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The Washington Post – May 01, 2018

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Democracy Dies in Darkness
Mostly sunny 81/58 • Tomorrow: Mostly sunny 87/67 B8
TUESDAY, MAY 1 , 2018
Flat stock market,
inflation and rising rates
are ushering in a new era
9 JOURNALISTS DIE
IN 2ND EXPLOSION
D AVID J . L YNCH
For most of the past decade, as
the U.S. economy marched
through the second-longest expansion in its history, Americans
enjoyed a rare trifecta: soaring
stock values, cheap loans and consumer prices that rarely rose.
That favorable climate benefited everyone from people nearing retirement to those buying
their first homes or just filling
their gas tanks.
But suddenly, the good fortune
is melting away, imperiling the
props that have supported American economic confidence and incomes and intensifying pressure
on President Trump to deliver the
faster growth and higher wages he
has promised.
Consumer prices by a key measure are rising at their fastest point
in seven years, with mass consumer companies such as McDonald’s
and Amazon.com increasing prices on some of their popular offerings. Mortgages and business
loans are becoming more expensive. And after peaking in late
January, the Dow Jones industrial
average is now roughly flat on the
year.
The result is that Americans
have to spend more money on
staples, pay more to borrow money to buy big-ticket items such as
cars and homes, and are seeing
less growth in their investments.
These factors will probably pinch
Americans particularly during
spring and summer, when homeECONOMY CONTINUED ON A13
Tariffs postponed: Some metal
imports again get a break. A2
ISIS attack ‘a black day’
for Afghanistan
BY
BY
E LIZABETH D WOSKIN
san francisco — The billionaire
chief executive of WhatsApp, Jan
Koum, is planning to leave the
company after clashing with its
parent, Facebook, over the popular messaging service’s strategy
and Facebook’s attempts to use its
personal data and weaken its encryption, according to people familiar with internal discussions.
Koum, who sold WhatsApp to
Facebook for more than $19 billion in 2014, also plans to step
down from Facebook’s board of
directors, according to these people. The date of his departure isn’t
known.
It “is time for me to move on,”
Koum wrote in a Facebook post
after The Washington Post report-
P AMELA C ONSTABLE
kabul — Just after 8 a.m. Mon-
The role of genetics in the case
is well known, but this account
reveals for the first time the massive scope, intricate science and
sheer doggedness of the effort to
catch one of the nation’s worst
serial predators.
Initial DNA work identified distant relatives — not a suspect.
Holes said a team of five investigators spent four months building
out family trees, name by name.
They pored over census records,
newspaper obituaries, gravesite
locaters, and police and commercial databases to find each relative
and, ultimately, DeAngelo.
The Golden State Killer was as
clever a criminal as he was sadistic, taunting authorities and stay-
day, a familiar boom filled the air
and rattled windows across the
Afghan capital. Local news photographers, reporters and TV
crews grabbed their gear and
rushed to the scene of the latest
suicide bombing in a long and
bloody conflict. Though such incidents were never without risk,
the journalists were used to covering them — and rather competitive about getting there first.
But about 20 minutes later,
when the journalists were gathered watching emergency workers at the bomb site in a
high-security official zone, another explosion erupted in their
midst. A second suicide bomber,
on foot and carrying a press pass
and camera, had joined and targeted the very group of people
tasked with covering such violence.
Of the 25 Afghans who died in
the twin blasts, nine were journalists at the second one. An
additional 45 people were injured. Claimed by the Islamic
State, it was the single deadliest
attack on the press since the
overthrow of Taliban rule in
2001. Later in the day, an Afghan
reporter for the BBC was killed in
a separate attack in Khost province.
“This is a black day for our
country, and for every journalist
DNA CONTINUED ON A10
KABUL CONTINUED ON A8
MASSOUD HOSSAINI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Security forces respond after a suicide bomber carrying a press pass and camera caused the second of two explosions in the Afghan capital.
Search of family trees led to serial-killing suspect
BY
J USTIN J OUVENAL
sacramento — Detectives had
searched for four decades for the
clue that would unlock the identity of the Golden State Killer, the
predator who terrorized California top to bottom with a string of
horrific rapes and homicides in
the 1970s and ’80s.
Criminal DNA databases produced no hits, sweeps of crime
scenes no fingerprints and hefty
rewards no definitive tips. But
Paul Holes, an investigator and
DNA expert, had a hunch he could
create a road map to the killer
through his genetics.
Holes used DNA recovered
from a crime scene to find the
killer’s great-great-great grand-
In Golden State Killer
case, investigators
looked back generations
parents, who lived in the early
1800s. Branch by painstaking
branch, he and a team created
about 25 family trees containing
thousands of relatives down to the
present day.
One fork led to a 72-year-old
retiree who was quietly living out
his golden years in the Sacramento suburb of Citrus Heights. Holes
was intrigued after learning
that the man was a disgraced police officer who had bought guns
At odds with Facebook,
WhatsApp CEO will exit
Jan Koum had clashed
with parent company
over policies on data use
. $2
Dual
blasts
in Kabul
kill 25
A cruising
economy
encounters
rough seas
BY
M2 V1 V2 V3 V4
ed his plans to depart. He has been
informing senior executives at
Facebook and WhatsApp of his
decision and in recent months has
been showing up less frequently
to WhatsApp’s offices on Facebook’s campus in Silicon Valley,
according to the people.
The independence and protection of its users’ data is a core tenet
of WhatsApp that Koum and his
co-founder, Brian Acton, promised to preserve when they sold
their tiny start-up to Facebook. It
doubled down on its pledge by
adding encryption in 2016. The
clash over data took on additional
significance after revelations in
March that Facebook had allowed
third parties to mishandle its users’ personal information.
Facebook chief executive Mark
Zuckerberg replied to Koum’s
post by crediting Koum with
teaching him “about encryption
and its ability to take power from
centralized systems and put it
back in people’s hands. Those values will always be at the heart of
WHATSAPP CONTINUED ON A12
Forty years after the first ‘test tube’ baby was born, religions are grappling
with the moral implications of rapidly advancing fertility technologies
IN VITRO, WE TRUST
BY
E
CAROLYN VAN HOUTEN/THE WASHINGTON POST
From left: Triplets Rosalie, Rocco and Regan Mullane, age 2, are seen in October
at a Boston-area gathering of families with IVF children. Some 7 million babies
have been born through in-vitro fertilization in the past 40 years. As reproductive
technology advances, the moral questions are rapidly becoming more complex.
THE NATION
Waiting in Mexico The first eight members of
a migrant caravan were taken into U.S.
custody to process asylum claims. A6
Targeting Rosenstein House conservatives
have drafted articles of impeachment against
the deputy attorney general. A4
A RIANA E UNJUNG C HA
IN BROOKLYN, N.Y.
IN THE NEWS
CAROLYN VAN HOUTEN/THE WASHINGTON POST
during two bursts of activity by
the killer.
The test of Holes’s novel sleuthing would come in mid-April,
when officers scooped up an item
discarded by the man that contained his DNA and tested the
genetic material against the killer’s. The shot in the dark produced a match — an improbable
ending fit for detective fiction.
Joseph James DeAngelo was arrested in Citrus Heights on
April 24.
“Everything else up to this time
had failed,” Holes said. “For 44
years, law enforcement has been
trying to solve this case. No other
case has had more resources
poured into it in the history of
California. I was just stunned.”
NASA canceled its
only moon rover in development just months
after President Trump
directed the agency to
focus on returning
there. A3
The Pentagon saw
a spike in sexual assault
reports but said it believes the number of incidents is declining. A3
In an upcoming memoir, Sen. John McCain
(R-Ariz.) says President
Trump’s “reality show
facsimile of toughness”
seems to matter more to
him than the nation’s
values. A4
The Supreme Court
next term will consider a
Missouri inmate’s challenge to the state’s preferred method of executing him. A5
The Intercept is exposing Democrats’ squabbles and feeding the
perception that the party’s worst enemy is
itself. A14
THE WORLD
Israel’s prime minister
said a trove of documents from Iran’s secret
nuclear archive proves
Tehran lied about its
weapons program. A7
U.K. opposition lawmakers pushed Prime
Minister Theresa May
Attorneys made their
closing arguments in the
Justice Department’s attempt to block the
merger of AT&T and
Time Warner. A11
Congressional Black
Caucus members arrived in the Bay Area to
speak to tech companies
about efforts to diversify
Silicon Valley. A11
Virginia intends to adjust the pricing algorithm for the 66 Express
Lanes, but officials say
lower tolls aren’t guaranteed. B1
Beachgoers stuck in
traffic trying to get out
of Washington just got a
little help: an extra lane
to ease bottlenecks at
the Severn River
Bridge. B1
Catholic University officials are planning to
cut their full-time faculty by 9 percent and ask
some professors to take
larger teaching loads. B1
THE REGION
OBITUARIES
Details are slow to
emerge about the remains of three women
found in the District. B1
The Rev. James H.
Cone, 79, was a founder
of black liberation theology. B6
to answer for her role in
a policy to create a “hostile environment” for
those in the country illegally. A8
THE ECONOMY
sther Friedman held the Book of Psalms with
both hands as she peered over her glasses at the
fertility lab monitor. There were eight beautiful
round eggs, retrieved from a young woman earlier
that day.
“A good number,” Friedman said, nodding.
A technician grabbed a long glass tube, filled it with
sperm and, within a few minutes, the eggs were
fertilized. Eight potential new lives had just been
conceived.
Friedman — an Orthodox Jewish rabbinical observer hired by the prospective parents — took a step
back, lowered her eyes and began to pray.
Forty years ago this July, the world’s first “test tube”
baby was born at a British hospital in the industrial
city of Oldham, heralding a radical change in the
creation of human life. Until Louise Joy Brown arrived, hopeful parents had been at the mercy of fate,
and a barren marriage could feel like divine punishment.
Afterward, as one of the doctors involved in
Brown’s birth put it, it seemed that science — not God
— was in charge.
Since then, in vitro fertilization, or IVF, and
FERTILITY CONTINUED ON A18
Inside
ST YLE
Clueless in D.C.?
Michelle Wolf’s defenders
say a thin-skinned capital
can’t digest a roast. C1
HEALTH & SCIENCE
‘A 50-50 shot’
A baby’s heart tumor
presented a terrifying
choice for her parents. E1
BUSINESS NEWS ........................ A11
COMICS........................................C6
OPINION PAGES ......................... A15
LOTTERIES ................................... B3
OBITUARIES ................................. B5
TELEVISION..................................C4
WORLD NEWS .............................. A6
CONTENT © 2018
The Washington Post / Year 141, No. 147
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B2
1 2 5 1
A2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
MAY 1 , 2018
Trump delays steel and aluminum tari≠s for Canada, Mexico and E.U.
BY S TEVEN M UFSON
AND D AMIAN P ALETTA
President Trump at the last
minute on Monday evening announced he would again postpone
imposing tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from Canada,
Mexico and the European Union,
the White House said, pushing off
a key economic decision while he
tries to prod foreign leaders into
making trade-related concessions.
The White House said it
reached agreements on metals imports with Argentina, Australia
and Brazil, saying more details
will be finalized in 30 days.
The contours of those agreements could not be immediately
learned, though the White House
had been pushing other nations to
agree to quotas on exports to the
United States.
Trump has put off a decision on
steel and aluminum tariffs aimed
at Mexico and Canada because he
is trying to gain more access for
U.S. businesses to their markets as
part of a North American Free
Trade Agreement renegotiation.
Canadian, Mexican and U.S. officials are meeting in Washington
H A P P ENI NG TO D A Y
For the latest updates all day, visit washingtonpost.com.
12:45 p.m.
U.S. Trade Representative Robert E. Lighthizer speaks
at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s China Business
Conference. Visit washingtonpost.com/world for details.
2 p.m.
Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein discusses
the First Amendment and its intersection with the Justice
Department’s mission at the Newseum in Washington. For
details, visit washingtonpost.com/politics.
Defense Secretary Jim Mattis meets with Macedonian
Defense Minister Radmila Sekerinska at the Pentagon.
Visit washingtonpost.com/world for developments.
7:05 p.m.
The Washington Nationals host the Pittsburgh Pirates at
Nationals Park. Follow the game at postsports.com.
7:30 p.m.
The Washington Capitals visit the Pittsburgh Penguins in
Game 3 of their second-round series in the National
Hockey League playoffs. The series is tied. For updates and
analysis, visit postsports.com.
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CO R R ECTI O N S
The recipe for Chipotle-Garlic
Chopped Salad in the April 25
Food section misstated the yield
of dressing. It is about one-half
cup, not one cup. The corrected
recipe appears online at
washingtonpost.com/recipes.
In an April 24 A-section article
about Philadelphia’s closure of
the 91-year-old House of
Correction as part of an
overhaul of criminal justice
policies, the city’s chief public
defender, Keir Bradford-Grey,
incorrectly described a program
for early bail review. She said
the initial bail hearings at police
district stations are staffed by
lawyers 24 hours a day, seven
days a week. In fact, they are
staffed by a nonlawyer, for eight
hours a day, four days a week, at
one police station under a pilot
program, according to Mark
Houldin, policy director for the
city’s Defender Association.
this week to discuss the plan.
Trump’s strategy with the European Union is more fluid, as he has
praised some countries, such as
France, but chastised others, such
as Germany, which he says needs
to allow U.S. companies more access to consumers.
The late announcement — the
tariffs would have kicked in at
midnight — is the latest unexpected directive in Trump’s fourmonth effort to upend the United
States’ trade relationship with
more than a dozen countries.
Some countries have received
preferential treatment by agreeing to early changes, such as South
Korea. Others, such as Japan, have
been rebuffed despite repeated
overtures from their leaders.
The
administration
has
reached agreements in principle
on the metals trade with Argentina, Australia and Brazil and is
extending negotiations with Canada, Mexico and the European
Union for a final 30 days, a modest
reprieve.
The metals negotiations have
been a key test of Trump’s trade
strategy and diplomacy, pitting
his highly personal bargaining
style against the determination of
major U.S. trade partners and allies to hold fast and retaliate if
necessary under World Trade Organization rules.
Trump has shown a willingness
to both befriend and berate almost
every ally and adversary, a dynamic that has played out in the past
two months as he has tried to lure
many of them into making concessions in exchange for delaying tariffs.
“We are in uncharted territory
in terms of trade policy,” said Chad
Bown, a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute of International Economics. “What President Trump
has done is make everything uncertain in trade policy.”
A high-powered delegation will
go to Beijing to hold talks on trade
Thursday, the White House announced. The group will include
Treasury
Secretary
Steven
Mnuchin, Commerce Secretary
Wilbur Ross, U.S. Trade Representative Robert E. Lighthizer, National Economic Council head
Larry Kudlow and Peter Navarro,
assistant to the president for trade
and manufacturing policy. Terry
Branstad, the U.S. ambassador to
China, will join the group.
Earlier this year, the Commerce
Department issued a report alleging that the United States’ reliance
on imported steel and aluminum
posed a national security threat.
In March, Trump used that finding
to announce steep tariffs against
China and Japan, temporarily offering exemptions for many other
countries.
Ross said in an interview with
The Washington Post that Trump
was acting within his authority.
He said that under Section 232 of a
key U.S. trade law Trump “has very
broad powers. He can raise the
tariffs. He can lower them. He can
let countries in and let them out.”
In recent weeks, Trump has met
with leaders from three U.S. allies
caught in the middle of the tariff
debate. French President Emmanuel Macron and German Chancellor Angela Merkel appealed last
week to Trump to alter his stance,
yet the administration has contin-
ued to press for concessions, and
there is no guarantee that they will
be spared.
European leaders have threatened countermeasures if Trump
goes ahead with his proposed tariffs. The European actions would
target items such as motorcycles
and bourbon, produced in Republican electoral strongholds.
In March, the administration
set aside tariffs it had proposed on
South Korean steel and aluminum
manufacturers. In return, South
Korea amended its U.S.-Korea
Free Trade Agreement, accepting
quotas that will cut its steel exports to the United States by
30 percent below the average of
the past three years.
The Trump administration has
pushed European nations to
adopt the same approach. “We are
asking for them either to be in the
tariff mode or to accept a quota,”
Ross said.
Quotas, however, are more appealing in some ways than tariffs,
Bown said, because the governments of exporting countries get
revenue by selling export permits
to their own firms without paying
anything to the U.S. government.
The U.S. government would gain
revenue from taxes on higherpriced steel and aluminum. Consumers would pay higher prices.
The role of China looms large in
these talks. South Korea is the
third-largest steel exporter to the
United States and the top importer of Chinese steel, which some
trade experts say made it a conduit
for Chinese exports to the United
States.
“The Chinese have created the
overcapacity problem,” said William Reinsch, senior adviser at the
Center for Strategic and International Studies. “It’s one of the few
cases in the trade business where
you can assign blame and be accurate. It’s not that big a leap to say
that if it is their fault it is not
unreasonable to design a policy
that pushes the problem back on
them.”
steven.mufson@washpost.com
damian.paletta@washpost.com
Heather Long contributed to this
report.
Trump considers DMZ as site of N. Korea summit
He suggested successful
talks would be better
celebrated at border
BY D AVID N AKAMURA
AND J OHN W AGNER
President Trump on Monday
said he is considering holding his
summit with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un at the demilitarized zone with South Korea,
rather than in a third-party country, because of the potential to
have a “great celebration.”
The president’s announcement, made first in a tweet and
then reiterated during a news
conference, came after his aides
had focused for weeks on arranging the historic meeting outside
the Korean Peninsula. Trump
also disclosed that Singapore was
a leading option, but he said he
was intrigued at the idea of using
the Peace House, a three-story
South Korean building in the
border village of Panmunjom,
where Kim met last week with
South Korean President Moon
Jae-in.
“I threw it out today as an
idea,” Trump said at the news
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LOREN ELLIOTT/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jose Mata grinds a steel pipe at a plant in Baytown, Tex. The United States had a midnight deadline to
decide whether to push ahead on the tariffs and risk antagonizing key trading partners.
ƫņāĂĆąĆĀƫđƫƫņĂĈĀĆƫāĀĉĉăĆ
Locally Owned & Operated
POOL/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Security guards surround a car carrying North Korean leader Kim Jong Un after a session Friday with
South Korean President Moon Jae-in in the demilitarized zone between the two countries.
conference with Nigerian President
Muhammadu
Buhari.
Trump told reporters that he
relayed his interest to Moon.
“There’s something I like
about it because you’re there,
you’re actually there,” he said.
“Where, if things work out,
there’s a great celebration to be
had, on the site.”
In some regards, the demilitarized zone, a tensely guarded
strip of land at the 38th parallel
that has divided the peninsula
since the 1953 Korean War armistice, has been seen as an obvious
choice to hold diplomatic talks
between the United States and
North Korea. But some Trump
aides had been wary of having the
president travel to meet Kim so
close to his own turf, lest it
appear too deferential and come
off as a meeting between equally
powerful world leaders. Other
foreign policy analysts speculated Trump would want a grander
setting than the gritty demilitarized zone.
But the Moon-Kim meeting
produced astonishing images of
the two leaders shaking hands
across the dividing line before
stepping, in turn, back and forth
over the line together — a symbolic and emotionally powerful
moment for many South Koreans
who have relatives living in the
North.
Trump’s embrace of the site
could carry some risk given that a
“celebration” during his summit
with Kim could be premature.
White House aides have expressed skepticism in private of
Kim’s motives, given North Ko-
rea’s history of violating past
deals aimed at stunting its nuclear weapons and ballistic missile programs.
“Maybe a lot of things will
change, but Kim Jong Un has
been very open, very straightforward so far,” Trump said. “I can
only say ‘so far,’ but he’s talking
about getting rid of the [nuclear
testing] site. He’s talking about
no research, no launching ballistic missiles, no nuclear testing.
He has lived up to that for a
longer period of time than anybody has seen.”
His comments were the most
specific to date about the logistics
of the meeting, which, Trump
said, has the potential to be
celebratory in tone. He said last
week that a site for the historic
meeting had been narrowed to
two or three possible locations,
with speculation focusing on other countries in the region. Mongolia and Geneva were also said
to be under consideration, along
with Singapore.
“Numerous countries are being considered for the MEETING,
but would Peace House/Freedom
House, on the Border of North &
South Korea, be a more Representative, Important and Lasting
site than a third party country?
Just asking!” Trump wrote on
Twitter on Monday.
At the news conference, he
said, “The good news is, everybody wants us. This has a chance
to be a big event.”
At a campaign-style rally in
Michigan on Saturday, Trump
told the audience that he expects
to meet Kim in the next three or
four weeks.
Experts have noted that any
deal between Trump and Kim is
likely to be an overarching statement of common goals rather
than a detailed agreement that
provides a road map toward eliminating North Korea’s nuclear
program. Those details, including ensuring compliance through
inspections and the potential lifting of economic restrictions on
the North, would have to be
worked out in subsequent meetings between the two countries,
as well as South Korea, China,
Japan and the United Nations.
At the news conference, Trump
reiterated a previous pledge to
walk away from the summit with
Kim if talks do not go well. “Got to
get rid of the nuclear weapons,”
Trump said. “If it’s not a success, I
will respectfully leave. It’s that
simple.”
Patrick Cronin, an Asia-Pacific
security analyst at the Center for
a New American Security, said
the demilitarized zone makes
sense because that area just
staged a successful inter-Korea
summit and because it is said
that Kim does not want to travel
too far from home.
“It’s a lot of theatrics,” Cronin
said. “Don’t overthink the substance. This process has momentum, and Trump wants to continue the theatrics to continue the
momentum to see if we have a
turning point here. It’s up to
Trump to keep the momentum
going to see if diplomacy can
work.”
david.nakamura@washpost.com
john.wagner@washpost.com
TUESDAY, MAY 1 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
SU
Politics & the Nation
Pentagon says reports
of sex assault increase
BY
D AN L AMOTHE
The Pentagon saw a 10 percent
increase in the number of sexual
assaults reported last year but
still thinks that the number of
people in the U.S. military who
experience the crime is declining,
based on surveys they have conducted, Defense Department officials said Monday.
There were 6,769 sexual assaults reported in the U.S. military in the fiscal year ending
Sept. 30, the Pentagon said in a
new report. That total includes
4,193 involving female service
members and 1,084 involving
male service members, with others involving victims who were
not in the military.
The number of female service
members reporting sexual assault jumped 13 percent, the Pentagon said. The number of men
reporting was flat.
“While the progress we have
seen provides some comfort, we
neither take it for granted nor
are we under any illusions that
our work is done,” said Elizabeth Van Winkle, principal director of the Pentagon’s Office
of Force Resiliency. “In fact, we
see this progress as cautionary
and recognize that one of the
greatest threats to progress is
complacency.”
The Pentagon bases its belief
that occurrences of sexual assault
in the military are falling on a
biennial survey of service members. The most recent survey
found that about 14,900 people in
the military were assaulted in
2016, down from 26,000 in 2012
and 34,200 in 2006. The next
prevalence survey is to be carried
out this year.
The number of reports documented is complicated by the
way the Pentagon tracks them.
Ten percent of the incidents
occurred before a service member joined the military but
were included in the numbers
because they were reported while
victims were in uniform.
The Pentagon also reported
4,779 cases that reached a conclusion last year, some of which
dated back several years. Of
those, 3,567 involved service
members who were investigated,
and 2,218 of those resulted in
commanders taking some form of
disciplinary action.
But the percentage of cases
that the U.S. military prosecuted
criminally declined. In fiscal
2013, the Pentagon reported that
71 percent of cases resulted in
criminal charges being referred
to courts-martial. That number
fell to 64 percent in fiscal 2014
and 2015, dropped to 59 percent
in 2016 and declined to 54 percent
last year.
Nate Galbreath, deputy director of the Pentagon’s Sexual Assault Prevention and Response
Office, said Monday that there is
“no right number” when it comes
to sexual assault prosecutions.
The Pentagon setting one, he said,
would raise the possibility of unlawful command influence, a legal term in military justice in
which senior officials compromise the fair prosecution of cases
by getting involved.
NASA cancels only moon rover, shocking scientists
BY
S ARAH K APLAN
Months after President Trump
signed a directive ordering NASA
to return astronauts to the moon,
the space agency has canceled
its only lunar rover currently in
development.
According to Clive Neal, a University of Notre Dame planetary
scientist and emeritus chairman
of the Lunar Exploration Analysis Group, members of the Resource Prospector lunar mission
were told to close out the project
by the end of May.
“I’m a little shocked,” he said.
Neal, who is not directly involved
in developing the mission, said
he did not know the reason for
the cancellation.
NASA confirmed the cancellation in a statement posted online
Friday. The space agency said it is
soliciting input to develop a series of progressively larger lunar
landers, culminating in an eventual crewed mission. According
to the statement, selected instruments that were being developed
for the Resource Prospector will
fly on these other missions.
That evening, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine tweeted
that the Resource Prospector instruments would go forward in
an “expanded lunar surface campaign” that would include “More
landers. More science. More
prospectors. More commercial
partners.”
Yet neither Bridenstine nor
NASA provided an explanation
for the mission’s cancellation.
The Resource Prospector,
which was in the concept formulation stage for potential launch
in the 2020s, would have surveyed one of the moon’s poles in
search of volatile compounds
such as hydrogen, oxygen and
water that could be mined to
support future human explorers.
It would have been the first
mission to mine another world
and was seen as a steppingstone
toward long-term crewed missions beyond Earth.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER
A simulator version of NASA’s Resource Prospector undergoes a mobility test at the Kennedy Space
Center in Florida. NASA has canceled the rover, saying it will focus on developing larger lunar landers.
study processes that are occurring on the moon . . . all these
things are really enabled by being
able to use resources on the
moon for making fuel, propellant, life support, that sort of
thing,” said Hurley, who also is a
member of the LEAG executive
committee. “This mission is a
first step in trying to understand
how we’re going to exploit those
resources.”
The Resource Prospector was
being developed as part of the
Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate. A prototype was field-tested in 2015
and underwent vacuum and
thermal testing the following
year. But recently, Neal said,
NASA moved to transfer the project to its Science Mission Directorate, which develops robotic
missions for mainly research,
rather
than
exploration,
purposes.
That would have created a
“mismatch” between the science
program’s capabilities and what
Resource Prospector was de-
signed to do, Neal said.
In their letter, the LEAG members advocated for keeping the
Resource Prospector as part of
the human exploration program.
They also emphasized the importance of launching soon. A 2022
launch, they wrote, would demonstrate NASA’s ability to react
quickly to changes in space policy, preempt robotic missions being developed by other nations,
and pave the way for commercial
activities on the moon.
“We have an opportunity here
to not only enhance the moon
in terms of science and human
exploration but also to expand
the lunar economy,” Neal said.
“And if the results from this
prospecting are actually really
good, we could go a long way to
setting up sustainable human
exploration of Mars. We just need
to know exactly how much
is there.”
HEALTH
SUPREME COURT
CDC director requests
pay cut after questions
Sotomayor to undergo
shoulder replacement
The director of the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention
has asked that his $375,000 salary
be reduced after a top Democratic
senator and others raised
questions last week about his pay,
which is almost twice what his
predecessor earned and more
than other directors.
Health and Human Services
Secretary Alex Azar agreed to
Robert Redfield’s request, an
HHS representative said Monday.
Redfield told Azar that he did not
want his compensation to
become a distraction for his work
at the CDC, the representative
said. Officials provided no details
on his new salary.
In a letter Friday to Azar, Sen.
Patty Murray (D-Wash.) asked for
the justification for offering
Redfield “a salary significantly
higher” than that of his
predecessors and other leaders at
HHS.
Redfield, 66, a former Army
researcher and leading AIDS
clinician and professor of
medicine at the University of
Maryland School of Medicine,
was named March 21 to head the
Supreme Court Justice Sonia
Sotomayor will have shoulder
replacement surgery after
injuring herself in a fall at home,
the court said Monday.
Sotomayor, 63, is scheduled to
have the procedure on her left
shoulder Tuesday morning.
She hurt herself April 16 and
decided on the surgery after
consulting with specialists.
The court said Sotomayor will
wear a sling and curtail activities
for the next few weeks. She is
expected to need several months
of physical therapy.
Justice Stephen G. Breyer had
shoulder replacement surgery in
2013 after a bicycle accident.
A nine-member review
commission unanimously voted
on a waiver that releases the city
from state financial oversight
after Detroit delivered three
consecutive years of audited
balanced budgets. A $36 million
operating surplus also is expected
for fiscal 2018.
The waiver must be approved
annually for 10 years before the
commission is fully retired.
Detroit was about $12 billion in
debt and unable to deliver
adequate city services when Gov.
Rick Snyder (R) placed the city
under state receivership in early
2013. A state-appointed
emergency manager overseeing
Detroit’s finances filed for
bankruptcy the same year. Detroit
left bankruptcy in December
2014, restructuring about
$7 billion in debt and setting
aside $1.7 billion in savings and
revenue over a decade to improve
city services.
The financial review
commission was created in 2014
and given oversight over
borrowing and large city-issued
contracts as part of the
bankruptcy restructuring plan.
Most city operations were
returned to Mayor Mike Duggan’s
control in September 2014.
dan.lamothe@washpost.com
“While the progress we have seen provides some
comfort, we neither take it for granted nor are we
under any illusions that our work is done.”
Elizabeth Van Winkle of the Pentagon’s Office of Force Resiliency
The cancellation, initially reported by NASA Watch and the
Verge, troubles many lunar scientists. They say the mission is vital
both to human exploration and
to scientific understanding of the
moon. In a letter to Bridenstine,
the Lunar Exploration Analysis
Group — which conducts analyses for NASA and other space
agencies — called for the mission
to be reinstated and scheduled to
launch in 2022.
“This action is viewed with
both incredulity and dismay by
our community,” the group
wrote. Members pointed out that
Trump’s Space Policy Directive 1,
signed in December, calls for the
United States to “lead the return
of humans to the Moon for longterm exploration and utilization.”
Dana Hurley, a planetary scientist at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, elaborated on the situation Friday.
“If we want to go back to the
moon and really work on the
moon and make it a place that we
can set up research stations and
sarah.kaplan@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/speaking-of-science
DIGEST
— Associated Press
MICHIGAN
BRENDAN MCDERMID/REUTERS
Even among the tulips, it was still chilly in New York on Monday. Temperatures later this week look more
springlike, with highs expected to reach the mid- to upper 80s before cooling down over the weekend.
Financial control given
back to Detroit officials
CDC. He earned an annual salary
of $645,676 at the University of
Maryland. The upper end of the
basic salary range for CDC
Michigan on Monday returned
financial control of Detroit to the
city’s mayor and council, just over
three years after the Motor City
exited the largest municipal
bankruptcy in U.S. history.
director is about $190,000.
Former director Tom Frieden
earned $219,700. Redfield
succeeds Brenda Fitzgerald, the
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former Georgia health
commissioner who resigned
Jan. 31 over conflicts of interest.
— Lena H. Sun
— Associated Press
A4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
In Trump, Paul sees potential ally on Afghanistan
M ICHAEL S CHERER,
G REG J AFFE
AND J OSH D AWSEY
BY
In the days leading up to a key
vote last week over the fate of his
nominee for secretary of state,
President Trump found a way to
win over one of the biggest skeptics in the Senate.
Sen. Rand Paul (Ky.), a rare noninterventionist Republican, was
signaling that he would oppose
Trump’s pick, then-CIA Director
Mike Pompeo, a hawkish former
congressman who had backed the
Iraq War.
But the more Trump and Paul
spoke, including three calls April
23, the more assured Paul became
that the president was moving
back toward the noninterventionist worldview that Trump had
championed on the campaign
trail. The conversations left Paul
with a particularly enticing notion: that Trump was prepared to
end the war in Afghanistan.
“The president told me over
and over again in general we’re
getting the hell out of there,” Paul
said in an interview Thursday in
his Senate office. “I think the president’s instincts and inclination
are to resolve the Afghan conflict.”
The two men discussed no exit
dates and did not strike a written
agreement, as Trump urged Paul to
meet one-on-one with Pompeo and
ultimately secured the senator’s
support ahead of a key Foreign
Relations Committee vote that
paved the way for confirmation.
It is unclear just how much
Trump’s private conversations signal a public shift in policy or,
rather, if they are just maneuvering by a famously transactional
leader who often says what he
needs to say to make a deal and
then reverses himself. The White
House declined to comment for
this story, but an official confirmed the outlines of the interactions that Paul described.
Nonetheless, Trump’s talks
with Paul reflect an area of growing tension between the president, whose instinct is to pull out
from overseas entanglements,
and his military, whose leaders
argue that swift withdrawals
would spark dangerous instability. In Afghanistan, one indication
of the military’s nervousness is its
eagerness to open peace talks with
the Taliban and try to negotiate an
end to the conflict.
The Trump-Paul conversations
also point to an effort by the dovish senator and former Trump rival, long treated by his party as a
foreign policy gadfly, to assert influence over a president who
chafes at being managed by his
advisers and the Republican foreign policy establishment.
The odds are steep for Paul,
even as he tries to nudge Trump
into being more like Trump, or at
least the Trump he came to know
on the campaign trail. Paul’s efforts have been complicated by a
recent spate of attacks in the country, including two bombings Monday that killed at least 25 people.
R OBERT C OSTA,
S ARI H ORWITZ
AND M ATT Z APOTOSKY
Conservative House allies of
President Trump have drafted
articles of impeachment against
Deputy Attorney General Rod J.
Rosenstein, who oversees the ongoing special counsel probe, setting up a possible GOP showdown over the federal investigation into Russian interference in
the 2016 election.
The document, which was obtained by The Washington Post,
underscores the growing chasm
between congressional Republican leaders, who have maintained for months that special
counsel Robert S. Mueller III
should be allowed to proceed,
and rank-and-file GOP lawmakers who have repeatedly battled
the Justice Department during
the past year.
The draft articles, which one of
its authors called a “last resort,”
would be unlikely to garner significant support in Congress. But
the document could serve as a
provocative political weapon for
conservatives in their standoff
with Mueller and the Justice
Department.
Members of the conservative
House Freedom Caucus — led by
Rep. Mark Meadows (R-N.C.), a
Trump confidant — finalized the
draft in recent days. It came after
weeks of disputes with Rosenstein over the Justice Department’s response to congressional
requests for documents about the
decisions and behavior of federal
law enforcement officials working on the Russia investigation
and other federal probes, including the investigation into 2016
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton’s email server.
MAY 1 , 2018
McCain:
Trump’s
tough-guy
act just that
In upcoming memoir,
senator is critical of
president, partisan divide
BY
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
President Trump pats Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) after signing an executive order Oct. 12 at the White House. Trump’s talks with the
noninterventionist senator about U.S. war efforts reflect an area of growing tension between the president and his military advisers.
An affiliate of the Islamic State
asserted responsibility.
The White House is increasingly full of hawks, such as national
security adviser John Bolton,
whose views Paul has fiercely opposed. And Trump has long been
courted by Paul’s foreign policy
nemesis in the Senate, Sen. Lindsey O. Graham (R-S.C.).
“Senator Paul is an outlier,”
Graham said.
Defense Secretary Jim Mattis
told reporters Monday that Trump
had not given any indication that
he wants to withdraw from Afghanistan.
“We’re there to do a job. We’re
not there to stay forever. But the
job comes first,” he said. “Matter of
fact, we have a number of nations
looking to add forces as we speak.”
There are signs that Trump is
increasingly coming around to
Paul’s message on Afghanistan and
a host of other foreign policy issues.
Of late, Trump has bucked his
top economic advisers and proposed a broad set of new tariffs on
steel, aluminum and Chinese
products. He agreed to a meeting
with North Korean leader Kim
Jong Un without clear concessions from Pyongyang as a precondition.
In March, he shocked the Pentagon and State Department when
he went off script at an Ohio event
and announced, “We’ll be coming
out of Syria, like, very soon.” Since
then commanders have rushed
through plans to mop up the remnants of the Islamic State as a
fighting force and withdraw U.S.
troops over the next six months.
On the campaign trail, Trump
blasted Paul as “truly weird” and
denigrated his rival’s appearance.
“I never attacked him on his look,”
Trump said once of Paul. “And
believe me, there is plenty of subject matter right there.”
These days, he talks about Paul
as a trusted friend, telling aides
that on key votes, Paul “won’t let us
down.” He has even praised the
senator’s golf game.
Paul gets less-positive reviews
from White House staffers, who
grouse that he is a grandstander
who causes them unnecessary headaches and hours of work. “If you
think anyone in the White House
has an ounce of clout with Rand Paul
other than the president, you are
wrong,” one White House official
said. “There is not a single person
who can take credit for having a
conversation that was successful
with Rand Paul except for POTUS.”
In their talks last week, Paul
said, Trump agreed to reopen discussion about placing a warrant
requirement on FBI searches of
foreign intelligence data collected
under Section 702 of the FISA
Amendments Act. The intelligence community fiercely opposes
the change, and Paul recently
failed to get the new limit written
into law.
“I think there is a great deal of
sympathy from the president,”
Paul said, noting Trump’s concerns about politicization of the
FBI. “We are pushing for a meeting within the next couple of
weeks with the president.”
But the most consequential
parts of the conversations may
have concerned Afghanistan,
where Trump, known for relying
on his gut, has so far accepted an
approach that cuts against his
original instinct to pull out. The
core of the current Afghanistan
policy is built on a commitment to
end the Obama-era withdrawal
timelines and stay in the country
until conditions on the ground
improve.
Taliban leaders “are realizing
that they can’t just wait us out
anymore,” a senior U.S. official in
Kabul said in March. “That’s
huge.”
Other senior officials have expressed more doubt about the
conflict, which still appears stalemated. To Paul, the president’s private comments reflect a broader
impatience with the war strategy
inside the administration.
“We are in the midst of a shifting policy that I don’t think they’ll
want to get very specific in the
White House — and maybe for
good reasons,” Paul said. “If you
were to ask, ‘Is the president for
resolving the Afghan conflict?’ I
think he would say, ‘Yes.’ I think he
is just not willing like most people
to say, ‘Tomorrow.’ ”
The question is whether Paul’s
influence will persuade Trump to
listen less to generals and more to
his gut.
“His true worldview, and I have
heard him say this over and over, is
that we have no business being
anywhere over there and we look
like fools,” said one longtime friend,
who has spoken to Trump repeatedly about the Middle East. “He is
inclined to agree with Rand Paul.”
The challenge for the military
will be convincing Trump that despite modest battlefield success,
the threat posed by terrorist networks in Afghanistan and Pakistan demands a robust U.S. investment in money and troops. “His
military leaders are definitely opposed to the Rand Paul worldview,” said Graham. “They understand the value of some of us being
over there.”
Trump and Paul first got to
know each other in 2014, when
Trump invited Paul to play a round
at Trump International Golf Club
in West Palm Beach, Fla. Trump
later gave money to a Utah charity
that funded Paul’s regular trips to
Haiti and Central America, where
Paul, an ophthalmologist, performs cataract surgeries.
By the 2016 campaign, however,
relations had descended into a
vicious tit for tat. Paul said at one
point that a “speck of dirt” was
more qualified to be president
than Trump and compared him to
Gollum, a slimy, power-obsessed
creature from J.R.R. Tolkien’s
“Lord of the Rings” books. Trump
called Paul “a spoiled brat without
a properly functioning brain” and
mocked his height at a rally.
“Rand, I’ve had you up to here,”
Trump said, holding his hand
partway up his chest.
But since Trump’s election,
their relationship has blossomed,
as they once again became golf
partners and the president began
calling regularly. “Rand Paul is a
very special guy, as far as I’m concerned,” Trump told reporters on
April 18, during negotiations for
the Pompeo vote.
michael.scherer@washpost.com
greg.jaffe@washpost.com
josh.dawsey@washpost.com
GOP lawmakers draft impeachment articles against Rosenstein
BY
. TUESDAY,
Meadows acknowledged the
draft in an interview Monday,
calling the one-page document “a
last resort option, if the Department of Justice fails to respond”
to his requests for more information.
“My frustrations about their
inability to respond to simple
requests could warrant further
action,” Meadows said, adding
that many of his colleagues are
nearing a breaking point with
Rosenstein.
The Freedom Caucus, which
counts a few dozen House Republicans as members, is one of the
more influential blocs in Congress because of its ability to
drive debates to the right inside
the House and Meadows’s close
relationship with the president.
Still, the group’s impeachment
draft would face many challenges
if it were referred to the House
Judiciary Committee for consideration. Republican leaders have
kept their distance from calls to
remove Rosenstein from office,
and Democrats have argued that
the GOP’s clashes with the deputy
attorney general are little more
than a pretext to weaken Mueller’s efforts.
In recent weeks, the Judiciary
Committee reached an agreement with the Justice Department over documents it wanted
turned over — possibly curbing
the appetite of its leaders for a
fight.
Impeaching a federal official is
an exceedingly difficult endeavor.
While House members can refer
impeachment articles to the
House Judiciary Committee, it is
usually up to the committee to
debate or draft impeachment legislation that could be brought
before the House for a vote. A
simple majority is then needed
MELINA MARA/THE WASHINGTON POST
Action against Rod Rosenstein
would be a “last resort.”
for an article of impeachment to
pass and be sent to the U.S.
Senate for a trial. Two-thirds of
the Senate is necessary to convict
and remove the accused from
office.
Should the Judiciary Committee decline to take up a proposal,
Meadows and his colleagues are
considering offering articles of
impeachment under what is
called a “privileged” resolution,
which is when a floor vote is
quickly called if the House speaker approves.
The last federal official impeached by the House was federal
judge G. Thomas Porteous Jr.,
who was convicted by the Senate
in 2010 on bribery allegations.
A spokesperson for the House
Judiciary Committee declined to
comment on the draft or the
prospect of impeachment proceedings. A Justice Department
spokesman also declined to comment on the draft.
Democrats have said that conservative criticisms of Rosenstein
are aimed at protecting Trump.
But Meadows and others involved in the impeachment dis-
cussions say their concerns are
serious and should be heard.
The draft criticizes Rosenstein’s disclosure of materials related to a classified surveillance
warrant application and subsequent renewals targeting former
Trump campaign adviser Carter
Page. Conservatives have alleged
the Justice Department acted inappropriately because the department relied on information
in its warrant applications that
was funded by Clinton’s presidential campaign. The warrants were
approved by multiple judges.
The conservatives’ outline,
which is divided into eight parts,
focuses on Rosenstein and surveillance matters in the first
three articles. The document asserts that the veteran Justice
Department official “engaged in a
pattern of conduct incompatible
with the trust and confidence
placed in him” in his dealings
with Congress and “failed to enforce multiple laws” in the warrant process.
The draft also states that
Rosenstein “knowingly provided
misleading statements” during
congressional testimony about
steps the federal government
took to investigate Russian interference in the 2016 election.
Justice Department Inspector
General Michael Horowitz announced in March that he will
examine the series of applications to surveil Page, along with
the department’s relationship
with former British intelligence
officer Christopher Steele, whose
research was cited in those requests.
The impeachment draft comes
at a charged moment within the
Republican Party and inside the
White House. Trump warned in
recent days that he could make
sweeping changes at the Justice
Department and has repeatedly
railed against the special counsel
investigation as a “witch hunt”
that is baseless and politically
motivated.
And it follows months of pressure on Rosenstein, going back to
January when Rep. Paul A. Gosar
(R-Ariz.) called him a “traitor”
who should be criminally prosecuted.
The impeachment draft comes
even as other House Republicans
have cooled their tensions with
Rosenstein, who has largely capitulated to lawmakers’ demands.
In early April, for example, the
Justice Department gave House
Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes (R-Calif.) access to a redacted document detailing the origin of the investigation into whether the Trump
campaign coordinated with Russia to influence the 2016 election,
just a day after Nunes had threatened impeachment proceedings.
At the time, Nunes publicly
thanked Rosenstein for his cooperation, although he said his
subpoenas would remain in effect.
Similarly, the Justice Department came to an agreement in
recent weeks with House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob
Goodlatte (R-Va.) and House
Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Trey
Gowdy (R-S.C.), who had been
seeking documents on the investigation into Clinton’s use of a
private email server and the firing of Andrew McCabe as deputy
FBI director, among other things.
robert.costa@washpost.com
sari.horwitz@washpost.com
matt.zapotosky@washpost.com
J OHN W AGNER
In a new memoir, Sen. John
McCain offers a harsh assessment
of President Trump’s leadership,
asserting that his “reality show
facsimile of toughness” seems to
matter more to him than the nation’s values.
In the book, McCain (R-Ariz.),
who is battling brain cancer and
says he feels more free to speak out
because he is not seeking reelection, writes that he has sometimes
heatedly disagreed with all six of
the presidents who have held office
during his 36 years on Capitol Hill.
McCain takes particular aim at
Trump, a real estate developer
and former reality-television star,
writing that he “has declined to
distinguish the actions of our government from the crimes of despotic ones.”
“The appearance of toughness,
or a reality show facsimile of
toughness, seems to matter more
than any of our values,” McCain
says.
The assessment is included in
excerpts of McCain’s forthcoming
book, “The Restless Wave,” that
were published Monday by Apple
News. The book, co-written by
Mark Salter, McCain’s longtime
aide and writing collaborator, is
slated for publication on May 22.
In the excerpts published Monday, McCain laments the decline
of civility and bipartisanship in
Washington, writing that “whether we think each other right or
wrong on the issues of the day, we
owe each other respect.”
The book’s publication comes
as McCain faces an uncertain future.
In July, doctors diagnosed the
six-term senator and former
presidential nominee with glioblastoma, an aggressive form of
brain cancer that took the lives of
Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (DMass.) and Beau Biden, son of
former vice president Joe Biden.
McCain, 81, returned to Congress and maintained a relatively
regular congressional schedule
through the fall as he underwent
chemotherapy and radiation
treatments. By December, however, he had returned to Arizona to
continue his treatments and go to
physical rehabilitation.
Last week, he was discharged
from the hospital after spending
more than a week there for surgery related to an intestinal infection.
And over the weekend, Ben Domenech, a writer who recently
married McCain’s daughter
Meghan, tweeted: “John hugged
me tonight. He asked me to take
care of Meghan. I said I would.”
The tweet has since been deleted.
In his forthcoming book, McCain calls himself “a champion of
compromise in the governance of
a country of 325 million opinionated, quarrelsome, vociferous
souls.”
“There is no other way to govern an open society, or more precisely, to govern it effectively,” the
senator writes.
He proceeds to offer some “unsolicited advice” to voters.
“If a candidate for Congress
pledges to ride his white horse to
Washington and lay waste to all
the scoundrels living off your taxes, to never work or socialize or
compromise with any of them,
and then somehow get them to
bow to your will and the superiority of your ideas, don’t vote for that
guy,” McCain writes. “It sounds
exciting, but it’s an empty boast
and a commitment to more gridlock.”
He says that the kind of candidate who should be president is
someone who “modestly promises
to build relationships on both
sides of the aisle, to form alliances
to promote their ideas, to respect
other points of view, and to split
differences where possible to
make measurable progress on national problems.”
McCain and Trump have had a
rocky relationship since the early
stages of the 2016 election.
Trump once derided McCain, a
former Navy pilot who spent more
than five years in a North Vietnamese prison, saying he wasn’t a
war hero “because he was captured.”
Last year, McCain cast a deciding vote against a GOP effort to
overhaul the Affordable Care Act,
prompting repeated recriminations of McCain by Trump.
john.wagner@washpost.com
Paul Kane contributed to this report.
TUESDAY, MAY 1 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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A5
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Justices take up cases on execution method, type of class-action settlement
BY
R OBERT B ARNES
The Supreme Court next term
will consider a Missouri inmate’s
contention that the state’s preferred method of executing him
could cause him to choke on his
own blood and will review a kind
of class-action lawsuit settlement
in which no payments go to the
plaintiffs’ class.
The court announced Monday
it is taking the cases, and will
hear them in the term that begins
in October.
The court, on a 5-to-4 vote in
March, issued a last-minute stay
of the planned execution of 49year-old Russell Bucklew, who
suffers from a rare disease called
cavernous
hemangioma.
It
causes blood-filled tumors to
grow in his head, neck and
throat, which his lawyers say
could rupture during the state’s
lethal injection process.
Bucklew’s attorneys have said
Missouri should execute him using nitrogen gas rather than lethal injection, a method that has
been floated elsewhere but never
used by a state seeking to execute
someone.
This year, Oklahoma said it
would become the first state to
use nitrogen gas for all execu-
tions going forward, a dramatic
response to the inability of states
nationwide to obtain the drugs
used for lethal injections. Mississippi last year adopted nitrogen
gas as a potential method of
execution there.
Bucklew is not contesting his
conviction for a particularly
gruesome crime.
In 1996, Bucklew stalked his
former girlfriend to another
man’s trailer. He shot the man,
tried to shoot the woman’s fleeing
child and then captured the
woman. He handcuffed and
raped her, then wounded a police
officer in a subsequent gunfight.
Bucklew later escaped from
jail and attacked the rape victim’s
mother with a hammer before he
was recaptured.
In a brief to the court, Missouri
Attorney General Joshua D. Hawley said Bucklew is simply trying
to delay his execution, and has
not presented verifiable evidence
that another manner of death
would prevent suffering.
While Missouri’s law authorizes the use of lethal gas, “the state
has no protocol in place . . . because that method has not been
used since 1965,” Hawley wrote.
“The state’s only gas chamber not
only is inoperable; it sits in a
they compare to the state’s method of execution.”
Bucklew’s lawyers said the
court should clarify that inmates
“need not custom-design their
own method of execution in light
of the idiosyncratic reasons the
state’s generally lawful method of
execution will prove cruel as
applied to them.”
The case is Bucklew v. Precythe.
JEREMY WEIS PHOTOGRAPHY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Russell Bucklew suffers from a rare disease that causes blood-filled
tumors, which lawyers say could rupture during lethal injection.
museum.”
Bucklew’s lawyer, Robert N.
Hochman, says Bucklew’s actions
should not justify an indifference
on society’s part that he might
suffer during execution.
“We refuse to punish with cruelty to protect ourselves against
being party to cruelty,” Bucklew’s
lawyers write. “We do so even
when the temptation is powerful
because the crime we are punish-
ing was itself barbaric and cruel.”
In accepting the case, the justices told the state and Bucklew’s
lawyers that they should address
whether Bucklew has met the
burden, announced in a previous
death penalty case, “to prove
what procedures would be used
to administer his proposed alternative method of execution, the
severity and duration of pain
likely to be produced, and how
‘Cy pres’ settlement review
The court also said it will
review an $8.5 million class-action settlement involving Google
in which the money went to
lawyers and a group of organizations instead of the class members who brought the complaint.
The lawsuit involved complaints that Google improperly
disclosed users’ Internet search
terms to others.
About $2 million of the settlement went to lawyers, and the
rest went to organizations and
university centers that said they
would use the money to promote
privacy protection.
But Theodore Frank and Melissa Ann Holyoak objected to
what is called a “cy pres” agreement and said Monday they were
gratified the court had taken the
case.
“We are hopeful that the Supreme Court’s review will result
in a standard forbidding attorneys from misusing class-action
settlements to selfishly put themselves and third parties ahead of
their clients,” said Frank, director
of litigation at the Competitive
Enterprise Institute.
Google said it would have been
“infeasible to distribute $5.3 million in settlement funds to
129 million class members who
had been unable to plead any
concrete injury resulting from
the challenged feature of Internet
searches.”
The Supreme Court has seemingly been looking for a case that
would allow it to review cy pres
(pronounced “see pray”) settlements. In declining to accept
such a challenge in 2013, Chief
Justice John G. Roberts Jr. nevertheless said the agreements
raised “fundamental concerns,”
including “when, if ever, such
relief should be considered” and
“how to assess its fairness as a
general matter.”
The case is Frank V. Gaos.
robert.barnes@washpost.com
Mark Berman contributed to this
report.
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K
. TUESDAY,
MAY 1 , 2018
The World
First caravan migrants cross over U.S. border
Eight Central Americans
begin process of seeking
asylum in the U.S.
Israelis
likely hit
Iran-linked
Syria bases
BY M AYA A VERBUCH
AND J OSHUA P ARTLOW
BY L OUISA L OVELUCK
AND L OVEDAY M ORRIS
tijuana, mexico — The first
beirut — Missile strikes at two
eight members of a Central American migrant caravan crossed into
U.S. territory on Monday evening
after waiting a day at the border,
and authorities began a process to
determine whether they will be
granted asylum in the United
States.
Even as the first of a group of
150 asylum seekers trickled into
the port of entry at the San Ysidro
crossing into California, the
Trump administration showed
that it will seek to punish some of
the migrants, who have attracted
the ire of President Trump and
other senior members of his administration.
Attorney General Jeff Sessions
announced Monday that the Justice Department has filed criminal charges against 11 suspected
members of the caravan for illegally entering the country, including one who has been deported
previously, according to a statement. While the main caravan
group is waiting to enter through
legal channels at the port of entry,
the statement said these migrants
got picked up crossing into the
country illegally elsewhere along
the border.
“The United States will not
stand by as our immigration laws
are ignored and our nation’s safety
is jeopardized,” Sessions said in a
statement.
Alex Mensing, one of the caravan coordinators, said he did not
know whether the people charged
had been part of the caravan. In
legal workshops, the migrants
have been told that “crossing anywhere other than a port of entry is
a crime that’s prosecutable, and
we never encourage anyone to do
that,” he said.
At the port of entry, U.S. authorities appeared to be following
through on plans to accept the
migrants into custody and begin
Iran-linked bases in Syria caused
huge explosions and killed dozens of pro-government fighters, a
monitoring group said Monday,
in an attack seen as Israel’s latest
blow in a shadow war to contain
Iranian influence.
Syrian state media reported
major blasts in parts of Hama
and Aleppo provinces about
10:30 p.m. Sunday. It did not
identify the targets, but other
pro-government media outlets
said they were weapons depots
for the Syrian regime and Iranian
forces.
While the state-owned daily
Tishreen said the missiles were
launched from U.S. and British
military bases, analysts said the
most likely source was Israel,
which has previously acknowledged carrying out more than 100
strikes in Syria during the civil
war.
The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said
Israel carried out the attacks. The
monitoring group identified the
main target as an arms depot for
surface-to-surface missiles at a
base in northern Syria known as
Brigade 47. It said the Neirab
military air base, southeast of
Aleppo city, also was hit.
At least 26 people were killed,
four of them Syrians, the Syrian
Observatory said. Representatives of a regional alliance that
includes Iran, Syria and the Hezbollah paramilitary group said
that Iranians were among the
dead, and some cited a much
higher toll.
The names and faces of some of
the dead appeared to be circulated across loyalist websites all day
Monday with captions describing
them as heroes and victims
of “wanton aggression.”
In Iran, there were conflicting
reports on the casualties and on
whether Iranian assets were
struck. Tehran has sent thousands of fighters to bolster Syrian
President Bashar al-Assad, including proxy forces from Iraq
and Afghanistan.
Seven years after Syria’s largely
peaceful uprising morphed into a
civil war, the country is now the
stage for proxy conflicts of global
powers.
Israel has watched anxiously
as Iran shored up Assad’s rule
with weapons and money, then
committed its own troops and
developed military infrastructure
across the country.
Israel has been pushing for the
United States to maintain a military presence in Syria to counterbalance Iran. U.S. forces already
have clashed with Iranianbacked militias that had advanced against positions of local
fighters supported by the United
States.
PHOTOS BY CAROLYN VAN HOUTEN/THE WASHINGTON POST
Honduran Javier Rivera holds his son Alexander, 1, while they wait Sunday at the San Ysidro border crossing in Tijuana, Mexico.
the process of determining
whether they would be granted
asylum. The first group of eight,
including three mothers, four
children, and an 18-year-old male,
entered the border crossing before 7 p.m.
The scene at the Tijuana border
has garnered intense scrutiny. On
one side of the standoff are about
150 migrants who cite their right
to seek shelter from persecution
back home and have traveled
through Mexico in a caravan to
highlight the suffering of asylum
seekers. On the other side is the
Trump administration, which is
trying to crack down on illegal
immigration and says many asylum claims are fraudulent.
Trump tweeted last week that
he had ordered the secretary of
homeland security “not to let
these large Caravans of people
into our Country,” adding, “It is a
disgrace.”
But under international treaties it has signed, the U.S. government is obliged to allow foreigners
to apply for asylum.
It remains unclear how fast the
Trump administration plans to
process the remaining migrants.
The San Ysidro port of entry in San
Diego has detention space for
about 300 people. U.S. officials
have not said how many people
are being held there. Asylum seekers are typically detained until
officers from U.S. Citizenship and
Immigration Services conduct interviews to determine whether
they have a credible fear of persecution or torture if they are sent
Central American asylum seekers stand in line for food Monday at the crossing in Tijuana. Under
international treaties, the U.S. government is obliged to allow foreigners to apply for asylum.
home.
The first few dozen migrants
from the caravan walked up to the
San Ysidro entry point Sunday
night but were not allowed to
enter. They and the other Central
Americans on the convoy had received extraordinary attention after conservative U.S. media highlighted their trip and the president denounced the caravan.
On Monday, many migrants sat
on the ground on blankets and
under donated blue tarps outside
the border crossing. They passed
around a Tijuana newspaper to
try to learn scraps of information
about their fate.
Trump has made this caravan a
symbol of what he calls a porous
border and lax immigration laws.
He has used it as justification to
deploy National Guard troops
along the border and alleged that
Mexico was not enforcing its immigration laws, further straining
relations with a key U.S. ally.
Attorney General Jeff Sessions
recently called the caravan “a deliberate attempt to undermine our
laws and overwhelm our system.”
Asked about the asylum seekers
Monday, Trump told reporters
that “we’re working on the border
with the worst laws any country —
no matter where you go, all over
the world, they can’t even believe
it.” He called for tougher border
policies, including a massive wall.
Many migrants say they face
threats to their lives in their native
lands. Karina Gomez Cruz, 16,
who said she had left Nicaragua
with her mother because of domestic violence and gang threats,
spent the night at the border
crossing and was wondering Monday what her future would hold.
“I’m bored of waiting, anxious
to arrive and nervous because
they don’t let us through,” Gomez
Cruz said.
If they succeed in entering the
United States, the migrants may
still face a long and complicated
journey through the immigration
court system. Migrants who pass
the initial “credible fear” screening often get assigned a date in
immigration court and then are
released after a few days in custody. U.S. officials say many migrants skip their court dates and
try to live illegally in the United
States.
Homeland Security Secretary
Kirstjen Nielsen issued a statement when the caravan reached
the border, warning that the administration would prosecute its
members if they entered the country illegally, if they made false
claims or if they coached anyone
into telling lies.
“That would really show how
much the administration is willing to make the caravan an example of its harsh policy proposals,”
said Maureen Meyer, director for
Mexico and migrant rights at the
Washington Office on Latin America.
Trump administration officials
say that more migrants are applying for asylum than in the past, in
an attempt to take advantage of
immigration rules. The number of
foreigners making a claim of
“credible fear” rose nearly 1,900
percent between 2008 and 2016,
according to the Department of
Homeland Security.
In past years, organizers have
assembled caravans of asylum
seekers to raise awareness about
the plight of migrants, but they
normally do not gain international attention. This year, conservative media in the United States
seized on the caravan as a symbol
that illegal immigration was surging, and Trump focused his Twitter ire on the march.
joshua.partlow@washpost.com
louisa.loveluck@washpost.com
loveday.morris@washpost.com
Partlow reported from Mexico City.
Nick Miroff in Washington contributed
to this report.
Morris reported from Jerusalem.
Suzan Haidamous in Beirut
contributed to this report.
the court that he had been in
Malaysia for only 10 days and did
not know that it had a law against
fake news. He said his action was a
mistake and apologized.
spokesman, said Moe Yan Naing
was sentenced Saturday, but
refused to give details. Moe Yan
Naing has been detained since the
reporters’ arrest on Dec. 12,
apparently for earlier giving one
of them an interview.
Officers who violate Burma’s
Police Disciplinary Act can be
sentenced to up to a year in prison.
The two reporters were charged
with violating the Official Secrets
Act and could get up to 14 years in
prison. They apparently were
targeted because their work
concerned the brutal crackdown
by security forces against the
Rohingya minority in Rakhine
state. About 700,000 Rohingya
have fled to Bangladesh since the
crackdown began in August.
DIGEST
AUSTRALIA
Cardinal Pell to face
trial in sex abuse case
Australian Cardinal George
Pell, the most senior Vatican
official to be charged in the
Catholic Church sex abuse crisis,
must stand trial on charges that
he sexually abused multiple
victims decades ago, a magistrate
ruled Tuesday.
Magistrate Belinda Wallington
dismissed some of the charges
that had been heard in the fourweek preliminary hearing in
Melbourne but decided that the
prosecution’s case against him
was strong enough to warrant a
trial by jury.
When she asked Pell how he
pleaded, the cardinal stood and
said in a firm voice: “Not guilty.”
Lawyers for Australia’s highestranking Catholic had argued that
the accusations were untrue and
should be dismissed.
Pell, Pope Francis’s former
finance minister, was charged last
June with sexually abusing
multiple people in his Australian
home state of Victoria. The details
of the allegations against the
76-year-old have yet to be
released to the public, though
police have described the charges
as “historical” sexual assault
offenses — meaning the crimes
allegedly occurred decades ago.
Pell was the archbishop of
Melbourne and later Sydney
before his promotion to Rome in
2014. He returned to Australia
from the Vatican in July.
— Associated Press
BURMA
Officer penalized for
testifying in press case
— Associated Press
MALAYSIA
Dane is 1st to be jailed
under fake-news law
A Malaysian court on Monday
sentenced a Danish citizen to a
week in jail after he pleaded guilty
to maliciously publishing false
information, the first person to be
punished under a controversial
law against fake news.
The legislation was approved
by Parliament this month despite
criticism that it was aimed at
silencing dissent ahead of a May 9
general election. It carries a
maximum penalty of six years in
jail and a fine of 500,000 ringgit
($128,000).
Salah Salem Saleh Sulaiman
was detained April 23, two days
after he claimed in a YouTube
video that he was with a Hamas
scientist who was fatally shot in
FAROOQ KHAN/EPA-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK
Women gather in a funeral procession for slain civilian Shahid
Ahmad in Arihal village, Pulwama district, south of Srinagar, the
summer capital of Indian-administered Kashmir. The young man was
killed Monday when troops fired at protesters who were trying to
help rebels escape during a clash in another village. Two rebels died.
The rebels want Kashmir to be part of Pakistan or be independent.
Malaysia by two assailants.
Sulaiman claimed that he made
countless calls to police, who he
said were slow to respond, and
that an ambulance came an hour
later.
Local media said Sulaiman did
not personally know the victim,
Fadi al-Batsh, a Palestinian
electrical engineering lecturer in
Malaysia who was a member of
Hamas, the militant group that
controls the Gaza Strip.
Local media quoted Sulaiman,
who is of Yemeni descent and was
in Malaysia on a holiday, as telling
A police officer in Burma who
testified that he was ordered to
help entrap two Reuters
journalists investigating abuses
by security forces against
Rohingya Muslims has been
punished under police
regulations, a police spokesman
said Monday.
Police Capt. Moe Yan Naing
testified in court on April 20 that
his superior arranged for two
police officers to meet reporters
Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo and
give them documents described as
“important secret papers” in order
to later arrest them on charges of
possessing state secrets.
The day after Moe Yan Naing’s
surprise testimony — he had been
a prosecution witness — his wife
and daughter were ordered to
vacate their police housing unit.
Col. Myo Thu Soe, a police
— Associated Press
Inflation-hit Venezuela boosts
minimum wage 155 percent:
Venezuelan President Nicolás
Maduro said he is boosting the
minimum wage by 155 percent to
keep up with runaway inflation
that is making it difficult for
people to afford essentials.
Maduro’s order brings the
monthly wage to 1 million
bolívars, or $1.61 on the
commonly used black market.
— From news services
TUESDAY, MAY 1 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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AMIR COHEN/REUTERS
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu says Israel has obtained tens
of thousands of documents from Iran’s secret nuclear archive.
Israel: Files show Iran
lied about nuclear plans
BY L OVEDAY M ORRIS
AND K AREN D E Y OUNG
jerusalem — Israel’s Prime
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu
on Monday said Israel is in possession of tens of thousands of
documents and discs that prove
that Iran lied about the history of
its nuclear weapons program
when it signed the 2015 nuclear
deal.
In a televised speech from Tel
Aviv, Netanyahu dramatically
pulled a curtain away from a
shelf of files that he said were
copies of some of the 55,000
documents that Israel had obtained from Iran’s secret nuclear
archive. Most of the documents,
as described, dated from 2003
and before, when Iran had a
clandestine weapons development program dubbed “Project
Amad.”
The speech came at a critical
time for the nuclear deal, just
ahead of a May 12 deadline for
President Trump to decide
whether to continue to waive
statutory sanctions that were lifted as part of the agreement.
In his remarks, Netanyahu
said the cache confirmed something that has not been in dispute
among signatories of the deal —
that Iran has lied about its past
nuclear efforts. He has waged a
fierce campaign for the pact to be
changed or scrapped, often repeating the mantra “fix it or nix
it” — concerned that it will enable
Israel’s archrival to come closer
to developing a nuclear weapon.
Trump, speaking at a Washington news conference with the
president of Nigeria, said Netanyahu’s revelations “showed that
I’ve been 100 percent right” in
describing the nuclear agreement as the “worst deal” ever
from what he said was “half a
ton” of documents on a screen
behind him, Netanyahu said
they demonstrated conclusively
that Iran had not “come clean”
on its program. Iran has repeatedly insisted that it never has
had and never would have a
weapons program.
The documents indicated that
Iran had been proceeding with
“five key elements of a nuclear
weapons program,” he said, including designing a weapon, developing nuclear cores and building implosion systems, preparing
test sites and integrating nuclear
warheads on ballistic missiles.
“These files conclusively prove
that Iran is brazenly lying when it
says it never had a nuclear weapons program,” Netanyahu said.
“We’ve shared this material with
the United States, and the United
States can vouch for its authenticity.”
Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif mocked Netanyahu as the “boy who can’t
stop crying wolf,” tweeting a picture of the Israeli prime minister
holding up a diagram of a cartoonlike bomb that he used to
illustrate the Iranian nuclear
threat during a speech to the U.N.
General Assembly in 2012.
“Trump is jumping on a rehash
of old allegations already dealt
with by the IAEA to ‘nix’ the deal,”
Zarif added, referring to the International Atomic Energy Agency. “How convenient.”
The timing of Netanyahu’s presentation seemed designed for
maximum impact on Trump’s decision. Secretary of State Mike
Pompeo was apparently briefed
on the material during a visit to
Israel on Sunday, and Trump and
Netanyahu also had a Sunday
telephone call.
MAY 5 • 4:05 PM
PHILADELPHIA
PHILLIES
WASHINGTON
NATIONALS
“What he is revealing with
all this detail is not news.”
Daryl Kimball of the Arms Control Association
signed. “We’ll see what happens,”
he said of the coming deadline.
Richard Nephew, a former senior State Department official who
was part of the U.S. team that
negotiated the deal implemented
in January 2016, said Netanyahu’s revelations were “interesting, and important for building a
history of [Iran’s] program. But it
is not a new revelation, at least in
terms of where the program was
when we were negotiating.”
“To put it another way,” he said,
“it is why we negotiated the
JCPOA,” or Joint Comprehensive
Plan of Action.
“What he is revealing with all
this detail is not news,” said Daryl
Kimball, executive director of the
Arms Control Association. “The
fact that Iran has experimented
with nuclear warhead designs,
and had at one point an active
weapons program, makes it all
the more essential that the
JCPOA remains in place to prevent Iran from quickly amassing
enough fissile material for even
one bomb.”
“It is ludicrous to recommend
. . . that the deal should be dismantled, which would open a
pathway for Iran to pursue” a
nuclear weapon, Kimball said.
Iranian officials have said that
if the deal is canceled, they would
quickly increase both the quantity and quality of centrifuges, now
restricted under the deal, which
would allow them theoretically to
produce weapons-grade uranium.
In a dramatic presentation,
Netanyahu stood on a stage with
a pointer. To one side was a
bookcase filled with shelves of
files that he said were Iran’s
secret nuclear records, apparently obtained through a covert operation by Israeli intelligence.
Next to it was a display cabinet of
compact discs.
Standing in front of a screen,
Netanyahu displayed slides from
the files that revealed the
breadth of the Iranian nuclear
program. Showing excerpts
“I am sure this was all fully
coordinated with the Trump administration,” said former U.S.
ambassador to Israel Dan Shapiro, a fellow at the Institute for
National Security Studies. He
said the information was “not
new” but described the retrieval
of so many files from Iran as
an “intelligence coup.”
The IAEA , charged with monitoring the deal, has said Iran has
complied with its terms, an assessment the Trump administration has not disputed. But Trump
has specifically cited the sunset
clauses in the agreement, its
monitoring and verification provisions, and its failure to address
Iran’s ballistic missile program.
European allies that signed the
deal — along with Russia
and China — have been negotiating with the State Department
on supplemental agreements to
address Trump’s concerns without changing the nuclear agreement itself. In visits to Washington last week, French President
Emmanuel Macron and German
Chancellor Angela Merkel appealed to Trump to keep the deal
in place.
“I’ve been a longtime advocate
of fixing” flaws in the deal rather
than tearing it up, said Mark
Dubowitz, CEO of the Foundation for Defense of Democracies.
“Today’s revelations just make
that much more difficult,” he
said.
As the May 12 U.S. deadline
approaches, Netanyahu said he is
sure Trump will “do the right
thing for the United States, the
right thing for Israel and the
right thing for the peace of the
world.” His announcement was
made largely in English, a sign
that he wanted his message
spread to an international audience.
loveday.morris@washpost.com
karen.deyoung@washpost.com
DeYoung reported from Washington.
Ruth Eglash in Jerusalem
contributed to this report.
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RE
. TUESDAY,
MAY 1 , 2018
Nine journalists among 25 Afghans killed in dual bombing
KABUL FROM A1
in Afghanistan,” Fawad Nasiri,
25, a journalist at Radio Azadi,
said Monday morning. He was
waiting outside an operating
room at Wazir Akbar Khan Hospital, where one of his colleagues
was undergoing surgery. “We lost
a lot of friends today. I’m sorry, I
cannot say any more.”
A few hundred yards away, at
the hospital morgue, a cluster of
men watched somberly as
the body of Nawroz Ali Rajabi, a
young reporter for the TV One
news channel, was pulled from a
steel drawer and lowered into a
pasteboard coffin. The men were
his brothers, cousins and colleagues. Several peered down at
his burned and bruised face, then
gasped or turned away, sobbing.
One man gently zipped up the
black body bag. Another nailed
down the coffin lid. A cousin,
red-eyed and shaking with anger,
shouted, “The sons of generals
and officials drive in armored
cars, but we poor people are
being killed.” Then the men
hoisted the box onto their shoulders, chanting a Koranic prayer,
and carried it out to be buried.
The blasts, which occurred in
the heavily guarded zone that
houses foreign embassies, Afghan government offices and
NATO’s mission in Afghanistan,
also killed Shah Marai, the
chief photographer here for
Agence France-Presse, and seven
journalists from local TV and
radio stations. Six others were
among the wounded.
The heavy casualties left
Kabul’s war-hardened press
corps reeling in shock and grief.
Dozens of Afghan journalists
have died covering combat and
conflict in recent years, but this
was a deliberate attack on a
group of professionals and
friends in the capital, many of
whom who had worked together for years.
Afghan press associations and
individual journalists complained Monday that the government was not doing enough to
protect them, and some suggested they be provided with armed
guards and flak jackets. There
was also anger that the Afghan
intelligence service did not take
more defensive action after the
first bomber, on a motorbike,
“We lost two of our best employees. We will honor them,
and we will help support their families, but this hurts our souls.”
A manager for Afghanistan’s TV One news channel
PHOTOS BY PAMELA CONSTABLE/THE WASHINGTON POST
LEFT: Friends and relatives of Nawroz Ali Rajabi, a reporter for TV One, wait at a hospital morgue. RIGHT: Family members and
colleagues prepare to place the bag holding Rajabi’s body in a coffin. The heavy death toll left the war-hardened press corps reeling.
detonated his explosives outside
its compound.
“On the one hand, we have to
cover the news. On the other
hand, our people need to be
protected,” said a TV One manager who asked not to be named,
citing insecure conditions for
journalists. In addition to Rajabi,
he said, a station cameraman
died in the blast.
“We lost two of our best employees,” he said. “We will honor
them, and we will help support
their families, but this hurts our
souls.”
The twin bombings came just
over a week after a massive
suicide attack killed at least 57
people in the Afghan capital. In
that attack, also claimed by the
Islamic State, a suicide bomber
on foot detonated explosives outside a building where people
were waiting in a long line to
obtain voter ID cards.
Several hours after the Monday bombings, the regional
branch of the Islamic State posted a statement online saying that
two of its “martyrs” had carried
out an attack on the Afghan
intelligence service in Kabul.
Both the Taliban and the
Islamic State have often used the
tactic of quick-succession bombings to increase casualty tolls.
International media groups
mourned the slain Afghan journalists and denounced the cruelty of the attack that claimed their
lives.
“This latest attack on journalists in Afghanistan is a reminder
of the extreme dangers to media
workers in that country and of
the extremely brutal tactics used
there by enemies of the free
press,” said a statement by Steven
Butler, Asia program coordinator
for the Committee to Protect
Journalists.
Reporters Without Borders
urged the United Nations to
create a special representative
for the protection of journalists.
“It is high time that the U.N. sent
a strong signal to the international community,” the group’s
secretary general, Christophe
Deloire, said in a statement.
The bombings occurred on the
same day that one U.S. service
member was killed and another
wounded during a combat operation in eastern Afghanistan, the
U.S. military said in a statement.
Several Afghan troops also were
killed or wounded, and the surviving wounded U.S. service
member was taken to a military
hospital at Bagram air base.
In southern Kandahar province Monday, meanwhile, NATO
officials said 11 children were
killed when a convoy of Romanian troops was struck by a car
bomb near a religious school in a
densely populated area. They
said 16 people were wounded,
including
eight
Romanian
troops, Afghan civilians and policemen.
Taliban insurgents last week
announced the launch of their
annual spring offensive, dimming hopes for peace talks recently proposed by the government. The group said it would
target Afghan and foreign forces
but would avoid civilian casualties. The Islamic State, however,
has made targeting civilians a
key part of its strategy.
All morning, sirens wailed as
ambulances rushed from the Kabul blast site to several hospitals.
In one ward at Wazir Akbar Khan
Hospital, severely wounded police officers were lying in a row of
beds, surrounded by anxious relatives and medical staff. One had
a bandaged face and breathing
tube. A nurse said he was in a
coma and might not survive. A
younger man burst into the
room, stared closely at his face
and began weeping.
Outside the hospital, families
looked anxiously at lists of blast
patients posted on the walls, and
some donated blood to help their
injured relatives. Among the
families was an English teacher
named Amanullah. He said his
nephew, a doctor, had just finished the night shift and passed
by the blast site on his way home.
He was badly injured by shrapnel
and underwent three hours of
surgery.
“So many innocent people
died,” said Amanullah, 30.
“These are terrorists. They just
want to destroy our country.
Muslim people would never do
this. We just want peace with no
blasts, no killing, no kidnappings. It may be impossible, but
we have to try.”
pamela.constable@washpost.com
Sayed Salahuddin in Kabul and
Dan Lamothe in Washington
contributed to this report.
May ensnared in immigration scandal
British prime minister
pressured over policy of
‘hostile environment’
BY K ARLA A DAM
AND W ILLIAM B OOTH
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to go before Britain leaves the
European Union — a decision
voters made in part to stem
immigration — the government
is confronting a scandal over its
treatment of migrants, both legal
and illegal.
Opposition
lawmakers
stepped up pressure Monday on
Prime Minister Theresa May to
answer for her role in an official
policy to create, in her words, a
“hostile environment” for those
in the country illegally — a policy
that also ensnared a generation
of legal arrivals from the Caribbean who were welcomed to
Britain to help it rebuild after
World War II.
Late Sunday, Amber Rudd resigned as Britain’s home secretary following accusations that
she lied to Parliament last week
about deportation targets for
illegal immigrants.
Rudd first told Parliament that
there were no national quotas,
then amended her remarks and
said that maybe there were some.
Finally, the Guardian produced a
private letter Rudd sent to May
outlining her commitment to
increase deportations by 10 percent, which included numbers
and targets.
In her resignation letter, Rudd
acknowledged that she had “inadvertently misled” lawmakers
and had “become aware of information provided to my office
which makes mention of targets.
I should have been aware of this,
and I take full responsibility that
I was not.”
On Monday, her replacement
was named: Sajid Javid, a successful investor, experienced
government minister and the
first member of an ethnic minority to hold the position of home
secretary.
Javid is the son of a Pakistani
immigrant bus driver and is one
of the most outspoken members
of May’s cabinet to confront
President Trump over his tweets
about Muslims.
After Trump in November
BEN STANSALL/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Sajid Javid, fourth from right, was named home secretary after
the resignation of Amber Rudd, second from right, who said she
‘inadvertently misled” lawmakers over deportation targets.
retweeted misleading antiMuslim videos by an extremist fringe group called Britain
First, Javid tweeted: “So POTUS has endorsed the views of a
vile, hate-filled racist organisation that hates me and people
like me. He is wrong and I
refuse to let it go and say
nothing.”
But the departure of Rudd —
the fourth member of May’s top
leadership team to resign in the
past six months — and the appointment of Javid have not
subdued the scandal.
The prime minister’s critics
note that it was May — not Rudd
— who as home secretary was
responsible for the changes in
immigration rules that led to
doctors, landlords and employers checking people’s immigration statuses.
Because they haven’t been able
to gather the extensive paperwork required to prove that they
are allowed to live here, some of
those in what is known as the
Windrush generation, named after the ship that brought the first
wave of Caribbean immigrants to
Britain after World War II, have
been threatened with deportation, have been denied health
benefits or have lost jobs.
Britons, overall, probably
would not be too upset with a
government that pushed out
illegal immigrants. But the Windrush stories, first reported in
the Guardian, drew widespread
condemnation. Even May’s own
Tories said the shabby treatment was an affront to British
decency.
The Windrush scandal, said
Rob Ford, a professor of politics
at the University of Manchester,
“highlights that, even with all of
the toxic politics we’ve had
around immigration in the
country for well over a decade,
there is a basic kind of gut-level
sense of fair treatment and fair
play.”
May has repeatedly apologized
in recent days for her government’s treatment of people from
the Caribbean and other Commonwealth citizens living in
Britain.
But the opposition Labour
Party has continued to train its
fire on her.
Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn
tweeted pictures of his meetings
with members of the Windrush
generation on Monday, writing:
“With @AmberRuddHR’s departure, @Theresa_May has
lost her human shield. The
Prime Minister should end the
‘hostile environment’ she created.”
The timing is a huge headache
for May, coming amid tricky
Brexit negotiations and just days
ahead of local elections Thursday, with polls suggesting that
the Conservative Party could face
big losses.
The scandal also has raised
eyebrows across the English
Channel, with E.U. officials worried about the post-Brexit immigration status of the 3 million
E.U. citizens who live in Britain.
karla.adam@washpost.com
william.booth@washpost.com
TUESDAY, MAY 1 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
Pentagon ends combat against ISIS
in Iraq but will retain troop presence
BY
T AMER E L- G HOBASHY
AND P AUL S ONNE
baghdad — The U.S. military
disbanded the command overseeing American ground forces
in Iraq on Monday, as the Pentagon ends major combat operations against the Islamic State in
the country but looks to maintain a longer-term troop presence there to prevent the extremists from regrouping.
U.S. Central Command, which
oversees military operations in
the Middle East, marked the
deactivation of the command in
Baghdad with a ceremony, calling the event an acknowledgment of the “changing composition and responsibilities of the
coalition” the United States assembled nearly four years ago to
destroy the Islamic State.
The Combined Joint Forces
Land Component Command
oversaw troops from the U.S.-led
coalition as they helped Iraqi
forces roll back the Islamic
State’s self-declared caliphate.
While the command’s closure
marked a milestone in the fight
against the militant group, U.S.
officials say the battle isn’t finished.
The equivalent-level special
operations task force the U.S.
military is using to finish off the
Islamic State in Syria remains
active, as does the higher-level
command that oversees the
broader campaign against the
Islamic State in both countries.
President Trump has been vo-
cal about bringing home the
roughly 2,000 U.S. troops fighting the Islamic State from Syria
as soon as possible.
But he has said little about
withdrawing more than double
the number of American forces
still deployed to Iraq, in what
many in Washington have read
as a desire by the White House to
avoid disrupting upcoming Iraqi
elections.
Defense Secretary Jim Mattis
said in Senate testimony last
week that he would support
keeping a residual U.S. force in
Iraq alongside other troops from
NATO nations to help maintain
security in the country, with a
phased withdrawal over time
based on certain conditions.
U.S. military commanders fear
that if American troops withdraw sooner than they should,
the Iraqi government could
again prove unable to defend the
country from a possible renewed
Sunni insurgency emanating
from the remnants of the Islamic
State.
The extremist group was
fueled in part by feelings of
marginalization among Iraqi
Sunnis, who dominated the nation before Saddam Hussein’s
ouster in 2003 and still largely
feel underrepresented under the
current Shiite-led government,
which faces elections May 12.
Trump hasn’t weighed in publicly on the possibility of keeping
a residual U.S. force in Iraq. For
weeks, however, he has pushed
for a full-scale withdrawal from
Syria, where, unlike in Iraq,
American forces operate without
the government’s permission.
The ground troops were there
to advise, equip and assist Iraq’s
military during the grueling
three-year fight to claw back the
one-third of Iraqi territory that
the Islamic State had claimed.
Technically, U.S. troops were not
involved in active combat, but
they were often seen near field
command centers on Mosul, operating surveillance drones or
coordinating battlefield logistics
with Iraqi commanders.
Since Iraqi Prime Minister
Haider al-Abadi declared the Islamic State defeated in December, American forces have been
gradually drawing down while
shifting their tasks to the training of Iraqi forces in intelligence
gathering and policing.
Officially, the Pentagon says
about 5,200 American troops are
deployed to Iraq, but it is not
fully clear how many are in the
country on any day, given the
way the U.S. military tabulates
and releases the numbers.
One reason American officials
have been vague about the number of forces in the country is
that they believe publicizing the
figures could adversely impact
the elections, said a senior American official who spoke on the
condition of anonymity to discuss sensitive negotiations.
tamer.el-ghobashy@washpost.com
paul.sonne@washpost.com
Sonne reported from Washington.
Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said last week that he would support
keeping a residual U.S. force in Iraq alongside other troops from NATO
nations to help maintain security in the country, with a phased
withdrawal over time based on certain conditions.
SALAH MALKAWI/GETTY IMAGES
Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, left, meets Sunday with Jordanian King Abdullah II in Amman.
Pompeo also visited Saudi Arabia and Israel during his first foreign trip as secretary of state.
Pompeo maneuvers to own
U.S. diplomacy in Mideast
BY
C AROL M ORELLO
amman, jordan — Mike
Pompeo uses language economically, and that was evident on his
first foreign trip as secretary of
state. Many of the messages he
conveyed required few words.
When he headed directly from
his swearing-in ceremony Thursday for the airport, Pompeo said
he aims to get the State Department’s “swagger” back.
With no aides brought over
from the CIA or Congress, he
boarded the plane alone. To the
career professionals shunted
aside at the State Department
under his predecessor, Rex Tillerson, Pompeo’s simple gesture was
an invitation to show him their
worth.
Pompeo visited three countries in the Middle East, suggesting he expects to own U.S. diplomacy in the region. At every stop,
he lambasted Iran as the singular
most malign influence in the
Middle East and warned people
not to be surprised if President
Trump withdraws from the Iran
nuclear deal this month.
It was an action-packed beginning for any secretary of state, as
he headed back to Washington to
address employees on Tuesday
and sit in his Foggy Bottom office
for the first time. In the coming
weeks, he will start to demonstrate how he plans to occupy the
largest platform in U.S. diploma-
cy.
His Middle East visit suggested he is positioning himself to
take a larger role in trying to coax
Israelis and Palestinians back to
the negotiating table for what
Trump has said would be the
ultimate accomplishment in
dealmaking. Up to now, that has
been in the portfolio of Jared
Kushner, Trump’s adviser and
son-in-law.
The trip underscored the difficulties in balancing the Middle
East peace process with the ramifications of the embassy move to
Jerusalem and the administration’s focus on Iran.
Pompeo’s encounters went
smoothly when he was in Saudi
Arabia and Israel, two countries
that see Iran as an archrival for
regional dominance.
But it was more complicated in
Jordan, another key U.S. ally in
the region but one that considers
the Israeli-Palestinian conflict
the chief impediment to peace
and stability. After Jordanian
Foreign Minister Ayman Safadi
described it as such, Pompeo
declined to challenge him.
“Precisely how to rank it,
amongst all the various challenges, I’ll defer on that,” he said.
“Know that it is an incredible
priority for the United States to
provide whatever assistance we
can to allow the two parties to
come to a resolution of this
incredibly long-standing and im-
portant conflict.”
Pompeo sidestepped criticism
of Israel’s crackdown against Palestinian protests along the Gaza
Strip border, where 39 Palestinians have been killed and hundreds wounded in a month of
violent encounters. Israel says
that it is defending its border and
protecting its citizens and that it
targets only instigators of violence.
Pompeo demurred when asked
whether Israel is overreacting.
“We do believe the Israelis
have the right to defend themselves, and we’re fully supportive
of that,” he said.
Aides characterized Pompeo’s
debut as a diplomat as a chance
for him and world leaders to get
to know each other. As the former
head of the CIA, however, he was
already a familiar figure in some
of the capitals he visited.
Pompeo made as much as he
could of the fact that he was on
his maiden trip.
At NATO headquarters in
Brussels, he told diplomats he
was with them, in his 13th hour
on the job. In Israel, he told
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu he hadn’t even been to his
office yet.
And at the Jordanian Foreign
Ministry, he wrote in a guest
book, “I am honored to visit
Jordan on my very first trip as
secretary of state.”
carol.morello@washpost.com
RE
A9
A10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
MAY 1 , 2018
Police used census data, news clippings, a gravesite locator
DNA FROM A1
ing one step ahead as police say he
killed at least 12 people, raped
more than 50 and committed 100
burglaries between 1974 and 1986,
when his crimes appeared to mysteriously end.
His mayhem touched 10 counties, and he was variously called
the East Area Rapist, Original Nightstalker, Diamond Knot
Killer and Visalia Ransacker before
authorities
discovered
that the various strings of crimes
appeared to be the work of a single
man.
He instilled fear like few others.
Sacramento District Attorney
Anne Marie Schubert was a child
when dozens of seemingly related
rapes occurred in the Sacramento
area in 1976 and 1977. Schubert
said her mother put a weapon
under her pillow.
“It changed this community,”
Schubert said. “People referred to
him as the boogeyman. It wasn’t a
matter of if he was coming, it was
when, because it happened so
much and it went on for so long.”
The boogeyman
The horror began with the flash
of a blinding light.
Linda O’Dell, then 22, said she
and her husband were woken
about 1 or 2 a.m. on May 14, 1977,
by an intruder shining a flashlight
on their bed.
“Don’t move,” the man barked.
He threw string to O’Dell and
ordered her to tie up her husband.
Then the intruder tied O’Dell up
himself. He piled plates and bowls
on her husband’s back and stalked
around the house yelling and
drinking the couple’s beer. Finally,
he moved O’Dell to the living
room, where he raped her.
“He told me he would cut my
husband’s ear off and bring it
to me if there was any noise,”
she said.
He eventually took O’Dell’s
wedding ring, possibly as a souvenir, then slipped out into the
night.
The three-hour ordeal bore the
terrible hallmarks of a predator
who came to be dubbed the East
Area Rapist. The rape of O’Dell
was No. 21 attributed to the same
man in the Sacramento area in
1976 and 1977. Thirty more would
follow there and in other communities in Northern California.
PHOTOS BY NICK OTTO FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Police say the Golden State Killer’s mayhem touched 10 counties in
California, and he was variously called the East Area Rapist,
Original Nightstalker, Diamond Knot Killer and Visalia Ransacker
before authorities discovered that the string of crimes appeared to
be the work of one man. ABOVE: A map with numbered
thumbtacks indicating attacks shows how the East Area Rapist
would cluster his targets. LEFT: Carol Daly and Richard Shelby
were two of the Sacramento County Sheriff 's Department
detectives assigned to the East Area Rapist case early on.
“This was the most heinous
rapist I had ever known,” said
former detective Carol Daly, who
was one of the first to investigate the case for the Sacramento
County Sheriff 's Department.
“The attacks were bizarre, cruel
and long-lasting.”
They were also cunning, said
Richard Shelby, another former
detective with the department. Shelby said the East Area
Rapist planned meticulously. He
watched the victims, broke into
their homes and even called them
to learn their routines before
striking. He always seemed to
have an escape route via a stream,
trail or field.
With each attack, fear ratcheted higher.
Sales of locks, dogs and guns
soared — doubling in Sacramento
County between 1976 and 1977,
according to the Sacramento Bee.
Daly said burglaries nose-dived
during that era; she surmised it
was because of the gun sales and
burglars knowing that residents
were on edge.
But what truly seemed to set
the East Area Rapist apart, Daly
said, was his apparent delight in
stoking this public terror.
At a forum on the rapes in 1977,
Daly recalled that a man rose and
said he doubted a rapist would be
able to rape a woman in front of
her husband, since the man would
retaliate. Several months later,
that man’s wife was raped while
he was at home, Daly said.
“I can’t positively say, but I
think the rapist was in the meeting that night,” she said.
Despite intense searches, Shelby said, the East Side Rapist
seemed to anticipate police moves
and slip away. At the time, DeAngelo was a police officer in
the small Northern California
town of Auburn.
If DeAngelo is the East Side
Rapist, Shelby thinks his police
training may have given him an
edge. His police radio may have
even allowed him to listen in as
police investigated.
The violence grew.
In February 1978, a young couple from Rancho Cordova, Brian
and Katie Maggiore, were shot
dead when they fled a confrontation on the street while walking
their dog. The killings eventually
became the first attributed to the
East Area Rapist.
The year after the killings,
DeAngelo was dismissed from the
Auburn force for shoplifting a can
of dog repellent and a hammer
from a drugstore.
The terror soon shifted to
Southern California, although it’s
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unclear what DeAngelo was doing
or where he was living.
Shortly after Christmas in 1979,
a surgeon and a psychologist were
shot and killed in their Santa Barbara County apartment. In March
1980, a couple was fatally bludgeoned with a piece of firewood in
their Ventura County home. The
woman was raped. Six more homicides would follow, all believed to
be the work of a killer who was
dubbed the Original Nightstalker.
By 1986, that wave of crimes
appeared to abruptly end.
The reason remains unknown,
but Daly and Shelby think the
killer may have grown too old to
continue the physically demanding attacks and flights. In 2001,
DNA evidence linked the East
Area Rapist and Original Nightstalker cases.
The search for the Golden State
Killer helped spur advances in
criminal justice. The brother of
one victim successfully lobbied to
expand the collection of DNA
from criminals in California, and
the Sacramento Sheriff’s Department added a dedicated sexcrimes unit.
The final push to find the killer
would spawn one more investigative innovation.
Road map to a killer
Paul Holes had been tracking
the Golden State Killer for
24 years, but time was running
out. He had nine months before he
retired as an investigator for the
Contra Costa County district attorney’s office, and he desperately
wanted to crack his biggest case.
Holes had been obsessed with
the Golden State Killer since coming across the case file in the
mid-90s while working as a forensic scientist. Holes had handled
serial predator cases, but the
Golden State Killer stood out even
among these hardened offenders.
“I was struck by the lengths this
predator would go to to instill fear
in his victims,” Holes said. “It was
psychological terror.”
A detective told Holes about a
2002 case in which a young kidnapping victim was identified using her DNA and a genealogy web-
site. Holes wondered: Could he do
the same with the Golden State
Killer?
Holes began researching and
hit upon a novel tool in
GEDmatch, a no-frills website
that allows users to upload their
genetic information and search
a database of roughly 1 million
profiles for possible family connections.
He prepared to sell the unorthodox idea to officials to get a
sample of the killer’s DNA.
“We ended up going on a road
show,” Holes said.
Holes and an FBI lawyer found
a partner in Ventura County last
summer. A meticulous pathologist had put a duplicate evidence
kit from the rape and murder of
Charlene and Lyman Smith in a
freezer in 1980. Many other DNA
samples from the case had been
depleted over the years.
A lab converted the sample into
a format that could be read by
GEDmatch, which analyzes hundreds of thousands of DNA datapoints to determine relatedness.
Holes waited anxiously as he fed
in the killer’s profile.
Holes, prepared for another
dead end, was heartened when
the analysis returned. It wasn’t a
close match, but the site found 10
to 20 distant relatives of the killer,
roughly the equivalent of third
cousins.
Holes knew that if he traced
back the lineages of distant cousins far enough, he could find a
common ancestor they shared
with the killer. That turned out to
be great-great-great grandparents from the early 1800s.
A daunting task lay ahead as
Holes and his team began to trace
offspring to the present day to find
potential suspects. That meant
filling in thousands of blanks.
“When you go that far back in
time, you have trees that grow
huge,” Holes said.
They used census data, old
newspaper clippings and a
gravesite locator to find the deceased relatives. When they got to
the current day, they turned to
police databases and websites
such as LexisNexis.
Holes created his family trees
using a tool on Ancestry.com. His
team stole time on weekends
and during meetings to plug the
holes one by one. It was tedious work, and it wasn’t their
full-time focus.
By April, they had pieced together about 25 distinct family
trees from the great-great-great
grandparents. There were roughly 1,000 family members just in
the one that included DeAngelo.
The team began scouring the
trees for potential suspects, men
about the killer’s age who had
connections to Sacramento and
other locations of the crimes.
They found two.
Holes said the other suspect
looked promising on paper but
was eventually eliminated by a
DNA test of a relative. That left
DeAngelo.
Holes had doubts.
“How could this guy be a fulltime law enforcement officer and
be committing all these attacks
across Northern California?” he
said. “I had my reservations that it
was him.”
Sacramento sheriff’s deputies
put DeAngelo under surveillance
and picked up the discarded item
containing his DNA. After the
match, they arrested DeAngelo at
his home, not far from where he
allegedly carried out many of the
crimes. He now faces eight counts
of murder.
On Friday, DeAngelo, whose attorney did not return calls seeking
comment for this article, was
pushed into a Sacramento courtroom in a wheelchair to face arraignment. He appeared frail in
an orange jumpsuit, answering
a judge’s questions in a thin, raspy
voice.
Holes said he was gratified to
finally put a face to the ghost he
chased for so many years.
“Thousands of nightmares and
thousands of sleepless nights
have been put to an end with
the capture of this rapist,” Carol
Daly said.
justin.jouvenal@washpost.com
Magda Jean-Louis contributed to this
report.
Acting ICE director plans to resign
BY
N ICK M IROFF
Thomas Homan, the Trump administration’s top immigration
enforcement official, announced
Monday that he plans to step
down from his job, less than six
months after Trump nominated
him to be director of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.
Homan was named ICE’s acting
director soon after Trump took
office in 2017, and the tough-talking, barrel-chested former Border
Patrol agent quickly became an
unapologetic enthusiast for the
administration’s more aggressive
enforcement approach.
Under Homan, immigration arrests surged 40 percent after
agents scrapped an Obama administration policy of targeting
serious or violent criminal offenders in favor of casting a wider net.
Homan said those living illegally
in the United States “should be
afraid” that his agents could be
coming for them.
Pleased with Homan’s beat-cop
demeanor, Trump picked him for
the permanent ICE leadership
role in November. But his nomination went nowhere and never
reached a vote on the Senate floor.
Homan ran ICE in a provisional
capacity for so long the agency
could no longer legally refer to
him as its “acting director,” instead identifying him as its “Senior Official Performing the Duties
of the Director.”
In recent months, Homan told
friends and co-workers that he felt
increasingly sidelined by his boss,
Homeland Security Secretary
Kirstjen Nielsen, according to
Nomination to head
immigration enforcement
agency did not reach vote
three people close to Homan.
When Nielsen met with lawmakers this year to negotiate an immigration deal, Homan was not invited to join the discussions, and
his frustrations deepened.
Homan informed Nielsen in
early February of his plans to retire, but she urged him to delay the
announcement because there was
already so much turnover at the
highest levels of the Trump administration, a person with
knowledge of their talks said.
Homan’s retirement plans were
first reported by the Wall Street
Journal.
In a statement Monday, Homan
said the decision was prompted by
a desire to spend more time with
his family.
“It has been the honor of my life
to lead the men and women of ICE
for more than a year,” his statement read. “The decision to leave
federal service after more than 34
years is bittersweet, but my family
has sacrificed a lot in order for me
to serve and it’s time for me to
focus on them.”
Nielsen informed DHS staff of
Homan’s retirement in a memo,
calling him a “patriot and true
public servant.”
“Under his exceptional leadership, the men and women of ICE
have made significant progress in
restoring the rule of law to our
immigration system,” Nielsen
wrote. “He has made my predecessors and myself better secretaries,
faithfully upholding the Constitution and executing ICE’s law enforcement mission.”
Homan had been the subject of
several critical reports in recent
weeks regarding ICE policies that
include the forced separation of
immigrant families in detention
as well as the agency’s controversial arrest practices.
Homan’s statement said his
agency has been repeatedly maligned by “unfair and false criticism from politicians and the media.”
In a letter Friday, nearly 20 Senate Democrats asked the Department of Homeland Security to
provide documents explaining
why Homan’s nomination had
stalled, suggesting DHS didn’t
want him to face scrutiny.
“We understand that the Trump
Administration may be concerned
about Mr. Homan answering
questions under oath about his
leadership of ICE, as well as the
possibility that Mr. Homan’s nomination could be defeated in the
Senate,” the letter said. “However,
the Senate is an independent
branch of government and has a
responsibility under the Constitution to provide its advice and consent on this nomination.”
Homan was to announce his
retirement Monday night at an
award ceremony where he was to
receive a leadership award from
the Federal Law Enforcement Officers Association Foundation, his
statement said.
nick.miroff@washpost.com
TUESDAY, MAY 1 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
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Economy & Business
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Last arguments made
in AT&T merger case
The world’s workers, welded together
Sides in Time Warner
suit disagree over effects
on consumers’ TV bills
BY
BILAWAL ARBAB/EPA-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK
A worker welds steel bars at a construction site for a road in Peshawar on the eve of International Labor Day in
Pakistan. The annual event, also called May Day, stems from the efforts of the labor movement to recognize the
economic achievements of workers and is celebrated around the world, sometimes at different points in the year.
A direct appeal for a diverse future
Congressional Black Caucus members travel to Silicon Valley to press tech giants on hiring, retention
BY
T ONY R OMM
Top black lawmakers are paying a visit to Airbnb, Apple, Twitter
and other tech giants this week, as
they continue their crusade to improve Silicon Valley’s hiring practices and train a new generation of
diverse engineers and entrepreneurs.
For members of the Congressional Black Caucus, who arrived
in the Bay Area on Monday, the
tech sector has been too slow to
diversify its executive ranks, invest in minority-owned start-ups
and assist workers who can’t find
jobs in tech hubs, like San Francisco, or afford those cities’ sky-high
costs of living.
In response, lawmakers said
they plan to raise those issues
directly with tech companies on
their home turf, hoping their
political firepower — and subtle
threats of bad press and tough
regulation — might nudge some of
the industry’s biggest players to be
more mindful of black workers’
needs.
“We’re letting companies know
they must provide greater opportunity to African Americans,” said
Rep. G.K. Butterfield (D-N.C.) in
an interview, adding they would
“expose any company that provides lip service.”
A key early goal of the visit: Butterfield said he and three fellow CBC
members plan to ask tech executives
to attend a public “summit” focused
on diversity. Facebook CEO Mark
Zuckerberg previously signaled he
might attend such a gathering during his first-ever testimony to Congress in April — a hearing that focused on privacy yet at times pivoted
to the company’s hiring practices.
Facebook declined to comment
Monday.
Already, CBC lawmakers said
they had secured participation
from PayPal, one of the firms they
visited Monday. The company’s
chief executive, Dan Schulman,
said in a statement that PayPal is
“fully committed to achieving a
more diverse and inclusive
workplace.”
The trip marks the third time
the CBC has taken its message
about diversity directly to the
country’s tech capital since lawmakers announced their campaign in 2015. Since then, the
49-member bloc of black members of Congress has secured
changes to tech companies’ business practices. Last year, for example, the CBC secured a commitment from Facebook that it would
appoint a black board member,
which the company ultimately
announced in January. And it
pushed Airbnb in 2016 to address
accusations that hosts on the site
were discriminating against African American renters. The homesharing site did not immediately
respond to a request for comment.
Despite its prodding, however,
even the CBC has acknowledged
CURRENCIES
$1=109.30 YEN; EURO=$1.208
that Facebook, Google and their tech
peers continue to struggle to hire
and retain black workers and leaders.
At Apple, which the CBC visited
Monday, about 9 percent of its U.S.
workforce is black while 54 percent of it is white, according to its
most recent employment report.
Still, the iPhone maker has said
roughly half of its new hires
between July 2016 and July 2017
came from “historically underrepresented groups in tech,” including women and people of color.
At Twitter, meanwhile, black
employees make up 3.4 percent of
its U.S. team while more than
43 percent is white. The company
— along with its social media
peers, such as Facebook — long
has struggled to stop the spread of
racist, extremist content on its
platform. Twitter declined to comment for this story.
“The pace of change is much too
slow,” said Rep. Barbara Lee, a
Democratic congresswoman who
represents a slice of the Bay Area,
during an interview. Among her
constituents, she said she knows
“many, many cases of African
Americans who wanted to break
into the workforce here . . . and
never were able to do that.”
Lee and her peers seem especially
mindful of a company they are not
planning to visit on their trip west
this week: Amazon.com. The e-commerce giant is in the hunt for a locale
to host its second headquarters — an
office that could employ as many as
50,000 new workers. And the eventual arrival of the “HQ2” could affect
housing and rents, education and
transportation, and the very character of the city that Amazon selects —
so Lee said it would be critical for the
company to keep diversity in mind.
“I have talked to members [of
Congress] where the siting is being considered . . . to try to mitigate what has happened in the Bay
Area,” she said. “I think that any
company that is willing to set up
new offices, new buildings, new
operations, has to take into consideration the communities
where they’re [looking].”
A spokeswoman for Amazon
declined to comment. Amazon
founder and chief executive
Jeffrey P. Bezos owns The Washington Post.
Broadly, though, lawmakers insisted Monday that they don’t plan
to ease the political pressure — a
sign that even tougher scrutiny
could follow if Democrats win a
majority in the House or Senate,
elevating some CBC members to
key positions of power on Capitol
Hill.
“We’re just going to tell the companies that the CBC is expecting
better results, and if you want to
work with us, then we want to
work with you,” Butterfield said.
“It’s good business to have a good
relationship with a significant
bloc of lawmakers.”
tony.romm@washpost.com
B RIAN F UNG
The Justice Department made
a final pitch to a federal judge
Monday, calling for AT&T’s
$85 billion merger with Time
Warner to be blocked — or that
AT&T be permitted only to buy a
portion of the media and entertainment giant.
Addressing a packed courtroom that included the chief executives of both companies, Justice
Department attorney Craig Conrath cited economic analyses, industry witnesses and AT&T’s own
statements to support the government’s case opposing the merger.
The deal would add hundreds
of millions of dollars a year to
consumers’ TV bills, Conrath said,
while restricting competition in
the television industry. Addressing one of AT&T’s key justifications for the deal — the desire to
compete with Facebook and
Google for ad dollars — Conrath
said that the benefits do not outweigh the costs to society.
“The fact that AT&T may want
to compete in some other market,
that doesn’t give them a free pass
to reduce competition in the payTV market,” he said.
Monday’s closing arguments in
the six-week trial represent the
last opportunity in the trial for
both sides to make their case personally before Judge Richard
Leon. Leon showed little emotion
as he occasionally scribbled notes.
At times, he sat back in his chair,
folded his arms and furrowed his
brow as he listened to the government’s argument.
For both sides, the trial carries
high risks — and high rewards.
The case is the first of its kind
since President Richard M. Nixon’s administration, when the
government successfully sued to
block a merger involving Ford
Motor Co. and a manufacturer of
spark plugs. Analysts say the outcome of the AT&T trial is likely to
influence the Justice Department’s ability and likelihood of
bringing antitrust cases in the
near future. Regulators already
have another major deal, between
with Sprint and T-Mobile, to consider. The two companies announced their proposed merger
Sunday.
The Justice Department has alleged that the merger would give
AT&T the “incentive and ability”
to use Time Warner’s content as
both carrot and stick with other
cable companies and TV distributors that need that programming.
AT&T could use its “gatekeeper”
position in the industry, Conrath
said, to raise the price it charges
other companies for the rights to
show Time Warner’s channels,
such as CNN, TBS and TNT. In
price negotiations, he said, AT&T
could threaten to cut off access
and siphon consumers away to its
own TV service, DirecTV.
AT&T has argued that it has no
incentive to wield Time Warner’s
content anti-competitively, because Time Warner benefits
the most when its content is widely distributed. AT&T also says that
the new company would be structured in ways that would limit the
ability of Time Warner to coordinate with DirecTV.
AT&T and Time Warner’s lead
attorney, Daniel Petrocelli, told
the court Monday that the economic theory underpinning the
government’s case “makes no
sense.” AT&T’s plan is to use its
new data-driven advertising business — made possible by selling
ads for Time Warner content —
not only to compete against the
tech industry, said Petrocelli, but
to use those gains to relieve the
upward pressure on consumers’
TV prices.
As Leon nodded along to parts
of his argument and asked several
questions that appeared to underscore AT&T's points, Petrocelli argued that the government presented a slipshod case, ignoring
data and arguments favorable to
AT&T when it was convenient and
cherry-picking other numbers to
undercut the merger.
When Petrocelli said DirecTV
could lower its prices as a result of
the merger, Leon interrupted.
“Doesn’t that create more competition in the marketplace?” the
judge asked.
Yes, Petrocelli said, because
other TV providers would have to
respond to those price cuts with
benefits of their own.
But Conrath said internal documents created by AT&T chief executive Randall Stephenson and
others show that the company has
contemplated how it could use
Time Warner to give an advantage
to its distribution business, such
as DirecTV. As AT&T was thinking
about buying Time Warner,
Stephenson prepared a presentation to AT&T board members in
which he jotted down a note asking precisely that question. In his
witness testimony, Stephenson
said that note was simply a rhetorical tool, not an actual plan to
behave anti-competitively.
Conrath said it seemed odd that
Stephenson would think to raise
that issue with the board despite
later telling the court that the idea
was “absurd.” Conrath also said
that AT&T’s own pre-merger communications with Time Warner
show how “maybe that concern
isn’t so absurd after all.”
Earlier in 2016, when Time
Warner announced it was buying
a 10 percent stake in Hulu as Hulu
was preparing to launch a livestreaming video service, Stephenson had a phone call with Time
Warner chief executive Jeffrey
Bewkes. In Stephenson’s notes regarding the call, Conrath said, it
became clear that the Hulu investment “made Mr. Stephenson worried that AT&T might not get the
same Time Warner content at the
same terms” for DirecTV.
That dynamic, said Conrath, is
similar to the one underlying the
government’s concerns about the
AT&T-Time Warner deal.
Leon said that he expects to
render a decision on June 12.
brian.fung@washpost.com
DIGEST
ECONOMY
Consumer spending,
inflation rose in March
Americans boosted their
spending by 0.4 percent in March,
the best showing in three months.
Meanwhile, a key gauge of
inflation closely watched by the
Federal Reserve rose at the fastest
pace in more than a year.
The March jump in consumer
spending followed two months of
weak readings with no gain in
February and a 0.2 percent rise in
January, the Commerce
Department reported Monday.
The result is an encouraging sign
that economic growth, which
slowed in the first quarter, will
accelerate in the current quarter.
Personal incomes advanced a
moderate 0.3 percent in March,
matching the February gain.
An inflation gauge tied to
consumer spending rose
1.9 percent in March compared
with 12 months ago. The Fed seeks
to achieve moderate annual hikes
in inflation of around 2 percent
but has fallen below that target
for the past six years. With
unemployment at a 17-year low of
4.1 percent, economists expect
that tight labor markets will start
to lift wages and overall inflation.
social media platform using
Disney’s properties. Twitter and
the Disney-owned ESPN sports
network will announce live shows
in development at their
NewFronts presentations in New
York this week, the companies
said in a statement.
— Associated Press
REGULATION
Panasonic settles
with federal agencies
Panasonic Corp. will pay about
$280 million to resolve U.S.
allegations that executives at its
in-flight-entertainment unit
improperly hid payments to
consultants in the Middle East
and Asia, some of whom did little
or no work for the company.
The Panasonic parent
company, in a settlement
announced Monday, will pay
$143 million in disgorgement to
the Securities and Exchange
Commission, while Panasonic
Avionics agreed to pay about
$137 million in penalties to the
Justice Department for violations
of the accounting provisions of
the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.
“We are pleased to have
resolved these investigations,”
Hideo Nakano, chief executive of
Panasonic Avionics, said in a
statement. “We have taken
extensive steps over the past few
years to strengthen Panasonic
Avionics’ compliance programs
and internal controls, and we
McDonald’s reported strong
DAVID CHANG/EPA-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK
Wind turbines in Taichung, Taiwan. The island’s Economic
Ministry awarded contracts to seven foreign companies to build 11
offshore wind farms. The winners include German wind-farm
developer Wpd AG, Danish firm Orsted and fund manager
Copenhagen Infrastructure Partners, and Canada’s Northland Power.
welcome an independent
compliance monitor to assess our
progress.”
— Bloomberg News
ALSO IN BUSINESS
Walt Disney Co. and Twitter said
Monday that they are working
together to create live content and
advertising opportunities on the
profit and revenue on Monday,
helped by higher sales in overseas
markets and as U.S. customers
spent more at the fast-food chain’s
outlets. Shares by revenue rose
more than 5 percent as global
same-restaurant sales topped
Wall Street forecasts, driven by
strength in mature markets,
especially the United Kingdom
and Germany. Same-restaurant
sales in the United States rose
2.9 percent — propelled by
consumers opting for $1-$3 valuemenu items, while also adding
more-expensive burgers.
Slightly more Americans signed
contracts to buy homes in March,
yet higher mortgage rates and a
shortage of available houses are
weighing on sales. The National
Association of Realtors said
Monday that its pending home
sales index ticked up 0.4 percent
last month to 107.6. It was the
second straight increase, but the
index is still 3 percent lower than
it was a year ago.
The U.S. Treasury said Monday
that it expects to slow the pace of
borrowing in the April-June
period after debt sales surged
earlier in the year when Congress
lifted a cap on federal debt. The
Treasury Department said in a
statement that it expects to issue
$75 billion through credit
markets during the period,
assuming an end-June cash
balance of $360 billion. It also
expects to issue $273 billion in net
marketable debt in the JulySeptember period.
— From news reports
COMING TODAY
10 a.m.: Institute for Supply
Management releases its
manufacturing index for April.
10 a.m.: Commerce Department
releases construction spending
for March.
All day: Federal Reserve
policymakers begin two-day
meeting on interest rates.
All day: Automakers release
vehicle sales data for April.
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Koum’s exit marks
rare show of strife
within Facebook
WHATSAPP FROM A1
WhatsApp.”
Facebook, though, needs to
prove that its investment in
WhatsApp — its largest acquisition ever — was worth it.
“Part of Facebook’s success has
been to digest acquisitions, successfully monetize them and integrate them into their advertising
machine,” said Daniel Ives, chief
strategy officer for research firm
GBH Insights. “This was a massive culture clash.”
Koum’s exit is highly unusual at
Facebook. The inner circle of
management, as well as the board
of directors, has been fiercely loyal during the scandals that have
rocked the social media giant. In
addition, Koum is the sole founder of a company acquired by Facebook to serve on its board. Only
two other Facebook executives,
Zuckerberg and Chief Operating
Officer Sheryl Sandberg, are
members of the board.
Facebook declined to comment
on the reasons for Koum’s departure but didn’t dispute the accounts.
In his Facebook post, Koum
said he would take some time off
from technology to focus on other
pursuits, “such as collecting rare
air-cooled Porsches, working on
my cars and playing ultimate frisbee.”
Acton left the company in November. He has joined a chorus of
former executives critical of Facebook. Acton recently endorsed a
#DeleteFacebook social media
campaign that has gained force in
the wake of the controversy over
data privacy sparked by Cambridge Analytica, a political marketing firm tied to the Trump
campaign that had inappropriately obtained the private information of 87 million Facebook users.
Though the Cambridge Analytica revelations contributed to a
climate of broader frustration
with Facebook among WhatsApp
employees, Koum made his decision to leave before the scandal,
the people said.
WhatsApp, with 1.5 billion
monthly users, is the largest messaging service in the world. It is
most popular in countries such as
India, Egypt and Brazil, as well as
in Europe, where it is used for
phone calls and text messaging
with friends and businesses, as
well as news distribution and
group chats.
Koum and Acton, former coworkers at Yahoo, founded
WhatsApp in 2009. It promised
private communications for 99
cents a year. By 2014, the tiny
company had almost 500 million
users. It caught the attention of
Zuckerberg, who was looking to
expand the social network overseas. After a dinner at Zuckerberg’s house, Zuckerberg made an
offer for WhatsApp that turned
Acton and Koum into instant billionaires.
But even in the early days, there
were signs of a mismatch. WhatsApp had less than $20 million in
revenue at the time of the acquisition. Facebook was making billions of dollars by selling advertisers access to its users, on whom it
had collected large amounts of
information.
Koum and Acton were openly
disparaging of the targeted advertising model. In a WhatsApp blog
post in 2012, they wrote that “no
one wakes up excited to see more
advertising; no one goes to sleep
thinking about the ads they’ll see
tomorrow.” They described online
advertising as “a disruption to
aesthetics, an insult to your intelligence, and the interruption of
your train of thought.”
The WhatsApp co-founders
were also big believers in privacy.
They took pains to collect as little
data as possible from their users,
requiring only phone numbers
and putting them at odds with
data-hungry Facebook. At the
time of the acquisition, Koum and
Acton said Facebook had assured
them that WhatsApp could remain an independent service and
would not share its data with
DAVID RAMOS/GETTY IMAGES
WhatsApp chief executive Jan Koum, shown during a 2014 conference in Barcelona, announced Monday that he will leave the company.
Koum had clashed with Facebook, which acquired the messaging service in 2014, over data privacy and other issues.
Facebook.
How and if WhatsApp would
make money was left an open
question. “WhatsApp will remain
autonomous and operate independently,” the founders wrote in
a blog post announcing the acquisition. “And you can still count on
absolutely no ads interrupting
your communication.”
Eighteen months later, the
promise not to share data evaporated. Facebook pushed WhatsApp to change its terms of service
to give the social network access
to the phone numbers of WhatsApp users, along with analytics
such as what devices and operating systems people were using.
WhatsApp executives were
comfortable sharing some data
with Facebook to measure who
was using the service, according
to the people. But they opposed
using WhatsApp’s data to create a
user profile unified across Facebook’s multiple platforms, which
also include Instagram and Facebook Messenger, and that could
$49**
be used for ad-targeting or for
Facebook’s data-mining.
Acton and Koum acquiesced,
enabling Facebook to recommend
that users’ WhatsApp contacts become their Facebook friends and
making it possible for Facebook to
collect more data about those relationships. The changes also allowed advertisers to feed lists of
phone numbers into Facebook’s
advertising system, known as
Custom Audience, and find new
people to target with ads.
Last year, the European Commission, the European Union’s
regulatory authority, fined Facebook $122 million for making
“misleading” statements when
the E.U. approved the WhatsApp
takeover.
Conflicts soon arose over how
WhatsApp would make money.
Facebook scrapped the 99 cent
annual charge, and Koum and
Acton continued to oppose the
advertising model. The service
still has no ads, but WhatsApp has
embarked on experiments to
make money: In January, Facebook rolled out a tool, called
WhatsApp Business, to allow
businesses to create a profile and
send messages to their customers
on WhatsApp.
Another point of disagreement
was over WhatsApp’s encryption.
In 2016, WhatsApp added end-toend encryption, a security feature
that scrambles people’s messages
so that outsiders, including
WhatsApp’s owners, can’t read
“This was a massive culture clash.”
Daniel Ives, chief strategy officer for research firm GBH Insights,
referring to Facebook’s 2014 acquisition of messaging service WhatsApp
them. Facebook executives wanted to make it easier for businesses
to use its tools, and WhatsApp
executives believed that doing so
would require some weakening of
its encryption.
Ultimately, Koum was worn
down by the differences in approach, the people said. Other
WhatsApp employees are demoralized and plan to leave in November, when they are allowed to
exercise all their stock options
under the terms of the Facebook
deal, according to the people.
Acton donated $50 million of
his money to Signal, a rival messaging app that is geared toward
security and privacy. In a recent
blog post announcing his donation and role as the executive
chairman of the nonprofit Signal
Foundation, Acton said his goal
was to build “the most trusted
communications experience on
the planet.”
elizabeth.dwoskin@washpost.com
Julie Tate contributed to this report.
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TUESDAY, MAY 1 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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Market watchers describe a move ‘from benign to biting’
without the risk of losses that
stockholders face, stocks’ performance is down. Higher interest
rates will also push up corporate
borrowing costs and erode profits,
another negative for stocks. Already, investors in four of the past
five weeks pulled money from mutual funds investing in domestic
stocks and added to their bond
funds, according to the Investment Company Institute, an industry group.
The recent combination of falling stock prices and rising bond
yields troubled some financial
market veterans. “It raises the risk
of a deep and disruptive drop by
share prices. A good analogy?
1987,” said John Lonski, chief
economist for Moody’s Analytics,
referring to the stock market
crash of 1987. “This is not a favorable portent. It’s an ominous development.”
Borrowing costs for ordinary
Americans are on the way up, too.
To battle the financial crisis in
2008, the Fed pushed short-term
interest rates to near zero and left
them there for years. Easy money
helped consumers and businesses
afford new purchases and aided in
the healing of the economy.
Rising interest rates will inflate
borrowing costs for consumers
and companies alike, adding
$100 billion to annual debt-servicing costs, Rosenberg said. That is
money that consumers otherwise
could spend on houses, clothes,
ECONOMY FROM A1
buying and driving peak.
Overall, the economy is still
doing well today, and many economists don’t expect any major disruption this year. But the rise in
consumer prices and interest
rates — and the stagnating stock
market — are seen by many as
warning signs that this period of
easy growth could be ending.
“You’re moving from being benign to biting. It is a fundamental
shift from the world we’ve
known,” said economist Diane
Swonk of Grant Thornton. “I fear
we’re seeding a boom-bust cycle.”
That fear, experts say, explains
why the stock market has had
such a difficult year.
“The markets always lead the
economy,” said David Rosenberg,
chief economist and strategist at
Gluskin Sheff.
The transition to a less-forgiving era was underscored when the
yield on the 10-year Treasury note,
a borrowing benchmark, touched
3 percent, a level it hadn’t reached
since 2013. Investors say interest
rates will probably continue to
rise, especially with the Federal
Reserve poised to further tighten
monetary policy.
From its March 2009 low to its
peak in late January, the Dow
roughly quadrupled, making millions of Americans wealthier. But
now as bonds begin offering investors a better rate of return
JUSTIN LANE/EPA-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK
Investors in four of the past five weeks pulled money from mutual
funds investing in domestic stocks and added to their bond funds.
and cars or that businesses could
devote to new machinery.
But today’s rising borrowing
costs will hit an economy loaded
with debt, meaning that people
and businesses will have to spend
even more on interest payments.
Corporations outside the finance
industry at the end of last year
owed creditors more than
$49 trillion.
That debt burden has grown
since 2004 at a rate four times
faster than the economy, according to the Federal Reserve.
Despite progress in paying off
mortgage balances since the housing collapse, American households still owe more in debt than
they make in disposable income.
Credit card delinquency rates
have begun inching up.
Interest payments (not including mortgages) now take as big a
bite out of the typical American’s
income as in mid-2008, when the
crisis was gathering force, according to the Federal Reserve.
With interest rates headed
higher, some experts worry that
consumer borrowing no longer
will be able to power the economy.
“You still needed that growth
. . . to drive the meager expansion
that we’ve seen,” said Daniel Alpert, managing partner of Westwood Capital. “How much on the
household side was that debt be-
ing increased in order to make
ends meet, i.e. sustain existing
levels of spending?”
Americans already must pay
more for mortgages, though that
is not yet influencing home-buying. Average rates on a 30-year
fixed rate mortgage hit 4.5 percent
this week, up from about 4 percent at the beginning of the year.
That change would add about $88
to the monthly cost of a $300,000
mortgage, yet applications for
new loans held steady this week,
according to the Mortgage Bankers Association.
“As rates rise over the next couple of years, they will weigh on
housing demand,” said Alan Levenson, chief economist for T.
Rowe Price.
Rising consumer prices have
not been a significant problem for
years. That may be about to
change. On Friday, the Commerce
Department reported that prices,
excluding food and energy products, rose at a 2.5 percent annual
clip in the first three months of
2018.
Oil prices are nearing $70 a
barrel, up roughly 50 percent
since August, and Trump’s tariffs
on steel, aluminum and Chinese
goods will raise costs. The boost in
spending coming from the big tax
cut passed in December could further push up prices.
That, in turn, may lead the Fed
to more quickly move rates higher.
“The economy will run hotter
than it would have because of the
tax cuts and spending increases,”
said economist Michael Strain of
the American Enterprise Institute. “That will push the Fed to
increase interest rates a little faster than they otherwise would
have.”
After topping $4 per gallon in
2008, gas prices have remained
below $3 for more than three
years.
But they have been creeping
higher for several months. With
the nationwide average now at
$2.80, filling up will cost the average household an additional $190
this year, according to the U.S.
Energy Information Administration.
While financial conditions are
tightening, they remain comparatively easy. The Fed’s benchmark
interest rate, currently hovering
between 1.5 percent and 1.75 percent — would need to reach 3 percent before it begins slowing the
economy, William Dudley, president of the New York Federal Reserve Board, said in a recent
speech.
The Fed is expected to increase
short-term borrowing rates three
more times this year, in quarterof-a-percentage-point
increments. If it does, and continues
the trend into next year, rates will
reach the 3 percent level by mid2019, according to Capital Economics.
david.lynch@washpost.com
What a merger of T-Mobile and Sprint could mean for wireless customers
BY
B RIAN F UNG
be called T-Mobile, to collect revenue from one massive customer
base.
This expanded scale could
have key implications for consumers. The wireless industry is
racing to deploy a next-generation data technology called 5G.
Expect to hear a lot about 5G in
the coming weeks as this deal
moves forward.
Sprint and T-Mobile are officially seeking to merge. If the deal
is approved, the resulting company would be the nation’s secondbiggest wireless carrier after Verizon, controlling about 100 million customers. While the merger
could put the companies in a
stronger position to take on AT&T
and Verizon, it would also eliminate a competitor from the wireless industry. That might not sit
well with some policymakers,
who say U.S. businesses have become too concentrated in recent years. What could the merger mean for competition — and
your pocketbook? Here’s what to
expect.
What is 5G?
5G stands for “fifth generation,” and it refers to technology
that will enable smartphones and
other mobile devices to surf the
Internet at speeds comparable to
some of the fastest in-home Internet connections available. It can
also support other smart devices,
such as self-driving cars.
Sprint and T-Mobile say that
only together can they pour
enough resources into the project to have a world-class 5G network that is competitive with
those of AT&T and Verizon.
Why is the deal happening?
The argument from T-Mobile
and Sprint largely boils down to
scale. By combining, they say,
they will be in a better position
to take on the leaders, AT&T and
Verizon. The deal could allow
the new company, which would
How could the proposed deal
affect consumer prices?
its own right, offering deep discounts and promotions to lure
customers.
The reduction in competition
could lead to higher prices, said
Blair Levin, a policy adviser for
New Street Research and contributor to The Washington Post’s
Innovations blog.
“The general view on Wall
Street is that as a result of this
deal, there are likely to be job
cuts and prices are likely to rise,”
he said.
Whether prices will go up or
down will probably be a key
focus of regulators at the Justice
Department and the Federal
Communications Commission as
they decide whether to approve
the deal.
It’s too soon to tell. T-Mobile
chief executive John Legere said
Sunday that the merger would
lead to lower prices for Sprint
and T-Mobile customers. He
claimed that even customers of
other providers, such as AT&T,
Verizon and Comcast, could see
price cuts as those companies
respond to the business moves of
the new company.
That
argument
reflects
T-Mobile’s reputation for undercutting the competition. The selfstyled “Un-carrier” has transformed how millions of Americans get their wireless service,
from doing away with long-term
contracts that lock customers in
with a provider to offering unlimited data plans. Many of these
practices prompted T-Mobile’s
larger rivals to respond with similar offerings as T-Mobile siphoned off chunks of their customer base.
But the proposed deal eliminates a provider that has been an
aggressive competitor on price in
What will happen to Sprint
and T-Mobile subscribers?
For now, a new roaming agreement announced Sunday will allow Sprint customers to use
T-Mobile’s network in places
where Sprint’s service is not available, giving them greater access
to coverage. The two companies
will otherwise operate independently until the deal receives regulatory approval.
If regulators bless the merger,
then Sprint customers will be
gradually migrated to T-Mobile’s
network — a process that could
take up to three years, the companies say. About half of Sprint’s
customer base, or about 20 million users, won’t notice a thing;
that’s because their phones already support both networks, executives said Sunday.
That view has persisted, particularly with an attempt by Sprint to
buy T-Mobile in 2014.
Since then, the regulators’ theory has been proved correct,
some analysts say. T-Mobile went
on to launch its “Un-carrier” campaign to reshape the wireless
industry, and that has helped
consumers. That experience has
underscored a belief that four
national wireless providers can
sustain a healthy level of competition in the industry.
Meanwhile, other analysts say
regulators will have come a long
way if they decide only three
national providers are necessary.
“Back when I started as an
antitrust lawyer, people worried
about mergers that reduced the
number of competitors in a market from six to five,” said Jeffrey
Blumenfeld, a partner at Lowenstein Sandler in Washington.
“That seems sort of quaint now.”
Is there anything else we
could expect?
T-Mobile and Sprint also claim
that the deal will lead to “thousands” of new hires in construction, retail and customer service.
Why ‘four carriers’ has been a
magic number for the government
In 2011, AT&T tried to make its
own bid for T-Mobile. But regulators moved to block the deal,
saying that the elimination of a
rival would harm competition.
brian.fung@washpost.com
Tony Romm contributed to this report.
THE MARKETS
6 Monitor your investments at washingtonpost.com/markets
Data and graphics by
Daily Stock Market Performance
Index
Dow Jones Industrial Average
26,750
Close
YTD
% Chg
24,163.15
–0.6
–2.2
25,500
24,250
23,000
21,750
20,500
Nasdaq Composite Index
7600
7066.27
–0.8
+2.4
Daily
% Chg
Industry Group
Leisure Equipment & Prod
Computers & Peripherals
Water Utilities
Hotels Restaurants & Leis
IT Services
Household Durables
Automobiles
Biotechnology
Distributors
Diversified Telecomm
0
–3.0%
+3.0%
2.03
1.36
1.04
0.92
0.16
–2.15
–2.26
–2.30
–2.50
–2.66
6800
6400
6000
S&P 500 Index
2648.05
–0.8
–1.0
2900
2790
2680
2570
2460
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D
J
F
M
A
Americas
Brazil (Bovespa)
Canada (S&P/TSX Comp.)
Mexico (Bolsa)
Europe
Eurozone (DJ Stoxx 600)
France (CAC 40)
Germany (DAX)
U.K. (FTSE 100)
Asia Pacific
Australia (ASX 200)
China (CSI 300)
Hong Kong (Hang Seng)
Japan (Nikkei)
Close
Daily
% Chg
86,115.50
15,607.88
48,320.82
–0.4
–0.4
0.1
385.32
5520.50
12,612.11
7509.30
0.2
0.7
0.2
0.1
5982.73
3756.88
30,808.45
22,467.87
0.5
0.0
1.7
0.7
YTD % Chg
–15%
0%
+15%
3M Co
AmExp
Apple Inc
Boeing
Caterpillar
Chevron Corp
Cisco Systems
Coca-Cola
DowDuPont Inc
Exxon Mobil
GE
GoldmnSchs
Home Depot
IBM
Intel Corp
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
194.39
98.75
165.26
333.56
144.36
125.11
44.29
43.21
63.24
77.75
14.07
238.33
184.80
144.96
51.62
–0.9
–0.9
1.8
–2.1
–0.2
–1.2
–0.9
–0.2
–1.7
–0.1
–2.2
–0.6
–0.9
–1.0
–2.1
–17.4
–0.6
–2.3
13.1
–8.4
–0.1
15.6
–5.8
–11.2
–7.0
–19.4
–6.4
–2.5
–5.5
11.8
Company
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
Microsoft
Nike
P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
United Tech
UnitedHealth
Verizon
Visa Inc
WalMart
Walt Disney
126.49
108.78
167.44
58.87
93.52
68.39
72.34
36.61
131.60
120.15
236.40
49.35
126.88
88.46
100.33
–1.4
–0.6
5.8
–1.0
–2.4
–1.7
–0.6
–1.1
–1.2
–1.9
–1.6
–4.3
0.7
1.3
1.1
–9.5
1.7
–2.7
4.6
9.3
9.3
–21.3
1.1
–3.0
–5.8
7.2
–6.8
11.3
–10.4
–6.7
Cross Currency Rates
US $
US $ per
EU € per
EU €
Japan ¥
Britain £
Brazil R$
Canada $
1.2080
0.0091
1.3767
0.2854
0.7792
0.0535
0.0076
1.1397
0.2363
0.6451
0.0443
150.4720
31.1886
85.1660
5.8439
0.2073
0.5660
0.0389
0.8278
Japan ¥ per 109.3000
132.0200
Britain £ per
0.7264
0.8773
0.0066
Brazil R$ per
3.5036
4.2326
0.0320
4.8233
Canada $ per
1.2834
1.5502
0.0117
1.7668
0.3663
Mexico $ per
18.6908
22.5770
0.1710
25.7329
5.3350
Mexico $
2.7301
0.1875
0.0687
14.5648
Index
Close
DJ Total Stock Market Index 27,452.69
Russell 2000
1541.88
Post-Bloomberg DC Area Index 539.91
CBOE Volatility (VIX)
15.93
Consumer Rates
Daily % Chg
–0.8
–0.9
–0.8
3.4
YTD % Chg
–0.8
0.4
–0.7
44.3
Daily
% Chg
$3.0740
$4.0075
$68.57
$1,319.20
$2.76
+0.1
+0.6
+0.7
–0.3
–0.3
Orange Juice
Silver
Soybeans
Sugar
Wheat
Exchange-Traded (Ticker)
Coffee (COFF.L)
Copper (COPA.L)
Corn (CORN.L)
Cotton (COTN.L)
Crude Oil (CRUD.L)
Gasoline (UGAS.L)
Gold (BULL.L)
Natural Gas (NGAS.L)
Silver (SLVR.L)
Daily
% Chg
Close
Daily
% Chg
$1.5570
$16.40
$10.4850
$0.1175
$5.1050
+1.2
–0.6
–0.7
+2.0
+2.4
day
$900
$1000
month
$1100
0.6
0.1
1.0
–0.6
0.3
0.2
–0.6
–1.3
–1.2
Gainers
Financial Engines
Andeavor
DCT Industrial
Kemper Corp
CARBO Ceramics
Infinity Property
McDonald's Corp
NY Times
FTI Consulting
MiMedx Group Inc
Cloud Peak Energy
Insperity Inc
ILG Inc
US Steel
Mattel Inc
Chuy's Holdings Inc
Ensco PLC
National Instr
Knowles Corp
DSP Group Inc
Daily
Close % Chg
$44.65
$138.32
$65.57
$67.50
$8.84
$132.00
$167.44
$23.45
$58.40
$8.21
$3.19
$80.25
$34.13
$33.83
$14.80
$28.60
$5.65
$40.89
$12.80
$11.95
31.5
13.0
11.6
10.2
9.4
6.4
5.8
5.6
5.1
5.0
4.9
4.9
4.5
4.5
4.4
4.0
3.7
3.7
3.6
3.5
Losers
Close
Arconic Inc
$17.81
Fred's Inc
$2.40
First Solar Inc
$70.91
CooperTire & Rubber
$24.45
MarriottVacationsWw $122.61
Marathon Petroleum
$74.91
JC Penney
$2.91
Piper Jaffray
$70.05
Atla Tele-Network
$53.00
Mercury General
$45.73
Monotype Imaging
$22.15
United Stationers
$7.44
MarineMax Inc
$21.60
Rogers Corp
$106.70
Pitney Bowes Inc
$10.22
Big 5 Sprtg Goods
$8.40
Washington Prime
$6.47
Saul Centers Inc
$47.85
AppliedOptoelctrncs
$31.96
Teleph & Data Sys
$27.33
Daily
% Chg
–20.6
–18.0
–9.0
–8.9
–8.8
–8.0
–7.6
–7.2
–7.1
–7.0
–6.7
–6.5
–6.3
–5.7
–5.7
–5.6
–5.5
–5.5
–5.3
–5.3
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Interest Rates
Other Measures
Close
Gainers and Losers from the S&P 1500 Index
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
Company
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
7200
2350
Commodities
S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot
Daily
% Chg
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
0.41
0.55
0.80
1.67
3.59
6.07
4.75%
4.43%
Bank Prime
30-Year fixed mortgage
1.75%
Federal Funds
3.85%
2.36%
LIBOR 3-Month
3.92%
10-year note
Yield: 2.95
2-year note
Yield: 2.49
5-year note
Yield: 2.79
6-month bill
Yield: 2.01
15-Year fixed mortgage
1-Year ARM
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
A14
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
MAY 1 , 2018
PowerPost
INTELLIGENCE FOR LEADERS WASHINGTONPOST.COM/POWERPOST
A new tack on opioid crisis: Supervised centers for drug use
Several major
The
cities are trying to
Health 202 open “safe
injection sites” for
drug users — even
though they are
technically illegal.
With recent evidence that
these sites can save lives and
money, cities including San
Francisco, Seattle and
Philadelphia are considering
opening public health facilities
where people who have acquired
illegal drugs can inject them
under the supervision of trained
health-care providers.
They would be the first U.S.
cities to adopt such an approach
to combat the sweeping opioid
epidemic, which has gained
attention from the White House,
Congress and policymakers
throughout the country.
“While overdose deaths aren’t
new, the scale of them is new . . .
and that’s leading a lot of
communities to look for different
solutions, to look for something
new that hasn’t been tried,”
said Laura Thomas, deputy
California state director for the
Drug Policy Alliance.
San Francisco’s Department of
Public Health says it expects to
open its first sites this summer,
but it is still working out the legal
issues and location details. In
King County in Washington,
which includes Seattle, a task
force recommended opening
sites as part of a 2016 list of
recommendations for combating
addiction, and the county’s Board
of Health unanimously voted last
year to endorse opening two
sites.
In Philadelphia, city officials
have said they want the private
sector to develop such a facility.
They have hosted community
forums to seek public feedback
on the plans.
Outside the United States,
these sites are gaining traction as
a way to combat drug abuse.
There are about 100 sanctioned
sites that have opened in 11
countries, according to one
expert, mostly in Europe as well
PAULINA
FIROZI
SALWAN GEORGES/THE WASHINGTON POST
At a “safe injection site,” trained health-care workers could help if they see signs of an overdose in drug users.
as in Australia and Canada.
The facilities don’t provide
illicit drugs, but they offer a
space for people to use drugs
with sterile instruments and
under supervision. Trained
health-care workers are also
available to administer opioid
antidotes if users exhibit signs of
an overdose and can offer
information about long-term
treatment.
In the United States, however,
the federal government is against
the opening of these facilities.
And concerns about abuse of the
law and community pushback in
some cities has stalled their
creation.
Drug Enforcement
Administration spokesman
Melvin Patterson said the
facilities violate the federal
Controlled Substances Act and
are “subject to being prosecuted.”
Patrick Trainor, a special agent
with the DEA in Philadelphia,
said these facilities are a
nonstarter. “I don’t think it
should come as a real surprise,
but no, coming from the DEA
perspective, we’re not in favor or
don’t support them,” he said.
But experts who have been
observing and studying injection
sites say they see a lot of
positives to supervised drug use.
Alex Kral, an epidemiologist
for the nonprofit research group
RTI International, said the
sites can decrease drug users’ risk
of infections from HIV and
hepatitis, reduce overdose
fatalities and connect users with
resources such as drug treatment
programs or social services. They
can also reduce the number of
people injecting in public and
ensure needles are properly
disposed of, he said.
What’s more, he said, “we don’t
see a lot of negative aspects” to
the sites. “It’s surprising. As a
researcher, I’m interested in both
the positive and the negative.
And I haven’t seen a lot or heard
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of a lot of negative components.”
Kral’s research has found
supervised injection facilities
would save money, too. In a study
that looked at the cost
effectiveness of opening a facility
in San Francisco, he found a
single 13-booth facility would
lead to $3.5 million in net annual
savings for the city.
Henry L. Dorkin, president of
the Massachusetts Medical
Society, said he was initially
skeptical about supporting a
facility that enables drug use but
changed his mind after looking at
the research.
“People already had these
drugs, and they were already
going to inject them,” he said.
“The only thing that’s being
facilitated is saving their lives,
and, at the same time, making
available to them rehabilitation
facilities and people who
wouldn’t be available down that
proverbial dark alley where they
would normally shoot up.”
Thomas, from the Drug Policy
Alliance, argued drug users
“don’t like having to inject in
public; that’s very much a last
resort for people.”
She continued, “If we could
have these programs, it would
give people a little bit of safety
and belonging and respect,
which is often what people need
in order to stabilize their lives
and make changes in their lives.”
But state and local lawmakers
are divided. Some worry law
enforcement would come after
those involved with the sites. And
in some cities, residents have
expressed fears that a site might
cause trouble in their
neighborhood.
“There’s still a lot of stigma,
there’s still a lot of questions
about legality of it. And I think
that’s one of the things people are
worried about — potential
liability,” Kral said.
Thomas pointed to the success
of similar injection facilities in
other countries. There have been
no overdose deaths at Vancouver,
B.C.’s Insite, which became the
first such program in North
America when it opened in
2003. Research from the
Massachusetts Medical
Society also found a 35 percent
reduction in overdose deaths in
areas surrounding the facility
and estimated that 6,440
overdose deaths have been
averted since its opening.
“When you look at the
thousands of people who are
dying across the U.S. and think,
well, we have this intervention
that could potentially eliminate
those deaths, why aren’t we
trying it?” Thomas said.
paulina.firozi@washpost.com
Airing of discord feeds perception that
Democrats are their own worst enemy
The Democratic
Congressional
Campaign
Committee has
DAVID
broken its own
WEIGEL
fundraising
records, stacked
more cash than its Republican
rival and expanded its 2018 target
map as Republican incumbents
filed for retirement.
But there is nothing it can do
about the Intercept. The fouryear-old website, which was
launched by eBay founder Pierre
Omidyar with articles based on
Edward Snowden’s National
Security Agency document haul,
has become a weekly Democratic
nightmare.
The website’s scoops on intraDemocratic arguments started
with a sprawling and buzzy
January article on how the DCCC
was “throwing its weight behind
candidates who are out of step
with the national mood.”
The publication’s exposure of
the family feud is playing into a
narrative that Democrats’ biggest
risk to their goal of capturing the
House majority in this year’s
midterm elections — with
President Trump hanging around
the GOP’s neck — is themselves.
That is, the progressive antiTrump energy driving the party is
leading to a plethora of messy
Democratic primaries and some
serious differences over how to
approach them.
Just last week, the Intercept
reported on a secret recording of
Rep. Steny Hoyer (Md.), the
House minority whip, urging a
progressive primary candidate to
drop out in Colorado; a voice mail
purportedly from a DCCC-backed
candidate threatening to go
negative against another
Democrat in a top-tier California
race; and Facebook musings
about abortion from a candidate
the DCCC recruited in a race
where a liberal contender had
already locked up local support.
Those reports have landed like
grenades in races that might
otherwise have escaped national
attention. House Minority Leader
Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) was asked
about the Hoyer tape at her
weekly news conference; the
candidate in the voice mail
controversy has threatened to
sue.
The DCCC no longer hides its
contempt about this coverage.
“This is the most baseless and
embarrassing request that I’ve
received from the Intercept yet,
and that says a lot,” the DCCC
communications director
told reporters last week.
Those requests will keep
coming. The Intercept’s punchy
focus on Democratic politics is in
large part the work of D.C. bureau
chief Ryan Grim, who spent years
running HuffPost’s political team.
The
Daily 202
In an email, Grim said that the
Intercept’s coverage “was fueled
by the insight that the Bernie/
Hillary divide exists on Twitter
and in Washington but not in the
real world,” and that the DCCC
was barreling into primaries
where all the local party’s factions
had already gotten behind a
candidate. Grim was referring to
the endless ink spilled by
Washington journalists about the
2016 primary rivalry between
Hillary Clinton — then the
establishment candidate — and
Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), who
waged a surprisingly strong
primary challenge from the left.
That thought led to January’s
9,000-word article, a survey of
several races rumbled by the
same dynamic in which the
DCCC has gotten behind
candidates who sometimes
weren’t supported by local
activists. In February, when the
DCCC published opposition
research on Laura Moser, a
congressional candidate in Texas,
it backfired and emboldened
more candidates to take their
fights public.
“The thinking was that that
would help explain to our
audience why we were doing
short items about individual
races here and there,” Grim said.
“We didn’t realize how much of a
nerve it would strike.
Immediately, other campaigns
started reaching out saying, ‘Hey,
that’s happening here, too!’ And
with so many races happening,
the chances of some really good
stories emerging go way up.”
In 2006, the last time
Democrats were in a strong
position to win back the House,
they faced a similar problem with
party activists.
The DCCC, then led by Rahm
Emanuel, found that it could
mollify critics with a little bit of
access. In “The Thumpin’, ” his
history of Emanuel’s tenure at the
DCCC, reporter Naftali Bendavid
wrote that Emanuel held
monthly, exclusive calls for liberal
bloggers, and that even the
harshest online critics “were for
the most part painstakingly
polite” after being let in.
The Intercept is not so easily
swayed. It’s not an access
publication — it gathers
information that the party
doesn’t like, then swoops in for
the confrontation. Just as
important, it has a view of history
that it repeats in nearly every
article.
In Washington’s popular
memory, Emanuel was a whiz
who helped the party win again
by recruiting centrist candidates
in swing seats. In the Intercept’s
own view, shared widely on the
left, Emanuel’s version of the
party was unsustainable and
unpopular, suppressing more
left-wing candidates whose
agendas might have excited
voters in favor of good-on-paper
candidates who lost.
The Intercept’s Hoyer article
included an important digression
about how the second-ranking
Democrat in the House “regularly
invites corporate lobbyists for
weekly lunches” and raised
“corporate cash” for the party in
2006.
Republican campaigns
frequently share articles from the
Intercept. But their tone is often
of reporters trying to save
Democrats from themselves. One
of the site’s DCCC articles
published internal polling
warning candidates to “offer
reasonable solutions” on health
care and presented two pages of
likely attacks on anyone who
endorsed “Medicare for All,” even
though public polling has found
more support for the idea.
Another scoop exposed a
wealthy Michigan candidate who
was running as a “progressive” for
having talked about running as a
Republican — an article that
helped that state’s Democrats
blunt his momentum.
But the totality of the
Intercept’s coverage fits into a
problematic story line for
Democrats — one where the
committee that is supposed to
help them flip the House can’t be
trusted. In just five weeks,
Democrats in a half-dozen
California primaries will face off.
Thanks to the state’s primary
system, in which the top two
candidates advance to the general
election regardless of party, there
is a chance that Democrats crowd
one another out and create
Republican-vs.-Republican races
in November.
The DCCC has planned to stop
that with endorsements — but the
weekly coverage of angry
candidates has complicated its
ability to act.
And that has made some
Democrats nervous. Andy
Janowicz, a candidate who quit
one California race to reduce the
risk of an all-Republican general
election, wrote on Facebook that
the Intercept was sowing discord
and making it hard for Democrats
to unite behind a candidate.
“I have very little love for the
DCCC myself,” Janowicz wrote.
“Trust me on that. But I’m not
willing to take our primary to
prove a point.”
The Intercept’s coverage of
the California contests laid out
the publication's own philosophy.
“Party operatives,” wrote Grim
and David Dayen, were worried
about losing face. “If a candidate
loses an election, that’s the
candidate’s fault. If there are no
candidates on the ballot, that’s
the party’s fault.”
david.weigel@washpost.com
TUESDAY, MAY 1 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
RE
A15
K
TUESDAY Opinion
The chilling ‘real-world’
punishment for abortion
BY
I LYSE H OGUE
C
onservative writer Kevin D.
Williamson says that, past
comments to the contrary notwithstanding, he doesn’t think
women should be hanged for having
abortions. But he still wants them to be
punished somehow. So really we’re just
negotiating the terms.
Williamson made headlines in April
for being hired and, after his views
touched off a firestorm online, he was
very quickly fired by the Atlantic
magazine. Now he aims to make clear
what he says the so-called Twitter mob
— actually, women and men across the
country with real concern about his
beliefs — wasn’t interested in knowing: What Williamson truly thinks the
punishment for abortion should be.
“Only real-world experience will show
what is effective, and our preference
should be for the least-invasive effective settlement,” he writes in a Post
op-ed. I suppose that’s meant to be
reassuring.
For me and millions of women who,
like me, have had abortions, however,
Williamson’s words are deeply chilling, even when watered down. And
this is not because of where they might
lead, though that is cause for concern,
too, but because of what they say about
reality — about where we already are.
In fact, women are now punished
every day for seeking reproductive
health care in this country. It’s getting
hard to count all of the various
legislative measures in place, or being
contemplated, to make accessing abortion services difficult, costly and
humiliating.
Depending on where you live, you
might be subjected to medically disproved lies about the psychological
and physical consequences of your
decision to have an abortion, or have
to endure a state-mandated time-out
before you can act on your decision.
You may be forced to undergo an
invasive ultrasound and to disclose
your reasons for terminating your
pregnancy to strangers. If you are a
rape survivor, you may be made to
experience further trauma through
needless delay. When you visit a clinic
for care, you may be harassed and
threatened with violence. If you continue to speak openly about your
decision, expect this punishment to
become part of your life.
There are financial penalties, too.
Many health-care insurance companies won’t cover the procedure. Because of the paucity of clinics in
various places, you might be required
to pay for travel, to pay to stay
overnight, to lose wages or even your
job and, since most women seeking
abortions are already mothers trying
to care for the families they have, to
pay for child care.
“I differ from most pro-lifers in that I
am willing to extend criminal sanctions to women who procure abortions,” Williamson writes. He may
consider himself to be an outlier on
criminal penalties, but culturally, and
legislatively, Williamson has won the
punishment argument: No wonder as a
candidate, Donald Trump was so quick
to say as much in a well-publicized
interview. As a neophyte to the politics
of the organized anti-choice movement, Trump was merely saying out
loud what is easily observed.
And about that “hanging” tweet:
Williamson may say he didn’t mean it,
but for some it’s not so outlandish. In
March, 20 Ohio legislators introduced
a bill that would punish women with
life in prison, or potentially even the
death penalty, for choosing abortion.
Last month, a Republican candidate
for lieutenant governor in Idaho suggested, before backtracking, that women should receive the death penalty for
abortion. Further, outside of the law,
we know that deranged individuals
have taken matters into their own
hands. After speaking of my own
abortion from the stage of the 2016
Democratic National Convention, my
social media feed was so full of vile
threats and grotesque Photoshopped
images of myself that I advised close
family members not to look for awhile.
I sympathize with Williamson; getting fired must be hard. But you know
what’s terrible? Having to worry about
whether someone harassing you is
unhinged enough to follow through on
tracking you or your family down in
real life. Whether meant seriously or
not, any suggestion that women
should be hanged is a form of public
shaming that fosters humiliation and
plants ideas. As women, we already
live the experience that Williamson
advocates.
While Williamson claims to recognize that the interests of women are
core to his concerns, he shows a
disregard for our humanity in his
arguments. Conversations about punishing women for seeking reproductive health care — especially conversations that fail to even notice the extent
to which we are already being punished — speak volumes about his truth.
The writer is president of NARAL
Pro-Choice America.
RICHARD COHEN
Trumpism will carry on
T
he Economist, a weekly news
magazine of British pedigree,
devoted a recent cover to an obituary. The stiff in question is the
GOP, once the party of Abraham Lincoln
and Teddy Roosevelt but now decidedly
that of Donald Trump. He has taken it
over. He demands personal loyalty, refuses to abide dissent and rules by whim.
For the once Grand Old Party, its mascot
is no longer the elephant but the chicken,
and its parade march is the grovel. Watch
most Republicans do it.
President Trump’s way of governing
and his almost absolute lack of political
principles is often referred to as “Trumpism.” This is a dandy term, because it
moves us past the temptation to say
“fascism” — the subject of countless articles and books, including two important
ones. The respected Dutch public intellectual Rob Riemen calls his book “To
Fight Against This Age: On Fascism and
Humanism”, while Madeleine Albright,
as befits her admirably direct style,
comes right out and says it: “Fascism: A
Warning”.
But to Americans the term fascism is
off-putting. It comes freighted with all
sorts of baggage that does not describe
Trump. Foremost, he is not an antiSemite. Jew-hatred was the sine qua non
of the most prominent fascist movements, particularly Germany’s, where
the murder of Jews was of the highest
priority. Italy, where the term fascism
originated, followed suit.
Trump has an authoritarian bent, but
as his Jewish friends can attest and the
conversion of his daughter to Judaism
proves, he lacks fascism’s most recognizable feature. Michael Cohen, I dare say,
would not take a bullet for a Jew-hater.
So the term “Trumpism” works best
because it describes something uniquely
American. It’s true that nations all over
the world have moved to the authoritarian right, but China, Russia, Poland, Hungary and others are returning to their
histories. These nations were never democracies for very long. The United
States is different. The closest thing we
previously had to Trump was Huey Long,
the 1930s-era governor and then senator
from Louisiana. He had the makings of a
dictator, but he was killed before he
could mount a presidential campaign.
Long, to his credit, actually had a program.
Trumpism has no such program. He
sometimes mentions jobs, but that’s just
a talking point. His most consistent reference points are his own grudges. For all
his wealth, Trump is a bundle of insecurities and resentments. In that way, he
validates similar feelings in others. If
they loathe the establishment, so does
he. If they loathe foreign aid, so does he.
If they misunderstand trade agreements, so does he. If they fret over an
America that is less white and more
tolerant of homosexuality and immigrants, then so does he. If they recoil
from a news media that talks the PC
language they abhor, so does he. They are
him. He is them. That’s the program.
If Trumpism needs an emblem, I suggest a bust of Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.). He
was once renowned as a congressional
iconoclast, a team player for his own
team only, and widely disliked as a result.
During the presidential primaries, Cruz
hit his stride, denouncing Trump as an
“utterly immoral” “pathological liar,” “serial philanderer” and “sniveling coward.”
Trump, of course, responded in kind,
even suggesting that Cruz’s father was
somehow linked to John F. Kennedy’s
assassination.
No matter. In a recent issue of Time
magazine, Cruz revealed his new-found
admiration for Trump. His joy at the
Trump administration could hardly be
contained. The article is a model of “sniveling” political cowardice.
Trumpism did not come out of nowhere. The GOP has long reviled the
so-called mainstream media. Trumpism
is Sarah Palinism updated. It is the GOP’s
acceptance of white racism — the reason
segregationist Strom Thurmond left the
Democratic Party — and is an extreme
version of Reaganism and his dictum
that “government is not the solution to
our problem; government is the problem.” In a way Ronald Reagan did not
intend, that is certainly the case now.
Does Trumpism have a future beyond
Trump himself? Maybe. The woods are
thick with Trumps-in-waiting, but none
so far have his celebrity mojo. More
likely, America’s political immune system will kick in and install a more conventional government. But Trump —
with his tweets, his vulgarity, his appeal
to bigotry, his insults, his carefree ignorance and his ability to maintain himself
as an addictive spectacle — has changed
things forever. Trump is where the end
begins. He will be gone, but Trumpism
will remain.
cohenr@washpost.com
The census
threatens
people of color
BY
B RADFORD M . B ERRY
M
RAHMAT GUL/ASSOCIATED PRESS
The body of Agence France-Presse chief photographer Shah Marai is buried in
Guldara, Afghanistan, on Monday. Marai was killed in a suicide bombing.
DANA MILBANK WASHINGTON SKETCH
Next time, journalists,
cancel the comedians
H
ow do we square these two
scenes from the weekend?
On Saturday night, Washington journalists hobnobbed with
politicians and celebrities at the blacktie White House Correspondents’ Association dinner — and then spent Sunday
arguing about whether comedian Michelle Wolf was too harsh toward President Trump, who uses his presidential
pulpit to mock the journalists.
Late Sunday night, Washington time,
nine journalists in Kabul were among at
least 29 people killed in suicide bombing attacks. That brings to 24 the number of journalists killed worldwide so far
this year, following 46 last year — a year
that also saw a record high of 262 journalists jailed, according to the Committee to Protect Journalists.
This ugly juxtaposition ought to
shame Washington media. It isn’t just
about the dinner, though that spectacle
needs to be replaced with something appropriate for this grim time in our profession. What’s needed is a change in the
way we think of ourselves as journalists.
Journalists are, with good reason, resistant to the role of advocate. But at a
time when Trump is leading a successful
movement to discredit the free press at
home, advocating the First Amendment
isn’t a conflict of interest. And at a time
when the Trump administration is helping autocrats undermine journalists
around the world, campaigning for our
jailed and murdered brethren doesn’t
compromise our journalistic independence.
On May 3 of last year — World Press
Freedom Day — the U.S. secretary of
state, Rex Tillerson, gave a speech announcing that freedom and human
rights may be “our values” but they are
“not our policies.” He continued: “If we
condition too heavily that others must
adopt this value . . . it really creates obstacles to our ability to advance our national security interests, our economic
interests.” (Just last week, Trump described North Korea’s Kim Jong Un,
leader of the most repressive regime on
Earth, as “open” and “honorable.”)
As the president attacks the press as
the “fake news media” and the “enemy
of the American people,” so far this year,
two journalists in the United States have
been arrested, eight have been attacked
and nine have received subpoenas. The
Trump administration has charged two
people for leaking under the 1917 Espionage Act.
As U.S. officials have stopped protesting the abuse of journalists
abroad, strongmen around the world
have accelerated a crackdown on journalists as “terrorists.” Last year, six
countries imprisoned journalists for
promulgating “fake news,” compared
with only two countries in 2016, the
CPJ reports. Trump has had friendly
words for the leaders of Turkey, China
and Egypt — the world’s top three jailers of journalists.
A report last week by Reporters Without Borders outlines the “growing animosity towards journalists” worldwide:
the president of the Philippines saying
journalists “are not exempted from assassination,” the president of the Czech
Republic attending a news conference
with a fake Kalashnikov inscribed “for
journalists,” Slovakia’s prime minister
calling journalists “filthy anti-Slovak
prostitutes.” As murders of journalists
predictably swell, the killers go free in
nine out of 10 cases.
Against this gruesome backdrop, the
White House Correspondents’ Association recognizes its chummy dinner is an
anachronism. My friend Margaret Talev,
the association’s president, used her
speech on Saturday to mention Austin
Tice, an American journalist held in Syria. Olivier Knox, the incoming president,
has said he wants to make the dinner
“boring.”
How about better than boring? Move
the dinner back a week, to honor World
Press Freedom Day, and cancel the comedians. Instead, read the names of
journalists killed doing their jobs over
the year; people such as Daphne
Caruana Galizia, who reported on government corruption in Malta, killed on
Oct. 16, when the car she was driving exploded; and Miroslava Breach Velducea,
who reported on politics and crime in
Mexico, shot eight times and killed on
March 23, 2017, when leaving her home
with one of her children. Also, read the
names of some jailed journalists and
their time behind bars: Turkey’s Zehra
Dogan, 323 days; Egypt’s Alaa
Abdelfattah, 1,282 days; China’s Ding
Lingjie, 221 days; Kyrgyzstan’s Azimjon
Askarov, 2,877 days; Congo’s Ghys
Fortuné Dombé Bemba, 475 days.
Media companies and personalities,
instead of hosting glitzy parties, would
make contributions to and solicit funds
for groups that protect the free press.
And they would pledge to devote more
air time and column inches to exposing
abuses of press freedoms at home and
abroad. The Post did this, successfully,
during my colleague Jason Rezaian’s imprisonment in Iran. We should all
pledge to be unabashed advocates: to
shine light on the journalists languishing in prisons, the unsolved murders of
journalists and the erosion of press freedom at home.
Maybe Trump would boycott and ridicule such an event. Fine. It will be clear
to everyone exactly where he stands —
and where we do.
Twitter: @Milbank
ALEXANDRA PETRI
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/blogs/compost
Some government-approved
jokes for next year’s dinner
People are saying that White House Correspondents’ Association dinner headliner
Michelle Wolf went too far with her critiques
of the media and the Trump administration,
especially those who were in the room. To
avoid such unpleasantness in the future,
here is a list of approved jokes ready for next
year’s celebration.
Oh wow, when has there ever been a
gathering like this? (This is a rhetorical
question; anyone who yells “slightly before
the French Revolution” will be removed.)
They say that the Trump administration
has eroded many of the cherished norms of
democracy. But I saw Macdonald and Ornstein the other day, and they both looked
fine! Norm Macdonald and Norm Ornstein.
One is a comedian, and the other is a
resident scholar at the American Enterprise
Institute! They’re named Norm, and they
both look fine. There has been no erosion of
America’s cherished Norms. All right!
My wife!
You know why liberals are so worried
about climate change? Because if it got any
warmer, those snowflakes would melt! All
right! We can all laugh together here!
I won’t accuse anyone of constantly lying.
It might sound like I was calling them
unattractive, and we have agreed that second place is where the line is!
What is the president’s least favorite
vegetable? The leek!
Ha ha, fake news! A term that is now
mainstream, that we use as a joke! We can
all laugh together about how the president
uses this term to undermine the institution
of the free press!
And if the president is undermining the
free press, it is just because he loves the
mining industry, and he loves America’s
miners! There is a Roy Moore joke to be
made here, but I will not make it because I
am upholding decorum and civility!
What’s the difference between a CNN
panel and a hydra? One is a many-headed
monster that doesn’t get excited whenever
Donald Trump says something!
Look at everyone’s charm and deportment. Deportment is different than deportation, something I will not allude to this
evening because we’re all laughing together
and getting along.
What’s the difference between the institution of the free press and the GOP tax-reform
plan? One of them is good for America!
Something in that joke for everyone, ha ha!
I will leave the harsh, personal attacks
where they belong: in the mouth of the
president of the United States!
illions of Americans are
rightly outraged by the
Trump administration’s recent decision to include a
citizenship question in the 2020 Census
— which, if allowed to stand, will surely
reduce participation in the census by
immigrant communities. But the risk
facing the 2020 Census, and the stakes
for communities of color, are much
greater than the citizenship question
alone.
With fewer than two years to go before the count, the U.S. Census Bureau is
alarmingly understaffed, underfunded
and underprepared for its constitutionally mandated population survey. That’s
why the NAACP is suing the federal
government to demand that it immediately step up its preparations, especially
with respect to communities of color.
Our case rests on a simple premise:
An inaccurate and racially biased census
does not meet constitutional requirements. Unless a court intervenes, the
census will become yet another tool of
voter suppression against communities
of color — the same communities that
are often targeted by state legislatures
determined to depress African American and Latino voter participation.
Last year, the NAACP engaged the
Rule of Law Clinic at Yale Law School on
strategies to ensure the integrity of the
census. We quickly realized the hard
road ahead, given that the Census Bureau was severely underfunded and understaffed during critical stages of preparations. Indeed, the amount allocated
for census operations in President
Trump’s proposed fiscal 2018 budget was
so inadequate that Congress added billions more to the bureau’s coffers in the
budget deal that was passed in March.
Although that appropriation is welcome, it does not necessarily extend
beyond September of this year. Trump
has asked Congress to give the bureau
$400 million less for fiscal 2019 than it
received in fiscal 2009.
Uncertainty around the budget has
already had a negative impact on census
preparations. The bureau has severely
reduced its footprint in the field and has
fallen behind in forming partnerships
with the specialists and community organizations essential to reaching communities the bureau characterizes as
“hard to count.” The bureau also canceled critical field tests for last year and
two of the three “dress rehearsal” sites
slotted for this year. These tests cannot
be rescheduled. This means the bureau
will head into the 2020 Census largely
blind to how its methodologies, some of
them brand new, will affect the count.
This lack of testing is particularly
disturbing because the Census Bureau is
experimenting with a “digital-first” census for most U.S. households in 2020.
This strategy does not take into account
the digital divide, which risks discriminating against Americans — disproportionately people of color — who lack
reliable access to broadband. It also
raises cybersecurity concerns, which the
Trump administration has yet to recognize, much less address. Rushing into a
digitized census risks undermining the
overall accuracy of the count and disproportionately erasing economically disadvantaged households from it.
Our concerns about the census are
nothing new. Under our system of government, we have long known that those
who aren’t counted don’t count for purposes of drawing legislative districts and
distributing federal dollars. But the risks
tied to the 2020 survey are especially
worrisome.
Faced with a train wreck in the making, the NAACP filed a federal lawsuit in
March with Prince George’s County, a
majority African American jurisdiction
that was one of the nation’s most undercounted jurisdictions in the 2010 Census. Although we are deeply concerned
about the citizenship question, like
many others in the civil rights community, we chose to highlight the many other
structural problems with the 2020 Census preparations in our lawsuit.
By the bureau’s own estimate, the
2010 Census did not account for 1.5 million black and Hispanic residents nationwide.
The
systemic
and
disproportionate undercounting of
communities of color deprives us of
badly needed federal resources for medical care, K-12 education, housing and
transportation while diminishing our
ability to be heard politically. The undercount affects the quality of life in communities of color every day.
If the Census Bureau continues down
its current path, the 2020 undercount
will be unprecedentedly severe. History
tells us that communities of color will be
hurt the most. The original Constitution
mandated that enslaved Africans be
counted as three-fifths of a person. The
three-fifths clause was abolished after
the Civil War, but the government has
continued to disproportionately undercount African Americans.
Our nation cannot afford a census
that systemically and disproportionately undercounts communities of color.
The Constitution doesn’t allow it, and
neither will we.
The writer is general counsel of the NAACP.
A16
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
ABCDE
letters@washpost.com
This bias has gone on for decades
EDITORIALS
A poor plan for public housing
Mr. Carson’s call for higher rent and work requirements is premature, at best.
T
understand exactly what’s right and, mostly, what’s
wrong with them. We’re all for reducing any disincentives to work. Mr. Carson’s plan addresses one by
proposing that public-housing authorities calculate
tenants’ rent every three years rather than annually,
so as not to “tax” any short-term income boosts they
may earn. It might also be smart, and a lot simpler, to
base rents on gross income rather than income after
adjustments and deductions. However, the Carson
proposals offset those wise reforms by jacking up a
tenant’s share of the rent from 30 percent of adjusted
income under current law to 35 percent of gross
income — a stiff increase for a group of people who
are among the poorest of the poor. HUD is already
testing pilot programs that charge some tenants
28 percent of their previous year’s average gross
monthly income; the agency should wait for the
results of that experiment.
As for work requirements, Mr. Carson’s proposal
to permit public-housing agencies across the country to impose them suffers from the same flaw
similar Republican notions for food and medical
The E.U.’s work
begins at home
assistance have: It is a solution in search of a
problem. As a January Urban Institute report on
current HUD work-requirement pilot programs
shows, only a very small percentage, usually less
than 10 percent, of current housing aid recipients are
nonworking, able-bodied, nonelderly adults. Many
of those may already be subject to existing work
requirements for other federal means-tested aid. As
the Urban Institute notes, there is only one rigorous
study of the long-term effect of such a program, from
Charlotte, N.C.; it showed minimal improvement in
work and income, the two key metrics of the
“self-sufficiency” Mr. Carson wants to achieve.
The irony is that, under a law President Barack
Obama signed in 2015, HUD was preparing to
increase from 39 to 100 the number of housing
authorities free to experiment with work requirements and other locally tailored policies to improve
tenants’ earning potential and independence.
Mr. Carson should carry out that program, closely
monitor its results — then fashion policy based on
the facts.
TOM TOLES
The sanction could put an end to a particularly
perverse practice of the two governments, which
regularly denounce the European Union while
depending on its money to shore up their political
bases. Mr. Orban has routed E.U. aid to businesses
close to his government, including his son-in-law,
while the PiS party depends on agricultural subsidies for its rural base. Moreover, the two governments would not be able to shield each other: An
E.U. decision to block funding could be stopped
only by a majority vote of member states, weighted
by their size.
At best, the prospect of the new regulation will
prompt both governments to make some significant
concessions. Hungary should back away from the
crackdown on nongovernment groups that Mr. Orban repeatedly promised in his recent campaign.
Poland should reverse its tampering with the constitutional tribunal and refrain from a purge of judges.
If Mr. Macron’s call for liberal democracies to defend
themselves is to be heeded, the European Union
must start by policing itself.
The District, Maryland and Virginia team up to woo the company — a collaboration that makes sense.
recognize that if one of our jurisdictions earns the
honor of being selected for HQ2, we all win,” wrote
the three. “We are partners, dedicated to shaping a
better future for our Greater Washington region.”
That sounds like a truism; it’s not. The three
neighbors, though separated by nothing more than
an avenue or a river, often conduct themselves as
strangers who, by the merest coincidence, happen to
share a few major-league sports franchises, a transit
system, a few-hundred-thousand daily commuters
and a daily newspaper. (That’s the one you’re reading, which, full disclosure, is owned by Mr. Bezos.)
Perhaps slightly abashed by their newfound spirit
of cooperation, neither the mayor nor either governor saw fit to release their letter when it was written.
It fell to WAMU 88.5 FM, Washington’s public radio
station, to ferret it out more than a month later.
Nonetheless, the fact that it was written at all — by
two Democrats and a Republican (Mr. Hogan) —
recognizes the plain truth that hitting the Amazon
jackpot for any one of the jurisdictions would be a
victory for all.
No doubt, the economic benefits — as well as the
likely costs, including in traffic and housing prices —
would accrue disproportionately to the winner. It’s
also obvious that HQ2 would make such a splash —
the company says it would entail $5 billion in
construction and 50,000 employees over a decade —
that the waves would slosh over every adjacent
border.
With the exception of Newark and New York City,
which have not joined forces, none of the other
17 finalists for HQ2 lie within easy commuting
distance of each other. As for the other contenders,
one-upmanship is the name of the game, including
(and especially) in the corporate welfare packages
they have dangled before Amazon.
The District, Maryland and Virginia are also
playing the incentive game. Still, the written expression of partnership can only help the area’s three
finalists to make their case as one and, it is hoped,
knit the region more tightly together.
ABCDE
L O CA L O P I N I O N S
FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
Montgomery County’s slow march to a shrinking tax base
The April 28 Metro article “Study: Montgomery Co.
is stunting its own economic growth” put a spotlight on
Montgomery County’s slow march to a waning tax
base. But the county’s elected leadership has known for
years that its policies led to this dire position.
I wrote the county executive and County Council on
Dec. 4, 2009, laying out what was happening. No reply.
I followed up with more data on July 25, 2014. Again, no
reply. I tried with more information on March 9 and
Aug. 4, 2015. No response. I gave up. The county’s
leading political blog reported with approval my warnings, but they fell on deaf ears among the council and
executive.
Three of those council members, who have served a
total of 40 years and are now term-limited, wish to be
the next county executive. They remind one of the
quote from “Casablanca”: “I’m shocked, shocked, to
A few days ago, before White House doctor Rear
Adm. Ronny L. Jackson withdrew as the nominee to
be secretary of veterans affairs, President Trump, in
extemporaneous remarks, complained bitterly
about the confirmation process, calling it “disgusting” [“Cabinet chaos engulfs Trump,” front page,
April 27].
It is disturbing that the president would refer to
the Senate’s solemn advice and consent responsibility, as provided for in Article II, Section 2, paragraph
2 of the Constitution, as “disgusting.”
Joseph D. O’Connell, Gaithersburg
More to Mr. Pruitt’s proposal
The DMV’s Amazon bundle
A
It’s the Senate’s solemn job
The homeland security secretary is considering
separating children from their parents who are
caught illegally crossing the Mexican border [“Memo
urges policy that would separate families,” front
page, April 27]. Officials claim that tens of thousands
crossed during the first quarter of the current fiscal
year alone. I worked as a social worker for Child
Protective Services, whose mission is to keep children safe, secure and out of harm’s way. Presumably
if this instant separation of children from parents
occurs, the idea is that criminal charges will be filed
against the parents with incarceration from six
months to two years looming for them.
And what about the children? Are there already
detention camps set up for them, or will camps be
built out in the desert somewhere? And with thousands of children, from infants to teenagers, where
are the facilities adequate? What kind of staff,
professionals and resources are we talking about?
Our country has come to this? Potential physical
and psychological harm, and worse? This whole
absurd idea sounds a lot like institutional child
neglect, and one would hope that relevant national
associations and groups intervene and protest.
Don D. Roose, Germantown
T
MAZON’S SEARCH for a suitable site to
build the equivalent of three Empire State
Buildings for its second corporate headquarters has triggered heated competition
among the 20 localities the company has identified as
finalists, with some salutary byproducts.
In the Washington area, home to three of the
20 contenders — the District and its close-in suburban neighbors, Northern Virginia and Montgomery
County — the sweepstakes helped produce a longdiscussed but widely unexpected agreement among
the two states and the city to juice their collective
subsidy for the beleaguered Metro system by
$500 million annually. Now comes word that the
spirit of cooperation among the region’s three top
elected officials vying for the Amazon bonanza,
known as HQ2 — D.C. Mayor Muriel E. Bowser,
Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam and Maryland
Gov. Larry Hogan — has gone even further.
In a March letter to Amazon chief executive Jeffrey
P. Bezos, the trio presented a united front. “We
I was dismayed to read in Petula Dvorak’s April 27
Metro column, “For black girls, dress codes are a
mess,” one student’s comment that “it’s my black
friends who get dress-coded way more than my
white friends.” I’m a 1970 graduate of Woodrow
Wilson High School, a product of the desegregation
of D.C. Public Schools.
Several of my friends and I were transferred (we
did not have a choice) to Wilson from Roosevelt High
School in 1968. We black girls faced much discrimination. Reading Ms. Dvorak’s column brought back
memories of when we were stopped/harassed because of the clothing we wore. We were even singled
out in gym class because we had to wear our
uniforms from Roosevelt. My father had to confront
the gym teacher for such overt racism.
I’m now a grandmother, and to see this still
happening 48 years after I graduated from Wilson is
very troubling.
Valerie Youmans, Silver Spring
A policy of child neglect
It must police its own members’
anti-democratic tendencies.
HE CALL to defend democracy by French
President Emmanuel Macron in a speech to
Congress last week resonated in Washington, but it is even more relevant to the
European Union. What is supposed to be a community of 28 free nations is increasingly challenged by
nationalist and avowedly “illiberal” governments
that are concentrating power, dismantling checks
and balances, and undermining the rule of law.
The trend began with the rise in 2010 of Hungary’s
Viktor Orban, who won a new mandate in a free but
unfair election in April, and accelerated when
Poland’s right-wing Law and Justice (PiS) party won
a parliamentary majority in 2015. Directed by party
leader Jaroslaw Kaczynski, PiS proceeded to pack
the Constitutional Tribunal, purge the military and
security forces, and turn once relatively balanced
state-owned media into propaganda organs. Last
year it rammed through another judicial “reform”
that will allow it to repopulate courts with its
partisans.
For years, E.U. leaders have condemned these
violations of democratic norms but found it difficult
to do much about them. Last year, the commission
formally found a “clear risk of a serious breach” of
the rule of law in Poland under an article of an E.U.
treaty that provides for tough sanctions, including
the loss of voting rights. The problem is that any
such action would require a unanimous vote by E.U.
members — and Poland and Hungary have promised
to defend each other.
Now Brussels may have found a way to bring more
pressure to bear. According to the Financial Times,
the commission will propose a new regulation that
would allow it to curb funding to governments when
it judges that threats to the rule of law could affect
financial management. The rule, which would be
applied to the new E.U. budget being developed for
2021 to 2027, could have a potentially devastating
impact on Poland, the largest recipient of E.U. funds,
as well as Hungary, whose E.U. subsidies have
equaled 4 percent of its gross domestic product in
some years.
MAY 1 , 2018
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
HERE IS a painful, chronic lack of affordable
housing in urban areas. The causes are often
rooted in local law and policy, notably exclusionary zoning that limits high-density projects so as to protect the property values of single-family homeowners. So the first point to make
about the changes in federal housing aid that House
and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson
rolled out on April 25 — including potential rent
hikes and work requirements — is that, at best, they
would amount to a Band-Aid on a Band-Aid. The
second is that there is little chance Congress will
adopt his plan: It is a rehash of ideas lawmakers
rejected earlier this year in the course of increasing
federal housing spending for fiscal 2019, contrary to
what Mr. Carson had recommended. The announcement seems designed as Mr. Carson’s response to
President Trump’s April 10 executive order demanding that all agencies submit plans for linking safetynet benefits to work.
Still, given that the Trump administration seems
so wedded to these ideas, it’s worth the effort to
. TUESDAY,
find that gambling is going on in here.”
Gus Bauman, Silver Spring
The writer is a former chairman of the
Maryland-National Capital Park
and Planning Commission.
Unfortunately, I have been laid off a couple of times
since moving up to the D.C. area in 2005. When I looked
for positions, they seemed to be mostly in Virginia. You
take what you can get when the mortgage is due, even
Germantown to Vienna.
Now I understand why it seemed as though everything was over there. Our elected officials are chasing
jobs away. One can only hope that all the “space”
former Montgomery County executive Neal Potter and
others created will land us Amazon.
Steve Barone, Germantown
News pages:
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Executive Editor
CAMERON BARR
Managing Editor
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Deputy Managing Editor
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Editorial Page Editor
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Deputy Editorial Page Editor
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Deputy Editorial Page Editor
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Associate Editorial Page Editor
Vice Presidents:
JAMES W. COLEY JR......................................................................................Production
L. WAYNE CONNELL..........................................................................Human Resources
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1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20071 (202) 334-6000
In three ways the April 25 front-page article
“Pruitt unveils proposal limiting usable research”
gave a false impression or misrepresented the truth.
It said that Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt’s action, based on the Honest
and Open New EPA Science Treatment (Honest) Act
that I introduced, would prevent scientific studies
from being considered. No, the new policy would
allow any study to be used as long as the underlying
data was made public. Why are some scientists so
afraid of letting the American people see their work?
The article also said that the new policy would
threaten the disclosure of confidential information.
No, personal data could be stricken out, as it has been
routinely by government agencies for many years.
The Honest Act was approved by the House and
has not been considered yet by the Senate.
Readers deserve objective reporting, not a onesided story.
Lamar Smith, Washington
The writer, a Republican, represents Texas’s
21st Congressional District in the House and is
chairman of the Science, Space
and Technology Committee.
The real chaplain scandals
Regarding the April 28 news article “Lawmakers
demand answers in House chaplain’s exit”:
It appears that House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.),
though he is Catholic, is following in the footsteps of
the Trump evangelical Christians. If Mr. Ryan asked
the chaplain of the U.S. House of Representatives to
step aside for political reasons, it is just one more step
toward the destruction of public decency and basic
civility. As a nation, where is our moral compass?
Claire O’Dwyer Randall, Springfield
The real scandal isn’t why House Speaker Paul
D. Ryan (R-Wis.) fired the in-house chaplain; it’s why
we taxpayers are forking out hundreds of thousands
of dollars a year for a chaplain’s office to soothe the
troubled souls of members of Congress.
How about they instead pick up the phone and call
their own spiritual advisers or catch a cab for a
face-to-face with one of the hundreds of religious
leaders in the D.C. area? As for the day’s opening
prayer on the House and Senate floors, what about a
(free) minute of silence for private reflection?
Maz Rauber, Silver Spring
U.S. women lead the way
Regarding Fred Bowen’s April 26 KidsPost column, “Rain or shine, it’s time to keep on running.” :
American women are leading the way in running.
Shalane Flanagan placed first and broke a 40-year
U.S. record at the New York City Marathon in
November; Emma Coburn placed first and set a U.S.
record in the 3,000-meter steeplechase at an international competition in August; and Jenny Simpson
placed first, for the sixth time, at the Fifth Avenue
Mile in New York in September and at the Drake
Relays in Iowa. Last Friday, Ms. Simpson set an
American record in the 2-mile relay.
These runners and two-time Olympic marathon
runner Kara Goucher are elevating standards, supporting each other and speaking in support of
anti-doping regulations, which have truly leveled
the playing field in 2017 and 2018.
Jessica Frost, North Bethesda
TUESDAY, MAY 1 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
RE
A17
K
CHARLES LANE
MICHAEL GERSON
Do rules on
opioids violate
human rights?
Triumph
of the
boors
F
O
atal overdoses of prescription opioids
were rare before 1999. Then doctors,
influenced by pharmaceutical industry marketing, began prescribing
them for chronic non-cancer pain. By the end
of 2016, prescription opioids — not illicit
heroin or fentanyl — had claimed 200,000
lives.
Now, at last, the opioid wave has crested.
Per capita usage declined for the sixth
straight year in 2017, according to IQVIA
Institute for Human Data Science, a healthcare consulting group. Changes in public
policy, including long-awaited prescribing
guidelines issued by the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention (CDC) in March 2016,
promise to sustain this life-saving progress.
Or maybe they’ll lead to human rights
violations. Believe it or not, that’s the premise
of a new investigation by the New York-based
nonprofit Human Rights Watch (HRW),
known for its exposés of war crimes around
the world.
HRW is seeking evidence that the CDC
guidelines and other efforts to modulate
opioid prescribing result in patients being
cut off from vital medication, in violation of
their right to appropriate health care.
The group “is looking for testimonials
from chronic pain patients who have been
forced or encouraged to stop their opioid
medication by physicians or pharmacists,”
the Pain News Network reported in March.
“The CDC clearly knows what’s going on
and they haven’t taken any real action to say,
‘That is not appropriate, involuntarily forcing people off their medications. That’s not
what we recommended,’ ” Diederik Lohmann, director of health and human rights for
HRW, told the network, which says twothirds of its readers take opioids, mostly for
chronic, non-cancer pain. “When a government puts in place regulations that make it
almost impossible for a physician to prescribe an essential medication, or for a
pharmacist to stock the medication, or for a
patient to fill their prescriptions, that becomes a human rights issue.”
Human Rights Watch is not alone; a recent
cover story of the libertarian magazine Reason denounced “America’s war on pain pills.”
And, of course, patients who have become
dependent on opioids must be treated compassionately.
But even after the recent decline in prescriptions, the U.S. opioid rate of consumption in 2017 — 676 morphine milligram
equivalents per adult — was five times the
1992 rate. It’s double or triple that of other
advanced countries. People who really need
them can get licit opioids in the United
States.
And the drugs still killed 46 people a day in
2016, according to the CDC.
In any case, alleged unintended consequences of justifiable and, indeed, moderate
public-health policies just do not belong in
the same moral conversation as deliberate
human rights violations such as police brutality or torture.
Article 12 of the International Covenant on
Economic, Social and Cultural Rights does
indeed exhort governments to guarantee the
“highest attainable standard” of health; in
that sense, there is a human right to health.
Whether it can be defined with sufficient
objectivity for this situation is another story.
Assuring health is exactly what the CDC is
trying to do — not through “regulations,” but
through evidence-based recommendations.
To be sure, HRW acknowledges that opioids have been overprescribed in the past, in
part due to deceptive industry marketing; a
key focus of its current research is ensuring
non-opioid alternatives for patients weaned
off the drugs, Lohmann told me.
One ought not to prejudge the HRW
report, due later this year, even if Lohmann’s
comments to the Pain News Network implied
that the CDC is blameworthy, and even if the
organization funding the study, the U.S.
Cancer Pain Relief Committee, is headed by a
five-member board of pain specialists who
are well-known advocates of opioid use for
chronic non-cancer pain.
Two of them, Russell Portenoy and Richard
Payne, have received financial support from
opioid manufacturers. In late 2015, Payne
spoke out against the CDC guidelines in a
government advisory group’s deliberations
before they were adopted. (Efforts to reach
board members were unsuccessful.)
Note that the CDC guidelines specifically
address opioid use for non-cancer pain only.
The government encourages palliative care
for cancer and hospice patients.
The U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee has
previously underwritten HRW reports on the
developing world, the theme of which is that
AIDS and cancer patients are being denied
access to morphine due to international and
national rules intended to prevent opioid
misuse. Palliative care in poor countries is a
legitimate concern — among the many urgent health-care deficits that such countries
face.
Here’s another legitimate concern: Poor
and middle-income countries may be vulnerable to the same kind of pro-opioid campaign
that wreaked such havoc in the United States.
Mundipharma, a network of companies
controlled by the same closely held family
business that introduced Purdue Pharma’s
OxyContin to the United States, is engaged in
aggressive opioid marketing in China, Colombia, Egypt, Mexico and the Phillipines,
according to a recent Los Angeles Times
report.
As Keith Humphreys, Jonathan P. Caulkins
and Vanda Felbab-Brown write in the May/
June issue of Foreign Affairs, the U.S. experience shows that “legal drugs pushed by
corporations can bring death on a scale vastly
surpassing the effects of illegal ones.” And no
human right is more important than the
right to live.
lanec@washpost.com
dock in Miami; the Coast Guard sent out
patrol boats to warn the ship away. The
St. Louis was forced to return to Europe,
and 254 of its passengers later perished
during the Holocaust.
That shameful history led to changes
in immigration policy that prohibit
rejecting claims of asylum out of hand.
The bar is high, but many of the Central
American asylum seekers probably clear
it.
In El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala, the major threat comes from
rampant gang violence. Boys are often
offered a stark choice: Join a gang or be
killed. Girls are threatened with rape. It
is easy to say this is a problem local
elected officials and police ought to
solve, but government institutions are
weak, and corruption is widespread.
What choice does a family under imminent threat have but to flee? What would
you do?
It is of course true that not every
Central American who asks for asylum
truly merits it. That’s why each case is
examined and evaluated, with all the
time needed to reach a proper determination — which is how the migrants
now at the border must be handled,
despite what Trump and Sessions might
prefer.
To close our eyes and hearts to
legitimate claims of persecution would
be to repeat the shameful and tragic
mistakes of the World War II era. If the
subjects of Trump’s demagoguery were
summarily denied entry, as he apparently would like, most would be forced to go
home and some would be killed. That
would be a terrible stain on the nation’s
conscience.
I’m tempted to add that it would be a
stain on Trump’s conscience as well, but
it’s not clear that he has one.
n a Saturday night in April, the
rhetoric of our historical era
reached a culminating, symbolic moment.
In Washington — at the White
House Correspondents’ Association
dinner — comedian Michelle Wolf
mocked the physical appearance of a
Trump administration official, joked
about feticide and compared the president’s daughter to “an empty box of
tampons.”
In Washington, Mich., President
Trump gave an 80-minute speech in a
stream-of-semiconsciousness
style
that mixed narcissism, nativism, ignorance, mendacity and malice. He attacked the FBI, intelligence agencies,
the Justice Department and his presidential predecessors. “Any Hispanics
in the room?” he asked at one point,
producing some boos. Of the press:
“These people, they hate your guts.” Of
his political opponents: “A vote for a
Democrat in November, is a vote for
open borders and crime. It’s very simple.”
In both Washingtons, political discourse was dominated by the values
and practices of reality television and
social media: nasty, shallow, personal,
vile, vindictive, graceless, classless,
bullying, ugly, crass and simplistic.
This is not merely change; it is digression. It is the triumph of the boors. It is
a discourse unworthy of a great country, and a sign that greatness of purpose and character is slipping way.
Here is an experiment. Take a book
of John F. Kennedy’s speeches and put
your finger randomly on a page. Mine
went to a last-minute appeal Kennedy
made to Democratic convention delegates before the 1960 convention. He
ends by quoting the poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow: “Humanity with all
its fears / with all its hopes of future
years / is hanging breathless on thy
fate!”
This was not a moment when high
oratory was expected. It was an appeal
at a political dinner during a delegate
street fight against Lyndon B. Johnson. And Kennedy’s natural style of
speaking was usually different: direct,
cutting and funny. But for Kennedy —
and for at least some Americans in the
1960s — rhetorical ambition was seen
as appropriate to the generational
ambitions of the New Frontier. (Not
everyone, by the way, was an unqualified fan. “John Kennedy spoke in public,” said British writer Henry Fairlie,
“as Byzantine emperors appeared on
state occasions: sheathed in gold, suspended between earth and heaven.”)
American political rhetoric has
changed dramatically over time. After
being florid and verbose, Lincoln
made it spare and poetic. With radio
and television, presidential language
became more conversational, personal
and image-oriented. Kennedy was, in
some ways, a glorious exception. Of his
inaugural address, John Steinbeck
said: “Syntax, my lad. It has been
restored to the highest place in the
Republic.”
The golden age of American rhetoric in the 1960s, of course, stood beside
the hate-filled, populist appeal of Alabama Gov. George Wallace and the
profanity and vulgarity of comedian
Lenny Bruce. But the updated versions
of both have come to dominate American politics in an entirely new way. It is
as if, in the struggle for America’s
rhetorical soul, Wallace has finally
won. “Hell,” exclaimed Wallace, “we
got too much dignity in government
now.” Not anymore.
What is the problem with this?
What is wrong with the discourse of
the Internet comments section? The
rhetoric of common people?
For starters, I would deny that most
people would have anything to do with
such revolting garbage in their own
lives. A guest at your dinner table like
Wolf who profanely attacked other
guests would be politely (or not so
politely) asked to leave. A neighbor
who ranted like Trump about Mexicans and the FBI would be avoided like
the plague. And yet people whom we
could not trust to behave in civilized
company now dominate American
public discourse. It is something Wolf
would immediately recognize: a sad,
sick joke.
But the problem is deeper, for one
main reason: because good rhetoric is
the carrier of serious thought. “Eloquence,” said theologian Lyman
Beecher, “is logic on fire.” A great and
memorable phrase encapsulates an
argument. “The world must be made
safe for democracy” expressed Woodrow Wilson’s vision of America’s role in
the world. Kennedy’s “Let them come
to Berlin” summarized America’s commitment to containing the Soviet
Union. The Rev. Martin Luther King
Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech grew out
of a compelling conception of fairness
and justice.
Trump’s signature phrase — “fake
news” — is an attack on the free press
and a comfort to authoritarians everywhere. The memorable rallying cry of
his campaign — “lock her up” — was a
call to jail his political opponent. His
degraded language results from a degraded politics. And the repair of our
public life will eventually require a
restoration of rhetoric.
eugenerobinson@washpost.com
michaelgerson@washpost.com
JUSTIN LANE/EPA-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK
A shopper in New York on Friday.
CATHERINE RAMPELL
The economy: Boom or bluster
O
ver the past few months,
President Trump has painted
a portrait of a resurgence:
After tanking under President Barack Obama, the economy has
finally been Made Great Again.
Based on recent polls and my own
reader email, much of the public believes this narrative. The word
“booming” gets thrown around a lot.
But how has the economy actually
performed under Trump? There is
plenty of data to help us answer this
question. So I bring you: Six questions about Trump and the economy
you may have been too embarrassed
to ask.
1. What’s the big picture? Have we
seen a change under Trump?
Generally speaking, the economy
today is virtually indistinguishable
from the economy in the several years
before Trump took office, as measured by economic growth.
Gross domestic product continues
to increase at a modest but steady
rate, according to the Bureau of Economic Analysis. In the first quarter of
this year, it grew at an annual rate of
2.3 percent; last year it also grew at
2.3 percent. That’s roughly what
growth averaged during Obama’s second term.
2. What about hiring? Haven’t we
seen a big boom there?
Nope. The pace of hiring has been
decent, but again, not better than it
was under Obama.
Since Trump took office, non-farm
payrolls have expanded by an average
of 186,000 jobs per month, according
to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Over Obama’s second term, it averaged nearly 216,000 per month. In
Obama’s final year, it was 195,000.
The unemployment rate has been
falling, but that decline also began
early in Obama’s presidency and has
more recently leveled off. Which
makes sense, given that we’re nine
years into one of the longest recoveries on record. At some point, there
isn’t much further it can fall.
3. Wages have been going up
though, right?
Wage growth has disappointed under Trump, as it did under Obama.
Adjusted for inflation, hourly earnings grew little over the past year, up
just 0.4 percent in March compared
to a year earlier. Obama oversaw a
few stretches of year-over-year real
wage growth above 2 percent, but
mostly his record was lousy too.
After the GOP tax cut passed, a
bunch of companies announced plans
to use some of their windfall to boost
worker pay. So far, we haven’t seen
that in the overall data. Many of these
firms were probably planning to raise
pay anyway — just as they had in years
past — and credited Trump’s tax cut to
curry favor with the White House.
4. What about federal deficits and
debt? Surely Trump compares favorably to red-ink-guzzling Obama.
Federal deficits as a share of the
economy did grow a lot under
Obama, at first. That was largely because we had a major financial crisis.
Tax revenue fell dramatically. Meanwhile, federal spending rose, thanks
both to automatic outlays (e.g., more
people became eligible for unemployment benefits) and deliberate stimulus measures. Additionally, boomers
began aging into entitlement eligibility, and Obama extended the Bush tax
cuts.
As the economy improved, those
deficits shrank but did not go away. In
fiscal 2016 (so still under Obama)
they began expanding again, and
now under Trump, they have exploded, despite there being neither a recession nor a major war. That is
thanks to both tax cuts and spending
increases.
The Congressional Budget Office
projects that, in a few years, our debtto-GDP ratio will be at its highest
level since 1946.
5. Tax cuts just passed. Isn’t it
unfair to judge Trump’s economic
track record until those have been
factored into the economy?
That’s true: We haven’t seen the
impact of the tax cuts yet. But their
salutary effects are likely to be modest and short-lived, for a few reasons.
So far, consumers mostly haven’t
noticed them. The biggest beneficiaries are also the wealthiest Americans,
who are less likely to spend their tax
savings. The best hope for GDP, jobs
and wage growth comes from the
corporate-side cuts, which could increase investment over time.
Even so, the effects are expected to
be small. The respected Penn Wharton Budget Model, for instance, projects that the tax cuts will raise annual
GDP growth by 0.06 to 0.12 percentage points over the next decade.
Meanwhile, an aging population, rising federal debt and Trump’s threats
of a trade war present significant
head winds.
All of which is to say: Don’t hold
your breath for that 4 percent to 6
percent GDP growth that Trump
promised.
6. So, uhh, how much influence do
presidents have over the economy,
anyway? It sounds like not very
much.
Bingo. Presidents get too much
blame when the economy sours and
too much credit when it improves.
Not that you’d know this from
Trump’s boasts whenever some good
news — even news that’s not actually
that good — rolls in.
crampell@washpost.com
EUGENE ROBINSON
A stain on our conscience
T
he “caravan” of asylum-seeking
migrants that has finally arrived at the U.S.-Mexico border
is a test of American character
and purpose — a test President Trump
wants us to fail.
I put caravan in quotation marks
because the group that reached Tijuana
hardly qualifies for the term. Just a few
dozen would-be entrants presented
themselves at the Port of San Ysidro on
Sunday — only to be told that U.S.
immigration officials were too busy to
attend to them. Another several hundred were reported to be in the general
area, waiting their turn to attempt to
cross the border.
Trump has spoken of these people as
if they were some kind of rampaging
horde. Attorney General Jeff Sessions
has accused them of “a deliberate attempt to undermine our laws and overwhelm our system.” The truth is that this
sort of thing happens every year: Wouldbe migrants seek safety in numbers as
they make the long and perilous trek
north through Mexico.
Sessions probably understands this
context; Trump probably doesn’t. But I
believe both are sincere in their desire to
stanch the flow of Latino immigration —
not, I strongly suspect, because of drugs
or crime, but because they loathe the
demographic and cultural change that is
taking place.
While he and his administration were
being appropriately roasted at the
White House Correspondents’ Association dinner on Saturday evening, Trump
was at a rally in Michigan saying that
our immigration laws are “corrupt . . . so
corrupt” and that the motives of those
who defend our nation’s traditional role
as a haven for asylum seekers are
political. “The Democrats actually feel,
and they are probably right, that all of
these people that are pouring across are
going to vote for Democrats, they’re not
going to vote for Republicans.”
They’re not going to vote for anybody,
of course, since they’re not citizens.
Truth doesn’t matter to Trump. But you
knew that.
What seems to really drive
the president crazy is that
the United States remains
a haven for those
fleeing persecution.
What seems to really drive the president crazy is that the United States
remains a haven for those fleeing persecution. Trump laid out his complaint
Saturday: “If a person puts their foot
over the line, we have to take them into
our country, we have to register them.
We then have to ask them a couple of
questions. Lawyers are telling them
what to say. How unsafe they are. And
once they say that, we have to let them
go, to come back to court in like a year.
Only one problem: They don’t come
back, okay. That’s the end. Welcome to
the United States.”
You will have noticed that missing
from Trump’s rant is any sense of
morality or mission.
There is a reason the law makes
provision for those seeking asylum. In
1939, Congress rejected a bill that would
have admitted 20,000 German Jewish
children. Later that year, authorities
refused to allow the St. Louis, a ship
carrying about 900 German Jews, to
A18
EZ
RE
THE WASHINGTON POST
K
‘A blessed event?’
The world’s 7.6 billion people
practice an estimated 4,200 religions, each with various ideas
about the soul and human destiny. So when British scientists Patrick Steptoe and Robert Edwards
helped produce the first IVF baby,
born on July 25, 1978, the event
was viewed through heavy filters
of wonder and suspicion.
Newspaper and TV reports recognized the birth of a child conceived in vitro — literally “in
glass” — as a milestone in human
history, akin to Neil Armstrong’s
walk on the moon. London’s Evening News declared little 5pound, 12-ounce Louise Brown a
“Superbabe.” Newsweek compared her birth with a “first coming.” The New York Daily News
wondered, “Test tube birth: a
blessed event?”
Some faith leaders — especially
Catholics — expressed grave misgivings and concern that the birth
was unnatural, immoral and possibly dangerous. Some wondered
whether children born through
IVF might be superhuman or exceptionally frail or plagued by
unforeseen defects introduced by
the process.
Brown’s parents, who had been
trying to conceive for nine years,
saw divine intervention.
“Louise is, truly, a gift from
God,” Lesley Brown tearfully told
reporters. Her husband, John,
added: “I am not a religious man,
but I thank God that I heard our
little girl cry for the first time.”
Steptoe emphasized the mundaneness of the science, arguing
he was neither a wizard nor Dr.
Frankenstein.
“We have merely done what
many people try to do in all kinds
of medicine — to help nature,”
Steptoe said. “We found nature
could not put an egg and sperm
Alejandro and
Adrianna Vanas, 6
‘GIFT FROM GOD’
Families gathered in Gillette Stadium near Boston in the fall for what is believed
to be the largest assemblage of babies born through assisted reproduction.
Paige and Jeremy Casella, 3
Xavier Jones, 7
Isla Jones, 3
Benjamin
Young,
4 months
Emerson
Piccirilli, 3
PHOTOS BY CAROLYN VAN HOUTEN/THE WASHINGTON POST
together, so we did it.”
Edwards, who won the Nobel
Prize for medicine in 2010 for the
breakthrough, was more direct in
challenging critics in the religious
establishment. In a rare interview
in 2003, he told the London Times
the experiments were “about
more than infertility.”
“I wanted to find out exactly who
was in charge, whether it was God
Himself or whether it was scientists
in the laboratory,” he said.
He was confident of the answer: “It was us.”
A long debate
Numerous research teams
quickly set out to replicate the
breakthrough. Candice Reed, Australia’s first IVF baby, was born in
1980. Elizabeth Jordan Carr, the
first American, followed in 1981.
In those early years, scholars
from the world’s major religions
expressed uneasiness about IVF.
Some faith communities were
quicker to accept assisted reproduction — including within the
Hindu, Buddhist and Protestant
traditions. In other places, many
couples were left waiting for a
signal from religious leaders.
Egypt’s Gad el-Haq Ali Gad elHaq, a grand imam, was among
the first major Muslim leaders to
take a clear stand. In 1980, he
issued a fatwa, or ruling, permitting IVF and similar procedures,
so long as they involved a husband
and a wife and no eggs or sperm
from a third party.
The grand imam compared sterility with a disease and — noting
the prophet Muhammad spoke of
the need to seek remedy for disease — concluded IVF is permissible as a cure.
If a “trustworthy physician recommends in vitro fertilization
and shall be responsible for its
appropriateness, then it is permissible and obligatory as a treatment of a woman who has pregnancy impediments,” el-Haq
wrote, according to a translation
published by Marcia C. Inhorn, a
Yale medical anthropologist.
Nearly two decades later, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei of Iran
weighed in, loosening restrictions
further for his Shiite Muslim followers. For example, men were
permitted to engage in “mut’a”
marriage to egg donors — a temporary union — to take advantage
of technological advances without the taint of adultery.
Today, IVF is a widely accepted
intervention in the Muslim world,
and el-Haq’s fatwa is prominently
displayed on many clinic walls.
Percent of U.S. adults who say each of these is:
Morally
wrong
Having an
abortion
Embryonic stem
cell research
Non-embryonic
stem cell research
Not a
moral issue
49%
22
16
Using in vitro
12
fertilization
32
42
46
Morally
wrong
Not a
moral issue
Protestant 13%
15%
36
reason for joy. But the question
was, what did they do to get there,
and what does that mean?” said
Richard M. Doerflinger, a scholar
who recently retired from the U.S.
Conference of Catholic Bishops,
where he served for 36 years as a
liaison to Congress on bioethics.
The other primary objection to
IVF involves the treatment of fertilized eggs as “products” in a
marketplace, as well as their routine creation and destruction. The
church teaches that life begins at
the moment of conception, and it
has condemned the destruction of
embryos as an evil on par with
abortion and euthanasia.
Despite his liberalism on some
issues, the current pope has been
unwavering on the subject.
“We are living in a time of
experimentation with life. But a
bad experiment,” Pope Francis
said in 2014 shortly after he was
elected to his position. “Making
children rather than accepting
them as a gift, as I said. Playing
with life. Be careful because this is
a sin against the Creator.”
Much like church teaching on
contraception, the guidance on
IVF is out of step with public opinion in the United States. The Pew
Research Center found in 2013
that, while Americans are divided
Percent who say that using in vitro fertilization is:
Morally
acceptable
23%
‘Lost’ embryos
The Vatican saw things differently. When Louise Brown was
born, Cardinal Albino Luciani,
who would become Pope John
Paul I, congratulated her parents
and wished the baby a happy and
blessed life. He also said IVF
raised many questions that would
require a deeper moral response.
Nine years later, in 1987, the
church issued the “Donum Vitae”
(the Gift of Life), a guidance document on biomedical issues that
has become the definitive Catholic teaching on IVF. In it, the
church divided fertility treatments into two categories: Those
that help achieve pregnancy
through sex — fertility drugs, ovulation charts, surgery to remove
blockages — are moral. Those that
replace sex with technology, including IVF and artificial insemination, are immoral.
The division reflects the
church’s view that the physical expression of love within marriage is
godly and that sex alone can produce a child who is loved unconditionally as a person independent of
the parents’ will and desires. Techniques like IVF end up “producing”
a child in a lab where the parents
are completely absent.
“The birth of a baby is always
Catholic 13
Morally
acceptable
45%
46
51
31%
31
33
Unaffiliated 9
34
33
Survey: March 21 - April 8, 2013, among a representative sample of 4,006 adults nationwide.
The margin of error for the survey is plus or minus 2.1 percentage points.
Note: Responses of those who volunteered “depends on the situation” and those who did not give an answer are not shown.
Source: Pew Research Center
MAY 1 , 2018
on the morality of abortion, nearly
80 percent of U.S. adults consider
IVF morally acceptable or not a
moral issue — a finding that holds
regardless of gender, political affiliation or religion.
John S. Grabowski, director of
moral theology at Catholic University, acknowledged “a disconnect between official church
teaching and Catholics’ practice.”
In interviews, Catholic couples
who have undergone IVF said
they felt a successful birth had
been blessed by God or was otherwise “meant to be.”
Still, many Catholics are troubled by the destruction of embryos.
Ariannet Vanas of Boston
struggled with the idea of IVF
because she knew the Vatican disapproved. Ultimately, she said,
she concluded God would not
“judge us because we want to be a
family.”
After her twins were born six
years ago, doctors told Vanas, 39,
she would be unable to sustain
another pregnancy. So she removed the laboratory tubes containing her unused embryos from
cryo-storage and arranged them
next to pictures of grandparents
and other relatives who had died.
“It kind of weighs on you,” she
said, “the journey that was needed.”
FERTILITY FROM A1
related technologies have produced some 7 million babies who
might never have existed —
roughly the combined population
of Paris, Nairobi and Kyoto — and
the world’s fertility clinics have
blossomed into a $17 billion business.
The procedures have amplified
profound questions for the world’s
theologians: When does life begin?
If it begins at conception, is it a sin
to destroy a fertilized egg? What
defines a parent? Is the mother the
woman who provides the egg or
the woman who gives birth? What
defines a marriage? If a man’s
sperm fertilizes an egg from a
woman who is not his wife, does
that constitute adultery?
The moral questions are rapidly becoming more complex. Researchers are working to advance
gene-editing tools that would allow parents to choose or “correct
for” certain preferred characteristics; to create artificial wombs
that could incubate fetuses outside the body for nine months;
and to perfect techniques to produce “three-parent” babies who
share genetic material from more
than two people.
The risks, both scientific and
moral, are enormous — particularly with gene editing, which
could be used to produce babies
with superhuman eyesight, speed
and intelligence. “Off target” effects could result in fundamental
changes not just to human bodies
but to human nature.
Some religious leaders have objected to using gene editing on
embryos or in ways that could
affect future generations, arguing
the human genome is sacred and
editing it violates God’s plan for
humanity. The U.S. National
Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine have invited
religious critiques of the technology, and the Vatican is convening
meetings to discuss its moral implications.
On the guest list is Harvard
geneticist George Church, who
helped launch the Human Genome Project to map human DNA
and is part of a team that announced plans in 2016 to use the
gene-editing tool CRISPR to create synthetic human genomes to
advance
medical
research.
Church said he believes critics
from the faith community will
come to accept gene-editing technology, just as religious leaders
eventually adapted to the discoveries of Galileo, Copernicus and
Darwin.
“In the Bible, it says we are
given dominion over the Earth,”
Church said. “Inventing newer
and newer advanced technologies
is almost a key component of
human nature.”
Most major religions have indeed come to tolerate — and even
embrace — IVF, which was originally viewed with equal alarm.
But the increasingly commonplace procedure is still condemned at the highest levels of
the Catholic Church.
“Technology is a great thing, but
technology does change us,” said
the Rev. Michael J.K. Fuller, executive director of the Secretariat of
Doctrine and Canonical Affairs for
the U.S. Conference of Catholic
Bishops. “At some point, we need
to ask — how much is it changing
us, and is that a good thing?”
. TUESDAY,
THE WASHINGTON POST
The rabbi and the doctor
Some of the first scholarly writings about IVF from Jewish experts were also negative. Rabbi
Eliezer Yehuda Waldenberg, one
of the most important authorities
of his generation on medical issues, wrote that a baby produced
from the procedure was not related to his biological parents. Rabbi
Moses Feinstein, known for his
writings about women’s issues,
raised questions about the waste
of “seed,” or semen.
Attitudes began to change with
greater understanding of the procedure. And since the soul does
not enter the embryo until 40 days
after conception, according to
some interpretations of Jewish
scripture, unused embryos did
not raise the same moral questions. Many Jewish leaders began
to actively encourage assisted reproduction, viewing it as a way to
heed God’s instruction to “be
fruitful and multiply.”
Technical worries remained,
however: Could a woman’s eggs
be joined with the wrong man’s
sperm? The solution was rabbinical observers such as Friedman
who supervise fertility clinics to
make sure they conform to Jewish
law and there are no questions
about the child’s lineage.
The idea originated in Israel,
where IVF is universally covered
by national health insurance.
Working with Friedman and Rabbi Avrohom Friedlander, the Genesis Fertility and Reproductive
Medicine clinic in Brooklyn was
among the first American clinics
to adopt the practice to meet the
needs of its large population of
Orthodox and Hasidic patients.
“Religious couples who go
through infertility, no matter
what religion, suffer because it
feels like divine punishment,”
clinic founder Richard Grazi said.
“And that makes everything more
dramatic and painful.”
Monitoring IVF is similar in
intensity to certifying kosher restaurants, Friedlander said: Religious observers keep the keys to
cryo-tanks where frozen eggs,
sperm and embryos are stored
and must be present whenever lab
technicians handle genetic material. They verify labels and make
sure separate surfaces and sometimes equipment are used to avoid
mix-ups.
While there are many industry
protocols to ensure the integrity of
the IVF process, Friedlander said,
“rabbis were more comfortable
having a divine presence” in the lab.
“When you are dealing with
God’s creation, you want to make
as sure as possible that things are
being done right,” he said.
Friedman, 63, a mother of six,
grandmother to 29 and greatgrandmother to one, said she got
into the work after seeing so many
in her community suffer from infertility. “I believe in a higher
being and that He is good and will
help us,” she said.
Esther Fixler, who lives near
New York, was among the first patients to use the rabbinical monitoring process. Fixler spent a decade trying to get pregnant before
coming to Genesis, where she
quickly learned her chances of conceiving were abysmally low. In an
outburst of emotion, she told Grazi
to throw away her genetic material.
Instead, Grazi told her to pray
and to have faith. Within a few
weeks, she was pregnant with the
first of her three children.
“When the pregnancy took, I
thought, ‘This is God.’ I had seen it
in black and white, whether I had
a chance or not,” said Fixler, now
51. “But it wasn’t for human understanding how this happened.”
Her son, now 20, was married
in December 2016. Three months
ago, he and his wife welcomed
their first child, a girl, Fixler’s first
grandchild.
ariana.cha@washpost.com
Ellie Silverman in Washington
contributed to this report.
KLMNO
METRO
TUESDAY, MAY 1 , 2018
High today at
approx. 5 p.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
8 p.m.
55 73 80 74°
°
°
°
81°
Precip: 0%
Wind: WSW
7-14 mph
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
EZ
JOHN KELLY’S WASHINGTON
VIRGINIA
OBITUARIES
May Day used to be a big
deal in Washington,
involving maypoles,
communists and more. B3
Rezoning, traffic and
crowded classrooms are
among top concerns for
today’s local elections. B2
The Rev. James H. Cone’s
black liberation theology
centered the Gospels on
racial justice. B6
Baker’s public schools takeover: Achievement or Achilles’ heel?
BY
O VETTA W IGGINS
Prince George’s County Executive Rushern L. Baker III took the
bold step five years ago of asking
state lawmakers to make him
responsible for the county’s educational system, convinced that
students needed better options
and that failing schools were
scaring off potential residents
and stunting economic growth.
The legislature gave him au-
B
SU
His education strategy
in Pr. George’s now an
issue in race for governor
thority to pick the schools chief
and make other key decisions,
despite objections from the
teachers union and some members of the elected school board,
who have criticized his actions
since.
“At the end of the day, you are
the judge of whether I made the
right decision,” Baker told residents in 2013, just weeks after the
General Assembly vote.
That day may be coming soon.
As Baker makes a run for Maryland governor, his critics are lambasting schools chief Kevin M.
Maxwell and highlighting scandals and allegations to counter
Baker’s claim that the schools
have improved significantly since
he took a stepped-up role.
Former national NAACP chief
Ben Jealous, one of the other six
Democrats competing in the June
26 gubernatorial primary, came
to Prince George’s months ago to
join an anti-Maxwell rally. The
teachers union literally turned its
back on Baker. (Dozens of county
teachers walked out of a state
convention when Baker took the
stage, and the state union has
since endorsed Jealous.) The local NAACP chapter met with Gov.
Larry Hogan (R) asking him to
help repeal the five-year-old legislation and give authority back
to a fully elected school board.
And Hogan, Jealous and the three
leading Democratic candidates
running to succeed Baker as
county executive have called for
Maxwell’s ouster.
Tweaks
for I-66
tolling
system
BAKER CONTINUED ON B4
VIRGINIA TO TEST
MULTIPLE OPTIONS
Outcry over $47 rides
prompts adjustment
Mysterious deaths probed
BY
L UZ L AZO
Virginia will adjust the pricing
algorithm on the 66 Express
Lanes in an effort to lower tolls
that have stunned commuters
and some elected officials by
topping $40 more than a dozen
times since the lanes opened.
Transportation
Secretary
Shannon Valentine said Monday
that the state will test various
options, including lowering the
target travel speed from 55 mph
to allow more cars to enter the
lanes and possibly bring down
toll prices. The tolls are dynamic
— meaning they change according to demand and volume of
traffic to maintain an average
vehicle speed of 55 mph. The tolls
are calculated every six minutes.
However, Valentine said there
is no guarantee that the adjustments will lead to lower tolls in
the long term.
“Our goal and commitment is
to move more people at a lower
cost,” Valentine said. “But there is
really no one solution.”
The agency also plans to increase outreach to commuters
and promote carpooling and alternative routes for solo drivers
unwilling to pay the tolls on this
stretch of Interstate 66. Any
changes to the toll system will be
made to maintain steady speeds
in the corridor and to guarantee
TOLLS CONTINUED ON B3
MATT MCCLAIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
Police working to identify
remains of three women
found in Southeast
BY P ETER H ERMANN
AND C LARENCE W ILLIAMS
Authorities investigating the
skeletal remains of three women
found last week in Southeast
Washington said Monday that the
bones of two of the women were
commingled in a shallow grave
behind an apartment building.
The other set of remains was
found under a crawl space in the
basement of the same building in
the 100 block of Wayne Place SE,
in the Congress Heights neighborhood.
D.C. police and the medical
examiner warned it could take
some time to identify the remains
and say how and when the women died. In addition to forensic
work, detectives are scouring
through missing persons reports,
reaching out to current and past
tenants of the apartment building and learning the property’s
history.
Police Chief Peter Newsham
said the bones appear to be “very
dated.” He said he appreciates
that the situation is disconcerting
to residents. “We want to get the
answers as quickly as we can.”
Roger Mitchell Jr., the District’s chief medical examiner,
said his team is working to clean
Police investigate a property
along Wayne Place SE after
remains, left, were found last
week. The bones of two women
were found in a shallow grave
behind an apartment building.
Those from a third woman were
discovered under a crawl space.
and examine all the bones, and to
separate those found in the grave.
He said his office quickly determined all three were female by
looking at the pelvis.
“The cause and manner of
death is still outstanding,” Mitchell said. “We are still looking for
injury and disease.” He said he is
confident that DNA can be extracted from the remains to try to
make a match.
ADAN ESCOBAR
REMAINS CONTINUED ON B4
Rte. 50 no day at beach, Catholic U. to cut 35 faculty positions
but new lane may help School to ask professors
BY
A SHLEY H ALSEY III
Escaping Washington during
rush hour can be a nightmare,
but those bound for the beach —
white sands, relaxation, perhaps
a libation — know a particular
moment when unbridled despair
sets in.
Traffic crawls out New York
Avenue or off the Capital Beltway
and then pokes along stop-andgo out Route 50 toward the east.
It begins to speed up, giving you
the sense that you’ve finally broken free, soaring along with visions of the surf by sunset. Then
the bad news hits: There is a (fill
in the blank here)-mile backup
trying to reach the bridge over
the Severn River.
to teach more classes
That pathway to beaches and
Maryland’s Eastern Shore may
have gotten a bit smoother Monday as the state inaugurated a
$23 million fix for a bottleneck
that often causes multi-mile
backups of frustrated motorists.
The Maryland State Highway
Administration (SHA) opened a
fourth eastbound lane on Route
50 at the Severn River Bridge,
which carries traffic to the larger
bridge over the Chesapeake Bay.
Even the dead-of-winter commute that merges people leaving
Annapolis state offices with those
flowing east from Washington
regularly backs up traffic in the
approach to the Severn River for
several miles, but with added
Catholic University officials are
planning to cut their full-time faculty by 9 percent through attrition, buyouts and possibly layoffs,
a cost-saving proposal that has
rattled professors at the school
known for its close ties to the
Vatican.
Under the proposal, 35 positions would be eliminated from a
roster that this school year includes 381 faculty members.
Twenty-five of the departures
would be “voluntary” and 10 “involuntary,” according to a propos-
BRIDGE CONTINUED ON B2
UNIVERSITY CONTINUED ON B2
BY
N ICK A NDERSON
CHIP SOMODEVILLA/GETTY IMAGES
Catholic University plans to eliminate 9 percent of its full-time
faculty, which this school year includes 381 members.
Fire claims
instruments
but not a
band’s spirit
A real musician
knows: An
instrument is
something special
— as precious as a
baby.
Petula
So when the
Dvorak
flames shot high
into the air and
the smoke billowed, the
Northwestern High School band
members wanted to race back
onto the burning bus and save
their babies.
“I was so worried about it,”
said Sylvia Garcia, 17. “I was like,
‘Where’s my saxophone?’ I asked
everyone, ‘Did you see my
saxophone?’ ”
The rest of her bandmates
were also freaking out. They
were on their way home to
Hyattsville, Md., from a trip to
New York. Three buses full of
kids who had just gone to a
music clinic and seen the
musical “Wicked.”
The timing couldn’t have been
worse. Their big musical
assessment — the test they’d
been training for all year — was
the next day. But as they were
riding on the New Jersey
Turnpike April 22, hoping to
make it home in time to do
homework, to practice, to do
chores, a tire popped.
The bus driver pulled over.
The kids in the back saw the
flames first.
Christopher Renberg, the
music department chair, had
dozed off. But as soon as the
smoke smell filled the bus, he
was wide-awake. He and
Anthony Townes, the director of
DVORAK CONTINUED ON B5
B2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
MAY 1 , 2018
VIRGINIA
VIRGINIA
Senators
back
Justice
lawyer
Growth
a top issue
in local
elections
Communities wrestle
with development as
voters head to polls
Kaine, Warner suggest
Rosenstein deputy for
Eastern District position
BY
BY
have a very small number of people who are making a lot of noise,”
he said.
“We don’t close any programs,
don’t cut any courses,” he added.
The planned reductions would
continue a recent shrinkage of the
faculty. Federal data show Catholic had 413 full-time instructional
faculty as of fall 2016. But Abela
said the university is aiming to
keep what attracts students —
small classes and close faculty relationships — while preserving its
niche as a research institution
with strong ties to the Catholic
faith.
Founded under a papal charter
in 1887, Catholic is often thought
of as the “bishops’ university” in
America.
Towns and cities in Virginia
will hold elections for mayor,
local councils and school boards
Tuesday, with races focused on
issues ranging from rezoning to
traffic and crowded classrooms.
In Northern Virginia, election
campaigns in municipalities in
Fairfax, Prince William, Loudoun and Fauquier counties have
mostly centered on how to keep
the character of smaller communities intact amid steady growth
in the Washington region.
That is particularly the case in
Fairfax City, where eight candidates are vying for six council
seats. Fairfax Mayor David L.
Meyer is unopposed in his bid for
a second term.
The city of roughly 25,000
residents was unnerved by the
2016 arrest of longtime mayor
Scott Silverthorne in a drugsfor-sex undercover operation.
Since then, the community
has been mostly focused on the
potential effects of a handful
of building projects around the
city. Among them: a $150 million development near the Fairfax Circle intersection that will
replace a long-vacant strip mall
with new stores, restaurants and
about 400 townhouses and
apartments.
“There is an understandable
concern among the citizens
about how many people should
be in the city,” said Meyer, who
replaced Silverthorne in a 2017
special election. “The real challenge for leadership is the question of balance, finding that right
mix.”
Four council incumbents are
running for another term: Michael J. DeMarco, Jennifer E.
Passey, Janice B. Miller and Jon
R. Stehle Jr.
Other candidates for the atlarge council seats are: Joe Harmon, a small-business owner and
city planning commission member; So Lim, owner of a local
insurance agency; Tom Ross, a
retired assistant director for the
National Park Service and former chair of the city’s electoral
board; and Sang Yi, a staff director of a congressional subcommittee on natural resources.
Council members Jeffrey C.
Greenfield and Eleanor D.
Schmidt are not seeking reelection.
In Loudoun, Purcellville Mayor Kwasi Fraser is facing a challenge from Christopher Thompson, the town’s building code
enforcement administrator. That
race is partly fueled by a controversy that stemmed from the
attempted firing of the town’s
police chief last year.
Purcellville Councilman Ted
Greenly, who was appointed to
fill a vacancy this year, is seeking
reelection to one of three open
town council seats. The other
candidates are: Joel Grewe, director of a Christian leadership
program for teens; Tip Stinnette,
chair of the town’s planning
commission; and Steve Warfield,
a marketing manager for Costco.
Council members Doug McCollum and Karen Jimmerson are
not seeking reelection.
Local elections will also take
place in Clifton, Haymarket,
Dumfries, Occoquan and Vienna.
The town of Herndon is scheduled to hold its local elections in
November.
All of those communities are
grappling with a steady increase
in road traffic that has come with
new residential and commercial
development in recent years.
The main goal is “to maintain
that history and keep that community feel while managing the
growth that’s really around us,”
said Vienna Mayor Laurie A.
DiRocco. “Vienna really wants to
keep that small-town feel.”
DiRocco and Vienna council
members Linda Colbert and Pasha Majdi are running unopposed Tuesday.
nick.anderson@washpost.com
antonio.olivo@washpost.com
R ACHEL W EINER
Virginia’s two Democratic senators are recommending that Justice Department lawyer G. Zachary Terwilliger take over as U.S.
attorney for the Eastern District
of Virginia, a high-profile jurisdiction that is involved in the investigation into Russian interference
in the 2016 election.
If nominated and confirmed,
he would replace acting U.S. attorney Tracy McCormick, who took
over when Dana Boente was
asked to resign last fall.
“We highly recommend Mr.
Terwilliger for this important position,” Tim Kaine and Mark R.
Warner wrote in a letter to the
White House on Monday.
Virginia’s Eastern District often handles significant terrorism,
espionage and public corruption
cases. But since President Trump
took office, the post has become
more prominent and politically
charged. The Eastern District is
one of two courthouses where former Trump campaign manager
Paul Manafort faces charges related to his work for a Russia-friendly political party in Ukraine.
Terwilliger serves under Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein, who has been criticized by
the president for his handling of
the Russia investigation.
“He has a great heart,
a lot of passion.”
Gene Rossi, a longtime prosecutor
Before that, Terwilliger was an
assistant U.S. attorney in the district he may soon lead, focused on
gang violence and human trafficking. He is technically still working
in the district but on detail to the
deputy attorney general’s office.
“He has a great heart, a lot of
passion, and he’s got tremendous
integrity,” said Gene Rossi, a longtime federal prosecutor in Alexandria who is now in private practice. “He is incredibly organized,
he’s incredibly focused, and he
will be extremely fair as a head
prosecutor.”
Terwilliger’s father, George Terwilliger, served as deputy attorney
general under President George
H.W. Bush.
The White House ultimately
will nominate a U.S. attorney for
the post, and that person must be
confirmed by the Senate.
That process probably will be
watched closely. Boente’s ouster
in October came as a surprise,
according to people close to him,
and raised concern among Democrats in Congress.
Boente, who became U.S. attorney in 2015, served for a period as
both acting attorney general and
acting assistant attorney general
under Trump. He has been interviewed by the special counsel’s
office and turned over handwritten notes that could be evidence
in the ongoing investigation into
whether the president obstructed
justice, according to people familiar with the matter.
Outside the Russia investigation, Virginia’s Eastern District is
involved in several sensitive matters with international reach.
Two ex-CIA officers face charges related to handling of classified
information. Prosecutors also are
working on two complex terrorism cases, according to people
familiar with both: that of an unnamed American citizen held in
Iraq and a pair of former U.K.
residents believed to be the remaining members of a cell that
executed Western hostages.
Should WikiLeaks founder Julian
Assange or his associates face
prosecution in the United States,
they would also be tried in the
Eastern District.
rachel.weiner@washpost.com
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Spring flowers trail behind
A biker rides on a road lined with bluebells adjacent to the C&O Canal in Williamsport, Md. Spring blooms are late to start, but more
should be appearing soon, with May expected to be warmer than normal, according to the Capital Weather Gang. Weather, B8
Md. adds lane to ease bottleneck before the Severn
BRIDGE FROM B1
beach-bound traffic on weekends
the nightmare backup can extend
farther.
The opening, which state officials said was a month ahead of
schedule, comes just in time for
Memorial Day, the kickoff of the
summer travel season.
Adding a fourth lane may
sound like a trifling response, but
it was debated for years and
completion of the project
brought out Gov. Larry Hogan (R)
to pronounce his blessings.
“For far too long this stretch of
Route 50 has been a serious
bottleneck that is a constant
headache for many Marylanders
who live in the Annapolis area, as
well as commuters and vacation-
ers trying to reach the Eastern
Shore,” Hogan told a cluster of
reporters assembled on a bridge
above Route 50. “This opening of
this new fourth lane on the Route
50 Severn bridge is just in time
for summer. Beyond this bridge,
we’re also continuing to tackle
the congestion that affects trips
to the beach.”
There are two tests on the
horizon for the add-a-lane project.
The first will come this weekend, when temperatures forecast
near 80 should set off the first big
stampede toward the beaches of
Delaware and Maryland.
“This Friday will be a reality
test,” SHA spokesman John Schofield said. “We think it will work.”
The other test is whether driv-
ers will be comfortable with lanes
that have been narrowed by one
foot, from 12 feet to 11 feet, to help
make room for the fourth.
“There’s been a lot of research
on this,” said Gregory Slater, administrator of the Maryland Department of Transportation.
The Federal Highway Administration examined lane shrinkage in a 60-page report that said,
“There are undoubtedly several
other factors that can impact
crash frequency and rates associated with narrow lanes — such as
volumes, speeds, the resulting
decrease in congestion and improved traffic flow, the length of
the narrow lane segment, horizontal and vertical curves.”
Several of those factors apply
to the Severn River Bridge. The
additional lane was created by
continuing what had been an
on-ramp from downtown Annapolis over the bridge, only to have
it exit onto a different route once
it reaches the opposite side.
The bridge reaches its highest
point above the river at about the
point where most drivers would
want to merge if they are continuing on Route 50 toward the
Chesapeake Bay Bridge. Schofield said he is not overly concerned, because the lanes were
narrowed during the construction phase.
“A lot of my friends were worried about the 11-foot lanes, and I
said: ‘What are you talking
about? We’ve been at 11-foot lanes
for six months!’ ” he said.
ashley.halsey@washpost.com
Enrollment decline pinched revenue at Catholic U.
UNIVERSITY FROM B1
al for “Academic Renewal,” a document that has been circulating
over the past several weeks on the
campus in Northeast Washington.
University officials said they are
hoping to keep the number of layoffs of tenured faculty as low as
possible.
Officials said their goal is to cut
costs without eliminating academic programs. To do that,
they’re asking some professors to
take on a larger teaching load than
they previously had by enforcing,
with certain exceptions, a standard of three classes per semester
for those in undergraduate and
professional programs. Professors
in doctoral programs would generally teach two classes a semester.
At the same time, officials plan
to trim faculty in 15 selected fields,
including architecture, media
studies and music, to save
$3.5 million a year.
The university traces its fiscal
problems in large part to an enrollment decline that has pinched
tuition revenue. It had 3,315 undergraduates last fall, down 11 percent compared with four years
earlier. At some other Catholic-affiliated schools in the Northeast
region, enrollment has risen in
recent years.
“We’re in a competitive higher
education market,” Andrew V.
Abela, Catholic’s provost, said
Monday. “We are working hard on
marketing, but our enrollments
haven’t kept up with expenses.”
The plan also includes measures meant to strengthen research and teaching. It envisions
hiring new faculty over the next
three years to support certain areas of growth in academic programs; renovating laboratories
and classrooms; and creating a
new school of music, visual and
performing arts.
The proposal is under delibera-
THE POSTPOINTS HUNT
ASTRID RIECKEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
The board of trustees of Catholic University is expected to vote in June on the proposal to cut faculty
positions at the school. The planned reductions would continue a recent shrinkage of the faculty.
tion by Catholic’s academic senate, a body that includes professors and administrators. The senate does not have a veto but can
make recommendations. The
board of trustees is expected to
vote on final approval in June.
The chair of the senate, Patrick
B. Tuite, an associate professor of
drama, declined to comment. In
an email, he cited a packed schedule of meetings Monday about the
proposal.
Two veteran professors, who
spoke on the condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the
matter, said they and many of
their colleagues are worried about
a plan that seems, to them, to be at
odds with the notion of “renewal.”
“A lot of people who care deeply
about this institution are in fact
frightened — for the school and for
what we feel will be a compromise
to the core principles of the university and its mission,” one said.
“Morale has never been lower,”
said the other. “People are despondent.”
In recent days, a website called
SaveCatholic.com has emerged,
claiming to represent concerned
faculty, staff, students and alumni
who are critical of the administration’s proposal. A professor who
helped to create the site, reached
by telephone, declined to comment for fear of reprisal.
Abela called the website “a little
disappointing” and said the university consulted with professors
as it developed its plans. Asked
about faculty fear and criticism,
he said it is not widespread. “We
On the piano, Evgeny Kissin
At the Kennedy Center, come have a listen.
He’ll tickle the ivories playing Beethoven.
Like Romantic music? The artist’s a showman.
Washington Performing Arts will present Evgeny Kissin at what time
on May 16 at the Kennedy Center Concert Hall?
Woolly Mammoth does it up right
With Gloria and Describe the Night
BLKS and Damned If You Do –
All “new season” shows waiting for you.
Who will direct Gloria September 3-30 at Woolly Mammoth Theatre
Company in Washington, D.C.?
(Hint: See WashingtonPerformingArts.org for the answer.)
(Hint: See WoollyMammoth.net for the answer.)
A NTONIO O LIVO
WHAT WILL YOU FIND?
To get your wheels turning: DC Bike Ride.
You set the pace; take it in stride.
Opt for a 20- or 6-mile route –
Bring the family; this event’s a hoot.
Who will headline the music at DC Bike Ride, the District’s only closed-road,
car-free recreational bike ride for all ages on May 19 at West Potomac Park?
(Hint: Login to your account for the answer.)
E A R N 5 P O I N T S F O R E V E RY C O R R E C T R E S P O N S E : F i n d t h e a n s w e r s , t h e n g o t o w a s h i n g t o n p o s t . c o m / p o s t p o i n t s a n d c l i c k o n “ Q u i z z e s ” t o e n t e r t h e c o r re c t re s p o n s e s .
TUESDAY, MAY 1 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B3
M2
May Day used to be a big deal in Washington. Could it ever be again?
May Day in
Washington used
to be one thing,
then it was
another thing,
and now it’s
John
neither of those
Kelly's
things.
Washington
Primitive
humans once
celebrated May 1
with fertility rituals — think
maidens with garlands dancing
around a priapic maypole. We’ve
always been more sophisticated
than that here in Washington,
though as early as 1886, the
clothing store Saks & Co. was
lamenting the end of the old
ways.
May Day “celebrated in song
and dance” was a thing of the
past, the store’s ad in The
Washington Post read that year.
It continued: “Modern
iconoclasm tends to the
abolition of the fanciful and the
merely aesthetical. This is an
eminently practical age in all
that relates to the occupations of
men, and perhaps in the near
future May will only be known as
the fifth month, and no more
shall we hear of: ‘Cupid with
Aurora playing/ As he met her
once a-Maying.’ ”
Still, Saks was happy that May
Day continued to have “an
intense practical meaning.” The
day served as a good reminder
that it was time to buy spring
clothing. Saks could help you
with that.
May 1, 1886, coincidentally,
was the date that U.S. labor
organizations had set for the
introduction of an eight-hour
workday. It would take decades
for that practice to spread
through the workforce, industry
by industry. The troubled road it
traveled was exemplified by the
May 1886 strike that led to a riot
in Chicago’s Haymarket Square.
As it happened, the day had a
long association with laborrelated strife. On May 1, 1517,
Londoners rioted against
foreigners they felt were taking
their jobs. They’d been spurred
on by an anti-immigrant
preacher who sermonized that
“the aliens and strangers eat the
bread from the poor fatherless
children.”
It was not a good day to be
French, Flemish or Venetian in
London. In what came to be
known as “Evil May Day,” more
than 1,000 rioters ransacked the
houses of immigrant artisans. In
the aftermath, about 15 rioters
were executed, putting a bit of a
damper on May Day.
In the United States, May Day
came to be associated with
improving children’s health,
after the American Child Health
Association — founded in 1923 —
adopted it as a day for physical
activity and physical
examinations. In Washington, as
many as eight maypoles were
erected every year at
Neighborhood House, a child
welfare center at 470 N St. SW.
There were festivities on the
city’s (then-segregated)
playgrounds, too, and at Union
Station, where May queens held
Four men are shot
in Northeast D.C.
Four men were shot early
Monday in Northeast
Washington, according to D.C.
police.
Officials said the men were
“conscious and breathing.” Few
details were available.
The incident happened in the
3600 block of New York Avenue
near the U.S. National
Arboretum. Roads in that area
were closed as police
investigated.
— Dana Hedgpeth
Man fatally stabbed
in seniors building
A 48-year-old man was fatally
stabbed early Monday in an
apartment of a senior housing
building near Barracks Row in
Southeast Washington, police
said.
The victim was identified as
Ivan Lynch of Hyattsville, Md. It
wasn’t clear why he was at the
building; authorities said he
celebrated his birthday on
Sunday.
Police said they arrested
Marquette Jordan, 26, also of
Hyattsville, and charged him
with second-degree murder.
The stabbing occurred about
2 a.m. in the Arthur Capper
senior public housing building
in the 900 block of 5th Street
SE, near the Southeast Freeway.
A police report says the victim
was stabbed in the chest and
died at a hospital.
The apartment building is
owned by the D.C. Housing
Authority and is managed
privately. It has 162 apartments.
— Dana Hedgpeth, Peter Hermann
Boy, man hurt by
gunfire in Northeast
A small boy and a man were
shot and wounded Monday
evening in Northeast
Washington, D.C. police said.
Both victims were conscious
and breathing after being hit,
said Brianna Jordan, a
spokeswoman for the police
department. The boy is 4 years
old, she said. It was not known
whether he was related to the
man.
The gunfire erupted about
6:10 p.m. in the 1800 block of M
Street NE, Jordan said. It
appeared that an investigation
was also underway on nearby
Bladensburg Road.
The circumstances were
unclear. It was not known
whether either victim was an
intended target. Police said they
were looking for four attackers,
but detailed descriptions were
not available.
According to police, the man
was hit more than once in his
lower extremities. The nature of
the boy’s wounds was not
immediately known.
The area is just southwest of
the National Arboretum and
southeast of the Trinidad area.
— Martin Weil
MARYL AND
Two hurt as vehicle
jumps retaining wall
A vehicle jumped a retaining
wall Sunday and fell into a
below-ground enclosure at the
headquarters of an Islamic
organization in Montgomery
County, authorities said.
Two occupants of the vehicle
were trapped inside but were
extricated and taken to
hospitals with injuries
described as not lifethreatening.
The incident occurred in the
15000 block of Good Hope Road
in the Silver Spring area of the
county, according to Pete
Piringer, a spokesman for the
county fire and rescue service.
One occupant suffered what was
said to be a serious injury.
The building at that address
houses the U.S. headquarters of
the Ahmadiyya Muslim
Community, according to the
community’s website.
According to the site, the
community was founded in 1889
as a revival movement within
Islam and emphasizes teachings
of peace, love, justice and
sanctity of life.
It was not clear what caused
the vehicle to jump the wall.
— Martin Weil
LOTTER I ES
Results from April 30
Match 5 (Mon.):
5 Card Cash:
5-16-25-32-37 *36
5S-5H-2S-KS-8S
DISTRICT
Mid-Day Lucky Numbers:
Mid-Day DC-4:
Mid-Day DC-5:
Lucky Numbers (Sun.):
Lucky Numbers (Mon.):
DC-4 (Sun.):
DC-4 (Mon.):
DC-5 (Sun.):
DC-5 (Mon.):
9-4-5
1-8-5-6
2-7-6-2-5
0-8-6
5-2-0
1-4-4-4
2-9-8-4
0-6-8-7-8
4-9-2-6-2
VIRGINIA
Day/Pick-3:
Pick-4:
Cash-5:
Night/Pick-3 (Sun.):
Pick-3 (Mon.):
Pick-4 (Sun.):
Pick-4 (Mon.):
Cash-5 (Sun.):
Cash-5 (Mon.):
2-5-9
4-9-7-3
3-9-21-22-33
6-5-0
5-6-9
3-5-3-1
8-7-7-9
2-4-5-19-22
1-14-21-31-33
MARYLAND
Mid-Day Pick 3:
Mid-Day Pick 4:
Night/Pick 3 (Sun.):
Pick 3 (Mon.):
Pick 4 (Sun.):
Pick 4 (Mon.):
Multi-Match:
Match 5 (Sun.):
0-2-1
2-9-3-6
7-0-4
2-6-2
5-7-6-4
3-6-0-0
7-15-30-34-41-43
8-16-30-31-33 *17
MULTI-STATE GAMES
Cash 4 Life:
Lucky for Life:
*Bonus Ball
court. Wrote The Post:
“Democratic queens they were,
elected by vote of their
playmates for their qualities of
leadership, health and
comeliness. Each had flower
girls and some had page boys
and attendants to carry their
trains; one shared her throne
with a ‘king.’ ”
Maypoles were also set up on
the Ellipse, where doctors and
nurses performed health checks.
According to The Post, “Most of
the children were suffering from
throat ailments, and others were
in poor health because of faulty
habits in eating and resting.”
Watching sickly youngsters
dance around a maypole wasn’t
the only feature of May Day. As a
1923 Post editorial noted: “The
communists have marked it red
on the calendar; but healthy
custom has marked it white and
set it aside for child’s play. And,
after all, this should make some
appeal to communists — for
many of them are grown-up
children who have temporarily
wandered astray. It may be
something of a strain on
imagination to hold
john.kelly@washpost.com
Twitter: @johnkelly
For previous columns, visit
washingtonpost.com/people/johnkelly.
Va. promises adjustments on I-66 pricing algorithm
LOCA L D I G ES T
THE DISTRICT
CROWLEY COMPANY/LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
Children dance around a maypole in the 1920s. May Day festivities in the D.C. area have waned.
communists, with their
penchant for bombs and
dynamite, to be children. But
they often act childishly, and
certainly they stand for
immaturity in political and
economic thought.”
Franklin Square became the
setting for Washington’s red
rallies: communists in the
afternoon, socialists in the
evening.
In 1934, a reader wrote to The
Post: “The May Day gathering of
the Communists in Franklin
Square was a rather drab affair.
These followers of the Soviet
Republic are not representative
of the men and women who
made America. Of the 25 or
more, half were Negroes whom
almost any one could feel
sympathy for as individuals. Half
of the whites apparently had
little American background and
the rest were nondescript.”
Ho-kay.
I imagine it was World War II
and television that killed May
Day in Washington. It’s making a
comeback in Britain, the
Guardian recently reported,
spurred on by such advances as
collapsible maypoles.
However you choose to mark
May Day — by wrapping a ribbon
around a pole or calling for the
overthrow of capitalism — please
celebrate responsibly.
2-11-14-45-49 ¶3
1-10-13-16-21 ‡17
‡Lucky Ball
¶Cash Ball
For late drawings and other results, check
washingtonpost.com/local/lottery
TOLLS FROM B1
carpoolers and bus riders a reliable trip, Valentine said.
The rush-hour, peak-direction
toll system between the Capital
Beltway and the District line
debuted Dec. 4, with rates reaching as high as $40 that first week
and igniting outrage among
Northern Virginia commuters.
There is no cap on the toll
pricing, which means that the
tolls increase as congestion rises
and decrease as congestion eases; they have gone as high as
$47.50.
Tolls are in effect weekdays
from 5:30 to 9:30 a.m. eastbound
and from 3 to 7 p.m. westbound.
The system has drawn national attention, trending on social
media and prompting heated
discussions at local transportation panels and in the Virginia
General Assembly. Some elected
officials called on the commonwealth to lower, cap or drop the
tolls altogether.
Transportation officials have
insisted that the system is working as intended, giving solo drivers the option to pay to use the
roadway while giving carpoolers
and bus riders smoother rides
and more consistent speeds.
“The public has gone through
so much pain over these new
tolls,” said Loudoun County Supervisor Ron Meyer (R-Broad
Run), who tried unsuccessfully to
lower the tolls through a resolution in the Northern Virginia
Transportation Commission.
“You talk to anyone in the area
that drives and they can’t believe
the tolls,” he said.
Meyer said adjusting the pricing algorithm to lower the toll
rates “is the least they can do.”
Since the first day, when tolls
peaked at $34.50, prices to travel
the 10-mile stretch have drawn
complaints from drivers. Tolls
have topped $30 at least 27 times
and surpassed $40 on 14 occasions, including hitting a record
$47.50 the morning of Feb. 28,
according to the Virginia Department of Transportation.
Commuters say the tolls,
among the highest in the nation,
have disrupted their travels.
Many motorists and neighborhood residents say the tolls also
have pushed more traffic onto
other roads, simply shifting the
congestion to areas off I-66. Others have complained that transit
isn’t a viable option for the outer
suburbs of Loudoun and Prince
William County, where bus service is limited and there is no
Metro.
State officials say their data
does not show an increase of
traffic on arterials.
“We have so many commuters
who expressed that inaction is
not an option,” said Del. Danica
Roem (D-Prince William), who
opposes the tolls and spoke from
the House floor about the impact
they have had on commuters,
including many who are hourly
workers and can’t afford to pay
the high rates to get to work.
Toll critics say they want the
state to return to the previous
HOV hours, which were expanded from 2.5 hours in the morning
and evening to four hours. Transportation officials have dis-
JAHI CHIKWENDIU/THE WASHINGTON POST
Commuters use the 66 Express Lanes during a rush-hour period in December, when the tolling system
went into effect. High costs associated with using the lanes have drawn fire from some lawmakers.
missed that idea.
“Finding a way to lower the
tolls, hopefully substantially, is at
least a good first step for easing
the burden on the commuters in
Northern Virginia,” Roem said.
Deputy Transportation Secretary Nick Donohue said the state
has been collecting data, analyzing changes to travel patterns
and is finally in a position to
make adjustments. He said the
state will look at potential adjustments by examining when is
the road most congested, the
history of usage, and possibly
ways to encourage users to travel
outside the busiest time: 8:30 to
9 a.m.
The changes, first reported by
WTOP, will be in full force this
summer.
Though the high tolls have
captured the most attention,
commuters in March were paying an average of $12.65 roundtrip. During those morning commutes,
speeds
averaged
53.2 mph, according to state
data. That is an improvement
from an average speed of
43.6 mph the previous year. Motorists saved about three minutes
in travel time during the morning and evening commute, according to the data.
Donohue said the state will
test lowering the target speed
but didn’t say what the new
target would be. By law, the
target can’t be lower than
45 mph.
Drivers with one or more passengers can ride free in the lanes
as long as they have an EZ-Pass
transponder set to carpool mode.
All other drivers, except motorcyclists, pay a toll.
The roadway previously was
limited to high-occupancy vehicles during rush hours. But then
those hours expanded when the
toll lanes opened, affecting thousands of solo commuters who
used I-66.
Valentine said the changes to
the toll system are the next step
in continuing improvements in
the corridor.
“The intention was to see if we
could improve travel time, move
people, improve carpooling, increase transit; and if you look at
all those factors, yes, performance has improved,” she said.
“The steps that we took have
created much better mobility for
the corridor. Now at six months
the question is, ‘How can we do a
better job?’ ”
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
MAY 1 , 2018
A search for answers after women’s remains found in D.C.
REMAINS FROM B1
The first remains were found
by contractors Wednesday in the
basement under the first floor of
the three-story red brick apartment building. Police then used
dogs from D.C. Fire and Emergency Medical Services and Fairfax
County to search the area and the
dogs alerted about 30 yards behind the house in woods that run
along Mississippi Avenue. Authorities searched that spot and
reported Saturday finding the remains of the two additional women.
Adan Escobar was among the
construction workers who saw
the bones in the building. He said
members of his crew were enlarging the crawl space and digging
deeper into the basement floor to
make room for additional apartments.
He said the crew had dug about
10 inches into the ground when
someone spotted what appeared
to be bones of a hand, a skull and
a jawbone. “He was thinking it
was animals,” Escobar said. “But
when he saw the skull and jaw, he
figured out it was a person.”
Escobar, 42, of Forestville, Md.,
said he raced over to the find and
called police. “There were no
clothes, no hair, no weapons,”
Escobar said. “Nothing but
bones.”
The apartment building is one
of several similar-looking buildings lining both sides of Wayne
Place. The one where the remains
were found is divided into six
apartments for a total of 4,350
square feet. The lot that extends
back and into woods, where the
other sets of remains were buried,
is nearly 8,000 square feet. It was
built in 1948, according to Redfin,
the real estate website.
The discovery of the remains
and 24-hour presence of police
officers, forensic scientists from
the medical examiner’s office and
other law enforcement officials
has unnerved residents of this
residential neighborhood a half-
Baker’s schools takeover
now in election spotlight
BAKER FROM B1
Although Baker touts increased enrollment, expanded
academic offerings and better
test scores as proof that the
takeover is working, some analysts say the system’s problems
could be an albatross that threatens Baker’s political future.
“I think it absolutely is a vulnerability,” said Todd Eberly, a
political-science professor at St.
Mary’s College. “He can’t deflect.
He made a point of saying, ‘I am
going to be the one to fix it.’ ”
With just over eight weeks
until the primary, voters are only
starting to focus on the crowded
field of candidates vying to challenge Hogan, who according to
the research group Morning Consult is the nation’s second-mostpopular governor.
Baker, who was a state lawmaker before he took the helm of
Maryland’s second-largest jurisdiction eight years ago, has
ranked at the top of most recent
polls, with large swaths of Democratic voters still undecided.
He has dismissed attacks on
his school efforts as politics and
says the county system continues
to face challenges, like others in
the state, but has made strides,
adding nearly 9,000 students
since 2013 after losing more than
1,000 students a year for nearly a
decade.
“If you measure academic performance and you measure anything, the school system is in a
much better position than it’s
probably been in 35 years,” Baker
said in an interview. As for recent
questions over potentially unauthorized pay raises and other
actions by Maxwell, Baker said he
is loath to abandon an educational leader who he believes has
made significant improvements.
“When something goes wrong
you don’t automatically change
to the next quarterback,” he said.
“You make a judgment call. And
that’s what I’ve tried to do, weighing everything in balance. Is it
better to bring somebody else in
now and start all over again? Or
do we continue down this path of
progress and make sure that
when we do make a change, it’s
actually a transition and not an
abrupt stop?”
The school system remains one
of the lowest-performing in the
state, but it has expanded specialty programs, including language
immersion, full-day prekinder-
mile from the Anacostia Freeway.
The woods had been a playground for children and the wide
alleys that cut through the area a
place to park and mingle.
“Nothing but bones.”
Adan Escobar, a construction worker
who saw the bones in the building’s
crawl space
Over the weekend, residents
complained that “nobody knows
what’s going on,” and the woman
who lives in the apartment above
where the skull was located called
it “creepy” and said she wanted to
move.
Newsham would not estimate
when his detectives and forensic
scientists would conclude their
investigation at the site. “We’re
going to stay here for as long as it
takes,” he said.
MATT MCCLAIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
Police search for clues at a property along Wayne Place SE. Two women were found in a shallow grave.
garten, arts integration and dual
enrollment, which allows high
school students to earn college
credits.
The percentage of eighth-graders who met or exceeded standards on standardized English
tests crept from 28 percent in
2015 to 28.8 percent in 2017. The
increase was higher for thirdgraders taking math tests:
18.6 percent met or exceeded
standards in 2015, compared
with 25.4 percent in 2017.
But in addition to progress,
there have been headline-grabbing scandals. In 2016, Deonte
Carraway, a 22-year-old elementary school volunteer, was arrested and accused of recording
young students committing sex
acts, and school officials were
criticized for not responding adequately to indications that
something was wrong. Months
later, the school district lost a
$6.4 million federal grant for
Head Start after a review found
that teachers in the program used
corporal punishment and humiliated children and that county
school officials failed to address
the problem.
And a state probe last year
found that grades for nearly
5,500 students were changed between 2015 and 2017, just days
before graduation. School officials promised corrective action,
and the Maryland State Board of
Education assigned a monitor to
make sure it happens.
More recently, Maxwell’s critics on the board attacked his
decision to give large pay raises to
a number of central-office employees, some of which, they say,
should have required board approval.
Ron Lester, a Democratic consultant who lives in Prince
George’s, said he thinks there is a
“small, vocal minority” who have
made Maxwell and Baker’s handling of the school system a
political issue.
“Turning around a public
school system is like turning
around a battleship,” Lester said.
“Given the resources, all in all
they’ve done a good job. Most
people would say there has been
progress.”
Other observers say Baker
could lose votes over the issue —
from those who oppose the takeover in Prince George’s, a Democratic stronghold, and elsewhere
in the state from those hearing
criticism of the district.
“Education is always an issue,”
said Bob Ross, the president of
the county branch of the NAACP,
which also has called for Maxwell
to be fired. “People in the county
are angry. . . . It falls back on the
county executive, because he said
the buck stops with him.”
During a campaign stop in
Frederick County, Baker recalled
in a recent speech, a woman
praised the progress Prince
George’s has made but then said:
“You know the schools. Why don’t
you just divorce yourself from
that issue?”
He told his audience he responded by saying he ran for
office “to make sure everybody,
especially in our public schools,
gets the same opportunities that I
got.”
Dolores Millhouse is a Prince
George’s parent who founded My
Bilingual Child, which advocates
for the language-immersion programs Maxwell has expanded.
She supported giving Baker more
power over the school system and
said that the scrutiny of him and
Maxwell is “a political ploy” by
those who have always opposed
the takeover.
“We need to keep politics out of
where they belong — out of our
schools,” she said.
Other parents, such as Nicole
Nelson — who was not a fan of
giving Baker more power — say
the criticism of Maxwell’s leadership resonates. Nelson, vice president of the John Hanson Montessori Parent Teacher Student Association, said that she has not
decided whom to vote for in the
gubernatorial primary but that
the problems are on her mind.
“The upside is if we can have
someone from Prince George’s,
we can get the dollars that we
need,” she said, “especially the
funding that we need for our
schools.”
Baker’s strained relationship
with the county teachers union
contributed to his inability to win
peter.hermann@washpost.com
clarence.williams@washpost.com
the coveted endorsement from
the Maryland State Education
Association, which decided overwhelmingly to back Jealous.
Hogan has sparred with the
union repeatedly over the years.
Should Jealous lose, union officials said, they are likely to endorse whoever wins the Democratic nomination in the general
election. But there are concerns
about whether any of the other
Democrats, including Baker, will
be able to get the required support needed to obtain the endorsement.
If Baker wins the primary,
Prince George’s schools will be a
ripe target for Hogan, who says
Baker and Maxwell did not respond adequately to the gradechanging scandal.
The governor told reporters in
February that Baker should have
fired his schools chief “a long
time ago.”
Baker, who has attacked Hogan for scaling back planned
funding increases for Prince
George’s and other school systems, should have a ready answer, said Democratic strategist
Justin Schall, who managed thenLt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown’s losing gubernatorial campaign in
2014.
The governor “will say, ‘He
took over the schools,’ ” Schall
said. “While Baker’s answer will
be, ‘You took money from our
schools.’ ”
ovetta.wiggins@washpost.com
MARYLAND
Computer-based tests are a challenge for low-income students, teachers say
Online PARCC exams
may be helping to widen
the achievement gap
BY
T ALIA R ICHMAN
baltimore — When students at
Govans Elementary School in
North Baltimore took statewide
standardized tests last year, Principal Linda Taylor said, some
struggled with using a mouse to
navigate the online assessment.
Some didn’t know how to scroll to
the appropriate sections. Others
grappled with how to highlight
information.
The nearly 450 students enrolled at the public charter school
last year shared roughly 70 computers, laptops and iPads. Some
had access to a computer only
once a week, Taylor said, making
it difficult for them to develop the
skills needed to succeed on an
online test.
About 14 percent of Govans
students passed the Partnership
for Assessment of Readiness for
College and Careers test last year.
(The PARCC tests are also used in
D.C. public schools.)
“You’re going to stumble if
you’re struggling to navigate the
system before you even look at the
questions,” Taylor said.
Four years after the Maryland
State Department of Education
began requiring the state’s public
schools to give students the
PARCC tests, some teachers remain concerned that the online
version is helping to widen an
achievement gap they’ve spent
decades working to close.
Children in grades three
through eight and high school
students take the PARCC tests.
Their scores help determine
whether they are eligible for graduation and will be used to rate the
state’s public schools starting next
year.
PARCC was designed to be taken online, and most Maryland
schools quickly transitioned from
paper and pencil to the computerized assessment when it was introduced in the 2014-2015 school
year. But as students sit for the
test this month, it will be the first
time that all schools are required
to administer the computerized
version.
Test officials say computers are
a more secure way to administer a
test, allow for faster scoring and
enable more innovative questions. Proponents say online testing is an important way to prepare
students for a workplace reliant
on technological skills.
But some Baltimore educators
worry it presents yet another hurdle for students from poor families. Nationally, researchers have
found that low-income households continue to lag in technology adoption and that the majority of teachers in poor schools say
their students are not prepared to
take computerized tests.
Students without regular access to computers or high-speed
Internet at home will face challenges when it comes to building
the skills needed to excel on the
test, said Towson University professor Jessica Shiller, who studies
urban education. Low-income
homes with children are four
times less likely to have a broadband Internet connection than
their middle- or upper-class counterparts, the Pew Research Center
reported in 2015. The gap is wider
for children from black and Hispanic households.
“Putting the test online just sets
the city kids three steps back,”
Shiller said. “It’s more a measure
of income than skill.”
After the first year of PARCC
testing, some research showed
that students performed better on
the paper-and-pencil version of
the test than on the online version.
The leader of the company that
manages the PARCC consortium
said he is “committed to fairness
and ensuring no student is disadvantaged in how they take the
test.”
Arthur VanderVeen, the chief
executive of New Meridian, said
the company recently studied the
two modes of testing and found
that paper test questions and
computer test questions yield
comparable results. He said the
data from those studies likely
won’t be made public until this
summer.
“We look at every single test
question and look at how does it
perform on an online mode or
paper-based mode,” VanderVeen
said. He said the company also
looks at how the questions score
among different socioeconomic
and racial groups.
He said students and teachers
have grown more comfortable
with the online assessment.
Since 2016, state education department spokesman Bill Reinhard said, more than 90 percent of
tests have been completed online.
“Systems are prepared,” he
said.
Still, administrators at Govans,
where nearly 70 percent of students come from low-income families, say the shift to online testing
three years ago led to lower student scores on the PARCC than on
previous paper-and-pencil assessments.
The PARCC test was written to
be more rigorous than the previous assessment and to align the
state with Common Core standards.
Govans recently launched an
online fundraising campaign
aimed at bolstering its stock of
computers.
“We had to get creative,” Taylor
said.
The school raised more than
$42,000, enough to buy 90 laptops for students to share. Taylor
said the extra resources will give
students additional computer
time to develop the skills necessary to take the PARCC online and
succeed in 21st-century jobs.
Dozens of students worked on
class assignments on the new
computers one recent morning.
Third-graders learned basic coding and researched the planets.
Fifth-graders Googled questions
about the side effects of fast-food
diets for a group project on health.
Teacher Ashley Turner said her
fifth-graders already have grown
more comfortable with the technology since the computers arrived two months ago. Her class
has gone from using computers
once a week to three times a week.
“They love being on the computers,” she said. “And it’ll help
tremendously for the test, because they’re practicing the skills
they have to use.”
Across Baltimore, 15 percent of
students passed the English test
and 11.9 percent passed the math
PARCC last year.
City school officials say they’re
not blaming the mode effect for
poor test results.
“As a district, we’re not using
this as an excuse for student performance on any assessment we
do,” city schools spokeswoman
Edie House-Foster said.
Administrators have long
raised concerns about funding for
technology. State education officials told the Maryland legislature
in 2014 that it would cost schools
more than $100 million to buy the
computers and other upgrades
needed to administer the PARCC
tests online.
City school officials said they’ve
bought more than 3,000 devices
— the number the district concluded would be needed to fully
administer the PARCC online.
“We’re coming to a good place,
as far as devices go,” said Kenneth
Thompson, the district’s chief information technology officer.
Traditional public schools in
Baltimore are funded through a
model called “fair student funding,” under which principals are
given substantial control of their
budgets. They decide, for example, whether to buy more computers or spend the money on other
items.
As a result, the number of devices per student varies. At some
elementary schools, there are
roughly five students per device.
At others, the ratio is 1 to 1.
The schools to open under the
district’s 21st-century construction program — a $1 billion initiative to rebuild or renovate up to 28
schools — are designed to be
equipped with one device for every two students.
Neighboring Baltimore County
is spending more than $200 million to give every student a laptop
by next school year.
Baltimore City schools officials
provide budget guidance as principals work on crafting their
spending priorities.
“When it’s time to prepare
school budgets, we talk about the
importance of technology,” said
Janise Lane, the district’s executive director of teaching and
learning. “We try to really keep
that at the forefront.”
Even when students have ac-
cess to computers, researchers
say, the quality of technology is
often uneven.
Students who produced a report for the University of Maryland Baltimore County’s Shriver
Center in 2015 said technological
problems are “particularly a concern in lower income schools in
Baltimore City.”
The city students and teachers
who were interviewed for the report spoke of computer crashes,
answers spontaneously deleting
and difficulty scrolling and highlighting text.
“These challenges are less frequently experienced by students
in schools with more modern
computers and technical infrastructure, which compounds the
performance gap already identified between schools in high and
low income communities,” the researchers concluded.
Baltimore Teachers Union
President Marietta English said
online testing is an added burden
for teachers working with students who don’t have regular access to technology.
“You have to teach both the
computer and the content,” she
said. “It’s very stressful for teachers to have to do both, knowing
that this is a high-stakes test.”
Stacey Davis, the district’s coordinator of media and instructional technology, said the system provides professional development
and training on how teachers
should incorporate computers
into the curriculum.
The district partners with Comcast to give students a discount on
Internet access at home.
“We recognize kids need better
access in their homes, but we’ve
really worked with partners to
make sure we can provide some of
that,” Davis said.
But for some teachers, the frustrations remain.
“It’s an accepted inequality to a
degree,” said Jesse Schneiderman,
a teacher at Frederick Douglass
High School. “We know this is a
problem for our kids more than
other kids. But we just have to
keep dealing with it.”
— Baltimore Sun
TUESDAY, MAY 1 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
PETULA DVORAK
High school
band proves
the show
does go on
DVORAK FROM B1
bands at Northwestern, saw the
fire and made a quick agreement.
“We’re not getting off this bus
until all the kids are off first,”
Townes said. So they tag teamed,
getting all the kids off safely.
Many left behind cellphones,
laptops, even the instruments.
This wasn’t the freshman
band and their rented
instruments. These musicians
are some of the region’s most
accomplished. A good number of
them are going to some of the
most prestigious music schools
in the country when they
graduate. Garcia, for instance, is
heading to Berklee College of
Music in Boston this fall.
“Some of them have
instruments that have been in
their families for generations,”
Townes said. Or they have
specialized, high-end
instruments their parents saved
for years to buy, like the nearly
$6,000 Buffet R13 clarinet that
was still on the bus, the flames
closing in on it, as the kids were
running off and their teachers
were telling them to “Move!
Move! Move!”
Garcia had been asleep when
her friend nudged her awake.
“She told me, ‘It smells like
burned beans.’ And it did,” she
said.
Her saxophone, a Yamaha
Custom Z, cost $3,500. It wasn’t
EZ
something her parents — a
maintenance man and an office
worker — could afford. But her
whole church heard her wail on
that sax. And they bought it for
her.
As the kids jumped from the
bus along a turnpike culvert, a
familiar-looking man was
standing on the side of the
turnpike filming.
“I saw the guy and told him,
‘Here, take these,’ and I handed
him a trombone and a trumpet,”
Renberg said. The guy was
Mehmet Oz, known at TV’s Dr.
Oz, who happened to be driving
by and stopped to help.
Oz took the instruments,
assumed Townes was the bus
driver and tried to help the kids
get away from the flaming bus.
(He later posted a video and said
the kids were from Baltimore.)
After they grabbed all the
instruments they could safely
get, they watched the bus burn
all the way to its skeletal, metal
B5
RE
frame.
Dozens of instruments were
charred, burned, melted,
including cellos, violas, that
$6,000 clarinet.
Let’s be clear. This isn’t a fancy
part of Maryland; it’s not the
kind of school where kids who
are phenomenally gifted get the
kind of equipment to match their
talents with the swipe of a
parental credit card. Around
70 percent of the Prince George’s
County students at
Northwestern qualify for
subsidized lunches, which means
they live at or below the poverty
level.
So losses like this are
devastating.
Last week, before their big
assessments, three local music
stores swooped in to loan the
kids instruments. The teachers
could tell their gifted kids
weren’t playing like themselves.
They still got the highest scores
possible.
Then they had a big county
honor band concert Friday night.
That’s where I met them. I was
in the audience to see my son
perform in a middle school
honor band.
The high school honor jazz
band, led by Townes, killed it.
Free-flowing, funky perfection.
Big pieces, improv, smooth. A
couple boys took the stage for
solos, hammed it up. Wow.
And then Garcia the
saxophonist, in the front row
with her cardigan, modest skirt
and demure, flat shoes stood up.
“I didn’t want to get in front of
the stands,” she said, trying to
hang back. But Townes gave her
a look, and she nudged past the
stands, closer to the edge of the
stage. And the crowd went wild
as she played. Running the notes
up and down, letting her mind
and her fingers go. The audience
whooped and cheered and
screamed. She put her eyes
down, nudged back past the
stands and sat down.
“I never even heard jazz before
I got here,” Garcia said. Her
grandfather played saxophone in
churches, but jazz was
something she had never been
exposed to until Townes played it
for her.
“When you do classical, you’re
judged by how you play what’s on
the page,” she told me. “But in
jazz, you can also play what’s in
your mind.”
She’s the quiet, reserved one in
class.
“And then you get her on
stage,” Townes said, “and it’s like
she has a cape! Sax Girl!”
She loves playing her
grandpa’s sax. But what about
her beloved Yamaha Custom Z?
“I saw your saxophone,”
someone told her, running from
the flames on the turnpike.
Yes, her baby made it. And this
fall, it’s going to Boston with her.
petula.dvorak@washpost.com
Twitter: @petulad
MARYLAND
Robbery suspect wounded in police-involved shooting in Prince George’s
BY
L YNH B UI
A man wanted in connection
with an armed robbery was shot
by police Monday morning as law
enforcement was serving a warrant against him.
Corey Janifer, 26, was transported to a hospital in critical
condition after he was wounded
by a Prince George’s County po-
lice officer in Greenbelt, Police
Chief Hank Stawinski said.
The incident unfolded shortly
before noon when Prince
George’s police were helping officers from the District execute an
arrest warrant in an apartment in
the 5800 block of Cherrywood
Lane, Stawinski said.
Members of the department’s
Fugitive Apprehension Team
were allowed into the apartment
by family, but Janifer had locked
himself in a bedroom, Stawinski
said. After Janifer would not turn
himself in, police were preparing
to break down the door when one
of the officers “perceived a threat
and responded to that threat,”
Stawinski said.
The officer fired a single shot
and struck Janifer, Stawinski
Obituaries of residents from the
District, Maryland and Northern
Virginia.
science at the Food and Drug
Administration’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health.
John ‘Jack’ Tracey,
juvenile court judge
John “Jack” Tracey, 86, a juvenile court judge in the U.S. District Court of Maryland for 22
years until he retired in 1992,
died March 11 at a hospital in
Silver Spring. The cause was
acute respiratory failure, said a
daughter, Juliette Goldman.
Judge Tracey, a resident of
Laurel, was born in Silver Spring.
As a child, he was a U.S. Capitol
page and became chief page for
then-Speaker of the House Sam
Rayburn (D-Tex.). Judge Tracey
was a U.S. Capitol Police officer in
the late 1940s and early 1950s. He
co-founded what is now Hearts
and Homes for Youth, a nonprofit
for at-risk youth, was a Mason
and enjoyed scuba diving.
Barbara Dyke,
museum docent
Barbara Dyke, 91, a docent at
the Smithsonian Institution’s National Air and Space Museum
from its opening in 1976 until
2016, died Feb. 23 at a hospital in
Prince Frederick. The cause was
encephalitis, said a son, Robert
Dyke.
Mrs. Dyke, a resident of Solomons, Md., was born Barbara
Williams in the Panama Canal
Zone and had lived in the Washington area for 54 years. At the
National Air and Space Museum,
she trained other docents and
conducted special tours for
guests ranging from schoolchildren to high-ranking government
officials and foreign dignitaries.
William Leach,
Public Health Service officer
William Leach, 84, a specialist
in genetics and cytology who
served in the U.S. Public Health
Service for 32 years and taught
cytogenetics as part of George
Washington University’s adjunct
faculty, died Feb. 26 at an
assisted-living center in Potomac.
The cause was coronary artery
disease, said a daughter, Jennifer
Leach.
Dr. Leach, a resident of Silver
Spring, was born in Pine Mountain, Ky. He taught at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville
before moving to the Washington
area and joining the Public
Health Service in 1966. He retired
in 1998 as associate director for
Stawinski said the shooting
was “unfortunate,” but police
were dealing with a “dangerous
individual” who had fled from
law enforcement officials who
tried to apprehend him last week.
Police in the District had been
searching for Janifer in connection with a robbery and shooting
on April 8, police said.
The county police department
does not name officers who fire
their weapons until 24 hours after
a shooting incident. Stawinski
said the officer was a 19-year
veteran of the department and
has been on the Fugitive Apprehension Team for two years.
lynh.bui@washpost.com
Dana Hedgpeth contributed to this
report.
———— Trustee Sales & Legal Notices ————
OF NOTE
Helen Barnes,
nurse
Helen Barnes, 75, a geropsychiatric nursing specialist who
worked for Prince George’s County government for 20 years before
retiring in the late 2000s, died
Feb. 14 at her home in College
Park. The cause was complications from lung cancer, said her
husband, James Barnes.
Mrs. Barnes was born Mary
Helen Scroggins in Chattanooga,
Tenn., and moved to College Park
in 1981. In the 1980s, she taught
nursing aides at Prince George’s
Community College and worked
as a staff development director at
Collingswood Nursing & Rehabilitation Center in Rockville. She
also volunteered as a psychiatric
disaster nurse for the American
Red Cross. She was a member of
St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church in
College Park.
said. Janifer was taken to a hospital, where he was in critical condition as of Monday afternoon,
Stawinski said.
Stawinski said he could not
immediately detail the nature of
the threat perceived by the officer
who fired. Police have not recovered a weapon and were searching the apartment Monday afternoon, Stawinski said.
Eugene Skora,
lawyer
Eugene Skora, 94, a retired
federal lawyer who in the 1980s
and early 1990s organized golf
and tennis tournaments and other sports opportunities for retired military officers and other
senior citizens, died March 7 at a
retirement community in Springfield. The cause was cardiopulmonary arrest, said a son-in-law,
Bruce Martin.
Mr. Skora was born in Berea,
Ohio, and had lived in the Washington area for 68 years. From
1956 to 1973, he was associate
general counsel to the U.S. Information Agency. He then spent six
years as general counsel to the
American Revolution Bicentennial Commission and then was
briefly general counsel to the
National Association of Retired
Federal Employees.
Farid Srour,
real estate investor
Farid Srour, 99, a real estate
investor, developer and home
builder doing business as FS Peoples Realty, died March 4 at his
home in Potomac. The cause was
congestive heart failure, said a
son, James Srour.
Mr. Srour was born in Tartus,
Syria, and settled in the Washington area 70 years ago. For about
20 years, he was a building maintenance man, lawn and garden
worker, taxi driver and a life
insurance salesman. He went
into real estate investing and
development 50 years ago and
remained active in his business
until three years ago, his family
said.
— From staff reports
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING
KNOWN AS:
3611 WARDER STREET NW
WASHINGTON, DC 20010
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of the
District of Columbia recorded on March 1, 2005, as Instrument
Number 2005028871, and in accordance Judgment filed on
March 14, 2018 in case 2016 CA 002495 R(RP) and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the office of
HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin Avenue,
NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
MAY 22, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
3611 WARDER STREET NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20010, LOT
NUMBERED TWO HUNDRED FIFTY-THREE (253), SQUARE
NUMBERED THIRTY-HUNDRED THIRTY-FOUR (3034).
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (5.875%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 31920
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET. AL.,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
840
Trustees Sale - DC
APRIL 24, MAY 1, 8, 15, 2018
APRIL 24, MAY 1, 8, 15, 2018
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING
KNOWN AS:
4647 HILLSIDE ROAD SE
WASHINGTON, DC 20019
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of
the District of Columbia recorded on December 14, 2010, as
Instrument Number 2010110551, and in accordance Judgment
filed on March 23, 2018 in case 2015 CA 006462 R(RP) and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the
office of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin
Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
MAY 22, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
4647 HILLSIDE ROAD SE, WASHINGTON, DC 20019, LOT 117,
IN SQUARE 5363.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (4.875%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 25526
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET. AL.,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
12179352
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING
KNOWN AS:
519 Q STREET NW
WASHINGTON, DC 20001
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of
the District of Columbia recorded on October 15, 2008, as
Instrument Number 2008107204, and in accordance Judgment
filed on March 29, 2018 in case 2015 CA 006728 R(RP) and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the
office of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin
Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
MAY 22, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
519 Q STREET NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20001, LOT NUMBERED THIRTY-NINE (39), IN SQUARE NUMBERED FOUR
HUNDRED SEVENTY-SEVEN (477).
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (7% per
annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 31907
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET. AL.,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
12179356
APRIL 24, MAY 1, 8, 15, 2018
12179349
Does this page look familiar?
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
MAY 1 , 2018
obituaries
MICHAEL ANDERSON, 98
Directed World War II classic ‘The Dam Busters’
BY
FILIP WOLAK /UNION THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY
In his writings, the Rev. James H. Cone emphasized racial justice,
later focusing on the struggles for gender and class equality.
JAMES H. CONE, 79
Minister who founded
black liberation theology
BY
H ARRISON S MITH
In the late 1960s, the Rev.
James H. Cone later recalled, “I
was within inches of leaving the
Christian faith.” He had spent a
decade immersed in theology —
poring over the teachings of the
African Methodist Episcopal
Church, studying for a doctorate
and closely following the sermons
and speeches of the Rev. Martin
Luther King Jr., whose nonviolent
civil rights tactics were informed
by his ministry.
Then he heard Malcolm X.
The Black Power leader proclaimed that “Christianity is the
white man’s religion,” one that
encouraged African Americans to
wait patiently for a “milk and
honey” heaven, and called for
blacks to fight for their rights “by
any means necessary.” His assassination in 1965, followed by the
killing of King three years later,
plunged Dr. Cone into what he
described as a full-fledged spiritual crisis.
To gather his thoughts, he traveled to Little Rock and all but
locked himself inside the church
office of his older brother, a fellow
minister. Six weeks later, he
emerged with a new perspective,
dubbed black liberation theology,
that sought to reconcile the fiery
cultural criticism of Malcolm X
with the Christian message of
King.
Through books such as “Black
Theology & Black Power” (1969),
“A Black Theology of Liberation”
(1970) and “God of the Oppressed” (1975), he “changed the
way we do theology,” said the Rev.
Kelly Brown Douglas, a professor
at Union Theological Seminary in
Manhattan, where Dr. Cone was
long on the faculty.
Dr. Cone, she said, centered the
Gospels on racial justice and later
on the struggles for gender and
class equality. “He could not understand how anyone could do
Christian theology in America
without talking about the black
struggle for freedom, and how
anyone could do Christian theology in general without talking
about the oppressed.”
“When crucifixion is at the center of the faith,” said Douglas, who
is also dean of Union’s Episcopal
Divinity School, “you have to talk
about the crucified classes of people.”
Dr. Cone, who upended America’s theological establishment
when he argued that God had a
“radical identification” with African Americans and poor peoples
across the globe, died April 28 at
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer
Center in Manhattan, Douglas
said. He was 79.
In his writings, Dr. Cone suggested that God was black — an
argument that was famously advanced by his 19th-century predecessor Henry McNeal Turner,
who spurned the traditional image of Jesus as a blond, whiteskinned prophet.
Dr. Cone “wasn’t arguing that
God was physically black, or that
only black people were righteous,” said Anthony B. Pinn, a
religion professor at Rice University. “He was arguing that Christians — white, black, purple, red
— have to be committed to racial
justice. That whites in their
churches have to be committed to
racial justice, or they need to call
themselves something different.”
While Dr. Cone’s theology was
founded on a King-like embrace
of love and acceptance, he was
fiercely critical of white churches
and theologians, telling the New
York Times in 1969 that “white
theology is basically racist and
non-Christian.” He once called
himself “the angriest theologian
in America,” and explained that
he was driven to rage by the
failure of leading white theologians to forcefully condemn institutional racism, and especially
lynching.
In part, his anger was driven by
the fact that his father, a laborer
who once sued to desegregate the
local school district in Arkansas,
was nearly the victim of racial
violence. He recalled that his father once picked up a shotgun
when he was told that a lynch
mob would run him out of his
house. “Let them come,” he said,
“because some of them will die
with me.”
James Hal Cone was born in
Fordyce, a small town in central
Arkansas, on Aug. 5, 1938. He was
raised in nearby Bearden and said
he was called to the ministry at 16.
He graduated in 1958 from Philander Smith College, a historically black college in Little Rock, and
three years later received a bachelor of divinity degree from Garrett Theological Seminary (now
Garrett-Evangelical Theological
Seminary in Evanston, Ill.).
Dr. Cone received a master’s in
divinity in 1963 and a doctorate in
1965, both from Northwestern
University, and was teaching at
Adrian College in Michigan when
his political views began to shift
toward the Black Power movement.
According to Dwight N. Hopkins, a theology professor at the
University of Chicago, Dr. Cone
was the first to publish books of
liberation theology — works “that
said the heart of Jesus Christ . . . is
liberation of the economically
poor.” He was soon followed by
Catholic theologians such as
Gustavo Gutiérrez, who called for
the emancipation of the poor in
Latin America.
His wife, the former Sandra
Gibson, died in 1983. Survivors
include two children from an earlier marriage, Charles Cone of
New York City and Michael Cone
of Kansas City, Kan.; two children
from Gibson, Robynn Cone of
New York City and Krystal Cone
of Washington; a brother; and
two grandchildren.
In 2018, his book “The Cross
and the Lynching Tree” (2011) —
which described the crucifixion of
Jesus as “a first-century lynching”
— received the Grawemeyer
Award in Religion from Louisville
Presbyterian Theological Seminary and the University of Louisville. His final book, the memoir
“Said I Wasn’t Gonna Tell Nobody,” is scheduled for publication later this year.
Dr. Cone continued to speak
out against racial inequality in
recent years, appearing at rallies
and broadening his writings to
cover the experience of women,
whom he said he had overlooked
in his early work. He remained
hopeful, he said, that “together
we can create a society and world
not defined by white supremacy.”
“Hope,” he told the Jesuit magazine America in 2006, “is found
where two or three small groups
of people . . . become willing to
bear witness to the Gospel’s transcending racial bonding and
move toward human bonding. We
need some signs of that transcending. Where will they come
from if not from the church? And
how will these signs be expressed,
except by preachers and priests
and rabbis?”
harrison.smith@washpost.com
A DAM B ERNSTEIN
Michael Anderson, a British
director whose 1955 film “The
Dam Busters” became one of the
most popular wartime dramas
ever made and launched him to a
filmmaking career that included
the
all-star
Oscar-winner
“Around the World in 80 Days”
and the sci-fi fantasy “Logan’s
Run,” died April 25 at his home on
the Sunshine Coast of British Columbia. He was 98.
His family announced the
death and said the cause was
heart disease.
Mr. Anderson was born into an
acting family and entered British
cinema as an errand boy and
movie extra. He became an assistant to directors Noël Coward and
David Lean on the first-rate
World War II film “In Which We
Serve” (1942) and began his professional rise after service in the
British army’s Royal Signal Corps.
His breakthrough was “The
Dam Busters,” about the 1943
British raid against the Ruhr
dams in Germany’s industrial
heartland. The mission involved
the dropping of “bouncing
bombs,” which skipped along the
surface to avoid torpedo netting,
hit the dam and exploded many
meters down. The British Lancaster bombers, flying at the perilous height of 60 feet above water, were raked by German antiaircraft fire, and 53 of the 133 men
in the aircrews were killed.
Mr. Anderson began filming a
decade after the war, at a time
when the British moviegoing
public had wearied of screen
propaganda about stiff-upper-lip
bravery in combat. In a departure,
“The Dam Busters” emphasized
the rigors of scientific trial and
much error as well as the understated, sardonic humor among
the principal players, which included Michael Redgrave as aeronautical engineer and bouncingbomb mastermind Barnes Wallis
and Richard Todd as Wing Commander Guy Gibson, who led the
squadron on the mission.
HOLIDAY FILMS/ RONALD GRANT ARCHIVE/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO
Michael Anderson made more than three dozen movies, including
the popular “Around the World in 80 Days” and “Logan’s Run.”
To re-create the sortie over the
Ruhr, the Lancasters had to fly far
lower even than on the actual
raid. “Sixty feet didn’t photograph like 60 feet,” Mr. Anderson
later told an interviewer. “It photographed like 200 feet. We had to
go down to 30 feet in some cases.”
For all its primitive special effects, the attack sequence was
said to have been echoed in the
climax of “Star Wars: A New
Hope” (1977) when rebel pilots fly
into the heart of the Death Star.
Cinematographer Erwin Hillier’s inventive black-and-white
camerawork imbued the film
with a quasi-documentary feel,
seamlessly incorporating actual
test footage and serving as a somber counterbalance to the jaunty title march by Eric Coates
that became a staple of British
military parades and sports
events for decades.
“The Dam Busters,” Britain’s
top-grossing film of the year,
vaulted Mr. Anderson to the attention of Hollywood producers.
He was recruited to showman Mike Todd’s big-budget
adaptation of Jules Verne’s
“Around the World in 80 Days”
(1986), starring David Niven
as balloonist and adventurer
Phileas Fogg and Cantinflas as his
trusty manservant.
The film was a bloated affair,
shot in more than 100 locations
worldwide and with cameos by
Frank Sinatra, Buster Keaton
and Marlene Dietrich providing
much of the thrust. But it garnered five Academy Awards, including best picture, and earned a
best-director Oscar nomination
for Mr. Anderson.
His subsequent career included promising material often hampered by uneven scripts. His adaptation of “1984” (1956), with
Edmond O’Brien as George Orwell’s dystopian hero Winston
Smith, featured the jolt of an
alternative “happy” ending for
American audiences.
The suspense drama “The
Wreck of the Mary Deare” (1959),
with Gary Cooper and Charlton
Heston, sorely lacked in pacing,
as did the spy thriller “The Quiller
Memorandum” (1966), with
George Segal as an American
secret agent and Max von Sydow
as a knuckle-cracking neo-Nazi.
One of Mr. Anderson’s finest
midcareer efforts was “Conduct
Unbecoming” (1975), based on
Barry England’s play about an
officer in colonial India accused
of rape. It starred Michael York.
“Its taut construction, mounting
tension and polished performances make for a fascinating entertainment,” New York Times
film critic A.H. Weiler wrote.
The next year, Mr. Anderson
directed York in “Logan’s Run,” a
special effects-laden drama about
a futuristic society that encourages hedonistic abandon by young
people — until they are killed at
age 30, to control population
growth. It was a commercial
smash but critical flop.
Mr. Anderson’s journeyman career included several horror film
credits, among them “Orca”
(1977), as well as the religious
dramas “The Shoes of the Fisherman” (1968), with Anthony Quinn
as a Russian who becomes
pope, and “The Jeweller’s Shop”
(1988), starring Burt Lancaster and based on a 1960 play
about the sanctity of marriage by
Karol Wojtyla, who became Pope
John Paul II.
The challenge of the latter “was
as much a matter of catching the
spirit of the book as doing it
literally,” Mr. Anderson told the
Toronto Star. “For instance,
there were lines like, ‘The eternity
of man passes through love.’
Now how do you get an actor to
say that?”
Michael Joseph Anderson was
born in London on Jan. 30, 1920.
His first outing as a solo director
was “Waterfront” (1950), a melodrama about a sotted Liverpool
merchant mariner (Robert Newton) who abandons his pregnant
wife, only to stir further trouble
upon his return years later.
His final credit was “The New
Adventures of Pinocchio” (1999),
a live-action movie starring Martin Landau as Geppetto.
In 2012, Mr. Anderson received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Directors
Guild of Canada.
Survivors include his third
wife, Adrianne Ellis. A complete
list of survivors could not immediately be determined.
adam.bernstein@washpost.com
ART PAUL, 93
Created empire’s long-eared, bow-tied emblem
BY
M ATT S CHUDEL
Art Paul, the founding art director of Playboy magazine who
created the familiar bunny logo
that became the symbol of Hugh
Hefner’s publishing and entertainment empire and who exerted
a lasting influence on magazine
design, died April 28 at a hospital
in Chicago. He was 93.
The cause was pneumonia, said
his wife, Suzanne Seed.
Hefner was developing his idea
for a new men’s magazine in 1953
when he approached Mr. Paul,
then working as a freelance illustrator and designer in Chicago.
Hefner sought a clean, modern
design for the magazine that he
wanted to call Stag Party.
When another men’s publication, Stag, sent a cease-and-desist
letter, Hefner was forced to come
up with another name, and Playboy was born. Mr. Paul designed
the first cover, a photograph of
Marilyn Monroe taken during a
parade as she waved to the crowd.
“Art Paul managed to create a
striking black-and-white cover
design with a red logo,” Hefner
wrote in Playboy in 1994. “This
was just the first example of how
Art took ordinary pictures and,
through inventive design and the
addition of illustrative details,
made the magazine and its covers
innovative and interesting.”
Mr. Paul, the first person hired
by Hefner at Playboy, designed
the magazine’s table of contents,
articles, regular features — and
the magazine’s first nude photo,
an image of Monroe on a red satin
sheet. (“I had nothing on but the
radio,” she later quipped.)
When Hefner, who died last
year, decided the magazine needed a recognizable symbol, like the
New Yorker’s top-hatted Eustace
Tilley or Esquire’s mustachioed
“Esky,” he suggested the idea of a
rabbit. In less than an hour, Mr.
Paul sketched the bunny head in
profile, with a jaunty bow tie.
At first, it was intended to mark
the end of stories, but by the third
issue, it had migrated to the magazine’s cover, where it has stayed
ever since, month after month.
Mr. Paul, who was Playboy’s art
director for 29 years, came up
with ingenious ways to disguise
the bunny logo on the magazine’s
cover.
Readers sometimes wrote to
the magazine, saying the logo was
missing from the cover, but it was
invariably there, whether in a pair
DAMIAN DOVARGANES/ASSOCIATED PRESS
SUZANNE SEED
Playboy’s instantly recognizable bunny logo, top, was created by
Art Paul, above, who said he drew the image in a few minutes.
of gloves held just so, in a reflection from a woman’s eye, in a
pattern of rumpled sheets, on a
cuff link peeking out from a sleeve
or, shown in negative space, by an
overhead view of a group of women arranged on a beach.
“I didn’t want to hide it so
much, necessarily,” Mr. Paul told
the Chicago Sun-Times in 2009. “I
wanted to involve it with the lifestyle a little more — with fun and
with humor.”
In addition to designing the
look of the magazine, Mr. Paul
hired artists to create original
paintings and illustrations. He
commissioned work from Salvador Dali, Andy Warhol, LeRoy
Neiman, James Rosenquist and
Shel Silverstein, telling them
their work should reflect the spirit of the article and should stand
alone, without need of a caption.
“Art deserves the credit for the
illustrator’s liberation,” Christie
Hefner, Hugh Hefner’s daughter
and Playboy’s former chief executive, said in a recently completed
documentary, “Art of Playboy,” by
Jennifer Hou Kwong. “He helped
redefine the whole notion of commercial art as being able to be as
well-regarded and legitimate as
high art.”
During Mr. Paul’s tenure as art
director, Playboy won hundreds
of awards for illustration and
graphic design and influenced the
visual appearance of scores of
other magazines and newspapers.
He was credited with creating a
rhythmic flow to Playboy’s pages.
He came up with the magazine’s
simple but effective layout for its
monthly interviews, with three
contrasting photos of the subject
at the top of the page.
He used cropped images from
stories in the table of contents and
experimented with “participatory
graphics,” such as pop-up pages,
collages, and die-cut patterns revealing images from other pages.
Mr. Paul said he took the job at
Playboy only because Hefner offered him complete freedom and
the chance to create the magazine’s visual identity.
“Quite simply, he was the right
guy in the right place at the right
time,” Hefner said in 2009. “I
couldn’t have done it without
him.”
Arthur Paul was born Jan. 18,
1925, in Chicago. He was 1 when
his Ukrainian-born father died.
Mr. Paul delivered newspapers as
a boy, and an older brother became the family’s primary breadwinner.
Young Arthur decided to become an artist after seeing a
sculpture his brother made of
their sleeping sister. He kept his
brother’s sculpture for the rest of
his life.
Mr. Paul studied at the school
of the Art Institute of Chicago
before serving in the U.S. Army
Air Forces during World War II.
He used the G.I. Bill to study at
Chicago’s Institute of Design
(now part of the Illinois Institute
of Technology), graduating in
1950. His studies were strongly
influenced by the German Bauhaus aesthetic, which emphasized clean lines and simplicity.
After retiring from Playboy in
1982, Mr. Paul worked as an independent designer in advertising,
television, magazines and film.
He also created thousands of
paintings, which he occasionally
exhibited in galleries in Chicago.
His first marriage, to Beatrice
Miller, ended in divorce. Survivors include his wife of 43 years,
Suzanne Seed of Chicago; two
sons from his first marriage; a
stepdaughter; and two grandchildren.
Mr. Paul’s bunny logo became
one of the world’s most recognizable corporate symbols, emblazoned on the tail of Hefner’s private jet and on countless products, as well as every issue of
Playboy magazine. It was so well
known that letters addressed
with nothing more than a bunny
head found their way to the Playboy offices in Chicago.
“I drew the new logo in a few
minutes,” Mr. Paul said in 1994. “If
I had known how famous that
trademark was to become, I
would have taken more time with
it — and it probably wouldn’t have
turned out as well as it did.”
matt.schudel@washpost.com
TUESDAY, MAY 1 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
BARGE
GREEN
ARTHUR L. BARGE, SR.
Arthur L. Barge, Sr., peacefully passed away on
Tuesday, April 24, 2018. Family will welcome
friends on Wednesday, May 2, 2018 from 10:30
a.m. until time of service at 11 a.m. at Trinity
Episcopal Church, 7005 Piney Branch Road,
NW, Washington DC, 20012.
DEATH NOTICE
BAUL
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
LEVIN
VERMILLION
BROOKS
McCULLOUGH
DANIEL L. LEVIN
GEORGE ALFRED VERMILLION "Al"
(Age 81)
BETTY JOSEPHINE GREEN
Founder of Mother’s Band and Show
Passed away Tuesday, April 25, 2018. Beloved
wife, mother, sister, and grandmother is survived by husband, Ralph F. Green, three children, Spencer, Robin, Vonnie, sister, Catherine
Milstead, seven grandchildren, and five great
grandchildren. Celebration of life services will
be held at Our Lady Queen of Peace, 3800
Ely Place SE, Washington, DC 20019. Viewing
begins 10 a.m. and followed by service at 11
a.m.
www.marshallmarchfh.com
BEAL
VRABLIC
RAYMOND VRABLIC, SR.
We regret to inform our members
of the passing of Raymond Vrablic
Sr. Book #456782 on April 20, 2018.
Brother Vrablic became an Iron
Worker member with Local 16 in
January 1951.
BEALL
LAURA BEALL
Marlboro #61, OES, announces
with sorrow the passing of Sister
Laura Beall on April 28, 2018.
Eastern Star Services will be held
on Wednesday, May 2, at 7 p.m.
at Rausch Funeral Home, 8325
Mt. Harmony Ln., Owings, MD. Our heartfelt
sympathy is extended to her family.
Gay Topper, W.M.
Barbara Andrukitis, Sec'y
FELTON
RORY FELTON
"DC" of Rare Essence Band
Passed away April 20, 2018. Services Thursday,
May 3, 2018 at Spirit of Faith Christian Center,
2261 Oxon Run Dr., Temple Hills, MD 20748,
Viewing 9:3o a.m., Service 11 a.m.
Service will be held May 5, 2018 at 12 Noon,
Bay Country Church, 714 Locust St., Cambridge, MD 21613. Brother Vrablic will be
greatly missed by all.
Official Death #153
DONNA JOAN HARRINGTON
Born October 24, 1956 died suddenly on
Saturday, April 21, 2018 of complications
resulting from recent surgery. Donna
earned two masters degrees from the University of Maryland in creative writing and
literature. Donna taught on the college
level in the Washington area for over 30
years at several schools, including Prince
George’s Community College, Northern Virginia Community College, Capital College,
University Maryland University College and
Howard University. Donna’s marriages to
Peter Kenny and David Walton ended in
divorce. Donna is survived by her husband
Stefan Patejack; her daughter Chelsea Rose
Harrington Walton; her mother, Joan
Harrington; her brothers Ken and Richard;
her sister Nancy; four nieces and three
nephews. A memorial service will be held
for Donna on Saturday, May 5, 2018 at
2 p.m. at the Hope Lutheran Church and
Student Center, 4201 Guilford Drive in College Park, MD.
MARGARET P. MURRAY (Age 88)
On Saturday, April 28, 2018, of
Silver Spring, MD. Beloved wife
of Edward P. Murray; mother of
Lynne (William)Yates and Barbara
(Mark) Sievers. Grandmother of
Edward (Amber), Brendan, and
Erin Yates; and Dana, Caroline,
and Stephanie Sievers; great-grandmother of
Kinsley Yates. Relatives and friends may call at
Collins Funeral Home, 500 University Boulevard
West, Silver Spring, MD, (Valet Parking), Thursday, May 3, 2018, from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9
p.m. Mass of Christian Burial at St. John the
Evangelist Historic Church, 9700 Rosensteel
Avenue, Silver Spring, MD, on Friday, May 4,
2018 at 11 a.m. Interment St. John’s Cemetery.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
HERBERT
JAMES EDWARD HERBERT
On Friday, April 27, 2018 of Springfield, VA.
Beloved husband of Mary Elizabeth “Ebby”
Herbert; father of James E., Jr. (Ann) and
Stephen L. Herbert (Kathryn); grandfather of
Truly Lynn Herbert, Lee Ann Mayfield (Richard),
Jeffrey Scott Herbert (Amy Lynne) and Jennifer
Lynn Chang (Vincent); great-grandfather of five.
Relatives and friends may call at Jefferson
Funeral Chapel, 5755 Castlewellan Dr. Alexandria, VA on Wednesday, May 2, 2018 from 6 to
8 p.m. Funeral service at Greenspring Village
Chapel, 7420 Spring Village Dr. Springfield, VA
22150 on Thursday at 10:30 a.m. Interment Mt.
Comfort Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made to the Greenspring
Benevolent Care Fund, 7410 Spring Village Dr.
Springfield, VA 22150.
REIFENAUER
ERWIN J. REIFENAUER "Reds"(Age 91)
It is with regret that we notify
the members of Steamfitters
Local #602 of the death of Brother
Erwin "Reds" Reifenauer. Funeral
services, today, May 1, 11 a.m. at
Mt. Zion United Methodist Church,
27108 Mt. Zion Church Rd.,
Mechanicsville, MD 20659.
Notice #1658
Daniel W. Loveless, FST
HOUSE
FURMAN
GOODWIN
BARTON ROBERT HOUSE, SR.
FENTON BOOGHER GOODWIN (Age 80)
Died from heart failure at Inova Alexandria
Hospital, Virginia on Wednesday, April 25, 2018.
Born March 9, 1938 in Baltimore, MD, Fenton
spent her childhood in Alexandria, Virginia
at the Virginia Theological Seminary and the
house her parents built nearby. She married
Edward LeBaron “Bish” Goodwin in 1958 and
they raised their family in that same house. She
worked as a pre-school teacher at Emmanuel
Episcopal Church and volunteered at Cople
parish, where they spent summers. In 1989
she and Bish moved to the village of Kinsale
on Virginia’s Northern Neck. In 2013 Fenton
moved into Goodwin House Alexandria where
she enjoyed reconnecting with old friends and
making many new friends, who were all very
dear to her.
Survivors include daughter Elizabeth Knights
(Chet), son Lee Goodwin (Chris), eleven grandchildren, eight great-grandchildren, sister-inlaw Ann Boogher and many loving nieces and
nephews. Fenton also held a special place in
her heart for her foster daughter Rosalie Bond
(Roger) and her family. Fenton was preceded in
death by her husband Edward LeBaron “Bish”
Goodwin and her brother Benton T. “Ben”
Boogher Jr.
Peacefully passed away surrounded by
family on Saturday, April 28, 2018 in Springfield, Virginia. She was born in Heilwood,
Pennsylvania, and was a longtime resident
of Fairfax City, Virginia. Josephine was the
beloved wife of 55 years to the late Steve
J. Zagrodniczek and loving mother to
Stephanie, Joan, Eileen, Stephen and
Michael (deceased). She was adored by
eight grandchildren and three great grandchildren.
Smart
and
strong-willed,
Josephine selflessly dedicated her life to
her family and friends. Affectionately
known as Sophie, Mrs. “Z” and most of
all as Grandma, she will be remembered for
her delicious cakes and traditional family
recipes. Kind to all, she always had room
for one more person at the dinner table and
was the heart of the “Z” family holidays.
Friends may visit with the family on Tuesday, May 1, 2018 from 5 to 8 p.m. at Fairfax
Memorial Funeral Home, 9902 Braddock
Road in Fairfax, VA. A memorial mass will
be celebrated on Wednesday, May 2, 2018
at 10:30 a.m. at St. Leo the Great Catholic
Church, 3700 Old Lee Highway, Fairfax, VA.
Interment will follow at National Memorial
Park, 7400 Lee Highway, Falls Church, VA.
In lieu of flowers, please consider a contribution to “Little Sisters of the Poor” ATTN:
St. Joseph’s Home, 1503 Michaels Road,
Henrico, Virginia 23229 or via
www.littlesistersofthepoorvirginia.org
ALSOP
Died in his home, Saturday, April 28, 2018
surrounded by his wife of 57 years Pauline E.
House; daughters Karen House Sapp, Elaine
House Custead; son Barton R. House Jr.; and
brother-in-law, Raymond H Roberts. Barton
was born January 15, 1937 in Dighton MA.
During his lifetime, he was a founding member
of the Consumer Energy Commission (later to
become the Department of Energy) where he
was the Assistant Secretary for Environmental
Protection, Safety and Emergency Preparedness, eventually becoming the Assistant Secretary to the Secretary of the Department of
Interior. Bart House loved his family, flying and
sailing.
The viewing will be Wednesday, May 2, 2018
from 6 to 9 p.m. at Pumphrey Funeral Home,
300 W. Montgomery Avenue, Rockville, MD.
A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated
on Thursday, May 3, 2018 at 1 p.m. in Our
Lady of Mercy Church, 9222 Kentsdale Drive,
Potomac, MD. Interment in All Souls Cemetery,
Germantown, MD. In lieu of flowers, the family
has asked that donations be made to St. Jude
Children’s Research Hospital. Please view and
sign the family online guestbook at
www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
She is survived by her loving husband Johnny;
“adopted” daughter Sohe (Chris); brothers J.
Ross (Nadine) and Jon (Luanne); sister Amy
(Buddy) and numerous loving step-children and
step-siblings, nieces, nephews and grandchildren.
Viewing will held at Jefferson Funeral Chapel,
5755 Castlewellan Drive, Alexandria, VA on
Wednesday, May 2, 2018 from 7 to 9 p.m.
Mass of Christian Burial will be held at St.
Bernadette Catholic Church, 7600 Old Keene
Mill Rd. Springfield, VA on Thursday, May 3 at
11 a.m. Interment will follow at Chestnut Grove
Cemetery in Elmer, NJ.
Donations, in lieu of flowers, may be sent to
Cancer Research Institute (https://www.cancerresearch.org); The American Cancer Society
(https://cancer.org); the American Lung Association http://www.lung.org); Central Union Mission (http://www.missiondc.org); or Autism
Speaks (https://www.autismspeaks.org).
Please view and sign the family guest book
online at
www.jeffersonfuneralchapel.com
LANG
A Service of Remembrance will be held at 4
pm on Wednesday, May 2, at Goodwin House
Alexandria, 4800 Fillmore Ave., Alexandria, VA.
SHILESKY
The Funeral Service will be held at 2 pm on
Saturday, May 5 at Yeocomico Church, Kinsale,
VA.
EILEEN THERESA SHILESKY (Age 71)
Goodwin House Foundation
4800 Fillmore Ave.
Alexandria, VA 22311
BERNARD C. LANG
When the need
arises, let families
find you in the
Funeral Services Directory.
To be seen in the Funeral
Services Directory, please
call paid Death Notices at
202-334-4122.
It is with great sadness that the family of
Bernard "Bernie" C. Lang, announces his passing on Thursday, April 26, 2018, at the age of
86, after a brief illness. He is held in loving
memory by his wife of 63 years, Eleanor
(Burlee); his two children Mark H. Lang and
Sherri A. Lang; granddaughter Olivia R. Lang
and surviving brothers Raymond W. Lang and
Walter R. Lang. Bernie was preceded in death
by his parents, Edward and Gertrude Lang and
brothers, Edward J. Lang and Richard L. Lang.
BYRON LEE ALSOP
Born March 31, 1931 in Newport News. VA,
lost his battle with cancer on April 16, 2018.
Byron graduated from Washington & Lee High
School in Arlington, VA. Byron then worked
for American Airlines at National Airport. He
retired from the airlines and then embarked
upon a successful career in the Coin Laundry
Industry.
As a child he collected Lionel Trains with his
brother Edward and later clocks which chime
through his house to this day. Byron also
had a strong interest in antique automobiles
and airplanes. His interest in Automobiles was
so strong that he belonged and participated
in the Classic Car Club of America, Antique
Automobile Club of America and The CADILLAC
LaSALLE Club. Byron belonged to both the local
and national factions of all three clubs. He
acquired two highly desirable antique Cadillac
automobiles which he loved to show and drive
on tours. Driving the cars gave him a spirit
of adventure and he truly enjoyed it. He
was known for his great sense of humor,
incredible knowledge of history, geography and
his generosity, kindness and love of people.
Being a football fan Byron enjoyed the Washington Redskins. Byron will be greatly missed
by his many friends, neighbors and family. He is
survived by his loving wife, Alida, son, Thomas
and wife Marianne, step daughter Peggy and
son, Mark. Services Private.
AMES
The viewing will be held on Thursday, May 3,
2018 from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Fairfax Memorial
Funeral Home in Fairfax, VA. A Mass of Christian burial will be celebrated in his memory on
Friday, May 4, 2018 at 11 a.m. at Holy Spirit
Catholic Church in Annandale, VA. Interment
will follow at Fairfax Memorial Park.
To see the full obituary please visit
www. fmfh.com
SARRO
He played both basketball and baseball for
the varsity teams at U of R and later was
inducted into the sports Hall of Fame. Tom
was also a member of the Delta Upsilon
fraternity. Post-graduation, Tom served in
the US Army for two years before returning
to attain his law degree at Georgetown University law school. Tom was Chairman of
the Patent, Trademark & Copyright section
of the Washington, DC Bar and member of
the Board of Directors. He also spent a term
as President of the Patent Attorney’s Club.
Tom is predeceased by his adored brother,
Christ, is survived by his loving wife, Mary;
daughters, Kristine (husband Carl), Stephanie
and Thea; his son, Peter; and his grandchildren, Carly, Melina, Elbridge, Caleb, Josiah
and Phillip.
THOMAS PETER SARRO (Age 88)
Patent attorney and partner at Larson &
Taylor, loving husband, father and grandfather, passed away peacefully on April 28,
2018 in the care of hospice at The Adler
Center in Aldie, VA.
Tom attended the University of Rochester
graduating with a BS in Chemistry in 1951.
A viewing will be held at Demaine Funeral
Home, 520 S. Washington St., Alexandria VA
on Thursday May 3 from 6 to 8:30 p.m. A
funeral service will be held at St. Sophia’s
Greek Orthodox Cathedral, 2815 36th St.
NW, in Washington DC on Friday, May 4,
2018. Visitation is at 10 a.m. followed by
the service at 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers,
please make donation to The Adler Center
for Caring, 24419 Millstream Drive, Aldie, VA
20105.
SIMON
RALPH SIMON, Ph.D. (Age 95)
On April 29, 2018. Psychologist at the
National Institutes of Health until his retirement in 1977 and fellow of the American
Psychological Association. Devoted son of
the late Abraham and Anna (Samuels)
Simon and brother of the late Mortimer
Simon. Devoted and beloved husband,
father, and grandfather survived by daughter Lisa Onken (James) of Rockville, MD
and son Russell Simon of Gaithersburg, MD.
He is survived by five grandchildren who
he loved dearly: Elena Stover, Samantha
Stover (Sean), Randall Stover (Aubin), Laura
Onken, and Allison Onken. He was preceded in death by his wife, Charlotte (Tulchin)
Simon; his son, Randall Simon; and daughter, Ellen Simon Stover (Alan).
Interment at 2 p.m. on Wednesday, May
2, at King David Memorial Gardens, 7482
Lee Highway, Falls Church VA. Following
interment, friends and relatives will be
received at the Onken home, 21 Hardwicke
Place, Rockville MD. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made to the St. Jude
Children's
Research
Hospital
at
https://www.stjude.org.
STENGER
CHARLES A. STENGER , PhD
July 19, 1922 – April 29, 2018
On Sunday, April 29, 2018 of Rockville, MD.
Beloved husband of Mary Lou Guandolo; stepfather of Mila Burgess and Edward Stenger;
grandfather of Katelyn, Colin and Luke Burgess;
uncle of Jack Stenger and Lynne Reese. Dr.
Stenger was a recipient of the Bronze Star,
Purple Heart and POW Medal. He received his
PhD in Psychology from Case Western Reserve
and served as Chief Psychologist for the VA.
Retirement years were spent as a luminary in
the ACBL (American Contract Bridge League).
Friends will be received at ROBERT A.
PUMPHREY FUNERAL HOME, BETHESDACHEVY CHASE, INC., 7557 Wisconsin Ave.,
Bethesda, MD on Friday, May 4 from 3 to 6 p.m.
Interment will be at a later date at Arlington
National Cemetery. Please view and sign the
family guestbook at
www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
BETSY McGREGOR COOLEY
A Washington artist who served as Executive
Director of the Citizens Association of Georgetown from 2002 until her retirement in 2016,
died peacefully at her home on April 25, 2018.
She was 73. The cause was brain cancer.
Betsy was born in Indiana, Pennsylvania, the
daughter of Jane and Paul McGregor. She
graduated from Chatham College in 1966, after
which she worked at the Peace Corps central
office in Washington, DC. In 1968, she taught
English at Thammasat University in Bangkok,
Thailand, and returned home to earn a Masters
Degree in Counseling at the University of
Maryland in 1971.
Betsy helped launch the Federal Women's
Program for the Civil Service Commission in
the early 1970's. She continued her work on
women's issues with Wider Opportunities for
Women, a non-profit organization. In 1982, she
established a fabric design business, Brushworks, creating tabletop linens for high-end
boutiques throughout the United States.
CHARLES J. WEIR "Chuck" (Age 86)
Of Lansdowne, Virginia passed away at home
on Tuesday evening, January 30, 2018, just
thirty hours before his 87th birthday.
Charles, known as Chuck to all his friends, lived
a life of service to his country and others. Most
of all, he was entirely devoted to his wife of 57
years, the late Darlene E. Weir, his children Sue
(Steve) Jones, Maureen Wood, Gregory (Valerie)
Weir, Jeffrey (Karen) Weir, eight grandchildren
and two great-grandchildren.
Funeral services will be held at the Old Post
Chapel, Fort Myer, VA on May 8, 2018, at 1 p.m.
followed by interment at Arlington National
Cemetery. Please join Chuck’s family for a
reception in the Lamplighter Room at the Fort
Myer Officer’s Club after the burial. Please
share online condolences with the family at
www.loudounfuneralchapel.com
In 2002, Betsy became Executive Director
of the Citizens Association of Georgetown,
expanding the scope of the organization’s
events and initiatives.
A memorial celebration of Betsy's life will be
held at 2 p.m. on June 23, 2018 at St. John’s
Episcopal Church in Georgetown.
Cople Parish
P.O. Box 110
Hague, VA 22469
St. Stephen’s and St. Agnes School Foundation
400 Fontaine St.
Alexandria, VA 22302
WEIR
She is survived by two daughters, Alison Hall
Cooley of Easton, Maryland and Meredith
McGregor Cooley, of Exeter, New Hampshire;
and three grandchildren, Finley Simons, Gustav
Mertz and Giselle (Gigi) Mertz. She is also
survived by her sisters, Judy McGregor
Bollinger of Alexandria, Virginia and Naples,
Florida and Kathryn McGregor of Pittsburgh,
Pennsylvania.
Of Cary, NC passed away April 9, 2018. She
was born on July 29, 1946 in Manhattan, NY.
Memorial Mass to be held May 3, 2018 in
Durham, NC.
Condolences to
www.ApexFuneral.net
Memorial contributions are welcome to:
JAMES C. McCULLOUGH (Age 91)
LTC US Army (Ret.)
On Wednesday April 25, 2018, surrounded by
his loving family. Survived by his devoted wife
of 65 years, Willie E. McCullough; daughter,
Adele McCullough-Graham (Bobby); sons,
James McCullough, II and Michael McCullough
(Carol); granddaughters, Rachel McCullough
and Sakkara Bebberian; sister, Carrie M. Hanson (Geddes) and a host of family members
and friends. James was loved and respected by
many. A Celebration of Life will be held May
2, 2018 at the Fifteenth Street Presbyterian
Church, 1701 15th St, NW, Washington DC
20009. Family will receive friends from 9:30
a.m. until time of service at 11 a.m. Interment
at Arlington National Cemetery at a later date.
Arrangements entrusted to Snowden Funeral
Home, Rockville, MD.
Betsy Cooley was a skilled artist, and exhibited
her Plein Air works at the Yellow Barn Studio
and Gallery in Glen Echo, Maryland.
Passed away on April 26, 2018 after a long
battle with cancer. Born in Vineland, NJ on May
2, 1956, she attended Willow Grove Methodist
church and graduated from Vineland High
School in 1974. Jan devoted her life to service
to her country: she enlisted in the Navy in 1976,
served nine years on active duty, transferred
to the Naval Reserves and was accepted to
the Limited Duty Officer Program. She was
recalled to active duty after 9/11, and retired
from the reserves in 2003 with the rank of LT.
She worked for the Navy as a contractor for 32
years before joining the Federal Government in
2010.
Jan married Johnny Sanchez on December 15,
2007 and became a member of St Bernadette
Catholic Church in Springfield, VA. She enjoyed
music, played several instruments over the
course of her life.
COOLEY
ZAGRODNICZEK
JAN USINGER GRUBE SANCHEZ
Of Haymarket, VA passed peacefully on
Sunday, April 22, 2018 at Haymarket Medical Center. Predeceased by her husband,
Claude "Tony" Furman. Survived by her
daughter Vanessa Ann Furman, and siblings
Kevin Fleming and Helen Harrison. Services
will be held at Fairfax Memorial Funeral
Home, 9902 Braddock Road, Fairfax, VA on
Saturday, May 5, 2018 at 10 a.m., followed
by inurnment at Fairfax Memorial Park. In
lieu of flowers, contributions may be made
to Friends of Homeless Animals, Aldie, VA.
MILTON ANDRE BROOKS
Entered into eternal rest on Friday, April 20,
2018. He is survived by his wife, Yvette Brooks;
four children, Bonita Brooks, Michael Brooks
(Danielle), Marita Brooks and Serena Ody; five
grandchildren, Naiya Brooks, Devon Artist,
Jordan Brooks, Josselyn Lewis and Maylani
Brooks; brother, Gerald Brooks; special cousin,
Cynthia Gibson; and a host of other relatives
and friends. Mr. Brooks will lie in state at
From the Heart Ministries, 5055 Allentown Rd.,
Suitland, MD on Wednesday, May 2 from 10
a.m. until service at 11 a.m. Interment private.
www.stewartfuneralhome.com
JOSEPHINE M. ZAGRODNICZEK
(Age 88)
DEATH NOTICE
SANCHEZ
THERESA ANN FURMAN "Teri"
(Age 69)
A 23 year resident of Glenn Dale, MD, went
to be with the Lord on April 27, 2018. Born
on January 31, 1937, in Baltimore Maryland,
Al entered the U.S. Navy in 1954 and was
aboard the USS Brownson. Al was a member
of the Seat Pleasant VFD, the VFW, as well
as the American Legion; he had just recently
celebrated his 60th year wedding anniversary.
Al is survived by his wife Nancy whom he
married in 1958, his children, Suzanne, Kellye,
and Dennis, as well as four grandchildren.
The family invites friends to a visitation on
Tuesday, May 1, 2018 from 2 to 4 and 7 to
9 p.m. at the Robert E. Evans Funeral Home,
16000 Annapolis Rd., Bowie, MD. A mass of
Christian burial will take place on Wednesday,
May 2, 2018 at 11 a.m. at Ascension Catholic
Church, 12700 Lanham Severn Rd., Bowie, MD.
Interment to follow in Fort Lincoln Cemetery,
3401 Bladensburg Road, Brentwood, MD.
Online condolences may be made at
www.robertevansfuneralhome.com
MURRAY
HARRINGTON
CRAIG JAMES BEAL
Craig James Beal, 61, who worked 43
years as a commercial painter and was a
member of the Painter's Local Union 368,
before retiring on disability in 2018, passed
away unexpectedly on Sunday, April 29.
He was born on December 11, 1957, in
Hyattsville, MD. Craig graduated in 1976
from Northwestern High School. He is the
son of Oswald Beal and the late Phyllis
Beal. Craig was preceded in death by his
sister, Jdee Winans. Craig is survived by
his father, Oswald Beal; his aunt, Zelma
Kelly; niece, Jillian Winans; and many loving
relatives and friends. Friends may call at
Gasch's Funeral Home, P.A., 4739 Baltimore
Avenue, Hyattsville, MD on Thursday, May
4 from 5 to 7 PM. A graveside service will
be held at Rest Lawn Memorial Gardens,
Cumberland, MD on Saturday, May 6, at 1
PM.
www.gaschs.com
B7
RE
DEATH NOTICE
On Saturday, April 28, 2018 Daniel
passed suddenly at home in
Arlington, VA. He is survived by his
daughters, Maura Levin Kortlang
(Rick) and Randi Levin Mendelsohn (Myles); brother Morris Levin
(Virginia); grandchildren Andrew
Kortlang, Janell Portare (Anthony) and Riana
Thurston (Shane); great-grandson Landen
Portare and companion Diane Tobin. Daniel
was predeceased by his beloved wife, Ruth
C. Levin and infant son, Paul Edward Levin.
Graveside service at King David Memorial Gardens, Falls Church, VA on Tuesday, May 1
at 1 p.m. Please omit sending flowers and
offer a contribution to the Shriners Hospital for
Children in memory of Daniel.
SUSAN RENEE BLAND BAUL (Age 66)
Of Taneytown, MD, passed away on April 27,
2018 at Frederick Memorial Hospital. She was
the wife of Charles Baul, her husband of
48 years. In addition to her loving husband,
Mrs. Baul is survived by three children, Cheryl
Moberly, Edward Baul, and Kenneth Baul; two
sisters, Pamela Froelich and Debra Yarrington;
two brothers, Robert Bland and William Bland;
nine grandsons; two granddaughters; and a
host of nieces, nephews, cousins, friends and
other relatives. She was preceded in death
by her brother, Thomas Bland. The family will
receive friends at 2 p.m. on Saturday, May 5,
2018 at the Chapel Mausoleum of Resthaven
Memorial Gardens, 9501 U.S. Route 15 N.,
Frederick, MD, where a funeral service will
begin at 3 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made to St. Jude Children’s Research
Hospital, 501 St. Jude Pl., Memphis, TN 38105.
EZ
WALTER D. AMES
Passed from this world on April 27, 2018. He
was 92 years old.
Walter led an eventful life and, while he would
have liked it to continue for a few more
years, recognized that, in accordance with a
Swinburne poem, even the longest river flows
safely home to the sea.
Walter was born in New York, NY, but his family
moved to Atlantic City when his father died
when Walter was 10 years old. He graduated
from Penn State with a degree in chemistry and
worked briefly in that field, where he admits
to having an outstandingly poor laboratory
technique. Recognizing that he would always
be an inferior chemist, he became a newspaper reporter, first on the Atlantic City Press and
then the New York World-Telegram and Sun
until the demise of that paper. After a brief
span as a press agent in New York, he decided
to go to law school, first at the University
of Miami and then at George Washington
University. During law school he drove a taxi
and sold women’s shoes in different locales to
supply tuition. After law school and a brief stint
emulating Perry Mason as a criminal defense
attorney, he surrendered to the inevitable: he
would be an intellectual property attorney. He
worked for a patent firm in New York, then for
five years with the Law Dept. of General Foods
Corp., in White Plaines, NY. Finally he returned
to what was then the D.C. firm of Watson,
Cole, Grindle & Watson, where he remained for
some 33 years as the lead litigation counsel,
trying IP cases throughout the country.
Walter never achieved one of his legal goals:
to become a member of the Bar of all 13 U.S.
Courts of Appeals. Although he had several
cases in their jurisdictions, no appeals were
ever taken and so he never achieved membership in the Bars of the Sixth and Eighth Circuits.
He is survived by his wife of more than 60
years, Marion Lemle Ames, of McLean, VA and
two sons, Mitchell Ames of Sterling, VA and
Douglas Ames, of Huntington Beach, CA, as
well as his grandchildren, great grandchildren
and nieces. As Walter would have liked to close
this chapter, in the words of Poe, In paced
requiescat, he rests in peace.
A graveside service will be held on Tuesday,
May 1 at 11 a.m. at King David Memorial
Gardens, 7482 Lee Highway, Falls Church, VA
22042.
The family requests that in lieu of flowers,
donations be sent to the Betsy McGregor
Cooley ‘66 Memorial Scholarship Fund, Office
of Advancement, Chatham University, Woodland Road, Pittsburgh PA, 15232.
FISHER
CARYL TRATEN FISHER
A beloved music and art teacher
in the Washington DC area for
70 years, died April 29, 2018
following a brief struggle with
leukemia. A graduate of Calvin
Coolidge High School and portrait
copyist at the National Gallery of Art, she
studied at American and Catholic Universities and made her career teaching piano
at her Suburban Music School, Georgetown
University, Montgomery College, and the US
Department of State, where she founded
the State of the Arts Cultural Series. She
will be remembered for her independent
spirit, pink house, and love of skull motifs
- her reminder to live life to its fullest. She
is survived by sister, Jacklyn Traten Young;
daughters, Erica Yanoff and Margo Fisher
Newman; and grandchildren, Logan and
Callan Yanoff and Blair and Jesse Newman.
A service will be held Wednesday, May 2,
2018, 10:30 a.m. at B'nai Shalom of Olney,
18401 Burtfield Drive, Olney, MD, followed
by burial at Judean Memorial Gardens. In
lieu of flowers, donations may be made to
the Caryl Traten Fisher Fund at the National
Center for Children and Families to support
music and art education.
www.nccf-cares.org/donate-money/.
Services entrusted to Sagel Bloomfield Danzansky Goldberg Funeral Care.
WWW.SAGELBLOOMFIELD.COM
PAID DEATH NOTICES
MONDAY- FRIDAY 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
To place a notice, call:
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of the responsible billing party.
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CURRENT 2018 RATES:
( PER DAY)
MONDAY-SATURDAY
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2" - $306 (text only)
3" - $441
4" - $482
5" - $611
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Additional plaques start at $26 each
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KELLY
Remembering
Mom
on
MOTHER'S DAY
May 13, 2018
THOMAS KELLY (Age 88)
Of Arlington, VA passed away on Friday, April
27, 2018. Tom was a devoted family man to
his wife, the late Patricia Maher Kelly; four
children, Neil (Creola), Dan (Megan), Jeanne,
and PJ; and five grandchildren Kaitlyn, Caroline,
Tommy, Cate, and Sean. He was born and
raised in Chicago, Ill and served as a PFC
in the US Army from 1949-1952. He retired
from the Interstate Commerce Commission in
1995. He enjoyed volunteering at the Virginia
Hospital Center, listening to music, watching
basketball games, and spending time with his
family. Visitation with the family will be held
at Murphy’s Funeral Home, Arlington, VA on
Wednesday, May 2 from 4 to 7 p.m. and a
funeral mass will be held on Thursday, May 3 at
11 a.m. at Our Lady Queen of Peace, Arlington,
VA.
Deadline:
Saturday, May 12
2 p.m.
Call:
202-334-4122
Email:
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B8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
MAY 1 , 2018
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
A beautiful start to May
After a crisp early morning in the
40s, temperatures take off. By the
afternoon, we’re into the 70s, and a
few spots could close in on 80 by late
afternoon. Sunshine is abundant,
and winds are light. Tonight, lows range through
the 50s under mostly clear skies.
Today
Mostly sunny
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Wednesday
Mostly sunny
Thursday
Partly sunny,
breezy
Friday
Mostly cloudy
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Saturday
Partly sunny
Sunday
Partly sunny
81° 58
87° 67
90° 70
89° 65
82° 62
76° 58
FEELS*: 82°
FEELS: 88°
FEELS: 89°
FEELS: 87°
FEELS: 82°
FEELS: 75°
CHNCE PRECIP: 0%
P: 0%
P: 5%
P: 25%
P: 15%
P: 25%
WIND: WSW 7–14 mph
W: SW 6–12 mph
W: SW 8–16 mph
W: SW 8–16 mph
W: S 6–12 mph
W: NNW 7–14 mph
°
°
°
°
°
OFFICIAL RECORD
Temperatures
NATION
Harrisburg
79/53
Hagerstown
80/55
Davis
71/51
High
Record high
Record low
FORECAST
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
73° 5:00 p.m.
41° 4:38 a.m.
71°/52°
92° 1910
34° 1874
71° 3:50 p.m.
31° 5:42 a.m.
71°/46°
86° 2017
29° 1977
70° 4:00 p.m.
37° 4:35 a.m.
70°/47°
92° 1910
32° 1961
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: –1.9° yr. to date: +0.1°
Precipitation
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
OCEAN: 55°
Ocean City
71/55
OCEAN: 53°
Richmond
81/56
Norfolk
78/60
Virginia Beach
74/58
Past 24 hours
Total this month
OCEAN: 55°
Normal
Kitty Hawk
71/61
Total this year
Normal
OCEAN: 60°
Pollen: High
Air Quality: Moderate
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Ozone
Low
High
Low
Low
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.00"
3.59"
3.06"
11.24"
11.97"
0.00"
3.56"
3.47"
11.74"
12.27"
0.00"
3.20"
3.19"
11.75"
13.04"
Moon Phases
UV: Very High
Solar system
9 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, mostly sunny. High 65–70. Wind west
6–12 mph. Tonight, clear. Low 47–52. Wind west 4–8
mph. Wednesday, mostly sunny. High 68–73. Wind west–
southwest 6–12 mph. Thursday, partly sunny. High 70–77.
Wind southwest 7–14 mph.
Atlantic beaches: Today, mostly sunny. High 71–78. Wind
west 7–14 mph. Tonight, clear. Low 56–60. Wind southwest
6–12 mph. Wednesday, mostly sunny. High 75–84. Wind
south–southwest 7–14 mph. Thursday, partly sunny. High
76–84. Wind south–southwest 7–14 mph.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, mostly sunny. Wind west–
southwest 6–12 knots. Waves a foot or less. Visibility unrestricted.
• Lower Potomac and Chesapeake Bay: Today, mostly sunny. Wind
southwest 6–12 knots. Waves 1 foot on the lower Potomac and on
the Chesapeake Bay. Visibility unrestricted.• River Stages: Today, the
Little Falls stage will be 4.5 feet, falling to 4.3 feet Tuesday. Flood
stage at Little Falls is 10 feet.
Annapolis
ACTUAL
Cape May
70/56
Annapolis
76/56
Lexington
81/51
Washington
Sa
Low
Normal
Philadelphia
77/58
Charlottesville
83/53
Today’s tides
F
Weather map features for noon today.
Baltimore
79/54
Dover
76/56
Washington
81/58
RECORD
°
Th
REGION
AVERAGE
(High tides in Bold)
4:22 a.m.
9:46 a.m.
5:07 p.m.
10:21 p.m.
12:25 a.m.
7:04 a.m.
1:37 p.m.
7:14 p.m.
Ocean City
3:16 a.m.
9:12 a.m.
3:14 p.m.
9:31 p.m.
Norfolk
5:15 a.m.
11:19 a.m.
5:16 p.m.
11:37 p.m.
Point Lookout
2:57 a.m.
9:57 a.m.
3:16 p.m.
8:50 p.m.
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Punta Gorda, FL 91°
Low: Bodie State Park, CA 12°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
72/53/pc
73/51/pc
46/34/c
81/58/s
84/68/c
79/54/s
56/40/c
83/61/pc
61/38/c
64/41/pc
64/57/c
67/56/s
68/56/pc
82/56/s
80/54/s
82/53/s
51/37/sh
82/64/pc
80/60/s
77/58/s
84/69/c
62/42/t
Tomorrow
83/63/pc
66/42/pc
46/35/c
83/59/s
86/68/pc
88/65/s
61/44/pc
85/62/s
69/37/pc
70/45/s
84/62/s
71/60/t
80/61/c
83/58/s
84/61/s
83/57/s
46/34/c
77/63/c
82/66/pc
80/65/pc
83/70/pc
58/37/c
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
79/65/c
80/61/s
85/63/pc
44/28/c
57/38/c
73/54/pc
82/69/c
82/69/pc
80/60/s
83/64/pc
81/59/s
78/68/c
69/53/pc
82/63/pc
65/54/t
83/63/s
82/66/pc
82/74/pc
77/61/pc
70/50/t
84/62/s
84/69/pc
77/62/s
78/60/s
$49**
76/60/t
80/65/c
82/55/pc
42/26/c
67/43/c
84/64/s
82/73/r
87/72/pc
81/65/pc
86/62/s
80/59/s
81/65/r
68/56/c
84/68/pc
65/52/pc
85/68/pc
84/68/pc
82/74/t
73/52/t
69/51/c
84/65/s
85/68/s
86/68/s
84/64/s
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
78/67/c
80/57/t
83/62/pc
77/58/s
79/58/pc
76/56/s
61/48/c
63/45/c
70/56/pc
82/54/s
64/41/pc
81/56/s
78/50/pc
84/66/pc
85/76/sh
62/46/c
61/57/t
68/53/pc
85/74/sh
61/46/c
62/42/pc
74/55/pc
87/66/pc
80/69/c
World
High: Jacobabad, Pakistan 122°
Low: Summit Station, Greenland –42°
May 7
Last
Quarter
May 15 May 21
New
First
Quarter
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
May 29
Full
Rise
6:10 a.m.
9:43 p.m.
7:34 a.m.
1:29 a.m.
8:32 p.m.
12:24 a.m.
excludes Antarctica
80/67/t
73/56/t
84/62/pc
86/65/s
75/58/c
80/64/pc
79/61/pc
75/50/pc
82/63/s
85/58/s
69/44/pc
87/63/s
79/51/pc
85/70/pc
86/76/pc
61/45/t
63/56/c
68/54/pc
86/75/pc
70/50/pc
69/47/pc
81/63/t
89/67/s
82/67/t
WORLD
Today
Addis Ababa
71/54/t
Amsterdam
54/42/r
Athens
83/61/pc
Auckland
68/57/pc
Baghdad
88/69/pc
Bangkok
88/78/t
Beijing
73/51/c
Berlin
61/40/pc
Bogota
65/51/r
Brussels
55/41/pc
Buenos Aires
65/57/c
Cairo
96/71/s
Caracas
75/65/c
Copenhagen
53/45/r
Dakar
75/67/s
Dublin
52/40/r
Edinburgh
55/41/r
Frankfurt
60/40/pc
Geneva
58/44/sh
Ham., Bermuda 70/65/s
Helsinki
48/40/r
Ho Chi Minh City 94/78/pc
Tomorrow
75/53/pc
61/43/c
80/65/pc
67/49/pc
90/69/pc
90/78/t
74/51/c
61/49/pc
64/51/r
61/41/c
69/62/pc
94/74/s
75/66/pc
57/46/pc
76/68/s
53/40/pc
53/37/pc
68/47/pc
63/48/r
73/65/s
51/39/sh
93/79/t
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
86/76/pc
101/74/c
71/57/pc
77/60/c
67/49/pc
81/55/pc
86/78/pc
87/76/t
89/78/t
74/66/s
61/50/pc
57/45/pc
61/42/t
94/81/c
79/55/pc
63/53/sh
74/55/sh
90/79/pc
72/60/t
104/82/pc
46/37/r
69/52/pc
57/40/c
65/45/pc
87/74/pc
96/69/t
73/59/s
82/62/s
69/50/pc
74/51/pc
86/77/pc
90/73/t
90/78/c
74/66/s
60/52/sh
54/41/c
64/48/pc
96/80/s
76/56/pc
70/58/t
77/51/t
90/82/pc
75/61/pc
104/78/pc
52/39/sh
75/56/r
60/41/c
69/51/t
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei City
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
87/71/s
96/77/pc
65/57/r
87/70/pc
74/43/s
77/47/t
75/59/t
86/72/t
87/79/c
56/41/r
74/59/s
89/74/c
65/54/sh
80/65/pc
72/58/pc
74/57/pc
78/49/pc
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83/71/s
97/75/pc
76/57/t
88/70/pc
70/45/pc
77/51/t
68/46/r
80/58/t
90/79/t
57/38/sh
74/59/pc
91/67/pc
73/60/pc
76/65/c
75/61/t
79/58/t
72/57/t
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
sh- showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
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Set
8:00 p.m.
7:28 a.m.
10:18 p.m.
10:58 a.m.
6:49 a.m.
9:57 a.m.
KLMNO
Style
TUESDAY, MAY 1 , 2018
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/STYLE
EZ
C
SU
THE RELIABLE SOURCE
MUSIC REVIEW
CAROLYN HAX
MUSIC REVIEW
A comedian outraging the
establishment at a media
dinner is kind of a
Washington tradition. C2
South Korean pianist Yeol
Eum Son plays with power
and poise in a Phillips
Collection recital. C3
A grandmother worries
about a boy’s return to
the baseball diamond
after a head injury. C4
Teen piano prodigy
Nathan Lee makes his
Washington debut at the
Kennedy Center. C5
BOOK WORLD
Confronting
his father
and other
demons
AIR
TRAFFIC
A Memoir of
Ambition
and
Manhood in
America
By Gregory
Pardlo
Knopf. 253
pp. $26.95
BY
TASOS KATOPODIS/GETTY IMAGES FOR NETFLIX
The last laugh?
Comics defend Wolf’s
set at White House
correspondents’ dinner
BY
Under pressure, group
may drop comedians
at future dinners
E LAHE I ZADI
Washington has lost its collective mind over a comedian’s 20minute-long set.
In case you haven’t turned on
cable news or checked Twitter
over the past 48 hours, everyone
from New York Times and MSNBC
journalists to the president himself have said they were scandalized by Michelle Wolf’s roasting at
the White House Correspondents’
Association Dinner.
Wolf’s fellow comedians, however, have risen to her defense.
Several not only argued in favor of
Wolf’s set, but said that most critics missed the point of her jokes.
The WHCA dinner has long
inspired criticism from those who
view the ritual with disdain —
reporters shouldn’t even appear
to be cozying up with the very
COMEDIANS CONTINUED ON C3
BY
HARAZ N. GHANBARI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
TOP: Michelle Wolf, at center attending an after-party, ignited a
debate about the appropriateness of having comedians at the annual
White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner. Other comedians
who have headlined the dinner defended Wolf ’s routine, but some
media members are calling for an end to the comedic aspect to the
dinner. ABOVE: President Barack Obama high-fives late-night comic
Jimmy Kimmel as Caren Bohan, a Reuters journalist and thenpresident of the White House Correspondents’ Association, watches
during the dinner in 2012.
P AUL F ARHI
Several news organizations
have threatened to withdraw
their financial support of the
White House correspondents’
dinner next year if the group
doesn’t drop the traditional comedy act from the program.
The board of the dinner’s
sponsoring organization, the
White House Correspondents’
Association, began discussing
changes after Saturday night’s
entertainer, comedian Michelle
Wolf, delivered a standup routine that sparked both outrage
and cheers with her jabs at
President Trump and administration staffers, including press
secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders and counselor to the president Kellyanne Conway.
Upset by the reaction, some
DINNER CONTINUED ON C3
J ABARI A SIM
Where autobiographical writing by black men is concerned,
perhaps no figure looms as large
as James Baldwin’s stepfather, David Baldwin. In the immortal
“Notes of a Native Son,” James
Baldwin painted an indelible portrait of the man, an itinerant Harlem preacher. He could be “chilling” and “indescribably cruel,”
Baldwin wrote, and “certainly the
most bitter man I have ever met;
yet it must be said that there was
something else in him, buried in
him, which lent him tremendous
power and even, a rather crushing
charm.”
David Baldwin’s large shadow
threatens to obscure any number
of fathers appearing in similar
books in the years since the explosive arrival of “Notes” in 1955. We
could turn, for instance to “Bourgeois Blues” by Jake Lamar, “Losing My Cool” by Thomas Chatterton Williams or to Gregory
Pardlo’s riveting new book, “Air
Traffic.” By no means the only recent works in this vein, these
books contain complex and entirely plausible portraits of fiercely intelligent African American fathers. For each of these men, selfawareness sometimes makes
them painfully cognizant of their
limitations. In some cases they ran
up against the tight contours of a
race-obsessed society; in other instances, their boundaries were
self-imposed.
In Pardlo’s telling, addiction
played a pivotal part in his father’s
decline and eventual death in
2016. Gregory Pardlo Sr.’s career
and life had begun to fall apart
many years before. In 1981, President Ronald Reagan fired 11,345
members of PATCO, the union of
air traffic controllers, and banned
them from federal employment
for life. A controller as well as a
labor organizer, Pardlo Sr. hurtled
toward the ground without a parachute. (As Pardlo notes, President
Bill Clinton lifted Reagan’s ban in
1993).
Although Pardlo believes his
mother was the brains of the family, it was his father’s overbearing
personality that dominated their
household in Willingboro, N.J. At
home, Pardlo writes, “my dad’s
language was often dismissive,
hostile and unpredictable.”
The elder Partlow eventually
found other jobs, but “there was a
PARDLO CONTINUED ON C8
THEATER REVIEW
‘Snow Child’: Half-baked Alaska
BY
P ETER M ARKS
Like Jack and Mabel, the transplanted Pennsylvania couple at
the center of “Snow Child,” the
audience itself is apt to feel stuck
in the middle of nowhere with this
innocuous Arena Stage musical,
adapted from a mystical 2011
Alaskan novel “The Snow Child,”
by Eowyn Ivey.
Ivey gets two tiny, easy-to-miss
mentions in Arena’s program, and
not a single one on the title page —
paltry tribute considering that the
plot and characters of this wilderness story, about childless homesteaders who meet a mysterious
girl in the frozen woods, come
from her highly regarded book,
based partly on a Russian folk
tale. But then again, much about
this world-premiere production
feels underserved, especially be-
cause of the personality-deprived
script by John Strand and a bluegrass score by Bob Banghart and
Georgia Stitt, whose songs never
rise above garden-variety.
Director Molly Smith fills the
Kreeger Theater stage with signifiers of her own love of Alaska,
where she has both lived and
worked: set designer Todd Rosenthal’s monumental trees and
mountain vistas and Emily DeCola’s wonderful life-size puppets of
a fox, swan and horse, all gracefully manipulated by puppeteer-performers. Owing to these elements
— as well as the show’s almost
perverse determination to soften
any sense of conflict — this seems
to be a musical better suited to
fifth-graders than to anyone older. Perhaps a class trip tied to a
school’s study of the environment
would be in order.
Vanilla, too, is the flavor of the
performances Smith coaxes out of
Matt Bogart and Christiane Noll,
polished pros whose work I’ve
often liked but who as Jack and
Mabel can’t find much to do with
themselves here except fret about
the winter pantry running low,
and whatnot. Just as bland is a
family working a neighboring
claim, George (Dan Manning), Esther (Natalie Toro) and son Garrett (Alex Alferov), who act friendly-like but secretly harbor a wish
for Jack and Mabel to go home so
they can take their land. This
notion is explored in exactly one
comic song, “Opportunity,” and
then kicked into the narrative
underbrush.
“Snow Child’s” emotional core
is the grief Jack and Mabel can’t
shake off, over the death of their
THEATER CONTINUED ON C3
MARIA BARANOVA
From left, Dan Manning as George, Alex Alferov as Garrett, Natalie Toro as Esther, and Christiane
Noll and Matt Bogart as Mabel and Jack in Arena Stage’s world premiere of “Snow Child.”
C2
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THE WASHINGTON POST
K
. TUESDAY,
MAY 1 , 2018
The Reliable Source
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
Impolite dinner conversation: Michelle Wolf was hardly the first to go there
If something feels just a little
familiar in all the outrage/counteroutrage reaction to comedian
Michelle Wolf’s routine at Saturday
night’s White House
Correspondents’ Association
dinner, there’s a good reason.
Folks, we’ve clutched these very
same pearls before. Several other
comedians in the not-so-distant
past have scandalized the welldressed folks gathered in
Washington to hear them. Here’s a
brief look at some of the other
meant-to-be-funny monologues
that didn’t amuse the crowd.
The dinner: The 2011 WHCD
The comedian(s): Seth Meyers
was the professional ringer;
President Barack Obama did the
traditional presidential roasting.
The jokes: No one knew it at the
time, but Meyers’s and Obama’s
punchlines directed at Donald
J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Wanda Sykes’s takedown of
Rush Limbaugh.
POOL PHOTO BY ROGER L. WOLLENBERG/GETTY IMAGES
Stephen Colbert used his “Colbert Report” persona in 2006 to
mock President George W. Bush and (a bridge too far!) the media.
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Trump — who was a guest — would
prove to be history-shaping. Maybe.
A theory is that Trump was so
enraged by the humiliation that his
decision to run for president was
sealed that night.
“Donald Trump has been saying
that he will run for president as a
Republican,” Meyers said. “Which is
surprising, since I just assumed that
he was running as a joke.”
Obama noted that “we all know
about your credentials and breadth
of experience. Just recently in an
episode of ‘Celebrity Apprentice,’ at
the steakhouse, the men’s cooking
team did not impress the judges
from Omaha Steaks. And there was
a lot of blame to go around, but you,
Mr. Trump, recognized that the real
problem was a lack of leadership
and so, ultimately, you didn’t blame
Little John or Meatloaf — you fired
Gary Busey. And these are the kinds
of decisions that would keep me up
at night. Well handled, sir. Well
handled.”
The dinner: The 2009 WHCD
The comedian: Wanda Sykes
The jokes: She drew gasps for
this burn on Rush Limbaugh — the
radio talk-show host had said he
hoped Obama failed, which she
equated to saying he hoped
America fails: “I think Rush
Limbaugh was the 20th hijacker.
But he was just so strung out on
OxyContin he missed his flight.”
(Predictably, conservatives were
outraged by that one, but even
White House press secretary Robert
Gibbs was unamused. “I think there
are a lot of topics that are better left
for serious reflection rather than
comedy,” he sniffed. “I think there’s
no doubt that 9/11 is part of that.”)
The dinner: The 2006 WHCD
The comedian: Stephen Colbert,
who at the time had just begun
hosting “The Colbert Report” and
delivered his monologue as his
schticky conservative TV pundit
persona.
The jokes: “I stand by this
man, because he stands for
things,” Colbert said of President
George W. Bush. “Not only for
things, he stands on things,
things like aircraft carriers and
rubble and recently flooded city
squares. And that sends a strong
message, that no matter what
happens to America, she will
always rebound with the most
powerfully staged photo-ops in
the world.”
Colbert also savaged the press:
“You people were so good, over tax
cuts, WMD intelligence, the effect of
global warming,” he said. “We
Americans didn’t want to know, and
you had the courtesy not to try to
find out.”
The dinner: The 1996 Radio &
TV Correspondents Dinner
The comedian: Radio shock jock
Don Imus
The jokes: Imus talked about
President Clinton’s alleged
infidelities — in front of the first
couple, who were on the dais —
describing how the president once
announced a Baltimore Orioles
game. “We all heard the president
holler ‘Go, baby!’ and I remember
commenting at the time, ‘I bet that’s
not the first time he’d said that.’ ”
He also poked fun at Peter
Jennings: “You wonder what’s
under his desk — besides an intern.”
Like Wolf on Saturday,
organizers of the 1996 dinner were
well aware of their performer’s
ruthless comedic style. So the hosts
knew (or should have known)
exactly who they had invited,
making their later protestations
ring a little hypocritical.
Funny moments, but
not of the ‘haha’ variety
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There were plenty of head-scratching moments at the three-hour
White House correspondents’ dinner at the Washington Hilton.
As the controversy surrounding
comedian Michelle Wolf’s eyepopping routine at the annual
White House correspondents’
dinner crescendos, the rest of the
night’s other headscratching moments were largely
forgotten. And there were definitely
a few odd one-offs at Saturday
night’s event that deserve an
honorable mention. Remember:
The comedian’s roast of the room is
the cap of the evening. That leaves
nearly three hours of dinner time
for something awkward to happen.
The first clumsy moment came
when country singer Ty Herndon
sang “America the Beautiful” and
“God Bless America.” The crowd of
3,000 was hastily asked to sing
along and lots of extremely off-key
mumbling ensued — as well as
confusion about whether to sit,
stand or keep drinking. Herndon,
who came out as gay in 2014 and is
a supporter of the “Beyond I Do”
campaign against LGBT
discrimination, was a guest of Fox
News. The last singer to perform in
the Hilton ballroom in recent
memory was Natalie Stovall, who
sang “America the Beautiful” at the
2007 dinner.
The next random cameo was
actually President Trump — in
cartoon form. A clip was played
from “Our Cartoon President,” the
Showtime series executiveproduced by late-night host and
dinner alum Stephen Colbert. In it,
an animated version of Trump
agrees to speak at the dinner. “Can
you believe the lying fake media
invited me again to the White
House correspondents’ dinner? I
mean, you don’t see the Central
Park Five inviting me to brunch.”
Har har?
But the deepest record scratch
came during White House
Correspondents’ Association
President Margaret Talev’s
opening speech. She fiercely
underscored the importance of
the First Amendment and
condemned attempts to
undermine the press. Makes
sense. But just seconds later,
Talev, who works at Bloomberg
News, made it a point to thank
White House press secretary
Sarah Huckabee Sanders.
Sanders, who has repeatedly used
Trump’s “fake news” phrase, has
an adversarial relationship with
the briefing room at best and a
combative one at worst.
“Thank you for being here,” Talev
said. “Sarah, we really appreciate
your participation and your
ongoing work with our members to
help us cover the White House and
help Americans see their
government in action, thank you.”
The gratitude seemed extremely
odd in the face of the growing rift
between the press and the current
administration.
Later, the very real Rep. Paul D.
Ryan (R-Wis.) appeared in a
satirical address from “the future
former Speaker of the House” that
looked like it was shot on an
iPhone. Ryan, who is retiring, joked
that “unfortunately I’m not able to
be there with you tonight. Instead,
[my wife] Janna and I will be
spending the evening freshening
up my LinkedIn page.” Then the
camera cut to Ryan typing in his
office: “Waiter at Tortilla Coast,
1991 to 1994.” That “punchline” and
the video as a whole got crickets in
the ballroom. Ryan’s cameo in
general seemed random —
although he had earlier met with
WHCA scholarship recipients.
Of course, all of these quirkier
moments would soon be
overshadowed completely by the
evening’s highlight — or lowlight,
depending on who you ask. Once
Wolf started lobbing F-bombs and
landing punchlines about
pussyhats, the dinner’s overall
awkwardness took a back seat.
G O T A T I P ? EMA I L U S A T RE LIA BLE SOURCE @ WA SH POST. COM .
FO R T H E L A T ES T S C O O PS , V IS IT WA SH IN GTON POST. COM/
RE L IA BL E SO URCE
@ h elena _a nd r ew s @ em ilya h eil
TUESDAY, MAY 1 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C3
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At Arena Stage, ‘Snow Child’ feels a little warmed over
THEATER FROM C1
newborn, the longing that has
brought them out west to live in a
cute little cabin for a life for which
they are unprepared. It’s during
one of her dark reveries by a frozen
river that Mabel first sees Faina
(Fina Strazza), and we are meant to
wonder if the resourceful girl of the
outback is a fantasy born of desola-
tion, or simply another lost human
being in search of a loving home.
Either way, Strand’s libretto
bogs down in the predictable
scenes of Jack and Mabel’s struggles with the land, and their irritation with each other. A thin topical overlay to the plot, set in the
1920s — when Alaska was still a
U.S. territory, decades away from
statehood — has George and Gar-
rett vowing opposition to a federal
government that seeks ever more
control of the free and rugged way
of life they cherish. For this reason, apparently, “Snow Child” has
been designated one of Arena’s
“power plays,” original works
about “power and politics” the
company is serving up over multiple seasons. Although a character
also has an epiphany about the
ethical use of firearms, “Snow
Child” is as much about power
and politics as “Mary Poppins” is
an exposé of conditions for domestic laborers.
A small band conducted by William Yanesh is parked downstage,
plunking out Banghart and Stitt’s
tunes on banjo, mandolin, fiddle,
keyboard and guitar. Its pallid contribution conforms to the impres-
sion that solidifies over the course
of this disappointing evening: of a
journey through snow that leaves
no tracks.
peter.marks@washpost.com
Snow Child, book by John Strand,
music by Bob Banghart and Georgia
Stitt; lyrics by Stitt. Directed by Molly
Smith. Music direction, William
Yanesh; sets, Todd Rosenthal;
costumes, Joseph P. Salasovich;
lighting, Kimberly Purtell; sound, Roc
Lee; projections, Shawn Duan;
puppets, Emily DeCola and Eric Wright;
fight direction, Lewis Shaw. With
Dorothy James, David Landstrom,
Calvin McCullough. About 2 hours 15
minutes. $40-$90. Through May 20 at
Arena Stage, 1101 Sixth St. SW.
arenastage.org or 202-488-3300.
MUSIC REVIEW
Korean pianist Yeol Eum Son opens up a big box of tools at Phillips recital
BY
C HARLES T . D OWNEY
The drama of a solo piano recital lies in a performer measuring
herself against perilous musical
demands. Yeol Eum Son, who won
silver medals at the Van Cliburn
Competition in 2009 and the
Tchaikovsky Competition in 2011,
plays with grace under pressure.
The South Korean pianist’s recital
Sunday afternoon, presented by
the Phillip Collection at the International Student House, showed
more than just steely nerve.
Sensitivity of touch and musical
phrasing are not necessarily the
stuff that wins competitions. In
Mozart’s Fantasia in C Minor, K.
475, Son played with a dazzling
range of dynamics, patiently giving
each musical idea a semi-improvisatory spontaneity. The first part of
the set of six pieces in Brahms’s Op.
118 did not flow as effortlessly,
especially metronomic and uninspired in the yearning “Intermezzo
in A Major.” Greater variety in the
voicing of countermelodies lifted
the last three pieces, particularly
the wandering, enigmatic “Intermezzo in E-flat Minor.”
The low point of the program
came with Arvo Part’s “Variations
for the Healing of Arinushka for
Piano.” Son took this simplistic
set of six variations at a good clip,
making the bell-like texture more
trite than profound. The piece
was over so quickly that the audi-
ence did not even realize it had
come and gone, neglecting to applaud even though Son gave clear
signs it was over.
Her showmanship came
to the fore in Liszt’s
“Mephisto Waltz No. 1,”
played with devilish
ferocity.
JAEHYONG PARK
DINNER FROM C1
members have advised the
WHCA’s leadership to get rid of
the comedy portion next year —
or else. “News organizations are
going to make their feelings
known that the comedy aspect
of the dinner has become too
risky for the association and too
damaging for the dinner,” said a
White House reporter involved
in the discussions. “It’s too disruptive.”
The
WHCA’s
president,
Bloomberg reporter Margaret
Talev, sounded officially contrite after Wolf ’s televised routine scandalized some of
Trump’s supporters and brought
others rushing to Wolf ’s defense. She issued a statement to
members, prompted in part by
threats of an exodus next year,
that read in part, “Unfortunate-
ly, the entertainer’s monologue
was not in the spirit of [the
WHCA’s] mission.”
For his part, Trump — who
ditched the event for the second
year in a row — repeatedly
trashed Wolf and the dinner on
Sunday and Monday and offered
his suggestion about what to do
next: “Put Dinner to rest, or
start over!” he tweeted.
It’s highly unlikely the WHCA
will end the dinner, a Washington ritual dating back to 1921.
Almost all of the group’s annual
revenue, used to maintain a
small office that coordinates
pool reporting duties and advocates for media access, comes
from selling tables at the dinner
to news organizations. The dinner’s proceeds also fund the
organization’s journalism scholarships.
But in discussions on Sunday
with three key board members
— Talev, incoming president Olivier Knox of SiriusXM and
Jonathan Karl of ABC News —
several news organizations indicated their support next year
could be jeopardized if another
controversial comic is hired.
People involved in the discussions said executives from Politico, CBS News and The Washington Post were among those urging the change.
“To put it mildly, Saturday’s
performance was not helpful,”
Politico founder and publisher
Robert Allbritton told The Post.
“But I’m hopeful that the association will evaluate the dinner
from top to bottom so that the
program better aligns with its
objectives and mission — one
that we share and strongly support.”
Comedians have performed at
the dinner for decades, joining
opera singers, jazz artists and
radio and TV stars over the
years, said George Condon, a
former president of the association who is writing a history of
it.
But in recent years, the
WHCA has had trouble attracting top-flight names. A-list performers have been reluctant to
take the gig because the pay —
$10,000 for the night — is less
than they’d make for a weekend
stand elsewhere, said one person familiar with the negotiations. (The payment apparently
hasn’t changed since 1994, when
future senator Al Franken received $10,000 for his performance, said Condon.)
What’s more, a performer also
must create material for the
evening that can’t really be
recycled into an ongoing standup act.
“The pay is chicken feed,” said
one journalist active in the
WHCA. (He and others spoke on
Comedians come to Michelle Wolf’s defense
COMEDIANS FROM C1
gatekeepers they’re charged with
covering, so goes the reasoning.
As a comedy gig, it’s long been
notoriously difficult. A big, cavernous room filled with thinskinned people wearing uncomfortable clothing is a comic’s leastideal situation.
During roasts, the main target
eventually gets to roast back. So
the WHCA dinner format has become even more fraught under
President Trump, who has
skipped the event while in office.
Trump is also known to directly
attack journalists, calling them
“the lowest form of humanity.”
“Trump has to some extent broken political comedy,” said comedian Guy Branum, who hosts a
show on TruTV. “We for such a
long time were working on a ‘Daily Show’ model of sort of scoffing
at politicians and calling them
undignified, and he owns being
undignified. Figuring out other
strategies to handle that has been
complex.”
Wolf focusing largely on those
in Trump’s orbit was brilliant, Branum said, because those individuals “purport to the dignity of being
part of the establishment.”
On Saturday, Wolf told jokes
about Trump, Vice President
Pence, White House counselor
Kellyanne Conway, Hillary Clinton and the Democrats. She also
targeted CNN, Fox News and the
mainstream media, saying they
must secretly love Trump because
they profit off him.
The comic devoted four jokes to
style@washpost.com
Yeol Eum Son performed a program of Mozart, Brahms, Part, Ravel, Liszt and Friedrich Gulda on Sunday.
Will group nix comedians at dinner?
AARON P. BERNSTEIN/REUTERS
Comedian Michelle Wolf performs at the White House Correspondents' Association dinner.
press secretary Sarah Huckabee
Sanders, including the line that
“she burns facts, and then she uses
the ash to create a perfect smoky
eye.”
“That @PressSec sat and absorbed intense criticism of her
physical appearance, her job performance, and so forth, instead of
walking out, on national television, was impressive,” tweeted
Times reporter Maggie Haberman. And MSNBC host Mika
Brzezinski tweeted, “Watching a
wife and mother be humiliated on
national television for her looks is
deplorable.”
Several comedians, however,
say the smoky-eye was just a setup: The joke was calling Sanders a
liar.
“She is to some extent being
criticized because we don’t expect
a woman to be that harsh,” Branum said. “After decades of always
going after women for their appearance or gender, having a
woman come after other women
in ways that were just about their
job performance almost left people vexed.”
As Wolf told NPR’s Terry Gross,
“I made fun of Mitch McConnell’s
neck and I did a small jab at Chris
Christie’s weight and no one is
jumping to their defense.”
In excerpts published online in
advance of the interview’s airing
on Tuesday, Wolf told Gross that
perhaps people look at a woman
and think, “Oh, she’ll be nice.”
“If you’ve seen any of my comedy you know that I don’t — I’m
not,” she continued. “I don’t pull
punches. I’m not afraid to talk
about things. And I don’t think
they expected that from me. I
think they still have preconceived
notions of how women will present themselves, and I don’t fit in
that box.”
When the program became
more virtuosic, in Ravel’s “Valses
Nobles et Sentimentales,” Son
came back to life. With the first
piece she took the listener by the
collar and never let go, ranging
from wispy and mysterious to a
murky haze of sound in the smoky
final waltz. Her showmanship
came to the fore in the final work,
Liszt’s “Mephisto Waltz No. 1,”
played with booming power and
devilish ferocity in the cackling
multi-trills and gossamer righthand runs.
The first encore, Friedrich Gulda’s “Play by Play,” a bluesy romp,
stayed in the same hot vein, while
the second, Chopin’s “Waltz in
G-flat Major,” Op. 72/1, cooled the
audience back down to room temperature.
background because they aren’t
authorized to speak publicly.)
“It’s not competitive. So we get
less-established
comedians.
What are their incentives to play
nice? They have every incentive
not to kowtow and to show
future booking agents how aggressive and edgy they can be.
It’s good for them, not us. . . .
Our alternative is to just take
[the comedian] out of the evening.”
Condon also points out that
young comedians aren’t very
likely to be Trump-friendly, ensuring that the evening will have
a partisan feel to it. This is
especially true since Trump has
declined to attend and therefore
isn’t around to offer his own
zingers, as other presidents have
done.
Among options under discussion by the WHCA are replacing
the comic with a musical performer, although that, too, has
proved problematic in the past.
A series of what Condon called
“excruciatingly bad” acts from
the late 1960s to early 1980s —
ranging from the Mike Curb
Congregation to the Disneyland
Golden Horseshoe Revue — led
the association to phase out
musical performances from the
program. Even legendary performers like Ray Charles, who
headlined in 2003, couldn’t hold
the chattering room’s attention,
he said.
A comedian has performed at
every event continuously since
1983, with the exceptions of
2003 and 1999, when Aretha
Franklin entertained.
But the comic tradition may
have ended with Wolf on Saturday. Said one longtime board
member: “A dinner without a
comedian does sound boring,
and there’s nothing wrong with
that. I’m a defender of the
dinner. I believe the dinner is
important. . . . If that’s the price
of preserving it, it’s worthwhile.”
While critics also called Wolf’s
set mean and vulgar, such claims
are hypocritical, say her defenders, given Trump’s own use of
profanity and insults.
“Enough with holding everyone else but the President of the
United States and his staff to higher standards,” tweeted comedian
Kathy Griffin, who herself landed
at the center of a controversy after
a gruesome satirical photo of
Trump.
Comedy writer Nell Scovell,
who helped with jokes for President Barack Obama, says comedians are stepping up in a way that
journalists aren’t, pointing to the
jokes about Sanders and lying. “If
the job of journalism is to get at
the truth, they need to do a better
job.”
“I’m not the first to observe that
we’re not living in normal times,
and I keep going back to George
Orwell’s ‘Two minutes of hate’ and
that mob mentality,” Scovell said,
referencing the ritual in the novel
“1984” where people are forced to
show their hatred of enemies of
the state for two minutes. “What
happened to Kathy Griffin, now
it’s happening to Michelle Wolf.”
In a statement Sunday, WHCA
President Margaret Talev said she
heard “dismay” from members
about Wolf’s monologue. The program “was meant to offer a unifying message about our common
commitment to a vigorous and
free press while honoring civility,
great reporting and scholarship
winners, not to divide people,” she
said. “Unfortunately the entertainer’s monologue was not in the
spirit of that mission.”
Known as a hard-working comic who likes to make fun of everyone, Wolf operates by the “if you
offend everyone, you offend no
one” approach. Those who know
her are not surprised by her performance.
“Few people go to DC and accomplish what they set out to do
while staying true to themselves,”
past WHCD correspondents’ dinner headliner and Wolf’s former
boss, Seth Meyers, tweeted.
“[Wolf ] is one of those people.”
Another past WHCD performer, Jimmy Kimmel, tweeted: “Dear
‘the media’ — [Michelle Wolf ] was
FUNNY. Hire a juggler next year.”
“Michelle did exactly what she
should do, which was she upset
everybody,” said Anthony Atamanuik, a Trump impersonator
who hosts the Trump-themed
“The President Show” on Comedy
Central. “That’s the role of a commentator and a bomb thrower
and a comedian. Your job is not to
make people comfortable and
your job is definitely not to stay
within the line. Your job is to say
the things that make people uncomfortable and upset.”
For her part, Wolf said she
“wouldn’t change a single word.”
“I wasn’t expecting this level,
but I’m also not disappointed
there’s this level,” she told Gross
on NPR. “I knew what I was doing
going in. I wanted to do something different. I didn’t want to
cater to the room. I wanted to
cater to the outside audience, and
not betray my brand of comedy.”
She added: “A friend of mine
who helped me write, he gave me a
note before I went on which I kept
with me which was, ‘Be true to
yourself. Never apologize. Burn it
to the ground.’ ”
paul.farhi@washpost.com
elahe.izadi@washpost.com
C4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
MAY 1 , 2018
Television
TV HIGHLIGHTS
5/1/18
7:00
7:30
BROADCAST CHANNELS
8:30
9:00
9:30
8:00
◆ News
◆ Access
4.1 WRC (NBC)
The Nanny
The Nanny
4.2 WRC (IND)
◆ TMZ
Mod Fam
5.1 WTTG (Fox)
◆
◆
Wheel
J’pardy!
7.1 WJLA (ABC)
◆ ET
9.1 WUSA (CBS) Off Script
◆
La
Rosa
de
Guadalupe
14.1 WFDC (UNI)
◆ FamFeud
20.1 WDCA (MNTV) ◆ FamFeud
22.1 WMPT (PBS) Farm-Harvest Outdoors
26.4 WETA (PBS) PBS NewsHour
◆ Old House
32.1 WHUT (PBS) DW News
Goldbergs
50.1 WDCW (CW) Goldbergs
66.1 WPXW (ION) Criminal Minds
The Voice (Live)
Frasier
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◆ Lethal Weapon
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◆ Middle
◆ NCIS
El rico y Lázaro
Fox 5 News ◆ Page Six
◆ Civilizations
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Unforgotten on Masterpiece
◆ The Flash
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◆
10:00
(9:01) ◆ Rise
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◆ LA-Vegas
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◆ blackish
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Papá a toda madre
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10:30
11:00
Chicago Med
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Por amar sin ley
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CABLE CHANNELS
FOX
LA to Vegas (Fox at 9) Over the objections of Nichole (Olivia Macklin,
pictured with Peter Stormare, who plays Artem), Ronnie applies for a new
job, and Dave plans to propose to Patricia on the finale of Season 1.
Roseanne (ABC at 8) Beverly gets
herself removed from the nursing
home.
Hills (Bravo at 9) Reunion part 2.
The Flash (CW at 8) Cisco and
Gypsy discuss their relationship.
Unsolved: The Murders of Tupac
and the Notorious B.I.G.
(USA at 10) The investigators hunt
down their last leads.
Splitting Up Together
(ABC at 9:30) Martin wants to
start dating.
FINALE
LATE NIGHT
For the People (ABC at 10)
Leonard’s new case causes him to
confront his building insecurities.
PREMIERE
Hunting Nazi Treasure
(AHC at 10) Investigators track
down works of art that were stolen
by the Nazis at the end of World
War II.
MIDSEASON PREMIERE
The Haves and the Have Nots
(OWN at 9) Candace goes back to
her old ways.
SPECIALS
John Mulaney: Kid Gorgeous at
Radio City (Netflix streaming)
Stand-up from the comedian.
Conan (TBS at 11) Kunal Nayyar,
Adam Pally.
Daily Show (Comedy Central at
11) Antoinette Robertson.
Fallon (NBC at 11:34) Ariana
Grande.
Colbert (CBS at 11:35) Helen
Hunt, Kevin Smith, Paramore.
Kimmel (ABC at 11:35) Miley
Cyrus, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (DMass.).
Corden (CBS at 12:37) Elizabeth
Olsen, David Tennant, Anne-Marie.
Meyers (NBC at 12:37) Kathy
Griffin, Jonny Sun, Carter McLean.
— Sarah Polus
More at washingtonpost.com/tv
Married at First Sight
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The First 48
The First 48: Killer Confessions
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(5:30) Movie: The Last Stand Movie: Twister ★★★ (1996)
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In Contempt
(11:01) In Contempt
BET
Real Housewives/Beverly
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Watch
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Deadliest Catch: On Deck
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(6:20) Diary of a Wimpy Kid DuckTales
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Boxing: Jessie Magdaleno vs. Isaac Dogboe
E:60
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Chopped
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Transformers Movie: Guardians of the Galaxy ★★★ (2014)
Legion
(11:05) Legion
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Last-Standing Last-Standing Last-Standing Last-Standing The Middle
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Murder, She Baked: A Chocolate Chip Cookie Mystery
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Movie: Kong: Skull Island ★★★ (2017)
Silicon Valley Barry
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History
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MLB Baseball: Pittsburgh Pirates at Washington Nationals (Live)
Nats
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Teen Mom: Young
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Jersey Shore--Vacation
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Genius
Genius
Nat’l Geographic Movie: Captain Phillips ★★★ (2013)
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Redskins 100 Redskins
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Henry Danger Henry Danger Movie: Miss Congeniality ★★ (2000)
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PARMT
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Futurama
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TBS
(6:15) Movie: The Slave
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(5:45) Movie: I Am Legend
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Movie: The Matrix ★★★ (1999)
Movie: The Matrix ★★★ (1999)
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Real Housewives of Beverly
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High Definition Movie Ratings (from TMS) ★★★★ Excellent ★★★ Good ★★ Fair ★ Poor No stars: not rated
Safe or out? Grandson wants to play baseball again following a head injury.
Adapted from a recent online discussion.
Dear Carolyn: My
son has always
loved baseball,
and now that he’s
grown, he coaches
his son’s baseball
team. This past summer my
grandson got hit in the head with
a ball and was knocked
unconscious, and he didn’t play
for the rest of the season. I
assumed he was done playing
baseball, but my son told me last
week that my grandson will be
playing again next summer.
I told my son I’m appalled he’d
expose his son to another injury
like that, and my son ignored my
Carolyn
Hax
opinion. I also called my
daughter-in-law to try to get her
to talk some sense into my son
and she also pretty much ignored
me.
I know most of the time you tell
parents to butt out of things like
this, but isn’t there an exception
when we’re talking about a
grandchild’s physical health? I
can’t believe my son and his wife
— who are usually good parents —
would let their son continue to
play a sport after he’s already
been badly hurt playing it.
— Appalled
Appalled: If it were my son, and if
he loved the sport enough to want
to keep playing it, then I would let
him play it. (Full disclosure: My
kids play ice hockey, soccer and
Let technophobic patients
sign hard-copy forms
Hints
From
Heloise
Dear Heloise: My
mother had to
check in at the
doctor’s office and
was dismayed to
find that she was required to use
a computer mouse to sign forms.
She didn’t know how to use a
mouse, and the woman told her
to do the best she could. It
resulted in scribbling instead of
a signature, which was
humiliating to my mother.
I wrote a letter to the hospital
baseball.)
A serious head injury warrants
a serious consideration of the
risks, of course, and if it were one
of the sports involving repetitive
head impact, I could see wanting
to step in as a grandparent to say,
“Wait, are you sure?!” But while
baseball has its dangers like any
sport involving a high-speed
projectile, a head injury is more of
a fluke than a certainty, and so I’d
feel better leaving it entirely to
parents to decide.
One caveat: If the boy is playing
only/mostly because his daddy is
smitten with baseball, then that
supersedes a lot of what I just
wrote. If that’s true and the boy
isn’t good at baseball and a lack of
skill/coordination is why he got
beaned, then that wipes it all out.
system, asking them to consider
providing actual paper forms for
people who are unfamiliar with
technology.
Medical professionals, please
consider the abilities and
feelings of your elderly and
disabled patients when deciding
how to have paperwork signed.
April C., via email
April C.: Great effort in fighting
for your mom! Hugs to you both!
Dear Readers: Recently, we
It still doesn’t supersede the
parent’s prerogative, though. It
just means a grandparent gets to
say, once: “If the boy wants this,
then I understand, but if it’s more
about your wanting it for him,
then I hope you’ll reconsider. A
kid who isn’t all in is more likely to
get hurt again.”
“Good parents,” by the way,
wouldn’t try to relive their favorite
childhood sport vicariously
through their child. So if they are
in fact good parents as you say,
then maybe it’s time to take the
“usually” modifier away and trust
their judgment on this.
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
asked for your reaction to a letter
about tip jars. Here is what you
said.
“My concern about tipping is
that it is now a requirement, not
a choice. I don’t care for the
technology at the tables for
paying your bill. If you don’t eat
out often, you end up asking the
server for help in using it. I only
want to tip for good service, and
I don’t like the server standing
over me while I figure out how
much I want to give.”
signing off on football physicals
because concussions are so
common. But if you’re gonna say
no baseball, you may as well say
no leaving the house. Sports are
great for kids.
It sounds like these parents
acted responsibly by benching
their son until he was symptomfree. I agree with you and your
caveats, Carolyn.
— Anonymous
Anonymous: Thanks muchly.
Re: Baseball: I’m a health-care
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her column
delivered to your inbox each morning
at wapo.st/haxpost.
provider and I see kids with
concussions quite a bit. I also
clear kids for sports. I hate
Join the discussion live at noon
Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com
Daphne in Vancouver, Wash.
“I also get confused about tip
jars at counters of shops that
don’t really wait on you personally. I’m not cheap, but realistic; I
tip a full 20 percent at all restaurants, but delivery maybe 10 percent to 12 percent. After all, it’s
not direct personal service like a
restaurant. Am I the only one who
feels this way?”
Nickeled and Dimed
to Death, via email
“Tip jars on counters don’t
bother me; they’ve become fairly
common these days. Sometimes I
contribute, sometimes not. Depends on the attitude of the ones
behind the counter.”
Shirley M., Conroe, Tex.
Heloise’s column appears six days a
week at washingtonpost.com/advice.
Send a hint to Heloise, P.O. Box
795000, San Antonio, TX 782795000, or email it to
Heloise@Heloise.com.
© 2018, King Features Syndicate
THEATRE
Shear Madness
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Regular Schedule:
Tuesday–Friday at 8
Saturday at 6 & 9
Sunday at 3 & 7
This record-breaking interactive solve-the-crime comedy
keeps the audiences laughing as they try to outwit the
suspects and catch the killer. New clues and up to the
minute improvisation deliver “shrieks of laughter night after
night.” (Washington Post)
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Student Rush
Tickets Available
Tickets: 202-467-4600
Groups: 202-416-8400
www.shearmadness.com
Tickets
Available
at the
Box Office
Added Shows:
Mon at 8PM
Tue at 5PM
Wed at 5PM
Thu at 5PM
Great Group Rates
for 15 +
MUSIC - CONCERTS
First Wednesday
Concerts presents
organist Michael Lodico
Wednesday, May 2nd
from 12:10-12:45 p.m.
A recital of music about angels, including Craig Phillips’
“Archangel Suite"
Sun, May 6, 4:00pm
Soprano Tamara Wilson and guest conductor Matthew
Halls join the UMD Symphony Orchestra for Strauss,
Mozart, and Brahms.
St. John’s Church, Lafayette Square
at the corner of 16th & H Streets NW
Washington, D.C. 20005
( 202) 270-6265
Free
The Clarice
University of Maryland
301.405.2787
TheClarice.umd.edu
$25
The church is
fully wheelchair
accessible
MUSIC - ORCHESTRAL
UMD School of Music
Strauss’s Four
Last Songs
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
• Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
16-2898
TUESDAY, MAY 1 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C5
RE
MUSIC REVIEW
A prodigy shows technical
prowess in D.C. debut
BY
P ATRICK R UCKER
Pianist Nathan Lee hails
from the Seattle area, where he
studies with Sasha Starcevich.
Lee won the 2016 Young Concert Artists auditions in New
York when he was 15. Sunday
afternoon, he made his Washington debut at the Kennedy
Center under the auspices of
YCA and Washington Performing Arts.
Lee’s program would be formidable for a pianist three
times his age. He began with
arguably the most elaborate of
Bach’s Six Partitas, the fourth in
D major, followed by Mozart’s
late Adagio in B Minor. The first
half of the recital ended with
the Variations from 1984 by
Nikolai Kapustin, a Russian
composer now in his 80s, whose
music could be described as a
fusion of jazz with the traditional Russian piano school.
For an American pianist with
more than a century’s worth of
native product to draw on,
importing jazz from the Soviet
Union seemed a curious choice.
After intermission, we heard
Chopin’s B-minor sonata, followed by Alfred Grünfeld’s
frothy “Soiree de Vienne,” based
on Strauss waltzes.
Lee is immensely self-as-
Nathan Lee
performed Sunday
afternoon at the
Kennedy Center.
sured, his relaxed demeanor at
the piano due no doubt to the
ample technical resources at his
disposal. His playing is virtually
note perfect. His Bach, for instance, was poised, well mannered and a model of clarity.
The Kapustin Variations were
persuasive and the Grünfeld
waltz medley had all the appropriate Viennese “schwung.”
What was less discernible in
Lee’s playing was the nascent
sense of an original voice, that
quality that lifts a performance
from a simulacrum of the music
to an authentic utterance, born
of necessity. Finding this quality full-blown in someone Lee’s
age is rare, but the potential can
often be glimpsed. With luck,
professional pressures can be
held at bay and life experience
will bring Lee’s considerable
gifts into full bloom.
style@washpost.com
MATT DINE
MOVIE DIRECTORY
DISTRICT
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
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Blockers (R) CC: 2:00-4:407:20-9:50
Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
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Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
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Labyrinth (1986)7:00
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
12:00-3:30-7:00-10:30; 12:304:00-7:30
Smithsonian - Lockheed Martin
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CC: 11:00-1:15-4:30-5:45-7:45
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Digital 3D (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:202:45-6:25-9:15-10:00
Rampage (PG-13) CC: 2:30-7:35
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Kings (R) (!) 11:10-1:40-4:206:50-9:20
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AFI Silver Theatre Cultural Ctr I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: (!) 12:508633 Colesville Road
3:35-6:15-9:10
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 12:20-2:30- Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) CC:
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11:15-5:15
Duke Ellington on Film: Part 1
Traffik (R) CC: (!) 11:35-2:00-4:40(NR) 7:30
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Kedi (NR) 5:15
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3:15-10:15
The Death of Stalin (R) 12:30Avengers: Infinity War The IMAX
2:45-5:00-9:30
2D Experience (PG-13) CC:
Le silence de la Mer (1949)3:10 11:45-6:45
The Decline of Western Civiliza- Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
tion (1981) (NR) 9:45
Digital 3D (PG-13) (!) 2:15
Pursued (1947) (NR) 1:00
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG13) 12:00-2:35-5:00-7:25-9:50
AMC Academy 8
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 10:2511:35-1:00-3:15
Avengers: Infinity War An IMAX
3D Experience (PG-13) 3:50-9:55
Avengers: Infinity War The IMAX
2D Experience (PG-13) 6:50
Planet Power: An IMAX 3D
Experience (NR) 1:35
Pandas: An IMAX 3D Experience
(G) 12:10-2:25
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians
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11:00AM
MARYLAND
6198 Greenbelt Road
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
CC: (!) 9:30-11:00-1:00-4:30-6:008:00-9:30-11:25
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
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Avengers: Infinity War in Disney 2:30-3:30-7:00-10:25
Rampage (PG-13) CC: 10:45Digital 3D (PG-13) (!) 4:20
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AMC Mazza Gallerie
Ready Player One (PG-13) CC:
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4:00
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PGCC: 12:00-1:00-4:30-7:00-8:00
13) CC: 11:30-2:00-4:30-7:00-9:45
Ready Player One (PG-13) CC:
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2:15-5:00-7:30-10:00
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) CC:
Digital 3D (PG-13) (!) 3:30
10:00-12:45-3:45-6:30-9:20
Rampage (PG-13) CC: 12:30-3:10 Traffik (R) CC: 9:45-12:15-2:45A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 1:00- 5:15-7:45-10:05
3:20-5:40-8:10
AMC Center Park 8
Super Troopers 2 (R) CC: 12:104001 Powder Mill Rd.
2:40-5:45-8:20
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: 12:10- Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
CC: (!) 11:00-12:00-1:00-3:30-4:002:40-5:20-8:05
6:05-7:00-10:30
Albert Einstein Planetarium - Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
National Air and Space Museum Digital 3D (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:006th Street and Independence Ave SW 1:30-2:30-5:00-8:45-9:30
To Space and Back 11:00AM
Rampage (PG-13) CC: 11:30Dark Universe Space Show (NR) 5:30-8:00-10:30
11:30-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30 Ready Player One (PG-13) CC:
Journey to the Stars (NR) 12:00- 2:15
1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00-5:00
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 12:30The Stars Tonight (NR) 10:30AM 3:00-5:15-7:30-9:45
Super Troopers 2 (R) CC: 10:45Angelika Pop-Up
1:15-7:15-9:40
at Union Market
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: 10:30550 Penn Street NE - Unit E
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:45-1:45- 1:15-4:00-6:35-9:15
Traffik (R) CC: 10:15-4:20-6:453:40-5:35-7:30-9:30
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) 9:15
11:30-12:30-2:45-3:45-6:00AMC Columbia 14
7:00-9:00
10300 Little Patuxent Pkwy
Blockers (R) CC: 3:10-9:50
Avalon Theatre
Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
5612 Connecticut Avenue
Borg vs. McEnroe (R) 12:00-2:30- 11:50AM
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
5:00-7:45
CC: (!) 10:30-11:30-2:00-3:00The Leisure Seeker (R) 5:30
Final Portrait (R) 1:00-3:15-8:00 5:30-6:30-9:00-10:00
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Landmark
Digital 3D (PG-13) 12:30-4:00Atlantic Plumbing Cinema
7:25-10:45
807 V Street, NW
Rampage (PG-13) CC: 11:20Ready Player One (PG-13) CC:
4:50-10:20
11:15-2:00
Ready Player One (PG-13) CC:
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: 11:45- (!) 2:30-9:45
2:15-4:30-7:45-10:10
Rampage 3D (PG-13) CC:
Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
2:05-7:40
1:00-3:45
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 11:30- (PG-13) CC: 11:05-1:35-4:001:30-3:30-4:50-5:30-7:30-9:35
6:30-9:05
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 11:10CC: 12:15-12:45-3:30-4:00-6:45- 1:40-3:00-4:10-6:40-9:10
7:00-7:10-7:15-9:45-10:00-10:05- Kings (R) 11:05-1:35-4:0010:15
6:25-9:00
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: 10:40Landmark E Street Cinema
1:25-4:10-7:20-10:05
555 11th Street NW
Ghost Stories (NR) CC: 2:30-5:00- Traffik (R) CC: 12:00-10:05
Like Arrows (!) 7:00
7:30-9:40
Avengers: Infinity War The IMAX
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) CC: 2:152D Experience (PG-13) CC: (!)
4:45-7:15-9:45
You Were Never Really Here (R) 11:00-2:30-6:00-9:30
Ready Player One in 3D (PG-13)
CC: 1:20-3:30-5:40-7:50-9:50
The Death of Stalin (R) CC: 2:20- CC: 11:05-6:00
Labyrinth (1986)(!) 7:00
4:50-7:20-9:40
Beirut (R) CC: 1:30-4:00-7:00-9:30 Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) (!)
12:00-3:30-7:00-10:30
Landmark West End Cinema Super Troopers 2 (R) (!) 10:502301 M Street NW
1:30-4:05-6:35-9:15
Lean on Pete (R) CC: 1:00-4:00AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18
7:00
9811 Washingtonian Ctr.
Love After Love 1:30-4:30-7:30
Avengers:
Infinity War (PG-13)
Summer in the Forest 1:15CC: (!) 10:30-2:00-5:30-9:00
4:15-7:15
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Medal of Honor Theater - NMMC Digital 3D (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:3018900 Jefferson Davis Highway
3:00-6:30-10:00
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the Rampage (PG-13) CC: 11:10Seas 2D 11:00-2:00
1:50-4:30-7:10-10:15
We, the Marines (NR) 10:00A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 9:5012:00-1:00-3:00
12:10-2:30-5:00-7:45-9:40
The Magic of Flight (NR) 4:00
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: 11:00Regal Gallery Place Stadium 14 1:40-4:20-7:00-9:50
Avengers: Infinity War An IMAX
701 Seventh St Northwest
3D Experience (PG-13) CC: (!)
Blockers (R) 12:10
12:45-10:40
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:25Avengers: Infinity War The IMAX
3:25-9:45
Experience (PG-13) CC: (!)
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) 2D
9:30-4:00-7:20
10:30-11:00-11:30-1:30-2:00-2:50AMC Loews
3:15-5:00-5:30-6:00-6:45-8:30St. Charles Town Ctr. 9
9:00-10:25
11115 Mall Circle
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Digital 3D (PG-13) 1:00-4:30Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
8:00-11:30
CC: (!) 9:00-12:00-12:45-3:30Rampage (PG-13) 11:20-2:004:30-7:00-10:30
11:05
Avengers: Infinity War in
Ready Player One (PG-13)
Disney Digital 3D (PG-13) CC:
10:30-1:45
(!) 10:00-10:45-1:30-2:45-5:00Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG- 6:15-7:30-9:45-10:00
13) 11:00-6:55-9:40
Rampage (PG-13) CC: 10:15A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:001:00-3:45-6:30-9:15
12:15-2:35-4:55-7:15-9:35
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare
Super Troopers 2 (R) 10:45-1:15- (PG-13) CC: 9:30-12:00-2:353:45-6:15-8:45
7:15-10:45
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 11:45-2:25- A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 9:305:05-7:45-10:25
12:00-2:30-5:00-8:30-9:45
Traffik (R) 1:30-4:15-9:25-10:10 Super Troopers 2 (R) CC: (!)
9:15-2:15-4:45-7:30-10:50
Like Arrows 7:00
Labyrinth (1986)7:00
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: (!)
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney 10:30-1:15-4:00-6:45-9:30
Traffik (R) CC: (!) 9:45-12:15Digital 3D (PG-13) 12:30-2:304:00-7:30-9:40-11:05
5:00-8:00-10:30
AMC Loews Uptown 1
3426 Connecticut Ave N.W.
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
ArcLight Bethesda
7101 Democracy Boulevard
Rampage (PG-13) 10:30-3:2011:00
Ready Player One (PG-13) 10:2012:10-4:25
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 11:20AM
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:45-2:055:50-8:10-10:25
Super Troopers 2 (R) 11:50-2:555:20-7:40-10:05
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 11:35-2:355:10-7:50-10:20
Beirut (R) 12:05
Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
2:10-5:05
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
10:15-1:30-8:00-11:10
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Digital 3D (PG-13) 11:15-2:305:45-9:00
Chappaquiddick (PG-13) CC:
10:25-12:25
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
10:45-11:30-12:30-12:45-1:001:15-1:45-2:00-2:15-2:45-3:454:00-4:15-4:30-5:00-5:15-5:306:00-7:00-7:15-7:30-7:45-8:058:30; 8:45-9:15-10:15-10:30-10:45
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Digital 3D (PG-13) 4:45; 12:153:30-6:45-7:20-8:15-10:00-10:35
Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
1020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Digital 3D (PG-13) 12:00-3:307:00-10:20
Rampage (PG-13) 12:50-3:506:50-9:40
Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero
(PG) 12:10-2:25
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
10:30-11:10-11:30-12:30-2:002:40-3:00-4:00-4:30-6:10-6:307:30-9:30-9:50
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG13) 10:15-7:50
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:001:20-3:40-4:40-6:00-7:10-8:159:20-10:35
Super Troopers 2 (R) 12:20-2:505:15-7:40-10:05
Traffik (R) 5:20-10:15
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Digital 3D (PG-13) 10:00-1:001:30-5:00-8:00-8:30
Bow Tie Harbour 9
2474 Solomons Island Road
I Can Only Imagine (PG) 11:102:00-4:40-7:20-10:05
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:202:50-6:10-9:10
You Were Never Really Here (R)
11:50-2:30-5:10-7:40-10:10
Beirut (R) 10:30-1:20-4:307:10-9:40
Blockers (R) 11:30-2:20-5:007:30-10:20
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 10:50-1:304:10-6:50-9:20
Chappaquiddick (PG-13) 10:201:10-4:00-6:40-9:30
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 10:00-11:0012:40-1:40-3:20-4:20-6:00-7:009:00-10:00
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Digital 3D (PG-13) 12:00-3:307:00-10:30
Rampage (PG-13) 10:25-12:251:15-4:20-7:20-9:25-10:25
Bharath Ane Nenu (NR) 9:4511:45-1:45-3:45-7:40-10:00
Ready Player One (PG-13)
12:20-3:30
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare
(PG-13) 9:50
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:00-2:304:50-7:10-9:30
Super Troopers 2 (R) 11:30-2:00Hoyt's West Nursery Cinema 14 4:30-9:30
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 11:10-1:501591 West Nursery Road
4:30-7:15-10:00
Blockers (R) CC: 11:00-1:25Bharath Ane Nenu (NR) 11:007:20-9:45
2:40-6:20-10:00
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 12:50- Traffik (R) 10:30-1:00-3:30-6:004:00-7:10-10:10
8:25-10:50
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) Like Arrows 7:00
CC: 11:00-11:50-12:40-1:30-2:30- Labyrinth (1986)7:00
3:20-4:10-5:00-6:05-6:55-7:45Regal Hyattsville Royale
8:35-9:30-10:20
Stadium 14
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
6505 America Blvd.
Digital 3D (PG-13) CC: 3:50
Black
Panther
(PG-13) 12:15Rampage (PG-13) CC: 11:303:45-7:05-10:15
2:05-4:40-7:15-9:50
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG- Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
11:45-12:30-12:45-2:45-3:1513) CC: 11:15-1:40-4:05-10:30
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 12:00- 3:30-4:00-4:15-6:15-6:45-7:007:20-7:35-9:45-10:15-10:302:15-4:30-7:25-9:40
Super Troopers 2 (R) CC: 12:05- 10:45-11:00
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
2:40-5:10-7:35-10:00
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: 11:00- Digital 3D (PG-13) 11:30-12:003:00-6:30-10:00
1:30-4:05-6:40-9:15
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) CC: Rampage (PG-13) 11:30-2:154:55-7:50-10:40
11:15-2:00-4:45-7:40-10:25
Ready Player One (PG-13)
I Can Only Imagine (PG) CC:
11:30AM
11:55-2:30-9:30
Traffik (R) CC: 12:20-2:50-5:20- Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG13) 12:15-2:45-5:15-7:45-10:35
7:55-10:15
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:25-2:55Landmark
5:20-7:40-10:00
Bethesda Row Cinema
Super Troopers 2 (R) 11:40-2:207235 Woodmont Ave
5:05-7:35-10:15
Foxtrot (R) 1:30-6:50
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 11:35-2:20Finding Your Feet (PG-13) CC:
5:15-7:55-10:35
4:10-9:20
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) 1:00The Rider (R) CC: 1:10-1:50-3:50- 4:10-7:25-10:35
4:50-7:00-7:40-9:30-10:00
Traffik (R) 11:40-2:20-5:00-7:40Isle of Dogs (PG-13) CC: 2:0010:10
4:30-7:10-9:30
Beirut (R) CC: 1:20-4:20-7:20-9:50 Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12
14716 Baltimore Avenue
Lean on Pete (R) CC: 1:00-4:00Black Panther (PG-13) 12:20-6:30
9:45
The Death of Stalin (R) CC: 12:50- Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
11:15-11:45-12:30-2:30-3:001:40-3:30-4:40-6:30-7:15-8:50
3:30-4:00-6:15-6:45-7:30-8:45Old Greenbelt Theatre
9:45-10:05
129 Centerway
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
After Auschwitz 7:30
Digital 3D (PG-13) 1:30-7:55Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr
10:30
Story 5:15
Rampage (PG-13) 1:10-3:507:00-9:55
Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG3899 Branch Ave
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) 13) 11:40-2:40-5:20
12:45-1:00-3:15-4:15-7:00-8:00- A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:00-2:455:35-8:10-10:30
8:30
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney Super Troopers 2 (R) 11:50-2:204:50-7:40-10:35
Digital 3D (PG-13) 11:45-4:30
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 1:00-4:15Traffik (R) 1:30-3:55-6:20-8:45
7:15-10:25
Rampage (PG-13) 12:15-2:50Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R)
5:25-8:10
3:35-9:35
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG- Traffik
(R) 12:50-3:15-6:00-10:00
13) 12:30-3:05-5:25-8:05
Like Arrows 7:00
Regal Bowie Stadium 14
15200 Major Lansdale Blvd
Regal Rockville Center
Stadium 13
199 East Montgomery Avenue
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:40
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
12:00-12:40-1:30-3:00-3:304:00-4:30-5:05-6:30-7:40-8:108:40-10:00
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Digital 3D (PG-13) 2:00-5:357:00-9:10
Rampage (PG-13) 1:00-4:00-10:10
Ready Player One (PG-13)
12:00-3:10
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG13) 10:00-10:30
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:30-3:105:40-8:20
Kings (R) 12:45-3:00-5:30-8:0010:30
Super Troopers 2 (R) 12:20-2:505:20-7:50-10:15
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 1:10-3:506:40-9:20
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) 1:004:00-7:00-9:50
Traffik (R) 12:20-1:40-4:206:50-9:30
Like Arrows 7:00
Labyrinth (1986)7:00
Blockers (R) 11:00-1:30-4:056:30-9:05
Black Panther (PG-13) 9:30
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
11:00-11:15-11:30-12:00-2:302:45-3:00-6:00-6:30-7:00-7:309:30-10:00
Rampage (PG-13) 11:45-2:204:55-9:35
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Digital 3D (PG-13) 11:45-1:303:30-5:35-7:30-10:30
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 11:251:55-4:35
Ready Player One (PG-13) 11:052:15-5:30-8:40
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:35-2:054:30-6:45-9:00
Super Troopers 2 (R) 11:00-3:054:45-8:50-10:45
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 11:25-2:004:35-7:10-9:45
Traffik (R) 11:10-1:30-4:007:00-9:30
Like Arrows 7:00
Labyrinth (1986)7:00
Regal Cinemas Majestic
Stadium 20 & IMAX
900 Ellsworth Dr
Regal Waugh Chapel
Stadium 12 & IMAX
1419 South Main Chapel Way
Blockers (R) 9:55
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:153:35-10:15
Sherlock Gnomes (PG) 1:50
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
12:00-1:15-1:50-3:40-4:45-5:005:35-6:45-7:20-8:30-8:45-9:2010:15-11:00
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Digital 3D (PG-13) 12:15-1:00Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD
1:30-3:55-5:15-7:35-9:00-11:15
7000 Arundel Mills Circle
Rampage (PG-13) 1:45-4:45Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) 7:25-10:40
XD: 9:00-4:00-7:30; 10:00-1:30Ready Player One (PG-13) 12:355:00-8:30
4:00-7:15-10:35
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:10-3:55
Digital 3D (PG-13) 11:00-12:00- Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 4:15-9:55
2:00-3:30-6:00-7:00-9:00-10:30
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PGRampage 3D (PG-13) 3:25-6:25 13) 12:05-2:35-5:25-8:05-10:45
Blockers (R) 11:50-2:25-5:05A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:25-3:007:50-10:30
5:40-8:00-10:30
Black Panther (PG-13) 9:40Kings (R) 12:00-2:30-5:10-7:3512:50-4:25-7:35-10:45
10:05
Avengers: Infinity War in
Super Troopers 2 (R) 12:00-2:35Disney Digital 3D (PG-13) XD:
5:15-7:55-11:00
12:30-11:00
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 1:35-4:20Rampage (PG-13) 11:20-2:257:10-10:10
5:25-8:25
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) 1:05Ready Player One (PG-13) 9:05- 3:55-6:55
4:35-11:00
Traffik (R) 12:05-2:35-5:15-7:55Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 10:40-1:20- 10:55
4:00-10:00
Like Arrows 7:00
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG- Avengers: Infinity War An IMAX
13) 11:15-2:05-4:35-7:15-9:45
3D Experience (PG-13) 12:30-7:50
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:40Avengers: Infinity War The IMAX
12:40-2:10-3:10-4:40-5:40-7:15- 2D Experience (PG-13) 4:10-11:30
8:15-9:40-10:40
Labyrinth (1986)7:00
Super Troopers 2 (R) 11:25-2:15- Héctor 'El Father' Conocerás la
4:45-7:25-10:15
verdad (NR) 1:25-4:25-7:20-10:15
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 10:15-1:00Regal Germantown Stadium 14
3:45-6:35-9:35
20000 Century Boulevard
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) 10:10Black Panther (PG-13) 12:101:10-4:05-7:05-10:05
Traffik (R) 11:45-2:20-5:05-7:40- 3:25-6:35-9:45
Blockers (R) 12:00-2:30-5:0010:20
7:30-10:00
Like Arrows 7:00
Ready Player One in 3D (PG-13) Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
10:30-11:00-12:10-12:30-2:201:05-7:50
3:40-3:50-5:10-5:40-7:00-7:10Labyrinth (1986)7:00
DOTGA: Da One That Ghost Away 9:15-10:20-10:30
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
9:10-12:15-3:15-6:15-9:15
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) Digital 3D (PG-13) 12:50-1:509:30-10:00-10:30-11:30-1:00-1:30- 4:10-7:30-8:30-10:50
Rampage (PG-13) 12:00-2:352:30-3:00-4:30-5:00-5:30-6:305:15-7:55-10:35
8:00-8:30-9:30-10:00
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:203:20-6:20-9:20
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
12:30-1:00-2:30-4:30-6:00-7:308:00-9:30
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Digital 3D (PG-13) 11:30-3:004:00-6:30-10:00
Rampage (PG-13) 12:10-2:4010:00
Ready Player One (PG-13) 11:502:50-6:10-9:20
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG13) 12:05-2:00
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:45-2:104:45-7:15-9:45
Super Troopers 2 (R) 11:55-2:355:20-8:00-10:30
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 11:40-2:205:00-7:40-10:20
Traffik (R) 11:35-4:20-9:50
Like Arrows 7:00
Avengers: Infinity War An IMAX
3D Experience (PG-13) 12:00-7:00
Avengers: Infinity War The IMAX
2D Experience (PG-13) 3:30-10:30
Labyrinth (1986)7:00
Regal Westview
Stadium 16 & IMAX
5243 Buckeystown Pike
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:103:10-6:15-9:20
Blockers (R) 7:20-10:00
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
10:30-12:00-12:30-1:00-2:153:45-4:45-6:00-7:30-8:00-8:309:45-11:15
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Digital 3D (PG-13) 11:00-2:454:15-6:30-10:15
Rampage (PG-13) 10:45-1:204:00-6:40-9:40
Ready Player One (PG-13) 11:402:50-10:00
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:202:00-4:50
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 11:10-1:454:20-9:55
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG13) 7:40-10:10
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:50-2:104:40-7:10-9:50
Super Troopers 2 (R) 10:40-1:153:50-6:25-9:00
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 10:50-1:404:25-7:15-10:20
I Can Only Imagine (PG) 11:151:50-4:30
Traffik (R) 11:55-2:30-5:00-7:3510:30
Like Arrows 7:00
Avengers: Infinity War An IMAX
3D Experience (PG-13) 11:30-7:00
Avengers: Infinity War The IMAX
2D Experience (PG-13) 3:15-10:45
Labyrinth (1986)7:00
Rampage 3D (PG-13) CC:
2:30-10:30
Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero
(PG) 11:25-1:35
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare
(PG-13) CC: 12:20-2:50-5:257:50-10:20
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 11:552:25-4:15-5:10-7:25-9:55-10:10
Kings (R) 12:00-2:20-4:50-7:159:40
Super Troopers 2 (R) CC: 11:352:00-4:55-7:30-10:05
UA Snowden Square
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: 10:45Stadium 14
1:40-4:20-7:05-10:00
9161 Commerce Center Drive
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) CC:
Blockers (R) 12:10-2:40-5:2010:45-12:50-3:45-6:40-9:30
7:45-10:20
Traffik (R) CC: 10:55-1:15-4:05Black Panther (PG-13) 12:206:55-9:25
3:30-6:45-10:15
Infinity War An IMAX
Rampage (PG-13) 12:15-3:00-8:45 Avengers:
3D
Experience (PG-13) CC:
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
12:00-12:30-1:00-3:30-4:30-7:00- 2:15-9:45
Avengers: Infinity War The IMAX
7:30-8:00-10:30
2D Experience (PG-13) CC:
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney 10:30-6:00
Digital 3D (PG-13) 11:00-11:30- Ready Player One in 3D (PG-13)
2:30-3:00-4:00-6:00-6:30-9:30CC: 12:05-6:15
10:00
Ready Player One (PG-13) 11:45- Labyrinth (1986)7:00
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
3:05-10:00
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 11:15-1:45- 1:00-4:45-8:30; 11:30-3:15-7:0010:45
4:15-6:00-9:45
AMC Shirlington 7
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:25-2:552772 South Randolph St.
5:40-8:00-10:20
Super Troopers 2 (R) 11:00-1:45- Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
4:15-7:30-10:00
CC: (!) 2:30-4:00-6:00-7:30
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 11:20-2:10- Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
5:10-7:50-10:30
Digital 3D (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:00Traffik (R) 12:00-2:45-5:30-8:00- 1:45-5:00-7:00
10:30
Ready Player One (PG-13) CC:
Like Arrows 7:00
4:20
Labyrinth (1986)7:00
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 2:00Xscape Theatres Brandywine 14 4:45-8:15
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: 1:307710 Matapeake Business Drive
4:30-7:20
Blockers (R) CC: (!) 10:10
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 11:40- Chappaquiddick (PG-13) CC:
1:50-7:45
3:00-6:30-9:30
Rampage (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:10- Beirut (R) CC: 1:15-4:15-7:10
AMC Tysons Corner 16
10:50-1:30-4:20-7:10-9:50
7850e Tysons Corner Center
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
CC: (!) 9:00-11:50-3:20-4:05-6:50- Blockers (R) CC: 10:25-1:00-3:4010:20-11:00
6:15-9:10
Avengers: Infinity War in
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 10:15Disney Digital 3D (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:40-4:50-7:55-10:55
12:30-7:30
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare
CC: (!) 10:05-11:10-1:30-2:35-4:55(PG-13) CC: (!) 9:30-12:05-2:30- 6:00-6:30-8:20-9:25
5:10-7:40
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: (!)
Digital 3D (PG-13) (!) 10:45-11:4010:00-12:20-2:50-5:35-8:00-10:30 2:10-3:05-5:35-9:00-9:55
Ready Player One (PG-13) CC:
Rampage (PG-13) CC: 11:2011:30-3:05-6:20-9:20
2:00-4:45-7:35-10:20
Super Troopers 2 (R) CC: (!)
Ready Player One (PG-13) CC:
10:40-1:20-3:50-6:40-9:10
9:35-12:45-4:05-7:25-10:40
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: 11:00- Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG1:40-4:25-7:20-10:00
13) CC: 2:55-5:30-10:50
Traffik (R) CC: 10:30-12:50-3:40- A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 9:406:00-8:30-10:50
12:00-1:25-2:20-4:40-8:15-9:40
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) CC: Super Troopers 2 (R) CC: 9:3511:25-2:10-5:00-7:50-10:40
12:05-2:45-5:15-8:00-10:35
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: 10:55CC: (!) 9:40-11:10-1:10-1:50-2:40- 1:35-4:25-7:20-10:00
4:40-5:20-6:10-8:10-8:50-9:40
Traffik (R) CC: 10:40-4:10-9:35
Chappaquiddick (PG-13) CC:
iPic Pike & Rose
9:45-12:20
11830 Grand Park Avenue
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) Beirut (R) CC: 11:05-1:45-4:307:05-9:45
(!) 9:30-10:15-10:45-11:00-11:30Like Arrows (!) 7:00
1:30-2:15-3:00-3:30-5:30-6:006:15-7:00-7:30-9:30-10:15-11:00 Avengers: Infinity War An IMAX
3D Experience (PG-13) CC: (!)
Rampage (PG-13) 2:45-10:00
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 1:45-4:45- 9:30-12:50-4:15-7:40-11:00
Labyrinth (1986)(!) 7:00
7:45-10:45
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) (!)
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) (!) 11:1512:15-3:35-7:00-10:25
2:30-5:45-9:00
Traffik (R) (!) 12:15-3:15-6:30-9:45
AMC Worldgate 9
VIRGINIA
13025 Worldgate Drive
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 1:004:00-7:00
AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
2150 Clarendon Blvd.
CC: (!) 3:00-3:40-7:00
Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
1:00-7:30
Digital 3D (PG-13) (!) 1:20-2:20Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) 4:40-5:40-8:00-8:30
CC: 12:00-1:00-2:30-3:30-4:30Rampage (PG-13) CC: 12:506:00-8:00-9:30
3:25-6:00
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney Ready Player One (PG-13) CC:
Digital 3D (PG-13) CC: 1:452:55-4:40-6:00-9:00
5:15-8:45
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 1:10Rampage (PG-13) CC: 12:156:15-8:45
2:45-5:15-7:45-10:15
Super Troopers 2 (R) CC: 1:30Ready Player One (PG-13) CC:
4:00-6:30-9:00
4:00
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC:
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 12:45- 2:00-8:00
3:15-5:30-7:45-10:00
Rampage (PG-13) 9:00
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: 12:00Alamo Drafthouse Cinema 2:30-5:00-7:30-10:15
One Loudoun
Ready Player One in 3D (PG-13)
20575 East Hampton Plaza
CC: 10:30
Avengers:
Infinity War (PG-13)
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
10:00-11:00-12:20-1:00-5:00-8:45
Digital 3D (PG-13) 7:00-10:30
Avengers:
Infinity War in Disney
AMC Hoffman Center 22
Digital 3D (PG-13) 1:20-9:20
206 Swamp Fox Rd.
Ready Player One (PG-13)
Blockers (R) CC: 5:05-8:00
12:00-3:55
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 10:05- A Quiet Place (PG-13) 10:10-12:50
1:15-4:25-7:40-10:45
Super Troopers 2 (R) 10:20-12:35
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) CC: I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 10:35-1:45
10:00-12:00-3:45-4:15-7:30-10:30 Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney 2:00-4:10-5:20-6:00-8:00-10:00
Digital 3D (PG-13) 11:00-12:30Ready Player One (PG-13)
1:30-2:45-5:15-6:30-9:00-10:15
7:20-10:40
Ready Player One (PG-13) CC:
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 3:3012:35-4:05-7:20-10:30
6:20-9:00
Sherlock Gnomes (PG) CC:
Super Troopers 2 (R) 3:45-6:4011:45-2:25
9:30
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) CC: 10:40I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 4:40-7:401:25-4:00-6:45-9:30
10:50
Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
(PG) 10:00AM
3:00-7:00-11:00
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 11:45Angelika Film Center Mosaic
2:20-4:40-7:15-9:35
2911 District Ave
Kings (R) (!) 11:05-1:50-4:20Black Panther (PG-13) 1:45-7:45
6:50-9:20
Super Troopers 2 (R) CC: (!) 11:35- You Were Never Really Here (R)
10:30-10:15
2:05-4:35-7:05-9:40
The Rider (R) 10:15-12:50-3:15-5:45
Love, Simon (PG-13) CC: 12:25I Feel Pretty (PG-13) (!) 10:40-1:303:30-10:10
Traffik (R) CC: 10:55-11:20-1:20- 4:15-7:00-9:45
2:00-4:10-4:50-6:35-7:35-9:15-10:25 Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Beirut (R) CC: 12:15-3:20-10:05
Digital 3D (PG-13) (!) 9:00-3:55
Like Arrows 7:00
Ready Player One (PG-13) 1:15Labyrinth (1986)7:00
4:15-7:15
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 11:00-4:45AMC Potomac Mills 18
10:45
2700 Potomac Mills Circle
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:45-2:10Blockers (R) CC: 10:50-1:25-4:00- 4:35-7:00-9:30
6:35-9:15
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) (!)
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 12:45- 10:00-11:25-12:25-1:25-2:55-4:553:50-6:50-9:50
6:30-7:30-8:30-10:00-11:00
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
Bow Tie
CC: 11:00-1:30-5:15-6:30-9:00
Reston Town Ctr 11 & BTX
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
11940 Market St
Digital 3D (PG-13) CC: 12:30Blockers (R) 2:00-4:30-6:55-9:25
2:45-4:15-8:00-10:15
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
Rampage (PG-13) CC: 11:5012:10-7:20
5:00-7:45
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Ready Player One (PG-13) CC:
3:10-9:35
Digital 3D (PG-13) 2:20-6:00-9:40
Black Panther (PG-13) 4:10-10:00
Ready Player One (PG-13) 2:406:10-9:20
Beirut (R) 1:00-4:00-6:50-9:30
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 1:50-10:10
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:30-2:505:30-8:10-10:40
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Digital 3D (PG-13) 3:40-11:00
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 1:45-4:207:10-9:50
Rampage (PG-13) 1:10-7:00
Chappaquiddick (PG-13)
4:40-7:30
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
1:40-3:00-5:20-6:40-9:00-10:20
Tuesday, May 1, 2018
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
Rampage (PG-13) 11:20-2:054:45-7:25-10:00
Ready Player One (PG-13)
1:20-7:05
Sherlock Gnomes (PG) 11:251:50-4:00-6:15-8:30
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG13) 11:00-1:35-4:05-6:35-9:10
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:25-2:555:15-7:35-9:55
Super Troopers 2 (R) 11:45-2:154:55-7:30-10:05
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 11:30-2:105:05-7:45-10:30
Rangasthalam (NR) 11:05-2:356:05-9:40
Bharath Ane Nenu (NR) 11:15Cinema Arts Theatre
2:45-6:20-9:45
9650 Main St
October (Hindi) (NR) 12:20-2:50Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) 5:20-7:55-10:25
CC: 10:00-1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
Achari America Yatra (NR) 12:35The Leisure Seeker (R) CC: 12:10- 3:35-6:30-9:25
2:10-9:00
Chappaquiddick (PG-13) 11:10Lean on Pete (R) CC: 2:30-7:30- 1:45-4:15-6:45-9:15
9:55
The Miracle Season (PG) 2:20Finding Your Feet (PG-13) CC:
4:50-7:15-9:50
9:40-5:00
Beirut (R) 4:25-10:10
The Death of Stalin (R) CC: 9:45- Cake 12:40-3:20-6:10-9:05
12:05-2:40-5:05-7:40-9:50
Baaghi 2 (NR) 11:35-2:40-5:40Beirut (R) CC: 9:55-12:15-2:35- 8:40
4:50-7:20-9:40
Blackmail (Hindi) 12:30-3:25Itzhak CC: 10:05-12:20-4:30-7:10 6:25-9:30
After Auschwitz 9:50-12:00-2:00Regal Dulles Town Ctr 10
4:10-6:00-8:00-9:45
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Digital 3D (PG-13) 11:50-2:302:50-3:40-6:00-9:20-9:45-10:30
Rampage (PG-13) 1:00-3:506:30-9:10
Ready Player One (PG-13)
11:40AM
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare
(PG-13) 9:50
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:00-2:405:10-7:50-10:00
Super Troopers 2 (R) 12:40-3:105:40-8:10-10:30
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 11:40-2:205:00-7:40-10:20
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) 12:50
I Can Only Imagine (PG) 1:30-4:10
Chappaquiddick (PG-13) 1:404:30-7:10
Avengers: Infinity War An IMAX
3D Experience (PG-13) 12:30-7:30
Avengers: Infinity War The IMAX
2D Experience (PG-13) 4:00-10:50
Regal Potomac Yard Stadium 16
3575 Potomac Ave
Black Panther (PG-13) 9:55
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
11:30-12:00-12:30-1:45-3:15-3:454:15-7:00-7:30-7:50-9:15-10:30
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Digital 3D (PG-13) 11:00-1:0021100 Dulles Town Circle
Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
2:45-4:30-5:30-6:30-8:15-10:15
Blockers (R) 10:30
1600 Village Market Boulevard
Black Panther (PG-13) 3:30-8:10 Rampage (PG-13) 11:20-2:00Blockers (R) 7:50
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) 4:30-7:50-10:30
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:40-2:50 11:00-11:30-12:30-1:00-2:30Ready Player One (PG-13) 10:20
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney 3:00-4:30-6:00-6:30-8:00-8:30Sherlock Gnomes (PG) 11:20Digital 3D (PG-13) 2:05-6:30
10:00-11:15
1:40-4:30
Rampage (PG-13) 12:00-2:30Avengers: Infinity War in Disney A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:25-3:40
5:00-7:40
Digital 3D (PG-13) 10:30-2:00A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:25-2:10Ready Player One (PG-13) 12:10- 3:45-5:30-7:15-9:00-10:45
4:40-7:05-9:35
3:20-7:10
Rampage (PG-13) 12:15-2:45Kings (R) 11:10-11:45-2:25-5:05I Can Only Imagine (PG) 7:15
5:15-7:45-10:15
7:40-10:25
Beirut (R) 11:35-2:20-4:50
Ready Player One (PG-13) 12:00
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG- Super Troopers 2 (R) 11:45-2:255:05-7:40-10:25
Digital 3D (PG-13) 6:30
13) 10:30AM
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:30-3:00- A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:00-1:15- I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 11:05-1:404:25-7:15-10:05
5:30-7:45
3:40-6:15-9:10
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 11:10-1:55- I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 10:45-1:30- Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) 11:004:30-7:20
1:50-4:45-7:35-10:25
4:15-7:00-9:45
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) Traffik (R) 10:40-12:50-3:15Traffik (R) 11:15-1:55-4:2511:20-11:50-12:20-12:50-1:255:45-11:00
7:00-9:50
2:40-3:10-3:40-4:10-4:45-5:25Labyrinth (1986)7:00
Like Arrows 7:00
6:00-7:00-7:30-8:00; 11:50-3:10
Labyrinth
(1986)7:00
Regal Fairfax Towne Ctr 10
Manassas 4 Cinemas
4110 West Ox Road
Héctor 'El Father' Conocerás la
8890 Mathis Ave.
verdad (NR) 11:15-1:35-4:20Blockers (R) 2:30-7:40
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) Rampage (PG-13) 1:10-4:006:50-9:20
2:25-5:20-8:15; 1:55-4:50-6:157:00-9:40
Regal Springfield Town Ctr 12
7:45-9:00
Ready Player One (PG-13) 12:206500 Springfield Town Ctr
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 2:00-4:00- 3:30-7:30-9:55
Blockers
(R) 12:00-2:30-5:106:00-8:00
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 12:20-2:208:00-10:50
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 1:45-4:00
5:15-7:20-9:55
Black
Panther
(PG-13) 10:15
Blumhouse's
Truth
or
Dare
(PG-13)
Rave Cinemas Centreville 12
12:00-5:10-10:15
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
6201 Multiplex Drive
A
Quiet
Place
(PG-13)
12:00-2:5510:50-11:00-11:20-11:40-2:15Black Panther (PG-13) 10:054:55-7:50-10:10
2:40-6:00-6:20-7:00-9:30-9:5012:35-1:05-4:05-10:45
(R) 12:05-2:25-4:45-7:10-9:30 10:10
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) Kings
Super Troopers 2 (R) 12:40-3:10- Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
10:00-1:30-8:50
Digital 3D (PG-13) 10:20-2:00Avengers: Infinity War in Disney I5:40-8:10-10:40
Feel Pretty (PG-13) 12:00-2:40Digital 3D (PG-13) 5:10
3:20-5:40-9:10-10:40
5:20-8:00-10:40
Rampage (PG-13) 11:10-1:50Rampage (PG-13) 11:15-2:10Paul, Apostle of Christ (PG-13)
4:30-7:10-9:50
5:00-7:40-10:30
1:00-3:40-9:35
Ready Player One (PG-13) 10:10- Like Arrows 7:00
Ready Player One (PG-13)
4:00-10:20
10:30-1:50
Labyrinth (1986)7:00
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG- Gonjiam: Haunted Asylum 12:10- A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:10-1:4013) 1:20-4:05
2:35-5:00-10:40
4:00-6:30-9:00
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 10:20Regal Fox Stadium 16 & IMAX Super Troopers 2 (R) 12:30-3:0012:40-3:00-5:15-7:40-10:15
5:30-8:10-10:45
22875 Brambleton Plaza
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 11:00-1:45Blockers (R) 1:10-3:40-6:15-8:45 I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 10:10-1:004:20-6:55-9:30
3:45-6:50-10:10
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:20
Bharath Ane Nenu (NR) 10:35Traffik (R) 12:20-2:50-5:20-7:5011:30-2:05-3:10-5:35-6:35-9:05- Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
11:00-12:30-2:15-2:45-3:45-4:15- 10:20
10:05
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) 4:45-6:00-6:30-7:30-8:00-8:30Like Arrows 7:00
11:15-11:40-2:55-3:20-6:30-7:00- 9:45-10:15
Labyrinth (1986)7:00
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
7:55-10:00-10:40
Regal Virginia Gateway
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney Digital 3D (PG-13) 1:30-3:30-5:15Stadium 14 & RPX
7:15-9:00
Digital 3D (PG-13) 10:45-2:258001 Gateway Promenade Pl
Rampage (PG-13) 11:40-2:206:05-9:45-11:35
5:00-7:40-10:20
Blockers
(R) 4:20-10:05
Rave Cinemas
Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme Ready Player One (PG-13) 10:50- Black Panther (PG-13) 7:45-10:45
2:00-5:20-8:40
Avengers:
Infinity War (PG-13)
11900 Palace Way
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG- 11:30-3:00-6:30
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:0513) 11:10-1:40-4:20-6:50-9:20
Avengers:
Infinity War in Disney
3:15-6:55-10:10
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:15Digital 3D (PG-13) 10:00
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) 12:20-2:40-5:00-7:20-9:40
Rampage
(PG-13)
11:50-2:2010:15-10:50-1:45-2:20-5:15-5:50- Super Troopers 2 (R) 12:50-3:208:45-9:20-9:55
4:50-7:20-9:50
5:50-8:20-10:50
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 11:15-1:50- Ready Player One (PG-13)
Digital 3D (PG-13) XD: 7:00-10:30 4:30-7:10-9:50
12:15-4:15
Rampage (PG-13) 11:20-2:15Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PGChappaquiddick (PG-13) 1:00
5:00-7:40-10:20
The Miracle Season (PG) 11:20- 13) 12:20-2:50-5:20-8:15-10:50
Ready Player One (PG-13) 10:45- 1:45-4:10-6:40-9:10
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:45-2:102:00-6:30-9:40
Beirut (R) 12:45
4:40-7:10-9:45
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:30-2:10- Avengers: Infinity War An IMAX
Super Troopers 2 (R) 11:05-2:404:45-7:30-10:05
3D Experience (PG-13) 3:15-7:00 5:10-7:50-10:20
Super Troopers 2 (R) 11:05-1:40- Avengers: Infinity War The
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 11:15-1:504:20-7:05-10:00
IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
4:45-7:15-9:55
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 10:40-1:55- 11:30-10:45
Traffik (R) 11:20-12:10-10:35
4:55-7:50-10:35
Regal Kingstowne
The Miracle Season (PG)
Bharath Ane Nenu (NR) 11:00Stadium 16 & RPX
2:40-6:15-9:50
11:10-1:45
5910 Kingstowne Towne Ctr
Traffik (R) 10:35-1:50-4:35-7:45Like Arrows 7:00
Blockers
(R) 12:40-3:25-10:10
10:15
Labyrinth (1986)7:00
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) Black Panther (PG-13) 1:20-4:20- Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
XD: 9:05-12:00-12:35-3:30-4:05- 7:20-10:20
12:00-12:30-1:00-1:30-2:00Avengers:
Infinity
War
(PG-13)
7:35-11:05
3:30-4:00-4:30-7:00-7:30-8:00Avengers: Infinity War in Disney 12:15-3:35-7:10
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney 8:30-10:30
Digital 3D (PG-13) 9:40-11:25Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Digital 3D (PG-13) 10:40
1:10-2:55-4:40-6:25-8:10
Digital 3D (PG-13) 11:00-2:30Rampage (PG-13) 12:50-3:30Regal Ballston Common
5:00-6:00-9:30-11:00
6:10-9:05
Stadium 12
Ready Player One (PG-13)
Smithsonian - Airbus
671 N. Glebe Road
1:05-4:15
IMAX Theater
Blockers (R) 4:20-10:15
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG-13)
14390 Air and Space Museum Pkwy
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:4010:05
4:15-7:45-11:00
D-Day:
Normandy
1944 3D
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:15-2:30Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) 4:50-7:10-9:40
(NR) 1:25
12:00-12:30-1:00-1:30-3:30-4:00- Kings (R) 12:30-2:45-5:05-7:25-9:45 Journey to Space 3D (NR) 10:354:45-7:00-8:45-9:30-10:45-11:00 Super Troopers 2 (R) 12:20-2:55- 2:15-3:25
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney 5:25-8:00-10:35
Avengers: Infinity War An IMAX
Digital 3D (PG-13) 2:30-5:30I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 12:35-3:203D Experience (PG-13) 4:00-10:00
6:15-10:00
6:05-8:50
Avengers: Infinity War The IMAX
Rampage (PG-13) 1:00-3:50Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) 12:45- 2D Experience (PG-13) 7:00
6:45-9:40
3:45-6:45-9:50
Planet Power: An IMAX 3D
Ready Player One (PG-13)
Traffik (R) 12:55-7:30
Experience (NR) 11:45AM
1:10-7:10
Chappaquiddick (PG-13) 12:55Pandas: An IMAX 3D Experience
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:00-2:30- 3:35-6:30-9:30
(G) 12:35
5:05-7:35-10:10
Labyrinth (1986)7:00
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of
Super Troopers 2 (R) 1:20-4:15- Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
6:50-9:45
the Seas 3D (2018) (NR) 10:0012:30-1:30-2:10-3:10-4:00-5:30I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 12:40-3:25- 6:00-6:50-7:40-9:00-9:30-11:10
11:10-2:50
6:25-9:35
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
University Mall Theatre
Traffik (R) 12:45-3:45-9:20
Digital 3D (PG-13) 1:00-4:3010659 Braddock Road
Like Arrows 7:00
8:05-10:25
The
Greatest
Showman (PG) CC:
Regal Countryside Stadium 20
Regal Manassas
12:00-2:30-4:45-7:15-9:35
45980 Regal Plaza
Stadium 14 & IMAX
Peter
Rabbit
(PG)
CC: 12:1511380 Bulloch Drive
Blockers (R) 12:45-3:15-5:45-8:15
2:15-4:20
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) Blockers (R) 12:20
Early
Man
(PG)
CC:
12:30-2:4011:00-12:00-1:00-4:30-7:00Black Panther (PG-13) 6:50-9:40
8:00-10:20
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) 4:35
Tomb Raider (PG-13) CC:
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney 1:20-1:50-3:20-4:20-4:50-5:207:30-9:50
Digital 3D (PG-13) 2:00-3:306:20-6:40-7:00-8:00-8:20-8:5010:10
5:30-9:00
Game Night (R) CC: 7:40-9:50
C6
EZ
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
PICKLES
. TUESDAY,
MAY 1 , 2018
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
N-S VULNERABLE
NORTH
KJ62
AQ
AK7642
3
EAST (D)
10 9 8 7 4 3
10 9 6
Q9
76
WEST
None
KJ842
J 10 5
KQJ94
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH
AQ5
753
83
A 10 8 5 2
The bidding:
EAST
SOUTH
WEST
Pass
Pass
1
Pass
3
Pass
Pass
3
Pass
All Pass
Opening lead — K
NORTH
Dbl
3
4
CLASSIC PEANUTS
CHARLES SCHULZ
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
H
ere’s another deal from
my monthly game in
Birmingham, Ala., with old
friends and teammates. Our
deals always have points of
interest.
When North doubled
West’s opening bid of one
heart, South’s three clubs
invited game. North’s three
diamonds was forcing.
South’s next bid promised
only three spades; with four,
he would have bid spades
earlier. North raised to four
spades when he might
have cue-bid four hearts. All
passed, East quite happily
with his six trumps.
South took the ace of
clubs and led a diamond to
dummy and a trump to his
ace. West’s discard was a
shock, but South continued
with a diamond to dummy
and a third diamond. East
ruffed with the seven, and
South overruffed, took the
Q-A of hearts, and led a
fourth diamond from dummy.
East ruffed in and led a
club, but South ruffed in
dummy for his eighth trick.
When dummy led still another diamond, East could win
only one more trick. Making
five!
The last laugh was on
North-South. They could
make six diamonds.
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
LIO
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
KJ62AQ
AK76423
You open one diamond,
your partner responds one
heart, you bid one spade and
he tries 1NT. What do you
say?
ANSWER: Chances for
game are bright, but the play
at 3NT may be taxing, especially if partner’s clubs are
weakish or if he has no help
for your diamonds. Jump to
three diamonds, encouraging but not forcing. If partner
passes, be satisfied to try for
a plus score right there.
BLONDIE
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2018, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
TUESDAY, MAY 1 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
MUTTS
EZ
PATRICK McDONNELL
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
C7
RE
ZITS
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
BIRTHDAY | MAY 1
This year you seem to
get past many of your
issues because of a
willingness to relate
intensely and take smart
risks. You will gain insight
as a result, and also put a
problem or two to bed. If you
are single, you will attract a
different type of person than
usual. If you are attached,
the two of you become much
closer, as you are more willing
to let your feelings be known.
Your vulnerability appeals to
your sweetie; he or she finds
you absolutely charming.
Sagittarius helps you see the
big picture when you seem
confused.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
You could be forced to see a
situation differently. You might
fight your sixth sense, but it
is more on than off. A partner
demonstrates his or her
caring. The efforts you have
made to regulate a partnership
stem from a need to detach.
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
You have decided to go
your own way, despite some
objections. A loved one seems
to want the exact opposite
of what you want. You can
imagine what problems could
develop. Listen to the other
party’s ideas and thoughts.
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
You’ll want to get as much
done as possible in the
WEINGARTENS & CLARK morning. Someone could
come along in the evening and
force you to rethink a decision.
Try to stay light and easy when
dealing with a problem.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
Your creativity and
understanding resolve
problems and push
possibilities into a positive
realm. You will want to really
study a loved one’s suggestion
in order to make an informed
decision about it.
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
You might have to switch
gears or rethink a decision,
especially if it involves a
creative enterprise. You realize
that not everything is written
in stone. Be more direct in how
you handle a child or someone
you care about.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
You will be clear about your
expectations, yet you might
wonder what you need to
do. Open up to new ideas,
especially if you would
like more stability on the
homefront. Someone could
question you, but only if you
allow it.
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
Allow your imagination to take
the lead, as you might want
to try a new approach or do
something very differently.
You’ll want to keep firm control
over your finances, as tempted
as you might be to spend
money.
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
You are personality-plus in the
morning. If there is something
you want, the time is now to
go for it. You are more likely
to become extravagant in the
evening. Honor your goals,
and maintain a firm sense of
discipline.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
You could feel off in the
morning, so save important
conversations for the evening.
Only then will you be able
to focus in the way that you
like and deserve. Be sensible
about what you need.
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
Don’t be so skeptical about
someone’s kind gesture. You
could be wondering what this
person’s expectations are.
Take another look at what you
want from a personal matter
that could be affecting you.
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
You might want to rethink a
personal matter. A friend will
encourage you to be more
welcoming. Understand where
you are coming from. Pace
yourself, and you’ll cover as
much ground as possible.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
Look at what is happening
behind the scenes, and follow
through on your priorities. Do
not allow a key person in your
life to steal your thunder. You
enjoy every moment of being
in the spotlight.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2018, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
C8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
MAY 1 , 2018
kidspost
CHIP SAYS
TODAY
KIDSPOST.COM
Not only can a female spotted hyena hunt and
kill animals three times its size, but it can also
eat 30 pounds of meat in 30 minutes. That’s
equivalent to 120 quarter-pound hamburgers!
Warmer days may finally be upon us.
Temperatures close in on 80 by late
afternoon, with light wind and lots of sun.
Today is May Day, a
celebration that goes back
several hundred years. Read
about it in our online story.
ILLUSTRATION BY VICTORIA PAN, 7, ARLINGTON
TOD AY ’ S NE WS
HOUGHTON MIFFLIN HARCOURT
Hyenas are no laughing matter
PHOTOS BY NIC BISHOP/HOUGHTON MIFFLIN HARCOURT
BY
A BBY N OLAN
S
y Montgomery thinks hyenas have
gotten a bad reputation. They are,
it turns out, great hunters, not the
skulking scavengers of “The Lion
King.” They are also very social creatures
and express themselves through a variety
of sounds, not just what seem like hysterical giggles.
Montgomery and photographer Nic
Bishop spent 10 days in Kenya watching
these misunderstood animals while researching their latest book, “The Hyena
Scientist.”
They stayed in a research encampment
in the Masai Mara wildlife reserve that is
run by Kay Holekamp, an American zoologist who has studied the spotted hyena
for 30 years. Holekamp has discovered,
among other things, that spotted hyenas
are more effective hunters than lions.
“That’s the great thing about science,”
Montgomery says. “You look at the most
fundamental assumptions about an ani-
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
1
6
10
14
15
16
17
18
20
21
23
24
27
28
29
31
34
36
38
39
40
41
43
44
45
46
47
48
52
56
57
58
60
ACROSS
Goldman’s
partner
Socially
awkward sort
Potter’s material
Voyager 1, e.g.
Like James Bond
antagonists
With 11-Down,
2016 almostOscar-winning
movie
Screen legend
Flynn
*Tuna eater’s
tool, maybe
Neither’s partner
Boxing ref’s
decision
Worked, as
dough
*Eyebrowplucking tool
Family room
Captain’s group
Spring shape
Lottery ticket
purchase,
essentially
Michaelmas
daisy
*Shape of
rotini pasta
Trendy
Sixth __:
intuition
Émile who wrote
“J’Accuse...!”
*Cocktail frank
stabber
“Miracle
on 34th Street”
store
Thor, to Odin
Its football
team has played
Harvard 134
times
Grand Marquis,
for short
2100, to
Augustus
*Loser to rock,
beater of paper
Adjusted (to)
Dorm mgrs.
“Ben-Hur”
author Wallace
With 60-Across,
contraption that
usually includes
the answers to
the starred clues
See 58-Across
ABOVE: Hyenas, seen in a photo from
“The Hyena Scientist,” are exceptional
hunters with powerful jaws. RIGHT:
Zoologist Kay Holekamp takes a swab
from a hyena that has been sedated.
mal to see if they’re true, and sometimes
you’re going to be surprised.”
Hyenas’ teeth may be the strongest in
the world.
“The power of their jaws is strong
enough to break the bones of giraffes,”
Montgomery notes. “And they eat the
bone. Not like a dog chews on a bone.
They digest the bone.”
Because hyenas can be so fierce,
Holekamp and her team of research assistants mostly study the hyenas from the
safety of a jeep. They use a quiet dart gun
to put an individual hyena to sleep so that
they can examine it or fit it with a tracking
device.
Holekamp’s goal is to never hurt or
frighten the hyenas. “The old dart guns
used to make this really loud, awful
noise,” Montgomery says, “and the hyenas
would be terrified when they saw you
because this bad noise was coming.”
And instead of cutting pieces out of
their ears, as the previous researcher did
to identify them, Holekamp focused on
learning what natural markings set them
apart from other members of their clan.
“She’s got this down so that these
hyenas are not harmed by her studying
them,” Montgomery says. Furthermore,
“the data she has collected shows them in
a much better light,” Montgomery says.
“And when people appreciate animals,
they’re more likely to treat them well.”
Holekamp has followed several hyena
clans for many generations, naming and
keeping track of each hyena. She has
given her research assistants the opportunity to name the cubs as each new litter
is born. So that’s why the young male who
gets measured in Chapter 7 is called
McDonald’s; the graduate students
picked a fast-food-restaurant theme for
that litter.
Along with describing the clan war and
other exciting events she and Bishop
witnessed, Montgomery writes about the
diverse members of Holekamp’s research
group. It includes 69-year-old Dee, who
hired Holekamp as a young intern and
had always wanted to work in Africa, and
25-year-old Benson, who was a Masai
herder who began working in the camp as
a dishwasher.
“He was an orphan who hadn’t completed school,” Montgomery says. Most
local herders don’t like hyenas because
they eat Masai livestock, but “Benson
could see them as the exciting individuals
they are and now will be going to college
in the United States. Great blessings are
in store if you learn to love hyenas!”
HANS-MAXIMO MUSIELIK/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Central American migrants wait
near the U.S.-Mexico border. They
were told a crossing facility is full.
Caravan is stopped
at Mexican border
Nearly 200 Central American migrants seeking refuge in the United
States were waiting Monday at the
Mexican border after inspectors said
Sunday that a crossing facility was full.
President Trump vowed last week
to stop the caravan, which had set off
from Mexico near the Guatemalan
border March 25.
About 50 of the people were allowed
past a Mexico-controlled gate but were
halted at the entrance to the U.S. inspection facility. They were allowed to
wait outside, not knowing when they
could claim asylum, or protected entry
into the United States because they are
in danger at home. Others camped out
in Tijuana, Mexico, after being stopped
from getting near the building.
The inspection facility can hold
about 300 people, according to Pete
Flores of U.S. Customs and Border
Protection, suggesting the delay may
be short. The agency processed about
50 asylum cases per day from October
through February.
Wendi Yaneri Garcia, traveling with
her sick toddler, wasn’t discouraged.
She said she was jailed in Honduras
for protesting and later received death
threats. “All I want is a place where I
can work and raise my son,” she said.
kidspost@washpost.com
— Associated Press
Exploring the role of black fathers
By Victor Barocas
PARDLO FROM C1
© 2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
62 Pub size
63 “The World
According to __”
64 Concave
navel
65 Not leave
66 Leave
67 Surprising plot
development
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
19
22
DOWN
Used up
Cursor shape
Proofer’s change
“Game of
Thrones”
network
Soda water
Interior
designer’s
concern
Eggs, to a
biologist
Hockey venue
Yukon gold rush
region
Wash the dirt off
See 16-Across
Protected at sea
Three feet
Banana leftovers
Royal Botanic
Gardens locale
25 Build
26 Wall-mounted
light fixtures
30 Ural River city
31 Hybrid green
veggie with
small florets
32 Slippery
33 “__ the night
before ...”
34 Play divisions
35 “Go away!”
5/1/18
36 Finish the top of,
as a room
37 Business
magnates
39 Era that began
with Sputnik
42 Church songs
43 Soldier’s cooking
supplies
46 Actress Farrow
47 In need of air
freshener
49 Burial chamber
50 Int.-reducing
mortgages
51 Like sugar
52 Egyptian snakes
53 Foolish one
54 Funny Fey
55 “The Destroyer”
of Marvel
Comics
59 Med. scan
61 Opposite of SSE
MONDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
wounded quality he never quite
shook.”
Just as James Baldwin worried
“that the bitterness which had
helped to kill my father could also
kill me,” Pardlo made a similarly
troublesome observation about his
father. “I’d learned at a young age to
adjust for the self-aggrandizement
in my father’s narratives. Problem
was, so much of the way I interpret
the world has come from the way he
interprets it.” Perhaps unsurprisingly, Pardlo has also struggled with
alcoholism, and so has his younger
brother, a gifted musician who
briefly enjoyed a taste of commercial success. “Alcoholism was the
Muzak of our familial dysfunction,”
Pardlo notes.
While immersed in efforts to
overcome his own demons and his
father’s troubling influence, the
author endured a brief stint in
college, washed out of the Marine
Corps and stumbled through a
short-lived marriage. While managing his grandfather’s bar, he arrived at a breakthrough of sorts:
“Money, power, and geography
hadn’t worked for me. Language
had given me a semblance of escape.” Newly determined, he returned to school in hopes of remaking himself “as a cosmopolitan artist with a magical blue passport.” By 1998, he was a 30-yearold junior in college.
Here it would probably be helpful to mention that the author is
now a celebrated poet, who won a
Pulitzer Prize for his work in 2015.
That fact might explain the frequent emergence of a phrase or
metaphor that sparkles with lyricism and imaginative muscle. “I
heard the sliding glass door open
like the lid on a can of baked
beans,” for instance, or “I stared up
at clouds bright as teeth in a black
light nightclub.”
Amid such gems, Pardlo doesn’t
RACHEL ELIZA GRIFFITHS
Poet Gregory Pardlo’s memoir includes gems such as “I heard the
sliding glass door open like the lid on a can of baked beans,” and “I
stared up at clouds bright as teeth in a black light nightclub.”
dwell on his extraordinary climb;
instead he refers often to the precariousness of this ascent. “There
can be no happily ever after for a
“Money, power, and
geography hadn’t
worked for me.
Language had given me
a semblance of escape.”
Gregory Pardlo in “Air Traffic”
recovering drunk like me,” he
writes. “Relapse can seduce me
with the confidence that I’ve ‘got
my drinking under control’ or that
I’m ‘getting better.’ ”
Pardlo’s journey from aimless
job-hopper to successful writer
and partner in a fruitful second
marriage isn’t so much described
in detail as employed as a launchpad for philosophical musings.
What! Still not getting home delivery?
About 100 pages from the end, the
book shifts from a more or less
seamless narrative to a series of
stitched-together observations
and mini-essays on race, black art
and the perils of parenting. While
his thoughts on these and other
subjects are perceptive and provocative, they seldom are as intriguing as the tale of his own
meanderings. He eschews a
straight line, he tells readers, because his experience has been anything but. He writes, “And so I keep
searching, not entirely knowing
what it is I’m looking for.”
Pardlo shares these reflections
in prose that seems powerful and
effortless. At the same time, he
often writes as if holding something in reserve, perhaps stockpiling memories and experiences to
be examined in future essays, poems and memoirs. Let’s hope so.
bookworld@washpost.com
Jabari Asim is a former editor and
columnist at The Washington Post. His
next book, “We Can’t Breathe: On
Black Lives, White Lies and the Art of
Survival,” will be published in October.
1-800-753-POST
washingtonpost.com/subscribe
SF
KLMNO
SPORTS
TUESDAY, MAY 1 , 2018
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
Second
straight
victory
not easy
Wizards likely
won’t be able
to execute
Wall’s requests
John Wall spent
more than 15
minutes this past
weekend
CANDACE
dissecting the
BUCKNER
Washington
Wizards’ roster
flaws. He is, after all, the player
emboldened by the organization
to be the leader, vocal and
otherwise. And as Wall
capitalized on his platform, he
spared no feelings, shared coldblooded truths and strongly
advocated for improvements.
“A lot, to be honest,” Wall said
when asked about pieces the team
should add. “There’s a lot that we
can use. I really don’t have to say
certain positions. There are
certain things that people who
have been around the team
understand what we could use to
help our team. It’s not throwing
shade to anybody that is on our
team because everyone that is on
our roster gave everything they
have to make it work and fit with
the team, but at the same time,
when it’s not working and then
you try and you try and you try
and it keeps failing over and over,
then you have to make certain
adjustments and certain
changes.”
Those changes, however, won’t
come as easy as a 15-minute
interview might suggest.
The Wizards, shepherded by
team President Ernie Grunfeld,
find themselves in a mess by their
own doing. As they try to clean it
up, they must navigate the
changing climate within the NBA
and face significant practical
hurdles.
Wall said he supports signing
an “athletic big.” But Washington
is committed to three traditional
centers: Marcin Gortat and Ian
Mahinmi, who don’t fit into the
modern NBA game, and Jason
Smith, who can’t get off the
bench.
Wall also said he wants more
wing help to back up Otto Porter
Jr. But the money tied up in the
centers, coupled with Porter’s
maximum contract, will hinder
the team’s spending in the
offseason.
“It’s just figuring out what
pieces we can add to our team,
what guys can stay and what guys
On
the NBA
NATIONALS 3,
PIRATES 2
Offense misses chances,
but Roark, bullpen deliver
BY
NATIONALS CONTINUED ON D12
Pirates at Nationals
Today, 7:05 p.m., MASN
BRUCE BENNETT/GETTY IMAGES
Nobody questions Crosby’s talent, but his work ethic is what keeps him atop the NHL
practice makes perfect
BY
The Celtics stay perfect at
home in the playoffs, take
Game 1 over the 76ers. D4
HOCKEY
The Lightning beats the
Bruins to even series at
one game apiece. D4
FOOTBALL
C HELSEA J ANES
After his Washington Nationals squeaked by with a 3-2 win
over the Pittsburgh Pirates on
Monday night, Manager Dave
Martinez plopped down in his
chair at his postgame news conference and immediately offered
his answer to a question nobody
had a chance to ask.
“That was exciting,” Martinez
said. “We got to start scoring
runs when we can. They’re playing well. They really are. But
when we have a chance to put
teams away, we have to start
putting teams away. We really
do.”
Martinez’s team had just won
consecutive games for the first
time in two weeks and just the
third time since it started the
season 4-0. His starter, Tanner
Roark, had allowed just two runs
in seven innings against a firstplace team mounting an unexpected charge. But the rookie
manager was not happy. He was
exhausted, he was relieved, and
he was concerned.
Like so many other days this
season, the Nationals held a
one-run lead when their starter
departed after an outing worthy
WIZARDS CONTINUED ON D4
PRO BASKETBALL
D
M2
A DAM K ILGORE
Game 3: Capitals at Penguins
Today, 7:30 p.m., NBCSN
Series tied, 1-1
Inside: Tom Wilson won’t be
suspended for his hit on Brian
Dumoulin in Game 2. D5
In a league that gets
younger and faster
every year, Sidney
Crosby remains
among the NHL’s
elite. “Still the best
guy in the league,”
former teammate
Brooks Orpik said.
S
aturday afternoon, Sidney Crosby walked on skates from the
practice ice into the cramped visiting locker room at Capital
One Arena and placed his black CCM stick into a rack, jiggling
it until it fit. He navigated a horde of notebooks and cameras in front
of his locker, sat down and pulled on a black Pittsburgh Penguins
cap. At the end of a brief media scrum, a question — one he was
perhaps more qualified to answer than anyone on the planet — made
Crosby pause: Does he believe hockey instinct can be honed through
repetition? ¶ “Mmm,” Crosby said. “Maybe.” ¶ He mulled over his
answer, a clue to how one of the greatest hockey players ever views
the game. Crosby, 30, is playing at his highest level in these Stanley
Cup playoffs, having recorded seven goals and eight assists in eight
games, controlling the action either through muscular stickhandling
CROSBY CONTINUED ON D5
or by planting himself in front of the net.
A study finds a correlation
between CTE and the age
a player starts playing. D3
Redskins
are happy
with haul
from draft
Williams says team
not concerned with what
others thought of Guice
BY
K IMBERLEY A . M ARTIN
The Washington Redskins are
feeling lucky, and a little bit
blessed, after a three-day haul in
the NFL draft resulted in them
landing their “guy” at No. 13 as
well as picking up a player who
they believe is a first-round talent
following a trade down in the second round.
There still are some prospects
the organization “would have
loved to have had,” acknowledged
Doug Williams, the team’s senior
vice president of player personnel,
but the Redskins are optimistic
they have improved what they believe was already a talented roster with their draft acquisitions,
namely Alabama defensive tackle
Da’Ron Payne and Louisiana State
running back Derrius Guice.
“The football gods were looking
after us this weekend,” Williams
said Monday during his post-draft
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D2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
MAY 1 , 2018
washingtonpost.com/sports
EARLY LEAD
ASK BOSWELL: PERSPECTIVE
DOPING
Witten’s
TV future
gets more
complex
C INDY B OREN
Those reports of Jason Witten
retiring from the Dallas Cowboys
to become ESPN’s “Monday Night
Football” analyst? They aren’t as
simple as they seemed.
The tight end reportedly spent
the weekend thinking about his
future. His uncertainty had already complicated the Cowboys’
on-field plans just before the draft,
and then ESPN — his potential
future employer — reported that
another network had made an “interesting” proposal to Witten. Given that Fox now has “Thursday
Night Football,” that might be the
competition. Dallas Coach Jason
Garrett also was still trying to
convince Witten to return for a
16th season, according to ESPN. In
short: It’s good to be Jason Witten.
An announcement about his future is expected by Wednesday,
according to ESPN, and Cowboys
owner Jerry Jones wasn’t offering
many details, telling reporters Friday that Witten “has some things
to think about.”
Witten, who signed a four-year
contract extension worth as much
as $29.6 million in March 2017, is
the franchise leader in receptions
(1,152) and receiving yards
(12,448).
ESPN is reportedly offering a
multiyear deal worth $4 million to
$4.5 million per year, according to
the Dallas Morning News. Although reports late last week indicated that the Cowboys had been
“blindsided” by the Witten developments, Jones downplayed that
Friday.
“I’ve talked to Jason several
times this week. I have met with
him, met with him as late as just a
few hours ago, and we’ve had great
discussions,” Jones said, reading a
statement. “I’ll keep the details of
those discussions private forever.
He has some things to think about
and discuss with his family from a
professional perspective. He also
told me that those things are going
to require a few more days of
consideration, at least through the
weekend. He has not made any
decisions that are definite at this
time.”
cindy.boren@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
QUOTABLE
“I’ve always lived this
way: You take what
you get. I look over
my life, and it’s
been a storybook.”
MATT MILLEN,
former NFL linebacker, executive
and broadcaster, who is suffering
from a rare heart disease and
needs a transplant. (Via Early Lead)
BY
ALEX BRANDON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
John Wall’s parting shot at his teammates — “Don’t ask for something you can’t handle” — exposed fissures on the team.
‘Buy a mirror, John’
A reader asked Washington Post
sports columnist Thomas Boswell in his
weekly online chat Monday what
changes the Wizards should make to
improve the direction of “an apparently
directionless franchise.” After a lengthy
reply that took many twists and turns,
Boswell finally threw up his hands,
concluding that fixing the Wizards
might be beyond anyone’s capabilities.
Q: Perhaps they ought to remove the
“C” from Mr. [John] Wall’s Wizards
sweater [jersey] . . . after [Wall told] the
press, “If I’m doing my part, the other
14 guys on my team have to do their part
at getting better every year.” The
franchise is in trouble if their floor
leader, still hoisting too many bricks and
too frequently hurtling “pointlessly”
down the lane, can’t see that he’s just as
much of the problem as anyone. Then
[Marcin Gortat] proclaims his summer
goal is to make his abs, tan and dome
more buff . . . deep sigh. Got it — these
players, the coaches and the GM aren’t
on the same page. Given the owner’s
proclivity toward avoiding drama, what
changes are most likely? Perhaps what
this club needs is TNT (not the network)?
A: So many issues here.
1) There’s no indication that, in almost
a decade owning the Wizards, Ted
Leonsis has a feel for NBA personnel or
team building. He leaves it to his general
manager and front office.
2) Ted never fires anybody if he can
help it, so Ernie Grunfeld is on about his
eighth life as a GM. Do GMs have more
than nine lives? A couple of pretty good
seasons got Ted to buy into “it’s working,
so stay the course.” But, as we can see
now, it isn’t working.
Wall and at least some of his
teammates — presumably Gortat, but
others as well — don’t have a good
working relationship. And the Wizards
have built a team full of good three-point
shooters — Otto Porter Jr. was third in
the NBA in three-point percentage, but if
they had enough attempts, both Mike
Scott and Tomas Satoransky had even
higher percentages. After that, Bradley
Beal is good from long three-point range,
Some pointed advice
for the Wizards’
star point guard
but Markieff Morris is even a little better.
It’s one of his gifts.
But they don’t get enough shots.
Because Wall is taking 17 shots a game,
when he should be taking 11, 12, 13 like
Jason Kidd, John Stockton, Steve Nash.
Which brings us to Problem 3: Wall
himself.
3) Wall should be the best player on
the team. But except for 2016-17, he rarely
has been. He has huge heart, speed,
athleticism, leader-ego and is a gifted
passer. But he misjudges and overvalues
his own game just as much as he accuses
some teammates of misjudging their
talents and roles. Buy a mirror, John.
The money quote in the Wall
interview, for me, was his analysis of how
so many of his teammates didn’t
understand or accept “their roles” and
that they wanted bigger roles but didn’t
have the skills or mentality to cope with
bigger roles. “Don’t ask for something
you can’t handle,” Wall said.
What are we talking about here? One
thing and one thing only: who gets the
shots. And Wall wants to keep getting his
— all of ’em.
“Don’t ask for something you can’t
handle” does not have anything to do
with getting rebounds, playing good
defense, blocking shots, making steals,
hustling on 50-50 balls or even getting
assists. Famous expression: “There is no
such thing as a bad rebound.” Every
Wizards player, regardless of “role,” is
always trying to get every rebound or
loose ball that he can.
This is about shots. Wall doesn’t think
his teammates can handle the
responsibility, especially late in games, if
he isn’t the one jacking it up.
The facts say Wall is just wrong and
doesn’t appreciate his teammates’ skills
— in one area — as much as he should.
There are so many things that John can
do better than the others. It is the height
of irony that he does not realize that the
two areas in which he is weak — shooting
and turnovers — are exactly the areas in
which he has the teammates in place to
complement him and de-emphasize his
flaws.
Wall is totally right about one thing:
The Wizards need an “athletic big.”
That’s not Gortat or Ian Mahinmi. But
where do you get that athletic big — by
standing on a street corner and
whistling? It’s tough. They tried to get Al
Horford. He wouldn’t come. The sight
(or sound) of Wall ripping his teammates
isn’t going to encourage anybody to want
to join his merry band.
What’s the solution? Fire Ernie? Hire a
new GM and tell him his first job is to
trade Wall? Hire a new GM and tell him
to fire Scott Brooks because the coach
can’t get Wall and his teammates on the
same page? Hire a new GM and trade
Beal? (No.) Blow the whole thing up?
(No.)
Problems with a pro sports team
breed among themselves until there are
too many of them to solve at one time.
When it gets this messed up, it’s beyond
mortal comprehension — okay, it’s
beyond this mortal’s comprehension —
to figure out how to solve the
interlocking problems of a belowaverage GM, a superstar who fusses with
his teammates but also doesn’t see his
own game clearly, and a roster with
enough talent to win 42 to 49 games but
not enough to win anything important.
I have a friend who has been a fine
NBA writer who said, “Trade Wall to the
Lakers for Lonzo Bell, a top draft pick
(and other considerations).” His case had
logic. But in the end, I just smote my
brow and said: “Lonzo Ball??? And his
dad? On the Wizards????”
But then, that’s what the Wizards have
done best for 40 years — make you smite
your brow.
thomas.boswell@washpost.com
Matt Millen, who won Super
Bowls with the Raiders, 49ers
and Redskins before becoming a
broadcaster and then the Lions’
chief executive, is suffering from
a rare heart disease and likely
needs a transplant, he told the
Morning Call newspaper in
Allentown, Pa. Doctors say
Millen has amyloidosis, which
occurs when abnormal proteins
build up in organs or tissue and
robs the heart of its ability to
function.
According to the Amyloidosis
Foundation, the disease affects
fewer than 200,000 people in
the United States. Symptoms —
which include chest pain and
shortness of breath — often
resemble those of other diseases
and go unchecked until
permanent damage has been
done.
Millen learned that he had the
disease last year after years of
symptoms and has undergone
chemotherapy nearly every week
for the past eight months. There
is no cure for amyloidosis, only
treatment, and Millen’s heart is
operating at only about
will.hobson@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/sports
TELEVISION AND RADIO
STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS, SECOND ROUND
7:30 p.m.
Millen will likely
need heart transplant
The Russian doctor whose
whistleblowing unveiled one of
the biggest drug cheating scandals in sports history has sued the
Brooklyn Nets’ owner, a Russian
oligarch who is financially backing a lawsuit against the doctor
on behalf of three Russian athletes accused of doping.
“With today’s filings, the hunted becomes the hunter,” said Jim
Walden, attorney for Grigory
Rodchenkov, a doctor who has
been living in protective custody
in the United States since he fled
Russia in late 2015 and went
public with claims of a state-supported drug cheating regime that
corrupted the results of the 2014
Winter Games in Sochi.
Rodchenkov is suing Mikhail
Prokhorov, the billionaire owner
of the Nets, for underwriting a
libel lawsuit filed by three Russian biathletes in New York state
court in February. The biathletes
— Olga Zaytseva, Yana Romanova
and Olga Vilukhina — were
stripped of a silver medal they
won in Sochi that, according to
evidence provided by Rodchenkov, was accomplished with the
help of banned drugs.
“Russia and its puppets have
been persistently attacking
Dr. Rodchenkov for too long,
most recently with this frivolous
lawsuit that parrots the Kremlin’s
slander,” Walden said. Rodchenkov’s lawsuit is filed under a New
York law intended to prevent frivolous lawsuits that seek to silence
speech.
Rodchenkov, a former Russian
anti-doping laboratory chief, has
said he helped orchestrate a
scheme to help Russia’s performance at the 2014 Games by concocting a difficult-to-detect drug
cocktail and then sabotaging
drug testing with the assistance
of government agents. His claims
have been bolstered by two reports by the World Anti-Doping
Agency, which concluded that
hundreds of top Russian athletes
in at least 30 sports have cheated
since 2011, resulting in the International Olympic Committee
banning the Russian federation
from the 2018 Games in South
Korea.
In Russia, Rodchenkov is a
pariah, denounced by government officials as a turncoat and a
liar. The former head of Russia’s
Olympic committee said Rodchenkov should be shot; two of
his former colleagues at Russia’s
anti-doping agency died under
suspicious circumstances; and
Rodchenkov’s lawyers believe
Moscow has agents in the United
States searching for him.
Russian sports officials have
apologized for widespread doping among the nation’s athletes
but have denied allegations of
government involvement or support.
Excerpted from
live.washingtonpost.com
DIG ES T
PRO FOOTBALL
W ILL H OBSON
30 percent capacity, likely
necessitating a heart transplant.
Millen, 60, told the Morning
Call that he’s not going to let the
disease stop him from his usual
activities, including his role as a
color commentator for Big Ten
Network football broadcasts (a
job he plans to continue this
fall).
But if an evaluation at CedarsSinai hospital in Los Angeles
shows he’s a top candidate for a
heart transplant, he would have
to spend at least four months in
California to be in place in case a
donor heart comes in and then
to recover from the actual
transplant.
— Matt Bonesteel
New England Patriots
quarterback Tom Brady
confirmed he will return to play
in 2018, ESPN.com reported. In
an appearance at the Milken
Institute Global Conference in
California, Brady, 40, said his
goal remains to extend his
career into his mid-40s. . . .
The ex-girlfriend of San
Francisco 49ers linebacker
Reuben Foster has submitted a
video to prosecutors to support
her statement that she lied when
she told authorities Foster had
hit her.
But Santa Clara County
prosecutor Jim Dermertzis said
the district attorney’s office will
continue to prosecute a
domestic violence case against
Foster even if his ex-girlfriend,
Elissa Ennis, does not cooperate
with the investigation.
Prosecutors said Foster
attacked his girlfriend in
February at their Los Gatos,
Calif., home, leaving her bruised
and with an injured eardrum.
The 28-year-old woman told
responding officers that Foster
dragged her by her hair,
physically threw her out of the
house and punched her in the
head eight to 10 times. . . .
The Pittsburgh Steelers
released veteran safety J.J.
Wilcox just days after selecting
a pair of safeties in the NFL
draft.
Wilcox played in 12 games for
the Steelers in 2017 after
Pittsburgh acquired him from
Tampa Bay in September. . . .
The Minnesota Vikings resigned cornerback Terence
Newman, bringing the NFL’s
oldest active defensive player
back for a 16th season that will
begin five days after he turns 40.
. . . The Cleveland Browns
exercised the fifth-year option
on defensive back Damarious
Randall, acquired during the
offseason from Green Bay.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Virginia said defensive
lineman Dylan Thompson has
transferred from Ohio State to
the Cavaliers.
Thompson will graduate from
Ohio State this summer and
enroll at Virginia. He will be
eligible to play immediately.
Thompson has played in only
two games for the Buckeyes. He
made three tackles in 2017 but
was limited by injuries.
SOCCER
Tottenham regained its fivepoint cushion over Chelsea in
the race for Champions League
qualification by beating Watford,
2-0, with Harry Kane netting
the second goal to keep alive his
chances of being the English
Premier League’s top scorer.
Dele Alli opened the scoring
at Wembley Stadium for
Tottenham, which won for the
first time in three league games
and needs two wins in its final
three matches to seal a top-four
finish. . . .
Real Betis defeated last-place
Malaga, 2-1, in the Spanish
league to keep alive its hopes of
qualifying for the Champions
League.
8 p.m.
Eastern Conference, Game 3: Washington at Pittsburgh »
NBC Sports Network, WDCH (99.1 FM)
Western Conference, Game 3: Nashville at Winnipeg » CNBC
NBA PLAYOFFS CONFERENCE, SECOND ROUND
8 p.m.
10:30 p.m.
Eastern Conference, Game 1: Cleveland at Toronto » TNT
Western Conference, Game 2: New Orleans at Golden State » TNT
MLB
7 p.m.
8 p.m.
10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Washington » MASN, WJFK (106.7 FM)
New York Yankees at Houston » MLB Network
Baltimore at Los Angeles Angels » MASN2, WTEM (980 AM)
TENNIS
5 a.m.
ATP: BMW Open, round of 32 » Tennis Channel
SOCCER
2:45 p.m.
UEFA Champions League semifinals, second leg: Bayern Munich
at Real Madrid » Fox Sports 1
VS
Tonight @ 6:30pm
MISC.
Tony Romo didn’t get out of
the opening stage in another
failed attempt to play in the U.S.
Open.
Romo three-putted his
opening hole at Gleneagles
Country Club in Plano, Tex.,
made only two birdies and shot a
5-over-par 77 in the 18-hole local
qualifier. The top eight finishers
from Gleneagles advanced to 36hole sectional qualifying June 4.
ADVERTISEMENT
BY
Nets owner
Prokhorov
is sued by
informant
Romo, the retired Dallas
Cowboys quarterback and NFL
analyst for CBS Sports, failed to
get through local qualifying for
the second straight year. . . .
Top-seeded Karolina Pliskova
withdrew from her home Prague
Open because of a right thigh
injury. Pliskova won the
Stuttgart Open on Sunday for
her 10th career WTA title.
— From news services
and staff reports
TUESDAY, MAY 1 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
SU
Tackle football by age 12 could bring earlier CTE
Onset of cognitive
and behavioral symptoms
come earlier, study finds
BY
R ICK M AESE
A new study suggests a strong
correlation between the age at
which some athletes begin playing
tackle football and the onset of
behavioral and cognitive problems later in life, findings that
become significantly more pronounced for those who take up the
sport before age 12.
Researchers concluded that for
every year earlier an athlete begins
to play tackle football, he could
experience symptoms associated
with chronic traumatic encephalopathy 21/2 years earlier. Those who
begin playing before age 12 could
start experiencing symptoms more
than 13 years earlier.
The study was published Monday in the Annals of Neurology
journal and was conducted by researchers with the Boston University School of Medicine and VA
Boston Healthcare System, including some of the leading CTE
researchers, such as Ann McKee,
Robert Stern and Robert Cantu.
The lead author was BU’s Michael
Alosco.
The study comprised 246 deceased football players who had
donated their brains to the brain
bank run by VA, Boston University
and the Concussion Legacy Foundation. Of that group, 211 had CTE
diagnosed.
While the research did not find a
“statistically significant” connection between the age of first exposure and the severity of CTE later in
life, the study says “youth exposure
to tackle football may reduce resiliency to late life neuropathology.”
The researchers warned the results might not be representative
of the broader population of foot-
ball players. It did not include a
control group and could suffer
from ascertainment bias, meaning families might have been more
likely to donate a loved one’s brain
posthumously if they suspected
something was amiss.
The study results were not impacted by the level of play and
included those who had played
football in high school, college and
professionally. Researchers found
that even the former players who
were not diagnosed with CTE experienced an earlier onset of behavioral and cognitive impairments the earlier they took up the
sport, “suggesting that the relationship between younger [age of
first exposure] to tackle football
and long-term neurobehavioral
disturbances may not be specific
to CTE,” the study says.
While CTE, like most neurodegenerative diseases, cannot be diagnosed in a living person, the
symptoms surface earlier and become more pronounced as the
person ages, often in the form of
behavioral and mood issues followed by cognitive impairment.
“Youth exposure to repetitive
head impacts in tackle football
may reduce one’s resiliency to
brain diseases later in life, including, but not limited to CTE,” McKee, the director of Boston University’s CTE Center, said in a statement. “It makes common sense
that children, whose brains are
rapidly developing, should not be
hitting their heads hundreds of
times per season.”
Research on traumatic brain injuries related to sports is a burgeoning field, particularly among
youth athletes. Several recent studies have suggested head impacts
before the age of 12 can be more
damaging than those suffered by
athletes who take up the sport later, though some research hasn’t
found that age of first exposure is
necessarily a contributing factor to
cognitive functioning later in life.
GERALD HERBERT/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Washington selected polarizing former LSU running back Derrius
Guice late in the second round but considers him a first-round talent.
rick.maese@washpost.com
Williams says Redskins
NFL’s great quarterback reshu±ing is now complete ‘fortunate’ to get Guice
The NFL draft is
done, and the
league’s grand
MARK MASKE quarterback
reshuffling that
began in free
agency seems pretty much done.
Prominent veterans changed
teams. Prized rookies came off the
board early and often on draft
night. Some teams doubledipped, adding both a
quarterback of the present and a
quarterback of the future. For
roughly one quarter of the league,
things have changed dramatically
at the most important position.
It undoubtedly won’t work out
as planned for everyone. But for
now, there is reason for every
team with a reworked
quarterback situation to hope.
There were, for a change, enough
quarterbacks to go around.
Actually, there were more than
enough quarterbacks to go
around. Each of the four
quarterbacks selected in the top
10 of the NFL draft Thursday
night went to a team that already
had made arrangements this
offseason to have a veteran in
place who could, if needed, serve
as a temporary caretaker of the
starting job.
The Cleveland Browns, who
made Heisman Trophy winner
Baker Mayfield of Oklahoma the
top pick, had traded for former
Buffalo Bills starter Tyrod Taylor.
The New York Jets, who took
Southern California’s Sam
Darnold with the third choice,
had re-signed Josh McCown and
signed Teddy Bridgewater. The
Bills, who traded up to No. 7 to get
Wyoming’s Josh Allen, had added
AJ McCarron. The Arizona
Cardinals, who moved up to
10th for UCLA’s Josh Rosen, had
signed Sam Bradford and Mike
Glennon.
That creates the curious
possibility that, while this highly
celebrated class produced the
first occasion that four
quarterbacks were drafted in the
top 10, all four of those potential
franchise saviors could begin
their NFL careers as backups.
“We’re not going to rush him,”
Bills General Manager Brandon
Beane said of Allen at a post-draft
news conference. “But if he
somehow wins the job, then he
wins it. There’s other players out
there. There will be 52 other
players out there and if they see
that he’s clearly the best, I don’t
think we could do that [keep
Allen on the bench]. We wouldn’t
On the
NFL
REDSKINS FROM D1
DAVID J. PHILLIP/ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Jets drafted Sam Darnold No. 3 overall after also signing QB Teddy Bridgewater this offseason.
do that at any other position.
We’ll let it go. But he’s got a lot of
catching up to do.”
Allen and Darnold probably
have the best chances to be
opening day starters. Allen would
have to overtake McCarron, who
is well-regarded but was a backup
with the Cincinnati Bengals
before moving to Buffalo in free
agency. Darnold’s competition
consists of McCown, who is
respected but has been a backup
for most of his career, and
Bridgewater, who has not
demonstrated whether he can
make a successful return from the
serious leg injury that ended his
tenure as the Minnesota Vikings’
starter.
In Cleveland, Mayfield
probably will have to wait his
turn behind Taylor, who had some
success as a starter in Buffalo and
cost the Browns a third-round
draft choice in their trade with
the Bills. In Arizona, Rosen likely
will have to bide his time behind
Bradford, the oft-injured but
competent-when-healthy former
starter for the St. Louis Rams and
Philadelphia Eagles.
It was the rare offseason in
which quarterback-deprived
franchises could give themselves
more than one possibility for
filling that void.
“I would say I think, really,
when you look at it, ideally you’d
probably attack it from both
angles in a perfect world,” Jets
General Manager Mike
Maccagnan said when asked at
the NFL scouting combine
whether he wanted a veteran or a
rookie to address the team’s
quarterback need.
A fifth quarterback went in the
first round Thursday, as the
Baltimore Ravens traded up to
No. 32 to take Lamar Jackson, the
former Heisman Trophy winner
from Louisville. He becomes the
heir apparent to Joe Flacco in
Baltimore.
Other teams passed up
opportunities to put eventual
successors in place behind
veteran starters. The New York
Giants could have gone with
Darnold, Allen or Rosen with the
No. 2 overall selection. Instead,
they chose tailback Saquon
Barkley, trying to make the most
of what’s left of quarterback Eli
Manning’s career. The Denver
Broncos, at No. 5, fortified their
defense with N.C. State pass
rusher Bradley Chubb, putting
them all-in on free agent addition
Case Keenum at quarterback.
The Giants did use a fourthround pick on Richmond
quarterback Kyle Lauletta.
Whether he could develop into a
viable post-Manning starter
R ED S K I N S N O TES
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/redskins
Washington releases
McClain, five others
The Washington Redskins parted
ways with six players Monday,
including defensive lineman
Terrell McClain.
The team also released
defensive linemen A.J. Francis
and Montori Hughes and waived
tight end Chris Bazile, linebacker
Cassanova McKinzy and
defensive back James Sample as
it began to retool the roster
following the NFL draft. The
moves cleared room mostly on
the defense after Washington
drafted five defensive players.
McClain played 12 games and
started two in his lone season in
Washington, posting 20 tackles
and two sacks. He missed
Weeks 12 through 15 because of a
toe injury. McClain signed a fouryear, $21 million deal with the
team last offseason as it
continued to search for help
along the line. He was a third-
round pick in the 2011 draft by
the Carolina Panthers.
Francis, a Maryland product,
played a total of six games and
had 18 tackles during his twoyear career with the Redskins.
He was added to the practice
squad in 2016 and eventually
advanced to the active roster but
never played a game that season.
Francis was once again bumped
up from the practice squad to the
active roster in 2017 after rookie
Jonathan Allen was placed on
injured reserve.
Hughes, Bazile, McKinzy and
Sample signed with the Redskins
in January.
Washington will have Allen
back from a Lisfranc injury in his
left foot this season and selected
Alabama defensive tackle Da’Ron
Payne No. 13 overall and Virginia
Tech defensive tackle Tim Settle
in the fifth round. Defensive
tackle Phil Taylor, who impressed
Redskins coaches during training
camp but missed the season
because of an injury suffered
during the preseason, re-signed
with the organization in April.
Improving the run defense has
been a priority after the team
ranked last in the NFL in that
category in 2017. Payne was
considered the top run stopper
in the draft.
Not reaching for guard
Perhaps the most glaring
omission from the Redskins’
draft class was at the guard
position.
Team brass has repeatedly
touted Arie Kouandjio as a
replacement for four-year starter
Shawn Lauvao, who remains an
unsigned unrestricted free agent,
and the position has not been
otherwise addressed this
offseason.
The lone offensive lineman
Washington selected was
Louisville tackle Geron Christian
in the third round. Coach Jay
Gruden said the plan is to keep
Christian at tackle.
“The guard that we targeted
wasn’t there,” said Doug Williams,
Washington’s senior vice
president of player personnel. “So
you don’t do a reach.”
— Kareem Copeland
remains to be seen. Similarly, the
Pittsburgh Steelers added
Oklahoma State quarterback
Mason Rudolph in the third
round, taking only a tentative
step toward a succession plan for
whenever Ben Roethlisberger
steps aside.
The maneuverings during the
draft came after the Vikings bid
farewell to Keenum, Bradford
and Bridgewater and signed Kirk
Cousins, the coveted free agent
coming off three straight 4,000yard passing seasons for the
Washington Redskins, to a
guaranteed three-year,
$84 million deal in March. The
Redskins had gotten an early
start during Super Bowl week in
lining up Cousins’s successor by
arranging to trade for Kansas
City’s Alex Smith, who had been
ousted as the Chiefs’ starter when
they decided to go with Patrick
Mahomes in his upcoming
second NFL season.
For now, all those teams with
new quarterbacks can envision
Pro Bowl seasons and Super Bowl
titles. In truth, there are only so
many Pro Bowl spots and
championship trophies to go
around. But in this unusual
offseason of quarterback
availability, all that counts at this
point is being able to dream big.
mark.maske@washpost.com
news conference at Redskins Park.
Washington drafted eight players, five of whom play on the defensive side of the ball. But the
pick garnering the most attention
is Guice, the standout running
back whose slide to the second
round because of reported character concerns earned national attention. His unexpected fall allowed the Redskins to grab him
with the 59th pick, even after they
moved down from No. 44 to obtain
a third-round pick via a trade with
San Francisco. Washington “took
a chance” in agreeing to swap
picks with the 49ers, Williams
said, but there were no reservations about taking Guice when the
Redskins finally were on the clock.
“We’re talking about a guy that
we had in the first round on the
draft board,” Williams said, defending the polarizing prospect.
The 5-foot-11, 224-pound running back with speed and tremendous lower-body strength rushed
for 1,251 yards and 11 touchdowns
for the Tigers last season as a
junior while dealing with a lingering knee injury.
“When he’s there at your pick,
you have to take advantage of it,”
Williams said, adding that the
Redskins had “about six to seven
other players” on the board when
they were ready to make their
pick, “and we chose Guice. . . . We
didn’t let what other people said
influence us. What influenced us
is the information that we had
gotten from him and the people
around him. We had a lot of
sources that we talked to.”
Rumors of Guice’s immaturity
ran wild immediately before the
draft and during the first round.
The former LSU star, who recently
fired his previous agent, reportedly was late to pre-draft meetings
and was involved in a situation,
initially described by some outlets
as “an altercation,” with the Philadelphia Eagles. A day before the
draft, the NFL also announced
that an investigation did not confirm Guice’s claims that he was
asked by a team during the NFL
scouting combine whether he is
gay and whether his mother “sells
herself.”
During the broadcast of the
draft, NFL Network analyst Mike
Mayock said Guice “had several
issues meeting with teams,” including some missed flights, and
that some teams “didn’t like his
attitude.” Mayock also said “there
is another investigation out there
that could be potentially embarrassing for the kid and the team
that drafts him.”
The Redskins, however, say
they know better.
After meeting and going to dinner with the running back, and
gathering “some inside information” on the Baton Rouge native,
Washington was giddy to get
Guice.
“Where Guice is from, I’m from
the same area, basically,” said Williams, a native of Zachary, La., a
small town roughly 20 miles from
the LSU campus. “I know who he
is. I know where he comes from.
And when you talk about a kid that
has produced on the field the way
he has, other than what was out
there, and you look at this kid,
man, he’s just a [happy-go-lucky]
kid who likes to play football. And
I think we were fortunate enough
to get a guy like that.”
The front office also felt fortunate to get Payne, a 6-3, 311-pound
versatile nose tackle who turned
pro after his junior season. For the
second consecutive year, the Redskins targeted an Alabama defensive lineman on Day 1, but they
were pleasantly surprised to see
he still was available. In 2017, they
walked away with Jonathan Allen
at No. 17. Now they’re excited to see
him paired with Payne.
“At 13, we got our guy,” Williams
said of the athletic, run-stopping
defensive tackle. “I think his career speaks for [itself ]. . . . He completely dominated the [national]
championship game, and that’s
what you’re looking for in a football player up front.”
The Redskins didn’t set out to
address roster needs specifically
but rather aimed to find players
who fit “what you’re looking for,”
Williams said. The end result is a
draft class that features a pair of
defensive linemen (Payne and
fifth-rounder Tim Settle) and defensive backs (fourth-rounder
Troy Apke and Greg Stroman, a
seventh-round pick) as well as
a swing offensive tackle in thirdround choice Geron Christian —
all players they are hopeful will
develop into key contributors.
And, of course, there are Payne
and Guice, two potential NFL
stars in the making.
“What these guys are going to
do is fit in with what we already
have and will make us a better
football team, at every position,”
Williams said of the draft picks.
kimberley.martin@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. TUESDAY,
MAY 1 , 2018
Needing a new voice, Bucks can’t pass on Coach Bud
It isn’t often that
a team in a small
market such as
Milwaukee has
TIM
the best available
BONTEMPS
coaching job in
an NBA offseason.
But it also isn’t often that a
team in any market has a talent
such as Giannis Antetokounmpo.
That’s what makes the
coaching search that lies ahead
for the Milwaukee Bucks after
Saturday’s Game 7 loss to the
Boston Celtics so crucial for the
future of the franchise. Quite
simply, this is a decision the
Bucks have to get right — or risk
losing Antetokounmpo.
This is the nature of today’s
NBA, in which contracts are
shorter and players control their
destinies. Antetokounmpo is one
of the five or six best players in
the world, and he doesn’t turn
24 until December. His potential
still feels limitless.
But he is already on his
second NBA contract. And, with
three years remaining before he
becomes an unrestricted free
agent, the clock is ticking for the
Bucks to prove they can contend
with him before he has the
option to look for that
opportunity elsewhere.
Over the next 18 months, the
Bucks will have pivotal decisions
to make when it comes to what
they pay Jabari Parker (or
whether they should pay him at
all) and how they spend what
should be a lot of cap space next
summer. Who the Bucks hire as
their new head coach not only
will inform those decisions, but it
will also give them the chance to
develop and utilize their roster.
So who should the Bucks hire
after firing Jason Kidd
midseason then having interim
coach Joe Prunty play out the
rest of the year? Among the
options with head coaching
experience: Jeff Van Gundy,
David Fizdale, Monty Williams
and Terry Stotts, if his tenure
with the Portland Trail Blazers
On
the NBA
ELISE AMENDOLA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Celtics guard Terry Rozier made seven of his nine three-point
attempts, finishing with 29 points in Boston’s win over the 76ers.
NBA ROUNDUP
Boston shoots way past
Philadelphia in Game 1
Terry Rozier scored 29 points and
first-year Celtics forward Jayson
Tatum had 28 to outplay redshirt
rookie Ben Simmons and lead the
Boston Celtics to a 117-101 win over
the Philadelphia 76ers in Game 1 of
the Eastern Conference semifinals
Monday night at TD Garden.
With much of the attention focused on Philadelphia young guns
Simmons and Joel Embiid, Boston’s youth movement of Tatum
and Rozier led the way. Rozier, in
his third year, added eight rebounds and six assists, and Al
Horford had 26 points and seven
rebounds for Boston.
Embiid scored 31 points with
13 rebounds for Philadelphia. Simmons, the likely rookie of the year,
scored 18 with seven boards and
six assists.
Game 2 is Thursday night in
Boston.
Playing point guard in place of
Kyrie Irving, Rozier was a star for
Boston in Game 7 against Milwaukee, and he came out hot again vs.
the Sixers. He had 10 points and
six assists in the first quarter and
was 7 for 9 from three-point range
overall, overshadowing the lottery
picks accumulated by Philadelphia during “The Process.”
Tatum was Boston’s first pick
last year — third overall — after it
swapped the No. 1 pick to the
Sixers and grabbed a 2018 firstrounder as well. Philadelphia
picked Markelle Fultz; he did not
play Monday night.
The game was tied at 33 with
just over seven minutes left in the
half when the Celtics ran off 10
straight points. Horford had four
of the five baskets and assisted on
the other. Boston led 87-70 in the
final minute of the third when Philadelphia scored nine straight to
make it a nine-point game.
After Simmons made a layup to
make it 97-88, Horford hit a three
from the top of the key with 5:30
left, and it was never within single
digits again.
Curry probable for Game 2
Golden State Warriors guard
Stephen Curry will make his return from a sprained medial collateral ligament Tuesday night
against the New Orleans Pelicans
in Game 2 of their Western Conference semifinal.
Warriors Coach Steve Kerr confirmed Curry was probable for
Game 2 after the team practiced in
Oakland, Calif., saying that there
won’t be a minutes restriction in
his return and that the team will
monitor his minutes based on his
conditioning and rhythm.
Golden State brought Curry back
quickly from a similar injury two
years ago, as he returned two weeks
after spraining his MCL against the
Houston Rockets in the first round
of the playoffs to play in Game 3 of
the Warriors’ second-round series
with the Portland Trail Blazers.
This time, Curry got more than
five weeks to heal from JaVale
McGee falling into his leg during a
game in late March — a product
both of this injury being slightly
more severe than that one and the
Warriors having the added luxury
of the presence of Kevin Durant on
their roster to help cushion the
blow of losing one of the league’s
most dynamic scorers.
The Warriors cruised through
their first-round series against the
San Antonio Spurs in five games
without Curry and then demolished the Pelicans, who were coming off an impressive first-round
sweep of the Trail Blazers, in
Game 1 on Saturday night with
Curry still sitting on the sidelines.
Given Curry won’t have a minutes limit, it seems safe to assume
he will slide into the starting lineup in place of Nick Young, who
started Game 1 as the Warriors
went small — a precursor to what
they would do when Curry returned. Starting small allowed the
Warriors to put Andre Iguodala on
Nikola Mirotic and give both Klay
Thompson and Durant time on
Jrue Holiday, negating two of New
Orleans’s leading scorers.
That still left Draymond Green
— only the league’s reigning defensive player of the year — to guard
New Orleans star Anthony Davis,
a task to which Green responded
by putting up a triple-double.
— Associated Press
— Tim Bontemps
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The Milwaukee Bucks and Giannis Antetokounmpo are on the hunt
for a new head coach following a first-round exit against Boston.
comes to an end, as many
around the league suspect it
might. There are also plenty of
intriguing assistant coaches to
choose from, including Utah’s
Igor Kokoskov; San Antonio’s
Ettore Messina, James Borrego
and Ime Udoka; Toronto’s Nick
Nurse and Rex Kalamian; and
Philadelphia’s Lloyd Pierce.
The best choice for this job is
also the most obvious: Mike
Budenholzer.
On Wednesday night,
Budenholzer came to an
agreement with the Atlanta
Hawks to leave the franchise
after five successful seasons. Or,
to put it more accurately, four
successful seasons and a fifth
that set in motion a full-scale
rebuild Budenholzer clearly
didn’t want a part of after giving
up control over basketball
operations a year ago.
Even before officially leaving
Atlanta, Budenholzer held
meetings with the Phoenix Suns
and New York Knicks — two
other teams in the middle of
rebuilding cycles — so it is clear
he’s interested in coaching. And
if he wants to be in the league
next season, it’s hard to see a
better scenario than the one he
would inherit in Milwaukee.
His acumen is exactly what
the Bucks need. The hallmark of
Budenholzer’s time with the
Hawks was his ability to develop
and improve talent. That was
the case year after year as
“Hawks University” refined one
player after another and took
their games to a new level.
Milwaukee has plenty of raw
talent. Thon Maker showed in
the playoffs for a second straight
year what he is capable of in
short bursts; if he can become a
consistent threat, suddenly
Milwaukee has a new weapon.
Sterling Brown had a strong
rookie year as a second-round
pick and could become the latest
wing player to grow under
Budenholzer following DeMarre
Carroll, Kent Bazemore and
Taurean Prince.
Then there is Antetokounmpo
himself, who still has strides to
make — specifically in creating
offense late in games. Some of
that will come with further
improvements to his jump shot,
but he also needs to be in a
system that can take advantage
of his gifts.
Of the coaches available,
Budenholzer seems uniquely
qualified to create such a
system. His Atlanta teams were
successful at both ends of the
court, including the 60-win
team he led in 2015 — and none
of those teams had anyone even
remotely close to
Antetokounmpo in talent.
More generally, there also
needs to be a recognition of the
way the Bucks need to play. For
example, Milwaukee too often
failed to push the pace this
season, something that seemed
exceedingly obvious with a team
featuring so much athletic
talent. The difference in
Milwaukee’s fast-break points in
a Game 6 win (25) compared
with the Bucks’ loss in Game 7
(zero) underscores that.
But, more than anything, the
Bucks need someone to come in
and instill a coherent vision for
how they want to play in the
post-Kidd era. The next three
years will be the most crucial for
this franchise since the end of
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar’s tenure in
Milwaukee more than 40 years
ago. Succeed in convincing
Antetokounmpo that Milwaukee
is a place he can win
championships, and perhaps the
Bucks will add to the title they
won with Abdul-Jabbar and
Oscar Robertson in 1971. Fail, and
it might take another 40 years to
get another player of his talent
level to join the franchise.
Those are the stakes at play
here, which is why the Bucks
simply have to get this coaching
hire right. Luckily for them,
though, they have the most
appealing job on the market.
That should allow them to snag
the best coach available.
Mike Budenholzer is that
coach. Milwaukee would be wise
to find a way to get a deal done.
tim.bontemps@washpost.com
ON THE NBA
Wizards won’t be able to fulfill Wall’s roster requests
WIZARDS FROM D1
can go,” Wall said matter-of-factly.
But making moves is not that
simple. Several organizations are
waiting out their own bad
contracts while teams with cap
space prefer not to take in
multiyear contracts, meaning an
ideal trade could be difficult to
execute, even if another team
might find the Wizards’ assets
desirable.
The Wizards, however, are not
without hope. The team can still
try to make trades, use the
stretch-and-waive option —
which allows teams to spread out
over multiple seasons the money
they owe players they let go — or
find that unpolished or
underappreciated player no one
else wants through clever and
astute scouting to improve the
roster. Still, while the franchise
player has a wish list, an overhaul
seems more like a pipe dream.
“John Wall isn’t that far off
from what they need,” said Eric
Pincus, a salary cap expert for
NBA TV and Basketball Insiders.
“[But] they have lower flexibility.
They don’t have as much
spending power, and when they
do spend, they have tax on it.”
In 2016, a year of big contracts
around the league, Washington
overspent on Mahinmi, who came
off a career season with the
Indiana Pacers and was rewarded
with a four-year, $64 million
contract. When considering that
the team already had a traditional
big man on the roster with several
years remaining on his contract
in Gortat, the deal was, at best,
perplexing.
“They made the mistake that
everybody made, for the most
part, in 2016. In their case it was
on Mahinmi,” Pincus said. “When
you already have Gortat, didn’t
make a lot of sense.”
This past season, the 31-yearold Mahinmi, who has battled
injuries throughout his time in
Washington, averaged 5.8 points,
4.1 rebounds and 3.0 fouls.
Gortat, who was frequently
benched in fourth quarters as the
team elected to go small, excels in
setting screens and rolling to the
basket but refuses to add a threepoint shot into his skill set.
Together, the old-school duo
will take up more than
$29 million next season. Throw in
last summer’s investment with
Porter, who is set to make
$26 million next season, and
Washington heads into the 2018
offseason — before even drafting
and signing their first-round pick
or wooing a free agent — already
beyond the luxury tax threshold.
According to Pincus, the NBA
recently sent out a memo
advising teams that the salary cap
for the upcoming season will be
projected at $101 million and the
luxury tax threshold at
$123 million. The Wizards have
eight players signed for next year
in addition to a pair (Smith and
Jodie Meeks) who can exercise
player options and return to the
team. If both players opt in, the
Wizards’ 2018-19 roster salary will
push $124 million.
The Wizards’ main spending
tool for the summer would be the
taxpayer mid-level exception,
which allows teams to sign
veteran free agents up to a
specified amount — projected to
be $5.3 million — without it
counting against the salary cap.
But Pincus points out that five to
10 other teams should have
significant cap room, while at
least 10 more will be able to pay
free agents the more attractive
mid-level exception, projected at
$8.6 million. This will greatly
limit the caliber of free agents the
Wizards can attract.
Instead of banking on
inexpensive free agents, the
Wizards can get active in the
trade market. Gortat enters the
final year of his contract and
understands how that can hold
value.
“I know how the league goes.
Management is going to make the
right decision for the future of the
team,” Gortat said about
potentially being traded. “If
something’s happening, I want to
be informed. I don’t want to read
this little headline on the bottom
of ESPN, ‘Gortat gets traded,’ and
I’m finding out from TV. I would
like to know that from my agent.”
Even so, trades can be costly. By
shedding Gortat, the Wizards
might have to package an asset
such as the young and economical
Kelly Oubre Jr. or a first-round
draft pick, or even be willing to
take on a player with two or more
years remaining on his contract.
That would mean taking on more
money. Though stretching and
waiving would free up short-term
flexibility, that would leave the
Wizards on the hook for Gortat’s
salary of $4.5 million for the next
three years or $6.3 million owed
to Mahinmi for the next five.
Wall gave an audit of the areas
the team desperately needs to
address and how the onus falls on
the men “upstairs.” However, the
Wizards’ front office wields no
higher power to appease their
star.
“At the end of the day, we don’t
make those decisions. Upstairs
does their part,” Wall said. “It’s me
and the other 14 guys on the team
and the coaching staff who
prepare ourselves to play every
game and listen to the game plan
the coach gives us, go out there
and give 110 percent effort. I think
those guys that are watching and
seeing understand what they can
add and what we might need to
make our team better to finally
get over the second round or get
through the first round like we
didn’t this year.”
candace.buckner@washpost.com
NHL ROUNDUP
Tampa Bay slows Boston’s high-scoring line to win Game 2
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Brayden Point had an emptynet goal and three assists, and the
Tampa Bay Lightning found a way
to slow Boston’s high-scoring line
of Patrice Bergeron, David Pastrnak and Brad Marchand to beat
the Bruins, 4-2, in Game 2 of their
second-round playoff series Monday night in Tampa.
The victory evened the best-ofseven matchup between the top
two teams in the Eastern Conference. Game 3 is Wednesday night
in Boston.
Point assisted on Tampa Bay’s
first three goals before sealing the
win with his empty-netter with
25.2 seconds left.
Yanni Gourde, Tyler Johnson
and Ondrej Palat also scored for
the Lightning, which rebounded
from a 6-2 loss in Game 1.
Bergeron, Pastrnak and Marchand combined for three goals and
11 points in the opener. They had
four more points in Game 2 but
were unable to take over the game.
Charlie McAvoy scored for the
Bruins late in the first period. Torey Krug’s late goal trimmed Tampa Bay’s lead to 3-2 with just over
four minutes remaining.
Tampa Bay’s Andrei Vasilevskiy
stopped 18 shots. Tuukka Rask
finished with 27 saves for Boston.
The Lightning had nearly twice
as many scoring opportunities as
the Bruins in the series opener and
controlled play early Monday
night, getting off the first 10 shots
of the game and taking a 1-0 lead
on Gourde’s power-play goal at
11:47 of the first period.
With the exception of failing to
taking advantage of a long five-onthree power play, the Bruins made
the most of limited chances, with
the Bergeron line leading the way.
McAvoy’s goal, with Bergeron
and Marchand assisting, made it
1-1. Pastrnak and Marchand set up
Krug’s goal to keep the Bruins
close.
The Bergeron line has 12 goals
and 41 points in Boston’s five playoff wins. The four assists Monday
night are the only points the trio
has delivered in four losses.
Notes: The Lightning has not
fallen behind 2-0 in a playoff series
since the 2014 Eastern Conference
quarterfinals against Montreal. . . .
Bruins defenseman Zdeno
Chara appeared in his 111th playoff game, tying Rick Middleton for
fourth place on Boston’s career
list. It was the 109th playoff game
for Bergeron, tied with John
Bucyk for the sixth most in franchise history.
GM change in Toronto
Toronto Maple Leafs General
Manager Lou Lamoriello will not
return to the role next season.
Team President Brendan Shanahan said he was sticking to a plan
that called for the 75-year-old
Lamoriello to serve as GM for
three years and then transition to
senior adviser for four years.
Shanahan said he doesn’t have
a timeline for filling the GM position.
The Maple Leafs set franchise
records for points (105) and wins
(49) in the regular season, but they
were eliminated in seven games by
the Bruins in the first round of the
playoffs last week.
HURRICANES: Carolina terminated the contract of demoted
general manager and Hall of Fame
player Ron Francis.
The Hurricanes announced the
move in a three-sentence statement nearly two months after
Francis was reassigned to another
front-office position — president
of hockey operations — while the
team began a search for a new GM
that will report directly to new
owner Tom Dundon.
Carolina has not made the playoffs since 2009.
TUESDAY, MAY 1 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D5
SU
Work ethic keeps Crosby among the NHL elite
CROSBY FROM D1
All four Penguins goals in their
second-round series against the
Washington Capitals, which
heads to Pittsburgh on Tuesday
night tied at 1, have come with
Crosby on the ice. If the Penguins
win a third straight Stanley Cup
— a distinction no team has
earned since the New York Islanders captured their fourth
consecutive title 35 years ago —
Crosby will again be the engine.
Having overcome the concussion scares of his mid-20s, Crosby has reached the apex of North
American sports, a player so
embedded at the top of his game
and so regularly excellent that it
becomes tempting to take him
for granted or look past him at
newer, fresher stars. Crosby often
ends up on a secondary tier of the
hockey world’s consciousness.
Edmonton’s Connor McDavid, 21,
won last year’s Hart Trophy as
the league’s most valuable player.
Auston Matthews, 20, is the face
of one of the league’s most storied franchises, the Toronto Maple Leafs.
The sport is growing faster
and younger, and Crosby is doing
neither, probably in the former
case and certainly in the latter.
Still, those inside the game have
no doubts about his eminence.
Like baseball’s Mike Trout, Crosby is a metronomic exemplar of
all-around skill. Like basketball’s
LeBron James, he has established all-time-great bona fides
as he remains at the crest of his
performance.
“The last couple seasons, he’s
been the best player,” Capitals
defenseman Matt Niskanen said.
“I truly believe he’s the best
player in the world,” NBC analyst
Jeremy Roenick said.
“Still the best guy in the
league,”
former
teammate
Brooks Orpik said.
The quality that allows Crosby
to remain atop the league, coaches and teammates say, is his
unique work ethic, an ability to
specify subtle areas for improvement and work with meticulous
precision until they match the
other elite elements of his game.
While his natural ability — powerful skating, pistol-quick hands,
uncommon feel — made him a
phenom, his creative, distinct
capacity for work has enabled
him to stay atop the NHL.
“He’s a generational talent,”
Penguins Coach Mike Sullivan
said. “He does things that you
can’t teach, and that’s part of
what makes him what he is.
What separates him from other
elite players is his appetite to be
the best and his willingness and
his drive to be the best.”
Craig Adams, now retired, arrived in Pittsburgh in 2009 and
practiced in the same positional
group with Crosby for six-plus
seasons. When he came to Pittsburgh, he appreciated that Crosby worked hard. But, well, it was
the NHL; everybody worked
hard. “It doesn’t make you special,” Adams said. The specificity
of Crosby’s work struck him. He
noticed a habit: If Crosby missed
a scoring chance one night, he
would replicate the situation the
next day in practice.
“He’s able to pick things he
thinks he needs to get better at,
and he’s very deliberate at practicing those things and working
on those things all the time,”
Adams said. “He’s methodical
about doing that on a daily
basis.”
‘Not a lot of luck involved’
Former Penguins coach Dan
Bylsma recalled one night when
a puck bounced off the end
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Capitals vs. Penguins
Series tied, 1-1
Game 1: Penguins 3, Capitals 2
Game 2: Capitals 4, Penguins 1
Today: at Pittsburgh, 7:30, NBCSN
Thursday: at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.,
NBCSN
Saturday: at Washington, 7 p.m., NBC
Monday*: at Pittsburgh, TBD, NBCSN
May 9*: at Washington, TBD, NBCSN
* If necessary
boards and toward Crosby, who
was standing in front of the net.
Crosby missed the scoring
chance, and it ate at him. The
next day, Crosby discussed the
play with coaches, then asked for
pucks to be smacked off the end
boards in identical fashion.
“He’ll do it 100 times, until it
becomes second nature,” former
teammate Pascal Dupuis said.
“Trust me, he can analyze his
own game better than anybody
else. When he sees something of
his own game that’s not where he
thinks it should be, he works on
it and works on it until he gets
really good at it. As far as him
getting better, I’ve never seen
anybody else doing it that way.”
For Crosby, the idea to re-create game situations in extreme
detail came naturally. Missed
chances gnawed at him, and
through specific work he ironed
out perceived flaws.
“I don’t know if you call it a
mistake, or you call it something
you wish you could do over again,
but yeah, he’s always done that,”
Troy Crosby, Sidney’s father, said
Saturday afternoon while lingering outside the Penguins’ locker
room at Capital One Arena. “For
a long time he’s done that, ever
since he was a kid. For as long as I
can remember.”
“It’s an instinctive game,”
Crosby said. “Sometimes, things
come easier than others. Just
being aware of what those are,
the areas you’re not comfortable
or don’t feel as comfortable in,
you just try and develop those
things. It’s not something you
think about or pick apart. It
seems to come pretty naturally. If
you play that many games over
the course of the year, you kind of
get reoccurring things.”
Early in his career, Crosby
racked up assists with modest
goal totals, so he started arriving
10 to 15 minutes early for practice
to rip shots from specific spots on
the ice. The next year, he led the
NHL in goals. In his first three
seasons, he sat in on penalty-kill
meetings, even though he was
not on the penalty kill — he
wanted to be ready, just in case.
One year, he decided he needed
to improve on the draw, and he
became one of the best faceoff
men in the league.
“He’s made a ton of changes,”
said Capitals center Jay Beagle, a
frequent faceoff foil of Crosby’s.
“I mean, it’s no surprise that if he
doesn’t like a little part of his
game, he’s going to come back
the next year better.”
“He’s still the hardest-working
guy I’ve ever played with,” said
Orpik, now a Capitals defenseman. “That’s probably the one
thing that people overlook —
how he achieves his success. A lot
of guys are just naturally gifted.
He obviously has a lot of natural
gifts. But, I mean, I’ve never seen
someone as committed to getting
better as him.”
Late this season and into the
playoffs, Crosby scored a spate of
what can only be called fall-offyour-couch-and-scream goals,
whacking pucks out of the air
and past goalies, in one instance
after an aerial tip to himself.
They appeared to be feats of
improvisational genius, the
product of instinct and divine
hand-eye coordination. To an
extent, perhaps, they were. “I
don’t know,” Crosby said. “It’s
just instincts.”
Teammates believe otherwise.
Bylsma remembered watching
Crosby work on batting pucks
and said the likelihood the goals
were a result of practice was
“100 percent.”
“He does practice weird stuff
like that,” Niskanen said. “He’s
naturally very intelligent. Really,
I think his on-ice awareness is so
high, he knows where the puck is
at all times. A lot of guys don’t
have the awareness to even try
C A P I TA L S N O TES
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/capitals
No suspension
coming for Wilson
Washington Capitals forward
Tom Wilson will not be
suspended for a hit that knocked
Pittsburgh Penguins defenseman
Brian Dumoulin out of Sunday’s
Game 2 of the teams’ secondround Stanley Cup playoff series.
Wilson’s shoulder appeared to
strike Dumoulin in the head as
the defenseman turned away
from an oncoming hit from
Capitals forward Alex Ovechkin.
Dumoulin did not return to the
game, and he practiced Monday
in Pittsburgh in a noncontact
jersey. He has averaged more
than 22 minutes in the playoffs as
a top-pairing defenseman.
“I got the puck behind the net.
I knew Wilson was coming from
behind,” Dumoulin told reporters
in Pittsburgh on Monday. “At that
point, I saw Ovi coming. I tried to
make a pass through him. I didn’t
know Wilson was there at all or
anything like that. I was just
bracing for Ovechkin.”
According to a person familiar
with the NHL’s supplemental
discipline process, in the league’s
view, Dumoulin materially
changed the position of his head
and body immediately before
contact. Wilson was chasing him
and not able to initiate any sort of
hit, but Dumoulin stopped
suddenly. Per the wording of Rule
48.1.iii, such hits are considered
unavoidable and not suspensionworthy. A penalty wasn’t called
on the ice.
“I’m at no point trying to target
the head at all,” Wilson said
Sunday. “I’m skating,
backchecking, trying to do my
job, and unfortunately there’s a
collision there. . . . I think if you
watch it at game speed, I don’t
even alter my movement at all.
I’m just skating straight.”
Wilson is considered a repeat
offender after he was suspended
twice in the preseason, and this
marks the second time during the
playoffs that he has faced the
threat of supplemental
discipline. In Game 1 of the
Capitals’ first-round series
victory against the Columbus
Blue Jackets, a Wilson check led
to center Alexander Wennberg
missing three games. Wilson was
penalized for that hit but was not
suspended.
Injury updates
Capitals forward Andre
Burakovsky remains week-toweek with an upper-body injury
suffered in Game 2 of the firstround series, and he won’t travel
to Pittsburgh for Games 3 and 4.
The Capitals are healthy other
than that, having avoided injuries
to forward T.J. Oshie, who
blocked a shot with his hand late
in Game 2 against the Penguins,
and center Evgeny Kuznetsov,
who took a slash. Coach Barry
Trotz said he is keeping the same
lineup for Game 3.
The Penguins’ Evgeni Malkin,
who missed the first two games of
the series with an apparent leg
injury, could return for Game 3;
he practiced fully Monday. Like
Dumoulin, winger Carl Hagelin
practiced in a noncontact jersey,
making their status for Tuesday’s
game more questionable.
— Isabelle Khurshudyan
something like that.”
Orpik remembered how Crosby would ask teammates to stand
in the corners and rifle waisthigh shots toward him as he
stood near the net. Crosby would
use the shaft of his stick to knock
the pucks into the net, like a bunt
in baseball.
“Just stupid little stuff like
that,” Orpik said. “You would
think it would never happen in a
game. He would work on it for
hours at a time if it meant he
would score one goal that way.
. . . A lot of people label it as
lucky. With him, guys that practice with him know there’s not a
lot of luck involved there.”
Of course, if you are going to
target a specific skill to improve,
it helps to be Sidney Crosby. His
creativity allows him to create
and execute plays in practice that
others cannot.
“I try to do a couple of drills,
like where he’s on the goal line
and there’s a shot coming, and he
deflects it under the bar,” Pittsburgh winger Tom Kuhnhackl
said. “We’ve tried that a bunch of
times. It’s either up somewhere
on the rafters or it’s on the ice.
I’ve never even managed to get it
on net.”
And so, do those extra hours
create instinct? Or does instinct
make the hours pay off ?
“It’s got to be both,” Crosby
said. “One without the other,
you’re probably not getting those
opportunities.”
Always striving to improve
Over the years, Crosby has
built a complete game, and his
collection of skills makes him a
skeleton key in skates. As Pittsburgh has tweaked its roster,
Sullivan often places new players
on the same line as Crosby.
Whatever strengths they possess,
Crosby can accommodate them.
Teams often build around superstars. Crosby’s game is so well
developed, he can conform to
whatever teammates are available.
“We ask them to play their
game and not try to do something outside of their game, and
Sid will make the adjustments,”
“He practices
the way he
would play in
a playoff game,
and he does
it every day.
When he’s on
the ice, he never
takes a day off.
He’s just driven
by perfection.”
Jim Rutherford,
Penguins general
manager
As he seeks a third
straight Stanley Cup,
Pittsburgh’s Sidney
Crosby has seven
goals and eight assists
through eight playoff
games. He had a goal
and an assist in
Thursday’s Game 1
against the Capitals
before being held off
the scoresheet in
Game 2 on Sunday.
Sullivan sad. “Sid has the ability
to adapt and adjust based on who
we utilize beside him. He’s one of
the easier guys to play with
because he has the ability to
adapt to the guys we put beside
him.”
The work also made him a
natural leader, worthy of the “C”
on his sweater even if he were not
the team’s best player, let alone
the league’s. Sullivan called him
the best leader he has ever met,
in hockey or otherwise. When
Crosby devotes himself, it leaves
teammates no choice.
“He practices the way he
would play in a playoff game, and
he does it every day,” Penguins
General Manager Jim Rutherford said. “When he’s on the ice,
he never takes a day off. He’s just
driven by perfection. That’s how
he drives our team.”
“Just the way he works on
things after practice, it’s something new every day,” secondyear winger Jake Guentzel said.
“But he’s usually one of the first
ones on and one of the last ones
to get off the ice. I think everyone
notices that. He’s the guy we all
look up to.”
In the past two years, Crosby
has displayed a consistent on-ice
calmness sometimes missing in
previous playoff runs. He faced
greater expectations and pressure than perhaps any Canadian
player since Wayne Gretzky, and
when those forces combined
with his perfectionism, they
could boil over. Now, though,
observers no longer see actions
that led some rivals and experts
to label him a “whiner.”
“He has grown and matured so
much as a — I don’t want to say
‘ambassador’ or ‘leader’ — but he
has been able to mentally handle
the negative attention on the ice
so much better,” said Roenick, an
NBC analyst who in the past has
criticized Crosby’s on-ice demeanor. “He is not letting anything bother him. A couple years
back against Boston, he’s going
after [defenseman Zdeno] Chara,
he’s yelling at the refs, he’s visually frustrated at being taken advantage of on the ice, which stars
get. They get slashed, they get
punched in the face. They get the
attention you don’t like from
other players. Sidney has been
able to let that go and understand and almost use it to his
benefit.”
Roenick added that he has
never impugned Crosby’s behavior off the ice, where those
around him regard him as an
ideal avatar of the sport. Capitals
Coach Barry Trotz was an assistant on Canada’s 2016 World Cup
team, which Crosby guided to the
championship while leading the
tournament in points.
Outside the team hotel one
night, Trotz watched Crosby sit
down next to Trotz’s son, Nolan,
who has Down syndrome. He
watched Crosby start a conversation and play on Nolan’s iPad
with him, even though Crosby
had never met Nolan.
“I know he gets pulled in a lot
of different directions, but he’s
very personable, very sincere in a
lot of ways,” Trotz said. “He’s a
good representative for the
game.”
And he is still, in his 13th
season, the best at playing it. He
has melded work and instinct
like no player in the game, and
like few in any sport. He entered
the NHL with more talent than
any prospect in a generation, but
it is the work that makes him its
best player.
“Some guys are talented, but
they use their talent and that’s it,”
Dupuis said. “He’s talented, and
he wants to be there every day.
He feels like the better version of
Sidney Crosby, it’s going to be
tomorrow. ‘Tomorrow, I’ll be better. Tomorrow, I’ll be better.’ ”
adam.kilgore@washpost.com
D6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. TUESDAY,
MAY 1 , 2018
Baseball
National League
American League
EAST
W
L PCT GB L10 STR
CENTRAL
W
WEST
W
L PCT GB L10 STR
EAST
W
L PCT GB L10 STR
CENTRAL
W
New York
17
9 .654
Chicago
16 10 .615
— 8-2 W-5
x-Arizona
19
8 .704
Boston
21
7 .750
— 5-5 W-2
Cleveland
15 12 .556
— 6-4 W-1
Houston
20 10 .667
Atlanta
16 11 .593 11/2 6-4 W-2
Pittsburgh
17 12 .586
1/
2
Colorado
15 15 .500 51/2 4-6 L-3
New York
18 10 .643
3 9-1 L-1
Detroit
11 16 .407
4 3-7 L-2
Seattle
16 11 .593 21/2 7-3 W-2
Philadelphia
16 12 .571
Milwaukee
17 13 .567
5 4-6 W-2
Washington
13 16 .448 51/2 4-6 W-2
St. Louis
15 12 .556 11/2 5-5 L-3
Miami
10 18 .357
Cincinnati
— 5-5 W-1
2 5-5 L-3
8 5-5 W-3
L PCT GB L10 STR
5-5 L-1
1 6-4 W-1
7 22 .241 101/2 4-6 L-1
— 7-3 L-1
x-San Fran.
14 14 .500 51/2 7-3 W-2
Toronto
16 12 .571
x-Los Angeles
12 15 .444
Tampa Bay
13 14 .481 71/2 9-1 W-1
x-San Diego
10 19 .345 10 3-7 L-1
Baltimore
8 20 .286 13 3-7 W-1
7 4-6 L-2
L PCT GB L10 STR
WEST
W
L PCT GB L10 STR
— 7-3 W-3
Minnesota
9 15 .375 41/2 1-9 L-2
Los Angeles
16 12 .571
3 3-7 L-4
Chicago
8 18 .308 61/2 4-6 L-2
Oakland
14 14 .500
5 6-4 L-2
Kansas City
7 21 .250 81/2 3-7 L-1
Texas
11 19 .367
9 4-6 L-2
x-Late game
NO T E S
PERSONNEL DEPT.
Angels: Shohei Ohtani
will have his upcoming
scheduled start pushed
to next weekend after
spraining his left ankle.
The two-way sensation
was slated to pitch
Tuesday against
Baltimore, but Manager
Mike Scioscia said he
instead expects Ohtani to
start during a three-game
series at Seattle that
begins Friday.
Dodgers: SS Corey
Seager will undergo
Tommy John surgery and
miss the rest of the
season, the team
announced.
The 2016 National
League rookie of the year
has a sprained ulnar
collateral ligament in his
right arm.
He was batting .267 with
two home runs and 13
RBI this season, playing
all but one game heading
into Monday.
Rangers: LHP Martin
Perez was placed on the
10-day disabled list
because of right elbow
discomfort.
Perez had arthroscopic
surgery on his nonthrowing elbow in
December.
Rockies: Placed 2B DJ
LeMahieu on the 10-day
DL with a right hamstring
strain and activated OF
Carlos Gonzalez from the
DL.
BY THE NUMBERS
.326
Batting average for Tigers
1B Miguel Cabrera. Last
year, Cabrera batted
.249 — his first season
below .310 since 2008.
But at age 35, it appears
he has bounced back.
STAR OF THE DAY
Charlie Morton,
Astros: The RHP struck
out 10 and held the
Yankees to one run in
72/3 innings to improve
to 4-0.
TODAY’S GAME
TO WATCH
Dodgers at
Diamondbacks,
9:40 p.m.
Three-time Cy Young
Award winner Clayton
Kershaw (1-4, 2.84 ERA)
faces relative unknown
rookie Matt Koch (1-0,
1.93), who has been
sharp in each of his two
starts this season.
Cubs 3, Rockies 2
Rays 3, Tigers 2
Jon Lester pitched effectively into the sixth inning
as Chicago beat Colorado
for a season-high fifth
straight victory.
Lester extended the
streak for Chicago’s starting pitchers to 332/3 innings without giving up an
earned run. The Cubs have
permitted just four runs
and 21 hits during their
past five games.
C.J. Cron and Brad Miller
each homered in the ninth
inning, and Tampa Bay
held on in the bottom half
to beat Detroit.
The Rays have won nine
of their last 10 games after
a 4-13 start.
Rays starter Jake Faria
had the longest outing of
his career, holding the Tigers scoreless for eight innings.
COLORADO
AB
Desmond 1b........5
Blackmon cf ........3
Arenado 3b .........4
Story ss ..............3
Iannetta c ...........4
Parra lf................4
Cuevas rf ............4
Valaika 2b...........2
Dahl ph................1
Freeland p...........2
Gonzalez ph ........1
TOTALS
33
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
2
H BI BB SO AVG
0 0 0 0 .178
1 1 1 1 .281
1 1 1 2 .310
0 0 1 1 .236
1 0 0 1 .216
0 0 0 1 .222
3 0 0 0 .278
0 0 1 0 .096
0 0 0 1 .261
0 0 0 2 .091
1 0 0 0 .246
7 2 4 9 —
TAMPA BAY AB
Span lf ................3
Cron dh ...............4
Duffy 3b..............4
Miller 1b .............4
Robertson ss ......4
Wendle 2b ..........4
Gomez rf .............2
Smith cf ..............3
Sucre c ................3
TOTALS
31
R
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
3
H BI BB SO AVG
0 0 1 0 .256
1 2 0 1 .269
2 0 0 0 .307
1 1 0 1 .230
0 0 0 3 .333
0 0 0 0 .329
0 0 1 1 .173
0 0 0 1 .329
0 0 0 0 .281
4 3 2 7 —
CHICAGO
AB
Almora cf............4
Baez 2b ...............4
Bryant 3b............3
Rizzo 1b ..............4
Contreras c .........2
Zobrist rf ............3
Russell ss ...........3
Happ lf ................3
Lester p...............2
Schwarber ph .....1
TOTALS
29
R
0
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
3
H BI BB SO AVG
1 1 0 1 .289
0 0 0 2 .280
1 0 1 0 .291
0 1 0 1 .149
0 0 1 1 .264
1 0 0 0 .327
2 1 0 0 .250
1 0 0 1 .246
0 0 0 1 .091
0 0 0 0 .273
6 3 2 7 —
DETROIT
AB
Jones cf ..............3
Candelario 3b......3
Castellanos rf .....3
Martinez dh ........4
McCann c ............4
Hicks 1b ..............3
Machado 2b ........4
Iglesias ss...........3
Reyes lf...............2
Goodrum ph ........1
TOTALS
30
R
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 0 1 .273
1 0 1 2 .283
1 0 0 0 .309
1 2 0 0 .232
0 0 0 2 .244
0 0 1 1 .179
0 0 0 0 .204
1 0 0 0 .223
0 0 0 0 .118
0 0 0 1 .217
5 2 2 7 —
TAMPA BAY ... 000 000 003 — 3 4 0
DETROIT ......... 000 000 002 — 2 5 0
COLORADO ..... 000 020 000 — 2 7 1
CHICAGO......... 010 011 00X — 3 6 2
LOB: Tampa Bay 3, Detroit 5. 2B: Castellanos (6), Iglesias (7). HR: Cron (7), off
Greene; Miller (2), off Greene.
E: Story (3), Baez (7), Bryant (5). LOB:
Colorado 10, Chicago 4. 2B: Arenado (5),
Zobrist (2). 3B: Bryant (2).
COLORADO
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Freeland .............. 7 6 3 3 1 5 4.24
Ottavino .............. 1 0 0 0 1 2 0.56
CHICAGO
IP
Lester ............... 5.2
Farrell............... 1.1
Strop.................... 1
Duensing .......... 0.1
Cishek............... 0.2
H
5
0
1
1
0
R ER BB SO ERA
2 0 3 5 2.73
0 0 0 2 0.00
0 0 0 0 2.25
0 0 0 1 0.00
0 0 1 1 2.70
WP: Farrell (1-0); LP: Freeland (1-4); S:
Cishek (1). Inherited runners-scored:
Farrell 2-0, Cishek 1-0. HBP: Lester
(Blackmon). T: 2:57. A: 35,922 (41,649).
BOB LEVEY/GETTY IMAGES
Not quite liftoff
TAMPA BAY IP
Faria .................... 8
Roe ................... 0.1
Alvarado........... 0.2
H
3
1
1
R ER BB SO ERA
0 0 1 6 4.60
2 2 0 1 4.91
0 0 1 0 2.57
DETROIT
IP
Zimmermann ...... 7
Stumpf ................ 1
Greene .............. 0.1
Farmer.............. 0.2
H
2
0
2
0
R ER BB SO ERA
0 0 1 5 5.81
0 0 0 1 1.59
3 3 1 0 5.73
0 0 0 1 5.54
WP: Faria (2-1); LP: Greene (1-2); S: Alvarado (1). Inherited runners-scored:
Alvarado 3-2. HBP: Roe 2 (Jones,Castellanos). WP: Faria. T: 2:52. A: 19,398
(41,297).
Houston’s Jose Altuve reacts after flying out against the Yankees. He went 1 for 4 in the Astros’ 2-1 win.
Indians 7, Rangers 5
Marlins 8, Phillies 4
Red Sox 10, Royals 6
Astros 2, Yankees 1
Blue Jays 7, Twins 5
Homers by Manny Pina
and Lorenzo Cain ended
Milwaukee’s historically
bad slump (23 straight
scoreless innings), and Domingo Santana doubled
home the go-ahead runs.
Jose Ramirez’s RBI double broke an eighth-inning
tie for Cleveland. Texas
scored twice in the top of
the eighth to go ahead 4-3,
but the Indians scored four
times off Chris Martin.
MILWAUKEE AB
Cain cf.................4
Yelich lf-rf ..........5
Braun 1b-lf .........3
Shaw 3b..............4
Santana rf...........4
Pina c ..................4
Villar 2b ..............3
Arcia ss...............3
Aguilar 1b ...........1
Chacin p ..............2
Perez ss ..............2
TOTALS
35
R
1
1
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
6
H BI BB SO AVG
1 2 1 0 .290
2 0 0 1 .271
1 0 2 0 .258
0 0 1 0 .243
1 2 0 1 .237
1 1 0 0 .196
1 0 1 1 .271
0 0 0 1 .190
1 0 0 0 .378
1 0 0 0 .091
0 0 0 0 .185
9 5 5 4 —
TEXAS
AB
DeShields cf .......4
Choo dh...............4
Profar ss .............5
Mazara rf ............4
Gallo lf ................4
Kiner-Falefa 3b...3
Guzman 1b..........3
Chirinos c ............4
Robinson 2b........4
TOTALS
35
R
0
2
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
5
H BI BB SO AVG
2 0 1 2 .256
1 0 1 2 .241
2 1 0 0 .243
2 2 1 0 .294
0 1 1 1 .216
0 0 1 2 .258
0 0 0 3 .227
1 1 0 2 .182
1 0 0 2 .176
9 5 5 14 —
Brian Anderson homered, drove in four runs
and made a diving catch in
right field with the bases
loaded to preserve a lead,
helping Miami beat Jake
Arrieta and Philadelphia.
The Marlins have won
three games in a row.
Xander Bogaerts hit a
grand slam over the Green
Monster, and Boston beat
Kansas City to finish with
19 wins in April, a franchise
record for the month. The
Red Sox finished April with
18 wins three times, most
recently in 2013. The slam
was Boston’s sixth of the
season, tying the 1996
Montreal Expos for most
ever in the majors by May 1.
Charlie Morton pitched
two-hit ball into the eighth
inning and struck out 10 as
Houston ended New York’s
nine-game winning streak.
Carlos Correa had two
hits and an RBI for the Astros in the first meeting between the teams since
Game 7 of last year’s AL
Championship Series, in
which Morton led Houston
to a 4-0 victory.
Justin Smoak and Russell Martin homered,
Yangervis Solarte had
three hits, and Toronto
held on for a victory over
Minnesota.
The Blue Jays have won
two straight. Eduardo Escobar homered for the Twins,
who have lost 10 of their
past 11.
CINCINNATI AB
Winker lf.............5
Peraza ss ............4
Votto 1b..............1
Schebler rf ..........4
Suarez 3b............4
Barnhart c...........1
Blandino 2b.........4
Finnegan p ..........2
Gennett ph..........1
Duvall ph.............1
Hamilton cf.........4
TOTALS
31
R
1
0
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
5
H BI BB SO AVG
2 0 0 1 .305
0 1 0 1 .288
0 0 2 1 .270
2 0 0 1 .320
2 4 0 1 .327
0 0 3 0 .228
0 0 0 3 .234
0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 1 .298
0 0 0 1 .175
1 0 0 2 .172
7 5 5 12 —
CLEVELAND AB
Lindor ss .............5
Kipnis 2b.............5
Ramirez 3b .........5
Encarnacion 1b ...4
Alonso 1b............1
Gomes dh............3
Guyer rf ..............1
Brantley ph.........1
Naquin rf.............0
Davis lf ...............3
Perez c ................4
Zimmer cf ...........3
TOTALS
35
R
2
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
2
7
H BI BB SO AVG
3 1 0 1 .245
2 1 0 2 .178
2 2 0 1 .267
0 0 0 1 .160
1 2 0 0 .234
1 0 1 2 .258
0 0 2 0 .146
0 0 0 0 .343
0 0 0 0 .294
2 0 0 0 .186
0 0 0 3 .121
1 0 1 1 .240
12 6 4 11 —
KANSAS CITY AB
Merrifield 2b.......5
Soler rf ................4
Moustakas dh .....0
Almonte ph-dh....4
Perez c.................4
Cuthbert 3b.........4
Duda 1b ...............3
Jay cf...................4
Gordon lf .............3
Escobar ss...........4
TOTALS
35
R
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
2
6
H BI BB SO AVG
3 2 0 1 .266
1 0 1 1 .304
0 0 0 0 .302
0 0 0 2 .250
1 1 1 2 .265
0 0 0 2 .213
0 1 1 1 .207
1 1 0 2 .238
0 0 0 2 .250
3 1 0 0 .227
9 6 3 13 —
NEW YORK
AB
Gardner lf ...........4
Gregorius ss .......4
Stanton rf...........4
Sanchez dh-c ......3
Hicks cf ...............4
Andujar 3b ..........3
Walker 1b ...........3
Torres 2b ............2
Romine c.............2
Judge ph .............0
TOTALS
29
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
H BI BB SO AVG
1 1 0 2 .210
0 0 0 3 .327
0 0 0 3 .230
0 0 1 2 .202
0 0 0 2 .231
0 0 0 1 .289
0 0 0 1 .165
1 0 1 0 .323
1 0 0 0 .276
0 0 1 0 .317
3 1 3 14 —
BOSTON
AB
Benintendi cf ......4
Ramirez dh..........5
Martinez lf ..........4
Moreland 1b........4
Bogaerts ss.........5
Devers 3b ............4
Nunez 2b .............4
Bradley Jr. rf .......3
Vazquez c............4
TOTALS
37
R
1
1
2
3
1
1
0
1
0
10
H BI BB SO AVG
1 1 0 0 .242
2 0 0 0 .330
2 0 1 0 .337
3 2 1 0 .305
3 4 0 0 .412
0 1 0 2 .257
1 1 0 0 .240
0 0 1 0 .195
1 0 0 1 .187
13 9 3 3 —
HOUSTON
AB
Springer cf-rf......4
Altuve 2b ............4
Correa ss.............3
Gurriel 1b............4
Marisnick cf........0
Reddick rf-lf........3
Bregman 3b ........1
Gonzalez lf-1b ....3
McCann c ............3
Gattis dh.............3
TOTALS
28
R
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 0 1 .267
1 0 0 0 .347
2 1 1 0 .330
1 1 0 1 .224
0 0 0 0 .143
0 0 0 0 .233
0 0 2 0 .259
0 0 0 2 .232
0 0 0 0 .271
0 0 0 1 .200
5 2 3 5 —
MILWAUKEE .. 000 120 300 — 6 9 0
CINCINNATI .... 000 230 000 — 5 7 1
E: Barnhart (1). LOB: Milwaukee 7, Cincinnati 6. 2B: Santana (3), Winker (7),
Schebler (3), Suarez (4), Hamilton (2).
HR: Pina (2), off Finnegan; Cain (4), off
Finnegan.
MILWAUKEE IP
Chacin............... 4.1
Jennings .............. 0
Barnes .............. 0.2
Woodruff.......... 1.1
Hader................ 2.2
H
5
1
1
0
0
R ER BB SO ERA
4 4 3 1 4.54
1 1 1 0 2.08
0 0 0 1 1.12
0 0 0 2 3.86
0 0 1 8 1.00
CINCINNATI
IP
Finnegan.............. 5
Brice .................... 1
Peralta.............. 0.2
Hughes ............. 1.1
Iglesias ................ 1
H
5
1
1
2
0
R ER BB SO ERA
3 3 3 2 7.27
0 0 0 2 3.24
3 3 2 0 4.40
0 0 0 0 1.69
0 0 0 0 2.19
WP: Woodruff (1-0); LP: Peralta (1-2);
S: Hader (4). Jennings pitched to 2 batters in the 5th. Inherited runnersscored: Jennings 1-0, Barnes 3-2,
Hughes 2-2. HBP: Chacin (Votto). T:
3:02. A: 9,536 (42,319).
TEXAS............. 000 100 121 — 5 9 1
CLEVELAND.... 000 110 14X — 7 12 0
E: Robinson (4). LOB: Texas 9, Cleveland
10. 2B: DeShields (3), Profar (5),
Mazara (4), Kipnis (7), Ramirez (5). HR:
Chirinos (6), off Bauer.
TEXAS
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Hamels ................ 5 4 2 1 3 8 4.08
Leclerc ................. 1 0 0 0 0 2 0.00
Claudio................. 0 3 1 1 0 0 7.50
Jepsen ................. 1 0 0 0 1 0 4.50
Martin .............. 0.2 4 4 4 0 0 5.14
Chavez.............. 0.1 1 0 0 0 1 5.62
CLEVELAND
IP
Bauer ................ 6.2
Olson ................ 0.2
Allen ................. 1.1
Beliveau ........... 0.1
H
4
3
2
0
R ER BB SO ERA
2 2 3 11 2.45
2 2 0 1 4.66
1 1 2 1 2.13
0 0 0 1 0.00
WP: Allen (2-0); LP: Martin (0-1); S: Beliveau (1). Hamels pitched to 2 batters
in the 6th. Claudio pitched to 3 batters
in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored:
Leclerc 2-0, Jepsen 2-0, Chavez 2-2, Allen 1-0, Beliveau 2-0. HBP: Hamels
(Gomes), Allen (Guzman). WP: Hamels
3, Olson. T: 3:56. A: 12,851 (35,225).
PHILA.
AB
Hernandez 2b .....4
Hoskins lf ...........4
Herrera cf ...........4
Altherr rf ............3
Santana 1b .........4
Kingery ss...........4
Franco 3b ............3
Alfaro c ...............4
Arrieta p .............1
Williams ph ........1
Florimon ss.........1
TOTALS
33
R
0
0
0
0
0
1
2
1
0
0
0
4
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 1 0 .283
0 0 1 1 .303
2 0 1 0 .343
0 0 1 1 .192
0 0 0 0 .153
1 0 0 0 .225
1 2 1 0 .266
2 2 0 1 .213
1 0 1 0 .143
0 0 0 0 .185
0 0 0 1 .211
8 4 6 4 —
Machado, Bal ................................... .361
Altuve, Hou ..................................... .351
Betts, Bos ........................................ .344
Smith, TB ......................................... .342
Gregorius, NY .................................. .340
Lowrie, Oak ...................................... .339
Martinez, Bos .................................. .330
Ramirez, Bos ................................... .326
Cabrera, Det .................................... .326
Correa, Hou ...................................... .320
HOME RUNS
Gregorius, NY ..................................... 10
Haniger, Sea ....................................... 10
Trout, LA ............................................. 10
Davidson, Chi ........................................ 9
Machado, Bal ........................................ 9
Alonso, Cle ............................................ 8
Betts, Bos ............................................. 8
Gallo, Tex .............................................. 8
Moustakas, KC ..................................... 8
5 tied ..................................................... 7
RBI
Gregorius, NY ..................................... 30
Haniger, Sea ....................................... 27
Lowrie, Oak ......................................... 27
Sanchez, NY ........................................ 24
Davis, Oak ........................................... 23
Machado, Bal ...................................... 22
Martinez, Bos ..................................... 22
Cabrera, Det ....................................... 21
Segura, Sea ........................................ 21
Span, TB ............................................. 21
STOLEN BASES
Gordon, Sea ........................................ 10
Anderson, Chi ....................................... 8
Benintendi, Bos .................................... 5
Garcia, Chi ............................................. 5
Gentry, Bal ............................................ 5
Lindor, Cle ............................................. 5
Segura, Sea .......................................... 5
Smith, TB .............................................. 5
Trout, LA ............................................... 5
7 tied ..................................................... 4
ON-BASE PCT.
Mauer, Min ...................................... .454
Judge, NY ......................................... .449
Machado, Bal ................................... .448
Betts, Bos ........................................ .439
Soler, KC .......................................... .436
Gregorius, NY .................................. .436
Cano, Sea ......................................... .422
Cabrera, Det .................................... .413
Altuve, Hou ..................................... .409
Trout, LA .......................................... .408
PIRATES AT NATIONALS, 7:05
W-L
ERA TEAM
Kuhl (R)
3-1
4.55
3-2
Scherzer (R)
5-1
1.62
5-1
PHILLIES AT MARLINS, 7:10
Eflin (R)
0-0
0.00
0-0
Garcia (L)
1-0
1.00
1-2
BRAVES AT METS, 7:10
Newcomb (L)
1-1
4.23
2-3
Syndergaard
(R)
2-0
2.86
5-1
BREWERS AT REDS, 7:10
Anderson (R)
2-2
2.86
4-2
Bailey (R)
0-3
4.19
0-6
ROCKIES AT CUBS, 8:05
Gray (R)
2-4
5.51
2-4
Hendricks (R)
2-1
3.10
2-3
DODGERS AT DIAMONDBACKS, 9:40
Kershaw (L)
1-4
2.84
2-4
Koch (R)
1-0
1.93
1-1
PADRES AT GIANTS, 10:15
Ross (R)
2-2
3.64
3-2
Suarez (L)
0-1
6.75
0-1
NL scores
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
Miami 3, Colorado 0
Atlanta 10, Philadelphia 1
Pittsburgh 5, St. Louis 0
Washington 3, Arizona 1
Chicago Cubs 2, Milwaukee 0
N.Y. Mets 14, San Diego 2
San Francisco 4, L.A. Dodgers 2
MONDAY’S RESULTS
at Washington 3, Pittsburgh 2
at Chicago Cubs 3, Colorado 2
Milwaukee 6 , at Cincinnati 5
at Miami 8, Philadelphia 4
L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, Late
San Diego at San Francisco, Late
AL games
MIAMI
AB
Realmuto c .........5
Prado 3b..............4
Castro 2b ............3
Dietrich 1b ..........4
Anderson rf ........4
Maybin lf ............4
Rojas ss ..............4
Brinson cf ...........4
Straily p ..............0
Shuck ph .............1
Rivera ph ............1
Bour ph ...............1
TOTALS
35
R
1
1
2
1
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
8
H BI BB SO AVG
2 0 0 0 .357
1 0 0 1 .250
3 1 1 0 .312
1 1 0 2 .241
3 4 0 0 .265
1 0 0 0 .213
1 1 0 0 .234
1 1 0 1 .167
0 0 1 0 --0 0 0 1 .244
0 0 0 1 .100
0 0 0 0 .247
13 8 2 6 —
PHILA.............. 020 200 000 — 4 8 0
MIAMI............. 014 100 20X — 8 13 0
LOB: Philadelphia 8, Miami 5. 2B: Hernandez (5), Kingery (8), Realmuto (1),
Castro 2 (6), Dietrich (3), Anderson (6).
HR: Alfaro (3), off Straily; Franco (4),
off Straily; Anderson (2), off Hunter.
PHILA.
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Arrieta.............. 3.2 8 6 6 2 2 3.49
Rios .................. 1.1 1 0 0 0 1 2.84
Ramos ................. 1 1 0 0 0 2 0.71
Hunter ................. 1 2 2 2 0 1 4.91
Curtis................... 1 1 0 0 0 0 0.00
MIAMI
IP
Straily.................. 4
Gonzalez.............. 2
Barraclough......... 1
Guerrero .............. 1
Ziegler ................. 1
H
6
1
1
0
0
R ER BB SO ERA
4 4 4 1 9.00
0 0 0 0 4.50
0 0 2 1 2.13
0 0 0 2 4.40
0 0 0 0 7.11
WP: Gonzalez (2-0); LP: Arrieta (3-1).
Inherited runners-scored: Rios 1-0. WP:
Barraclough. T: 3:06. A: 5,415 (36,742).
KANSAS CITY . 300 200 001 — 6 9 1
BOSTON.......... 015 110 20X — 10 13 0
E: Cuthbert (3). LOB: Kansas City 7, Boston 7. 2B: Merrifield 2 (6), Escobar 2 (8),
Ramirez (5), Martinez (7), Moreland (6).
HR: Moreland (3), off Hammel; Bogaerts
(3), off Hammel.
KANSAS CITY IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Hammel ............ 4.2 8 8 8 3 2 4.91
Hill .................... 0.1 0 0 0 0 0 3.60
Barlow ................. 3 5 2 1 0 1 3.00
BOSTON
IP
Rodriguez ............ 4
Velazquez ............ 2
Smith................... 1
Johnson ............... 2
H
5
1
1
2
R ER BB SO ERA
5 5 3 6 4.78
0 0 0 3 2.05
0 0 0 2 5.19
1 1 0 2 4.76
WP: Velazquez (4-0); LP: Hammel (0-3).
Inherited runners-scored: Hill 2-0. HBP:
Rodriguez 2 (Moustakas,Gordon). T:
3:13. A: 31,314 (37,731).
0-3
Tropeano (R)
1-2
4.67
1-2
RANGERS AT INDIANS, 6:10
Fister (R)
1-2
3.93
2-2
Clevinger (R)
2-0
2.56
3-2
ROYALS AT RED SOX, 7:10
Junis (R)
3-2
3.34
3-2
Sale (L)
2-1
2.31
4-2
RAYS AT TIGERS, 7:10
Archer (R)
2-1
6.61
4-2
Boyd (L)
0-2
2.74
1-3
YANKEES AT ASTROS, 8:10
MINNESOTA AB
Dozier 2b ............5
Mauer 1b ............4
Rosario lf ............4
Escobar 3b ..........5
Kepler cf .............5
Grossman rf........4
Morrison dh ........3
Garver c ..............4
Adrianza ss.........3
TOTALS
37
R
0
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
5
H BI BB SO AVG
0 0 0 3 .248
1 0 1 0 .291
1 0 1 0 .231
1 2 0 0 .301
3 1 0 0 .299
2 0 1 0 .222
0 1 0 0 .145
2 1 0 1 .281
0 0 1 1 .216
10 5 4 5 —
Triggs (R)
2-0
4.70
4-1
Hernandez (R)
3-2
4.96
4-2
TORONTO ....... 020 310 001 — 7 10 0
MINNESOTA... 000 121 100 — 5 10 2
H
4
0
1
R ER BB SO ERA
2 2 3 4 6.67
0 0 0 1 4.91
0 0 0 0 7.04
HOUSTON
IP
Morton ............. 7.2
Peacock ............... 0
Devenski........... 0.1
Giles .................... 1
H
2
0
1
0
R ER BB SO ERA
1 1 2 10 1.72
0 0 1 0 2.84
0 0 0 1 0.73
0 0 0 3 1.80
MINNESOTA IP
Lynn..................... 5
Hildenberger ....... 2
Pressly.............. 1.2
Curtiss.............. 0.1
WP: Morton (4-0); LP: Gray (1-2); S:
Giles (3). Peacock pitched to 1 batter in
the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Peacock 1-0, Devenski 2-1. T: 2:31. A:
30,061 (41,168).
13.11
H BI BB SO AVG
0 1 3 2 .306
1 0 0 0 .306
1 2 0 0 .255
3 1 0 0 .250
1 0 0 0 .305
1 1 1 2 .156
0 0 2 1 .160
2 1 0 1 .267
1 0 0 1 .183
10 6 6 7 —
NEW YORK
IP
Gray ..................... 6
Betances ............. 1
Holder.................. 1
LOB: New York 4, Houston 5. 2B: Torres
(3), Correa (9), Gurriel (6).
ERA TEAM
0-3
R
1
1
2
1
1
1
0
0
0
7
E: Dozier (4), Rosario (4). LOB: Toronto
10, Minnesota 10. 2B: Hernandez (7),
Pillar (10), Kepler 2 (9), Grossman (5).
3B: Kepler (1). HR: Smoak (4), off Lynn;
Martin (3), off Lynn; Escobar (4), off
Sanchez.
TORONTO
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Sanchez ............... 6 6 4 4 3 2 4.06
Loup.................. 0.1 1 1 1 0 0 4.22
Barnes .............. 0.2 1 0 0 1 0 1.98
Clippard ............... 1 0 0 0 0 3 1.88
Osuna .................. 1 2 0 0 0 0 2.19
NEW YORK ..... 000 000 010 — 1 3 0
HOUSTON ....... 100 100 00X — 2 5 0
W-L
Cobb (R)
TORONTO
AB
Granderson lf......2
Hernandez rf.......5
Smoak 1b............5
Solarte 3b ...........5
Pillar cf ...............5
Martin c ..............4
Morales dh..........3
Gurriel Jr. 2b.......5
Diaz ss ................4
TOTALS
38
H
7
0
3
0
R ER BB SO ERA
6 6 5 4 8.37
0 0 0 2 4.15
1 0 1 1 0.59
0 0 0 0 0.00
WP: Sanchez (2-2); LP: Lynn (0-3); S:
Osuna (7). Inherited runners-scored:
Barnes 1-1, Curtiss 2-0. HBP: Sanchez
(Morrison). PB: Garver (1). T: 3:13. A:
16,456 (38,649).
Montgomery
(L)
2-0
3.76
4-1
Verlander (R)
4-0
1.36
5-1
BLUE JAYS AT TWINS, 8:10
Estrada (R)
2-2
6.00
3-2
Gibson (R)
1-1
3.33
3-2
ATHLETICS AT MARINERS, 10:10
AL scores
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
Baltimore 5, Detroit 3
Boston 4, Tampa Bay 3
Toronto 7, Texas 2
Seattle 10, Cleveland 4
Houston 8, Oakland 4
Kansas City 5, Chicago White Sox 4
N.Y. Yankees 2, L.A. Angels 1
MONDAY’S RESULTS
at Cleveland 7, Texas 5
at Boston 10, Kansas City 6
Tampa Bay 3, at Detroit 2
at Houston 2, N.Y. Yankees 1
Toronto 7, at Minnesota 3
Interleague games
WHITE SOX AT CARDINALS, 8:15
W-L
ERA TEAM
Shields (R)
1-3
6.14
2-3
Wacha (R)
4-1
3.62
4-1
Interleague Scores
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
Cincinnati 8, Minnesota 2
MONDAY’S RESULTS
No games scheduled.
AL leaders
BATTING
NL games
ORIOLES AT ANGELS, 10:07
Brewers 6, Reds 5
NATIONALS NOTES
Through Sunday’s games
TOD AY
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/
nationals
Top relief prospect Suero
called up for first time
The Washington Nationals recalled
Wander Suero and optioned Austin
Voth to Class AAA Syracuse on
Monday, swapping a starter who was
called up Sunday as bullpen insurance
for their top relief prospect.
Suero, 26, has been a dominant
reliever in the Nationals’ farm system,
but he wasn’t placed on the 40-man
roster until November. He was one of
the few effective relievers in
Washington’s high minors not to get a
chance at the big league level last
season, when the Nationals’ bullpen
was baseball’s worst until a July
overhaul. The bullpen has more
stability in the back end this year, but
middle relief remains a soft spot.
Suero and his wipeout slider figure to
bolster that area.
The Nationals likely would have
called up Suero earlier in the season,
but the right-hander only recently
returned from an oblique injury he
suffered in a March 9 Grapefruit
League game. He made his season
debut with Syracuse on April 21,
allowing three runs on five hits in an
inning. But he rebounded to toss
three scoreless innings over his next
three appearances. He last pitched
Saturday and needed just 10 pitches
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Wander Suero had a 1.79 ERA in the minors last year. He likely would have
been called up earlier this season but suffered an oblique injury in March.
to record three outs. Last season, he
pitched to a 1.79 ERA between Class
AA Harrisburg and Syracuse.
He attributed the success to
developing his cutter, a pitch he said
he learned to command on both sides
of the plate. He carried over the
success to the spring training, where
he logged four scoreless innings with
seven strikeouts and a walk before
sustaining the oblique injury.
“I liked his ability to get both lefty
hitters and righty hitters out,”
Nationals Manager Dave Martinez
said. “He’s got a really good cutter.
And he throws strikes. That’s what
you need out of the bullpen.”
Murphy ‘not quite’ ready
Daniel Murphy doesn’t spend much
time at his locker when he is healthy.
He prefers to hit, watch soccer or talk
about hitting, and he rarely has time
to linger. But as he rehabbed his
surgically repaired right knee in West
Palm Beach, Fla., over the last few
weeks, his absence in the Nationals’
clubhouse was noticeable
nonetheless. He is the offensive
equivalent of Max Scherzer, always
talking about his craft regardless of
who is listening. Things are quieter
without him.
So when Murphy ambled into
Washington’s clubhouse Monday
afternoon, dropped his backpack and
Nationals duffel bag, changed and
headed to the training room, he
restored a balance. A clubhouse
attendant unpacked his things,
refilling what had been a largely
barren locker, and seemed to unpack
some hope with every pair of batting
gloves. Things have not been easy for
this team. They will get easier.
Murphy will not be activated
immediately, or perhaps even soon.
Though he did not speak to reporters,
he told one teammate he was in town
to see doctors and be reevaluated.
When that teammate asked if he was
ready to help them play baseball
again, Murphy said “not quite.”
“He’s going to be reevaluated by the
doctors,” Martinez said. “. . . He’s
going to continue his rehab program
here. He’s going to continue his
running program, hit and take
groundballs — everything he’s done in
Florida. So he’s going to see the doctor
today, and we’ll see where he’s at.”
— Jorge Castillo and Chelsea Janes
NL leaders
Through Sunday’s games
BATTING
Pham, StL ........................................ .341
Cabrera, NY ...................................... .340
Herrera, Phi ..................................... .337
Hoskins, Phi ..................................... .318
Belt, SF ............................................ .317
Dickerson, Pit .................................. .316
Freeman, Atl .................................... .314
Arenado, Col .................................... .313
Peralta, Ari ...................................... .309
Cervelli, Pit ...................................... .307
HOME RUNS
Albies, Atl ............................................. 9
Blackmon, Col ....................................... 9
Harper, Was ......................................... 8
Villanueva, SD ...................................... 8
Baez, Chi ............................................... 7
DeJong, StL .......................................... 7
Schwarber, Chi ..................................... 7
Thames, Mil .......................................... 7
8 tied ..................................................... 6
RBI
Baez, Chi ............................................. 26
Cespedes, NY ...................................... 25
Pollock, Ari ......................................... 21
Albies, Atl ........................................... 20
Cervelli, Pit ......................................... 20
Franco, Phi .......................................... 20
Freeman, Atl ....................................... 19
Grandal, LA ......................................... 19
Harper, Was ....................................... 19
Hoskins, Phi ........................................ 19
Story, Col ............................................ 19
STOLEN BASES
Inciarte, Atl ........................................ 13
Turner, Was ........................................ 12
Taylor, Was .......................................... 9
Marte, Pit ............................................. 8
Cain, Mil ................................................ 7
Pollock, Ari ........................................... 6
ON-BASE PCT.
Hoskins, Phi ..................................... .468
Harper, Was .................................... .457
Pham, StL ........................................ .453
Bryant, Chi ....................................... .439
Freeman, Atl .................................... .437
Belt, SF ............................................ .424
Hernandez, Phi ................................ .415
Winker, Cin ...................................... .415
Arenado, Col .................................... .414
Cain, Mil ........................................... .405
.
TUESDAY, MAY 1 , 2018
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D7
M2
scoreboard
B A SK E T B ALL
H O CK EY
GOLF
NBA playoffs
Stanley Cup playoffs
World Golf Ranking
FIRST ROUND
FIRST ROUND
Best of seven
Best of seven
EASTERN CONFERENCE
RAPTORS ELIMINATED WIZARDS, 4-2
EASTERN CONFERENCE
CAPITALS ELIMINATED BLUE JACKETS, 4-2
Through Sunday
1. Dustin Johnson .......................... USA
2. Justin Thomas ........................... USA
3. Jon Rahm .................................... ESP
4. Jordan Spieth............................. USA
5. Justin Rose ................................ ENG
6. Rickie Fowler ............................. USA
7. Rory McIlroy.................................NIR
8. Hideki Matsuyama...................... JPN
9. Brooks Koepka ........................... USA
10. Patrick Reed............................. USA
11. Sergio Garcia............................. ESP
12. Tommy Fleetwood ................... ENG
13. Paul Casey................................ ENG
14. Jason Day................................. AUS
15. Henrik Stenson ........................SWE
16. Marc Leishman ........................ AUS
17. Alex Noren ...............................SWE
18. Bubba Watson ......................... USA
19. Phil Mickelson.......................... USA
20. Tyrrell Hatton .......................... ENG
21. Matt Kuchar ............................. USA
22. Pat Perez.................................. USA
23. Brian Harman........................... USA
24. Kevin Kisner............................. USA
25. Rafael Cabrera Bello ................. ESP
26. Ian Poulter ............................... ENG
27. Satoshi Kodaira ........................ JPN
28. Charley Hoffman...................... USA
29. Xander Schauffele ................... USA
30. Louis Oosthuizen ......................SAF
31. Francesco Molinari ....................ITA
32. Kiradech Aphibarnrat .............. THA
33. Tony Finau ............................... USA
34. Patrick Cantlay ........................ USA
35. Branden Grace...........................SAF
36. Gary Woodland ........................ USA
37. Daniel Berger ........................... USA
38. Matthew Fitzpatrick................ ENG
39. Cameron Smith ........................ AUS
40. Si Woo Kim .............................. KOR
41. Webb Simpson......................... USA
42. Ross Fisher .............................. ENG
43. Kevin Chappell ......................... USA
44. Brendan Steele ........................ USA
45. Li Haotong................................ CHN
Game 1: at Toronto 114, Washington 106
Game 2: at Toronto 130, Washington 119
Game 3: at Washington 122, Toronto 103
Game 4: at Washington 106, Toronto 98
Game 5: at Toronto 108, Washington 98
Game 6: Toronto 102, at Washington 92
Game 1: Columbus 4, at Washington 3 (OT)
Game 2: Columbus 5, at Washington 4 (OT)
Game 3: Washington 3, at Columbus 2 (2OT)
Game 4: Washington 4, at Columbus 1
Game 5: Washington 4, Columbus 3 (OT)
Game 6: Washington 6, at Columbus 3
CELTICS ELIMINATED BUCKS, 4-3
LIGHTNING ELIMINATED DEVILS, 4-1
Game 1: at Tampa Bay 5, New Jersey 2
Game 2: at Tampa Bay 5, New Jersey 3
Game 3: at New Jersey 5, Tampa Bay 2
Game 4: Tampa Bay 3, at New Jersey 1
Game 5: at Tampa Bay 3, New Jersey 1
Game 1: at Boston 113, Milwaukee 107 (OT)
Game 2: at Boston 120, Milwaukee 106
Game 3: at Milwaukee 116, Boston 92
Game 4: at Milwaukee 104, Boston 102
Game 5: at Boston 92, Milwaukee 87
Game 6: at Milwaukee 97, Boston 86
Game 7: at Boston 112, Milwaukee 96
BRUINS ELIMINATED MAPLE LEAFS, 4-3
Game 1: at Boston 5, Toronto 1
Game 2: at Boston 7, Toronto 3
Game 3: at Toronto 4, Boston 2
Game 4: Boston 3, at Toronto 1
Game 5: Toronto 4, at Boston 3
Game 6: at Toronto 3, Boston 1
Game 7: at Boston 7, Toronto 4
76ERS ELIMINATED HEAT, 4-1
Game 1: at Philadelphia 130, Miami 103
Game 2: Miami 113, at Philadelphia 103
Game 3: Philadelphia 128, at Miami 108
Game 4: Philadelphia 106, at Miami 102
Game 5: at Philadelphia 104, Miami 91
PENGUINS ELIMINATED FLYERS, 4-2
CAVALIERS ELIMINATED PACERS, 4-3
Game 1: at Pittsburgh 7, Philadelphia 0
Game 2: Philadelphia 5, at Pittsburgh 1
Game 3: Pittsburgh 5, at Philadelphia 1
Game 4: Pittsburgh 5, at Philadelphia 0
Game 5: Philadelphia 4, at Pittsburgh 2
Game 6: Pittsburgh 8, at Philadelphia 5
Game 1: Indiana 98, at Cleveland 80
Game 2: at Cleveland 100, Indiana 97
Game 3: at Indiana 92, Cleveland 90
Game 4: Cleveland 104, at Indiana 100
Game 5: at Cleveland 98, Indiana 95
Game 6: at Indiana 121, Cleveland 87
Game 7: at Cleveland 105, Indiana 101
WESTERN CONFERENCE
ROCKETS ELIMINATED TIMBERWOLVES, 4-1
Game 1: at Houston 104, Minnesota 101
Game 2: at Houston 102, Minnesota 82
Game 3: at Minnesota 121, Houston 105
Game 4: Houston 119, at Minnesota 100
Game 5: at Houston 122, Minnesota 104
WESTERN CONFERENCE
PREDATORS ELIMINATED AVALANCHE, 4-2
Game 1: at Nashville 5, Colorado 2
Game 2: at Nashville 5, Colorado 4
Game 3: at Colorado 5, Nashville 3
Game 4: Nashville 3, at Colorado 2
Game 5: Colorado 2, at Nashville 1
Game 6: Nashville 5, at Colorado 0
JETS ELIMINATED WILD, 4-1
WARRIORS ELIMINATED SPURS, 4-1
Game 1: at Golden State 113, San Antonio 92
Game 2: at Golden State 116, San Antonio 101
Game 3: Golden State 110, at San Antonio 97
Game 4: at San Antonio 103, Golden State 90
Game 5: at Golden State 99, San Antonio 91
PELICANS ELIMINATED TRAIL BLAZERS, 4-0
Game 1: New Orleans 97, at Portland 95
Game 2: New Orleans 111, at Portland 102
Game 3:at New Orleans 119, Portland 102
Game 4: at New Orleans 131. Portland 123
Game 1: at Winnipeg 3, Minnesota 2
Game 2: at Winnipeg 4, Minnesota 1
Game 3: at Minnesota 6, Winnipeg 2
Game 4: Winnipeg 2, at Minnesota 0
Game 5: at Winnipeg 5, Minnesota 0
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Best of seven; x-If necessary
EASTERN CONFERENCE
PENGUINS AND CAPITALS TIED, 1-1
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Best of seven; x-If necessary
EASTERN CONFERENCE
RAPTORS VS. CAVALIERS
Tuesday’s game: Cleveland at Toronto, 8
Thursday’s game: Cleveland at Toronto, 6
Saturday’s game: Toronto at Cleveland, TBD
Monday’s game: Toronto at Cleveland, TBD
x-Wednesday, May 9: Cleveland at Toronto, TBD
x-Friday, May 11: Toronto at Cleveland, TBD
x-Sunday, May 13: Cleveland at Toronto, TBD
CELTICS LEAD 76ERS, 1-0
Game 1: at Boston 117, Philadelphia 101
Thursday’s game: Philadelphia at Boston, 8:30
Saturday’s game: Boston at Philadelphia, TBD
Monday’s game: Boston at Philadelphia, TBD
x-Wednesday, May 9: Philadelphia at Boston, TBD
x-Friday, May 11: Boston at Philadelphia, TBD
x-Sunday, May 13: Philadelphia at Boston, TBD
WESTERN CONFERENCE
WARRIORS LEAD PELICANS, 1-0
Game 1: at Golden State 123, New Orleans 101
Tuesday’s game: New Orleans at Golden State, 10:30
Friday’s game: Golden State at New Orleans, 8
Sunday’s game: Golden State at New Orleans, 3:30
x-Tuesday, May 8: New Orleans at Golden State, TBD
x-Thursday, May 10: Golden State at New Orleans, TBD
x-Monday, May 14: New Orleans at Golden State, TBD
ROCKETS LEAD JAZZ, 1-0
Game 1: at Houston 110, Utah 96
Wednesday’s game: Utah at Houston, 8
Friday’s game: Houston at Utah, 10:30
Sunday’s game: Houston at Utah, 8
x-Tuesday, May 8: Utah at Houston, TBD
x-Thursday, May 10: Houston at Utah, TBD
x-Monday, May 14: Utah at Houston, TBD
Game 1: Pittsburgh 3, at Washington 2
Game 2: at Washington 4, Pittsburgh 1
Tuesday’s game: Washington at Pittsburgh, 7:30
Thursday’s game: Washington at Pittsburgh, 7
Saturday’s game: Pittsburgh at Washington, 7
x-Monday, May 7: Washington at Pittsburgh, TBD
x-Wednesday, May 9: Pittsburgh at Washington, TBD
BRUINS AND LIGHTNING TIED, 1-1
Game 1: Boston 6, at Tampa Bay 2
Monday’s result: Boston at Tampa Bay, Late
Wednesday’s game: Tampa Bay at Boston, 7
Friday’s game: Tampa Bay at Boston, 7
Sunday’s game: Boston at Tampa Bay, TBD
x-Tuesday, May 8: Tampa Bay at Boston, TBD
x-Thursday, May 10: Boston at Tampa Bay, TBD
WESTERN CONFERENCE
JETS AND PREDATORS TIED, 1-1
Game 1: Winnipeg 4, at Nashville 1
Game 2: at Nashville 5, Winnipeg 4 (2OT)
Tuesday’s game: Nashville at Winnipeg, 8
Thursday’s game: Nashville at Winnipeg, 9:30
Saturday’s game: Winnipeg at Nashville, 9:30
x-Monday’s game: Nashville at Winnipeg, TBD
x-Thursday, May 10: Winnipeg at Nashville, TBD
GOLDEN KNIGHTS AND SHARKS TIED, 1-1
Game 1: at Vegas 7, San Jose 0
Game 2: San Jose 4, at Vegas 3 (2OT)
Monday’s result: Vegas at San Jose, Late
Wednesday’s game: Vegas at San Jose, 10
Friday’s game: San Jose at Vegas, 10
x-Sunday’s game: Vegas at San Jose, TBD
x-Tuesday, May 8: San Jose at Vegas, TBD
Lightning 4, Bruins 2
BOSTON ................................... 1
TAMPA BAY ............................ 1
Celtics 117, 76ers 101
Philadelphia ........................ 22
Boston ................................ 25
PHILADELPHIA
Covington
Saric
Embiid
Redick
Simmons
Belinelli
Ilyasova
McConnell
Anderson
Johnson
Holmes
Bayless
TOTALS
23
31
30
31
26 — 101
30 — 117
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
26:54
0-6 3-3 0-2 1 1
3
33:01 5-11 2-2 5-7 4 2 12
35:01 12-21 5-6 1-13 5 2 31
34:04 7-13 4-5 1-3 3 4 20
41:52 6-11 6-11 0-7 6 4 18
28:02
3-9 4-4 0-1 1 2 11
21:15
2-9 2-4 3-9 2 1
6
6:08
0-1 0-0 1-1 0 0
0
5:16
0-1 0-0 0-2 0 2
0
4:59
0-0 0-0 0-0 0 1
0
1:44
0-1 0-0 0-0 0 0
0
1:44
0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0
0
240 35-83 26-35 11-45 22 19 101
Percentages: FG .422, FT .743. 3-Point Goals: 5-26, .192
(Embiid 2-5, Redick 2-7, Belinelli 1-2, Anderson 0-1,
Ilyasova 0-3, Covington 0-4, Saric 0-4). Team Rebounds:
13. Team Turnovers: 12 (23 PTS). Blocked Shots: 2
(Covington, Simmons). Turnovers: 12 (Simmons 7,
Embiid 3, Ilyasova, Redick). Steals: 7 (Covington 2,
Simmons 2, Embiid, Ilyasova, Saric). Technical Fouls:
None.
BOSTON
Horford
Tatum
Baynes
Rozier
Smart
Morris
Ojeleye
Larkin
Nader
Yabusele
TOTALS
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
32:59 10-12 4-4 0-7 4 3 26
39:38 8-16 11-12 0-3 2 1 28
29:17
2-4 0-0 1-6 1 4
6
34:53 11-18 0-0 2-8 6 2 29
32:09 3-12 1-1 2-3 9 4
9
27:52 5-12 0-0 0-5 1 2 11
21:37
1-4 0-0 0-1 0 1
3
18:07
1-6 2-2 0-3 4 3
5
1:44
0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0
0
1:44
0-1 0-0 0-0 0 1
0
240 41-85 18-19 5-36 27 21 117
Percentages: FG .482, FT .947. 3-Point Goals: 17-36, .472
(Rozier 7-9, Baynes 2-3, Horford 2-3, Smart 2-8, Larkin
1-1, Ojeleye 1-3, Morris 1-4, Tatum 1-5). Team Rebounds: 8. Team Turnovers: 10 (16 PTS). Blocked Shots:
4 (Baynes, Morris, Rozier, Tatum). Turnovers: 10 (Tatum
4, Horford 2, Rozier 2, Baynes, Smart). Steals: 4 (Rozier
2, Ojeleye, Smart). Technical Fouls: None.
Cavaliers 105, Pacers 101
Sunday
Indiana ................................ 19
Cleveland ............................ 31
INDIANA
Bogdanovic
T.Young
Turner
Collison
Oladipo
Sabonis
Joseph
Stephenson
Booker
TOTALS
24
23
31
22
27 — 101
29 — 105
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
37:02
1-9 0-0 0-0 2 5
3
37:37 6-13 1-2 5-10 4 3 14
25:03
2-3 4-5 1-4 0 6
8
40:26 9-13 4-4 0-1 2 3 23
41:27 10-21 6-9 0-12 6 1 30
26:01 3-10 4-4 3-5 0 6 10
13:23
1-3 0-0 0-1 1 1
3
11:57
3-6 0-0 0-1 0 2
8
7:04
1-2 0-0 1-3 0 1
2
240 36-80 19-24 10-37 15 28 101
Percentages: FG .450, FT .792. 3-Point Goals: 10-31, .323
(Oladipo 4-9, Stephenson 2-4, Joseph 1-2, Collison 1-3,
T.Young 1-3, Bogdanovic 1-7, Booker 0-1, Sabonis 0-1,
Turner 0-1). Team Rebounds: 9. Team Turnovers: 11 (11
PTS). Blocked Shots: 0. Turnovers: 11 (Bogdanovic 3,
Collison 2, Oladipo 2, T.Young 2, Joseph, Sabonis).
Steals: 6 (Oladipo 3, Bogdanovic, Collison, T.Young).
CLEVELAND
James
Love
Thompson
Korver
Smith
Green
Hill
Nance Jr.
Clarkson
Hood
Calderon
TOTALS
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
43:25 16-25 11-15 3-9 7 4 45
32:15 5-12 0-0 3-6 2 5 14
34:54
5-6 5-6 5-10 1 2 15
22:38
1-7 0-0 0-3 2 2
3
35:16 3-10 2-2 2-3 2 3 11
21:27
1-5 3-4 0-1 1 2
5
19:12
1-3 9-11 1-6 3 0 11
12:44
0-2 1-2 0-4 0 2
1
10:55
0-4 0-0 1-1 0 0
0
7:14
0-0 0-0 0-1 0 1
0
0:00
0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0
0
240 32-74 31-40 15-44 18 21 105
Percentages: FG .432, FT .775. 3-Point Goals: 10-29, .345
(Love 4-7, Smith 3-9, James 2-3, Korver 1-5, Clarkson
0-1, Green 0-2, Hill 0-2). Team Rebounds: 10. Team
Turnovers: 12 (15 PTS). Blocked Shots: 4 (Green, Hill,
Smith, Thompson). Turnovers: 12 (James 4, Thompson
3, Clarkson, Hill, Korver, Love, Smith). Steals: 6 (James
4, Green, Thompson).
L O C A L GOLF
JEFFERSON DISTRICT
George Bishop won fight A with a net score of 32, and Joe
Metzler won flight B with a net score of 23. John Wagner
won closest to the pin on hole No. 3, and Dick Prosser
won closest to the pin on hole No. 7. Fred Fulton won low
gross with a score of 38.
PAINT BRANCH
Charles Jackman, Gerald Grimes, James C. Thomas and
Paul Ray Prather won first place in the senior men’s
league with a 27. Joe Corson was closest to the pin on
hole No. 2, and Jack Dunn was closest to the pin on hole
No. 7.
0
1
1 —
2 —
2
4
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Tampa Bay, Gourde 2 (Point, Sergachev),
11:47 (pp). 2, Boston, McAvoy 1 (Marchand, Bergeron),
18:30.
SINGLES
FIRST ROUND
Pedro Sousa, Portugal, def. Gilles Simon, France, 6-3,
4-6, 7-6 (7-4); Alex de Minaur, Australia, def. Gastao
Elias, Portugal, 6-3, 6-1; Frances Tiafoe, United States,
def. Tennys Sandgren, United States, 3-6, 7-6 (7-5), 7-6
(7-4).
DOUBLES
FIRST ROUND
Kyle Edmund and Cameron Norrie, Britain, def. Federico
Delbonis and Nicolas Kicker, Argentina, 6-4, 6-0.
ISTANBUL OPEN
At Garanti Koza Arena in Istanbul
Purse: $516,800 (WT250)
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
SINGLES
FIRST ROUND
Laslo Djere, Serbia, def. Denis Istomin, Uzbekistan, 7-6
(7-5), 7-6 (8-6); Viktor Troicki (6), Serbia, def. Bernard
Tomic, Australia, 3-6, 6-0, 7-5; Marco Trungelliti, Argentina, def. Elias Ymer, Sweden, 4-6, 6-3, 6-2; Paolo Lorenzi
(5), Italy, def. Cem Ilkel, Turkey, 6-2, 6-3; Taro Daniel,
Japan, def. Matteo Berrettini, Italy, 7-5, 6-3.
BAVARIAN INTERNATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS
At MTTC Iphitos in Munich
Purse: $608,000 (WT250)
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
SINGLES
FIRST ROUND
Yannick Hanfmann, Germany, def. Marcos Baghdatis,
Cyprus, 6-2, 6-4; Matthias Bachinger, Germany, def.
Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, 7-6 (10-8), 3-6, 6-3;
Martin Klizan, Slovakia, def. Florian Mayer, Germany,
3-6, 6-4, 6-3.
$1,036,800
Horschel/Piercy (400) .............. 65 73 61 67
$417,600
Dufner/Perez (163) .................. 66 72 61 68
$273,600
Oosthuizn/Schwrtzl (105) ....... 66 72 62 68
$216,900
Garnett/Hadley (83) ................ 64 73 61 71
Fleetwood/Paisley (83/0) ........ 62 75 63 69
$172,800
Finau/Summerhays (68) .......... 62 72 63 73
$127,200
Duncan/Schenk (54) ................ 64 72 64 71
Cantlay/Reed (54) .................... 65 71 66 69
Knox/Laird (54) ........................ 64 73 63 71
$73,512
Chalmers/Percy (39) ................ 66 72 65 69
de Jonge/Merritt (39) .............. 62 75 62 73
Hearn/Power (39) .................... 66 72 66 68
Lovemark/Steele (39) .............. 64 71 66 71
Henry/Hoge (39) ...................... 62 73 65 72
$43,830
Lashley/Oppenheim (24) ......... 64 69 68 72
Byrd/Johnson (24) ................... 66 70 65 72
Brown/Kisner (24) ................... 62 70 64 77
Kim/Putnam (24) ..................... 62 69 66 76
$31,680
Goosen/Van Aswegen (17) ...... 65 71 64 74
Rose/Stenson (17) ................... 65 71 65 73
Campbell/Jones (17) ................ 63 70 70 71
$23,088
Glover/Reavie (11) ................... 60 75 67 73
McDowell/Poulter (11) ............ 65 71 66 73
Kim/Yun (11) ............................ 66 69 67 73
$17,592
Dahmen/McCarthy (8) ............. 68 71 62 75
Lindheim/Werenski (8) ............ 64 71 69 72
O'Hair/Walker (8) .................... 64 73 66 73
$16,200
Harrington/Lowry (6) .............. 63 75 68 71
Stroud/Stuard (6) .................... 68 71 66 72
Kuchar/Watson (6) .................. 68 67 68 74
$15,336
Mullinax/Randolph (4) ............. 65 73 67 73
Hoffman/Watney (4) ............... 65 72 65 76
Cejka/Crane (4) ........................ 64 74 66 74
$14,616
Gribble/Peterson (3) ................ 66 68 69 76
Day/Ruffels (3/0) .................... 64 74 67 74
$14,184
Huh/Kang (3) ........................... 66 73 65 77
DOUBLES
FIRST ROUND
— 266 -22
— 267 -21
Scoring: 3, Tampa Bay, Johnson 3 (Palat, Point), 10:14.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Tampa Bay, Palat 2 (Point), 14:08. 5, Boston,
Krug 3 (Pastrnak, Marchand), 15:58. 6, Tampa Bay, Point
2 (Hedman), 19:34.
— 269 -19
— 269 -19
— 270 -18
— 271 -17
— 271 -17
— 271 -17
—
—
—
—
—
272
272
272
272
272
-16
-16
-16
-16
-16
—
—
—
—
273
273
273
273
-15
-15
-15
-15
— 274 -14
— 274 -14
— 274 -14
— 275 -13
— 275 -13
— 275 -13
— 276 -12
— 276 -12
— 276 -12
— 277 -11
— 277 -11
— 277 -11
— 278 -10
— 278 -10
— 278 -10
— 279
— 279
-9
-9
— 281
-7
LPGA Tour
SHOTS ON GOAL
BOSTON ................................... 8
5
7 — 20
TAMPA BAY .......................... 10
8
13 — 31
Power-play opportunities: Boston 0 of 3; Tampa Bay 1 of
4. Goalies: Boston, Rask 5-3 (30 shots-27 saves). Tampa
Bay, Vasilevskiy 4-2 (20-18). A: 19,092 (19,092). T: 2:36.
Predators 5, Jets 4 (2OT)
Late Sunday
0
2
2
1
0
0
0 — 4
1 — 5
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Nashville, Johansen 3 (Subban, Forsberg),
0:27. 2, Winnipeg, Byfuglien 1 (Scheifele), 12:47. 3,
Winnipeg, Scheifele 7 (Laine, Stastny), 13:16 (pp).
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Nashville, Subban 1 (Arvidsson, Forsberg),
5:04 (pp). 5, Nashville, Arvidsson 3 (Ellis, Forsberg),
18:41.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 6, Winnipeg, Tanev 3 (Little), 5:11. 7, Nashville,
Johansen 4 (Arvidsson), 5:45. 8, Winnipeg, Scheifele 8
(Wheeler, Byfuglien), 18:55.
SECOND OVERTIME
Scoring: 9, Nashville, Fiala 3 (Turris, Smith), 5:37.
SHOTS ON GOAL
—
WINNIPEG ................... 9 13 14 12
2
50
—
NASHVILLE .................. 9
9
7 13
3
41
Power-play opportunities: Winnipeg 1 of 4; Nashville 1
of 4. Goalies: Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 5-2 (41 shots-36
saves). Nashville, Rinne 5-3 (50-46). A: 17,274 (17,113).
T: 3:42.
STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS LEADERS
Through Sunday’s games
GOALS
Name Team .............................................. GP
Mark Scheifele Winnipeg............................ 7
Sidney Crosby Pittsburgh ........................... 8
Jake Guentzel Pittsburgh ........................... 8
Alex Ovechkin Washington ........................ 8
Jake DeBrusk Boston .................................. 8
Sean Couturier Philadelphia ....................... 5
Nikita Kucherov Tampa Bay........................ 6
Evgeny Kuznetsov Washington.................. 8
David Pastrnak Boston ............................... 8
Logan Couture San Jose.............................. 6
Filip Forsberg Nashville .............................. 8
Ryan Johansen Nashville............................ 8
Alex Killorn Tampa Bay............................... 6
G
8
7
7
7
6
5
5
5
5
4
4
4
4
ASSISTS
Name Team...............................................GP
David Pastrnak Boston ............................... 8
Jake Guentzel Pittsburgh ........................... 8
Brad Marchand Boston ............................... 8
Patrice Bergeron Boston ............................ 7
John Carlson Washington .......................... 8
Sidney Crosby Pittsburgh........................... 8
David Krejci Boston .................................... 8
Torey Krug Boston ...................................... 8
Mitchell Marner Toronto ............................ 7
Reilly Smith Vegas ..................................... 6
Nicklas Backstrom Washington ................. 8
Dustin Byfuglien Winnipeg ........................ 7
Kris Letang Pittsburgh ............................... 8
A
12
10
9
8
8
8
7
7
7
7
6
6
6
SHOTS
Name Team .............................................. GP
Alex Ovechkin Washington ........................ 8
Filip Forsberg Nashville .............................. 8
Evgeny Kuznetsov Washington ................. 8
Roman Josi Nashville ................................. 8
David Pastrnak Boston ............................... 8
Viktor Arvidsson Nashville......................... 8
Patrice Bergeron Boston ............................ 7
Nathan MacKinnon Colorado ...................... 6
Torey Krug Boston ...................................... 8
S
40
34
34
32
29
28
28
28
27
PLUS/MINUS
Name Team ............................................... GP
Jake Guentzel Pittsburgh ............................ 8
Olli Maatta Pittsburgh................................. 8
Patrice Bergeron Boston.............................. 7
Mattias Ekholm Nashville ........................... 8
Zdeno Chara Boston..................................... 8
Sidney Crosby Pittsburgh ............................ 8
Justin Schultz Pittsburgh............................ 8
Brad Marchand Boston ................................ 8
+/10
9
8
8
7
7
7
6
Mirza Basic, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and Marton Fucsovics,
Hungary, def. Yuichi Sugita, Japan, and Mischa Zverev,
Germany, 6-3, 6-4; Kevin Krawietz and Maximilian
Marterer, Germany, def. Jurgen Melzer, Austria, and
Philipp Petzschner, Germany, 7-6 (9-7), 5-7, 10-8.
THE TOP 10
EASTERN
W
New York City FC .............6
Atlanta United FC ............6
Orlando City .....................5
New England ....................4
Columbus .........................4
New York .........................4
Chicago ............................2
Philadelphia .....................2
Montreal ..........................2
D.C. United .......................1
Toronto FC .......................1
L
1
1
2
2
3
3
3
3
6
4
4
T PTS
2
20
1
19
1
16
2
14
2
14
0
12
2
8
2
8
0
6
2
5
1
4
GF
19
21
16
13
13
17
11
6
10
8
6
GA
10
9
13
8
10
10
12
10
21
13
13
WESTERN
W
Sporting KC ......................5
Los Angeles FC ................5
Vancouver ........................4
Dallas ...............................3
LA Galaxy .........................3
Real Salt Lake ..................3
Minnesota United ............3
Houston ...........................2
Colorado ...........................2
Portland ...........................2
San Jose ...........................1
Seattle .............................1
L
2
2
4
1
4
4
5
3
3
3
4
4
T PTS
2
17
0
15
1
13
3
12
1
10
1
10
0
9
2
8
2
8
2
8
2
5
1
4
GF
20
17
10
10
10
9
11
15
10
12
12
5
GA
12
13
17
6
13
16
16
11
10
14
15
9
PRAGUE OPEN
At TK Sparta Praha in Prague, Czech Republic
Purse: $226,750 (Intl.)
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
SINGLES
FIRST ROUND
Sam Stosur, Australia, def. Daria Gavrilova (4), Australia, 6-3, 4-6 retired; Tamara Korpatsch, Germany, def.
Oceane Dodin, France, 6-2, 7-5; Katerina Siniakova (8),
Czech Republic, def. Andrea Petkovic, Germany, 6-2, 7-6
(7-4); Wang Qiang, China, def. Viktoria Kuzmova,
Slovakia, 7-6 (7-4), 6-1; Natalia Vikhlyantseva, Russia,
def. Carina Witthoeft, Germany, 6-4, 6-4; Anna Karolina
Schmiedlova, Slovakia, def. Heather Watson, Britain,
6-1, 6-3; Ekaterina Alexandrova, Russia, def. Richel
Hogenkamp, Netherlands, 7-6 (7-5), 6-1.
DOUBLES
FIRST ROUND
Desirae Krawczak, United States, and Giuliana Olmos,
Mexico, def. Shuko Aoyama and Miyu Kato (4), Japan,
6-2, 2-6, 10-6; Andrea Sestini Hlavackhova and Renata
Voracova (1), Czech Republic, def. Alona Fomina and
Valentyna Ivakhnenko, Russia, 6-4, 6-0; Mihaela Buzarnescu, Romania, and Lidziya Marozava, Belarus, def.
Gabriela Dabrowski, Canada, and Ellen Perez, Australia,
6-1, 6-3; Viktoria Kuzmova, Slovakia, and Elena-Gabriela
Ruse, Romania, def. Diana Marcinkevica, Latvia, and
Aliaksandra Sasnovich, Belarus, 4-6, 6-1, 14-12.
Sara Sorribes Tormo, Spain, def. Yulia Putintseva,
Kazakhstan, 7-6 (7-4), 6-0; Johanna Larsson, Sweden,
def. Rebecca Peterson, Sweden, 2-6, 6-3, 6-1; Jana Fett,
Croatia, def. Sachia Vickery, United States, 6-2, 3-6, 6-3;
Kirsten Flipkens, Belgium, def. Petra Martic (3), Croatia,
3-6, 6-2, 6-4; Sara Errani, Italy, def. Zarina Diyas (6),
Kazakhstan, 6-4, 6-4.
— 276 -12
— 276 -12
—
—
—
—
280
280
280
280
-8
-8
-8
-8
—
—
—
—
281
281
281
281
-7
-7
-7
-7
—
—
—
—
283
283
283
283
-5
-5
-5
-5
— 284
— 284
— 284
-4
-4
-4
—
—
—
—
—
285
285
285
285
285
-3
-3
-3
-3
-3
—
—
—
—
—
286
286
286
286
286
-2
-2
-2
-2
-2
— 287
— 287
— 287
-1
-1
-1
—
—
—
—
—
—
288
288
288
288
288
288
E
E
E
E
E
E
— 289 +1
— 289 +1
—
—
—
—
290
290
290
290
+2
+2
+2
+2
— 291 +3
— 291 +3
—
—
—
—
—
291
291
291
291
291
+3
+3
+3
+3
+3
— 292 +4
— 292 +4
— 292 +4
—
—
—
—
—
293
293
293
293
293
+5
+5
+5
+5
+5
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
294
294
294
294
294
294
294
294
+6
+6
+6
+6
+6
+6
+6
+6
— 295 +7
— 295 +7
— 295 +7
— 296 +8
— 296 +8
— 297 +9
— 298 +10
— 299 +11
— 305 +17
— 305 +17
— 305 +17
Anna Blinkova, Russia, and Raluca Olaru, Romania, def.
Oksana Kalashnikova, Georgia, and Bibiane Schoofs (4),
Netherlands, 2-6, 6-3, 10-5; Darija Jurak, Croatia, and
Jessica Moore, Australia, def. Timea Bacsinszky and Jil
Teichmann, Switzerland, 7-6 (7-1), 7-6 (7-4); Georgina
Garcia Perez, Spain, and Fanny Stollar, Hungary, def.
Nicola Geuer, Germany, and Arantxa Rus, Netherlands,
6-2, 6-1; Rebecca Peterson, Sweden, and Sara Sorribes
Tormo, Spain, def. Oumaima Aziz and Diae El Jardi,
Morocco, 6-4, 6-2.
TRANSACTIONS
Team
Riverdale Baptist
Paul VI
St. John’s
Sherwood
Riverside
Lake Braddock
Woodgrove
Dominion
C.H. Flowers
Arundel
Record
26-1
20-4
19-5
14-1
11-2
12-3
12-1
13-2
11-2
14-3
SOFTBALL
Philadelphia 3, D.C. United 2
Atlanta United FC 4, Montreal 1
Chicago 2, Toronto FC 2, tie
Columbus 2, San Jose 1
New England 1, Sporting KC 0
Minnesota United 2, Houston 1
New York 3, LA Galaxy 2
Madison continued to tear through its schedule with
two shutouts last week: 11-0 against Chantilly on
Thursday and 5-0 against Woodgrove on Saturday. . . .
Montgomery County rivals Northwest and Sherwood
continue to keep pace with each other in Maryland 4A.
They meet Monday. . . . Stone Bridge junior Emily
Sappington had three hits, three RBI and a home run in
Saturday’s 11-6 win against Langley. . . . South Lakes
senior Aly Rayle struck out 14 in a 7-0 shutout of McLean
on Friday. The Virginia signee has 190 strikeouts this
season.
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
Orlando City 2, Colorado 1
New York City FC 3, Dallas 1
Los Angeles FC 1, Seattle 0
Rank
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
FRIDAY’S MATCH
Philadelphia at Toronto FC, 8
SATURDAY’S MATCHES
New England at Montreal, 1
New York City FC at New York, 2
Vancouver at Minnesota United, 2
Columbus at Seattle, 4
Dallas at Los Angeles FC, 4
Atlanta United FC at Chicago, 8:30
Colorado at Sporting KC, 8:30
LA Galaxy at Houston, 8:30
Portland at San Jose, 10:30
L
0
1
1
1
2
2
1
3
2
Record
15-0
11-0
11-0
12-1
15-2
12-2
11-1
13-2
12-2
14-3
BASEBALL
NWSL
W
North Carolina .................5
Chicago ............................2
Portland ...........................2
Seattle .............................2
Washington .....................1
Orlando ............................1
Utah .................................0
Houston ...........................0
Sky Blue FC ......................0
Team
Madison
Northwest
Sherwood
Blair
Huntingtown
Woodgrove
Stone Bridge
South Lakes
Northern
McLean
Results
T PTS
1
16
3
9
2
8
1
7
2
5
2
5
4
4
2
2
1
1
GF
11
9
7
4
7
4
3
1
1
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
Chicago 1, Washington 1
North Carolina 2, Houston 0
Seattle 1, Orlando 1
Portland 1, Utah 1
WEDNESDAY’S MATCH
Orlando at Chicago, 7:30
SATURDAY’S MATCHES
GA
4
6
6
3
8
6
4
7
3
MARYLAND
Gaithersburg 11, Magruder 2
La Plata 23, Thomas Stone 1
Leonardtown 11, Chopticon 9
Paint Branch 15, Wheaton 1
PRIVATE
Bishop Ireton 6, Good Counsel 4
Georgetown Day 11, St. Andrew’s 1
Wilson 3, DeMatha 2
SOFTBALL
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Wilson 19, H.D. Woodson 2
MARYLAND
Blair 6, Northwest 2
Calvert 7, Northern 5
Eleanor Roosevelt 13, Riverdale Baptist 0
Quince Orchard 6, Whitman 5
Seneca Valley 13, Springbrook 2
Sherwood 26, Bethesda-Chevy Chase 1
VIRGINIA
James Madison 20, West Potomac 1
Lake Braddock 12, W.T. Woodson 0
PRIVATE
Flint Hill 21, Holton-Arms 0
Good Counsel 20, Bishop Ireton 5
Potomac School 15, Maret 0
BOYS’ LACROSSE
Washington at Utah, 9
Seattle at Portland, 3:30
Houston at Sky Blue FC, 7
MARYLAND
Calvert 17, Leonardtown 6
Churchill 16, Damascus 6
VIRGINIA
Riverside 11, Loudoun County 4
GIRLS’ LACROSSE
NATIONALS ON DECK
vs. Pittsburgh Pirates
Today
7:05 MASN
Tomorrow
7:05 MASN
Thursday
1:05 MASN
MARYLAND
Poolesville 19, Clarksburg 3
VIRGINIA
Freedom-South Riding 13, Patriot 7
St. Stephen’s/St. Agnes 17, Langley 8
BOYS’ SPRING SOCCER
VIRGINIA
Briar Woods 4, Stone Bridge 0
Broad Run 7, Rock Ridge 0
Herndon 3, Falls Church 1
GIRLS’ SPRING SOCCER
VIRGINIA
Tuscarora 3, Champe 1
vs. Philadelphia Phillies
BOYS’ TENNIS
Friday
7:05 MASN
Saturday
4:05 MASN
PRIVATE
Episcopal 7, O’Connell 0
Flint Hill 9, Paul VI 0
St. John’s 9, Bishop Ireton 0
Sunday
1:35 MASN
SPRING GOLF
PRIVATE
Landon 195, Georgetown Prep 182
at San Diego Padres
BOXI NG
Monday
10:10 MASN
May 8
10:10 MASN2
May 9
9:10 MASN2
MLB
Boston Red Sox: Signed 3B Tony Renda to a minor league
contract. Sent RHP Tyler Thornburg to Pawtucket (IL)
for a rehab assignment.
Detroit Tigers: Placed LHP Daniel Norris on the 10-day
DL. Recalled LHP Chad Bell from Toledo (IL).
Kansas City Royals: Optioned LHP Eric Stout to Omaha
(PCL).
Minnesota Twins: Recalled RHP John Curtiss from
Rochester (IL).
Texas Rangers: Placed LHP Martin Perez on the 10-day
DL. Recalled RHP Jose Leclerc from Round Rock (PCL).
Atlanta Braves: Released OF Peter Bourjos.
Colorado Rockies: Placed 2B DJ LeMahieu on the 10-day
DL, retroactive to Saturday. Optioned RHP Jeff Hoffman
to Albuquerque (PCL).
Miami Marlins: Placed RHP Tyler Cloyd on paternity
leave. Reinstated RHP Dan Straily from the 10-day DL.
Washington Nationals: Optioned RHP Austin Voth to
Syracuse (IL). Recalled RHP Wander Suero from Syracuse.
Rank
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
THE TOP 10
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
B AS E BALL
SINGLES
FIRST ROUND
Senior outfielder Matt Day went 2 for 3 with a double
and a walk in Riverdale Baptist’s 4-2 win over Battlefield. . . . Paul VI scored both of its runs in the first inning
and relied on solid defense and Thomas Russell’s arm to
carry it to a 2-0 win over St. John’s. . . . Senior Matt
Rhodes hit a walk-off single to help St. John’s take down
DeMatha, 3-2. . . . Rockville ended Sherwood’s undefeated run with a 4-1 win. . . . Seniors Ryan Baker and Will
Reid each had two hits in Lake Braddock’s 7-1 win over
W.T. Woodson. . . . Woodgrove bounced back from its
first loss, to Freedom-South Riding, by beating Loudoun
County, 2-1. . . . Friday’s 6-2 win over Severna Park was
the fifth in a row for Arundel.
Vancouver 2, Real Salt Lake 0
GRAND PRIX DE SAR
At Royal Club de Tennis in Rabat, Morocco
Purse: $226,750 (Intl.)
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
BASEBALL
FRIDAY’S RESULT
WTA
DOUBLES
FIRST ROUND
At Lake Merced Golf Club in Daly City, Calif.
Purse: $1.5 million
Yardage: 6,551; Par 72
(x-won on first playoff hole)
Final
$225,000
x-Lydia Ko, ............................... 68 70 67 71
$137,536
Minjee Lee, .............................. 70 70 68 68
$72,476
Angel Yin, ................................ 73 69 71 67
Shanshan Feng, ....................... 73 71 68 68
Charley Hull, ............................ 69 68 73 70
Jessica Korda, .......................... 68 67 71 74
$35,956
Caroline Masson, ..................... 72 69 72 68
Aditi Ashok, ............................. 73 71 68 69
Nasa Hataoka, ......................... 71 69 72 69
Ariya Jutanugarn , ................... 71 72 68 70
$25,620
Brittany Altomare, .................. 76 68 73 66
Carlota Ciganda, ...................... 70 74 69 70
Ryann O'Toole, ........................ 70 71 69 73
Moriya Jutanugarn, ................. 71 68 71 73
$20,682
Jaye Marie Green , ................... 70 72 73 69
Celine Boutier, ......................... 72 70 71 71
Mariajo Uribe, .......................... 71 71 68 74
$17,349
Su Oh, ...................................... 68 72 75 70
Jenny Shin, .............................. 72 72 70 71
Mi Hyang Lee, .......................... 72 70 71 72
So Yeon Ryu, ............................ 70 70 73 72
Annie Park, .............................. 70 66 75 74
$14,398
Nelly Korda, ............................. 72 70 75 69
Michelle Wie, ........................... 74 72 69 71
Caroline Hedwall, .................... 68 74 73 71
Jacqui Concolino, ..................... 72 69 74 71
Mo Martin, ............................... 70 71 71 74
$12,299
Azahara Munoz, ....................... 73 73 73 68
Mariah Stackhouse, ................. 73 72 72 70
Celine Herbin, .......................... 69 73 74 71
$10,278
Lizette Salas, ........................... 72 74 73 69
Lexi Thompson, ....................... 69 75 74 70
Inbee Park, ............................... 72 71 75 70
Emma Talley, ........................... 74 72 71 71
Amy Olson, .............................. 71 73 72 72
Haeji Kang, ............................... 71 75 67 75
$8,697
Jin Young Ko, ........................... 72 73 72 72
Sei Young Kim, ........................ 69 70 75 75
$7,681
In-Kyung Kim, .......................... 68 78 73 71
Sandra Changkija, .................... 70 74 74 72
Candie Kung, ............................ 75 70 70 75
Hee Young Park, ...................... 71 71 73 75
$6,185
Giulia Molinaro, ....................... 73 73 72 73
Brooke M. Henderson,
.............. 72 71 75 73
....................................
Ayako Uehara, ......................... 71 72 75 73
Bronte Law, ............................. 76 70 70 75
Katie Burnett, .......................... 71 75 70 75
Eun-Hee Ji, .............................. 71 74 71 75
Yu Liu, ...................................... 72 73 69 77
$5,120
Sandra Gal, .............................. 75 69 76 72
Cheyenne Woods, .................... 75 69 75 73
Alena Sharp, ............................ 72 73 71 76
$4,518
Tiffany Chan, ........................... 71 75 75 72
Vicky Hurst, ............................. 71 72 78 72
Catriona Matthew, .................. 74 72 74 73
Cristie Kerr, ............................. 73 73 72 75
Danielle Kang, .......................... 71 75 72 75
$3,680
Sydnee Michaels, ..................... 74 72 75 73
Lee-Anne Pace, ........................ 74 70 77 73
Maria Hernandez, .................... 73 73 74 74
Hye Yong Choi, ......................... 75 70 74 75
Hannah Green, ......................... 73 71 75 75
Caroline Inglis, ......................... 70 73 76 75
Peiyun Chien, ........................... 72 70 77 75
Perrine Delacour, ..................... 70 71 72 81
$3,238
Laetitia Beck, ........................... 73 73 76 73
Jeong Eun Lee, ......................... 71 74 77 73
Dani Holmqvist, ....................... 70 73 76 76
$3,050
Juli Inkster, .............................. 72 71 77 76
Tiffany Joh, .............................. 72 72 73 79
$2,975
Emily K. Pedersen, ................... 72 74 77 74
$2,936
Jane Park, ................................ 70 76 77 75
$2,899
Karine Icher, ............................ 70 72 78 79
$2,826
Lauren Coughlin, ...................... 75 71 80 79
Katelyn Dambaugh , ................ 72 73 80 80
Youngin Chun, .......................... 72 74 78 81
H I GH S C HOOLS
— 268 -20
MEDIHEAL CHAMPIONSHIP
SECOND PERIOD
WINNIPEG ................... 2
NASHVILLE .................. 1
At Clube de Tenis do Estoril in Estoril, Portugal
Purse: $608,000 (WT250)
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
At TPC Louisiana in Avondale, La.
Purse: $7.2 million
Yardage: 7,425; Par 72
Final
Game 1: at Vegas 1, Los Angeles 0
Game 2: at Vegas 2, Los Angeles 1 (2OT)
Game 3: Vegas 3, at Los Angeles 2
Game 4: Vegas 1, at Los Angeles 0
SOCCER
MLS
ESTORIL OPEN
ZURICH CLASSIC OF NEW ORLEANS
GOLDEN KNIGHTS ELIMINATED KINGS, 4-0
Game 1: San Jose 3, at Anaheim 0
Game 2: San Jose 3, at Anaheim 2
Game 3: at San Jose 8, Anaheim 1
Game 4: at San Jose 2, Anaheim 1
Game 1: at Oklahoma City 116, Utah 108
Game 2: Utah 102, at Oklahoma City 95
Game 3: at Utah 115, Oklahoma City 102
Game 4: at Utah 113, Oklahoma City 96
Game 5: at Oklahoma City 107, Utah 99
Game 6: at Utah 96, Oklahoma City 91
ATP
9.43
9.39
8.49
8.49
7.31
7.09
6.49
6.35
5.50
5.42
5.41
5.31
5.29
5.23
5.18
4.81
4.71
4.66
4.47
4.33
4.01
3.95
3.80
3.74
3.73
3.41
3.39
3.37
3.35
3.28
3.23
3.20
3.15
3.08
3.05
2.98
2.88
2.85
2.83
2.83
2.80
2.79
2.60
2.59
2.58
PGA Tour
SHARKS ELIMINATED DUCKS, 4-0
JAZZ ELIMINATED THUNDER, 4-2
TENNIS
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM)
Fight Schedule
WEDNESDAY
At Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand, Wanheng Menayothin
vs. Leroy Estrada, 12, for Menayothin’s WBC minimumweight title.
Owned and Operated by
Professional Engineers since 1993
NFL
NFL: Suspended Minnesota Cayleb Jones for the first
four games of the 2018 regular season for violating the
NFL policy on performance-enhancing substances.
Arizona Cardinals: Agreed to terms with FB Austin
Ramesh; DE Alec James; QB Chad Kanoff; PK Matt
McCrane; DT Owen Obasuyi; TEs Alec Bloom and Andrew
Vollert; Ss A.J. Howard, Jonathan Owens and Zeke
Turner; CBs Elijah Battle, Deatrick Nichols and Tavierre
Thomas; OL Will House, Austin Olsen and Brant Weiss;
LBs Matthew Oplinger, Dennis Gardeck, Frank Ginda and
Mike Needham; and WRs Trent Sherfield, Jalen Tolliver,
Jonah Trinnaman and Corey Willis.
Cincinnati Bengals: Waived LBs Carl Bradford and
Connor Harris.
Cleveland Browns: Signed QB Joel Stave. Exercised their
fifth-year option on DB Damarious Randall. Waived WR
Matt Hazel, DB Kai Nacua and WR Kasen Williams.
Green Bay Packers: Released QB Joe Callahan.
Houston Texans: Re-signed RB Alfred Blue. Released TE
Zach Conque, CB Bryce Jones, TE Ryan Malleck and LB
Gimel President.
Jacksonville Jaguars: Released P Brad Nortman and WR
Jaelen Strong. Signed OL Tony Adams; DT Michael
Hughes; DE Lyndon Johnson; OT KC McDermott, S C.J.
Reavis; WRs Allen Lazard and Dorren Miller; CBs Dee
Delaney, Tre Herndon and Quenton Meeks; and LBs
Reggie Hunter, Darius Jackson and Andrew Motuapuaka.
Minnesota Vikings: Re-signed CB Terence Newman.
Exercised their fifth-year option on CB Trae Waynes.
Agreed to terms with DE Jonathan Wynn, QB Peter
Pugals, FB Kamryn Pettway, S Tray Matthews, DT Curtis
Cothran, G Chris Gonzalez, TE Tyler Hoppes, RBs Mike
Boone and Roc Thomas, CBs Holton Hill and Trevon
Mathis, LBs Garrett Dooley and Hercules Mata’afa and
WRs Jeff Badet, Armanti Foreman, Korey Robertson and
Jake Wieneke.
Tampa Bay Buccaneers: Waived OT Avery Young. Agreed
to terms with QB Austin Allen, OL Cole Boozer, FB/TE
Tanner Hudson, PK Trevor Moore, RB Shaun Wilson, Ss
Godwin Igwebuike and Josh Liddell, WRs Sergio Bailey
and Ervin Phillips, TEs Donnie Ernsberger and Jason
Reese and DEs Demone Harris, Evan Perrizo and Antonio
Simmons.
Tennessee Titans: Waived QB Alex Tanney, DL Johnny
Maxey and RB Khalfani Muhammad.
Washington Redskins: Released DL A.J. Francis, Montori
Hughes and Terrell McClain. Waived TE Chris Bazile, LB
Cassanova McKinzy and DB James Sample.
EVERY TIME IT RAINS
F LO O D
WAT E R S I N VA D E
BASEMENTS.
A wet basement is a real nuisance, smelling musty and
ruining furniture, appliances, and important valuables.
It can also present a health hazard as a breeding ground
for mold and other destructive conditions that effect
the structural integrity of your home, and your health!
NO PAYMENT OR INTEREST FOR 18 MONTHS!*
NHL
Carolina Hurricanes: Terminated the contract of president of hockey operations Ron Francis. Announced the
resignation of pro scout and adviser Joe Nieuwendyk.
Toronto Maple Leafs: Announced general manager Lou
Lamoriello will leave that role next season and transition to senior adviser.
COLLEGES
Columbia International: Named Tony Stockman men’s
basketball coach.
Nebraska: Announced junior men’s basketball G Dachon
Burke is transferring from Robert Morris.
Pennsylvania: Promoted associate athletic director for
operations Scott Ward to senior associate athletic
director/chief operations officer.
Winthrop: Named Jayson Gee associate head men’s
basketball coach.
Call JES Foundation Repair for a Free
Foundation Inspection, Consultation, and Estimate.
MD:
301-985-2256
VA:
703-382-8450
*Financing offer good at time of Free Inspection. Subject to qualifying credit approval. Interest accrues during the promotional period but
all interest is waived if the purchase amount is paid before the expiration of the promotional period. Financing for GreenSky consumer
credit programs is provided by federally insured, federal and state chartered financial institutions without regard to race, color, religion,
national origin, sex or familial status. Not to be combined with any other offer.
VA 2705068655
MHIC 50637
EFGHI
N
JOBS
820
JOBS
820
Official Notices
Official Notices
MONTGOMERY COUNTY
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
Notice is hereby given that a public hearing, pursuant to Section 147(f)
of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, will be held by
Montgomery County, Maryland (the “County”) to permit any resident
of the County to appear and testify concerning the plan of finance
(the “Plan of Finance”) pursuant to which the County would issue
up to $35,000,000 of its Economic Development Revenue Bonds (the
“Bonds”) in one or more series at one time or from time to time for
the benefit of Friends House Retirement Community, Inc., a nonstock
Maryland corporation (the “Institution”). The hearing will be held on
Tuesday, May 15, 2018, at 10:00 am at the Executive Office Building,
15th Floor, Large Conference Room, 101 Monroe Street, Rockville,
Maryland.
Newspapers carriers
needed to deliver
The Washington Post
in
DC, MD and VA area.
Great part-time income opportunity!
Transportation required.
To apply, go to
deliverthepost.com
815
815
Legal Notices
Legal Notices
Department of Justice
Antitrust Division
Take notice that the United States has filed a proposed Final Judgment
in a civil antitrust case in the United States District Court for the
District of Columbia, United States of America v. Martin Marietta
Materials, Inc. et al., Civil Action No. 1:18-cv-00973. On April 25,
2018, the United States filed a Complaint alleging that Martin Marietta
Materials, Inc.’s proposed acquisition of Panadero Corp. and Panadero
Aggregates Holdings, LLC, including subsidiary Bluegrass Materials
Company, LLC, would violate Section 7 of the Clayton Act, 15
U.S.C. § 18. The proposed Final Judgment, filed at the same time
as the Complaint, requires that Defendants divest the lease to
Martin Marietta’s Forsyth Quarry, located in Suwanee, Georgia, and
Bluegrass’s Beaver Creek quarry, located in Hagerstown, Maryland,
and related assets. A Competitive Impact Statement filed by the
United States describes the Complaint, the proposed Final Judgment,
the industry, and the remedies available to private litigants who may
have been injured by the alleged violation.
Copies of the Complaint, proposed Final Judgment, and Competitive
Impact Statement are available for inspection on the Antitrust
Division’s website at http://www.justice.gov/atr and at the Office
of the Clerk of the United States District Court for the District of
Columbia.
Interested persons may address comments to Maribeth Petrizzi,
Chief, Defense, Industrials, and Aerospace Section, Antitrust Division,
Department of Justice, 450 Fifth Street N.W., Suite 8700, Washington,
D.C. 20530 (telephone: 202-307-0924) within 60 days of the date of
this notice. Such comments, including the name of the submitter, and
responses thereto, will be posted on the Antitrust Division’s website,
filed with the Court, and, under certain circumstances, published in
the Federal Register.
1405
C
Cars
CADILLAC
CADILLAC 1997 Sedan wht/ blue lthr,
MD insp, only 52K very pretty $4999.
Auto
Plaza
301-340-1390
JOBS
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers are needed
to deliver
FORD
The Washington
Post
FORD 2007 TAURUS SE - 4 door,
auto, sky blue, exc cond, AC,
181k miles, clean, runs well. $950
Call 240-645-6767
for the following
areas:
LEXUS
For routes in
LEXUS 2004 ES 330 1 owner,
like new, MD insp, 113k. $7000s fee.
Auto
Plaza
301-340-1390
Fairfax, VA
TOYOTA
Call
703-323-4987
TOYOTA 2009 YARIS - 2dr htchbck,
MD insp, new tires. $5199 No process
fee. Auto Plaza 301-340-1390
VOLKSWAGEN
Excellent part-time
income!
Reliable transportation
required.
VOLKSWAGEN 2016 Jetta 1.8T Sport.
Nav, SiriusXM, Apple Carplay, Alloy
Wheels, ABS, Cruise Control, Halogen Lights, Fog Lights, Heated front 820
seats. Red ext. w/ black/ceramique
leatherette. Looks & drives like new!
Notice is hereby given that the
23K mi. $15,200/OBO. 703-309-2344.
following named company at the
address listed herewith has
1447
made application to engage in
the business of loaning money
DONATE AUTOS, TRUCKS, RV'S.
for the license year ending
LUTHERAN MISSION SOCIETY. Your
December 31, 2018 as provided
donation helps local families with
by the Act of Congress, approved
food, clothing, shelter, counseling.
February 14, 1913. Anyone desirTax deductible. MVA License
ing to protest against the
#W1044. 410-636-0123 or
issuance of this license should
www.LutheranMissionSociety.org
do so in writing to the Commissioner of the Department of
1490
Insurance, Securities and Banking, 810 First Street, NE, Suite
CHEVY ’05 Equinox AWD 3 in Stk, 701, Washington, DC 20002, in
Lthr, Roof, Pre-Strike Prices Starting the manner prescribed by said
@ $17,777.
Act: See DC Code Title 26, Chapdudleymartin.com
888-634-9211 ter 9 and 16 DCMR 2.
HONDA 2007 PILOT EX-L - 4WD, black/
Simplicity Financial Services, LLC
tan int, 171k, lthr, htd seats, SR, C/D,
868 Corporate Way
alloy, new tires/brakes, new cond.
Westlake, OH 44145
Carfax. $5900. Bowie. 240-374-8861
Official Notices
Autos Wanted
Sports Utility Vehicles
Career Training - Emp Svcs
AIRLINES ARE HIRING-Get
FAA approved hands on
Aviation training. Financial aid
for qualified students – Career
placement assistance.
CALL Aviation Institute of
Maintenance
888-896-7869
C
JOBS
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers are needed
to deliver
The Washington
Post
for the following
areas:
For routes in
Bladensburg,
Riverdale and
Lanham, MD
Call Monique
Reddy at
301-728-0459
851
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers are needed
to deliver
The Washington
Post
for the following
areas:
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
DONALD T WASHINGTON
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-14811
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 26th
day of April, 2018 by the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, Maryland and by the
authority thereof, that the sale
made by Kristine D. Brown, William
M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R.
Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner, Philip
S. Shriver, Trustees, of the Real
Property designated as 11913 Saint
Francis Way, Mitchellville, MD
20721, and reported in the above
entitled cause, will be finally
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 29th day
of May, 2018 next; provided a copy
of this Order be inserted in THE
WASHINGTON POST, 1150 15th
Street, Washington, DC, MD in said
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S
once a week for three successive
weeks before the 29th day of May,
2018.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #544
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
May 1, 8, 15, 2018
Herndon and
Reston, VA
Call
703-318-4184
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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
SANDRA GUINN
ALTON LEON GUINN
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 26th
day of April, 2018 by the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, Maryland and by the
authority thereof, that the sale
made by Kristine D. Brown, William
M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R.
Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner, Philip
S. Shriver, Trustees, of the Real
Property designated as 10015 Mike
Road, Fort Washington, MD 20744,
and reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 29th day of May, 2018
next; provided a copy of this Order
be inserted in THE WASHINGTON
POST, 1150 15th Street, Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S once a week for
three successive weeks before the
29th day of May, 2018.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $211,000.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #544
Clerk of the Circuit Court
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
12180203
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-36991
NOTICE
For routes in
SF
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
May 1, 8, 15, 2018
12180204
Aviation, Boats, RVs
Motorcycles Directory
35
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
INITIAL OWNER AND OPERATOR OF FACILITIES: The Institution is and
will be the initial owner and operator of the Project. The Institution is
a nonprofit continuing care retirement community providing housing,
healthcare and related services to seniors in the County.
PROPOSED USE OF FACILITIES: The Community and the Project have
been and/or will be used by the Institution as a continuing care
retirement community.
Interested persons wishing to express their views on the issuance
of the Bonds, the Plan of Finance, or on the nature and location of
the Project proposed to be financed or refinanced will be given an
opportunity to do so at the public hearing. Written comments may
also be given by submitting them to Jacqueline Carter, Montgomery
County Government, Department of Finance, 101 Monroe Street,
Rockville, Maryland 20850, but must be received on or before the date
and time of the hearing.
The Bonds will be limited obligations of the County, the principal
of, premium (if any) upon, and interest on which are payable solely
from revenues to be received in connection with the financing or
refinancing of the Project herein described and from other moneys
available to the County for such purposes. NEITHER THE BONDS NOR
THE INTEREST THEREON SHALL EVER CONSTITUTE AN INDEBTEDNESS
OR CHARGE AGAINST THE GENERAL CREDIT OR TAXING POWERS OF
THE COUNTY WITHIN THE MEANING OF ANY CONSTITUTIONAL OR
CHARTER PROVISION OR STATUTORY LIMITATION AND NEITHER SHALL
EVER CONSTITUTE OR GIVE RISE TO ANY PECUNIARY LIABILITY OF THE
COUNTY.
Dated: May 1, 2018
825
Montgomery County, Maryland
825
Bids & Proposals
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP)
Paul Public Charter School seeks bids for:
I Bathroom Partition and Mirror Replacement: the replacement of
approximately 30 bathroom partitions of various sizes, to also
include removal and disposal of existing partitions. Replacement
of existing mirrors in student bathrooms
I School grounds upgrade: evaluate and upgrade outdoor landscaping and grounds
I Painting: multiple projects to include classrooms, hallways, radiators, and the school auditorium
I Asphalt: two areas for repaving, striping and edging at a total of
approximately 875 square feet
I Door and lock replacements: to include both indoor and outdoor
single and double doors, replacements and new installs. Replacement of existing locking mechanisms on classroom doors, as
needed.
I Kitchen remodel: including two areas, the main school kitchen
and the remodel of a media center into a lunch room.
I Classroom remodel: split one existing copy room into an IT room
and classroom, to include building a wall, accommodating new
wiring, replacing doors, and other accommodations as needed
I LED lighting: to replace all light fixtures throughout the building
with LED grade lights
I Composite wood deck: composite wood deck built over boiler
room, approximately 3,064 square feet
I Replace existing roofing system: prime concrete and install insulation system with SBS modification bituminous system
I Water fountain replacement and installation: remove and replace
existing water fountains with updated models
I Power washing: power wash full exterior of school building
I Teacher desks and student desks: remove and replace classroom
furniture
More information on each project is available by request and building
walk throughs are available by appointment.
Bids are due Thursday, May 10th by 4:00pm to the following location:
Paul Public Charter School
ATTN: Shelby Legel
5800 8th St NW
Washington, DC 20011
slegel@paulcharter.org
PAUL PUBLIC CHARTER SCHOOL
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP)
Paul Public Charter School seeks bids for:
I Chromebooks: (Branded Lenovo, Dell, HP, Acer, ect.) must have 14
inch screens
I Chromebook Carts: (Branded Anywhere cart, Anthro cart, etc)
capacity to hold at least 30 chromebooks.
I Windows PC laptops: (Branded Dell, Lenovo, HP, ect.) must contain
intel processor
I Apple laptops: (Macbook, Macbook Pro, Macbook Air, etc)
I Windows Servers: (tower, rack mounted, etc) will need 2-3 servers
with Windows 2016 licenses. Contractor will setup, migrate and
configure all roles of current servers to Windows 2016 new
servers with replication across servers.
I Intranet: looking for a contractor/consultant to design and help
implement company intranet.
I Mounted Speaker Systems: upgrade of current full-court gym
speaker system is needed along with the installation of a new
speaker system for a dance studio.
I LaserJet Printers: printers must be Google Cloud print ready, and
have USB and ethernet connection.
More information on each project is available by request. Paul Public
Charter School reserves the right to cancel this RFP at any time.
Bids are due Thursday, May 10th by 4:00pm to the following location:
Paul Public Charter School
ATTN: Lamar Hyde
5800 8th St NW
Washington, DC 20011
lhyde@paulcharter.org
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
VALERIE L COOPER
KENNETH T LANDIS, JR
A/K/A KENNETH T LANDIS JR
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-17838
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 26th
day of April, 2018 by the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, Maryland and by the
authority thereof, that the sale
made by Kristine D. Brown, William
M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip
Stone, Thomas J. Gartner, Philip S.
Shriver, Trustees, of the Real Property designated as 17101 Usher
Pl, Upper Marlboro, MD 20772, and
reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 29th day of May, 2018
next; provided a copy of this Order
be inserted in THE WASHINGTON
POST, 1150 15th Street, Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S once a week for
three successive weeks before the
29th day of May, 2018.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $371,000.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #544
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
May 1, 8, 15, 2018
12180206
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
62
SF
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
v.
SHELIA L. MOSES
THOMAS V. MOSES
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-27829
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 23rd
day of April 2018, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 703 Avis
Drive, Upper Marlboro, MD 20774,
will be ratified and confirmed
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the
23rd day of May, 2018, provided a
copy of this NOTICE be published
at least once a week in each of
three successive weeks in some
newspaper of general circulation
published in said County before
the 23rd day of May, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$210,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #544
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
May 1, 8, 15, 2018
12179574
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
ANGEL L. WISE
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-29205
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 26th
day of April, 2018 by the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, Maryland and by the
authority thereof, that the sale
made by Kristine D. Brown, William
M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip
Stone, Thomas J. Gartner, Philip S.
Shriver, Trustees, of the Real Property designated as 15103 North
Berwick Lane, Upper Marlboro, MD
20774, and reported in the above
entitled cause, will be finally
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 29th day
of May, 2018 next; provided a copy
of this Order be inserted in THE
WASHINGTON POST, 1150 15th
Street, Washington, DC, MD in said
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S
once a week for three successive
weeks before the 29th day of May,
2018.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $316,000.00.
SF
Recreational Vehicles
MONTANA 5th Wheel 2018,
42 feet, 5 slides, never used, like
brand new, still under factory
warranty, loaded with options,
$54,000/obo. 443-871-2729
Bids & Proposals
PAUL PUBLIC CHARTER SCHOOL
Home delivery
is convenient.
Sailboats
2003, HOME BUILT SAILBOAT 13'4",
Spirit sail & oars, new jib, w/trailer
very good cond. Prepared by Veteran
$2500 1yr storage Bob 703-625-8111
LOCATION: The Community is and will be located on an approximately
62 acre site at 17340 Quaker Lane, Sandy Spring, Maryland 20860, all
in Montgomery County, Maryland.
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $300,000.00.
Excellent part-time
income!
Reliable transportation
required.
FACILITIES: The Institution currently owns and operates an existing
continuing care retirement community (the “Community”). Upon
completion of the Project (defined below), the Community is expected
to include 195 living units, consisting of 72 independent living cottages
or apartments, 20 rental apartments, 21 assisted living units, and 82
beds in a skilled nursing hall, together with common facilities that
serve the entire Community. The proceeds from the sale of the
Bonds will be loaned by the County to the Institution to be used
by the Institution to finance, refinance or reimburse the costs of
improvements to the Community including, but not limited to, (a)
the renovation and expansion of the Institution’s existing commons
building, (b) the demolition and removal of two vacant cottages, (c) the
construction, furnishing and equipping of approximately fourteen new
residential cottage units and approximately thirty-three residential
apartment units to be located in approximately three buildings, and
(d) other associated site work and development (collectively, the
“Project”). A separate low income tax credit building consisting of 80
units to be operated by Homes for America, Inc. will be located on
the Community site, but such building will not be part of the Project
and none of the proceeds of the Bonds will be used to finance the
building or its site improvements. The Project may also include land
or interests in land, buildings, landscaping, structures, machinery,
equipment, furnishings or other real or personal property located
on the same site as the Community. The proceeds from the sale
of the Bonds may also be used by the Institution to fund a debt
service reserve fund and certain other funds to be established under
the indenture for the Bonds, and to pay certain costs of issuance,
capitalized interest for the Bonds, working capital expenses, and
other related costs. The maximum aggregate principal amount of the
Bonds to be issued with respect to the Project and its related funds
and costs will not exceed $35,000,000.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #544
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
SF
May 1, 8, 15, 2018
12180000
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
EZ
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
11517 Aquarius Court
Fort Washington, MD 20744
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to DIVERSIFIED SETTLEMENT SERVICES, INC.
, Trustee(s), dated January 5, 2011, and recorded among the
Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
in Liber 32366, folio 100, the holder of the indebtedness
secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned
Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the
aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby,
the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
ON,
MAY 17, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED THIRTEEN (13), IN BLOCK LETTERED "A",
IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS FRANKLIN SQUARE, AS
PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS
OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK
W.W.W. 80, AT PLAT 81.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 4.25% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (57635)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
11110 Cranford Drive
Upper Marlboro, MD 20772
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to DIANA R. HARRISON, Trustee(s), dated October
13, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 26240, folio 001, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MAY 10, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED THIRTY-TWO (32) IN A BLOCK LETTERED
"I" IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "SECTION FIVE, NORTH
ROBLEE ACRES (ERRONEOUSLY REFERRED TO AS NORTH
ROBLES ACRES)" AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG
THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK NLP 95 AT PLAT 56.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 5% per annum from the
date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on
all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (41332)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
405 Boyden Street
Upper Marlboro, MD 20774
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to LAWYERS TITLE INSURANCE CORP.,
Trustee(s), dated March 30, 2007, and recorded among the
Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
in Liber 27640, folio 047, the holder of the indebtedness
secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned
Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the
aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby,
the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
ON,
MAY 17, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT "7", BLOCK "B", IN A SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT
ONE, OAK CREEK CLUB LAKE VIEW", AS PER PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, OCTOBER 12, 2004, IN
PLAT BOOK 203, AT PLAT 22.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 4.5% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (55611)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
To place your legal notice in
the Classified section:
Call: 202-334-7007
To place your legal notice in
the Classified section:
Call: 202-334-7007
12177302
12176962 APRIL 24, MAY 1, 8, 2018
12175497 MAY 1, 8, 15, 2018
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE,
MARYLAND
20852
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEES'
SALE
OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
KNOWN AS
KNOWN AS
6403 Blue Sage Lane
3503 28th Parkway
Upper Marlboro, MD 20772
5209 Derby Manor Lane
Temple Hills, MD 20748
Upper Marlboro, MD 20772
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain a certain Deed of Trust to COMMONWEALTH LAND TITLE
Deed of Trust to DAVID A. NEAL, Trustee(s), dated February Deed of Trust to DAVID E. WATERS AND ANTHONY B. OLMERT, INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee(s), dated January 10, 2006,
22, 2010, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE SR. , Trustee(s), dated October 14, 2014, and recorded among and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 31551, folio 156, the the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 24621, folio 270, the holder
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having in Liber 36429, folio 351, the holder of the indebtedness of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby, party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
ON,
MAY 3, 2018 at 11:30AM
MAY 17, 2018 at 10:00 AM
MAY 17, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
ALL
THAT
FEE
SIMPLE
LOT
OF
GROUND
and
improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and described as follows:
described as follows:
LOT 25, IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "CROOM STATION",
LOT 67 IN BLOCK A AS SHOWN ON A PLAT ENTITLED "PLAT described as follows:
OF CORRECTION CLUSTER SUBDIVISION - PLAT SEVEN, LOT NUMBERED TWELVE (12) IN BLOCK NUMBERED (4) AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND
MARLBORO RIDING", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN IN A SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "SECTION 1, HILLCREST RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND IN
GARDENS", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT PLAT BOOK VJ 186 AT PLAT 30.
PLAT BOOK REP 212 AT PLAT 33.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition BOOK BB12 AT PLAT NO. 66.
without either express or implied warranty or representation, The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a without either express or implied warranty or representation, including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, including but not limited to the description, fitness for a particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $45,500.00 payable in certified
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
certified
funds,
shall
be
required
at
the
time
of
sale.
CASH
WILL
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 4.125% per annum from NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within of the purchase price with interest at 4.25% per annum from COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
association dues and assessments that may become due after by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. association dues and assessments that may become due after the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
Trustee's File No. (21112)
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
Trustee's File No. (54076)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
JOHN
E.
DRISCOLL
III,
et
al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
www.hwestauctions.com
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-03069)
www.hwestauctions.com
MAY 1, 8, 15, 2018
12177419
MAY 1, 8, 15, 2018
12177301
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
MAY 1, 8, 15, 2018
e-mail: legalnotices@washpost.com
e-mail: legalnotices@washpost.com
WP 2x1
N
TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2018
WP 2x1
washingtonpost.com/classifieds
CLASSIFIED
D8
www.hwestauctions.com
APRIL 17, 24, MAY 1, 2018
12177202
851
Prince Georges County
OPQRS
EZ
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
SUITE 100
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
KNOWN AS
7814 HANOVER PARKWAY, APARTMENT 102
1501 Southern Avenue
Greenbelt, MD 20770
Oxon Hill, MD 20745
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to PAUL FEIN, Trustee(s), dated October certain Deed of Trust to PAUL SIMONSON AND RON DIVINE,
26, 2005, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE Trustee(s), dated December 10, 2015, and recorded among
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 27538, folio 527, the the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having in Liber 37728, folio 183, the holder of the indebtedness
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby,
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
MAY 17, 2018 at 11:30AM
ON,
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
MAY 10, 2018 at 10:00 AM
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
described as follows:
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
UNIT NUMBERED 359 IN A HORIZONTAL PROPERTY REGIME described as follows:
KNOWN AS "GREENBRIAR CONDOMINIUM - PHASE II", ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
ESTABLISHED BY A CONDOMINIUM DECLARATION DATED RECORDED DECEMBER 30, 2015 IN LIBER 37728, FOLIO
DECEMBER 11, 1975 AND RECORDED DECEMBER 12, 1975, 183.
IN LIBER 4564, AT FOLIO 790, AND AS SHOWN ON A PLAT
OF CONDOMINIUM SUBDIVISION ENTITLED "GREENBRIAR The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
CONDOMINIUM - PHASE II", RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK without either express or implied warranty or representation,
C.E.C. 93, AT PLAT 20 THROUGH 27, INCLUSIVE, AMONG THE including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
TOGETHER WITH THE FACILITIES AND OTHER APPUR- construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
TENANCES TO SAID UNIT, WHICH UNIT AND APPURTE- liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merNANCES HAVE BEEN MORE SPECIFICALLY DEFINED IN THE chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
DECLARATION AFORESAID, ANDINCLUDING THE FEE IN A laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
UNDIVIDED INTEREST IN THE COMMON ELEMENTS OF SAID subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
REGIME APPURTENANT TO SAID UNITS AS SUCH INTEREST which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
IS SET OUT AND DEFINED IN THE SAID DECLARATION AS THE subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
SAME MAY BE LAWFULLY REVISED OR AMENDED FROM TIME record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TO TIME; BEING IN THE 21ST ELECTION DISTRICT.
Said property is subject to a 120 day IRS Right of TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
Redemption.
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
Said property is subject to a prior mortgage.
of the purchase price with interest at 10% per annum from
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
without either express or implied warranty or representation, TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- association dues and assessments that may become due after
chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $1,500.00 payable in certified mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 5.75% on the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured Trustee's File No. (56745)
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
www.hwestauctions.com
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
12175462
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium APRIL 24, MAY 1, 8, 2018
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
KNOWN AS
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
1913 Forest Park Drive
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
District Heights, MD 20747
www.hwestauctions.com
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
MAY 1, 8, 15, 2018
12178662 is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to DEBORAH CURRAN OR LAURA O SULLIVAN,
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe Trustee(s), dated December 6, 2006, and recorded among the
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-02244)
Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
in Liber 27013, folio 140, the holder of the indebtedness
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the
SUITE 100
Substitute Trustees
aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
KNOWN AS
ON,
150 Joyceton Terrace
MAY 3, 2018 at 11:30AM
www.hwestauctions.com
Upper Marlboro, MD 20774
MAY
1,
8,
15,
2018
12177430
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
thereon
situated
in
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
Deed of Trust to MICHAEL LYON, Trustee(s), dated October
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
described as follows:
31, 2012, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 34164, folio 582, the
SUITE 100
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NO. 327, BLOCK
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
B, AS SHOWN ON THE PLAT ENTITLED "PLAT 2, SECTION
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
THREE, PART OF BLOCK "B" FORESTVILLE PARK", WHICH
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
PLAT IS RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
GEORGE'S COUNTY IN BOOK 96, PAGE 67, BEING IN
KNOWN AS
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
THE MELLWOOD (15TH) DISTRICT OF PRINCE GEORGE'S
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
14309 Indian Head Highway
COUNTY.
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
Accokeek, MD 20607
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a without either express or implied warranty or representation,
MAY 17, 2018 at 10:00 AM
certain Deed of Trust to TITLE STREAM, Trustee(s), dated July including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements 16, 2007, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condithereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 28491, folio 599, the tion, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, mateholder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having rials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED TWENTY-EIGHT SIX (28-6), IN BLOCK appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
NUMBERED 62, IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT NO. duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
56, KETTERING", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
BOOK 95, AT PLAT NO. 72.
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
without either express or implied warranty or representation, MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
MAY 10, 2018 at 10:00 AM
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $19,500.00 payable in certified
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
thereon
situated
in
PRINCE
GEORGE'S
COUNTY,
MD
and
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other described as follows:
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.58% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record RECORDED AUGUST 29, 2007 IN LIBER 28491, FOLIO 599.
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of without either express or implied warranty or representation, post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA including but not limited to the description, fitness for a party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
of the purchase price with interest at 4.99% per annum from laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
association dues and assessments that may become due after TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement of the purchase price with interest at 2.06% per annum from or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any association dues and assessments that may become due after The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-06803)
Trustee's File No. (57640)
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris, Robert
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher,
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
mail
and
certified
mail
addressed
to
the
address
provided
by
Substitute Trustees
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
APRIL 17, 24, MAY 1, 2018
12177201
MAY 1, 8, 15, 2018
12176967 Trustee's File No. (52793)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
LEGAL NOTICES
To place your legal notice in
the Classified section:
Call: 202-334-7007
To place your legal notice in
the Classified section:
Call: 202-334-7007
e-mail: legalnotices@washpost.com
WP 2x1
LEGAL NOTICES
www.hwestauctions.com
APRIL 24, MAY 1, 8, 2018
12174737
e-mail: legalnotices@washpost.com
WP 2x1
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
7802 Johnson Avenue
Lanham, MD 20706
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust dated March 9, 2007, and recorded among the
Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
in Liber 27469, folio 563, the holder of the indebtedness
secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned
Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the
aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby,
the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
ON,
MAY 17, 2018 at 11:30AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
ALL THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY IN PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, TO WIT: LOT NUMBERED
TWO (2), BLOCK LETTERED "G" IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN
AS PLAT NUMBERED TWO (2), GLENARDEN WOODS AS PER
PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
PRINCE TH ELECTION GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, IN
PLAT BOOK WWW 30 AT PLAT 43. BEING IN THE 20 DISTRICT
OF SAID COUNTY.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $19,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-13521)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
14936 ASHFORD COURT
Laurel, MD 20707
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE COMPANY,
Trustee(s), dated July 3, 2012, and recorded among the Land
Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber
35180, folio 181, RE-RECORDED MAY 5, 2014 IN LIBER
35963, FOLIO 455, MODIFIED DEC 29, 2016 IN LIBER
38899, FOLIO 453 the holder of the indebtedness secured by
this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED
AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MAY 3, 2018 at 11:30AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY SITUATE IN PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, STATE OF MARYLAND, DESCRIBED AS: BEING KNOWN
AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NO. 58, AS SHOWN ON THE
PLAT ENTITLED, "LOTS 45 THROUGH 97, A RESUBDIVISION
OF "PART OF PLAT A, LARIUM ESTATES, SECTION TWO,
ASHFORD", WHICH PLAT IS RECORDED AMONG THE PLAT
RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, IN
PLAT BOOK NLP 114, FOLIO 21. BEING ALL AND SAME
PREMISES CONVEYED TO SAID MORTGAGORS IN DEED
RECORDED IN BOOK 29505, PAGE 466 IN THE GEORGE'S
COUNTY REGISTRY OF DEEDS.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $24,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (15-20142)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
851
Prince Georges County
851
D9
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
5513 AUTH ROAD
Suitland, MD 20746
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to LYNDE SELDON, Trustee(s), dated December
18, 2015, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 37751, folio 005, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MAY 17, 2018 at 11:30AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, STATE OF MARYLAND AND DESCRIBED
AS FOLLOWS: LOT NUMBERED TEN (10) IN BLOCK LETTERED
"A" IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "SECTION ONE, DARCEY
ESTATES", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE
LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
IN PLAT BOOK WWW 27 AT FOLIO 28. THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON BEING KNOWN AS: 5513 AUTH ROAD, SUITLAND,
MD. 20746.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $25,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.25% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (16-12555)
Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Thomas W. Hodge, Thomas J. Gartner,
Robert M. Oliveri, Erin M. August,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
MAY 1, 8, 15, 2018
12171024
www.hwestauctions.com
APRIL 17, 24, MAY 1, 2018
12176807
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
112 Gray Street
Capitol Heights, MD 20743
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to JAMES H. HUDSON,III, Trustee(s), dated May
29, 2012, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 33695, folio 383, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MAY 10, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT 23, IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS REVISION OF PM
233/17, PLAT THREE, VILLAGES AT PEPPER MILL, PER PLAT
BOOK PM 233/93.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 4% per annum from the
date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on
all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (57775)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
532 Harry S. Truman Drive
Upper Marlboro, MD 20774
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to DAVE VACH, Trustee(s), dated January 2, 2009,
and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 30755, folio 491, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MAY 10, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED SEVENTEEN (17), IN THE SUBDIVISION
KNOWN AS "LOTS 1 THRU 41 AND PARCEL A, SECTION B4, "NORTHHAMPTON", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN
PLAT NLP AT PLAT 17.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 5.25% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
www.hwestauctions.com
Trustee's File No. (35296)
APRIL 24, MAY 1, 8, 2018
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
12174901
LEGAL NOTICES
To place your legal notice in
the Classified section:
Call: 202-334-7007
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APRIL 24, MAY 1, 8, 2018
12175491
e-mail: legalnotices@washpost.com
WP 2x1
TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2018
D10
851
Prince Georges County
OPQRS
851
Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
614 Nova Avenue
Capitol Heights, MD 20743
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust, dated September 1, 2009, and recorded among
the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
in Liber 31100, folio 211, the holder of the indebtedness
secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned
Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the
aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby,
the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
ON,
MAY 17, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOTS 13 AND 14, IN BLOCK 44, IN A SUBDIVISION KNOWN
AS "CAPITOL HEIGHTS", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK A, AT PLAT 76.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 4.125% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (46996)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
2227 Houston Street
Suitland, MD 20746
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION, III,
Trustee(s), dated March 26, 2007, and recorded among the
Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
in Liber 27592, folio 097, the holder of the indebtedness
secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned
Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the
aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby,
the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
ON,
MAY 3, 2018 at 2:30 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT 25, BLOCK C, DUPONT VILLAGE, PLAT WWW18/6. BEING
MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN A DEED DATED 05/16/1988
AND RECORDED 05/17/1988, AMONG THE LAND RECORDS
OF THE COUNTY AND STATE SET FORTH ABOVE, IN DEED
VOLUME 6972 AND PAGE 661.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 4.75% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (58619)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
MAY 1, 8, 15, 2018
12176490
www.hwestauctions.com
APRIL 17, 24, MAY 1, 2018
12173896
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
4815 Parkmont Lane
Upper Marlboro, MD 20772
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to JEFFREY S. YABLON, Trustee(s), dated
November 17, 2004, and recorded among the Land Records
of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 21180,
folio 232, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed
of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees,
by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MAY 3, 2018 at 2:30 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED SIXTEEN (16), IN THE BLOCK LETTERED
"J", (ERRONEOUSLY REFERRED TO AS "3"), IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "SECTION FOUR, NORTH ROBLEE ACRES",
AS PER PLAT RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
PRINCE GEORGES COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK WWW
64, AT PLAT 69.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 4.375% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (59028)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
208 Bonhill Drive
Fort Washington, MD 20744
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to ALAN J. HYATT, Trustee(s), dated August
26, 2015, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 37432, folio 106, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MAY 3, 2018 at 2:30 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED NINE (9), IN BLOCK LETTERED "N", IN THE
SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT SEVEN, TANTALLON HILLS",
AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK WWW 75,
AT PLAT 83.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 4% per annum from the
date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on
all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (58565)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
APRIL 17, 24, MAY 1, 2018
12174103 APRIL 17, 24, MAY 1, 2018
12173895
COULD YOU USE
ARE YOUR TENANTS
MOVING OUT?
SOME EXTRA CASH?
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851
Prince Georges County
851
TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2018
EZ
Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
3422 Memphis Lane
Bowie, MD 20715
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to JEFF TRUSHEIM, Trustee(s), dated November
30, 2015, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 37690, folio 350, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MAY 10, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
RECORDED DECEMBER 16, 2015 IN LIBER 37690, FOLIO
350.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 4.125% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (45744)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
855
855
Charles County
856
Charles County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
5106 ROCK BEAUTY COURT
Waldorf, MD 20603
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to MICHAEL J. BROKER, Trustee(s), dated October
30, 2008, and recorded among the Land Records of CHARLES
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 06730, folio 0419, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE CHARLES COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 200 CHARLES STREET ( IN THE
BREEZEWAY BETWEEN CIRCUIT AND DISTRICT COURTS ), LA
PLATA, MD 20646 ON,
MAY 17, 2018 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in CHARLES COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
LOT NUMBERED TWENTY-SIX (26), IN A SUBDIVISION
KNOWN AS "ST. CHARLES COMMUNITIES, DORCHESTER
NEIGHBORHOOD, PARCEL P" DULY RECORDED AMONG THE
PLAT RECORDS OF CHARLES COUNTY, MARYLAND AT PLAT
BOOK 45, FOLIO 11.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $26,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of CHARLES COUNTY,
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 6.0% on unpaid
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other
public charges and private charges or assessments, including
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postsale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
No. (17-12020)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher, ,
Substitute Trustees
Frederick County
856
Frederick County
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
12358 LEGORE RD.
KEYMAR, MD 21757
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated October
16, 2006 and recorded in Liber 6368, Folio 736 among the Land Records of
Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of $260,000.00,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court
House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
MAY 18, 2018 AT 10:50 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $24,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title.
If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied
by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law
or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 144388-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
May 1, May 8 & May 15
12179413
LAW OFFICES
Shulman, Rogers, Gandal, Pordy & Ecker, P.A.
12505 Park Potomac Avenue, 6th Floor
Potomac, MD 20854
(301) 230-5241
File No. 121944.00113
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
of
Valuable Fee Simple Property
located in Frederick County, Maryland,
known as
214 13th Avenue
Brunswick, MD 21716
(the “Property”)
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust,
Assignment of Rents and Security Agreement (the “Deed of
Trust”) from 214 13TH AVENUE LLC, to JEFFREY P. SHILLER,
Trustee, bearing the date of MARCH 6, 2017 in Book 11716,
at Page 0089 among the Land Records of Frederick County,
Maryland, and at the request of the party secured thereby,
default having occurred in the terms and conditions thereof,
the Substitute Trustees having been substituted for the Trustee
named in said Deed of Trust, will sell at public auction at the
Frederick County courthouse located at the 100 W. PATRICK
www.hwestauctions.com
STREET, FREDERICK, MD 21701, on MAY 18, 2018 AT 10:30
APRIL 24, MAY 1, 8, 2018
12174405
A.M., some or all of the Property described in said Deed of Trust.
851
Prince Georges County 851 Prince Georges County
All that Fee-Simple lot of ground and the improvements thereon
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
identified as Tax ID No. 25-476093 and more fully described in
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
MARYLAND
MARYLAND
James
E.
Clarke
TERMS OF SALE
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Hugh J. Green
Trustee(s)
Shannon
Menapace
The bid which yields the highest price for the Property will
Plaintiff(s)
Christine M. Drexel
be accepted by the Substitute Trustees. Notwithstanding the
vs.
Brian Thomas
Substitute Trustees
foregoing, the Substitute Trustees absolutely reserve the right
STACIE M DICKENS
Plaintiffs
Defendant(s)
to postpone the sale and/or cancel the sale at any time until
Mortgagor(s)
v.
the auctioneer announces that the Property are "sold" and the
CIVIL NO: CAEF16-40109
Ryan Alin Glover
aka
Ryan
A.
Glover
deposit in the required amount and form is received by the
NOTICE
Defendant(s)
Substitute Trustees. A deposit in the amount of $7,500.00
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 26th
www.hwestauctions.com
Civil No. CAEF17-31809
day of April, 2018 by the Circuit
MAY 1, 8, 15, 2018
12177303 will be required at the time of sale. Such deposit must be
NOTICE PURSUANT
Court for the COUNTY OF PRINCE
by cashier's check or certified check or such other form as
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
GEORGE'S, Maryland and by the
856
856
authority thereof, that the sale
Frederick County
Frederick County
the Substitute Trustees’ may determine in their sole discretion.
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
made by Kristine D. Brown, William
BWW Law Group, LLC
Prince
George's
County,
Maryland,
The Noteholder secured by the Deed of Trust (or any related
M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip
6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101
this 23rd day of April 2018, that the
Stone, Trustees, of the Real PropRockville, MD 20852
party) shall be exempted by the Substitute Trustees from
foreclosure
sale
of
the
property
erty designated as 101 Joyceton
(301) 961-6555
described
in
the
deed
of
trust
submitting any bidding deposit. The Substitute Trustees will,
Terr, Upper Marlboro, MD 20774,
docketed herein and located at
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
and reported in the above entitled
as a condition of the sale, require all potential bidders, except
6945 Woodstream Lane, Lanham,
OF
REAL
PROPERTY
AND
ANY
IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON
cause, will be finally ratified and
Maryland
20706,
made
and
reportthe Noteholder, to show their deposit before any bidding begins.
confirmed, unless cause to the
2513 SHELLEY CIR., UNIT #3C
ed by James E. Clarke, Hugh J.
contrary thereof be shown on or
FREDERICK, MD 21702
The retained deposit of the successful purchaser shall be
Green,
Shannon
Menapace,
Chrisbefore the 29th day of May, 2018
tine
M.
Drexel,
and
Brian
Thomas,
Under
a
power
of
sale
contained
in
a
certain
Deed
of
Trust
dated
February
applied, without interest, to the successful purchaser's credit at
next; provided a copy of this Order
Substitute Trustees, be RATIFIED
19, 2013 and recorded in Liber 9424, Folio 168 among the Land Records of
be inserted in THE WASHINGTON
and CONFIRMED, unless cause to
settlement, provided, however, that in the event the successful
Frederick
County,
MD,
with
an
original
principal
balance
of
$203,250.00,
POST, 1150 15th Street, Washingthe contrary be shown on or
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
ton, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF
purchaser fails to consummate the purchase in accordance
before the 23rd day of May, 2018,
sell
at
public
auction
at
the
Circuit
Court
for
Frederick
County,
at
the
Court
PRINCE GEORGE'S once a week for
provided
a
copy
of
this
Order
be
with the terms of sale as herein provided, such deposit will
House
Door,
100
W.
Patrick
St.,
Frederick,
MD
21701,
on
three successive weeks before the
inserted in The Washington Post
29th day of May, 2018.
be forfeited. The terms of sale must be complied with and
MAY 4, 2018 AT 10:55 AM
once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 23rd day of
The report states the amount of
settlement consummated thereon within 30 days from date of
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
May, 2018.
the sale to be $241,011.98.
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and described as
final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick
Unit
9-3C,
Phase
9,
Ridgeview
II
Condominium
and
more
fully
described
in
The Report of Sale states the
BY THE COURT:
County, Maryland unless extended at the sole discretion of the
the
aforesaid
Deed
of
Trust.
amount of the sale at $180,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #544
Clerk of the Circuit Court
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest
Sydney J. Harrison #544
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
Clerk
of
the
Circuit
Court
For
due from the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Prince George's County, Maryland
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
any reason. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE. The balance of the
Terms
of
Sale:
A
deposit
of
$20,000
in
the
form
of
certified
check,
Manassas, Virginia 20109
May 1, 8, 15, 2018
12179580
cashier’s
check
or
money
order
will
be
required
of
the
purchaser
at
time
purchase price over and above the retained deposit, with interest
703 449-5800
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
thereon at a rate of 8% from the date of sale through the date
May 1, 8, 15, 2018
12180207
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
MARYLAND
of receipt of the balance of the purchase price, will be due
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
James E. Clarke
at settlement in cash or certified funds; and if not so paid,
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
Renee Dyson
MARYLAND
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
the Substitute Trustees reserve the right to retain the deposit
Hugh J. Green
settlement.
TIME
IS
OF
THE
ESSENCE
FOR
THE
PURCHASER.
Adjustment
James E. Clarke
Shannon Menapace
and resell the Property at the risk and cost of the defaulting
of
current
year’s
real
property
taxes
are
adjusted
as
of
the
date
of
sale,
Renee Dyson
Christine M. Drexel
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
Hugh J. Green
purchaser, after such advertisement and on such terms as the
Brian Thomas
including
costs
of
any
tax
sale
are
payable
by
the
purchaser.
Purchaser
Shannon Menapace
Substitute Trustees
Substitute Trustees may deem proper, and to avail themselves
is
responsible
for
any
recapture
of
homestead
tax
credit.
All
other
public
Khalid D. Walker
Plaintiffs
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
Christine M. Drexel
and the Noteholder of any legal or equitable rights against the
survive
foreclosure
sale,
including
water/sewer
charges,
ground
rent,
v.
Brian Thomas
defaulting purchaser.
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
Substitute Trustees
William M. Jones
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
Plaintiffs
Defendant(s)
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
The Property are sold subject to the lawful rights, if any, of
v.
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
Civil No. CAEF17-15686
parties in possession, if such rights have priority over the Deed
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
Andrea M. Brown
NOTICE PURSUANT
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
of Trust, and to any and all covenants, conditions, restrictions,
Defendant(s)
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
easements, rights of way, encumbrances, liens, agreements and
Civil No. CAEF17-06337
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
Prince George's County, Maryland,
limitations of record having priority over the Deed of Trust. The
NOTICE PURSUANT
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
this 20th day of April 2018, that the
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
Property will be sold “WHERE IS” and in “AS IS” condition
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
foreclosure sale of the property
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
described in the deed of trust
without any warranty as to condition, express or implied, and
Prince George's County, Maryland,
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
docketed herein and located at
without any representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the
this 23rd day of April 2018, that the
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
10707 Elizabeth Parnum Place,
foreclosure sale of the property
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772,
information furnished to prospective bidders by the Substitute
described in the deed of trust
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
made and reported by James E.
docketed herein and located at
Trustees or any other party and without any other representations
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
Clarke, Renee Dyson, Hugh J.
10406 Falling Leaf Court, Springor paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
Green, Shannon Menapace, Chrisor warranty of any nature. The sale is also subject to postsale
dale, Maryland 20774, made and
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
tine M. Drexel, and Brian Thomas,
reported by James E. Clarke, Renee
audit of the status of the loan. Without limiting the generality
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
Substitute Trustees, be RATIFIED
Dyson, Hugh J. Green, Shannon
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
and CONFIRMED, unless cause to
of the foregoing, the Property will be sold without representation
Menapace, Khalid D. Walker, Christhat property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
the contrary be shown on or
tine M. Drexel, and Brian Thomas,
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
or warranty as to (i) title to the Property, (ii) the nature,
before the 21st day of May, 2018,
Substitute Trustees, be RATIFIED
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
provided a copy of this Order be
condition, structural integrity, or fitness for a particular use of
and CONFIRMED, unless cause to
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
inserted in The Washington Post
the contrary be shown on or
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
any improvements, fixtures or personal Property included within
once in each of three (3) succesbefore the 23rd day of May, 2018,
purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title.
sive weeks before the 21st day of
the Property, (iii) the environmental condition of the Property
provided a copy of this Order be
If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied
May, 2018.
inserted in The Washington Post
by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law
or the compliance of the Property with federal, state and local
The Report of Sale states the
once in each of three (3) succesor equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 201540-2)
amount of the sale at $162,100.00.
laws and regulations concerning the presence or disposal of
sive weeks before the 23rd day of
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
May, 2018.
Sydney J. Harrison #544
hazardous substances, (iv) compliance of the Property with
UPCOMING SALES
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
The Report of Sale states the
the Americans with Disabilities Act or any similar law, or (v)
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
Prince George's County, Maryland
amount of the sale at $397,333.82.
compliance of the Property with any zoning laws or ordinances
ALEX
COOPER
AUCTS,
INC.
May
1,
8,
15,
2018
12179579
Sydney J. Harrison #544
908
YORK
RD.,
TOWSON,
MD
21204
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
and any and all applicable safety codes, and acceptance of the
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Prince George's County, Maryland
Deed to the Property by the successful purchaser shall constitute
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
Apr 17, Apr 24 & May 1
12176388
May 1, 8, 15, 2018
12179582
MARYLAND
a waiver of any claims against the Substitute Trustees or the
851
852
James E. Clarke
Prince
Georges
County
Anne
Arundel
County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
Noteholder concerning any of the foregoing matters. Purchaser
Renee Dyson
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
Hugh J. Green
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
MARYLAND
FOR
PRINCE
GEORGE'S
COUNTY
Shannon Menapace
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY,
Property.
MARYLAND
Christine M. Drexel
James E. Clarke
MARYLAND
Brian Thomas
Hugh J. Green
James E. Clarke
ERIN M. SHAFFER
Conveyance shall be by Trustee’s Deed, without covenant or
Shannon Menapace
Substitute Trustees
Renee Dyson
Substitute Trustee
Christine M. Drexel
Plaintiffs
warranty, express or implied, specifically including marketability
Brian Thomas
Versus
Brian Thomas
Erin M. Cohen
v.
or insurability (hazard or title), unless otherwise required by
Substitute Trustees
Hugh J. Green
Estate of William H. Roberts
Angela W. Foster,
Plaintiffs
statute, court rule or the Deed of Trust. The risk of loss or damage
Patrick M. A. Decker
Defendant
aka Angela Coleman
Substitute Trustees
v.
No.
C-02-CV-002386
by fire or other casualty to the Property from and after the
Defendant(s)
Plaintiffs
E&E Family Trust and The Estate of
NOTICE OF SALE
date of sale will be upon the successful purchaser. Adjustment
Civil
No.
CAEF17-17866
v.
Emma H. Horn, as Surviving Tenant
Notice is hereby issued this Monof all taxes, ground rents, public charges, assessments, sewer,
NOTICE PURSUANT
by the Entirety of Ernest P. Horn
day, April 9, 2018 that the sale of
Dionne Mason
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
Defendant(s)
the property in the proceedings
Defendant(s)
water, drainage and other public improvements will be made as
mentioned, made and reported by
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Civil No. CAEF18-01811
Civil No. CAEF15-20377
of the date of sale and are to be assumed and paid thereafter
Erin M. Shaffer, Substitute Trustee
Prince
George's
County,
Maryland,
NOTICE PURSUANT
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
NOTICE PURSUANT
by the successful purchaser, whether assessments have been
this
20th
day
of
April
2018,
that
the
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
unless cause to the contrary thereof
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
foreclosure sale of the property
levied or not. Any condominium fees, homeowners association
be shown on or before the 9th
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
described in the deed of trust
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
day of May 2018 next; provided, a
Prince George's County, Maryland,
docketed herein and located at
dues, assessments or capital contributions, if any, payable with
Prince George's County, Maryland,
copy of this Notice be inserted in
7635 Arbory Court #65, Laurel,
this 23rd day of April 2018, that the
this 20th day of April 2018, that the
respect to the Property shall be assumed after the date of sale
some newspaper published in Anne
Maryland 20707, made and reportforeclosure sale of the property
foreclosure sale of the property
Arundel County, once in each of
described in the deed of trust
ed by James E. Clarke, Renee
by the successful purchaser. All costs incident to the settlement
described in the deed of trust
three successive weeks before the
docketed herein and located at
Dyson, Hugh J. Green, Shannon
docketed herein and located at
9th day of May 2018 next. The report
and conveyancing including, without limitation, examination
10312 Garson Terrace, Lanham,
Menapace, Christine M. Drexel,
3602 Community Drive, Forestville,
states that the amount of sale of the
Maryland 20706, made and reportand Brian Thomas, Substitute
of title, conveyancing, all recordation taxes and charges, all
Maryland 20747, made and reportproperty at 1904 WAYLENE DRIVE,
Trustees, be RATIFIED and CONed by James E. Clarke, Hugh J.
ed by James E. Clarke, Renee
HANOVER, MD 21076 to be
transfer taxes and charges, title insurance premiums, notary
FIRMED, unless cause to the conGreen, Shannon Menapace, ChrisDyson, Brian Thomas, Erin M.
$285,000.00.
trary be shown on or before the
tine M. Drexel, and Brian Thomas,
fees, settlement fees and all other costs incident to settlement
Cohen, Hugh J. Green, and Patrick
Substitute Trustees, be RATIFIED
21st day of May, 2018, provided
Robert
P.
Duckworth
M. A. Decker, Substitute Trustees,
shall be at the cost of the successful purchaser. In the event
and CONFIRMED, unless cause to
a copy of this Order be inserted
Clerk
Circuit
Court
be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED,
the contrary be shown on or
in The Washington Post once in
for Anne Arundel County
unless cause to the contrary be
the Substitute Trustees are unable for any reason to convey
before the 23rd day of May, 2018,
each of three (3) successive weeks
shown on or before the 21st day of
title, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be to
before the 21st day of May, 2018.
provided a copy of this Order be
April 17, 24, May 1, 2018 12177439
May, 2018, provided a copy of this
inserted in The Washington Post
Order be inserted in The Washingrequest and receive a return of the deposit. Upon return of the
The Report of Sale states the
once in each of three (3) succeston Post once in each of three (3)
amount of the sale at $143,000.00.
deposit, this sale shall be void and of no effect and the purchaser
sive weeks before the 23rd day of
successive weeks before the 21st
May, 2018.
Sydney J. Harrison #544
day of May, 2018.
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
Clerk
of
the
Circuit
Court
For
Home
delivery
The Report of Sale states the
The Report of Sale states the
This advertisement, as amended or supplemented by any oral
Prince
George's
County,
Maryland
amount of the sale at $316,000.00.
amount of the sale at $178,457.80.
makes good
May 1, 8, 15, 2018
12179577
announcements during the conduct of the sale, constitutes the
Sydney J. Harrison #544
Sydney J. Harrison #544
sense.
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
entire terms upon which the Property shall be offered for sale.
of the Circuit Court For
You, too, could have PrinceClerk
Prince George's County, Maryland
George's County, Maryland
Benjamin P. Smith and Sara A. Michaloski,
May 1, 8, 15, 2018
12179581
home delivery.
May 1, 8, 15, 2018
12179578
Substitute Trustees
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
Wake up to
SF
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
SF
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
www.hwestauctions.com
SF
MAY 1, 8, 15, 2018
12179721
TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2018
856
Frederick County
OPQRS
EZ
856
Frederick County
856
Frederick County
856
Frederick County
856
856
Frederick County
D11
Frederick County
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
102 GRIMES CT.
MOUNT AIRY, MD 21771
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
8010 HOLLOW REED CT.
FREDERICK, MD 21701
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated April 17,
2013 and recorded in Liber 9552, Folio 469 among the Land Records of
Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of $202,800.00,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court
House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
MAY 18, 2018 AT 10:47 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated June 28,
2006 and recorded in Liber 6175, Folio 101 among the Land Records of
Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of $240,000.00,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court
House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
MAY 11, 2018 AT 10:51 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated
December 9, 2005 and recorded in Liber 5758, Folio 60 among the Land
Records of Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of
$162,000.00, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick
County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701,
on
MAY 11, 2018 AT 10:50 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $19,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title.
If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied
by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law
or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 324020-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
May 1, May 8 & May 15
12179410
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $26,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title.
If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied
by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law
or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 322314-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Apr 24, May 1 & May 8
12178279
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
922 EAST D ST.
BRUNSWICK, MD 21716
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $13,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title.
If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied
by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law
or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 319254-1)
6675 SEA GULL CT.
A/R/T/A 6675 SEAGULL CT.
FREDERICK, MD 21703
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
5321 HINES RD.
FREDERICK, MD 21704
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated May
22, 2009 and recorded in Liber 7425, Folio 1 among the Land Records of
Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of $244,506.00,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court
House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
MAY 18, 2018 AT 10:48 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated
November 17, 2005 and recorded in Liber 5731, Folio 486 among the
Land Records of Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance
of $300,000.00, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the
Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick
County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701,
on
MAY 18, 2018 AT 10:46 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $32,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title.
If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied
by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law
or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 171370-2)
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $27,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title.
If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied
by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law
or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 322022-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
May 1, May 8 & May 15
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
12179411
May 1, May 8 & May 15
12179409
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
4484 WILLOW TREE DR.
MIDDLETOWN, MD 21769
5548 ETZLER RD.
FREDERICK, MD 21702
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated August
30, 2012 and recorded in Liber 9092, Folio 6 among the Land Records of
Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of $364,417.00,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court
House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
MAY 18, 2018 AT 10:49 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated March
15, 2013 and recorded in Liber 9482, Folio 214 among the Land Records of
Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of $106,122.00,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court
House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
MAY 18, 2018 AT 10:45 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $27,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title.
If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied
by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law
or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 317405-2)
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $10,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title.
If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied
by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law
or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 325474-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
May 1, May 8 & May 15
May 1, May 8 & May 15
12179412
OUR PRESSES
DON’T STOP.
NEITHER
SHOULD YOUR
SUBSCRIPTION.
All your news, no
interruptions. Just another
benefit of automatic
payments with Easy Pay.
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Apr 24, May 1 & May 8
ENROLL IN EASY PAY TODAY
Visit sub.wpsubscribe.com/easy
or call 202-334-6100.
S0447A 2x3
12178278
857
Howard County
Howard County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
7247 Dockside Lane, Columbia, MD 21045
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 7247 Dockside Lane, Columbia, MD
21045. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a
Deed of Trust, dated September 30, 2011, and recorded in Liber
13507 at Page 043 among the land records of the COUNTY
OF HOWARD, in the original principal amount of $311,888.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
offer for sale at public auction at the Thomas Dorsey Building,
located at 9250 Bendix Rd, Columbia MD 21045, on May 10,
2018 at 10:00 AM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 16-154180
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 18-272132.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-97978
C054F 2x3
857
Howard County
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
12175403
APRIL 24, MAY 1, 8, 2018
12175811 APRIL 24, MAY 1, 8, 2018
872
872
Fairfax County
Fairfax County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
6225 Deep River Canyon, Columbia, MD 21045
12446 FALKIRK DRIVE,
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
FAIRFAX, VA 22033
premises known as 6225 Deep River Canyon, Columbia, MD
virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust
21045. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed By
dated August 13, 2007, and recorded at Instrument Number 2007024680,
of Trust, dated May 5, 2008, and recorded in Liber 11300 at Book 19522 Page 1182 in the Clerk's Office for the Circuit Court for
County, VA, securing a loan which was originally $101,000.00. The
Page 084 among the land records of the COUNTY OF HOWARD, Fairfax
appointed SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, S&T Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at
in the original principal amount of $312,620.00. Upon default public auction at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Fairfax County,
4110 Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, VA 22030 on:
and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale
May 7, 2018 at 1:30 PM
at public auction at the Thomas Dorsey Building, located at improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of All
9250 Bendix Rd., Columbia MD 21045, on May 10, 2018 that certain lot or parcel of land with improvements thereon and
thereto appertaining, lying and being situate in the County
at 10:00 AM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust appurtenances
of Fairfax, Virginia and more particularly described as follows: Lot 15,
including but not limited to:
Section 1, DARTMOOR WOODS, as the same appears duly dedicated,
platted and recorded in Deed Book 4239, at Page 705, among the Land
Tax ID# 16-207772
Records, of Fairfax County, Virginia, and as more fully described in the
aforesaid Deed of Trust.
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and TERMS OF SALE: PROPERTY BEING SOLD SUBJECT TO SENIOR LIEN DATED
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, 02/28/2007 IN THE ORIGINAL AMOUNT OF $1,000,000.00 RECORDED AT
NUMBER 2007019547, BOOK 19437 PAGE 400. The property
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may INSTRUMENT
will be sold "AS IS," WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY
KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions, restrictions, reservations, easements,
affect same, if any.
rights of way, and all other matters of record taking priority over the Deed
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash of Trust to be announced at the time of sale. A deposit of $6,000.00, or 10%
the sale price, whichever is lower, in cash or cashier's check payable to
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The of
the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will be required at the time of sale. The balance
the purchase price, with interest at the rate contained in the Deed
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum of
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date said funds are received
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within in the office of the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15)
days
of sale. In the event of default by the successful bidder, the entire
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments deposit
shall be forfeited and applied to the costs and expenses of sale
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other public charges or assessments,
including
water/sewer charges, whether incurred prior to or after the sale,
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed and all other
costs incident to settlement to be paid by the purchaser. In
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners the event taxes, any other public charges have been advanced, a credit
be due to the seller, to be adjusted from the date of sale at the
association dues and assessments that may become due after will
time of settlement. If Purchaser requests counsel for Substitute Trustee
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. to draft any settlement documents including but not limited to a deed,
fee of $350.00 shall be paid. Seller shall not be responsible for any
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer acosts
incurred by the purchaser in connection with their purchase or
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement settlement, including, without limitation, state and local recording fees,
insurance or research, or any other costs of purchaser’s acquisition.
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for title
Trustee shall have no duty to obtain possession for purchaser. All risks
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the of casualty pass to the successful bidder at conclusion of bidding. In the
the sale is legally null and void, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting event
or equity, shall be the return of the Purchaser’s deposit without interest.
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms bidder
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding. The
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. Substitute Trustee is S&T Trustees, LLC, 6802 Paragon Place, Suite 410,
Richmond, VA 23230. For information contact: Diana C. Theologou at
Trustee's File No. 17-263139.
301-468-4990.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
April 24, May 1, 2018
12178997
416
MARYLAND
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Tickets, Wanted
Roommates
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-97978
REDSKINS
COLLEGE PARK -1br w/ Den pvt entr
& prvt BA $850/mo. sec dep req. No
smoking. Pref male. 240-423-7923
www.hwestauctions.com
878
www.hwestauctions.com
APRIL 24, MAY 1, 8, 2018
12176933
TRUSTEE'S SALE
6554 Pennacook Court, Columbia, MD 21045
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 6554 Pennacook Court, Columbia, MD
21045. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated June 20, 2017, and recorded in Liber 17673 at
Page 11 among the land records of the COUNTY OF HOWARD,
in the original principal amount of $202,268.00. Upon default
and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale
at public auction at the Thomas Dorsey Building, located at
9250 Bendix Rd, Columbia MD 21045, on May 10, 2018
at 10:00 AM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust
including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 16-096148
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-270806.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-97978
www.hwestauctions.com
APRIL 24, MAY 1, 8, 2018
12175402
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
SF
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
Howard County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
8250 MORRIS PLACE, UNIT 52, Jessup, MD 20794.
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 8250 MORRIS PLACE, UNIT 52, Jessup,
MD 20794. By virtue of the power and authority contained in
a Deed of Trust, dated June 16, 2010, and recorded in Liber
12589 at Page 231 among the land records of the COUNTY
OF HOWARD, in the original principal amount of $304,152.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
offer for sale at public auction at the Thomas Dorsey Building,
located at 9250 Bendix Rd, Columbia MD 21045, on May 10,
2018 at 10:00 AM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 06-591671
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or
certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-271200.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-97978
APRIL 24, MAY 1,8, 2018
1-800-753-POST
KLMNO
857
DISTRICT HEIGHTS- Furnished room
for rent, cable ready, near Metro.
$125-up weekly. Call 240-388-4611
872
Fairfax County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
904 ROYAL ELM CT,
HERNDON, VA 20170
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $540,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.750000% dated
September 20, 2004, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 16525,
Page 1172, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on June 6, 2018 at 2:30 PM,
the property with improvements
to wit:
Tax Map No. 0113-24-0007
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
CLASSIFIED
Howard County
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
12179408
ARE YOUR
TENANTS
MOVING OUT?
857
Howard County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
11920 Meadow Vista, Clarksville, MD 21029
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 11920 Meadow Vista, Clarksville, MD
21029. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated July 22, 2005, and recorded in Liber 09412 at
Page 089 among the land records of the COUNTY OF HOWARD,
in the original principal amount of $650,000.00. Upon default
and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale
at public auction at the Thomas Dorsey Building, located at
9250 Bendix Rd, Columbia MD 21045, on May 10, 2018
at 10:00 AM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust
including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 05-409047
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.25% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-265825.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-97978
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
857
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
857
Wake up
to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-266756.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
May 1, 8, 2018
SF
12180465
12175808
878
Stafford County
Stafford County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
218 SPRING KNOLL CIRCLE,
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22405.
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
15 WHITESTONE DRIVE,
STAFFORD, VA 22556
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated January 10, 2005,
in the original principal amount
of $100,000.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Stafford County, Virginia as Instrument No. LR050004006 . The
undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction
in the front of the Circuit Court
building for Stafford County, 1300
Courthouse Road, Stafford, Virginia on May 3, 2018 , at 2:00
PM, the property described in said
Deed of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: PARCEL I: ALL
THAT CERTAIN LOT OR PARCEL OF
LAND, SITUATE, LYING AND BEING
IN FALMOUTH DISTRICT, STAFFORD
COUNTY, VIRGINIA, AND KNOWN
AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NO. 77
ON THE MAP AND PLAT OF SECTION TWO OF SPRING VALLEY SUBDIVISION, MADE NOVEMBER, 1965
BY CARROLL KIM AND ASSOCIATES, PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS AND LAND SURVEYORS, A
COPY OF WHICH PLAT IS DULY
RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
STAFFORD COUNTY, VIRGINIA IN
PLAT BOOK 3 AT PAGE 88 ALONG
WITH THE DEED OF DEDICATION
OF SAID SECTION TWO OF SPRING
VALLEY SUBDIVISION DATED FEBRUARY 7, 1966 AND DULY RECORDED IN SAID CLERKS OFFICE IN DEED
BOOK 165 AT PAGE 276. PARCEL II:
ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT OR PARCEL
OF LAND, SITUATE, LYING AND
BEING IN FALMOUTH DISTRICT,
STAFFORD COUNTY, VIRGINIA,
CONTAINING 0.606 ACRE SHOWN
AND DESIGNATED AS LOT 7B-A
OF SECTION TWO ,2, OF SPRING
VALLEY SUBDIVISION ON THAT
CERTAIN PLAT OF SURVEY BY
HENRY W CROPP, JR., C.L.S. DATED
JUNE, 1976. THE PROPERTY HEREIN CONVEYED IS THE NORTHERN
ONE-HALF ,1/2, OF LOT 78 OF SECTION TWO,2, OF SPRING VALLEY
SUBDIVISION AS THE SAME IS DULY
PLATIED AND RECORDED IN THE
CLERKS OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF STAFFORD COUNTY,
VIRGINIA, IN PLAT BOOK 3, AT PAGE
88.
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated August 22, 2012,
in the original principal amount
of $366,500.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Stafford County, Virginia as Instrument No. 120017509 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Stafford County, 1300 Courthouse Road, Stafford, Virginia on
May 31, 2018, at 2:00 PM, the
property described in said Deed
of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL THAT
CERTAIN PROPERTY SITUATED IN
THE COUNTY OF STAFFORD, AND
STATE OF VIRGINIA, AND BEING
DESCRIBED IN A DEED DATED
MARCH 29, 1996 AND RECORDED
APRIL 4, 1996, AS INSTRUMENT
NO. LR960004384, AMONG THE
LAND RECORDS OF STAFFORD
COUNTY, VIRGINIA, AND REFERENCED AS FOLLOWS: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY:
ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT OR PARCEL
OF LAND, AND ALL RIGHTS AND
PRIVILEGES THERETO APPURTENANT, SITUATE, LYING AND
BEING IN ROCK HILL MAGISTERIAL
DISTRICT, STAFFORD COUNTY, VIRGINIA, AND DESIGNATED AS LOT
8, PHASE ONE (1), BRENTWOOD
ESTATES SUBDIVISION, AS SHOWN
ON PLAT OF SURVEY PREPARED
BY RINKER-DETWILER AND ASSOCIATES, P.C., DATED JANUARY 27,
1995, REVISED MARCH 2, 1995,
WHICH PLAT IS RECORDED IN THE
CLERK‘S OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF STAFFORD COUNTY,
VIRGINIA, IN PLAT BOOK 27 AT
PAGES 206-211.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3253282.
April 11, 17, 24, May 1, 2018
12173802
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Roommates
CAPITAL HGHTS: Newly reno fully furn
house to share. Nr metro & shops. All
utils incl, cable, wifi, W/D. Must see.
Starting $185+/wk. 240-463-2554
NE - 1 room for rent. Large $675.
Pref male. No smoking. Clean &
neat. Call 202-285-1256 leave msg
MARYLAND
Roommates
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-1916351.
May 1, 8, 2018
12180286
SF
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
1-800-753-POST
SF
ANDREWS AFB Area- Nice furn room,
int. & cbl, kit privs. w/w. $550/mo
+ $50 sec dep. Call 301-395-6738
CLARKSBURG- 1 full flr furn condo,
full kitch access, near shopping.
Piano, pool. Must see. $800. Senior
ok, Female pref. 240-274-5506
CLINTON-Spring into a clean furn rm
w/ all utils, cable, internet inc. F pref.
$650/mo + $200 dep. 301-751-4523
CLINTON- TH to shr, nice area, upper
lvl rm w/pvt BR&BA. Nr AAFB. $650
utils incld + sec dep. 202-492-9219
HYATTSVILLE- 1 room for rent in
private home. On bus route.
$625/mo utils inc. 240-593-8760
LANHAM Furn room in a house, pvt
BA, $500/mo, + 1st mo rent & sec.
dep. 240-432-7154
Lanham-Rm in SFH. Renov, quiet,
clean & secure. Utils, cable & WiFi
inc. Nr Metro. $650. 202-487-4442
LARGO ROOM FOR RENT$750 incl utils,free cable/net,shared
BA. N/P,N/S Call 240-338-0955
LARGO- Share furn lux 2MBR TH w/
ceramic flrs, nr shopping/Metro/MD
Campus & Medical Ctr. $800-$1000
inc deposit. Curtis 301-641-3035
OXON HILL- In nice house, cable
avail, close to shops, on bus line,
M pref. Call 202-549-0060
ROCKVILLE- Share SFH. near
trans/shops. N/S, N/P, Small rm w/
lge window, furnshd or unfurnshd,
Clean, quiet hse. Avail to individual
$599 inc utils. Dep req. Leave voice
msg for response 240-351-5150
SILVER SPRING - Room ($600),
Bsmt ($950). Incl utils. Sec dep req.
No pets. Call 301-439-0468
SILVER SPRING- Lrg rm, priv BA, off
st parking, kit privileges, close dwn
SS, NS $550/m+ utils. 301-526-8204
Silver Spring, 1 room, $499/mo,
$499 sec dep, 1 month free after
1 year. Call Jean 512-800-3979
Season Tickets Wanted.
Buying all locations. Top $ paid.
Please call 1-800-786-8425
610
Dogs for Sale
AUSSIEDOODLE MINI PUPS 1 black m, 2 bl&wh males $495.
1 tiny wh fem $595. Cash. 8 wks, 1st
Shots / Wormed 301-797-5645
Bostons, Toy Poodles & more—SALE
Golden Doodles, 304-904-6289 Yorkchon, Toy Poodle, Chihuahua, MaltiPom, 3/4 E. Bulldog, Yorkies, Maltese, Husky, Beagliers, Maltipoos, GSheps, CC, cash or easy financing on
our web www.wvpuppy.com 59 East
Rd Martinsburg wv 304-268-3633
GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS 4 F, 2 M, black & sable. $600/obo,
S/W, parents on premises. AKC reg.
Ready now. Call 240-606-3815
ITALIAN CANE CORSO PUPPIES
Males & females.
Tails docked. Shot records.
Call 202-957-7458
LAB PUPS - AKC, vet checked,
1st shots & wormed.
$400. Call 540-820-9512
Rottweiler—Full Reg. Champ Bloodlines. Feb 16, 2018 litter is 2 males
and 1 female! Parents OFA ADRK
$1500, No Sun. sales, 540-383-4895.
SHIH TZU PUPPY - Adorable, pick
of the litter, pet only, parti brown
and white. 8 weeks. 1 shots and
wormed. $750. Call 301-659-9175
SHIH TZU PUPS - Pure bred,
8 weeks old, 1st shots/wormed,
parents on premises.
$550. Call 540-743-5906
SHIH TZU PUPPIES- Will have shots
and wormed Well socialized,
mother and father on premises.
Ready
to
go!
540-406-0740
TAKOMA PARK - 1 & 2 BR for rent.
Female pref. $900/$575 with sec
dep. Call 301-448-2363
UPPER MARLBORO - 1 Bsmnt Rm w/
BA. Shared Kitchen. No Smoking,
No Pets. $750 inc utils. 240-893-1473
WALDORF- Rm for rent, 10 X 12,
pvt BA, $500/mo., $500 SD. Util.
incl + cbl. Cat in home. N/S. Use of
Kit/W/D. Colleen 301-751-2853
VIRGINIA
Roommates
Arlington- Large furnished rm in
condo w/ prvt bath. $1050/mo. utils
inc, no smking. Call 703-671-1823
Fairfax VA - $700, close to George
Mason U., furn rm, responsible person, N/P, N/s. Call 703-244-2395
Out-of-Town
Real Estate
LEGAL SERVICES
Lung Cancer? And Age 60+?
You And Your Family May Be
Entitled To Significant Cash Award.
Call 844-591-5210 for information.
No Risk. No Money Out Of Pocket.
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
DELAWARE New Move-In Ready
Homes! Low Taxes! Close to
Beaches, Gated, Olympic pool. New
Homes from low $100’s. No HOA
Fees. Brochures Available.
1-866-629-0770 or
www.coolbranch.com
225
Collectibles
SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH
FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS.
Call Al, 301-807-3266.
Will Come to you!
275
Merchandise Wanted
Wake up
to home
delivery.
Freon R12 WANTED—Certified
buyer will pick up, pay CASH. Cylinders and cans. Call 312-291-9169
REDSKINS TICKETS WANTED—
Call 1-800-296-3626 X3
280
Musical Instruments
PIANO Concert Grand RX1 Kawai
5 foot, 6 inches, exc condition,
$8000. Call 717-352-3814
Steinway model L Grand
Piano—Flame Mahogany Finish.
Like New. $29,950., Amherst,
VA, 540-223-0924 call or text
355
Garage Sales, VA
1-800-753-POST
Annandale Acres Community Yard
Sale - Auburn, Beverly, Calvert &
Clemons Streets, Annandale, VA.
May 5th & 6th, 8am-3pm.
LORTON Area Community Yard Sale
Southpointe Estates, Davis Drive
and Wrights Hollow Lane.
Saturday, May 5th, 8am-noon
408
Tickets, Sports
REDSKIN TICKETS
Too long on waiting list?
Use my season tickets.
Call 301-460-7292
SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
D12
EZ
$10
TICKETS
VS.
PITTSBURGH
PIRATES
WASHINGTON
NATIONALS
APRIL
301–MAY
MAY
-3 3
MAYĂđĈčĀĆ
. TUESDAY,
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
MAY 1 , 2018
Nats eke out win over Pirates
NATIONALS FROM D1
of a win. As in so many other
April games, the lead could have
been bigger, and because it
wasn’t, the exhausted arms at the
back of the bullpen — in this
case, Ryan Madson and Brandon
Kintzler — worked again.
Though they finished April on a
relative high note, having
climbed back to three games
under .500, the Nationals are
white-knuckled and just hanging
on because the offense can’t
seem to sew a cushion.
The Nationals have played 10
one-run games in their first 29.
They have won two of them.
Three of their relievers, including Madson and Kintzler, have
appeared in more than half of
their games.
“If we start scoring runs, we
can give these guys days off,”
Martinez said. “But we’ve played
so many one-run games already,
it’s scary. It really is.”
The Nationals entered Monday’s game at Nationals Park
with the third-worst batting average with runners in scoring
position in the National League.
Chance after chance to build
leads — and crucially, chance
after chance to build on them
late — slipped away. But the first
chance the Nationals mounted
Monday against Pirates starter
Jameson Taillon did not.
With two on and two out in the
second, Wilmer Difo hit a
groundball up the middle to
score a run. Difo is filling in at
third base until Anthony Rendon
returns from his bruised big toe,
which could be sooner than later.
Without Rendon, Daniel Murphy
and Adam Eaton, this lineup was
bound to produce fewer runs
than normal. Without them, this
lineup cannot afford to waste
scoring chances, which is exactly
what it has been doing this
month.
In that way, the chance the
Nationals squandered in the
third was illustrative of their
April. After Trea Turner doubled
to lead off the inning, struggling
Ryan Zimmerman chopped a
ball weakly to short that didn’t
advance Turner. Zimmerman is 0
for his last 10.
“I just want to see, like, better
contact — moving the ball,” Martinez said of his lineup with
runners in scoring position. “. . .
We score a lot of runs, we
typically hit the ball up the
middle. Difo, big hit up the
middle. When you got runners
on base, try to stay up the
middle.”
The Pirates intentionally
walked Bryce Harper, not willing
to give him a chance, more
willing to face Howie Kendrick
and Matt Adams. Kendrick and
Adams struck out.
Kendrick and Adams have
been key parts of this team’s
success, and the Nationals would
be far worse without them. But
they are not Rendon or Murphy,
and they can’t protect Harper
like either (or both) of those
players could. The Nationals entered Monday with the secondworst average in the fourth spot
in their lineup in the majors —
.207. It dropped Monday.
As a result, Harper walked 38
times in March and April, second
all time to Barry Bonds, who
walked 39 times by the end of
April in 2004. Bonds set the
record for walks in a single
season that year, which started
almost a full week after this one,
on April 5. But Harper is also
struggling, and swinging at the
first pitch more often than he
does when things go well. He is 5
for his last 35 with 17 walks in
that span, and this lineup needs
him so desperately that he has
yet to have a day off this season,
though he could probably use
one to reset himself in this
week-long slump.
“They’re walking him,” Martinez said, “and he’s a little frustrated.”
But the more others contribute with runners in scoring position, the less pressure falls on
Harper. Roark and Turner joined
Difo by singling with runners in
scoring position Monday. The
Nationals had 54 hits with runners in scoring position in 28
games entering Monday — or
fewer than two per game. Monday, that average went up, but a
few more squandered chances
left a one-run lead to the bullpen
yet again.
“I pray for a lot of runs,”
Kintzler said. “It’s just the way
it’s going right now.
Not only did Madson and
Kintzler each work for the 15th
time this season, but they had to
do so with no margin for error.
Needing to be at their sharpest
Nationals 3, Pirates 2
PITTSBURGH
AB
R
H
Frazier 2b .......................4
Polanco rf.......................4
Rodriguez cf...................3
Bell 1b ............................4
Dickerson lf....................4
Cervelli c ........................3
Moran 3b........................2
Mercer ss .......................3
Taillon p .........................2
Rodriguez p....................0
Marte ph ........................1
Crick p ............................0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
TOTALS
30
2
6
WASHINGTON
AB
R
H
Turner ss........................4
Zimmerman 1b ..............4
Harper rf ........................2
Kendrick 2b ....................4
Adams lf ........................4
Kintzler p .......................0
Taylor cf .........................4
Wieters c .......................3
Difo 3b............................4
Roark p...........................2
Stevenson ph .................1
Madson p .......................0
Bautista lf......................0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
3
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
2
1
0
0
0
TOTALS
3
32
9
BI BB SO AVG
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
.250
.198
.156
.232
.313
.308
.280
.247
.200
--.286
---
2
2
4
—
BI BB SO AVG
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
2
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
3
3
7
.284
.184
.247
.287
.260
--.222
.220
.233
.154
.400
--.000
—
PITTSBURGH ................ 000
010
100
—
2
1
6
WASHINGTON.............. 010
200
00X
—
3
90
E: Frazier (4). LOB: Pittsburgh 3, Washington 8. 2B:
Taillon (1), Turner (6), Taylor (7). HR: Dickerson (3), off
Roark. RBI: Dickerson (16), Taillon (2), Turner (7), Difo
(8), Roark (1). CS: Polanco (1).
DP: Pittsburgh 1 (Mercer, Frazier, Bell); Washington 2
(Turner, Zimmerman), (Kendrick, Turner, Zimmerman).
PITTSBURGH
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Taillon .........................6 7 3 3 2 5 101 4.83
Rodriguez.....................1 1 0 0 1 1 13 1.29
Crick .............................1 1 0 0 0 1 16 1.42
WASHINGTON
IP
Roark ...........................7
Madson .......................1
Kintzler .......................1
H
6
0
0
R ER BB SO NP ERA
2 2 2 4 105 3.55
0 0 0 0
9 5.79
0 0 0 0 11 4.20
WP: Roark, (2-2); LP: Taillon, (2-3); S: Kintzler, (1).
WP: Taillon.
T: 2:34. A: 20,879 (41,313).
HOW THEY SCORED
NATIONALS SECOND
Kendrick grounds out. Adams singles. Taylor
reaches on a fielder’s choice. Adams out at second. Wieters walks. Difo singles. Wieters to second. Taylor scores. Roark grounds out.
Nationals 1, Pirates 0
NATIONALS FOURTH
Taylor flies out. Wieters singles. Difo singles.
Wieters to second. Difo to second. Wieters to
third. Roark singles. Difo to third. Wieters scores.
Turner singles. Roark to second. Difo scores. Zimmerman grounds out. Turner out at second.
Nationals 3, Pirates 0
PIRATES FIFTH
Cervelli singles. Moran grounds out. Cervelli out
at second. Mercer singles. Taillon doubles. Mercer scores. Frazier strikes out swinging.
Nationals 3, Pirates 1
PIRATES SEVENTH
Dickerson homers. Cervelli lines out. Moran
strikes out. Mercer strikes out.
Nationals 3, Pirates 2
while at their most fatigued, both
worked scoreless innings to secure the win.
For the first time in two weeks,
the Nationals are on a winning
streak. But their manager thinks
his beard is graying. Their relievers hope their arms aren’t fraying. Even after they won back-toback games, the Nationals are
hanging on for dear life.
chelsea.janes@washpost.com
HIGH SCHOOL BOYS’ LACROSSE
Bulldogs continue county dominance
BY
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C ALLIE C APLAN
Churchill’s boys’ lacrosse team
hasn’t lost to a Montgomery County opponent since 2014, routinely
pummeling local competition and
then stringing together deep postseason runs that have ended just
short of the program’s first Maryland state championship.
Monday night at Damascus,
though, the No. 3 Bulldogs didn’t
start with that same aura of dominance.
There were some missed defensive slides, allowing Damascus to
twice take a lead, lengthy scrums
on faceoffs and, at one point, a
warning from the referees for
each side to stop trash talking.
Churchill, however, quelled its
lapses — and possible doubts
about its postseason readiness —
in the second half of a 15-6 victory.
The Bulldogs outscored Damascus 10-3 after halftime, including
a 6-0 run to close the third quarter, and delivered a reminder to
their upcoming playoff opponents
that they might be Montgomery
County’s best chance yet to claim a
state lacrosse title.
“We really think we’re one of
the best teams in the state,” mid-
CHURCHILL 15,
DAMASCUS 6
fielder Reed Moshyedi said.
“When we play to our potential,
we don’t really think anybody can
beat us. When we play together as
a team and make the right plays,
we’re pretty unstoppable.”
Attackmen Ryan Shure (five
goals, one assist) and Ryan Leonard (three goals, three assists)
paced Churchill with six points
apiece. Attackman Brady Altobello added five goals, including two
in a 20-second stretch to finish the
third-quarter burst, while Moshyedi, a senior signed to Brown,
capped the scoring by hurling his
second overhanded attempt into
the net with about a minute left.
Damascus, which has also
rolled through Montgomery
County competition this season
and totaled more than 16 goals per
game, countered in the first half
and received a team-best two
scores from attackman Nick Mohardt.
But as the game wore on,
Churchill’s precise passes, movement in transition and control on
faceoffs ensured the Hornets
(11-2) wouldn’t beat the Bulldogs
(11-0) for the first time since at
least 2005.
“Credit goes to Damascus for
being really good. We weren’t
ready for that,” Churchill Coach
Jeff Fritz said. “We just stuck with
the process and knew that eventually it would start clicking.”
With one game left in the regular season — against Sherwood on
Thursday — Fritz said his players
needed to face pressure and
“learn a little self-scout” before
next week’s playoff opener.
The Bulldogs, who lost in the
Maryland 4A/3A final to Severna
Park last May, had won their previous six games by an average of 16
goals. Moshyedi estimated they
hadn’t faced a test like the one
posed by Damascus, a Maryland
3A/2A West region finalist a year
ago, since beating Urbana by three
in the season opener.
“We didn’t have the greatest
start,” Shure said. “But I think as
soon as we started moving the ball
around and finding the cutters, it
helped us get through that third
quarter and pounce on a very
tough opponent.”
callie.caplan@washpost.com
nationals.com/Post
HIGH SCHOOL BASEBALL
Contenders
in the WCAC
preparing for
one wild ride
BY
Available online only at nationals.com/Post, while supplies last.
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M ICHAEL E RRIGO
If you want proof that this year’s
Washington Catholic Athletic
Conference baseball playoffs will
be wildly competitive and entirely
unpredictable, look no further
than two recent days on the schedule of Paul VI.
On Saturday, the Panthers fell
to St. Mary’s Ryken, 4-2. It was the
second upset of the season for the
Knights, who knocked off
St. John’s, 3-2, last week. Yet they
sit in the middle of the pack in the
conference and have spent the
season hovering around .500.
On Sunday, Paul VI beat fellow
WCAC leader St. John’s, 2-0. Senior Thomas Russell threw a twohit shutout as the Panthers evened
the season series with the Cadets.
“That’s really a good snapshot
of our conference,” Paul VI Coach
Billy Emerson said. “Anybody can
take down anybody on any given
day.”
Sunday’s win was a big one for
the Panthers: It assured them one
of the league’s top two seeds in the
playoffs. In what has been an upand-down season for most of the
WCAC, Paul VI and St. John’s have
emerged as the strongest squads.
Emerson knew he had to have
Russell, who has not given up a
run this season in 412/3 innings, on
the mound for Sunday’s game.
Russell is one of three talented
senior pitchers on the roster,
something that other WCAC
coaches pointed to as a distinct
advantage come playoff time. The
league’s semifinals and final are
played as best-of-three series, so
the more arms you have, the better.
But to get to the semis, WCAC
teams must win a one-off quarterfinal. All four of these will be
played Saturday, and none of the
league’s coaches knows what they
will bring.
“I don’t think anyone wants to
play in the quarterfinals,” DeMatha Coach Sean O’Connor said
with a laugh. “We’d rather have
those be two out of three and
everything else be one game. Because everybody has a good guy on
the mound now; everyone can win
one game.”
DeMatha leads the second tier
of teams in the conference. The
Stags — not to mention Gonzaga,
St. Mary’s Ryken and O’Connell —
could easily disrupt the dominance of Paul VI and St. John’s
next week.
“It’s a fun league,” O’Connell
Coach Kyle Padgett said. “But it’ll
drive you crazy every week how
good everyone is.”
michael.errigo@washpost.com
KLMNO
HEalth&Science
TUESDAY , MAY 1 , 2018 . WASHINGTONPOST.COM/HEALTH-SCIENCE
EE
E
JENN ACKERMAN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
A baby, a heart tumor, a mother’s terrifying choice
BY
E MILY S OHN
A
lysha Kellner was 23 weeks pregnant when she learned last year that her baby had a rare,
fast-growing tumor on her heart that might require surgery while still inside the womb. ¶ It was
earth-shattering news that didn’t stop there. Fetal surgery to remove this type of tumor had been
done successfully just three times in the world and had never even been attempted by Kellner’s doctors at Children’s Minnesota. ¶ Once she got past the initial shock, Alysha swore there was no way she would
trust the surgeons to take their first shot at a high-risk procedure on her baby. Then she grasped for hope:
Maybe she would make it to 28 weeks, a far cry from a full-term, 40-week pregnancy but far enough along for
the baby to be delivered and then operated on after birth. ¶ That hope didn’t last long. FETAL CONTINUED ON E6
Alysha and Ben Kellner learned last year that the baby they were expecting had a fast-growing tumor on her heart. In July,
Kora, who is now more than 7 months old, underwent surgery that had been done successfully just three times in the world.
BY
A MANDA L OUDIN
Liz Wolfert seemed a picture of health.
The Denver-based financial consultant
rode her bike to work, climbed “14ers” —
mountains that rise more than 14,000
feet above sea level — took kung fu
lessons and swam. But in 2015, at age 32,
she learned that she had elevated blood
glucose levels, a possible sign of
pre-diabetes.
Wolfert’s first instinct was to work out
harder and faster. But she soon learned
that she needed to do the opposite: slow
down and exercise at a much easier pace.
Wolfert was told of her “metabolic
inflexibility” — and the recommendation
of low-intensity exercise — by Iñigo San
Millàn, director of the Sports Performance Program at the University of Colorado Sports Medicine Center in Boulder. An
exercise physiologist who works with
elite athletes, San Millàn defines metabolic flexibility as the body’s ability to
METABOLISM CONTINUED ON E5
Does your pooch really need Prozac?
BY
A patient history
can be more than
a diary of ailments
N ATHANIEL M ORRIS
“There are a few options for treating
your depression,” I say to the patient.
“But I think this medication may help.”
The patient starts laughing. “That’s
pretty funny, Doctor.”
“I’m sorry?”
“My dog takes the same pill!”
The interface between pets and
mental-health care has been a hot-button
issue in recent years. The evidence that
therapy animals can help treat people
with psychiatric issues is patchy, yet
emotional-support animals seem to be
everywhere, perhaps most noticeably on
planes. The Internet was in an uproar not
long ago over reports that a traveler
attempted to bring an emotional-support
peacock onto a flight.
Meanwhile, veterinary providers and
pet owners are paying increased attention to such problems as separation anxi-
BY
PETS CONTINUED ON E4
ISTOCKPHOTO
Don’t put faith in
tougher workouts
to prevent illness
E RSILIA M . D E F ILIPPIS
One of the fundamental skills we learn
early in medicine is how to take a patient
history. We are encouraged to tell a story.
Yet these stories have a specific formula.
They go something
PERSPECTIVE like this: “Mr. A is a
60-year-old man with
high blood pressure and diabetes who
presents with new left lower extremity
weakness.” We describe when the weakness started, what makes it better and
what makes it worse, and any other accompanying symptoms.
Most often, we elicit a story of disease
but not one of the patient who is experiencing an illness. The best stories are cut
short. Mr. A’s story may not communicate
that he has been homeless for months
because he lost his job. Or that his daughter is getting married in a few months and
that he is most concerned that he will not
be able to walk her down the aisle. Both of
PATIENT CONTINUED ON E4
ALSO INSIDE Daggers made from a warrior’s bones held special power. E2 |Clues about when our ancestors began to walk upright. E2
Pros and cons of tooth whitening. E3 | How fiber helps keep a body youthful. E3 | Should you bank your baby’s umbilical cord blood? E6
E2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
. TUESDAY,
MAY 1 , 2018
S C I E NC E NE WS
No yolk: A three-pound egg turns out to be
an authentic relic of the extinct elephant bird
NATHANIEL DOMINY/DARTMOUTH COLLEGE/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Weapons from a warrior’s bone held special power
BY
B EN G UARINO
If you lived in the Sepik region
of New Guinea a century ago and
you wanted to impress your
neighbors, you’d strap to your
biceps a dagger made of bone.
Not just any skeletal parts
would do. The most common
bone weapons came from the legs
of giant flightless birds called
cassowaries. But the most prized
materials were human femurs,
removed from a vanquished enemy — or from your father’s
remains upon his death.
Nathaniel J. Dominy, an anthropologist at Dartmouth College, has been studying these
bone daggers for the better part
of a decade. He was exploring the
Hood Museum of Art in Hanover,
N.H., when he found the museum’s collection of bone weapons. The ornate designs cut into
the daggers captivated him.
The most powerful symbols
were carved into the grip, Dominy said, so a wielder could derive
strength from holding the weapon. “They’re really striking objects,” he said. “Formidable,
fierce-looking and beautiful.”
Human-bone daggers are also
rare. Of the 500 or so bone daggers held at the American Museum of Natural History in New
York, the Yale Peabody Museum
of Natural History in New Haven,
Conn., and the Field Museum in
Chicago, only 21 are carved from
human parts. The last New Guinean people to make such daggers
did so at the end of the 19th
century and the beginning of the
20th.
In a new study in the journal
Royal Society Open Science,
Dominy and colleagues quote
German anthropologist Leonhard Schultze-Jena, who described the weapons in functional terms in 1914: “The dagger
serves not only to stab into the
main arteries but at the same
time as a lever with which one
twists the punctured neck of the
enemy in order to tear the throat
and, with sufficient power, break
the neck.”
Bone daggers were status symbols. “All cultures on Earth will
decorate utilitarian objects like
pots and pans or their own bodies,” Dominy said. These daggers
are no different. Slaying a cassowary was a source of status, and
better still was to have a dagger
carved from a warrior’s bones,
Dominy said, to capture that person’s symbolic power and
strength.
Dominy set the scene: “These
are only used for hand-to-hand
combat,” he said. “You both are
trying to stab each other in the
nape at the same time and twist.”
The anthropologist wanted to
know how the New Guineans
managed this violent action without breaking their prized weapons. Dominy took 10 of the daggers, five cassowary-bone and five
human-bone
weapons,
to
Dartmouth-Hitchcock hospital.
Dominy and colleagues sent the
items through a CT scanner,
which revealed a pattern: The
bird-bone daggers were flatter
and straighter than the human
ones.
The scientists also purchased a
modern cassowary bone dagger
carved in the 1970s. The scientists
drove the tip of the weapon into
urethane to simulate jabbing the
dagger into a joint. Then they
bent and twisted the bone until it
snapped.
This demonstration showed
that cassowary bones are “extremely dense,” Dominy said. The
giant birds do not have pneumatic bones — that is, they are not
filled with air sacs, as are the
bones of most flying birds. In fact,
in terms of their mechanical
properties, the cassowary bones
are “striking similarly to our human femur.”
The scientists applied the cassowary data to 3-D computer
models of the human weapons. In
the simulations, the human dag-
Researchers compared
human-bone daggers —
including one marked
“a” in the image above —
with cassowary-bone
daggers, one of which is
shown as “b.” The
weapons made from
human remains were
stronger than those from
the flightless birds.
gers proved to be much stronger
than the cassowary versions.
These findings suggest that the
structure of a human dagger,
carved to maintain the natural
curve of the bone, explains its
superior strength. “When men
are shaping the dagger from a
human femur, they retain a lot of
the cross-sectional curvature,”
Dominy said.
Dominy was not entirely sure
why the cassowary bones were
engineered to be weaker, but he
suspects the flatness of the cassowary dagger might have prioritized comfort over strength. The
human daggers, on the other
hand, were carved to last, in
proportion to their value.
A Buffalo museum has made a
rare discovery within its own
collection: a fully intact egg from
the extinct elephant bird, an egg
that until now was thought to be
fake.
Curators at the Buffalo Museum of Science were cataloguing
pieces in their collection when
they realized and later confirmed
that the foot-tall egg had been
mislabeled as a model. Measuring
28 inches around, it weighs more
than three pounds.
Experts say public institutions
hold fewer than 40 intact eggs
from elephant birds.
The flightless elephant bird
was native to Madagascar. It grew
to be 10 feet tall, weighed up to
1,100 pounds and laid the largest
eggs of any vertebrate, including
dinosaurs.
The museum will unveil the
egg to the public Tuesday.
— Associated Press
BUFFALO MUSEUM OF SCIENCE/
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Experts say public institutions
hold fewer than 40 intact eggs
from extinct elephant birds.
This egg, deemed authentic,
weighs more than three pounds.
One of most celebrated books of natural history,
Audubon’s ‘Birds of America,’ to be auctioned
A first edition of John James
Audubon’s “The Birds of America,” one of the most celebrated
books of natural history, is going
up for auction in New York in
June. It could fetch up to $12 million, according to Christie’s.
The book, featuring more than
400 hand-colored illustrations of
1,037 life-size birds, is one of just 13
complete sets thought to remain
in private hands, Christie’s said.
Proceeds from the June 14 sale
will benefit conservation of
plants, animals and natural habitats through the work of the
Knobloch Family Foundation.
Christie’s said the book was
“among the most superlative copies in private hands of the finest
color-plate book ever produced.”
It gave it a presale estimate of
$8 million to $12 million.
The book has been owned for
the past six years by the late
businessman Carl W. Knobloch
Jr., who established the Texasbased foundation bearing his
family’s name and who died in
2016. He bought it from the heirs
of Britain’s fourth Duke of Portland for $7.9 million.
Audubon’s “The Birds of America” was first published as a series in
sections between 1827 and 1838
and represented his years-long
mission to find and paint all the
known species of birds in North
America.
The illustrations are full size,
reflecting Audubon’s decision to
depict the birds in a lifelike manner, be they flamingoes or hummingbirds.
Most of the 120 complete firstedition sets thought to be still
existing are owned by art galleries, libraries and universities in
the United States and Britain.
— Reuters
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/speaking-of-science
S C I E NC E S C AN
Big brains are fine, but upright walking was key
BY
J OEL A CHENBACH
Humans are walkers, and
we’re really good at it. Other
creatures can walk on two legs —
chimpanzees, for example, walk
with bent knees and bent hips,
kind of like Groucho Marx — but
no animal walks the way we do,
with the torso vertical, the legs
extended, the stride long.
Paleoanthropologists
point
out that the ability to walk, and
to do so with a minimum of
expended energy, predated the
evolution of big brains among
human ancestors. Walking freed
the hands for tools and weapons,
and allowed those species to
roam far and wide to obtain food
and other resources. “Walking is
“Walking is huge.
Walking set the stage for
all of those things that
come later.”
Carol Ward, a professor of anatomy
at the University of Missouri
huge. Walking set the stage for
all of those things that come
later,” notes Carol Ward, a professor of anatomy at the University
of Missouri.
But when did our ancestors
begin to walk the way we do?
Footprints can provide a clue.
Two sites in Laetoli, Tanzania,
feature footprints of human ancestors that lived about 3.6 million years ago. They were members of the genus Australopithecus. That’s the genus of “Lucy,”
the 3.2 million-year-old human
ancestor whose fossilized bones
were discovered in Ethiopia in
1974.
David Raichlen, an evolutionary anthropologist at the University of Arizona, has studied the
Laetoli footprints and compared
them to footprints made by human volunteers in laboratory
settings. He examined footprints
of individuals walking normally
and also those walking with bent
knees and bent hips. The Laetoli
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footprints more closely match
the former, the modern human
footprints.
“Upright, humanlike bipedal
walking goes back 4 to 5 million
years,” Raichlen told The Washington Post in advance of a
symposium on the evolution of
human locomotion at the Experimental Biology 2018 conference
in San Diego.
“If you were in a time machine, looking at ‘Lucy’ in the
distance, the way they walked
would have looked very humanlike,” said Ward, another symposium participant.
The ability to walk this way
emerged through natural selection as our ancestors adapted to
changing environmental conditions. The forests were drying
out as a result of climate change.
Our primate cousins generally
continued to live in trees, existing largely on ripe fruit, with
their anatomy adapted for vertical climbing and swinging from
branch to branch. But long ago,
some chose a different path,
striking out for the frontier. They
went to the ground more often
and eventually, through many
evolutionary changes, they left
the trees behind altogether.
Gone was the grasping big toe;
instead, the big toe aligned with
the other toes. And our arched
feet are also an evolutionary
development, because they stiffen rather than fold as we push off
the back foot in our walking gait.
Other anatomical features keep
our weight centered over our legs
and our head steady as we walk.
Ian Wallace, an evolutionary
biologist at Harvard University
and another symposium presenter, said that “upright walking is
the defining characteristic of the
human lineage. Its consequences
are hard to oversell.”
There’s a splendid description
of human bipedality at the start
of “Wanderlust: A History of
Walking” by Rebecca Solnit,
which was first published nearly
two decades ago:
“Muscles tense. One leg a pillar, holding the body upright
between the earth and sky. The
other a pendulum, swinging
from behind. Heel touches down.
The whole weight of the body
rolls forward onto the ball of the
foot. The big toe pushes off, and
the delicately balanced weight of
the body shifts again. The legs
reverse position.”
achenbachj@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/to-your-health
CONSERVATION
PHOTOS BY BRIAN FORREST/COURTESY OF THE MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, LOS ANGELES
An art conservator is putting his technique on display at a Los
Angeles museum by inviting visitors to watch as he gives a thorough
cleaning to an abstract expressionist painting by Jackson Pollock.
Museum shows visitors how the grime
of decades is removed from pieces of art
There’s an art to conserving
precious paintings — and a science.
Art conservators work in hightech labs and use scientific techniques to make sure paintings
and other works of art stay clean
and safe.
Now, a conservator is putting
his technique on display at the
Museum of Contemporary Art in
Los Angeles. From now through
Sept. 3, the museum is conducting a conservation treatment —
think of it as a professional intervention, but for art — on an
abstract expressionist painting
by Jackson Pollock.
The painting, “Number 1,
1949,” has collected some grime
over the years, and for it to be
seen as Pollock intended, the
work needs a thorough cleaning.
Chris Stavroudis, an independent art conservator, will clean the
painting inside the gallery on
select Thursdays, uncovering
brighter colors and helping gallery visitors learn about the process. (He’ll conduct Q&A sessions
twice daily when he’s in the gallery.)
There’s more to cleaning a
Jackson Pollock’s Number 1,
1949: A Conservation Treatment
MOCA Grand Avenue, Los Angeles
painting than meets the eye. Art
conservators spend years learning about the chemistry of paint
and how to clean with chemical
solutions that remove grime but
not the painting’s pigments.
Want to learn more? New
York’s Metropolitan Museum of
Art and Museum of Modern Art
have entire websites that detail
the careful conservation of their
artistic treasures. These sites and
the Los Angeles exhibition might
make you see art in a different
way — and appreciate the craft
and chemistry that conservators
bring to their profession.
— Erin Blakemore
H E ALTH & S C I E NC E
Editor: Laura Helmuth • Assistant Editors: Kathy Lally, Margaret Shapiro
• Art Director: Alla Dreyvitser • Advertising Information: Ron Ulrich,
202-334-5289, ronald.ulrich@washpost.com • To contact us: Email:
health-science@washpost.com Telephone: 202-334-5031 Mail: The
Washington Post, Health, 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20071
TUESDAY, MAY 1 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
FROM CONSUMER REPORTS
H EA LTH NEW S
RESEARCH
In animal tests, an engineered painkiller works
like an opioid, but it doesn’t cause addiction
Sometimes forgotten in the spiraling crisis of opiate abuse is a
clinical fact about narcotic pain
medications: Addiction is basically an unwanted side effect of drugs
that are highly effective at blunting pain.
Addiction, of course, is a particularly dangerous and disruptive
side effect, since it hijacks a patient’s brain and demands escalating doses of opioid drugs to hold
withdrawal symptoms at bay.
What if there were a drug that
did the job opioids do best —
relieve pain — without prompting
many of their negative side effects,
especially addiction?
A researcher from the University of Michigan Medical School
may have done just that.
Tomas Joaquin Fernandez has
described a process for designing
opioid-like drugs that would act
on pain receptors in the brain
while blocking the receptors responsible for fostering dependence and building tolerance.
Using pain-relieving peptides
released by the brain as models,
Fernandez and colleagues developed a library of “peptidomimetics.” These agents were small
enough to get into the brain, and
they worked on different opioid
receptors in different ways.
When they tested one such
compound in mice, they found
that it not only relieved pain, it
also induced less buildup of tolerance and less physical dependence than morphine. In other
words, it was less addictive.
“We are striving to solve the opioid epidemic by working at the
most fundamental problem: the
effective treatment of pain,” said
Fernandez, whose work was presented during the 2018 Experimental Biology meeting in San Diego.
“Our work can also provide other researchers with a better understanding of opioid receptors and
interactions between receptors,
which could be exploited to develop better options for pain management,” he said.
— Los Angeles Times
H EA LTH S CA N
AWARENESS
140,000 Americans are killed by stroke
each year, even though it’s largely preventable
How stroke-aware are you?
Perhaps you know the warning
signs — sudden numbness on one
side of the body, trouble speaking, sudden blurred vision, trouble walking — or know someone
who has experienced a stroke.
There’s never a bad time to
brush up on stroke awareness,
and May — National Stroke
Awareness Month — is a good
time to get up to speed.
According to the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention,
stroke is our fifth-leading cause of
death, accounting for 140,000 fatalities each year. It’s also largely
preventable. Although things
such as family history and age can
increase stroke risk, up to 80 percent of strokes can be sidestepped
with lifestyle changes that include
controlling blood pressure and
quitting smoking.
The National Stroke Association’s Stroke Awareness Month
website can help you learn how to
identify and prevent a stroke, and
spread the word. The site offers
resources on stroke and ways to
tell a friend via social media or
free e-cards.
Another way to up your stroke
awareness without putting down
E3
EE
National Stroke Awareness
Month
National Stroke Association
your phone or leaving your desk
is to visit Stroke Connection, a
virtual magazine. Co-produced
by the American Heart Association and the American Stroke
Association, it can be found via a
free app or at strokeconnection.
strokeassociation.org. The quarterly includes articles on risk
management and stroke treatment, and information for stroke
survivors.
Speaking of survival, there’s
another resource for people who
have been through a stroke. The
Hand in Hand Show podcast —
free and updated weekly — is
produced and hosted entirely by
stroke survivors and caregivers.
Episodes cover such questions as
“Why me?” along with ways to
heal after a stroke and the unique
stories of people who have been
through a stroke and people who
care for them. You can hear
episodes, which clock in at
around 30 minutes, at handinhandshow.com or via iTunes or
Google Play.
— Erin Blakemore
Fiber: Why it’s vital to good health
F
iber gets well-deserved
credit for keeping the
digestive system in good
working order — but it
does plenty more. In
fact, it’s a major player in so many
of your body’s systems that getting enough can actually help
keep you youthful. Older people
who ate fiber-rich diets were
80 percent more likely to live
longer and stay healthier than
those who didn’t, according to a
recent study in the Journals of
Gerontology.
The trouble is, few Americans
consume the amount they should.
For people age 51 and older, government guidelines recommend
at least 28 grams per day for men
and 22 grams for women. But
adults in this age group actually
average just about 16 grams per
day.
What is fiber, anyway?
Fiber is a carbohydrate found
in plant foods: beans, fruit,
grains, nuts and vegetables. Technically, it isn’t a nutrient because
it isn’t broken down and absorbed. But that’s what makes it
so beneficial.
There are several types of fiber,
but they all fall into two broad
categories: soluble and insoluble.
Soluble fiber is soft and dissolves in water, forming a gellike
substance. It bulks up your stool,
making it easier to pass. Sources
include beans, oats, sweet potatoes and the flesh of some fruit.
Insoluble fiber is found in
whole grains, vegetables and fruit
skin. “This kind of fiber promotes
contractions of the digestive tract
that move food and waste
through the body,” says Lindsay
Malone, a dietitian at the Cleveland Clinic Center for Functional
Medicine.
Many plant foods contain both,
so by eating a variety, you’ll cover
all your bases.
How it keeps you young
How can this simple substance
have such a powerful effect on
health and longevity? It turns out
there are many ways that fiber
works its magic.
Cutting cholesterol. Soluble
fiber binds to bile acids, substances produced by the liver that aid
in digestion and fat absorption,
and it helps your body excrete
them. “The body then needs to
produce more bile acids, and it
pulls cholesterol from the blood
to do it,” says JoAnn E. Manson,
chief of the division of preventive
medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.
Protecting against diabetes. A
study published in 2009 in Diabetes Care found that people who
ISTOCK
Fiber, found in beans, fruit, grains, nuts and vegetables, isn’t broken down and absorbed when eaten.
got less than 20 grams of fiber per
day had about a 50 percent greater risk of developing Type 2 diabetes than those who got 31
grams or more per day. “Eating a
food that’s high in fiber slows the
absorption of carbohydrates into
your bloodstream,” Manson says,
“so blood sugar levels rise more
slowly and the pancreas has more
time to react and produce insulin.”
Controlling weight. Fiber
adds bulk, so you feel full faster
and stay full longer. And many
high-fiber foods are low in calories.
Lowering colorectal cancer
risk. A recent report by the World
Cancer Research Fund International/American Institute for
Cancer Research found that eating 90 grams of fiber-rich whole
grains daily could lower colorectal cancer risk by 17 percent.
Reducing
inflammation.
Chronic inflammation has been
linked to many diseases, such as
arthritis, certain cancers and
even Alzheimer’s. “Many studies
have shown that increased insoluble fiber intake leads to reduced
inflammation,” says Qi Sun, an
assistant professor in the department of nutrition at the Harvard
T.H. Chan School of Public
Health.
Protecting joints. If fiber can
reduce inflammation, it stands to
reason that it may help reduce the
risk of arthritis. And a recent
study, published in the Annals of
the Rheumatic Diseases, offers
some proof. Researchers evaluated two groups. In one, those
whose daily fiber intake averaged
20 grams had a 30 percent lower
risk of knee osteoarthritis than
people who ate about eight
grams. In the other, those who
averaged about 25 grams of fiber
per day had a 61 percent lower
risk compared with those who
consumed about 14 grams.
Boosting good bacteria in the
gut. “Fiber doesn’t digest, it ferments,” Malone says. “By the time
it reaches the colon, the fermented material supplies food to help
those good bacteria multiply and
thrive.” A healthy supply of good
bacteria can have far-reaching
health effects, such as strengthening the immune system and
helping to control inflammation.
Natural or not?
Beta glucan, cellulose, chicory
root, inulin, pectin, psyllium and
xanthan gum are types of fiber
that are added to some packaged
foods. The Food and Drug Administration is reviewing some of
those ingredients to determine
whether to allow manufacturers
to continue to count them as part
of a product’s total fiber content.
“The advantage of adding fiber
into foods and beverages is to
increase fiber without increasing
calories,” says Joanne Slavin, a
professor of food science at the
University of Minnesota. But critics worry that this practice may
make something that’s essentially
junk food appear to be healthy
because the label touts its fiber
content.
Tips for boosting fiber intake
Getting fiber from foods naturally rich in it is your best bet.
“Using a supplement as a replacement means missing out on all
the other benefits of fruits, vegetables and whole grains,” Manson says.
And getting more fiber doesn’t
limit you to eating only prunes
and wheat bran. Some top
sources include avocados, green
peas, raspberries, sweet potatoes
and pears.
People often cite gas and bloating as reasons for not adding
more fiber-rich foods to their
diets too quickly. That concern is
warranted. “There are enzymes
that need to be cultivated so that
the intestines are ready to handle
the increased load,” Manson says.
So up your fiber intake gradually; spread it across meals; drink
more water simultaneously to
avoid constipation; and consider
experimenting with a variety of
high-fiber foods to find which
ones your digestive system tolerates best.
© Copyright 2018, Consumer Reports Inc.
Consumer Reports is an
independent, nonprofit organization
that works side by side with
consumers to create a fairer, safer,
and healthier world. CR does not
endorse products or services, and
does not accept advertising. CR has
no financial relationship with
advertisers in this publication. Read
more at ConsumerReports.org.
Tooth whiteners essentially bleach your teeth, and that has pros and cons
Walk down the
toothpaste aisle at
your typical
JILL U.
drugstore and
ADAMS
you’ll see a range
of products that
promise to whiten your teeth.
Whitening toothpaste, whitening
strips, a whitening gel that you
can paint on your teeth with a
cotton swab or use in a mouth
tray, a two-step “daily cleaning
and whitening system,” and more.
“I see a lot more attention on
pretty smiles,” says Clifton Carey,
a chemist at the University of
Colorado’s School of Dental
Medicine. Tooth whitening, in
particular, is “a big thing these
days. A lot of sellers and a lot of
customers.”
The products at the drugstore
all have essentially the same
whitening ingredient — the
bleaching agent peroxide. If you
go to your dentist for a
professional tooth whitening,
they’ll use a more concentrated
peroxide product.
With the in-office procedure,
“you get a lot of whitening very
quickly, but it requires expertise,”
says Matthew Messina, a
practicing dentist at the Ohio
State University College of
Dentistry and a spokesman for
the American Dental Association.
With such a high-powered
bleaching agent, he says, “the
dentist has to protect the gums.”
The over-the-counter products
are weaker. That means less
active whitening but also less risk
to the gums, should the whitening
agent come in contact. “All of the
products are safe if used as
directed,” Messina says. Still, they
can increase sensitivity of teeth
and they can irritate gum tissue.
“Anything that doesn’t feel right,
you should see your dentist.”
Tooth whitening is best done in
a “healthy mouth condition,”
Messina says. “Have a thorough
exam, make sure your teeth are
clean and that plaque and tartar
have been removed.” Also, be
aware that tooth whitening doesn’t
work on crowns or most fillings.
AnyBODY
Professional whitening, which
will be immediate and last for
years, might cost $500 or more
and is not generally covered by
dental insurance. Products to use
at home usually require multiple
applications over a week or two,
will have a gradual and lesser
whitening effect, and will not last
as long. Whitening strips can cost
as little as $25.
“The do-it-yourself products
can be used as a booster, after a
professional treatment, to keep
the teeth white,” Carey says.
“Dentists often recommend this.”
How do these products work?
“It’s a surface-type bleach,” Carey
says, working on stains that are
bonded to tooth enamel. “Bleach
is a chemical that breaks those
bonds,” Carey says. The staining
compounds might remain, but
the bleach turns them clear.
The concentrated product that
dentists use also dehydrate the
tooth somewhat. “That’s the
immediate color change —
bleaching plus dehydration,”
Carey says. As the surface of the
tooth rehydrates over the next
few weeks, people may notice
their teeth’s whiteness slip back a
couple of shades.
A quick bit of tooth anatomy:
Enamel is the thin hard outer
layer of the tooth; dentin is the
next layer in and is less dense
than enamel. In the middle is the
pulp, which is the soft tissue that
holds the nerve center.
“Enamel is what you’re
bleaching,” Carey says. “It’s really
thin near the gum line. If you
have receding gums, it exposes
your root tissues.” Dentists try to
avoid applying the concentrated
product on or near the dentin.
Dentin comes into play for
aesthetics as well, because it’s got
a naturally yellowish hue. As
people age, their enamel can
become thinner, a result of
decades of wear and tear. The
thinner the enamel, the more
likely the yellowish dentin shows
through. That’s why older people
often have yellowed teeth.
Bleaching products won’t help in
this situation because they don’t
affect the dentin.
There are a few other
discolorations that whitening
procedures cannot change. If you
took tetracycline as a kid, say for
an ear infection, you might have
antibiotic staining of the teeth. Or
if your teeth suffered trauma
when you were young and your
enamel was still forming,
whitening won’t work. Dentists
refer to these discolorations as
intrinsic stains.
If you spend a little time
searching the Web, you’ll find
plenty of ideas about natural
methods of tooth whitening. Use
lemon juice or apple cider vinegar
as a mouthwash? Scrub your teeth
with an activated charcoal
product? Messina says those
techniques come with risks. The
acid of lemon juice can erode the
enamel on your teeth, and
charcoal is an abrasive that can
wear it away. “Your teeth will be
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whiter initially, but as the enamel
wears away, you’ll see more
dentin,” Messina says. “That
yellowish color will show through.”
Can you prevent your teeth
from becoming stained in the first
place? Good practices mean
avoiding staining substances. The
most egregious are red wine,
coffee and tobacco residue. Other
foods on the staining list are tea,
tomato sauce and balsamic
vinegar. If the thought of avoiding
any of those makes you want to
cry, Messina advises rinsing with
water after eating. Brushing your
teeth is even better.
And, of course, the dentists
advise good oral hygiene: regular
brushing, flossing and checkups.
health-science@washpost.com
free educational seminar
Ankle Arthritis and Total Ankle Replacement
The Sibley Institute of Bone
& Joint Health is pleased to
present an informative, free
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and Total Ankle Replacement
Surgery with Ben Stein,
M.D., orthopaedic surgeon
with expertise in foot and
ankle orthopaedics, as well
as arthroplasty and sports
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Wednesday, May 9
6:30 to 8 p.m.
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SIBLEY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL | 5255 LOUGHBORO ROAD, NW | WASHINGTON, DC 20016 | SIBLEY.ORG
E4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
Some can seek aid in dying, many can’t
BY
M ICHAEL O LLOVE
Susan Boyce, married and the
mother of four, doesn’t know
when she will die, but she does
know how. One day, her diseasedecimated lungs will no longer be
able to pump oxygen through her
bloodstream.
“What happens with us is that
we can’t get enough oxygen,” said
Boyce, 54, of Rumson, N.J., who
must take oxygen through a machine most of the day to breathe.
“We die by suffocation. I don’t
want to die by suffocation. It’s a
slow, awful death.”
Which is why Boyce, whose
condition causes her immune system to destroy healthy lung tissue, wants New Jersey to join the
handful of states that allow physicians to prescribe lethal medications to dying patients.
New Jersey is one of at least 25
states considering aid-in-dying
bills this year, according to the
Denver-based advocacy group
Compassion and Choices, and advocates think momentum is on
their side.
Nearly 18 percent of Americans
live in places where aid-in-dying
is legal, and support is increasing:
A recent Gallup poll found twothirds in favor, up from half four
years earlier. Some medical
groups have softened their opposition. And increasing life spans,
while generally a positive development, mean that more Americans are watching their parents
die drawn-out, agonizing deaths.
Oregon voters legalized aid-indying — sometimes referred to as
“death with dignity” or assisted
suicide — by approving a ballot
measure in 1994. Washington
state voters followed suit in 2008,
and a court ruling made it legal in
Montana in 2009. Since 2013, Colorado, California, Vermont and
the District have legalized it, either through ballot initiative or
legislation. (The District’s law
withstood an attempt last year to
nullify it, but no patients have
used it. Some advocates say the
rules make doing so difficult.)
David Grube, who practiced
family medicine in Oregon before
retiring in 2012, once opposed
aid-in-dying. But he said that as
more states have legalized it and
no evidence has emerged that patients are being pressured into the
process, more people are becoming comfortable with the idea.
“It’s like same-sex marriage,”
said Grube, who is the medical
director of Compassion and
Choices. “Forty or 50 years ago, I
didn’t even know what a homosexual was. Now I see people in
loving relationships, and that’s
great.”
Even some critics of the aid-indying idea acknowledge the momentum.
“Many of my colleagues have
softened,” said Ira Byock, a
palliative-care doctor in Torrance,
Calif., who is chief medical officer
for the Institute for Human Caring. The institute provides medical, spiritual and emotional support to seriously ill patients and
their families as part of the Providence St. Joseph Health system.
The American Medical Association remains firmly against aidin-dying. “Physician-assisted sui-
COURTESY OF AMANDA BAUDANZA
COURTESY OF KEVIN STONE
“I don’t want to die by suffocation,” says Susan Boyce, here with
husband Kevin Stone. She wants New Jersey to allow physicians to
prescribe lethal medications to dying patients.
cide is fundamentally incompatible with the physician’s role as
healer, would be difficult or impossible to control, and would
pose serious societal risks,” the
group says. Yet, 10 of its state
chapters have dropped their opposition.
Officially, organizations such
as the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization maintain
their opposition to aid-in-dying
measures. But many individual
practitioners have become more
comfortable with the idea.
Many supporters credit as a
turning point the extensive media
coverage of the 2014 death of
29-year-old Brittany Maynard,
who had an aggressive form of
brain cancer and who promoted
aid-in-dying before taking lethal
medications prescribed by her
doctor in Oregon.
“I really did believe that good
palliative care could address the
needs of people who were dying,”
said Ann Jackson, the CEO of the
Oregon Hospice Association from
1988 to 2008. But Jackson came to
change her mind.
“The main thing I’ve learned is
that that is not true,” said Jackson,
who now consults on end-of-life
issues. “We may be able to address
pain and symptoms, but we cannot address the futility some people feel at the end of life, the
suffering they feel over their loss
of autonomy. Hospice care cannot
allow people to control their lives
if they are going to deny them the
right to die at a time of their own
choosing.”
The Catholic Church remains
firmly opposed to aid-in-dying, as
do many organizations that represent people with disabilities.
Oregon the model
Most state measures are modeled on Oregon’s law, which outlines steps for patients who want
assistance in death: The person
must be a state resident, at least
18 years old, still able to communicate, and diagnosed with a terminal illness with a prognosis of
six months or less.
Patients must make two separate oral and one written request
to their physician. The prescribing physician and a consulting
physician must confirm the diagnosis and prognosis and determine whether the patient is capable of making a decision and isn’t
impaired by a mental disorder.
And the prescribing physician
must inform the patient of feasible alternatives to medical aid-indying, including hospice care and
pain control.
Oregon closely tracks how the
law is used. Since the measure took
effect in 1997, 1,967 people have
received prescriptions under the
law, and 1,275 have ingested the
medication. Oregon data shows
the median age for people who
took this option in 2017 was 74.
Byock said he believes doctors
who provide aid-in-dying are violating the most sacred stricture in
medicine. He also believes that in
most cases, it is possible to pro-
vide pain relief to dying patients
and that the real problem is that
quality palliative care is not universally available or embraced by
the medical profession.
Byock also points out that the
biggest concern of Oregon patients who used the law was not
escape from pain, but their decreasing ability to enjoy their
lives, loss of autonomy and loss of
dignity, according to an Oregon
report on its use. “Plenty of other
people face those same conditions,” said Byock, including those
with severe arthritis, depression
or failing eyesight. “Once we go
down this road, it’s a slippery
slope.”
In Oregon, however, patients
didn’t turn to aid-in-dying because they couldn’t get end-of-life
services. About 90 percent were
enrolled in hospice at the time of
death, according to the most recent state data, published this
year.
Byock acknowledges palliative
care can’t always take away pain.
It didn’t for T.J. Baudanza Jr., a
onetime marketing manager who
in 2015 died of colon cancer at age
32 in New Seabury, Mass. “T.J.
died the way he feared he would,”
said Amanda Baudanza, his widow, in an interview. “He suffered a
prolonged, painful death because
Massachusetts denied him the option of medical aid-in-dying.” He
was in hospice in the last portion
of his life.
T.J. had been a big supporter of
an aid-in-dying referendum that
narrowly missed passage in Massachusetts in 2012, not long after
his diagnosis. Now Amanda is
championing aid-in-dying in the
state legislature.
“I’m Catholic, and so was T.J.,”
Baudanza said, “but he and I both
believed that God wouldn’t want
anyone to suffer needlessly.”
In New Jersey, Susan Boyce
says her lungs are doing well
enough that she believes her
death is still off in the distance.
She doesn’t know whether she
actually would take medicine that
would end her life. But she knows
one thing: “I want the option.”
health-science@washpost.com
Ollove is a reporter for Stateline, an
initiative of the Pew Charitable Trusts.
“Hospice care cannot allow people to control their lives if they are going to deny them
the right to die at a time of their own choosing.”
Ann Jackson, a former CEO of the Oregon Hospice Association
MAY 1 , 2018
Simple questions reveal
stories of patients’ lives
PATIENT FROM E1
T.J. Baudanza Jr. with his wife, Amanda, in 2011. “He suffered a prolonged, painful death because
Massachusetts denied him the option of medical aid-in-dying,” she says.
. TUESDAY,
these stories — about the illness
and about the patient — are important in different ways.
When we look at the medical
chart, we can read multiple notes
without learning any information
that tells us who our patients really
are. But what if we could sit down
with our patients for an hour and
learn about them as people?
So I was intrigued when I heard
about the My Life, My Story program started in 2013 by Eileen
Ahearn and Dean Krahn, psychiatrists at the Veterans Affairs hospital in Madison, Wis. With My Life,
My Story, veterans have the opportunity to tell their story through
interviews. These interviews are
conducted by volunteers, social
work interns, medical students
and staff, and others.
Each story is approximately
1,000 words long and written in the
first person. Suggested interview
questions include: “What has been
the most significant change you’ve
seen in yourself? What is most important to you? What are you most
grateful for? What do you want
your health-care team to know that
they don’t already know?” There
are no medical questions.
The interviewer writes a story,
then shares it with the veteran to
make sure it is accurate. The story is
then stored in the VA electronic
medical record; any VA provider
caring for the veteran can quickly
access it. The patient and family are
also offered a printed copy to keep.
The Veterans Health Adminis-
When we look at the
medical chart, we can
read multiple notes
without learning . . .
who our patients really
are. What if we could sit
down . . . and learn
about them as people?
tration, the largest integrated
health-care system in the United
States and a part of VA, operates
170 medical centers and 1,063 outpatient sites. They serve 9 million
veterans every year, placing VA in
a position to set an example for
other health-care systems. The My
Life, My Story program is offered
at 18 VA medical centers, and VA
plans to implement the program
nationally.
This provokes the question:
Why don’t all hospitals have this
program? The VA system is unique
in that its electronic patient record system allows seamless transitions of care between providers,
allowing patients’ stories to be visible to many.
However, the model is a fairly
simple one to duplicate. By mobilizing community resources, our
patients’ stories can be captured
by community volunteers who
don’t need to be skilled healthcare providers. We can learn more
about our patients and help them
leave a legacy.
Susan Nathan, a specialist in
geriatrics and palliative care,
championed the program at the
VA Boston Healthcare System in
Massachusetts as a way for students and trainees from multiple
health and social professions to
really get to know a patient’s
whole person rather than merely a
list of medical problems.
According to Nathan, “Many
veterans are surprised how good
their story is when they hear it.”
One family sent her a copy of the
eulogy from the funeral of one of
her patients: It included a My Story excerpt. Another veteran requested 12 copies to give to everyone in his immediate family.
Since Nathan spearheaded and
formalized the program in April
2016 at the West Roxbury campus
of the VA Boston Healthcare System, stories of 230 veterans ranging in age from 33 to 103 have been
written.
At their core, stories help our
patients heal emotionally and
physically. They help both doctors
and patients reflect on their experiences with suffering in all forms.
When people tell their own stories,
they often suppress their bodies’
response to stress, minimizing the
production of stress hormones
such as cortisol and epinephrine.
At the same time, individuals may
release dopamine, endorphins and
oxytocin, which can help improve
mood. Through these mechanisms, storytelling may reduce
stress, anxiety and depression. In
addition, this process reminds our
patients that their stories are
unique and gives them a legacy.
Furthermore, as providers, it is
important for us to know whom we
are taking care of. One patient
Nathan interviewed, for example,
had helped liberate 15,000 people
from a concentration camp. By
knowing more, we can be more
connected and engaged with our
patients. We can truly live the “patient-centered care” that we talk of.
These stories humanize the person
in the hospital bed and may protect against physician burnout.
Nathan told me the story of a
Vietnam War-era Marine veteran
she cared for in her medical center’s inpatient hospice unit. “By the
time I met him, he was close to the
end of his life and couldn’t communicate. I was told that he had been
very stoic and that he hadn’t wanted to take pain medicine despite
having severe pain. He didn’t have
any visitors, there were no pictures, there was no way for me to
know who he was as a person
before this point,” she recounted.
Fortunately, he had done a My
Life, My Story interview about six
months earlier. “He talked about
when he was a kid, sitting at the top
of the stairs and watching his parents dance in the basement. He
talked about love and loss and guilt
about not being there for family
and about not taking better care of
himself. There was nowhere else in
the chart where I could have found
that information, and it helped me
feel like I actually knew who I was
taking care of and more connected
to him.”
Although these stories cannot
capture an entire life, they can
capture emotions, relationships
and values. All by asking a few
simple questions.
health-science@washpost.com
DeFilippis is a resident physician in
internal medicine at Brigham and
Women’s Hospital in Boston and will
be starting a fellowship in
cardiovascular medicine this summer
at New York Presbyterian Hospital —
Columbia University Medical Center.
It’s no longer rare for pets to be given mood-altering medications
PETS FROM E1
ety, compulsive behaviors, phobias and aggression in pets. As a
result, many American pets are
taking psychiatric medications.
“I think the increased use of
psychoactive drugs comes from
acceptance, even in the scientific
community, that it’s okay to talk
about fear, stress and anxiety in
animals,” said Carlo Siracusa, a
clinical assistant professor of behavior medicine at the University
of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine.
On the basis of a 2017 national
survey, the market research firm
Packaged Facts concluded that
8 percent of dog owners and
6 percent of cat owners gave medications to their pets for anxiety,
calming or mood purposes within
the previous 12 months. Because
about 60 million American households own dogs and 47 million
households own cats, according
to one estimate, these figures suggest that millions of animals in
the United States are taking medications for behavioral issues.
Some versions of human medications have received approval by
the Food and Drug Administration for specific mental-health
uses in pets, including the antidepressant clomipramine (Clomicalm) for separation anxiety in
dogs, the sedative dexmedetomidine (Sileo) for dogs with noiseaversion problems, and selegiline
(Anipryl), a drug often used to
treat Parkinson’s disease in humans, for canine cognitive dysfunction.
However, many if not most of
the psychiatric medications given
to pets are being used off-label —
that is, for conditions other than
the ones that the drugs were
approved to treat. A survey of
small-animal veterinarians published in 2016 found that 83 percent had prescribed the antidepressant fluoxetine (a.k.a. Prozac
for humans) to cats and/or dogs,
often for off-label uses such as
treating inappropriate urination
and aggression. Owners have
written about giving common
psychiatric drugs such as buspirone, trazodone and alprazolam (Xanax, for humans) to their
pets. An article for the website the
Daily Puppy publicizes risperidone, an antipsychotic used in
humans for the treatment of
schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, as an option for “improving
your dog’s behavior.”
Whether pets really need these
mood-altering drugs remains
controversial. Nicholas Dodman,
a professor emeritus at the Tufts
University Cummings School of
Veterinary Medicine and author
of the book “Pets on the Couch,”
has written that animals experience behavioral disorders similar
to those of humans and that pets
may need medications to alleviate
their suffering. Treating these
conditions, Dodman says, might
also prevent some pets with behavioral issues from being sent to
shelters or from being euthanized.
Siracusa said that the use of
psychiatric drugs in veterinary
medicine represents a shift away
from poorly regulated “punishment-based behavior modification” such as shock collars for
dogs that bark too much. “If you
have to use a psychoactive drug,
you have to talk to a vet, right?” he
said. “If you have to use the shock
collar, you just go on Amazon and
buy it yourself,” he said, adding,
“The psychoactive drug is probably more benign of all the possible terrible things that [people]
could do to animals when [they]
don’t like their behavior.”
Yet it’s not entirely clear how
often these medications are used
to truly care for pets, as opposed
to being used for the convenience
of pet owners. In a 2015 column in
The Washington Post, veterinarian Michael W. Fox wrote about his
concerns regarding “the overreliance on psychopharmaceuticals
to help animals adapt to situa-
tions in which they do not belong
— such as a dog being left at home
in a crate all day.” While drugs
may be helpful in some cases, he
wrote, “the trend of applying
mind-altering drugs to help animals cope in stimulation-lacking
and socially deprived domestic
environments is an ethical concern that all responsible parties
need to address.”
There is at least some published evidence to support treating pets with psychiatric drugs. In
particular,
randomized,
placebo-controlled trials suggest
that antidepressants may help
dogs suffering from separation
anxiety or compulsive behaviors
such as tail chasing. But several of
these studies received some funding from the pharmaceutical
companies marketing these
drugs to veterinarians and pet
owners. These studies also frequently showed mixed results or
included behavioral therapies as
part of the treatments for animals.
Critics of giving pets psychiatric medications argue that owners should rely more on behavioral approaches, such as spending
more time with pets, taking them
outdoors and using training programs. Research supports the notion that environmental factors
probably play a role in the devel-
opment of behavioral issues in
pets. Perhaps unsurprisingly,
studies suggest that dogs who are
walked only a few times each
week or whose owners spend less
time at home may be at greater
risk for behavioral problems,
such as excessive barking and
destructiveness.
Still, there are situations that
seem to warrant treating pets
with psychiatric medications. For
instance, veterinary staff often
suffer injuries such as lacerations
and bites from agitated animals.
Under these circumstances, veterinarians may turn to such medications as acepromazine — a
medication similar to chlorpromazine, the first antipsychotic
widely used in humans — to help
sedate aggressive pets.
Giving these kinds of drugs to
pets isn’t risk-free. Just as with
humans, psychiatric medications
for pets can carry plenty of side
effects, including gastrointestinal
upset, weight changes and irregular heartbeats.
The overlapping use of psychiatric medications among humans
and animals also raises the specter of owners sharing drugs with
their pets. Veterinarians have
voiced concerns about owners using pets to obtain access to restricted drugs, including antipain opioids and anti-anxiety
benzodiazepines. (Some states
now require veterinarians to file
reports to authorities when prescribing controlled substances
for pets.)
Veterinary organizations are
establishing frameworks to guide
the use of psychiatric drugs in
pets. In 2015, the American Animal Hospital Association published practice guidelines for the
behavioral management of cats
and dogs, including recommendations regarding when medications may be helpful to these
animals. Several academic institutions now offer specialized
training in animal behavior for
veterinarians, including board
certification in the specialty by
the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists.
Pets undoubtedly have mentalhealth needs that deserve our
attention. But as a doctor specializing in mental-health care for
people, I’ve learned that prescribing psychiatric medications often
comes with a great deal of uncertainty.
I can only imagine how hard it
must be when the patients cannot
speak their minds.
health-science@washpost.com
Morris is a resident physician in
psychiatry at the Stanford University
School of Medicine.
TUESDAY, MAY 1 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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Top athletes know the value of low-intensity training
METABOLISM FROM E1
quickly switch between fat and
carbohydrates to fuel exercise.
Individuals with Type 2 diabetes are metabolically inflexible.
That is, they have a poor ability to
switch back and forth. Endurance
athletes, on the other hand, have
an amazing capacity to do so. Fats
and carbohydrates are metabolized in the mitochondria, so mitochondrial function is the key
element behind metabolic flexibility.
Elite athletes, San Millàn explained, are incredibly efficient at
this task because they have a high
level of mitochondrial health.
“Mitochondria have the job in
“I . . . don’t exercise to
the degree that Liz does.
So we were shocked to
see that I had good
metabolic efficiency and
Liz didn’t.”
Diane Wolfert, who joined with her
daughter LIz in being tested for
metabolic flexibility
cells of metabolizing carbohydrates and fats in order to generate energy,” he said. “As a result,
this is a population practically
devoid of Type 2 diabetes.”
The average person, however,
may have a metabolism that is
less agile. “If you are not metabolically flexible, you have a tough
time accessing and burning fat
for fuel,” San Millàn explained.
Wolfert learned this after a trip
with her mother to San Millàn’s
lab. “We read about his testing
methods and that he was looking
for average people to come in and
try it,” Wolfert explained. “We
thought it might be a good idea to
see where we stood and if it could
help me with my” suspected pre-diabetes.
Both Wolfert and her mother
expected her to exhibit better
metabolic efficiency. “I am your
typical deskbound American, not
athletic, and don’t exercise to the
degree that Liz does,” said Diane
Wolfert, who is 66. “So we were
shocked to see that I had good
metabolic efficiency and Liz
didn’t.”
One thing the mother got right
that the daughter did not was
exercising at a low intensity. “I do
go for walks,” said Diane Wolfert.
“Based on my results, nothing
needed to change.”
San Millàn has spent years
testing the metabolic flexibility of
elite athletes using high-tech and
expensive methods. The standard
test includes a muscle biopsy,
which is not practical for widespread use.
Determined to broaden the
test’s accessibility, San Millàn developed a streamlined version
that he used on the Wolferts.
San Millàn has patients exercise at gradually increasing intensity on either a bike or a treadmill
wearing a mask that measures
how efficiently they are utilizing
fat and carbohydrates. “The test
stresses the mitochondria to give
us very clear signals of how well
they work,” he said. “I take periodic blood samples from the fingertip and assess how quickly the
cells are clearing lactate, which is
a metabolic byproduct that can
lead to disease if it accumulates.”
San Millàn tested his methods
to demonstrate their efficacy vs.
the standard protocol, which involves a muscle biopsy, and it held
up well, he said. “All the physicians I talk to love the concept of
my test, and many refer their
patients to us for metabolic rehabilitation.”
Rosalie Naglieri, a Marylandbased clinical endocrinologist,
finds the approach intriguing but
suggests that multiple factors
may be at play.
“I think this test probably has
validity in trying to determine
why some people really have
marked benefits with adding exercise, and other people have
hardly any,” she said. “I have
many patients who exercise all
the time and can’t lose a pound. I
also have very heavy patients doing IronGirl-like (sprint triathlon) races. The question in these
patients: Is the exercise wrong for
them or is the diet they eat
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT BOULDER
Iñigo San Millàn conducts a metabolic flexibility test, in which a patient exercises at gradually
increasing intensity while wearing a mask to reveal how efficiently fat and carbohydrates are utilized.
wrong?”
According to San Millàn, the
only treatment for metabolic inefficiency is exercise, and for the
more sedentary, it should be very
low in intensity.
In contrast, however, some
studies have shown that highintensity interval training, or
HIIT, can benefit pre-diabetics as
well as a moderate-intensity program does. “So the interesting
question would be,” Naglieri said,
“in those HIIT studies, what is
their mitochondrial status before
and after? Or did those studies
somehow have a skewed population?”
Since taking her test with San
Millàn in early 2016, Liz Wolfert
began taking 30-to-60-minute
walks several times per week.
“After several months of this, I
climbed a 14er and realized it was
much easier for me,” she said. “My
body began working more efficiently.”
When she was retested, Wolfert said, she was thrilled to learn
that she was in the normal range
for metabolic efficiency. And her
primary-care physician ordered a
blood test that indicated that her
signs of pre-diabetes were gone.
“Clearly I needed to add this
lower-intensity work into my routine,” she said.
“I do agree that exercise is not a
one-size-fits-all,” Naglieri said,
“and that there are definitely differences in metabolic response to
exercise.”
San Millàn said that too many
people are like Wolfert: They
work out, but at too high an
intensity for their fitness level. “If
you look at the exercise workloads of top athletes, they do 70
percent to 80 percent of their
training at a low intensity,” he
said. “But out on the streets, we
often see the opposite: an out-ofshape population jumping in at
high intensity.”
The result can be burnout, injury or not keeping heart rates
low enough to build mitochondria. “Really what we need is an
individualized approach for everyone,” he said. “But for beginners, walking is a wonderful place
to start. It can be incredible medicine.”
health-science@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
MAY 1 , 2018
‘A 50-50 shot: The baby is either going to survive or not’
this as long as I live,” she says.
“He’s at the foot of my bed, and
he’s, like, ‘Okay, we’re going to put
you under. And there’s a 50-50
shot: The baby is either going to
survive or not.’ ”
FETAL FROM E1
T
he first sign that something
might be wrong had come
at 21 weeks, when a routine
ultrasound flagged a small
amount of fluid around the baby’s
heart. The Kellners’ doctor suggested she follow up with a specialist.
Alysha, a high school Spanish
teacher, and her husband, Ben, a
mechanical designer, made the
appointment and decided not to
worry about it. Instead, they
threw a party to celebrate the
pregnancy at their house in Shoreview, Minn., north of St. Paul.
The party featured a cake that
held the secret of the baby’s gender beneath its yellow and white
icing. Alysha and Ben cut into it
together, and everyone could see
that the inside was pink. It was a
girl.
Then came their visit with the
specialist at the Midwest Fetal
Care Center at Children’s Hospital and Clinics of Minnesota,
where they were blindsided by
the news: Their baby had a fetal
teratoma, a rare kind of tumor.
And hers was an even rarer type
that is called a pericardial teratoma because it is found on the
heart.
They also learned that the tumor had caused a dangerous
amount of fluid to accumulate
around the baby’s heart and that
the fluid would need to be
drained with a needle. Then they
discussed what might happen
next.
Ideally, the tumor would avoid
causing too many more problems
until the pregnancy had passed
28 weeks, when doctors could
operate on the baby while she was
still attached to the placenta and
then deliver her using an ex utero
intrapartum treatment, or EXIT
procedure. The Minnesota doctors had related experience: They
had done EXIT procedures for
other conditions, and they had
operated on tumors in newborn
babies before.
But if the tumor grew too
quickly and put too much stress
on the baby before 28 weeks,
Alysha and Ben would have to
decide whether to try to save the
baby with a more advanced kind
of fetal surgery. Surgeons would
slice through Alysha’s uterus and
the baby’s chest and remove most
of the tumor. But instead of delivering the baby as with an EXIT
procedure, they would sew mother and baby back up for the
remainder of the pregnancy.
Children’s Minnesota had
started performing open fetal
surgeries like these just a year
earlier, after the arrival of pediatric surgeon Joseph Lillegard, and
the hospital didn’t have experience with fetal teratomas.
T
he era of open fetal surgery
was still fairly new. It began
in 1981, when doctors at the
University of California at San
Francisco (UCSF) successfully operated on a fetus with a blocked
urinary tract. In the early days of
the technique, doctors cut
through a mother’s uterus only
when a fetus’s problems were
bound to be lethal, Lillegard says.
As a result, there were a lot of
early failures.
Eventually, the procedure became more common, especially
for a form of spina bifida in which
a baby’s spinal cord and spinal
canal don’t close during development, leading to nerve damage
and other problems.
Between 1997 and 2003, doctors performed more than 200
open surgeries in the United
States on fetuses with spina bifi-
T
PHOTOS BY JENN ACKERMAN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
ABOVE: Alysha Kellner
reads to her daughter, Kora,
who was born weeks after
undergoing surgery in the
womb.
LEFT: Ben Kellner puts
Kora down for a nap at the
family home in Shoreview,
Minn. Her last scan showed
no signs of the heart tumor
that threatened her before
her birth on Sept. 29.
he surgery began at 8 a.m.
with two incisions on Alysha’s abdomen. Music is
common in an operating room
during routine procedures. But
the only sounds that day were
words of communication among
the 20 or so doctors and nurses
present.
Guided by ultrasound, an incision in Alysha’s uterus exposed
the baby’s chest and arms, which
the surgeons splayed out, like a
gymnast at the end of a routine —
chest up, back arched. The fetus
had her own anesthesiology team
and tiny IV. She weighed less than
two pounds. Each arm was smaller than a surgeon’s index finger.
When the doctors cut open her
chest, Lillegard says, the tumor
bulged out. Roughly the size of an
orange, it was four times bigger
than her heart.
Lillegard and pediatric cardiovascular surgeon Francis Moga
used tweezerlike electrocautery
tools to remove the tumor, bit by
bit. They wanted to work quickly
while also allowing time to observe and respond to distress in
the baby. When her heart occasionally slowed down, they used
medications, gave blood or repositioned the tumor to speed it up.
In the recovery room, Ben waited, playing cards, praying and
talking with a small group of
family members, including his
parents. If a decision needed to be
made during the procedure, Ben
knew it would be up to him to
make the call.
Around 10:30 a.m., Lillegard
appeared and told the family that
the surgery had been a success.
The surgeons had removed more
than 90 percent of the tumor and
would get the rest after the birth.
Ben cried. So did Alysha when
she woke up and heard the news.
After sewing up the incisions,
the doctors celebrated, too. “I’ll be
honest, I’ve never had a hug in the
operating room before,” Lillegard
says. “I think I got three that day.”
K
da. And the procedure appeared
to improve outcomes even as it
remained controversial: Some
people thought it put the mother
and baby at too much risk.
A turning point came in 2011,
when researchers at Children’s
Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP),
UCSF and other institutions reported that, compared with babies who underwent surgery for
severe spina bifida after birth,
those who received open fetal
surgery before 26 weeks of gestation were more likely to survive
and less likely to need shunts in
their spinal cords by their first
birthdays. At 30 months old, the
babies who were operated on as
fetuses were more likely to walk
independently, among other measures.
The study was a game-changer,
says Brad Feltis, a pediatric surgeon at Children’s Minnesota
who has long specialized in minimally invasive fetal surgeries,
which are not an option for fetal
teratomas. “It opened up a new
realm of possibilities,” he says.
One of those possibilities was
operating on a fetal teratoma, a
far riskier surgery than one for
spina bifida. In 2013, just four
years before Alysha Kellner got
her diagnosis, doctors at CHOP,
led by pediatric and fetal surgeon
Alan Flake, performed the first
successful open fetal surgery on a
pericardial teratoma. The CHOP
team followed with two more —
the only times the procedure had
ever been performed successfully
anywhere in the world.
The condition is so rare, Lillegard adds, that Children’s Minnesota has diagnosed just three or
four fetal teratomas in the past 10
years. The most recent one had
been in 2014, before the hospital
started its open fetal surgery program, and that baby died without
undergoing surgery.
The Minnesota doctors explained the surgery to Alysha and
Ben, and they did not sugarcoat
the risks. The baby might not
survive the operation or might
have to be delivered during the
procedure — more than two
months early. And even if the
baby did make it, Alysha’s uterus
could rupture later in pregnancy,
which would be fatal for the baby
and an emergency for the mother.
At first, Alysha was determined
to go to Philadelphia if the surgery became necessary. But when
she met the Minnesota doctors,
she felt comfortable with them.
Being close to home also sounded
appealing. She and Ben decided
that, if the surgery became necessary, they would stay.
Preparations began immediately, just in case. Lillegard, who
has two children and a history of
mountaineering and rock-climbing, gathered a team of more than
a dozen specialists, included a
fetal cardiologist, pediatric surgeons, anesthesiologists, even an
ethicist.
Three times a week, Alysha was
given a fetal echocardiogram to
monitor the baby’s heart. Just as
often, doctors met to discuss the
case. Twice, they ran through simulations of anything that might
go wrong during the surgery.
Lillegard also sought advice
from colleagues, including Flake,
who had been one of his mentors
at CHOP. When Lillegard called
him, Flake sensed that the Minnesota doctors faced the added pressure of needing to prove themselves as a new program attempting a complex surgery.
“It’s a very invasive and delicate procedure,” says Flake.
“You’re taking a tumor off of the
heart. Babies are usually compromised by that tumor and are in
some kind of heart failure to
begin with. Any time you compromise cardiac function any further, you have the potential for
deterioration and death.”
B
y the time Alysha was 26
weeks pregnant at the end
of July, the fluid had returned around her baby’s heart
despite having been drained a few
weeks earlier. And the tumor had
quadrupled in size. Lillegard
called her and Ben in for a talk.
In a conference room on a
Saturday morning, he showed
them an MRI scan of the baby on
a large TV screen. They could see
where the tumor had shoved her
heart down near her stomach and
pushed it sideways. She would
not survive without surgery.
Alysha didn’t have to go
through with it. The doctors
made that clear. But she never
considered backing out. Before
the procedure, she and Ben
picked out a name for the baby:
Kora Amada. In Spanish, “Amada” means “loved.” “Kora” reminded them of “corazon,” the
Spanish word for heart.
Two days later, on July 31,
Lillegard talked with Alysha as
she was being prepped for surgery. “I don’t think I’ll ever forget
ora was born on Sept. 29 by
Caesarean section at 35
weeks. She weighed 6
pounds, 4 ounces. Her eyes were
blue, like her dad’s. Lillegard was
assisting in the delivery room, and
Alysha could tell he was in a good
mood. She remembers hearing
him sing “It’s a Wonderful Life.”
As soon as Kora was born,
doctors covered the incision in
her chest and whisked her to the
neonatal intensive care unit. A
week later, they removed the rest
of the tumor. Still in the hospital
on Halloween, Kora wore a Wonder Woman costume. She went
home in November, wearing a
onesie that said “History Maker.”
Now more than 7 months old,
Kora giggles, babbles, sits and
rolls over. Her first solid foods
were avocado and oatmeal. Now
she likes sweet potatoes and butternut squash. Her last MRI
showed no signs of the tumor.
And as her tumor markers continue to drop, Alysha and Ben have
become focused on more typical
baby issues, such as parental
sleep deprivation. Until recently,
Kora was waking up every couple
of hours at night.
All that remains of Kora’s ordeal is a C-shaped scar on her
chest and two small scars lower
down on her ribs. As soon as she
can understand, Alysha and Ben
plan to tell her how she got them.
health-science@washpost.com
Should you bank your baby’s umbilical cord blood? Some facts to keep in mind.
BY
L AURA S ANDERS
How should parents decide
whether to put their baby’s blood
on ice, either for their own family’s future use or as a donation
for the greater good? It’s a tricky
calculation, one that changes
based on a family’s risk threshold, dreams for the future and, of
course, money.
In 2015, the American College
of Obstetricians and Gynecologists put out an opinion that, at
this point, the science doesn’t
support routine cord blood banking. “The routine storage of umbilical cord blood as ‘biologic
insurance’ against future disease
is not recommended,” the authors of that opinion write.
The American Academy of Pediatrics largely agrees. A 2017
policy statement notes that there
is an “unquestionable need to
study the use of cord blood
banking,” but at this point, the
uses are still limited. Medical
professionals should acquaint
themselves with the issues surrounding cord blood banking. (A
2008 survey suggested that only
18 percent of physicians felt con-
fident discussing the pros and
cons of public and private cord
blood donation.)
“Parents, not infrequently, are
getting variable advice,” says pediatrician William Shearer of
Baylor College of Medicine and
Texas Children’s Hospital, who
co-authored the AAP policy statement.
Parents ought to be told about
the distinctions between public
and private banks, including the
additional caveats and financial
risks associated with private
banks, the policy statement says.
And barring any compelling reason, people who would like to
donate should strongly consider
a public bank, the AAP argues.
Likewise, the American Medical
Association endorses donations
to a public bank unless there’s a
known medical reason a family
member might need the umbilical cord cells, such as a leukemia
diagnosis for an older child.
Though perhaps outdated, results from a survey reported in
2009 offer a glimpse into the
minds of physicians. When asked
about their view of private cord
banking, none of 93 respondents
who perform pediatric stem cell
transplants said they would recommend private cord blood
banking for a baby who had a
healthy older sibling when both
parents were of northern Euro-
“Maybe in the future it
will have been the
perfect thing to do. We
just don’t know that
today.”
Joanne Kurtzberg, a pioneer in the
field of cord blood research
pean descent. For parents of a
different ethnicity, a still-small
portion, 11 percent, of the physicians recommended private
banking — presumably because
it’s more difficult for these parents to find transplant matches.
Both the ACOG and the AAP
recommendations urge physicians and other health-care professionals advising parents to
always disclose any financial interests in for-profit cord blood
banks. That’s a huge issue, and
one that’s being ignored. Parents
need to know about the motivations of the person providing
guidance.
Such conflicts of interest hit
home for me when I was taking a
birth class while pregnant with
my first daughter. Unprompted,
my instructor launched into the
many ways that umbilical cord
blood was revolutionizing medicine and curing diseases. She
then passed around brochures
and a sign-up sheet to get more
information.
As she began describing the
free breakfast a private cord bank
was hosting the following week, I
realized I was listening to a sales
pitch. Similar blurred lines between health decisions and marketing, such as brochures for
private companies stacked in
doctors’ offices, muddy the issue.
If you hear the pros and cons
from an unbiased source and you
decide to go with a public bank,
you’ll have to find out if the
option is actually an option for
you. Most public banks don’t
have enough money and bandwidth to take every sample that’s
being offered. But if you luck out,
your hospital may be a Be the
Match participant, or you can
find a public bank that takes
mailed samples. (Doctors and
hospitals vary on whether they’ll
charge a collection fee, but the
donation itself is free.)
Parents interested in privately
banking their child’s umbilical
cord blood have more homework
to do.
The first step should be investigating the company: Has it been
around for a long time? Does it
voluntarily meet some of the
same standards as the public
cord banks, such as those listed
by the AABB or FACT, the Foundation for the Accreditation of
Cellular Therapy? How many
units of the bank’s cord blood
have been used successfully? This
list of questions certainly isn’t
comprehensive, but it may help
you avoid horror stories of unscrupulous companies on the
verge of bankruptcy with leaky
blood bags, dusty rooms and
failing freezers.
Joanne Kurtzberg of Duke Uni-
versity, a pioneer in the field of
cord blood research, says that
parents who can’t swing the finances for private banking or
who can’t find a public bank
shouldn’t feel bad. “I think it’s
important for those parents, as
well as all parents, to know this
has not been proven as a therapy
yet for anything other than transplant,” she says. “And for transplant, you generally want a donor, not your own.”
In sorting through the issue,
I’ve realized that, frustratingly,
there is no magical answer that’s
right for everybody. The cells held
in umbilical cord blood are fascinating and potentially powerful,
and the science on them is speeding along. But it’s impossible to
know where the science will ultimately land.
Kurtzberg compares the decision to bank umbilical cord blood
to an investment that could go
either way.
“If you want to gamble and see,
maybe in the future it will have
been the perfect thing to do,” she
says. “We just don’t know that
today.”
— Science News
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