House.
House Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows (R-N.C.) argued that the amount of wall
funding was minuscule, and he
mocked the security barriers outlined in the omnibus spending
bill as merely border levees and a
small amount of new fencing.
Referring to House Speaker
Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) and Senate
Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), Meadows said: “Perhaps they can express the dynamics of the negotiations and
why there weren’t more conservative wins.”
“It’s a frustration for me, too,”
said Sen. David Perdue (R-Ga.)
“But the reality is, they have all
the cards when it comes to an
omnibus like this, the Democrats.
“When you have a president in
the White House who says he has
certain things he wants, you got
Republican control of the Senate
and Republican control of the
House, the minority party actually has a lot of power when you get
into an omnibus situation,” Perdue said.
david.nakamura@washpost.com
seung-min.kim@washpost.com
FRIDAY, MARCH 23 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A21
RE
washington forum
FAREED ZAKARIA
CATHERINE RAMPELL
A shake-up
looms in
Silicon Valley
The dumb way
to deal with
China
W
L
e might look back on 2017 as the
last moment of unbridled faith
and optimism in the technology
industry. The revelations about
Cambridge Analytica’s use of Facebook data —
mining more than 50 million users’ personal
information — came at a time when people
were already considering appropriate ways to
curb the handful of tech companies that dominate not just the American economy but also,
increasingly, American life.
As the information revolution took off in
the 1990s, we got caught up in the excitement
of the age, along with the novelty of the
products and their transformative power. We
were dazzled by the wealth created by nebbishy 25-year-olds, who became instant billionaires — the ultimate revenge of the nerds.
And in the midst of all this, as the United
States was transitioning into a digital economy, we neglected to ask: What is the role for
government?
The image of technology companies springing forth from unfettered free markets was
never quite accurate. Today’s digital economy
rests on three major technologies: the computer chip, the Internet and GPS. All three owe
their existence in large part to the federal
government. The latter two were, of course,
developed from scratch, owned and run by the
government until they were opened up to the
private sector. Most people don’t realize that
GPS — the global positioning system of satellites and control centers that is so crucial to
the modern economy — is, even now, owned
by the U.S. government and operated by the
Air Force.
comments@fareedzakaria.com
from Tehran to Damascus.
In an email exchange, Mark Dubowitz, chief executive of the Foundation for
Defense of Democracies, offered a few
other ideas that I’m happy to endorse:
Adopt “Israeli redlines on construction
of [Iranian] military bases, missile production facilities, transfers of gamechanging weaponry”; implement “U.S.
financial warfare campaign against
Iran, Assad and Russia” to “make them
bleed financially”; win a “commitment
from U.S., Europe, Gulf and Asian allies
that no reconstruction money will go to
areas controlled by Iran, Assad, Hezbollah or Russia”; and indict “Iran, Hezbollah, elements of the LAF [Lebanese
Armed Forces] and Assad regime for
using civilians as human shields under
laws of armed conflict and for war
crimes.”
All reasonable suggestions. But none
of them is a game-changer.
Dubowitz, however, went further
than I would when he suggested asking
Congress for an Authorization for the
Use of Military Force to turn the “counter-ISIS mission into a counter-Iran
mission.” I don’t think the American
people are ready to risk war with Iran,
and I don’t think the current facts
warrant it. After all, Iran’s nuclear program is held in check by an international agreement — at least until Trump
torpedoes it. But short of a massive U.S.
military intervention, there isn’t much
the United States can do to dramatically
affect the outcome in Syria.
I am not abandoning my commitment to freedom. I’m suggesting only
the implementation of our principles
needs to be tempered by considerations
of prudence and practicality. In today’s
political environment, that appears to
be a radical thought.
writetoboot@gmail.com
crampell@washpost.com
EVAN VUCCI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Vladimir Putin and President Trump meet at the Group of 20 summit in Hamburg in July.
MICHAEL GERSON
A White House cry for help
A
s a former presidential
staffer, I have little patience for leaks. Any president deserves and requires the ability to conduct policy
discussions in private. Leaks are
an abuse of power and position,
generally by people who are unelected and self-serving.
But motivations matter, and the
taxonomy of White House leakage
is a worthy study. A surprising
number of leaks are the result of
simple vanity — the desire to appear in the know. Other leakers are
trying to embarrass or sabotage a
rival. Some leaks result from deviousness — the attempt to box the
president in on a policy matter.
The exposure of a White House
briefing document telling President Trump “DO NOT CONGRATULATE” Russia’s Vladimir Putin
on his sham election victory —
leaked after Trump congratulated
Putin on his sham election victory
— falls into a different category. It
seems to have been motivated by
desperation.
The circle of aides with access to
the president’s briefing book — in
the George W. Bush administration, a big, black binder sent along
with the president to the residence
each night — is small. The disclosure of an important briefing
memo makes a leak investigation
inevitable, and more likely to produce the culprit.
Someone at the White House,
presumably on the national security team, has taken a large personal risk to call attention to Trump’s
mysteriously cozy relationship
with a strategic rival. This is extraordinary — and extraordinarily
frightening. In most administrations, the aides closest to the presi-
As the United States was
transitioning into a digital
economy, we neglected to ask:
What is the role for
government?
And yet, as these revolutionary technologies created new industries, destroyed others
and reshaped communities and cities, we
simply assumed that this was the way of the
world and that nothing could be done to affect
it. That would have been socialist-style interference with the free market.
But the result does not seem one that a
libertarian would celebrate. We now have a
tech economy dominated by just a few mammoth companies that effectively create a barrier to entry for newcomers. In Silicon Valley,
new start-ups don’t even pretend that they
will become independent companies. Their
business plan is to be acquired by Google,
Facebook, Amazon, Microsoft or Apple. The
situation looks more like an oligopoly than a
free market. In fact, through the age of big
tech, the number of new business start-ups
has been declining.
The other noticeable consequence has
been the erosion of privacy, highlighted by
the Cambridge Analytica/Facebook scandal.
Because technology companies now deal
with billions of consumers, any individual is a
speck, a tiny data point. And since for most
technology companies the individual consumer is also a product, whose information is
sold to others for a profit, he or she is doubly
disempowered. The tech giants would surely
respond that they have democratized information, created products of extraordinary
power and potential, and transformed life for
the better. All of this is true. So did previous
innovations such as the telephone, the automobile, antibiotics and electricity. But precisely because of these products’ power and
transformational impact, it was necessary for
the government to play some role in protecting individuals and restraining the huge new
winners in the economy.
Change is likely to come from two directions. Regulatory action in the West will give
more control to the individual. The European
Union has established rules, which will go into
effect on May 25, that will make it much easier
for people to know how their data is being
used and to limit that use. It is likely that the
United States will follow suit.
The second direction is even more intriguing and comes from the East. Until recently,
as Indian entrepreneur Nandan Nilekani
pointed out to me, there were just a handful
of digital platforms with more than 1 billion
users, all run by companies in the United
States or China, such as Google, Facebook
and Tencent. But now India has its own
billion-person digital platform: the extraordinary “Aadhaar” biometric ID system,
which includes almost all of the nation’s
1.3 billion residents (and whose creation
Nilekani oversaw). It is the only one of these
massive platforms that is publicly owned.
That means it does not need to make money
off user data. It’s possible to imagine that in
India, it will become normal to think of data
as personal property that individuals can
keep or rent or sell as they wish in a very open
and democratic free market. India might
well become the global innovator for individuals’ data rights.
Add innovations in blockchain technology,
and we are likely to see even more challenges
to the current gatekeepers of the Internet in
the near future.
Whether from East or West, top down or
bottom up, change is coming to transform the
world of technology. Properly handled, it can
produce freer markets and greater individual
empowerment.
ook. The Trump administration
isn’t entirely wrong about China
and trade.
For years, U.S. companies — as
well as foreign ones — have been victims of
Chinese intellectual property rights policies, including being forced to hand over
their technology if they wanted access to
the Chinese market.
But there’s a smart way and a dumb way
to deal with this misbehavior. Unfortunately, in its pursuit of sweeping new tariffs on
Chinese imports, the Trump administration is once again choosing the dumb way
— as markets suggested when they closed
down nearly 3 percent on Thursday.
Let’s talk first about the smart way to
confront China.
That would involve banding together
with allies. And, in fact, lots of our allies
have been asking for our help keeping
China in line.
Yet we have, repeatedly, rebuffed such
entreaties. Or worse: accepted and then
reneged.
That includes the Trans-Pacific Partnership, a 12-country trade pact that we signed
in 2016. The pact specifically excluded
China to make sure it didn’t “write the rules
of the road for trade in the 21st century,” as
then-President Barack Obama put it.
Among Trump’s first actions as president, however, was to pull out of the deal.
As time goes on, this decision looks
worse and worse, and not only because of
the leverage lost over China. Two weeks
ago the remaining 11 countries signed
their own version of the pact, without us.
That deal stripped out provisions the
United States had fought for on behalf of
American companies — including, somewhat ironically, increased intellectual
property protections (in this case, for
pharmaceuticals).
Another smart, multilaterally approved
way to confront China would be through
dispute proceedings at the World Trade
Organization. The United States has
been unusually successful there, but China
hasn’t.
Some of the people around Trump, at
least, seem to understand the value of such
measures.
Last week, the incoming National Economic Council director, Larry Kudlow, said he’d like to see the United States
and allies join forces against China in a
“trade coalition of the willing” — which
sounds an awful lot like the TPP.
And the White House did include pursuing WTO dispute settlements “in cooperation with other WTO members” in the
actions it said will take over China’s intellectual property rights violations.
And yet, and yet. Trump clearly prefers,
and emphasizes, the dumb way to deal with
China.
By which I mean tariffs.
This month, Trump announced new
steel and aluminum tariffs. The administration initially came out with guns blazing, declaring no exceptions whatsoever —
even for the allies that actually produce
most of our steel and aluminum imports.
Over subsequent weeks, however, the administration exempted more and more
countries from the once draconian-sounding measures.
First we shielded Canada and Mexico.
Now, according to U.S. Trade Representative Robert E. Lighthizer’s Senate testimony on Thursday, we’ve given a reprieve to
Europe, Australia, South Korea, Argentina
and Brazil. China’s still in there, but it
supplies only 2 percent of our steel imports.
Why did we pluck all the teeth from this
supposedly fearsome policy?
Probably because allies, economists and
even industry groups almost universally
condemned it as likely to alienate friends,
raise prices on U.S. consumers and destroy
jobs in industries that either use these
metals or might face retaliatory tariffs. Plus
Republicans lost a special election in a
deep-red Pennsylvania district that should
have been especially sympathetic to steel
tariffs.
If you thought all this meant Trump had
learned his lesson, you’d be wrong.
In remarks ahead of signing the memorandum about the U.S. response to China’s
intellectual property violations, he completely left out the memorandum’s directive to work through the WTO with our
allies.
Instead, he called WTO proceedings
“very unfair” and talked up tariffs, which
the memorandum instructs the trade representative to soon propose. The White
House says these will include about
$60 billion worth targeting the Chinese
aerospace, information communication
technology and machinery industries.
Once again, these tariffs would be
against the advice of economists and U.S.
industry groups, such as the U.S. Chamber
of Commerce. Once again, the announcement rattled markets, fearing that it could
be the opening salvo of a trade war; China
is reportedly preparing countermeasures
against U.S. agricultural products, according to the Wall Street Journal. And once
again, in acting unilaterally, the action will
likely further alienate our allies.
Our best hope is that Trump doesn’t
actually mean to follow through on these
tariffs — or, alternatively, won’t notice if his
own administration gradually walks them
back.
Not exactly where you’d like U.S. global
economic leadership to be.
dent have the greatest sense of
loyalty. In this case, an aide close to
the president is expressing panic.
He or she cannot explain the hold
that Putin has over Trump. This
leak is a cry for help from within
the White House itself.
It is not that the Trump administration has been entirely unwilling
to take steps to counter Russian
aggression. The provision of arms
to Ukraine, for example, indicated
a foreign policy apparatus still
capable of pursuing American interests. The problem is Trump’s
strange inability to confront Putin
personally — about his oppressive
rule, the disruption of America’s
electoral process, human rights
violations and even attempted
murder on the soil of a NATO ally.
Trump’s initial instinct is to explain such abuses away.
It deepens the mystery that all of
Trump’s political interests push in
the opposite direction. A president
pulled into an investigation of improper ties to Russia might be
expected to distance himself from
disturbing Russian behavior. Such
public criticisms are an easy and
cheap form of damage control. But
at every stage, Trump has been
dragged kicking and screaming
into the pursuit of self-interest.
Trump has not provided an adequate explanation for his radical
departure from the diplomatic
norm. It is not enough to say, as he
did in a recent tweet, “Getting
along with Russia (and others) is a
good thing, not a bad thing.......”
Ronald Reagan’s diplomatic engagement of the Soviet Union did
not translate into fawning subservience toward a dictator. Such selfabasement actually emboldens
dictators. And it is rich for Trump
to accuse other presidents of lacking “smarts” about U.S.-Russian
relations in the course of a foreign
policy explanation at the length
and level of a fortune-cookie saying.
Into this vacuum of plausible
explanation have flooded other
theories. “I think he is afraid of the
president of Russia,” former CIA
director John Brennan recently
speculated. “The Russians may
have something on him personally
that they could always roll out and
make his life more difficult.” This
might seem incredible, except for
the fact that Trump’s first national
security adviser, Michael Flynn,
was forced out over blackmail
fears, and one of his principal
foreign policy advisers, Jared
Kushner, has been denied top secret security clearance because he
might be susceptible to undue influence.
It says something that the most
innocent explanation for Trump’s
attitude toward Putin is authoritarian envy. Trump seems to admire the strength and efficiency of
personal rule. “At least he’s a leader,” Trump once said of Putin,
“unlike what we have in this country.” A Trump adviser once leaked
to The Post: “Who are the three
guys in the world he most admires?
President Xi [Jinping] of China,
[Turkish President Recep Tayyip]
Erdogan and Putin.”
This now covers the range of
likely options — from the influence
of a foreign power to the thrall of a
foreign ideology. In the absence of
adequate explanation from Trump
himself, it is up to special counsel
Robert S. Mueller III to provide
clarity.
michaelgerson@washpost.com
MAX BOOT
Wishful thinking won’t remove Assad
L
ast week, the Syrian civil war
entered its eighth year. At least
465,000 people have been
killed, 1 million injured and
12 million displaced out of a prewar
population of around 21 million. It is a
humanitarian and strategic nightmare,
and the primary culprits are the Bashar
al-Assad regime and its enablers in
Moscow and Tehran. It is right to be
furious at Assad and his backers, but
expressions of disapproval, no matter
how vehement, will not change this
horrific reality.
That is a lesson that critics of my
recent column, “To save Syrians, let
Assad win,” don’t seem to get. The
Twitterati claimed that “Max Boot is
how genocide is created” and accused
me of becoming an “advocate for Assad.” Clifford D. May, president of the
Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, accused me of concluding “that
America need not and should not stand
up to the enemies of freedom.” Syrian
exile Mouaz Moustafa argued that “saying that Assad can stay brings him
comfort [and] greenlight.” My contention that “tyranny is preferable to
useless and endless war” brought derision from Michael Rubin of the American Enterprise Institute, who compared it to saying in 1940 “To Save Brits,
Let Hitler Win,” in 1953 “To Save Korea,
Let Kim Il Sung Win,” or in 2018 “To
Save Afghanistan, Let the Taliban Win.”
The analogy is inapt because Britain
in 1940, South Korea in 1953 and Afghanistan today all had a much better
chance to prevail than the Syrian opposition does — and especially the nonextremist opposition. The Free Syrian
Army has been decimated since 2011,
largely because the United States failed
to provide it with sufficient backing, as I
and others suggested at the beginning
of the war. The most powerful nonKurdish opposition groups today are
Hay’at Tahrir al-Sham, a U.S.-designated terrorist organization that used to be
affiliated with al-Qaeda, and another
militant organization, Ahrar al-Sham.
They continue to hold out in Idlib
province, but these are not groups the
United States should back.
Overall, according to the U.S. intelligence community, non-Kurdish rebels
hold just 14.2 percent of Syria’s inhabited territory (a third of the country is
sparsely populated). The Syrian Democratic Forces, a Kurdish-Arab militia in
the east, hold 32.8 percent, including
the country’s oil reserves, while the
Islamic State has 10 percent and falling.
The regime controls 42.8 percent and
climbing. In most of the country, the
rebellion is a lost cause.
It is easy to say, as my friends at the
Institute for the Study of War and the
American Enterprise Institute do, that
“the removal of the Assad regime remains a necessary condition to achieve
a desirable outcome in Syria,” but we
have lost the leverage to achieve that
objective. Even if Assad could be overthrown, it is not clear his successors
would be any better.
My March 9 column was an attempt
to come to terms with this grim reality. I
didn’t suggest legitimating or supporting Assad. I simply said there is nothing
we can do to save the embattled city of
Eastern Ghouta or to roll back the Assad
offensive more generally. I did write,
however, that President Trump should
launch airstrikes to punish Assad’s forces for their use of chemical weapons. I
also argued for using American military
might to defend the Kurdish enclave in
the east, thereby denying Assad control
of a third of the country and preventing
Iran from establishing a land bridge
A22
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
ABCDE
letters@washpost.com
‘NDA’ stands for ‘obstruction’
EDITORIALS
Fealty on the dotted line
Mr. Trump’s ego, and not the national interest, appears to be driving a push for White House staff to sign NDAs.
I
The New York Times subsequently reported that
White House Counsel Donald McGahn had cautioned that threatening penalties for those revealing
secrets was illegal and unenforceable, but — mainly
to placate the president — eventually drew up a
broad document barring officials from revealing
what they heard and saw at work.
The specific details of the agreements are unclear.
The White House has refused to release a copy of the
document or answer our questions. Among them:
How many officials signed nondisclosure agreements? Over what period of time? Do they give
Mr. Trump a personal right of action after the end of
his presidency? Are there exceptions for congressional testimony?
No one denies the need to keep secret sensitive
government information that could undermine the
interests and security of the country. But there is
already a system in place that classifies information
at various levels and provides for appropriate
clearance levels and access, as well as resulting
Pragmatist or
protectionist?
penalties for those found in violation. It is routine to
require federal employees and contractors who
work with classified information to sign nondisclosure agreements.
The fact that this administration was, until
recently, all too willing to let people without appropriate security clearance be privy to top-secret
materials makes the push for these newly disclosed
and unprecedented nondisclosure agreements all
the more suspect. The main motivator appears to be
the president’s ego and not the national interest.
Any appeal to Mr. Trump to disavow use of these
confidentiality agreements based on historic norms,
constitutional principles or the need for accountability in government would probably fall on deaf
ears. After all, the country is still waiting for him to
fulfill his promise to release his tax returns. So
perhaps the government accountability committees
in Congress could stir themselves and demand to see
a copy of the agreement. Even for them, is not
secrecy in the service of secrecy a bit too much?
TOM TOLES
C
nese people, you’d have to say pessimism is plausible: “If people want to play tough, we will play tough
with them and see who will last longer,” China’s
ambassador to the United States warned. A more
hopeful view, though, is that Mr. Trump’s action is a
shock to the system, which might stimulate serious
negotiations with the Chinese. The measures
Mr. Trump announced do not go into effect immediately, leaving time for talks. Notably, the administration has decided to grant its allies in Europe, Asia
and elsewhere exemptions to the March 8 steel
tariffs, pending negotiations — a limited but wel-
come show of pragmatism.
Ultimately, though, much depends on Mr. Trump’s
ability to recognize there are benefits as well as costs
to the economic relationship with China, and to
formulate a strategy that maximizes the former while
minimizing the latter. At times, he has spoken as if
tariffs are a means to an end — “fair” trade. At other
times, however, he has suggested that he, like Beijing’s leaders, regards protection as an end in itself. At
some point soon, he must articulate clear and reasonable objectives, regarding both China and the allies —
and then be willing to take “yes” for an answer.
leaders support the plan, which would also prevent
some damaging new Trump administration rules
from taking effect in the state.
But reinsurance would not be enough. The federal
tax bill eliminated Obamacare’s individual mandate,
which required every American to carry health-care
coverage. This important provision was meant to
prevent people from signing up for insurance only
when they got sick and needed expensive care. Even
with reinsurance holding down premiums, the
Wakely analysis made clear, the lack of a mandate
could mean fewer and fewer people signing up for
health insurance. Sicker people are more likely to
buy health insurance, leading to higher premiums,
which in turn would drive more relatively healthy
people away.
The second bill would fix this mandate problem,
and in a particularly ingenious way. As with the
defunct federal mandate, Marylanders would be
charged a fee on their tax forms if they failed to buy
coverage. But the state would apply that fee to enroll
the uninsured in health-care plans. Those who are
due federal premium subsidies and can get a
zero-dollar health-care plan would be automatically
enrolled, unless they opted out. Those who would
have to kick in their own money could use the fee
toward the cost of insurance during the next open
enrollment period. Rather than a penalty, the
proposal’s backers call it a health-care “down payment,” reflecting the less punitive nature of the
policy.
Maryland lawmakers may be tempted to defer
imposing such a plan until after this year’s elections.
But the sabotage that Washington Republicans have
already wreaked threatens health-insurance markets now. Waiting to act means another openenrollment period would pass without a patched-up
system. Maryland can show other states how to
make the Obamacare system work. It should embrace the opportunity.
ABCDE
L O CA L O P I N I O N S
FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
Parole decisions should rely on law, not instinct
In the March 20 Metro article “The lifeline for
Md. inmates,” a profile of David R. Blumberg,
chairman of the Maryland Parole Commission,
Mr. Blumberg likens his role to that of a judge yet
also discusses relying on his instincts when making
decisions regarding whether those serving a life
sentence should receive a second chance. Therein
lies the problem with Maryland’s parole system.
Parole commissioners are not judges, and many
have little or no legal training at all. Unlike for
judges, who are bound by the rules of criminal
procedure and evidence and must make detailed
findings of their rulings, the statutes and regulations governing parole give commissioners wide
latitude regarding how to exercise their discretion.
Maryland law provides no discernible legal stan-
Regarding the March 19 editorial “Older, yes. What
about wiser?”:
Elder entitlements need to be focused on need, not
age. These programs need to be solvent.
Start by having affluent Medicare recipients pay
more into the system in higher premiums on an
escalating scale tied to current income; create another
premium bracket above the highest that now exists.
Allow the federal government to negotiate drug prices
with manufacturers, using purchasing power to cut
prices. Remove the limit on the amount of income to be
taxed for Social Security while retaining the present
system of annual benefit payments. Tax Social Security
income at an escalating rate based on current income,
reaching 100 percent for recipients with current incomes above $250,000.
Peter A. Michel, Alexandria
dard for release on parole. The result is that many
of the clients I represent are refused release
without a reasoned explanation. Those decisions
perpetuate injustice and, in the case of individuals
serving life sentences for crimes they committed as
juveniles, are quite likely unconstitutional in light
of the Supreme Court’s ruling that juveniles must
receive a meaningful opportunity for release.
To fulfill our constitutional obligations to those
convicted as juveniles and our civic obligation to
end mass incarceration, we must have a system that
relies on more than instinct.
Lila Meadows, Baltimore
The writer is a clinical teaching fellow in the
Juvenile Justice Project at the
University of Baltimore School of Law.
News pages:
MARTIN BARON
Executive Editor
CAMERON BARR
Managing Editor
EMILIO GARCIA-RUIZ
Managing Editor
TRACY GRANT
Managing Editor
SCOTT VANCE
Deputy Managing Editor
BARBARA VOBEJDA
Deputy Managing Editor
The March 19 Business & Economy article “How
5G became a political football during merger drama”
provided a global perspective on the complexities
involved in deployment of this more reliable telecommunications technology. However, it missed the
real barriers that are certain to hobble more widespread deployment in residential neighborhoods
throughout the nation. The two hurdles that the
telecommunications industry and local government
have failed to address are how to aesthetically install
30-foot towers with bulky radio transceivers and
backhaul boxes in residential front yards and how to
address public-health concerns related to human
proximity to these microwave devices.
Unless these issues can be resolved quickly and
satisfactorily, U.S. 5G dominance is likely to be
severely compromised, particularly if China and
Chinese company Huawei are able to develop and
deploy more palatable solutions.
Donald DeNucci, North Potomac
Campus speech is in crisis
Republicans and Democrats have an opportunity to show the rest of the states how it’s done.
N
To means-test or not to means-test
5G and two big problems
Maryland’s ingenious plan to fix Obamacare
OW THAT Congress has failed to shore up
Obamacare in the massive spending bill it
is considering, it is all the more urgent for
states to fill the gap. Maryland can lead the
way, if state leaders embrace two critical Obamacare fixes under consideration in the General
Assembly.
The first, creating a “reinsurance” program for the
state, seems likely to pass. The idea is for Maryland
to charge insurance companies an amount roughly
equal to a tax break they received in the recent
federal tax bill, then dedicate that money to keeping
premiums down. The state would help insurers pay
for very high-cost patients, allowing insurers to keep
rates more manageable for everyone else. A recent
study commissioned by the state and conducted by
Wakely Consulting Group found that “for every
$50 million dollars spent, premiums will be 3% to
4% lower than they otherwise would have been.”
Gov. Larry Hogan (R) and Democratic legislative
I read with horror Ruth Marcus’s March 19 op-ed,
“Nondisclosure agreements at the White House.” As
news of nonanswers from the House Intelligence
Committee kept coming out, I wondered about nondisclosure agreements, or NDAs. Now I have my
answer. These are wrong under any system of government but especially ours.
Senior staff, aides to the president, groundskeepers, et al., are all salaried by my taxes. They are
employed by the U.S. government, not the Trump
Organization. Each of these is ultimately answerable
to me, the taxpayer. I understand there are policy
issues (maybe?) that should not be discussed outside
the office. President Trump is no longer a private
citizen with a family business. He cannot have government employees sign personal documents to protect him.
Certainly sounds like obstruction to me.
Lisa Orsborn Hernandez, Corpus Christi, Tex.
Means-testing benefits to Social Security is the
wrong approach for making this program solvent.
Social Security is an insurance program that pays
benefits on the occurrence of three life events: death,
disability or retirement. It is not a welfare program but
a mandatory program for most U.S. workers, and it
should never be treated as welfare. Can you imagine a
private insurance company deciding benefits you have
already paid for should be means-tested?
For 30 years, the government has spent excess
Social Security funds and left IOUs behind, in the form
of Treasury securities. The annual Social Security
Trustees report for 2017 showed that these securities,
with interest, amounted to $2.8 trillion that the government owed Social Security. In recent years the
government has had to start paying back those debts
because incoming Social Security taxes are beginning
to fall short of outgoing Social Security benefits. Time
to pay the piper, so to speak.
The Social Security Trustees report shows that the
government will be able to pay full Social Security
benefits until 2034, and thereafter, about 75 percent of
current benefits through 2091. We need to shore up the
program, but means-testing should be off the table.
Jim Beller, Rockville
Mr. Trump keeps roiling markets
with tariff talk. He needs a strategy.
HINA’S PARTICIPATION in the world economy has both lifted hundreds of millions of its
own people out of poverty and benefited
Americans by expanding access to consumer
goods. China’s stubborn adherence to mercantilism,
though, is a real problem, both for the United States
and for the Chinese people, to whom it denies the
benefits of maximally free interaction with the rest
of the world. It’s not just China’s refusal to import
more freely. The country’s discriminatory approach
to foreign investment allows Western companies in
only if they agree to onerous conditions, including
the transfer of technology to Chinese partners.
China also systematically infringes on U.S. intellectual property rights, to the tune of at least $225 billion per year, according to a 2017 blue-ribbon commission report. Meanwhile, Chinese capital has
enjoyed relatively unfettered access to the U.S.
market. One U.S. administration after another has
tried to get China to change, without success.
Will President Trump succeed where his predecessors have failed? On Thursday the president announced measures aimed at China, including tariffs
on up to $60 billion in Chinese goods, possible
restrictions on Chinese investment in the United
States and a case against China at the World Trade
Organization. That the president would reach for the
blunt instrument of tariffs against China is no
surprise; it’s certainly easier and more satisfying,
emotionally, than tackling homegrown factors in the
U.S. trade deficit, such as the structural budget
deficits his tax cuts will worsen. He promised tariffs
in the 2016 campaign and on March 8 he threatened
a separate, globally applicable set of tariffs on steel
and aluminum. Nor is it a surprise that China would
threaten to fight back, with tariffs on such U.S.
products as soybeans.
The pessimistic view of this — apparently prevalent on Wall Street on Thursday — is that Mr. Trump
has started a growth-killing trade war. Given China’s
strategic commitment to mercantilism, and its oneparty state’s power to impose sacrifice on the Chi-
MARCH 23 , 2018
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
T WAS one thing for Donald Trump, the businessman, to require employees, investors, exwives and adult-film stars to sign nondisclosure
agreements. As distasteful as those agreements
may have been, he was exercising the legal rights of a
private citizen. It is an entirely different — and
completely unacceptable — matter for Donald
Trump, the president, to think he can similarly gag
White House staff.
Federal employees, including those in the West
Wing, work for the American people, not some
corporate executive, and their loyalty is to the
Constitution, not an individual. Attempts to bully
them into giving up their First Amendment right to
speak are yet another troubling example of
Mr. Trump’s failure to understand the duties and
sensibilities of his public office.
Mr. Trump’s demand for signed confidentiality
agreements, The Post’s Ruth Marcus reported in
revealing their existence, was prompted by his fury
over embarrassing leaks early in his administration.
. FRIDAY,
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Deputy Editorial Page Editor
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Andrew Hartman’s argument in his March 18
Outlook essay, “There is no campus speech crisis,
there are only aggrieved customers,” foundered in the
face of data and facts. A 2016 Gallup survey revealed
that 27 percent of college students deem it acceptable
to censor political speech if they “are upsetting or
offensive to certain groups.” Results of the most
recent Gallup/Knight Foundation survey are yet
more alarming: 37 percent of college students find it
okay to shout down speakers.
Mr. Hartman argued that only rarely are a school’s
students or faculty silenced. Tell that to Middlebury
College professor Allison Stanger, who still suffers
from neck injuries received when she attempted to
hold a discussion with Charles Murray on campus. Or
Evergreen State College professor Bret Weinstein,
who refused to leave campus as asked by students of
color; the president ordered the campus police to
stand down when an angry crowd of students grew
threatening. Mr. Weinstein’s saga ended with his
resignation and a cash settlement from Evergreen.
President Barack Obama was sufficiently troubled
by the threats to campus speech to scold students
and faculty at Rutgers University for discouraging
Condoleezza Rice from speaking, and he admonished graduates at Howard University to hear out
opposing viewpoints. To remedy the problem, we
must recognize it.
Michael Poliakoff, Washington
The writer is president of the American Council of
Trustees and Alumni.
‘Free’ isn’t free
Recent news of abuses of the privacy of Facebook
clients dramatizes the dilemma of unfettered capitalism, even in the face of pseudo government oversight
[“FTC investigating Facebook over Cambridge Analytica’s harvesting of data,” news, March 21]. In
capitalism, profit is the only responsibility of management toward owners and shareholders. Only the
government is responsible to the user. Public Facebook accounts are “free.” “Free” can be very expensive. Perhaps Facebook should have a category of
paid membership where privacy is provided. If you
believe that one, I have a bridge to sell you.
Donald A. Kniffen Sr., Crofton
FRIDAY, MARCH 23 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A23
RE
EUGENE ROBINSON
DAVID IGNATIUS
Don’t reward
the authors
of torture
Protecting
Mueller’s
independence
P
H
resident Trump vowed during
his campaign to bring back
torture as a weapon against
terrorism. Now the Senate
must stop him from installing as CIA
director a woman whose résumé includes overseeing a disgraceful episode of torture — and then joining in
a cowardly effort to cover it up.
This should not be a close call. In
other respects, Trump’s nominee, CIA
veteran Gina Haspel, seems to have
been an exemplary public servant.
But that’s like saying that except for
one unfortunate incident, Mrs. Lincoln had a lovely night at the theater.
The torture of suspected terrorists
was a singular transgression of this
nation’s values — as well as a violation
of U.S. and international law — and it
simply cannot be rationalized or ignored.
This obscene chapter in our history
took place during the George W. Bush
administration. For a time, Haspel
was in charge of one of the CIA’s
secret overseas prisons — a “black
site” located in Thailand. She is credibly reported to have been the boss
there when a detainee named Abd
al-Rahim al-Nashiri, the alleged planner of the deadly attack against the
USS Cole, was subjected three times
to the torture known as waterboarding.
You will recall that the Bush administration used the Orwellian term
“enhanced interrogation techniques,”
perhaps in an attempt to convince
those implementing the policy that
what they were doing was legally and
morally acceptable. But the euphemism is a despicable lie. Waterboarding is torture, and it is clearly against
the law.
After World War II, at the Tokyo
war crimes trials, a number of Japanese soldiers found guilty of waterboarding prisoners of war were
hanged or given long prison sentences. U.S. victims testified to the
gruesome horror of these episodes of
simulated drowning. No one questioned the fact that waterboarding
was a particularly sadistic form of
torture. No one should question it
now.
The torture of Nashiri was videotaped. Acting on orders from her CIA
supervisor, Haspel wrote a cable ordering the destruction of those tapes
— even though she and the supervisor
had been told to preserve them as
evidence in an ongoing investigation.
The videotapes were indeed destroyed.
A stopped clock is right twice a day;
Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) somewhat less
often. But Paul is a hero for raising a
racket about the torture issue and
announcing his opposition to Haspel’s nomination.
“What is known is that Haspel
participated in a program that was
antithetical to the ideals of this country. She destroyed evidence in defiance of our ideals,” Paul wrote in a
Politico op-ed. “I simply do not believe she should hold the post to
which she has been nominated.”
Initial reports that Haspel oversaw
even more torture appear to have
been wrong, and her supporters will
try to make the debate about that
error — thus diverting attention from
the central issue. But the Nashiri
torture has not been disputed, and
Haspel clearly ordered destruction of
the evidence. That is reason enough
for the Senate to vote no.
It is unclear what other mistreatment Haspel may have overseen in
Thailand — depriving detainees of
sleep, subjecting them to extreme
temperatures, forcing them to remain in painful positions for extended periods of time. Some of these
“techniques” probably also qualify as
torture, in my view. About waterboarding, however, there is not really
a question.
Given the overall chaos of the
Trump administration and the president’s erratic conduct of foreign policy, it would be good to have an
experienced, internally respected CIA
veteran at the helm of the agency. And
it would be a milestone for the CIA to
be run, for the first time, by a woman.
But these pluses are outweighed by
one big minus: torture.
It can be argued that Haspel was
just following orders, but she should
have known that those orders were
illegal. And if she and others who
played a role in waterboarding did
nothing wrong, then why did they
destroy the videotapes of those supposedly legitimate “enhanced interrogation” sessions? In most U.S.
courts, such action would be seen as
an indication of “consciousness of
guilt.”
Despite Trump’s bluster, his outgoing CIA director, Mike Pompeo, flatly
ruled out any return to torture during
his confirmation hearings. It is understandable that agency officials
would want to put the whole sordid
affair behind them. We may never be
able to hold the authors of torture
accountable, but we can, and should,
insist that they not be rewarded.
I hope Haspel is at peace with the
choices she has made. The Senate’s
choice should be to say no.
eugenerobinson@washpost.com
STEPHEN M. DOWELL/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on March 7.
It’s my job now
to be Alyssa’s voice
BY
L ORI A LHADEFF
H
er name was Alyssa. My beautiful daughter was only 14 when she was shot and
killed in her classroom at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.
The day after her death, I was interviewed on camera. I could barely speak: “I just spent
the last two hours putting together the burial arrangements for my daughter’s funeral, who’s 14.”
I was grieving and outraged that day — and have
been every day since. I miss my baby girl more than
words can express.
Alyssa was a special young girl who was just
beginning her high school education and had so
much life to live.
Alyssa was a leader. She was the captain of her
soccer team with hopes of playing professionally. An
honors student who aced algebra after placing out of
pre-algebra. A volunteer at a homeless shelter. Someone whose laugh was contagious.
That was my Alyssa — weeks from her 15th birthday. I know in my heart that she was meant for
greatness. Instead, she was one of 17 killed and more
than a dozen injured in her school.
Here’s something else about my Alyssa: She was a
fighter. Now, it is my job to fight in her name — to end
gun violence, to elect people who will stand up to the
National Rifle Association and to make our communities safer.
In honor of Alyssa, and all the other young men and
women and educators who were shot and killed in
Parkland, Fla., a group of surviving students from
Stoneman Douglas started the March for Our Lives.
On Saturday, I will march in my daughter’s honor in
Washington. I am moved beyond words that student
organizers from across the country and the world will
host more than 800 sibling marches that day.
In Alyssa’s name, I ask our lawmakers: Why hasn’t
anything been done? There is so much elected
officials can do to make our children safer in their
schools. And they can make all Americans safer by
strengthening our gun laws.
I say to our lawmakers: If you can’t do something
about this disgraceful scourge of gun violence in our
schools and across our country, you should not hold
public office. It is your job to find answers. If you
can’t, or won’t, let someone take your place.
I know what my job is now. My job is to be Alyssa’s
voice, because hers has been silenced. My job is to fight
to make sure that other kids all across the country
don’t have to go to school and feel unsafe. To honor
Alyssa’s memory, I have created the organization Make
Schools Safe with a mission of preventing school
shootings. I will speak out for stronger gun laws.
What gives me hope, beyond my grief and outrage?
The very students who are asked to go to school and
risk being shot and killed. This generation gives me
hope. They are doing what Alyssa would be doing had
she survived. The surviving Stoneman Douglas students, and students across the country, are courageous and powerful advocates.
I stand with these students, in Alyssa’s honor, and I
will cheer them on as they fight for much-needed
change.
Alyssa always thought she was safe. I would tell her
to lock the door, and she would reply, “Why do I have
to lock the door? It’s Parkland. Nothing happens in
Parkland.”
It is on us, the students, the adults, the elected
officials to make sure no one ever forgets what
happened in Parkland.
The writer is the mother of Alyssa Alhadeff, one of 17 people killed
in the Feb. 14 shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.
What if millennials get politically active?
BY
I
P AUL T AYLOR
f gun control becomes the gateway
issue that entices distrustful millennials into the voting booth, America is
in for a makeover.
Never before has this country produced
a generation with political views and
demographic traits so different from
those of its elders. On nearly every important issue — immigration, health care,
climate change, gender equality, racial
disparity, sexual identity, economic inequality, size of government, use of military force, presidential disapproval —
millennials are by far our most liberal
adult generation.
Ironically, gun control is one of the few
issues that has never generated a generation gap. But by dint of their numbers, life
stage and core values, millennials have the
potential to move the United States beyond the angry stalemate that has seen an
aging political class drive policy to the
right while a youth-centric popular and
commercial culture pushes the rest of
society to the left. If millennials start
voting at the same rate as older generations, they’ll align policy with zeitgeist.
This will not happen overnight. And it
might not happen at all, because most
millennials are allergic to politics, skeptical about democracy and wary about
human nature. In their young lives,
they’ve been leaders or foot soldiers in
plenty of progressive protest movements
— Occupy Wall Street, Black Lives Matter,
“dreamers,” #MeToo, March for Our Lives
— but their activism so far has been “more
throat than vote.”
Millennials came of age in an era when
technology reinvents the world every day,
while politics is mired in a toxic mess of
gridlock, backlash and recrimination. In
the last midterm election, just 20 percent
of 18- to 29-year-olds voted, fewer than
half the share of their elders in 2014 and a
third less than the share of their sameaged counterparts who voted back in 1978.
What makes millennials so distinctive
and potentially so transformational
comes down to a single characteristic:
diversity.
About 44 percent of millennials are
black, Hispanic, Asian or mixed race.
They’re the rainbow created by a modern
immigration wave that has brought
60 million newcomers to our shores since
1965, nearly 9 in 10 of them nonwhite.
As immigrants themselves, or as their
children, or as the parents of today’s
mostly nonwhite cohort of newborns,
they’re the generation that will turn the
United States “majority minority” by
mid-century.
For them, diversity is not just a demographic trait; it’s a core value. The
20th century metaphor for an immigrantrich United States — the melting pot —
doesn’t resonate with millennials. They
want a society in which each person is free
to celebrate her or his own unique identity
— a mosaic.
Some generations grow conservative as
they age. This isn’t likely to happen with
millennials. Their political views are too
braided to their racial diversity, which
won’t change.
Typically, voter turnout rates increase
as generations cross into middle age. By
2024, millennials (approximately ages
20 to 37) and the even more diverse cohort
of post-millennials will account for nearly
half of all eligible voters.
But even then, these younger voters
might still punch below their weight in
elections, because they’re wary not only of
politics but also of people. According to
the most recent General Social Survey,
just 18 percent of 18- to 24-year-olds say
that most people can be trusted. That’s
less than half the share of older adults who
felt that way in 2016, and the lowest
number recorded in the half-century that
this question has been asked.
Explanations abound: Millennials live
their social lives online, where people
aren’t always who they say they are.
They’ve grown up in era when that strange
kid from fourth period could be the next
school shooter. As members of one minority or another, they feel less fortified to
deal with the consequences of misplaced
trust.
Trust in institutions has nose-dived
among all generations, but this deficit of
trust in people is unique to millennials.
This is worrisome. In an entrepreneurial
economy, trust is the grease that keeps the
gears from grinding. In a multiracial
society, it’s the glue that holds the mosaic
together. In a self-governing democracy,
it’s a rationale for voting and a predicate
for pragmatic compromise.
Millennials have plenty of cause to be
disillusioned by the gerontocracy that’s
mucked up politics. But they also have
cause for hope. In the weeks since the
slaughter in Parkland, Fla., the activism of
student survivors has triggered a surge in
support for gun control — now at its
highest level in a quarter century.
The old ways do not yield easily to the
new, but generational turnover is inexorable. If millennials can learn to trust their
fellow human beings — young and old;
conservative and liberal; white, black and
brown — they can eventually change more
than gun policy. They can reinvigorate our
politics, our democracy and maybe even
our souls.
Paul Taylor is the author of “The Next America:
Boomers, Millennials, and the Looming
Generational Showdown.”
ere’s a new twist in the Robert S.
Mueller III saga: A former top
Senate staffer for Attorney General Jeff Sessions is nearing confirmation to head the Justice Department’s Criminal Division. Should his
appointment worry people who want to
protect the special counsel’s independence?
As with any issue involving Mueller
and the Trump White House, the answer
reflects the supercharged atmosphere
surrounding the Russia investigation.
This may seem like a routine bureaucratic appointment. But because the stakes
are so high in any matter that affects
Mueller’s status, it’s worth reviewing the
basic questions before the Senate votes
on confirmation.
The nominee is Brian Benczkowski,
who served as head of the Trump transition team at Justice and was staff director
of the Senate Judiciary Committee when
Sessions was the ranking Republican.
Supporters praise his performance in the
George W. Bush administration. “I’ve
never seen Brian do anything unethical,
nor do I think that he ever would,” says
Michael Mukasey, who made Benczkowski his chief of staff when he was
Bush’s attorney general.
Critics fault Benczkowski for his 2017
legal representation of Alfa Bank, a Russian financial giant that has prospered
under the Putin government, after he
helped run the Trump transition operation. News reports in 2016 had explored
the bank’s possible computer communications with Trump Tower, but Benczkowski told senators that two independent investigations later found no connection between the bank and the Trump
Organization.
Benczkowski now says he wouldn’t
have taken Alfa Bank as a client had he
anticipated his nomination to head the
Criminal Division. But when asked by the
Judiciary Committee if he would recuse
himself from the Russia investigation
because of the Alfa connection, he answered: “I cannot commit to such a
recusal at this time.”
Benczkowski also told senators that in
a December 2016 conversation with Sessions, he had criticized “mistakes” by
James B. Comey, then FBI director, in
handling the Hillary Clinton email investigation, “converting his role as FBI
director into that of a prosecutor. . . .”
This was one of the rationales Trump
initially gave for firing Comey last May.
The leading skeptic about Benczkowski’s nomination is Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.), a Judiciary Committee
member who voted against Benczkowski
in the 11-to-10 party-line vote that sent his
nomination to the floor in January.
Whitehouse, a former U.S. attorney, worries that as Criminal Division chief, Benczkowski could have a “window” on the
Mueller investigation.
Whitehouse bases his concern on a
previously undisclosed Dec. 11 letter he
received from Stephen Boyd, who heads
Justice’s Office of Legislative Affairs.
That letter acknowledged that Benczkowski might consult with Mueller, as he
could with a U.S. attorney.
Boyd’s letter noted that the Criminal
Division chief “has no supervisory role
with respect to the special counsel. . . .
However, it is possible that the SCO
[special counsel’s office] will seek approvals from the Criminal Division as
required by statute, regulation, or policy,
or may simply want to consult with
subject-matter experts in the Criminal
Division as appropriate in the normal
course of department investigations.”
Boyd explained that if confirmed,
Benczkowski would talk to “appropriate
ethics experts” at Justice “prior to his
participation in or supervision of the
SCO’s interaction with the Criminal Division.” Boyd stressed that Mueller’s boss
would be Deputy Attorney General Rod
J. Rosenstein (because of Sessions’s recusal), but he left room for Benczkowski
to advise.
Whitehouse worries that by sanctioning even a limited role for Benczkowski,
Justice has opened a backdoor. He outlined his concern in an email Wednesday.
“We still don’t have a clear view of how
the Justice Department protects special
counsel Mueller’s investigation,” Whitehouse cautioned. He continued:
“If, as Justice officials have told me, the
special counsel clears matters through
the Criminal Division, that could give
Benczkowski a window into the investigation. I remain concerned he could
provide a back channel to his old boss
and to the man in the Oval Office who’s
declared open war on the Mueller investigation, and that procedures in place are
not adequate to detect or prevent this.”
Benczkowski wouldn’t comment publicly, because of the pending vote on his
nomination. Sarah Isgur Flores, the Justice Department spokesperson, said
Benczkowski is “a talented and wellregarded lawyer with extensive experience” and that Justice is “eager for the
Senate to confirm him.”
The Benczkowski nomination may
seem like small potatoes. But we should
examine every issue that affects Mueller’s
independence right now. In the Benczkowski nomination, Justice has summarized the rules, Whitehouse has voiced
his worries, and the nominee appears to
recognize proper limits. If these checks
and balances hold up, they can help
protect the rule of law as Mueller’s
investigation proceeds.
Twitter: @IgnatiusPost
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8 p.m.
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WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
EZ
B
SU
THE DISTRICT
THE DISTRICT
OBITUARIES
Council member Vincent
C. Gray won’t run in the
mayoral primary, clearing
a path for Bowser. B2
Federal prosecutors drop
charges against 11 of 15
Turkish guards accused of
beating protesters. B4
Charles Lazarus founded
Toys R Us and grew it into
a global empire before its
collapse in recent years. B5
Maryland
agrees
to fund
Metro
ANNAPOLIS JOINS
D.C., VA. IN ACCORD
Dedicated revenue is
a first for transit agency
BY
PHOTOS BY BONNIE JO MOUNT/THE WASHINGTON POST
Adolfo Martinez, 16, was brought to the United States from Honduras in 2003. The Owings Mills, Md., teen did not apply for protection
under Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, right when he became eligible at age 15. Now, new applicants have been blocked.
Would-be ‘dreamers’ fear
their window has closed for good
While DACA renewals are proceeding for now, halt to new applications has left teens in limbo
BY
A NTONIO O LIVO
A
dolfo Martinez’s college
plans always included applying for Deferred
Action for Childhood Arrivals, the Obama-era program
that would allow him to qualify
for in-state college tuition in
Maryland and a work permit.
But he didn’t apply as soon as
he turned 15, the age of eligibility.
The $495 application fee was
hefty, and he was only in ninth
grade.
Then the Trump administration stopped accepting new applicants, as part of its plans to
phase out DACA, which President
Trump and his top deputies call
an illegal example of executive
overreach.
A federal judge has ordered the
government to continue renewing permits for the estimated
690,000 young immigrants already in the program while a legal challenge to ending it is pending.
The court ruled that the government does not have to accept
The Martinez siblings — Emilio, 11, left, Miranda, 12, and Adolfo —
at their home this week in Owings Mills, in Baltimore County.
new applications, however, leaving Martinez — now a 16-year-old
high school sophomore — and
potentially thousands of other
immigrants in limbo as they edge
closer to adulthood.
“I’m not quite sure what to do
now,” said Martinez, who is captain of the lacrosse team at his
Baltimore County high school
and wants to become a civil engi-
neer. “I had planned on applying
as soon as possible.”
The Migration Policy Institute
estimates
that
there
are
120,000 immigrants brought to
the United States illegally as children who would turn 15 and become eligible for DACA protections over the next four years.
Immigrant advocates say that
pool of people illustrates the need
for a legislative replacement for
DACA, an idea that has stalled
multiple times in Congress
and was left out of the spending
deal reached on Capitol Hill on
Thursday to avoid a looming
government-shutdown deadline.
Lawmakers appear unlikely to
focus again on the issue anytime
soon.
“The fact that there are thousands of immigrant young people
who are now at that point where
they need to be protected just
shows you how important it is to
have permanent legislation,” said
Bruna Bouhid, spokeswoman for
United We Dream, an advocacy
group for the young immigrants
known as “dreamers.”
Some state legislatures are offering alternative relief to wouldbe DACA recipients, with bills
that allow undocumented immigrants to qualify for driver’s licenses, in-state tuition and some
health benefits.
A bill that would broaden
Maryland’s 2012 Dream Act to
allow in-state tuition for people
DACA CONTINUED ON B8
Tuition-aid Parkland and D.C. students find common purpose
program in Florida youth activists
visit peers in Washington
D.C. set for ahead
of gun-control rally
full funding
BY D ANIELLE
D OUGLAS- G ABRIEL
Congressional
negotiators
have secured full federal funding
for a tuition-aid initiative that
helps D.C. residents attend college, rejecting a White House bid
to cut support for the popular D.C.
Tuition Assistance Grant.
In the $1.3 trillion federal
spending agreement released
Wednesday night and set for votes
ahead of a Friday deadline, lawmakers designated $40 million
for the program. It gives D.C.
students — who don’t have access
to a robust in-state university system — affordable college options.
The money would maintain the
TUITION CONTINUED ON B4
BY
M ARISSA J . L ANG
Before the assembly, before
the mayor spoke and people
cheered, before TV cameras
packed the gymnasium at Thurgood Marshall Academy in
Southeast Washington on Thursday, Dakota McNeely drew a
purple heart on her hand in ink.
Then, through its center, she
carved a crack.
It was an homage to her
friend, James Smith, 17, who was
shot dead in an apparent robbery
a few days before Christmas last
year. It was a way to feel Smith’s
presence as she joined her classmates and Parkland, Fla., teenagers in calling for stricter gun
laws.
The Parkland students, in the
JAHI CHIKWENDIU/THE WASHINGTON POST
Cameron Kasky was one of the students from Parkland, Fla., to talk
about gun control Thursday at Thurgood Marshall Academy.
nation’s capital for the March for
Our Lives, an anti-gun-violence
rally that could draw hundreds
of thousands of people to down-
town Washington this weekend,
met with a handful of the D.C.
school’s upperclassmen before
taking the stage.
They said the meeting illuminated how much they had in
common with students from
some of the District’s most underserved neighborhoods. It also
highlighted key differences,
showing how survivors of school
violence in more privileged areas
are treated differently than students touched by violence in
their neighborhoods.
“This past Valentine’s Day, all
the people in my school and my
community lost someone,” said
16-year-old Alfonso Calderon, a
student at Marjory Stoneman
Douglas High School in Parkland. “Nothing in my entire life
has affected me that much —
ever. Not only am I a different
person, but I was robbed of my
innocence. I no longer get to go
home and be a normal kid, and I
know you guys are going through
the exact same thing. You just
don’t have the platform. People
aren’t listening to you.”
Calderon and his classmates —
David Hogg, Cameron Kasky and
MARCH CONTINUED ON B2
R OBERT M C C ARTNEY
Maryland will give Metro its full
share of $167 million a year in new,
permanent funding, the governor
and leaders of both legislative
chambers said Thursday, putting
the transit system on track to win a
historic regional deal to support it.
Virginia and the District have
committed to provide their share
for a total of $500 million a year in
the dedicated funding that Metro
says it needs for capital investments to ensure safety and reliability.
With Maryland’s assent, and
barring last-minute hitches, the
system will receive a reliable revenue stream for the first time since
its trains began rolling in 1976.
“This is terrific news for Metro
customers, as well as the businesses and communities we serve,”
Metro General Manager Paul J.
Wiedefeld said.
“In the last two weeks, we have
seen history made in the Greater
Washington region” as jurisdictions have joined “to make an unprecedented commitment to our
Metro system,” said MetroNow, a
broad coalition of business, nonprofit and advocacy groups.
Maryland lawmakers had been
FUNDING CONTINUED ON B4
Girl shot at
Md. school
brain dead,
family says
16-year-old ‘has no life
left in her,’ will be
taken off life support
BY
M ARISSA J . L ANG
A 16-year-old girl shot Tuesday
in a Southern Maryland high
school by a fellow student is brain
dead and will be taken off life
support Thursday night, her family said at a brief news conference.
Jaelynn Willey was shot in the
head in a hallway just before classes began about 7:55 a.m. at Great
Mills High School, according to
the St. Mary’s County Sheriff’s Office and the girl’s family.
She had been targeted by Austin Wyatt Rollins, 17, after the couple recently ended their relationship, according to previous statements from the sheriff’s office.
“My daughter was hurt by a boy
who shot her in the head and took
everything from us,” said her
mother, Melissa Willey.
“She is brain dead. She has no
life left in her,” she said, standing
beside her husband, Daniel, and
carrying one of their younger children in her arms.
Willey’s family spoke Thursday
night at the University of Maryland Prince George’s Hospital
Center, where she had been
brought for treatment after the
shooting.
SHOOTING CONTINUED ON B3
Petula
Dvorak
She is away. Her column will resume
when she returns.
B2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
Parkland, D.C. students agree on gun control
MARCH FROM B1
M ARISSA J . L ANG
Sophie Ruotolo has never been
much of an activist.
But after watching school
shooting after school shooting
play out on the news for years,
she’s had enough. It was time to
do something more.
On Saturday, as hundreds of
thousands flood downtown
Washington for the antigun-violence March for Our
Lives, Ruotolo will walk out of her
downtown apartment and into
her first D.C. protest.
One thing sets her apart from
other would-be first-timers: Ruotolo is 97 years old.
Although the march has been
billed as a youth-centered movement led by students, for students, the cause at its core — gun
control — has rallied many adults
to their cause. Hollywood celebrities have donated millions to the
event and announced on social
media that they’ll be marching
this weekend. Teachers from
throughout the nation have organized groups to travel to the District. Parents will march alongside their kids.
And in a traffic circle blocks
from the White House, about 50
seniors will hold their own rally in
solidarity with the student-led
rally along Pennsylvania Avenue.
They’ve been preparing for
weeks.
With the help of a local print
shop, the seniors have amassed 45
T-shirts, 11 picket signs and a big,
green banner they plan to string
up between two walkers.
They’ll work the protest in
shifts. That way, no one has to
stand outside in the cold all day.
The most die-hard of the bunch
will picket from 10:30 a.m. until
1 p.m. with signs that denounce
the National Rifle Association,
demand universal background
checks for gun buyers and declare
No serious
challenger
for Bowser
ladies who can’t handle ourselves,” Fullbright said. “We know
our limits. We can do this.”
This year, Fullbright said, they
have the full support of their
community.
On Wednesday, during the
height of the nor’easter that
rolled through the District this
week, a group of them set out to
pick up their signs from a print
shop about two-and-a-half blocks
away.
Bill Fischer, 86, leaned on his
cane for support as snow and
wind blew past. Hobson held his
arm and guided him across the
slippery grates.
“Wow, you made it,” Print Express manager Leila Mouenhi exclaimed as the group walked in.
Hobson smiled, then shrugged.
They weren’t going to let a few
inches of snow stop them.
marissa.lang@washpost.com
peter.jamison@washpost.com
JAHI CHIKWENDIU/THE WASHINGTON POST
March for Our Lives
Road closures from 3 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday
Metro Center
E ST. NW
15TH ST. NW
The
Ellipse
Washington
Monument
14TH ST. NW
Entrance
Federal
Triangle
(Closed)
Open to all but
northbound traffic
Gallery Place
PEN
NSY
AVE LVANIA
. NW
Archives
Entrance
CONSTITUTION AVE. NW
Entrance
Smithsonian
THE MALL
D ST. NW
Main stage
Capitol
Building
3RD ST. SW
112TH
T S
ST. SW
INDEPENDENCE AVE. SW
Tidal
Basin
395
Judiciary Square
(441 entrance closed)
3RD ST. NW
White
House
May be open or closed based
on public safety concerns
9TH ST. NW
NW
Closed to traffic
and parking
Federal Center
L’Enfant Plaza
395
Note: Other closures may occur from First Street NW to 18th Street NW and
from E Street NW to E Street SW
Sources: D.C. Police; March for Our Lives
THE WASHINGTON POST
and said it felt like the Stoneman
Douglas students were really listening to their stories.
“Coming from them, to hear
that they noticed how different
they’re being treated to how we
get treated when one of our
friends gets killed, it means a
lot,” Jenkins said. “I’m very grateful that they showed up, that
they told everyone how we deserve the same platform.”
Parents of two Thurgood Marshall students who were killed
this school year sat in the crowd.
They said seeing teenagers from
different backgrounds and communities unite around an issue
such as gun violence gives them
hope.
“I feel like maybe something
great can happen from this tragedy, from all these tragedies,”
said Seditra Brown, whose 19year-old son, Paris, was fatally
shot in January.
Brown said she never heard
themselves “grannies for gun control.”
And, because they’re grandparents, they’ll also be handing out
cookies.
Hundreds of them.
“We’ll be handing out heartshaped cookies because we want
to say to those young people, ‘We
love you, and we’re going to do
what we can to help take care of
you,’ ” Tina Hobson said.
They hope their demonstration
brings attention to the fact that
it’s not just children who care
about this issue, but that it touches people of all ages.
Resident Phyllis Richman, 78,
who worked as The Washington
Post’s restaurant critic for more
than two decades, said that seeing
students who have participated
in protests and walkouts around
the country these past few weeks
filled her with a renewed drive to
do something to help.
In the retirement community,
she said, there is constant programming meant to entertain the
seniors who live there: Movie
nights, speakers, gym class, spa
nights.
“All these things, they’re here to
entertain us, and we don’t want to
be entertained. We want to help,”
Richman said. “We get discounted because we’re women and
we’re old and we’re any number of
things.”
“But we’re not dead yet,” added
Ruotolo.
Richman, who protested the
Vietnam War in her youth, called
her friend, Hobson, 88, to start
organizing.
They thought up slogans for
their signs and persuaded grandchildren to design logos.
Hobson, who was married to
D.C. city councilman Julius Hobson until his death in 1977, said
she is no stranger to activism and
was delighted by the opportunity
to organize for something she
believes in: changes to gun laws.
On the wall in her apartment,
Hobson collects buttons and swag
from marches she’s attended in
years past. Among her prized
causes are civil rights, environmental protection, statehood for
the District and women’s rights.
Students from Marjory
Stoneman Douglas High School
in Parkland, Fla., meet with
peers from Thurgood Marshall
Academy.
from city officials after her son’s
death and was surprised to see
several city leaders, including
D.C. Mayor Muriel E. Bowser, at
the school.
Curtis Kelly, whose 16-year-old
son, Zaire, was killed in September, said helping to support guncontrol measures is a way of
honoring his son’s legacy.
His surviving son, Zion, who
was Zaire’s twin, was one of the
students to speak during the
rally.
Zion “is the twin that’s going
to continue the fight for his
brother,” Kelly said.
marissa.lang@washpost.com
MARISSA LANG/THE WASHINGTON POST
Tina Hobson, 88, checks a sign Wednesday at a print shop near her home in the District. Hobson and
about 50 other seniors will be out Saturday in support of the March for Our Lives.
This week, her apartment was
filled with another kind of memento: mock-ups for the signs
she and her fellow residents will
carry Saturday.
“We want to get people’s attention,” Hobson said. “So we made
sure to include some signs that
people might find upsetting. You
know, things like ‘bury guns, not
kids.’ If that makes you uncomfortable, good.”
Ruotolo, who has 12 greatgrandchildren, was on the phone
with her 4-year-old great-granddaughter last week when she realized the preschooler was describing an active-shooter drill she had
at school that day.
The little girl didn’t know what
they were doing, Ruotolo said, but
the teachers told students to hide
under their desks and to be quiet.
“That hurt me so much,” Ruotolo said. “What kind of child-
hood do children have today?”
The next day she ran into Hobson. She told her she wanted to
volunteer at the rally.
It’s not the first time that Hobson organized a protest at her
community.
Hobson and Harriet Fullbright, 84, assembled a small
group of women to rally in support of the Women’s March on
Washington last year. The setup
was similar: They stood in the
Thomas Circle roundabout with
signs, encouraging cars to honk
and greeting rally-goers as they
passed.
Some in the retirement community were concerned the women would hurt themselves. They
told them it would be best to not
go.
But, they did it anyway.
“Protests aren’t dangerous,
and we’re not just some fragile old
THE POSTPOINTS HUNT
It isn’t top secret, everyone knows
The Spy Museum is the place to go
For intel and artifacts used by real spies
From Lipstick Pistols to Embroidered Eyes.
How old must you be to take part in Operation Spy, an immersive,
interactive experience at the International Spy Museum in
downtown D.C.?
(Hint: See SpyMuseum.org for the answer.)
P ETER J AMISON
D.C. Council member and former mayor Vincent C. Gray
(Ward 7) will not challenge Mayor Muriel E. Bowser in the Democratic primary, clearing the way
for Bowser to secure her party’s
nomination — which in overwhelmingly Democratic D.C. typically presages
a general election victory —
without any
serious opponents.
In a brief interview Thursday, with the
filing deadline
for the June
primary
approaching at Vincent Gray
day’s end, Gray
said he had not tried to gather
signatures to get on the ballot.
However, he would not rule
out the possibility of running
against Bowser in the general
election — a move that would
require him to change his party
registration — and said he had
been urged to challenge the mayor by District residents unhappy
with recent scandals in the public school system.
“I have heard it just repeatedly,” he said.
The decision by Gray, a oneterm mayor whom Bowser defeated in 2014 amid a federal
investigation into his campaign
finance activity, had long been
anticipated by watchers of D.C.
politics.
Gray was never charged and
still commands a loyal following
in his base of Southeast Washington. But his reputation remains
damaged, and he would likely
struggle to build a coalition
broad enough to threaten Bowser.
A Washington Post poll in the
summer showed that the mayor
enjoys a 67 percent approval
rating. She has raised more than
$2 million toward her reelection
campaign.
In recent months, as education-related scandals buffeted
Bowser’s administration, speculation grew about a primary
challenge from Gray or council
member Robert C. White Jr.
(D-At Large).
But White has said he would
not run because the timing is bad
for his young family; his daughter is 18 months old.
Gray had left the possibility
open through the end of last
week, saying he could collect the
2,000 petition signatures necessary to qualify for the primary
ballot within a couple of days if
he chose to jump in at the last
minute.
The filing deadline for candidates was 5 p.m. Wednesday. It
was extended for 24 hours as
much of the District and the
surrounding region shut down
because of a snowstorm.
A $653,000 “shadow campaign” of illegal spending in
Gray’s victorious 2010 campaign
against Mayor Adrian Fenty led
to an FBI investigation and
guilty pleas by six people, including associates of Gray. Gray has
consistently said he was not
aware of the illegal activity.
He blamed federal prosecutors for unfairly tarnishing him
and causing his 2014 loss to
Bowser.
Gray returned to public office
in January 2017, easily winning a
seat representing Ward 7 on the
council. In that position, he has
played an influential role as
chairman of its health committee
and led newly aggressive oversight of the District’s troubled
public hospital, United Medical
Center.
Gray said Thursday that he
remained focused on similar policy issues, such as funding for a
new hospital for Southeast
Washington in the mayor’s justreleased budget.
“My attention really is on
health care at this stage,” he said.
‘Grannies for gun control’ to take to the streets Saturday
BY
THE DISTRICT
BY
THE DISTRICT
They will be supporting
the March for Our Lives
(and handing out cookies)
MARCH 23 , 2018
Gray won’t run
in primary for
Democratic nomination
17TH ST. NW
Alex Wind, each 17 — took turns
at the microphone in front of a
roomful of students and a media
scrum reminiscent of a campaign rally.
Each called out their own
privileges and the struggles of
the students they called their
“new friends from Thurgood
Marshall.” They highlighted the
gulf between their ability to be
heard by lawmakers and the
news media.
“We’ve seen again and again
the media focus on school shootings and oftentimes be biased
toward white-privileged students,” Hogg said. “Many of these
communities are disproportionately affected by gun violence,
but they don’t get the same
media attention that we do.”
In the crowd below, several
students nodded their heads. A
mother seated on blue risers
made a noise of assent.
“Now that they’ve lived
through this shooting and
they’ve lost people, they can
relate to kids like us better,”
McNeely, a junior, said after the
rally. “But that’s not good, either.
No one should have to go
through this. It shouldn’t be how
things are for any of us.”
When one of the Parkland
teens asked to see a show of
hands from those who had lost a
friend or relative to gun violence,
dozens of students lifted their
hands into the air.
Half-a-dozen Thurgood Marshall juniors and seniors stepped
forward to speak after the Parkland students finished their remarks.
They called on their classmates to attend the Saturday
march. They mentioned friends
and family members lost to gun
violence.
One student looked into the
TV cameras and said simply:
“We’re showing up.”
Assad Jenkins, 17, said he attended the small-group listening
session with the teenagers from
Florida before the main event
. FRIDAY,
WHAT WILL YOU FIND?
Enjoy an evening with the Dave Matthews Band.
Their music will make you clap your hands.
Tap Live Nation for tickets, then prepare to go.
Rest assured, it will be a riveting show.
When will the Dave Matthews Band be performing at Jiffy Lube Live?
(Hint: See LiveNation.com, then search for Jiffy Lube Live
for the answer.)
Don’t miss Shear Madness, a delightful play
A funny whodunit the hair salon way.
Audience members help solve the crime
In a beloved show that’s played thousands of times.
With more than 13,200 performances at the Kennedy Center, Shear
Madness is the second longest-running play in the history of
American Theater. How long is the show, with one intermission?
(Hint: See Kennedy-Center.org for the answer.)
E A R N 5 P O I N T S : F i n d t h e a n s w e r, t h e n g o t o w a s h i n g t o n p o s t . c o m / p o s t p o i n t s a n d c l i c k o n “ Q u i z z e s ” t o e n t e r t h e c o r r e c t r e s p o n s e .
FRIDAY, MARCH 23 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B3
M2
Md. shooting prompts calls to action
LOC AL D I GE S T
THE DISTRICT
SHOOTING FROM B1
She is one of nine children.
An uncle, Timothy Cormier, on
Wednesday described Willey as an
“amazing young lady, whose
peaceful presence and love of her
fellow students and family” is
well-known at the school. She was
a dedicated student and swimmer,
he said.
Rollins was killed after school
resource officer Blaine Gaskill
confronted the teen as students
and staff scrambled for cover. The
sheriff’s office said Wednesday
that Gaskill fired one shot at Rollins, “who simultaneously fired a
shot as well.”
“Rollins sustained a life-threatening injury in the exchange,” the
department said.
Rollins used a Glock handgun
legally owned by his father, according to the sheriff’s office.
Attempts to reach Rollins’s parents have been unsuccessful.
Desmond Barnes, 14, who also
was in the hallway, was wounded
by Rollins but was released
Wednesday from MedStar St.
Mary’s Hospital after surgery on
his thigh, officials said.
His mother, Kimberly Dennis,
said in a statement Thursday evening that “our entire family is eternally grateful that Desmond is
alive, doing well and in good spirits. He is an amazing testimony.”
“We remain deeply saddened
and shocked by this shooting inci-
MARISSA LANG/THE WASHINGTON POST
Melissa and Daniel Willey, with one of their nine children,
announce that their daughter is brain dead Thursday night.
dent and continue to pray for the
other victim and her family during
this difficult time. We are also
praying for the entire Great Mills
High School family and young
people around this country. As a
community and nation, we must
continue to work and fight for a
world that is safe for our children,”
she said.
School officials said Wednesday
that Great Mills will be closed
through the end of the week to
assist law enforcement efforts.
The school is scheduled to reopen
April 2, after spring break.
The shooting occurred on the
cusp of Saturday’s March for Our
Lives, a rally against gun violence
sparked by the Florida school
shooting last month that left
17 people dead.
The Great Mills shooting
prompted a lockdown and evacuation at the school of more than
1,600
students.
Authorities
praised Gaskill, who has been a
resource officer at the high school
since August, for his quick reaction.
Details of Rollins’s life remained sparse, though the sheriff’s office said it hadn’t “uncovered any public social media
posts/threats made by Rollins.”
Friends and neighbors de-
scribed him as a friendly, happy
teenager who liked to play ball,
skateboard and hang out with
friends.
Newell Rand, a Great Mills
graduate who knew Rollins, said
he never expected the burst of
violence.
“He was a very intelligent guy
who had so much going for him,”
Rand said in a message on social
media.
The shooting has prompted
calls to action from the St. Mary’s
community.
Rand and other Great Mills students and alumni are planning to
travel to the march.
“We are trying to turn a tragedy
into a learning experience,” Rand
has said in a message to The Washington Post via Facebook. “We
hope that some form of action will
be taken.”
Aaron Foreman, who was a
coach at Great Mills and lives
across the street from the Rollins
family, posted a Facebook Live video Wednesday morning urging
businesses and religious organizations with vans to help take students to the D.C. rally so they could
join “their brothers and sisters”
from across the nation who are
victims of school violence.
“We need to show our children
that we believe in them and that
their voices need to be heard
downtown Saturday,” Foreman
said.
marissa.lang@washpost.com
MARYLAND
Medical marijuana dispensary bans four patients
Advocates concerned
after customers barred
for blasting prices online
BY
T AUHID C HAPPELL
A medical marijuana dispensary in western Maryland has
banned at least four customers
because they posted complaints
online about pricing or other issues, sparking concern from advocates and potentially violating
state rules for the emerging industry.
Joy A. Strand, the executive director of the Maryland Medical
Cannabis Commission, said registered dispensaries have the right
to decline marijuana to patients or
caregivers if they appear to be
under the influence of drugs or
alcohol.
But other attempts to bar patients could be problematic, she
said, especially because in some
parts of the state — including
western Maryland — there aren’t
other places for would-be customers to go.
“If any dispensaries establish a
practice of banning compliant patients, who are registered and certified with the Commission, from
receiving medical cannabis treatment in accordance with the requirements of our program, the
Commission will be obligated to
perform a thorough investigation
into that practice and take appro-
priate enforcement action,” Strand
said in an emailed statement.
Sajal Roy, owner of Allegany
Medical Marijuana Dispensary in
Cumberland, Md., said he has
banned four patients for spreading what he deemed to be false or
misleading information online,
and another who was acting disruptive inside the dispensary. He
said he feels justified because
those patients can buy cannabis
elsewhere, even though the closest
dispensaries to his are in Frederick, about 90 miles away.
“There’s plenty of other dispensaries, and access is not a question,” Roy said. “I think on some
level in today’s society we baby
everyone and we coddle everyone.
There are repercussions for what
you do.”
Two patients he put on a do-notserve list in January and February
were allowed back into the dispensary after apologizing for their
critical posts. Roy said the patient
who was disruptive also has been
allowed back in, but two others
remained on the banned list as of
March.
Kelly Robertson, founder of the
Western Maryland Medicinal
Marijuana Patients Alliance, said
banning patients is wrong because it limits access to medication and creates a particular burden for those with low incomes
who may not have the resources to
travel across the state.
Neil Weigman, 35, uses cannabis to help treat post-traumatic
stress disorder, rheumatoid arthritis and chronic pain. He
emailed Roy at the end of January
to discuss delivery options, and
the conversation turned to pricing. At one point, according to
copies of the emails shared with
The Washington Post, Roy said
cannabis prices were higher in
Colorado than in Maryland, which
is generally not true.
Weigman then posted on a private Facebook page that is focused
on Maryland’s medical marijuana
program, accusing Roy of being a
liar and saying he was charging
too much. Roy later emailed Weigman to say he’d received complaints about the post, and would
no longer welcome Weigman at
his store.
Weigman apologized to Roy
and deleted his Facebook post. “I
kind of just figured, ‘Well, it’s not
worth it.’ Getting my medicine is
more important to me right now,”
he said.
He said he submitted a complaint to the state cannabis commission but never heard back.
Spokeswoman Jennifer White
said the commission does not have
a record of receiving the complaint.
Dianna Bennett, a resident of
Allegany County, said she also was
banned after posting on the dispensary’s Facebook page that she
thought its prices were too high.
“I didn’t say anything about
[Roy] personally. I just said $84
was too much for an eighth [of an
ounce],” said Bennett, who suffers
from lupus and receives a monthly
$1,200 disability check.
When Bennett went back to the
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dispensary, she said, an employee
told her she had been banned.
Bennett then called Roy.
“He never gave me a straight
answer. He asked me if I caused a
disruption in the dispensary or if I
spread false information,” she
said, adding that Roy later said he
would remove her from the
banned list. She has since been
able to purchase cannabis there.
Roy said he could not provide
details about the other two people
he said were banned, except to say
they also had posted negative “online harassment.”
Robertson, the marijuana advocate from western Maryland, recently arranged a meeting at Allegany Medical dispensary with customers and co-owner Greg Pappas, who blamed high prices for
cannabis products that are in
heavy demand and limited supply.
As of March, prices had eased
somewhat; an eighth of an ounce
of cannabis now costs $60, according to the dispensary’s Facebook
page.
“As more and more growers are
bringing product to the marketplace, we’ll be in a better position
to negotiate,” Pappas told customers at the meeting. He also said
that the dispensary plans to take a
look at how they decide whether to
ban patients.
Robertson urged the patients at
the meeting to “be positive vocal
advocates” for medical marijuana.
“If everybody hears complaints,
it’s steering patients away from
the program altogether,” she said.
tauhid.chappell@washpost.com
After carjacking,
woman flees to river
A woman was carjacked at
gunpoint Tuesday night, sexually
assaulted and chased into the
icy waters of the Anacostia River
in Southeast Washington,
authorities said.
The incident started around
10 p.m. in the 3200 block of
Buena Vista Terrace SE, when a
man with a handgun forced his
way into the back seat of the
woman’s car, according to a
report from D.C. police. The man
ordered the victim to drive to
the rear of the block, where he
sexually assaulted her, police
said.
After the assault, the assailant
forced the woman to drive to a
road near Anacostia Park before
he took the car, police said.
The woman called 911 and
said “she was being chased by a
suspect and had no clothes on
and had jumped into the
[Anacostia] river” between Good
Hope Road and the 11th Street
Bridge, said Sgt. James
Dingeldein, a spokesman for the
U.S. Park Police.
When Park Police arrived, the
victim signaled to an officer
with the flashlight on her phone,
and she was helped out of the
river.
The assailant was described
as a black man, between 18 and
25 years old, about 5 feet
3 inches tall, with a medium
complexion and a thin build. He
was last seen wearing a hooded
shirt underneath a black jacket
and black jeans.
The stolen car is a black 2016
Toyota Camry, with D.C. plates
FB0193. It has damage to the
front bumper on the right side.
— Dana Hedgpeth
Man fatally shot
in Southeast
A 26-year-old man was fatally
shot Wednesday night in
Southeast Washington, police
said.
D.C. police said officers
responding to a report of gunfire
shortly after 7 p.m. found Travis
Courtney Ennis unconscious in
the 2900 block of Langston
Place SE.
Ennis, who lived in Southeast,
was pronounced dead at a
hospital, police said. They said
the shooting remained under
investigation Thursday and no
arrests had been made.
— Paul Duggan
MARYLAND
2 dead after house fire
in Mount Rainier
Two people were killed in a
house fire in Mount Rainier,
Md., near the District border,
officials said.
The fire was reported about
6 a.m. Thursday in the 3400
block of Eastern Avenue near
34th Street, Prince George’s
County Fire officials said. Few
details were immediately
available and the victims’
identities weren’t released,
pending the notification of
family.
The deaths come after eight
other fire fatalities in the county
in the past two years. Earlier
this month, an elderly couple
died in a fire at a house that
officials said had hoarding
conditions. There were five
deaths related to fires last year,
officials said.
— Dana Hedgpeth
Pedestrian hit, killed
in Prince George’s
A pedestrian was struck by a
car and killed Thursday along
Indian Head Highway in Prince
George’s County.
Police identified the victim as
Samira Jenkins, 24, of Oxon Hill,
Md.
The crash happened around
5:40 a.m. along the northbound
side of the highway near Kerby
Hill Road in Fort Washington.
The woman was in the
crosswalk and was hit by a car
headed north on Indian Head
Highway, police said. She was
pronounced dead at the scene.
The car stayed on the scene,
police said.
Police are asking anyone who
witnessed the incident or with
information to call investigators
at 301-731-4422 or 1-866-411TIPS (8477).
— Dana Hedgpeth
LOTTE R I E S
VIRGINIA
Results from March 22
DISTRICT
Mid-Day Lucky Numbers:
Mid-Day DC-4:
Mid-Day DC-5:
Lucky Numbers (Wed.):
Lucky Numbers (Thu.):
DC-4 (Wed.):
DC-4 (Thu.):
DC-5 (Wed.):
DC-5 (Thu.):
8-4-7
8-8-4-2
3-5-3-4-3
5-4-1
6-6-8
1-6-1-8
4-1-2-8
7-1-0-2-3
0-7-7-4-9
Day/Pick-3:
9-6-7
Pick-4:
2-9-1-3
Cash-5:
17-22-25-28-31
Night/Pick-3 (Wed.):
0-6-4
Pick-3 (Thu.):
0-1-5
Pick-4 (Wed.):
3-3-2-2
Pick-4 (Thu.):
5-3-2-4
Cash-5 (Wed.):
9-12-13-17-31
Cash-5 (Thu.):
5-6-24-29-32
Bank a Million:
10-15-23-24-36-37 *40
MULTI-STATE GAMES
MARYLAND
Mid-Day Pick 3:
3-2-6
Mid-Day Pick 4:
6-9-7-6
Night/Pick 3 (Wed.):
9-5-7
Pick 3 (Thu.):
3-0-2
Pick 4 (Wed.):
3-0-8-6
Pick 4 (Thu.):
3-9-7-6
Multi-Match:
4-5-17-20-41-42
Match 5 (Wed.):
7-10-15-20-24 *32
Match 5 (Thu.):
18-24-28-32-38 *16
5 Card Cash:
KS-7H-KC-7S-AD
Cash 4 Life:
Lucky for Life:
Powerball:
Power Play:
*Bonus Ball
¶Cash Ball
2-8-15-40-41 ¶4
9-17-27-29-31 ‡16
3-4-18-29-61 **25
2x
**Powerball
‡Lucky Ball
For late drawings and other results, check
washingtonpost.com/local/lottery
B4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 23 , 2018
Md.’s agreement completes historic Metro funding deal
FUNDING FROM B1
moving gradually to hit the
$167 million target that represents its portion under a Metro
cost-sharing formula. The Democratic-dominated House originally considered a bill providing
$125 million, and then lifted the
figure to $150 million with agreement from Gov. Larry Hogan (R).
On Thursday afternoon, Senate
President Thomas V. Mike Miller
Jr. (D-Calvert) said his chamber
would approve the full $167 million — and that plan was promptly
endorsed by House Speaker Michael E. Busch (D-Anne Arundel)
and Hogan.
“We’re very pleased to see those
final details have been worked out
in the legislature,” Hogan spokesman Doug Mayer said. “This has
been a bipartisan effort from start
to finish, and the governor looks
forward to signing this into law as
soon as possible.”
Miller’s comments were first reported by the website Maryland
Matters and confirmed by spokesman Jake Weissmann.
“What the [Senate] president
was saying was, ‘We’re going to
pass a bill with $167 [million],’ ”
Weissmann said.
Underlining the urgency, the
Senate will hold a hearing on the
bill Tuesday, two days earlier than
scheduled, to get it to the full
Senate by the end of the week.
“The president wants it on the
floor as soon as possible,” Weissmann said.
Busch said he expected the
House to agree to $167 million
after the Senate acted.
In a related development, Metro got some good financial news
from Capitol Hill: The omnibus
federal spending bill moving
through Congress includes a full
$150 million annual appropriation for its capital spending for the
current fiscal year. The White
House has proposed cutting the
subsidy to $120 million for the
next fiscal year.
The appropriation for the next
fiscal year, which begins in October, is the 10th and final installment in a 10-year funding program for Metro that the region
hopes to extend. Even with the
$500 million a year in new, dedicated funding now expected from
the District, Maryland and Virginia, Metro says it needs to continue receiving the $150 million a
year from the federal government.
Meanwhile, top elected officials
in Northern Virginia agreed to ask
Gov. Ralph Northam (D) to use
more state money or raise local
taxes to pay for that state’s Metro
bill, instead of using so much
funding earmarked mostly for
road projects.
The leaders of Fairfax, Arlington and Loudoun counties and the
city of Alexandria are pressing
Northam to restore some or all of
the $102 million a year that Northern Virginia would lose under
Metro legislation passed this
month by the General Assembly.
The officials, all Democrats,
support the plan to provide Metro
with $154 million a year in new,
permanent funding if Maryland
contributes $167 million and the
District gives $178 million.
But the officials are dismayed at
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Barring last-minute hitches, Metro is set to receive a reliable
revenue stream for the first time since trains began rolling in 1976.
the bill’s higher-than-expected
cost in giving Metro money that
goes to widen roads, improve intersections and support transit
projects in their severely congested suburbs. Northam has said he
will propose amending the legislation to address Northern Virginia’s concerns.
The plan for the three jurisdictions to increase their support for
Metro by a total of $500 million a
year in dedicated funding was first
proposed by Wiedefeld last April.
He called then for a “new business
model” for the transit agency,
17 months after he took over and
launched changes including accelerated repairs, improved financial
management and a campaign
against absenteeism and excessive overtime.
The money — on top of what the
three jurisdictions provide now —
Tuition-aid initiative set to get full federal funding
TUITION FROM B1
program’s funding levels for the
third fiscal year in a row. The
House passed the spending bill
Thursday afternoon; the timing
of the Senate vote was not clear.
“Despite facing incredibly
tough conditions for these budget
negotiations, District residents
got what they deserved in this
omnibus,” D.C. Del. Eleanor
Holmes Norton (D) said in a statement. “I am particularly relieved
that we were able to face down the
administration and secure the
full $40 million funding.”
Norton had said she was confident that she could protect the
tuition-assistance program after
the White House proposed its
elimination in the fiscal 2019
budget released in February. At
the time, Congress had just struck
a two-year budget deal that Norton said rendered President
Trump’s plan “dead on arrival.”
Although Wednesday’s 2,000-
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At others,
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Outlook
page spending agreement covers
funding only until Sept. 30, the
bipartisan support for the tuition
program — widely known by the
acronym DCTAG — bodes well
for its continued funding.
“Together with Congresswoman Norton, we fought to restore
DCTAG to $40 million in the fiscal
2018 omnibus,” D.C. Mayor Muriel
E. Bowser (D) said in a statement.
“We will stay woke, stand up and
fight back to ensure full funding
for DCTAG remains in 2019 and
beyond. DCTAG is critical to ensuring our residents have access
to higher education and are on
the pathway to the middle class.”
The tuition assistance program
has long enjoyed bipartisan support on Capitol Hill. Congress
spurned proposed cuts to the program in 2013, when President
Barack Obama’s administration
considered sacrificing some of its
budget.
Still, the Senate Appropriations Committee introduced a
spending bill in November seeking to reduce funding by onefourth. Lawmakers complained
that the 18-year-old program
failed to live up to expectations
because only 51 percent of award
recipients graduated within six
years, compared with 60 percent
of students nationwide. The D.C.
Office of the State Superintendent
of Education, which oversees the
tuition program, has argued that
the most recent graduation rate is
56 percent, higher than the sixyear graduation rate for students
overall from D.C. public high
schools.
“TAG is probably one of the
most transformative things that’s
happened to D.C. kids in terms of
education,” said Argelia Rodriguez, president and chief executive of the District of Columbia
College Access Program, a college
18-0312 2x10.5
danielle.douglas@washpost.com
4 of 15 remain indicted
in D.C. melee outside
ambassador’s residence
BY
K EITH L . A LEXANDER
Prosecutors in recent months
have dropped assault charges
against several security guards
for Turkish President Recep
Tayyip Erdogan who were allegedly involved in a melee last May
outside the Turkish ambassador's residence in Washington.
Video of the incident, which
showed guards for the visiting
Turkish president charging and
beating protesters who had gathered outside the Sheridan Circle
residence, sparked international
condemnation.
Fifteen guards were indicted
in July, but federal prosecutors in
the District dismissed charges
against four members of Erdogan’s security detail in November. Last month, they dropped
the cases against seven others.
Charges against four guards
remain active, though the men
left the country soon after the
incident and experts have said it
is unlikely they will ever be put
on trial.
The Wall Street Journal first
reported the latest dismissals.
A spokesman for the U.S. attorney’s office in the District
declined to say why the cases
were dropped.
According to the July indictment, the guards faced a variety
of charges, including conspiracy
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robert.mccartney@washpost.com
Charges are dropped
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advising group known as DC-CAP.
“Being able to sustain the pipeline
that the legislation established is
critical. It means students will
have access, economic support
and the choice of education
around the country.”
Over the years, the tuition program has provided $350 million
to help more than 26,000 D.C.
students attend and graduate
from college. Students can receive
as much as $10,000 a year to
attend public universities outside
the city or up to $2,500 to enroll in
a private college in the D.C. metro
area or at any historically black
college or university across the
nation. Award recipients have enrolled at 578 colleges across the
country.
The grants are available to all
D.C. students — except high-income families — but student advocates say the money makes the
biggest difference for low-income
residents. The annual family income cap has shifted; it once was
$1 million but, in more recent
years, has stood between
$750,000 and $777,000.
Rodriguez said she fielded
questions about the future of the
program from parents. Many
wanted to know what actions they
could take to fight the proposed
funding cuts or expressed concern about how the program’s
elimination would affect their
children’s ability to attend college.
“D.C. doesn’t have financial-aid
resources. The fact that this was
even on the table was frightening
to many parents because it means
the likelihood of their children
enrolling and graduating from
college decreases,” she said. “A lot
of our parents are low-income, so
without this program the door is
closed for their children.”
After
Business
have struggled with shortages of
funding for new equipment and
maintenance, but Metro was
unique in one respect: It is the
only major subway system in the
nation without a tax or other dedicated source of funding.
That meant the agency had to
rely on annual appropriations
from the District, Maryland and
Virginia. Almost 10 years ago, the
federal government also began
providing subsidies, which required appropriations to be approved each year.
Without a dedicated source of
funding, it was difficult for Metro
to make long-term plans or count
on adequate support. The lack of a
dedicated revenue source was
identified as a major weakness in
the agency’s finances as early as
the 1970s.
Government and private analyses and studies have said the system needed dedicated funding,
but efforts to provide it were always stymied. Part of the problem
was the difficulty in getting three
jurisdictions — each with a distinct legislative and administrative structure — to cooperate.
Nearly two years ago, elected
officials, business groups and others in the region began a process of
intense study and debate over how
to address Metro’s problems. A
large coalition of Metro supporters — spearheaded by business
organizations but also including
environmentalists, unions, grassroots activists and other civic
groups — came together to advocate for dedicated funding in both
state capitals as well as the city.
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Travel
will help pay for a 10-year investment program totaling $15.5 billion. Metro says it will use the
money to buy new rail cars and
buses, upgrade track and power
systems, modernize stations and
make other improvements.
The cost is divided according to
a formula based on factors including population, ridership and
number of Metro stations in each
jurisdiction.
Each of the three is raising the
money in a different way. Maryland has planned to tap its state
transportation trust fund, which
will reduce the total available for
road and bridge projects throughout the state.
Virginia is using a combination
of state funds, an increase in regional wholesale gasoline taxes
and the diversion of funds from
Northern Virginia road and transit projects.
The District plans to rely in part
on raising the sales tax, commercial property tax and tax on ridehailing services such as Uber and
Lyft.
The impetus to increase support for Metro followed a prolonged period in which the transit
system suffered from unreliable
service, fiscal mismanagement
and chronic safety lapses, including the fatal Red Line crash at Fort
Totten in 2009 that killed nine,
and the L’Enfant Plaza smoke incident in 2015 that killed one rider.
Many of the problems arose
from lack of oversight and poor
management, but another contributing factor was decades of
underinvestment and neglect.
Many urban transit agencies
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and assault. Prosecutors said the
men had “assaulted and kicked
protesters who were assembled
in front of the embassy.”
Officials had previously said
the men were identified with the
help of the State Department,
which matched surveillance video to entry visas and passports.
Erdogan had immediately denounced the charges, blasting
D.C. law enforcement and arguing the demonstrators were affiliated with a terrorist group. The
Turkish Foreign Ministry summoned the U.S. ambassador in
Ankara after the cases were announced and said in a statement
after the incident that the decision to file the charges “lacks
legal basis.”
One person familiar with the
case, who was not authorized to
comment publicly about the decision and spoke on the condition of anonymity, said prosecutors had questioned whether
there was sufficient evidence to
move forward.
Charges and arrest warrants
remain for four guards — Ismail
Dalkiran, Servet Erkan, Ahmet
Karabay and Mehmet Sarman.
According to the indictment,
Sarman, along with the guards
whose charges were eventually
dropped, assaulted and kicked a
protester, as well as American
law enforcement officers who
were trying to intervene. He is
also charged with pushing one
protester to the ground and
punching and kicking another
protester.
Karabay and Dalkiran are accused of ignoring orders from
D.C. police officers who told
them to stop the assaults and
return to the sidewalk. Karabay
was also accused of communicating with other security guards
via earpieces and then kicking
and punching a victim.
Dalkiran was also charged
with assaulting and threatening
another victim “in a menacing
manner.”
Erkan was charged with recklessly causing significant bodily
injury to one victim and charged
with using a dangerous weapon,
a shod foot, on another person.
On April 5, two U.S. citizens
who were not part Erdogan’s
security team, Sinan Narin and
Eyup Yildirim, are scheduled to
be sentenced in D.C. Superior
Court after pleading guilty to
felony assault charges in the
incident.
keith.alexander@washpost.com
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EZ
obituaries
MARYLAND
No bond in slaying of
woman, burning of body
BY
D AN M ORSE
Stephan Lunningham walked
into a 7-Eleven service station this
month, carrying a red can, and
bought $2.60 worth of gasoline.
It was 3:49 a.m., in Germantown, and according to authorities, the 29-year-old was trying to
cover up the killing of a woman
whose body was stuffed in the
back seat of a nearby car, where
they said he had kept it for more
than a day. Twenty minutes after
the gas purchase, police say, Lunningham drove the Honda Accord
to a wooded area and set it on fire.
The allegations were revealed
Thursday in court filings and in a
brief hearing for Lunningham,
who is charged with first-degree
murder and first-degree arson in
the death of Angela Fay Thomas.
Thomas, 49, was a hairdresser
with three children, the youngest
an 8-year-old boy.
Investigators said they think
Thomas was killed March 11 or 12,
after she was seen leaving an
apartment with Lunningham.
“The victim in this case was
stabbed approximately 30 times
in her chest, her back and her neck
by Mr. Lunningham,” Montgomery County Assistant State’s Attorney Jessica Hall said in court.
At some point, probably after
the killing, police said, Lunningham used the victim’s debit card to
withdraw money from an ATM.
But he did not burn the body
immediately, the prosecutor said.
“After driving around with a
body in [the] car for between one
or two days,” Hall said, “he ultimately set the car and Ms. Thomas’s body on fire to destroy the
evidence of his crime.”
Court records did not detail
how Lunningham and Thomas
knew each other.
A public defender representing
Lunningham on Thursday in
court — where he was ordered
held without bond — did not address the allegations in detail.
“Although I understand the severity of the charges in the case, I
would note that Mr. Lunningham
is in fact innocent until proven
guilty,” said the attorney, Samantha Fuchs, who told the court he
had worked in landscaping and in
a chain of chicken-wing outlets.
Lunningham spoke briefly via
closed-circuit TV from jail. “I’m
not a violent individual,” he told
the judge, adding that he goes to
school and has two jobs. “I just
want a chance.”
For police, the case began with a
911 call about 4:20 a.m. on March
14 reporting a brush fire in an area
near the 13700 block of Wisteria
Drive in Germantown. When firefighters arrived, they found a vehicle in flames and after extinguishing the fire, the body, police said.
An autopsy by the Office of the
Medical Examiner in Baltimore
ruled the death a homicide.
Investigators spoke with a witness who said Lunningham and
Thomas were seen leaving a Germantown apartment March 11, according to police.
Before leaving with Thomas,
Lunningham had told someone
that he and Thomas were going to
drive to a friend’s apartment, and
then to Thomas’s apartment so
she could change clothes before
they came back, according to
court records.
According to a court affidavit,
Thomas never returned.
About 48 hours later, the burning car was discovered. Investigators identified Lunningham as a
suspect and put together a timeline of some of his activity in the
days Thomas had been missing.
On March 12, according to police, a surveillance camera at a
Bank of America captured an image of a man who looked like
Lunningham at an ATM where
investigators think he used Thomas’s debit card to get cash.
About 30 minutes after getting
the cash, Lunningham went to a
friend’s home and asked about
Thomas, as if she were alive,
charging documents state. The
friend said Thomas was not there
and asked Lunningham what had
happened, the documents state.
Lunningham allegedly said
Thomas had driven him to work
and that he was trying to reach her
because he had left his backpack
and jacket in her car.
Two days later, surveillance video from a 7-Eleven station along
Liberty Mill Road in Germantown
showed Lunningham with a red
gas can, according to charging
documents. He bought $2.60
worth of gasoline, police said.
Shortly after, Thomas’s black
Honda Accord was set on fire,
according to court records.
Police said Lunningham was arrested Wednesday after a traffic
stop along Interstate 495.
According to police, Lunningham told them that he and Thomas had argued and that he stabbed
her before burning the car.
Details of how Thomas was
killed drew gasps in the courtroom from her relatives.
“She had an electrifying personality,” said a niece, Taylor Proctor,
after the hearing. “You could hear
her before you could see her. She
always lit up a room, even if things
were bad.”
“She has three kids that will
spend the rest of their lives missing her terribly,” added Marshall
Thomas, her brother, “as well as
hundreds of friends throughout
the community who are going to
miss her. She was a wonderful
person.”
dan.morse@washpost.com
Dana Hedgpeth contributed to this
report.
VIRGINIA
$5 million gift to bolster
GMU economics faculty
BY
S ARAH L ARIMER
George Mason University will
use a $5 million gift to its Department of Economics to create three faculty positions, the
school announced Thursday.
The gift comes from the
Charles Koch Foundation, which
has given millions of dollars to
colleges and universities across
the country. The Koch family is
known for its support of conservative political groups, and
at George Mason, concerns have
been raised by some students and
faculty about the foundation and
whether its generosity influences
academic freedom.
“It means a tremendous
amount to the Economics Department,” Dan Houser, the department chairman, said of the latest
gift. “It allows us to compete for
top faculty. The marketplace is
highly competitive right now.”
The money will go toward
helping the department hire
for three tenure-track positions.
George Mason faculty members have twice won the Nobel
Prize in economics.
The Charles Koch Foundation and GMU also garnered attention in 2016, when the foundation pledged $10 million to
the public institution in Northern
Virginia as part of a bundle of
combined gifts that led the university to rename its law school
for the late Supreme Court justice
Antonin Scalia.
In an announcement about the
$5 million donation, George Mason’s president, Ángel Cabrera,
tried to address concerns some
might have about the funding,
saying the Koch gifts tend to
attract scrutiny.
“I feel compelled to once again
affirm that all gifts accepted by
the university, including this one,
are strictly compliant with our
principles of academic independence,” he said. “The Charles Koch
Foundation has been a generous
donor to the university for many
years and has consistently shown
deep respect for and support of
our commitment to academic independence and free and open
intellectual inquiry.”
Samantha Parsons — a staff
member of UnKoch My Campus,
an organization that focuses on
the Koch family and its influence
on higher education — said people are worried about gifts from
the foundation.
“And, as a public institution,
George Mason University is supposed to be accountable to the
public,” she said in an email. “The
public is demanding proof that
the university prioritizes the interests of the common good, not
just its private donors.”
Funding from the foundation
provides resources to schools so
they can pursue the visions they
have established, said John Hardin, its director of university relations. In this case, that vision is to
increase the size of George Mason’s faculty.
“And so our role, our responsibility here, is to provide those
resources. We’re writing a check
so that they can do that,” Hardin
said. “Our other responsibility
here is to ensure that the university has full academic independence, that it is an environment in
which there is free and open
inquiry.”
sarah.larimer@washpost.com
B5
SU
CHARLES LAZARUS, 94
His Toys R Us was a global empire
BY H ARRISON S MITH
AND E LLIE S ILVERMAN
Charles Lazarus, who transformed his father’s Washington
bicycle business into Toys R Us, a
retail giant that rivaled Santa
Claus’s workshop as one of the
world’s largest distributors of
games, dolls, stuffed animals and
other children’s goodies before it
declared bankruptcy in September, died March 22. He was 94.
A Toys R Us spokeswoman confirmed the death but did not provide additional details.
Mr. Lazarus was 25 when he
founded what became Toys R Us,
his “supermarket for toys,” in
1948. Over six decades, the company grew into an international
empire with a flagship store in
New York’s Times Square, a giraffe
mascot named Geoffrey and an
earworm jingle: “I don’t wanna
grow up, I’m a Toys R Us kid.”
The “Toy King,” as Mr. Lazarus
was christened in headlines,
stepped down as chief executive
in 1994. His company soon became mired in a pitched battle
against big-box retailers such as
Walmart, founded by his friend
Sam Walton, and e-commerce giants such as Amazon. Acquired by
private equity firms in 2005, it
eventually took on $7.9 billion of
debt, according to bankruptcy filings. Last week, it announced it
would sell or close all 735 of its
U.S. stores.
Mr. Lazarus had weathered
countless industry changes over
the years to become one of America’s highest-performing, bestpaid business leaders. A hands-on
executive who once tested baby
toys by hanging mobiles over
cribs, he steered his company
from bikes to baby furniture to
toys, later adding children’s
clothes and video games.
He had served as an Army cryptographer during World War II,
and after returning home he decided to sell cribs and cradles
from his father’s Adams Morgan
bike shop, now the site of Madam’s Organ, a popular bar and
restaurant. An uncle was in the
baby-furniture business, and Mr.
Lazarus said he anticipated a
postwar baby boom. He soon took
over the space entirely, turning
the storefront into a shop named
Children’s Bargain Town, flipping
the Rs in reverse in a whimsical
touch that he later used for the
signage of Toys R Us.
“The toy business was kind of
an accident,” Mr. Lazarus later
explained to the trade publication
DSN Retailing Today. “I started
out selling a few baby toys and
realized that customers didn’t buy
another crib or another high chair
or playpen as their family grew,
but they did buy toys for each
child.”
Mr. Lazarus opened his first
toys-only store in 1957 in Rock-
CHERYL CHENET/CORBIS/GETTY IMAGES
Charles Lazarus, who once sold cribs and cradles from his father’s Adams Morgan bike shop, now the
site of the bar Madam’s Organ, was the country’s best-paid executive in 1987, making $60 million.
ville, Md., taking on the name
Toys R Us in part because the
letter “R” helped fit the store’s
name onto signs. He modeled his
locations after the New York chain
Korvettes, in which a large variety
of products were stocked in long
aisles, easily accessible by shopping cart. By 1966, he had four
stores and $12 million in sales.
Perhaps anticipating that his
company had peaked, Mr. Lazarus
sold Toys R Us that year to the
Interstate department store chain
for $7.5 million, remaining with
the business as head of its toys
division. When Interstate went
bankrupt in 1974, Mr. Lazarus
took the reins of the company,
which emerged from bankruptcy
and renamed itself Toys R Us in
1978.
The business went on to expand at a rate of nearly 20 percent
each year, elbowing department
stores out of the toy business as it
added locations across the country and grew to offer about 18,000
items in each store in the mid1980s.
According to Eric Clark, author
of “The Real Toy Story: Inside the
Ruthless Battle for America’s
Youngest Consumers,” the company’s success was in part a result of
tough business tactics by Mr. Lazarus. The executive used his leverage in the industry to force
toymakers to accept payment
months after they delivered products, and insisted they grant Toys
R Us exclusive offerings, early releases and free advertising.
Unusual for the time, he also
oversaw the installation of a com-
puterized inventory system that
allowed him to track sales and
inventory from behind his desk.
“I think Toys R Us is a unique
operation — the only proprietary
merchandise company that rivals
IBM as revolutionary in concept,”
a retail analyst told The Washington Post in 1982. “Their superb
controls and information systems
“Nobody has to buy
what we sell. You buy it
because you want to
buy it. Although, over
the years, I have tried to
teach children to say
I need it rather than
I want it.”
Charles Lazarus, founder of Toys R Us
are unrivaled in the industry.”
Mr. Lazarus applied his lowcost, high-volume strategy to
clothing beginning in 1983, when
he opened Kids R Us stores in
Brooklyn and Paramus, N.J. The
brand launched stores across the
country but proved less successful
than Babies R Us, which opened
in 1996 and sold diapers, cribs and
car seats.
Mr. Lazarus had by then left his
day-to-day oversight role at the
company, which by 1987 had
made him the country’s best-paid
executive, according to Forbes
magazine. He earned more than
$60 million that year.
“If you’re going to be a success
in life, you have to want it,” he told
Forbes in an earlier interview. “I
wanted it. I was poor. I wanted to
be rich.”
Charles Phillip Lazarus was
born in Washington on Oct. 4,
1923.
According to New York magazine, he had two daughters with
his first wife, Udyss. Their marriage ended in divorce, and he
generated tabloid headlines from
his subsequent marriage to sex
therapist Helen Singer Kaplan.
Shortly before her death in 1995,
she wrote a note requesting a
divorce — an act that apparently
exercised a provision in their prenuptial agreement entitling her,
and by extension her three children, to $20 million.
Mr. Lazarus challenged the
claim, and in 2000 a Manhattan
judge dismissed a fraud charge
filed by Mr. Lazarus’s stepchildren over the issue. He later married Joan Regenbogen, an interior
designer. A complete list of survivors was not immediately available.
“Nobody has to buy what we
sell. You buy it because you want
to buy it,” Mr. Lazarus said in a
recent documentary, explaining a
simple yet crucial aspect to his
company’s growth. “Although,
over the years, I have tried to
teach children to say I need it
rather than I want it.”
harrison.smith@washpost.com
ellie.silverman@washpost.com
OF NOTE
Obituaries of residents from the
District, Maryland and Northern
Virginia.
Wilbur ‘Bill’ Morrison,
nuclear engineer
Wilbur “Bill” Morrison, 91, a
retired Navy commander and
later a civilian engineer who
became a branch chief and assistant director in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s division of
engineering standards, died
Dec. 31 at a nursing home in
Rockville, Md. The cause was
complications from dementia,
said a daughter, Marilyn Erway.
Mr. Morrison, a Rockville resident, was born in Minneapolis.
He served 20 years in the Navy,
retiring in 1967 after having
served as project officer for the
construction and development
of nuclear propulsion during the
building of the USS Bainbridge,
the world’s first nuclear-powered
frigate. He retired from the NRC
in 1986. He was an enthusiastic
runner and a participant in Senior Olympics.
Michael Hutchins,
conservationist
Michael Hutchins, 66, a conservationist and wildlife biologist who since 2013 had been
director of the American Bird
Conservancy’s campaign to minimize the impact of wind turbines
on birds and other wildlife, died
Jan. 15 in Tanzania while on his
way to lead a safari. The cause
was a heart attack, said his wife,
Song Hutchins.
Dr. Hutchins, a resident of
Silver Spring, Md., was born in
Algona, Iowa. He began his career in conservation at the Bronx
Zoo. From 1990 to 2005, he was a
conservationist in Washington
with the Association of Zoos &
Aquariums, where he managed
the breeding program for endangered species. He then spent
seven years as executive director
of the Wildlife Society.
Leonard Oberlander,
federal official
Leonard Oberlander, 76, an
official in five federal agencies
who retired in 1995 from the
Federal Emergency Management
Agency where he was a program
analyst and a policy specialist,
died Jan. 6 at his home in
Washington. The cause was multiple myeloma, said his wife,
Marina Oberlander.
Mr. Oberlander was born in
the Bronx and came to Washington in 1964. He began his federal
career in 1965 as a research
psychologist at the Naval Medical Research Center. Later he
was a research psychologist and
a program and policy analyst at
the old National Bureau of Standards, the Justice Department
and the Federal Aviation Administration. He joined FEMA in
1989. He edited a book, “Quantitative Tools for Criminal Justice
Planning,” and wrote articles on
aviation economics, behavior
and perception.
— From staff reports
What are you doing this
Fridays in
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N0779 1x1.5
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obituaries
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
IN MEMORIAM
DEATH NOTICE
GENIES
BRADLEY
DANIEL W. GENIES
January 24, 1933 ~ March 23, 2007
Our hearts will always be filled
with love for you
Eleanor and Family
BETTY ANN BOWSER, 73
THORNTON
JULIAN THORNTON
1916 - 1996
How sad is this day to me,
The day on which you died;
Your memory will cling to my heart
Till I rest by your side.
Devoted Wife, Anna
DEATH NOTICE
CARNEY
MARCH 23 , 2018
DEATH NOTICE
NAGLER
JOHN COLLINS BRADLEY, M.D.
(Age 75)
On Tuesday, March 20, 2018,
of Washington, DC. Son of the
late James C. and Margaret C.
Bradley. Beloved partner of Jim
Kampe; loving father of Kelly
Thackston, Laura (Jon) McCoy,
Paul Bradley, Mary (Ken) Kolb and Elizabeth
Bradley. Cherished grandfather of Turner,
Baeley, Ellsie, Adeleine and Alexander.
Brother of the late James C. Bradley, III and
the late William Joseph Bradley.
Dr. Bradley completed his pre-medical and
medical degrees at Georgetown University.
Following graduation, he was selected to
become the Chief Resident at Georgetown
University Hospital. Dr. Bradley completed
his fellowship at the Washington Hospital
Center where he specialized in ophthalmology. Upon completion of his fellowship,
Dr. Bradley became a Board-Certified Ophthalmologist. He then joined the Navy
where he obtained the rank of Lieutenant
Commander. In 1974, Dr. Bradley opened
a private practice in Chevy Chase, M.D.
where he specialized in ophthalmic surgery
for over 35 years.
Relatives and friends may call at Collins
Funeral Home, 500 University Boulevard
West, Silver Spring, MD, (Valet Parking),
Sunday, March 25, 2018, from 2 to 4 p.m.
and 7 to 9 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial
at St. Raphael's Church, 1513 Dunster Rd,
Rockville, MD 20854, on Monday, March 26,
2018 at 12 p.m. Interment Gate of Heaven
Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to The American
Academy of Ophthalmology Foundation,
P.O. Box 7309, San Francisco, CA 94120.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
. FRIDAY,
In 1958, realizing that their Dalmatian,
Sparky, needed training, Nan enrolled in a
dog obedience class offered by what was
to become the Canine Training Association
(CTA). This began a lifelong passion she and
Ken shared for raising and training dogs.
They raised eleven litters of Dalmatians and
two litters of Poodles. Nan competed in
the early days of canine freestyle and went
on to judge for the organization. Nan and
Ken taught obedience classes for CTA and,
over the years, they also worked with the
Hyattsville Dog Training Club, the Washington
Poodle Club, the Greater Washington Dalmatian Club, and the Rock Creek Kennel Club.
ANN HAMILTON NAGLER "Nan"
Ann Hamilton Nagler, 94, of Edgewater, MD,
died peacefully at home, surrounded by family, on March 17, 2018 of complications from
a stroke. Nan had a passion for athletics
and later, dog obedience training. She began
playing competitive tennis as a teenager,
something she continued into her seventies,
and was a skilled figure skater in high school
and college.
Nan met her husband, Ken, at the University
of Chicago where they were both pursuing
master’s degrees. They married in 1947, and
moved to Washington, DC where Ken began
a thirty-year career with the U.S. Weather
Service. Nan and Ken settled in Hyattsville,
MD where they raised three daughters. Nan
continued her interest in athletics, teaching
tennis and exercise classes. She taught
swimming for more than thirty years at
the Silver Spring YMCA including classes for
many disabled children and adults. She was
active in the PTA and was a Brownie and Girl
Scout leader.
Ann Blythe Hamilton was born June 1, 1923 in
Chicago, IL to Elisabeth and George Hamilton.
She attended Bryn Mawr college for a year
and transferred to the University of Chicago.
At Chicago she completed a B.S. degree in
Chemistry and began work on a master’s
degree in Microbiology. Before starting a
family, Nan worked as a laboratory technician at Billings Hospital in Chicago and
Georgetown University Hospital in Washington.
She is survived by her husband of more
than 70 years, Ken; three daughters, Betty
Smith (Greg) of Winfield, IL, Janet Nagler of
Silver Spring, MD, and Sue Beatty (Charlie) of
Edgewater, MD; and two grandchildren, Paul
Beatty of Annapolis, MD and Julia Beatty of
Millersville, MD. She was preceded in death
by her two sisters, Helen Bross and Kathie
Smith. Her Poodles, Poppy and Willy, were
also close to her heart.
A memorial gathering will be held from 12 to
2 p.m. on Saturday, March 24, at the George
P. Kalas Funeral Home, 2973 Solomons Island
Rd., Edgewater, MD, 21037. In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions may be made to
the American Kennel Club Canine Health
Foundation, P.O. Box 900061, Raleigh, NC
27675 (www.akcchf.org).
An online guestbook is available at:
www.KalasFuneralHomes.com
EVELYN CARNEY (Age 71)
Passed away peacefully at Washington Hospital Center on March
12, 2018. Evelyn is survived by her
husband, Howard Cooper; daughter, Cynthia; sons, Robert and
Steve. Funeral service will be held
at Petworth United Methodist Church, 32 Grant
Circle, NW, Washington, DC 20011, viewing, 11
a.m.; service, 12 Noon on Saturday, March 24,
2018. Interment National Harmony Memorial
Park. Services entrusted to R.N. HORTON CO.
MORTICIANS, INC.
Betty Ann Bowser in 1999. She was a journalist “who always felt
she could do a little more digging,” a “NewsHour” producer said.
Dogged correspondent
for ‘PBS NewsHour’
BY
H ARRISON S MITH
Betty Ann Bowser, a broadcast
journalist who for decades was a
regular presence on “PBS NewsHour,” where she skillfully interwove policy analysis and empathetic interviews, died March 16
at a clinic near her home in Ajijic,
Mexico. She was 73.
She had pneumonia, her son
Patrick Kelley said, and had recently moved to Mexico because
of the low cost of living.
Ms. Bowser, who began contributing to “NewsHour” in 1988
and served as its health correspondent before retiring in 2013,
was known for her doggedness as
a reporter and her dry off-camera
wit. Her coverage spanned the
Oklahoma City bombing, the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina
and the fierce debate over healthcare restructuring under President Barack Obama.
“Betty Ann was as solid and
reliable a reporter as there is,
taking on assignments no matter
how tough,” anchor and managing editor Judy Woodruff said in
an online “NewsHour” tribute.
“You could drop her in the middle
of any story, and she’d figure it out
quickly.”
Ms. Bowser began her television career in 1966, working at a
local station in Virginia’s Hampton Roads area. She soon rose to
become co-anchor at what was
then WTAR, the region’s CBS
affiliate, where she was one of
only two women in the newsroom.
“She said a lot of people wrote
her off as some dumb girl who
didn’t know what she was talking
about,” Kelley recalled in a phone
interview. “But my mom was
steadfast on the principle that
you always do your homework.
When people try to discredit you
or treat you like you don’t understand what you’re talking about,
you have the intellect to back it
up.”
Her breakthrough came after
she joined CBS News in 1974. She
was in California shortly after
President Richard M. Nixon resigned from the White House and
received a tip that Nixon would
be playing at a golf course near
his residence in San Clemente.
Ms. Bowser’s editors were skeptical, Kelley recalled her saying, but
she received permission to rent a
car and visit the course.
Sure enough, Nixon was there.
He granted Ms. Bowser one of his
first post-presidential interviews,
leading CBS anchor Walter
Cronkite to offer his congratulations in a telephone call, Ms.
Bowser said. (As she told it, network producers expressed their
appreciation in a different way,
sending a helicopter to pick her
up while leaving the rental car
stranded in the parking lot.)
Ms. Bowser later went overseas
to cover African and Middle Eastern affairs and co-anchored a
youth-oriented news program —
“30 Minutes,” a play on the network’s successful series “60 Minutes” — with newsman Christopher Glenn.
She briefly left journalism in
the 1980s to raise her sons and
work in real estate but returned
to freelance for “NewsHour” before becoming a Denver-based
correspondent in the mid-1990s.
At the time, the show was presented by Robert MacNeil and
Jim Lehrer, who were succeeded
in recent years by Woodruff and
Gwen Ifill, who died in 2016.
Ms. Bowser “was a journalist
who always felt she could do a
little more digging to get to the
bottom of a story,” said Murrey
Jacobson, senior “NewsHour”
producer for national affairs. She
was particularly proud of her
coverage of the levees in New
Orleans, where she reported on
design problems that contributed
to catastrophic flooding after
Hurricane Katrina in 2005.
Her resolve extended to capturing the perfect moment on
film, regardless of the emotional
or financial cost. While working
on a story about the V-22 Osprey,
a controversial tilt-rotor helicopter that was deployed following
the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq in
2003, she insisted on waiting late
at a military landing site to capture footage of the aircraft in
action.
“The landing kept getting delayed, and I began to worry about
our crew going overtime and being over budget,” said Dan Sagalyn, deputy senior producer for
foreign affairs and defense. “And
she said, ‘Dan, don’t worry about
the crew — just get that shot.’ And
she was right — it was a magnificent scene. . . . I’ve never had a
correspondent tell me that: ‘Get
that shot. We really need that
shot, to hell with the cost.’ ”
Elizabeth Ann Bowser was
born in Norfolk on Aug. 19, 1944.
Her father sold cars and insurance, and her mother was a
homemaker.
She studied English and journalism at Ohio Wesleyan University and, after graduating in
1966, wrote obituaries for the
Virginian-Pilot before joining the
television station WAVY.
A marriage to Chris Kelley, a
fellow CBS correspondent, ended
in divorce. Survivors include two
sons, Patrick Kelley of Westminster, Colo., and Matthew Kelley of
Denver.
Ms. Bowser covered scores of
major breaking news stories
while at “NewsHour,” including
the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing, when Timothy McVeigh used
a truck full of explosives to destroy a federal office building. But
she also wrangled sit-down interviews with figures such as real
estate businessman Donald
Trump, who in 1992 was known
less for his political views than for
his multiple bankruptcies and
tabloid-saturated affair with actress Marla Maples.
“Are you a Republican or a
Democrat?” Ms. Bowser asked at
the time.
The future president replied
that he was “probably a Republican, but . . . really more for an
individual than I am for a party.”
Ms. Bowser moved to the
health beat in 2009, amid a rancorous national debate over what
became the Affordable Care Act.
She often imbued her reporting
with a personal touch, incorporating reflections from patients
struggling to find health insurance or, occasionally, stories on
her own experience with health
care.
One of her last pieces, from
March 2013, featured an interview with an expert on long-term
senior care but began with a
striking story from her own life:
“The roller coaster often starts in
the middle of the night with a
long-distance phone call. ‘Miss
Bowser,’ the caller begins tentatively. ‘It’s about your Mother.’ ”
“And that’s how my chaotic
ride through the years of taking
care of Mom got going,” she continued. “It ended 10 years later
when she died at the age of 90.”
harrison.smith@washpost.com
DEATH NOTICE
CARTER
ANDERSON
ROBERT LEE CARTER (Age 54)
Rob Carter passed suddenly on February 3,
2018 at his place in Virginia. Rob is survived by
his father, Robert Neil and mother, Lena "Lee"
Carter; brother, Bill Carter; sister Karen Carter
Mowder; his five nieces and one nephew.
Memorial Mass will be held Saturday, March
24, 2018 at St. Francis of Assisi, 8300 Old
Columbia Rd., Fulton, MD at 10 a.m. In lieu of
flowers, please send donations to the National
Kidney Foundation, attn: Finance Department,
30 East 33rd St., New York,NY 10016-5337.
DANIEL GODWIN ANDERSON
(Age 90)
Daniel Godwin Anderson died at home
on March 16, 2018 of respiratory failure,
surrounded by his family. He is survived
by his devoted wife, Margot Anderson;
his daughter, Jennifer Anderson (Thorold
Barker) and Robert Anderson (Beth Johnson), stepdaughter, Emily Miller (Chris
Bruun) and 13 grandchildren, Jared Anderson, Shelby Butkus, Delaney Anderson,
Bernt Bruun, Kyle Bruun, Kurt Bruun, John
Bruun, Eve Miller, Margot Miller, Lily B.
Miller, Poppy Miller, Ella Barker, and Tess
Barker. He is also survived by his sister,
Jackie Karlson and her children, Laurie,
Courtney and Kristin. He was preceded in
death by stepson, Robert J. Miller III (Grace)
and his twin sister, Frances.
Danny was born in Lewes, DE and started
his first business when he was 12 selling
umbrellas on the beach. He graduated from
Woodberry Forest, and got a scholarship to
Yale University where he joined the ROTC.
He fought in the Korean War as a second
lieutenant. Afterwards, he became a cryptogropher. In 1959, with Paul Stokes, he
founded Anderson Stokes, which became
one of the leading summer vacation real
estate companies on the east coast. He left
in the early 1970s to found North Shores
Inc., where he was president for more than
30 years. In 1993 he donated 30 acres
of wetlands to the state of Delaware to
expand a local state park.
He was active in Delaware politics and
a passionate follower of national politics.
He enjoyed spending time with his family,
music and playing bridge. His sense of
humor and persistently positive outlook on
life will be deeply missed.
There will be a memorial service at Fox Hill
Residences at 3 p.m. on Saturday, March
24, 2018.
DEATH NOTICE
D'AMBROSIO
ROSARIA D'AMBROSIO
Of Arlington, VA, peacefully passed away
March 18, 2018. Rosaria was born in Santa
Marinella, Italy to parents Sabatino De Simoni
and Maria DeSimoni (nee Venturelli). During
WWII, she and her family were displaced for
three years. In 1957, while at a dance, Rosaria
met the future love of her life, Diego. Three
years later, Rosaria and Diego were married. In
1961, they came to the US working as Embassy
staff and later became U.S. residents.
Rosaria was well known for excelling at anything she put her hand to. As a teenager,
Rosaria loved Community Theater. Later in
life, she became the bookkeeper for a family
business in Italy and was integral to the success of Diego’s Hair Salon through her bookkeeping. Rosaria and Diego had a long and
fruitful partnership in love and business.
Throughout her life, Rosaria had a great passion
for cooking, art (especially painting and sculptures), interior design, antiques, and architecture.
She is survived by her loving spouse, Diego
D’Ambrosio; sons, Marco and Fabrizio; sister,
Blandina; her brothers, Franco and Carlo, as
well as many loving cousins, nieces, and
nephews.
A visitation will be held at Murphy Funeral
Home, 4510 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA 22203
on Friday, March 23, 2018 from 6 to 8 p.m.
A funeral mass will be held at Holy Rosary
Catholic Church, 595 3rd St. NW, Washington,
DC on Saturday, March 24, 2018 at 2 p.m.
KRULL
Foundation and Alumni Association. He was
the lead in raising money to build the ISU
football stadium.
Gary was the head of public relations at
Georgetown University during the John
Thompson era when the Georgetown Hoyas
basketball team led the nation. The fast pace
of PR in Washington, DC was made to order
for Gary’s wit and wisdom.
Tapped in 1993 by President Clinton to be
Director of Communications Policy at the
National Endowment for the Humanities in
Washington, DC, Gary was in charge of publications, marketing & information, and media
relations. There he was known as the “Czar
of PR.”
GARY L. KRULL
Of Williamsburg, VA, formerly of Washington,
DC, passed away peacefully on March 14,
2018 at age 73. Born in Omaha, Nebraska,
and raised in small-town Iowa, he was the
son of the late Vienna (Imel) and Kenneth
Krull.
Gary graduated from Iowa State University
with a BA in English and Speech/Broadcast
Journalism. As all who knew him were aware,
he gave full credit to Iowa State for opening
up the world to him and he “flew the colors”
of ISU everywhere he went. At ISU, Gary
was in a singing group of seven called “The
Folkswingers” and after graduation the group
was chosen to go on a USO tour in Europe.
They have remained close ever since.
He was an active duty member of the US
Army (1967-1971) serving in the Signal Corp.
He had tours as Post Adjutant/Army Pictorial
Center; Combat Photo leader in Vietnam/221st Sig and Director of PR for Military
Terminal, Military Traffic Service in Washington, DC.
After the Army, Gary returned to Ames, IA
where he held senior positions in the ISU
Gary then opened his own consulting company in Williamsburg, Krull Communications,
where he advised clients in the areas of
graphic/corporate identity, communications
as part of development, and crisis communications management.
Gary is survived by his wife of almost 30 years
Margaret Weaver Krull; sons Terry (Betsy) and
Derek (Donn); two grandchildren Lauren and
Alex and brother Ron (Judy).
He was an active volunteer serving on ISU’s
advisory board, the Executive Partner’s team
at the College of William & Mary, President
of Ford’s Colony Country Club Members’
Association, Board Member of Williamsburg
Land Conservancy, Board President of Network Williamsburg, and member the Endowment Committee at St. Stephen Lutheran
Church. He enjoyed his book club, travel,
golf, ISU sports and a big glass of Oban.
READY
KATHERINE M. READY
Katherine Mary Ready died March 10, 2018
in the loving company of her family in her
niece's home in St. Johnsbury, VT. The cause
of death was heart failure. The daughter of
Robert W. and Helen O’Leary Ready, Kay grew
up in St. Albans, VT, where she graduated
from Bellows Free Academy (BFA) in 1957.
She graduated from St. Lawrence University
in 1961, where she was a member of Delta
Delta Delta sorority. For many happy summers in her youth, she worked at the Tyler
Place in Highgate Springs, VT.
After a brief stint in New York City, she
established a long, successful career as a
civil servant in Washington, D.C. She worked
for the U.S. Office of Education, Indian Health
Service, and later the Department of Health
and Human Services. She was highly regarded for her human resources expertise in civil
service classification. She also worked for
a while as a special education teacher in
Rockville, MD.
In Washington, she adopted her first cats,
twins Finnegan and Fogerty, the first in a
long line of beloved feline friends. She often
adopted older cats who needed special care,
and gave them quality of life in their last
years.
Soon after her beloved twin brother Rick's
untimely death at age 54, she retired and
moved back to Vermont, where she worked
in state government and later served with
distinction on the Vermont Medical Practice
Board and the Vermont Judicial Conduct
Board. As the daughter of Robert Ready,
long-time Democratic National Committeeman from the Vermont, she was imbued with
a lifelong interest in politics, and she admired
leaders who displayed integrity, honesty, fairness, and service to others.
“Auntie Kit,” as she was known by her nieces
and nephews, played a significant role in
rearing two generations of Ready children,
delivering steadfast love and authoritative
advice. She taught each child table manners,
good posture, and the game of cribbage.
She instilled in them a pride in the Ready
family name and an abiding love for Vermont,
Lake Champlain, and the family’s Irish roots.
“AK” was a matriarch, a touchstone, and a
wellspring of family lore. Like her mother
before her, she loved playing bridge and
spent many happy retirement hours with her
St. Albans bridge friends.
Kay characteristically directed her last days
and was supported in this effort by a loving
family, especially her grandniece, Anna
Ready-Campbell. She is survived by: Mary
Ann Ready, her sister-in-law, of Richmond,
VA; niece Molly Curtis Ready and her family
of Cambridge, MA; nephew Charles David
Ready and his family of Richmond, VA;
nephew Robert Ready of CA; niece Mary
O’Leary Ready and her family of St. Johnsbury, VT; niece Annie Ready Coffey and her
family of Richmond, VA; niece Louise Ready
of Lunenberg, MA; and nephew Varick Ready
and his family of London, England. She was
predeceased by her parents and brothers,
Richard Michael Ready and Robert David
Ready, and her niece Tara McMann Ready.
She is also survived by loving cousins and
many friends.
Donations in her honor may be made to
Franklin County Animal Rescue, 30 Sunset
Meadows, St Albans, Vermont 05478 or
Caledonia Home Health and Hospice, 161
Sherman Drive, St Johnsbury, Vermont
05819. A celebration of her life will be held
in St. Albans at a later date. Sláinte!
SCHWARTZ
MARIE D. SCHWARTZ
Journalist, Author, Philanthropist
(Age 97)
Died on March 15, 2018 at Greenwich Hospital, Greenwich, Connecticut, at the age of 97.
She was the daughter of the late David Paul
Smith and Dessie Marr Smith and a sister
of the late Nellie Jane Smith Macdonald,
Annie Pauline Smith, Ruth Smith Kerstein
and David Porter Smith. She is survived
by her niece, Sylvia Kerstein Kossel, and
stepdaughter, Constance Schwartz Harris.
A native of Atlanta, Georgia, Marie attended
schools there and a branch of the University
of Georgia system in Atlanta (now Georgia
State University). She holds an honorary doctor of humane letters degree from the Long
Island University College of Pharmacy.
As a journalist, Marie was a staff writer
for the Washington Post from 1954 until
1970, during which years she covered the
White House during the administration of four
Presidents: Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson
and Nixon. She won many awards for her
writings. She was chosen “best woman
writer’ in Washington by the Sons and Daughters Foundation. She won the top Catherine
L. O’Brien award for excellence in women’s
news reporting in a competition with 1,000
other reporters throughout the country. She
was cited by the National League of American
Pen Women for outstanding achievement in
non-fiction writing. She served as President
of the American Newspaper Women’s Club.
As an author, Marie wrote a number of
books, including: “Entertaining in the White
House,”which grew out of her experiences
covering the White House; “The President’s
Lady: An Intimate Biography of Mrs. Lyndon
B. Johnson;” and “White House Brides,” a
history of romances and marriages in the
White House involving its occupants. She
also authored one book of poetry, “My Heart
Looks Up.”
In 1970, she met and marred New York City
oil company executive, Arnold Schwartz, and
left Washington and the newspaper world
behind. In New York, she embarked upon
a new career in philanthropy, sharing her
husband’s interest in health care and health
education. Together, they made a significant
impact in the fields of health and education
in the Greater Metropolitan area and beyond.
They made naming gifts to New York University, including the Arnold and Marie Schwartz
Health Care Center and the Arnold and Marie
Schwartz Lecture Hall (now part of NYU
Langone Medical Center) as well as the
Arnold and Marie Schwartz Hall of Dental
Sciences at the New York University College
of Dentistry. They endowed a Dr. Howard
Rusk Chair in Rehabilitative Medicine at the
Rusk Institute. Additional NYU facilities that
benefitted from Marie and Arnold Schwartz’
largesse were: The Arnold Schwartz Memorial Scholarship at the Dental Center; The
“Marnold” Fellows Program at the Graduate
School of Public Administration; The Arnold
Schwartz Memorial Workshops at the Tisch
School of the Arts; and The Marie Schwartz
Scholarship at the NYU College of Nursing.
Arnold Schwartz died in 1979, but Marie
continued to support the institutions they
both believed in, including: The Arnold and
Marie Schwartz International Hall for Cancer
Research at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer
Center; The Arnold and Marie Schwartz
College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences at
Long Island University; The Arnold and Marie
Schwartz Hall of Humanities and the Salena
Library Learning Center at LIU (named for
Mr. Schwartz’ parents); The Arnold and Marie
Schwartz Athletic Center; the Dessie Marr
Smith Chapel (named for Marie’s mother) and
the Arnold and Marie Schwartz International
Drug Information Center at LIU.
Marie continued to support the expansion
of the Brookdale Hospital Medical Center in
Brooklyn, whose library is named after her
(the Marie Smith Schwartz Medical Library).
Also, in Brooklyn, she continued to support
the Arnold and Marie Schwartz Police Athletic League Center.
In Manhattan, Marie supported the Arnold
and Marie Schwartz Atrium and the Arnold
and Marie Schwartz Gallery Met, both at the
Metropolitan Opera.
In Florida, Marie supported the Arnold and
Marie Schwartz Kidney Dialysis Center at St.
Mary’s Hospital and the Norton Gallery of Art,
both in West Palm Beach.
In Texas, she supported the San Antonio
Museum and, in memory of her friend, Lady
Bird Johnson, the Wildflower Center at the
University of Texas at Austin.
In Washington, she endowed a week of
concerts by the National Symphony Orchestra at the Kennedy Center (the Arnold and
Marie Schwartz Concerts). Marie spent most
of her time in her later years in Greenwich,
Connecticut, where she made naming gifts to
the Bruce Museum and served at one time as
President of the Pen Women’s Association,
Greenwich Chapter.
Marie’s philanthropy extended beyond just
making endowments. She was also an active
participant in a variety of nonprofit institutions. She was a former Trustee of New
York University, an overseer of the Arnold
and Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy
and Health Sciences at LIU, an emeritus
member of the Board of Overseers of Memorial Sloane-Kettering Cancer Center, a member of the Metropolitan Opera Association, a
member of the Board of the Police Athletic
League of New York City, a member of
the Board of the Norton Gallery of Art in
West Palm Beach, a life member of the
Advisory Committee of St. Mary’s Hospital in
West Palm Beach, a former member of the
Board of the Bruce Museum Association in
Greenwich, Connecticut, a national Trustee
of the National Symphony Orchestra in Washington, DC., a member of the Board and
Executive Committee of the National Wildflower Research Center at the University
of Texas at Austin, and, by appointment
of New York Governor Cuomo, served on
the Governor’s Commission on the Voluntary
Sector.
Marie was especially generous to the Church
of the Transfiguration, a national landmark
also known as “The Little Church Around
the Corner,” to which she donated funds
to restore its building and commission the
Arnold Schwartz Memorial Organ, in addition
to funding a concert series in memory of her
late husband.
A memorial service will be held at the Church
of the Transfiguration in April. Burial will be
private. In lieu of flowers, contributions may
be made to the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower
Center in Austin, Texas, and to the New York
Botanical Garden in Bronx, New York.
A memorial service for Gary will be held on
Saturday, April 7 at 1 p.m. at Williamsburg
Presbyterian Church, 215 Richmond Road.
In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made
to the Gary L. and Margaret W. Krull International Scholarship Fund, Iowa State University Foundation, 2505 University Blvd, Ames,
IA 50010-2230.
When the need arises,
let families find you in the
Funeral Services Directory.
To be seen in the Funeral Services Directory,
please call paid Death Notices at 202-334-4122.
Because your loved one served proudly...
Military emblems are available with death notices and in-memoriams
To place a notice call 202-334-4122 or 800-627-1150, ext. 44122
C0979 2x3
CAROL POWERS/PBS NEWSHOUR
FRIDAY, MARCH 23 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DARDEN
NAHAMIS
LTC (R) EARL DARDEN
DAVID E. NAHAMIS
LTC (R) Earl Darden received his final marching orders on Monday, March 5, 2018. LTC
Darden was honorably discharged from his
biggest battle in life to go on a permanent
“R & R” (rest and relaxation) until the
Trumpet Sounds in the GREAT LAST DAY. At
the age of 86 years and four months after
a victorious battle with complications from
brain aneurysms in 2011 and 2013, LTC
Darden did not die but as a mighty soldier
simply faded away.
Relative and Friends, Soldiers and Saints are
all invited to attend services Honoring LTC
Earl Darden commencing with a viewing
on Sunday, March 25, 2018 from 3:30 p.m.
to 7 p.m. at the Everly Funeral Home &
Cremation Service, 6161 Leesburg Pike,
Falls Church, VA 22044 and on Monday
from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. at The People’s
Community Baptist Church, 31 Norwood
Road, Silver Spring MD 20905 where Earl’s
Funeral/Celebration of Life Services will
follow at 11 a.m. Burial will be in Arlington
National Cemetery at a later date.
www.everlycommunity.com
EADES
JAMES A. EADES "Ajo"
Passed away on Sunday, March 18, 2018.
Homegoing services, Saturday, March 24 at
STEWART FUNERAL HOME, 4001 Benning Rd.,
NE. Viewing 10 a.m., service 11 a.m. Interment
Harmony Memorial Park.
www.stewartfuneralhome.com
David Edward Nahamis passed away at
his residence in Fairfax, Virginia on March
18, 2018. David was born December 1,
1958 in Barcelona, Spain to the late Irving
and Olwyn Nahamis. David will be lovingly
remembered by his wife and best "buddy"
Debbie who shared 37 years together, 25 of
them married. He is survived by his siblings
Bobbi Posta (Rick) and Clifford Nahamis
and by numerous nieces, nephews and
extended family.
Family will receive friends on Friday, March
23 from 4 to 8 p.m. with a memorial service
at 5:30 p.m. at Everly Funeral Home and
Cremation Services, 6161 Leesburg Pike,
Falls Church, VA.
Memorial donations in David's name may
be made to the Bladder Cancer Advocacy
Network (BCAN).
www.everlycommunity.com
SPINKS
EZ
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
WARDEN
BRADLEY
MURRAY
ROBINSON
ELLA INEZ BRADLEY
JOSEPH CECIL MURRAY
IDA M. ROBINSON
KENNETH WAYNE WARDEN
Kenneth Wayne Warden, 50, of Springfield, VA,
passed away Saturday, February 24, 2018. He
was born in Knoxville, Tennessee on December
2, 1967 to Juanita Ruth and Samuel Hugh
Warden. Ken is survived by his brother Steven
of Fountain, Colorado; nieces, nephew and
aunts and uncles. Ken also leaves behind many
friends and two Boston Terriers. Ken, with
his warm personality, was one of the kindest
and most compassionate individuals always
making people feel good. Graduating from
American University he enjoyed his career in
Facilities Management most recently working
with JLL. Ken was passionate about fostering
and rescuing Boston Terriers. He will be greatly
missed by his family, friends and pets. Ken
will be buried with his parents in the Sunset
Cemetery. Services will be held in Clinton,
Tennessee on April 6, 2018. In lieu of flowers
we ask for tax deductible donations in Ken’s
Memory to:
Milagro Boston Terrier Rescue, Inc.
Post Office Box 2332
Corrales, NM 87048
Attn: Mitzi Hobson
JOSEPHINE CECELIA SHORT SPINKS
Peacefully on Sunday, March
18, 2018. Loving sister of William (Jane) and Charles Short;
devoted aunt of Lavelle, Tonya,
Danita, Constance, Hermaine,
Keith, Kevin, Charles and Darrell. She is also survived by a
host of other relatives and friends. Visitation,
Sunday March 25, from 3 to 5 p.m. at BriscoeTonic Funeral Home, 2294 Old Washington Rd.
Waldorf, MD and on Monday, March 26 from
9 a.m. until Mass of Christian Burial, 11 a.m.
at Our Lady Help of Christians, 100 Village St.,
Waldorf, MD. Interment Sacred Heart Cemetery, La Plata, MD.
www.briscoe-tonicfuneralhome.com
B7
RE
WESTFALL
On Saturday, March 17, 2018, passed away
after a brief illness. She is survived by her
loving husband of 53 years, William G. Bradley,
Jr.; daughter, Linda; son, William, III (Yvonne);
four grandchildren; two great-grandchildren
and a host of other relatives and friends.
Service will be held on Monday, March 26,
2018 at St. Anthony's Catholic Church, 1029
Monroe Street NE, Washington, DC, visitation,
9 a.m. until Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m.
Interment Arlington National Cemetery at a
later date. Arrangements by McGuire.
www.mcquire-services.com
BUTLER
STEWART
On Sunday, March 18, 2018.
Beloved father of Michael
Murray, Joanne Johnson, Victoria Johnson, Kevin Murray,
Margaret Sheridan, Roberta
Baer, Catherine Murray, Brian
Murray and Brendan Murray and dear brother
of Marguerite. He is also survived by 33 grandchildren; 46 great-grandchildren and countless
other relatives and friends. He was preceded
in death by his beloved wife, Anne Murray his
son, Martin Murray and his daughter, Lorraine
Sampson.
Friends may call on Saturday, March 24, from
9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Shrine of The Most
Blessed Sacrament, 3630 Quesada St. NW,
Washington, DC with a Mass of Christian Burial
to Follow at 11 a.m. Interment Gate of Heaven
Cemetery immediate to follow. Memorial Contributions may be made to SOME (So Others
May Eat), 71 O Street NW, Washington, DC
20001 or The Washington Jesuit Academy, 900
Varnum St. NE, Washington, DC 20017.
www.devolfuneralhome.com
On Friday, March 2, 2018 she
passed away peacefully surrounded by family and friends. She was
survived by her two sons, Alvin
Cornes and Gregory Cornes; one
daughter, LaGail Robinson; one
sister, Martha Watson; three grandchildren,
two great grandchildren and a host of other
relatives and friends. Viewing, 10 a.m. until
time of funeral services, 11 a.m., Saturday,
March 24, 2018 at R.N Horton Chapel located
at 600 Kennedy St NW Washington, DC 20011.
Internment Arlington National Cemetery at a
later date. Services entrusted to R. N. Horton's
Company Morticians Inc.
SHREIBER
EDMONDSON
MURRAY
LELLIA ANN DICK EDMONDSON
Lellia Ann Dick Edmondson, 90, passed
away on March 17, 2018. Born in Grimes,
VA on July 25, 1927, she was the daughter
of late John Lohr and Neva Henderson
Dick. Ann is survived by her son, Ron
Rawlinson of North Myrtle Beach, SC, and
her brother Donnie Dick of Falls Church, VA.
She was preceded in death by her husband,
Woodrow Wilson “Woody” Edmondson of
Clover, VA and her brothers, L. Mitchell
Dick of McLean, VA and James E. “Jim”
Dick, Sr. of Manassas, VA. Ann served
as Membership Director for the Arlington
Chamber of Commerce for 26 years. The
family will hold a private celebration of life.
LAWSON
HARRIET ELIZABETH WESTFALL
RHONDA MONROE STEWART
She passed away from brain cancer on Sunday
March 11, 2018. She graduated from Calvin
Coolidge High in 1977, and later obtained her
B.S. degree in Communications in 1981 from
Howard University. Rhonda was a producer
at WDCA-TV for the Petey Greene Show; and
Producer for Paul Berry at Channel 7’s, 7 on
Your Side and was Deputy Press Secretary for
Mayor Marion Barry and as a Communications
Specialist for Mayor Sharon Pratt-Kelly. Survived by Jasmine (daughter), Francis Stewart
(Jasmine’s Father), Malcolm and Mary Monroe
(parents); Vanessa and Floria (sisters); Megan
(niece). Celebration of Life Saturday, March 24,
2018. Viewing 12:30 p.m.; Service 1:30 p.m,
Fort Lincoln Funeral Home, 3401 Bladensburg
Road, Bladensburg, MD 20722. Interment Ft.
Lincoln Cemetery.
Harriet was born on July 3, 1943 in Washington, D.C. and died March 19, 2018 after
a three year battle with cancer. She was 74
years old. She died peacefully with friends
and family at her side. She is survived by
her husband of 51 years, Ronald Westfall,
two children, Ronald and Anthony Westfall,
and four grandchildren. Harriet was an
accomplished and award winning artist.
Before retiring, she had a career as a layout
editor with U.S. News and World Report.
Harriet was a friend and an inspiration
to many. In addition to her family she
leaves behind an incredible and large group
of friends that will miss her dearly. She
enjoyed traveling and especially enjoyed
being at the beach with her children and
grandchildren.
Harriet’s ashes will be interred at the
Columbarium at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, VA. A memorial service
will be held at Murphy’s Funeral Home in
Arlington, VA. on Tuesday, March 27 at 1
p.m. with a reception to follow immediately.
STORKE
GORDON JAMES STORKE
ELOIS LAWSON
“Lois”
Elois R. Lawson, of Jefferson, TX, transitioned from her earthly life to eternal rest
on March 7, 2018, at her residence in
Washington, DC. She is survived by two
nephews, Wayne (Cynthia) Jackson and
Samuel House (Bernadine); one niece, Elois
(David) Davidson; five great-nephews and
four great-nieces; sisters-in-law, Jo Frances
Jackson and Solona Jackson; loving and
devoted goddaughters, Bertina (Vincent)
Cleveland and Cassandra Pinkney; and a
host of other relatives and friends. She
was preceded in death by her mother and
father, Pollie Williams Jackson and Robert
Allen Jackson, and two brothers, Robert
Allen Jackson, Jr. and Lonnie Jackson. The
graveside burial will be celebrated on Saturday, March 24, 2018, at 12 noon; Ft.
Lincoln Cemetery, 3401 Bladensburg Rd.,
Brentwood, MD. Services entrusted to J.B.
Jenkins Funeral Home, Hyattsville, MD.
On Sunday, March 18, 2018, of West
Ocean City, MD. Gordon served in the
Marines from 1969 to 1971 and was
honorably discharged. He loved his family
and everyone loved him. Gordon was an
avid Redskins fan. Loving son of Rose
Marie Stallone and the late Edward Storke.
Beloved father of Gordon Storke and
Melissa Reel. Dear brother of Sharon Zetts,
Debora Cave, Francesca Stallone-Beaven
and Ronald Storke and his wife, Denise.
Grandfather of six grandchildren and two
great-grandchildren. Family will receive
friends on Saturday, March 24, 2018 from
2:30 to 4:30 p.m. at the family-owned Beall
Funeral Home, 6512 NW Crain Hwy. (Rte.
3 South), Bowie, MD. Interment, Private.
Please view and sign the family’s guestbook at:
www.beallfuneral.com
PATRICIA ANN TREFRY
On Saturday, March 17, 2018; the beloved wife
of Frederick Irving Trefry; mother of Susan
(Tim) Ploor, Thomas (Terry), John (Valerie) and
Michael Trefry, Sr.; daughter of the late John
Ervin and Leona Eleanor Gillis; sister of the
late Jeanne Cunningham. She is also survived
by seven grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Relatives and friends are invited to
Pat's Life Celebration on Sunday, March 25
from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 p.m. at the GEORGE P.
KALAS FUNERAL HOME, P.A., 6160 Oxon Hill
Rd., Oxon Hill, MD. Mass of Christian Burial
will be offered on Monday, March 26 at 11
a.m. at Holy Family Catholic Church, 2210
Callaway St., Hillcrest Heights, MD. Interment
Resurrection Cemetery. Online at:
www.KalasFuneralHomes.com
CLARK ANTHONY SNEED
Chief Sneed, C.A., USN (Ret.)
On Wednesday, March 21, 2018,
of Potomac, MD. Beloved wife
of Charles J. Wolf, II; mother of
Ginger (Bobby) Browning, CJ
(Cady) Wolf, Tara (Eddie) Monaco, and Cristina (Rafael Medina
Adalfio) Wolf; grandmother of Heidi, Ellie,
Charlie, and Jameson Browning, Sebastian,
Beckett, and Fletcher Wolf, Nicholas, Gavin,
and Olivia Monaco; sister of Frank (Jane
Cavanaugh) Santoro. Relatives and friends
may call at St. Bartholomew Church, 6900
River Road, Bethesda, MD, on Wednesday,
March 28, beginning at 1 p.m., where Mass
of Christian Burial will be celebrated at
2:30 p.m. Private Interment at St. Gabriel's
Cemetery, Potomac, MD. Memorial contributions may be made to Gonzaga College
High School Faculty Fund, 19 Eye Street
NW, Washington, DC 20001.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
McGILL
JOHN C. McGILL (95)
On March 20, 2018 passed away peacefully.
Beloved husband of the late Arlette McGill;
father of Christine Martin, Michelle Boyle of
Reading and John P. McGill. Also survived by
10 grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.
Relatives and friends may call at Holy
Redeemer Church, 9701 Summit Avenue,
Kensington, Md. on March 24 from 12 noon to
1 p.m. with a Mass of Christian Burial following
immediately thereafter. Private interment at
Gate of Heaven Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to St. Francis Inn, 2441
Kensington Ave., Philadelphia, PA 19125.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
J. ALEXANDER VARSON "Alex"
Alex's Celebration Reception will take place
Saturday, March 24 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
at The Other Barn, 5851 Robert Oliver Place,
Columbia, Maryland.
His memorial service will take place Monday,
March 26 at 10 a.m. at the St. Louis Catholic
Church Chapel, 12500 Clarksville Pike,
Clarksville, Maryland.
In lieu of flowers please consider donations to
Small Miracles Animal Rescue, Ellicott City, MD
or the National Zoo.
Was peacefully called to eternal rest on Friday,
March 16, 2018. He leaves to cherish his
memory, wife, Gail Sneed; children, Demetrius,
Jonathan, Kellie, Brittney, Allysha and Shayna;
nine grandchildren, two loving sisters, six
devoted brothers and a host of nieces,
nephews, relatives and friends. Visitation will
be held at Westphalia United Methodist
Church, 9363 D'Arcy Rd., Upper Marlboro, MD
20774, Saturday, March 24 beginning at 10 a.m.
until time of service at 11:30 a.m. Interment
Maryland Veterans Cemetery.
www.johnsonandjenkinsfh.com
MYRTLE V. JENKINS
On March 19, 2018 of Amissville, VA; wife
of the late Roy F. Jenkins; mother of Beverly
Hayes (Joseph), Jeffrey K (Patricia) Jenkins
and the late Roy T. and Kevin Jenkins; sister
of Peggy Beasley; grandmother of Jamie
Pohlmann, Shannon Edwards, Kim Baker,
Andrew and Zachary Jenkins; great-grandmother of Grace and Kate Pohlmann, Brittney
Hayes and Caroline and Virginia Edwards.
Friends may call Sunday, March 25, from 4 to
6 p.m. at Moser Funeral Home, Warrenton, VA
where services will be held Monday, March 26
at 10 a.m. Interment Culpeper National Cemetery. Memorials may be made to Alzheimer's
Assn. or to The Culpeper.
www.moserfuneralhome.com
JOHNNIE S. OWENS
On Tuesday, March 10, 2018, JOHNNIE S.
OWENS, beloved husband of Sandra. He is also
survived by his four children, 11 grandchildren
and two great-grandchildren. Friends may call
on Tuesday, March 27, 2018 at Pope Funeral
Home Forestville Chapel, 5538 Marlboro Pk.,
Forestville, MD 20747 from 10 a.m. until time
of service at 11 a.m. Interment with military
honors at Cheltenham Veterans Cemetery,
Cheltenham, MD.
CAPUANO
IN MEMORIAM
LEFFERTS
VARSON
Of Columbia, MD was born on May 14, 1972
and died suddenly on March 17, 2018. He
leaves behind his wife Beth Anna; children
Connor and Ally; parents Bob and Debbie
Varson; sister Kate (Brian) Compton; sisterin-law Louise (Chris) Cottrell; his nieces and
nephews Noah, Hannah and Hayley Compton
and Michael Cottrell; his in-laws Wayne and
Mary Speckard and lots of cousins, aunts and
uncles scattered around the world. Alex grew
up in Upper Marlboro, MD where he attended
Frederick Douglass High School (and met the
love of his life Beth Anna). He went on to earn
his degree from Salisbury State University and
was a lifelong employee of the United States
Census Bureau. Throughout his life, Alex never
gave up his kid-like sense of adventure and fun
and took any opportunity to go to Disneyworld,
Dave & Buster’s or to be first in line to see
any new Marvel or Star Wars movie. He was
a music-loving, gifted photographer who loved
to decorate both cakes and his work cube for
the holidays. Alex was a Capitals and Notre
Dame Fighting Irish fan who kept his devotion
even though they often earned his frustration.
But more than any of this, Alex was a devoted
husband and father who took immense pride
in all his family accomplished. We will miss
his sense of humor, his creativity, his calm
demeanor and just his presence in our lives.
SNEED
OWENS
JANET PATTERSON LEFFERTS
PAUL BEN MAYS, JR.
(Age 80)
In his 103rd year, on March 19,
2018. Musician extraordinaire,
beloved husband of the late
Rose Rothman Shreiber, and
devoted father of Joseph (Sue)
Shreiber and Rita (Steven)
Schreiber. Loving brother of the late Martin
and Norman Shreiber. Also survived by
three grandchildren, five great-grandchildren, and one great-great-grandchild.
Graveside services will be held Friday,
March 23, 2018 at 1 p.m. at Alliance Cemetery, 970 Gershall Avenue, Norma, NJ.
Memorial contributions may be made to
the Jewish Social Service Agency at
https://www.jssa.org/ or 301-816-2633.
#HTTR
www.sagelbloomfield.com
JENKINS
DONALD JOSEPH CAPUANO
(Age 83)
Peacefully on Wednesday, February 28, 2018
God called his child, Paul B. Mays, Jr. of Ft.
Washington, MD. Devoted and loving husband
of Henrietta Carmon Mays; father of Carmen
Jimason (Jerome), Dr. Karen S. Owens (Brian),
Myron C. Staton (Linda), Forrest R. Staton and
Angela Scarborough; loving brother of J. James
Mays, (Diane) Henry L. Mays (Shirley), Catherine
Mays Roper, Paula B. Mays Esq., Dr. Mamie
Mays Jordan and the late Mary Louise Mays;
dedicated brother-in-law to Elmira C. Gwynn.
Also survived by eight grandchildren; 19 greatgrandchildren; one great-great-grandchild and
a host of nieces; nephews; cousins and friends.
Visitation, 10 a.m., service, 11 a.m., Saturday,
March 24, 2018 at Fort Washington Christian
Church, 10900 Indian Head Highway, Ft. Washington, MD 20744.
www.jbjfh.com
WILLIAM WALLACE MURRAY, Ph.D
Died on March 18, 2018, after a day with his
family. A memorial service will be held at 11
a.m. on March 30, in the Potomac Room at
Westminster at Lake Ridge.
Dr. Murray was born in Yonkers, NY on December 30, 1922 to parents who had emigrated
from Scotland. He had a long and distinguished
career as a physicist, first with UERD, and then
with the David Taylor Model Basin until he
retired in 1985. He was given the Navy’s
Distinguished Civilian Service Award in 1963 for
his work as the Scientific Director of Operation
SWORDFISH, and the DoD’s Distinguished Civilian Service Award in 1975.
A devoted husband and father, Dr. Murray
enjoyed travelling with his family. In his private
life, he was a gentleman farmer; a voracious
reader; a dangerous chess opponent; and a
happy participant in the many social activities
and parties organized by his wife.
He’s survived by his loving wife of 65 years,
Florence; his two daughters, Caprice and
Jamie; his son, C.K.; and four grandchildren,
Banister, Justin, Kendra and Megan.
VIRGINIA WOLF
"Ginger"
EBENEZER A. MARTINS
MAYS
SAMUEL N SHREIBER
TREFRY
MARTINS
On Thursday, March 8, 2018 in Takoma
Park, MD, Ebenezer Martins transitioned
into eternal life. He is survived by his
daughters, Elizabeth Ayodele Martins and
Elizabeth Titilayo Martins; granddaughter
Daphane Martins; sister-in-law, Angela Harrison (Randolph); and a host of relatives
and friends. Services will be held on Friday,
March 23, 2018, Viewing 10 a.m.; Service
11 a.m. at Johnson & Jenkins Funeral Home,
716 Kennedy Street, NW, Washington, DC.
Interment Gate of Heaven Cemetery, 13801
Georgia Ave, Silver Spring, MD.
WOLF
SHIRLEY R. BUTLER
On March 19, 2018, Shirley R. Butler passed
away peacefully at home, in her sleep.
She was born on August 21, 1922, and grew
up in New Orleans, Louisiana. She was the
oldest daughter of a family of six girls and
seven boys, and often took on the role of an
additional parent to her younger siblings.
She had a distinguished 40 year government career as an administrative assistant
for the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in the
Office of Management and Budget.
She was a dedicated member of the Sligo
Seventh-day Adventist Church for many
years, before becoming, along with her husband, a founding member of the Reaching
Hearts International Seventh-day Adventist
Church.
She was the beloved wife of John Davis
Butler, Sr., for 70 years, and was the loving
mother of Ann Canas, and John Davis Butler,
Jr. She was the cherished grandmother of
Haley Ann Butler and Lauren Elise Butler.
She is also survived by her sisters Melba,
Beverly, and Brenda, and her brothers
Thomas, Samuel, Bland, and Gerald, and
multiple nieces and nephews.
Memorial Service will be at the Reaching
Hearts International Seventh-day Adventist
Church, on Saturday, March 24, at 3 p.m.,
with repast to follow at the church. Interment will be at Parklawn Memorial Park,
12899 Veirs Mill Road, Rockville, MD at 10
a.m. on Sunday, March 25.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions
and expressions of sympathy may be provided to the Alzheimer’s Foundation of
America.
Janet Patterson Lefferts passed away
peacefully on March 18, 2018, at the age
of 98. She was born in 1919, the first of
two daughters of James Samuel and Bertha
Patterson of Round Hill, VA. "Dr. Pat" was
the pharmacist at his drug store in Round
Hill for 55 years.
Janet attended Virginia Intermont College
and graduated from Mary Washington College in 1939. She taught at the high school
in Aldie, VA, for three years before marrying
Miles Lefferts of Leesburg in 1942. Miles
had just become a Lieutenant in the Army
Signal Corps, and they lived in several army
installations before he was sent overseas
before D-Day. After returning from the war,
Miles and Janet moved to Arlington and
brought up two daughters there. Ann was
born in 1947, and Nancy in 1952.
Janet was a Girl Scout leader for her daughters' troops, and substituted in Arlington
County Public Schools for 20 years. She was
active in her church, Trinity Presbyterian in
Arlington. Her volunteering included delivering Meals on Wheels, serving as a docent
at the Arlington Historical Society and 17
years as a "Pink Lady" at Virginia Hospital
Center.
Of Washington, DC, beloved husband of Carol
Koval Capuano, passed away peacefully on
March 13, 2018.
Don was born on September 26, 1934, in
Green Island, New York, one of three sons
of Xavier and Carmela Capuano. In his early
days, Don could be found delivering milk and
bread via horse-drawn wagon, or working
in a local Italian restaurant. Don attended
the New York State College for Teachers
in Albany (now known as the University at
Albany, SUNY) with the intention of becoming
a teacher. Instead, the law beckoned, and
Don moved to Washington, DC to attend
Georgetown University Law School, where
he was a member of the Georgetown Law
Journal. Following graduation from law
school, he was a law clerk to Judge Charles
F. McLaughlin of the U.S. District Court for
the District of Columbia. He then served as
a staff attorney on the Board of Monitors
appointed by the District Court to oversee
administration of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters. Don soon joined the
three-lawyer firm of O'Donoghue &
O'Donoghue, which grew to 30 lawyers. He
continued to practice law there for more than
fifty years, many as its senior partner. Don
retired in 2011.
Don's practice with O'Donoghue spanned the
full range of labor, employee benefits, and
employment law issues, with the goal to
improve the lives of the working people of
America. He served as counsel to a number
of international and local unions, as well as
to many national and local employee benefit
funds. He represented clients before state
and federal courts, including in two oral
arguments before the United States Supreme
Court. Don was especially proud of the
fact that the O'Donoghue firm was pro bono
counsel for a habeas corpus death penalty
case for 13 years that ultimately wound up
before the United States Supreme Court,
which overturned the death penalty in that
case.
In addition to his practice, Don was an active
participant in a number of professional and
honorary organizations and societies. He was
a member of the Judicial Conference of
the District of Columbia; Chair of the Labor
Law Committee of the Bar Association of
the District of Columbia; and Chair of the
American Bar Association's Section of Labor
and Employment Law. He was a Fellow of the
College of Labor and Employment Law, and
active on the College's Board of Governors.
Don was also a frequent speaker at many
labor law programs around the country.
Above everything else, Don was a loving and
devoted husband and father, and nothing
gave him more pleasure than spending time
with his family. Don is survived by his wife
of 59 years, Carol; his children (and their
spouses), Betsy Eger (John), Chris Capuano
(Lisa), Mary Feller, Pat Capuano (Mariangeles), and Dave Capuano (Becky). Don loved to
spend time with each of his 11 grandchildren,
Josh, Mia, Sarah, Dani, Kate, Corina, Ellie,
Michael, Julia, Luli, and Tomas. Don loved
relaxing with Carol and the entire family at
Bethany Beach, DE, where they vacationed
for over 50 years. Don was also a master
Weber charcoal griller and an avid runner,
having participated in many races across the
country.
A Memorial Service will be held on Friday,
April 6, 2018 at 11 a.m. at the Shrine of
the Most Blessed Sacrament, 3630 Quesada
St NW, Washington, DC; reception to follow.
In lieu of flowers, the family requests that
contributions be made in memory of Donald
Capuano to The Children’s Inn at NIH.
PAID DEATH NOTICES
MONDAY- FRIDAY 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
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Her hobbies included reading, following
politics, history and travel. She was an
involved and devoted grandmother.
POST YOUR
CONDOLENCES
Janet was predeceased by her husband in
2001, and her daughter Ann Guthridge in
2012. She is survived by her sister, Dorothy
Patterson; daughter Nancy Thaete; grandchildren Liz Burks, Sam Guthridge and Sarah
Szymanowski; and three great grandsons,
Jon, Felix and Elias.
Now death notices on
washingtonpost.com/obituaries allow you
to express your sympathy with greater ease.
Visit today.
Graveside services were held at Hillsboro
Cemetery on March 23. A memorial service
will be held at Trinity Presbyterian Church
at 3 p.m., Sunday, March 25.
GHI
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B8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 23 , 2018
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
Mostly sunny and chilly
Skies are mostly sunny and winds
are gusty, if a bit lighter. Highs reach
the mid-40s to near 50. Winds are
out of the northwest around 15 to
20 mph, with higher gusts. Tonight,
clear skies give a good view of the waxing moon
in the western evening sky. Bundle up, as
readings fall below freezing yet again with lows
in the mid-20s to upper 20s.
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Today
Partly sunny,
breezy
Saturday
Mostly cloudy
48° 30
49° 31
47° 32
50° 31
54° 39
62° 45
FEELS*: 40°
FEELS: 50°
FEELS: 42°
FEELS: 47°
FEELS: 53°
FEELS: 61°
CHNCE PRECIP: 10%
P: 0%
P: 0%
P: 0%
P: 0%
P: 25%
WIND: NW 10–20 mph
W: NW 6–12 mph
W: NNE 8–16 mph
W: NE 8–16 mph
W: NE 6–12 mph
W: ESE 7–14 mph
°
Sunday
Partly sunny
.
°
Monday
Mostly sunny
°
Tuesday
Partly sunny
°
°
Wednesday
Partly sunny
OFFICIAL RECORD
Temperatures
NATION
Harrisburg
44/26
Hagerstown
43/24
Davis
35/15
Philadelphia
43/29
FORECAST
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
49° 3:27 p.m.
34° 6:44 a.m.
58°/39°
90° 1907
17° 1892
44° 4:00 p.m.
31° 7:00 a.m.
58°/35°
83° 1968
12° 1988
47° 3:24 p.m.
31° 6:49 a.m.
56°/35°
86° 1907
19° 1885
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: –3.6° yr. to date: +1.1°
Precipitation
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
OCEAN: 43°
Ocean City
45/29
OCEAN: 39°
Lexington
50/25
Richmond
53/28
Norfolk
49/33
Virginia Beach
48/34
Past 24 hours
Total this month
Normal
Total this year
Normal
OCEAN: 40°
Kitty Hawk
48/35
OCEAN: 45°
Pollen: High
Air Quality: Good
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
High
Low
Low
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
Trace
1.80"
2.38"
7.53"
7.81"
0.01"
1.49"
2.28"
7.88"
7.70"
0.14"
2.13"
2.71"
8.43"
8.66"
Moon Phases
UV: Moderate
Solar system
5 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, mostly sunny, breezy, cold. High 32–36.
Wind northwest 7–14 mph. Tonight, mostly clear, cold. Low
19–23. Wind northwest 6–12 mph. Saturday, mostly cloudy,
1–3 inches of snow, cold. High 27–31. Wind southwest 4–8
mph.
Atlantic beaches: Today, partly sunny, breezy, chilly. High
43–50. Wind northwest 8–16 mph. Tonight, clear, cold,
breezy. Low 29–34. Wind northwest 7–14 mph. Saturday,
increasing clouds, rain or wet snow at night. High 42–48.
Wind north 6–12 mph.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, partly sunny, breezy. Wind
northwest 10–20 knots. Waves 2 feet or less. Visibility unrestricted.
• Lower Potomac and Chesapeake Bay: Today, partly sunny, blustery.
Wind northwest 12–22 knots. Waves 2 feet or less on the Potomac,
1–2 feet on the Chesapeake.• River Stages: Today, the Little Falls
stage will be 3.6 feet, rising a bit to 3.7 feet Saturday. Flood stage at
Little Falls is 10 feet.
Today’s tides
(High tides in Bold)
Washington
12:53 a.m.
7:40 a.m.
1:03 p.m.
8:46 p.m.
4:05 a.m.
10:42 a.m.
5:15 p.m.
10:45 p.m.
Ocean City
ACTUAL
Cape May
42/31
Annapolis
46/30
Charlottesville
52/30
Annapolis
M
High
Low
Normal
Record high
Record low
Weather map features for noon today.
Baltimore
44/26
Dover
45/28
Washington
48/30
RECORD
°
Su
REGION
AVERAGE
12:23 a.m.
6:56 a.m.
12:48 p.m.
7:03 p.m.
Norfolk
2:21 a.m.
8:49 a.m.
2:50 p.m.
8:55 p.m.
Point Lookout
6:30 a.m.
1:42 p.m.
6:57 p.m.
none
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Midland, TX 91°
Low: Ely, MN –5°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
40/27/pc
73/43/pc
33/20/s
62/47/pc
84/63/pc
44/26/pc
50/30/c
67/52/c
37/28/r
55/38/c
41/32/pc
35/24/pc
38/25/pc
63/45/pc
48/27/s
59/38/pc
59/30/c
44/32/s
48/30/pc
37/24/s
82/67/pc
69/34/c
Tomorrow
40/26/c
69/42/pc
35/18/pc
71/57/c
83/63/c
46/26/pc
50/30/sh
74/61/pc
40/32/c
50/32/c
43/31/pc
34/22/pc
34/23/pc
66/53/pc
36/31/sn
50/39/sh
61/30/pc
37/29/sn
36/28/sn
40/24/pc
88/67/pc
68/37/s
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
48/35/r
44/25/s
87/62/pc
30/4/s
39/27/sn
45/31/pc
81/71/r
82/68/pc
50/31/c
76/57/pc
68/45/pc
61/48/t
73/52/pc
76/60/pc
66/51/pc
51/37/c
69/58/c
77/60/s
39/31/pc
43/27/c
52/46/c
76/63/pc
45/31/pc
49/33/s
39/31/c
43/24/s
83/63/pc
25/5/s
37/30/sn
45/30/c
80/70/t
85/68/c
33/25/sn
80/63/pc
76/55/pc
52/35/c
69/49/s
79/49/c
62/48/pc
45/35/r
73/49/c
78/65/s
41/29/c
40/28/sn
67/44/t
81/63/pc
46/32/pc
44/36/r
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
75/55/pc
53/37/r
72/49/s
43/29/pc
83/59/pc
39/17/pc
41/30/pc
48/36/r
46/32/pc
56/31/s
52/35/c
53/28/s
59/45/pc
50/42/c
81/72/pc
62/46/sh
65/55/pc
60/48/pc
85/73/sh
49/36/r
46/33/c
36/21/pc
72/53/s
75/50/pc
75/50/pc
45/31/c
79/56/s
45/30/pc
80/54/pc
39/20/pc
41/29/c
52/34/c
45/31/pc
46/33/r
47/29/sn
46/30/sn
56/38/sh
50/35/r
81/72/sh
57/39/c
64/55/pc
57/46/sh
84/74/sh
50/35/c
43/25/c
32/19/pc
77/62/s
67/39/pc
Mar 24
First
Quarter
World
High: Diffa, Niger 112°
Low: D'elind'e, Russia –50°
Mar 31
Full
Apr 8
Last
Quarter
Apr 15
New
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Rise
7:07 a.m.
11:17 a.m.
7:54 a.m.
2:38 a.m.
11:23 p.m.
2:56 a.m.
Set
7:23 p.m.
12:57 a.m.
8:48 p.m.
12:00 p.m.
9:33 a.m.
12:28 p.m.
excludes Antarctica
WORLD
Today
Addis Ababa
77/52/pc
Amsterdam
47/37/c
Athens
64/51/s
Auckland
72/62/r
Baghdad
89/64/s
Bangkok
90/76/pc
Beijing
69/38/pc
Berlin
41/32/c
Bogota
68/50/r
Brussels
47/40/pc
Buenos Aires
84/57/pc
Cairo
101/62/pc
Caracas
73/62/pc
Copenhagen
38/34/c
Dakar
80/66/s
Dublin
49/36/r
Edinburgh
49/35/r
Frankfurt
47/35/c
Geneva
50/32/pc
Ham., Bermuda 65/56/pc
Helsinki
32/15/pc
Ho Chi Minh City 93/72/pc
Tomorrow
78/50/pc
51/37/c
63/48/t
70/61/r
94/69/pc
93/79/pc
73/42/s
45/30/c
66/48/sh
53/38/c
78/48/pc
74/57/pc
71/62/pc
40/36/c
79/66/pc
50/34/pc
50/35/pc
50/33/pc
55/39/s
61/58/sh
35/29/c
96/77/pc
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
76/68/s
83/59/c
60/42/sh
84/61/pc
65/54/sh
66/39/c
85/75/pc
93/77/pc
88/78/t
77/68/pc
61/49/r
54/42/r
56/40/r
86/75/c
80/51/pc
38/24/c
37/20/sn
88/77/s
79/55/pc
89/64/pc
37/33/c
37/19/c
44/41/r
42/28/c
77/67/pc
83/58/s
50/43/sh
65/48/c
73/55/pc
68/41/s
82/75/pc
96/75/t
85/78/t
78/69/pc
57/50/sh
52/37/c
53/40/sh
87/74/c
82/53/pc
34/23/c
30/15/s
92/79/s
80/60/pc
93/66/pc
45/31/c
31/19/pc
55/40/c
45/27/pc
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei City
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
87/74/s
91/62/s
53/37/s
90/65/pc
78/50/pc
31/20/sn
53/37/s
67/50/s
90/79/pc
40/30/c
75/67/sh
77/58/s
77/57/s
57/46/c
37/19/pc
45/30/c
42/30/c
90/75/s
90/60/s
55/40/pc
91/66/pc
84/52/s
40/24/c
56/41/s
68/51/pc
90/79/pc
41/32/sf
81/70/pc
78/62/s
81/62/pc
59/49/pc
36/19/s
46/31/pc
45/26/pc
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
sh- showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
Allergen Extract Lab (pollen data); airnow.gov (air
quality data); National Weather Service
* AccuWeather's RealFeel Temperature®
combines over a dozen factors for an accurate
measure of how the conditions really “feel.”
Polar
pretensions
Giant panda Mei Xiang
rolls in the snow in her
enclosure at the National
Zoo on Thursday. The bears
come from a part of China
where winters can be cold,
and they love to play in the
snow. But in their native
habitat in the summer, they
seek cool air in higher
elevations.
MATT MCCLAIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
Young immigrants reach DACA age — but now can’t apply
DACA FROM B1
who do not have DACA or temporary protected status recently
passed the House of Delegates
and is awaiting a vote in the state
Senate. Maryland already allows
undocumented immigrants who
do not have DACA protection to
get driver’s licenses, a privilege
not available in 37 other states,
according to the National Council
of State Legislatures.
In other states, however, there
are no laws offering benefits to
undocumented
immigrants. Legislation that would
have allowed driver’s licenses and
in-state tuition for undocument-
ed immigrants died in committee
in the Virginia General Assembly
this year.
Like Martinez, Fairfax City
high school junior Gerry Pinto held off on applying
for DACA after turning 15. He and
his family were unsure how the
2016 presidential election would
affect the program. They, too,
worried about the application
fee.
When Trump began to signal
that he planned to end the program, they rushed in an application last summer, said Ambar
Pinto, Gerry’s older sister.
But they left a box unchecked
on the form, Ambar Pinto said.
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration
Services, the agency that administers DACA, sent back the application with instructions to resubmit it completed.
By then, Trump had canceled
the program. The resubmitted
application was turned down.
“I had to sit down with my
brother and explain to him what
“The fact that there are thousands of immigrant
young people who are now at that point where
they need to be protected just shows you how
important it is to have permanent legislation.”
Bruna Bouhid, spokeswoman for United We Dream, an advocacy group for the
young immigrants known as “dreamers”
this meant,” said Ambar Pinto,
who manages a deportation defense hotline for United We
Dream. She said her brother, who
declined
to
be
interviewed, is now unsure whether he
will attend college.
“I say: ‘No, don’t say that. We’ll
figure it out,’ ” she said. “But that’s
not what he hears. What he hears
is that all the scholarships are
focused on DACA recipients.”
Guillermo Martinez, 18, said he
has been monitoring negotiations in Congress as he prepares
to graduate from his Baltimore
County high school in June.
He applied for DACA when he
was 14, only to learn that he was a
few months too young.
Last year, he began preparing
an application again. But he gave
up when Republican leaders in
10 states threatened to sue the
Trump administration in federal
court in an effort to shut down
the program. That threat, Trump
has said, is what ultimately led
him to his attempt to end DACA.
“My plan was to go to a good
college,” said Guillermo Martinez, who was brought to the
United States from Honduras
when he was 3 and hopes to study
business and marketing. “But it
looks like I’ll have to stick to
community college.”
antonio.olivo@washpost.com
KLMNO
Style
FRIDAY, MARCH 23 , 2018
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/STYLE
EZ
RE
THE WASHINGTON POST . GOINGOUTGUIDE.COM
K
C
. FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 2018
MOVIE REVIEWS IN WEEKEND
Isle of Dogs Using stop-motion, Wes Anderson crafts a thin coat of a story, but it sure is shiny. 26
Pacific Rim: Uprising Plenty of giant battle-bots for a 13-year-old — or the 13-year-old at heart. 27
Unsane Claire Foy involuntarily lands in a mental hospital, but you’re the one who will want out. 28
BOOK WORLD
When life
calls, there
are no easy
answers
TRICK
By Domenico Starnone
Translated from Italian
by Jhumpa Lahiri
Europa. 176 pp. Paperback, $16
BY
The president
showed a≠ection
to his wife.
MARICE COHN BAND/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Everglades protector Marjory
Stoneman Douglas and her cat,
Willie, in 1994.
Douglas’s
legacy
lives on in
Parkland
M ANUEL R OIG- F RANZIA
For those of us who have left
the places of our youth, any return to those rooms we once occupied, those halls we once traversed, can be freighted with
emotion. The ghosts of our past
life crouch there, and sometimes
we want to leave them undisturbed, for they can force a reckoning with what we were and
what we have become.
A reckoning is certainly what
awaits Daniele Mallarico, the aging illustrator at the center of
Domenico Starnone’s superb
Italian novel, “Trick,” now available in an English translation by
Jhumpa Lahiri. In this layered,
alternately witty and melancholy
story, Mallarico sees shadowy
apparitions
everywhere when he
returns to his
childhood
home in Naples.
And
though they do
not
speak
(these are not ghosts that rattle
chains), they nudge him to assess
his life and explore his insecurities.
What ensues for Mallarico is a
running internal dialogue about
art, aging, love, infidelity, violence, envy and ambition.
Mallarico’s daughter, Betta, a
harried academic in an unhappy
marriage, lives in the Naples
apartment where he grew up as
the son of an inveterate gambler.
At her urging, Mallarico reluctantly agrees to leave his home in
Milan and spend four days in the
apartment watching Betta’s precocious 4-year-old son, Mario,
while she and her husband attend
a conference.
Mallarico’s health is poor, but
he’s also burdened by the creeping sense that he’s become irrelevant. Once a celebrated artist,
his phone doesn’t ring as often
anymore. His invitations are drying up. What’s worse, he’s struggling to please a young publisher
who has commissioned him to
illustrate a deluxe edition of the
classic Henry James short story
“The Jolly Corner.”
“The Jolly Corner,” you may
remember, is also about a man
who confronts ghosts in his childhood home. Starnone expertly
plucks some of the short story’s
essence, twisting and molding his
own work into a marvel of metafiction that feels fresh and surprising.
The school that’s named
after an activist gives
rise to a movement
BY
H
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
Why do we care?
Behind our obsession with the state of first couples’ unions
BY
O
E MILY H EIL
n Monday, onlookers divined outsize
meaning from a small gesture by President
Trump toward his wife.
As he walked with Melania Trump
across the White House lawn to the awaiting Marine One helicopter, he placed his arm around
her waist — then held her closer as she stumbled
slightly, the heel of her designer boot apparently
caught in the grass.
The British tabloid the Mirror homed in on the
Trumps’ interaction in a story headlined “Donald
Trump’s reaction to Melania’s stumble ‘may reveal
true feelings,’ ” and the Twittering class shared their
thoughts on his save.
In another context it would have been an unremarkable moment between husband and wife, but
Trump is currently being sued by a former Playboy
model and a porn actress, both of whom claim he had
affairs with them, and the latter of whom is set to tell
her story in a “60 Minutes” interview on Sunday.
Trump has denied the allegations.
In the meantime, the public has turned the
Trumps’ marriage into Kabuki by way of YouTube, a
union that others try to understand by interpreting
pantomimes of their public appearances. They have
both said little about their marriage in recent
months, so small gestures such as a half-embrace are
deciphered, one tweet at a time.
Asking “How is the Trump marriage” isn’t just a
matter of idle gossip, said Katherine Jellison, an Ohio
University history professor. Americans have always
cared about the state of our presidents’ unions.
“There’s the concern that, for people in public life,
TRUMPS CONTINUED ON C3
President Trump and first lady Melania Trump wrap their arms around one another after she stumbled
Monday on the South Lawn. “We are fascinated by first families,” says Bush adviser Anita McBride.
BOOK WORLD CONTINUED ON C2
THEATER REVIEW
‘Frozen’: A warm hug for
fans of the Disney movie
BY
P ETER M ARKS
new york — Frenzied “Frozen”
fans: chill. Your prayers for a
faithfully well-executed Broadway rendition of your favorite
animated movie musical have
been answered.
The altogether respectable production devised by the creative
team — director Michael
Grandage, designer Christopher
Oram, songwriters Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez
and book writer Jennifer Lee —
seizes capably on the solemn Nordic grandeur of Disney’s 2013
movie version. And we cannot
underestimate the import of a
J ESSICA C ONTRERA
musical arriving at this moment
that deals with young women
coming to terms with their own
power: not with its limits, but
with its awesome range.
These attributes — which also
include the most endearing lifesize puppet to be herded onto
Broadway since “War Horse” (I
speak of Sven, the noble reindeer)
— ensure that a warm reception
awaits “Frozen” from its devoted
base.
Winning over the uninitiated,
though, may be a tougher task for
the eagerly anticipated musical
that had its official opening
Thursday night at the St. James
THEATER CONTINUED ON C2
DEEN VAN MEER
Caissie Levy gives Elsa a sufficiently big voice in “Frozen” on Broadway.
er name appeared in every news report about the
Florida school shooting. It
was stamped on the historic
gun-control legislation passed
soon after. And now, as fired-up
crowds arrive in Washington for
the March for Our Lives, it will
be invoked once again: Marjory
Stoneman Douglas.
The woman whose name
adorns the school where a consequential shift in the movement
against gun violence began was
an activist herself. Douglas had a
reputation for relentlessly challenging politicians and powerful
political interests even on issues
that seemed like lost causes at
the time — a description that
almost eerily parallels the efforts of the teenagers leading the
charge today.
It’s a coincidence, to be sure.
But when nearly every other
high school in the surrounding
area bears only the placidsounding name of its local community (Coconut Creek High
School, Coral Glades High
School . . .), it’s striking that the
name of the Parkland school is
an homage to someone who
spent her life fighting the status
quo, just as a new generation of
activists is doing now.
“I would bet my soul that Mrs.
Douglas would not only approve,
but applaud,” said Jeff Klinkenberg, a former columnist for the
Tampa Bay Times and one of the
last journalists to interview
Douglas before she died in 1998
— at the age of 108.
Google her to learn what she
did with all those years, and
you’ll find her best-known crusade: saving the Florida wetlands that politicians wanted to
drain and develop.
But long before she was
dubbed “Empress of the Everglades,” Douglas was an advocate who, like the students who
would come after her, cared little
about how someone of her age
and stature was supposed to act.
At 25, she got a job at the Miami
Herald, the newspaper her father founded. As a young woman
in 1915, she was expected to
write about parties, gossip and
subjects as diverse as “flowers
and sunsets and tree planting,”
wrote her biographer, Jack E.
Davis.
On her third day, she did a
story about the women’s suffrage movement.
“She wrote whatever the hell
she wanted to write about,”
Davis said. That turned out to
be: ranting against the KKK,
shaming her readers for not
knowing that Florida was still
running a slavery-like convictleasing program and demanding
the creation of a public welfare
office for the protection of children.
She once suggested that the
members of the state legislature
should be awarded a prize “for
their earnest and efficient work
in not passing all the bills that
DOUGLAS CONTINUED ON C3
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 23 , 2018
The Reliable Source
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
5 MINUTES WITH NATASHA ROTHWELL
The ‘Insecure’ actor exudes confidence
T
THEO WARGO/GETTY IMAGES
Bill Murray at a Tuesday screening of “Isle of Dogs” in New York.
Bill Murray compares Parkland
students to Vietnam War protesters
Bill Murray is having a
flashback to the ’60s.
In a recent op-ed for NBC
News, the comedian compared
the Parkland, Fla., students who
became warriors for stricter guncontrol laws after a shooting left
17 dead at their high school last
month to student advocates of a
former decade.
“I was thinking, looking at the
kids in Parkland, Florida who
have started these anti-gun
protests, that it really was the
students that began the end of
the Vietnam War,” the 67-yearold Murray wrote. “It was the
students who made all the news,
and that noise started, and then
the movement wouldn’t stop.”
Despite the serious nature of
his plea, Murray wasn’t afraid to
get a little cheeky. People
thought the world would end if
the United States didn’t win the
Vietnam War, but that wasn’t the
case, he argued. “And we all
survived: they survived, we
survived,” Murray wrote. “People
will survive. If you can just stop
shooting at them, they really do
pretty well.”
Murray hasn’t been outwardly
political throughout his career,
but comments he has made in
the past have prompted some to
believe he leans right. He bashed
Dems in February, telling CNBC,
“I just think the way Democrats
handle things is poor.” In 2014,
Forbes published an article
questioning whether he was a
“closet Republican.” But his
praise for the sanguine views of
the Parkland advocates favors
the views of the left.
“The thing that’s so powerful
about students is that, when you
haven’t had your idealism
broken yet, you’re able to speak
from a place that has no
confusion, where there is a clear
set of values,” he wrote. “But
there are idealists left over the
age of 18, I’m sure of it.”
The comedian didn’t push a
specific action for changing the
United States’ relationship with
guns but rather approached the
issue from a place of, well,
idealism. “It’s the right idea for a
human to live in peace, and a
peaceful nature is a proper
thing,” he wrote. “For children to
be concerned about going to
school, worried about what could
happen to them at school, that
makes for a horrible moment.”
he tweet pinned to the top of Natasha
Rothwell’s Twitter feed isn’t a promo for
her new movie, “Love, Simon,” or even a
sneak peek at Season 3 of “Insecure,” the HBO
comedy that put the actress on the map. No,
the tweet Rothwell doesn’t want any of her
fans to miss is a year-old dis aimed at
President Trump: “Saddened and sickened by
Frederick Douglass’ silence surrounding the
Bowling Green Massacre.” The joke, which
pokes fun at Trump’s understanding of
American history and conspiracy theories,
Rothwell said, is just how she rolls. Sorry,
trolls. And there are more burns to come (she
recently called Donald Trump Jr. “messy”)
because as the comedian’s star rises (a new
movie and her own HBO show are in the
works), there are some things Rothwell
won’t change: her sense of humor and her
sense of self.
in my political ideology. To me, it’s being
authentic in every area, and that includes
politics.
Natasha
Rothwell
tweets
regularly at
President
Trump.
Q: There must be plenty of trolls then.
A: When the trolls come out, I’m doing
something right. It’s part affirmation that I’m
saying something provocative to people who
need to hear it.
Q: But with a punchline thrown in.
A: There are things that are going on in my
country and the world I’m scared about, and I
use humor to deal with it. It makes the real
fear a little less anxiety-ridden. We have some
comic relief but are saying something
important at the same time.
Q: So then how do you feel about
celebrities running for office? Cynthia
Nixon just announced her run for New
York governor.
A: There is more gray than there is black and
white. Honestly, just the idea of Miranda
running for office speaks to me as a die-hard
“Sex and the City” fan, but the levelheaded,
educated voter that I am wants to know what
her platform is. It’s her job to prove to us that
she has the political acumen to make her
platform a reality.
Q: You’ve been described as a “scene
stealer” on both “Insecure” and now in
“Love, Simon.” Is that a compliment?
A: It’s affirmation that I’m doing the right
thing, something that is compelling and
intriguing. Hopefully, it’s just proof that I’m
doing my job — when folks are watching, that
they’re drawn to my character.
Q: Does the fact that fans are so drawn to you,
a self-described “plus-size, fat-loving, bodypositive feminist,” say anything about the
culture writ large?
A: When someone on-screen portrays a
character that behaves in a way you don’t
expect, you’re subverting ideas. So if there’s a
Venn diagram between why people are drawn
to the characters I play, it may be that. But I’d
like to think that the craft of acting and the
choices I make as an actor are drawing people
on their own merits.
Q: So all famous-people politicians don’t fall
under the same category of “please don’t do
it”?
A: The instant juxtaposition of Cynthia Nixon
to Donald Trump is a false comparison. “Hey,
lefties, you didn’t like this celebrity politician
so therefore all celebrity politicians are trash!”
There’s a question of qualifications to be asked
regardless of who is running.
Q: You tweeted about Saturday’s March for
Our Lives recently. Will you be there?
A: I have signs ready! I’m going to put on my
good walking shoes and let people know we
need sensible gun laws before we have any
more casualties. One of the benefits of having
a platform now is to get my followers to show
up. It’s not about having a meet-and-greet
with me, but about all of us being there with
one united voice letting folks in office know
that we’re unhappy, and we’re registered to
vote, and both of those things have a cause and
effect.
Q: You don’t shy away from calling out
politicians, including the president, online. Is
there any fear of negative blowback?
A: Any backlash that I would incur, I welcome.
I’m not going to run or be silent for fear of
keeping a fan base. One of the things I pride
myself on is that my fan base is progressive,
but I don’t shy away from people who think
differently from me. I welcome productive
conversations, but it’s important for me to not
hide where I stand. My feet are firmly planted
RODIN ECKENROTH/GETTY IMAGES
GOT A TIP? EMAIL US AT RELIABLESOURCE@WASHPOST.COM. FOR THE LATEST SCOOPS, VISIT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RELIABLESOURCE
‘Frozen’
won’t leave
movie fans
out in cold
Haunted by his childhood
(and also that grandchild)
author of the fantastically successful novels published under
Throughout “Trick,” Mallarico
the name Elena Ferrante.) Lahiri,
and Mario engage in a kind of
who was born in England then
duel. Despite his youth, Mario is
moved as a child to the United
relentless and self-assured, dicStates with her Bengali parents,
tating things as simple as how his
learned Italian and embraced the
grandfather prepares their orlanguage with such vigor that she
ange juice. Mallarico is annoyed
wrote a memoir, “In Other
and overwhelmed. “I
Words,” in Italian.
was starting to feel
There are translators
trapped by that instrucwho remain in the backtion-manual voice of
ground barely noticed,
his,” Mallarico observes.
and then there are transBut Mallarico sees
lators who maintain a
hints of himself in his
more visible posture. Lagrandson, a preternatuhiri is definitely the latter.
rally talented artist. MaIn her fascinating introrio is also an unforgiv- Domenico
duction to “Trick,” she
ing critic, examining a Starnone
writes with captivating
sketch of his grandfaskill about the complex
ther and insisting, over
language choices she had
his elder’s protests, that
to make.
it’s a crude self-portrait.
“Trick” struck her as
“You’re really ugly,”
the perfect translation
the kid says.
for the title of Starnone’s
Mallarico shudders.
book, originally called
“Yes indeed,” the
“Scherzetto.” But when
grandfather responds,
she encountered the
“but it’s a bit mean of Jhumpa
word at an important
you to say so.”
juncture in the book’s
Lahiri
When the child looks
text, “trick” didn’t feel
at his grandfather’s more formal
right. She suggested “gotcha.”
work, he comes away cold. While
Starnone told her “it was closer to
leafing through a book his granda proposal. ‘Let’s play around,
father illustrated, he declares that
let’s have a little fun.’ ”
the images are “a little dark,” then
For Lahiri, “translation, much
goes on to instruct Mallarico to
like this novel, is the intersection
make them lighter next time. of two texts and two voices.” But
That interplay between darkness
she adds that there was another
and light trickles through the narelement at play: the influence of
rative. The boy pushes the grown
Henry James, whose ghost story
man to step out of the gloom.
inspired Starnone. “A legitimate
When they venture beyond the
translation of ‘Trick’ required
apartment, Mario is better at navthree players: Starnone, James,
igating the present-day city, while
and myself,” she writes.
his grandfather is transported
It’s all fascinating stuff. But, in
again to the past. Mallarico finds
a sense, it pulls attention from the
himself thinking about the explonovel. I’d suggest reading “Trick”
sive tempers of the people he
first, then reading Lahiri’s inencountered in his childhood. In
sightful introduction. Otherwise,
school, they’d been instructed to
like me, you might find yourself
say people were “irate.” But he
marveling at her mastery of lanthought the dialect used in the
guage but distracted by wonderstreets was more appropriate:
ing how she landed on words like
“They only knew ’a raggia, a
“agglutination” or phrases such
rage.”
as “omniscient homunculus.”
“Trick” is the second book by
Or maybe next time, Lahiri
Starnone to be translated by Lacould just skip the introduction
hiri, the Pulitzer Prize-winning
and let Starnone do all the talkauthor of such works as “The
ing. Now that would be a neat
Namesake” and “Interpreter of
trick.
Maladies.” (Lahiri translated
manuel.roigStarnone’s “Ties,” released last
franzia@washpost.com
year, months after an Italian journalist published a much-discussed article asserting that StarManuel Roig-Franzia is a writer for
none’s wife, Anita Raja, is the true
The Washington Post.
BOOK WORLD FROM C1
THEATER FROM C1
Theatre. What may prevent “Frozen” from appealing to more sophisticated theater crowds is the
unfulfilled promise of the plot.
We’re teased in this venture with
the idea of an animated story
wrought in three dimensions
with more psychological subtlety
than is the custom in Disney musicals. Because “Frozen” attempts
to traverse the tender and intimate terrain of trauma and loss of
love. But it never achieves that
necessary climax — paradoxical
in a show of this title — when a
spectator’s heart is able to melt.
Based loosely on a fairy tale by
Hans Christian Andersen, Lee’s
script recounts the travails of orphaned royal sisters, Elsa (Caissie
Levy), the Scandinavian kingdom’s new queen, and Anna (Patti
Murin), who are separated because of the dangerous magic that
emanates from Elsa’s hands: her
anger or passion can literally
freeze people and objects. (Elsa
controls her secret by wearing
gloves; when the power is catastrophically revealed after one off
her gloves is taken from her, you
are left to wonder why she doesn’t
simply carry an extra pair.)
The power should be a compelling metaphor, but instead it just
feels like an expository device,
allowing set designer Oram, lighting designer Natasha Katz and
special-effects wizard Jeremyy
Chernick to create some nifty visuals. A moment when Elsaa
touches the proscenium arch,
seemingly transforming it from
wood to solid ice, has the desired
wow factor, as does a quicksilver
costume change by Elsa in her
remote mountain ice fortress,
during the evening’s marquee
(and Oscar-winning) song, “Let It
Go,” which Levy delivers with the
requisite supercharged vocal
brio.
Several of the Lopezes’ numbers from the movie — “Do You
Want to Build a Snowman?” “For
the First Time in Forever,” “Love
Is an Open Door” — are buoyantlyy
summoned to life again. Murin, as
bubbly Anna, proves to be a winning touchstone, and the actress-
@helena_andrews @emilyaheil
PHOTOS BY DEEN VAN MEER
Jelani Alladin, above center, is pleasing as Kristoff in “Frozen.” The Disney musical, which includes
songs from the film, features Caissie Levy, below left, as Elsa and Patti Murin as Anna.
es at my performance who played
the sisters as children, Ayla
Schwartz and especially the naturally funny Mattea Conforti, were
exceptionally well cast. Still,
many of the numbers added for
the stage version, particularly a
long and unfortunate comedy
number, “Hygge” (pronounced
“Hoo-ga”), are not the entertain-
ing enhancements they’re intended to be.
Olaf the snowman, cheerily
voiced and operated by Greg Hildreth, is a mechanical homage to
director Julie Taymor’s evocation
of Timon the meerkat in Disney’s
artistically triumphant stage version of “The Lion King.” Even
better is puppetmaker Michael
Curry’s Sven, who lopes comically
onto the stage behind mountain
man/Anna love interest Kristoff
(a pleasing Jelani Alladin). Andrew Pirozzi is the heroic puppeteer who, completely camouflaged, gives Sven his mournful
majesty. Although there are a
whole slew of other actors playing
enchanted mountain trolls called
the Hidden Folk, Pirozzi is the
show’s best Hidden Folk by far.
So even if “Frozen” is afflicted
with some narrative lumps, and
might not convert you if the film
didn’t make you want to sing, the
fans in your family will thank you
for taking them. On evenings such
as this, I defer to the member of
my family who grew up on Disney
videos: my now adult daughter
Lizzie, who pronounced the stagecraft of “Frozen” sufficiently cool.
peter.marks@washpost.com
Frozen, music and lyrics by Kristen
Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez,
book by Jennifer Lee. Sets and
costumes, Christopher Oram;
choreography, Rob Ashford; music
supervision, Stephen Oremus;
lighting, Natasha Katz; special
effects, Jeremy Chernick; sound,
Peter Hylenski; video, Finn Ross;
puppets, Michael Curry. With John
Riddle, Robert Creighton, Kevin Del
Aguila, Timothy Hughes, Olivia Phillip,
Audrey Bennett, Brooklyn Nelson.
About 2 hours 20 minutes. $99.50$200. At St. James Theatre, 246 W.
44th St., New York. Visit
ticketmaster.com or call 866-8702717.
FRIDAY, MARCH 23 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
An enduring fascination with White House couples
TRUMPS FROM C1
their personal life matters and
can affect their decision-making
— so they want to know what that
connection is, and they want to
read the tea leaves,” Jellison said.
“Many first families have had
marriages that people suspected
might not be the greatest, and so
there’s often been speculation.”
Many people knew that Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt lived
largely separate lives, and criticism of Eleanor for not being an
adequate housewife spilled into
editorial cartoons mocking their
marriage. The Kennedys, of
course, were famously whispered
about — although there was a
tacit “gentleman’s agreement”
among male reporters covering
the president that his affairs were
off limits, Jellison said.
In the 1990s, the Clintons’ marriage, which weathered his highprofile affair with a White House
intern, was the subject of tabloid
headlines and multiple books.
The collective curiosity about
the inner workings of first couples is increasingly fed by a generally more “invasive” media coverage, said Anita McBride, who
served as an adviser to George W.
Bush and chief of staff to first lady
Laura Bush.
“We are fascinated by first families and the behind-the-scenes
life of public figures,” said
McBride, who is an executive in
residence at the School of Public
Affairs at American University.
“What’s different about it [is] . . .
greater media access and so many
different platforms has led to
more robust knowledge about a
first family.”
Long gone are the days when
Eleanor Roosevelt could select
the photos of her family that she
wanted released to the newspapers, McBride added. Melania
Trump can carefully curate her
Instagram feed, but she can’t control tabloid headlines or hashtags
about her, such as the #FreeMelania campaign that her husband’s critics often fire up on
social media.
Concern about the state of the
marriage and the feelings of the
first lady relate to concern about
the president’s state of mind, Jellison said.
“First ladies,” McBride added,
C3
M2
MUSIC REVIEW
Noseda
proves his
deft touch
with Verdi
BY
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
The first lady has been described as a rare soft voice among the shouting that surrounds the president.
“are often validators of their husbands.”
And in the Trump White
House, where the president’s
mood is watched closely, friends
predicted that Melania Trump
would be a positive influence. She
had been described as a rare soft
voice amid the shouting that surrounds her husband.
“She provides great balance” to
Trump, campaign adviser Roger
Stone said in 2015, when the prospective first lady was being introduced to voters.
That narrative has continued
throughout Trump’s tumultuous
tenure. “I do think Donald listens
to his wife and respects her opinions on things tremendously,” his
friend and Newsmax CEO Chris
Ruddy told Politico in June, when
Melania Trump moved into the
White House.
In the nine months she’s lived
in the White House, she has revealed flashes of independence
amid the news reports of her husband’s alleged infidelities. On
Tuesday, during a meeting she
convened of tech and social media company executives to dis-
cuss cyberbullying, an issue she
has said she wants to address,
she seemed to be setting her own
agenda.
“I am well aware that people
are skeptical of me discussing
this topic,” she said, in a rhetorical shoulder-brush to those who
say her husband’s harsh tweets
complicate her message on the issue. “I have been criticized for my
commitment to tackling this issue, and I know that will continue. But it will not stop me from
doing what I know is right. I am
here with one goal: helping children and our next generation.”
McBride said that moment,
amid all the scandalous headlines
and criticism of her husband, was
a defining one for a first lady who
has sometimes been accused of
playing a smaller role in public
life than previous first ladies
have.
“She’s just been business as
usual — she’s saying, ‘These are
things I care about, and I’m moving ahead no matter what.’”
McBride said. “She’s serious
about her efforts. Is it a different
model than what we’ve seen?
Sure, but each [first lady] defines
the role for themselves.”
As images of her husband’s alleged mistresses flick across cable-news screens, Melania Trump
has continued to perform her
role. Monday, she introduced the
president at a gathering about
the opioid crisis in New Hampshire. Tuesday, she welcomed the
tech CEOs to the White House.
Her office did not respond to a
request for comment about her
marriage.
Such public stoicism doesn’t
surprise Paolo Zampolli, the Manhattan businessman and longtime friend who introduced the
Trumps. “She’s very strong and
very used to fake news — from day
one she’s been attacked,” he said,
adding that the presidential campaign prepared her for a spotlight
that was more intense than any
she’s experienced before.
“I think she was aware she
wasn’t a private person anymore,”
he said. “She wasn’t just going to
be the gorgeous wife of this very
powerful businessman, wealthy
man, who has a TV show.”
A NNE M IDGETTE
Powerful, dramatic and familiar, Verdi’s Requiem is supposed to
be a specialty of the National Symphony Orchestra’s new music director, Gianandrea Noseda. It’s
one of his signature pieces, in fact:
a calling card he’s left at his various international way stations in
the course of his career. But the
piece is so well known, and so
often done — especially in Washington, this chorus-filled city —
that I confess I harbored a certain
skepticism. At least, I did until
Thursday night, when he conducted the Requiem with the NSO at
the Kennedy Center Concert Hall,
and completely won me over.
The wonderful thing about this
Requiem was that it was entirely
unexpected, without being obviously showy. When you think of an
Italianate Verdi Requiem — this
piece that began as a tribute to the
Italian patriot Alessandro Manzoni, too theatrical for any church —
you might expect a certain kind of
heart-on-the-sleeve, thundering
drama. Noseda delivered drama
aplenty, but it was organic rather
than melodramatic. His line was
fluid and supple, his touch light, so
that even the thwacks of the bass
drum in the “Dies Irae” were forwardly propulsive and part of a
bigger picture.
Noseda is also a born opera
conductor, as he showed anew
Thursday with his careful attention to the singers, the words, and
their meaning. The Washington
Chorus, in its first months with its
own new music director, Christopher Bell, sounded warm and
glowing and responsive, from the
resilient whispers of the “Kyrie” to
the full-throated near-shouts of
the “Dies Irae.”
Three of the four soloists were
leads in the Washington National
Opera’s “Don Carlo,” which finished its run here Saturday. Eric
Owens, the bass, brought dignity
and a warm, crumbly sound that
sometimes seemed to land between the notes but was deeply
felt. Tenor Russell Thomas is still
unfolding his potential as a Verdian; his voice is on the light side,
but he has good instincts about
how to approach the big moments.
A hint of fixedness, a lack of flexibility, slightly constricts the middle of his range, however.
Leah Crocetto, the soprano,
sings Verdi as if every word were
written in capital letters, with
some lovely notes but a steady
focus on vocal size rather than the
limpidity of sound that is part of a
great Verdian’s arsenal. She made
quite a contrast to the one member of the cast that hadn’t come
from the “Don Carlo,” the mezzo
Veronica Simeoni, whose voice
was not large, but whose singing
was straightforward and honest
and heartfelt, if sometimes
drowned out in the waves of sound
from the orchestra. It was quite a
feat for the two women to merge so
well in their one unison line in the
“Recordare,” although in the “Agnus Dei” they sounded as if they
were inhabiting different planets.
The orchestra did some fine
playing of its own, particularly the
responsive strings and the flutes.
The showstopping moment when
the trumpets of judgment sang
down from the balconies, building
to a climax that was huge and yet
allowed the voices rather than the
instruments to dominate, was
somehow executed with ease rather than effort under Noseda’s light
hand. It was so fine that it made up
for the unfortunate final chords,
when the chorus sang with taut
silence dissolving into nothing,
like gelatin, but the brass had trouble keeping its voice down to
match.
The palm, though, went to
Noseda, for making something
memorable and vivid and sincere
out of this oft-heard and deservedly beloved work. The evening confirmed that the NSO has selected a
very fine music director.
anne.midgette@washpost.com
The performance repeats Friday and
Saturday at 8 p.m.
emily.heil@washpost.com
Douglas was an ardent protector of the Everglades
DOUGLAS FROM C1
were brought to them to pass.”
(Sound familiar?) She called the
two-party political system “an
old-fashioned, noisy, illogical
unnecessary nuisance.” That was
what she learned in 1917, when
she took a train to Tallahassee to
persuade lawmakers to allow
women to vote. She later compared the experience to talking
to “dead mackerel.”
“They never paid attention to
us at all. They weren’t even
listening,” she recalled in her
autobiography, “Voice of the River.” “This was my first taste of
the politics of north Florida.”
And there, too, was another
parallel between Douglas and
the students who demanded
change from lawmakers just
hours after their classmates became targets of an AR-15. She
wasn’t politically active because
she enjoyed politics; she believed that the circumstances
demanded her participation.
That’s what happened when
she was in her 70s, more than 20
years after she published her
famous book, “The Everglades:
River of Grass.” She was set up
for a comfortable retirement:
She had a house to herself, a
reputation as a beloved writer, a
steady supply of Desmond &
Duff, her favorite scotch.
Meanwhile, the state was
making plans to build a vast
airport (then called a jetport) on
top of the Everglades.
The fight to stop the draining
of the wetlands, much like the
fight for gun control, had been
going on for decades. Douglas’s
own father had advocated to
save them in the early 1900s. But
the titans of the sugar industry
and the rapid development of
South Florida were powerful
forces.
The idea that a tiny old woman, bedecked in a straw hat and
pearls, might win such a fight
was laughable.
“It was very much an uncertain outcome,” said former senator Bob Graham (D-Fla.), who
was on the receiving end of
many of Douglas’s demands.
“The Everglades, for many people, was still seen as a swamp,
and that it was the goal of
mankind to make something
more ‘normal’ out of it.”
She wrote letters, met with
influential community members
and gave impassioned speeches
at public hearings. Her eyesight
had deteriorated so much that
MARK FOLEY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
“Be depressed, discouraged, and
disappointed at failures and the
disheartening effects of
ignorance, greed, corruption and
bad politics — but never give up.”
Marjory Stoneman Douglas
DOUG MILLS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Conservation advocate Marjory Stoneman
Douglas, at top in 1984 with presidential
candidate Walter Mondale and above with
President Bill Clinton in 1993 when she was
presented with a Medal of Freedom.
she could no longer make out the
faces in the crowd, but she could
hear them yelling: “Go home,
Grandma!” (She did not, in fact,
have any children.)
And eventually, she won. The
airport construction was halted.
Requests for additional drainage permits were turned down.
Everglades restoration projects
were funded. When Graham was
successful in achieving one of
Douglas’s goals, she would say to
him, “Robert, you’ve got a lot
more work to do.”
Still, the Everglades shrank as
construction continued in many
parts of Florida. Houses, shopping centers and golf courses
appeared where the wetlands
used to be. Entire new communities formed — including the
town that would become Parkland.
By 1990, Parkland was large
enough to need its own high
school. It was decided that the
school would be named after one
of the state’s most successful
activists, who by then was 100
years old. After winning the
Presidential Medal of Freedom
and being inducted into the
National Women’s Hall of Fame,
Douglas was finally retiring into
a quieter life.
She left behind an organization — Friends of the Everglades
— that would continue her fight,
following the example she had
set and her writings on what it
takes to be an activist.
“Be a nuisance where it
counts, but don’t be a bore at any
time,” Douglas once wrote. “Be
depressed, discouraged, and disappointed at failures and the
disheartening effects of ignorance, greed, corruption and bad
politics — but never give up.”
It was that quote (with the
“bore” part cut out) that circled
the Internet on March 14, the
day thousands of students nationwide walked out of their
classrooms in support of the
students at Marjory Stoneman
Douglas High School. Someone
had hung a banner with the
quote on it outside the school.
The county superintendent
tweeted a photo of it. Douglas’s
name lived on.
Davis, her biographer, never
could find any evidence of how
Douglas felt about having a high
school built on top of the Everglades named after her. He had
always thought it was a bit of an
insult. The students, he says,
have changed his mind.
jessica.contrera@washpost.com
KEITH SAUNDERS
Takacs Quartet (from left, Geraldine Walther, Edward Dusinberre,
Andras Fejer and Karoly Schranz) played a compelling program.
MUSIC REVIEW
On snowy night,
audience warms
to Takacs Quartet
BY
P ATRICK R UCKER
Snow and slush didn’t daunt
the enthusiastic audience on
hand at the Kennedy Center on
Wednesday night for a performance by the Takacs Quartet, one
of the most esteemed and beloved string quartets today.
Founded in Budapest 43 years
ago, the Takacs, whose members
are violinists Edward Dusinberre and Karoly Schranz, violist Geraldine Walther, and cellist Andras Fejer, is in residence
at University of Colorado at
Boulder. Their concert was a
treat.
Mozart’s G-major Quartet,
the first of a set of six that he
dedicated to Haydn, was buoyant and cheerful, every detail
vividly characterized with a
droll sense of humor. Stylistically speaking, no one would call
this cutting-edge Mozart. Bows
were seldom raised from the
strings and more or less indiscriminate vibrato was liberally
applied. The musical narrative,
however, was never less than
compelling. In the slow movement, a path was deftly struck
between sunny pleasures on one
side and gripping pathos on the
other. The finale was energetic,
an aural delight, with sparkling
textures.
The Takacs brought sympathy
and conviction to Shostakovich’s 11th Quartet from 1966.
This work, with elements of
cunning, artifice and naivete
that sometimes fails to jell,
emerged with cohesion and an
unmistakable emotional credibility.
All this was but preamble for
the concert’s second half, devoted to Beethoven’s Quartet, Op.
131, a seven-movement work
played without pause during the
course of 35 minutes. Once
aboard, there was no looking
back. From the anguished polyphony at the outset, through
the furious finale, evoking along
the way more of the human
condition than it seems possible
for a single life to contain, the
Takacs brought us with them on
this extraordinary musical journey. Dense textures were rendered with luminous clarity and
the quartet’s natural and seemingly effortless rubato underscored Beethoven’s expressivity
at every turn.
style@washpost.com
C4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 23 , 2018
Television
TV HIGHLIGHTS
3/23/18
7:00
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Requiem (Netflix streaming) After her mother commits suicide, a rising
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with Jeff goes public.
MasterChef Junior (Fox at 8)
Contestants make racks of lamb
and pan-seared halibut for a
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Taken (NBC at 9) Hart tries to track
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This sitcom follows two friends, one
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Roxanne Roxanne (Netflix
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O Mecanismo (The Mechanism)
(Netflix streaming) “Narcos”
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LA TIMES CROSSWORD
ACROSS
1 Flintstones
Vitamins option
5 Chicago Eight
defendant
10 B.C. law
enforcers
14 Big name in
denim
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restoration
16 Cause of some
bad apples?
17 Has to pay
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19 Cyber
phenomenon
20 Turned tail
22 Like some
underbellies
23 Memphis-toAtlanta dir.
24 Big fuss
25 With “the,” what
a boxer doesn’t
want to hit?
26 Pulse
28 High points
31 Latin I word
32 Prepared, as
eggs for eggs
Benedict
34 Votin’ nay
35 Emulate Moses
... and what four
black squares do
in this puzzle
38 Like a breeze?
39 August
birthstone
40 “How you
doin’?”
41 Lost patience
42 “The Beauty
Myth” author
Wolf
46 Chip off the
old block?
48 Annoyed
exclamation
50 Greek god
of the wild
51 Needed an
eraser
52 Herbs and spices
55 Bill __ Climate
Lab: former
exhibit at
Oakland’s
Chabot Space &
Science Center
56 Awaits decision
57 Brief refusal
to “Are you
hungry?”
Brazil.
Game Over, Man! (Netflix
streaming) “Workaholics” cast
members star in this comedic
action film about employees of a
hotel that is taken over by gunmen.
RETURNING
Santa Clarita Diet (Netflix
streaming) Season 2.
DOCUMENTARY
March of the Penguins 2: The
Next Step (Hulu streaming) A
sequel to the 2005 film, narrated
by Morgan Freeman.
FINALE
High Maintenance (HBO at 11)
The Guy attempts to make a few
life changes.
LATE NIGHT
Fallon (NBC at 11:34) Leslie Mann,
Jim Jefferies, Joe List.
— Sarah Polus
(5:00) Live PD
(8:06) Live PD: Rewind
Live PD (Live)
A&E
(5:00) Movie: Open Range
Movie: In the Heart of the Sea ★★ (2015)
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Tanked: Tank Madness
(9:01) Tanked: Pranked!
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Animal Planet
(5:40) True to the Game
Movie: Takers ★★ (2010)
The Quad
BET
(6:54) Married to Medicine (7:57) Married to Medicine Married to Medicine
Relative Success
Movie: Bring It On ★★
Bravo
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Cartoon Network Apple
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AC 360 Special
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Movie: The Waterboy ★ (1998)
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Gold Rush: White Water
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(11:02) Gold Rush
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Movie: Enough ★★ (2002)
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E!
2018 NCAA Women’s Basketball Tournament
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Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive
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More at washingtonpost.com/tv
By Samuel A. Donaldson
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Hubby’s sedentary ways don’t sit well
© 2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
58 Nineteenth
Amendment
campaigner
59 Rolex rival
60 Gillette offering
61 Book of Mormon
prophet
62 Ready to drop
63 Burn a little
DOWN
1 Daisy
component
2 Clean some
more
3 Plane, for one
4 Ph.D. hurdle
5 “I feel your pain”
6 Went too far
7 Protected,
in a way
8 Succeed
in getting
9 Word with
private or public
10 Collegian’s
diet staple
11 Rift
12 “Money, Money,
Money” musical
13 Exploits
21 Henry __ Lodge:
WWI senator
3/23/18
22 Swedish carrier
25 Surrendered
27 Nashville
highlight
29 “SNL” alumna
Oteri
30 Scout’s honor?
33 How some
bonds are
purchased
34 Movie role
for Skippy
35 Speaker after
John Boehner
36 Shoot for
37 Air Force pilot
who became a
pop star
38 True nature
41 “__ give you
the shirt off
his back”
43 Morphine, e.g.
44 It’s repeated a lot
45 Ready to go
47 Kevlar products
49 Mideast
ruling family
name
52 Rest area
heavyweight
53 Cabinet dept.
54 Long and
Vardalos
56 Winner’s
gathering
THURSDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
Dear Carolyn: My
husband and I are
both 61 and fat. I,
however, am
active and work to
keep moving and
Carolyn
have no health
Hax
issues. My
husband is
sedentary, and I
have watched him go from prediabetes to diabetes to now
having to take insulin and a
recent hospitalization with
diabetes complications.
I am growing angry at his
disregard for what I thought was
our shared retirement of hiking,
biking and travel. I am worried I
will lose him or worse, watch him
suffer. How do I keep my
resentment at bay?
— M.
M.: Know you will watch him
suffer, be his caretaker and lose
him.
For sure? No, anything’s
possible; we’re all one accident or
diagnosis away from a future we
never imagined.
But your resentment lives in
the gap between what you have
and what you want, so close it.
Stop hoping things will be
different. Accept the worst-case
scenario, grieve, express your
anger about it to your husband.
Tell him that you love him and
envisioned years of his company
and that it pains you to spend
this time instead witnessing his
self-destruction.
Unless you’ve said so already.
In that case, skip the harping and
move to the next step: the life you
lead in this truth.
And make the best you can of
who your husband actually is.
That can mean a lot of things.
Even with the hard limits of age
and weight and health
conditions and expenses and
whatever else, there always
remains a high degree of choice.
You can adjust what you think,
what you do, what you plan and
with whom, and what you expect
of it all.
It seems your choice is
between an active retirement or a
shared one — but not both. Or
one that toggles between the two:
X diversions you share with your
husband, because he is physically
capable of them; Y activities you
do independently.
Anticipate and budget for the
caretaking, too, so it doesn’t
chain you to home.
I won’t pretend this is a great
solution. “Bye, I’m off to do Y
while you yell at the TV” is not a
scene out of anyone’s epic
romance.
But it’s a solution that’s real,
achievable and potentially
lifesaving, since simmering anger
will kill off these last years for
you — emotionally, if not for real
— faster than the sofa is killing
your husband. Be active in peace.
Dear Carolyn: We have gone on
weekend getaways with another
couple for years. They are now
asking about a longer vacation.
The trouble is, the entire time
they are calling or texting their
children about everyday things.
We love our kids but connect
with them when we return
home. I’ve jokingly hinted at the
amount of time on the phone,
but it doesn’t seem to get to
them.
The wife also receives constant
Facebook notifications that she
immediately checks.
If I tell the truth, I’m afraid
we’ll lose their friendship, which
I value greatly. They would do
anything for us, if needed.
— Too Much
Too Much: Possibly the one good
thing about dumbphones ruining
everything is that you needn’t
point fingers. Everyone’s guilty!
So: “Yes, we’d love a longer
vacation! A warning, though —
I’m on an anti-phone crusade
and will only go unplugged. That
okay?” If they refuse: “I
understand — another time
then.”
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her
column delivered to your inbox each
morning at wapo.st/haxpost.
Join the discussion live at noon
Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com
FRIDAY, MARCH 23 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
EZ
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
RE
PICKLES
C5
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
BOTH SIDES VULNERABLE
NORTH
J6
A542
AK8732
A
EAST
93
J 10 8 3
Q J 10 6
10 9 7
WEST
10 8 5 4
Q9
94
KQJ54
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH (D)
AKQ72
K76
5
8632
The bidding:
SOUTH
WEST
NORTH
1
Pass
2
2
Pass
3
3 NT
Pass
4
4
Pass
6
Opening lead — K
EAST
Pass
Pass
Pass
All Pass
CLASSIC PEANUTS
CHARLES SCHULZ
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
T
his week’s deals have
treated a basic skill in
dummy play: setting up a
long suit. To test yourself,
cover the East-West cards.
West leads the king of clubs
against your six spades.
What is your plan?
You have 10 tricks: five
trumps, two hearts, two diamonds and a club. It seems
you must make something of
dummy’s diamonds. Say you
cash the ace, ruff a diamond,
draw trumps, lead a heart
to dummy’s ace and take
the king of diamonds. When
diamonds break 4-2, you go
down.
Nor can you succeed by
taking the ace of diamonds,
ruffing a diamond, leading a
trump to dummy and ruffing
a second diamond. With the
4-2 trump break, you lose
control.
Your winning play is to
lead a low diamond from
dummy at the second trick.
Say East wins and shifts to a
heart. You win with the king,
lead a trump to dummy and
ruff a diamond. Then you
can draw trumps and go to
the ace of hearts to run the
diamonds.
This play works when
trumps and diamonds break
no worse than 4-2.
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
LIO
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
J6A542
AK8732A
You open one diamond,
and your partner bids one
spade. What do you say?
ANSWER: This is a matter
of personal and partnership style. A jump to three
diamonds would be descriptive, suggesting about 16
high-card points and a good
six-card suit. Many experts
would “reverse” with a bid of
two hearts. That would be a
strong action, but they would
have methods allowing them
to stop below game.
BLONDIE
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2018, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
C6
EZ
MUTTS
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
PATRICK McDONNELL
ZITS
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 23 , 2018
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
BIRTHDAY | MARCH 23
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
This year you want
to achieve a longterm goal. You
communicate with
exactitude, yet others often
misunderstand you. If you
are single, now through
September you might meet
someone special. This person
will light up your life. If you are
attached, the two of you relate
well and enjoy each other. You
have your differences, but you
learn to respect them. Gemini
makes you laugh and think at
the same time!
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
Listen to what others say and
communicate back with care.
Misunderstandings could
occur with greater frequency.
Be sensitive to others’ needs.
Avoid a tense situation in your
professional life, and embrace
your desire to enjoy the
weekend.
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
You might be overwhelmed by
what is happening. A power
play or a legal situation could
have you on edge. Stay calm,
and find someone trained to
help you with this issue. Once
you speak to the right person,
your stress will ease.
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
Trust yourself to do whatever
is necessary to get past a
difficult issue that involves
shared finances. You could
feel as if the other party’s
WEINGARTENS & CLARK determination is likely to wear
you down. Surprises occur
around certain events.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
A friend might suggest that
your moodiness attracts
strong-willed people. Others
seem to want to run the show.
Ask yourself if this type of
personality works for you.
Avoid getting into a power play
with a difficult person.
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
Emphasis is on receiving what
you want. You find people to be
quite amenable, yet at some
point in the day, you could
be on a collision course with
a partner or co-worker. Take
time to schedule important
checkups and meetings.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
Keep reaching out to someone
you respect who could be an
authority figure; a boss is a
strong possibility. Messages
easily might be misinterpreted.
A statement meant one way
comes off another way.
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
Your curiosity comes out when
meeting someone from a
different culture. Be careful, as
you might not realize how flirty
you can be. This person might
misread your gestures and
words. A family member needs
more of your time.
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
Emphasize your priorities
when having an important
conversation. You put
organization into a project.
Know that others are grateful.
Keep a conversation on an
individual level.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
You will be surprised by how
rampant conflict seems to be
around you. Try to be more
open and compassionate. You
might not agree, but if you can
respect what you are hearing
rather than be critical, you’ll
make a big step.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
You know more about a
personal situation than you
are sharing. You’ll pitch in to
make the issue easier. Do
not push others too hard -- it
won’t work for you or for them.
Avoid being controlling or
demanding, and the results
will be better.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
You might hit a jolt at some
point in the day. You could be
involved in a tense situation.
The other person is into having
control. Ignore this person’s
power play. Go off and make
plans that will delight you.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
You might not be as confident
as you would like to be.
Expect a problem to arise
with a family member. The
issue might be new, but the
contentious tone of this person
is not. Seek out different
ideas as to how to handle this
matter.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2018, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
KLMNO
SPORTS
FRIDAY, MARCH 23 , 2018
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
K-State hangs on,
bounces Kentucky
KANSAS STATE 61,
KENTUCKY 58
BY
G ENE W ANG
atlanta — The last blue blood
in the nonconformist South Region is out of the NCAA tournament.
No. 9 seed Kansas State eliminated No. 5 Kentucky, 61-58, on
Thursday night at Philips Arena
in front of a blue-clad crowd that
looked and sounded as if the
game was in Lexington, Ky.
Barry Brown Jr.’s layup with
19 seconds remaining put Kansas
State ahead to stay at 60-58, and
Amaad Wainwright added 1 of 2
free throws for the final margin.
Kentucky had a final chance to
tie, but Shai Gilgeous-Alexander’s
clean look at a three-pointer
clanked off the iron at the final
buzzer.
Kansas State (25-11) faces upstart Loyola Chicago, a No. 11
seed, on Saturday for the right to
advance to the Final Four.
Kentucky (26-11) took the lead
for only the second time in the
game on Gilgeous-Alexander’s
layup with 4:04 left, but Kansas
State forced a turnover that resulted in Cartier Diarra’s layup
while drawing a foul. The redshirt
freshman missed the bonus free
throw, leaving Kansas State in
front 56-55.
KENTUCKY CONTINUED ON D8
D
M2
Ramblers’ roll
reaches Elite Eight
LOYOLA CHICAGO 69,
NEVADA 68
BY
G ENE W ANG
atlanta — A sign in the first few
rows of a section filled with
Loyola Chicago faithful — and
that’s the precise word Ramblers
fans use to refer to themselves,
with good reason — told the story
of the No. 11 seed that continued
to defy the odds in the NCAA
men’s basketball tournament.
“Mission From God,” it read,
quoting from the Chicago-centric
comedy classic “The Blues Brothers” and complete with a picture
of the most famous member of
JOHN AMIS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Loyola Chicago’s Marques Townes hit the decisive three-pointer.
NCAA TOURNAMENT SWEET 16
Thursday’s results
11 Loyola Chicago 69, 7 Nevada 68
3 Michigan 99, 7 Texas A&M 72
9 Kansas State 61, 5 Kentucky 58
9 Florida State 75, 4 Gonzaga 60
Today’s games
5 Clemson vs. 1 Kansas, 7:07, CBS
5 West Va. vs. 1 Villanova, 7:27, TBS
11 Syracuse vs. 2 Duke, 9:37, CBS
3 Texas Tech vs. 2 Purdue, 9:57, TBS
Via Chicago: Villanova’s Brunson, West Virginia’s Carter go way back. D7
the Loyola community.
That would be Sister Jean Dolores-Schmidt, the 98-year-old
nun and team chaplain who’s
sticking around through the
weekend after her Ramblers held
off a rally to outlast seventh-seeded Nevada, 69-68, on Thursday
night in the South Region round
of 16 at Philips Arena.
The difference was Marques
Townes’s three-pointer with six
seconds to play that provided
Loyola with a 69-65 margin and
stemmed the momentum the
Wolf Pack had gathered following
a push that erased a double-digit
deficit in the second half.
Townes released his threepointer from in front of the LoyoSOUTH CONTINUED ON D8
39 shots?
Grubauer
has zero
tolerance.
“I’m a big guy, but I can offer a little bit more.”
Andrija Novakovich, a 6-foot-4, 21-year-old prospect vying for a role with the U.S. men’s national soccer team.
CAPITALS 1,
RED WINGS 0
Connolly breakaway tally
is all Caps goalie needs
BY
I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN
detroit — The puck kept skittering down the ice, escaping the
lunging swipe from Red Wings
defenseman Xavier Ouellet. Capitals forward Jakub Vrana corralled it as he and Brett Connolly
converged on Detroit goaltender
Jimmy Howard for the rare twoon-zero.
Vrana passed it to Connolly,
and he thought Connolly might
pass it back to him for the
one-timer.
“I thought we were probably
going to pass it because that’s our
M.O.,” Coach Barry Trotz said
with a chuckle. “I think Howard
probably thought he was going
to pass it, too.”
Said Connolly: “Maybe if we
get another one, we’ll do that,
CAPITALS CONTINUED ON D5
Capitals at Canadiens
Tomorrow, 7 p.m., NBCSW, NHLN
Nats look
to make
right call
on lefties
BY
SOCCRATES IMAGES/GETTY IMAGES
Andrija Novakovich, left, has scored 18 goals in 29 games for Telstar, a second-tier Dutch team. U.S. coaches will get to see whether that scoring translates.
dutch treat?
Born in Wisconsin, thriving in Netherlands, striker could be U.S. soccer’s next big thing
BY
S TEVEN G OFF
raleigh, n.c. — The newest scoring prospect for the
U.S. men’s national soccer team is a 6-foot-4 striker with
a slight Serbian accent who was born and bred in
Wisconsin, carries American and British passports and
is under contract with a club in England but amassing
goals at a crazy rate for a team in the Netherlands.
His name is Andrija Novakovich. He’s 21. And
through this week and part of next, he will aim to
impress the interim head coach and interim assistants
caretaking a program in transition after the spectacular failure to qualify for this summer’s World Cup.
It’s his first appearance in a senior training camp,
which will culminate Tuesday against Paraguay in a
friendly at WakeMed Soccer Park in nearby Cary.
With the team pivoting to the 2022 World Cup cycle,
the roster is loaded with young players, most notably
teenagers Weston McKennie, Tim Weah and Tyler
Adams. The 23-man crew also includes lesser-known
figures, such as Novakovich, who did not feature
prominently in the youth national teams and quietly
ventured overseas four years ago.
He signed with Reading, a second-tier English club,
and toiled in the development program before going on
loan to a fifth-flight team. After returning to Reading,
Novakovich last summer joined Telstar, a second-division Dutch side. The arrangement has yielded eyecatching results: 18 goals in 29 matches, including six in
the past five appearances for a team in the hunt for
promotion to the top-tier Eredivisie with the likes of
Ajax and PSV Eindhoven.
Novakovich’s production could earn him promotion
NOVAKOVICH CONTINUED ON D4
C HELSEA J ANES
west palm beach, fla. — The
decisions are looming for the
Washington Nationals, who entered spring training with very
few of them to make.
Most of those decisions don’t
have major personnel implications. If the Nationals choose
Miguel Montero to be their backup catcher instead of Pedro Severino, Severino can go to the
minors. They will not lose him. If
the Nationals choose Matt Reynolds over Adrian Sanchez as a
backup infielder until Daniel
Murphy returns from injury, Sanchez can go to the minors. They
will not lose him, either.
But the decision concerning
left-handers in their bullpen has
long-term consequences. Sammy
Solis, Matt Grace, Tim Collins
NATIONALS CONTINUED ON D4
PRO BASKETBALL
His injuries behind him,
Bradley Beal has become
the Wizards’ iron man. D3
PRO FOOTBALL
International friendly: United States vs. Paraguay | Tuesday, 7:30 p.m., Cary, N.C., Fox Sports 1
Giants deal two-time Pro
Bowl defensive end Jason
Pierre-Paul to Bucs. D3
D2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 23 , 2018
washingtonpost.com/sports
D.C. SPORTS BOG
EARLY LEAD
EARLY LEAD
Shanahan
coveted
Cousins
for 49ers
BY
D. Hurley
set to fix
basketball
at U-Conn.
S COTT A LLEN
BY
The Kirk Cousins-to-San Francisco speculation may have
peaked before the Redskins hosted first-year Coach Kyle Shanahan
and the winless 49ers at FedEx
Field in October. The occasion
prompted much reminiscing in
the days leading up the game
about Shanahan’s four-year tenure as the offensive coordinator in
Washington under his father,
Mike, including Cousins’s first two
years in the NFL.
“Kyle believed in me when it
was just potential; there was no
production,” Cousins said before
throwing for 330 yards and two
touchdowns in a 26-24 Redskins
win. “I hadn’t done anything to
earn his belief, and he believed in
me.”
The 49ers, who benched veteran Brian Hoyer for rookie C.J.
Beathard in the second quarter of
their loss in Landover, were desperate for a quarterback. A Cousins-Shanahan reunion in the Bay
Area made sense. Two weeks later,
San Francisco traded a secondround pick for New England Patriots backup quarterback Jimmy
Garoppolo.
The Cousins-to-San Francisco
speculation officially ended when
the 49ers signed Garoppolo to a
five-year, $137.5 million contract
in February.
Had the 49ers’ reported interest
in Shanahan’s former pupil
waned? Not exactly.
During an interview with
ESPN’s Trey Wingo and Mike Golic on Wednesday, General Manager John Lynch confirmed what
many had assumed: Shanahan always really, really, really wanted
Cousins.
“For Kyle, I think the thing I
would tell people is, we made the
trade, but then there were some
days that Kyle Shanahan was like
in mourning because I think everybody knows his master plan was to
have Kirk Cousins come in eventually,” Lynch said. “I was proud of
Kyle because I think he knew that
this was the right thing for our
franchise. And he didn’t hesitate.
“But then, even then, Jimmy had
to really prove himself. Kyle, I
think, was really smart. He didn’t
play him right away. He waited
until he had some semblance of an
understanding of our scheme.
When he did put him in, he put him
in in a position to succeed.”
STREETER LECKA/GETTY IMAGES
This young Kansas State fan is sleeping, not crying, because we don’t want anyone accusing us of exploiting sad children.
Crying foul over use of sad kids
BY
C INDY B OREN
It’s as much a fixture of March
Madness as shocking upsets and
squeaky sneaker noises. But this year
there are increasing calls for TV
cameras to lay off those images of
children weeping inconsolably when
their basketball team loses.
Often, those tearful images become
memes or are used in tweets that are
shared a seemingly infinite number of
times. Is it time for broadcasters to stop
showing the distraught young kids?
“It’s part of the drama and the
storytelling of the tournament,” CBS
executive producer Harold Bryant told
Yahoo, speaking for that network and
Turner, the networks that carry the
NCAA tournament. “It’s part of the
emotion. We try to capture the
emotion, and we try to strike that right
balance.”
Still, these are kids, and they often
are, to put it mildly, mocked for their
emotional breakdowns. Unlike adults,
maybe they haven’t yet had the lifecrushing experience of seeing their
favorite teams lose a last-minute
heartbreaker. Do you remember the
first time the team you root for lost in
crushing fashion? Tom Brady’s kids
were roped into a similar conversation
after the New England Patriots’ Super
Bowl loss to Philadelphia, when Gisele
Bündchen explained to two of their
crying kids that Daddy couldn’t win all
the time.
Bryant, the producer, stresses that
this is all part of the story. The “right
balance” was his go-to description
when he was asked whether zeroing in
on kids was a too convenient way to
amp up the drama, according to Yahoo’s
Henry Bushnell.
“We show happy kids. We show sad
kids. We show happy adults. We show
players that are happy. We show players
that are sad, crying on the benches or
scott.allen@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/dcsportsbog
QUOTABLE
“It’s about damn time.”
WES UNSELD,
Washington Bullets legend and
basketball Hall of Famer, on the
Wizards’ plans to retire former
teammate Phil Chenier’s No. 45
jersey during a halftime ceremony
Friday at Capital One Arena.
Ibrahimovic is going
to join MLS’s Galaxy
Zlatan Ibrahimovic signed a
two-year contract with Major
League Soccer to leave
Manchester United and join the
LA Galaxy, two people with
knowledge of the deal told the
Associated Press.
The agreement was first
reported by the Los Angeles
Times.
The 36-year-old forward is
Sweden’s career scoring leader
with 62 goals in 116 international
appearances and is the first
player to make Champions
League appearances for seven
teams.
He left Paris Saint-Germain for
Manchester United ahead of the
2016-17 season but since injuring
his right knee April 20 has made
just two starts and five substitute
appearances, scoring just one
goal. Manager Jose Mourinho
has not used him since Dec. 26.
Ibrahimovic joined the 20-time
English champions as a free agent
in July 2016. He has made
53 appearances with the club,
scoring 29 goals.
Over the course of his career,
Ibrahimovic has played for some
on the floor,” Bryant told Yahoo. “We do
our best, throughout all of these games,
throughout the tournament, to strike
that proper balance.”
And imagine what the tournamentclosing “One Shining Moment”
montage would be without those quick
snippets of tears, whether they’re from
kids, players, parents or cheerleaders.
Bushnell pointed out that the images
seem more prevalent this March, a year
after video of the son of Northwestern
Athletic Director Jim Phillips went
viral.
And Turner was criticized when
truTV showed “crying ASU kid,” a boy
in an Arizona State jersey who was
weeping his eyes out as Syracuse pulled
off a first-round upset last week. The
boy was GIF-worthy, and cameras
repeatedly showed him as a woman
comforted him. “Shame on you,” one
social media user tweeted. Others
urged producers just to stop already.
As with the Phillips child in 2017, it
turned out that this story went deeper.
“Crying ASU kid” happens to be the son
of one of the team’s athletic trainers.
Which means that, as with the Brady
children after the Super Bowl, the
disappointment was more deeply
personal.
As Bryant points out, it’s not the
broadcaster’s fault when the Internet
gets snarky, as it did after Cincinnati’s
loss to Nevada.
And yet the criticism persists. Sports
Media Watch tweeted that the images
are “the cheapest way to convey drama.
. . . Beyond anything else, it’s just lazy.”
And that opinion has plenty of
supporters.
“Surely I’m not the only one who
hates seeing TV cameras focus on
children crying in the stands,” St. Louis
Post-Dispatch columnist Jose de Jesus
Ortiz wrote. “I hated seeing the young
girl crying after Tennessee lost. Why
not give the girl space and focus on
adults if you need to exploit folks in
tears?”
“The problem with the children
crying is it is unneeded and gratuitous,”
wrote New York Post columnist Andrew
Marchand, who urged the broadcasters
to alter their approach.
“It just seems cruel and exploitative,”
Awful Announcing’s Matt Yoder wrote.
“No other broadcast at a sporting event
seems to play the ‘crying kid’ card as
much as the NCAA Tournament. Not
even the Little League World Series!
And yet after almost universal criticism
for showing crying kids in the
bleachers, the broadcasters of the
NCAA Tournament are still doing it.”
“Can we get all the network heads
together and make an agreement to
stop showing crying kids???” SiriusXM
host Danny Kanell asked.
The networks “really needs to stop
showing crying kids in the stands,”
wrote Buffalo News columnist Mike
Harrington, who called the practice
“just dumb.”
Still, the images aren’t likely to
disappear. Not when they’re a
shorthand way to convey an agony/
ecstasy story angle, as tired as it is, in a
tournament that demands networks so
quickly swivel from game to game.
“We can’t control what people are
doing on the Internet,” Bryant told
Bushnell. “We’ve got to strike a balance.
We’ve got to be journalistic and cover
the story.”
cindy.boren@washpost.com
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/
earlylead
Dan Hurley has faced a rebuilding project at every stop of his
NCAA head coaching career. Wagner won just five games the season
before his 2010 arrival in Staten
Island; two years later, the Seahawks went 25-6. Moving on to
Rhode Island, Hurley increased
the Rams’ win total from eight to
14 to 23 in his first three seasons.
In his past two, Rhode Island was
an AP poll and NCAA tournament
mainstay.
On Thursday, Hurley accepted
his biggest challenge yet: He
agreed to become the next head
coach at Connecticut, a once-dominant program that has stumbled
upon prolonged mediocrity for
the first time since the early 1980s,
before Jim Calhoun led the Huskies to three national titles in
13 seasons.
Connecticut fired Kevin Ollie,
Calhoun’s replacement, on March
10 after the team missed the NCAA
tournament for the third time in
the four seasons since the Huskies’ surprise NCAA title in 2014,
Ollie’s second season. With its
men’s basketball program the subject of an NCAA investigation, the
school fired him for “just cause,” a
designation that would allow it to
avoid paying the $10 million buyout on Ollie’s contract. He has said
he will challenge the rationale behind his “just cause” firing.
Hurley, 45, spent six seasons at
Rhode Island and turned the
Rams into an Atlantic 10 power
with NCAA tournament berths
the past two seasons. Rhode Island was a No. 7 seed in this year’s
tournament, its highest seeding
ever, before falling to Duke on
Saturday in the second round.
ESPN’s Jeff Goodman reported
that Rhode Island gave Hurley “an
increased, long-term offer” to stay
and that Pittsburgh, another former power that has fallen on hard
times, also asked him to fill its
vacancy at a salary of more than
$3 million per year, which Goodman said is more than he will
receive in his six-year deal with
the Huskies.
Perhaps no men’s basketball
program has been hurt more by
the football-driven conference realignment than U-Conn., which
was left without a natural fit after
the former Big East disintegrated
following the 2012-13 season.
Mainly because its lackluster football program was undesired by the
Power Five conferences, the
school was forced to band together with other castoffs to form the
American Athletic Conference. It
plays many games outside its recruiting base and has struggled to
attract talent.
Hurley, the son of legendary
New Jersey high school coach Bob
Hurley Sr. and brother of Arizona
State Coach Bobby Hurley, seems
well suited to reverse the program’s slide.
matt.bonesteel@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
D I G ES T
SOCCER
NCAA broadcasts feed on
the tears of young children,
and critics have had enough
M ATT B ONESTEEL
of Europe’s top clubs, including
Ajax, Juventus, Barcelona and
Milan. . . .
Juventus will play in the MLS
All-Star Game in Atlanta on Aug. 1.
Leading the Italian League as
they pursue a seventh straight
Serie A title, the Bianconeri will
be the latest high-profile
European club to face MLS’s top
players in the annual showcase.
Real Madrid won last year’s game
in Chicago on penalty kicks.
Juventus is Italy’s most successful
club with 33 league
championships. . . .
Paris Saint-Germain was
ordered to close part of its
stadium at its next Champions
League home game as
punishment for fans lighting
flares and fireworks.
UEFA said the north end of
Parc des Princes will be closed
because of incidents during PSG’s
2-1 loss to Real Madrid this
month, a result that eliminated
the French club from the round of
16. The French league leaders
already have qualified for the next
Champions League.
COLLEGE LACROSSE
Megan Whittle scored four
goals and Jen Giles and Caroline
Steele added three apiece to pace
the No. 4 Maryland women to a
TELEVISION AND RADIO
NBA
7 p.m.
10 p.m.
2 p.m.
Denver at Washington » NBC Sports Washington, NBA TV, WFED (1500 AM)
Boston at Portland » NBA TV
NHL
7 p.m.
11 a.m.
New Jersey at Pittsburgh » NHL Network
Boston vs. New York Yankees » ESPN
Cincinnati vs. Colorado » MLB Network
Washington vs. Houston » MASN, WJFK (106.7 FM)
Texas vs. San Diego » MLB Network
Noon
3:30 p.m.
10 p.m.
7:27 p.m.
9:37 p.m.
9:57 p.m.
NCAA, Sweet 16: Clemson vs. Kansas » WUSA (Ch. 9), WJZ (Ch. 13),
WTEM (980 AM)
NCAA, Sweet 16: West Virginia vs. Villanova » TBS, WTEM (980 AM)
NCAA, Sweet 16: Syracuse vs Duke » WUSA (Ch. 9), WJZ (Ch. 13),
WTEM (980 AM)
NCAA, Sweet 16: Texas Tech vs. Purdue » TBS, WTEM (980 AM)
Men’s international friendly: Brazil vs. Russia » beIN Sports
Men’s international friendly: Italy vs. Argentina » beIN Sports
Men’s international friendly: Mexico vs. Iceland » Fox Sports 1
AUTO RACING
1 p.m.
3 p.m.
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7:07 p.m.
ATP/WTA: Miami Open, second round » Tennis Channel
SOCCER
MLB SPRING TRAINING
1 p.m.
4 p.m.
6 p.m.
9:30 p.m.
PGA Tour: WGC Match Play, Day 3 » Golf Channel
TENNIS
NASCAR Truck Series: Alpha Energy Solutions 250, practice » Fox Sports 1
NASCAR Truck Series: Alpha Energy Solutions 250, final practice »
Fox Sports 1
MIXED MARTIAL ARTS
10 p.m.
LFA 36: Ricky Simon vs. Vinicius Zani (bantamweights) » AXS TV
CURLING
7 p.m.
Women’s world championship, round robin: United States vs. Canada »
NBC Sports Network
WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
FIGURE SKATING
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
8 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
9:30 p.m.
9:30 p.m.
NCAA, Sweet 16: Oregon State vs. Baylor » ESPN2
NCAA, Sweet 16: North Carolina State vs. Mississippi State » ESPN
NCAA Division II, championship: Central Missouri vs. Ashland »
CBS Sports Network
NCAA, Sweet 16: Stanford vs. Louisville » ESPN
NCAA, Sweet 16: UCLA vs. Texas » ESPN2
World championships, ladies’ free program » NBC Sports Network
MEN’S COLLEGE ICE HOCKEY
3 p.m.
4 p.m.
6:30 p.m.
NCAA, first round: Michigan Tech vs. Notre Dame » ESPN2
NCAA, first round: Air Force vs. St. Cloud State » ESPNU
NCAA, first round: Providence vs. Clarkson » ESPNU
GOLF
10:30 a.m.
PGA Tour: Corales Puntacana Resort & Club Championship, second round
» Golf Channel
13-7 victory over No. 7 Penn at
Franklin Field in Philadelphia.
The Terrapins (7-1) raced out to
a 5-0 lead midway through the
first half against the Quakers (7-1).
MISC.
In Assago, Italy, American
skaters Nathan Chen and
Vincent Zhou finished in the top
three in the men’s short program
at the world figure skating
championships.
Chen finished first going into
the final free skate, while Zhou
was third. Mikhail Kolyada of
Russia was in second place. . . .
Martin Fourcade won the
biathlon World Cup sprint title
for the seventh straight year after
a victory in Tyumen, Russia.
The Frenchman went into the
race trailing Johannes Thingnes
Boe of Norway by 31 points, but
he won the title by two points. . . .
Former Colorado State
assistant Niko Medved is
returning to Fort Collins to lead
the Rams men’s basketball
program after spending a year as
Drake’s head coach.
Medved replaces Larry
Eustachy, who stepped down last
month. Medved was an assistant
coach at CSU from 2007 to 2013.
— From news services
FRIDAY, MARCH 23 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
M2
R E D S K I N S NOTE S
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/redskins
Is it Hankins or bust?
D-line options shrink.
DARREN ABATE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
When the Wizards host Denver on Friday, Bradley Beal will play in his 72nd straight game this season.
Beal won’t have a seat
Long labeled injury-prone, Wizards guard is now a much-needed iron man
BY
C ANDACE B UCKNER
san antonio — As Bradley Beal
answered for the Washington
Wizards’ latest loss, he resisted
the easy out. The Wizards
dressed 10 healthy players
against the San Antonio Spurs on
Wednesday night but used only
eight for much of a game in
which they were outrebounded
and outplayed in the paint for a
98-90 result. But that didn’t
matter, Beal murmured in his
baritone, which predictably
grows toneless and deeper following tough losses.
“It’s not an excuse,” Beal said.
“We still had a chance to win.”
This same defiance has defined Beal’s sixth NBA season, in
which he has played in the most
consecutive games of his career,
refusing to yield to fatigue ahead
of achieving a personal goal.
On Friday when the Wizards
host the Denver Nuggets, Beal
will step onto the court for the
72nd straight game. The streak
has long eclipsed his previous
regular season high of 48 consecutive games, set a year ago, and
heads toward the larger objective of appearing in all 82.
Beal set a career high last
season with 77 games played
and earned rest at the end of the
schedule because Washington
had its playoff spot sealed. This
year, the 82-game objective carries more weight than just being
a vanity accomplishment.
The Wizards (40-31) have fallen into sixth place in the East,
and as the playoff picture continues to shuffle, the team will need
the remaining 11 games to secure
a better spot. As Washington’s
leading scorer at 23.2 points per
game, Beal must remain on the
floor on those nights, a challenge
he had long accepted before the
start of the season.
“I never played in 82 before,”
Beal said. “So this will be the first
time in my whole career that I’ll
WIZ ARDS’ NEX T THREE
vs. Denver Nuggets
Today
7 NBCSW, NBA TV
vs. New York Knicks
Sunday
6 NBCSW, NBA TV
vs. San Antonio Spurs
Tuesday
7 NBCSW
Radio: WFED (1500 AM)
be able to do it.
“You got to be able to be
mentally tough, physically, emotionally, spiritually, everything,”
Beal said. “We got to be tougher
than we are. We’re running out of
time.”
Earlier in his career, Beal had
bristled at the stigma of being
perceived as injury prone. Over
his third and fourth seasons,
Beal missed 46 games. Then,
eight games into Beal’s fifth
season — after he signed a fiveyear, $128 million contract — a
hamstring injury sidelined him
for three matchups, and that
familiar refrain picked up. But
the hamstring didn’t bother Beal
again for the rest of the season, at
least not enough to keep him off
the court.
Now deep into his healthiest
campaign, Beal ticks off the simple checklist that has created
71 consecutive appearances and
counting.
“Just taking care of my body.
Eating the right foods. Try to do
all my recovery processes. Sit in
my space boots, I call them,” Beal
said. “I hate ice, but ice baths . . .
and sleeping more than anything
and just sticking to it.”
Beal hasn’t simply played in
every game this season. As the
team’s best player in the absence
of John Wall, Beal has carried a
larger load than any of his teammates. Since Wall stepped away
from the lineup nearly two
months ago, Beal has averaged
36.9 minutes as the Wizards’ top
offensive option and playmaker
(6.4 assists per game over the
past 23 contests). During this
stretch, Beal also has pulled
down 4.5 rebounds per game, but
Wednesday night, he snorted at
his performance against the
Spurs.
“It’s frustrating because we
were right there,” Beal said after
highlighting his zero-rebound
night. “Every time we have a
chance to move up [in the standings], we kind of take two steps
back. All we can do is put it
behind us and move on.”
After the loss in San Antonio,
Beal wasn’t in the mood to reflect
on personal achievements. He
was courteous yet cross. Standing up as the responsible voice in
the locker room but stewing over
a loss that anyone could have
seen coming — maybe except for
him and his remaining healthy
teammates. When reminded how
the Wizards had slipped from
fourth to sixth place in the East,
Beal shook his head, then began
a soliloquy about finishing
strong. Not just a reminder for
himself but for the Wizards.
“Especially if we want home
court. We got to take advantage
of that. Take advantage of our
schedule, of teams we’re playing. It’s not going to be easy,”
Beal said. “Every team we play is
a playoff team after the all-star
break. We’ve got to have a better
mentality coming into the
games knowing that [Wednesday] the Spurs we’re playing for
seeding position just like we
were. They could’ve lost and
been out of the top eight.
“We got to realize what’s at
stake, man. If we keep going the
way we’re going, we’re going to
end up dropping. We might end
up and mess around and be
eighth. We got to do whatever it
takes to get a win.”
candace.buckner@washpost.com
NBA ROUNDUP
Walker’s 46 help Charlotte win by 61
HORNETS 140,
GRIZZLIES 79
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Kemba Walker scored 46 points
and made 10 three-pointers, and
the Charlotte Hornets rolled to the
most lopsided victory in franchise
history and sixth largest in NBA
history by beating the Memphis
Grizzlies, 140-79, on Thursday
night in Charlotte.
“That’s not something you see
every day,” Walker said.
Walker had the ninth 40-point
game of his career as the Hornets
easily overcame the absence of the
suspended Dwight Howard. The
all-star guard hit 13 of 18 shots
overall, including 10 of 14 on threepointers, and was 10 for 10 on free
throws in 28 minutes.
Walker scored 17 points in the
first quarter, 18 in the second
quarter and 11 in the third before
he was replaced for the final time
with 1:48 left in the period.
It came one night after Howard’s 32-point, 30-rebound performance that helped Charlotte
rally from a 23-point deficit for a
111-105 victory at Brooklyn. But in
the process, Howard was whistled
for his 16th technical foul of the
season, meaning he had to serve a
one-game suspension Thursday
night.
It didn’t matter as the Hornets
roared ahead 12-2 in the first fourplus minutes, were ahead 37-14
after one quarter and 75-42 at
halftime and led by a game-high
65 points (137-72) with 1:45 left
before taking the 61-point win.
The largest previous win in
franchise history came by
52 points (136-84) at home against
Philadelphia on Feb. 27, 1992.
It was the third-highest scoring
game of Walker’s career. The 6foot-1 guard had a career-high 52
points against Utah in double
overtime in 2016, and had 47 vs.
Chicago in 2017.
PELICANS 128, LAKERS
125: Anthony Davis capped a 33-
point performance with two
clutch free throws and a gamesealing steal in the final seconds,
Rajon Rondo had 24 points and
10 assists, and New Orleans erased
an 11-point fourth-quarter deficit
to beat visiting Los Angeles.
Rondo scored 12 of his points in
the fourth quarter, when the Pelicans could not have been blamed
if they had faded, giving they were
playing for the fifth time in six
nights.
ROCKETS 100, PISTONS 96
(OT):
James
Harden
scored
21 points, including 10 of host
Houston’s 12 points in overtime, in
a game in which the teams combined to miss 71 three-point attempts.
76ERS 118, MAGIC 98: In
Orlando, Joel Embiid had 17
points and nine rebounds in just
20 minutes, and surging Philadelphia clinched its first non-losing
season in six years.
JAZZ
The Washington Redskins still
need a defensive lineman after
yet another who visited their
facility signed elsewhere
Wednesday. That could mean it’s
Johnathan Hankins or bust, as far
as free agency is concerned.
Hankins might be the biggest
name remaining on the market.
Others linked to the Redskins
signed elsewhere. Muhammad
Wilkerson met with the
organization during the two-day
negotiation period but signed
with the Green Bay Packers for
one year and $5 million. Sylvester
Williams met with the Redskins
this week but signed with the
Detroit Lions on Wednesday.
Sheldon Richardson signed with
the Minnesota Vikings for one
year at $8 million, and Dontari
Poe inked a three-year,
$28 million deal with the
Carolina Panthers. DaQuan Jones
reached a three-year, $21 million
agreement with the Tennessee
Titans.
The Redskins also met with
Pernell McPhee this week, but he
left without a deal and visited the
Atlanta Falcons on Wednesday.
He remains in the mix.
Former Philadelphia Eagles
run-stopper Bennie Logan is still
available and would help a
defense that ranked last against
the run in 2017, allowing
134.1 rushing yards per game.
Washington could draft a
defensive lineman and is
reportedly interested in University
of Washington defensive tackle
Vita Vea. But the Redskins have
other positions of need they could
fill in the first round and might be
attracted to a player such as
Florida State safety Derwin James,
if he’s still on the board.
Judging by the free agent visits,
the organization would like to
lock up a defensive lineman
before the draft. Both Coach Jay
Gruden and Doug Williams,
senior vice president of player
personnel, have said the
preference is to fill holes in free
agency and be able to take the
best player available in the draft.
Hankins (6-foot-3, 320 pounds)
seems like the best defensive
tackle still available in free
agency. Five-time Pro Bowl player
Ndamukong Suh has yet to sign,
but he probably will be too pricey
for the Redskins.
Hankins, 25, started 15 games
for the Indianapolis Colts last
season and posted 44 tackles and
two sacks. He started 41 games for
the New York Giants from 2014 to
2016 and had a career-high seven
sacks in 2014. The Colts released
Hankins after Frank Reich and a
new coaching staff took over and
switched from a 3-4 to a 4-3 base
defense. He was one of their big
free agent signings in 2017 with a
three-year, $30 million deal.
Addressing a porous run
defense is more than a defensive
line issue, according to Gruden.
He expects all three levels of the
defense to be involved.
The Redskins avoided having
another hole in the defense by resigning middle linebacker Zach
Brown to a three-year deal worth
up to $24 million. Outside
linebacker Trent Murphy signed a
three-year deal with the Buffalo
Bills, and linebacker Junior
Galette remains on the market.
The Redskins signed former
Dallas Cowboys cornerback
Orlando Scandrick, but safety is
still a position of need.
Defensive tackle Jonathan
Allen was the Redskins’ No. 17
overall pick in the 2017 draft, but
a foot injury ended his season
after five games.
“There’s a lot of reasons for the
downfall of the run,” Gruden said
at the NFL combine. “At the end
of the day, we have guys that
should be able to step in here and
play the run better. Safeties,
linebackers, corners might have
to . . . make tackles, which we
didn’t do a great job of from time
to time.”
— Kareem Copeland
NFL NOTES
Giants trade Pierre-Paul to the Bucs
A SSOCIATED P RESS
The New York Giants traded
two-time Pro Bowl defensive end
Jason Pierre-Paul to the Tampa
Bay Buccaneers for draft picks
Thursday, another step by a team
rebuilding after a 3-13 season.
Pierre-Paul, 29, is a former firstround draft choice whose career
was interrupted by a fireworks
accident in 2015 that severely
damaged his right hand. PierrePaul, who helped the Giants win a
Super Bowl in the 2011 season,
signed a four-year, $62 million
contract a year ago.
New York will get Tampa Bay’s
third-round pick (69th overall) in
the draft in late April. The teams
also will swap fourth-round picks,
with the Bucs moving up to the
102nd pick and the Giants selecting 108th.
Later in the day, the Giants announced they had terminated the
contract of wide receiver and special teams player Dwayne Harris,
who missed the final 11 games
with a broken foot.
While the Pierre-Paul trade
only clears up a couple million
dollars in cap space this year, the
benefit for the Giants will be in
2019 when it sheds roughly
$18 million in cap space.
Tampa Bay registered only
22 sacks last season. Pierre-Paul
had 81/2 last season and 581/2 since he
was drafted 15th overall in 2010.
DOLPHINS: Frank Gore, the
NFL’s active rushing leader,
agreed to terms with Miami, a
person familiar with the negotiations said.
Gore, who turns 35 next month,
grew up in South Florida and
played for the Miami Hurricanes.
He rushed for 961 yards for Indianapolis last year, but the Colts
decided against trying to re-sign
him.
But the Dolphins want to give
the durable Gore a chance to provide depth behind Kenyan Drake,
who averaged 4.8 yards per carry
as a starter last season.
Miami also kept defensive end
STEVEN SENNE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Defensive end Jason Pierre-Paul, 29, had 581/2 sacks in eight seasons
with New York, but his career was hindered by a severe hand injury.
William Hayes, signing him to a
one-year contract. Hayes played in
10 games as a backup in 2017 before being placed on injured reserve because of a back injury.
Gore
has
rushed
for
14,026 yards in his NFL career to
rank fifth on the all-time list. In
2016 he became the league’s oldest
1,000-yard rusher since John Riggins in 1982.
EAGLES:
Philadelphia
agreed on a one-year contract with
wide receiver Mike Wallace, 31,
who spent the past two seasons in
Baltimore and had 52 catches for
748 yards and four touchdowns
last year. The deal reportedly is
worth up to $4 million.
Wallace has 538 receptions for
8,072 yards and 57 touchdowns in
nine seasons with four teams.
COWBOYS: Free agent wide
receiver Deonte Thompson signed
a one-year contract with Dallas.
In six seasons, Thompson has
played 53 games for Baltimore,
Buffalo and Chicago. He has
77 catches for 1,032 yards and four
touchdowns and 82 kickoff returns for a 24.8 yard average.
SEAHAWKS: Seattle is
bringing back running back Mike
Davis, 25, reportedly on a one-year
contract. Davis was a restricted
free agent, but the Seahawks did
not tender him, making him an
unrestricted free agent.
Promoted off Seattle’s practice
squad in November, Davis rushed
for 240 yards and averaged
3.5 yards per carry in six games.
FALCONS: Atlanta re-signed
defensive end Derrick Shelby to a
one-year contract. The Falcons released Shelby, 29, on March 2.
Shelby signed a four-year,
$18 million deal, with $7.5 million
guaranteed, with Atlanta in 2016
after spending his first four seasons in Miami. He played in
16 games in 2017 and had 30 tackles with one sack.
TITANS: Tennessee agreed to
terms with offensive lineman Kevin Pamphile, who spent the last
four years with Tampa Bay. Pamphile, 27, has 33 career NFL starts
with the Buccaneers, including 15
last season.
VIKINGS: Minnesota signed
guard Tom Compton, who spent
last season with Chicago, where he
played in 11 games with five starts.
He was drafted in the sixth round
by Washington in 2012 and appeared in 44 games with 10 starts
with the Redskins.
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Visiting Utah got 26 points from
Donovan Mitchell and beat Dallas
for its 22nd win in 25 games.
Protests in Sacramento
The start of the game between
the Sacramento Kings and Atlanta
Hawks was delayed 19 minutes
because of protesters who were
locked arm-in-arm obstructing
entrances to Golden 1 Center in
Sacramento.
A massive crowd shut down
nearby freeways and gathered in
the surrounding streets Thursday
to protest the police shooting of
Stephon Clark, who was unarmed
and in the back yard of his grandparents’ house Sunday night. According to reports, Clark was shot
20 times.
Only a few hundred fans made
it into Golden 1 Center before police decided to not allow anyone
else to enter.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
To get innings, Fedde
to start year in minors
Erick Fedde had little chance of
cracking the Nationals’ Opening
Day roster. That he would start
the season with Class AAA
Syracuse was almost a foregone
conclusion, one the Nationals
made official Thursday when they
optioned the right-hander to
minor league camp.
Fedde, 25, threw two scoreless
innings in relief Wednesday. But
despite his brief bullpen
experiment last season, the
Nationals see Fedde as a starter,
and he needs to get innings. With
four days left in spring training in
West Palm Beach, Fla., and no
room for him in the big league
rotation, the team decided to
send him back to the minors to
allow him to build.
“He’s really good,” Nationals
Manager Dave Martinez said.
“Unfortunately we can only carry
25. He’s young. We just want to
stretch him out and for him to
continue to build on spring
training. He had a really good
spring training.”
Fedde made six appearances
this spring, two starts, and threw
2
14 /3 innings in which he allowed
four earned runs. His velocity,
which dipped to the low 90s
before he finished last season on
the disabled list, jumped back
into the mid-90s. His fastball
showed the sinking life the
Nationals loved from the day they
drafted him. His change-up and
slider both looked improved.
Goodwin must adjust
Brian Goodwin finally received a
chance to make an impact at the
major league level last season,
and he’s itching for more.
“It was real nice to get up out of
Triple-A and get to where you felt
you were supposed to be,”
Goodwin said. “But it still was like
a little bit of a tease.”
It was a tease, he said, because
he wants to play every day. And
the 27-year-old outfielder knows
he probably won’t, at least not
this season.
“It’s just a lot of talent for not
too many spots,” Goodwin said.
Goodwin probably will be the
fourth outfielder to start the
season. Barring the unexpected,
he will break camp on the major
league roster — and as a bench
player — for the first time.
“It’s a big adjustment,”
Goodwin said of the reserve role.
“It’s not as much physically but
just staying mentally prepared.
You have to keep the same
intensity as a guy that’s playing
every day when you’re on the
bench. You got to prepare
yourself. . . . It’s definitely tough.
It’s definitely something that
takes some time.”
Ties severed with chef
The Nationals parted ways with
Mike Isabella in the wake of news
that the celebrity chef and four of
his business partners were named
in a sexual harassment lawsuit
filed Monday by a former top
manager at his company, Mike
Isabella Concepts.
The team is exploring options
for what will replace Isabella’s
three vacated outposts — G
(Italian-style sandwiches),
Kapnos at the Park (Greek food)
and Catchfly Kitchen (Southernstyle cuisine) — at Nationals Park.
In the lawsuit filed in D.C.
Superior Court, Chloe Caras
alleges Isabella and his partners
commented on the size of her
buttocks and touched her without
permission, The Washington Post
reported Monday.
Isabella and his partners
denied the allegations.
— Chelsea Janes, Jorge Castillo
and Scott Allen
Nats face a di∞cult decision on left-handed relievers
NATIONALS FROM D1
and Enny Romero are all in
contention for what seems likely
to be two left-handed middle
relief spots. That decision could
be coming soon.
The Nationals have a history of
carrying a few extra players
north, either to reward them for
big spring trainings or to postpone decisions a few days. They
head north Sunday for an exhibition game against the Minnesota
Twins on Tuesday and probably
will bring more than their Opening Day group of 25 players with
them. They also have a history of
keeping people around somehow, though they might find it
hard to do so this time.
Whenever the final cuts come,
a proven left-handed reliever or
two will be among them. In Mike
Rizzo’s tenure, the Nationals
have avoided jettisoning potential pitching depth whenever
possible, but of the four contenders, three of them cannot be
assigned to the minor leagues
without first landing on waivers.
All three of them probably would
entice another team to take
them, meaning the Nationals
would lose them in the process.
Solis is the only left-handed
reliever with options, meaning
he is the only one they can leave
off the Opening Day roster and
keep in the organization all year.
He is also the lefty the Nationals
have treasured most despite an
injury-riddled history and a few
playoff stumbles. Solis has the
widest arsenal of the group, with
a plus fastball, a consistent
curveball and a relevant changeup that does more than just
hover in the back of hitters’
minds.
He doesn’t throw as hard as
Romero, can’t handle the innings
load Grace can and doesn’t have
the extended track record Collins
built with the Kansas City Royals.
His splits say he fares better
against right-handed hitters than
he does lefties, meaning he isn’t
an ideal option to face an opponent’s big lefty slugger late. But
entering Thursday’s game, Solis
only has helped his cause this
spring, holding opponents to a
.185 batting average and averaging more than a strikeout per
inning.
Grace doesn’t entice strikeouts
the way Solis does, relying more
JOHN BAZEMORE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sammy Solis is the only lefty reliever the Nats can leave off the Opening Day roster and keep all year.
on weak contact than power
stuff. His average fastball velocity
is lower than those of Romero
and Solis, and he has not been
relied on in late-inning situations
the way Romero and Solis were
last season. But he has a lower
walk rate than either of them and
has proved capable of pitching
multiple innings at a time —
something no reliever locked
into the Opening Day bullpen has
proved as definitively.
“Any bullpen guy is competing
with the next bullpen guy, but I
think we’re different type of
pitchers,” Solis said of Grace, his
friend and fellow homegrown
National. “He’s a sinkerballer.
He’s a groundball guy — get a
double play ball guy. . . . We keep
it easy, and we keep it loose. We
don’t really think about that.”
Romero is a different type of
pitcher from both Solis and
Grace. He had the highest average fastball velocity of anyone in
the Nationals’ bullpen at
98 mph. But his breaking stuff is
the least reliable, and his delivery allows hitters to see that
fastball well enough that even
when it touches 100, which it
does regularly, it doesn’t feel as
hard as fastballs of pitchers who
hide the ball better.
Nationals Manager Dave Martinez said his staff ’s priority for
Romero is command, not only in
terms of limiting walks but also
within the strike zone.
“When he throws a strike, he
throws a strike,” Martinez said,
signaling with his hands to indicate that those strikes often catch
more of the plate than would be
ideal. Romero has pitched to a
9.85 ERA in 61/3 spring innings, a
statistic that wouldn’t matter
much for a proven reliever but
probably will hurt his chances of
making the Opening Day roster.
While Romero and Grace are
out of options and therefore
probably would head elsewhere
as soon as they hit waivers,
Collins is in camp on a minor
league deal that allows him the
right to opt out July 1. Should the
Nationals decide to send him to
the minors, Collins can pitch and
build his résumé there, and they
will not lose him immediately.
But if he is still in the minors
July 1 and pitching as he has as in
his 71/3 strong innings this spring,
Collins probably will find an
opportunity elsewhere. That late
opt-out date will give the Nationals flexibility to leave Collins off
their Opening Day roster. But if
the 28-year-old lefty proves two
Tommy John surgeries have not
diminished his ability to get outs,
they will not have flexibility to
stash him at Class AAA Syracuse
MARCH 23 , 2018
SPRING TRAINING NOTES
N AT IO N A L S N O T ES
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/nationals
. FRIDAY,
forever.
As of now, given the personnel
locked into bullpen spots already, Solis seems likely to get a
spot. Grace seems to be the kind
of versatile reliever they desperately need in their aging relief
corps. Collins can hang around
and not hit waivers immediately,
so the Nationals probably will
decide to start him in Syracuse.
Given his struggles and despite
his high-90s stuff, Romero could
be the odd man out. If he is, the
Nationals probably will have to
risk putting him on waivers. If
they do, someone probably will
take a chance on a lefty with a
100-mph fastball, and they could
lose him.
These decisions are coming
soon and will impact the Nationals’ relief depth moving forward.
They do not have many up-andcoming lefties in their minor
league system, at least not at the
higher levels. They are well
aware of the injury risks that
populate their bullpen, from
closer Sean Doolittle to righty
Shawn Kelley and everyone in
between. They must choose carefully, more carefully than even at
other positions on their roster.
They will not be able to keep
everyone, and they must choose
soon.
chelsea.janes@washpost.com
Arrieta battles nerves
in first start for Phillies
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Eight days before Opening Day,
Jake Arrieta made his first appearance for the Philadelphia Phillies.
“I had a ton of nervous energy,”
Arrieta said Thursday after allowing two runs, including Miguel
Cabrera’s solo homer, during a 6-2
loss to the Detroit Tigers in Clearwater, Fla.
Arrieta struck out two and
walked none, throwing 31 pitches
over two innings. He gave up three
hits.
“Very anxious to get out there,”
the 32-year-old right-hander said.
“I was in here at 8, and I couldn’t
stop moving. But now that’s over. I
can kind of take a deep breath and
remember what it feels like to be in
a game situation. Umpires, crowd,
and it felt great.”
Arrieta and the Phillies finalized a three-year, $75 million contract March 12, a deal that could be
worth up to $135 million over five
seasons. Aaron Nola will start the
March 29 opener at Atlanta, and it
is not clear whether Arrieta will
take a turn the first time through
the rotation.
“Do I think I can handle going
out there? Of course,” he said. “But
is it the smartest thing to do?
Maybe not. I’m on board with
what these guys intend to do. I
know they have my health and the
teams’ success over the long haul
in mind, and that’s the most important thing moving forward.”
Thursday’s contest featured
five ejections — Detroit starter
Matthew Boyd and Philadelphia
relievers Parker Frazier and Pedro
Beato, along with Phillies Manager Gabe Kapler and bench coach
Rob Thomson — as three batters
were hit by pitches.
ORIOLES: Dylan Bundy was
picked to start Baltimore’s opener
against Minnesota on March 29.
The 24-year-old right-hander
led the Orioles in wins last season,
when he was 13-9 with a 4.24 ERA.
Bundy beat out Kevin Gausman, who started last year’s opener, and Chris Tillman, the starter
of the previous three. Last year
was Bundy’s first season in the
rotation.
INDIANS: Rajai Davis made
it all the way back with Cleveland.
Mike Napoli remains on the outside.
Davis, who hit perhaps the most
memorable home run in club history during the 2016 World Series,
was told by Manager Terry Francona that he will be on Cleveland’s
Opening Day roster. The 37-yearold outfielder signed a minor
league contract with the club last
month.
As for Napoli, the Indians intend to release him and re-sign the
36-year-old to a minor league contract.
METS: New York right-hander Rafael Montero probably will
miss the season after tearing a
ligament in his pitching elbow.
New York said the 27-year-old
has a complete tear of the ulnar
collateral ligament and probably
will need Tommy John surgery.
Montero was 5-11 with a
5.52 ERA in 18 starts and 16 relief
appearances last year.
TIGERS: Detroit reassigned
veteran catcher Jarrod Saltalamacchia to its minor league camp.
The Tigers brought back Saltalamacchia on a minor league contract March 9 to add depth behind
James McCann and John Hicks.
Saltalamacchia has hit .233 with
110 homers and 381 RBI over an
11-year big league career. He played
in 10 games last season for Toronto
and had one hit in 25 at-bats.
Left-handers Chad Bell and
Blaine Hardy were optioned to
Class AAA Toledo.
ATHLETICS: Oakland righthander Jharel Cotton had Tommy
John surgery to repair a torn ulnar
collateral ligament in his pitching
elbow.
Cotton was 0-1 with a 3.75 ERA
in four spring training appearances. The 26-year-old was 9-10 with a
5.58 ERA in 24 starts last year.
MARINERS: Seattle reliever
David Phelps will miss the season
after tearing the ulnar collateral
ligament in his pitching arm.
Phelps was injured on the final
pitch of his previous outing
March 17 against the Angels. The
right-hander will have Tommy
John surgery to repair his elbow,
though a surgery date has not
been set.
DIAMONDBACKS: Arizona
Manager Torey Lovullo says outfielder Steven Souza Jr. probably
will open the season on the disabled list after straining his right
pectoral muscle while diving for a
baseball in a spring training game
Wednesday night.
Lovullo said Souza will be out “a
couple of weeks at least.”
REDS: Cincinnati claimed
slugger Kennys Vargas off waivers
from the Twins.
The 27-year-old Vargas batted
.253 with career highs of 11 home
runs and 41 RBI last season.
CHRIS O'MEARA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
“I had a ton of nervous energy,” said Jake Arrieta, who allowed two
runs over two innings in his first start since joining Philadelphia.
A scoring sensation for overseas club, Novakovich hopes to earn a role with U.S.
NOVAKOVICH FROM D1
to Reading’s first team next season — and callbacks to the national team.
“It’s nice to know,” he said, “the
U.S. coaches have been looking
and watching.”
U.S. soccer has developed target forwards over the years —
Brian McBride and Jozy Altidore,
among them — but no one with
such unusual height. Tall players
in the American system have typically been central defenders and
goalkeepers.
Although dangerous in the air,
Novakovich impresses with his
footwork.
“He’s different because he’s big,
lanky and long,” U.S. assistant
Richie Williams said, “but he’s got
some pretty good feet and pretty
good technical ability.”
Despite his height, Novakovich
said his father emphasized ball
control.
“From a young age, it was about
dribbling and touching the ball
and keeping it close. . . . Everyone
looks at my size and automatically thinks I am a target man and
can head the ball. Honestly, I
prefer to play a little bit and have
the ball at my feet, not just headers. I’m a big guy, but I can offer a
little bit more.”
His family roots stretch from a
Serbian town near the Hungarian
and Romanian borders on his
mother’s side to greater Belgrade
on his father’s side. His mother
was actually born in England after the family fled unrest in the
former Yugoslavia decades ago. In
England, his maternal grandfather played soccer for Bicester
Town and Oxford United.
Both of his parents immigrated
to the United States at young ages
and settled in the Milwaukee
area. They met in the tightknit
Serbian community, which centered on St. Sava Serbian Orthodox Cathedral and, for the soccerobsessed, the adult ethnic league
known as the Majors. Serbs
played Croatians, Germans faced
Poles. Latin American teams blossomed.
“I come from a Serbian background. Growing up, I am proud
of my Serbian heritage. I do have a
special place for Serbia in my
heart. I grew up in America. I love
my country. I don’t want to
choose. It’s who I am.”
In a household influenced by
generations of immigrants, Novakovich’s first language was Serbian. This explains the accent.
“Some people say I have an ac-
PA IMAGES/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO
“He’s got some pretty good feet and pretty good technical ability,”
U.S. assistant Richie Williams said of Andrija Novakovich, left.
cent; some say I don’t. I don’t
know, man. Maybe it’s a little
different.”
He grew up in the suburb of
Muskego playing soccer religiously with his younger brother and
two cousins. They are all now
competing for college teams, in
Division I (Marquette), Division
II (Wisconsin Parkside) and Division III (Milwaukee School of Engineering).
As a sophomore in high school,
Novakovich committed to play at
Marquette but ultimately decided
to pursue a pro path overseas.
Eligible for British citizenship
through his mother, he dodged
the work permit issues that have
dogged other Americans. With
English relatives helping with his
transition, he settled in Reading,
45 miles west of London.
Though he started in the acad-
emy system, Novakovich worked
himself into two first-team
matches in spring 2015. He was
loaned for the 2015-16 season to
fifth-flight Cheltenham Town. Illness sidelined him for months,
and he returned to Reading. The
following season, he scored eight
league goals for the under-23
squad.
His agent worked with Reading
— which until this week was
coached by former Dutch star
Jaap Stam — in arranging a loan
to Telstar, a modest club located
15 miles northwest of Amsterdam.
This season, Novakovich has
scored a pair of goals in five
matches and, with 18 goals overall, ranks second on the league
charts. On the European scales,
the level of play isn’t very high,
but for him, it’s a step up from
Reading’s under-23s.
“It’s been challenging. I went
there to get experience on a first
team in a competitive atmosphere,” he said. “Fans care. We’re
fighting for promotion. It’s what
football is all about. With the
U-23s, I didn’t really get that.”
His exploits thrust him onto
the U.S. national team radar. Williams, the U.S. assistant, remembered coaching him briefly on the
U.S. under-17 squad. As interim
coach Dave Sarachan began considering whom to call up from
abroad, Williams studied Novakovich’s work on a video scouting
service.
“Even though it’s second-division Holland, he’s proven he can
score goals,” Williams said. “And
we don’t have a lot of depth in that
position.”
The other forwards in this particular camp are Bobby Wood,
who has scored once in 20
Bundesliga matches for Hamburg
this season; and Rubio Rubin,
who didn’t pan out in Europe and
is now with Mexican club Tijuana.
“Hopefully,” Novakovich said,
“I can show what I can do in
training and get an opportunity
in the [Paraguay] game.”
And when camp closes, he will
return to Telstar, where his scoring exploits have earned him star
status at a 3,600-seat stadium two
miles from the North Sea Canal.
What do Telstar supporters
make of him?
“They know I am American,
and they know I am Serbian. I
have heard many times: ‘the Serbian American striker.’ They
know I am from Wisconsin. Just a
country boy, man.”
steven.goff@washpost.com
FRIDAY, MARCH 23 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D5
M2
NHL ROUNDUP
GOLF ROUNDUP
Red-hot Columbus blanks Florida for 10th consecutive victory Spieth, Reed
BLUE JACKETS 4,
PANTHERS 0
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Sergei Bobrovsky stopped
33 shots for his fifth shutout of the
season, Cam Atkinson had a goal
and an assist, and the Columbus
Blue Jackets shut out the visiting
Florida Panthers, 4-0, on Thursday night for their 10th straight
win.
Pierre-Luc Dubois had two assists for the Blue Jackets, who improved to 42-28-5 and joined Philadelphia (1984-86) and Pittsburgh
(2010-13) as the only NHL franchises to record 10-game winning
streaks in consecutive seasons.
The shutout was the 24th of
Bobrovsky’s career and his seventh straight win. Sonny Milano,
Seth Jones and Thomas Vanek —
into an empty net — also scored for
Columbus, which moved into a
second-place tie in the Metropolitan Division with idle Pittsburgh,
both with 89 points.
FLYERS
4, RANGERS 3:
Travis Konecny scored twice,
Claude Giroux had three assists
and Philadelphia beat New York at
home.
Jakub Voracek had a goal and
an assist and Oskar Lindblom also
scored for the Flyers, who won for
just the fourth time in the past
12 games.
With the Flyers’ top two goalies
sidelined by injury and Petr
Mrazek, who Philadelphia acquired to fill in, ineffective of late,
Coach Dave Hakstol went with
little-used rookie Alex Lyon. In his
10th career game, Lyon made
33 saves to improve to 4-2-1.
LIGHTNING
7, ISLAND-
ERS 6: J.T. Miller scored twice,
Brayden Point had a goal and two
assists, and high-scoring Tampa
Bay held off host New York.
Andrei Vasilevskiy stopped
35 shots for his league-leading
42nd win, extending Tampa Bay’s
franchise record. The Lightning
extended its lead atop the Eastern
Conference and Atlantic Division
to six points over idle Boston.
HURRICANES
6,
COY-
OTES 5: In Raleigh, N.C., Jeff
Skinner scored his second goal
with 1:58 left, and Carolina beat
Arizona despite surrendering a
weird goal when the puck stuck in
goalie Cam Ward’s skate.
Skinner added an assist, and
Valentin Zykov scored two goals,
with the second tying it at 5 with
10:14 remaining. Phil Di Giuseppe
had a goal and two assists, and
Jaccob Slavin had three assists.
OILERS
6, SENATORS 2:
Connor McDavid had two goals
and two assists, his first goals
against Ottawa, and visiting Ed-
monton eliminated the Senators
from playoff contention.
Drake Caggiula also had two
goals for the Oilers, with Ryan
Nugent-Hopkins and Ty Rattie
adding the others. Cam Talbot
stopped 33 shots as Edmonton
concluded a four-game trip 3-1-0.
MAPLE LEAFS 5, PREDATORS 2: Auston Matthews had a
goal in his return from a shoulder
injury that sidelined him for
10 games as Toronto won in Nashville.
The Predators had been 14-0-1
since their previous regulation
loss Feb. 17.
James van Riemsdyk and
Mitchell Marner each had a goal
and an assist, and William Nylander and Jake Gardiner also
scored for Toronto, which has won
five of six.
CANUCKS
5,
BLACKHAWKS 2: Alexander Edler
scored twice, Jacob Markstrom
made 39 saves, and Vancouver
stopped a seven-game slide with a
victory in Chicago.
Henrik Sedin and Bo Horvat
each had a goal and an assist as
Vancouver won for the first time
since Brock Boeser was sidelined
by a back injury, probably ending
his impressive rookie season.
KINGS
CAPITALS FROM D1
RICK OSENTOSKI/USA TODAY SPORTS
Washington’s Jakub Vrana, right, had the lone assist of the game Thursday night, helping Brett Connolly score on a breakaway.
Wings. Grubauer has a .942 save
percentage and a 1.76 goals
against average in 23 appearances since beating Tampa Bay on
Nov. 24 for his first win.
While Grubauer was surging,
Holtby struggled through the
month of February, and when he
was pulled for a third time in his
past six starts earlier this month,
Trotz decided to turn to Grubauer for four straight starts, giving
Holtby more than a week to work
on his game. Holtby has played
better of late, but because
Grubauer has been so steady, the
two have been alternating starts.
Trotz said he will go with the
hotter goaltender for the playoffs, meaning it’s at least possible
Holtby, a Vezina Trophy finalist
the past two seasons as a top
netminder, won’t be in net to
start the postseason.
“We’ve got two really good
C A PITA L S ’ N E X T T H R E E
at Montreal Canadiens
Tomorrow
7 NBCSW,
NHL Network
Capitals 1, Red Wings 0
WASHINGTON ......................... 0
DETROIT .................................. 0
0
0
1 —
0 —
1
0
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: None. Penalties: Boyd, WSH, (roughing), 1:30;
Ericsson, DET, (holding), 8:03; Wilson, WSH, (roughing),
13:56.
SECOND PERIOD
at New York Rangers
Scoring: None. Penalties: Oshie, WSH, (tripping), 12:24;
Eller, WSH, (high sticking), 12:24.
Monday
THIRD PERIOD
7:30 NBCSN
vs. New York Rangers
Wednesday
8 NBCSN
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM)
options here in net,” Connolly
said. “It’s exciting to see Grubi
play that well, and he deserves
everything he’s getting right now,
for sure.”
Grubauer made a compelling
case for himself Thursday. The
Capitals could have been down
by a goal after the first period
Scoring: 1, Washington, Connolly 15 (Vrana), 6:41.
Penalties: Helm, DET, (interference), 1:27; Kronwall,
DET, (tripping), 11:08.
SHOTS ON GOAL
WASHINGTON ....................... 11
10
5 — 26
DETROIT ................................ 13
15
11 — 39
Power-play opportunities: Washington 0 of 3; Detroit 0
of 4. Goalies: Washington, Grubauer 12-9-3 (39 shots-39
saves). Detroit, Howard 19-26-8 (26-25). A: 19,515
(20,000). T: 2:31.
were it not for Trotz’s coach’s
challenge for goaltender interference. Speedy Red Wings forward
Andreas
Athanasiou
sniped a puck past Grubauer, but
Grubauer immediately objected
to an official. Video review
A SSOCIATED P RESS
7, AVALANCHE 1:
Anze Kopitar became the first
Kings player with a four-goal
game since 1993, Jonathan Quick
stopped 29 shots, and Los Angeles
picked up another valuable road
win by cruising past the Avalanche in Denver.
Kopitar was so efficient that he
picked up his fourth career hat
trick with 7:33 remaining in the
second period. He added another
goal early in the third. This was the
first four-goal game by a Kings
player since Luc Robitaille accomplished the feat Nov. 25, 1993, at
Quebec.
Grubauer makes 39 saves, shuts out Red Wings
but I think I needed that one, for
sure.”
Connolly held on to the puck,
and his shot beat Howard 6:41
into the third period to lift the
Capitals to a 1-0 win, keeping
Washington four points clear of
Pittsburgh for first place in a
tight Metropolitan Division
race.
As Connolly walked through
the locker room after the game,
he paused in front of goaltender
Philipp Grubauer. “Great game,
Grubi,” he told him.
It might have been better than
that — Grubauer made 39 saves
for his third shutout of the
season. As Washington’s offense
missed top-six center Evgeny
Kuznetsov — the Capitals’ second-leading scorer missed his
third straight game with an undisclosed “upper-body” injury —
and struggled to get anything
past Howard, Grubauer bought
time for his teammates to capitalize on Ouellet’s turnover.
“Guys made it pretty easy,”
Grubauer said with a shrug. “I
saw pucks all of the way.”
The game was Grubauer’s
sixth start this month as Trotz
has opted to give Grubauer and
Braden Holtby a share of the
goaltending duties before the
playoffs. Grubauer was scheduled to start this game anyway,
but the Capitals recalled Pheonix
Copley before the game to take
on backup responsibilities. Holtby “tweaked something” in his
previous start, Trotz said, so
Washington is taking a cautious
approach with him. He’s considered “day-to-day” with an undisclosed “lower-body” injury,
which is believed to stem from a
collision with Stars forward
Remi Elie in the third period of
his previous start. Holtby was
slow to get up and then flexed his
left knee several times.
Holtby was on the ice for
Thursday’s morning skate, so the
injury isn’t believed to be too
serious. Trotz said the team will
keep Copley on the roster until at
least Saturday morning, the next
time the team is on the ice.
Fortunately for the Capitals,
Grubauer has been one of the
league’s steadiest goaltenders
since late November, and he
impressed again against the Red
to face o≠
after victories
at Match Play
showed that Tyler Bertuzzi made
contact with Grubauer’s head at
the top of the crease, and that
overturned the goal.
From there, Grubauer put on a
clinic through two periods as
Washington couldn’t beat Howard on the other end. He saved all
28 Detroit shots through two
periods, including six at five-onfour. A critical moment came
when forwards T.J. Oshie and
Lars Eller were sent to the penalty box for tripping and highsticking, respectively, meaning
Washington was on the wrong
end of a two-minute five-onthree. Grubauer saved all three
shots to keep the game scoreless
and buy the Capitals’ offense
more time.
And when Connolly finally got
some good luck, he wasn’t going
to pass it up.
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
Jordan Spieth and Patrick
Reed enjoy few things more than
trying to beat each other, and
that’s when they are partners.
The stakes are even higher in
match play.
Win or go home.
Spieth and Reed did their part
Thursday by winning their
matches for a second straight day
to set up a showdown in Austin.
They play Friday to determine
who wins the group and advances
to the weekend of the World Golf
Championship Match Play.
Spieth dodged trouble early
against Li Haotong, who missed
putts inside eight feet on two of
the opening three holes, won the
second hole when Spieth hit into
the hazard and thought he won
the fourth hole until Spieth
matched his birdie by chipping in
from short of the green.
Spieth never trailed and pulled
away with a savvy play on the
par-4 13th over the water and
into the wind. He hit driver well
to the right, which gave him a
clear look at the green without
having to hit over any of the lake.
His pitch-and-run settled a foot
away for birdie and a 2-up lead,
and Spieth closed him out, 4
and 2.
Right behind was Reed in his
match against Charl Schwartzel,
and the South African was 2 up at
the turn until Reed won the next
two holes to set up a tight finish.
Schwartzel stayed 1 down when
he missed a five-foot par putt on
the 17th. Needing a birdie on the
18th to halve, Schwartzel only
could watch as Reed hit a wedge
that nearly went in and stopped a
few inches away.
Alex Noren of Sweden beat
Thomas Pieters in 14 holes and
won for the sixth time in his past
seven matches. He faces Tony
Finau, who dispatched Kevin Na.
Defending champion Dustin
Johnson, who lost to Bernd Wiesberger on Wednesday, fell behind
early in a 4-and-3 loss to Adam
Hadwin on Thursday.
Rory McIlroy beat Jhonattan
Vegas, while Brian Harman
knocked out Peter Uihlein in the
other match in their group.
Phil Mickelson, who lost to
Charles Howell III in the opening
round, rallied from 4 down after
eight holes and won the last three
holes to beat Satoshi Kodaira.
PGA TOUR: Tony Romo settled down after a nervous start,
only to come undone on the back
nine in his Tour debut.
The former Dallas Cowboys
quarterback played a four-hole
stretch in 5 over par on the back
nine that led to a 5-over 77 in the
Corales Puntacana Resort and
Club Championship in the Dominican Republic. He was
14 shots behind Brice Garnett,
who had a 63 to lead by one shot.
Romo received a sponsor’s exemption to the tournament and is
playing as an amateur.
Garnett played bogey-free,
opening with a 30 on the back
nine and building a one-shot lead
over Corey Conners of Canada.
LPGA TOUR: Caroline Hedwall, Jackie Stoelting and Hee
Young Park opened at 6-under 66
to share the lead at the Kia Classic
in Carlsbad, Calif.
WEEKEND ON THE AIR
TOMORROW
NBA
8 p.m.
10 a.m.
New Orleans at Houston » NBA TV
NHL
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
Houston at Boston » MLB Network
Colorado at Chicago Cubs (split squad) » MLB Network
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
3 p.m.
6 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
NCAA Division II, championship game: Ferris State vs. Northern State »
WUSA (Ch. 9), WJZ (Ch. 13), WTEM (980 AM)
NCAA, Elite Eight » TBS, WTEM (980 AM)
NCAA, Elite Eight » TBS, WTEM (980 AM)
WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
11:30 a.m.
1:30 p.m.
4 p.m.
6 p.m.
NCAA, Elite Eight, Buffalo vs. South Carolina » ESPN
NCAA, Elite Eight, Duke vs. Connecticut » ESPN
NCAA, Elite Eight, Texas A&M vs. Notre Dame » ESPN
NCAA, Elite Eight, Central Michigan vs. Oregon » ESPN
MLB SPRING TRAINING
Premiership: Saracens vs. Harlequins » NBC Sports Network
FIGURE SKATING
Noon
Washington at Montreal » NBC Sports Washington, NHL Network,
WJFK (106.7 FM)
Detroit at Toronto » NHL Network
MLB SPRING TRAINING
1 p.m.
10 p.m.
RUGBY
World championships » NBC Sports Network
AUTO RACING
10 a.m.
11 a.m.
12:30 p.m.
2 p.m.
NASCAR Cup Series: STP 500, practice »Fox Sports 1
NASCAR Truck Series: Alpha Energy Solutions 250, qualifying » Fox Sports 1
NASCAR Cup Series: STP 500, final practice » Fox Sports 1
NASCAR Truck Series: Alpha Energy Solutions 250 » Fox Sports 1
CURLING
2 p.m.
Women’s world championship, semifinal » NBC Sports Network
Jose Martinez vs. Alejandro Santiago (super flyweights) » ESPN
COLLEGE BASEBALL
Noon
Arkansas at Florida » ESPN2
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
3 p.m.
5 p.m.
Tennessee at South Carolina » ESPN2
Texas A&M at Florida »ESPN2
GOLF
MEN’S COLLEGE ICE HOCKEY
2 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
6 p.m.
9 p.m.
2 p.m.
5 p.m.
7 p.m.
PGA Tour: Corales Puntacana Resort & Club Championship, third round »
Golf Channel
PGA Tour: WGC Match Play, finals » WRC (Ch. 4), WBAL (Ch. 11)
Champions Tour: Rapiscan Systems Classic, second round » Golf Channel
LPGA Tour: Kia Classic, third round »Golf Channel
Miami Open: ATP second round, WTA third round » Tennis Channel
SOCCER
1 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
6 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
Men’s international friendly: Sweden vs. Chile » beIN Sports
NWSL: Portland at North Carolina » Lifetime
NHL
2 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
NCAA, Elite Eight » WUSA (Ch. 9), WJZ (Ch. 13), WTEM (980 AM)
NCAA, Elite Eight » WUSA (Ch. 9), WJZ (Ch. 13), WTEM (980 AM)
WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Noon
7:30 p.m.
NCAA, Elite Eight » ESPN
NCAA, Elite Eight » ESPN
GOLF
3 p.m.
5 p.m.
7 p.m.
PGA Tour: Corales Puntacana Resort & Club Championship, final round »
Golf Channel
PGA Tour: WGC Match Play, finals » WRC (Ch. 4), WBAL (Ch. 11)
Champions Tour: Rapiscan Systems Classic, final round »Golf Channel
LPGA Tour: Kia Classic, final round » Golf Channel
TENNIS
11 a.m.
ATP/WTA: Miami Open, third round » Tennis Channel
RUGBY
10 a.m.
Premiership Rugby: Leicester vs. Wasps » NBC Sports Network
AUTO RACING
1 a.m.
2 p.m.
Formula One: Australian Grand Prix » ESPN2
NASCAR Cup Series: STP 500 » Fox Sports 1
COLLEGE BASEBALL
SUNDAY
1 p.m.
NBA
TENNIS
11 a.m.
NCAA, first round, Ohio State vs. Princeton » ESPNU
NCAA, quarterfinal »ESPNU
NCAA, quarterfinal » ESPN2
New York Yankees vs. Tampa Bay » MLB Network
Los Angeles Dodgers vs. Los Angeles Angels » MLB Network
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
2:30 p.m.
BOXING
8:30 p.m.
1 p.m.
9 p.m.
New York at Washington » NBC Sports Washington, NBA TV,
WFED (1500 AM, 820 AM)
Utah at Golden State » NBA TV
LSU vs. Vanderbilt » ESPN2
MEN’S COLLEGE ICE HOCKEY
4 p.m.
6:30 p.m.
NCAA, quarterfinal » ESPN2
NCAA, quarterfinal » ESPNU
WOMEN’S CURLING
D6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 23 , 2018
scoreboard
B A S K ETB A L L
NBA
Spurs 98, Wizards 90
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Late Wednesday
W
y-Toronto ...................................53
y-Boston ....................................48
Cleveland ...................................42
Philadelphia ...............................41
Indiana .......................................41
Washington ...............................40
Miami .........................................39
Milwaukee .................................37
Detroit........................................32
Charlotte....................................32
New York....................................26
Chicago.......................................24
Brooklyn.....................................23
x-Atlanta....................................21
Orlando ......................................21
L
19
23
29
30
31
31
33
34
40
41
46
47
49
50
51
Pct
.736
.676
.592
.577
.569
.563
.542
.521
.444
.438
.361
.338
.319
.296
.292
GB
—
41/2
101/2
111/2
12
121/2
14
151/2
21
211/2
27
281/2
30
311/2
32
L
14
18
27
30
30
30
31
31
33
33
40
49
50
53
53
Pct
.806
.746
.620
.589
.589
.583
.569
.569
.542
.535
.437
.319
.306
.264
.264
GB
—
41/2
131/2
151/2
151/2
16
17
17
19
191/2
261/2
35
36
39
39
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W
z-Houston ..................................58
z-Golden State...........................53
Portland .....................................44
Oklahoma City ...........................43
New Orleans ..............................43
San Antonio ...............................42
Minnesota..................................41
Utah ...........................................41
Denver........................................39
L.A. Clippers...............................38
L.A. Lakers .................................31
x-Sacramento ............................23
Dallas .........................................22
Memphis ....................................19
Phoenix ......................................19
x-late game, y-clinched playoff spot, z-clinched division
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
WASHINGTON ................... 18
SAN ANTONIO ................... 18
26
32
30 — 90
21 — 98
WASHINGTON: Porter Jr. 5-13 0-0 12, Morris 2-6 1-2 5,
Gortat 2-3 3-4 7, Satoransky 0-8 0-0 0, Beal 9-13 1-1 21,
Oubre Jr. 9-17 0-0 21, Smith 1-2 0-0 3, Mahinmi 4-8 4-5
12, Frazier 1-5 0-0 2, Sessions 2-8 3-4 7. Totals 35-83
12-16 90.
SAN ANTONIO: Green 3-10 0-0 7, Anderson 7-8 1-2 16,
Aldridge 12-23 3-3 27, Murray 4-6 0-1 9, Mills 2-9 2-2 7,
Gay 2-5 5-6 10, Bertans 1-3 0-0 3, Lauvergne 0-1 0-0 0,
Gasol 3-4 2-4 8, Forbes 1-1 0-0 2, Parker 1-2 0-0 2, Paul
0-0 0-0 0, Ginobili 3-7 0-0 7. Totals 39-79 13-18 98.
Three-point Goals: Washington 8-25 (Oubre Jr. 3-6,
Porter Jr. 2-4, Beal 2-5, Smith 1-2, Satoransky 0-1,
Mahinmi 0-1, Morris 0-1, Frazier 0-2, Sessions 0-3), San
Antonio 7-23 (Anderson 1-1, Murray 1-1, Ginobili 1-1,
Gay 1-2, Bertans 1-2, Green 1-6, Mills 1-8, Aldridge 0-2).
Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Washington 35 (Porter Jr.
7), San Antonio 42 (Murray 10). Assists: Washington 27
(Satoransky 6), San Antonio 21 (Aldridge, Anderson 4).
Total Fouls: Washington 16, San Antonio 17. A: 18,418
(18,418).
Pelicans 96, Pacers 92
Late Wednesday
INDIANA ............................. 25
NEW ORLEANS .................. 24
25
27
19
16
23 — 92
29 — 96
INDIANA: Bogdanovic 4-10 0-0 9, T.Young 3-12 3-4 9,
Turner 4-15 5-5 13, Collison 4-11 1-1 11, Oladipo 7-16 4-4
21, Robinson III 0-0 2-2 2, Booker 5-8 0-0 10, Jefferson
1-3 2-2 4, Joseph 4-11 0-0 8, Stephenson 2-7 0-0 5. Totals
34-93 17-18 92.
NEW ORLEANS: E.Moore 10-15 0-0 23, Davis 9-14 9-9
28, Okafor 0-4 0-0 0, Rondo 1-6 0-0 2, Holiday 4-10 1-4 10,
Miller 1-3 0-0 3, Diallo 2-3 5-5 9, Mirotic 6-16 1-2 15,
Drew II 0-1 0-0 0, Clark 1-7 4-4 6. Totals 34-79 20-24 96.
Cleveland 132, Toronto 129
Philadelphia 119, Memphis 105
Charlotte 111, Brooklyn 105
Miami 119, New York 98
Denver 135, Chicago 102
L.A. Clippers 127, Milwaukee 120
New Orleans 96, Indiana 92
San Antonio 98, Washington 90
Three-point Goals: Indiana 7-22 (Oladipo 3-7, Collison
2-4, Stephenson 1-3, Bogdanovic 1-3, Joseph 0-1, Turner
0-2, T.Young 0-2), New Orleans 8-23 (E.Moore 3-4,
Mirotic 2-9, Davis 1-1, Holiday 1-3, Miller 1-3, Clark 0-1,
Rondo 0-2). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Indiana 48
(Turner, T.Young 10), New Orleans 50 (Davis 13).
Assists: Indiana 15 (Collison 6), New Orleans 15 (Rondo
6). Total Fouls: Indiana 21, New Orleans 19. Technicals:
Indiana coach Pacers (Defensive three second).
THURSDAY’S RESULTS
Charlotte 140, Memphis 79
Philadelphia 118, Orlando 98
Houston 100, Detroit 96, OT
New Orleans 128, L.A. Lakers 125
Utah 119, Dallas 112
Atlanta at Sacramento, Late
NCAA men’s tournament
FRIDAY’S GAMES
SCHEDULE-RESULTS
Denver at Washington, 7
L.A. Clippers at Indiana, 7
Brooklyn at Toronto, 7:30
Minnesota at New York, 7:30
Phoenix at Cleveland, 7:30
Miami at Oklahoma City, 8
Milwaukee at Chicago, 8
Utah at San Antonio, 8:30
Boston at Portland, 10
Atlanta at Golden State, 10:30
EAST REGION
First round
March 15 results
In Pittsburgh
Villanova 87, Radford 61
Alabama 86, Virginia Tech 83
In Dallas
Texas Tech 70, Stephen F. Austin 60
Florida 77, St. Bonaventure 62
March 16 results
In Detroit
Purdue 74, Cal State Fullerton 48
Butler 79, Arkansas 62
In San Diego
Marshall 81, Wichita State 75
West Virginia 85, Murray State 68
Second round
Saturday‘s results
In Pittsburgh
Villanova 81, Alabama 58
In Dallas
Texas Tech 69, Florida 66
Sunday‘s results
In Detroit
Purdue 76, Butler 73
In San Diego
West Virginia 94, Marshall 71
SATURDAY’S GAMES
Minnesota at Philadelphia, 6
Chicago at Detroit, 7
Phoenix at Orlando, 7
L.A. Lakers at Memphis, 8
New Orleans at Houston, 8
Charlotte at Dallas, 8:30
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Cleveland at Brooklyn, 1
San Antonio at Milwaukee, 3:30
Miami at Indiana, 5
Boston at Sacramento, 6
L.A. Clippers at Toronto, 6
New York at Washington, 6
Portland at Oklahoma City, 7
Atlanta at Houston, 8
Utah at Golden State, 8:30
REGION SEMIFINALS
Friday’s games
In Boston
Villanova (32-4) vs. West Virginia (26-10), 7:27
Purdue (30-6) vs. Texas Tech (26-9), 9:57
76ers 118, Magic 98
PHILADELPHIA .................. 32
ORLANDO ........................... 23
REGION CHAMPIONSHIP
38
26
25
16
23 — 118
33 — 98
PHILADELPHIA: Covington 5-12 2-2 15, Saric 3-7 3-4 10,
Embiid 6-11 4-4 17, B.Simmons 3-4 0-2 6, Redick 3-8 5-5
12, Holmes 3-5 0-0 7, Ilyasova 7-11 1-1 18, Johnson 1-4
0-0 2, McConnell 2-5 0-0 4, Jackson 1-1 1-2 4, Belinelli
5-10 3-4 15, Korkmaz 1-5 0-0 3, Anderson 2-6 0-0 5.
Totals 42-89 19-24 118.
ORLANDO: Hezonja 3-9 2-2 9, Gordon 4-15 1-1 10,
Vucevic 3-11 0-0 7, Augustin 2-9 1-4 6, Iwundu 3-5 2-2 8,
Speights 3-6 2-3 10, Biyombo 5-7 3-6 13, Birch 2-3 0-0 4,
Purvis 8-12 0-0 19, Mack 1-7 1-2 3, Artis 1-2 0-0 2, Afflalo
2-5 2-2 7. Totals 37-91 14-22 98.
Three-point Goals: Philadelphia 15-37 (Ilyasova 3-4,
Covington 3-7, Belinelli 2-5, Holmes 1-1, Jackson 1-1,
Saric 1-2, Anderson 1-2, Korkmaz 1-3, Embiid 1-4, Redick
1-5), Orlando 10-33 (Purvis 3-5, Speights 2-5, Vucevic
1-2, Augustin 1-4, Afflalo 1-4, Gordon 1-5, Hezonja 1-5).
Rebounds: Philadelphia 56 (B.Simmons 11), Orlando 40
(Gordon 11). Assists: Philadelphia 30 (B.Simmons 10),
Orlando 26 (Mack 6). Total Fouls: Philadelphia 15,
Orlando 19. Technicals: Orlando team.
Hornets 140, Grizzlies 79
MEMPHIS ........................... 14
CHARLOTTE ....................... 37
28
38
15
37
22 — 79
28 — 140
MEMPHIS: Martin 5-15 2-2 12, Green 2-7 0-0 5, Davis 2-5
0-0 4, Evans 7-11 1-4 16, Brooks 2-5 0-0 5, Johnson 1-4
0-2 2, Rabb 0-1 0-0 0, Chalmers 1-3 0-0 2, Weber 0-1 2-2
2, Simmons 1-5 4-4 6, McLemore 2-9 3-3 7, Selden 7-12
3-4 18. Totals 30-78 15-21 79.
CHARLOTTE: Kidd-Gilchrist 2-5 0-0 4, Williams 5-8 3-4
15, Hernangomez 5-11 0-1 10, Walker 13-18 10-10 46,
Lamb 4-7 2-2 12, Bacon 6-14 3-3 15, Kaminsky 5-6 0-0 14,
Mathiang 4-5 0-1 8, Paige 3-6 2-2 9, Monk 1-4 2-2 4,
Stone 0-1 0-0 0, Graham 1-7 1-2 3. Totals 49-92 23-27
140.
Three-point Goals: Memphis 4-18 (Green 1-2, Evans 1-2,
Brooks 1-3, Selden 1-3, Chalmers 0-2, McLemore 0-2,
Simmons 0-2, Martin 0-2), Charlotte 19-40 (Walker
10-14, Kaminsky 4-4, Lamb 2-4, Williams 2-5, Paige 1-3,
Hernangomez 0-1, Stone 0-1, Bacon 0-1, Monk 0-2,
Graham 0-5). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Memphis 38
(Martin 8), Charlotte 53 (Hernangomez 12). Assists:
Memphis 13 (Evans, Simmons 4), Charlotte 25 (Lamb 6).
Total Fouls: Memphis 24, Charlotte 17.
Pelicans 128, Lakers 125
L.A. LAKERS ....................... 44
NEW ORLEANS .................. 40
29
31
35
26
17 — 125
31 — 128
L.A. LAKERS: Kuzma 5-11 7-8 21, Randle 9-16 5-8 23,
Lopez 9-12 4-5 23, Ball 2-15 1-2 6, Caldwell-Pope 9-15
2-2 28, Wear 2-5 0-0 6, Zubac 1-1 0-0 2, Thomas 6-12 2-2
15. Totals 43-87 21-27 125.
NEW ORLEANS: Moore 6-10 0-0 13, Davis 12-20 9-10 33,
Okafor 1-3 0-0 2, Rondo 11-18 1-1 24, Holiday 12-16 1-3
26, Hill 1-3 0-0 3, Miller 3-6 0-0 7, Diallo 0-2 2-2 2, Mirotic
1-7 3-4 5, Liggins 0-0 0-0 0, Clark 5-10 2-2 13. Totals
52-95 18-22 128.
Three-point Goals: L.A. Lakers 17-39 (Caldwell-Pope
8-11, Kuzma 4-6, Wear 2-4, Lopez 1-2, Thomas 1-4, Ball
1-12), New Orleans 6-24 (Moore 1-3, Rondo 1-3, Hill 1-3,
Clark 1-3, Holiday 1-4, Miller 1-4, Mirotic 0-2, Davis 0-2).
Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: L.A. Lakers 41 (Ball 13),
New Orleans 42 (Davis 9). Assists: L.A. Lakers 19 (Ball
9), New Orleans 28 (Rondo 10). Total Fouls: L.A. Lakers
20, New Orleans 19. Technicals: Thomas.
Sunday’s game
Semifinal winners
SOUTH REGION
First round
March 15 results
In Dallas
Tennessee 73, Wright State 47
Loyola of Chicago 64, Miami 62
In Boise, Idaho
Kentucky 78, Davidson 73
Buffalo 89, Arizona 68
March 16 results
In Charlotte
Kansas State 69, Creighton 59
UMBC 74, Virginia 54
In Nashville
Cincinnati 68, Georgia State 53
Nevada 87, Texas 83
Second round
Saturday’s results
In Boise, Idaho
Kentucky 95, Buffalo 75
In Dallas
Loyola Chicago 63, Tennessee 62
Sunday’s results
In Charlotte
Kansas State 50, UMBC 43
In Nashville
Nevada 75, Cincinnati 73
REGION SEMIFINALS
Thursday’s results
In Atlanta
Loyola Chicago 69. Nevada 68
Kansas State 61, Kentucky 58
REGION CHAMPIONSHIP
Saturday’s game
Loyola of Chicago vs Kansas State
MIDWEST REGION
First round
March 15 results
In Pittsburgh
Rhode Island 83, Oklahoma 78 (OT)
Duke 89, Iona 67
In Wichita
Kansas 76, Pennsylvania 60
Seton Hall 94, N.C. State 83
March 16 results
In Detroit
Michigan State 82, Bucknell 78
Syracuse 57, TCU 52
In San Diego
Auburn 62, College of Charleston 58
Clemson 79, New Mexico State 68
Second round
Saturday‘s results
In Pittsburgh
Duke 87, Rhode Island 62
In Wichita,
Kansas 83, Seton Hall 79
Sunday‘s results
In Detroit
Syracuse 55, Michigan State 53
In San Diego
Clemson 84, Auburn 53
REGION SEMIFINALS
Friday’s games
In Omaha
Kansas (29-7) vs. Clemson (25-9), 7:07
Duke (28-7) vs. Syracuse (23-13), 9:37
REGION CHAMPIONSHIP
Sunday’s game
Semifinal winners
Rockets 100, Pistons 96 (OT)
DETROIT ........................ 27
HOUSTON ...................... 21
16
27
HOCKEY
23
27
18
23
20
17
8 — 96
12 — 100
DETROIT: S.Johnson 2-4 0-0 5, Griffin 9-22 2-3 21,
Drummond 6-13 5-10 17, Jackson 2-13 0-0 4, Bullock
5-10 0-0 12, Ennis III 2-6 1-3 5, Tolliver 0-2 0-1 0, Smith
8-14 0-0 18, Kennard 6-11 2-2 14. Totals 40-95 10-19 96.
HOUSTON: Ariza 3-11 0-0 9, Tucker 4-11 0-0 10, Capela
5-8 0-2 10, Gordon 8-19 3-4 22, Harden 4-20 13-18 21,
Mbah a Moute 3-4 0-0 7, Anderson 3-6 1-3 7, J.Johnson
4-11 1-1 11, Green 1-9 0-0 3. Totals 35-99 18-28 100.
Three-point Goals: Detroit 6-38 (Smith 2-6, Bullock 2-7,
S.Johnson 1-2, Griffin 1-7, Tolliver 0-2, Ennis III 0-3,
Kennard 0-5), Houston 12-51 (Ariza 3-8, Gordon 3-9,
Tucker 2-7, J.Johnson 2-7, Mbah a Moute 1-2, Green 1-8,
Anderson 0-2, Harden 0-8). Rebounds: Detroit 66 (Drummond 20), Houston 52 (Capela 14). Assists: Detroit 22
(Griffin 10), Houston 19 (Gordon, Harden 5). Total Fouls:
Detroit 17, Houston 19. Technicals: Detroit coach Pistons (Defensive three second), Houston coach Rockets
(Defensive three second), Harden.
Jazz 119, Mavericks 112
UTAH .................................. 37
DALLAS .............................. 34
28
24
31
23
23 — 119
31 — 112
WEST REGION
First round
March 15 results
In Wichita
Houston 67, San Diego State 65
Michigan 61, Montana 47
In Boise, Idaho
Gonzaga 68, UNC Greensboro 64
Ohio State 81, South Dakota State 73
March 16 results
In Charlotte
Texas A&M 73, Providence 69
North Carolina 84, Lipscomb 66
In Nashville
Xavier 102, Texas Southern 83
Florida State 67, Missouri 54
Second round
Saturday’s results
In Boise, Idaho
Gonzaga 90, Ohio State 84
In Wichita
Michigan 64, Houston 63
Sunday‘s results
In Charlotte
Texas A&M 86, North Carolina 65
In Nashville
Florida State 75, Xavier 70
REGION SEMIFINALS
UTAH: Ingles 7-10 1-1 18, Favors 8-14 2-2 19, Gobert 3-4
5-5 11, Rubio 8-14 2-2 22, Mitchell 11-22 3-4 26, Crowder
4-10 2-2 11, O’Neale 2-4 0-0 5, Jerebko 2-4 0-0 5, Exum
1-5 0-0 2. Totals 46-87 15-16 119.
Thursday’s results
In Los Angeles
Michigan 99, Texas A&M 72
Florida State 75, Gonzaga 60
DALLAS: Barnes 8-18 0-0 21, Nowitzki 2-6 0-0 4, Powell
1-5 3-4 5, Barea 9-15 0-0 23, Finney-Smith 2-4 0-0 6,
McDermott 3-4 0-0 7, Kleber 2-3 4-4 9, Mejri 3-4 0-0 6,
Ferrell 8-16 1-1 20, Harrison 2-5 2-3 6, Collinsworth 0-1
1-2 1, Jones 2-4 0-0 4. Totals 42-85 11-14 112.
REGION CHAMPIONSHIP
Three-point Goals: Utah 12-29 (Rubio 4-8, Ingles 3-5,
Jerebko 1-1, Favors 1-2, O’Neale 1-2, Crowder 1-4,
Mitchell 1-6, Exum 0-1), Dallas 17-32 (Barnes 5-6, Barea
5-7, Ferrell 3-6, Finney-Smith 2-3, McDermott 1-1,
Kleber 1-2, Powell 0-1, Harrison 0-2, Nowitzki 0-2, Jones
0-2). Rebounds: Utah 39 (Favors, Gobert 7), Dallas 35
(Finney-Smith, Mejri 5). Assists: Utah 32 (Ingles 10),
Dallas 22 (Barea 8). Total Fouls: Utah 19, Dallas 16.
Saturday’s game
Michigan vs Florida State
FINAL FOUR
In San Antonio
National semifinals
Saturday, March 31
South champion vs. West champion
East champion vs. Midwest champion
National championship
Monday, April 2
Semifinal winners
H I GH S C HOOLS
Loyola Chicago 69,
Nevada 68
NHL
Blue Jackets 4, Panthers 0
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Loyola Chicago (31-5)
Krutwig 4-6 0-0 8, Richardson 4-7 0-0 8, Custer 7-9 0-2
15, Townes 6-10 4-4 18, Ingram 1-3 0-0 2, Jackson 6-11
2-2 15, Williamson 1-4 0-0 3, Skokna 0-2 0-0 0,
Satterwhite 0-0 0-0 0. 29-52 Totals 6-8 69.
FLORIDA .................................. 0
COLUMBUS .............................. 0
METROPOLITAN
Washington ..................
Pittsburgh .....................
Columbus ......................
Philadelphia ..................
New Jersey ...................
Carolina .........................
N.Y. Rangers .................
N.Y. Islanders ...............
W
43
42
42
38
37
32
32
31
L
24
27
28
25
28
31
34
33
OL PTS. GF GA
7
93 230 217
5
89 243 225
5
89 214 206
12
88 226 223
8
82 219 221
11
75 203 237
8
72 214 240
10
72 241 270
ATLANTIC
y-Tampa Bay .................
yBoston .........................
Toronto .........................
Florida ...........................
Detroit ..........................
Montreal .......................
Ottawa ..........................
Buffalo ..........................
W
51
45
44
37
27
26
26
23
L
19
17
23
28
36
36
36
38
OL PTS. GF GA
4 106 271 211
10 100 240 186
7
95 251 210
7
81 219 222
11
65 189 229
12
64 185 237
11
63 201 257
12
58 173 240
Nevada (29-8)
Co.Martin 6-12 4-4 16, Ca.Martin 8-18 0-0 21, Cooke 1-3
0-0 2, Stephens 0-8 0-0 0, Caroline 5-9 7-8 19, Foster 0-0
0-0 0, Hall 4-8 2-2 10, Tooley 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 24-58
13-14 68.
Halftime: Loyola Chicago 28-24. Three-point goals:
Loyola Chicago 5-13 (Townes 2-2, Jackson 1-1, Custer
1-2, Williamson 1-3, Richardson 0-3), Nevada 7-26
(Ca.Martin 5-10, Caroline 2-3, Hall 0-1, Co.Martin 0-2,
Cooke 0-2, Stephens 0-8). Rebounds: Loyola Chicago 27
(Krutwig 5), Nevada 24 (Co.Martin, Caroline 6). Assists:
Loyola Chicago 15 (Townes 5), Nevada 8 (Co.Martin 5).
Total fouls: Loyola Chicago 13, Nevada 13.
Michigan 99, Texas A&M 72
Texas A&M (22-13)
Hogg 3-9 0-0 7, Williams 6-8 0-1 12, T.Davis 11-17 2-3 24,
Starks 2-11 0-0 5, Gilder 5-11 0-0 10, Jasey 0-0 0-0 0,
Trocha-Morelos 2-5 0-0 5, Collins 0-1 0-0 0, Chandler 2-3
3-6 7, Flagg 1-2 0-0 2. 32-67 Totals 5-10 72.
Michigan (31-7)
Wagner 8-12 2-2 21, Livers 1-4 0-0 2, Simpson 5-8 0-0 11,
Abdur-Rahkman 9-16 2-2 24, Matthews 8-11 1-2 18,
A.Davis 1-1 0-0 2, Baird 1-1 0-0 3, Poole 1-1 2-2 5,
Simmons 0-0 0-0 0, Watson 1-4 0-0 3, Robinson 4-5 0-0
10. Totals 39-63 7-8 99.
Halftime: Michigan 52-28. Three-point goals: Texas
A&M 3-15 (Trocha-Morelos 1-2, Starks 1-4, Hogg 1-5),
Michigan 14-24 (Abdur-Rahkman 4-7, Wagner 3-3,
Robinson 2-3, Poole 1-1, Simpson 1-2, Watson 1-3,
Matthews 1-3). Rebounds: Texas A&M 30 (T.Davis 8),
Michigan 27 (Simpson, Abdur-Rahkman, Matthews 5).
Assists: Texas A&M 13 (Hogg 5), Michigan 21 (AbdurRahkman 7). Total fouls: Texas A&M 12, Michigan 15.
Kansas St. (25-11)
Sneed 7-14 3-7 22, Mawien 0-4 0-0 0, Diarra 2-6 0-1 5,
Stokes 2-7 1-1 6, Brown 4-15 4-5 13, Stockard 0-0 2-2 2,
Wade 1-2 2-2 4, Wainright 2-3 2-4 6, McGuirl 1-3 0-0 3.
19-54 Totals 14-22 61.
Kentucky (26-11)
Washington 5-7 8-20 18, Richards 0-0 1-2 1, Knox 5-10
2-2 13, Gilgeous-Alexander 2-10 11-12 15, Diallo 1-4 0-0
2, Gabriel 1-5 1-1 3, Killeya-Jones 0-1 0-0 0, Green 2-5 0-0
6. Totals 16-42 23-37 58.
Halftime: Kansas St. 33-29. Three-point goals: Kansas
St. 9-22 (Sneed 5-8, Diarra 1-2, McGuirl 1-2, Brown 1-4,
Stokes 1-5), Kentucky 3-12 (Green 2-4, Knox 1-3, Diallo
0-1, Gabriel 0-2, Gilgeous-Alexander 0-2). Fouled out:
Sneed, Mawien, Stockard. Rebounds: Kansas St. 27
(Sneed 9), Kentucky 38 (Washington 15). Assists:
Kansas St. 12 (Stokes, Brown 3), Kentucky 6 (GilgeousAlexander 5). Total fouls: Kansas St. 30, Kentucky 22.
Technical fouls: Kentucky coach John Calipari.
Florida State 75, Gonzaga 60
Florida St. (23-11)
Cofer 2-6 3-4 7, Koumadje 1-2 0-0 2, Mann 8-13 2-3 18,
Angola 3-6 2-4 9, C.Walker 3-8 0-0 9, Allen 1-1 0-0 2,
Kabengele 2-3 3-4 7, Obiagu 2-2 0-0 4, Forrest 3-7 1-3 7,
Savoy 2-6 -0 6 M.Walker 0-4 4-4 4,27-58 Totals 15-22 75.
Gonzaga (32-5)
Williams 3-7 2-4 8, Hachimura 5-12 6-8 16, Norvell 4-16
3-6 14, Perkins 3-9 2-2 9, Melson 3-11 1-2 7, Jones 0-0
0-0 0, Kispert 2-3 1-2 6, Larsen 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 20-59
15-24 60.
Halftime: Florida St. 41-32. Three-point goals: Florida
St. 6-20 (C.Walker 3-5, Savoy 2-5, Angola 1-2, Forrest
0-1, Mann 0-2, M.Walker 0-2, Cofer 0-3), Gonzaga 5-20
(Norvell 3-7, Kispert 1-2, Perkins 1-5, Williams 0-1,
Melson 0-5). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Florida St. 35
(Forrest, Obiagu, Angola 6), Gonzaga 36 (Williams 11).
Assists: Florida St. 19 (Forrest 6), Gonzaga 7 (Perkins 4).
Total fouls: Florida St. 22, Gonzaga 16.
National Invitation Tournament
SCHEDULE-RESULTS
First Round
March 13 results
Baylor 80, Wagner 59
Louisville 66, Northern Kentucky 58
Middle Tennessee 91, Vermont 64
Western Kentucky 79, Boston College 62
Oklahoma State 80, Florida Gulf Coast 68
Notre Dame 84, Hampton 63
Oregon 99, Rider 86
Saint Mary’s 89, SE Louisiana 45
Southern Cal 103, UNC Asheville 98 (2OT)
March 14 results
Marquette 67, Harvard 60
LSU 84, Louisiana-Lafayette 76
Penn State 63, Temple 57
Mississippi State 66, Nebraska 59
Utah 69, UC Davis 59
Stanford 86, BYU 83
Washington 77, Boise State 74
Second Round
Saturday’s results
Penn State 73, Notre Dame 63
Sunday’s results
Mississippi State 78, Baylor 77
Marquette 101, Oregon 92
Louisville 84, Middle Tennessee 68
Monday’s results
Oklahoma State 71, Stanford 65
Utah 95, LSU 71
Saint Mary’s 85, Washington 81
Western Kentucky 79, Southern Cal 75
Quarterfinals
Tuesday’s results
Penn State 85, Marquette 80
Mississippi State 79, Louisville 56
Wednesday’s results
Western Kentucky 92, Oklahoma State 84
Utah 67, Saint Mary’s 58 (OT)
Semifinals
In New York
Tuesday’s games
Western Kentucky (27-10) vs. Utah (22-11), 7
Penn State (24-13) vs. Mississippi State (25-11), 9:30
Championship
Thursday, March 29
Semifinal winners, 7
NCAA women’s tournament
SCHEDULE-RESULTS
ALBANY REGION
Second round
Sunday, March 18
In Columbia, S.C.
South Carolina 66, Virginia 56
Monday, March 19
In Storrs, Conn.
UConn 71, Quinnipiac 46
In Athens, Ga.
Duke 66, Georgia 40
In Tallahassee
Buffalo 86, Florida State 65
REGION SEMIFINALS
Saturday, March 24
In Albany, N.Y.
South Carolina (28-6) vs. Buffalo (29-5), 11:30 a.m.
UConn (34-0) vs. Duke (24-8), 2
SPOKANE REGION
Second round
Sunday, March 18
In South Bend, Ind.
Notre Dame 98, Villanova 72
In College Station, Tex.
Texas A&M 80, DePaul 79
In Eugene, Ore.
Oregon 101, Minnesota 73
Monday, March 19
In Columbus, Ohio
Central Michigan 95, Ohio State 78
REGION SEMIFINALS
Saturday, March 24
In Spokane, Wash.
Notre Dame (31-3) vs. Texas A&M (26-9), 4
Oregon (32-4) vs. Central Michigan (30-4), 6:30
KANSAS CITY REGION
Second round
Sunday, March 18
In Raleigh, N.C.
N.C. State 74, Maryland 60
Monday, March 19
In Starkville, Miss.
Mississippi State 71, Oklahoma State 56
In Los Angeles
UCLA 86, Creighton 64
In Austin
Texas 85, Arizona State 65
Scoring: 1, Columbus, Atkinson 18 (Panarin), 0:59. 2,
Columbus, Milano 13 (Dubois, Calvert), 3:20. 3, Columbus, Jones 15 (Atkinson, Dubois), 5:42 (pp).
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Columbus, Vanek 21, 17:35.
SHOTS ON GOAL
FLORIDA ................................ 14
5
14 — 33
COLUMBUS ............................ 11
11
11 — 33
Power-play opportunities: Florida 0 of 4; Columbus 1 of
3. Goalies: Florida, Luongo 15-10-2 (32 shots-29 saves).
Columbus, Bobrovsky 34-21-5 (33-33). A: 16,919
(18,500). T: 2:30.
Girls’ soccer
Madison is ranked fifth in Region I in USA Today’s first
Super 25 rankings. . . . Oakton started the season with a
bang, knocking off defending 6A state champion Yorktown, 2-1. . . . With new Coach Hannah Laman-Maharg,
Yorktown rebounded from the Oakton loss with wins
over Wakefield and Stuart. . . . Emilene Parham scored
two goals and Ana Elson scored one in Battlefield's win
over Colonial Forge. . . . T.C. Williams beat Stuart, Falls
Church and Faith Christian by a combined score of 19-0.
. . . Briar Woods made a statement with a 4-0 seasonopening win over Broad Run. . . . George Mason, winner
of 10 straight state titles, fell to Dominion, 2-1, to start
the season. (All records are from 2017.)
CENTRAL
y-Nashville ....................
Winnipeg ......................
Minnesota .....................
Colorado ........................
St. Louis ........................
Dallas ............................
Chicago .........................
W
48
44
41
40
40
38
30
L
15
19
24
26
28
28
36
OL PTS. GF GA
10 106 238 183
10
98 242 190
8
90 227 210
8
88 237 217
5
85 203 194
8
84 212 201
9
69 211 233
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Vancouver, Edler 4 (Leipsic, H.Sedin), 7:11. 2,
Chicago, Schmaltz 21 (Kane, Seabrook), 8:02. 3, Vancouver, H.Sedin 3 (Gagner, D.Sedin), 17:42.
THE TOP 10
PACIFIC
x-Vegas .........................
x-San Jose ....................
Los Angeles ..................
Anaheim .......................
Calgary ..........................
Edmonton .....................
Vancouver .....................
Arizona .........................
W
47
41
41
38
35
33
26
25
L
21
23
27
24
30
36
39
38
OL PTS. GF GA
5
99 248 200
9
91 225 201
7
89 219 187
12
88 210 197
10
80 204 226
5
71 214 236
9
61 192 242
11
61 184 237
THIRD PERIOD
Canucks 5, Blackhawks 2
VANCOUVER ........................... 2
CHICAGO .................................. 1
WESTERN CONFERENCE
x-late game, y-clinched playoff spot
Pittsburgh 5, Montreal 3
Arizona 4, Buffalo 1
St. Louis 2, Boston 1 (OT)
Anaheim 4, Calgary 0
1 —
1 —
5
2
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Vancouver, Horvat 20 (Stecher, Goldobin),
6:59. 5, Vancouver, Edler 5 (Goldobin, Horvat), 9:38.
Scoring: 6, Vancouver, Sutter 8 (Del Zotto, Archibald),
3:24. 7, Chicago, Highmore 2 (Saad), 16:27.
SHOTS ON GOAL
VANCOUVER ......................... 10
12
5 — 27
CHICAGO ................................ 13
12
16 — 41
Power-play opportunities: Vancouver 0 of 1; Chicago 0 of
4. Goalies: Vancouver, Markstrom 18-26-6 (41 shots-39
saves). Chicago, Forsberg 9-16-3 (9-8), Berube 2-4-1
(18-14).
Kings 7, Avalanche 1
LOS ANGELES .......................... 3
COLORADO .............................. 1
2
0
2 —
0 —
7
1
FIRST PERIOD
THURSDAY’S RESULTS
Scoring: 1, Colorado, Rantanen 27 (MacKinnon,
Landeskog), 3:33. 2, Los Angeles, Kopitar 30 (Brown),
4:28. 3, Los Angeles, Muzzin 7 (Thompson, Toffoli), 7:54.
4, Los Angeles, Kopitar 31 (Muzzin, Brown), 19:44 (pp).
Philadelphia 4, N.Y. Rangers 3
Carolina 6, Arizona 5
Columbus 4, Florida 0
Tampa Bay 7, N.Y. Islanders 6
Washington 1, Detroit 0
Edmonton 6, Ottawa 2
Toronto 5, Nashville 2
Vancouver 5, Chicago 2
Los Angeles 7, Colorado 1
Vegas at San Jose, Late
SECOND PERIOD
SHOTS ON GOAL
LOS ANGELES ........................ 15
13
7 — 35
COLORADO .............................. 9
11
10 — 30
Power-play opportunities: Los Angeles 1 of 2; Colorado 0
of 3. Goalies: Los Angeles, Quick 29-26-2 (30 shots-29
saves). Colorado, Varlamov 22-14-6 (20-15), Bernier
18-11-2 (15-13).
Rank
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Team
Oakton
Briar Woods
Washington-Lee
Langley
W.T. Woodson
Park View
Forest Park
Robinson
Battlefield
Riverside
Record
13-5-1
14-6-4
11-3-3
19-1-2
8-3-4
16-4-1
14-4-1
7-4
13-6-3
21-0-2
ATP/WTA
MIAMI OPEN
At Tennis Center at Crandon Park
In Key Biscayne, Fla.
Purse: Men, $8.9 million (Masters 1000)
Women, $7.97 million (Premier)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
MEN’S SINGLES
FIRST ROUND
Vegas at Colorado, 3
Calgary at San Jose, 4
Chicago at N.Y. Islanders, 7
Buffalo at N.Y. Rangers, 7
Detroit at Toronto, 7
Arizona at Florida, 7
Tampa Bay at New Jersey, 7
Washington at Montreal, 7
Carolina at Ottawa, 7
St. Louis at Columbus, 7
Nashville at Minnesota, 8
Los Angeles at Edmonton, 10
Ducks 4, Flames 0
Late Wednesday
ANAHEIM ................................ 1
CALGARY ................................. 0
2
0
1 —
0 —
4
0
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Anaheim, Cogliano 8, 12:51 (sh).
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Anaheim, Kase 18 (Henrique, Beauchemin),
8:58. 3, Anaheim, Lindholm 11 (Rakell, Getzlaf), 18:55.
SUNDAY’S GAMES
THIRD PERIOD
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 12:30
Nashville at Winnipeg, 7
Vancouver at Dallas, 7
Boston at Minnesota, 7:30
Anaheim at Edmonton, 9:30
Scoring: 4, Anaheim, Beauchemin 3 (Perry, Getzlaf),
17:31.
SHOTS ON GOAL
Flyers 4, Rangers 3
1
2
1 —
1 —
3
4
ANAHEIM ................................ 5
6
5 — 16
CALGARY ............................... 11
12
6 — 29
Power-play opportunities: Anaheim 0 of 1; Calgary 0 of 2.
Goalies: Anaheim, Gibson 29-17-6 (29 shots-29 saves).
Calgary, Rittich 8-5-3 (5-4), Smith 24-21-6 (11-8). A:
19,059 (19,289). T: 2:23.
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Philadelphia, Konecny 21 (Giroux, MacDonald), 7:56. 2, N.Y. Rangers, Zibanejad 26 (Fast, Pionk),
13:53.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Philadelphia, Voracek 19 (Sanheim, Giroux),
3:46. 4, Philadelphia, Konecny 22 (Gudas, Giroux), 8:38.
5, N.Y. Rangers, Fast 12 (Kreider, Sproul), 17:03.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 6, Philadelphia, Lindblom 2 (Patrick, MacDonald), 0:08. 7, N.Y. Rangers, Fast 13 (O’Gara, Gilmour),
1:28.
SHOTS ON GOAL
N.Y. RANGERS ......................... 8
15
13 — 36
PHILADELPHIA ...................... 15
10
11 — 36
Power-play opportunities: N.Y. Rangers 0 of 2; Philadelphia 0 of 2. Goalies: N.Y. Rangers, Georgiev 3-3-1 (36
shots-32 saves). Philadelphia, Lyon 4-2-1 (36-33). A:
19,584 (19,543). T: 2:25.
B AS E BALL
MLB spring training
TODAY’S RESULTS
N.Y. Mets 12, Washington 5
N.Y. Yankees 2, Minnesota 1
Baltimore 10, Boston 7
Miami 15, Houston 7
Detroit 6, Philadelphia 2
St. Louis 8, Atlanta 2
Tampa Bay 5, Toronto (1) 3
Milwaukee 1, Kansas City 0
San Diego 7, Cleveland 6
Colorado vs. Oackland, Late
Toronto (2) 5, Pittsburgh 4
Cincinnati vs. Texas (1), Late
Texas (2) vs. Seattle, Late
Chicago White Sox vs. Arizona, Late
L.A. Angels vs. L.A. Dodgers, Late
Chicago Cubs vs. San Francisco, Late
1
0
4 —
2 —
6
2
Mets 12, Nationals 5
FIRST PERIOD
WASHINGTON AB R H BI NEW YORK
Scoring: 1, Edmonton, Caggiula 11 (Aberg, Nurse), 8:23.
A.Eaton lf
Kieboom ph
Kendrick 1b
Dominguez 3b
A.Rendon 3b
A.d Aza lf
Wieters c
Severino c
M.Taylor cf
R.Raburn rf
Brignac ss
T.Roark sp
Stevenson lf
Wi.Difo 2b
M.Sierra rf
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Edmonton, McDavid 35 (Rattie, Nugent-Hopkins), 5:10.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Ottawa, Duchene 23 (Chabot, Ceci), 4:43 (pp).
4, Edmonton, Nugent-Hopkins 21 (McDavid), 4:51. 5,
Edmonton, Rattie 3 (McDavid, Nurse), 5:29. 6, Edmonton, Caggiula 12 (Lucic, Aberg), 6:34 (pp). 7, Ottawa,
Chlapik 1 (Gaborik, Ryan), 14:23. 8, Edmonton, McDavid
36 (Nugent-Hopkins, Nurse), 16:40.
SHOTS ON GOAL
EDMONTON ........................... 18
8
12 — 38
OTTAWA .................................. 9
13
13 — 35
Power-play opportunities: Edmonton 1 of 5; Ottawa 1 of
2. Goalies: Edmonton, Talbot 28-27-2 (35 shots-33
saves). Ottawa, Anderson 21-22-6 (38-32). A: 16,538
(18,572). T: 2:31.
Lightning 7, Islanders 6
4
2
0 —
3 —
7
6
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Tampa Bay, Cirelli 3 (Coburn, Gourde), 2:09. 2,
Tampa Bay, Johnson 21 (Sergachev, Kunitz), 2:35. 3,
N.Y. Islanders, Pulock 8 (Tavares, Eberle), 10:24 (pp). 4,
Tampa Bay, Hedman 14 (Palat, Point), 14:17.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 5, Tampa Bay, Point 28 (Cirelli, McDonagh), 2:43
(sh). 6, N.Y. Islanders, Pulock 9 (Eberle, Beauvillier),
3:20 (pp). 7, N.Y. Islanders, Lee 37 (Bailey), 5:15. 8,
Tampa Bay, Miller 19 (Coburn, Stamkos), 8:27. 9, Tampa
Bay, Sergachev 9 (Point, Gourde), 11:22 (pp). 10, Tampa
Bay, Miller 20 (Hedman, Kucherov), 18:20 (pp).
TOTALS
3
2
4
1
4
1
4
1
4
4
3
2
2
3
1
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
1
1
1
2
0
1
0
2
1
0
1
0
1
0
39 5 12
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
AB R H BI
B.Nimmo cf
Cespedes lf
C.Stuart lf
J.Bruce rf
Jo.Mora rf
Frazier 3b
L.Crpio 3b
Cabrera 2b
And.Ely 2b
Gonzalez 1b
Rosario ss
To.Nido c
Plawecki c
Se.Lugo rp
P.Evans ph
5 TOTALS
WASHINGTON
NEW YORK
230
000
5
3
1
2
2
3
1
4
1
4
3
3
1
3
1
2
2
0
2
0
2
0
0
0
1
1
1
0
1
0
3
3
0
1
0
2
0
0
0
2
1
2
0
1
0
1
4
0
2
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
2
0
37 12 15 12
000
903
000
00X
—
—
WASHINGTON
IP
H
R
ER
BB
SO
Roark (L, 0-3)
Collins
Kelley
Doolittle
Solis
3 .2
1 .1
1
1
1
9
1
4
1
0
9
0
3
0
0
9
0
3
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
2
1
2
3
NEW YORK
IP
H
R
ER
BB
SO
Wheeler
Lugo (W, 1-2)
Sewald
Rhame
Gsellman
2
4
1
1
1
7
2
1
0
2
5
0
0
0
0
3
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
3
5
0
1
0
HBP: by_Collins (Frazier), Roark (Rosario).
Umpires: Home, Chris Segal; First, Larry Vanover;
Second, Gary Cederstrom; Third, Mike Estabrook.
T: 2:41. A: 6,733
THIRD PERIOD
SOCCER
MLS
SHOTS ON GOAL
TAMPA BAY .......................... 16
10
10 — 36
N.Y. ISLANDERS .................... 11
16
14 — 41
Power-play opportunities: Tampa Bay 2 of 4; N.Y.
Islanders 3 of 5. Goalies: Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 41-14-3
(41 shots-35 saves). N.Y. Islanders, Halak 18-24-6
(12-11), Gibson 2-1-2 (24-18).
Hurricanes 6, Coyotes 5
3
2
0 —
2 —
5
6
EASTERN
W
New York City FC .............3
Columbus .........................2
Atlanta United FC ............2
Philadelphia .....................1
New York .........................1
Montreal ..........................1
New England ....................1
D.C. United .......................0
Orlando City .....................0
Chicago ............................0
Toronto FC .......................0
L
0
0
1
0
1
2
1
1
2
2
2
T PTS
0
9
1
7
0
6
1
4
0
3
0
3
0
3
2
2
1
1
0
0
0
0
GF
6
5
7
2
4
4
2
4
2
4
0
GA
1
2
6
0
1
5
3
6
5
6
3
L
0
1
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
1
2
2
T PTS
0
6
0
6
0
6
0
6
1
4
1
4
1
4
0
3
0
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
GF
6
6
7
5
7
4
3
5
3
1
0
1
GA
1
5
7
6
4
1
6
5
3
2
4
6
Friday, March 23
In Kansas City, Mo.
N.C. State (26-8) vs. Mississippi State (34-1), 6:30
UCLA (26-7) vs. Texas (28-6), 9
Scoring: 1, Carolina, Skinner 21 (Di Giuseppe, Lindholm),
0:48. 2, Carolina, Zykov 1 (Aho, Slavin), 4:55. 3, Arizona,
Goligoski 10 (Richardson), 8:27. 4, Arizona, Keller 21
(Stepan, Hjalmarsson), 19:38.
LEXINGTON REGION
SECOND PERIOD
Second round
Sunday, March 18
In Louisville
Louisville 90, Marquette 72
In Knoxville, Tenn.
Oregon State 66, Tennessee 59
In Waco, Tex.
Baylor 80, Michigan 58
Monday, March 19
In Stanford, Calif.
Stanford 90, Florida Gulf Coast 70
Scoring: 5, Carolina, Di Giuseppe 3 (Skinner, Lindholm),
1:40. 6, Arizona, Archibald 5 (Domi), 4:27. 7, Arizona,
Cousins 12 (Strome, Fischer), 5:45. 8, Carolina, Teravainen 23 (van Riemsdyk, Aho), 14:56. 9, Arizona, Goligoski
11 (Keller, Stepan), 19:49 (pp).
WESTERN
W
Los Angeles FC ................2
Minnesota United ............2
Sporting KC ......................2
Vancouver ........................2
Houston ...........................1
Dallas ...............................1
Real Salt Lake ..................1
San Jose ...........................1
LA Galaxy .........................1
Colorado ...........................0
Seattle .............................0
Portland ...........................0
THIRD PERIOD
SATURDAY’S MATCHES
Scoring: 10, Carolina, Zykov 2 (Teravainen, Slavin), 9:46.
11, Carolina, Skinner 22 (Di Giuseppe, Slavin), 18:02.
New York City FC at New England, 1:30
Portland at Dallas, 3:30
D.C. United at Columbus, 6
Minnesota United at New York, 7
Sporting KC at Colorado, 9
LA Galaxy at Vancouver, 10
SHOTS ON GOAL
ARIZONA ............................... 10
13
10 — 33
CAROLINA ............................... 8
12
10 — 30
Power-play opportunities: Arizona 1 of 3; Carolina 0 of 1.
Goalies: Arizona, Kuemper 12-5-4 (30 shots-24 saves).
Carolina, Ward 20-13-4 (33-28). A: 10,535 (18,680). T:
2:36.
FRIDAY, MARCH 30
Real Salt Lake at Toronto FC, 8
WOMEN’S SINGLES
SECOND ROUND
Agnieszka Radwanska (30), Poland, def. Alison Van
Uytvanck, Belgium, 6-3, 7-6 (7-4); Anastasija Sevastova
(20), Latvia, def. Alize Cornet, France, 7-5, 6-4; Christina
McHale, United States, def. Barbora Strycova (25),
Czech Republic, 6-1, 6-4; Karolina Pliskova (5), Czech
Republic, def. Ekaterina Makarova, Russia, 7-5, 7-5;
Angelique Kerber (10), Germany, def. Johanna Larsson,
Sweden, 6-2, 6-2; Monica Niculescu, Romania, def.
Magdalena Rybarikova (17), Slovakia, 6-3, 6-3; Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (23), Russia, def. Aliaksandra Sasnovich, Belarus, 6-2, 3-6, 6-2; Simona Halep (1), Romania, def. Oceane Dodin, France, 3-6, 6-3, 7-5; Carina
Witthoeft, Germany, def. Julia Goerges (12), Germany,
7-6 (7-2), 4-6, 6-4; Sloane Stephens (13), United States,
def. Ajla Tomljanovic, Australia, 6-1, 6-3; Alison Riske,
United States, def. Caroline Garcia (7), France, 6-3, 6-1;
Zarina Diyas, Kazakhstan, def. Svetlana Kuznetsova
(18), Russia, 6-1, 6-3; Su-Wei Hsieh, Taiwan, def. Sorana
Cirstea (32), Romania, 7-5, 6-2; Yafan Wang, China, def.
Carla Suarez Navarro (27), Spain, 7-5, 6-3; Victoria
Azarenka, Belarus, def. Madison Keys (14), United
States, 7-6 (7-5), 2-0 retired.
Henri Kontinen, Finland, and John Peers (2), Australia,
def. Robin Haase and Matwe Middelkoop, Netherlands,
6-3, 3-6, 10-6; Alexander and Mischa Zverev, Germany,
def. Santiago Gonzalez, Mexico, and Fernando Verdasco,
Spain, 6-4, 6-3; Nikola Mektic, Croatia, and Alexander
Peya, Austria, def. Novak Djokovic and Viktor Troicki,
Serbia, 4-6, 7-5, 10-3; John Isner and Donald Young,
United States, def. Kyle Edmund, Britain, and Nenad
Zimonjic, Serbia, 6-4, 7-6 (7-1); Karen Khachanov and
Andrey Rublev, Russia, def. Fabrice Martin, France, and
Franko Skugor, Croatia, 6-7 (7-2), 6-3, 15-13.
WOMEN’S DOUBLES
FIRST ROUND
Johanna Konta and Heather Watson, Britain, def. Nicole
Melichar, United States, and Kveta Peschke, Czech
Republic, 6-2, 4-6, 10-3; Ashleigh Barty, Australia and
CoCo Vandeweghe, United States, def. Timea Babos,
Hungary, and Kristina Mladenovic (4), France, 3-6, 6-2,
10-4; Lyudmyla Kichenok, Ukraine, and Alla Kudryavtseva, Russia, def. Kirsten Flipkens, Belgium, and Nina
Stojanovic, Serbia, 6-4, 6-4; Barbora Krejcikova and
Katerina Siniakova (6), Czech Republic, def. Daria
Kasatkina and Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, Russia, 6-3,
6-3.
5
12
E: Nimmo (1), Frazier (3), Rosario (1). DP: Washington 2,
New York 1. LOB: Washington 8, New York 5. 2B: Rendon
(3), Roark (1), Nimmo 2 (6), Cespedes (1), Rosario (4).
HR: Cespedes 2 (5), Bruce (2), Frazier (2). SB: Rosario
(1). SF: Cespedes (1).
Scoring: 11, N.Y. Islanders, Lee 38 (Bailey, Tavares), 1:35
(pp). 12, N.Y. Islanders, Beauvillier 15 (Eberle), 3:21. 13,
N.Y. Islanders, Beauvillier 16 (Boychuk, Barzal), 4:36.
Denis Shapovalov, Canada, def. Viktor Troicki, Serbia,
6-3, 6-7 (7-4), 7-6 (8-6); Yoshihito Nishioka, Japan, def.
Alex de Minaur, Australia, 6-2, 6-4; Nicola Kuhn, Spain,
def. Darian King, Barbados, 7-6 (7-4), 6-4; Leonardo
Mayer, Argentina, def. Donald Young, United States,
3-6, 6-4, 6-2; Evgeny Donskoy, Russia, def. Aljaz Bedene,
Slovenia, 7-5, 6-4; Nikoloz Basilashvili, Georgia, def.
Thomas Fabbiano, Italy, 1-6, 6-2, 7-5; Guillermo GarciaLopez, Spain, def. Tennys Sandgren, United States, 7-6
(7-3), 7-6 (6); Daniil Medvedev, Russia, def. Stefanos
Tsitsipas, Greece, 2-6, 6-4, 6-2; Yuki Bhambri, India, def.
Mirza Basic, Bosnia and Herzegovina, 7-5, 6-3; Dusan
Lajovic, Serbia, def. Horacio Zeballos, Argentina, 3-6, 7-6
(7-2), 6-4; Steve Johnson, United States, def. Victor
Estrella Burgos, Dominican Republic, 6-3, 6-3; Radu
Albot, Moldova, def. Ricardas Berankis, Lithuania, 6-1,
4-6, 7-6 (4); Denis Istomin, Uzbekistan, def. Miomir
Kecmanovic, Serbia, 7-5, 6-4; Thanasi Kokkinakis, Australia, def. Calvin Hemery, France, 6-1, 6-2; Marius Copil,
Romania, def. Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, 7-6 (7-2),
6-4.
MEN’S DOUBLES
FIRST ROUND
Oilers 6, Senators 2
ARIZONA ................................. 2
CAROLINA ............................... 2
Midfielder Bryan Silver, a Notre Dame commit, leads an
experienced Oakton team eager to make it to the state
playoffs. . . . Briar Woods Coach Francois Bernard
returns 16 contributors from a team that won the first
state title in school history. . . . Langley lost a lot of
firepower from last year’s 6A state title squad, but
Coach Bo Amato’s team is one of the most consistent in
the area at regrouping and rebuilding year after year. . . .
After a strong freshman season, forward Elton Quintanilla is back to lead Park View. . . . Forest Park should
have a dangerous attack with William & Mary commit
Johnny Eberle at the center. . . . South Lakes is returning
seven starters this season, including Division I commits
Kahlil Dover and Bardia Kimivia. . . . Riverside, the
defending 3A state champion, will look to establish
itself again as the best team in Loudoun County.
TE NNI S
Scoring: 7, Los Angeles, Kopitar 33, 3:28. 8, Los Angeles,
Rieder 11 (Folin, Carter), 9:31.
SATURDAY’S GAMES
TAMPA BAY ............................ 3
N.Y. ISLANDERS ...................... 1
Record
15-5
10-3-2
17-3-2
19-1
13-6-3
13-3-3
16-4-4
8-8-4
8-9
21-2-1
Boys’ soccer
THIRD PERIOD
Montreal at Buffalo, 7
New Jersey at Pittsburgh, 7
Anaheim at Winnipeg, 8
Vancouver at St. Louis, 8
Boston at Dallas, 8:30
EDMONTON ............................. 1
OTTAWA .................................. 0
Team
Madison
Oakton
Yorktown
Battlefield
T.C. Williams
W.T. Woodson
Briar Woods
Chantilly
Tuscarora
George Mason
Scoring: 5, Los Angeles, Rieder 10 (Doughty, Quick),
0:47. 6, Los Angeles, Kopitar 32 (Thompson, Forbort),
12:27.
FRIDAY’S GAMES
N.Y. RANGERS ......................... 1
PHILADELPHIA ........................ 1
2
0
FIRST PERIOD
Friday, March 23
In Lexington, Ky.
Oregon State (25-7) vs. Baylor (33-1), 6:30
Louisville (34-2) vs. Stanford (24-10), 9
0
4
SECOND PERIOD
REGION SEMIFINALS
REGION SEMIFINALS
THE TOP 10
0 —
1 —
Rank
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
Kansas State 61, Kentucky 58
0
3
GOLF
World Golf Championships
MATCH PLAY
At Austin Country Club
Yardage: 7,108. Par: 71
First Round
(Seedings in parentheses)
Pat Perez (15), United States, halved with Si Woo Kim
(50), South Korea.
Gary Woodland (24), United States, halved with Webb
Simpson (37), United States.
Justin Thomas (2), United States, def. Luke List (60),
United States, 2 up.
Francesco Molinari (21), Italy, def. Patton Kizzire (48),
United States, 3 and 1.
Tyrrell Hatton (12), England, def. Alexander Levy (55),
France, 3 and 2.
Brendan Steele (36), United States, def. Charley Hoffman (22), United States, 1 up.
Hideki Matsuyama (5), Japan, def. Yusaku Miyazato
(53), Japan, 2 and 1.
Cameron Smith (46), Australia, def. Patrick Cantlay
(30), United States, 2 up.
Alex Noren (13), Sweden, def. Kevin Na (61), United
States, 4 and 2.
Tony Finau (29), United States, def. Thomas Pieters
(39), Belgium, 2 and 1.
Jordan Spieth (4), United States, def. Charl Schwartzel
(49), South Africa, 2 and 1.
Patrick Reed (19), United States, def. Li Haotong (34),
China, 3 and 2.
Ian Poulter (58), England, def. Tommy Fleetwood (9),
England, 3 and 2.
Kevin Chappell (33), United States, def. Daniel Berger
(26), United States, 3 and 2.
Jason Day (8), Australia, def. James Hahn (56,) United
States, 4 and 2.
Louis Oosthuizen (25), South Africa, def. Jason Dufner
(42), United States, 1 up.
Matt Kuchar (16), United States, halved with Zach
Johnson (54), United States.
Yuta Ikeda (47), Japan, def. Ross Fisher (27), England, 2
and 1.
Bernd Wiesberger (52), Austria, def. Dustin Johnson (1),
United States, 3 and 1.
Kevin Kisner (32), United States, halved with Adam
Hadwin (38), Canada.
Julian Suri (64), United States, def. Marc Leishman (11),
Australia, 3 and 2.
Bubba Watson (35), United States, def. Branden Grace
(23), South Africa, 5 and 3.
Peter Uihlein (57), United States, def. Rory McIlroy (6),
Northern Ireland, 2 and 1.
Brian Harman (18), United States, halved with Jhonattan Vegas (44), Venezuela.
Charles Howell III (59), United States, def. Phil Mickelson (14), United States, 3 and 2.
Jon Rahm (3), Spain, halved with Keegan Bradley (63),
United States.
Kiradech Aphibarnrat (28), Thailand, def. Chez Reavie
(43), United States, 3 and 2.
Paul Casey (10), England, def. Russell Henley (51),
United States, 1 up.
Kyle Stanley (45), United States, def. Matt Fitzpatrick
(31), United States, 1 up.
Sergio Garcia (7), Spain, def. Shubhankar Sharma (62),
India, 1 up.
FRIDAY, MARCH 23 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D7
SU
ncaa tournament
A classic rivalry, from junior high to the Sweet 16
Villanova’s Brunson and West Virginia’s Carter go way back, and now they will go at it once more in a quest for a national championship
BY
R OMAN S TUBBS
boston — West Virginia Coach
Bob Huggins had picked up a large
coffee and was still trying to wake
up when he discovered Jevon
Carter at an AAU tournament in
Orlando a few years ago. It was an
8 a.m. game on the farthest court
in a sprawling gym, and Carter, a
lightly recruited point guard from
Illinois, was the only player pressing full-court on defense. Huggins
immediately called an assistant
and demanded that they sign him.
Carter played an anti-AAU
style, and if anyone on the circuit
knew how relentless he was, it was
Jalen Brunson. They were scrappy
prospects on the same AAU team
in suburban Chicago in eighth and
ninth grade when the older Carter
would hound Brunson at every
turn in practice.
“He was definitely a guy that
picked on me,” Brunson said.
Carter would go on to sign with
Huggins and the Mountaineers
and become one of the best defenders in college basketball, embodying his program’s nickname,
“Press Virginia.” Brunson grew
from those early lessons and became a five-star recruit who
signed with Villanova, where in
three years he has become one of
the most intelligent and crafty
point guards in the country.
When the top-seeded Wildcats
and fifth-seeded Mountaineers
meet Friday in the East Region
semifinals at TD Garden, they will
be the faces of contrasting styles:
Brunson, the Big East player of the
year, steers the country’s most efficient offense, while Carter, the
two-time Big 12 defensive player of
the year, drives a full-court pressure defense that is fully capable of
stopping it.
“He’s a great player. He’s been
similar [to] back then in those
days,” Brunson said of Carter.
“He’s very smart. He’s crafty. He
knows how to use his body well,”
Carter said of Brunson.
They reminisced about each
other in opposite locker rooms
before their respective practices
Thursday, talking about their
teenage years together, but both
did their best to deflect talk about
their individual matchup in Friday’s game. Carter compared the
Wildcats to Kansas because both
have a stable of guards. Brunson
touched on the Mountaineers’
depth and ability to pressure the
ball for 40 minutes; at one point he
even changed the subject to the
sartorial contrasts of the teams’
coaches: Villanova’s Jay Wright
wears custom-tailored suits, while
Huggins prefers baggy pullovers.
“They have two unique styles. I
think they have a very good chance
of winning in their own bracket.
JUSTIN K. ALLER/GETTY IMAGES
ABOVE: Villanova’s Jalen Brunson leads the most efficient offense in the country, according to KenPom.com’s statistical ratings.
BELOW: West Virginia’s Jevon Carter, the two-time Big 12 defensive player of the year, leads the nation this season with 108 steals.
JAKE ROTH/USA TODAY SPORTS
Coach [Wright] is over here;
Coach Huggins over there,”
Brunson said with a grin. “Definitely unique.”
So are the lean, left-handed
Brunson and the stocky, righthanded Carter. Their style of offensive play is different —
Brunson plays more in the post
and is more of a natural scorer.
“He knows about angles and stuff,”
Carter said. Carter’s offensive development took longer and relies
on his penetrating ability and
step-back jumper, but both are
hard-nosed players who are elite
on different ends of the floor.
Villanova’s offensive efficiency
is 127.6 points per 100 possessions,
the highest rate in the country,
according to analytics site KenPom.com; it continued to display
both its balance and its prolific
three-point shooting ability in
wins over Radford and Alabama
during the first two rounds of the
tournament. The Wildcats hit
31 three-pointers over those
games, including 17 in the victory
over Alabama, when Brunson
overcame early foul trouble and
helped junior Mikal Bridges spark
a second-half blowout to advance
to the Sweet 16.
They waited more than
24 hours for their opponent. After
West Virginia easily took care of
in-state rival Marshall in the second round behind Carter’s
28 points, five assists, four rebounds and five steals, the Wildcats knew they would be facing
one of their most difficult defensive challenges of the season.
But while Brunson is not as decorated a defender as Carter, who
leads the country with 108 steals,
he is comparable in how hard he
plays and how integral his leadership is to his team, which is pushing for its second national championship in three years.
“We know they’re a great team
with a great leader in Jevon, but
it’s just not him. The whole team
has great pieces,” Brunson said.
Brunson played just two years
of AAU basketball with Carter,
who is a year older, but that was
enough to help prepare him for his
standout high school career. They
would go at each other during
practices and hang out together
off the court as much as possible
when they played on the road,
Brunson said, learning as much as
they could from one another without knowing that years later their
paths would cross again in the
Sweet 16 in Boston.
“There were days I made him
better. There were days he made
me better,” Brunson said. “It’s just
great to have someone like that at
such a young age to make you
better.”
roman.stubbs@washpost.com
Secret to buzzer-beaters, especially on biggest of stages, is all in (mental) release
The combination
of gathered
tension and free
unwinding makes
the buzzer-beater
such an
Sally
interesting shot
Jenkins
to replay. Take
Loyola Chicago’s
Marques Townes, with that
dodging ball move with six
seconds left, then a rise in the
air to ruffle the net calmly from
deep in the corner as if he was
dropping the ball off on the way
to dinner. Nothing special about
the shot at all — except the time
on the clock and the way it
ended, sending his team so
improbably forward in the
NCAA tournament.
Shot doctor Ben Sullivan
collects buzzer-beaters. Every
time somebody hits a gamewinner in the final seconds, the
Atlanta Hawks assistant coach
goes to the tape and dissects it
frame by frame. Sullivan, who is
renowned for upping the
percentages of players such as
Kent Bazemore, says there are
common characteristics to
buzzer-beaters, even the ones
that look desperate, such as that
split-legged jumping jacker that
Michigan freshman Jordan
Poole sank to beat Houston and
carry his team to the Sweet 16.
“If you freeze the tape, the
split-second they are actually
shooting, their body is on
balance and their eyes are on
target,” Sullivan said. “Their
eyes are at rim; they can see it.
They get themselves on balance
for just long enough to shoot it.”
The analytics folks always are
debating whether there is such a
thing as clutch. Clutch-deniers
argue that athletes tend to
perform statistically at about
the same level in regular
situations as they do under
pressure and that we
overemphasize the last shot. So
what? That entirely misses the
point. Clutch describes a set of
stresses that simply don’t exist
earlier in the game. It’s well
worth examining and even
anatomizing how people can
manage to make their arms and
legs work in the most important
moment, with stakes and
pressures at their highest.
A buzzer-beater is a marriage
of mechanics and mind-set,
both of which can be taught and
even imported by us
commoners. Young ballplayers
seem to be realizing this and
increasingly practicing their
minds as much as their bodies,
employing cognitive training
along with 1,000 shots or weight
training.
“I consider the vast majority
of what I do to be mental,”
Sullivan said.
Sports psychologist Graham
Betchart, founder of a company
called Lucid, has been teaching
the buzzer-beater state of mind
to young ballplayers for some
years now, building a stable of
clients that includes Tyus Battle
of Syracuse, as well as various
NBAers such as Jaylen Brown,
Marcus Smart, Ben Simmons,
Karl-Anthony Towns and Aaron
Gordon. Betchart uses a variety
of cognitive techniques,
including yoga and meditation,
to attain “presence,” that alert
but restful state, a less woo-woo
term for concentration. The
player who makes a buzzerbeater, he contends, is not “preliving or reliving”; rather, he has
been trained to de-escalate the
event and take his mind off
results, the thinky state that can
DAVID GOLDMAN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Marques Townes stepped to his left before launching a threepointer with six seconds left that lifted Loyola Chicago to a win.
freeze a player with a fear of
consequences, such as the
impact on draft status or a
contract.
To the buzzer-beating player,
“Failure is not missing the shot;
it’s ‘I didn’t take it,’ ” Betchart
says. “It’s a complete shift,
where everyone else is obsessed
with winning and losing, which
is paralyzing. People who have a
hard time being present are
afraid of the results.”
The mind-set can’t be trained
overnight. Betchart starts
working with athletes when
they are teenagers — he has
coached Battle since he was in
high school and Gordon since
he was 14 — and may not see the
full results until they are
collegians or pros, he said. He
begins with visualization.
“Be where your feet are,” he
tells them. “What do you see
right now? Nine players and the
refs, that’s what’s happening.
Nothing else.”
The buzzer-beater doesn’t
consider himself lucky or
desperate. He has the ability to
set his body on default, to
achieve a state that Dan
Peterson labels “automaticity.”
Peterson, who co-authored “The
Playmaker’s Advantage” with
noted sport performance
scientist Leonard Zaichkowsky,
said, “He’s not thinking at all
about mechanics, the release
point, where he is on floor.”
Listen to Poole talk about that
last shot: “I’ve been hitting
shots like this all year in
practice,” he said. “I saw it. I
looked at the board. I knew
what I was supposed to be
doing.”
This composure is reliant, of
course, on conditioning. “There
is being willing to do it, and
then there is being able,”
Sullivan said. A buzzer-beater
has an essential economy and
clarity that’s learned only
through mundane but intense
repetition, “hours and hours of
diligently working on your craft
so when you get to that moment
you aren’t thinking, ‘How am I
holding the ball? Am I leaning
back or leaning forward?”
Sullivan said. Automaticity
starts with the feet on takeoff,
which in turn align the shooting
elbow, hip and wrist. A finished
follow-through is a sign of
someone who trusts his
mechanics.
“You can see when someone
tightens up; it doesn’t look as
natural, doesn’t flow,” Sullivan
said. “That’s a guy who doesn’t
have as much belief.”
Sports psychologists and
behavioral researchers have
spent a lot of time thinking
about choking. Buzzer-beaters
are studied less commonly, but
they yield an important insight,
one that has nothing to do with
clutch statistics. It’s this: Stress
can sharpen a knife. “For sure,”
Sullivan said.
Somewhere along the line,
stress got a bad name. But stress
is interesting and complicated,
and the arousal it causes is a
potential enhancer if you learn
to use it. It’s a basic principle
that the greater the pressure,
the more our large motor skills
improve, thanks to our adrenal
firings. As Jeff Wise, author of
the book “Extreme Fear: The
Science of Your Mind in
Danger,” said, “Any idiot can run
fast when a bear is chasing you.”
But stress has a subtler and
not always helpful effect on fine
motor control. For more than a
century, psychologists have
recognized something called the
Yerkes-Dodson law:
Performance of complex skills
improves with a certain amount
of stress but then declines if the
stress increases further. But
here’s the really interesting part:
According to Wise, under even
higher stress, such as the end of
a hard-fought basketball game,
performance can either decline
catastrophically — or improve
dramatically. And the more
highly trained you are, the more
likely the latter is to happen. It’s
why Yo-Yo Ma can be at his best
in a world-class concert hall.
“The better you are, the more
true that is,” Wise explained.
“Precision and fine motor
coordination depend on skills,
but there is a mental
component, too, that is very
much affected by your arousal
level, which in turn is affected
by your conception of what
you’re doing. There’s a big
similarity between fear and
excitement. If you interpret it as
terrifying, then you’ll do worse.
But if you interpret it as
exciting, then you’re
encouraged. Psychologists call
this framing.”
What shot doctors do is help
players frame. Preparation and
conditioning are the ultimate
framers; they link mechanics
and mind-set, allow a buzzerbeater to convert pressure to
enhancement.
“A lot people with a strong
fear of performance ultimately
become excited and good at it,”
Wise said. “It’s a power a lot of
people don’t realize they have.”
sally.jenkins@washpost.com
For more by Sally Jenkins, visit
washingtonpost.com/jenkins.
D8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 23 , 2018
ncaa tournament
Ramblers squeeze past Wolf Pack to earn spot in Elite Eight
SOUTH FROM D1
la bench as the shot clock reached
one second. The redshirt junior
guard finished with a team-high
18 points on 6-for-10 shooting in
addition to five assists and four
rebounds.
“Like I’ve been saying all year,
this team never quits,” said
Townes, whose team will face
Kansas State in the Elite Eight.
“We’re such a resilient team. Nevada, they’re a great team as well,
and we respect them, and they
fought real hard, and they made
that huge run. We got some stops.
We made some big shots.”
With the outcome secure and
the final seconds ticking off the
game clock, Sister Jean appeared
from the tunnel in her wheelchair to take her familiar place
alongside the Loyola bench.
Ramblers fans stood and applauded as players hugged Sister
Jean on their way to the locker
room.
“I’m happy for us, for my community, for Loyola, for the city of
Chicago and for the world,” Sister
Jean said outside Loyola’s locker
room, “because we have people
watching us all over the world.
The viewing numbers on every
channel should go up over this
weekend, and I’m sure that it
will.”
Fans and media members alike
haven’t been able to get enough
of not only Sister Jean but also
another personality not on a basketball roster. That would be
Mariah Musselman, the 8-yearold daughter of Nevada Coach
Eric Musselman.
Before tip-off, CBS aired an
interview between Mariah Musselman, an aspiring sports broadcaster, and Sister Jean, both of
whom have captivated basketball
junkies and non-diehards alike
with their charm, wit and cutes to
spare.
“We played our hearts out,
came up a basket short or a point
short,” Eric Musselman said after
the Wolf Pack’s season concluded
at 29-8 despite forcing 16 turnovers and shooting 48 percent
during the second half. “It’s obviously tough for our locker room
right now to know our season is
over.”
In front by four at halftime, the
Ramblers (31-5) made their first
13 shots in the second half to
open a 55-45 lead with 10:05 to
play. Eleven of those field goals
came on layups, with seven players contributing to the perfect
shooting stretch.
The first miss occurred when
guard Ben Richardson’s desperation heave from well beyond the
three-point line landed short,
creating a turnover for Nevada,
which soon used a 12-2 run to tie
it at 59 with 4:06 to play.
A three-pointer from reserve
senior forward Aundre Jackson
followed to put Loyola ahead to
stay with 2:57 left, setting the
stage for Townes’s dramatic shot.
“I’m telling you, you’ve got to
KEVIN C. COX/GETTY IMAGES
CURTIS COMPTON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
At top, Loyola’s Aundre Jackson puts up a shot between Wolf Pack defenders Cody Martin, left, and
Josh Hall. Above, Elijah Foster, left, Jordan Caroline and Hall ponder the end of Nevada’s season.
give so much credit to Nevada,”
Ramblers Coach Porter Moser
said. “They ever quit. I mean,
those guys keep coming.”
Nevada’s path to its second
appearance in the regional semifinals comprised a pair of memorable comeback victories. The
most recent was overcoming a
22-point deficit in the second half
to rally past No. 2 seed Cincinnati, 75-73, in the round of 32 in
Nashville for the second-largest
comeback in NCAA tournament
history.
In the round of 64, the Wolf
Pack toppled No. 10 seed Texas,
87-83, in overtime after trailing
by 14 points in the second half.
A sequence following the first
of those cardiac performances
went viral when Eric Musselman,
son of late NBA coach Bill Musselman, shouted an expletive
picked up inadvertently on
broadcast audio.
After the win over Cincinnati,
he tore off his dress shirt in
exultation of the improbable circumstances that had the Wolf
Pack playing for its first berth in
the regional finals in program
history.
As they have been virtually the
entire season, the Martin twins,
Caleb and Cody, were front and
center in Thursday night’s showdown, combining for 37 points
and 11 rebounds.
The 6-foot-7 juniors began
their college basketball careers at
North Carolina State, playing two
seasons for Mark Gottfried before
electing to transfer with speculation swirling that playing time
would be less abundant given the
addition of heralded recruit Maverick Rowan.
“We’ll just remember all the
work that we had put in,” Caleb
Martin said. “This is something
really, really hard to do that
people don’t really realize that
we’ve been doing with around a
six- or seven-people rotation and
with a true big and just how
much preparation and behindthe-scenes stuff that we go
through all the time to get to a
place like that and come up short.
“It’s hard, but I’ll remember all
the relationships and the work
and stuff that we put in and with
a lack of depth. It’s been a special
year.”
gene.wang@washpost.com
Seminoles trounce Bulldogs Kansas State ousts Kentucky
FLORIDA STATE 75,
GONZAGA 60
BY
T IM B ONTEMPS
los angeles — Gonzaga may
have been the higher seed in its
NCAA tournament matchup with
Florida State on Thursday night,
but Mark Few knew what his
fourth-seeded Bulldogs were in
for when they faced the ninthseeded Seminoles.
“Physically, probably easily the
most physically imposing and
athletically gifted team we’ve
faced maybe in the 20 years I’ve
been head coach, I would say,”
Few said Wednesday. “Just the
bodies, the size, the length, and
the athleticism is really impressive, and the amount of pressure
they can bring, just the size and
athleticism and the voracity they
go to the offensive glass, and the
way they drive downhill.
“It’s impressive.”
Florida State’s size, length and
athleticism bothered Gonzaga
from start to finish Thursday
night, allowing the Seminoles to
dominate the interior and lead
them to a 75-60 upset victory over
the Bulldogs in the West Region
semifinals.
The victory sent Florida State
(23-11) to the Elite Eight for the
first time since 1993 — a team that
featured Charlie Ward, Sam Cassell and Bob Sura — where it will
face third-seeded Michigan for a
chance to go to the program’s first
Final Four in more than 50 years.
Gonzaga, on the other hand,
saw its dreams of making it back
to the Final Four for a second
straight season dissipate.
The Bulldogs (32-5) were missing sophomore forward Killian
Tillie, who sat out Thursday’s
game after aggravating a hip injury. Though he was ably replaced
in the starting lineup by sophomore forward Rui Hachimura,
who led Gonzaga with 16 points
and grabbed nine rebounds, this
was one game, in particular, in
which the Bulldogs needed all the
size they could get.
Although Gonzaga won the rebounding battle 42-40, there was
no question which was the more
dominant team inside. Florida
State had more points in the paint
(38-22), blocks (9-2), steals (8-5),
and assists (19-7) and the better
field goal percentage (46.6 to
33.9), a statistical edge that was
reflected in the final score line.
An 18-5 run for Florida State in
the first half put the Seminoles up
23-11 — only to be answered by a
15-0 Gonzaga run that put the
Bulldogs up 26-23 after a Josh
Perkins three-pointer with 6:30
remaining in the first half.
But after the two teams went
back and forth over the next few
minutes, Florida State closed the
half with an 8-0 run to take a
41-32 lead into the halftime
break.
From there, the game remained in a holding pattern. Gonzaga fell behind by 13 points early
in the second half but quickly
pulled back to within five on
another Perkins jumper with
15:29 to go in the game.
Florida State’s lead then vacillated between four and nine
points for the next 11 minutes —
KENTUCKY FROM D1
EZRA SHAW/GETTY IMAGES
Terance Mann scored a gamehigh 18 points for the Seminoles.
never getting small enough for
Gonzaga to make it a one-possession game or big enough for the
Seminoles to feel as if they had
the game won.
That changed, though, when a
layup by Terance Mann — who
was Florida State’s lone player in
double figures with 18 points —
and Phil Cofer’s dunk on back-toback possessions made it 66-55 in
favor of Florida State with four
minutes remaining.
Gonzaga never threatened
again, and Florida State was soon
celebrating an upset few saw
coming — one that allowed the
Seminoles to reach a place they
rarely have before.
tim.bontemps@washpost.com
Kansas State bumped its lead
to eight with 9:52 left in the
second half thanks to a five-point
run capped by Xavier Sneed’s
layup, but Kentucky clawed back
within 54-52 on the strength of
1 of 2 free throws by P.J. Washington, Hamidou Diallo’s layup, two
more Washington foul shots and
Kevin Knox’s three-pointer that
brought Kentucky fans out of
their seats.
Washington then sank 1 of 2
free throws with 4:43 left in regulation, and Kentucky trailed by a
single point.
Trailing for the majority of the
game and by four at halftime,
Kentucky scored five in a row to
take its first lead at 36-35 with
17:21 remaining in regulation.
Those points came courtesy of
two free throws from Knox and
Quade Green’s three-pointer.
But Kansas State forced a pair
of turnovers, one by Green and
the other by Gilgeous-Alexander,
and reclaimed the lead on Sneed’s
three-pointer a minute and a half
later. It was Sneed’s fourth threepointer of the game and the
eighth overall for Kansas State.
It used a 9-0 burst to grab a
47-38 lead, going 4 for 4 from the
field in that time, including
Brown’s layup with 13:17 to play
that led immediately to a timeout
from Kentucky Coach John Calipari, who clearly was not pleased
with his team’s four turnovers
over four minutes in the second
half.
Kentucky ended the drought
with Knox’s jumper and with
Calipari jumping in front of the
DAVID GOLDMAN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Barry Brown Jr.’s 13 points against Kentucky included a layup with
19 seconds remaining that put Kansas State ahead to stay.
bench to catch a glimpse of the
proceedings that had the highest
seed left in the South Region
teetering.
The storied program has won
eight national championships,
most recently in 2012 under Calipari, and made its 26th appearance in the regional semifinals. It
was Kentucky’s seventh berth to
the round of 16 under Calipari,
more than any other team since
2010.
Kentucky, which outlasted Davidson, 78-73, in the round of 64
and clobbered Buffalo, 95-75, two
days later, entered 6-0 in the
round of 16 under Calipari and
winners of eight straight overall
in the regional semifinals.
Kansas State, meanwhile, advanced to the round of 16 for the
first time since 2010 by beating
Creighton, 69-59, in its NCAA
tournament opener and ousting
Maryland Baltimore County, 5043, ending the improbable run of
the first No. 16 seed to beat a No. 1.
The Retrievers dismantled Virginia, 74-54, last week in the
round of 64 in Charlotte.
gene.wang@washpost.com
FRIDAY, MARCH 23 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D9
M2
ncaa tournament
To defensive-minded Syracuse, ugly win is thing of beauty
Boeheim and the Orange are not apologizing for choking opponents’ offenses to earn three NCAA tournament victories without scoring more than 60 points
BY
C HUCK C ULPEPPER
omaha — The Washington Post
can confirm that Syracuse has
been allowed passage into the
Sweet 16. A video board next to a
locker room door shows an unmistakable orange “S.” That’s Jim
Boeheim’s
Syracuse-bound,
6-foot-5 son, Buddy, standing by
the door. Inside, Syracuse players
chatter to Syracuse TV cameras.
Clearly, there is no NCAA Committee on Aesthetics to vote out the
Orange. The groans of a nation
beholding Syracuse’s NCAA tournament wins of 60-56, 57-52 and
55-53 have not held any jurisdiction. In the symphony of clangs,
victims Arizona State, TCU and
Michigan State have ventured into
the vaunted Syracuse zone and
crawled out a combined 57 for 166
(34 percent), 22 for 86 on those
irresistible three-point shots.
That
latter
percentage:
.25581395349.
It just looks sad, sitting there.
The most somber number of all,
Michigan State’s astonishing 8 for
37 from three-point range, helped
prevent the anticipated Michigan
State-Duke game here. It left Omaha with Syracuse-Duke, with a rematch of their 60-44 barnburner
of February in Durham, N.C., with
hoops geeks sitting around comparing zones. How does Syracuse’s
2-3 zone, which has been around
since roughly the Mesozoic Era,
differ from Duke’s newfangled
thingy, which dates back to around
February?
Duke senior Grayson Allen sat
at a dais to answer but could have
used a lectern.
“A lot of times, you’ll see when
the ball goes into the middle
against them, their center steps
up,” he said, helpfully. “A lot of
times there’s two guys stepping up
to take the ball in the middle,
whereas we try to keep our big to
protect the rim and have another
guy come to contest the shot in the
middle or challenge the ball, try to
make them uncomfortable then.”
In a match between a coach
born in early 1947 (Mike Krzyzewski) and a coach born in late
1944 (Jim Boeheim), the sager
philosopher spoke. Asked on
ESPN’s “Pardon The Interruption” Tuesday to defend his clunky
team against the masses who
would portray it as an eyesore,
Boeheim proclaimed — okay, he
said, because he doesn’t run
around proclaiming — that defense is beautiful.
On Wednesday at CenturyLink
Center here, he began, “I think
defense is good.”
PAUL SANCYA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Syracuse’s Marek Dolezaj blocked a shot by Michigan State’s Nick Ward in an NCAA tournament game in which the Orange limited the Spartans to 25.6 percent shooting.
And while he wasn’t suggesting
his own epitaph there, he was
beginning a defense of his defense
and of his No. 11 seed that
squeezed into the tournament,
then has squeezed on through,
much as his No. 10 seed in 2016
reached the Final Four.
“I think it’s funny about the
fans and the public and the media: Everybody says defense wins
games, but then when they see it
they don’t like it,” he said. “You
know, fans and the uneducated in
the media and uneducated in the
fandom base want to see 85-82
games, which I think there’s a
beauty in that, or 90 to 95 or 100.
And you can do that. You can
watch the NBA and see that anytime you want to. College basketball is different. It’s always been
different. You can control the
game a little bit more with your
defense and with your offense a
little bit, too.”
He continued: “But there’s a
good thing in watching a good
defensive team. If you’re an offensive guy, then you’re not going to
like it, probably. But if you like
defense and you see good defense
— I watched Virginia’s team this
year, and I think they’re great. I
love to watch. Their defense is
unbelievable. It’s fun to watch. But
if you like offense, you’re not going
to like it. But we tried to play a
combination of good defense and
good offense this year. We just
can’t do one of those two things.
We’ve had many teams in the past
that have played zone but we’ve
averaged 80 points a game. We just
aren’t good on that end of the
court. Where we struggle is on that
end. On defense, if you like defense, it’s good to watch. But our
offense has struggled, and that
gets difficult sometimes.”
Finally: “I don’t like to watch it
sometimes.”
His team distills life to one of its
essential questions: whether defense can be beautiful or, by its
calling and its nature, is supposed
to be ugly. Boeheim’s players see
game film and see beauty.
“And you will see, when everybody’s locked in, when we are moving, helping each other out, I think
it’s a beautiful thing to see, yeah,”
said Paschal Chukwu, a 7-foot-2
center from Westport, Conn.
“Being all on the same page,
moving around the same time,
just moving as one,” said Oshae
Brissett, a 6-8 forward from Mississauga, Ontario.
Just moving as one. . . . That
hint of ballet might help a viewer.
It didn’t help Arizona State,
which averaged 82.7 points and
got 56; or TCU, which averaged
82.1 and got 52; or Michigan State,
which averaged 80.2 and got 53.
Arizona State Coach Bobby Hurley saw “a rock fight,” TCU Coach
Jamie Dixon noted that they
“slowed the tempo down,” and
Michigan State Coach Tom Izzo
saw “a war of a game.” Michigan
State’s Miles Bridges found himself “probably the saddest I’ve
ever been in my life,” proving how
a well-crafted 2-3 zone with the
big man stepping out can wreak
untold human sadness.
They have all seen zones, but
Syracuse’s seems to be different,
according to those in the know,
including Arizona State’s Kodi
Justice, who cited “their length,
their athleticism, the way they
took away the corners, kind of
taking away the middle.”
Those teams, of course, had not
seen Syracuse before. Duke has,
and Boeheim said: “I never liked to
play teams that I played [already]
in the tournament. And I think it’s
better for us when we don’t.”
Giant talents such as Duke’s
Marvin Bagley III and Wendell
Carter Jr. are the kind Syracuse
once had more bountifully, in the
days of Pearl Washington; or in 1987
when the Derrick Coleman-Sherman Douglas-Rony Seikaly Orange
rattled to the national final with
score tallies of 79, 104, 87, 79, 77 and
73; or Carmelo Anthony in 2003,
when Syracuse belonged to a conference that fit more snugly with its
region, when it hadn’t had that little
NCAA kerfuffle in 2015 that might
have lent recruiting a hiccup.
Krzyzewski said playing zone
can help a team comprehend the
“intricacies” of its offense. He also
said, “We’re playing very good
basketball right now.” Duke-wise,
that long has been known to rob a
defense of some of its beauty.
chuck.culpepper@washpost.com
Wolverines go three deep and move closer to the Final Four
MICHIGAN 99,
TEXAS A&M 72
BY
T IM B ONTEMPS
los angeles — Long before it
became in vogue, before it became
the way everyone in basketball
aspired to play, John Beilein
preached the importance of the
three-point shot.
Throughout a well-traveled
coaching career — including Upstate New York stops at Newfane
High and Erie Community College
and Division III Nazareth, then Division II Le Moyne, then Division I
stops at Canisius, Richmond, West
Virginia and now Michigan — Beilein’s teams have all played the same
way, focusing on spacing the floor,
moving the ball and firing away
from three-point range.
The philosophy works, as evidenced by Beilein’s success at each
stop. And after his third-seeded
Wolverines annihilated No. 7 seed
Texas A&M on Thursday, 99-72,
Michigan is playing in the Elite
Eight for the third time in six
seasons. It will face No. 9 Florida
State, which beat No. 4 Gonzaga in
the nightcap.
“The ability to shoot the three at
every position, especially the five
position, is something you don’t
see,” Texas A&M Coach Billy Kennedy said before Thursday’s game.
“That’s where the challenges are
going to be presented with our bigs
being able to go out on the floor and
guard them and maybe their bigs
being able to guard our bigs inside.”
That’s exactly how the game
played out, with Texas A&M (22-13)
trying to bludgeon Michigan (31-7)
inside with its two traditional big
men — including Robert Williams,
a potential top 10 pick in June’s
NBA draft — and Michigan staying
with its usual formation of four and
sometimes five players spaced beyond the three-point arc.
From there, the game turned
into a math equation. Once it did,
EZRA SHAW/GETTY IMAGES
Michigan’s Muhammad-Ali Abdur-Rahkman eludes Texas A&M’s Tyler Davis. The Wolverines made 14 three-pointers in Thursday’s win.
it wasn’t long before Michigan’s
hailstorm of three-pointers was
more than enough to counter Texas A&M’s attempts to bully the
Wolverines in the paint.
By the time the game was over,
Michigan had put on an offensive
clinic. Led by 24 points from Muhammad-Ali
Abdur-Rahkman
and 21 from Moritz Wagner, Michigan shot 61.9 percent overall and
58.3 percent (14 for 24) from threepoint range, while finishing with
21 assists and just seven turnovers.
It was about as efficient of an
offensive performance as possible
in today’s college game. And it was
more than enough to overwhelm a
Texas A&M team that had no way
to slow Michigan down.
“It’s something that we recruit
— a culture that we’re united —
and we really work at that,” Beilein
said. “We really value the assist as
much as the shot. We talk as much
about that. The other thing about
to get assists, the pass has to be on
time and on target. If you saw us
early in the year, guys were catching the ball here and here. It’s a
thing they just have to work on to
make sure that these guys can
catch the ball and be ready to
shoot it.”
Michigan certainly was ready
to shoot it in this one. Before the
first half was even over, the Wolverines had tied the NCAA tournament record with seven players
making a three — and did so in
style as their first seven threes
were made by those players.
They broke the record on the final
basket of the game, when freshman
walk-on C.J. Baird buried a 30-footer from the top of the key with 31 seconds remaining — much to the delight of the Michigan bench and the
heavily partisan crowd.
The Aggies, meanwhile, didn’t
make a three until junior D.J.
Hogg buried one from the top of
the key with 4:02 remaining in the
first half. By then, though, the
Aggies were down 21.
By the time the first half had
ended, Michigan led 52-28, and
the final 20 minutes turned into a
mere formality.
“Felt like we ran into a buzz
saw,” Kennedy said. “I felt like
Michigan, the first eight to 10 minutes, played about as well as anybody we played against this year.
They looked like that’s how they
played in the Big Ten tournament,
more so than they played their last
two games.
“You’ve got to give them a lot of
credit. It seemed like everything
they shot went in.”
Texas A&M eventually — some
would argue finally — changed up
its defense early in the second half,
occasionally trying to press full
court and run Michigan off the
three-point line. And while the Wolverines wound up not shooting
quite as well — or as often — from
behind the arc, they turned the
game into a layup line instead, going
15 for 20 on two-pointers in the second half.
It was a complete reversal from
last weekend, when the Wolverines
struggled offensively in a pair of victories over No. 14 seed Montana and
No. 6 Houston. The way they played
Thursday made the memories of
those struggles quickly disappear.
“We knew that we could pick
and choose our spots on offense,”
Abdur-Rahkman said. “We didn’t
shoot too well in Wichita, but we
knew that we were confident coming into the game that we could hit
get our shots off.
“We just picked and chose our
shots, and we took them.”
tim.bontemps@washpost.com
EFGHI
washingtonpost.com/classifieds
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
1834 FREDERICK DOUGLASS PLACE SE
WASHINGTON, DC 20020
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of the
District of Columbia recorded on March 2, 2007, as Instrument
Number 2007029685, and in accordance Judgment filed on
May 10, 2017 in case 2015 CA 006433 R(RP) and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the office of
HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin Avenue,
NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
APRIL 24, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
1834 FREDERICK DOUGLASS PLACE SE, WASHINGTON,
DC 20020, LOT NUMBERED FIFTY-ONE (51), IN SQUARE
NUMBERED FIVE THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED EIGHTY-ONE
(5881).
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (5.5%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 31957
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET AL,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
840
CLASSIFIED
Trustees Sale - DC
FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 2018
840
Trustees Sale - DC
229
Clothing, Shoes
& Accessories
Electronics
Apple iPhone X—249 Apple iPhone
X256G, $800, Email: amasystems@
outlook.com, 323 250 6503
Speakers - Martin Logans Monolith.
excellent condition. Best offer.
301-996-0946
Therapy Lamp—$29 NatureBright
Light and Ion Therapy Lamp $29,
Alexandria, VA, 571-431-1501
260
Furniture
Car Seats—$29 Generic infant or
Graco child car seat $44 (70 both)
Alexandria, VA 571431-1501
265
Home & Garden
Solid
Hardwood
Brazilian
Cherry Flooring - 3600 S.F.,
$2.50 per SF. 301-860-1190
VARIETY OF ITEMS FOR SALE—$5 UP.
PLEASE CALL FOR MORE INFO.
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
275
Merchandise Wanted
ELECTRONIC CLEANOUTS—1 RADIO
TUBES HI-FI AMPS PARTS MCINTOSH MOST CASH 410-740-5222
GOVT SURPLUS TUBES—1
JOINT
ARMY NAVY JAN PREMIUM PAID
420-740-5222 50's 60's 70's
840
Trustees Sale - DC
UNIT OWNERS’ ASSOCIATION SALE OF VALUABLE CONDOMINIUM UNIT CONTAINED WITHIN PREMISES at 1726 17th Street,
N.W., #403, WASHINGTON, D.C. 20009. Pursuant to District of
Columbia Condominium Act of 1976, Section 313 and under the
power of sale contained in the Declaration and Bylaws of the
Condominium, recorded on February 24, 1982 as Instrument
Number 8200004825 and as Instrument Number 820004826,
and as amended, and in accordance with Public Law 90-566
and D.C. Code Section 42-1903.13, as amended, notice filed
February 26, 2018, and at the request of the Attorney for the
Unit Owners’ Association, we shall sell at public auction on
Thursday the 29th day of March 2018, at 10:47 AM, within the
office of Alex Cooper Auctioneers, 4910 Massachusetts Ave,
N.W., #100, Washington, .D.C. 20016.
Unit 403 of the Revere House, A Condominium Unit Owners
Association designated on the Records of the Assessor of the
District of Columbia for assessment and taxation purposes as
Lot2201 in Square 0154.
Terms of sale: Sold Subject to the provisions, restrictions,
easements and conditions as set forth in the Declaration of
Condominium, the By-laws relating thereto, and any and all
amendments thereto existing deed(s) of trust and real estate
taxes, as applicable; the purchase price above said trust(s) to
be paid in cash. Also sold subject to any other prior liens,
encumbrances and municipal assessments, if any, as applicable,
further particulars of which may be announced at time of sale.
A deposit of $5,000.00 will be required at time of sale, such
deposit to be in cash, certified check, or in such other form
as the attorney for the Owners’ Association may require in her
sole discretion. All conveyancing, recording, recordation tax,
transfer tax, etc. at purchaser’s cost. All adjustments made as
of date of sale. The balance of the purchase price, together
with interest at the rate of 10% per annum from date of sale
to date of receipt of the balance of the purchase price, must
be paid in cash or by cashier’s or certified check and all other
terms to be complied with within 30 days, otherwise deposit
is forfeited and the property may be re-advertised and sold at
the discretion of the Owners’ Association and at the risk and
cost of the defaulting purchaser. Association shall convey a
deed pursuant to D. C. Code Section 42-1903.13 (c) (1) and (3) as
amended, and make no further representations or warranties as
to title. The Association reserves the right in its sole discretion
to rescind the sale at any time until conveyance of the deed. In
the event of failure on the part of the Association to convey such
deed, the purchaser’s sole remedy shall be return of deposit.
Anthony R. Champ, Esq.
Attorney for Owner’s Association
Kass Legal Group, PLLC
Washington Post
Mar. 19, 23, 28
12171753
UNIT OWNERS’ ASSOCIATION SALE OF VALUABLE CONDOMINIUM UNIT CONTAINED WITHIN PREMISES at 1226 Eton Court,
NW, #T22, WASHINGTON, D.C. 20007. Pursuant to District of
Columbia Condominium Act of 1976, Section 313 and under the
power of sale contained in the Declaration and Bylaws of the
Condominium, recorded on April 8, 1981 as Instrument Number
8100011438, and Instrument Number 810011439 as amended,
and in accordance with Public Law 90-566 and D.C. Code Section
42-1903.13, as amended, notice filed February 26, 2018, and at
the request of the Attorney for the Unit Owners’ Association,
we shall sell at public auction on Thursday the 29th day of March
2018, at 10:45 AM, within the office of Alex Cooper Auctioneers,
4910 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Suite 100, Washington, DC
20016.
Unit #T22 of the Eton Court, A Condominium designated on
the Records of the Assessor of the District of Columbia for
assessment and taxation purposes as Lot 2032 in Square 1206.
Terms of sale: Sold Subject to the provisions, restrictions,
easements and conditions as set forth in the Declaration of
Condominium, the By-laws relating thereto, and any and all
amendments thereto existing deed(s) of trust and real estate
taxes, as applicable; the purchase price above said trust(s) to
be paid in cash. Also sold subject to any other prior liens,
encumbrances and municipal assessments, if any, as applicable,
further particulars of which may be announced at time of sale.
A deposit of $5,000.00 will be required at time of sale, such
deposit to be in cash, certified check, or in such other form
as the attorney for the Owners’ Association may require in her
sole discretion. All conveyancing, recording, recordation tax,
transfer tax, etc. at purchaser’s cost. All adjustments made as
of date of sale. The balance of the purchase price, together
with interest at the rate of 10% per annum from date of sale
to date of receipt of the balance of the purchase price, must
be paid in cash or by cashier’s or certified check and all other
terms to be complied with within 30 days, otherwise deposit
is forfeited and the property may be re-advertised and sold at
the discretion of the Owners’ Association and at the risk and
cost of the defaulting purchaser. Association shall convey a
deed pursuant to D. C. Code Section 42-1903.13 (c) (1) and (3) as
amended, and make no further representations or warranties as
to title. The Association reserves the right in its sole discretion
to rescind the sale at any time until conveyance of the deed. In
the event of failure on the part of the Association to convey such
deed, the purchaser’s sole remedy shall be return of deposit.
Anthony R. Champ, Esq.
Attorney for Owner’s Association
Kass Legal Group, PLLC
Washington Post
Mar. 19, 23, 28
12171749
Garage Sales, VA
Annandale—Moving/Garage
Sale. 8432 Briar Creek Dr. 22003,
360
03/24, 8 am to 1, 571-235-2755.
358
360
Silver Spring, MD
Sun 3/18-Sat 3/24
15520 Thompson Rd
Moving Sale
CLIFTON, VA 12326 FFX. STA. RD.
Sat 3/24, 9-3 & Sun 3/25, 10-2
Household items and more!
Estate Sales
8615 River Rock Terr.
Bethesda, Md. 20817
Fri, Sat & Sun 10 - 3
www.emeraldestatesales.com
703 582 1135
WELLS ESTATE SALES
Presents a Fabulous sale consisting
of antiques and high quality
furniture plus more.
3400 North Glebe Road
See website estatesales.net.
#930 Fri. 703-536-7816.
Estate Sales
ESTATE SALE
Items to be sold include:
Dolls, Brik-A-Brak, A Few Toys, Furniture Items, Cookware, Dinner
Ware, Some Exercise Equipment,
Tools, Lawn & Garden Equipment,
Power Tools, Police Figurines, DC
Metropolitan Police Memorabilia,
including Three Call Boxes (1
Restored, 1 Unrestored, 1 on a
Stand in Back Yard), etc.
There will be signs posted at intersections in the vicinity of the area
of the sale to direct customers
where to come, including two signs
directly in front of the location of
the sale.
Cash & Checks are acceptable as
methods of payment for items.
Sorry, No Credit.
9122 Kittery Lane
Springfield,VA - 8123 Ainsworth Ave
Fri - Sat - Sun 10-3
Fri - Sun, 10-3. Full House Sale
Greater Washington Estate Services
www.caringtransitionsnova.com
Eclectic throughout! Wurlitzer jukefor pics and details.
box loaded w/ 45s. Fabulous ant
silverplate (some sterling). Items for 416
entertaining galore. Orig artwork &
h.c. engravings/etchings. Vint toys.
Snooker table w/ all accessories.
REDSKINS
Vint jewelry. Full kit, linens, office,
Season Tickets Wanted.
garage, HH. See estatesales.net. #'s
Buying all locations. Top $ paid.
@ 9:30. CC's 3% fee. All sales final.
Please call 1-800-786-8425
Bethesda
610
12170357
Dogs for Sale
Bichon Frise Puppy,
AKC reg, available 4/09,
female, hypo allergenic.
www.bichonoasis.com
Call 540-348-4212
610
American Akita—Puppies! $700 each
3males/2females, 6weeks old, dark
brindles. vet checked & healthy
540-521-1944
Whoodles—$1000, Males & Females,
10 Weeks old, 3 Females and 2 Males
Registered Papers Included Updated
Shots 301-320-6340
GOLDEN RETREIVER PUPS - AKC,
absolutely gorgeous, must see the
pups to appreciate them, M & F,
parents on site, 9 weeks old.
$1,000-$1,200. Call 804-221-5485
Yorkiepoo Shihtzus & more—Puppies
for Sale. 304-904-6289, Cash, CC,
Easy Finance, www.wvpuppy.com,
59 East Rd, Martinsburg WV, exit 16E
European Great Dane —$1200 (OBO),
Male, 16 wks, Gentle Giant, registered, great European blood line,
Mantle Color. 202-438-6059
Labrador Retrievers — Papers, shot
records, ready 3/24/18 for Easter. 6
boys: black, yellow 3 girls: yellow.
$800, Call /text 410-474-9291
K
i
Pomski f, Malshih & more—Puppies
for Sale. 304-904-6289, Cash, CC,
Easy Finance, www.wvpuppy.com,
59 East Rd, Martinsburg WV, exit 16E
GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS 4 F, 3 M, black & sable. $700, S/W,
parents on premises. AKC reg.
Ready 3/15. Call 240-606-3815
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Yorkshire Terrier—Yorkie,
7 mos, Male. $500 all shots,papers.
house trained, socialized. Charles
Town WV area. 304-620-8390
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Labrador Retriever—$800,
FOX RED 3 Males, 10
weeks old, 540-223-0406
Old Eng Bulldog—$800, 3M & 4F,
12wks, CKC & IOEBA Papers &
Pedigree, 1st Shots & Dewormed,
Dame & Sire on Site, 240-920-1261
FRENCH BULLDOGS - 10 weeks,
2 Males, brindle & white,
black & white. $2,500 each.
301-252-9213 or visit:
www.windsoroakfarm.com
Dogs for Sale
GOLDEN RET AKC & GOLDEN /
LAB RET CROSS PUPS & ADULTS
8 weeks - 5 yrs. Vet checked, parents
on prem, health guar. 301-605-0543
W www.VictoriasPups.com W
Labradoodle—wavy, curly and cute!
f1b S&W Hlth. guar. Goldendoodle
pups rdy 4/18 $1200 540-729-6365
www.doodledogpups.com
Dogs for Sale
12170968
610
Dogs for Sale
DOBERMAN PINSCHER PUPPIESEuropean working lines, all shots,
10 weeks old, ready for their new
homes. Call 443-336-6840
Tickets, Wanted
COOL & ECLECTIC ESTATE SALE
Dirty Dig purchases. Plants, art,
antiques, statues, furniture.
Cash Only 13507 Reid Circle,
Ft. Washington MD . CASH ONLY.
MAKE OFFERS & bring own
shovel. Sat March 24th 9am-5pm.
610
LAB PUPS- AKC, OFA, top champ
lines, S/W, written warr, yellow,
parents on site. Ready 4/6. $850.
301-246-9116
or
301-751-6846
FRENCH BULLDOG PUPPIES-Black
& Fawn, Ready now. Champ
bloodlines, Starting at $3,000 240793-7503
jushara@hotmail.com
Trustees Sale - DC
840
EZ
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 Rockville Pike, Suite 100
Rockville, MD 20852
PUBLIC AUCTION SALE
SHARES OF CAPITAL STOCK
"MEMBERSHIP SHARES" OF
EASTMONT COOPERATIVE, INC.
allocated to
7058 EASTERN AVENUE NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20012
SALE ON APRIL 24, 2018 at 3:00 PM
Pursuant to Order of Sale entered in DC Superior Court Case
# 2016 CA004994 R(RP) , the secured creditor, by the court
approve substitute trustee will sell at Public Auction AT THE
OFFICE OF HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., LOCATED AT
5335 WISCONSIN AVENUE, NW, Suite 440, WASHINGTON,
DC 20015.
All the membership shares described in said Security Agreement
being EASTMONT COOPERATIVE, INC. shares of Capital Stock
of the EASTMONT COOPERATIVE, INC. allocated to 7058
Eastern Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20012, together with all
rights, duties and obligations under the terms of a certain
Occupancy Agreement OCTOBER 17, 1987 between Jean G.
Oates-Morris and the EASTMONT COOPERATIVE, INC. Subject
to the terms, provisions and conditions contained in the Articles
of Incorporation, By-Laws, Occupancy Agreement and House
Rules of the EASTMONT COOPERATIVE, INC and the Superior
Court’s Order of Sale.
The membership shares will be sold subject to their proportionate share of certain underlying purchase money mortgages, the
exact amount due thereon will be announced at time of sale and
subject to all conditions, liens restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same, and subject to any assessments including
assessments pursuant to D.C. Code Sections 42-1903.13.
The membership shares will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE
IS" condition without either express or implied warranty or
representation, including but not limited to the description,
fitness for a particular purpose or use, structural integrity,
physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental
condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing
codes or other laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of
the purchaser to obtain title insurance or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $24,600.00 certified funds shall
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase
price with interest at 6.875% per annum from the date of sale
to the date of settlement. Settlement within TEN DAYS after
the final ratification of the sale. There will be no abatement of
interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds
are tendered before settlement. Adjustment of current year’s
real property taxes and coop dues and fees are adjusted as of
the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All
other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent
such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer
charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale
are to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of transfer of the
share certificate including but not limited conveyancing, city,
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, and all other costs incident
to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Purchaser is
responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property,
and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from date of
sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the Purchaser
fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser agrees
that the property will be resold and the entire deposit retained
by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses
occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have
no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
DANIEL J. PESACHOWITZ, ESQUIRE
Attorney
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Trustees Sale - DC
Substitute Trustee Sale of Residential Property:
409 Newcomb St. SE, Washington, DC 20032
Default occurred under a Deed of Trust signed February 13,
2008 and recorded on February 28, 2008 as Instrument
No. 2008021460 in the Land Records of Washington, DC,
securing the original principal amount of $375,000. A Deed of
Appointment of Substitute Trustee dated February 5, 2018 was
recorded on February 9, 2018 as Instrument No. 2018014727.
In accordance with DC Code §§ 42-815 et seq., the Notice of
Default dated October 30, 2017 was recorded on November 9,
2017 as Instrument No. 2017124794, and the Final Mediation
Certificate was recorded on February 9, 2018 as Instrument No.
2018014427. The Notice of Intention to Foreclose a Residential
Property was recorded on March 13, 2018 as Instrument No.
20180258272.
The land and premises secured by the Deed of Trust, situated
in the District of Columbia, and designated as and being
Lot numbered Sixty-Eight (68) in Square numbered Fifty-Nine
Hundred Ninety-five (5995) in the subdivision made by H & J
Construction Co., Inc. as per plat recorded in Liber 116 at Folio
140 among the Records of the Office of the Surveyor for the
District of Columbia, commonly known as 409 Newcomb St. SE,
Washington, DC 20032, will be offered for sale by public auction
at:
Harvey West Auctioneers, 5335 Wisconsin Ave. NW,
Washington, DC 20015
on
TUESDAY, APRIL 24, 2018 AT 2:30 P.M.
This sale is subject to all other liens, encumbrances, conditions,
easements, and restrictions, if any, superior to the aforesaid
deed of trust and lawfully affecting the Property, including but
not limited to the lien created by the aforementioned Deed
of Trust recorded on February 28, 2008 as Instrument No.
2008021460. The sale of the Property shall further be made
subject to any rights of redemption, including but not limited
to any rights under 26 U.S.C. § 7425, and the rights, if any
of persons in possession of the Property. The Property and any
improvements thereon shall be sold in “as-is” condition without
any warranties.
A deposit of Forty Thousand Dollars ($40,000.00) or ten per
cent (10%) of the sale price in the form of a certified or
cashier’s check (made payable to “Yi Shen, Substitute Trustee”)
will be required to qualify as a bidder before the sale, except
from the Noteholder. The deposit, without interest, will be
applied to the purchase price at settlement. Settlement will be
held within thirty (30) days after the sale at the office of the
Substitute Trustee. Upon purchaser’s default, the deposit shall
be forfeited and the Property shall be resold at the risk and
costs of the defaulting purchaser. In the event the Substitute
Trustee cannot convey to the purchaser marketable title, in the
Substitute Trustee’s sole discretion, the sale may be rescinded
and purchaser’s sole remedy shall be refund of the deposit at any
time prior to the aforesaid Settlement.
The balance of the purchase price shall be in cash or its
equivalent. Purchaser shall be responsible for all future and past
due real property taxes, property owner's dues or assessments,
settlement charges, and costs of conveyance, including, but not
limited to, preparation of the deed and recording and transfer
taxes. In the event real property taxes or property owner's dues or
assessments have been advanced, those sums will be due from
purchaser to the seller at the time of settlement. The Property
shall be conveyed by Special Warranty Deed. The successful
bidder shall assume all loss or damage to the Property from and
after the time of sale. Neither Substitute Trustee nor the secured
party shall assume any obligation to deliver possession of the
property. In the event a Trustee’s deed or deed of foreclosure
has been recorded and the Substitute Trustee determines in its
sole discretion that it is necessary to rescind the sale, Substitute
Trustee reserves the right to nullify the Trustee’s deed or Deed
of Foreclosure and revest title to the mortgagor’s/prior owners
subject to the deed of trust upon which was foreclosed. The
Substitute Trustee reserves the right to reject all bids, extend
the time to receive bids, withdraw the Property from sale,
waive or modify the deposit requirement, and/or extend the
period for settlement. Additional terms may be announced at
the time of sale and the successful bidder will be required to
sign a Memorandum of Sale incorporating the terms of the sale.
For more information contact
Yi Shen, Substitute Trustee,
Levine & Associates, PLLC,
5311 Lee Highway, Arlington, VA 22207,
Telephone: 703-525-2668, Facsimile: 703-525-8393
Yi Shen, Substitute Trustee
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING
KNOWN AS:
4521 IOWA AVENUE NW
WASHINGTON, DC 20011
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of
the District of Columbia recorded on November 13, 2006, as
Instrument Number 2006153678, and in accordance Judgment
filed on February 12, 2018 in case 2016 CA 004340 R(RP)
and at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the
office of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin
Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034, on,
APRIL 24, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
4521 IOWA AVENUE NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20011, LOT 78
SQUARE 2918.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (6.875%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
12169758
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event 815
825
Legal Notices
Bids & Proposals
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
SUPREME COURT OF THE
Purchasing Cooperative of
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
STATE OF NEW YORK
America will receive proposals
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
COUNTY OF ORANGE
12171914
until 11:00am CT on Tuesday, MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMMONS
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
May 1, 2018 in the Bonfire 850
AND NOTICE
Montgomery County 850 Montgomery County
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, Index No. 2016-008033
application on the PCA Website
for Region 3 ESC, 1905 Leary
Filed: 3/8/2018
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are Date
Deutsche Bank National Trust ComMONTGOMERY COUNTY,
MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
Victoria, TX 77901, for the
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation pany, as Trustee for Morgan Stanley Ln,
MARYLAND
MARYLAND
following # of RFP national conABS
Capital
I
Inc.
Trust
2006-WMC2,
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city Mortgage Pass-Through Certifi- tracts: (1) RFP 3-189-18 Art James E. Clarke
James E. Clarke
Hugh J. Green
Class Supplies (Traditional &
Renee Dyson
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other cates, Series 2006-WMC2,
Shannon Menapace
Brian Thomas
Electronic); (2) RFP 3-190-18
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Plaintiff,
Christine M. Drexel
Hugh J. Green
Laboratory Systems & Related
-againstBeth Thomas
Patrick M. A. Decker
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the Crispus Sawyer a/k/a Crispus E. Items; (3) RFP 3-191-18 Voca- Substitute
Substitute Trustees
Trustees
Sawyer, if he be living or dead, tional Training Products, SerPlaintiffs
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from his spouse, heirs, devisees, distribPlaintiffs
vices, & Related Items; (4) RFP
V.
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the utees and successors in interest, 3-192-18 Kitchen Equipment, V.
of whom and whose names and
Constance Robinson
The Estate of Edward Moriarty
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser all
places of residence are unknown Products & Service, POS & RelatRandi A. Robinson and
Defendant(s)
Walden W. Robinson
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit to Plaintiff; Deutsche Bank National ed Items. NOTICE: PCA is holdCivil No. 432733V
Trust Company, as Trustee for Mor- ing a pre-proposal Meeting on
Defendant(s)
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all gan Stanley ABS Capital 1 Inc. Trust April 4, 2018 at 11811 North
NOTICE PURSUANT
Civil No. 440975V
Mortgage
Pass- Freeway (I-45N), 5th Floor,
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall 2006-WMC2,
Through Certificates, Series 2006NOTICE PURSUANT
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service WMC2; State of New York; and Houston, TX @ 10 a.m. – Noon. ORDERED, by the Circuit Court
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
for Montgomery County, MaryRSVP Required. Call 844-722"JOHN
DOE”,
said
name
being
ficby first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address titious, it being the intention of 6374 x700 or 713-254-1858. Go land, this 27th day of February, ORDERED, by the Circuit Court
for Montgomery County, Marythat the foreclosure sale
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Plaintiff to designate any and all to www.pcamerica.org/solicita- 2018,
land, this 28th day of February,
of the property described in the
of premises being fore- tions for more information.
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause occupants
2018, that the foreclosure sale
deed of trust docketed herein
closed herein, and any parties, corof the property described in the
and located at 11222 Valley View
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be porations or entities, if any, having 830 Special Notices
deed of trust docketed herein
Avenue, Kensington, Maryland
or
claiming
an
interest
or
lien
upon
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even the mortgaged premises,
and located at 18441 Crownsgate
20895,
made and reported
Dear RCN Customers,
Circle, Germantown, Maryland
by James E. Clarke, Renee Dyson,
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by Defendants.
IMPORTANT CHANNEL CHANGE TO
20874,
made and reported
Brian Thomas, Hugh J. Green, and
PROPERTY ADDRESS: 162 Dubois YOUR RCN CHANNEL LINE-UP
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit Street, Newburgh, NY 12550
by James E. Clarke, Hugh J. Green,
Patrick M. A. Decker, Substitute
March 31, 2018, MHz Netshannon Menapace, Christine M.
Trustees, Be RATIFIED and CONof the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFEN- Effective
works LLC (International channels
Drexel and Brian Thomas, SubstiFIRMED, unless cause to the conDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUM- 30-37) will no longer be available on
tute Trustees, Be RATIFIED and
trary be shown on or before the
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered MONED to answer the complaint RCN. MHz channels include:
CONFIRMED, unless cause to the
29th day of MARCH, 2018; prointo and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan in this action and to serve a copy of · 30 MHz 1 MHz Worldview (DC)
contrary be shown on or before
vided a copy of this Order be
answer, or a notice of appear- · 31 MHz TRT World
the 30th day of MARCH, 2018;
inserted in The Washington Post,
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the your
ance on the attorneys for the Plain- · 32 MHz 3 MCN (Chinese)
provided a copy of this Order be
once in each of three (3) succestiff
within
thirty
(30)
days
after
the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
· 33 MHz 4 RT (Russia)
inserted in The Washington Post,
sive weeks before the 29th day of
service of this summons, exclusive · 34 MHz 10 Worldview (National)
once in each of three (3) succesMARCH, 2018.
of
the
day
of
service.
The
United
Trustee’s File No. 21156
· 35 MHz 6 Native
sive weeks before the 30th day of
States of America, if designated · 36 MHz 7 France 24
The Report of Sale states the
MARCH, 2018.
as
a
defendant
in
this
action,
may
amount
of
the
sale
at
$679,500.00
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET. AL.,
· 37 MHz 8 RT Español
appear within sixty (60) days of
The Report of Sale states the
BY THE COURT:
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
service hereof. In case of your fail- 835
amount of the sale at $394,715.30
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
Bassett Hound—Cute lovable long
eared tri-colored $750, 3-male/
Silver Spring - Estate sale at 3141
4-female, 9 weeks old, will text
Gershwin ln, silver spring from 9-4
pictures.303-667-8825
on 3/24 and 1-4 on 3/25. Sale items
include wicker, antique Furn, never
Old Bottles of Bourbon—50 Seeking used sleeper sofa, framed travel
full bottles of vintage bourbon and posters/books, 33 1/3 records, Vera
rye. Alex 443-223-7669.
Bradley, longerberger bskts, Fenton
art glass, area rugs, Amish pottery, BERNESE MOUNTAIN PUPPIES- AKC,
OLD HI--FI---ITEMS—1 COLLECTOR Christmas
entertaining
pieces, females avail now, dewormed & first
PAYS MOST CASH PLEASE CALL framed artwork, gardening items, vaccinations. $1200/obo. Call 717THANK YOU 410-740-5222
765-6820 for pics. Please no Sun calls
much much more. Cash only.
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!—1 I
drive to you, pay CASH, and haul
them away. Call 571-830-5871
840
ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC.
4910 MASSACHUSETTES AVE. NW, #100
WASH. DC 202-364-0306
WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM
SILVER SPRING, MD - 408 Southview
Ave. Sat 3/24 10am-4pm. Furniture,
household & garden items, toys,
garden tools and free items
Arlington
Fri & Sat10am-4pm, Sun 1-4pm
Brm furn 3pc turn of the Century, 5'
sm curio w/ curved gl. w/ painting,
4'wx6'h folding fancy wood screen,
lift chair, Ships clock, 2 leg wall Tbl
w/ marble top, misc dishes & linens.
202-438-3858 or 443-878-8391
Trustees Sale - DC
201. Sat 3/24, 11-3. Furn, antiques,
misc figurines, clothes, etc
MEN'S EUROPEAN SUITS. Brand new.
Assorted brands & styles. Priced $35
& $45 or best offer. Call 732-586-9424 355
245
840
ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC.
4910 MASSACHUSETTES AVE. NW, #100
WASH. DC 202-364-0306
WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
1355 SHERIDAN STREET, NW
WASHINGTON, DC 20011
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of the
District of Columbia recorded on October 6, 2005, as Instrument
Number 2005143902, and in accordance Judgment filed on
November 27, 2017 in case 2015 CA 003370 R(RP) and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the office of
HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin Avenue,
NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
APRIL 24, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
1355 SHERIDAN STREET, NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20011, LOT
NUMBERED SIXTY THREE (63), IN THE SUBDIVISION MADE
BY BIRON & COMPANY, INC. OF LOTS IN SQUARE NUMBERED
TWENTY SEVEN HUNDRED EIGHTY EIGHT (2788).
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
12169760 at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (5.875%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
275
208
Merchandise Wanted
Appliances
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
BISSELL CARPET CLEANER—25 Used Radio tubes—249 WANTED ham DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
radios huge speakers tube hifi ampbut works well. Alexandria, VA,
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
s2025279501, vcvdc@msn.com
703-941-8206
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
REDSKINS TICKETS WANTED—
HOOVER UPRIGHT VACUMN CLEANCall 1-800-296-3626 X3
ER—$25 With extra bags. Alexanof current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
dria, VA, 703-941-8206
WANTED
PRE
1975
COMIC of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
Kirby Sentria G10 Vacuum Cleaner & BOOKS—TOYS, SPORTS & NON
Shampooer—$249 Like New-Cost SPORTS CARDS, ORIG ART, MOVIE public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
MEM. COLLECTOR IN TOWN. WILL amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
$1800 . 571-606-0319
PAY CASH. CALL MIKE 800-273-1621
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
215
Books, Music & Movies MIKECARBO@GMAIL.COM
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
284
Office & Business
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
Martin Luther King Jr.—Political
analyst Earl Ofari Hutchinson
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
Equipment
tells why 50 yrs, after the murcosts incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
23" CHALLENGE PAPER CUTTER w/
der of Dr. King his death still
new blade. $500. 1 HAND 8X10 LEThaunts America & race relations
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
TERPRESS W/ MOTOR $300. Call 202hutchinsonreport@aol.com
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
544-6400, Mon-Fri btwn noon-5pm.
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Martin Luther King Jr.—7.95 50 Years 291
Later Why Dr. King's Murder Still
Sporting
Goods
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
Hurts. hutchinsonreport@aol.com
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
&
Services
225
Nordic Track Exercise Skier—$195 retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
Collectibles
Exc.Cond-Folds up easy to fit in losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
AURORA SLOT CARS Wanted—$100
car. Cost $800 new. 571-606-0319
& up, cars/sets. +Atlas, AFX, Tyco,
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
Cox, Strombecker 703-960-3594
295
Toys
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
CHRISTMAS VILLAGE—$75
FOUR
HOT WHEELS CARS—$10, McLean, provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
LARGE CERAMIC HOUSES AlexanVA,
703-356-0170,
Two
Sets
22
cars
dria, VA, 703-941-8206
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
in all.
Comic Book & Sports Card
Toy trucks and cars—$20, McLean, Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
Show—Sunday March 25 10am-3pm
VA, 703-356-0170, two semi-truck entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
Annandale Va. Fire House Expo Hall
trailers with 48 cars
7128
Columbia
Pike
22003
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
Info:shoffpromotions.com Adm. $3 , 350
Garage Sales, MD
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
12 under free. $1 Off adm. with ad
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!—1 I Darnestown — Garage/Moving
14824 Keeneland Cir, N.Potomac,
drive to you, pay CASH, and haul
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
03/24, 8:30-1:00, 301-908-7653
them away. Call 571-830-5871
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
MOTOROLA RADIO—$20 Vintage in
ROCKVILLE - Japanese Christian
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
cabinet. Does not work. Call for
Community Center, Yard Sale.
info. Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
1099 Rockville Pike,
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Rockville, MD 20852
RAILROAD MISC—$20, McLean, VA,
Sat 3/24, 10:30- 2:30.
Trustee’s File No. 23469
703-356-0170, Set of AMTRAK sysFurniture, appls, clothing, toys,
tem timetables 1971-2016
books, Japanese food, etc.
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET AL,
TEDDY BEAR TEA SET—$20 VINTAGE
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
MINIATURE PORCELAIN. PERFECT.
SILVER SPRING - 8810 Lanier Dr Apt
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
D10
POMSKY (Siberian Husky by Pom)
1 F, 6 M, , ICA reg., blue eyed-ready
$2500 Call 717-278-8343
www.heritagehillpomskies.com
PUG PUPS - 3 black M, up to date
on vaccines & worming, has been
vet check with health records. Short
stocky built, 10 wks. 540-778-5658
ShiChon—Cute little Shi Chon Teddybears! Raised in our home with
TLC. 703-577-1069 $750-850
www.DCDogFinders.com
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Wake up
to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
ure to appear or answer, judgment
will be taken against you by default
for the relief demanded in the complaint.
TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: The foregoing Summons is
served upon you by publication pursuant to an Order of the Hon.
Catherine M. Bartlett, a Justice of
the Supreme Court, Orange County,
entered Mar. 1, 2018 and filed with
the complaint and other papers in
the Orange County Clerk’s Office.
NOTICE OF NATURE OF ACTION AND
RELIEF SOUGHT THE OBJECT of the
above captioned action is to foreclose a Mortgage to secure
$180,400.00 and interest, recorded
in the Orange County Clerk’s Office
on April 19, 2006, in Book 12133
of Mortgages, page 403 covering
premises as 162 Dubois Street,
Newburgh, NY 12550 a/k/a Section
18, Block 1, Lot 6.
The relief sought in the within
action is a final judgment directing
the sale of the premises described
above to satisfy the debt secured
by the Mortgage described above.
Plaintiff designates Orange County
as the place of trial. Venue is based
upon the County in which the mortgaged premises is situated.
NOTICE
YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING
YOUR HOME
IF YOU DO NOT RESPOND TO THIS
SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT BY
SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER
ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE MORTGAGE COMPANY WHO FILED THIS
FORECLOSURE
PROCEEDING
AGAINST YOU AND FILING THE
ANSWER WITH THE COURT, A
DEFAULT JUDGMENT MAY BE
ENTERED AND YOU CAN LOSE YOUR
HOME.
SPEAK TO AN ATTORNEY OR GO TO
THE COURT WHERE YOUR CASE IS
PENDING FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ON HOW TO ANSWER THE SUMMONS AND PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY.
SENDING A PAYMENT TO YOUR
MORTGAGE COMPANY WILL NOT
STOP THIS FORECLOSURE ACTION.
YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A
COPY OF ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE
COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER
WITH THE COURT.
Dated: February 15, 2018
Frank M. Cassara, Esq.
Senior Associate Attorney
SHAPIRO, DICARO & BARAK, LLC
Attorneys for Plaintiff
175 Mile Crossing Boulevard
Rochester, New York 14624
(585) 247-9000
Fax: (585) 247-7380 our
File No. 16-057914
#94465
Public Sale Notices
IN ORDER TO ENFORCE ITS LIEN
FOR UNPAID RENT, AMERICAN
SELF STORAGE WILL SELL AT A
PUBLIC AUCTION ON Thursday
03/29/2018
AT
12:00PM
NOON, FOR CASH, THE CONTENTS OF THE FOLLOWING
UNITS
12169014
V.
Robin M. Hudspeth and
Stuart L. Hudspeth
Defendant(s)
Civil No. 426988V
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court
for Montgomery County, Maryland, this 28th day of February,
2018, that the foreclosure sale
of the property described in the
deed of trust docketed herein and
located at 2817 Kingswell Drive,
Silver Spring, Maryland 20902,
made and reported by James E.
Clarke, Renee Dyson, Brian
Thomas, Erin M. August, Hugh J.
Green and Patrick M. A. Decker,
Substitute Trustees, Be RATIFIED
and CONFIRMED, unless cause to
the contrary be shown on or
before the 30th day of MARCH,
2018; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in The Washington Post, once in each of three
(3) successive weeks before the
30th day of MARCH, 2018.
Home delivery
is convenient.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $307,700.00
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
BY THE COURT:
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Md.
MATL558470
Orlans PC
PO Box 2548
Leesburg, Virginia 20177
March 9, 16, 23, 2018
SF
SF
BY THE COURT:
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Md.
MATL578593
Orlans PC
PO Box 2548
Leesburg, Virginia 20177
March 9, 16, 23, 2018
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Beth Thomas
Erin M. August
Hugh J. Green
Patrick M. A. Decker
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
Sale to be held at
American Self Storage
3700 Plyers Mill Road
Kensington, MD 20895
301-933-3300
03/29/2018 at 12:00pm.
Victor Jones
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
March 9, 16, 23, 2018
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
MARYLAND
223- J. Morales
229- S. Mackabee
249- N. Walkup
336- B. McCaw
475- L. Boone
499- C. Houston
502- E. Lewis
661- G. Sandoval
703A- J. Stephenson
760A- E. Henson
790- E. Henson
915- R. Abraham
924- B. McCaw
926- B. Barrett
1216- S. Jenkins
2319- P. Kiingi
3743- P. Lewis
4006- R. Cifuentes
4130- R. Cifuentes
4212- H.Albasri
6410- C. Gibson
6421- S. Jenkins
9510- P. Tomlinson
1-800-753-POST
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Md.
MATL558132
Orlans PC
PO Box 2548
Leesburg, Virginia 20177
12169613
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY
MARYLAND
DIANE S. ROSENBERG
MARK D. MEYER
JOHN A. ANSELL, III
KENNETH SAVITZ
JENNIFER ROCHINO
SYDNEY ROBERSON
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway
Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiff(s)
v.
Wilson Sauceda
Sandra J. Cole
a/k/a Sandra J. Sauceda
13656 Harvest Glen Way
Germantown, MD 20874
Defendant(s)
Case No. 436969V
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 27th
day of February, 2018, by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, Maryland, that the sale of
13656 Harvest Glen Way, Germantown, MD 20874, made and reported, will be ratified and confirmed,
unless cause to the contrary
thereof be shown on or before the
29th day of March, 2018, provided
a copy of this notice be inserted
in a daily newspaper printed in
said County, once in each of three
successive weeks before the 29th
day of March 2018. The Report
of Sale states the amount of the
foreclosure sale price to be
$76,000.00.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Montgomery County, MD
March 9, 16, 23, 2018
12169607
12169615
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 2018
840
Trustees Sale - DC
OPQRS
EZ
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
5454 B STREET, SE
WASHINGTON, DC 20019
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of the
District of Columbia recorded on July 31, 2013, as Instrument
Number 2013089436, and in accordance Judgment filed on
March 14, 2018 in case 2017 CA 005388 R(RP) and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the office of
HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin Avenue,
NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
APRIL 24, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
5454 B STREET, SE, WASHINGTON, DC 20019, LOT NUMBERED SIXTY-SEVEN (67) IN SQUARE NUMBERED FIVE
THOUSAND TWO HUNDRED NINETY (5290).
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (4.5%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 55401
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET. AL.,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING
KNOWN AS:
4414 EDSON PLACE NE
WASHINGTON, DC 20019
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of the
District of Columbia recorded on May 7, 2009, as Instrument
Number 2009048783, and in accordance Judgment filed on
May 8, 2017 in case 2015 CA 002391 R(RP) and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the office of
HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin Avenue,
NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
APRIL 24, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
4414 EDSON PLACE NE, WASHINGTON, DC 20019, LOT
NUMBERED EIGHT HUNDRED SIXTY-NINE (869) IN SQUARE
NUMBERED FIFTY-ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-ONE (5131).
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (4.875%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 26264
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET. AL.,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
12172429
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
900 BURNS STREET SE
WASHINGTON, DC 20019
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of the
District of Columbia recorded on July 10, 2013, as Instrument
Number 2013080518, and in accordance Judgment filed on
February 16, 2018 in case 2015 CA 000515 R(RP) and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the office of
HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin Avenue,
NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
APRIL 24, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
900 BURNS STREET SE, WASHINGTON, DC 20019, LOTS
NUMBERED SEVENTY-SEVEN (77) AND SEVENTY-EIGHT (78),
IN SQUARE NUMBERED FIVE THOUSAND THREE HUNDRED
AND EIGHTY-TWO (5382).
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (4.25%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 31699
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET AL,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
Trustees Sale - DC
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
509 ROXBORO PLACE NW
WASHINGTON, DC 20011
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of
the District of Columbia recorded on November 26, 2014, as
Instrument Number 2014109511, and in accordance Judgment
filed on February 14, 2018 in case 2017 CA 003562 R(RP)
and at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the
office of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin
Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034, on,
APRIL 24, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
509 ROXBORO PLACE NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20011, LOT
NUMBERED ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-SEVEN (167), SQUARE
NUMBERED 3199.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (2.926%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 42899
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET. AL.,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING
KNOWN AS:
515 25TH PLACE, NE
WASHINGTON, DC 20002
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of
the District of Columbia recorded on January 18, 2006, as
Instrument Number 2006008573, and in accordance Judgment
filed on March 9, 2018 in case 2015 CA 003048 R(RP) and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the
office of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin
Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
APRIL 24, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
515 25TH PLACE, NE, WASHINGTON, DC 20002, LOT NUMBERED 42 IN SQUARE 4518.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (2.625%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 14088
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET. AL.,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
12171397
12171398
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING
KNOWN AS:
1805 TOBIAS DRIVE SE
WASHINGTON, DC 20020
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of the
District of Columbia recorded on July 20, 2006, as Instrument
Number 2006098210 , and in accordance Judgment filed on
January 30, 2018 in case 2015 CA 000485 R(RP) and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the office of
HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin Avenue,
NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
APRIL 24, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
1805 TOBIAS DRIVE SE, WASHINGTON, DC 20020, LOT
NUMBERED EIGHTY-THREE (83) IN SQUARE NUMBERED
FIVE THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED EIGHTY-ONE (5881).
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (2% per
annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 31941
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET. AL.,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
2839 27TH STREET NE
WASHINGTON, DC 20018
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of
the District of Columbia recorded on January 17, 2007, as
Instrument Number 2007007247, and in accordance Judgment
filed on June 7, 2017 in case 2015 CA 000846 R(RP) and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the
office of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin
Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
APRIL 24, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
2839 27TH STREET NE, WASHINGTON, DC 20018, LOT
NUMBERED TWENTY-ONE (0021), IN SQUARE NUMBERED
FORTY-THREE HUNDRED FORTY-ONE (4341), IN ANNIE
KIRLAND WARREN'S SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE TRACT
OF LAND KNOWN AS "GREENVALE", AS PER PLAT RECORDED
IN LIBER 63, AT FOLIO 36.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 cash or certified
funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the
purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money at
the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (4% per
annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 25908
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET AL,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
7 18TH STREET SE UNIT 103
WASHINGTON, DC 20003
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of
the District of Columbia recorded on November 5, 2004, as
Instrument Number 2004153713, and in accordance Judgment
filed on February 13, 2018 in case 2015 CA 003414 R(RP)
and at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the
office of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin
Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034, on,
APRIL 24, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
7 18TH STREET SE UNIT 103, WASHINGTON, DC 20003,
PART OF LOT 68, IN SQUARE 1096.
Sale Subject to 1st Lien Deed of Trust:
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (6.375%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 21616
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET AL,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
12169762 MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
D11
Trustees Sale - DC
12170965
12171757
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
2404 2ND STREET, NE
WASHINGTON, DC 20002
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of the
District of Columbia recorded on August 8, 2007, as Instrument
Number 2007104492, and in accordance Judgment filed on
February 12, 2018 in case 2017 CA 003505 R(RP) and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the office of
HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin Avenue,
NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
APRIL 24, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
2404 2ND STREET, NE, WASHINGTON, DC 20002, LOT
NUMBERED NINE (9), IN SQUARE 3541.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (8.55%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 51855
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET. AL.,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
12169763 MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
840
12171766
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
400 MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE NW, UNIT NUMBER 618
WASHINGTON, DC 20001
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of the
District of Columbia recorded on May 31, 2005, as Instrument
Number 2005074275, and in accordance Judgment filed on
February 7, 2018 in case 2015 CA 000990 R(RP) and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the office of
HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin Avenue,
NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
APRIL 24, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
400 MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE NW, UNIT NUMBER 618,
WASHINGTON, DC 20001, LOT NO. 2566, SQUARE 517.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (3.25%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 24155
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET AL,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
12170355 MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
12170353
D12
850
Montgomery County
OPQRS
850
Montgomery County
HEISE JORGENSEN & STEFANELLI P.A.
18310 Montgomery Village Avenue, Suite 400
Gaithersburg, MD 20879
(301) 977-8400
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE
Known as
25910 RIDGE MANOR DRIVE, UNIT 1000-M, DAMASCUS, MARYLAND 20872
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a certain Deed of Trust
from Shereen Jaouni to G. Michael Dufour, Trustee, dated September 28,
2005 and recorded in Liber 31059 at Folio 161 among the Land Records
for Montgomery County, Maryland, the undersigned substituted trustees
(by virtue of Deed of Appointment between Housing Opportunities
Commission of Montgomery County, Maryland, successor in interest to
Weichert Financial Services (the "Beneficiary"), and said trustees recorded
among the Land Records of Montgomery County) will, on
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 28, 2018 at 9:05 O'Clock, A.M.
offer for sale at public auction at the front door of the Montgomery County
Judicial Center, 50 Maryland Avenue, Rockville, Maryland 20850, all of
the property and improvements thereon conveyed by said deed of trust,
described as 25910 Ridge Manor Drive, Unit 1000-M, Damascus, Maryland
20872, Tax Identification No. 12-03232532 (the "Property") and more fully
described in the Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The Property, which is improved by a dwelling, will
be offered for sale, subject to matters known and unknown, in an "AS
IS, WHERE IS" condition with no warranty of any kind and will be sold
and conveyed by the Substitute Trustees subject to all encumbrances,
rights, reservations, covenants, conditions, easements, restrictions, and
statutory liens, if any, having priority over the Deed of Trust, as they
may lawfully affect the Property. The risk of loss or damage to the
Property shall be borne by the successful bidder from and after the
date and time of the sale. Obtaining possession of the Property shall
be the sole responsibility of the successful bidder. A deposit of Eight
Thousand Dollars ($8,000.00), in the form of certified check or cashier's
check, (the "Deposit") at the time of sale will be required at the time of
sale. The Beneficiary is not required to make a Deposit. The balance
of the purchase price for the Property, together with interest at 5.625%
per annum from the date of sale to the date of settlement, shall be
paid in cash within fifteen (15) days after final ratification of the sale of
the Property by the Circuit Court, TIME BEING OF THE ESSENCE WITH
REGARD TO ALL OF PURCHASER'S OBLIGATIONS. Taxes, water, sewer,
ground rent, condominium fees, and/or homeowners association dues, if
applicable, will be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by
the purchaser. All other public charges and assessments payable on an
annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges will
be adjusted for the current year to date of sale and assumed thereafter
by the purchaser. All costs of conveyance, including transfer taxes and
recordation taxes will be paid by the purchaser. If any successful bidder
fails for any reason to complete settlement as provided above, the Deposit
shall be forfeited and applied to the costs of the sale, including Substitute
Trustees' fees, and the balance, if any, shall be delivered to the Beneficiary
to be applied by the Beneficiary against the indebtedness secured by,
and other amounts due under, the Deed of Trust in accordance with the
Deed of Trust or applicable law or otherwise as the Beneficiary shall elect.
Forfeiture of the Deposit shall not limit any rights or remedies of the
Substitute Trustees or the Beneficiary with respect to any such default.
If the Property is resold after any such default, such re-sale shall be at
the risk and the cost of the failing bidder, and the failing bidder shall
be liable for any deficiency between its bid and the successful bid at
the resale as well as the costs of conducting such re-sale. In the event
the Substitute Trustees do not execute a deed of conveyance or other
necessary settlement documents, the purchaser’s sole remedy shall be
the refund of the Deposit. In the event the Substitute Trustees are unable
to convey marketable title or in the event the borrower entered into a
repayment plan, reinstated or paid the loan off prior to the sale, or if for
any other reason, the undersigned did not have the right to sell, the sale
is null and void and the purchaser is not entitled to any legal or equitable
remedy other than return of the Deposit without interest and any and all
other claims of the purchaser are hereby released. Additional terms and
conditions to be announced at the time of sale. All inquiries regarding
the sale should be directed to Stephen B. Jackson, Substituted Trustee.
STEPHEN B. JACKSON and STEVEN P. HENNE
Substitute Trustees
March 9, 16, 23, 2018
851
12168677
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 2018
EZ
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
14201 DEVINGER PLACE, Accokeek, MD 20607
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 14201 DEVINGER PLACE, Accokeek, MD
20607. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated January 23, 2009, and recorded in Liber 30373
at Page 035 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $156,450.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on April 10, 2018 at 2:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 05-3680725
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-271251.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
9007 Temple Hills Road, Clinton, MD 20735
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 9007 Temple Hills Road, Clinton, MD
20735. By virtue of the power and authority contained in
a Deed of Trust, dated November 10, 2006, and recorded
in Liber 26808 at Page 323 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
amount of $396,950.00. Upon default and request for sale,
the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at
the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the
front of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at
14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on April
10, 2018 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed
of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 09-0979310
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-264824.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
9732 WYMAN WAY, Upper Marlboro, MD 20772
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 9732 WYMAN WAY, Upper Marlboro, MD
20772. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated February 28, 2007, and recorded in Liber 27396
at Page 440 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $370,120.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on April 10, 2018 at 2:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 11-1146349
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 14-243764.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-97978
TRUSTEE'S SALE
15020 Newcomb Lane, Bowie, MD 20716
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 15020 Newcomb Lane, Bowie, MD 20716.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust, dated October 10, 2006, and recorded in Liber 27377 at
Page 101 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $382,950.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on March 27, 2018 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 07-0745810
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-269744.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 2018
12169285 MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 2018
12169273 MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 2018
12169256 MARCH 9, 16, 23, 2018
12167907
TRUSTEE'S SALE
3803 Early Glow Ln, Bowie, MD 20716
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 3803 Early Glow Ln, Bowie, MD 20716.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust, dated January 17, 2006, and recorded in Liber 25269 at
Page 036 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $200,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on April 10, 2018 at 2:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 07-0814764
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-258742.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-97978
TRUSTEE'S SALE
15103 North Berwick Lane, Upper Marlboro, MD 20774
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 15103 North Berwick Lane, Upper
Marlboro, MD 20774. By virtue of the power and authority
contained in a Deed of Trust, dated July 30, 2013, and
recorded in Liber 35153 at Page 215 among the land records
of the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
amount of $384,599.00. Upon default and request for sale,
the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at
the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the
front of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at
14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on April
10, 2018 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed
of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 03-5511864
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-269215.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
6324 PATTERSON STREET, Riverdale, MD 20737
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 6324 PATTERSON STREET, Riverdale, MD
20737. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated September 28, 1992, and recorded in Liber 8664
at Page 210 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $106,050.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on April 10, 2018 at 2:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 19-2146173
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-270276.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
101 Joyceton Terr, Upper Marlboro, MD 20774
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 101 Joyceton Terr, Upper Marlboro, MD
20774. By virtue of the power and authority contained in
a Deed of Trust, dated September 15, 2005, and recorded
in Liber 23522 at Page 394 among the land records of the
County of Prince George's, in the original principal amount
of $265,200.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front
of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735
Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on April 10,
2018 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 13-1495613
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 10% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-260853.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
4715 Pistachio Lane, Capitol Heights, MD 20743
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 4715 Pistachio Lane, Capitol Heights,
MD 20743. By virtue of the power and authority contained
in a Deed of Trust, dated June 15, 2007, and recorded in
Liber 28172 at Page 029 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
amount of $232,000.00. Upon default and request for sale,
the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at
the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the
front of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at
14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on April
10, 2018 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed
of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 06-0600874
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.15% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-255900.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-97978
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 2018
12170599 MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 2018
12169729 MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 2018
12169274 MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 2018
12169267 MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 2018
12167492
TRUSTEE'S SALE
17101 Usher Pl, Upper Marlboro, MD 20772
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 17101 Usher Pl, Upper Marlboro, MD
20772. By virtue of the power and authority contained in
a Deed of Trust, dated December 15, 2006, and recorded
in Liber 26972 at Page 130 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
amount of $360,000.00. Upon default and request for sale,
the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at
the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the
front of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at
14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on April
10, 2018 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed
of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 03-0206359
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or
certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 6.238% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-266290.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-97978
TRUSTEE'S SALE
2824 BELAIR DRIVE, Bowie, MD 20715
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 2824 BELAIR DRIVE, Bowie, MD 20715.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust, dated January 25, 2006, and recorded in Liber 24356 at
Page 646 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $282,764.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on April 10, 2018 at 2:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 07-0666032
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 15-250597.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-97978
TRUSTEE'S SALE
10015 Mike Road, Fort Washington, MD 20744
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 10015 Mike Road, Fort Washington, MD
20744. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated June 9, 2005, and recorded in Liber 22602 at
Page 355 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $251,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on April 10, 2018 at 2:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 05-0399923
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-270631.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
9401 Dashia Drive, Fort Washington, MD 20744
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 9401 Dashia Drive, Fort Washington, MD
20744. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated October 25, 2004, and recorded in Liber 21551
at Page 686 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $177,625.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on April 10, 2018 at 2:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 05-0366930
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-263254.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
11913 Saint Francis Way, Mitchellville, MD 20721
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 11913 Saint Francis Way, Mitchellville,
MD 20721. By virtue of the power and authority contained
in a Deed of Trust, dated August 3, 2006, and recorded in
Liber 26514 at Page 037 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
amount of $540,900.00. Upon default and request for sale,
the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at
the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the
front of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at
14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on April
10, 2018 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed
of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 07-0730408
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 10-185804P.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-97978
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 2018
12170702 MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 2018
12170597 MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 2018
12169276 MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 2018
12169271 MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 2018
12169255
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S0833-2 10x3
FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 2018
851
Prince Georges County
OPQRS
EZ
851
Prince Georges County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
8524 Paragon Ct, Upper Marlboro, MD 20772
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 8524 Paragon Ct, Upper Marlboro, MD
20772. By virtue of the power and authority contained in
a Deed of Trust, dated September 28, 2006, and recorded
in Liber 26196 at Page 062 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
amount of $260,000.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front
of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735
Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on March 27,
2018 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 15-1745421
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-267187.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
1917 Jennings Mill Drive, Bowie, MD 20721
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 917 Jennings Mill Drive, Bowie, MD
20721. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated October 25, 2010, and recorded in Liber 32126
at Page 316 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $680,811.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on March 27, 2018 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 07-3592334
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-268063.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
15804 Buxton Place, Upper Marlboro, MD 20774
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 15804 Buxton Place, Upper Marlboro, MD
20774. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated April 4, 2007, and recorded in Liber 28476 at
Page 393 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $428,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on March 27, 2018 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 03-3654480
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-269749.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 9, 16, 23, 2018
12167697
TRUSTEE'S SALE
860 NEPTUNE AVENUE, Oxon Hill, MD 20745
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 860 NEPTUNE AVENUE, Oxon Hill, MD
20745. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated October 6, 2004, and recorded in Liber 20898
at Page 533 among the land records of the County of Prince
George's, in the original principal amount of $49,970.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on March 27, 2018 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 12-1291160
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-267996.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
MARCH 9, 16, 23, 2018
12166697
TRUSTEE'S SALE
7724 Fishing Creek Way, Clinton, MD 20735
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 7724 Fishing Creek Way, Clinton, MD
20735. By virtue of the power and authority contained in
a Deed of Trust, dated December 16, 2005, and recorded
in Liber 24372 at Page 696 among the land records of
the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
amount of $252,000.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front
of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735
Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on March 27,
2018 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 09-3037702
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-268971.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
MARCH 9, 16, 23, 2018
12165755
TRUSTEE'S SALE
1727 Village Green Dr, Unit Z-40, Landover, MD 20785
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 1727 Village Green Dr, Unit Z-40,
Landover, MD 20785. By virtue of the power and authority
contained in a Deed of Trust, dated August 29, 2007, and
recorded in Liber 28598 at Page 710 among the land records
of the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
amount of $119,200.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front
of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735
Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on March 27,
2018 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 13-1459593
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-265174.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
6002 Maria Avenue, Suitland, MD 20746
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 6002 Maria Avenue, Suitland, MD 20746.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust,
dated December 23, 2009, and recorded in Liber 31396 at
Page 247 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $194,596.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on March 27, 2018 at 2:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 06-0565309
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-270165.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 9, 16, 23, 2018
852
12165553
Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
1249 Pekin Road, Pasadena, MD 21122
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 1249 Pekin Road, Pasadena, MD 21122.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust, dated January 30, 2008, and recorded in Liber 20029
at Page 558 among the land records of the COUNTY OF ANNE
ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount of $360,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY
OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland,
on April 10, 2018 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in
said Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 03-542-11449304
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-263730.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
852
Anne Arundel County
852
D13
Anne Arundel County
HEISE JORGENSEN & STEFANELLI P.A.
18310 Montgomery Village Avenue, Suite 400
Gaithersburg, MD 20879
(301) 977-8400
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE
Known as
5711 PHILLIPS STREET, BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 21225
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a certain Deed
of Trust from Francis P. Gunde to Thomas F. McDonough and Robert
S. Handzo, Trustees, dated December 4, 2007 and recorded in Book
20184 at Page 614 among the Land Records for Anne Arundel County,
Maryland, the undersigned substituted trustees (by virtue of Deed of
Appointment between Maryland Department of Housing and Community
Development, Community Development Administration, as successor in
interest to Southern Trust Mortgage, LLC (the "Beneficiary") and said
trustees recorded among the Land Records of Anne Arundel County) will,
on
THURSDAY, MARCH 29, 2018 at 11:30 O'Clock, A.M.
offer for sale at public auction at the Anne Arundel County Circuit Court,
located at 7 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland 21401, all of the property
and improvements thereon conveyed by said deed of trust, described as
5711 Phillips Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21225, Tax Identification No. 05693-16857430 (the "Property") and more fully described in the Deed of
Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The Property, which is improved by a dwelling, will
be offered for sale, subject to matters known and unknown, in an "AS
IS, WHERE IS" condition with no warranty of any kind and will be sold
and conveyed by the Substitute Trustees subject to all encumbrances,
rights, reservations, covenants, conditions, easements, restrictions, and
statutory liens, if any, having priority over the Deed of Trust, as they may
lawfully affect the Property. The risk of loss or damage to the Property
shall be borne by the successful bidder from and after the date and
time of the sale. Obtaining possession of the Property shall be the sole
responsibility of the successful bidder. A deposit of Twenty-Five Thousand
Dollars ($25,000.00), in the form of certified check or cashier's check,
(the "Deposit") will be required at the time of sale. The Beneficiary is
not required to make a Deposit. The balance of the purchase price for
the Property, together with interest at 6.50% per annum from the date
of sale to the date of settlement, shall be paid in cash within fifteen (15)
days after final ratification of the sale of the Property by the Circuit Court,
TIME BEING OF THE ESSENCE WITH REGARD TO ALL OF PURCHASER'S
OBLIGATIONS. Taxes, water, sewer, ground rent, condominium fees,
and/or homeowners association dues, if applicable, will be adjusted to the
date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. All other public
charges and assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary
and/or metropolitan district charges will be adjusted for the current year
to date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. All costs of
conveyance, including transfer taxes and recordation taxes will be paid by
the purchaser. If any successful bidder fails for any reason to complete
settlement as provided above, the Deposit shall be forfeited and applied to
the costs of the sale, including Substitute Trustees' fees, and the balance,
if any, shall be delivered to the Beneficiary to be applied by the Beneficiary
against the indebtedness secured by, and other amounts due under, the
Deed of Trust in accordance with the Deed of Trust or applicable law
or otherwise as the Beneficiary shall elect. Forfeiture of the Deposit
shall not limit any rights or remedies of the Substitute Trustees or the
Beneficiary with respect to any such default. If the Property is resold
after any such default, such re-sale shall be at the risk and the cost of
the failing bidder, and the failing bidder shall be liable for any deficiency
between its bid and the successful bid at the resale as well as the costs
of conducting such re-sale. In the event the Substitute Trustees do not
execute a deed of conveyance or other necessary settlement documents,
the purchaser’s sole remedy shall be the refund of the Deposit. In the
event the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey marketable title or in
the event the borrower entered into a repayment plan, reinstated or paid
the loan off prior to the sale, or if for any other reason, the undersigned
did not have the right to sell, the sale is null and void and the purchaser
is not entitled to any legal or equitable remedy other than return of the
Deposit without interest and any and all other claims of the purchaser are
hereby released. Additional terms and conditions to be announced at the
time of sale. All inquiries regarding the sale should be directed to Stephen
B. Jackson, Substituted Trustee.
STEPHEN B. JACKSON and STEVEN P. HENNE
Substitute Trustees
March 9, 16, 23, 2018
12168674
TRUSTEE'S SALE
7712 East Classic Court aka 7712 Classic E CT,
Severn, MD 21144
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 7712 East Classic Court aka 7712 Classic
E CT, Severn, MD 21144. By virtue of the power and authority
contained in a Deed of Trust, dated July 24, 2004, and recorded
in Liber 15664 at Page 234 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount
of $372,000.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church
Circle, Annapolis, Maryland, on March 27, 2018 at 4:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 04-211-90080116
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-269531.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 9, 16, 23, 2018
12167901
TRUSTEE'S SALE
310 Rollins Ave, Capitol Heights, MD 20743
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 310 Rollins Ave, Capitol Heights, MD
20743. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a
Deed of Trust, dated July 9, 2007, and recorded in Liber 28349
at Page 510 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $352,500.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on March 27, 2018 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 18-2048049
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-270970.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
MARCH 9, 16, 23, 2018
12166789
TRUSTEE'S SALE
11701 CAROL ANN CT, Upper Marlboro, MD 20774
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 11701 CAROL ANN CT, Upper Marlboro,
MD 20774. By virtue of the power and authority contained
in a Deed of Trust, dated April 30, 2007, and recorded in
Liber 28421 at Page 368 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
amount of $436,800.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front
of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735
Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on March 27,
2018 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 15-1767789
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-266521.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
MARCH 9, 16, 23, 2018
12165561
TRUSTEE'S SALE
14215 LUSBY RIDGE ROAD, Accokeek, MD 20607
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 14215 LUSBY RIDGE ROAD, Accokeek,
MD 20607. By virtue of the power and authority contained
in a Deed of Trust, dated October 27, 2010, and recorded
in Liber 32168 at Page 271 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE, in the original principal amount
of $304,415.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE, at the front
of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735
Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on March 27,
2018 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 05-3681210
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-263988.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 2018
12169324 A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
MARCH 9, 16, 23, 2018
12167902
TRUSTEE'S SALE
851
Prince Georges County 851 Prince Georges County
7728 Gatewood Court, Pasadena, MD 21122
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
MARYLAND
premises known as 7728 Gatewood Court, Pasadena, MD
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
James
E.
Clarke
21122. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed Hugh J. Green
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
of Trust, dated April 30, 2003, and recorded in Liber 12995 Shannon Menapace
v.
M. Drexel
at Page 079 among the land records of the County of Anne Christine
JOHN C. STEWART
Brian Thomas
Defendant(s)
Arundel, in the original principal amount of $178,489.00. Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
Civil Action No. CAEF15-32505
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
NOTICE
offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY v.The Estate of Melecio S. Soriano,
is hereby given this 12th
OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland, surviving tenant by the entirety of Notice
day of March 2018, by the Circuit
Soriano, and Florence C.
on April 10, 2018 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in Filomena
Court for Prince George's County,
Kogok and Michael E. Kogok as
Maryland, that the sale of the propsaid Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
Trustee of the Melecia S. Soriano
erty mentioned in these proceedRevocable Living Trust created by
ings and described as 9225 Fowler
Tax ID# 03-676-06304411
Declaration of Trust dated NovemLane, Lanham, MD 20706, will be
ber 13, 2007
ratified and confirmed unless
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and Defendant(s)
cause to the contrary thereof be
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
Civil No. CAEF17-40895
shown on or before the 12th day of
April, 2018, provided a copy of this
NOTICE PURSUANT
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
NOTICE be published at least once
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
a week in each of three successive
affect same, if any.
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
weeks in some newspaper of genTERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash Prince George's County, Maryland, eral circulation published in said
9th day of March 2018, that
County before the 12th day of
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The this
the foreclosure sale of the properApril, 2018.
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum ty described in the deed of trust The Report of Sale states the
herein and located at
amount of the sale to be
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within docketed
5602 Galloway Drive, Oxon Hill,
$182,000.00.
20745, made and reportTEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments Maryland
ed by James E. Clarke, Hugh J.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments Green, Shannon Menapace, ChrisClerk of the Circuit Court For
M. Drexel and Brian Thomas,
Prince George's County, Maryland
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed tine
Substitute Trustees, be RATIFIED
March
16,
23,
30, 2018 12170798
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners and CONFIRMED, unless cause to
contrary be shown on or 852
association dues and assessments that may become due after the
Anne Arundel County
before the 9th day of April, 2018,
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. provided a copy of this Order be
in The Washington Post
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer inserted
once in each of three (3) succesFOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement sive weeks before the 9th day of
Thomas W. Hodge, et al.
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for April, 2018.
Substitute Trustees
Report of Sale states the
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the The
amount of the sale at $133,100.00.
Versus
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Estate of Leroy Brown, et al.
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms Prince George's County, Maryland Defendants
No. C-02-CV-17-003637
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. March 16, 23, 30, 2018 12170933
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
Trustee's File No. 16-258324.
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
NOTICE
MARYLAND
Notice
is hereby issued this ThursKristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
day, March 8, 2018 that the sale
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
of
the
property
in the proceedPlaintiffs,
Substitute
Trustees
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
ings mentioned, made and reportv.
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
ed by Thomas W Hodge, Substitute
FRANK A. CARDASCIA
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-06325
NOTICE
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
12167905 MARCH 9, 16, 23, 2018
MARCH 9, 16, 23, 2018
850
Montgomery County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR THE COUNTY OF
MONTGOMERY, MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
MARIE COLETTE AHOU
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO. 418965V
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THIS
27th day of February, 2018 by the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
MONTGOMERY, Maryland, and by
the authority thereof, that the sale
made by Kristine D. Brown, William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto,
R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the Real
Property designated as 14522
Wexhall Drive, Burtonsville, MD,
20866, and reported in the above
entitled cause, will be finally ratified and confirmed, unless cause
to the contrary thereof be shown
on or before the 29th day of
March, 2018, next; provided a
copy of this order be inserted
in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
15th Street, Washington DC, MD
published in said COUNTY OF
MONTGOMERY once a week for
three successive weeks before
the 29th day of March, 2018.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $177,790.10
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Montgomery County, Maryland
Feb19, 26, March 5, 2018 12169010
850
851
Montgomery County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
v.
IN RE: 9216 CRANDALL ROAD
LANHAM, MD 20706
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
MARYLAND
JEFFREY LEVIN AND
JOEL ARONSON,
Trustees
Plaintiff,
v.
TAYLOR ROAD, LLC
Defendant
Civil No. 439433V
NOTICE is hereby issued, this 8th
day of March, 2018 that the property
known as 3602 Taylor St, Chevy
Chase, Montgomery County, Maryland and reported by Joes S. Aronson be raified and confirmed unless
casue to the contrary be shown on
or before the 9th day of April 2018,
provided a copy of this notice be
inserted in some newspaper published in this County, once in each of
three (3) successive weeks before
the 9th day of April 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount ofsale to be Five Hundred
Thousand Dollars ($500,000.00) to
Capitol Funding Group, LLC.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Mar 23, 30,April 6,2018
12171927
You, too, could have
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
Prince Georges County
SF
AND
ALL OCCUPANTS
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-35958
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 13th
day of March 2018, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 9216 Crandall Road, Lanham, MD 20706, will
be ratified and confirmed unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 13th day of
April, 2018, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive
weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said
County before the 13th day of
April, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$365,250.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
March 16, 23, 30, 2018 12170947
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
www.hwestauctions.com
12167491 MARCH 9, 16, 23, 2018
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
v.
ANDREA HILL A/K/A
ANDREA D. HILL
CURTIS HILL
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-39087
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 12th
day of March 2018, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 14304 Kathleen Lane, Brandywine, MD 20613,
will be ratified and confirmed
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the
12th day of April, 2018, provided a
copy of this NOTICE be published
at least once a week in each of
three successive weeks in some
newspaper of general circulation
published in said County before
the 12th day of April, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$284,750.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
March 16, 23, 30, 2018 12170905
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
851
12166384
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
Civil Action No. CAEF15-00433
NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
v.
ANTHONY L BURKS
KHALILAH BURKS
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-26168
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 12th
day of March 2018, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 10607 Terraco Terrace, Cheltenham, MD 20623,
will be ratified and confirmed
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the
12th day of April, 2018, provided a
copy of this NOTICE be published
at least once a week in each of
three successive weeks in some
newspaper of general circulation
published in said County before
the 12th day of April, 2018.
Notice is hereby given this 12th
day of March 2018, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 5028 Leland
Drive, Oxon Hill, MD 20745, will
be ratified and confirmed unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 12th day of
April, 2018, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive
weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said
County before the 12th day of
April, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$258,700.00.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$184,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
March 16, 23, 30, 2018 12170904
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
v.
GORDON A. TROTZ
BRENDA A. TROTZ
Defendant(s)
March 16, 23, 30, 2018
12170901
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 2018
12170068
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
v.
JAMES R. PEYTON
Defendant(s)
v.
CAROL MCKENZIE
Defendant(s)
Notice is hereby given this 13th
day of March 2018, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 6414 Fairborn Terrace, Hyattsville, MD
20784, will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 13th day of April, 2018,
provided a copy of this NOTICE be
published at least once a week in
each of three successive weeks
in some newspaper of general circulation published in said County
before the 13th day of April, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$355,162.51.
Civil Action No. CAEF17-33834
NOTICE
Civil Action No. CAEF14-22347
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 12th
day of March 2018, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 9805 Lake
Pointe Court, Unit 204, Largo, MD
20774, will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 12th day of April, 2018,
provided a copy of this NOTICE be
published at least once a week in
each of three successive weeks
in some newspaper of general circulation published in said County
before the 12th day of April, 2018.
Notice is hereby given this 13th
day of March 2018, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 15940
Alameda Drive, Bowie, MD 20716,
will be ratified and confirmed
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the
13th day of April, 2018, provided a
copy of this NOTICE be published
at least once a week in each of
three successive weeks in some
newspaper of general circulation
published in said County before
the 13th day of April, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$96,000.00.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$290,000.00.
You, too, could have
home delivery.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
1-800-753-POST
March 16, 23, 30, 2018
12170907
March 16, 23, 30, 2018
March 16, 23, 30, 2018
12170945
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
/S/Robert P Duckworth
Circuit Court for
Anne Arundel County, MD
Mar 16, 23, 30, 2018
12171933
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
Robert E. Frazier, et al.
Substitute Trustees
Versus
CFMW LLC, et al.
Defendants
No. C-02-CV-16-001307
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
12170935
SF
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Trustee.
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 9th
day of April 2018 next; provided,
a copy of this Notice be inserted
in some newspaper published in
Anne Arundel County, once in each
of three successive weeks before
the 9th day of April 2018 next. The
report states that the amount of
sale of the property at 777 MacSherry Drive, Arnold, MD 21012 to be
$310,000.00.
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
1-800-753-POST
SF
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this Thursday, March 1, 2018 that the sale
of the property in the proceedings mentioned, made and reported by Thomas W Hodge, Substitute
Trustee.
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 2nd
day of April 2018 next; provided,
a copy of this Notice be inserted
in some newspaper published in
Anne Arundel County, once in each
of three successive weeks before
the 2nd day of April 2018 next. The
report states that the amount of
sale of the property at 1484 Snug
Harbor Road, Shady Side, MD 20764
to be $250,750.00.
/S/Robert P Duckworth
Circuit Court for
Anne Arundel County, MD
Mar 9, 16, 23, 2018
12169903
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
D14
852
Anne Arundel County
OPQRS
852
Anne Arundel County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
1520 WINTERBERRY DRIVE, Arnold, MD 21012
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 1520 WINTERBERRY DRIVE, Arnold, MD
21012. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated February 24, 2006, and recorded in Liber 17592
at Page 429 among the land records of the COUNTY OF ANNE
ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount of $272,744.75.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY
OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland,
on March 27, 2018 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in
said Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 03-166-90039085
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-269581.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
852
Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
1191 Hammond Lane, Odenton, MD 21113
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 1191 Hammond Lane, Odenton, MD 21113.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust, dated October 17, 2006, and recorded in Liber 18430
at Page 669 among the land records of the COUNTY OF ANNE
ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount of $400,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY
OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland,
on March 27, 2018 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in
said Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 04-403-02768450
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-266053.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
855
855
Charles County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
102 WHISTLESTOP COURT, La Plata, MD 20646
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 102 WHISTLESTOP COURT, La Plata, MD
20646. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated July 22, 2016, and recorded in Liber 9468 at
Page 396 among the land records of the COUNTY OF CHARLES,
in the original principal amount of $342,388.00. Upon default
and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for
sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF
CHARLES, at 200 Charles St (in the Breezeway between Circuit
& District Courts), LaPlata, MD, on March 27, 2018 at 12:00
PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including
but not limited to:
Tax ID# 01-091263
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-270030.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
www.hwestauctions.com
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
MARCH 9, 16, 23, 2018
12165752 MARCH 9, 16, 23, 2018
12165756
12165746 MARCH 9, 16, 23, 2018
853
853
TRUSTEE'S SALE
Calvert County
Calvert County
17949 Cypress Drive, Cobb Island, MD 20625
ORLANS PC
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
premises known as 17949 Cypress Drive, Cobb Island, MD
LEESBURG, VA 20175
TRUSTEE'S SALE
20625. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
703-777-7101
590 Beech Dr, Lusby, MD 20657
of Trust, dated June 30, 2009, and recorded in Liber 6911 at
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by Page 457 among the land records of the COUNTY OF CHARLES,
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
premises known as 590 Beech Dr, Lusby, MD 20657. By virtue in the original principal amount of $211,105.00. Upon default
5903 Lynbrook Road
of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust, dated and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for
Baltimore, MD 21225
March 10, 2016, and recorded in Liber 4732 at Page 0331 sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from among the land records of the COUNTY OF CALVERT, in the CHARLES, at 200 Charles St (in the Breezeway between Circuit
MELISSA QUINLAN, dated April 3, 2015 and recorded in original principal amount of $278,489.00. Upon default and & District Courts), LaPlata, MD, on April 10, 2018 at 12:00
Liber 28238, folio 098 among the Land Records of ANNE request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including
ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF CALVERT, but not limited to:
(Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.C-02-CV-17-003610; at 175 Main Street, Prince Frederick, Maryland, on April 10, Tax ID# 05-001595
Tax ID No.502203033200 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at 2018 at 9:30 AM, all that property described in said Deed of
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
public auction at the ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY COURTHOUSE, Trust including but not limited to:
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
located at 8 CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401, on
Tax ID# 01-067494
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
MARCH 28, 2018 at 11:15 AM
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and affect same, if any.
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and more conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
affect same, if any.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
Terms of Sale: A deposit $16,500.00 will be required at the from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments association dues and assessments that may become due after
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for ANNE by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
ARUNDEL COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. association dues and assessments that may become due after taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees Trustee's File No. 17-269200.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale, of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus Trustee's File No. 17-266404.
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-97978
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
SHAPIRO
&
BROWN,
LLP,
10021
Balls
Ford
Road,
Suite
200,
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
www.hwestauctions.com
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
MARCH23, 30, APRIL 6, 2018
12168305
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
857
872
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
Howard County
Fairfax County
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
www.hwestauctions.com
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
FOR HOWARD COUNTY
5604 WILLOUGHBY NEWTON DR,
12169727
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 2018
MARYLAND
UNIT 18,
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect, 855
855
BENJAMIN P. SMITH, et al.
CENTREVILLE, VA 20120
Charles County
Charles County
Substitute Trustees
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
Plaintiff(s)
In execution of a Deed of Trust
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
vs.
in the original principal amount
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
of $244,120.00, with an annual
5565 STERRETT PLACE, LLC, et al.
interest rate of 7.000000% dated
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
Defendant(s)
April 6, 2006, recorded among
TRUSTEE'S
SALE
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
the land records of the Circuit
Civil No. 13-C-17-111771
Court for the County of Fairfax
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
NOTICE PURSUANT
2019 Tanglewood Drive, Waldorf, MD 206014
as Deed Book 18453, Page 0344,
TO RULE 14-305(c)
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible premises known as 2019 Tanglewood Drive, Waldorf, MD Pursuant to Rule 14-305(c),
at public auction all that property
Notice is hereby given this 8th
located in the County of Fairfax,
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser 20601. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a day of March 2018 by the Circuit
on the courthouse steps at the
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date Deed of Trust, dated August 26, 2009, and recorded in Liber Court for Howard County, Maryfront of the Circuit Court building
land, that the sale of the property
for the County of Fairfax located
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey 06963 at Page 0476 among the land records of the COUNTY mentioned in these proceedings,
at 4110 Chain Bridge Road, Fairinsurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in OF CHARLES, in the original principal amount of $173,796.00. made and reported by Benjamin
fax, Virginia on April 18, 2018
P. Smith, of the the trustees hereat 2:30 PM, the property with
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will in, will be ratified and confirmed,
improvements to wit:
unless
cause
to
the
contrary
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY thereof be shown on or before
Tax Map No. 054411070018
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity, OF CHARLES, at 200 Charles St (in the Breezeway between the 16th day of April, 2018, proTHIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
vided
a
copy
of
this
Notice
be
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 573988)
DEBT COLLECTOR.
Circuit & District Courts), LaPlata, MD, on April 10, 2018 at inserted in some newspaper pubin said County once in
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
JAMES E. CLARKE,
12:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust lished
each of theree successive weeks
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
HUGH J. GREEN,
before the 9th day of April, 2018.
sale price, will be required in cash,
including but not limited to:
certified or cashier's check. SetThe report states the amount of
SHANNON MENAPACE,
tlement within fifteen (15) days
Tax ID# 06-160395
the sale to be $7,000,000.00. The
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
property sold has the following
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and street address: 5565 STERRETT
BRIAN THOMAS,
to be announced at sale. Loan
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, PLACE, COLUMBIA, MD 21044.
type: Conventional. Reference
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
Wayne
A
Robey
Number 17-268767.
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
Clerk of the Circuit Court
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
Howard County, MD
affect same, if any.
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, SubSpahr LLP
stitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash Ballard
300 E. Lombard St. 18th Flr.
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The Baltimore, MD 21202
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virbalance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum March 16, 23, 30, 2018 12171019 ginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
872
Mar 9, 16, 23, 30, 2018 12169473
from
the
date
of
sale
to
the
date
of
payment
will
be
paid
within
Fairfax
County
www.hwestauctions.com
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
2547 JAMES MONROE CIRCLE,
6455 HOLYOKE DRIVE,
MARCH 9, 16, 23, 2018
12169110 on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
HERNDON, VA 20171
ANNANDALE, VA 22003
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
TRUSTEE'S SALE
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners In execution of a Deed of Trust In execution of a Deed of Trust
the original principal amount
association dues and assessments that may become due after in the original principal amount in
378 Forest Beach Rd, Annapolis, MD 21409
of $368,000.00, with an annual
of $607,792.00, with an annual
rate of 3.500000% dated
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. interest rate of 3.750000% dated interest
December
30, 2005, recorded
16, 2016, recorded
premises known as 378 Forest Beach Rd, Annapolis, MD Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer February
among the land records of the
among the land records of the
taxes,
title
insurance,
and
all
other
costs
incident
to
settlement
Circuit
Court
for the COUNTY OF
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
21409. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
FAIRFAX
as
Deed Book 18100,
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 24456,
of Trust, dated May 22, 2007, and recorded in Liber 19140 are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for Page 0562, the undersigned Page 130, the undersigned
the
purchaser,
otherwise
the
deposit
will
be
forfeited
and
the
appointed
Substitute
Trustee will
appointed Substitute Trustee will
at Page 021 among the land records of the COUNTY OF ANNE
offer for sale at public auction
offer for sale at public auction
ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount of $867,000.00. property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting all that property located in the all that property located in the
COUNTY
OF
FAIRFAX,
on
the courpurchaser.
If
the
sale
is
not
ratified
or
if
the
Substitute
Trustees
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courUpon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
thouse steps at the front of the
thouse steps at the front of the
offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms Circuit Court building for the Circuit Court building for the
County
of
Fairfax
located
at 4110
of Fairfax located at 4110
OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland, of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. County
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, VirChain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on April 18, 2018 at 2:30 PM,
ginia on April 25, 2018 at 2:30 PM,
on March 27, 2018 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in Trustee's File No. 17-270309.
the
property
with
improvements
the property with improvements
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
said Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
to wit:
to wit:
Tax Map No. 0251 20 0031
Tax Map No. 061-3-06-0034
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Tax ID# 300027379965
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-97978
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
DEBT COLLECTOR.
DEBT COLLECTOR.
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
sale price, will be required in cash,
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Setaffect same, if any.
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
tlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
forfeit
deposit.
Additional
terms
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
to be announced at sale. Loan
to be announced at sale. Loan
www.hwestauctions.com
type: Conventional. Reference
balance of the purchase price with interest at 7.65% per annum
type: VA. Reference Number 18Number 16-255842.
MARCH
23,
30,
APRIL
6,
2018
12169731
272854.
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, SubCORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
stitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, VirRoad, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
ginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
March 16, 23, 2018
12169474
March 23, 30, 2018
12169442
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
Home delivery starts
Home delivery
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
your day off right.
is convenient.
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
SF
SF
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Wake up to
Trustee's File No. 15-247308.
home delivery.
Home delivery
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
1-800-753-POST
is convenient.
SF
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
IS YOUR CAR
HOLDING UP?
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
www.hwestauctions.com
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
MARCH 9, 16, 23, 2018
12166791
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
1-800-753-POST
SF
Wake up to
home delivery.
C054E 2x3
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 2018
EZ
872
Charles County
SF
872
Fairfax County
N
Fairfax County
N
JOBS
JOBS
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE
3051 Copeland Lane, Oakton, VA 22124
MARCH 27, 2018
Trustees’ Notice of Sale of valuable residential property commonly known
as 3051 Copeland Lane, Oakton, VA 22124. By virtue of a certain Deed
of Trust dated September 16, 2014 and recorded October 14, 2014, in
Deed Book 23829, Page 1004 among the land records of Fairfax County,
Virginia, and at the request of the party secured thereby, the appointed
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES, Michael L. O’Reilly and Nancy J. O’Reilly will offer
for sale, at public auction, at the Fairfax County Circuit Court, 4110 Chain
Bridge Road, Fairfax, VA 22030, on Tuesday, March 27, 2018, at 2:00
p.m., the following-described premises, situated in Oakton, County of
Fairfax, Virginia, and designated as and being now known for taxation and
assessment purposes as 3051 Copeland Lane, Oakton, VA 22124, Tax
Map. No. 047-2-49-0001, and more particularly described as:
Lot One (1), OAK MANOR, as the same appears duly dedicated, platted
and recorded in Deed Book 10576 at Page 1857, among the land records
of Fairfax County, Virginia.
Newspaper Delivery Carriers
are needed to deliver
The Washington Post
for the following areas:
For Routes in
College Park, Lanham & Hyattsville, MD
Call Robert Garner
301-490-2032
Terms of Sale: ALL CASH. A Deposit of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is less, will be required at time of sale; such deposit to
be in cash, certified check, cashier’s check, or such other form as the
trustees may determine, in their sole discretion. The property will be
sold subject to the first trust held by Wells Fargo Bank N.A. The property
is sold in AS IS condition. All conveyancing, recording, recordation tax,
transfer tax, etc., at cost of purchaser. The balance of the purchase price,
due in cash, certified check, or cashier’s check shall accrue interest at
the rate of 6% per annum from date of sale to the date of receipt of
the balance of the purchase price. Terms of sale to be complied with
within fifteen (15) calendar days from date of sale, otherwise trustees
reserve the right to forfeit deposit, readvertise and sell the property at
the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser; or without forfeiting deposit,
trustees may avail themselves of any legal or equitable rights against the
defaulting purchaser. Time is of the essence. If trustees cannot convey
title, purchaser’s sole remedy is a return of deposit. Further terms and
particulars may be announced at the time of sale.
Michael L. O’Reilly, Substitute Trustee
Nancy J. O’Reilly, Substitute Trustee
For further information contact Nancy J. O’Reilly, The O’Reilly Law Firm,
761-C Monroe St., Suite 200, Herndon, VA 20170. 703-766-1991
March 16, 23, 2018
872
873
are needed to deliver
The Washington Post
for the following areas:
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
4205 Kenton Circle
Dumfries, VA 22025
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $405,900.00, with an annual
interest rate of 6.000000% dated
August 16, 2005, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX
as Deed Book 17644, Page 0772,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at
the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road,
Fairfax, Virginia on April 25, 2018
at 2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 44-3-4--32B
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $218,776.00, dated April 19,
2012, recorded among the land
records of the Circuit Court for
Prince William County on April 19,
2012, as Instrument Number
201204190036754, the undersigned
appointed
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction, at the main entrance of
the courthouse for the Circuit Court
of Prince William County, 9311 Lee
Ave, Manassas, VA on April 20, 2018
at 9:30 AM, the property described
in said deed of trust, located at
the above address and briefly
described as: Lot T-3, Section 4-B,
MONTCLAIR, as the same appears
duly dedicated, platted and
recorded in Deed Book 1372 at
Page 1543 and corrected in Deed
Book 1407 at page 745, among
the land records of Prince William
County, Virginia. Tax ID: 8191-506867.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $11,000.00 or 10%
of the sale price, whichever is
lower, will be required in the form
of a certified or cashier’s check.
Cash will not be accepted as a
deposit. Settlement within fifteen
(15) days of sale, otherwise Trustee
may forfeit deposit. Additional
terms to be announced at sale.
This is a communication from a
debt collector. This notice is an
attempt to collect on a debt and
any information obtained will be
used for that purpose.
(Trustee # 576321)
Substitute Trustee: ALG Trustee,
LLC, C/O Orlans PC PO Box 2548,
Leesburg, VA 20177, (703) 7777101,
website:
http://www.orlans.com
Towne #: 5000.0733
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 18-272971.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
March 23, 30, 2018
12170595
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
5927 OAKLAND PARK DRIVE,
BURKE, VA 22015
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $620,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.750000% dated
October 17, 2005, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 17914,
Page 1186, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on April 18, 2018 at 2:30 PM,
the property with improvements
to wit:
Tax Map No. 077-3-04-0232
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 18-271922.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
March 16, 23, 2018
12170565
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
2375 EMERALD HTS CT,
RESTON, VA 20191
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $135,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 8.300000% dated
August 28, 2002, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX
as Deed Book 13310, Page 1860,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at
the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road,
Fairfax, Virginia on April 18, 2018
at 2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 026-1-11-4-A-0091
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 18-273073.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
12170564
Prince William County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
16386 KRAMER ESTATE DR,
WOODBRIDGE, VA 22191
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $507,685.00, with an annual
interest rate of 4.875000% dated
July 6, 2010, recorded among the
land records of the Circuit Court
for the County of Prince William
as Deed Instrument Number
201007090058944, the undersigned appointed Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction all that property located
in the County of Prince William,
on the Court House steps in front
of Main Entrance for the Circuit
Court building for the County of
Prince William located at 9311
Lee Avenue, Manassas, Virginia
on April 24, 2018 at 4:00 PM, the
property with improvements to
wit:
Tax Map No. 8290-63-0840
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: VA. Reference Number 17271660.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
March 23, 30, 2018
12169494
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
1785 WIGGLESWORTH WAY,
WOODBRIDGE, VA 22191
March 16, 23, 2018
12168684
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
14606 Featherstone Gate Drive
Woodbridge, VA 22191
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $318,995.00, dated April 29,
2016, recorded among the land
records of the Circuit Court for
Prince William County on May 3,
2016, as Instrument Number
201605030032395, the undersigned
appointed
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction, at the main entrance of
the courthouse for the Circuit Court
of Prince William County, 9311 Lee
Ave, Manassas, VA on April 20, 2018
at 9:30 AM, the property described
in said deed of trust, located at
the above address and briefly
described as: Unit 26, Phase 3,
FEATHERSTONE STATION CONDOMINIUM, as set forth in Declaration of Featherstone Station Condominium, recorded as Instrument
Number 201505180038236, as
amended in Instrument Number
201509250080283, as further
amended in Instrument Number
201603160018364, and any and all
prior and/or subsequent amendments thereto, and as set forth
on any plats recorded therewith,
among the land records of Prince
William County, Virginia. Tax ID:
8391-57-0106.01.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $12,000.00 or 10%
of the sale price, whichever is
lower, will be required in the form
of a certified or cashier’s check.
Cash will not be accepted as a
deposit. Settlement within fifteen
(15) days of sale, otherwise Trustee
may forfeit deposit. Additional
terms to be announced at sale.
This is a communication from a
debt collector. This notice is an
attempt to collect on a debt and
any information obtained will be
used for that purpose.
(Trustee # 575300)
Substitute Trustee: ALG Trustee,
LLC, C/O Orlans PC PO Box 2548,
Leesburg, VA 20177, (703) 7777101,
website:
http://www.orlans.com
Towne #: 5000.0065
March 16, 23, 2018
Excellent part-time income!
Reliable transportation required.
Newspapers carriers
needed to deliver
The Washington Post
in
DC, MD and VA area.
Great part-time income opportunity!
Transportation required.
To apply, go to
deliverthepost.com
876
C
Loudoun County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
47550 RIPPLING DR,
STERLING, VA 20165
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$96,400.00, with an annual interest rate of 5.250000% dated May
3, 2002, recorded among the land
records of the Circuit Court for
the COUNTY OF LOUDOUN as Deed
Book 2175, Page 0187, the undersigned appointed Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction all that property located
in the COUNTY OF LOUDOUN, on
the courthouse steps in front of
the Circuit Court building for the
County of Loudoun located at 18
East Market Street, Leesburg Virginia on April 11, 2018 at 9:30 AM,
the property with improvements
to wit:
Tax Map No. 82-E16-56
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $296,934.00, with an annual
interest rate of 4.000000% dated
July 25, 2016, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the County of Prince
William as Deed Instrument Number 201608020060346, the undersigned appointed Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction all that property located
in the County of Prince William,
on the Court House steps in front
of Main Entrance for the Circuit
Court building for the County of
Prince William located at 9311
Lee Avenue, Manassas, Virginia
on May 1, 2018 at 4:00 PM, the
property with improvements to
wit:
Tax Map No. 7201-02-7839
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: FHA. Reference Number
17-271336.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Mar 23, 30, Apr 6, 2018 12170562
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
14022 CLATTERBUCK LOOP,
GAINESVILLE, VA 20155
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $552,500.00, with an annual
interest rate of 5.000000% dated
October 31, 2006, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE WILLIAM as Deed Instrument Number 200611060159107,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF PRINCE
WILLIAM, on the Court House
steps in front of Main Entrance for
the Circuit Court building for the
County of Prince William located
at 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas,
Virginia on April 24, 2018 at 4:00
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 7398-72-3314
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 16-261115.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
How about some
home delivery?
12169453
1-800-753-POST
SF
How about some
home delivery?
1-800-753-POST
SF
JOBS
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers are needed
to deliver
The Washington
Post
for the following
areas:
For routes in
Olney, Silver Spring
& Rockville, MD
Don Money at
301-674-0010
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-265230.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
March 23, 30, 2018
12173022
Career Training - Emp Svcs
AIRLINES ARE HIRING-Get
FAA approved hands on
Aviation training. Financial aid
for qualified students – Career
placement assistance.
CALL Aviation Institute of
Maintenance
888-896-7869
C
JOBS
Excellent part-time
income!
Reliable transportation
required.
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers are needed
to deliver
The Washington
Post
for the following
areas:
For routes in
Suitland, Oxon Hill
and Temple Hills, MD
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers are needed
to deliver
The Washington
Post
Call Mr. Howard
at 301-627-2408
Excellent part-time
income!
Reliable transportation
required.
for the following
areas:
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
2652 COLLINS CT.,
HAYMARKET, VA 20169
March 23, 30, 2018
Call Joe Shojamanesh
410-340-7791
12167394
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$57,400.00, with an annual interest rate of 10.500000% dated January 4, 2005, recorded among the
land records of the Circuit Court
for the COUNTY OF PRINCE WILLIAM as Deed Instrument Number
200501050002664, the undersigned appointed Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction all that property located
in the COUNTY OF PRINCE WILLIAM, on the Court House steps
in front of Main Entrance for the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Prince William located
at 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas,
Virginia on April 17, 2018 at 4:00
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 8392-51-1041
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 18-272863.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
March 16, 23, 2018
12170567
For Routes in
Crofton/Davidsonville
Cape St. Claire/Arnold
Millersville
Prince William County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
14534 SMITHWOOD DR,
CENTREVILLE, VA 20120
873
Newspaper Delivery Carriers
12167630
Fairfax County
March 16, 23, 2018
Excellent part-time income!
Reliable transportation required.
For routes in
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers are needed
to deliver
Arlington, VA
Call
703-580-7916
The Washington
Post
For routes in
Alexandria, VA
Call
703-780-1910
for the following
areas:
Excellent part-time
income!
Reliable transportation
required.
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers are needed
to deliver
The Washington
Post
For routes in
Upper NW area
in D.C.
Call Dan Santos at
240-912-7978
Excellent part-time
income!
Reliable transportation
required.
Out-of-Town
Real Estate
for the following
areas:
DELAWARE New Move-In Ready
Homes! Low Taxes! Close to
Beaches, Gated, Olympic pool. New
Homes from low $100’s. No HOA
Fees. Brochures Available.
1-866-629-0770 or
www.coolbranch.com
For routes in
Bladensburg,
Riverdale and
Lanham, MD
Call Monique
Reddy at
301-728-0459
Excellent part-time
income!
Reliable transportation
required.
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
1370
Business /
Entrepreneurial
Opportunities
INVESTOR WANTED- experienced
DC / VA contractor looking for
investor/partner to flip houses.
GREAT returns! 202-528-4600
HandymanMastersLLC.com
1-800-753-POST
SF
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
Ask me about home delivery!
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Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
COULD YOU USE
SOME EXTRA CASH?
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054B 2x2
Cars
FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 2018
OPQRS
EZ
AUTOMOTIVE H
CHRYSLER
FORD
CHEVROLET 2013 EQUINOX LS $9,495
CHRYSLER 2008 300C $8,495
FORD 2016 FOCUS SE $9,995
4X4, MANAGER SPECIAL
4X4 VA INSPECTED
FWD, 1-OWNER, CLEAN CARFAX
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422 Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422 Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
CHEVROLET 2011 CRUZE LTZ $9,495
FWD, MANAGER SPECIAL
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
Wake up to home delivery.
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$
OR LESS
FORD 2012 FOCUS SE $6,995
Ford 2014 Focus SE Hatchback
FORD 2008 TAURUS LIMITED $6,495
FWD, MANAGER SPECIAL
$9,995 1-owner, auto., 35K mi, Silver
4X4, VA INSPECTED, READY TO GO
Alexandria Hyundai
703-535-6840 Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422 Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
D15
MITSUBISHI
Place
for as your ad he
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little a
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202-3 Dealers
34-47
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a
202-3
r
34-62 ty
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NISSAN
SUBARU
TOYOTA
MITSUBISHI 2017 MIRAGE ES $8,895
NISSAN 2012 LEAF SV $7,495
SUBARU 2008 TRIBECA LIMITED
TOYOTA 2006 PRIUS $6,495
FWD, 1-OWNER, CLEAN CARFAX
FWD, MANAGER SPECIAL
$7,895 4X4, 7 PASS, VA INSPECTED
FWD, MANAGER SPECIAL
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422 Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422 Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422 Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
FORD 2013 C-MAX ENERGI SEL $8,995
FWD, MANAGER SPECIAL
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
HONDA
FORD 2016 FIESTA SE $9,995
FWD, 1-OWNER, CLEAN CARFAX
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
H Cars H Trucks, Vans & SUVs
SPONSORED BY CARS.COM
CARS 10K
CHEVROLET
AUTOMOTIVE
FORD 2008 EXPLORER LIMITED $8,995 HONDA 2003 ACCORD EX-L $7,495
4X4, VA INSPECTED, READY TO GO
FWD, 67K MI, 1-OWNER, CLN CRFX
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422 Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
NISSAN 2011 SENTRA 2.0SL $6,995
FWD, VA INSPECTED
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
Home delivery
is convenient.
Home delivery
is convenient.
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
TOYOTA 2000 RAV4, 98,000 miles,
like new. $4000/ obo.
Call 703-437-3286
SF
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
CARS 10K OR LESS
$
BUICK
FORD 2014 C-MAX ENERGI SEL FWD
1-OWNER, CLN CRFX. ONLY $11,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
BUICK 2004 LESABRE Golden / beige,
good condition, practically new
tires, asking $3500 /nego.
Call 202-726-1931
CHEVROLET
CHEVROLET 2011 CRUZE LTZ FWD
MANAGER SPECIAL. ONLY $9,495
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
CHEVROLET 2008 IMPALA 4 door,
3.9, V6, automatic, runs good, 148K
miles, am/fm $2100/ obo.
Call 240-595-7562
CHRYSLER
FORD 2013 C-MAX ENERGI SEL FWD,
MANAGER SPECIAL. ONLY $8,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
FORD 2013 TRANSIT CONNECT XLT
MANAGER SPECIAL. ONLY $11,795
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
FORD 2012 FOCUS SE FWD,
MANAGER SPECIAL. ONLY $6,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
FORD 2008 TAURUS LIMITED 4X4
VA INSPECTED, READY TO GO. $6,495
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
HONDA
MINI
HONDA 2015 CIVIC EX-L NAVI FWD1OWNER CLN CRFX ONLY $14,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
MISTUBISHI 2017 MIRAGE ES FWD
1-OWNER, CLN CRFX. ONLY $8,895
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
HONDA 2015 CIVIC LX FWD, 1 OWNER,
CLEAN CARFAX. ONLY $12,495
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
HONDA 2003 ACCORD EX-L FWD,
67K MI, 1-OWNER, CLN CRFX. $7,495
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
HYUNDAI
HYUNDAI 2016 ELANTRA SE FWD 1OWNER, CLN CRFX. ONLY $11,495
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
NISSAN
NISSAN 2017 SENTRA SV FWD
1-OWNER, CLEAN CARFAX. $10,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
NISSAN 2015 VERSA NOTE SV FWD
1-OWNER, CLN CRFX. ONLY $10,895
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
NISSAN 2012 LEAF SV FWD
MANAGER SPECIAL. ONLY $7,495
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
NISSAN 2011 SENTRA 2.0SL FWD 1408
VA
INSPECTED.
ONLY
$6,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
CHEVROLET 1971 CORVETTE
Fire maroon with T-Top, 350, motor
has been reworked. Must See.
$25,500 firm. Call 301-943-1963
Antiques & Classics
TOYOTA
TOYOTA 2016 COROLLA LE FWD,
CLEAN CARFAX. ONLY $13,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
TOYOTA
2006
PRIUS
FWD,
MANAGER SPECIAL. ONLY $6,495
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
VOLKSWAGEN
VOLKSWAGEN 2012 GTI DSG FWD
MANAGER SPECIAL. ONLY $11,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
LOOKING TO BUY AN OLD FOREIGN
PROJECT CAR - In any condition,
running or not. Porsche, Jaguar,
Mercedes, Rolls-Royce, Ferrari,
and much more! Fast & easy
transaction, cash on the spot.
If you have any of these or any
other old foreign cars sitting
around, please call 703-819-2698
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
1447
Autos Wanted
1480
WANTED VINTAGE SPORTS CARS &
CLASSICS, Especially Mercedes,
Porsche, Jaguar. highest prices
paid for the very best examples
Call Bob 703-966-0122
DONATE AUTOS, TRUCKS, RV'S.
LUTHERAN MISSION SOCIETY. Your
donation helps local families with
food, clothing, shelter, counseling.
Tax deductible. MVA License
#W1044. 410-636-0123 or
www.LutheranMissionSociety.org
1480
Trucks
CHRYSLER 2008 300C BASE 4X4
MANAGER SPECIAL. ONLY $8,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
FORD 2016 FOCUS SE FWD,
1-OWNER, CLN CRFX. ONLY $9,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
FORD 2015 FUSION SE LUXURY ENERGI FWD, IMMACULATE. ONLY $11,777
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
FORD 2015 FUSION SE FWD,
1 OWNER, CLEAN CARFAX. $12,495
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
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From dramas and musicals to standup and ballet, discover great ways to
save money, win tickets and have fun
at the theater.
washingtonpost.com/postpoints
NISSAN 1990 Pick Up V6, ext cab,
seats 2, tool box cabinet in back,
work truck, 148K Needs paint.
Runs good $975.00 240-595-7562
1490
Sports Utility Vehicles
CHEVROLET 2013 EQUINOX LS 4X4
MANAGER SPECIAL. ONLY $9,495
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
FORD 2008 EXPLORER LIMITED 4X4
VA INSPECTED, READY TO GO. $8,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
JEEP 2016 PATRIOT LATITUDE FWD
1-OWNER, CLN CRFX. ONLY $14,495
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
1490
Sports Utility Vehicles
JEEP 2001 CHEROKEE 4WD- Blue w/
gray int, very good cond, runs excellent, 161k miles, new emissions
& insp. $4,200/obo. 703-598-1447
SUBARU 2008 TRIBECA LIMITED 4X4
7 PASS, VA INSPECTED. ONLY $7,895
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
TOYOTA 2000 RAV4, 98,000 miles,
like new. $4000/ obo.
Call 703-437-3286
Vans
DODGE 2017 CARAVAN SXT FWD
1-OWNER CLN CRFX. ONLY $19,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
JEEP 2011 GRAND CHEROKEE LIMITED
4X4 1-OWNER, CLN CRFX. $12,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
ARE YOUR TENANTS
MOVING OUT?
1-800-753-POST
CLASSIFIED
Home delivery
is convenient.
KLMNO
Not a member? It’s free! JOIN TODAY.
S2930 6x2
FORD
FORD 2016 FIESTA SE FWD,
1 OWNER, CLEAN CARFAX. $9,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
FORD 2013 F-150 SUPER CREW LARIAT
4X4, MGR SPECIAL. ONLY $26,895
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
1485
CHEVROLET 2015 COLORADO Z71 4X4
CREW CAB MGR SPECIAL. $22,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
Trucks
FORD 2015 F-150 XL EXT CAB 8'BED
18K MI, MANAGER SPECIAL. $23,495
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
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SF
1-800-753-POST
SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
FROM
"NO FOOD ALLOWED."
TO
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C3748 6x10.5
You know us for shopping, and now Cars.com is the site for
the entire life of your car. So for every turn, turn to Cars.com.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 23 , 2018
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PAGE 17
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Noteworthy events this week
EZ
Dining
Liberty
Barbecue
features an allstar team in the
kitchen. 12
Steven F. Udvar-Hazy
Center open house
The Steven F. Udvar Hazy Center
is more than a place to marvel at
the space shuttle or see an Imax
movie: It’s home to the Mary
Baker Engen Restoration
Hangar and the Emil Buehler
Conservation Laboratory, where
teams of experts painstakingly
restore and preserve objects
ranging from airplanes to the
interiors of space capsules.
During the Udvar-Hazy Center’s
once-a-year open house, visitors
can go behind the scenes to
learn about how items on
display are worked on and cared
for, and try hands-on activities.
Exhibits
Do Ho Suh’s
show
represents
relocation,
transience,
rootlessness
and
migration. 24
When: Wednesday from noon to
7 p.m.
2017 PHOTO FROM ANNAPOLIS MARITIME MUSEUM
Annapolis Oyster Roast and Sock Burning
Movies
Wes Anderson
brings his
jewel-box
aesthetic to
Japan with “Isle
of Dogs.” 26
For some, the blooming of cherry blossoms is the harbinger of spring. For others, it’s
baseball’s Opening Day. In Annapolis, it’s a bonfire of burning socks. This annual
tradition, which dates to the 1980s, is a reminder that the days of Wednesday night boat
races and padding around docks without shoes are just around the corner. Bring your
scratchiest winter socks to torch at the Annapolis Maritime Museum’s celebration.
Tickets include unlimited raw and roasted oysters, music by the Eastport Oyster Boys,
boat tours of Back Creek, entry to the museum and optional entry into an oyster
shucking contest. Beer, mixed drinks and other food are available for purchase.
Where: Udvar-Hazy Center,
14390 Air and Space Museum
Pkwy., Chantilly.
airandspace.si.edu.
Admission: Free.
When: Saturday from noon to 4 p.m.
Where: Annapolis Maritime Museum, 723 Second St., Annapolis. amaritime.org.
Tickets: $25-$75.
MARK AVINO, SMITHSONIAN NATIONAL AIR
AND SPACE MUSEUM
When: Saturday from 11:30 a.m.
to 3 p.m.
Admission: Free; $10 for
Maggie O’Neill workshop.
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Catch outfielder and former National League MVP Bryce Harper
on Tuesday and the rest of this season (it could be his last in D.C.).
Washington Nationals vs. Minnesota Twins
Baseball fans with long memories might consider this a grudge match
between the Washington Nationals and the Washington Senators:
Washington’s original American League franchise moved to Minnesota
after the 1960 season. For everyone else, it’s the only chance to see a
noncompetitive preseason game at Nationals Park this season, and a first
look at the team’s offseason acquisitions, including manager Dave
Martinez.
When: Tuesday at 4:05 p.m.
Where: Nationals Park, 1500 S. Capitol St. SE. nationals.com.
Tickets: $12-$410.
Mari Andrew’s achingly
vulnerable and completely
relatable watercolor illustrations
about relationships, heartbreak
and the struggles of urban life
have earned her almost
750,000 Instagram followers.
Andrew lived in the District for
years, which inspired art about
the city’s dating scene. Though
she has since moved to New
York, she’s coming back to
celebrate the launch of her first
book, “Am I There Yet?: The
Loop-de-Loop, Zigzagging
Journey to Adulthood.”
When: Thursday at 7 p.m.
Where: Sixth and I, 600 I St.
NW. sixthandi.org.
Tickets: $15 general admission;
$27-$37 includes a copy of the
book.
— Fritz Hahn
MARCH 23, 2018
Where: Smithsonian American
Art Museum, Eighth and F
streets NW. nationalcherry
blossomfestival.org.
Mari Andrew
. FRIDAY,
Stage
A Belfast-born
director
examines his
Irish roots to
direct
‘Translations.’
15
Before the National Cherry
Blossom Festival officially gets
underway at the Tidal Basin on
Sunday, the Smithsonian American
Art Museum throws its own allages party with face painting,
blossom-inspired crafts and a
scavenger hunt. Performances by
Japanese drummers, musicians
and Okinawa’s NS Ryukyu Ballet
Company are featured throughout
the day. Artist Maggie O’Neill, the
creator of this year’s festival poster,
leads a hands-on workshop in the
museum’s Luce Foundation from 1
to 3 p.m., which requires
registration.
THE WASHINGTON POST
Music
Jenna Camille;
Demi Lovato;
Dead Meadow;
GAS; Steve
Moakler. 5
Get a look behind the hangar
doors at Steven F. UdvarHazy Center’s open house.
American Art
Museum’s Cherry
Blossom Festival
celebration
4
EZ
Plan Ahead
Noteworthy events over the next few weeks
April 7 ‘Between the World and Me’
Ta-Nehisi Coates’s best-selling book has sparked discussion since it hit
shelves in 2015, and now it’s headed to the Kennedy Center in the form
of a live performance. Jason Moran, the center’s artistic director for jazz,
composed music to pair with excerpted selections from the National
Book Award winner, which is both an intimate letter to Coates’s son and
an elegy on race relations in America. The book’s themes will also play
out onstage, thanks to projections from artists. 2 p.m. (8 p.m. show is
sold out.) Kennedy Center, 2700 F St. NW. kennedycenter.org. $39-$99.
April 7 Petalpalooza
One of the National Cherry Blossom Festival’s signature events has a
new name (Petalpalooza, instead of the Southwest Waterfront Fireworks
Festival) and location (the new Wharf development), but it’s still packed
with activities. Entertainment includes eight hours of music on three
stages, a beer garden, a free roller skating rink and selfie opportunities
such as an interactive “flower-by-numbers” wall. The day ends with a
fireworks show at 8:30 p.m. 1 to 9:30 p.m. The Wharf, 1100 Maine Ave.
SW. nationalcherryblossomfestival.org. Free.
April 13 ‘Snow Child’
1967 PHOTO BY JOHN GOSSAGE/PRIVATE COLLECTION
April 6 ‘Diane Arbus: A Box of Ten Photographs’
The portfolio that cemented Diane Arbus’s legacy as a photographer — and helped vaunt photography into the
realm of fine art — will be on view in its entirety for the first time, so you can see the full range of Arbus’s iconic,
haunting figures. The day the exhibition opens, there will be a two-part program starting at 4 p.m. featuring a
recording of Arbus, above in New York’s Central Park, speaking about her photographs, along with a panel
discussion from photographers and experts who’ve studied her work. Through Jan. 21, 2019. Smithsonian American
Art Museum, Eighth and F streets NW. americanart.si.edu. Free. Online registration required for April 6 program.
See the world premiere of this new musical based on Eowyn Ivey’s fairytale-inspired novel, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in 2013. In Arena
Stage’s adaptation, the struggles of a homesteading Alaskan couple in
1920 are set to a score influenced by Americana string bands. There’s
magic in the air, though, when a mysterious girl is spotted in the snowy
landscape. This show is the first musical to debut as part of Arena
Stage’s Power Plays initiative, with the goal of developing 25 new plays
and musicals from 25 writers within 10 years. Through May 20. Arena
Stage, 1101 Sixth St. SW. arenastage.org. $65-$110.
— Adele Chapin
WORLD-PREMIERE MUSICAL
“POWERFUL … DEEPLY RESONANT”
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 23, 2018
— Seattle Times
AUGUST WILSON’S
TWO TRAINS RUNNING
BEGINS MARCH 30
SNOW CHILD
BEGINS APRIL 13
BY AUGUST WILSON | DIRECTED BY JULIETTE CARRILLO
CO-PRODUCTION WITH SEATTLE REPERTORY THEATRE
BOOK BY JOHN STRAND | MUSIC BY BOB BANGHART AND GEORGIA STITT
LYRICS BY GEORGIA STITT | DIRECTED BY MOLLY SMITH
MUSIC SUPERVISOR AND ORCHESTRATIONS BY LYNNE SHANKEL
CO-PRODUCTION WITH PERSEVERANCE THEATRE
Photo of Carlton Byrd for Seattle Repertory Theatre by Nate Watters.
Photo of Christiane Noll, Fina Strazza and Matt Bogart by Tony Powell.
ORDER TODAY! ARENASTAGE.ORG | 202-488-3300
Music
5
EZ
4 more concerts to catch
BY
C HRIS K ELLY
Dead Meadow
The description “stoner rock”
perfectly encapsulates the genre’s
sludgy, psychedelia-meets-Sabbath formula. The early albums
from D.C.-born band Dead Meadow certainly fit under this umbrella, with their narcotized tempos and guitars armed with wahwah, feedback and fuzz effects
that smothered rather than attacked eardrums. After more
than a decade under the influence
of stoner rock, the band stripped
away some of the sludge on 2013’s
“Warble Womb” in favor of rocksolid melodies. Dead Meadow
continued that strange trip on its
recently released album “The
Nothing They Need,” which finds
the band tighter, more playful
and just as heavy as ever. Friday
at 8 p.m. (doors) at the Black Cat.
blackcatdc.com. $16-$18.
CHRIS M.L. BATES
Soul singer-songwriter Jenna Camille, who will play at U Street Music Hall, mined a breakup
for her first album’s material. She ultimately “got to know who I was” and found confidence.
after defining
years, she’s
bold and wiser
Jenna Camille
Show: Monday at 6 p.m. at U Street Music Hall. ustreetmusichall.com. $15.
O
C HRIS K ELLY
KEVIN MAZUR/GETTY IMAGES FOR PHILYMACK
Be sorry-not-sorry for spending Saturday belting it out with a
former Disney star: Demi Lovato is coming to Capital One Arena.
MARCH 23, 2018
goingoutguide@washpost.com
goingoutguide@washpost.com
. FRIDAY,
ne of Jenna Camille’s first musical memories is learning to sing “You Gotta Be,”
the 1994 smash hit by Des’ree, at 4 years
old. “My mom tells me I was all over the
house singing it,” says the 27-year-old singersongwriter. “That was the first song I fell in love
with.” It certainly influenced Camille, and not
just musically: Its hook — “You gotta be bad, you
gotta be bold, you gotta be wiser” — is a message
of self-confidence that Camille clearly took to
heart.
Camille, a classically trained pianist who
attended Washington’s esteemed Duke Ellington
School of the Arts and studied at the New Sewell
Music Conservatory, has been playing in and
around the District for a few years. Her music is a
heady mix of R&B with elements of jazz, hip-hop
and electronic music, and it evokes the anythinggoes apotheosis of neo-soul.
In 2014, she released “RED,” converting all the
“pent-up frustration” of a breakup into an album
that sublimates animosity and passion into
sultry, syrupy jams. “It was all about me and this
guy, and I was kinda lost,” Camille recalls of the
relationship, which started in high school. “It
was that super-critical point from your teenage
life to your adulthood: This is the defining
moment for you, and it slips from under you, so
you don’t really know who you are anymore.”
After a period of “spiritual exploration” during
which she studied religion and began meditating, Camille was able to re-center herself. “I got to
know who I was,” she says. “It gave me the space
to make my own path that I could feel confident
about.”
That confidence illuminates her latest material, such as the frisky, funky “Up & Down.” Just
don’t expect to hear the song as recorded when
you see Camille in concert: Thanks to her
improvisational jazz background, she favors
spontaneity over the routine. “It’s about feeling
what you’re expressing in the moment,” she says.
“My style is, what can we do tonight? How can we
make it happen tonight?”
Steve Moakler
The geography of Steve Moakler’s backstory tells you everything you need to know about
his music. He was born in New
Jersey, and Bruce Springsteen is
in his genes. Raised in Pittsburgh, Moakler writes lyrics that
are more Rust Belt than Bible
Belt, full of platitudes about
blue-collar resilience and the
lessons learned in a “Steel
Town.” And thanks to his Nashville home, Moakler’s songs —
pop-rockers in their hearts —
have taken on the melodies and
motifs of country music (and
have been helped along by his
Pennsyltucky twang). If geography is destiny, then this is who
Steve Moakler had to be. “I’d
rather make a living being myself,” he sings, “than a killing
being someone else.” Thursday
at 8 p.m. at Union Stage.
unionstage.com. $18-$30.
THE WASHINGTON POST
BY
Demi Lovato
Among the latest generation of
Disney-Nickelodeon star-factory
products, Demi Lovato might not
pass the “Does your mother know
who this is” test like Miley Cyrus
or Ariana Grande would. But as a
pop star for the moment, Lovato
passes with flying colors. Not only
does the 25-year-old have the
necessary vocal chops and pop
acumen, but she has also used her
brutal honesty — about body positivity and bullying and her battles with mental illness and eating disorders — as fuel for her
musical fire. That’s what she did
on last year’s “Tell Me You Love
Me,” belting out pop-R&B ballads
that
were
kid-tested,
mother-approved. Saturday at
7:30 p.m. at Capital One Arena.
capitalonearena.monumental
sportsnetwork.com.
$39.95-$256.95.
GAS
Minimal techno pioneer Wolfgang Voigt has been a fixture on
the electronic-music scene for
more than 25 years. He also has
been astonishingly prolific, releasing more than 100 projects
under some 30-odd monikers.
Perhaps Voigt’s best known of
these aliases is GAS, a project in
which he has aimed to “bring the
forest to the disco, or vice-versa,”
submerging the four-on-the-floor
grooves of techno under immaculately textured ambiance. His
2000 album, “POP,” was a landmark work, but he didn’t release
an album under GAS until last
year’s industrial-tinged “Narkopop,” a return to form deeper and
darker than its predecessor, and
well worth the wait. Sunday at
3 p.m. at Union Stage.
unionstage.com. $25-$28.
6
EZ
Happy Hour with Fritz Hahn
Excerpts from the Weekend reporter’s online discussion
Q: What are your go-to happy
hour recommendations near the
White House?
A: Joe’s Seafood, Prime Rib and
Stone Crab (15th and H streets
NW, one block from the White
House) is a favorite for half-price
oysters and drinks (beer, wine
and cocktails), and it’s just a
bonus that it starts at 2:30 p.m.
in case you can leave work early.
I also like the half-liter mugs of
German beer at Cafe Mozart
(13th and H streets NW),
especially on Tuesday, when
they’re discounted until 9 p.m.
And when the weather’s nice, I
like taking people to Ellipse, the
rooftop bar at the Hyatt near
16th and K streets NW. Great
views of downtown, rarely too
crowded and it’s not even two
years old. It may be continuing
its $5 beers and $6 glasses of
wine at happy hour. But I’d wait
until the temperatures warm up.
SUMMER
NEW SHOWS ON SALE APR 7
Q: Can you recommend some
decent bars/restaurants/places
to meet friends along the Yellow
Line in Virginia? All I can think
of is Matchbox at Pentagon City.
A: At Pentagon City, I wouldn’t
even go to Matchbox — I’d
probably pick Siné, the Irish pub
at Pentagon Row, near the ice
rink.
In Crystal City, I’d choose
Highline RxR, which has good
cocktails and beers, room to
hang out, bar games, etc. Jaleo
would be the runner-up.
Braddock Road has plenty of
choices; I probably would go
with Lena’s for pizza, or bar
snacks and drinks at Mason
Social.
Alexandria is a destination
unto itself. Try an Irish pub
(Murphy’s or the sprawling
Daniel O’Connell’s), Pizzeria
Paradiso, Hank’s Oyster Bar,
Eamonn’s: A Dublin Chipper, or
maybe waterfront views at
Blackwall Hitch.
HARRY CONNICK JR.
A NEW ORLEANS
TRICENTENNIAL CELEBRATION
STEVEN TYLER AND
THE LOVING MARY BAND
THE SISTERHOOD BAND
AUG 17
DAWES
BOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD
ALANIS MORISSETTE
JOSEPH
AUG 26
JUN 14
SHOVELS & ROPE
AUG 23
JUN 21
A JOURNEY THROUGH HINDI CINEMA
GLADYS KNIGHT & THE O’JAYS
LUDOVICO EINAUDI
JEFF BECK
ANN WILSON OF HEART
BOY GEORGE & CULTURE CLUB
THE B-52S
MICHAEL McDONALD AND
PETER CETERA
MARCH 23, 2018
JUL 8
. FRIDAY,
SEP 6
NILE RODGERS & CHIC
CHAKA KHAN
JUN 5
THE WASHINGTON POST
TROMBONE SHORTY, GALACTIC,
PRESERVATION HALL, AND MORE!
THOMPSON TWINS’ TOM BAILEY
JUL 18
Q: My wife and I left Washington
to return to Nashville after
nearly a decade in 2013. A long
weekend in April will be our first
trip back together, so we’re
trying to cram in as much
sampling of the new options as
possible, while revisiting old
favorites. It seems like several of
the buzzing restaurants in town
involve waiting in long lines; can
you give a suggestion of great
newer spots to eat that take
reservations? We’re interested in
Asian and continental cooking
that can be hard to find in the
South.
First bonus question: Can you
recommend any progressive
dinners involving spots in
proximity to one another that
may have happy hours? We had a
bunch of these we used to do —
Rasika/Oyamel/Jaleo was a
favorite (though they don’t need
to be that close together).
Second bonus question: Aside
from the African American
Museum, are there any must-see
tourist attractions that have
premiered or been revamped in
the last five years?
A: You’re right that a lot of the
buzzier spots don’t take
reservations, and while Himitsu
and Tail Up Goat are fantastic,
you don’t want to spend your
vacation waiting in line.
I’d suggest Tiger Fork in
Blagden Alley, which makes for a
great special-event destination,
with an ambitious menu, fun
design and Hong Kong-inspired
cocktails. You can also make your
way around Blagden Alley, if you
want — perhaps tacos or queso
fundito at Espita, charcuterie
and cheese at the Dabney Wine
Cellar (my favorite new spot that
opened in 2017) and a nightcap
at the Columbia Room, the best
cocktail bar in town.
You could also try ChiKo, a
fantastic mash-up of Chinese
and Korean cooking from former
Source chef Scott Drewno and
Danny Lee of Mandu. The
combination of flavors is
outstanding. ChiKo takes only
four reservations at a time at the
chef’s counter, but it’s a simple,
fast-casual spot, and I’ve never
had a problem getting seats.
In terms of museums: The
HAPPY HOUR CONTINUED ON 7
AUG 15
AUG 20
AUG 22
CASINO ROYALE IN CONCERT
NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
JUL 22
DISNEY BEAUTY & THE BEAST
IN CONCERT
FILM WITH LIVE ORCHESTRA
& SINGERS
AUG 8 + 9
2015 PHOTO BY T.J. KIRKPATRICK FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Blackwall Hitch, about a mile walk from the Metro in Alexandria,
has nice views of the Potomac and access to the Yellow Line.
Premier Sponsor
2018 Summer Season
Email: goingoutguide@washpost.com Telephone:
202-334-6808 Get listed: Our listings include
events in the following categories: pop music, classical music, museums,
theater, dance, comedy and film. We accept events in the District;
Montgomery, Prince George’s, Calvert, Charles and St. Mary’s counties in
Maryland; and the area including Arlington, Fairfax, Loudoun and Prince
William counties and the city of Alexandria in Virginia. If you’d like your
event to be considered, please submit the event name, description, date,
time, location and price at events.washpost.com. Listings are subject to
space restrictions. We cannot acknowledge every submission. Advertising: Ron Ulrich, ronald.ulrich@washpost.com, 202-334-5289
W EEKEN D
7
EZ
HAPPY HOUR FROM 6
Renwick Gallery has reopened
since you left, and I’d
recommend a visit there. (In fact,
it’s currently closed while they’re
installing an exhibit, which
opens March 30 — just in time!)
Q: Since the District seems to be
too expensive to add breweries to
its already stellar lineup these
days, what are some of the
newish breweries in Virginia and
Maryland you recommend?
A: The Diamondback and
Goonda breweries in Baltimore,
and Solace and the new Crooked
Run brewery in Sterling. Solace
is one that I’m really happy to be
seeing more of these days — I’ve
really enjoyed almost everything
I’d had of theirs. (Suns Out Hops
Out session IPA and the Lucy
Juicy double IPA were recent
faves.)
D.C. folks who don’t get to
Virginia much might not have
gotten to know Pale Fire, from
Harrisonburg, outside of the
stellar Salad Days saison and
Arrant IPA, but I’m told they’re
going to start making a big push
into D.C. in the coming weeks.
Their Irish red ale, Red Molly, is
pretty great and would be perfect
for a Saturday.
Q: Which local breweries do you
think are the best to visit for
those interested in brewing their
own beer?
A: It depends on what you’re
interested in brewing. Rustic,
funky saisons and grisettes?
Head to Right Proper and chat
with brewer Nathan Zeender,
who’s all about farmhouse styles.
IPAs? Take a tour of Ocelot with
brewer Mike McCarthy, who’s
leaving the Loudoun County
brewery in a few months to set
up his own brewery in
Winchester. Big stouts? Hang out
for a pint in the tasting room at 3
Stars and meet Brandon Miller
and Mike McGarvey.
Right Proper’s Brookland
facility is one of my favorite tours
in the area, by the way, because
it’s easy to geek out among the
foeders and equipment.
Q: What’s your take on Savor
craft beer festival these days? Is
it worth $135 a pop?
A: Last year’s Savor was the best
one in years. More breweries,
better use of the space (including
putting breweries upstairs), and
it didn’t seem like anything ran
out early, including food.
This year’s list has 90
breweries, and the Brewers
Association says 60 percent of
the participants weren’t here last
year, and more than a third have
never poured at Savor before.
Really looking forward to tasting
beers from Blackberry Farm,
Lawson’s Finest Liquids, Marble,
Night Shift, Roadhouse, Purpose,
etc.
$135 is a lot to spend for a onenight beer festival, but I think
Savor’s one of the best around.
ONSTAGE
THE MOST RELUCTANT CONVERT
MAX MCLEAN AS C.S. LEWIS
“ONE TERRIFIC PIECE OF THEATER!”
DC METRO ARTS
“HIGHLY ENTERTAINING”
CHICAGO SUN-TIMES
“HUGELY MOVING!”
WASHINGTON POST
APRIL 4 - 8
ONLY!
CSLewisOnStage.com
Lansburgh Theatre
450 7th St. NW, Washington DC
202.547.1122
HANDMADE HEAVEN
Fritz Hahn hosts a
Q&A every other Thursday at 1 p.m. at
live.washingtonpost.com.
New York City Ballet
March 27–April 1 | Opera House
with the Kennedy Center Opera House Orchestra
Tickets also available at the Box Office. Groups call (202) 416-8400.
For all other ticket-related customer service inquiries, call the Advance Sales Box Office at (202) 416-8540.
Support for Ballet at the Kennedy Center is generously provided by Elizabeth and C. Michael Kojaian.
•Exciting Demos
•Tasty Treats
•FREE Painting Class
•Kids’ Entertainment
MAR 23, 24, 25
Dulles Expo Center
CHANTILLY, VA • RT. 28 AT WILLARD RD
Admission: $8 online; $10 at the door
Admission good all 3 days
Children under 12 & parking are FREE
Fri. & Sat. 10-6, Sun. 10-5
DISCOUNT TICKETS,
show info, exhibitor lists,
directions and more at:
SugarloafCrafts.com
SUGARLOAF MOUNTAIN WORKS, INC. • 800-210-9900
MARCH 23, 2018
TICKETS ON SALE NOW! KENNEDY-CENTER.ORG | (202) 467-4600
250+
AMERICAN
ARTISTS
LIVE!
. FRIDAY,
BEGINS NEXT WEEK!
Glass Pieces, photo by Paul Kolnik
Robbins Centennial Program: Bernstein, Glass & Verdi
(Mar. 30–Apr. 1)
THE WASHINGTON POST
Metal by Richard Kolb
Balanchine, Martins & Peck (Mar. 27–29)
8
EZ
On the Town
My D.C. Dream Day
Perk up, and extend the buzz absorbing the arts
In D.C. Dream Day, we ask our
favorite people in the area to tell
us how they would spend a perfect
day in the District.
C. Brian Williams really loves
D.C. — he even has affection for
the Metro. “I like the public transportation part of it,” says Williams, 49. “I like to not just enjoy
the destinations, but the process
of moving through the city, too.”
N
FR
SL
IA
BR
AN
BY
TR
NO
W
PL
AY
I
NG
A
IE T I
L
ON
D
MA IRE
T T C TE
TO D B
RN Y
EY
S
Williams has gotten to know
WMATA and the local arts scene
pretty well over the past two
decades as executive director of
Step Afrika!, the dance troupe
dedicated to stepping that he
founded after learning about the
dance form while studying at
Howard University. Having lived
and worked in the District for
nearly 30 years, Williams says, “I
“A period play of ideas...
that have haunting
resonance in our own era.”
—The New York Times
could probably do several dream
days. But I’ll go with this one —
for now.”
— as told to Lori McCue
I would open my day at Calabash Tea. I love the way it smells,
I love the people who work there.
I’d have that amazing chai or,
better yet, I’d just let the baristas
ask me, “How are you feeling?”
and let them structure something
based on what I need that morning.
I wanna get a little exercise in,
so I’d go down to Kennedy Recreation Center, on Seventh and P
streets NW. I might do that little
outdoor track they have, and they
have these exercises you can do,
you know, push-up bars and other
little exercises.
Since I’ve exercised and I’m
feeling good, I wanna get something to eat. I like Sumah’s West
African Restaurant, on Seventh
Street NW. Or I’d do something
really historic and go to Saint’s
Paradise Cafeteria, in this historic church on Sixth and N, for a
little taste of D.C. soul food. It’s
like walking into 1940s, 1950s
D.C.
I’ll take a Capital Bikeshare or
the X2 bus down to H Street NE to
LORI ROBINSON
Williams feels in such capable hands at the tea house Calabash, in
Shaw, he’d let a barista choose his brew.
Atlas Performing Arts Center
202.332.3300 | STUDIOTHEATRE.ORG
INVEST IN THE FUTURE
RECYCLE THE PAST
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 23, 2018
CHIPPENDALE TO COTTAGE, DECO TO DIAMONDS
FURNITURE, ACCESSORIES AND MORE!
THE MADEIRA SCHOOL
MCLEAN, VA
March 24 – 25th
SAT. 10 ~ 5
SUN. 11 ~ 4
DIRECTIONS TO: 8328 GEORGETOWN PIKE, MCLEAN VA
FROM I-495 CAPITAL BELTWAY, TAKE EXIT VA-193/GEORGETOWN PK.
TOWARD GREAT FALLS. FOLLOW 2.3 MILES TO MADEIRA SCHOOL
and go by the office for a sec to see
the dancers and connect with the
artists. We just had our successful
off-Broadway run, and right now
we’re in rehearsals to bring that
C. Brian Williams is founder
and executive director of Step
Afrika!
KK OTTESEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
show [“The Migration: Reflections on Jacob Lawrence”] back
home in D.C. in June.
Then I’m gonna get on the
trolley and go to Kingman Island, which is a total hidden
treasure. It’s a beautiful reserve
on the Anacostia. You feel like
you’re a thousand miles from the
city, and you’re right underneath
a Metro [track]. I’ll probably
hang around there, get a little
walk in after that heavy lunch.
It’s time to head over to Shaw.
I’ll probably meet some friends
for drinks in Blagden Alley. D.C.
has so many hidden, secret spots.
When you’re in those little alleys,
it feels like you’re discovering
new, cool things. I like the Dabney, the environment is great; the
Columbia Room, where you get
those high-end cocktails; and I
love that Asian restaurant Tiger
Fork.
As an artist, I gotta catch a
show. I might check out Mosaic
Theater Company, maybe something at the Kennedy Center,
Arena Stage, or even Theater
Alliance in Southeast D.C. Definitely gonna do some arts and see
what’s up in the scene.
There’s this club I like to hang
out at when I do hang out: Flash.
The music is very, very different.
They have really good DJs and
house music.
One of my favorite jukeboxes is
at Ben’s Chili Bowl. I’d hit there
around 2 a.m. and wind the night
down. When I was here in the late
’80s, there was only Ben’s and
Lee’s Flower Shop and Industrial
Bank [on U Street]. Ben’s has
been through so much, so I like to
go there and see them thriving in
the city.
lori.mccue@washpost.com
9
On the Town
This new restaurant serves only
vegetables. But don’t call it vegan.
Fancy Radish sprouts
from a Philly star duo
BY
L AVANYA R AMANATHAN
There are half-moons of Peruvian
potatoes topped with creamy (but
creamless) aji amarillo; a woodroasted carrot that arrives on a
bed of lentils, like a gussied-up
piece of salmon; and dan dan
noodles topped with mushrooms
that look suspiciously meaty to
the naked eye. Desserts include a
fudgy mud pie served with a
verdant lavender ice cream. (Jacoby turns to coconut and soy
milks to achieve the ice cream’s
perfect lusciousness.)
For the record, all of it, including cocktails, wines and beers
(which can be produced using
animal products), is vegan. Just
don’t call it that.
Fancy Radish, 600 H St. NE.
202-675-8341. fancyradishdc.
com.
VERY
Presented by Le Théâtre Des Confettis from Canada
In collaboration with Lincoln Center Education
Written and created by Véronique Côté
Experience the rare marvel of theater for the
very young in this carefully crafted experience!
NEW PERFORMANCES JUST ADDED!
March 24–April 1
Family Theater
Most enjoyed by
Photo by Louise Le Blanc
18 mo.–4 yr.
TICKETS ON SALE NOW!
KENNEDY-CENTER.ORG | (202) 467-4600
Major Supporters:
Tickets also available at the Box Office.
Groups call (202) 416-8400.
David M. Rubenstein and
the U.S. Department of Education
For all other ticket-related customer service inquiries,
call the Advance Sales Box Office at (202) 416-8540.
Additional Supporters:
The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation
lavanya.ramanathan@washpost.com
Fabergé
Egg
Festival
Celebrate spring’s arrival in Russian
style! Enjoy folk music and dancing,
play Russian games, make your own
Fabergé-style egg, and more.
Sat, Mar 24 & Sun, Mar 25, 10am–5pm
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
Cabinet card of Frederick Douglass, signed, Boston, circa 1879.
Estimate $10,000 to $15,000.
Printed & Manuscript African Americana
March 29
Rick Stattler • rstattler@swanngalleries.com
Now open every Sunday Hours: Tues – Sun 10am – 5pm HillwoodMuseum.org
4155 Linnean Ave. NW, Washington DC Free parking
104 East 25th Street New York, NY 10010 • 212 254 4710 • SWANNGALLERIES.COM
Funded in part by the Bonnie Mapelli Youth Education Fund. All of Hillwood’s 2018 festivals
are supported by a grant from the Sally Foss and James Scott Hill Foundation.
MARCH 23, 2018
Don’t expect Richard Landau
and Kate Jacoby, who opened
Fancy Radish this week on the
street level of H Street NE’s stylish Apollo building, to try to
convince you about the joys of
vegan living or sell you on a
plant-based lifestyle. Sure, there’s
no roast chicken for two on the
menu at Fancy Radish, no scallops or octopus hot dog — there’s
no meat at all, frankly — but the
husband-and-wife (and chef and
pastry chef, respectively) team
behind Philadelphia’s all-vegan
trifecta of restaurants — Vedge,
V Street and Wiz Kid — want
diners to see what they do simply
as “good food.” (There’s plenty of
reason to believe it will be: Since
opening Vedge in 2011, the couple
have received several James
Beard Award nominations, including one for Landau this year
for best chef in the Mid-Atlantic
region.)
“We don’t really want to be
seen as a vegan restaurant,” Landau says. “We want to be seen as a
restaurant that serves vegetables.” Vegetarian restaurants, he
says, are “about limits. They’re
restaurants that don’t serve meat.
We want to be about what we do
do.”
What Landau and Jacoby do is
employ flavors and cooking
methods, including smoking,
roasting, brining and curing, that
can transform those vegetables
into meals fit for all sorts of
palates.
The 65-seat Fancy Radish
slides into a Washington that, like
a lot of markets, is increasingly
happy eating less meat. Quietly,
so-called plant-based and vegetable-forward restaurants have
been thriving here, particularly
such fast-casuals as Chaia, NuVegan Cafe, Shouk, Beefsteak and
Sweetgreen, all of which build
dishes almost solely around vegetables. In the same neighborhood as Fancy Radish, Fare Well
is serving vegan diner fare that’s a
step up from casual. None are
quite as elegant as Fancy Radish
hopes to be.
The decision to open in the
District was prompted by how
many Washingtonians the couple
saw making reservations at their
Philadelphia restaurants. “So
many of our guests come from
D.C.” Landau says. Perhaps it’s
because Washington is too much
of a steakhouse town.
The Fancy Radish menu draws
heavily from the long list of dishes
served over the years at the couple’s Philadelphia restaurants,
making Fancy Radish’s menu
something like a greatest-hits list
for the couple. It was a choice, at
least in part, driven by necessity.
“Vedge is a difficult concept to
pull off,” Landau says. “It’s very
chef-driven, there’s a lot that goes
into it.” V Street, a more casual
and vibrant street-food restaurant, was bound to be confused
with the actual street that slices
through Washington.
What they’ve settled on is 14
dishes, organized in three categories by heartiness, but nearly all
of them “medium plates” that
draw inspiration from Landau
and Jacoby’s globe-trotting.
EZ
10
EZ
Ask Tom
Excerpts from Post Food Critic
Tom Sietsema’s online discussion
Q: My birthday is coming up and
interesting flavors and not
outrageously priced (about $50
per person).
A: It might be a touch oldfashioned for some in your party,
but the country-French La
Ferme in Chevy Chase has what
you’re after: a festive air, the
ability to talk without shouting,
main courses averaging $30. In
Rockville, the Greek-themed
Mykonos Grill should be
considered. It’s been years since
I’ve dined there, but one of the
cozy dining rooms suggests a
village courtyard in blue paint
and white plaster, and the
standards — spanakopita,
moussaka, lamb chops with
toasted potatoes — are prepared
with care.
I want to go out for Middle
Eastern food. Turkish would be
great but I’m flexible. D.C./
Maryland/Virginia all work,
because people will be coming
from various places. Zaytinya is a
possibility, but what are other
options?
A: The dreamiest source for
Middle Eastern right now is
Maydan in Washington, which
features an enormous hearth on
its ground floor and one of the
buzziest scenes around. Go for
the dips, the drinks, the fatty
lamb shoulder and whole
chicken.
Q: My partner’s birthday is
coming up, and I would like to
treat him to a very nice, setmenu dinner. I’d like to stay
about $200 per person with wine
pairings (if possible), which I
think knocks out the Inn at Little
Washington, Kinship, and
Pineapple and Pearls. I was
thinking of Komi or Sushi Taro,
but I was wondering if you had
ideas I might be missing.
A: The beauty of the menu at
Marcel’s in the West End is the
diner’s ability to create a tasting
menu according to budget and
appetite, starting with several
courses for $80 (pre-theater) up
to seven courses for $170. The
French-Belgian restaurant also
comes with the bonus of relative
peace and quiet.
Q: Can you suggest a good
DIXIE D. VEREEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Looking for a tasty Middle Eastern meal that isn’t Zaytinya? Try the buzzy scene at Maydan in
Washington for the dips, drinks, the fatty lamb shoulder and whole chicken.
suggest you aim for the bar at
such draws as Zaytinya and
Oyamel in Penn Quarter and
Joselito on the Hill.
Q: My husband and I are going
on a rare date night this
Saturday. We have two
reservations, one that we had
intended to use for drinks and
some snacks at Little Pearl, and
then a late (9 p.m.) dinner
reservation at Rose’s Luxury (we
got one of the gift cards with a
reservation in December). Since
we usually eat with our kids at
about 5:30 p.m., we expect that
we’ll want several snacks to tide
us over, but after your review of
Little Pearl, I wonder if it is
appropriate for us to just order
snacks and not a full meal.
A: One of the joys of Little Pearl
is, you can make it whatever you
want it to be: a quick snack with
wine or a more leisurely dinner,
although you should know
before you go: The menu there is
brief, and the food comes out
fairly quickly. So if you’re
expecting to spend a few hours
there, that’s a stretch, although
no one is likely to push you out.
I’d be inclined to go somewhere
unrelated to Little Pearl for
drinks, a bit later, but that’s me.
Q: My father-in-law uses me for
restaurant recommendations
and usually I’ve got it covered . . .
however, this time I am at a loss.
He’s on the hunt for a “fried
whole snapper” entree
somewhere in the D.C./Northern
Virginia area. Maybe a Thai or
Vietnamese restaurant?
A: Allow me to steer you to
Maketto on H Street NE, where
the kitchen grills the body of the
fish — sometimes red snapper,
other times porgy or branzino —
but “tempura-fries” the flesh,
which is served with an herb
salad and a haze of fried garlic,
shallots and more. The entree
most recently cost $34.
Q: I am looking for a restaurant
to celebrate my son’s graduation
from college on a Thursday night
in May. Our group will be seven
to eight people and will include
three grandparents who are 8090 years old. All but one of us are
adventurous eaters, and we all
appreciate good food. I’m
looking for something
celebratory, fun but not loud,
with good food with potentially
got one of the wine pairings with
my meal. Will I end up stumbling
out of the restaurant? Or will
they pace the servings enough
that I’ll be able to keep my wits
about me and drive home?
A: Only you know your tolerance
for alcohol. And you’re talking to
someone who routinely relies on
Uber to get home after meals
with wine. That said, the pours
at Minibar are what I would call
moderate (and paced
appropriately).
Q: Our 40th anniversary is
coming up, and we can’t get a
table at Del Mar until really late
in the evening. What would you
suggest at the Wharf or near
Nationals Park (staying nearby
that evening)?
A: They’re not in quite the same
fancy league, but a table at the
seafood-themed Salt Line
overlooking the water, or the
chance to eat chef Haidar
Karoum’s international food at
Chloe, would both be nice places
to toast your togetherness.
Tom Sietsema hosts a weekly
Q&A on Wednesdays at 11 a.m. at
live.washingtonpost.com.
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 23, 2018
vegetarian restaurant, preferably
one that has spicy food and good
dessert? Also, are there any good
places around the Mall that do
not require reservations?
A: I have yet to try it, but Fancy
Radish opened this week in the
Atlas District. It’s the highly
anticipated vegan restaurant
from the owners of the first-rate
Vedge in Philadelphia.(For more
on Fancy Radish, see Page 9.) If
you want to eat near the Mall but
don’t have a reservation, I
Q: I’ll be dining at Minibar and
DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
For a graduation celebration, La Ferme, left, in Chevy Chase has a festive
air without being too loud and affordable entrees, averaging $30. Chloe,
from chef Haidar Karoum, second from left above, can be the perfect spot
for an anniversary celebration with delicious international food.
On the Town
11
DRAMATIC CHANGES
EZ
“THE SINGLE GREATEST
WITCH HUNT...”
ARTHUR MILLER’S
DIRECTED BY ELEANOR
KYLE GUSTAFSON FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Lee Ann Womack performs in 2015 at the Barns at Wolf Trap. She’ll be back in the Washington area
Friday, this time at the Birchmere in Alexandria, Va., along with opener Sarah Allison Turner.
P O P M U SIC
Prices listed where available
MONDAY
HOLLIE COOK U Street Music Hall.
ustreetmusichall.com. 6 p.m. $15. NEW
POLITICS The Fillmore.
fillmoresilverspring.com. 7:30 p.m. $25.
FRIDAY
TUESDAY
LEE ANN WOMACK WITH SARAH ALLISON
TURNER The Birchmere. birchmere.com.
7:30 p.m. $35. MANEKA 9:30 Club.
930.com. 8 p.m. $15. MARLON WILLIAMS
Rock & Roll Hotel. rockandrollhoteldc.com. 7
p.m. $15. RED BARAAT FESTIVAL OF
COLORS The Hamilton. thehamiltondc.com.
6:30 p.m. Through Saturday. $20-$25. STAY
AMPED: A CONCERT TO END GUN
VIOLENCE FEATURING FALL OUT BOY, GEAZY, BEBE REXHA, LIZZO AND MORE
The Anthem. theanthemdc.com. 6:30 p.m.
$50-$175. THE JOEY ALEXANDER TRIO
Music Center at Strathmore. strathmore.org.
8 p.m. $25. THE STRYPES U Street Music
Hall. ustreetmusichall.com. 7 p.m. $15.
ALBERT HAMMOND JR. U Street Music
Hall. ustreetmusichall.com. 7 p.m. $20. MIKE
AND THE MECHANICS The Birchmere.
birchmere.com. 7:30 p.m. $45. S. CAREY
DC9. dcnine.com. 7:30 p.m. $18.
TURNOVER 9:30 Club. 930.com. 7 p.m.
$20.
WE’RE CLOSE BY! Just 10 min from the ICC, 30 min from DC, 15 min from Rockville and Columbia, and 40 min from Baltimore!
CO-PRESENTED BY
Orchestras in Motion!
April 9–15, 2018
BOOGIE T AND SQUNTO STRIKE BACK
Soundcheck. soundcheckdc.com. 10 p.m.
$15-$20. BRUBECK BROTHERS TRIO
DIEGO EL CIGALA
THU, MAR 29, 8pm
STRATHMORE
TONIGHT!
With his soaring voice and
magnetic presence, the great
Spanish–Romani singer has been
called “the Sinatra of Flamenco”
(Billboard).
Co-presented with Strathmore; Special thanks: Lyn
and Barry Chasen
AARON DIEHL TRIO
FRI, MAR 23 - SUN, MAR 25
THE SECOND CITY
LOOK BOTH WAYS BEFORE TALKING
SAN FERMIN
PETER OREN
SAT, APR 7, 8pm
SIXTH & I
Savor the “melodic precision [and]
harmonic erudition” (New York
Times) of jazz piano virtuoso and
longtime Cécile McLorin Salvant
collaborator Aaron Diehl.
Special thanks: the Susan B. Hepner Family and Great
Jones Capital; the Abramson Family Foundation
GENERAL ADMISSION
FRI, MAR 30
ANA MOURA
WED, APR 4
SAT, APR 7
AND MANY MORE!
1 6 3 5 T R A P R D, V I E N N A , VA 2 2 1 8 2
SUN, APR 22, 7pm
KENNEDY CENTER
The world-renowned trumpeter
and “jazz-pop powerhouse”
(New York Times) delights with
enchanting ballads, deep grooves,
and more.
Special thanks: Daimler
TICKETS: (202) 785-9727
WashingtonPerformingArts.org
Plus exciting FREE performances
and other events around the city!
Tickets and info at (202) 467-4600
or SHIFTfestival.org
For all other ticket-related customer service inquiries,
call the Advance Sales Box Office at (202) 416-8540.
Presented in cooperation with the League of American Orchestras
Generous support of the SHIFT Festival is provided through a matching grant from
The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation; by the D.C. Commission on the Arts & Humanities, which receives support
from the National Endowment for the Arts; by Dr. Gary Mather and Ms. Christina Co Mather;
and by Michael F. and Noémi K. Neidorff and The Centene Charitable Foundation.
This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts,
Abramson Family Foundation, Betsy and Robert Feinberg, and Morton and Norma Lee Funger.
MARCH 23, 2018
A BANDHOUSE GIGS
TRIBUTE TO
LEON RUSSELL
CHRIS BOTTI
Four adventurous orchestras.
$25 concerts.
. FRIDAY,
20 YEAR CELEBRATION: PHASE II WITH
MATTHEW WHITAKER Bethesda Blues &
Jazz Supper Club. bethesdabluesjazz.com. 7
p.m. $30-$35. DONNA ULISSE & THE
POOR MOUNTAIN BOYS ALONG WITH 15
STRINGS American Legion Post 238.
alpost238.org. 2 p.m. $20. GAS Union
Stage. unionstagei.com. 3 p.m. $25-$28.
JOAN SORIANO Tropicalia. tropicaliadc.com.
6 p.m. $20-$25. 18+. K.D. LANG Music
Center at Strathmore. strathmore.org. 7:30
p.m. $48-$98. OF MONTREAL 9:30 Club.
930.com. 7 p.m. $20. RIDERS IN THE SKY
‘40TH ANNIVERSARY’ The Birchmere.
birchmere.com. 7:30 p.m. $29.50. VINYL
THEATRE, VESPERTEEN U Street Music
Hall. ustreetmusichall.com. 7 p.m. $15.
Tickets/Info:
olneytheatre.org
301.924.3400
THE WASHINGTON POST
SUNDAY
BEGINS APRIL 18
WEDNESDAY
SATURDAY
BE'LA DONA'S SPRING JAM Bethesda
Blues & Jazz Supper Club.
bethesdabluesjazz.com. 8 p.m. $20-$25.
BRANDY Howard Theatre.
thehowardtheatre.com. 9 p.m. $49.99$79.99. BUILT 4 COMFORT New Deal Cafe.
newdealcafe.com. 8:30 p.m. Free. CITY OF
FAIRFAX BAND: POLKAS, FUGUES AND
FOXTROTS Richard J. Ernst Community
Cultural Center Theater. 7:30 p.m. $15.
DEMI LOVATO, DJ KHALED Capital One
Arena. capitalonearena.monumentalsports
network.com. 7:30 p.m. $39.95-$184.95.
GLEN HANSARD The Anthem.
theanthemdc.com. 6:30 p.m. $35-$75.
GODSPEED YOU! BLACK EMPEROR 9:30
Club. 930.com. 8 p.m. $30. KC JAZZ CLUB:
AKUA ALLRICH Kennedy Center. kennedycenter.org. 7 p.m. $26-$30. PALM Rock &
Roll Hotel. rockandrollhoteldc.com. 7 p.m.
$15. SELDOM SCENE BlackRock Center for
the Arts. blackrockcenter.org. 8 p.m. $32$45. TOM RUSH The Birchmere.
birchmere.com. 7:30 p.m. $45.
Bethesda Blues & Jazz Supper Club.
bethesdabluesjazz.com. 8 p.m. $40-$45.
DIGITALISM U Street Music Hall.
ustreetmusichall.com. 7 p.m. $20.
LANGHORNE SLIM The Birchmere.
birchmere.com. 7:30 p.m. $25.
STRATHMORE ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE
DREW KID Mansion at Strathmore.
strathmore.org. 7:30 p.m. $17. THE STEEL
WOODS The Hamilton. thehamiltondc.com.
6:30 p.m. $12-$17.
TOWN CONTINUED ON 14
HOLDRIDGE
12
EZ
$20 Diner
DAYNA SMITH FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 23, 2018
BY
T
T IM C ARMAN
he smoker at Liberty Barbecue in Falls Church is a
hand-me-down from the
previous occupant of the
space: a Famous Dave’s outlet
that fell victim to the chain’s
cost-cutting measures. The gasassisted machine is not the kind
that makes pitmasters drool, but
it’s the kind that makes the grade
with city health inspectors. It’s a
standard, set-it-and-forget-it urban smoker — safe, ugly and
reliable.
But here’s the thing: Dedicated
pitmasters have been finding
ways to manipulate these
large-capacity contraptions to
produce smokier, more succulent
barbecue. They may turn off the
gas function on the unit, relying
only on smoldering logs to cook
their meats. Or they may turn the
thermostat so low that the gas
Barbecue
born of a
Midas touch
The pitmasters at Liberty make the most of their
machine, turning out mostly smoking results
Pans with a Grand Slam Platter, featuring ribs, brisket,
pulled pork and char siu pork belly; smoked wings; and fried
chicken at Liberty Barbecue in Falls Church, the first
smokehouse that chef Matt Hill has run.
never kicks on. Whatever the
technique, the pitmasters are
willfully undermining the very
purpose of these machines, which
is to make low-and-slow barbecue
easy for anyone to master, even
the underpaid line jockeys working at every Famous Dave’s.
Technically, I guess, you could
lump Matt Hill into the category
of rookie pitmasters. The chef,
who oversees a trio of related
restaurants in Clarendon, including Liberty Tavern, had never run
his own smokehouse until sister
restaurant Liberty Barbecue
came along late last year. But Hill
is a child of North Carolina —
Charlotte, to be exact — where the
barbecue traditions run deep and
proud. He recalls smoking his
first pork shoulder on an improvised grill at age 14, or maybe 15.
He can’t remember the exact year
because, in all likelihood, it was
DINER CONTINUED ON 13
If you go
LIBERTY BARBECUE
370 West Broad St., Falls Church.
libertyfallschurch.com.
Hours: 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. SundayThursday; 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Friday
and Saturday.
Prices: $4 to $32 for appetizers
and salads; $6 to $55 for smoked
meats, platters and entrees.
13
EZ
PHOTOS BY DAYNA SMITH FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
ement immediately stood out:
There was barely a trace of smoke
in the air, a potentially worrisome
sign as I waited on a three-meat
platter.
My platter arrived on a jelly roll
pan, generously loaded with
pulled pork, thick slices of brisket
and two clublike spare ribs, the
rib tips still attached. The smokiest of the three was, to my surprise, the ribs, which spend the
least amount of time in the smoker. Seasoned with only salt and
tim.carman@washpost.com
MARCH 23, 2018
their results are solid and sometimes even impressive, although
not consistently so.
The first time I visited Liberty,
it was an unseasonably warm day
in February, barbecue weather in
winter. I sat at the bar, admiring
the airy space with its mix of
bench seating and simple, armless chairs placed around familystyle tables. It reminded me of an
outdoor picnic, only set in a climate-controlled room with a full
bar and craft cocktails. One el-
pepper, the bones offered the
kind of meaty resistance that
makes biting into them such a
pleasure. The pulled pork featured rich, ropy strands of shoulder meat, light on smoke but long
on fatty, gelatinous flavor.
The brisket was the runt of this
litter. Cut from the end of the
brisket, the slices sported a
brawny,
black-pepper-heavy
bark, but concealed flesh that had
started to break down into individual fibrils, a sure sign of overcooked meat. I chalked it up to
time, barbecue’s sworn enemy. It
was well into the 8 o’clock hour
when I dined, and I suspect the
meat had sat in a warming unit
since morning, slowly losing its
figure.
. FRIDAY,
no big deal. Just the standard rite
of passage for any kid who grew
up with the scent of chopped pork
in his nostrils.
Hill had lusted after his own
barbecue joint for years, yet he’s
been running kitchens long
enough to know he would need
pitmasters with real experience if
he wanted to tinker with that
Southern Pride rotisserie smoker
in the kitchen. So he hired a pair
of pros: Dan Till, a veteran of Pork
Barrel in Alexandria, and Wilson
Giron, a former executive sous
chef at Texas Jack’s in Arlington.
Together, this trio endlessly
searches for ways to improve the
performance of their smoker, and
The Falls Church joint Liberty Barbecue, top, which has an all-star
team in the kitchen, navigates a relatively safe course, with some
surprises, good and not as much. There’s nary a miss among the
sides, such as Brussels sprouts, but don’t miss one of Liberty’s
greats: the crispy, crackly fried chicken, which has taken a 36-hour
pickle-brine bath.
THE WASHINGTON POST
DINER FROM 12
A week and a half later, some
friends and I pawed our way
through a four-meat platter, and
it was as if the brisket had been
shipped in from Central Texas.
The slice of moist brisket practically quivered, releasing a rush of
hickory smoke when passed before my nose for inspection. This
was objectively fine barbecue, although I should point out one
pertinent detail: Hill spotted me
in the restaurant before we sat
down to eat. Now, he couldn’t
exactly smoke a whole new brisket for us, but he could make sure
that only the finest slices were
sent our way. The scales, I’d suggest, were tipped in our favor.
Just three months into its existence, Liberty Barbecue has navigated a relatively safe course,
keeping its menu tight and manageable. Still, there are surprises,
starting with the appetizer chicken wings, so smoky, crackly and
buttery they don’t need the spicy
chipotle or Alabama white sauces. The strips of smoked pork
belly, rubbed with something approximating Chinese five-spice
power, have a split personality:
sometimes firm and smoky, and
sometimes luscious and lined
with grill marks for an acrid
finish. Honestly, I’ll take them
either way, especially with a
splash of the house-made Carolina vinegar sauce.
One of the unexpected pleasures at Liberty has nothing to do
with barbecue. It’s the picklebrined fried chicken, a dish featured only on Mondays at Liberty
Tavern. It’s a daily offering here,
and I swear I could eat it just as
often. The bird is brined for 36
hours in a mixture that includes
apple cider vinegar, garlic, salt,
sugar, dill seed and more. The
chicken is then breaded and pressure-fried into a crackly specimen, with the sweetest, softest
note of acid hiding in the background.
There’s nary a miss among the
sides, although consistency can
be an issue here, too. One evening
a disposable tin of mac-andcheese arrived stiff and lukewarm, as if it had barely touched
the salamander broiler on its way
from walk-in to table; another
night, it was creamy, nutty and
irresistible. The kitchen stumbled in other areas, too: a burger
griddled to an almost dehydrated
state and a smoked-brisket chili
that was so timidly spiced it practically qualified as tomato soup.
Bridie McCulla handles the
desserts at Liberty Barbecue, as
she does at all the sister establishments. I’d encourage you to save
space for her Texas sheet cake, a
dark and fudgy treat that dares to
suggest that there’s no such thing
as too much chocolate. This is not
a subtle finishing course. It’s like
the brisket of desserts, which is
no doubt why I love it.
14
On the Town
PG
First Street SE. loc.gov/concerts/
curriehodges.html. 8 p.m. Free.
NATIONAL CHAMBER ENSEMBLE'S
STRINGS FEVER The group performs
Brahms’s String Sextet No. 2 and
Mendelssohn’s Octet in E-flat major.
Unitarian Universalist Church of Arlington,
4444 Arlington Blvd., Arlington. 7:30 p.m.
$18-$36.
PRINCE GEORGE'S PHILHARMONIC: AN
AMERICAN TAPESTRY The group performs
William Schuman’s “American Festival
Overture,” Barber’s Second Essay for
Orchestra, William Grant Still’s Symphony
No. 1, “Afro-American,” Copland’s “El Salón
México” and Coleridge-Taylor’s “Ballade” in
A minor. Bowie Center for the Performing
Arts, 15200 Annapolis Rd., Bowie.
pgphilharmonic.org. 8 p.m. $20-$25.
Advanced tickets are available the night of
or by mailing in the online form.
ROMAN RABINOVICH Washington
Performing Arts presents the pianist,
performing classic works and personal
compositions. The Kennedy Center, 2700 F
St. NW. kennedy-center.org. 2 p.m. $45.
THE GORENMAN BACH PROJECT Yuliya
Gorenman performs Bach’s “The WellTempered Clavier,” Book I. Abramson Family
Recital Hall, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW.
7:30 p.m. $10-$25.
TOWN FROM 11
THURSDAY
CORCORAN HOLT CD RELEASE CONCERT
Bethesda Blues & Jazz Supper Club.
bethesdabluesjazz.com. 8 p.m. $25. CRIS
WILLIAMSON, BARBARA HIGBIE, TERESA
TRULL The Birchmere. birchmere.com. 7:30
p.m. $35. DIEGO EL CIGALA Music Center
at Strathmore. strathmore.org. 8 p.m. $38$78. RENÉ MARIE: EXPERIMENT IN
TRUTH MilkBoy ArtHouse.
milkboyarthouse.com. 7 p.m. $10-$30. THE
SOUL REBELS FEATURING GZA AND
TALIB KWELI 9:30 Club. 930.com. 7 p.m.
$25.
PostPoints takes you to
Bobby McKey’s
Dueling Piano Bar.
C LAS S ICAL
Prices listed where available
FRIDAY
WASHINGTON CHAMBER ORCHESTRA
The group performs Mozart’s “Le Nozze di
Figaro” overture, as well as arias and the
complete ballet version of Stravinsky’s
“Pulcinella.” Christ Episcopal Church, 6800
Oakland Mills Road, Columbia, Md.
thewco.org. 8 p.m. $5-$15.
SUNDAY
SATURDAY
BALTIMORE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Peter Oundjian conducts Rachmaninoff’s
“Isle of the Dead,” among other works.
Music Center at Strathmore, 5301
Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda.
strathmore.org. 8 p.m. Through March 25.
$35-$99.
CITY OF FAIRFAX BAND: POLKAS,
FUGUES AND FOXTROTS The group
performs selections from Jaromir
Weinberger’s “Polka and Fugue” from
“Schwanda the Bagpiper” and from Ira
Hearshen’s Aragon: 1945-1952, a collection
of dances from the post-World War II swing
era. Richard J. Ernst Community Cultural
Center Theater, 8333 Little River Turnpike
NOVA-Annandale Campus, Fairfax.
fairfaxband.org. 7:30 p.m. $15.
COLIN CURRIE AND NICOLAS HODGES
The percussionist and pianist perform works
by Feldman and Stockhausen, along with a
new piece by Sir Harrison Birtwistle.
Coolidge Auditorium, Library of Congress, 10
BENEDETTO LUPO The pianist performs
selections by Debussy. National Gallery of
Art, Sixth Street and Constitution Avenue
NW. nga.gov. 3:30 p.m. Free.
ERIC OWENS AND MYRA HUANG The bassbaritone and pianist perform. Baltimore
Hebrew Congregation, 7401 Park Heights
Ave., Baltimore. shriverconcerts.org. 5:30
p.m. $10-$42.
THE APOLLO ORCHESTRA The group
performs Wagner’s Prelude to Act 1 of
“Parsifal,” Strauss’s “Four Last Songs”
and Fauré’s “Requiem” in D minor. Church
of the Little Flower, 5607 Massachusetts
Ave. Bethesda. apolloorchestra.com. 4 p.m.
Free.
THE KENNEDY CENTER CHAMBER
PLAYERS The ensemble performs
Beethoven’s Duet “with two eyeglasses
obligato” in E-flat for viola and cello,
Mozart’s String Quintet in G minor and
Franck’s Piano Quintet in F minor. The
Kennedy Center, 2700 F St. NW.
kennedy-center.org. 2 p.m. $36.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 23, 2018
I WISH THEY
WOULD STAY
FOREVER
On Stage
15
EZ
PHOTOS BY TEDDY WOLFF
A people’s performance of Irishness
A nation’s identity and destiny are at the heart of an 1830-set play
T
N ELSON P RESSLEY
MARCH 23, 2018
TRANSLATIONS CONTINUED ON 16
Studio Theatre’s
cast, top, of
“Translations,”
about Britain’s
remapping of
Ireland and the
subsequent
renaming of
places from
Gaelic. Director
Matt Torney, left,
calls it a
“masterpiece of
miscommunication.”
. FRIDAY,
rue tales of Irish stereotypes: Belfast-born Matt Torney tells of an
Irish-loving American who wanted
to fight because Torney was drinking the wrong whiskey.
“That’s traitor’s whiskey,” the Yank said,
for there are hardcore types who insist on
sorting brands into Protestant or Catholic
camps. To cool things down, Torney replied, “No true Irishman lets politics come
between him and his whiskey.”
A contested sense of identity is key to
“Translations,” the Brian Friel drama that
Torney is now directing at Studio Theatre.
Friel wrote the play in 1980, during the
heart of the 30-year unrest known as the
Troubles; it was the first production from
the politically attuned Field Day Theatre
Company, which Friel started with actor
Stephen Rea. He set the drama in 1830 as
the British remapped Ireland and Anglicized place names. Even now, Northern
Ireland is culturally unsettled about the
largely eroded Irish language.
Torney’s father had a saying meant to
tamp down factional fever: You can’t eat
flags. But as a college student in Dublin
whose accent marked him as Northern
Irish, Torney was once pressed in a pub to
identify himself as a Catholic or a Protestant.
“They did not want to accept me as a
kind of, like, middle-class, moderate, inclusive person who wanted to be part of
modern Ireland, with a European identity,
an international identity,” Torney says.
“Someone who wanted to love Northern
Ireland from afar, rather than fight on the
details.”
That’s partly what drew him to Friel’s
play, along with the mixed-up sense of
borders and allegiances that came with the
Brexit vote in 2016 and the 2015 death of
the playwright (whose plays include “Faith
Healer” and “Dancing at Lughnasa”). “I
TRANSLATIONS
Studio Theatre,
1501 14th St. NW.
202-332-3300.
studiotheatre.org.
Dates: Through
April 22.
Prices: $20-$85.
THE WASHINGTON POST
BY
If you go
16
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 23, 2018
TRANSLATIONS FROM 15
think all the Northern Irish directors kind of have ‘Translations’ on
their bucket list,” says Torney,
who has been Studio’s associate
artistic director since 2015. “You
want to get in there, because
there’s something sticky about it.”
The play features a mash of
language — English, Gaelic, Latin, Greek — yet it’s easy to follow.
Characters mainly speak English
even when it’s clear to audiences
that they can’t understand one
another. “It’s a masterpiece of
miscommunication,” Torney says.
Friel works in an overtone of
the 1980s strife when a character
goes missing; Torney notes that
“the disappeared” were not uncommon at the time. Yet the
strength of the play, he suggests,
is its avoidance of political melodrama.
“It’s not saying, ‘Aren’t the English terrible for doing this to
Ireland?’ ” he explains. “It’s saying, ‘What happens when you
translate names? What happens
to the country’s sense of itself ?’ If
you’re not given a choice to
choose your own identity, it
doesn’t go well.”
Torney describes his relationship with Irish drama as complicated, doubly so when he encounters American versions of stage
Irishness — “peasants and drink
and songs and the warm hearth.”
Torney, whose post-college stint
as an art director included gopher
work on Annie Leibovitz photo
shoots, has taste that runs toward
the rough-edge visions of Enda
Walsh and Martin McDonagh.
“That’s a full-frontal assault on
a certain kind of Irishness,” he
says of McDonagh’s black comedies, not including McDonagh’s
thoroughly characteristic “Three
Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” (which Torney hasn’t seen
yet). “I think they also travel very
well,” he adds, “because that Ireland is like a kind of abstract,
film-noir-type Ireland.”
Working against sentiment is
something Torney will guard
against with the frequently
staged “Translations.”
“I’ve seen a couple of productions that present the Irish as a
sylvan pastoral paradise, people
who want nothing more than to
be left free among the hills,” he
says.
“That’s boring, and I think it’s
not a close reading of the play,
because the characters do not
agree what Irishness is. Some are
very addicted to the past. Some
want to change. That’s the perspective I’m bringing — that everybody has an individual sense
of Ireland, an individual sense of
England. And what’s interesting
is the Venn diagram of what
aligns.”
nelson.pressley@washpost.com
TERESA CASTRACANE PHOTOGRAPHY
Jon Hudson Odom and Joe Carlson in “Nat Turner in Jerusalem,” by Nathan Alan Davis, a play that imagines the final night in the life of
the slave rebellion leader in a jail cell in Jerusalem, Va. Playing at the Forum Theatre in Silver Spring through April 7.
A L S O P L A Y I NG
Prices are for the entire run of the
show; individual shows might vary.
OPENINGS
410[GONE] Frances Ya-Chu Cowhig’s dark
play about the afterlife explores identity
and love. Performed by Rorschach Theatre.
Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St.
NE. 202-399-7993. atlasarts.org. Opening
Friday. $20-$30.
CHRISTOPHER K. MORGAN & ARTISTS A
wide-ranging evening of mixed dance
repertory. Dance Place, 3225 Eighth St.
NE. 202-269-1600. danceplace.org.
Opening Saturday at 8 p.m. Free.
CHURCH & STATE Arena Stage hosts a
benefit reading of Jason Odell Williams’s
fast-paced dramedy, starring Jack Coleman
(“The Office”). All proceeds go to Everytown
for Gun Safety. Arena Stage, 1101 Sixth St.
SW. 202-488-3300. dcactorssalon.com/
performances. Opening Sunday at 2 p.m.
$50.
DEAR JACK, DEAR LOUISE A staged
reading of Ken Ludwig’ s latest play, about
his parents’ courtship. Folger Theatre, 201
East Capitol St. SE. 202-544-7077.
folger.edu. Tuesday at 7 p.m. Free.
ERTH'S DINOSAUR ZOO LIVE A dinosaur
puppet show that begins in prehistoric
Australia. Reston Community Center at
Hunter Woods, 2310 Colts Neck Rd.,
Reston. 703-476-4500.
restoncommunitycenter.com. Opening
Tuesday at 11 a.m. $15.
GUILTY A one-woman show about a
transgendered woman, Lady Dane Figuero
Edidi, on trial. Andrew Keegan Theatre,
1742 Church St. NW. 202-265-3767.
keegantheatre.com. Opening Sunday at 7
p.m. $15.
MIGRATORY TALES An original musical
theater piece focusing on the stories of
women, men and children immigrating to
the United States. Dorothy Betts Marvin
Theatre, 800 21st St NW. 202-994-8072.
theatredance.columbian.gwu.edu. Opening
Thursday at 7:30 p.m. $10-$20.
PAPER DOLLS A play based on the 2006
documentary by Israeli filmmaker Tomer
Heymann, about transgendered Filipino
caregivers in Tel Aviv. Atlas Performing Arts
Center, 1333 H St. NE. 202-399-7993.
mosaictheater.org. Opening Thursday at
7:30 p.m.
POSTSECRET: THE SHOW Projected
images, videos, three actors and a guitarist
guide the audience through crowdsourced
narratives that reveal personal secrets and
stories from the PostSecret blog and bestselling books. Lincoln Theatre, 1215 U St.
NW. 202-888-0050. thelincolndc.com.
Opening Saturday at 6:30 p.m. $35.
ROB BELL WITH PETER ROLLINS Podcast
host and best-selling author Rob Bell
(“Love Wins”, “What We Talk About When
We Talk About God”) will host a live show
with the Irish theologian. Lincoln Theatre,
1215 U St. NW. 202-888-0050.
thelincolndc.com. Tuesday at 6:30 p.m.
$35-$60.
STORIES FROM THE FRINGE: WOMEN
RABBIS, REVEALED!The script portrays 18
female rabbis at different stages of their
lives. Directed by Bari Hochwald. Jewish
Community Center of Northern Virginia, 8900
Little River Tpk. Fairfax. 703-323-0880.
jccnv.org. Opening Sunday at 7 p.m. Free.
THE VAGINA MONOLOGUES Based on
dozens of interviews, the award-winning
play addresses women’s sexuality and the
social stigmas surrounding rape and
abuse. Andrew Keegan Theatre, 1742
Church St. NW. 202-265-3767.
keegantheatre.com. Opening Monday at
6 p.m. $15.
WASHINGTON CHAMBER ORCHESTRA
Mozart’s “Le Nozze di figaro” overture,
concert arias from “The Marriage of Figaro”
and “The Magic Flute,” and Stravinsky's
“Pulcinella,” complete ballet version.
Providence Presbyterian Church, 9019
Little River Turnpike, Fairfax. 703-7195643. music-and-arts-providence.org.
Opening Friday at 8 p.m. $5-$15.
WAVES, ALL THAT GLOWS SEES A beach
theater performance, featuring shadow
puppetry and fun sound effects, for children
ages 18 months-4. The Kennedy Center,
2700 F St. NW. 202-467-4600. kennedycenter.org. Opening Saturday at 11 a.m. $15.
ONGOING
ADULT ENTERTAINMENT The Klunch
presents a comedy written by Elaine May
about a group of porn stars who tire of their
profession and enlist a Yale-educated
cameraman to write a movie script for them.
Caos On F, 923 F St NW. 202-215-6993.
theklunch.com. Through March 31. $25-$75.
ALABAMA STORY The regional premiere of
Kenneth Jones’s play about a children’s
picture book that sparked a heated civil
rights debate between an Alabama state
senator and a librarian. Based on real
events. Washington Stage Guild at the
Undercroft Theatre, 900 Massachusetts
Ave., NW. 240 582-0050. stageguild.org.
Through April 15. $20.
ALEXANDER AND THE TERRIBLE,
HORRIBLE, NO GOOD, VERY BAD DAY A
play based on the popular book by Judith
Viorst. Directed by Cara Gabriel.
Recommended for all ages. Adventure
Theatre MTC, 7300 MacArthur Blvd., Glen
Echo. 3016342270. adventuretheatremtc.org. Through March 31. $19.50.
BALLOONACY A lonely old man develops
an unexpected friendship with a red
balloon. Best for ages 1-5. Imagination
Stage, 4908 Auburn Ave., Bethesda. 301280-1660. imaginationstage.org. Through
April 8. $12.
IN THE HEIGHTS Lin-Manuel Miranda’s
Tony Award-winning show about
Washington Heights. The Kennedy Center,
2700 F St. NW. 202-467-4600. kennedycenter.org. Through Sunday. $69-$175.
CHICAGO The long-running Broadway
musical about crime, fame and fortune in
the Roaring Twenties has songs by John
Kander and Fred Ebb (“Canaret”). Andrew
Keegan Theatre, 1742 Church St. NW. 202265-3767. keegantheatre.com. Through
April 7. $55.
EVERY BRILLIANT THING A boy attempts
to cure his suicidal mother’s depression by
making her a list of all the best things in
the world. Olney Theatre Center, 2001
Olney-Sandy Spring Rd., Olney. 301-9243400. olneytheatre.org. Through Sunday.
$49-$74.
FRANKENSTEIN Set in 19th-century
Switzerland, Mary Shelley’s classic tale of
horror and suspense details the ill-fated
experiments of young Dr. Frankenstein, as
he tries to fathom the secrets of life and
death. Bowie Playhouse, 16500 White
Marsh Park Dr., Bowie. www.bctheatre.com.
Through Sunday. $17-$22.
GODSPELL NextStop Theatre Company
presents Stephen Schwartz’s musical,
based on parables from the New
Testament. NextStop Theatre Company,
269 Sunset Park Dr., Herndon. 866-8114111. Through April 1. $20-$55.
HOLD THESE TRUTHS Playwright Jeanne
Sakata's drama about Gordon Hirabayashi,
a Japanese-American who was imprisoned
during World War II for disobeying an
internment order. Arena Stage, 1101 Sixth
St. SW. 202-488-3300. arenastage.org.
Through April 8. $91-$111.
LOVE IN THE TIME OF COLORING Heather
Frank’s solo cabaret debut looks at
romance and desire in the age of selfies.
Capital Fringe Trinidad Theatre, 1358
Florida Ave., NE. 866-811-4111.
capitalfringe.org. Through Friday. $20.
NAT TURNER IN JERUSALEM A play by
Nathan Alan Davis that depicts the final
night in the life of slave rebellion leader Nat
Turner. Forum Theatre, 8641 Colesville Rd,
Silver Spring. 301-588-8279. forumtheatre.or. Through April 7. $18-$38.
THE BECKETT TRIO A series of short plays
by Irish playwright Samuel Beckett. Atlas
Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE.
202-399-7993. atlasarts.org. Through
April 8. $10-$35.
THE GOSPEL AT COLONUS The Oedipus
tragedy told gospel-style by WSC Avant
Bard. Gunston Arts Center Theater II, 2700
S. Lang St., Arlington. Through Sunday.
Free-$35.
THE SNOW QUEEN Our Learning Theater
Ensemble performs the fairy tale by Hans
Christian Andersen. Creative Cauldron, 410
S. Maple Ave. Falls Church. 703-436-9948.
creativecauldron.org. Through Sunday. $12$18.
THE TEXAS HOMECOMING REVOLUTION
OF 1995 Best Medicine Rep’s latest play
takes place at a suburban high school,
where a student commits an unspeakable
act to the Texas flag during homecoming.
Best Medicine Rep Theater, 701 Russell
Avenue, Gaithersburg. bestmedicinerep.org.
Through Sunday. $25.
THE WINTER'S TALE One of Shakespeare’s
final plays, directed by Aaron Posner. Folger
Theatre, 201 East Capitol St. SE. 202-5447077. folger.edu. Through April 22. $35-$79.
THE WIZ Kent Gash directs the Tony
Award-winning musical adaptation of “The
Wizard of Oz.” Ford's Theatre, 511 10th St.
NW. 202-347-4833. fords.org. Through
May 12. $28-$71.
THIS LITTLE LIGHT A comedy from writeractor Jennifer Falsetto about time, age and
technology. Venus Theatre, 21 C St., Laurel.
202-236-4078. venustheatre.org. Through
April 1. $15-$40.
TRANSLATIONS Irish dramatist Brian
Friel's 1980 play about British efforts to
impose its language and customs on the
Irish in the early 19th century. Studio
Theatre, 1501 14th St. NW. 202-332-3300.
studiotheatre.org. Through April 22. $20$85.
STAGE CONTINUED ON 22
From the cover
17
EZ
The chefs’
way to eat
Annandale
in a day
This Korean enclave
will fill you up from
dawn till the wee hours
BY
MARCH 23, 2018
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE
. FRIDAY,
When Jonathan Lee opened
Korean Bakery in Annandale in
1989, he even made his bean
paste from scratch. He didn’t
have a choice. “There was no
supplier,” he says. “When I
opened this business, it was the
only Korean bakery in the
Washington area.”
Twenty-nine years later,
nearby shopping centers are
home to countless Korean
restaurants, and Annandale has
become a must-visit dining
destination not only for Fairfax
County, and its dense Korean
population, but also for patrons
across the area. In fact, there are
so many compelling places to try
that you could literally spend an
entire day bouncing among
them.
Follow along with this chefapproved Korean dining
itinerary stretching from
morning until late night, which
allots a few hours per stop, and
you’ll understand what David
Chang, the celebrity chef behind
the Momofuku empire — and a
Northern Virginia native —
means when he names the
biggest misconception about
Korean food: “that it’s just
barbecue and kimchi.”
THE WASHINGTON POST
Standard bibimbap,
center, surrounded
by sides at Yechon,
in the Northern
Virginia suburb of
Annandale.
A DELE C HAPIN
18
EZ
From the cover
FROM PREVIOUS PAGE
MORNING
Breeze Bakery Cafe, 7 a.m.
Your Korean dining extravaganza
begins with pastries, coffee and tea at
this inviting two-level cafe (complete
with outdoor dining upstairs). Wire
baskets are provided for shoppers to
load up on all sorts of baked goods —
think sweet pumpkin cake rolls
($5.50), chestnut bread loaves ($4.50)
and mocha buns ($1.99). Adorable
animal cupcakes peer out from the
glass pastry case. The cafe menu is
wide-ranging: You can get a nitro
coffee — and a bulgogi quesadilla
with marinated beef and mozzarella.
4125 Hummer Rd. breezebakery.com.
Siroo, 10 a.m.
Don’t miss the juk, a comforting
Korean rice porridge, at Siroo. Chef
Danny Lee — who owns Mandu, in
Northwest Washington, along with
his mother, Yesoon, and co-founded
the buzzy Barracks Row destination
ChiKo — is amazed by the varieties of
juk offered, including ginseng chicken
($10.99), spicy kimchi — a side dish
and staple of Korean cuisine, made
with fermented cabbage and other
vegetables ($8.99) — and abalone
($12.99). “They have 20 different
versions of this juk that are all cooked
in different broths, and all have
different proteins and different
produce in them,” Lee says. “It’s really
a cool thing to see, and it’s delicious.”
4231 Markham St. siroousa.com.
AF TERNOON
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 2018
Cheogajip Chicken, 1 p.m.
Bonchon is arguably the biggest
name Washingtonians might know
when it comes to Korean fried
chicken but there’s another huge
franchise from Korea making
inroads in the Washington region.
Cheogajip, which translates as
“mother-in-law’s home,” slathers on
spicy, soy garlic or sweet sauce on its
fried chicken, all while keeping the
drumsticks extra crispy (family size
order, $16.85). Not in the mood for
chicken? The small carryout also
offers an intriguing pizza topped
with yellow sweet potatoes.
4300 Evergreen Lane.
Gom Ba Woo, 3 p.m.
Bone-broth devotees need to try
the soups and stews at Gom Ba
Woo, says chef Rob Rubba. Rubba
— whose wife, Deb Rubba, is
Korean — often cooks Korean food
at home and showcases the
cuisine’s flavors at his globally
inspired restaurant, Hazel, in Shaw.
But when Rubba’s looking for a
warming soup such as sulrung tang
(a beef-bone broth with rice and
noodles), he heads to this cozy spot.
“The way they do [the bone broth]
so slow with the marrow bone, it
just looks like you’re eating a bowl
of warm milk,” he says. “It’s just the
best beef broth you’ve ever had.”
Stir scallions and hot chile paste
into your bowl ($7.95 at lunch) until
you get the spice level just right.
7133 Columbia Pike. gombawoo.net.
Tous Les Jours, 5 p.m.
You might not guess it from Tous
Les Jours’ nondescript exterior, but
the spacious Annandale outpost of
this popular French Asian bakery
chain is all soaring ceilings, polished
concrete floors and exposed brick
walls. Wooden display cases are
stocked with such Parisian desserts
as croissants stuffed with
strawberries ($3.25), along with other
specialties: kimchi croquettes ($2.75),
soft milk bread buns ($2.50) and
chewy, orblike doughnuts stuffed
with a spoonful of sweet pumpkin
filling ($1.75). Grab a lavender milk
tea latte ($3.25) with a pastry, or cool
down with a bingsoo, a Korean
dessert stacked with toppings — ice
cream, red beans and fresh fruit — on
a mound of fluffy shaved ice.
7219 Columbia Pike. tljus.com.
EVENING
surplus food from American
military bases eaten during the
Korean War. The portions are
generous: The dish — bubbling with
hot dogs, kimchi and dried instant
ramen — could easily feed four. 7211
Columbia Pike. tosokjip.com.
Choong Hwa Won, 9 p.m.
To Sok Jip, 7 p.m.
It can be tough to get a table at
this tiny restaurant, which excels in
seafood stews such as daegu maeun
tang, a spicy codfish soup ($15.99)
and bo ssam, a build-it-yourself,
seasoned-pork-belly dish with
cabbage leaves, kimchi and
seasoned radish. Also of note, a
favorite of Rubba’s: budae jjigae
($31.99), or “army base stew,” a
hearty red hot pot inspired by the
David Chang may be one of the
most famous chefs in the United
States, but his dad still calls the
shots when they’re dining out in
Annandale. “He calls in the
orders” in advance, Chang says. “I
don’t recall ever looking at a
menu in my life.” Their
destination is often Choong Hwa
Won, where they go for the
jjajangmyun. An order of the
Chinese-Korean dish brings a
giant helping of fresh, chewy,
wheat-based noodles with pork,
vegetables and black bean curd
sauce ($6.99 at dinner), which
servers can cut with scissors for
easier slurping. The no-frills
restaurant stays open until
midnight — and has a karaoke
room, too. 4409 John Marr Dr.
choonghwawon.com.
Kogiya, 11 p.m.
Order one of the all-you-caneat options at Kogiya, and the
meat will keep coming until you
admit defeat. (Dinner starts at
$23 per person.) Diners sit
around an open flame grill while
servers cook brisket, pork belly,
short ribs and more before your
eyes. The stainless-steel table
19
EZ
PHOTOS BY DAYNA SMITH FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
LATE NIGHT
At this after-hours haunt,
where posters of throwback
Korean musicians decorate the
walls (hi, Cho Yong Pil) and
bottle caps hang from the
ceiling, the order is soju or
makgeolli. The former, Korea’s
most popular spirit, is often
distilled from rice, and the
latter is a sweet, traditional rice
wine. Pair drinks with bar food
fit for a crowd, such as the
intensely fiery, cheese-covered
crazy chicken ($20.95).
7118 Columbia Pike.
menu goes on for pages at
Yechon, a dinerlike Korean
and Japanese restaurant. Day
or night, grab a table at the
wood-paneled spot, and
servers in traditional hanbok
dresses will bring out sushi
rolls (prices vary), mul
naengmyeon (homemade
buckwheat noodles,
vegetables, beef and a boiled
egg in a cold broth, $12.95) or
kimchi dolsot bibimbap (the
traditional Korean mixed-rice
dish served in a hot stone
bowl, topped with marinated
beef and vegetables, $13.95).
4121 Hummer Rd.
Yechon, 3 a.m.
To Soc Chon, 5 a.m.
Jangteo 7080, 1 a.m.
The doors never close and the
The menu highlights at this
24-hour spot include dakdori
tang (a steaming-hot, spicy
stew with potatoes, carrots
and chicken) and handmade,
knife-cut noodles served in
the broth of your choice
(think clam or chicken, $12$13). But To Soc Chon is best
known for one dish, and it’s a
big reason the restaurant is
open at all hours. “They make
sundae guk, which is like a
stew or soup where the base is
Korean blood sausage,” says
Danny Lee, the chef. “It’s
pretty much known as
hangover soup.” Sounds like a
necessity after a full day of
kimchi, bulgogi and soju. 7031
Little River Tpk., Suite 21D.
goingoutguide@washpost.com
. FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 2018
Annandale’s Koreanrun restaurants cater
to locals and far-flung
diners alike in search
of authentic dishes.
CLOCKWISE, FROM
BOTTOM LEFT:
Kimchi mandoo
jungol at Gom Ba
Woo; meat sizzles on
Kogiya’s tableside
grills; bingsoo and the
self-service pastries at
Tous Les Jours; sweet
potato pizza at
Cheogajip Chicken;
bibimbap at Yechon;
pork belly at Kogiya.
THE WASHINGTON POST
will also be packed with banchan
(an array of gratis side dishes
that traditionally arrives with
each meal, including kimchi,
seasoned soybean sprouts or
cucumber salad), rice, a steamed
egg dish and soup. Don’t worry:
Kogiya has a ventilation system
above each table to keep the
smoky meat aroma mostly
contained. (For another classic
Korean barbecue experience,
there’s Honey Pig. The local
institution has expanded with
locations in Northern Virginia
and Maryland, but its Annandale
home base still packs in diners
for kalbi beef rib grilled to the
thumping beat of K-pop.)
4220-A Annandale Rd.
kogiya.com.
20
EZ
B FEATURED LISTING B
The Apollo
Orchestra
The Apollo Orchestra will be joined by
Washington National Opera's Domingo
Cafritz Young Artists in a free Palm
Sunday concert. Program includes works
by Wagner, Strauss and Faure.
Church of the Little Flower
5607 Massachusetts Avenue
Bethesda, MD 20816
Free
Medical drama about a doctor at the
onset of the AIDS crisis and the ethical
questions she faces. Stars Susan Rome
and Tom Story.
A riveting story about the courageous
Maribel sisters who inspired resistance
against the brutal regime of Dominican
General Rafael Trujillo.
The Music and Magic of beloved British
comedienne Joyce Grenfell.
“theatrical magic and charming humor..
masterful..hilarious” -DCtheatrescene
Based on the Disney movie, this Tony
Award winning, high energy musical is
the rousing tale of a ragged band of
“newsies” who strike for what’s right.
Theater J
1529 16th St., NW
Theaterj.org, 202-777-3210
$39-$69
Senior and
under-35
discounts
$30-$45
In Spanish
with English
surtitles
This record-breaking interactive solvethe-crime comedy keeps the audiences
laughing as they try to outwit the
suspects and catch the killer. New clues
and up to the minute improvisation
deliver “shrieks of laughter night after
night.” (Washington Post)
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Student Rush
Tickets Available
Tickets: 202-467-4600
Groups: 202-416-8400
www.shearmadness.com
Tickets
Available
at the
Box Office
April 4 – 29
2017 Obie Award Winner for “Best New
American Theatre Work” Underground
Railroad Game arrives at Woolly this April
Woolly Mammoth Theatre Co.
641 D Street NW
202-393-3939,
woollymammoth.net
Regular
Tickets
Coming Soon!
start at $41
Shakespeare’s
The Winter's Tale
On Stage Through
April 22
This soul-stirring love story marries some
of Shakespeare’s saddest and darkest
moments with his most hopeful. Aaron
Posner directs this spellbinding tale of
love, loss, and the power of forgiveness
in the lands of Bohemia and Sicilia. An
unforgettable staging featuring original
music performed by the all-star cast.
Folger Theatre
201 East Capitol St., SE, DC
202.544.7077
www.folger.edu/theatre
Final Weekend!
Today 11am
Sat & Sun 11:30am &
1:00pm
A romantic tale of a handsome prince,
and his love, Beauty. There are hopes,
dreams and all the things that make a
happy ending that much sweeter.
The Puppet Co. Playhouse
7300 MacArthur Blvd.
Glen Echo, MD 20812
www.thepuppetco.org
$12
Group
rates
available
301.634.5380
March 23 – March 31
11am, 2pm and 4:30pm
Alexander is having the worst day! He
wakes up with gum in his hair, his mother
forgets to pack him dessert, and his best
friend decides he's not his best friend
anymore. Australia, here he comes!
Adventure Theatre MTC
7300 MacArthur Blvd
Glen Echo, MD 20812
301.634.2270
adventuretheatre-mtc.org
$19.50
Be sure to visit
our website for
Spring Break
showtimes!
$35 adult
$15
student
children 12
and under
free
Great classical
music in
historic village
one hour from
DC. Subscriptions for all five
2018 concerts
now on sale.
With
WNO Young Artists
Sunday, March 25 at
4pm
www.apollo
orchestra.com
THEATRE
A new drama
Roz and Ray
April 3 – 29
Julia Alvarez’s
En el Tiempo de
las Mariposas
April 12-May 13
Thurs-Sat at 8 pm
Sun at 2 pm
George_Don’t Do That!
starring Catherine Flye
Final weekend
Fri at 8,
Sat at 8, Sun 3 & 7
Newsies
A Disney Musical
March 15- June 10
Shear Madness
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Regular Schedule:
Tuesday–Friday at 8
Saturday at 6 & 9
Sunday at 3 & 7
The Ars Nova production
Underground
Railroad Game
presents
GALA Theatre
3333 14th Street, NW
202-234-7174
Galatheatre.org
MetroStage
1201 N. Royal St. Alex. VA
703-548-9044
www.metrostage.org
Toby’s Dinner Theatre
of Columbia
410.730.8311
Tobysdinnertheatre.com
With Michael
Discount Tolaydo and
tix, 3+ tix Joe Walsh at
call theatre the piano
Call for
tickets and
information
Added Shows:
Mon at 8PM
Tue at 5PM
Wed at 5PM
Thu at 5PM
Great Group
Rates for 15 +
Tix starting
at $35
Discounts
available
- visit
website
Brews &
Banter on
Fri., April 6,
6:30pm
CHILDREN'S THEATRE
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 23, 2018
Beauty and the
Beast
Alexander and
the Terrible,
Horrible,
No Good,
Very Bad Day
MUSIC - CONCERTS
The American
Chamber Players
The National
Presbyterian Church
Chancel Choir,
Soloists &
Orchestra
Sunday, March 25,
4 PM
Sunday, March 25 at
5 PM
Led by violist Miles Hoffman, the
American Chamber Players perform a
sparkling program of music for strings,
flute and piano by Pierné, Beethoven,
Poulenc and Lekeu.
Promise of Glory A Palm Sunday Concert
featuring Ralph Vaughan Williams, O Clap
Your Hands, and Gabriel Fauré, Cantique
de Jean Racine, Op. 11, and Requiem,
Op. 48
Waterford Old School
40222 Fairfax St.
Waterford, VA.
Info and tickets at
571-510-0128 or
www.waterfordconcert
series.org
National Presbyterian
Church
4101 Nebraska Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20016
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
• Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
No Tickets
Required
An
Offering
Will Be
Received
Free Parking
Corner of
Nebraska and
Van Ness
Tenleytown
Metro Red
Line
16-2898
21
EZ
MUSIC - CONCERTS
Royal Air Force
Centenary
Concert
Strings Fever:
Brahms and
Mendelssohn
George Frideric
Handel:
Israel In Egypt
Marine Band
Living History:
For “The
President’s Own”
Music of Honor
Celebrating Medal
of Honor Day
Mon, Apr 16, 7:30 p.m.
Wed, Apr 18, 7:30 p.m.
Sat, March 24, 2018
7:30pm
Apr 16 - The Central Band of the Royal
Air Force and the United States Air Force
Concert Band join forces for a Centennial
Celebration.
Apr 18 - Don't miss the Royal Air Force
Squadronaires and the Airmen of Note for
a joint big band performance.
Two of the greatest works of music
featuring the lush sounds of the strings.
Reception with the
artists to follow
performance.
Johannes Brahms:String Sextet No. 2
in G Major Op.36
Felix Mendelssohn: String Octet in E flat
Major, Op.20
Sunday, March 25,
4:00pm
Experience Holy Week anew with the retelling of the Exodus, the same Passover
narrative that Jesus and his friends would
have commemorated during Holy Week.
Handel's use of color and texture with
choir and orchestra combine to paint vivid
images of this epic story, and capture the
composer at his peak of creative genius.
April 16:
DAR Constitution Hall
1776 D St NW, Wash, DC 20006
April 18:
The Music Center at
Strathmore
5301 Tuckerman Ln,
North Bethesda, MD 20852
Free
tickets
required
for both
events.
Apr 16:
www.usafband.
eventbrite.com
Unitarian Universalist
Church of Arlington
4444 Arlington Blvd.
Arlington, VA 22204
Free Parking
info only: 703-685-7590
Tickets:NationalChamber
Ensemble.org
$36 Gen
Adm,
$18 Stdnt
Guest host:
Monique
O'Grady,
Arlington
School Board
Washington National
Cathedral
3101 Wisconsin Ave., NW
Washington DC 20016
Ticket info:
Apr 18: www.
usafband.af.mil
Tickets
Student tickets
start at $25 available.
202.537.2228
cathedral.org/concerts
Sunday, March 25
at 2 p.m.
Conducted by Capt. Ryan Nowlin and
special guest 25th Director Col. John
Bourgeois, USMC (ret.), this program
features music written for or premièred by
“The President’s Own” by John Williams,
Gustav Holst, John Philip Sousa, and
more!
Schlesinger Concert Hall
Northern Virginia
Community College
4915 East Campus Dr.
Alexandria, VA
202-433-4011
Live streaming at:
www.marineband.marines.mil
FREE, no
tickets
required
Free parking is
available.
This weekend!
Sun, March 25
3:00 p.m.
The Army's premier concert band
will pay tribute to Medal of Honor
recipients through the years with
marches by Karl King, symphonic music
by James Barnes, film music by John
Williams, and modern music by
Lee Greenwood and Toby Keith.
Bowie Center for
Performing Arts
15200 Annapolis Rd
Bowie, MD
usarmyband.com
facebook.com/usarmyband
youtube.com/usarmyband
Free!
No tickets
required.
Visit
usarmyband.
com for full
schedule.
Cultural Arts Center of
Montgomery College
7995 Georgia Ave
Silver Spring, MD 20910
(301) 799-4028
www.marlowguitar.org
Adult:
$35-45;
Discount
for
students
and
children
Order tickets
online at
www.
marlow
guitar.org
April 7 - 14
A darkly comic opera about a teenaged
girl falsely accused of matricide. A highlystylizd vision of suburbia set to a jazzinflected score, the opera follows its hero,
Florida Fandango, through a maze of
gossip, desire, justice and lipstick.
Atlas Performing Arts
Center
1333 H Street NE
202.399.7993 x2
urbanarias.org
$42
Fri Mar. 23 at 7:30
Sun Mar. 25 at 3:00
Set in 12th Century Novgorod, Russia.
Performed in Russian with supertitles,
with Olney Ballet and Four Seasons
dancers.
Randolph Road Theater
4010 Randolph Rd.
Silver Spring
www.belcantanti.com
MUSIC - JAZZ
The John E. Marlow
Guitar Series presents
Saturday, March 24,
2018, 8pm
Rhythm Future
Quartet
Pre-concert talk,
7:15pm
Travel to Paris of the 1920s with this
virtuosic and fun foursome. Gypsy jazz
standards of Django Reinhardt mix with
original compositions to evoke the
famous Hot Club of France.
OPERA
Based on true events
Florida
A new opera.
$36
Discounts available for groups
of 10+. Call:
202-312-1427
$25 adult
$15
students,
staff,
seniors
$10
groups of
10+
Spectacular
modern dance
performed by
talented
student artists
Tickets:
cfa.gmu.edu
COMEDY
Orange is the
New Barack
Fridays & Saturdays
at 7:30pm
A musical, political satire.
We put the MOCK in Democracy!
www.capsteps.com | Info: 202.312.1555
Ronald Reagan Building
1300 Pennsylvania Ave, NW
Tix available at 202.397.SEAT
ticketmaster.com
DANCE
Mason Dance
Company
2018 Gala Concert
March 23-24 at 8 p.m.
George Mason
University’s Center for
the Arts
March 25 at 4 p.m.
Hylton Performing Arts
Center
Featuring the work of celebrated
choreographers:
“Mass” by Doug Varone
“Flesh” by Iván Pérez
“Within Reach” by Yin Yue
“A Brahms Symphony” by Lar Lubovitch
George Mason University’s
Center for the Arts
Fairfax, VA
Hylton Performing Arts
Center
Manassas, VA
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
• Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
16-2898
MARCH 23, 2018
Tickets online
and at the
door
. FRIDAY,
$15 - $40
See
website
THE WASHINGTON POST
RimskyKorsakov’s
Sadko
22
EZ
On the Stage
STAGE FROM 16
COMEDY
FIGHTING IMPROV SMACKDOWN
TOURNAMENT (FIST) The 12th annual
competition pits improv teams against one
another in a March Madness-style
tournament in which audiences pick the
winners. Source Theatre, 1835 14th St.
NW. 202-204-7800. witdc.org. Friday at
7:30 p.m. Through Sunday. $15-$18.
THE SECOND CITY: LOOK BOTH WAYS
BEFORE TALKING An improvised comedy
show with sketches and songs from the
comedy troupe made famous by former
members such as Tina Fey, Stephen
Colbert, Steve Carell and Bill Murray. The
Barns at Wolf Trap, 1635 Trap Rd., Vienna.
877-965-3872. wolftrap.org. Friday at 8 p.m.
Through March 25. $27-$32.
DANCE
CHRISTOPHER K. MORGAN & ARTISTS A
wide-ranging evening of mixed dance
repertory. Dance Place, 3225 Eighth St.
NE. 202-269-1600. danceplace.org.
Saturday at 8 p.m. Through Sunday. Free.
CONTRADICTION DANCE: LITTLE WHITE
LIES A collection of new dances exploring
the “little white lies” that shape our
thoughts and behavior. Choreographed and
performed by Contradiction Dance Theatre
and guest performers. Anacostia Arts
Center, 1231 Good Hope Rd. SE. 202-6316291. anacostiaartscenter.com. Friday at 8
p.m. Through Saturday. $20.
MARK MORRIS DANCE GROUP AND SILK
ROAD ENSEMBLE: LAYLA AND MAJNUN
Based on an ancient Persian tale, “Layla
and Majnun” tells a story of passion and
tragic love. The Kennedy Center, 2700 F St.
NW. 202-467-4600. kennedy-center.org.
Friday at 7:30 p.m. Through Saturday. $29$99.
MASON SCHOOL OF DANCE GALA
CONCERT The Gala Concert features
George Mason University’s dance majors in
several works, including Lar Lubovitch's “A
Brahms Symphony” and Yin Yue's “Within
Reach.” George Mason University Center
for the Arts, 4373 Mason Pond Dr., Fairfax.
PAUL KOLNIK
Joseph Gordon and Tiler Peck in “Fancy Free,” a dance piece choreographed by Jerome Robbins for the New York City Ballet. The
company returns to the Kennedy Center on Tuesday for its annual appearance, which will include a program to celebrate Robbins.
703-993-8888. cfa.gmu.edu. Friday at
8 p.m. Through Saturday.
NEW YORK CITY BALLET The company
returns for its annual appearance with two
repertory programs, including a program to
celebrate Jerome Robbins. Resident
choreographer Justin Peck will present a
new piece. The Kennedy Center, 2700 F St.
NW. 202-467-4600. kennedy-center.org.
Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. Through April 1.
THE WASHINGTON BALLET: PETER AND
THE WOLF This children’s introduction to
music, instruments, and dance tells the
tale of Peter as he ventures into the
meadow. Choreographed by Brian Reeder,
with music by Sergei Prokofiev. THEARC,
1901 Mississippi Ave. SE. 202-889-5901 .
washingtonballet.org. Saturday at 1 p.m.
Through Sunday.
Membership is rewarding.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 23, 2018
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and synth pop, discover great ways to save
money, win tickets and have fun at concerts.
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S2929 5x6
On Exhibit
23
PG
M USE U M S
OPENINGS
CÉZANNE PORTRAITS An exhibition of
about 60 portraits by Cézanne accompanied
by an illustrated catalogue with essays by
the exhibition’s curators. This is the first full
visual account of the artists portraits,
exploring the thematic characteristics of his
works, and the development of his style and
methods. Opening Sunday. National Gallery
of Art, Sixth Street and Constitution Avenue
NW. nga.gov.
TO DYE FOR: IKATS FROM CENTRAL ASIA
An exhibition of 30 historical ikats, the
vividly designed textiles produced in Central
Asia notable for their complex technique.
Contemporary designers have worked ikat
motifs into carpets, sofa covers, bedding,
jeans, T-shirts and socks. Opening Saturday.
Smithsonian Arthur M. Sackler Gallery,
1050 Independence Ave. SW.
freersackler.si.edu.
UNSEEN: OUR PAST IN A NEW LIGHT, KEN
GONZALES-DAY AND TITUS KAPHAR An
exhibition of works by Gonzales-Day and
Kaphar, contemporary artists who address
the underrepresentation and
misrepresentation of minorities in American
history and portraiture. Opening Friday.
National Portrait Gallery, Eighth and F
streets NW. npg.si.edu.
ONGOING
LAURIE SIMMONS/SALON 94
“Women House” is on view at National Museum of Women in the Arts through May 28. It includes roomlike installations from more than
30 global artists who envision the idea of home as a place of liberation, rather than solely of comfort and nurturing.
“Femme en Extase,” a portrait of the Italian
dancer Giulia Leonardi by the Swiss painter
Ferdinand Hodler. The work embodies the
Swiss modernist approach of emotional
expression through bodily movement — a
theory known as eurythmics — which
transformed dance in America.Eighth and F
streets NW. npg.si.edu.
NATIONAL POSTAL MUSEUM “Beautiful
Blooms: Flowering Plants on Stamps,”
through July 14, 2019. An exhibition that
highlights the variety of flowering plants
commemorated on U.S. postage stamps
during the past 50 years. It includes some
30 pieces of artwork used to produce at
least 28 flora stamps. 2 Massachusetts Ave.
NE. postalmuseum.si.edu.
NEWSEUM “The Marines and Tet: The Battle
That Changed the Vietnam War,” through
July 8, 2019. An exhibition of 20 largeformat photographs of John Olson, a
photographer with Stars and Stripes who
spent three days with the Marines at the
1968 Battle of Hue of the Vietnam War. Hue
was one of more than 100 cities and villages
that North Vietnamese forces struck with a
surprise attack on the holiday known as Tet.
555 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. newseum.org.
SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN ART MUSEUM
“Do Ho Suh: Almost Home,” through Aug. 5.
A major installation of the artist’s Hub
sculptures — representations of thresholds
and transitional spaces from places he has
lived — along with a group of
semitransparent copies of household
objects called “Specimens.” Eighth and F
streets NW. americanart.si.edu.
SMITHSONIAN ARTHUR M. SACKLER
GALLERY“The Prince and the Shah: Royal
Portraits from Qajar Iran,” through Aug. 5.
An exhibition of about 30 works from the
Freer and Sackler collections, including
recent gifts and acquisitions, of painted
portraits and studio photographs from
Qajar-era (19th century) Iran when rulers
used portraiture to convey monarchical
power. 1050 Independence Ave. SW.
asia.si.edu.
SMITHSONIAN NATIONAL MUSEUM OF
NATURAL HISTORY “Objects of Wonder,”
through Jan. 1, 2019. The exhibition
includes the “Blue Flame,” one of the
world’s largest and finest pieces of gemquality lapis lazuli; Martha, the last known
passenger pigeon; the Pinniped fossil, a
fossil of one of the earliest members of the
group of animals that includes seals, sea
lions and walruses; and the 1875 Tsimshian
House Front, one of the best examples of
Native Alaskan design artwork. 10th Street
and Constitution Avenue NW.
naturalhistory.si.edu.
THE PHILLIPS COLLECTION “Ten
Americans: After Paul Klee,” through May 6.
An exhibition that explores the role of Swiss
artist Paul Klee (1879–1940) in the
development of mid-20th century American
art, featuring work by Klee in dialogue with
Adolph Gottlieb, Norman Lewis, Robert
Motherwell, Kenneth Noland, Jackson
Pollock, Theodoros Stamos, Mark Tobey,
Bradley Walker Tomlin, William Baziotes and
Gene Davis. 1600 21st St. NW.
phillipscollection.org.
UNITED STATES HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL
MUSEUM Permanent exhibition spanning
three floors offers a chronological narrative
of the Holocaust through photographs, films
and historical artifacts. 100 Raoul
Wallenberg Pl. SW. ushmm.org.
U.S. BOTANIC GARDEN “Wall Flowers:
Botanical Murals,” through Oct. 15. An
exhibition of botanical murals. “Orchid
Spectrum,” through April 8. An annual
exhibition of thousands of orchids, including
those unique and rarely seen from the U.S.
Botanic Gardens’s and Smithsonian
Gardens’s extensive plant collections. 100
Maryland Ave. SW. usbg.gov.
U.S. NATIONAL ARBORETUM “Sakura
Orihon: Diary of a Cherry Blossom Journey,”
through April 8. An exhibition of orihon
sketchbooks by Ron Henderson who
recorded his experience following
blossoming cherry trees from south to north
in Japan, celebrating the cherry blossom
culture there. 3501 New York Ave. NE.
usna.usda.gov.
VIRGINIA MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS
“Steinlen: Cats,” through May 13. A catthemed exhibition of 32 works by the artist
known best for the cabaret advertisement
“La Tournée du Chat Noir,” the 1896 poster
featuring a black cat silhouetted against an
orange background — explores his range of
styles, such as realism, Japonisme, art
nouveau and post-impressionism. 200 N
Blvd., Richmond. vmfa.museum.
WALTERS ART MUSEUM “Crowning Glory:
Art of the Americas,” through Oct. 7. An
exhibition of some 20 objects spanning
more than 2,500 years including figures,
ceramics and vessels that express power,
identity and spirituality in North, Central and
South American cultures, including the Wari
and Nazca of Peru, the Olmec of Mexico and
the Jama-Coaque of Ecuador. 600 N.
Charles St., Baltimore. thewalters.org.
MARCH 23, 2018
time-lapse images taken from a fixed
vantage point over the course of 15 to 30
hours from sunrise to sunset of four ancient
bird migrations across the globe. 17th and M
streets NW. nationalgeographic.org.
NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN
AMERICAN HISTORY AND CULTURE
Ongoing exhibitions focusing on a diversity
of historical subjects including the
transatlantic slave trade, the civil rights
movement, the history of African American
music and other cultural expressions, visual
arts, theater, sports and military history.
14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW.
nmaahc.si.edu.
NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN ART
“Visionary: Viewpoints on Africa’s Arts,”
through Nov. 4, 2020. An ongoing exhibition
of some 300 works of art from over 30
artists that offers a broad spectrum of visual
expression. 950 Independence Ave. SW.
africa.si.edu.
NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AMERICAN
HISTORY. “City of Hope: Resurrection City &
the 1968 Poor People’s Campaign,” through
Dec. 28. An ongoing exhibition that marks
the 50th anniversary of the assassination of
Martin Luther King Jr. with never-beforeseen photographs and original artifacts
from Resurrection City, the small community
set up in Washington for the nation’s poor.
14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW.
americanhistory.si.edu.
NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN
INDIAN “Americans,” through Sept. 30,
2022. An exhibition of 350 objects and
images that explores the prevalence
of American Indian names and images
throughout American culture: from the
Tomahawk missile to baking powder cans, to
the stories of Thanksgiving, Pocahontas, the
Trail of Tears and the Battle of Little Bighorn.
Fourth Street and Independence Avenue
SW. nmai.si.edu.
NATIONAL MUSEUM OF WOMEN IN THE
ARTS “Women House,” through May 28. An
exhibition of photographs, videos,
sculptures and room-like installations built
with materials such as felt and rubber bands
from more than 30 global artists who
envision the idea of home as a place of
liberation rather than solely of comfort and
nurturing. A sequel to the project
“Womanhouse,” developed in 1972 by Judy
Chicago and Miriam Schapiro. 1250 New
York Ave. NW. nmwa.org.
NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY “Portraits
of the World: Switzerland,” through Nov. 12.
An exhibition that features the work,
. FRIDAY,
involvement in and experience of it —
via correspondence, music, film, recordings,
diaries, posters, photographs, scrapbooks,
medals, maps and materials from the
Veterans History Project. 101 Independence
Ave. SE. loc.gov.
MUSEUM OF THE BIBLE Includes five floors
of exhibits of ancient biblical manuscripts,
including an array of texts on papyrus,
Jewish texts, including the world’s largest
private collection of Torah scrolls, medieval
manuscripts, as well as Americana such as
Bibles belonging to celebrities. 400 Fourth
St. SW. museumofthebible.org.
NATIONAL AIR AND SPACE MUSEUM
“Artist Soldiers,” through Nov. 11. An
exhibition that examines the work of
professional artists who were recruited by
the U.S. Army and were considered the first
true combat artists, along with the artwork
of soldiers, including Jeff Gusky’s photos of
stone carvings made in underground
shelters, that provide a unique perspective
on the First World War. Sixth Street and
Independence Avenue SW.
airandspace.si.edu.
NATIONAL BUILDING MUSEUM “Making
Room: Housing for a Changing America,”
through Sept. 16. An exhibition of developers’,
architects’ and interior designers’ answers to
the changing housing needs because of shifts
in demographics and lifestyle. At the center of
the exhibition is a full-scale, flexible dwelling
that illustrates how a small space can be
adapted to meet many needs. It comprises
two living spaces that could be used
independently or combined to form a larger
residence. 401 F St. NW. nbm.org.
NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART “Sally Mann: A
Thousand Crossings,” through May 28. An
exhibition of about 125 photographs by Sally
Mann (b. 1951, Lexington, Va.), including
portraits, still lifes and landscapes that
explore how her relationship with the South
has shaped her work. Sixth Street and
Constitution Avenue NW. nga.gov.
NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART, EAST
BUILDING “Jackson Pollock’s ‘Mural,’ ”
through Oct. 28. This exhibition of works by
Pollock has at its center a special installation
of one of his murals on loan from the
University of Iowa Museum of Art. Originally
commissioned by Peggy Guggenheim for her
New York City townhouse, it is Pollock’s
largest work at nearly 20 feet long. 440
Constitution Ave. NW. nga.gov.
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC MUSEUM“Day to
Night: In the Field with Stephen Wilkes,”
through April 29. An exhibition of over 1,500
THE WASHINGTON POST
AMERICAN VISIONARY ART MUSEUM “The
Great Mystery Show,” through Sept. 2. An
exhibition that explores mystery as the
secret power behind art, science and the
pursuit of the sacred. 800 Key Hwy.,
Baltimore. avam.org.
ART MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAS
“Palimpsestus: Image and Memory,”
through Sunday. An exhibition of 70 works
produced between 1900 and 2014 including
that of 30 artists from 10 countries of the
Colección Memoria, Mexico, curated by
Alejandro de Villota Ruiz, with OAS collection
works. “Art of the Americas,” through Oct.
28. Modern and contemporary Latin
American and Caribbean permanent
collection highlights. 201 18th St. NW.
museum.oas.org.
DUMBARTON OAKS MUSEUM “Early
Acquisitions: Bliss Collecting in Paris and
London, 1912–1919,” through March 31. An
exhibition of the acquisitions of Robert and
Mildred Bliss, collected when they lived in
Paris from 1912 to 1919, including artworks
and unusual, decorative objects that were
newly available via avant-garde art dealers,
including medieval, Islamic and preColumbian artworks. 1703 32nd St. NW.
doaks.org.
GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY
MUSEUM AND THE TEXTILE MUSEUM
“Binding the Clouds: The Art of the Central
Asian Ikat,” through July 9. An exhibition
focused on the complex dyeing technique
from the region that is now Uzbekistan,
known as abrband (binding the clouds). 701
21st St. NW. museum.gwu.edu.
HILLWOOD ESTATE, MUSEUM AND
GARDENS “The Artistic Table,” through June
10. An exhibition of historic tables designed
by Hillwood curators and inspired by 18thand 19th-century French and Russian
models, on view in the 44-foot dining room
and the adjacent breakfast room. 4155
Linnean Ave. NW. hillwoodmuseum.org.
HIRSHHORN MUSEUM AND SCULPTURE
GARDEN “Brand New: Art and Commodity in
the 1980s,” through May 13. An exhibition of
about 150 works by 66 artists, including Jeff
Koons, Barbara Kruger, Ashley Bickerton,
General Idea, Julia Wachtel and Peter Halley
that explores the pivotal point in the 1980s
when art became a commodity and artists
became brands. Seventh Street and
Independence Avenue SW. hirshhorn.si.edu.
KREEGER MUSEUM “Reinstallation of the
Permanent Collection,” through Dec. 31,
2019. Guest curated by modern art
historian Harry Cooper, the reinstallation of
the collection introduces works that have
not been on view for several years. Phase I
of the reinstallation comprises the
museum’s main floor galleries and focuses
on 19th- and early-20th-century painting and
works on paper. Phase II of the
reinstallation, opening in the lower galleries
in September, will focus on the museum’s
postwar and contemporary art holdings,
including a bold vertical canvas by abstract
expressionist Hans Hofmann, as well as the
museum’s collection of West African masks.
2401 Foxhall Rd. NW. kreegermuseum.org.
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS “Echoes of the
Great War: American Experiences of World
War I,” through Jan. 5, 2019. An exhibition
that commemorates the centennial of the
Great War through depictions of the U.S.
24
EZ
On Exhibit
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 23, 2018
LIBBY WEILER/SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN ART MUSEUM
For Do Ho Suh, home is where the art is
His show represents
relocation, transience
BY
T
M ARK J ENKINS
here is no one place like
home in Do Ho Suh’s exhibition at the Smithsonian
American Art Museum.
There are many. The variety represents the artist’s experience of relocation, transience and rootlessness. It also suggests, less directly,
the contemporary age of mass migration, whether forced or voluntary.
The Korean-born Suh’s “Almost
Home” features partial simulations of his lodgings, past or present, in Asia, Europe and the Unit-
ed States. The full-scale models
are very specific, complete with
details such as an apartment inspection placard. Yet they’re also
imprecise and even spectral, because they’re made of gauzy colored fabric rather than wood,
brick or plaster.
The show’s centerpiece is a series of “hub” sculptures: a long,
translucent hallway that connects
Seoul (blue) to New York (pink) via
Berlin (green). At the pink end is a
one-story staircase in red that replicates part of the building in Manhattan’s Chelsea neighborhood
where Suh lived from 1997 to 2016.
(He left when his landlord died
and the building was sold.)
Museum visitors can enter the
corridor — albeit gingerly, because
the fabric is delicate — and gaze
from the safety of “home” out into
the world. But they can’t climb the
stairway, which is no more functional than a bicycle made of silk.
Also included are several drawings, most of which are actually
stitchings. The lines of “Blueprint,” for example, are embroidered with thread; they depict a
calm blue facade in front of red
chaos.
The rest of the show consists of
what Suh calls “specimens”: soft,
single-color replicas of architectural details and domestic appliances. There are locks, door handles and switch plates, and a radiator, sink, microwave oven and
fire extinguisher. All are constructed the same way as the larg-
If you go
DO HO SUH: ALMOST HOME
Smithsonian American Art
Museum, Eighth and F streets NW.
202-633-7970. americanart.si.edu.
Dates: Through Aug. 5. Note: At
5:30 p.m. April 18, curator Sarah
Newman will guide visitors through
the exhibition.
Admission: Free.
A translucent hallway connects
Seoul (blue) to New York (pink)
via Berlin (green), cities that
Do Ho Suh has called home. His
show replicates humdrum
apartment-living details, which
hold personal meaning.
er structures: Stainless-steel armatures give shape to diaphanous
cloth.
Long before Suh thought to sew
a fabric toilet seat, Marcel Duchamp exhibited a common urinal.
The French artist was declaring
his prerogative to declare anything art. Suh is, in a sense, more
conservative. His specimens are
art because they have personal
meaning — they all reproduce
things he has lived with — and
because they’re made with considerable craft.
To fabricate these pieces, Suh
learned the skills of Korean garment makers. The featherweight
material is the same used in traditional Korean summer clothing.
DO HO SUH CONTINUED ON 25
25
EZ
GENE YOUNG/SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN ART MUSEUM
Do Ho Suh’s “Almost Home”
exhibition features partial
simulations of his lodgings in
Asia, Europe and the United
States that are made of gauzy
colored fabric, top, and what he
calls “specimens”: soft, singlecolor replicas of architectural
details and domestic
appliances, above.
his footprints.)
This is Suh’s first major exhibition on the East Coast, and the
Seoul section of the installation
has never been seen. But the artist’s work has been shown in galleries worldwide. Indeed, it’s designed to get around.
Suh calls his fabric domiciles
“suitcase homes,” capable of being
goingoutguide@washpost.com
MARCH 23, 2018
(Not all that traditional — it’s polyester.) At a recent museum talk,
the artist explained that he sees
clothes and buildings as similar:
Both are spaces to inhabit. And
both can contain memories as well
as bodies.
The link between Suh’s art and
his homeland’s clothing serves as
a concrete assertion of Korean
identity, even if the works themselves are barely tangible. (Elsewhere, Suh has exhibited pieces
based on buildings at the site of
the 1980 student protests that
shook Korea’s authoritarian government. But the work in this
show reflects only the artist and
. FRIDAY,
DO HO SUH FROM 24
THE WASHINGTON POST
TAEGSU JEON/DO HO SUH/LEHMANN MAUPIN/SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN ART MUSEUM
easily moved and rebuilt in a new
location. These jet-age yurts aren’t
quite carry-on art, but they’re
much more portable than marble
or bronze. They’re also more substantial, in their see-through way,
than a purely conceptual piece.
Although Suh’s fabric constructions are personal, they’re part of a
growing art-world penchant for
place-making over thing-making.
The Hirshhorn just had its lobby
redesigned by Japanese artist Hiroshi Sugimoto, who in 2008 cofounded a Tokyo architecture studio even though he’s not a licensed
architect.
Museums welcome such projects in part because of their popularity. At a time when one-dimensional images are ubiquitous, and
people spend much of their lives
gazing at screens, it’s a pleasant
change to exit the smartphone
universe and enter a unique 3-D
space — even if it’s used as just
another colorful backdrop for selfies.
However the public experiences the installation, though, it
can never become entirely a public
place. The artist’s private memories walk that hallway, and that is
what gives the piece its resonance.
Suh may be only “Almost Home,”
but he’s closer than anyone else
can be.
26
EZ
Movies
Isle of Dogs FOX SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES
Wes Anderson’s new dog with old tricks
BY
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 23, 2018
V
A NN H ORNADAY
iewers may be forgiven
for being confused by
Wes Anderson’s movies.
Constructed with dollhouse fastidiousness, their hypersymmetrical, squared-off tableaus dressed with gorgeous textures and color palettes — and
their clipped dialogue delivered
with deadpan sincerity — they
depict a universe with only glancing resemblance to the real world.
A tonal mash-up of ironic distance and emotional manipulation, they invite the audience to
laugh knowingly one minute, and
to coo with empathy the next.
They’re moviedom’s fussiest,
most arcane inside joke.
All of these gifts, contradictions and irritations abound in
“Isle of Dogs,” Anderson’s ninth
movie and his second stop-animation feature. Like his first one,
“Fantastic Mr. Fox,” this is both a
celebration and sendup of cartoon anthropomorphism. Taking
his cues from Akira Kurosawa,
Rankin/Bass holiday specials,
“The Little Prince,” “Lady and the
The maker of moviedom’s fussiest, most arcane
inside jokes puts the predictable preciousness on
his second stop-motion movie
Tramp” and Japanese kaiju movies, Anderson has adapted his
usual jewel-box aesthetic into
bento-box proportions: “Isle of
Dogs” bursts with color (including extravagant swaths of crimson) and precious detail, and is
shot through with the filmmaker’s reliably understated humor.
The degree to which any of this
will appeal to filmgoers beyond
Anderson’s core constituency is
debatable. True to its title, “Isle of
Dogs” is a circuitous collection of
false starts, flashbacks and —
sorry, there’s no other word for it
— doglegs that are far less captivating than the formal beauty on
display. Put most briefly: The
story takes place 20 years into the
future, when the Stalinesque, catloving mayor of a Japanese city
has banished dogs to a place
called Trash Island, having
spread the vicious lie that they
carry an incurable disease. When
his 12-year-old ward Atari (Koyu
Rankin) travels to the island to
rescue his faithful guard dog,
Spots, he falls in with a plucky
band of former pets and their
leader, a street-toughened stray
named Chief.
Voiced by Bryan Cranston,
Chief is the Bogartlike antihero of
“Isle of Dogs,” which features the
voices of such frequent Anderson
collaborators as Bill Murray, Edward Norton, Bob Balaban and
Frances McDormand. Although it
can be fun to try to match the
voice with the character — Norton, Murray, Balaban and Jeff
Goldblum are particularly amusing as Chief ’s ragtag posse — the
chief attractions here are the visuals, from the gently blowing
alpaca wool of the dogs’ fur and
the vagrant beauty of the detritus
they live in to the waxy translucence of Atari’s skin and the retrofuturistic look of the fictional
metropolis he calls home.
Not everything is too-too adorable in “Isle of Dogs,” which possesses more than its share of
grimness, suffering and death.
(The film includes a particularly
beautiful and brutal sushi-making scene.) Even if it belongs to a
puppet, the sight of a dog’s ear
that’s been bitten off sends a
discomfiting jolt. And the specter
of cultural appropriation haunts
a production that clearly revels in
the design elements and moodboard inspirations of Japanese
technology and art, but also commits a few patronizing missteps.
One subplot features Greta Gerwig as Tracy, a spirited American
exchange student who rallies her
meekly obedient Japanese cohorts to save the dogs, at one
point literally throttling a scientist named Yoko Ono who is
voiced by Yoko Ono. Ha . . . ha?
With its solemn children escaping the long arm of selfish,
unfeeling adult controllers, “Isle
of Dogs” shares the cardinal
themes of Anderson’s oeuvre,
“Moonrise Kingdom” in particular. Does this variation offer any-
PG-13. At area theaters. Contains mature thematic elements and some violent images. 94 minutes.
Twelve-year-old Atari
(voice of Koyu Rankin,
center) goes looking for
his missing dog on Trash
Island and encounters a
pack of exiles (from left,
Bryan Cranston as Chief,
Bob Balaban as King,
Bill Murray as Boss,
Edward Norton as Rex
and Jeff Goldblum as
Duke).
thing genuinely new? In its own
messy, slightly ungovernable way,
this digressive bagatelle feels
looser than some of Anderson’s
most tightly controlled mis-enscenes. But the story, for all its
busyness, is negligible. The script
feels less like an organic whole
than an effort to keep building up
a scrawny central premise until it
felt like a movie. “Isle of Dogs”
possesses moments of memorable beauty, but even at its most
observant and obsessively painstaking, it’s still little more than a
shaggy-dog story.
ann.hornaday@washpost.com
Movies
27
EZ
Ratings guide
Pacific Rim: Uprising Masterpiece
Very good
Okay
Poor
Also reviewed
Unsane
A young woman is
locked in a mental
facility against her
will. 28
Paul, Apostle of
Christ
The biblical drama
stars Jim Caviezel.
29
Plus
Common Sense
Media 31
LEGENDARY PICTURES/UNIVERSAL PICTURES
Heavy on loud action, but lacking heart
The robots-vs.-monster
sequel panders to its
young audience,
sacrificing substance
BY
M ICHAEL O ’ S ULLIVAN
John Boyega of the
Star Wars franchise
plays Jake Pentecost,
the orphaned son of
Stacker Pentecost
who has been left to
wrestle with his
father’s legacy.
michael.osullivan@washpost.com
PG-13. At area theaters. Contains sequences of sci-fi violence and action, and some coarse language. 111 minutes.
Sam Claflin stars in
the British World
War I drama
Journey’s End.
Tyler Perry’s
Acrimony is a story
of marital betrayal.
The documentary
The China Hustle is
an exposé about
financial fraud.
Three siblings try to
save their family
vineyard in Back to
Burgundy.
MARCH 23, 2018
“plasma cannons” and something
called “drift compatibility,” in a
screenplay by DeKnight and
three co-writers that is long on
things that sound awesome but
mean nothing. Like the names of
this film’s Jaegers — Gipsy Avenger, Saber Athena, Bracer Phoenix,
Obsidian Fury and Guardian Bravo — the film appears to have
been cobbled together from the
likes and dislikes mined from
player profiles in a focus group of
13-year-old gamers. The emphasis on surface and spectacle over
substance betrays the film’s video
game aesthetic, and a corresponding lack of emotional engagement.
When a team of pilots knocks
out a kaiju, for instance, saving
the planet, it merits a fist pump,
and little else.
Final Portrait is a
drama from writerdirector Stanley
Tucci about artist
Alberto Giacometti.
. FRIDAY,
then other signs of a kaiju breach
— Jake must team up with a teen
girl (Cailee Spaeny) — like Jake,
an orphan — who shows an aptitude for mechanics and scrappy
derring-do. There is a mild plot
twist involving a character from
the previous film, but much of the
new cast play adolescent members of a Jaeger pilot academy,
which makes the pandering to the
youth audience, and the market
for Jaeger action figures — collect
them all! — even more obvious.
But the departure of Elba, who
brought a grown-up worldweariness to the first film’s shenanigans, and his replacement with
the more kid-friendly Boyega, of
the Star Wars franchise, aren’t the
only concessions to adolescent
taste in this outing. Director Steven S. DeKnight, a TV producer
and director known for Netflix’s
“Daredevil” and other series, has
taken the reins from filmmaker
Guillermo del Toro.
“Uprising” is loud, packed with
impressive effects and propulsive
— or as propulsive as a car with no
brakes going downhill — but it
lacks the heart of del Toro’s original. In its place is a barrage of
shouted jargon: Watch out for
references to the “Shatterdome,”
A teen searches for
a valuable prize in a
virtual-reality world
in Steven
Spielberg’s Ready
Player One, based
on the novel by
Ernest Cline.
THE WASHINGTON POST
The sequel “Pacific Rim: Uprising” is, like the 2013 “Pacific Rim,”
something of a chimera: a cheesy
Japanese monster movie for people who happen to love “Transformers” for its gigantic, battling
robots and thunderous soundtrack, and “Power Rangers” for its
cast of teeny-bopper heroes and
kinetic, overeager display of martial-arts action.
What do you mean no one loves
those things?
Oh.
Set 10 years after the action of
the first film, “Uprising” is, once
again, all about skyscraper-size
battle-bots, controlled by teams
of two pilots synced up to each
other via a kind of mind-meld.
Once called upon to defend the
world from an invasion of
Godzillaesque monsters, or kaiju,
who have escaped through holes
in the Earth’s crust from another
dimension, the oversize Rock ’Em
Sock ’Em Robots, known as Jaegers, now operate as giant, metallic beat cops. Working for the
Pan-Pacific Defense Corps, a kind
of “RoboCop”-like police department in a post-apocalyptic but
peaceful world, Jaegers, as the
film opens, seem mostly tasked
with impounding unregistered
cyborgs that have been jerry-built
from scavenged Jaeger parts.
Until, that is, there’s another
kaiju breach.
Gone from this outing is Idris
Elba as hero Stacker Pentecost,
the gruff but warmhearted Jaeger
pilot with the unbelievably cool
name from the first film. In the
wake of his death saving the
universe, which we’re told took
place in the gap between films,
his son Jake (John Boyega) has
been left to wrestle with Dad’s
legacy. Jake, a jaded former pilot
himself, now scrapes together a
living selling stolen engine components from decommissioned
Jaegers and black-market Sriracha sauce. (There’s a lot of cheeky,
post-apocalyptic humor here —
call it “Baby’s First Blade Runner”
— but it mostly falls flat.)
When things start to get hairy
— first a pilotless, rogue Jaeger
appears from beneath the ocean,
Opening next
week
28
EZ
Movies
Flower A clique not as clever as its pitch-black forebears
BY
S TEPHANIE M ERRY
When we first meet Erica, the
17-year-old girl at the center of
“Flower,” she’s in the process of
blackmailing a police officer —
performing oral sex on him in his
squad car while her friends secretly film the encounter from
outside. He isn’t the first to fall for
her extortion. The little group has
been making money this way all
over town.
It’s for a good cause: Erica
(Zoey Deutch) hopes to save
enough to bail her dad out of jail.
“Flower” wastes no time — although it sure wastes plenty of
energy — letting us know that its
protagonist (and, by extension,
the movie) revels in edginess. Just
to put a cherry on top of things,
we’re soon shown a peek inside
Erica’s notebook, where she has a
gallery of hand-drawn penis portraits, labeled by their owners’
names. She also punches a classmate in the face.
We’ve seen high-schoolers behaving badly before, sometimes
to brilliant and entertaining effect. (Think “Heathers,” “Mean
Girls” and the recent “Thoroughbreds.”) But “Flower” can’t quite
nail the necessary tone, aiming
for dark, but missing the comedy.
The plot gets going in earnest
when Luke, the 18-year-old son of
Erica’s future stepfather, moves in
with Erica’s family, fresh out of
THE ORCHARD
Zoey Deutch, far left, is infinitely watchable playing a wild child who, along with calculating pals
(Dylan Gelula, center, and Maya Eshet), conspires to exact revenge on an accused pedophile.
rehab. “I thought junkies were
supposed to be skinny,” Erica tells
her mother (Kathryn Hahn) when
she first sees her portly new
housemate. Erica eventually
warms to Luke (Joey Morgan)
when she learns that he once
accused a male teacher of fon-
dling him and is still reeling after
running into the man (Adam
Scott).
In short order, Erica hatches a
plan, along with Luke and her two
extortionist friends (Dylan Gelula
and Maya Eshet), to exact revenge. “Shaking down a child mo-
lester is our moral obligation,” she
says.
It’s a mission that’s destined to
go too far.
What sells the movie are the
performances, especially Deutch’s. The 23-year-old daughter of
actress Lea Thompson and direc-
tor Howard Deutch, the performer has an unforced charisma and
is a delight to watch — even when
the script isn’t doing her any favors. She and Hahn, in the role of
Erica’s laissez-faire single mother,
play especially well off each other.
But Deutch’s character undergoes some bizarre changes of
heart: If at first Erica is overly
broad — a paint-by-numbers wild
child — by the end of the film,
she’s beyond comprehension, a
teenage girl written by grown-ups
who don’t understand teenage
girls. Initially cryptic, Luke, by
contrast, is at least understandable, once he has laid out his
ulterior motives. Morgan emerges as the movie’s breakout star.
As “Flower” reaches its climax,
director Max Winkler, who cowrote the script with Matt Spicer
and Alex McAuley, switches gears
on his enigmatic main character,
dropping the negative portrait for
a heartwarming one. It’s a
strange, but hardly bold, choice.
Turns out, the only thing more
confounding than Erica is the
movie’s attempt at happy-ever-after.
stephanie.merry@washpost.com
R. At AMC’s Shirlington 7 and
Landmark’s E Street Cinema.
Contains crude sexual content and
language throughout, graphic nude
drawings, some drug content and a
brief violent image. 90 minutes.
Unsane THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 23, 2018
Stars who should undergo observation
BY
M ICHAEL O ’ S ULLIVAN
I’ll tell you what’s crazy: The
name “Sawyer Valentini” is crazy.
But that’s what the young heroine
of “Unsane” — a movie about a
woman who finds herself locked
up in a psychiatric institution
against her will — is called.
Played by Claire Foy of “The
Crown,” Sawyer has recently
moved to Pennsylvania from
Massachusetts to escape a stalker. After visiting a psychiatrist,
where she ill-advisedly admits to
feeling suicidal every now and
again, she’s handed a paper to
sign and, without reading it, finds
that she has just “voluntarily”
committed herself to a 24-hour
stay in a psychiatric hospital — a
period of observation that quickly becomes an involuntary, weeklong incarceration after she tries
to renege on the deal and slugs a
staff member in the face.
Once she’s stuck there, Sawyer
finds that her psychotic tormentor from Boston (Joshua Leonard
of “The Blair Witch Project”) is —
reasonably enough — employed
by the hospital. Or is Sawyer the
psychotic one and Mr. Stalker
simply a figment of her tortured
imagination?
That’s the conundrum that
“Unsane’s” trailer would have you
believe this movie is about, but
don’t buy it. “Unsane” is a
straightforward, B-movie horror
flick — “The Snake Pit” without
the prestige — complete with
intentional overdosing, electroshock torture and patients
threatening each other with
sharpened spoons, when they’re
not either screaming or catatonic.
It also is very, very bad.
What possible mishap of legal
paperwork could explain why
Steven Soderbergh would have
ever agreed to direct this lazy,
misbegotten mess (written by
Jonathan Bernstein and James
Greer of the Jackie Chan secretagent comedy “The Spy Next
Door”)? Matt Damon, believe it or
not, also appears in a flashback
cameo, as a security consultant
hired by Sawyer. Did the actor
lose a bet, possibly while working
with Soderbergh on the director’s
2011’s “Contagion”? There’s no
other reason I can think of to
explain why A-listers would associate themselves with this garbage.
There are other names you
may recognize: Amy Irving plays
Sawyer’s mother, but don’t get
your hopes up, she’s barely in it.
FINGERPRINT RELEASING/BLEECKER STREET
Claire Foy plays a woman named Sawyer Valentini — the first tipoff to the B-movie to come — in Steven Soderbergh’s latest.
Juno Temple is wasted as one of
Sawyer’s drooling ward-mates.
And Jay Pharoah, late of “Saturday Night Live,” plays a sympathetic fellow patient.
Pharoah is, at least, passably
watchable. But he’s not enough to
stop that sinking feeling that you,
like Sawyer, have just made a
terrible, terrible mistake.
michael.osullivan@washpost.com
R. At area theaters. Contains
disturbing behavior, violence,
coarse language and sexual
references. 98 minutes.
Movies
Paul, Apostle of Christ 29
EZ
Hannah Rampling gives
a master class
in acting
BY
COLUMBIA PICTURES
Jim Caviezel, left, as Luke and James Faulkner as Paul in “Paul, Apostle of Christ,” which focuses on
Luke as he visits his incarcerated friend, who insists on following Christ’s essential commandments.
Inspiring portrayal of early
Christians at a fraying point
BY
A NN H ORNADAY
PG-13. At area theaters. Contains some violence and disturbing images. 107 minutes.
Unrated. At the Angelika Pop-Up at Union Market.
Contains nudity, mature thematic material and crude
language. In French and English with subtitles. 95
minutes.
PARADE DECK FILMS
A wife (Charlotte Rampling) is on the verge of
collapse, slowly but surely, in this quiet but
piercing drama set in Belgium.
MARCH 23, 2018
ann.hornaday@washpost.com
goingoutguide@washpost.com
. FRIDAY,
British and Irish accents, Olivier
Martinez plays Paul’s captor, a
man whose belief in his own
Roman gods is being rattled by
the fatal illness of his daughter.
But next