close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

The Washington Post – March 30, 2018

код для вставкиСкачать
ABCDE
Prices may vary in areas outside metropolitan Washington.
FRIDAY, MARCH 30 , 2018
Democracy Dies in Darkness
Showers 66/39 • Tomorrow: Mostly sunny 61/47 B8
SU V1 V2 V3 V4
. $2
VA pick draws
wide skepticism
Beneath the grief, anger simmers
LACK OF EXPERIENCE A BIPARTISAN CONCERN
White House forced to defend surprise nominee
BY L ISA R EIN,
S EUNG M IN K IM,
E MILY W AX- T HIBODEAUX
AND J OSH D AWSEY
The White House was thrown
on the defensive Thursday over
President Trump’s choice to lead
the Department of Veterans
Affairs, forcing officials to fend
off mounting skepticism that Ronny L. Jackson has the experience
to run the government’s secondlargest agency.
Trump announced by tweet late
Wednesday that the White House
physician would succeed ousted
secretary David Shulkin, surprising veterans groups and lawmakers, who were not notified beforehand and scrambled to learn the
policy views of someone whose
positions on the chronic challenges facing VA are unknown.
Jackson is a career naval officer
who was an emergency trauma
doctor in Iraq before spending the
past 12 years as a White House
physician. But his résumé lacks
the type of management experience usually expected from the
JOSH EDELSON/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Mourners embrace before Stephon Clark’s funeral Thursday in Sacramento. The black father of two was unarmed
when police shot and killed him outside his grandmother’s house on March 18, sparking protests across the country
over police use of force against minorities. Hundreds gathered at a church for Clark’s funeral. Story, A3
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
White House physician Ronny
L. Jackson was nominated after
an informal interview process.
Daniels trial won’t be expedited
A judge denies her request to
quickly depose Trump, Cohen. A6
leader of an agency that employs
360,000 people, has a $186 billion
annual budget and is dedicated to
serving the complex needs of the
country’s veterans.
“It’s great that he served in Iraq
and he’s our generation. But it
doesn’t appear that he’s had assignments that suggest he could
take on the magnitude of this job,
and this makes Jackson a
NOMINEES CONTINUED ON A4
Rep. Esty retained aide
D.C. families play the odds in hopes of better schools for 3 months after threat
BY
P ERRY S TEIN
Sabrina Gordon knows that
any lottery is a fluky game of odds.
But she needs to believe that the
school lottery is different.
The single mother lives in a
poor area of Southeast Washington and refuses to enroll her 10year-old son, Trevonte, in their
neighborhood school, Johnson
Middle, where he has a guaranteed slot.
So Gordon joins the thousands
of families across the city anxiously awaiting results of the
city’s competitive school lottery
this week — a system that highlights the bleak reality that the
demand for high-performing
schools in the District far exceeds
Lottery stakes are
particularly high for
low-income families
the supply.
The lottery has been a longstanding source of tension, with
wealthy families hiring consultants to navigate the school choices and nonprofits emerging to
ensure that disadvantaged families know how to maximize their
options. The lottery was thrust
into the spotlight last month
when D.C. Public Schools Chancellor Antwan Wilson was forced
to resign amid outrage that he
As boycotts hit, Fox TV host
apologizes for taunting teen
A MY B W ANG,
A LLYSON C HIU
AND T RACY J AN
BY
When Fox News host Laura Ingraham taunted a Parkland shooting survivor in a Wednesdaymorning tweet about his college
applications being rejected, Twitter
users hit back where it hurt most:
among her advertisers.
David Hogg, the 17-year-old high
school senior who has become a
gun-control activist, mustered the
collective power of social media —
and his more than 630,000 Twitter
followers — and urged them to
“tweet away” at her top sponsors to
call on them to boycott her TV
show, “The Ingraham Angle.”
Within 24 hours, several compa-
nies responded — among them the
pet food brand Nutrish and the
home goods retailer Wayfair — announcing on Twitter and in media
interviews that they would pull
their ads from the show. Stitch Fix
and Hulu also announced via Twitter that they would no longer advertise on Ingraham’s show. The
#GrabYourWallet campaign reported that Johnson & Johnson has
also pulled its ads from the show.
By Thursday afternoon, Ingraham apologized. “On reflection, in
the spirit of Holy Week, I apologize
for any upset or hurt my tweet
caused him or any of the brave
victims of Parkland,” she tweeted.
In the era of boycotts as a byproduct of outrage, with figures
INGRAHAM CONTINUED ON A2
bypassed the lottery so his daughter could transfer to Wilson High,
which has a wait list of more than
600 students. Now, because of
that scandal, the school lottery is
likely to draw more scrutiny than
ever.
For young, upper-income families who move into gentrifying
neighborhoods with low-performing public schools, a bad lottery outcome could mean packing
up and leaving the city. And for
families who have few resources,
a lousy lottery number brings
uncertainties and little hope.
“Johnson, he’s not going there,”
said Gordon, lamenting a school
where fewer than 5 percent of
students meet expectations on
standardized math and English
BY
President Trump
sought to promote his
infrastructure plan, to
which Congress has allocated just over 1 percent of the $1.5 trillion
he seeks. A6
THE WORLD
Changing goals Trump officials are debating
how to undo federal fuel-efficiency targets,
despite some automakers’ misgivings. A15
BY
E LISE V IEBECK
The threat from Rep. Elizabeth
Esty’s chief of staff arrived in a
voice mail.
“You better f-----g reply to me
or I will f-----g kill you,” Tony
Baker said in the May 5, 2016,
recording left for Anna Kain, a
former Esty aide Baker had once
dated.
Kain, who provided a copy of
the recording to The Washington
D AMIAN P ALETTA
bethlehem, pa. — On April 1,
hundreds of millions of marshmallow chicks and bunnies
called Peeps will peer out from
Easter baskets at American children.
They are a pastel symbol of
Easter joy, but behind the waxeyed candy is a company at war
with its union workforce over
rising pension costs — an escalating legal tangle that could soon
upend the retirement plans of
10 million Americans.
The fight has featured a strike,
Twinkies-related bankruptcy, irreparably broken friendships, obscene T-shirts and a locked-up
Peepsmobile. Now all sides await
a federal appeals court’s ruling.
The 95-year-old company that
THE NATION
CARLOS GARCIA RAWLINS/REUTERS
LOTTERY CONTINUED ON A9
Chief of staff accused
of harassing co-worker
received job reference
Post, alerted the police, filed a
report for felony threats and
obtained a 12-month restraining
order against Baker.
According to emails obtained
by The Post, Esty found out about
the episode within a week. At
that point, the Connecticut Democrat took matters into her own
hands.
Rather than firing or suspending Baker, the congresswoman
consulted her personal attorneys
and advisers, she said. She also
spoke to Kain on May 11, emails
show; Kain said she provided
detailed allegations that Baker
had punched, berated and sexually harassed her in Esty’s Capitol
Hill office throughout 2014, while
AIDE CONTINUED ON A12
In land of Peeps, fight threatens U.S. pension plans
IN THE NEWS
Venezuela blaze Relatives of 68 people killed
in a jail fire converged at the police station,
demanding answers from officials. A11
tests. “I have faith that one of
these schools will pick him.”
The school lottery, known as
My School DC, places students in
nearly 250 traditional public and
charter schools. It is intended to
give families such as Gordon’s the
same shot at securing a seat in the
city’s top schools as a wealthy
family in Georgetown.
But families and education
watchdogs say the existence of
the lottery underscores the inequities in the city’s education offerings: Shouldn’t there be enough
quality schools that families don’t
have to rely on luck to secure a
seat?
“The way to fix the inequities is
to expand the supply,” said Steven
Russia announced that
it will kick out 60 American diplomats and close
a U.S. consulate. A11
A major influx of Chinese investment and
tourists is worrying
some in one Cambodian
port town. A10
Nobel laureate Malala
Yousafzai returned to
Pakistan for the first
time since 2012. A12
France’s highest court
ordered ex-president
Nicolas Sarkozy to stand
trial, accusing him of
trying to intervene in a
campaign-finance
investigation. A12
Scientists said the
Sahara has grown by
10 percent since 1920,
thanks in part to climate
change. A17
THE ECONOMY
Facebook is cutting ties
with data miners that
target users for advertisers, asserting its dominance in the field. A13
Job growth has accelerated fastest in areas
MIKE MERGEN/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Just Born Quality Confections wants to block new workers from
joining its pension. A court ruling will have national implications.
where President Trump
earned the most votes,
but the gains could be
short-lived. A13
The FDA will encourage the food industry to
cut the salt in processed
foods and allow some
Obama-era food-labeling rules to proceed. A16
THE REGION
Walmart agreed to pay
the District $1.3 million
after abruptly abandoning plans to open stores
in underserved neighborhoods. B1
The ancient ritual of
the Jewish Seder was
changed dramatically in
the United States nearly
50 years ago by a civil
rights activist from the
District. B1
D.C. police suspect a
serial tab-skipper is
frequenting upscale
hotel bars — in one case,
downing a $1,200 whiskey shot before dashing
without paying. B1
Howard University
students occupied the
administration building
amid a financial aid
scandal. B1
A restaurant owner is
challenging in federal
court Virginia’s restrictions on promoting happy hour specials. B2
ST YLE
The African American
Museum is trying
“Walk-Up Wednesdays”
in April, where no timed
passes will be required
on the weekday. C2
makes Peeps, Just Born Quality
Confections, wants to block new
employees from enrolling in the
multi-employer pension it has
offered workers for decades, a
retirement plan it funds along
with roughly 200 other companies.
While many other companies
facing similar pressures have left
pensions in recent years, Just
Born wants to bar new employees
from the plan without paying a
$60 million fee required under
federal law, saying it must do so
to remain competitive.
The fee exists to ensure future
retirees’ benefits are covered, and
if Just Born succeeds in escaping
it, union officials fear the unprecedented ruling would prompt
thousands of other firms to do
PEEPS CONTINUED ON A8
Inside
WEEKEND
Beltway is Burning
The Renwick brings
the fantastical desert
party to us.
ST YLE
Pot, meet CBD
A cousin to marijuana’s
active ingredient is part
of a wellness craze. C1
BUSINESS NEWS........................A13
COMICS........................................C5
OPINION PAGES..........................A19
LOTTERIES ................................... B3
OBITUARIES ................................. B5
TELEVISION..................................C4
WORLD NEWS ............................ A10
CONTENT © 2018
The Washington Post / Year 141, No. 115
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B2
3 4 1 1
A2
EZ
SU
THE WASHINGTON POST
K
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30 , 2018
As advertisers depart, Fox host Ingraham apologizes for mocking Florida teen
INGRAHAM FROM A1
such as President Trump threatening the NFL over player protests
and airline customers employing
the tactic to force change, Hogg’s
push for Ingraham’s advertisers to
respond to her comments worked
remarkably quickly.
The swift results show the power
that the Parkland survivors have,
not just in organizing rallies but in
spurring corporate America to act.
Brands, too, have become quicker
to distance themselves from controversy, whether by denouncing
white supremacy after neo-Nazis
praise their products or by pulling
their sponsorship after another Fox
News personality, Bill O’Reilly, was
accused of sexual harassment.
Since the 2016 election, calls to
boycott retailers have become frequent: #GrabYourWallet began as a
way to protest Trump, and it identified companies that carried merchandise bearing the Trump name.
Those calls have been met with
equally passionate responses by
Trump supporters who say they are
determined to use their buying
power to stand with the president
and his family.
On Thursday, #GrabYourWallet
co-founder Shannon Coulter called
Ingraham’s mocking of Hogg’s college rejections “really egregious violations of basic human decency.”
“Corporate America has a really
positive role to play in preventing
that kind of targeted harassment,”
Coulter said. “It’s not just that one
H A P P ENI NG TO D A Y
Awesome Con opens its annual three-day D.C. event, a
“celebration of geek culture” at the Walter E. Washington
Convention Center featuring stars from across comics,
movies, television, toys and games. For more, visit
washingtonpost.com/lifestyle.
4:10 p.m.
The Washington Nationals open the 2018 season,
taking on the Reds in Cincinnati. To follow the action, go
to postsports.com.
7 p.m.
The Washington Capitals host the Carolina Hurricanes
at Capital One Arena. Follow the game at postsports.com.
9:15 p.m.
Pope Francis marks Good Friday at the Colosseum in
Rome. Go to washingtonpost.com/world for more.
VS
Today @ 3:30pm
KLMNO
NEWSPAPER DELIVERY
For home delivery comments
or concerns contact us at
washingtonpost.com/subscriberservices or
send us an email at
homedelivery@washpost.com or call
202-334-6100 or 800-477-4679
TO SUBSCRIBE
800-753-POST (7678)
TO ADVERTISE
washingtonpost.com/mediakit
Classified: 202-334-6200
Display: 202-334-7642
MAIN PHONE NUMBER
202-334-6000
TO REACH THE NEWSROOM
Metro: 202-334-7300;
metro@washpost.com
National: 202-334-7410;
national@washpost.com
Business: 202-334-7320;
business@washpost.com
Sports: 202-334-7350;
sports@washpost.com
Reader Advocate: 202-334-7582;
readers@washpost.com
TO REACH THE OPINION PAGES
Letters to the editor:
letters@washpost.com or call
202-334-6215
Opinion:
oped@washpost.com
Published daily (ISSN 0190-8286).
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
The Washington Post, 1301 K St. NW, Washington,
D.C. 20071.
Periodicals postage paid in Washington, D.C., and
additional mailing office.
ADVERTISEMENT
Noon
CO R R ECTI O N S
A Home Sales listing in the
Montgomery County edition of
the March 29 Local Living
section misstated the price for a
home at 5105 Fairglen Lane in
Chevy Chase. The home sold for
$1.08 million, not $108,000.
A March 13 Health & Science
article about doctors prescribing
exercise and “nature” for their
patients incorrectly said that the
American Academy of Pediatrics
launched the Park Rx Initiative.
The initiative was started in 2013
by the Institute at the Golden
Gate and the National
Recreation and Park Association
with support from the National
Park Service; the AAP has merely
promoted it.
The Washington Post is committed to
correcting errors that appear in the
newspaper. Those interested in
contacting the paper for that purpose
can:
Email: corrections@washpost.com.
Call: 202-334-6000, and ask to be
connected to the desk involved —
National, Foreign, Metro, Style, Sports,
Business or any of the weekly sections.
Comments can be directed to The
Post’s reader advocate, who can be
reached at 202-334-7582 or
readers@washpost.com.
tweet. It’s that [Ingraham is] signaling to her large audience that it’s
okay to do that. Particularly when
minors are concerned, I think
there’s a line that corporations can
draw that apparently Laura Ingraham’s parents didn’t draw.”
Ingraham, in addition to apologizing, tried to curtail the damage
by noting that Hogg had appeared
on her show after the shooting at
Marjory Stoneman Douglas High
School on Feb. 14.
Hogg said he felt the apology
was merely an effort to save her
advertisers. “I will only accept your
apology only if you denounce the
way your network has treated my
friends and I in this fight,” Hogg
tweeted. “It’s time to love thy neighbor, not mudsling at children.”
Ingraham had faced immediate
backlash over her original tweet
Wednesday from those shocked by
her attack on a teenager who had
survived the mass shooting in Parkland, Fla. Some of them reminded
Ingraham, simply, that she was a
mother. Hogg’s 14-year-old sister
accused the Fox News host of stooping to a “real low” to boost her
ratings.
The shooting in Florida — one of
several school attacks in 2018 — left
17 students and staff members
dead, and it galvanized a new generation of activists, including many
teenagers from Parkland.
Hogg has been one of the most
vocal, speaking at the March for
Our Lives rally against gun violence
in Washington. Since the shooting,
the teen has appeared frequently
on television and rallied his growing number of Twitter followers to
become civically engaged if they
are frustrated with the status quo.
In an interview with TMZ on
Tuesday, Hogg spoke about receiving rejection letters from California
J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE AND RICH SCHULTZ/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Fox News’ Laura Ingraham apologized to gun-control activist
David Hogg for taunting him over his rejection by several colleges.
colleges. Hogg, who has a 4.2 GPA
and an SAT score of 1270, was accepted to Florida Atlantic University, California Polytechnic State
University and California State
University at San Marcos, TMZ reported.
On Wednesday morning, Ingraham tweeted a story from a conservative news site that described
Hogg as a “Gun Rights Provocateur” who had not gained acceptance to four University of California schools.
“David Hogg Rejected By Four
Colleges To Which He Applied and
whines about it,” Ingraham tweeted. “(Dinged by UCLA with a 4.1
GPA…totally predictable given acceptance rates.)”
Hours later, Hogg wondered, on
Twitter, who Ingraham’s biggest
advertisers were and soon compiled a list of 12 companies that his
followers could contact.
Before long, Hogg’s tweet was
flooded with replies from his supporters, some of whom pasted images of their messages to the companies mentioned. Also responding were people accusing Hogg of
“bullying” Ingraham.
Several companies soon responded to the boycott call.
“We are in the process of removing our ads from Laura Ingraham’s
program,” Nutrish tweeted Thursday morning.
TripAdvisor pointed to one of its
company values — “We are better
together” — in its decision to stop
advertising on Ingraham’s show.
“We do not . . . condone the inappropriate comments made by this
broadcaster,” TripAdvisor said in a
statement. “In our view, these statements focused on a high school
student cross the line of decency.”
Online home goods retailer Wayfair told CNBC that Ingraham’s personal criticism of Hogg was “not
consistent with our values.”
Nestlé told ThinkProgress it had
no plans to buy future ads on the
show.
It was unclear whether any of
the brands would change their
minds after Ingraham apologized.
“We’ve seen corporations years
ago pull out from O’Reilly, only to
go back and have to pull out again,”
said Rashad Robinson, executive
director of Color Of Change, a nonprofit advocacy group pushing corporations on issues of racial justice.
“The question is, if the corporations do go back, what are they
sponsoring? They are sponsoring
someone who will use the next tragedy to attack the most vulnerable,”
Robinson said. “Laura Ingraham
would not exist without corporations enabling her to exist on the
air.”
Ingraham was previously criticized for telling professional basketball players to “shut up and dribble” after Cleveland Cavalier LeBron James criticized Trump in an
interview.
While Ingraham has been the
most recent target of criticism, she
is not the only prominent figure
who has faced backlash for attacking the high school students.
Just days ago, Rep. Steve King
(R-Iowa) and his campaign team
were sharply criticized for posting
a meme on Facebook about Emma
González, another Parkland student and activist. The meme was
decried as attacking González’s Cuban heritage.
And CNN contributor and former U.S. senator Rick Santorum
had to backtrack after saying students would be better off learning
CPR than demonstrating for tighter gun laws.
amy.wang@washpost.com
allyson.chiu@washpost.com
tracy.jan@washpost.com
DIGEST
Supporters said the bill is
needed to attract more
organizations to help in adoptions.
Some senators took offense with
Bollier’s comments and saw them
as an attack on Catholicism, which
opposes same-sex marriage.
Senate President Susan Wagle (RWichita), said the legislation
would protect religiously affiliated
groups. “ This is the right thing to
do,” Wagle said.
CALIFORNIA
Family of 8 presumed
dead after SUV crash
They were known as the Hart
Tribe, the free-spirited,
multiracial family of Jennifer and
Sara Hart and their six adopted
children who raised their own
food, took spontaneous road trips,
and traveled to festivals and other
events, where they offered free
hugs and promoted unity.
Their final journey, however,
ended in tragedy.
All eight were presumed dead
after their SUV plunged off a 100foot cliff along a seaside California
highway. The vehicle was
discovered Monday — three days
after child-welfare authorities
were called to the Harts’ home in
rural Woodland, Wash., to
investigate possible abuse or
neglect.
“We know that an entire family
vanished and perished during this
tragedy,” Mendocino County
Sheriff Tom Allman said as he
appealed for help retracing where
the family had been.
Investigators have not
— Associated Press
TEXAS
Chief calls bomber
a ‘domestic terrorist’
MARK LENNIHAN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
National Guard members watch the Oculus transit hub in
Manhattan after smoke caused a brief evacuation. Fire officials
blamed a small fire in an electrical closet. The Oculus, completed in
2016, is used by trains to and from New Jersey. It is on the site of the
World Trade Center, destroyed in the 2001 terrorist attacks.
determined the cause of the crash,
and the sheriff said there is “no
evidence . . . to believe that this
was an intentional act.” However,
there were no skid marks and no
Enjoy the Breeze
in Your New
Screen Room
sign the brakes were used at the
spot where the vehicle went over.
The case has thrown a spotlight
on the Harts’ previous run-ins
with the law and neighbors’
concerns about the children. A
neighbor said the Harts’ 15-yearold son had come over to ask for
something to eat, saying his
parents were “punishing them by
withholding food.”
— Associated Press
KANSAS
Critics say adoption bill
is discriminatory
Adoption and foster care
organizations contracting with
Kansas welfare officials would be
allowed to refuse placements to
gay and lesbian couples based on
religious beliefs under a bill that
has passed the state Senate.
The bill that passed Thursday
on a 28-to-12 vote now heads to the
House, where nearly identical
legislation has been introduced,
the Kansas City Star reported.
“It’s sick discrimination,” said
Sen. Barbara Bollier (R-Mission
Hills). “And these are people who
can love and adopt children and
are doing so. So to say it is not
discriminatory, I beg to differ.”
Opponents fear that the bill
could result in fewer adoptions.
ancing
Easy fin
s.
$149/mo
Austin’s police chief said
Thursday that a “domestic
terrorist” set off a series of
explosions that killed two people
and severely wounded four others
in Texas’s capital, offering a
stronger characterization of the
bomber after drawing criticism for
being unwilling to do so previously.
Brian Manley had hesitated to
label the bombings terrorism,
citing an investigation that is
ongoing. But at a meeting
Thursday on police and
community responses to the
bombings, Manley answered
audience questions with other
panelists and said, “I actually agree
now that he was a domestic
terrorist for what he did to us.”
The admission didn’t go far
enough for some present, who
continued to ask questions about
racism in Austin. The dead people
were African American.
— Associated Press
Brother of Parkland suspect
released: Zachary Cruz, the 18-
year-old brother of the alleged
gunman who police say attacked
a Parkland, Fla., high school,
pleaded no contest Thursday to
trespassing on the campus where
the deadly rampage occurred and
was released from jail after being
sentenced to time served and six
months of probation. He was
arrested March 19 and held on
$500,000 bond after police found
him skateboarding at Marjory
Stoneman Douglas High School
after school, 33 days after his 19year-old brother, Nikolas Cruz, is
alleged to have killed 17 students
and staff members.
— Associated Press
BUY NOW AND
$
SAVE
1250
Some restrictions apply
FREE ESTIMATES
202-741-4435 DC
703-334-0331 VA
301-683-7211 MD
MHIC#125450, DC#67004413, VA#2705 108835A, WVA#036832
202-849-5995 DC | 301-683-7207 MD
571-429-5589 VA
Corporate Discounts Available
WONDER BOOK
Buy 2 Get 2 Free
Books, DVDs and/or CDs
With this coupon & 1 can of nonperishable food.
Expires 4/30/18. Buy 4 get 4, etc. Mix & match items. Items paired by price then free items cheaper of each pair.
In store only. Excludes rentals, special/web orders, and holds. Limit one use per coupon. Code: WP
GAITHERSBURG MD • 15976 Shady Grove Rd. • Open 10-7 Every Day
301-977-9166 • Also in FREDERICK & HAGERSTOWN MD
www.WonderBook.com • WE “RECYCLE” ALL BOOKS
We Buy ALL Books
• DVDs, CDs & More Every Day • Cash Paid
At Our Retail Stores 10-6 Every Day
House calls possible for large collections of 1000+ desirable items • Prompt Removal
Contact chuck@wonderbk.com or 301-694-0350
• • • WE
ART PRINTS, SHEET MUSIC, AUDIOBOOKS, COLLECTIBLE MAGAZINES, VHS, CASSETTES
WINTER SPECIAL
WE BUY/SELL DVDS, BLU-RAY, VIDEO GAMES, CDS, COMICS, MAPS,
BOOKS (USED, NEW VINTAGE, RARE, COLLECTIBLE), NEW! EXPANDED LP SECTIONS,
ALSO SELL RETRO SODAS, MOVIE SNACKS, LOCAL CANDY & WE RENT MOVIES/GAMES •• •
FRIDAY, MARCH 30 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
SU
Politics & the Nation
At Stephon Clark’s funeral, tears give way to tension over fatal police shooting
BY S AWSAN M ORRAR,
A MY B W ANG AND A VI S ELK
sacramento — Hundreds of
mourners joined black and Muslim leaders at a church in California’s capital on Thursday for the
funeral of Stephon Clark, a black
father of two whose shooting
death by police 11 days ago
touched off protests across the
country and opened a new rift of
public anger about police use of
force and treatment of minorities.
The approximately 300 people
who packed the Bayside of South
Sacramento Church were joined
by an overflow crowd of about
600 who waited in the midday
sun. And though the people had
come to grieve, the anger and
tension that have spilled over
into National Basketball Association games and Sacramento City
Council meetings at times simmered beneath the surface.
It was visible on the face of
Clark’s brother, Stevante, who
threw himself on his brother’s
coffin as the ceremony began and
later interrupted speakers from
the NAACP to lead mourners in
loud chants of his brother’s
name.
Speaking during the funeral,
Dallas-based imam Omar Suleiman noted that Clark, whom
police shot at 20 times, “had
almost as many bullets put into
him as the years he’s been on this
earth.” Clark, 22, converted to
Islam several years before his
death.
PETER DASILVA/EPA-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK
Protesters rally Thursday, hours after the funeral of Stephon Clark, outside the federal courthouse in
Sacramento. The killing of Clark, an unarmed black man, by Sacramento police officers this month has
led to weeks of protest in California’s capital that has shut down roads and basketball games.
The Rev. Al Sharpton delivered
a eulogy that encouraged protesters and challenged the assertion
made by the White House that
Clark’s death was a “local issue.”
“No, this is not a local matter,”
Sharpton said. “They’ve been
killing young black men all over
the country.”
Stevante Clark, who earlier
this week interrupted a council
meeting with a group of protesters by jumping onto a platform
where Mayor Darrell Steinberg
was sitting and telling him to
“shut up,” took on a different tone
when he spoke at the funeral. He
called on mourners to “forgive
the mayor” and after the service
left the funeral with Steinberg.
Sharpton stood from his seat
several times to comfort Stevante
Clark during the ceremony. He
acknowledged that some were
criticizing the actions of Stephon
Clark’s family members and protesters.
“You don’t tell people in pain
how to handle their pain,” Sharpton said. “You don’t tell people
when you kill their loved one how
to grieve.”
Sharpton defended protests
that have disrupted traffic and
two Sacramento Kings basketball
games.
“They were not violent, they
did not shoot at anybody 20
times, they didn’t take anybody
down,” Sharpton boomed.
The Kings — whose players
participated in an on-court protest of Clark’s death — have said
that a heavy police presence
would be on hand Thursday to
avoid another disruption of the
team’s game.
Clark was shot March 18 after
police responding to a complaint
that someone had been breaking
windows in the neighborhood
potted Clark running into a back
yard.
One officer yelled: “Hey, show
me your hands! Stop!” followed
by a yell of “Gun, gun, gun!”
before officers fired their guns.
Clark died in the yard — it was
his grandmother’s house, where
he had been staying. Police later
said the officers feared for their
lives, though the only thing in
Clark’s hand was a white iPhone.
Captured in grainy footage
from a police helicopter as well
as a shaky video from a body
camera worn by one of the officers, Clark’s death has become
the latest to galvanize protests
about police use of force against
minorities.
Clark was one of more than
3,000 people who have been
shot and killed by U.S. police
since 2015, according to The
Washington Post’s database of
fatal police shootings.
Sharpton and other speakers
at the funeral said they were
determined to prevent Clark
from being forgotten.
Muslim leaders said Clark’s
body was in such bad shape after
the shooting and autopsies that
they were unable to give it a
ritual washing for the burial.
“The tools of dehumanization
are eerily similar in how they are
employed against Muslims and
African Americans,” Suleiman
said. “The vilification of these
figures after they are killed is to
plant the message that this isn’t a
person worth fighting for, this
isn’t a community worth fighting
for.”
On Wednesday night, Sacramento-area Muslims held an
emergency town hall with community leaders, the NAACP and
members of Clark’s family to
discuss how his death has affected the city.
Clark’s body was taken to St.
Mary’s Cemetery to be buried
next to his brother, who also died
in gun violence.
amy.wang@washpost.com
avi.selk@washpost.com
Alex Horton contributed to this
report.
Report: Mass violence in U.S. tends to follow warning signs from attackers
BY
M ARK B ERMAN
The attacks have taken on a
numbing familiarity in recent
years: Five shot to death at an
airport in South Florida. Twentysix slain at a church in Texas. Five
killed by a gunman rampaging
through Northern California.
These violent outbursts last
year, and others like them, had a
key thing in common: Long before the violence, the people
identified as attackers had elicited concerns from those who
encountered them, red flags that
littered their paths to wreaking
havoc on unsuspecting strangers.
This is a common thread in
most of the mass attacks carried
out in public spaces last year, the
majority of which were preceded
by behavior that worried other
people, according to a report
released Thursday by the U.S.
Secret Service National Threat
Assessment Center.
“Regardless of whether these
attacks were acts of workplace
violence, domestic violence,
school-based violence, or terrorism, similar themes were observed in the backgrounds of the
perpetrators,” the report stated.
Every person blamed for a
mass attack was a man, the
report said.
All of them “had at least one
significant stressor within the
last five years, and over half had
indications of financial instability in that time frame,” the report
found. That included issues with
family relationships, being fired
or suspended from work and
facing unstable living situations.
More than half had histories of
mental health issues, criminal
charges and substance abuse, the
report said. And nearly half were
fueled by some kind of personal
grievance. Half of the attackers
had patterns of making threats,
while a third made specific
threats to their eventual targets,
the report found.
“Direct threats should be investigated, because a threat unchecked could escalate into an
act of violence,” said Matthew W.
Doherty, who formerly led the
National Threat Assessment
Center. “But the mere absence of
a threat doesn’t mean somebody
is not a danger. And that is a
learning curve that many in law
enforcement still need to grasp.”
The new report comes as the
school shooting in Parkland, Fla.,
last month has prompted intense
scrutiny of how law enforcement
officials handled warnings about
the alleged shooter before 17
people were slain in that massacre. Authorities were repeatedly
told about the suspect’s potential
for violence, including tips that
said he was amassing weapons
and hoped to attack a school.
Doherty pointed to that shooting in stressing the need for law
enforcement officials to listen to
people who interact with and
warn about potential attackers.
“That’s why it’s so important
to draw that circle,” said Doherty,
who is now senior vice president
of threat, violence and risk management at Hillard Heintze, a law
enforcement and security advi-
sory firm. “What have they told
others? What have they communicated [about] a potential act or
capability to carry out an act of
violence?”
He added: “There’s no such
thing as an impulsive act.”
The report released Thursday
studied 28 of these mass attacks,
defined as those that injured at
least three people in a public
space. The studied attacks left
147 people dead and injured
nearly 700 others, most of them
wounded during the Las Vegas
shooting rampage.
According to the Secret Service report, 4 out of 5 attackers last
year had “engaged in communications or exhibited behaviors
that caused concern in others,”
worrying relatives, friends,
neighbors, teachers, co-workers
and members of law enforcement. Some of those who were
worried warned others about the
person or avoided them; others
contacted law enforcement or
spoke to the person directly. For
nearly half of the people later
blamed for mass attacks, “those
concerned feared for the safety of
the individual or others around
them.”
When attacks were carried
out, the death tolls were, on
average, larger for those attackers who had prompted concerns
than those who never had worried anyone.
Some of the attacks included
in the report received intense
media coverage, including the
Las Vegas massacre; the truck
attack along a New York City bike
path; the shooting rampage at a
Sutherland Springs, Tex., church;
the car attack that killed a woman in Charlottesville; and the
gunman who opened fire during
a congressional baseball practice
outside Washington.
In other cases, they were
bursts of violence that devastated local communities, receiving
some national attention before
fading from the headlines. Those
included the gunman in Northern California who killed his wife
and fired at strangers, the attacker who opened fire at a Tennessee
church, the armed man who
killed one person and injured
two others in a Kansas bar, and
the gunman who made his exgirlfriend listen as he opened fire
at a pool party in San Diego.
Some of these showed the
warning signs highlighted in the
Secret Service report. Police said
the San Diego shooter was “despondent” over a breakup, while
police records showed the accused Tennessee church gunman
had previous encounters with
police and that his father had
worried he was suicidal.
mark.berman@washpost.com
Our CD rates
are a thing of beauty.
Fired FBI deputy starts GoFundMe
BY
M ATT Z APOTOSKY
Former FBI deputy director
Andrew McCabe on Thursday
launched an online fundraiser to
help cover the legal costs that
might come as he navigates investigations and congressional inquiries and explores whether he
will sue over his abrupt ouster
from the bureau.
McCabe’s team unveiled the legal defense fund, hosted on the
website GoFundMe, about 2 p.m.
By 7 p.m., it had raised more than
$213,000 toward a $250,000 goal
(which was earlier set at
$150,000).
Attorney General Jeff Sessions
fired McCabe from the bureau
about two weeks ago, ending his
more than 20-year career just 26
hours before McCabe could retire
and begin collecting his full retirement benefits. The move is
likely to cut into his pension,
though McCabe’s team said money raised for the legal defense
fund will not be used “for anything beyond his defense of the
allegations against him.”
“He will continue to fight for
the pension and benefits he deserves, rather than accept any
crowdfunding for that purpose,”
his team wrote on his GoFundMe
page. His team said that after any
legal proceedings were over,
whatever remained in the fund
would be donated to charity. Soon
after McCabe’s firing, his team
noted that there were a number of
crowdfunding sites claiming to be
raising money in his name, but
none was affiliated with him.
“Unfortunately, the need for a
legal-defense fund is a growing
reality,” his team wrote Thursday.
Sessions said he fired McCabe
over findings from the Justice Department inspector general that
McCabe had authorized an inappropriate disclosure to the media,
then allegedly misled investigators about it. The FBI’s Office of
Professional Responsibility had
recommended the termination.
But McCabe, who disputes the
inspector general’s conclusions,
shot back that his firing was politically motivated, meant to undermine the FBI and its high-profile
investigation into whether the
Trump campaign coordinated
with Russia to influence the 2016
election. President Trump had
openly attacked McCabe over donations his wife, who ran as a
Democrat for a Virginia state senate seat, took from a political
action committee of Terry McAuliffe, an ally of Hillary Clinton.
After McCabe was fired, Trump
tweeted:
“Andrew
McCabe
FIRED, a great day for the hard
working men and women of the
FBI - A great day for Democracy.
Sanctimonious James Comey was
his boss and made McCabe look
like a choirboy. He knew all about
the lies and corruption going on at
the highest levels of the FBI!”
The Justice Department inspector general has yet to release
his report on McCabe — leading
some to speculate that he has
asked federal prosecutors to look
into the matter to see whether
criminal charges are appropriate.
Lying to federal investigators is a
crime to which several Trump
aides have pleaded guilty.
Even without criminal proceedings, though, McCabe is likely to face inquiries from Congress
that will require a lawyer to respond, and he is weighing whether to file a lawsuit over his termination. He is being represented by
Michael R. Bromwich, who wrote
on Twitter on Thursday: “In 38
years as a lawyer and 24 years in
private practice, I have rarely seen
the kind of support Andy McCabe
is getting. He got a raw deal and
people know it. He deeply appreciates the support.”
matt.zapotosky@washpost.com
60-MONTH CD
%
2.50
APY*
$2,000 minimum opening deposit
Synchrony Bank has once again earned
the Bankrate Safe & Sound® 5-Star Rating!*
Visit us at synchronybank.com or call 1-800-753-6870
to get started.
*Annual Percentage Yield (APY) is accurate as of 3/1/18 and subject to change at any time without notice. A minimum
of $2,000 is required to open a CD and must be deposited in a single transaction. A penalty may be imposed for early
withdrawals. Fees may reduce earnings. After maturity, if you choose to roll over your CD, you will earn the base rate of
interest in effect at that time. Visit synchronybank.com for current rates, terms and account requirements. Offer applies to
personal accounts only.
AWARDS: Bankrate Safe & Sound 5-Star Rating earned for Q1 2014 through Q2 2017.
© 2018 Synchrony Bank
A4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30 , 2018
Nomination by tweet surprised even Jackson and administration o∞cials
NOMINEES FROM A1
surprising pick,” said Paul Rieckhoff, chief executive of Iraq and
Afghanistan Veterans of America.
Jackson was taken aback by his
nomination, said senior White
House officials, who spoke on the
condition of anonymity to discuss
internal deliberations. After aides
gauged his interest in recent days,
he hesitated to take on such a big
job. But the president continued
to push and told his senior staff
Monday that the doctor was his
top choice. A senior White House
official described an informal interview process, without the extensive vetting that typically accompanies a Cabinet selection.
“The President has full confidence in Dr. Jackson’s abilities to
give our veterans the care they’ve
earned,” spokesman Raj Shah
said.
The White House planned to
announce
Wednesday
that
Shulkin would leave the administration and be replaced on an interim basis by Robert Wilkie, undersecretary for defense personnel and readiness at the Defense
Department, until a nominee was
found.
But Trump preempted the plan
when he tweeted that he intended
to nominate Jackson, administration officials said.
The active-duty rear admiral
had been a behind-the-scenes figure while serving the past three
administrations as a White House
physician, but he moved into the
spotlight in January when he delivered a glowing assessment of
Trump’s physical and mental
health to reporters, which aides
said endeared him to the president.
The White House on Thursday
defended Trump’s choice of Jackson, saying his hands-on experience as a doctor would serve him
well as Veterans Affairs secretary.
“He knows what soldiers need
on the battlefield and what they
need when they come home as
veterans,” deputy White House
press secretary Lindsay Walters
told reporters aboard Air Force
One en route to Cleveland, where
Trump delivered a speech on his
infrastructure plan. “The president has full confidence in his pick
and trusts he will be able to give
veterans the care they deserve.”
Key congressional Republicans
publicly took a cautious approach
to the nomination.
“We are doing our homework
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
Senators will press Ronny L. Jackson at his confirmation hearing for his views on VA’s problems.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Also facing a tough confirmation, for CIA
director, is Gina Haspel.
on Dr. Jackson,” said Amanda
Maddox, spokeswoman for Sen.
Johnny Isakson (R-Ga.), chairman
of the Senate Veterans’ Affairs
Committee, which will hold Jackson’s nomination hearing. Trump
called Isakson after announcing
that he had picked the doctor to
replace Shulkin, she said.
“His name was never floated
around,” Maddox said, “so we are
doing our due diligence.”
Trump’s decision to upend VA’s
leadership comes as Senate Republicans were already worried
about other potentially difficult
nominations in the months leading up to midterm elections, when
they want to focus their message
on the recently passed tax cuts
rather than deal with more up-
AARON BERNSTEIN/REUTERS
Haspel’s boss at the CIA, Director Mike Pompeo,
is waiting to be confirmed as secretary of state.
heaval in the administration.
“Any time Republicans are not
selling the tax bill over the next
seven months is a missed opportunity,” said GOP strategist Brian
Walsh, a former spokesman for
the National Republican Senatorial Committee. “I will say Senate
Republicans are a little more insulated by the nature of the seats that
are up. But there’s no question that
these are unhelpful distractions.”
The stack of Trump nominees
includes Gina Haspel, who was
picked this month to be the director of the Central Intelligence
Agency and is facing opposition
from members of both parties because of her ties to the agency’s
past use of brutal interrogation
measures on terrorism suspects,
which critics say amounted to torture.
Senate Republicans have told
White House officials in recent
days that the process of confirming CIA Director Mike Pompeo to
replace Rex Tillerson as secretary
of state is going to be challenging
even though he is expected to be
approved, according to two people
briefed on the discussions. Democratic senators said privately
when Pompeo was tapped to replace Tillerson that they expect far
fewer Democrats to back him than
the 14 who voted for him to lead
the CIA.
Senior Senate Republicans
have privately expressed frustration over the personnel battles
that have raged since the begin-
ning of Trump’s presidency and
recently told the White House that
they did not want to have to consider a series of nominees this
year, according to aides and officials who have heard the complaints.
The move to dismiss Shulkin —
as well as the lack of communication about Jackson — only fueled
concerns on Capitol Hill that the
administration was not doing
enough to help Congress defend
or even respond to the president’s
rush of personnel changes.
Jackson’s policy views are unknown, particularly on the most
pressing issue facing VA: how
much access veterans should have
to private doctors outside the system at government expense.
Shulkin’s moderate views on the
subject, which were at odds with
many administration officials,
helped end his tenure.
VA secretary is one of Washington’s most unforgiving jobs even
for someone with extensive management experience. Shulkin, also
a physician, had run large hospital
systems — including VA’s — before
taking the job. His predecessor,
Robert McDonald, was a chief executive of Procter & Gamble. The
secretary before him was a decorated retired Army general, Eric K.
Shinseki, who was forced out after
managers in the far-flung health
system were found to have fudged
waitlists for veterans’ medical appointments.
As recently as February, Jackson was a candidate to run VA’s
health-care arm, the Veterans
Health Administration, the country’s largest health-care system,
with 1,200 hospitals and medical
clinics. On the day of his interview,
he told a selection panel that the
president was unwilling to let him
leave his White House job, according to two people familiar with the
discussion.
The panel interviewed him informally anyway, asking him how
he would drive change in such a
large organization but not about
his views on policy. One person
who sits on the panel, and who
spoke on the condition of anonymity because its proceedings are
confidential, said they didn’t think
Jackson had the requisite skills to
transition from overseeing a team
of about 20 doctors, nurses and
physician assistants in the White
House medical office to overseeing
the health administration.
“I don’t remember him coming
in trying to convince us he had the
experience to do the job. He did
not inflate his qualifications,” this
person said. “The tone was, ‘Maybe I don’t have the same kind of
experience as others who came
before me in the job.’ ”
Jackson’s former colleagues in
the Obama White House, who
have publicly praised him in the
past, said his nomination caught
them off guard as they swapped
text messages to ask how an extremely likable but unlikely candidate could end up running VA in
the Trump administration.
“I’ve seen him managing a staff
of a couple dozen, which he did to
perfection,” said Ned Price, a National Security Council spokesman under Obama who recalled
that he was treated by Jackson for
a toe injury in the Philippines.
“But how that would translate
to managing the second-largest
department in federal government I have no idea,” Price said.
“He has competence and integrity.
I don’t think he’s going to fly
around the world first-class or be
buying thousands of dollars in furniture. But can he run VA? Anyone’s guess is as good as mine.”
Colleagues described the schedule of the White House physician
as grueling, with continual foreign and domestic travel, always
at the president’s side.
Some Democrats warned that if
Jackson embraced the idea of
privatizing more of VA’s health
coverage, his nomination would
be met with stiff resistance.
“I will carefully review Dr. Jackson’s qualifications to determine
whether he has the best interests
of our Veterans at heart or whether he, like many in the Trump
administration, wants to push VA
down the dangerous path of privatization,” Sen. Tammy Duckworth
(D-Ill.), a wounded Iraq veteran,
said in a statement.
At the American Legion, the
country’s largest veterans organization, senior officials were putting together ideas to help Jackson
acquaint himself with the agency
and its challenges.
“He’s going to have a huge
learning curve,” Executive Director Verna Jones said, “but we
stand ready to assist and educate
him.”
lisa.rein@washpost.com
seungmin.kim@washpost.com
emily.wax@washpost.com
joshua.dawsey@washpost.com
Robert Costa and Julie Tate
contributed to this report.
Data firm’s work for Trump, Bolton super PAC spurs complaint to Justice
BY
M ICHELLE Y E H EE L EE
Government watchdog groups
on Thursday called for an investigation into whether President
Trump’s campaign and a super
PAC controlled by his new national security adviser conspired with
an embattled political data firm to
violate elections laws.
In complaints filed Thursday
with the Justice Department, the
watchdog groups allege that the
firm, Cambridge Analytica, violated a law barring foreign nationals
from participating in U.S. elections. And they accuse the Trump
campaign and John Bolton Super
PAC of knowing their actions were
improper when they worked with
the firm.
Cambridge Analytica is already
at the center of a federal investigation into Facebook’s protection of
users’ private data, which Cambridge Analytica may have improperly used to develop voter
profiles for political campaigns.
In a statement, Garrett Marquis, Bolton’s spokesman, said
that the super PAC only recently
learned of the allegations against
Cambridge and that its agreement
with the firm said the firm’s methods complied with the law.
“No individuals at Cambridge
Analytica, foreign or otherwise,
made any strategic decision regarding election-related activities,” he added. “Furthermore,
John Bolton Super PAC hasn’t
worked with Cambridge Analytica
on any independent-expenditure
effort since 2016, and the John
Bolton Super PAC no longer uses
any of the data provided by Cambridge Analytica.”
Neither the Trump campaign
nor Stephen K. Bannon — Trump’s
former campaign chief executive
and former vice president of Cambridge Analytica, who also was
named in the complaints — responded to requests for comment.
A Trump campaign official previously told The Washington Post
that the Cambridge team was
managed by a U.S. citizen to ensure compliance. Federal law says
foreign nationals cannot “directly
or indirectly participate in the
decision-making process” of a political campaign, but they can play
lesser roles.
A spinoff of a British company,
Cambridge Analytica assigned
dozens of non-U.S. citizens to provide campaign strategy and messaging advice to John Bolton Super PAC, and Republican candidates in the 2014 midterms, according to former employees. The
firm advised the Trump campaign
in the 2016 cycle.
In their complaint, Democracy
21 and Citizens for Responsibility
and Ethics in Washington also
named SCL Elections, a company
affiliated with Cambridge Analytica. The complaint raises questions
that may be relevant to Bolton’s
role as national security adviser
and the security clearance he may
receive, said Fred Wertheimer,
president of Democracy 21.
“It’s reasonable to question
whether the Bolton super PAC was
aware of the misconduct or not,”
said Norm Eisen, board chair of
CREW. “And the evidence of mis-
conduct is so profound that we
believe that the Justice Department has no choice but to open an
inquiry into the matter.”
In August 2014, Cambridge Analytica and SCL Elections signed a
contract with the super PAC led by
Bolton to support Republican
Senate candidates in Arkansas,
North Carolina and New Hampshire and to raise the issue of
national security.
The two firms worked with the
super PAC’s staff “to craft and deploy a communications programme in the target states,” according to the contract.
michelle.lee@washpost.com
Sessions, for now, rebu≠s GOP calls for 2nd special counsel to probe FBI
U.S. attorney for Utah is
already engaged in such
a review, he reveals
BY
M ATT Z APOTOSKY
Attorney General Jeff Sessions
on Thursday rebuffed — at least
for now — a call from Republican
leaders to appoint a second special counsel to look into the FBI’s
handling of its most high-profile
probes and announced that he
has asked the U.S. attorney in
Utah to spearhead a broad review.
Sessions made the revelation
in a letter to three key GOP
leaders in the House and Senate
who have called on him to appoint a second special counsel,
noting that Justice Department
regulations call for such appointments only in “extraordinary circumstances” and that he would
need to conclude “the public interest would be served by removing a large degree of responsibility for the matter from the Department of Justice.”
He asserted that the department previously has tackled highprofile and resource-intensive
probes and revealed he had
named U.S. Attorney John W.
Huber to lead a review of the
topics that the legislators had
requested he explore. Those topics include aspects of the investigation into Russian interference
in the 2016 presidential election
and several matters related to
Hillary Clinton and her family’s
foundation.
“I am confident that Mr. Huber’s review will include a full,
complete, and objective evaluation of these matters in a manner
that is consistent with the law
and the facts,” Sessions wrote. “I
receive regular updates from
Mr. Huber and upon the conclusion of his review, will receive his
recommendations as to whether
any matters not currently under
investigation require further resources, or whether any merit the
appointment of a Special Counsel.”
Sessions in November revealed
to GOP legislators that he had
directed senior federal prosecutors to look into matters they
wanted probed, and he said in an
interview with Fox News this
month that the review was being
led by a person outside Washington. Sessions, though, had not
revealed the name of that person,
and his public comments have
done little to quiet the cries for a
second special counsel.
Sessions’s letter was addressed
to Senate Judiciary Committee
Chairman Charles E. Grassley (RIowa), House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte
(R-Va.) and House Oversight
Committee
Chairman
Trey
Gowdy (R-S.C.) — each of whom
has called on him to appoint a
second special counsel.
The lawmakers have raised numerous concerns — including the
handling of the Clinton email
investigation, alleged wrongdoing by the Clinton Foundation,
the sale of a uranium company to
Russia and what some conservatives view as inappropriate surveillance of former Trump campaign adviser Carter Page.
Democrats view their concerns
as unfounded and part of a possible ploy to distract from the work
of special counsel Robert S. Mueller III, whom Deputy Attorney
General Rod J. Rosenstein appointed to look into whether the
Trump campaign coordinated
with Russia to influence the 2016
presidential election.
Justice Department Inspector
General Michael E. Horowitz already has been probing aspects of
the Clinton email case, and he
announced Wednesday that he
would review the surveillance of
Page. Conservatives charge the
surveillance was inappropriate
and that to obtain the warrant
Does this page look familiar?
that authorized it, the FBI used
information from a former British intelligence officer who had
been hired by an opposition research firm working for Clinton
and the Democratic National
Committee.
Democrats argue that the warrant was obtained legally and
with the approval of judges, who
were relying on information far
beyond the material provided by
Christopher Steele, the intelligence officer.
Lawmakers reiterated their
calls for a second special counsel
even after Horowitz’s announcement, noting that the inspector
general’s authority is limited in
some respects. They did the same
after Sessions’s Thursday announcement, although they said
it was a welcome step.
“We are encouraged that Attorney General Sessions has designated U.S. Attorney John W. Huber to investigate the actions of
the Department of Justice and
FBI in 2016 and 2017. While we
continue to believe the appointment of a second Special Counsel
is necessary, this is a step in the
right direction,” Goodlatte and
Gowdy said in a statement.
President Trump previously
had been critical of Sessions for
relying merely on the inspector
general to look into his party’s
concerns, particularly with respect to Page.
“Why is A.G. Jeff Sessions asking the Inspector General to investigate potentially massive
FISA abuse. Will take forever, has
no prosecutorial power and already late with reports on Comey
etc. Isn’t the I.G. an Obama guy?
Why not use Justice Department
lawyers?
DISGRACEFUL!”
Trump wrote on Twitter last
month, referring to former FBI
director James B. Comey.
In his letter, Sessions seemed
to defend the inspector general,
noting that he had “broad discretion and significant investigative
powers” and that he could develop cases that he could refer elsewhere for prosecution or make
his findings public — which regular criminal prosecutors might
not be able to do.
Huber’s appointment might allay some. Grassley, in a March 15
letter, wrote that if Sessions felt
Justice Department regulations
did not allow him to appoint a
second special counsel, he should
instead designate a “disinterested
U.S. attorney.”
Mueller, too, has been functioning much like a U.S. attorney’s office, although he enjoys
some special protections that Huber would not have. For example,
the regulation that governs his
appointment says he can be removed only by the attorney general for cause, and the attorney
general must explain his removal
to Congress.
Huber was first appointed as a
U.S. attorney in Utah during the
Obama administration, although
Trump reappointed him last summer. Sessions wrote that he was
working from outside Washington and in cooperation with
Horowitz. Senator Orrin G. Hatch
(R-Utah) said of Huber’s appointment: “Attorney General Sessions
has picked the right man for the
job.”
It is not unheard of for sitting
U.S. attorneys to be asked to
handle high-profile, Washingtoncentric investigations, although it
has been done in different ways.
Under Obama, then-Attorney
General Eric Holder tapped two
U.S. attorneys — including Rosenstein when he served in the role in
Maryland — to lead high-profile
leak investigations, and Comey,
when he was deputy attorney
general, appointed then-U.S. Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald as a
special counsel to look into who
revealed the identity of a covert
CIA officer.
matt.zapotosky@washpost.com
Karoun Demirjian contributed to this
report.
The Washington Post is printed using recycled fiber.
NF407 6x.5
FRIDAY, MARCH 30 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A5
RE
Anniversary
SALE EVENT
Buy One Get One
FREE
*
Get a Free Piece of Furniture
for Every Piece You Buy.
*
Buy Any Group, Get Another Group
ABSOLUTELY FREE!*
PLUS
FREE
Whatever you spend, Ashley HomeStore
will match your purchase.
Amazon Echo Dot
*
or Google Home Mini
with $499 or more purchase. *See store for details.
PLUS
FREE DELIVERY
*
Ashley Furniture HomeStore
HOURS: Monday - Saturday 10am - 9pm • Sunday 11am - 7pm
Capitol Heights
240-455-0749
Waldorf
240-607-1896
Falls Church
703-933-8842
Gaithersburg
301-591-0460
Off Ritchie Marlboro Road (I-495) to Exit 13, turn
left at light, 1/4 mile to shopping complex,
1711 Ritchie Station Ct., Capitol Heights, MD.
From I495 take Exit 7A-7B follow
MD-5 S. and US 301 (14 miles) to
1240 Smallwood Dr., Waldorf, MD.
From I-395 Take Route 7Leesburg Pike to Baileys Crossroads,
turn right into Crossroads Center.
Intrsctn. of N. (Rt. 355) Frederick Ave. &
Perry Pkwy in Gaithersburg. Near I-270
across from Lake Forest Mall.
Ritchie Station Marketplace St. Charles Towne Plaza 5871 Crossroads Center Way 534 N. Frederick Ave.
Visit Our
Other Area
Showrooms
White Marsh
410-918-0421
8823 Pulaski Hwy.
Glen Burnie
443-270-0137
7425 Ritchie Hwy.
Bel Air
410-638-8441
615 Baltimore Pike
Catonsville
410-788-7779
6610 Balt. Nat’l Pike
Hagerstown
301-733-3540
1501 Wesel Blvd.
Easton
410-822-9003
29602 Dover Road
Fairfax
703-667-9308
9900 Fairfax Blvd.
1/2 mile west of Fairfax Circle.
Near 495 & Rt. 66. Across from
Fairfax High School
Frederick
301-662-3342
1305 W. 7th Street
*Buy one get one free of equal or lesser value. Free delivery is available in our local delivery area and requires a minimum purchase. $499 Minimum qualifying purchases on bonus gift exclude sales tax and delivery
charges. Best Buy or Amazon gift card will be given for value of bonus gift. One bonus gift per household. Not to be combined with any other promotional offers. ©2018 Ashley HomeStores Ltd.
A6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30 , 2018
Trump’s Ohio speech to promote infrastructure ranges widely U.S. ends
policy for
pregnant
detainees
BY
P HILIP R UCKER
richfield, ohio — President
Trump flew here Thursday to
promote his infrastructure plan,
but after a week of seclusion as he
has been besieged by an adultfilm star’s allegations of an affair
and by news on the Russia probe,
he delivered his thoughts on a
variety of topics, from the midterm elections to his North Korea
talks.
Trump threatened to delay finalizing his renegotiated trade
deal with South Korea until after
he meets with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and resolves the
nuclear confrontation with Kim’s
rogue nation.
“I may hold it up until after a
deal is made with North Korea,”
Trump said. “You know why? Because it’s a very strong card and I
want to make sure everyone is
treated fairly and we’re moving
along very nicely with North Korea.”
Regarding his still-unscheduled upcoming meeting with
Kim, Trump said, “If it’s no good,
we’re walking, and if it’s good, we
will embrace it.”
Trump’s speech seemed at
times like a stream-of-consciousness commentary reminiscent of
his signature campaign rallies
from 2016, as he zigzagged from
his prepared text on infrastructure policy to his thoughts on
issues of the day, such as this
week’s debut of the remake of
“Roseanne.”
“Look at her ratings!” the president said of Roseanne Barr, the
Trump supporter who is the
show’s star. Its two-episode premiere drew 18.2 million viewers.
Rallying union engineers and
maintenance workers inside a
chilly and dirt-floored industrial
barn here in Richfield, on the
outskirts of Cleveland, Trump
used his official, taxpayer-funded
visit to warn his political supporters against complacency in the
fall midterm elections.
As Trump told it, the country
BY
Trump’s Council of Economic
Advisers predicts that the
$1.5 trillion plan would boost
growth by 0.1 to 0.2 percentage
points a year and generate more
than 290,000 additional jobs. But
critics say that what the president
is really proposing is $200 billion
in federal funding and that it is
unclear how much additional
money would come from cashstrapped local governments.
Economists at the Penn Wharton Budget Model predict that
Trump’s plan would lead to
$230 billion in new investment,
meaning it would have little impact on the economy or jobs.
“Two hundred billion will not
get the job done. The Trump administration recognizes there is a
need to have a lot more money in
order to have a credible program.
This is a starting point for negotiation with Congress,” said Martin
Klepper, an appointee of President Barack Obama who served
most of last year as executive director of the Transportation Department’s Build America Bureau.
“The $1.5 trillion is totally fake
news.”
The Trump administration has
rescinded an Obama-era policy
that ordered immigration officials generally to release pregnant
women from federal custody, U.S.
officials said Thursday.
Immigrant organizations immediately blasted the policy
change as an example of human
rights abuses under President
Trump, but it remained unclear
how many more pregnant women
might be jailed for deportation as
a result.
Under the Obama administration, some pregnant women also
were subject to mandatory detention if they had committed certain
crimes or had arrived illegally and
were subject to a fast-paced expulsion process called expedited removal.
U.S. Immigration and Customs
Enforcement (ICE) said the new
policy follows Trump’s executive
order last year directing them to
target anyone in the United States
illegally. His order reversed President Barack Obama’s instructions
to mainly detain and deport criminals and those who had recently
crossed the border.
However officials cautioned
that the new directive does not
mean that all pregnant women
will be detained. Cases will be
handled on an individual basis,
depending on the women’s flight
risk, medical condition and
whether they pose a danger to the
public. Immigration officials also
generally do not detain women in
their third trimester.
“We’re ending the presumption
of release for all pregnant detainees,” said Philip Miller, deputy
executive associate director at
ICE. “We’re no longer exempting
any individual from being subject
to the law.”
The policy took effect in December, and Miller said he did not
know if it has led to an increase in
pregnant detainees.
Since then, ICE has held 506
pregnant women in custody, but
most are no longer detained. Miller said he did not know if they
had been released or deported.
As of March 20, about 35 pregnant women were in custody, subject to mandatory detention under the law.
Advocates for immigrants
swiftly rebuked the new policy,
which comes months after the
American Civil Liberties Union,
the Women’s Refugee Commission and others filed a complaint
with the Department of Homeland Security about the treatment
of pregnant detainees. They said
that ICE offered inadequate care
and that the detention harmed
women who had been raped or
had high-risk pregnancies. Some
miscarried.
The National Immigrant Justice Center, a nonprofit that advocates for immigrants’ rights,
called the new policy “little more
than blanket prolonged detention
for all immigrants.”
“Again, ICE’s policymaking
tells us all we need to know about
the administration’s immigration-related goals — inflicting the
maximum possible harm on already vulnerable individuals and
communities, all in service of an
explicitly anti-immigrant agenda,” Mary Meg McCarthy, the center’s executive director, said in a
statement.
ICE officials said the agency
provides prenatal care and education to pregnant detainees, as well
as “remote access” to specialists.
The agency also “ensures access to
comprehensive counseling and
assistance, postpartum follow-up,
lactation services and abortion
services.”
Adult ICE detainees will continue to have access to abortion
services in federal custody, according to agency records.
Most pregnant women are detained after crossing the border
illegally, Miller said, but some
have committed crimes.
The new policy opens a new
chapter in the president’s attempt
to clamp down on illegal immigration, one of his signature issues on the campaign trail. Trump
has aggressively peeled back
Obama’s protections for undocumented immigrants.
He has phased out work permits for hundreds of thousands of
undocumented immigrants, including Liberians this week. Immigration arrests are up more
than 40 percent, and deportations
surged 34 percent during Trump’s
first nine months in office.
Federal officials also have separated parents from their children
after they crossed the border illegally and issued new rules that
make it harder to get an asylum
hearing before a judge.
heather.long@washpost.com
maria.sacchetti@washpost.com
PABLO MARTINEZ MONSIVAIS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Trump, speaking at the Local 18 training facility in Richfield, Ohio, touched on topics from North Korea to “Roseanne.”
was headed in the wrong direction — until he took office.
“There’s never been an economy
like this,” he boasted. “We can’t
lose that by getting hurt in the
midterms, so we can’t be complacent.”
Trump promised to repair the
nation’s ailing roads, bridges and
other infrastructure “from a
source of endless frustration into
a source of absolutely incredible
pride.”
“And we’re going to do it all
under budget and ahead of schedule,” the president promised,
seeming to look past the reality
that his $1.5 trillion infrastructure plan has little apparent momentum on Capitol Hill.
Chief among the infrastructure
projects Trump promoted here
was his long-promised wall at the
U.S.-Mexico border.
“We’re getting that sucker
built!” Trump said. “That’s what I
do. I build. I was always very good
at building. It was my best thing. I
think better than being president,
I was always very good at building.”
Trump’s visit to Ohio was his
first public appearance this week
— a notable absence from the
spotlight for a president who relishes the give-and-take with reporters and typically has daily
opportunities for the media to see
him doing his job.
Trump had not been seen in
public since porn actress Stormy
Daniels appeared Sunday night
on “60 Minutes,” detailing her
allegations of a sexual encounter
with Trump in 2006.
In his Ohio speech, Trump remained silent on the Daniels saga
and instead talked about a medley of issues that animate the
working-class people who voted
for him. He talked about defeating Islamic State terrorists, renegotiating trade deals, investing in
the military, nominating conservative judges and cracking
down on illegal immigration.
As is typical for Trump, the
president appeared several times
to veer off his prepared remarks
on infrastructure policy to interject comments that were perhaps
designed to appeal to his audience.
“I don’t know what that means,
a community college,” Trump said
at one point. “Call it vocational
and technical. People know what
that means. They don’t know
what a community college
means.”
As he left the Oval Office on
Thursday morning to begin his
trip to Ohio, Trump bade farewell
to Hope Hicks, one of his longestserving aides and closest confidants. Hicks is leaving her post as
White House communications director.
Trump was to join his family
Thursday evening in Palm Beach,
Fla., where he will spend the
Easter holiday weekend at his
private Mar-a-Lago estate.
philip.rucker@washpost.com
Judge refuses to expedite trial in Daniels’s suit against Trump
AND
BY M ARK B ERMAN
F RANCES S TEAD S ELLERS
A federal judge on Thursday
denied a request from Stormy
Daniels, who says she was paid to
remain silent about an affair with
President Trump, to expedite a
jury trial in her lawsuit against
the president.
The ruling looked like a temporary setback for Daniels’s case.
But it also carries legal implications for Trump. The judge
deemed the request for an expedited jury trial and depositions of
Trump and his personal attorney,
Michael Cohen, “premature.”
Judge S. James Otero of the U.S.
District Court for the Central District of California said some questions may wind up being answered by a future petition from
Trump and Cohen.
Daniels, whose real name is
Stephanie Clifford, filed a lawsuit
against Trump earlier this month,
asking the court to declare her
nondisclosure
agreement,
reached in the final days of the
2016 election, invalid because
Trump did not sign it.
The judge’s denial came a little
more than a day after Michael J.
Avenatti, an attorney for Daniels,
filed the motion seeking to depose
Trump and Cohen. Cohen has said
he paid Daniels the $130,000 out
of his own funds, while the White
House has denied that Trump had
CBSNEWS/”60 MINUTES”/REUTERS
Stormy Daniels’s interview with Anderson Cooper aired Sunday on
“60 Minutes.” Her lawyer asked to move quickly on depositions of
the president and his attorney, but a judge called that “premature.”
an affair with Daniels.
In his filing, Avenatti argued
that his side told attorneys for
Trump and Cohen last week that
they would seek “limited discovery on an expedited basis.” Avenatti wrote that the attorneys for
Trump and Cohen “contend that
no discovery should be conducted
in the case, and no trial should be
set, because the case should be
summarily ordered to arbitration.”
Cohen has claimed in court
filings that he has a right to seek
at least $20 million in damages
from Daniels for violating the
hush agreement. Court filings
made on behalf of Cohen’s limited
liability company, Essential Consultants, and Trump also said they
intended to push the case back
into arbitration, which would be
shielded from the public.
Otero wrote that Essential Consultants and Trump have stated
their intention to file a petition to
force the case back into arbitration. If such a petition is filed, he
wrote, it could answer a number
of the questions Daniels’s request
for discovery had asked.
Attorneys for Trump and Cohen did not immediately respond
to requests for comment.
Avenatti said in a telephone
interview Thursday that the language as it relates “to the law and
the merits is very, very positive for
us and shows that the court appears to agree with our position.
This does not bode well for the
president or Mr. Cohen.”
David A. Super, a law professor
at Georgetown University, said he
believed Otero made the right
decision.
“At this stage, the court has to
determine the validity of the purported contract,” Super wrote in
an email. “If that contract were
valid, the court likely would have
no jurisdiction over this matter.
And making that determination
does not require any depositions:
the contract is invalid on its face.
Once the court has determined
that the contract is invalid, it can
move on to deciding whether any
other claims, such as those relating to alleged intimidation, are
sufficiently substantial to allow
the case to go forward.”
Should that happen, “depositions might well be in order,”
Super said. “But depositions now
would be premature.”
Daniels’s allegations against
Trump have received intense
scrutiny. In an appearance Sunday on “60 Minutes,” Daniels said
she was threatened for trying to
tell the story publicly in 2011 and
took the $130,000 payment out of
fear.
Daniels’s credibility came under question. A lawyer for Cohen
and a spokesman for Trump both
said they did not believe that she
was threatened in 2011, while
Keith Davidson, Daniels’s former
lawyer, said he did not believe the
interview “represents a fair and
accurate description of the situation.”
Cohen has argued that neither
Trump’s campaign nor the president’s business were involved in
the payment to Daniels. David
Schwartz, an attorney for Cohen,
argued Thursday that the lawyer
“never told” Trump about the
agreement.
“Michael Cohen had great authority within that organization
to take care of things,” Schwartz
said on NBC’s “Megyn Kelly Today.”
Otero, who was nominated to
the bench by President George W.
Bush in 2003, included an admonition:
“The parties are advised that
the instant litigation is not the
most important matter on the
court’s docket,” he wrote in a
footnote attached to the fourpage order. “Requests for expedited proceedings, hearings, and discovery not clearly supported by
the record and law are discouraged.”
mark.berman@washpost.com
frances.sellers@washpost.com
Trump is just past 1% of way to $1.5 trillion infrastructure goal
BY
H EATHER L ONG
President Trump traveled to
Ohio on Thursday for a rally, hoping to revive interest in his plan to
revamp the country’s roads, bridges, railways and ports.
The president wants $1.5 trillion in new spending on infrastructure, but Congress so far has
allocated $21 billion — slightly
more than 1 percent of the president’s goal.
Among the president’s top economic plans for the United States
— tax cuts, deregulation, infrastructure upgrades and renegotiated trade deals — infrastructure
is the area where Trump has accomplished the least.
While the president has vowed
to deliver “the biggest and boldest
infrastructure investment in
American history,” congressional
leaders’ aims are more modest.
They plan to move a few small
pieces of legislation before the
midterm elections, although the
bills under consideration are
mostly to reauthorize funding for
existing initiatives and programs,
not the massive new investment
for which Trump is asking.
When Trump won the election,
many saw infrastructure as a
chance for a bipartisan victory: Democrats and Republicans
alike have talked up the issue, and
it has public support. But infrastructure has repeatedly slipped
down the priority list. The White
House has not made a major push
for infrastructure, and Congress is
stuck: It cannot agree on a funding
source and cannot stomach adding more to the federal deficit.
Trump
on
Thursday
spent much of his speech in front
of hard-hat-wearing workers covering other subjects: trade, immigration, tax cuts, the news media
and the revival of TV show “Roseanne.” Senior administration officials insist a big push is coming to
woo lawmakers on infrastructure,
even beyond Trump’s trip to Richfield, Ohio.
But veteran lobbyists — on the
left and the right — say the White
House’s repeated declarations
that this is “infrastructure week”
have become a running joke. The
designed weeks are almost always
consumed by controversy over unrelated issues. This latest week is
happening while Congress is in
recess, Trump faces high-profile
allegations of marital infidelity,
the special counsel’s Russia investigation continues to make headlines, and the administration
grapples with staff turnover and
contentious firings.
And some Republicans in Congress are clamoring for a vote on a
balanced-budget
amendment,
a reminder that many in the GOP
do not want to spend any extra
money after tax cuts and spending
increases have added at least
$1.3 trillion to the national debt.
Trump accused Democrats of
holding up the infrastructure bill,
telling the crowd in Ohio that “we
have a very important election
coming up, and they don’t like the
wins we’ve been getting.”
Infrastructure has stalled in
Congress over funding, but lobbyists say some of the blame also falls
on the White House, which lacks a
clear message on what Trump
wants.
Republican aides say the bills
most likely to be completed in the
coming months are the reauthorization and funding of the Federal
Aviation Administration and the
Water Resources Development
Act. But it is a stretch for Trump to
take credit for this, since these
programs are long-standing and
have been renewed every few
years in Congress.
The only money Trump has
managed to secure for infrastructure came from the budget the
president threatened to veto last
week. The bill included $21.2 billion in new infrastructure-related
funding, which the White House
is calling a “down payment” on the
president’s goals. But several of
the programs that received additional funding in the budget, such
as Amtrak and the Transportation
Investment Generating Economic
Recovery grants, had been slated
for cuts or elimination in Trump’s
budget proposal.
Although there is consensus in
Washington that U.S. infrastructure needs an upgrade, Republicans and Democrats remain far
apart on how to pay for it and on
how much money the federal government should spend. Democrats recently released a plan that
called for $1 trillion in government funding, paid for largely by
rolling back some tax cuts, a nonstarter for the GOP.
M ARIA S ACCHETTI
FRIDAY, MARCH 30 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A7
RE
ENDS TOMORROW!
FURNITURE & SLEEP GALLERY MARLOFURNITURE.COM
ROCKVILLE, MD
725 Rockville Pike
(301) 738-9000
ALEXANDRIA, VA
5650 Gen. Washington Dr.
(703) 941-0800
LAUREL, MD
13450 Baltimore Ave.
(301) 419-3400
*Free local delivery with $1799 minimum purchase. See store for details.
FORESTVILLE, MD
3300 Marlo Lane
(301) 735-2000
A8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30 , 2018
Feud in Pa.
jeopardizes
pensioners
nationwide
PEEPS FROM A1
the same. This chain reaction
could divert workers and money
at a time when new employees
are seen as crucial to ensure
ample funding for the wave of
retiring baby boomers — putting
payouts for millions of pensioners at risk.
It is a fight that has divided
this town, pitting the company
that concocts a 28-calorie yellow
spongy baby chicken against the
union workers it employs. It has
splintered the workforce of mechanics and candy makers who
make 2 billion Peeps every year.
The company has suggested
that if these changes are not
made, its future in Bethlehem
could be in doubt.
“To remain a sustainable business we need to continue to
contain or reduce our costs in
order to invest in our infrastructure, our associates and our
brands,” said Matt Pye, a Just
Born vice president. “Our goal is
to keep producing iconic candy
brands for generations to come.”
To many of the workers who
make Peeps, members of the Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco
Workers and Grain Millers union,
it is a line that cannot be crossed.
“There comes a point in time
when you have to take a position,”
said Alex Fattore, 55, who has
worked at Just Born for 37 years,
and walked out during the stunning 2016 strike that escalated
the feud. “You have to make a
stand.”
Strike and Ike
The stand came on Sept. 7,
2016. It was supposed to be peak
Peep time, when the company
accelerates production to prepare for an Easter binge that
locks in almost half the company’s annual sales.
Five days earlier, at a union
building in nearby Allentown,
272 Just Born employees met and
voted against the company’s latest contract proposal. That offer
would have directed all new employees into a 401(k) savings plan
— which does not ensure benefits
after retirement — and blocked
them from participating in the
pension.
The workers voted unanimously to strike.
The following Wednesday, Fattore and more than 100 others
walked out of the sprawling candy factory that also makes the
candies Mike & Ike and Hot
Tamales.
They marched up and down
the sidewalk, screaming “No Justice! No Peeps!” again and again.
The strike went around the clock.
Belt One, the first-floor marshmallow-moving sidewalk that
produces most of the company’s
5.5 million Peeps per day, stood
idle.
Striking workers noticed the
Peepsmobile, a yellow Volkswagen Beetle adorned with a
giant look-alike chick head, had
disappeared from the front of the
factory, to be found later locked
up in a cage where it could not be
damaged.
Many in Bethlehem and the
surrounding area were stunned.
Just Born and the union had
coexisted since the 1970s without
a strike. The company’s revenue
was reportedly growing. In an
area where steel jobs had mostly
disappeared, candy jobs had endured.
Peeps are an iconic brand for
Bethlehem and central to its
identity. On New Year’s Eve, they
do not drop a crystal ball. They
drop a giant yellow Peep. The
union workforce volunteers at
soup kitchens and local churches.
“It’s not exactly like ‘us versus
them,’ ” said Thomas Hyclak, an
economics professor at nearby
Lehigh University. “It’s not like
management was trying to take
jobs and move them to South
Carolina. This is a good company.
But the workers are our friends
and neighbors too. It’s hard for
people to take sides.”
The strike went on for several
weeks. Candy production plummeted, workers said, but the
company refused to budge. The
same family has owned Just Born
for three generations, and they
had complained that personnelrelated costs were rising too fast.
They needed to contain these
costs to keep the firm competitive with others that have moved
overseas.
“Many companies are moving
part or all of their operations
outside of the U.S. to take advantage of lower sugar prices available outside the U.S. and lower
labor costs,” Pye said in a statement to The Washington Post.
“Just Born has, so far, been able to
retain all of its manufacturing in
MIKE MERGEN/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Just Born Quality Confections of Bethlehem, Pa., makes 5.5 million Peeps a day, along with other candies. The same family has owned the company for three generations.
Fewer are paying into multiemployer pensions
Percentage of participants in U.S. multiemployer pensions who are inactive,
meaning they no longer pay into the plan but are not yet receiving benefits.
100%
75
61%
50
25
17%
0
1975
2014
Source: Center for Retirement Research at Boston College
MICHAEL S. WILLIAMSON/THE WASHINGTON POST
The Peepsmobile is seen at the Just Born complex in September 2016. The pension fight has divided
Bethlehem, where Peeps are part of the town’s identity. Steel jobs have left, but candy jobs remain.
the U.S. which puts us at a competitive disadvantage.”
Union workers were skeptical.
Candy Industry magazine had
projected Just Born’s net sales
climbing to $231 million in 2016,
up from $222 million in 2014.
(The company would not comment on the candy magazine’s
estimates.)
The union tried to hold ranks,
but people started slipping away.
Twenty workers crossed the picket line and went back to work.
They warned striking friends
they would lose their jobs if they
did not return immediately. The
company even held a job fair, and
more than 150 people showed up,
enticed by the attractive pay people could earn without a college
degree.
People panicked. Union officials said Just Born hired 100 new
workers, while more striking
workers ran back to their old
jobs, fearful of losing their careers. Longtime friends hurled
verbal, vulgar threats as they
ducked away.
The union’s worst nightmare
was coming true — its members
were splintering.
“If they break the union, do
these people realize they could
lose everything?” said Gordon
Grow, a mechanic who spent 41
years at Just Born but retired
after the strike because he refused to work with people he said
crossed the picket line.
The striking workers, half of
whom were older than 50, were
losing money and knew their
health benefits would run out in
October. The strike had begun
with unity but now they were
wondering about the endgame.
Jobs in Lehigh Valley that pay
between $15 and $25 an hour for
people without college degrees
are hard to find.
So the union agreed to end the
strike after four weeks. The damage between the company and its
workforce was done. Many people staffing Belt One would not
look each other in the eye.
It only got worse.
Union officials put a list of all
the people who crossed the picket
line on their bulletin board with
the word “scab”— a labor epithet
for someone breaking solidarity
— written across it. It was ripped
down less than two hours later.
Fattore wore a T-shirt of Calvin, a comic strip character, urinating on the word “scab.” He was
reprimanded by management.
Trouble with Twinkies
The Calvin image remains on
the window of a union member’s
truck, a daily reminder that the
animus from the strike still festers — and that the issues that
originally drove it remain unresolved.
The pension, which is adminis-
tered by a group of labor officials
and corporate executives from
the 200 participating companies,
has sued the company, alleging it
improperly tried to stop enrolling new employees in the pension without paying the withdrawal fee. The company has
sued the union, demanding
“monetary damages” and alleging the strike was illegal.
Companies, labor leaders and
retirees are watching closely, because the multi-employer pension that Peeps workers depend
on is one of close to 1,300 around
the country.
In total, 10 million current and
retired workers participate in
multi-employer pensions, according to the Pension Benefit
Guaranty Corporation. These
pensions allow employees to
move from one job to another
within the same pension and
carry their retirement benefits
with them.
Many of these multi-employer
pensions are on track to run out
of money. If the pension runs out
of money, retired workers might
only get a small percent of the
money they thought they had
earned through decades of work.
Further complicating matters:
If one of the companies paying
into the multi-employer plan falters, the other firms are left on
the hook to pay even more to
stabilize the fund.
Just Born’s union employees
participate in the Bakery and
Confectionery Union and Industrial International Pension Fund,
which was flush with cash several
years ago, even after the financial
crisis. At one point, it had so
much money that it paid pensioners 13 monthly checks each
year.
The company and the pension
seemed healthy, but when disaster struck it seemed far outside
their control.
Hostess Brands, maker of
Twinkies and Ding Dongs, accounted for 24 percent of all
those contributions to the multiemployer pension. It stopped
making contributions in 2011 and
then filed for bankruptcy in 2012,
weighed down by weakened demand, rising competition, and
large levels of debt. Federal
courts allowed it to escape without paying the pension fund
$1 billion in obligations.
The pension fund immediately
went from being one of the
healthiest in the country to one of
the most at risk.
The pension was now in a
category known as the “red zone,”
which means if changes are not
made it will likely become insolvent, and beneficiaries might just
get pennies on the dollar when
they retire. Some other pensions
are even in worse shape.
“The crisis is looming on the
horizon,” said Kenneth Feinberg,
who worked at the Treasury Department until last year and was
tasked with scrutinizing rescue
proposals from multi-employer
plans.
In February, as part of a new
budget law, Congress created a
commission to try to stabilize
MICHAEL S. WILLIAMSON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Alex Fattore and his co-workers at Just Born went on strike in September 2016, when production is accelerated to prepare for Easter sales.
“You have to make a stand,” said Fattore, a 37-year employee and a member of the Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers and Grain
Millers union. The union tried to hold strong, but some workers crossed the picket line and the strike eventually ended.
THE WASHINGTON POST
struggling pension funds. In the
meantime, many existing companies like Just Born are on the
hook to pay higher premiums.
The Peeps-making company says,
without providing hard numbers, that it pays 39 percent more
in pension contributions than
what it negotiated under its last
union contract.
These are the contributions it
tried to scale back when it tried to
unilaterally make the change to
divert new employees into a
401(k) plan. A federal judge last
year said the company could not
do this, but it appealed that
decision. The company and its
union — as well as many other
firms — are waiting for the appellate court decision.
From sweet to sour
“We like to say that Just Born is
the sweetest place in our community,” Ross Born, co-chief executive of the company and a grandson of its founder, said in a 2016
“year in review” video. “We use
more sweeteners than anyplace
around, and we have the sweetest
people, who really care about our
iconic brands.”
The sugary praise masked how
strained relations had become
with Just Born’s union workforce.
The pension had already sued
Just Born, and now the company,
the pension, and the union are all
tangled up in lawsuits. All sides
are frozen as a federal appeals
court decides whether Just Born
can block new employees from
the pension while avoiding the
$60 million fee.
“You’ve gotten rid of the fund
in a circular way that I don’t
think anybody has ever done,”
U.S. Circuit Court Judge James A.
Wynn Jr. told Just Born’s lawyer
in January, without saying
whether he would allow it.
Since the strike, the company
and its workforce have contracted. The union says there are only
326 workers on the production
floors at Just Born now, down
from 400 at the time of the strike.
And just 250 are in the union.
Just Born’s Pye said the firm
has no plans to sell itself or move
overseas. The company is just
trying to manage costs for the
future. Union officials said they
believe the company and its
workforce have been changed
forever.
“Will everybody look at things
like they did before?” said Hank
McKay, president of the union’s
chapter “Local 6,” which includes
the Bethlehem workforce. “I
don’t think so.”
damian.paletta@washpost.com
FRIDAY, MARCH 30 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A9
RE
THE
NATS
ARE BACK!
APRIL 7
BONNIE JO MOUNT/THE WASHINGTON POST
APRIL 8
Sabrina Gordon with her son Trevonte, 10, seated, and grandchildren in their Southeast home. Gordon
entered Trevonte in the school lottery because their neighborhood school has poor test results.
Critics say D.C. families should not
have to rely on luck for a quality school
LOTTERY FROM A1
Glazerman, a senior fellow at
Mathematica Policy Research
who has researched the city’s lottery system. “That’s the long-term
solution; the short-term is a
Band-Aid.”
Children in the District are
guaranteed a slot at their neighborhood school. But if families
want their children to attend a
charter school or a traditional
public school not in their neighborhood, they have to enter the
lottery.
About 75 percent of the nearly
100,000 students attending traditional and charter schools used
the lottery to win a spot. In 2017,
nearly 2 of every 5 students participating in the lottery came
from east of the Anacostia River
— the poorest neighborhoods in
the city but also the wards with
the most children. All families
seeking a preschool slot, which is
not guaranteed for every child
under city law, must also go
through the lottery.
The lottery uses an algorithm
to assign students to schools and
is engineered to be fair, according
to Cat Peretti, the executive director of My School DC.
“Why parents and students
choose schools is a very complex
and personal decision,” Peretti
said.
Families rank up to 12 schools
on a single application, and each
child is randomly assigned a
number. The lower the number,
the better the chance of securing a
slot at a coveted school.
The lottery doesn’t account for
students’ race or academic history. But most schools give preference to families who already have
a child enrolled at a school — and
that preference can be potent.
At Mundo Verde, a popular
language-immersion
charter
school, all but one pre-K3 slot was
given to 3-year-olds who had a
sibling enrolled or a parent on
staff, reflecting a common practice. The school opens more slots
in pre-K4 and kindergarten because the school gets more lowincome and minority applicants
in the later grades, when enrollment is mandatory, said Kristin
Scotchmer, executive director of
Mundo Verde.
The populations at each school
don’t necessarily mirror the demographics of the traditional public and charter school systems.
The student body at Two Rivers
Public Charter School — which
had the longest wait list of any
school this academic year, at 1,438
students — is 26 percent white,
while white children make up
only 5.9 percent of students enrolled in all D.C. charter schools.
At Mundo Verde, which has the
second-longest wait list, 32 percent of students are white.
Peretti has a team of five people
dedicated to reaching out to parents. If families don’t have a computer, a city employee will help fill
out the lottery application over
the phone.
“I’ve been losing the lottery
system every year,” said Tamika
Williams, whose son attends his
neighborhood school, Brookland
Middle.
But she wants him to go to a top
high school and is playing the
lottery again this year.
Push for a unified lottery
Before the District implemented a lottery system using a single
application in 2014, parents had
to keep track of about 30 lottery
deadlines and applications. Charter schools operated their own
lotteries, and the traditional public school system ran separate
lotteries for lower and upper
grades. Chaos ensued. Parents of-
ten had to go to each school to
submit a lottery application.
Adding to the confusion, charter schools informed parents of
the lottery results at different
times, which resulted in parents
enrolling their children in the
first school they heard back from
and then, when they received a
slot at a more desirable campus,
enrolling them there, too.
When Scott Pearson took over
the D.C. Public Charter School
Board in 2012, he met with Kaya
Henderson, who was chancellor
of D.C. Public Schools, and they
pushed for a unified lottery system. Denver, New Orleans and
New York had already streamlined the process, so the technology and precedent were there.
By spring 2014, My School DC
was ready for use. Schools aren’t
required to enlist in the common
lottery, and Pearson said it wasn’t
an easy sell.
He worked on convincing the
big charter networks, including
KIPP and Democracy Prep, to
participate, and most other
schools followed.
“We had a target customer in
mind, and it was a single mom
living east of the river who was
unbelievably burdened and often
locked out of the ability to participate in school choice,” Pearson
said.
The engineering behind My
School DC is based on the algorithm that earned the 2012 Nobel
Prize in economics for formulas
that matched thousands of medical residents with hospitals, kidney donors with recipients and
New York students with high
schools.
Neil Dorosin, executive director of the Institute for Innovation
in Public School Choice, which
develops lottery algorithms, said
parents can’t cheat the system,
and schools can’t sift through
applicants to choose who they
want.
Software assigns participants a
number that sticks with them
until they are matched with a
school. Children then get to enroll
in that school while remaining on
About 75 percent of
the nearly 100,000
students attending
traditional and
charter schools
in the District used
the lottery to win a
spot. In 2017, nearly
2 of every 5 students
participating in the
lottery came from
east of the Anacostia
River — the poorest
neighborhoods in
the city but also the
wards with the most
children.
the wait list for any school that a
family ranked higher but did not
get into.
“All the algorithm is doing is
just implementing what that
city’s rules are,” Dorosin said. “If
you are looking for unfairness, it
is not in the algorithm.”
Location a major factor
Each winter, Vanessa Gerideau
receives the names of about 125
families. They are typically low
income and don’t know much
about the lottery system. Gerideau, a part-time parent advocate
for the nonprofit DC School Reform Now, calls each family to
offer help navigating the lottery.
She reminds them of deadlines
and talks about different schools.
The organization sets up virtual
tours so families can learn about
the city’s schools without visiting
them.
She said many of the families
have never heard of language immersion and Montessori-style
schools, which are often the most
coveted and highest performing.
But those families often say other
schools are a better fit, she said.
For Gordon, mother of the 10year-old in Southeast Washington, location and academic rigor
matter most, leading her to select
Democracy
Prep
Congress
Heights as her top pick.
According to David Pickens,
executive director of DC School
Reform Now, location is a major
factor in choosing schools, and
the schools that wealthier white
residents select are not in parts of
the city with the highest concentrations of low-income black residents.
Some students from poorer
neighborhoods use the lottery to
get a seat in high-performing
campuses run by D.C. Public
Schools in more affluent neighborhoods.
“The stakes are much higher
for Ward 7 and 8 families,” Pickens said, referring to neighborhoods east of the Anacostia River,
“because their options are not
good options in most cases.”
But the lottery system could
undergo an important change.
Some advocates want to give a
preference to at-risk students —
defined as homeless, recipients of
welfare or food stamps, and those
who have languished in high
school.
The proposal would allow
schools with relatively few at-risk
students to decide whether they
want to give these disadvantaged
students, who represent 44 percent of all traditional public and
charter school students in the
District, a lottery preference. But
detractors say that could penalize
other students and taint a lottery
that touts its equity.
Conor Williams, who lives in
Petworth with his two young children, said he has participated in
the lottery three times and got
“laughable” numbers his first two
times. His older child, a firstgrader, has been in three different
schools, and although Williams
was happy with them, he continued to participate in the lottery
until he matched with a school he
found suitable in the older
grades, as well.
“We didn’t get what we wanted
right away,” said Williams, a researcher at a think tank.
Williams said his family was
contemplating moving because of
concerns over the neighborhood
and because his family didn’t initially love its school options. But
then he secured a slot for his older
child in their top choice: DC Bilingual Charter, a language-immersion school.
He now has no plans to leave
his neighborhood.
perry.stein@washpost.com
vs. NEW YORK METS
vs. ATLANTA BRAVES
APRIL 9 –11
vs. COLORADO ROCKIES
APRIL 12–15
GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY AT
nationals.com
A10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30 , 2018
The World
Growing Chinese sway stokes worry in Cambodian city
Even as investment and tourists pour into the port town of Sihanoukville, some locals say these new visitors are strangling their businesses
BY
A NNA F IFIELD
sihanoukville, cambodia — It
was a hot, clear day. The kind of
day when, a few months ago, the
beach here would have been
crowded with tourists deciding
whether to drink a $1 beer or a $1
fresh coconut juice.
Instead, the beach was almost
deserted. Women wandered with
trays of fresh lobsters perfectly
balanced on their heads or carrying kits for performing pedicures,
touting in vain for customers.
Men lounged on chairs at their
restaurants offering barbecued
squid and local curries. But the
only patrons were stray cats and
flies.
“We’re not going to be able to
feed ourselves soon. Our business
is about to die,” said Doung Sokly,
a 30-year-old woman who has
been selling drinks, snacks and
cigarettes from a cart on Independence Beach for eight years.
A block away, however, business is booming in the new casinos that have popped up in recent
months. They have names such as
New Macau and New MGM, and
they cater exclusively to Chinese
guests. Cambodians are prohibited from gambling.
On this sunny afternoon when
the beach was empty, the casinos
were packed with Chinese customers smoking and slapping
down $100 bills on the tables. All
around were eagle-eyed Chinese
supervisors and gaggles of young
local women in short dresses and
long eyelashes.
China is trying to spread its
political and economic influence
across the region, particularly
through its ambitious “One Belt,
One
Road”
infrastructuredevelopment initiative. And Cambodia is trying to develop its economy without having to adhere to
any of the human rights demands
that U.S. and European governments tend to insist upon.
Those two interests directly coincide in Sihanoukville, a port city
on the Gulf of Thailand named
after the late king who is still
ANNA FIFIELD/THE WASHINGTON POST
Construction is underway on the Blue Bay, a Chinese-backed resort complex in Sihanoukville, seen last
week. Chinese tourism to the city doubled from 2016 to 2017.
revered as the father of modern
Cambodia.
It is here that Cambodian
Prime Minister Hun Sen’s willingness to be embraced by China is
most evident.
“Sihanoukville is kind of a poster boy for China’s development.
On all economic measures, China
is number one,” said Carl Thayer, a
Southeast Asia expert affiliated
with the Australian Defense Force
Academy and a former adviser at
U.S. Pacific Command in Hawaii.
“China is definitely trying to displace the U.S., and it’s succeeding
wonderfully.”
For Hun Sen, who has been in
power for 33 years and is taking
steps to ensure he will be reelected
in a vote scheduled for the end of
July, this investment means he is
able to boast about economic advances even as democratic institutions backslide.
The Cambodian government
has allowed extraordinary levels
of Chinese investment: Thirty ca-
sinos have already been built, and
70 more are under construction.
One huge development, the
Blue Bay casino and condos, advertises itself as “one of the iconic
projects of China’s One Belt, One
Road initiative.” The smallest studios start at $143,000, while the
most prized apartments cost
more than $500,000.
The number of Chinese tourists
visiting Sihanoukville, a city of
90,000, doubled between 2016
and 2017 to hit 120,000 last year.
Restaurants, banks, landlords,
pawnshops, duty-free stores, supermarkets and hotels all display
signs in Chinese.
But with the exception of those
working in the hotels and casinos,
most Cambodians, whose average
income is $1,100 a year, are seeing
little benefit from this investment.
And resentment is mounting.
“My business has halved,” said
Chhim Phin, who has run a seafood restaurant on Independence
Beach since 2003. “We used to
CHINA
VIETNAM
BURMA
LAOS
THAILAND
CAMBODIA
Phnom Penh
Gulf of
Thailand
Sihanoukville
MALAYSIA
South
China
Sea
200 MILES
THE WASHINGTON POST
have lots of Western tourists coming here, people who liked to try
our food. But Chinese tourists
don’t want to eat Khmer food and
experience our local customs —
they prefer to eat their own food.
Chinese tourists like to stay in
their bubble.”
Next to his restaurant, a plot of
land that used to be filled with
backpacker bars that held dance
parties on the beach has been
reduced to rubble, the lease taken
over by Chinese developers.
And when Chinese customers
do come to his restaurant, Chhim
Phin is not thrilled with their business. “I don’t speak Chinese, so it’s
very difficult to communicate,” he
said. “To be honest, I’ve had a very
bad experience dealing with Chinese. They’re so rude.”
Doung Sokly, operating her
cart, does not enjoy interacting
with the new arrivals, either.
“Western tourists don’t haggle,
because they want to try local
things. But Chinese tourists really
try to get the prices down,” she
said.
As if on cue, a group of Chinese
tourists on the beach erupted into
laughter and yelling. “Listen to
them. They’re so loud,” she said,
glancing over at the group with a
look of distaste. “It’s so annoying.”
Locals are also worried about
organized crime resulting from
the casinos, and the increasing
incidents of drunken violence. After the publication of reports
about the pros and cons of Chinese investment, Beijing’s ambassador acknowledged that “a small
amount of low-educated people”
from his country were breaking
Cambodian laws.
Not that Western tourists are
always well behaved. Sex tourism
is a draw for some, while others
have recently gotten into trouble
for lewd behavior.
One local business owner who
is happy with the Chinese influx is
Ko Hong. He rents water scooters,
charging Westerners $60 for an
hour of joyriding. For Chinese
customers, the price is $50.
“Before it was more seasonal,
but now I can earn lots of money,”
Ko Hong said. On an average day
he makes $200.
The main reason for the exodus
of Western tourists and influx of
Chinese visitors is accommodations, Chhim Phin and other busi-
ness owners here say.
The cheaper hotels and guesthouses that locals and Western
tourists have liked have been
crowded out by the big Chinese
developers, who will pay much
more for the land. Those that do
remain have trouble hiring staff
because they’re being snatched up
for much higher wages.
“There used to be cheap accommodations here, but not anymore,” said Koeun Sao, a 29-yearold who estimates that his income
from driving a tuk-tuk has
dropped by 70 percent in the past
three months. “Chinese people
take cars, not tuk-tuks.”
The Chinese investment has
not translated into better roads or
other infrastructure in a city that
struggles with basic plumbing.
“All this building they’re doing
is only to benefit Chinese,” Koeun
Sao said. “It’s good for the landowners but not for ordinary people.”
But both the Cambodian and
Chinese governments tout their
economic cooperation.
The Sihanoukville Special Economic Zone, a 4.4-square-mile industrial park where 104 of the 121
companies are Chinese, “stands as
a symbol of renewed ChinaCambodia friendship by delivering real benefits to the people,”
Chinese Premier Li Keqiang wrote
for a Cambodian newspaper when
he visited in January.
While here, Li signed 19 business deals. These included building an expressway between the
capital, Phnom Penh, and Sihanoukville to replace the potholed
narrow roads that link the cities
now, and the construction of a
new airport in Phnom Penh.
The two countries pledged to
more than double the number of
Chinese tourists coming to Cambodia to 2 million within the next
two years and to boost bilateral
trade to $6 billion.
“We’ll try to remain here,”
Doung Sokly said from behind her
cart. “We need to see how things
unfold.”
anna.fifield@washpost.com
Kenyan opposition figure says he was drugged and then deported to Dubai
A SSOCIATED P RESS
nairobi — A Kenyan opposition
politician alleged that he was
drugged and deported to Dubai
early Thursday after his attempt
to enter Kenya led to his being
detained in an airport bathroom
for more than a day.
Miguna Miguna, targeted in
a Kenyan government crackdown
amid lingering election tensions,
was deported even after a
court ordered authorities to
release him, said his attorney,
Cliff Ombeta.
Miguna said in a Facebook post
that authorities entered the airport bathroom where he had been
held and forcibly injected him
with a substance. He said he
passed out and regained consciousness only when the Emirates airline flight landed in Dubai.
“I will and must return to Kenya as a Kenyan citizen by birth as
various courts have ordered,” he
wrote.
There was no response from
Kenyan authorities, although
the immigration department retweeted a post calling on the public to ignore a rumor that Miguna
had been sedated or drugged.
The deportation ended the Nairobi airport drama in which Miguna posted from what he called
“Toilet at Terminal 2.”
Hours before Miguna was deported, a High Court judge declared Kenya’s interior minister,
national police chief and permanent secretary for immigration in
contempt of court for disregarding an order to immediately re-
lease him, said another of his
attorneys, Nelson Havi.
Miguna was deported to Canada last month in a crackdown on
politicians who attended the
mock inauguration of opposition
leader Raila Odinga to protest
President Uhuru Kenyatta’s reelection. A court later ordered
that Miguna’s Kenyan passport be
restored and that he be allowed to
return.
However, when Miguna arrived Monday at Jomo Kenyatta
International Airport, plain-
clothes officers tried to hustle him
onto an outbound plane, witnesses said. That failed when he protested.
Miguna later posted statements on social media saying he
had been “detained inside a tiny
and filthy toilet” in one of the
terminals. “I have not eaten. I
have not taken a shower. I have
not been given access to my lawyers, family members and physicians.”
The airport confrontation
came two weeks after a surprise
meeting between Odinga and
Kenyatta that led to the announcement of an initiative to
heal this East African nation after
months of sometimes deadly election turmoil.
Odinga had argued that Kenyatta lacked legitimacy because
his initial Aug. 8 reelection victory was nullified by the Supreme
Court over “irregularities and illegalities.” The repeat election had
a low turnout as Odinga boycotted it, citing a lack of electoral
reforms.
DIGEST
reporting” and “damage battle
assessment” was completed,
Africom said in a statement.
“He provided critical logistics
support, funding and weapons to
AQIM, enabling the terrorist
group to threaten and attack U.S.
and Western interests in the
region,” Africom said. The
statement did not identify the
other militant killed in the strike.
Islamist extremists have
expanded their reach in Libya
after the country was plunged
into chaos following the 2011
uprising that ousted and killed
dictator Moammar Gaddafi.
SYRIA
Last rebel holdout near
capital gets ultimatum
The Syrian government has
given a final, three-day ultimatum
to the largest rebel group in the
enclave of Eastern Ghouta to leave
the last remaining oppositionheld town in the area, state TV
reported Thursday.
According to the TV report,
the 72-hour deadline began
Wednesday night.
Talks have been deadlocked for
days between the Army of Islam,
which controls the town of
Douma, just outside Damascus,
and Russian mediators.
The Syrian government and its
Russian backers have insisted that
Army of Islam members leave the
area for northern Syria. An Army
of Islam spokesman said the
group’s fighters have rejected such
demands.
Pro-government media have
warned of an all-out offensive
against Douma if the rebels do not
withdraw.
— Associated Press
Top Abu Sayyaf extremist
surrenders: A senior commander
of the Abu Sayyaf extremist group
blamed for bombings and
kidnappings has surrendered in
the southern Philippines, the
country’s defense chief said.
Nurhassan Jamiri surrendered
with 13 of his men in Basilan
province. Abu Sayyaf emerged in
the late 1980s as an offshoot of the
decades-long Muslim separatist
rebellion in the Philippines.
— Associated Press
JERUSALEM
Gaza Christians’ entry
to be limited for Easter
Israeli authorities said
Thursday that they have decided
to block most of Gaza’s small
Christian community from
traveling to Jerusalem for the
upcoming Easter holiday, citing
security concerns.
COGAT, the defense body that
oversees Palestinian civilian
concerns, says it will allow only
people 55 and older to enter Israel.
Italy arrests 5 linked to Berlin
Christmas attacker: Italian
ASHRAF SHAZLY/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Dust hangs in the air in Khartoum, Sudan’s capital, after a sandstorm engulfed the city, forcing authorities to cancel flights and shut schools.
Such storms occur frequently in Sudan and usually dissipate in a couple of hours, but Thursday’s storm was expected to last into Friday.
Israel maintains a blockade
over the Gaza Strip and restricts
entry from the territory, which is
controlled by the Islamist group
Hamas, considered a terrorist
organization by Israel, the United
States and the European Union.
COGAT said Thursday that the
restrictions are needed to prevent
people from fleeing and
overstaying their visits in Israel.
Wadie Abunassar, a Catholic
Church official, called the
restrictions “very sad,” adding that
he hopes Israel will reconsider.
— Associated Press
LIBYA
U.S. says strike killed
a top al-Qaeda official
A U.S. airstrike last weekend in
southwestern Libya killed two alQaeda militants, including a top
recruiter, the military’s Africa
Command said this week.
Musa Abu Dawud was a highranking official of the terrorist
network’s North Africa branch,
known as al-Qaeda in the Islamic
Maghreb. His death was
confirmed after “operational
police have arrested five people
connected to Anis Amri, the
Tunisian who carried out the 2016
Berlin Christmas market attack
and was later killed in a shootout
with police in Italy. Police said one
of the five was thought to have
procured the fake Italian identity
papers that allowed Amri, a failed
asylum seeker, to move around
Europe. Amri hijacked a truck and
drove it into the Christmas market
on Dec. 19, 2016, killing 12 people.
— From news services
FRIDAY, MARCH 30 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A11
RE
Relatives demanding answers return to scene of deadly Venezuelan jail fire
BY R ACHELLE K RYGIER
AND A NTHONY F AIOLA
caracas, venezuela — Fami-
lies of 68 people, mostly prisoners,
who were killed in a jail fire in
Venezuela gathered outside the
scene at a police station Thursday
to demand answers, as opposition
lawmakers pledged to investigate
the tragedy.
A fire ripped through the detention center of a police headquarters west of Caracas on
Wednesday morning as families
waited outside for visiting hours
to begin. As the flames and smoke
engulfed the jail, frantic relatives
clashed with police, who drove
them back with tear gas.
Late Wednesday, the country’s
head prosecutor, Tarek William
Saab, announced a death toll of
68, including two women who
were probably visitors. He promised an investigation to “clarify
these dramatic events.”
Local opposition lawmaker
Juan Miguel Matheus said the
tragedy was compounded by a
wait for information. No one was
allowed to see the bodies long
after the fire had been extinguished in the city of Valencia in
Carabobo state, about 100 miles
west of the capital.
“Part of the drama is that there
was no list of dead because many
of the bodies were incinerated
and it was impossible to recognize
them,” he added. He said that by
his count, 78 people had died.
The fire struck amid a historic
economic and political crisis. Venezuela faces serious shortages of
basic goods and bouts of unrest as
the socialist government attempts
to hold on to power.
The crisis, experts say, has
worsened conditions in an already overcrowded system in
which inmates lack food, water
and medical care but drugs and
guns are plentiful. Inmates have
increasingly resorted to strikes to
protest the situation.
Carlos Nieto Palma, director of
the nonprofit prison watchdog
group A Window to Freedom, said
the blaze began after an attempted jailbreak failed and inmates set
fire to their mattresses. The in-
Russia to expel 60 U.S.
envoys, close consulate
B Y M ATTHEW B ODNER
moscow — Russia will close the
U.S. Consulate in St. Petersburg and
kick out 60 American diplomats in
response to Monday’s coordinated
expulsion of Russian diplomats
from the United States and a number of other countries, Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said Thursday.
The move continues an ongoing
escalation of tit for tat between
Moscow and the West that began in
early March with the alleged poisoning of a former Russian double
agent on British soil with a Sovietdesigned nerve agent. U.S. officials
said Thursday that another round
might be coming.
“We reserve the right to respond,” State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said in
Washington. “Russia should not be
acting like a victim,” she said, calling Moscow’s move “regrettable”
and “unwarranted.”
U.S. Ambassador Jon M. Huntsman Jr. was summoned Thursday
night to the Foreign Ministry,
where Deputy Foreign Minister
Sergei Ryabkov informed him of
Russia’s response.
According to a Foreign Ministry
statement, 58 U.S. diplomats from
the Moscow embassy and two from
the consulate in Yekaterinburg
have been declared persona non
grata. The United States expelled
60 Russians on Monday. The other
U.S. consulate in Russia, in Vladivostok, will not be affected.
U.S. officials have hinted at further moves, possibly against Russian assets abroad. Huntsman told
the local RBC news outlet earlier
Thursday that such a move was
“possible.”
According to a Foreign Ministry
readout of Huntsman’s meeting
with Ryabkov, the U.S. ambassador
was rebuked for the remark and
warned that such a move would
have the “gravest consequences for
global stability.”
In addition to the expulsion of
Russian diplomats Monday, the
United States closed Russia’s consulate in Seattle — claiming it to be
a hub of Russian intelligence activity and citing its proximity to a major U.S. nuclear submarine base.
On March 14, British Prime Minister Theresa May had ordered the
expulsion of 23 Russian diplomats
after Moscow rebuffed an earlier
demand to explain how a Sovietdesigned and Russian-produced
nerve agent known as Novichok
came to be used in Britain.
Last week, 10 of Britain’s allies,
including the United States, agreed
to coordinated expulsions of Russian diplomats, believed to be intelligence officers, from their respective countries. The movement grew
this week to include 27 countries. A
tally by the Associated Press put the
total number of expelled Russian
diplomats at more than 150. The
number of expulsions in other nations was mostly in the single digits.
“All [measures] regarding the
number of people who will have to
leave the Russian Federation . . .
will also be mirrored with respect
to other countries,” Lavrov said.
“This is the situation as of now.”
Russia’s move, in particular
against the United States, “is a minor escalation,” said Alexander
Gabuev, an analyst at the Carnegie
Moscow Center and a former foreign policy correspondent for the
Kommersant newspaper.
“Sixty diplomats is tit for tat, but
shutting down the consulate in
St. Petersburg is asymmetrical and
escalatory — a mirror response
would have been to shut down the
Vladivostok consulate.”
Another analyst, Vladimir Frolov, disagreed that Russia had escalated. “It was a matching response,”
Frolov said. “I was expecting them
to close two U.S. consulates.”
The Russian Foreign Ministry
ran a poll on Twitter this week
asking users to vote on which of the
three consulates to respond
against. St. Petersburg won the poll.
Vladivostok is the headquarters of
Russia’s Pacific Fleet.
The St. Petersburg consulate has
been given two days to pack up. All
60 of the U.S. diplomats subject to
the expulsion order have one week
to leave.
Russian officials from President
Vladimir Putin on down have
maintained that Moscow had nothing to do with the poisoning of
former Russian double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia
Skripal in the British town of Salisbury on March 4.
Both Skripals remain hospitalized. British authorities said Thursday that Yulia Skripal was showing
signs of recovery, while her father
remained in serious but stable condition. A police officer who came in
contact with the substance also was
hospitalized but has recovered.
Speaking before Parliament on
Monday, May said that about 130
British citizens came in contact
with the substance. May also said
that Russia has offered 21 different
arguments concerning the use of
the Novichok agent.
Those arguments included denials that Novichok ever existed as
well as accusing other former Soviet satellites of producing it. The
only thread linking these denials is
that Moscow had nothing to do
with it and that the accusations are
little more than a provocation.
Frolov said that Moscow’s strategy probably will focus on shouldering the blow from the current
round of expulsions and pivoting
its attention to organizing a summit with President Trump.
“Putin is hoping to use his
charm, just as he did with Bush in
2001,” Frolov said, referring to President George W. Bush. “Putin needs
to move quickly from here to there
to score, but finds himself blocked
by Theresa May.”
But it may take a considerable
amount of charm to overcome this
week’s moves.
“It is clear from the list provided
to us,” the State Department’s Nauert said, referring to the expelled
diplomats, “that the Russian Federation is not interested in dialogue
on the issues that matter to our two
countries.”
Meanwhile, Russia has demanded that Britain hand over a sample
of the substance used in the poisoning for analysis and demanded access to Yulia Skripal — a Russian
citizen. Britain has not ceded to
either demand.
The international Organization
for the Prohibition of Chemical
Weapons (OPCW) has arrived in
Salisbury to conduct its own analysis of the chemical used in the poisoning. It is expected to reveal its
findings in two or three weeks.
The OPCW has said it will hand
over its findings to Britain, the Tass
news agency reported Thursday.
Lavrov said that Russia was calling for a special session of the
OPCW’s executive council April 4 to
discuss the situation, establish a
dialogue and “raise specific questions” about the Skripals’ poisoning
and the alleged use of Novichok.
If Western nations shy away
from engaging in dialogue via the
OPCW, Lavrov said, it would prove
that the allegations against Moscow are nothing more than a “brazen provocation.” He also said that
the OPCW could confirm only the
substance used, not Britain’s assertions that Russia was behind it.
foreign@washpost.com
Carol Morello in Washington
contributed to this report.
CARLOS GARCIA RAWLINS/REUTERS
A distraught woman is restrained Wednesday as relatives of
inmates at the Carabobo detention center gather. Some said police
used tear gas and rubber bullets to keep the crowds at bay as the
fire raged. The fire killed 68 people, mostly prisoners.
mates immediately began to succumb to the heavy smoke.
“The fire caused so much
smoke that people started to die in
the enclosed space,” Nieto Palma
said.
According to Matheus, at least
180 inmates were crammed into
the detention center, far exceeding its capacity of 60.
Nieto Palma said his sources
told him that the deaths were all
due to smoke inhalation and that
the two women among the dead
were there on conjugal visits.
Even as the smoke was choking
the inmates, family members carrying food were outside waiting to
visit. A few of the inmates managed to call family members on
cellphones before succumbing to
the smoke, said Tibisay Romero, a
journalist and investigator for A
Window to Freedom.
“When journalists and photographers started arriving, family
members started to push at the
police to enter, and they threw
rocks at the policemen,” she said.
“It was really tough.”
Police then resorted to tear gas
to drive the families back.
“I don’t know if my son is dead
or alive,” Aida Parra told the Spanish news agency EFE on Wednesday. “They haven’t told me any-
thing.”
In video footage from the scene,
one woman who identified herself
as the mother of an inmate railed
against police. “Corrupt police
threw gasoline in there,” she said.
“We want justice. We want to
know what is happening.”
Peguiliana Ruiz, a 47-year-old
street vendor in Valencia, said she
formally identified the body of her
son, Brian Silva, by a tattoo and an
amputation.
“He lost a leg long ago. So I
could recognize him,” she said.
“There were so many bodies on
the floor. It was something that
one sees it and can’t believe it. Too
horrible.”
Ruiz said her 26-year-old son
had been held for two years. When
family members arrived at the
compound during the fire, police
used tear gas and rubber bullets to
keep the crowds away, she said.
“We’re not dogs or anything
less. We want justice,” she said. “So
many kids were left without fathers now. Guilty and innocent,
it’s not fair that they die like that.
Those responsible have to pay.”
The fire was one of the deadliest jail disasters in a country
where human rights advocates
say conditions for prisoners are
among the worst in Latin America. In 1994, a prison fire in the
state of Zulia killed at least 100.
Last August, at least 37 inmates
died in a riot in the southern state
of Amazonas.
In a statement, the nonprofit
watchdog Venezuelan Observa-
tory of Prisons said: “We have
been warning of the grave situation of police detention centers
that put the lives and personal
integrity of the detained at risk.
. . . The deaths have to be investigated to define responsibilities.”
In the first two months of 2018,
the Observatory has registered 26
dead in jails, 10 injured, 1,016 prisoners on hunger strikes for better
conditions and 90 escapees.
The group’s 2016 annual report
said 54,758 prisoners were being
held in spaces meant for 35,562.
That year, it said, 173 inmates died
in custody, 58 percent more than
in 2015. The report also said
33,000 detainees were in police
stations that had capacity for only
8,000.
Matheus, the lawmaker, said
the tragedy highlighted the crisis
in the country’s penal system. He
said a lack of adequate prisons in
Venezuela meant that inmates
were often jammed into cramped
detention centers in police stations — often for years while
awaiting trial.
“People are in limbo there,” he
said, promising to bring the matter up in the National Assembly
when it meets again Tuesday.
In a statement from Geneva,
the U.N. human rights body also
called for an investigation to establish the causes of the deaths,
identify those responsible and pay
reparations to families.
anthony.faiola@washpost.com
Faiola reported from Miami.
it’s our
ANNIVER SARY SALE
GOING ON NOW
CELEBRATE WITH
OUR AMAZING PRICES!
NO PA SS NEEDED.
40% OFF
Women’s Apparel
$90
Day Dresses
Orig. $138
25% OFF
Almost All Spring
Dresses
40-50% OFF
Kids’ Dresses
& Dresswear
EXTRA 30% OFF
Almost All Women’s
Spring Shoes
UP TO 40% OFF
Men’s Shoes
60% OFF
Almost All Fine Jewelry
50% OFF
exclusively ours
Black Brown 1826
Apparel
$200-$250
Men’s Suits
& Suit Separates
Orig. $375-$650
S H O P C O N F I D E N T LY. W E P R I C E M ATC H !
I F YO U F I N D I T FO R L E SS, W E ’ L L M ATC H I T… A N D S AY T H A N K YO U W I T H A RO S E !
Ask your Sales Associate about our Price Match Policy or go to lordandtaylor.com/pricingpolicy
BUY ONLINE, PICK UP IN STORE
FOLLOW US
S I G N U P F O R E M A I L S AT L O R D A N D TAY L O R . C O M / G E T O N T H E L I S T
T E X T PA S S T O 9 5 5 5 5 T O G E T A S AV I N G S O F F E R S E N T T O YO U R P H O N E
Valid Now-Wednesday, April 4, 2018. By texting PASS to 95555 you agree to receive up to 10 autodialed marketing text messages per month from 95555 (Lord & Taylor) to the phone number provided at
opt-in. Consent is not a condition to purchase. Message & data rates may apply. Text HELP to 95555 for help. Text STOP to 95555 to cancel. Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy at lordandtaylor.com. No
adjustments to prior purchases. Advertised merchandise may be available at sale prices in upcoming sale events. Our regular and original prices are offering prices only and may or may not have resulted in actual
sales. Prices, savings and selection may differ by store and at lordandtaylor.com. Unless otherwise noted, all offers are select styles only. Intermediate markdowns may have been taken. Not valid at Old Orchard,
IL or Annapolis, MD, Lord & Taylor Outlet stores and FIND@Lord&Taylor. Buy Online, Pick Up In Store: In-store pickup service is available at Lord & Taylor stores. Items are ready for pickup the same day, provided
that the order is placed before 3PM local time. Email confirmation is sent when the order is ready to be picked up. Photo ID is required for in-store pickup. Unless otherwise noted, all apparel items are imported.
A12
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30 , 2018
Malala Yousafzai makes first return to Pakistan
BY
S HAIQ H USSAIN
islamabad, pakistan — Malala
PHILIPPE LOPEZ/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Former French president Nicolas Sarkozy attends a ceremony
Wednesday for slain police officer Arnaud Beltrame in Paris.
Court orders France’s
Sarkozy to stand trial
BY
J AMES M C A ULEY
paris — France’s highest court
on Thursday ordered former
president Nicolas Sarkozy to
stand trial for allegedly attempting to intervene in an investigation into his 2007 campaign finances.
The charges — corruption and
the abuse of influence — emerged
as the latest twist in a tangled web
of suspected wrongdoing that
Sarkozy, France’s conservative
president between 2007 and 2012,
has doggedly denied. Specifically,
they concern allegations that he
attempted to sway judges investigating him for possible campaign
finance abuses.
Shortly after he left office,
French media outlets, citing documents from Libyan archives, reported that Sarkozy may have
accepted cash transfers of 50 million euros from the regime of the
now-deceased dictator Moammar Gaddafi to finance his 2007
election campaign. A government
probe was opened that year.
As part of that inquiry, investigators monitored cellphones
Sarkozy used to communicate
with his attorney, Thierry Herzog.
According to French media, those
monitored phones revealed, in
2014, communications with a
judge, Gilbert Azibert, to whom
Sarkozy — planning a 2016 presidential run at the time — allegedly promised a plum position in
Monaco in exchange for information about other pending legal
proceedings against him.
Sarkozy and his attorneys ar-
gued that the wiretapping violated attorney-client privilege and
that the secretly monitored communications should be deemed
inadmissible in court. But in
2016, the Cour de Cassation, the
nation’s highest judicial body, rejected their appeal, clearing the
way for him to stand trial.
Sarkozy, 63, will now attempt
to appeal the trial summons, his
attorneys announced Thursday
in a statement. “He does not
doubt that once again the truth
will triumph,” the statement read.
But even a successful appeal in
this case would be unlikely to end
Sarkozy’s extensive legal woes.
Thursday’s order, first reported
by Le Monde, is only the latest in a
rapidly multiplying list of charges
against the former president.
For one, the Libya probe is
ongoing, and Sarkozy — after
years of public denial — was
placed under formal investigation last week after being accused
of accepting bribes and illegal
campaign financing from Gaddafi’s regime, perhaps the gravest
charges against a former head of
state in modern French history.
In that case, the distinction of
formal investigation suggests
that investigators now have sufficient grounds to suspect that
Sarkozy committed a crime. He
could ultimately stand trial in the
Libya case, as well.
Sarkozy also is slated to stand
trial for alleged campaign finance
abuses in his 2012 reelection campaign, which he ultimately lost to
François Hollande, a Socialist.
james.mcauley@washpost.com
Yousafzai, the world’s youngest
Nobel laureate, returned to Pakistan on Thursday for the first time
since Taliban militants shot her in
the head more than five years ago
for fighting for the right of girls to
go to school.
Yousafzai was flown to Britain
in 2012 for medical care and then
impressed the world with her
eloquent defense of the rights of
girls and women. She went on to
receive the Nobel Peace Prize in
2014, along with Indian child
rights activist Kailash Satyarthi,
before being accepted to Oxford
University.
While she has been hailed by
supporters as a champion against
extremism, some Islamist hardliners in Pakistan and elsewhere
have criticized Yousafzai, calling
her a mouthpiece for Western
cultural views.
In a sign of the attention she
still draws in Pakistan, security for
Yousafzai’s visit was extremely
tight.
“I have been dreaming of returning to Pakistan for the last
five years, and today I am very
happy, but I can still not believe
that this is actually happening,”
she said tearfully at a reception
hosted by Prime Minister Shahid
Khaqan Abbasi.
“Today, after 51/2 years, I have set
foot on my soil. Whenever I would
travel, in a plane or in a car, I
would imagine that it’s Pakistan
and I am driving in Islamabad. I
would imagine this is Karachi,
and it was never true, but now
that I see it, I am very happy,” she
added.
The reception included senior
government functionaries, leading social activists, lawmakers
and guests from her home region
of Swat who came to welcome the
young woman they dubbed
“daughter of Pakistan.”
“The entire world gave you
honor and respect, and Pakistan
will also give you honor,” the
prime minister said at the meeting. “It is your home. . . . You are
not an ordinary citizen; your security is our responsibility.”
He also referred to the militants who wounded Yousafzai and
the battle Pakistan is still fighting.
“We are fighting a war against
terror,” he said. “No matter what
the world says about us, Pakistan
is fighting the largest war against
terror, and our more than 200,000
PRESS INFORMATION DEPARTMENT/ASSOCIATE PRESS
Nobel laureate Malala Yousafzai, left, and her parents pose with Pakistani Prime Minister Shahid
Khaqan Abbasi, second from left, in Islamabad. Yousafzai was shot by Taliban militants in 2012.
soldiers are fighting this war.”
Video showed the Nobel laureate clad in a traditional Pakistani
shalwar kameez and her head
covered in a multicolored scarf as
she sat next to the prime minister
alongside her parents. She also
met with female ministers.
Yousafzai, 20, arrived early
Thursday amid tight security at
Islamabad’s Benazir Bhutto International Airport. Pakistani news
channels aired footage of her leaving the airport along with her
parents in a convoy of more than a
dozen vehicles, many carrying police and security personnel.
It is not yet clear whether she
will visit her home village in the
Swat Valley. Her four-day itinerary has her staying mostly in
Islamabad and meeting Pakistani
officials, media representatives
and social activists, as well as
relatives.
“It’s the happiest day of my life
that I am back to my country and
meeting my people. All my countrymen sitting here, I want to
welcome you,” she said in Pashto,
the native language of her region.
“I continued my education in the
U.K., but I always wanted to move
freely in Pakistan. I want to invest
in the education of children. Pakistani women should be empow-
ered.”
Even in her early teens,
Yousafzai was known as a champion of girls’ education, something that cannot be taken for
granted in parts of Pakistan and
elsewhere in the region.
When the Taliban took control
of the Swat Valley, she refused to
remain silent. Taliban militants
boarded her school bus one day,
asked for “Malala” and then shot
her.
They also blew up many girls’
schools and imposed their strict
version of Islamist law until they
were eventually driven out.
Even after her recovery,
Yousafzai continued to agitate for
girls’ education, setting up the
Malala Fund aimed at supporting
education advocacy groups in
countries such as Pakistan, Nigeria and Kenya.
This month, she used her Nobel
Prize money to build a new school
in Shangla, close to her home
district.
“I am 20 years old but have seen
many things in life, from growing
up in Swat Valley — it was such a
lovely place — and seeing extremism and terrorism there from
2007 to 2009, seeing how many
difficulties our women and girls
faced against those challenges,”
she said, fighting back tears. “If it
was up to me, I would never have
left my country. But for treatment,
I had to go out and continue my
education there.”
Ahmad Shah, a close family
friend of Yousafzai and an education activist, was ecstatic about
her return.
“All well-wishers and friends
from Swat are happy. She is our
pride. She is a source of inspiration for girls in Swat,” he said,
noting the new school in Shangla.
“One positive aspect of Malala’s
image is that now mostly people
are welcoming her. Very few, almost none, are writing and speaking against her.”
Some in Pakistan, especially
religious conservatives, have been
critical, calling her a polarizing
figure who portrays her country in
a negative way to seek fame
abroad.
However, she was greeted
warmly on Twitter and other social media platforms by many of
her countrymen, including actress Mahira Khan, who tweeted,
“Welcome home baby girl.”
Former TV anchor and social
activist Reham Khan said, “Lots of
love and prayers to dearest Malala
on her return to Pakistan.”
foreign@washpost.com
Conn. congresswoman kept aide on staff for 3 months after he made threat
AIDE FROM A1
she worked as Esty’s senior adviser.
Later, Esty enlisted a friend,
former chief of staff Julie Sweet,
to look into Baker’s past behavior,
emails show.
Baker did not leave for three
months. By his last day on Aug.
12, according to documents Esty
provided to The Post, he and Esty
had co-written a positive recommendation letter he could use in
a job search and signed a legal
document preventing her from
disparaging him or discussing
why he left. Baker went on to
work for Sandy Hook Promise,
the gun-control group created
after the 2012 shooting in Esty’s
district. He was dismissed from
the group this week after The
Post contacted him.
The controversy over Esty’s
handling of Baker’s dismissal was
first reported Thursday by the
Connecticut Post.
In retrospect, Esty said she
dealt with the situation poorly.
She said she plans to reimburse
the U.S. Treasury for what she
described as the roughly $5,000
Baker received in severance. She
also plans to improve how she
runs her office, she said.
“What I did was not good
enough and it didn’t protect [my
staff ] enough,” Esty said Monday
in an interview at her home in
Cheshire, Conn. “ . . . I’m hopeful
now with this conversation and
this coming out that I’ll be able to
be much more direct and help
other people in Congress understand the risks they are placing
their staff at when they don’t
think they are.”
Baker referred questions to a
friend, Andrew Ricci. Ricci said
Baker disputed that he struck
Kain. He said Baker had a drinking problem in 2016 but since
then has been sober and received
treatment for anger issues and
substance abuse.
While the rise of the #MeToo
movement has triggered a national reckoning on sexual harassment and ended the careers
of many prominent men, the
issue continues to be especially
thorny in Congress, where, critics
say, rules written and enforced by
lawmakers are designed to protect the institution rather than
victims of abuse. Alleged abusers
have avoided penalties and nega-
TOM WILLIAMS/CQ ROLL CALL/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rep. Elizabeth Esty (D-Conn.) said she consulted her personal attorneys and advisers regarding the allegation made against chief of staff
Tony Baker. Later, emails show, she enlisted a friend to look into Baker’s past behavior.
tive publicity through nondisclosure agreements, such as the one
signed in Baker’s case, and taxpayer-funded settlements that
have been used to ensure accusers’ silence.
Esty’s case underscores how
the harassment issue can be challenging even for lawmakers who,
in their public positions, find
common cause with #MeToo victims.
The congresswoman, a perennial target for Republicans, was
among the Democrats who called
on their colleague Rep. John
Conyers Jr. (Mich.) to resign after
he was accused last fall of serially
harassing female staff members.
“For too long, the culture in
Washington has accepted entirely unacceptable behavior,” Esty
said in a statement in November
after anti-harassment training
became mandatory for House
offices. “That needs to change —
period.”
Esty provided The Washington
Post with a copy of her agreement
with Baker, which included multiple secrecy provisions, a draft
recommendation letter and his
severance terms. The document
provides a rare look at a contract
signed by a lawmaker and a
departing senior staffer facing
possible scandal, the result of a
process that at no point sought a
formal response from Kain.
In response to questions, Esty
expressed remorse for her handling of Baker’s situation. She
said she was pressured by the
Office of House Employment
Counsel to sign an NDA, a process that she said delayed Baker’s
departure. She said she was
working within a system that
appeared designed to shield
members who had misbehaved,
not those trying to dismiss problematic aides.
“Clearly that’s what it’s all set
up to do — to protect the member
of Congress whose bad behavior
caused the problem,” Esty said.
“It felt wrong to me. . . . When
I’m reading the documents and
these drafts, it kept going
through my mind, ‘This is not
right. This is not what happened.’ ”
Gloria Lett, lead counsel with
OHEC, declined to comment,
writing in an email that her office
does not respond to media inquiries. She referred questions to the
Committee on House Administration.
The committee said in a statement that OHEC “serves to provide advice to House employing
offices on employment policies
and practices” and that “ultimately, each member makes the
final decision for how a case
against the office is handled and
an employee’s employment sta-
tus.”
The statement said the committee “does not review any employment decisions” and “is not
involved in the advice that OHEC
provides.”
According to both sides, Kain
and Baker met in Esty’s office
following her 2012 election. They
dated casually in 2013 before
being promoted to senior adviser
and chief of staff, respectively, in
early 2014.
According to Kain’s petition
for a restraining order, Baker
punched her in the back and
“repeatedly screamed” at her in
Esty’s office while threatening to
retaliate professionally if she reported his behavior. She did not
tell Esty or the House Ethics
Committee out of fear for her
safety, her petition stated.
Kain told The Post that she was
so anxious about imperiling her
boss’s chance of reelection that
she removed her cellphone from
the House’s WiFi network so that
she could privately look up how
to report misconduct to the Ethics Committee.
“I was 24 and doing a job that I
believed in for an institution I
was proud to be a part of,” Kain
said Thursday in an interview.
“But I was being severely abused
and had nowhere to turn. Nobody talked about things like
this. I was suffering and thought
it was weakness.”
On May 5, 2016, Baker called
Kain approximately 50 times and
said he would “find her” and “kill
her,” she alleged in the petition.
Ricci disputed that Baker
punched Kain but did not challenge her other allegations. He
said that Baker was too intoxicated at the time to remember
leaving the message and that he
offered to resign after Esty
learned what had happened. The
congresswoman said Baker never
offered his resignation.
Baker was barred from working out of Esty’s Capitol Hill
office starting on July 24, 2016,
according to the separation
agreement, which required Esty
to serve as a reference in his job
search outside of Washington. A
draft letter of recommendation
from Esty that was attached to
the agreement praised his “considerable skills.”
Baker accompanied the congresswoman to the Democratic
National Convention in Philadelphia from July 25 to 28 before
sending a departing email to
colleagues on Aug. 12.
A spokeswoman for Sandy
Hook Promise declined to comment on Baker’s departure this
week.
Esty said she plans to advocate
for greater accountability in how
congressional offices are managed.
“I hope in the course of all of
this we’re pulling the curtain
back in a way that will make the
institution truly better than it is
now,” she said.
Kain urged the Senate to approve legislation to better protect
its staffers, in line with recent
changes to House policy.
“I just want people working on
the Hill and going through this to
know that it’s real, it’s a problem
and nothing about it is okay,” she
said.
elise.viebeck@washpost.com
FRIDAY, MARCH 30 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A13
SU
Economy & Business
DOW 24,103.11
UP 254.69, 1.1%
NASDAQ 7,063.44
UP 114.22, 1.6%
S&P 500 2,640.87
UP 35.87, 1.4%
GOLD $1,327.30
DOWN $2.70, 0.2%
CRUDE OIL $64.94
UP $0.56, 0.9%
Breaking down job growth by presidential vote
How job growth since 2008 would look if you divided the nation into five
equal labor forces, based on how counties voted in presidential
elections — all figures are 12-month averages
How 2017 job growth compared to 2015-2016 with those same five
equal labor forces, grouped by Trump’s vote share in 2016
12%
Job growth in the 20% of counties where Trump
got the lowest share of the vote in 2016
Second-lowest 20%
Middle 20%
Next-highest 20%
8
June
2008,
12-month
average
4
0
20152016 2017*
Average job growth
By Trump’s share of the vote in 2016
Trump’s
vote
share in
2016
election
20% of counties
where Trump’s share of the
vote was highest
Top 20%
(1,955 counties)
Second-highest
(643)
Middle 20%
(233)
Second-lowest
(185)
Lowest 20%
(125)
0%
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
0
0.5
pct. pts.
The same growth calculation, but with counties simply ranked by
Trump’s share of the vote in 2016 and not adjusted for population
’10
’12
’14
’16
’18
By Romney’s share of the vote in 2012
Difference from
2015-2016 to 2017
2015-2016* 2017*
County rank
By shift from Romney to Trump
Top 200**
Counties where
Romney voters shifted
away from Trump
12%
200-400
400-600
8
Higher
Trump
vote
share
4
600-800
800-1,000
1,000-1,200
1,200-1,400
1,400-1,600
0
1,600-1,800
−4
−8
2008
Where voters shifted toward Trump
’10
’12
’14
’16
’18
’08
’10
’12
’14
’16
’18
*All years are counted from February of one year to January of the next to account for the
month of a president’s inauguration.
**Some county rank groupings vary in size because of voting ties
Lower
Trump
vote
share
1,800-2,000
2,000-2,200
2,200-2,400
2,400-2,600
2,600-2,800
2,800-3,000
3,000+
−0.5%
0
0.5
1.0
Note: Some counties have been grouped or excluded for consistency. All boroughs in Alaska have
been given the statewide figure.
1.5
0
0.5
pct. pts.
1.0
ANDREW VAN DAM/THE WASHINGTON POST
Sources: Labor Department, Dave Leip’s Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections
A surprising rebound in Trump territory
BY
A NDREW V AN D AM
As he ran for president, Donald
Trump promised to lift up regions
of the country that had been left
behind by the economy. “I want to
go into the neglected neighborhoods, the failing schools, the forgotten stretches of this nation, and
unlock their potential for all of our
people,” he said in September 2016.
The argument proved persuasive — many of the nation’s most
economically distressed regions
voted for Trump.
Now the early returns are in: In
the first year of the Trump presidency, places that voted for Trump
are doing better economically than
at the end of the Obama administration. But that is not totally surprising, because the overall economy has continued to add jobs.
What may be more surprising
is that not only are these counties
adding jobs, but also job growth
has accelerated the most in counties where Trump earned the
most votes, according to a Washington Post analysis of Labor Department data.
In other words, even if the counties that supported Trump most are
still struggling relative to the rest of
the country, they’ve experienced
the largest reversal of fortune.
It’s too soon to declare victory,
however, and the current set of
gains may well be short-lived.
But for now, the data indicate
that the 10 percent of Americans
living in counties that gave Trump
the most support in 2016 saw
average job growth of 0.6 percent
in 2015-2016. They saw job growth
of 1 percent in Trump’s first year.
Expand to counties that were
home to the top 20 percent of his
Job growth accelerates fastest in areas where he
won the most votes, but sustainability is suspect
supporters — places where he got
60.6 percent of the vote or higher
— and the acceleration was a still
perceptible 0.2 percentage points.
Meanwhile, the 10 percent of
people living in counties that
showed little support for Trump —
which tend to do better economically overall — saw job growth slow
slightly, going from 1.9 percent in
2015-2016 to 1.7 percent in 2017.
The broader top 20 percent of
anti-Trump counties saw job
growth effectively stagnate.
(We’re
measuring
February through January of each year,
because presidents begin their tenures Jan. 20.)
Economists broadly agree that
a politician’s ability to create jobs
in the short term is overblown.
(The exception is a large spending
bill, such as the 2009 fiscal stimulus, but that did not occur in 2017.)
And Trump hasn’t yet had time to
fully see the effects of long-term
policy that might bring sustained
growth to rural America. He initiated a process of regulatory overhaul and passed tax cuts at the
end of the year, but any gains from
those policies probably won’t
show up in the 2017 figures.
It’s
nonetheless
possible
Trump’s victory has contributed
at least in part to the faster improvement in regions where residents voted for him most.
That’s because economic expectations of Republicans turned
drastically more positive after
Trump’s election. Those higher expectations alone might nudge
growth rates upward as people are
more willing to spend and invest,
said Jed Kolko, chief economist at
the job-search site Indeed.com.
“The industries that have seen a
rebound . . . tend to lean red,”
Kolko said.
It’s not just expectations
According to government data,
six industries are overwhelmingly
concentrated in Trump territories:
mining, support activities for mining and oil and gas extraction,
livestock production, logging, and
the manufacturing of textiles and
wood products.
The prominence of mining and
its support services on that list, in
particular, hints as to why those
territories are doing better.
Oil and commodity prices collapsed in the second half of 2014,
driven by slowing global demand,
and U.S. production plummeted.
Counties that depended on mining
and drilling shed jobs throughout
2015 and 2016.
“In some of these smaller areas, the economy outside of oil
and gas is growing pretty slow,”
said Jason Brown, assistant vice
president and economist at the
Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas
City. “When oil prices declined by
over 70 percent between 2014
into 2016, oil and gas activity
declined pretty quickly in areas
that were less productive.”
Oil and commodity prices
crawled up off the floor in 2017 as
global economic growth picked up
pace and, more importantly, production started to recover. Companies became more efficient and
shifted their efforts to more costeffective wells and regions. As
Brown explains, production, not
price growth, leads most directly to
jobs in the industry.
The return of mining and petroleum-related jobs goosed growth
rates in Trump’s favor. The list of
counties that bounced back the
most last year is dominated by
mining towns and shale basins,
from Wyoming and South Dakota
to Texas, Oklahoma and even parts
of Appalachia.
It’ll be tough to sustain
Oil, gas and mining are cyclical,
but at least cycles include, by
definition, some upswings. As the
U.S. economy continues a long
structural shift toward industries
and services that tend to be focused in urban areas, it’s one of
the few rural industries that can
foster a 2017-like boost.
Of the six industries that are
most concentrated in Trump territory, the Labor Department estimates five will lose jobs over the
coming decade. Just one — oil, gas
and mining support activities — is
expected to grow.
So while 2017 was relatively
strong, the rural areas that supported Trump most lack the underlying economic structure to overcome the ever-present head winds
of an aging population and receding industries.
“The trend over the past year or
so is, in many ways, the opposite of
what has — and will probably
return to be — the longer-term
trend,” Kolko said.
andrew.vandam@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/wonkblog
10-YEAR TREASURY
UP $3.60 PER $1,000, 2.74% YIELD
CURRENCIES
$1=106.42 YEN; EURO=$1.230
Facebook is now so good
at mining your data, it’s
ditching partner firms
BY
−4
−8
2008
Difference from
2015-2016 to 2017
D REW H ARWELL
Facebook was for years a best
friend to the data brokers who
make hundreds of millions of dollars a year gathering and selling
Americans’ personal information.
Now, the world’s largest social
network is souring that relationship — a sign that the company
believes it has overshadowed
their data-gathering machine.
Facebook said late Wednesday
that it would stop data brokers
from helping advertisers target
people with ads, severing one of
the key methods marketers used
to link users’ Facebook data about
their friends and lifestyle with
their offline data about their families, finances and health.
The data brokers, critics say,
stealthily
contributed
to
the seemingly all-knowing creepiness of Facebook users seeing ads
for things they never mentioned
on their pages. A marketer who
wanted to target new mothers, for
instance, could use the data brokers’ information to send Facebook ads to all women who
bought baby formula with a store
rewards card.
Acxiom, Experian and other
data brokers once had a prized
seat at Facebook’s table, through a
program called Partner Categories, that allowed advertisers to
tap into the shadow profiles crafted with Facebook’s and brokers’
data to drill down on their target
audience. The data brokers got a
cut of the money when the ads
they helped place turned into a
sale, and Facebook also shared
some data with the brokers to
help gauge how well its ads performed.
Facebook said in a statement
that it will wind down that program over the next six months,
which “will help improve people’s
privacy on Facebook.” But privacy
experts saw the move as an assertion of dominance from the social
network, which in recent years
has consolidated its power over
an increasingly intimate level of
detail about its users’ lives —
and wants advertisers to pay for
its expertise.
“Facebook is officially in the
data-mining business,” said Joel
Winston, a privacy lawyer in Pittsburgh. “It’s a definitive signal that
Facebook’s data capture and identity-targeting technology is lightyears ahead of its competitors’.”
The move comes as Facebook
battles a major privacy scandal in
the wake of revelations that a
political data firm, Cambridge
Analytica, improperly obtained
data on more than 30 million
Facebook users. The company has
in recent days outlined steps
showing how users can see and
limit what Facebook knows about
them, following what chief executive Mark Zuckerberg called a
“major breach of trust.”
In 2015, Facebook restricted
the kinds of data that outside
developers could gather from users and their friends. Christopher
Wylie, Cambridge Analytica’s
whistleblower, told The Washington Post that Cambridge Analytica had paired Facebook data with
information from data brokers to
build out its voter profiles.
A year earlier, the Federal
Trade Commission issued a report finding that data brokers had
collected information on nearly
every American and that
they “operate with a fundamental
lack of transparency.” But the social network continued to
strengthen its ties with the data
brokers.
While Facebook gathers much
of its 2 billion users’ online information, the data brokers attempt
to scoop up everything else, including billions of bits of information from voter rolls, property
records, purchase histories, loyalty card programs, consumer surveys, car dealership records and
other databases.
The brokers use that raw data
to build models predicting (with
varying success) many hundreds
of details about a customer, which
they then sell to marketers and
major conglomerates seeking a
vast and targeted customer
base — including on Facebook,
which now accounts for a fifth of
the world’s online ads.
Acxiom, the Arkansas-based
broker that has worked with Facebook since 2013 and reported
more than $880 million in revenue last year, estimated Facebook’s ditching of its data-sharing
program would carve as much as
$25 million from the company’s
revenue and profit. “Today, more
than ever, it is important for businesses to be able to rely upon
companies that understand the
critical importance of ethically
sourced data and strong data governance. These are among Acxiom’s core strengths,” chief executive Scott Howe said in a statement. Its stock plunged more
than 30 percent Thursday morning.
Representatives for Experian
did not respond to questions, and
Oracle Data Cloud declined to
comment.
Data brokers’ models are often
intricately and oddly detailed:
Acxiom has categorized people
into one of 70 “household life
stage clusters,” including “CareerCentered Singles” and “Soccer
and SUVs.” But advertisers wanting more information —
served straight from the source,
in the person’s own words — have
increasingly turned to Facebook,
where they can grab first-party
data from the actual customer
and not just third-party data gathered and analyzed from afar.
Facebook and the data brokers
have often dealt in the same kinds
of personal information. Experian, for instance, runs a Newborn
Network that sells advertisers detailed information, gleaned from
personal spending and demographic data, of women they predict are new and expectant mothers; the company says it “captures
more than 80 percent of all U.S.
births.” But Facebook users also
freely share baby photos and
mark their life events — a more
direct way of relaying the same
information to sellers of baby formula, cribs and maternity clothes.
drew.harwell@washpost.com
Elizabeth Dwoskin contributed to this
report.
More at washingtonpost.com/
technology
DIGEST
BANKING
Barclays settles with
U.S. for $2 billion
After a three-year
investigation, the Justice
Department said Thursday that
it had reached a $2 billion
settlement with Barclays, a giant
British bank that federal
prosecutors say sold toxic
mortgages that contributed to
the global financial crisis.
Prosecutors say that between
2005 and 2007 Barclays sold
investors packages of mortgages
that were worth less than the
bank claimed, costing investors
billions of dollars. More than
half of the $31 billion in
mortgage packages eventually
defaulted, prosecutors said.
The settlement “is an
important step in recognizing
the harm that was caused to the
national economy,” Richard P.
Donoghue, U.S. attorney for the
Eastern District of New York,
said in a statement.
But for Barclays, the deal may
be a triumph. The $2 billion
penalty could have been much
bigger, industry analysts say. The
bank also didn’t have to admit
wrongdoing.
Barclays is paying much less
than some other big banks who
have faced similar allegations
had to pay. In 2013, JPMorgan
Chase paid $13 billion. In 2014,
Bank of America agreed to a
record-setting $16 billion
settlement. Deutsche Bank paid
$7 billion earlier this year.
General Data Protection
Regulation, which kicks in
May 25, Apple said.
Apple also updated operating
systems for iPhones, iPads, Macs
and Apple TVs on Thursday.
Apple’s new Web-based
privacy options will be released
in Europe in early May, and will
come to other countries later.
— Bloomberg News
— Renae Merle
TECHNOLOGY
Apple updates privacy
controls under law
Apple is revamping privacy
controls for its devices and cloud
services to comply with strict
new European rules.
The iPhone maker said it will
update its Web page for
managing Apple IDs in coming
months to let users download a
MOHD RASFAN/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Chuan Kee, 77, changes a wristwatch battery at his clock shop in
Bentong, Malaysia, near Kuala Lumpur.
copy of all their data stored with
the company. The site will also
let customers correct personal
information, temporarily
deactivate their account and
delete it. The new privacy
controls are designed to comply
with the European Union’s
ALSO IN BUSINESS
Under Armour said Thursday
that data from about 150 million
MyFitnessPal diet and fitness
app accounts was compromised
in February, sending shares of
the athletic apparel maker down
3 percent in after-hours trading.
The stolen data includes account
user names, email addresses and
scrambled passwords for the
popular MyFitnessPal mobile
app and website. Social Security
numbers, driver’s license
numbers and payment card data
were not compromised, it said.
Electric-carmaker Tesla is
recalling 123,000 sedans
worldwide to fix a problem with
the power-assisted steering. The
recall covers all Model S sedans
built before April 2016. Five bolts
holding the power-steering
motor in place can corrode and
either come loose or break,
possibly causing a loss of power
steering. Manual steering would
still work. Service centers will
replace the bolts with ones that
are more corrosion-resistant.
The family of a woman killed by
an Uber self-driving vehicle in
Arizona has reached a settlement
with the ride-services company,
ending a potential legal battle
over the first fatality caused by
an autonomous vehicle. Arizona
attorney Cristina Perez Hesano
said “the matter has been
resolved” between Uber and the
daughter and husband of Elaine
Herzberg, 49, who died after
being hit by an Uber self-driving
SUV while walking across a
street in Tempe on March 18.
— From news services
A14
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30 , 2018
THE MARKETS
6 Monitor your investments at washingtonpost.com/markets
Data and graphics by
Daily Stock Market Performance
Index
Dow Jones Industrial Average
27,250
Close
YTD
% Chg
24,103.11
+1.1
–2.5
25,500
23,750
22,000
20,250
Nasdaq Composite Index
7600
Commodities
S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot
Daily
% Chg
7063.44
+1.6
+2.3
Industry Group
Internet Software & Svcs
Metals & Mining
Semiconductors & Semi Eqp
Construction & Engineerng
Communications Equipment
Diversified Telecomm
REITS
Tobacco
Health Care Providers
Health Care Technology
Daily
% Chg
0
–4.0%
+4.0%
3.34
3.28
2.80
2.72
2.71
0.00
–0.14
–0.31
–0.64
–1.09
6400
5800
2640.87
S&P 500 Index
+1.4
–1.2
2900
2700
2500
2300
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D
J
F
M
Americas
Brazil (Bovespa)
Canada (S&P/TSX Comp.)
Mexico (Bolsa)
Europe
Eurozone (DJ Stoxx 600)
France (CAC 40)
Germany (DAX)
U.K. (FTSE 100)
Asia Pacific
Australia (ASX 200)
China (CSI 300)
Hong Kong (Hang Seng)
Japan (Nikkei)
Close
Daily
% Chg
85,365.56
15,367.29
46,124.85
1.8
1.3
–1.4
370.87
5167.30
12,096.73
7056.61
0.4
0.7
1.3
0.2
5759.37
3894.05
30,093.38
21,159.08
–0.5
1.3
0.2
0.6
YTD % Chg
–15%
0%
+15%
3M Co
AmExp
Apple Inc
Boeing
Caterpillar
Chevron Corp
Cisco Systems
Coca-Cola
DowDuPont Inc
Exxon Mobil
GE
GoldmnSchs
Home Depot
IBM
Intel Corp
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
219.52
93.28
167.78
327.88
147.38
114.04
42.89
43.43
63.71
74.61
13.48
251.86
178.24
153.43
52.08
1.4
1.2
0.8
2.5
1.5
1.7
3.0
0.3
2.1
2.5
–1.5
1.0
2.0
0.6
5.0
–6.7
–6.1
–0.9
11.2
–6.5
–8.9
12.0
–5.3
–10.5
–10.8
–22.8
–1.1
–6.0
0.0
12.8
Company
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
Microsoft
Nike
P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
United Tech
UnitedHealth
Verizon
Visa Inc
WalMart
Walt Disney
128.15
109.97
156.38
54.47
91.27
66.44
79.28
35.49
138.86
125.82
214.00
47.82
119.62
88.97
100.44
0.5
1.8
–1.3
–1.1
2.1
1.5
0.6
0.5
0.1
1.1
–2.1
–0.4
2.2
1.4
1.9
–8.3
2.8
–9.1
–3.2
6.7
6.2
–13.7
–2.0
2.4
–1.4
–2.9
–9.7
4.9
–9.9
–6.6
Cross Currency Rates
US $
US $ per
EU € per
EU €
Japan ¥
Britain £
Brazil R$
Canada $
1.2300
0.0093
1.4022
0.3027
0.7760
0.0550
0.0076
1.1400
0.2460
0.6309
0.0447
0.8130
Japan ¥ per 106.4200
130.8900
Britain £ per
0.7131
0.8771
149.2110
0.0067
Mexico $
32.2117
82.5810
5.8535
0.2158
0.5534
0.0392
Brazil R$ per
3.3037
4.0637
0.0310
4.6329
Canada $ per
1.2887
1.5851
0.0121
1.8070
0.3900
2.5636
Mexico $ per
18.1800
22.3647
0.1710
25.4969
5.5030
0.1816
0.0709
14.1068
Consumer Rates
Daily % Chg
1.3
1.1
1.1
–12.7
Index
Close
DJ Total Stock Market Index 27,383.00
Russell 2000
1529.43
Post-Bloomberg DC Area Index 554.20
CBOE Volatility (VIX)
19.97
YTD % Chg
–1.0
–0.4
2.0
80.9
+0.8
+3.8
+0.9
–0.2
+1.3
Orange Juice
Silver
Soybeans
Sugar
Wheat
Exchange-Traded
Coffee (COFF.L)
Copper (COPA.L)
Corn (CORN.L)
Cotton (COTN.L)
Crude Oil (CRUD.L)
Gasoline (UGAS.L)
Gold (BULL.L)
Natural Gas (NGAS.L)
Silver (SLVR.L)
Daily
(Ticker) % Chg
Close
Daily
% Chg
$1.4110
$16.27
$10.4475
$0.1235
$4.5100
0.0
+0.1
+2.6
+1.1
+1.2
day
month
$1100
$1000
$900
0.1
0.9
0.5
–0.2
0.5
0.3
–0.6
1.4
0.1
Gainers
Unit Corp
Movado Group Inc
American Public Edu
Energizer Holdings
Vicor Corp
AMAG Pharma
Pioneer Energy Svcs
Sci Applications
Diebold Nixdorf Inc
Centene Corp
AppliedOptoelctrncs
Callon Petroleum Co
AK Steel Holding
HighPoint Resources
Ultra Clean
Lannett Co Inc
Chemours Co
Marathon Oil Corp
Worthington Indst
WPX Energy Inc
Daily
Close % Chg
$19.76
$38.40
$43.00
$59.58
$28.55
$20.15
$2.70
$78.80
$15.40
$106.87
$25.06
$13.24
$4.53
$5.08
$19.25
$16.05
$48.71
$16.13
$42.92
$14.78
21.1
15.7
12.4
12.4
9.8
8.6
8.0
7.5
7.3
6.5
6.0
5.9
5.8
5.8
5.8
5.6
5.4
5.3
5.3
5.2
Losers
Close
Acxiom Corp
$22.71
Quorum Health Corp
$8.18
GameStop Corp
$12.62
Cloud Peak Energy
$2.91
DHI Group Inc
$1.60
NVR Inc
$2800.00
CBL & Associates
$4.17
Francesca's
$4.80
Cal-ME Foods
$43.70
Alliance Data Sys
$212.86
Dress Barn Inc
$2.01
Comty Health Sys
$3.96
Sanderson Farms
$119.02
TangerFactoryOutlet
$22.00
Walgreen
$65.47
Select Medical
$17.25
RoadrunnerTrans Sys
$2.54
FutureFuel Corp
$11.99
Cato Corp
$14.74
La-Z-Boy Inc
$29.95
Daily
% Chg
–19.0
–12.7
–10.8
–9.3
–8.6
–6.0
–5.2
–4.6
–4.2
–4.1
–3.8
–3.6
–3.4
–3.3
–3.1
–3.1
–3.1
–2.8
–2.8
–2.8
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Interest Rates
Other Measures
Daily
% Chg
Gainers and Losers from the S&P 1500 Index
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
Company
Close
$3.0255
$3.8775
$64.94
$1,327.30
$2.73
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
7000
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
0.35
0.54
0.80
1.66
3.49
6.06
4.75%
Bank Prime
1.75%
Federal Funds
2.31%
LIBOR 3-Month
4.28%
30-Year fixed mortgage
3.70%
10-year note
Yield: 2.74
2-year note
Yield: 2.27
5-year note
Yield: 2.56
6-month bill
Yield: 1.91
15-Year fixed mortgage
3.79%
1-Year ARM
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
Give Your Deck a Makeover!
SPRING SPECIAL
FREE
$
300
%
60
Value 2nd
Rail Color
RESTORE Option
t4BOEBMM%FDLCPBSET
t3FTFU/BJMT&MJNJOBUF4QMJOUFST
t3FQMBDF3PUUFEPS%BNBHFE8PPE
t"QQMZ$PBUT$PMPS&OIBODFE4FBMFS
REPLACE Option
t3FNPWFPMEEFDLCPBSET
t3FNPWFPMESBJMTBTOFDFTTBSZ
t*OTUBMMOFXLJMOESJFEXPPEEFDLJOH
t"QQMZ$PBUT$PMPS&OIBODFE4FBMF
UPGRADE Option
t3FNPWFPMEEFDLCPBSET
t3FNPWFPMESBJMTBTOFDFTTBSZ
t*OTUBMMOFXNBJOUFOBODFGSFFDPNQPTJUFEFDLJOH
t*OTUBMMOFXNBJOUFOBODFGSFFWJOZMSBJMT
Plus
OFF
Materials!*
* Restoration Only
DECK
WIZARD
RESTORE YOUR DECK LIKE MAGIC
'BTUt&BTZt"GGPSEBCMF
Schedule Your FREE ESTIMATE TODAY!
877.926.1283
www.deckwizard.com
72 Years of Integrity
Deck Wizard is a division of
Wheaton Door and Window,
one of the oldest remodeling
companies on the East Coast.
Established in 1945.
FRIDAY, MARCH 30 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A15
RE
Trump’s
latest trade
target:
Rwanda
U.S. used-clothing
industry says African
nation shuts out products
BY
LUCY NICHOLSON/REUTERS
As the Trump administration tries to fulfill the president’s promise to relax regulatory burdens on Detroit, some automakers are concerned that a rollback would result in a
two-tiered system, with California imposing stricter requirements than the rest of the country. California says it will forge ahead on its own if limits are significantly eased.
Trump o∞cials debate fuel-e∞ciency goals
Carmakers say rolling
back Obama-era limits
could fracture market
BY J ULIET E ILPERIN
AND B RADY D ENNIS
Top Trump administration officials are engaged in a heated
debate over how to undo federal
fuel-efficiency targets for cars
and light trucks, as manufacturers voice concern that a major
rollback of an Obama-era rule
could go too far and fracture the
nation’s auto market.
The internal negotiations over
relaxing carbon-emissions limits
for cars and SUVs slated to be sold
in model years 2022 to 2025 underscore the challenge officials
face in trying to fulfill President
Trump’s 2017 promise to ease the
regulatory burden on Detroit.
Some of the same companies
that pressed for action worry that
they will be forced to comply with
two standards: the stricter specifications that California imposes
on its massive auto market and a
separate requirement for the rest
of the country.
Within the next few days, several administration officials say,
the Environmental Protection
Agency will announce that it has
concluded that automakers cannot meet the fuel-efficiency
guidelines set by the previous
administration. Those require
cars and light trucks to average
more than 50 miles per gallon
overall by 2025.
But the more difficult issue is
what the replacement will be — a
point of intense wrangling
among the EPA, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
and White House. The talks have
been complicated by the fact that
California sets the pace for nearly
35 percent of the nation’s auto
market, with tailpipe requirements followed by a dozen states
and the District.
California has threatened to
press ahead on its own if the
administration weakens the federal targets significantly, prompting some automakers to lobby for
the current standards to mainly
be kept. The current federal requirement for the 2018 model
year is 38.3 mpg. By 2025, it
would rise to roughly 51 mpg.
On Tuesday, Ford Motor Co.
Executive Chairman Bill Ford and
CEO Jim Hackett wrote a Medium post calling for “one set of
standards nationally, along with
additional flexibility” that would
allow Ford to sell lower-emissions
vehicles that U.S. consumers
could afford.
“We support increasing cleancar standards through 2025 and
are not asking for a rollback,” they
wrote.
A separate statement came
Thursday from Honda, which
urged the government for additional “flexibilities” for automakers to meet the requirements,
“without a reduction in overall
stringency.”
Honda continued: “These policy options help minimize costs to
automakers and ultimately consumers. This balanced approach
could succeed in satisfying key
objectives of EPA, California and
industry, and retain the one na-
tional program concept which is
important to all.”
Auto executives plan to meet
soon with EPA Administrator
Scott Pruitt to discuss the potential new standards. General Motors CEO Mary Barra already met
with Pruitt and Transportation
Secretary Elaine Chao.
Margo Oge, a former senior
EPA official who helped to negotiate the Obama administration’s
guidelines with California and
the auto industry, said that multiple companies have privately
shared the concerns that Ford
raised publicly. Rather than
change the 2025 thresholds, the
automakers want more options
for meeting them given the significant sums manufacturers have
already invested.
“I don’t think they were expecting that the Trump administration would roll back the standards” to the degree now likely,
Oge said. “Sometimes you dance
with the devil, then you don’t
really like the dance.”
Officials at the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, whose
members produce 70 percent of
the cars and light trucks sold in
the United States, say low gasoline prices in recent years have
created a disconnect between
what sort of vehicles federal policymakers expect to be sold and
what Americans are buying. Alliance
spokeswoman
Gloria
Bergquist noted that the government had previously predicted
that future sales would be twothirds cars and one-third light
trucks, while the current ratio is
the reverse.
“We’re caught between these
standards and the marketplace,
and they’re not aligning,”
Bergquist said.
Within the administration,
NHTSA Deputy Director Heidi
King has repeatedly pressed for a
significant reduction in future
mileage levels. The agency has
offered a range of numbers in
negotiations, according to individuals who spoke on the condition of anonymity because no
final decision has been reached,
with the lowest proposal being
34.5 mpg by 2025.
On Wednesday, the agency unveiled a proposed rule that would
freeze the civil penalties automakers must pay if their fleets fail
to meet federal fuel-efficiency requirements. The fine had been
slated to rise to $14 from $5.50 for
every tenth of a mile per gallon by
which companies missed the
standards for 2019 vehicles.
NHTSA spokeswoman Karen
Aldana said officials are working
on a fuel-efficiency-standards
package, which she said she cannot discuss until it is “final and
publicly released.”
Bill Wehrum, assistant administrator for the EPA’s Office of Air
and Radiation, and White House
energy and environment adviser
Michael Catanzaro have continued to talk with California officials about the prospect of a compromise — but have yet to show
them any specific proposal or the
supporting data and analysis, according to the California Air Resources Board.
“We have not seen the document in question, and California
had no input into its content,”
board spokesman Stanley Young
said in an email. “We feel strongly
that weakening the program will
waste fuel, increase emissions
and cost consumers more money.
It’s not in the interest of the
public or the industry.”
California Attorney General
Xavier Becerra (D) said the state
has no intention of backing
down on its plans to increase
fuel-efficiency goals over time:
“We’re prepared to take whatever
action, legal or otherwise, that we
must to protect our economy, our
environment and the public
health of people of California.”
Beyond the health and climaterelated benefits of more-stringent emissions standards, he noted, many businesses in California
and elsewhere already have made
major investments in preparing
to build vehicles that meet the
guidelines set under the Obama
administration.
“We’re not interested in participating in a race to the bottom,”
Becerra said.
Pruitt has taken a harder line
against California’s autonomy in
recent months. Asked by Sen.
Kamala D. Harris (D-Calif.) in a
January hearing whether he
would promise to continue to
grant the state’s waiver under the
federal Clean Air Act, which allows it to put stricter standards in
place, Pruitt declined, vowing
only to “review” the issue.
In the weeks since, he has said
in media interviews that California should not be able to dictate
standards for the rest of the nation and that the state is “not the
arbiter of these issues.”
EPA spokeswoman Liz Bowman said officials there “value all
feedback.”
juliet.eilperin@washpost.com
brady.dennis@washpost.com
Netflix seeks Cannes’s prestige, but film fest says ‘non, merci’
Streaming service wants
to woo tastemakers and
future customers
BY
S TEVEN Z EITCHIK
Organizers of the Cannes Film
Festival last week said they will be
making good on a 2017 promise to
ban Netflix films from their main
competition. Netflix opposes traditional theatrical runs for its
films, a practice that contradicts
Cannes’s policy.
Could that hurt the streaming
company, which wants to win the
awards game even as it seeks to
play outside its rules?
Last year, Netflix made a big
Cannes foray. It had two competition entries, “Okja” and “The
Meyerowitz Stories,” and threw
several splashy parties. It set up a
media home base just steps from
the vaunted ritzy Boulevard de la
Croisette.
Netflix did so even as it criticized its host for not embracing
the company. “Establishment
closing ranks against us,” chief
executive Reed Hastings wrote on
Facebook last year after organizers said there would be no more
Netflix movies in competition at
future festivals. There was an air
of tension at the festival as a
result, and it appears to have carried over to this year.
“The intransigence of their
model is now the opposite of
ours,” festival director Thierry
Frémaux told the Hollywood Reporter last week. A Cannes
spokeswoman referred The Washington Post to a clause in festival
bylaws outlining the new theaterrequirement policy.
Netflix thirsts for the prestige
that Cannes or the Oscars confers
on films. It paid more than
$10 million each to acquire
“Beasts of No Nation” and “Mudbound,” dark dramas designed to
win prizes. This winter, Netflix
spent millions on the awards campaign for “Mudbound.” The movie
would go on to earn several Oscar
nominations, but Netflix has yet
to persuade Oscar voters to hand
one of its narrative films a statuette. (It has won several prizes in
lower-profile documentary categories.)
Netflix engages in all this activity because it hopes to woo the
kinds of tastemakers that can cement a prestige film brand. But if
it’s at war with an institution like
Cannes, that could pose a challenge on several fronts.
The streaming service has
snagged top filmmakers thanks to
budgets that are routinely higher
than those offered by studio counterparts. It is producing movies
from such filmmakers as Martin
Scorsese, Noah Baumbach and
J.C. Chandor — part of a bid,
under film chief Scott Stuber, to
produce as many as 80 movies per
year.
But money may go only so far.
Continuing to attract filmmakers
without the blessing of Cannes
juries or Oscar voters could be
tough. In an interview last week
with ITV News, Steven Spielberg
called Netflix films, with their lack
of theatrical distribution, “TV
movie[s],” the latest in a series of
disses from blue-chip directors.
“I don’t believe that films that
are just given token qualifications, in a couple of theaters for
less than a week, should qualify
for the Academy Award nominations,” Spielberg said as he alluded to movies Netflix sought
awards for despite playing them
almost exclusively online.
But it’s also consumers Netflix
has in mind with its prestige
branding.
Much like HBO, Netflix relies
on a certain seal of quality to get
people to fork over money every
month. Without a chance at something like Cannes’s Palme d’Or,
regarded as global cinema’s brass
ring, it could have a harder time
making the case to new subscribers. This is especially true internationally, where the Palme has a lot
of cachet and where Netflix hopes
to substantially grow. For subscribers, Netflix’s algorithm offers
recommendations based on signals from other viewers of how
much they liked a show or movie.
Netflix is under pressure from
Amazon to define itself as the
most prestigious streaming company, said a film veteran who
spoke on the condition of anonymity so as not to be viewed as
critical of a potential partner.
Amazon already beat Netflix to
the punch with “Manchester by
the Sea,” which won the first major Oscar for a streamer, for original screenplay, last year. (The film
went on to win a second Oscar, for
best actor.) Netflix doesn’t want to
be known as the “mediocre” home
of commercial movies like “The
Cloverfield Paradox” and Adam
Sandler comedies, this person
said.
“Cannes remains the ultimate
tone-setting prestige festival,” he
noted. “If you want to remain a
premium service that the most
affluent consumers consider a
must-subscribe, you need to be
able to play in the game.” (Cannes,
incidentally, allows Amazon movies in competition because it
opens films in theaters; the service has had several.)
The trickiness of Netflix’s goal
— winning over the establishment
while adopting an anti-establishment tack on theaters — is not lost
on its executives.
“We have to work harder to be
accepted,” its chief content officer,
Ted Sarandos, told The Post several weeks ago, before the controversy reignited. He said one way
around it was via creative persuasion. “Our films just have to be
that much more undeniable,” he
said. A Netflix spokeswoman declined to comment for this story.
For its part, Cannes has long
been a standard-bearer of deep
industry tradition; it embraces its
country’s unusually long 36month window between theatrical and secondary releases, for
instance. The festival serves as de
facto leader of an old guard that
believes in the supremacy of the
cinematic experience.
In fact, the Netflix comments
come as part of a larger effort by
Frémaux to roll back a digital tide.
He revealed last week that he will
seek to stop the social-mediadriven phenomenon of red-carpet
selfies and make a move that
would essentially stop critics from
tweeting before gala premieres as
well.
In the long run, many pundits
think Cannes can’t win this staring contest, especially as more
high-end films arrive from other
theater-agnostic streamers. But
the festival isn’t blinking yet, forcing Netflix to hold on to its philosophy but not a Palme d’Or.
steven.zeitchik@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
technology
D AVID J . L YNCH
President Trump said Thursday that he will soon suspend
Rwanda’s participation in a program that allows African countries to export apparel to the
United States on a duty-free basis,
citing the country’s refusal to permit U.S. exports of used clothing.
The latest sign of Trump’s uncompromising trade policy follows a petition from the U.S.
used-clothing industry, which
complained in March 2017 that
Rwanda and three other African
nations were introducing a ban
on foreign-made used clothing
and footwear.
The imposition of steep tariffs
was “already having an impact on
exports of secondhand clothing
from the United States to Kenya,
Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda,”
the Secondary Materials and
Recycled Textiles Association
(SMART) told the U.S. trade representative last summer.
Rwanda raised its per-kilogram import tax in 2016 from
20 cents to $2.50, amounting to “a
de facto ban on our industry,” the
trade group said in its complaint.
The East African trade barriers
were responsible for the loss of
24,000 jobs, the trade group said.
Including used clothing and footwear shipped to Africa via third
countries, total sales of $124 million were at risk.
U.S. officials began talks with
the East African countries during
the Obama administration. But
with the exception of Kenya,
which announced an about-face
on the tariffs last year, the barriers remained in place, prompting
the complaint from U.S. industry.
After a review, the U.S. trade
representative agreed that the
import ban “harms the U.S. used
clothing industry and is inconsistent” with rules set out in the
African Growth and Opportunity
Act (AGOA). Participating countries are required to adhere to a
market economy and move
toward the “elimination of barriers to U.S. trade and investment.”
The trade representative’s finding led to Thursday’s letter from
the president to Congress announcing his intention to suspend Rwanda from the program
in 60 days. Tanzania and Uganda
escaped sanction by committing
to drop the import limits.
The decision to suspend Rwanda came “despite intense engagement” with the Rwandan government, Trump wrote.
Unlike other countries that
Trump has targeted in his trade
offensive, the United States runs a
small surplus on its goods trade
with the poor African country. In
2017, U.S. exports to Rwanda were
worth $66.1 million and imports
were valued at $43.7 million, for a
surplus of about $22.4 million.
Still, Trump’s move is not unprecedented. President Barack
Obama suspended South Africa’s
participation in AGOA two years
ago in a dispute over bone-in
chicken parts.
“This kind of thing happens
more than one would think. . . .
It’s a relatively small way to ping
smaller countries with which we
have some small, specific trade
disputes,” said William Reinsch, a
former Commerce Department
official. “It almost always leads to
a negotiation and a resolution of
the issue.”
Indeed, Trump told Congress
that he had decided to suspend
rather than terminate Rwanda in
hopes that the dispute can be
resolved.
The program began in 2000
under the Clinton administration
as a way of promoting economic
development in some of Africa’s
poorest countries. “One hope of
AGOA was labor-intensive manufacturing would move into these
countries,” said Mary Lovely, an
economics professor at Syracuse
University.
Trump’s decision may hurt economic development in Rwanda,
where annual per capita income
is around $700. The economy
grew last year at a 6.1 percent rate
and was expected to accelerate to
7 percent to 8 percent over the
next two years, according to the
International Monetary Fund.
“It is our hope that Rwanda
will reconsider their position on
banning secondhand clothing
imports as it will impose unnecessary economic harm to its
people,” said Jackie King,
SMART’s executive director.
david.lynch@washpost.com
A16
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30 , 2018
Nike moves to transform in-store experience with promotion of new shoe
Brand uses virtual reality
in some stores in China
as it tries to boost sales
BY
R ACHEL S IEGEL
Hopping on a treadmill may
seem like the definition of running in place, but with virtual
reality, Nike is taking some runners past the Great Wall of China
and the Statue of Liberty.
To promote the new Nike React
Flyknit running shoe, the brand
teamed with longtime advertising partner Wieden+Kennedy
Shanghai to launch an interactive
video game in which shoppers,
after lacing up their sneakers,
become characters in the world of
“Reactland.” Customers create avatars of themselves and navigate
through the game’s forests and
rooftops while jogging (in real
life) on a treadmill for three
minutes.
Nike hopes the experience,
which was open for a few weeks
this month, will sell players on
the light and bouncy design of its
shoe. Yet the brand’s use of virtual
reality also reinforces the importance of technology for retailers
looking for innovative ways to
boost brick-and-mortar sales.
“The realm between digital
and physical will continue to
blend or merge to enhance the
in-store customer experience,”
said Ellen Schmidt-Devlin, executive director and co-founder of
the sports product management program at the University
of Oregon’s Lundquist College of
Business. “It allows the customer
to further engage with a brand,
hopefully moving them further
along in the purchase funnel.”
The Nike video game is available in China at some stores in
Shanghai, Beijing, Guangzhou
and Chengdu. Players scan their
photos to create an avatar. Then
they jog while holding a small
remote that helps their characters jump on top of trains or the
ocean-blue rooftops of Santorini,
Greece. The longer runners last,
the higher they appear on the
leader board. Once their three
minutes are up, players are given
a 10-second video of their run to
share on social media.
“Technology helps people look
at the sport different and gives
people a different access point,”
said Ilana Finley, a communications director for Nike. “For those
who feel like they’re not runners
or they could never go out and
run a 5K or a 10K, it gives them a
chance to experience the sport in
a way that meets them in the
place that they are.”
Matt Powell, vice president and
senior sports industry analyst for
the NPD Group, said the key for
brands is to have customers “experience the product.” In Nike’s
case, that includes showing shoppers how a shoe feels “without
actually having to get out on the
road and run it.”
More often, Powell said he notices companies use virtual reality to market items that, in real
life, fill space — like a couch that
has to fit into a room. But he said
this was the first time he had seen
the technology used to promote
footwear.
Schmidt-Devlin said virtual reality is still a limited option for
retailers, in part because of the
high cost of developing the experience. Still, the North Face, the
National Basketball Association
and the Olympics have used virtual reality for marketing, she
said.
In a video of “Reactland” posted by Wieden+Kennedy Shanghai, a woman laces up her crisp,
white sneakers and leads her
avatar through a panda forest
and past the Great Sphinx of Giza.
As her character zips through
Times Square, the woman hoists
her arms in the air in celebration.
Her avatar has just crossed the
finish line.
rachel.siegel@washpost.com
NIKE
Nike hopes to sell the light and bouncy design of its React Flyknit.
“The realm between digital and physical will
continue to blend or merge to enhance the in-store
customer experience.”
Ellen Schmidt-Devlin, University of Oregon’s Lundquist College of Business
Amazon is once again in Trump’s Twitter crosshairs
President says retailer
pays too little in taxes,
abuses Postal Service
BY
A BHA B HATTARAI
President Trump once again
lashed out at Amazon.com, the
online retailing giant, on Thursday morning, saying he has long
had concerns about the company’s business practices.
Trump has periodically criticized Amazon before and since
becoming president. Jeffrey P.
Bezos, the founder and chief
executive of Amazon, owns The
Washington Post.
Trump tweeted Thursday:
“I have stated my concerns
with Amazon long before the
Election. Unlike others, they pay
little or no taxes to state & local
governments, use our Postal System as their Delivery Boy (causing tremendous loss to the U.S.),
and are putting many thousands
of retailers out of business!”
Trump’s latest critique comes
after Amazon’s stock took a hit
Wednesday following the publication of a report in Axios that
Trump was “obsessed” with the
retail giant, according to a person interviewed by the publication. Shares fell more than 4 percent on Wednesday and continued their tumble Thursday, falling more than 3.8 percent in
morning trading.
Some of Trump’s claims about
Amazon have not been based on
complete information. Amazon,
for example, does collect taxes on
products it sells to customers in
the 45 states with a sales tax.
TODD MCINTURF/DETROIT NEWS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Amazon employees move bins at the loading dock of the company’s fulfillment center in Livonia, Mich.
Items sold by third-party vendors, however, may have different arrangements. The company has also said it supports
legislation that would require
other online retailers to pay state
and local sales taxes.
Amazon and the U.S. Postal
Service declined to comment on
Trump’s tweet Thursday.
Trump’s use of social media to
call out people and companies
has been unprecedented for a
president.
His other Twitter targets have
included Apple, Boeing and General Motors, as well as media
outlets including The Washington Post, the New York Times
and CNN.
The president has long been
vocal with his disapproval of
Amazon.
Trump has frequently complained about Amazon and Bezos
to his friends, according to people who have spoken with the
president.
For example, at a dinner last
month at his Mar-a-Lago resort
with Fox News personality Geraldo Rivera and the president’s
adult sons, Donald Jr. and Eric,
Trump brought up Amazon and
said it should pay more in taxes,
according to a person familiar
with the dinner.
In December, Trump attacked
the company’s arrangement with
the U.S. Postal Service and called
on the agency to raise the shipping rates it charges Amazon.
“Why is the United States Post
Office, which is losing many
billions of dollars a year, while
charging Amazon and others so
little to deliver their packages,
making Amazon richer and the
Post Office dumber and poorer?”
he tweeted. “Should be charging
MUCH MORE!”
His tweets about the Postal
Service reflect a debate about
whether the agency is charging
Amazon and other retailers
enough to deliver packages.
Parcel delivery has become an
increasingly important part of
the Postal Service’s business as
first-class mail has been on a
long-running decline.
Amazon’s partnership with
the Postal Service is reviewed
annually by the Postal Regulatory Commission, an oversight
agency that also sets the rates
that Amazon pays for shipping.
Last year, the Postal Service
reported a loss of $2.7 billion and
revenue of $69.6 billion.
Earlier in his presidency,
Trump tweeted that “Amazon is
doing great damage to tax paying
retailers. Towns, cities and states
throughout the U.S. are being
hurt — many jobs being lost!”
Before becoming president,
Trump criticized Amazon’s “monopolistic tendencies” and said
the company could face “a huge
antitrust problem” because
“Amazon is controlling so much.”
The retailer, which last year
had $177.9 billion in revenue, has
more than half a million employees worldwide.
The company purchased
Whole Foods Market for
$13.7 billion last year, in a deal
approved by the Federal Trade
Commission.
Trump has also suggested that
The Post is “a lobbyist weapon
against Congress to keep Politicians from looking into Amazon
no-tax monopoly.”
The Post’s editors and Bezos
have said that Bezos is not involved in any journalistic decisions.
The Post is owned by Bezos
personally, not by Amazon.
abha.bhattarai@washpost.com
Josh Dawsey contributed to this
report.
After delaying Obama’s nutrition rules, Trump’s FDA is embracing them
BY
C AITLIN D EWEY
The Trump administration will
encourage the food industry to
reduce the salt in processed foods
and will take steps to overhaul
some food labels to make them
easier to understand, Food and
Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb announced
Thursday.
The FDA will also move forward
Labeling requirements
for menus, food products
will move forward
with Obama-era plans to require
calorie labeling on restaurant
menus and new “Nutrition Facts”
panels on food products, two rules
the agency had delayed.
The wait had alarmed consumer watchdogs and public health
advocates, who have long feared
that nutrition would suffer under
a White House that has championed industry deregulation and
criticized concerns about child
obesity. But in a speech that
seemed designed to signal that
nutrition is still a priority at President Trump’s FDA, Gottlieb said
Financing
As Low As
99
$
Per Month
Complete Bathroom Remodeling
Ready To
Remodel?
Superior Service | Years of Experience
Winter
Special!
FREE 8 Jet
Body Massager
or $1,000 OFF
Limited time offer.
Other restrictions may apply.
FREE Consultation | FREE Design | FREE Estimates
703-468-1540 VA | 301-841-8322 MD | 202-794-9033 DC
MHIC #125450 | DC #67004413 | VA #2705 108835A | WVA #036832
his agency would launch a comprehensive, multiyear package of
nutrition initiatives this summer,
with the goal of tackling health
conditions such as obesity and
heart disease.
“I’m committed to advancing
our work in nutrition as one tool to
help reduce health disparities and
improve the lives of all Americans,” Gottlieb told a gathering of
industry representatives, consumer watchdogs and academics
in Washington.
The FDA initiatives announced
Thursday are part of what Gottlieb
has termed the agency’s “Nutrition Innovation Strategy.” Many of
them continue programs begun
under the Obama administration,
such as menu labeling and sodium
reduction.
In 2016, for instance, the FDA
announced plans to nudge the
food industry toward cutting salt,
releasing voluntary two-year and
10-year sodium reduction targets
for more than 150 foods, including
snacks and frozen pizza.
Those plans stalled over objections from the food industry officials and some lawmakers in Congress who have argued that it is
difficult to cut salt from recipes
and that the science on sodium
and health is unsettled. Earlier
this month, the Salt Institute, an
industry group, asked the FDA to
reconsider that science as it develops the 2020 Dietary Guidelines
for Americans.
But on Thursday, Gottlieb signaled loudly that the agency
would work to reduce sodium in
the food supply, calling salt reduction the “single [most] effective
public health action related to nutrition.” The FDA will release new,
short-term sodium reduction targets in 2019, Gottlieb said, and will
continue to advocate for longer-
term reductions to prevent health
conditions linked to overly salty
diets, such as high blood pressure.
The FDA is committing to other
Obama-era policies, as well. On
May 8, Gottlieb said, chain restaurants and grocery stores will be
required to display calorie and
other nutrition information on
their menus, following a one-year
delay the agency granted at the
behest of industry last year, shortly after Trump took office.
Foodmakers will also have until
January 2020 to roll out the new
Nutrition Facts panel, including
information about added sugars
and emphasizing calorie counts in
bold letters. The FDA had delayed
the panel, championed by former
first lady Michelle Obama, after
industry groups complained they
did not have enough time to make
the changes. But Gottlieb implied
that there would be no further
extensions, noting that some food
companies have already rolled out
the new panels. “Consumers are
starting to have access to an updated label that’s based on current
science and provides more information to empower them to
choose healthful diets,” he said.
Gottlieb is also considering new
nutrition policies. The agency
is debating a voluntary, front-ofpack labeling system, the commissioner said, that would give consumers clearer information about
a product’s healthfulness.
The FDA is also evaluating
food manufacturers’ use of health
and science marketing claims, including the term “healthy,” and
will seek to make ingredient information clearer, Gottlieb said. And
the agency may revisit its regulations on the content of processed
foods to make it easier for companies to make their recipes more
healthful. Current rules require
that cheese contain a certain
amount of sodium, for instance,
which makes salt reduction difficult.
Gottlieb emphasized that many
of the new initiatives are designed
to nudge food companies to voluntarily make their products healthier and to reward the ones that do
so. That differs slightly from the
approach under the Obama administration, experts in the audience said, but they described
themselves as relieved that the
Trump FDA appears to be pursuing similar goals.
Margo Wootan, vice president
for nutrition at the Center for Science in the Public Interest, has
criticized the FDA’s delays on
menu labeling and the Nutrition
Facts panel, as well as a decision by
Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue to delay scheduled sodium
reductions in school lunches.
Some advocates have also criticized the FDA for discontinuing
its Food Advisory Committee in
December. The independent panel advised the agency on emerging
food safety and nutrition issues.
Others have accused the agency
of giving some companies a pass
on added-sugar labels, allowing
them to explain in small print why
products such as maple syrup and
cranberry juice have such high
added-sugar numbers.
But on Thursday, Wootan said
she was “encouraged.”
“This commissioner does seem
to have an interest and understanding of the importance of nutrition,” Wootan said. “ ‘Progressive’ is a relative term, but I think
[he is], compared to what we’re up
against in other agencies.”
caitlin.dewey@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
wonkblog
FRIDAY, MARCH 30 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A17
RE
The Sahara is expanding, thanks in part to climate change
south toward the poles. It
does not sink until it is over the
subtropics, but as it does, the air
warms and dries out, creating
deserts and other areas that are
nearly devoid of rain.
“Climate change is likely to
widen the Hadley circulation,
causing northward advance of
the subtropical deserts,” Nigam
said in a statement that announced the study.
At the same time, he added, the
Sahara’s southward creep suggests that additional mechanisms
are at work, as well. One is probably the natural climate cycle
called the Atlantic Multidecadal
Oscillation, or AMO, in which
temperatures over a large swath
of the northern Atlantic Ocean
fluctuate between warm and cold
phases for 50 to 70 years. The
warm cycles deliver precipitation
to subtropical areas, and the cold
cycles keep it away. Human-
caused climate change can increase the intensity and length of
the drier cycle.
Nigam and the study’s lead
researcher, Natalie Thomas, a
doctoral candidate at the University of Maryland, used data from
the Global Precipitation Climatology Center to arrive at their
findings. They studied grids and
patterns from 1920 to 2013, mixing in satellite data compiled
“over the last three decades,”
Nigam said.
They determined that the
AMO was in a positive phase that
delivered more rain to areas near
the Sahara from the 1930s to the
early 1960s. It then switched to a
negative cycle that lasted 40
years. A 1980s drought — “the
most intense . . . of the 20th century” — was attributed to the
latter phase and linked to “higher
levels of greenhouse gases in the
atmosphere.”
Over the second phase, the
Sahara crawled south mostly, encroaching on a more tropical area
known as the Sahel. Its effect
could be seen on a water basin
that drains into Lake Chad.
“The water level has been falling precipitously,” Nigam said.
“It’s very depleted. We can’t attribute it all to rainfall. There may
be human draws from the lake.
But it’s telling, a visible element,
and it clearly lies in the area
where the Sahara is encroaching
southward.”
Africa is the continent least
responsible for human-caused
climate change, but it’s the most
vulnerable to its effect because
housed at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural
History.
Interior Department officials
sought to shutter it as a way to
trim the department’s overall
budget. Several academics and
scientific societies protested the
move, saying the unit’s staff provided access to key specimens that
shed insight on critical scientific
questions, including on how ecological conditions changed over
more than a century in the West
and elsewhere in North America.
New USGS budget documents
show that the agency will keep the
division intact at least until
Sept. 30, the end of the current
fiscal year, as it devises a plan to
transfer its responsibility to the
Smithsonian Institution. The
Smithsonian serves as the official
repository for the collection and
jointly manages it.
“The Survey is directed to formulate a transition plan with the
Smithsonian Institution regarding the curation of the Institution’s collection for which the Survey is currently responsible,” the
documents state.
A USGS spokeswoman confirmed Thursday that the Biological Survey Unit will continue operating until the end of the fiscal
year.
Researchers welcomed the
temporary stay of execution but
warned that it did not address
larger questions about the future.
Robert S. Sikes, president of the
American Society of Mammalogists, said in an email that the
plan to close the division “and
transition its collections to the
Smithsonian is shortsighted.”
“Such a move curtails core
work by the Unit’s scientists and
will undoubtedly limit use of collection materials by researchers
at a time when dwindling populations of so many species is headline news,” said Sikes, a biology
professor at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock.
He noted that the society’s lead-
Scientists say the world’s
largest desert has crept
south in recent years
BY
D ARRYL F EARS
Earth’s largest hot desert, the
Sahara, is getting bigger, a new
study finds. It is advancing south
into more tropical terrain in
Sudan and Chad, turning
green vegetation dry and soil
once used for farming into barren ground in areas that can least
afford to lose it.
Yet, it is not just the spread of
the Sahara that is frightening, the
researchers say. It’s the timing:
The growth is happening during
the African summer, when
there is usually more rain. But the
precipitation has dried up, allowing the boundaries of the desert
to expand.
“If you have a hurricane come
suddenly, it gets all the attention
from the government and communities galvanize,” said Sumant
Nigam, a professor of atmospheric and oceanic science at the
University of Maryland and the
senior author of the study. “The
desert advance over a long period
might capture many countries
unawares. It’s not announced like
a hurricane. It’s sort of creeping
up on you.”
The study was published
Thursday in the Journal of Climate. The authors said that while
their research focused only on the
FADEL SENNA/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Camels walk in the Sahara on March 1. A new study says the Sahara’s growth suggests that other
deserts around the world might also be widening, which could have harsh economic consequences.
Sahara, it suggests that climate
changes also could be causing
other deserts to expand — with
potentially harsh economic and
human consequences.
Deserts form in subtropical
regions because of a global
weather circulation called the
Hadley cell. Warm air rises in the
tropics near the equator, producing rain and thunderstorms.
When the air hits the top of the
atmosphere, it spreads north and
USGS unit receives a
short stay of extinction
BY
J ULIET E ILPERIN
The 133-year-old Biological
Survey Unit, scheduled to be
closed this year, has gotten a short
reprieve from the budget ax, according to documents obtained
by The Washington Post.
The U.S. Geological Survey,
which oversees the division, had
planned to close it this spring. The
unit, which has a $1.6 million
Division overseeing
animal specimens was
to be closed in spring
annual budget and six employees, helps maintain nearly a million bird, reptile and mammal
specimens and historic field notes
Top 10 Things To Do When
Replacing Your Roof:
of unique features. It is, for example, a land mass almost evenly
divided between the Southern
and Northern hemispheres,
creating a wide variety of climate zones.
Thomas said she started the
research as a way to characterize
century-long trends but focused
on Africa’s Northern Hemisphere
when she noticed “really strong
trends over the proximity of the
Sahara.”
As the researchers went about
their work, downloading satellite
data and information from the
global climatology center, the evidence became more concerning.
“The finding was impressive
because it was happening in
the summer season, the growing
season where Africa receives
most of its rainfall, a really important season for agriculture,”
Nigam said.
Yet, that is when the greatest
southward advance of the Sahara
occurred, he said. A season of rain
was being replaced by the expansion of a desert, without the
affected governments, Chad and
Sudan mostly, noticing.
The future implications for
countries already affected by lack
of rain and drought could be dire,
Nigam said. “Water resource
planning, water use and longterm planning is important.”
ers had written the Smithsonian a
year ago about its curatorial staff
for mammals being underfunded
and lacking the number of experts
needed to provide researchers
sufficient access to the collections.
“Now the size of those collections will double while staff
shrinks,” he said. “These specimens are irreplaceable spatial
and temporal records whose value continues to grow as science
devises new ways to glean data
from them.”
darryl.fears@washpost.com
Angela Fritz contributed to this
report.
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/energy-environment
juliet.eilperin@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/energy-environment
ARCHITECTURAL
SHINGLES
SCALLOPED
EDGE
1. Call Long Roofing
ASPHALT
SHAKES
(We’ll take care of the other 9!)
J
50 Year Full Replacement
Value Warranty
J
J
FREE
GUTTERS!
Select ShingleMaster Earned by
Only 1% of the Nation’s Roofers
with Roofing Purchase
DESIGNER
SLATE
Licensed, Bonded, Insured MHIC 51346, VA 2705048183A,
DC 67006785, PA 115431. Expires 5/25/18. Valid initial
Traditional Asphalt Shingles,
Architectural, Designer & Luxury
Styles, and Flat Roofing
visit only. Min. purchase required. Cannot be
combined with other offers.
FREE ESTIMATES
DESIGNER
PREMIUM
SHINGLES
844-427-LONG (5664)
LongRoofing.com
We build Trust and Peace of Mind
into every Long Product
Cal
l
5RR Long
ÀQJ
LUXURY
SHINGLES
A18
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30 , 2018
PowerPost
INTELLIGENCE FOR LEADERS WASHINGTONPOST.COM/POWERPOST
Ryan isn’t going anywhere — for now
House Speaker
Paul D. Ryan isn’t
about to retire
PAUL KANE
anytime soon.
Take it from two
men who know him well and are
quite familiar with the burdens
of political leadership.
“The idea that he’s going to
walk out of there in the middle of
the fight is ludicrous,” said John
A. Boehner, Ryan’s predecessor.
“Absolutely not,” said Eric
Cantor, the former majority
leader. “The notion that Paul
Ryan is just going to abdicate
and leave is preposterous.”
Boehner and Cantor, speaking
in separate telephone interviews
Wednesday, were reacting to the
latest speculation about Ryan’s
future, after a rank-and-file
Republican told local Nevada
media that the Wisconsin
Republican would resign within
60 days.
The comments drew a terse
rebuttal from Ryan’s aides — “the
speaker is not resigning” — but
they amplified the suspicions
among some House Republicans
that Ryan has one foot out the
door.
Ryan is only 48 years old, but
he has been in office 20 years. He
never really wanted the top job
and was drafted into the post.
His biggest policy goal, an
overhaul of the tax code, ended
in victory in December.
And, not to be forgotten, Ryan
is not personally close to
President Trump, with operating
styles that are essentially night
and day.
All this has created a strange
buzz among lawmakers and on
K Street that Ryan might just
leave midterm rather than wait
for the November elections.
To Boehner (R-Ohio) and
Cantor (R-Va.), the idea is
blasphemy, both because of
Ryan’s sense of duty and what it
would say about the Republican
chances in November.
“It would be a signal of
surrender,” Cantor said, speaking
from his Washington office of
Moelis & Company, the New
York-based investment bank
@PKCapitol
In GOP primaries, loyalty
to Trump is measured
only in the extremes
Michigan
Attorney General
Bill Schuette is
running two
JAMES
commercials right
HOHMANN
now. One
highlights the
endorsement he’s received from
President Trump in the race for
governor. The other attacks his
Republican primary opponent,
Lt. Gov. Brian Calley, for calling
on Trump to drop out after the
“Access Hollywood” tape
emerged in October 2016.
“With the White House and
the Supreme Court hanging on
the line, Brian Calley deserted
Donald Trump — helping Hillary
Clinton’s campaign,” a narrator
says.
In the 2005 tape, Trump
boasted in lewd terms about
being able to get away with
groping and kissing women. He
also discussed an effort to
seduce a married woman by
taking her furniture shopping.
“When you’re a star, they let you
do it,” the future president said
on a hot mic. “You can do
anything.”
At the time, Calley said he’d
write in Mike Pence’s name on
his ballot if Trump didn’t step
aside. “This is not a decision I
take lightly because I still believe
that a Hillary Clinton presidency
represents a disastrous
alternative,” he said then.
Schuette also condemned Trump
but didn’t withdraw his
endorsement.
Naturally, none of that nuance
comes through in the 30-second
commercial. Calley has the
strong endorsement of outgoing
Gov. Rick Snyder (R), who also
declined to vote for Trump in
2016, ahead of the Aug. 7
primary.
The escalation in Michigan’s
air war mirrors what’s
happening in other
gubernatorial, House and Senate
primaries across the country.
Fealty to Trump has become
more of a litmus test than ever
for Republicans. Emboldened by
private polling and focus groups
that show the president is
incredibly popular with the base,
GOP candidates are stepping up
attacks on their rivals over any
daylight they’ve shown with
Trump, even if it stemmed from
his personal conduct toward
women or apostasy on
traditional conservative
orthodoxy. It’s another
illustration of the degree to
which Trumpism has come to
define the Republican Party.
This is no longer the party of
Abraham Lincoln, Ronald
Reagan or George W. Bush. It’s
the party of Donald Trump.
Support for Trump has also
become one of the biggest flash
points in the Ohio Republican
primary for governor. Lt. Gov.
Mary Taylor has intensified her
attacks on Attorney General
Mike DeWine, the heavy favorite
in the May 8 contest to succeed
outgoing Gov. John Kasich.
The pro-Taylor super PAC,
Onward Ohio, has spent heavily
over the past week to run a
commercial contrasting DeWine
with Trump. “If you like
President Trump, then you won’t
like Mike DeWine,” a narrator
says. “In the Senate, DeWine
voted with Hillary Clinton to let
illegal immigrants receive Social
Security. And in Ohio, DeWine
allowed illegal immigrants to
receive driver’s licenses. . . .
DeWine backs unfair trade with
China and received an F from
the NRA. President Trump is
right on immigration, guns and
China. Mike DeWine: wrong on
all three.”
The pro-DeWine super PAC,
Ohio Conservatives for a
Change, has been sending
mailers highlighting Taylor’s
endorsement of Kasich during
the 2016 Republican primaries.
(Never mind that DeWine and
Taylor endorsed Kasich together
in September 2015.)
Taylor has distanced herself
from Kasich, whom she’s served
under for the past eight years, as
he continues to flirt with a
potential run against the
president in 2020. The outgoing
The
Daily 202
MELINA MARA/THE WASHINGTON POST
House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) is “going to be the leader of the team all the way through the
election,” his predecessor, John A. Boehner, said after rumors started swirling about an early exit.
where he now works.
“Paul’s a stand-up guy,”
Boehner said from his condo in
Marco Island, Fla.
The former speaker says Ryan
is so valuable to House
Republicans — their most
prolific fundraiser, their chief
spokesman and a respected
colleague in most corners of the
fractious caucus — that an early
departure would likely propel
other GOP lawmakers to head
for the exits, before a brutal
midterm election.
“He’s going to be the leader of
the team all the way through the
election,” Boehner said.
Since the start of World War
II, just three speakers have left
office midterm: Boehner, who
spared his caucus from an
internal insurrection; Jim
Wright (D-Tex.), who resigned
amid an ethics scandal in 1989;
and Sam Rayburn (D-Tex.), who
died in 1961.
After the elections, it’s
anyone’s guess as to what Ryan
will do. Neither Boehner nor
Cantor, who both occasionally
speak to Ryan, professed any
inside knowledge about his
intentions for next year.
If Republicans hold the
majority, Ryan might step aside
as speaker and go out on a
political high note, having
passed the tax overhaul in 2017
and defended the majority in
2018. It’s possible that he could
be talked into sticking around if
there is a clear, achievable policy
goal.
One thing most insiders agree
on is that Ryan has little interest
in serving as minority leader
should Republicans lose the
majority.
“He’ll do what’s best for him,
for Janna,” Cantor said, referring
to Ryan’s wife. She is likely at the
center of a very small circle of
advisers who will guide this
decision, or maybe even a circle
of one.
“Nobody else,” Boehner
predicted.
Never Clean Your
®
Gutters Again
Gutter Protection
Spring Extravaganza
18% OFF
*
Monthly Payments as low as $49**
CALL before April 30th!
Get a permanent maintenance-free solution
Tested to handle up to 22 inches of rain per hour
Triple lifetime NO clog performance warranty
FREE Estimates
Senior & Military Discounts Available
888-417-0653
*Min. purchase required, offer expires 4/30/18. Offer applies to Gutter Helmet only and must be presented at time of estimate, cannot be combined with any other offers and subject
to change without notice. Void where prohibited by law **Subject to credit approval, fixed APR of 9.99% for 96 months. Lednor is neither a broker nor a lender. Financing is provided
by 3rd party lenders, under terms & conditions arranged directly between the customer and such lenders, satisfactory completion of finance documents is required. Any finance
terms advertised are estimates only. †Based on an independent 2014 national marketing study. MD MHIC #48622 - VA #2705036173 - DC#420218000007 © 2018 Lednor
Corporation.
“The notion that Paul
Ryan is just going to
abdicate and leave is
preposterous.”
Eric Cantor, former House majority
leader from Virginia
When he made his original
retirement plans, Boehner clued
in only three aides, who had
been with him more than 20
years. Boehner wanted to serve
four years, through the 2014
elections.
By that spring, the House was
rife with rumors about his
future. Cantor had lined up
plenty of support to succeed
Boehner and had made peace
with some of Boehner’s close
allies, who often felt the majority
leader was too ambitious.
Even in detente, Boehner did
not let Cantor in on his plans.
The moment word leaks that a
speaker is retiring, he becomes a
lame duck with little clout to
keep the caucus unified.
When did Cantor learn of
Boehner’s intentions? “Only after
I lost my primary,” Cantor
recalled Wednesday.
In one of the biggest upsets in
congressional history, Cantor
lost to David Brat in the June
2014 primary. Boehner joked to
Cantor about how this upended
his retirement plans and he was
going to stay on as speaker a bit
longer to groom the next
generation of potential leaders.
That turned out to be Ryan,
who after weeks of GOP gridlock,
when no one could secure the
necessary 218 votes, succeeded
Boehner in October 2015. The
outgoing speaker, a fellow
Catholic, had applied every bit of
religious pressure to get Ryan to
stand up for the job — even
getting Cardinal Timothy Dolan
of New York, a faith adviser to
Ryan, to urge him to take the
post.
That ambivalence about the
speaker’s gavel makes Ryan
different from any other of the
modern era. Everyone else saw
the job as their career ambition,
but not Ryan. That’s partly why
there is always speculation that
he could just walk away at any
moment.
Ryan’s handling of questions
about his future also fuels
speculation. In January, on CBS’s
“Face the Nation,” he did not
commit to filing for reelection in
his southern Wisconsin district.
“That’s something that my
wife and I always decide in late
spring of the election year,” Ryan
said. Now that it’s spring, with a
June 1 deadline to run, the
rumors are kicking up again.
But Cantor expects Ryan to
run for reelection, knowing that
retirement would spark a
divisive six-month leadership
election to succeed him. When
he lost to Brat, Cantor could have
stayed on another six months
and finished his term as majority
leader, but he said that would
have divided Republicans
through nasty internal
leadership elections.
He quit his leadership post
immediately and resigned from
office seven weeks after the loss.
In the past 30 years, speakers
have bowed out because of ethics
charges, internal rebellion or the
loss of the majority. How should
Ryan plan his exit to avoid that
fate?
“I’m not in the advice
business,” Boehner said.
paul.kane@washpost.com
governor will hold a “fireside
chat” at New England College in
New Hampshire on April 3. A
poll published last week by
Baldwin Wallace University
showed Trump crushing Kasich
in Ohio, 62 percent to 27
percent, in a hypothetical 2020
head-to-head matchup.
One reason Republican
candidates are leaning so hard
into the Trump loyalty issue is
that it proved quite potent last
year in Virginia. Corey Stewart,
despite having no real
establishment support and
being dramatically outraised,
came within about a point of
toppling former Republican
National Committee chairman
Ed Gillespie in the June primary
for governor. Stewart chaired
Trump’s 2016 campaign in
Virginia and referred to
Gillespie as “anti-Trump” in his
ads.
In Tennessee, where there’s a
four-way race for the GOP
gubernatorial nomination, Rep.
Diane Black has been on the air
this month with a spot built
around footage of Trump
praising her at the signing
ceremony for the tax-cut bill in
December. “Helping write the
president’s tax cut was one of my
proudest moments,” the
congresswoman says.
In Pennsylvania, the two GOP
candidates for governor are
trying to outdo each other in
who can praise Trump more.
State Sen. Scott Wagner, a
wealthy businessman, paid for
20,000 Trump lawn signs during
the summer of 2016. “While
many political leaders refused to
support Donald Trump, Scott
Wagner was leading the charge,”
says a Wagner mailer that’s been
going to Republican households.
Businessman Paul Mango,
who spent his career at
McKinsey and hasn’t run for
office before, says “there’s a lot of
similarity between the
president’s agenda and my
agenda.”
“I absolutely love the
president and what he’s doing,”
he said in a radio interview last
fall. “I just have to give the guy
all the credit in the world for
fighting these Democrats.”
The Trump loyalty test is also
taking center stage in Senate
GOP primaries.
Indiana Rep. Todd Rokita
released a web video on Tuesday
attacking his opponent, Rep.
Luke Messer, as a “Never Trump
lobbyist.” The narrator describes
Rokita as “a pro-Trump
conservative.” They are vying to
take on Sen. Joe Donnelly (D) in
a state Trump carried by 19
points.
In House primaries,
Republicans are also using TV
ads to emphasize their devotion.
The North Carolina rematch
between Rep. Robert Pittenger
and Mark Harris has become
one of the most acrimonious in
the country. Both men are
accusing the other of
exaggerating their support for
Trump. Harris lost by just 134
votes in 2016, so he decided to
run again. Last month, Pittenger
ran a commercial that said,
“Mark Harris worked to stop a
Trump presidency.” The citation
was an interview he gave
supporting Ted Cruz before the
convention in Cleveland. This
week, Harris released a response
ad decrying it as “more lies”
from “just another Washington
politician.” It notes that
Pittenger falsely claimed that
Trump had endorsed him on
Twitter when he had not.
On Staten Island, felon and
former congressman Michael
Grimm (R-N.Y.) — who served
time in prison for tax evasion —
is trying to win back his old seat
by waging a primary challenge
against his successor. The
central rationale of his
campaign: The incumbent, Dan
Donovan, has not backed up the
president enough on health care,
taxes, “sanctuary cities” and the
border wall. Grimm even said
during an appearance on Fox in
January that he’s “willing to die”
for Trump.
james.hohmann@washpost.com
One reason Republican candidates are leaning
so hard into the Trump loyalty issue is
that it proved quite potent last year
in Virginia.
FRIDAY, MARCH 30 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A19
RE
washington forum
Don’t mess with the census
MAX BOOT
We’re prepping
for the
wrong war
BY
C
A
fter the Vietnam War, the U.S. military deliberately set out to forget
everything it had learned about the
brutal and unpleasant business of
fighting guerrillas. The generals were operating under the assumption that if they
didn’t prepare for that kind of war, they
wouldn’t be asked to fight it. The emphasis
in the 1980s and 1990s, even after the
collapse of the Soviet Union, was on fighting
conventional, uniformed adversaries. That
worked out well in the 1991 Gulf War but left
the U.S. armed forces tragically ill prepared
for the post-9/11 wars in Afghanistan and
Iraq.
I fear that history may be about to repeat
itself. In discussing my new book about the
legendary Vietnam-era covert operative Edward Lansdale, I have been visiting military
installations, including the Army War College, Fort Benning, the Naval Postgraduate
School and the Pentagon. And everywhere I
go, I hear that the military is switching its
focus from counterinsurgency to conventional conflict.
This is in keeping with Defense Secretary
Jim Mattis’s National Defense Strategy,
which states: “Inter-state strategic competition, not terrorism, is now the primary
concern in U.S. national security.” Mattis
concedes that “threats to stability remain as
terrorist groups with long reach continue to
murder the innocent and threaten peace
more broadly,” but he is more exercised
about the threats from “revisionist powers”
(Russia, China) and “rogue regimes” (Iran,
North Korea).
His analysis makes sense on a certain
level, given that all those anti-American
countries are expanding their military capabilities. But low-intensity conflict isn’t going
away. It’s been around since the dawn of
time (tribal warfare is essentially guerrilla
warfare), and it will remain a major threat
despite the Islamic State’s loss of its caliphate.
While we still face terrorist and guerrilla
threats, we also confront unconventional
challenges from countries such as China,
Iran and Russia that wage what is known as
“asymmetric,” “gray-zone” or “hybrid” warfare. As the National Defense Strategy notes:
“In competition short of armed conflict,
revisionist powers and rogue regimes are
using corruption, predatory economic practices, propaganda, political subversion,
proxies, and the threat or use of military
force to change facts on the ground.”
Russia is particularly adept at this type of
warfare. Special counsel Robert S. Mueller
III indicted, and the Treasury Department
imposed sanctions on, the Internet Research Agency in St. Petersburg for its
successful efforts to subvert the 2016 election. At virtually the same time, Russian
mercenaries working for a private firm
called the Wagner Group attacked a U.S.
base in Syria, suffering heavy losses from
American air power.
The Internet Research Agency and the
Wagner Group are owned by the same man:
Yevgeniy Prigozhin, a Russian oligarch who
is known as President Vladimir Putin’s
“chef” because he got his start running
restaurants. Prigozhin wouldn’t go to the
bathroom without Putin’s permission, but
the fact that he is not a government employee gives the Kremlin “deniability” in
carrying out its aggression. By employing
“little green men” in Ukraine and in Syria,
Putin has expanded his sway while minimizing the risk of World War III.
The Russian dictator has brought a similarly canny, covert-action mind-set to his
influence operations in Europe and the
United States. He has backed Russophile
leaders such as Trump, Silvio Berlusconi in
Italy and Viktor Orban in Hungary, while
sowing dissent and confusion in Western
societies. Mueller’s indictment details how
Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort
paid a group of European politicians —
reportedly including former Austrian chancellor Alfred Gusenbauer — $2.5 million to
lobby on behalf of a pro-Russian government in Ukraine.
There’s nothing wrong with rebuilding
the United States’ conventional combat capacity. By all means, buy more fighter
aircraft and navy ships. Spend more time
training with artillery and tanks. Those
weapons are needed to maintain deterrence
and keep the peace. But don’t imagine that
all this firepower will keep us safe. The
United States urgently needs to upgrade its
defenses against hybrid warfare.
Countries such as Sweden and Italy are
working to combat Russian election interference by educating citizens about “fake
news” and closing loopholes that hackers
can exploit. (Even so, pro-Russian populists
won the recent Italian election.) But Adm.
Michael S. Rogers, outgoing head of U.S.
Cyber Command, told Congress that he
hasn’t been granted enough authorities to
fight back against the Kremlin’s meddling
and that the Russians “haven’t paid a price
. . . that’s sufficient to get them to change
their behavior.”
Generals are often accused of fighting the
last war. Actually, they are more likely to
prepare for a future war that never arrives
while neglecting a current conflict. The
Pentagon will be repeating that mistake if it
focuses its energy on conventional wars
rather than the hybrid threat. In fairness,
that’s not all Mattis’s fault. Combating hybrid warfare requires extensive civilianmilitary cooperation. But it’s hard to fight a
war when the foremost beneficiary of the
enemy’s attack is the commander in chief.
writetoboot@gmail.com
V ANITA G UPTA
JEFF CHIU/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Angela Henriquez hugs her children Jessica, left, and Fernando at a
news conference on immigration in San Francisco this month.
Don’t we care
about the children?
BY
J ACK M ARKELL
R
eading recent stories
about U.S. citizens being
forcibly separated from
their undocumented parents reminds me of a visit I made
to South Africa in 1985.
During that trip, I spent several
days with the Black Sash in Johannesburg and Cape Town. This
group of white women had formed
30 years earlier to protest legislation designed to remove voting
rights of “coloured” South Africans. Over time, the Black Sash
evolved from protest to advocacy,
and by the time of my visit, it had
grown to thousands of women
who volunteered their time to
help black and mixed-race South
Africans deal with the horrendous
laws and regulations of apartheid.
Among the most painful of the
system’s effects was the destruction of families. Meeting with the
Black Sash volunteers, I saw teenagers who had been removed
from their families and black
families forced to move from Johannesburg to a far-off rural
“homeland” where they had no
relatives.
Now, in our own country, the
Trump administration is preparing to threaten the well-being of
16 million U.S. citizens who live
with their immigrant parents.
That’s right. Sixteen million
U.S.-born children under 18
would be on the receiving end of a
series of new proposals from President Trump’s team that could
make it more difficult for parents
to stay in the United States legally
— and, even if they remained
here, would reduce the likelihood
that those parents would avail
themselves of the services designed to keep their children
healthy.
The proposals are embodied in
changes to the “public charge”
regulations, which limit the cost
to the government of caring for
immigrants. This concept has
been in the law for decades. The
difference with these proposals is
that they would allow officials to
include nutrition, health and other programs among the benefits
that can be used to define an
immigrant as being too dependent on public aid. That means
immigrants availing themselves
of those benefits — even for their
children who are U.S. citizens —
could be barred from obtaining a
new visa or becoming a lawful
permanent resident.
So, not surprisingly, an increasing number of immigrants are no
longer enrolling their citizen children in government-sponsored
health-care programs or feeding
them with groceries purchased
with food stamps. (Almost half of
all immigrant-headed households with children buy food with
the assistance of the government.)
Our country has historically
made sure that a safety net will
prevent our most vulnerable children from going hungry or without health care. These proposed
changes reflect a betrayal of our
core values.
Administration officials claim
that they are proposing these
changes in order to protect taxpayers. This argument is — at best
— penny-wise and pound-foolish.
Hungry and unhealthy children
are more likely to be chronically
dependent on government services and less likely to find good
jobs and pay taxes.
Even without the rules being
put into effect, we’re seeing massive negative consequences for
many of these children. The advocacy group CLASP recently released research that reveals how
the combination of fear caused by
possible separation from parents
and increased economic uncertainty has increased toxic stress
among children from families
who have members with different
immigration statuses.
While these rules have not yet
taken effect, once they are introduced, they could become the law
of the land within a few months.
In the meantime, once the regulations are posted for public comment, it’s critical for those who
care about fiscal prudence as well
as those who believe that it’s
important to help keep our citizen children with their families to
act. They must protest on behalf
of these vulnerable children and
on behalf of our core American
values.
The writer, a trustee of the Annie E.
Casey Foundation, was governor of
Delaware from 2009 to 2017.
THE PLUM LINE
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/blogs/plum-line
The fake Gillibrand flap
reveals a double standard
Here’s a sentence I never thought I
would need to write: Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) is not involved in a sex
scandal.
That I even need to devote a blog
post to this topic is evidence of the
double standard women are held to in
politics.
More than 10 years ago, Gillibrand’s
father, Doug Rutnik, an attorney and
lobbyist, worked briefly with Nxivm
(pronounced “nex-ee-um”), a marketing and life-and-work seminars organization that experts refer to as a cult.
Nxivm co-founder and head Keith Raniere was arrested by federal authorities Monday. He is accused of running a
sex slavery ring within the group.
Now some Republicans are trying to
link Gillibrand to this story. Chele
Farley, the little-known Republican
running against Gillibrand this year,
demanded that Gillibrand answer for
the “scandal.” Then it began to pick up
traction in the right-wing media. And
then Slate — progressive Slate! — published a story arguing that this development highlights the fact that her
political career features ties to such
establishment figures as New York
Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo (D) and former presidential candidate Hillary
Clinton. We’d never want a woman to
get involved with people like that!
What’s going on here? Gillibrand is
attracting attention as a potential
2020 candidate. She has mounted high-profile opposition to President
Trump, including voting against his
nominees more than anyone else in the
Senate.
At the same time, it’s no secret that
many Democrats and liberal pundits
are furious with Gillibrand for being
the first senator to call for Al Franken
to resign over allegations of unwanted
advances. Why ask a man to take responsibility for his bad behavior when
you can point the finger at a woman for
calling him on it? There is a phrase for
this: double standard. Franken is
blameless, but the woman who said his
behavior was unacceptable is at fault.
Women are forever judged more
harshly than men in many aspects of
work and society. Politics is Exhibit A.
For being an assiduous, hard-working
networker, Gillibrand has long been
viewed by insiders as an operator. (Apparently, most men elected to office
never think about their own interests
when taking a political position.) The
idea that she is somehow responsible
for her father’s client is ridiculous —
and says far less about her than it does
about the higher standard imposed on
women in politics.
— Helaine Olen
ommerce Secretary Wilbur Ross
failed a crucial test of leadership
this week. Buckling to President
Trump, Attorney General Jeff Sessions and their anti-immigrant agenda,
Ross agreed to add a citizenship question
to the 2020 Census, sacrificing the integrity, fairness and accuracy of the count. For
the good of our democracy, Congress must
overturn his decision.
Ross testified just last week that he was
still considering the Justice Department’s
last-minute, “very controversial request”
(as he put it) to jam an untested, unnecessary question about citizenship status onto
the 2020 questionnaire. That request drew
intense opposition from a nonpartisan
and ideologically broad group of business
leaders, state and local officials, social
scientists, and civil and human rights advocates who know how much is at stake
with a fair and accurate census.
Not only is the constitutionally mandated census central to apportioning political
power at every level of our representative
form of government, but also the data
collected influences the allocation of more
than $675 billion in federal funds every
year, along with countless policy and investment decisions by government agencies, nonprofit organizations and private
enterprise.
The Supreme Court in 2016 ruled unanimously that “representatives serve all residents, not just those eligible or registered
to vote,” and the Constitution makes clear
that the census has a clear purpose: to
count all U.S. residents, regardless of background, as the basis for the apportionment
of political power. The Census Bureau
spent most of this decade responding to
this mandate, leading painstaking research, technology development and question testing. With their belated interference, Trump and Sessions are upending
this meticulous preparation.
The harm from this decision, if it’s not
reversed, will be expensive and longlasting. This cavalier action will drive
down response rates and drive up costs, as
the Census Bureau tries to incorporate this
untested question with little time to spare,
develop new communications and outreach strategies, plan for the expanded
field operation and count the millions of
people who will be more reluctant to participate because of the addition of this
controversial question.
Even before this disastrous decision,
local officials and community leaders were
deeply concerned about the difficulty of
achieving a robust response in some communities, given a political climate in which
immigrants are demonized and families
live in fear of loved ones being plucked off
the streets and deported. Adding a question about citizenship status into the mix
can only heighten suspicions, depress re-
sponse rates and sabotage the accuracy of
the 2020 count. This decision would affect
everyone, with communities that are already at greater risk of being undercounted — including people of color, young
children, and low-income rural and urban
residents — suffering the most.
What is the benefit here? The false
justification offered by Sessions and his
Justice Department, and repeated in
Ross’s decision memo, is that this question
is critical for Voting Rights Act enforcement. That argument is a bitter lie, laced
with cruel irony. Consider that this is the
same Sessions who has called the Voting
Rights Act “intrusive” and has shown no
compunction in flouting voting rights enshrined in law.
During the final years of the Obama
administration, I was the Justice Department official responsible for overseeing
voting rights enforcement. I know firsthand that data from the ongoing American
Community Survey was sufficient for us to
do our work. Rigorous enforcement of the
Voting Rights Act has never required the
addition of a citizenship question on the
census form sent to all households. In fact,
the census has not collected citizenship
data from every household since the enactment of the Voting Rights Act in 1965. The
last time this question was asked of everyone, this country was in a pre-civil rights
era when communities of color were systematically undercounted and underrepresented. The Trump-Sessions-Ross argument is a red herring.
But these arguments should sound familiar. The notorious Kris Kobach and
other advocates for voter suppression laws
have pushed this question before — spurring legitimate suspicion from public officials and other stakeholders who wonder
why the Trump administration would seek
to undermine an accurate 2020 Census.
The Trump campaign and Republican National Committee validated those suspicions last week by baring their partisan,
nativist intentions in a fundraising email
forecasting this decision, telling recipients
“the President wants to know if you’re on
his side.”
There should be no “side” when it comes
to the census; it is foundational to our
representative form of government. Civil
rights advocates are preparing litigation.
California has already filed a lawsuit, and
New York has announced plans to lead a
multistate legal effort to oppose this move.
Members of Congress are also weighing in,
because they can undo this.
The census is a sacred trust. The goal of
an accurate count has been, and should
remain, a nonpartisan one. Our democracy depends on it.
The writer, president and CEO of the Leadership
Conference on Civil and Human Rights, was
head of the civil rights division at the Justice
Department from 2014 to 2017.
MARC A. THIESSEN
The citizenship question
T
he Trump administration is being
sued over its plans to include a
question about citizenship in the
2020 Census, which California
Attorney General Xavier Becerra (D) says
“is not just a bad idea — it is illegal.”
No, it’s not. There is nothing wrong
with asking about citizenship. Canada
asks a citizenship question on its census.
So do Australia and many other U.S. allies.
The U.S. government asked about citizenship for 130 years — from 1820 to 1950 —
as part of the decennial “short form”
census and continued to do so in the “long
form” survey — distributed to 1 in 6 people
— through 2000, when the long form was
replaced by the annual American Community Survey. The ACS goes to about
2.6 percent of the population each year
and asks about citizenship to this day.
So why are many on the left up in arms
over a question that should be relatively
uncontroversial? Answer: Money and
power. Democrats are worried that adding a citizenship question will dampen
participation in the census by illegal
immigrants, reducing the total population count in the Democratic-leaning
metropolitan areas where illegal immigrants are largely concentrated. Because
census data is used to determine the
distribution of federal funds, that could
decrease the cities’ share of more than
$675 billion a year in federal funding. And
because census data is also used to create
and apportion congressional seats, Democrats fear that if illegal immigrants don’t
participate it could shift power from
Democratic cities to rural communities,
which tend to vote Republican.
At least, that’s Democrats’ theory. But
there is no evidence that a citizenship
question would dramatically impact census participation. The census is not like a
telemarketing survey where people have
the option of adding their names to a “do
not call” list. Everyone is required by law
to respond. If a household does not fill out
the census form, then census workers visit
that household to gather census data. If
they still cannot get a household to
cooperate, nonrespondents can be fined
or prosecuted — though in practice they
rarely are. Usually, the Census Bureau
instead asks neighbors about the household in order to get as much accurate
information as possible. This may add
costs to the census, but it is not likely to
produce inaccurate data.
Moreover, if asking about citizenship is
a deterrent to participation by illegal
immigrants, then what about the existing
census question that asks whether respondents are “of Hispanic, Latino, or
Spanish origin” — the only ethnic group
specifically called out? Respondents are
required by law to tell the government
whether they are of Mexican, Puerto
Rican, Cuban or other Hispanic origin,
which they are required to list (“print
origin, for example, Argentinean, Colombian, Dominican, Nicaraguan, Salvadoran, Spaniard, and so on”). If that does not
deter the participation of many illegal
immigrants, how would a question on
citizenship?
There is no good reason not to answer
the census, whether one is here legally or
illegally. As the Census Bureau points out,
“It is against the law for any Census
Bureau employee to disclose or publish
any census or survey information that
identifies an individual or business . . . the
FBI and other government entities do not
have the legal right to access this information.” Furthermore, the proposed question is about citizenship, not legal status.
This question should not be a deterrent to
participation for anyone.
But let’s say for the sake of argument
that some illegal immigrants do decide
not to participate in the 2020 Census. So
what? Illegal immigrants are here illegally. If they choose to violate U.S. law yet
again by refusing to participate in the
census because of a perfectly legitimate
question about citizenship, that’s not the
U.S. government’s fault.
This is a losing issue for Democrats.
They are effectively arguing that sanctuary cities should be rewarded with more
federal money for interfering with the
federal enforcement of our immigration
laws and turning themselves into magnets for illegal immigrants. And Democrats, who claim to be deeply concerned
about foreign interference in our democracy, seem to have no problem with
foreign interference when it comes to
noncitizens in the United States illegally
affecting the distribution of seats in Congress. If Democrats want to make that
argument to the American people, go for
it. It will further alienate millions of
voters who abandoned the Democratic
Party in the 2016 election.
Marc A. Thiessen, a fellow with the American
Enterprise Institute and former chief
speechwriter to President George W. Bush,
writes a twice-weekly online column for The
Post.
A20
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
ABCDE
letters@washpost.com
The audacity of these advisers
EDITORIALS
Closely examine this doctor
The Senate must carefully consider whether the White House physician can run VA.
O
national security adviser and CIA director. A
holdover from the Obama administration who won
unanimous Senate confirmation, Dr. Shulkin was
once seen as a favorite of the administration,
particularly after he helped secure bipartisan
legislative wins on issues such as streamlining the
appeals process for veterans seeking disability
benefits and making it easier to fire bad employees.
But a scathing report by the agency’s inspector
general detailing use of $122,334 to help underwrite
European travel and sightseeing for Dr. Shulkin and
his wife — and his attempts to deflect blame —
tarnished his credentials and impaired his ability to
be effective. Despite the Trump administration’s
high tolerance for Cabinet secretaries and other
senior staff living large on the taxpayers’ dime,
critics of Dr. Shulkin who differed with him on
policy issues skillfully took advantage of his missteps.
The challenges that will face Dr. Jackson, if he is
confirmed, are significant and have long vexed both
Policy by whim
at Interior
Democratic and Republican administrations.
Dr. Jackson, a career Navy officer who came into the
public spotlight with his disarming discussion of
Mr. Trump’s annual physical, has no real experience
managing a large bureaucracy. That has rightly
prompted concerns about his ability to lead the
federal government’s second-largest department,
with some 377,000 employees and more than
1,200 health-care facilities.
Hard questions about whether Dr. Jackson’s
résumé qualifies him to do this job need to be asked
at Senate confirmation hearings. There also should
be scrutiny of his plans for the agency, specifically
his views on the controversial issue of the privatization of VA services. If it is to make good on its
members’ frequent promises to the men and women
who have served the country, the Senate must take
seriously its responsibility to advise and consent on
the next VA secretary. It should not rubber-stamp
an appointee who makes the president feel comfortable.
TOM TOLES
Mr. Zinke’s decisions appear to rest
on political connections.
I
N JANUARY, Florida Gov. Rick Scott (R) claimed
a big political win, wrangling a surprise meeting
with Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke and immediately obtaining a special exemption for his state
from the Trump administration’s expansive offshore
drilling plan. It was a well-choreographed drama
meant to boost Mr. Scott’s impending campaign for
the U.S. Senate — and it has now been exposed in all
its cynicism.
Politico reported Tuesday that Mr. Zinke and
Mr. Scott’s staffs had been planning the secretary’s
seemingly last-minute trip for days, beginning
shortly after the Interior Department announced its
new offshore drilling policy. Reporters were not told
about the meeting until an hour before the public
announcement, in which Mr. Zinke said that new
drilling off Florida was “off the table,” and state
officials were taken similarly by surprise. Held in the
Tallahassee airport, the event appeared to have been
hastily arranged. In fact, the whole episode seems to
have been designed to demonstrate Mr. Scott’s
power and influence, by having him appear to
summon the interior secretary to his state and bring
him to heel in an afternoon.
Mr. Zinke has given no other state such attention.
His Florida announcement drew quick complaints
from state officials from South Carolina to Massachusetts and California to Washington state. Many
of these states have unique interests in preserving
their coastlines, as Florida does. None have been told
that new offshore drilling is “off the table” for them
— months after Mr. Scott got immediate, in-person
service from Mr. Zinke. As lawmakers from these
states charged that Mr. Zinke was using his power
arbitrarily, the secretary insisted that Florida had
not yet received any formal waiver from the Trump
administration’s offshore drilling plan. Yet he has
simultaneously assured Florida reporters that “what
I said is no new oil and gas platforms.”
We do not oppose more offshore drilling. The
United States consumes vast quantities of oil and
will for decades to come, even if it gets more serious
about cutting greenhouse-gas emissions. The nation
can export the risk of extracting that oil to other
countries, many with less effective oversight, or it
can allow well-regulated drilling here, profiting in
the process. But any policy shift should be orderly
and fair, with each state given an equal opportunity
to object.
Florida’s special dispensation raises implications
that are far weightier than whether a couple of oil
platforms will appear off Santa Barbara, Calif., or
Virginia Beach. Mr. Zinke’s behavior suggests that
major government policy will be made on his whim,
according to whether petitioners have ingratiated
themselves with the Trump administration or which
political ally requires a favor. With the Florida
drilling episode in mind, it is hard not to see the
same thinking at work as Mr. Zinke has exempted
sections of his home state, Montana, from oil and
gold mining. As capricious, clan-based government
advances, the public good is forgotten.
A proposed law in Malaysia against ‘fake news’ looks like censorship in disguise.
M
outcome of the law, should it be passed, would be to
chill media discussion of the corruption scandal.
The legislation would define as fake news “any
news, information, data and reports which are
wholly or partly false, whether in the form of
features, visuals or audio recordings or in any other
form capable of suggesting words or ideas.” It would
cover those who create, offer, circulate, print or
publish fake news or publications containing fake
news, and impose a 10-year jail term, a fine of up to
$128,000, or both, at the whim of the government.
The law would apply to those overseas as well as
inside Malaysia. A fact sheet outlining hypothetical
examples includes anyone who knowingly offers
false information to a blogger, as well as cases that
seem to encompass acts of slander or false advertising.
We don’t take lightly the problem of truth in
today’s information whirlwind. But an open society
must guarantee the right to express a wide range of
views, including criticism of its leaders, with very
few limitations, accompanied by due process and
rule of law. The Malaysian proposal looks more like a
tool of arbitrary government control and intimidation. Singapore is holding hearings on a similar
scheme. Other closed systems, such as China, long
ago perfected the art. It is called censorship.
President Trump has championed the moniker
“fake news” to mean any news report he dislikes, and
to undermine the legitimacy of the news media by
creating confusion over whether news is true or
false. An army of people on social media likewise
muddy the waters, spreading reports that are corrosive and malicious. In this environment, a free
society has to be dedicated to unfettered speech,
allowing it to flourish and regulating it extremely
carefully. Yes, publishers, platforms and people must
be vigilant for garbage and pollution in the news
stream. But imposing governmental controls will
only yield one thing: real fake news.
ABCDE
L O CA L O P I N I O N S
FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
Organized citizens have a lot to do with Metro’s progress
Fred Hiatt’s March 26 op-ed, “A good-news story.
Really.,” aptly cited progress on dedicated Metro
funding as an example of democracy at work.
However, Mr. Hiatt glossed over the role of organized citizens.
Democracy works only when citizens cease to
react as frustrated individuals and band together to
make their voices heard. For instance, we as pastors
have been organizing together with 200 congregations representing more than half a million households in the District, Maryland and Virginia to
demand new funding for more than two years. We
have rejected the cynical approach of some in the
Metro debate that sought to gain votes for funding
by throwing front-line workers and low-income
passengers under the bus, so to speak.
Regarding David Ignatius’s March 28 op-ed,
“With Bolton, Trump’s war cabinet is complete”:
Does one laugh or cry at being told that national
security adviser-designate John Bolton “opens his
memoir with a quote from the French revolutionary
Georges Danton: ‘Audacity, and more audacity, and
always audacity, and the nation will be saved.’ ”
Not only was Danton a Jacobin — which is to say,
the antithesis of everything a traditional conservative is supposed to stand for — but also he wound
up at the guillotine, having been outdone in the
“audacity” department by Robespierre, who in the
current situation would be . . .
Thomas Anthony DiMaggio, York, Pa.
Now that President Trump has cleared nearly
all the adults from the room, I am reminded of a
line from a song by Paul Simon: “Still a man hears
what he wants to hear and disregards the rest . . . li,
la, li . . . .” With Mike Pompeo and John Bolton
whispering in Mr. Trump’s tin ear for foreign policy,
and Larry Kudlow guiding him on economic policy,
the take-home message for us is to be afraid, fellow
Americans, be very afraid. We are in for, at best, a
rough, rough ride for a while.
Conrad Rosenberg, Silver Spring
We’re likely in familiar waters
Regarding Robert J. Samuelson’s March 26 op-ed,
“Another huge threat from the Internet”:
While we are sent raging over Stormy Daniels and
other crud, the West Wing is in utter turmoil, and
President Trump asserts “things are going very
smoothly” in his administration. My father said
Mr. Samuelson’s op-ed reminded him of the time in
President Bill Clinton’s second term when, while the
president was distracted with the impeachment
proceedings, would-be terrorists were enrolled in
flight-training schools where they showed great
interest in flying planes but not a whit about landing
them. No one connected the dots.
I fear we are in the same bubbling hot waters we
were in then, but doing almost nothing about it. We
cannot wait four years for this Trump disaster to
resolve. He has to go now and be replaced with
someone capable of putting together an organized,
coherent administration. But this critical action has
to start with Republicans, or at least conservative
people and others of that ilk.
I sit, Mr. Trump fiddles, and our country lurches
toward the abyss. As Mr. Samuelson ended his piece,
so will I: “If we fail to act, we will have only ourselves
to blame for the consequences.”
Sara Acharya, Rockville
It’s not just Turkey
Fake justice, real danger
ALAYSIAN PRIME Minister Najib Razak
is no stranger to muzzling free expression.
His government has used existing laws to
prosecute bloggers and journalists for
satire and criticism of Mr. Najib, who has been
embroiled in an epic corruption scandal. Now the
Malaysian cabinet has gone a step further, proposing
a law that would impose stiff fines and jail sentences
on those who publish what it deems “fake news.” The
proposed law is a warning of the danger when
governments decide what is true and what is not.
Mr. Najib, seeking reelection to a third term, is
being investigated by several countries, including
the United States, on allegations that he and close
associates diverted $4.5 billion from a Malaysian
government investment fund for their own use,
including $730 million that ended up in accounts
controlled by the prime minister. He has denied
wrongdoing involving the 1Malaysia Development
Berhad fund, known as 1MDB. But a surefire
MARCH 30 , 2018
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
USTED VETERANS AFFAIRS Secretary David Shulkin blasted a “toxic, chaotic, disrespectful and subversive” Washington environment for costing him his job. No doubt
there is some truth to his critique of Washington’s
political climate, but if Dr. Shulkin wants to place
blame for his downfall he need look no further than
the mirror. His arrogant misuse of taxpayers’ money
undermined efforts to reform the agency and gave
ammunition to those who sought his removal.
He is far from a victim. That designation
unfortunately goes to veterans who look to his
troubled department for vital services, and in many
cases have been underserved. The dysfunction
makes it all the more important to determine if the
person named by President Trump to lead the
agency, White House physician Ronny L. Jackson, is
up to the job.
Dr. Shulkin’s dismissal, announced Wednesday,
was the latest in an administrative shake-up that
has included changes for the secretary of state, the
. FRIDAY,
Metro’s renewal cannot come at the expense of
good, middle-class jobs lost to contractors who claim
success by offering salaries so low that workers must
seek taxpayer-funded public assistance to survive.
Progress cannot come at the expense of low- and
middle-income residents who rely on robust service
for access to jobs, schools and doctors.
Our organizations will remain engaged so that we
all see the day when an equitable, sustainable,
world-class transit system operates in our growing
region.
Austin Almaguer, Vienna
H. Lionel Edmonds, Washington
Michael Armstrong, Silver Spring
The writers are members of the
Metro Industrial Areas Foundation.
News pages:
MARTIN BARON
Executive Editor
CAMERON BARR
Managing Editor
EMILIO GARCIA-RUIZ
Managing Editor
TRACY GRANT
Managing Editor
SCOTT VANCE
Deputy Managing Editor
BARBARA VOBEJDA
Deputy Managing Editor
Editorial and opinion pages:
FRED HIATT
Editorial Page Editor
JACKSON DIEHL
Deputy Editorial Page Editor
RUTH MARCUS
Deputy Editorial Page Editor
JO-ANN ARMAO
Associate Editorial Page Editor
Vice Presidents:
JAMES W. COLEY JR......................................................................................Production
L. WAYNE CONNELL..........................................................................Human Resources
KATE M. DAVEY..................................................................................Revenue Strategy
ELIZABETH H. DIAZ ................................................. Audience Development & Insights
GREGG J. FERNANDES........................................................Customer Care & Logistics
STEPHEN P. GIBSON...................................................................Finance & Operations
SCOT GILLESPIE .......................................................................................... Engineering
JED HARTMAN.......................................................................................Client Solutions
KRISTINE CORATTI KELLY...................................................Communications & Events
JOHN B. KENNEDY.................................................................General Counsel & Labor
MIKI TOLIVER KING........................................................................................Marketing
SHAILESH PRAKASH...............................Digital Product Development & Engineering
The Washington Post
1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20071 (202) 334-6000
The March 26 editorial “Threading a needle in
Syria” wistfully ruminated on the possibility of preserving a relationship between Turkey, a once-valued
member of NATO that was the standard for democracy in the region, and the United States, a current,
though in decline, representative democracy notable
for its failure to sustain its commitment to its
heritage. Judging by the standards of each country’s
leadership, neither would qualify today for admittance to NATO.
The results are evident: The ease with which
invasions of sovereign states can be justified; the
disasters accompanying the failures to consider consequences; the loss of empathy that comes with
continued diminution of human rights and disregard
for the human condition; the lingering suffering of
those victims caught in the middle; and the agonizing
finality of death that comes to those without power.
But memories are long. While horrific, current
conditions are not permanent. Power will eventually
shift. And with no will for better, there will be a
reckoning. There always is.
David M. Siegler, Oakton
Do something, anything, about China
Regarding Josh Rogin’s March 26 op-ed, “Fighting
China’s economic aggression”:
As an inventor and patent holder whose product
will surely be knocked off by China if it achieves
enough of a market share to warrant doing so, I’m
ecstatic to see this problem finally being addressed.
Why have past administrations and Congress allowed
U.S. citizens to be stolen from with impunity?
When I recently asked a staff member of our senior
U.S. senator from Virginia “what can be done,” his
answer was basically “nothing.” Mr. Rogin’s op-ed
proved that something can be done. And something is
better than nothing.
Tim Batchelor, Oakton
How is Mr. Trump any different?
Why do we care, or more specifically, why does the
mainstream media think we should care about
President Trump’s alleged dalliances from more
than 10 years ago [“Daniels alleges threats led to
silence on Trump,” front page, March 26]? We have
known about the Trump mind-set at least since the
“Access Hollywood” tape.
When Presidents Franklin D. Roosevelt, John F.
Kennedy and Bill Clinton demonstrated similar
proclivities, we apparently did not care, or at least
the media thought we should not care. Why now?
Why Mr. Trump?
I care because all this salacious coverage is serving
to further erode any remaining moral standards in
our society. When the media highlight the failures of
Mr. Trump, no new information is provided, only
permission for others to drift in the same direction.
William Hicks, Gaithersburg
The real disrespect to our anthem
Houston Texans owner Robert McNair claimed
that stopping National Football League players from
kneeling during the national anthem is the way “to
respect our flag and respect our country” [“McNair
bullish on NFL anthem policy,” Sports, March 26].
He is wrong. The players’ protest of racial injustice
(which is, after all, the point of their kneeling during
the national anthem) is a reasonable exercise of the
constitutional right of free speech. It is lawful,
peaceful and respectful, and it does not interfere
with the anthem or the football game.
What actually would be disrespectful to our flag
and country is a decision by NFL owners to block
their employees’ right to freedom of expression.
William Shapiro, McLean
FRIDAY, MARCH 30 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A21
RE
MICHAEL GERSON
DAVID IGNATIUS
This political
moment
is not normal
Ad-libbing
with Kim can
lead to a deal,
or disaster
I
s it time for anti-Trump conservatives to recognize that they have lost
the political and policy battle within
the GOP and to accommodate themselves as best they can to an uncomfortable reality?
This is the argument of the Ethics and
Public Policy Center’s Henry Olsen, one of
the most thoughtful political analysts on
the right. On issues such as trade, immigration and the Muslim travel ban, he
argues, Republican critics of President
Trump are dramatically “out of step with
conservative[s].” And the possible options are limited. A primary challenge to
Trump is “doomed to failure.” The creation of a third party is a pipe dream, since
“there simply aren’t enough dissatisfied
conservatives.”
This leaves anti-Trump conservatives,
in Olsen’s view, with one viable choice —
to make peace with a Trump-dominated
movement. “If they are willing to work
with other conservative-movement types
on immigration and trade to reach common ground,” he contends, “they might
find that other longtime conservatives
are willing to work with them.” Olsen’s
historical model is “fusionism” — a theory
associated with conservative thinker
Frank Meyer that asserted common political and intellectual ground between social conservatives and libertarians in the
middle of the last century.
Olsen’s hope for a return to normalcy
within the conservative movement — in
which even deep disagreements did not
lead to complete rupture — is understandable. But his real contribution is
probably not what he intended. Olsen
sees this as an important but normal
political moment, in which the policy
views of populists and conservative intellectuals need to be reconciled on issues
such as trade and immigration. An intellectual dialectic within the Republican
coalition is straining to produce a new,
more pro-worker synthesis — which
Olsen himself has long advocated. But
this raises the question: Is this a normal
political moment?
Trump defines loyalty
to conservatism as contempt
for many of our neighbors.
If Trump were merely proposing a
border wall and the more aggressive
employment of tariffs, we would be engaged in a debate, not facing a schism.
Both President Ronald Reagan and President George W. Bush played the tariff
chess game. As a Republican presidential
candidate, Mitt Romney endorsed the
massive “self-deportation” of undocumented workers without the rise of a
#NeverRomney movement.
But it is blind, even obtuse, to place
Trumpism in the same category. Trump’s
policy proposals — the details of which
Trump himself seems unconcerned and
uninformed about — are symbolic expressions of a certain approach to politics.
The stated purpose of Trump’s border
wall is to keep out a contagion of Mexican
rapists and murderers. His argument is
not taken from Heritage Foundation policy papers. He makes it by quoting the
racist poem “The Snake,” which compares
migrants to dangerous vermin. Trump
proposes to ban migration from some
Muslim-majority countries because Muslim refugees, as he sees it, are a Trojanhorse threat of terrorism. Trump’s policy
ideas are incidental to his message of
dehumanization.
So how do we split the political difference on this one? Shall we talk about
Mexican migrants as rapists on every
other day? Shall we provide rhetorical
cover for alt-right bigots only on special
occasions, such as after a racist rally and
murder?
The point applies in other areas. While
some Republicans have criticized media
bias, Trump has attempted to systematically delegitimize all critical information
as “fake news” and referred to the media
as “the enemy of the people.” While other
politicians have pushed back against investigations, Trump has attempted to
discredit federal law enforcement as part
of a “deep state” plot against him.
We have seen similar damage in the
realm of values and norms. In the cultivation of anger and tribalism. In the use of
language to inflame and demean. In the
destruction of a common factual basis for
politics, making policy compromise of the
kind Olsen favors impossible.
What would fusion with this type of
politics look like? Trump defines loyalty
to conservatism as contempt for many of
our neighbors. One might as well have
proposed a fusion between popular sovereignty and Abraham Lincoln’s conception
of inherent human rights. They were not
a dialectic requiring a synthesis. They
were alternatives demanding a choice.
Which raises a fourth option: For elected leaders to remind Americans who they
are and affirm our common bonds. For
conservative policy experts to define an
agenda of working-class uplift, not an
agenda of white resentment — which will
consign Republicans to moral squalor
and (eventually) to electoral irrelevance.
For principled conservatives to hear the
call of moral duty and stand up for their
beliefs until this madness passes. As it
will.
michaelgerson@washpost.com
D
Lough is not the first person to ask
voters to send in the clowns.
In fact, he has some extra-big floppy
shoes to fill. In the 19th century, clown
and satirist Dan Rice ran for Congress,
Senate and the presidency, and since then
plenty of other comedians and entertainers have run for office. And although
comparisons of politics to a “circus” or of
politicians to “clowns” are not usually
intended to be flattering, Lough says they
should be.
Circus folk like him could teach this
Washington sideshow a lot, he says.
The circus is a microcosm of the world,
he argues, but one where everyone is
welcome and diversity is valued. (Hey, you
might even call it the original big tent.) In
the circus, Lough worked alongside performers from Russia (who turned him on
to Dostoevsky) and South Africa (who
taught him about the horrors of apartheid). Recalling the visual of an 8-foot-tall
Pakistani colleague standing next to a
33-inch-tall Hungarian, Lough marvels:
“My God, you think about how unique
and how wonderful creation is.”
Circus requires discipline, practice and
sacrifice, he says, observing that the
high-wire-act performers he has known
never, ever drank caffeine. And in a
circus, everyone has to learn how to work
together, regardless of how different they
are or how big their egos may be. Otherwise the whole thing falls apart.
Most important, unlike many politicians, circus folk understand that every
person, no matter their background, and
every job, no matter how seemingly minor or menial, matters.
“Walking on stilts, your life depends on
the floor being clean,” Lough says. Consequently: “You develop great respect for
people who scoop the poop.”
onald Trump made the case in
“The Art of the Deal” for “winging it” on big negotiations. “I
never get too attached to one
deal or one approach,” he wrote. “I keep
a lot of balls in the air, because most
deals fall out, no matter how promising
they seem at first.”
Trump is now about to wing it on an
epic, global stage in his planned faceto-face meeting with North Korean
leader Kim Jong Un. Nobody in Washington or abroad seems to know just
what Trump wants to accomplish in the
meeting — an ambiguity the president
apparently views as a beneficial source
of leverage.
The problem is that if this particular
“ball in the air” should fall, the result
could be a military confrontation in
Northeast Asia. I’ve been asking U.S.
and Asian experts what a Trump-Kim
summit might accomplish. There is a
consensus that Trump has a big opportunity, but a very risky one, since the
deal that is doable now may not be one
that he can (or should) accept.
The most intriguing aspect of this
diplomacy is that it is being shaped
largely by the two Koreas. Kim has been
a surprisingly nimble player, pivoting
this year from his belligerent push for
nuclear weapons toward dialogue and
unilateral concessions. Kim’s partner
has been President Moon Jae-in of
South Korea, operating through his top
intelligence advisers. They’ve set the
table carefully, even though no one can
predict yet what will be served at this
meal.
The pace quickened with Thursday’s
announcement that Kim and Moon will
meet on April 27 for what a South
Korean statement called the “start of a
great journey to denuclearize the Korean peninsula.” The most interesting
detail was that the meeting will take
place on the “southern” side of the
border zone at Panmunjom. The two
previous Korea summits, in 2000 and
2007, took place in Pyongyang. Kim
had apparently proposed Pyongyang
again, and then another city close to
the border, before agreeing to Panmunjom.
The meeting will set the stage for
Trump’s encounter and allow some
preliminary U.S.-North Korean contact. But the United States, in effect, is
subcontracting the preparatory work
to its Asian friends. South Korean
intelligence has taken the lead, keeping
CIA Director Mike Pompeo in the loop.
China is acting as a diplomatic
concierge. Worried they might be excluded from the Kim-Trump feast, the
Chinese invited the North Korean leader this week to Beijing. The visit helped
“avoid the mentality that China is being
marginalized,” as the Beijing Global
Times expressed it this month. President Xi Jinping told Kim that China
embraces “the goal of denuclearization
of the peninsula.”
But make no mistake: It is the two
Koreas that are driving the action,
forcing their superpower allies to respond. Kim took the first steps by
offering to halt weapons tests, discuss
denuclearization and drop objections
to U.S.-South Korean military exercises.
With the PyeongChang Olympics as
backdrop, Seoul brokered Kim’s offer of
direct talks. Trump astounded the
world with a quick “yes.” But this has
mainly been a Korean production thus
far.
So what, exactly, can the super-hyped
Trump-Kim meeting accomplish?
There’s a low-key version, in which the
two leaders will agree on framework for
denuclearization and normalization of
relations, claim it as a big “win,” and
then turn the details over to working
groups of experts. China endorsed the
step-by-step approach Kim suggested
this week — what he called “phased,
synchronized measures.”
The problem is that for skeptics
(starting with John Bolton, Trump’s
incoming national security adviser),
such an interim agreement would seem
eerily like the 1994 “Agreed Framework” and the 2005 structure for the
Six-Party talks — past “breakthroughs”
that proved to be dead ends. U.S.
officials have been studying why these
past negotiations failed to deliver. One
answer is that they lacked a vision of
the end state for the Korean Peninsula,
including the future role of U.S. troops
stationed there.
Kurt Campbell, the leading Asia
strategist during the Obama administration, argues that Trump and Kim
should see themselves as mountain
climbers, and establish a base camp
from which they can eventually reach
the peak of a “grand bargain.” But this
base camp needs to be high enough up
the mountain, anchored with enough
specific provisions, that the peak is in
sight.
Trump’s history is to “go big” and
look for the flamboyant deal. Kim
seems to have a similar flair for the
dramatic, and he has already taken big,
bold risks. Strangely, perhaps, the decisive achievement of the Trump-Kim
summit may be personal chemistry
between two leaders who, for all the
insults they’ve exchanged, seem remarkably similar in temperament.
crampell@washpost.com
Twitter: @IgnatiusPost
MANUEL BALCE CENETA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ronny L. Jackson, the White House physician, at the daily press briefing on Jan. 16.
EUGENE ROBINSON
To lead VA, it seems,
no real experience is needed
Y
ou can’t make this stuff up:
President Trump has announced he will nominate a
medical doctor who has no
discernible management experience
to run the second-largest agency in
the federal government.
Can presidents be sued for malpractice?
The man Trump has named to
become secretary of veterans affairs,
Ronny L. Jackson, happens to be the
president’s personal doctor. More to
the point, given Trump’s perpetual
hunger for sycophancy, is the fact that
Jackson showered the president with
hyperbolic Dear-Leader-style praise
during a widely viewed television
appearance in January.
Trump has “incredibly good genes,”
the White House physician said in
describing a examination he had
given the president. Trump’s overall
health is “excellent.” His “cardiac
assessment” put him “in the excellent
range.” If his diet were a bit better, “he
might live to be 200 years old.” In any
event, “I think he will remain fit for
duty for the remainder of this term
and even for the remainder of another term if he’s elected.”
That is an unusual way to describe
a 71-year-old man whose height was
reported as a generous 6 feet 3 inches,
and weight at an eyebrow-raising
239 pounds, which classifies him as
overweight — but conveniently one
pound short of obese. Jackson’s are
odd words characterizing a man
whose cheeseburger-laden diet my
doctor would describe as suicidal and
whose coronary calcium scan results,
according to many other physicians,
indicate some degree of heart disease
and a clearly elevated risk of heart
attack.
I assume Jackson has been more,
shall we say, plain-spoken with the
president about his health than he
was with the public. But am I suggesting that flattery, rather than merit, is
what makes him Trump’s choice to
replace ousted VA Secretary David
Shulkin? Absolutely, because no other
explanation makes sense.
Pliability may also be playing a
role. In a New York Times op-ed,
Shulkin wrote that he believed he was
being sacked because he opposed a
push by the Trump administration
“to put VA health care in the hands of
the private sector.”
Shulkin is a physician, but before
he took over VA, he also had experience running hospitals. With no
comparable administrative background, Jackson — if confirmed by
the Senate — would take over a
sprawling agency with about
360,000 employees, a $186 billion
budget and responsibility for providing medical care to 9 million veterans who deserve better, faster service
than they now receive.
Shulkin was one of several highranking Trump appointees under fire
for lavish spending on the taxpayers’
dime. He was also a holdover from the
Obama administration, and even
though the job is perhaps the least
partisan in the Cabinet, that prior
association clashed with Trump’s
bratty determination to oppose everything President Barack Obama supported and support everything he
opposed.
But Shulkin, by most accounts, had
stabilized VA’s vast system of hospitals
and health clinics. What he refused to
do was support the notion of privatizing veterans’ health care — an idea
pushed by some of the political appointees the White House had installed under him.
“I am convinced that privatization
is a political issue aimed at rewarding
select people and companies with
profits, even if it undermines care for
veterans,” Shulkin wrote in his Times
op-ed. “The private sector . . . is ill-prepared to handle the number and
complexity of patients that would
come from closing or downsizing VA
hospitals and clinics, particularly
when it comes to the mental health
needs of people scarred by the horrors
of war.”
Shulkin wrote that “in recent
months” the political environment in
Washington had become “toxic, chaotic, disrespectful and subversive,”
making it impossible for him to do his
job. “It should not be this hard to serve
your country,” he wrote.
But it should be hard to get a job
running any organization as big, complex and vital as the Department of
Veterans Affairs. Perhaps Jackson has
an innate genius for management that
awaits only the opportunity to flower.
If not, Trump will be doing a grave
disservice to men and women who are
owed the nation’s thanks and gratitude.
I can’t say I’m surprised. Trump put
neurosurgeon Ben Carson in charge of
the Department of Housing and
Urban Development, despite Carson
having zero experience in housing
policy. He put Betsy DeVos in charge
of the Department of Education,
despite her apparent unfamiliarity
with actual schools. He put politician
Rick Perry in charge of the Department of Energy, which Perry wanted
to eliminate until he learned what the
agency does.
Perry actually said that during his
confirmation hearing. One doesn’t
know whether to laugh or cry.
eugenerobinson@washpost.com
CATHERINE RAMPELL
It’s only Congress. Send in the clown!
C
ontrary to popular perception,
there are not enough clowns in
Congress.
So believes Steve Lough, a
Democratic candidate for South Carolina’s 5th Congressional District. As a
professional clown, he should know.
Yes, an honest-to-goodness clown: the
kind with a red rubber nose who throws
pies and performs magic tricks. Thirty
years ago, Lough graduated from
Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey
Clown College, and he has toured on and
off with the Greatest Show on Earth and a
circus in Japan. That’s where he met his
wife, Rie Sekine, also a clown and now his
campaign manager.
One of Lough’s bits involves a renegade
toupee, a gag that has a real-life historical
precedent on the House floor: A congressman once grabbed another’s hairpiece
during an 1858 brawl over slavery.
Lough’s specialty, though, has always
been juggling. His favorite trick requires
balancing on his forehead a six-foot pole,
with his hat up on top; he juggles five
balls and, at the end, drops the hat from
the pole to his head.
For the past 10 years, Lough traveled
around North Carolina with an antibullying show sponsored by McDonald’s.
When the program ended in December,
he decided to return to his hometown of
Camden, S.C., and throw his hat in the
ring, so to speak.
“When life gives you lemons, you run
for Congress,” Lough says.
Whether his career change is a step up
or down likely depends on where you
sit. But either way, Lough is not exactly
new to strange and unexpected transitions. Before enrolling in clown college,
he attended Dartmouth College, where he
majored in anthropology, played football
and wrote a paper on beer pong. (It
earned him an A.)
And in any case, the transformation
from clown to politician was less abrupt
than it might appear, and not only because he juggles in his campaign videos.
Over the years, he said, he has gradually
become more politically engaged. He
volunteered for Barack Obama’s 2008 and
2012 campaigns. Sandy Hook, Trayvon
Martin and some family connections to
gun violence inspired a reading binge on
gun policy.
Whether his career change is
a step up or down likely
depends on where you sit.
Then, in 2016, Sen. Bernie Sanders
(I-Vt.) got him jazzed about spreading the
gospel of single-payer health care.
In fact, it’s Lough’s policy agenda,
rather any clown-phobic voters, that likely presents the biggest obstacle to his
winning the seat in November. Or even
just his party’s primary in June.
Lough is running in a deep-red congressional district. Until last year, it was
represented by tea partyer and now
Trump Cabinet member Mick Mulvaney.
Lough insists, though, that “a lot of
people don’t understand yet that they are
Bernie Sanders liberals, too.” He believes
his campaign can help bring voters to that
realization.
“I may not win this election, but if I can
get 10 people or 100 people in every single
county of South Carolina to Google
single-payer health care, or to Google
about our gun laws,” he says, he’ll declare
victory.
A22
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30 , 2018
THIS WEEK
Look for BONUS ITEMS in the ad & throughout the store to earn extra game tickets!
NO PURCHASE NECESSARY TO PLAY OR WIN. See store for official rules & odds chart. Hasbro is not a sponsor.
The MONOPOLY game is in-store only and not available for online orders. Effective 2/7/18-5/8/18.
Clip or CLICK!
4
DAY
sale
Clip or CLICK!
3/29 | 3/30 | 3/31 | 4/01
Thursday - Sunday
Spiral Sliced Hams
Without coupon $1.69-lb.
1
29
lb
4
Club Price
Limit
1
USDA
CHOICE
This coupon must be presented at time of purchase. Offer valid with
Card and Coupon. COUPON CANNOT BE DOUBLED. Coupon valid
thru 04/03/18.
Beef Prime Rib Roast
Without coupon $5.99-lb.
99
Club Price
Limit
1
1
lb
Pepsi or Dr. Pepper
12-pk., 12-oz. cans.
Selected varieties.
Limit
4
99
ea
.
Club Price
This coupon must be presented at time of purchase. Offer valid with
Card and Coupon. COUPON CANNOT BE DOUBLED. Coupon valid thru
04/03/18.
BUY
1
GET 1
FREE
Strawberries,
Blueberries,
EQUAL OR LESSER VALUE Blackberries
Club Price or Raspberries
5
99
2
99
1
Asparagus
49
lb
Club Price
lb
Club Price
Carver Boneless Ham
Whole or Half.
lb
Club Price
Fresh Atlantic Salmon Fillets
Or Sea Scallops 16-oz. $7.99-ea.
7
1
99
ea
7
Colossal Raw or
Cooked Shrimp
99
16 to 20-ct. raw or
26 to 30-ct. cooked.
Gourmet Pies
11-in. Selected varieties.
lb
Hormel Cure 81
Spiral Sliced Ham
Nabisco Snack
or Ritz Crackers
3.75 to 13.7-oz.
Selected varieties.
49
¢
lb Hellmann’s Mayonnaise
Club Price
20 to 30-oz. Selected varieties.
Limit
2
2
MUST
BUY
1
3
.
ea
5
Club Price
.
2
GET2
FREE
EQUAL OR LESSER VALUE
Club Price
Lay’s or Tostitos
9 to 14-oz.
Selected varieties.
Libby’s or Signature Kitchens
Canned Vegetables or Signature
Kitchens Condensed Soup
5
49
ea
Club Price
1
BUY
15-oz. Libby’s, 14.5 to 15-oz. SK Vegetables
or 10.5-oz. Condensed Soup.
MUST
BUY
Selected varieties.
¢
Lucerne Butter
16-oz. Regular or Unsalted.
GET 1
FREE
EQUAL OR LESSER VALUE
Club Price
Dunkin’ Donuts, Folgers,
Lavazzo or Kauai Coffee
11 to 12-oz. or 10-ct. Dunkin’, 24.2 to 30.5-oz.
or 12-ct. Folgers, 12-oz. Lavazza
MUST
BUY
or 12-ct. Kauai. Selected varieties.
3
Lindt Easter Candy
5-pk., 1.7-oz. minis or 1-ct., 3.5 to 4.1-oz.
bunny. Selected varieties. While supplies last.
5
ea
Club Price
2
MUST
BUY
3
99
.
ea
Club Price
ea
1
99
.
ea
Club Price
10
3$
Signature
Farms Bacon
16-oz. Selected varieties.
99
99
Club Price
Gorton’s or Mrs. Paul’s
Seafood Selections
6.3 to 24.5-oz.
Selected varieties.
for
Club Price
1
BUY
16 to 28-oz. Ben & Jerry’s, 16 to 48-oz. Breyers or
16-oz. Talenti. Selected varieties.
BUY
BUY
2
EQUAL OR LESSER VALUE
Club Price
12-pk., 12-oz. cans or 8-pk., 12-oz. bottles.
Selected varieties.
Ben & Jerry’s Dairy or Non-Dairy
Ice Cream, Breyers Ice Cream,
Breyers Delights or Talenti Gelato
ea
99
32-oz. Selected varieties.
GET 3
FREE
88
.
Club Price
Lucerne
Shredded Cheese
Coca-Cola or Canada Dry
lb
Club Price
Club Price
Club Price
Sweet Potatoes
99
GET 1
FREE
EQUAL OR LESSER VALUE
Club Price
KLMNO
METRO
FRIDAY, MARCH 30 , 2018
High today at
approx. 12 a.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
8 p.m.
62 66 60 52°
°
°
°
66°
Precip: 60%
Wind: W
10-20 mph
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
EZ
VIRGINIA
VIRGINIA
OBITUARIES
A restaurateur is suing the
state in federal court over
laws that limit the touting
of happy-hour specials. B2
Nearly 80 percent oppose
renaming the Lee-Davis
and Stonewall Jackson
schools near Richmond. B4
Rusty Staub, baseball’s
redheaded, clutch-hitting
“Le Grand Orange,” was a
hero to Expos fans. B6
Dine, down a $1,200 whiskey shot, and dash
BY
P ETER H ERMANN
He announced it was his birthday and that he was from London. Drinking at the bar at the
Willard InterContinental hotel,
police said, he was overheard
plotting — perhaps in a boozy
swagger — to jump the White
House fence.
At the Old Ebbitt Grill, the
manager said the man with the
crew cut blended in like a “regular kind of guy” and made quick
friends ordering rounds at a bar
B
M2
Upscale D.C. bars are on watch for man police suspect is a serial tab-skipper
once patronized by presidents.
And at the Ritz-Carlton, police
said, he topped a dinner of
grilled octopus and rack of lamb
with a $156 bottle of cabernet
sauvignon and a $1,200 shot of a
rare 34-year-old single-malt Irish
whiskey kept under combination
lock in a vault.
Police and the bartenders at
some of Washington’s swankiest
hotels, which attract a clientele
of pols, scribes and lobbyists, say
that for at least two recent weeks,
the man with the British accent
has come in. He orders from the
expensive side of the menu —
then skips out without paying
the bill. (Though police said he
did once try to bill the room of a
professional basketball player.)
An informal network has kept
tabs on the man’s travels, and
photos of him are circulating.
Managers or spokesmen for two
of three targets — the Willard
and the Ritz-Carlton — declined
to comment.
Police have arrested a suspect,
Nicholas James Cooper, 21, three
times, yet he has routinely been
released pending his next court
date, on April 12.
A motive remains unclear,
though court documents say
Cooper has been combative
when confronted by police, at
least twice begged officers to
shoot him and has tried to harm
himself while in custody. His
attorney, Teresa G. Kleiman, declined to comment, and neither
Cooper nor relatives could be
reached by The Washington Post.
Authorities said he is a British
citizen, and they have been in
contact with the consulate; officials there did not respond to
interview requests.
James Swanson and Michael F.
DINER CONTINUED ON B2
Walmart
to pay
for nixed
stores
PLANS SCRAPPED IN
UNDERSERVED AREAS
D.C. deal sets precedent
in era of turmoil for retail
Among the fields of gold
BY A BHA B HATTARAI
AND J ONATHAN O ’ C ONNELL
Walmart, the world’s largest
retailer, has agreed to pay the
District $1.3 million after
abruptly scrapping plans to open
two stores, including one in one
of Southeast Washington’s poorest neighborhoods.
The settlement, which the District’s attorney general announced Thursday, comes two
years after Walmart backed out
of plans to open two stores in
underserved D.C. neighborhoods — one at the Skyland Town
Center in Southeast Washington
and the other at Capitol Gateway
Marketplace in Northeast Washington.
Experts say the settlement sets
an interesting precedent at a
time when retailers continue to
shutter hundreds of stores to
make up for shifting customer
preferences.
“This isn’t a classic clawback
— it’s sort of a kissing cousin to a
clawback,” said Greg LeRoy, executive director of Good Jobs
First, a District-based watchdog
group that tracks government
subsidies for businesses. LeRoy
called the settlement “unusual”
but said it could put pressure on
other retailers to pay local govWALMART CONTINUED ON B4
MATT MCCLAIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
Michaela Herndon of Arlington does a handstand while playing with her children near the spring blooms of daffodils off Mount Vernon
Trail in the District. Temperatures are expected to stay in the 60s Friday, with a chance of showers. Forecast, B8
A Seder di≠erent
from all others
In 1969, a civil rights activist from the District
reimagined the way Passover is observed in U.S.
BY
J ULIE Z AUZMER
The day before the Rev. Martin
Luther King Jr.’s assassination,
Arthur Waskow defined himself
many ways: Civil rights activist.
Antiwar demonstrator. Historian. Writer.
An identity he did not put front
and center: Jew.
Then, on April 4, 1968, King
was killed — and the next day,
riots broke out in Washington.
Waskow and fellow white activists deeply immersed in the struggle for civil rights in the District
spent the rest of the week huddled in a makeshift command
center, trying to ferry supplies to
black communities under curfew as the National Guard took
over the streets of the city.
Eight days after the assassination, the Jewish holiday of Passover began. Waskow trudged
wearily back to his home in
Adams Morgan for the Passover
Seder. And as he passed a military
vehicle, with its machine gun
pointed outward, he had something of a religious experience.
“My guts began to say: ‘This is
Pharaoh’s army,’ ” he recalls. “The
Seder became not just serious —
it became explosive, like a volcano. Like discovering a volcano
you didn’t even know existed in
your own back yard. . . . Something blew up. Wham.”
Waskow’s sudden awakening
of Jewish consciousness was the
spark that would change the
Passover tradition for much of
American Jewry.
The next year, he wrote his own
Haggada — a religious text for the
Passover Seder — that incorporated modern-day injustices into
the age-old ritual.
If that seems like an obvious
aspect of the Seder to you now,
well, that’s because you’ve been
going to Seders since the Freedom Seder.
More than 800 people — black
and white, Jewish and Christian
— joined in a cross-racial gathering in a Washington church,
which used Waskow’s Haggada and would transform the
American Seder.
This year, on the 50th anniversary of King’s death, the pivotal
Haggada is getting its due accolades. The Center for Jewish History in New York and the National Museum of American Jewish
History in Philadelphia hosted
events in the past week where
historians extolled the influence
of the Freedom Seder.
The huge crowd in 1969 sat at
long tables in front of candles and
matzah.
They
read
from
Waskow’s book, which invoked
nuclear disarmament and police
brutality as modern problems in
SEDER CONTINUED ON B4
A first-generation college student
goes to Wegmans for spring break
During the crush of studying
for midterms, Antonio
Cummings kept hearing about
all the fabulous places his
friends at Allegany College
were going for spring break.
Petula
“Antigua, some are going to
Dvorak
Bermuda, some going to
Southern California, some
going to Atlanta,” said Cummings, who is 20
and a second-year communications student at
the Maryland college. “And there’s me, who is
going to work.”
Cummings is home in Prince George’s
County this spring break week, bagging
groceries and greeting customers at Wegmans
supermarket.
Cummings and hundreds of thousands of
college students like him don’t have the option
of taking fun trips or even participating in
alternative spring breaks — volunteering in
hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico or building
Habitat for Humanity houses in Houston.
They need to work to stay in college.
Many are first-generation college students,
DVORAK CONTINUED ON B5
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Antonio Cummings, a first-generation college student, chats with a customer during his
shift at Wegmans in Glenarden, Md., while on spring break from Allegany College.
Students
occupy
building
at Howard
Move comes amid
allegations employees
swindled financial aid
BY S ARAH L ARIMER AND
D ANIELLE D OUGLAS- G ABRIEL
More than 100 Howard University students occupied the
school’s administration building
Thursday, one day after the iconic
school disclosed a financial aid
scandal that prompted the firing
of six employees.
“Today, the goal was to take
over and occupy the A building, to
have leverage over the university,”
said Llewellyn Robinson, 20, a
Howard junior who was with the
student group HU Resist. “And
we’re successful in doing that,
obviously.”
Some students who lingered in
the building Thursday afternoon
sat on the floor, their backpacks
nearby. A banner that read “Student Power” hung by elevators,
and music played, sometimes
prompting a raucous, impromptu
dance party. Robinson said a list
of demands was released days
earlier, and the group planned to
stay in the building until those
demands were met.
“The whole goal here is student
power,” he said. “We need power
over our university.”
Jason Ajiake, 20, a junior at
Howard who is also with HU Resist, noted the university’s history
of campus demonstrations. He
said Thursday’s protest reflected
an array of concerns at the university, not just the financial aid
scandal.
HOWARD CONTINUED ON B3
B2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30 , 2018
MARYLAND
Baltimore legislator resigns from state Senate, admits to taking bribes
Nathaniel T. Oaks
pleads guilty to
corruption charges
BY
O VETTA W IGGINS
AND L YNH B UI
Hours after resigning from the
Maryland state Senate, Nathaniel
T. Oaks on Thursday pleaded
guilty to public corruption charges.
Oaks, a longtime Democratic
lawmaker from Baltimore, admitted in federal court that he
accepted more than $15,000 in
bribes from a man he thought
was a real estate developer, in
exchange for help securing funds
for a project.
He is set to be sentenced
July 17 in federal court in Baltimore.
Late Wednesday night, Oaks,
71, submitted a letter of resignation to Senate leadership saying
he had decided to step down “to
eliminate all clouds that have
hovered over the 2018 Legislative
Session.”
“Due to any potential concerns
or questionable activities on my
behalf, it is with deep regret,
respect and all my love for Baltimore City, the Maryland General
Assembly, its leadership, my
legislative colleagues and my
constituents in the 41st District,
that I resign my position,” Oaks
said.
Oaks is the second Maryland
lawmaker embroiled in a federal
corruption scandal to resign in
the past two years. Former state
delegate Michael L. Vaughn (DPrince George’s) resigned on the
first day of the 2017 legislative
session. He was later charged and
found guilty earlier this month of
conspiracy and bribery for accepting cash in exchange for
votes to expand liquor sales in
Prince George’s County.
Prosecutors said Oaks used his
power as a legislator to help a real
estate developer known as
“Mike,” who was interested in a
housing development project in
Baltimore. The developer turned
out to be an undercover FBI
source. In exchange for cash
bribes, Oaks filed a request for a
bond bill with the Maryland Department of Legislative Services
to secure funding for the project.
He also admitted to filing statements he knew to be false in a
letter asking for federal funds for
the purported development.
After accepting bribes in 2016,
Oaks confessed to the FBI after
arriving at a Baltimore hotel in
early 2017 expecting to meet the
developer but instead facing two
FBI agents, his plea states.
Oaks agreed after that encounter to wear a recording device in
an FBI investigation of another
businessperson with interests in
the bail bond and health-care
industry. That person had previously given Oaks money for car
repairs and paid for short trips to
Las Vegas and dinners as Oaks
helped build support for legislation in the person’s interest, the
Oaks plea agreement states.
But after several months of
helping the FBI in a “covert
public corruption investigation,”
Oaks admitted in his plea, he
tipped off the businessperson,
which meant the federal investigation into that person “and possibly other politicians was no
longer viable,” prosecutors wrote
in the Oaks plea deal.
Oaks had appeared determined to remain in office despite
repeated calls for his resignation
from Gov. Larry Hogan (R) and
some of his colleagues. Last
month, he filed for reelection.
Oaks was stripped of his committee assignment last month
after the Joint Committee on
Legislative Ethics found “numerous potential violations of the
Maryland Public Ethics Law,” including the misuse of public resources, conflicts of interest, misuse of the prestige of office,
improper acceptance of gifts, failure to make required disclosures
and failure to register as a lobbyist. The committee took the action after referring to the criminal complaint and “other related
documents.”
Oaks, who has served in the
General Assembly for 30 years,
was charged in federal court on
April 7, a Friday. He shocked his
colleagues the following Monday,
April 10 — the final day of the
session last year — when he
walked into the Senate chamber
and took his seat.
He lost his seat in the House of
Delegates in the late 1980s after
being convicted of stealing thousands of dollars from his campaign account. He regained his
seat in 1994 and was appointed to
the state Senate last year to
replace a legislator who stepped
down because of ill health.
Oaks faces a maximum of
20 years each on charges of wire
fraud and honest services wire
fraud.
Oaks and his attorney could
not immediately be reached for
comment Thursday.
ovetta.wiggins@washpost.com
lynh.bui@washpost.com
VIRGINIA
Chef challenges state’s
happy-hour restrictions,
citing free-speech rights
BY
SALWAN GEORGES/THE WASHINGTON POST
The Quadrant Bar and Lounge at the Ritz-Carlton hotel in Washington. On March 23, police said, Nicholas James Cooper, 21, rang up a
$2,200 bar bill, including a $1,200 whiskey shot, and tried to charge it to the room of Trey Lyles, a forward for the NBA’s Denver Nuggets.
Suspected D.C. tab-skipper
has court date in April
DINER FROM B1
Bishop, longtime friends who frequently gather over a drink, were
discussing the issues of the day when
they met a man who fits Cooper’s
description at the Hay-Adams bar on
Monday evening.
Swanson, the author of the bestseller “Manhunt: The 12-Day Chase
for Lincoln’s Killer,” said he recalled
the man bragging about a $1,200
shot he drank at the Ritz-Carlton and
about having celebrated his birthday
with a three-week trip to Las Vegas.
He recalled the man talking about
London, and living in the exclusive
Kensington neighborhood.
Swanson and Bishop said the man
was dressed casually — jeans and a
sweater. Bishop, the director of the
National Churchill Library and Center at George Washington University,
said he talked to the man for a few
minutes before the man turned his
attention to two young women.
“It was amusing watching him
drink expensive drink after expensive drink over the period of a couple
of hours,” Bishop said. “He appeared
knowledgeable.” He said the women
“seemed mortified. . . . They were
obviously trying to have a pleasant
conversation between them, and he
kept insisting on talking to them and
taking photographs with them.”
Police said they are looking into
the possibility that the man Swanson
and Bishop saw, who later absconded
without paying his bill, could be
Cooper. Cooper has not been charged
in that incident.
Hans Bruland, the vice president
and general manager of the HayAdams, declined to comment. “I’d
rather not be rude or mean,” he said.
“I’d just rather not speak about it.”
Cooper first attracted the attention of authorities on March 13, when
police officers responded to a report
of two thefts — from the Willard,
where authorities said the man
signed his $68.20 bar bill with a fake
name and hotel room — and then the
Old Ebbitt Grill, where they said he
tried to pay $67.91 with a closed
credit card.
One of Old Ebbitt’s managers, Ezra
Riggs, described the man as “relatively friendly and offering to buy
drinks.” He said bartenders can often
recognize a customer who may not be
able to pay, but he said with this
customer “there wasn’t any red flags,
at least at the beginning.”
Cooper was arrested and charged
with two counts of theft, and he was
released pending his April court
“It was amusing watching
him drink expensive drink
after expensive drink over
the period of a couple of
hours.”
Michael F. Bishop, on a man he saw at the
Hay-Adams bar Monday
date. He told the arresting officers,
according to an affidavit, “I have
nothing.”
Three days later, Cooper was back
in custody. Authorities said he was
charged with destruction of property
after he allegedly pulled on the glass
doors of the Embassy Row Hotel so
hard that they shattered. Police said
he mistook the hotel for the one he
was actually staying at across the
street.
Court records show that Cooper
was again released after a hearing.
On March 23, police said, Cooper
showed up at the Ritz-Carlton in the
West End, where a report says he
rang up a $2,200 bar bill, which
included the $1,200 shot from a
limited-edition bottle from the Teel-
ing Whiskey Co. Police said in an
affidavit that Cooper charged the
$2,220.40 bill to the room of Trey
Lyles, a forward for the Denver
Nuggets. Hours earlier the team had
beaten the Washington Wizards at
Capital One Arena.
Police confronted Cooper in the
hotel lobby. An officer noted in an
arrest affidavit that he is “known to
officers for previous incidents at
hotels in the area.” The officer said in
the affidavit that in previous incidents the suspect had asked officers
to “just shoot him.”
Police said Cooper put his hands in
his pocket and refused orders to take
them out. Fearing he had a weapon,
the officer tackled Cooper, the affidavit says. It was not a gun or knife that
fell out, however, but a bottle of
alcohol, which broke on the floor.
Police arrested Cooper, who for a
third time since March 13 was released on his own recognizance.
On Monday evening when Swanson and Bishop were at the HayAdams, a customer was accused of
absconding on a $500 bar bill of wine
and oysters by signing a check to an
empty room.
This time, police arrived too late to
make an arrest. Swanson said the
bartender chased the man they had
met into the street but “could only
get a glimpse as he watched him run
off into the night.”
On Wednesday, Cooper was entering a hotel a block from the White
House when he caught the attention
of authorities. Court documents say
that Cooper had been flagged by the
Secret Service as acting suspiciously
near the executive mansion and that
a judge had barred him from the
surrounding area.
Authorities arrested Cooper and
charged him with unlawful entry and
violating the stay-away order, court
papers show. He was released from
custody Thursday.
peter.hermann@washpost.com
THE POSTPOINTS HUNT
Tables and chairs, beds, sofas and more
Belfort has it all, it’s a superstore.
Their wares are in Dulles, just a short drive.
When you spot massive showrooms, you’ll know you’ve arrived.
For how many years have consumers voted Belfort
“Best Furniture Store” in Loudon County?
(Hint: See BelfortFurniture.com for the answer.)
R ACHEL W EINER
For years, chef Geoff Tracy has
railed against a Virginia law that
bans bars and restaurants from
touting happy hour specials outside an establishment’s walls.
The owner of three area restaurants, he didn’t understand why
he could tell potential customers
in Chevy Chase and the District —
but not Tysons Corner — how
much they would pay for an
afternoon drink.
Last year, his complaints
caught the attention of a libertarian law firm. Now Tracy is suing
the state’s alcohol control board
in Alexandria federal court, saying the law violates his free
speech.
“It’s one of those things that
just continued to irk me,” Tracy
said in an interview Thursday.
“It’s kind of a rule for the sake of a
rule.”
He and other restaurateurs
successfully pushed for more liberal happy hour laws in the Virginia legislature four years ago.
For the first time since the end of
Prohibition, it became legal to
put a sign promoting boozy discounts outside a restaurant or bar
in the commonwealth. Print, social media and broadcast ads
were also legalized.
But only two phrases can be
used: “happy hour” or “drink
specials.” That leaves Chef Geoff’s
Tysons Corner unable to advertise, for example, his “Wednesday
Wine Night” (half-priced bottles).
Although the kinds of drinks on
offer can be listed, the prices must
remain a mystery until a customer enters the establishment.
“What I find to be most absurd
is that I can’t tell you what the
price of a beer is,” Tracy said.
He said the rules are also confusing: It’s unclear whether he
can put an ad in a newspaper
listing all his restaurants and the
happy hour specials without
breaking Virginia law.
First-time violators can be hit
with a $500 fine and a week-long
liquor license suspension.
An effort he backed in 2015 to
further loosen the regulations
stalled. Now, Tracy hopes to see
them completely undone.
The lawsuit, brought by the
Pacific Legal Foundation, argues
that the limits on advertising
legally discounted drinks are unconstitutional and, “in a town
well-known for its love of happy
hour,” are hurting Tracy’s business.
It also argues that a ban on
“two-for-one” drink specials is
unconstitutional, because bars
are allowed to offer two drinks for
half price.
Anastasia Boden of the PLF
said that she had been looking at
“crazy” alcohol laws across the
country and that Virginia’s restrictions are ripe for challenge.
She reached out to Tracy about six
months ago and offered to represent him free.
The group is best known for
challenging environmental protection laws on behalf of property
owners.
“There’s a knee-jerk reaction to
view alcohol as something dangerous, but the reality is these are
businesses that are acting like
any other businesses, and there’s
no reason to treat alcohol with
such venom,” Boden said in an
interview.
Several other states ban happyhour specials altogether, she said,
but she knows of no other that
allows afternoon price cuts while
barring open discussion of the
details.
“If it’s perfectly legal to do it, it
has to be legal to say it,” she said.
Genevieve Lakier, a professor
at the University of Chicago Law
School who studies First Amendment issues, said Tracy will probably prevail.
“Courts generally frown on
laws that attempt to deprive consumers of information,” she said.
“I don’t know what Virginia was
thinking here, but I don’t see how
the law can be upheld.”
She pointed out that it was a
Virginia case involving pharmaceutical prices that led the Supreme Court in 1976 to rule that
corporate speech is protected under the First Amendment.
The push to change Virginia’s
law in 2015 was met with resistance from anti-substance-abuse
organizations, who argued that
any expansion of encouragement
to drink is dangerous.
But Tracy said he’s heard no
opposition since filing the suit
Wednesday, and he expects the
state to settle. He’s not asking for
compensation, just for the law to
be scrapped.
A spokeswoman for the Virginia Alcoholic Beverage Control
Authority said she could not comment on pending litigation.
rachel.weiner@washpost.com
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Chef Geoff Tracy, with his wife, Norah O’Donnell, said that he is
able to advertise prices of afternoon drink specials in his other area
restaurants and that the laws are hurting his Virginia business.
WHAT WILL YOU FIND?
Take in a show at Arena Stage
A world-premiere musical that’s all the rage
About a young couple and a wild girl.
Sit back and watch the story unfurl.
Who will direct Snow Child April 13-May 20 at Arena Stage?
(Hint: See ArenaStage.org for the answer.)
Catch the Earth, Wind & Fire Tribute Band
At BB&J, come if you can.
Prepare to sing, boogie and groove
To “Shining Star,” “Reasons” and funky “Let’s Groove.”
At what time will the Earth, Wind & Fire Tribute Band perform on
April 4 at Bethesda Blues & Jazz Supper Club?
(Hint: See See BBJLive.com for the answer.)
E A R N 5 P O I N T S : F i n d t h e a n s w e r, t h e n g o t o w a s h i n g t o n p o s t . c o m / p o s t p o i n t s a n d c l i c k o n “ Q u i z z e s ” t o e n t e r t h e c o r r e c t r e s p o n s e .
FRIDAY, MARCH 30 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
U.S. DISTRICT COURT
A sign posted at the entrance to a homeless encampment in
Northwest asks that the person’s possessions be left alone.
THE DISTRICT
Lawsuit: City destroys
property of homeless
BY
P ETER J AMISON
A group of homeless people —
with the help of a high-powered
team of attorneys — has filed a
class-action lawsuit against the
D.C. government, alleging that city
workers are improperly throwing
out their belongings during sweeps
of street encampments.
The lawsuit, filed Wednesday in
U.S. District Court for the District
of Columbia, asserts that the city
government and Mayor Muriel E.
Bowser (D) are violating the Fourth
Amendment’s protections against
unreasonable searches and seizures.
It comes as the nation’s capital is
struggling with one of the highest
rates of homelessness of any U.S.
city, and draws attention to the
most visible facet of that problem:
the plight of men and women who
live on the street.
The named plaintiffs are Shanel
Proctor and Charlaine Braxton,
who say they sleep in tents near
Union Station. They are being rep-
resented by attorneys from Covington & Burling, one of Washington’s
most prestigious law firms, and are
requesting that their case be certified as a class-action suit on behalf
of D.C.’s homeless.
The lawsuit alleges that District
government workers have ignored
a city protocol requiring that possessions confiscated during the
clearing of homeless encampments be stored for up to 60 days so
the items can be retrieved by their
owners.
Instead, the suit asserts, the city
“has followed a consistent practice
of destroying unattended belongings whenever the owner is absent
for some or all of a clearing,” including “tents and other shelters, bicycles, blankets, clothing, identification documents, medications, Social Security cards, medical and
court records, family photographs,
letters, and other personal belongings.”
Such actions put the homeless
“in grave danger of suffering irreparable harm through loss of per-
sonal property that is necessary for
survival or that cannot be replaced,” the suit states. Proctor and
Braxton are seeking an injunction
against the District to prevent further destruction of homeless people’s belongings.
Sean Barry, communications director for HyeSook Chung, the
city’s deputy mayor for health and
human services, declined to comment on the lawsuit but said in a
written statement that the city
cleared encampments “in a manner which is respectful of individuals experiencing homelessness and
those individuals’ personal property” and that encampments are
cleared because of “real security,
public health and safety concerns.”
Attached as exhibits to the lawsuit are reports from the D.C. Department of Human Services that
appear to acknowledge that items
cleared from encampments were
destroyed. Also attached is a photograph of a cardboard sign, hung on
a makeshift shelter at K and
26th streets NW and apparently
directed to city cleaning crews: “I
have very little, as is. Please try to
restrain from taking any more.”
Other cities and counties — especially in Western states where
outdoor encampments tend to be
larger and more widespread —
have found themselves mired in
litigation over their efforts to sweep
the homeless from the streets.
Families, who don’t typically
sleep outside, make up the bulk of
Washington’s homeless. But hundreds of others, most of them single
adults, still live on the street, especially during warmer months. Shelters and short-term housing exist
for such people, but they can be
hard to access and are considered
outdated in the services they provide.
The city’s annual homeless
count in January 2017 found an
estimated 897 people on the street.
City officials and homeless advocates say that figure may have been
unreliably high because of unseasonably warm weather that discouraged people from seeking shelter. In 2016, the estimate was 318,
and the year before that, 544.
peter.jamison@washpost.com
L O C A L D I G ES T
MARYLAND
Man fatally shot
in parking garage
A man was shot and killed late
Wednesday in Prince George’s
County.
Police said the shooting
happened about 11:05 p.m. in the
600 block of Harry S. Truman
Drive in the Largo area.
Police investigating a report of
gunshots found the man suffering
from a gunshot wound in a
parking garage.
The victim — identified as 39year-old Omar Wright of Largo —
was pronounced dead at the scene.
Police ask anyone with
information about the shooting to
contact them at 301-772-4925.
The D.C. region has had more
than two dozen homicides this
year, according to a tracking
system maintained by The
Washington Post. Of those, 17 were
in Maryland, including a dozen in
Prince George’s.
— Dana Hedgpeth
Two arrested in
shooting over bill
Two people were arrested in
Prince George’s County on
Thursday after a dispute over a bill
at a National Harbor restaurant
ended in gunfire, police said.
At around 12:40 a.m., officers
went to a restaurant in the 100
block of Fleet Street in Oxon Hill
for a reported shooting, Prince
George’s County police said. They
found one security guard suffering
from a gunshot wound and
another with a graze wound, the
police statement said; neither
injury was life-threatening.
The police statement said
Montana Artis, 21, of Waldorf,
Md., and Tony Irene Marie Smith,
19, of Alexandria were customers
who got into a dispute with
restaurant employees over their
bill, then were escorted out by the
guards before Artis opened fire.
Artis and Smith fled before
being arrested at a nearby hotel,
police said; Artis was charged with
two counts of attempted murder
and assault, and Smith was
charged with disorderly conduct
and conspiracy after the fact.
— Dana Hedgpeth
and Justin Wm. Moyer
VIRGINIA
Police say man killed
his brother in fistfight
A fistfight between two
brothers left a 28-year-old man
dead in Alexandria, the city’s first
homicide this year.
The fight took place about 6:24
p.m. Sunday in an apartment in
the 2200 block of North
Beauregard Street, police said.
Brian Cruz-Segovia, 23, knocked
his brother Nelson Cruz
unconscious, according to police.
Cruz was taken to a hospital,
and his brother was arrested and
charged with malicious
wounding.
On Wednesday, Cruz was taken
off life support.
— Rachel Weiner
Police: Store worker
stole and sold goods
The once-popular retail chain
Toys R Us is closing all of its stores
and liquidating its merchandise.
But the location in Fairfax County
has had items missing from its
shelves for a while, officials said.
Obaid Sheikh, a 25-year-old
employee at the Toys R Us in the
Fair Lakes Shopping Center in
Chantilly, is alleged to have stolen
more than $100,000 in toys and
merchandise from there and sold
them on eBay.
Toys R Us has said it is closing
all of its 800 stores in the United
States — a move that is expected to
eliminate 33,000 jobs. The chain,
which was once one of the biggest
toy retailers in the country, has
dealt with roughly $8 billion in
debt.
Police said they believe that
Sheikh was involved in stealing
from the store since 2014.
An internal security team at the
Chantilly store discovered the
stealing scheme and reached out
to Fairfax County police. Sheikh
was arrested in late February and
charged with money laundering,
embezzlement and selling stolen
property.
— Dana Hedgpeth
There's a smarter way to remodel
your kitchen.
After
Avoid the mess, time and
cost of major remodeling,
while renewing the look of your
kitchen in about 3-5 days.
$500 OFF
or 12 Months
Same as Cash
Before
Coupon must be presented
at the time of estimate.
Offer cannot be combined with
any other discounts.
Prepare to be impressed.™
Schedule Your FREE In-Home Consultation Today!
202-996-3563 DC | 301-265-5719 MD
703-520-6154 VA
MHIC#28743 District of Columbia Basic Business License #420214000004 Virginia Class A Contractor’s License #2705152898
B3
M2
SARAH LARIMER/THE WASHINGTON POST
More than 100 Howard University students occupy the administration building Thursday,
a day after the school revealed a financial aid scandal that led to the firing of six employees.
‘The whole goal here is student power’
HOWARD FROM B1
Howard senior Alexis McKenney also said the demonstration
transcended concerns about
financial aid, although she acknowledged the scandal gave organizers “the fuel that we needed.”
“Students were enraged,” McKenney, 21, said. There are Howard students who struggle — students who have trouble with
housing or scholarships, she said,
and yet the university seems to
keep having problems.
“So now, we’re making a stand,”
she said.
This week, Howard’s president,
Wayne A.I. Frederick, promised
“swift action” against those entangled in the financial aid misappropriation.
“My team is currently working
with outside experts to assist us in
exploring all options to recoup
the funds,” Frederick said
Wednesday in a message to students. “I feel strongly that any
dollar that is taken away from a
deserving student due to malfeasance or fraud is unacceptable.
We will continue to take swift
action against any individuals involved in this wrongdoing.”
Howard officials disclosed the
scandal this week but by Thursday morning had not said how
much money was involved. An
email seeking an estimated figure, sent Thursday to school
spokeswoman Alonda Thomas,
was not immediately returned.
Police were present at the demonstration, and Robinson said
there was a concern they might
attempt to end the occupation.
“Honestly, we’re in here. We
control the building,” he said. “We
control the entrances. So right
now, we’re in a good position.”
The university had no plans to
remove students from the building, Howard spokeswoman Crystal Brown said Thursday evening.
“Howard University students
have a legendary history of exercising their civic rights,” Brown
said. “We support this wholeheartedly.”
A university investigation discovered that for nine years — from
2007 to 2016 — some employees
who received tuition benefits to
cover the cost of taking classes
were also receiving university
grants. That double-dipping exceeded the actual cost of attendance, signaling that the workers
appeared to be embezzling.
Frederick has said he learned
in December 2016 that financial
aid money might have been misused, a revelation that triggered
an internal investigation. An outside auditor was brought in, and
Frederick said he received audit
results in May 2017.
Six employees were later fired
for “gross misconduct and neglect
of duties,” Frederick said. His
statement indicated Howard
would refer the issue for criminal
prosecution, if appropriate. A D.C.
police spokeswoman said Thursday the department had not been
contacted about the allegations.
Frederick said he had met with
student leaders Wednesday evening to discuss the situation and
answer questions.
“I heard their concerns firsthand,” he said in his statement. “It
was a productive session and I
look forward to having more engagement with them on critical
issues as we move the university
forward.”
Jade Agudosi, president of the
Howard University Student Association, said student leaders were
left “a little bit unsatisfied” with
the response they received,
though Frederick did provide
some details of the investigation.
“Some things just didn’t add up
for us,” she said. “More specifically, the timeline.”
Agudosi said she saw transparency issues with the way Howard
handled the matter, something
that was discussed at the meeting.
Student leaders are aware of
Howard’s legacy, she said, but a
lack of transparency suggested
the university prioritized its
brand over its students.
“And that’s something I can
never get behind,” she said.
While no definitive data exists
on financial aid fraud involving
university dollars, the U.S. Education Department’s inspector general routinely investigates school
officials accused of misappropriating federal aid.
In the past three years, the
inspector general’s office has been
involved in nearly 40 cases of
colleges and college officials allegedly misusing student aid funds.
Some of those cases have resulted
in criminal prosecution, while
others have been settled out of
court or are ongoing. Some involve employees at for-profit colleges, while others involve staff at
institutions such as Baruch College in New York and Suffolk
University in Boston.
Howard officials said the misappropriated grant money was
not from the federal government,
nor was it money that donors had
designated for grants.
Frederick had said findings
from the investigation were reported to the Education Department. That agency’s inspector
general would neither confirm
nor deny Wednesday whether officials were investigating.
News of Howard’s investigation and the subsequent terminations came the same week that an
anonymous item was posted to
the online blogging platform
Medium alleging an “office-wide
scandal” involving officials in the
university’s financial aid department. Later, the Medium post was
no longer available online.
In his message this week to
students, Frederick said learning
about mishandled funds at Howard could be “difficult to process.”
“The goal established at the
onset of this investigation was to
conduct it in a confidential manner that ensured a thorough examination of the issues without
jeopardizing the integrity of the
findings,” he said. “However, that
does not mitigate the sense of
mistrust that many students and
members of our community feel
right now. We understand that
and we hear you.”
sarah.larimer@washpost.com
danielle.douglas-gabriel@washpost.com
L O TTE R I E S
Results from March 29
DISTRICT
Mid-Day Lucky Numbers:
Mid-Day DC-4:
Mid-Day DC-5:
Lucky Numbers (Wed.):
Lucky Numbers (Thu.):
DC-4 (Wed.):
DC-4 (Thu.):
DC-5 (Wed.):
DC-5 (Thu.):
2-3-5
6-9-4-0
8-4-9-5-3
7-1-3
3-8-0
2-5-5-8
2-9-7-3
0-9-2-7-8
5-7-5-9-9
MARYLAND
Mid-Day Pick 3:
Mid-Day Pick 4:
5-1-7
3-2-3-5
Night/Pick 3 (Wed.):
Pick 3 (Thu.):
Pick 4 (Wed.):
Pick 4 (Thu.):
Multi-Match:
Match 5 (Wed.):
Match 5 (Thu.):
5 Card Cash:
4-8-8
1-4-2
9-2-4-5
1-7-5-5
3-7-14-18-22-27
1-5-15-19-21 *39
4-18-20-31-34 *1
7S-7H-QC-8C-KD
VIRGINIA
Day/Pick-3:
Pick-4:
Cash-5:
Night/Pick-3 (Wed.):
Pick-3 (Thu.):
Pick-4 (Wed.):
4-0-8
0-7-8-4
5-13-21-30-33
1-2-0
3-9-0
2-9-8-1
Pick-4 (Thu.):
Cash-5 (Wed.):
Cash-5 (Thu.):
Bank a Million:
2-0-9-3
4-6-15-29-30
4-15-22-28-29
3-9-29-35-38-39 *6
MULTI-STATE GAMES
Cash 4 Life:
Lucky for Life:
Powerball:
Power Play:
*Bonus Ball
¶Cash Ball
34-35-36-46-58 ¶1
16-19-31-44-48 ‡7
6-8-26-52-53 **21
2x
**Powerball
‡Lucky Ball
For late drawings and other results, check
washingtonpost.com/local/lottery
B4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30 , 2018
Freedom
Report finds desire to
Seder
keep Rebel school names reimagined
Civil War ties run deep
the ritual
as 76% want to preserve
VIRGINIA
legacy, results show
BY
D EBBIE T RUONG
Thousands of community
members chimed in on the proposed renaming of Lee-Davis
High School and Stonewall Jackson Middle School near Richmond. The response was resounding: Keep the names.
Roughly 76 percent of the more
than 13,000 people who submitted responses to a survey supported keeping the names of the
schools in Mechanicsville, a suburb of the capital city, according
to a report provided by Hanover
County Public Schools.
The debate over the school
names
in
Mechanicsville
emerged as schools and other
institutions across the country
began evaluating the place of
Confederate symbols in public
places after white supremacists
and white nationalists descended
in Charlottesville for an August
rally that turned deadly.
Those who have called for
change in Mechanicsville argue
the school names and mascots —
the Confederates (the high
school) and Rebels (the middle
school) — inappropriately honor
men who fought to maintain
slavery, and reflect a tortured
racial history. Opponents view
renaming the schools as an effort
to dismiss history.
The high school is named
for Robert E. Lee, a Confederate
general, and Jefferson Davis,
president of the Confederacy.
Stonewall Jackson, the middle
school’s namesake, was also a
Confederate general.
A survey was generated by the
school district to gauge public
sentiment on the names after
alumni and other community
members began advocating for
change last year. Students, parents, faculty and alumni who
supported keeping the names cited the importance of honoring
the schools’ heritage, expressed
cost concerns and argued that
renaming the schools wouldn’t
ameliorate racism, according to
the district’s report.
Ryan Leach, a Lee-Davis graduate who spearheaded the campaign to rid the schools of the
names and mascots, said the
results weren’t unexpected. Ties
to the Civil War run deep in
Hanover, the county where Mechanicsville is located, and the
renaming push was met with
significant resistance in the community.
But Leach said he was pleased
two members of the seven-member school board appeared to
signal support for the school
renaming at a work session earlier this month.
“It’s so important now that
there’s a contemporary record of
people going against the name
and mascots and a revisitation of
history in Hanover County,”
Leach said.
Marsha Boyce Rider, a LeeDavis graduate who launched a
petition to maintain the names,
declined to comment on the survey results.
The school board is expected to
discuss the renaming proposal at
an April board meeting and
“bring this item to a conclusion,”
according to a district spokesman.
debbie.truong@washpost.com
The Magazine
Masks
and Truth
SEDER FROM B1
need of solutions alongside the
traditional “Dayenu” recitation of
ancient problems that God
solved, and listed King and Gandhi as “prophets” alongside Elijah. The worshipers raised their
wine glasses and proclaimed not
“L’chaim” but “Liberation now!”
and sang a hymn common to
black Christians and to Jews: “Go
Down, Moses.”
The service was broadcast live
by a New York radio station and
filmed by the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. Jewish publications
across the country wrote articles
about it. Hundreds of people
bought Waskow’s Haggada to use
at their own family Seders the
following year; many families
have used it ever since.
Michael Tabor, a leader of the
activist group Jews United for
Justice that distributed the Haggada across the country in 1970
and later, recalled: “At these Seders using the new Haggada, people would get into fistfights. They
wrote me, ‘My uncle got up and
slapped his nephew, and he got
up and slammed him, over him
referring to Eldridge Cleaver as
a shofet,’ ” or comparing the
Black Panther Party leader to a
biblical judge, as the new Haggada did.
But Waskow’s concept spread.
There have been countless interpretations of the Haggada: feminist Seders, vegetarian Seders,
refugee Seders, LGBT Seders.
Jewish and black communities
will come together for Freedom
Seders once more this week in
several cities, including a soldout Washington gathering at Silver Spring United Methodist
Church, where a gospel choir and
a Muslim choir will sing. Several
attendees of the first Freedom
Seder will be there, including
Jamie B. Raskin, now a U.S.
congressman representing suburban Maryland, who was
just 6 years old when he attended
the original Seder with his father,
activist Marcus Raskin.
Topper
Carew
will
be
there, one of the many Freedom
Seders he has attended in several
cities over the decades since that
first one.
When Waskow, whom Carew
ARTHUR WASKOW
At the Freedom Seder in 1969, historian Arthur Waskow, center, was joined by the Rev. Channing
Phillips, left, of Lincoln Congregational Temple, and civil rights activist Topper Carew.
got to know when they were both
delegates to the 1968 Democratic
National Convention, invited him
to help lead the 1969 event,
Carew had never even heard of a
Seder.
“It was an event to talk about
the parallel histories and commonalities that the Jewish community and the black community
had in their respective struggles.
That made sense to me,” said
Carew, who was active in the
District’s black progressive community at the time. “It made me
more aware of the common history, the parallel histories. It was
something I didn’t know and
didn’t think about until that occasion.”
Since then, Carew — who went
on to become one of the creators
of the TV sitcom “Martin” — has
come to think of the Jewish Seder
as a useful vehicle for passing
down history, one that he compares to observing Martin Luther
King Jr. Day. “Conversations
about the history of struggle need
to be reignited. I think there has
been a real dropping of the ball
when it comes to a more thorough understanding of where we
come from historically. Young
people in particular need to know
that,” Carew said. “We need as
many markers and as many occasions as we can, to celebrate the
history of our struggles.”
That’s why he keeps going to
Seders.
Washington are locked in another round of that seemingly
endless friction, sparked this
time by D.C. Council member
Trayon White Sr.’s recent espousal
of a conspiracy theory about the
Jewish banking family, the Rothschilds. Again, the Freedom Seder comes at a time when the two
communities are trying to understand one another and unite for a
common purpose.
For Waskow, the Freedom Seder was the first step on a path to
far deeper Jewish involvement.
After the Haggada, he wrote several books about Judaism. In
1995, he was ordained as a rabbi.
“The Freedom Seder liberated
the Haggada. . . . The Freedom
Seder was the first Seder that
opened the framework beyond
the Jewish experience to include
multiple experiences, especially
the black community’s struggle
against American racism,” he
said. After that came a flood of
interpretive Seders that brought
the ancient ritual into perpetual
relevance in American homes
and communities.
Waskow likens the enduring
tradition that he launched to a
chemistry lesson: “If you have a
supersaturated solution and you
drop a crystal into that solution,
the whole solution crystallizes. I
was lucky enough to be the one
who dropped the crystal into the
solution. And, wow, was it ready.”
julie.zauzmer@washpost.com
Walmart settles over abandoned plans to open stores
Our photo essay
reveals one
photographer’s
bid to upend
our perceptions
of race.
WALMART FROM B1
ernments if they change their
plans.
“This is a reminder that there
are real public-sector costs associated with making it possible
for companies to arrive in a city,”
LeRoy said. “There is so much
turmoil in retail right now — so
many planned retail projects are
getting canceled or being
shrunken or reshaped. City efforts to build retail are being
upended.”
In Walmart’s case, both failed
projects were in major developments considered crucial to the
District’s efforts to bring groceries and amenities to its poorest neighborhoods. City officials
say Walmart had agreed to open
two stores in underserved areas
as part of its deal to set up shop
in the District. The retailer had
Arts & Style
Funny talk: From “As if” to “Don’t call me Shirley,”
we list memorable quotes from 40 years of comedies
that have changed the way we talk.
Outlook
Reality trumps: The creator of the television show
“Veep” wonders how to write political satire in an age
when politics itself are a farce.
Travel
BONNIE JO MOUNT/THE WASHINGTON POST
Employees participate in opening ceremonies at the Walmart on
Georgia Avenue in 2013. The retailer agreed to pay the District
$1.3 million after canceling plans to open two additional stores.
Cruise 2.0: Explore how cruises are starting to offer
mountain bike excursions, cheaper WiFi and better
food to appeal to millennials and Gen Xers.
Enjoy the Outdoors All Year!
Business
SunSuites Sunrooms
The Turo effect: In the rapidly shifting
transportation landscape, will the Goliaths of the
rental car industry be left behind in the wake of
savvier startups?
SunSuites Sunroom
End of the Year Special
$
2,500 OFF
Wiith thhis co
oupo
on. No
N t valid withh othher offerss or prior salees.
Couupon good
o up
pon initiaal preesent
n atio
on onnly.
Lim
mited timee off
ffer. Pricee incluudess exper
p t installlatio
on.
Sunday Coupons
18-0312 2x10.5
The Freedom Seder aimed to
improve strained relations between black and Jewish communities. Tabor, who helped organize the original Seder and the
upcoming Silver Spring commemoration, saw plenty of cause
for black Washingtonians’ mistrust of Jews.
He recalls that Jews were formally and informally restricted
from many professions, because
certain law firms, hospitals and
businesses wouldn’t hire Jews in
the 1940s and 1950s. As a result, a
disproportionate number of Jews
went into real estate and became
the landlords who owned segregated properties, which were often poorly maintained. Throughout the late 1960s, Jews United
for Justice confronted those landlords and other Jewish business
owners, and sometimes picketed
their businesses and staged other
dramatic protests when conversations failed to persuade them.
“It was such a contradiction.
How could Jews, so soon [after
the Holocaust], be involved in
being racist?” he asked this week,
choking up as he recalled those
years of activism in an interview
for an oral history project for the
Jewish Historical Society of
Greater Washington. “We tried to
make people aware of the contradictions in what they were doing
and make them ashamed of it.”
Half a century later, the black
and Jewish communities in
Save nearly $100 with coupons in the Post
Marketplace package of this Sunday’s Post!
ents
Paymw as
as lo 99
$1
Some stories may not run due to breaking news.
Winter Screen Room
Special
BUY NOW AND
$
SAVE
1,250
Some restrictions apply
Find out what’s happening this
.
202-869-1044 DC
703-468-4418 VA
301-841-8308 MD
Fridays in
Lifetime Warranty
N0779 2x1.5
ƫņāĂĆąĆĀƫđƫƫņĂĈĀĆƫāĀĉĉăĆ
Locally Owned & Operated
worked closely with the District
in planning the stores and had
already signed leases. After Walmart backed out, both projects
were set back more than a year,
with no major retailers signing
on to replace them.
The Skyland store was expected to bring 300 jobs to Ward 7,
which has some of the District’s
highest unemployment rates.
City officials said they had also
expected about $65 million in
sales and property taxes from the
store.
“When Walmart terminated
its lease at Skyland, an underserved part of our community
was deprived of jobs and retail
options it had been promised,”
Attorney General Karl A. Racine
said in a statement. “My office
took action on this matter because District residents expect
corporations and developers to
honor their commitments. Moving forward, we plan to take a
closer look at financial incentives made by the city and work
to ensure that benefits promised
to our community are actually
delivered, especially where residents need them most.”
A spokesman for Walmart said
the company had not received
any financial incentives from the
District related to the opening of
any of its stores. The retailer has
about 1,100 employees in its
three D.C. stores and contributes
about $15 million in local taxes, according to Walmart spokesman Randy Hargrove.
But in early 2016, Walmart
canceled its plans for the two
stores and announced it would
close 269 stores worldwide, including 154 in the United States.
Company officials said at the
time that they had new concerns
about the potential profitability
of the two stores. Walmart now
operates three D.C. locations:
near Union Station, on Georgia
Avenue and at Fort Totten.
“We have absolutely been
shafted,” D.C. Council member
Vincent C. Gray (D-Ward 7) said
at the time. “They think they can
do this to us and we will roll over.
I bet you Walmart doesn’t do that
everywhere.”
abha.bhattarai@washpost.com
jonathan.oconnell@washpost.com
FRIDAY, MARCH 30 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
obituaries
MARYLAND
Senate votes to strip 3 top o∞cials of
roles in school construction decisions
BY
O VETTA W IGGINS
The Maryland Senate on
Thursday voted to eliminate a
decades-old state process for prioritizing the building and repairing of schools by stripping the
governor, comptroller and state
treasurer of their role in approving projects, a move Gov. Larry
Hogan (R) called a “personal
vendetta” against his ally, Comptroller Peter Franchot (D).
The 29-to-14 vote, with one
abstention, came after a brief
filibuster and long debate about
why the Democratic-controlled
legislature pushed so hard to
eliminate Franchot from the
school construction process.
Sen. Bill Ferguson (D-Baltimore City) said the bill, which
requires standards for school
buildings and assessments of
school structures as well as a plan
to spend $400 million a year on
projects, will help to remove
politics from the process. The
legislation also includes $10 million for school safety enhancements.
“The system has been broken,”
he said, noting the condition of
some Baltimore City schools.
“Parents across the state are
clamoring for better schools for
their children.”
But Republicans said the new
process is likely to create bigger
problems.
“We’re taking away an important part of the transparency and
accountability that we’ve come to
rely on in this state,” said Sen.
Justin D. Ready (R-Carroll), who
voted against the measure.
Amelia Chasse, a spokeswoman for Hogan, said the governor
will veto the bill. But the move
would be symbolic; both chambers have passed the measure
with a veto-proof majority.
“In what is surely one of the
least transparent episodes in legislative history, 29 senators voted
today to take away critical oversight and give authority over
billions of taxpayer dollars in
school construction funding over
to an unelected, unaccountable
group that includes lobbyists,
partisan operatives and political
cronies,” Chasse said.
The legislation sets up a commission made up of appointees
by the governor, Senate president
and House speaker, to handle
decisions involving school construction that are currently made
by the Board of Public Works
(BPW), composed of the governor, comptroller and treasurer.
On Wednesday, at the start of
the bimonthly BPW meeting, Hogan called the legislative action
and the amendment, which was
added to a popular school construction bill, “simply outrageous.”
Franchot said it was “utterly
shameful” that the legislature
would “hijack” the bill to strip
him and the rest of the panel of
its authority. He said he was not
apologetic for taking county and
school officials to task, including
those from Democratic-run jurisdictions, over the “inhumane
conditions” of the schools and
how they spend state taxpayer
dollars.
“I’m not going to apologize for
this board’s advocacy,” he said in
a nearly 10-minute speech at the
beginning of the meeting.
Sen. Michael J. Hough (R-Frederick) read Franchot’s entire
speech on the Senate floor.
ovetta.wiggins@washpost.com
MARYLAND
Adnan Syed of ‘Serial’ podcast will
get a new trial, appeals court a∞rms
BY
S ONIA R AO
Adnan Syed, known to many as
a subject of the popular podcast
“Serial,” has been granted a new
trial almost 20 years after he was
convicted of killing his ex-girlfriend and sentenced to a life in
prison.
Syed received the sentence in
2000 for the murder of his Woodlawn High School classmate Hae
Min Lee, whose body was found in
nearby Leakin Park. A Baltimore
Circuit Court vacated that conviction in 2016, citing the “ineffective
assistance” of Syed’s former attorney. On Thursday, the Maryland
Court of Appeals upheld the ruling
granting him a new trial.
“Serial” devoted its first season
to the crime and the conviction, as
host Sarah Koenig and her producers interviewed a number of
Syed’s friends and family members, sparking a national debate
over whether he was innocent or
guilty as the podcast became a
cultural phenomenon attracting
millions of listeners.
Rabia Chaudry, a lawyer who
has fought to prove Syed’s innocence for years, was one of the
interviewees and celebrated the
opinion on Twitter on Thursday
with the hashtag #FreeAdnan.
Syed’s new lawyer, Justin
Brown, also shared the hashtag on
Twitter with a similar message:
“WE WON THE APPEAL.” Brown
held a news conference from his
Baltimore office Thursday afternoon and said he had spoken with
Syed after the opinion came out.
“He asked me to convey his
deep gratitude and thanks from
COURTNEY COLUMBUS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
CARLOS BARRIA/REUTERS
Adnan Syed was the subject of
the first season of “Serial.” His
new attorney, Justin Brown,
top at right, seen with lawyer
Christopher Nieto, credited the
show Thursday.
the bottom of his heart [to] all
those people who have supported
him this long and all those people
who have believed in him,” Brown
said.
After a reporter asked whether
Brown felt “Serial” had supported
Syed’s case, the lawyer credited
Koenig and her team with helping
him locate alibi witness Asia McClain, a key player in the podcast.
“ ‘Serial’ has also helped build
this groundswell of support for us
and for Adnan and for the case,
and that has really fueled these
efforts and allowed us to keep
fighting on the way that we have,”
Brown said. “Just emotionally, this
has gone on for so long now that
without all the support of all these
people, it would have been very
hard to maintain this high level of
intensity and keep fighting on like
we have.”
sonia.rao@washpost.com
PETULA DVORAK
Student says, ‘It’s my time to work hard’
DVORAK FROM B1
who make up a third of all people
enrolling in two- and four-year
colleges.
And while there’s been lots of
focus on the achievement gap
that can keep those students from
graduating, there isn’t always a
lot of acknowledgment of the
culture gap they face.
“Hearing about all those
vacations wasn’t easy,” Cummings
said. “I’ve never really been
anywhere.”
It’s hard to feel like you’re part
of things when your peers are
packing their swimsuits, and
you’re ironing your uniform and
pinning your name tag back on.
Not that Cummings is
complaining. He wants to work in
management for Wegmans when
he graduates. “I’m still young, so I
just have to remember that it’s my
time to work hard,” he said.
I wasn’t so gracious.
I remember the same scenario.
I went to the University of
Southern California, where there
were fliers all over the dorms
advertising Cancun and Palm
Springs vacation packages. The
moment after my last midterm, I
got into my ailing VW Bug,
hoping it would make the eighthour journey home. I woke up to
the polyester, Swiss Miss-style
waitress uniform — name tag in
place — that I wore on school
breaks and made the 5 a.m.
breakfast shift.
I defiantly wore my college
sweatshirt over my uniform the
first day back, insisting I was
cold, trying to let everyone know I
was really a fancy college student.
The boss wasn’t amused.
But I needed the cash, as do
most first-generation students.
And all that came flooding
back when I was in Wegmans,
and I heard the cashier and a
customer ahead of me talking.
“So how are you liking school?”
the customer asked.
“I love it,” the cashier said.
“Keep your studies up. Make us
proud,” the customer told her.
She was a first-generation
college student, going to school in
another state. Her boss lets her
have her old shift whenever she’s
back in town.
Turns out that Wegmans
allows students to clock back in
whenever they need the cash. The
Wegmans Employee Scholarship
Program has also given about
$110 million to more than 35,000
Wegmans employees since 1984,
according to media relations
coordinator Valerie Fox, who was
one of those recipients when she
was a student who worked part
time.
Kudos, Wegmans.
Cummings started working at
the grocery store when he was in
high school. He is the youngest of
five kids. He never knew his
father. “He was a John Doe in the
court system,” he said. Cancer
killed his mom when he was 14.
He was raised by his
grandparents.
When it came time to go to
college, “I wanted to get away
from home and experience
college,” he said.
So the two-hour drive to
Allegany was far enough to feel
away, but close enough to come
help his grandparents or nieces
and nephews if they needed him.
Besides being the resident
adviser in charge of an all-male
dorm, he works at Wegmans
every chance he gets.
“A lot of people didn’t even
think I’d be in college, so I don’t
mind,” he said.
Cummings will be joining
thousands of other young adults
like him these weeks. They are
waiting tables, babysitting,
picking up a cashier shift here
and there.
Be kind to them. Ask them how
they’re doing. Tell them you’re
proud of them.
And to the students toiling
away while their friends are
having fun, don’t give up.
I finally got to go on a cool
spring break trip this week, many
years after graduating college.
And the wait was worth it.
petula.dvorak@washpost.com
Twitter: @petulad
B5
SU
PAUL J. RICHARDS/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
FRANK C. GAYLORD, 93
Sculpted soldiers in Korean
War Veterans Memorial
BY
B ART B ARNES
Frank C. Gaylord, a Vermont
sculptor who created the 19 statues in a column tableau of battletested soldiers for the Korean War
Veterans Memorial on the Mall in
Washington, died March 21 at the
home of a daughter in Northfield,
Vt. He was 93.
The family confirmed the death
in an announcement on the website of Hooker Whitcomb Funeral
Home in Barre, Vt. No cause was
listed.
Mr. Gaylord, a World War II
Army paratrooper who received
the Bronze Star Medal for valor
during the Battle of the Bulge, said
he intended his sculptures to
“confront visitors with the reality
of actual war” while complying
with the design committee’s instructions not to glorify it.
His memory of the faces of the
men he served with became models for many of the soldiers in the
memorial.
The design was years in the
making and underwent several
revisions at the insistence of several review panels before it became a reality. The number of
soldiers in the tableau was reduced from 38 to 19. The memorial also includes a mural wall by
designer Louis Nelson, consisting
of black granite etched with faces
of military support personnel,
nurses, truck drivers, medics and
chaplains.
Mr. Gaylord’s statues of soldiers
“are all combat people,” he told
the Chicago Tribune. “They are
people who got up in the morning
and went into attack. They know
what it’s like.”
After the Vietnam Veterans Memorial was dedicated in 1982, legislation was introduced in Congress calling for a memorial commemorating the Korean War, in
which more than 33,000 members of the U.S. armed forces perished in combat from 1950 to
1953, according to Defense Department figures.
The Korean War Memorial, at
the west end of the Mall near the
Lincoln Memorial, was dedicated
in 1995 by President Bill Clinton
and President Kim Young-sam of
South Korea.
“Cast in stainless steel at a scale
slightly larger than life, these gray,
weary troopers unself-consciously invite the empathy of all viewers, veteran and non-veteran
alike,” Washington Post architecture critic Benjamin Forgey wrote
in 1995, when the memorial
opened.
“There is fatigue and alertness
everywhere you look,” Forgey added. “These ghostly soldiers in
their windblown ponchos seem
intensely real.”
Mr. Gaylord was a well-known
figure in the colony of sculptors in
Barre, Vt., who carved their artistic expressions in the plentiful
granite supplies in the area. He
had lived there since 1951.
Among his other sculptures
were those of Thomas Chittenden,
the first governor of Vermont;
President Calvin Coolidge, a native Vermonter; and conductor
Arthur Fiedler of the Boston Pops
Orchestra. He did a Little League
monument for Williamsport, Pa.,
the site of the Little League World
Series; and a statue of William
Penn for a park in Philadelphia.
Frank Chalfant Gaylord II was
born in Clarksburg, W.Va., on
March 9, 1925. He once told the
Free Press of Burlington, Vt., that
his career as a sculptor began
taking shape when his grandmother made clay animals for him
when he was 3.
JOE LAMBERTI/CAMDEN COURIER-POST/ASSOCIATED PRESS
TOP: A tourist walks among the statues of soldiers at the Korean
War Veterans Memorial on the Mall. ABOVE: The sculptor, Frank
C. Gaylord, a World War II veteran, said he intended his work to
“confront visitors with the reality of actual war” while complying
with the design committee’s instructions not to glorify it.
“I’d take it to her and ask her to
make me another, and she’d say, ‘I
don’t have time to do it again. You
do it,’ ” he said. “And here I am.”
He attended Temple University
in Philadelphia on the GI bill and
graduated in 1950. Among Mr.
Gaylord’s first jobs as a sculptor
was the carving of granite headstones for cemeteries.
His wife of 56 years, the former
Mary Cornwall, died in 2005. Survivors include two daughters, Leanne Triano of Northfield and
Victoria Gaylord of Essex, Vt.; two
grandchildren; and a greatgranddaughter. A son, Richard
Gaylord, predeceased him.
On July 27, 2003, the U.S. Postal
Service issued a 37-cent Korean
War stamp commemorating the
50th anniversary of the end of
hostilities. Mr. Gaylord sued,
claiming the Postal Service had
used his work without his permission. In 2013, the U.S. Court of
Federal Claims ordered the Postal
Service to pay him $684,844 in
damages.
In addition to his sculpting, Mr.
Gaylord was an actor in the Barre
Players theater ensemble. He is
still remembered in Vermont for
his performance as Professor
Henry Higgins in the theatrical
group’s production of the musical
“My Fair Lady.”
newsobits@washpost.com
<PM[]XXWZ\aW]VMML\WÅVLY]ITQ\a
SENIOR LIVING SOLUTIONS
INDEPENDENT LIVING • ASSISTED LIVING • MEMORY CARE
A Place for Mom has helped over a million families find senior
living solutions that meet their unique needs. Our Advisors
are trusted, local experts who can help you understand your
options. Here’s what’s included with our free service:
A dedicated
local Advisor
Hand-picked list
of communities
Help scheduling
tours
Full details and
pricing
Move in
support
There’s no cost to you!
DC Call (202) 996-3553
MD Call (301) 264-7331
VA Call (703) 496-5291
! We’re paid by our partner communities
Joan Lunden, journalist, best-selling author, former
host of Good Morning America and senior living advocate.
B6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
obituaries
IN MEMORIAM
DEATH NOTICE
GILMORE
CHERNENKOFF
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30 , 2018
DEATH NOTICE
DAVIS
DORIS E. DAVIS
On Sunday, March 25, 2018. Loving and devoted wife of Lloyd Davis; beloved mother of Iris
B. Davis and Edgar P. Davis; sister of Shirley
Berkley, Barbara Jean Hancock, Teresa Joiner,
Rudolph Lindsey, Jr., Theodore Lindsey, Bryan
Lindsey, Earl Lindsey and the late Margaret
Lindsey and Robert Lindsey. She is also survived by a host of other relatives and friends.
Memorial services will be held at Campbell
AME Church, 2562 Martin Luther King Ave.,
SE on Wednesday, April 4, 2018 at 11 a.m.
Interment private.
DILLON
BRENICE E. GILMORE
February 5, 1962 ~ March 30, 1993
Beautiful memories, treasured forever,
of all the years, we spent together.
Your Loving Family
CARD OF THANKS
HURD
HARRIETT LOVE CHERNENKOFF
Harriett Love Chernenkoff, 70, dearly loved
by her husband, Sidney and two daughters,
Courtney and Kelly, passed away peacefully
on Monday, March 26, 2018. Harriett was
a highly successful real estate managing
broker who loved animals, traveling, gardening and life itself. She was filled with
joy and passion, which is also present
in her four vibrant grandchildren, Stewart,
Anderson, Liam and Connor. Please join
us for a visitation on Friday, March 30,
2018 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., at Money
and King Funeral Home, 171 Maple Ave.
W, Vienna, VA 22180. There will be private
family services next week. In lieu of flowers,
please send donations to: Alzheimer's
Association (alz.org/donate) or Best Friends
Animal Society (bestfriends.org/donate).
CLARK
PHILIP R. CLARK (Age 87)
MAURICE C. HURD, SR.
The family of the late Maurice C. Hurd, Sr.,
would like to thank everyone for the many
acts of kindness during our season of loss. We
have been overwhelmed by the outpour of love
from family and friends, coworkers from far
and near. Thank you so very much.
Grace and Peace
The Hurd Family
RON FREHM/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rusty Staub, who played for five major league teams, including the Mets in 1984, finished his career
with 2,716 hits and a batting average of .279. He was also a restaurateur and philanthropist.
RUSTY STAUB, 73
‘Le Grand Orange’ was
clutch-hitting bon vivant
M ATT S CHUDEL
Rusty Staub, the red-haired,
clutch-hitting “Le Grand Orange,”
who became Montreal’s first major league baseball hero and who
was a star player with the New
York Mets and other teams during a 23-year career, died
March 29 at a hospital in West
Palm Beach, Fla. He was 73.
The Mets announced his
death. He had been treated for a
blood infection that led to kidney
failure. He had a near-fatal heart
attack in 2015.
In the 1960s, Mr. Staub was a
teenage phenomenon with the
Houston Colt .45s (later the Astros) before being traded in 1969
to the Montreal Expos as major
league baseball expanded to Canada.
He was the best player on a
woeful Expos team that lost 110
games in its first season. After he
hit a home run and made a
game-winning outfield catch to
end a long losing streak, Mr.
Staub was dubbed “Le Grand
Orange” (the Big Redhead) by a
Montreal sportswriter. The sobriquet followed him throughout his
career, which lasted through 1985
and included six All Star selections.
Mr. Staub was a rare bright
spot during his three seasons
with the fledgling Expos, hitting
.300 two times and slugging a
career-high 30 home runs in
1970.
“I always knew Rusty had
beaucoup power,” his manager,
Gene Mauch, said at the time,
“even before I knew what beaucoup meant.”
Mr. Staub, who grew up in
French-flavored New Orleans, endeared himself to Montreal fans
by living in the city year-round
and by taking language classes to
give speeches in French and banter with the locals.
“I was in Quebec — I couldn’t
talk to a child,” he told the Montreal Gazette in 2012. “I couldn’t
say something encouraging. I felt
like I was not doing my job.”
He was also something of a bon
vivant, becoming a wine connoisseur and skilled cook. He often
treated teammates to homemade
meals, sometimes featuring wild
game he had shot or caught in
rural Canada. One of his specialties was “duck Le Grand Orange.”
Despite his popularity in Montreal, the club traded Mr. Staub to
the New York Mets in 1972. The
following year, he belted three
home runs in a five-game playoff
series as the Mets beat the heavily
favored Cincinnati Reds to advance to the World Series. He hit
.423 with six runs batted in during the World Series, but the Mets
lost to the Oakland A’s in seven
games.
In 1975, Mr. Staub drove in 105
runs, becoming the first Met in
history with more than 100 RBI
in a season. He then moved on to
the Detroit Tigers, where he had
seasons of 96, 101 and 121 RBI.
“If a young player wants to
BEAVERS
VIRGINIA L. BEAVERS
Virginia L. Beavers, age 89 of Fredericksburg,
Virginia peacefully passed away on March
26, 2018 surrounded by her loving family at
Greenfield of Fredericksburg. Virginia was predeceased by her husband, George W. Beavers.
Virginia is survived by her loving children,
Donna (Geary) Rogers, Sally (Ronald) Kari and
George Beavers, Jr.; beloved grandchildren,
James (Kristie) Coffey, Michael (Beverly) Coffey,
Nicholas (Michelle) Rogers, Sgt. Christopher
(Becka) Rogers and Kathleen (Michael) Cavender; and eight great-grandchildren. Virginia
is also survived by her sister-in-law, Patricia
Hanekamp and many adored nieces and
nephews.
Virginia was predeceased by her siblings, Mary
Jo Potter, William Hanekamp and Georgeanna
DiSalvo.
Virginia was an avid Bingo player and won
often, enjoyed crocheting, reading and loved
spending time with her grandchildren.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions can
be made to the Fredericksburg SPCA at
https://fburgspca.org/donate/ or Messiah
Lutheran Church located at 6510 Fort Hunt
Rd., Alexandria, VA 22307.
The family will receive friends at the Mountcastle Turch Funeral Home, 4143 Dale Boulevard,
Dale City, VA 22193 on Thursday, April 5, 2018
from 10 a.m. until 12 p.m., where a Celebration
of her Life will be held on Thursday, April 5,
2018 at 12 p.m. Interment will follow at 2 p.m.
at Mount Comfort Cemetery, 6600 South Kings
Highway, Alexandria, VA 22306.
learn how to hit,” Detroit manager Ralph Houk said, “all he has to
do is watch Rusty Staub.”
Mr. Staub had a short-lived
return to Montreal in 1979, then
spent a season with the Texas
Rangers before rejoining the
Mets in 1981 for the last five years
of his career.
By then he was also a restaurant owner who sometimes demonstrated recipes on television.
His weight climbed from
190 pounds in his rookie season
to more than 230, but as a lefthanded batter with a quick swing,
Mr. Staub emerged late in his
career as one of baseball’s preeminent pinch hitters. Coming
off the bench in key situations, he
choked up on his bat and seemed
unflappable at the plate.
In 1983, he tied a major league
record with 25 pinch-hit RBI and
equaled a National League record
with eight consecutive pinch hits.
He retired in 1985 with 2,716 hits
(including 292 home runs) and a
career batting average of .279.
Mr. Staub is one of four players
in history to hit a home run
before turning 20 and after turning 40; the others are Ty Cobb,
Gary Sheffield and Alex Rodriguez. He remains the only player
in history to record 500 hits with
four different teams — the Astros,
Expos, Mets and Tigers.
Daniel Joseph Staub was born
April 1, 1944, in New Orleans. A
nurse named him Rusty on the
day he was born because of his
red hair. His father was a teacher
and onetime minor league catcher.
Mr. Staub was 17 when he
signed a $100,000 bonus to play
for the new expansion franchise
in Houston. After a year in the
minor leagues, joined the big
league club for its second season,
in 1963.
The Colt .45s changed their
name to the Astros in 1965, and
Mr. Staub developed into one of
the team’s premier players, hitting a career-best .333 in 1967.
He was active in the players’
union throughout his career and
was known as a tough contract
negotiator. He threatened to retire several times, including in
1969, when his trade to Montreal
was briefly held up by a lawsuit
after an Expo refused to play in
Houston. (Commissioner Bowie
Kuhn ordered the Expos to send
other players and cash to Houston to complete the trade.)
After his playing career, Mr.
Staub spent 10 years as a Mets
broadcaster, working alongside
Ralph Kiner and Tim McCarver.
As a child, Mr. Staub recalled
being told that his uncle, a New
Orleans police officer, had been
killed in the line of duty. In 1986,
he established the New York Police and Fire Widows’ and Children’s Benefit Fund, which has
raised tens of millions of dollars
for the families of first responders. Mr. Staub also directed a
foundation that distributes food
to needy families.
Survivors include two sisters
and a brother.
Mr. Staub opened his first New
York restaurant in 1977, followed
by another in 1989. Both have
since closed, but he traced his
lifelong love of food back to his
mother’s kitchen.
“I grew up in New Orleans
where fine food was everything,”
he told the New York Daily News
in 2006, “and the two things you
adhered to were, one, you had to
learn all the family recipes, and,
two, you didn’t give out the family
recipes.”
matt.schudel@washpost.com
HISAO MATSUMOTO "Mat" (Age 89)
Hisao “Mat” Matsumoto, a US citizen who
survived the Hiroshima atomic bomb, US
Air Force veteran, lifelong employee of the
US Library of Congress, beloved husband,
father, and grandfather died February 13,
2018. His life story can only be described as
extraordinary.
Mat’s parents, Kumekichi and Sekiyo Matsumoto, immigrated to America in the early
1900s and worked in the coal mining town of
Superior, Wyoming. They eventually moved
to Los Angeles and owned a flower shop.
Mat was born on February 9, 1929 and,
when he was two years old, his parents
moved back to Hiroshima, Japan to care
for elderly family members. World War II
started when Mat was 12 years old, and
students like him were mobilized to work
in factories. Mat was 16 years old and
working in a rifle factory in Hiroshima when
the atomic bomb exploded. He recalled a
white flash through the windows and an
enormous bang, causing the glass to shatter
and the ceiling to collapse. Their house,
located approximately three miles from the
hypocenter, was miraculously spared and
utilized as a refuge for survivors. With complete destruction of the city, there was little
prospect for higher education or work, and
the future looked bleak. In the ensuing years
after the war, Mat helped survivors at his
home and worked in the fields around the
home.
Because Mat was born in the US and a
US citizen, he bravely chose, at age 19- all
alone and speaking little English, to make
the voyage back to America to seek a better
future. He arrived in Sacramento California
and attended Sacramento High School, graduating in 1951 at age 22. During this time,
GROCHAL
GRUER
ALLAN L. GRUER (Age 83)
COL, U.S. Air Force (Ret.)
DEATH NOTICE
the Korean War had begun and Mat enlisted
in the US Air Force immediately after high
school graduation. He spent time in Texas,
Louisiana, and Georgia before being sent to
the Korean War Theater, assigned to the Far
East HQ in Tokyo, Japan. He was honorably
discharged in 1955 as a Staff Sergeant.
ED KOLENOVSKY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Brothers and Sisters of Sheet
Metal Workers’ Local 100 are
hereby notified of the death of
Brother E. Randolph Estes who
passed away on January 21, 2018.
Fraternally,
Richard D. LaBille III
Business Manager/President
ALICE GROCHAL
MATSUMOTO
Mr. Staub wore two different sets of shoes when he played for the
Houston Astros in 1967. At left is the traditional baseball shoe he
wore while batting, and at right is the soccer shoe he wore when
playing the field.
ESTES
E. RANDOLPH ESTES
Alice Grochal (98) of Chevy
Chase, MD on March 25, 2018.
Beloved wife of the late Bernard;
devoted mother of Diane (Jim)
Gordon and Alan (Barbara)
Grochal; loving grandmother of
five and great-grandmother of three. Graveside services will be 12 noon on Sunday,
April 1, 2018 at King David Memorial Park,
Falls Church, VA. The family will be receiving friends and family at the late residence
following the burial. Donations in her memory can be made to the charity of your
choice. Services entrusted to Sagel Bloomfield Danzansky Goldberg Funeral Care.
www.sagelbloomfield.com
He attended The University of California
Berkeley under the GI Bill, graduating in 1958
with a major in Political Science. He and his
new bride, Reiko, drove cross-country and
settled in Northern Virginia where Mat began
work at the Library of Congress. His goal …
to live the American dream. Working full
time and raising three children, Mat received
his Master of Arts Degree in International
Studies from American University in 1963.
Mat’s 36-year career at the Library of Congress took him and his family to Japan for
eight years where Mat was the Field Director
of the National Program for Acquisitions and
Cataloging in Tokyo, and the Washington
DC area where Mat was the Head of the
Library of Congress Japanese Section and
later acting Head of the Asian Division. During
his tenure, he was instrumental in greatly
expanding the Library’s collection of books
and literature about Japan. In 1977, he
received the Superior Service Award from
the Librarian of Congress, Daniel J. Boorstin.
He also had the honor of meeting and escorting Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko of
Japan during their official state visit to the
Library of Congress in 1994.
For his exemplary service and contribution
to Japan-US understanding and relations, in
1995 he was awarded by His Majesty the
Emperor of Japan, one of the nation of
Japan’s highest honors: the prestigious Order
of the Sacred Treasure Gold Rays with Neck
Ribbon at the Imperial Palace in Tokyo, a
rare accolade for a non-Japanese citizen.
Mat loved driving cross-country, golf, visiting
relatives and friends across the US, taking
his kids to baseball games, national parks,
college basketball, and doting on his grandkids. He believed in and lived a life of
education, patriotism, hard work, resilience,
and humility.
Mat's loving wife of 57 years, Reiko, predeceased him in 2016, and he is survived by
his children, Kent (Connie) Matsumoto, Esq;
Mimi (Herbert) Backhausen; and Cal (Lisa)
Matsumoto, MD (COL, USAR); grandchildren
Sarah, Andrew, and Michelle; and brother
Akira (Teiko) Matsumoto of Hiroshima, Japan.
A memorial service and interment with military honors will be held at Arlington National
Cemetery at a later date.
Of Alexandria, VA passed away peacefully on
Saturday, March 24, 2018. Allan is survived by
his beloved wife, Rose M. Gruer of 58 years;
brothers, Jack Gruer and Earl Gruer (Linda Lee);
and numerous nieces and nephews. He was
preceded in death by his parents, Allan P.
Gruer and Margaret Smith Gruer. While Allan
served globally in the US Air Force, his proudest
achievement was serving in the Vietnam War
as a helicopter pilot. A funeral service will be
held at Ft. Myer Old Post Chapel, followed
by interment at Arlington National Cemetery
at a later date. In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made to a charity of
your choice. Please view and sign the family
guestbook, and check for service updates at
www.everlywheatley.com
HANRAHAN
PATRICIA ANN RITTER HANRAHAN
(Age 92)
On Friday, March 23, 2018 of Rockville,
MD. Beloved wife of the late William F.
Hanrahan; mother of William “Liam”
Hanrahan, Jr.; grandmother of Max
Hanrahan; most loving aunt of Sara Klosky,
Peter Klosky, Jr., Maria Klosky, James Ledlie
Klosky, Kathryn Klosky, Stephen Klosky,
Mathew Klosky, Anne Klosky Arpa, Susan
Flaesch, Lee Ritter, Allison Ritter, Gretchen
Ritter, Christopher Ritter and Timothy
Ritter.
Patricia was a graduate of Catholic University of America where she received
her degree in nursing. From 1950 until
1974, she was a registered nurse first at
Providence Hospital and then as a Public
Health Nurse for Montgomery County Maryland. Patricia was a parishioner of St.
Raphael's Catholic Church, where in 1974
she created the Parish Personal Assistance
Center and eventually became Director
of Social Ministries where she retired in
1988. Montgomery County recognized her
in 1978 with its Volunteer Activist Award.
Patricia was a very proud member of the
Rockshire Community Garden Club and the
Ancient Order of Hibernians.
The family will receive friends at
PUMPHREY’S COLONIAL FUNERAL HOME,
300 W. Montgomery Ave., Rockville, MD on
Thursday, April 5, 2018 from 3 to 5 and
7 to 9 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial will
be offered at St. Raphael Catholic Church,
Falls at Dunster Roads, Rockville, MD on
Friday, April 6, 2018 at 10:30 a.m. Interment
Gate of Heaven Cemetery. Memorial Contributions may be made to the Mater Dei
Council #9774 Knights of Columbus, c/o
St. Raphael’s Church, 1513 Dunster Rd.,
Rockville, MD 20854. Please view and sign
the family guestbook at:
www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
HAWKINS
STANLEY W. HAWKINS (Age 89)
Because your loved one served proudly...
Military emblems are available with death notices and in-memoriams
To place a notice call 202-334-4122 or 800-627-1150, ext. 44122
C0979 2x3
BY
DEATH NOTICE
Of Boonton Township, NJ, passed away on
March 28, 2018, at St. Clare’s Hospital in
Denville, NJ. Born and raised in Brooklyn, NY,
Philip resided in Tennessee, Washington, DC,
and Mountain Lakes, NJ, before settling in
Boonton Township. Philip and his family spent
their summers in Bethany Beach, Delaware.
Philip graduated from Brooklyn Polytechnic
Institute, with a Bachelor of Science degree
in engineering and attended Oakridge School
of Reactor Technology in Tennessee. Philip
was the President and CEO of GPU Nuclear
in Parsippany, NJ.; Associate Director of Reactors, Naval Reactors Division, Department of
Energy. He was a Director of the Institute
of Nuclear Power Operations, a Director of
the Association of Edison Electric Companies,
and a member of the National Academy of
Engineering.
A devout Roman Catholic, Philip was a parishioner and Eucharistic Minister at St. Catherine
of Siena Church in Mountain Lakes, NJ. He
was also a parishioner of St. Ann’s Church in
Bethany Beach, Delaware.
Visitation will be held on Thursday, March 29,
2018 from 7 to 9 p.m. and Friday, March 30,
2018 from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. at the Dangler
Lewis and Carey Funeral Home, 312 West Main
Street Boonton, NJ 07005. A Funeral Liturgy will
be celebrated on Saturday, March 31, 2018, at
9:30 a.m., at St. Catherine of Siena Church, 10
North Pocono Road, Mountain Lakes, NJ 07046.
Interment will follow immediately at Holy Rood
Cemetery, 61 Whippany Road, Morristown, NJ
07960. Letters of Condolence may be posted
at danglerlewisandcareyfuneralhome.com.
Philip is survived by his beloved wife Jeanne
C. (Cushing) Clark, whom he married in 1953;
his devoted children Philip R. Clark, Jr. (Lili),
Margaret A. Gatti (the late Richard), Andrew J.
Clark (Cynthia Roberts), Mary T. Clark, Michael
A. Clark (Cheryl), Jeanne M. Clark, MD (Stephen
Smolka) and Robert F. Clark (Lorena Palagonia);
his caring sister Marjorie O’Loughlin; his cherished grandchildren Benjamin, Nancy, Danny,
Elizabeth, Matthew, Katherine, Carolina and
Robert D.; his adored great-granddaughter Lily.
MARILYN MAE NAUMEC DILLON
Born November 5, 1941 to John and Mary
Sorokolit Naumec in Willimantic CT,
Marilyn passed away peacefully at home
in New Carrollton, MD on Monday, March
26, 2018. She was the beloved wife of
John F. Dillon; mother of John, Patrick
(Stephanie), Christopher (Ikuko) and
Michael Dillon, Kathleen (Roger) Hogan,
Erin (David) Maurantonio, Tracy and Kelly
Dillon; grandmother of Kevin (Sondra) and
Lori Hogan, Mikiya, Sean and Ryan Dillon,
Megan, Brian, Christopher and Kara Maurantonio; and great-grandmother of
Nicholas Stowe and Jaden Hogan. She is
also survived by her brothers, John and
Ted (Irene) Naumec; her sister, Sandra (Bob)
Wojick, many uncles, aunts, nieces,
nephews, cousins and countless friends.
She was predeceased by her parents and
her sister, Mary Ann Desrosiers. Tireless
and devoted volunteer worker for St.
Bernard's Parish in Riverdale, MD. For many
years, she was the main buyer and cook for
the Crystal Room, catering everything from
wedding receptions and banquets to parish
breakfasts and school hotdog lunches. She
was the Good Samaritan to everyone she
ever encountered beset by troubles on the
road of life. Friends may call on Sunday,
April 1, 6 to 9 p.m. at Gasch's Funeral Home,
P.A., 4739 Baltimore Ave., Hyattsville, MD.
Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated
Monday, April 2 at 11 a.m. at St. Bernard's.
Interment in Willimantic, CT at a later date.
In lieu of flowers, an offering may be made
in Marilyn's name to the St. Vincent de Paul
Society of St. Bernard's Parish.
www.gaschs.com
Entered into eternal rest on
Thursday, March 8, 2018. He
leaves to cherish his memory,
one sister, Pauline J. Henderson;
one brother, Clarence Hawkins
(Faye) and a host of other relatives and friends. On Saturday,
March 31, at 10:30 a.m., friends may visit
with the family for a memorial service at Hunt
Funeral Home, 908 Kennedy St., NW. Interment
private.
FRIDAY, MARCH 30 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
DEATH NOTICE
HENDERSON
W. LOUISE HENDERSON
On March 16, 2018, beloved
mother of Amani L. Morgan
Miles Henderson. Also survived by two grandchildren,
one brother, Robert Thompson
Jr. and a host of other relatives and friends.
Services will be held on Saturday, March
31, 2018 from 10 a.m. until time of funeral
11 a.m. at New Home Baptist Church, 8320
Landover Rd., Landover, MD., Rev. Bobby D.
Hicks, Pastor. Interment Maryland National
Cemetery. Services by B.K. HENRY FUNERAL
HOME.
JACOBS
DAVID JACOBS, JR. "Dave"
The Washington DC Boxing Hall of
Fame members regret the passing of
inductee David "Dave" Jacobs, Jr.
Ken Sprouse, President
Bobby Magruder, Treasurer
JUDD
DEATH NOTICE
EZ
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
MAK
TEITMAN
LAURANCE
DAYTON S. MAK
GERALD JOSEPH TEITMAN (Age 76)
Passed away on Friday, March 16, 2018 at
age 100. A World War II veteran and recipient
of both the Bronze Star Medal and Purple
Heart, he had a distinguished career in the U.S.
Foreign Service having served throughout the
Middle East and North Africa.
He is survived by his beloved wife Julia E.
Mak; daughter Holly D. Mak and her husband
Marc J. Hersh; granddaughter Emma C. Hersh
and her wife Jean Doyle and their son Aiden;
and grandson Christopher J. Hersh and his
wife Tammy Saah and their daughter Charlotte.
A memorial service will be held on Friday, April
6 at 2 p.m. at his late residence, Grand Oaks,
5901 MacArthur Blvd., NW, Washington, DC.
Since the late 1980's, Dayton Mak volunteered
at the oral history program with the Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training (ADST).
Contributions may be made to the Dayton
Mak Fund established in his honor at ADST,
PO Box 41839, Arlington, Virginia 22204 or
https://adst.org/membership-and-donations
WHITE
Peacefully transitioned on Saturday, March 24,
2018. Family will receive friends on Tuesday,
April 3 at Allen Chapel AME Church, 2498
Alabama Ave., SE, visitation, 10 a.m.; service,
11 a.m. Interment Heritage Cemetery, Waldorf,
MD. Services by FREEMAN.
MICHAEL FRANCIS MAYHEW
Of Maurertown, VA, passed away March
27, 2018. A funeral service for Michael will
be conducted at 11 a.m. Monday, April 2,
at Stover Memorial Chapel, Strasburg, VA.
The family will receive friends at Stover
Funeral Home Sunday, April 1 from 6
to 8 p.m. For complete obit and service
information view online at
www.stoverfuneralhome.com
McCAIN
HOWARD JOSEPH JUDD "Howie"
Passed away March 29, 2018 at his home
in Fort Lauderdale surrounded by loved ones.
Howard Joseph "Howie" Judd was born to
William and Catherine (Rehberg) Judd on September 6, 1940 in Albany, NY. Howie was a
standout athlete in basketball at St. John's
Academy in Rensselaer, NY and continued
his love of sports throughout hs life. Working
for the Central Intelligence Agency until his
retirement in 1990, Howie traveled extensively
outside the United States and received both
the Agency's Career Intelligence Medal and
Intelligence Star. He maintained a varied and
busy tavel schedule throughtout his retirement
and especially enjoyed spending time with
family and friends at his homes in Rehoboth
Beach, DE and The Villages, FL asnd while
visiting his former home in Washington, DC.
Howie was predeceased by his wie, Kay
Brueckner Judd, who was the mother of his
two sons, John of Leesburg, VA and Scott
(Frankie) of Winchester, VA. In addition to his
sons, he is survived by his spouse, Robert W.
Gordon of Fort Lauderdale. He leaves brother
Jerry of Fort Lauderdale and brothers Ron and
Tom of the Albany, NY area. His surviving
grandchildren are John's children, Josh and
Kaylee and Scott's children, Keri, Benjamin,
Broady and Ava. In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made in Howie's name to Saint
Anthony's Catholic Church, Fort Lauderdale,
FL. Memorial service pending.
KELLY
The Brothers and Sisters of Sheet
Metal Workers’ Local 100 are
hereby notified of the death of
Brother Patrick H. Kelly who
passed away on February 9, 2018.
Fraternally,
Richard D. LaBille III
Business Manager/President
KICAK
MARJORIE A. CARROLL KICAK (Age 86)
Former Administrator of an Independent Counsel, Department of Justice
Marjorie Kicak, of Alexandria, VA died on March
26, 2018 in Inova Alexandria Hospital, Alexandria, VA. Born and reared in Chester, PA, she
was the daughter of the late Clayton Alvin
Carroll, Sr. and Eleanor Gladys Stoms. She
graduated from Chester High School and, in
1980, graduated with a B.S. degree, magna
cum laude, from the University of Maryland,
University College in College Park, MD.
During her early life Mrs. Kicak was a mother
and worked at T. C. Williams High School in the
Guidance Department and Reading Lab. After
graduating with her B.S. degree she worked
in administrative positions for several trade
organizations before becoming the Administrator of an Independent Counsel, Department
of Justice. She retired in 2007.
Chairman of the Alexandria chapter of the
National Conference of Christians and Jews,
member of the Board of the Alexandria Salvation Army, actively involved with the Urban
League and other civic and local organizations.
Recipient of many local awards. Mrs. Kicak
traveled with NCCJ to Israel and Egypt in 1988.
Upon her retirement she enjoyed traveling with
her family around the U.S., Europe, and Africa.
Predeceased by John Kicak, her husband of 47
years. Survived by her three daughters, Patricia
Lynn Korver-Kicak of Haarlem, the Netherlands;
Pamela Ann Kicak and Allison Jane Kicak,
both of Alexandria, Va.; three grandchildren,
Andrew Richard Kicak Vanderhoeven and his
wife Marci Lynn, Erica Lynn Kicak Vanderhoeven, Cameron Poole Kicak; one stepgranddaughter, Madelon Korver; one great-grandson, Sean Henry Vanderhoeven; three sonsin-law, Hardy Korver, Richard M. Vanderhoeven
and David C. Poole; and three sisters, Eleanor
Nealy of Media, Pa., Audrey Blossic of Glen
Mills, Pa., Lorraine Fleming of Old Orchard
Beach, Me.; and one brother, James Carroll Sr.
of Saint Petersburg, Fl.
There will be a visitation held on Friday, April
6 at Everly-Wheatley Funeral Home in Alexandria, VA from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. A memorial
service will take place the following day on
Saturday, April 7 at 1 p.m. at the Old Presbyterian Meeting House located at 321 S. Fairfax
Street in Alexandria, VA. All are welcome.
KLEIER
BEA KLEIER
While surrounded by family Sunday, March
25, 2018, William "Bill" McCain went home
to be with the Lord. Visitation, 10 a.m. until
Celebration of Life, 11 a.m., Saturday, March
31, 2018 at Pope Funeral Home, 5538 Marlboro
Pike, Forestville, MD 20747.
McCRARY
Passed away and entered the presence of
our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ on Friday,
March 23, 2018 at age 18. Luke was the
beloved son of Tina and Tom McCrary and
is survived by three brothers Tommy, Noah,
and Troy. A visitation will take place at
Everly Funeral Home in Falls Church, VA
on Friday, March 30 at 11 a.m. Funeral
service will follow at 12 Noon. Interment at
National Memorial Park, Falls Church, VA.
WILLIAMS
read this book… but particularly [those] who
guide the lives of others, parents, teachers,
therapists, managers...”
Having published a book and written dozens
of articles and lengthy blog posts on emotional intelligence, shame disorders, and parenting, Brock continued his love of the written word by teaching writing classes at the
Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at American
University. He was also known as an irrepressible limerick writer, never letting a life
event of his friends, family or himself go by
without a multi-stanza comic salute.
BRIAN EVERETT LAURANCE (Age 25)
Died Friday, March 23, 2018 in a tragic car
accident on Oakland Ave. in Potomac, MD. He
is survived by his mother and father, Joel and
Kathy Laurance of Potomac. He was their only
child. He is also survived by the love of his
life since childhood, Emma Carty. Brian went
to Potomac Elementary School, Hoover Middle,
and Churchill High. Brian was an Electronics
Technician at Digital Imaging Technology in
Rockville.
A Mass will be celebrated at Our Lady of
Mercy Church, 9200 Kentsdale Dr., Potomac,
MD 20854 on April 3 at 2 p.m. In lieu of flowers,
the family requests that donations be made to
the church in his name. Please view and sign
the family online guestbook at:
www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
ELIJAH WILLIAMS
Elijah "Eli" Williams, age 89. Born
in Trenton, New Jersey, recently
of Brisbane, Australia, after a long
battle with bone cancer, died on
Thursday March 29, 2018. Graduated from Trenton Central High
school and also received an engineering
degree from Drexel University in Philadelphia.
He was stationed at Andrews Airforce base
during WW2. He established a consulting engineering firm in Melbourne Australia, introducing central air conditioning and heating.
He was preceded in death by his parents,
Menakhem Mendel and Bella Leah Williams
who were born in Lithuania but lived most
of their lives in Trenton, New Jersey, and his
first wife, Betty Williams. He is survived by
their son, David Guy Williams; his second
wife, Donna Williams; sisters, Faye Williams
and Marcia Gruss Levinsohn; nieces, Phyllis
Schwartz, Debbie Wood, Nanette Gruss, Marian Dowling; nephew. Martin Gruss. Services
were held Thursday night in Australia and in
Silver Spring Maryland at his sister’s home.
DEATH NOTICE
BROCK HANSEN
Brock Hansen, a social worker and psychotherapist in Washington and Baltimore
for 48 years, died of metastatic prostate
cancer on March 13, 2018 at Georgetown
University Hospital. Born to Robert and Jean
Hansen on September 5, 1946 in Iowa City,
Iowa, he was 71 years old.
Educated at Johns Hopkins University and
the Smith College School for Social Work in
Northampton, MA, he started his career as
a nurse’s aid at the Baltimore City Hospital
Psych Unit (“to be sure I really wanted to do
this work”) in 1970. Confirmed in his choice
of vocation, he worked at the Shepherd
Pratt Psychiatric Hospital in Baltimore and
at Dominion Psychiatric Hospital in Falls
Church while conducting a substantial private practice. His work during these years
focused primarily on eating disorders. He
also received training in strategic family
therapy with Jay Haley, and Ericksonian Hypnosis and Neurolinguistic Programming certifications. In the late 1980s he was president
of the Washington Society for the Study of
Eating Disorders and Obesity for three years.
In 1990, he entered full time private practice,
establishing Change for Good with offices on
Connecticut Avenue in Washington and in
Falls Church, VA.
In 2006 he published Shame and Anger: The
Criticism Connection. The book focuses on
the importance of powerful innate emotions
that become activated when criticism is
experienced, and the emotional intelligence
tools that can be used to control overreaction. A reviewer stated, “Everyone should
SMITH
Blessed with a beautiful bass voice, Brock
sang with the 16 member professional
Emmanuel Church Choir in Baltimore for 15
years, which, in addition to weekly singing,
presented six concerts a year with members
of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. In
2006 he joined Washington’s Polyhymnia
Chamber Chorus with whom he sang until
a month before his death. The joy of these
musical challenges were pinnacles of his life.
A man of many talents and interests, Brock
was an ardent traveler, roaming the world
with his wife on over 40 adventurous trips
through their long marriage. Focusing on
history, art and the beauty of the natural
world, they also took rigorous walking and
cross country ski vacations. At St. Mark’s
Episcopal Church, Capitol Hill, he was a
member of the Vestry, a co-director of Christian Education and participated in numerous
other activities including leading a group of
teens on a service trip to Honduras and
teaching 3rd and 4th graders in Sunday
school. Always athletic, he was a wind surfer
for 30 years and a so-so, but determined,
tennis player.
During the last four years of his life, he
was treated by Dr. Nancy Dawson of the
Lombardi Cancer Center at Georgetown University Hospital. Her expertise, focus and
warm support allowed him to live a full and
active life during the entire time of his illness.
His family and friends are eternally grateful
to this outstanding physician.
Brock’s memory will be lovingly preserved
by his wife of 48 years, Penelope Hansen,
his daughter Layne Humphrey, sons David
and Jared Fuller, grandsons Bryce and Ian
Humphrey, many other family members, and
hundreds of friends. A memorial service
will be held at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church,
Capitol Hill (3rd and A Streets, NE) on April 21
at 11 a.m.
STACEY LYNN MOATS-GALLAGHER
Born January 23, 1968 to Donald Moats and
Soyrieta Gail Moats. In Alexandria Virginia. A
1986 graduate from Hayfield Secondary School
in Fairfax County. As a resident of Elkton
Virginia for 18 years, Stacey was a dedicated
employee to Four Star Realty in Elkton Virginia
for 17 years.
Stacey passed away on March 27, 2018 after a
long battle with an illness after surviving Breast
Cancer,at the University of Virginia Hospice of
the Peidmont in Charlottesville, Virginia.
She is survived by her husband for 15 years
Richard Gallagher. Stacey was a devoted mother of three, Amanda Mae Weiler, Heather Lee
Weiler, and Maegan Marie Elizabeth Gallagher.
At Stacey's request there will be no services.
YUFFEE
On March 29, 2018, Sandra
Yuffee (nee Needle), devoted
wife of 57 years of Lester Yuffee;
loving mother of Todd (Jan) Yuffee, Rachel (Marc) Ehudin,
Michael Yuffee; cherished sister
of Paula Shtrum; adored grandmother of Maxi and Orin Davidson, Ali Yuffee, Peri Ehudin, Berret, Zack and
Robbie Yuffee.
Services at the Chapel-Judean Gardens, Olney,
MD 20832. Contributions can be made to:
House of Ruth, 5 Thomas Cir NW #4, Washington, DC 20005, (202) 667-1700; National Stroke
Association, 9707 E. Easter Lane, Ste B, Centennial, CO 80112, 1-800-Strokes (7876537).
Celebration Of Life at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
Marc Ehudin.
Services entrusted to Sagel, Bloomfield, Danzansky, Goldberg Funeral Care, Inc.
www.sagelbloomfield.com
DEATH NOTICE
FROGG
PAID DEATH NOTICES
To place a notice, call:
202-334-4122
800-627-1150 ext 4-4122
FAX:
202-334-7188
EMAIL:
deathnotices@washpost.com
NARITA
PERRELL
BEVERLY S. PERRELL (Age 72)
EMMA JANE SMITH
On Monday, March 26, 2018 of Hyattsville,
MD, formerly of Huntingdon, PA. Beloved
mother of Cathy (Gary) Jessee and Terry
(Thomas) Carroll; cherished grandmother
of Lisa Marie (Joseph) Sullivan, James Kenneth Curry, and Casey Jane Carroll; greatgrandmother of Joey Hartge, III, James
Curry, Jr., Bradley Curry, and Landon Sullivan. Sister of Donna (Richard) Godard. She
was preceded in death by her husband,
Charles Kenneth Smith and her two sisters,
Betty Brindle and Karen Walker. Friends
may call at Gasch's Funeral Home, P.A.,
4739 Baltimore Avenue, Hyattsville, MD on
Tuesday, April 3 from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8
p.m. Interment at a later date. Memorial
contributions may be made in her name to
the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society of the
National Capital Chapter, Donor Services,
PO Box 98018, Washington, DC 200908018
www.gaschs.com
MONDAY- FRIDAY 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
YASU NARITA (Age 92)
Of Washington, DC, passed away on January 8,
2018 at George Washington University Hospital
Center. Ms. Narita and her sister, Eiko, together
with their parents, were detained in one of
the Japanese American internment camps in
Wyoming during the course of World War
II. Following the 1945 death of their father,
Matatsu Narita, in Montana, from an illness
contracted in the camps, they and their mother
were released. The family eventually settled
in Washington, DC where they resided in their
Southwest townhouse community from 1961
until their deaths. The death of Yasu marks
the end of the immediate family, but she
leaves surviving cousins who reside in Japan.
Memorial service previously held.
need for the legislation. She also served
as an expert witness in federal and state
court cases that challenged the exclusion
of children with disabilities from education
including the two landmark federal court
cases, the Pennsylvania Association for
Retarded Children (PARC) v. the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the Mills v. Board
of Education in the District of Columbia. In
recognition of her many accomplishments
and work on behalf of special educators, Jean
received several prestigious awards from the
from the Council for Exceptional Children
including the J.E. Wallace Wallin Lifetime
Achievement Award (1994), the Outstanding
Leadership Award (2003) and the Outstanding Contributor in CEC and Special Education,
Pioneer Division.
SANDRA N. YUFFEE
MOATS-GALLAGHER
ALVIN R. FROGG
USMC (Ret.)
Peacefully on Sunday, March 25, 2018 at Walter
Reed Medical Center, Bethesda, MD. He is survived by his devoted companion, Patricia
McLaughlin of Mitchellville, MD; two daughters,
two sisters, one aunt, one brother-in-law,
nieces, nephews, cousins and many wonderful
friends. Family will receive friends on Saturday,
March 31 from 11 a.m. until time of service, 12
Noon at Peoples Community Church, 653 11th
St., NE. Interment Quantico National Cemetery,
Monday, April 2 at 12 Noon.
GROSSMILLER
On Tuesday, March 27, 2018, Beverly S. Perrell,
of Silver Spring, MD. Beloved wife of the
late James D. Perrell; loving mother of Teresa
A. Perrell and the late Toni L. Perrell; dear
sister of Louis G. Schreiber (Kathy), Stephen
R. Schreiber (Vicki) and Elizabeth J. Schreiber;
cherished grandmother of Ryan J. Perrell. Also
survived by numerous nieces and nephews
and extended family. Services private. Contributions may be made to the American Cancer
Society or the National Association of the Deaf.
Arrangements by Hines-Rinaldi Funeral Home.
Email and faxes MUST include
name, home address & home phone #
of the responsible billing party.
Fax & email deadline - 3 p.m. daily
Phone-In deadline
4 p.m. M-F
3 p.m. Sa-Su
CURRENT 2018 RATES:
( PER DAY)
MONDAY-SATURDAY
Black & White
1" - $135 (text only)
2" - $306 (text only)
3" - $441
4" - $482
5" - $611
-----SUNDAY
Black & White
1"- $161 (text only)
2" - $339 (text only)
3" - $489
4" - $515
5" - $665
JEAN R. HEBELER
Professor Emerita (University of Maryland
–College Park), age 86, of Silver Spring, Maryland passed away on March 17, 2018. Jean
spent her childhood on a farm near Lockport,
New York – very close to the Erie Canal
and subsequently lived in Illinois and Utah,
before coming to Maryland. Jean devoted her
extraordinary career to advancing the rights
to education and services for exceptional
children and youth.
Jean joined the faculty of the University
of Maryland, College Park from Syracuse
University in September 1960 as Assistant
Professor and Coordinator of the Special
Education Program. In the early 1960s, Dr.
Hebeler was instrumental in developing programs to respond to the immediate need for
teachers and at the same time working with
the Maryland State Department of Education
to develop standards for the certification
and preparation of special education teachers…and for special education programs.
She also was an author of Maryland’s special
education by laws.
Dr. Hebeler’s advocacy and service to the
profession on behalf of special education
teachers and children and youth with exceptionalities extended well beyond Maryland.
She was a longtime active member of the
Council for Exceptional Children and served
as president of the Teacher Education Division of the Council for Exceptional Children
in 1963-64 and was very active in the Professional Standards movement – serving as
Chair of the Professional Standards Committee of CEC 1966-68 and served as President
of the Council for Exceptional Children in
1972-73. This was a time of great Congressional activity as parents and other advocates moved for national legislation that
guaranteed the right to education for children with disabilities. CEC was a major
supporter of national legislation and developed the model legislation which led to
the enactment of P.L. 94-142 was being
developed by the Council for Exceptional
Children along with other professional and
parent advocate groups. In her role as President of the Council for Exceptional Children
Jean was very involved with both national
and state policymakers in support of the
6"+ for ALL Black & White notices
$135 each additional inch wkday
$161 each additional inch Sunday
-------------------MONDAY-SATURDAY
Color
3" - $566
4" - $609
5" - $744
-----SUNDAY
Color
3" - $599
4" - $685
5" - $834
BARBARA JEAN GROSSMILLER
"Bobbi"
10/13/1954 ~ 3/23/2018
DEATH NOTICE
RANDOLPH
CHARLES LEROY RANDOLPH "Randy"
On March 25, 2018. Randy is survived by his
wife of 59 years, Arthuree R. Randolph; his
children Yinka R. Flores (Ricardo) and Charles
A. Randolph (Renee); grandchildren, Jordan S.
Williamson, Jade A. Williamson, Jett A. Williamson, Nicole K. Randolph and Charles B.
Randolph; and sister, Idamae Evans.
Services will be held at 10 a.m. on Saturday,
March 31, 2018, at Shiloh Baptist Church, 1500
9th Street, NW. Entombment at Fort Lincoln
Cemetery.
Barbara Jean Grossmiller peacefully
entered to rest Friday, March 23, 2018.
A woman who will be remembered for her
infectious joy and charisma, love for family
and strength when met with adversity, she
will be greatly missed.
Born in Valparaiso, FL to the late Charles
and Helen Godwin, she was a loving wife
to the late William John Grossmiller, IV. She
is survived by son, William J. Grossmiller, V
and wife, Kerry; daughter, Sarah Maher and
husband, Regis; daughter, Ashley Ciampo
and husband, Michael; son, Phillip Grossmiller and wife, Megan; her grandchildren,
Regis C. Maher, III, Lauren D. Maher, William
J. Grossmiller, VI and Sadie V. Grossmiller;
brother, Brent and sisters-in-law, Karen
Powell and husband, Michael, Gwen Grossmiller and Cindi Karlen; and mother-in-law,
Loretta Delores Grossmiller.
A memorial service will be held to celebrate
her life on April 5 at 1 p.m. at MACC: 2485
Davidsonville Rd., Gambrills, MD 21054.
Please view and sign the family's guest
book at:
www.ruckfuneralhomes.com
Notices with photos begin at 3"
(All photos add 2" to your notice.)
ALL NOTICES MUST BE PREPAID
MEMORIAL PLAQUES:
All notices over 2" include
complimentary memorial plaque
Additional plaques start at $26 each
and may be ordered.
All Paid Death Notices
appear on our website through
www.legacy.com
LEGACY.COM
Included in all death notices
Optional for In Memoriams
PLEASE NOTE:
Notices must be placed via phone, fax or
email. Photos must be emailed. You can
no longer place notices, drop off photos
and make payment in person.
Payment must be made via phone with
debit/credit card.
POST YOUR
CONDOLENCES
Now death notices on
washingtonpost.com/obituaries allow you
to express your sympathy with greater ease.
Visit today.
GHI
Dr. Hebeler set the foundation of the special
education program at University of Maryland,
College Park. She was instrumental in the
construction of the College of Education’s
Benjamin Building, she served as chairperson
of the Department of Special Education from
1967 to 1974, and she served as acting dean
of the College of Education from 1991-1993.
Dr. Hebeler’s relationship with her students
and mentees was lifelong. She worked with
over forty doctoral students during her time
on the faculty. The Jean R. Hebeler Endowment Scholarship Fund was established in
2000 in her honor by some of those students
she had mentored. The fund provides support to graduate and undergraduate students
pursuing degrees in special education. To
date, over 65 students have received awards.
Jean always had an interest in art, but
did not have the opportunity to pursue it
until after retirement. She then exposed
her wonderful talent through her watercolor
paintings. In addition to painting, Jean’s other
favorite pastimes were attending the Terps
football and basketball games, collecting
turtles, gardening and of course spoiling
animals…everyone’s, Con Man the cat, and
especially her dogs, Pete and Buffy.
Jean is predeceased by her parents Richard
and Madeline (May) Hebeler and her sister,
Dorothy Heary. She is survived by her
nephews, Timothy (Anita) Heary and Dale
(Therese) Heary of Niagara Falls, New York
and great nieces and nephews Nina (Kevin
Schendel), Jeremy Heary, Christin (Venkat
Koli), Angela (Ryan) Heary, Anthony (Amy)
Heary, Mark (Jessica) Heary, and great-great
nieces and nephews.(Brandon, Ashlea,
Mackenzie, Cooper, Hudson, Nicholas, Tyler,
Amar).
The family asks that in lieu of flowers contributions be made to the Special Education
Endowed Fund in Honor of Jean Hebeler.
Please make checks payable to the University of Maryland College Park Foundation
(UMCPF) Attn: Rachael Day, University of
Maryland, College of Education, 1308 Benjamin Building, College Park, Maryland
20742. A memorial service will be held on
April 16, 2018 at 2:00pm at the University
of Maryland College Park, Memorial Chapel,
1101 Memorial Chapel, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742.
TAMAGNA
6"+ for ALL color notices
$224 each additional inch wkday
$250 each additional inch Sunday
MARGARET EDMONDS LITTLEJOHN
Of Brentwood, MD, our most precious and
beloved gift, was called away on Monday,
March 19, 2018. She is survived by one son,
Charles Edmonds, Jr.; three daughters, Margaret Deschamps (John), Angellena Harris
(Michael), and Kartrina Edmonds; 21 grandchildren; 27 great-grandchildren; six great-greatgrandchildren; a sister, Edna Magruder; three
brothers, James Rawles, William Rawles and
Dexter Brown; an aunt, Beatrice Poteat; many
other relatives and friends. Family will receive
friends and relatives on Saturday, March 31
from 12:30 p.m. until time of service, 1:30
p.m. at FORT LINCOLN FUNERAL HOME, 3401
Bladensburg Road, Brentwood, MD. Interment
Fort Lincoln Cemetery.
www.fort-lincoln.com
HANSEN
HEBELER
On Friday, March 2, 2018 of
Alexandria, VA. Beloved wife of
the late LTC USA (Ret.) Joseph
Kleier; mother of Cheryl
Phipps, Dale Latiff and the
late Scott Kleier; grandmother of Michael Phipps, Rachel Kleier-Koch,
Ashley Nam, Paul Latiff, Susan Latiff and
Zachary Kleier. Great-grandmother to eight.
Graveside service at Arlington National
Cemetery on Wednesday, April 4, 2018
at 1 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made to CTOF
JEWISH, and sent to Sara Astrow, Office
of the Staff Chaplain, 5950 12th Street Suite
#101, Ft. Belvoir, VA 22060-5539
LITTLEJOHN
DEATH NOTICE
WILLIAM McCAIN
LUKE R. McCRARY
PATRICK H. KELLY
DEATH NOTICE
Of Vienna, VA, passed away on Tuesday, March
20, 2018 at Reston Hospital. Beloved husband
of Virginia A. Teitman; devoted father of John G.
Teitman (Stacey); grandfather of Cody Teitman
(Andrea); brother of the late Frederick Teitman.
Memorial services will be held on Tuesday,
April 3 at 10:30 a.m. at Christ the King Lutheran
Church, 10550 Georgetown Pike, Great Falls,
VA. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made
to Fisher House Foundation, 111 Rockville Pike,
#420, Rockville, MD 20850. The online guestbook is available at
www.moneyandking.com
HELEN JANET WHITE (Age 94)
MAYHEW
B7
RE
IRENE G. TAMAGNA, M.D.
Dr. Irene G. Tamagna overcame tremendous
obstacles during her life to realize her dream
of becoming a physician.
Irene Tamagna (Irene Gorski) was born May
3, 1915 in Vienna Austria. She lived and
attended Medical School in Vienna, Austria
until 1938 when she was forced to leave
her home and medical training due to the
Nazi Occupation of Austria. She moved to
Italy to continue her medical studies at
the Medical School of Rome and to marry
Frank M. Tamagna (an economist at the
Central Bank of Italy). She learned Italian
by reading medical texts. However in 1939,
during her final (sixth) year of medical school
in Italy, the Hitler-Mussolini pact again forced
Dr. Tamagna to leave her studies and new
home without completing her degree. Irene
Tamagna and her husband moved to the
United States and undeterred by her ambition to study medicine, she reapplied to
Medical School in the United States. However
because of her status as a Jewish refugee,
woman and foreigner, all but one of her 50
applications to medical school was rejected.
The Women's Medical College of Pennsylvania accepted Dr. Tamagna, but only recognized one year of training. She again learneda
new language and completed the additional
years of Medical School. She subsequently
completed her residency and further specialty training in cardiology, as the first woman
resident and first cardiology fellow at NY Post
Graduate and Columbia University Medical
Centers. Dr. Tamagna joined the George
Washington University Medical School Faculty in 1948 and continued her career there for
over 30 years.
At GWU, Dr. Tamagna opened and directed
the first Hypertension Clinic. Dr. Tamagna
was a leader in the fight against poliomyelitis
and opened one of only nine polio Respiratory Centers in the country. She subsequently became Director of the GWU Division
of Rehabilitation and the Rehabilitation
Research and Training Center. Dr. Tamagna
was a pioneer in education and comprehensive medicine. She received recognition
for her outstanding contributions, leadership
and dedication to Rehabilitation of the Handicapped from the District of Columbia Rehabilitation Association and the US Department
of Education.
With her multilingual background, Dr. Tamagna served as the Embassy physician for the
Austrian and Swiss Embassies and in 1995;
she received the "Gold Medal of Honor" from
the Republic of Austria for her services to the
Embassy of Austria.
In addition to her academic accomplishments, Dr. Tamagna continued her private
practice through her career at GWU and
after retiring. She was a very dedicated
physician, seeing patients in her home office
and
making
frequent
house
calls.
She was loved by her staff, students and
patients.
Dr. Tamagna passed away on March 25, 2018.
She derived great joy from her life with
her loving husband Frank Tamagna. They
balanced two demanding and rewarding
careers with worldwide travels, raising two
successful daughters, and a life filled with
friends and family.
Dr. Tamagna is survived by her two daughters
and their husbands, Ellen Tamagna and Victor
Hogen and Jane Tamagna and Lonnie Darr;
her grandchildren and their spouses, Katherine and Travis Furr, Jeremiah Tamagna-Darr
and Sarah Keesler, Lucas and Heather Tamagna-Darr, Rachel Tamagna Hogen and
Matthew Russell and Victor Tamagna Hogen;
as well as her three great-grandchildren,
Skylar Furr, Elsie Tamagna-Darr and Caleb
Keesler.
Services will be held at a later date. In lieu of
flowers, we would appreciate contributions
to the United States Holocaust Museum,
Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR), or
So Others Might Eat (SOME).
When the need arises, let families find you in
the Funeral Services Directory.
To be seen in the Funeral Services Directory,
please call paid Death Notices at 202-334-4122.
B8
EZ
. FRIDAY,
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
MARCH 30 , 2018
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
Staying warm, chance of showers
Rain shouldn’t be particularly heavy
or long lasting, but you may run into
brief heavier showers in the
morning. We then stick with a
chance of showers through a good
chunk of the day. With plenty of clouds and rain
around, temperatures don’t seem likely to rise a
ton. Highs are in the 60s. Tonight, a stray shower
is possible but not likely in the evening as much
cooler, drier air barrels in on blustery winds from
the northwest. Skies clear and winds calm late
night. Lows fall to mid-30s to lower 40s.
Today
Showers
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Saturday
Mostly sunny
Sunday
Partly sunny
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Monday
Mostly cloudy
Tuesday
Cloudy
Wednesday
Cloudy, rain
possible
66° 39
61° 47
60° 41
56° 45
66° 56
57° 35
FEELS*: 64°
FEELS: 61°
FEELS: 56°
FEELS: 59°
FEELS: 61°
FEELS: 51°
CHNCE PRECIP: 60%
P: 0%
P: 10%
P: 25%
P: 25%
P: 35%
WIND: W 10–20 mph
W: SSE 7–14 mph
W: NW 8–16 mph
W: ENE 6–12 mph
W: S 10–20 mph
W: NW 10–20 mph
°
°
°
°
°
OFFICIAL RECORD
Temperatures
NATION
Harrisburg
61/35
Hagerstown
60/34
Davis
50/23
High
Record high
Record low
ACTUAL
FORECAST
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
77° 3:59 p.m.
48° 5:00 a.m.
61°/41°
92° 1907
18° 1923
74° 5:00 p.m.
46° 6:00 a.m.
61°/37°
86° 1998
20° 1982
72° 5:00 p.m.
47° 5:00 a.m.
58°/37°
90° 1945
18° 1923
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: –3.6° yr. to date: +0.7°
Precipitation
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
Ocean City
60/37
OCEAN: 42°
Lexington
67/32
Richmond
74/38
Norfolk
73/44
Virginia Beach
71/42
Past 24 hours
Total this month
OCEAN: 42°
Normal
Kitty Hawk
67/42
Total this year
Normal
OCEAN: 47°
Pollen: Low
Air Quality: Moderate
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
Low
Low
Low
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.08"
1.92"
3.23"
7.65"
8.66"
0.08"
1.76"
3.13"
8.15"
8.55"
0.03"
2.22"
3.64"
8.52"
9.59"
Moon Phases
UV: Moderate
Solar system
3 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, morning shower, clouds breaking late.
High 52–56. Wind west–northwest 10–20 mph. Tonight,
clear, chilly. Low 23–27. Wind north–northwest 4–8 mph.
Saturday, mostly sunny, breezy. High 45–51. Wind south
8–16 mph.
Atlantic beaches: Today, cloudy, rain, windy. High 60–73.
Wind west–southwest 10–20 mph. Tonight, becoming clear.
Low 37–44. Wind northwest 8–16 mph. Saturday, mostly
sunny, breezy. High 49–55. Wind east 7–14 mph. Sunday,
partly sunny. High 53–66.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, morning showers, clearing
late. Wind southwest 10–20 knots. Waves around 1 foot. • Lower
Potomac and Chesapeake Bay: Today, morning showers, clearing late.
Wind west 10–20 knots. Waves 2–3 feet. Small craft advisory is in
effect.• River Stages: Today, the Little Falls stage will be around 5.0
feet, rising to 5.8 feet Saturday. Flood stage at Little Falls is 10 feet.
(High tides in Bold)
Washington
2:38 a.m.
7:55 a.m.
3:03 p.m.
8:21 p.m.
Annapolis
5:04 a.m.
11:23 a.m.
5:42 p.m.
11:40 p.m.
Ocean City
1:14 a.m.
7:26 a.m.
1:43 p.m.
7:45 p.m.
Norfolk
3:16 a.m.
9:35 a.m.
3:41 p.m.
9:55 p.m.
12:55 a.m.
7:30 a.m.
1:37 p.m.
7:53 p.m.
Point Lookout
Tu
Low
Normal
Philadelphia
64/37
Charlottesville
72/38
Today’s tides
M
Weather map features for noon today.
Baltimore
65/35
Dover
65/36
Cape May
Annapolis
59/38
65/37
OCEAN: 45°
Washington
66/39
RECORD
°
Su
REGION
AVERAGE
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
Snow
10s
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Thermal, CA 95°
Low: Yellowstone Lake, WY 1°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
Tomorrow
52/32/pc
70/46/s
36/20/pc
66/41/pc
77/53/s
65/35/r
53/16/c
66/41/pc
36/4/sn
66/42/pc
60/38/r
42/30/pc
46/28/r
73/48/r
49/34/r
76/39/pc
56/27/pc
50/38/pc
51/36/r
42/31/pc
73/55/s
63/33/pc
55/37/pc
73/50/pc
35/22/s
70/47/s
82/59/s
58/44/s
25/19/sn
73/48/pc
22/7/c
60/41/pc
53/41/s
50/28/pc
51/34/pc
69/46/s
65/44/pc
69/47/s
38/21/sn
52/21/sh
58/33/pc
52/29/sh
80/60/s
51/26/c
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
54/38/pc
47/33/pc
83/56/s
32/13/pc
31/11/sn
61/35/r
83/69/s
78/54/s
52/35/pc
68/43/pc
75/50/t
57/45/pc
82/62/s
66/45/pc
82/58/pc
54/38/r
62/44/pc
83/69/pc
47/36/pc
45/30/c
59/41/pc
74/57/pc
62/38/r
73/44/r
42/21/pc
51/26/r
85/58/pc
31/21/pc
17/8/c
58/39/s
82/70/pc
81/61/s
54/28/sh
75/49/s
71/51/s
54/26/c
87/64/pc
76/48/pc
78/58/pc
62/39/pc
71/49/pc
82/71/c
49/20/sh
31/16/sf
71/45/pc
75/56/s
56/43/s
55/45/s
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
65/50/s
57/39/pc
88/64/pc
64/37/r
89/64/s
42/28/r
57/32/r
60/44/c
61/40/r
73/39/c
73/41/pc
74/38/pc
80/52/pc
54/41/pc
78/69/s
68/48/pc
72/57/pc
75/53/pc
81/73/s
57/43/c
55/33/pc
42/28/pc
81/64/pc
63/49/s
70/35/c
40/23/pc
77/64/t
58/44/s
92/69/pc
55/32/pc
50/38/pc
64/42/pc
58/42/s
66/45/s
73/41/pc
64/48/s
81/53/pc
58/29/sh
79/69/pc
69/48/c
72/58/pc
69/53/pc
82/73/pc
60/40/pc
52/34/pc
54/30/pc
79/64/t
63/31/sh
World
High: Mardie, Australia 115°
Low: Summit Station, Greenland –46°
Mar 31
Full
Apr 8
Last
Quarter
Apr 15
New
Apr 22
First
Quarter
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Rise
6:56 a.m.
6:45 p.m.
7:48 a.m.
2:27 a.m.
10:54 p.m.
2:29 a.m.
Set
7:29 p.m.
6:42 a.m.
9:04 p.m.
11:49 a.m.
9:05 a.m.
12:02 p.m.
excludes Antarctica
WORLD
Today
Addis Ababa
79/52/pc
Amsterdam
54/39/pc
Athens
67/54/pc
Auckland
73/61/pc
Baghdad
77/57/s
Bangkok
92/79/pc
Beijing
66/48/pc
Berlin
51/36/pc
Bogota
63/51/r
Brussels
54/39/sh
Buenos Aires
87/62/s
Cairo
74/55/pc
Caracas
72/62/pc
Copenhagen
38/29/pc
Dakar
73/63/pc
Dublin
46/37/sh
Edinburgh
42/36/r
Frankfurt
57/40/sh
Geneva
52/37/r
Ham., Bermuda 69/63/s
Helsinki
35/15/s
Ho Chi Minh City 90/77/t
Tomorrow
78/53/pc
51/36/c
69/58/pc
73/62/pc
79/58/s
90/78/pc
75/51/pc
44/34/r
63/50/sh
53/37/t
84/61/pc
77/57/s
73/62/pc
38/32/c
74/64/s
44/36/pc
42/29/pc
54/38/pc
54/37/t
68/64/pc
36/19/s
90/76/c
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
80/71/s
95/62/pc
55/47/s
57/48/c
78/58/pc
79/49/s
84/72/s
97/77/t
90/79/t
76/67/pc
56/48/sh
49/40/r
52/40/c
89/76/s
74/49/pc
47/26/c
33/24/pc
91/79/pc
76/58/pc
98/67/pc
37/17/s
43/24/c
50/38/sh
55/40/pc
80/69/s
96/66/pc
62/53/pc
65/50/s
77/58/pc
84/49/s
83/73/s
92/74/t
91/80/t
75/67/pc
60/50/pc
48/38/sh
57/39/pc
89/74/pc
77/50/pc
46/32/pc
39/33/c
91/78/pc
78/59/pc
97/69/pc
38/21/s
46/25/c
52/40/t
49/36/sh
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei City
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
87/75/s
100/70/pc
65/54/r
91/71/pc
88/54/s
60/47/pc
67/46/s
71/54/pc
90/76/t
38/19/s
84/70/s
81/67/pc
81/58/sh
61/47/s
44/27/c
54/46/pc
54/37/pc
88/75/c
84/66/pc
60/46/t
90/67/pc
82/53/s
61/40/r
64/49/s
74/57/pc
90/77/t
39/22/pc
76/68/c
82/66/s
73/52/s
61/53/s
48/24/sh
58/41/t
55/44/sh
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
sh- showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
Allergen Extract Lab (pollen data); airnow.gov (air
quality data); National Weather Service
* AccuWeather's RealFeel Temperature®
combines over a dozen factors for an accurate
measure of how the conditions really “feel.”
Give Your Deck a Makeover!
SPRING SPECIAL
FREE
$
300
%
60
Value 2nd
Rail Color
RESTORE Option
t4BOEBMM%FDLCPBSET
t3FTFU/BJMT&MJNJOBUF4QMJOUFST
t3FQMBDF3PUUFEPS%BNBHFE8PPE
t"QQMZ$PBUT$PMPS&OIBODFE4FBMFS
REPLACE Option
t3FNPWFPMEEFDLCPBSET
t3FNPWFPMESBJMTBTOFDFTTBSZ
t*OTUBMMOFXLJMOESJFEXPPEEFDLJOH
t"QQMZ$PBUT$PMPS&OIBODFE4FBMF
UPGRADE Option
t3FNPWFPMEEFDLCPBSET
t3FNPWFPMESBJMTBTOFDFTTBSZ
t*OTUBMMOFXNBJOUFOBODFGSFFDPNQPTJUFEFDLJOH
t*OTUBMMOFXNBJOUFOBODFGSFFWJOZMSBJMT
Plus
OFF
Materials!*
* Restoration Only
DECK
WIZARD
RESTORE YOUR DECK LIKE MAGIC
'BTUt&BTZt"GGPSEBCMF
Schedule Your FREE ESTIMATE TODAY!
877.926.1283
www.deckwizard.com
72 Years of Integrity
Deck Wizard is a division of
Wheaton Door and Window,
one of the oldest remodeling
companies on the East Coast.
Established in 1945.
KLMNO
Style
FRIDAY, MARCH 30 , 2018
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/STYLE
EZ
RE
C
MOVIE REVIEWS IN WEEKEND
Ready Player One Spielberg straps us in for a digital thrill ride in a 1980s pop-culture theme park. 28
Journey’s End Optimism and excruciating suffering battle it out in a trench during World War I. 29
Back to Burgundy A blend of family drama and the dreamy setting of the French wine region. 30
Isabella not
welcome at
restaurant
award table
Chef’s eateries removed
from RAMMY categories
amid harassment suit
BY
Once called ‘the hippie’s disappointment,’ cannabidiol,
better known as CBD, rebrands into the latest wellness craze
MARVIN JOSEPH/THE WASHINGTON POST
I
n a lowlit room at Joy’s Spa
in Washington, Dawn
Franklin is smoothing a
creamy white mask onto
Jessica Osorio’s face. The
mask, she says, is infused with
camomile and sage and aloe vera,
plus one ingredient that she still
has to explain to her clients: CBD.
An aesthetician, Franklin
started working with an Oregon
chemist last year to make CBD
products for the skin, believing
that a little of it swiped onto the
face could help repair the ravages
of age.
But Franklin also takes CBD in
gummy form, popping some in
the morning and some at night.
Like a magic pill, she says, it
wipes away the sleeplessness and
the stress and the nagging pain in
THC’s
trendy
cousin
BY
L AVANYA R AMANATHAN
her back that has left her with a
slight limp, though she’s only in
her 30s.
“It’s crazy,” she acknowledges.
But she insists that CBD can do it
all. “It’s just crazy, the different
things that it has helped.”
For Generation Anxious, affixed to its phones and stricken
by news alerts, overworked and
under-rested, the mysterious
substance known as CBD is
quickly becoming the new “it”
drug.
Devotees whisper about CBD
as a soothing remedy for racing
thoughts and aching extremities.
CBD for those restless nights.
Also, somehow, CBD for those
listless mornings.
Suddenly, you can find sugarCBD CONTINUED ON C2
The Restaurant Association of
Metropolitan Washington has decided to disqualify Mike Isabella’s
restaurants from its annual
award ceremony, the RAMMYs,
after a former employee filed a
sexual
harassment
lawsuit
against the chef and restaurateur. An emailed statement from
RAMW President Kathy Hollinger and the RAMMYs judges
panel said the chef ’s restaurants
Arroz and G would be removed
from eligibility in the categories
of new Restaurant of the Year and
Favorite Fast Bites, respectively.
Arroz chef Michael Rafidi, who
resigned from the restaurant last
week after the suit was filed, will
remain eligible to win in the
category Rising Star of the Year.
Isabella won the organization’s
prize for Restaurateur of the Year
in 2016.
Chloe Caras, a former manager
at the chef ’s company, Mike Isabella Concepts, alleged that Isabella and his partners called her
“bitch” and “whore,” commented
on the size of her buttocks and
touched her without permission,
The Washington Post reported
last week. Separately, a sous chef
told The Post that Isabella kissed
her without her consent. Other
allegations of misconduct include that Isabella’s company has
named cocktails after its partners’ encounters with prostitutes.
The chef has denied the allegations. “Simply put, the allegations
of an unwelcoming or hostile
work atmosphere are false,” Isabella, his partners and his company told The Post in a statement
prepared by the Bascietto & BregISABELLA CONTINUED ON C3
BOOK WORLD
Would you
pay $24 for
a Penn that
can’t write?
BY
Some zoom in, others zoom out for their definition of ‘movie’
What is a movie?
That question
has taken on new
relevance in
recent days, as
arbiters of
Ann
cinematic taste
Hornaday and taxonomy
have drawn
uncompromising lines in the
sand. Over the weekend, Cannes
director Thierry Frémaux
announced that films produced
by Netflix and other streaming
services would no longer be
invited to compete at the
prestigious film festival unless
they committed to a French
theatrical release with a monthlong window before becoming
available on other platforms.
A few days later, Steven
Spielberg told ITV News that he
didn’t think Netflix films should
qualify for Oscars. “Once you
commit to a television format,
you’re a TV movie,” Spielberg
said, adding that “if it’s a good
show, [you] certainly deserve an
Emmy. But not an Oscar.”
As it happens, Spielberg made
that pronouncement while on
the hustings for “Ready Player
One,” an adaptation of Ernest
Cline’s novel that raises its own
questions as to what we’re
talking about when we talk
about movies. For a futuristic
story that transpires mostly in
the world of virtual reality,
Spielberg marshals animated
avatars, first-person perspective
and latitudinal spatial logic to
create a big-screen video game,
hauling viewers on a ride that
feels less cinematic than a
random series of nostalgic
arcade attractions.
Larded with sentimental
references to movies from “King
Kong” and “The Shining” to “Star
Wars” and Spielberg’s own
“Jurassic Park,” “Ready Player
One” exemplifies the inevitable
point at which video games have
finally internalized the
production values of movies and
movies have regurgitated back a
visual language seeking to
replicate the seamlessly
subjective experience of gaming
and VR.
But is “Ready Player One” any
more of a movie than Dee Rees’s
classic World War II drama
HORNADAY CONTINUED ON C3
JAAP BUITENDIJK/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tye Sheridan, left, and Lena Waithe in “Ready Player One,” in which Steven Spielberg blurs the
lines between video game and movie. But he’s clear on delineating “movie” from “TV movie.”
M AURA J UDKIS
M ARK A THITAKIS
What is Sean Penn thinking?
Novels are supposed to be portals
into an author’s mind, reflecting a
writer’s thoughts and giving them
a clever and artful shape through
plot, style and characterization.
We are now in
our third year
of living with
Penn’s debut
fictional opus,
“Bob
Honey
Who Just Do
Stuff,” and the
picture is not
getting
any
clearer.
“Bob Honey,”
BOB HONEY
you may recall,
WHO JUST DO
first emerged
STUFF
during
the
By Sean Penn
height of the
Atria. 160 pp.
2016 election
$24
season,
released as a free
audiobook performed by a cast
that included Frances McDormand and Penn himself. At the
time, Penn was halfheartedly
slinging the line that “Bob Honey” was the brainchild of one
Pappy Pariah, whom Penn
claimed to have met at a writers’
conference in 1979. The “Bob
Honey” manuscript, the story
went, found its way in circuitous
fashion to Penn via his mother in
early 2016, and its satire of rising
BOOK WORLD CONTINUED ON C3
C2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30 , 2018
The Reliable Source
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
In this day and age,
with misinformation
running rampant, it’s
important that we
protect the truth, as
well as those who
work to bring it to
light. I can no longer,
in good conscience,
use the services of a
company that allowed
the spread of
propaganda and
directly aimed it at
those most
vulnerable.”
— Comedian Will Ferrell,
explaining his decision to join
the #DeleteFacebook
movement after the socialmedia platform revealed that
millions of users’ information
was improperly collected by a
political data firm. Ferrell
announced to his more than
10 million followers that he’d be
deleting his account for good by
Friday.
Roseanne hears
from No. 1 fan
After the reboot of her hit ABC
sitcom premiered to giant ratings
this week, comedian Roseanne
Barr received a yuge congrats
from one very famous fan:
President Trump.
“We just kind of had a private
conversation, but we talked about
a lot of things and he’s just happy
for me,” Barr said on “Good
Morning America” on Thursday.
The reboot’s two-episode
premiere attracted a whopping
18.2 million viewers, ABC’s best
results for an
hour-long
telecast since
fall 2006.
Trump, whom
Barr described
as an old friend
who’s done “a
lot of nice
things for me
Barr
over the years,”
pays particularly close attention
to numbers, whether inflating the
crowd size at his inauguration or
praying for former “Celebrity
Apprentice” host Arnold
Schwarzenegger’s ratings.
“He really understands ratings
and how they measure things,”
Barr said of the reality star turned
president. “And that’s kind of
been an interest of mine, too.”
“Roseanne” 2.0 tackles the
country’s divisive politics headon. Roseanne (Barr) is a Trump
voter who squares off with her
sister, Jackie (Laurie Metcalf), a
Hillary Clinton supporter.
Thrown into the first episodes
were debates about women’s
bodies, gender stereotypes, rising
prescription drug costs and the
lack of jobs.
The White House confirmed
the phone call between Trump
and Barr, which was first reported
by the New York Times, but did
not say whether the president had
actually watched the show.
ALASTAIR GRANT/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kristin Davis, Cynthia Nixon, Kim Cattrall and Sarah Jessica Parker. Nixon is running for governor of New York.
Support on, off screen: SJP backs Nixon bid
T
his is shaping up like the
scotched “Sex and the City 3
movie: Sarah Jessica Parker,
Kristin Davis and Cynthia Nixon
are all in . . . but Kim Cattrall, maybe
not so much?
Parker and Davis, the actresses
who played Carrie and Charlotte,
respectively, are vocally supporting
the gubernatorial bid of their “Sex
and the City” co-star Nixon, who
played Miranda on the late-andlamented HBO series and movie
spinoffs. But Cattrall, who played
bombshell Samantha, has so far
offered only a tepid note of support
for Nixon’s first foray into electoral
politics, in a Democratic primary run
against two-term Gov. Andrew M.
Cuomo.
SJP on Thursday posted a photo of
Nixon to Instagram with a caption
offering her full-throated support. “A
mother An activist An advocate A
fighter A NY’er A dear friend
Running for Governor of our great
state. My sister on and off screen, you
have my love, support and vote,” she
wrote.
The socially shared words of
encouragement follow speculation
that Parker wouldn’t be pairing her
signature stilettos with a “Nixon 4
Guv” T-shirt anytime soon. Pressed
by the New York Post on her position,
the “Divorce” actress released a
statement to the outlet Wednesday
that sounded kind of lukewarm:
“Cynthia has been my friend and
colleague since we were little girls. I
look forward to talking to her about
her New York state gubernatorial
bid,” she said, through a publicist.
So the far-more-enthusiastic
Instagram post Thursday puts her in
the same camp as Davis, who,
immediately after Nixon announced
her run for the Empire State’s
Democratic nomination, publicly
backed her former co-star in a tweet
March 19.
That leaves just Cattrall (who
reportedly was the holdout on a third
installment of the SATC movie
franchise). Asked about her feelings
on Nixon’s run, Cattrall cryptically
tweeted, “I support & respect any
former colleague’s right to make
their own career choices.”
Which makes us think of the
words Carrie Bradshaw so often
wrote on the show: We “couldn’t help
but wonder . . . ”
JAMIE MCCARTHY/GETTY IMAGES
Sonia Rao contributed to this report.
GOT A TIP? EMAIL US AT RELIABLESOURCE@WASHPOST.COM. FOR THE LATEST SCOOPS, VISIT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RELIABLESOURCE
@helena_andrews @emilyaheil
CBD is cannabis minus the high. So what’s all the buzz?
CBD FROM C1
coated CBD gummies to gnaw on,
and balms to rub onto pulse
points. There’s CBD for your dog
(gluten-free and pumpkin-flavored!) and CBD for your aching
feet. You can buy bottled CBD
water in trendy, seasonally driven fast-casual restaurants, and
bags of CBD-laced coffee in shops
on busy thoroughfares in Washington, Colorado Springs, Las
Vegas and dozens of other cities.
Back at Joy’s, Osorio, the mask
still plastered on her face, pipes
up about her own experience
with CBD, how it seemed to quiet
the back spasms she has suffered
since an accident years ago.
Plus, is it just her imagination,
or do her wrinkles seem to have
faded?
H
ave we mentioned CBD’s relationship to the green gold
mine that is the American
marijuana industry? (Surprise.)
Also known by its full name,
cannabidiol (pronounced cannabid-EYE-ol), CBD is just one of
hundreds of compounds hiding
within the cannabis plant. It’s a
distant cousin of THC, the stuff in
pot that’s notorious for getting
you stoned and for inciting the
wrath of Attorney General Jeff
Sessions.
But while the term “cannabidiol” smacks of weed, “CBD” somehow sounds . . . tame. Like something you can name-drop around
Mom, like turmeric and melatonin and charcoal and biotin or
any of the other wonder-elixirs
that have replaced Prozac in
America’s medicine cabinets.
The dizzying rise of CBD is a
story of timing as much as of
branding. As more states deregulate marijuana, the Reefer Mad-
ness stigma that surrounded it
for decades seems to have gone
up in smoke.
But here’s why CBD appeals to
some who would never smoke a
joint after dinner: Take a few
milligrams of CBD as, say, an oil
slipped onto the tongue or a piece
of candy, and it tastes unmistakably like cannabis, which is to
say, slightly minty and herbaceous, and just a little funky. But
cannabidiol’s effect is startlingly
anticlimactic. It’s weed without
the high.
And this may be why CBD is
legal in many states, including
several that don’t allow legal
recreational or medical marijuana. You can often buy it over the
counter; a 25-milligram gummy
frog, for example, costs about $5,
less than a cocktail at happy
hour.
An organic chemist named
Roger Adams isolated cannabidiol amid a wave of research into
the medicinal promise of marijuana in the 1930s and ’40s. He
filed for a patent, and in the
decades that followed, marijuana
growers experimented with raising plants with high levels of CBD
and almost no THC, hoping that a
puff might trigger its own trippy
bang.
It didn’t take long for them to
realize that they were wrong. So,
so wrong.
“CBD became known as the
hippie’s disappointment,” says
Stuart W. Titus, the chief executive of Medical Marijuana Inc., a
producer of several CBD oils and
products that entered the market
in 2012.
Now, the hippie’s disappointment is back, rebranded as the
stressed-out
modern
office
drudge’s salvation.
Gwyneth Paltrow’s obsessively
JAHI CHIKWENDIU/THE WASHINGTON POST
Aesthetician Dawn Franklin performs a facial using CBD-infused cleansers, masks and oils at Joy’s Spa
on Monday in the District. The cannabis compound is also being used in products like candy and coffee.
followed lifestyle site Goop, never one to miss a chance to gush
about a wellness trend, recently
published a guide to CBD cocktails. One of the many cushy
lounges offering swag at Coachella next month is promising CBD
oils, along with yoga and vegan
food, for all its guests. A writer
for the website the Cut wrote that
a little CBD made her feel
“delightful.”
“Some people do want the
high, of course,” Titus says. “But
others are looking for the health
and wellness benefits.”
Which, according to the char-
ter members of the Cult of Cannabidiol, are many. Infinite, in
fact.
“I like to call it the super-nutrient, the super plant,” says Spike
Mendelsohn, the Washingtonbased former “Top Chef ” contestant behind fast-casual restaurants including Good Stuff Eatery. More recently, he’s a partner
in the CBD-infused “wellness
drink” Plnt Water, which comes
in such flavors as turmeric and
ginger, and matcha and mint
and, for now, is available in a
healthy-leaning fast-casual restaurant chain.
African American Museum tries ‘walk-up’ option
BY
P EGGY M C G LONE
Eighteen months after its triumphant opening, the popular
National Museum of African
American History and Culture is
testing a new admission policy:
No timed passes will be required
for four Wednesdays in April.
“Walk-Up Wednesdays” will allow museum officials to test a
no-pass-required entry to the
Smithsonian museum, which
opened Sept. 24, 2016, and has
welcomed more than 3.3 million
visitors since.
On April 4, 11, 18 and 25, visitors
can enter without passes, officials
announced. The museum distributed timed passes for all of April
— including these four days — and
it will give priority to visitors
holding passes. Others will be
allowed in subject to capacity.
The museum will not distribute same-day passes online — as it
does daily starting at 6:30 a.m. —
as it tests its no-pass policy.
“Walk-Up Wednesdays in April
will help us to determine how to
manage visitor demand,” museum director Lonnie G. Bunch
III said in a statement. “We don’t
want to disappoint our visitors by
reaching capacity and having
them wait in long lines for space
to become available inside the
galleries. The goal of this pilot
program is to provide greater access for the public while maintaining the safety and security of
our visitors.”
Since it opened, the museum has issued advance timed
“It’s really mother’s milk,” he
says. “It’s natural.”
N
aturally, not everyone is buying the hype.
Last year, the FDA dinged a number of companies hawking CBD based on unsubstantiated claims — mainly that it could
cure or reverse cancer.
The agency hasn’t evaluated
all the claims about CBD, but
some in the research field already
have their doubts.
“I think you’re dealing with
disease states where people are
grasping for answers,” says Timo-
passes to control crowds and prevent long lines at entrances.
On the first Wednesday of every
month, it has released thousands of free passes on a firstcome basis through its website,
nmaahc.si.edu. The museum will
distribute passes for July on
April 4 beginning at 9 a.m.
The system has crashed repeatedly since it was introduced in
2016. Only last month it experienced “technical difficulties” that
lasted more than an hour and left
patrons thinking that passes for
thy E. Welty, a professor of pharmacy at Drake University in Des
Moines. “So they’re turning to
this and saying, ‘This is the
answer.’ ”
Welty has been involved with
CBD use in patients with epilepsy, and at least two reputable
studies have shown it can relieve
seizures. But as for the rest of it —
the anxiety and sleep claims, all
anecdotal — he’s doubtful.
“They’re not scientifically founded, in my mind,” he says.
So: Is CBD just this year’s
activated charcoal or functional
mushroom? Harmless enough to
pop without worry?
“I would be very cautious,”
Welty says. With no oversight of
the candies and waters and food
products containing CBD, he
says, “you’re not sure what you’re
really getting.”
For true believers, though, it’s
worth venturing into the unknown if it means tossing out the
aspirin and the painkillers and
the antidepressants.
“For a long time now, there
have been people approaching a
lot of chefs about working with
cannabis and edibles,” Mendelsohn says. Weed seems like fun.
“But is it worth risking all the
other work that I have? I’m in
business with my family. I do a lot
of work with kids. I do a lot of
work with policy.”
Drugs? Unwise. The wellness
space? Whole different ballgame,
he says. Plus, there’s no question
there’s a market for CBD. “People,” he says, “are already buying it.”
Franklin is convinced of its
powers. “I’ve had friends take
CBD for the first time, and call
me and say, ‘Where have you been
all my life?’ ” she says.
lavanya.ramanathan@washpost.com
June were gone.
In addition to advance tickets,
the museum distributes same-day
passes on its website every morning. A limited number of walk-up
passes are available weekdays after 1 p.m. at the Madison Drive
NW side of the building. No walkup passes are available on Saturdays or Sundays because of the
high volume of visitors.
Groups still must have timed
passes, according to the museum’s website.
peggy.mcglone@washpost.com
FRIDAY, MARCH 30 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
Cosby judge refuses to recuse himself
In tense hearing,
O’Neill rejects notion that
wife’s job creates bias
BY
M ANUEL R OIG- F RANZIA
norristown, pa. — In the
fierce, months-long legal slugfest
leading up to Bill Cosby’s retrial
on sexual assault charges, the
comedian’s high-powered defense team has repeatedly lost
fights over evidence and witnesses.
Steven T. O’Neill, the veteran
Montgomery County, Pa., judge
overseeing the case, has already
handed a huge victory to prosecutors by allowing five previous
accusers to testify that they were
allegedly drugged and sexually
assaulted by Cosby.
On Thursday, just days before
jury selection in the retrial is set
to begin, the defense was thwarted again, failing to force O’Neill
to remove himself from the case.
In a hearing, Cosby’s lead
attorney, Thomas Mesereau, argued O’Neill might be biased
because the judge’s wife, Deborah V. O’Neill, works for a sexual
trauma center at the University
of Pennsylvania, where she is
employed as a social worker.
“We are concerned that there
might be an appearance of bias,”
Mesereau told the judge whose
role he was questioning.
Judge O’Neill, though, his
voice cracking with emotion,
eventually rejected the defense
request, relying on a legal technicality by saying it had not been
filed in a timely manner but also
firmly asserting that he is not
influenced by his wife’s work. He
accused Cosby’s attorneys of
“trivializing” his wife’s accomplishments by suggesting she
had some sway over his judicial
rulings. In a lengthy statement
from the bench, O’Neill professed his “deep” love for his wife
and his admiration for her
achievements.
“She is an independent woman, and she has a right to be
involved in anything she believes
in,” O’Neill said. “It’s difficult to
have her accomplishments trivialized.”
The scene played out in a
courtroom thick with tension.
O’Neill, who at times can be
POOL PHOTO BY DOMINICK REUTER/REUTERS
Bill Cosby attends a pretrial hearing Thursday in Norristown, Pa.
Jury selection in his sexual assault retrial is set to begin Monday.
folksy and chatty, entered the
courtroom in the morning with
pursed lips. He fumbled with
papers for several moments as a
long and uncomfortable silence
hung in the air.
O’Neill was clearly irked at the
defense, and he did nothing to
hide his annoyance at Cosby’s
team for distributing its court
filing demanding his recusal to
the media before it was officially
accepted by the clerk of court’s
office. As Mesereau and his cocounsels argued with the judge,
Cosby — now 80 — periodically
smirked, smiled and chuckled as
he rocked in his swivel chair at
the head of the defense table.
The courtroom machinations
delved extensively into the work
of the judge’s wife, plunging into
her speaking engagements and
into her academic career by addressing her academic writings
about acquaintance rape. Until
last week, when the defense filed
paperwork asking for Steven
O’Neill’s recusal, the judge’s wife
had played no public role in the
case. The defense’s court filings,
which include Deborah O’Neill’s
photograph and email address,
trained a spotlight on her.
The defense asserted that the
judge’s wife has described herself
as an “activist and advocate for
sexual assault victims.” Cosby’s
defense team noted Deborah
O’Neill spoke at a University of
Pennsylvania campus event in
2013 sponsored by a group called
Abuse and Sexual Assault Prevention. Several years later, the
same group called on the univer-
sity to rescind an honorary degree it had awarded to Cosby. The
degree was rescinded in February.
It was another defense allegation that became the main focus
of Thursday’s squabble. The defense alleged that Deborah
O’Neill made a donation to an
activist group — Women Organized Against Rape — that plans
“She is an independent
woman, and she has
a right to be involved
in anything she
believes in.”
Judge Steven T. O’Neill on his wife’s
work at a sexual trauma center
to hold demonstrations during
the Cosby retrial. The evidence
the defense presented was an
Internet donation page for the
group that shows Deborah
O’Neill’s name and photograph.
Judge O’Neill sternly said his
wife’s employer made the donation and that none of their
marital assets were involved. He
said he did not know that her
name and face ended up on the
page.
Prosecutors, who have had the
upper hand in the battle over
pretrial legal motions, pushed
back against the request to remove the judge. They pointed out
the donation was made more
than a year ago — long before the
activist group announced plans
to hold a demonstration.
Mesereau, best known for winning an acquittal for pop star
Michael Jackson on child molestation charges, held his ground.
“It still appears to us that your
wife was responsible for the
donation,” Mesereau told the
judge.
O’Neill revealed Thursday that
the possibility of bias related to
his wife’s work was raised in the
first trial. For the first time, he
divulged that Cosby’s original
defense attorney, who has since
withdrawn from the case, told
him in a phone conference that
Cosby wanted the judge to recuse
himself after an Internet blogger
argued he might be biased. However, the attorney, Brian McMonagle, chose not to make a formal
request, O’Neill said, and the
issue faded away.
O’Neill also took pains Thursday to distance his legal rulings
from his wife’s professional
work. Deputy District Attorney
Robert Falin read a statement
O’Neill had previously made
about how his wife’s profession
has no impact on his decisionmaking.
“This type of smoke-machine
tactic should not be tolerated,”
Falin said.
In a previous setback for the
defense, O’Neill resisted greenlighting the defense’s plan to call
a witness who says Cosby’s main
accuser, Andrea Constand, was
willing to lie about being sexually assaulted by a celebrity to
make money from a lawsuit.
Jury selection is scheduled to
begin Monday, with the judge
and the lawyers looking to seat 12
jurors who can decide whether
Cosby drugged and sexually assaulted Constand at his suburban Philadelphia home in 2004.
The first jury to hear the case
could not reach a unanimous
verdict in June 2017, and O’Neill
declared a mistrial. Mindful that
possible jurors in the retrial may
be paying attention, O’Neill
pleaded with both sides to watch
what they say and do.
“Everything that you say,” he
said, “the world is listening. You
don’t need to do this labeling.
You don’t need to do this namecalling.”
manuel.roig-franzia
@washpost.com
RAMMYs panel nixes Isabella amid harassment suit
ISABELLA FROM C1
man law firm. “Harassment, discrimination, bullying, abuse, or
unequal treatment of any kind
whatsoever are not tolerated
at MIC.”
Isabella’s businesses and personal brand have begun to experience consequences in the wake of
the lawsuit. His name and his
restaurants were dropped from
the website of José Andrés’s annual Dine ’n’ Dash fundraiser. His
longtime publicist, Jennifer
Resick Williams, has scrubbed
the chef ’s name from her company’s website, Washingtonian reports. He lost his spot as the chef
chair of the fundraiser Best Buddies Prom, where he was replaced
by “The Chew’s” Carla
emailed other letters of
Hall. And the Washingsupport from women
ton Nationals cut ties
who knew the chef. One
with the chef, who forwas from Isabella’s flomerly had several conrist, who said she had
cession stands in the sta“never witnessed or been
dium. They will be
a part of sexual harassreplaced.
ment or abuses in these
Hours before RAMW’s
work places.” Two others
announcement, Isabel- Mike Isabella
came from former Isala’s new publicist circubella restaurant employlated to local media a letter deees who had not worked at his
fending the chef, signed by “The
restaurants since 2014.
Women of Mike Isabella ConThe
James
Beard
cepts.” “Chef Mike and his team
Awards changed its criteria this
have built a culture based on
year in response to revelations of
open-communication, equality,
alleged sexual misconduct at top
and a productive, friendly work
restaurants, including accusaenvironment,” said the letter,
tions of notable chefs John Besh
which was signed by 10 female
and Mario Batali. In January, the
employees. The publicist also foundation told its awards com-
C3
RE
mittee to consider chefs’ character when making its selections.
“If you have concerns about a
chef, restaurateur or beverage
professional, or about the culture
around a restaurant or restaurant group, leave the person or
business out of your nominations,” read a directive sent to
judges, Eater reported. That
meant
that
such
restaurants as the Spotted Pig, which
the New York Times reported last
year as having a “rape room,”
were out of the running.
In its statement, RAMW said it
would reevaluate its criteria to
include “good standing as a leader and or member of the community” for future awards.
ANN HORNADAY
Is a movie defined by
the size of the screen?
HORNADAY FROM C1
“Mudbound,” which played in a
handful of theaters while
becoming available for
streaming on Netflix? Or
“Annihilation,” Alex Garland’s
ambitious science-fiction thriller
that opened theatrically in the
United States but will be
available only via streaming in
other countries?
As a director who probably
best personifies 20th-century
American filmmaking at its most
narrative and mainstream,
Spielberg would presumably
recognize both “Mudbound” and
“Annihilation” as movies — or
maybe he would call them
“films.” It’s a distinction the
director invoked at “Ready
Player One’s” premiere at the
South by Southwest Film Festival
earlier this month, when he
greeted the enthusiastic crowd
by assuring them, “This is not a
film that we’ve made — this is, I
promise you, a movie.”
That quip tacitly
acknowledged a bifurcation —
both artistic and economic — in
the movie business that
Spielberg himself helped create,
when blockbusters like “Jaws,”
the “Indiana Jones” movies and
“Jurassic Park” led Hollywood to
embrace a business model
almost entirely dependent on
effects-heavy tentpole “events.”
By “film,” perhaps, Spielberg
meant something like “The Post,”
the journalistic drama starring
Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks
that he rushed into production
last year. As the very kind of
old-school, serious-minded
movie that the special-effects
spectacles constantly threaten to
crowd out of the marketplace,
“The Post” exemplified an
alternative business model that
has emerged, whereby the Oscar
campaign and other awardsseason events provide awareness
for movies that otherwise might
be lost in the superhero sturm
und drang.
As a smart, well-written and
acted movie geared toward
adults, “The Post” also
exemplifies the kind of
storytelling that is increasingly
migrating to traditional
television and sites like Netflix
and Amazon, where filmmakers
of Spielberg’s generation are
finding money, creative freedom
and forgiving time frames that
are scarcer than ever at
traditional studios. Even as
discerning a judge as Frémaux
saw fit last year to include two
cable series at Cannes: Jane
Campion’s “Top of the Lake:
China Girl” and David Lynch’s
“Twin Peaks.”
He also programmed “Carne y
Arena,” Alejandro G. Inarritu’s
deeply moving VR installation
about migration that can now be
seen in Washington. It was their
auteurist bona fides, as well as a
nod to rapidly evolving notions
of visual language, that secured
purchase for these projects at
Cannes. It’s the same elasticity
that led Steven Soderbergh, who
was so alarmed at the state of
film that he retired a few years
ago, to return, most recently
with “Unsane,” a movie he filmed
on an iPhone and is now being
shown in theaters.
Movie stars such as Will Smith
and Adam Sandler are bypassing
that step entirely, going straight
to streaming with their newest
releases. Audiences are choosier
than ever about what will get
them to a multiplex, reserving
their box-office dollars for horror
films, comedies and superhero
thrill-rides, happy to watch the
rest on alternately enormous or
palm-sized home screens.
Meanwhile, like Justice Potter
Stewart and pornography,
audiences know a movie when
they see one: A singular, selfcontained aesthetic event
involving sound and image on a
screen — whether that event tells
a recognizable story, evokes an
abstract emotion, immerses us in
a familiar or alien environment
or simply provides a few hours of
escapist spectacle.
Whether gatekeepers like
Frémaux and Spielberg — as well
as historians, critics and the
Motion Picture Academy — are
making new rules or
distinguishing between “movies”
and “films,” the impulse is the
same: to maintain control over a
medium whose definition and
canon have gone unquestioned
for the better part of the century
and are now open to debate. The
means of cinematic production
were democratized with the
advent of digital cameras;
streaming platforms and social
media could now do the same for
modes of distribution and
exhibition that are otherwise
prohibitively expensive (at least
if your name isn’t Spielberg).
That’s either a promise or a
threat, depending on which side
of the gate you’re on: Drawing
lines in the sand can be futile
when it keeps shifting beneath
your feet.
ann.hornaday@washpost.com
maura.judkis@washpost.com
Like, totally bogus, Spicoli: Sean Penn’s ‘Bob Honey’
BOOK WORLD FROM C1
Trumplandia was so potent it
demanded Penn rush to . . . narrate it.
For the novel version, released
this week, Penn has ditched the
Pappy Pariah nonsense and filled
out the plot, though it is still a
slim tale. Befitting an actor whose
résumé includes both “Dead Man
Walking” and “Fast Times at Ridgemont High,” “Bob Honey” is all
over the place in any format,
slapdash in style and structure.
Bob is a 50-something Southern
California man who has had a
Zelig-like relationship with South
American drug lords, Middle
Eastern warlords and the American military-industrial complex.
He walks the earth clouting the
aged with a mallet because they
cannot get with the zeitgeist and
also because EPA research found
that the “extermination of highflatulence populations” would be
a social boon. In a stumblebum
way, the story makes its way to
the Republican National Convention, where the “Mussolini of
Mayberry would be fomenting his
flock.”
The satire of Trumpish times
was clear in late 2016, though the
heroism of a cynical divorcee like
Bob was not; it did not help that
Penn voiced Bob in a sleepy,
squeaky drawl that at once
evoked Larry the Cable Guy and
Kermit the Frog. Still, as an audiobook, “Bob Honey” had a certain unserious, busman’s holiday
charm. It got a lift from its variety
of voices, though some of them
were broad ethnic stereotypes. As
a free download, “Bob Honey” hit
the right price point.
For the novel version of the
story, though, Penn is relegated to
being a maker of sentences. May
he never quit his day job; Penn
delivers prose as if he were gunning for a prize from the American Alliteration Association.
“Dreams died like destiny’s deadwood,” he writes. And: “Scottsdale’s dry climate contradicts the
clammy calescent of New Guinean condensation.” Something
prompts Bob’s “provision of personal protocols” ; an investigative
journalist named Spurley is on
his tail, and “Spurley sloppily
slurps” a Popsicle. Police are accused of “racial rancor by Ruger
in a country rife with rule of law.”
So, sadly, soporifically on. Penn
is fixated on matters of populism
and authenticity: Among Bob’s
chief targets is a society that has
been “marketed into madness.”
He has an affection for 1960s
protest music, quoting liberally
from John Lennon’s “Working
Class Hero” and a half-dozen
songs by downhearted, sarcastic
folkie Phil Ochs. Penn has a plain
affection for the 1960s counterculture novel, from the let-’er-rip
ERIC RAY DAVIDSON
“Bob Honey” author Sean Penn.
automatic writing of the Beats to
Ken Kesey’s “One Flew Over the
Cuckoo’s Nest,” with its suggestion that an oppressive society
will deem any outspoken, decent
human being insane. In that light,
“Bob Honey” is best appreciated
as the fever dream of a boomer
who watches the news, cannot
make sense of it, but cannot
contain his fury at it anyhow. His
head is filled with fantasies of an
attractive young girlfriend, a gig
setting off fireworks for a South
American strongman and chaos
on the streets during the Republican National Convention.
If only the satire were funnier,
though. If only the writing were
more coherent. And if only the
timing were better. In the weeks
before the last presidential election, “Bob Honey” reflected the
goofiness of the moment’s political theater. Now that we are living
with its consequences, the story
feels off point and toothless.
Toward the end of the novel, a
broken Bob Honey writes a letter
to “Mr. Landlord,” a stand-in for
Trump, grousing, “You are not
simply a president in need of
impeachment, you are a man in
need of an intervention. We are
not simply a people in need of an
intervention, we are a nation in
need of an assassin . . . Sir, I
challenge you to a duel. Tweet me
. . . I dare you.”
Pundits have seized on that
“assassin” line, as if Bob were a
sensible or interesting enough
character to take seriously as a
folk hero. (More curious is the
novel’s epilogue, an Ochs-ian
poem in which Penn keens at
#MeToo as “this infantilizing
term of the day.” ) The Trump era
may yet find its gonzo literary
truthteller who can capture our
moment with more comedy and
absurdity than reality itself can. It
is unquestionably a tough job.
Sean Penn is not up to it as a
novelist, but who knows? There is
always a chance for a movie.
bookworld@washpost.com
Mark Athitakis is a critic and author
of “The New Midwest.”
JAAP BUITENDIJK/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Steven Spielberg on the set of “Ready Player One.” Is it more of a
movie than Netflix’s “Mudbound” because it’s opening in theaters?
C4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30 , 2018
Television
TV HIGHLIGHTS
3/30/18
7:00
7:30
8:00
◆ News
◆ Access
4.1 WRC (NBC)
◆ TMZ
Fox 5
5.1 WTTG (Fox)
◆ Wheel
◆ J’pardy!
7.1 WJLA (ABC)
◆ Ent. Tonight
9.1 WUSA (CBS) Off Script
14.1 WFDC (UNI) ◆ La Rosa de Guadalupe
20.1 WDCA (MNTV) ◆ Family Feud ◆ Family Feud
22.1 WMPT (PBS) State Circle Artworks
26.4 WETA (PBS) PBS NewsHour
30.1 WNVC (MHz) France 24 Programming
Va. Currents
32.1 WHUT (PBS) DW News
Goldbergs
50.1 WDCW (CW) Goldbergs
66.1 WPXW (ION) CSI: Crime Scene
BROADCAST CHANNELS
8:30
9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
◆ Taken
◆ Dateline NBC
◆ Tonight Show
Blindspot
News
◆ MasterChef
◆ 9-1-1
News
Fox 5
News
The Final 5
◆ Once Upon a Time
◆ Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.
◆ J. Kimmel
(10:01) ◆ 20/20
News
◆ MacGyver
◆ Hawaii Five-0
◆ Blue Bloods
◆ Colbert
9 News
El rico y Lázaro
Papá a toda madre
Por amar sin ley
Noticias Univisión
Fox 5 News ◆ Page Six
Big Bang
Big Bang
American Ninja Warrior
American Ninja Warrior
◆ Wash
Murder
Midsomer Murders
(9:36) Rebecca
Wash
In Their Own Words
In Their Own Words
Richard Pryor: Icon
Soundb
France 24 Programming
The Legacy
The Vanishing of Pato
Movie: Postcards From the Edge ★★★ (1990)
Democracy Now!
World News Darley
◆ Dynasty
◆ Penn & Teller: Fool Us
◆ Seinfeld
◆ Mom
News
Two Men
CSI: Crime Scene
CSI: Crime Scene
CSI: Crime Scene
CSI: Crime Scene
◆
CABLE CHANNELS
ERIC MILNER/NETFLIX
A Series of Unfortunate Events (Netflix streaming) Neil Patrick Harris
stars in the second season of the series about the Baudelaire orphans’
encounters with the evil Count Olaf, who wants to steal their inheritance.
Dynasty (CW at 8) Fallon tries to
prove that Alexis and her mother
tricked their way into receiving a
fortune.
together, Sam and Molly must
decide if they should move forward
with their relationship or call it
quits.
MasterChef Junior (Fox at 8)
Contestants make desserts using
natural sweeteners instead of
sugar.
The Titan (Netflix streaming) An
air force pilot is chosen to be part
of an experiment to create a
human able to survive the
environment of Saturn’s moon
Titan.
PREMIERES
The Dangerous Book for Boys
(Amazon streaming) After their
father dies, three boys find comfort
and inspiration in a book he
created for them before his death.
Rapture (Netflix streaming) The
lives of hip-hop artists such as
Logic, G-Eazy, Nas and T.I. are
explored.
Trump: An American Dream
(Netflix streaming) This docuseries
explores the president’s rise to
fame and fortune.
First Match (Netflix streaming)
After years in foster care, a
teenage girl decides joining an allboys wrestling program is the only
way to win back her father.
Happy Anniversary (Netflix
streaming) After three years
ACROSS
1 Like “le” in Fr.
5 Degrade
10 There’s no
money in it
14 Prefix with
syllabic
15 Starbucks
offering
16 Cap with a flat,
circular top
17 Religious text
for a Texas
senator?
19 Flex ending
20 Home of
Amboseli
National Park
21 Pennant
race mo.
22 Tied accessory
23 Cause of
a sleeve
movement
24 Pet for a
Spanish
surrealist?
26 More uneven
29 Puts in a vault,
in a way
30 Dos Passos
trilogy
31 Mild rebuke
33 With 44-Across,
Hanna-Barbera
feline
34 Cravings
36 Sidekick
38 Glimpse
42 Not a good
start?
44 See 33-Across
45 Shade
46 Michigan
neighbor
50 Baptized
boys, often
53 Underage child
of a German
chancellor?
55 Milk source
56 Whac-__
57 Heating stat
58 Finnish
architect
Alvar __
61 Look closely
(over)
62 Household
help for a
19th-century
president?
64 Bank offerings
65 Resort WSW of
Denver
2018 Annual Stellar Gospel
Music Awards (TV One at 9) Kirk
Franklin hosts the 33rd annual
awards.
RETURNING
Trailer Park Boys (Netflix
streaming) Season 12.
Gold Rush: Parker’s Trail
(Discovery at 9) Season 2.
Bering Sea Gold (Discovery at 10)
Season 10.
LATE NIGHT
Colbert (CBS at 11:35) Bryan
Cranston, Jimmy Carter.
— Sarah Polus
More at washingtonpost.com/tv
LEGEND: Bold indicates new or live programs
◆
High Definition Movie Ratings (from TMS) ★★★★ Excellent ★★★ Good ★★ Fair ★ Poor No stars: not rated
By Mark Feldman
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
SPECIAL
(5:00) Live PD
Live PD: Rewind
Live PD
A&E
(5:30) Movie: The Green Mile ★★★ (1999)
Movie: Contagion ★★★ (2011)
AMC
Tanked
Tanked: Unfiltered
Tanked
(10:06) Tanked
(11:06) Tanked
Animal Planet
(4:30) Sparkle Movie: This Christmas ★★ (2007)
The Quad
Black Card
Mancave
BET
Housewives (7:43) Movie: Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Witness Protection ★★ (2012)
Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Witness Protection
Bravo
Craig
King of Hill
Cleveland
Cleveland
Amer. Dad
Amer. Dad
Burgers
Family Guy
Family Guy
Cartoon Network Teen Titans
Erin Burnett OutFront
Anderson Cooper 360
Anderson Cooper 360
CNN Tonight
Pope: Most Powerful Man
CNN
The Office
Movie: The Sitter ★ (2011)
Movie: The Fluffy Movie ★★ (2014)
Comedy Central The Office
Gold Rush
Gold Rush
Gold Rush
(10:02) Bering Sea Gold
(11:03) Gold Rush
Discovery
(6:20) Movie: Hop ★★
Stuck
Bizaard
Movie: Zombies (2018)
Stuck/Middle Bizaardvark Bizaardvark
Disney
E! News
Movie: What Happens in Vegas ★ (2008)
Movie: No Strings Attached ★★ (2011)
E!
NBA Countdown (Live)
NBA Basketball: New Orleans Pelicans at Cleveland Cavaliers (Live)
NBA Basketball: Clippers at Trail Blazers
ESPN
2018 NCAA Women’s Basketball Tournament
Final Four
2018 NCAA Women’s Basketball Tournament
SportCtr
ESPN2
Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners
Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive
Food Network
The Story With Martha
Tucker Carlson Tonight
Hannity
The Ingraham Angle
Fox News Night
Fox News
(6:25) Movie: Up ★★★ (2009)
Movie: Ratatouille ★★★ (2007)
The 700 Club
Freeform
Hancock
Movie: Captain America: The Winter Soldier ★★★ (2014)
Trust
FX
Full House
Full House
Full House
Full House
Full House
Full House
Meet the Peetes
Golden Girls Golden Girls
Hallmark
Psych
Movie: Garage Sale Mystery: A Case of Murder (2017)
Murder, She Wrote
Hallmark M&M Psych
(6:35) Movie: Wonder Woman ★★★ (2017)
Barry
Movie: Kong: Skull Island ★★★ (2017)
Real Time
HBO
Hunters
Hunters
Dream Home Dream Home Dream
Dream Home Hunt Intl
Hunters
Hunters
Hunters Int’l
HGTV
Ancient Aliens
Movie: Apollo 13 ★★★ (1995)
Hollywood
Pawn Stars
History
Bring It!
Bring It!
Bring It!
(11:04) Bring It!
Lifetime
Nats
MLB Baseball: Washington Nationals at Cincinnati Reds
ESPNWS
MLB Baseball
MASN
Hardball Matthews
All In With Chris Hayes
Richard Engel On Assign The Last Word
The 11th Hour
MSNBC
Ridiculous.
Ridiculous.
Ridiculous.
Ridiculous.
Ridiculous.
Ridiculous.
Ridiculous.
Ridiculous.
Ridiculous.
Ridiculous.
MTV
Locked Up Abroad
Lockdown
Inside Maximum Security
Lockdown
Nat’l Geographic Border Wars
Caps
Caps Overtime (Live)
Caps in 30 Redskins
NBC SportsNet WA NHL Hockey: Carolina Hurricanes at Washington Capitals (Live)
Alvinnn!!!
Spotless
Movie: Spy Kids: All the Time in the World ★ (2011)
Full House
Full House
Friends
Friends
Nickelodeon
(6:00) Movie: The Bourne Identity ★★★ (2002)
Movie: The Bourne Supremacy ★★★ (2004)
Bourne Ulti.
PARMT
Movie: Beetlejuice ★★★ (1988)
Futurama
Futurama
Futurama
Futurama
Futurama
Futurama
Syfy
Movie: Vacation ★★ (2015)
Movie: Old School ★★ (2003)
ELEAGUE
TBS
(5:45) Movie: Maytime (1937) Movie: Yield to the Night ★★ (1956)
Movie: The Long Haul ★★ (1957)
TCM
Trading Spaces
Trading Spaces
Trading Spaces
Trading Spaces
Trading Spaces
TLC
NCIS: New Orleans
Movie: The Expendables 3 ★★ (2014)
Movie: The Finest Hours ★★ (2016)
TNT
Expedition Unknown
Destination Truth
Destination Truth
Destination Truth
Destination Truth
Travel
Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers
TruTV
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
Raymond
Raymond
Raymond
Raymond
Mom
Mom
King
King
TV Land
Jeffersons
Jeffersons
Jonathan McReynolds
The 33rd Annual Stellar Gospel Music Awards (Live)
Music Awards
TV One
Mod Fam
Mod Fam
Mod Fam
Mod Fam
Mod Fam
Mod Fam
Mod Fam
Mod Fam
Secret
Secret
USA Network
(6:25) Movie: Forrest Gump ★★★★ (1994)
Movie: The Notebook ★★ (2004)
VH1
GE
Washington
Govt.
Matters
ABC7Women
Sports
ABC
News
News
at
10pm
Govt.
Matters
ABC7Women
WNC8
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
WGN
Walk away from this kind of hatred
Dear Carolyn:
© 2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
66 __ coffee
67 Titillating
message
68 Silly ones
69 Cong.
period
DOWN
1 Sham
2 Israeli port
3 Nonspeaking
movie role
4 Ingratiate
oneself (to)
5 “When We
Were Kings”
subject
6 It takes a
beating
7 Befuddled
8 Basic
9 Sushi
selection
10 65-Across
feature
11 Interoffice
connection
12 Poise
13 Madonna
portrayals
18 Crèche trio
22 Glee club
member
25
26
27
28
32
Completely
Accept
Consumption
List ender
Idiosyncratic
contraction
35 Of least
significance
37 They squelch
discussions
39 It goes over
the tongue
3/30/18
40 “Piano is not
my forte,” e.g.
41 With 51-Down,
sometimessighed line
43 French
weapon
46 Congo natives
47 “That’s enough
already!”
48 Middle section
of an insect
49 Hoping to get
home
51 See 41-Down
52 Religious
ascetics
54 Common
blood group
59 Connections
60 Chances
62 Identify on
Facebook
63 Unified
THURSDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
My girlfriend and
I are both female,
and she has
always had some
anti-male
Carolyn
leanings, but she
Hax
has become
unhinged with
the recent sexual
harassment news. She posts
things on social media like: “All
men are pigs. Yes, I said all.”
I pointed out that I have dear
friends who are male and are
wonderful to both of us, and that
the single most important
person in my professional life is
a male mentor who has been
nothing but kind and decent to
me and every other person I’ve
ever seen him around, man and
woman alike. She says if there’s a
man I don’t think is a pig, that’s
because I’m “blinded” by them
acting charming.
Is there anything I can say or
do to get my girlfriend to see
things differently? Is your advice
to me basically the same as your
recent advice to the letter-writer
with the racist fiance, that it’s a
dealbreaker?
— Anonymous
Anonymous: No, and yes.
There is a distinction to be
made here, to be fair. The
column you refer to (bit.ly/
NotTrivial) was about someone
on the power side expressing
hatred for those traditionally
oppressed, whereas the power
flows in the other direction with
your girlfriend. She is in the
mistreated demographic and
railing against the group that
abuses its power. On that narrow
basis alone, your girlfriend’s
outrage is less of an outrage than
the racist fiance’s.
But it’s a distinction without a
difference. Her outrage is an
outrage — perhaps
consequentially so if your
girlfriend is in a line of work that
has her supervising, advising,
teaching, coaching, defending,
admitting, hiring, firing, serving,
caring for, feeding, protecting or
treating boys or men.
Your girlfriend has hatred in
her heart and has turned it upon
just under half of the world.
Worse, she sees nothing wrong
with this. Worse still, she sees
something wrong with people
who see something wrong with
this.
Worst of all, at least as it
applies to the sustainability of
your relationship, your own
girlfriend has no respect for your
judgment or worldview. Or you
for hers.
These widely reported
incidents of sexual harassment
are crimes against the humanity
of the individual women
involved and against the
humanity of women in general.
Your girlfriend’s fury likewise
erases the humanity of men by
denying even the possibility of
individual culpability and
innocence.
As someone who will defend
to the last a person’s right to end
a relationship over anything
from bad kissing to
reprehensible taste in pizza
toppings — because if it matters
to you, then it matters — I have
no hesitation in advising you to
walk away from someone,
promptly, who harbors such
profound contempt. Contempt
for you or for men, take your
pick.
Or leave just for her utter
failure to see the irony in her
rage or to admit her own faults.
We measure one person at a
time based on that person’s
actions, or we’re wrong, sides
notwithstanding.
As with the racist fiance, it’s
time for your girlfriend to seek
treatment for an anger so
profound it’s distorting her
judgment. I urge you to suggest
it. I suggest you urge it.
But I don’t recommend you
stick around to see whether she
does.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her
column delivered to your inbox each
morning at wapo.st/haxpost.
Join the discussion live at noon
Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com.
FRIDAY, MARCH 30 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
EZ
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
RE
PICKLES
C5
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
BOTH SIDES VULNERABLE
NORTH
75
653
AK52
KQ64
EAST
J9632
9874
97
53
WEST
84
KQ2
J 10 8 6
10 9 8 7
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH (D)
A K Q 10
A J 10
Q43
AJ2
The bidding:
SOUTH
WEST
NORTH
2 NT
Pass
6 NT
Opening lead — 10
EAST
All Pass
M
onks at a monastery
CLASSIC PEANUTS
spent their time transcribing ancient texts by
hand. When they got computers to facilitate the process,
it elicited a comment from
the abbot: “Now we can have
archaic and eat it too!”
At 6NT, South needs more
than one slice of cake. He
has 11 top tricks with many
chances for one more. South
starts by taking four clubs,
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
pitching a diamond. East
lets go a spade and a heart.
South next leads a heart to
his jack.
West wins with the queen
and leads the jack of diamonds, and declarer takes
the queen and continues
with the top spades.
When West discards a
heart, South cashes the A-K
of diamonds next. East must
LIO
save his jack of spades; he
discards a heart. South discards his last spade.
At Trick 12, dummy leads
a heart. When East follows
low, his last card is the jack
of spades. South also knows
that West still has a high diamond, so South puts up the
ace of hearts to make the
slam. He has given himself
every chance, ending with a
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
squeeze.
CHARLES SCHULZ
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
75653
AK52KQ64
Neither side vulnerable.
The dealer, at your right,
opens one spade. What do
you say?
ANSWER: Some players
would climb in boldly with a
double, especially since the
vulnerability offers some protection. But the hand is more
oriented to defending, and
if your partner responded to
a double by bidding two (or
more) hearts, your support
for the other major would
be a major disappointment.
Pass.
BLONDIE
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2018, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
C6
EZ
MUTTS
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
PATRICK McDONNELL
ZITS
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30 , 2018
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
BIRTHDAY | MARCH 30
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
This year you break
out of your mold to
create new patterns
and/or try out new
interests. Your life takes on a
more exciting tone than in the
recent past. If you are single, a
powerful attraction could build
sometime after the summer.
If you are attached, you and
your sweetie add a new quality
to your life together. The two
of you might decide to expand
your family or take up a new
passion. Libra is loving and
sensitive toward you.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
Your energy and sense of
wellbeing are fueled by a close
friend or associate. You have
reason to celebrate. Handle
detailed work in the morning,
when you can focus on key
matters with precision.
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
Your ingenuity emerges when
eyeing a potential problem.
Make it okay to remain
focused on one project in the
afternoon, but expect some
calls or a knock on the door.
Decide what feels right when
working with an associate.
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
Indulge your need for precision
in the morning, when you can
focus. By the afternoon, even
if you are busy with a project,
your mind is likely to wander. A
case of spring fever might have
you feeling distracted.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
WEINGARTENS & CLARK
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
Make calls in the morning,
when you have a lot on your
mind and need to contact
several people. You might feel
as if you can discuss nearly
any topic with those around
you. In a sense, you have set
up a safe space with people
you can trust.
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
Observe a tendency to
loosen up as the day goes
on. In the morning, deal
with practicalities. By the
afternoon, you’ll adopt a much
more carefree attitude. Listen
to what is being shared by a
roommate or family member.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
Handle important matters in
the morning, when you are
likely to get your way. Expect
unusual creativity to come
forward. Confirm plans with
a key person in the evening.
You might want to indulge this
person, but you do have a
budget.
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
You could feel sluggish in the
morning. By the afternoon,
you will be at your best. Others
note your high charisma and
energy. Before you know it, if
you don’t already have plans,
you will.
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
If you have an important call
to make, by all means do it
before lunch. Afterward, you
might feel the weight of the
past few days and will need
some downtime. Some of you
will choose to reflect on certain
powerful feelings.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
The impression you give this
morning impresses the right
person. By the afternoon, a
successful meeting occurs that
gets you the desired results.
If you can start your weekend
early, do.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
You could be in for a surprise.
You approach a personal
matter differently from your
usual style. Suddenly, you
understand where a key
person is coming from.
Take on a strong role in the
afternoon, wherever you are.
Know that others want to join.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
One-on-one relating puts a
smile on your face. How you
deal with someone and the
choices you make could be
quite different from what you
had anticipated. Know that
you are breaking a pattern as
you head in a new direction.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
Your ability to move forward
could startle others. You’ll
go along with someone
else’s ideas, yet somehow
encourage changes that you
would like, too. You don’t see
yourself as manipulative, nor
does this person; you simply
use logic.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2018, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
KLMNO
SPORTS
FRIDAY, MARCH 30 , 2018
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
Two-time defending NL Cy Young Award winner Scherzer has a secret plan to get even better
D
M2
Wizards,
Porter go
down in
Motown
PISTONS 103,
WIZARDS 92
BY
C ANDACE B UCKNER
detroit — The night should
have marked the end of one chase
and the beginning of the next
phase.
The Washington Wizards had a
chance Thursday to clinch a playoff berth with a win against the
Detroit Pistons. Things appeared
to be lining up for them, with
John Wall dressed in team warmups instead of the designer suit
and sunglasses he had been
sporting on game nights the past
two months and Pistons star
Blake Griffin relegated to bystander with a right ankle contusion.
It didn’t matter. The Wizards
yielded yet another tough loss at
the wrong time of the season,
falling, 103-92, to a team essentially out of the playoff hunt.
WIZARDS CONTINUED ON D6
Hornets at Wizards
Tomorrow, 3 p.m., NBCSW
Women’s
Final Four
is no place
for Cinderella
No. 1 seeds to battle it out
in divergent semifinals
BY
A VA W ALLACE
columbus, ohio — Geno Auri-
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
BAD NEWS,
BATTERS ...
BY
J ORGE C ASTILLO
On Tuesday morning, as his teammates prepared for their final
tuneup before Opening Day, the first of the season’s many media
scrums circled Max Scherzer at his locker in the Washington
Nationals’ clubhouse. It was a reintroduction of sorts for the
two-time reigning National League Cy Young Award winner.
He was asked whether he will have jitters when he toes the rubber
on Opening Day against the Cincinnati Reds (yes, but he will be
more excited than nervous), whether the anticipated chilly weather
will affect him (no, he pitched in Detroit for five years) and whether
his daughter’s birth in November changed his perspective on the
game (no, but there are more late nights). Finally, he was asked how
he thought he fared in spring training. His answer was pointed.
“You don’t really rate spring training,” Scherzer said. “It’s either
are you ready or are you not. I’m ready.”
That decisiveness was absent last year, when Scherzer’s readiness was one of spring training’s pressing story lines. He didn’t
pitch in a spring training game until March 22, and when he finally
pitched he threw three-fingered fastballs to avoid aggravating a
fracture in his right ring finger.
The ailment didn’t force him to begin the season on the disabled
list as he initially feared, but it did push his first start to the
Nationals’ fourth game. He proceeded to allow two runs across
62/3 innings on a chilly, windy Philadelphia afternoon and, eventually, earn his second straight NL Cy Young Award with a 2.51 ERA
and 268 strikeouts in 31 starts despite a few injury scares. In other
words, he was still Max Scherzer, still dominant, still determined,
still intense.
There weren’t any reservations hanging over Scherzer this
spring. Scherzer reported completely healthy to camp in West Palm
Beach, Fla. If there was any need for proof, he provided plenty by
emma learned the danger of playing a No. 1 seed in the Final Four
almost two decades ago. The lesson came against Notre Dame, in
the nascent days of one of women’s college basketball’s richest
rivalries.
In 2001, Auriemma also had a
top-seeded team, a roster that
featured Sue Bird, Diana Taurasi
and Swin Cash, and a 15-point
lead in the first half of a national
semifinal against Coach Muffet
McGraw’s Fighting Irish. As
Notre Dame clawed back to beat
Connecticut on the way to the
only national title in program
history, Auriemma remembered
FINAL FOUR CONTINUED ON D6
NCAA TOURNAMENT
WOMEN’S FINAL FOUR
Today’s games in Columbus, Ohio
1 Louisville vs. 1 Mississippi State, 7
1 Notre Dame vs. 1 Connecticut, 9
Both games on ESPN2
NATIONALS CONTINUED ON D5
MEN’S FINAL FOUR
Rested, surely, but is Zimmerman really ready?
Ryan Zimmerman just
took the exhibition season
off.
“Somebody else must
have done it in the past,”
the Washington Nationals
Thomas
first baseman said.
Boswell
Maybe.
“I hit .500,” he said of
his 1-for-2 exhibition
season. “That’s my best spring training
ever.”
Zimmerman jokes, but plenty of people
in baseball are watching. Maybe there are
scattered examples through MLB history
of older players, nursing injuries, who
barely played in spring training yet
started on Opening Day as Zimmerman
will in Cincinnati on Friday. But
Zimmerman is still the extreme case.
He is only 33, a veteran but hardly
aged. He is due to make $14 million this
year and $18 million in 2019, so he is a
star whom fans come to see play even in
spring training. Last year, he was healthy
enough to hit 36 homers with 108 RBI
and bat .303.
Most important, throughout spring
training, he was in near-mint condition.
We talked several times, in February and
in mid-March, about how great he felt
and what a wonderful idea it was — for
him — to skip spring training games and
how much he appreciated rookie
Manager Dave Martinez letting him do so.
“If you didn’t have to do that stuff, why
would you do that stuff?” Zimmerman
told me Tuesday.
What is “that stuff,” exactly? And why
should Zimmerman be excused from it?
Zimmerman has chronic shoulder and
Tomorrow’s games in San Antonio
11 Loyola Chicago vs. 3 Michigan, 6:09
1 Villanova vs. 1 Kansas, 8:49
Both games on TBS
OBITUARIES
Rusty Staub, a pinchhitting savant who played
23 years, dies at 73. B6
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
U-Va.’s Tony Bennett still
has sense of humor as he
wins AP coaching honor. D6
BOSWELL CONTINUED ON D5
PRO BASKETBALL
Sixers’ Joel Embiid (orbital
fracture) reportedly will be
out two to four weeks. D7
Opening Day: Nationals at Reds | Today, 4:10 p.m., MASN
vs
TODAY @ 3:30PM
TOMORROW @ 1:30PM
SUNDAY @ 3:30PM
D2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30 , 2018
washingtonpost.com/sports
EARLY LEAD
D.C. SPORTS BOG
EARLY LEAD
Good dog
gives
Cavaliers’
Smith a lift
C INDY B OREN
BY
His name didn’t appear on the
stat sheet, but an unusual source
gave J.R. Smith a big hand — er,
paw — in the Cleveland Cavaliers’
118-105 victory Wednesday night
over Charlotte.
They don’t officially give assists to four-legged creatures, but
REMINGTON (all caps, please!)
deserves one after helping Smith
overcome a slump and score
19 points off the bench on 8-for-9
shooting.
REMINGTON, a golden retriever therapy dog for the University of North Carolina baseball
team, huddled with Smith, who
was in the midst of a slump, and
other players at the invitation of
Cavaliers trainer Steve Spiro on
Wednesday.
“For me, it was exactly what I
needed,” Smith, the owner of two
dogs, said (via Cleveland.com).
“Took my mind off the game so it
could make me feel better.”
Larry Drew, the Cavaliers’ acting coach, credited the pooch
with helping Smith.
“I walk in the room, and there
J.R. is, sitting on the floor. . . . He’s
sitting on the floor petting the
[dog],” Drew said. “I think it was
the canine that got him going. I
can tell he’s very fond of that dog,
and we’re going to have to get that
dog back to more shoot-arounds.
“We had breakfast, and he was
there petting the dog, and we did
our walk-through. After the walkthrough, he went back over to the
dog. I think it was the canine.”
REMINGTON, with an arsenal
of about 100 commands, is more
than just a canine. He’s a certified
celebrity who has been the subject of a number of media reports
over the past year. A fully trained
service dog, his task is to help
players deal with stress or recover
from injury. Smith didn’t say
what was eating at him, but REMINGTON seems to have an instinct for helping.
“I’m an emotional person,” said
Smith, who called him “my new
best friend” on Instagram. “I
don’t really express a lot of things.
Let’s just say it was right on time.”
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
For the record, there’s more to QBs
cindy.boren@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
QUOTABLE
“I don’t talk about
contracts. I think
it’s inappropriate,
especially right now.”
TED LEONSIS,
Capitals owner, after being asked
whether the future of Coach
Barry Trotz, whose contract is set to
expire, depends on how the team
performs in the playoffs this season.
(via Capitals Insider)
Brunson, Wilson are
AP players of the year
Villanova guard Jalen
Brunson is the Associated Press
men’s player of the year.
The 6-foot-3 junior received
36 of 65 votes from AP top 25
writers, with ballots submitted
before the start of the NCAA
tournament.
Oklahoma freshman Trae
Young was second with 15 votes
after leading the country in
scoring and assists. Arizona
freshman Deandre Ayton
earned seven votes, followed by
Duke freshman Marvin Bagley
III with four votes.
Brunson is averaging
19.2 points and shooting nearly
53 percent entering Saturday’s
national semifinal against
Kansas. He’s the first Villanova
player to win the award. . . .
A’ja Wilson is the first player
from the University of South
Carolina to win the AP women’s
player of the year award.
The 6-foot-5 senior received
22 votes from the 32-member
national media panel that selects
the weekly AP top 25. Katie Lou
Samuelson of Connecticut
received five votes, while Kalani
starting for, say, the Browns.
Maybe we could agree that the
most important statistic for a
quarterback or a running back or a
guard or an equipment manager is
not really wins. Maybe it’s adjusted
yards per passing attempt for a
quarterback or yards per touch for a
running back or quarterback
pressures allowed for a guard or
cleats taped per 60 seconds for an
equipment manager. And, yes, of
course, the quarterback has more to
do with the final result than the
guard or the equipment manager.
But attempting to judge individual
players primarily by the final score of
something as chaotic and
complicated as a football game is, at
best, a gross oversimplification and,
at worst, a bit of bad-faith nonsense.
(Blake Bortles has won 10 of his
past 16 regular season starts, better
than quarterbacks such as Matthew
Stafford, Rivers and Luck. Brees has a
losing record in four of his past six
seasons. Matt Ryan has a losing
record over his past five seasons, and
Tyrod Taylor does not. Get the rocket
scientist another shot of Fireball.)
I know some fans think D.C. media
members reflexively defend Kirk
Cousins and criticize the Redskins’
front office — and maybe so. You
would expect a team’s decisionmakers to be happy with their new
quarterback, and you would expect
them to express that happiness as a
form of public validation. It isn’t just
Allen. Coach Jay Gruden made the
same argument Tuesday. He said the
Redskins are “without a doubt”
better at quarterback now that they
have Smith, citing “his record the last
five years.”
But maybe a coach and team
president with worse records here
than their former quarterback might
show a bit of self-awareness when
talking about win-loss records. And
so just for the, ahem, record:
Cousins’s career win-loss
“record” is 26-30-1, for a winning
percentage of .465.
Gruden — whom I like and who I
think has done a good job — has a
win-loss record of 28-35-1, for a
winning percentage of .445.
Daniel Snyder has a win-loss
record of 132-171-1, for a winning
percentage of .436.
Allen — called by Snyder “the
personification of an NFL winner” on
his official team bio — has a 52-75-1
record in Washington for a winning
percentage of .410.
The least meaningful of those
records, I would suggest, is the first.
If there’s someone in an organization
who really needs to own an eightyear track record, it ain’t the
equipment manager or even the
quarterback.
The worst sports radio callers —
and also children — believe deeply in
quarterback win-loss records. There’s
really no need to treat an entire fan
base like the worst sports radio
callers or like children. Tell us Alex
Smith had the NFL’s best adjusted
yards per attempt in the NFL last
season, which is true. Tell us that he
had the best quarterback rating in
the league, which is also true. Tell us
he seems to be improving with age,
which is also true. Tell us that you
took a tenuous quarterbacking
situation and turned it into
something solid and hopeful and
stable, which is also true.
But don’t tell us that everything is
about wins and losses for
quarterbacks and equipment
managers and team presidents.
Because that might make us think
there is still at least one personnel
upgrade to be made.
After all, only six teams have worse
winning percentages than the
Redskins since Allen arrived. It
doesn’t take a rocket scientist to
figure that out.
dan.steinberg@washpost.com
cindy.boren@washpost.com
For more by Dan Steinberg, visit
washingtonpost.com/dcsportsbog.
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
D I G ES T
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Six weeks after 17 people were
shot to death at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High, the Major
League Baseball season opened
in Miami on Thursday, and students at the Parkland, Fla., high
school were not far from the
thoughts of the players.
One in particular used the
Chicago Cubs-Miami Marlins
pregame events to speak out
about the shooting and last weekend’s March for Our Lives. For
Cubs first baseman Anthony Rizzo, the shooting was intensely
personal because he attended the
school and left spring training to
be in the community after the
shooting. He also has spoken out
about gun laws and was especially moved by the march.
“I think these kids are standing
up for what they believe in,” Rizzo
said (via the Chicago Tribune).
“They’re motivating everyone to
go out there and register to vote,
which is amazing. That’s as powerful as they can make their voice
heard — going out and vote.
They’re holding the throttle
down on all these politicians,
holding them accountable for
what they believe in. It’s just
unbelievable how an entire nation is rallying around Stoneman
Douglas High School.”
Like the rest of the Cubs, Rizzo
wore a T-shirt emblazoned with
“#MSDStrong” for batting practice and warmups. Both teams
wore “MSD” ribboned patches on
their uniforms. Rizzo invited students to Friday’s game at Marlins
Park, where family members will
throw out the first pitch, and
reiterated his call for more stringent laws. He called for moderation in the national dialogue, as
well as defending student activists.
“You’ve got these extremists,
the people going for all the guns
laws and going for the full extreme,” he said. “And you’ve got
the other side that are defending
[the students]. . . . I think the
message is somewhere in the
middle that everyone can agree
on.
“For them to get bullied on
Twitter by some guy with strong
fingers, I think it’s pretty funny. I
know for a fact they’re not going
to let anything affect them in
their mission because what
they’re doing is bigger than themselves. It’s for a lot of people.”
Cubs Manager Joe Maddon explained that the Cubs were sending a local message to the Parkland students, as well as a national one to those who marched.
“We want to show our support
to the kids, the entire activist
movement by the youth of America. We love it. I love it. I think a lot
of the players do also,” Maddon
said (via the Tribune). “So this is
our show of support for what
they’re doing.”
Redskins President Bruce Allen’s new quarterback, Alex Smith, was 50-26 as a starter for the Chiefs from 2013 to 2017.
“His statistics are easy
to see,” Washington
Redskins President
Bruce Allen said this
week when asked
about new
Dan
quarterback Alex
Steinberg Smith. “There’s three
quarterbacks who
have 50 wins in the last five years. It
doesn’t take a rocket scientist to
figure out that might be the type of
guy you want on your football team.”
(Those quarterbacks, if you care,
are Tom Brady, Russell Wilson and
Smith. Fourth on the list is Cam
Newton. Sixth is Andy Dalton. They
are both, presumably, more
accomplished than Drew Brees and
Aaron Rodgers, who rank seventh
and ninth on the list of wins. Doesn’t
take a rocket scientist to figure that
out.)
“And so for you, are wins and
losses the most important statistic
when it comes to the quarterback
position?” NBC Sports Washington’s
JP Finlay asked Allen.
“Wins and losses is the most
important statistic when it comes to
an equipment manager, a team
president, a quarterback, a running
back, a guard or a coach,” Allen
responded. “Yes.”
(Drew Stanton, Trevor Siemian
and Brock Osweiler all have far better
winning percentages than Philip
Rivers over the past five years. Joe
Flacco, in that span, has won more
games than Andrew Luck. Doesn’t
take a rocket scientist, etc. etc.)
Look, we all sort of know —
because we are wise, modern and
progressive sports fans — that this
quarterback wins thing is basically
silly unless you’re a fan ranting to a
sports radio station. Similarly, we
know that Alex Smith is not a bad
quarterback because he started his
career 19-31 or because he has a 2-5
record in the playoffs or because he
probably wouldn’t have 50 wins over
the past five seasons if he had been
C INDY B OREN
Brown of Baylor, Asia Durr of
Louisville, Megan Gustafson of
Iowa, Sabrina Ionescu of
Oregon and Victoria Vivians of
Mississippi State received one.
Wilson led the Gamecocks to
their first national title last year
and averaged 22.6 points and
11.8 rebounds this season. . . .
Notre Dame’s Muffet McGraw
is the AP women’s coach of the
year for the fourth time.
She lost four players over the
course of the season to anterior
cruciate ligament injuries and
still managed to go 32-3. The
Hall of Fame coach received
10 votes from a 32-member
national media panel.
Mississippi State’s Vic Schaefer
also garnered 10 votes, with
McGraw winning a runoff. . . .
Lamar Stevens scored
28 points, Josh Reaves had 18
and Tony Carr had 15 points and
14 assists to lead Penn State to
the NIT championship with an
82-66 victory over Utah at
Madison Square Garden.
The fourth-seeded Nittany
Lions (26-13) also won the event
in 2009. Sedrick Barefield hit
six three-pointers and scored
22 points for the second-seeded
Utes (23-12). . . .
Wichita State guard Landry
Shamet declared for the NBA
TELEVISION AND RADIO
NBA
8 p.m.
10:30 p.m.
GOLF
New Orleans at Cleveland » ESPN
Los Angeles Clippers at Portland » ESPN
NHL
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
Carolina at Washington » NBC Sports Washington, WJFK (106.7 FM)
Tampa Bay at New York Rangers » NHL Network
LPGA Tour: Inspiration, second round » Golf Channel
PGA Tour: Houston Open, second round » Golf Channel
TENNIS
1 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
ATP: Miami Open, semifinal » ESPN
ATP: Miami Open, semifinal » ESPNews
WTA: Miami Open, doubles semifinal » Tennis Channel
COLLEGE BASEBALL
MLB
4 p.m.
7 p.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
Washington at Cincinnati » MASN, WJFK (106.7 FM)
New York Yankees at Toronto » MLB Network
7:30 p.m.
9 p.m.
West Virginia at Texas Tech » Fox Sports 1
TCU at Oklahoma State » ESPNU
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
MEN’S COLLEGE LACROSSE
7 p.m.
5 p.m.
7 p.m.
College Insider Tournament, championship: Illinois Chicago
at Northern Colorado » CBS Sports Network
CBI tournament, championship series, Game 3: San Francisco
at North Texas » ESPNU
WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
9:30 p.m.
NCAA, Final Four: Louisville vs. Mississippi State » ESPN2, WTEM (980 AM)
NCAA, Final Four: Connecticut vs. Notre Dame » ESPN2, WTEM (980 AM)
draft and intends to hire an
agent, ending his college career
with two seasons of eligibility
left. He averaged 14.9 points and
5.2 assists this season. . . .
Tennessee forward Admiral
Schofield decided to enter his
name into the NBA draft without
hiring an agent, giving him the
option to return for his senior
season.
The 6-5, 238-pound Schofield
averaged 13.9 points and
6.4 rebounds this season. . . .
UCLA guard Jaylen Hands
will put his name in the NBA
draft without hiring an agent. He
averaged 9.9 points,
4.0 rebounds and 2.6 assists
during his freshman season. . . .
Syracuse 6-9 five-star recruit
Darius Bazley said on social
media he has changed his mind
and will head to the NBA’s G
League.
Bazley is 17. Players can’t enter
the NBA draft until the year they
turn 19 or if they are at least one
year removed from their high
school graduation class. . . .
Drake hired longtime
Creighton assistant Darian
DeVries as its men’s coach. He
will replace Niko Medved, who
last week left after one season to
take over at Colorado State. . . .
Daryl Thomas, a starting
forward on Indiana’s 1987 NCAA
North Carolina at Duke » ESPNU
BOYS’ HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL
3 p.m.
5 p.m.
Geico Nationals, semifinal » ESPN2
Geico Nationals, semifinal » ESPN2
championship team, died at
age 52. He had been the coach at
Montini Catholic High in
suburban Chicago since 2015.
The school said Thomas died
Wednesday from a heart attack.
Thomas threw the pass to
Keith Smart for the gamewinning shot against Syracuse in
the championship game.
MISC.
Michigan canceled a homeand-home football series with
Virginia Tech in 2020 and 2021
and announced it will pay a
$375,000 cancellation fee to
VS
Virginia Tech. . . .
Nevada boxing regulators
have filed a formal complaint
against Canelo Alvarez for
doping violations, putting his
May 5 middleweight title
rematch with Gennady
Golovkin in jeopardy.
Alvarez could be suspended
for a year for testing positive
twice for the performanceenhancing drug Clenbuterol in
random urine tests conducted in
his home town of Guadalajara,
Mexico, in February.
An April 18 hearing was set.
— From news services
Today @ 3:30pm
ADVERTISEMENT
BY
Parkland
students
have fans
in the Cubs
FRIDAY, MARCH 30 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
M2
Under-the-radar Caps relish the role
Orpik notes this season
has felt ‘more enjoyable’
BY
I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN
Barry Trotz doesn’t have a social media presence, but the
coach is certainly aware of what’s
being said about his Washington
Capitals. And, well, it’s a lot different than the past two years.
“I look around right now, and
everybody’s, ‘We want to play the
Caps,’ ” Trotz said. “You hear it in
all the little Twitter sites and all
that. I’m like, ‘Okay. Someone’s
got to play us.’ They all want to
play us; not everybody can.”
After two years of entering the
postseason as a Stanley Cup favorite, as back-to-back Presidents’ Trophy winners with the
NHL’s best regular season record,
the Capitals are embracing a new
role as underdogs with the playoffs just two weeks away.
That role, however, is relative.
Washington is poised to finish
first in the Metropolitan Division
again, and the team has won nine
of its past 10 games. It clinched a
playoff spot after New Jersey’s
overtime loss to Pittsburgh on
Thursday. But after repeated second-round postseason exits, disappointing results for Capitals
teams that, on paper, were more
talented than this one, the hype
train has moved on to upstart
Vegas or last season’s Stanley
Cup runner-up, Nashville, or
powerhouse Tampa Bay.
Under the radar for a change,
the Capitals are relieved.
“The crown gets pretty heavy
when you’re carrying it for the
regular season,” Trotz said.
“I think there was some external pressure that creeped in the
room,” defenseman Brooks Orpik
said. “I think maybe as a veteran
group, you probably don’t want to
admit that it affected us. I think at
the time, it definitely did. . . .
More enjoyable to talk about it
this year than the last couple
years.”
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Coach Barry Trotz on the reduced hype for the Caps: “The crown
gets pretty heavy when you’re carrying it for the regular season.”
C A P I TA L S ’ N EX T TH R EE
vs. Carolina Hurricanes
Today
7 NBCSW
at Pittsburgh Penguins
Sunday
7:30 NBCSN
at St. Louis Blues
Monday
8 NBCSW,
NHL Network
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM)
or WFED (1500 AM)
General Manager Brian MacLellan had called the past two
seasons Washington’s all-in, gofor-it window, with contracts
aligning just right for the Capitals that they could assemble
deep teams to contend for the
organization’s first championship. The first year, Washington
ran into a second-round buzz saw
in the Pittsburgh Penguins, who
had more speed and skill in the
bottom of their lineup. The Capitals adjusted the following summer, but playing the Penguins in
the second round again last season, Washington again fell to the
club that eventually hoisted the
Stanley Cup. Contracts were up,
and a tough summer awaited.
MacLellan’s offseason moves
were largely criticized. Washington’s top-ranked defense was
shredded when Nate Schmidt
was swiped in the Vegas expansion draft and Karl Alzner and
Kevin Shattenkirk walked in free
agency. Big contracts for Evgeny
Kuznetsov and T.J. Oshie created
a salary cap crisis, so top-six
winger Marcus Johansson was
traded to New Jersey, just days
after fellow top-six winger Justin
Williams signed with the Carolina Hurricanes. Those departed
players were replaced by younger
or cheaper ones, and in an aboutface under Trotz, four rookies
were regularly in the lineup.
“A lot of you guys thought with
the moves we made and didn’t
make, we were going to struggle
to make the playoffs,” Orpik said.
“A lot of people probably didn’t
have as high of expectations for us
as they did the past couple of
years. With the roster we had the
past couple of years, we had real
experienced teams. That created
a lot of pressure on us that maybe
wasn’t real healthy for this group.
I think this year has been a lot
more enjoyable for the group, just
having less expectation on us and
less pressure. Flying under the
radar for this group is maybe
something that’s welcome.”
Before the Capitals played the
Maple Leafs in the Stadium Series
game at the Naval Academy this
month, Trotz was surprised to
realize his roster was younger
than Toronto’s, considered a
youthful club with stars Auston
Matthews, William Nylander and
Mitch Marner all 21 or younger.
Considering the Capitals had two
rookie blue-liners playing significant minutes all season, Washington arguably has overachieved as
it attempts to win the division for
a third straight year, but perhaps
relative to the standard the Capitals had created with dazzling
regular seasons, this one didn’t
feel as impressive. Meanwhile,
teams such as the Winnipeg Jets,
Vegas Golden Knights and Boston
Bruins garnered more attention
because they exceeded lower expectations. But Washington was
never concerned with winning a
third straight Presidents’ Trophy.
“The last two years, we were on
top of the league and we win
Presidents’ Trophy and everybody
thought we were going to be unstoppable in playoffs, but we
[weren’t],” captain Alex Ovechkin
said. “I hope right now everything
is going to calm down before the
playoffs around us. We’re going to
do our thing, and we’re going to
have success.”
Should the Capitals advance to
the second round again, especially if they’re matched against the
Penguins for a third straight year,
the spotlight will return. The talk
of past playoff failures and how
this particular group of Capitals
has never been to a conference
final and the shrinking window
for the aging superstar core will
be as loud as ever. But this time,
Washington may feel like it has
nothing to lose.
“We have one goal, and that’s
getting ourselves into the playoffs,” center Nicklas Backstrom
said. “And then we’ll go from
there. If you look at our playoff
records and how we’ve been, it
can’t get any worse.”
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
NFL NOTES
Lamar Jackson’s determined
look as he threw the football left
no question about his NFL intentions.
Quarterback is the only position he will play in the pros.
The former Louisville star and
2016 Heisman Trophy winner,
who was dangerous throwing and
running while in college, has stated that plan before and reinforced
it with an impressive pro day
workout Thursday before scouts
and officials from all 32 NFL clubs.
Pittsburgh Steelers Coach Mike
Tomlin was among those observing Jackson and 18 recent Cardinals teammates for consideration
in the draft that starts April 26.
But all eyes were on the
6-foot-3, 212-pound Jackson, who
threw for 9,043 yards and
69 touchdowns in college. Despite
those gaudy numbers and a résumé of dynamic highlights, he still
faced suggestions at the NFL combine this month about playing
wide receiver rather than quarterback.
Jackson wasn’t having it. He
served notice by delivering on target with many of his 59 scripted
passes at Louisville’s practice facility. He took snaps under center
Boston tops Tampa Bay
to move into first place
BRUINS 4,
LIGHTNING 2
on a semi-break. His initial shot
hit the post, but he swatted the
puck out of the air to extend his
goal-scoring streak to five games.
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Emergency goaltender Scott Foster, 36, played the final 14 minutes
after Chicago lost Anton Forsberg
and Collin Delia to injuries, closing out the Blackhawks’ home victory over Winnipeg.
It was Foster’s first competitive
action since 20 minutes in relief
with Western Michigan University in the 2005-06 season.
Forsberg was scratched after
being hurt during warmups. Delia, recalled from the minors
Wednesday, stopped 25 of 27 shots
in his NHL debut before he was
helped off the ice in the third
period with a lower-body injury.
WILD 5, STARS 2: Matt
Dumba had a goal and two assists
during Minnesota’s three-goal
second period in St. Paul, Minn.
Dallas has lost eight straight
road games.
Patrice Bergeron had a goal and
two assists, and the Boston Bruins
took over first place in the Eastern
Conference with a 4-2 win over the
visiting Tampa Bay Lightning on
Thursday night.
Tim Schaller and David Pastrnak scored goals 32 seconds
apart in the final minute of the
first period, and Brad Marchand
added an empty-net goal with
56 seconds left.
Torey Krug had two assists, Pastrnak had a goal and an assist and
Tuukka Rask stopped 26 shots for
the Bruins, who have 107 points
and lead Tampa Bay by one.
Boston has six games remaining to five for Tampa Bay. For the
first time since Oct. 18, a team
other than the Lightning leads the
Eastern Conference.
The Lightning has lost three
straight and is 0-3 against the
Bruins this season.
PREDATORS
PENGUINS 4, DEVILS 3
(OT): In Newark, Sidney Crosby
batted his own rebound out of the
air and into the net 19 seconds into
overtime as Pittsburgh denied
New Jersey a sweep of the fourgame season series.
Kris Letang stole a pass in the
opening seconds and sent Crosby
from lineman Geron Christian — a
pro hopeful as well — to answer
another question about his skills.
“I came out here to prove to the
guys that I can throw any pass
from under center instead of going to the [shot]gun,” Jackson told
NFL Network. “You have to see
how fast you can get back in the
pocket and have velocity on the
ball.”
Jackson showed precise footwork and mechanics but wasn’t
perfect, overthrowing receivers
on several deep balls early in his
script. He quickly improved to hit
targets on slants, fades, post and
go routes, completing passes with
inches to spare on some plays.
He drew applause on those
tough throws and high-fives from
teammates as he walked off the
field with a big smile.
Some draft boards project Jackson as a middle-to-late first-round
selection. Wherever he goes, 1989
Heisman Trophy winner and
ESPN analyst Andre Ware said,
the workout should end talk about
his quarterback potential.
“I think that question was answered today. . . . I think he’s one of
the more dynamic playmakers
that we’ve seen in quite some time
at the QB position, which makes it
tough on a defense,” Ware said.
LIONS: Detroit signed center
Wesley Johnson and tight end
Levine Toilolo.
Johnson started 15 games last
season with the New York Jets.
Toilolo spent the past five seasons
with the Atlanta Falcons, starting
12 games last season and making
12 catches for 122 yards and a
touchdown.
RAIDERS: Oakland signed
cornerback Leon Hall, who spent
part of last season with the San
Francisco 49ers, playing in nine
games and totaling 16 tackles. A
first-round pick in 2007 by the
Cincinnati Bengals, Hall has 27
interceptions in his career.
VIKINGS: Minnesota resigned punt returner Marcus
Sherels for a ninth season with his
home state team. On punt returns
since 2012, Sherels has an NFLleading five touchdowns and 23
returns of 20-plus yards.
BILLS: Buffalo addressed
depth needs by signing cornerback Phillip Gaines and wide receiver Kaelin Clay.
Gaines spent the past four seasons with Kansas City, where he
had one interception and two
forced fumbles in 41 games, including 16 starts. Clay rejoins the
Bills after finishing last season
with the Carolina Panthers.
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/redskins
Smith vs. Cousins:
Was it an upgrade?
The Washington Redskins
basically swapped Kirk Cousins
for Alex Smith by sending Kendall
Fuller and a third-round pick to
Kansas City and letting Cousins
walk in free agency. At 33, Smith
is four years older than Cousins,
and some have called him an
older, slightly cheaper version of
the Vikings’ new starting
quarterback.
Washington doesn’t see it that
way, and Coach Jay Gruden said it
plainly during an interview
session with multiple reporters at
the owners’ annual meeting.
“Yeah, without a doubt,”
Gruden said when asked whether
Washington is better off. “I don’t
want to compare two players, but
we’re always trying to be better at
every position. We got better.
Alex’s experience is well noted,
and his record the last five years is
what it is. You could argue that all
day, but we feel very good.”
It is difficult to say which
quarterback is superior with any
reasonable level of certainty, but
we can compare numbers and
situations.
Smith has thrown for
11,030 yards with 61 touchdowns
and 20 interceptions in the past
three seasons. The 2017 campaign
was a career year with 4,042 yards
and just five interceptions. He
never completed fewer than
65.3 percent of his passes in those
three seasons.
Cousins threw for more than
4,000 yards in the past three for a
total of 13,176. He has
81 touchdowns and
36 interceptions in that span.
Cousins never threw for fewer
than 11 interceptions in a season
during that stretch, and his
lowest completion percentage
was 64.3 in 2017.
Cousins, however, had more
than 200 more pass attempts over
those three seasons.
The Chiefs went 31-15 with
Smith under center, while the
Redskins were 24-23-1.
Smith ranked ninth last season
in Pro Football Focus’s overall
quarterback grading, while
Cousins was 19th. But Cousins
held the advantage in the two
previous years. Smith was No. 18
in the league in 2016 and No. 25 in
2015. Cousins was No. 8 in 2016
and No. 13 in 2015.
Situations and the players
surrounding the quarterback
certainly affect play under center.
The Chiefs had the No. 15
(2017), No. 7 (2016) and No. 3
(2015) scoring defenses in the
RED
6, JETS 2:
WINGS 6, SABRES 3:
Anthony Mantha scored his teamleading 24th goal as Detroit
snapped an 11-game road losing
streak. The Red Wings’ 0-10-1 skid
was the franchise’s longest without a win in 37 years.
SENATORS 3, PANTHERS 2
(OT): Jean-Gabriel Pageau scored
on a penalty shot in overtime to lift
Ottawa past visiting Florida.
Pageau and Magnus Paajarvi
also scored for the Senators, and
Craig Anderson stopped 24 shots.
Kings make a pair of moves
The Los Angeles Kings agreed
to terms with free agent defenseman Daniel Brickley and also
signed forward Mikey Eyssimont
to a two-year, entry-level deal.
Brickley had 10 goals and 25 assists in 40 games this season as a
junior at Minnesota State. Eyssimont had 39 points in 39 games
for St. Cloud State this season. He
was a fifth-round draft pick by the
Kings in 2016.
Phil Mickelson looked as if he
would be among the leaders when
he shot 30 on the front nine and
was one shot behind. Mickelson,
who won the Mexico Championship three weeks ago for his first
victory in more than four years,
stalled on the back nine, then
wound up in the wrong spot on the
par-3 14th.
Facing a bunker shot with the
green running away from him,
Mickelson left it in the sand, and
the ball rolled back into his footprint. He did well to get that one
on the fringe and got up-anddown to make double bogey.
Mickelson wound up with a 68,
along with Jordan Spieth, who
made three late birdies playing in
the morning.
“I didn’t make a birdie on the
back nine, and that’s disappointing,” Mickelson said. “But I’m playing well. I got off to a good start.
My goal is not to win on Thursday.
My goal is to try to get in contention for the weekend. So I didn’t
hurt myself there. But I didn’t help
myself as much as I could have.”
Steve Stricker was among those
at 67. Stricker is coming off a
victory last week on the PGA Tour
Champions, his second this year
on the 50-and-older circuit.
LPGA TOUR: Lexi Thompson was smiling and having fun
again at the Inspiration in Rancho
Mirage, Calif.
A year after a rules violation
cost her four strokes in regulation
in an eventual playoff loss,
Thompson shot a 4-under 68 to
finish the opening round three
strokes behind leader Pernilla
Lindberg.
Thompson also again overpowered Michelle Wie, four years after
routing her in a final-round showdown on another hot afternoon at
Mission Hills for her first major
title.
Fighting dizzy spells on the
front nine, Wie had a 75 that left
her in danger of missing the cut.
Lindberg birdied her final two
holes for a bogey-free 65, playing
in the last group to finish the
round. Beatriz Recari and Ayako
Uehara were a stroke back.
past three seasons. Smith wasn’t
required to outscore opponents
on a weekly basis as Cousins had
to. The Redskins were No. 27
(2017), No. 19 (2016) and No. 17
(2015) in the past three seasons.
The Redskins may have had
more offensive weaponry during
that time period, but 2017 is an
exception. Last season was a mess
for Washington’s supporting cast
because of injuries on the
offensive line, at running back
(including breakout receiving
back Chris Thompson) and to
tight end Jordan Reed.
Many factors and variables go
into a quarterback’s play that
make comparisons, but there
doesn’t seem to be a significant
difference in production over the
past three seasons.
Daniels is waived
The Redskins waived running
back LeShun Daniels on
Thursday. The 2017 undrafted
rookie from Iowa played in four
games and had three rushes for
14 yards. He was signed to the
practice squad in mid-November
and activated to the full roster a
week later. Daniels became the
fifth Redskins running back to go
on injured reserve last season
after breaking his hand in
practice.
— Kareem Copeland
Quality
Rookie, rain rule at the Houston Open
PGA Tour rookie Sam Ryder
played just enough golf Thursday
to get his name atop the leader
board in the Houston Open in
Humble, Tex.
Ryder holed an eight-foot birdie putt on the 15th hole to reach
8-under par before it was too dark
to continue. The opening round
was delayed for two hours because
of overnight rain that dumped
more than two inches on the Golf
Club of Houston.
But it was partly cloudy, warm
and breezy for most of the day,
with a forecast for more of the
same through the weekend.
Former U.S. Open champion
Lucas Glover and Kevin Tway each
shot a 7-under-par 65 in the morning. They had a one-shot lead over
Rickie Fowler, Rod Pampling,
Ryan Armour and Julian Suri
among those who completed their
rounds.
Beau Hossler, another PGA
Tour rookie, was at 7 under
through 16 holes.
5, SHARKS 3:
Ryan Ellis scored the go-ahead
goal with 9:54 left, and Nashville
beat visiting San Jose to set a
franchise record with 111 points.
The NHL-leading Predators
padded their lead to four points
over Boston in the chase for their
first Presidents’ Trophy.
Earlier Thursday, Nashville
signed forward Eeli Tolvanen of
Finland, the 30th pick overall last
year, to an entry-level contract.
Tolvanen, 18, could make his NHL
debut Saturday against Buffalo.
GOLF ROUNDUP
A SSOCIATED P RESS
BLACKHAWKS
R E D S K I N S ANALY S I S
Jackson makes strong case to stay QB
A SSOCIATED P RESS
NHL ROUNDUP
You Can
Complete Kitchen Remodeling
Afford
Superior Service | Years of Experience
Buy Now
and
Save
Financing
As Low As
$2000
limited time offers
other restrictions may apply
FREE Consultation | FREE Design | FREE Estimates
202-897-3095 DC | 703-382-8411 VA | 301-892-6015 MD
MHIC #125450 | DC #67004413 | VA #2705 108835A | WVA #036832
149
$
Per Month
D4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30 , 2018
Baseball
National League
EAST
W
American League
L PCT GB L10 STR
CENTRAL
W
L PCT GB L10 STR
WEST
L PCT GB L10 STR
EAST
L PCT GB L10 STR
CENTRAL
W
L PCT GB L10 STR
WEST
New York
1
01.000
— 1-0 W-1
Chicago
1
01.000
— 1-0 W-1
San Francisco
1
01.000
— 1-0 W-1
Tampa Bay
1
01.000
— 1-0 W-1
Chicago
1
01.000
— 1-0 W-1
Oakland
1
01.000
— 1-0 W-1
Atlanta
1
01.000
— 1-0 W-1
Milwaukee
1
01.000
— 1-0 W-1
Los Angeles
0
1 .000
1 0-1 L-1
Baltimore
1
01.000
— 1-0 W-1
Kansas City
0
1 .000
1 0-1 L-1
Houston
1
01.000
— 1-0 W-1
Philadelphia
0
1 .000
1 0-1 L-1
Cincinnati
0
0 .000
1/
2
0-0
0-
x-Arizona
0
0 .000
1/
2
0-0
0-
New York
1
01.000
— 1-0 W-1
x-Cleveland
0
0 .000
1/
2
0-0
0-
x-Seattle
0
0 .000
1/
2
Miami
0
1 .000
1 0-1 L-1
Pittsburgh
0
0 .000
1/
2
0-0
0-
x-Colorado
0
0 .000
1/
2
0-0
0-
Toronto
0
1 .000
1 0-1 L-1
Detroit
0
0 .000
1/
2
0-0
0-
Los Angeles
0
1 .000
Washington
0
0 .000
St. Louis
0
1 .000
1 0-1 L-1
San Diego
0
1 .000
1 0-1 L-1
Boston
0
1 .000
1 0-1 L-1
Minnesota
0
1 .000
Texas
0
1 .000
1/
2
0-0
0-
W
W
1 0-1 L-1
W
L PCT GB L10 STR
Jones homers in 11th
as O’s open with win
NO T E S
TIGERS-PIRATES
POSTPONED
Detroit’s season opener
against Pittsburgh was
postponed because of
rain. The game was
pushed to Friday.
BY
Cardinals: RHP Greg
Holland and St. Louis
agreed to a one-year,
$14 million contract,
according to a person
familiar with the deal.
Giants: Closer Mark
Melancon was placed on
the 10-day DL with a right
elbow flexor strain. The
move was made
retroactive to Monday.
2
Consecutive years in
which the Astros’ George
Springer has hit a leadoff
home run in a season
opener, the first player to
accomplish the feat, in
Houston’s win over Texas.
STAR OF THE DAY
BEN MARGOT/ASSOCIATED PRESS
L.A.’s next big hit
Japanese import Shohei Ohtani, who labored in spring training after a highly publicized signing in the
offseason, singles in his first major league at-bat as a designated hitter in the Angels’ season opener in
Oakland. Ohtani will get a chance to show his stuff as a pitcher when he takes the mound Sunday.
The DH became the fourth
player in major league
history to homer three
times on Opening Day in
Chicago’s 14-7 rout that
spoiled the Royals’ 50th
anniversary celebration.
TODAY’S GAME
TO WATCH
Red Sox at Rays,
7:10 p.m., MLB Network
David Price (6-3, 3.38 ERA
in 2017) takes the hill as
Boston takes on Blake
Snell (5-7, 4.04) and
Tampa Bay.
The Washington Post
is printed using
recycled fiber.
NATIONALS AT REDS, 4:10
ERA TEAM
Scherzer (R)
0-0
0.00
0-0
Bailey (R)
0-0
0.00
0-0
baltimore — An Opening Day that seemed scripted
for disaster Thursday at Camden Yards ended with
the longest-tenured Baltimore Orioles player — center fielder Adam Jones — the hero.
After Baltimore blew a two-run lead in the ninth
inning and failed to score the winning run in the 10th
with the bases loaded and one out, Jones wasted no
time in the 11th, lining Fernando Rodney’s first pitch
into the left field stands for a 3-2 win over the
Minnesota Twins.
The victory was the Orioles’ eighth straight on
Opening Day, extending the longest active streak for
an American League team.
Baltimore had an opportunity to win in the 10th
but couldn’t take advantage of a bases-loaded situation when Jonathan Schoop hit into an inning-ending
double play.
Before that, Brad Brach couldn’t hold a two-run
ninth-inning lead. The inning started easily, as Brach
struck out Miguel Sano on five pitches. But Eddie
Rosario then reached on a sharp grounder that
skipped past first baseman Chris Davis for a single.
Rosario went to second on a passed ball, and Brach
walked Logan Morrison on four pitches. Brach then
struck out Eduardo Escobar.
After Max Kepler drew a walk to load the bases, a
plate appearance in which Brach was ahead 0-2, Brach
fell behind pinch hitter Robbie Grossman 3-1 before
allowing a bloop single that dropped out of the reach of
shortstop Manny Machado in shallow center.
Hendricks (R)
0-0
0.00
0-0
Smith (L)
0-0
0.00
0-0
PHILLIES AT BRAVES, 7:35
Pivetta (R)
0-0
0.00
0-0
Foltynewicz (R)
0-0
0.00
0-0
ROCKIES AT DIAMONDBACKS, 9:40
Anderson (L)
0-0
0.00
0-0
Ray (L)
0-0
0.00
0-0
GIANTS AT DODGERS, 10:10
Cueto (R)
0-0
0.00
0-0
Wood (L)
0-0
0.00
0-0
BREWERS AT PADRES, 10:10
Chacin (R)
0-0
0.00
0-0
Lucchesi (L)
0-0
0.00
0-0
NL scores
THURSDAY'S RESULTS
Nationals at Reds, ppd.
Cubs 8, at Marlins 4
at Mets 9, Cardinals 4
Brewers 2, at Padres 1, 12 innings
at Braves 8, Phillies 5
Giants 1, at Dodgers 0
Rockies at Diamondbacks, Late
FRIDAY'S GAMES
Nationals at Reds, 4:10 p.m.
Cubs at Marlins, 7:10 p.m.
Phillies at Braves, 7:35 p.m.
Rockies at Diamondbacks, 9:40 p.m.
Brewers at Padres, 10:10 p.m.
Giants at Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
AL games
YANKEES AT BLUE JAYS, 7:07
W-L
ERA TEAM
Tanaka (R)
0-0
0.00
0-0
Sanchez (R)
0-0
0.00
0-0
RED SOX AT RAYS, 7:10
Cubs 8, Marlins 4
Mets 9, Cardinals 4
Astros 4, Rangers 1
Orioles 3, Twins 2 (11)
Yankees 6, Blue Jays 1
Rays 6, Red Sox 4
Price (L)
0-0
0.00
0-0
Ian Happ homered on the
first pitch of the major
league season, and Anthony Rizzo also hit a homer to
power Chicago past Miami.
Yoenis Cespedes drove
in three runs and newcomer Adrian Gonzalez hit a
go-ahead double to lead
New York.
Noah Syndergaard, who
missed most of last season
with a torn lat muscle,
struck out 10 in six innings.
World Series MVP
George Springer hit a leadoff homer in the season
opener for the second year
in a row, Justin Verlander
pitched six scoreless innings, and Houston opened
its championship defense
with a win over Texas.
Springer hit a 2-0 pitch
off Rangers lefty Cole
Hamels for his 100th career home run.
MINNESOTA AB
Dozier 2b ............5
Mauer 1b ............5
Sano 3b...............5
Rosario lf-cf........4
Morrison dh ........3
LaMarre pr-dh ....1
Escobar ss...........5
Kepler rf..............4
Buxton cf ............3
Grossman ph-lf...1
Castro c...............4
TOTALS
40
R
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
2
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 0 1 .200
1 0 0 0 .200
0 0 0 3 .000
1 0 1 0 .250
0 0 1 1 .000
1 0 0 0 1.00
1 0 0 2 .200
1 0 1 0 .250
1 0 0 2 .333
1 2 0 0 1.00
0 0 0 2 .000
8 2 3 11 —
0-0
0.00
0-0
R
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
3
H BI BB SO AVG
0 0 1 1 .000
2 0 1 1 .500
0 0 0 2 .000
1 1 0 2 .200
1 0 0 1 .250
0 0 0 2 .000
0 0 1 0 .000
0 0 1 1 .000
0 0 0 2 .000
0 0 1 0 --1 2 0 1 .333
5 3 5 13 —
Denard Span made a
huge splash in his debut
for his hometown team, lining a bases-loaded triple to
highlight a six-run rally in
the eighth inning that sent
Tampa Bay past Boston.
Red Sox ace Chris Sale
had blanked the revamped
Rays on one hit through
the sixth.
Snell (L)
BALTIMORE AB
Davis 1b ..............4
Machado ss.........4
Schoop 2b ...........5
Jones cf ..............5
Mancini lf............4
Beckham 3b ........4
Alvarez dh ..........1
Valencia ph-dh....1
Gentry rf .............3
Rasmus ph-rf......0
Joseph c..............3
TOTALS
34
Giancarlo Stanton began his New York career
with the hardest-hit, opposite-field home run since
MLB began tracking exit
velocity in 2015, doubled
and hit a second homer in
a four-RBI debut as Aaron
Boone won his first game
as a manager.
BOSTON
AB
Betts rf ...............4
Benintendi lf.......4
Ramirez 1b .........3
Moreland 1b .......0
Martinez dh ........3
Bogaerts ss ........4
Devers 3b............4
Nunez 2b.............4
Bradley Jr. cf ......4
Vazquez c............3
TOTALS
33
R
0
0
0
0
1
2
0
1
0
0
4
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 0 1 .250
0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 1 2 .000
0 0 0 0 --0 0 1 2 .000
3 0 0 0 .750
1 2 0 0 .250
2 2 0 1 .500
0 0 0 0 .000
1 0 0 0 .333
8 4 2 6 —
at Orioles 3,Twins 2, 11 innings
Astros 4, at Rangers 1
Yankees 6, at Blue Jays 1
at Rays 6,Red Sox 4
at Athletics 6, Angels 5, 11 innings
White Sox 14, at Royals 7
Indians at Mariners, Late
TAMPA BAY AB
Duffy 3b..............4
Kiermaier cf........3
Gomez rf .............3
Cron 1b................3
Miller ph-1b ........0
Ramos c ..............4
Span lf ................3
M.Smith lf ..........0
Hechavarria ss....4
Robertson 2b ......2
Wendle ph-2b .....1
Refsnyder dh ......1
TOTALS
28
R
1
1
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
6
H BI BB SO AVG
1 1 0 1 .250
0 0 1 2 .000
0 0 1 1 .000
0 0 0 3 .000
0 1 1 0 --0 0 0 1 .000
1 3 1 0 .333
0 0 0 0 --2 1 0 0 .500
0 0 1 2 .000
0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 2 1 .000
4 6 7 11 —
CHICAGO
AB
Happ cf................5
Bryant 3b............4
Rizzo 1b ..............4
Contreras c .........5
Schwarber lf .......3
Almora lf.............1
Russell ss ...........3
Heyward rf..........3
Baez 2b ...............3
Lester p...............2
Cishek p ..............1
La Stella ph.........1
TOTALS
35
R
1
2
2
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
8
H BI BB SO AVG
1 1 0 3 .200
1 0 1 1 .250
1 1 0 2 .250
1 1 0 3 .200
1 1 1 0 .333
0 0 0 0 .000
2 0 1 0 .667
1 1 1 0 .333
0 1 1 1 .000
0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 0 .000
1 2 0 0 1.00
9 8 5 10 —
MIAMI
AB
Brinson cf ...........5
Dietrich lf............4
Castro 2b ............3
Bour 1b ...............4
Anderson 3b .......3
Cooper rf.............3
Rojas ss ..............4
Wallach c ............3
Urena p ...............1
Maybin ph...........1
Telis ph ...............1
Rivera ss.............1
TOTALS
33
R
0
1
2
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
H BI BB SO AVG
0 0 0 0 .000
2 0 0 1 .500
1 0 2 1 .333
0 1 1 0 .000
2 2 1 0 .667
1 1 1 1 .333
1 0 0 0 .250
0 0 1 3 .000
0 0 0 1 .000
1 0 0 0 1.00
0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 0 .000
8 4 6 7 —
E: Schwarber (1), Russell (1), Wallach
(1), Tazawa (1). LOB: Chicago 9, Miami
9. 2B: Bryant (1), Contreras (1), Heyward (1), La Stella (1), Rojas (1), Maybin (1). 3B: Dietrich (1). HR: Happ (1),
off Urena; Rizzo (1), off Urena; Schwarber (1), off Guerrero.
CHICAGO
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Lester ............... 3.1 7 4 3 3 2 8.10
Cishek............... 1.2 1 0 0 1 2 0.00
Duensing ............. 1 0 0 0 1 1 0.00
Strop.................... 1 0 0 0 1 1 0.00
Wilson ................. 1 0 0 0 0 1 0.00
Montgomery ....... 1 0 0 0 0 0 0.00
MIAMI
IP
Urena................... 4
O'Grady ............... 1
Guerrero ........... 1.1
Steckenrider..... 0.2
Tazawa ................ 2
H
6
0
2
1
0
R ER BB SO ERA
5 5 4 2 11.2
0 0 0 0 0.00
3 2 0 4 13.5
0 0 0 2 0.00
0 0 1 2 0.00
ST. LOUIS
AB
Fowler rf .............4
Pham cf...............4
Carpenter 3b.......4
Ozuna lf ..............4
Martinez 1b ........4
Molina c ..............3
DeJong ss ...........4
Wong 2b .............3
Martinez p ..........2
Munoz ph............1
TOTALS
33
R
0
0
1
0
2
1
0
0
0
0
4
H BI BB SO AVG
0 0 0 2 .000
0 0 0 3 .000
1 0 0 0 .250
0 0 0 3 .000
3 2 0 0 .750
1 2 1 0 .333
1 0 0 2 .250
0 0 0 2 .000
0 0 0 2 .000
0 0 0 1 .000
6 4 1 15 —
NEW YORK
AB
Nimmo cf ............3
Cespedes lf .........5
Bruce rf...............3
Cabrera 2b ..........4
Frazier 3b............4
Gonzalez 1b ........3
Plawecki c...........3
Syndergaard p ....2
Flores ph.............1
Lagares ph ..........1
Rosario ss...........4
TOTALS
33
R
2
0
0
1
1
1
2
0
0
0
2
9
H BI BB SO AVG
2 0 1 0 .667
2 3 0 2 .400
1 1 2 1 .333
0 0 1 1 .000
1 0 1 1 .250
2 1 2 0 .667
2 1 2 0 .667
0 0 0 2 .000
0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 0 .000
2 2 0 1 .500
12 8 9 8 —
ST. LOUIS........ 020 101 000 — 4 6 1
NEW YORK ..... 120 050 01 — 9 12 0
E: Martinez (1). LOB: St. Louis 3, New
York 11. 2B: Carpenter (1), Gonzalez
(1), Plawecki (1). HR: Molina (1), off
Syndergaard; Martinez (1), off Syndergaard.
ST. LOUIS
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Martinez........... 4.1 4 5 4 6 5 8.31
Bowman ........... 0.1 3 3 3 1 0 81.0
Cecil.................. 0.1 1 0 0 0 0 0.00
Mayers ................ 1 2 0 0 0 1 0.00
Hicks.................... 1 1 0 0 0 1 0.00
Tuivailala............. 1 1 1 1 2 1 9.00
NEW YORK
IP
Syndergaard........ 6
Gsellman ............. 1
Swarzak............... 1
Familia ................ 1
H
6
0
0
0
R ER BB SO ERA
4 4 0 10 6.00
0 0 0 3 0.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
0 0 1 1 0.00
HOUSTON
AB
Springer rf ..........4
Bregman 3b ........3
Altuve 2b ............2
Correa ss.............3
Gonzalez 1b ........3
Reddick lf............4
Gattis dh.............3
Marisnick cf........4
McCann c ............4
TOTALS
30
R
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
4
H BI BB SO AVG
1 1 1 1 .250
1 0 1 1 .333
0 1 1 1 .000
1 1 1 2 .333
1 0 1 1 .333
0 0 0 2 .000
0 0 1 2 .000
1 1 0 2 .250
1 0 0 1 .250
6 4 6 13 —
TEXAS
AB
DeShields cf .......4
Gallo 1b...............4
Andrus ss............3
Beltre 3b.............4
Mazara rf ............3
Choo dh...............4
Chirinos c ............4
Odor 2b ...............2
Rua lf ..................3
TOTALS
31
R
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
H BI BB SO AVG
0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 1 .000
2 0 1 0 .667
2 0 0 0 .500
0 0 0 1 .000
1 0 0 0 .250
0 0 0 4 .000
1 0 1 1 .500
0 0 0 1 .000
6 0 2 9 —
HOUSTON ....... 101 100 010 — 4 6 0
TEXAS............. 000 000 001 — 1 6 0
LOB: Houston 6, Texas 6. 2B: Bregman
(1), Correa (1), Andrus (1). HR: Springer
(1), off Hamels; Marisnick (1), off
Hamels.
HOUSTON
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Verlander ............ 6 4 0 0 2 5 0.00
Devenski.............. 1 0 0 0 0 2 0.00
Peacock ............... 1 0 0 0 0 1 0.00
Giles .................... 1 2 1 1 0 1 9.00
TEXAS
IP
Hamels ............. 5.2
Leclerc .............. 0.1
Martin ................. 1
Bush .................... 1
Jepsen ................. 1
H
5
0
0
1
0
WP: Syndergaard (1-0); LP: Martinez
(0-1). Inherited runners-scored: Bowman 1-1, Cecil 2-1. HBP: Martinez (Nimmo). WP: Tuivailala 2. T: 3:01. A: 44,189
(41,922).
Braves 8, Phillies 5
Athletics 6,
Angels 5 (11)
Brewers 2,
Padres 1 (12)
Marcus Semien singled
into an empty center field
with one out in the 11th,
beating Los Angeles’ fiveman infield to give Oakland
an Opening Day victory.
Orlando Arcia’s two-out
RBI single in the 12th inning
vaulted Milwaukee.
Brewers reliever Jeremy
Jeffress got out of a basesloaded jam in the 11th.
L.A.
AB
Cozart 2b ............6
Trout cf...............6
Upton lf...............5
Pujols 1b .............5
Marte 1b .............0
Calhoun rf ...........5
Simmons ss ........4
Valbuena 3b........5
Ohtani dh............5
Maldonado c .......5
TOTALS
46
R
1
0
0
1
0
2
1
0
0
0
5
H BI BB SO AVG
3 1 0 2 .500
0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 0 .000
2 1 0 1 .400
0 0 0 0 --3 1 0 1 .600
1 1 1 0 .250
0 0 0 1 .000
1 0 0 1 .200
3 1 0 0 .600
13 5 1 7 —
OAKLAND
AB
Joyce lf ...............4
Semien ss ...........5
Lowrie 2b............5
Davis dh..............5
Olson 1b..............5
Piscotty rf...........4
Chapman 3b........4
Lucroy c...............5
Powell cf.............5
TOTALS
42
R
1
2
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
6
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 2 1 .250
3 1 1 1 .600
2 0 0 1 .400
2 4 0 1 .400
1 1 0 3 .200
0 0 1 1 .000
0 0 1 1 .000
1 0 0 0 .200
2 0 0 2 .400
12 6 5 11 —
MILWAUKEE AB
Cain cf .................5
Yelich lf ...............4
Braun 1b..............4
Shaw 3b ..............5
Santana rf ...........5
Pina c...................5
Villar 2b...............3
Thames ph...........1
Choi ph ................1
Arcia ss ...............5
Anderson p..........2
Sogard 2b ............1
Perez pr-2b..........1
TOTALS
42
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
2
H BI BB SO AVG
3 0 0 0 .600
1 1 1 1 .250
0 0 1 1 .000
1 0 0 2 .200
2 0 0 0 .400
0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 2 .000
0 0 0 0 .000
1 0 0 0 1.00
1 1 0 0 .200
1 0 0 1 .500
0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 1 .000
10 2 2 9 —
SAN DIEGO
AB
Margot cf .............. 4
Myers rf ................ 5
Hosmer 1b ............ 4
Pirela lf ................. 5
Asuaje 2b.............. 3
Szczur pr ............... 0
Lopez ph................ 0
Headley 3b ............ 4
Galvis ss ............... 4
Hedges c ............... 5
Richard p............... 2
Renfroe ph ............ 1
Spangenberg 2b.... 2
TOTALS
39
R
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 1 0 .250
0 0 0 2 .000
0 0 1 2 .000
2 0 0 1 .400
1 0 1 0 .333
0 0 0 0 --0 0 1 0 --0 0 1 1 .000
2 1 1 1 .500
0 0 0 4 .000
0 0 0 2 .000
0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 1 .000
6 1 6 15 —
Nick Markakis’s threerun home run with two outs
in the ninth lifted Atlanta.
PHILA.
AB
Hernandez 2b......5
Santana 1b..........5
Williams rf-lf ......4
Hoskins lf ............3
Herrera cf............0
Altherr cf-rf ........3
Crawford ss.........3
Franco 3b.............2
Knapp c................3
Nola p ..................2
Florimon ph.........1
TOTALS
31
R
1
1
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
5
H BI BB SO AVG
2 1 0 2 .400
0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 2 .000
2 1 0 0 .667
0 0 0 0 --1 0 1 1 .333
0 0 1 1 .000
0 1 2 0 .000
1 2 1 2 .333
0 0 1 1 .000
0 0 0 1 .000
6 5 6 11 —
ATLANTA
AB
Inciarte cf............4
Albies 2b .............5
F.Freeman 1b ......2
Markakis rf..........5
Flowers c.............0
Suzuki ph-c .........2
Bourjos pr-lf........0
Tucker lf ..............4
Swanson ss.........4
Flaherty 3b..........4
Teheran p ............2
Adams ph ............1
Culberson 3b .......1
TOTALS
34
R
1
1
3
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
8
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 0 1 .250
1 1 0 1 .200
1 2 3 0 .500
1 3 0 1 .200
0 0 0 0 --1 0 1 0 .500
0 0 0 0 --1 1 0 1 .250
0 0 0 1 .000
1 0 0 0 .250
0 0 0 1 .000
1 0 0 0 1.00
1 0 0 0 1.00
9 7 4 6 —
Two outs when winning run scored.
E: Knapp (1). LOB: Philadelphia 6, Atlanta 6. 2B: Hoskins 2 (2), Inciarte (1). HR:
Hernandez (1), off Teheran; F.Freeman
(1), off Milner; Albies (1), off Morgan;
Markakis (1), off Neris.
PHILA.
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Nola................... 5.1 3 1 1 1 3 1.69
Milner ............... 0.1 1 1 1 0 0 27.0
Garcia................... 1 1 0 0 0 1 0.00
Morgan ............. 0.2 1 2 2 1 1 27.0
Ramos............... 0.2 1 1 0 1 1 0.00
Neris ................. 0.2 2 3 3 1 0 40.5
ATLANTA
IP
Teheran............. 5.2
Brothers............... 0
Winkler ............. 1.1
Moylan.............. 0.2
S.Freeman ........ 0.1
Vizcaino ............... 1
H
4
0
1
1
0
0
R ER BB SO ERA
4 4 3 3 6.35
1 1 2 0 0.00
0 0 0 2 0.00
0 0 1 2 0.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
0 0 0 3 0.00
WP: Vizcaino (1-0); LP: Neris (0-1).
Brothers pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
Inherited runners-scored: Milner 1-1,
Morgan 1-0, Ramos 1-1, Brothers 2-1,
Winkler 3-2, S.Freeman 2-0. HBP: Teheran (Hoskins), Garcia (Suzuki). WP: Teheran. PB: Knapp (1). T: 3:28. A: 40,208
(41,500).
L.A. .............. 020 111 000 00 — 5 13 0
OAKLAND.... 000 040 100 01 — 6 12 0
One out when winning run scored.
LOB: Los Angeles 9, Oakland 10. 2B: Cozart (1), Maldonado (1), Powell (1). 3B:
Calhoun (1), Powell (1). HR: Calhoun
(1), off Graveman; Cozart (1), off
Graveman; Pujols (1), off Graveman;
Davis (1), off Richards; Olson (1), off
Richards.
L.A.
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Richards .............. 5 7 4 4 3 4 7.20
Wood ................... 1 0 0 0 0 1 0.00
Bedrosian ......... 0.1 3 1 1 0 0 27.0
Alvarez ............. 0.1 0 0 0 0 1 0.00
Middleton......... 1.1 0 0 0 0 1 0.00
Johnson ............... 1 0 0 0 0 1 0.00
Ramirez ............ 1.1 2 1 1 2 3 6.75
OAKLAND
IP
Graveman............ 5
Buchter................ 1
Petit .................... 2
Treinen ................ 2
Hatcher................ 1
H
7
0
1
3
2
R ER BB SO ERA
5 5 0 1 9.00
0 0 1 2 0.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
0 0 0 2 0.00
WP: Hatcher (1-0); LP: Ramirez (0-1).
Graveman pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
Inherited runners-scored: Alvarez 2-0,
Middleton 2-0. T: 4:02. A: 27,764
(37,090).
MINNESOTA . 000 000 002 00— 2 8 0
BALTIMORE .. 000 000 200 01— 3 5 0
No outs when winning run scored.
LOB: Minnesota 8, Baltimore 7. 2B:
Machado (1). 3B: Joseph (1). HR: Jones
(1), off Rodney. RBI: Grossman 2 (2),
Jones (1), Joseph 2 (2). SB: Rosario (1),
Buxton (1), Machado (1). S: Joseph.
MINNESOTA IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Odorizzi ............... 6 2 0 0 2 7 0.00
Duke .................... 1 1 2 2 1 4 18.0
Reed .................... 2 0 0 0 0 2 0.00
Hildenberger .... 0.1 0 0 0 2 0 0.00
Rodney ............. 0.2 2 1 1 0 0 13.5
BALTIMORE IP
Bundy .................. 7
O'Day................... 1
Brach ................ 0.2
Givens .............. 1.1
Bleier ................... 1
H
5
0
2
0
1
R ER BB SO ERA
0 0 1 7 0.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
2 2 2 2 27.0
0 0 0 1 0.00
0 0 0 0 0.00
WP: Bleier (1-0); LP: Rodney (0-1). Inherited runners-scored: Rodney 2-0,
Givens 2-0. WP: Duke 2, Bleier. PB: Joseph (1). T: 3:31. A: 45,469 (45,971).
WP: Verlander (1-0); LP: Hamels (0-1).
Inherited runners-scored: Leclerc 1-0.
HBP: Verlander (Mazara). WP: Giles. T:
2:59. A: 47,253 (48,114).
MILWAUKEE . 001 000 000001 — 2 10 1
SAN DIEGO.... 000 000 001000 — 1 6 0
E: Santana (1). LOB: Milwaukee 7, San
Diego 8. 2B: Shaw (1), Choi (1).
MILWAUKEE IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Anderson ............. 6 1 0 0 3 6 0.00
Hader ................... 1 1 0 0 1 3 0.00
Albers .................. 1 1 0 0 0 0 0.00
Knebel.................. 1 2 1 1 0 1 9.00
Jeffress................ 2 1 0 0 2 2 0.00
Barnes.................. 1 0 0 0 0 3 0.00
SAN DIEGO
IP
Richard................. 7
Yates................. 0.2
McGrath............ 0.1
Stammen ............. 1
Hand..................... 2
Cimber ................. 1
H
6
1
0
0
0
3
R ER BB SO ERA
1 1 1 4 1.29
0 0 1 2 0.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
0 0 0 0 0.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
1 1 0 1 9.00
WP: Jeffress (1-0); LP: Cimber (0-1); S:
Barnes (1). Inherited runners-scored:
McGrath 2-0. HBP: Hand (Aguilar). T:
3:36. A: 44,649 (42,302).
NEW YORK
AB
Gardner lf ...........5
Judge rf ..............4
Stanton dh..........5
Sanchez c............5
Hicks cf ...............4
Gregorius ss .......3
Drury 3b..............4
Walker 2b-1b......4
Austin 1b ............3
Wade 2b..............1
TOTALS
38
R
2
1
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
6
H BI BB SO AVG
1 1 0 0 .200
2 0 1 2 .500
3 4 0 1 .600
1 1 0 1 .200
2 0 0 2 .500
0 0 1 0 .000
1 0 0 2 .250
1 0 0 0 .250
0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 0 .000
11 6 2 9 —
TORONTO
AB
Travis 2b.............4
Donaldson 3b......3
Smoak 1b............3
Granderson lf......2
Pearce ph ............1
Morales dh..........4
Grichuk rf............3
Martin c ..............3
Pillar cf ...............3
Diaz ss ................3
TOTALS
29
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
H BI BB SO AVG
0 0 0 2 .000
0 0 1 0 .000
0 0 1 2 .000
1 0 1 1 .500
0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 2 .000
0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 1 .000
1 1 0 2 .333
0 0 0 0 .000
2 1 3 12 —
NEW YORK ..... 200 020 101 — 6 11 1
TORONTO ....... 000 000 010 — 1 2 2
E: Severino (1), Granderson (1), Oh (1).
LOB: New York 7, Toronto 4. 2B: Judge
(1), Stanton (1), Sanchez (1), Walker
(1). HR: Stanton (1), off Happ; Gardner
(1), off Barnes; Stanton (2), off Clippard; Pillar (1), off Betances.
NEW YORK
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Severino ........... 5.2 1 0 0 3 7 0.00
Green................ 1.1 0 0 0 0 3 0.00
Betances ............. 1 1 1 1 0 0 9.00
Chapman ............. 1 0 0 0 0 2 0.00
TORONTO
IP
Happ ................. 4.2
Axford .............. 0.1
Loup..................... 1
Barnes ................. 1
Oh ........................ 1
Clippard ............... 1
R ER BB SO ERA
3 3 4 7 4.76
0 0 0 1 0.00
0 0 0 2 0.00
1 1 2 2 9.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
WP: Cishek (1-0); LP: Urena (0-1). Inherited runners-scored: Cishek 2-0,
Steckenrider 2-2. HBP: Urena 3 (Rizzo,Russell,Baez), Montgomery
(Dietrich). T: 3:18. A: 32,151 (36,742).
PHILA. ............. 100 004 000 — 5 6 1
ATLANTA ........ 000 002 033 — 8 9 0
NF407 1x6
E DUARDO A . E NCINA
— Baltimore Sun
CHICAGO......... 310 100 300 — 8 9 2
MIAMI............. 103 000 000 — 4 8 2
Matt Davidson,
White Sox
NL games
H
4
2
1
2
1
1
R ER BB SO ERA
3 2 1 5 3.86
1 1 0 1 27.0
0 0 1 0 0.00
1 1 0 1 9.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
1 1 0 1 9.00
WP: Severino (1-0); LP: Happ (0-1). Inherited runners-scored: Green 1-0, Axford 1-1. T: 2:51. A: 48,115 (49,282).
White Sox 14, Royals 7
Giants 1, Dodgers 0
Matt Davidson hit three
home runs to help spoil
Kansas City’s 50th anniversary celebration.
Joe Panik homered off
Clayton Kershaw in the fifth
inning as San Francisco
dealt the three-time National League Cy Young Award
winner his first loss in his
franchise-record eighth
consecutive Opening Day
start.
Kershaw did not allow
any runs in spring training.
CHICAGO
AB
Moncada 2b.........6
A.Garcia rf...........6
Abreu 1b..............5
Davidson dh ........4
Delmonico lf........1
L.Garcia ph-lf ......1
Castillo c..............5
Anderson ss ........4
Sanchez 3b..........4
Engel cf ...............3
TOTALS
39
R
0
2
2
4
1
1
0
3
1
0
14
H BI BB SO AVG
1 1 0 2 .167
2 0 0 0 .333
2 2 0 0 .400
3 5 1 0 .750
0 0 2 0 .000
1 0 0 0 1.00
0 0 0 1 .000
2 3 1 1 .500
1 3 1 2 .250
2 0 2 1 .667
14 14 7 7 —
KANSAS CITY AB
Jay lf....................5
Merrifield 2b .......5
Moustakas 3b .....5
Duda 1b ...............4
Cuthbert dh.........3
Soler rf ................3
Gordon cf.............4
Orlando cf............0
Escobar ss ...........3
Butera c...............4
TOTALS
36
R
1
1
2
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
7
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 0 1 .200
1 1 0 0 .200
2 1 0 0 .400
1 3 0 0 .250
1 1 0 0 .333
0 0 1 1 .000
1 0 0 0 .250
0 0 0 0 --0 0 1 0 .000
2 0 0 0 .500
9 6 2 2 —
CHICAGO ......... 000 530 330 — 14 14 1
KANSAS CITY . 400 000 012 — 7 9 0
E: Moncada (1). LOB: Chicago 6, Kansas
City 5. 2B: Moncada (1), A.Garcia (1), Engel (1), Moustakas (1), Gordon (1),
Butera (1). HR: Abreu (1), off Duffy; Davidson (1), off Duffy; Anderson (1), off
Duffy; Davidson (2), off Boyer; Anderson
(2), off Boyer; Davidson (3), off Flynn;
Duda (1), off Shields.
CHICAGO
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Shields ................. 6 5 4 4 1 0 6.00
Infante ................. 1 1 0 0 0 0 0.00
Avilan................... 1 2 1 0 0 1 0.00
Minaya.............. 0.2 1 2 2 1 1 27.0
Bummer ............ 0.1 0 0 0 0 0 0.00
KANSAS CITY IP
Duffy.................... 4
Boyer.................... 1
Keller ................... 1
Grimm............... 0.1
Hill..................... 0.1
Smith ................... 0
Flynn ................. 1.1
Maurer .............. 0.2
Herrera ............. 0.1
H
7
2
0
0
0
1
4
0
0
R ER BB SO ERA
5 5 2 5 11.2
3 3 1 0 27.0
0 0 0 1 0.00
1 1 1 0 27.0
1 1 0 0 27.0
1 1 2 0 0.00
3 3 0 0 20.2
0 0 1 1 0.00
0 0 0 0 0.00
WP: Shields (1-0); LP: Duffy (0-1). Smith
pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. Inherited
runners-scored: Hill 1-0, Smith 2-2, Flynn
2-0, Herrera 1-0. HBP: Shields (Cuthbert), Hill (L.Garcia). WP: Minaya 2. PB:
Butera (1). T: 3:26. A: 36,517 (37,903).
SAN FRAN.
AB
Jackson cf............. 4
Panik 2b................ 4
McCutchen rf........ 4
Posey c ................. 2
Longoria 3b .......... 4
Pence lf................. 4
Belt 1b.................. 4
Crawford ss.......... 4
Blach p.................. 2
G.Hernandez ph ... 1
Sandoval ph.......... 1
TOTALS
34
R
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 0 1 .250
2 1 0 0 .500
1 0 0 1 .250
0 0 2 1 .000
0 0 0 3 .000
2 0 0 1 .500
1 0 0 2 .250
1 0 0 0 .250
0 0 0 2 .000
0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 0 .000
8 1 2 11 —
L.A.
AB
Taylor cf...............4
Seager ss .............4
Puig rf ..................3
K.Hernandez 2b ...2
Bellinger 1b .........4
Kemp lf ................3
Grandal c..............3
Forsythe 3b .........4
Kershaw p............2
Utley ph ...............1
Pederson ph.........1
TOTALS
31
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
H BI BB SO AVG
0 0 0 2 .000
0 0 0 2 .000
0 0 1 2 .000
0 0 2 0 .000
0 0 0 2 .000
1 0 1 1 .333
2 0 1 1 .667
0 0 0 0 .000
2 0 0 0 1.00
1 0 0 0 1.00
0 0 0 0 .000
6 0 5 10 —
BOSTON.......... 030 000 100 — 4 8 0
TAMPA BAY ... 000 000 06 — 6 4 0
LOB: Boston 4, Tampa Bay 5. 2B: Bogaerts 2 (2), Devers (1), Nunez (1),
Duffy (1). 3B: Span (1). HR: Nunez (1),
off Archer.
BOSTON
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Sale ..................... 6 1 0 0 3 9 0.00
Barnes ................. 1 0 0 0 0 0 0.00
Kelly ................. 0.1 1 4 4 3 1
C.Smith ............ 0.2 2 2 2 1 1 27.0
TAMPA BAY IP
Archer.................. 6
Pruitt................... 2
Colome ................ 1
H
6
1
1
R ER BB SO ERA
4 4 1 6 6.00
0 0 1 0 0.00
0 0 0 0 0.00
WP: Pruitt (1-0); LP: C.Smith (0-1); S:
Colome (1). Archer pitched to 2 batters
in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored:
C.Smith 3-3, Pruitt 1-0. PB: Vazquez
(1). T: 3:00. A: 31,042 (31,042).
ASTROS AT RANGERS, 8:05
Keuchel (L)
0-0
0.00
0-0
Fister (R)
0-0
0.00
0-0
ANGELS AT ATHLETICS, 10:05
Skaggs (L)
0-0
0.00
0-0
Manaea (L)
0-0
0.00
0-0
AL scores
THURSDAY'S RESULTS
FRIDAY'S GAMES
Yankees at Blue Jays, 7:07 p.m.
Red Sox at Rays, 7:10 p.m.
Astros at Rangers, 8:05 p.m.
Angels at Athletics, 10:05 p.m.
Interleague game
PIRATES AT TIGERS, 1:10
W-L
ERA TEAM
Nova (R)
0-0
0.00
0-0
Zimmermann (R)
0-0
0.00
0-0
Interleague scores
THURSDAY’S RESULT
Pirates at Tigers, ppd.
FRIDAY’S GAME
Pirates at Tigers, 1:10 p.m.
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
1. Coffee
2. Paper
3. Bills
Enroll your Washington Post subscription in Easy Pay
and we’ll automatically charge your card when a payment
is due–no fuss, no hassle, no interruptions.
Democracy Dies in Darkness
SAN FRAN....... 000 010 000 — 1 8 0
L.A. .................. 000 000 000 — 0 6 0
LOB: San Francisco 8, Los Angeles 9. 2B:
McCutchen (1), Pence (1). HR: Panik (1),
off Kershaw.
SAN FRAN.
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Blach.................... 5 3 0 0 3 3 0.00
Osich.................... 1 0 0 0 1 2 0.00
Gearrin................. 1 2 0 0 0 1 0.00
Watson................ 1 0 0 0 1 3 0.00
Strickland ............ 1 1 0 0 0 1 0.00
L.A.
IP
Kershaw .............. 6
Chargois............... 1
Fields ................... 1
Cingrani ............... 1
H
8
0
0
0
R ER BB SO ERA
1 1 2 7 1.50
0 0 0 2 0.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
WP: Blach (1-0); LP: Kershaw (0-1); S:
Strickland (1). WP: Osich. T: 2:55. A:
53,595 (56,000).
S0833-2 2x6
BY THE NUMBERS
TOD AY
CUBS AT MARLINS, 7:10
Blue Jays: SS Troy
Tulowitzki was placed on
the 60-day disabled list
because of bone spurs in
his right heel, retroactive
to March 28.
Reds: Placed closer
Raisel Iglesias on the
three-day paternity list.
The team also placed
setup man David
Hernandez on the 10-day
DL with a sore right
shoulder.
1 0-1 L-1
W-L
ORIOLES 3, TWINS 2 (11)
PERSONNEL DEPT.
Phillies: RHP Jake Arrieta
was assigned to Class A
Clearwater while working
into shape for his Phillies
debut April 8.
0-
x-Late game
x-Late game
Padres: LHP Joey
Lucchesi, one of San
Diego’s top prospects,
was recalled from the
minors and will make his
first major league start
Friday night at home
against Milwaukee.
0-0
1 0-1 L-1
ENROLL IN EASY PAY TODAY Visit sub.wpsubscribe.com/easy or call 202-334-6100.
FRIDAY, MARCH 30 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D5
SU
Scherzer has a plan to get even better this season
NATIONALS FROM D1
beginning his spring with a 60pitch bullpen session. He simulated various scenarios and became
angry with himself when he failed
to execute. His rookie manager observed with amazement.
“He already had gotten eight
guys out, and I was sitting there
thinking, ‘This is Day One,’ ” Nationals Manager Dave Martinez
said. “He was just jacked up about
his side [session].”
Scherzer made every one of his
scheduled Grapefruit League
starts, six in all. He surrendered
two runs over 14 innings in his first
four. Then he allowed 10 runs, including four homers, across 12 innings in his final two outings. The
results on either end of the spectrum are irrelevant. He utilized
those starts to work on different
aspects of his craft — above all,
sharpening his off-speed repertoire
— regardless of game situation.
“He looked good,” Nationals
catcher Matt Wieters said. “He
looked ready. He looked in midseason form. He works as hard as
anybody, but last year he was having to figure some things out being
able to get his work in with his
finger. . . . This year, it was a differ-
NATIONALS ON DECK
at Cincinnati Reds
Today
4:10 MASN
Tomorrow
2:10 MASN
Sunday
4:10 MASN2
at Atlanta Braves
Monday
7:35 MASN2
Tuesday
7:35 MASN2
Wednesday 12:10 MASN
vs. New York Mets
Thursday
1:05 MASN
April 7
1:05 MASN2
April 8
8:08 ESPN
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM)
ent mind-set for him.”
The mind-set carries an unquestioned belief that somehow,
someway, someone who has won
the past two NL Cy Young Awards
and three Cy Young Awards in five
seasons can get even better. Scherzer, 33, wouldn’t disclose where he
envisions improvement in his performance, unwilling to publicize
his plans because, well, other
teams read. Wieters provided a
vague overview, staying away
from any possible telling details.
“He’s going to keep refining his
consistency,” Wieters said. “Last
year, he was the best pitcher in the
National League, but he knows he
didn’t make every pitch perfect.
And with his mentality, until he
makes every pitch perfect the
whole season, I don’t think it’s
going to stop with him.”
That relentless hunt for perfection will begin Friday at Great
American Ball Park, one day later
than anticipated because of Thursday’s rainout. After last year’s interruption, it will be the third time
Scherzer steps on the mound for
Opening Day in a Nationals uniform. While Stephen Strasburg
surely would earn the right for most
teams across the majors, Martinez
said choosing Scherzer for the assignment was about the easiest decision he has had to make in his new
job. It was obvious because his ace
is healthy and undoubtedly ready.
“Things are different when it’s
the regular season,” Scherzer said.
“Lights are on. Everybody grips
the bat a little bit tighter. This is
when everything gets real.”
jorge.castillo@washpost.com
JOHN BAZEMORE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Nationals catcher Matt Wieters said starter Max Scherzer, above,
won’t rest “until he makes every pitch perfect the whole season.”
Zimmerman’s behind-the-scenes spring was logical but quite rare
BOSWELL FROM D1
ALEX BRANDON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ryan Zimmerman had 36 home runs and 108 RBI to complement a .303 batting average last season.
gotten two or three. Run the
bases? Field? Forget about it.
“Zim had six hits today
[against pitchers throwing in the
90s],” General Manager Mike
Rizzo said one day this month.
“You just didn’t see ’em ’cause
they weren’t in a game.”
Why can’t Zim just go-alongto-get-along and play in
exhibition games but “jake it” on
the bases and in the field?
“Pro athletes are not good at
doing 75 percent. We don’t know
what that is,” Zimmerman said.
“In the moment, instinct takes
over, and you just play full speed.”
This isn’t just about
Zimmerman. It’s about almost
every veteran player of stature
who hates spring training, has
chronic injuries and would love a
spring training with zero
exhibitions and zero road trips.
Just go to the training facility, do
what you think you need to do to
be fit for Opening Day. Then go
home. Why didn’t anybody think
of this for, like, most of a century?
“That’s true,” Zimmerman said
when asked whether, in fact,
most veterans have multiple
chronic injuries not so different
from his. “When I was Bryce
Harper’s age, I’d basically never
been injured. But that changes.”
Zimmerman is not only doing
what hundreds of big leaguers
have wanted to do, with
justifiable reasons, but he is also
being honest about it. And that
stumps everybody. “He must be
injured,” many have said because
nobody nixes every exhibition
game because they think the
games are irrelevant or possibly
harmful.
What team would allow it?
Well, the Nats. Zimmerman
asked Martinez, who is open to
novel approaches, for
permission, and the rookie
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/nationals
Taylor made it easy
to bet on him in 2018
THOMAS BOSWELL
foot issues that have ruined big
chunks of seasons and required
surgeries. “It’s not the age; it’s the
mileage,” he said.
What makes his injuries flare
up? In the case of his plantar
fasciitis, an inflammation of a
thick band of tissues on the
bottom of his foot that connects
the heel bone to the toes, the old
injury can be reawakened —
making playing impossible until
cured by weeks of rest — by
several familiar baseball actions.
They include taking leads,
breaking whenever a hitter
makes contact and running the
bases full speed, even on a
“routine” play, such as scoring
from second base on a single.
Also, standing at first base,
shifting his 225 pounds and
rising on his toes on every pitch,
anticipating a batted ball,
stresses that part of the foot.
Zimmerman can do those things
1,000 times and feel nothing.
Then the 1,001st time, he feels
discomfort. Here we go again.
Pain management, maybe the
disabled list.
His right shoulder, which took
years to heal as much as it finally
did, is endangered by, among
other things, diving to field balls,
sliding headfirst into a base or
diving back headfirst on a pickoff
throw. Again, it’s the 1,001st time
that gets him, and he never
knows when that might be. He’s
always playing the odds.
Hitting doesn’t bother him. Or
not much. But he must hit to get
ready for the season. If the
shoulder or heel is aggravated,
those are the breaks.
So all spring he has been
hitting against minor leaguers,
throwing full speed, in simulated
games on back fields. That’s
usually a luxury reserved for
players returning from injury,
such as Adam Eaton.
Zimmerman just made it his
norm, sometimes getting eight
at-bats a day when, in an
exhibition game, he might have
NATI ONALS NOTE S
manager said, “Okay.”
“[Martinez] has full trust in us
to do what we need to do to be
ready for the season,”
Zimmerman said. “I feel great.
Awesome.”
Stop being logical! Somebody
might overhear you.
Zimmerman’s spring has extra
spin because of the growing
hostility between players and
owners. In recent months, salary
assumptions have been flipped.
Young players are now valued
highly, but anybody past 30 is
depreciated like a used car
headed toward the junkyard.
Players such as Jayson Werth, 38,
and Adam Lind, 34, have only
recently been given minor league
deals. That means: Show up and,
if you look good, maybe we’ll give
you a big league roster spot at
very low pay.
In such a hardball atmosphere,
are established players going to
care whether an owner’s
exhibition product gets watered
down by stars skipping games?
Two weeks ago, several friends
and I went to a Nats game, and
we paid $34 a ticket to sit five
rows from the top on the first
base side. That’s not a throwaway
ticket price. We didn’t miss
Zimmerman. But he may be
setting an interesting precedent.
Does Zimmerman understand
why people are so interested in
what he is not doing? “Yeah,
there’s nothing else to talk about,”
he said, wryly.
How will his voluntary sit-out
be viewed?
“Depends on what I’m hitting
on May 1,” he said, chuckling.
There’s one final twist.
Zimmerman has an $18 million
team option for the 2020 season.
Not long ago, if he kept
producing, the Nats might have
picked it up. With the game’s new
economics, that probability has
shrunk to near zero in a blink.
In two years, if Zimmerman’s
production slips, he may find
himself at 35 in the same spot as
Werth, Mark Reynolds
(30 homers) and Lind were this
spring — unsigned, forced
toward retirement or trying to
make a team like a walk-on.
If he has only two more years
of guaranteed baseball, then
Zimmerman owes it to his
teammates, his franchise’s title
chances and himself to have the
two most productive seasons he
can muster. Maximize 2018 and
2019. That is all.
Come next spring, if
Zimmerman has a good 2018,
we’ll know where to find him.
Not in exhibition games but
hitting in simulated games on
those back fields.
Did a nice little revolt just
start? And who thought that
Zimmerman, the University of
Virginia gentleman, might ignite
it?
thomas.boswell@washpost.com
For more by Thomas Boswell, visit
washingtonpost.com/boswell.
Michael A. Taylor wasn’t
supposed to be Washington’s
starting center fielder in 2015.
Denard Span underwent sports
hernia surgery in spring training,
so Taylor got a chance to start.
He wasn’t supposed to be the
Nationals’ starting center fielder
in 2016. Ben Revere pulled an
oblique on Opening Day and was
never the same, so Taylor got the
chance to start.
Taylor wasn’t supposed to be
the Nationals’ starting center
fielder in 2017, either. Adam
Eaton tore his anterior cruciate
ligament in late April, and Taylor
took over from there.
Year after year, he mixed so
many swings and misses with
tantalizing power that the
Nationals sought more proven
options to play center field every
day. But last season, Taylor
seemed to turn a corner. And so
convincing was that turn that
instead of acquiring outside help
or handing the job to up-andcomer Victor Robles, the
Nationals are betting on the
player in whom they have
invested years of patience.
“It’s a different role and
definitely a different feeling,”
Taylor said. “Definitely easier
[knowing I’ll play every day].”
Some teams might have traded
Taylor after his prolific
postseason performance,
figuring his value would never be
higher, comfortable with such an
impressive prospect knocking on
the door. The Nationals held on,
choosing instead to bet on the
Gold Glove finalist coming off his
most impressive offensive
season. Everyone in the
organization always had
predicted Taylor would win a
Gold Glove someday. The
question was — and continues to
be — can he cut down on the
strikeouts enough to produce
consistently? After watching him
bat .271 last season, the Nationals
are betting the answer is yes.
Every time someone asks
Taylor about how he built his
average from .231 in 2016 to .271
in 2017, he gives the same answer:
“I’m just trying to stick with
my approach and not try to do
too much.”
Taylor didn’t fix his swing-andmiss habits. His strikeout rate
dropped from 32.5 percent in
2016 to 31.7 percent in 2017 —
hardly noteworthy.
But what has changed are the
intangibles, the importance of
which will become clearer as
Taylor’s season progresses. He
carries himself with more
confidence now, with the air of a
regular whose job is safe.
Now the Nationals are
counting on him to provide the
same kind of offensive
performance he did in 2017, when
he nearly pulled off a 20-20
season while not starting for
nearly two whole months. In
their loaded lineup, they don’t
need Taylor to flip his strikeout
numbers entirely. They don’t
need him to be an on-base guy at
the top of the order, something
they had tried to get from him in
years past. They need Taylor to be
a consistent force at the bottom
of the order, able to provide the
big hit when needed, much as he
did in 2017. This time, the center
field job is his from the start. This
time, he will have a full season to
show it should be his for some
time.
— Chelsea Janes
WEEKEND ON THE AIR
TOMORROW
NBA
3 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Washington » NBA TV, NBC Sports Washington, WFED (1500 AM)
Toronto at Boston » NBA TV
12:30 p.m.
Montreal at Pittsburgh » NHL Network
2:20 p.m.
3 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
8 p.m.
NHL
7 p.m.
MLB
1 p.m.
2 p.m.
4 p.m.
6 p.m.
7 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
St. Louis at New York Mets » MLB Network
Washington at Cincinnati » MASN, WJFK (106.7 FM)
Houston at Texas » Fox Sports 1
Boston at Tampa Bay » MLB Network
Minnesota at Baltimore » MASN2
Milwaukee at San Diego » Fox Sports 1
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
6 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
12:30 p.m.
Final Four: Loyola Chicago vs. Michigan » TBS, TNT, TruTV, WTEM (980 AM)
Final Four: Kansas vs. Villanova » TBS, TNT, TruTV, WTEM (980 AM)
HORSE RACING
12:30 p.m.
6 p.m.
WNIT, championship game: Virginia Tech at Indiana » CBS Sports Network
GOLF
1:30 p.m.
3 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
PGA Tour: Houston Open, third round » Golf Channel
PGA Tour: Houston Open, third round » WRC (Ch. 4), WBAL (Ch. 11)
LPGA Tour: Inspiration, third round » Golf Channel
TENNIS
1 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
5 p.m.
10 p.m.
Vanderbilt at Florida » ESPNU
TCU at Oklahoma State » ESPNU
Alabama at Kentucky » ESPN2
Oklahoma at Baylor » ESPN
MEN’S COLLEGE LACROSSE
English Premier League: Liverpool at Crystal Palace » NBC Sports Network
Bundesliga: Freiburg at Schalke » Fox Sports 1
Bundesliga: Augsburg at Bayer Leverkusen » Fox Sports 2
English Premier League: Southampton at West Ham » CNBC
English Premier League: Swansea City at Manchester United »
NBC Sports Network
HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL
3 p.m.
5 p.m.
10 a.m.
Noon
Philadelphia at Charlotte » NBA TV
Washington at Chicago » NBC Sports Washington, WFED (1500 AM)
Houston at San Antonio » WJLA (Ch. 7), WMAR (Ch. 2)
Oklahoma City at New Orleans » NBA TV
Sacramento at Los Angeles Lakers » NBA TV
NHL
12:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
Boston at Philadelphia » WRC (Ch. 4), WBAL (Ch. 11)
Washington at Pittsburgh » NBC Sports Network, WJFK (106.7 FM)
MLB
WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
5 p.m.
7 p.m.
1 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
6 p.m.
9:30 p.m.
Men’s world championship, round robin: United States vs. Japan »
NBC Sports Network
COLLEGE BASEBALL
Noon
7 p.m.
NBA
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
4 p.m.
4 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
CURLING
9:30 p.m.
SUNDAY
Anthony Joshua vs. Joseph Parker (heavyweights) » Showtime
Mark DeLuca vs. Michael Moore (junior middleweights) » ESPN2
WTA: Miami Open, singles final » ESPN2
ATP: Miami Open, doubles final » Tennis Channel
SOCCER
7:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m.
10 a.m.
10 a.m.
Dubai World Cup » NBC Sports Network
Florida Derby » NBC Sports Network
BOXING
WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
3 p.m.
German Bundesliga: Borussia Dortmund at Bayern Munich » WTTG (Ch. 5),
WBFF (Ch. 45)
English Premier League: Manchester City at Everton » WRC (Ch. 4),
WBAL (Ch. 11)
German Bundesliga: Wolfsburg at Hertha Berlin » Fox Sports 2
MLS: Los Angeles FC at Los Angeles Galaxy » WTTG (Ch. 5), WBFF (Ch. 45)
NWSL: Orlando at Washington » Lifetime
MLS: New York City FC at San Jose »ESPN2
Penn State at Ohio State » ESPNU
Notre Dame at Syracuse » ESPNU
Geico Nationals, girls’ final » ESPN2
Geico Nationals, boys’ final » ESPN
6 p.m.
St. Louis at New York Mets » ESPN
Minnesota at Baltimore » MASN, WTEM (980 AM)
Los Angeles Angels at Oakland » MLB Network
Washington at Cincinnati » MASN2, WJFK (106.7 FM)
San Francisco at Los Angeles Dodgers » ESPN, WTEM (980 AM)
NCAA, championship game » ESPN, WTEM (980 AM)
GOLF
2 p.m.
3 p.m.
5 p.m.
PGA Tour: Houston Open, final round » Golf Channel
PGA Tour: Houston Open, final round » WRC (Ch. 4), WBAL (Ch. 11)
LPGA Tour: Inspiration, final round » Golf Channel
TENNIS
1 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
ATP: Miami Open, singles final » ESPN2
WTA: Miami Open, doubles final » Tennis Channel
SOCCER
8:25 a.m.
9:30 a.m.
10:55 a.m.
Noon
English Premier League: Stoke City at Arsenal » NBC Sports Network
German Bundesliga: Eintracht Frankfurt at Werder Bremen » Fox Sports 1
English Premier League: Tottenham at Chelsea » NBC Sports Network
German Bundesliga: Borussia Monchengladbach at Mainz » Fox Sports 1
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
Noon
South Carolina at Texas A&M » ESPNU
D6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30 , 2018
He didn’t lose his sense of humor
As he accepts national award, Bennett tries to keep Virginia’s historic defeat vs. UMBC in perspective
BY
C HUCK C ULPEPPER
san antonio — In an eccentric
sport whose teams spend four
quiet months straining and
grinding to construct merit,
whereupon everyone agrees to
spend three loud weeks in a
68-team semi-crapshoot to mint
legacies, to determine which
coaches get more plum jobs and
to ascertain who gets the joy, the
Associated Press coach of the year
award went to Tony Bennett of
Virginia here Thursday.
When Barry Bedlan of the Associated Press clarified that the
voting had taken place before the
NCAA tournament and that the
voting had used that timetable
for all of its 57 years, Bennett
located the kind of apt wit that
might help him through his recent plight and said: “I thought it
was for NCAA tournament coach
of the year. I didn’t get that? I
wasn’t sure.”
It was one of the odd sights and
sounds as a coach who usually
abstains from coming to the Final
Four arrived at the Final Four
through his own fault of being
outstanding — 13 days after becoming the first of the 136 coaches ever seeded No. 1 in the men’s
tournament to lose to a team
seeded No. 16, when Maryland
Baltimore County demolished
Virginia, 74-54, in the round of
64. Listing some of the slew of
coaches who had contacted him
to offer consolation, Bennett
mentioned Mike Krzyzewski of
Duke, Jim Boeheim of Syracuse,
Brad Brownell of Clemson and
former Louisville coach Rick Pitino, then scooped again from the
wit reservoir to say: “This isn’t an
awards [show]. ‘Thank you!’ It’s
kind of a weird [thing], you
know? ‘So I don’t want to leave
anybody out!’
“And I joked, I said, I think all
of them, they reached out and
they’re so happy because I’m the
guy who took the first loss, the
1-16!” he said. “ ‘Thank you; it’s
not going to have to be us!’ That
being said, I was actually so
appreciative and surprised at”
the outpouring.
Soon after he said that, a door
popped open into the hallway
where Bennett spoke, and out
stepped Bill Self, the Kansas
coach safely entered in this Final
Four.
“I warmed ’em up,” Bennett
said to a news conference-bound
Self.
“I hope you’re here for the AP,”
said Self, who has had his own
early-round topples from high
places. “Congratulations, man.
It’s awesome.”
He gave Bennett what seemed
an understanding pat on the
back.
In the interview room, Bedlan
RAJ MEHTA/USA TODAY SPORTS
Pistons center Andre Drummond dunks for two of his 24 points as
Wizards center Marcin Gortat and guard Ramon Sessions watch.
TIM BRADBURY/GETTY IMAGES
Tony Bennett: “The only way you’re better after a tough loss is if you respond to it the right way.”
had read off Virginia’s steep list of
feats in 2017-18: a school-record
31 wins, a first No. 1 ranking since
1982, an ACC-record 17 conference wins, 20 wins against ACC
opponents, a third regular season
title and second tournament title
under Bennett. Then Bedlan had
said, “And, yes, Virginia suffered
an unprecedented upset,” before
extolling Bennett’s post-loss conduct.
Bennett’s program had just
gone from 31-2, stout and occasionally criticized for tedium, to
31-3, unwittingly historic and
suddenly fascinating. He agreed
that its mission going forward
will include the artful avoidance
of the lasting damage that can
stem from a haunting loss, as was
widely assumed of the Atlanta
Falcons last NFL season after
their implausible loss from a 25point lead in Super Bowl LI. (The
Falcons still made the NFL’s final
eight.)
“I got a great text from one of
my players, Ty Jerome, and he
said, ‘Coach, this is now part of
our story, and we get to respond
to it the way we want,’ ” Bennett
said. “And it will be day-by-day
where we can make the right
steps. And we shared that with
our team the other day. Everybody says, you know, ‘You’ll be
better because of this loss.’ And
the fact of the matter is, the only
way you’re better after a tough
loss is if you respond to it the
right way. If you do nothing with
it and just say, ‘Ah, this was tough,’
then nothing’s going to happen.”
He said he waited an uncommon two or three days before
watching the game tape. He said
he talked to his players about
whether they could bear to watch
the tournament that raged on
without them, and he said: “But I
watched the games. I said to
someone: ‘I love the NCAA tournament, and I hate the NCAA
tournament.’ ”
He said the game had been one
of those rare cases in which the
heaviness of offensive impotence
had forced cracks in Virginia’s
peerless defense. He said it
reached a point that “you feel the
game pressure, and then you see,
that’s where some of the uncharacteristic things happen.” He
brought up the lineup puzzle
wrought by the injury that cost
his team sixth man De’Andre
Hunter and said Hunter’s wrist
surgery had gone well.
He spoke the words that coaches often seek in hard scoreboard
times and said he had instructed
his players in recent days that life
inevitably would bring bigger
matters and even harder days.
Apparently, Virginia won’t shy
away from bringing it up.
“In a way, I told our guys, you
have an advantage or a head start
in terms of your preparation,”
Bennett said. “Once we start preparing, there should be some
really good motivation. And
there’s a point where you have to
move on and let it go; of course
you do. But you always use what
you learn from the past. . . . You
know, people will always make it
probably part of the story, but it
always comes to, ‘All right, it’ll be
a different team. It’ll be a new
year.’ ”
He added: “We don’t try to
cover [up] things. We say, ‘This is
who we are.’ And, all right, people
have been critical before of us,
our style of play. I think our guys
are unique. So there’s absolutely
value [in discussion]. I think
that’s even part of the offseason
for our staff and for me: ‘Okay, the
adjustments we need to make.
How can we become the best
team?’ And here we’re dealing
with a loss like that. ‘Okay, where
does that fall into it? Where does
the success of the year? How
much of that is part of it?’ ”
In the hallway as he left, he
reminded that people older than
his players have lived long
enough to know the value of
difficulty, which prompted a
question, possibly misguided,
about whether he might come to
“value” 74-54.
“The wisdom that will come
from that adversity is strong,” he
said. “Absolutely, there will be
tremendous growth and kind of
that growth mind-set, for sure.
‘Value’? I don’t know what the
right word is. But you’re going to
learn. You’re going to grow. ‘Value’? Sure, that could be part of it.”
He paused.
“Don’t know if I’ll celebrate it,”
he said, “but it’s part of the story.”
chuck.culpepper@washpost.com
Four top seeds to battle it out in women’s semifinals
FINAL FOUR FROM D1
feeling as if he was slowly suffocating.
He emerged from that semifinal with a bit of wisdom that
serves as preamble for this year’s
Final Four, which pits No. 1 seed
Mississippi State (36-1) against
No. 1 seed Louisville (36-2) and,
fittingly, No. 1 seed Connecticut
(36-0) against No. 1 seed Notre
Dame (33-3).
“There better not be any stones
left unturned. Every kid better be
on their best behavior. And whatever they’ve been doing all year
long, they better do it that well
and better,” Auriemma said.
“The harder part is you can do
all that and still get your [butt]
beat. . . . You know, there are
some other years where you go,
‘Okay, look, if we do A, B, C and
D, there is no way we can lose.’
Well, that’s not happening this
week.”
It’s not often that the consensus top teams in basketball are
the four left vying for a shot at the
national title. This year’s Final
Four, which tips off with Mississippi State facing Louisville at
Nationwide Arena on Friday at
7 p.m., features all four No. 1 seeds
for just the fourth time since the
NCAA tournament began in 1982.
The four teams have two conference tournament championships
among them, and it might have
been one more had Notre Dame
not had to face the Cardinals in
the ACC tournament final.
Amid all the chalk, the intrigue
Friday lies in two diametrically
opposed matchups: Notre Dame
and Connecticut will meet for the
48th time overall and the seventh
time in the Final Four. The Bulldogs and Cardinals, meanwhile,
will play for the first time.
The four coaches see the Final
Four as having a little something
for everybody — a Huskies-Fighting Irish matchup lends extra
heft, and Mississippi State Coach
JESSICA HILL/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Connecticut Coach Geno Auriemma, set to face former Big East foe
Notre Dame, said of the teams’ rivalry, “It’s still there, believe me.”
Vic Schaefer and Louisville Coach
Jeff Walz offer something fresh.
“It’s fun. It’s the fun part of the
job,” Walz said. “I say it all the
time: In 2006 when I was on staff
at Maryland and we won the
national championship, it was an
awesome experience. But at the
same time, we played North Carolina in the semis, who we had
played twice during the regular
season, then we played Duke for
the championship, which we had
played three times. . . . So sometimes it’s exciting when you play
somebody you haven’t played because it is a fresh set of eyes and
new scout and new challenges.”
The Cardinals are making their
third Final Four appearance; the
previous two ended with losses to
the Huskies. This time around,
Walz will pit his strong defense
against Mississippi State’s strong
defense and standout 6-foot-7
center Teaira McCowan, who has
27 double-doubles this season.
“It is a unique deal when you
don’t play somebody or haven’t
played them before,” said
Schaefer, whose Bulldogs are in
their second straight Final Four
after last year’s stunning semifinal upset of U-Conn. “To play
them on this stage, on a national
stage, you know, it will be
unique.”
Friday’s second semifinal
promises to be an unusual matchup for McGraw’s Fighting Irish,
too, even though Notre Dame and
Connecticut know each other in-
timately dating from their days as
Big East foes.
The Huskies have dominated
the series, winning the past seven
games to take a 36-11 lead. This
matchup puts Notre Dame, which
has only one loss to Connecticut
and two to Louisville this season,
in a rare underdog role.
“I think most of the games that
we’ve been in, with the exception
of probably the ACC final, we
were supposed to win,” McGraw
said. “I think it’s great for us to
know there’s no pressure on us,
that this is a game where we’re
the underdog. We’re going to
finally be wearing our dark uniforms, so I think maybe that will
make us feel a little different
coming out.”
Despite Connecticut’s lead in
the series, Auriemma knows better than to approach Friday’s
semifinal with too much confidence — the 2001 Final Four
taught him that. Besides, the
rivalry is only lopsided outside of
the NCAA tournament. In the
teams’ six Final Four meetings,
each squad owns three wins.
Auriemma is expecting a fight
until the final buzzer.
“It’s been because of the magnitude of the games, the regular
season and then because we’ve
played so many times in the Final
Four that the games take on a
huge significance every time we
play. That’s what rivalries do.
That’s how they’re born, and
that’s how they are sustained,”
Auriemma said.
“It was difficult when we were
in our other league, in the same
league together, because we
would end up playing each other
four times some years, and that’s
not always good. So now that
we’re not in the same league, it
doesn’t seem as intense. But it’s
still there, believe me. It’s there,
and it will come out Friday night.
That rivalry will come out Friday
night.”
ava.wallace@washpost.com
Porter unable to finish,
Wizards unable to clinch
WIZARDS FROM D1
Griffin watched as center Andre
Drummond dominated the Wizards for 24 points and 23 rebounds.
“We knew,” Bradley Beal said
about the potential to seal a
playoff spot Thursday. “That’s
probably what’s the most disappointing about it.”
But there’s more — because in
this Wizards’ season that has
produced a 41-34 record, there’s
always more.
The anticipation for Wall’s
comeback Saturday night has
taken a momentary back seat to
the concern over Otto Porter Jr.’s
ankle.
Less than four minutes had
expired in the third quarter when
Porter, defending Pistons forward Stanley Johnson, rolled his
right ankle. As Johnson made a
spin move, he then inadvertently
stepped on Porter’s right foot and
caused the Wizards forward to
fall. Porter, who played just 16
minutes and finished with seven
points, exited with what team
officials called a sprained right
ankle and did not return.
“I kind of took it twice,” Porter
said of the ankle twist and the
additional step by Johnson. “But
I’ll be fine.”
After undergoing an X-ray that
came back negative for anything
more severe, Porter called the
injury a “small tweak” and said
he would talk to the trainers
Friday to see whether an MRI
exam would be necessary. Still, as
he was helped off the Little Caesars Arena floor, Porter joined the
ever-expanding Eastern Conference injury list with the playoffs
looming.
On Thursday night, the Philadelphia 76ers announced that
all-star center Joel Embiid has
been placed in the NBA’s concussion protocol and will require
surgery to repair an orbital fracture. He is expected to miss two to
four weeks. Another all-star, Boston’s Kyrie Irving, is expected to
miss three to six weeks after knee
surgery.
For Embiid and Irving, their
teams’ postseason runs depends
on their recoveries. Although
Porter does not carry all-star
status, he has been as instrumental in helping the Wizards maintain a playoff seeding without
Wall. Washington’s late stumble,
however, has it occupying the
No. 6 seed, just a half-game ahead
of Miami (41-35) and 11/2 games
ahead of Milwaukee (39-35 entering its game at Golden State on
Thursday night).
If the season ended Friday, the
Wizards would be paired with
No. 3 seed Cleveland. But first,
the team needs to secure a playoff
spot.
“I wish we could’ve got it,”
Jodie Meeks said. “But there’s
always Saturday.”
In Wall’s absence, Porter had
averaged 16.9 points entering
Thursday. When he exited in the
third quarter, it wasn’t his scoring they missed but his defense.
Before the third quarter, Detroit (35-40) struggled to manufacture points. The Pistons committed eight first-half turnovers
that led to fewer shot attempts.
However, more opportunities
didn’t always produce more success — on one possession, Detroit
worked for three offensive rebounds and still couldn’t connect
for second-chance points.
After halftime, all of that
changed as the Pistons made 13 of
21 shots. Washington couldn’t
stop the ball — allowing 12 points
in the paint in the third quarter —
nor did the team protect the
perimeter as Detroit matched its
first-half total with three three-
Pistons 103, Wizards 92
Washington ........................ 24
Detroit ................................ 23
WASHINGTON
Morris
Porter Jr.
Gortat
Beal
Satoransky
Oubre Jr.
Scott
Sessions
Meeks
Mahinmi
TOTALS
25
26
17
32
26 — 92
22 — 103
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
36:06 5-15 0-0 2-6 5 3 11
15:50
2-7 2-2 1-2 2 0
7
27:47
5-7 0-0 2-12 3 3 10
35:41 6-17 2-3 1-5 1 1 15
34:51
4-8 2-2 3-5 6 3 11
32:10 5-12 4-5 0-4 3 2 14
19:09 4-10 0-0 1-4 1 4
8
15:17
2-4 2-3 1-2 6 0
6
13:50
2-5 0-0 0-1 1 1
6
9:19
2-4 0-0 1-2 0 2
4
240 37-89 12-15 12-43 28 19 92
Percentages: FG .416, FT .800. 3-Point Goals: 6-32, .188
(Meeks 2-5, Porter Jr. 1-3, Satoransky 1-3, Morris 1-6,
Beal 1-8, Sessions 0-1, Scott 0-2, Oubre Jr. 0-4). Team
Rebounds: 7. Team Turnovers: 15 (17 PTS). Blocked
Shots: 6 (Morris 4, Oubre Jr., Porter Jr.). Turnovers: 15
(Beal 6, Gortat 2, Porter Jr. 2, Mahinmi, Meeks, Morris,
Satoransky, Scott). Steals: 9 (Beal 2, Sessions 2, Gortat,
Meeks, Morris, Oubre Jr., Satoransky). Technical Fouls:
None.
DETROIT
Johnson
Tolliver
Drummond
Bullock
Jackson
I.Smith
Kennard
Ellenson
Ennis III
Moreland
TOTALS
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
36:44 4-11 0-0 2-5 2 2
9
31:53
4-6 5-5 1-2 2 2 14
37:52 10-16 4-7 5-23 4 2 24
29:20
6-9 0-0 0-1 3 0 14
27:50 6-16 1-2 0-2 8 2 13
20:10
3-9 0-0 0-3 2 2
6
18:40
2-5 3-4 0-1 2 1
8
16:07
3-7 2-2 1-5 1 0
9
11:16
2-4 0-0 0-0 0 0
4
10:08
1-1 0-0 1-2 2 3
2
240 41-84 15-20 10-44 26 14 103
Percentages: FG .488, FT .750. 3-Point Goals: 6-21, .286
(Bullock 2-4, Ellenson 1-1, Kennard 1-2, Johnson 1-3,
Tolliver 1-3, Ennis III 0-1, I.Smith 0-3, Jackson 0-4).
Team Rebounds: 9. Team Turnovers: 16 (19 PTS).
Blocked Shots: 3 (Drummond, Moreland, Tolliver). Turnovers: 16 (Jackson 4, Ennis III 2, Johnson 2, Moreland 2,
Bullock, Drummond, Ellenson, I.Smith, Kennard, Tolliver). Steals: 9 (Johnson 4, Kennard 2, Bullock, Moreland,
Tolliver). Technical Fouls: Johnson, 2:31 first
WIZ ARDS’ NEX T THREE
vs. Charlotte Hornets
Tomorrow
3 NBCSW, NBA TV
at Chicago Bulls
Sunday
3:30 NBCSW
at Houston Rockets
Tuesday
8 NBCSW
Radio: WFED (1500 AM)
pointers in the third quarter.
“We turned the ball over, and
we didn’t get back on defense,
and we missed a bunch of shots,”
Coach Scott Brooks said, reviewing the stretch that changed the
game. “Our three-point shooting
tonight was not like us. We just
couldn’t make any shots in that
third quarter.”
The Pistons outscored Washington 32-17 and built a lead that
grew to 15 points. Although the
Wizards pulled within four with
five minutes to go in the game,
Detroit scored the next six points
and put the game away.
Through much of the game,
Washington had its own shooting
woes; it started 1 for 12 from the
perimeter before Markieff Morris
and Tomas Satoransky drained
consecutive three-pointers late in
the second quarter. For the game,
the Wizards shot 41.6 percent and
missed 26 of 32 attempts from
beyond the arc.
“We got a lot of a great ones, a
lot of open ones,” said Beal, who
led the team with 15 points on
6-for-17 shooting. “It was one of
those nights for us. They were
hitting theirs. We weren’t making
ours. They got a lot of stuff with
Drummond in the paint, so they
beat us. They beat us. I’m not
going to sit here and say we live
and die by the three, but we got to
make shots.”
With only seven games remaining in the season, the Wizards have not played consistently
enough to inspire anyone to
think they can make a long run.
Now with Wall set to come back,
the clinching hopes transfer to
Saturday against the Charlotte
Hornets.
“Obviously we know we’re going to be in the playoffs,” Meeks
said. “I think we’re ready. We get
John back Saturday. Obviously,
he’ll be on a little minute restriction, but he’s our best player. We
get him back and get everybody
acclimated to getting his rhythm
back, I think it will be helpful.”
candace.buckner@washpost.com
FRIDAY, MARCH 30 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
NBA ROUNDUP
SCOREBOARD
Surgery
to sideline
Embiid for
2-4 weeks
F ROM NEWS SERVICES
AND STAFF REPORTS
When Joel Embiid said on social media Wednesday his situation was “Not good” while being
treated at a hospital, the Philadelphia 76ers star turned out to be
painfully accurate. Embiid initially was thought to have escaped
serious injury after he accidentally butted heads with teammate
Markelle Fultz during a 118-101
home win over the Knicks, but
Philadelphia announced Thursday that Embiid suffered a concussion and a fractured eye socket, which will require surgery that
could jeopardize his availability
for Philadelphia’s first-round
playoff series.
People in the league confirmed
to The Washington Post’s Tim Bontemps that the surgery is expected
to keep Embiid out of action for
two to four weeks, and the NBA’s
postseason starts April 14. On Sunday, the 76ers clinched their first
playoff berth since 2012, and their
surprisingly successful season has
been fueled by Embiid’s strong
play.
Arguably the biggest surprise
about Philadelphia (44-30) has
been Embiid’s availability for
63 games, given that he missed his
first two NBA seasons with foot
injuries and his rookie campaign
last season was limited to just
31 games, ending early because of
knee issues. The 24-year-old is
averaging 22.9 points, 11.0 rebounds, 3.2 assists and 1.8 blocks
this season. He earned his first
all-star nod and defensive player
of the year consideration.
The 76ers said Embiid was evaluated Wednesday for a concussion and found “asymptomatic,”
but he “later began experiencing
symptoms” and has been placed
in the NBA’s concussion protocol.
A CT scan revealed the fracture of
his left orbital bone, and the team
said his surgery “will be performed in the coming days.”
B A S K ET B A L L
NBA
EASTERN
W
y-Toronto ...................................55
y-Boston ....................................52
y-Cleveland ................................45
y-Philadelphia ............................44
xy-Indiana ..................................44
Washington ...............................41
Miami .........................................41
x-Milwaukee ..............................39
Detroit........................................35
Charlotte....................................34
New York....................................27
Chicago.......................................24
Brooklyn.....................................24
Orlando ......................................22
Atlanta.......................................21
L
20
23
30
30
31
34
35
35
40
42
49
51
51
52
54
Pct
.733
.693
.600
.595
.587
.547
.539
.527
.467
.447
.355
.320
.320
.297
.280
GB
—
3
10
101/2
11
14
141/2
151/2
20
211/2
281/2
31
31
321/2
34
WESTERN
W
z-Houston ..................................61
xz-Golden State .........................54
Portland .....................................46
San Antonio ...............................44
Oklahoma City ...........................44
New Orleans ..............................43
Minnesota..................................43
Utah ...........................................42
L.A. Clippers...............................41
Denver........................................40
L.A. Lakers .................................33
x-Sacramento ............................24
Dallas .........................................23
Memphis ....................................21
Phoenix ......................................19
L
14
20
29
32
32
32
33
33
34
35
41
51
52
54
57
Pct
.813
.730
.613
.579
.579
.573
.566
.560
.547
.533
.446
.320
.307
.280
.250
GB
—
61/2
15
171/2
171/2
18
181/2
19
20
21
271/2
37
38
40
421/2
x-Late game; y-Clinched playoff spot; z-Clinched division
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
Brooklyn 111, at Orlando 104
Cleveland 118, at Charlotte 105
at Philadelphia 118, New York 101
at Memphis 108, Portland 103
at Minnesota 126, Atlanta 114
Boston 97, at Utah 94
L.A. Clippers 111, at Phoenix 99
at L.A. Lakers 103, Dallas 93
LAKERS: Los Angeles guard
Isaiah Thomas will need four
months to recover from arthroscopic surgery on his right
hip.
The Lakers announced Thomas’s prognosis after the surgery
Thursday.
Thomas will be a free agent by
the time he recovers from the
procedure, but he has expressed
interest in staying with the Lakers.
The two-time all-star guard averaged 15.6 points and 5.0 assists
in 17 games with Los Angeles,
which acquired him from Cleveland in February.
Heat closes in on playoff berth
Josh
Richardson
scored
22 points, Goran Dragic added 17,
and the host Miami Heat trimmed
its magic number for clinching a
playoff berth to one by topping the
Chicago Bulls, 103-92, on Thursday night.
Justise
Winslow
scored
13 points and Kelly Olynyk finished with 11 for the Heat (41-35),
which has won a season-best eight
consecutive home games to move
within a half-game of Washington
for the No. 6 spot in the Eastern
Conference playoff race.
The Heat needs one more win
or one more Detroit loss to wrap
up its 20th postseason trip in
30 seasons. The Pistons are in
New York on Saturday in a game
that should be over before the
start of Miami’s home game
against Brooklyn.
Bulls center Robin Lopez was
ejected after picking up a pair of
technicals with 8:43 remaining,
ending his 13-point, six-rebound
night. The Bulls dropped their
seventh straight, making this the
third losing streak that lasted at
least that long for Chicago this
season.
103, THUNDER 99:
LaMarcus Aldridge had 25 points
and 11 rebounds, and San Antonio
held off Oklahoma City at home to
climb back into fourth place in the
Western Conference.
San Antonio matched Oklahoma City at 44-32 in jumping two
spots in the standings. The Thunder is fifth, a half-game ahead of
the New Orleans Pelicans.
Aldridge scored 21 points in the
first half, then drove past Steven
Adams for a dunk and a threepoint lead with 52 seconds left as
the Spurs snapped a two-game
slide.
Paul George led Oklahoma City
with 26 points and had six assists.
Russell
Westbrook
added
19 points and 11 assists but had a
pair of three-pointers miss the rim
and land out of bounds in the final
minutes.
— Associated Press
DALLAS .................................... 1
MINNESOTA ............................ 1
Loyola of Chicago (32-5) vs. Michigan (32-7), 6:09
Villanova (34-4) vs. Kansas (31-7), 8:49
NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP
MONDAY’S GAME
Semifinal winners, 9:20
Men’s National
Invitation Tournament
QUARTERFINALS
TUESDAY, MARCH 20
Penn State 85, Marquette 80
Mississippi State 79, Louisville 56
Western Kentucky 92, Oklahoma State 84
Utah 67, Saint Mary’s 58 (OT)
SEMIFINALS
IN NEW YORK
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
Utah 69, Western Kentucky 64
Penn State 75, Mississippi State 60
CHAMPIONSHIP
THURSDAY’S RESULT
18
14
24
14
19 — 82
18 — 66
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
22
3-4 1-2 4-12 0 2
7
39 11-15 2-3 0-2 3 1 28
39 5-16 3-3 2-9 14 1 15
37
2-6 2-2 0-3 2 2
8
40 8-13 1-1 1-6 2 2 18
15
3-3 0-0 0-1 0 4
6
6
0-1 0-0 0-0 1 1
0
1
0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0
0
1
0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0
0
200 32-58 9-11 7-33 22 13 82
SATURDAY’S GAMES
Charlotte at Washington, 3
Detroit at New York, 5
Toronto at Boston, 7:30
Brooklyn at Miami, 8
Golden State at Sacramento, 10
Heat 103, Bulls 92
25
22
22
27
24 — 92
25 — 103
CHICAGO: Holiday 3-10 4-4 13, Vonleh 5-12 3-4 14, Lopez
6-12 1-2 13, Payne 4-10 2-2 11, Nwaba 4-11 6-8 15,
Valentine 2-10 0-0 4, Portis 6-16 1-2 13, Arcidiacono 1-1
0-0 2, Grant 1-1 0-1 2, Kilpatrick 1-7 3-3 5. Totals 33-90
20-26 92.
MIAMI: Richardson 8-16 5-5 22, J.Johnson 1-5 0-0 2,
Whiteside 3-8 2-2 8, Dragic 6-11 4-4 17, T.Johnson 3-6
0-0 6, Winslow 5-8 2-3 13, Olynyk 4-7 1-1 11, Adebayo
1-2 1-2 3, McGruder 2-4 0-0 5, Ellington 2-8 3-3 8, Wade
2-7 4-4 8. Totals 37-82 22-24 103.
Three-point Goals: Chicago 6-26 (Holiday 3-7, Nwaba
1-1, Vonleh 1-4, Payne 1-4, Lopez 0-1, Portis 0-3,
Valentine 0-3, Kilpatrick 0-3), Miami 7-27 (Olynyk 2-4,
McGruder 1-2, Dragic 1-3, Winslow 1-3, Richardson 1-4,
Ellington 1-7, J.Johnson 0-1, T.Johnson 0-3). Fouled Out:
None. Rebounds: Chicago 50 (Portis 16), Miami 44
(Winslow 9). Assists: Chicago 19 (Payne 5), Miami 20
(Dragic 5). Total Fouls: Chicago 19, Miami 23. Technicals:
Chicago coach Fred Hoiberg, Lopez 2. Ejected: Lopez. A:
19,746 (19,600).
Spurs 103, Thunder 99
27
35
MIN
FG
13
2-5
36
4-9
35 8-11
36 4-12
15
0-3
27
3-7
21
4-8
10
0-2
2
0-0
1
0-0
1
0-0
1
0-0
1
0-1
1
0-0
200 25-58
FT O-T A PF PTS
0-0 1-2 3 0
4
1-1 0-3 1 1 11
0-0 0-2 2 1 22
5-6 1-4 4 4 15
0-0 0-1 0 2
0
0-2 2-6 1 2
6
0-0 1-4 0 3
8
0-0 0-1 2 1
0
0-0 0-0 0 0
0
0-0 0-0 0 0
0
0-0 0-0 0 0
0
0-0 0-0 0 0
0
0-0 0-0 0 0
0
0-0 0-0 0 0
0
6-9 5-23 13 14 66
Percentages: FG .431, FT .667. 3-Point Goals: 10-24, .417
(Barefield 6-8, Rawson 2-5, Bibbins 2-6, Van Dyke 0-2,
Bealer 0-3). Team Rebounds: 4. Team Turnovers: 8 (8
PTS). Blocked Shots: 1 (Tillman). Turnovers: 8 (Bibbins
3, Tillman 2, Collette, Johnson, Rawson). Steals: 6
(Tillman 2, Barefield, Bealer, Bibbins, Rawson). Technical Fouls: None.
18 — 99
26 — 103
SAN ANTONIO: Anderson 4-4 1-2 10, Aldridge 9-19 6-8
25, Gasol 2-7 2-4 6, Murray 3-8 1-2 7, Mills 3-12 5-5 14,
Gay 4-9 0-0 9, Bertans 1-3 0-0 3, Parker 2-6 3-4 8, Ginobili
2-4 4-5 10, Green 4-9 0-0 11. Totals 34-81 22-30 103.
Three-point Goals: Oklahoma City 11-30 (Anthony 3-3,
George 3-6, Felton 2-4, Patterson 1-1, Brewer 1-4,
Ferguson 1-4, Grant 0-1, Abrines 0-3, Westbrook 0-4),
San Antonio 13-31 (Green 3-7, Mills 3-9, Ginobili 2-3,
Aldridge 1-1, Anderson 1-1, Parker 1-2, Gay 1-2, Bertans
1-3, Gasol 0-1, Murray 0-2). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Oklahoma City 43 (Adams 13), San Antonio 48
(Gasol 12). Assists: Oklahoma City 19 (George 6), San
Antonio 22 (Murray 7). Total Fouls: Oklahoma City 23,
San Antonio 18. A: 18,418 (18,418).
Lakers 103, Mavericks 93
Late Wednesday
25
27
12 — 93
21 — 103
DALLAS: Barnes 7-15 1-1 17, Nowitzki 4-7 2-2 13, Powell
3-5 0-0 6, Smith Jr. 5-13 0-2 14, Finney-Smith 2-5 2-2 7,
McDermott 2-6 0-0 4, Kleber 2-5 2-2 7, Motley 1-3 1-2 3,
Noel 2-3 1-2 5, Ferrell 4-12 3-4 12, Jones 1-2 0-0 3,
Collinsworth 0-3 2-2 2, Harrison 0-5 0-0 0. Totals 33-84
14-19 93.
L.A. LAKERS: Ingram 4-10 4-6 13, Randle 7-10 6-9 20,
Lopez 8-16 4-4 22, Ball 3-7 1-2 8, Caldwell-Pope 2-8 3-3 7,
Wear 2-3 0-0 5, Kuzma 7-14 1-4 18, Zubac 0-0 0-0 0,
Ennis 2-3 0-0 5, Caruso 1-6 3-4 5. Totals 36-77 22-32 103.
Three-point Goals: Dallas 13-44 (Smith Jr. 4-7, Nowitzki
3-5, Barnes 2-7, Jones 1-1, Ferrell 1-4, Kleber 1-4,
Finney-Smith 1-4, Motley 0-1, McDermott 0-2, Collinsworth 0-2, Powell 0-2, Harrison 0-5), L.A. Lakers 9-33
(Kuzma 3-10, Lopez 2-5, Ennis 1-2, Wear 1-2, Ingram 1-3,
Ball 1-3, Caldwell-Pope 0-4, Caruso 0-4). Fouled Out:
None. Rebounds: Dallas 40 (Nowitzki 7), L.A. Lakers 49
(Randle 10). Assists: Dallas 17 (Smith Jr. 8), L.A. Lakers
25 (Ball 5). Total Fouls: Dallas 22, L.A. Lakers 16. A:
18,997 (19,060).
TENNIS
ATP/WTA
MIAMI OPEN
At Tennis Center at Crandon Park
In Key Biscayne, Fla.
Purse: Men, $7.97 million (Masters 1000)
Women, $7.97 million (Premier)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
L.A. CLIPPERS .................... 27
PHOENIX ............................ 32
31
24
27
26
26 — 111
17 — 99
L.A. CLIPPERS: Johnson 0-1 0-0 0, Harris 10-16 2-2 27,
Jordan 5-8 3-6 13, Rivers 7-12 3-4 18, Wallace 5-13 2-2
12, Dekker 1-2 0-0 2, Harrell 4-4 2-4 10, Marjanovic 0-1
0-0 0, C.Williams 3-5 2-2 9, Thornwell 3-6 1-2 7,
L.Williams 5-12 2-3 13. Totals 43-80 17-25 111.
PHOENIX: Jackson 8-17 1-2 18, Bender 1-5 0-0 2, Chriss
4-11 4-4 12, Ulis 9-16 2-2 23, Daniels 5-11 1-2 15, House
0-0 0-0 0, Dudley 0-2 0-0 0, Peters 2-5 0-0 5, A.Williams
1-5 0-0 2, Payton 0-0 0-0 0, Harrison 6-12 5-6 17, Reed
2-4 0-2 5. Totals 38-88 13-18 99.
Three-point Goals: L.A. Clippers 8-17 (Harris 5-6, L.Williams 1-2, C.Williams 1-3, Rivers 1-3, Johnson 0-1,
Wallace 0-1, Thornwell 0-1), Phoenix 10-34 (Daniels 4-8,
Ulis 3-7, Reed 1-1, Peters 1-4, Jackson 1-4, Dudley 0-1,
Harrison 0-2, Bender 0-3, Chriss 0-4). Fouled Out: None.
Rebounds: L.A. Clippers 51 (Jordan 15), Phoenix 39
(Chriss 13). Assists: L.A. Clippers 26 (Rivers 8), Phoenix
17 (Jackson 5). Total Fouls: L.A. Clippers 17, Phoenix 20.
A: 17,005 (18,055).
Women’s NCAA tournament
FINAL FOUR
IN COLUMBUS, OHIO
NATIONAL SEMIFINALS
FRIDAY’S GAMES
Mississippi State (36-1) vs. Louisville (36-2), 7
U-Conn. (36-0) vs. Notre Dame (33-3), 9:30
NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP
SUNDAY’S GAME
Semifinal winners, 7
Women’s National
Invitation Tournament
QUARTERFINALS
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
Indiana 81, UC Davis 66
Virginia Tech 74, Alabama 67
West Virginia 76, St. John’s 62
TCU 79, South Dakota 71
SEMIFINALS
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
Indiana 71, TCU 58
Virginia Tech 64, West Virginia 61
CHAMPIONSHIP
SATURDAY’S GAME
Virginia Tech (23-13) at Indiana (22-14), 3
L
24
28
29
25
28
32
35
35
OL PTS. GF GA
7
99 243 225
6
94 257 241
5
93 227 212
14
92 234 232
9
89 232 232
11
79 215 244
9
75 223 248
10
74 246 279
ATLANTIC
y-Boston .......................
y-Tampa Bay .................
y-Toronto ......................
Florida ...........................
Detroit ..........................
Montreal .......................
Ottawa ..........................
Buffalo ..........................
W
48
51
46
39
29
28
27
24
L
17
22
24
29
38
37
39
41
OL PTS. GF GA
11 107 253 196
4 106 275 221
7
99 261 219
8
86 231 231
11
69 205 242
12
68 196 245
11
65 210 272
12
60 180 256
CENTRAL
y-Nashville ....................
y-Winnipeg ...................
Minnesota .....................
St. Louis ........................
Colorado ........................
Dallas ............................
Chicago .........................
W
50
47
43
43
41
39
32
L
16
20
24
28
28
31
36
OL PTS. GF GA
11 111 250 196
10 104 257 206
10
96 238 217
5
91 212 198
8
90 241 224
8
86 220 215
10
74 223 240
PACIFIC
y-Vegas .........................
San Jose ........................
x-Los Angeles ...............
Anaheim .......................
Calgary ..........................
x-Edmonton ..................
x-Vancouver ..................
x-Arizona ......................
W
48
44
42
39
35
34
28
27
L
22
24
28
25
33
37
40
39
OL PTS. GF GA
7 103 256 208
10
98 241 214
7
91 224 190
13
91 218 208
10
80 206 239
6
74 224 250
9
65 201 248
11
65 193 244
0 —
1 —
2
5
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Dallas, Benn 29 (Seguin), 2:51. 2, Minnesota,
Granlund 20 (Suter), 16:02 (sh).
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Minnesota, Dumba 12 (Zucker, Suter), 7:19
(pp). 4, Minnesota, Parise 11 (Dumba, Granlund), 8:18. 5,
Dallas, Shore 10 (Hamhuis, Methot), 9:42. 6, Minnesota,
Zucker 31 (Dumba, Staal), 19:49 (pp).
HIGH SCHOOLS
BASEBALL
MARYLAND
Arundel 8, La Plata 0
South River 6, La Plata 1
VIRGINIA
Battlefield 6, Riverside 4
PRIVATE
Riverdale Baptist 11, Potomac School 1
Wilson 2, St. Albans 1
SOFTBALL
MARYLAND
Glenelg 7, Hammond 1
VIRGINIA
James Madison 4, Kaneland High School 2
South Lakes 11, Riverside 3
BOYS' LACROSSE
MARYLAND
DeMatha 22, Southern 9
PRIVATE
Gonzaga 11, Boys' Latin 8
Riverdale Baptist 10, Grace Christian Academy 2
St. Stephen's/St. Agnes 17, Cape Henry Collegiate 8
Woodberry Forest 7, Potomac School 4
GIRLS' LACROSSE
MARYLAND
Mount Hebron 16, Reservoir 4
PRIVATE
St. Stephen's/St. Agnes 15, Alpharetta 3
St. Stephen's/St. Agnes 17, Episcopal (Pa.) 9
BOYS' TENNIS
PRIVATE
Potomac School 7, Norfolk Academy 2
NFL
Detroit Lions: Signed C Wesley Johnson and TE Levine
Toilolo.
Minnesota Vikings: Signed LB Reshard Cliett and CB
Marcus Sherels.
Oakland Raiders: Signed CB Leon Hall.
Washington Redskins: Acquired 2018 fourth- (No. 109),
fifth- (No. 142 and 163), and conditional 2020 draft picks
from Denver for S Su’a Cravens and 2018 fourth- (No.
113) and fifth-round (No. 149) draft picks. Waived RB
LeShun Daniels.
WESTERN
W
Sporting KC ......................2
Vancouver ........................2
Los Angeles FC ................2
Minnesota United ............2
Dallas ...............................1
Houston ...........................1
LA Galaxy .........................1
Real Salt Lake ..................1
San Jose ...........................1
Colorado ...........................0
Portland ...........................0
Seattle .............................0
L
1
1
0
2
0
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
T PTS
1
7
1
7
0
6
0
6
2
5
1
4
1
4
1
4
0
3
1
1
1
1
0
0
GF
9
5
6
6
5
7
3
3
5
3
2
0
GA
9
6
1
8
2
4
3
6
5
4
7
4
GF
1
2
1
1
1
1
0
0
1
GA
0
1
1
1
1
1
0
1
2
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 7, Minnesota, Parise 12 (Dumba, Granlund), 19:42.
SHOTS ON GOAL
DALLAS .................................... 7
11
13 — 31
MINNESOTA ............................ 7
11
4 — 22
Power-play opportunities: Dallas 0 of 4; Minnesota 2 of
3. Goalies: Dallas, Lehtonen 13-14-3 (21 shots-17
saves). Minnesota, Dubnyk 33-14-7 (31-29). A: 19,350
(18,064). T: 2:48.
Blackhawks 6, Jets 2
WINNIPEG ............................... 0
CHICAGO .................................. 2
2
3
0 —
1 —
2
6
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Chicago, Kane 27, 3:44. 2, Chicago, Saad 18
(Schmaltz, Kane), 17:17.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Chicago, Jurco 5 (Anisimov), 4:26. 4, Chicago,
Jurco 6 (Murphy, Gustafsson), 11:13. 5, Winnipeg, Little
16 (Byfuglien, Morrow), 14:24. 6, Chicago, Gustafsson 4
(DeBrincat, Sikura), 17:27. 7, Winnipeg, Scheifele 23
(Connor), 18:51.
THIRD PERIOD
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
at Columbus 3, D.C. United 1
New York City FC 2, at New England 2
Portland 1, at Dallas 1
at New York 3, Minnesota United 0
Sporting KC 2, at Colorado 2
LA Galaxy 0, at Vancouver 0
FRIDAY’S MATCH
Real Salt Lake at Toronto FC, 8
SATURDAY’S MATCHES
SHOTS ON GOAL
WINNIPEG ............................. 14
9
11 — 34
CHICAGO ................................ 14
15
13 — 42
Power-play opportunities: Winnipeg 0 of 1; Chicago 0 of
2. Goalies: Winnipeg, Comrie 1-2-0 (42 shots-36 saves).
Chicago, Delia 1-0-0 (27-25), Foster 0-0-0 (7-7). A:
21,839 (19,717). T: 2:24.
Blue Jackets 5, Flames 1
NWSL
THURSDAY’S RESULTS
Detroit 6, at Buffalo 3
Pittsburgh 4, at New Jersey 3
at Boston 4, Tampa Bay 2
at Ottawa 3, Florida 2 (OT)
at Minnesota 5, Dallas 2
at Nashville 5, San Jose 3
at Chicago 6, Winnipeg 2
Columbus 5, at Calgary 1
Edmonton at Vancouver, Late
Arizona at Los Angeles, Late
COLUMBUS .............................. 2
CALGARY ................................. 0
1
0
2 —
1 —
5
1
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Columbus, Hannikainen 3 (Letestu, Calvert),
2:09. 2, Columbus, Dubois 16 (Atkinson, Panarin), 12:23.
SECOND PERIOD
FRIDAY’S GAMES
Scoring: 3, Columbus, Dubois 17 (Panarin, Atkinson), 3:55.
Carolina at Washington, 7
Toronto at N.Y. Islanders, 7
Tampa Bay at N.Y. Rangers, 7
Chicago at Colorado, 9
Los Angeles at Anaheim, 10
St. Louis at Vegas, 10:30
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Columbus, Nutivaara 7 (Murray, Vanek),
10:58. 5, Columbus, Dubois 18 (Milano, Bjorkstrand),
15:23 (pp). 6, Calgary, Stewart 10 (Lazar, Giordano),
19:38.
SHOTS ON GOAL
SATURDAY’S GAMES
COLUMBUS ............................ 13
5
10 — 28
CALGARY ............................... 14
13
11 — 38
Power-play opportunities: Columbus 1 of 3; Calgary 0 of 2.
Goalies: Columbus, Bobrovsky 36-22-5 (38 shots-37 saves).
Calgary, Gillies 2-3-1 (28-23). A: 18,967 (19,289). T: 2:26.
Florida at Boston, 1
Ottawa at Detroit, 2
Columbus at Vancouver, 4
N.Y. Islanders at New Jersey, 7
N.Y. Rangers at Carolina, 7
Montreal at Pittsburgh, 7
Winnipeg at Toronto, 7
Minnesota at Dallas, 8
Buffalo at Nashville, 8
St. Louis at Arizona, 9
Edmonton at Calgary, 10
San Jose at Vegas, 10:30
PHILADELPHIA ........................ 2
COLORADO .............................. 0
DETROIT .................................. 1
BUFFALO ................................. 2
2
0
3 —
1 —
6
3
FIRST PERIOD
0
1
0 —
0 —
2
1
SECOND PERIOD
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
at Seattle 2, Washington 1
at North Carolina 1, Portland 0
Utah 1, at Orlando 1
SUNDAY’S RESULT
Chicago 1, at Houston 1
FRIDAY’S MATCH
Utah at Houston, 8
SECOND PERIOD
Feb. 11: x-Advance Auto Parts Clash (Brad Keselowski)
Feb. 15: x-Can-Am Duel 1 (Ryan Blaney)
Feb. 15: x-Can-Am Duel 2 (Chase Elliott)
Feb. 18: Daytona 500 (Austin Dillon)
Feb. 25: Folds of Honor QuikTrip 500 (Kevin Harvick)
March 4: Penzoil 400 (Kevin Harvick)
March 11: TicketGuardian 500 (Kevin Harvick)
March 18: Auto Club 400 (Martin Truex Jr.)
March 25: STP 500 (Clint Bowyer)
April 8: O’Reilly Auto Parts 500, Fort Worth
April 15: Food City 500, Bristol, Tenn.
April 21: Toyota Owners 400, Richmond
April 29: Geico 500, Lincoln, Ala.
May 6: AAA 400 Drive for Autism, Dover, Del.
May 12: TBA, Kansas City, Kan.
May 19: x-NASCAR All-Star Open, Concord, N.C.
May 19: x-NASCAR All-Star Race, Concord, N.C.
May 27: Coca-Cola 600, Concord, N.C.
June 3: Pocono 400, Lond Pond, Pa.
June 10: FireKeepers Casino 400, Brooklyn, Mich.
June 24: Toyota/Save Mart 350, Sonoma, Calif.
July 1: Overton’s 400, Joliet, Ill.
July 7: Coke Zero 400, Daytona Beach, Fla.
July 14: Quaker State 400, Sparta, Ky.
July 22: New Hampshire 301, Loudon
July 29: Gander Outdoors 400, Long Pond, Pa.
Aug. 5: GoBowling at The Glen, Watkins Glen, N.Y.
Aug. 12: TBA, Brooklyn, Mich.
Aug. 18: Bass Pro Shops NRA Night Race, Bristol, Tenn.
Sept. 2: Bojangles’ Southern 500, Darlington, S.C.
Sept. 9: Big Machine Brickyard 400, Indianapolis
Sept. 16: South Point 400, Las Vegas
Sept. 22: Federated Auto Parts 400, Richmond
Sept. 30: Bank of America 500, Concord, N.C.
Oct. 7: TBA, Dover, Del.
Oct. 14: Alabama 500, Lincoln, Ala.
Oct. 21: Hollywood Casino 400, Kansas City, Kan.
Oct. 28: First Data 500, Martinsville, Va.
Nov. 4: AAA Texas 500, Fort Worth
Nov. 11: Can-Am 500, Avondale, Ariz.
Nov. 18: Ford Ecoboost 400, Homestead, Fla.
x-Non-points race
SHOTS ON GOAL
PHILADELPHIA ...................... 11
13
9 — 33
COLORADO .............................. 9
7
12 — 28
Power-play opportunities: Philadelphia 0 of 2; Colorado 0
of 3. Goalies: Philadelphia, Neuvirth 9-7-3 (11 shots-10
saves), Mrazek 13-12-6 (17-17). Colorado, Hammond
0-1-0 (33-31). A: 16,320 (18,007). T: 2:17.
Coyotes 3, Golden Knights 2
SHOTS ON GOAL
ARIZONA ................................. 2
VEGAS ..................................... 1
DETROIT ................................ 12
8
12 — 32
BUFFALO ............................... 11
13
8 — 32
Power-play opportunities: Detroit 0 of 5; Buffalo 1 of 4.
Goalies: Detroit, Howard 21-27-8 (32 shots-29 saves).
Buffalo, Johnson 9-13-3 (12-9), Lehner 14-26-9 (20-17).
A: 18,493 (19,070). T: 2:33.
1
1
1
1
Late Wednesday
1
1
0 —
0 —
3
2
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Arizona, Connauton 8 (Dvorak, Ekman-Larsson), 6:22. 2, Vegas, Haula 29 (Neal), 11:23 (pp). 3,
Arizona, Panik 12 (Keller), 17:09.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Vegas, Tuch 15 (Karlsson, Marchessault),
14:44 (pp). 5, Arizona, Connauton 9, 15:43.
Penguins 4, Devils 3 (OT)
1 — 4
0 — 3
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, New Jersey, Palmieri 24 (Hischier), 12:19. 2,
Pittsburgh, Sheary 16 (Hornqvist, Oleksiak), 12:44.
SHOTS ON GOAL
ARIZONA ............................... 15
13
4 — 32
VEGAS ..................................... 5
11
13 — 29
Power-play opportunities: Arizona 0 of 3; Vegas 2 of 5.
Goalies: Arizona, Raanta 19-16-6 (29 shots-27 saves).
Vegas, Fleury 28-12-4 (32-29). A: 18,121 (17,367). T: 2:28.
SECOND PERIOD
GO L F
Scoring: 3, Pittsburgh, Letang 8 (Hagelin, Dumoulin),
6:59. 4, New Jersey, Hall 34 (Butcher), 14:41 (pp).
THIRD PERIOD
PGA Tour
Scoring: 5, New Jersey, Coleman 12 (Zajac), 5:11. 6,
Pittsburgh, Hornqvist 25 (Dumoulin, Sheahan), 11:26.
HOUSTON OPEN
OVERTIME
Scoring: 7, Pittsburgh, Crosby 28 (Letang), 0:19.
PITTSBURGH ................... 12
8
14
1 — 35
NEW JERSEY ................... 12
9
10 — 31
Power-play opportunities: Pittsburgh 0 of 2; New Jersey
1 of 3. Goalies: Pittsburgh, Murray 25-15-3 (31 shots-28
saves). New Jersey, Kinkaid 22-10-2 (35-31). A: 16,514
(16,514). T: 2:35.
Bruins 4, Lightning 2
TAMPA BAY ............................ 0
BOSTON ................................... 2
1
0
1 —
2 —
2
4
Scoring: 1, Boston, Schaller 12 (Wingels), 19:02. 2,
Boston, Pastrnak 32 (Bergeron, Krug), 19:34 (pp).
Scoring: 3, Tampa Bay, J.Miller 21 (Hedman, Kucherov),
1:44 (pp).
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Boston, Bergeron 28 (Marchand, Krug), 11:59.
5, Tampa Bay, Hedman 15 (Girardi, Gourde), 13:54. 6,
Boston, Marchand 34 (Pastrnak, Bergeron), 19:04.
SHOTS ON GOAL
TAMPA BAY ............................ 6
11
11 — 28
BOSTON ................................. 17
3
10 — 30
Power-play opportunities: Tampa Bay 1 of 4; Boston 1 of
2. Goalies: Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 42-16-3 (29 shots-26
saves). Boston, Rask 33-11-5 (28-26). A: 17,565
(17,565). T: 3:10.
Senators 3, Panthers 2 (OT)
2
1
0
1
0 — 2
1 — 3
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Ottawa, Pageau 13 (Pyatt, Hoffman), 1:24. 2,
Florida, Ekblad 16 (McGinn, Yandle), 5:19 (pp). 3, Florida,
Dadonov 26 (Weegar, Petrovic), 6:50.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Ottawa, Paajarvi 8 (Karlsson, Smith), 0:16.
Scoring: 5, Ottawa, Pageau 14, 4:44.
SHOTS ON GOAL
FLORIDA ............................ 8
6
10
2 — 26
OTTAWA .......................... 10
12
5
3 — 30
Power-play opportunities: Florida 1 of 2; Ottawa 0 of 1.
Goalies: Florida, Reimer 20-13-6 (30 shots-27 saves).
Ottawa, Anderson 22-23-6 (26-24).
Predators 5, Sharks 3
1 —
2 —
Lucas Glover ......................................
Kevin Tway ........................................
Rickie Fowler .....................................
Rod Pampling .....................................
Julian Suri ..........................................
Ryan Armour .....................................
Bud Cauley .........................................
Keith Mitchell ....................................
Matt Every .........................................
Greg Chalmers ...................................
Padraig Harrington ............................
Michael Thompson ............................
Brett Stegmaier ................................
Seamus Power ...................................
Jason Kokrak .....................................
Shawn Stefani ...................................
Steve Stricker ....................................
Grayson Murray .................................
Brandt Snedeker ................................
Harold Varner III ................................
Scott Piercy .......................................
Tom Hoge ...........................................
Martin Piller ......................................
Jordan Spieth ....................................
Henrik Stenson ..................................
Bill Haas .............................................
Keegan Bradley ..................................
Joel Dahmen ......................................
Abraham Ancer ..................................
Denny McCarthy ................................
Nicholas Lindheim .............................
Danny Lee ..........................................
J.J. Henry ...........................................
Kevin Streelman ................................
Matt Kuchar .......................................
Fabian Gomez ....................................
Phil Mickelson ...................................
Justin Rose ........................................
Shane Lowry ......................................
Luke List ............................................
33 32
32 33
33 33
32 34
33 33
34 32
33 34
33 34
34 33
34 33
34 33
33 34
34 33
31 36
33 34
35 32
35 32
33 34
33 34
34 34
33 35
34 34
34 34
34 34
33 35
34 34
35 33
36 32
33 35
34 34
35 33
32 36
34 34
33 35
36 32
34 34
30 38
34 34
33 35
36 32
65
65
66
66
66
66
67
67
67
67
67
67
67
67
67
67
67
67
67
68
68
68
68
68
68
68
68
68
68
68
68
68
68
68
68
68
68
68
68
68
-7
-7
-6
-6
-6
-6
-5
-5
-5
-5
-5
-5
-5
-5
-5
-5
-5
-5
-5
-4
-4
-4
-4
-4
-4
-4
-4
-4
-4
-4
-4
-4
-4
-4
-4
-4
-4
-4
-4
-4
LPGA Tour
INSPIRATION
At Mission Hills CC (Dinah Shore Tournament Course)
In Rancho Mirage, Calif.
Purse: $2.8 million; Yardage: 6,763; Par: 72
3
5
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Nashville, Turris 15 (Subban, Smith), 5:26. 2,
San Jose, Couture 32 (Burns, Boedker), 6:55. 3, Nashville, Arvidsson 29 (Forsberg, Johansen), 10:14. 4, San
Jose, Dillon 5 (Hansen), 12:05.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 5, Nashville, Smith 22 (Ellis, Fiala), 10:38.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 6, San Jose, Boedker 15 (Tierney, Meier), 5:54.
7, Nashville, Ellis 9 (Arvidsson, Forsberg), 10:06. 8,
Nashville, Bonino 11 (Forsberg), 19:43.
SHOTS ON GOAL
SAN JOSE ................................ 9
9
24 — 42
NASHVILLE ............................ 14
11
7 — 32
Power-play opportunities: San Jose 0 of 6; Nashville 0 of
5. Goalies: San Jose, Jones 29-18-6 (31 shots-27 saves).
Nashville, Saros 8-5-7 (42-39). T: 2:41.
Pernilla Lindberg ................................ 32 33
Beatriz Recari .................................... 33 33
Ayako Uehara ..................................... 31 35
a-Albane Valenzuela .......................... 34 33
Jessica Korda ..................................... 31 36
Ha Na Jang ......................................... 35 32
Lexi Thompson ................................... 35 33
In Gee Chun ........................................ 35 33
Chella Choi ......................................... 33 35
Sung Hyun Park .................................. 34 34
Cristie Kerr ......................................... 33 35
Brittany Altomare ............................. 32 36
Charley Hull ........................................ 32 37
Emma Talley ...................................... 34 35
Amy Olson .......................................... 35 34
Hee Young Park .................................. 34 35
Kris Tamulis ....................................... 34 35
Sun Young Yoo ................................... 35 34
Jennifer Song ..................................... 35 34
Paula Creamer .................................... 35 35
Inbee Park .......................................... 35 35
Jodi Ewart Shadoff ............................ 35 35
Moriya Jutanugarn ............................ 35 35
Kim Kaufman ..................................... 36 34
Hannah Green .................................... 37 33
Nasa Hataoka ..................................... 34 36
Angel Yin ............................................ 37 33
Lindy Duncan ...................................... 36 34
Bronte Law ......................................... 35 35
a-Lucy Li ............................................. 36 34
Lydia Ko .............................................. 33 37
Brooke M. Henderson ........................ 33 37
Sei Young Kim .................................... 35 35
Pornanong Phatlum ........................... 36 34
Madelene Sagstrom ........................... 35 35
SCHEDULE/RESULTS
NASCAR Cup
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
FIRST ROUND
OVERTIME
0
1
At Golf Club of Houston; In Humble, Tex.
Purse: $7 million;
Yardage: 7,441; Par: 72
PARTIAL FIRST ROUND
SHOTS ON GOAL
AU TO R AC I NG
NASCAR Cup
Scoring: 6, Detroit, Athanasiou 15 (Kronwall, Abdelkader), 1:50. 7, Buffalo, Rodrigues 7 (Mittelstadt), 4:51. 8,
Detroit, DeKeyser 6 (Zetterberg, Nyquist), 10:10. 9,
Detroit, Svechnikov 2 (Larkin, Mantha), 16:59.
SAN JOSE ................................ 2
NASHVILLE .............................. 2
T PTS
0
3
0
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
Scoring: 1, Philadelphia, Giroux 27 (Gostisbehere, Provorov), 10:24. 2, Philadelphia, Provorov 15 (Weal, MacDonald), 18:12.
Scoring: 3, Colorado, Nieto 14 (Johnson, Toninato), 5:36.
Scoring: 1, Buffalo, Eichel 25 (Guhle, Pominville), 3:16. 2,
Buffalo, O’Reilly 21 (Ristolainen, Reinhart), 7:11 (pp). 3,
Detroit, Larkin 13 (Svechnikov), 7:41.
FLORIDA ............................ 0
OTTAWA ............................ 0
L
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
Orlando at Washington, 3:30
Sky Blue FC at North Carolina, 3:30
Portland at Chicago, 8:15
Late Wednesday
Red Wings 6, Sabres 3
PITTSBURGH ..................... 1
NEW JERSEY ..................... 1
W
North Carolina .................1
Seattle .............................1
Chicago ............................0
Houston ...........................0
Orlando ............................0
Utah .................................0
Sky Blue FC ......................0
Portland ...........................0
Washington .....................0
SATURDAY’S MATCHES
Flyers 2, Avalanche 1
SECOND PERIOD
Baltimore Orioles: Placed OF Mark Trumbo and RHP
Gabriel Ynoa on the 10-day DL, retroactive to March 26.
Selected the contracts of INF Pedro Alvarez, OFs Craig
Gentry and Colby Rasmus, and INF Danny Valencia from
Norfolk (IL). Optioned RHP Alex Cobb to Bowie (EL).
Designated RHPs Alec Asher, Stefan Crichton, Michael
Kelly and Jesus Liranzo for assignment.
Boston Red Sox: Selected the contracts of LHP Bobby
Poyner and RHP Marcus Walden. Placed INF Marco
Hernandez on the 60-day DL and RHPs Austin Maddox
and Tyler Thornburg and 2B Dustin Pedroia on the 10-day
DL.
Cleveland Indians: Placed OF Michael Brantley, LHP
Ryan Merritt, RHP Danny Salazar and INF Gio Urshela on
the 10-day DL, retroactive to March 26. Selected the
contracts of RHP Matt Belisle and OF Rajai Davis from
Columbus (IL). Designated OF Abraham Almonte and
RHP Ben Taylor for assignment. Reassigned LHP Jeff
Beliveau, INF Drew Maggi, RHP Evan Marshall, C Jack
Murphy and 1B Mike Napoli to minor league camp.
New York Yankees: Placed 1B Greg Bird and OF Jacoby
Ellsbury on the 10-day DL and OF Clint Frazier on the
seven-day concussion DL, retroactive to March 26.
Recalled INF/OF Tyler Austin from Scranton/WilkesBarre (IL).
Toronto Blue Jays: Selected the contracts of RHPs John
Axford and Tyler Clippard. Placed SS Troy Tulowitzki on
the 60-day DL. Placed OFs Dalton Pompey and Anthony
Alford on the 10-day DL. Designated LHP Sam Moll for
assignment. Optioned LHP Tim Mayza, RF Teoscar
Hernandez and RHP Joe Biagini to Buffalo (IL).
Atlanta Braves: Placed INF Johan Camargo, RHP Chase
Whitley and LHPs Luiz Gohara and Jacob Lindgren on the
10-day DL, retroactive to March 26. Optioned 3B Rio Ruiz
to Gwinnett (IL). Reassigned SS Sean Kazmar, OFs
Ezequiel Carrera and Danny Santana and RHP Anibal
Sanchez to minor league camp.
Cincinnati Reds: Placed RHP Anthony DeSclafani on the
60-day DL and LHP Brandon Finnegan and RHPs David
Hernandez, Michael Lorenzen and Kevin Shackelford on
the 10-day DL. Placed RHP Raisel Iglesias on the
three-day paternity list. Recalled LHP Cody Reed and
RHP Jackson Stephens from Louisville (IL). Selected the
contract of INF/OF Cliff Pennington.
Miami Marlins: Placed RHP Brett Graves to 60-day DL.
Designated C Austin Nola for assignment. Select contracts of RHP Jacob Turner, INF Yadiel Rivera and C
Bryan Holaday New Orleans (PCL). Recalled LHP Jarlin
Garcia from Jacksonville (SL) and LHP Dillon Peters and
OF Braxton Lee from New Orleans.
Pittsburgh Pirates: Placed RHP A.J. Schugel on the
10-day DL, retroactive to March 26.
GA
3
3
1
6
0
5
5
9
5
6
3
at Washington 3, N.Y. Rangers 2 (OT)
at Toronto 4, Florida 3
Philadelphia 2, at Colorado 1
Arizona 3, at Vegas 2
FIRST PERIOD
TRANSACTIONS
GF
8
8
7
7
2
4
4
5
2
4
0
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
THIRD PERIOD
Karen Khachanov and Andrey Rublev, Russia, def. Steve
Johnson and Sam Querrey, United States, 6-3, 6-1; Bob
and Mike Bryan (4), United States, def. Ben Mclachlan,
Japan, and Jan-Lennard Struff, Germany, 7-5, 6-4.
T PTS
1
10
1
10
0
6
0
6
1
4
1
4
0
3
2
2
1
1
0
0
0
0
D.C. United at Sporting KC, 8:30
New York at Orlando City, 1
Los Angeles FC at LA Galaxy, 3
Vancouver at Columbus, 3
Portland at Chicago, 6
Atlanta United FC at Minnesota United, 8
New York City FC at San Jose, 8
New England at Houston, 8:30
Philadelphia at Colorado, 9
Montreal at Seattle, 10
Scoring: 4, Detroit, Helm 11 (Nielsen), 5:21 (sh). 5,
Detroit, Mantha 24 (Nielsen, Hicketts), 16:26.
MEN’S DOUBLES — SEMIFINALS
L
0
0
1
1
0
1
2
2
2
2
2
Scoring: 8, Chicago, DeBrincat 27 (Ejdsell, Sikura), 2:11.
Pablo Carreno Busta (16), Spain, def. Kevin Anderson
(6), South Africa, 6-4, 5-7, 7-6 (8-6); Alexander Zverev
(4), Germany, def. Borna Coric (29), Croatia, 6-4, 6-4.
Sloane Stephens (13), United States, def. Victoria
Azarenka, Belarus, 3-6, 6-2, 6-1; Jelena Ostapenko (6),
Latvia, def. Danielle Collins, United States, 7-6 (7-1),
6-3.
EASTERN
W
Columbus .........................3
New York City FC .............3
New York .........................2
Atlanta United FC ............2
Philadelphia .....................1
New England ....................1
Montreal ..........................1
D.C. United .......................0
Orlando City .....................0
Chicago ............................0
Toronto FC .......................0
x-Late game: y-Clinched playoff spot
MEN’S SINGLES — QUARTERFINALS
MLB
Clippers 111, Suns 99
Late Wednesday
W
46
44
44
39
40
34
33
32
MLS
1
3
FIRST PERIOD
WOMEN’S SINGLES — SEMIFINALS
25
18
OKLAHOMA CITY: George 9-20 5-5 26, Anthony 3-6 0-0
9, Adams 5-11 0-2 10, Westbrook 7-19 5-8 19, Brewer 5-8
3-4 14, Grant 0-3 0-0 0, Patterson 3-3 0-0 7, Felton 4-8
0-0 10, Ferguson 1-4 0-0 3, Abrines 0-3 1-2 1. Totals
37-85 14-21 99.
22
23
UTAH
Collette
Rawson
Barefield
Bibbins
Bealer
Tillman
Johnson
Van Dyke
Seeley
Caldwell
Popoola
Rydalch
Jokl
Connor
TOTALS
METROPOLITAN
y-Washington ...............
Pittsburgh .....................
Columbus ......................
Philadelphia ..................
New Jersey ...................
Carolina .........................
N.Y. Rangers .................
N.Y. Islanders ...............
WESTERN CONFERENCE
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21
Percentages: FG .552, FT .818. 3-Point Goals: 9-22, .409
(Stevens 4-5, Garner 2-6, Carr 2-7, Reaves 1-3, Wheeler
0-1). Team Rebounds: 1. Team Turnovers: 10 (9 PTS).
Blocked Shots: 4 (Stevens 2, Garner, Reaves). Turnovers: 10 (Stevens 4, Reaves 3, Carr, Garner, Moore).
Steals: 4 (Carr 2, Garner, Reaves). Technical Fouls: None.
Chicago at Orlando, 7
Philadelphia at Atlanta, 7:30
Denver at Oklahoma City, 8
New Orleans at Cleveland, 8
Phoenix at Houston, 8
Minnesota at Dallas, 8:30
Memphis at Utah, 9
L.A. Clippers at Portland, 10:30
Milwaukee at L.A. Lakers, 10:30
DALLAS .............................. 34
L.A. LAKERS ....................... 32
Wild 5, Stars 2
EASTERN CONFERENCE
PENN ST.
Harrar
Stevens
Carr
Garner
Reaves
Moore
Wheeler
Buttrick
Zemgulis
TOTALS
FRIDAY’S GAMES
OKLAHOMA CITY ............... 29
SAN ANTONIO ................... 24
NHL
FINAL FOUR
IN SAN ANTONIO
NATIONAL SEMIFINALS
SATURDAY’S GAMES
Penn St. .............................. 21
Utah .................................... 20
at Detroit 103, Washington 92
at Miami 103, Chicago 92
at San Antonio 103, Oklahoma City 99
Indiana at Sacramento, Late
Milwaukee at Golden State, Late
S OC C E R
Men’s NCAA tournament
Penn State 82, Utah 66
THURSDAY’S RESULTS
CHICAGO ............................ 21
MIAMI ................................ 29
HOCKEY
Penn State 82, at Utah 66
— Des Bieler
SPURS
D7
M2
— 65 -7
— 66 -6
— 66 -6
— 67 -5
— 67 -5
— 67 -5
— 68 -4
— 68 -4
— 68 -4
— 68 -4
— 68 -4
— 68 -4
— 69 -3
— 69 -3
— 69 -3
— 69 -3
— 69 -3
— 69 -3
— 69 -3
— 70 -2
— 70 -2
— 70 -2
— 70 -2
— 70 -2
— 70 -2
— 70 -2
— 70 -2
— 70 -2
— 70 -2
— 70 -2
— 70 -2
— 70 -2
— 70 -2
— 70 -2
— 70 -2
a-Amateur
POINTS LEADERS
Through Monday
1. Kyle Busch .......................................................... 257
2. Martin Truex Jr. .................................................. 249
3. Ryan Blaney ........................................................ 233
4. Joey Logano ........................................................ 232
5. Brad Keselowski ................................................. 226
6. Denny Hamlin ..................................................... 217
7. Kevin Harvick ...................................................... 212
8. Clint Bowyer ....................................................... 210
9. Kyle Larson ......................................................... 195
10. Kurt Busch .......................................................... 177
11. Aric Almirola ....................................................... 171
12. Erik Jones ........................................................... 152
13. Austin Dillon ....................................................... 148
14. Alex Bowman ...................................................... 145
15. Paul Menard ........................................................ 139
16. Ryan Newman ..................................................... 135
17. Jimmie Johnson .................................................. 121
18. Chase Elliott ....................................................... 115
19. AJ Allmendinger ................................................. 110
20. William Byron ..................................................... 108
NASCAR Xfinity Series
SCHEDULE/RESULTS
Feb. 17: Powershares QQQ 300 (Tyler Reddick)
Feb. 24: Rinnai 500 (Kevin Harvick)
March 3: Boyd Gaming 300 (Kyle Larson)
March 10: DC Solar 200 (Brad Keselowski)
March 17: Roseanne 300 (Joey Logano)
April 7: My Bariatric Solutions 300, Fort Worth, Texas.
April 14: Fitzgerald Glider Kits 300, Bristol, Tenn.
April 20: ToyotaCare 250, Richmond, Va.
April 28: Sparks Energy 300, Lincoln, Ala.
May 5: OneMain Financial 200, Dover, Del.
May 26: Hisense 4K TV 300, Concord, N.C.
June 2: Pocono Green 250, Long Pond, Pa.
June 9: LTi Printing 250, Brooklyn, Mich.
June 17: American Ethanol 250, Newton, Iowa.
June 30: Overton’s 300, Joliet, Ill.
July 6: Coca-Cola Firecracker 250, Daytona Beach, Fla.
July 13: Alsco 300, Sparta, Ky.
July 21: Lakes Region 200, Loudon, N.H.
July 28: U.S. Cellular 250, Newton, Iowa.
Aug. 4: Zippo 200, Watkins Glen, N.Y.
Aug. 11: Mid-Ohio Challenge, Lexington, Ohio.
Aug. 17: Food City 300, Bristol, Tenn.
Aug. 25: Johnsonville 180, Elkhart Lake, Wis.
Sept. 1: Sport Clips Haircuts VFW 200, Darlington, S.C.
Sept. 8: Lilly Diabetes 250, Indianapolis.
Sept. 15: DC Solar 300, Las Vegas.
Sept. 21: Go Bowling 250, Richmond, Va.
Sept. 29: Drive for the Cure 300, Concord, N.C.
Oct. 6: TBA, Dover, Del.
Oct. 20: Kansas Lottery 300, Kansas City, Kan.
Nov. 3: O’Reilly Auto Parts 300, Fort Worth, Texas.
Nov. 10: TBA, Avondale, Ala.
Nov. 17: Ford EcoBoost 300, Homestead, Fla.
NASCAR Xfinity Series
POINTS LEADERS
Through March 17
1. Elliott Sadler ....................................................... 199
2. Tyler Reddick ...................................................... 195
3. Justin Allgaier .................................................... 194
4. Christopher Bell .................................................. 172
5. Daniel Hemric ..................................................... 169
6. Cole Custer .......................................................... 144
7. Spencer Gallagher .............................................. 143
8. Ryan Truex .......................................................... 140
9. Brandon Jones .................................................... 139
10. Matt Tifft ............................................................ 132
11. Ryan Reed ........................................................... 127
12. Kaz Grala ............................................................. 119
13. Ross Chastain ..................................................... 115
14. Michael Annett ..................................................... 86
15. Jeremy Clements .................................................. 85
16. Alex Labbe ............................................................ 85
17. Garrett Smithley .................................................. 81
18. Austin Cindric ....................................................... 72
19. Ryan Sieg .............................................................. 68
20. Joey Gase .............................................................. 66
EFGHI
washingtonpost.com/classifieds
homes for sale,
commercial real estate
rentals
merchandise, garage
sales, auctions, tickets
dogs, cats, birds, fish
washingtonpost.com/jobs
cars.com
washingtonpost.com/
realestate
apartments.com
washingtonpost.com/
merchandise
washingtonpost.com/pets
610
Antiques
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!—1 I
drive to you, pay CASH, and haul
them away. Call 571-830-5871
Appliances
Kirby Sentria G10 Vacuum Cleaner &
Shampooer—$249 Like New-Cost
$1800 . 571-606-0319
225
Collectibles
AURORA SLOT CARS Wanted—$100
& up, cars/sets. +Atlas, AFX, Tyco,
Cox, Monogram 703-960-3594
To place an ad, go to washingtonpostads.com
GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS AKC.
$685. Vet checked and shots.
Great watch & family dogs.
Ready April 8. Call 301-481-4943
German Shepherd Puppies - AKC,
$695. Schz III Lns. Exceptional
quality, vet checked, 1st shots. Email
dross@swva.net or 540-789-4000
U.S. stamps—$10.00 Stamps # 1295,
1305c & 1341 unused $10, Fairfax,
VA, 703-378-7425
Electronics
Therapy Lamp—$29 NatureBright
Light and Ion Therapy Lamp $29,
Alexandria, VA, 571-431-1501
255
Goldendoodle—F1B's available 3/9,
adorable, loving, submissive, docile,
low allergen, these black doodles
are impressive, bred from Teddybear
Goldendoodle F1 "Bella" bred from
AKC English Cream Golden Retriever
"Maggie Majestic Lady", Champion
lines. Sire is AKC Phantom Poodle.
$1200, M/F, 443-871-1028
Heavy Equipment,
Machinery & Tools
Ladder—$75, Germantown, MD, 301972-1919 20" Werner lad, Type III,
h/hold duty rate, 200lbs
GOLDEN RET AKC & GOLDEN /
LAB RET CROSS PUPS & ADULTS
8 weeks - 5 yrs. Vet checked, parents
on prem, health guar. 301-605-0543
W www.VictoriasPups.com W
ITALIAN CANE CORSO PUPPIES
2 male, 3 female, tails docked,
shot records, $1200.
Call 202-957-7458
RYOBI TOOLS—$110, Germantown,
MD,
301-972-1919
2 1/2" drills, recip saw, 5 1/2" circ
260
Furniture
Brass Halogen Pole Lamp—$50 300
Watt, 72" H, Frosted Dome Germantown, 301-208-6791
Danish Cherry Bedside Stand—50
24"W,15 D,24"H. 2 Shelves & Drawer. Germantown 301-208-6791
LAB PUPS- AKC, OFA, top champ
lines, S/W, written warr, yellow,
parents on site. Ready 4/6. $850.
301-246-9116
or
301-751-6846
LABRADOR RETRIEVER PUPPIESAKC. Black, yellow & chocolate.
Vet checked, 1st shots, wormed.
$800 cash only. Call 540-705-6275
SOFA—$200, Washington, D.C., DC,
503-803-4548
265
Home & Garden
Solid
Hardwood
Brazilian
Cherry Flooring - 3600 S.F.,
$2.50 per SF. 301-860-1190
Valet Storage—closetbox.com
We pick up. We store. We deliver. 877-620-8420
275
Merchandise Wanted
ELECTRONIC CLEANOUTS—1 RADIO
TUBES HI-FI AMPS PARTS MCINTOSH MOST CASH 410-740-5222
GOVT SURPLUS TUBES—1
JOINT
ARMY NAVY JAN PREMIUM PAID
CASH 410-740-5222 50's 60's 70's
Labrador Retriever puppies AKCNine weeks old Health Guarantee
Vet checked ALL SHOTS
(540) 879-9911
Labrador Retrievers — Papers, shot
records, ready 3/24/18 for Easter. 6
boys: black, yellow 3 girls: yellow.
$800, Call /text 410-474-9291
Old Eng Bulldog—$800, 3M & 4F,
12wks, CKC & IOEBA Papers &
Pedigree, 1st Shots & Dewormed,
Dame & Sire on Site, 240-920-1261
POMERANIAN PUPS, 8 weeks, shots,
dewormed, health guar., adorable,
mature approx 6-8 lbs. $850.00
Fredericksburg, VA. 540-538-1037
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!—1 I
drive to you, pay CASH, and haul
them away. Call 571-830-5871
ShiChon—Adorable little Powder
Puff Teddybear Shichon Puppy
8/9wks 5yr Health war, In home.
Local
Va
Breeder
$850
Old Bottles Of Bourbon—50 Seeking www.DCDogFinders.com
full bottles of vintage bourbon and
rye. Alex 443-223-7669.
OLD HI-FI---ITEMS—1 COLLECTOR
PAYS MORE CASH PLEASE CALL
410-740-5222 LEAVE MESSAGE
Radio tubes—249 WANTED ham
radios huge speakers tube hifi amps2025279501, vcvdc@msn.com
REDSKINS TICKETS WANTED—
Call 1-800-296-3626 X3
284
Office & Business
Equipment
Car Seats—$29 Generic infant or
Graco child car seat $44 (70 both)
Alexandria, VA 571431-1501
291
Sporting Goods
& Services
Nordic Track Exercise Skier—$195
Exc.Cond-Folds up easy to fit in
car. Cost $800 new. 571-606-0319
355
Garage Sales, VA
FALLS CHURCH - Sat. 8-12,
507 Anne St. 63 years of treasure,
tools, furniture, housewares.
360
Estate Sales
6217 12TH ST N, ARLINGTON, VA
Lovely 2-Day Estate Sale!
DIR: N Roosevelt St,
12th St N. Fri/Sat 9-3.
www.FOURSALES.com
Need a Quality Sale?
703-256-8300
10300 Bushman Dr #209 Oakton, Va
TM SALES
Tues- Sat 9-4
The Estate of J. Divone: Antique
furn., jewelry, Mid Cent art, storehouse sofa, arts & crafts, dr tbl &
chair, Karastan Herez rug, Lladros,
linens. For more info see
www.estatesales.net
405
Tickets, Entertainment
Minority Women in Pakistan:
Thur, Mar 29, 10 am, Busboys &
Poets, 2021 - 14th St NW, DC.
408
Tickets, Sports
NATIONALS—Join season ticket
group. $69/tkt. 2 Club Level seats.
Sec. 220, Row C, 1&2. 703-864-2132
416
Tickets, Wanted
REDSKINS
Season Tickets Wanted.
Buying all locations. Top $ paid.
Please call 1-800-786-8425
610
Dogs for Sale
Aussie, Maltese & more—Puppies for
Sale. 304-904-6289, CC, cash, easy
financing, www.wvpuppy.com,
59 East Rd Martinsburg wv
Bassett Hound—Long darted cute
looking for forever home $600,
Males, 11 weeks old, 303-66-8825, .
DASCHUND PUPPIES- 8 weeks old,
the best available. $495.
Call 410-375-6549
European Great Dane —$1200 (OBO),
Male, 16 wks, Gentle Giant, registered, great European blood line,
Mantle Color. 202-438-6059
German Shepherd—Puppies available now! AKC/OFA/DM/PENNHIP
certified parents! Health Guarantee,
vaccines, vet exam, Excellent References!540-290-9989
ShihTzu Bichon—ShiChon Teddy Bear
Puppies Ready for Spring. Local In
home breeder $750-850 9wks 5yr
Health
warranty
703-577-1069
www.DCDogFinders.com
Shih Tzu—Red/White Pups. CKC Registrable/ $550. Male-Female Avail/
12 Weeks Old. Falls Church.VA
(787)486-1232
ST. BEREDOODLE PUPPIES- Males,
and females, $1000. Veted and
shots, health guarantee. 11 weeks.
Call 724-464-3789 or 724-254-4594
YORKSHIRE TERRIER EASTER
PUPPIES - 2 Males, CKC papers,
first shots, wormed. $800.
Serious inquires only. 301-523-6728
815
Legal Notices
Notice is hereby given that the
following named company at the
address listed herewith has made
application to engage in the business of loaning money for the
license year ending December 31,
2018 as provided by the Act of
Congress, approved February 14,
1913: New Credit America LLC, PO
Box 9125, Portland, OR 972079125.
Anyone desiring to protest against
the issuance of this license should
do so in writing to the Commissioner of the Department of Insurance,
Securities and Banking, 810 First
Street, NE, Suite 701, Washington,
DC 20002, in the manner prescribed
by said Act: See DC Code Title 26,
Chapter 9 and 16 DCMR 2.
REPUBLIC OF TURKEY
ANKARA
THE FAMILY COURT NO 8
Non-commercial advertisers can now place ads 24/7
by calling 202-334-6200
Legal Notices
fee in the amount of TL 18.40. the
advance fee in the amount of TL
18.40 and the legal expense in the
amount of TL 709.00 incurred by
the Plaintiff for this lawsuit, shall
be collected from the Defendant
and be reimbursed to the Plaintiff;
The remainder advance payment
shall be reimbursed to the Plaintiff
Party at her request and when the
decision becomes final. This decision, which contains the above
paragraphs, has been clearly read
aloud, duly explained and rendered
in the presence of the Plaintiffs
Attorney, provided that each Party
is entitled to appeal against this
reasoned decision before the Upper
Appellate Court within two weeks
as from the date when this reasoned decision is served on that
Party. 11/07/2017"
SUPREME COURT OF THE
STATE OF NEW YORK
COUNTY OF ORANGE
SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMMONS
AND NOTICE
Index No. 2016-008033
Date Filed: 3/8/2018
Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Morgan Stanley
ABS Capital I Inc. Trust 2006-WMC2,
Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-WMC2,
Plaintiff,
-againstCrispus Sawyer a/k/a Crispus E.
Sawyer, if he be living or dead,
his spouse, heirs, devisees, distributees and successors in interest,
all of whom and whose names and
places of residence are unknown
to Plaintiff; Deutsche Bank National
Trust Company, as Trustee for Morgan Stanley ABS Capital 1 Inc. Trust
2006-WMC2,
Mortgage
PassThrough Certificates, Series 2006WMC2; State of New York; and
"JOHN DOE”, said name being fictitious, it being the intention of
Plaintiff to designate any and all
occupants of premises being foreclosed herein, and any parties, corporations or entities, if any, having
or claiming an interest or lien upon
the mortgaged premises,
Defendants.
PROPERTY ADDRESS: 162 Dubois
Street, Newburgh, NY 12550
TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the complaint
in this action and to serve a copy of
your answer, or a notice of appearance on the attorneys for the Plaintiff within thirty (30) days after the
service of this summons, exclusive
of the day of service. The United
States of America, if designated
as a defendant in this action, may
appear within sixty (60) days of
service hereof. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment
will be taken against you by default
for the relief demanded in the complaint.
TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: The foregoing Summons is
served upon you by publication pursuant to an Order of the Hon.
Catherine M. Bartlett, a Justice of
the Supreme Court, Orange County,
entered Mar. 1, 2018 and filed with
the complaint and other papers in
the Orange County Clerk’s Office.
NOTICE OF NATURE OF ACTION AND
RELIEF SOUGHT THE OBJECT of the
above captioned action is to foreclose a Mortgage to secure
$180,400.00 and interest, recorded
in the Orange County Clerk’s Office
on April 19, 2006, in Book 12133
of Mortgages, page 403 covering
premises as 162 Dubois Street,
Newburgh, NY 12550 a/k/a Section
18, Block 1, Lot 6.
The relief sought in the within
action is a final judgment directing
the sale of the premises described
above to satisfy the debt secured
by the Mortgage described above.
Plaintiff designates Orange County
as the place of trial. Venue is based
upon the County in which the mortgaged premises is situated.
NOTICE
YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING
YOUR HOME
IF YOU DO NOT RESPOND TO THIS
SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT BY
SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER
ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE MORTGAGE COMPANY WHO FILED THIS
FORECLOSURE
PROCEEDING
AGAINST YOU AND FILING THE
ANSWER WITH THE COURT, A
DEFAULT JUDGMENT MAY BE
ENTERED AND YOU CAN LOSE YOUR
HOME.
SPEAK TO AN ATTORNEY OR GO TO
THE COURT WHERE YOUR CASE IS
PENDING FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ON HOW TO ANSWER THE SUMMONS AND PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY.
SENDING A PAYMENT TO YOUR
MORTGAGE COMPANY WILL NOT
STOP THIS FORECLOSURE ACTION.
YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A
COPY OF ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE
COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER
WITH THE COURT.
Dated: February 15, 2018
Frank M. Cassara, Esq.
Senior Associate Attorney
SHAPIRO, DICARO & BARAK, LLC
Attorneys for Plaintiff
175 Mile Crossing Boulevard
Rochester, New York 14624
(585) 247-9000
Fax: (585) 247-7380 our
File No. 16-057914
#94465
820
Official Notices
ABC LICENSE: Wheatland Spring
Brewery, LLC trading as Wheatland
Spring Brewery, 38454 John Wolford
Rd. Waterford (Loudoun County) Virginia 20197-1603. The above establishment is applying to the VIRGINIA
DEPARTMENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL (ABC) for a Brewery, Limited and Keg license to sell
or manufacture alcoholic beverages. John Branding, Member/Manager NOTE: Objections to the
issuance of this license must be
submitted to ABC no later than 30
days from the publishing date of the
first of two required newspaper
legal notices. Objections should be
registered at www.abc.virginia.gov
or 800-552-3200.
ANNOUNCEMENT
File No: 2011/492
Due to the lawsuit of divorce,
heard between the Plaintiff ESRA
BALTACIOGLU and the Defendant
LOGER LEE POWERS before our
Court; Since the notification could
not be served on the Defendant
LOGER LEE POWERS and since his
residence, dwelling house and
office addresses could not be found
despite all the investigations; it has
been adjudged that the following
Reasoned Decision be served by
publication as required by the Article 28 and the subsequent Articles
of the Notification Law; As per the
Article 31 of the Notification Law. it
is hereby served by publication that:
"The lawsuit is hereby ACCEPTED;
and The Plaintiff ESRA BALTACIOGLU POWERS who is registered
at the Province Eski ehir, the Tepeba  District,Ho nudiyeNeighborhood/Village, at Volume No: 29. Section No: 2282 and who is the daughter of Timur and Fisun and was
born on 23.04.1980 and whose T.R.
Identity Number is 18715978736
and the Defendant ROGER LEE POWERS who is the citizen of the United
States of America are hereby
DIVORCED in accordance with the
Article 166/1 of the Turkish Civil
Code due to the irretrievable breakdown of the marriage; TL 13.00,
remaining after deduction of the fee
in the amount of TL 31.40 payable
on the date of the decision from
the fee in the amount of TL 18.40
initially collected in advance, shall
be collected from the Defendant
and be recorded as revenue in favor
of the Treasury; Since the Plaintiff
was represented by an attorney in
this lawsuit; the attorney's fee in
the amount of TL 1,980.00, calculated as required by the Minimum
Fee Tariff for Attorneys effective
on the date of the decision, shall
be collected from the Defendant
and be delivered to the Plaintiff;
TL 748.70 in total, comprised of
the power of attorney fee in the
amount of TL 2.90. the application
Legal Notices - 202-334-7007
Auctions, Estate Sales, Furniture 202-334-7029
Biz Ops/Services - 202-334-5787
or call 202-334-6200
815
Dogs for Sale
GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS 4 F, 3 M, black & sable. $700, S/W,
parents on premises. AKC reg.
Ready 3/15. Call 240-606-3815
K
i
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!—1 I
drive to you, pay CASH, and haul
them away. Call 571-830-5871
245
EZ
new and pre-owned
cars, trucks and suvs
Antique
Brass
Stiffel
Table
Lamp—$40 36" High, Germantown,
MD 301-208-6791
208
FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 2018
the local expert
on local jobs
For Jobs advertisements, go to
washingtonpost.com/recruit
or call 202-334-4100
(toll free 1-800-765-3675)
205
CLASSIFIED
D8
Affidavit of Interest: This is a notification that Maryam Rezaie has
interest of $13,077,832.27 in the
property at 11301 River Road,
Potomac, MD 20854. For details see
"GetNotice.info/rez.html".
825
Bids & Proposals
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
Design and Engineering
Services for W&OD Dual Trail
Expansion Project
NOVA Parks is seeking proposals for providing design,
engineering and permitting
services
for
expanding
approximately 1.1 miles of
the W&OD Trail into a dual
paved trail network. The
project area extends from
Grove Avenue to the east
side of Little Falls Street in
Falls Church, Virginia.
Proposals must be received
by mail or in person at NOVA
Parks Headquarters, 5400
Ox Road, Fairfax Station, Virginia 22039, by April 17,
2018, at 2:00 pm EDT. The
Request for Proposal and the
Project Drawings can be
downloaded from the NOVA
Parks
website
at
https://novaparks.com/
about/bids-proposals.
820
Official Notices
820
820
Official Notices
Official Notices
Public Notice: Five Year Review for environmental cleanup sites at Fort Belvoir, Fairfax County, Virginia.
The U.S. Army Garrison Fort Belvoir announces the commencement of a Comprehensive Environmental
Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Five Year Review (FYR) for three environmental
cleanup sites located on Fort Belvoir (FTBL), Fairfax County, Virginia. The FYR will assess the protectiveness
of remedies imposed at the sites to mitigate groundwater contamination. This is the Second FYR for sites,
FTBL-68 and FTBL-69 located on the Fort Belvoir North Area and the first FYR for the Tracy Road Range (FTBL014-R-01) located on the southern Main Post. The Commonwealth of Virginia, Department of Environmental
Quality provides regulatory oversight of Fort Belvoir’s CERCLA cleanup program.
Fuel-related compounds and chlorinated solvents have impacted groundwater at site FTBL-68 formerly
used for fuel storage and fire training activity. FTBL-69 was utilized in the mid to late 1950s for the
destruction of waste ammunition and explosives. Groundwater underlying the site is impacted by low
concentrations of explosives compounds notably RDX. Groundwater from these site areas is contained
on Fort Belvoir property and current site conditions do not pose a harmful risk to installation tenants,
personnel, or surrounding populations. Groundwater is not used as a water source on Fort Belvoir. The Tracy
Road Range is a former small arms rifle range that has been re-developed for facility usage. The imposed
remedy for FTBL-68 consists of soil removal with applied land use controls (LUCs) and the remedy selected
for FTBL-69 is LUCs. The remedy selected for the Tracy Road Range is Institutional Controls focused on
reducing human exposure to lead in the soil by managing intrusive activities on the site.
The FYRs will be completed to assess the effectiveness of the site remedies to be protective of human
health and the environment in accordance with CERCLA requirements. The FYR report will be available no
later than July 27, 2018 at the following information repository locations:
Directorate of Public Works
9430 Jackson Loop
Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-5116
Lorton Library
9520 Richmond Highway
Lorton, VA 22079
Kingstowne Library
6500 Landsdowne Centre Drive
Alexandria, VA 22315
If you would like to provide input on the FYR, the selected remedies or would like additional information,
please contact: Felix M. Mariani at 703-806-3193, or via email at: felix.m.mariani3.civ@mail.mil
850
Montgomery County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
MARYLAND
JEFFREY LEVIN AND
JOEL ARONSON,
Trustees
Plaintiff,
v.
TAYLOR ROAD, LLC
Defendant
Civil No. 439433V
NOTICE is hereby issued, this 8th
day of March, 2018 that the property
known as 3602 Taylor St, Chevy
Chase, Montgomery County, Maryland and reported by Joel S. Aronson be raified and confirmed unless
casue to the contrary be shown on
or before the 9th day of April 2018,
provided a copy of this notice be
inserted in some newspaper published in this County, once in each of
three (3) successive weeks before
the 9th day of April 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount ofsale to be Five Hundred
Thousand Dollars ($500,000.00) to
Capitol Funding Group, LLC.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Mar 23, 30,April 6,2018
12171927
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY
MARYLAND
DIANE S. ROSENBERG
MARK D. MEYER
JOHN A. ANSELL, III
KENNETH SAVITZ
JENNIFER ROCHINO
SYDNEY ROBERSON
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway
Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiff(s)
v.
Javier A. Zaldua
Krissanne L. Zaldua
14416 Marine Drive
Silver Spring, MD 20905
Defendant(s)
Case No. 439398V
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 19th
day of March, 2018, by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, Maryland, that the sale of
14416 Marine Drive, Silver
Spring,MD 20905, made and
reported, will be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 18th day of April, 2018,
provided a copy of this notice
be inserted in a daily newspaper
printed in said County, once in
each of three successive weeks
before the 18th day of April 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the foreclosure sale
price to be $357,000.00.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Montgomery County, MD
Mar 30, April 6, 13, 2018 12174526
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY
MARYLAND
DIANE S. ROSENBERG
MARK D. MEYER
JOHN A. ANSELL, III
KENNETH SAVITZ
JENNIFER ROCHINO
SYDNEY ROBERSON
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway
Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiff(s)
v.
Estate of Sally Dorsey
407 Christopher Avenue, Unit 32
Gaithersburg, MD 20879
Defendant(s)
Case No. 439012V
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 19th
day of March, 2018, by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, Maryland, that the sale of 407
Christopher Avenue, Unit 32,
Gaithersburg, MD 20879, made
and reported, will be ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 18th day of April, 2018,
provided a copy of this notice
be inserted in a daily newspaper
printed in said County, once in
each of three successive weeks
before the 18th day of April 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the foreclosure sale
price to be $104,000.00.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Montgomery County, MD
Mar 30, April 6, 13, 2018 12174527
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
v.
IN RE: 9216 CRANDALL ROAD
LANHAM, MD 20706
AND
ALL OCCUPANTS
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-35958
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 13th
day of March 2018, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 9216 Crandall Road, Lanham, MD 20706, will
be ratified and confirmed unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 13th day of
April, 2018, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive
weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said
County before the 13th day of
April, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$365,250.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
March 16, 23, 30, 2018 12170947
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
825
Bids & Proposals
825
Bids & Proposals
CREATIVE MINDS INTERNATIONAL PUBLIC CHARTER SCHOOL
(CMIPCS)
REQUESTS FOR PROPOSALS – SY 2017-18
Strategic Focus Group Consulting Services
CMIPCS is soliciting proposals for Strategic Focus Group Consulting
services on a contract basis for 10-16 hours/week over a 4-month
period. Assistance and guidance are required to provide focus groups
project for staff retention issues. The scope may include but not be
limited to the following deliverables:
1). Meetings to define focus group objectives and staffing and
stakeholder concerns. 2). Creation of facilitator’s guide; manage
edit and review rounds. 3). Conduct five focus groups with CMIPCS
staff. 4). Synthesize focus group responses into anonymous report.
Evaluate feedback, share with CMIPCS stakeholders, and make
recommendations for next steps to improve team culture and
retention.
Strategic Executive Coaching / Recruitment Consultant Services
CMIPCS is soliciting proposals for Executive Coaching and Recruitment Consultant services on a contract basis for 12-16 hours/week
over a 4-month period. These services include:
1). Tailored coaching for senior leadership school directors including
weekly check-ins. 2). Weekly and quarterly small-group facilitated
coaching sessions for school leaders. 3). Access for school leaders
to professional development opportunities, external social events
with influential leaders, and collaboration with leadership from other
schools. 4). Identify, set up, manage, and train school leadership to
use online recruitment portal. 5). Working with Board of Directors
to develop and implement a performance evaluation system for
Executive Director Assistance and guidance are required for both
projects as they relate to the identification and retention of good
quality public school teachers and administrators. In addition, CMIPCS
requires the executive consultant / recruitment coach to answer dayto-day questions and concerns that come up on a regular basis.
Content of Proposals and Proposed Deadline
Proposals should include a brief history and introduction of the
individual or firm, and their understanding of the services to be
performed. All proposals should include names of references from
other public organizations for which comparable services have been
rendered. Resumes summarizing the qualifications of the individuals
must also be provided. The deadline for receiving proposals is
1:00 p.m. on April 10, 2018. Proposals should be signed by an
authorized individual from the firm and must be valid for at least
60 days and submitted to James Lafferty-Furphy, 3700 N. Capitol
Street NW Sherman Building, Room 217, Washington, DC 20011.
Questions should be submitted to james.lafferty-furphy@creativemindspcs.org. CMIPCS reserves the right to reject any or all
proposals. CMIPCS will not be liable for, nor pay any cost incurred
by responding firms relating to the preparation of proposals or the
making of presentations. Although proposals may be opened and
reviewed prior to the closing date, proposals will not be disclosed to
competing firms or to the public until after the award of the contract.
The award of the contract will not necessarily be based on the lowest
maximum fee proposed. CMIPCS plans to have interviews completed
and select the consultant by April 13, 2018.
NOTICE OF FINDING OF NO SIGNFICANT IMPACT AND
NOTICE OF INTENT TO REQUEST RELEASE OF FUNDS
March 30, 2018
Commonwealth of Virginia,
Department of Housing and Community Development
600 East Main Street, Suite 300
Richmond, Virginia 23219
Kevin Hobbs (804) 371-7120
kevin.hobbs@dhcd.virginia.gov
These notices shall satisfy procedural requirements for activities to be
undertaken by the Commonwealth of Virginia Department of Housing
and Community Development (DHCD)
REQUEST FOR RELEASE OF FUNDS
On or about April 12, 2018, The Virginia Department of Housing
and Community Development will submit a request to the United
States Department of Housing and Urban Development Richmond
Field Office (HUD), for the release of National Housing Trust Fund
funds under Title I of the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of
2008, Section 1131, to undertake a project known as Carpenter’s
Shelter. Carpenter’s Shelter The Carpenter's Shelter project will
add 97 units of affordable housing to the City of Alexandria and
is part of a larger partnership between the Alexandria Housing
Development Corporation (AHDC) and the Carpenter's Shelter, a
nonprofit comprehensive homeless service center and shelter, to
redevelop a 19,000-square foot center that serves over 750 homeless
and formerly homeless children and adults each year. This project is
supported by National Housing Trust funds and has successfully been
completed and occupied. The total development cost for the current
phase is estimated at $40,768,561.00. Of this amount $800,000 in
National Housing Trust funding will be provided to the project from
DHCD.
840
FREE UNDER $250
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
1834 FREDERICK DOUGLASS PLACE SE
WASHINGTON, DC 20020
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of the
District of Columbia recorded on March 2, 2007, as Instrument
Number 2007029685, and in accordance Judgment filed on
May 10, 2017 in case 2015 CA 006433 R(RP) and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the office of
HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin Avenue,
NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
APRIL 24, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
1834 FREDERICK DOUGLASS PLACE SE, WASHINGTON,
DC 20020, LOT NUMBERED FIFTY-ONE (51), IN SQUARE
NUMBERED FIVE THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED EIGHTY-ONE
(5881).
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (5.5%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 31957
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET AL,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
851
Prince Georges County
851
ENVIRONMENTAL CERTIFICATION
The DHCD certifies to HUD that Erik Johnston in his capacity as
Director consents to accept the jurisdiction of the Federal Courts
if an action is brought to enforce responsibilities in relation to
the environmental review process and that these responsibilities
have been satisfied. HUD’s approval of the certification satisfies
its responsibilities under NEPA and related laws and authorities and
allows DHCD to use Program funds.
OBJECTIONS TO RELEASE OF FUNDS
HUD will accept objections to its release of funds and DHCD’s
certification for a period of fifteen days following the anticipated
submission date or its actual receipt of the request (whichever is
later) only if they are on one of the following bases: (a) the certification
was not executed by the Certifying Officer of DHCD; (b) DHCD has
omitted a step or failed to make a decision or finding required
by HUD regulations at 24 CFR part 58; (c) the grant recipient or
other participants in the development process have committed funds,
incurred costs or undertaken activities not authorized by 24 CFR
Part 58 before approval of a release of funds by HUD; or (d) another
Federal agency acting pursuant to 40 CFR Part 1504 has submitted a
written finding that the project is unsatisfactory from the standpoint
of environmental quality. Objections must be prepared and submitted
in accordance with the required procedures (24 CFR Part 58, Sec.
58.76) and shall be addressed to HUD Richmond Field Office, Public
and Indian Program Center at 600 East Broad Street, Richmond,
VA 23219-1800, Attention: Ms. Catherine Lamberg, Acting Director.
Potential objectors should contact HUD at 1 (800) 842-2610, Extension
4899 to verify the actual last day of the objection period.
Erik Johnston
Director
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP) No. 018-015
DISASTER MANAGEMENT SERVICES
Virginia Railway Express (VRE) is soliciting Proposals to establish
a Contract with one (1) qualified and experienced transportation
disaster management services firm to provide prompt assistance to
victims, as well as to achieve rapid and effective recovery following
an incident involving one (1) or more VRE trains resulting in a MassCasualty Event (MCE).
Proposals will be considered from qualified and experienced firms
who are regularly established in the disaster management services
business, and in the judgment of VRE are financially responsible.
Through prior work performed, Offerors must be able to show
evidence of reliability, ability, experience, and personnel to perform
the services. For additional information, visit VRE’s website at
https://www.vre.org/about/procurement/.
Proposals are due April 16, 2018 at 2:00 P.M. EST.
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Substitute Trustee Sale of Residential Property:
409 Newcomb St. SE, Washington, DC 20032
Default occurred under a Deed of Trust signed February 13,
2008 and recorded on February 28, 2008 as Instrument
No. 2008021460 in the Land Records of Washington, DC,
securing the original principal amount of $375,000. A Deed of
Appointment of Substitute Trustee dated February 5, 2018 was
recorded on February 9, 2018 as Instrument No. 2018014727.
In accordance with DC Code §§ 42-815 et seq., the Notice of
Default dated October 30, 2017 was recorded on November 9,
2017 as Instrument No. 2017124794, and the Final Mediation
Certificate was recorded on February 9, 2018 as Instrument No.
2018014427. The Notice of Intention to Foreclose a Residential
Property was recorded on March 13, 2018 as Instrument No.
20180258272.
The land and premises secured by the Deed of Trust, situated
in the District of Columbia, and designated as and being
Lot numbered Sixty-Eight (68) in Square numbered Fifty-Nine
Hundred Ninety-five (5995) in the subdivision made by H & J
Construction Co., Inc. as per plat recorded in Liber 116 at Folio
140 among the Records of the Office of the Surveyor for the
District of Columbia, commonly known as 409 Newcomb St. SE,
Washington, DC 20032, will be offered for sale by public auction
at:
Harvey West Auctioneers, 5335 Wisconsin Ave. NW,
Washington, DC 20015
on
TUESDAY, APRIL 24, 2018 AT 2:30 P.M.
This sale is subject to all other liens, encumbrances, conditions,
easements, and restrictions, if any, superior to the aforesaid
deed of trust and lawfully affecting the Property, including but
not limited to the lien created by the aforementioned Deed
of Trust recorded on February 28, 2008 as Instrument No.
2008021460. The sale of the Property shall further be made
subject to any rights of redemption, including but not limited
to any rights under 26 U.S.C. § 7425, and the rights, if any
of persons in possession of the Property. The Property and any
improvements thereon shall be sold in “as-is” condition without
any warranties.
A deposit of Forty Thousand Dollars ($40,000.00) or ten per
cent (10%) of the sale price in the form of a certified or
cashier’s check (made payable to “Yi Shen, Substitute Trustee”)
will be required to qualify as a bidder before the sale, except
from the Noteholder. The deposit, without interest, will be
applied to the purchase price at settlement. Settlement will be
held within thirty (30) days after the sale at the office of the
Substitute Trustee. Upon purchaser’s default, the deposit shall
be forfeited and the Property shall be resold at the risk and
costs of the defaulting purchaser. In the event the Substitute
Trustee cannot convey to the purchaser marketable title, in the
Substitute Trustee’s sole discretion, the sale may be rescinded
and purchaser’s sole remedy shall be refund of the deposit at any
time prior to the aforesaid Settlement.
The balance of the purchase price shall be in cash or its
equivalent. Purchaser shall be responsible for all future and past
due real property taxes, property owner's dues or assessments,
settlement charges, and costs of conveyance, including, but not
limited to, preparation of the deed and recording and transfer
taxes. In the event real property taxes or property owner's dues or
assessments have been advanced, those sums will be due from
purchaser to the seller at the time of settlement. The Property
shall be conveyed by Special Warranty Deed. The successful
bidder shall assume all loss or damage to the Property from and
after the time of sale. Neither Substitute Trustee nor the secured
party shall assume any obligation to deliver possession of the
property. In the event a Trustee’s deed or deed of foreclosure
has been recorded and the Substitute Trustee determines in its
sole discretion that it is necessary to rescind the sale, Substitute
Trustee reserves the right to nullify the Trustee’s deed or Deed
of Foreclosure and revest title to the mortgagor’s/prior owners
subject to the deed of trust upon which was foreclosed. The
Substitute Trustee reserves the right to reject all bids, extend
the time to receive bids, withdraw the Property from sale,
waive or modify the deposit requirement, and/or extend the
period for settlement. Additional terms may be announced at
the time of sale and the successful bidder will be required to
sign a Memorandum of Sale incorporating the terms of the sale.
For more information contact
Yi Shen, Substitute Trustee,
Levine & Associates, PLLC,
5311 Lee Highway, Arlington, VA 22207,
Telephone: 703-525-2668, Facsimile: 703-525-8393
Yi Shen, Substitute Trustee
12169760
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
TRUSTEE'S SALE
4715 Pistachio Lane, Capitol Heights, MD 20743
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 4715 Pistachio Lane, Capitol Heights,
MD 20743. By virtue of the power and authority contained
in a Deed of Trust, dated June 15, 2007, and recorded in
Liber 28172 at Page 029 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
amount of $232,000.00. Upon default and request for sale,
the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at
the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the
front of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at
14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on April
10, 2018 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed
of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 06-0600874
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.15% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-255900.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-97978
12171914
Membership is rewarding.
PostPoints takes you
to special exhibits.
From dinosaur bones and
space shuttles to panda
bears and modern art,
discover great ways to
save money, win tickets
and have fun at museums.
washingtonpost.com/postpoints
Not a member? It’s free! JOIN TODAY.
Inquiries regarding this Request for Proposals should be directed to:
Ms. Kristin Nutter
Manager of Purchasing and Contract Administration
Virginia Railway Express
1500 King Street, Suite 202
Alexandria, VA 22314-2730
Telephone/Fax: (703) 838-5441
Email: knutter@vre.org
840
Prince Georges County
PUBLIC COMMENTS
Any individual, group, or agency may submit written comments on the
ERR to DHCD located at 600 E. Main St, Suite 300, Richmond Virginia
23219. All comments received by April 11th, 2018; will be considered
by DHCD prior to authorizing submission of a request for release of
funds. Comments should specify which Notice they are addressing.
mypublicnotices.com/
washingtonpost/PublicNotice.asp
If the merchandise you’re selling is priced under $250, your 3-line, 3-day ad is FREE!
Go to washingtonpostads.com for complete details and to order your free ad.
FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT
DHCD has determined that the project in all phases on the contiguous
site will have no significant impact on the human environment.
Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement under the National
Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) is not required. Additional
project and funding information is contained in the Environmental
Review Record (ERR) on file at DHCD, located 600 E Main St, Suite 300,
Richmond Virginia 232222 and may be examined or copied weekdays
9 A.M to 5:00 P.M.
Trustee Sales
202-334-5782
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 2018
12167492
S2931 2x5
FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 2018
840
Trustees Sale - DC
OPQRS
EZ
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
5454 B STREET, SE
WASHINGTON, DC 20019
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of the
District of Columbia recorded on July 31, 2013, as Instrument
Number 2013089436, and in accordance Judgment filed on
March 14, 2018 in case 2017 CA 005388 R(RP) and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the office of
HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin Avenue,
NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
APRIL 24, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
5454 B STREET, SE, WASHINGTON, DC 20019, LOT NUMBERED SIXTY-SEVEN (67) IN SQUARE NUMBERED FIVE
THOUSAND TWO HUNDRED NINETY (5290).
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (4.5%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 55401
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET. AL.,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
2404 2ND STREET, NE
WASHINGTON, DC 20002
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of the
District of Columbia recorded on August 8, 2007, as Instrument
Number 2007104492, and in accordance Judgment filed on
February 12, 2018 in case 2017 CA 003505 R(RP) and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the office of
HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin Avenue,
NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
APRIL 24, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
2404 2ND STREET, NE, WASHINGTON, DC 20002, LOT
NUMBERED NINE (9), IN SQUARE 3541.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (8.55%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 51855
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET. AL.,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
509 ROXBORO PLACE NW
WASHINGTON, DC 20011
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of
the District of Columbia recorded on November 26, 2014, as
Instrument Number 2014109511, and in accordance Judgment
filed on February 14, 2018 in case 2017 CA 003562 R(RP)
and at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the
office of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin
Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034, on,
APRIL 24, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
509 ROXBORO PLACE NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20011, LOT
NUMBERED ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-SEVEN (167), SQUARE
NUMBERED 3199.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (2.926%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 42899
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET. AL.,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
12171757
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
D9
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING
KNOWN AS:
4521 IOWA AVENUE NW
WASHINGTON, DC 20011
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of
the District of Columbia recorded on November 13, 2006, as
Instrument Number 2006153678, and in accordance Judgment
filed on February 12, 2018 in case 2016 CA 004340 R(RP)
and at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the
office of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin
Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034, on,
APRIL 24, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
4521 IOWA AVENUE NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20011, LOT 78
SQUARE 2918.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (6.875%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 21156
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET. AL.,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
1355 SHERIDAN STREET, NW
WASHINGTON, DC 20011
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of the
District of Columbia recorded on October 6, 2005, as Instrument
Number 2005143902, and in accordance Judgment filed on
November 27, 2017 in case 2015 CA 003370 R(RP) and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the office of
HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin Avenue,
NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
APRIL 24, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
1355 SHERIDAN STREET, NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20011, LOT
NUMBERED SIXTY THREE (63), IN THE SUBDIVISION MADE
BY BIRON & COMPANY, INC. OF LOTS IN SQUARE NUMBERED
TWENTY SEVEN HUNDRED EIGHTY EIGHT (2788).
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (5.875%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 23469
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET AL,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
12171398
12172429
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING
KNOWN AS:
4414 EDSON PLACE NE
WASHINGTON, DC 20019
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of the
District of Columbia recorded on May 7, 2009, as Instrument
Number 2009048783, and in accordance Judgment filed on
May 8, 2017 in case 2015 CA 002391 R(RP) and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the office of
HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin Avenue,
NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
APRIL 24, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
4414 EDSON PLACE NE, WASHINGTON, DC 20019, LOT
NUMBERED EIGHT HUNDRED SIXTY-NINE (869) IN SQUARE
NUMBERED FIFTY-ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-ONE (5131).
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (4.875%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 26264
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET. AL.,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
400 MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE NW, UNIT NUMBER 618
WASHINGTON, DC 20001
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of the
District of Columbia recorded on May 31, 2005, as Instrument
Number 2005074275, and in accordance Judgment filed on
February 7, 2018 in case 2015 CA 000990 R(RP) and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the office of
HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin Avenue,
NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
APRIL 24, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
400 MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE NW, UNIT NUMBER 618,
WASHINGTON, DC 20001, LOT NO. 2566, SQUARE 517.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (3.25%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 24155
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET AL,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
12170968
12170353
12170357
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING
KNOWN AS:
515 25TH PLACE, NE
WASHINGTON, DC 20002
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of
the District of Columbia recorded on January 18, 2006, as
Instrument Number 2006008573, and in accordance Judgment
filed on March 9, 2018 in case 2015 CA 003048 R(RP) and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the
office of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin
Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
APRIL 24, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
515 25TH PLACE, NE, WASHINGTON, DC 20002, LOT NUMBERED 42 IN SQUARE 4518.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (2.625%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 14088
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET. AL.,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
7 18TH STREET SE UNIT 103
WASHINGTON, DC 20003
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of
the District of Columbia recorded on November 5, 2004, as
Instrument Number 2004153713, and in accordance Judgment
filed on February 13, 2018 in case 2015 CA 003414 R(RP)
and at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the
office of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin
Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034, on,
APRIL 24, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
7 18TH STREET SE UNIT 103, WASHINGTON, DC 20003,
PART OF LOT 68, IN SQUARE 1096.
Sale Subject to 1st Lien Deed of Trust:
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (6.375%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 21616
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET AL,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
900 BURNS STREET SE
WASHINGTON, DC 20019
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of the
District of Columbia recorded on July 10, 2013, as Instrument
Number 2013080518, and in accordance Judgment filed on
February 16, 2018 in case 2015 CA 000515 R(RP) and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the office of
HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin Avenue,
NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
APRIL 24, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
900 BURNS STREET SE, WASHINGTON, DC 20019, LOTS
NUMBERED SEVENTY-SEVEN (77) AND SEVENTY-EIGHT (78),
IN SQUARE NUMBERED FIVE THOUSAND THREE HUNDRED
AND EIGHTY-TWO (5382).
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (4.25%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 31699
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET AL,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
12171397
12170965
Trustees Sale - DC
12170355
12169763
D10
840
Trustees Sale - DC
OPQRS
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
2839 27TH STREET NE
WASHINGTON, DC 20018
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of
the District of Columbia recorded on January 17, 2007, as
Instrument Number 2007007247, and in accordance Judgment
filed on June 7, 2017 in case 2015 CA 000846 R(RP) and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the
office of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin
Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
APRIL 24, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
2839 27TH STREET NE, WASHINGTON, DC 20018, LOT
NUMBERED TWENTY-ONE (0021), IN SQUARE NUMBERED
FORTY-THREE HUNDRED FORTY-ONE (4341), IN ANNIE
KIRLAND WARREN'S SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE TRACT
OF LAND KNOWN AS "GREENVALE", AS PER PLAT RECORDED
IN LIBER 63, AT FOLIO 36.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 cash or certified
funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the
purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money at
the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (4% per
annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 25908
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET AL,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
850
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
3665 Autumn Glen Circle
Burtonsville, MD 20866
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
JULIANA OFORI BAMFO, dated March 29, 2006 and recorded
in Liber 32155, folio 718 ; MODIFIED BY THE HOME
AFFORDABLE MODIFICATION AGREEMENT RECORDED IN
LIBER 43665, FOLIO 177 among the Land Records of
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.443162V; Tax ID
No.05-02455668 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction
at the MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
APRIL 16, 2018 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $31,900.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 577654)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
851
Prince Georges County
851
FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 2018
EZ
Prince Georges County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
4910 King Patrick Way Unit 201
Upper Marlboro, MD 20772
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
TYRONE MCMILLAN, dated October 6, 2006 and recorded in
Liber 27694, folio 089 among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder
(Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.CAEF17-20144; Tax
ID No.03-2829414 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
located at 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772,
on
APRIL 18, 2018 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and more
fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $20,600.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten
days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 575323)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
KHALID D. WALKER,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
4404 Reamy Drive
Suitland, MD 20746
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from ANITA
L. SAVAGE, dated April 25, 2012 and recorded in Liber 33778,
folio 618 ; LOAN MODIFICATION AGREEMENT RECORDED IN
LIBER 39129, FOLIO 351 among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder
(Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.CAEF17-27810; Tax
ID No.06-0582494 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
located at 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772,
on
APRIL 18, 2018 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and more
fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $23,500.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten
days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 578933)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
4228 Applegate Lane
Suitland, MD 20746
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from EVELLA
D. CARD, dated April 20, 2004 and recorded in Liber 19768,
folio 071 among the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure
Case docketed as Case No.CAEF17-40906; Tax ID No.063020518 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 14735
MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772, on
APRIL 18, 2018 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and more
fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $10,000.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten
days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 577841)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
12173870
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
851
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
www.hwestauctions.com
12173885 MARCH 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
12173877
12169762
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 Rockville Pike, Suite 100
Rockville, MD 20852
PUBLIC AUCTION SALE
SHARES OF CAPITAL STOCK
"MEMBERSHIP SHARES" OF
EASTMONT COOPERATIVE, INC.
allocated to
7058 EASTERN AVENUE NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20012
SALE ON APRIL 24, 2018 at 3:00 PM
Pursuant to Order of Sale entered in DC Superior Court Case
# 2016 CA004994 R(RP) , the secured creditor, by the court
approve substitute trustee will sell at Public Auction AT THE
OFFICE OF HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., LOCATED AT
5335 WISCONSIN AVENUE, NW, Suite 440, WASHINGTON,
DC 20015.
All the membership shares described in said Security Agreement
being EASTMONT COOPERATIVE, INC. shares of Capital Stock
of the EASTMONT COOPERATIVE, INC. allocated to 7058
Eastern Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20012, together with all
rights, duties and obligations under the terms of a certain
Occupancy Agreement OCTOBER 17, 1987 between Jean G.
Oates-Morris and the EASTMONT COOPERATIVE, INC. Subject
to the terms, provisions and conditions contained in the Articles
of Incorporation, By-Laws, Occupancy Agreement and House
Rules of the EASTMONT COOPERATIVE, INC and the Superior
Court’s Order of Sale.
The membership shares will be sold subject to their proportionate share of certain underlying purchase money mortgages, the
exact amount due thereon will be announced at time of sale and
subject to all conditions, liens restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same, and subject to any assessments including
assessments pursuant to D.C. Code Sections 42-1903.13.
The membership shares will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE
IS" condition without either express or implied warranty or
representation, including but not limited to the description,
fitness for a particular purpose or use, structural integrity,
physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental
condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing
codes or other laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of
the purchaser to obtain title insurance or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $24,600.00 certified funds shall
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase
price with interest at 6.875% per annum from the date of sale
to the date of settlement. Settlement within TEN DAYS after
the final ratification of the sale. There will be no abatement of
interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds
are tendered before settlement. Adjustment of current year’s
real property taxes and coop dues and fees are adjusted as of
the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All
other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent
such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer
charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale
are to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of transfer of the
share certificate including but not limited conveyancing, city,
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, and all other costs incident
to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Purchaser is
responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property,
and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from date of
sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the Purchaser
fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser agrees
that the property will be resold and the entire deposit retained
by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses
occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have
no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
DANIEL J. PESACHOWITZ, ESQUIRE
Attorney
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
7304 Crafford Place
Fort Washington, MD 20744
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
RONALD E. HINES JR, dated March 28, 2008 and recorded in
Liber 29629, folio 473 among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder
(Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.CAEF17-37018; Tax
ID No.12-1243369 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
located at 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772,
on
APRIL 18, 2018 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and more
fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $19,600.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten
days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 580403)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
13202 Muscovy Court
Upper Marlboro, MD 20774
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
DEVIN Z. WALLACE, dated August 6, 2010 and recorded in
Liber 32099, folio 326 among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder
(Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.CAEF17-17864; Tax
ID No.03-0245126 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
located at 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772,
on
APRIL 18, 2018 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and more
fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $35,200.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten
days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 547699)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
12173856
12169758
12173886 MARCH 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
12173884
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
13717 Gullivers Trail
Bowie, MD 20720
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
RASHEDA A. EDWARDS, dated October 31, 2016 and recorded
in Liber 38834, folio 26 among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder
(Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.CAEF17-29218; Tax
ID No.14-1638121 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
located at 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772,
on
APRIL 18, 2018 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and more
fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $39,000.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten
days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 579570)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
7912 Quill Point Drive
Bowie, MD 20720
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
KWESI A. ABOAGYE AND BRIDGETTE MIRIAM HARRIS, dated
February 16, 2005 and recorded in Liber 23607, folio 324
among the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD,
default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed
as Case No.CAEF17-27809; Tax ID No.14-1598739 ) the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772, on
APRIL 18, 2018 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and more
fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $36,300.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
PURCHASER ACKNOWLEDGES THAT THE PROPERTY IS SUBJECT TO AN IRS RIGHT OF REDEMPTION. Balance of the
purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 566851)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
12173881 MARCH 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
12173874
FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 2018
851
Prince Georges County
OPQRS
EZ
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
2824 BELAIR DRIVE, Bowie, MD 20715
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 2824 BELAIR DRIVE, Bowie, MD 20715.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust, dated January 25, 2006, and recorded in Liber 24356 at
Page 646 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $282,764.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on April 10, 2018 at 2:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 07-0666032
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 15-250597.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-97978
TRUSTEE'S SALE
10015 Mike Road, Fort Washington, MD 20744
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 10015 Mike Road, Fort Washington, MD
20744. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated June 9, 2005, and recorded in Liber 22602 at
Page 355 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $251,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on April 10, 2018 at 2:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 05-0399923
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-270631.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
101 Joyceton Terr, Upper Marlboro, MD 20774
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 101 Joyceton Terr, Upper Marlboro, MD
20774. By virtue of the power and authority contained in
a Deed of Trust, dated September 15, 2005, and recorded
in Liber 23522 at Page 394 among the land records of the
County of Prince George's, in the original principal amount
of $265,200.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front
of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735
Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on April 10,
2018 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 13-1495613
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 10% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-260853.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
12170597 MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 2018
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 2018
TRUSTEE'S SALE
3803 Early Glow Ln, Bowie, MD 20716
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 3803 Early Glow Ln, Bowie, MD 20716.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust, dated January 17, 2006, and recorded in Liber 25269 at
Page 036 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $200,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on April 10, 2018 at 2:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 07-0814764
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-258742.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-97978
12169276 MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 2018
TRUSTEE'S SALE
14201 DEVINGER PLACE, Accokeek, MD 20607
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 14201 DEVINGER PLACE, Accokeek, MD
20607. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated January 23, 2009, and recorded in Liber 30373
at Page 035 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $156,450.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on April 10, 2018 at 2:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 05-3680725
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-271251.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
12169267
TRUSTEE'S SALE
9401 Dashia Drive, Fort Washington, MD 20744
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 9401 Dashia Drive, Fort Washington, MD
20744. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated October 25, 2004, and recorded in Liber 21551
at Page 686 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $177,625.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on April 10, 2018 at 2:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 05-0366930
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-263254.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 2018
12170599
TRUSTEE'S SALE
17101 Usher Pl, Upper Marlboro, MD 20772
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 17101 Usher Pl, Upper Marlboro, MD
20772. By virtue of the power and authority contained in
a Deed of Trust, dated December 15, 2006, and recorded
in Liber 26972 at Page 130 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
amount of $360,000.00. Upon default and request for sale,
the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at
the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the
front of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at
14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on April
10, 2018 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed
of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 03-0206359
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or
certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 6.238% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-266290.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-97978
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 2018
12169285
TRUSTEE'S SALE
15103 North Berwick Lane, Upper Marlboro, MD 20774
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 15103 North Berwick Lane, Upper
Marlboro, MD 20774. By virtue of the power and authority
contained in a Deed of Trust, dated July 30, 2013, and
recorded in Liber 35153 at Page 215 among the land records
of the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
amount of $384,599.00. Upon default and request for sale,
the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at
the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the
front of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at
14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on April
10, 2018 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed
of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 03-5511864
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-269215.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 2018
12169271
TRUSTEE'S SALE
6324 PATTERSON STREET, Riverdale, MD 20737
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 6324 PATTERSON STREET, Riverdale, MD
20737. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated September 28, 1992, and recorded in Liber 8664
at Page 210 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $106,050.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on April 10, 2018 at 2:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 19-2146173
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-270276.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
12170702 MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 2018
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 2018
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
v.
ANDREA HILL A/K/A
ANDREA D. HILL
CURTIS HILL
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-39087
NOTICE
v.
GORDON A. TROTZ
BRENDA A. TROTZ
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF15-00433
NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
v.
ANTHONY L BURKS
KHALILAH BURKS
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-26168
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 12th
day of March 2018, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 10607 Terraco Terrace, Cheltenham, MD 20623,
will be ratified and confirmed
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the
12th day of April, 2018, provided a
copy of this NOTICE be published
at least once a week in each of
three successive weeks in some
newspaper of general circulation
published in said County before
the 12th day of April, 2018.
Notice is hereby given this 12th
day of March 2018, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 5028 Leland
Drive, Oxon Hill, MD 20745, will
be ratified and confirmed unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 12th day of
April, 2018, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive
weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said
County before the 12th day of
April, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$258,700.00.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$184,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
March 16, 23, 30, 2018 12170901
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
March 16, 23, 30, 2018 12170904
Notice is hereby given this 12th
day of March 2018, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 14304 Kathleen Lane, Brandywine, MD 20613,
will be ratified and confirmed
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the
12th day of April, 2018, provided a
copy of this NOTICE be published
at least once a week in each of
three successive weeks in some
newspaper of general circulation
published in said County before
the 12th day of April, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$284,750.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
March 16, 23, 30, 2018 12170905
12169729
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
v.
JAMES R. PEYTON
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-33834
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 12th
day of March 2018, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 9805 Lake
Pointe Court, Unit 204, Largo, MD
20774, will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 12th day of April, 2018,
provided a copy of this NOTICE be
published at least once a week in
each of three successive weeks
in some newspaper of general circulation published in said County
before the 12th day of April, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$96,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
March 16, 23, 30, 2018 12170907
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 2018
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
12169274
851
Prince Georges County
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
v.
FRANK A. CARDASCIA
Defendant(s)
v.
CAROL MCKENZIE
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-06325
NOTICE
Civil Action No. CAEF14-22347
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 13th
day of March 2018, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 6414 Fairborn Terrace, Hyattsville, MD
20784, will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 13th day of April, 2018,
provided a copy of this NOTICE be
published at least once a week in
each of three successive weeks
in some newspaper of general circulation published in said County
before the 13th day of April, 2018.
Notice is hereby given this 13th
day of March 2018, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 15940
Alameda Drive, Bowie, MD 20716,
will be ratified and confirmed
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the
13th day of April, 2018, provided a
copy of this NOTICE be published
at least once a week in each of
three successive weeks in some
newspaper of general circulation
published in said County before
the 13th day of April, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$355,162.51.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$290,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
March 16, 23, 30, 2018
12170945
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
March 16, 23, 30, 2018
12170935
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
852
Anne Arundel County
852
D11
Anne Arundel County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
11913 Saint Francis Way, Mitchellville, MD 20721
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 11913 Saint Francis Way, Mitchellville,
MD 20721. By virtue of the power and authority contained
in a Deed of Trust, dated August 3, 2006, and recorded in
Liber 26514 at Page 037 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
amount of $540,900.00. Upon default and request for sale,
the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at
the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the
front of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at
14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on April
10, 2018 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed
of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 07-0730408
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 10-185804P.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-97978
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
110 Holeclaw Street
Annapolis, MD 21401
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
VIRGINIA L. TURNER AND JAMES V. TURNER, dated December
11, 2006 and recorded in Liber 18899, folio 055 among
the Land Records of ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD, default
having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as
Case No.C-02-CV-17-003893; Tax ID No.06-000-01227300
) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the ANNE
ARUNDEL COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 8 CHURCH CIR,
ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401, on
APRIL 18, 2018 at 11:15 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and more
fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $34,700.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten
days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for ANNE
ARUNDEL COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 2018
12169255 for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
TRUSTEE'S SALE
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
9732 WYMAN WAY, Upper Marlboro, MD 20772
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
premises known as 9732 WYMAN WAY, Upper Marlboro, MD transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
20772. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
of Trust, dated February 28, 2007, and recorded in Liber 27396 dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
at Page 440 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $370,120.00. applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on April 10, 2018 at 2:00 PM, all insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
limited to:
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
Tax ID# 11-1146349
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 561834)
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
JAMES E. CLARKE,
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
HUGH J. GREEN,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
SHANNON MENAPACE,
affect same, if any.
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
BRIAN THOMAS,
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
www.hwestauctions.com
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
12173834
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer MARCH 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
ORLANS PC
Trustee's File No. 14-243764.
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG,
VA 20175
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
703-777-7101
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-97978
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
613 Elizabeth Road
Glen Burnie, MD 21061
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from ONA P.
HARRY AND KEITH G. HARRY, dated December 22, 2004 and
recorded in Liber 15801, folio 0294 among the Land Records
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 2018
12169256 of ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD, default having occurred
(Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.C-02-CV-17851
Prince Georges County 852 Anne Arundel County thereunder
003357; Tax ID No.04-323-03161600 ) the Sub. Trustees
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
will
sell
at
public auction at the ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
MARYLAND
COURTHOUSE, located at 8 CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD
Diane S. Rosenberg, et al.
James E. Clarke
21401, on
Substitute Trustees
Hugh J. Green
Shannon Menapace
APRIL 18, 2018 at 11:15 AM
Versus
Christine M. Drexel
Brian Thomas
ALL THAT LEASEHOLD LOT OF GROUND and improvements
John E. Codd, III
Substitute Trustees
Defendant
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and more
Plaintiffs
v.
No. C-02-CV-17-001510 fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The Estate of Melecio S. Soriano,
THE PROPERTY IS SUBJECT TO A GROUND RENT OF $120.00
NOTICE
surviving tenant by the entirety of
Notice is hereby issued this TuesFilomena Soriano, and Florence C.
PAYABLE ON THE 28th DAYS OF March AND September OF
day, March 20, 2018 that the sale
Kogok and Michael E. Kogok as
EACH AND EVERY YEAR
Trustee of the Melecia S. Soriano
of the property in the proceedRevocable Living Trust created by
ings mentioned, made and reportThe property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
Declaration of Trust dated Novemed by Sydney Roberson, Substitute
ber 13, 2007
Trustee.
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
Defendant(s)
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
unless cause to the contrary thereCivil No. CAEF17-40895
of be shown on or before the 19th
Terms of Sale: A deposit $18,100.00 will be required at the
NOTICE PURSUANT
day of April 2018 next; provided,
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
a copy of this Notice be inserted
in some newspaper published in
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Anne Arundel County, once in each
Prince George's County, Maryland,
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten
of three successive weeks before
this 9th day of March 2018, that
the 19th day of April 2018 next. The
the foreclosure sale of the properdays of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for ANNE
report states that the amount of
ty described in the deed of trust
sale of the property at 3485 SOUTH
ARUNDEL COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
docketed herein and located at
RIVER TERRACE, EDGEWATER, MD
5602 Galloway Drive, Oxon Hill,
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
21037 to be $296,000.00.
Maryland 20745, made and reported by James E. Clarke, Hugh J.
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
/S/Robert P Duckworth
Green, Shannon Menapace, ChrisCircuit Court for
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
tine M. Drexel and Brian Thomas,
Anne Arundel County, MD
Substitute Trustees, be RATIFIED
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
and CONFIRMED, unless cause to Mar 30, April 6, 13, 2018 12174433
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
the contrary be shown on or
before the 9th day of April, 2018,
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
provided a copy of this Order be
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
inserted in The Washington Post
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
once in each of three (3) succesthe Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
sive weeks before the 9th day of
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
Diane S. Rosenberg, et al.
April, 2018.
Substitute Trustees
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $133,100.00.
Versus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
Sydney J. Harrison #619
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
Danny Laster
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Defendant
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Prince George's County, Maryland
March 16, 23, 30, 2018 12170933
No. C-02-CV-17-003040 Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
NOTICE
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
Notice is hereby issued this Tuesfor any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
day, March 20, 2018 that the sale
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
of the property in the proceedFOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
ings mentioned, made and reportMARYLAND
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
ed by Jennifer Rochino, Substitute
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Trustee.
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
v.
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 19th
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
JOHN C. STEWART
day of April 2018 next; provided,
Defendant(s)
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
a copy of this Notice be inserted
Civil Action No. CAEF15-32505
in some newspaper published in
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
Anne Arundel County, once in each
NOTICE
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
of three successive weeks before
Notice is hereby given this 12th
the 19th day of April 2018 next. The
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
day of March 2018, by the Circuit
report states that the amount of
Court for Prince George's County,
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
sale of the property at 1605 HAVRE
Maryland, that the sale of the propDE GRACE DRIVE, EDDGEWATER, MD
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
erty mentioned in these proceed21037 to be $261,900.00.
ings and described as 9225 Fowler
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
/S/Robert
P
Duckworth
Lane, Lanham, MD 20706, will be
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
Circuit
Court
for
ratified and confirmed unless
Anne Arundel County, MD
cause to the contrary thereof be
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
shown on or before the 12th day of Mar 30, April 6, 13, 2018 12174437
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
April, 2018, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
a week in each of three successive
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
weeks in some newspaper of genIN THE CIRCUIT COURT
eral circulation published in said
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
County before the 12th day of
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
April, 2018.
Diane S. Rosenberg, et al.
Substitute Trustees
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 580053)
Versus
$182,000.00.
JAMES E. CLARKE,
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Roland G. Poist
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Nicole L. Poist
HUGH J. GREEN,
Prince George's County, Maryland
Defendants
SHANNON MENAPACE,
March 16, 23, 30, 2018 12170798
No. C-02-CV-17-003055
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this TuesSUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
How about some
home delivery?
1-800-753-POST
SF
day, March 20, 2018 that the sale
of the property in the proceedings mentioned, made and reported by Jennifer Rochino, Substitute
Trustee.
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 19th
day of April 2018 next; provided,
a copy of this Notice be inserted
in some newspaper published in
Anne Arundel County, once in each
of three successive weeks before
the 19th day of April 2018 next.
The report states that the amount
of sale of the property at 607 OAKWOOD ROAD, GLEN BURNIE, MD
21061 to be $163,000.00.
/S/Robert P Duckworth
Circuit Court for
Anne Arundel County, MD
Mar 30, April 6, 13, 2018 12174433
www.hwestauctions.com
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
MARCH 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
12173841
OPQRS
Anne Arundel County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1024 4th Street
Glen Burnie, MD 21060
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from BRIAN
CLARK AND KIMBERLY CLARK, dated August 4, 2005 and
recorded in Liber 16707, folio 0539 among the Land Records
of ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD, default having occurred
thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.C-02-CV-17003847; Tax ID No.05-625-90048503 ) the Sub. Trustees
will sell at public auction at the ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, located at 8 CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD
21401, on
APRIL 18, 2018 at 11:15 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and more
fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $26,600.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten
days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for ANNE
ARUNDEL COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 580574)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
852
Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
MARCH 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
12173830
Anne Arundel County
852
PostPoints takes you
to special exhibits.
852
Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
washingtonpost.com/postpoints
Not a member? It’s free! JOIN TODAY.
Calvert County
853
Calvert County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
590 Beech Dr, Lusby, MD 20657
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 590 Beech Dr, Lusby, MD 20657. By virtue
of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust, dated
March 10, 2016, and recorded in Liber 4732 at Page 0331
among the land records of the COUNTY OF CALVERT, in the
original principal amount of $278,489.00. Upon default and
request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at
public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF CALVERT,
at 175 Main Street, Prince Frederick, Maryland, on April 10,
2018 at 9:30 AM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 01-067494
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-266404.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 2018
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 2018
12170068
12169727
ARE YOUR TENANTS
MOVING OUT?
Membership is rewarding.
kes you
PostPoints ta
INSIDE THSIEC.
MU
NO
YES
NO SUCH
LUCK
KEEP US
IN MIND
NEED TO
RENT THE
PLACE OUT?
CLASSIFIED
From classical and swing to alt rock
and synth pop, discover great ways to save
money, win tickets and have fun at concerts.
washingtonpost.com/postpoints
KLMNO
Not a member? It’s free! JOIN TODAY.
S2931 2x4
853
TRUSTEE'S SALE
7728 Gatewood Court, Pasadena, MD 21122
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 7728 Gatewood Court, Pasadena, MD
21122. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated April 30, 2003, and recorded in Liber 12995
at Page 079 among the land records of the County of Anne
Arundel, in the original principal amount of $178,489.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY
OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland,
on April 10, 2018 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in
said Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 03-676-06304411
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-258324.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
From dinosaur bones and
space shuttles to panda
bears and modern art,
discover great ways to
save money, win tickets
and have fun at museums.
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
MARCH 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
12173840
FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 2018
EZ
Anne Arundel County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
1249 Pekin Road, Pasadena, MD 21122
LEESBURG, VA 20175
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
703-777-7101
premises known as 1249 Pekin Road, Pasadena, MD 21122.
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Trust, dated January 30, 2008, and recorded in Liber 20029
at Page 558 among the land records of the COUNTY OF ANNE
1121 Castle Harbour Way, Unit 3A
ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount of $360,000.00.
Glen Burnie, MD 21060
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from ADAM Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
C. LANEHART, dated April 16, 2004 and recorded in Liber offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY
14798, folio 607 among the Land Records of ANNE ARUNDEL OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland,
COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure on April 10, 2018 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in
Case docketed as Case No.C-02-CV-17-002708; Tax ID No.03- said Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
174-90059771 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction Tax ID# 03-542-11449304
at the ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 8 Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401, on
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
APRIL 18, 2018 at 11:15 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements affect same, if any.
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and more TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
Terms of Sale: A deposit $8,100.00 will be required at the will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. association dues and assessments that may become due after
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for ANNE Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
ARUNDEL COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense. the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of Trustee's File No. 17-263730.
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
www.hwestauctions.com
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 2018
12169324
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
Membership is rewarding.
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 579395)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
852
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054F 2x4
ATV
Our readers like to know the terrain of the fascinating
place they inhabit. The Washington Post Magazine is
their vehicle. Stories on destinations, people, and
windows on the local past get them thinking and get
them going. To great restaurants, too.
Meet the readers.
N2569 6x10.5
852
S2929 2x4
D12
852
Anne Arundel County
FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 2018
855
OPQRS
EZ
855
Charles County
Charles County
856
856
Frederick County
873
Frederick County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
12221 Baugher Road
THURMONT, MD 21788
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to ROBERT R. DENNISON, II, Trustee(s),
dated May 8, 2008, and recorded among the Land Records
of FREDERICK COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 7008, folio
0213, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE FREDERICK
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 100 W. PATRICK ST,
FREDERICK, MD 21701 ON,
APRIL 17, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
RECORDED JUNE 12, 2008 IN LIBER 7008, FOLIO 0213.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 12.55% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
www.hwestauctions.com
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
MARCH23, 30, APRIL 6, 2018
12168305 will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
TRUSTEE'S SALE
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
2019 Tanglewood Drive, Waldorf, MD 206014
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
premises known as 2019 Tanglewood Drive, Waldorf, MD are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
20601. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
Deed of Trust, dated August 26, 2009, and recorded in Liber property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
06963 at Page 0476 among the land records of the COUNTY purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
OF CHARLES, in the original principal amount of $173,796.00. mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
OF CHARLES, at 200 Charles St (in the Breezeway between Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
Circuit & District Courts), LaPlata, MD, on April 10, 2018 at the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
12:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
including but not limited to:
Trustee's File No. (57435)
Tax ID# 06-160395
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
www.hwestauctions.com
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
12169369
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments MARCH 30, APRIL 6, 13, 2018
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
TRUSTEE'S SALE
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
9622 Bothwell Lane, Frederick, MD 21704
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. premises known as 9622 Bothwell Lane, Frederick, MD 21704.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement Trust, dated November 24, 2009, and recorded in Liber 7629
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for at Page 0491 among the land records of the COUNTY OF
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the FREDERICK, in the original principal amount of $370,609.00.
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees solicit additional bids at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms FREDERICK, at 100 W. Patrick Street, Frederick, Maryland, on
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. April 16, 2018 at 1:00 PM, all that property described in said
Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
Trustee's File No. 17-270309.
Tax ID# 07-256159
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-97978
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 23, 30, APRIL 6, 2018
12169731 TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
852
857
Anne Arundel County
Howard County
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
FOR HOWARD COUNTY
association dues and assessments that may become due after
MARYLAND
Thomas W. Hodge, et al.
BENJAMIN P. SMITH, et al.
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Substitute Trustees
Substitute Trustees
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
Plaintiff(s)
Versus
vs.
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
Estate of Leroy Brown, et al.
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
5565 STERRETT PLACE, LLC, et al.
Defendants
Defendant(s)
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
Civil No. 13-C-17-111771
No. C-02-CV-17-003637
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
NOTICE PURSUANT
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
TO RULE 14-305(c)
NOTICE
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
Notice is hereby issued this ThursPursuant to Rule 14-305(c),
day, March 8, 2018 that the sale
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Notice is hereby given this 8th
of the property in the proceedday of March 2018 by the Circuit
Trustee's File No. 17-264921.
ings mentioned, made and reportCourt for Howard County, Maryed by Thomas W Hodge, Substitute
land, that the sale of the property
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
Trustee.
mentioned in these proceedings,
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
made and reported by Benjamin
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
unless cause to the contrary thereP. Smith, of the the trustees hereof be shown on or before the 9th
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
in, will be ratified and confirmed,
TRUSTEE'S SALE
17949 Cypress Drive, Cobb Island, MD 20625
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 17949 Cypress Drive, Cobb Island, MD
20625. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated June 30, 2009, and recorded in Liber 6911 at
Page 457 among the land records of the COUNTY OF CHARLES,
in the original principal amount of $211,105.00. Upon default
and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for
sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF
CHARLES, at 200 Charles St (in the Breezeway between Circuit
& District Courts), LaPlata, MD, on April 10, 2018 at 12:00
PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including
but not limited to:
Tax ID# 05-001595
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-269200.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-97978
day of April 2018 next; provided,
a copy of this Notice be inserted
in some newspaper published in
Anne Arundel County, once in each
of three successive weeks before
the 9th day of April 2018 next. The
report states that the amount of
sale of the property at 777 MacSherry Drive, Arnold, MD 21012 to be
$310,000.00.
/S/Robert P Duckworth
Circuit Court for
Anne Arundel County, MD
Mar 16, 23, 30, 2018
12171933
857
Howard County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR HOWARD COUNTY,
MARYLAND
ERIN M. SHAFFER,
Substitute Trustee
Plaintiff,
870
V.
ESTATE OF SANDRA R. THORNE
10676 Scaggsville Rd.
Laurel, MD 20723
Defendant(s)
CASE NO. 13-C-17-113172
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby issued by the Circuit Court of Howard County this
22nd day of March, 2018, that the
sale of the property mentioned
in these proceedings, made and
reported by Erin M. Shaffer, Substitute Trustee, be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary be shown on or before the
23rd day of April, 2018 provided a
copy of this Notice be inserted in
The Washington Post, a newspaper published in Howard County,
Maryland, once in each of three (3)
successive weeks on or before the
16th day of April, 2018.
The report states the amount of
sale to be $269,000.00
Wayne A. Robey
Clerk of the Circuit Court
for Howard County, MD
Mar 30 April 6, 13, 2018 12173307
You, too, could have
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
unless cause to the contrary
thereof be shown on or before
the 16th day of April, 2018, provided a copy of this Notice be
inserted in some newspaper published in said County once in
each of theree successive weeks
before the 9th day of April, 2018.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $7,000,000.00. The
property sold has the following
street address: 5565 STERRETT
PLACE, COLUMBIA, MD 21044.
Wayne A Robey
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Howard County, MD
Ballard Spahr LLP
300 E. Lombard St. 18th Flr.
Baltimore, MD 21202
March 16, 23, 30, 2018 12171019
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Arlington County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
5521 15TH STREET NORTH,
ARLINGTON, VA 22205
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $755,900.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.500000% dated
March 6, 2013, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF ARLINGTON as Deed Book 4662, Page
1613, the undersigned appointed
Substitute Trustee will offer for
sale at public auction all that
property located in the COUNTY
OF ARLINGTON, at the front of
the Circuit Court building for the
County of Arlington located at
1425 N. Courthouse Road, Arlington, Virginia on May 2, 2018 at
12:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 09034016
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: VA. Reference Number 16258914.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
March 30, April 6, 2018 12171608
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
872
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
6455 HOLYOKE DRIVE,
ANNANDALE, VA 22003
Fairfax County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
5604 WILLOUGHBY NEWTON DR,
UNIT 18,
CENTREVILLE, VA 20120
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of All
that certain lot or parcel of land with improvements thereon and
appurtenances thereto appertaining, lying and being situate in Prince
William County, Virginia and more particularly described as follows:
Condominium Unit No. 548, Highpointe at Rippon Landing Condominium
and the limited common elements appurtenant thereto, including limited
common element parking space(s) no. 61 and Storage unit 2D, established
by condominium instruments recorded on November 15, 2006 at Instrument number 200611150161532 among the land records of Prince William
County, Virginia and as more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold "AS IS," WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the
time of sale. A deposit of $17,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever
is lower, in cash or cashier's check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE
will be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price,
with interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted from
the date of sale at the time of settlement. If Purchaser requests counsel
for Substitute Trustee to draft any settlement documents including but
not limited to a deed, a fee of $350.00 shall be paid. Trustee shall have no
duty to obtain possession for purchaser. Seller shall not be responsible
for any costs incurred by the purchaser in connection with their purchase
or settlement, including, without limitation, state and local recording fees,
title insurance or research, or any other costs of purchaser’s acquisition.
All risks of casualty pass to the successful bidder at conclusion of bidding.
In the event the sale is legally null and void, the Purchaser’s sole remedy,
in law or equity, shall be the return of the Purchaser’s deposit without
interest.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding. The
Substitute Trustee is S&T Trustees, LLC, 6802 Paragon Place, Suite 410,
Richmond, VA 23230. For information contact: Diana C. Theologou at
301-468-4990.
March 30, April 6,2018
12172778
872
873
Fairfax County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
8529 Trade Wind Court
Bristow, VA 20136
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $452,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.375000% dated
March 9, 2006, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX
as Deed Book 18279, Page 0415,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at
the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road,
Fairfax, Virginia on May 2, 2018
at 2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 0492070010
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$459,826.00, dated September 25,
2015, recorded among the land
records of the Circuit Court for
Prince William County on September 30, 2015, as Instrument Number 201509300081653, the undersigned
appointed
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction, at the main entrance of
the courthouse for the Circuit Court
of Prince William County, 9311 Lee
Ave, Manassas, VA on May 18, 2018
at 9:30 AM, the property described
in said deed of trust, located at
the above address and briefly
described as: Lot 75, Section 01,
LANIER FARMS, as the same
appears duly dedicated, platted
and recorded in Instrument Number 200301280021029 and rerecorded in Instrument Number
200305270092338 with plats
recorded in Instrument number
200301280021030, among the
records of Prince William County,
Virginia. Tax ID: 7496-95-0479.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $13,000.00 or 10%
of the sale price, whichever is
lower, will be required in the form
of a certified or cashier’s check.
Cash will not be accepted as a
deposit. Settlement within fifteen
(15) days of sale, otherwise Trustee
may forfeit deposit. Additional
terms to be announced at sale.
This is a communication from a
debt collector. This notice is an
attempt to collect on a debt and
any information obtained will be
used for that purpose.
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-267862.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
March 30, April 6, 2018 12173208
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
14534 SMITHWOOD DR,
CENTREVILLE, VA 20120
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $405,900.00, with an annual
interest rate of 6.000000% dated
August 16, 2005, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX
as Deed Book 17644, Page 0772,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at
the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road,
Fairfax, Virginia on April 25, 2018
at 2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 44-3-4--32B
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 18-272971.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
March 23, 30, 2018
873
12170595
Prince William County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
16386 KRAMER ESTATE DR,
WOODBRIDGE, VA 22191
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $507,685.00, with an annual
interest rate of 4.875000% dated
July 6, 2010, recorded among the
land records of the Circuit Court
for the County of Prince William
as Deed Instrument Number
201007090058944, the undersigned appointed Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction all that property located
in the County of Prince William,
on the Court House steps in front
of Main Entrance for the Circuit
Court building for the County of
Prince William located at 9311
Lee Avenue, Manassas, Virginia
on April 24, 2018 at 4:00 PM, the
property with improvements to
wit:
Tax Map No. 8290-63-0840
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: VA. Reference Number 17271660.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $244,120.00, with an annual
interest rate of 7.000000% dated
April 6, 2006, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the County of Fairfax
as Deed Book 18453, Page 0344,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the County of Fairfax,
on the courthouse steps at the
front of the Circuit Court building
for the County of Fairfax located
at 4110 Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on April 18, 2018
at 2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 054411070018
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: VA. Reference Number 18272854.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-268767.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
March 23, 30, 2018
Mar 9, 16, 23, 30, 2018 12169473
Home delivery
is convenient.
You, too, could have
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Don’t
miss a
minute.
SF
SF
Prince William County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
2603 SHELBY LANE,
FALLS CHURCH, VA 22043
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $607,792.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.750000% dated
February 16, 2016, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 24456,
Page 0562, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on April 25, 2018 at 2:30 PM,
the property with improvements
to wit:
Tax Map No. 061-3-06-0034
12169442
D13
Prince William County
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
March 28, 2007, and recorded at Instrument Number 200703290038418
in the Clerk's Office for the Circuit Court for Prince William County,
VA, securing a loan which was originally $171,900.00. The appointed
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, S&T Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at public
auction at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince William County,
9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas, VA 20110 on:
April 13, 2018 at 11:00 AM
12172340
872
Fairfax County
873
878
March 23, 30, 2018
12169494
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
878
Stafford County
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
15548 HORSESHOE LANE,
WOODBRIDGE, VA 22191
www.hwestauctions.com
APRIL 6, 13, 20, 2018
Prince William County
881
Stafford County
NOTICE OF TRUSTEES' SALE
2511 MEETING HOUSE ROAD
LOCUST GROVE, VA 22508
Pursuant to the terms of a certain 1 Deed of Trust, in the original principal
amount of $202,150.00 , dated September 22, 2010, and recorded in
the Clerk's Office of the Circuit Court of Stafford, Virginia (the "Clerk's
Office"), as Instrument Number LR100015336, default having been made
in the payment of the note thereby secured, the undersigned Sole Acting
Substitute Trustees, pursuant to the request of the holder of the Note
thereby secured, will offer for sale at public auction outside of the
Stafford Circuit Court, located at 1300 Courthouse Road, Stafford, VA
22555 on April 10, 2018 at 10:00 AM, the property briefly described as 200
WIMBELDON CT, STAFFORD, VA 22556, and more particularly described in
said Deed of Trust as follows:
In execution of a Deed of Trust dated April 26, 2007, in the original amount
of $44,600.00, recorded as Instrument Number 070004102 in the Clerk's
Office of the Circuit Court of Orange County, Virginia, the undersigned
Trustees, any of whom may act, will on April 18, 2018, at 11:00 a.m., by the
front main entrance to the Orange County Circuit Court, 110 N. Madison
Road, Orange, Virginia 22960, offer for sale at public auction to the highest
bidder the following property with improvements thereon:
Unit Number 212, Phase 23-B, Sunningdale Meadow Condominium,
established pursuant to the declaration of Condominium recorded in
Deed Book 705, Page 311 as amended in the Clerk‘s Office of the Circuit
Court of Stafford County, Virginia, with improvements thereon.
TERMS OF SALE: Cash. A ten percent (10%) bidder's deposit in cash
or certified check payable to the Trustee(s) shall be required of the
successful bidder at the time of sale before the bidding will be closed;
settlement must be made within twenty (20) days from the date of sale
or property to be resold at cost of defaulting purchaser. All costs of
conveyancing, examination of title, recording charges, etc. will be at
cost of purchaser. Neither the Substitute Trustees, nor any other party
guarantees or covenants to deliver, or in any way, to obtain possession
of the premises for any third party purchaser. Additional terms may be
announced at the time of sale. Sale will also be subject to additional terms
contained in the Memorandum of Sale to be executed by the successful
bidder upon purchase.
Commonwealth Asset Services, LLC
Sole Acting Substitute Trustees
This communication is from a debt collector. This is an attempt to collect
a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
Commonwealth Asset Services, LLC
281 Independence Boulevard, Pembroke One Building, 5th Floor,
Virginia Beach, VA 23462
www.sykesbourdon.com
(757) 965-5097 BETWEEN HOURS OF 9:00 A.M. and 11:00 A.M. ONLY
Our Case No: CA16-190175-3
March 30, April 6, 2018
12173284
TRUSTEE‘S SALE OF
15 Rosepetal St.
Stafford, VA 22556
Pursuant to the terms of a certain Deed of Trust, in the original principal
amount of $369,747.00 , dated June 5, 2009, and recorded in the Clerk's
Office of the Circuit Court of Stafford, Virginia (the "Clerk's Office"), as
Instrument Number 090009666, default having been made in the payment
of the note thereby secured, the undersigned Sole Acting Substitute
Trustees, pursuant to the request of the holder of the Note thereby
secured, will offer for sale at public auction outside of the Stafford Circuit
Court, located at 1300 Courthouse Road, Stafford, VA 22555 on April 10,
2018 at 10:00 AM, the property briefly described as 15 Rosepetal St.,
Stafford, VA 22556, and more particularly described in said Deed of Trust
as follows:
Being known and designated as Lot No. 53, Section 5, Rosedale, as the
same is duly dedicated, platted and recorded in Plat Book 9, (erroneously
stated as Deed Book 9), Page 174, among the Land Records of Stafford
County, Virginia. The improvements thereon being known as 15 Rosepetal
Street.
, with improvements thereon.
TERMS OF SALE: Cash. A ten percent (10%) bidder's deposit in cash
or certified check payable to the Trustee(s) shall be required of the
successful bidder at the time of sale before the bidding will be closed;
settlement must be made within twenty (20) days from the date of sale
or property to be resold at cost of defaulting purchaser. All costs of
conveyancing, examination of title, recording charges, etc. will be at
cost of purchaser. Neither the Substitute Trustees, nor any other party
guarantees or covenants to deliver, or in any way, to obtain possession
of the premises for any third party purchaser. Additional terms may be
announced at the time of sale. Sale will also be subject to additional terms
contained in the Memorandum of Sale to be executed by the successful
bidder upon purchase.
Commonwealth Asset Services, LLC
Sole Acting Substitute Trustees
This communication is from a debt collector. This is an attempt to collect
a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
Commonwealth Asset Services, LLC
281 Independence Boulevard, Pembroke One Building, 5th Floor,
Virginia Beach, VA 23462
www.sykesbourdon.com
(757) 965-5097 BETWEEN HOURS OF 9:00 A.M. and 11:00 A.M. ONLY
Our Case No: CA18-190032-1
March 30, April 6, 2018
N
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $348,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 4.750000% dated
March 30, 2007, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF PRINCE
WILLIAM as Deed Instrument
Number 200704050041745, the
undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF PRINCE
WILLIAM, on the Court House
steps in front of Main Entrance for
the Circuit Court building for the
County of Prince William located
at 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas,
Virginia on May 1, 2018 at 4:00 PM,
the property with improvements
to wit:
Tax Map No. 8392-11-9064
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-263893.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
March 30, April 6, 2018 12168695
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
2652 COLLINS CT.,
HAYMARKET, VA 20169
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $296,934.00, with an annual
interest rate of 4.000000% dated
July 25, 2016, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the County of Prince
William as Deed Instrument Number 201608020060346, the undersigned appointed Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction all that property located
in the County of Prince William,
on the Court House steps in front
of Main Entrance for the Circuit
Court building for the County of
Prince William located at 9311
Lee Avenue, Manassas, Virginia
on May 1, 2018 at 4:00 PM, the
property with improvements to
wit:
Tax Map No. 7201-02-7839
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: FHA. Reference Number
17-271336.
12173285
N
JOBS
877
Spotsylvania County
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated May 17, 2006, in
the original principal amount of
$503,860.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Spotsylvania County, Virginia as
Instrument No. LR200600018282.
The
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction in the front of the Circuit
Court building for Spotsylvania
County, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, Virginia on May 3,
2018, at 4:00 PM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT,
PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND, WITH
ALL IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
AND ALL APPURTENANCES THERETO BELONGING, LOCATED AND
BEING IN THE COUNTY OF SPOTSYLVANIA, COMMONWEALTH OF
VIRGINIA, AND BEING DESCRIBED
AS FOLLOWS: LOT 182, AS SHOWN
ON THAT CERTAIN PLAT ENTITLED
"PLAT OF SUBDIVISION, SECTION
ONE-C, POD B AT LEE‘S PARKE",
MADE BY SULLIVAN, DONOHOE
AND INGALLS, RECORDED AS
INSTRUMENT
NUMBER
200500038492, AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS
OF
SPOTSYLVANIA
COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-1206321.
Mar 30, Apr 6, 2018
12174153
Mar 23, 30, Apr 6, 2018 12170562
Career Training - Emp Svcs
SF
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
Wake up
to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
SF
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
AIRLINES ARE HIRING-Get
FAA approved hands on
Aviation training. Financial aid
for qualified students – Career
placement assistance.
CALL Aviation Institute of
Maintenance
888-896-7869
SF
Wake up
to home delivery.
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
1-800-753-POST
SF
1-800-753-POST
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
SF
1-800-753-POST
SF
12172433
C
JOBS
JOBS
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers are needed
to deliver
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers are needed
to deliver
The Washington
Post
The Washington
Post
for the following
areas:
for the following
areas:
For routes in
For routes in
Upper NW area
in D.C.
Olney, Silver Spring
& Rockville, MD
Call Dan Santos at
240-912-7978
Don Money at
301-674-0010
Excellent part-time
income!
Reliable transportation
required.
Excellent part-time
income!
Reliable transportation
required.
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers are needed
to deliver
The Washington
Post
for the following
areas:
For routes in
For routes in
Suitland, Oxon Hill
and Temple Hills, MD
Call Mr. Howard
at 301-627-2408
For routes in
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$96,400.00, with an annual interest rate of 5.250000% dated May
3, 2002, recorded among the land
records of the Circuit Court for
the COUNTY OF LOUDOUN as Deed
Book 2175, Page 0187, the undersigned appointed Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction all that property located
in the COUNTY OF LOUDOUN, on
the courthouse steps in front of
the Circuit Court building for the
County of Loudoun located at 18
East Market Street, Leesburg Virginia on April 11, 2018 at 9:30 AM,
the property with improvements
to wit:
Tax Map No. 82-E16-56
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
C
Arlington, VA
Call
703-580-7916
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
5618 EAST KESSLERS CROSSING,
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22407
Home
delivery
makes good
sense.
For Information contact:
William H. Casterline, Jr.
BLANKINGSHIP & KEITH, PC
4020 University Drive #300
Fairfax, Virginia 22030
(703) 691-1235
March 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 2018
for the following
areas:
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
47550 RIPPLING DR,
STERLING, VA 20165
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-265230.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
March 23, 30, 2018
12173022
The balance of the purchase price shall be paid by bank or cashier’s
check or wire transfer. Settlement shall be at the offices of the Substitute
Trustees or other mutually agreed location. The Property and any
improvements thereon shall be sold in "as is" condition without any
warranties. The successful bidder shall assume all loss or damage to
the Property from and after the strike down of the final bid at the sale.
Purchaser shall be responsible for all costs of the conveyance, which shall
be by special warranty including, but not limited to, the preparation of
the deed and the grantor's tax. Real estate taxes prorated to the date
of the foreclosure will be paid by the Substitute Trustees. The purchaser
shall be responsible for all assessments, sewer or water charges, and real
estate taxes due from and after the sale date. The sale is subject to such
additional terms as the Substitute Trustees may announce at the time
of sale. The purchaser will be required to sign a Memorandum of Sale
incorporating all the terms of the sale.
William H. Casterline, Jr.
Jeremy B. Root
James R. Meizanis
The Washington
Post
To apply, go to
deliverthepost.com
Loudoun County
This sale is subject to the restrictions, rights of way, conditions, easements, and mechanic's liens, if any, whether of record or not of record,
to the extent any of the foregoing apply and take priority over the lien of
the Deed of Trust. This sale further is subject to a Deed of Trust recorded
as Instrument Number 070004101 in the original amount of $202,000.00.
Deposit of $2,000.00 by cashier's check shall be required to qualify as a
bidder prior to the sale, except from the Noteholder.
The deposit, without interest, is applied to the purchase price at settlement. Settlement will be held on or before fifteen (15) days after sale;
time being of the essence. Upon purchaser's default, the deposit shall
be forfeited and the Property shall be resold at the risk and costs of the
defaulting purchaser.
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers are needed
to deliver
Great part-time income opportunity!
Transportation required.
876
All that certain tract or parcel of land, with all improvements
thereon and all appurtenances thereunto belonging, lying and being
situate in the Gordon District of Orange County, Virginia, containing
2.995 acres, more or less, and being more particularly shown
and described on that certain plat of survey entitled “Boundary
Survey Portion of Dorothy C. Lewis Property…” by Wylie E. Herndon,
Land Surveyor, dated April 5, 2006, recorded in the Clerk’s office,
Circuit Court, Orange County, Virginia, in Plat Cabinet L, Slot 204.
Tax Map Number: 0120000000045C
JOBS
Newspapers carriers
needed to deliver
The Washington Post
in
DC, MD and VA area.
(Trustee # 581642)
Substitute Trustee: ALG Trustee,
LLC, C/O Orlans PC PO Box 2548,
Leesburg, VA 20177, (703) 7777101,
website:
http://www.orlans.com
Towne #: 5000.1021
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
2125 CULPEPER DR,
WOODBRIDGE, VA 22191
Orange County
TRUSTEE‘S SALE OF
200 WIMBELDON CT
STAFFORD, VA 22556
All that certain lot or parcel of land situate in the County of Stafford,
Commonwealth of Virginia, and being more particularly described as
follows:
March 30, April 6, 13, 20, 2018
12170952
881
Orange County
Alexandria, VA
Call
703-780-1910
Excellent part-time
income!
Reliable transportation
required.
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers are needed
to deliver
Excellent part-time
income!
Reliable transportation
required.
Out-of-Town
Real Estate
DELAWARE New Move-In Ready
Homes! Low Taxes! Close to
Beaches, Gated, Olympic pool. New
Homes from low $100’s. No HOA
Fees. Brochures Available.
1-866-629-0770 or
www.coolbranch.com
The Washington
Post
for the following
areas:
You, too,
could have
home
delivery.
For routes in
Bladensburg,
Riverdale and
Lanham, MD
Call Monique
Reddy at
301-728-0459
Excellent part-time
income!
Reliable transportation
required.
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers are needed
to deliver
1-800-753-POST
The Washington
Post
for the following
areas:
SF
For routes in
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
Woodbridge, VA
Call
571-477-5603
1-800-753-POST
For routes in
Wake up to
home delivery.
SF
Alexandria, VA
1-800-753-POST
Call
301-933-8425 or
703-785-8816
Excellent part-time
income!
Reliable transportation
required.
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
1-800-753-POST
SF
1-800-753-POST
SF
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
SF
SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Pay your bill faster than you can say “breaking news.”
Enroll your Washington
Wash
Post subscription in Easy Pay and we’ll automatic
automatically charge your card when a payment
fu no hassle, no interruptions.
is due–no fuss,
Democracy Dies in Darkness
ENRO TODAY Visit sub.wpsubscribe.com/easy or call 202-334-6100.
ENROLL
S0833-1 10x2
Cars
OPQRS
D14
SPONSORED BY CARS.COM
CARS 10K
$
OR LESS
FORD 2014 FOCUS S $8,995
FORD 2014 FIESTA S $7,995
FORD 2013 C-MAX ENERGI SEL $8,995
Ford 2014 Focus SE $9,989
FWD, 1-OWNER, CLEAN CARFAX
FWD, MANAGER SPECIAL
MANAGER SPECIAL
4 door w/ hatch, auto., silver
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422 Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422 Alexandria Hyundai
703-535-6840 Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
BMW
FORD
BMW 2007 530XI AWD $9,999
MANAGER SPECIAL
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
FORD 2016 FIESTA SE $9,895
FWD, 1-OWNER, CLEAN CARFAX
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 2018
EZ
HYUNDAI
Place
for as your ad he
re
little a
s $10
Local
202-3 Dealers
34-47
10
Privat
e
P
a
202-3
r
34-62 ty
00
NISSAN
Hyundai 2012 Accent GLS $8,989
48K miles, auto., Va. Insp. pw., pl.
Alexandria Hyundai
703-535-6840
TOYOTA
Toyota 2007 Prius Touring $5,989
NISSAN 2016 VERSA NOTE SV $9995
Nav., Well maintained. Inspected
FWD, 1-OWNER, CLEAN CARFAX
703-535-6840
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422 Alexandria Hyundai
TOYOTA 2000 COROLLA $1,650/obo
4 door, runs great, clean in and out,
auto, silver, MD inspection.
Call 301-412-6336
You, too, could have
home delivery.
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
1-800-753-POST
SF
CARS 10K OR LESS
$
FORD 2015 FUSION S FWD
1-OWNER, CLEAN CARFAX. $13995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
BMW
2007
530XI
AWD
MANAGER SPECIAL. ONLY $9,999
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
CHEVROLET
FORD
2014
FIESTA
S
FWD
MANAGER SPECIAL. ONLY $7,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
HYUNDAI
NISSAN 2016 VERSA NOTE SV FWD 1408
1-OWNER, CLN CRFX. ONLY $9,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
CHEVROLET 1971 CORVETTE
Fire maroon with T-Top, 350, motor
has been reworked. Must See.
NISSAN 2015 ALTIMA 2.5S FWD
$25,500 firm. Call 301-943-1963
1-OWNER, CLEAN CARFAX. $14,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
Antiques & Classics
HYUNDAI 2017 ELANTRA SE FWD
1-OWNER, CLEAN CARFAX. $11,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
1447
CHEVROLET 2008 IMPALA 4 door,
3.9, V6, automatic, runs good, 148K
miles, am/fm $2100/ obo.
Call 240-595-7562
FORD
FORD 2016 FOCUS SE FWD
1-OWNER, CLEAN CARFAX. $11,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
FORD 2016 FIESTA SE FWD
1-OWNER, CLEAN CARFAX. $9895
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
FORD 2015 FOCUS SE FWD
1-OWNER, CLEAN CARFAX. $10,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
FORD
2014
FOCUS
S
FWD
1-OWNER, CLN CRFX. ONLY $8,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
HYUNDAI 2016 ELANTRA SE FWD
1-OWNER, CLEAN CARFAX. $11,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
FORD 2014 C-MAX ENERGI SEL FWD
1-OWNER, CLEAN CARFAX. $12,495
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
NISSAN
TOYOTA
NISSAN 2017 SENTRA SV FWD
1-OWNER, CLEAN CARFAX. $13,495
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
TOYOTA 2016 COROLLA LE FWD,
1-OWNER CLN CARFAX. ONLY $13,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
Wake up
to home delivery.
TOYOTA 2000 COROLLA - 4 door,
runs great, clean in and out,
auto, silver, MD inspection. 207K
$1,450/obo. Call 301-412-6336
HONDA
HONDA 2015 CIVIC LX FWD, 1 OWNER,
CLEAN CARFAX. ONLY $13,477
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
HONDA 2014 CIVIC LX FWD, LOW
MILES, IMMACULATE. ONLY $12,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
HONDA 2012 ACCORD EXL 3.5 FWD
MANAGER SPECIAL. ONLY $13,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
NISSAN 2011 SENTRA 2.0SL FWD
SUPER
CLEAN.
ONLY
$6,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
VOLKSWAGEN
1-800-753-POST
SF
VOLKSWAGON 2012 GTI DSG FWD
MANAGER SPECIAL. ONLY $11,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
Trucks
1480
Trucks
1485
CHEVROLET 2015 COLORADO Z71 4X4
4DR CREWCAB MGR SPECIAL. $21995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
NISSAN 1990 Pick Up V6, ext cab,
seats 2, tool box cabinet in back,
work truck, 148K Needs paint.
Runs good $975.00 240-595-7562
FORD 2015 F-150XL 8'BED
MANAGER SPECIAL. $23,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
Autos Wanted
DONATE AUTOS, TRUCKS, RV'S.
LUTHERAN MISSION SOCIETY. Your
donation helps local families with
food, clothing, shelter, counseling.
Tax deductible. MVA License
#W1044. 410-636-0123 or
www.LutheranMissionSociety.org
WANTED VINTAGE SPORTS CARS &
CLASSICS, Especially Mercedes,
Porsche, Jaguar. highest prices
paid for the very best examples
Call Bob 703-966-0122
1475
1480
Easy Pay keeps you in-the-know.
(And your subscription up-to-date.)
ENROLL TODAY
Visit sub.wpsubscribe.com/easy
or call 202-334-6100.
Commercial &
Specialized Vehicles
WHEEL CHAIR ACCESIBLE VANS
32 in stock. Starting at $7,000.
VA Dealer #12069.
1-800-420-6470
ASK FOR STEVE.
Democracy Dies in Darkness
Dem
Vans
DODGE 2017 CARAVAN SXT FED
1-OWNER, CLEAN CARFAX. $19,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
FORD 2016 TRANSIT CONNECT XL
MGR SPECIAL, 11K MILES. $18995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
FORD 2015 TRANSIT CONNECT XLT
MANAGER SPECIAL. ONLY $16,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
MERCEDES-BENZ 2012 SPRINTER
2500 MGR SPECIAL. ONLY $22,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
1490
S0833-1 6x2
BMW
1490
Sports Utility Vehicles
1490
Sports Utility Vehicles
FORD 2015 ESCAPE SE 4X4
1-OWNER, CLEAN CARFAX. $15,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
FORD 2010 EXPEDITION LIMITED 4X4
LOADED, IMMACULATE. ONLY $13995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
FORD 2013 EXPLORER XLT 4X4
MANAGER SPECIAL. ONLY $18,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
GMC 2012 TERRAIN SLE-1 4X4, 89K
MI, JUST REDUCED. ONLY $10,895
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
FORD 2013 C-MAX ENERGI SEL
MANAGER SPECIAL. ONLY $8,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
JEEP 2016 PATRIOT LATTITUDE FWD
1-OWNER, CLEAN CARFAX. $15,495.
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
FORD 2012 EXPEDITION LIMITED 4X4
LOADED, IMMACULATE. ONLY $17995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
JEEP 2007 WRANGLER X 4X4
MANAGER SPECIAL. ONLY $13,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
Sports Utility Vehicles
FORD 2016 ESCAPE SE FWD
1-OWNER, CLN CRFX. $15,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
FORD 2015 FUSION ENERGI SEL
FWD, IMMACULATE. ONLY $12,999
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
NISSAN 2015 ROGUE SV AWD
1-OWNER, CLEAN CARFAX. $17,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
Home delivery
is convenient.
TOYOTA 2015 RAV 4 LE AWD
1-OWNER, CLEAN CARFAX. $18,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
1-800-753-POST
SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
FROM
"NO FOOD ALLOWED."
TO
"HOW OLD ARE THESE FRIES?"
C3748 6x10.5
You know us for shopping, and now Cars.com is the site for
the entire life of your car. So for every turn, turn to Cars.com.
IS YOUR OLD CAR HOLDING UP?
YES
NO
NO
8"/5504&--*5
)&.&"/4
YES
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
NJMMJPOSFBEFSTDBSTIPQQFSTJODMVEFEttXBTIJOHUPOQPTUDPNDMBTTJmFEt0QFO0SQMBDFZPVSBEJO&YQSFTTPVSEBJMZDPNNVUFSSFBEBOESFBDISFBEFST
Source: Scarborough 2012, Release 2. Washington Post newspaper 7-day cumulative reach; Express 5-day reach.
C054E 10x2
THE WASHINGTON POST . GOINGOUTGUIDE.COM
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30, 2018
Weekend
Rising from
the ashes
Behold the art of the legendary Burning Man
festival without leaving D.C.
PAGE 17
WASHINGTON POST STAFF ILLUSTRATION/PHOTO BY MARVIN JOSEPH/THE WASHINGTON POST
THE HOTLIST
$20 DINER
MOVIES
Mark your calendars with the
best April has to offer in music,
art and festivals. 6
Is it time to stick a fork in that
request for Western flatware? A
helping hand with etiquette. 10
Whether you’ll love “Ready
Player One” hinges on your
feelings about video games. 28
2
EZ
TWO-STEP CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CLEANING
3 AREAS AND A FREE HALL!
$99!
([SLUHV
4 AREAS AND A FREE HALL!
$129!
SAVE $76!
([SLUHV
SAVE $91!
2IIHUVPD\QRWEHDYDLODEOHRXWVLGHWKHVHUYLFHWHUULWRU\$QDUHDLVGH¿QHGDVDURRPXSWRVTXDUH
IHHW&RPELQDWLRQDUHDVDQGDUHDVRYHUVTXDUHIHHWDUHFRQVLGHUHGDVVHSDUDWHDUHDV
Baths, staircases, landings, additional halls, walk-in closets, and area rugs are additional cost.
9DOLGIRUUHVLGHQWLDODUHDVRQO\1RWYDOLGZLWKRWKHUFRXSRQVRURIIHUV
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30, 2018
AIR DUCT CLEANING
ARE YOUR AIR DUCTS CLEAN?
SERVING VIRGINIA, MARYLAND, & DC
$99
SAVE $195
Additional vents $20 each. Includes FREE System Inspection.
([SLUHV
I N SID E
Dining
It’s a group
effort to assist
a diner whose
parents might
ruin his
reputation. 11
Stage
Arena Stage’s
production of
“Two Trains
Running”
carries a
personal touch
from August
Wilson. 23
Best Bets
3
Noteworthy events this week
EZ
Awesome Con
A celebration of all kinds of pop
culture, Awesome Con is rolling
into its sixth year with an
impressive roster of celebrities
and creators — John Boyega of
the Star Wars franchise, Michael
Dorn of multiple Star Trek series,
Cress Williams of “Black
Lightning” and Charisma
Carpenter of “Buffy the Vampire
Slayer” fame. If you aren’t much
for standing in line for photo
ops, hit the vast exhibit hall and
get all your cosplay shopping for
the year done in one fell swoop.
When: Friday through Sunday.
Where: Walter E. Washington
Convention Center, 801 Mount
Vernon Pl. NW.
awesome-con.com.
Tickets: $40-$55; three-day
weekend pass $80.
Music
Screaming
Females; Brent
Cobb;
Dashboard
Confessional;
Ravyn Lenae;
Superchunk. 5
JAHI CHIKWENDIU/THE WASHINGTON POST
Send a colorful kite soaring or watch the acrobatics of others on Saturday afternoon.
Blossom Kite Festival
Movies
“Journey’s End”
explores
leadership and
self-sacrifice
amid the first
World War. 29
LINDA WANG FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Flemeth from Dragon Age
was roaming last year’s
Awesome Con.
‘John’
Damaged City punk festival
This locally produced documentary follows first-time
restaurateurs Aaron Silverman of Rose’s Luxury and
Frank Linn of Frankly . . . Pizza! as they attempt to get
their businesses up and running. (Spoiler alert: One
of them is promptly named “Best New Restaurant in
America” by Bon Appétit.) Among the experts
included in the film are chef Michel Richard, New
York restaurant titan Danny Meyer and The
Washington Post’s $20 Diner columnist Tim Carman.
Concurrent screenings in the District and Bethesda
are followed by Q&A sessions with local chefs.
D.C.’s sixth annual festival devoted to hardcore punk
is scheduled for the first weekend in April this year,
with shows across the city, including at All Souls
Unitarian Church, the Black Cat and the Northeast
art space Hole in the Sky. Damaged City’s packed
lineup includes D.C.’s Guilt Parade, New York’s
Warthog and bands from as far afield as France and
the United Kingdom. Thursday’s “pre-show” festival
kickoff serves as a record release party for
Baltimore’s heavy, bombastic and increasingly
popular Turnstile, recently featured on NPR and in the
New York Times. Advance tickets are sold out, but
some will be available at the door.
When: Wednesday at 7 p.m.
Where: Signature Theatre,
4200 Campbell Ave., Arlington.
sigtheatre.org.
Where: Landmark Theatres Bethesda Row (7235
Woodmont Ave., Bethesda) and E Street Cinema (555
11th St. NW). landmarktheatres.com.
Tickets: $40-$94.
Tickets: $15.
When: Thursday through April 8.
Where: Various locations across the District.
damaged-city.com.
Tickets: $5-$35.
— Adele Chapin, Sadie Dingfelder and Fritz Hahn
MARCH 30, 2018
‘New Chefs on the Block’
. FRIDAY,
When: Tuesday through April
29.
When: Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Where: Washington Monument grounds, 17th Street and Constitution Avenue NW.
nationalcherryblossomfestival.org.
Admission: Free.
THE WASHINGTON POST
On the cover
Marco
Cochrane’s 18foot “Truth Is
Beauty”
sculpture, part
of the “No
Spectators: The
Art of Burning
Man” exhibition
opening Friday
at the Renwick
Gallery.
If you’re more inclined to think of
homey bed-and-breakfasts as
creepy rather than relaxing, you
might be the target audience for
Signature Theatre’s “John.”
Playwright Annie Baker sets her
tale in a B&B in Gettysburg, Pa.,
where a young couple from
Brooklyn heads for what’s
supposed to be a romantic
weekend — until a few eerie
occurrences and a strange
innkeeper force them to
examine the fissures in their
relationship.
One of the National Cherry Blossom Festival’s most popular events, the Blossom Kite
Festival fills the sky around the Washington Monument with hundreds of colorful kites in all
shapes and sizes. The day begins with a dazzling parade of kites and includes a “ballet” —
exactly what it sounds like — and demonstrations by experts, as well as a kite-building
station for families.
4
EZ
Theater
Our critics weigh in on noteworthy shows
‘The Beckett Trio’
‘Hold These Truths’
Nanna Ingvarsson, below, is the
only visible figure in an aptly
intense showcase of three
bleak, minimalist Samuel
Beckett playlets directed by
Robert McNamara for Scena
Theatre. In “Not I,” the actress
depicts the protagonist: a
disembodied mouth hovering
midair, amid darkness. It’s a
tour de force by the actress,
who generates welcome bursts
of humor with her squawks and
scoffs. Through April 8 at the
Atlas Performing Arts Center.
$25-$35. — Celia Wren
Jeanne Sakata’s script about
Gordon Hirabayashi, the reallife figure who refused to
comply with the American
policy of internment for anyone
of Japanese descent in the
wake of Pearl Harbor, is
functional biography. But as
performed by the entirely
watchable Ryun Yu, the solo
show is a timely reminder. The
audience listens closely as a
baffled and increasingly bitter
Hirabayashi tries to reassure
himself that the Constitution
really means what it says.
Through April 10 at Arena Stage.
$40-$101. — Nelson Pressley
‘Chicago’
TERESA CASTRACANE PHOTOGRAPHY
Jon Hudson Odom, left, and Joe Carlson in “Nat Turner in Jerusalem,” which takes place the night
before the leader of the largest slave rebellion in U.S. history is to be hanged.
‘Nat Turner in Jerusalem’
JAE YI PHOTOGRAPHY
You never expect slave rebellion leader Nat Turner to lose the moral high ground, and in Nathan Alan Davis’s 90minute drama, he doesn’t. Lights slice across the set just so, and the chains draped around Jon Hudson Odom’s
legs and shoulders clank heavily as he conducts himself like Jesus at the Last Supper. Forum Theatre is one of the
most exacting small troupes in town, and this is a superior production. Through April 7 at Forum Theatre. $33-$38.
— Nelson Pressley
WORLD-PREMIERE MUSICAL
“POWERFUL … DEEPLY RESONANT”
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30, 2018
— Seattle Times
AUGUST WILSON’S
TWO TRAINS RUNNING
STARTS TODAY
Maria Rizzo’s Roxie Hart is the
shiniest object in the show at
the intimate Keegan Theatre,
but directors Susan Marie Rhea
and Mark A. Rhea get credit for
creating a merry tone and for
giving emerging talent a
chance to stretch. It’s not a
champagne “Chicago,” but for
bathtub gin, it ain’t bad.
Through April 14 at Keegan
Theatre. $45-$55. — Nelson
Pressley
SNOW CHILD
BEGINS APRIL 13
BY AUGUST WILSON | DIRECTED BY JULIETTE CARRILLO
CO-PRODUCTION WITH SEATTLE REPERTORY THEATRE
BOOK BY JOHN STRAND | MUSIC BY BOB BANGHART AND GEORGIA STITT
LYRICS BY GEORGIA STITT | DIRECTED BY MOLLY SMITH
MUSIC SUPERVISOR AND ORCHESTRATIONS BY LYNNE SHANKEL
CO-PRODUCTION WITH PERSEVERANCE THEATRE
Photo of Carlton Byrd for Seattle Repertory Theatre by Nate Watters.
Photo of Christiane Noll, Fina Strazza and Matt Bogart by Tony Powell.
ORDER TODAY! ARENASTAGE.ORG | 202-488-3300
Music
5
EZ
4 more concerts to catch
BY
B RIANA Y OUNGER
Brent Cobb
There’s something warm and
endearing about the Southern,
rural sounds on Brent Cobb’s major label debut, “Shine On Rainy
Day.” The album was released in
2016, but Cobb has had no problem staying busy ever since: He
spent last year opening for Tim
McGraw and Faith Hill as well as
Chris Stapleton’s “All American
Road Show” tour, which was recently extended through November. Now, as he preps some anticipated new music, Cobb is taking a
little time to headline a few smaller venues. This is your chance to
get up close and personal with
him before he’s headlining his
own arenas. Saturday at 9 p.m. at
DC9. dc9.club. $15.
FARRAH SKEIKY
Screaming Females members, from left, Jarrett Dougherty, Marissa Paternoster and “King”
Mike Abbate.
No rock
left unturned
Dashboard Confessional
In the early aughts, Dashboard
Confessional was like a rite of
passage for angsty teenagers
drawn to forlorn lyrics and Chris
Carrabba’s eternally pained vocals. The band’s debut, “The Swiss
Army Romance,” released in
2000, was a place for the heartbroken and dejected to feel seen,
paving the way for emo music’s
rise to popularity. In the decade
that followed, there were five
more albums — three of which
were certified gold — before the
band went quiet. After nearly
nine years, Dashboard has returned with “Crooked Shadows,”
which traded in the closeness of
those first albums for something
more pop-adjacent and, perhaps,
more grown up. Saturday at 6:30
p.m. at the Fillmore.
fillmoresilverspring.com. $33.60.
Ravyn Lenae
Ravyn Lenae has said that she
likes to connect colors and emotions, which then translate into a
divine blend of pop and soul. Last
year’s “Midnight Moonlight EP”
was, as its name might imply, a
serene and starry-eyed collection
perfect for that late-night calm
beside a loved one. Lenae’s latest
EP, “Crush,” with its fire-engine
red cover, finds the Chicago singer in a more flirtatious mood. She
pushes her sound in a more experimental direction with the
help of Steve Lacy (who is best
known for his work with the
Internet), but to call her promising is an understatement. It’s
clear that Lenae isn’t here just to
get a hit or several. As she continues to evolve, her touch could
trickle its way into music beyond
her own for years to come. Thursday at 8 p.m. at Songbyrd.
songbyrddc.com. Sold out.
Superchunk
When Drake and Future
dropped their album “What a
Time to Be Alive,” it amounted to
a 40-minute victory lap for two
rappers who had plenty to celebrate at the peak of their popularity. Superchunk’s new album of
the same name, which takes aim
at the current political landscape,
has a lot more riding on it. The
lyrics are charged and direct (“I
hope you die scared of all the kids
that know the truth”), but the
North Carolina band manages to
turn turmoil into a compelling
portrait. Protest music has never
sounded so fun. Tuesday at 7:30
p.m. (doors) at the Black Cat.
blackcatdc.com. $22-$25.
goingoutguide@washpost.com
Screaming Females
Show: Wednesday at 8 p.m. at the Rock and Roll Hotel. rockandrollhoteldc.com. $16.
F
C HRIS K ELLY
WILLY SANJUAN/INVISION/ASSOCIATED PRESS
After pining away at high pitches in the 2000s, Chris Carrabba is
coming to Silver Spring, touring Dashboard Confessional’s seventh
album, “Crooked Shadows.”
MARCH 30, 2018
goingoutguide@washpost.com
. FRIDAY,
or Screaming Females frontwoman Marissa Paternoster, songwriting isn’t about
eureka moments. “A lot of people are
under some misconception that when
you write music or make paintings or execute
any creative act, you’re struck by inspiration. I
have never found that really to be true,” she says.
“It’s kind of like banging your head against the
wall until something comes out.”
Thankfully, the 31-year-old singer-guitarist
and her bandmates have done plenty of headbanging — literally and figuratively — since
coming together in 2005. The result has been
seven albums of ragged rock that finds drummer
Jarrett Dougherty and bassist “King” Mike Abbate setting the tempo for mosh pits — and then
getting out of the way of Paternoster’s righteous
riffs and Grace Slick-esque vibrato. After more
than a decade as a going concern, the band
finally has time to reflect — and not rush — its
music. “There’s more opportunity to discover
things that you haven’t been able to do in the
past,” Paternoster says. “It definitely offers up
chances for new and exciting things to happen.”
That’s the case on the trio’s latest album, “All at
Once,” as they find new stones to overturn,
blasting anthems about Information Age anxiety
and anti-patriarchy animus with clear-eyed vigor and a more varied palette. As always, Paternoster can pen such epic lines as “where future
structures fail, their ruins write your name,” belt
out a pop hook and find joy in a guitar solo — all
in the same song.
Paternoster still finds audience members who
are “surprised” that a female-fronted band can
be this good, or that she can wield an ax the way
she does. She has this: “If I’m going to serve as a
gateway into them understanding that women
are fully capable of doing anything and everything that men can do, then I’m happy to be of
service.”
THE WASHINGTON POST
BY
6
EZ
Hotlist
The best things to see, drink and do in April
Pictures of the Year: 75 Years of the World’s Best Photography at
the Newseum, opens April 6
This exhibition showcases some of the most striking images from the
past 75 years, drawn from the more than 40,000 photos in the archives
of the Pictures of the Year International photojournalism competition.
Walk through the show and take in seven decades of history through the
eyes of award-winning photographers, capturing people and events from
World War II to the present. Through Jan. 20, 2019. $14.95-$24.95.
— Adele Chapin
DIXIE D. VEREEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
At the Sovereign, you can drink the best of Brussels.
The Sovereign’s second anniversary party, April 7
A laserlike focus on Belgian-style craft beers has made this Georgetown
bar one of the area’s top destinations for beer lovers. Instead of the
sweet, boozy abbey ales and pink elephant beers found at most Belgianthemed bars, the Sovereign’s list highlights the best of Brussels —
Cantillon’s spontaneously fermented lambics, De La Senne’s flavorful
saisons — as well as American interpretations from Jester King and
Blackberry Farm. 11 a.m. Free; beers priced individually. — Fritz Hahn
2001: A Space Party at the National Air and Space Museum, April 7
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30, 2018
Fifty years ago, Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey” premiered at
the Uptown Theater. The National Air and Space Museum marks this
golden anniversary with “The Barmecide Feast,” an immersive art
installation that re-creates the strange hotel room seen in the film’s
penultimate scene. Your first chance to see it is during “2001: A Space
Party,” an after-hours affair featuring open bars, a DJ set by chillwave
performer Washed Out and a performance by Baltimore rapper DDm,
paper airplane contests, an Imax screening of “Ready Player One,” TEDstyle talks about space by Smithsonian scientists and other galactic
surprises. 8:30 p.m. $60-$65. — F.H.
EMMANUEL LUBEZKI
A person watching the “Carne y Arena” film, a convincing case for empathy in under seven minutes.
Carne y Arena, through Aug. 31
Until it closes, the hottest ticket in town is likely to be this virtual-reality experience created
by the Academy Award-winning director Alejandro G. Iñárritu. Installed in a converted church
near the H Street Corridor, “Carne y Arena” uses architecture and virtual reality to immerse
participants in a terrifying and topical vignette of modern life. After interviewing refugees
from Mexico and Central America, Iñárritu has distilled their experience into a 61/2-minute
virtual-reality drama that places the spectator directly in the moment when exhausted and
brutalized migrants are captured by American border agents. It is a shattering experience.
1611 Benning Rd. NE. Admission is free but tickets are required. The first round of tickets
has sold out. The next block will be available April 16 at carneyarenadc.com. -- Philip
Kennicott
Petalpalooza at the
Wharf, April 7
Shift: A Festival of American
Orchestras, April 9-15
Lil Rel Howery at Arlington
Drafthouse, April 13-14
One of the National
Cherry Blossom Festival’s
signature events has a
new name (Petalpalooza,
instead of the Southwest
Waterfront Fireworks
Festival) and location (the
new Wharf development),
but it’s still packed with
activities. Entertainment
includes eight hours of
music on three stages, a
beer garden, a free roller
skating rink and selfie
opportunities such as an
interactive “flower-bynumbers” wall. The day
ends with a fireworks
show at 8:30 p.m.
(weather permitting).
1 p.m. Free. — A.C.
The Kennedy Center is a grand
setting for the performing arts,
with a picturesque location on
the Potomac River. But during
this week-long festival, musicians
are taken out of the center’s
chandeliered concert halls and
sent to less glamorous spaces
around the city. The Albany
Symphony’s Dogs of Desire
ensemble performs new works by
young American composers at
the Blind Whino arts space, the
National Symphony Orchestra
takes up residence in historic
Congressional Cemetery, and the
Indianapolis Symphony
Orchestra offers a special
interactive concert for
kindergartners and preschoolers
at Busboys and Poets. Various
locations. Most events free. — F.H.
As an inquisitive and outspoken
TSA officer in “Get Out,” actor Lil
Rel Howery nearly steals the
whole movie — especially the
horror-comedy’s fist-pumping
climax. That should have come
as no surprise to fans who
watched Howery get big laughs
on the NBC sitcom “The
Carmichael Show.” Howery had
been grinding it out in comedy
clubs for years before catching
his big break, but now he’s
toplining his own Fox sitcom pilot,
“Rel,” will star with Tiffany
Haddish in the movie “Uncle
Drew” and will appear with
Sandra Bullock in the Netflix
post-apocalyptic film “Bird Box.”
Before those screen roles, he
heads back to the stand-up stage
for a series of shows in Arlington.
Times vary. $20. — Rudi Greenberg
MATT JAHROMI
HOTLIST CONTINUED ON 8
7
EZ
ID4c^@U@XcIF4cI7cI[Nc BI.*X@IFUcXIcU44c
c @^4c [NF@F9c #=I_NIIDc @ULB*aUc *F1cB4Yc
aLN[Uc@Nc.IF^4NXcaI[Nc4`@UX@F9c @N4LB*.4cXIc*Uc aLN[Uc@Nc@UcaI[Nc IF4UXILcU=ILc
=*F1B@F9c FUY*BB*X@IFc FUL4.X@IFc *F1c!4ND@XUc IcU[-.IFXN*.XINUc@F^IB^41cc
666
66666
666
6666
+
+
1.) !#6#5(23(+'6' 26$(1.* !#63,6/4 *(&6$,06 ""(3(,+ *66-%6
%&+*#)&+)&& (+'+&$+!++
+"&*+"(+'(+()&+
##"+
#'+
(+*+(+)&+#+
1-*1'<
(#8#<
(6cW6S@06c'@N<@H@+c +TB+H3c+H3c(+W?@H<ZKHc c
ƒ„„\SXCl„bII„cI„„ <mr„<`A„ -d{rD„„
<5<)
<
ƒ„„]SXCl„/c|sP„bI„*iT`?D„ DdjODm„d{`t„
$
$$$
ƒ„„\SXCl„/b|uP„bI„(YB„4e`„YD€<`BiT<
„ ƒ„ „]UZEn„=nu„bI„0hiT`ONTFYB„
ƒ„„]SZEn„=nu„bI„*iV`?D„9TY[T<^„e}`r„
ƒ„„ ]UZE„1b~yR„bL„%e`rOe^Fi „e{`r„
ƒ„ „&WZHp„2f~zR„fM„5‚qgaq„
ƒ„„\UXEn„1b|uP„bI„9<oQT`Ord`„ „
ƒ„ „\UXHp„'fkP„fK„+gxg_>@„
+S9CS&1PES9/)-S'0E:L'51S4S(2EL++L)53S5 SH+LS4EL8SES(A:+S'0KES5/SPDE)L'51ES5S35LS9;+RS S<Q+)#RS$5=S#BSIS#*A:+SR5PS.PGLS:P>%HS'4EL,+N(50S
!5?SL%SFRGL/FSFOA((60FS9:+R
SJSFM6@S"7@SL&+FS
!"" " " " " "
" !" " "
)8.„„ #3,$;3„6".)7!")76„
S "$$#$$ !
$ $$ $
$
MARCH 30, 2018
ƒ„ „\UXEn„1b|uP„bI„9eeBie„9TYoe`„iTBOG„
ƒ„„\SXCl„:Clv„bJ„iZT`Owd`„
$ . FRIDAY,
7 /$"127 17
70)4',,#7')#7 7 ( %-/.!757
++27 %31 &7 77 0*4',,#7 77 +"6.!1(7 77
!%< $26.< /
<
9),70<,< "< "03< <
<0<),&+"<4"< <
<
"<:7,< "9< ;<
THE WASHINGTON POST
&M:P25cbJ\Oc/\R5GZc+Vc@QMC+/5c+G2c$c
cG5O:bc8@/@5GZc"5+C@VZ@/c +Z]O,BcJJA@G;cJ:Vc
%>+Zc"5+BBbc5+Zc)J\OcJE5c
8
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30, 2018
EZ
Email: goingoutguide@washpost.com Telephone: 202-334-6808 Get listed: Our
listings include events in the following categories: pop music, classical
music, museums, theater, dance, comedy and film. We accept events
in the District; Montgomery, Prince George’s, Calvert, Charles and St.
Mary’s counties in Maryland; and the area including Arlington, Fairfax,
Loudoun and Prince William counties and the city of Alexandria in
Virginia. If you’d like your event to be considered, please submit the
event name, description, date, time, location and price at
events.washpost.com. Listings are subject to space restrictions. We
cannot acknowledge every submission. Advertising: Ron Ulrich,
ronald.ulrich@washpost.com, 202-334-5289
WEEKEND
Hotlist
The best things to see, drink and do in April
HOTLIST FROM 6
Hurray for the Riff Raff,
Waxahatchetee and Bedouine
at 9:30 Club, April 15
A trio of women, each with their
own distinctive voices and
genres, team up for a triple-bill in
D.C. Hurray for the Riff Riff, led
by enigmatic frontwoman Alynda
Lee Segarra, a former runaway
who train-hopped her way
around America as a teenager,
headlines its form of ramshackle
Americana. Katie Crutchfield,
meanwhile, is the voice behind
punky indie-rock act
Waxahatchee, which offered a
more polished sound on last
year’s “Out in the Storm.”
Bedouine, the solo project of
Azniv Korkejian, who immigrated
to America at age 10, will open
the show with a set of quiet but
compelling ’60s- and ’70sinspired folk songs. 7 p.m.
(doors). $25. — R.G.
District Winery’s rosé release
party, April 22
With the boom of craft liquor in
the District, it’s not like this city
needs more ways for hometown
pride to intersect with drinking.
But this latest offering is rosé —
a wine that practically
commands a whole season.
District Winery is celebrating the
release of its 2017 dry rosé — its
first wine produced entirely in
D.C. — with a blowout party at its
Navy Yard facility. The $75 ticket
gets you three drink tickets and
access to hors d’oeuvres; for
$95 you also get a bottle of the
rosé to take home. Tickets grant
access to one of two party
sessions: noon to 3 p.m. or 5 to
8 p.m. — Lori McCue
No Spectators:
The Art of Burning Man
VERY
Now Open
A take-over of the entire Renwick Gallery, extending to
the surrounding Golden Triangle neighborhood.
Presented by Le Théâtre Des Confettis from Canada
In collaboration with Lincoln Center Education
Written and created by Véronique Côté
The exhibition has been organized in close collaboration with
%XUQLQJ0DQ3URMHFWDQRQSURƓWSXEOLFEHQHƓWFRUSRUDWLRQ
Experience the joy of theater in this carefully
crafted experience for the very young!
Support comes from
NEW PERFORMANCES JUST ADDED!
Smithsonian
Now thru April 1
Family Theater
Most enjoyed by
Photo by Louise Le Blanc
18 mo.–4 yr.
17th and Pennsylvania Ave. | Free | AmericanArt.si.edu/BurningMan | #NoSpectators
FoldHaus, Shrumen Lumen, 2016. FoldHaus Art Collective. Photo by Rene Smith
TICKETS ON SALE NOW!
KENNEDY-CENTER.ORG | (202) 467-4600
Major Supporters:
Tickets also available at the Box Office.
Groups call (202) 416-8400.
David M. Rubenstein and
the U.S. Department of Education
For all other ticket-related customer service inquiries,
call the Advance Sales Box Office at (202) 416-8540.
Additional Supporters:
The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation
9
On the Town
AARON DIEHL TRIO
The best view of D.C., with nary an obstruction
BY
F RITZ H AHN
SAT, APR 7, 8pm • SIXTH & I
Savor the “melodic precision [and]
harmonic erudition” (New York
Times) of jazz piano virtuoso and
longtime Cécile McLorin Salvant
collaborator Aaron Diehl.
The eye-popping vantage
point from the perch of
the Old Post Office
Tower, which has the
third-tallest observation
deck in the city. The
tower is operated by the
National Park Service.
If you have visitors coming to
town this spring, you better give
them the bad news: The Washington Monument is still closed.
That shouldn’t come as a surprise. The landmark obelisk at
the center of the Mall has been
shuttered more than it has been
open in recent years. Damage
from the August 2011 earthquake
closed it until May 2014. Two
years later, persistent problems
with the elevator to the 500-foot
observation deck forced the monument to turn away people again.
It’s scheduled to reopen in spring
of next year.
Until then, the best views of
Washington come from the Old
Post Office Tower in the heart of
downtown. With an observation
deck 270 feet above street level,
it’s bested in height only by the
Washington Monument and the
Basilica of the National Shrine of
the Immaculate Conception.
The historic Old Post Office
became the Trump International
Hotel in September 2016 after
more than two years of renovation. But as part of the deal that
the General Services Administration made with the Trump Organization, the tower was kept
open to the public with no admission charge and is still staffed and
maintained by the National Park
Service. (One concession: Visitors
now enter through a separate
lower-level door at the rear of the
hotel, next to the Starbucks off
12th Street NW. It feels like a
service entrance, allowing camera-toting tourists to reach the
top without mingling with the
five-star hotel’s guests.)
The tower reopened to the public last year, and the experience is
Special thanks: the Susan B. Hepner Family and Great
Jones Capital; the Abramson Family Foundation
TICKETS: (202) 785-9727
WashingtonPerformingArts.org
Bridge, which is seven miles to
the south. One important thing to
remember: Only the southern
side of the building is closed to
the elements — the other three
sides have thin vertical wires instead of windows. If it’s a cold,
windy or rainy day, you’ll feel it.
That’s a small price to pay for
enjoying this vantage point.
Old Post Office Tower, 1100
Pennsylvania Ave. NW. (Entrance on 12th Street NW). Open
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, with last
entry at 4:30 p.m. Closed Thanksgiving and Christmas. Free.
FRITZ HAHN/THE WASHINGTON POST
slightly different. After wandering down a hallway filled with
historical photographs of Pennsylvania Avenue and the Post Office — and a stretch trumpeting
the hotel’s makeover of the building — guests take the first of two
minute-long elevator rides to the
observation deck. Thankfully,
nothing about the unobstructed
views of the city has changed.
Helpful signs under each of the
windows point out landmarks in
the distance, although locals
should recognize the FBI headquarters, Arlington House and
Washington National Cathedral
without the prompts.
How far you can see depends
on the weather, but on a recent
clear day, it was easy to observe
trucks crossing the Wilson
EZ
fritz.hahn@washpost.com
TONIGHT!
FRI, MAR 30
SAN FERMIN
GRACIE AND RACHEL
GENERAL ADMISSION
ANA MOURA
WED, APR 4
A BANDHOUSE GIGS
TRIBUTE TO
LEON RUSSELL
SAT, APR 7
CAMERON
CROZMAN,
CELLO
DEBUT ARTIST
Kennedy Center debut
CHAMBER MUSIC AT THE BARNS
Nederlands
Dans Theater
SUN, APR 8
AND MANY MORE!
Paul Lightfoot, Artistic Director
1 6 3 5 T R A P R D, V I E N N A , VA 2 2 1 8 2
Shoot the Moon (Glass/León & Lightfoot)
The Statement (Belton/Pite)
Singulière Odyssée (Richter/ León & Lightfoot)
S
ON
D
MA IRE
T T C TE
TO D B
RN Y
EY
A
IE T I
L
BY
FR
N
IA
BR
AN
SL
NG
AY
I
PL
W
TR
NO
—The New York Times
April 4–6 | Opera House
with the Kennedy Center Opera House Orchestra
ROSSLYN
TICKETS ON SALE NOW! KENNEDY-CENTER.ORG | (202) 467-4600
Tickets also available at the Box Office. Groups call (202) 416-8400.
For all other ticket-related customer service inquiries, call the Advance Sales Box Office at (202) 416-8540.
1900 N. Fort Myer Drive
Arlington, VA 22209
For Reservations Call
Additional support is provided by Performing Arts Fund NL.
202.332.3300 | STUDIOTHEATRE.ORG
12 to 8PM
Adults $27.95
Children $12.95
12 and under
International Programming at the Kennedy Center is made possible through
the generosity of the Kennedy Center International Committee on the Arts.
(703) 807-2000
Complimentary Enclosed Parking
http://www.vantagepointrestaurant.com/
MARCH 30, 2018
“A period play of ideas...
that have haunting
resonance in our own era.”
Easter
. FRIDAY,
BEGINS
NEXT WEEK!
A Rooftop Restaurant Overlooking
Georgetown, the Potomac River
and Washington, D.C.
THE WASHINGTON POST
Singulière Odyssée, photo by Rahi Rezvani
The Vantage Point
10
EZ
$20 Diner
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Utensil choices draw pointed reactions
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30, 2018
BY
I’
T IM C ARMAN
m leading off this edition
of the $20 Diner mailbag
with a twofer because, last
time I checked, you can
still address a pair of questions
simultaneously in Washington
even if you can’t order a beer and
backup in D.C. bars.
Katt M. Hull, of York, Pa., and
Melanie Haupt of Austin have
sort of bookend questions that
bear investigation. Hull asks,
“Why do servers at Asian restaurants judge patrons for asking for
silverware?” Haupt, on the other
hand, wonders, “Should I have
been insulted when a server at a
dim-sum parlor in Phoenix
brought me silverware without
asking whether I wanted it? Because I was.”
America is a country rich with
cuisines from around the world.
As diners expand their palates,
seeking out foods from beyond
their own culture and comfort
zone, they are bound to have
strained interactions similar to
those of Hull and Haupt. On a
fundamental level, these are culture clashes, often based on assumptions that either the server
or the diner draw from too little
information.
Take Hull’s question. It’s based
on an assumption that servers at
Asian restaurants are passing
judgment on her choice of flatware. Maybe some are. No, let me
rephrase that: Some definitely
are. But maybe there are other
explanations, too. If, for example,
Hull were dining in a traditional
Korean restaurant, she could be
experiencing a form of culture
shock known as Korean-style
service, which is foreign to those
accustomed to American hospitality, which aims to be attentive,
nurturing, pampering.
Korean service can be brusque
to all comers, including native
Koreans. No waiter is going to
approach your table, with his
Yes, your request
for a fork at an
Asian restaurant
might annoy. But
not for the reason
you think.
smile on high beam, and say, “Hi,
I’m Dave, and I’ll be taking care of
you tonight!” No one will ask
about your day or explain the
menu as if it were the Rosetta
Stone. Korean service is about
speed and efficiency.
Back in Korea, says Danny Lee,
the restaurateur behind Mandu
and ChiKo in Washington, diners
just take whatever table is available without bothering with a
host. Once seated, they raise their
hands and shout, “Yeogi yeo!”
which means “Over here!” in
Korean. A server quickly approaches and asks, “What do you
want?” The banchan snacks and
meal arrive posthaste. Diners pay
at the front when done.
“It’s a very quick style of service, even when you’re sitting
down to dine,” Lee says.
What does this mean for diners
visiting Korean restaurants in
America? Be aware of the establishment’s target customer. If the
place caters to Koreans, you
should expect Korean-style service. Your server will grab you a
fork, sure, but she may not go out
of her way to coddle you about it.
If she’s passing any judgment, it’s
not about your preference for
Western utensils. It’s about the
inconvenience of the request itself.
“They just might seem a little
put off because it’s not a request
they get all the time,” Lee says. “It
kind of takes them out of their
rhythm.” He speculates they
If you haven’t mastered
chopsticks for devouring
your stir-fried pigs feet
at Big Wang's Cuisine, a
pan-Chinese spot in
Derwood, Md., there’s
no shame in requesting
Western knives and
forks. Not even all Asian
cultures use the sticks as
their primary
eating utensil.
might just wonder: Do we even
have a fork? “Then they have to
run back to the kitchen, find a
fork, wash it and then bring it
out.”
The servers who do judge
chopstick-challenged diners tend
to be recent immigrants, says
Janet Yu, owner of Hollywood
East Cafe, the dim-sum parlor in
Wheaton. They’re the servers
who have not lived long enough
DINER CONTINUED ON 11
Ask Tom
DINER FROM 10
in the United States to understand that many Americans
have yet to master the pair of
sticks that dominate the table
in China.
Yu points out that it’s not just
Westerners who ask for utensils
other than chopsticks. Thais,
Indonesians and Filipinos all
have special requests, usually
for a fork and spoon, their
preferred cutlery. In other
words, as the world becomes a
smaller place, Chinese restaurants have become more bloated with silverware not of their
own culture. There’s no shame,
and very little judgment, in
asking for it.
But what about Haupt’s situation, in which a server at a
dim-sum shop forced Western
utensils on her? She has a
healthy perspective on this benign form of racial profiling.
Her own solution, she says, is to
get over herself. But Lee says
such unwanted flatware advances can create problems
with less-forgiving diners, who
are quick to perceive a slight at
the mere suggestion they need a
fork in a chopstick house, as if
the server has spotted a rube
underneath all the finery.
Which is why if diners want a
fork at Mandu, they have to ask
for it. (Same at Hollywood
East.) All the tables are set in
the traditional Korean manner
with chopsticks and a spoon.
Every customer is considered a
chopsticks master unless one
confesses otherwise. But even if
a server should offer you a fork
at, say, a dim-sum parlor, it’s not
necessarily because you’re an
alien in the house of Hong Kong
dumplings. It may be because
others in your party have requested one or because you
have, ahem, proved to the en-
Excerpts from Post Food Critic
Tom Sietsema’s online discussion
11
EZ
tire dining room that you have
the chopsticks skills of a manatee.
Trying to improve a guest’s
experience, in short, is not racial profiling. Sometimes it’s
just hospitality in a form that
can, nonetheless, still bruise
one’s ego.
On the hunt for tamales
Andrew Miller of Washington wants to know, “Where can
I find excellent corn-husk tamales? Ideally in the city, but
willing to travel for guaranteed
deliciousness.”
As Andrew’s question implies, Washington is not a tamales town. That said, you can find
some excellent Salvadoranstyle tamales at Panam Grocery
in Columbia Heights (3552 14th
St. NW, 202-545-0290). They
have corn-husk-wrapped tamales in a warmer by the cash
register. They’re fresh yellowcorn specimens ($1.25 each),
dense as cheesecake but sweet
and milky, perfect with some
tangy crema.
El Rinconcito Cafe (1129 11th
St. NW, 202-789-4110) has a
similar sweet Salvadoran-style
tamal de elote in corn husk
($2.45 each), every bit the equal
of the one at Panam, but the
cafe also sells a softer, looser
savory tamal ($2.45) stuffed
with chicken, chickpeas and
potatoes, all wrapped in a banana leaf. I would highly encourage you to try it. The thing
almost melts in your mouth.
Pati Jinich, the cookbook author and television personality,
forwarded a couple of sources
for fresh, homemade Mexicanstyle tamales, and I’m happy to
pass their contacts along if you
email me. The underground
economy, I’m told, offers some
of Washington’s best tamales.
tim.carman@washpost.com
PHOTOS BY DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Feather chandeliers are just one of the charms of Primrose, in Brookland, a great place for a date with
yourself on a milestone birthday.
birthday coming up. Rather than
go out with a group, I’m looking
for a good place to sit at the bar,
have an excellent whiskey
cocktail and a fantastic steak.
Price should be under $120. Any
thoughts?
A: Does it have to be a
traditional steakhouse, or can it
be someplace different? I’m
thinking Primrose, the beguiling
new wine bar in Brookland,
might make for a fun solo dinner.
The bar is cozy, the steak is the
tasty cut known as bavette, and I
never fail to finish the thricefried potatoes on the plate. Plus,
the cocktails are as interesting as
the wines by the glass.
Q: We have family coming to
town in a couple of weeks and we
will be celebrating my sister-inlaw’s 50th birthday. Do you have
any recommendations for a
restaurant that has a good
Sunday brunch menu and is
located in the vicinity of George
Washington University (where
their daughter is a student)?
A: Turning 50 calls for
something celebratory: the airy
Blue Duck Tavern in the West
End for gingerbread waffles, crab
cakes or fried chicken biscuits or
Q: What are you recommending
Any thoughts?
A: I don’t miss Ardeo one bit.
Sababa, my subject for next
DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
they wanted a place to get a
drink after. You suggested Elle in
Mount Pleasant. As a proud
Adams Morgan resident, I’m
wondering: Do you just not think
there are good drink options in
the vicinity? I might be young
and biased, but I think there are
plenty of good and fun places up
and down 18th Street, depending
on what you’re looking for. And if
you want something nicer, the
Line is right around the corner!
A: I guess I was so enamored of
Elle, I overlooked A Rake’s
Progress, Brothers and Sisters,
Mintwood Place, Johnny’s Half
Shell and other fine watering
holes in Adams Morgan. No
slight intended!
Q: What’s your take on D.C.’s
Q: Last week a questioner wrote
in saying they had early dinner
reservations at Tail Up Goat, and
Q: We’re going to Brothers and
Sisters for our anniversary. It’s
downtown, one of the most
beautiful Spanish restaurants
anywhere, for tapas and paella.
fast-casuals? Do you have a
favorite? I find myself craving
Cava’s spicy lamb meatballs and
harissa more than past meals at
restaurants.
A: The city is blessed with
terrific fast-casuals, many
homegrown, including the
whimsical (and recently
reviewed) Rasa in the Navy Yard
neighborhood.
Q: My parents are sort of
nightmare diners — my dad has
numerous, always-changing,
arbitrary dietary restrictions,
and my mother is rude to service
staff. They’re coming to visit for
the first time in a while. I’d like
to show them a nice time but
also not feel like I can never
ASK TOM CONTINUED ON 13
MARCH 30, 2018
week’s preview in the Food
Section, is offering something
fresh in Cleveland Park: modern
Israeli cooking.
Taberna del Alabardero
. FRIDAY,
Q: Have you been to Sababa yet?
Brothers and Sisters in Adams
Morgan not only has inventive
food (see: octopus hot dog), but
sophisticated drinks as well.
THE WASHINGTON POST
in Georgetown these days? Or is
it still a desert?
A: I haven’t been in a few
months, but Chez Billy Sud is
good for straightforward bistro
fare — and has the advantage of
a patio in good weather — while
La Chaumière caters to a more
senior clientele with more
traditional French cooking.
Q: I think Fiola Mare should be
added to your list of Georgetown
recommendations.
A: But of course the Italian
seafood restaurant should be on
a list of Georgetown sites (and
bites).
When savoring dim sum at a restaurant such as Q by Peter
Chang in Bethesda, don’t be afraid to request a fork if you need
it — and don’t misinterpret the appearance of one, either.
our third, but the first we’ve been
able to celebrate together. What
are the three or four must-haves
at Brothers and Sisters?
A: Not to be missed: a rum
cocktail, the knife-cut noodles,
duck consommé, the famous
“hoctodog” (read the review!)
and a berg of a cheesecake.
Q: I have a big milestone
12
EZ
Nightlife
JOY ASICO/CRAFT KOMBUCHA
Craft Kombucha made its cherry blossom fermented tea, above, using cold-pressed
black cherry juice. Green Hat has a floral gin flavored with cherry blossom leaves.
NEW COLUMBIA DISTILLERS
If you can’t peep the blossoms, sip them
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30, 2018
BY
F RITZ H AHN
With the annual return of the
cherry blossoms comes the deluge of restaurants offering cherry-themed food and drink specials, often as part of the National
Cherry Blossom Festival’s official
“Cherry Picks” program. It’s a
nebulous tie-in, since the cherries
that most restaurants use come
from different families than the
cherry trees flowering at the Tidal
Basin. (In fact, some popular
trees there, such as the Kwanzan
cherry tree, bear no fruit at all.) It
also doesn’t help that most of the
featured dishes and cocktails
don’t get more creative than pink
coloring or a cherry compote with
dessert. Yawn.
But there are some cherry beverages from local producers
worth seeking out, including one
that’s flavored with fresh blossoms. Here are three you can find
now.
New Columbia’s Green Hat
Spring/Summer Gin
When the owners of New Columbia Distillers decided to make
a seasonal Green Hat gin five
years ago, they knew their recipe
had to include cherry blossoms.
Other brewers and distillers suggested it would be easier if they
just used whole cherries, but “we
wanted to use the actual blos-
Cocktails at the distillery are
$5-$7.
Craft Kombucha cherry blossom kombucha
area, Craft Kombucha founder
Tanya Maynigo-Loucks knew she
wanted to make a cherry-blossom-flavored kombucha. She just
hadn’t settled on one recipe for it.
Last year, she used tart cherries,
but this year, she decided on
cold-pressed organic black cherry
juice blended with botanicals.
The sweet cherry mixes with floral flavors, including elderflower
and hibiscus, while the effervescence gives it the feeling of sparkling wine. Maynigo-Loucks says
that some customers have told
her they use it as a base for
cocktails at home, mixing the
kombucha with champagne in a
quasi-mimosa or spiking it with
vodka. At Elle in Mount Pleasant,
beverage director Sean MacPherson mixes the kombucha with
Japanese whiskey to create the
Pachinko Parlour highball.
The first few batches sold out
quickly at the kombucha brewery’s Union Market stand, but
Maynigo-Loucks says it can now
be found there and at a number of
local stores, including Elle, Pear
Plum Cafe and Little Red Fox, and
at farmers markets throughout
the region. (See the Craft Kombucha website for a full list.)
Available at Union Market
(1309 Fifth St. NE) for $9 per
32-ounce growler and $15 per
64-ounce growler.
As a native of the Washington
fritz.hahn@washpost.com
Old Ox Cherry Blossom
FestivAle cherry saison
FRITZ HAHN/THE WASHINGTON POST
Cherry Blossom FestivAle, brewed by Old Ox in Ashburn, is a rosy
saison containing sour cherry juice (no actual flowers, though).
soms,” says co-founder John Uselton.
Every year, Uselton explains,
they purchase cherry blossoms
on branches from florists and
bring the buds to the Ivy City
distillery. “As they open up, we
take the blossoms off of the
branches and macerate them in
spirits” before distilling, Uselton
says. “We’ll do it as many times as
we can while the blossoms are
blooming.”
The gin, which also contains
rose hips and three types of citrus
peel, has a vibrant floral aroma
mingling with juniper, citrus and
stone fruit. It’s used in a different
spring cocktail every Saturday
from 1 to 4 p.m. during New
Columbia’s tasting hours, and can
also be found on drink menus
around the city. (At home, you
should definitely use it in a classic
gin rickey.)
Available at the distillery (1832
Fenwick St. NE) and local liquor
stores for about $35 per bottle.
The National Cherry Blossom
Festival has named an official
beer for the first time, although
this one isn’t flavored with actual
cherry blossoms. Instead, FestivAle Cherry Saison, brewed by
Ashburn’s Old Ox brewing, is a
bright, effervescent saison that
features Michigan sour cherries
and a bold cherry color — just a
few shades darker than its ultraInstagrammable pink tallboy can.
Chris Burns, the president of
Old Ox, knows that some customers will be wary of FestivAle because “fruit beers can have a
cloying sweetness.” But this one
doesn’t, thanks to a Belgian
saison yeast that cuts the sugar
while providing a peppery spice
note and a dry finish. The cherry
flavor isn’t too sweet, yet the
tartness is light enough that it
won’t turn off the masses looking
to sample a taste of the Cherry
Blossom Festival.
Available for about $12-$13 for
a four-pack of 16-ounce cans in
liquor and grocery stores, or
$7-$8 on tap in bars.
Ask Tom
ASK TOM FROM 11
show my face in a beloved
restaurant again. Is there
anywhere that will fit the bill and
not be fazed by their behavior,
accommodate at least some offmenu ordering (remember,
always-changing food
restrictions) and roll their eyes
along with me? Cost isn’t a
problem; we can’t afford the Inn
at Little Washington but
otherwise I’m open to anything.
Even if that suggestion is cook at
home.
A: You have my sympathies. Your
situation sounds . . . challenging
at the least.
Help me help you: What kind
of dietary restrictions is Dad
prone to and just how rude is
Mom? One thought is to
introduce your parents to the
splashy new Mi Vida in the
Wharf for well-prepared
Mexican, or to direct them to the
simple Midwestern pleasures of
the cozy tavern on the ground
floor of Rare Steak and Seafood
downtown.
removing all mentions to Mike
Isabella restaurants from its
lists. Don’t get me wrong; the
allegations sound awful. But
aren’t they just that? Also, isn’t
the purpose of a “hottest” or
“best” restaurants list to say
what’s “hot” or “best”? This
strikes me as a bit extreme since
(while perhaps unlikely) the
allegations could turn out to be
exaggerated or false. And
anyway, it makes me think the
Eater lists are political and not
really something I should rely on
to choose the “best” or “hottest”
restaurant. What do you think?
A: The Washington Post doesn’t
Excerpts from Post Food Critic
Tom Sietsema’s online discussion
ban restaurants whose chefs
have been accused of sexual
harassment from coverage per
se. But we’ll no doubt be
selective about which
restaurants or aspects of
Isabella’s empire we’ll devote ink
to going forward. And we’ll
probably address the issue in the
u
o
y
s
e
k
a
t
s
t
n
PostPoi
context of the review or article
(or whatever we decide to run).
Why? My employer is in the
news business. We cover the
good, the bad and the ugly.
Tom Sietsema hosts a weekly
Q&A on Wednesdays at 11 a.m. at
live.washingtonpost.com.
Showcase
E
H
T
E
D
INSI SIC.
MU
Saturday, March 31, 2018
8:00 pm
TICKETS
$15/person; $10/seniors,
students and groups of
20 or more
PUBLICK PLAYHOUSE
5445 Landover Road
Cheverly, MD 20784
301-277-1710
TTY 301-699-2544
contact the restaurant to let
them know you’re bringing a
picky eater and a (I don’t even
know what to say) person? And
that you appreciate their
patience and will be tipping
well? If I were taking people like
that to a place I cared about, I’d
reach out in advance.
A: I love the way you think!
Calling the place and talking to
the manager ahead of bringing
in a tough customer — then
tipping generously — is a smart
strategy. Restaurants prefer
advance notice. It helps them
strategize and do their best.
arts.pgparks.com
The Washington Post
is printed using
Q: My husband and I often order
recycled fiber.
THE WASHINGTON POST
From classical and swing to alt rock
and synth pop, discover great ways to save
money, win tickets and have fun at concerts.
washingtonpost.com/postpoints
Not a member? It’s free! JOIN TODAY.
. FRIDAY,
S2929 3x9
1-800-753-POST
SF
NF407 1x6
MARCH 30, 2018
You, too, could have home delivery.
Q: I am curious what you, a food
media “A-lister,” think of Eater
PG
World
Dance
Membership is rewarding.
Q: Would it be possible to
appetizers before our entree
because we’re either not ready or
want to slow the pace a bit at
restaurants we know are very
speedy with dishes. However,
lately I’ve noticed that our
servers often don’t circle back to
ask about entree orders until our
appetizer is placed on the table. I
understand that they want to
make sure there isn’t a large time
in between the two courses, but I
find it irritating — it takes away
from the enjoyment of our
appetizer. Shouldn’t they make
sure to check in before the
appetizer is delivered or wait
until we’re done?
A: Servers aren’t mind readers,
as much as they try to be. Let
your wishes be known when you
order your appetizers. “If you can
give us a few minutes to look
over the entree choices, that
would be great. We just don’t
want everything to come out at
once.”
13
14
PG
On the Town
VICTORIA MILKO
For Marcella Kriebel, it’s never a bad time to grab food with pals.
My D.C. Dream Day
AMANDA VOISARD FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
ABOVE: The
Arts Walk in
Brookland is
home to studios
and galleries.
RIGHT:
Beyond wheat
or white, any
slice from
Seylou would
start the day off
right.
JENNIFER CHASE FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30, 2018
SPRING
SAVINGS
SPRING SAVINGS
89¢
SUNDAYS
Walking and tacos:
A painter masters
the art of snacking
In D.C. Dream Day, we ask our
favorite people in the area to tell
us how they would spend a perfect
day in the District.
Marcella Kriebel knows a thing
or two about snacks. The watercolor artist specializes in paintings of food for her “Illustrated
Feast” collection of prints that
Get 52 weeks of Sunday-only
home delivery for just $2.65 89¢
a week! Home delivery includes
unlimited digital access. You’ll also
get 1 bonus digital subscription to
share and a 30-day digital pass to
share every month.
— as told to Lori McCue
1-800-218-7417, Ext. 2
sub.wpsubscribe.com/spring18k
Offer expires 6/30/18. Available to new subscribers
only. Restrictions may apply. New subscriptions are
subject to a $4.95 activation fee.
Did you know? The Washington Post is printed using recycled fiber.
she sells online, at area craft
festivals and markets, and at her
studio in Brookland. She bases
her work on foods that are in
season, foods she’s craving and
foods that are trending. “The
ramen design is certainly one of
the most popular ones these
days,” says Kriebel, 32. She has
also collected plenty of illustrated
recipes in her two cookbooks, “Mi
Comida Latina” and “Comida Cubana,” both based on her travels
in Latin America. Her dream day
revolves around — what else? —
plenty of stops for bites to eat.
“Snacks are key in an ideal day,”
she says.
S0384 4x5
NF407 4x.25
Right away, I would have a
little snack. In my fridge I always
try to keep some whitefish from
Neopol Savory Smokery. I would
have a slice of bread from Seylou
Bakery with some of the whitefish — just like an open-faced. I’d
follow that up with a walk around
the McMillan Reservoir. Our
window looks out onto the grassy
knoll that leads out to the reservoir. It’s awesome. It’s a nice loop.
I would hop on my bike and go
over to the Brookland Arts Walk,
which is where my studio is, and
get an espresso and a taco over at
Fox Loves Taco. My favorite one
is the Wham!, which is a poached
egg taco. So I’d have one of those
— thinking snacks here! Certainly
I would say hello to my neighbors,
like Stitch & Rivet, Rachel Pfeffer jewelry and Latela art gallery. I love the community here.
After having tacos and coffee
(that was second breakfast), I
would bike down the MetropoliPERFECT CONTINUED ON 15
On the Town
PERFECT FROM 14
BILL O'LEARY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Crispus Attucks Park is a quiet
green space in Bloomingdale.
tan Branch Trail. It’s a nice way
to get from Brookland down to
the edge of NoMa, or east of
Rhode Island Avenue.
From there, I would hop back
over to Eckington and go to Yang
Market to grab some sandwiches.
I’d get a few, of course — and
would definitely make sure
they’re cut in half so I could share
’em. Then I’d head to Crispus
Attucks Park. I’d meet up with a
bunch of friends and we’d have a
“draw date.” Sometimes I’ll do
blind contour drawings, where
you’re drawing and observing
something and making marks on
a page but not looking at the
paper. I’ll do not just food-related
things, but I’ll also do observation drawings and color studies
and more human forms. Someone from the draw date can bring
something from RareSweets to
the picnic, too.
Moving on to early dinner: I
love to check out new places. And
I’ve been meaning to check out
the Salt Line, because I’ve heard
such great things. That would be
the precursor to an evening in
(Navy Yard), and I would go with
my
boyfriend,
Christopher
Graham. After that we’d head to a
play at Arena Stage. We just went
to this great play there about
Nina Simone (“Nina Simone:
Four Women”). It was awesome. I
went to a theater school when I
was a kid. That’s not my art
personally, but I love to go to
theater.
After that, I would go to the
Hamilton and get their late-night
sushi and a nightcap at their loft
bar. They have a really amazing
lineup of music down on the
15
EZ
lower level, but they also book
live music in this little annex bar.
I love it. I don’t think a lot of
people know about it, but it’s
certainly like old D.C. And definitely we’d catch some live music
there, for sure. Music’s important,
too.
lorena.mccue@washpost.com
Extended to april 22
ALL SEVEN HARRY POTTER BOOKS
IN SEVENTY HILARIOUS MINUTES!
“HAD US
ROARING
WITH
LAUGHTER!”
Washington Post
“CASTS THE
PERFECT SPELL
OVER THE
AUDIENCE!”
The New York Times
CO-PRESENTED BY
Orchestras in Motion!
April 9–15, 2018
Plus exciting FREE performances
and other events around the city!
Presented in cooperation with the League of American Orchestras
Generous support of the SHIFT Festival is provided through a matching grant from
The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation; by the D.C. Commission on the Arts & Humanities, which receives support
from the National Endowment for the Arts; by Dr. Gary Mather and Ms. Christina Co Mather;
and by Michael F. and Noémi K. Neidorff and The Centene Charitable Foundation.
This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts,
Abramson Family Foundation, Betsy and Robert Feinberg, and Morton and Norma Lee Funger.
Begins Tuesday
GET YOUR
TICKETS NOW!
WWW.SHAKESPEARETHEATRE.ORG
202.547.1122
MARCH 30, 2018
For all other ticket-related customer service inquiries,
call the Advance Sales Box Office at (202) 416-8540.
. FRIDAY,
Tickets and info at (202) 467-4600
or SHIFTfestival.org
THE WASHINGTON POST
Four adventurous orchestras.
$25 concerts at the Kennedy Center.
16
EZ
On the Town
P O P M U SIC
Prices listed where available
FRIDAY
ALGEBRA BLESSETT Bethesda Blues &
Jazz Supper Club. bethesdabluesjazz.com. 6
p.m. $40. JIMMY BUFFETT AND THE
CORAL REEFER BAND Royal Farms Arena.
royalfarmsarena.com. 8 p.m. $52.50-
$152.50. KAYZO Echostage. echostage.com.
9 p.m. $25-$35. KENDALL STREET
COMPANY Gypsy Sally’s. gypsysallys.com. 7
p.m. $13. MARSHALL CRENSHAW & THE
BOTTLE ROCKETS The Birchmere.
birchmere.com. 7:30 p.m. $29.50. PIGEONS
PLAYING PING PONG 9:30 Club. 930.com.
8 p.m. Through Saturday. Free-$20. REI COOP MEMBER JAM M Street REI rei.com.
5:30 p.m. Free. SAN FERMIN The Barns at
Wolf Trap. wolftrap.org. 8 p.m. $25-$30.
SLIPPERY WHEN WET: A TRIBUTE TO BON
JOVI State Theatre. thestatetheatre.com. 7
p.m. $12-$15. THE BLACK LILLIES The
Hamilton. thehamiltondc.com. 6:30 p.m.
$20-$25. THE FAB FOUR: THE ULTIMATE
TRIBUTE TO THE BEATLES Warner Theatre.
warnertheatredc.com. 7 p.m. $23-$43.
SATURDAY
BRENT COBB & THEM DC9. dcnine.com.
8:30 p.m. $15. CLEVE FRANCIS The
Birchmere. birchmere.com. 7:30 p.m. $35.
DASHBOARD CONFESSIONAL The
Fillmore. fillmoresilverspring.com. 5:30 p.m.
$33.60. INDONESIA NOSTALGIA: BACK TO
’70s & ’80s Frying Pan Farm Park Visitor
Center. 6:30 p.m. $15. METROPOLITAN
JAZZ ORCHESTRA WITH BRIA SKONBERG
George Mason University Center for the Arts.
cfa.gmu.edu. 8 p.m. $28-$46. REVELATOR
HILL Pearl Street Warehouse.
pearlstreetwarehouse.com. 7 p.m. $15. THE
ENGLISH BEAT The Barns at Wolf Trap.
wolftrap.org. 8 p.m. $30-$35. THE MACHINE
PERFORMS PINK FLOYD The Hamilton.
thehamiltondc.com. 6:30 p.m. $25-$30.
YELLOW DUBMARINE Gypsy Sally’s.
gypsysallys.com. 7 p.m. $18-$20. ZOSO: THE
ULTIMATE LED ZEPPELIN EXPERIENCE
State Theatre. thestatetheatre.com. 7 p.m.
$17-$20.
SUNDAY
April is
Fabulous
CASEY NEILL AND THE NORWAY RATS
Pearl Street Warehouse.
pearlstreetwarehouse.com. 7 p.m. $10.
FUJIYA & MIYAGI U Street Music Hall.
ustreetmusichall.com. 7 p.m. $15.
BRENT N. CLARKE/INVISION/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jimmy Buffett earlier this
month in New York. He and his
Coral Reefer Band will be at
Royal Farms Arena in
Baltimore on Friday.
MONDAY
CIGARETTES AFTER SEX 9:30 Club.
930.com. 7 p.m. $25. JANINE U Street
Music Hall. ustreetmusichall.com. 7 p.m.
$15.
TUESDAY
A V I RT UA L WO N D ER
DARK STAR ORCHESTRA: SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC SHOW The Hamilton.
thehamiltondc.com. 6:30 p.m. $38.50$49.25. EVA SALINA + PETER STAN Hill
Center at the Old Naval Hospital.
hillcenterdc.org. 7 p.m. $15-$18. MIRAH
DC9. dcnine.com. 7:30 p.m. $14.
SUPERCHUNK Black Cat. blackcatdc.com.
7:30 p.m. $22-$25.
WEDNESDAY
The Artistic Table
Gardener's Focus: Spring Designs
On view now
Tables set in style. Dazzling designs. And
you're invited. Today's most well-known
designers look to Marjorie Merriweather
Post and her finest table settings to curate
a feast for the eyes.
Tue, Apr 10 & 17, 2:45–3:30pm
Thu, Apr 12 & 19, 2:45–3:30pm
Fri, Apr 13 & 20, 2:45–3:30pm
Join Jessica Bonilla, head gardener, as she
highlights the spring seasonal plantings,
featuring more than 25,000 blooming
bulbs.
The Artistic Table Lecture Series
5:30–6:30pm: Mansion and The Artistic
Table open for self-guided touring
6:30–7:30pm: Lecture
7:30pm: Book Signing (Apr 18)
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30, 2018
Tickets in the theater are sold out for all dates.
Seating is available in a simulcast location.
Wed, Apr 11, 18 & 25, 10:30–11:15am
Thu, Apr 12, 19 & 26, 10:30–11:15am
Discover animals and other fanciful
creatures in the sculpture throughout
Hillwood's gardens.
Candice Shireman
Wed, Apr 4
Spring Floral Workshop with Cherry
Blossoms
Surtouts, Tureens, and Salt
and Pepper Shaker Sets: Table
Decoration, Then and Now, with
Sat, Apr 14
10:00–11:30am, 1–2:30pm & 3:30–5pm
Welcome spring to Washington by
creating your own arrangement accented
by soft, fragile pink cherry blossoms.
Wed, April 18
CHINESE MAN U Street Music Hall.
ustreetmusichall.com. 9 p.m. $20-$25. THE
MOTET 9:30 Club. 930.com. 7 p.m. $20.
THE SUBDUDES The Hamilton.
thehamiltondc.com. 6:30 p.m. $29.50$58.50.
Preschool Series: Spectacular Statues
Please call to register: 202.686.5807.
Art of the Table: Floral Design for
Entertaining, with Cathy Graham
THURSDAY
Tickets distributed at opening each day.
The Diplomatic Table: Blair House
Welcomes the World, with
Wilfried Zeisler
Wed, Apr 11
ANA MOURA The Barns at Wolf Trap.
wolftrap.org. 8 p.m. $50-$60. HOPE UDOBI
Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital.
hillcenterdc.org. 7 p.m. $18-$20. OUGHT
Black Cat. blackcatdc.com. 7:30 p.m. $15$17. RIPE U Street Music Hall.
ustreetmusichall.com. 7 p.m. $15.
SCREAMING FEMALES Rock & Roll Hotel.
rockandrollhoteldc.com. 7 p.m. $16-$18. YO
LA TENGO 9:30 Club. 930.com. 7 p.m. $35.
CLAS S ICAL
Prices listed where available
SATURDAY
SPEKTRAL QUARTET WITH WINSTON
CHOI The group performs works by Babbitt
and Schoenberg. Coolidge Auditorium,
Library of Congress, 10 First Street SE.
loc.gov. 2 p.m. Free.
Please call to register: 202.686.5807.
Gardener's Focus: Woodland Path
Tue, Apr 24, 2:45–3:15pm
Thu, Apr 26, 2:45–3:15pm
Sat, Apr 28, 2:45–3:15pm
Get an intimate look at Hillwood’s
beautiful woodland path, created in 2016.
SUNDAY
N OW O PE N
BUSCH TRIO The group performs works by
Schubert and Dvorák. The Phillips
Collection, 1600 21st St. NW.
phillipscollection.org. 4 p.m. $20-$40.
Advance reservations are recommended..
RICHARD STOLTZMAN, CLARINET, AND
MIKA STOLTZMAN, MARIMBA The
husband-and-wife team perform. National
Gallery of Art, Sixth Street and Constitution
Avenue NW. nga.gov/calendar/concerts/
seventy-sixth/richard-stoltzman-mikastoltzman.html. 3:30 p.m. Free.
17TH & M STREETS NW
WA S H I N G T O N , D C
THURSDAY
Tickets distributed at opening each day.
Now open every Sunday Hours: Tues – Sun 10am – 5pm
HillwoodMuseum.org 4155 Linnean Ave. NW, Washington DC Free parking
T I C K E T S AT N A T G E O M U S E U M . O R G
FORTAS CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERTS
Soprano Dawn Upshaw performs with So
Percussion, and debuts a new work by
Caroline Shaw. At the Kennedy Center
Terrace Theater. The Kennedy Center, 2700
F St. NW. kennedy-center.org/calendar/event/
MSFSM. 7:30 p.m. Through May 3. $45.
17
From the cover
EZ
Beltway, meet
Burning Man
The Renwick brings us the desert
party’s fantastical, touchable art —
and its bohemian spirit
BY
M ICHAEL O ’ S ULLIVAN
MARCH 30, 2018
BURNING MAN CONTINUED ON 18
Artist Duane
Flatmo
created his
sculptural
vehicle Tin
Pan Dragon,
which he
pedaled at the
desert
festival, out of
cookware.
. FRIDAY,
Shortly after Nora Atkinson was hired in 2014 as a crafts
curator at the Renwick Gallery, she pitched a crazy idea — an
exhibition dedicated to the art of Burning Man, the late-summer gathering of anarchic spirits in the Nevada desert that
culminates in the incineration of a giant, wooden effigy of a
man. The week-long Burning Man isn’t technically an art or
craft fair, and Atkinson struggled to make a case for the show,
an odd fit in buttoned-down Washington, the seat of
bureaucracy and government power. But eventually, her boss,
Elizabeth Broun, then the Renwick director, responded: “I
don’t really know what this is, but I can tell it’s going to be
interesting.”
That’s an understatement.
The exhibition, “No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man,”
opens Friday, with works filling the entire museum and, in a
partnership with the Golden Triangle business improvement
district, spilling onto neighboring streets (see map on
Page 20).
“No Spectators” still isn’t easy to wrap your head around.
As Atkinson conceived it, the show wouldn’t quite be fine art,
but not exactly craft either (at least not in the traditional
sense, epitomized by the Studio Craft Movement of the late
20th century: furniture, pottery, glass, metalwork, jewelry
and fiber).
Burning Man, Atkinson explained during a recent tour of
the show, is more about the ethos of the contemporary Maker
Movement, a burgeoning D.I.Y. trend among creative types —
often flying below the radar of the art establishment — that
promotes, among other things, repurposing castoff materials.
THE WASHINGTON POST
MARVIN JOSEPH/THE WASHINGTON POST
18
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 2018
EZ
From the cover
BURNING MAN FROM 17
One of the outdoor works on view, by a
husband-and-wife team known as Mr.
and Mrs. Ferguson, is a 14-foot-tall sculpture of a grizzly bear covered in a “fur” of
170,000 pennies. An indoor piece, by
Duane Flatmo, is a pedal-powered, dragon-shaped vehicle fashioned from discarded aluminum cookware.
The heart of Burning Man, Atkinson
argues, isn’t artifacts, anyway, but rather
people and community. So how exactly
do you show that in a museum? There’s a
you-had-to-be-there vibe to the whole
endeavor.
As the name implies, “No Spectators”
aims to capture some of that had-to-bethere energy. In a shift from standard
museum protocol, it isn’t about gawking
— or, rather, it’s not just about gawking —
but participating. If the Renwick’s previous eyepopper, “Wonder,” was all about
taking Instagram selfies with the art, “No
Spectators” wants you to put down the
cellphone and connect.
Many of the items in the show can be
handled, sat on and otherwise interacted with and/or entered. Along with the
more traditional, look-but-don’t-touch
displays of costuming and jewelry, digital paintings and archival material
about the history of Burning Man, “No
Spectators” boasts several immersive
and interactive installations. Candy
Chang’s “Before I Die” features chalkboards, inviting visitors to complete
this sentence: “Before I die I want to
[blank].” There’s also a bus — assembled
on-site, but minus an engine — that has
been converted into a miniature, working movie theater by the arts collective
Five Ton Crane — complete with fake
concession-stand candy, a parody newspaper blaring an “Art Heist” headline
and film canisters with treasures inside.
Like Burning Man itself, “No Spectators” requires a certain comfort with
contradiction, mixing the pleasures of
visual hedonism — eye candy, for lack of
a better word — with works of a more
spiritual, even sacred, bent. (The metaphor of a Burning Man conjures notions
of passionate life and mortality.) And
there’s an inherent irony to being in a
museum, looking at art, some of which
is, like the burning man of Burning Man,
ephemeral and destined to be destroyed.
How well does the exhibition capture
the elusive nature of Burning Man? Read
our guide to “No Spectators,” and then, in
the true spirit of the show, get out and see
for yourself.
A spark in 1986:
A brief history
of Burning Man
PHOTOS BY MARVIN JOSEPH/THE WASHINGTON POST
THE PAPER ARCH
The entrance to “No Spectators” is,
quite literally, a threshold. Symbolizing
the transition from stodgy Washington to
the wilder world of Burning Man, this
15-foot-tall, 25-foot-wide archway of
wood and particleboard is plastered with
black-and-white photographs of flowers,
theatrically costumed models and — in a
nod to both D.C. and the exotic —
taxidermy critters from the National
Museum of Natural History’s Hall of
Mammals. Commissioned specifically for
“No Spectators,” this site-specific work,
by veteran Burning Man artists Michael
BURNING MAN CONTINUED ON 20
If you go
NO SPECTATORS: THE ART OF BURNING MAN
Inside the Renwick Gallery and throughout the Golden Triangle
district. Renwick Gallery: Pennsylvania Avenue and 17th Street NW.
202-633-2850. si.edu/museums/renwick-gallery.
Dates: The show opens Friday and closes in two phases. Works on
the first floor are on view through Sept. 16, and works on the second
floor are on view through Jan. 21. The outdoor works are on view
through December.
Admission: Free.
Public programs: Information about related programs, including
gallery talks and an outdoor walking tour, is at americanart.si.edu/
exhibitions/burning-man.
LEFT: Ditch
the mental
suit as you
pass under an
arch, by
Michael
Garlington
and Natalia
Bertotti, into
the indoor
portion of the
show.
RIGHT:
Sculptures by
HYBYCOZO.
The seeds of Burning Man were
planted in 1986, on San
Francisco’s Baker Beach, where a
guy named Larry Harvey had
gathered a dozen of his friends
to celebrate the summer solstice
by building, and ultimately
burning, a human effigy made of
wood. The next year, they did it
again. And again the next. In
1990, after the city banned fires
on the beach — and the group
had exploded to more than 800
people — Harvey relocated the
inexplicably popular ritual to a
dry lake bed, or playa, in the
middle of Nevada’s Black Rock
Desert, at the invitation of a
group of kindred, anarchic
spirits calling themselves the
Cacophony Society.
Lo and behold: Burning Man
had taken root.
It had also taken hold of the
imaginations of a diverse
assortment of regulars, who
came to call themselves
“burners”: hippies, artists,
dadaists, pagans, New Age
spiritualists, anti-capitalists and
many members of Silicon
Valley’s newly wealthy digerati,
who, according to “No
Spectators” curator Nora
Atkinson, may have been drawn
to the event’s unplugged
earthiness as an antidote to the
deadening nature of the
electronic lifestyle. Fun fact: The
first Google Doodle, appearing
in 1998, featured an image of the
now iconic burning man. It was,
in essence, an out-of-office
message, letting the world know
that many of the tech company’s
employees had gone fishin’, as it
were, at the playa.
Today, attendance numbers in
the tens of thousands, and a
section of the participants’
encampment typically includes
an enclave of billionaires. The
organization’s offshoots have
grown to include such forms of
socially conscious outreach as
Burners Without Borders, a
group that provides disaster
relief and other aid around the
globe. The annual festival is
guided by 10 core principles,
including radical inclusion
(everyone is welcome, and
anyone can show art),
decommodification (gifting, not
cash, is the currency), and
leaving no trace (hence the
burning). Though still infused
with an anything-goes spirit,
Burning Man runs more like a
well-oiled machine than an
anarchy. “When it evolved to
70,000 people,” Atkinson says,
“there had to be an adult in the
room.”
— Michael O’Sullivan
. FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 2018
e
d
n
e
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
f
f
e
s
d
a
h
,
-
19
20
EZ
From the cover
BURNING MAN FROM 18
Garlington and Natalia Bertotti,
seems to whisper as you pass
through, “Toto, I’ve a feeling we’re
not in Kansas anymore.”
‘TRUTH IS BEAUTY’
Remember the news from the
fall of the National Park Service
denying a permit to install a 45foot sculpture of a naked woman
on the Mall? She’s baaack. Marco
Cochrane’s 18-foot version, in steel
mesh, of the same nude model
(dancer Deja Solis) is the centerpiece of a gallery featuring, ironically, elaborate costumes and jewelry. (Tyler Fuqua’s “Thorax, Ambassador of the Insects,” which the
artist wears at Burning Man as a
kind of informal, bug-inspired performance piece, is an especially
noteworthy example. Burning
Man, as Atkinson notes, is known
for both nudity and theatrical getups worthy of a Vegas showgirl.)
Cochrane’s joyful figure, which
captures Solis on tiptoe, arms
raised and back arched, is the
perfect icon for the #MeToo moment. Part of the artist’s “Bliss”
series, it is both straightforward
and, sadly, aspirational: According
to Atkinson, Cochrane meant to
capture what it would feel like if a
woman were able to live in a world
utterly without fear.
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30, 2018
TEMPLE
The heart of the Renwick is its
expansive Grand Salon, on the
second floor. And the heart of “No
Spectators” is a huge installation
called “Temple,” which has transformed the cavernous, ballroomlike hall into a space that is both
sacred and celebratory — a paradox embodied by the altar installed at one end of the room and
the giant chandelier that descends to 10 feet above the floor.
It all comes courtesy of David
Best, a San Francisco sculptor who,
since 2000, has been building similar structures at Burning Man out
of recycled wooden panels. (Best
MARVIN JOSEPH/THE WASHINGTON POST
Poet Maya Angelou’s face is rendered in the cast-cement “Maya’s Mind,” by artist Mischell Riley.
describes his material as the stuff
used to make the 3-D, naturalwood “dinosaur-puzzle” construction kits you might find in a
natural-history museum gift shop.)
In an interview during installation, Best said that he didn’t
initially think of the first structure as a temple but that it ended
up being used that way. A young
man who had apprenticed with
him had recently been killed,
Best said, and Burning Man at-
tendees — or “burners,” as they’re
known — who were friends of the
dead man began flocking to the
chapel-like enclosure as a place of
mourning and remembrance.
Since then, Best has returned
every year to create what is now
officially consecrated as the Burning Man “temple,” which holds
pride of place just behind the
central effigy that lends the festival its name and is ultimately set
ablaze.
With art e≠orts, downtown D.C. isn’t business as usual
The idea for “No Spectators:
Beyond the Renwick” came
about simply: Certain large
sculptures deemed for the
museum’s Burning Man
exhibition would not fit inside
the building’s front door.
The partnership with the
Renwick, which sits just outside
the boundaries of the Golden
Triangle business improvement
district (BID), is the first of its
kind, bringing six public
artworks to the neighborhood to
complement the Renwick’s
show. But it’s not Golden
Triangle’s first foray into public
art. Placards printed with haiku
poetry are visible in tree boxes
throughout downtown
Washington, and wooden
sculptures by local artist Foon
Sham have been installed in
rain gardens at 19th and L
streets NW.
But the sculptures featured
in “No Spectators: Beyond the
Renwick,” which was partly
underwritten by Lyft, go
against the grain of so much
D.C. art, which tends toward
memorials dedicated to white
men on horseback. “Beyond
the Renwick” includes a
portrait of poet Maya Angelou,
cast in cement by Mischell
Riley; an installation of giant
bronze crows by Jack
Champion; and monumental
steel X’s and O’s, with LED
lights, in a cheeky riff (by
Laura Kimpton with Jeff
Schomberg) on pop artist
Robert Indiana’s famous
“Love” statue. (Printed maps
are also available at the
Renwick.)
You could, of course, forgo the
map, and wait to chance upon
the art, unexpectedly. According
to Leona Agouridis, executive
director of the Golden Triangle
BID, the motive behind this
display is the same as the
Renwick’s: creating a sense of
discovery, and fostering
engagement with a world from
which we are too often
disconnected.
— Michael O’Sullivan
At the Renwick, visitors are
invited to leave a wooden block
on which they’ve written the
name of a deceased loved one, as
a token of thanks for what that
person gave them — tangible or
intangible. It may seem odd, Atkinson says, to find the spiritual
interwoven with the spectacle at
Burning Man, but that it really
isn’t. “A lot of burners,” she explains, “are a little bit religious
about the whole thing.”
WORKS BY FOLDHAUS,
HYBYCOZO,
CHRISTOPHER SCHARDT
Best’s “Temple” isn’t the only
contemplative space in “No Spectators.” There are three other oases
of peace that offer a place to chill
out or trip out, depending on your
taste.
At the chill end of the spectrum
is an installation of complex, polyhedral forms by Yelena Filipchuk
and Serge Beaulieu, an art duo
known as HYBYCOZO. (Inspired
by “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the
Galaxy,” the name is short for
Hyperspace Bypass Construction
Zone.) Evoking the cutout brass
lanterns of a Middle Eastern inn,
HYBYCOZO’s laser-cut steel abstractions, some of which incorporate lights, create an ambiance
both exotic and strangely soothing. One of the works, “Deep
Thought,” is large enough to sit
inside.
On the trippy end is “Nova,” by
Christopher Schardt, a former
programmer “who used to do art
for fun,” as he puts it, but who
now considers himself “an artist
who does programming for fun.”
On the floor, you’ll find a rug and
comfy pillows; overhead is a starshaped screen featuring a kaleidoscopic LED light show. Plop
down, turn on, tune in — to the
sounds of Bach’s Brandenburg
Concerto No. 4.
Situated somewhere in between
those extremes is “Shrumen Lumen,” a Lewis Carrollesque installation of giant, multicolor origami
mushrooms made out of folded
corrugated-plastic boards. Created by the FoldHaus art collective, it
playfully evokes the otherworldliness of “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.” Step onto one of several
strategically placed pads, and
these magic mushrooms — which
contain hidden motors, but no
active hallucinogens — gently fold
and unfold above you, like psychedelic umbrellas mimicking the
closing and opening of your mind.
michael.osullivan@washpost.com
On Exhibit
M USE U M S
OPENINGS
COMMUNITY POLICING IN THE NATION’S
CAPITAL: THE PILOT DISTRICT PROJECT,
1968-1972 A collaboration between the
National Building Museum and the
Historical Society of Washington, D.C., this
exhibition is part of a citywide
commemoration of the 50th anniversary of
Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination. It
explores the Pilot District Project (PDP), a
local experiment in community policing,
through a collection of PDP posters, maps
and other materials. Opening Saturday.
National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW.
nbm.org.
NO SPECTATORS: THE ART OF BURNING
MAN An exhibition of artwork created at
Burning Man, the annual desert gathering
and major art event, that includes
immersive, room-size installations,
photographs, jewelry, costumes and
archival materials from the Nevada
Museum of Art. Burning Man is an annual,
week-long event; a city of 75,000 people
created in Nevada’s Black Rock Desert,
where enormous experimental art
installations are erected, some of which
are then ritually burned. Opening Friday.
Renwick Gallery, 17th Street and
Pennsylvania Avenue NW.
americanart.si.edu.
SHARING IMAGES: RENAISSANCE
PRINTS INTO MAIOLICA AND BRONZE An
exhibition of about 90 objects that
highlight the effect of Renaissance prints
on maiolica and bronze plaquettes.
Focusing on designs by artists including
Andrea Mantegna, Antonio del Pollaiuolo,
Raphael, Michelangelo, Parmigianino and
Albrecht Dürer, the exhibition
demonstrates how printed images were
transmitted, transformed and translated
onto ceramics and small bronze reliefs.
Opening Sunday. National Gallery of Art,
Sixth Street and Constitution Avenue NW.
nga.gov.
ONGOING
ART MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAS “Art of
the Americas,” through Oct. 28. Modern
and contemporary Latin American and
Caribbean permanent collection highlights.
201 18th St. NW.museum.oas.org.
DUMBARTON OAKS MUSEUM “Early
Acquisitions: Bliss Collecting in Paris and
London, 1912–1919,” through Saturday. An
exhibition of the acquisitions of Robert and
Mildred Bliss, collected when they lived in
Paris from 1912 to 1919, including
artworks and unusual, decorative objects
that were newly available via avant-garde
art dealers, including medieval, Islamic
and pre-Columbian artworks. 1703 32nd
St. NW. doaks.org.
GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY
MUSEUM AND THE TEXTILE MUSEUM
“Binding the Clouds: The Art of the Central
Asian Ikat,” through July 9. An exhibition
focused on the complex dyeing technique
from the region that is now Uzbekistan,
known as abrband (binding the clouds).
701 21st St. NW. museum.gwu.edu.
HILLWOOD ESTATE, MUSEUM AND
GARDENS “The Artistic Table,” through
June 10. An exhibition of historic tables
designed by Hillwood curators and inspired
by 18th- and 19th-century French and
Russian models, on view in the 44-foot
dining room and the adjacent breakfast
room. 4155 Linnean Ave. NW.
hillwoodmuseum.org.
HIRSHHORN MUSEUM AND SCULPTURE
GARDEN “Brand New: Art and Commodity
in the 1980s,” through May 13. An
exhibition of about 150 works by 66 artists,
including Jeff Koons, Barbara Kruger,
Ashley Bickerton, General Idea, Julia
Wachtel and Peter Halley that explores the
pivotal point in the 1980s when art
became a commodity and artists became
brands. Seventh Street and Independence
Avenue SW. hirshhorn.si.edu.
KREEGER MUSEUM “Reinstallation of the
Permanent Collection,” through Dec. 31,
2019. Guest curated by modern art
historian Harry Cooper, the reinstallation of
the collection introduces works that have
not been on view for several years. Phase I
of the reinstallation comprises the
museum’s main floor galleries and focuses
on 19th- and early-20th-century painting
and works on paper. Phase II of the
reinstallation, opening in the lower
galleries in 2018, will focus on the
museum’s postwar and contemporary art
holdings, including a bold vertical canvas
by abstract expressionist Hans Hofmann,
as well as the museum’s collection of West
African masks. 2401 Foxhall Rd. NW.
kreegermuseum.org.
21
EZ
LIBBY WEILER/SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN ART MUSEUM
“Do Ho Suh: Almost
Home” at the
Smithsonian American
Art Museum features
semitransparent copies
of household objects.
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS “Echoes of the
Great War: American Experiences of World
War I,” through Jan. 5. An exhibition that
commemorates the centennial of the Great
EXHIBITS CONTINUED ON 22
100 YEARS
OF THE ROYAL AIR FORCE
FREE CONCERTS!
Monday, Apr. 16
at 7:30 p.m.
The U.S. Air Force Concert Band &
The Central Band of the Royal Air Force
Wednesday, Apr. 18
at 7:30 p.m.
The Airmen of Note &
The Royal Air Force Squadronaires
For ticket info, please visit our website:
VEHBI KOC FOUNDATION CONTEMPORARY ART COLLECTION
“Women House” at the National Museum of Women in the Arts includes works from over 30 artists
who envision the idea of home as a place of liberation rather than solely of comfort and nurturing.
www.usafband.af.mil
MARCH 30, 2018
FREE! Tickets Required.
. FRIDAY,
The Music Center at Strathmore
North Bethesda, MD
THE WASHINGTON POST
D.A.R. Constitution Hall
Washington, D.C.
22
EZ
On Exhibit
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30, 2018
EXHIBITS FROM 21
War through depictions of the U.S.
involvement in and experience of it —
via correspondence, music, film,
recordings, diaries, posters, photographs,
scrapbooks, medals, maps and materials
from the Veterans History Project. 101
Independence Ave. SE. loc.gov.
MUSEUM OF THE BIBLE Including five
floors of exhibits of ancient biblical
manuscripts, including an array of texts on
papyrus, Jewish texts, including the world’s
largest private collection of Torah scrolls,
medieval manuscripts, as well as
Americana such a Bibles belonging to
celebrities. 400 Fourth St. SW.
museumofthebible.org.
NATIONAL AIR AND SPACE MUSEUM
“Artist Soldiers,” through Nov. 11. An
exhibition that examines the work of
professional artists who were recruited by
the U.S. Army and were considered the first
true combat artists, along with the artwork
of soldiers, including Jeff Gusky’s photos of
stone carvings made in underground
shelters, that provide a unique perspective
on the First World War. Sixth Street and
Independence Avenue SW.
airandspace.si.edu.
NATIONAL BUILDING MUSEUM “Making
Room: Housing for a Changing America,”
through Sept. 16. An exhibition of
developers’, architects’ and interior
designers’ answers to the changing
housing needs because of shifts in
demographics and lifestyle. At the center of
the exhibition is a full-scale, flexible
dwelling that illustrates how a small space
can be adapted to meet many needs. It
comprises two living spaces that could be
used independently or combined to form a
larger residence. 401 F St. NW. nbm.org.
NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART “Cézanne
Portraits,” through July 1. An exhibition of
about 60 portraits by Cézanne
accompanied by an illustrated catalogue
with essays by the exhibition’s curators.
This is the first full visual account of the
artists portraits, exploring the thematic
characteristics of his works, and the
development of his style and methods.
Sixth Street and Constitution Avenue NW.
nga.gov.
NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART, EAST
BUILDING “Jackson Pollock’s ‘Mural,’ ”
through Oct. 28. This exhibition of works by
Pollock has at its center a special
installation of one of his murals on loan
from the University of Iowa Museum of Art.
Originally commissioned by Peggy
Guggenheim for her New York City
townhouse, it is Pollock’s largest work at
nearly 20 feet long. 440 Constitution Ave.
NW. nga.gov.
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC MUSEUM “Tomb
of Christ: The Church of the Holy Sepulchre
Experience,” through Dec. 31. An
immersive 3-D experience of the Church of
the Holy Sepulchre. Built in the 4th century
by the Emperor Constantine, the church
sits on the site where many scholars
believe the crucifixion of Christ took place.
“Day to Night: In the Field with Stephen
Wilkes,” through April 29. An exhibition of
over 1,500 time-lapse images taken from a
fixed vantage point over the course of 15 to
30 hours from sunrise to sunset of four
ancient bird migrations across the globe.
17th and M streets NW.
nationalgeographic.org.
NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN
AMERICAN HISTORY AND CULTURE
Ongoing exhibitions focusing on a diversity
of historical subjects including the
transatlantic slave trade, the civil rights
movement, the history of African American
music and other cultural expressions,
visual arts, theater, sports and military
history. 14th Street and Constitution
Avenue NW. nmaahc.si.edu.
NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN ART
“Visionary: Viewpoints on Africa’s Arts,”
through Nov. 4, 2020. An ongoing
exhibition of some 300 works of art from
over 30 artists that offers a broad
spectrum of visual expression. 950
Independence Ave. SW. africa.si.edu.
NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AMERICAN
HISTORY“City of Hope: Resurrection City &
the 1968 Poor People’s Campaign,”
through Dec. 28. An ongoing exhibition that
marks the 50th anniversary of the
assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. with
never-before-seen photographs and
original artifacts from Resurrection City,
the small community set up in Washington
for the nation’s poor. 14th Street and
Constitution Avenue NW.
americanhistory.si.edu.
NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN
INDIAN “Americans,” through Sept. 30,
2022. An exhibition of 350 objects and
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS/WORLD WAR I. U.S. ARMY SIGNAL CORPS
images that explores the prevalence
of American Indian names and images
throughout American culture: from the
Tomahawk missile to baking powder cans,
to the stories of Thanksgiving, Pocahontas,
the Trail of Tears and the Battle of Little
Bighorn. Fourth Street and Independence
Avenue SW. nmai.si.edu.
NATIONAL MUSEUM OF WOMEN IN THE
ARTS “Women House,” through May 28. An
exhibition of photographs, videos,
sculptures and roomlike installations built
with materials such as felt and rubber
bands from more than 30 global artists
who envision the idea of home as a place
of liberation rather than solely of comfort
and nurturing. A sequel to the project
“Womanhouse,” developed in 1972 by Judy
Chicago and Miriam Schapiro. 1250 New
York Ave. NW. nmwa.org.
NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY “UnSeen:
Our Past in a New Light, Ken Gonzales-Day
and Titus Kaphar,” through Jan. 6. An
exhibition of works by Gonzales-Day and
Kaphar, contemporary artists who address
the underrepresentation and
misrepresentation of minorities in
American history and portraiture. Eighth
and F streets NW. npg.si.edu.
NATIONAL POSTAL MUSEUM “In Her
Words: Women’s Duty and Service in World
War I,” through May 8. An exhibition of
letters and artifacts from World War I of
four women that demonstrate details of
their life, duty and service in the war, where
in great numbers, women officially served
in and alongside the military in ways that
revolutionized women’s work. 2
Massachusetts Ave. NE.
postalmuseum.si.edu.
The Library of Congress’s “Echoes of the Great War:
American Experiences of World War I” exhibition, on
view through Jan. 5, commemorates the centennial of the
war through depictions of the U.S. involvement in and
experience of it with photographs such as the one above
of an African American unit in Verdun, France.
NEWSEUM “The Marines and Tet: The
Battle That Changed the Vietnam War,”
through July 8, 2019. An exhibition of 20
large-format photographs of John Olson, a
photographer with Stars and Stripes who
spent three days with the Marines at the
1968 Battle of Hue of the Vietnam War.
Hue was one of more than 100 cities and
villages that North Vietnamese forces
struck with a surprise attack on the holiday
known as Tet. 555 Pennsylvania Ave. NW.
newseum.org.
SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN ART MUSEUM
“Do Ho Suh: Almost Home,” through Aug.
5. A major installation of the artist’s Hub
sculptures — representations of thresholds
and transitional spaces from places he has
lived — along with a group of
semitransparent copies of household
objects called Specimens. Eighth and F
streets NW. americanart.si.edu.
SMITHSONIAN ARTHUR M. SACKLER
GALLERY “The Prince and the Shah: Royal
Portraits from Qajar Iran,” through Aug. 5.
An exhibition of about 30 works from the
Freer and Sackler collections, including
recent gifts and acquisitions, of painted
portraits and studio photographs from
Qajar-era (19th century) Iran, when rulers
used portraiture to convey monarchical
power. 1050 Independence Ave. SW.
asia.si.edu.
SMITHSONIAN NATIONAL MUSEUM OF
NATURAL HISTORY “Objects of Wonder,”
through Jan. 1. The exhibition includes the
“Blue Flame,” one of the world’s largest
and finest pieces of gem-quality lapis lazuli;
Martha, the last known passenger pigeon;
the Pinniped fossil, a fossil of one of the
earliest members of the group of animals
that includes seals, sea lions and walruses;
and the 1875 Tsimshian House Front, one
of the best examples of Native Alaskan
design artwork. 10th Street and
Constitution Avenue NW.
naturalhistory.si.edu.
THE PHILLIPS COLLECTION “Ten
Americans: After Paul Klee,” through May
6. An exhibition that explores the role of
Swiss artist Paul Klee (1879–1940) in the
development of mid-20th century American
art, featuring work by Klee in dialogue with
Adolph Gottlieb, Norman Lewis, Robert
Motherwell, Kenneth Noland, Jackson
Pollock, Theodoros Stamos, Mark Tobey,
Bradley Walker Tomlin, William Baziotes
and Gene Davis. 1600 21st St. NW.
phillipscollection.org.
UNITED STATES HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL
MUSEUM Permanent exhibition spanning
three floors offers a chronological narrative
of the Holocaust through photographs,
films and historical artifacts. 100 Raoul
Wallenberg Pl. SW. ushmm.org.
U.S. BOTANIC GARDEN “Wall Flowers:
Botanical Murals,” through Oct. 15. An
exhibition of botanical murals. “Orchid
Spectrum,” through April 8. An annual
exhibition of thousands of orchids,
including those unique and rarely seen
from the U.S. Botanic Gardens’s and
Smithsonian Gardens’s extensive plant
collections. 100 Maryland Ave. SW.
usbg.gov.
U.S. NATIONAL ARBORETUM “Sakura
Orihon: Diary of a Cherry Blossom
Journey,” through April 8. An exhibition of
orihon sketchbooks by Ron Henderson who
recorded his experience following
blossoming cherry trees from south to
north in Japan, celebrating the cherry
blossom culture there. 3501 New York Ave.
NE. usna.usda.gov.
VIRGINIA MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS “The
Horse in Ancient Greek Art,” through July
8. An exhibition of Greek vases, sculpture
and coins from the 8th through the 4th
centuries B.C. that explores the
significance of the horse in ancient Greek
culture and imagery of the horse in
ancient myth, war, sport and competition.
200 N Blvd, Richmond. vmfa.museum.
On Stage
23
PG
NATE WATTERS FOR SEATTLE REPERTORY THEATRE
A prized player is taken
out for another spin
A jukebox owned by renowned playwright August Wilson lights up ‘Two Trains Running’
If you go
TOP: From left,
Memphis
(Eugene Lee),
Wolf (Reginald
Andre Jackson)
and Holloway
(David Emerson
Toney) in August
Wilson’s “Two
Trains Running.”
LEFT: The 1955
Rock-Ola, now
out of storage
and onstage.
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30, 2018
When the lights come up on a small Pittsburgh
restaurant in 1969, the jukebox has been broken
ne of the key characters in August Wilfor some time. For Memphis, the owner of the
son’s “Two Trains Running” is played not
diner, the Rock-Ola is a reminder of days when the
by a person but by a machine. In the
place was packed.
upcoming revival at Arena Stage, that
Sterling, who’s one week out of the state
part will be played by the same
penitentiary, sees the jukebox and
machine that originated the role for
the restaurant’s taciturn waitress,
the world premiere at the Yale
Risa, as the keys to his immediate
Repertory Theatre in 1990 and in TWO TRAINS RUNNING
redemption.
nine subsequent productions, in- Arena Stage, 1101 Sixth St.
Almost every August Wilson play
cluding the run on Broadway, in SW. 202-488-3300 or
has a moment when music enters
arenastage.org.
1992.
the action and lifts the dialogue to a
That machine is a 1955 Rock-Ola Dates: Through April 29.
higher level. In “The Piano Lesson,”
jukebox, Model 1448, its silver body
it’s when Berniece plays the upright
decorated with three large V’s, its Tickets: $50-$99.
piano with her family’s history
glass case displaying its 45 rpm
carved into its wood. In “Seven
records arranged on a circular carousel as if they
Guitars,” it’s when Schoolboy Barton’s friends
were a car tire cut into thin slices of black vinyl.
erupt in song at the musician’s funeral. In “Ma
After its initial stage career, Wilson claimed the
Rainey’s Black Bottom,” it’s when the titular singer
jukebox for himself and filled it up with his favorite
lays down the law to her male musicians that
45s. After Wilson died, in 2005, the jukebox went
they’re going to play the song her way: slow and
RUNNING CONTINUED ON 24
into storage. Now it’s onstage again.
O
ARENA STAGE
G EOFFREY H IMES
THE WASHINGTON POST
BY
24
PG
On Stage
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30, 2018
RUNNING FROM 23
bluesy. In “Two Trains Running,” it’s when the broken
jukebox comes back to life.
The actual jukebox that the
production borrowed from
Wilson’s widow, Constanza
Romero, was dusty and dingy
when it arrived at the Seattle
Repertory Theatre, where
this production originated. It
came with a note from her
that said, “The sudden working of the jukebox should be a
magical moment. Perhaps in
the scene where Risa puts the
quarter in, the light should go
out and it should stop working. When she does make it
work with Aretha Franklin,
there should be colorful
lights coming from inside it, a
magical moment should happen which goes with the music.”
Lighting designer Sherrice
Mojgani got the machine’s
lights working and laid LED
strips inside to provide more
psychedelic colors when the
crucial moment arrives.
Franklin starts singing Allen
Toussaint’s “Take a Look,” and
Sterling asks the waitress to
dance.
“The characters complain
about the broken jukebox,”
Mojgani says, “as if when it
got fixed, things would
change for the better. Then
one day, it’s fixed. That’s the
way life is: It’s just one bad
thing after another and finally something goes right. This
dingy thing in the corner
suddenly lights up.”
The fact that the music
comes through a jukebox that
once belonged to Wilson amplifies that effect for much
the same reason that museums always prefer a genuine artifact to a perfect replica. It’s as if the cast and crew
— and maybe the audience —
can feel the history that the
Rock-Ola carries with it.
“The thing I notice about
most musicals,” Wilson told
me in 1999, “is the contrivance. The song comes about
not because the characters
need to sing but because the
play needs a song. I try to use
music so it comes out of the
lives of the characters, so it’s
uncontrived. One of my favorite examples is in ‘The Piano
Lesson’ when Wining Boy sits
down at the piano and pretty
soon Boy Willie and the rest
are dancing around. If you
walked by their house and
looked through the window,
you’d say, ‘Boy, those people
are having fun,’ but there’s a
lot more to it than that. The
music is putting the characters back together; it heals
them. It has a function.”
goingoutguide@washpost.com
CAROL ROSEGG
“The Wiz,” the Tony Award-winning musical version of “The Wizard of Oz,” is playing at Ford’s Theatre through May 12.
A L S O P L A Y I NG
Prices are for the entire run of the
show; individual shows might vary.
OPENINGS
600 HIGHWAYMEN: THE FEVER Audience
involvement is required in this piece from
Abigail Browde and Michael Silverstone. The
Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, 8270
Alumni Dr., College Park. theclarice.umd.edu.
Opening Wednesday at 8 p.m. $10-$25.
CABARET NOIR A series of dark comic
vignettes from Happenstance Theater,
inspired by film noir. Joe's Movement
Emporium, 3309 Bunker Hill Rd. Mount
Rainier. 301-699-1819. joesmovement.org.
Opening Friday at 8 p.m.
DON JUAN Tonya Beckman has the title role
in Molière’s story about a self-centered
nobleman who puts all of his energy into
defiling what society holds sacred. Taffety
Punk, 545 Seventh St. SE. 202-355-9441.
taffetypunk.com. Opening Wednesday at
7:30 p.m. $10.
JOHN The Washington premiere of Annie
Baker’s relationship-focused drama.
Signature Theatre, 4200 Campbell Ave.,
Arlington. 703-820-9771. signaturetheatre.org. Opening Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.
$40.
MILLION DOLLAR QUARTET This Broadway
musical chronicles the day that Elvis
Presley, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis and
Carl Perkins came together in a recording
studio. Music Center at Strathmore, 5301
Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda. 301-5815100. strathmore.org. Opening Saturday at
8 p.m. $38-$88.
ROZ AND RAY The East Coast premiere of
Karen Hartman’s biomedical drama, set
during the AIDS crisis in the 1980s. Directed
by Adam Immerwahr. Theater J, 1529 16th
St. NW. 202-777-3210. edcjcc.org. Opening
Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.
SALON SERIES: THE MOORS Everyman
Theatre’s Resident Acting Company
presents staged readings of works by
female playwrights. Everyman Theatre, 315
W. Fayette St, Baltimore. 410-752-2208.
everymantheatre.org. Opening Monday at
6 p.m. $20-$80.
THE ARS NOVA PRODUCTION OF
UNDERGROUND RAILROAD GAME A
TERESA WOOD PHOTOGRAPHY
Christopher Herring and Julie-Ann Elliott in the Washington Stage Guild’s regional premiere of
Kenneth Jones’s “Alabama Story,” about a children’s book that sparked a heated civil-rights debate.
comedic meditation on history, power and
race by Jennifer Kidwell and Scott
Sheppard, structured around an elementary
school role-playing exercise, Woolly
Mammoth Theatre, 641 D St. NW. 202-3933939. woollymammoth.net. Opening
Wednesday at 8 p.m. $20-$99.
THE IMPROVISED SHAKESPEARE
COMPANY The Chicago-based troupe
performs a fully improvised Shakespearean
play based on audience members’
suggestions. The Kennedy Center, 2700 F
St. NW. 202-467-4600. kennedy-center.org.
Opening Thursday at 7 p.m. $29-$49.
THE PAVILION Craig Wright’s play is about a
man who attends his high school reunion
with the aim of winning back his former
sweetheart. The Hub Theatre, 9431 Silver
King Court. Fairfax. thehubtheatre.org.
Opening Friday.
TWO TRAINS RUNNING The 1960 entry in
August Wilson’s “Century Cycle,” coproduced with Seattle Repertory Theatre, in
the Fichandler. Arena Stage, Fichandler
Stage,1101 Sixth St. SW. 202-488-3300.
arenastage.org. Opening Friday at 8 p.m.
ONGOING
410[GONE] Frances Ya-Chu Cowhig’s dark
play is performed by Rorschach Theatre.
Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE.
202-399-7993. atlasarts.org. Through
April 15.
ADULT ENTERTAINMENT The Klunch
presents a comedy written by Elaine May,
about a group of porn stars who tire of their
profession and enlist a Yale-educated
cameraman to write them a movie script.
Caos On F, 923 F St NW. 202-215-6993.
theklunch.com. Through Saturday. $25-$75.
ALABAMA STORY The regional premiere of
Kenneth Jones’s play about a children’s
picture book that sparked a heated civilrights debate between an Alabama state
senator and a librarian. Based on real
events. Washington Stage Guild at the
STAGE CONTINUED ON 27
25
EZ
THEATRE
A new drama
Roz and Ray
April 3 – 29
Julia Alvarez’s
April 12-May 13
Thurs-Sat at 8 pm
Sun at 2 pm
En el Tiempo de
las Mariposas
The Most
Reluctant
Convert
Medical drama about a doctor at the
onset of the AIDS crisis and the ethical
questions she faces. Stars Susan Rome
and Tom Story.
A riveting story about the courageous
Maribel sisters who inspired resistance
against the brutal regime of Dominican
General Rafael Trujillo.
Using C.S. Lewis’ own words, award-winning actor, Max McLean inhabits Lewis to
take us on his extraordinary journey from
hard-boiled atheist to “the most reluctant
convert in all England.”
April 4-8, 2018
Mosaic Theater Co.
Paper Dolls
Shear Madness
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
$30-$45
In Spanish
with English
surtitles
“Hugely
Moving!”
$39 - $59
– The
Washington
Post
This record-breaking interactive solvethe-crime comedy keeps the audiences
laughing as they try to outwit the
suspects and catch the killer. New clues
and up to the minute improvisation
deliver “shrieks of laughter night after
night.” (Washington Post)
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Student Rush
Tickets Available
Tickets: 202-467-4600
Groups: 202-416-8400
www.shearmadness.com
Tickets
Available
at the
Box Office
April 4 – 29
2017 Obie Award Winner for “Best New
American Theatre Work” Underground
Railroad Game arrives at Woolly this April
Woolly Mammoth Theatre Co.
641 D Street NW
202-393-3939,
woollymammoth.net
Regular Online Pay
Tickets
What You Can
start at $41 Weds. April 4
On Stage Through
April 22
Visit the lands of Bohemia and Sicilia in
this “beautifully poignant” (BroadwayWorld)
staging of Shakespeare’s soul-stirring love
story. This spellbinding tale is filled with
romance, jealousy, reconciliation—and a
bear in pursuit. A reminder to us about the
power of forgiveness, The Winter’s Tale is
“moving to tears” (DC Metro Theater Arts).
Folger Theatre
201 East Capitol St., SE, DC
202.544.7077
www.folger.edu/theatre
Fri March 30 @ 8 PM;
Sat March 31 @ 8 PM
Sun April 1 @ 3 &
7:30 PM
Regular Schedule:
Tuesday–Friday at 8
Saturday at 6 & 9
Sunday at 3 & 7
presents
Shakespeare’s
The Winter's Tale
Senior and
under-35
discounts
Based on the Disney movie, this Tony
Award winning, high energy musical is
the rousing tale of a ragged band of
“newsies” who strike for what’s right.
PWYC Preview TONIGHT! “Raucously
Beguiling” (The Guardian) play with songs
about drag performance, immigration,
and the search for home.
March 15- June 10
The Ars Nova production
Underground
Railroad Game
GALA Theatre
3333 14th Street, NW
202-234-7174
Galatheatre.org
Lansburgh Theatre
450 7th Street NW
Washington, DC 20004
$39-$69
For tickets or more information
visit CSLewisOnstage.com
or call 202-547-1122
Toby’s Dinner Theatre
of Columbia
410.730.8311
Tobysdinnertheatre.com
Atlas Performing Arts Ctr
1333 H St NE,
202-399-7993,
mosaictheater.org
Max McLean as C.S.
Lewis
Newsies
A Disney Musical
Theater J
1529 16th St., NW
Theaterj.org, 202-777-3210
Directed by Aaron Posner
Call for
tickets and
information
$5-$35
Valet Parking
Available at
1360 H St NE!
Added Shows:
Mon at 8PM
Tue at 5PM
Wed at 5PM
Thu at 5PM
Great Group
Rates for 15 +
$35 - $89
“Beautiful and
haunting”
– Brightest
Young Things
$12
Group
rates
available
301.634.5380
$25-60,
most incl
dinner
571-477-9444
CHILDREN'S THEATRE
Little Red
Riding Hood &
the 3 Little Pigs
Today through May 12
Thu. & Fri 11am •
Sat & Sun 11:30am &
1:00pm
A fresh look at the two tales from the
viewpoint of B. B. Wolfe. The stories
weave together with music and rap, and
lots of audience participation
The Puppet Co. Playhouse
7300 MacArthur Blvd.
Glen Echo, MD 20812
www.thepuppetco.org
DINNER THEATRE
Murder Mystery
Simple Act of
Murder
A murder mystery aboard a 1928 river
boat cruise goes terribly wrong. Money is
missing and a dead body turns up. The
mob wants some answers.
April 7 – April 15
StageCoachTC.com
4/7 & 4/15 StageCoach
Theatre, Ashburn
4/8 Bright Box Winchester
MUSIC - CONCERTS
Irvin D. Peterson,
Conductor
Tonight!
Good Friday,
March 30, 7:30pm
Cello Sonata in D Minor, Op. 56 Robert Kahn
Sonya Hayes,
Violinist
Igor Zubkovsky,
Cellist
Diane Atherton, soprano
James Rogers, baritone.
Chorus and orchestra
Sunday, April 8th,
5:00 P.M.
Frank Conlon,
Pianist
Violin Sonata in E Flat Major, Op. 18 Richard Strauss
Annunciation Catholic
Church
3810 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20016
(one block west of Wisconsin
Avenue)
Info: 202-441-7678
Free-will
offering for
Shepherd’s
Table
Silver Spring
Station on
the Red Line
no
admission
charge
Plenty of free
parking
free-will
offerings
received
202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
An entrance
ramp
Reception
follows
16-2898
MARCH 30, 2018
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
• Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
Advertise in The Guide to the Lively
l Arts!
Free parking
. FRIDAY,
Trio in B Flat Major, Op. 21 Antonin Dvorak
Silver Spring United
Methodist Church
8900 Georgia Ave
Silver Spring, MD 20910
info@silverspringumc.org
Free and
open to
the public
THE WASHINGTON POST
Brahms Requiem
150th anniversary of the premiere of
Brahms’ first six movements of The
German Requiem at the Cathedral in
Bremen on Good Friday, 1868.
26
EZ
MUSIC - CONCERTS
Marine Band
Living History:
The Dream Hour
Royal Air Force
Centenary
Concert
Sunday, April 8
at 2 p.m.
Mon, Apr 16, 7:30 p.m.
Wed, Apr 18, 7:30 p.m.
Special guest moderator Robert Aubry
Davis of WETA and XM Sirius radio’s
Millennium of Music will join the Marine
Band for a reenactment of one of the
longest running programs in radio history,
NBC’s “The Dream Hour.” The program
will include music by Sousa, Rossini,
Gould, Glazunov, and more!
Clarice Smith Performing
Arts Center
University of Maryland
Stadium Drive & Route 193
College Park, MD
202-433-4011
Live streaming at:
www.marineband.marines.mil
FREE, no
tickets
required
Apr 16 - The Central Band of the Royal
Air Force and the United States Air Force
Concert Band join forces for a Centennial
Celebration.
April 16:
DAR Constitution Hall
1776 D St NW, Wash, DC 20006
April 18:
The Music Center at
Strathmore
5301 Tuckerman Ln,
North Bethesda, MD 20852
Free
tickets
required
for both
events.
Apr 18 - Don't miss the Royal Air Force
Squadronaires and the Airmen of Note for
a joint big band performance.
Free parking is
available in lot
1B and Z.
Ticket info:
Apr 16: www.
usafband.
eventbrite.com
Apr 18: www.
strathmore.org
MUSIC - CHAMBER
Bach’s unparelled contrapuntal mastery
fit for a King!
Washington Bach Consort
The Musical
Offering,
Friday, April 6, 2018
7:00 p.m.
Featuring:
David Ross, flute
Tatiana Chulochnikova, violin
John Moran, cello & viola da gambe
Dongsok Shin, keyboards
BWV 1079
First Congregational United
Church of Christ
945 G Street, NW
202.429.2121
www.bachconsort.org
Single
tickets
$35
$10 parking
after 5 p.m. in
attached
garage.
Post-concert
reception.
MUSIC - CHORAL
Charpentier Te
Deum & Handel
Laudate pueri
Dominum
Sunday, April 22, 2018,
4:30 PM
Come hear Metropolitan Opera soprano
Danielle Talamantes in Handel’s
exuberant Laudate pueri Dominum and
Charpentier’s thrilling Te Deum. The
concert will also feature Finzi’s lyrical and
dramatic Magnificat.
Saturday, April 7, 8 p.m.
Percussionist, vibraphonist and drummer
Chris Barrick has quickly become an
in-demand musician on the D.C. jazz
scene.
Robert Shafer,
Artistic Director
$15-50
Group and
student
disc. avail.
For more
information,
visit
citychoir.org
or call (571)
206-8525
Arts Barn
311 Kent Square Rd
www.gaithersburg.gov
301-258-6394
$25, $15
Free Parking
Atlas Performing Arts
Center
1333 H Street NE
202.399.7993 x2
urbanarias.org
$42
National Presbyterian
Church
4101 Nebraska Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20016
Free parking available.
MUSIC - JAZZ
Chris Barrick
Quartet
OPERA
Based on true events
Florida
April 7 - 14
A new opera.
A darkly comic opera about a teenaged
girl falsely accused of matricide. A highlystylizd vision of suburbia set to a jazzinflected score, the opera follows its hero,
Florida Fandango, through a maze of
gossip, desire, justice and lipstick.
COMEDY
Orange is the
New Barack
Fridays & Saturdays
at 7:30pm
A musical, political satire.
We put the MOCK in Democracy!
www.capsteps.com | Info: 202.312.1555
Tonight at 7:30
Tomorrow at 1:30 & 7:30
Sun at 1:30
New York City Ballet returns for its annual
appearance, with a program to celebrate
the centennials of Jerome Robbins, one of
the most influential dance-makers in the
company's history, and legendary
composer Leonard Bernstein. Complete
program and casting available online at
www.kennedy-center.org
Ronald Reagan Building
1300 Pennsylvania Ave, NW
Tix available at 202.397.SEAT
ticketmaster.com
$36
Discounts available for groups
of 10+. Call:
202-312-1427
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30, 2018
DANCE
New York
City Ballet
Robbins Centennial
Program
Kennedy Center
Opera House
kennedy-center.org
or call (202) 467-4600
Tickets
available
at the
Box Office
Part of
Leonard
Bernstein
at 100
AUDITIONS
Written by
Douglas Carter Beane
Directed by
Frank D. Shutts II
Little Theatre of Alexandria
600 Wolfe Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
3 W (20-60)
3 M (25-60)
The Nance
Sat, Apr 7 @ 2pm;
Sun, Apr 8 @ 7pm
Bring accurate list of rehearsal conflicts.
If available, please bring headshot &
resume.
For additional information
www.thelittletheatre.com
NA
Audition will
include
readings from
the script.
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
• Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
it’s not live art without a live audience.
ise in The Guide to the Lively
l Arts!
202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
16-2898
On Stage
EZ
ages 18 months to 4. The Kennedy Center,
2700 F St. NW. 202-467-4600. kennedycenter.org. Through Sunday. $15.
STAGE FROM 24
Undercroft Theatre, 900 Massachusetts
Ave., NW. 240 582-0050. stageguild.org.
Through April 15. $20.
ALEXANDER AND THE TERRIBLE,
HORRIBLE, NO GOOD, VERY BAD DAY A
play based on the popular book by Judith
Viorst. Directed by Cara Gabriel. Adventure
Theatre MTC, 7300 MacArthur Blvd., Glen
Echo. 301-634-2270. adventuretheatremtc.org. Through Saturday. $19.50.
Recommended for all ages. Patrons above
the age of 1 require a ticket.
BALLOONACY A lonely old man develops an
unexpected friendship with a red balloon.
Best for ages 1-5. Imagination Stage, 4908
Auburn Ave., Bethesda. 301-280-1660.
imaginationstage.org. Through April 8. $12.
CHICAGO This long-running Broadway
musical comedy about crime, fame and
fortune in the Roaring Twenties has songs
by John Kander and Fred Ebb (“Cabaret”).
Andrew Keegan Theatre, 1742 Church St.
NW. 202-265-3767. keegantheatre.com.
Through April 7. $55.
GODSPELL NextStop Theatre Company
presents Stephen Schwartz’s musical,
based on parables from the New Testament.
NextStop Theatre Company, 269 Sunset
Park Dr., Herndon. 866-811-4111. Through
Sunday. $20-$55.
HOLD THESE TRUTHS Playwright Jeanne
Sakata’s drama about Gordon Hirabayashi,
a Japanese-American who was imprisoned
during World War II for disobeying an
internment order. Arena Stage, 1101 Sixth
St. SW. 202-488-3300. arenastage.org.
Through April 8. $91-$111.
NAT TURNER IN JERUSALEM An original
work by Nathan Alan Davis that dramatizes
the final night in the life of slave rebellion
leader Nat Turner. Forum Theatre, 8641
Colesville Rd, Silver Spring. 301-588-8279.
forum-theatre.org. Through April 7. $18-$38.
PAPER DOLLS A play based on the 2006
documentary by Israeli filmmaker Tomer
Heymann, about transgender Filipino
caregivers in Tel Aviv. Atlas Performing Arts
Center, 1333 H St. NE. 202-399-7993.
mosaictheater.org. Through April 22.
THE BECKETT TRIO A series of short plays
by Irish playwright Samuel Beckett, author
27
COMEDY
IMPROVAGANZA! Howard Community
College’s Arts Collective presents its second
annual improv festival. Howard Community
College, 10901 Little Patuxent Pkwy.,
Columbia. 410-772-4800. Friday at 8 p.m.
Through Sunday. $10-$30.
MAYSOON ZAYID The actress and
comedian, a former contributor to
“Countdown With Keith Olbermann,” has
appeared on “The Queen Latifah Show” and
HuffPost Live. Reston Community Center at
Hunter Woods, 2310 Colts Neck Rd.,
Reston. 703-476-4500.
restoncommunitycenter.com. Saturday at
8 p.m. $20.
THE POWER OF POSITIVE DRINKING A nofrills comedy show by local performers. Port
City Brewing Company, 3950 Wheeler Ave.,
Alexandria. 703-797-2739. portcitybrewing.
com. Thursday at 6 p.m. Free.
DANCE
LOCK & COMPANY
“Godspell,” a musical by Stephen Schwartz (“Pippin,” “Wicked”) is based on parables from the New
Testament, chiefly the Gospel of Matthew. At Next Stop Theatre Company through Sunday.
of “Waiting for Godot.” Atlas Performing Arts
Center, 1333 H St. NE. 202-399-7993.
atlasarts.org. Through April 8. $10-$35.
THE WINTER'S TALE Shakespeare’s play is
directed by Aaron Posner. Folger Theatre,
201 East Capitol St. SE. 202-544-7077.
folger.edu. Through April 22. $35-$79.
THE WIZ Kent Gash directs the Tony Awardwinning musical adaptation of “The Wizard
of Oz.” Ford's Theatre, 511 10th St. NW. 202347-4833. fords.org. Through May 12. $28$71.
THIS LITTLE LIGHT A comedy from writeractor Jennifer Falsetto about time, age and
technology. Venus Theatre, 21 C St., Laurel.
202-236-4078. venustheatre.org. Through
Sunday. $15-$40.
TRANSLATIONS Irish dramatist Brian Friel’s
1980 play about Britain’s efforts to impose
its language and customs on the Irish in the
early 19th century. Studio Theatre, 1501
14th St. NW. 202-332-3300.
studiotheatre.org. Through April 22. $20$85.
WAVES, ALL THAT GLOWS SEES A beach
theater performance, featuring shadow
puppetry and fun sound effects, for children
DANZABIERTA: MALSON One of Cuba’s
modern dance companies presents its
2009 work “MalSon,” a love letter to
Havana with traditional Cuban music and
projections. Dance Place, 3225 Eighth St.
NE. 202-269-1600. danceplace.org. Friday at
7 p.m. Through Saturday. $15-$30.
NEDERLANDS DANS THEATER The
Nederlands Dans Theater makes its
Kennedy Center debut with three works,
including “Singulière Odyssée,” which is set
in an art deco train station and performed to
music by Max Richter. The Kennedy Center,
2700 F St. NW. 202-467-4600. kennedycenter.org. Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. Through
April 6.
NEW YORK CITY BALLET New York City
Ballet returns for its annual Washington
appearance with two repertory programs,
including a celebration of choreographer
Jerome Robbins. Resident
choreographer Justin Peck will present a
new piece. The Kennedy Center, 2700 F St.
NW. 202-467-4600. kennedy-center.org.
Friday at 7:30 p.m. Through Sunday.
What will you find?
THE WASHINGTON POST
Find the daily quiz questions in the PostPoints column
in Metro, then find the answers for your chance to
discover something extraordinary.
. FRIDAY,
New questions every day, 15 winners every week.
washingtonpost.com/postpoints
S0338 5x6
MARCH 30, 2018
PARTICIPATING POSTPOINTS PARTNERS
"SFOB4UBHFt#FMGPSU'VSOJUVSFt#FUIFTEB#MVFT+B[[4VQQFS$MVCt5IF#JSDINFSFt#MBDL$BUt#PCCZ.D,FZT%VFMJOH1JBOP#BSt$JUZ8JOFSZ
$SFBUJWF$BVMESPOt&BHMF#BOL"SFOBt'PMHFS5IFBUSFt'PSET5IFBUSFt5IF)BNJMUPO-JWFt*OUFSOBUJPOBM4QZ.VTFVNt5IF,FOOFEZ$FOUFSt-JWF/BUJPO
.FSSJXFBUIFS1PTU1BWJMJPOt.PTBJD5IFBUFS$PNQBOZPG%$t/BUJPOBM(FPHSBQIJD.VTFVNt/BUJPOBM.VTFVNPG8PNFOJOUIF"SUT
5IF0NOJ)PNFTUFBE3FTPSUt1FBSM4USFFU8BSFIPVTFt3PENBOTt3PVOE)PVTF5IFBUSFt4IBLFTQFBSF5IFBUSF$PNQBOZt4JHOBUVSF5IFBUSFt4USBUINPSF
4UVEJP5IFBUSFt5IFBUFS+t8BTIJOHUPO.ZTUJDTt8BTIJOHUPO/BUJPOBMTt8BTIJOHUPO1FSGPSNJOH"SUTt8PPMMZ.BNNPUI5IFBUSF$PNQBOZ
28
EZ
Movies
Ready Player One JAAP BUITENDIJK/WARNER BROS. PICTURES
As nostalgic as the NES Power Glove
The fun in this digital hunt is the (re)discovery
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30, 2018
BY
M ICHAEL O ' S ULLIVAN
T
he Oasis — the virtual-reality universe in which
much of “Ready Player
One” takes place, and
where the population of its dystopian world escapes from the misery of real life by donning digital
avatars — is, in the words of its
creator, “full of the things that
people love.” (Or, as one wag
sitting behind me at a recent
screening of the new Steven
Spielberg-directed sci-fi thriller
observed, with a snort, “Some
people.”)
You may be one of the people
who loves “Ready Player One,” or
you may not. But it will not be
because of a lack of stuff to love.
The pop-culture detritus of the
late 20th century — specifically,
for the most part, the Reagan
years — is crammed into the
Oasis, a massively multiplayer
online role-playing game (or
MMORPG) that feels like main-
lining the VH1 show “I Love the
’80s.”
References to the Atari 2600
gaming system, Batman, Buckaroo Banzai, “Back to the Future,”
Chuckie from “Child’s Play,” King
Kong, Jeeves of the search engine
Ask.com, the robot from “The
Iron Giant,” a Rubik’s Cube, “Stayin’ Alive” from “Saturday Night
Fever” and Stanley Kubrick’s “The
Shining” swirl in a soup teeming
with forgotten trash and fondly
remembered treasures. Surely,
there’s a little something in there
for (almost) everyone to love.
Set in 2045 in a decaying part
of Columbus, Ohio, known as the
Stacks — so called because of the
trailers that are piled atop each
other like Jenga blocks — “Ready
Player One” centers on Wade
Watts (Tye Sheridan), a teenage
geek who spends most of his free
time (and much of the plot of the
movie) inside the Oasis. There, he
appears not as himself, but as his
digitized doppelgänger: a plati-
In this action-adventure based
on a novel, the Oasis, a virtualreality landscape where people,
including teen geek Wade (Tye
Sheridan), above, pass time is
crammed with toys from the
’80s attic. LEFT: Mark Rylance,
left, as Anorak and Sheridan as
Wade’s digital avatar, Parzival.
WARNER BROS. PICTURES
num-haired version of his aspirational self called Parzival (after
the Arthurian hero who quested
for the Holy Grail). Here, Parzival’s quarry is something equally elusive: a digital artifact — in
gaming-speak, an Easter egg —
that has been hidden inside the
Oasis by its late creator, James
Halliday (Mark Rylance), whose
fortune will be inherited by whoever finds it. Assisting Wade/Parzival in his mission are Samantha,
a.k.a. the pixieish, animé-eyed avatar Art3mis (Olivia Cooke), and
three gamers Wade knows only as
avatars: a muscle-bound manmountain named Aech (pronounced “H”), the samurai Daito
and the ninja Sho. (Accept all of
these character descriptions with
a grain of salt. As the New Yorker
cartoon says, “On the Internet,
nobody knows you’re a dog.”)
This tension — between the
real world and the digital one —
provides much of the nuance, to
the extent that there is any, in
“Ready Player One.” “Reality is a
bummer,” someone says. But like
“Blade Runner 2049,” it’s ironically in the dingy, dirty real world
that the most engaging parts of
the film take place, and not in the
hologram-like perfection of places like the Oasis. Co-written by
Zak Penn (“X-Men: The Last
Stand”) and Ernest Cline, who
wrote the original 2011 book, the
story is a fairly straightforward
digital scavenger hunt: part
“Tron” and part “Willy Wonka
and the Chocolate Factory.” An
evil corporate titan bent on world
domination (Ben Mendelsohn) is
the requisite bad guy, a cliched
PLAYER CONTINUED ON 30
Movies
29
EZ
Ratings guide
Journey’s End Masterpiece
Very good
Okay
Poor
Also reviewed
Back to Burgundy
Three siblings from
a winemaking family
reconnect after their
father’s death. 30
The China Hustle
A documentary
looks at how
fraudulent Chinese
firms dupe
investors. 30
Plus
STEFFAN HILL/GOOD DEED ENTERTAINMENT
The ‘Upstairs/Downstairs’ of the front
An adapted 1928 play
explores myths and grim
realities about WWI
BY
A NN H ORNADAY
NICK WALL/GOOD DEED ENTERTAINMENT
A young recruit (Asa Butterfield), top, arrives at the trenches,
where he and his fellow soldiers wait out their fate in “Journey’s
End.” Paul Bettany, foreground above, delivers a magnificent
performance as an officer who personifies courage.
ann.hornaday@washpost.com
R. At Landmark’s Bethesda Row Cinema. Contains some coarse language and war images. 107 minutes.
Parents try to keep
their kids from
losing their virginity
in the comedy
Blockers.
Final Portrait is a
drama about artist
Alberto Giacometti.
Chappaquiddick
stars Jason Clarke
as Ted Kennedy.
Gemini is a
psychological thriller
about a Hollywood
starlet and her
personal assistant.
Timothy Spall stars
in Finding Your
Feet.
Charlotte
Gainsbourg stars in
Ismael’s Ghost.
Itzhak is a
documentary
portrait of musician
Itzhak Perlman.
MARCH 30, 2018
heavily and lashing out. Raleigh
finds a far calmer mediating presence in Osborne, a gentle, impeccably mannered gentleman, magnificently portrayed by Paul Bettany, who personifies with quiet
self-restraint the concept of courage as unwavering grace under
pressure.
Years before Stanley Kubrick
directed “Paths of Glory,” in which
he condemned an arrogant and
unfeeling military hierarchy that
reduced soldiers to so much cannon fodder, Sherriff laid bare
those hypocrisies in “Journey’s
A creature stalks
victims by sound in
the horror film A
Quiet Place.
. FRIDAY,
As in many war narratives, the
audience’s guide in this one is a
young, wide-eyed recruit named
Raleigh (Asa Butterfield), who
has pulled strings so that he can
join a company in France led by
an old school chum named Stanhope (Sam Claflin). When Raleigh
arrives, he is greeted by the muck
and metastasizing hopelessness
of the trench, where interminable
boredom is punctuated only by
cigarettes, cups of tea and moments of stark terror. Here, he
finds his old friend “Stanno” dealing with the pressure by drinking
Opening next
week
THE WASHINGTON POST
“Journey’s End,” a 1928 play by
the British writer R.C. Sherriff,
isn’t well known to American
audiences, although it’s been a
part of the English repertory for
generations (a young Laurence
Olivier starred in the first London
production). The story of a group
of soldiers and officers tensely
awaiting an oncoming offensive
during a particularly bloody
spate of trench warfare during
World War I, this taut, emotionally wrenching snapshot of the mythologies and grim realities of
war possesses useful reminders
about self-deception and abuse of
power, especially at a time when
bellicose rhetoric and war cabinets seem to be the order of the
day.
Saul Dibb, working with a
script by Simon Reade, gracefully
translates the optimism and excruciating suffering portrayed in
“Journey’s End” to the screen,
enlisting a cast of fine actors to
embody varying permutations of
trauma, denial and the shaded
fundamentals of brute survival.
End,” as generals dine on fine
wine and fish while blithely dispatching hundreds of noble
young men to sure death. An
“Upstairs/Downstairs” class critique pervades this production, in
which a lowly private and camp
cook named Mason, inhabited
with watchful empathy by Toby
Jones, eavesdrops on the arguments and confessions of his superiors with Shakespearean discretion.
Time is perhaps the most important character in “Journey’s
End,” which is structured around
a six-day hitch in northern
France, but hinges on a particularly thorny mission whose outcome is no less devastating for its
being utterly predictable. Masterfully calibrated by Dibb and his
thoroughly able ensemble, the
emotional toll brought on by
competing forces of dread, hope,
decency and crushing fatalism
becomes
keenly
palpable.
Through the skillful offices of
production designer Kristian Milsted and cinematographer Laurie
Rose, the walls close in, simultaneously keeping the men safe,
and entombing them forever,
whether they live or die. Its poetic
title notwithstanding, “Journey’s
End” suggests that, flowery invocations of glory, brotherhood and
bravery aside, every foxhole is its
own kind of grave.
Common Sense
Media 32
30
EZ
Movies
The China Hustle PLAYER FROM 28
‘The Big Short’ and its activism go to China
role that is taken down a great
peg by the sniping of T.J.
Miller as his whining, slightly
neurotic henchman.
In the end, whether you
love or hate this movie will
depend on how you feel about
video games — not just as
narrative, but as art.
Because so much of the
action of “Ready Player One”
tales place in the Oasis, so
much of the film feels like
watching “Final Fantasy: The
Spirits Within.” As with that
2001 film — the first photorealistic, all-CGI feature, and
the most expensive movie
based on a video game ever —
there’s something off-putting
about looking at avatars for
long periods of time. They’re
cartoony, but they’re also real
enough. Still, who wants to
spend that much time with
them? Long, long passages of
“Ready” — and at nearly 2 1/2
hours, it’s a long, long film —
feel less like watching a movie
than like playing a video game
— or, rather, like watching a
video game over someone’s
shoulder.
Spielberg, at 71, directs
with the verve of a 20-something (or maybe a 71-year-old
with a good memory). If
“Ready Player One” is tedious
at times, it’s also oodles of fun
at others, especially during
the extended “Shining” sequence, which uses actual
clips from the 1980 thriller.
(Stanley Kubrick’s film, like
many of the other movie references, comes from Warner
Bros., the studio behind
“Ready Player One,” which
made it easy to get the rights.)
There’s a meta quality to
“Ready Player One” that is an
intriguing — and underutilized — asset. When Parzival
finally meets Halliday, late in
the film, it is not as the game
designer’s avatar, a Gandalflike wizard with the colossally
stupid name of Anorak.
(Doesn’t it mean “ski jacket”?)
Rather, Halliday looks just as
he did in life. “Are you an
avatar?” asks Parzival. “Are
you alive?”
“No,” Halliday answers to
both questions before disappearing. That mystery, hanging in the air unanswered, is
the most interesting and infuriating thing about “Ready
Player One.”
BY
M ICHAEL O ’ S ULLIVAN
The phenomenon of “shorting”
— a financial maneuver in which
an investor only makes money if a
stock falls — is the subject of “The
China Hustle,” a documentary by
Jed Rothstein (director of the
2010 Oscar-nominated short
“Killing in the Name”). Its setting
is China, where many companies
have lured American investors
with fraudulent promises of financial prosperity.
That’s according to Dan David,
the film’s main subject, tour guide
and one of a handful of short-sellers featured in the film who are
trying to make money by, in essence, betting against the success
of those firms. Their participation in “China Hustle,” which is
an exposé, is, of course, self-serving. The more attention they can
MAGNOLIA PICTURES
A new documentary gives the viewer a tour of fraudulent investing
promises with a short-seller as guide — who stands to cash in.
It’s a mildly engrossing if wonky exercise in what could be
called a kind of selfish activism.
(Anyone who saw the 2016 documentary “Betting on Zero” or the
fact-based 2015 comedy-drama
“The Big Short” will already be
familiar with the practice of
shorting, which aims to profit
from putting corrupt — or simply
incompetent — firms out of business.) If the film accomplishes its
goal, it’s a win-win-lose proposition for everyone concerned.
Filmgoers are warned away from
making bad investments; David
and his fellow short-sellers make
a killing; and the crooked Chinese
companies go down the toilet.
michael.osullivan@washpost.com
bring to the sham — some of the
Chinese companies featured appear to do little or no actual
business — the greater the odds
are that the Dan Davids of the
world will eventually cash in,
when the companies they have
shorted collapse.
R. At Landmark’s E Street Cinema.
Contains some coarse language.
84 minutes.
Back to Burgundy Vineyard-set family drama needed more maturing
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30, 2018
BY
P AT P ADUA
“Back to Burgundy,” a lushly
photographed family drama set in
the famous French wine region,
dwells, pleasantly, on the winemaking process, as the capable
ensemble cast navigates domestic
tensions. But the film’s central
metaphor — life is like wine — is
an overripe one.
Jean (Pio Marmaï), the eldest of
three siblings from a winemaking
family, has walked away from the
family business, leaving Burgundy 10 years ago for Australia,
where he produces wine with his
girlfriend. As the film opens, Jean
has returned home to visit his
dying father and reconnect with
his sister and brother (Ana Girardot and François Civil). After their
father dies — and the three are
faced with a huge inheritance tax
— they must make a difficult
choice: keep making wine, as the
family has for generations, or —
the more lucrative option — sell
off the land.
This conflict between tradition
and change, between family and
money, exposes old resentments.
Just as each sibling has a different
opinion about the best time to
harvest grapes, for example, each
one also harbors the memory of a
personal slight — by one another
or, in the case of Jean, by his father.
In an effort to present as authentic a picture as possible, director Cédric Klapisch (“L’Auberge Espagnole”) filmed “Bur-
MUSIC BOX FILMS
Ana Girardot, Pio Marmaï and François Civil are siblings Juliette, Jean and Jérémie, who must make a
decision about their family’s business and confront uncomfortable memories after their father dies.
gundy” over the course of four
distinct seasons, shooting on location and consulting with JeanMarc Roulot (a Burgundy winemaker and actor who appears in
the film as the family’s estate manager). For most of the movie,
Klapisch deftly choreographs the
human drama.
Throughout the unhurried tale,
“Burgundy” subtly reinforces the
notion that a fine wine can only
reveal itself after a slow process of
aging (unlike the bottles that Jean
and his girlfriend rush to market
back in Australia). Unfortunately,
the screenplay, which Klapisch
wrote with Santiago Amigorena
and Roulot, ignores its own advice: The film’s narrative arc is
derailed when Jean delivers this
too-on-the-nose message to his
girlfriend: “Love is like wine. It
needs time. It has to ferment.”
If “Back to Burgundy” were a
wine, I’d say it has a complex
flavor profile but an overly aggressive finish. To put it in terms that
even a mass-market vintner might
understand, it’s a bottle that has
been served before its time.
goingoutguide@washpost.com
Unrated. At the Avalon. Contains
obscenity, brief nudity and sexual
situations. 113 minutes.
michael.osullivan@washpost.com
PG-13. At area theaters.
Contains sequences of sci-fi
action violence, bloody images,
some suggestive material,
partial nudity and strong
language. 140 minutes.
Movies
ALSO P L AYING
Also Opening
KEEP THE CHANGE
This rom-com, set in an autism
support group, is distinguished by
winning performances by a cast of
nonprofessionals. (Unrated, 94
minutes, contains a sexual
situation and tasteless jokes.)
7 DAYS IN ENTEBBE
There’s more to this story of a real
hostage rescue operation in 1976
than meets the eye. (PG-13, 107
minutes, contains violence, some
mature thematic material, drug
use, smoking and brief strong
language.)
LADY BIRD
Saoirse Ronan delivers a sweet-tart
portrait of teenage cluelessness
set in the early 2000s. (R, 93
minutes, contains obscenity,
sexuality, brief graphic nudity and
teen partying.)
12 STRONG
The Jerry Bruckheimer-produced
drama mixes bombast and cliche
with cynicism. (R, 130 minutes,
contains war violence and strong
language throughout.)
ANNIHILATION
BOMBSHELL: THE HEDY
LAMARR STORY
The Viennese-born actress was
known for her sultry looks but was
also a brilliant inventor. (Unrated,
89 minutes, contains some strong
language and brief nudity/
sexuality.)
CHIP BERGMANN/LIONSGATE
In “Acrimony,” a psychological thriller from writer-director Tyler Perry, Taraji P. Henson plays a
woman who decides to take revenge on her philandering husband (Lyriq Bent). This movie did not screen
in time for review in Weekend. PG-13. At area theaters. Contains some disturbing violent content and terror. 116
minutes.
sexuality, nudity and a disturbing
assault. In Spanish with subtitles.)
subtitles.)
GAME NIGHT
FLOWER
Believe the hype: Chadwick
Boseman’s African superhero is fun
to watch, and deeply important.
(PG-13, 140 minutes, contains
prolonged sequences of action
violence and a brief rude gesture.)
Zoey Deutch is the infinitely
watchable wild child who tries to
take down a child molester in this
coming-of-age revenge tale. (R, 90
minutes, contains crude sexual
content and language throughout,
graphic nude drawings, some drug
content and a brief violent image.)
CALL ME BY YOUR NAME
FOXTROT
Timothée Chalamet and Armie
Hammer give sensitive, selfassured performances during a
torrid Italian summer. (R, 132
minutes, contains sexuality, nudity
and some coarse language.)
Israeli filmmaker Samuel Maoz has
made a jewel box of a movie,
bursting with integrity and tough
honesty. (R, 113 minutes, contains
some sexual material including
graphic images, and brief drug use.
In Hebrew, Arabic and German with
BLACK PANTHER
Rachel McAdams stars in this
comedy about a low-key evening
that goes off the rails. (R, 93
minutes, contains strong
language, sexual references and
some violence.)
THE GREATEST
SHOWMAN
Don’t look for historical accuracy —
or warts — in this musical starring
Hugh Jackman. (PG, 105 minutes,
contains fight scenes.)
[NR] I CAN ONLY IMAGINE
This drama tells the true backstory
that inspired the Christian rock
band MercyMe’s single of the same
name. (PG, 110 minutes, contains
mature thematic elements,
including some violence.)
I, TONYA
Biopic uses two unreliable
narrators — Olympic figure skater
Tonya Harding and Jeff Gillooly — to
examine the elusiveness of truth.
(R, 120 minutes, contains
pervasive crude language, violence
and some sexuality and nudity.)
ISLE OF DOGS
Wes Anderson’s second stopanimation film draws inspiration
from Akira Kurosawa and vintage
cartoons. (PG-13, 94 minutes,
contains mature thematic
elements and some violent
images.)
LEANING INTO THE
WIND: ANDY GOLDSWORTHY
The British sculptor explores the
nature of nature itself in his landart installations in this
documentary. (PG, 93 minutes,
contains brief strong language.)
[NR] THE LEISURE SEEKER
Helen Mirren and Donald
Sutherland play a long-married
couple who take one last road trip
in their RV. (R, 112 minutes,
contains some sexual material.)
LOVE, SIMON
The first major-studio rom-com
featuring a hero who’s a closeted
adolescent is well-made, likable
and bland. (PG-13, 109 minutes,
contains mature thematic
elements, sexual references,
strong language and teen
partying.)
[NR] MIDNIGHT SUN
Bella Thorne plays a 17-year-old girl
with a rare genetic sensitivity to
sunlight in this romantic tearjerker. (PG-13, 90 minutes,
contains some teen partying and
sensuality.)
MOVIES CONTINUED ON 33
THE WASHINGTON POST
THE DEATH OF STALIN
Set in the Soviet Union in 1953,
Armando Iannucci’s new movie is a
tragicomedy that’s timely. (R, 97
minutes, contains crude language
throughout, violence and some
sexual references.)
. FRIDAY,
[NR] DEATH WISH
Bruce Willis plays a “Punisher”style vigilante in this remake of the
1974 pulp classic starring Charles
Bronson as a man driven to
vengeance by the murder of his
wife. (R, 107 minutes, contains
strong bloody violence and crude
language throughout.)
FOX SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES
From the maker of moviedom’s fussiest, most arcane inside jokes, Wes Anderson’s stop-motion movie “Isle of Dogs” is adorable and great
fun to watch, but its plot is a thin, patchy coat.
MARCH 30, 2018
A FANTASTIC WOMAN
The Chilean actress and trained
opera singer Daniela Vega plays a
grieving lover in an unconventional
love story. (R, 104 minutes,
contains coarse language,
EZ
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO
THE JUNGLE
Souped-up sequel to 1995 fantasy
film features teens trapped in adult
bodies. (PG-13, 118 minutes,
contains adventure action,
suggestive material and some
crude language.)
Star ratings are from Post reviews;
go to goingoutguide.com/movies for
the full-length reviews. Movies not
reviewed by The Post are marked
“NR.” For showtimes and theaters,
see the Movie Directory.
Follow-up to Alex Garland’s “Ex
Machina” engages similar themes,
to less riveting effect. (R, 115
minutes, contains violence, bloody
images, coarse language and some
sexuality.)
31
32
EZ
Movies
Common Sense Media
God’s Not Dead:
A Light in Darkness
(PG)
Age 10+
Issues of church vs. state in faithbased “threequel.”
“God’s Not Dead: A Light in
Darkness” is the third film in the
successful faith-based “God’s Not
Dead” series. Like its
predecessors, this one
What parents need to know
concentrates on issues of church
and state; this time, they revolve
around a public university trying
to close a controversy-sparking
church on campus. Although
there’s no swearing or sex,
characters do flirt/hold hands/
kiss, and there’s a scene or two of
implied drinking by college-age
students (red Solo cups are
visible), as well as of an adult
A ONCE IN A LIFETIME ROAD TRIP THEY WILL NEVER FORGET
“WONDERFUL. DONALD SUTHERLAND IS SO GOOD.
HELEN MIRREN, AS USUAL, IS SIMPLY SUPERB.”
-Pete Hammond, DEADLINE
HELEN
MIRREN
DONALD
SUTHERLAND
THE
LEISURE SEEKER
A FILM BY
PAOLO VIRZÌ
Ready Player One
WWW.SONYCLASSICS.COM
Bethesda LANDMARK’S BETHESDA Fairfax
ROW CINEMA (301) 652-7273 CINEMA ARTS THEATRE (703) 978-6991
VIEW THE TRAILER AT WWW.THELEISURESEEKERMOVIE.COM
WIN
ER
GRAND JUN
VE NI CE FI RY PR IZ E
LM FE ST IV
AL
WINNER
BE
ST FO IGN
LANGUAGRE
E FI
AR D OF LM
NATI ON AL
BO
8
RE VI EW
WINNER
OP
HIR AWARDS
IS RA EL AC
AD
I N C L EM Y AWAR D
UDING
BEST PIC
TU
RE
WO N D E R F
FOXT RO
ULLY UNE
XPECTED!“GRADE: A!
-Eric Kohn,RIVETING!”
INDIEW
AF
ILM BY
SAMUEL
MAOZ
WWW.SONYCLASSICS.COM
T
IRE
Bethesda
Fairfax
LANDMARK’S BETHESDA ROW CINEMA CINEMA ARTSTHEATRE
(703) 978-6991
(301) 652-7273
VIEW THE TRAILER AT WWW.FOXTROTMOVIE.COM
WINNER ACADEMY AWARD BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
“A FANTASTIC MOVIE.
DANIELA VEGA IS FANTASTIC IN IT.”
©A.M.P.A.S.
®
-A.O. Scott, THE NEW YORK TIMES
A FILM BY SEBASTIÁN LELIO
A FANTASTIC WOMAN
WWW.SONYCLASSICS.COM
EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT NOW PLAYING
WASHINGTON, DC The Avalon (202) 966-6000
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30, 2018
VIEW THE TRAILER AT WWW.AFANTASTICWOMAN.COM
FROM THE ACADEMY AWARD® NOMINATED
CREATOR OF VEEP AND IN THE LOOP
“
THE FUNNIEST, FIERCEST
COMEDY OF THE YEAR...”
- Peter Travers
“
INSANELY FUNNY...
the
POLITICAL SATIRE
we need right now.”
- April Wolfe
drinking beer. And there’s some
violence, including vandalism
that leads to a fire, a dramatic/
potentially scary death, and a
man punching a pastor and vice
versa. Although the movie
ultimately has a message of hope
and peace, there are also obvious
anti-protest/“social justice”
themes, in that characters claim
that protest culture divides
instead of unites and that
Christians who follow Jesus’
example are uniquely qualified
to fight for justice and the
oppressed. David A.R. White and
John Corbett co-star. (105
minutes)
(PG-13)
Age 12+
Intense virtual-reality adventure
will dazzle ’80s fans.
“Ready Player One” is director
Steven Spielberg’s muchanticipated adaptation of Ernest
Cline’s near-future sci-fi
adventure novel about an avid
gamer (Tye Sheridan) who spends
most of his time in the Oasis, a
virtual-reality universe/multi-user
game. Expect both virtual (i.e., in
the Oasis) and real-life violence,
although the movie’s real-world
violence isn’t quite as traumatic as
the book’s. The in-game action can
get pretty intense (especially
when seen in 3-D) and includes
over-the-top shootouts (with every
kind of weapon imaginable), allout attacks, large-scale battles,
destructive car chases, giant
monsters and a frightening recreation of a gory horror film that
includes ax attacks, zombies and
more. Outside the Oasis, there are
assassination attempts, an
explosion that kills civilians and
destroys homes, forced labor, a car
chase and gun threats. Characters
also flirt, kiss and touch each
other suggestively, and there’s
quite a bit of swearing (mostly
“s---,” though there’s a memorable
use of “f---ing”). Although fans of
the book, gamers and Gen Xers
with ’80s nostalgia are the most
obvious audience, you don’t need
to have read the book to
understand or appreciate the
story. In fact, if you haven’t read it,
you’re less likely to be distracted
by the significant story changes
made for the movie — and its
themes of teamwork,
perseverance and valuing real-life
connections. (140 minutes)
Benji
(TV-PG)
STREAMING
Age 8+
Updated dog tale has realistic
peril and violence.
EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENTS NOW PLAYING
Check Directories for Showtimes. No Paseses Accepted.
“Benji” (2018) is an updated
take on 1974’s hugely successful
“Benji,” which spawned sequels
JAAP BUITENDIJK/WARNER BROS. PICTURES
The characters Wade Watts and Samantha Cook frequently dip into
a virtual-reality game that gets intense in “Ready Player One,” a
movie most likely to delight gamers, Gen Xers and people who
enjoyed the novel upon which it’s based.
and a merchandising bonanza.
It’s still about an adorable stray
dog who’s almost adopted by two
kids until a reluctant parent
disappoints them, and the kids
are still abducted by sketchy
criminals. This time around, the
drama and suspense are played
for real. These villains, unlike
those in many family-friendly
pet stories, aren’t comic
buffoons: They’re scary,
menacing and playing for keeps.
It makes for a much better
movie, but it certainly raises the
stakes. Both the kids’ and the
dog’s lives are threatened.
They’re chased, snatched and
held captive; they face a man
with a hammer, make many
narrow escapes, and are kept in
line by a ferocious Rottweiler.
(Spoiler alert: In one long scene,
it appears that Benji has been
killed.) Still dealing with the loss
of their beloved dad, the kids are
scared and distressed. Bottom
line? It’s best for kids who are
completely comfortable with real
vs. pretend violence, and it’s not
meant for little children, extrasensitive ones or those who will
be disturbed by seeing an animal
and/or kids in jeopardy. (87
minutes)
Via Netflix streaming.
Boys,” based on the same-named
2007 bestseller, is a series about
a family that re-connects with a
deceased patriarch through a
mysterious book he left for his
three sons. The dad’s death isn’t
seen or dwelled upon, but his
family’s grief over his passing is a
big part of the story. Kids may
need to be reassured that their
own parents aren’t going
anywhere; those who’ve lost a
loved one may learn something
about handling grief in healthy
ways. A family is close and
supportive, but brothers scuffle
and fight, sometimes landing on
the floor or punching each other.
Two brothers in particular argue
and call each other names:
“nitwit,” “moron,” “troglodyte,”
“butthead.” A boy filming a
“challenge” video eats crickets;
viewers see him gulping and
handling them but not actually
putting them in his mouth. A
grandmother vaguely refers to
past drug use and casual sex; she
mentions walking around naked,
and when her grandson
accidentally sees her nude, he
faints. Young boys are each
interested in girls; expect to hear
them talking about dates and
crushes. (Six 30-minute
episodes)
Via Amazon streaming.
The Dangerous Book
for Boys (TV-Y7)
Common Sense
Media helps
families make smart media choices.
Go to commonsensemedia.org for
age-based and educational ratings
and reviews for movies, games, apps,
TV shows, websites and books.
STREAMING
Age 10+
Magic book reunites family in
warmhearted adventure show.
“The Dangerous Book for
Movies
MOVIES FROM 31
Also Opening
33
EZ
SERIES: IN LORTON'S
DARKROOM Wednesday at 7:30
p.m. Free. George Mason
University, 4400 University Dr.,
Fairfax. 703-993-2787. gmu.edu/
gallery/current.html.
HIPPOCRATIC: 18 EXPERIMENTS
IN GENTLY SHAKING THE WORLD
Thursday at 6:30 p.m. $13.25.
Seating is limited. Regal Cinemas
Gallery Place Stadium 14, 701
Seventh St. NW. 202-393-2121.
MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR.'S
LEGACY ON SCREEN Through April
7. $8-$13. AFI Silver Theatre, 8633
Colesville Rd., Silver Spring. 301495-6700. afi.com/silver.
MINUTE BODIES: THE INTIMATE
WORLD OF F. PERCY SMITH
Saturday at 2 p.m. Free. National
Gallery of Art, East Building, 440
Constitution Ave. NW. 202-7374215. nga.gov.
MONTHLY MATINEES: JAPANESE
CLASSICS Free. Freer Gallery of
Art, 1050 Independence Ave SW.
freersackler.si.edu.
NIGHT OF THE LEPUS Saturday at
7:30 p.m. $13. AFI Silver Theatre,
8633 Colesville Rd., Silver Spring.
301-495-6700. afi.com/silver.
OH LUCY!
A Japanese woman finds herself —
and a few flaws — in a journey of
self-discovery. (Unrated, 96
minutes, contains drug use and
sex. In Japanese and English with
some subtitles.)
PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING
The sequel to the robot-monster
movie mash-up is a downgrade
from the 2013 original. (PG-13,
111 minutes, contains sequences
of sci-fi violence and action, and
some coarse language.)
PADDINGTON 2
The sequel about a talking bear is a
charmer with a strong supporting
cast. (PG, 103 minutes, contains
some action and mild rude humor.)
PAUL, APOSTLE OF
CHRIST
Jim Caviezel stars as Luke in this
intriguing drama inspired by the
Acts of the Apostles. (PG-13, 107
minutes, contains some violence
and disturbing images.)
MOVIES CONTINUED ON 35
PETER RABBIT
Hybrid of live action and CGI
animation injects too much
modernity into Potter’s timeless
tale. (PG-13, 89 minutes, contains
some mildly gross humor and silly
battles.)
PURE FLIX ENTERTAINMENT
IT’S TIME TO LOOK AT YOUR INVESTMENTS.
In “God’s Not Dead: A Light in Darkness,” the third film in the “God’s Not Dead” series, Reverend Dave
(David A.R. White) helps his congregation rebuild their church building — and, for some, their faith —
after a devastating fire. This movie did not screen for critics. See Common Sense Media’s review on Page 32. PG13. At area theaters. Contains mature thematic elements, including some violence and suggestive material. 105
minutes.
RAMEN HEADS
The profile of chef Osamu Tomita,
Japan’s ramen king, has
mouthwatering ingredients, but it
doesn’t add up to much. (Unrated,
93 minutes, contains nothing
objectionable. In Japanese with
subtitles.)
RED SPARROW
Russians and Americans go headto-head in a movie that aspires to
be more than pulp. (R, 138
minutes, contains strong violence,
torture, sexuality, coarse language
and some graphic nudity.)
THE SHAPE OF WATER
STAR WARS: THE LAST
TOMB RAIDER
The video-game-inspired movie is
dull and riddled with bad dialogue
and worse special effects. (PG-13,
115 minutes, contains sequences
of violence and action, and some
strong language.)
UNSANE
A stalking victim is locked up
against her will in this lazy, B-movie
horror flick. (R, 98 minutes,
contains disturbing behavior,
violence, coarse language and
sexual references.)
REPERTO RY
CLUE Friday at 7 p.m. Free. Old
Firehouse, 1440 Chain Bridge Rd.
McLean. mcleancenter.org/teens.
DONNIE DARKO — THEATRICAL
CUT Saturday at 10:30 p.m. Through
April 5. $13. AFI Silver Theatre, 8633
Colesville Rd., Silver Spring. 301-495-
6700. afi.com/silver.
FAMILY FUN MOVIE NIGHTS
Through April 20. Free. Stacy C.
Sherwood Center, 3740 Old Lee
Hwy. Fairfax. fairfaxva.gov/home.
FROM VAULT TO SCREEN:
BRITISH FILM INSTITUTE Through
Saturday. Free. National Gallery of
Art, East Building, 440 Constitution
Ave. NW. 202-737-4215. nga.gov.
GMU VISITING FILMMAKERS
+++H
“An emotional powerhouse
you will not forget.”
-ROLLING STONE
WHAT, ALREADY?
THE DOCUMENTARY
OF THE YEAR?
‘‘
NO FILM I’VE SEEN IN A LONG TIME
HAS MADE ME AS ANGRY AS THIS ONE.
MASSIVELY IMPORTANT.’’
-James Van Maanen, TRUSTMOVIES
WILDLY
ENTERTAINING.
‘‘
BLOWS THE LID OFF A MULTIBILLIONDOLLAR HEIST. FAR FROM A
POSTMORTEM, THE FILM UNCOVERS
A SCANDAL THAT’S STILL ONGOING.’’
-Scott Tobias,VARIETY
‘‘
AN ALARMING,
WELL -REPORTED
EXPOSE.
+++++ “TERRIFIC!
AN ABSORBING FAMILY DRAMA.”
—SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE
DIRECTOR ROTHSTEIN BUILDS
A PERSUASIVE CASE.’’
-Alan Scherstuhl, THE VILLAGE VOICE
JOURNEY’S
END
DC’s only nonprofit film center
FROM THE DIRECTOR OF
THE DUCHESS AND
FROM THE DIRECTOR OF L’AUBERGE ESPAGNOLE!
BACK TO BURGUNDY
SUITE FRANÇAISE
Fri-Thu: 12:00, 2:40, 5:20, 8:00 (no 8:00 on Wed)
KEEP THE CHANGE
Fri-Thu: 1:00, 5:30
A FILM BY
CÉDRIC KLAPISCH
L’AUBERGE ESPAGNOLE
OSCAR WINNER: FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
THE DIRECTOR OF
Fri-Thu: 3:10, 7:45 (no 7:45 on Thu)
@MUSICBOXFILMS
MUSICBOXFILMS.COM/BACKTOBURGUNDY
A FANTASTIC WOMAN
SEE OBAMA'S LAST YEAR IN OFFICE!
avalon docs:
ONE SHOW ONLY!
THE FINAL YEAR
WED, 4/4 at 8PM
5612 Connecticut Ave NW • (202) 966-6000
tickets online: www.theavalon.org
STARTS
TODAY
INNOCENCE LOST...
COURAGE FOUND
FROM THE PRODUCERS OF
‘ENRON: THE SMARTEST GUYS IN THE ROOM’
SOME LANGUAGE
© CH FILMS LLC, 2017
WASHINGTON, DC
AVALON THEATRE
5612 Connecticut Ave NW
(202) 966-6000
JOURNEY’S END FILMS LTD/THE BRITISH FILM INSTITUTE 2017
Starts
Today
STARTS
TODAY
MARCH 30, 2018
JEDI
It’s overlong and too plotty, but the
sequel deepens the characters and
sticks with core values. (PG-13,
151 minutes, contains sequences
of sci-fi action and violence.)
Ava DuVernay’s adaptation of the
children’s classic isn’t a gamechanger. But it’s quietly
revolutionary. (PG, 115 minutes,
contains mature thematic
elements and some peril.)
. FRIDAY,
[NR] SHERLOCK GNOMES
Johnny Depp voices the titular
sleuth in this sequel to the 2011
animated comedy “Gnomeo &
Juliet,” set in a world of walking,
talking garden gnomes. (PG, 82
minutes, contains some rude and
suggestive humor.)
A WRINKLE IN TIME
AT NIGHT
This sequel to the 2008 cult hit
repeats the formula of the earlier
film, with less success. (R, 81
minutes, contains horror violence
and terror throughout, and coarse
language.)
THE WASHINGTON POST
Sally Hawkins delivers a radiant
turn as a woman who befriends a
fish-man from a distant lagoon. (R,
118 minutes, contains sexuality,
graphic nudity, violence and coarse
language.)
THE STRANGERS: PREY
34
EZ
MOVIE DIRECTORY
DISTRICT
Annihilation (R) CC: 11:45- Peter Rabbit (PG) CC:
2:20-4:55-7:25
12:45-3:15
AMC Loews Georgetown 14 Ready Player One (PG-13) Ready Player One (PG-13)
3111 K Street N.W.
CC: 12:00-3:00-7:00-10:00; CC: (!) 10:30-3:45-10:20
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG13) CC: 10:30-1:25-7:40
Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
10:45-1:00-4:15-7:30-9:55
Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D
(PG-13) CC: 4:45-10:30
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 4:057:20-9:40
Ready Player One (PG-13)
CC: 10:00-4:35
Tomb Raider (PG-13) CC:
11:20-2:10-5:00-7:55
Game Night (R) CC: 11:051:35-10:35
Ready Player One: An IMAX
3D Experience (PG-13)
11:15-2:35-6:00-9:20
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
10:40-1:30-4:15-7:00-10:45
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) CC:
10:45-12:00-1:20-2:404:00-5:15-6:40-7:50-9:1510:25
Annihilation (R) CC: 4:107:05-10:45
The Death of Stalin (R)
11:05-1:40-4:25-7:10-9:45
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R)
10:50-1:40-4:40-7:35-10:30
Love, Simon (PG-13) CC:
11:00-1:45-4:30-7:15-10:00
Unsane (R) CC: 2:00-11:15
Ready Player One in 3D
(PG-13) 1:15-8:00
Ready Player One (PG-13)
12:15-3:35-7:00-10:20
AMC Loews Uptown 1
3426 Connecticut Ave N.W.
Ready Player One in 3D
(PG-13) CC: 12:40-3:507:00-10:15
AMC Mazza Gallerie
5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG13) CC: 12:00-2:40-5:208:00-10:35
Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
10:00-1:00-4:00-7:10-10:15
Ready Player One (PG-13)
CC: (!) 10:10-4:30-9:20
Sherlock Gnomes (PG) CC:
(!) 10:00-12:10-2:30-4:457:00-10:50
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
11:15-1:50-4:40-7:20-10:00
Tyler Perry's Acrimony
(R) CC: (!) 11:10-2:00-5:007:50-10:40
Love, Simon (PG-13) CC:
11:30-2:10-4:50-7:30-10:10
Ready Player One in 3D
(PG-13) CC: (!) 1:20-7:40
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
MARCH 30, 2018
Albert Einstein Planetarium National Air and Space Museum
6th St and Independence Ave SW
To Space and Back
11:00AM
Dark Universe Space Show
(NR) 11:30-12:30-1:302:30-3:30-4:30-5:30-6:30
Journey to the Stars (NR)
12:00-1:00-2:00-3:00-4:005:00-6:00-7:00
One World, One Sky: Big
Bird's Adventure (NR)
10:30AM
Angelika Pop-Up
at Union Market
550 Penn St NE - Unit E
Ready Player One (PG-13)
11:00-12:00-1:45-2:454:30-5:30-7:15-8:30-10:00
Lady Bird (R) 1:25-7:45
I, Tonya (R) 11:05-5:20
Oh Lucy! 3:20-9:45
Avalon Theatre
5612 Connecticut Avenue
11:00-1:50-4:45-7:40-10:30 Sherlock Gnomes (PG) CC:
Landmark E Street Cinema 11:00-1:15-3:35-6:00
Tomb Raider (PG-13) CC:
555 11th Street NW
1:45-4:55-7:45-10:30
The China Hustle (R) CC: A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
1:00-3:15-5:30-7:45-10:00 (!) 10:45-1:25-4:00-6:30
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) CC: Tyler Perry's Acrimony
12:45-1:30-2:15-3:15-4:00- (R) CC: (!) 11:15-2:00-4:454:45-5:45-6:30-7:15-8:15- 7:30-8:15-9:15-10:15-11:00
9:00-9:45-10:30
(R) CC: 5:55-8:30The Death of Stalin (R) CC: Unsane
12:30-2:00-3:00-4:30-5:30- 11:00
Ready Player One in 3D
7:00-8:00-9:30-10:25
Ramen Heads (NR) 12:45- (PG-13) CC: (!) 12:30-7:00
AMC Center Park 8
3:00-5:15-7:30-9:45
4001 Powder Mill Rd.
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
1:05-4:05-7:05-9:40
Pacific Rim: Uprising
Landmark West End Cinema (PG-13) CC: (!) 12:45-3:306:15-9:00
2301 M Street NW
Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
Bombshell: The Hedy
12:30-3:15-6:30-9:30
Lamarr Story 1:30-4:30Ready Player One (PG-13)
7:30-9:40
CC: (!) 11:30-1:45-4:45Leaning Into The Wind
(PG) CC: 1:00-3:15-5:30- 6:00-10:15
Sherlock Gnomes (PG) CC:
7:45-9:55
Call Me by Your Name (R) (!) 11:15-2:20-5:00-8:0010:30
CC: 1:00-4:00-7:00-9:45
Tomb Raider (PG-13) CC:
Regal Gallery Place
2:30-7:30-10:25
Stadium 14
Midnight Sun (PG-13) CC:
701 Seventh St Northwest
(!) 5:15
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG- A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
13) 11:10-7:30-10:10
12:15-3:45-6:45-9:45
Black Panther (PG-13)
Tyler Perry's Acrimony
10:40-12:55-1:45-3:50(R) CC: (!) 11:45-1:00-4:004:40-6:45-9:40-11:00
7:00-10:00
Ready Player One (PG-13) Ready Player One in 3D
12:30-3:50-7:00-10:30
(PG-13) CC: (!) 11:00-7:20;
Sherlock Gnomes (PG)
(!) 2:45-9:15
11:15-1:30-3:45-6:00-8:15AMC Columbia 14
10:30
10300 Little Patuxent Pkwy
God's Not Dead: A Light in
Darkness (PG) 10:55-1:45- Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG13) CC: 11:10-4:50-10:20
4:30-7:15-10:00
Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
Midnight Sun (PG-13)
10:05-1:05-4:05-7:00-10:15
11:50AM
Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D
A Wrinkle in Time (PG)
11:45-2:45-5:25-8:25-11:00 (PG-13) CC: 2:00-7:30
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) Ready Player One (PG-13)
11:25-2:20-5:10-8:00-10:50 CC: (!) 11:00-5:40
Love, Simon (PG-13) 11:05- Peter Rabbit (PG) CC:
10:10-12:35
2:00-4:45-7:45-10:25
Ready Player One: An IMAX
Paul, Apostle of Christ
(PG-13) 11:30-2:30-5:05- 3D Experience (PG-13) (!)
10:00-1:15-4:30-7:45-11:00
8:05-11:05
God's Not Dead: A Light in
Unsane (R) 5:15-8:05
Darkness (PG) CC: 10:30Ready Player One in 3D
(PG-13) 10:00-1:10-4:20- 1:20-4:15-6:55-9:45
7:45-11:15
Tomb Raider (PG-13) CC:
Best F(r)iends Movie 8:00 7:50
Pacific Rim: Uprising 3D
Midnight Sun (PG-13) CC:
(PG-13) 2:10-4:50
(!) 5:30
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG- Game Night (R) CC: 10:35
13) 11:00
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
Red Sparrow (R) 2:05
9:40-12:25-3:30-6:30-9:20
Tomb Raider (PG-13)
Baaghi 2 (NR) 11:05-2:3011:00-4:30-7:15
6:05-9:25
Ready Player One in 3D
I Can Only Imagine (PG)
(PG-13) 11:00-2:25-5:35- CC: 10:50-1:40-4:25-7:209:00
10:10
Smithsonian - Lockhe