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The Washington Post – November 01, 2017

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Dodgers top Astros, force a decisive Game 7 in World Series. Sports, D1
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Democracy Dies in Darkness
Mostly cloudy 64/55 • Tomorrow: Partly sunny 75/58 B8
Trump allies split
over whether
to battle Mueller
President has resisted
calls by Bannon, others
for a combative response
BY P HILIP R UCKER
AND R OBERT C OSTA
Debate intensified in President
Trump’s political circle Tuesday
over how aggressively to confront
special counsel Robert S. Mueller
III, dividing some of the president’s advisers and loyalists as the
Russia investigation enters a new
phase following charges against
three former Trump campaign
officials.
Despite his growing frustration with a federal probe he has
roundly dismissed, Trump has
been cooperating with Mueller
and lately has resisted attacking
Contrasting styles
Trump’s impulse to attack diverges
from Mueller’s careful ways. A6
Democrats weigh strategy
Groups eyeing 2018 look to focus
on policy, not the Russia probe. A7
Exception now a rule?
Mueller is willing to use suspects’
lawyers to provide evidence. A8
him directly, at the urging of his
attorneys inside and outside the
White House.
But several prominent Trump
allies, including former White
House chief strategist Stephen K.
Bannon, have said they think the
president’s posture is too timid.
Seeing the investigation as a political threat, they are clamoring
for a more combative approach to
Mueller that would damage his
credibility and effectively kneecap his operation by cutting its
funding.
Still, Bannon and others are
not advising Trump to fire Mueller, a rash move that the president’s lawyers and political advisers oppose and insist is not under
consideration.
Bannon in recent days has spoken with Trump by phone to relay
his concerns about the president’s
position and to counsel a shift in
strategy, according to three people with knowledge of the conversation. The president — so far —
has not accepted Bannon’s advice,
these people said.
Bannon’s view has been amplified elsewhere on the right, with
talk radio and cable news commentators speaking out more
forcefully against Mueller and his
expanding probe. The Wall Street
GOP CONTINUED ON A6
Former adviser touted
ties to Trump campaign
BY
R OSALIND S . H ELDERMAN,
K AREN D E Y OUNG AND
T OM H AMBURGER
President Trump on Tuesday
belittled former foreign policy adviser George Papadopoulos, who
pleaded guilty this week to lying to
federal agents investigating Russia’s interference in the 2016 election, tweeting that “few people
knew the young, low level volunteer named George, who has already proven to be a liar.”
But interviews and documents
show that Papadopoulos was in
regular contact with the Trump
campaign’s most senior officials
and held himself out as a Trump
surrogate as he traveled the world
to meet with foreign officials and
reporters.
Papadopoulos sat at the elbow
of one of Trump’s top campaign
advisers, then-Sen. Jeff Sessions,
during a dinner for campaign advisers weeks before the Republi-
K
SU V1 V2 V3 V4
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
. $2
NYC truck attack kills 8
JUSTIN LANE/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY/EFE/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
Emergency personnel, in the background, remove a victim’s body from the Lower Manhattan bicycle path where a truck mowed down
cyclists and pedestrians. Eight people were killed and 11 injured in the attack. The driver was shot by police and taken into custody.
Vehicle hurtles down bike path in possible terror act
BY R ENAE M ERLE,
D EVLIN B ARRETT
AND W ESLEY L OWERY
new york — A 29-year-old man
can National Convention, according to an individual who attended
the meeting.
He met in London in September 2016 with a mid-level representative of the British Foreign
Office, where he said he had contacts at the senior level of the
Russian government.
And he conferred at one point
with the foreign minister of
Greece at a meeting in New York.
While some top campaign aides
appeared to rebuff Papadopoulos’s persistent offers to broker a
meeting with Russian President
Vladimir Putin, there is no sign
they told him directly to cease his
activities or sought to end his
affiliation with the campaign.
Emails included in court documents released Monday show that
Papadopoulos repeatedly told
Trump campaign officials about
his contacts with people he believed were representing the RusADVISER CONTINUED ON A8
ANDREW KELLY/REUTERS
Crews work at the scene of the attack, where the truck also struck a small school bus. Officials labeled
the act terrorism, and police identified the suspect as a 29-year-old Uzbek immigrant.
driving a rental truck plowed
down people on a Manhattan bike
path Tuesday in what authorities
described as a terrorist attack that
killed eight and injured 11 before
the suspect was shot and arrested
by police.
A sunny fall day along the Hudson River erupted in chaos just
around the time students were
getting out from nearby Stuyvesant High School, when a rented
Home Depot truck turned on to
the bike path along the West Side
Highway.
Witnesses say the speeding
truck struck unsuspecting bicyclists and pedestrians while onlookers screamed and scattered.
The truck then veered left toward
Chambers Street, where it collided
with a small school bus, injuring
two adults and two children inside, officials said.
Foreign ministries of Belgium
and Argentina said five ArgenATTACK CONTINUED ON A20
As Northam’s lead slips, other races have an edge In shift, GOP proposal won’t
BY S COTT C LEMENT
AND L AURA V OZZELLA
One week from Election Day,
Democrat Ralph Northam’s lead
has narrowed to five percentage
points in the Virginia governor’s
race, with Republican Ed
Gillespie closing a motivation gap
and consolidating support among
conservatives and supporters of
President Trump, a new Washington Post-Schar School poll finds.
Northam, the state’s lieutenant
governor, leads among likely voters 49 percent to Gillespie’s
44 percent, a margin that is not
statistically significant. The Democrat was up by 13 points in a Post
poll earlier this month. Libertarian Cliff Hyra is at 4 percent,
enough to play spoiler if the race
POLL
Washington Post-Schar School poll
Northam lead narrows in Virginia gubernatorial race
Q: If the election were held today, for whom would you vote?
Sept. 28-Oct. 2
Oct. 26-29
Ralph Northam (D) 53%
Ed Gillespie (R) 40%
49%
44%
A difference of at least
8 points is statistically
significant
Cliff Hyra (Libert.) 4%
No opinion 2%
Neither/Other (volunteered) 1%
4%
3%
1%
Source: Oct. 26-29 Post-Schar School poll of 921 likely voters. Error margin of +/- 4 points.
IN THE NEWS
remains tight through Tuesday.
Democrats have at least a slight
edge in two down-ballot contests,
with incumbent Attorney General
Mark Herring (D) holding a
49 percent to 43 percent lead
against Republican challenger
John Adams. In the lieutenant
governor’s race, Democrat Justin
Fairfax has a narrow lead over
Republican Jill Holtzman Vogel,
49 percent to 43 percent. Vogel
POLL CONTINUED ON A4
‘Architect of gerrymandering’
Ed Gillespie engineered redistricting
that swept the GOP into office. B1
Latinos may be soft on Northam
Some advocacy groups worry
about the Democrat’s appeal. B1
Peninsula. A12
THE ECONOMY
‘Potentially irreversible’ Climate change
significantly imperils public health globally, a
new report in the Lancet warned. A2
A fundamental shift The EPA chief has
banned scientists who receive agency grants
from serving on key advisory boards. A2
THE NATION
The ACLU sued the
federal government,
seeking the release of an
undocumented girl detained in Texas after undergoing surgery. A3
THE WORLD
A Pentecostal move-
ment known as prosperity gospel is challenging
the order of things in
predominantly Catholic
Brazil. A11
Seoul and Beijing
said they would put
aside their differences
out of a joint desire to
denuclearize the Korean
Leftovers constitute
the single-largest source
of edible food waste in
U.S. homes, a new study
found. A13
THE REGION
A Halloween ghoul
hanging in a tree that a
neighbor deemed racist
lower rate for the wealthiest
BY D AMIAN P ALETTA
AND M IKE D E B ONIS
House Republican leaders plan
to propose preserving the top
income-tax rate for very wealthy
people, a last-minute adjustment
to their plan to overhaul the tax
code that they hope will assuage
concerns that it will mainly benefit the rich, according to four
people briefed on the planning
Tuesday.
GOP leaders had planned to
collapse the seven existing income tax brackets into three
brackets, lowering the top rate
from 39.6 percent to 35 percent,
but now will retain the top bracket for people earning more than a
has divided a Northern
Virginia community. B1
A D.C. police oversight
board found that many
officers failed to properly use body cameras. B5
A white nationalist
dubbed the “crying
Nazi” has hosted an Internet radio show from a
Virginia jail for more
than two months. B5
certain
threshold,
perhaps
$1,000,000, the people said.
The detail was one of several
that emerged Tuesday as GOP
leaders scrambled to put the final
touches on their plan, widely seen
as the last best chance for Trump
and congressional Republicans to
advance a major policy achievement this year. Drafters planned
to work through the night on the
bill and unveil it Wednesday, but
later decided to delay it to Thursday, said House Ways and Means
Committee Chairman Kevin Brady (R-Tex.), its lead author.
After a closed-door meeting of
his panel Tuesday night, Brady
issued a statement saying, “In
FOOD
Better brewing
Five steps to making
coffee at home that will
beat a certain chain’s. E1
TAXES CONTINUED ON A15
BUSINESS NEWS........................A13
COMICS........................................C6
OPINION PAGES..........................A18
LOTTERIES ................................... B3
OBITUARIES ................................. B6
TELEVISION..................................C4
WORLD NEWS.............................A11
ST YLE
Obama’s legacy
The former president
charts his course. C1
CONTENT © 2017
The Washington Post / Year 140, No. 331
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B2
5 6 2 3
A2
EZ
H A P P ENI NG TO D A Y
For the latest updates all day, visit washingtonpost.com.
All day
Russian President Vladimir Putin visits Iran. Go to
washingtonpost.com/world for developments.
All day
The Supreme Court hears oral arguments. For details,
visit washingtonpost.com/national.
2 p.m.
The Federal Reserve issues a monetary policy
statement. Visit washingtonpost.com/business for details.
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CO R R ECTI O N S
An Oct. 31 Page One article
about the reach of Russian
operatives’ social media content
in the 2016 presidential race
mischaracterized a complaint
that USA Today made to the FBI.
The company notified federal
authorities because the number
of suspicious Facebook accounts
— some with threatening photos
and messages — that were
following USA Today’s Facebook
page continued to rise even after
Facebook said it had corrected
the problem by removing
suspicious accounts. USA Today
said it was not complaining about
a loss of Facebook followers as a
result of Facebook’s action.
An Oct. 31 correction of a Sports
digest item misstated the location
of a German Cup soccer match
between Bayern Munich and
Leipzig on Oct. 25. The match was
played in Leipzig, not Berlin.
An Oct. 31 Sports article about
the Washington Catholic Athletic
Conference girls’ tennis
championships incorrectly
reported that Grace Segreti and
Zoe Walker of St. John’s won the
No. 3 doubles match. Sarah Tran
and Elena Turner of Bishop
O’Connell defeated Segreti and
Walker in the match.
Thomas Boswell’s Oct. 30 Sports
column about the World Series
misidentified who hit the triple
that put the Los Angeles Dodgers
ahead of the Houston Astros, 8-7,
in the seventh inning of Game 5.
That triple was hit by Cody
Bellinger, not Justin Turner.
An Oct. 24 Metro article about a
TV ad aired by Ed Gillespie, the
Republican candidate for
Virginia governor, incorrectly
said that John Bowen of
Accomack County pleaded guilty
to possession of child
pornography in June. He pleaded
guilty in January and was
sentenced in June.
Washington Post
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The Threatened
Net: How the Web
Became a Perilous
Place: National
technology reporter
Craig Timberg tells
the story of how the
Internet evolved
into an unsafe
place, with an increase in dangers
ahead.
The Washington Post is committed to
correcting errors that appear in the
newspaper. Those interested in
contacting the paper for that purpose
can:
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
EPA-funded scientists blocked from advisory role
BY
AND
B RADY D ENNIS
J ULIET E ILPERIN
The head of the Environmental
Protection Agency upended the
agency’s key advisory groups on
Tuesday, announcing plans to jettison scientists who have received
EPA grants.
The move sets in motion a fundamental shift, one that could
change the scientific and technical advice that historically has
guided the agency as it crafts environmental regulations. The decision to bar any researcher who
receives EPA grant money from
serving as an adviser appears to be
unprecedented.
“It is very, very important to
ensure independence, to ensure
that we’re getting advice and
counsel independent of the EPA,”
Administrator Scott Pruitt told reporters Tuesday.
He estimated that the members
of three different committees —
the Scientific Advisory Board, the
Clean Air Science Advisory Committee and the Board of Scientific
Counselors — had collectively accepted $77 million in EPA grants
over the last three years. He noted
that researchers will have the option of ending their grant or continuing to advise the EPA, “but
they can’t do both.”
The EPA will not impose a similar litmus test on scientific advisers who receive grants from outside sources. But Pruitt said they
will undergo the same sort of ethics review that is in place “to ensure that there aren’t issues of
potential conflict with areas that
they’re working upon.”
The agency made an effort to
enlist researchers from a wider
range of states to broaden the
panels’ outlook, he said. Members
will include experts from 40 states
and the District, he said, reflecting
the addition of researchers from
Alaska and several states in the
middle of the country.
“We want to ensure geographical
representation,” he said. “We want
to ensure the independence and
integrity of the process through the
decisions we’re making.”
Pruitt did not announce his selections for new appointees to the
Science Advisory Board, but a list
obtained by The Washington Post
from multiple individuals familiar
with the likely appointments includes several categories of experts — from regulated industries,
academics and environmental
regulators from conservative
states, and researchers who have a
history of critiquing the science
and economics underpinning
tighter environmental regulations. They would replace scientists who have agency grants and
whose terms are expiring.
Terry F. Yosie, who was the advisory board’s director during the
Reagan administration, said the
changes “represent a major purge
of independent scientists and a
decision to sideline the SAB from
major EPA decision-making in the
future.”
Environmental and scientific
groups were quick to condemn the
changes and question Pruitt’s motives Tuesday.
“Pruitt is turning the idea of
‘conflict of interest’ on its head —
he claims federal research grants
should exclude a scientist from an
EPA advisory board but industry
funding shouldn’t,” Andrew
Rosenberg, director of the Center
for Science and Democracy at the
Union for Concerned Scientists,
said in a statement. “The consequences of these decisions aren’t
just bad for a few scientists. This
could mean that there’s no independent voice ensuring that EPA
follows the science on everything
from drinking water pollution to
atmospheric chemical exposure.”
But industry groups and conservative lawmakers, including
lSen. James M. Inhofe (R-Okla.), a
longtime EPA critic who attended
the announcement, applauded
the action.
“The changes announced today
will help ensure EPA’s scientific
review panels are well balanced
with perspectives from qualified
scientists of diverse backgrounds
and board members are free of any
disqualifying conflicts of interest,”
American Chemistry Council
President Cal Dooley said in a
statement.
Pruitt had foreshadowed the
sweeping changes in a speech this
month at the Heritage Foundation
that he planned to rid the agency’s
scientific advisory boards of researchers with EPA funding. He
said that the current structure
raises questions about their independence, although he did not
voice similar objections to industry-funded scientists.
“What’s most important at the
agency is to have scientific advisers that are objective, independent-minded, providing transparent recommendations,” Pruitt said
at the time.
Among the expected appointees are proponents of deregulation who have argued both in academic circles and while serving in
government that federal regulators need to raise the bar before
imposing new burdens on the private sector.
John D. Graham, who serves as
dean of Indiana University’s
School of Public and Environmental Affairs, launched a major deregulatory push while head of the
Office of Management and Budget’s Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs under President
George W. Bush. He repeatedly
informed agencies that they had
not sufficiently justified the rules
they wanted to enact, establishing
a process under the Data Quality
Act that allowed petitioners to ask
agencies to withdraw information
that did not meet OMB standards
for “quality, objectivity, utility and
integrity.”
Anne Smith, who serves as
managing director of NERA Economic Consulting and co-chairs its
environmental practice, belongs
to a firm that has done extensive
work for groups that fought the
Obama administration’s regulatory agenda. In June, President
Trump cited a report NERA produced for the American Council
for Capital Formation and the U.S.
Chamber of Commerce when announcing his decision to exit the
international Paris climate agreement. The report projected that
meeting America’s commitment
under the accord would mean “as
much as 2.7 million lost jobs by
2025.”
That study was based on several
assumptions, including that the
United States would meet its emissions targets by forcing the industrial sector to cut emissions by
40 percent between 2005 and
2025. The report did not take into
account potential benefits from
lowered greenhouse gas emissions or technological advances
that could make cutting carbon
emissions cheaper.
At least three potential appointees have backgrounds working
for large corporations with activities now or potentially regulated
by the EPA, including the French
oil giant Total, Phillips 66 and
Southern Co., one the largest U.S.
utilities.
One of them, Larry Monroe, was
previously chief environmental officer at Southern. Monroe has particular expertise in how the EPA
regulated emissions from coalfired power plants and criticized
the Obama administration’s Clean
Power Plan, which Pruitt is trying
to roll back, as “unworkable.”
The group also includes those
who have, like Pruitt, battled the
EPA. One is Michael Honeycutt,
head of the Texas Commission on
Environmental Quality’s toxicology division, whom Pruitt announced Tuesday as the new head
of the Science Advisory Board.
Honeycutt has suggested that the
health risks associated with smog
are overstated.
The move to prohibit anyone
receiving EPA grant money from
serving on the board has prompted questions and criticism from
independent researchers and
from some of the agency’s advisers, who noted that they follow
strict ethics procedures to avoid
conflicts of interest.
Advisory members contacted
Pruitt on Sept. 13, formally asking
him to meet with them so they
could discuss his agenda and their
role in advising the agency.
“The SAB stands ready to serve
and encourages you to take full
advantage of the vital resource we
can provide,” wrote board chair
Peter Thorne, a professor of occupational and environmental
health at the University of Iowa.
Pruitt never met with the
group.
brady.dennis@washpost.com
juliet.eilperin@washpost.com
Chris Mooney contributed to this
report.
Climate change is fueling disasters, report says
BY B EN G UARINO
AND B RADY D ENNIS
Climate change significantly
imperils public health globally, according to a new report that chronicles the many hazards and symptoms already being seen. The authors describe its manifestations
as “unequivocal and potentially irreversible.”
Heat waves are striking more
people, disease-carrying mosquitoes are spreading and weather disasters are becoming more common, the authors note in the report
published Monday by the British
medical journal the Lancet.
Climate change is a “threat multiplier,” they write, and its blows hit
hardest in the most vulnerable
communities, where people are suffering from poverty, water scarcity,
inadequate housing or other crises.
“We’ve been quite shocked and
surprised by some of the results,”
said Nick Watts, a fellow at University College London’s Institute for
Global Health and executive director of the Lancet Countdown, a
project aimed at examining the
links between climate change and
public health.
The effort involved 63 researchers from two dozen institutions
worldwide, including climate scientists as well as ecologists, geographers, economists, engineers,
mathematicians, political scientists and experts who study food,
transportation and energy.
It is the latest in several Lancet
reports to focus on climate change.
In 2009, a Lancet commission described climate change as “the biggest global health threat of the 21st
century.” In 2015, a second commission recognized that the innovations required to match this
threat represented “the greatest
global health opportunity of the
21st century.”
JAIPAL SINGH/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY-EFE/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
Indian children take a bath along with buffaloes on a hot afternoon in the Tawi River on the outskirts
of Jammu, the winter capital of Kashmir. A report in Lancet says climate change multiplies threats.
The Countdown, as its tickingclock title suggests, outlines the
way humans are adapting — or not
— to a rapidly evolving climate. It
was announced last year during
the United Nations Climate
Change Conference in Morocco.
The project, a synthesis of scientific literature and media reports,
tracks 40 indicators of human
health, including migration, nutrition and air pollution.
Given the profound health dangers posed by a warming climate,
the study’s authors focused on a
key question: How well is the
world responding?
“The answer is, most of our indicators are headed in the wrong
direction,” Watts said. “Broadly, the
world has not responded to climate change, and that lack of response has put lives at risk. . . . The
impacts we’re experiencing today
are already pretty bad. The things
we’re talking about in the future
are potentially catastrophic.”
Higher global temperatures are
exacting a human toll. Although
the increase since 2000 may seem
slight — about 0.75 degrees Fahrenheit — the planet is not a uniform oven. Local spikes can be
dramatic and dangerous. Heat
waves, defined as extreme temperatures that persist for at least three
days, are on the rise.
Between 2000 and 2016, the
number of people exposed to heat
waves climbed by 125 million vulnerable adults, according to the report. During 2015, the worst year on
record, 175 million people suffered
through sweltering temperatures.
Watts also cited the rising number of deaths from floods, storms
and other weather disasters. Each
year between 2007 and 2016, the
world saw an average of 300
weather disasters — a 46 percent
increase from the decade between
1990 and 1999. In the 25 years since
1990, these disasters claimed more
than 500,000 lives.
The number of potentially infectious bites from the Aedes aegypti
mosquito, which spreads viruses
such as dengue fever and Zika, is
up 9 percent over 1950s levels.
And in recent years, the ranks of
climate change migrants have
grown. Just in the United States,
more than 3,500 Alaskans have
fled coastal erosion and permafrost melts. Twenty-five homes
have been abandoned on Louisiana’s Isle de Jean Charles, which is
being overtaken by the Gulf of
Mexico. In 2016, its former residents became the first to receive
federal funds for a climate change
retreat.
“If governments and the global
health community do not learn
from the past experiences of HIV/
AIDS and the recent outbreaks of
Ebola and Zika viruses,” the authors warn in the paper, “another
slow response will result in an
irreversible and unacceptable cost
to human health.”
But Monday’s report also finds
“glimmers of hope,” Watts said. For
example, many countries are moving away from coal-fired power
plants, which are a source both of
carbon emissions that fuel global
warming and pollution that can
cause immediate health problems
in nearby communities.
After President Trump’s announcement in June that the United States would pull out of the
Paris climate accord, the global
response to climate change has
been heartening, the authors
write, “affirming clear political
will and ambition to reach the
treaty’s targets.” Nicaragua, previously a holdout because it said the
treaty was not stringent enough, is
set to join the Paris agreement,
leaving only Syria and the United
States opposed.
Watts and his co-authors note
the ways people are trying to cope
with the effects of climate change
— spending less time outdoors, for
example — even as they warn that
the world cannot rely on adaptation alone. “If anybody says we can
adapt our way out of this, the answer is, of course you can’t,” he
said. “Some of the changes we’re
talking about are so enormous, you
can’t adapt your way out.”
ben.guarino@washpost.com
brady.dennis@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
RE
politics & the nation
ACLU sues for release of 10-year-old
D I G ES T
Undocumented girl with
cerebral palsy detained
after surgery in Texas
BY
ROBERT F. BUKATY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Follow the yellow-brick road (if you can): Parents dressed as the Lion, the Tin Man and the Wicked
Witch of the West, characters from “The Wizard of Oz,” wait with their children as they trick-or-treat at a
shopping center in Freeport, Maine, on Tuesday. While Halloween celebrations went on as scheduled in
Freeport, several other towns in Maine decided to postpone the spooky holiday until Friday because of
ongoing cleanup from Monday’s severe storm, which ravaged the Northeast and left 1 million without
power. The University of Maine in Orono had to evacuate its dorms after prolonged power outages.
that the officers fired their
weapons into Bailey’s vehicle
“without prior verbal command
or warning” after the crash
impact deployed its air bags.
INDIANA
2 police officers avoid
charges in shooting
Two Indianapolis police
officers won’t face criminal
charges for the June shooting
death of an unarmed black
motorist who crashed his car
while fleeing from a traffic stop,
a special prosecutor announced
Tuesday.
St. Joseph County Prosecutor
Kenneth Cotter cited the claims
of self-defense from the officers
in deciding he wouldn’t file
charges against them in the
death of Aaron Bailey, 45.
Bailey’s family sued the city in
September, contending that
officers Michal Dinnsen and
Carlton Howard used excessive
force and that Bailey posed no
threat to them. Dinnsen is white
and Howard is biracial.
Authorities say Bailey had
been pulled over for a traffic stop
about 1:45 a.m. on June 29 when
he suddenly drove off. After a
short chase, Bailey crashed into a
fence and tree. The officers then
approached the vehicle and fired.
Howard fired six shots
through the car’s back passenger
window area, while Dinnsen
fired five shots through the back
windshield area, according to
Cotter’s report. An autopsy found
that four bullets hit Bailey in the
back.
A judge from Marion County,
where Indianapolis is located,
appointed Cotter to oversee the
shooting investigation on Aug.
22 after Marion County’s
prosecutor stepped aside.
Dinnsen and Howard were
placed on administrative leave
after the shooting and were later
assigned to administrative duty,
according to the police
department.
The FBI and the U.S. attorney’s
office in Indianapolis said in July
they were opening a civil rights
investigation into Bailey’s death,
but have not announced any
findings.
The federal lawsuit filed on
behalf of Bailey’s adult son and
daughter and his sister contends
Jones said Tuesday.
The figure represents claims
for homes and businesses
insured by 15 companies and is
more than triple the previous
estimate of $1 billion. Jones said
the number will continue to rise
as more claims are reported.
The amount of claims now
reported means that the fires
caused more damage than
California’s 1991 Oakland Hills
fire, which was previously the
state’s costliest, with $2.7 billion
in damages in 2015 dollars,
according to the Property
Casualty Insurers Association of
America.
Forty-three people were killed
in the October blazes that tore
through Northern California,
including the state’s renowned
winemaking regions in Napa and
Sonoma counties. They
destroyed thousands of buildings
as more than 100,000 people
were forced to evacuate. It was
the deadliest series of fires in
California history.
The fires are now nearly
contained.
Several dozen buildings were
also damaged or destroyed in a
fire in Southern California’s
Orange County.
Meanwhile a man suspected of
starting a wildfire on Oct. 16 that
destroyed two homes in
Northern California is facing
multiple arson charges. The
Santa Cruz Sentinel reported
that Marlon Coy, 54, pleaded not
guilty during a hearing Tuesday.
— Associated Press
UTAH
Man arrested in fatal
Colorado carjacking
Police arrested a man Tuesday
who was sought in a fatal
carjacking near the University of
Utah and in a Colorado
homicide.
Austin Boutain, 24, was
arrested after surrendering to
workers at a Salt Lake City
library.
The arrest came after a
manhunt following the death of
a 23-year-old Chinese student,
ChenWei Guo, who was killed
Monday during an attempted
carjacking near campus.
In addition, police in Golden,
Colo., have said they want to
question Boutain about the
killing of a 63-year-old man
whose body was found in a
trailer and whose truck had been
driven by Boutain in Utah.
His wife, Kathleen E. Boutain,
is also a person of interest in the
Colorado case. She was in
custody in Utah on unrelated
drug and theft charges.
Guo was a freshman from
Beijing who came to the United
States in 2012 and dreamed of
owning his own consulting
company.
A lockdown at the university
ended early Tuesday. About 175
students had to shelter in the
library because they couldn’t
return to their homes.
University officials canceled
Tuesday classes.
M ARIA S ACCHETTI
Lawyers for an undocumented 10-year-old girl who was detained in Texas after undergoing
surgery demanded her immediate release on Tuesday in a
lawsuit filed against the Trump
administration in federal court.
Rosa Maria Hernandez, who
has cerebral palsy, has been held
at a federally funded shelter in
San Antonio since leaving a Corpus Christi hospital last week
after gallbladder surgery.
She had planned to return to
her parents and siblings in the
U.S. border city of Laredo,
150 miles away.
Border officials have said they
detained Rosa Maria, who has
lived in the United States since
she was three months old, because she was undocumented
and traveling to the hospital in
an ambulance without her parents.
But her lawyer called that
position “indefensible,” saying
the government is well aware
that the girl’s parents, two sisters, and a grandfather, who is a
legal resident, are anxiously
awaiting her return.
“She’s been ripped away from
the only home she knows and the
mother who cares for her best,”
said Andre Segura, legal director
for the American Civil Liberties
Union of Texas, which filed the
lawsuit on behalf of the girl and
her mother, Felipa de la Cruz, in
federal court in San Antonio.
It was the second time in a
month that the ACLU has sued
the federal government over the
fate of a minor being held by the
Department of Health and Human Services, which oversees
the care of unaccompanied immigrant children through the
Office of Refugee Resettlement.
The organization represented
a pregnant 17-year-old who had
been blocked from obtaining an
abortion while in a governmentfunded shelter. The D.C. appeals
court last week ordered the government to allow her to have the
procedure.
The case involving Rosa Maria
began Oct. 24, when she left her
home in Laredo around 2 a.m. in
an ambulance for the scheduled
surgery. Her mother, who is also
undocumented, was concerned
about a border checkpoint located on the way to the hospital and
did not accompany her daughter.
Instead, de la Cruz signed a
notarized letter authorizing a
cousin, 34-year-old Aurora Cantu, to accompany the girl, according to the ACLU.
U.S. Border Patrol agents
stopped the vehicle at an interior
checkpoint in Freer, Tex. They
were told about her impending
surgery and, after a 30-minute
delay, followed the ambulance to
Driscoll Children’s Hospital in
Corpus Christi, the lawsuit says.
The complaint alleges that
agents told Cantu that Rosa
Maria would be detained after
the surgery unless she voluntarily left the country. Federal officials say she is a citizen of
Mexico.
U.S. Customs and Border Protection said federal law required
them to take Rosa Maria into
custody because she was not
with a parent or legal guardian.
They also notified the local Mexican consulate.
“For the welfare of the child,
she was escorted by Border Patrol agents to the hospital to
undergo surgery and remained
with the unaccompanied child
until such time as she could be
transferred to the Health and
Human Services Office of Refugees and Resettlement to reunite the child with her parents,”
the agency, which is part of the
Department of Homeland Security, said in a statement.
But the ACLU said officials
were not legally obligated to take
Rosa Maria into custody because
she has parents in Laredo. They
said the forced separation of
Rosa Maria from her family vio-
lates her legal and constitutional
rights, and has “inflicted serious
psychological and emotional injury” on her entire family.
She is being held at the BCFS
Health and Human Services
shelter in San Antonio. Her father recently visited her, Segura
said, but her mother has not seen
her and is distraught. They said
the girl has never before been
separated from the family.
It was not immediately clear
why Rosa Maria was not released
to her father when he visited the
shelter.
A spokeswoman for Health
and Human Services said the
agency does not comment on
individual cases, but aims to
“ensure the care and safety” of
minors, including their “safe and
timely release” to qualified parents and guardians.
Some children are released to
sponsors, who must apply for
custody and provide supporting
documentation. The government verifies their relationship
and
conducts
background
checks and in some cases, home
studies. The process can take
weeks or months.
Rosa Maria’s parents brought
her to the United States when
the girl was a baby to seek
medical care. Doctors said she’d
remain in a vegetative state. But
with home care and frequent
therapy, the lawsuit says, she has
grown into a “joyful young girl
with a constant smile on her
face.”
She attends school, plays with
her sisters, speaks English and
considers herself an American,
according the complaint.
But the lawsuit also said Rosa
Maria has the cognitive capacity
of a six-year-old. She “doesn’t
fully understand why she is away
from her mother,” Segura said.
The lawsuit said the government-funded shelter is an inappropriate place to care for Rosa
Maria, noting that the hospital
discharge papers said it was in
the girl’s “best interest” to be
discharged to a family member
who is “familiar with her medical and psychological needs.”
maria.sacchetti@washpost.com
KITCHENS | BATHS | ADDITIONS
Remodeling
Seminar
— Associated Press
N.Y. lawmakers vote to legalize
dancing in bars: The New York
City Council voted Tuesday to
repeal a 91-year-old law that
banned dancing at most
nightspots. The anti-dancing law
prohibits dancing in bars and
restaurants that don’t have a
cabaret license. Critics say the
law originated as a racist attempt
to police Harlem’s 1920s jazz
clubs and has continued to be
enforced unfairly. Mayor Bill de
Blasio (D) has said he supports
the repeal, which would go into
effect 30 days after it is signed.
— Associated Press
CALIFORNIA
Wildfire damage
claims top $3.3 billion
Property-damage claims from
deadly October wildfires now
exceed $3.3 billion, California
Insurance Commissioner Dave
— Associated Press
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A4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
U.S. deployment in
Syria raises questions
after slip of the tongue
General cites 4,000
troops, but Pentagon
says ground force is 503
BY
A NDREW
DE G RANDPRE
A senior U.S. military commander said Tuesday that 4,000
American troops are on the
ground in Syria, a figure far
greater than the 503 personnel
the Trump administration says
are deployed there.
Army Maj. Gen. James B. Jarrard, who heads the U.S.-led Special Operations task force targeting the Islamic State in Syria and
Iraq, offered the surprising figure while briefing Pentagonbased reporters via satellite from
Baghdad.
When asked to confirm the
4,000 figure, Jarrard appeared to
be caught off guard. He apologized and said the number is
about 500. Eric Pahon, a Pentagon spokesman facilitating the
briefing, then interjected, insisting the number is 503.
“The general misspoke,” Pahon
told The Washington Post after
the briefing. “I don’t know what
4,000 refers to. That’s nowhere
near an accurate number.”
Yet it has long been an open
secret that the Pentagon has
more personnel involved in oper-
ations against the Islamic State,
also known as ISIS, than its
publicly disclosed figures. Hundreds of additional American
troops moved into Syria to back
up allied local forces as they
prepared to assault Raqqa, the
Islamic State’s self-declared capital until its fall in October. U.S.
commanders also routinely send
attack helicopters into Syria and
leave them there, sometimes for
days at a time.
The Trump administration
says there are 5,262 U.S. troops
supporting war efforts in Iraq,
though the number is believed to
be much higher.
“It’s widely acknowledged
there are more than 503 in Syria
and 5,200 in Iraq,” Pahon told
The Post. “These are our force
management-level
numbers.
They don’t include temporary
forces.”
Jennifer Cafarella, a Syria expert at the Institute for the Study
of War, said sensitivity over U.S.
troop levels in Syria and Iraq
dates to the Obama administration, which was determined to
fight the Islamic State with a
minimal American presence on
the ground.
“President Obama,” she said,
“was forced to repeatedly scale
up the U.S. role after it became
clear that his initial strategy to
partner with local forces could
not generate the necessary outcomes without greater U.S. in-
HUSSEIN MALLA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
U.S. soldiers walk among Syrian children on a road that leads to Raqqa, in northeast Syria, in July. Hundreds of American troops moved
into Syria to back up local forces as they prepared to assault Raqqa, the Islamic State’s self-declared capital until its fall in October.
volvement. Whether Major General Jarrard’s statement was accurate, the United States was
certainly drawn deeper into Iraq
and Syria than it seems was
originally planned. This troop
creep reflects flaws in the design
of U.S. strategy against ISIS that
U.S. policymakers continue to fail
to recognize.”
These are not the only countries where the Pentagon appears
to have manipulated deployment
numbers. As the Wall Street Journal revealed in August, there are
about 3,000 more troops on the
ground in Afghanistan than the
administration’s official tally
showed.
The Pentagon has faced
growing pressure from Congress to be more transparent
about the scope of its activities
overseas, not only in the Middle East but also throughout
Africa and pockets of Southeast
Asia. Defense Secretary Jim
Mattis has promised to comply,
but Jarrard’s statement Monday is likely to raise deeper
suspicion among those who
have renewed scrutiny of the
military’s sprawling counterterrorism operations since the
deaths of four American soldiers Oct. 4 in Niger.
andrew.degrandpre@washpost.com
Carol Morello contributed to this
report.
Trump administration’s first year helps shape Va. contest
POLL FROM A1
POLL
would be the first woman to hold
the seat, Fairfax the second African American.
The Trump administration’s tumultuous first year has overshadowed the contest, and most of the
likely voters say their opinion of
the president is important to their
decision for governor. Gillespie
has faced criticism for sponsoring
ads focused on Confederate monuments and the danger posed by
the Latino MS-13 gang, themes
that echo Trump’s presidential
campaign.
Darwin Byrd, who plans to vote
for Northam, said he does not like
the fact that Gillespie has made
Confederate monuments a central issue.
“I’ve never seen that come up in
any election I’ve ever voted in,”
said Byrd, 55, who is African
American. “My parents may have,
but I’ve never seen it in any campaign until this year, which is
really unfortunate. It seems like
we’re drifting more toward the
Old South.”
Byrd, a Democrat who lives in
the Tidewater region of the state,
Washington Post-Schar School poll
Likely Virginia voters trust Northam more on
health care, Gillespie on crime
Q: Whom do you trust to do a better job handling…
Gillespie
Among likely voters
Northam
25
Health care 50%
Race relations
25
37%
48%
35%
Taxes
43%
44%
Illegal immigration
41%
44%
Crime and public safety
40%
48%
Note: Other/no opinion not shown
Source: Oct. 26-29 Post-Schar School poll. Results for above questions based on
half sample of 455-458 likely voters. Error margin of +/- 5.5 points.
also recoiled at a Gillespie ad that
blames Northam for violence connected to the MS-13 gang.
“I mean, really?” he said.
“They’re just feeding into a base
of fear.”
But there are only modest signs
of backlash in the Post-Schar
202-849-5995 DC | 301-683-7207 MD
571-429-5589 VA
Corporate Discounts Available
0
School of Policy and Government
poll, which was conducted
Oct. 26-29 among 1,238 Virginians, including 921 likely voters. It carries a four-point margin
of sampling error.
Gillespie, a former Republican
National Committee chairman,
Washington lobbyist and counselor to President George W. Bush,
has consolidated support among
the GOP base without repelling a
significant share of independents
and moderates. Voters split about
evenly when asked whom they
trust to handle illegal immigration, but Gillespie has an eightpercentage-point edge on trust to
handle “crime and public safety.”
Those numbers suggest that
Gillespie, who has struggled at
times with Virginia’s purple-state
politics in the Trump era, has
successfully threaded the needle
with his ads. Many of them suggest that the lieutenant governor,
a pediatrician and Army doctor
who treated soldiers in Operation Desert Storm, would empower illegal immigrants who
commit violent crime. Another
ad, tied to Northam’s support for
McAuliffe’s efforts to restore voting rights to felons, suggests he is
soft on pedophiles.
The ads have been highly controversial, with critics accusing
Gillespie of stoking racist fears
and abandoning his oft-stated
goal of making the GOP more
welcoming to minorities.
But they may be effective —
appealing to “Build That Wall”
Trump voters as well as suburbanites unnerved by brutal slayings
attributed to the gang.
The MS-13 message has resonated for Paul King of Lynchburg,
given the slaying of 17-year-old
Raymond Wood in central Virginia in March. Police have
charged three MS-13 gang members, all undocumented immigrants, with the crime.
“They killed a boy in Forest
here,” said King, 48, referring to
an area in Bedford. “You cannot
tell me these guys are here legally,” he added.
He likes Gillespie’s promise to
ban the establishment of sanctuary cities, a term generally used
to refer to localities that do not
cooperate with federal immigra-
tion authorities.
In a sign that Democrats fear
that Gillespie’s message is
breaking through, the Latino
Victory Fund on Monday released a controversial ad of its
own. It showed a white man in a
truck, decorated with a Confederate flag and a Gillespie bumper sticker, chasing minority
children. Gillespie campaign
manager Chris Leavitt called it a
“desperate smear campaign.”
The Democratic-aligned advocacy group pulled the ad after
Tuesday’s deadly truck attack in
New York.
A slight majority of voters —
51 percent — say Gillespie has run
a mainly negative campaign, compared with 37 percent who say the
same of Northam.
Meanwhile, Gillespie also has
shored up support in the swingvoting Northern Virginia exurbs
encompassing Loudoun County.
Gillespie runs even with Northam
at 44 percent after trailing by
more than 20 percentage points a
month ago. Likely voters are
about evenly split between
Northam and Gillespie when
asked which man they trust to
handle taxes — a notable parity
given that Gillespie made tax cuts
the basis for his campaign. Richmond and its surrounding area
and eastern Virginia are also split
evenly between the Democrat and
the Republican, while voters in
the Tidewater region that
Northam calls home favor him by
double digits. Northam leads
Gillespie by a more than 2-to-1
margin in the vote-rich D.C. suburbs, while Gillespie holds a double-digit advantage in the southwest part of the state, 55 percent
to 38 percent.
“We have a very competitive
race, largely about mobilizing the
base” for each candidate, said
Mark Rozell, dean of George Mason University’s Schar School,
which co-sponsored the poll. “If
[Gillespie] can make the pitch as
he has been to the Trump Republicans, while at the same time
maintaining his credibility with
establishment Republicans, that
will be a real accomplishment.”
As the nation’s only competitive governor’s race this year, Virginia’s contest is a measure of
whether swing-state Republicans
can survive Trump’s unpopularity. Gillespie has tried to walk a
fine line with the president, keeping him at arm’s length while also
courting Trump voters with redmeat TV ads and campaign surrogates. Gillespie is outpacing
Trump with his 44 percent support in the governor’s race, six
points higher than Trump’s
38 percent job approval among
likely voters.
Gillespie receives 95 percent
support from Trump approvers,
while Northam garners a significantly smaller 81 percent among
those who disapprove of
Trump’s performance, a group
that makes up 59 percent of
likely voters.
Sara Ortiz, a 45-year-old
Springfield resident, left her
presidential ballot blank last year
and has been distressed by what
she sees as Trump’s erratic behavior and his high-profile feuds with
members of his own party. But her
distaste for Trump has not rubbed
off on Gillespie, whom she supports because he seems less likely
to raise taxes and shares her socially conservative views.
“Gillespie has been in Virginia
politics for a long time, and I
haven’t heard the same stories
about his personal behavior or his
decision-making that you hear
about Trump,” said Ortiz, a stayat-home mother who has an MBA
in international marketing.
But some swing voters say
Trump has turned them off all
Republicans. Gale Robinson, 63,
has always prided herself on voting for the person, not the party.
She last backed a Republican for
governor in 2009, when Robert F.
McDonnell won.
But this year, she can’t bring
herself to support any Republican, because she sees them as
enabling Trump. She considers
the president a liar and manipulator and was especially aghast
when he responded to the summer’s deadly clashes between
white nationalists and counterprotesters in Charlottesville by
suggesting that there were “very
fine people on both sides.”
“This is the first year I can say
in a very long time that, ‘Okay, I
don’t even have to look at the
news. I don’t have to look at
what’s going on, because I’m voting straight Democrat,’ ” said the
government employee in Richmond. “I’m really distrustful of
the Republican Party because of
the leader.”
Gillespie has strengthened his
advantage among two Republican base groups where his support lagged behind one month
ago. Among self-identified conservatives, Gillespie’s lead over
Northam grew from 56 points to
69 points. Gillespie’s lead among
white voters without college degrees has increased from
25 points to 35 points, although
he still has room to grow among a
group that favored Trump by
47 points in the state in the 2016
election.
Gillespie’s supporters have also
caught up to Northam’s in motivation to vote and in attention to the
race. Among registered voters, an
identical 71 percent of both
Northam and Gillespie supporters say they are certain to vote or
have already done so, a shift from
four weeks ago, when Northam
“This is the first year
I can say in a very
long time that, ‘Okay,
I don’t even have to
look at the news. . . .
because I’m voting
straight Democrat.’ ”
Gale Robinson, 63
backers had a nearly 10-point
edge on this measure. The Democrat’s supporters are more engaged on one measure in the poll,
with 62 percent saying it is “extremely important” to vote in this
year’s election, compared with 53
percent of Gillespie supporters.
Trump has become another
motivating factor for voters, with
57 percent of likely voters who
approve or disapprove of him saying their view is “very” or “fairly”
important in deciding their vote
for governor. Fully two-thirds of
Northam’s backers, but less than
half of Gillespie’s, say Trump factors into their choice.
“I can’t stand him,” Marsha
Moore, 63, said of the president. “I
would rather see a Democrat in
the governor’s mansion over
someone who is just going to sidle
up to him. That’s what Gillespie
would do.”
A lifelong resident of the
Shenandoah Valley, Moore argued that Gillespie lost credibility
when the New Jersey native began playing up his support for
preserving Confederate monuments. Both candidates say localities should decide their fate, but
Gillespie prefers that they remain
in place while Northam would
like them moved to museums.
Joshua Needham, 21, was excited last year to vote for Trump and
remains firmly in the president’s
camp, saying that “Trump’s doing
really good things to drain the
swamp right now.”
But Gillespie leaves Needham
cold. The Woodbridge resident,
who studies business management online through Columbia
Southern University, plans to sit
out this election. “I don’t think
that his ideology is aligned correctly with Trump’s,” Needham
said. “So I’m definitely not too
interested in him.”
Northam maintains several
key advantages in the race. He
holds double-digit leads over
Gillespie on trust to handle race
relations and health care, the latter of which voters rated among
the two most important issues in
their choice for governor earlier
this month.
Dartania Emery, 30, believes
Northam’s experience as a physician would lead him to support
policies benefiting people like
her, who have disabilities.
Emery, who has cerebral palsy
and a neurological disorder
known as hydrocephalus, worries
that Trump will cut Medicaid and
Medicare. “I really hope he
[Northam] blocks them from cutting both programs,” said Emery,
who lives in the Tidewater region.
Northam benefits from a
52 percent to 41 percent advantage among women, a group that
has consistently made up a majority of state voters in recent elections, as well as 89 percent support among African Americans
and 73 percent among all nonwhite voters.
scott.clement@washpost.com
laura.vozzella@washpost.com
Emily Guskin, Fenit Nirappil and
Antonio Olivo contributed to this
report.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
Controversy follows Moore to the Hill
BY S EAN S ULLIVAN
AND D AVID W EIGEL
Roy Moore arrived in the Capitol to play an unfamiliar role:
Republican conformist.
By the time he left, he was once
again a lightning rod for controversy.
The hard-right former judge
made his second trip to Washington on Tuesday as his party’s
Senate nominee in Alabama. Unlike the last time he was in town,
Moore decided to mingle with the
Republican establishment he has
villainized on the campaign trail.
He joined Republican senators
at their weekly policy luncheon.
Most backed his opponent in the
primary. He chatted with Majority Leader Mitch McConnell
(R-Ky.), his bitter foe.
Afterward, he refrained from
reiterating his criticism of the
Kentuckian. Moore also dodged
questions from reporters about
incendiary statements he has
made about a Muslim serving in
Congress and gay people, declaring that he was not there to
“answer any questions about issues.”
As he made the rounds, some of
Moore’s potential future Republican colleagues strained to separate themselves from him. One
even attacked him head-on in a
speech on the Senate floor.
The visit offered a preview of
the headaches Moore’s presence
could cause in Senate Republican
leaders, should he prevail in a
Dec. 12 special election to fill the
seat once held by Attorney General Jeff Sessions.
“I don’t know where I’m going
right now,” Moore told reporters
as he exited Tuesday’s lunch and
walked down a hallway near the
Senate chamber before doubling
back toward a bank of elevators.
Asked by one reporter whether
JONATHAN ERNST/REUTERS
Roy Moore of Alabama, a Republican Senate candidate, dodged
questions from reporters about his more incendiary comments.
he still thinks Rep. Keith Ellison
(D-Minn.) should not be a member of Congress because he’s Muslim, as Moore wrote in a 2006
opinion piece, Moore replied, “I’ll
address that later.”
Did he still think “homosexual
conduct should be illegal,” as he
said in a 2005 television interview?
“I’m not answering any questions on issues right now,” Moore
said.
He said he spoke at lunch to
McConnell, whom he has vowed
to oppose as leader. But as he
departed the second floor of the
Capitol, he said he was “not going
to give an opinion” on that matter
at that moment.
Less than two hours later, Sen.
Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.), a frequent
critic of the far right and President Trump who is retiring at the
end of this Congress, used a floor
speech in favor of a conservative
judicial nominee to condemn
Moore.
“When the presidential nominee of my party, the party of
Lincoln, called for a Muslim ban,
it was wrong, and I said so,” said
Flake. “When a judge expressed
his personal belief that a Muslim
should not be a member of Congress because of his faith, it was
wrong. That this same judge is
now my party’s nominee for the
Senate should concern us all. Religious tests have no place in the
United States Congress.”
Moore’s visit came amid an
effort by Senate Republicans to
criticize Democrats for what they
have charged was anti-Catholic
animus against judicial nominee
Amy Coney Barrett, a Catholic law
professor who has questioned the
legal rationale behind the Supreme Court ruling on abortion
in Roe v. Wade. The Senate on
Tuesday confirmed Barrett to
serve on the U.S. Court of Appeals
for the 7th Circuit.
Republicans have focused on
Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.),
who accused Barrett at a hearing
of letting “dogma” overwhelm legal reasoning, and then expanded
to attacking any Democrat who
opposed Barrett.
But some of the same lawmak-
ers lodging that complaint have
not forcefully criticized Moore’s
past comment about Ellison, adding awkwardness to their line of
attack on the basis of religious
liberty.
For some Republican senators,
Moore’s appearance on Tuesday
also created some discomfort.
Asked whether he supported
Moore, Senate Republican Conference Chairman John Thune
(S.D.) responded, “I’m hoping to
meet with him while he’s up here.
I haven’t had a chance to do that
yet. I don’t know him.”
Like Trump and many other
leading Republicans, Thune
backed Sen. Luther Strange in the
GOP primary that Moore won.
“He stood up and was pleasant
in his comments,” said Sen. Bob
Corker
(R-Tenn.),
recalling
Moore’s appearance at lunch. But
Corker wasn’t won over — and he
did not want to weigh in on
Moore’s controversial positions.
“I plan on staying out of the
election, and the people of Alabama will determine that,” he
said. “And I have nothing to do
whatsoever with what’s happening in the Senate race in Alabama.”
Moore is scheduled to attend a
fundraiser in Washington on
Wednesday evening. An invitation distributed by his campaign
recently lists the names of prominent conservative activists and
senators backing his campaign,
including Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah).
But in a sign that Moore may
not even be on the same page as
some of his allies in Washington,
a spokesman for Lee said Tuesday
it was not on the senator’s to-do
list.
“Tomorrow’s fundraiser is not
on our schedule,” said the spokesman, Conn Carroll.
sean.sullivan@washpost.com
david.weigel@washpost.com
Bergdahl provided ‘gold mine’ of intelligence
Captive solider gleaned
valuable details about
militants, experts testify
BY
A LEX H ORTON
fort bragg, n.c. — Army Sgt.
Bowe Bergdahl has provided a
“gold mine” of useful intelligence
about the militants who held him
captive for years in Pakistan, and
his experience has injected valuable lessons into the military’s
program that instructs troops in
how to avoid and escape capture,
experts testified during Bergdahl’s sentencing Tuesday.
Those experts said Bergdahl’s
decision to abandon his post in
Afghanistan in 2009 produced an
unintended consequence: His detailed recollections of his captors’
tactics, methods of detainment
and other information were so
valuable that intelligence agencies and military doctrine were
dramatically improved, potentially adding a new foil to the
factors being weighed by a military judge to determine Bergdahl’s punishment, if any.
Terrence Russell of the Joint
Personnel Recovery Agency, the
lead Pentagon group for recovering prisoners of war and other
captives — which also produces
related training and doctrine —
testified that Bergdahl’s debriefing contributed to lessons taught
to U.S. troops and allied militar-
ies.
“There is still more data to
mine. We have forces at risk. We
need this information,” Russell
said, adding that he has debriefed
more than 120 American captives,
more than any other U.S. official.
The defense appeared to use
testimony from Russell and a
former Defense Intelligence
Agency analyst to suggest that
there is a national security interest in showing Bergdahl leniency.
Army Col. Jeffery R. Nance, the
presiding judge who will determine Bergdahl’s potential punishment, is expected to announce
the soldier’s sentence this week.
Bergdahl pleaded guilty Oct. 16
to desertion and misbehavior before the enemy, which carries a
maximum of life in prison.
Amber Dach, the lead intelligence analyst tracking Bergdahl,
said initial intelligence collection
was difficult in the region. The
Taliban-linked Haqqani network,
which held Bergdahl in Pakistan,
executes “robust disinformation
operations” to deceive analysts
sifting through large amounts of
raw data, she said.
That changed weeks after
Bergdahl was recovered and offered a “gold mine” of useful
intelligence, including actionable
information on militant activity
that was immediately sent to
commanders in Afghanistan,
Dach said.
“It reshaped the way we did
intel in the area. It confirmed
what we knew and what we did
not know,” she said.
Dach did not elaborate on what
kind of information he provided,
but she did say Bergdahl helped
analysts “build a captor network
like never before,” suggesting that
he offered information such as
details on key Haqqani leaders,
preferences for terrain, and how
guards transport prisoners and
pick prisoner holding sites for the
group, which uses ransom to fund
its operations.
The testimony Tuesday contrasts with a slate of other witnesses called by the prosecution
— troops who say they were
wounded on the battlefield during search-and-rescue operations
launched to find Bergdahl.
The defense has suggested that
Bergdahl’s treatment should be a
mitigating factor in determining
his sentence. Russell said the brutality and duration of Bergdahl’s
captivity, which included torture
and confinement in a cage,
amounted to the worst case of
prisoner treatment involving a
U.S. service member since the
Vietnam War.
Nance also will weigh other
positive contributions Bergdahl
has made since his rescue.
Doctrine and strategies to recover missing personnel are
honed to specific regions, but no
U.S. soldier other than Bergdahl
had ever been captured in Afghanistan, making him a uniquely valuable source of information
as the Trump administration increases troop levels there.
Only 32 enemy-held U.S. troops
have been recovered since the
A5
RE
Persian Gulf War, making each
one especially valuable to students learning how to evade capture if alone in hostile territory,
Russell said.
alex.horton@washpost.com
Trump nominee vows
cooperation on Russia
Ex-Bush appointee says
he would be ‘loath’ to jail
reporters in leak probes
BY
E LLEN N AKASHIMA
The man poised to become
the next head of the Justice
Department’s National Security
Division pledged to cooperate
with Congress’s investigation
into Russian interference in the
2016 election.
John Demers, who served in
the NSD during the George W.
Bush administration, stopped
short of promising to turn over
all materials requested by the
Senate Intelligence Committee
but said he would do as much as
possible.
The committee is one of three
congressional panels probing
Russia’s meddling in the election and potential coordination
between associates of President
Trump and Russian officials.
The hearing lasted less than
an hour, and the senators who
questioned him — even those
who took issue with his position
on a controversial surveillance
authority — said they would
vote to confirm him.
Demers, 46, served on the
leadership team of the NSD
from 2006 to 2009, when the
division was new. He is currently vice president and assistant
general counsel at the Boeing
Co.
During the hearing, several
senators asked him to explain
his view on a contested provision of Section 702 of the FISA
Amendments Act, a surveillance
power that is due to expire at the
end of the year.
The law, which Demers
helped draft in 2008, enables
the National Security Agency to
gather the emails and other
electronic communications of
foreign targets overseas. The
agency uses it for foreign intelligence, including to gather information on cyber, terrorism and
nuclear proliferation threats.
Some of the data collected
might include correspondence
with an American. And as it
stands, the law allows the FBI to
query the NSA’s collection of a
U.S. person’s data without a
warrant. That’s a problem for
some lawmakers, who say that
such authority violates Americans’ privacy rights.
Demers acknowledged to Sen.
Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) that he
understands “the concern.” But
“on balance,” he said, “I don’t
think you should need a warrant
to look at those communications that are already in the
government’s possession.” He
repeated the intelligence community’s argument that courts
have ruled that a warrant is not
needed to query data collected
under Section 702.
At least three federal district
courts and the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court have
agreed with that position. But
no appeals court has expressly
ruled on the issue.
Demers promised Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) that he
would think about the question
and provide a written response.
She said he could do so after he
was confirmed.
The other issue weighing on
senators’ minds was leaks of
classified information. Asked if
journalists should be jailed for
protecting their sources, he
said, “I would hate to have to
ever go down a path like that.”
But, he said, “I don’t want to say
that something could never happen. . . . I would be loath to do
it.”
He concurred with Justice
Department policy from 2013
that using subpoenas to gather
evidence from journalists is an
“extraordinary” measure. And,
he said, “they’d be a last resort
or close to a last resort.”
In early October, Demers testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee, which is also
conducting a Russia investigation — particularly into Russian
disinformation. He said the NSD
would also focus on that issue.
He also said he had no reason to
doubt the U.S. intelligence community’s January assessment
that Russia sought to influence
the election.
ellen.nakashima@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
the mueller investigation
Trump, Mueller: A study in contrasts
BY
G REG M ILLER
The main protagonists of the
Russia probe stayed largely out
of public view on Monday. President Trump surfaced only late in
the day for a White House trickor-treating event, while special
counsel Robert S. Mueller III was
invisible apart from the signature he affixed to the indictment
that was unsealed.
But their clashing dispositions
— a contrast in the way they
conduct themselves that goes
beyond their competing approaches to legal combat — have
become a palpable part of the
investigation of Russian interference in American politics.
Trump has often treated the
probe as a political assault to be
met with counterattacks in both
public and private, rather than a
legal minefield to be navigated
carefully. He has fired his former
FBI director, lashed out frequently on social media, shuffled
teams of lawyers and called for
the prosecution of Democrats —
all part of a highly public but so
far unsuccessful attempt to derail the investigation.
Mueller, by contrast, has been
silently methodical. He has not
uttered a single word in public,
works from an undisclosed location in Southwest Washington
and demonstrated the same discipline and disdain for theatrics
that defined his 12-year tenure as
FBI director. Submarine-like in
approach, Mueller has remained
entirely below the surface except
when delivering legal strikes that
have included the raid of former
Trump campaign chairman Paul
Manafort’s home and the indictments this week.
“Mueller is the opposite of
Trump, the opposite of a showman, opposite of blustery,” said
Jack Goldsmith, who served as a
senior Justice Department official in the George W. Bush administration. Mueller “is very
quiet, very circumspect, very disciplined,” Goldsmith said. “But
he spoke very loudly and very
powerfully” through the indictments of Manafort and his longtime business partner Rick Gates
as well as the guilty plea of
former Trump foreign policy adviser George Papadopoulos that
were disclosed on Monday.
The president’s defenders re-
TRUMP BY JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST; MUELLER BY WIN MCNAMEE/GETTY IMAGES
President Trump has treated the Russia probe as a political assault
to be met with counterattacks, while special counsel Robert S.
Mueller III has been silently methodical.
main convinced he will be vindicated, and that Mueller’s investigation will fail to find evidence
that the Trump campaign colluded with Russia as part of a
Kremlin interference campaign
that, according to a report by U.S.
intelligence agencies, sought to
discredit the 2016 U.S. election
and help propel Trump to victory.
“Here we are and it’s November, 11 or 12 months into this
thing, and still no evidence that
Trump did anything,” said Barry
Bennett, a former campaign adviser to Trump. “I don’t think
Trump even sees [Mueller] as an
adversary.”
If Trump at times seems unconcerned with the extent to
which his statements and actions
complicate his legal position,
Bennett said, it is because he sees
himself as innocent and “doesn’t
even understand why we’re engaged in this process.”
One of Trump’s lawyers, Ty
Cobb, said Monday that Mueller’s moves had “not been a cause
of great agita or angst or activity
at the White House.”
But the statement was belied
by Trump’s own behavior, according to those close to him who
said he spent much of Monday
fuming over media coverage and
venting to subordinates. He also
lashed out in a series of posts on
Twitter, saying Tuesday that the
“Fake News is working overtime,”
and that Papadopoulos — an
adviser Trump once praised as
“an excellent guy” — was “proven
to be a liar.”
The predictably rapid leak of
details about Trump’s reaction
from inside the White House
only highlighted the contrast
with Mueller, whose legal team
has a lock on the progress of the
probe. CNN reported on an indictment Friday night, but there
were no reports that it was
Manafort and Gates until just
hours before it was unsealed.
Nothing leaked on the plea and
cooperation of Papadopoulos until Mueller chose to disclose it.
Mueller’s refusal to engage
publicly sets him apart from
other legal and political adversaries that Trump has encountered since his entry into politics.
Trump’s combative impulses are
often most effective when he can
draw opponents into a public
skirmish, whether on a crowded
debate stage during the Republican primaries or in social media
showdowns with members of his
own party, including most recently Sen. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.)
Trump has, at times, sought to
pressure key players in the Russia probe. He pressed former FBI
director James B. Comey for an
oath of loyalty before firing him
in frustration as the inquiry
expanded. More recently, Trump
publicly berated Attorney General Jeff Sessions over his decision
to recuse himself from matters
related to the Russia probe, a
decision that cleared the way for
installing Mueller as special
counsel.
Mueller has been protected
from such entanglements, partly
because of the nature of his job as
special counsel — which, unlike
leading the FBI, requires minimal interaction with the White
House — but also because of his
temperament.
Former associates of Mueller
said his stealth approach reflects
long-standing views of prosecutorial conduct, but also has the
strategic advantage of unnerving
targets of investigations, a list
that may include Trump.
“The net effect of having these
two powerful actions in court
[Monday] combined with the
mystery that has surrounded the
investigation up until today has
set everyone in Trump world on
edge,” said Matthew Miller, who
served as Justice Department
spokesman during the Obama
administration.
Miller noted that other special
prosecutors have taken a more
public role. Kenneth Starr, who
led the Whitewater investigation
that culminated in impeachment
charges against President Bill
Clinton, spoke in public during
the investigation and even appeared on news programs.
Mueller, by contrast, was not
seen entering or leaving the
courthouse on Monday. As the
Manafort indictment was unsealed, there was no accompanying statement from Mueller’s office describing the facts of the
case — as is typical in Justice
Department news releases —
leaving reporters to read the
extensive court filings to fill in
the blanks. Even the location of
his office in Southwest Washington is a mystery to many in
government.
Mueller did meet with Trump
earlier this year when Trump was
interviewing candidates to replace Comey as head of the FBI,
officials said. But within weeks
Mueller was tapped as special
counsel and is not known to have
had any further contact with
Trump since then.
greg.miller@washpost.com
Sari Horwitz, Devlin Barrett, Matt
Zapotosky, Philip Rucker, Ashley
Parker and Spencer Hsu contributed
to this report.
Filing argues Manafort
poses serious flight risk
Document cites multiple
U.S. passports, difficulty
ascertaining his wealth
BY
S PENCER S . H SU
Onetime Trump campaign
chairman Paul Manafort keeps
three U.S. passports with different
identification numbers and submitted 10 passport applications in
as many years, the office of special
counsel Robert S. Mueller III disclosed in a new court filing Tuesday arguing that Manafort poses a
significant flight risk.
The 17-page filing came one day
after Manafort and longtime business partner Rick Gates pleaded
not guilty to an unsealed 12-count
indictment alleging conspiracy to
launder money, making false
statements and other charges in
connection with their work advising a Russia-friendly political party in Ukraine.
In the first criminal allegations
to come from probes into possible
Russian influence in U.S. political
affairs, prosecutors pressed their
case against the two defendants,
who face a hearing Thursday to set
bail terms. A U.S. magistrate on
Monday put the men on home
confinement pending that hearing after Manafort, 68, pledged to
pay a $10 million penalty and
Gates a $5 million one if they
failed to appear.
Prosecutors argued in the filing
that they “pose a risk of flight”
based on a “history of deceptive
and misleading conduct,” the evidence against them, and their
wealth and foreign connections.
The incentive to flee is even
stronger “for a defendant such as
Manafort, who is in his late 60s,”
the government observed, noting
that he faces a recommended sentence of about 12 to 15 years in
prison if convicted, not counting
“related frauds.”
In
addition
to
noting
Manafort’s unusual acquisition of
numerous U.S. passports, prosecutors Andrew Weissmann, Greg
D. Andres and Kyle R. Freeny expanded on their argument Monday, citing the government’s difficulty in ascertaining his wealth.
Trump allies split over how to deal with Mueller
GOP FROM A1
Journal editorial board has called
on Mueller to resign. The Journal
is part of News Corp., which is led
by Rupert Murdoch, a friend of
Trump who speaks privately with
the president.
But many people in Trump’s
orbit recommend that he stay the
course with cooperation — encouraging him to harshly criticize
media coverage of the investigation but avoid engaging Mueller.
“I like Steve, but his advice is
not always the most helpful,” said
Christopher Ruddy, a Trump
friend and the chief executive of
Newsmax, a conservative media
outlet. “In this case, whatever
Steve says, the president should
do the opposite.”
The tensions extend to Capitol
Hill, where Republican lawmakers have mostly split into two
camps: those who are wary of
weighing in on Mueller’s investigation and those who see it as a
prime political target.
Bannon is demanding that
GOP leaders move swiftly to end
congressional probes into Russian interference, undermine
Mueller’s investigation and increase scrutiny on Democratic
controversies.
“The Republicans are like
church mice,” Bannon said Tuesday. “No support of the president.
Totally gutless. The Hill needs to
step up.”
Senate Judiciary Committee
Chairman Charles E. Grassley (RIowa) said he believes that Republicans should proceed carefully, and he called Mueller a “very
ethical person.”
“I don’t know how you could
improve things by interfering,”
Grassley said. “The process just
ought to go.”
House Intelligence Committee
Chairman Devin Nunes (R-Calif.),
a trusted Trump ally, has
launched an investigation into an
Obama-era uranium deal and is
preparing to invite witnesses this
week to testify about the FBI’s
handling of Russia investigations. Nunes intends to issue subpoenas if people decline to appear, according to people briefed
on his plans.
Former House speaker Newt
Gingrich, an informal Trump ad-
MARY F. CALVERT/REUTERS
Former White House chief strategist Stephen K. Bannon called congressional Republicans “church mice” for what he sees as their timid
response to the Russia investigation. He has urged more efforts to undermine special counsel Robert S. Mueller III.
viser who praised Mueller earlier
this year after his appointment as
special counsel, said he has slowly
“soured” on the former FBI director and agrees that Congress
should put a harsher national
spotlight on him.
“Mueller ought to be held accountable,” Gingrich said.
He ticked through a series of
what he considers questionable
moves by Mueller and his team,
including their handling of former Trump foreign policy adviser
George Papadopoulos, whom the
government described in an indictment unsealed Monday as a
“proactive cooperator.”
“Congress should look seriously at whether Mueller put a wire
on this guy and sent him around
to entrap people,” Gingrich said.
“If that happened, Congress bet-
ter see the full transcripts, not
just the FBI’s edited versions.
Congress should also ask why
they’re raiding [former campaign
chairman Paul] Manafort’s home
at 5 a.m. for a white-collar crime
from a few years ago.”
This sentiment is not heard at
the White House, however, where
officials have been careful not to
antagonize the special counsel.
“Our approach has been to be
cooperative and responsive and
to see this come to a quick conclusion,” White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders
said. “Have we been aggressive in
our comments and our feelings
towards the Clinton campaign
and the DNC? Yes. But that’s
where our aggression is seen and
nowhere else.”
Ty Cobb, the White House law-
yer overseeing Russia matters,
said after Monday’s indictments
of Manafort and his longtime
deputy, Rick Gates, “Nothing
about today’s events alters anything related to our engagement
with the special counsel, with
whom we continue to cooperate.”
Cobb added, “There are no discussions and there is no consideration being given to terminating
Mueller.”
Republicans in Congress said
Trump is wise to avoid messing
with Mueller.
“There would be an uprising at
the Capitol like never seen before
if any kind of interference looked
like it was taking place,” said Sen.
Bob Corker (R-Tenn.). “Regardless of which side of the aisle.
That’s just beyond the pale.”
Among Republicans, there is
broad agreement to bring attention to past controversies involving Hillary Clinton, Trump’s Democratic opponent in the 2016 election, that have animated hourly
discussions on Fox News Channel
and conservative talk radio programs.
The White House and allies
have waged a public relations
battle over the Clinton campaign’s and the Democratic National Committee’s funding of research that resulted in the famous
dossier that details Trump’s alleged connections to Russia.
The dossier has become a lightning rod, with congressional Republican leaders trying to discredit Fusion GPS, the firm that
commissioned the dossier, and
the document’s author, Christopher Steele, a former British intel-
“Manafort’s financial holdings
are substantial, if difficult to quantify precisely because of his varying representations,” they said.
Manafort, for instance, reported
$42 million in assets in March
2016; $136 million that May; and
$28 million and $63 million that
August, in two financial applications, the government said.
Gates listed his and his wife’s
net worth as $30 million in a
February 2016 application for a
line of credit, but just $2.6 million
in a March 2016 residential loan
application.
Prosecutors also said that
Manafort registered a phone and
an email account under an alias in
May and traveled with it to Mexico
in June, to China on May 23 and to
Ecuador on May 9.
Manafort attorney Kevin
Downing did not immediately respond to a request for comment
Tuesday evening, but told the
court Monday that his client “definitely disagree[d]” with prosecutors using the “ valuation of assets
that fluctuate greatly in different
countries” to argue against his release.
Separately, outside the courthouse, Downing said, “There is no
evidence that Mr. Manafort and
the Trump campaign colluded
with the Russian government.”
Downing called “ridiculous” the
charges, which he characterized
as interpreting Manafort’s maintaining of offshore accounts as a
means to bring his funds into the
United States as a scheme to conceal assets.
Gates’s temporary attorney, Assistant Federal Defender David
Bos, declined to comment, saying
Gates is arranging for new private
counsel.
The new court filing was disclosed after business hours after
prosecutors asked — and the court
ordered — that portions of the
case be unsealed Tuesday.
U.S. Magistrate Deborah A.
Robinson had granted prosecutors’ motion Friday to seal the
entire case including the indictment and any warrants, and any
other related matters, citing concern that disclosure could cause
Manafort or Gates to flee or “to
destroy (or tamper with) evidence.”
spencer.hsu@washpost.com
ligence officer with ties to the U.S.
intelligence community.
Republicans also are trying to
bring scrutiny to a 2010 uranium
deal approved by the Obama administration, while Clinton was
secretary of state. The deal —
which Trump used as a political
cudgel against Clinton during the
campaign — allowed a Russian
nuclear energy agency to acquire
a controlling stake in a Canadianbased company that had mining
licenses for about 20 percent of
U.S. uranium extraction capacity,
although the company cannot export uranium.
Fox News Channel host Sean
Hannity, a Trump confidant, decried the lack of investigative attention on Clinton, a point the
president and his top aides have
made in recent days.
“This is not hyperbole,” Hannity said Monday night in his on-air
monologue, which the president
is known to watch regularly. “I am
not overstating the case. We are at
a major crisis point in America
tonight. Do we have equal justice
under the law in this country
today?”
Some Republican lawmakers
have heeded these calls. House
and Senate GOP leaders have announced two investigations into
the uranium deal, while at least
three congressional committees
are continuing to look into how
the FBI handled Clinton’s email
scandal.
But there appears to be little
appetite for legislation that
would cut Mueller’s funding or
otherwise limit the scope of his
investigation, something various
Trump allies have suggested is
necessary.
“My basic philosophy is, once
you have an independent counsel,
you ought to give him a chance to
follow the facts,” said Sen. Richard C. Shelby (R-Ala.), a senior
member of the Senate Appropriations Committee and the chairman of the subcommittee that
handles the Justice Department’s
funding. “If somebody’s doing a
job, you don’t want to cut it off.”
Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine)
said: “The idea that Bob Mueller
is going to have the scope of his
inquiry constrained, or be otherwise restricted, is really out there.
I think that’s extremely unlikely.”
philip.rucker@washpost.com
robert.costa@washpost.com
Karoun Demirjian and Sean Sullivan
contributed to this report.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
the mueller investigation
“We have to . . . start giving people a reason to vote for Democrats.”
Ken Martin, chair of the Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party
MELINA MARA/THE WASHINGTON POST
Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) heads to Democratic Party caucus luncheons on Tuesday.
Democrats grapple with strategy:
Hammer on probe or focus on policy?
BY E D O ’ K EEFE
AND D AVID W EIGEL
The intense focus in Washington on the investigation led by
special counsel Robert S. Mueller
III is not expected to become a
dominant theme for Democrats
on the campaign trail as the party
continues grappling with how to
talk about President Trump.
Trump, his sagging popularity,
his conservative policy ideas and
the investigation now embroiling
his administration are a major
preoccupation for Democratic
leaders, who might relish watching the White House struggle but
who vividly remember that the
“Stop Trump” message fell flat
last year.
The Russia investigation “is
important to talk about, but I
don’t think it’s something that
you can focus entirely on,” said
Ken Martin, chair of the Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor
Party.
In each race, “it’s not enough
just to say that Trump and his
allies are bad people,” Martin
said. “We have to be able to move
beyond it and start giving people
a reason to vote for Democrats.”
In Minnesota, Martin and his
party will be working next year to
hold the governor’s mansion and
a U.S. Senate seat and turn out
voters in at least four competitive
congressional districts.
In Ohio, Democratic Party
Chairman David Pepper is hoping
to retake the governor’s mansion,
hold a Senate seat and claw back a
congressional district or two.
“We don’t spend a lot of time
around here talking about Vladimir Putin and James Comey,” he
said. “I’m as frustrated as anyone
by what Comey did and that Putin
interfered, and Congress should
get to the bottom of that, but if
that’s what we talk about . . . we
will lose again.”
Pepper, who spoke the night
before indictments were unsealed Monday, added that the
way Ohio Democrats will win
next year “is by getting a core
message that appeals across all 88
counties.”
But Guy Cecil, president of the
Democratic super PAC Priorities
USA Action, said that despite the
reservations of some, the Russia
story will be part of the party’s
2018 focus, especially after the
indictments.
“That took what had been a
complicated story and it simplified it,” he said.
The story, Cecil said, would
have the greatest impact on
“white, college-educated voters
who all along had conflicted feelings about Trump” but voted
against Hillary Clinton after
Comey announced a last-minute
decision to briefly reopen the
investigation of the former secretary of state.
Also complicating the party’s
response to the investigations is
that a prominent party stalwart
may also end up entangled in the
Mueller probe.
On Monday, Tony Podesta, a
Democratic power lobbyist and
the brother of John Podesta, a
longtime Democratic adviser
who led Clinton’s presidential
campaign, announced that he is
stepping away from his lobbying
firm amid questions about the
work he did with former Trump
campaign
chairman
Paul
Manafort and his business partner Rick Gates, who were indicted Monday.
Across the country, Democrat-
ic political consultants and progressive groups agreed that mentions of the ongoing investigation
will resonate best in areas where
Trump is deeply unpopular. It
may also help make broader antiincumbent arguments about the
need to clean up Washington or
preserve American democracy.
“It isn’t directly relevant for
every campaign, but if you’re
running for Congress, it sure is,”
said Rodd McLeod, an Arizonabased consultant working with
congressional and state legislative candidates. “Congress’s job is
to be a check on Donald Trump,
and right now Congress is failing.”
Focus on tax bill
Since the end of the effort to
repeal the Affordable Care Act,
the grass-roots Indivisible project, a network of citizen groups,
has focused more on building
opposition to tax cuts than on the
Russia probe.
“We went through the exact
same thing during the Trumpcare
fight. Comey was fired, and Mueller was appointed, and we had to
try to focus the field: ‘Yes, this is
bonkers, but keep your eye on the
prize,’ ” said Ezra Levin, the cofounder of Indivisible. “Where we
have leverage is through the legislative process — that’s where constituent power actually works.”
MoveOn.org is working with
two dozen smaller groups for a
“day of action” if Trump fires
Mueller; a website, at trumpisnotabovethelaw.org, is already being used to organize it. But Ben
Wikler, MoveOn’s Washington director, said the group was using
this week to protest the rollout of
the Republicans’ tax-cut bill, not
double down on Russia news.
“People will be in the streets if
Mueller is fired,” Wikler said. “But
public pressure isn’t going to
change how Mueller conducts his
investigation. It can affect whether Congress cuts taxes for the
rich.”
Out on the campaign trail, the
investigation could prove to be an
especially tricky subject for the 10
Democratic senators facing reelection next year in states Trump
won handily, and on the dozens of
Democratic House candidates
running in exurban or rural
swing districts.
During a recent town hall
meeting in Washington, Mo., Sen.
Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) pulled
questions out of a fishbowl that
attendees had written and submitted as they walked in the door.
The first asked whether Congress
can “stop President Trump from
lying to the American people every day.”
McCaskill shook her head,
didn’t answer and moved on to
the next question. Later, she
pulled out a question asking
whether Trump would be impeached.
“I don’t support impeaching
the president. I don’t believe
there’s anything that’s occurred
that requires an impeachment,
and so I’m not in favor of that,”
she said before moving on.
Other Democrats up for reelection next year are speaking about
the investigation in measured
tones.
“I consider it a truth hunt and
not a witch hunt,” Sen. Amy
Klobuchar (D-Minn.) said Monday on “CBS This Morning” when
asked to react to Trump’s characterization of the investigation.
“We owe it to our democracy.”
“What I want to know is how
far this went, who was involved
and who gave the orders,” she
added.
Candidates stay quiet
In the battle for the House,
Democrats say they may have a
unique opportunity by virtue of
the people they have running.
The party’s unprecedented wave
of recruits includes military veterans such as Jason Crow, running against Rep. Mike Coffman
(R-Colo.); former intelligence officers such as Abigail Spanberger,
running against Rep. Dave Brat
(R-Va.); and senior government
officials such as former State Department official Ed Meier, running against Rep. Pete Sessions
(R-Tex.).
But Monday, as the indictments of Trump campaign officials dominated the news, none of
those candidates responded with
statements. Neither did the Democratic candidates in next week’s
closely watched races for governor in New Jersey and Virginia.
New York Mayor Bill de Blasio
is running for reelection next
week and has frequently plunged
into national debates, but on
Monday he campaigned for a
“millionaire’s tax” that would
fund transportation and rode the
New York subway with Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) — and didn’t
opine on the indictments.
Some Trump critics are going
further with the story than Democrats might like. Ryan Clayton,
an organizer with Americans
Take Action who was arrested last
week after tossing Russian flags
at Trump during a visit to the
Capitol, said that the indictments
demonstrated why protests were
needed to stop “fascism” in the
United States.
“Now whenever someone
starts talking about Hillary and
uranium, all we have to say is:
Yeah, check the news about
Manafort,” Clayton said. “I look
forward to the day that Trump
and his associates are getting
marched to jail in orange jumpsuits. That will send the message
that you can’t collude with a
foreign power to undermine democracy.”
And shortly before the indictments were unsealed, billionaire
donor Tom Steyer began a multimillion-dollar television ad campaign calling on Congress to begin impeachment proceedings
for Trump. He is planning to
travel the country to build awareness, with plans to stop this week
outside the district office of Rep.
Darrell Issa (R-Calif.), a longtime
critic of President Barack Obama
who Democrats say isn’t being
tough enough on Trump.
“This isn’t about doing what’s
the best move politically or tactically — this is about doing what’s
right,” said Steyer spokeswoman
Aleigha Cavalier.
In a recent interview, House
Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (DCalif.) said Steyer’s push for impeachment is “one that no one
could disagree with in terms of
the justification.” But she said she
and her caucus would stay focused on defeating the Republican tax plan.
“I say to the members it’s no
use talking about him,” she said.
“He’s self-evident. So why don’t
we just talk about what we want
to do.”
ed.okeefe@washpost.com
david.weigel@washpost.com
James Hohmann and Michael
Scherer contributed to this report.
SU
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THE WASHINGTON POST
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. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
the mueller investigation
Mueller may force suspects’ lawyers to testify against them
BY D EVLIN B ARRETT
AND M ATT Z APOTOSKY
A little-noticed court filing unsealed this week as part of special
counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s
ongoing probe could have big consequences for his other targets —
showing he’s willing to use suspects’ lawyers to provide evidence
against them.
After unsealing a 12-count indictment
against
President
Trump’s former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, the U.S. District Court also unsealed an opinion from Chief Judge Beryl A.
Howell saying one of Manafort’s
former lawyers could be compelled to testify to the grand jury.
Typically, such information is
protected by attorney-client privilege — a bedrock principle of U.S.
legal practice that says a lawyer
must keep confidential what they
are told by their clients.
There are some exceptions to
that confidentiality, including in
instances where a suspect may
have lied to his or her lawyer,
causing that lawyer to unwittingly
lie to the government. Howell
ruled that in Manafort’s case, the
exception applied and the attorney could be called to testify before the grand jury.
“The opinion is troubling, because people make representations to the government all the
time through their lawyers, and I
think there’s a general expectation of confidentiality behind the
conversations that go into those
representations,’’ said Peter D.
Hardy, a partner at the Ballard
Spahr law firm. “It’s widening a
door that’s not often used. And the
wider the door gets, maybe the
more people will use it.’’
Hardy said the use of what lawyers call the “crime-fraud exception’’ indicates “the special counsel team is highly intelligent,
highly aggressive, and they’re going to pursue legal theories that
your average prosecutor will not
use. Will they use the specific theory again? It’s certainly possible.’’
Manafort is hardly the only person under scrutiny who used lawyers to make government filings.
One of Mueller’s other key targets,
People gather near the Washington courthouse where Paul Manafort appeared Monday. The U.S. District Court unsealed a judge’s opinion
that one of the former lawyers for the ex-Trump campaign chairman could be compelled to testify to the grand jury.
“The opinion is troubling, because people make
representations to the government all the time
through their lawyers, and I think there’s a general
expectation of confidentiality behind the
conversations that go into those representations.”
Peter D. Hardy, partner at the Ballard Spahr law firm
Michael Flynn, has also filed government papers regarding his
work on behalf of another government.
No public charges have been
filed against Flynn, former national security adviser in the
Trump administration, but he remains under investigation, according to officials familiar with
the matter who, like others, spoke
on the condition of anonymity to
discuss an ongoing investigation.
In the Manafort case, the judge
began her ruling by declaring,
“This is a matter of national importance.’’ The ruling does not
identify Manafort’s lawyer — it
refers to the attorney simply as
“the Witness,’’ but people familiar
with the case said it was Melissa
Laurenza who was willing to testify if her clients consented, which
they did not. Neither Laurenza
nor her lawyer responded to a
request for comment Tuesday.
A Manafort spokesman also declined to comment.
After several hearings on the
subject, the judge decided prosecutors could ask the lawyer seven
out of eight proposed questions,
ruling one went too far. The judge
said investigators had gathered
enough evidence from other
sources to justify questioning the
lawyer, though the details of that
evidence were redacted from the
court filing.
That legal fight took place un-
der seal in September, but the
opinion was unsealed Monday,
the same day charges were announced against Manafort and
his deputy Rick Gates.
Prosecutors also revealed Monday that a former Trump campaign adviser, George Papadopoulos, had pleaded guilty and
been cooperating with investigators for months.
In Manafort’s case, prosecutors
used information from his former
lawyer to charge him with lying to
the government about his work
for a foreign government —
Ukraine. While most of the indictment focuses on issues of alleged
money laundering, conspiracy
and failure to file reports to tax
authorities, the last two counts of
the indictment say that Manafort
and Gates “knowingly and willfully caused to be made a false statement’’ in a government filing required under the Foreign Agents
Registration Act, or FARA.
Court filings suggest those two
charges stem in part from information provided by Manafort’s
former lawyer.
In the FARA filing, Manafort
and Gates denied that their work
on the part of Ukraine’s Party of
Regions constituted lobbying on
behalf of a foreign government.
Jacob Frenkel, a white-collar
attorney at Dickinson Wright who
previously worked in the Office of
the Independent Counsel, said
Howell’s ruling was likely a critical one for prosecutors — who
otherwise “would need to jump
over and avoid altogether the
communications with counsel.”
“It is invaluable to the FARA
counts, and to the issue of
Manafort’s state of mind more
broadly in the indictment, because an experienced, credible
lawyer is going to have instant
credibility with a jury,” Frenkel
said.
Frenkel said that the ruling was
written in such a way that Howell
seemed to believe it would be
appealed.
“The attorneys’ testimony will
be central to an actual case, if this
case ever gets there,” Frenkel said.
devlin.barrett@washpost.com
matt.zapotosky@washpost.com
Papadopoulos had scant experience to qualify him to advise Trump campaign
ADVISER FROM A1
sian government.
The court documents do not
answer a key question: whether
Papadopoulos also told his superiors that he had met a Londonbased professor who claimed to
know that the Russians had “dirt”
on Democratic candidate Hillary
Clinton, including thousands of
her emails.
An FBI agent told the court in
July that Papadopoulos lied in an
interview with federal agents, saying he did not tell anyone on the
campaign about the “dirt” because he thought the professor
was a “nothing.”
At 29, Papadopoulos had scant
experience that qualified him to
advise a presidential candidate.
He had entered the Trump campaign after a six-week stint working for the campaign of Trump’s
rival for the Republican nomination, neurosurgeon Ben Carson.
Carson’s campaign manager,
Barry Bennett, recalled that Papadopoulos was hired after sending
him an unsolicited message via
LinkedIn seeking a job.
At the time, Carson’s campaign
was desperate to show it had policy experts advising his campaign,
given that most leading Republican foreign policy thinkers had
been snapped up by other candidates.
Bennett said his only vetting
was to ask a friend at the Washington-based Hudson Institute,
where Papadopoulos’s résumé indicated he had worked as a researcher, whether Papadopoulos
was “an okay guy.”
“I wasn’t looking for something
stellar,” Bennett said. “I wanted to
make sure he was okay.”
For six weeks of work, Bennett
said, Papadopoulos was paid
$8,500, before he was let go from
the campaign at the end of January 2016 as it shed staff.
By March 2016, Trump’s campaign, like Carson’s before it, was
eagerly searching for foreign policy expertise. As Trump rose in the
polls and won Republican primaries, the former reality TV host
was under pressure to announce a
group of advisers with whom he
was consulting on foreign policy
issues.
The scrutiny intensified early
that month after 70 conservative
national security experts signed
an open letter opposing Trump’s
candidacy. In mid-March, Trump
was asked on the MSNBC show
COSTAS BEJ/NATIONAL HERALD
George Papadopoulos and Michael Katehakis of Rutgers University
at a meeting Nov. 6, 2016. A cursory vetting would have found that
much of Papadopoulos’s résumé was exaggerated or false.
“Morning Joe” to name people
with whom he spoke about foreign affairs.
“I’m speaking with myself,
number one, because I have a very
good brain,” Trump responded,
Papadopoulos, they would have
found that much of his alreadyslim résumé was either exaggerated or false.
While he claimed to have
served for several years as a fellow
George Papadopoulos continued to hold himself out
as a Trump adviser after the election. And after
the inauguration, he met with a group of Israelis.
prompting more calls for a list of
formal advisers.
To come up with names, the
campaign turned to Sam Clovis, a
former Iowa radio host who
served as national campaign cochairman, an attorney for Clovis
confirmed Tuesday in a statement.
But the statement did not address how Papadopoulos ended
up on the list. Bennett said he was
not consulted and would not have
recommended his former employee if he had been asked because he found him unimpressive.
On March 21, Trump included
Papadopoulos among five men he
announced were advising him on
matters of national security in a
meeting with The Washington
Post editorial board. “An energy
and oil consultant. Excellent guy,”
Trump said.
If Trump or his team had undertaken even a cursory vetting of
at the Hudson Institute, officials
there said he had been an unpaid
intern and a researcher under
contract to several fellows who
were writing a book.
Although he claimed to be “U.S.
Representative at the 2012 Geneva International Model United
Nations,” officials at that organization said they had no record of
him.
Papadopoulos said he had delivered the “keynote address” at a
leading American-Greek organization in 2008 — while a student
at DePaul University. But records
from the gathering indicate he
merely participated in a youth
panel with other participants. The
keynote was delivered by 1988
Democratic presidential candidate Michael Dukakis.
Though Papadopoulos’s exaggerated résumé issues quickly became public, he remained a part of
the Trump advisory panel and
soon began urging campaign
aides to let him set up a meeting
between Trump and Russian officials.
Court documents show he
raised the idea at a March 31 meeting of the group attended by both
Trump and Sessions, who had endorsed Trump’s campaign, telling
the group that “he had connections that could help arrange a
meeting between then-candidate
Trump and President [Vladimir]
Putin.”
He also began appearing in the
foreign press. While visiting Israel
the next month, he told a group of
researchers that Trump saw Putin
as “a responsible actor and potential partner,” according to a column in the Jerusalem Post.
In May, he told the Telegraph of
London that Prime Minister David Cameron should apologize to
Trump for calling the candidate
“divisive, stupid and wrong.” Cameron’s comments had come after
Trump announced that he supported a ban on Muslims entering
the United States.
Papadopoulos’s
comments
were big news in Britain — and the
campaign took notice.
J.D. Gordon, a former Pentagon
spokesman and Trump national
security adviser, said campaign
officials were displeased, and Papadopoulos was counseled that he
should clear future media appearances with campaign staff and
keep a low profile.
“I was surprised to learn what
George Papadopoulos was up to
during the campaign,” he said
Tuesday in a text message. “He
obviously went to great lengths to
go around me and Sen. Sessions.”
And yet, Papadopoulos continued to be invited to campaign
events. In late June or early July,
he attended a dinner at the Capitol
Hill Club along with several other
national security advisers for the
Trump campaign.
Another person who was at the
meeting said Sessions also attended; Papadopoulos was seated to
Sessions’s left.
A spokeswoman for Sessions
declined to comment.
Media appearances by Papadopoulos continued.
In September, he spoke extensively to Interfax, telling the Russian news agency that Trump “has
been open about his willingness to
usher in a new chapter” in
U.S.-Russia relations, depending
on “Russia acting as a responsible
stake holder in the international
system.” He also questioned the
effectiveness of U.S. sanctions on
Russia.
By that time, WikiLeaks had
released emails hacked from the
Democratic National Committee
that were widely suspected to
have been stolen at the direction
of the Russian government.
Trump’s warm rhetoric toward
Putin had become a controversial
topic on the campaign trail.
Court documents show that Papadopoulos forwarded a copy of
the Interfax article to a Russian
woman with whom he had been
corresponding during the campaign.
British sources said it was
around that time that he approached British government officials to say he was traveling to
London and asked to be given a
meeting with senior government
ministers. Instead, he was offered
a session with a mid-level official
at the Foreign Office in London.
During the meeting, Papadopoulos made a comment indicating he had contacts at the senior
level of the Russian government,
British sourcessaid. British officials quickly concluded he was not
a major or knowledgeable player
in the Trump orbit and did not
pursue the issue or continue contact.
A spokesman for the Greek Embassy said he met with that nation’s foreign minister in New
York. Spokesman Efthymios Aravantinos said the conversation
was conducted as part of a routine
effort that the embassy makes to
reach out to Greek Americans
“hoping they have a sentimental
attachment to Greece and that we
can connect.”
It is not clear how much the
campaign knew about Papadopoulos’s activities. But he continued through these months to have
contact with other Trump officials.
In September, Papadopoulos
emailed another Trump aide, Boris Epshteyn, and told him he
planned to be in New York and
hoped to set up meetings around
the U.N. General Assembly meeting.
The email was described to The
Washington Post in August of this
year and is among 20,000 pages of
documents that the Trump campaign has turned over to the White
House, congressional committees
and defense attorneys.
Papadopoulos wrote that he
wanted to connect Epshteyn with
a friend, Sergei Millian of the Russian American Chamber of Commerce, the emails said.
Millian would later be identified as a major source for the
author of a dossier that included
unsubstantiated salacious allegations about Trump’s activities in
Russia, a claim Millian has denied.
Epshteyn said he never met
Millian and declined to comment
further. Asked in August to describe his relationship with Papadopoulos, Millian responded by
email, “I can meet and talk to any
person. . . . It’s none of your business.”
Millian did not respond to a
request for comment Tuesday.
Papadopoulos continued to
hold himself out as a Trump adviser, even after the November election.
Two days after Trump’s inauguration in January, he met in Washington with a group of Israelis
headed by Yossi Dagan, a leader of
the West Bank settler movement
that prepared a video of the session to be shown at home.
“We had an excellent meeting
with Yossi and we hope that the
people of Judea and Samaria” —
the name used by the Israeli right
for the West Bank — “will have a
great 2017,” Papadopoulos said, according to the video. “We are looking forward to ushering in a new
relationship with all of Israel.”
According to an account in the
Jerusalem Post, the settler leaders
had been invited to attend the
inauguration and meet with “senators, congressmen and members
of the President’s team.” Dagan,
reached by telephone Tuesday in
Israel, declined to comment on
the visit or who had arranged the
meeting with Papadopoulos.
While the president now seems
to have left Papadopoulos behind,
Papadopoulos has continued to
highlight the tie. On LinkedIn, he
indicates he was a Trump adviser
through January 2017 and includes the experience as the first
line of his description about himself.
“President Trump recommendation about me: ‘George is an oil
and gas consultant; excellent
guy,’ ” Papadopoulos wrote.
rosalind.helderman@washpost.com
karen.deyoung@washpost.com
tom.hamburger@washpost.com
Dan Balz, Sari Horwitz and Devlin
Barrett in Washington and Ruth
Eglash in Jerusalem contributed to
this report.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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the mueller investigation
Probe questions will follow Trump to Asia
Indictments threaten to
overshadow 12-day trip
— and the GOP tax push
BY J OHN
AND D AVID
W AGNER
N AKAMURA
The first criminal charges
stemming from the Russia investigation landed this week at a
perilous point in Donald
Trump’s presidency, threatening
his standing with foreign leaders
ahead of an important trip to
Asia on Friday and his effectiveness in selling the Republican
tax plan set to be released this
week.
Aides insisted the twin challenges at home and abroad
would not be undermined by the
indictments, but the frustration
of the president — whose job
approval ratings hit a new low
this week in Gallup polling —
was evident Tuesday. He started
the day with a spate of tweets in
which he lashed out at the media
and “Crooked Dems” and urged a
focus instead on the “Massive
Tax Cuts” he has promised to
deliver by Christmas.
In a bid to show he remains
focused on the tasks at hand,
Trump later in the day allowed
reporters to witness the start of a
White House meeting with business leaders at which he boasted
that the December signing of the
yet-to-be-unveiled GOP tax bill
would be “the biggest tax event
in the history of our country.”
But special counsel Robert S.
Mueller III’s probe loomed large.
At the meeting, Trump ignored
reporters’ shouted questions related to the charges unveiled
Monday against three campaign
officials, including former campaign chairman Paul Manafort
and a foreign policy adviser,
George Papadopoulos, whom
Trump derided on Twitter as a
“young, low level volunteer” and
“a liar.”
Foreign policy analysts said
Trump’s political crisis could dis-
tract from or complicate his
message on a high-stakes 12-day
trip to five Asian nations aimed
at building regional support for
his bid to pressure North Korea
over its nuclear weapons and
ballistic missile programs.
Beyond Trump’s tweeting,
analysts said, the issue could
dominate the U.S. press corps’
coverage of the trip, with reporters asking him about the Mueller
investigation on foreign soil.
Michael Green, an Asia policy
aide to President George W.
Bush, recalled the 43rd president being asked about the Iraq
War during trips to Asia even as
he attempted to sketch a vision
of U.S. engagement in the region.
“My prediction is that it will
be a story for the White House
press corps and then the Asian
press will pick up on it like an
echo chamber,” said Green, who
was in Japan when news of
Mueller’s indictments broke
Monday. He added that “having
been on those trips, it can be
very, very hard for the White
House to get their strategic and
foreign policy message through.”
Trump plans to visit Japan,
South Korea, China, Vietnam
and the Philippines, engaging in
bilateral meetings with a host of
foreign leaders. Aides have been
briefing him heavily.
The trip comes as Chinese
President Xi Jinping has consolidated power on the heels of the
Communist Party’s National
Congress, creating another problematic narrative for Trump.
“Trump is by far the weakest
leader in modern U.S. history,
and Xi is by far the strongest
leader,” said Ian Bremmer, president of the Eurasia Group, a
global risk assessment firm.
“That’s going to make the meeting uncomfortable.”
Bremmer, who also was in
Japan last week at a security
conference, said Japanese officials are concerned that Trump
could be motivated to take a
more provocative stance on
North Korea or on U.S. trade
relations with South Korea and
China to distract from his do-
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
President Trump, joined by Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, speaks Tuesday during a
meeting on tax policy with business leaders at the White House. He predicted he would sign a
GOP tax bill in December in what will be “the biggest tax event in the history of our country.”
mestic problems.
Unlike past U.S. leaders who
have tried to stay on message in
Asia while dealing with distractions at home, Trump “always
wants to create a distraction,”
Bremmer said. “To what extent
will he play harder ball with the
Chinese or North Koreans or on
trade? And, most importantly,
will he decide to really fulminate
against the North Koreans? It is
dangerous, the combination of
all that.”
Bonnie Glaser, a China expert
at the Center for Strategic and
International Studies, was in
Beijing last week.
“The Chinese are worried that
his domestic problems will cause
Trump to do something internationally that will bolster his domestic position and distract people from his problems at home,”
she said.
“The biggest worry is an attack on North Korea,” Glaser
said. “Those who think he is not
bluffing — they think this is
something they should be worried about.”
In interviews, several prominent Republicans argued that
the tax bill will rise or fall based
on factors unrelated to Trump’s
level of distraction.
Heading into next year’s midterm elections, Republicans in
Congress are under tremendous
pressure to show they can get
something done with control of
both chambers and the White
House.
“This bill was never going to
pass because Donald Trump
went up to the Hill and negotiated it,” said Barry Bennett, a GOP
consultant who advised Trump
during last year’s general election. “It’s going to pass because
Republicans have to pass it. . . .
They’re not really counting on
much leadership from the president.”
A senior Republican congressional aide largely echoed that
sentiment and said lawmakers
do not expect Trump to have
much of an impact in the days
following the bill’s introduction
this week and its subsequent
markup by the House Ways and
Means Committee, in a stretch
when he’ll be out of the country.
“It’s kind of an inside-the-cone
process,” said the aide, who requested anonymity to speak
more candidly. “I’m not sure how
much Trump would make a difference.”
But the aide said there will be
points later in the process that
could benefit from presidential
leadership, including help selling the legislation to the public
before the full House votes and
navigating differences that
emerge after the Senate passes a
bill.
The aide also said lawmakers
have become accustomed to having to navigate distractions created by the White House.
“When this year have we not
had some big story about Russia
or something else supposedly
looming over us?” the aide said.
“This is kind of the new normal.”
Other observers suggested the
pervasiveness of the Russia
probe — which continued to
dominate cable television news
much of Tuesday — will have a
more significant impact on Capitol Hill, particularly if more
indictments are handed down in
coming weeks.
“It brings more chaos into an
already chaotic situation, where
they’re operating on an almost
impossible timeline to begin
with,” said Jim Manley, a lobbyist and longtime aide to thenSenate Minority Leader Harry
M. Reid (D-Nev.).
Manley and others also argued that Trump tends to lash
out on Twitter when he’s agitated
— and often not in a helpful way.
Last week, for instance, he
tweeted that the tax-cut plan
would not include any changes
to tax-deferred retirement accounts such as 401(k)s, following
reports last week that House
Republicans were weighing a
sharp reduction in the amount
of income American workers
could save through such programs.
Doug Heye, a GOP political
consultant, said the Mueller indictments have largely overshadowed what could have been
a string of positive stories about
Trump’s week — his push for tax
cuts, the expected announcement of a new Federal Reserve
chairman on Thursday and a
major trip abroad.
“This distraction makes it
harder to see any successes they
have,” Heye said. “It highlights a
problem this administration had
since the beginning — staying
out of its own way.”
john.wagner@washpost.com
david.nakamura@washpost.com
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A10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
the mueller investigation
Professor claims to have met with Putin
BY K ARLA A DAM,
J ONATHAN K ROHN
AND G RIFF W ITTE
london — He was, he insisted,
just an academic who had “absolutely no contact” with the Russian government. Any suggestion
that he had offered to play matchmaker between the future president of the United States and the
power players of the Kremlin was,
he maintained dismissively, “incredible.”
Or so he told reporters.
But in private exchanges, Joseph Mifsud was proud of his alleged high-level Moscow contacts,
reporting that they had extended
all the way to the top: He’d had, he
told a former assistant late last
year, a private meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin.
The assistant didn’t think much
of that claim. But the boastfulness
matches the portrait of Mifsud
sketched in court papers unsealed
Monday that have made him one
of the most critical — and enigmatic — figures in special counsel
Robert S. Mueller III’s investigation into Russian interference in
the 2016 U.S. election.
In those papers — a plea agreement for former Trump campaign
foreign policy adviser George
Papadopoulos — Mifsud is not
named. But the Maltese national
and London-based academic confirmed Tuesday that he is the “professor” mentioned in the probe.
According to the court files, the
professor took an interest in Papadopoulos after the latter joined
the Trump campaign. Mifsud
promised him “dirt” on Hillary
Clinton compiled by the Russians,
including thousands of emails. He
also offered to serve as a
go-between in Papadopoulos’s efforts to connect the Trump campaign with the Kremlin, even going so far as introducing Papadopoulos to a woman he identified
as Putin’s niece.
Whether Mifsud really had the
sort of Kremlin contacts that
Papadopoulos claims he advertised is unknown. But the question of how the Trump campaign
regarded Mifsud’s apparent approach, and whether it yielded
VALDAI DISCUSSION CLUB
Joseph Mifsud speaks at a 2014 meeting of the Valdai Discussion Club, a Russian state-funded think tank, in Sochi.
anything substantive, could be a
key focus of Mueller’s investigation.
Mifsud, who is in his mid-50s,
insisted Tuesday that the claims
embedded in the court documents
are exaggerated, echoing points
he had made months earlier in
response to inquiries from The
Washington Post.
“I have a clear conscience,” Mifsud told Britain’s Daily Telegraph.
Mifsud told the Telegraph that
he knew nothing about emails
containing “dirt” on Clinton, calling the allegations upsetting. He
also dismissed the disclosure that
he introduced Papadopoulos to a
“female Russian national,” calling
the allegation a “laughingstock.”
In emails to The Post in response to questions in August,
Mifsud had played down his connections to Moscow, insisting they
were purely related to his work as
a professor.
“I am an academic, I do not even
speak Russian,” he wrote.
But the details that emerged
Tuesday based on interviews with
those who know him, his writings
and his travels suggested a more
complex picture, one that better
matched the image of the professor in court files as a somewhat
obscure European academic who
longed for more.
Hailing from Malta, the European Union’s smallest nation, he
parlayed roles advising the government there into top positions
with educational institutions that
bear exalted-sounding names but
are little-known even within academia. Those included president
of the Slovenia-based Euro-Mediterranean University and honorary director at the London Academy of Diplomacy.
Natalia Kutepova-Jamom, his
onetime assistant at the academy,
said he had set out in 2014 to build
his contacts with Russian academics and policymakers.
She said that she booked her
former boss a speaking slot in 2014
at the Sochi meeting of the Valdai
Discussion Club, a Russian statefunded think tank that is seen as
close to the Kremlin, to speak on
“economic and international cooperation.”
Mifsud later suggested to her
that he used those early contacts
to open doors for higher-level
meetings. But she was in disbelief
when he told her last year that his
contacts had reached all the way
to Putin, with whom Mifsud
claimed to have had “a short private meeting.”
She said she didn’t believe the
two met because Mifsud is “a too
‘small-time’ person” to meet with
the Russian leader.
But Mifsud himself had written
about being in the room with Putin to hear him speak at a 2015
event hosted by the Valdai Discussion Club, and reported that he
had asked a question of Foreign
Minister Sergei Lavrov.
In that piece, for Valdai’s website, he wrote approvingly of Rus-
sia’s policy in Syria, saying Putin
had “walked the talk.” The U.S.
administration of then-President
Barack Obama, by contrast, was
“on the defensive.”
In a spring 2016 piece — about
the same time he was allegedly
meeting with Papadopoulos — he
asserted that he knew “Russia
quite well.”
Online biographies present
Mifsud as an authority in the field
of international relations and diplomacy across Europe, the United States, Russia, Africa and the
Mediterranean region. But his
academic work in these areas appears limited. He has published in
peer-reviewed journals on Maltese education policies.
According to a biography on the
London Centre of International
Law Practice’s website, which was
deleted Sunday, Mifsud “served
prominently” in Malta’s Ministry
of Foreign Affairs and worked as
an adviser for Malta’s Ministry of
Education.
Scotland’s University of Stirling
said in an emailed statement that
Mifsud joined its politics department in May this year as a “fulltime professorial teaching fellow.”
Former colleagues said they
didn’t think of Mifsud as someone
with any particular Russian expertise.
Nabil Ayad, who hired Mifsud
as an honorary director at the
London Academy of Diplomacy —
where Ayad was founder and director — said Mifsud’s focus was
broadly in the area of diplomacy.
“As assistant to the Maltese foreign minister, he traveled to many
countries and met many heads of
state,” Ayad said.
Ayad said the institution’s work
involved occasional trips to Moscow, including for collaboration
with the Diplomatic Academy of
the Russian Foreign Ministry.
“We tend to deal with governments, so I don’t think he has any
special connections or relationships,” Ayad said. “If a meeting
took place between a Russian official or he introduced someone, it
must have been by chance, not by
design.”
But Mifsud had occasionally
gone beyond the role of the typical
academic. In 2015, he was an observer for elections in Kazakhstan
that were sharply criticized by independent groups. Mifsud’s take
was far rosier, mirroring the Russian line.
The election, he told Kazakh
media, was “consistent with all
international norms.”
“At many polling stations was
an image that I associate with a
family meeting,” he reported.
Mifsud told the Telegraph that
he introduced Papadopoulos to a
program director of the Russian
International Affairs Council, a
state-funded Russian think tank
that is close to the Foreign Ministry, and that he tried to set up
meetings with experts on the European Union.
“We are academics,” Mifsud
told the paper. “We work closely
with everybody.”
karla.adam@washpost.com
griff.witte@washpost.com
Krohn reported from Atlanta and Witte
from Berlin. Brian Murphy in
Washington, Andrew Roth and David
Filipov in Moscow, and Isaac StanleyBecker in Oxford, England,
contributed to this report.
Russia says indictments Mueller’s charges could signal his plan of action
are no proof of meddling
“There could be something out there that stinks
BY
BY
D AVID F ILIPOV
moscow — The Kremlin on
Tuesday dismissed as “baseless”
and “ludicrous” the notion that
charges leveled by special counsel
Robert S. Mueller III against
three former Trump campaign
officials constituted proof of Russian meddling in U.S. political
affairs.
Moscow has always denied
playing any role in the 2016 U.S.
presidential election and has portrayed the investigation into Russian interference as an attempt by
President Trump’s opponents
to rationalize the election defeat
of Hillary Clinton. Kremlin
spokesman
Dmitry
Peskov
said the indictments released
Monday provided no evidence of
Russian meddling.
“From the outset we have been
completely baffled over these
baseless, unproven accusations
against our country, about alleged attempts to interfere with
U.S. elections,” Peskov told reporters on a conference call. “We
don’t want to be any part of this
process, and we’d prefer that
these proceedings not facilitate
the intensification of already
rampant Russophobic hysteria.”
Former Trump campaign
chairman Paul Manafort and his
longtime business partner, Rick
Gates, were charged in a 12-count
indictment with conspiracy to
launder money, making false
statements and other offenses in
connection with their work advising a political party in Ukraine.
The leader of that party, former
president Viktor Yanukovych,
fled to Russia after his regime was
toppled by protesters in 2014.
The indictment makes no mention of Russia’s role, which Peskov
said shows that “Russia isn’t part
of it.”
The second indictment concerned former Trump foreign policy adviser George Papadopoulos, who admitted making a false
statement to FBI investigators
who asked about his contacts
with foreigners claiming to have
high-level Russian connections.
Papadopoulos’s plea agreement, signed earlier this month
and unsealed Monday, described
his extensive efforts to broker
connections with Russian officials and arrange a meeting between them and the Trump campaign. Emails show that higherranking officials at least entertained the idea of arranging these
meetings.
Peskov dismissed a question
about whether the charges
against Papadopoulos provided
proof that Russian officials had
tried to meddle in the U.S. election.
“These are ludicrous accusations, ludicrous statements, once
again groundless, baseless, and
we treat them accordingly,” he
said.
Peskov said the Kremlin was
watching the proceedings “with
interest.”
“The main thing is that it
doesn’t concern our citizens, because we are always going to
defend the interests of our citizens,” he said.
david.filipov@washpost.com
Rosalind S. Helderman in Washington
contributed to this report.
MAXIM SHEMETOV/REUTERS
Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said Russia is “completely
baffled” by allegations that it interfered in the 2016 U.S. election.
M ATT Z APOTOSKY
Special counsel Robert S. Mueller III fired his opening salvo this
week, unsealing charges against
three former Trump campaign
aides thought to have engaged in
a medley of wrongdoing.
The cases he revealed, legal
analysts said, indicate he is pursuing an extensive probe that will
explore both personal wrongdoing of those connected with President Trump and possible efforts
campaign officials took to work
with Russia to influence the 2016
election.
Collusion — the word Trump
often uses to describe Mueller’s
case, even as he asserts such a
thing never happened — is not
itself a crime, and Mueller’s team
will probably have to sort through
unseemly political dealings to determine whether a law was broken, legal analysts said. In his first
public charges, though, Mueller
offered a hint of the direction he
might take.
Former campaign foreign policy adviser George Papadopoulos,
for example, pleaded guilty to
making a false statement to FBI
investigators who asked about his
contacts with foreigners claiming
to have high-level Russian connections.
Of particular note, he falsely
described his interactions with a
London-based professor claiming
to have connections to high-level
Russian officials who purportedly
had “dirt” on Hillary Clinton in
the form of “thousands of emails.”
Papadopoulos said his interactions with the professor —
thought to be Joseph Mifsud, the
director of the London Academy
of Diplomacy — occurred before
he joined the campaign and did
not amount to much. In fact, the
professor told him about the
emails in April 2016 — after his
role on the campaign was made
public — and the two were involved in extensive discussions
about a possible meeting between
the Trump campaign and Russian
officials, according to Papadopoulos’s plea agreement.
The conversation about emails
is possibly a critical piece of evidence, legal analysts said. That is
because one charge that investigators might try to substantiate
against those higher in the Trump
campaign is a conspiracy to violate the Computer Fraud and
Abuse Act.
If Mueller can find evidence
that members of Trump’s team
to high heaven, but it doesn’t make
it a violation of law.”
Jacob Frenkel, a lawyer at Dickinson Wright
SHAWN THEW/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY/EFE/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
Special counsel Robert S. Mueller III has unsealed charges against
George Papadopoulos, Paul Manafort and Rick Gates.
conspired in Russia’s hacking effort — by directing it or aiding in
another way — they might face
criminal charges, legal analysts
said. Papadopoulos’s plea says
that he discussed some of his
efforts to broker a meeting with
the Russians with other, more
senior Trump campaign officials
— although some seemed to treat
him warily.
“There’s a significant difference between the Russians having dirt and offering that dirt, and
someone asking the Russians to
commit an illegal act to obtain
that dirt,” said Jacob Frenkel, a
white-collar lawyer at Dickinson
Wright who previously worked in
the now-defunct Office of the Independent Counsel. “The latter
likely would be prosecutable, and
probably as a conspiracy to commit a computer crime or as a
computer crime.”
Papadopoulos’s conversation
about “emails of Clinton” took
place a month after Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta’s
email account was hacked and
well before WikiLeaks released
his messages. Also, it was not
until June 2016 that The Washington Post reported that the Democratic National Committee’s computer network had been
breached.
But at that time, it was well
known that Clinton had deleted
tens of thousands of emails she
deemed personal from her private
server. Those messages were of
great interest to Republicans who
believed they might show something nefarious.
It was unclear to what emails
the professor was referring or if
he truly had access to any messages damaging to Clinton. Jonathan
Biran, a former federal prosecutor now in private practice at
Biran Kelly, said Mueller’s team is
probably asking, “What did people within the campaign know
about how those emails had been
obtained,” and whether they had
reason to believe they were illegally obtained.
Aaron Zelinsky, a lawyer in the
special counsel’s office, said at
Papadopoulos’s plea hearing,
which was held in secret earlier
this month, that the foreign policy
adviser’s case was a “small part” of
a “large-scale ongoing investigation.” Though Papadopoulos was
first arrested in July, the court
kept his case sealed for months
after prosecutors asserted that
making it public would “significantly undermine his ability to
serve as a proactive cooperator.”
Former Trump campaign
chairman Paul Manafort and Rick
Gates, his longtime business partner, were charged in a separate,
12-count indictment in connection with their work advising a
Russia-friendly political party in
Ukraine. While their charges do
not directly relate to their roles on
the Trump campaign, legal analysts said the case could offer a
preview of how Mueller plans to
proceed.
Among many other counts, including conspiracy to launder
money and failing to file reports
of foreign bank accounts,
Manafort and Gates were charged
with carrying out a conspiracy
against the United States. Specifically, the special counsel alleged
that they worked to defraud the
Justice and Treasury departments as they tried to hide their
incomes and lobbying work for
Ukrainian interests.
Mueller could be working to
convince Manafort and Gates to
cooperate, and he could also be
trying to send a message to others
in Trump’s orbit that he will leave
no stone unturned and that those
who deceive investigators will be
charged, legal analysts said.
But Mueller also could be signaling a charge he could pursue in
connection with the coordination
case — a conspiracy to defraud the
United States by coordinating
with Russia.
“Collusion is not a crime, but
basically the criminal equivalent
is conspiracy,” said former federal
prosecutor Randall Eliason. “You
could have a conspiracy to defraud the U.S. by interfering with
our election.”
Mueller must also separate efforts that might seem seedy from
those that are illegal.
An opposition research firm
funded by Clinton’s campaign
and the DNC tapped a former
British spy to dig into Trump’s
personal and business dealings,
and the former spy purportedly
solicited information from Russian government officials. That
work might similarly be viewed as
an unsavory effort to engage with
foreign interests to win an election, but it would not necessarily
be illegal if there was no conspiracy to defraud anyone, legal analysts said.
“There could be something out
there that stinks to high heaven,”
Frenkel said, “but it doesn’t make
it a violation of law.”
matt.zapotosky@washpost.com
Devlin Barrett contributed to this
report.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A11
SU
The World
BY
S ARAH P ULLIAM B AILEY
IN SAO PAULO, BRAZIL
S
peaking from a stage encircled by 12 large wooden
crosses, Gabriel Camargo
held up wads of fake Brazilian money, showing his flock what
could be theirs.
“God will bless you if you give a
lot more to the church,” said Camargo, a Pentecostal pastor with
the Universal Church of the Kingdom of God.
Then he extended an arm and
pointed a black pouch toward his
parishioners in the working-class
neighborhood of Osasco.
Pick up your wallets and purses,
he said, instructing his flock to
look for Brazilian reais. About a
dozen people hurried forward to
dump bills and coins into the bag.
Those without cash didn’t have
to worry: An usher held out a
credit card machine. “You’ll have
so much money” after giving generously to the church, the pastor
boomed, that “smoke is going to
come out of the machine.”
In a country struggling with the
worst economic crisis in its history, with long lines at unemployment offices and public health
clinics, perhaps it’s not surprising
that Brazilians are increasingly
drawn to the promises of personal
wealth.
The belief that faith can lead to
riches — known as the prosperity
gospel — is a form of Pentecostalism, a Protestant movement that,
in a modern-day version of the
Protestant Reformation 500 years
ago, is challenging the dominance
of the Catholic Church in Latin
America’s most populous country.
Brazil, which has the most
Catholics of any country in the
world, is undergoing religious debates similar to those sparked in
1517 by a fiery German preacher
named Martin Luther — over
church riches and corruption, political power, and the proper way
to read the Bible. By 2030, Catholics, now the religious majority in
Brazil, are projected to become a
religious minority.
Pentecostalism,
which
is
sweeping across Latin America
and Africa, is also challenging Catholicism worldwide. The Catholic Church has 1.1 billion members
worldwide, about half of all Christians. But much of the global
growth in Christianity is found
in Pentecostalism, with about
300 million followers, according
to the Pew Research Center.
Known for charismatic practices such as the laying on of hands
for healing, exorcisms and speaking in tongues, and its emphasis
on cultivating a personal relationship with Jesus, Pentecostalism
has done a particularly good job of
adapting itself to Brazilian culture, with pastors who tend to look
and talk more like their flocks
than Catholic priests do.
The prosperity gospel has
spread quickly in poorer neighborhoods as the unemployment
rate has climbed to a record
13 percent. The movement’s promises of a better material life
through actions such as giving
and prayer, as well as its strict
social rules in Brazil banning urban ills such as drinking and
smoking, give followers a sense of
structure and agency over their
lives, said Paul Freston, a sociologist and an expert in Pentecostalism in Latin America.
“You learn to see yourself as an
agent who has possibilities, who
has the ability with God’s help to
achieve things, to get control of
yourself,” Freston said. “It doesn’t
mean you become rich, but it often
means you rise from absolute destitution to dignified poverty.”
Money matters
Much as they do in the United
States, prosperity-gospel pastors
also serve as role models for
wealth attainment. Yet standing
by the pool outside his $1.5 million
house, Silas Malafaia, one of Brazil’s most famous prosperity
preachers, insists he doesn’t live
extravagantly.
Malafaia is one of the country’s
most prominent and controversial preachers, wielding enormous
political clout on behalf of the
evangelical population. In Brazil,
the term “evangelical” is used syn-
Faith, and a promise it will pay o≠
A Pentecostal movement challenges the order of things in predominantly Catholic Brazil
PHOTOS BY LIANNE MILTON/PANOS PICTURES FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
reformation in Brazil — of Pentecostal churches.
TOP: A healing service at an
Assemblies of God church in
Sao Paulo.
ABOVE: Santina Almeida,
71, collects donations at the
Assemblies of God church, a
Pentecostal congregation
that does not promote the
prosperity gospel.
LEFT: Sao Paulo’s Universal
Church of the Kingdom of
God, a prosperity-gospel
congregation, worships in a
re-creation of the biblical
Solomon’s Temple.
onymously with “Protestant,” and
about 70 percent of the country’s
Protestants are Pentecostal.
Many Brazilian pastors, like
Malafaia, take their cues from
prominent American prosperitygospel preachers who have grown
in influence as advisers to President Trump — even though only
3.6 percent of Americans are Pentecostal, compared with about a
quarter of Brazilians. Evangelicals
in Brazil have harnessed a voting
bloc in the National Congress that
enables them to lobby against gay
rights and abortion and for the
death penalty and limited government.
“Pentecostals have been a decisive element in tilting the Brazilian agenda toward conservative
views and policies,” said Joanildo
Burity, who researches Brazilian
evangelicals and politics.
Wearing a purple shirt, his hair
slicked back, the 59-year-old
Malafaia compared himself to
evangelist Billy Graham, who was
a friend of several U.S. presidents.
There’s nothing wrong with ministers having wealth if they get
their money through side projects,
he said, as he does through his
spiritual bestsellers.
Pastors should also be compensated for the size of their ministries, Malafaia said.
“God wants me to be mediocre?
The devil would give riches to
everyone else,” he said.
Malafaia said he is like Luther
because he, too, wants the Bible in
the hands of average parishioners
instead of interpreted for them
primarily by a religious elite.
“Have you ever seen the pope
with a Bible in his hand?” Malafaia
said. “The Catholic Church doesn’t
incentivize you to have the Bible in
your hands. Catholics believe in
leaders and the pope. Evangelicals
believe in the Bible.”
Indeed, most of the 4,000 people who streamed into his Assem-
bly of God Victory in Christ church
in a lower-class neighborhood in
Rio de Janeiro for a Thursday
night service came bearing Bibles
in their hands. But even many
Protestants in Brazil find it laughable that Malafaia is leading a
reformation, because they believe
leaders who focus on prosperity
are selling a false gospel.
They put Pentecostalism’s
promise of personal wealth in exchange for donations on a level
with the Catholic Church’s sale of
indulgences in exchange for the
forgiveness of sins in the 16th century, a practice that was famously
criticized by Luther.
Augustus Nicodemus Lopes, a
Presbyterian minister, called the
churches that promote a prosperity gospel “cults” and criticized
their pastors for distributing healing cloths anointed with oil while
asking for donations. “They’re saying, ‘Your pocket needs religion,’ ” Lopes said. He hopes for a
Catholic Church competes
Pope Francis took his first overseas trip to Brazil right before it
hosted the World Cup and the
Olympics, when the country was
riding a global commodities boom
to prosperity. Many people here at
the time felt the 2013 papal visit
confirmed Brazil’s position at the
top of the world.
Manuel Jose da Penho and his
wife, Maria, remember the exhilaration they felt when the pope
showed up at their home. The
couple recalled how their parish
held Mass just once on Sundays
before Francis’s visit. Now the parish offers two Masses on Sundays
and five on weekdays.
“After he came it was like a
spiritual revival,” said da Penho,
who recently listed his two-bedroom house in a Rio de Janeiro
slum for a premium price with the
pitch “Pope Francis was here.”
But experts say it’s still too soon
to tell whether enthusiasm for the
first Latin American pope can
counteract the rise of Pentecostalism, which had been well underway before the pope’s visit.
The 2014 recession in Brazil
complicated the church’s challenge.
Now even with a popular pope,
the church is desperately trying to
keep young people like 28-yearold Marina Silva, who is unemployed, from leaving the faith. The
prosperity gospel’s promise of
riches, however, is just one front in
the competition.
Sipping orange juice in a Sao
Paulo cafe before her next job interview, Silva explained that Brazilians are known for picking and
choosing from different traditions
in everything from food to art and
music.
“We don’t have strict characteristics,” she said. “We mix things
together to make them good. We
are not like good little lambs.”
To win over Brazilians, the
Catholic Church is attempting to
appeal to people such as Silva by
mixing in charismatic components of Pentecostalism that have
more emotional elements, including catchier music.
Catholic priests such as Marcelo Rossi, who has sold millions of
CDs, have become increasingly
popular. Rossi’s Masses attract
people from all over the city to his
outdoor sanctuary.
At a recent service Silva attended, teenagers took selfies, livestreamed the service on Instagram and swayed along with their
hands waving back and forth as if
they were at a rock concert.
“Glory, glory hallelujah.” Rossi
sang, holding out his mic.
The competition for souls is so
fierce in Brazil that every church
must try mightily to stand out
from the rest, said Odilo Scherer,
archbishop of Sao Paulo.
“Today, people go by their personal subjective tastes and experiences,” said Scherer, who was appointed by Pope Benedict XVI. “In
our Brazilian context, religion is
presented as a product in a marketplace which seeks to please the
customer and present a product
that is appetizing.”
Charges of corruption
To stand out in this marketplace and demonstrate their
wealth and power, Pentecostal
congregations have built enormous churches across the Brazilian landscape. Amid Sao Paulo’s
high-rises sprawls one compound
that is perhaps the most lavish of
all — a re-creation of the biblical
Solomon’s Temple.
Inside, an auditorium that seats
12,000 is flanked on both sides by
menorahs, a nod to the church
leaders’ love for Jewish symbolism. Security guards in black suits
buzz about as female ushers in
white tunics and gold sashes hold
large golden baskets in preparation for the offering. After services, members flock to a water
fountain to fill up empty bottles
with water that has been blessed.
The temple’s construction in
2014 carried obvious symbolism:
The biblical story of Solomon suggests that when he was king of
Israel, he asked God for wisdom
and was granted wealth, as well.
The massive church has also
come to symbolize a challenge
facing Pentecostalism in Brazil.
Much like leaders of the Catholic
Church in Europe during Luther’s
time, some prominent Pentecostals have become embroiled in
high-profile political and financial scandals.
Edir Macedo, pastor at the temple and founder of the Universal
Church of the Kingdom of God
denomination, has fought allegations of corruption, including that
his church siphoned billions of
dollars set aside for charity. In
1992, Macedo spent 11 days in jail
on charges of charlatanism.
Still, Macedo maintains enormous reach through TV and social
media, and his political endorsements are hugely influential. A
2015 Datafolha poll showed that
his church was considered the
fifth most-influential institution
in Brazil, above the presidency.
The mayor of Rio de Janeiro,
Macedo’s nephew, is a bishop in
the denomination.
Other prominent Pentecostals
have been involved in scandals
splashed across Brazil’s front pages.
Megachurch pastors Estevam and
Sônia Hernandes were arrested in
2007 in Miami and pleaded guilty to
illegally smuggling money into the
United States. A prominent Pentecostal, Eduardo Cunha, was the
first major politician sentenced to
prison this year in a huge corruption scandal called Operation Car
Wash that has ensnared many highprofile politicians.
“What makes this scandalous,
of course, is that the evangelicals
set themselves apart rhetorically
as a force for moral goodness and
order,” said Eric Miller, a professor
at Geneva College in Pennsylvania
who studies Brazilian religion.
Even so, many Brazilians are
already jaded by political bribery
in the country in general, so it’s
difficult to say whether scandals
are enough to turn people away
from Pentecostalism, Miller said.
But the Catholic Church has at
least one advantage over its Pentecostal counterparts in Brazil.
While it doesn’t promise riches, it
tends to do a better job of providing social services such as food
and shelter, said Celso Rudeck, a
pastor in a Catholic parish across
the street from the re-creation of
Solomon’s Temple.
So sometimes when former
Catholics tire of praying for money
without result, they return to the
flock for help in this world, he said.
sarah.bailey@washpost.com
Bailey reported this article on a
fellowship from the International
Reporting Project.
DIGEST
AFGHANISTAN
Attack kills 7 in Kabul’s
diplomatic enclave
A suicide bomber on foot
penetrated Kabul’s fortified
diplomatic area Tuesday, leaving
at least seven people dead and
wounding more than 20 in the
first blast to strike the Afghan
capital’s Green Zone since May 31,
when a bomb killed 150 people.
Police said all the victims were
Afghan civilians, mostly people
who worked in embassies, Afghan
government facilities and other
offices inside the barricaded zone.
The Islamic State, through its
Amaq News Agency, asserted
responsibility for the blast. It
followed a bloody streak of attacks
across the country by Taliban and
Islamic State insurgents in the
past several weeks.
Officials said the target of the
bombing was not clear, but the site
was close to the Canadian and
British embassies as well as half a
dozen Afghan government offices.
— Pamela Constable
and Sayed Salahuddin
IRAN
Khamenei said to have
restricted missile range
Iran’s supreme leader has
restricted the range of ballistic
missiles manufactured in the
country to 2,000 kilometers, or
1,240 miles, the head of the
paramilitary Revolutionary Guard
Corps said Tuesday, which limits
their reach to regional targets.
The comments on Ayatollah Ali
Khamenei’s orders appear to be
an effort by Iran to contrast its
missile program, which it often
describes as being for defensive
purposes, against those of nations
such as North Korea, which poses
a threat to the United States.
The 1,240-mile range
encompasses much of the Middle
East, including Israel and U.S.
military bases in the region. Iran’s
ballistic missile program was not
included in the 2015 nuclear deal
that it struck with world powers.
Gen. Mohammad Ali Jafari said
the capability of Iran’s ballistic
missiles is “enough for now.”
— Associated Press
Libyans accuse Egypt of
bombing civilians: Lawmakers
Oxfam dismisses 22 over sexual
abuse allegations: British aid
and forces controlling an eastern
Libyan city accused Egypt of
conducting airstrikes that killed
a dozen civilians, including an
entire family. Lawmaker Hamad
al-Bandaq said jets bombed a
house in Darna, killing at least
12 people. A separate airstrike
reportedly killed a shepherd and
his family. Egypt, which has been
fighting militants, was carrying
out strikes to deter what it called
“any attempt of infiltrating or
smuggling.”
agency Oxfam said it had
dismissed 22 staff members over
allegations of sexual abuse in the
past year. Media reports of
inappropriate behavior by Oxfam
staff emerged amid heightened
attention on sexual harassment
and abuse in the workplace after
allegations against Hollywood
producer Harvey Weinstein.
Oxfam said it dealt with 87 claims
involving its workers in the year
that ended in April.
— From news services
A12
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
Seoul, Beijing aim to denuclearize Korean Peninsula
Tensions had risen over
South’s installation of
missile defense platform
BY
A DAM T AYLOR
seoul — After a year of frosty
diplomacy and economic pressure, South Korea and China
announced Tuesday that they
would put aside their differences
out of a joint desire to denuclearize the Korean Peninsula.
South Korea’s Foreign Ministry
said the two countries will resume normal relations. “The two
sides attach great importance to
the Korea-China relationship,” a
statement from the ministry said.
In its own coordinated statement, China’s Foreign Ministry
said the two nations would work
to put their relationship back on a
normal track “as soon as possible.”
China and South Korea have
historically deep ties and over the
past few decades had enjoyed a
close relationship. However, that
relationship was deeply damaged
last July when Seoul agreed to
install the U.S.-owned Terminal
High Altitude Area Defense
(THAAD) missile defense platform on its land.
Though both Seoul and Washington argued the THAAD system
had only defensive capabilities,
Beijing was concerned about U.S.
encirclement as well as the system’s sophisticated radar capabilities.
Chinese President Xi Jinping
was also angered that former
South Korean president Park Geun-hye had sided with American
interests over China, said Yun
Sun, a senior associate with the
East Asia Program at the Stimson
Center.
“Xi had tried to sway South
Korea’s alignment choice, and
when Park rejected China’s demand not to deploy THAAD, it
made Xi’s great diplomacy on
South Korea a failure and an
embarrassment,” Sun said in an
email this weekend.
When the missile system was
deployed earlier this year, China’s
Foreign Ministry spokesman,
Geng Shuang, warned that Beijing would “resolutely take necessary measures to defend our secu-
rity interests.”
South Korea’s Foreign Ministry
acknowledged that the THAAD
dispute had not been fully resolved. “The two sides agreed to
engage in communication on
THAAD-related issues about
which the Chinese side is concerned through communication
between their military authorities,” it said in a statement.
For its part, China confirmed
Tuesday that its position on
THAAD had not changed.
And on Sunday, South Korea’s
military chief met with his American and Japanese counterparts,
as part of a growing three-way
dialogue.
China is South Korea’s largest
trading partner, and it used this
economic clout to punish Korean
businesses when the antimissile
system was deployed. Trips by
Chinese tour groups to South
Korea were suspended, with the
number of Chinese visitors dropping 60 percent in the first nine
months of the year compared
with 2016, according to figures
released by the Bank of Korea.
Korean-owned businesses also
suffered boycotts and bans in
China. The situation was espe-
cially difficult for the Lotte conglomerate, which had allowed its
land to be used for the installation of the THAAD system. Last
month, it announced it would be
selling off its supermarkets in
China after most were shut down
for fire code violations and other
alleged infractions.
President Moon Jae-in’s new
South Korean government had
recently made a number of moves
to ease China’s anxiety over
THAAD, with Foreign Minister
Kang Kyung-wha announcing
last week that South Korea would
not seek any more deployments
of the system. The moves had
been received warmly in China’s
state-run press, with the nationalist Global Times newspaper
saying that the “proactive” stance
of Moon’s government was “a new
gesture that is welcomed.”
Choi Kang, vice president of
the Seoul think tank Asan Institute for Policy Studies, said that
South Korea had not offered any
real concessions on the issue. “Since South Korea has
maintained a very firm position
on THAAD, the Chinese side decided to move instead,” Kang
said.
Instead, North Korea and other factors may have led to the
agreement between the two nations, which came after the Chinese Party Congress that saw Xi
consolidate his power over the
country and exactly a week before President Trump arrives in
South Korea as part of a 12-day
Asia trip.
China is keen to restart relations with South Korea under
Moon, said Sun, as he has signaled that he is seeking an independent policy and is open to
talks with North Korea, a longstanding ally of Beijing. “When
the relationship with President
Park was beyond repair for China, Moon gives China new hope,”
Sun wrote.
However, Kang said that the
two sides still had different outlooks on the region that could
lead to more disputes. China and
South Korea felt the “necessity to
manage their bilateral relations
for different reasons, not for common objectives and concerns,”
Kang said. “The conflict is not
over yet.”
North Korea’s provocations
have prompted other shifts in the
Pacific, as well. In one example,
the senior military officials from
the United States, South Korea
and Japan are incrementally increasing collective ballistic missile defense, despite strained relations between South Korea and
Japan that date back to Japan’s
invasion of the Korean Peninsula
during World War II.
On Sunday, Marine Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr., the chairman
of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, met
with his South Korean counterpart, Gen. Jeong Kyeong-doo, and
their Japanese equivalent, Adm.
Katsutoshi Kawano, at the sundrenched headquarters of U.S.
Pacific Command in Hawaii.
The Japanese and South Korean defense chiefs have narrowly increased military dialogue
with each other as it relates to
North Korea, meeting five times
since July 2014 in three-party
talks with Dunford and his predecessor, Army Gen. Martin E.
Dempsey. On Sunday, the agreed
to hold quarterly missile defense
exercises in 2018, Dunford said.
adam.taylor@washpost.com
Simon Denyer in Beijing and Dan
Lamothe in Washington contributed
to this report.
China’s Xi laid his cards on the table. Now it’s Trump’s turn to play his hand.
Diplomatic poker game
between world powers
adds intrigue to Asia trip
BY
S IMON D ENYER
beijing — In China, the foreign
policy mantra had long been to
hide your strength, and bide your
time. Cards, in other words,
would be played close to the vest,
and bets would be modest.
No longer. At the 19th Communist Party Congress, President Xi
Jinping declared that a “new era”
had begun. It was time for China
to show its hand, to put its cards
on the table.
“It will be an era that sees
China moving closer to center
stage,” he said, describing a confident nation “blazing a trail” for
other developing countries to follow, a nation that “now stands
tall and firm in the East.”
Xi set out a vision of a political
system directly opposed to Western values of democracy and free
speech, values that Chinese Communist Party media mockingly
declared had brought only chaos,
confusion and decline to the
West.
But is it a winning hand? Is
China about to replace the United States as the dominant power
in the Asia-Pacific region?
For an answer, Asia is looking
to President Trump, who will
arrive in Asia on Friday for his
first visit, a 10-day trip that will
take him from South Korea and
Japan to China, Vietnam and the
Philippines.
“This must be a wake-up for
the Trump administration and
officials in Washington,” said
Paul Haenle, director of the
Carnegie-Tsinghua Center in Beijing and a former China director
on the National Security Council
for Presidents Barack Obama and
George W. Bush. “On his visit to
Asia, Trump should push back
forcefully against the narrative
that U.S. leadership on the global
stage and in Asia is receding.”
It is a narrative fueled by one
of Trump’s first acts on taking
office, his withdrawal from the
Trans-Pacific Partnership, an ambitious 12-nation trade deal that
excluded China and was the cornerstone of the Obama administration’s economic strategy
toward the region. Western diplomats in Beijing shake their
heads ruefully when that decision comes up in conversation.
Trump may have backed away
from campaign suggestions that
the United States’ Asian allies
should pay more for their own
defense, or even that they should
develop their own nuclear deterrents. But he continues to threaten South Korea, a key strategic
ally, with the renegotiation of its
free-trade deal with the United
States.
Last week, as Chinese media
covering the party congress celebrated the triumph of the socialist system over Western democracy, Trump didn’t even appear to
realize there was a contest.
He congratulated Xi for his
“extraordinary elevation,” and
told Fox Business Network that
the Chinese president — who
presides over one of the most
repressive regimes on the planet
— is “a very good person.”
“People say we have the best
relationship of any presidentpresident, because he’s called
president also. Some people
might call him the king of China,
but he’s called president,” Trump
said.
Fudan University’s Wu Xinbo,
a foreign policy expert, says he
welcomes a president refreshingly free of “ ideological bias,” with
a more transactional style.
The White House says Trump
ANDY WONG/ASSOCIATED PRESS
With Xi Jinping exerting more power as China’s president and seeking to stand ideologically opposed
to Western values, many will be watching for a response from President Trump while he is in Asia.
will be coming to Beijing to seek
more help in exerting pressure
on North Korea, and to “rebalance” the U.S.-China economic
relationship.
But European diplomats said
there is little or no policy coordination between Washington and
Western Europe in setting trade
and market-access policy toward
China, and little confidence that
Washington has a coherent strategy.
Trump’s April meeting with Xi
at his Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida is not seen as having made
significant progress, and the risk
is that the Chinese will flatter
Trump’s ego with the pomp and
“Trump should push
back forcefully against
the narrative that U.S.
leadership on the global
stage and in Asia is
receding.”
Paul Haenle of the Carnegie-Tsinghua
Center in Beijing
ceremony of a high-profile state
visit — and so deflect his demands, diplomats here say.
The more fundamental question, though, is whether Trump
can repair some of the damage he
has wrought to American reputation in the region, diplomats and
experts say, and counter talk of
U.S. decline, set against China’s
rise.
Western diplomats in Beijing
say their counterparts from Africa, Latin America and even poorer parts of Europe are increasingly fascinated with China’s political and economic system.
Closer to home, in the Asia-Pacific region, however, many
countries still look to the United
States to keep the peace, and
keep China in check.
Beijing’s growing influence
has generated significant pushback in Australia, while its territorial ambitions have generated
even more intense ill will in
Vietnam and India.
Attempts to wield Chinese influence globally still generate
more pushback than American
attempts, said Andrew Nathan, a
political science professor and
China expert at Columbia University in New York.
“I’m not entirely sure why that
is — I mean, the U.S. has done a
lot of bad things, but the U.S.
seems more trusted and accepted,” he said. “Chinese money may
be accepted, and Chinese influence yielded to when necessary,
but I don’t find Chinese ‘leadership’ being much welcomed either by its near neighbors or in
Africa and Europe.”
Trump’s long Asia trip is likely
to help reassure nervous allies,
experts say.
A speech at the Asia-Pacific
Economic Cooperation Forum in
Vietnam will be a key point of
engagement, said Rana Mitter, a
professor of the history and politics of modern China at Oxford
University.
That speech, he said, will be
closely scrutinized to see if
Trump presents a clear and coherent statement of the United
States’ commitment to the region, or a more confused and
uncertain assessment.
“If you look objectively, the
level of American power, influence and alliances in East Asia
still massively outplays China,”
he said. “The Americans still have
a lot of the cards in their hands.
It’s up to them if they play these
cards or keep them off the table.”
simon.denyer@washpost.com
Luna Lin contributed to this report.
Catalan separatist leader emerges in Brussels, vows to continue the fight
Puigdemont says new
regional elections will
backfire against Madrid
BY
M ICHAEL B IRNBAUM
barcelona — When the time
comes to write the history of
breakaway nations, Catalonia
will have an unusual trajectory:
On Friday, leaders triumphantly
declared independence. On Tuesday, they emerged in at least
temporary self-imposed exile.
Independence advocates ruefully acknowledged that Catalonia had failed to seize the political steering wheel from Spanish
leaders in Madrid, and many
looked back at a whirlwind October to ask whether different tactics could have achieved better
results.
The month began with violence, as Spanish riot police
wielding truncheons cracked
down on an Oct. 1 Catalan independence referendum that Madrid declared illegitimate. It ended with former Catalan regional
president Carles Puigdemont addressing a packed room of jostling journalists in Brussels.
“We are facing a state that only
understands the reason of force,”
Puigdemont said, explaining his
decision to flee his nascent na-
tion even as he declared himself
the “legitimate president” of Catalonia. Spanish Prime Minister
Mariano Rajoy stripped him and
other Catalan officials of their
posts after invoking extraordinary constitutional powers Friday. Puigdemont said new regional elections on Dec. 21 would
deliver a decisive result against
unionist backers of Madrid, even
if it meant working, for now,
within Spain’s system.
If he and his colleagues had
remained in Catalonia, Puigdemont said, “I am convinced, according to the information that I
have, that there would have been
a violent reaction.” He spoke
alongside several of his top former ministers, who he said
agreed with him Friday night to
leave Catalonia.
Some activists questioned
Puigdemont’s decision to flee to
Belgium with about half his government in tow, setting up a
government in exile as other
allies faced rebellion and sedition
charges back in Spain. But others
praised him for a strategic retreat
that allows him to keep fighting
for Catalonia in the heart of the
European Union.
“Puigdemont is doing exactly
what he needs to do,” said Liz
Castro, a member of the Catalan
National Assembly, a proindependence activist group.
“War pretty much sounds like the
other option. This is better.”
For Puigdemont, a pensive former journalist who has devoted
his life to Catalan independence,
October was a challenging month
even as he moved to realize his
dream, allies said. He struggled
to hold together his unruly coalition, whose members ranged
from anti-capitalist anarchists to
pro-business conservatives and
agreed only on the notion that
Catalonia should be free.
All were horrified by the police
violence that accompanied the
referendum, consisting mostly of
beatings that left hundreds of
people battered and bruised.
Some of them wanted to push as
fast as possible toward independence. But others were spooked as
some of Catalonia’s biggest companies moved their headquarters
outside the region, hammering
the economy.
At one point, Puigdemont declared independence only to suspend it in the same speech, leading supporters and opponents
scratching their heads about
what had happened. Behind the
scenes, he was pushing national
authorities to let him rerun a
referendum with national approval, allies said.
As late as Thursday, he was
poised to call new regional elections to defuse the crisis. But
amid splits in his coalition, he
instead asked the Catalan Parliament to vote whether to declare
independence. Its decision — fol-
lowing a bitter walkout by prounion forces — set off the takeover by Madrid, as Spain’s Senate
invoked a never-before-used
clause of the constitution to allow
Rajoy to suspend Catalonia’s autonomy.
Instead of rallying Catalan
supporters over the weekend,
Puigdemont kept a low profile in
his home town of Girona. By
Monday, he was gone, escaping
by car to Marseille and then
flying to Brussels.
“It was a big mistake on the
part of the Spanish government
to use violence to prevent the
referendum,” said Salvador Illa,
secretary of the pro-union Catalan Socialist Party. “But it was a
big mistake to declare independence.”
Rajoy’s allies in Madrid offered
no apologies for their tough approach to the separatists.
“In a modern democracy,
there’s room for all of us. What we
were seeing is that we didn’t all
fit,” said José Ramón García
Hernández, executive secretary
of international relations for Rajoy’s center-right Popular Party.
“I have no problem that there
are pro-independence lawmakers,” he said. “All I want is that
they comply with the law the
same way we all do.”
Now, crestfallen pro-independence forces say they need to
find a way to retake the initiative.
“The situation is bad; we know
that,” said Mireia Vehí, a member
of the Catalan Parliament from
the far-left, pro-independence
Popular Unity Candidacy party. “We have declared a republic,
but in reality, we don’t have the
power, because leaders didn’t
prepare it.”
She said her party wants Puigdemont and other top leaders to
exercise their authority more actively.
“We’re saying, ‘Come on, make
politics, act as the legitimate
government you are,’ ” she said.
Puigdemont said Tuesday that
he plans to push Catalonia’s case
inside the European Union and
across the world in a bid to
breathe life into the still-struggling independence movement.
He said he was not applying for
political asylum in Belgium, at
least not now.
The Catalan leaders’ plans beyond that remained unclear. Belgium’s Flemish nationalists, who
belong to the ruling coalition, are
among the few political groups in
Europe that have shown sympathy to the Catalan cause. Belgian
Prime Minister Charles Michel, a
member of a French-speaking
pro-unity party, offered far cooler
words Tuesday.
“The Belgian government did
not take any steps to encourage
Mr. Puigdemont to travel to Belgium,” Michel said in a statement. “Mr. Puigdemont has the
same rights and duties as any
European citizen, no more and
no less.”
A challenge could come as
soon as Thursday if Puigdemont
and others fail to appear in
Spanish court as scheduled and
Spanish authorities issue international arrest warrants for
them. In that case, they would
face up to 30 years in prison if
Belgium decided to hand them
over. If Belgium did not, it would
risk a rift with Madrid, a close
ally.
For now, some pro-independence leaders believe that the
Dec. 21 Catalan elections can offer another shot at freedom.
“These elections are a good
chance to turn them into a plebiscite that will be watched by the
whole world,” said Alfred Bosch,
leader of the Barcelona branch of
the Republican Left party, which
was a coalition partner alongside
Puigdemont. “It might seem that
you’re accepting [the Spanish authorities’] game, but let’s face it,
they control the game.”
He said pro-independence
forces can succeed only if they
remain strategic about which
battles they fight.
“You have a new republic,” he
said. “You have to nourish it. It’s
so fragile. Let’s protect it.”
michael.birnbaum@washpost.com
Pamela Rolfe in Madrid and Braden
Phillips in Barcelona contributed to
this report.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A13
RE
Economy & Business
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IPhone X asks users to break
things o≠ with the home button
The iPhone X
The Switch arriving in stores
Friday isn’t just a
new design. It’s a
new relationship.
Compared with your current
phone, the 10th-anniversary
iPhone is missing a key element:
the home button. The whole front
is just screen. You have to learn
new gestures to operate it. Instead
of scanning a finger to unlock it,
now you stop and look at it for a
second as though you’re taking a
selfie. This phone recognizes you.
Is the $1,000 iPhone X for you?
It’s no slam dunk. The zaniest new
features, such as the face unlock,
mostly function as billed. Its
slimmed-down big screen makes it
easier to hold than previous
iPhones, and its battery lasts two
blissful extra hours. But this year,
Apple’s also selling the cheaper
iPhones 8 and 7 with nearly as
much horsepower and a design —
complete with a trusty home
button — you already know.
If you buy a X (pronounced
“ten”) now, think of it as signing
up for a blind date with your most
important gadget. Navigating it
can be just as confusing as figuring
out when to hold hands. Your
thumb is going to keep ending up
in the wrong place.
I’m a columnist whose job is to
live on the cutting edge, and even
I’d describe my relationship (so
far) with the iPhone X as
“awkward.”
There’s a bigger idea behind
Apple’s war on buttons. Aside
from to-be-expected
improvements in the camera and
processor, the X moves the iPhone
forward by removing parts that
get between you and the message
you want to send Mom. In Silicon
Valley, they call these barriers the
“chrome”: menus and buttons that
are the interface between you and
information.
Apple has a long history of
giving us new tech — and taking it
away. I’m not just talking about
the headphone jack Apple
removed from the iPhone 7 (and is
still missing from the iPhones 8
and X). People were skeptical of
the iPhone in its early years
because it axed their beloved
BlackBerry keyboards. That
turned out to be a worthwhile
compromise.
The X tries to make the iPhone
the world’s smartest screen. Not
only can it recognize you by face,
but with a phalanx of sensors
buried in the notch at the top of its
screen, it can even know whether
you’re smiling. It hears you when
you call out (to Siri) and tries to
take you right to the information
you seek.
That’s a future vision that
makes sense, given that millions of
people have already adopted
talking speakers around the
house. But after living with the
iPhone X for a bit, I quickly ran
into some of its present-day limits
— and near-future challenges.
Full disclosure: I’m still getting
used to the X. Tech companies
usually provide reviewers such as
me with a week to live with a
flagship phone before publishing
assessments simultaneously. With
the X, Apple provided us just 15
hours, if you include the time I
GEOFFREY
A. FOWLER
SALWAN GEORGES/THE WASHINGTON POST
A study shows that leftovers, once a mainstay of lunchboxes and thrifty cooks, are the largest source of edible food waste in U.S. homes.
Lobbying to restore a love of leftovers
Environmentalists suggest public service campaigns, meal-planning lessons to reduce such waste
BY
C AITLIN D EWEY
American consumers throw
away 27 million tons of food each
year, according to the food waste
coalition ReFED, clogging landfills, generating greenhouse gasses and costing the economy an
estimated $144 billion.
The solution, however, could
be simple: Get people to eat
leftovers again.
Once the mainstay of weekday
lunchboxes and thrifty home
cooks, leftovers constitute the
single largest source of edible
food waste in U.S. homes, according to a new study by the Natural
Resources Defense Council, an
environmental group.
The finding defies conventional wisdom about the sorts of
foods consumers waste — and
represents a major obstacle for
environmentalists and anti-foodwaste campaigns. While past efforts have focused on improving
consumers’ food literacy and
kitchen skills, converting them to
leftovers will involve changing
deep-seated food preferences.
“I don’t think this is just about
education,” said Dana Gunders, a
senior scientist in NRDC’s Food
and Agriculture Program. “It’s a
cultural shift that needs to happen.”
In the report, published last
week, NRDC sought to measure
how much food Americans waste
and what types of foods they tend
to waste most. The study analyzed the food-waste habits of
more than 1,151 households in
Nashville, Denver and New York,
who agreed to keep diaries of the
items they tossed and allow re-
BRITTANY GREESON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Americans throw away 27 million tons of food each year, according
to the food waste coalition ReFED.
searchers to check their trash
cans afterward.
What researchers found was
staggering: The typical person
wasted 3.5 pounds of food per
week. Of that, only a third consisted of inedible parts, such as
chicken bones or banana peels.
And of the remaining edible
trashed food, bin digs found that
23 percent consisted of prepared
leftovers from any source — followed by fruits and vegetables,
baked goods, and liquids and
oils.
Gunders said that many consumers appear to stash Tupperware containers in their fridges
and then forget to excavate them
before the food goes bad. Other
times, consumers grow bored of
eating the same food on multiple
occasions.
“There were two big reasons
people threw out edible food,”
Gunders said. “They thought it
had spoiled, or they just didn’t
like leftovers.”
This is not a new feeling in the
American psyche, although it has
come under scrutiny with increased attention to food waste.
The food historian Helen Veit has
observed that regard for leftovers
plummeted in the 1960s, when
refrigeration and cheap food became plentiful. Although saving
food had been patriotic during
the two World Wars, and economically necessary in the century before them, rising incomes
and agricultural productivity
pushed thrift out of favor.
“I’m not saying all Americans
did this recklessly, but by the
1960s, people were able to say, ‘I’d
rather not eat that leftover pot
roast,’ ” Veit said. “They could say,
‘Let’s drive to a restaurant or go
to the grocery store or get something out of the freezer.’ ”
Shifting Americans back to
that old way of thinking could be
tricky. Gunders said the effort
could include public-service
campaigns aimed at getting people to “love their leftovers.”
NRDC is also emphasizing education around portion size and
meal planning to encourage
home cooks to make only what
they’ll consume.
Apart from that, environmentalists and anti-food-waste campaigners are holding out for a
shift in American eating culture.
Gunders is hopeful that cultural
influencers, led by the food media, can help convince people
that it’s cool to eat leftovers.
Some have already tried: Ted
Allen, the host of the popular
Food Network show “Chopped,”
declared that leftovers were not
“a dirty word” during one of the
show’s three episodes on the
subject.
But if Americans are truly to
embrace the doggie bag, they
may need a stronger push, Veit
said. After all, it has never been
so cheap, from a purely monetary
perspective, to ditch yesterday's
takeout for lunch elsewhere. Veit
sees one possible model in the
government propaganda campaigns that got Americans to
embrace leftovers during World
War I and World War II.
“They succeeded,” she said, “by
pushing this idea that it was
morally wrong to waste food.”
caitlin.dewey@washpost.com
should have been asleep. (I’ll
continue to test and share my
findings — as well as take your
questions — perhaps after a nap.)
It’s been an intense first date.
The Face ID unlocking
mechanism embodies the iPhone
X’s ambitions and hurdles. Using
it takes about a second: Tap the
screen to wake it up, and then
sensors embedded in the notch at
the top of the screen shoot out
beams (invisible to the eye) to map
the contours of your face. If it
recognizes you, a lock icon opens.
In my initial tests, it worked
nine times out of 10. You really
have to hold it in front of your face
as though you’re taking a selfie.
Too close, in particular, and it
won’t work. It recognized me in
the dark and when I put on
sunglasses — but not when, in the
interest of science, I put on a fake
beard. (Apple says it adapts to
handle beards when they come on
more slowly.)
When the Face ID fails five times
— or you share your phone with
someone else — you can type in an
old-fashioned PIN. (Apple lets you
register only one face per phone.)
Is it really secure? That will
require more testing. Twins could
confuse it, as might siblings with
similar faces and children younger
than 13. You can increase the
security by turning on an option
that requires your “attention” —
eyes open, looking at the phone —
to unlock the phone.
The existential question is:
What makes it a worthwhile trade
for a fingerprint reader? Face ID
will work when your hands are
wet or dirty, but it isn’t exactly
faster. Rival Samsung gave its
Galaxy S8 face and iris-reading
capabilities but still threw in a
fingerprint reader on the back.
And Apple made an annoying
decision not to make the iPhone X
just open to the home screen when
it spots your face. Instead, it
unlocks to a screen full of
notifications. To get home, you
have to swipe up from the bottom
edge of the phone with your
thumb, and I keep swiping from
the wrong spot. (It’s just one of the
new finger gyrations you’ll have to
master on the post-button iPhone.)
A more exciting — and
potentially terrifying — rationale
for Face ID is that the sensors
behind it can also power all sorts
of other uses.
It doesn’t take much of a leap to
imagine how the technology
might appeal to advertisers that
want to know where (and
whether) you’re looking at the
screen during their messages.
Facebook, Google or other
companies that monetize our
behaviors might want to know if
we’re smiling or frowning. Apple’s
terms for app developers require
permission before tapping into the
camera and forbid using face data
for advertising — but we’re just at
the beginning for this technology.
The iPhone X will know you
better than any phone before it,
and it paves the way for the phone
to act a lot more like a person. Let’s
hope it’s a good one.
geoffrey.fowler@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/the-switch
DIGEST
DRUGMAKERS
Pfizer profit doubles
on higher sales
Pfizer doubled its thirdquarter profit, thanks to slightly
higher sales, lower one-time
charges and reduced spending
on production and
administration. The drug giant
edged past Wall Street’s profit
expectations and improved its
2017 financial forecast.
The maker of Viagra and pain
treatment Lyrica on Tuesday said
that it will decide next year
whether to sell or spin off its
consumer health business, which
sells products including
ChapStick, Centrum vitamins
and Advil pain reliever.
The New York company has
been down this road before. In
2006, it sold a stable of popular
consumer products — including
Listerine, Nicorette, Visine,
Sudafed and Neosporin — to
rival Johnson & Johnson for
$16.6 billion. Many analysts
called that move a mistake.
Just three years later, Pfizer
ended up back in the consumer
business with Advil, Anacin,
Preparation H and other wellknown brands when it bought
rival drugmaker Wyeth for
$68 billion.
In the latest period, Pfizer
reported a third-quarter profit of
$2.84 billion, or 47 cents a share,
up from $1.36 billion, or 22 cents
a share, in 2016’s third quarter.
Excluding one-time items, net
income came to $4.06 billion, or
67 cents a share.
Meanwhile, Pfizer posted
higher sales for most of its key
new drugs, including cancer
medicines Ibrance and Xtandi,
Xeljanz for rheumatoid arthritis
and Eliquis for preventing
strokes and blood clots. Top
seller Prevnar, a vaccine against
ear, bloodstream and other
pneumococcal infections
acquired in the Wyeth deal, saw
sales dip 1 percent to
$1.52 billion, but overall, the
company’s key segment selling
newer, patent-protected
medicines posted an 11 percent
increase in revenue, to
$8.12 billion.
Sales from Pfizer’s essential
health business — mostly older
drugs facing generic competition
— fell 12 percent to $5.05 billion.
They were hurt by
manufacturing problems
dragging on at its Hospira unit,
causing U.S. shortages of
injected drugs.
technology at several plants
along the Gulf Coast. Federal
officials said Tuesday that the
settlement will prevent
thousands of tons of future
pollution from eight
petrochemical plants in Texas
and Louisiana.
— Associated Press
INSURERS
Aetna profit rises,
revenue declines
Health insurer Aetna did not
provide any hints on reported
merger talks with CVS Health
when discussing quarterly results
on Tuesday and laid out obstacles
to 2018 earnings growth.
The company reported a
better-than-expected thirdquarter profit despite a decline
in revenue related to a scalingback of its Affordable Care Act
individual insurance business,
on which Aetna expects to lose
about $200 million this year.
Aetna said it expects member
medical spending to stay low this
year, a trend that has benefited
health insurers and dragged
down hospital revenue, and that
the moderated spending would
likely continue into 2018.
Aetna chief executive Mark
Bertolini started the call by
declining to comment on rumor
or speculation, referencing last
week’s reports that CVS Health
offered to buy Aetna for more
than $200 a share, or more than
BP will become the first major
GREG BAKER/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Construction workers prepare lunch outside a construction site in
Beijing’s central business district on Tuesday. Chinese manufacturing
expansion slowed in October after two consecutive months of
acceleration, according to official data.
$66 billion.
Bertolini said that the
company would make a decision
about the contract internally by
the end of this year and a public
decision by mid-2018.
— Reuters
ALSO IN BUSINESS
ExxonMobil settled air
pollution violations with the
Trump administration by paying
a $2.5 million civil penalty and
promising to spend $300
million on pollution-control
European oil and gas company to
resume share buybacks since the
2014 price slump, a sign years of
austerity have paid off. Tuesday’s
surprise announcement came as
the British oil company reported
a doubling in third-quarter
profit. The oil major reported
third-quarter underlying
replacement cost profit, the
company’s definition of net
income, of $1.87 billion.
— From news services
COMING TODAY
10 a.m.: Institute for Supply
Management releases its
manufacturing index for
October.
10 a.m.: Commerce Department
releases construction spending
for September.
Earnings: Honda, Facebook,
Tesla.
A14
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
Tech executives try to placate lawmakers on disclosure
Silicon Valley leaders
decline to endorse
ad-transparency bill
BY C RAIG T IMBERG,
E LIZABETH D WOSKIN
AND H AMZA S HABAN
Lawmakers grilled executives
of three leading tech companies
Tuesday in a wide-ranging and
sometimes contentious hearing
that focused on the ability and
willingness of Silicon Valley to
combat manipulation of U.S.
elections by the Russians and
other foreign actors.
The Senate hearing, the first of
three to take place on Capitol
Hill this week, represented a rare
moment in the political spotlight
for companies that, despite large
lobbying teams in Washington,
generally seek to avoid public
scrutiny and potentially unpredictable confrontations. A growing number of lawmakers have
vowed to expose Russian interference on U.S. technology platforms and work to prevent a
recurrence through legislation.
The companies’ testimony
comes on the heels of revelations
that the reach of the Russianconnected disinformation campaign on Facebook, Google, and
Twitter was much larger than
initially reported. As many as
126 million Facebook users may
have seen content produced and
circulated by Russian operatives.
Twitter said it had discovered
2,752 accounts controlled by Russians, and more than 36,000
Russian bots tweeted 1.4 million
times during the election. And
Google disclosed for the first
time that it had found 1,108
videos with 43 hours of content
related to the Russian effort on
YouTube. It also found $4,700
worth of Russian search and
display ads.
With the threat of regulation
looming, lawyers for the companies took pains to appear accommodating as they faced a host of
questions about their businesses, their role in democratic societies, their efforts to be transparent and their ability to clamp
down on malicious and nefarious content in past and future
elections. They said that they
were pouring significant new
resources into combating foreign meddling but fell short of
endorsing proposed legislation
that would hold technology
companies that publish political
ads to the same disclosure standards as television and radio
broadcasters.
“The foreign interference we
saw is reprehensible,” Facebook
General Counsel Colin Stretch
said in his opening remarks.
“That foreign actors, hiding behind safe accounts, abused our
platform and other Internet services to try to sow division and
discord — and to try to undermine the election — is an assault
on democracy that is directly
contrary to our values and violates everything Facebook stands
for.”
Twitter acting general counsel
Sean Edgett said that half the
company’s approximately 3,000
employees were engaged in
fighting abuse of its service.
Facebook said it had about
150 employees fighting terrorism
alone.
The lawmakers appeared
skeptical. Some expressed frustration with the pace of revelations, with Sen. Christopher A.
Coons (D-Del.) decrying the companies’ “slow, halting steps” to
come forward and help lawmakers understand what took place.
The most tense exchanges
took place when the companies
were asked to explain more
about what their services can
and can’t do — and what capabilities they have to prevent abuse.
Sen. John Neely Kennedy (R-La.)
challenged Stretch with pointed
questions.
“I’m trying to get us down
from La-La Land here,” Kennedy
said. “You have 5 million advertisers that change every year,
every month, probably every second . . . You do not have the
MELINA MARA/THE WASHINGTON POST
Facebook General Counsel Colin Stretch, left, Twitter acting general counsel Sean Edgett and Google
Director of Law Enforcement and Information Security Richard Salgado testify on Capitol Hill.
ability to know about every one
of those advertisers, do you?”
When Stretch acknowledged
that advertisers probably can
obscure their identities, Kennedy interrupted him to ask
pointedly, “Do you have a profile
on me?” Then he asked whether
Facebook knew the movies that
his fellow senator Lindsey O.
Graham (R-S.C.) liked, the bars
he visited and who his friends
were.
Stretch replied that Facebook
has systems to prevent such
invasions of privacy. “The answer is absolutely not. . . . We
have designed our system to
avoid exactly that.”
After Kennedy sharply reminded Stretch that he was under oath, Kennedy turned his
attention to Google attorney
Richard Salgado. The senator
demanded to know whether the
company was essentially a newspaper, rather than merely a neutral platform, given its role in
distributing news reports worldwide. The issue has important
consequences because under
federal law, technology platforms do not have the same legal
responsibility for material they
carry as traditional news sources
that employ journalists.
“We are not a newspaper. We
are a platform that shares information,” said Salgado, Google’s
director of law enforcement and
information security.
Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.) also
took aim at Facebook, blasting
the company for failing to discover the Russian online influence campaign sooner, especially
given that many of the ads were
paid for in rubles, the Russian
currency. “American political ads
and Russian money, rubles —
how could you not connect those
two dots!”
Stretch replied: “In hindsight,
we should have had a broader
lens. There were signals we
missed.”
The most important unanswered question going into the
hearing, experts said, is whether
the tech companies have evidence that might substantiate
allegations that the Russians colluded with President Trump’s
political campaign, which made
Facebook in particular a focus of
its election efforts in 2016.
Trump and his campaign officials have repeatedly denied allegations of collusion, but questions about the role played by
Russia are at the heart of investigations on Capitol Hill and by
special counsel Robert S. Mueller
III, whose first charges against
Trump campaign figures were
unsealed Monday.
Intelligence agencies concluded in January that the Russian
government engaged in a vast
campaign to meddle in the presidential election and tilt the outcome toward Trump.
The hearing, as well as
Wednesday’s hearings before
the Senate and House Intelligence committees, comes amid
pushes by Sens. Mark R. Warner
(D-Va.), Amy Klobuchar (DMinn.) and John McCain (RAriz.) to pass new legislation
forcing tech companies to disclose information about political ads sold and distributed on
their networks.
The bill, dubbed the “Honest
Ads Act,” would require digital
platforms with more than
50 million monthly viewers to
create a public database of political ads purchased by a person or
group that spends more than
$500. The public file would include the ad, a description of the
targeted audience, the number
of views it generated, the date
and time it ran, its price, and
contact information for the purchaser.
The companies have tried to
get ahead of the bill by introducing their own transparency initiatives. Facebook, and then
Twitter and Google, have vowed
to publish all federal election-related ads that name a candidate
in a public database, as well as
the amounts spent on those ads.
But when asked by Klobuchar
whether they would support the
bill, the executives avoided a
direct answer.
“We certainly support the
goals of the legislation and
would like to work through the
nuances,” Salgado said.
“We’re not waiting for legislation. . . . We stand ready to work
with you,” Stretch said.
“The same goes for Twitter,”
Edgett said.
In an interview after the hearing, Klobuchar said she was
disappointed that the tech companies declined to support the ad
transparency bill.
“They’ve been willing to expose a major problem, but they
are still opposing a national
solution,” she said.
“We are only 370 days away
from the next federal election.
And we can’t just keep dialoguing about this anymore.”
craig.timberg@washpost.com
elizabeth.dwoskin@washpost.coml
Powell’s wealth and business background fit the mold of a typical Trump pick
In 2011, when
Republicans were
threatening to
HEATHER
force the
LONG
government to
default on its debt
if the party’s policies were not
adopted, they found support in a
flashy, wealthy businessman:
Donald Trump. “The Debt Limit
cannot be raised until Obama
spending is contained,” he
tweeted.
A countervailing voice came
from a wealthy, mild-mannered
businessman who had left the
world of high-finance to work for
a dollar a year for one of
Washington’s quiet think tanks.
Jerome Powell, a former Carlyle
Group executive and investment
banker who had served a stint in
the George H.W. Bush
administration, traveled around
Capitol Hill with a large binder
from the Bipartisan Policy
Center, urging Republicans to
understand the risks of a default
on the economy.
“He was the right person at
the right time,” says Jason
Grumet, president of the
Bipartisan Policy Center. “Powell
brought a credible, factual
presentation to Capitol Hill that
allowed him to be effective
Wonkblog
despite the aggressive politics at
the time.”
Now Trump, a combative
politician who has tried to upend
the institutions of Washington, is
expected this week to name
Powell as the new chairman of
the Federal Reserve, where he
serves as a governor. Fed chair is
the top job steering America’s
economy, and, according to
people familiar with the process,
Trump has decided to tap Powell
for it after deciding against
renominating the current Fed
chair, Janet L. Yellen, or going in
a sharply different direction by
tapping Fed critics John Taylor
or Kevin Warsh for the job. Prior
presidents had typically
renominated the sitting Fed
chair, especially when the
economy was doing well.
In some ways, though, Powell,
who goes by the nickname “Jay,”
fits the mold of a typical Trump
pick for a premium post. He’s a
Republican who built a vast
wealth as a partner at Carlyle.
Powell’s latest financial
disclosure from June lists his net
worth between $19.7 million and
$55 million. If he gets the job,
Powell would be the richest Fed
chair since banker Marriner
Eccles, who held the position
from 1934 to 1948, according to
The Washington Post’s reviews of
former Fed chair financial
disclosures and former Fed
historian Gary Richardson.
But the expected decision to
tap Powell highlights how Trump
is willing to compromise the
bomb-throwing mentality that
has characterized much of his
time in Washington and many of
his appointments. Powell has
developed a reputation in
Washington as a consensus
builder who prefers to operate
behind the scenes. President
Barack Obama felt comfortable
enough with Powell to nominate
him to the Fed board in 2012,
renominating him again in 2014.
“I never saw him lose his
temper,” says Richard Fisher, the
former president of the Federal
Reserve Bank of Dallas, who sat
next to Powell at many Fed
meetings and had dinner with
him from time to time. “Jay
doesn’t promote himself like so
many do in Washington. He likes
to do the unglamorous jobs.”
After joining the Fed in 2012,
Fisher says Powell continued to
travel to Capitol Hill to soothe
Republicans, some of whom felt
the Fed had erred by cutting
interest rates to zero and
purchasing trillions in assets
after the financial crisis. Powell
worked closely alongside Yellen,
a Democrat, to keep interest
rates low in recent years and
defend the Fed’s actions.
Finding someone who
wouldn’t raise rates too quickly
was a key consideration for
Trump, according to two people
familiar with the president’s
thinking who spoke on the
condition of anonymity because
they aren’t authorized to speak
publicly. Trump has repeatedly
tweeted about the stock market’s
rise since the election and how
many jobs are being created.
Taylor and Warsh have criticized
the Fed’s low-interest-rate policy
and may be more willing to raise
rates faster, potentially
curtailing the market rally.
Trump wasn’t willing to take
that risk. Powell is widely
expected to keep Yellen’s tactics
largely in place, albeit with a bit
more of a Wall Street touch.
“He is not the kind of person
who would exert himself
immediately,” Fisher says, but
“he has a market background,
which is needed at the Fed.”
Powell is a lawyer, not a PhD
economist like Yellen and the
two prior holders of the post
before her: Ben S. Bernanke and
Alan Greenspan. But people who
worked with Powell at the Fed
say he has done everything he
can in the past five years to learn
the technical details of the Fed
and macroeconomics.
“When he showed up at the
Fed, he basically did not know
much about macroeconomics or
monetary policy,” says Seth
Carpenter, chief U.S. economist
at UBS Financial Services who
spent 15 years at the Fed,
including time overlapping with
Powell. “He made a conscious
decision to spend a lot of time
with staff and colleagues to learn
as deeply and completely as
possible.”
Many on the left are frustrated
that Trump isn’t keeping Yellen,
the first woman to hold the post,
who has seen the employment
market improve significantly
under her tenure.
They also see Powell as more
likely to bow to the interests of
big banks. Powell has defended
some of the Fed’s tighter
oversight of the financial market
but also pointed to areas where
he thinks regulation may have
run amok.
“Yellen’s background as a
trained economist and
experienced Fed official gave her
needed independence from the
influence of Wall Street,” says
Jordan Haedtler, campaign
manager for Fed Up, a grassroots Democratic effort. He says
it’s concerning that Powell would
be Trump’s second Carlyle Group
veteran appointed to the Fed
board. Earlier this year, Trump
nominated Randal Quarles,
another Carlyle Group alum, to
an open Fed board seat
overseeing bank regulation.
Despite his wealth, friends
and former colleagues of Powell’s
describe him as “annoyingly
normal.” He lives in Chevy Chase,
Md., and often rides his bike
about eight miles from home to
the Fed. He doesn’t drink much,
plays golf and the guitar, and has
an odd ability to repeat people’s
sentences backward to them, a
quirk former colleagues say is a
reminder of his smarts — and
how closely he listens.
Powell is expected to easily
clear the Senate if Trump does
nominate him for the post. The
Senate confirmed him 74 to 21 in
2012 and 67 to 24 in 2014.
heather.long@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
wonkblog
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.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A15
SU
GOP looks to counter claims that plan is a boon for rich
cans hope to recoup some of that
lost revenue by eliminating a
number of tax breaks, but they
have been careful not to identify
all of these changes, in part because they expect a revolt from
interest groups that would be affected.
“They’ve got $4 trillion worth
of tax promises, and they basically
at this point have got virtually no
revenue in order to pay for it,” Sen.
Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) said Tuesday.
“So what they have done is basically made it clear that their
promises to the middle class are
really not worth the paper they
are written on. They are false
promises to the middle class.”
White House officials and GOP
congressional leaders have met
for months to try to establish the
framework for rewriting the tax
code, but they agreed only on
broad parameters. Big tests now
loom for Brady and his Senate
counterpart, Finance Committee
Chairman Orrin G. Hatch (RUtah), to craft legislation that can
pass both chambers.
The
government
collects
roughly $4 trillion a year in taxes
and other revenue, a threshold
that still falls short of how much
money it spends.
Trump says the changes could
lead to an immediate jolt in economic growth, saying on Tuesday
that it could lead companies to
bring more than $4 trillion in past
foreign earnings back to the United States. He also said it would
lead to a flood of companies moving back to the country, lured by
big tax cuts and the threat that
their foreign earnings would be
subject to stricter taxation for the
first time.
It is details such as those,
though, that will be the focus of
several intense weeks of negotiations in the House and Senate.
GOP tax writers are also expected
to have a much different approach to the taxation of profits
overseas.
Resolving these differences
will be crucial because Republicans have signaled they will try to
push the tax cuts into law without
any support from Democrats,
testing the slim margin they control in the Senate and their balky
caucus in the House.
“Given that they are trying to
do this with a one-party approach,
they don’t have a lot of flexibility,”
said Alan Auerbach, director of
the Burch Center for Tax Policy
and Public Finance at the University of California at Berkeley.
TAXES FROM A1
consultation with President
Trump and our leadership team,
we have decided to release the bill
text on Thursday.” He said they
“remain on schedule to take action and approve a bill” next
week.”
The delay raises questions
about whether Republicans have
resolved all of their differences
amid concerns that even a few
defections could prevent the bill
from passing.
The bill will aim to slash corporate tax rates, simplify taxes for
individuals and families and lure
the foreign operations of multinational firms back to the United
States with incentives and penalties.
The decision to preserve a top
rate signals that Republicans are
eager to avoid the impression that
their plan, which has already
come under attack as doing little
to boost the middle class, seeks
only to reward wealthy Americans and corporations. And the
move could attract the support of
more moderate Republicans.
The House and Senate plan to
work on separate tracks to pass
legislation by Thanksgiving and
send a bill to President Trump for
his signature by year’s end,
though many expect it will take
longer than that, if the effort succeeds at all.
“It will be the biggest tax event
in the history of our country,”
Trump promised on Tuesday during a meeting with business trade
groups at the White House, a
claim he has made repeatedly.
Later, in a tweet, he said “the
Republican House members are
working hard (and late) toward
the Massive Tax Cuts that they
know you deserve.”
In a sign that House Republicans are willing to go only so far to
mollify concerns about inequality,
they plan to move ahead with a
proposal to eliminate the estate
tax, though it would be phased out
over a number of years. They also
will propose changes to tax-protected retirement savings plans,
such as 401(k)s, in an effort to
raise revenue. But Brady said
Tuesday those changes remained
in flux and that 401(k)s might
ultimately be left alone.
Overall, House Republicans say
their plan would reduce federal
tax revenue by $1.5 trillion over
the next decade. Keeping the tax
rate for people earning over
$1 million could reduce the impact on the deficit by about
$200 billion over a decade, according to the Committee for a
Responsible Federal Budget.
House Majority Leader Kevin
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
President Trump hosts a meeting at the White House on Tuesday with business leaders to discuss the Republican tax-overhaul effort.
Drafters planned to work through the night on the bill ahead of a planned unveiling on Wednesday.
.
McCarthy (R-Calif.) said Tuesday
that Brady’s tax plan would lower
the corporate tax rate from
35 percent to 20 percent, as demanded by Trump. A new wrinkle
was emerging late Tuesday, however, with concern growing that
the corporate tax reduction might
not be able to be made permanent
if it proves too costly.
Business leaders will fight hard
to prevent Republicans from allowing the rate to go back up after
several years, but the GOP could
be hamstrung, because it cannot
push into law a tax change that
adds too much to the deficit.
Numerous details of the tax
proposal came during a briefing
that House Speaker Paul D. Ryan
(R-Wis.) had Tuesday afternoon
with conservative activists. Grover Norquist, president of Americans for Tax Reform, is one of the
people who confirmed the
39.6 percent rate would remain
for the highest income.
“Overall, I’m very happy with
the bill,” said Adam Brandon, who
is chief executive of FreedomWorks and attended the Ryan
briefing. “My read is that everyone is going to be seeing a tax cut.”
Currently, families pay the
39.6 percent rate on income above
$470,700, so the proposal would
still lower taxes for people who
earn above the lower amount.
The implications of the changes envisioned by GOP leaders
could be far-reaching, but numerous aspects remain uncertain.
Thousands of companies that
pay their taxes through the individual income-tax code would see
their rates lowered on top income
from 39.6 percent to 25 percent.
It’s unclear whether there would
be new provisions to prevent
wealthier individuals from creating companies to pay the 25 percent rate on their income rather
than the higher rate.
The new proposal is expected
to include a new “minimum tax”
that U.S. companies would be required to pay on certain foreign
earnings as a way to prevent them
from moving U.S. operations to
low-tax countries. Businesses are
watching carefully how the House
bill deals with U.S. companies
that produce goods overseas and
then sell them back into the United States.
The House GOP plan would
also allow companies to immediately expense capital invest-
ments, such as new equipment,
for five years but cut back the
ability to deduct interest payments.
Many businesses and the
wealthy are expected to be the
biggest beneficiaries, according
to initial versions of the plan,
while the impact on many in the
middle class is disputed and less
clear.
The proposal would roughly
double the “standard deduction”
that many Americans can claim to
exempt a portion of their income
from taxation, but it would also
eliminate the “personal exemption,” which tends to benefit families with multiple children. But
the tax plan is expected to expand
the child tax credit, something
Ivanka Trump has said would
help working families.
The House GOP plan would
allow Americans to deduct the
property taxes they pay from their
income but prohibit, for the first
time, Americans from deducting
the state and local income taxes
they pay from their federal taxable income, a simmering issue
that threatens to rip apart the
GOP coalition needed to approve
the bill.
The plan would also abolish the
alternative minimum tax, a system set up to ensure people do not
claim so many deductions that
they pay too little in taxes, McCarthy said.
The economic success of the
package hinges on controversial
economic theories that assume
large tax cuts for businesses and
the wealthy will lead to economic
growth and wage gains for everyone else, a conclusion that economists and policymakers have debated for decades.
But Republicans have a rare
lock of political power, controlling the White House, House and
Senate, and are desperate to regain political footing lost after a
number of missteps this year, particularly the failure to rewrite
health-care policy.
“The speed with which they are
doing this is more about politics
than it is about policy,” said Rep.
Richard E. Neal (Mass.), the ranking Democrat on Brady’s committee. “They don’t want people to
see what’s in it, and I think they
need a victory.”
The tax package is expected to
reduce revenue by more than
$4 trillion over 10 years. Republi-
damian.paletta@washpost.com
mike.debonis@washpost.com
Heather Long contributed to this
report.
THE MARKETS
6 Monitor your investments at washingtonpost.com/markets
Data and graphics by
Daily Stock Market Performance
Index
Dow Jones Industrial Average
23,500
Close
YTD
% Chg
23,377.24
+0.1
+18.3
22,000
20,500
19,000
17,500
Nasdaq Composite Index
6800
Commodities
S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot
Daily
% Chg
6727.67
+0.4
+25.0
Daily
% Chg
Industry Group
Food Products
Distributors
Health Care Technology
Computers & Peripherals
Personal Products
Road & Rail
Airlines
Textiles & Apparel
Diversified Consumer Svcs
Leisure Equipment & Prod
0
–6.0%
+6.0%
2.67
1.61
1.59
1.39
1.31
–0.96
–0.99
–1.19
–2.21
–5.11
5600
5000
S&P 500 Index
2575.26
+0.1
+15.0
2650
2450
2250
2050
N
D
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
Americas
Brazil (Bovespa)
Canada (S&P/TSX Comp.)
Mexico (Bolsa)
Europe
Eurozone (DJ Stoxx 600)
France (CAC 40)
Germany (DAX)
U.K. (FTSE 100)
Asia Pacific
Australia (ASX 200)
China (CSI 300)
Hong Kong (Hang Seng)
Japan (Nikkei)
Close
Daily
% Chg
74,308.49
16,025.59
48,621.95
–0.7
0.1
–0.5
395.22
5503.29
13,229.57
7493.08
0.3
0.2
0.1
0.1
5909.02
4006.72
28,245.54
22,011.61
–0.2
–0.1
–0.3
0.0
YTD % Chg
–30%
0%
+30%
3M Co
AmExp
Apple Inc
Boeing
Caterpillar
Chevron Corp
Cisco Systems
Coca-Cola
DowDuPont Inc
Exxon Mobil
GE
GoldmnSchs
Home Depot
IBM
Intel Corp
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
230.19
95.52
169.04
257.98
135.80
115.89
34.15
45.98
72.31
83.35
20.16
242.48
165.78
154.06
45.49
–0.4
0.5
1.4
–0.5
–0.5
1.3
0.3
0.3
0.9
–0.2
–1.2
0.7
0.3
–0.2
2.5
28.9
28.9
46.0
65.7
46.4
–1.5
13.0
10.9
26.4
–7.7
–36.2
1.3
23.6
–7.2
25.4
Company
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
Microsoft
Nike
P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
United Tech
UnitedHealth
Verizon
Visa Inc
Wal-Mart
Walt Disney
139.41
100.61
166.91
55.09
83.18
54.99
86.34
35.06
132.45
119.76
210.22
47.87
109.98
87.31
97.81
–0.4
–0.8
0.4
0.7
–0.8
–0.5
0.1
–0.3
–0.1
–0.1
0.4
0.1
–0.1
0.4
–0.2
21.0
16.6
37.1
–6.4
33.9
8.2
2.7
7.9
8.2
9.3
31.4
–10.3
41.0
26.3
–6.2
Cross Currency Rates
US $
US $ per
EU € per
0.8584
EU €
Japan ¥
Britain £
Brazil R$
Canada $
1.1649
0.0087
1.3288
0.3055
0.7754
0.0522
0.0076
1.1406
0.2623
0.6656
0.0448
151.0550
34.7370
88.1480
5.9309
0.2299
0.5836
0.0393
Japan ¥ per
113.6800
132.4300
Britain £ per
0.7526
0.8767
0.0066
Brazil R$ per
3.2713
3.8108
0.0287
4.3492
Canada $ per
1.2897
1.5023
0.0113
1.7137
0.3940
Mexico $ per
19.1582
22.3192
0.1690
25.4568
5.8540
Mexico $
2.5364
0.1705
0.0673
14.8559
Index
Close
DJ Total Stock Market Index 26,687.97
Russell 2000
1502.87
Post-Bloomberg DC Area Index 528.14
CBOE Volatility (VIX)
10.18
Consumer Rates
Daily % Chg
0.2
0.8
0.0
–3.0
YTD % Chg
14.7
10.7
18.1
–27.5
$3.1010
$3.4575
$54.38
$1,270.50
$2.90
–0.4
–0.9
+0.4
–0.6
–2.4
Orange Juice
Silver
Soybeans
Sugar
Wheat
Exchange-Traded (Ticker)
Coffee (COFF.L)
Copper (COPA.L)
Corn (CORN.L)
Cotton (COTN.L)
Crude Oil (CRUD.L)
Gasoline (UGAS.L)
Gold (BULL.L)
Natural Gas (NGAS.L)
Silver (SLVR.L)
Daily
% Chg
Close
Daily
% Chg
$1.5450
$16.69
$9.8475
$0.1474
$4.1850
–0.1
–0.9
0.0
+0.1
–1.5
day
$900
month
$1100
$1000
–1.3
–0.2
–1.0
–0.7
0.4
1.0
–0.7
–2.5
–1.1
Gainers
Close
Trex Co Inc
$109.45
Harmonic Inc
$3.70
MarineMax Inc
$18.55
QuinStreet Inc
$8.90
Simpson Mfg
$55.74
TrueBlue Inc
$27.10
Shutterstock Inc
$38.99
William Lyon Homes
$27.75
Glatfelter
$20.96
Cray Inc
$20.65
WellCare Hlth Plans
$197.74
Bill Barrett Corp
$4.93
Orthofix Intl
$53.73
Sabre Corp
$19.56
EnPro Industries
$83.74
ABIOMED Inc
$192.92
Rockwell Automation $200.82
KEMET Corp
$25.69
Integr Device Tech
$31.07
Mosaic Co
$22.34
Daily
% Chg
25.6
25.4
22.0
20.8
14.6
14.1
13.8
10.9
9.7
9.3
9.1
8.8
7.8
7.8
7.7
7.5
7.4
7.3
7.2
7.1
Losers
Under Armour Inc
Under Armour Inc
AK Steel Holding
Nautilus Inc
Sanmina Corp
Lannett Co Inc
John B Sanfilippo
Barnes & Noble Edu
Lumber Liquidators
Iconix Brand Group
Big 5 Sprtg Goods
Advanced Energy Ind
Mattel Inc
First Solar Inc
Steven Madden
Omega Healthcare
Qualcomm
Mylan NV
Alexion Pharma
Strayer Education
Daily
Close % Chg
$12.52
$11.53
$4.59
$13.00
$32.73
$19.90
$58.85
$5.45
$30.78
$1.64
$6.35
$84.72
$14.12
$54.82
$39.00
$28.86
$51.01
$35.71
$119.66
$93.73
–23.7
–21.8
–21.5
–20.2
–15.7
–13.7
–12.7
–12.0
–11.5
–11.4
–9.9
–9.5
–9.4
–9.3
–8.9
–6.8
–6.7
–6.6
–6.4
–6.3
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Interest Rates
Other Measures
Daily
% Chg
Gainers and Losers from the S&P 1500 Index
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
Company
Close
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
6200
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
0.32
0.45
0.80
1.47
2.64
5.34
4.25%
3.85%
Bank Prime
30-Year fixed mortgage
1.25%
Federal Funds
1.38%
LIBOR 3-Month
3.13%
10-year note
Yield: 2.37
2-year note
Yield: 1.60
5-year note
Yield: 2.01
6-month bill
Yield: 1.28
15-Year fixed mortgage
3.22%
1-Year ARM
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
A16
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
The financial lessons we should learn from the allegations against Paul Manafort
Living too large is
often what brings
criminals down.
Topping the
news right now is
the indictment of
Michelle
two Trump
Singletary campaign officials
as part of the
THE COLOR
government’s
OF MONEY
investigation into
Russia’s meddling
in the 2016 election.
The indictment alleges former
Trump campaign manager Paul
Manafort and his associate Rick
Gates earned millions working as
agents of the Ukrainian
government. They are accused of
hiding much of this money,
which they allegedly used to pay
for their luxurious lifestyles.
The indictment says, “In order
to hide Ukraine payments from
United States authorities, from
approximately 2006 through at
least 2016, Manafort and Gates
laundered the money through
scores of United States and
foreign corporations,
partnerships, and bank
accounts.”
In such cases, it always comes
down to “follow the money.”
Manafort is accused of
laundering more than
$18 million. Gates allegedly
transferred more than $3 million
from offshore accounts.
I’m programmed to look for
financial lessons in most things.
So I was particularly interested
in the details coming out about
what Manafort and Gates did
with their supposed ill-gotten
gains. Here’s what the indictment
says:
“Manafort used his hidden
overseas wealth to enjoy a lavish
lifestyle in the United States,
without paying taxes on that
income. Manafort, without
reporting the income to his tax
preparer or the United States,
spent millions of dollars on
luxury goods and services for
himself and his extended family
through payments wired from
offshore nominee accounts to
United States vendors.”
Manafort allegedly withdrew
money from offshore accounts to
purchase multimillion-dollar
properties. Some of his spending
also allegedly included the
purchase of four Range Rovers
that cost a total of $210,705 and a
Mercedes-Benz for $62,750;
landscaping at a Hamptons
property; and improvements to a
house in Palm Beach, Fla.
Manafort allegedly also spent
$934,350 on antique rugs at a
store in Alexandria, Va.; close to
$850,000 on clothing at a men’s
store in New York between 2008
and 2014; and another halfmillion dollars at a clothing store
in Beverly Hills, Calif.
Gates allegedly used money
from offshore accounts to “pay
for his personal expenses,
including his mortgage,
children’s tuition, and interior
decorating of his Virginia
residence.”
At this point in the
investigation, what’s the money
lesson for those of us watching all
of this unfold? How can we relate
this to our everyday lives?
How about this: Why do so
many people have a need to show
their wealth?
One Princeton University
economic researcher examined
the need for people to flaunt
their financial status. In a 2004
paper, Ori Heffetz wrote, “In the
signaling game we call life, when
deciding upon a course of action,
we consider not only the direct
effects of our choice on our
welfare, but also the indirect (or
social) effects resulting from
society observing our choice.”
I’ve often heard people say
they look forward to the day they
can buy a certain luxury-brand
car. Practically speaking, the goal
of a vehicle is to get you from
point A to point B. So why does it
matter so much about the make
of the car if everything else is
equal in terms of reliability and
safety?
It matters to many because it
signals they’ve arrived at some
destination point of social
standing. It’s a sign of success.
People like to tell themselves
their BMWs, Mercedes or Range
Rovers are far superior to other
vehicles. But on Consumer
Reports’ 2017 list of the 10 most
reliable cars, half are priced
under $30,000.
Often the motivation behind a
purchase is the desire to draw
attention to the appearance of
affluence. If a Timex watch tells
the same time as a Rolex, why
then are we impressed with the
higher-priced timepiece?
In his 1899 book “The Theory
of the Leisure Class,” American
economist Thorstein Veblen
coined the term “conspicuous
consumption” to describe
wealthy people who broadcast
their bountiful lives and attempt
to boost their reputations by
purchasing expensive things.
“Conspicuous consumption of
valuable goods is a means of
reputability to the gentleman of
leisure,” Veblen wrote.
Conspicuous consumption is
now not limited to the rich.
People who can least afford to
show their wealth are doing so
nonetheless. They are doing so at
the expense of a secure
retirement or having savings for
a financial emergency.
In Proverbs, there’s a scripture
that can keep your conspicuous
consumption in check.
It says, “One person pretends
to be rich, yet has nothing;
another pretends to be poor, yet
has great wealth.”
I wonder, if they are convicted,
if Manafort and Gates will regret
living so large despite the cost.
Readers may write to Michelle
Singletary at The Washington Post,
1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C.
20071 or
michelle.singletary@washpost.com. To
read previous Color of Money
columns, go to http://wapo.st/
michelle-singletary.
Tesla is about to answer crucial questions about its production challenges
Earnings report should
provide some clues on
Model 3’s outlook
BY
P ETER H OLLEY
Tesla plans to announce the
company’s third-quarter earnings
Wednesday, offering the public a
window into a strenuous period of
vehicle production that chief executive Elon Musk has likened to
“hell.”
Last month, with several weeks
in the quarter remaining, Tesla
reported that it had produced
only 260 Model 3s, a far cry from
its goal of 1,500.
While Tesla is expected to announce that the company has
missed Model 3 production goals
for the third quarter, the question,
experts say, is whether more bad
news will make that goal even
harder to reach. How much longer, experts wonder, can Tesla continue to coast on the allure of
promise?
“Not only does the [Model 3]
miss undermine the credibility of
future Model 3 targets, but it increases the near term risks,” UBS
auto analyst Colin Langan wrote
in a note to clients Monday. “We
believe the market should not ignore fundamental challenges that
persist with regards to Tesla’s
Model 3 profitability, stationary
storage & solar businesses, and
eventual need to raise cash.”
The longer production problems persist, the more external
challenges Tesla will face, Langan
noted.
“We see increased pressure on
demand as luxury automakers
launch competing products,” he
added.
A spokesperson declined to
comment on whether the company would fulfill a promise to deliver Model 3s to non-employee customers by the end of October.
Even so, Tesla customers — perhaps more than any other car
buyers — have steeled themselves
for setbacks, as their remarkable
patience has already shown, according to Jessica Caldwell, the
director of industry analysis with
the auto research website Edmunds.
“People are very forgiving with
Tesla compared to other automakers,” Caldwell said, noting that
those expectations are more malleable, in part, because Tesla is not
a traditional automaker. “The fact
that these people have been waiting for 1½ years says a lot. If they
wanted to, they could just go get a
Chevy Bolt right now. It’s a perfectly fine electric vehicle, but it’s
not a Tesla Model 3.”
Patience, however robust, is not
unlimited, Caldwell cautioned.
It’s one thing to woefully undershoot production numbers in October. But if similarly dismal numbers persist into December and
January, Caldwell said, that’s “a
very different problem” because it
its product — that Musk has highlighted for its pressure and difficulty. After he unveiled the Model
3 at Tesla’s Fremont, Calif., headquarters in July, the chief executive said production would increase to 20,000 vehicles per
month by the end of the year.
“As the saying goes, if you’re
going through hell, keep going!”
Musk said at the time.
“People are very
forgiving with Tesla
compared to other
automakers.”
Jessica Caldwell of Edmunds
ROMAN PILIPEY/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY/EFE/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
A Tesla charging station last week in Beijing. Tesla will announce its quarterly earnings Wednesday.
would suggest that the company is
facing a serious struggle to correct
its production issues.
“For Tesla as a company,” she
added, “it could also be a big issue
because they’re depending on revenue streams from that production that could seriously affect the
company.”
News earlier this month that
Tesla had fired “hundreds of
workers” as a result of annual
performance reviews have only
added to speculation that the
company is struggling to re-engineer itself as a mass-market automaker.
Tesla said the dismissals were
unrelated to production delays
and would have no effect on the
vehicle’s continued rollout.
In recent months, the company
has vacillated between lofty promises and calls for patience, as well
as faith in its “S curve” production
schedule — in which volume increases as the company fine-tunes
The company says that’s exactly
what they’ve been doing. Tesla
blamed low Model 3 numbers on
“production bottlenecks” earlier i
October and now says the company is in the early stages of its
production ramp. That ramp is
fully operational, the company
says, and becoming increasingly
automated and fine-tuned, increasing volume daily.
Investors can expect to have a
clearer picture Wednesday of exactly how much that volume is
increasing, analysts say.
peter.holley@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/innovations
Under Armour’s rough year worsens Facebook’s bigotry problem predates
Russian election role, coalition says
Athletic wear giant lacks
customer loyalty, among
other problems
BY
A BHA B HATTARAI
Americans, it seems, are over
Under Armour.
The onetime darling of the athletic wear industry on Tuesday
announced that sales are down for
the first time since 2005, even as it
makes an aggressive push to expand into mainstream chains
such as DSW, Kohl’s and Famous
Footwear. The news sent shares of
the company’s stock tumbling
nearly 24 percent Tuesday.
“This is an abrupt about-turn
for a company that, until recently,
was on a mission to challenge the
might of Nike,” Neil Saunders,
managing director of the analytical firm GlobalData Retail, said in
an email. “Under Armour has become just another brand in a sea of
brands.”
The problems are numerous, he
said. Although Under Armour
racks up billions of dollars in sales
each year, analysts say it has failed
to drum up much loyalty among
its customers. It has also been slow
to resonate with women and has
struggled to compete with larger
rivals such as Nike and Adidas,
which often offer lower-priced
goods. Another factor: bankruptcy filings by key retail distributors
such as Sports Authority and
Sport Chalet.
“Kind of a perfect storm,” Patrik
Frisk, Under Armour’s president
and chief operating officer, said
Tuesday morning in call with analysts. “Both internal and external
factors are hitting us really hard.”
North American sales at
the Baltimore-based company
slumped by 12 percent in the most
recent quarter amid slowing demand and mounting competition.
Overall, sales fell 4.5 percent during that period, marking the first
quarterly sales decline for the
A coalition of
civil rights
groups called
TRACY JAN
upon Facebook
this week to
conduct an independent review
of how its policies may have
allowed hate groups and
political entities to stoke racial
and religious resentment or
violence.
Muslim Advocates, along
with more than a dozen groups
including the Southern Poverty
Law Center and the NAACP,
sent a four-page letter to
Facebook outlining reported
instances of posts, pages and
ads used to promote hate
against Muslims, African
Americans, immigrants and
sexual minorities.
The groups have long
complained to Facebook about
the bigotry and racism
promoted on its platform,
meeting with its chief operating
officer, Sheryl Sandberg, earlier
in October about their
concerns.
“Even though Facebook has
listened to our concerns, they
haven’t made meaningful
changes to the way the platform
is being used,” said Madihha
Ahussain, special counsel for
anti-Muslim bigotry at Muslim
Advocates, in an interview with
The Washington Post on
Monday.
Lawyers for Facebook,
Google and Twitter were
scheduled to testify at
congressional hearings that
began Tuesday on Russian
meddling in the 2016
presidential election.
The coalition pointed to
media reports of Facebook
being used to sow divisions
among Americans. Russian
operatives set up fake Facebook
accounts posing as U.S. citizens
concerned about an influx of
refugees and promoting antiimmigrant rhetoric. The
Wonkblog
CHRISTOPHER DILTS/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Under Armour’s store in downtown Chicago. The Baltimore
company said that its sales are down for the first time since 2005.
company since it went public in
2005. Profit, meanwhile, fell
58 percent to $54 million, or
12 cents a share, from $128 million, or 29 cents a share, a year
earlier.
The company said it expects its
financial struggles to continue
and lowered its forecast for the
rest of the year.
“We are incredibly disappointed with our 2017 performance,”
Kevin Plank, Under Armour’s
founder and chief executive, said
during the call with analysts. “We
have not performed to the level we
had originally aspired to.”
Under Armour tried to keep up,
he said, by discounting prices and
offering more promotions than
usual, which further cut into the
company’s margins. But, Plank
added, those were temporary efforts to shore up sales and not a
long-term strategy for the company, which once could command
higher prices than its competitors.
(Men’s running shoes, for example, start at $74.99 at Under Armour, $65 at Adidas and $60 at
Nike, according to the companies’
websites.)
“In no way, shape or form do we
anticipate changing the pricing
model that makes Under Armour
special and unique,” Plank said.
“We invented the $25 T-shirt.
We’ve pressed the bounds as to
what consumers will pay for apparel. That will continue. No one is
looking for Under Armour to have
the $25 hooded fleece. They want
Under Armour at the $75 and $100
price points.”
Analysts say that might be a
tough sell, particularly as customers grow accustomed to deep discounts. Saunders added that a
“marked slowdown” in demand
for athletic apparel is likely to
further complicate Under Armour’s turnaround efforts.
“While customer numbers have
risen, loyalty to the brand is not
deep-rooted in the same way that
it is at Lululemon and Nike,” he
wrote. “What this means is that as
demand moderated, Under Armour has been quick to drop off
the radar of many consumers.”
The latest round of disappointing earnings comes on the heels of
a tough year. The company posted
its first-ever loss in April and in
August announced that it would
lay off 2 percent of its workers.
There have also been changes to
the leadership team. Still, shares
of Under Armour stock, which
closed at $12.52, have lost more
than half their value this year.
abha.bhattarai@washpost.com
operatives even managed to
orchestrate an anti-refugee
rally in Idaho last year.
Russian operatives also
bought Facebook ads
alternately claiming to speak
for Black Lives Matter and
describing it as a threat. The
ads targeted residents of
Baltimore and Ferguson, Mo. —
communities on edge over
police killings of black men —
in an apparent attempt to
further inflame political
discord.
“We were alarmed to see your
platform being abused to
promote bigotry, and especially
disappointed that it has taken
media exposure and
congressional oversight to give
a degree of transparency into
your practices,” the letter said.
for Facebook. “This is an
ongoing process and we are
committed to listening and
learning from communities that
face attacks based on factors
such as race, religion, ethnicity,
gender, and sexual orientation.
We are taking action in the
form of investments in security
and making improvements to
our policies and tools.”
Ahussain said civil rights
groups have also repeatedly
asked Facebook to address
white supremacists’ open
attacks on African Americans
and Muslims even as the
company disproportionately
censored black and Muslim
voices.
The company has previously
acknowledged the problem,
telling The Post in July that it
“Bigotry has long existed on your platform, and the
Russian operatives simply exploited the hateful
content and activity already present.”
The civil rights coalition, in a letter to Facebook executives
“It is important to keep in mind
that pervasive bigotry has long
existed on your platform, and
the Russian operatives simply
exploited the hateful content
and activity already present.”
The groups said they were
concerned about Facebook’s
apparent unwillingness to
institute safeguards against
such manipulation. The groups
want the company to publicly
disclose all the ads, pages,
accounts, events and posts that
have been traced to Russian
operatives.
Facebook said in a statement
to The Post that it was “grateful
for the feedback” in the letter.
“There is no place for hate on
Facebook,” said Erin Egan, vice
president of U.S. public policy
was working to change its
policies as well as its tools to
police content.
The groups want Facebook to
develop clear procedures for
reviewing content flagged as
hate speech and to produce an
annual report on the company’s
effectiveness in tracking and
stopping hate speech.
“This is not just about what
we are dealing with right now
with these Russian ads. These
are about long-term concerns
these communities have raised
over time,” Ahussain said.
“Facebook has the opportunity
to set the tone and transform
the way people have taken
advantage of the weaknesses
within the platform.”
tracy.jan@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A17
RE
Brought in to impose order, Kelly stirs controversy
Civil War remarks, other
stumbles show a difficult
adjustment to politics
BY G REG J AFFE
AND A NNE G EARAN
More than any recent resident
of the White House, President
Trump has used the military and
“my generals,” as he often calls
them, as a shield against criticism
from political rivals.
And no general in recent weeks
has been a more ardent or harder-edged defender of the president than John F. Kelly, a retired
Marine four-star general and the
White House chief of staff. But
the White House got a lesson in
the downsides of relying on generals in times of political crisis
when Kelly in a Monday interview suggested that an inability
to “compromise” had caused the
Civil War.
His remarks drew an immediate backlash in Washington and
among many historians, who noted that the North spent decades
reaching compromises with the
South over slavery. The comments also revived a chorus of
criticism that began two weeks
ago, when Kelly lamented that
nothing in the United States was
“sacred” anymore and denigrated
a Florida congresswoman by misstating her remarks at a building
dedication in honor of two slain
FBI agents.
“He violated the first basic rule
of the chief of staff, which is not
to make yourself the news of the
day,” said former defense secretary Leon E. Panetta, who worked
with Kelly in the Pentagon and
also served as White House chief
of staff. “I have no idea what he
was trying to say because history
is not on his side.”
Kelly — Trump’s first homeland security secretary — was
brought to the White House over
the summer in an attempt to
impose order on a chaotic policy
process and feuding staff and has
received generally high marks.
He bolted shut the open door to
the Oval Office and banished
ideologues such as former chief
strategist Stephen K. Bannon.
But Kelly has struggled with the
more political aspects of his job
and at times has seemed to be a
detriment to a White House reeling from several self-inflicted
wounds.
Kelly’s public stumbles highlight the downsides of relying
heavily on current and retired
military brass to fill political jobs
traditionally filled by civilians. In
addition to Kelly, Trump has
turned to an active-duty threestar general, H.R. McMaster, to
act as his national security adviser and a retired Marine four-star
general, Jim Mattis, to serve as
his defense secretary. The White
House’s national security staff,
meanwhile, is made up of an
unusually large number of current and former military officers.
Kelly, though, has been
pressed into a far more political
role than the other top brass.
Those who served with him in the
Pentagon describe a general who
was often maddened by politics
and viewed members of Congress
as self-serving. “He was pretty
cynical and thought that a lot of
politicians were full of hot air,”
said Derek Chollet, a former top
official at the Pentagon during
the Obama administration who
worked with Kelly. “It was always
a puzzle how this was going to
work out. Trump is not a process
guy. And this position is all about
politics.”
Said Panetta: “John is a great
Marine . . . but he is not a politician, and one thing he lacks is the
ability to look at the big political
picture and understand what you
should and shouldn’t say as chief
of staff.”
So far, the White House and
Trump, who has a far different take
on political discourse from his
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
White House Chief of Staff John F. Kelly suggested an inability to “compromise” led to the Civil War.
predecessors, are backing Kelly.
“The media continue to want
to make this and push that this is
somehow a racially charged and
divided White House,” White
House press secretary Sarah
Huckabee Sanders said at Tuesday’s media briefing, saying that
Kelly’s Civil War comments had
been taken out of context in a
manner that was “absurd and
disgraceful.”
One former White House adviser, who still works in government and spoke on the condition
of anonymity to speak candidly,
said Kelly’s higher public profile
and more overtly political stance
have been welcomed by Trump
and taken as marks of success.
There is a “bunker mentality”
around the president, this person
said, and Kelly is seen as “shooting out.”
The view that Kelly is being
helpful to Trump is not universal,
however. Kelly is seen by some in
the West Wing as violating his
own advice that those who serve
the president should keep a low
profile and avoid drama.
As president, Trump has often
prioritized loyalty to him and his
administration, and Kelly has repeatedly delivered.
After Rep. Frederica S. Wilson
(D-Fla.) said Trump behaved insensitively during a condolence
call with the widow of a U.S.
soldier slain in Niger, Kelly —
whose son was killed in combat
in Afghanistan — leapt immediately to the president’s defense.
He movingly described the
path that the bodies of dead
soldiers and Marines take as they
make their way home from overseas battlefields and described
the sacrifices that military families make for the country. He then
carried his defense a step further
by slamming Wilson, a family
friend, for listening in on the call
and criticizing the president.
Kelly called her an “empty
barrel” and relayed an unflattering story about her conduct at the
building dedication, which a videotape later suggested was incorrect. In an interview aired Monday night with Fox News host
Laura Ingraham, Kelly declined
to apologize for those remarks.
Asked to weigh in on a move by
a Virginia church to remove
plaques that honored Gen. Robert E. Lee and George Washington, he described the Confederate
general as an “honorable man.”
“He was a man that gave up his
country to fight for his state,
which 150 years ago was more
important than country,” Kelly
told Fox.
To some former military offi-
cers, Kelly’s remarks were misguided. “His comments excusing
Robert E. Lee’s traitorous conduct were frankly appalling,” said
retired Lt. Col. John Nagl, a
well-known military officer who
co-authored the Army’s counterinsurgency doctrine. Nagl said
Kelly is on his way to “becoming a
creature of the president. . . . It’s
unfortunate.”
Other military officials described Kelly’s remarks as the
product of a somewhat cloistered
view of the conflict inculcated in
military officers but not necessarily shared by the broader public.
Lee, for example, is still among
the most revered graduates at the
U.S. Military Academy in West
Point, N.Y., where his name graces roads, buildings, barracks and
even the school’s award for excellence in mathematics.
His place of honor reflects a
view, still dominant among the
military, that both sides of the
war were populated with honorable men, said retired Lt. Gen.
David Barno, who commanded
U.S. forces in Afghanistan. “They
were all Americans,” Barno said.
“When I heard Kelly talk, I heard
a view that I think is relatively
common in the U.S. military.”
The other controversial aspect
of Kelly’s recent remarks has
been his frustration, bordering
on contempt, for the country he is
serving. Kelly picked up that
theme again in his Tuesday interview in which he described an
America that “seems to be broken
now and [turning] against itself.”
Barno described the view as
very common among those who
have led a diverse cross-section of
the country in combat and then
return home to a country that
seems more divided along partisan lines than ever. “I don’t fault
him entirely,” Barno said. “I know
where he comes from.”
greg.jaffe@washpost.com
anne.gearan@washpost.com
Karen DeYoung contributed to this
report.
Kushner skyscraper plan won’t work, partner says
Statement puts future
of Manhattan
property in doubt
BY J ONATHAN O ’ C ONNELL
AND M ICHAEL K RANISH
Jared Kushner’s $7.5 billion
plan to transform a Manhattan
skyscraper into a mix of high-end
residences and retail has been
deemed “not feasible” by the project’s partner, putting the future of
the property — saddled with
$1.2 billion in debt — in doubt.
Steven Roth, chief executive
and chairman of office giant Vornado Realty Trust, owns 49.5 percent of the offices at 666 Fifth
Ave. and said Tuesday that it did
not appear that redevelopment
plans, hatched by Kushner, President Trump’s son-in-law, before
he left the company in January to
become a senior White House
adviser, were likely to succeed.
“There have been rumors in
the marketplace, more than rumors, about tearing the building
down and doing all manner of
fairly
grand
development
schemes,” Roth said. “It’s likely
that those are not feasible.”
Roth’s statement is a potentially huge blow to Kushner’s dream
of tearing down the existing
building, doubling its height, and
creating a high-end hotel, retail
and condominium project. The
existing building has been losing
money — and tenants — for years.
Roth’s decision has been much
anticipated. He is one of Trump’s
closest friends and has helped
keep the project afloat while
Kushner pursued investors.
Those efforts have failed, in part
because foreign investors appear
reluctant to pour money into the
project at a time when Kushner’s
financial dealings are under review by special counsel Robert S.
Mueller III.
Among the matters that Mueller may review are Kushner’s
effort to gain financing from
investors in China and Qatar who
have strong ties to those nations’
governments. In addition, Kushner met with a Russian banker
weeks before Trump’s inauguration; the bank has said that
business was discussed, but
Kushner has said it had nothing
to do with his company. A White
House spokesman referred questions to Kushner Cos., which did
not respond to a request for
comment.
Tom Barrack, another close
friend of Trump’s, whose real
estate investment company once
held part of the building’s debt,
has said that Kushner’s ascension
to the White House “crushed”
efforts to woo foreign investment. Barrack, who said he had
suggested the project to a Qatarbased fund, said prospective investors were skeptical after Kushner moved to the White House.
“No way — can’t be associated
with any appearances of conflict
of interest, even though there was
none,” Barrack said.
Roth, speaking on an investor
conference call, said it was likely
that 666 Fifth Ave. would “revert
to an office building” and that
“we are working on capital plans
. . . it’s a work in progress.”
Although Roth long has been
sympathetic to Kushner, he runs
a public company that must answer to investors. At a time when
the stock market has soared,
Vornado’s shares have decreased
this year by more than 11 percent.
A company analyst, Michael R.
Lewis of SunTrust Robinson
Humphrey, said recently that
Vornado stockholders wanted
clarity on 666 Fifth Ave., particularly because many investors
would be skeptical about Vornado taking on additional costly
construction projects.
“I think that something that
requires heavy development on
the site would be poorly received
by shareholders,” he said.
If redevelopment plans have
indeed fallen through, it could be
the biggest blow yet to the Kushner family’s project plans and
raises pressing questions about
how the company will pay off the
debt due in February 2019.
With Kushner as chief executive, the Kushner Cos. purchased
666 Fifth Ave. for a recordbreaking $1.8 billion in 2007.
After the real estate bust, the
building did not produce enough
revenue to make debt payments,
and Kushner brought in Vornado
as a partner on the office and
retail.
At least two years before
Trump became president, Kushner had pitched his plan for
tearing down most of the building and turning it into a mix of
high-end residences, offices and
shops.
The effort included entreaties
to a Chinese insurance fund and a
former Qatari foreign minister,
raising concerns among ethics
officials about whether Kushner’s
company was profiting off his
political position.
When Kushner entered the
White House as a senior adviser,
he divested his interest in 666
Fifth Ave. and resigned from his
company positions.
Without the redevelopment
plan, it’s unclear how the Kushner Cos. will pay off the debt.
About one-fourth of the offices
are empty, and the lease revenue
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
A redevelopment project by Jared Kushner, President Trump’s
son-in-law and senior adviser, has accumulated $1.2 billion in debt.
does not cover monthly interest
payments, requiring regular cash
infusions.
Kushner Cos. President Laurent Morali has vowed not to seek
money from foreign governments
to avoid ethical conflicts. He told
The Washington Post in September that doing so would not
preclude him from finding investors and that he had a number of
options for moving forward despite the slow leasing market.
“We happen to be at a point
where we’ve explored a lot of
different options and I’m pleased
with the progress we’ve made on
them,” he said, “so I can anticipate that over the next couple of
months, the partnership is going
to make a decision.”
If the building remains an
office building, Vornado could
take an interest in acquiring it,
with or without Kushner as a
partner.
Earlier this year, Roth said the
project represented “the rare case
when we may be sellers.”
But he changed his tune on the
call Tuesday. When asked by a
stock analyst whether the company might try to up its stake in the
project, Roth demurred, saying
the situation was “evolving.”
“The grand scheme has gone
away, and I don’t want to speculate,” he said.
jonathan.oconnell@washpost.com
michael.kranish@washpost.com
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A18
EZ
RE
THE WASHINGTON POST
K
ABCDE
letters@washpost.com
The media is doing its job
EDITORIALS
Mr. Trump’s cynical distraction
The uranium deal is not a scandal, no matter how many times the White House says it is.
D
the Treasury Department had the lead. The Nuclear
Regulatory Commission also had to approve the deal,
and President Barack Obama had the final call.
The conspiracy theory is that people related to
Uranium One had given money to the Clinton Foundation, mostly before the 2008 election, and therefore
Ms. Clinton pressed the deal through. But given the
structure of the committee, the separate NRC approval and the president’s role in the process, it was not
really Ms. Clinton’s decision to make, even if the
Russians had tried to influence her. In fact, a key
premise of the conspiracy theory — that the United
States gave up a big chunk of its uranium to the
Russians — is simply wrong; none of the uranium
could legally be exported, anyway.
Claims that the Clinton campaign colluded with
Russia are similarly perplexing. Ms. Clinton’s campaign helped pay for a dossier of unconfirmed accusations about Mr. Trump, some of which a British former
intelligence official gathered from Russian contacts.
It’s fair for Congress to want the full story on this and to
be frustrated that it has been emerging in fits and
Holding sexual
predators
accountable
starts. But U.S. intelligence agencies have concluded
that insofar as the Russian government’s efforts to sow
discord boosted any one candidate, the Kremlin aimed
to help Mr. Trump, not Ms. Clinton. The Russian
government did not get the dossier’s content published
on WikiLeaks — as it did a variety of emails it stole from
the Democrats — or anywhere else before the election.
The real scandal in all this is the cynicism of the
president and others trying to distract Americans and
draw moral equivalencies where none exist. Even
White House Chief of Staff John F. Kelly, at one time
considered to be among the more sober members of
the administration, called Monday for an investigation into Ms. Clinton. Mr. Kelly should think about
what this does to his credibility — and to the country’s. The party in power is demanding the investigation and possible prosecution of its defeated political
rival on trumped-up claims of wrongdoing. This is
what happens in banana republics, not the world’s
greatest democracy. Even if this is just a strategy to
divert attention, it is unbecoming of the leaders of a
rule-of-law state and a disservice to their oaths.
TOM TOLES
Assailants use non-disclosure
agreements to silence their victims.
T
HE STORY OF Harvey Weinstein is partly a
story of secrecy: how the Hollywood producer
managed to keep his habit of sexually harassing and assaulting women under wraps for so
long. The answer, at least in part, involves Mr. Weinstein’s use of confidential settlements and non-disclosure agreements that kept his victims and employees
from speaking out.
In this sense, Mr. Weinstein’s story is far from
unique. Powerful men engaged in sexual misconduct
often use similar legal tools to bury controversy — as
did both Fox News’s Roger Ailes and Bill O’Reilly, who
negotiated multimillion-dollar settlements to ensure
their victims would remain silent. Even now, with the
appalling behavior of these men in the public record,
some victims remain unable to make their experiences public. Mr. Weinstein’s former assistant has
chosen to break her confidentiality agreement to
speak out, but took the risk of doing so only after news
of her employer’s behavior became public.
Several types of agreements can prevent a public
accounting of harassment and assault. Some employers — including the Weinstein Co. and Fox — require
employees to sign away their rights to criticize the
company in public or to adjudicate disputes before a
judge, rather than in private arbitration. After leaving
Fox, former anchor Gretchen Carlson fought to make
her harassment case against Mr. Ailes public rather
than bring her complaints to arbitration as required
by her employment contract. And Mr. Weinstein’s
employees have now publicly requested that the
company’s board free them from their non-disclosure
agreements to allow them to speak openly about what
took place.
Many of the women harassed or assaulted by
Mr. Weinstein or Mr. Ailes reached settlements under
the condition that they never make their experiences
publicly known. While federal law places some limitations on the scope of non-disclosure agreements
written into employment contracts, corporations
have greater leeway to restrain speech through confi-
NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
ID HILLARY CLINTON sell the country’s
uranium to Russia in return for donations to
the Clinton Foundation? Did the Democrats
collude with Russian nationals to tip the
election against Donald Trump?
No, and no. Which raises a third question: Why is
any of this relevant, particularly now? A fair look at
the facts suggests only one option. President Trump
needs a distraction, and his surrogates, some Republican members of Congress, right-wing media and
even some people in mainstream outlets are helping
him gin up outrage against a woman who is not, was
never and will never be president. It is a measure of
the power of partisanship to warp people’s judgment
that this bald trickery is getting any traction.
Here are the facts. In 2010 Rosatom, the Russian
nuclear authority, bought a piece of Uranium One, a
Canadian company that held rights to mine a share of
U.S. uranium deposits. The Committee on Foreign
Investment in the United States approved the deal. The
State Department, then run by Ms. Clinton, was one of
nine agencies represented on that committee, though
. WEDNESDAY,
Gary Abernathy must have had quite a headache
after writing his recent piece, “Will the media’s
anti-Trump fever ever break?” [Washington Forum,
Oct. 27]. Emboldened by former president Jimmy
Carter’s statement about the media being hard on
President Trump, Mr. Abernathy tied himself in knots
noting a few platitudes on the importance of the
administration deserving close scrutiny from the
press, while claiming the media has devolved into an
opposition party that is simply too tough on the
White House.
What instance of lying, taunting or bungling
should the media have backed off on?
Mr. Abernathy suggested leading media outlets
“require a significant internal overhaul” to “restore
the majority of Americans’ faith in them.” Putting
aside the fact that this is a solution looking for a
problem (polls show that Americans trust the media
more than the White House), maybe we should give
editorial boards an opportunity to devise ways of
being a little nicer to Mr. Trump. If they fail in this
“reform” effort, surely the next step would be to take a
closer look at the president’s ideas about libel reform
and revocation of broadcasting licenses.
Mr. Abernathy should know that it is not the role of
the media to pacify Trump supporters or any segment
of the population. The fourth estate’s job is to educate,
inform and hold those in power accountable. If that
feels like a fever, he might just be allergic to democracy.
Sean Foley, Burke
Gary Abernathy seemed to think that the mainstream media is derelict in not crediting the president
for his accomplishments and in using such terms as
“sabotage” and “lies” in describing the president’s
accomplishments and proclivities. President Trump
has done what he has promised, to a great extent,
without the help of a Republican-led Congress.
If you consider withdrawing from the Paris climate
agreement, castrating the Environmental Protection
Agency, raising the specter of nuclear war, eviscerating the Affordable Care Act, alienating our closest
international partners and lowering our country’s
esteem to be accomplishments, he indeed has been
quite successful.
As far as the word “lies” is concerned, Mr. Trump
either lies or is pitifully uninformed. I think the
mainstream media has a duty to call it as they see it,
and I for one am grateful that they fulfill their
obligation to keep the public informed of the unfortunate state of our nation.
George Smith, Frederick
A unique religion-communism link
dentiality provisions in settlements.
Ms. Carlson is now pushing for federal legislation
to prohibit employers from mandating private arbitration for civil rights complaints. On the state level,
lawmakers in New York, New Jersey and California
plan to introduce legislation to block courts from
enforcing non-disclosure agreements in employment
contracts and settlements that prevent employees
from speaking out about sexual harassment. Many
states have similar laws preventing settlements that
conceal information on “public hazards,” and California already prohibits such agreements in cases involving rape and sexual assault.
Some victims of sexual harassment and assault may
desire settlements that allow them to retain their
privacy. Legislators should be mindful of these differing needs. Perhaps, as University of Chicago law professor Daniel Hemel suggests, lawmakers could allow
confidentiality agreements with a one-sided opt-out
provision: The assailant would be barred from speaking publicly unless the victim chose to speak first.
Laws alone can’t change a culture in which powerful men feel entitled to prey on those around them.
But reducing secrecy would be an important step
toward holding predators accountable and diminishing their opportunity to transgress multiple times.
The Oct. 29 front-page article “A communist
success” touched on one key point as to why this
flavor of political doctrine has survived. The fact that
religious, communal and caste lines were blurred by
Hindu, Muslim and Christian activists has been one
of the more enduring facets of this strange flavor of
communism. The birth and growth of communism
in the Indian state of Kerala, as in other countries,
was the result of a revolt against socioeconomic lines
and was remarkable in how it kept in check strong
religious biases. To that extent, probably one of the
main causes of such open-mindedness and lack of
stricture is how Hinduism, the dominant religion,
treats other religions with respect and deference.
As one who grew up in Kerala, I recall that in our
small village there was a temple devoted to the
goddess Kali next to a church devoted to Mary, the
mother of Jesus, and the saying was that the two
deities were sisters. Unfortunately, with the passing
of time, this tolerance is becoming a thing of the past.
Indian political leader T.M. Thomas Isaac is an
excellent example of this phenomena with his
disavowing of religion in a country that is both polyand monotheistic and where prayers and mantras
are a way of life.
Kerala is unique in that in 1957, the state was the
first to democratically elect a communist government, then headed by Chief Minister E.M.S. Namboodiripad. As far as I know, the only country in the
world that did so in an open election was Chile in
1970, with the short-lived tenure of Salvador Allende.
Eapen “Peter” Panicker, Sterling
A sensible, helpful health-care bill
An ad that had no place in the Va. governor’s race
Mr. Northam should have repudiated an offensive message from the Latino Victory Fund.
“F
EAR-MONGERING.” That is the title of an
ad being aired by Virginia Democrat Ralph
Northam that takes aim at ads by Ed
Gillespie, his Republican opponent for
governor, trying to tie Mr. Northam to MS-13 gang
violence and to a child pornographer. Mr. Northam is
correct in his assessment of the poisonous ads and
correct that it is “despicable” to imply he would tolerate anyone hurting a child. But just as despicable is an
anti-Gillespie ad created by an independent group that
supports Mr. Northam. It behooves Mr. Northam,
while he is offering criticism, to make clear that even
though the anti-Gillespie spot was not a product of his
campaign, his campaign wants no part of it.
The minute-long spot from the Latino Victory
Fund depicted a pickup truck being driven by a
sinister-looking white man, flying a Confederate flag
and sporting a Gillespie bumper sticker as it chased
down a group of terrified brown-skinned children.
Titled “American Nightmare,” the ad ended with the
children waking up from a nightmare and adults
watching television footage of August’s torch-bearing
white-nationalist march in Charlottesville. “Is this
what Donald Trump and Ed Gillespie mean by the
‘American Dream?’ ” asked the narrator.
There is no question that if this were a race to the
bottom, Mr. Gillespie would be the winner, having
spent millions of dollars on ads that use specious
claims and appeals to race and ethnicity to scare and
divide. That he has doubled down in recent days with
deceptive ads trying to paint Mr. Northam as an
enabler of child predators underscores the lack of
character that has marked his campaign. It is one
reason we endorsed Mr. Northam.
ABCDE
L O CA L O P I N I O N S
FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
Don’t allow accessory dwellings in Arlington
The cheery Oct. 30 Metro article “Making room
for more,” about an Arlington County proposal to
allow homeowners to construct “accessory dwelling” units on their property, read as if grandma
would be moving into a tiny ivy-covered cottage in
the back garden.
Not so. Nor is the goal of the proposal, as
Arlington County Board Chairman Jay Fisette (D)
claimed, removing “unnecessary, administratively
burdensome barriers.”
Instead, it would allow, for the first time,
unlimited construction of separate dwellings of up
to 750 square feet, 25 feet high, eight feet from the
main house and a mere one foot from lot lines,
some on lots not even 50 feet wide. Up to three
unrelated people could live in the unit. Think of
three loud fraternity brothers living one foot away
But just because Mr. Gillespie has resorted to gutter
tactics doesn’t give others leave to do the same. The
Latino Victory Fund ad was vile. Among other faults, it
glossed over the fact that Mr. Gillespie condemned the
white-supremacist violence in Charlottesville far
more directly than did President Trump.
“Ralph Northam would not have run this ad and
believes Virginians deserve civility, not escalation,” a
spokesman for Mr. Northam emailed us. That was
before the Latino Victory Fund announced Tuesday
night that it was pulling the ad, issuing a statement
that cited “recent events.” Maybe that was a reference
to Tuesday night’s truck attack in Manhattan. It is sad
that it took such a tragedy for the group to realize how
out of bounds its ad was. It’s also sad that someone
who promises to be a governor for all Virginians
didn’t call them out right away.
in a building that looms over your small back yard.
That’s what this proposal would allow.
Barbara E. Taylor, Arlington
Not noted in the article about “accessory” dwellings in Arlington was that the county is proposing
changing zoning to allow construction of “accessory” dwellings on Arlington’s relatively small lots.
We are destroying permeable land and trees in
Arlington at an unprecedented rate. Allowing
additional structures on already-small lots would
cause more runoff problems. Such changes would
also be a stress to neighboring properties and their
trees. These new dwellings would not be “affordable” either, considering the cost of construction
and the market rental rates.
Margie Bell, Arlington
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The Oct. 26 editorial “Health-care reform that
pays off” unfairly maligned a bill introduced by two
committee chairmen as “dismantling major pieces
of Obamacare.” It does nothing of the sort.
Like the bill proposed by Sens. Lamar Alexander
(R-Tenn.) and Patty Murray (D-Wash.) that the
editorial praised, a bill from Sen. Orrin Hatch
(R-Utah) and Rep. Kevin Brady (R-Tex.) would
appropriate money for cost-sharing-reduction subsidies. That’s not nearly enough to provide relief to
consumers, who are leaving health-insurance markets in droves. Gallup reported that the uninsurance rate in the third quarter of 2017 reached its
highest level since 2014, as the Affordable Care Act
makes insurance unaffordable.
Hatch-Brady would temporarily suspend tax
penalties on the uninsured. This wildly unpopular
tax sought to stabilize markets by coercing healthy
people into paying an unattractive price for an
unattractive product. It has failed utterly. It seems
especially cruel for government to levy this tax
before repairing rickety individual markets.
The Hatch-Brady measure also would expand
health savings accounts, providing consumers tax
relief as they struggle with the ACA’s skyrocketing
deductibles. Neither bill would undo the damage
Washington has inflicted on families who once
could afford health insurance. But Hatch-Brady
advances some very sensible and politically popular ideas and is far from the “unhelpful, partisan
proposal” the editorial made it out to be.
Doug Badger, Ashburn
The writer is a senior fellow at the Galen Institute.
Mr. Ovechkin’s inspirational play
Alex Ovechkin made one of the greatest and most
inspirational plays of his hockey career by scoring
some warm clothes for a half-naked man on a cold
downtown Edmonton street in Alberta, Canada, on
Friday. I’m sure heaven cheered loudly at that goal. Ol’
St. Basil, who cared for the poor, is probably proudly
wearing a #8 Capitals jersey now.
It would be great to see Mr. Ovechkin and other
professional hockey players continue to play with
inspiration like that.
Garth Ukrainetz, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A19
RE
DAVID VON DREHLE
DAVID IGNATIUS
A church
changes,
with care
Putin, exposed, may become
more dangerous
H
macon, ga.
T
he First Baptist Church of
Christ, founded in 1826, is one
of the oldest congregations in
this central Georgia city. Its
towering red-brick sanctuary, dedicated in 1887, occupies a hilltop between
downtown and nearby Mercer University — a physical prominence that
evokes the stature of the church in local
history.
So it was front-page news in the
Telegraph, Macon’s daily newspaper,
when First Baptist called an Aug. 27
meeting of its membership to decide
whether its stated policy of welcome
and inclusion should extend to the
celebration of same-sex marriages.
I’ll admit that my first reaction, on
coming across the story, was surprise
that a Baptist church in the Bible Belt
reached this crossroads so soon after
the Supreme Court’s 2015 ruling on
equality in civil marriage. Even in the
digital age, church time tends to run
slowly. After paying a visit, I think
there’s something more to learn from
this story: how to foster respect and
civility even amid disagreement.
The news that hit driveways in Macon that Sunday morning had, in fact,
been brewing a long time inside the
church. First Baptist is one of about
2,000 congregations that have chosen
to leave the conservative Southern Baptist Convention over the past 25 years.
For the roughly 47,000 churches that
remain in the SBC, same-sex marriage is
a nonstarter; no church that condones
such unions can participate.
But freedom to weigh the subject did
not make the weighing easy. When I met
with Pastor Scott Dickison and the chair
of the church deacons, Bonnie Chappell, two months after the decision, they
still spoke gingerly of an “exhausting”
years-long “journey” that could yet split
their membership.
The voyage began with a series of
discussions on the Christian ethics of
homosexuality even before Dickison’s
arrival in Macon from a church in
Dallas five years ago. Bible verses in
both the Old and New Testaments define marriage as a monogamous relationship between a man and a woman,
and other verses condemn sexual activity outside of that relationship. Yet for
many believers, strict application of
those verses conflicts with Christian
ideals of outreach and respect — especially for the outcast or downtrodden of
society.
For several years after those sessions,
First Baptist wrestled with the issue
without confronting it head-on. A key
moment came when an openly gay man
was nominated to become a deacon.
The congregation’s vote to ordain him
was a big step away from Baptist tradition — but the step was taken without
an explicit airing. “We had talked about
this subject in hushed tones for so long
that it was difficult to make the discussion formal,” Chappell told me.
Then the world pressed in. When the
Supreme Court took its step, Dickison
wrote approvingly on his blog. After last
year’s terrorist attack on a gay nightclub
in Orlando, the pastor confronted the
subject from the pulpit. His topic that
day was baptism, the sacrament that
signals acceptance into faith. Dickison
praised the strides his church had made
toward recognizing the universal equality of this sacrament — not only in terms
of sexuality, but on questions of race
and gender as well.
And he mapped “where I hoped we
would go.”
Whispered conversations gave way to
communal soul-searching, through
which the pastor and deacons were
determined to maintain a spirit of mutual respect. To assure that every view
was heard, one meeting was designated
solely for the expression of each participant’s thoughts: No one could respond,
favorably or unfavorably, to another’s
statement.
And a discussion of Scripture focused
on the Bible passages most cherished by
church members. The same verses came
up again and again, and none dealt with
sexuality. “We reminded ourselves why
we listen to Scripture in the first place:
not to be a battleground, but to bring us
together,” Dickison recalled.
Perhaps most important, the church
gathered to hear often-wrenching testimony from church members marginalized by teachings on sexuality. “One of
our older members said to me afterward, ‘I’ve been wondering why we are
putting ourselves through this, but now
I get it,’ ” the pastor told me.
Dickison and Chappell had hoped to
avoid voting on a resolution — “there is
something distasteful about taking a
vote on someone’s humanity,” the pastor
observed. But Baptist churches are democracies, and the congregation wanted clarity. In a secret ballot of some 230
members, more than 70 percent voted
for inclusion.
A few on the outvoted side left over
the decision, a result that has the pastor
“grieving,” he said. His hope is that
others will stay long enough to find that
the essentials of the church experience
have not changed.
Indeed, with patience they might
discover an even deeper appreciation
for a faith large enough to span gulfs of
difference — and for a nation large
enough, too.
david.vondrehle@washpost.com
CHIP SOMODEVILLA/GETTY IMAGES
House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Senate Minority Leader
Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) speak at the U.S. Capitol on Oct. 4.
DANA MILBANK
The Democrats, ready
to self-destruct
P
resident Trump’s job approval
rating fell to just 33 percent in a
Gallup poll this week. One of his
campaign aides pleaded guilty in
the Russia probe and two more were
indicted. Republicans are fighting over
their tax plan, increasing the odds of yet
another legislative debacle.
It would seem that the midterm election is the Democrats’ to lose. And you
can be sure they will try their best to do
exactly that.
Democrats seldom miss an opportunity to miss an opportunity. Several
recent incidents of self-sabotage have
already proven the great Will Rogers
adage: “I am not a member of any
organized political party. I am a Democrat.”
Rich guy Tom Steyer gets October’s
Rogers Prize for turning one of the
Democrats’ most unifying themes (the
singular disaster that is Trump) into a
source of discord. He launched a petition
drive, backed by advertising, pressuring
Democratic candidates to go on record
supporting the impeachment of Trump
and committing to “remove him from
office at once.” Pretty much no Democrat
thinks Trump should be in the White
House, but even perfect unanimity
among Democrats for impeachment
won’t remove Trump. And the Steyer
“pledge” just might prevent Democrats
from winning in Trump-friendly districts
they need to retake the House.
First runner-up for the Rogers Prize
for Democratic Entropy is Sen. Bernie
Sanders (I-Vt.), who nearly salvaged Republican attempts to repeal Obamacare
with his ill-timed “Medicare for All”
rollout. The attempt to get Democrats to
commit to single-payer health care, and
particularly the attempt by some Sanders advisers to make it a litmus test for
Democrats, provided a welcome diversion for Republicans at a time when they
were feeling intense heat for their votes
to take insurance from millions. Democrats are now fighting about an ideal
solution that has no chance of becoming
law for at least three years.
Second runner-up for the Democratic
Chaos Prize is Rep. Linda T. Sánchez
(D-Calif.), the fifth-ranking House Democrat, who just called for House Democratic leaders Nancy Pelosi, Steny H.
Hoyer and James E. Clyburn to step
down after next year’s election. “There
comes a time when you need to pass that
torch, and I think it’s time,” she said on
C-SPAN. It’s not a crazy idea to say
Democrats need younger leaders (I argued the same a year ago), but Sánchez’s
call to make these ducks lame halfway
through the current Congress causes
more disunity and distraction.
And honorable mention goes to Tom
Perez, the Democratic National Committee chairman. When Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.)
delivered his passionate denunciation of
Trump on the Senate floor last week, he
validated the Democrats’ case against
Trump. Yet Perez chose to attack . . .
Flake. “His retirement is symbol of a
Republican Party whose leaders allow
Donald Trump’s divisive politics to flourish as long as it serves their political
interests, and who fail to criticize this
dangerous president until it’s too late,”
Perez said of the early and outspoken
critic of Trump. The malpractice baffled
John Weaver, the anti-Trump Republican
who advised John Kasich during his 2016
presidential run. “They can have the left
and the center, but for some reason the
leadership of the DNC doesn’t want that,”
Weaver told me.
Nor apparently, do a number of Democrats. They’ve struggled so far to come up
with a clear midterm election message —
Health care for all! Make the rich pay
their fair share! A living wage! — that
would give people a reason to vote for
Democrats rather than just against
Trump. House Minority Leader Pelosi
(Calif.) and Senate Minority Leader
Charles E. Schumer (N.Y.) attempted to
roll out just such a populist, aspirational
agenda earlier this year — and it was
immediately ridiculed on the left because of its name (“A Better Deal”), and it
quickly disappeared.
I called some of my favorite strategists, both Republican (who were happy
to be named) and Democrat (who were
not), for this column, to see how they
thought the Party of Rogers would, as
one Democratic operative put it, “seize
defeat from the jaws of victory.” Bernie
backers and “establishment” types will
chop each other to pieces in primaries
even if their ideology is much the same.
Democrats will overplay the Russia scandal rather than simply letting special
counsel Robert S. Mueller III do his job.
Underfunded party committees won’t
vet the flood of new candidates, some of
whom will turn out to have played guitar
in nudist colonies. And Democrats will
struggle, as out-of-power parties do, with
the absence of a leader. “Until someone
captures that, they’ll drift,” says Stuart
Stevens, who ran Mitt Romney’s 2012
presidential campaign.
Of course, Trump has generated such
destruction that Democrats might win
the House in 2018 despite their best
efforts to screw things up. But when it
comes to self-immolation, nobody holds
a candle to them.
Twitter: @Milbank
PO S T P A R T I S A N
Excerpted from www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/post-partisan
Is Kelly trolling us?
Serious question: Is John F. Kelly trolling
us?
At first, the chief of staff seemed poised to
restore order in the tumultuous Trump
White House. But it now seems that his
main job is to infuriate and distract the
public — in essence, to troll us.
Case in point: Monday night, on Laura
Ingraham’s new Fox News show, Kelly was
asked about the decision of a Virginia
church to remove plaques honoring Robert
E. Lee and George Washington. His response was to share an aggressively bad
take on the Civil War:
“I think we make a mistake, though, as a
society and certainly as individuals, when
we take what is today accepted as right and
wrong and go back 100, 200, 300 years . . . It
shows you just how much of a lack of
appreciation of history, and what history is,”
he told Ingraham.
“I would tell you that Robert E. Lee was
an honorable man. He was a man that gave
up his country to fight for his state. . . . It was
always loyalty to state first back in those
days. Now it’s different today. But the lack of
an ability to compromise led to the Civil
War, and men and women of good faith on
both sides made their stand where their
conscience had them make their stand.”
Hmm. No.
First, a factual point. The Civil War was
about slavery, not “lack of compromise” —
historians and well-educated citizens agree.
Efforts to elide that fact are rooted in the
“Lost Cause” narrative that sought to whitewash the South’s misdeeds.
Second, appreciating “what history is”
means looking closely at past events from a
variety of perspectives, not evaluating them
in a vacuum. Lee may have been a conscientious enough individual (his slaves recalled
him less fondly), but his contribution to
history was defined by his waging war to
defend the view that black people deserved
to be enslaved. Not an honorable cause.
Third, and most relevant here: Kelly is
not a stupid man. As his time in the White
House has progressed, he has become more
and more purposeful in serving as President
Trump’s justifier.
In this particular dust-up, Kelly has mirrored the ridiculous “many sides” language
that the president deployed after Charlottesville’s tragic white supremacist march
in August.
Is it accidental? Ingraham asked the
question, after all — Kelly didn’t bring it up.
But his divisive response was an obvious
pitch to Trump’s base. It was also a transparent attempt to cause a distraction when all
eyes are trained on special counsel Robert S.
Mueller III.
Distraction does work, at least in the
short term. Much of today’s news cycle has
concerned itself with Kelly’s ridiculous understanding of the Civil War. But in the long
run, the chief of staff’s credibility is dwindling, our understanding of history is
broadening and the investigation rolls on
apace.
— Christine Emba
as there ever been a covert
action that backfired as disastrously as Russia’s attempt to
meddle in the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign?
Granted, we know all the reasons
Moscow is gloating: Donald Trump is
president; America is divided and confused; Russia’s propagandization of
“fake news” is now repeated by people
around the world as evidence that nothing is believable and all information is
(as in Russia) manipulated and mendacious.
But against this cynical strategy there
now stands a process embodied by special counsel Robert S. Mueller III, which
we will call, as a shorthand: “The Truth.”
Mueller has mobilized the investigative
powers of the U.S. government to document how Russia and its friends sought
to manipulate American politics. We are
seeing the rule of law, applied.
Put aside for the moment what the
indictments and plea agreement announced Monday will ultimately mean
for Trump’s presidency. Already, Mueller has stripped the cover from Russia’s
machinations: Trump’s former foreign
policy adviser George Papadopoulos has
confessed that he lied to FBI agents
about his contacts with individuals connected to Moscow who promised “dirt”
on Hillary Clinton; Trump’s former
campaign chairman Paul Manafort has
been charged with laundering $18 million in payoffs from Russia’s Ukrainian
friends.
Russian meddling is now advertised
to the world. This topic will dominate
American debate for the next year, at
least. In Europe, meanwhile, a similar
reaction to Russian influence operations is gaining force. President Vladimir Putin once imagined that Trump
would be Russia’s bridge back from
isolation. Not anymore.
Next comes the overtly dangerous
part: When covert operations are exposed, nations sometimes adopt more
aggressive actions. On the continuum of
warfare, Russia has been playing somewhere in the middle, between war and
peace. Now, as the world focuses on
Russian mischief, will the Kremlin
move the dial up or down?
Putin made some comments last
week that worry me. Before a meeting
of his security council on Oct. 26, Putin
announced that he was augmenting
cyberwar policies to take into account
“that the level of threat in the information space is on the rise.” He proposed
“additional measures” to combat adversaries and protect Russia. He argued
that Russia was simply protecting its
citizens from cybercriminals, but his
language was emphatic: “It is necessary
to be tough as regards those persons
and groups that are using the Internet
and the information space for criminal
purposes.”
To me, that sounded as if Putin was
doubling down on Russia’s bid to shape
the “information space,” by whatever
means necessary. That was reinforced
by his call for a “system of international
information security,” in which Russia
would seek to impose new rules for the
Internet through the United Nations
and other pliable international organizations. That’s a threat I noted a week
ago, now confirmed explicitly by Putin.
The potential scope of Russia’s cyberoperations was highlighted in a littlenoticed report by the Defense Intelligence Agency, “Russia Military Power:
Building a Military to Support Great
Power Aspirations.” Its conclusion:
“Russia views the information sphere as
a key domain for modern military conflict . . . critically important to control
its domestic populace and influence
adversary states.”
The DIA explains how “Russian
propaganda strives to influence, confuse and demoralize its intended audience.” The report describes Russian
trolls, bots and cover organizations.
Among the major themes of Russian
propaganda, the DIA says, is this Steve
Bannon-esque message: “The West’s liberal world order is bankrupt and should
be replaced by a Eurasian neo-conservative post-liberal world order, which defends tradition, conservative values,
and true liberty.” And remember, this
exposé of Moscow’s hidden hand is
coming from Trump’s Pentagon!
Here’s the strategic impact of Mueller’s investigation: He is probing efforts
by Russia and its foreign allies to manipulate our political system; he is unraveling a covert action. Trump’s protests of
“witch hunt” and “fake news” are similar to words used by Moscow-controlled
media outlets.
Perhaps we begin to see a timeline: In
March 2016, Papadopoulos met with a
Russian-linked “professor”; in April, the
professor said Moscow had “dirt” on
Hillary Clinton from her emails; in
June, Donald Trump Jr., Manafort and
Jared Kushner met with a Russian who
had promised “some official documents
and information that would incriminate Hillary”; in July, Trump was touting WikiLeaks’s release of documents
about Clinton allegedly supplied by
Russian cutouts.
Trump may or may not have colluded
with Russia during the 2016 campaign;
we’ll leave that question for the lawyers.
But if Trump seeks to derail Mueller’s
probe, he is implicitly colluding with
Russia now. By many people’s definition, that would be aiding a foreign
power, which might be deemed a “high
crime or misdemeanor.” Let Mueller
finish his job of exposing Russian manipulation.
Twitter: @IgnatiusPost
KATHLEEN PARKER
After Manafort, who’s next?
B
eware the low-level volunteer.
Virtually unheard of before
Monday, when two of President
Trump’s campaign staffers were
indicted on federal charges, George Papadopoulos is either the key to Russian
collusion with the Trump campaign
during the 2016 presidential election —
or a lying “low level volunteer,” as the
president tweeted early Tuesday morning.
But contrary to Trump’s dismissive,
never-heard-of-him shrug, Papadopoulos was also known within the campaign
as Trump’s foreign affairs adviser. It was
within the latter capacity that Papadopoulos tried, unsuccessfully, to arrange
meetings between the Trump campaign
and Russians close to the Kremlin, ostensibly to learn dirt about Hillary Clinton.
He may be the key to special counsel
Robert S. Mueller III’s investigation that
led to Monday’s indictments of the
president’s former campaign manager
Paul Manafort and his longtime business associate Rick Gates on charges of
money laundering, tax evasion and
crimes against the United States. Papadopoulos himself was offered a pre-indictment plea bargain on charges that
he had lied to the FBI during an earlier
point in the investigation.
In response to the indictments,
Trump has done everything but burn an
effigy of Hillary Clinton — as a distraction or, well, what? In the swamp, one is
never sure whether movements beneath
the surface are gators or mere shadows.
Trump’s history has taught us, however,
that when he’s under attack, Clinton will
feel it. Like the Ghost of Election Past,
she haunts Trump’s dreamscape.
“But why aren’t Crooked Hillary & the
Dems the focus?” he tweeted Monday
soon after the news broke.
Indeed, on Capitol Hill, some Republicans, who’ve been scurrying away
from the indictment news as fast as
their little mice feet can carry them,
have moved to open an investigation
into the Obama-era sale of Canadabased Uranium One, which had licenses
to mine U.S. uranium, to a subsidiary of
a Russian state-owned energy corporation. A committee composed of representatives from several U.S. government
agencies, including the State Department — at the time led by Clinton — had
to approve the sale, which transpired
after the Clinton Foundation received
$145 million in donations from Uranium One investors.
This would probably be a good time
to grab a sheet of graph paper and a
pencil. You’re going to need them to
chart the many possible overlaps in this
Venn diagram of Russian propaganda/
possible collusion/corruption/sleaze/
lies/more lies — and wires. As of yet, we
have seen no videotape, though it’s
possible that Papadopoulos has been
wearing a wire in recent months.
Also, keep your eraser handy. People
have people, you know, and others get
fired. Or pardoned. But speculation that
Trump would pardon Manafort and
Gates is probably irrelevant. Manafort
and Gates’s alleged federal crimes almost certainly could not have happened
without committing state crimes. State
attorneys general could build cases off
of Mueller’s investigation and effectively neuter Trump’s power. A president
can only pardon federal crimes.
The question now is: Who’s next? And
what bigger fish could Manafort or
Gates offer up in a plea that would spare
them potentially up to 80 years and 70
years, respectively, in prison? Former
national security adviser Michael
Flynn’s name keeps coming up.
None of this affirms or even bolsters a
case that Trump’s campaign colluded
with Russia to influence the election,
especially given that many of Manafort’s
relevant business dealings preceded his
association with the campaign. All we
know for certain is that Russia did
influence the election, thanks to astounding testimony by social media
leaders Tuesday.
Twitter identified 36,746 accounts associated with Russia that generated
election-related content; Google found
about 43 hours of election content in
about 1,100 videos suspected to be of
Russian origin; Facebook estimates that
about 126 million people were exposed
to Russian-produced stories leading up
to the election.
If Trump benefited from these virtual
incursions, there’s no proof that he
knew about it. Then again, we’ve likely
only seen the tip of the iceberg, which
must loom large to swamp-dwellers.
Plus remember, Chicago crime boss Al
Capone was brought down not for murder or racketeering, but for tax evasion.
kathleenparker@washpost.com
A20
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
Trial opens for Marine accused of abusing Muslim recruits during tirades
Drill instructor allegedly
terrorized men under
his care at Parris Island
BY
R ORY L AVERTY
camp lejeune, n.c. — A third
Muslim military recruit has been
added to the list of alleged victims
of a Marine Corps drill instructor
accused of terrorizing and abusing young men under his care.
During their opening statements at his court-martial here
Tuesday, military prosecutors
said Gunnery Sgt. Joseph Felix
put two Muslim recruits inside an
industrial clothes dryer at the
Marines’ storied recruit training
facility in Parris Island, S.C. —
starting it in one case. He’s also
accused of repeatedly slapping
another Muslim recruit seconds
before the young man jumped
three stories to his death.
Felix is charged with cruelty
and maltreatment, obstruction of
justice, drunk and disorderly conduct, and failure to obey a general
order. He has pleaded not guilty.
Twenty Marine drill instructors were swept up this year in a
broad investigation into claims of
hazing and physical abuse targeting recruits at Parris Island,
which the tradition-minded Marines consider hallowed ground.
The scandal shocked the military
community and appalled those in
Congress with oversight of the
armed forces. Several of those
instructors face courts-martial.
One has been acquitted.
Prosecutors say Felix called all
three Muslim recruits “terrorists”
and insulted their religion during
whiskey-fueled tirades in July
2015 and March 2016. The new
charges concern the alleged
abuse of Rekan Hawez. The Navy
Criminal Investigative Service
(NCIS) learned of the incident
while questioning members of
Felix’s platoon at the Marines’
storied recruit training facility in
Parris Island, S.C., said Capt.
Joshua Pena, a Marine Corps
spokesman. Hawez told investigators the drill instructor put him
in a dryer but did not turn it on.
The burly former drill instructor scowled as one of his accusers,
Lance Cpl. Ameer Bourmeche, detailed his treatment as a boot
camp recruit two years ago. Bourmeche’s story, along with the alleged maltreatment and suicide
of Raheel Siddiqui in 2016, has
galvanized the Marine Corps to
confront issues of hazing, bullying and religious persecution in
boot camp and beyond.
Bourmeche, 23, told the court
he awoke in the middle of the
night by shouts of, “Where’s the
terrorist?” He said two drill instructors marched him to the
showers, where Felix elbowed
him in the chin.
“I could tell they were drunk,”
Bourmeche said. “I smelled alcohol.”
Bourmeche said that after he
was forced to do push-ups,
crunches and other exercises
while in the shower, Felix and the
other drill instructor, Sgt. Michael Eldridge, told him they
needed to dry him off, so they
took him to the “Maytag room”
and made him to climb into an
industrial-size clothes dryer.
Bourmeche said they turned on
the dryer, with him inside, three
separate times.
“I was tumbling in there,”
Bourmeche said. “I was burning
up.”
Eldridge also was charged over
the alleged incident, but he is
cooperating with the prosecution
and is expected to face less-severe
punishment. He is one of 76 witnesses likely to testify during Felix’s court-martial, including seven drill instructors.
After each tumble, the dryer
was turned off and the drill instructors asked him if he was still
a Muslim, Bourmeche testified.
Twice he said he was, and they
turned the dryer back on. So on
the third time, he said he was no
longer a Muslim, and that’s when
his abuse stopped — for one night.
The next night, Bourmeche
said, the same two drill instructors woke him again, this time
tying him up while bent over, his
head almost touching his legs.
They then forced him to march
and run around the squad bay, he
said. Later the drill instructors
made him yell “Allahu akbar” —
which in Arabic means God is
great — while simulating the be-
heading of his platoon-mate,
Bourmeche said.
Felix also is accused of terrorizing Siddiqui. After days of cruel
treatment in March 2016, the recruit snapped, sprinted out of the
squad bay and leapt over a rail,
falling more than 40 feet onto a
concrete staircase, according to
military investigations. Siddiqui
was pronounced dead hours later.
A medical examiner said the
cause was blunt-force head trauma.
The court ruled in July that
actions leading up to Siddiqui’s
death are fair game during Felix’s
trial, and prosecutors brought up
the incident early in their opening statement Tuesday. They did
not suggest Felix was directly responsible for Siddiqui’s apparent
suicide, but they argued that his
alleged treatment of the recruit
was criminal and discriminatory.
national@washpost.com
Uzbek immigrant detained in NYC truck attack that killed 8
ATTACK FROM A1
BRENDAN MCDERMID/REUTERS
Central
Park
BROADW
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Hudson
42
ND
ST.
Pedestrian/
bike path
Stuyvesant
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WEST
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Riv
er
57
TH
ST.
Times
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Man drove
20 blocks down
a bike path
DETAIL
9/11 Memorial
River
Ea
tines and a Belgian were among
the victims.
According to a video from the
scene, the man then jumped out of
the wrecked vehicle brandishing
what appeared to be handguns.
Some witnesses said he shouted
“Allahu akbar,’’ meaning “God is
great’’ in Arabic.
Law enforcement officials,
speaking on the condition of anonymity to discuss an open investigation, identified the suspect as
Sayfullo Saipov, an Uzbek immigrant who had been living in Tampa.
The attack could intensify the
political debate over immigration
and security. President Trump has
argued for much tougher screening of immigrants to prevent terrorism, and opponents of those
policies have sought to block his
efforts in the courts. Uzbekistan
was not among the countries
named in any version of the president’s travel ban, which largely
targeted
a
number
of
majority-Muslim countries.
Trump responded to the attack
on Twitter, saying it “looks like
another attack by a very sick and
deranged person.’’ He tweeted a
short time later: “We must not
allow ISIS to return, or enter, our
country after defeating them in
the Middle East and elsewhere.
Enough!” ISIS is an acronym for
the Islamic State.
On Tuesday night, Trump said
he was tightening immigrant
screening, tweeting: “I have just
ordered Homeland Security to
step up our already Extreme Vetting Program. Being politically
correct is fine, but not for this!”
There was no immediate indication that the attack had been
directed by the Islamic State.
However, the group has called on
its supporters in Western countries to launch their own attacks,
using anything at hand as weapons, including vehicles.
Inside the rental truck, investigators found a handwritten note
in which Saipov had declared his
allegiance to the Islamic State, according to officials.
Saipov is expected to survive,
meaning investigators will likely
have a chance to question him
about his motive for the attack,
but so far, they said, he appears to
have been a “lone wolf’’ suspect —
someone who acted alone after
being inspired, but not directly
instructed, by the Islamic State.
He had been living in Paterson,
N.J., before the attack, and rented
the vehicle in that state before
driving it into Manhattan, officials
said.
The violence was terrifyingly
similar to vehicle attacks carried
out in Europe, where Islamic State
supporters have used cars and
trucks to strike pedestrians in
crowded streets, a tactic that has
been employed in France, Britain,
Germany, Sweden and Spain.
“This certainly bears all the hallmarks of an ISIS-inspired or alQaeda-inspired attack,” said Rep.
Adam B. Schiff (Calif.), the ranking
Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, whom the FBI
briefed on the attack Tuesday evening. “We have to expect that as the
capital of the caliphate has now
fallen, there are going to be increasing efforts to show that they
remain dangerous and lethal, and
to expand the virtual caliphate.”
Antonio Valasquez, 28, said he
saw the truck speed by as he left a
restaurant and then heard a crash.
“I didn’t really understand, you
know, at first what was happening,” he said. Valasquez said he
heard what seemed to be gunshots
shortly after but couldn’t be sure.
“I was running away.”
An officer from the 1st Precinct
approached Saipov and shot him
in the abdomen, police said. He
was taken to a hospital, but officials did not discuss his condition
or location. The weapons he was
st
Wrecked truck
and bus at
this corner
CH
AM
BE
RS
ST.
1 MILE
Source: Google Earth
brandishing turned out to be a
pellet gun and a paintball gun,
police said.
Rabbi Chaim Zaklos was picking up about half a dozen children
from school to escort them to Hebrew school nearby when he encountered the scene. Police were
pushing people away, and he could
see abandoned bikes and what
appeared to be uprooted trees
nearby. “It was obvious something
drastic was happening, so I just
wanted to get the kids someplace
safe,” said Zaklos, 35.
“This is a very painful day in our
city,’’ said New York Mayor Bill de
Blasio. “Based on the information
we have at this moment, this was
an act of terror, a particularly cowardly act of terror aimed at innocent civilians.”
Saipov moved to the United
States from Uzbekistan about six
years ago, said Dilnoza Abdusamatova, 24, who said Saipov stayed
with her family in Cincinnati for
his first two weeks in the country
because their fathers were friends.
Some officials said he arrived in
2010.
Abdusamatova said Saipov
then moved to Florida to start a
trucking company. Her family
members think he got married
about a year after arriving in the
United States and may now have
two children. Around that time,
she said, he cut off contact with
them. “He stopped talking to us
when he got married,” Abdusam-
THE WASHINGTON POST
atova said.
Saipov had lived in an apartment complex, Heritage at Tampa,
near the Hillsborough River. On
Tuesday evening, two plainclothes
investigators were seen departing
the community, having interviewed several residents and others in the surrounding neighborhood. The investigators declined
to answer any questions.
“Four FBI agents came and told
me he used to live here,” said Venessa Jones, who said she lives in an
apartment above the one Saipov
rented. Neighbors at the complex
said they didn’t know Saipov.
New York officials said they had
no information to suggest that the
attacker had any accomplices or
that there was a further threat to
the city.
Nevertheless, they said, extra
police would be posted around the
city as a precaution, particularly
along the route of the Halloween
Parade, a long-standing tradition
in Manhattan’s Greenwich Village
that attracts big crowds. Officials
said sand trucks, police vehicles
and other equipment would be
used to deter any vehicle attacks at
the parade.
The investigation is being led by
the FBI with the assistance of the
New York Police Department.
“We have recently seen attacks
like this one throughout the
world,’’ said acting homeland security secretary Elaine Duke.
“DHS and its law enforcement
ABOVE: First responders help
a woman injured when a truck
mowed down New Yorkers on a
Lower Manhattan bicycle path
Tuesday, killing several.
BELOW: Authorities
investigate the scene near a
covered body.
partners remain vigilant and committed to safeguarding the American people.’’
Hours after the attack sent New
Yorkers running for their lives,
hundreds of cheerful Halloween
revelers began lining up early to
see the annual parade.
Sarah Butler, 24, said she had
not heard much about the suspected terrorist attack and felt
safe enough with the heavy police
presence. “This is my first Halloween here,” said Butler, a film student. “It’s sad. I hope everyone is
okay, but we shouldn’t let this ruin
everything.”
Ivo Araujo, 72, and a group of
about a dozen drummers hammered out a rhythm along Varick
Street as they prepared for the
parade to begin.
“We heard about it, but what
can you do?” he said when asked
whether he and his group, Manhattan Samba, had any qualms
about making their 27th appearance in the parade. “The cops are
going to take care of us. Nothing
is going to happen. It’s going to be
great.”
Michael Walz, 40, was tapping a
snare next to him. Walz lives in Rio
de Janeiro as well as New York and
said he was used to violent attacks,
in part because he was in Barcelona during a vehicle attack earlier
this year.
A few blocks from the parade,
parents were starting to bring their
children home from trick-or-treating. Among them were Marianne
Aulie, 46, walking with her daughter and her pumpkin-costumed
toddler strapped to her chest.
Aulie had some qualms about
heading out after hearing news of
the attack shortly before they left
the house. She said she generally
felt safe with all the police in the
area but was still nervous.
She noted that such events are
becoming common. “It was unexpected but expected,” she said.
“We can’t let fear take us.”
As she spoke, a large truck
turned a nearby corner. “When
you see a big truck now, you, you
know . . .” She trailed off. A man
who was with her pointed out that
it was a police bomb squad truck.
“Bomb squad!” her daughter
chirped.
renae.merle@washpost.com
devlin.barrett@washpost.com
wesley.lowery@washpost.com
Barrett and Lowery reported from
Washington. Philip Bump in New York,
Jon Silman in Tampa, and Julie Tate,
Ellen Nakashima, Jennifer Jenkins,
Mark Berman and Rachel Siegel in
Washington contributed to this report.
BEBETO MATTHEWS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
KLMNO
METRO
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
High today at
approx. 5 p.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
64°
8 p.m.
48 58 62 59°
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°
°
Precip: 30%
Wind: SE
6-12 mph
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WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
EZ
B
M2
JOHN KELLY’S WASHINGTON
VIRGINIA
OBITUARIES
A D.C. history conference
will include a look at gay
rights and an integrated
19th-century community. B3
A white nationalist arrested
after the violent protest in
Charlottesville is hosting a
radio show from jail. B5
Dennis Banks, a founder
of the American Indian
Movement, spotlighted
long-festering wounds. B6
Ed Gillespie, guru of gerrymandering Latino voters may be soft on Northam
BY
L AURA V OZZELLA
richmond — Republican Ed
Gillespie has had to fend off some
zingers — “Establishment Ed,”
“Enron Ed” — while running for
governor of Virginia.
But “architect of gerrymandering”?
That one fell flat when Democrat Ralph Northam lobbed it at
Gillespie this month during their
final debate. The insult seemed
obscure. And Gillespie brushed
it off with an attempt at humor:
“In my history books, it’s El-
GOP nominee for Va.
governor led 2010 push
for redder redistricting
bridge Gerry who came up with
gerrymandering.”
Gillespie did, in fact, take partisan mapmaking to a new level,
but just try turning that into a
bumper sticker.
While he is better known as
the former chairman of the Re-
publican National Committee, a
Washington lobbyist and a counselor to President George W.
Bush, Gillespie helped pull off a
stunning political coup — one
that gave Republicans unprecedented muscle to reshape the
nation’s congressional maps to
their advantage.
Right after President Barack
Obama’s 2008 win, Gillespie
helped dispirited Republicans
claw back into power one statehouse at a time.
Instead of asking donors for
GILLESPIE CONTINUED ON B2
BY E D O ’ K EEFE,
G REGORY S . S CHNEIDER
AND F ENIT N IRAPPIL
A television ad depicting minority children running from a
pickup truck sporting a bumper
sticker for Virginia Republican
Ed Gillespie was designed to criticize the gubernatorial candidate’s
ties to President Trump — and to
address concerns that Democratic candidate Ralph Northam is
struggling to connect with minority voters, according to people
familiar with the strategy.
Some advocacy groups
worry about Democratic
candidate’s appeal
The ad was removed late Tuesday after a terrorism attack in
New York City involved a pickup
truck running down people on a
bike path.
But before it was removed, it
was designed to appeal to Latino
voters. Public polling shows
Northam easily beating Gillespie
among black and Latino voters,
but a recent private poll shared
widely among minority advocacy
groups sparked worry about the
Democrat’s appeal. Northam’s
campaign urged the groups not to
release the poll’s findings, according to multiple people familiar
with the matter — a point not
disputed by his campaign.
In the weeks since the poll was
conducted, progressive groups
have worked to tie Gillespie to
Trump, whose approval rating
LATINO CONTINUED ON B5
D.C. Youth
Act revamp
o≠ers help
for convicts
Wind fall
ALLOWS LENIENCY,
REHABILITATION
Bill calls for justification
and limits on eligibility
BY
R ACHEL C HASON
A bill to overhaul the District’s
troubled Youth Rehabilitation Act
would limit the number of young
offenders eligible for more lenient
sentences and require judges to
justify — in writing — why they are
giving convicts benefits under the
law.
But the bill also would require
the city to offer new treatment and
services to young-adult offenders,
a change that is being applauded
by juvenile-justice advocates,
many of whom had been openly
critical of adding any restrictions
to the 32-year-old law.
The law currently allows individuals under the age of 22 to
receive shorter sentences and to
have their crimes removed from
the public record.
Although it is called the Youth
Rehabilitation Act, a study by the
Criminal Justice Coordinating
YOUTH ACT CONTINUED ON B3
MICHAEL S. WILLIAMSON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Many fans of fall have been disappointed by the lack of intense leaf colors this year. Mother Nature seems to have sabotaged the show, and
the colors are among the weakest in seven years, attributable to unusually dry weather in August and September. There are exceptions. Tree
biologists say areas in Western Maryland are having a good year. This photo taken near Oakland, Md., in Garrett County proves them right.
A Halloween ghoul in a Montgomery to protect cemeteries
tree, or a faux lynching?
New development
BY
Holiday decoration
causes tension among
neighbors in Va. suburb
BY E LLIE S ILVERMAN
AND T HERESA V ARGAS
Jamie Stevenson was passing
her neighbor’s house on Saturday
when she saw the dark-faced figure hanging between two trees.
She knew it was a Halloween
decoration, but she also saw in it
something more sinister: a lynching.
What occurred in the hours and
days that followed has pitted
neighbors on an affluent Northern
Virginia block against one another, thrust a homeowners association into a conversation about
race and sparked angry accusations online about how people
should respond when their actions, regardless of intent, offend
others. And the tensions have
played out at a time when all kinds
of symbols — Confederate statues,
flags, even the national anthem —
have become flash points across
the country.
In Fairfax County’s Oakton
community, Stevenson was certain she was looking at what she
called “a racist display” but what
her neighbors considered a Halloween ghoul.
She took a picture and began
making calls and sending emails
to her homeowners association
and the Southern Poverty Law
Center in an effort to get it taken
down. She also emailed the homeowners. Stevenson, who is Asian
and who moved into the neighborhood in March, had never met
them when she pressed send.
“What you appear to be displaying is an effigy of a black person
being lynched,” she wrote. “As
your neighbor and a person of
color, I find this racist. I find this
deeply offensive. I’m sure this is
not your intent.
“Would it be possible for you to
remove this racially loaded effigy
from your display for the good of
the neighborhood?”
Stevenson received a response
three hours later.
R ACHEL C HASON
The Montgomery County
Council voted unanimously on
Tuesday to inventory and protect
old cemeteries that could be
affected by new development.
The legislation directs the
county’s Planning Board to create a list of burial sites, to be
updated at least annually. It also
amends county law to require
prompts an inventory
Protesters from Bethesda’s old
Westbard area are challenging
construction of up to 1,200
townhouses and apartments
that may affect burial grounds.
applicants who want to subdivide a property to research the
boundaries of burial sites on
their land and, in most cases,
protect them from development.
Officials said the bill could
help avoid what seems to have
happened in Bethesda’s Westbard neighborhood in the 1960s,
when the construction of a highrise apartment building probCEMETERIES CONTINUED ON B4
Lies to the
FBI net
him 2 years
in prison
Va. man tried to stop
friend from joining ISIS
but misled agents
BY
R ACHEL W EINER
When Soufian Amri found out
his friend Haris Qamar had
bought a plane ticket to join the
Islamic State, he set out to stop
him. When Qamar expressed support for the terrorist group, Amri
told his friend he was an idiot.
Amri even promised to help
Qamar get a degree and a job
where he could do some good.
But when the FBI came to
Amri’s Fairfax gaming center and
asked whether he knew anyone
who had expressed support for
the Islamic State or tried to join
the group, Amri decided he could
not expose a close friend. He lied,
saying he knew only of a “tall, thin
Indian kid” he had briefly met a
long time ago. (Qamar is heavyset
and of Pakistani heritage.)
ISIS CONTINUED ON B4
Courtland
Milloy
He is away. His
column will resume
when he returns.
TENSIONS CONTINUED ON B4
BILL TURQUE/THE WASHINGTON POST
B2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
VIRGINIA
At Gillespie rally, immigrant rights activists lash out
BY
J ENNA P ORTNOY
Outside a rally for Ed Gillespie
with Sen. Marco Rubio in Loudoun County on Monday night,
immigrant rights activists labeled
the Republican candidate for governor racist for a campaign that
they say scapegoats immigrants.
Inside, surrounded by supporters, Gillespie talked about how
much he has in common with
Rubio (R-Fla.), a 2016 candidate
for president popular in the
Northern Virginia suburbs and a
fellow child of immigrants.
The dueling messages came the
same day the Latino Victory Fund
released an ad featuring a pickup
truck flying a Confederate flag
and sporting a bumper sticker for
Gillespie chasing a group of minority children.
The ad is a response to commercials from Gillespie tying his
Democratic opponent, Ralph
Northam, to MS-13 gang violence
and others vowing to protect the
state’s Confederate monuments.
In a plumbing-equipment
warehouse in Sterling, Gillespie
emphasized biographical details
he has in common with Rubio,
who often spoke of his Cuban
American heritage on the 2016
campaign trail. Gillespie’s Irish
grandfather came to America because he found work as a janitor,
he said.
“My parents worked on their
feet all day long in the grocery
store,” Gillespie said. “[Rubio’s]
parents worked on their feet all
day long. His mother was a hotel
maid. His father was a bartender.
He, too, is the son of immigrants.”
“We appreciate and understand the importance of the
American Dream, because our
parents have seen it here firsthand,” he said.
Then he introduced Rubio, but
just before the senator took the
stage, an activist jumped up on
the stage, holding a sign protesting deportations. Sheriff’s deputies quickly hustled her out the
building as the audience clapped.
Within minutes, Rubio alluded
to the immigration controversy,
telling the crowd that Gillespie
would work for them “no matter
where your family came from or
how your last name is pronounced.”
Rubio said he, too, comes from
a community affected by gang
violence and said it would make
no sense to ignore MS-13 in a state
impacted by the gang.
“That would be like talking
PHOTOS BY JAHI CHIKWENDIU/THE WASHINGTON POST
Top: On Monday in Sterling, Va., members of CASA in Action protested an appearance by Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), who was
leading a rally for Ed Gillespie, the Republican gubernatorial candidate. That day, Rep. Barbara Comstock (R-Va.) and Gillespie
also held a rally at the Inspiration Plumbing Co., also in Sterling. Critics say Gillespie is using immigration as a dividing issue.
about organized crime but refusing to talk about the Mafia,” he
said to chuckles from supporters.
Later, he joked about his common Irish heritage with Gillespie,
which is why they call him Marc
O’Rubio.
“In our veins runs the blood of
people who are go-getters of
someone from somewhere who
refused to accept the restrictions
placed upon them,” he said.
Rubio, who won 40 percent of
the vote to President Trump’s
28 percent in Loudoun County
during the Republican presidential primary, smiled when a few
people shouted “Rubio 2020!”
Among his supporters was twoterm Rep. Barbara Comstock (R),
who spoke on behalf of Gillespie
at the start of the hour-long rally.
Last month, the House passed
a bill — introduced by Comstock
— in response to MS-13 violence
that would expand the federal
government’s powers to deport or
detain noncitizen immigrants
who are gang members or are
suspected of gang activity.
The bill drew the ire of immigrant rights groups, including
those who protested the Gillespie
rally.
Before the rally, activists from
left-leaning organizations CASA
in Action, People for the American Way and Indivisible groups
chanted “Back up, back up. We
want freedom, freedom. All these
racist politicians — we don’t need
them, need them.”
Many of them held signs saying
“Gillespie Racist” beneath a
black-and-white
photo
of
Gillespie with a red line through
it.
Luis Aguilar, a community organizer with CASA in Action who
lives in Alexandria, said Gillespie
cannot align himself with Rubio
or New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez, who stumped for him last
week, and profess to understand
the immigrant experience.
Those politicians “absolutely
do not exemplify the regular Latino, the regular immigrant,” he
said. “Who are they? The elite. He
is showing us that he is an establishment Republican seeking to
be Trump Jr. as well.”
Lizet Ocampo, the political director for People for the American
Way who is based in the District,
said Gillespie is trying to win the
election based on racism and fear.
“He is using racist imagery and
language to send his message,”
she said. “When he shows images
of Latino-looking people and says
‘Fear them,’ this is the same thing
Trump did when he went down
the escalator and said Mexicans
are drug dealers and rapists and
criminals. Exactly the same campaign strategy.”
As protesters chanted “Yes we
can!” Rick Canton of Sterling
yelled back “Detain!” “No, you
can’t” and “Not a chance.”
Canton, a first-generation Cuban American who was among
the local GOP activists endorsing
Rubio during the primary, later
said he believed that the protesters stoked division in politics.
“This is not us,” he said. “This is
not America at all. This is not
Virginia at all. These are a bunch
of liars corrupting what we are
trying to do here.”
As he spoke, a man nearby
watched the protesters and commented, “And that woman’s carrying an American flag — that really
makes me sick.”
The election is Nov. 7.
jenna.portnoy@washpost.com
‘Architect of gerrymandering’ Gillespie helped engineer wave of GOP victories
GILLESPIE FROM B1
the big bucks needed to swing
congressional races, they focused on legislative contests in
certain states — those where
Republicans needed to flip only a
few seats to win control of the
legislatures and the mapmaking
that would occur after the
2010 Census.
Named “REDMAP,” the project
helped the GOP win control of 22
state legislatures in 2010, paving
the way for GOP gains in Congress in 2012, even as Obama won
reelection.
To some, it was a triumph, a
bold and perfectly legal tactic
deployed in plain sight of Democrats. To others, it was an affront
to democracy, the root of the
no-compromise politics that’s left
Washington gridlocked. Or some
combination of both.
Liberal MSNBC host Rachel
Maddow gushed over the “political genius” of the scheme, even as
she lamented the fate of “blindsided Democrats” all across the
country.
“Do you mind if I lock you in an
airless vault before we leave here
tonight and never let you out?”
she joked in a 2015 interview with
Chris Jankowski, the GOP strategist who led REDMAP with
Gillespie.
Jankowski, now chief consultant to the Republicans running
for Virginia attorney general and
lieutenant governor alongside
Gillespie, laughed with Maddow
and said it was a “team effort.”
Then he tipped his hat to one
person by name: Gillespie.
Their REDMAP project was
efficient and effective.
“In early 2010, Gillespie and
Jankowski took a PowerPoint
THE DAILY QUIZ
What laboratory tool did
researchers from the Chinese
Academy of Sciences in Beijing
use to alter the DNA of pigs?
(Hint: The answer is in today’s Food section.)
EARN 5 POINTS: Find the answer, then go to
washingtonpost.com/postpoints and click on
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presentation on the road,” wrote
David Daley, author of a book on
REDMAP focused on the efforts
of Gillespie, Jankowski and GOP
strategist Karl Rove. “They met
with Wall Street donors, oil magnates, hedge-funders, Washington lobbyists and trade associations — anyone open to an audacious, long-term play.”
“Gillespie is the rainmaker, really,” Daley said in an interview
with The Post. “Goes off on a
year-long fundraising tour and
shakes the trees and comes up
with $30 million at least. . . . ‘You
will save hundreds of millions if
you fund this instead of everything else.’ ”
The plan was no secret. Rove
laid it out in a 2010 Wall Street
Journal commentary sub-headlined: “He who controls redistricting can control Congress.”
Gerrymandering is gaining
new attention now, as the Supreme Court considers whether
extreme partisan mapmaking is
constitutional. Two lawsuits over
Virginia’s legislative maps are
pending, one before a federal
three-judge panel, the other before the state Supreme Court.
Former president Obama and
his first attorney general, Eric H.
Holder Jr., are leading Democrats’ call for fairer maps. At an
Oct. 19 rally for Northam in
Richmond, Obama lamented
how districts are drawn in a way
that forces politicians to cater to
extremes.
“Ralph wants to end the practice of gerrymandering so our
districts are drawn in a nonpartisan way,” Obama said. “We
shouldn’t have politicians choosing their voters; we should have
voters choosing those who would
serve them. That’s one more dif-
ference between him and his
opponent.”
Holder, chairman of the National Democratic Redistricting
Committee, stumped in Norfolk,
Virginia Beach and Richmond on
Saturday and Sunday for the
Democratic ticket.
“During the last round of national redistricting, Ed Gillespie
was the chief architect of a plan to
lock in political power for Republicans and lock out the voice of
the voters in Virginia and states
around the country,” Holder
wrote in a statement to The
Washington Post. “Gerrymandering is a threat to our democracy. It
seems arcane to many voters.
“We, as voters, often don’t
understand the importance of
redistricting and gerrymandering,” Daley said. The book gets its
title from a profane term for
political sabotage. Its subtitle:
“The true story behind the secret
plan to steal America’s democracy.”
“It’s a concept that put us all to
sleep in civics class in high
school,” said Daley, former editor
in chief at Salon. “But that’s why
the politicians have been able to
exploit it — because it seems to us
it’s simply politics as usual, or it’s
boring, or it’s inside baseball. It’s
“Ed Gillespie literally called his project REDMAP.
You can’t get much more blunt . . . than that.”
Christina Freundlich, spokeswoman
for Gillespie’s opponent, Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam (D)
creates districts in which the
electoral outcome is predetermined for one party, effectively
diminishing the voting power of
citizens and providing incentives
for politicians to cater to the
fringes of their parties.”
The winner of the Nov. 7 governor’s race will control, along with
Virginia’s currently GOP-led General Assembly, how the state’s
maps are drawn after the
2020 Census.
Holder’s group has donated
$950,000 to the Democratic Party
of Virginia this year. Republicans
say the giving shows that the
Democrats are merely trying to
play catch-up, not pushing for
nonpartisan maps.
Even with renewed focus on
gerrymandering, the issue still
none of those things. These district lines are the building blocks
of our democracy. And when they
get twisted in this way, it twists
the very notion of republican
democracy into something that is
unrecognizable.”
In response to questions about
Gillespie’s role in REDMAP, campaign spokesman David Abrams
issued a statement: “Ed will closely assess proposals for reforms to
Virginia’s existing redistricting
process. In his ten years in office,
Lt. Gov. Northam has done nothing to eliminate partisan redistricting maps. In fact, he’s voted
to gerrymander his own district.”
Abrams is referring to
Northam’s vote in 2011 for a state
Senate map that made his swing
district more blue. It was drawn
under a deal struck between leaders of the GOP-dominated House
of Delegates and the state Senate,
then under Democratic control.
Republicans got to draw maps for
the House, Democrats for the
Senate.
“Ralph Northam has supported nonpartisan redistricting
since his first campaign in 2007,
and 2011 was an attempt at bipartisan compromise,” said Christina Freundlich, a Northam
spokeswoman. “Ed Gillespie literally called his project REDMAP.
You can’t get much more blunt
about gerrymandering than that.”
In a May interview with The
Washington
Post,
Gillespie
pushed back against the notion
that REDMAP undermined democracy.
“We were very successful,”
Gillespie said. “And there was no
doubt in 2010 we put a focus on
state legislatures that would have
a significant impact in the redistricting process. I think it was a
smart plan. No secret about it. . . .
I’m proud of the work that we did
there, and I’m proud of the work
that state legislatures are doing.
You know, we have, I think, now
69 of the 99 state legislative
chambers are in Republican
hands, including the state House
and the state Senate in Virginia.”
Jankowski declined to be interviewed.
Both parties have long histories of gerrymandering — an
ignominious tradition that goes
back to Virginia’s first governor.
Patrick Henry drew the
boundaries of Virginia’s 5th Congressional District in an unsuccessful bid to keep James Madison out of the House, said Brian
Cannon, executive director of
the redistricting reform group
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OneVirginia2021.
Modern gerrymanderers have
tools that could not have been
imagined by Henry in 1788 or
Gerry, the Massachusetts governor Gillespie invoked in the debate, who gave partisan mapmaking its name with the salamander-shaped district he ordered up
in 1812. And certain advances
arrived just in time for REDMAP,
which mashed up data on voting,
education, income, magazine
subscriptions and even consumer
purchases to guide mapmaking,
Cannon said.
“Technology got really good, so
they were able, with their gains,
to exploit it better than anybody
ever had before,” Cannon said.
“They know you vote in Republican primaries but also know you
subscribe to Guns and Ammo and
buy Crest.”
Republicans first put the maps
to the test in 2012. And they
worked, despite Obama’s reelection and Democratic victories in
69 percent of U.S. Senate elections that November. Despite the
fact that Democrats won more
than 1 million more votes than
Republicans in House races
around the country, the GOP
scored a 33-seat majority in the
113th Congress.
The REDMAP group gave
some of the credit to the quality
of their candidates and other
factors, but at the heart of it all
were the maps tilted in their
favor, strategists said.
“All components of a successful congressional race . . . rest on
the congressional district lines,”
the REDMAP website declared,
“and this was an area where
Republicans had an unquestioned advantage.”
laura.vozzella@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B3
M2
Conference will present unearthed tidbits from the District’s past
L O C A L D IG ES T
MARYLAND
Attorney general seeks
price-gouging victims
If you have been the victim of
price gouging for generic drugs,
state Attorney General Brian E.
Frosh (D) wants to hear from you.
Frosh is joining with
Maryland Health Care for All, a
health-care advocacy group, to
identify possible price-gouging
victims, a move made possible by
a new state law allowing the
attorney general to sue drug
companies that dramatically
increase the price of off-patent
or generic drugs.
Maryland is the first state in the
country to give its attorney general
the ability to take legal action
against the drug companies.
— Ovetta Wiggins
Man dies of injury from
car striking building
A man died one week after he
was injured by a car that plowed
through a restaurant in Upper
Marlboro, Md.
Isiah Pugh, 73, was one of six
people taken to a hospital after a
driver lost control of a car and
crashed into the side of Babes
Boys Tavern on Oct. 24 about
1:10 p.m., according to Prince
George’s County police.
— Lynh Bui
Robbery at Wheaton
mall last month
Robbers followed a woman
from the food court at the mall in
Wheaton, Md., Oct. 11 to a garage
stairwell, where they pulled a gun
and, wearing masks, stole her
wallet, officials said.
The robbery happened about
9 p.m. at the Westfield Wheaton
Mall. Montgomery County police
released a surveillance photo
Monday.
— Dana Hedgpeth
VIRGINIA
Teen falls to death
from parking garage
A teenager was fatally injured
Friday evening when he
accidentally fell from the upper
level of a parking garage in
Reston, Fairfax County police
said.
They said Robin Buritica
Carvajal, 18, of Woodbridge, was
“hanging out with a friend” when
the incident occurred in the
11900 block of Freedom Drive in
the Reston Town Center.
In 1869, D.C. real
estate investors
N.F. Onion and
A.B. Butts started
developing land
around Fort Reno,
John
part of the
Kelly’s
necklace of
Washington fortifications that
ringed
Washington
during the Civil War.
“The interesting thing about
this neighborhood was that it
was integrated,” said Alcione
Amos, curator of the Anacostia
Community Museum. “There
were black families that bought
lots, and white and blacks were
living there from the very
beginning.”
You can get an idea of what
eventually happened from the
title of the presentation Alcione
will give Saturday at the 44th
annual Conference on D.C.
History: “Destroying the Reno
Neighborhood.” It’s one of more
than two dozen offerings Friday
and Saturday at the conference,
held at the New York Avenue
Presbyterian Church.
Reno City — the development’s
original name — was in what we
today call Tenleytown, then a
decidedly rural section of the
District. Lots were as cheap as
$12.50. By 1926, there were 375
homes — mainly wood-frame
structures, many with vegetable
gardens. Ninety-percent of the
homeowners were black.
That is not the case today. It
isn’t that whites live in houses
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE
This house once stood in Reno City, an integrated neighborhood
that was demolished to construct what is today Fort Reno Park.
once owned by blacks. It’s that
there are no houses at all. What
happened?
“The powers that be were
describing it as an ill-shaped and
ill-advised subdivision
detrimental to the surrounding
neighborhood,” Alcione said.
Houses were taken by eminent
domain and demolished to build
an underground water reservoir,
Deal Junior High and, finally,
Fort Reno Park. By then, the
original black families had
moved elsewhere.
Before Stonewall
In 1964, a group of about a dozen
picketers met in front of the
White House. The instructions
from the protest’s organizer had
been clear: Men should wear
suits and ties and be clean
shaven; women were to wear
skirts or dresses, no slacks.
And on no account were there
to be public displays of affection
among the protesters. For a man
to hold another’s hand or a
woman to kiss her female
partner would create the wrong
kind of publicity, explained
Peter Bonds, who Friday at the
conference will present
“Stonewall on the Potomac: Gay
Liberation Arrives in the Nation’s
Capital.”
The U.S. gay rights movement
is commonly said to have started
on June 29, 1969, when patrons
of the Stonewall Inn fought back
after a police raid at the
Greenwich Village club.
Said Peter: “What I was trying
to say in my work is that there
was stuff happening before that
in lots of places, but really
especially in Washington, D.C.”
The 1964 protest, and later
ones, were organized by Frank
Kameny, an astronomer fired
from his U.S. government job
because he was gay.
“He keeps these protests up,”
Peter said.
Then came Stonewall.
“That kind of ushered in this
new wave of activism,” Peter said.
“Younger activists said: ‘We don’t
have to be so cautious and so
conservative. We can be a little
more risky.’ ”
The movement became more
confrontational, a marked
contrast to Kameny’s early
efforts, where protest signs said
nothing more combative than
“15 million American
Homosexuals Protest Federal
Treatment!”
Peter said he hopes his
research will help rescue
Washington’s gay rights efforts
from obscurity.
Cheers!
The people who lived in the
narrow, shotgun-style house at
1229 E St. SE liked their beer.
How else to explain the 15 intact
beer bottles — and fragments of
many others — found when
archaeologists started scraping
away the earth around it last
year?
“It’s always exciting to find
something that’s intact,” said
Julianna Jackson, who on
Friday will present “Original DC
Brau: An Examination of Beer
Bottles at the Shotgun House,”
with collaborator Nikki Gregg.
“We knew the first owner was
a German immigrant,” Julianna
said. “Successive owners were
also German immigrants.” Some
were brewery workers.
In the 19th century,
Washington had a vibrant beer
scene, with breweries all over the
city. Among the bottles found at
the E Street house was one from
the National Capital Brewery. It
features a handsome design
embossed in the brown glass:
George Washington above an
eagle.
There’s a Safeway on that
brewery site now, and Julianna
said the archaeology team would
often run over there to pick up
lunch. In a nice bit of continuity,
the Safeway also sells beer.
The D.C. history conference
kicks off Thursday evening at the
National Museum of American
History with a free lecture from
Marya Annette McQuirter titled
“Washington, D.C. 1968:
Activism, Art and Architecture.”
To register for Friday and
Saturday’s sessions — $30 ($35 at
the door) — visit dchistory.org.
john.kelly@washpost.com
Twitter: @johnkelly
For previous columns, visit
washingtonpost.com/johnkelly.
THE DISTRICT
5 suspected cases of mumps reported at American University
BY
S ARAH L ARIMER
Five suspected cases of
mumps have been reported at
American University, the school
confirmed Tuesday.
“So far, all affected students
have been isolated for five days
after their initial symptoms, in
accordance with D.C. Department of Health guidelines,” David Reitman, medical director
for the AU Student Health Center, said in an email to the AU
community. “The D.C. Department of Health has contacted the
affected students to identify any
other potentially affected students who might be at direct risk
of contracting mumps.”
Mark Story, an AU spokesman,
said samples were taken from AU
students dealing with suspected
mumps cases.
The D.C. Department of
Health sent those samples to the
Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention, said Story, calling it
standard procedure.
The news at AU comes not
long after students at the University of Virginia were urged to
take precautions after officials
identified two suspected cases of
mumps there.
Christopher Holstege, executive director of the Department
of Student Health at U-Va., alerted students of the possible appearance of the contagious disease.
The university has also notified faculty and staff, a U-Va.
spokesman said in an email to
The Washington Post.
Symptoms of the mumps in-
clude fever, headaches, muscle
aches and swollen or tender
glands under a person’s ears, the
CDC says on its website. These
symptoms usually occur 16 to 18
days after someone is infected.
“Given that students with
mumps will be isolated for five
days and asked not to participate
in university activities during
their period of contagion, we
want to help you protect yourself
from the virus,” Holstege’s email
to U-Va. students said. “The best
protection against mumps is the
mumps vaccine, usually MMR. If
you have not completed the twoshot series, you should do so
now.”
The MMR vaccine is for measles, mumps and rubella. In the
email, students were also given
tips on how to avoid contracting
the disease, which spreads
through saliva or mucus, according to the CDC.
Those tips included handwashing, directing a cough into
an elbow or a tissue, and not
sharing items that have had
contact with saliva.
Story, the AU spokesman, said
the university is communicating
with its students through email
as well as through its health
center, trying to educate them
about how mumps is transmitted.
“It’s, ‘Don’t share a drink,’
‘Don’t share utensils,’ ‘Don’t
share something that someone
else’s saliva could be on,’ ” he
said.
A student at the University of
Maryland was diagnosed with
mumps in 2016, and university
officials at College Park were
tracking other suspected cases at
the time.
This year, there have been
more than 4,000 reported cases
of mumps infections in the country, according to the CDC.
Federal disease trackers have
chronicled major mumps outbreaks on college campuses in
recent years.
In 2014, a mumps outbreak
erupted on the campus of Ohio
State University before spreading to surrounding communities
in central Ohio, with a total of
more than 400 people infected at
the school and in the community.
During the 2015-2016 academic year, two large outbreaks
struck at universities in Iowa and
Illinois.
sarah.larimer@washpost.com
— Dana Hedgpeth
THE DISTRICT
Bike trail robbers get
bank card, 52 cents
A pedestrian was robbed on
the Metropolitan Branch Trail
near S Street NE about 9:30 on
Monday morning, when one
person grabbed him from behind
and another went through his
pockets, police said.
The robbers fled with the
victim’s bank card and 52 cents,
police said.
— Martin Weil
L O T T E RIE S
Results from Oct. 31
DISTRICT
Mid-Day Lucky Numbers:
Mid-Day DC-4:
Mid-Day DC-5:
Lucky Numbers (Mon.):
Lucky Numbers (Tue.):
DC-4 (Mon.):
DC-4 (Tue.):
DC-5 (Mon.):
DC-5 (Tue.):
3-1-9
8-2-0-9
4-8-6-1-7
9-7-3
0-3-5
8-1-0-1
6-3-8-2
0-0-3-2-2
7-5-6-6-9
MARYLAND
Day/Pick 3:
5-8-8
Pick 4:
7-2-1-1
Night/Pick 3 (Mon.):
7-9-2
Pick 3 (Tue.):
0-0-1
Pick 4 (Mon.):
9-9-3-3
Pick 4 (Tue.):
0-7-0-2
Multi-Match (Mon.): 12-16-20-21-34-42
Match 5 (Mon.):
2-7-13-31-36 *22
Match 5 (Tue.):
9-12-13-20-34 *38
5 Card Cash:
QH-3S-QD-9H-3C
VIRGINIA
Day/Pick-3:
Pick-4:
Cash-5 (Tue.):
Night/Pick-3 (Mon.):
Pick-3 (Tue.):
Pick-4 (Mon.):
Pick-4 (Tue.):
Cash-5 (Mon.):
Cash-5 (Tue.):
7-1-2
7-8-4-3
8-12-26-32-33
3-1-6
6-1-6
6-3-7-7
9-0-3-7
1-9-16-18-33
11-12-22-24-31
MULTI-STATE GAMES
Cash 4 Life:
Mega Millions:
Megaplier:
Lucky for Life:
*Bonus Ball
‡Lucky Ball
6-22-23-36-42 ¶2
6-28-31-52-53 **12
4x
2-12-22-40-46 ‡10
**Mega Ball
¶Cash Ball
For late drawings and out-of-area results,
check washingtonpost.com/lottery
Bowser agreed to reform Youth Act after Post exposé on abuses
YOUTH ACT FROM B1
Council found that the District
does not have programs specifically tailored to rehabilitating youth
who are sentenced under the law.
“For years, we’ve called it the
Youth Act and left out the R,” said
D.C. Council member Charles Allen (D-Ward 6), who chairs the
council’s judiciary committee and
authored the legislation to overhaul the act. “It’s like the rehabilitation part was just forgotten.”
Allen and Mayor Muriel E.
Bowser (D) asked the criminal justice council to study the Youth
Rehabilitation Act following The
Washington Post’s investigation
that found hundreds of youngadult offenders who had been provided leniency under the law later
went on to rob, rape or murder.
Bowser, D.C. Attorney General
Karl A. Racine and the council
pledged to work together to reform
the law, the shortcomings of which
they said they had not been aware
of before The Post’s reporting.
A key provision of Allen’s bill
would eliminate a requirement
that D.C. Superior Court judges
decide at sentencing whether
young offenders should be eligible
to have their crimes removed from
the public record. Offenders
would instead serve their full sentences before the judge determined whether their records
could be cleared.
The bill would also require the
mayor’s office to submit a strategic
plan to the council by Jan. 1, 2019,
“to provide comprehensive treatment and services to youth offenders and youth and young adults at
risk of becoming youth offenders.”
Kevin Donahue, Bowser’s deputy mayor for public safety, said at a
public hearing Thursday that the
mayor’s office supports Allen’s legislation and is committed to exploring “additional programming
opportunities” for young offenders and those at risk of becoming
offenders.
Racine’s office also supports Allen’s bill, which would amend the
existing law. Seema Gajwani, special counsel to Racine, said the
new legislation “honors the com-
passion of the original law, while
protecting public safety.”
Eddie Ellis, who was convicted
of manslaughter when he was 16
and sentenced under the Youth
Rehabilitation Act, testified at the
hearing Thursday that the new
requirement for education and
job-training programs would ease
the transition of leaving prison.
“When we come home, a lot of
us don’t have the strength to remain strong if we can’t get a job,”
said Ellis, who spent 15 years being
shipped to prisons around the
country and emerged without basic life skills, including how to ride
the Metro. “There would have
been fewer struggles if those programs were in place.”
At the same time, Ellis said he
did benefit from having his records sealed as part of the terms of
his sentencing under the Youth
Rehabilitation Act. He said not
having employers know about his
youthful conviction allowed him
to find steady work. He now runs a
nonprofit organization dedicated
to youth mentorship and helping
those who have been incarcerated
reenter society.
Ellis said his success story is one
of the many that was not reflected
in The Post’s series, which focused
on the failings of the law, including the 121 defendants previously
sentenced under the Youth Rehabilitation Act who were charged
with murder from 2010 to 2016.
“There was a fear factor after
the articles were written,” Ellis
said. “There were people who
wanted to take the Youth Act away
completely. I’m glad council member Allen stood fast and brought
together this broad coalition.”
Allen said he would take into
consideration requests from Racine’s office and criminal-justice
reform advocates who want to
raise the age of eligibility for leniency under the law from 22 to 24.
In her testimony, Gajwani said
brain development research
shows that up to age 24, young
adults “continue to make risky,
immature decisions that might
not reflect who they will be once
fully mature.”
Research also shows that young
adults up to age 24 are “more
amenable to rehabilitation than
their adult peers,” she said. Bowser’s Summer Youth Employment
Program already includes 18- to
24-year-olds.
Donahue said during questioning at the hearing that although he
could not offer a formal position
on whether Bowser might be open
to increasing the age of eligibility,
he recognizes that “the unique
needs of an individual do not magically end at 18 or 22.”
Criminal-justice reform advocates also oppose a provision of
the legislation that would exclude
those convicted of certain sex
crimes — first- or second-degree
sexual crimes, or sexual assault
against a minor — from being
eligible for leniency. The current
law excludes people convicted of
murder. Advocates said judges
should have discretion on whether to exclude people on a case-bycase bases.
“Ending mass incarceration
cannot occur while excluding serious crimes from sentencing reforms,” said Nazgol Ghandnoosh,
a research analyst at the Sentencing Project, in her testimony.
“Mandatory minimum sentences
are ineffective and unfair. This is
true for all crimes, including sex
offenses and crimes of violence.”
But Denise Krepp, the advisory
neighborhood commissioner for
the Hill East neighborhood, delivered a passionate defense for excluding those convicted of rape.
Krepp’s neighbor, a 40-year-old
college professor, was brutally
raped in 2015 by Antwon Pitt, who
had been sentenced under the
Youth Act and whose story was
highlighted in the Post series.
“I don’t need studies to tell me
that victims suffer,” Krepp said.
“This is a story I’ve heard over and
over again.”
Allen said although he respects
the opinion of advocates who want
all crimes to be eligible for leniency and for judges to have complete
discretion, he believes that murder and rape are crimes so harmful
that they must be excluded.
“The victim of that rape will
never be able to seal and turn off
what happened to them,” Allen
said. “It will have a lasting impact
and be something they carry for
the rest of their life.”
rachel.chason@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
Neighbor sees something sinister in Halloween array
TENSIONS FROM B1
“Jamie, you are right,” it began.
“It is not my intent to offend anyone.
. . . I never realized the Monster in
the tree had darker skin. If you see it
up close it is indeed a Monster with
blood clawed head and face. . . . I
have my entire garage full of items I
am frantically preparing for Halloween and will spend most of the
day Tuesday setting up for Halloween. I can’t promise I will have it
down by Halloween but I can promise you this — I will NEVER ever put
it up again.”
The man who wrote the email
spoke on the condition of anonymity because he and his wife now fear
for their family’s safety. But he said
he went outside in the rain on Sunday to take the figure down.
He said he never intended for the
“ghoul” to be perceived as racist. He
has included it before in the elaborate display the family has put up
for about 20 years, one that draws
hundreds of costumed children
from the neighborhood and beyond, he said.
After he sent the email and removed the figure, he said, he hoped
that would satisfy his neighbor. Instead, he said, she posted a flier
online that labeled his family as
racist and included their address.
The flier, which appeared on
Stevenson’s Facebook page Monday, features a picture of a real
lynching from 1889 next to a photo
of the already removed Halloween
display. Underneath are the words,
“RACISM and HATE have no place
in our neighborhood.” It asks peo-
JAMIE STEVENSON
An interpretation of this
hanging Halloween display,
which has been removed, has
divided a neighborhood in Va.
ple to boycott the family’s home on
Oct. 31. It also encourages people
to reach out to the president of the
homeowners association, Richard
Cramond, and includes his email
and phone number.
Stevenson said Cramond hadn’t
responded to her concerns when
she posted the flier and later
emailed her to say there was no
reason to take action because the
display had been removed.
Cramond, reached Tuesday by
phone, said he hadn’t talked to all
the people involved.
“It’s a good neighborhood,” Cramond said. “Until I know more, I
really can’t say anything.”
Leisa Branton, a longtime neighbor, said she comes to see the display with her family every Halloween and never thought the hanging
figure had any racist overtones.
“We never looked at it that way. I
mean, maybe it’s our ignorance, but
we thought it was ghouls and goblins,” she said.
Branton, 58, was dressed as a
ladybug Tuesday and didn’t hesitate
to return to the house. She was
saddened by the furor and the way it
was affecting the family. “They put a
lot of decorations up and a lot of
time into it,” she said.
When Stevenson and her partner
were looking to buy a house, she
said, the area appealed to them in
part because of its diversity. Among
their neighbors are interracial and
same-sex couples. But if she had
been househunting at this time of
year and had seen the hanging figure, she said, she never would have
settled in the neighborhood, where
houses can cost $750,000 and
above.
Stevenson said she was told there
had been some complaints about
the hanging figure in the past, but
she acknowledged that in recent
conversations with her neighbors,
many rejected her interpretation of
it. Their reaction disappointed her
but did not surprise her.
“I expected it because when you
point out racism, people have a
choice to make: They either acknowledge it and have to do something about it, or they deny it and
are complicit in it,” she said. “Whenever minorities bring up issues of
race, they’re told they’re hypersensitive or they are blowing things out
of proportion.”
She said she knows the repercussions could stretch long past Hal-
loween. On Monday night, she had
already seen some backlash. Someone ordered pizza to her address to
be paid “with cash on delivery,” and
she received alerts about attempts
to hack into her Facebook account.
She also received a knock on the
door from her neighbor, who wanted to talk face to face. The encounter
ended with Stevenson filing a police
report, saying she felt threatened.
The family gave a different version of that encounter but said
they, too, are scared now that their
information has been made public.
“I fear for the safety of my kids
and the safety of my house,” said the
woman who talked to Stevenson. “It
was never intended to be what she
turned it into.”
The Halloween display began as
an activity they did with their own
children and grew as they saw how
much other young people in the
neighborhood enjoyed it.
As darkness fell Tuesday, in hope
that candy-seeking children would
still come to the house, she drew
freckles on her face as her husband
put up the final decorations, including a clown in an electrocution
chair and a “chop shop” of strobe-lit
dismembered body parts. Later, he
dressed as a mad scientist and presided over the body parts. “May I
offer you a hand?” he said to kids
walking by.
He left the figure that loomed the
largest over their Halloween celebration where he had tossed it
three days earlier, on the floor of the
garage.
ellie.silverman@washpost.com
theresa.vargas@washpost.com
THE DISTRICT
Georgetown students delay vote to defund group
BY
M ARY H UI
A marathon hearing at Georgetown University that started Monday evening and stretched well
past midnight ended because the
building had to be locked up, with
no decision on whether to defund
a pro-marriage campus group accused of fostering hatred and intolerance.
Love Saxa had been the subject
of a complaint filed by two students last month in which they
argued that the group’s promotion
of traditional heterosexual marriage discriminates against LGBT
relationships at the university in
the District. The group’s existence
as an officially recognized university club now hangs in the balance
after the Student Activities Commission decided to adjourn the
meeting without a vote. As of early
Tuesday morning, the committee
had not decided on a date to reconvene for a final decision.
Love Saxa advocates for marriage as “a monogamous and permanent union between a man and
a woman,” the group states in its
constitution. That definition of
marriage, coincidentally, aligns
with that espoused by the Catholic
Church, raising the question of
how administrators at Georgetown, the United States’ oldest
Catholic and Jesuit institution of
higher learning, will handle the
controversy if it eventually comes
before them.
In their complaint, Jasmin
Ouseph, a junior from Fort Lauderdale, and Chad Gasman, a
sophomore from Los Angeles, argued that Love Saxa’s definition of
marriage excludes and dehumanizes people in the LGBT community. They charge that Love Saxa
violates university standards governing sanctioned student groups
and demand that it be defunded
and removed as an officially sanctioned student group.
Both Ouseph and Gasman declined to comment Monday evening.
At Monday night’s hearing, the
complainants and Love Saxa
made their cases before the panel
of student commissioners.
The complainants repeated
much of what they had spelled out
in a 10-page document filed last
month. Quoting directly from
Love Saxa’s constitution, they
charged that the group’s definition of same-sex marriage is homophobic and hateful.
They also argued that defunding and withdrawing official recognition from Love Saxa would
not violate free speech, because
the group would still be allowed to
exist and remain active in an unofficial capacity.
They cited the student group
H*yas for Choice, which describes
itself as “pro-choice, pro-reproductive justice” and has an active
campus presence despite not being officially recognized by the
university.
Love Saxa, in response, argued
that its events this semester have
focused on sexualized campus cultures and the prevalence of pornography in society, and have not
actively fostered hate or intolerance.
The group raised the larger
question of what the complainants’ demands would mean for the
university. Love Saxa, the group
argued, shares the same Catholic
and Jesuit values with Georgetown, and to say that the group is
intolerant would amount to accusing the university of intolerance.
The fundamental question, the
group said, is whether Georgetown recognizes the traditional
Catholic version of marriage —
and if not, then can Georgetown
still call itself a Catholic university?
For now, these questions remain unanswered.
Amelia Irvine, a junior from
Phoenix and the president of Love
Saxa, said she had been expecting
a decision and was disappointed
that the hearing had ended without a vote. She added she was “not
feeling confident” about the fate of
her group after hearing the commission’s deliberations.
The student-run activities commission allocates about $350,000
to more than 110 student organizations annually, according to its
website. Love Saxa receives about
$250 annually in funding, according to the Hoya, and would stand
to lose access to this money and
other university benefits if it is no
longer an officially recognized student group.
In the run-up to the hearing,
prominent Catholic scholars
voiced support for Love Saxa.
The Rev. James Martin, author
of a book on promoting dialogue
between the Catholic Church and
the LGBT community, told the
Catholic News Agency that for “a
true dialogue to happen around
LGBT issues, especially at Catholic
universities,” all participants
should engage in open dialogue
and treat one another “respectfully and lovingly.”
Robert George, a professor of
jurisprudence at Princeton University and a leading conservative
Christian intellectual, called the
effort to defund Love Saxa “illiberal — even authoritarian,” which is
a “matter of grave concern for
honorable people across the ideological spectrum.”
Irvine’s boyfriend, Michael
Khan, is a senior from Buffalo,
N.Y., and a member of Love Saxa.
He said Monday that while he
thinks the majority of Georgetown
students disagree with the group’s
stance on marriage, there is also a
“good portion” of the student body
that supports Love Saxa’s right to
speak as a recognized student
group.
Amri asked his business partner, Michael Queen, to lie as well.
Now they are both convicted felons, sentenced this month to two
years in prison.
“These are serious times,”
Judge Leonie M. Brinkema said
during Amri’s sentencing last Friday. “And people have to be cooperative.”
But John Zwerling, an attorney
for Amri, argued that Brinkema’s
sentence would only make Muslims more fearful of cooperating.
“The message this case sends is
clear,” he said after the court
hearing. “If you’re a young Muslim, if you thwarted your friend
from joining ISIS and the FBI
comes to talk to you, tell them you
have nothing to say.”
For the past two years, Amri
and Queen have together run the
Cave, a storefront in Fairfax
where people gather to play video
games. Qamar was a frequent
customer and sometimes helped
out with the business.
Both Amri, 31, and Queen, 28,
said that they had no idea Qamar
had been attempting to actively
help the Islamic State through a
confidential informant they
knew as Ali. At Ali’s instigation,
Qamar bought gift cards he
thought would be used by terrorists to send messages and took
photos of Washington-area landmarks he believed were for a
propaganda video. He was sentenced this year to 81/2 years in
prison.
Prosecutors stressed that Qamar said shocking things, including that he would like to chop off
heads and drink “a blood slurpee”
for the Islamic State. Had he been
involved in a true terrorist plot,
prosecutors said, his friends
would have stood by while people
died. They let Qamar use the
Internet at their business, even
after he was banned by Twitter for
Prosecutors stressed
that Qamar said
shocking things,
including that he would
like to chop off heads
and drink “a blood
slurpee” for the Islamic
State.
celebrating mass murder.
“In this case, Queen and Amri
not only discounted Qamar’s
gruesome Twitter activity, his
love of violent ISIS videos, and his
attempt to travel to join ISIS, but
also openly lied about it to the
FBI,” prosecutors Colleen Garcia
and Gordon Kromberg wrote in a
court filing. ISIS is another name
for the Islamic State.
In follow-up interviews, when
it became clear Qamar was the
focus of an investigation, Amri
and Queen came clean. Amri said
that he never thought Qamar
would act on his violent words,
even if he had made it to the
Middle East.
“[It’s] hard when you know
someone and you can feel it in
your heart that that person is
really a good person and that he
has just kind of warped viewpoints on a lot of things,” Amri
told an agent, according to court
filings. “I love the guy.”
Despite his supposed commitment to a Sunni group that has
targeted Shiite Muslims, Qamar
treated the game store’s “Iraqi
Shiite customers . . . so well and
so nice,” Amri told the FBI agent.
“It breaks my heart.”
In court, Amri apologized. “I
didn’t have the right to make that
decision,” he said.
Amri early on had cheered the
Islamic State, thinking it was
defending Sunni Muslims against
the Syrian regime of Bashar al-Assad. His Google Play profile photo
was an Islamic State flag. But
friend Antoine Bridges wrote in a
letter to the court that Amri
changed his mind when he
learned of the atrocities being
committed, in particular the beheading of photojournalist James
Foley in August 2014. He would
tell Qamar he was an American,
that he “needed a reality check,”
Bridges said.
Amri told the FBI he thought of
Qamar as a “brother” and felt
obligated to try to steer him in the
right direction. When Qamar
bought a plane ticket to Turkey in
2014, Amri said he told him to go
to his parents and apologize; they
took his passport away. He encouraged Qamar to focus on
school and a career in civil engineering, saying he was planning
to start a granite business and
would give his friend a job.
Kayla Merlino wrote to the
court that she was suspicious of
Islam when she started dating
Amri last year and engaged him
in deep conversations about politics and religion. She said that
Amri warned her about Qamar
but said he thought his friend
would soon outgrow his “really
polarizing political viewpoints
we can’t stand.”
Merlino now also works at the
Cave. She said the business is
likely to close while Amri and
Queen are in prison, although
other co-owners hope to keep it
open.
Other friends and family emphasized Amri’s kindness.
“He is the person I would call if
my car broke down in the middle
of the night and I needed a lift. He
is the person who would run to
pick up my daughter from school
if I was running late or stuck in
traffic,” his brother-in-law wrote.
“He is dependable and his support is unlimited and unconditional.”
Amri would let homeless people sleep in his game store or help
out in exchange for food and
computer use, Bridges wrote.
He is “generous,” Amri’s mother wrote — “sometimes to a fault.”
rachel.weiner@washpost.com
NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
VIRGINIA
Race to unseat Comstock
gets its 9th Democrat
BY
J ENNA P ORTNOY
A former federal prosecutor has
joined the crowded field of Democrats seeking the nomination to
challenge Rep. Barbara Comstock
(R-Va.) next year.
Paul Pelletier, who spent nearly
27 years with the Justice Department, is the ninth Democrat to
join a midterm race that could be
among the nation’s most competitive.
During his career, Pelletier focused on drug trafficking and
health-care fraud, and he directed
high-profile public corruption investigations of lobbyist Jack
Abramoff and U.S. Reps. Robert
W. Ney and William J. Jefferson.
Pelletier, 61, said Congress
made it possible for him to prosecute criminals, using laws such
as the Sarbanes-Oxley Act’s accounting and disclosure rules. But
he said today’s members are unwilling to work together to pass
similar reforms.
“When you look at congressional approval ratings, they poll
horribly,” he said. “I think that
some people are getting the message, ‘We don’t want this anymore.’ ”
Pelletier’s Democratic opponents have a head start on fundraising, a key factor in a district
partially located in Washington’s
pricey media market.
Leading the money race are
anti-human-trafficking activist
Alison Friedman, Army veteran
Dan Helmer, communications
strategist Lindsey Davis Stover
and state Sen. Jennifer T. Wexton
(D-Loudoun).
Other candidates for the
10th District nomination include
educator Kimberly Adams, retired
naval intelligence officer Dave
Hanson, school founder Deep
Sran and scientist Julia Biggins.
Democrats will decide later this
year whether to pick a nominee
through a state-run primary or a
party-run caucus.
The district includes all of Loudoun County and parts of Fairfax
and Prince William counties, as
well as all of Frederick and Clarke
counties to the west.
Pelletier said he has lived in
Northern Virginia since 2002 but
PELLETIER CAMPAIGN
Former federal prosecutor
Paul Pelletier directed the
public corruption investigation
of lobbyist Jack Abramoff.
only recently moved to a section of
McLean that is located in the
10th District so that he could run
for office.
He grew up south of Boston,
graduated from Providence College and worked for his local police department before graduating from New England Law
School.
From there he worked as a federal prosecutor in Miami, which
he said was ground zero for narcotics trafficking at the time, and
went on to lead the economic
fraud unit. In 2002, he moved to
Washington, where he tackled
corporate accounting fraud and
developed health-care fraud
strike forces across the country.
“I really believe I have the background and tenacity and passion
to accomplish what I don’t think a
lot of people can accomplish,”
Pelletier said. “And I’m going to
prove it.”
His tenure at Justice overlapped with Comstock’s stint as
director of public affairs under
Attorney General John Ashcroft,
but Pelletier said he did not interact with the future congresswoman.
He left the agency in 2011, went
into private practice and works at
the law firm Pepper Hamilton.
jenna.portnoy@washpost.com
African American church
hopes to shield heritage
CEMETERIES FROM B1
ably disturbed an African American cemetery.
A proposal to redevelop the
site has drawn attention to that
little-known history, prompting
protests and demands from a
nearby African American church
to halt the development project
and memorialize the cemetery.
“This is an important issue for
a number of folks in our community — especially in our African
mary.hui@washpost.com
Attempt to help ISIS-bound friend ends in jail time
ISIS FROM B1
. WEDNESDAY,
“They are placing
primacy of commerce
over primacy of sacred
space, and that’s where
we differ.”
Marsha Coleman-Adebayo,
Macedonia Baptist Church
American community, where we
don’t have necessarily the same
sort of historic markers that have
been retained as some of the
other burial sites,” said Craig
Rice (D-Upcounty), the only African American on the nine-person
council. “It’s part of our heritage
and our history.”
Eileen McGuckian, president
of Montgomery Preservation,
said the law — which is similar to
statutes on the books in Howard
and Prince George’s counties — is
“the first time the county has
identified burial sites as important areas worthy of historical
preservation.”
McGuckian has compiled a list
of more than 350 burial sites in
the county, adding that there are
more yet to be discovered.
But leaders of Macedonia Baptist Church, who have led the
protests of the new development
in Westbard, say they do not
support the legislation because it
gives the county the ability to
allow burial sites to be relocated
under certain circumstances, including if retaining the sites
would deny the property owner
“reasonable use of their property.”
“They are placing primacy of
commerce over primacy of sacred space, and that’s where we
fundamentally differ,” said Marsha Coleman-Adebayo, chair of
Macedonia’s social justice ministry.
Coleman-Adebayo also said it
was her understanding that the
legislation would not affect either the Westbard redevelopment project or the majority of
projects in Montgomery, many of
which have already gone through
the subdivision process.
But Gwen Wright, the county’s
planning director, called those
criticisms “untrue.”
Wright said a “very large percentage” of development projects in the county, including
those in urban areas, go through
a preliminary plan of subdivision
and would thus be subject to the
new requirements.
“This is going to take a lot of
work,” she said.
County officials said it could
cost up to $260,000 to develop
the inventory of burial sites and
$118,300 annually for a staff
member to review sites that are
part of subdivision applications
and research additional sites.
Wright said that if the Westbard project goes forward —
“and that’s a big ‘if ’ at this point”
— then Regency Centers, a
Florida-based company that also
owns the Westwood Shopping
Center, would have to follow the
county’s new rules.
At the same time, it is unclear
whether any evidence of the
original burial sites would be
found because the land was
paved over decades ago.
“If the property comes in for
redevelopment, and if burial
sites are found, and if the owner
proposes moving any of those
sites, then the Planning Board
would use the criteria developed
and make a judgment,” Wright
said.
Any decision to move a burial
site is subject to review by the
state attorney, whose approval is
required to relocate human remains, under state law.
Negotiations between the
Macedonia Church and a county
commission about how to memorialize the former cemetery site
stalled in October, and residents
who say they would be harmed
by the redevelopment plan are
suing the county, making the
future of the project uncertain.
rachel.chason@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B5
RE
VIRGINIA
THE DISTRICT
Man dubbed ‘the crying Nazi’ hosts a radio show from jail
3 police
o∞cers
disciplined
over shirts
BY
J USTIN W M. M OYER
Christopher Cantwell, a selfprofessed white nationalist arrested in the days after the violent
demonstrations in Charlottesville
in August, has hosted an Internet
radio show from the confines of a
Virginia jail for more than two
months.
Cantwell was prominently featured in a Vice News documentary about violence in Charlottesville, where another white nationalist allegedly drove into a crowd,
killing a counterprotester during
the Aug. 12 “Unite the Right” rally.
Two state police officers who had
been monitoring the protests also
died when their helicopter
crashed after leaving the scene.
After the rally, Cantwell was
charged with one count of malicious bodily injury by means of a
caustic substance and two felony
counts of illegal use of tear gas.
He has been at the AlbemarleCharlottesville jail since he
turned himself in to police after
posting an emotional video about
his arrest warrant.
In response to the video, he was
widely dubbed “the crying Nazi”
on social media.
EVELYN HOCKSTEIN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Christopher Cantwell is helped by police after being overcome by tear
gas during skirmishes after a torchlight march through the University
of Virginia campus on the eve of the “Unite the Right” rally.
Since then, Cantwell, 36, has
called into white nationalist Internet radio shows while also
hosting his own from jail — all
without violating jail rules. He
discusses current events, solicits
donations for his legal defense,
refers to himself as a “talk-radio
personality” and “political prisoner,” and appears with other
white nationalists such as David
Duke, Mike Enoch and “Unite the
Right” organizer Jason Kessler.
Cantwell’s recordings are
sometimes titled “Live from Seg”
or “Letters from a Charlottesville
Jail” — a take on Martin Luther
King Jr.’s famed “Letter from a
Birmingham Jail,” written in 1963
after he was incarcerated for participating in Alabama civil rights
protests. In one episode, Cantwell
says he was reading books sent by
allies to “become a real expert
anti-Semite” and describes seeing
James A. Fields Jr., who was
housed on the same unit. Fields is
accused of ramming his car into
the crowd of “Unite the Right”
counterprotesters, killing 32year-old Heather Heyer.
In his most recent recording,
dated Oct. 26, Cantwell criticizes
members of the alt-right who
have distanced themselves from
white nationalism in the wake of
Charlottesville.
“This is a war,” he said. “You
want to just play the center in a
war between ideological extremes,
all you’re going to be doing is
getting shot at by both sides.”
Martin Kumer, the AlbemarleCharlottesville jail superintendent, said administrators know
about Cantwell’s recordings but
can’t stop them because inmates
have a right to freedom of speech.
He said Cantwell’s calls, except for
those to legal counsel, are monitored.
“We certainly don’t allow a
podcast from a cellblock. He
merely calls someone else who’s
recording his phone conversation, they digitize the phone conversation, they put it on the blog,”
Kumer said. “It’s not as though we
provide him with equipment to
assist in this matter or condone it,
we just don’t have any control.”
Jonathan M. Smith, executive director of the Washington Lawyers’
Committee for Civil Rights and Urban Affairs, said the First Amendment protects Cantwell’s speech behind bars, regardless of how offensive some might consider it.
“Unless he’s running a criminal
enterprise using the telephone, or
encouraging criminal conduct
through broadcasts or phone conversations, there’s very little that
correctional officials can do to
prevent it,” he said.
In the Oct. 26 broadcast,
Cantwell said he hoped to be
released after a preliminary hearing on Nov. 9.
justin.moyer@washpost.com
THE DISTRICT
Body camera noncompliance hampers police oversight cases
BY
P ETER H ERMANN
More than a third of cases
investigated by a D.C. police
oversight board after complaints
were made about officers’ conduct this past year involved officers who did not properly use
their body-worn cameras during
those incidents, according to a
report made public Tuesday.
Some officers turned the cameras on too late, others too early,
the report from the Office of
Police Complaints found. In
13 percent of the cases, at least
one officer at a crime scene or
incident failed to turn on the
camera, though colleagues did.
Michael G. Tobin, the director
of the Office of Police Complaints
(OPC), said that part of the
noncompliance with the cameras
“is unintentional and can be
attributed to the time it takes to
adapt to any new technology.”
But he said that his investigators have sometimes been hampered by the lack or poor quality
of video linked to an officer’s
“failure to follow policy” on operating the cameras. “Sometimes
the failure of an officer to activate
the camera has a negligible effect
if other cameras in the vicinity
are activated, and sometimes the
failure means the entire case may
be compromised,” Tobin said.
Tobin said his agency’s findings, released in an annual report
covering fiscal year 2017, should
move police toward imposing
sanctions on officers who fail to
properly activate the recording
devices. “Having cameras on every officer will mean nothing if
the department fails to enforce
the policy mandating their use,”
Tobin said in an email.
Dustin Sternbeck, the police
department’s chief spokesman,
called the report’s conclusion of
body camera misuse “misleading.” He noted the largest category of improper use was instances
where officers failed to notify
people they were being recorded.
Police rules require notification only when practical, which is
not in many encounters that
unfold in an instant, Sternbeck
noted.
“OPC does not indicate whether it was practicable in these
cases or whether the notification
may have been given prior to the
recording beginning,” Sternbeck
said in a statement.
He also took issue with the
report faulting some recordings
for having obstructed views and
said more context is needed.
“There is no additional information to determine if the obstructions were avoidable or were the
result of the physically rigorous
work that police officers often are
required to do,” the statement
says.
Sternbeck said the department
“takes the failure to activate a
camera very seriously, and we
have worked with our officers
who have readily accepted this
technology to ensure that the
cameras are activated when necessary.”
The report says the complaint
office investigated 773 cases in
fiscal 2017, up 77 percent from
438 the previous year. That rise
was, in part, driven by a new
online filing process and an extended period of time that people
now have to register a complaint.
The Office of Police Complaints is an alternative to the
“Having cameras on
every officer will mean
nothing if the
department fails to
enforce the policy.”
Michael G. Tobin, director of the
Office of Police Complaints
police department’s in-house investigation squad, the Internal
Affairs Bureau. The civilian
board typically investigates allegations of improper use of force,
bad language and rude behavior
and makes recommendations on
disciplining individual officers
and on broader policy concerns.
Investigators also monitored
the police handling of large demonstrations, including the unrest
on Inauguration Day. And the
board gained new authority this
fiscal year to audit police files on
use of force. Nearly half the cases
investigated in fiscal 2017 involved allegations of police harassment, and more than a quarter involved complaints of inappropriate language or conduct.
Complaints over use of force
made up 10 percent of the cases,
slightly down from last year.
The report says the office
closed 440 investigations, which
include those filed the previous
year. About 40 percent were dismissed with no credible merit
found, down from roughly half to
two-thirds dismissed in the previous three years.
Complaints against officers
were sustained in 3 percent, or
14 cases, about on par with
previous years. One complaint
involved use of excessive force,
dating to 2014. Punishment on
cases decided this year ranged
from re-education to letters of
reprimand. The cases do not
include those handled by detectives in the department’s Internal
Affairs Division, which can involve more serious allegations.
About 2,800 officers, mostly in
patrol, wear body cameras. The
department implemented the
program slowly, with about half
the eligible officers equipped
with recording devices in the
summer of 2016. All the officers
had cameras by December 2016.
The police complaints office said
that camera footage was relevant
in about 63 percent of the
773 cases it investigated.
The report notes a problem of
delays in officers activating the
cameras — though the devices
constantly record and save one
minute of already recorded footage once the officer hits the
record button. This notably happened on Sept. 11, 2016, when an
officer failed to turn on his
camera until after he fired his
gun in a confrontation with motorcyclist Terrence Sterling, who
was killed. The officer did not
face criminal charges and is undergoing an internal investigation.
Police Sgt. Matthew Mahl, the
chairman of the police union,
said he plans to ask the department for new equipment that
would automatically turn on
body cameras when a gun is
removed from the holster.
In an interview last week,
Tobin said the board’s analysis
largely falls in line with a study
completed by a D.C. police inhouse research team that showed
officers wearing cameras reported using force about as often as
officers who didn’t have them.
He said that given police departments are under increased
scrutiny, failure to properly use a
police body camera could result
in an assumption by the public
that it was intentional, “and the
officer’s credibility will be questioned as to the entire incident.”
peter.hermann@washpost.com
Ad designed to appeal to Latino voters was pulled after attack
LATINO FROM B1
among Latinos nationwide hovers in the teens. They worry that if
Gillespie wins, his campaign ads
— which raised concerns about
illegal immigration and “sanctuary cities” and voiced support for
Confederate-era monuments —
could be replicated nationwide
next year by GOP candidates eager to turn out conservative voters.
“If we can respond in a very
hard way right now, that causes
our people to turn out in force
and stomp out that fire. Hopefully we will do that,” Latino Victory
Fund (LVF) President Cristóbal J.
Alex said in an interview.
Alex’s group produced the new
ad, “American Nightmare,” which
features four young children —
two Latino boys, an African
American child and a Muslim girl
wearing a headscarf — running
from a white man driving a pickup truck adorned with the
Gillespie sticker and a Confederate flag. The truck chases the
children through a suburban
neighborhood into a dead-end
alley — at which point the children awake from a bad dream.
On late Tuesday afternoon, the
LVF removed the commercial
from YouTube and deleted its
tweet promoting it, citing the
suspected terrorist attack, which
killed at least eight.
“We knew our ad would ruffle
feathers. We held a mirror up to
the Republican Party and they
don’t like what they see. We have
decided to pull our ad at this
time,” Alex said. “Given recent
events, we will be placing other
powerful ads into rotation that
highlight the reasons we need to
elect progressive leaders in Virginia.”
The Northam campaign did
not ask the Latino Victory Fund
to take down the ad, said spokesman David Turner, but believes
“it is appropriate and the right
thing to do.”
LVF is a progressive organization that promotes and endorses
Latino Democratic political candidates. The group plans to air
the ad through Election Day on
Spanish-language television stations in the Richmond and Washington markets and during local
ad breaks on CNN and MSNBC in
the Washington area.
“Gillespie brought this on with
his relentless attacks on our community,” Alex said. “This is a
direct response.”
Gillespie told Fox News Channel on Tuesday that the ad shows
that Northam “doesn’t just disagree with millions of Virginians
who don’t share his liberal policy
agenda, he disdains us. And he
disdains the people who want to
have a civil debate about the
policies.”
Northam’s campaign had nothing to do with the ad, but the
candidate defended it on Monday, saying that the tactics used
by Gillespie’s campaign “have
promoted fearmongering, hatred, bigotry, racial divisiveness. I
mean, it’s upset a lot of communities, and they have the right to
express their views as well.”
The private poll that caused
worry showed Northam’s support
among Latino and black voters
lower than expected across the
commonwealth, according to
multiple people who reviewed
the data.
The private poll, published on
Oct. 16, was paid for by America’s
Voice, an immigration change organization.
Frank Sharry, the group’s
founder and executive director,
did not deny that his group paid
for the poll.
“Not able to talk about this
now,” he said in an email. “Check
back with me after the election.”
Turner initially said he was not
familiar with the poll, but after
checking further he did not deny
that the campaign had discouraged its release.
“We get a lot of data from a
variety of organizations,” he said.
“Generally, unless I am responding to something like this, we do
not release our data because
there’s no benefit to giving
Gillespie free polling information.”
Public polling shows
Northam easily beating
Gillespie among black
and Latino voters.
He added that support from
minority voters tends to rise as
the election gets closer, and he
said that internal polling shows
the campaign matching or exceeding the performance of Gov.
Terry McAuliffe (D) with Latino
and black voters at his election in
2013.
Surveying Latino voters in Virginia is difficult, given that they
made up just 4.6 percent of all
voters statewide last year, according to the Pew Research Center.
But the private poll suggests
Northam is lagging slightly behind the Latino support Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton received last year.
She won 65 percent of the Latino
vote in Virginia, compared with
30 percent for Trump, according
to exit polls. Clinton won the state
by about five percentage points.
A Washington Post-Schar
School poll released Tuesday did
not poll enough Latino voters to
generate a measurable sample.
But among nonwhite voters overall, Northam leads Gillespie
73 percent to 17 percent — similar
to Clinton’s margins in Virginia
last year. Other statewide polls
conducted last month by the Wason Center and Fox News showed
Northam trouncing Gillespie
among nonwhite voters.
But out on the trail, the
Northam campaign’s outreach to
Latino voters sometimes appears
to fall short.
Two “VA Vota” happy hours in
Northern Virginia marketed to
Latino voters drew sparse
crowds. More recently, U.S. Sen.
Catherine Cortez Masto (D-Nev.)
— the first female Hispanic elected to the body — met with a small
group of Latino student activists
at George Mason University, telling them that they need Northam
in the governor’s mansion if they
want Virginia to issue driver’s
licenses and discounted tuition to
undocumented immigrants. Only
eight student activists attended.
One advocate familiar with the
strategy behind the new ad said
that years of polling showed that
such dramatic messages can work
in the closing days of a campaign.
“All of us in the political class
are talking about the Gillespie
MS-13 ads. It turns out that a lot of
people weren’t aware it’s on TV —
he isn’t running it on Telemundo,”
said the advocate, who spoke on
the condition of anonymity to
speak frankly about strategy. “We
know from previous efforts that
when people feel that threat and
feel attacked, they respond.”
Colin Rogero, who directed
and produced the ad for the LVF,
said the commercial is intended
to evoke the same kind of visceral
emotional reaction that Republicans have successfully used in
their own advertising. The pickup
truck chasing children is a metaphor for how communities of
color feel targeted, he said.
“We needed to push back as
forcefully as we have been
pushed,” Rogero said. “Let’s show
people who may not be experiencing this what people feel like and
the real kind of palpable fear that
exists right now.”
The progressive group People
for the American Way is also
airing a Spanish-language TV
message across the commonwealth that tries connecting
Gillespie to Trump.
“Ed Gillespie talks about us, he
demonizes us with divisive and
racist language, calling us criminals,” an announcer says in Spanish. “Let’s not allow Trump’s policies in Virginia.”
CASA in Action, an immigration advocacy group that is politically active in the Washington
region, is also spending roughly
$170,000 to air spots on Spanishlanguage television, radio and
websites to promote the Democratic statewide slate.
“We’re dealing with difficult
moments in this community,” a
young woman says in one of the
ads.
“That’s why we need leaders
who think about us,” a young man
adds.
ed.okeefe@washpost.com
gregory.schneider@washpost.com
fenit.nirappil@washpost.com
Scott Clement contributed to this
report.
BY
P ETER H ERMANN
A D.C. police officer who
admitted to wearing a T-shirt in
public that was printed with
what authorities said were inappropriate and possibly offensive images has been disciplined, according to Peter Newsham, the District’s police
chief.
Newsham said two supervisors also were disciplined for
knowing about the shirts but
failing to take action. The
shirts, which were printed with
the name of a police unit, had
depictions of the Grim Reaper
and a pre-Christian style of
cross that an advocacy group
said has been used as a whitesupremacist symbol.
Newsham declined to describe the type of discipline but
said none of the officers had
been fired. He said as many as a
dozen other officers were suspected of buying the shirts, but
all denied wearing them. The
chief said it could not be proved
that the cross was intended to
be a white-supremacist symbol,
citing an Anti-Defamation
League report that said the
symbol may have been added
unintentionally because it is
part of the font used in the
lettering on the shirt.
One officer was spotted earlier this year wearing the shirt
over his uniform in D.C. Superior Court; some officers wear
shirts over their uniforms when
off-duty to avoid being recognized as police. Officials have
said this officer was considered
on-duty while in the courthouse waiting for a hearing.
It could not be determined if
the officer in court was the
same officer who was disciplined.
The officer wearing the shirt
had been photographed by a
member of Law for Black Lives, a
group of legal professionals affiliated with Black Lives Matter.
The officer was put on desk
duty when a complaint was
made in March. He was not
identified by police but was
named by advocates concerned
about the shirts.
Eugene Puryear, an organizer with a group called Stop
Police Terror Project D.C.,
which filed the complaint, said
he is disappointed that more
officers were not punished but
pleased that supervisors were
disciplined.
“It reinforces the point that
we made all along, that obviously there is a culture that
tolerates this kind of thing,”
Puryear said. “It vindicates
some of the criticism we were
making that we think there
were a lot more people who had
the shirts and who deserve
punishment.”
The T-shirts refer to the
7 th District, which includes
some of the city’s most violent
areas: Anacostia, Barry Farm,
Naylor Gardens and Washington Highlands.
The shirts have the Grim
Reaper as the centerpiece,
holding what appears to be a
rifle with the District of Columbia flag attached. At the top is
the word “powershift,” referring to officers assigned to a
special unit that focuses on
tough crime areas. The cross is
embedded in the “o” in “powershift.” The advocacy group says
it’s the same type of cross used
in the logo for the neo-Nazi
website Stormfront.
The Anti-Defamation League
lists a variant of that cross as a
commonly used white-supremacist symbol but said the intent
of the shirt’s designer was unclear. A research fellow at the
center said in August that the
font used in the lettering on the
shirt may be responsible for the
cross appearing, rather than it
being a deliberate attempt to
copy the neo-Nazi symbol.
Newsham, who earlier this
year termed the shirt “disturbing and disgraceful,” noted the
Anti-Defamation
League’s
stance that there may have
been no racist intent behind
the shirt. He said the department was “unable to prove it
was white supremacist in any
way.”
Regardless, Newsham said,
the shirt was “inappropriate.”
The department’s rules prohibit officers from wearing clothing that contains language “of a
social, economic or political
nature that might be considered as an advocacy statement,
or which might create controversy.”
peter.hermann@washpost.com
B6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
DEATH NOTICE
obituaries
GINGRAS
RUSSELL EDWARD GINGRAS
DENNIS BANKS, 80
AIM founder led siege at Wounded Knee in 1973
BY
E MILY L ANGER
Dennis Banks, a founder of the
American Indian Movement who
helped lead demonstrations —
notably the 10-week siege at
Wounded Knee, S.D., in 1973 —
that at times descended into violence as they brought long-festering tribal wounds to national
attention, died Oct. 29 at a hospital in Rochester, Minn. He was 80.
The cause was complications
from pneumonia after recent
open-heart surgery, said a daughter, Arrow Banks.
Mr. Banks, a member of the
Ojibwa, or Chippewa, tribe,
helped form the American Indian
Movement (AIM) in 1968 to challenge what he and other activists
considered the U.S. government’s
centuries-long exploitation of Native Americans. He traced his
personal anger to his boyhood,
when he was placed in Bureau of
Indian Affairs boarding schools,
which he compared to “concentration camps.”
A self-described “nightmare to
the whole judicial system,” Mr.
Banks spent periods as a fugitive
or in prison for crimes associated
with his demonstrations. To detractors, his apparent lawlessness
did little to bolster his cause. But
to supporters, Mr. Banks was a
fearless defender of victimized
peoples who, after years of oppression, had no recourse but
dramatic resistance.
Along with AIM leader Russell
Means, he became, in the description of the Los Angeles Times, one
of the “most famous Indians since
Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse,” the
tribal leaders who defeated
George Armstrong Custer at the
Battle of the Little Bighorn in
1876.
Mr. Banks’s early protests included a takeover of Alcatraz, the
island off San Francisco that was
the site of an infamous penitentiary. Later, in 1972, he participated in an AIM occupation of the
Bureau of Indian Affairs building
in Washington.
But he was best recognized for
his part in the 1973 occupation of
Wounded Knee, where 83 years
earlier U.S. forces had slaughtered 350 Lakota people at the
JIM PALMER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dennis Banks announces a 1972 decision that Native Americans will be allowed to hold religious
services in Arlington National Cemetery to honor their war dead there.
end of the American-Indian Wars.
The 1973 uprising witnessed a
confrontation between hundreds
of Indians and hundreds of lawenforcement officers. Two Indians died, and a federal officer was
paralyzed in the ensuing violence.
By the time the incident ended
after 71 dramatic days, international attention had been turned
to the Indian movement as well as
its tactics.
Mr. Banks and Means were
charged with conspiracy, assault
and theft in connection with the
events, but a federal judge in 1974
dismissed the charges, citing government misconduct.
Mr. Banks faced more serious
legal difficulty stemming from
another demonstration, also in
South Dakota, weeks before the
Wounded Knee incident.
AIM activists including Mr.
Banks had gathered at the Custer
County courthouse to protest after the alleged white killer of an
Indian man was charged with
manslaughter rather than the
“We had reached a
point in history where
we could not tolerate
the abuse any longer.”
Dennis Banks,
in Peter Matthiessen’s book
“In the Spirit of Crazy Horse”
higher offense of murder. The
demonstration resulted in injuries to protesters and police officers, the destruction of two police
cars, and fires at the courthouse
and the Chamber of Commerce.
“We had reached a point in
history where we could not tolerate the abuse any longer,” Mr.
Banks told Peter Matthiessen, author of the book “In the Spirit of
Crazy Horse.” “These mothers
could not tolerate the mistreatment that goes on on the reservations any longer, they could not
see another Indian youngster
NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
die.”
In 1975, Mr. Banks was convicted of rioting and assault. Saying
that he feared for his life in
prison, he went on the run. His
cause was bolstered by Hollywood figures including Jane Fonda and Marlon Brando, as well as
by the legal representation of
attorney William Kunstler.
Mr. Banks found a haven in
California, then led by Gov. Jerry
Brown, and later on an Onondaga
reservation in New York. He surrendered to authorities in 1984,
was imprisoned and then was
paroled the following year.
Dennis James Banks — his
Ojibwa name was Nowacumig,
meaning “at the center of the
universe” — was born on the
Leech Lake Reservation in Minnesota on April 12, 1937.
He described the experience of
being taken to boarding school as
a “dark day in the lives of all
Indian children.”
“They are forcibly taken away
from those who love and care for
them, from those who speak their
language,” he recalled in a memoir, “Ojibwa Warrior” (2004),
written with Richard Erdoes.
“They are dragged, some screaming and weeping, others in silent
terror, to a boarding school where
they are to be remade into white
kids.”
He served in the Air Force in
Japan, where he married a Japanese woman and fathered a child.
The Los Angeles Times reported
that he was married at least five
times. Arrow Banks said her father had 20 children and more
than 100 grandchildren, but a
complete list of survivors was not
immediately available.
Upon his return from military
service, Mr. Banks told People
magazine in 1984, “I was heading
down a road that was filled with
wine, whiskey and booze. . . .
Then I landed in prison.” He said
he served “two years, seven
months and 18 days” for burglarizing a grocery store while a white
accomplice received probation.
The experience galvanized Mr.
Banks to help found AIM.
During his sojourn in California, he taught classes at Stanford
University. After his imprisonment in South Dakota, he said
that he decided he “could best
help by staying out of politics
altogether.” He provided addiction counseling and ran a rice and
maple syrup company that aimed
to bring jobs to reservations.
Like Means, who died in 2012,
Mr. Banks acted in films including “War Party” (1988) and “The
Last of the Mohicans” (1992).
Despite the efforts of AIM, reservation residents continue to
live in what are universally recognized as disastrous conditions.
Looking back on AIM’s work, Mr.
Banks nonetheless saw progress.
“An awareness reached across
America that if Native American
people had to resort to arms at
Wounded Knee, there must really
be something wrong,” he said.
“And Americans realized that native people are still here, that they
have a moral standing, a legal
standing. From that, our own
people began to sense their
pride.”
On October 29, 2017, RUSSELL EDWARD GINGRAS, beloved husband of Susan Elizabeth
Childs; survived by his loving daughters, Nicole
Bruette Rathmann (Christopher John), and Carrie Gingras; devoted grandfather of Madeline
Elizabeth and Hayden Christopher Rathmann;
dear brother-in-law of Natalie Ann Miller
(James Lyle), Thomas William Childs, Jr. (Jean),
and Jeffrey Childs (Debra); cherished son-inlaw of Thomas William Childs, Sr. and the late
Freda Margaret Childs; also survived by many
loving family and friends.
Family will receive friends on Thursday from 2
to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. at Harry H. Witzke's Family
Funeral Home, 4112 Old Columbia Pike, Ellicott
City, MD. A funeral service will be held on Friday
at 11 a.m. at St. John's Episcopal Church.
Interment will follow at St. John's Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to
support Head and Neck Cancer Research to the
University of Maryland Baltimore Foundation,
Inc. (UMBF, Inc.), c/o Trish Bates, School of
Medicine, Office of Development, 31 S. Greene
St., Baltimore, MD 21201.
www.harrywitzkefuneralhome.com
GORDON
BETTE DAWSON GORDON (Age 95)
Peacefully at her home in Poolesville, MD
on October 26, 2017. Bette is predeceased
by her beloved husband of 70 years, Alexander, and leaves her four children, Betsy
Gordon, Valerie Slattery, Katherine Gordon
and Bill Gordon; three nephews, John and
Michael Cox and Butch Ochsenreiter; nine
grandchildren, Justin Gordon, Jimmy, Catelyn, Jack, and Annie Slattery, Alex McInturff,
Kealy Trout, Natalie and Katie Gordon; and
three great-grandchildren, Caden and Sterling McInturff and Charlotte Slattery.
Bette was a longtime Washingtonian, having attended Wilson High School and later
graduating from the George Washington
University. Bette loved horses and was
devoted to her family and friends. She
remained an active member of The Garden
Club, the Historical Society of Maryland
and the Sugarloaf Riding Club. She will be
greatly missed.
Visitation will be held at 10 a.m. on Thursday, November 2, 2017 at Joseph Gawler's
Sons, 5130 Wisconsin Ave., NW, Washington, DC with services to follow at 11
a.m. Interment will follow at Rock Creek
Cemetery at 1 p.m.
DEATH NOTICE
HAWKINS
SCOTT A. HAWKINS (Age 53)
It is with regret that we notify
the members of Steamfitters
Local #602 of the death of Brother
Scott A. Hawkins. Viewing Thursday, November 2 from 1 to 2 p.m.
followed by a celebration of life
service at 2 p.m. at Eackles-Spencer & Norton
Funeral Home, 251 Halltown Rd. Harpers Ferry,
WV 25425.
Notice #1639.
Daniel W. Loveless, FST
JANIFER
emily.langer@washpost.com
FRED BECKEY, 94
‘Dirtbag’ mountaineer scaled peaks others saw as impossible
BY
H ARRISON S MITH
Fred Beckey, an American alpinist who helped establish the
sport of modern rock climbing
and who developed a dual reputation as an irascible “dirtbag”
mountaineer and unmatched
chronicler of North American
peaks, died Oct. 30 at a friend’s
home in Seattle. He was 94.
The cause was congestive heart
failure, said Megan Bond, his
friend and biographer.
Although little-known outside
of climbing circles, Mr. Beckey
was considered the finest mountaineer of his generation and one
of the most prolific alpinists in
history, recording hundreds of
first ascents across the Cascade
Range of the Pacific Northwest
and in mountains as far afield as
China and Tanzania.
“People talk about young
climbers today and how prolific a
person might be. But there’s just
no comparison with Fred,” Phil
Powers, executive director of the
American Alpine Club, told Outside magazine in 2010. “I mean,
it’s not one level, but ten levels of
magnitude more than the secondplace guy. If you travel the American West, open any guidebook,
try to do any route, try to do any
mountain, you’ll likely come
across Fred’s name.”
Mr. Beckey possessed a geckolike talent for scaling vertical rock
walls and a wanderlust that scarcely dimmed over eight decades of
alpine exploration. Born in Germany, he settled in Seattle as a boy,
learned to climb while in the Boy
Scouts and scaled the 5,700-foot
Boulder Peak in the Olympic
Mountains by himself at 13.
In part, climbing offered Mr.
Beckey an escape from the schoolyard taunts that led him to
change his given name, Wolfgang,
to Fred. There were also more
elemental concerns: “a longing to
escape from the artificial civilized
order, a need for self-rejuvenation, a desire to restore my sense
of proportion,” he once said.
Mr. Beckey never married, never had children and never kept a
full-time job that would prevent
him from striking out on a whim
for the Gunks of New York or the
Bugaboos of British Columbia. By
all accounts, the sole rival for his
interest and affection was wom-
DAVE O'LESKE/FRED BECKEY ARCHIVES/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Fred Beckey, right, pauses with a friend on the summit of Mount Baker in Washington state in a
circa 1940 photo. He recorded hundreds of first ascents on mountains around the globe.
TED S. WARREN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Mr. Beckey appears at a 2016 event promoting “Dirtbag: The
Legend of Fred Beckey,” a documentary about his life.
en. His only major fall, friends
said, was one he took off a bar
stool at the sight of a lady.
In climbing parlance, Mr. Beckey was the ultimate mountainminded nomad, or “dirtbag,” a
term used as the title of a 2017
documentary about his life. He
used a weathered McDonald’s
coffee cup to receive free refills on
the road, and maintained a makeshift Rolodex in the trunk of his
station wagon, a collection of
cardboard scraps that listed potential climbing partners — some
of them one-third his age —
whose couches he could crash on
in his travels.
Gleefully embracing his dirtbag image, he staged a photograph, later used as a Patagonia
advertisement, in which he appeared as a disheveled hitchhiker
on the side of the road, decked out
in climbing gear and carrying a
cardboard sign that read, “Will
Belay For Food!!!”
Yet Mr. Beckey worked far
more than most climbers knew,
Bond said, spending years in the
printing and marketing industries while writing a dozen books
that mixed scholarship with
hard-won wisdom. His three-volume “Cascade Alpine Guide,” first
published in 1973, became an in-
dispensable reference work
known to climbers as the “Beckey
Bible.” One of his final books,
“Range of Glaciers” (2003), was a
sweeping piece of scholarship
that detailed the 19th-century exploration of the North Cascades.
Mr. Beckey reportedly spent 15
years researching the book.
“If Thoreau and Emerson describe the transcendental American theme, then Beckey — after
Ahab, akin to Kerouac — describes the oddly manic drive to
scale and map and detail the
wilderness in a modern way,”
Steve Costie, executive director of
the Mountaineers climbing club,
told the New York Times in 2008.
“Almost adversarial; never transcendental.”
Wolfgang Paul Gottfried Beckey was born in Zulpich, near the
German city of Dusseldorf, on
Jan. 14, 1923. His father was a
surgeon and his mother was an
opera singer.
Described by many climbers as
fiery and single-minded on the
mountain, Mr. Beckey spent
many of his early years in tense
association with the Seattlebased Mountaineers group,
climbing peaks that other members said were unclimbable, including Mount Waddington.
The 13,200-foot peak in British
Columbia had been ascended just
once before. Mr. Beckey climbed
it at 19. Climbing with his younger
brother Helmut Beckey, who survives him, he sported tennis shoes
that he covered in wool stockings
when the terrain became slippery.
The climb established Mr.
Beckey as something of a daredevil, and whether through bad
luck or poor leadership, members
of several of his early expeditions
were severely injured or killed,
including on a disastrous 1955
trip to the Himalayas.
Mr. Beckey had by then graduated from the University of Washington, receiving a bachelor’s degree of arts in economics and
business in 1949, and performed
what some climbers described as
his “Triple Crown”: the 1954 ascent of Mount McKinley and the
previously unscaled Mounts
Hunter and Deborah in Alaska.
The following year, however,
Mr. Beckey’s reputation in American climbing cratered during an
international expedition on
Lhotse, an unconquered peak in
the Himalayas. Forced to stop
during a storm, Mr. Beckey “left a
weakened climber on the mountain,” according to a 2010 account
in Outside magazine, destroying
his relationship with expedition
leader Norman Dyhrenfurth, who
died in September.
When Dyhrenfurth led the first
American expedition to Mount
Everest, resulting in fellow Seattle climber Jim Whittaker’s reaching the summit in 1963, Mr. Beckey was not invited. “It was a big
thing,” Mr. Beckey told Outside.
“But I didn’t take it too hard.”
He responded instead by
notching an astonishing 26 first
ascents in 1963, climbing more
than 40 peaks in all.
Mr. Beckey was planning to
return to the Himalayas before he
died, Bond said, although not to
climb. His strength had finally
dissipated, and he was to be carried by porters into the mountains of Garhwal, in India.
“You’re putting yourself on the
line,” he told the Times, describing
the appeal that climbing maintained for him, even in old age.
“Man used to put himself on the
line all the time. Nowadays we’re
protected by the police, fire, everything. There’s not much adventure
left. Unless you look for it.”
harrison.smith@washpost.com
LaVERNE G. JANIFER (Age 86)
Passed away on Wednesday, October 25, 2017.
Visitation 10 a.m., until time of service, 11 a.m.,
on Friday, November 3 at Parkview Baptist
Church, 7900 Oxman Rd., Landover, MD 20785.
Interment Harmony Memorial Park. Services
by Henry S. Washington & Sons.
DEATH NOTICE
KAUFMAN
JOSEPH S. L. KAUFMAN, SR.
Passed away suddenly at his home on October
28, 2017. He is survived by his wife Theresa;
son Joseph, Jr.; daughter Angela (Don); daughter Jessica; sister Annie Sachs (Leonard);
grandchildren Brittani and Nathaniel; many
nieces and nephews and loving family and
friends. He was preceded in death by his
parents Frank and Mary Housely, his brother
Patrick and sister June. The family will receive
visitors at Pierce Funeral Home and Cremation
Services, 9609 Center St., Manassas, VA on
Friday, November 3, 2017 from 5 to 9 p.m.
Mass of Christian Burial will take place on
Saturday, November 4, 2017 at 12 Noon in All
Saints Catholic Church, 9300 Stonewall Rd.,
Manassas, VA. In lieu of flowers, donations can
be made to the American Heart Association in
honor of Joe Kaufman.
MARTIN
ERIC Z. MARTIN (Age 45)
It is with regret that we notify
the members of Steamfitters
Local #602 of the death of Brother
Eric Z. Martin. Viewing Thursday,
November 2 from 7 to 9 p.m.
and November 3 from 1 to 2
p.m. followed by funeral service at 2 p.m.
at the Kelso Cornelius Funeral Home, 6492
Lincoln Way West, St. Thomas, PA 17252.
Notice #1640.
Daniel W. Loveless, FST
McSHANE
CLAY McSHANE
Professor Emeritus of Northeastern University, passed away on October 29, 2017.
Beloved husband of Carolyn A. (Kidman)
McShane for 52 years; loving father of
Kevin McShane (wife Kelly), Susan McShane
and Sharon McShane; cherished grandfather of Molly, Michael and Memuna; caring
brother of Michael and Peter McShane and
the late Frank, Edward and James.
A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated
in St. Patrick Church, 4101 Norbeck Road,
Rockville on Saturday, November 4, 2017 at
11 a.m. Interment private.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions
may be made to Arlington Soccer Club, 350
Massachusetts Ave., PMB212, Arlington,
MA 02474. Please sign the online family
guestbook at
www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
DEATH NOTICE
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
BAYLOR
FURR
LUCAS
THORNTON
JAMES W. LUCAS
GLENN E. THORNTON (Age 89)
MILLS
TATE
SANDRA ANN MILLS
SHIRLEY YVETTE TATE (Age 69)
Wife of the late M.C. Mills, Jr., transitioned
peacefully on Saturday, October 21, 2017 at
George Washington University Hospital. She
is survived by her son, Rev. Medric C. Mills,
III (Jean); her daughter, Marie N. Mills; three
grandchildren, Kortnie, Medric IV and Kayla;
great-grandson, Mason; one sister, Mildred
Burnett; nieces, nephews, other relatives and
friends. Visitation Friday, November 3 from 6 to
9 p.m. and Service of Celebration on Saturday,
November 4 at 10:30 a.m. at John T. Rhines
Funeral Home, 3005 12th St., NE, Washington,
DC. Interment George Washington Cemetery,
Adelphi, MD.
On Monday, October 23, 2017. Daughter of the
late Henrietta Stuckey Turner and Frank Tate;
devoted mother to the late Deneen Tate. She is
survived by children, Mya McElrath, De’Lante’
Robinson and son-in-law Andre Gardner Sr. She
also leaves five grandchildren, Tavone, Tyran,
Andre Jr., Dylan, and De’Lante’ Jr.; three greatgrandchildren, Ny’eenah, Nasir and Garrett Jr.;
three sisters, Gloria, Vicki, Junita; one brother,
Tyrone and a host of nieces, nephews, God
children, relatives and friends.
The family will receive friends for a memorial
service and repast on Friday, November 3,
2017 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Southeast
Tabernacle Baptist Church, 4101 First Street.,
SE, Washington, DC 20032.
MORENO
MARIA VICTORIA MORENO "Mita"
Born October 22, 1942, and who passed away
on October 29, 2017, is the loving mother
of Diana Vigier de Latour, Mónica Jaramillo
Murphy (Gregg) and Andrés Julián Salcedo.
She is also survived by her cherished family
of six grandchildren, two great-grandchildren,
and her devoted sisters Nury Espinel (Ciro)
and Pia Melo (Carlos), as well as five nieces
and nephews. A memorial Mass will be held
at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, November 4, 2017,
at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Old Town
Alexandria, VA. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to the Cholangiocarcinoma
Foundation:
http://cholangiocarcinoma.org/get-involved/donate/#whydonate%7CO
MURPHY
B7
RE
THORNTON
PHILIP BARTHOLOMEW FURR
WELFORD BAYLOR "Boo"
ROBERT HERBERT THORNTON
On October 26, 2017 at the Veterans Affairs
Medical Center in Washington, DC. Born
December 25, 1938, Robert was the father
of Andrea, Bobbi and Thomas. He was
preceded in death by his wife Marilyn
Thornton and his brother Francis (Mickey)
Thornton. Robert was a retired United
States Air Force veteran. He was a football
enthusiast – a die-hard Pittsburgh Steelers
fan. Family and friends will gather to celebrate his life on Friday, November 3, 2017
at Goshen United Methodist Church, 19615
Goshen Rd., Gaithersburg, MD. Viewing at
10 a.m. Service at 12 Noon. Services
entrusted to SNOWDEN FUNERAL HOME.
www.snowdencares.com
November 30, 1925 ~ October 26, 2017
Welford Baylor of Washington, DC died peacefully at his home on October 26, 2017. He is
survived by his son, Ellis Baylor; his daughters,
Arneda Bowens, Eleanor Muse, Julie Scatliffe,
and Ethel Jenkins; and a host of other relatives
and friends. A service will be held on Thursday,
November 2, 2017 at New Beginnings Church
of God of Prophecy, 6017 Cipriano Road, Lanham, MD 20706, Viewing 10 a.m., Service 11
a.m. The Interment with Military Honors will
be Friday, November 3, 11 a.m. at Quantico
National Cemetery. Arrangements by Robinson
Funeral Home.
Passed away on Wednesday, October 25, 2017.
Visitation 10 a.m., until time of service 11
a.m., on Friday, November 3, at Hemingway
Memorial AME Church, 6330 Gateway Blvd,
District Heights, MD 20747. Interment National
Harmony Memorial Park. Services by HENRY S.
WASHINGTON & SONS.
Peacefully passed on October 26, 2017.
Beloved father of Stanley Lucas (Sara), LaJuan
Lucas-Jones (Bobby), Heidi Hill (James) and
Bettina Lucas. Also survived by grandchildren,
Kofi, Derek, Kia, Chante, Michael and Jamella;
great grandchildren Amber, Kiarra, Derek Jr.
and Jane; his siblings, Benny L. Lucas, Lola M.
Dodson and Bernard C. Lucas Sr.; godson, Earl
N. Smith and a host of nieces, nephews other
relatives and friends. On Saturday, November
4, 2017 friends may visit with the family from
10 a.m. until time of funeral service at 11
a.m. at Union Wesley AME Zion Church, 1860
Michigan Ave. NE. Interment Maryland National
Cemetery. In lieu of flowers contributions may
be made to the Boys and Girls Club of America
(www.bgca.org)
JOHN C. M. MURPHY (Age 70)
Of New Oxford, PA passed away in his sleep
at home on Sunday, October 29, 2017. He and
his wife, Ella (née O’Dell) recently celebrated
their 35th wedding anniversary. Born in the
family home on Minnetonka Road, Severn, MD
to the late George and Emma (née Rodgers)
Murphy, John was a 1965 graduate of Arundel
High School. Following college at the University
of Maryland, College Park and George Washington University he began his career as an
electrical engineer with Potomac Electric
Power Company and went on to hold many
positions at Pepco before retiring in 2005. In
his spare time John liked to garden and rebuild
tractor engines, but what he enjoyed most
was helping family and friends in any way
needed. John is survived by his devoted wife,
Ella, daughter, Sheri (Joe), of Allentown, PA,
stepchildren, Ryan (Lisa), of Saginaw, MI, Kellie
(Kirk), of Martinsburg, WV, nine grandchildren,
seven great-grandchildren, sisters Jane, of
Millersville, MD and Colleen, of Norco, LA. He
was predeceased by his stepdaughter Allison
(Tim), brothers George, Patrick, David and sister Catherine. Family and friends are invited to
gather at the Gary L. Kaufman Funeral Home
at Meadowridge Memorial Park, Inc., 7250
Washington Boulevard, Elkridge, MD 21075
(exit 6 off Rt. 100) on Thursday, November 2
from 3 to 5 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. as well as
for the service to be held on Friday, November
3 beginning at 1:30 p.m. Interment will follow
at Meadowridge Memorial Park, Elkridge, MD.
Donations in John’s name may be made to VNA
Hospice of Hanover, 440 N. Madison Street,
Hanover, PA 17331 in appreciation for their
compassionate care.
NORRIS
SHIRLEY L. NORRIS
Departed this life on Tuesday,
October 17, 2017. Beloved wife of
the late James W. Norris. Survived
by a devoted niece, Joan Lomax;
and a host of other nieces;
nephews; other relatives and
many friends. Friends may visit
with the family on Friday, November 3 from
10 a.m. until time of service at 11 a.m. at
New Covenant Baptist Church, 1301 W St. SE,
Washington, DC. Interment Ft. Lincoln Cemetery. Arrangements by Hodges and Edwards.
WALLENMEYER
WILLIAM A. WALLENMEYER
Dr. Wallenmeyer passed away peacefully on
August 25, 2017 at the Rockville Nursing Home
in Rockville, MD. He is survived by his loving
wife, Diane Hankins Wallenmeyer, their four
devoted children, Wendy Kauffman, Jon Wallenmeyer, Ann Ellis and Timothy Wallenmeyer,
13 cherished grandchildren, and three blessed
great-grandchildren. His Celebration of Life will
be held at the Cedar Lane Unitarian Universalist
Church in Bethesda, MD on Sunday, November
5, at 3 p.m. Friends and family are welcome.
Expressions of sympathy may be made to The
Rockville Nursing Home in Rockville, MD and
The American Rhododendron Society-Potomac
Valley Chapter, MD. For his full obituary please
view and sign the family guestbook at:
www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
EDMUND K. DALEY, JR, Ph.D.
Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Army (Ret.)
Beloved husband of Mary E Welch. Life member: V.F.W., D.A.V., Purple Heart., M.C. League.
Funeral Mass at 10:45 a.m. Old Post Chapel,
Fort Myer, VA.
Interment immediately following Mass in
Arlington National Cemetery
A gallant, magnanimous, brilliant, strong and
confident man.
A true Renaissance Man.
IN MEMORIAM
BEALLE
O'CALLAGHAN
Colonel O'Callaghan, age 94, died in Sun City
Summerlin, Las Vegas, NV, on December 1,
2016. Colonel O'Callaghan will be buried with
full military honors at Arlington National Cemetery on Friday, November 3, 2017 at 3 p.m.
RAWLS
LILLIE M. RAWLS
On Wednesday, October 25, 2017. Beloved
wife of the late John K. Rawls. Devoted mother
of Patricia, Tracy, Roxanne, Gregory, Gerald,
Ondra, Miles, Derrick, Barrington, Trent,
Reginald and the late Tyrone, Daryle and Kevin.
She is also survived by a host of grandchildren,
great-grandchildren, other relatives and
friends. Mrs. Rawls will lie in state at Pilgrim
Rest Baptist Church, 4611 Sheriff Rd., NE on
Thursday, November 2 from 10 a.m. until
service at 11 a.m. Interment Harmony
Memorial Park. Online condolences can be
made:
www.StewartFuneralHome.com
When the
need arises,
let families
find you in the
Funeral Services
Directory.
To be seen in the
Funeral Services
Directory, please call
paid Death Notices
at 202-334-4122.
MARY C. BEALLE
June 4, 1925 - October 31, 1997
Mom, it's been 20 years since you left us to
Be with your Heavenly Father.
Missed is the touch of your loving hand.
Gone is your kindness beyond recall;
Gone to a world where peace and love
Are given and gained by all.
Your Loving Children, Grandchildren,
Great & GG-grandchildren
CATOE
Visitation will be held Sunday, November 5,
2017 from 3 to 6 p.m. at Murphy’s Funeral
Home, 4510 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA 22203.
A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated
Monday, November 6, 2017 at 11 a.m. at Saint
Ann Roman Catholic Church, 5300 N 10th St.,
Arlington, VA 22205. A burial service will occur
at Arlington National Cemetery at a later date.
In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be
made to the Good Samaritan Fund at St. Ann
Catholic Church.
JONES
SUSAN LEHRER JONES (Age 73)
Of Chevy Chase, MD died peacefully from
cancer on October 29, 2017. Surviving are her
husband, David Jones of Chevy Chase, MD; her
sons Morgan and Cooper, her daughters-inlaw Annie and Maureen, and her grandchildren
Abigail and Crosby.
MICHELLE BROWN CATOE
November 1, 1969 - November 13, 2012
Wishing you were here today
For even just a while,
So we could say Happy Birthday
And see your loving smile.
But your memory is our keepsake,
With which we'll never part.
God has you in his keeping,
We have you in our hearts.
Love forever,
Ma and Daddy
Maya, Jeremiah, Makenzie,
Joshua & Jerry
WARD
ROY
LELIA ANN ROY
CHRISTINIA ALLEN MATNEY "Cris"
Cris Matney, 73, of Herndon, VA, passed away
after a short illness October 27, 2017, at
Reston Hospital. Survived by Joseph S. Matney,
her high school sweetheart, soul mate and
husband of 52 years; daughter Kate Cardone;
son-in-law CAPT Daryle Cardone, USN; and two
granddaughters, Gianna Cardone and Emma
Saunders. Predeceased by her daughter
Rebecca. Others survivors include four siblings,
Claudette McDonald, Jeanette Johnson, Joe
Allen and Becky Hill, and numerous nieces,
nephews and cousins.
Cris radiated joy and love wherever she went.
She was an empathetic listener with a strong
sense of social justice. Her deep and abiding
Christian faith carried her through difficult
times, including the death of her younger
daughter. A former first-grade teacher, Cris
coordinated her church’s Power Pack Program
for disadvantaged Flint Hill Elementary School
students. She sought opportunities to serve
others and was well known for her “baking
ministry.”
Born May 10, 1944, and raised in Keen Mountain, VA, Cris was the daughter of the late
Edna and Kara Allen. A graduate of Radford
College, she taught in Blacksburg, VA, and
Gahanna, Ohio, before moving to Northern
Virginia in 1971. Always a dedicated volunteer,
she served as a Sunday School teacher and
devoted many hours to her daughters’ elementary school. She also enjoyed 10 years as a cast
member at The Disney Store in Tyson’s Corner
and was active in the Emmaus and Chrysalis
communities.
Visitation: 7 to 9 p.m., Friday, November 3 at
The Church of the Good Shepherd, 2351 Hunter
Mill Rd., Vienna, VA. Memorial service: 10 a.m.,
Saturday, November 4 at the church, followed
by reception. Officiating: The Revs. Jay Hanke,
Eric Song and Rosemary Welch. In lieu of
flowers, donations may be made to The Church
of the Good Shepherd to support community
outreach ministries to which Cris was so
devoted. (See Online Giving at www.GoodShepherdVA.com.)
DUNN
DEATH NOTICE
Peacefully on October 26, 2017 at her residence. Survived by her daughter, Brenda Roy
Drennon (Darren) of Manassas, VA; one sister,
Theresa S. Smart (Al) of Dumfries, VA and
one brother, Curtis Smith of Warrenton, VA.
Family will receive friends Friday, November
3, 2017 from 10 a.m. until 11 a.m. service
time at Beulah Baptist Church, 3124 Beulah
Rd., Markham, VA 22643. Dr. Lindsay Green,
Eulogist. Interment Mt. Morris Community
Cemetery, Hume, VA. Online condolences may
be made at
www.joynesfuneralhome.com
Edmund K. Daley, Jr., “Mick,” of Arlington,
VA passed away peacefully on October 24,
2017 at age 88. Born in Washington, DC to
the late Edmund K. and Elizabeth S. Daley,
he graduated from Georgetown University in
1954 and was commissioned as an Infantry
Officer. Mick served his nation honorably for
28 years in Infantry and Airborne Divisions in
Europe, Korea, Vietnam and the United States.
He is a Distinguished Member of the 16th
Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division. Staff
assignments include Allied Forces Northern
Europe in Oslo, Norway and as an Assistant
Army Attaché in Laos. His military awards and
decorations include the Legion of Merit, Air
Medal, and the Korea and Vietnam Service
Medals. He was awarded the Combat and
Expert Infantry Badges, the Senior Parachutist
Wings and Laotian Parachute Wings. Following
retirement from the U.S. Army, he was the
Senior Army JROTC Instructor at Forestville
High School, Forestville, MD. He was awarded
his PhD in Education from George Mason
University.
Relatives and friends may call at Collins Funeral
Home, 500 University Boulevard West, Silver
Spring, MD, (Valet Parking), on Thursday
November 2, 2017, from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9
p.m. where Funeral Service will be held on
Friday, November 3, 2017 at 11 a.m. Graveside
Service and Interment Maryland Veteran's
Cemetery-Cheltenham on Thursday, November 9, 2017 at 1 p.m. In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions may be made to Montgomery Hospice, 1355 Piccard Drive, Suite 100,
Rockville, MD 20850.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
ANDREW THOMAS GILROY "Tom"
(Age 56)
Of Burke, VA passed away peacefully from
cancer on October 29, 2017 at home with
family by his side. Beloved husband of Susan
(Popola) Gilroy. Devoted father of Ashley
McFarland (Jesse), Jessica Gilroy (George
Washington), Lindsey Huggins (Eric), and
Andrew “Drew” Gilroy (Kimberly). Adoring
grandfather of Booker Washington and Gracie
Gilroy. He is also survived by his mother, Regina
Gilroy, siblings Andrea LaRue, Joe Gilroy, Bette
Ernst, Donna Gilroy, Pat Gilroy, and a host of
relatives including his devoted in-laws Tom and
Mary Ann Popola. He was preceded in death
by his father, Andrew Gilroy, and sister, Gina
Doyle.
The viewing will be held on November 5, 2017
from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. at Fairfax
Memorial Funeral Home, 9902 Braddock Road,
Fairfax, VA. The Funeral Mass will be held
on November 6, 2017 at 11 a.m. at Church
of the Nativity, 6400 Nativity Lane, Burke,
VA. Interment will be at Arlington National
Cemetery at a later date. In lieu of flowers,
memorial donations may be made to VITAS
Community Connection (www.vitascommunityconnection.org).
Mick is survived by his loving wife of 62 years
Patricia; sons Edmund K. Daley, III (Marianne)
and Daniel G. Daley; daughters Rosemary P.
Wilcox (Perry) and Mary Anne Baker (Charlie);
15 grandchildren; 11 great-grandchildren; and
his sister Beatrice Ishler (Glenn) of Mobile, AL.
THOMAS PATRICK O'CALLAGHAN,
Colonel, USMC (Ret.)
He was a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps
and served on Johnston Island in the South
Pacific. For 47 years he was employed as an
automobile mechanic, most recently at Marv &
Mike's Transmission in Rockville, MD. He loved
to fish, hunt and cut anything down with a
chainsaw. He spent time volunteering at West
River Center, Churchton, MD. He lived for
51 years on Mitscher Court, Kensington, MD
where he was part of a loving, tight-knit group
of neighbors.
MATNEY
WELCH
JAMES D. WELCH
MGySgt, U.S. Marince Corps (Ret.)
January 6, 1947 – March 4, 2017
He was predeceased by his wife of 49 years,
Jean Galloway Thornton; seven brothers and
sisters, and his beloved hunting dog, Joe.
GILROY
DALEY
RAYMOND EUGENE DUNN "Gene"
(Age 93)
On October 28, 2017, of Asbury
Methodist Village, Gaithersburg,
MD, joined hands once again with
his late wife, Alberta V. Hood, as they began
to walk down memory lane together. He
was a loving father to Susan Diane Dunn of
Gaithersburg, MD, Richard Eugene (Darrylin)
Dunn of Myrtle Beach, SC, and Robert Russell
(Nicole) Dunn of Longwood, FL. Predeceased
by daughter Lynda Jean Dunn in 1997. He was
also the beloved "Poppy" to grandchildren
Kimberly Dee (Matt) Jones of Lake Forest
Park, WA, Kasey Christine (Evan) Downey
of Norwalk, CT, and Alexander Ronan Dunn
of Longwood, FL; and great-granddaughter
Natalie Quinn Jones of Lake Forest Park, WA.
Visitation to be held Tuesday, October 31, from
2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m., and Wednesday,
November 1, from 2 to 4 p.m. at DeVol Funeral
Home, 10 E. Deer Park Dr., Gaithersburg, MD.
A Masonic Lodge ceremony will be held for
Brother Dunn on Tuesday afternoon. Private
interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery in Frederick,
MD, on Thursday, November 2.
In lieu of flowers, the family requests contributions be made to the Asbury Benevolent
Care Fund, 201 Russell Ave., Gaithersburg, MD
20877.
A special memorial celebration of Gene's life
and laugh is planned for a later date. Online
guestbook at
www.DeVolFuneralHome.com
MILLER
Susan poured so much of her heart into
her family. From her husband David to her
sons Morgan and Cooper, to her grandchildren
Abigail and Crosby, she mindfully set intentions
and goals for each of them – whether they
liked it, or not. Her humor, her drive, and
her indomitable spirit will forever be missed.
A memorial service will be held on Friday,
November 3 at 2 p.m. at Temple Sinai on
3100 Military Rd NW, Washington DC. In lieu of
flowers, memorial donations may be made to
the League of Women Voters (http://lwv.org/)
or to Temple Sinai (http://www.templesinaidc.org/donate).
PAID DEATH NOTICES
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Notices with photos begin at 3"
(All photos add 2" to your notice.)
Susan was born on June 2, 1944 in Brooklyn,
NY and grew up on Long Island, NY with her
parents Frieda and Morton Lehrer, and her
sister Randy. She graduated with a BS from
Cornell University in 1965 and received a MSW
from New York University in 1968. She lived her
life with great intention and purpose -- which
permeated her diverse fields of psychology,
entrepreneurship, and education. She practiced psychotherapy in Washington, DC for
40 years, later expanding her career path
to include educational consulting at Dunbar
and app development as co-founder of
Quad2Quad.
Her wit, humor and intellectual energy were
infectious. When she was in your presence,
there was never a dull moment. Susan would
light up a room and make strong connections
with everyone she met along the way. Her
friends and family would certainly agree: she
was not only a force of nature – she was The
Force.
On Monday, October 30, 2017, of
Silver Spring, MD. He was born
May 24, 1928 in Newton, IA to
Arthur and Lillie Thornton. He is
survived by his loving wife of 11
years, Margaret Thornton; four
children, Andy (Carol) Thornton,
Kathy (Gary) Miller, Alison McHenry, and Tricia
Blankinship; eight grandchildren, Sarah, Ben,
and David (Kara) Thornton, Carolyn (Kent)
Gabriel, Michael (Laura) Miller, Patty Reed,
Emily (Chad) Humbert, and Tina Blankinship
and two great-grandchildren, Sam and Peter
Humbert. He is also survived by step-daughter,
Peggy (Miles) Chidel and their children, Max,
Jake, Kimberly, and Heather; sisters-in-law
Vivian (Floyd) Knudsen and Shirley Galloway,
and brothers-in-law Jim and Henry (Annette)
Galloway; and several nieces and nephews.
ALL NOTICES MUST BE PREPAID
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All Paid Death Notices
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GENEVA MILLER (Age 87)
On October 23, 2017 of Washington, DC;
mother of Velma Gray, Juanita Barksdale,
Veronica Spivey, Marian, Delesantro and
Carolyn Miller. She is also survived by 11
grandchildren; 30 great-grandchildren and one
great-great grandchild; many other relatives
and friends. Visitation Friday, November 3 from
6 to 9 p.m. and Saturday, November 4 from
9 a.m. until service at 11 a.m. at St. Mark’s
Baptist Church, 624 Underwood Street NW.
Interment Arlington National Cemetery at a
later date.
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REMEMBER
YOUR LOVED ONES
MANYAK
Her nursing career at George Washington
University Medical Center was focused on the
intensive care and post anesthesia recovery
room.
JESSICA M. WARD
August 8, 1984 ~ November 1, 2003
Dear Jessica,
A silent thought, a secret tear,
Keeps your memory ever dear,
God took you home, it was his will,
But in our hearts, we love you still.
Mom, Dad, Sisters, Brothers and Family
REBECCA BRUNING MANYAK
Rebecca Bruning Manyak of Chevy Chase,
MD, died peacefully on October 19, 2017,
while in hospice care surrounded by her
family. She was 64.
Because your loved one served proudly...
Military emblems are available with death notices and in-memoriams
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To place a notice call 202-334-4122 or 800-627-1150, ext. 44122
Rebecca was born and raised in Louisville, KY,
on August 18, 1953, as one of six siblings
and graduated from Sacred Heart Academy.
She received an academic scholarship to
Vanderbilt University where she graduated
with a BS in nursing in 1975. During her
collegiate career, she was an active member
of Pi Beta Phi Sorority and played varsity
tennis for the Vanderbilt University Women’s
Tennis Team. Rebecca came to Washington
shortly after graduation and was a registered
nurse for many years at The George Washington University Medical Center.
Rebecca retired from nursing and dedicated
herself to raising her three children and
multiple activities. She was highly active
in various tennis leagues, was a volunteer
at Walter Reed Army Medical Center with
the Wounded Warrior program, and was an
active member of the Washington Chapter of
the Daughters of the American Revolution.
She returned to earlier roots and became an
enthusiastic piano player. She also founded
the neighborhood book club, still vibrant
after 25 years. Rebecca attended many
activities of The Explorers Club both locally
and nationally where her husband has been
active for over 25 years. During all of these
varied associations, Rebecca cultivated and
cherished many friendships.
Nothing was more important to Rebecca
than family, and she is survived by husband,
Dr. Michael Manyak and children, Rachel,
Susanna and Timothy (Chevy Chase, MD);
mother, Edith Pitzer and brother, Dr. Walter
Bruning (Louisville, KY); sisters, Susan Mossholder (Auburn, AL) and Madge Dennis
(Athens, GA) and brother, William Bruning
(Athens, GA). She was preceeded in death
by brother, Dr. Jeffrey Bruning and her father,
Walter Bruning. She also leaves behind 19
close nieces and nephews, extended family
members, and a multitude of good friends
and many fond memories for all.
Funeral services will be Saturday, November
4, 2017, at 11 a.m at the Shrine of The Most
Blessed Sacrament, 3630 Quesada St, NW,
Washington, DC.
December 17, 2017
TheWashington Post Magazine will publish
an Annual Commemorative Section.
Plan to be a part of this annual tradition!
RATES
$11.10 per Line
$150 B&W Photo
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DEADLINE
5 p.m.
Friday, November 17, 2017
For more information, please call:
202-334-4122 or 1-800-627-1150, ext. 4-4122
E-mail:
deathnotices@washpost.com
B8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
Cloudy and cool, chance of rain
Clouds rule, and a few showers drift
by during the day. For the most part,
any rain that amounts to much
should stay north of us. A few
hundredths of an inch can’t be ruled
out, though. With all the clouds and a possibility
of rain, temperatures will top out in the upper
50s and lower 60s. Tonight, there may be evening
showers or light rain, but otherwise it’s mostly
cloudy with lows ranging through the 40s to
around 50 in the city. Winds are light to calm.
Today
Mostly cloudy
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Thursday
Partly sunny
Friday
Partly sunny
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Saturday
Mostly cloudy
Sunday
Mostly cloudy
Monday
Mostly cloudy
64° 55
75° 58
78° 51
64° 53
68° 57
75° 57
FEELS*: 63°
FEELS: 74°
FEELS: 78°
FEELS: 62°
FEELS: 63°
FEELS: 69°
CHNCE PRECIP: 30%
P: 20%
P: 40%
P: 5%
P: 30%
P: 40%
WIND: SE 6–12 mph
W: S 6–12 mph
W: W 6–12 mph
W: ENE 7–14 mph
W: SE 7–14 mph
W: SSW 6–12 mph
°
°
°
°
°
OFFICIAL RECORD
Temperatures
NATION
Harrisburg
52/48
Hagerstown
53/48
FORECAST
High
Low
Record high
Record low
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
63° 3:00 p.m.
44° 6:30 a.m.
64°/46°
85° 1950
26° 1917
60° 4:00 p.m.
36° 5:43 a.m.
63°/39°
81° 2004
21° 1968
60° 2:09 p.m.
38° 5:00 a.m.
62°/41°
85° 1946
25° 1966
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: +5.4° yr. to date: +3.2°
Precipitation
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
OCEAN: 58°
Richmond
69/53
Norfolk
73/58
Virginia Beach
72/59
Past 24 hours
OCEAN: 59°
Total this month
Normal
Total this year
Kitty Hawk
71/62
OCEAN: 63°
Normal
Pollen: Low
Air Quality: Moderate
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
Low
Low
Low
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.00"
2.02"
3.40"
33.10"
33.52"
0.00"
3.15"
3.25"
37.90"
35.17"
0.00"
2.99"
3.33"
35.18"
35.21"
Moon Phases
UV: Low
Solar system
1 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, mostly cloudy, shower. High 49–53.
Wind southwest 7–14 mph. Tonight, mostly cloudy. Low
41–46. Wind southwest 4–8 mph. Thursday, partly sunny,
milder. High 56–60. Wind southwest 6–12 mph. Friday,
partly sunny, late–day shower. High 60–64.
Atlantic beaches: Today, partly sunny, mild. High 64–73.
Wind southeast 7–14 mph. Tonight, mostly cloudy, mild.
Low 57–61. Wind southeast 6–12 mph. Thursday, morning
shower, partly sunny. High 70–74. Wind southeast 4–8 mph.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, increasingly cloudy. Wind
southeast 5–10 knots. Waves a foot or less. Visibility good. • Lower
Potomac and Chesapeake Bay: Today, partly sunny. Wind southeast
7–14 knots. Waves around a foot on the lower Potomac, 1–2 feet on
the Chesapeake.• River Stages: Today, the stage at Little Falls will be
around 5.0 feet, falling to 4.3 feet on Thursday. Flood stage at Little
Falls is 10 feet.
Washington
ACTUAL
Ocean City
66/59
Lexington
61/47
Today’s tides
Su
Normal
Philadelphia
58/56
Charlottesville
63/49
Sa
Weather map features for noon today.
Baltimore
61/49
Dover
64/55
Cape May
Annapolis
64/60
63/56
OCEAN: 67°
Washington
64/55
RECORD
°
F
REGION
AVERAGE
(High tides in Bold)
12:46 a.m.
6:11 a.m.
1:06 p.m.
6:36 p.m.
Annapolis
3:10 a.m.
9:36 a.m.
3:52 p.m.
10:01 p.m.
Ocean City
5:40 a.m.
11:53 a.m.
6:00 p.m.
Norfolk
1:25 a.m.
7:40 a.m.
1:57 p.m.
8:05 p.m.
Point Lookout
5:41 a.m.
11:49 a.m.
6:11 p.m.
11:53 p.m.
none
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Kingsville, TX 87°
Low: Alliance, NE 3°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
Tomorrow
50/43/pc
71/45/s
41/31/s
72/57/pc
81/62/pc
61/49/c
42/24/r
67/60/pc
46/21/c
64/38/s
54/50/pc
48/42/pc
51/45/pc
77/58/s
59/49/sh
73/53/pc
63/37/pc
49/45/c
51/49/r
49/45/sn
80/62/pc
71/39/pc
64/56/c
69/43/s
41/29/pc
74/57/pc
85/68/pc
73/54/pc
38/26/sf
76/63/pc
38/22/c
58/43/c
65/59/c
62/51/sh
63/58/r
79/56/pc
71/54/c
75/51/c
55/35/c
57/38/sh
67/57/c
66/52/sh
93/62/s
61/34/pc
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
52/40/c
47/44/c
79/56/pc
31/20/pc
39/26/sn
55/45/pc
87/74/c
79/68/r
49/47/sn
72/64/c
79/57/pc
55/45/c
79/58/s
66/59/sh
69/58/pc
57/54/r
66/62/sh
82/69/pc
47/44/c
40/32/sn
67/56/c
77/66/c
55/53/pc
73/58/pc
53/32/pc
62/44/sh
79/52/s
29/25/pc
37/20/c
70/56/sh
88/74/s
87/69/pc
66/49/sh
83/65/c
81/59/c
61/38/pc
76/55/s
80/62/c
69/57/pc
70/61/sh
77/65/sh
84/70/pc
54/37/sh
42/27/c
75/62/c
81/66/pc
69/60/pc
74/59/c
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
73/52/pc
52/38/c
79/61/pc
58/56/c
83/62/s
49/45/r
53/43/s
57/44/c
58/48/pc
73/53/pc
73/38/s
69/53/c
71/48/s
55/53/c
86/76/s
69/50/s
69/61/c
65/52/pc
87/77/s
54/44/sh
49/35/sh
46/41/r
80/63/pc
64/46/pc
80/49/s
54/32/pc
82/63/pc
73/58/pc
83/62/pc
66/55/c
58/54/r
53/41/r
68/58/c
75/53/c
65/40/pc
75/54/pc
65/50/pc
72/50/c
86/76/s
69/52/s
70/59/pc
67/56/pc
87/76/s
50/39/r
46/32/sh
65/53/sh
83/65/pc
64/43/s
World
High: Mandora, Australia 112°
Low: Verkhoyansk, Russia –38°
Nov 4
Full
Nov 10
Last
Quarter
Nov 18
New
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Nov 26
First
Quarter
Set
6:07 p.m.
4:23 a.m.
5:29 p.m.
4:47 p.m.
5:58 p.m.
8:46 p.m.
excludes Antarctica
WORLD
Today
Addis Ababa
75/48/pc
Amsterdam
58/48/pc
Athens
64/50/pc
Auckland
66/58/pc
Baghdad
86/63/s
Bangkok
85/76/c
Beijing
65/39/s
Berlin
54/47/sh
Bogota
67/49/r
Brussels
57/43/pc
Buenos Aires
74/61/pc
Cairo
81/64/pc
Caracas
75/67/pc
Copenhagen
56/47/sh
Dakar
89/80/s
Dublin
57/45/pc
Edinburgh
55/39/c
Frankfurt
55/42/pc
Geneva
59/37/pc
Ham., Bermuda 79/73/sh
Helsinki
35/26/pc
Ho Chi Minh City 82/75/t
Tomorrow
74/51/pc
56/46/c
66/51/s
66/60/pc
87/65/s
90/73/pc
65/33/s
53/42/c
66/48/c
55/43/c
69/58/r
80/62/s
74/66/pc
54/43/c
90/80/s
52/41/pc
49/39/pc
57/41/c
60/41/pc
77/72/pc
37/31/c
86/74/t
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
80/71/s
84/57/s
54/44/pc
68/55/pc
83/55/s
75/41/s
86/79/t
86/67/s
87/79/c
68/61/c
71/61/c
60/43/c
70/51/c
83/78/sh
75/57/pc
49/40/pc
31/20/sf
96/75/s
77/58/pc
88/65/pc
46/38/sh
46/35/c
58/44/c
48/43/sh
84/71/s
84/58/s
57/47/s
66/54/pc
84/55/s
77/41/s
87/78/pc
85/67/s
87/78/t
69/60/pc
67/59/t
57/44/pc
68/50/pc
87/77/c
77/53/pc
60/49/r
32/22/s
95/77/s
77/60/c
88/66/pc
50/31/c
58/45/r
58/45/pc
55/39/c
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
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76/67/c
92/62/s
67/46/s
85/68/pc
68/48/pc
52/29/s
65/51/c
71/52/s
86/77/c
45/41/sh
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75/56/pc
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48/45/c
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66/51/pc
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87/77/t
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83/73/sh
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Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
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Rise
7:35 a.m.
4:59 p.m.
6:11 a.m.
4:50 a.m.
7:12 a.m.
11:15 a.m.
KLMNO
Style
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/STYLE
EZ
SU
THE RELIABLE SOURCE
BOOK WORLD
MUSIC REVIEW
CAROLYN HAX
Jake Tapper’s 10-year-old
writes a New York Times
op-ed encouraging girls to
raise their hands. C2
The Polaroid Man et al.
will shake you up in Joe
Hill’s short-story collection
“Strange Weather.” C3
Four men and a book:
The Orlando Consort’s
“Meet the Manuscript” at
the Library of Congress. C5
Daughter-in-law is
standoffish, but you
can keep things from
turning standoff-ish. C8
C
NPR places
editor on
leave after
accusations
TWO WOMEN ALLEGE
UNWANTED KISSES
Oreskes was N.Y. Times
bureau chief at the time
BY
NPR is investigating allegations by two women who said the
head of its news department made
unwanted physical contact with
them while he was employed by
another news organization nearly
two decades ago.
The women, both journalists at
the time of the alleged incidents,
made the accusations in recent
weeks against Michael Oreskes,
senior vice president of news and
editorial director at the Washington-based public broadcasting organization.
In response
to the allegations, NPR said
Tuesday that it
has
placed
Oreskes on indefinite leave.
In separate
complaints, the Oreskes
women
said
Oreskes — at the time, the Washington bureau chief of the New
York Times — abruptly kissed
them while they were speaking
with him about working at the
newspaper. Both of them told similar stories: After meeting Oreskes
and discussing their job prospects, they said he unexpectedly
kissed them on the lips and stuck
his tongue in their mouths.
Both of the women spoke to The
Washington Post on the condition
of anonymity so as not to damage
their employment prospects.
The alleged incidents occurred
in the late 1990s, the women said.
Oreskes joined NPR in March 2015
after working at the Times and the
Associated Press in senior editing
roles.
The women spoke with NPR’s
attorney in charge of labor and
employment matters in midOctober. She sent the women
emails acknowledging that the
news organization was looking
into the information they provided.
NPR didn’t address any of the
specific allegations when contacted by The Post for comment. Instead, it issued a statement reading: “We take these kinds of allegations very seriously. If a concern is
raised, we review the matter
promptly and take appropriate
steps as warranted to assure a safe,
comfortable and productive work
JIM YOUNG/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
The Obamas, in the now
BY K AREN T UMULTY
AND K RISSAH T HOMPSON
chicago — This was the way Barack Obama
had imagined these years would be.
He started thinking about it long before the
shock of President Trump’s election, before
the rout of his party that would be the coda to
his two terms in office, even before he stood
on the frigid grounds of the Old State House
in Springfield in February 2007, and declared
he was running for president.
A decade later found him here at the
opening of a two-day summit to launch his
foundation and yet-to-be-built presidential
library.
“When I asked myself after the presidency,
‘How could I have an impact?,’ ” Obama said,
“the thing that was most exciting for me was
the idea of creating a hub, a venue, a place, a
network in which all of these young people
across the globe and across the country, that
all of these young people from every race, and
every background and every religion could
start meeting each other, and seeing each
other and teaching each other and learning
from each other.”
For the former president himself, it was a
literal and spiritual homecoming, at a down-
At Chicago summit, the former president
and first lady set their course
CHARLES REX ARBOGAST/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Michelle and Barack Obama listen to a speaker at a
two-day summit to launch his foundation. Since leaving
the White House, the former president has been more
cautious when it comes to partisan politics.
P AUL F ARHI
town hotel just a few miles from the housing
projects where he found his early calling as a
community organizer in the 1980s, and the
lakefront park where he and nearly a quartermillion supporters celebrated his election as
the nation’s first African American president
in 2008.
“Even after I left community organizing,
the lessons that I had learned about people
and about being rooted in communities and
listening and sharing stories and creating
power from the bottom up rather than the top
down to bring about real change — those
lessons never left me,” Obama said. “I carried
those lessons with me even after I became
president of the United States.”
The event had the earnestness of a TED
Talk, the nostalgia of a family reunion, and a
dollop of the celebrity allure that envelops all
things Obama.
Obama convened famous friends such as
Britain’s Prince Harry and “Hamilton” writer
and star Lin-Manuel Miranda, along with
more than 500 budding activists from 60
countries and 27 states. The schedule included speakers and wonky panel discussions on
topics from community engagement to empowering women and girls, to social media
OBAMA CONTINUED ON C4
ORESKES CONTINUED ON C2
BOOK WORLD
A nut-and-dolt story by
the author of ‘Wicked’
BY
R ON C HARLES
If you have a child who dreams
of dancing, you’ve seen “The Nutcracker” enough times to know
that you can’t leave until Clara
finally wakes up — and you do, too.
During the years when my
younger daughter studied at Boston Ballet, she was sometimes a
mouse, sometimes a soldier, always adorable. But the tickets
were about $80 apiece, and there
were grandparents and other relatives who wanted in on this cherished holiday performance, which
meant that the Stahlbaums’ opulence depended, at least in part, on
my impoverishment.
I’m not complaining. That gorgeous Russian score wound
around E.T.A. Hoffmann’s surreal
story produced one of the world’s
most eidetic tales. Every time I
hear Tchaikovsky’s music — even
the tortured pop versions at the
mall — visions of sugar plums still
dance in my head.
Which made
me excited to
read “Hiddensee,” Gregory
Maguire’s new
novel about “a
once and future
Nutcracker.”
Maguire would
seem the perfect author for
HIDDENSEE
this act of creA Tale of the
ative investigaOnce and
tion. He’s alFuture
ready delved
Nutcracker
into the early
By Gregory
lives of such
Maguire
fantastical figWilliam Morrow.
ures as Snow
304 pp. $26.99
White and Cinderella. And, of
course, his novel about the Wicked Witch of the West is the basis
for that spellbinding Broadway
hit “Wicked.”
But there’s barely a nutshell of
music or magic in “Hiddensee.”
BOOK WORLD CONTINUED ON C3
‘House of Cards’ topples in wake of Spacey scandal
BY
PETE SOUZA
Production has stopped on “House of Cards,” which stars Kevin Spacey as President Underwood.
B ETHONIE B UTLER
“House of Cards,” which helped
transform the way we watch TV, is
meeting a particularly unceremonious end.
Amid a scandal involving lead
actor Kevin Spacey, Netflix and
production company Media
Rights Capital said in a statement
Tuesday that they would suspend
production on the political drama’s sixth season “until further
notice, to give us time to review
the current situation and to address any concerns of our cast and
crew.”
The companies announced
Monday that the show’s forthcoming sixth season would be its
last. The show, which premiered
in 2013 as Netflix’s first original
series, paved the way for the company — once known for its DVD
mailers — to pioneer the streaming TV era.
“House of Cards” was an early
binge-watching favorite and
proved that streaming services
could contend with more traditional networks when it came to
accolades, racking up nine Emmy
SPACEY CONTINUED ON C2
C2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
The Reliable Source
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
A proud dad moment for Tapper
Like most dads, journalist
Jake Tapper is super proud of
his daughter’s accomplishments.
But instead of taping her crayon
masterpieces to the fridge, the
CNN anchor posts about them
on Twitter. Which is how 10year-old Alice Paul Tapper got
an op-ed published in the New
York Times.
Last week, the “Lead” anchor
announced to his 1.45 million
Twitter followers that Alice, a
Girl Scout, had come up with her
very own patch: the “Raise Your
Hand” patch, which aims to
encourage and celebrate
classroom participation. The
new badges had just been
delivered to the Girl Scouts
Nation’s Capital council, and
Tapper was unsurprisingly
“psyched,” he told us.
Just minutes after his proud
dad tweet, a Times editor, Bari
Weiss, reached out to Tapper.
Would Alice maybe want to
write about her new badge?
Tapper conferred with his
daughter offline and then
tweeted back in the affirmative.
Alice was in. Now the fifthgrader had her next big
homework assignment — an oped for the New York Times. No
pressure or anything.
Less than a week later, the
paper published “I’m 10. And I
Want Girls to Raise Their
Hands,” the younger Tapper’s
take on why girls don’t raise
their hands as much as boys in
class. Short answer: They’re
afraid of being wrong. Alice,
who’s named after American
suffragette Alice Paul, took the
issue to her troop and a new
patch was eventually born.
“People say girls have to be
90 percent confident before we
raise our hands,” Alice wrote in
the Times, “but boys just raise
their hands. I tell girls that we
should take the risk and try
anyway, just like the boys do. If
the answer is wrong, it’s not the
end of the world. It’s not like
answering a trivia question to
win a million dollars on live TV.”
And if you think that dear old
dad, who has a novel coming out
next summer, did most of the
heavy lifting for the piece, you’d
be wrong. Tapper tells us that
Alice dictated the column to him
after discussing an outline with
Weiss, who then did some
editing, and voilà! A 10-year-old
writer was born.
But despite the coveted clip,
Alice doesn’t have any
immediate plans for a future in
journalism.
“She wants to be an activist to
help save dogs and puppies,”
said Tapper.
After dad Jake Tapper tweeted
about daughter Alice Paul
Tapper’s design for a Girl Scout
patch, an editor at the New
York Times asked whether the
10-year-old would be willing to
write an op-ed for the
newspaper.
The Inauguration was after the election and I thought I’d
help us heal. I was wrong.”
— Singer Chrisette Michele, who performed at President Trump’s inaugural
celebration, in a series of social media posts about how her life and career have
since changed. After the inauguration, Michele said, she was shunned by fans,
experienced suicidal thoughts and was dropped by her music label, Capitol Records.
CHARLIE NEIBERGALL/ASSOCIATED PRESS
JACQUELYN MARTIN/AP
MARIO ANZUONI/REUTERS
Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) posited that the real-life drama of Washington is “what killed ‘House of Cards,’ ” despite
the fact that the show’s cancellation comes after an allegation that lead actor Kevin Spacey made sexual advances
in 1986 toward another Broadway actor, who was 14 at the time.
Rubio’s flawed critique of ‘House of Cards’
Marco Rubio clearly hasn’t been
following the headlines. If he had
been, the Republican senator from
Florida would know that “House of
Cards,” once Washington’s favorite
guilty pleasure, wasn’t canceled for
lack of drama.
A TMZ cameraman caught up
with Rubio on the Hill (seriously,
there are now TMZ cameramen
stalking the hallowedhalls of
Congress). The senator was asked
about “everything that’s going on”
with Paul Manafort, the former
Trump campaign manager who was
recently indicted in the investigation
into Russia’s role in the 2016
election.
Rubio said that he hadn’t read the
indictment but added that “it sounds
like stuff he was doing back in 2012,”
referring to Manafort. “It has
nothing to do with the campaign,”
said the former presidential
candidate.
When asked if the whole thing had
a whiff of “House of Cards,” the
Netflix drama about corruption in
politics, Rubio responded, “It’s
probably what killed ‘House of
Cards,’ is that real life is more
dramatic right now.” Well, no. Not
quite.
What probably “killed” the Netflix
series were allegations that star
Kevin Spacey once made unwanted
sexual advances on a 14-year-old. (A
Netflix representative said that the
decision to end the flagship series
after the next season, which is
currently in production, was made
months ago.)
Late Sunday night, actor Anthony
Rapp accused Spacey of
inappropriate sexual conduct at a
New York party in 1986. Hours later,
Spacey issued a two-paragraph
apology and a coming-out statement.
The very next day, Netflix announced
that “House of Cards” would end
after the upcoming sixth season.
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NPR investigating harassment allegations against editor Michael Oreskes
ORESKES FROM C1
environment. As a matter of policy, we do not comment about
personnel matters.” A spokeswoman, Isabel Lara, offered no
further comment.
Oreskes didn’t respond to multiple requests for comment.
The 63-year-old editor is the
latest media figure whose conduct
has been called into question by
women who worked for him or
who sought employment when he
was in a position to wield power
over hiring and firing. Allegations
against former New Republic editor Leon Wieseltier and political
journalist Mark Halperin have
also come to light in the past
month.
Both
complainants
say
Oreskes’s alleged behavior had a
lasting impact.
One of the women said her encounter with him permanently
damaged her confidence. She was
in her late 20s at the time, recently
arrived in Washington from a
small Western town. “When I first
went to see him, it was after screwing up my nerve to try to be bold
and maneuver myself into a better
job, and after what happened with
him, I never really tried that
again,” she said.
The women said they met with
Oreskes after he expressed an interest in reviewing their work and
giving them career advice, possibly with an eye toward hiring
them as reporters. Neither was
ever hired.
The first woman said she met
Oreskes at the Times’ offices in the
Army and Navy Club Building in
downtown Washington.
Afterward, she said, he took out
a personal ad in the Washington
City Paper aimed at her. It read:
“Saw you at the Army-Navy Building. Loved hearing your life story
and your ideas. Hope you get this
message. Let me know.”
She recounted that a week later,
he emailed her to ask why she
hadn’t responded to his ad. The
woman said she was unaware of it
and had to search for it. “What was
especially creepy about it was that
he put it in the wrong place in the
paper,” she said in an interview.
Instead of appearing in the
“Missed Connections” section, the
ad was in a section called “Adult
Services” that featured thinly disguised offers of prostitution.
Thereafter, she said, Oreskes invited her to have lunch in a room
at the Watergate Hotel, catered by
room service. She declined the offer.
She nevertheless maintained
contact with him, hoping to keep
her job prospects alive. She says
that when she mentioned to him
that she was traveling to New York
for a job interview at the New York
Daily News, he told her to book the
flight he planned to take the same
day. They shared a cab into the city
from the airport. At the end of the
trip, he leaned against her, kissed
her and slipped his tongue into
her mouth, she said.
“The worst part of my whole
encounter with Oreskes wasn’t the
weird offers of room service lunch
or the tongue kiss but the fact that
he utterly destroyed my ambition,”
she said.
The second woman recounted a
similar sequence of events. After
booking him on a TV program that
she was producing, and mentioning that she wanted to return to
print reporting, he offered to review her published work. They
‘House of Cards’ spinoffs
are a possibility for Netflix
SPACEY FROM C1
nominations in its first season.
Netflix has said the decision to
end the show after Season 6 was
made months ago. But the cancellation news arrived on the heels of
an explosive BuzzFeed interview
in which actor Anthony Rapp
alleged that Spacey made a sexual
advance toward him more than
30 years ago, when Rapp was 14.
Hours later, Spacey responded
to the accusations on Twitter with
a two-paragraph statement that
has been met with widespread
criticism, particularly from the
LGBT community. Spacey said he
did not remember the encounter
but was “beyond horrified” to
hear Rapp’s account. “If I did
behave then as he describes, I owe
him the sincerest apology for
what would have been deeply
inappropriate drunken behavior,”
Spacey wrote.
In the second paragraph, Spacey addressed long-standing speculation about his sexual orientation. “As those closest to me know,
MICHEL EULER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Michael Oreskes, then Associated Press senior managing editor,
at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, in 2014.
agreed to meet at a local restaurant, but at the last minute,
Oreskes called and said he had a
trip planned that day and was
running late. He asked to meet at
her apartment. She agreed.
The apartment meeting went
off without issue, although the
woman recalled feeling uncomfortable when Oreskes placed his
hand in the small of her back as
she showed him around her apartment. She then offered to drive
him to Reagan National Airport
for his flight. As she pulled to the
curb, Oreskes said goodbye, then
kissed her unexpectedly, she said.
“I was frozen,” she recalled. “I
was shocked. I thought, ‘What just
happened?’ ”
She said she drove 100 feet,
pulled over and called her boyfriend to tell him about the incident.
Later, she said, she got a voice-
in my life I have had relationships
with both men and women,” he
wrote. “I have loved and had
romantic encounters with men
throughout my life, and I choose
now to live as a gay man. I want to
deal with this honestly and openly and that starts with examining
my own behavior.”
Spacey
was
immediately
slammed for coming out as gay
while addressing the very serious
allegation that he had made a
sexual advance on a minor.
“Coming-out stories should not
be used to deflect from allegations of sexual assault,” GLAAD
President Sarah Kate Ellis said in
a statement. Others criticized
Spacey’s implication that it was
his choice to be gay.
“The worst part of
my whole
encounter with
Oreskes wasn’t the
weird offers of
room service lunch
or the tongue kiss
but the fact that he
utterly destroyed
my ambition.”
A woman who complained
about NPR’s Michael Oreskes
On Monday, Netflix and Media
Rights Capital said in a joint
statement that they were “deeply
troubled” by the allegations
against Spacey, who is also an
executive producer on the show.
Spacey was not filming at the
time, and the companies said that
executives would be meeting with
cast and crew members “to ensure that they continue to feel
safe and supported.”
The International Academy of
Television Arts & Sciences announced Monday that it is withdrawing a special Emmy Award
that Spacey was to receive
Nov. 20.
Throughout five seasons of
“House of Cards,” Spacey has
carved an iconic role as politician
mail message from Oreskes saying
how much he enjoyed meeting her
and that he looked forward to
seeing her again.
About two months later, she
booked him on the TV program
again and invited him to lunch.
She arranged to meet him at a
restaurant in the center of Union
Station.
“I looked him in the eye, and I
said: ‘You kissed me, and it was
totally inappropriate. That’s not
the way I want to get ahead in this
business.’ His jaw dropped. He
said: ‘I was overcome with passion. I couldn’t help myself.’ ”
Neither woman complained at
the time; both believed that their
complaints would be ignored and
would jeopardize any chance of
working for the Times.
Both said they were motivated
to come forward now by NPR’s
coverage of recent sexual harassment episodes, especially those involving Harvey Weinstein. “The
idea that he’s in charge of that
coverage is just so hypocritical to
me,” one woman said. “It’s sickening. I want to say: ‘You owe me . . . a
public apology. You should recuse
yourself” from NPR’s coverage of
harassment.
Two people who worked at the
Times with Oreskes around the
late 1990s recalled that he focused
extraordinary attention on another young woman who worked
as a news aide in the Washington
bureau.
“I would call it pestering,” said
one editor. “It made [the woman]
really nervous. There was excessive phone calling [by him to her]
and messages that he wanted to
meet her outside the office.”
This account was confirmed by
Jill Abramson, who was Oreskes’s
deputy at the time. Abramson,
who went on to become the Times’
top editor and is now a columnist
and a senior lecturer at Harvard,
said in an interview that she regretted not confronting Oreskes
about his behavior.
“If I had to do it again, I would
have told him to knock it off,” said
Abramson, co-author of a book
about the Clarence Thomas-Anita
Hill harassment case. “I think I
should have raised this with [the
Times’ human resources department]. . . . Maybe confronting him
would have somehow stopped him
from doing it to another woman.”
Abramson said she hesitated in
part because the young woman
didn’t want to raise the issue but
did want Oreskes’s alleged behavior to stop. But Abramson said: “I
don’t really feel it was in a gray
area in retrospect. I should have
stopped him.”
“The Times takes all allegations
of sexual harassment seriously and
we are looking into it,” a spokeswoman for the company said.
Eventually, another editor
passed the word to a senior editor
in New York, who gave Oreskes “a
father-son talking-to,” as one editor put it, warning him to steer
clear of the young woman. The
young woman eventually landed a
job at another publication in
Washington.
One of the women who complained about Oreskes to NPR said
she thought she saw him a few
months ago at her gym for the first
time in years. “I just about had a
heart attack,” she said. “I fled the
building feeling sick. I’m not sure I
would want to talk to him long
enough for him to apologize even
if he wanted to.”
Francis “Frank” Underwood, who
ruthlessly used murder and manipulation to achieve his dream
of reaching the White House, only
to resign in disgrace. The show’s
most recent season saw his wife,
Claire (Robin Wright), become
the nation’s first female president.
In addition to luring the Oscarwinning Spacey to TV, the show
also nabbed director David
Fincher (of “Fight Club” and “The
Social Network”), who won an
Emmy for directing the pilot. Netflix made a big gamble by ordering the first 26 episodes at once,
with a reported budget of
$100 million.
Despite the Spacey controversy, Netflix doesn’t appear to be
completely ready to let go of its
flagship series. Variety reported
Monday that the streaming company and Media Rights Capital
are developing multiple spinoff
ideas for the drama, which has
continued to garner awards-show
buzz despite growing criticism
about its narrative issues. “House
of Cards” was up for best drama at
this year’s Emmys ceremony, with
Wright and Spacey both receiving
lead acting nods.
According to Variety, one such
spinoff idea revolves around Underwood’s former chief of staff
Doug Stamper, played by Michael
Kelly, who also landed an Emmy
nomination this year for his supporting role.
paul.farhi@washpost.com
bethonie.butler@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C3
RE
book world
Y OU NG R E AD E R S
T
he sweetness of food, the warmth
of a sweater, the soil and rain that
nourish plants and flowers: There
is much for which to be grateful. But
where do these things come from? Toni
Yuly shows us, joyfully, in Thank You,
Bees (ages 18 months to 4 years).
Cheerful ink and collage art sings from
each page in vibrant primary colors and
interesting textures. Yuly’s clear, crisp
depictions of things such as rain,
gardens or a treehouse are lively and
immediate, demonstrating that we have
light from the sun, honey from the bees,
wool from sheep, wood from trees — and
each of these makes up a part of the
home that the Earth gives us. This is an
exuberant book about some everyday
gifts from the natural world and a
lighthearted way to express gratitude for
them, with words that are easy,
charming and important to say out loud
now and then: “Thank you, bees,”
“Thank you, trees,” “Thank you, Earth.”
— Kathie Meizner
THE WASHINGTON POST/ISTOCK IMAGES
‘Wicked’ author cracks another chestnut
BOOK WORLD FROM C1
Maguire has a style glazed with a patina of
Old World formality. Don’t look for the
passion and color of Tchaikovsky here;
this is a novel with its own palette of
darker, woodland tones.
In Bavaria around 1808, a foundling
boy named Dirk lives with an old woman
and an old woodcutter. When a falling
tree knocks Dirk out, he experiences a
vision of a talking bird, a gnome and a very
aggrieved spirit of the forest. Returning to
life and believing that his guardians will
again try to kill him, Dirk runs away from
home into the wide world he knows nothing about. “How many times,” he wonders,
“will I lie down in a darkness whose
character I cannot imagine, to see what
daybreak reveals of my new circumstances?” Many times.
Dirk is a “bit of a dolt,” Maguire writes,
but not usually the funny kind. Although
he’s literal and serious, he’s no rube, nor is
he a naive standard of moral innocence
like Mark Twain’s Huck Finn. As Dirk
wanders around Germany with a patch
over one eye — the result of that accident
in the forest — he views everyone from a
distance. He can be an oversensitive prig.
“I have no talents,” he says honestly, “I
only watch and listen.” Something about
his upbringing with those two loveless
guardians has cauterized his affections.
Even his rare flutterings of lust and romance are tightly constrained, largely
unexpressed — one might say, almost
wooden.
This remains
very much a
study of a
man who left
the forest of
fairy tales
and never
fully joined
the world of
getting and
spending.
But despite some early allusions, Dirk
is not the Nutcracker himself, which may
be what sets this novel on its pedestrian
trajectory. The moment a village pastor
names our hero “Drosselmeier,” the pixie
dust falls from the pages, and it’s clear
that this is the story of a future toymaker,
not the tale of a magical soldier who will
battle the Mouse King around Clara’s
Christmas tree.
And yet — like Dirk — the novel feels
suspended between realism and fantasy.
“You’re an oddity among young men,” says
one of the many people who struggle to
get close to him. “Does anyone know
much about you?” No, not even we do,
though we follow Dirk from one village to
another. That structure allows Maguire to
sprinkle the plot with references to 19thcentury characters, all of whom seem
more vivacious than our one-eyed hero.
(An extended encounter with the hypnotist Franz Mesmer provides the novel’s
best set piece.)
But this remains very much a study of a
man who left the forest of fairy tales and
never fully joined the world of getting and
spending. Dirk doesn’t really belong anywhere, a condition that eventually causes
him a certain amount of tightly repressed
anguish. Maguire explores this theme
most sensitively over Dirk’s long friendship with a gay musician. For different
reasons, neither of these young men can
freely express what he’s feeling, but even
the closeted gay man finds more happiness than Dirk, whose passions are channeled into carving wooden toys. We come
to know the dimensions of his longing,
but we never really know the content of
his desire.
That mystery must be the point of this
unhurried story, which eventually meshes with the details of Petipa and Ivanov’s
ballet. Maguire suggests that we all pine
for some vaguely recalled but tantalizing
moment from childhood. “Surely you
have such a walnut in your own life,” he
writes, “something that holds the key to
all your past ease and safety.” Dirk’s winding journey finally brings him close to that
lost paradise, but not in any way you’d
expect.
After all, the past is a tough nut to crack.
bookworld@washpost.com
Ron Charles is the editor of Book World and
host of TotallyHipVideoBookReview.com.
Totally Hip Video Book Review
Ron Charles dances after Herr
Drosselmeier and the Nutcracker. To
watch, go to wapo.st/hiddensee.
T
rust comes hard to 11-year-old Ada
in The War I Finally Won (Dial,
ages 9 to 12), by Kimberly
Brubaker Bradley. This stunning sequel
to Bradley’s Newbery Honor book “The
War That Saved My Life” opens in 1940
with Ada about to undergo surgery on
her clubfoot. Its success allows Ada to
walk and run, but she remains haunted
by memories of her abusive mother.
Ada’s worries are further complicated by
the uncertainties of war. The cottage
Ada shares in Kent, England, with her
younger brother and their guardian
grows cramped and occasionally
fractious when the landlord, Lady
Thorton, moves in. Bradley brings to
vivid life the home-front experience of
blackout curtains, ration books, bombs
and the constant fear of loss. When a
Jewish teenager from Germany joins the
household, Ada remains aloof, believing,
like many at the time, that all Germans
were enemies. Slowly, the girls bond
over a shared love of the horses in Lady
Thorton’s stable, and Ada learns of
Hitler’s treatment of Jews. A series of
tragic events thrusts Ada into action —
and brings the disparate characters
together. By turns tough and tender, this
novel leavens complex themes with
moments of wonder and joy, including a
trip to the London zoo and a magical
late-night gallop.
— Mary Quattlebaum
‘Strange Weather’: Cloudy with a chance of terror
BY
E LIZABETH H AND
I
n fiction and film, horror can be
cautionary (Don’t go in the basement!) and even oddly comforting
(Bad as things are, they’re even
worse on Elm Street). But in times like
these, when real-world terrors outstrip
our night terrors, how can a novelist
possibly compete?
Joe Hill, the author of several terrifying bestsellers, rises to this challenge in
“Strange Weather,” a striking if sometimes uneven collection of four short
novels.
In “Snapshot,” Michael Figlione is a
smart 13-year-old Californian who
spends his free time inventing items such
as a party gun that shoots confetti. “I was
fat, and I was lonely,” he says. “If you were
the former, the latter was a given.” Michael’s mother is MIA; his well-meaning
father encourages his son’s interests by
taking him to a local club of older,
like-minded geeks, which doesn’t really
help. “When I dropped in on this crew, I
wasn’t just learning about circuit boards.
I believed I was looking at my future:
depressing late-night arguments about
Star Trek and a life of celibacy.”
But then an elderly neighbor, Mrs.
Beukes, shows up at Michael’s door and
warns him about someone she calls the
Polaroid Man: “Don’t let him take a
picture of you. Don’t let him start taking
things away.” Michael dismisses her ravings as the early stages of dementia, but a
run-in with the Polaroid Man at a con-
STRANGE
WEATHER
Four Short
Novels
By Joe Hill
William Morrow.
432 pp. $27.99
venience store convinces him that something far creepier is going on. Hill’s artful
blend of 1980s nostalgia and supernatural unease is enhanced by his touching
depiction of Michael’s encounters with
Mrs. Beukes and her husband, an aging
bodybuilder distraught over his wife’s
abrupt, inexplicable decline.
“Loaded,” the most disturbing story
here, recounts a decade-long history of
gun violence, racism and domestic abuse
in a Florida town. Hill deftly cuts back
and forth between seemingly unrelated
characters — a philandering lowlife and
his teenage lover; an African American
journalist and her young daughter; a
former military cop now employed at a
fetid shopping mall; a dark-skinned
young woman in a headscarf — building
to a gut-clenching resolution as horrific
and familiar as this morning’s news.
After all this darkness, the whimsical
“Aloft” provides a welcome break in the
clouds. Aubrey Griffin is crammed into a
single-engine Cessna with other firsttime skydivers preparing to honor a
friend who recently died. The appearance of a vast, UFO-shaped cloud and the
subsequent failure of the plane’s engines
cause everyone to make an emergency
jump. The next thing he knows, Aubrey
has fallen only 39 feet, not 12,000, and
landed on the mysterious cloud. “He
patted the mist ahead of him, stroked it
like a cat. It firmed up into a lumpy,
pliant mass at the first touch.” A dreamlike, affecting tale unfolds, as Aubrey’s
memories and desires begin to come to
life in ephemeral form. Anyone who’s
gazed out a plane window at cloud
mountains, or dozed in a field on a
summer afternoon and imagined castles
(and perhaps aliens) in the sky, will be
enchanted.
In the final story, “Rain,” whimsy and
horror form a more uneasy alliance. A
young woman named Honeysuckle observes an ominous thunderhead over
Denver. “I could smell rain in that wind —
or something like rain anyway,” she says.
“It was the fragrance of a quarry, the odor
of pulverized rock.” A short time later, the
storm hits:
“I took one step into the driveway, and
something stung my arm. . . . I looked at
my bare shoulder and saw a bright red
drop of blood and something sticking out
of the skin: a thorn of gold.”
The ensuing downpour of crystalline
needles kills Honeysuckle’s girlfriend
and thousands of others and destroys the
area’s infrastructure. An increasingly
apocalyptic scenario unfolds as the
spikes fall across the world. Hill’s scenes
of glass rain are surrealistically beautiful
and frightening; those of looters,
mounds of corpses and emergency responders evoke other post-apocalypse
books and movies and, sadly, recent
events. Like our own national reports,
“Strange Weather” leaves readers with a
scant chance of hope on the horizon.
bookworld@washpost.com
Elizabeth Hand’s most recent book is “Fire,”
a collection of essays and stories.
O
n the afternoon of Nov. 4, 2013, a
16-year-old boy in Oakland, Calif.,
set fire to another teenager’s thin
white skirt. The victim received secondand third-degree burns and spent the
next few weeks undergoing multiple
surgeries. In The 57 Bus (Farrar Straus
Giroux, ages 12 to 18), Dashka Slater
examines this horrific incident from
several angles, providing a nuanced
portrait of the assailant and the victim, a
brainy teen who identifies as agender
(neither male or female). The book also
sensitively explores the hot-button
issues of gender nonconformity, bias
crimes and juvenile justice. And since
the attack occurred at one point along
the sprawling route of the 57 bus, the
city of Oakland — a diverse community
beset by inequalities in income,
opportunity and safety — also figures
heavily in the narrative. For kids in East
Oakland, “life had a way of sticking its
foot out, sending you sprawling,” and
Slater well describes the bleak and
bleaker prospects they face.
— Abby McGanney Nolan
bookworld@washpost.com
LITERARY CALENDAR
TONIGHT 6 P.M. Mark Helprin will
discuss his novel “Paris in the Present
Tense” at National Churchill Library and
Center, 2122 H St. NW. 202-994-6558.
C4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
Television
TV HIGHLIGHTS
11/1/17
7:00
7:30
BROADCAST CHANNELS
8:30
9:00
9:30
8:00
◆ News
◆ Hollywood
4.1 WRC (NBC)
◆ TMZ
Mod Fam
5.1 WTTG (Fox)
◆ Wheel
◆ J’pardy!
7.1 WJLA (ABC)
◆
ET
9.1 WUSA (CBS) Off Script
14.1 WFDC (UNI) Enamorándome
◆
◆
FamFeud
FamFeud
20.1 WDCA (MNTV)
◆ MotorWeek
22.1 WMPT (PBS) ◆ Business
26.4 WETA (PBS) PBS NewsHour
30.1 WNVC (MHz) France 24 Programming
32.1 WHUT (PBS) Tavis Smiley ◆ House
50.1 WDCW (CW) Mike & Molly Goldbergs
66.1 WPXW (ION) Law & Order
The Blacklist
◆ Empire
◆ Goldbergs
◆ Speechless
◆ Survivor
◆ La Rosa de Guadalupe
Fox 5 News ◆ Page Six
◆ Nature
Nature
France 24 Programming
Rock Newman
◆ Riverdale
Law & Order
◆
Law & Order: SVU
◆ Star
◆ Mod Fam
◆ Housewife
◆ SEAL Team
Mi marido tiene familia
Big Bang
Big Bang
◆ NOVA
NOVA
The Scent of Rain in the
Alzheimer-Caregiver
◆ Dynasty
Law & Order
◆
10:00
10:30
Chicago P.D.
Fox 5 News at Ten
◆ Designated Survivor
◆ Criminal Minds
Caer en tentación
◆ Dateline
Frontline
Frontline
The Scent of Rain in the
Democracy Now!
News
Seinfeld
Law & Order
◆
11:00
11:30
◆ J. Fallon
News
Fox 5 News
The Final 5
◆ Kimmel
News
◆ Colbert
News
◆ Noticiero
Noticias
◆ Dateline
◆ Charlie Rose
Charlie Rose
The Churchmen
◆ Charlie Rose
◆ Mom
Two Men
Law & Order
CABLE CHANNELS
KIM SIMMS/IFC
Stan Against Evil (IFC at 10) Erstwhile sheriff Stanley Miller (John C.
McGinley) is back to battle more supernatural forces in Season 2 of this
comedy horror series.
Riverdale (CW at 8) Riverdale’s
mayor (recurring guest star
Robin Givens) calls an emergency
town hall meeting to try to address
the town’s growing fears.
Empire (Fox at 8) Cookie tries to
get Lucious back in the recording
studio after the truth about his
memory loss is exposed.
Law and Order: Special Victims
Unit (NBC at 9) Rollins goes
undercover at a high-end rehab
center.
Modern Family (ABC at 9) Claire
(over)enthusiastically plans a 10thanniversary party for Jay and
Gloria.
Nova (WETA and MPT at 9) The
docu-series explores the
devastation behind the Great
Hurricane of 1780, which killed at
least 20,000 people.
Queen Sugar (OWN at 10) Violet
tells Hollywood about her
diagnosis.
Designated Survivor (ABC at 10)
Kirkman works to thwart a national
security threat.
Criminal Minds (CBS at 10) The
BAU tries to figure out what several
missing women have in common.
DOCUMENTARY
Frontline: Putin’s Revenge (WETA
and MPT at 10) This two-part
documentary concludes with a look
at Russian involvement in the 2016
election.
RETURNING
Total Divas (E! at 9) Season 7.
LATE NIGHT
Full Frontal (TBS at 10:30)
Samantha Bee returns.
Conan (TBS at 11) Kristen Bell,
Frank Grillo, Beth Stelling.
Daily Show (Comedy Central at 11)
Hillary Clinton.
Fallon (NBC at 11:34) Chris
Hemsworth, Lindsey Vonn,
Maroon 5, SZA.
Colbert (CBS at 11:35) Nicole
Kidman, Jonathan Groff, Walter
Isaacson.
Kimmel (ABC at 11:35) Guest host
Channing Tatum. Ellen DeGeneres.
Corden (CBS at 12:37) Mila Kunis,
Jim Parsons, Sam Smith.
Meyers (NBC at 12:37) Blake
Shelton, Robin Thede.
— Bethonie Butler
Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars
A&E
(6:00) Movie: Insidious ★★★ (2010)
Movie: Insidious: Chapter 2 ★★ (2013)
Movie: Insidious: Chapter 3
AMC
Treehouse Masters
Treehouse Masters
Treehouse Masters: Branched Out
Treehouse Masters
Animal Planet
Brotherly
(7:25) Movie: Death at a Funeral ★★ (2010)
Face
50 Central Face Value
50 Central
BET
Housewives/NJ
Housewives/NJ
Housewives/NJ
Housewives/NJ
Watch
Housewives
Bravo
Gumball
King of Hill
Amer. Dad
Cleveland
Amer. Dad
Burgers
Burgers
Family Guy
Family Guy
Cartoon Network Gumball
Erin Burnett OutFront
Anderson Cooper 360
Anderson Cooper 360
CNN Tonight
CNN Tonight
CNN
South Park
South Park
South Park
South Park
South Park
South Park
Broad City
Daily
Opposition
Comedy Central South Park
Misfit Garage
Misfit Garage: Fired Up
Misfit Garage
(10:03) Garage Rehab
(11:08) Fast N’ Loud
Discovery
Bunk’d
Raven
Andi Mack
K.C. Under.
Bizaardvark Raven
Stuck/Middle Liv-Mad.
Bizaardvark Raven
Disney
E! News
Total Bellas
Total Divas
Total Divas
E! News
E!
NBA Countdown (Live)
NBA Basketball: Houston Rockets at New York Knicks (Live)
NBA Basketball: Mavericks at Clippers
ESPN
Baseball
SportCtr
College Football: Central Michigan at Western Michigan (Live)
SportsCenter (Live)
ESPN2
Best Baker in America
Best Baker in America
Best Baker in America
Best Baker in America
Holiday Baking
Food Network
The Story With Martha
Tucker Carlson Tonight
Hannity
The Ingraham Angle
Fox News at Night
Fox News
(6:00) Movie: Alice in Wonderland ★★
Movie: Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory ★★★ (1971)
The 700 Club
Freeform
(6:00) Movie: The Croods
Movie: Hotel Transylvania 2 ★★ (2015)
Movie: Hotel Transylvania 2 ★★ (2015)
FX
Every Christmas Has
Movie: I’m Not Ready for Christmas (2015)
Movie: A Rose for Christmas (2016)
Hallmark
Movie: A Nutcracker Christmas (2016)
Movie: Finding Christmas
Hallmark M&M Movie: Home for Christmas Day (2017)
Termnator
VICE
Movie: Fast & Furious ★★ (2009)
(9:50) The Deuce
Vice
Amity Horror
HBO
Property Brothers: Buying
Property Brothers
Property Brothers
Hunters
Hunt Intl
Property Brothers
HGTV
American Pickers
American Pickers
American Pickers
(10:10) American Pickers
(11:09) American Pickers
History
Little Women: Dallas
Little Women: Dallas
Little Women: Dallas
Little Women: LA
(11:06) Little Women: Dallas
Lifetime
MASN College Classics
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Pro Football Plus
Football
MASN
Hardball Matthews
All In With Chris Hayes
Rachel Maddow Show
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MSNBC
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Teen Mom 2
Are You the One?
Catfish: The TV Show
MTV
Putin Takes Control
The Story of Us
Inside North Korea
LongRoad
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Nat’l Geographic Explorer
Extra
Wizards Overtime (Live)
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NBC SportsNet WA NBA Basketball: Phoenix Suns at Washington Wizards (Live)
Henry Danger Thundermans Full House
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Full House
Full House
Fresh Prince Fresh Prince Friends
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Nickelodeon
Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
Shannara Chronicles
The Day After Tomorrow
Spike
(6:30) Movie: Green Lantern ★★ (2011)
Movie: The Lone Ranger ★★ (2013)
Syfy
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Full
Conan
TBS
(6:00) Made for Each Other James Stewart: A Wonderful Life
(9:45) Movie: Mr. Smith Goes to Washington ★★★★ (1939)
TCM
The Little Couple
The Little Couple
The Little Couple
The Little Couple
The Little Couple
TLC
Pirates of the Caribbean
Movie: Now You See Me ★★ (2013)
(10:31) Movie: Red 2 ★★ (2013)
TNT
Expedition Unknown
Expedition Unknown
Expedition Unknown
Expedition Unknown
Finding Beasts
Travel
Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Impractical Jokers
Carbonaro
Carbonaro
Carbonaro
Carbonaro
TruTV
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Everybody Loves Raymond Raymond
Raymond
Mom
Mom
King
King
TV Land
Cosby Show Cosby Show Movie: This Christmas ★★ (2007)
Movie: This Christmas ★★ (2007)
TV One
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Mr. Robot
Law & Order: SVU
USA Network
Black Ink Crew: Chicago
Black Ink Crew: Chicago
Black Ink: Chicago
Black Ink Crew: Chicago
Scared Famous
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News at 10pm
Govt. Matters On Your Side
WNC8
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
WGN
LEGEND: Bold indicates new or live programs
More at washingtonpost.com/tv
◆
High Definition Movie Ratings (from TMS) ★★★★ Excellent ★★★ Good ★★ Fair ★ Poor No stars: not rated
At summit in Chicago, Obama talks of ‘civic culture’
OBAMA FROM C1
responsibility.
“He’s
bringing
together
strands of his past and things he
was particularly excited about
during his presidency,” said Susan E. Rice, who was Obama’s
United Nations ambassador and
national security adviser.
The former president never
mentioned Trump, and made
only an oblique reference to the
current divisiveness.
“The moment we are in right
now is the tail not the dog,”
Obama said. “What we need to do
is think about our civic culture,
because what’s wrong with our
politics is a reflection of the
problems in our civic culture.”
Even before he announced his
bid for the Oval Office, Obama
was considering how he would
spend these years.
He would be the fifth-youngest
man to be inaugurated the nation’s chief executive, which carried the presumption that he
would be given far more years
than most to shape his legacy and
manage a last act.
That, in fact, was part of why
Obama made what many believed to be a premature, even
impudent leap by a 45-year-old,
first-term U.S. senator over others who had been climbing the
ladder far longer.
“It appealed to him that he
would be a relatively young man
when he finished his presidency,
and he would have a useful life
ahead,” said David Axelrod, his
chief political strategist.
He imagined that his postpresidency would not be a twilight but a luxuriant afternoon
heavy with possibility.
Circumstances, however, have
brought another, more urgent set
of forces with which Obama must
grapple.
His party is shut out of power
and lacking in leadership; his
successor is intent on tearing
down his greatest achievements
— health-care overhaul, an international climate accord, the Iran
arms deal, new procedures to
spare from deportation children
brought to this country illegally
by their parents, and so much
more.
“To be honest, I inherited a
mess,” Trump said shortly after
taking office. “We’ll take care of
it, folks.”
There are those who say that
the 44th president is the best
CHARLES REX ARBOGAST/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Former president Barack Obama acknowledges the crowd at the
first session of a Chicago summit to launch his foundation.
possible figure to lead the resistance to the 45th.
Obama is not among them.
He has been exploring the
lucrative side of his new membership the world’s most exclusive club, giving six-figure
speeches to corporations and private groups. He and wife Michelle also signed a combined
book deal worth an estimated
$65 million to write their memoirs.
Ex-presidents are also be-
stowed a status as international
elder statesmen. Obama has traveled to Germany, Indonesia and
Brazil and hosted foundation
events to train civic leaders in
those countries.
Obama has been more cautious when it comes to partisan
politics. He has said he will weigh
in occasionally on specific issues;
a few weeks ago, he returned to
the campaign trail for Democratic gubernatorial nominees in Virginia and New Jersey.
He has noted: “I believe in the
wisdom that George Washington
showed, that at a certain point,
you make room for new voices
and fresh legs.”
William Galston, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution,
said Obama is “within the historical zone, the normative area for
former presidents, especially
compared to President Trump,
who prides himself on never
leaving an attack unanswered. I
don’t see Barack Obama as having reentered the ring to try to
throw blows at a president who is
trying to undo his agenda and
legacy.”
That is in part because when
Obama was in office, he had
appreciated the restraint his
predecessors showed in commenting on his performance.
“The two presidents Bush had
taught him a lesson in how to be a
former president,” Axelrod said.
But Obama is also seeking to
create something uniquely his
own.
“This idea of being a community organizer goes way back for
Obama so what he is doing is
really who he is,” said Burton
Kaufman, historian and author
of “The Post-Presidency From
Washington to Clinton.”
Kaufman contrasted Obama’s
perspective from that of former
president Jimmy Carter, who has
tackled international conflicts,
and Bill Clinton, who has leveraged large contributions to undertake specific projects.
“If we could create an architecture, a platform for those young
people to thrive and to scale up
all of those things they were
doing globally,” Obama said,
“then there’s no problem we
couldn’t solve.”
karen.tumulty@washpost.com
krissah.thompson@washpost.com
Aalap Shah, Mariana Alfaro and
Hannah Wiley contributed to this
report.
THEATRE
Shear Madness
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Vicuna & The American
Epilogue
Reserve now, holiday shows sell out early!
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Student Rush
Tickets Available
Tickets: 202-467-4600
Groups: 202-416-8400
www.shearmadness.com
Wed Nov 1 (PWYC) at 8
PM; Thurs Nov 2 @ 8 PM;
Fri Nov 3 @ 8 PM
“Uniquely fresh” (Variety) Trump-inspired satire. Written by
Jon Robin Baitz, directed by Robert Egan, starring John de
Lancie (Star Trek, Breaking Bad).
The Atlas Performing Arts Center
1333 H St NE
202-399-7993, mosaictheater.org
Tomorrow at 7
Saturday at 8
Former NSO Music Director Leonard Slatkin leads two
Bernstein compositions: the lively fanfare Slava! A Political
Overture and Songfest, a tribute to American perspectives and
writers. He concludes with Stravinsky's legendary ballet score
The Rite of Spring. Part of Leonard Bernstein at 100
Regular Schedule:
Tuesday–Friday at 8
Saturday at 6 & 9
Sunday at 3 & 7
This wildly popular interactive comedy whodunit keeps
the audiences laughing as they try to outwit the suspects
and catch the killer. New clues and up to the minute
improvisation deliver “shrieks of laughter night after night.”
(Washington Post)
Tickets
Available
at the
Box Office
Great Group Rates
for 15 or More
$35 and
Under
Pay-What-You-Can
preview Nov 1,
Talkbacks Nov 2, 5
Tickets
available
at the
Box Office
AfterWords postconcert discussion
immediately
following the Thu.,
Nov. 2 performance.
MUSIC - ORCHESTRAL
Slatkin conducts
Bernstein /
Stravinsky's “The
Rite of Spring”
Kennedy Center
Concert Hall
nationalsymphony.org
or call (202) 467-4600
ForeWords, with Ted Libbey
Beginning at 6:45 p.m. before the Sat., Nov. 4 performance.
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
• Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
16-2898
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C5
RE
MUSIC REVIEW
Orlando Consort brings four voices to Renaissance songs written for three
BY
C HARLES T . D OWNEY
This season the Library of
Congress is offering “Meet the
Manuscript” concerts, featuring
music from important sources in
its collection. On Monday night,
the Orlando Consort sang music
transcribed from the “Chansonnier de M. le marquis de
Laborde,” a hand-size book of
Renaissance songs compiled
around 1470 that was on display
outside Coolidge Auditorium.
The Orlando Consort is a
quartet of men, while the chansonnier contains almost entirely
pieces for three voices. Countertenor Matthew Venner, who sang
in all the pieces, kept his serene
voice fluty and flexible on the
top part. In different combina-
tions the blend, balance and
intonation of the group’s other
voices varied for better and
worse. Performing some of the
chanson parts on a textless vowel deflated some of the beautiful
imitations among parts in this
repertory.
Standout moments came in
Hayne van Ghizeghem’s “Allez
regretz” and Dufay’s “Se la face
ay pale,” both in the slightly
different versions found in the
Laborde source. Happily, the
ensemble included movements
from Mass settings, by Loyset
Compère and Dufay himself,
based on these same two chansons. The group’s sound opened
up more fully and naturally in
these gorgeous four-part pieces,
which were among the half-doz-
MOVIE DIRECTORY
DISTRICT
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
3111 K Street N.W.
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 2:154:50-7:30-10:10
AMC Loews Uptown 1
3426 Connecticut Ave N.W.
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 4:00
It (R) CC: 7:30
AMC Mazza Gallerie
5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 1:10
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) CC: 3:50
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:203:30-7:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
2:10-4:40-7:20
Suburbicon (R) CC: (!) 12:303:00-5:30-8:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
2:30-5:05-7:30
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 1:304:20-7:10
Thank You For Your Service (R)
CC: (!) 12:50-4:50-7:25
Kirk Cameron REVIVE US 2
(!) 7:00
Albert Einstein Planetarium National Air and Space Museum
6th Street and Independence Ave SW
To Space and Back 11:00AM
Dark Universe Space Show (NR)
11:30-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30
Hemisphere: An evening with Ulf
Langheinrich 7:00
Journey to the Stars (NR) 12:001:00-2:00-3:00-4:00-5:00
Angelika Pop-Up
at Union Market
550 Penn Street NE - Unit E
Suburbicon (R) CC: 11:45-2:004:30-7:15
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
11:15-12:15-1:30-2:30-3:45-4:456:00-7:00-8:15
Avalon Theatre
5612 Connecticut Avenue
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13)
11:15-2:00-4:45
Aida's Secrets 8:00
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 12:152:45-5:15-8:00
Landmark
Atlantic Plumbing Cinema
807 V Street, NW
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 12:202:40-9:55
It (R) CC: 1:40-4:25-7:10-9:50
Suburbicon (R) CC: 12:15-2:455:10-7:30-10:00
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 12:303:15-9:50
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
12:00-3:30-7:00-10:15
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
12:10-2:35-5:00-7:45-10:10
Landmark E Street Cinema
555 11th Street NW
The Paris Opera (L'Opera) (NR)
12:45-3:45-6:45-9:30
Wonderstruck (PG) Open Caption:
1:00-4:00-7:00-9:30
The Killing of a Sacred Deer (R)
CC: 1:15-4:15-5:00-7:15-9:45
Jane 12:45-3:00-5:15-7:30-9:45
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
1:05-4:05-7:05-9:35
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
1:35-4:10
Human Flow (PG-13) CC:
1:00-7:45
The Florida Project (R) CC:
1:05-4:05
The Royal Opera House: La
Boheme (NR) 7:00
Landmark West End Cinema
2301 M Street NW
What Ever Happened to Baby
Jane? (NR) 1:30-4:30-7:30
Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought
Down The White House (PG-13)
CC: 2:15-7:15
Chavela (NR) 2:30-5:00-7:30
Goodbye Christopher Robin
CC: 4:30
Medal of Honor Theater - NMMC
18900 Jefferson Davis Highway
We, the Marines (NR) 10:0011:00-12:00-1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00
Regal Gallery Place Stadium 14
701 Seventh Street Northwest
Geostorm (PG-13) 12:00-8:0010:40
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 2:35-5:25
Same Kind of Different as Me
(PG-13) 1:00-3:45
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:053:35-7:05-10:35
The Foreigner (R) 9:55
Jigsaw (R) 12:30-3:00-5:308:00-10:30
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:403:05-5:30-8:20-10:35
Suburbicon (R) 12:45-3:15-5:4510:45
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
12:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
Spirited Away - Studio Ghibli
Fest 2017 7:00
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) 1:15-3:4010:25
Kirk Cameron REVIVE US 2 7:00
Smithsonian - Lockheed Martin
IMAX Theater
601 Independence Avenue SW
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D
(NR) 2:40
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 4:20
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of
the Sea 3D (NR) 11:00-1:153:30
Dream Big: Engineering Our
World: An IMAX 3D Experience
12:25
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX
2D Experience (R)
Journey to Space 3D (NR)
10:25-11:50-2:05-5:15
MARYLAND
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
5:20
The Snowman (R) 7:10
Dunkirk (PG-13) 7:35
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 4:30-7:50
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 1:00It (R) 4:20-7:10
3:00-5:05-7:10-9:15
Only the Brave (PG-13) 5:20-8:10
Phantasm: Remastered (R) 9:15
Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
Jigsaw (R) 5:50-7:55
Goodbye Christopher Robin
1020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
Suburbicon (R) 5:25-7:45
12:30-2:45-4:55-7:05-9:20
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
Night of the Living Dead (4K
3:20-9:10
5:10-7:30
Restoration) (NR) 6:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 3:10-9:30
Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
Only the Brave (PG-13) 1:20AMC Academy 8
3899 Branch Avenue
4:20-7:20-10:20
6198 Greenbelt Road
Geostorm (PG-13) 12:15-2:50Jigsaw (R) CC: (!) 1:00-3:25-5:45- Jigsaw (R) 1:00-6:30
Tyler
Perry's
Boo
2!
A
Madea
5:30-8:05
8:00-10:20
Jigsaw (R) 1:30-3:45-6:30-9:05
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: Halloween (PG-13) 2:00-4:307:00-9:50
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:30(!) 12:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
Jigsaw (R) 12:00-2:30-5:002:55-5:30-7:55
AMC Center Park 8
7:30-10:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
4001 Powder Mill Rd.
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 1:30- 12:45-3:10-5:40-8:15
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 1:15-6:30 4:00-6:40-9:00
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) CC:
Thank You For Your Service (R) Halloween (PG-13) 1:00-1:453:50-9:05
12:30-2:30-5:10-6:50-7:50-10:30 3:25-4:10-5:50-6:30-8:30-9:15
It (R) CC: 9:00
Bow Tie Harbour 9
Regal Bowie Stadium 14
The Foreigner (R) CC: 12:45-3:302474 Solomons Island Road
15200 Major Lansdale Blvd
6:15-9:00
Suburbicon (R) 11:20-2:00-4:40- Geostorm (PG-13) 1:30-7:40
Jigsaw (R) CC: (!) 12:30-2:457:20-10:00
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 4:35-10:25
5:00-7:15-9:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
11:00-12:30-1:30-3:00-4:00-5:30- 1:00
1:00-3:45-6:10-8:45
6:30-7:50-9:00-10:30
The Mountain Between Us (PGSuburbicon (R) CC: (!) 1:30-4:00The Snowman (R) 11:40-2:3013) 1:10-4:10-7:05-10:15
6:30-9:10
5:10-8:00-10:40
The Snowman (R) 3:45
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:45- Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 10:40- Only the Brave (PG-13) 1:051:20-4:10-7:00-10:10
4:15-7:25-10:30
4:15-6:45-9:15
The Foreigner (R) 3:35-6:40-9:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: Goodbye Christopher Robin
10:50-1:40-4:20-6:50-9:30
Jigsaw (R) 3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
(!) 2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
The Florida Project (R) 11:30Happy Death Day (PG-13) 3:10Marshall (PG-13) CC: 12:152:20-5:00-7:40-10:20
5:40-8:10-10:30
3:00-6:00
Suburbicon (R) 2:35-5:10-7:45Cinemark
Egyptian
24
and
XD
AMC Columbia 14
10:20
7000 Arundel Mills Circle
10300 Little Patuxent Parkway
Bad Moms Christmas (R) 2:00Seven Sundays (NR) 11:00-2:05- A4:45-7:30-10:15
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 9:35
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 1:30-6:55 5:10-8:10
Marshall (PG-13) 1:00-3:50Geostorm
(PG-13)
11:45-5:20Jigsaw (R) CC: (!) 12:00-2:30-4:50
6:50-9:50
8:15
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
Thank You For Your Service (R)
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 2:35
11:15-2:50-6:20-9:55
1:00-3:40-6:20-9:05
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) Spirited Away - Studio Ghibli
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
12:00-6:30
11:40-2:20-5:00-7:35-10:10
Fest 2017 7:00
The Snowman (R) 10:55-1:45Suburbicon (R) CC: (!) 11:20Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
4:40-7:30-10:20
1:50-4:30-7:10-9:50
Halloween (PG-13) 1:30-2:30Blade
Runner
2049
(R)
10:55Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
4:00-6:30-9:00-10:00
2:45-6:20
10:55-1:25-4:00-6:40-9:20
Kirk Cameron REVIVE US 2 7:00
It (R) 10:10
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
A Question of Faith (PG) 2:40Only
the
Brave
(PG-13)
12:45CC: 6:10
5:25-8:00-10:30
3:50
Thank You For Your Service (R) The
Regal Cinemas Majestic
Foreigner (R) 12:10-3:05CC: (!) 11:10-2:00-4:40-7:20-10:10 5:50-8:40
Stadium 20 & IMAX
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 10:50-1:30- Jigsaw (R) 11:00-1:30-4:00900 Ellsworth Drive
4:10-10:15
6:30-9:00
Geostorm
(PG-13) 3:30-6:10
Spirited Away - Studio Ghibli
Happy
Death
Day
(PG-13)
10:55- Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 12:45-9:10
Fest 2017 (!) 7:00
1:20-4:05-6:35-9:15
Kingsman:
Kirk Cameron REVIVE US 2 7:00 Suburbicon (R) 11:40-2:20-5:05- (R) 12:00 The Golden Circle
Jigsaw: The IMAX 2D Experience 7:40-10:15
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
(R) (!) 11:00-1:30-4:00-6:30-9:00 A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
12:50-3:55
Geostorm (PG-13) 10:50-4:15
12:45-3:20-5:55-8:35
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Marshall (PG-13) 3:30-9:45
Halloween (PG-13) 11:05-1:30- Thank You For Your Service (R) 3:30-7:05-10:40
It (R) 12:25-3:55-7:30-11:05
4:00-7:00-9:40
11:00-1:45-4:30-7:15-10:00
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:05A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
3:20-10:25
10:50-1:30-4:20-7:10-10:00
Halloween (PG-13) 11:15-2:00- The Foreigner (R) 1:15-4:25Only the Brave (PG-13) (!) 12:20- 4:35-7:35-10:10
7:30-10:15
3:30-10:05
Kirk Cameron REVIVE US 2 8:00 Jigsaw (R) 12:15-2:50-5:25It (R) 12:00-3:05-9:00
Geostorm (PG-13) 11:45-5:208:00-10:35
The Foreigner (R) 10:50-1:358:15
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:304:15-10:10
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 2:35
3:00-6:00-8:35-11:00
Jigsaw (R) 7:10-10:00
Jigsaw (R) 11:00-12:15-1:30Suburbicon (R) 1:00-4:10-7:05AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18 2:45-4:00-5:15-6:30-7:45-9:009:45
10:15
9811 Washingtonian Ctr.
Secret Superstar (NR) 6:45-10:25
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) XD: Thank You For Your Service (R)
Suburbicon (R) CC: (!) 11:3011:30-2:05-4:40-7:15-10:00
12:25-3:05-5:50-9:10
2:00-4:30-7:10-9:50
Jigsaw: The IMAX 2D Experience Hoyt's West Nursery Cinema 14 Spirited Away - Studio Ghibli
Fest 2017 7:00
(R) (!) 1:05-3:25-5:45-8:05-10:25
1591 West Nursery Road
Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Jigsaw (R) (!) 11:50-2:15-4:35Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 1:10-3:50- Tyler
Halloween (PG-13) 12:05-2:356:55-9:15
6:25-9:00
3:10-5:15-5:50-7:50-8:30-10:30A Bad Moms Christmas (R) (!)
The Snowman (R) CC: 2:10-4:55- 11:00
12:10-2:45-5:20-7:55-10:30
7:40-10:25
Jane 12:05-2:35-5:15-7:40-10:05
Thank You For Your Service (R) It (R) CC: 1:15-4:15-7:15-10:15
Bad Moms Christmas (R)
(!) 2:05-4:45-7:25-10:05
Only the Brave (PG-13) CC: 1:00- A12:00-2:40-5:20-8:00-10:40
4:00-7:00-10:00
AMC Loews
Marshall
(PG-13) 1:30-4:25The Foreigner (R) CC: 1:00St. Charles Town Ctr. 9
7:15-10:05
3:40-9:55
11115 Mall Circle
Regal Germantown Stadium 14
Jigsaw (R) CC: 1:00-3:30-5:45Jigsaw (R) CC: (!) 11:55-2:3020000 Century Boulevard
8:00-10:20
5:00-7:15-9:30
Geostorm (PG-13) 2:30-8:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
2:00-4:40-7:00-9:20
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 5:15-10:45
(!) 11:45-2:30-5:00-7:45-10:15
Suburbicon (R) CC: 2:15-4:50Same Kind of Different as Me
Kirk Cameron REVIVE US 2
7:20-9:50
(PG-13) 12:00
(!) 8:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: American Made (R) 3:45
AMC Magic Johnson
1:00-2:00-3:00-4:30-5:30-7:00The Snowman (R) 12:15-3:15Capital Ctr 12
8:00-9:30-10:30
10:00
800 Shoppers Way
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 1:25-4:10- Blade Runner 2049 (R) 3:00-9:45
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 2:006:55-9:40
It (R) 12:30-6:30-9:45
7:00-9:30
Thank You For Your Service (R) Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:30Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 4:30
CC: 1:30-4:05-6:50-9:30
3:45-7:00-10:15
Jigsaw (R) CC: 1:00-3:15-5:30- Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
The Foreigner (R) 2:15-5:007:45-10:00
Halloween (PG-13) CC: 2:207:45-10:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: 4:45-7:30-10:00
Jigsaw (R) 12:15-3:00-5:452:15-4:45-7:15-9:45
Defining Hope CC: 7:00
8:15-10:45
Jigsaw: The IMAX 2D Experience Let There Be Light (PG-13) CC: Happy Death Day (PG-13) 1:30(R) CC: 2:15-4:30-6:45-9:00
1:45-4:15-6:45-9:15
4:00-6:30-9:00
Thank You For Your Service (R)
Suburbicon (R) 2:00-4:45-7:30Landmark
1:30-4:00-6:30-9:00
10:15
Bethesda Row Cinema
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 2:15ArcLight Bethesda
7235 Woodmont Avenue
7101 Democracy Boulevard
Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought 5:00-7:45-10:30
Geostorm (PG-13) 11:40-1:05Down The White House (PG-13) Thank You For Your Service (R)
1:45-4:30-7:15-10:00
5:10-7:35-9:45
CC: 2:00-4:30-6:50-10:00
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
Wonderstruck (PG) Open Caption: Spirited Away - Studio Ghibli
Fest 2017 7:00
3:00
1:10-3:50-7:10-9:45
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13)
Faces, Places (Visages, villages) Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
2:10-4:45
(PG) 1:20-3:30-5:40-7:50-10:00 Halloween (PG-13) 12:00-2:455:15-8:00-10:30
American Made (R) 3:20-6:40
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
Kirk Cameron REVIVE US 2 7:00
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) 12:50-3:40-6:40-9:10
5:00
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC: Mersal (NR) 1:00-4:45-8:30
Regal Hyattsville Royale
1:00-4:10-7:00-9:40
The Foreigner (R) 11:45-2:35Stadium 14
The Royal Opera House: La
4:35-7:10-10:05
6505 America Blvd.
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:05- Boheme (NR) 7:00
Breathe (PG-13) CC: 1:50
2:30-5:45-7:05-10:10
Geostorm (PG-13) 3:30-6:15
Suburbicon (R) CC: 1:30-4:20A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 12:30-9:00
12:10-1:15-2:45-3:30-4:30-5:15- 7:20-9:45
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
7:15-7:45-9:30-10:15
1:00-4:00-6:45
1:40-4:40-7:30-10:00
Marshall (PG-13) 12:15-2:45American Made (R) 1:00
Goodbye Christopher Robin CC: Kingsman: The Golden Circle
5:40-8:10-9:20
Thank You For Your Service (R) 4:35-10:05
(R) 9:45
11:50-2:55-5:50-8:00-9:40
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Old Greenbelt Theatre
The Killing of a Sacred Deer (R)
12:45-3:20
129 Centerway
CC: 11:30-2:25-5:25-7:00-9:10
The Foreigner (R) 1:15-4:00Battle
of
the
Sexes
(PG-13)
The Florida Project (R) 12:006:45-9:45
2:30-7:45
2:20-5:20-7:40-9:35
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 3:45-7:30
Faces,
Places
(Visages,
villages)
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
It
(R) 5:55-9:20
(PG) 5:30
Halloween (PG-13) 11:45-2:05Only the Brave (PG-13) 1:15Paragon Kentlands Stadium 10 4:45-7:50
4:55-7:05-9:25
629 Center Point Way
Scrooged (PG-13) 7:25
Jigsaw (R) 12:45-3:30-6:00-8:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:25Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:30Geostorm (PG-13) 5:15-7:40
4:50-8:15
3:00-5:30-8:15
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
Jigsaw (R) 12:20-2:25-5:05Suburbicon (R) 1:30-4:15-7:154:55
8:05-10:20
10:00
American Made (R) 4:50-7:20
AFI Silver Theatre Cultural Ctr
8633 Colesville Rd
en in the concert that weren’t
taken from the Laborde Chansonnier.
The most affecting music
came at the evening’s end.
“D’ung aultre amer,” a chanson
by Ockeghem (or possibly by
Busnois), was again matched
with an astounding Mass setting
of it, by Josquin Desprez, the
most celebrated composer of the
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 11:552:15-4:25-7:20-9:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:359:15
Suburbicon (R) 12:25-2:00-4:407:55-10:15
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 1:154:15-7:15-10:15
Marshall (PG-13) 2:00-5:00-8:00
Thank You For Your Service (R)
1:30-4:45-7:45-10:35
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) 12:30-1:453:00-4:30-5:45-7:00-8:30-9:45
The Snowman (R) 1:15-4:006:40-9:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:203:45-7:10
It (R) 10:30
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:303:35-10:00
The Foreigner (R) 12:45-3:30Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12 6:15-9:00
Jigsaw (R) 12:25-2:50-5:1514716 Baltimore Avenue
7:40-10:10
Geostorm (PG-13) 12:45-3:30Golmaal Again (NR) 8:50
6:50
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:40Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 9:50
3:05-5:40-8:05-10:25
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
Suburbicon (R) 12:20-2:50-5:201:15
7:50-10:20
The Mountain Between Us (PG- A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
13) 12:00-3:00-6:20-9:35
12:30-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) Marshall (PG-13) 12:50-3:401:25-4:15
6:30-9:20
It (R) 9:10
Thank You For Your Service (R)
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:401:30-4:20-7:15-10:00
3:40-6:40-10:10
Spirited Away - Studio Ghibli
The Foreigner (R) 7:30-10:35
Fest 2017 7:00
Jigsaw (R) 12:30-3:00-5:30Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
8:00-10:30
Halloween (PG-13) 12:30-3:00Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:15- 5:30-8:00-10:35
2:55-5:25-8:15-10:40
Kirk Cameron REVIVE US 2 7:00
Suburbicon (R) 12:00-2:35-5:10Xscape Theatres Brandywine 14
8:10-10:45
7710 Matapeake Business Dr
Marshall (PG-13) 12:20-3:10-6:15
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:20A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
1:30-4:20-7:15-10:50
12:00-2:35-5:15-8:00-10:40
The Mountain Between Us (PGTyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) 12:10-2:45- 13) CC: 3:30-6:10-8:50
4:00-5:15-6:30-7:50-9:15-10:20 Same Kind of Different as Me
Thank You For Your Service (R) (PG-13) CC: 12:20
The Snowman (R) CC: (!) 11:401:00-3:45-7:20-10:15
Regal Rockville Ctr Stadium 13 3:20-6:40-9:30
It (R) CC: 9:50
199 East Montgomery Avenue
The Foreigner (R) Open Caption;
Geostorm (PG-13) 3:15-8:30
CC: 10:30-1:10-4:10-6:50-9:40
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 12:30-5:45 Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
12:30-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:20
12:45-3:15-6:15
Suburbicon (R) CC: 11:10-2:10American Made (R) 8:45
5:00-7:45-10:25
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
3:30-10:00
(!) 10:40-1:40-4:45-7:50-10:40
The Snowman (R) 1:00-4:00Marshall (PG-13) CC: 10:0010:00
12:40-3:40-6:30-9:20
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:00Thank You For Your Service (R)
5:00-9:00
CC: 11:00-1:50-4:40-7:30-10:30
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:15Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
3:30-10:00
Halloween (PG-13) CC: (!) 12:10The Foreigner (R) 1:15-4:002:40-5:10-7:40-10:10
6:45-9:45
Jigsaw (R) CC: (!) 11:50-2:20Jigsaw (R) 12:15-2:45-5:154:50-7:20-10:15
7:45-10:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 1:00- (!) 10:00-11:50-12:50-3:10-3:503:45-6:15-9:00
6:20-7:10-9:10-10:00
Suburbicon (R) 12:30-3:15Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
5:45-8:30
Halloween (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:30A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
2:00-4:30-7:00
12:30-3:15-6:00-8:30
iPic Pike & Rose
Marshall (PG-13) 12:45-7:00
11830 Grand Park Ave
Thank You For Your Service (R)
Jigsaw (R) (!) 2:00-5:00-8:0012:15-3:00-5:45-8:30
11:00
Spirited Away - Studio Ghibli
Suburbicon (R) (!) 1:30-4:30Fest 2017 7:00
7:30-10:30
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) 12:30-3:00- A Bad Moms Christmas (R) (!)
1:15-4:15-7:15-10:15
5:30-8:00-10:30
Kirk Cameron REVIVE US 2 7:00
Regal Waugh Chapel
Stadium 12 & IMAX
1419 South Main Chapel Way
Geostorm (PG-13) 12:00-2:408:00
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 5:20-10:45
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
12:05
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:20-6:40
It (R) 12:15-3:15-6:15-9:15
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:103:10-6:15-9:30
The Foreigner (R) 3:50-10:10
Jigsaw (R) 1:00-3:25-5:50-8:1510:40
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:303:20-6:00-8:30-10:50
Suburbicon (R) 1:10-4:20-7:3010:20
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
12:00-2:35-5:10-7:45-10:20
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) 12:50-2:303:40-5:10-6:30-7:45-9:15-10:30
Thank You For Your Service (R)
1:20-4:10-7:00-10:00
Jigsaw: The IMAX 2D Experience
(R) 12:00-2:20-4:50-7:15-9:40
Regal Westview
Stadium 16 & IMAX
5243 Buckeystown Pike
Geostorm (PG-13) 1:00-7:15
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 4:00-10:00
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
1:15-4:00
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
12:45-4:30-7:45-11:00
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
1:00-3:45
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:453:15-7:00-10:45
It (R) 1:15-4:15-7:30-10:45
The Snowman (R) 6:30-9:30
The Foreigner (R) 12:15-3:306:15-9:00
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:303:30-6:45-9:45
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:303:15-6:00-8:30-11:15
Jigsaw (R) 11:30-2:00-4:457:30-10:15
Marshall (PG-13) 6:30-9:30
Suburbicon (R) 11:45-2:15-5:007:45-10:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
12:00-1:15-2:45-4:15-5:30-7:008:15-10:00-11:00
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) 12:00-2:305:15-8:00-10:30
Thank You For Your Service (R)
12:45-3:45-7:15-10:15
Jigsaw: The IMAX 2D Experience
(R) 12:15-2:45-5:30-8:15-11:00
UA Snowden Square
Stadium 14
9161 Commerce Center Drive
Geostorm (PG-13) 1:20-7:15
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 4:30-9:50
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
12:20-3:30-10:10
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
1:10-3:50-6:20
Suburbicon (R) CC: 11:30-2:154:45-7:20-9:50
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
12:45-3:15-5:45-8:15-10:45
Thank You For Your Service (R)
CC: 11:30-2:10-5:00-7:40-10:15
Jigsaw: The IMAX 2D Experience
(R) CC: 12:00-2:30-5:00-7:3010:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
11:45-2:15-4:45-7:15-9:45
AMC Shirlington 7
2772 South Randolph St.
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
4:00-10:00
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
1:30-4:15-7:30-10:15
Suburbicon (R) CC: (!) 2:15-4:457:45-10:15
Wonderstruck (PG) CC: (!) 1:454:30-7:15-10:00
Goodbye Christopher Robin (!)
2:00-4:40-7:30-10:10
The Florida Project (R) 1:30-4:157:00-9:45
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) CC: 1:45
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC:
6:45
Jane (!) 2:00-4:45-7:00-9:30
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 10:0012:20-2:20-4:35-7:00-9:15
Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
1600 Village Market Boulevard
Kirk Cameron REVIVE US 2 7:00
Manassas 4 Cinemas
8890 Mathis Ave.
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 2:004:00-6:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 2:054:10-6:25-8:30
Marshall (PG-13) 1:50-4:106:30-8:55
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) 2:20-4:256:30
Rave Cinemas Centreville 12
6201 Multiplex Drive
Geostorm (PG-13) 12:05-5:157:55-10:45
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 2:40
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
10:30-1:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:254:00-7:30
It (R) 11:00
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:203:20-6:20
The Foreigner (R) 11:45-2:255:05-7:45-10:30
AMC Tysons Corner 16
Jigsaw (R) 10:20-12:40-3:007850e Tysons Corner Center
5:20-7:40-10:00
Kirk Cameron REVIVE US 2 (!)
Golmaal Again (NR) 2:45-9:35
7:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 10:10A Bad Moms Christmas (R) (!)
12:35-3:05-5:30-8:00-10:25
11:45-2:15-4:45-7:15-9:45
Suburbicon (R) 11:50-2:20-4:55Spirited Away - Studio Ghibli
7:25-10:15
Fest 2017 (!) 7:00
Secret Superstar (NR) 3:30AMC Worldgate 9
6:50-10:40
13025 Worldgate Drive
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: (!)
12:10-2:40-5:10-7:40-10:10
1:10-6:45
Thank You For Your Service (R)
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) CC: (!)
11:25-2:05-4:40-7:15-9:50
4:05-9:25
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
American Made (R) CC: 1:20-7:15 Halloween (PG-13) 11:30-2:00The Snowman (R) CC: (!) 12:40- 4:30-7:00-9:30
3:40-6:30-9:20
Mersal (NR) 11:10-6:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: (!)
Vunnadhi Okate Zindagi (Unnadi
2:30-6:00-9:30
Okate Zindagi) (NR) 9:20
It (R) CC: 4:10-9:55
Rave Cinemas
The Foreigner (R) CC: (!) 1:30Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme
4:15-7:00-9:45
11900 Palace Way
Jigsaw (R) CC: (!) 12:35-2:55Geostorm (PG-13) 2:45-8:055:15-7:35-10:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:45
American Made (R) 12:301:40-4:00-6:20-9:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: 3:20-6:40
The Snowman (R) 11:05-1:50(!) 12:15-2:45-5:15-7:45-10:15
4:35-7:25-10:10
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) CC: (!) 12:00- It (R) 12:40-4:00-7:05-10:25
Jigsaw (R) 12:20-2:40-5:002:25-5:05-7:35-10:00
7:40-10:00
Alamo Drafthouse Cinema - Golmaal Again (NR) 9:30
One Loudoun
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 11:1020575 East Hampton Plaza
1:45-7:15
The Snowman (R) 11:00-5:45
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 11:55Geostorm (PG-13) 12:20-3:252:30-5:05-7:30-10:05
6:20-10:05
Suburbicon (R) 11:25-2:05-4:30Cool Hand Luke (NR) 7:20
7:45-10:35
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
11:40-3:15-6:40-10:30
11:50-2:15-4:50-7:50-10:30
It (R) 2:15-9:00
Marshall (PG-13) 4:25-9:50
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:10Thank You For Your Service (R)
AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
3:10-7:00-10:50
11:45-2:20-4:55-7:35-10:15
2150 Clarendon Blvd.
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:40Vunnadhi Okate Zindagi (Unnadi
4:00-8:00-10:45
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 10:20
Okate Zindagi) (NR) 11:30-2:55Geostorm 3D (PG-13) CC: 2:45-5:15 The Foreigner (R) 12:00-3:006:25-9:45
American Made (R) CC: 4:15-10:15 6:00-9:00
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 12:05-5:25
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) Suburbicon (R) 11:30-2:40Jigsaw (R) XD: 11:00-1:20-3:405:35-9:25
CC: 1:50-7:00
6:10-8:30-10:50
Only the Brave (PG-13) CC: 2:30- A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) XD:
11:10-2:00-4:50-7:40
4:30-7:30-10:00
11:15-1:45-4:15-7:10-9:55
Thank You For Your Service (R)
Jigsaw (R) CC: 2:45-5:15-7:45Regal Ballston Common
10:45-1:40-4:45-8:40
10:00
Stadium 12
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: 1:45Angelika Film Ctr Mosaic
671 N. Glebe Road
5:30-8:00-10:30
2911 District Ave
The
Mountain
Between Us
Suburbicon (R) CC: 2:00-5:00Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
(PG-13) 1:20
7:30-10:20
10:00-12:30-2:50-5:20-7:45-10:20 The Snowman (R) 1:35-4:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
The Florida Project (R) CC:
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 3:002:45-5:15-7:40-10:00
11:30-2:10-4:45-7:30-10:05
6:30-10:00
Thank You For Your Service (R) CC: Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
The Foreigner (R) 4:10-6:50-9:30
1:45-4:20-7:45-9:30
11:45-3:15-7:00-10:30
Jigsaw (R) 2:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
Suburbicon (R) CC: (!) 10:05AMC Hoffman Center 22
Golmaal Again (NR) 2:20-6:1512:35-2:55-5:25-7:55-10:25
206 Swamp Fox Rd.
9:40
Seven Sundays (NR) 12:35-3:45- Wonderstruck (PG) CC: (!)
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13)
10:45-11:40-1:30-2:20-4:15-5:05- 4:15-9:45
6:45-9:40
7:10-9:50
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 11:45Happy Death Day (PG-13) 1:05The Killing of a Sacred Deer (R) 3:30-6:00-8:25-10:40
2:25-5:05-7:40-10:15
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 1:00-3:40- CC: (!) 10:30-1:15-4:05-7:05-7:50- Suburbicon (R) 2:00-5:30-8:1010:00-10:45
6:20-9:10
10:10
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: Secret Superstar (NR) 3:45-7:00
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
(!) 11:30-2:00-4:30-7:30-10:30
CC: 1:05-3:45
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 2:00American Made (R) CC: 11:25Bow Tie
4:30-7:00-9:30
2:10-4:55-7:35
Reston Town Ctr 11 & BTX
Thank You For Your Service (R)
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
11940 Market Street
1:00-2:15-5:15-8:00-10:15
CC: 2:55-9:05
Spirited Away - Studio Ghibli
Geostorm (PG-13) 12:50-4:20The Snowman (R) CC: 11:00Fest 2017 7:00
7:20-10:10
1:50-4:40-7:35-10:20
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
The Snowman (R) 1:30-4:30Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
Halloween (PG-13) 1:15-2:057:30-10:15
11:10-2:45-6:15-9:45
4:30-7:15-10:05
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 2:40It (R) CC: 6:25-9:35
Kirk Cameron REVIVE US 2 7:00
6:10-9:40
Only the Brave (PG-13) CC:
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:40Regal Countryside Stadium 20
11:50-6:00
3:40-6:40-10:00
45980 Regal Plaza
The Foreigner (R) CC: 11:35-2:15- The Foreigner (R) 12:20-3:20The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
5:10-7:50-10:25
6:35-9:35
1:05-3:50-6:20-9:05
Jigsaw (R) CC: 12:30-3:15-5:45- Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 12:30The Mountain Between Us (PG8:00-10:15
3:30-6:20-9:20
13) 12:35-3:20-6:00-9:15
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
All I See Is You (R) 1:40-4:40Same Kind of Different as Me
11:05-1:25-4:05-6:40-9:05
7:40-10:20
(PG-13) 3:00-5:50-9:25
All I See Is You (R) CC: 2:20-7:50 Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00
American Made (R) 12:25-3:05Marshall (PG-13) CC: 11:10Suburbicon (R) 2:30-5:00-8:00- 5:45-8:45
2:05-10:25
10:30
Suburbicon (R) CC: 11:15-1:45- A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 1:40- The Snowman (R) 1:20-4:05-6:50
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:154:30-7:15-9:45
4:40-7:40-10:20
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: Thank You For Your Service (R) 4:45-8:15
It (R) 12:55-4:20-7:30
12:00-12:45-2:30-3:30-5:00-6:00- 1:10-4:10-7:10-9:50
Golmaal Again (NR) 1:30-5:05-8:30
7:30-8:30-10:00
Suburbicon (R) 4:00-7:00-9:50
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 1:35Thank You For Your Service (R)
Cinema Arts Theatre
4:35-7:25-10:00
CC: 11:30-5:15-10:30
9650 Main St
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 2:30Spirited Away - Studio Ghibli
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC: 5:15-8:00
Fest 2017 7:00
All I See Is You (R) 1:50-5:00-7:45
2:30-7:30
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 7:50 Raju Gari Gadhi 2 (NR) 12:45-4:00Halloween (PG-13) CC: 11:007:10-10:00
12:00-1:30-2:30-4:00-5:00-6:30- Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
9:50-12:10-2:30-4:55-7:20-9:35 Secret Superstar (NR) 12:507:25-9:00-10:00
Kirk Cameron REVIVE US 2 7:00 Suburbicon (R) CC: 9:55-12:15- 4:15-7:15
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 1:302:25-4:45-7:10-9:20
Jigsaw: The IMAX 2D Experience
4:00-6:45-9:15
Lucky CC: 2:00
(R) 11:30-2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 1:35- Goodbye Christopher Robin CC: Judwaa 2 (NR) 12:30-3:30-6:309:50
9:40-12:00-2:35-5:00
4:10-6:50-9:25
Faces, Places (Visages, villages) Raja The Great (NR) 12:30-3:40A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
6:40-9:45
10:05-12:05-4:00-6:00(PG)
CC:
11:00-1:30-4:00-6:30-9:00
Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought
8:00-9:45
AMC Potomac Mills 18
Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down The White House (PG-13)
2700 Potomac Mills Circle
Down The White House (PG-13) 1:00-3:35-6:05-9:00
Jigsaw (R) CC: 1:30-4:00-6:30-9:00 CC: 9:45-12:10-5:05-9:50
Mersal (NR) 12:50-4:10-7:30-9:30
VIRGINIA
Renaissance. In an even more
virtuosic recycling, Josquin wove
the top part of the song together
with the sequence “Victimae paschali laudes” in his polyphonic
setting of that text. A single
encore, the frottola “In te Domine speravi,” cemented the oft-repeated estimation of Josquin as
“master of the notes.”
style@washpost.com
Wednesday, November 1, 2017
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
Vunnadhi Okate Zindagi (Unnadi
Okate Zindagi) (NR) 1:00-4:10-7:20
Bhalwan Singh (NR) 12:40-3:456:45-9:40
Suburbicon (R) 1:50-5:00-7:4510:20
Secret Superstar (NR) 12:453:20-6:40-9:45
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
Regal Dulles Town Ctr 10
12:30-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
21100 Dulles Town Circle
Thank You For Your Service (R)
Geostorm (PG-13) 3:30-6:30
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 12:50-9:15 1:40-4:40-7:30-10:10
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
American Made (R) 11:30AM
Halloween (PG-13) 1:45-4:45Blade Runner 2049 (R) 2:157:50-10:30
6:00-9:30
Jigsaw: The IMAX 2D Experience
It (R) 2:15-6:15-9:50
(R) 1:10-3:30-6:00-8:30-10:50
The Foreigner (R) 1:15-4:00Regal Potomac Yard Stadium 16
6:45-10:30
3575 Potomac Avenue
Jigsaw (R) 12:15-2:45-5:157:45-10:20
Geostorm (PG-13) 1:25-4:55-7:50
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:45- Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 10:30
3:15-5:45-8:30-10:50
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
Suburbicon (R) 1:45-4:30-7:15- 1:10-4:10-6:45-9:15
10:10
The Mountain Between Us (PGA Bad Moms Christmas (R)
13) 1:20-4:05-6:45-9:25
12:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
Marshall (PG-13) 11:30AM
1:00-3:45-10:05
Thank You For Your Service (R) Blade Runner 2049 (R) 2:101:30-4:15-7:00-9:45
6:00-9:45
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
The Snowman (R) 1:45-4:40Halloween (PG-13) 12:40-3:00- 7:35-10:20
5:30-8:15-10:40
The Foreigner (R) 1:55-4:457:30-10:10
Regal Fairfax Towne Ctr 10
Only the Brave (PG-13) 1:004110 West Ox Road
3:55-10:30
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 1:4012:00-2:35
4:20-7:40-10:05
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:30Jigsaw (R) 1:00-3:20-5:40-8:003:20-6:40-9:40
10:25
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:25Marshall (PG-13) 1:00-3:503:30-10:10
The Foreigner (R) 5:10-7:55-10:40 6:50-9:55
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:00- Suburbicon (R) 1:50-4:35-7:3510:10
2:30-5:00-10:15
Suburbicon (R) 12:10-2:45-5:20- A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
1:00-1:40-3:40-4:20-7:00-7:408:00-10:35
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 12:10- 9:40-10:20
Thank You For Your Service (R)
2:40-5:10-7:45-10:15
Thank You For Your Service (R) 2:05-4:50-7:45-10:20
Spirited Away - Studio Ghibli
12:05-2:50-5:30-8:10-10:50
Spirited Away - Studio Ghibli Fest Fest 2017 7:00
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
2017 7:00
Halloween (PG-13) 1:35-4:30Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
7:05-9:40
Halloween (PG-13) 12:00-2:30Kirk Cameron REVIVE US 2 7:00
5:00-7:30-10:00
Kirk Cameron REVIVE US 2 7:00
Regal Springfield Town Ctr 12
The Fortress (nam-han-san6500 Springfield Town Ctr
seong) (NR) 12:30-3:45-7:30-10:40 Geostorm (PG-13) 12:30-6:20
Let There Be Light (PG-13) 12:30- Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 3:30-9:10
4:10-7:00-10:25
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
Regal Fox Stadium 16 & IMAX 12:10
22875 Brambleton Plaza
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Despicable Me 3 (PG) 11:45-2:00- 1:00-3:50
The Snowman (R) 11:05-4:504:15-6:30-8:45
10:40
Geostorm (PG-13) 4:00-6:45Blade Runner 2049 (R) 6:3010:45
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 1:15-9:30 10:20
It (R) 10:25
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:0012:15-2:45-5:15-8:00
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) 3:10-6:40-9:50
The Foreigner (R) 1:10-4:10
12:45-3:45-7:00-10:15
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) Jigsaw (R) 11:30-2:00-4:307:00-9:30
12:30-3:00-5:45
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 1:20The Snowman (R) 8:15-11:00
4:20-7:10-9:40
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00Suburbicon (R) 11:00-1:40-4:403:30-7:00-10:30
7:20-10:10
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:15A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
3:15-6:15-9:15
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:30- 11:15-2:10-4:45-7:30-10:15
Marshall (PG-13) 1:50-7:40
3:00-5:30-8:15-10:45
Thank You For Your Service (R)
The Foreigner (R) 1:30-4:1511:10-2:30-5:10-7:50-10:50
7:15-10:00
Spirited Away - Studio Ghibli
Jigsaw (R) 12:00-2:30-5:00Fest 2017 7:00
7:30-10:00
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 1:00- Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) 11:40-2:204:00-7:15-10:15
Suburbicon (R) 12:00-2:30-5:00- 2:50-5:00-5:30-7:30-8:00-10:007:45-10:15
10:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
Regal Virginia Gateway
11:45-12:45-2:30-3:30-5:15-6:15Stadium 14 & RPX
8:00-9:00-10:45
8001 Gateway Promenade Pl
Thank You For Your Service (R)
Geostorm
(PG-13) 2:20-8:10
12:45-3:45-6:45-9:45
Jigsaw: The IMAX 2D Experience Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 5:00-10:50
American
Made
(R) 2:30
(R) 1:00-3:30-6:00-8:30
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
Regal Kingstowne
12:55-6:45
Stadium 16 & RPX
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
5910 Kingstowne Towne Ctr
1:15-3:45
Geostorm (PG-13) 3:50-5:10The Snowman (R) 1:20-4:159:15-10:25
7:10-10:45
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 1:05-6:35 Blade Runner 2049 (R) 6:15-9:55
American Made (R) 12:15
It (R) 9:10
The Snowman (R) 12:15-3:45Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:506:50-9:50-10:30
3:50-6:50-10:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:00-3:15- The Foreigner (R) 1:10-3:55-6:30
7:05-10:00
Jigsaw (R) 2:15-4:45-7:15-9:45
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:30Happy Death Day (PG-13) 1:003:30-6:45-9:50
3:30-6:00-9:00
The Foreigner (R) 1:45-4:45Suburbicon (R) 1:30-4:10-7:457:25-10:30
10:15
Golmaal Again (NR) 2:50-6:05- A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 2:309:35
5:00-7:30-10:00
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 12:30- Marshall (PG-13) 4:00-10:10
3:20-6:00-9:05
Thank You For Your Service (R)
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:40- 1:50-4:50-7:50-10:40
3:05-5:30-8:00
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Suburbicon (R) 1:30-4:15-7:05- Halloween (PG-13) 5:15
9:45
Jigsaw (R) 3:00-5:30-8:15-10:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 2:00- Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
4:50-7:30-10:00
Halloween (PG-13) 1:45-4:30Marshall (PG-13) 2:30-7:45
7:00-8:00-9:30-10:30
Thank You For Your Service (R)
Smithsonian - Airbus
1:10-4:30-7:30-10:10
IMAX Theater
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
14390
Air and Space Museum Pkwy
Halloween (PG-13) 12:25-3:00D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
5:30-8:00-10:30
11:10-4:00
Jigsaw (R) 12:15-2:45-5:15A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 12:35
7:50-10:30
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
12:15-1:15-2:40-4:30-5:20-6:45- Sea 3D (NR) 10:20-1:30-3:10
Dream Big: Engineering Our
8:00-9:30-10:40
World: An IMAX 3D Experience
Regal Manassas
2:20
Stadium 14 & IMAX
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX 2D
11380 Bulloch Drive
Experience (R)
Geostorm (PG-13) 1:30-7:20
Journey to Space 3D (NR)
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 4:30-10:00 12:00-4:50
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
University Mall Theatre
1:00-3:50-6:15
10659 Braddock Road
The Snowman (R) 1:15-4:00Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC: 12:207:00-10:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:20-3:15- 2:35-4:35
The Mountain Between Us (PG6:50-10:15
13) CC: 7:30-9:50
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:40American Made (R) CC: 7:00-9:25
3:40-6:45-9:50
The Emoji Movie (PG) CC: 12:00The Foreigner (R) 12:30-5:201:45-3:30-5:15
8:00-10:45
Jigsaw (R) 2:20-4:50-7:15-9:40 Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 12:102:20-4:20
Golmaal Again (NR) 9:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:30- American Assassin (R) CC:
2:50-5:50-8:15-10:40
7:15-9:35
C6
EZ
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
PICKLES
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
E-W VULNERABLE
NORTH
K654
K6
6542
A83
EAST
QJ2
Q J 10 5
AKQ93
4
WEST
873
98732
J 10 7
J6
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH (D)
A 10 9
A4
8
K Q 10 9 7 5 2
The bidding:
SOUTH
WEST
NORTH
1
Pass
1
Dbl
2 (!) 2 4
Pass
5
Opening lead — J
EAST
2
3
All Pass
CLASSIC PEANUTS
CHARLES SCHULZ
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
I
n the Life Master Pairs
at the ACBL Summer
Championships, today’s
North-South reached five
clubs, but that contract was
“normal”: Many other pairs
would get there. For a good
score, declarer, Dan Boye of
Farmington, N.Y., needed an
overtrick.
When West led the jack
of diamonds, East overtook
and tried to cash a second
diamond. Boye ruffed, led a
trump to dummy and ruffed
another diamond to “isolate
a menace”: East was left
with the defenders’ only
diamonds.
Declarer then ran his
trumps and took the A-K of
hearts. With three tricks left,
dummy had a diamond and
the K-6 of spades, and South
had the A-10-9 of spades.
East couldn’t both save a
diamond and guard his Q-J-2
of spades, so South took the
rest for plus 420.
If West wins the first diamond and shifts to a spade,
South can still take 12 tricks
with a similar squeeze —
or with a complex “trump
squeeze,” threatening to
set up a diamond winner in
dummy with a ruff. Only a
spade opening lead holds
him to his contract.
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
LIO
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
Q J 2 Q J 10 5
AKQ934
You open one diamond,
your partner bids one spade
and the player at your right
overcalls two clubs. What do
you say?
ANSWER: Your hand is
too weak to “reverse” with
two hearts. Bid two spades.
To support your partner is
better than rebidding two
diamonds. Some pairs would
make a “support double,”
artificially showing three
cards in spades. That was
the meaning of South’s
double in today’s deal.
BLONDIE
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2017, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
MUTTS
EZ
PATRICK McDONNELL
C7
RE
ZITS
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
BIRTHDAY | NOVEMBER 1
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
This year you are
very in sync with your
intuition. You are
likely to experience
an unusually successful
and happy year. If you are
single, you will have the
presence and ability to attract
someone of significance.
You will decide what type of
bond works for you. If you are
attached, emotions run deep
between you. You are likely
to make a commitment to
the relationship, which would
enhance your bond. Pisces
is even more emotional than
you are.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
You feel invigorated with
energy and ready to tackle
anything that comes along.
However, if you are annoyed,
you could just as easily lose
your temper. Use caution, as
your fuse could be short.
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
You might have worn yourself
out over the past few days.
Consider working from home
or taking a day off. You need
some time to evaluate what
could be an irritating situation.
Use care and sensitivity with a
partner who seems to be out
of sorts.
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
An energized friend and/or
loved one will cause you to
think that today will not be
one of those humdrum kind of
WEINGARTENS & CLARK days. This person has strong
feelings, and whether you
agree or not, he or she gets
you energized. Be willing to
make adjustments.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
Tension mounts between
you and a key associate who
seems to be calling the shots.
You might not have seen this
person so energized and
determined before. Sit back
and enjoy his or her passion,
or jump right in.
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
Reach out to someone at a
distance. You might not be
able to home in on what is
happening with this person,
so ask a question or two. You
might not understand where
a friend’s strong feelings are
coming from. Listen carefully.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
One-on-one relating throws a
touchy situation into a whole
new light. You’ll understand
why the other party involved is
being so assertive. You could
be thinking through a problem,
and will have little time to
respond to this person.
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
You will be inclined to defer
to someone else. You might
feel as if you have had enough
with this person directing his
or her anger toward you. After
a discussion, you’ll realize
that he or she is going through
some big changes.
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
Allow an associate to open
up to your ideas. You don’t
need to agree about what is
going on, but you do need to
understand where this person
is coming from. Your energy
seems to build from out of
nowhere.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
You might be a lot happier
and more direct than you have
been in a while. A new friend
could be unusually pushy.
If this person doesn’t get
what he or she wants, you’ll
see some anger emerge. Be
straightforward, and help this
friend to chill out.
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
Pressure builds to complete
a personal matter or to make
a decision at home or in your
domestic life. You might be
forced to make a major change
by a boss, parent or higher-up.
Don’t worry so much.
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
You could be aggravated or
overly energetic right now.
Funnel this high energy into
some kind of productive
project, and you will be less
likely to lose your temper.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
Reach out to a friend at
a distance. You could be
swallowing your anger and not
recognizing that it is coming
out through spending. Rein in
a tendency to go overboard,
and use some self-control.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2017, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
kidspost
CHIP SAYS
TODAY
KIDSPOST.COM
The 2017 Children’s Africana Book Award was also given
to “Amagama Enkululeko! Words for Freedom: Writing
Life Under Apartheid.” The book, for readers 12 and
older, is a collection of stories from South African writers.
The day’s high temperature may not
reach 60 degrees. We’ll have plenty
of clouds, maybe even a little rain.
We need weather art for the
chilly, windy, rainy and sunny
days ahead. Find out online
how to send us yours.
ILLUSTRATION BY MIKAELA LY, 6, ARLINGTON
Story time: A greedy spider and a thirsty boy
TOD AY ’ S NE WS
IF YOU GO
JOHN SCHAIDLER/ZONGO STORY PROJECT
BRYAN ANDES
Elizabeth Williamson, left, collaborated with her students in Ghana on a folk tale about pollution. Evan Turk, right, was
inspired to write his book when he learned that the storytelling tradition in Morocco was disappearing. Both authors are
scheduled to appear Saturday at the National Museum of African Art.
BY
M ARY Q UATTLEBAUM
W
ater plays an important
part in the winners of this
year’s Children’s Africana
Book Awards in the young
readers category. In “GizoGizo!” (pronounced gee-zo gee-zo) by
Emily Williamson, a greedy spider pollutes it, and in “The Storyteller” by Evan
Turk, a boy uses it to defeat a powerful
desert spirit.
The two books also explore the African
art of storytelling, said Brenda Randolph,
director of Africa Access and chairwoman of the award committee. Randolph
founded the awards 25 years ago to help
kids learn more about Africa through
books.
“There is a strong oral tradition in
Africa,” she said by phone from her office
in Washington. Storytellers often perform for an audience of all ages.
A free family event Saturday at the
Smithsonian National Museum of African Art gives you a chance to hear stories
and meet Turk, Williamson and other
ACROSS
1 Olympic
swimmer Buster
who played
Buck Rogers
7 Naughty
10 Queequeg’s
captain
14 “Yowzah!”
15 365 d’as
16 Place for a long
winter’s nap
17 Restaurant
review pricing
symbol
19 __ bar
20 Physicians’ gp.
21 Cheese couleur
22 Like some bread
23 Out of __: not
together
25 Grad’s memento
28 Wagering
parlors: abbr.
31 Printer problem
32 Key with no
sharps or flats
35 Slatted window
40 British
Columbia’s
capital is on it
42 Where a tennis
server’s doubles
partner is
usually
positioned
43 Most cordial
44 Like this ans.
45 Diamond bag
46 Equal chance
51 Slide __
55 Slangy negative
56 School whose
a cappella
group is the
Whiffenpoofs
59 Albany is its cap.
60 Nabisco cracker
61 “Baby Got Back”
rapper, and
a hint to this
puzzle’s circles
64 Extra
65 Boxing legend
66 Catty?
67 Cookie
monster?
68 Center of
Austria?
69 Fly to flee
DOWN
1 Musical endings
2 Unlike most
airline seating
Modern folk tale
“Gizo-gizo” means “spider” in Hausa
(how-za), one of the languages spoken in
Ghana. At the Hassaniyya Quaranic (Hasa-nee-ya Ker-an-ic) School in the city of
Cape Coast, Williamson and her students
wanted to write an original folk tale
about a modern problem: pollution. They
chose a spider as their main character
because tricky arachnids often appear in
African tales.
For three years, Williamson and her
students wrote, illustrated and refined
Power of stories
Turk wanted to create a book about the
power of stories when he visited Morocco
in 2012 and learned that the storytelling
tradition was disappearing.
Storytellers “were mostly not telling
stories in public anymore, having become
too old to compete with the noise and
music” there, Turk said in an email from
his home in Croton-on-Hudson, New
York.
In “The Storyteller,” a thirsty boy re-
U.S. NAVY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jennifer Appel waves at rescuers
near her crippled sailboat. Appel
and another woman said they had
left Hawaii in May for Tahiti.
Rescued sailors had
emergency beacon
ceives a brass cup that fills with water
whenever he listens to an old man’s
stories. When a giant djinn (jin), or spirit,
from the nearby Sahara Desert stirs up a
sandstorm, the boy retells the stories and
uses their water-generating power to
push back the djinn.
While researching the book, Turk traveled to Morocco several times and interviewed elderly storytellers. Moroccan art
and craft inspired his illustrations. He
learned from carpet weavers how to create page borders that resembled carpet
patterns. To paint the water, he used a
natural dye called indigo. Sugary green
tea brushed over paper and held over a
flame became the color of sand.
On his most recent research trip, Turk
met with some young Moroccans in the
city of Marrakesh. They are learning from
master storytellers and want to “keep the
art form alive,” Turk said. He interviewed
them and watched them tell stories.
“I was so excited,” Turk said. These new
storytellers will carry this powerful tradition into the future.
Two women from Hawaii who say
they were lost at sea on a sailboat for
months never activated their emergency beacon, the U.S. Coast Guard
said, adding to a list of inconsistencies
that cast doubt on their survival tale.
Jennifer Appel and Tasha Fuiava
said they left Hawaii on May 3 for
Tahiti but ran into storms that damaged the boat. The U.S. Navy rescued
them last week 900 miles southeast of
Japan, thousands of miles off course.
The women had told the Associated
Press that they had radios, satellite
phones, GPS and other emergency
gear, but they didn’t mention the
Emergency Position Indicating Radio
Beacon, or EPIRB.
A Coast Guard review of the incident and interviews with the women
revealed that they had an EPIRB
aboard the boat but never turned it on.
The device communicates with satellites and would alert authorities in
minutes.
Appel said Tuesday that she
thought it should be used only if you
are likely to die in the next 24 hours.
Officials have said key parts of the
women’s account are not consistent
with weather reports or geography.
kidspost@washpost.com
— Associated Press
By Matt Skoczen
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
Africana Award-winning authors.
their story about a spider that throws
trash and chemicals into a lagoon that is
shared by many animals. But when he
eats the lagoon’s sick fish and becomes
sick himself, the spider decides to clean
up his mess.
The book owes much to the “students’
memories of listening to their grandparents telling them stories [and to] their
everyday experiences and imaginations,”
said Williamson in an email from Cambridge, Massachusetts, where she is a
graduate student in anthropology at Boston University.
What: Meet Children’s Africana Book
Award winners and hear stories. There will
also be drummers, art activities and face
painting.
Where: Smithsonian National Museum of
African Art, 950 Independence Avenue
SW, Washington.
When: Saturday. Community-day activities
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Children’s Africana
Book Award winners present from 11 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Museum open daily 10 a.m. to
5:30 p.m.
How much: Free.
For more information: Call 202-6334600 or visit africa.si.edu/2017/10/
community-day for the museum’s
community day and
africaaccessreview.org/caba-2017 for
winning books.
An in-law is silent. And the problem is?
© 2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
3 Poe’s middle
name
4 Statement amt.
5 Spoil the
surprise
6 English
nobleman
7 Olympic skater
Oksana
8 Country in
SW Afr.
9 Put on
10 Place to say
“I do”
11 Port-au-Prince’s
country
12 Singer whose
fans are called
Claymates
13 __ to light:
reveal
18 “Just a few __”
22 Gradual
absorption
24 Marine snail
26 Open a bit
27 City in central
Kansas
29 Not the least bit
challenging
30 Mimosa time
32 Glamorous
Gardner
33 Yoga class need
11/1/17
34 Statement amt.
35 Hot tub water
agitator
36 Stomach
problem
37 RSVP
convenience
38 Officeholders
39 July hrs. in
Georgia
41 “Bates Motel”
actress Farmiga
45 Shine
46 Terra __
47 Self-evident
principle
48 Opening
words
49 Reduces
to rubble
50 Four-time NBA
All-Star __
Irving
52 Not illuminated
53 Rhone cathedral
city
54 Lauder of
cosmetics
57 Emotional
boost
58 Former union
members?
61 Posed (for)
62 __-de-France
63 Oktoberfest
quaff
TUESDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
Dear Carolyn: I
have known my
daughter-in-law
for 14 years, but
we have no
relationship. We
Carolyn
have never had an
Hax
argument or even
any unkind words
between us. Their
son, our only grandchild, is the
apple of my eye, and we have a
wonderful time with him. The
problem is that no matter what I
seem to do, my daughter-in-law
shuns me. She rarely speaks to
me. If I speak to her she
responds with one or two words.
On a recent visit to their home,
there were no sheets on our bed,
no towels and no toilet paper in
the bathroom. I had just sent
them a gift for their anniversary,
and it was sitting in the family
room. She never acknowledged
it or thanked us.
I asked my son, in private,
what I might do to improve my
relationship with her. He said
there is no problem; she’s like
that with everyone, she is just
quiet. He seemed annoyed I
would even ask. I clarified that if
I perceived it to be a problem
then there was validity in that,
but he simply changed the
subject.
I know things could be much
worse. She is not mean to me;
she does not prevent access to
my grandchild or overtly
interfere with my relationship
with my son. It is just so terribly
awkward and uncomfortable to
be around someone who works
so hard to maintain distance. I
worry that if I try to address this
directly with her, I jeopardize
what I currently have. I sadly
find myself simply ignoring her
during our visits now, since I
cannot continue to tolerate what
I perceive as her rejection of me.
I vacillate between accepting
her “as she is” and being angry
at what can only be described as
rudeness. Your suggestions?
— Never Thought It Would Be
This Hard
Never Thought It Would Be
This Hard: Your son gave you
the only answer you need, and
an out: This is just the way his
wife is.
It’s not the answer you wanted
— you want a warm relationship
with your daughter-in-law
(“Dilly”), understandably, and
TP is nice, and so you were
hoping to hear there was
something concrete you were
doing wrong and could therefore
fix.
But it was the second-best
answer, and also a totally
workable one. Your son gave you
license to accept Dilly as she is.
Forget whether it’s actually true
that “she’s like that with
everyone”; for your purposes, it
is. She’s inert matter: not good,
not bad, just there.
Let’s put proper emphasis,
too, on the “not bad.” You are
welcome in the lives of your son
and your grandchild, and I
obviously don’t have to remind
you that not everyone with a
less-than-welcoming son- or
daughter-in-law is so blessed.
I’d also argue this reframing is
not optional. Your son’s answer
is workable only if you choose
not to walk yourself out onto the
“I cannot continue to tolerate”
limb, and choose to rethink
“what I perceive.” Taking Dilly
personally makes you her
adversary. Taking her as socially
awkward, and being consistently
warm and kind, makes you her
ally. Maybe a thaw will never
happen, but where’s your best
chance that it will?
Oh, and about those absentee
linens — Dilly and your son are
manners challenged. Don’t lay
that all on the girl.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her
column delivered to your inbox each
morning at wapo.st/haxpost.
Join the discussion live at noon
Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com
KLMNO
SPORTS
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
D
M2
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
PRO BASKETBALL
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Georgia is atop the season’s first
College Football Playoff rankings,
just ahead of Alabama, Notre Dame
and Clemson. D3
Wizards forward Markieff Morris
plans to return this week to make
his season debut after undergoing
offseason surgery. D3
Maryland looks for Kevin Huerter to
take on an expanded role this year,
while Georgetown’s biggest star is
its new coach. D4
49ers’ trade
for Garoppolo
leaves Cousins
in unsure spot
While the NFL’s
collective head
spun Monday
night — and not
because of Ezekiel
Elliott’s
Barry
suspension, and
Svrluga
not because of
Broncos-Chiefs on
“Monday Night Football” — isn’t
it reasonable to think a certain
quarterback in Ashburn picked
up his phone, looked at the news
alert and said, “Um, Kyle . . .
What about me?”
The San Francisco 49ers
selected their quarterback for
the future Monday night by
pulling off a trade with the New
England Patriots for Jimmy
Garoppolo that has ramifications
not just in Boston and the Bay
Area, but well beyond.
There is room to debate about
whether the Patriots botched the
timing of the deal, holding on to
Garoppolo too long and
receiving “only” a second-round
pick in exchange for Tom Brady’s
backup, who could have been
their quarterback of the future.
There’s reason to wonder about
the Patriots’ safety net now,
should Brady get hurt.
But even the 49ers’ formal
statement announcing the deal
is striking.
“Jimmy is a player we have
researched extensively since Kyle
and I joined the 49ers,” General
Manager John Lynch said.
“Kyle,” in this case, is San
Francisco Coach Kyle Shanahan
— you know, the former
offensive coordinator of the
Washington Redskins, the son of
the head coach here who drafted
Kirk Cousins.
Here are the people most
directly affected by Monday’s
trade: Garoppolo, incumbent
49ers quarterbacks Brian Hoyer
SVRLUGA CONTINUED ON D7
WORLD SERIES
Pushed to the limit
SEAN M. HAFFEY/GETTY IMAGES
DODGERS 3, ASTROS 1: Joc Pederson of the Dodgers was the man of the moment after giving his team a little insurance with a solo home run during the seventh inning
against Houston. Los Angeles evened this dramatic World Series at three games apiece at Dodger Stadium. More coverage online at washingtonpost.com/sports
Redskins at Seahawks
Sunday, 4:05 p.m., Fox
Inside: Jay Ajayi, Kelvin Benjamin
on the move in latest trades. D8
L.A. win ensures wild Series
lasts for a magnificent seven
los angeles — This is what you wanted,
NFL players
need to fight
Goodell’s
power plays
That thunking
noise is the sound
of attorneys for
NFL players
banging their
heads against
Sally
their heavy desks.
Jenkins
Dallas Cowboys
running back
Ezekiel Elliott’s six-game
suspension is back on. Thunk.
It doesn’t matter that police
didn’t find enough evidence to
prosecute him for domestic
violence. Thunk.
It doesn’t matter that he was
denied basic fairness and access
to essential facts in the NFL
disciplinary process. Thunk,
thunk.
All that matters is that under
Article 46, the execrably written
disciplinary clause in the NFL
labor contract, Commissioner
Roger Goodell can tie any player
he wants to a wheel and spin
him on a personal whim. Thunk,
thunk, thunk.
In the same way that you can’t
really grasp the speed of an NFL
game until you attend one live,
you can’t really understand what
players are up against in
Goodell’s disciplinary system
until you’ve seen them try to
fight it live in a federal
courthouse.
Elliott was in trouble from the
moment federal Judge Katherine
Polk Failla opened the door to
her 2nd Circuit courtroom, an
illustrious setting with heavy
brass chandeliers and starred
blue carpet and buttercream
trim, in which it was going to be
JENKINS CONTINUED ON D7
Dodgers rally against Astros,
force decisive final game
right?
This World Series between the Los
Angeles Dodgers and the Houston Astros
was just too superb, too tightly contested
and too thrilling, with both slugfests and
Thomas
pitchers’ duels, for it not to go to a Game
Boswell
7.
“Game 7,” they say, are the best two
words in sports, but when they apply to the pluperfect
pandemonium these teams have provided for the last
eight days, including a 3-1 Dodgers victory over the
Astros and ace Justin Verlander on Tuesday night here in
Dodger Stadium, then “Game 7” isn’t too terribly far
down the list of best words, or at least most fun words,
by any standard.
In Game 6, this World Series provided not a classic
worth a winter of discussion but rather an exciting,
crisply played game with a dramatic premise: Could a 37-
BY
D AVE S HEININ
los angeles — The door to the Los Angeles Dodgers’
bullpen — pale blue frame, plexiglass windows, undoubtedly close to falling off its hinges — opened one last time
Tuesday night, and to the accompanying bounce and
Auto-Tuned hook of “California Love” over the sound
system, Kenley Jansen jogged in to the mound at Dodger
Stadium. It was the top of the eighth inning of Game 6 of the
World Series, and anybody who said they knew what was
about to happen was lying.
This World Series had defied predictions, upended convention and left nothing that could be counted upon — aces
crumbling, relievers burned to a crisp, no lead safe. The
great Jansen, big, burly and bearded, had himself blown a
save, taken a loss and, in the face of a relentless Houston
Astros offense, generally appeared a shell of his dominating
2017 self. He needed six outs to carry home a two-run
Dodgers lead. A crowd of 54,128 fans had the same thought:
BOSWELL CONTINUED ON D5
SERIES CONTINUED ON D5
Game 7: Astros at Dodgers Today, 8:20 p.m., Fox
HIS OWN MAN, HIS OWN TEAM
“[Martinez] knows a lot of intelligent
things about the game learning from Joe
[Maddon],” Lobaton said of Martinez’s
years at the side of the current Chicago
Cubs manager. “. . . He tells you everything
directly. He tells you the things he needs to
tell you. He’s really good with that.”
Lobaton, who has spent the past four
years in Washington, will be a free agent
when the World Series ends this week. He
might never play for Martinez, who was
officially named Nationals manager Monday and will be introduced at a news
conference Thursday.
But that story, of baseball advice communicated clearly, and of players trusting
enough to accept it, illustrates the prevailing industry opinion of the 53-year-old
Martinez: He is a smart baseball man and
good communicator, a guy many thought
had what it takes to be a manager who is
finally getting the chance to prove it.
Nats Manager Martinez looks
to make most of opportunity
BY
C HELSEA J ANES
Before Jose Lobaton headed to the ondeck circle in the bottom of the ninth
inning of Game 3 of the 2013 American
League Division Series, then-Tampa Bay
Rays bench coach Dave Martinez made a
suggestion.
Boston Red Sox reliever Koji Uehara had
been throwing a lot of splitters, Martinez
noted. Move up in the box a bit. Maybe
catch one early.
Lobaton swung at and missed the first
pitch, a splitter down and away. Then he
moved up in the box as Martinez had
recommended. Uehara threw him another
splitter, down and away. Lobaton golfed it
out to right-center field for a walk-off
homer.
BRIAN CASELLA/TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE/GETTY IMAGES
Dave Martinez is regarded as a smart baseball man and good communicator.
MARTINEZ CONTINUED ON D4
D2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
washingtonpost.com/sports
D.C. SPORTS BOG
D.C. SPORTS BOG
Capitals’
radio voice
gets call for
Olympics
BY
That time
Robinson
left RFK
in uniform
PRO BASKETBALL
S COTT A LLEN
Washington Capitals radio
play-by-play man John Walton
was driving to Kettler Capitals
Iceplex during training camp in
September when he got a call
from NBC. Having done play-byplay of college hockey and Stanley
Cup playoff games for the network
in the past, Walton figured the call
was in regards to a similar future
opportunity, but the conversation
went in a different direction.
“They asked if I would be available and if I would be interested in
doing women’s hockey for the
Olympics, and I think when I
heard the word ‘Olympics,’ I almost drove off the road,” Walton,
who is in his seventh season with
the Capitals, recalled Tuesday after first sharing the news on Twitter.
For Walton, his first Olympic
assignment brings his career and
his lifelong love of hockey, which
was sparked as a child growing up
in Minnesota, full circle.
“My first hockey memory was
watching the Miracle on Ice, albeit on tape delay, which I don’t
think I understood at age 7,” Walton said of the United States’ 4-3
upset win over the Soviet Union at
the 1980 Winter Games. “The only
thing that would be better than
this would be the Capitals winning a Stanley Cup. . . . Everybody
watches the Olympics. To be able
to be a part of that in some way, I
didn’t expect it, but boy am I sure
glad that they called.”
Walton will work with an analyst and a sideline reporter on his
TV broadcasts from the Winter
Games. Washington Wizards radio announcer Dave Johnson will
fill in on Capitals radio broadcasts
while Walton is away, beginning
with the Capitals’ game against
the Vegas Golden Knights on
Feb. 5. Hershey Bears announcer
Zack Fisch will call the CapitalsLightning game at Capital One
Arena on Feb. 20, and Grady Whittenburg, who has called college
and AHL games for nearly
30 years, will handle play-by-play
duties for road games during Walton’s absence.
scott.allen@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/dcsportsbog
QUOTABLE
“Oh, he is being
blackballed. That’s a
no-brainer.”
STEVE KERR,
Golden State Warriors coach,
discussing Colin Kaepernick on the
“Pod Save America” podcast this
week. (Via Early Lead)
BY
ANDREW GOMBERT/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY
Russian billionaire Mikhail Prokhorov will keep control of the Nets through 2021 and gets to hold on to Barclays Center.
5 ripples of the Nets’ pricey sale
BY
T IM B ONTEMPS
Last week, the Brooklyn Nets became
the second NBA team to be agreed to be
sold in as many months when Taiwanese
billionaire Joseph Tsai agreed to buy
49 percent of the franchise with the
option to assume majority control four
years later at a locked-in valuation of
$2.3 billion.
Between the complicated deal to sell
the Nets and the Houston Rockets being
sold by Leslie Alexander to Tilman
Fertitta for $2.2 billion in September, the
league has now seen two teams shatter
the record $2 billion Steve Ballmer paid
to purchase the Los Angeles Clippers in
2014.
Here’s how the Nets sale could have
wide-ranging impacts not just for
Brooklyn but also for the rest of the NBA:
1. Prokhorov gets what he wants
This is the most stunning
development — even more than the
official price tag, which passes the one
Fertitta paid for the entire team as the
highest sale valuation in league history.
Russian billionaire Mikhail Prokhorov,
the sole owner of the Nets, has been open
to selling the team for more than a year,
and the expectation among most outside
observers was that his demands — from
keeping control of the team for a number
of years, to keeping Barclays Center, the
team’s five-year-old arena in Brooklyn —
were unrealistic. If someone was willing
to pay $2 billion or more for the Nets
most expected the buyer to get
concessions from Prokhorov on one or
both of those points.
Prokhorov managed to get everything
he wanted, not only keeping control of
the team through 2021 (he will remain a
minority owner even after Tsai opts in to
assume majority control in 2021) but
also keeping complete ownership of the
arena. It’s the second point that is
particularly important, given that the
Nets are a significant money loser —
they still remain virtually irrelevant in
New York, a city completely dominated
by the Knicks — and the arena is
profitable.
Team is being valued
at $2.3 billion, which could
affect forthcoming NBA deals
2. NBA franchise values keep rising
Tsai was willing to hold off four years
to gain control of the team, but why
wait? The most logical reason is that he
wanted to get into the game, and that by
locking in a price now, he’ll save money
in the long run. That’s a hefty bet that
sports teams — in particular, NBA teams
— are only going to get more expensive.
That is music to the NBA’s ears, as the
league continues to see interest grow
both domestically and abroad. And
unlike the NFL, the NBA doesn’t have to
worry about any long-term structural
issues (specifically, when it comes to
player health) that could undermine the
sport.
3. The Phoenix Suns could be next
There are already rumblings around
the league that Robert Sarver, who
bought the team from Jerry Colangelo
for $401 million in 2004, is looking to
cash out. While the NBA would never
publicly admit it, the league would likely
be happy if Sarver chose to move on,
given the complete collapse of the
franchise under his watch.
Despite
never
winning
a
championship, the Suns were long one
of the league’s top franchises, making
the playoffs in 24 of their first 36 seasons.
Since Sarver took over, the Suns have
missed the playoffs eight times in 13
seasons — a number that’s almost
certain to grow this year to nine whiffs in
14 seasons, given Phoenix has already
fired its coach, Earl Watson, and appears
destined for yet another high draft pick.
Given the recent sales of the Rockets
and Nets, it wouldn’t be surprising to see
Sarver get somewhere close to $2 billion
for the team — five times what he
initially paid, enough return on
investment to make anyone think long
and hard about moving on.
4. Further intrigue in Memphis
One of the most important but
underreported stories in the NBA today is
the impending battle for control of the
Grizzlies. There was an option this past
month for two of the team’s many
minority owners — Steve Kaplan and
Daniel Straus — to begin exploring a bid
to buy the team from the current
controlling owner, Robert Pera. It is
expected that Kaplan will attempt to
make a bid for Pera’s stake; it’s unclear
whether Straus will as well.
This could lead to a fascinating dance.
Kaplan must come up with a valuation of
the franchise, leading one of two things
to happen: Either Pera will choose to sell
his stake in the team to Kaplan, who will
then become the controlling owner, or
Pera will buy Kaplan’s share, increasing
his controlling stake. One of them,
however, will wind up cashing out.
Kaplan would want to set a valuation
that Pera wouldn’t be willing to pay, but
Kaplan also wouldn’t want to set too
steep of a price, which could make
potential future purchases of other
minority stakes far more expensive.
5. Further inroads in China
Now, to bring things full circle, the
sale of the team to Tsai accomplishes
something the NBA is clearly interested
in: continuing its expansion into the
lucrative Chinese market. It’s not a
coincidence the league plays two
preseason games there every year, or
that many of its stars go there every
summer for promotional tours.
To be clear, Tsai is Taiwanese — a
significant distinction — and he not only
went to high school in New Jersey but also
to Yale University as an undergrad and
then Yale Law School. Still, he’s the
executive vice chairman of Alibaba, a
massive Chinese company, and just as the
NBA was thrilled to have Vivek Ranadive
purchase the Sacramento Kings to try to
establish more of a presence in India,
there’s no doubt any avenue to further the
league’s growth in China will be embraced.
tim.bontemps@washpost.com
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/nba
D AN S TEINBERG
With the Washington Nationals
and their latest new manager
back in the news, longtime playby-play voice Charlie Slowes had
occasion this week to reminisce
about the history of Nationals
managers. Which led him to one
of his favorite stories about a Nats
manager, one I had never heard
but immediately loved.
This took place at RFK Stadium, following a twi-night doubleheader, with an early game
scheduled for the following day.
“And the parking lot for the
players and staff was out in right
field, next to all of the trash dumpsters,” Slowes told Andy Pollin on
Pollin’s latest D.C. sports podcast,
which will be released Wednesday. “Every night you’d go to and
from your car with that smell. So
I’m going to get in my car — you’d
go all the way around to the outfield, go up this ramp to the parking lot — and I get in my car, and
Frank Robinson’s parked next to
me.
“I guess he’d just got into his
car, he’s listening to the radio or
something,” Slowes went on. “And
he rolls his window down — and
he was still in full uniform! He
goes, ‘I’ve got to be back so early
tomorrow, why even bother
changing?’
“So my thought was — as he
rolls his window up and he pulls
away — he’s living in an apartment
building in D.C.,” Slowes said.
“And I’m just thinking, he’s got to
go in the garage and go up to his
apartment. He’s doing that in full
uniform? If you lived in the apartment, you’d go, ‘Hey, who’s the guy
in the Frank Robinson uniform?’
“I couldn’t believe that he did it,
and to this day nobody else knows
that story,” Slowes said. “I’ve told
it to a couple people, but nobody
else saw it, so it’s not believable to
anybody else.” But Slowes called it
“one of my great memories” from
his time with the Nats.
Meanwhile, Slowes — who also
has a history with the Tampa Bay
Rays — has known new Nationals
skipper Dave Martinez for 20
years and has spoken with him
frequently about his desire to get a
big league managerial job.
“I’ve talked to him every year,”
Slowes said. “I talked to him during the [Nats-Cubs] playoff series.
Each year I’d see him back in
Florida — because we live near
each other — and he’d say, ‘I’m so
ready, I’m ready to have my own
team, I’m ready to manage, that’s
what I want to do.’ So I knew that
he interviewed when Matt Williams was hired; he was the runner-up. I knew he was considered
after Matt Williams, but they decided to go with the experienced
manager. I knew he interviewed
for other jobs.”
Slowes did not mention whether Martinez ever drove home from
a game in full uniform.
dan.steinberg@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/dcsportsbog
TELEVISION AND RADIO
WORLD SERIES
DIG ES T
8 p.m.
OLYMPICS
Flame begins journey
to PyeongChang
The Olympic flame was
handed to organizers of the 2018
PyeongChang Games on Tuesday
in Athens, and it arrived in Seoul
to begin a 100-day journey across
South Korea before the Opening
Ceremonies on Feb. 9.
South Korean figure skating
prospect You Young will kick off
the 2,018-kilometer (1,253-mile)
trip from Incheon on Wednesday.
PyeongChang’s organizers have
designated 7,500 torchbearers.
PyeongChang organizing
committee President Lee Heebeom said the Games would be
about “peace and harmony,”
despite tension between the host
and reclusive, nuclear-armed
neighbor North Korea.
Dressed as a high priestess,
actress Katerina Lehou led the
90-minute ceremony in Athens.
A cauldron was lit by Greek skier
Ioannis Proios following
performances by singers,
dancers and acrobats from
Greece and South Korea. The
flame, placed in a lantern, was
handed over to Greek Olympic
Committee President Spyros
Capralos, who passed it to Lee.
SOCCER
Paris Saint-Germain and
Bayern Munich are the first
teams in the Champions League
knockout rounds after the group
rivals both won to advance with
two games left.
PSG routed Anderlecht, 5-0 —
with Layvin Kurzawa scoring
three to outshine Neymar — and
Bayern won, 2-1, at Celtic.
Manchester United, like PSG,
won a fourth straight game, but
beating Benfica, 2-0, was not yet
enough to ensure advancing
from Group A.
Roma started early, scoring
after 40 seconds in a 3-0 win
against Chelsea that seized
leadership of Group C from
Coach Antonia Conte’s team.
Atletico Madrid is still winless
after a 1-1 draw with visiting
Qarabag. . . .
In the MLS Eastern
Conference semifinals, Artur
started a three-goal outburst in
the second half shortly after New
York City FC went down a man,
and the host Columbus Crew
won the first leg, 4-1. The Crew
was clinging to a 1-0 lead when
New York defender Alexander
Callens was given a red card in
the 52nd minute following a
video review of his takedown of
Justin Meram. . . .
A former aide to the president
of the soccer group comprising
North and Central America and
the Caribbean was sentenced in
New York to 15 months in prison
after pleading guilty to money
laundering in the bribery
scandal engulfing FIFA.
Costas Takkas will serve five
months after being given credit
for 10 served in Switzerland.
TENNIS
Second-seeded CoCo
Vandeweghe opened the WTA
Elite Trophy with a 3-6, 6-3, 6-2
win over Chinese wild-card entry
Peng Shuai in Zhuhai, China.
Vandeweghe overcame a slow
start and two service breaks in
the first set, recovering to finish
with six aces and converting five
of her eight break-point chances
in the Bougainvillea group.
Seventh-seeded Julia Goerges
beat No. 10 Magdalena
Rybarakova, 6-1, 7-6 (7-5), in the
Azalea group, while fourthseeded Anastasia
Pavlyuchenkova defeated
Angelique Kerber, 6-3, 3-6, 6-2,
in the Rose group. . . .
Fifth-seeded Dominic Thiem
needed four match points to beat
lucky loser Peter Gojowczyk,
6-4, 6-7 (7-3), 6-4, in the second
round of the Paris Masters.
COLLEGES
Nathan Rourke threw for
three touchdowns and ran for
three more, and host Ohio pulled
away to defeat rival Miami
(Ohio), 45-28, in the 94th Battle
of the Bricks in Athens. . . .
Jarret Doege threw for two
touchdowns and ran for another,
Andrew Clair topped 100 yards
rushing for the fourth straight
game, and the two freshmen led
Bowling Green to a 44-16 win
over Kent State in Kent, Ohio. . . .
Iowa freshman point guard
Connor McCaffery has decided
to play this season instead of
redshirt. The star recruit and son
of Hawkeyes Coach Fran
McCaffery had planned to sit
out as a freshman and play
baseball for Iowa in the spring.
But backup point guard
Christian Williams left the
program last week, leaving Iowa
thin at that position. . . .
Milton Overton will step
down as athletic director at
Florida A&M to accept the same
position at Kennesaw State.
MISC.
Formula One’s engines in 2021
will be noisier and higherrevving — and more affordable.
“We’ve carefully listened to
what the fans think about the
Game 7: Houston at Los Angeles Dodgers » WTTG (Ch. 5), WBFF (Ch. 45),
WTEM (980 AM)
NBA
7 p.m.
8 p.m.
10:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Washington » NBC Sports Washington, WFED (1500 AM)
Houston at New York » ESPN
Dallas at Los Angeles Clippers » ESPN
NHL
8 p.m.
10:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Chicago » NBC Sports Network
Nashville at San Jose » NBC Sports Network
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
Central Michigan at Western Michigan » ESPN2
GOLF
3 p.m.
East Lake Cup, match-play championship » Golf Channel
TENNIS
6 a.m.
ATP: Paris Masters, early-round play » Tennis Channel
SOCCER
1 p.m.
3:45 p.m.
3:45 p.m.
UEFA Champions League: Monaco at Besiktas » Fox Sports 2
UEFA Champions League: Real Madrid at Tottenham » Fox Sports 1
UEFA Champions League: Manchester City at Napoli » Fox Sports 2
current PU [engine] and what
they would like to see in the near
future,” F1 managing director of
motor sports Ross Brawn said.
“We believe that the future
power unit will achieve this.” . . .
South African runner Wayde
van Niekerk was forced to put
his honeymoon on hold to have
surgery in the United States on a
right knee injury he suffered
while playing in a celebrity tag
rugby game three weeks ago. The
Olympic champion and world
record holder in the 400 meters
is expected to be out of action for
six to nine months. . . .
Austrian ski jumper Gregor
Schlierenzauer is out
indefinitely and will miss the
start of the World Cup season
after damaging his right knee in
a fall while training.
— From news services
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
M2
In year’s first CFP rankings, Georgia receives No. 1 spot
College Football Playoff rankings
Alabama is No. 2;
Notre Dame and Clemson
fill out the top four
BY
Through Tuesday
Record
1. Georgia..................................................................... 8-0
2. Alabama................................................................... 8-0
3. Notre Dame ............................................................. 7-1
4. Clemson ................................................................... 7-1
5. Oklahoma................................................................. 7-1
6. Ohio St. .................................................................... 7-1
7. Penn St. ................................................................... 7-1
8. TCU........................................................................... 7-1
9. Wisconsin ................................................................ 8-0
10. Miami..................................................................... 7-0
11. Oklahoma St. ......................................................... 7-1
12. Washington ........................................................... 7-1
13. Virginia Tech.......................................................... 7-1
14. Auburn ................................................................... 6-2
15. Iowa St................................................................... 6-2
16. Mississippi St. ....................................................... 6-2
17. Southern Cal .......................................................... 7-2
18. UCF......................................................................... 7-0
19. LSU......................................................................... 6-2
20. N.C. State .............................................................. 6-2
21. Stanford................................................................. 6-2
22. Arizona .................................................................. 6-2
23. Memphis ................................................................ 7-1
24. Michigan St............................................................ 6-2
25. Washington St. ..................................................... 7-2
The College Football Playoff selection committee will
issue weekly rankings each Tuesday, with the final
rankings being announced Sunday, Dec. 3, at noon
Eastern time. The playoff semifinals will match the No. 1
seed vs. the No. 4 seed and the No. 2 seed against No. 3.
The semifinals will be hosted at the Rose Bowl and
Sugar Bowl on Jan. 1. The championship game will be
played Jan. 8 in Atlanta.
C HUCK C ULPEPPER
The eternal national question of
Notre Dame, a question presumed
less eternal after that program’s
4-8 hardship of 2016, reared its
loud head again Tuesday night.
The Irish began the College Football Playoff rankings season at a
loud No. 3 even as somehow, what
happened at No. 1 might make
more noise as the country begins
its annual November rancor.
Up top, the 13-member selection committee finished two days
of wrangling near Dallas-Fort
Worth International Airport and
decided that Georgia (8-0) had
looked a smidgen better than Alabama (8-0), and that the reasons
included Georgia’s 20-19 win at
Notre Dame (7-1) in a Sept. 9 game
that looked second-tier at the time.
Alabama, meanwhile, had its nonconference achievement go south
when Florida State, the Crimson
Tide’s first victim, careened to 2-5.
Georgia became only the fourth
program to sit at No. 1 in the four
seasons and 20 rankings of this
concept, following Mississippi
State, Alabama and Clemson.
The Georgia-Alabama question, committee chairman Kirby
Hocutt said on ESPN, wreaked “as
passionate a debate as I’ve seen,”
while the passion it will wreak
among Alabamians is not up for
debate. That’s true even as the
committee has five more weekly
lists to issue before it chooses the
four playoff teams on Sunday,
Dec. 3.
In the coveted fourth spot, for
now, stood defending national
champion Clemson (7-1), meaning
the Tigers have occupied the top
DYLAN BUELL/GETTY IMAGES
Josh Adams leads a potent rushing attack for Notre Dame (7-1), which landed at No. 3 in the first College Football Playoff rankings Tuesday.
four across all 13 rankings since
2015. (The committee does not issue postseason rankings.) In favoring Clemson over seven more Power Five one-loss teams, the committee noted the Tigers’ six wins
over teams with winning records
and their two wins over top 25
teams: at No. 13 Virginia Tech (7-1)
and against No. 14 Auburn (6-2).
The expected pockets of intrigue turned up at both Nos. 5-6
and Nos. 9-10. At the former, the
committee sorted out the Oklahoma-Ohio State puzzle. At the latter,
it showed the new dimension of
this concept that differs from so
many seasons in the game’s long
history: A once-beaten record can
trump an unbeaten record if the
latter has fed off a weak schedule.
Oklahoma took No. 5 to Ohio
State’s No. 6, a dramatic departure
from the weekly polls, in which the
media (Associated Press) had Ohio
State at No. 3 and Oklahoma at
No. 8, with the coaches ranking
Ohio State at No. 3 and Oklahoma
at No. 9. That was all curious because the Sooners (7-1) and the
Buckeyes (7-1) happened to play
each other, on Sept. 9, with Oklahoma winning, 31-16, on the road,
before it began to look less emphatic while Ohio State began to
rise. “As you know,” Hocutt said on
ESPN, “we don’t look at the polls.
The first ranking, in our eyes, just
came out with the top 25.”
Then, at Nos. 9 and 10, the committee placed the latter two of the
four Power Five unbeaten teams:
No. 9 Wisconsin (8-0) and No. 10
Miami (Fla.) (7-0). It ranked these
behind one-loss Notre Dame,
Clemson, Oklahoma, Ohio State,
No. 7 Penn State (7-1) and No. 8
TCU (7-1) because neither Wisconsin nor Miami has beaten a ranked
team.
At that No. 7, Penn State landed
in a spot quite lower than it looked
like it might on Saturday in Columbus, when it led Ohio State by
18 points before falling, 39-38, for a
rare time when a one-point deficit
on the field led to a one-point
deficit in the rankings.
Of the Power Five conferences,
the Pacific-12 suffered most for its
indecipherable parity. It placed no
team higher than No. 12 Washington, which reached the playoff last
year, but which even at 7-1, suffered
from a startling 13-7 loss at Arizona
State. Teams ranked as low at first
as No. 16 (Ohio State, 2014) and
No. 15 (Oklahoma, 2015) have
reached the playoff in previous
Morris expecting to return this week
Forward feels recovered
from sports hernia,
could play Friday vs. Cavs
BY
OKC rules in the paint
in defeating Milwaukee
F ROM NEWS SERVICES
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Markieff Morris might serve a one-game suspension vs. Phoenix and get back on the court Friday night.
WIZ ARDS’ NEX T THREE
vs. Phoenix Suns
Today
7 NBCSW
vs. Cleveland Cavaliers
Friday
7 ESPN
at Toronto Raptors
Sunday
6 NBCSW
Radio: WFED (1500 AM)
Brooks plans to move Morris
into the starting lineup and play
him no more than 12 to 16 minutes. Morris could possibly make
his season debut and start during
Washington’s first big home
event of the season: Friday night
against LeBron James and the
Cleveland Cavaliers.
While facing the Suns would
have been a nice appetizer, as
Morris works to get his legs
beneath him, he doesn’t mind
moving straight to the main
course. When asked about potentially “dealing with LeBron” in
his first game back from surgery
and recovery, Morris bristled.
“Don’t care who it is. Dealing
with LeBron? It’s another man,”
Morris said. “It don’t matter who
it is. It’s just another game.”
Unfazed by the challenge from
the Cavaliers, Morris is instead
focusing on his own conditioning. After his first full-on practice, Morris admitted that while
he felt no pain, his legs seemed
heavy.
“It’s one of the toughest things
is to stay in as close to game
shape as possible, but he was able
to do that with our staff,” Brooks
said. “Give him and the staff
credit. They did whatever it took
for him for him to be in pretty
good shape.”
Morris has shown aggressiveness through workouts with
team staffers as well as little-used
players such as Devin Robinson.
His shot looked precise Tuesday
as he knocked down eight
straight three-pointers from the
right corner. But workouts with
teammates and shooting inside a
quiet gym cannot replace the
experience of playing in live
games.
“Probably the fans and just
being on that level competing
under the whistle, I think that’s
one thing that’s going to get me
there,” Morris said. “Also, you
need to actually play in games to
be in game shape. Not just running around five-on-five in practice. You need to actually be in the
game atmosphere.”
candace.buckner@washpost.com
chuck.culpepper@washpost.com
NBA ROUNDUP
THUNDER 110,
BUCKS 91
C ANDACE B UCKNER
At the last minute, Washington
Wizards forward Markieff Morris
figured he would be a good friend
and attend John Wall’s Halloween party Monday night. This late
decision was reflected in his costume: Morris found a $9.99 “Friday the 13th” hockey mask at
Party City a half-hour before the
store closed, splattered fake
blood over his outfit and called it
a day.
“I had 15 minutes to decide
whether I was going or not going,” Morris said. “Just wanted to
show my teammate some love.”
Morris, however, has put more
thought into his comeback from
surgery to his abdominal wall
following a sports hernia. He
knows he will probably wear his
customary Nike Foamposites
sneakers, and he anticipates the
enthusiastic welcome from fans
inside Capital One Arena will jolt
him alive after nearly six weeks
away from the court.
Morris has planned ahead because he declared Tuesday, with
great likelihood, that he will
make his season debut this week.
“I feel like I’m ready to play,”
said Morris, who would be returning at the beginning of his
six-to-eight-week recovery timeline.
“We’re just going through protocol,” Morris added. “Everybody’s body is different. Mine, I
feel like it healed a little faster
than normal, and I’m just ready
to go now.”
In the Wizards’ first practice
since they returned from a fourgame road trip, Morris participated in five-on-five play — the
final step in his recovery before
being cleared for game action.
“He’s been progressing to get
on five-on-five level, and today he
did. He participated in the entire
practice,” Coach Scott Brooks
said after the Tuesday afternoon
session. “We’ll see how he feels
tonight and [Wednesday] morning and decide if we’re going to
activate him for [Wednesday]
night’s game.”
Morris must be cleared by an
independent doctor from the
NBA before returning to the active roster. If Morris is ruled
physically able to play, then he
will serve his one-game suspension Wednesday night against
the Phoenix Suns as punishment
for leaving the bench during the
Bradley Beal-Draymond Green
scuffle Friday night in the Wizards’ 120-117 loss in Oakland,
Calif.
years.
The first two-loss team on this
list was Auburn at No. 14, its 6-2
record dented only on trips to play
the various other Tigers at No. 4
Clemson and No. 19 LSU. The Auburn Tigers do have a curious opportunity ahead, potentially, because they play both No. 1 Georgia
and No. 2 Alabama at home, on
Nov. 11 and Nov. 25, respectively.
The first 12 playoff qualifiers
across the first three seasons have
had either zero losses (three
teams) or one loss (nine teams).
Further down lurked three fresh
success stories.
In the annual chase for the top
spot in the second-tier Group of
Five programs, with the annual
prize a trip to a gaudy New Year’s
Six bowl game, Central Florida
(7-0) became one of two Group of
Five teams included, getting No. 18
to land five spots ahead of Memphis (7-1), which UCF defeated, 4013, on Sept. 30.
In the Notre Dame spirit, three
programs that went 3-9 just last
season debuted on the list: the feelgood story of No. 15 Iowa State (6-2)
— with its two wins over teams
lodged in the Associated Press top
five at the time, Oklahoma and TCU
— as well as No. 22 Arizona (6-2)
and No. 24 Michigan State (6-2).
All have looked freshly, surprisingly good, even as none has
looked as strong as Notre Dame. In
the debate between slots Nos. 3
and 7, the Irish came in first after
their routs of three other ranked
teams, No. 24 Michigan State (by
38-18), No. 17 Southern California
(by 49-14) and No. 20 North Carolina State (by 35-14), games in
which Notre Dame rushed for 182,
377 and 318 yards, to go with the
515 it got against onrushing Boston
College (5-4). That all came after
Georgia had held it to 55, a statistic
that helped translate into No. 1.
Paul George scored 20 points,
and the Oklahoma City Thunder
dominated the paint during a
16-0 run to take control early in a
110-91 win over the host Milwaukee Bucks on Tuesday night.
Russell
Westbrook
had
12 points, 10 rebounds and nine
assists, while Carmelo Anthony
scored eight of his 17 points in the
pivotal first quarter.
Oklahoma City went from
down four to a 20-8 lead on
George’s jumper with 4:16 left in
the first. It was essentially over
from there, especially considering the way Westbrook kept finding driving lanes.
The reigning NBA MVP dished
off to Steven Adams in the paint
when he wasn’t taking it to the
hoop himself. Adams finished
with 14 points and 11 rebounds.
The Bucks’ Giannis Antetokounmpo scored 28 points on 9for-14 shooting. But he spent
much of the first quarter on the
bench with two fouls.
SUNS 122, NETS 114: Devin
Booker scored 32 points, Mike
James added 24, and visiting
Phoenix rallied in the fourth
quarter to beat Brooklyn.
T.J. Warren scored 14 of his
20 points in the final period for
the Suns, who squandered an
18-point lead in the third quarter.
D’Angelo Russell had 33 points
for the Nets.
PACERS 101, KINGS 83: Bojan Bogdanovic scored 17 points
as Indiana routed Sacramento in
Indianapolis.
Pacers forward Domantas Sabonis had a career-best 16 rebounds.
Sixers decline Okafor option
Jahlil Okafor’s tenure with the
Philadelphia 76ers will not continue past this season.
The team will not pick up the
2018-19 option on the player it
selected third overall in the 2015
NBA draft. The team had until
Tuesday night to make a decision
on player options for first-rounders on rookie deals.
Okafor was in line to make
$6.3 million in what would be his
fourth year, if the option had been
picked up. However, the 76ers decided not to retain the center after
they could not find a trade partner.
CAVALIERS: Reserve guard
Iman Shumpert could miss another week with a sore right knee.
JAZZ: Forward Joe Johnson
will miss at least two weeks with a
right wrist injury.
D4
EZ
SU
THE WASHINGTON POST
K
. WEDNESDAY,
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
“I think our team is going to be a lot more versatile this year,” Kevin Huerter said of Maryland.
NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
PHOTOS BY KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
The Hoyas’ Marcus Derrickson, Jagan Mosely, Jessie Govan, Jonathan Mulmore and Kaleb Johnson.
Terps’ Huerter embraces greater role Ewing shifts the spotlight to himself
BY
R OMAN S TUBBS
After playing nearly all of his
freshman season at small forward, Maryland’s Kevin Huerter
has spent much of the offseason
preparing for a transition to the
backcourt. He returned early
from summer vacation to log
more time in the gym in College
Park, added 12 pounds of muscle
and spent time studying Villanova guards and their reputable use
of jump stops and ball fakes in the
lane, fundamentals that Huerter
wants to incorporate into his
game as the ball swings his way
more this season.
But while the 6-foot-7, 202pound Huerter is physically prepared to play more at shooting
guard, the move has also helped
him find his voice. He is not the
only one expected to endure a
transition this year — sophomore
Justin Jackson will play more at
small forward after spending
much of his rookie season at the
stretch-four spot — and Huerter
has made it a habit to pull Jackson
aside in practice to give him advice on playing small forward in a
complex offensive system.
“I’m just trying to make him
realize that he doesn’t have to be
so robotic in our offense,” Huerter
said Tuesday at the team’s annual
media day, “that he has a lot of
freedom that he doesn’t realize.”
Now that guard Melo Trimble is
gone after three productive seasons and the Terrapins program
searches for a new identity,
Huerter will no longer be able to
sit in the shadows on his own
team.
“I think the guy that is most
natural, the guy that likes to talk
the most, the guy [that] gets it the
most, is Kevin Huerter,” Maryland
Coach Mark Turgeon said. “Now
I’m not saying he’s our leader, I’m
saying he kind of gets it and he
just naturally does it and doesn’t
even know he’s doing it.”
Huerter will be somewhat liberated during his second season
in College Park, even as the expec-
Sophomore makes shift
to shooting guard,
steps up as team leader
tations for him mount. He was
largely flying under the radar at
this point last season — Huerter,
Jackson and point guard Anthony
Cowan Jr. were the first Maryland
freshmen trio to start multiple
games in the modern era — but
Huerter will no longer be able to
use the element of surprise after
starting all 33 games last season
and averaging 9.3 points and 4.9
rebounds.
Cowan is considered the heir
apparent to Trimble, while Jackson is the centerpiece of the roster
and a potential first-round NBA
draft pick should he opt to leave
after this season. Both of those
players grew immensely in the
offseason; Cowan tested himself
against older players in the Kenner League, while Jackson tested
the NBA draft waters by attending
the league’s scouting combine
and visiting several professional
teams for workouts.
But Huerter also made strides,
which included a stint with the
U.S. U-19 World Cup national
team in Egypt. He returned to
College Park vowing to remain
one of Maryland’s best perimeter
defenders — he had several gamechanging defensive plays as a
freshman, including a game-winning block in a win over Georgetown — and to expand his game
on the offensive end. Huerter led
the team with 65 three-pointers
made last season, but he struggled at times getting to the rim.
He finished with just 28 free
throw attempts. With that in
mind, Huerter has worked to
transform his mentality during
the preseason.
“He’s taking more shots, [is]
more aggressive off the bounce.
[He’s] not just [a] catch-andshoot guy,” redshirt junior guard
Dion Wiley said. “I would say he’s
gotten a lot more athletic and
stronger.”
Maryland’s backcourt won’t be
as deep as it was a year ago —
Wiley will be one of Huerter’s
primary backups, while freshman
Darryl Morsell will serve as Cowan’s primary backup — but Turgeon will have the luxury of keeping his lineups fluid.
“I think our team is going to be
a lot more versatile this year,”
Huerter said.
Trimble was involved in 71 percent of the team’s pick and rolls
last year; aside from Cowan, that
number will be divvied up more
between Huerter and Jackson.
Huerter played 74 percent of his
minutes at small forward last season, according to the analytics
site kenpom.com, while Jackson
played 72 percent of his minutes
at power forward. Those two players will be able to slip into their
natural positions at shooting
guard and small forward, respectively, thanks in part to a more
versatile frontcourt that is still
working to get healthy.
Senior center Michal Cekovsky,
who is just getting back to full
strength after suffering a fractured ankle late last season, has
begun to blossom in practice, according to Turgeon. Freshman
Bruno Fernando, who is expected
to help carry the load at power
forward, suffered a sprained left
ankle two weeks ago and will be
held out of Thursday night’s exhibition against Randolph-Macon,
but he is hopeful to return for next
week’s season opener at Stony
Brook. It has been a difficult time
for the freshman, but he has received support from Huerter, who
has helped Fernando and Morsell
confront the new challenges of
the college game.
“I’m just trying to be more
vocal on the court, in practice,”
Huerter said. “I’m trying to lead
by example, getting extra shots in,
extra lifts in, things like that, and
having the rest of the team follow.”
roman.stubbs@washpost.com
BY
A VA W ALLACE
At Georgetown men’s basketball media day Tuesday, five
Hoyas players squeezed in behind
a table, sat shoulder to shoulder
and fielded questions about new
Coach Patrick Ewing for the better part of 12 minutes.
A nasty, booming cough coming from the back of the room
occasionally peppered their answers: Ewing was still giving oneon-one interviews for TV cameras
just a few feet away. The message
was clear: The story, at least for
now, is going to be all about the
first-year coach.
Both Ewing and his players are
just fine with that.
“I feel like it’s just great for us,”
junior forward Marcus Derrickson said this past month. “It takes
a lot of attention off.”
The spotlight shone bright on
Ewing from the moment he decided to play college basketball at
Georgetown, and it helped shape
his college experience. In 1981,
Ewing was viewed as a boon for
the burgeoning Big East Conference — a rival to Villanova’s recently signed superstar, Ed Pinckney, and a player transcendent
enough that the conference felt it
was ready to move its league tournament to Madison Square Garden.
As Georgetown’s coach, Ewing
is happy to shield his players from
anything close to that level of
attention — and scrutiny — as
they try to rebuild after consecutive 18-loss seasons in which the
Hoyas missed the NCAA tournament.
“I hope so,” Ewing said Tuesday,
when asked whether the attention he receives lessens the spotlight on his players. “It’s my goal
to take a little bit, if not a lot, of the
pressure off them while I’m pushing them and driving them to be
successful. The players that have
been here had two poor years, and
that’s why I’m sitting here today.
It’s my goal to alleviate some of
the pressures while we become a
New Georgetown coach
wants his young team
to find its own identity
Patrick Ewing’s Hoyas were
picked to finish ninth out of 10
Big East teams. The season
begins Nov. 12 vs. Jacksonville.
more cohesive team and work
towards being a much better
team. Just keep on getting better.
“You’re asking me about something that’s been a part of my life
for a lot of years. That’s my life
since, what, 14, 15? That’s been a
way of life for me, so I don’t see it
as anything new.”
The team appreciates that they
can work essentially in the dark.
There are plenty of adjustments to be made under Ewing,
not the least of which includes
acclimating to a more up-tempo
style and so much running in
practice that it’s “to the point
where you just want to pass out,”
said Derrickson, who was joined
at the podium Tuesday by junior
center Jessie Govan, senior guard
Jonathan Mulmore, junior guard/
forward Kaleb Johnson and sophomore guard Jagan Mosely.
The Hoyas are without last season’s two leading scorers, L.J.
Peak and Rodney Pryor, who com-
bined to average 34.5 of Georgetown’s 74.7 points per game. That
leaves Govan and Derrickson to
fuel the offense even as Ewing has
been stressing defense in practice. He said Govan and Derrickson, two big men Ewing looks
forward to mentoring throughout
the season, will be keys to the
Hoyas’ success.
A handful of newcomers — including highly touted freshman
forwards Jamarko Pickett and
Antwan Walker and center Chris
Sodom — will be expected to
contribute as well.
“I use it as motivation,” Derrickson said of the lack of media
attention on the players, “because
a lot of people don’t know about
us, know about me. We can do our
behind-the-scenes work without
all of the media attention, we can
work hard, then once we come on
the court, there’s maybe lower
expectations for us, so we just
play our hardest. I feel like we just
have a clean slate.”
Georgetown was picked to finish ninth out of 10 teams in the
Big East preseason poll this year,
ahead of only DePaul. A light
nonconference schedule begins
at Capital One Arena on Nov. 12
against Jacksonville.
In the meantime, Ewing will
field questions about his favorite
Halloween candy — Snickers, for
which he appeared in a commercial some years ago — while allowing his team to practice, and theoretically grow, without too much
outside attention.
“Right now, we’re just learning
a lot of new information on the
court that can make us better,”
Derrickson said. “A lot of small
details . . . the juniors — me, Kaleb, Jessie, we haven’t won anything since we got here. So we
know the bad feelings of not making it to the postseason, and we
try to display that sense of urgency to our younger players. The
players, we definitely have high
expectations for each other — in
practice.”
ava.wallace@washpost.com
Martinez, long believed to have what it takes, finally gets a chance to prove it
MARTINEZ FROM D1
Know it when you see it
People in front offices and dugouts around the majors know the
names. Any of them can rattle off
an unwritten list of coaches everyone thinks will make good managers someday, and usually they find
consensus. Dave Roberts was always on that list before landing
with the Los Angeles Dodgers in
2015. So was Alex Cora, who agreed
to manage the Red Sox last month.
Martinez’s name has been on that
list for years, too.
Earning a spot normally requires some combination of exposure, longtime connections with
well-established managers, and
harder-to-pin-down personality
traits — the know-it-when-you-seeit things that can be hard to articulate, even for those who experience
them regularly.
“Players have a feel for the people they work with and their coaches and their managers. In all of my
experiences, players have reacted
very favorably with Davey,” said
former Rays outfielder Rocco
Baldelli, who was with Tampa Bay
when Martinez joined the organization as a spring training instructor in 2006, then as bench coach
starting with the 2008 season.
“He lets the players play, which
I think they appreciate. If there is
reason to say something, he’s
certainly not afraid to say it, but
he also lets the players play. That’s
a real fine line that every coach
and every staff member — especially the manager — straddles,
and I think he’s very good at it.”
Martinez played 16 major
league seasons for nine teams,
ALEX GALLARDO/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dave Martinez spent 10 seasons as bench coach to Joe Maddon with
Tampa Bay and Chicago, winning a World Series with the Cubs.
accumulating 1,599 hits while
batting .276. He played in the
postseason one time, in 2001 with
the Atlanta Braves in the final
year of his career. He has since
been a part of two pennant-winning coaching staffs and a World
Series-winning coaching staff, experiencing 66 playoff games overall in the dugout.
He also endured scandal. In
Jose Canseco’s 2005 book,
“Juiced: Wild Times, Rampant
’Roids, Smash Hits and How
Baseball Got Big,” the baseball
firebrand wrote he injected Martinez with steroids when the two
were teammates with Tampa
Bay. Martinez admitted to the
Tampa Bay Times that he lis-
tened to Canseco’s offer but told
the Times, “I didn’t use steroids.
The guy approached me with
them, I took a look at them, but,
from the bottom of my heart, I
couldn’t use it.”
Despite Canseco’s accusation,
which occurred after Martinez’s
playing career had concluded,
Martinez was not named in the
2007 Mitchell Report on steroid
use in baseball, and he wasn’t the
subject of any MLB discipline.
In 2008, Martinez’s first as
bench coach, the Rays marched to
the American League pennant.
Through this fall, Martinez
learned under Maddon. People
close to him — such as longtime
Rays bench coach Tom Foley, who
drove Martinez to and from the
park every day of their Tampa Bay
tenure — say Maddon’s approach
to the baseball grind probably
rubbed off.
“I’ve been with four managers
here in Tampa — with Joe it was
just his positiveness. From Day Pne
it was, ‘We can play with these
guys, we can beat these guys, we’re
as good as they are.’ And we were
losing 98 games or losing 100
games,” Foley said. “. . . Davey’s a
positive guy. He’s going to look on
the positive side, and I think his
one thing is communication, and I
think he can do that with anybody.”
Foley said he expects Martinez
to have two rules as manager, and
probably not many more. Be on
time. Run balls out. Nothing that
should ruffle the feathers of an
experienced clubhouse like that of
the Nationals.
A sense of baseball right and
wrong, combined with the people
skills to communicate it, were
hallmarks of Dusty Baker’s managerial style. He handled personalities, knew players better than
they sometimes knew themselves,
and made sure days off and playing time questions were answered
before they arose. Multiple people
who have worked with him believe Martinez should have the
communication skills to do the
same, if not the requisite experience.
Good at the numbers game
But besides experience, the difference between Martinez and
Baker seems likely to be a heightened reliance on analytics. Nationals General Manager Mike Rizzo
pointed that out in his statement
about the hiring.
“As we went through this process it became clear the type of
manager we were looking for,” Rizzo said in the release. “Someone
who is progressive, someone who
can connect with and communicate well with our players, and
someone who embraces the analytical side of the game.”
Exactly how much emphasis
Martinez will put on analytics, on
new-school numbers rather than
old-school traditions, remains to
be seen. But his mentor, Maddon,
is considered a forward thinker, a
man not beholden to tradition for
its own sake.
“Joe has treated him as an
assistant manager. So he has the
same sheet, the same information
that Joe has every game. And they
think alike,” said longtime friend
Buck Martinez, now a Blue Jays
television announcer. “So you’re
going to see a lot of Joe Maddon
traits in his managing, I would
think. He communicates very
well, and obviously working for
Maddon, he embraces the analytics.”
Lobaton said he was surprised
it took Martinez this long to earn
a managerial position. For years,
he interviewed for jobs like these.
For years, teams — including the
Nationals — went another direction. Maddon’s protege will now
get his chance, one earned with
communication and baseball
acumen that has paid off in October before — and that the Nationals hope will pay off again.
chelsea.janes@washpost.com
Jorge Castillo and Dave Sheinin in
Houston contributed to this report.
1983
Drafted in third round of January
draft-secondary phase out of Valencia
Community College in Orlando
June 15, 1986
Makes major league debut for Cubs
vs. Cardinals in center field
1996
Posts the best offensive season of his
16-year MLB career (10 home runs,
53 RBI, 15 steals, .318 BA, .861 OPS
with White Sox)
Oct. 21, 2001
Makes final career appearance in
Game 5 of NLCS vs. Arizona in the
only season he reached the playoffs
as a player
2008
First season as bench coach with
Rays under Joe Maddon; team wins
the AL pennant and loses to the
Phillies in the World Series
2010
Interviews with Blue Jays and Indians
for managerial vacancies
2014
Follows Maddon to Cubs to serve as
bench coach after being passed over
to replace Maddon as Rays manager
2016
Cubs win World Series in Martinez’s
second season with club
2017
Cubs beat Nationals to advance to
the NLCS for the third straight
season. Martinez replaces Dusty
Baker as Washington’s manager later
in the month.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D5
M2
baseball
Home is sweet: Dodgers draw even with Astros
SERIES FROM D1
Was it too much to ask?
But the outs came with the sort
of ease with which they came in
those languid days of April and
June. One, two, three, four, five, six
— with nary a stumble. Jansen had
a six-out save, the Dodgers had a
taut 3-1 win, and the World Series
— this crazy, inspired, never-ending World Series — will have a
Game 7.
It will be Wednesday night,
with the Dodgers’ Yu Darvish set
to face Houston’s Lance McCullers
Jr., and everyone but Sandy Koufax and Nolan Ryan available out
of the bullpen for at least a batter
or two. After all the madness that
has transpired over these past six
games, it was only fitting.
“You have to dig deeper and
deeper,” Astros third baseman
Alex Bregman said of the prospect
of a Game 7. “We’re into November
now. You got to be tough.”
We are here, on the doorstep of
Game 7, because Justin Verlander,
the Astros’ indefatigable ace,
could not protect a slim, 1-0 lead
through the middle of Game 6 on
Tuesday night, and because the
Astros, desperate for a rally,
couldn’t push across a single run
against a Dodgers bullpen that
seemed to be simultaneously running out of fuel.
The Dodgers went ahead
against Verlander in the sixth,
pushing across runs on Chris Taylor’s RBI double and Corey Seager’s sacrifice fly, and they tacked
on an insurance run in the seventh
on Joc Pederson’s homer off Astros
reliever Joe Musgrove. Pederson
capably channeled the emotions
of every Dodgers fan in the building, punctuating his rowdy trip
around the bases with a fist in the
air, a chest-thump, a get-on-yourfeet gesture to the crowd and a
double-barreled finger-point to
his dugout.
From there, all that was left was
for Jansen to convert a six-out save
— something he tried and failed to
do in Game 2. In all, he had allowed a run in three of his four
previous appearances in the series, including a pair of homers,
and was the losing pitcher in
Game 5.
Jansen entered in the eighth to
face the Astros’ fourth, fifth and
sixth hitters — a critical distinction.
The opening four-batter segment of the Astros’ lineup is a
minefield of dangerous hitters, all
of them right-handed, all of them
capable of major damage. After
George Springer’s third-inning
homer off Dodgers left-hander
Rich Hill — his fourth of the series
and third in the last three games —
that quartet had 10 homers and 20
RBI combined in the series.
But in pitching a 1-2-3 eighth
and a 1-2-3 ninth, Jansen ensured
he wouldn’t have to walk through
that minefield. He struck out
pinch hitter Carlos Beltran, in the
No. 9 spot in the order, to end it,
KEVORK DJANSEZIAN/GETTY IMAGES
Dodgers Cody Bellinger and Kenley Jansen embrace after the final out as Los Angeles comes away with a 3-1 victory at Dodger Stadium.
calmly walking toward catcher
Austin Barnes to accept a handshake.
Hill had already survived 42/3
innings against the Astros’ destructive offense but trailed 1-0
and faced a second-and-third,
two-out jam in the fifth, with the
top of the Astros’ lineup - Springer
— due up. This is the pivot point
around which the entire series has
swung, with the Dodgers, as a
policy, almost uniformly unwilling to let their starters face this
dangerous stretch of the Astros’
lineup for a third time — a stance
that had caused their bullpen to
red-line late in the series.
Here, after Springer was intentionally walked, Roberts pulled
Hill with a pitch count of just 58 —
a move met with a healthy dose of
boos from the crowd — and into
the game, for the 13th time in the
Dodgers’ 14 games this postseason, came right-hander Brandon
Morrow. Hill, visibly upset at the
early hook, walked to the dugout
and turned over a tray of full water
cups.
“The pivotal point right there,”
Dodgers Manager Dave Roberts
said. “And Rich just gave us what
he got and gave us a chance to win.
And for me, I just felt that in that
one particular spot, Brandon gave
us the best chance to get out the
hitter, Bregman. So that was kind
of my gut.”
When last seen, at Houston’s
Minute Maid Park in Sunday
night’s seventh inning, Morrow,
obviously diminished, was giving
up four runs in a span of six lifeless
pitches. Here, though, he retired
Bregman on a grounder to short to
end the threat and keep the Dodgers’ deficit at one, and returned to
retire two more batters in the
sixth. The parade of relievers was
on: Tony Watson, Kenta Maeda
and finally Jansen. In three
straight innings, the Astros had
multiple runners on base but
failed to score.
The Dodgers’ bullpen was bulging at the seams, but it was not
bursting.
Verlander’s fateful stretch in
the sixth pivoted around a 59-foot
slider that bounced and hit Chase
Utley in the leg. The Dodgers had
double-switched Utley into the
game at second base in the sixth to
avoid having the pitcher’s spot
come up in the bottom half — but
Utley is more or less a pitcher at
the plate these days. His last hit
was on Sept. 30, and since then he
had gone 0 for 29 before Tuesday
night. But his specialty is the hitby-pitch, of which he has more
than any active player in the game.
When Verlander clipped him, the
Dodgers had runners on first and
second with nobody out.
Taylor doubled to right field to
tie the game, and Seager flied out
to the wall in right for a sacrifice
fly to put the Dodgers ahead 2-1.
The long slog of an inning, and
the two runs he had given up,
ended any talk of Verlander going
the distance. The Astros pinch-hit
for him in the seventh.
“Absolutely not. No chance,”
Verlander said when asked if he
was thinking complete game. “Not
the way the series has gone. Not
the way those guys’ lineup is. If we
could have squeaked together one
or two more [runs], I maybe would
have changed my mentality a little
bit.”
The calculus of who was available out of the bullpen Tuesday
night, and for how long, was a
matter of vast intrigue before the
game. Clayton Kershaw, the Dodgers’ ace and Game 5 starter, reportedly texted Roberts to say he was
ready to help out. Alex Wood, the
Game 4 starter, was also believed
to be available. For the Astros,
McCullers was a candidate for relief duty after starting Game 3.
None of them pitched Tuesday
in Game 6, because, somewhat
amazingly, none were needed.
Both teams’ overtaxed bullpens,
fortified by the crucial rest of
Monday’s day off, more or less did
their jobs. But Wednesday, and
Game 7, is another story altogether.
dave.sheinin@washpost.com
Los Angeles win ensures World Series lasts for magnificent seven
year-old journeyman pitcher
named Rich Hill, who has only
found his prime years in the last
three seasons, find a way to
hang with Verlander, a likely
Hall of Famer, long enough to
keep his Dodgers close, let them
peck away and finally break
through?
Thanks to an RBI double by
Chris Taylor and a sacrifice fly
by Corey Seager in the sixth
inning off Verlander, plus a solo
opposite-field homer by Joc
Pederson in the seventh off
reliever Joe Musgrove, the
Dodgers got just enough offense.
The five-man Dodgers tag
team of Hill, Brandon Morrow,
Tony Watson, Kenta Maeda and
finally Kenley Jansen for the last
six straight outs was enough to
hold the Astros — who scored 13
runs two days ago and now have
14 homers in this World Series —
to one lone homer Tuesday by
George Springer.
This World Series has
changed its tone. Instead of
broiling hot temperatures — and
home runs — here in Dodger
Stadium, plus more blast in
Houston’s closed-roof bandbox
park, the temperatures are now
cool, in the low 60s, and this
park, famous for pitchers and
scary to sluggers, is playing big
again.
To the Astros, built on power
and slugging, that’s just a little
bit like sneaking up behind
them and yelling, “BOOOO!”
This game began as a contrast
in career arcs. Hill is a man who
McCullers
to start, but
‘all hands
on deck’
A SSOCIATED P RESS
THOMAS BOSWELL
BOSWELL FROM D1
BASEBALL NOTES
has always had one of the best
curveballs in the sport but also
some of the worst arm injuries
and buzzard luck. He has
pitched for 10 major league
teams. In 2015, after leaving the
Washington Nationals by
mutual consent, he dropped to
the nadir of the Long Island
Ducks in an independent league,
which means nobody in pro ball
wants you.
There, Hill found his lodestar
— ignore results, demolish the
scoreboard and focus entirely,
fanatically in his case, on the
process of throwing one pitch —
the next pitch — at a time.
Just as in Game 2, Hill was
effective, rendering an outing in
what he called “the supreme
challenge” of his long career, of
which he can always be proud.
And he got the ovation as he left
the mound that he deserved.
In Game 2, he was relieved,
too soon some think, after four
innings and just 60 pitches,
trailing 1-0. This time, he was
left in for 42/3 innings, allowing
only one run on a Springer
opposite-field homer to right
field to lead off the third. His
last act was his best; with Astros
on second and third and no
outs, the Dodgers trailing 1-0
and the game on the verge of
getting out of hand, Hill fanned
Josh Reddick and rival pitcher
Verlander. Morrow, whose right
arm must feel like it is just about
ready to fall off from postseason
overuse, got dangerous Alex
Bregman, who won Game 5 with
a 10th-inning RBI hit, to ground
out to end the threat.
That 1-0 Houston lead looked
unusually large because the man
protecting it was Verlander,
who, after being acquired in a
trade just seconds before the
waiver trade deadline Aug. 31,
has transformed the Astros from
a serious contender to a team
that would look entirely
comfortable holding a
championship trophy.
Verlander was 5-0 in his
month as a regular season Astro
with a 1.06 ERA. In the
postseason, he entered this
game with a 3-0 record and a
win in each round of the
playoffs, including a 124-pitch,
13-strikeout performance in
Game 6 of the American League
Championship Series against the
New York Yankees to stave off
elimination.
The Astros seemed giddy at
the prospect of having him
perfectly positioned to end their
season on a joyous note —
perhaps a little too certain.
Verlander was first-rate but
far from unhittable. And in the
sixth inning, the Dodgers got to
him for a huge pair of runs.
Austin Barnes led off with a
humble single, but that brought
up ornery old pinch hitter Chase
Utley, who likes nothing better
than to infuriate pitchers by
leaving some past of his body —
any part — in the path of a
thrown ball to reach base. This
time, Utley proffered a leg and
took first base. The Dodgers’
rally was on.
Verlander tried to power a
97.1-mph fastball on a 1-2 count
past Taylor, right in his kitchen,
and in.
But with a classic piece of
professional hitting, Taylor kept
his hands inside the ball, fought
off the heat and squared up a
solid line drive over the first
baseman’s head that died down
the right field line for an RBI
double to tie the score and leave
Angelenos on second and third
base with no outs.
Verlander battled well, but
not quite well enough. The 6foot-5 right-hander also got
ahead of Seager, 23, by busting
him with four straight fastballs.
Then, Verlander went for the kill
with his slider, perhaps his most
devastating finish-’em-off pitch
the last two months. But he left
it squarely over the plate.
Seager missed a three-run
homer to right field by perhaps
five feet but settled for a
sacrifice fly as Reddick snagged
the ball near the top of the wall
with his glove fully extended
over his head. Nonetheless, the
Dodgers led 2-1 and the game’s
strategy was altered. By the top
of the seventh, after a leadoff
walk gave the Astros a peak at
hope, it was time to pinch-hit for
Verlander and take both his arm
and his presence out of the
game.
The rally came to naught
when Maeda, a starter who has
been converted to relief with
brilliant results this month
(except for one Jose Altuve
homer in Game 6), got Bregman
and Altuve out on a fly and
grounder with two men on base.
Thus, a game started by the
humble Hill, who left trailing,
1-0, was suddenly a potential
Dodgers win with Verlander,
who went six innings, in line for
a tough-luck loss.
In the seventh, Astros
Manager A.J. Hinch had his
choice of gentlemen with ERAs
of 27.00 (Ken Giles), 7.71 (Chris
Devenski) and 6.00 (Musgrove).
He chose the Musgrove door.
The second Dodger to face
Musgrove, the left-handedhitting Pederson, chose to blast
a Musgrove mistake into the left
field bleachers for a 3-1 Dodgers
lead.
So now we have what we
want. A Game 7. And a Game 7
that gives Yu Darvish another
chance to redeem himself
against the Astros but, also,
perhaps, to take some fire from
the racist taunts of Yuli Gurriel
after a home run in that game.
The booing of Gurriel, which
filled Dodger Stadium at his
every appearance in Game 6,
may not be an important factor.
But it’s part of a tone that is
being set here. The Dodgers
aren’t dead. They keep crawling
out of graves to scare the hell
out of the Astros. Do they have
enough frightening masks, and
enough pitchers who can lift
their arms high enough to get 27
more outs and their first World
Series title in 29 years?
Or will we see more lateinning Astros pyrotechnics? Or,
given the nature of this series,
are things in store for us that we
never dreamed, but, on
Wednesday night, will find on
our grateful, delighted baseball
plates?
thomas.boswell@washpost.com
For more by Thomas Boswell, visit
washingtonpost.com/boswell.
Lance McCullers Jr. headed
into Game 6 of the World Series
not knowing whether he would
be attempting to close out a
championship Tuesday night or
starting Game 7 on Wednesday.
Several hours later, McCullers
learned he will be on the mound
for the biggest game in Houston
Astros history.
The right-hander with one victory since June will start the
World Series decider, Manager
A.J. Hinch announced after the
Los Angeles Dodgers forced the
seventh game with a 3-1 victory in
Game 6.
The entire Houston pitching
staff will be available behind
McCullers, including Dallas
Keuchel and possibly even Game
6 starter Justin Verlander.
“I think all of our guys are
going to have the adrenaline on
their side,” Hinch said. “They’re
all going to be ready to pitch. How
we use them, how much we use
them — we’ll get to the field.
They’ll do their throwing program. If it’s one pitch or a hundred pitches, I think we’re going
to have to have all hands on deck.”
But McCullers seems suited to
handle the spotlight that has
been thrust upon him by the
Dodgers, who will counter with
star Yu Darvish. McCullers has
already been a resilient contributor to the Astros’ remarkable
season, and they need him one
more time.
While Keuchel and Verlander
have formed a dynamic one-two
punch at the top of Houston’s
rotation, McCullers has been a
steady young contributor as the
No. 3 starter. After an all-star first
half of the regular season and a
winless second half, the 24-yearold has slotted comfortably into
the Astros’ playoff plans.
McCullers won Game 3 of the
World Series, pitching four-hit
ball into the sixth inning of Houston’s 5-3 victory. Six days before
that, he pitched four stellar innings of relief to earn the save in
Game 7 of the American League
Championship Series. McCullers
also pitched six innings of two-hit
ball against the Yankees in
Game 4 of the ALCS.
DODGERS: Darvish didn’t
think it was necessary to meet
with Yuli Gurriel after the Houston first baseman’s racist gesture
toward the Los Angeles pitcher.
Gurriel contacted the Dodgers
and told them he wanted to meet
with the pitcher in person and
apologize.
Major League Baseball suspended Gurriel for the first five
games next season for pulling on
the corners of his eyes after
homering off Darvish during
Houston’s 5-3 win in Game 3 on
Friday. The Cuba-born player also
used a derogatory Spanish term
in reference to Darvish, who was
born in Japan.
“I told him, ‘Hey, you don’t
have to do that, because you
made a comment, and like I’m not
that mad,’ ” Darvish said Tuesday
through a translator. “So I really
didn’t care much about that.”
Darvish said a Dodgers employee informed him about Gurriel’s gesture, which was caught
on television, after the Astros’
win.
“I didn’t think it was going to
be this big of a deal,” Darvish said.
“But to me I wasn’t that frustrated at that point when I saw it the
first time.”
After Friday’s game, Darvish
tweeted, “Let’s stay positive and
move forward instead of focusing
on anger.”
But Dodgers fans weren’t as
conciliatory.
Fans booed Gurriel heavily
during pregame introductions
Tuesday and got louder during
his first at-bat in the second
inning. Dodgers starter Rich Hill
even stepped off the rubber before his first pitch to Gurriel,
prolonging the booing.
The choruses of boos only
changed into a raucous cheer
when Gurriel fouled out.
Initially, Gurriel apologized in
a statement released by the Astros.
“I made an offensive gesture
that was indefensible,” he said. “I
sincerely apologize to everyone
that I offended with my actions. I
deeply regret it.”
Gurriel will lose $322,581 of his
$12 million salary next year,
which the Astros will donate to
charitable causes. He also will be
required to undergo sensitivity
training during the offseason.
D6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
nfl rewind
NFC East
AFC East
DALLAS (4-3)
PHILADELPHIA (7-1)
BUFFALO (5-2)
NEW ENGLAND (6-2)
September
10: N.Y. Giants, 19-3
17: at Denver, 17-42
25: at Arizona, 28-17
October
1: L.A. Rams, 30-35
8: Green Bay, 31-35
15: Bye
22: at San Fran., 40-10
29: at Washington, 33-19
November
5: Kansas City
12: at Atlanta
19: Philadelphia
23: L.A. Chargers
30: Washington
December
10: at N.Y. Giants
17: at Oakland
24: Seattle
31: at Philadelphia
September
10: at Washington, 30-17
17: at Kansas City, 20-27
24: N.Y. Giants, 27-24
October
1: at L.A. Chargers, 26-24
8: Arizona, 34-7
12: at Carolina, 28-23
23: Washington, 34-24
29: San Fran., 33-10
November
5: Denver
12: Bye
19: at Dallas
26: Chicago
December
3: at Seattle
10: at L.A. Rams
17: at N.Y. Giants
25: Oakland
31: Dallas
September
10: N.Y. Jets, 21-12
17: at Carolina, 3-9
24: Denver, 26-16
October
1: at Atlanta, 23-17
8: at Cincinnati, 16-20
15: Bye
22: Tampa Bay, 30-27
29: Oakland, 34-14
November
2: at N.Y. Jets
12: New Orleans
19: at L.A. Chargers
26: at Kansas City
December
3: New England
10: Indianapolis
17: Miami
24: at New England
31: at Miami
September
7: Kansas City, 27-42
17: at New Orleans, 36-20
24: Houston, 36-33
October
1: Carolina, 30-33
5: at Tampa Bay, 19-14
15: at N.Y. Jets, 24-17
22: Atlanta, 23-7
29: L.A. Chargers, 21-13
November
5: Bye
12: at Denver
19: at Oakland
26: Miami
December
3: at Buffalo
11: at Miami
17: at Pittsburgh
24: Buffalo
31: N.Y. Jets
NEW YORK (1-6)
WASHINGTON (3-4)
MIAMI (4-3)
NEW YORK (3-5)
September
10: at Dallas, 3-19
18: Detroit, 10-24
24: at Philadelphia, 24-27
October
1: at Tampa Bay, 23-25
8: L.A. Chargers, 22-27
15: at Denver, 23-10
22: Seattle, 7-24
29: Bye
November
5: L.A. Rams
12: at San Fran.
19: Kansas City
23: at Washington
December
3: at Oakland
10: Dallas
17: Philadelphia
24: at Arizona
31: Washington
September
10: Philadelphia, 17-30
17: at L.A. Rams, 27-20
24: Oakland, 27-10
October
2: at Kansas City, 20-29
8: Bye
15: San Fran., 26-24
23: at Philadelphia, 24-34
29: Dallas, 19-33
November
5: at Seattle
12: Minnesota
19: at New Orleans
23: N.Y. Giants
30: at Dallas
December
10: at L.A. Chargers
17: Arizona
24: Denver
31: at N.Y. Giants
September
17: at L.A. Chargers, 19-17
24: at N.Y. Jets, 6-20
October
1: New Orleans, 0-20
8: Tennessee, 16-10
15: at Atlanta, 20-17
22: N.Y. Jets, 31-28
26: at Baltimore, 0-40
November
5: Oakland
13: at Carolina
19: Tampa Bay
26: at New England
December
3: Denver
11: New England
17: at Buffalo
24: at Kansas City
31: Buffalo
September
10: at Buffalo, 12-21
17: at Oakland, 20-45
24: Miami, 20-6
October
1: Jacksonville, 23-20 (OT)
8: at Cleveland, 17-14
15: New England, 17-24
22: at Miami, 28-31
29: Atlanta, 20-25
November
2: Buffalo
12: at Tampa Bay
19: Bye
26: Carolina
December
3: Kansas City
10: at Denver
17: at New Orleans
24: L.A. Chargers
31: at New England
ELAINE THOMPSON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Russell Wilson, above, and the Seahawks outlasted Deshaun Watson and the Texans in a 41-38 win Sunday in Seattle.
NFC North
CHICAGO (3-5)
GREEN BAY (4-3)
September
10: Atlanta, 17-23
17: at Tampa Bay, 7-29
24: Pittsburgh, 23-17 (OT)
28: at Green Bay, 14-35
October
9: Minnesota, 17-20
15: at Baltimore, 27-24 (OT)
22: Carolina, 17-3
29: at New Orleans, 12-20
November
5: Bye
12: Green Bay
19: Detroit
26: at Philadelphia
December
3: San Fran.
10: at Cincinnati
16: at Detroit
24: Cleveland
31: at Minnesota
September
10: Seattle, 17-9
17: at Atlanta, 23-34
24: Cincinnati, 27-24 (OT)
28: Chicago, 35-14
October
8: at Dallas, 35-31
15: at Minnesota, 10-23
22: New Orleans, 17-26
29: Bye
November
6: Detroit
12: at Chicago
19: Baltimore
26: at Pittsburgh
December
3: Tampa Bay
10: at Cleveland
17: at Carolina
23: Minnesota
31: at Detroit
DETROIT (3-4)
MINNESOTA (6-2)
September
10: Arizona, 35-23
18: at N.Y. Giants, 24-10
24: Atlanta, 26-30
October
1: at Minnesota, 14-7
8: Carolina, 24-27
15: at New Orleans, 38-52
22: Bye
29: Pittsburgh, 15-20
November
6: at Green Bay
12: Cleveland
19: at Chicago
23: Minnesota
December
3: at Baltimore
10: at Tampa Bay
16: Chicago
24: at Cincinnati
31: Green Bay
September
11: New Orleans, 29-19
17: at Pittsburgh, 9-26
24: Tampa Bay, 34-17
October
1: Detroit, 7-14
9: at Chicago, 20-17
15: Green Bay, 23-10
22: Baltimore, 24-16
29: at Cleveland, 33-16
November
5 Bye
12: at Washington
19: L.A. Rams
23: at Detroit
December
3: at Atlanta
10: at Carolina
17: Cincinnati
23: at Green Bay
31: Chicago
NFC South
ATLANTA (4-3)
NEW ORLEANS (5-2)
September
10: at Chicago, 23-17
17: Green Bay, 34-23
24: at Detroit, 30-26
October
1: Buffalo, 17-23
8: Bye
15: Miami, 17-20
22: at New England, 7-23
29: at N.Y. Jets, 25-20
November
5: at Carolina
12: Dallas
20: at Seattle
26: Tampa Bay
December
3: Minnesota
7: New Orleans
18: at Tampa Bay
24: at New Orleans
31: Carolina
September
11: at Minnesota, 19-29
17: New England, 20-36
24: at Carolina, 34-13
October
1: at Miami, 20-0
8: Bye
15: Detroit, 52-38
22: at Green Bay, 26-17
29: Chicago, 20-12
November
5: Tampa Bay
12: at Buffalo
19: Washington
26: at L.A. Rams
December
3: Carolina
7: at Atlanta
17: N.Y. Jets
24: Atlanta
31: at Tampa Bay
CAROLINA (5-3)
TAMPA BAY (2-5)
September
10: at San Fran., 23-3
17: Buffalo, 9-3
24: New Orleans, 13-34
October
1: at New England, 33-30
8: at Detroit, 27-24
12: Philadelphia, 23-28
22: at Chicago, 3-17
29: at Tampa Bay, 17-3
November
5: Atlanta
13: Miami
19: Bye
26: at N.Y. Jets
December
3: at New Orleans
10: Minnesota
17: Green Bay
24: Tampa Bay
31: at Atlanta
September
17: Chicago, 29-7
24: at Minnesota, 17-34
October
1: N.Y. Giants, 25-23
5: New England, 14-19
15: at Arizona, 33-38
22: at Buffalo, 27-30
29: Carolina, 3-17
November
5: at New Orleans
12: N.Y. Jets
19: at Miami
26: at Atlanta
December
3: at Green Bay
10: Detroit
18: Atlanta
24: at Carolina
31: New Orleans
AFC North
NFL power rankings
Each week, national NFL writer Mark Maske provides his ranking and commentary on all 32 teams. Dive deeper daily on
washingtonpost.com/sports.
1. Patriots, 6-2 PREVIOUS: 1
Trading backup QB Jimmy Garoppolo means New England can
no longer lose Tom Brady and still have any Super Bowl hopes.
The Patriots are on a four-game winning streak.
16. Texans, 3-4 PREVIOUS: 12
The performance in Seattle was spirited and probably better
than anyone should have expected following the controversy
over the comments made by owner Robert McNair.
2. Eagles, 7-1 PREVIOUS: 2
Prevailing at home against the winless 49ers was not exactly a
major accomplishment. But beating the teams you should beat
is part of the equation for being good in the NFL.
17. Bengals, 3-4 PREVIOUS: 25
The Bengals still can put their season back together but have
three straight road games at Jacksonville, Tennessee and Denver.
3. Steelers, 6-2 PREVIOUS: 3
Rookie WR JuJu Smith-Schuster looks like the real deal. But
Pittsburgh did not accommodate Martavis Bryant’s request to
move on, choosing to keep him at Tuesday’s trade deadline.
4. Seahawks, 5-2 PREVIOUS: 4
The defense had few answers for rookie sensation Deshaun
Watson and the Texans on Sunday, but the Russell Wilson-led
offense pulled out the win in a wonderfully entertaining game.
5. Rams, 5-2 PREVIOUS: 5
It’s back to work for the Rams, who come out of the bye trying to
remain one of the NFL’s most surprising success stories. The
post-bye portion of their schedule begins with a game they
should win Sunday against the Giants at the Meadowlands.
6. Vikings, 6-2 PREVIOUS: 6
Case Keenum continues to thrive as the fill-in starter at QB. A
poor first half against the Browns in London gave way to an
impressive second half for the NFC North favorites.
7. Chiefs, 6-2 PREVIOUS: 7
Monday night’s home win over the Broncos came after two
straight losses. The Chiefs now go to Dallas and face the Cowboys
in what could be the first game of RB Ezekiel Elliott’s suspension.
8. Saints, 5-2 PREVIOUS: 8
Is it time to conclude that New Orleans is the team to beat in the
NFC South? The Saints have five straight wins since starting 0-2,
and the defense continues to inch closer toward respectability.
9. Bills, 5-2 PREVIOUS: 9
Buffalo took advantage of Oakland’s mistakes Sunday. Now the
Bills have a quick turnaround for Thursday night’s key divisional
game against the Jets at the Meadowlands.
10. Jaguars, 4-3 PREVIOUS: 10
The Jaguars’ next five opponents following their bye are the
Bengals, Chargers, Browns, Cardinals and Colts.
ARIZONA (3-4)
SAN FRANCISCO (0-8)
September
10: at Detroit, 23-35
17: at Indianapolis,
16-13 (OT)
25: Dallas, 17-28
October
1: San Fran., 18-15 (OT)
8: at Philadelphia, 7-34
15: Tampa Bay, 38-33
22: at L.A. Rams, 0-33
29: Bye
November
5: at San Fran.
9: Seattle
19: at Houston
26: Jacksonville
December
3: L.A. Rams
10: Tennessee
17: at Washington
24: N.Y. Giants
31: at Seattle
September
10: Carolina, 3-23
17: at Seattle, 9-12
21: L.A. Rams, 39-41
October
1: at Arizona, 15-18 (OT)
8: at Indianapolis,
23-26 (OT)
15: at Washington, 24-26
22: Dallas, 10-40
29: at Philadelphia, 10-33
November
5: Arizona
12: N.Y. Giants
19: Bye
26: Seattle
December
3: at Chicago
10: at Houston
17: Tennessee
24: Jacksonville
31: at L.A. Rams
LOS ANGELES (5-2)
SEATTLE (5-2)
September
10: Indianapolis, 46-9
17: Washington, 20-27
21: at San Fran., 41-39
October
1: at Dallas, 35-30
8: Seattle, 10-16
15: at Jacksonville, 27-17
22: Arizona, 33-0
29: Bye
November
5: at N.Y. Giants
12: Houston
19: at Minnesota
26: New Orleans
December
3: at Arizona
10: Philadelphia
17: at Seattle
24: at Tennessee
31: San Fran.
September
10: at Green Bay, 9-17
17: San Fran., 12-9
24: at Tennessee, 27-33
October
1: Indianapolis, 46-18
8: at L.A. Rams, 16-10
15: Bye
22: at N.Y. Giants, 24-7
29: Houston, 41-38
November
5: Washington
9: at Arizona
20: Atlanta
26: at San Fran.
December
3: Philadelphia
10: at Jacksonville
17: L.A. Rams
24: at Dallas
31: Arizona
19. Dolphins, 4-3 PREVIOUS: 11
The performance Thursday night in Baltimore was about as ugly
as it gets. Those contending that Miami would be better off with
Matt Moore at QB instead of Jay Cutler can just stop it.
20. Packers, 4-3 PREVIOUS: 24
Coach Mike McCarthy had a bye week to find a way for fill-in QB
Brett Hundley to play better. If there is not an improved
performance, it will reflect on McCarthy as well as on Hundley.
21. Bears, 3-5 PREVIOUS: 16
Chicago is 2-2 since turning to rookie Mitchell Trubisky as the
starter at QB, and he is averaging 128 passing yards per game.
Things are still better than they were before Trubisky took over.
22. Chargers, 3-5 PREVIOUS: 17
The Chargers are in the middle of playing two straight road
games. Has anyone in L.A. noticed?
11. Cowboys, 4-3 PREVIOUS: 14
Dallas could play its next six games without RB Ezekiel Elliott
after Monday night’s court ruling involving his suspension. If it
stands and Elliott’s suspension goes into effect, the Cowboys
would turn to Alfred Morris and Darren McFadden at RB.
12. Panthers, 5-3 PREVIOUS: 19
They didn’t exactly get all of QB Cam Newton’s recent issues
resolved or get the offense completely back on track Sunday at
Tampa Bay. But the Panthers did emerge with a victory.
13. Falcons, 4-3 PREVIOUS: 23
The Falcons overcame deficits of 7-0, 10-7 and 17-10 to beat the
Jets, meaning that they found a team even less capable of
holding a lead than they are.
15. Titans, 4-3 PREVIOUS: 15
QB Marcus Mariota’s hamstring injury is said to be fully healed
as the Titans return from their bye week. His restored mobility
could be a major boost to the Tennessee offense.
NFC Statistics
23. Raiders, 3-5 PREVIOUS: 18
It’s just not going to happen this season for the Raiders, is it?
24. Cardinals, 3-4 PREVIOUS: 26
It’s time to watch Drew Stanton take over at QB. The sense of
anticipation is less than overwhelming, huh?
25. Broncos, 3-4 PREVIOUS: 20
Trevor Siemian is not the answer at QB, and the season is
slipping away from Denver.
26. Lions, 3-4 PREVIOUS: 21
The loser of Monday night’s game at Green Bay will have a
difficult time climbing back into playoff contention.
28. Buccaneers, 2-5 PREVIOUS: 28
Few are talking about Tampa Bay being among the NFL’s most
disappointing teams, but it certainly belongs on that list.
29. Giants, 1-6 PREVIOUS: 29
The Giants will return from their bye week and play the rest of
their season because, well, NFL rules pretty much require that.
30. Colts, 2-6 PREVIOUS: 30
Injured QB Andrew Luck will go another week without practicing
because of his ailing shoulder, and it seems inevitable that he
will remain on the shelf until 2018.
31. 49ers, 0-8 PREVIOUS: 31
The trade for QB Jimmy Garoppolo was a terrific deal for the
Niners, who no longer have to worry about trying to pry Kirk
Cousins from the Redskins.
Rush
118.7
81.1
123.3
129.2
97.6
150.6
127.6
120.0
105.4
63.4
82.1
97.6
101.6
95.8
83.3
130.1
Pass
271.7
295.4
251.1
242.5
272.7
219.3
241.6
238.5
251.7
269.7
242.1
213.4
208.4
211.2
213.1
157.5
DEFENSE
Yards
Carolina .............................. 264.0
Minnesota .......................... 282.1
Chicago .............................. 312.0
Atlanta ............................... 320.6
Washington ....................... 322.6
Dallas ................................. 324.9
Philadelphia ....................... 327.1
L.A. Rams ........................... 328.1
Seattle ............................... 333.7
New Orleans ...................... 344.7
Detroit ............................... 346.1
Green Bay .......................... 348.9
Arizona .............................. 352.7
N.Y. Giants ......................... 379.4
San Francisco ..................... 382.0
Tampa Bay ......................... 386.4
Rush
81.6
81.4
104.4
102.1
105.1
106.0
70.4
123.1
117.7
120.3
91.6
125.7
105.9
120.7
131.8
111.7
Pass
182.4
200.8
207.6
218.4
217.4
218.9
256.8
205.0
216.0
224.4
254.6
223.1
246.9
258.7
250.2
274.7
PASSING
ATT-CMP
Cousins, WAS ......... 237/161
A. Rodgers, GBY ...... 193/128
Brees, NOR .............. 248/175
Wentz, PHL ............. 264/161
R. Wilson, SEA ........ 258/164
Prescott, DAL .......... 226/142
M. Ryan, ATL ........... 232/153
Goff, LA ................... 222/133
Stafford, DET .......... 270/163
Keenum, MIN .......... 233/149
Winston, TAM ......... 246/152
PCT
67.9
66.3
70.6
61.0
63.6
62.8
65.9
59.9
60.4
63.9
61.8
YDS TD INT RATE
1900 13 4 103.3
1385 13 3 103.2
1951 11 4 101.7
2063 19 5 101.6
2008 15 4 100.4
1569 14 4 96.6
1844 9 6 92.3
1719 9 4 90.3
1851 12 4 89.6
1610 7 3 88.8
1853 10 6 88.3
32. Browns, 0-8 PREVIOUS: 32
Shouldn’t the Browns get credit for a half-win after leading at
halftime Sunday against the Vikings in London?
mark.maske@washpost.com
RECEIVING
NO YDS AVG
Thielen, MIN .......................... 48 627 13.1
Ju. Jones, ATL ....................... 37 540 14.6
Ertz, PHL ............................... 43 528 12.3
Mi. Evans, TAM ..................... 39 519 13.3
Garcon, SNF ........................... 40 500 12.5
Fitzgerald, ARI ...................... 45 494 11.0
Mic. Thomas, NOR ................ 42 480 11.4
Benjamin, CAR ...................... 32 475 14.8
Tate, DET ............................... 43 449 10.4
LG TD
45 1
53 1
53 6
41 4
59 0
37 3
33 2
43 2
45 2
RUSHING
E. Elliott, DAL ......................
J. Howard, CHI .....................
Gurley, LA ............................
Blount, PHL .........................
D. Freeman, ATL .................
Ingram, NOR ........................
Hyde, SNF ............................
Abdullah, DET .....................
LG TD
30 6
53 4
29 5
68 2
44 5
51 4
61 4
34 1
NO YDS AVG
164 690 4.2
162 662 4.1
145 627 4.3
100 467 4.7
103 466 4.5
107 464 4.3
112 453 4.0
101 369 3.7
OFFENSE
Yards
New England ...................... 411.1
Kansas City ........................ 377.9
Houston ............................. 367.4
Pittsburgh .......................... 363.8
Jacksonville ....................... 361.6
Denver ................................ 341.7
L.A. Chargers ..................... 332.8
Tennessee .......................... 326.4
Oakland .............................. 317.8
N.Y. Jets ............................ 307.9
Buffalo ............................... 303.3
Cleveland ........................... 301.2
Indianapolis ....................... 296.2
Cincinnati ........................... 287.1
Baltimore ........................... 279.8
Miami ................................. 252.4
Rush
109.0
122.8
138.3
108.9
169.0
123.4
88.9
124.6
88.0
95.8
124.6
95.1
99.5
78.4
126.9
76.4
Pass
302.1
255.1
229.1
254.9
192.6
218.3
243.9
201.9
229.8
212.1
178.7
206.1
196.8
208.7
152.9
176.0
DEFENSE
Yards
Denver ................................ 261.0
Pittsburgh .......................... 286.6
Cincinnati ........................... 295.0
Jacksonville ....................... 300.3
Miami ................................. 306.3
Cleveland ........................... 313.5
Baltimore ........................... 317.2
Tennessee .......................... 329.4
Houston ............................. 334.6
L.A. Chargers ..................... 337.0
Buffalo ............................... 346.6
Oakland .............................. 356.9
N.Y. Jets ............................ 361.4
Kansas City ........................ 392.2
Indianapolis ....................... 406.8
New England ...................... 417.0
Rush
72.9
106.6
111.9
138.6
95.4
84.2
132.8
100.1
96.6
135.1
80.1
120.4
128.2
131.1
116.4
121.5
Pass
188.1
180.0
183.1
161.7
210.9
229.2
184.5
229.3
238.0
201.9
266.4
236.5
233.1
261.1
290.4
295.5
PASSING
ATT-CMP
Al. Smith, KC ........... 259/179
Brady, NE ................ 309/206
D. Watson, HOU ...... 204/126
McCown, NYJ .......... 254/179
Ty. Taylor, BUF ........ 196/125
D. Carr, OAK ............ 240/155
Rivers, LAC .............. 286/173
Dalton, CIN .............. 218/138
Bortles, JAC ............ 196/115
Mariota, TEN ........... 176/110
Roethlisberger, PIT . 275/168
September
10: Pittsburgh, 18-21
17: at Baltimore, 10-24
24: at Indianapolis, 28-31
October
1: Cincinnati, 7-31
8: N.Y. Jets, 14-17
15: at Houston, 17-33
22: Tennessee, 9-12 (OT)
29: Minnesota, 16-33
November
5: Bye
12: at Detroit
19: Jacksonville
26: at Cincinnati
December
3: at L.A. Chargers
10: Green Bay
17: Baltimore
24: at Chicago
31: at Pittsburgh
CINCINNATI (3-4)
PITTSBURGH (6-2)
September
10: Baltimore, 0-20
14: Houston, 9-13
24: at Green Bay, 24-27 (OT)
October
1: at Cleveland, 31-7
8: Buffalo, 20-16
15: Bye
22: at Pittsburgh, 14-29
29: Indianapolis, 24-23
November
5: at Jacksonville
12: at Tennessee
19: at Denver
26: Cleveland
December
4: Pittsburgh
10: Chicago
17: at Minnesota
24: Detroit
31: at Baltimore
September
10: at Cleveland, 21-18
17: Minnesota, 26-9
24: at Chicago, 17-23 (OT)
October
1: at Baltimore, 26-9
8: Jacksonville, 9-30
15: at Kansas City, 19-13
22: Cincinnati, 29-14
29: at Detroit, 20-15
November
5: Bye
12: at Indianapolis
16: Tennessee
26: Green Bay
December
4: at Cincinnati
10: Baltimore
17: New England
25: at Houston
31: Cleveland
PCT
69.1
66.7
61.8
70.5
63.8
64.6
60.5
63.3
58.7
62.5
61.1
HOUSTON (3-4)
JACKSONVILLE (4-3)
September
10: Jacksonville, 7-29
14: at Cincinnati, 13-9
24: at New England, 33-36
October
1: Tennessee, 57-14
8: Kansas City, 34-42
15: Cleveland, 33-17
22: Bye
29: at Seattle, 38-41
November
5: Indianapolis
12: at L.A. Rams
19: Arizona
27: at Baltimore
December
3: at Tennessee
10: San Fran.
17: at Jacksonville
25: Pittsburgh
31: at Indianapolis
September
10: at Houston, 29-7
17: Tennessee, 16-37
24: Baltimore, 44-7
October
1: at N.Y. Jets, 20-23 (OT)
8: at Pittsburgh, 30-9
15: L.A. Rams, 17-27
22: at Indianapolis, 27-0
29: Bye
November
5: Cincinnati
12: L.A. Chargers
19: at Cleveland
26: at Arizona
December
3: Indianapolis
10: Seattle
17: Houston
24: at San Fran.
31: at Tennessee
INDIANAPOLIS (2-6)
TENNESSEE (4-3)
September
10: at L.A. Rams, 9-46
17: Arizona, 13-16 (OT)
24: Cleveland, 31-28
October
1: at Seattle, 18-46
8: San Fran., 26-23 (OT)
16: at Tennessee, 22-36
22: Jacksonville, 0-27
29: at Cincinnati, 23-24
November
5: at Houston
12: Pittsburgh
19: Bye
26: Tennessee
December
3: at Jacksonville
10: at Buffalo
14: Denver
23: at Baltimore
31: Houston
September
10: Oakland, 16-26
17: at Jacksonville, 37-16
24: Seattle, 33-27
October
1: at Houston, 14-57
8: at Miami, 10-16
16: Indianapolis, 36-22
22: at Cleveland, 12-9 (OT)
29: Bye
November
5: Baltimore
12: Cincinnati
16: at Pittsburgh
26: at Indianapolis
December
3: Houston
10: at Arizona
17: at San Fran.
24: L.A. Rams
31: Jacksonville
AFC West
AFC Statistics
OFFENSE
Yards
New Orleans ...................... 390.4
Tampa Bay ......................... 376.6
Atlanta ............................... 374.4
Philadelphia ....................... 371.8
Seattle ............................... 370.3
Dallas ................................. 369.9
L.A. Rams ........................... 369.1
Minnesota .......................... 358.5
Washington ....................... 357.1
Arizona .............................. 333.1
Detroit ............................... 324.3
Carolina .............................. 311.0
Green Bay .......................... 310.0
San Francisco ..................... 307.0
N.Y. Giants ......................... 296.4
Chicago .............................. 287.6
CLEVELAND (0-8)
September
10: at Cincinnati, 20-0
17: Cleveland, 24-10
24: at Jacksonville, 7-44
October
1: Pittsburgh, 9-26
8: at Oakland, 30-17
15: Chicago, 24-27 (OT)
22: at Minnesota, 16-24
26: Miami, 40-0
November
5: at Tennessee
12: Bye
19: at Green Bay
27: Houston
December
3: Detroit
10: at Pittsburgh
17: at Cleveland
23: Indianapolis
31: Cincinnati
AFC South
27. Jets, 3-5 PREVIOUS: 22
Maybe the Jets should have tanked the season, after all.
14. Ravens, 4-4 PREVIOUS: 27
If only Baltimore could play Miami every week.
NFC West
18. Redskins, 3-4 PREVIOUS: 13
Injuries are not an excuse in the NFL, but they cannot be ignored,
either. The Redskins’ depleted offensive line was in shambles
Sunday, and the team really had no chance vs. the Cowboys.
BALTIMORE (4-4)
YDS TD INT RATE
2181 16 0 115.4
2541 16 2 106.5
1699 19 8 103.0
1840 12 7 95.3
1343 8 2 93.1
1654 12 6 90.9
2028 13 6 88.4
1603 11 8 87.0
1398 9 5 85.4
1301 4 4 83.1
2062 10 9 82.7
RECEIVING
NO YDS AVG
A. Brown, PIT ........................ 57 835 14.6
D. Hopkins, HOU .................... 45 606 13.5
A. Green, CIN ......................... 38 572 15.1
Cooks, NE .............................. 33 563 17.1
Kelce, KC ................................ 44 556 12.6
T. Hill, KC ............................... 38 553 14.6
K. Allen, LAC ......................... 40 548 13.7
T. Hilton, IND ........................ 29 527 18.2
Gronkowski, NE ..................... 34 509 15.0
LG TD
51 3
72 7
77 4
54 3
44 4
75 3
50 1
63 1
53 5
RUSHING
NO YDS AVG
K. Hunt, KC .......................... 146 763 5.2
Bell, PIT ............................... 194 760 3.9
Fournette, JAC .................... 130 596 4.6
Gordon, LAC ........................ 131 526 4.0
McCoy, BUF ......................... 137 521 3.8
A. Collins, BAL ....................... 80 478 6.0
C.. Anderson, DEN ............... 107 469 4.4
Jay Ajayi, MIA ..................... 138 465 3.4
LG TD
69 4
27 5
90 6
87 4
48 3
50 0
40 1
21 0
DENVER (3-4)
LOS ANGELES (3-5)
September
11: L.A. Chargers, 24-21
17: Dallas, 42-17
24: at Buffalo, 16-26
October
1: Oakland, 16-10
8: Bye
15: N.Y. Giants, 10-23
22: at L.A. Chargers, 0-21
30: at Kansas City, 19-29
November
5: at Philadelphia
12: New England
19: Cincinnati
26: at Oakland
December
3: at Miami
10: N.Y. Jets
14: at Indianapolis
24: at Washington
31: Kansas City
September
11: at Denver, 21-24
17: Miami, 17-19
24: Kansas City, 10-24
October
1: Philadelphia, 24-26
8: at N.Y. Giants, 27-22
15: at Oakland, 17-16
22: Denver, 21-0
29: at New England, 13-21
November
5: Bye
12: at Jacksonville
19: Buffalo
23: at Dallas
December
3: Cleveland
10: Washington
16: at Kansas City
24: at N.Y. Jets
31: Oakland
KANSAS CITY (6-2)
OAKLAND (3-5)
September
7: at New England, 42-27
17: Philadelphia, 27-20
24: at L.A. Chargers, 24-10
October
2: Washington, 29-20
8: at Houston, 42-34
15: Pittsburgh, 13-19
19: at Oakland, 30-31
30: Denver, 29-19
November
5: at Dallas
12: Bye
19: at N.Y. Giants
26: Buffalo
December
3: at N.Y. Jets
10: Oakland
16: L.A. Chargers
24: Miami
31: at Denver
September
10: at Tennessee, 26-16
17: N.Y. Jets, 45-20
24: at Washington, 10-27
October
1: at Denver, 10-16
8: Baltimore, 17-30
15: L.A. Chargers, 16-17
19: Kansas City, 31-30
29: at Buffalo, 14-34
November
5: at Miami
12: Bye
19: New England
26: Denver
December
3: N.Y. Giants
10: at Kansas City
17: Dallas
25: at Philadelphia
31: at L.A. Chargers
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D7
SU
professional football
T H E INSIDER
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/insider
Mailbag addresses
Cousins, injury bug
Halloween was Tuesday. I hope
everyone enjoyed the holiday.
For the Washington Redskins,
it ended a nightmare of a month
in which they went 1-3 and lost
starter after starter to injury. In
Sunday’s 33-19 defeat to the
visiting Dallas Cowboys, tight end
Jordan Reed, defensive end Matt
Ioannidis and right guard Shawn
Lauvao all suffered injuries.
So, every Redskins starting
offensive lineman is dealing with
an injury. But, hey, it should only
get better from here. Right? Um,
take a look at the schedule. The
Redskins travel to Seattle to face
the Seahawks, then host the
Minnesota Vikings (who are
coming off a bye week) before
hitting the road again to face the
New Orleans Saints. The three
teams lead their divisions and
have a combined record of 16-6.
A nightmare, indeed.
At 3-4, the Redskins are on the
outside looking in when it comes
to the playoff picture.
As always, thanks for sending
in your Redskins mailbag
questions. We switched the
format from email to Twitter, so
please keep tweeting your
questions using the
#RedskinsWP hashtag.
Q: Should the Redskins sign
Kirk Cousins for $34.5 million on
the franchise tag for one year?
A: The San Francisco 49ers,
who have long been rumored as a
potential landing spot for
Cousins, acquired quarterback
Jimmy Garoppolo from the New
England Patriots for a secondround pick Monday. Niners
Coach Kyle Shanahan appears to
have his franchise quarterback in
Garoppolo, meaning the
Cousins-to-San Francisco rumors
are dead for now.
So what does that mean for the
Redskins? Well, they always had
the opportunity to tag Cousins
for a third straight season. The
transition tag would cost about
$26 million, while the franchise
tag would be about $34 million.
With San Francisco acquiring
Garoppolo, I think the transition
tag makes a little more sense
now.
Q: How can the Redskins
overcome all of these injuries?
A: At this point, I think it’s too
much to overcome.
Left tackle Trent Williams
(knee), center Spencer Long
(knees) and right guard Brandon
Scherff (back/knee) all did not
play against Dallas. Right tackle
Morgan Moses fought through
two sprained ankles to play every
snap. Lauvao went down with a
stinger, which Coach Jay Gruden
on Monday said could force him
out.
Williams’s backup, Ty Nsekhe,
continues to recover from core
muscle surgery. Nsekhe’s backup,
T.J. Clemmings, hurt his ankle
against the Cowboys.
It’s not just the offensive line,
either. Reed could miss time
because of a hamstring injury,
while fellow tight end Niles Paul
is in the concussion protocol.
Washington’s defensive line was
already without Jonathan Allen,
and Ioannidis fractured his hand
and will have surgery.
The Redskins have been
fighting, but the injury situation
could ruin their season.
— Master Tesfatsion
NFL NOTES
Dolphins’ Alonso won’t be suspended for hit on Ravens’ Flacco
FROM NEWS SERVICES
AND STAFF REPORTS
Miami Dolphins linebacker
Kiko Alonso will not be suspended
by the NFL for a hard hit that left
Baltimore Ravens quarterback
Joe Flacco helmetless and woozy
Thursday night.
NFL spokesman Joe Lockhart
announced there would be no
suspensions across the league for
on-the-field play, although he did
not rule out the possibility of fines
for Alonso and others involved in
a scrum after the hit.
Alonso hit Flacco’s head as the
quarterback was sliding, knocking him out of the game. The play
drew a 15-yard penalty, but Alonso
was not ejected.
“I thought that was a very
vicious type of a hit,” Coach John
Harbaugh said Monday. “He was
definitely
defenseless
and
couldn’t protect himself. Therefore, he got his ear sliced open and
he got hit in the head. You never
minimize that.”
Flacco entered the concussion
NICK WASS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami linebacker Kiko Alonso battered Baltimore quarterback Joe
Flacco and sent his helmet flying with this hit Thursday night.
protocol and needed stitches to
close the cut, but he was at the
team facility the next day and is
likely to be cleared to play Sunday
against the Tennessee Titans. Harbaugh added that Flacco has
“zero” concussion symptoms.
— Cindy Boren
The NFL players’
union has turned to a federal
appeals court in its quest to let
running back Ezekiel Elliott play
COWBOYS:
Sunday at home against Kansas
City as he fights his six-game
suspension over domestic violence allegations.
Union lawyers said Elliott’s suspension should be delayed until
the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals considers the issue. League
lawyers had no immediate comment.
The NFL Players Association
first asked U.S. District Judge
Katherine Polk Failla to suspend
her Monday ruling reinstating the
suspension during an appeal. But
she refused Tuesday, so the file was
moved to the appeals court.
BROWNS: A proposed trade
between Cleveland and the Cincinnati Bengals involving quarterback AJ McCarron fell through
when paperwork was not filed
before the 4 p.m. deadline.
The teams had an agreement in
place, sending McCarron to Cleveland, but paperwork did not arrive
at the NFL office in time, said
league spokesman Brian McCarthy. He did not provide any further
details about why the transaction
wasn’t finalized.
BRONCOS: Coach Vance Joseph is either going to simplify his
offense for Trevor Siemian or send
him to the bench in favor of Brock
Osweiler.
Joseph complained that Siemian made “three horrific decisions”
on “three horrible interceptions”
in the Broncos’ 29-19 loss at Kansas City on Monday night, wasting
another dominant defensive effort
and negating any gains made by
the offense.
So, Joseph huddled Tuesday
with General Manager John Elway, offensive coordinator Mike
McCoy and quarterbacks coach
Bill Musgrave to decide who will
be under center when the Broncos
(3-4) visit NFL-leading Philadelphia (7-1) this weekend.
GIANTS: Cornerback Janoris
Jenkins was suspended indefinitely for a violation of team rules.
The suspension takes effect immediately, meaning Jenkins will
miss Sunday’s home game against
the Rams.
— Associated Press
BARRY SVRLUGA
If Shanahan wanted Garoppolo, what does that say about Cousins?
SVRLUGA FROM D1
(who was released) and C.J.
Beathard, and Shanahan, still
pursuing his first victory as a
head coach as the season heads
to the second half. Next on that
list: I’d argue it’s Cousins.
What we know from the deal:
Lynch and Shanahan chose
Garoppolo, a career backup who
has completed just 63 career
passes, over Cousins, a Pro Bowl
player last year who has thrown
85 touchdown passes and is in
his third full year as a starter.
Throw that mix into the
dominant story line of the NFL
season in Washington —
Cousins’s impending free agency
and whether he is worth the
gazillion dollars it’ll take to
retain him — and the New
England-San Francisco trade has
an impact here.
In the popular parlor game of
“Where Will Kirk End Up?” San
Francisco has toggled with the
Los Angeles Rams (whom we’ll
get to) as the leading destination
because of the ties those
franchises now have to Cousins’s
career.
We know the links: When
Shanahan was Washington’s
offensive coordinator under his
father, Mike, the team traded up
to select Robert Griffin III in the
2012 draft — but then shrewdly
spent a fourth-round pick on
Cousins that same draft.
“Kyle believed in me when it
was just potential; there was no
production,” Cousins told
reporters before the 49ers’ visit
to Washington in October.
Now Shanahan appears to
have applied that belief to
another quarterback. From
Lynch’s statement: “Albeit in
limited game action, Jimmy has
displayed the characteristics and
traits that we believe are vital to
being a successful quarterback
in this league.”
It’s not terribly difficult to
read into it: We’ve looked at
Cousins’s much-more-complete
body of work — including 48
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Kirk Cousins is in the middle of another solid season, ranking third in the NFL in passer rating.
starts in which he has gone 2225-1 — and chosen to place our
time and money elsewhere.
The money: It’s important to
note that Garoppolo’s rookie
deal expires this season, and the
49ers could be making an
evaluation of their new
quarterback over the next eight
games. Garoppolo, who turns 26
on Thursday, is more than three
years younger than Cousins, and
therefore comes with more
wiggle room. And the 49ers now
have spent a second-round pick
on him.
The bet here: Garoppolo could
throw 20 interceptions and for
zero touchdowns, and the Niners
would try to work out a longterm deal with him or place the
franchise tag on him to punt the
decision down the road — a
situation with which Cousins is
all too familiar.
So say the trade takes San
Francisco out of the Cousins
picture. He would, naturally,
look next to the Rams, coached
by his former offensive
coordinator Sean McVay —
under whom Cousins produced
back-to-back franchise records
for passing yards.
When McVay departed
Ashburn for Los Angeles,
Cousins signed one of his jerseys
for his outgoing coach. The
inscription: “I owe you my
career.”
But are the Rams really
looking for an expensive free
agent quarterback? Just a year
and a half ago, the Rams — not
on McVay’s watch — selected
Jared Goff with the first overall
pick in the draft. Now, Goff ’s
current stats, seven games into
his second season, don’t
compare to those of Cousins,
who ranks third in the NFL —
behind Kansas City’s Alex Smith
and New England’s Brady — in
passer rating.
But listen to McVay, whose
Rams are 5-2 with Goff as the
starter, during an appearance on
Fox last week.
“We want to make him an
extension of our coaching staff,”
McVay said of Goff, “and he’s
continuing to become that.”
If McVay is still saying that in
December or, for goodness sake,
January — and the Rams are in
the playoffs while Washington
sits home — what would lead
you to believe Los Angeles would
want to spend nine figures on a
new quarterback when the
incumbent is doing just fine?
This isn’t to say there won’t be
a market for Cousins. There will
be. He still plays the sport’s most
important position at a
(reasonably) high level. There
will be plenty of franchises
looking for a quarterback: The
Jets, Browns, Jaguars, Broncos
and Cardinals come to mind.
Oh, and Washington. You can’t
draw a line between Monday
night’s trade between New
England and San Francisco and
a conclusion that Cousins will
end up right back where it
started. But it has to make
Cousins’s camp think. The coach
who believed in Cousins before
he produced has moved on to
someone else. His options are
out there. They just might not be
those we expected.
barry.svrluga@washpost.com
For more by Barry Svrluga, visit
washingtonpost.com/svrluga.
SALLY JENKINS
NFL players gave commissioner total authority. They need to fight his abuse of it.
JENKINS FROM D1
hard to upset the status quo. Her
brisk manner suggested, “This
better be really important.” Her
tone had bite. “I’m one of those
judges given to tire-kicking,” she
announced. She proceeded to
kick all of the air out of the
pinstriped suits representing
Elliott.
“There is a certain rhetoric in
your briefs that is not helpful to
me,” she said. The words were
clearly aimed at NFL Players
Association attorney Jeffrey
Kessler, whose rising and
increasingly frustrated voice she
continually shushed over the
next two hours.
Did Failla smile more sweetly
and defer to the NFL’s superbly
concise litigator Paul Clement
right from the outset? She
certainly seemed to. Did she
appear to suppress more than
one eye roll at Kessler’s
passionate, verbose and
desperately searching
arguments? Indeed, she did. “I
can read,” she said at one point.
One thing was obvious:
Lawyers for NFL players have
been arguing against Goodell’s
capriciousness for so long that
they have become frustrated and
hyper-emotional. It doesn’t
matter that they are right.
Clearly, Goodell abused his
power: He discarded the
conclusions of his own
investigator, Kia Roberts, who
recommended no suspension
because she found Elliott’s
accuser not believable. Key
evidence was buried or hidden
from Elliott, and Goodell’s
rubber-stamp arbitrator, Harold
Henderson, denied Elliott a
chance to examine key notes and
to cross-examine key witnesses.
Goodell and the league simply
made an example out of Elliott
because they needed a public
splash on domestic violence, and
they trusted in the grim fortress
of arbitration law to protect
them.
All of this Kessler argued. But
it was striking how unfavorably
his words fell on the ears of
Failla, who is unattuned to
Goodell’s imperatorial abuses.
She just didn’t buy it or
understand the tone of hostility
to the league office.
“Throughout your papers, you
suggest there is a conspiracy,”
she said. She did not like the
intimations of something
“nefarious.” These allegations of
dark motives seemed to her
bombastic. “What I don’t
understand is, who are the
conspirators and where is the
conspiracy?”
In her ruling she delivered a
clean sweep victory to the NFL
and the neat, precise Clement in
his clear rimless spectacles.
On other occasions, federal
court judges have bought
Kessler’s arguments. In
Deflategate, 2nd Circuit judges
Richard Berman and Robert
Katzmann both took serious
issue with Goodell’s unfair
conduct. In Elliott’s case, so did
2nd Circuit judge Paul A. Crotty
and 5th Circuit judge Amos
Mazzant. But at best, this leaves
NFL players with divided rulings
and dependence on the luck of
the draw.
The problem is that any
arbitration challenge is an
inherently uphill battle.
Arbitration is meant to be
difficult to overturn, precisely to
keep labor disputes out of court.
What became clear in Failla’s
courtroom is that NFL players
have a doubly steep uphill battle
because they signed a collective
bargaining agreement that is
lousy with vagueness and
includes no specific written
protections — none — against a
commissioner run amok, and
some judges are too weak or
reluctant to check him and
defend the basic integrity of the
arbitration system.
For instance: Article 46
doesn’t require Goodell to hear
from witnesses in doling out
penalties. Think about that:
Unlike more responsible
commissioners, Goodell
interprets that silence as
meaning he does not need any
direct evidence in order to
suspend; he can simply say, “Off
with your head.” Lawyers such as
Kessler are therefore left to
argue that Goodell should
adhere to some invisible code of
fairness that appears nowhere in
the labor contract.
Kessler tried to paint a picture
of “a perfect storm of unfairness”
to Elliott. To which Failla
responded by ruling, “Courts
should not superimpose an
extracontractual definition of
‘fairness’ in arbitrations beyond
the actual standards and
procedures for which the parties
bargained.”
In Failla’s eyes, if the CBA left
Elliott unprotected from a
vicious or ill-motivated Goodell,
that was the players’ problem,
not hers.
“While reasonable minds
could differ on the evidentiary
decisions made by the arbitrator,
the proceedings in their totality
accorded with the” collective
bargaining agreement, she
wrote.
All of which left Elliott
suspended again, unless he can
obtain emergency relief in a
second circuit appeal — and find
a judge who is not quite so
reluctant to step in to ensure the
NFL doesn’t violate the rights of
its players. As Failla saw it, any
intervention by her on behalf of
Elliott would “micromanage”
Goodell on his disciplinary
decisions. She just didn’t see it
as her business. But just because
arbitration law is meant to be a
steep hill to climb doesn’t mean
it’s supposed to be impossible.
Arbitration law wasn’t written to
destroy fairness — and if a judge
won’t preserve fairness, then
who will?
In the last round of legal
wrangling, Failla’s 2nd Circuit
colleague Crotty rightly halted
Elliott’s suspension because he
understood Elliott had been
deprived of “opportunities to
explore pertinent and material
evidence.” No matter how tired
the NFL’s lawyers are of
constantly re-litigating
fundamental fairness under
Goodell, they have to go back
and fight it again and again —
and try to find a cooler tone with
which to do so, and a judge who
will protect the integrity of the
system.
sally.jenkins@washpost.com
For more by Sally Jenkins, visit
washingtonpost.com/jenkins.
D8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
Eagles improve, Panthers perplex with their deadline deals
BY
M ARK M ASKE
The deals kept coming Tuesday
as the NFL’s 4 p.m. trading deadline came and went. The Philadelphia Eagles acquired running
back Jay Ajayi from the Miami
Dolphins and the Carolina Panthers dealt away wide receiver Kelvin Benjamin to the Buffalo Bills,
meaning one NFC contender added and another subtracted on
deadline day.
The Eagles have clearly been
the NFC’s top team so far, with a
league-best 7-1 record halfway
through their season. They have
established themselves as the conference’s Super Bowl favorite.
They have a league MVP candidate in second-year quarterback
Carson Wentz.
In other years, that would have
meant sitting back and watching
things play out for the rest of the
season, hoping that being the
NFC’s best team for half a season
would translate into becoming the
conference’s final team standing
in February.
Not this year.
The new way of the NFL, apparently, is to keep bolstering your
roster right up until the calendar
turns to November. The Seattle
Seahawks, another leading NFC
contender, upped the ante Monday when they fortified their offensive line by trading for Duane
Brown, the three-time Pro Bowl
left tackle for the Houston Texans.
The Eagles’ response came
Tuesday when they dealt a fourthround draft choice to the Dolphins
for Ajayi.
C A PIT A L S NO TES
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/capitals
Connolly remains out;
return date is unclear
Capitals forward Brett Connolly
wasn’t at Tuesday’s practice,
Washington’s first after a threegame road trip through western
Canada. Connolly was placed in
concussion protocol during the
team’s game in Vancouver on
Thursday, and it’s unclear if he’ll
play against the New York
Islanders on Thursday night.
“He’s still sort of day-to-day,
and we’ll see where he is,” Coach
Barry Trotz said. “He didn’t skate
[Tuesday], so we’ll see where he is
[Wednesday]. I don’t know if he’ll
be able to skate or not. I’ll wait for
my trainers to give me all of the
info.”
Connolly, who scored a careerhigh 15 goals last year, is one of
four injured Capitals. Andre
Burakovsky had surgery on his
left thumb last week, and he is
expected to be out six to eight
weeks. Trotz said he doesn’t know
when forward Tyler Graovac
might start skating with the team
again. Graovac missed the past
five games with an undisclosed
“upper-body” injury.
Connolly and Burakovsky were
both playing on the third line
with center Lars Eller when they
got hurt, and Trotz has had to get
creative with his forward
combinations without them,
promoting Devante Smith-Pelly
into the top-six forward corps.
The Capitals have had Chandler
Stephenson playing on the third
line, and Anthony Peluso has
played the past two games on
Washington’s fourth line. Peluso
has logged less than five minutes
of ice time in each game.
Top defenseman Matt
Niskanen injured his left hand
Oct. 13, and he has been skating
with the team’s strength and
conditioning coach before
practices. Because he is on longterm injured reserve, Niskanen
isn’t eligible to play again until
Nov. 7, but that seems like an
optimistic return date
considering he hasn’t joined the
team in a practice yet.
Washington has allowed an
average of 33.6 shots in the seven
games he has missed.
“I know he’s skating every day
because he was here [Tuesday]
morning skating,” Trotz said. “I
think that will really be the
doctors assessing it. They’ll
probably take a few more pictures
[of his injury] and go from there.”
— Isabelle Khurshudyan
C A PITA L S’ NE X T TH R EE
vs. New York Islanders
Tomorrow
7 NBCSW
at Boston Bruins
Saturday
7 NBCSW,
NHLN
vs. Arizona Coyotes
Monday
7 NBCSW
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM);
WFED (1500 AM)
Welcome to the new NFL and its
modified approach to roster construction.
The Eagles already had an effective running back in LeGarrette
Blount. Now they have two effective running backs in Blount and
Ajayi, a nearly 1,300-yard rusher
last season who ran for 465 yards
in seven games for Miami this
season. Ajayi is not the pass-catcher out of the backfield that the
Eagles lost when Darren Sproles
suffered season-ending injuries in
Week 3. But he is considered very
good in pass protection.
The Eagles still aren’t a perfect
team. They lost their left tackle,
Jason Peters, to a season-ending
knee injury in Week 7. They have
good wide receivers but lack a true
No. 1 wideout. Their defense is
very good against the run but has
had issues against the pass this
season.
But they are a better team at
this moment than they were when
Tuesday began. They answered
the Seahawks’ big move with one
of their own.
It was a far different story for
the Panthers, who have a record of
5-3. They are a half-game behind
the New Orleans Saints for first
place in the NFC South. They are
two games in back of the Eagles for
the best record in the entire NFC.
There is half a season still to be
played. The Panthers are well positioned to reach the NFC playoffs.
It’s not out of the question that
they could make a run toward
what would be the franchise’s second Super Bowl appearance in
three years.
NICK WASS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Eagles bolstered their running game by trading a fourth-round pick to the Dolphins for Jay Ajayi.
Yet at the deadline, the Panthers decided they were sellers,
not buyers.
Carolina’s trade of Benjamin to
Buffalo for third- and seventhround draft choices next spring
was not the biggest deal swung
Monday or Tuesday. But it was
perhaps the toughest one to figure
out.
Benjamin, a fourth-year pro,
has had one 1,000-yard receiving
season in the NFL. That was as a
rookie in 2014. He missed his en-
tire second season because of a
knee injury. He returned last season to have 63 catches for 941
yards, and he has 32 catches for
475 yards through half of this season.
That’s not quite the production
of a true No. 1 wide receiver in a
successful NFL passing offense.
But it’s good enough to be at least a
very good No. 2 wideout. It means
Benjamin is fully capable of being
a significant contributor to a productive offense. He is, for certain, a
useful player to a contending
team.
That’s exactly what he will be
for the Bills, who have a record of
5-2 and trail the first-place New
England Patriots by a half-game in
the AFC East. Benjamin will give
quarterback Tyrod Taylor another
receiving option.
The Bills’ new brain trust of
General Manager Brandon Beane
and Coach Sean McDermott formerly worked in Carolina and is
familiar with Benjamin. Beane
was the Panthers’ assistant general manager, and McDermott was
their defensive coordinator.
There may have been issues
with Benjamin in Carolina. He left
a recent Panthers practice early,
saying later that he was frustrated
about a knee injury. The Panthers
now can give more chances to
rookie wideout Curtis Samuel in
tandem with Devin Funchess. The
trade provides future salary cap
space in addition to draft picks.
Even so, it is a curious maneuver by Carolina.
Panthers quarterback Cam
Newton needs more help around
him on offense, not less. Tight end
Greg Olsen is hurt and is not eligible to be activated from the injured reserve list until late November. Without Olsen or Benjamin,
Newton will be lacking in passcatchers who truly scare a defense
and who inspire complete trust by
a quarterback.
Rookie tailback Christian McCaffrey has been an asset. But
Newton again has been asked to
carry too much of the offensive
burden at times this season. His
season, following his return from
shoulder surgery, has been a
mixed bag. There has been impressive pocket passing at times.
But there have been mistake-filled
performances as well.
For a team that should be gearing up for a stretch-drive push
toward the postseason, the Panthers had the look Tuesday of a
team instead eyeing the future at
the possible expense of the present.
mark.maske@washpost.com
NHL ROUNDUP
New York scores four goals in the third period to upend Vegas
RANGERS 6,
GOLDEN KNIGHTS 4
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Mika Zibanejad got the tiebreaking goal with 5:39 left, and
the New York Rangers scored four
in the third period to rally for a 6-4
win over the expansion Vegas
Golden Knights on Tuesday night
at Madison Square Garden.
Jimmy Vesey, Mats Zuccarello,
Chris Kreider, Pavel Buchnevich
and Michael Graber scored for the
Rangers, and Henrik Lundqvist
made 30 saves. Zibanejad also had
assists on the first two goals in the
third, helping the Rangers win for
the third time in seven games.
Reilly Smith scored twice, Oscar Lindberg got a goal against his
former team and David Perron
converted a penalty shot for Vegas,
which has lost consecutive games
after winning five straight. Maxime Lagace, the fourth goalie used
by the Golden Knights this season,
stopped 32 shots in his first NHL
start.
Kreider pulled the Rangers to
4-3 with a power-play goal as he
took a pass from Zibanejad and
beat Lagace from the left side for
his third at 5:31 of the third.
Buchnevich tied it nearly four
minutes later, taking a pass from
Zibanejad on the left side and
putting it into the open net with
Lagace out of position after mov-
ing forward in the crease. It gave
Buchnevich a goal for the third
straight game.
Grabner added an empty-netter
with 1:14 left to seal it.
RED WINGS 5, COYOTES
3: Anthony Mantha scored his
team-leading fifth goal, and Dylan
Larkin added a goal and an assist
as host Detroit upended Arizona.
Knowing the Coyotes (1-11-1)
had played the night before in
Philadelphia, where they won in
overtime for their first victory of
the season, the Red Wings applied
pressure early. They fired the first
eight shots on goal and scored
twice before the game was three
minutes old.
Gustav Nyquist intercepted a
clearing attempt by Arizona de-
fenseman Alex Goligoski and
threaded a shot through traffic
that beat goalie Scott Wedgewood
at 1:31 of the first period.
Detroit made it 2-0 at 2:37 when
Luke Glendening snapped a high
wrist shot past Wedgewood on the
blocker side.
The Coyotes got on the board
11:36 into the second when Jason
Demers took a feed from Clayton
Keller and his point shot eluded a
partially screened Jimmy Howard.
JETS 2, WILD 1: Connor Hellebuyck made 28 saves, and Nikolaj Ehlers and Kyle Connor scored
to carry Winnipeg to victory in St.
Paul, Minn.
Ehlers scored his team-leading
seventh goal of the season and
Connor added his second for Winnipeg, which is 6-1-1 since an 0-2
start to the season.
Rookie Luke Kunin scored his
second goal of the season and
goaltender Alex Stalock stopped
17 shots for Minnesota, which had
won two in a row and three of its
previous four games.
The Wild was 0 for 5 on the
power play.
Hellebuyck continued his
strong run in net for the Jets, who
had made the move to acquire
Steve Mason as the starting netminder in the offseason. While
Mason has a 4.84 goals against
average and .872 save percentage
in his four games, Hellebuyck’s
numbers rank among the league’s
best.
At Middleburg Academy, small numbers produce big results
With a focus on efficiency, the Dragons have become a volleyball powerhouse despite a roster that boasts just 10 players
BY
M ICHAEL E RRIGO
During a recent practice, the
volleyball team at Middleburg
Academy was simulating ingame scenarios. On one half of
the court, six girls moved in
practiced rhythm, setting and
spiking point after point. On the
other side, because Middleburg
doesn’t have enough players to
field a practice squad, three
teammates and the coach’s son
did their best to provide some
resistance.
“Be efficient!” Coach Maureen
DiClementi yelled over the
booming bass of a 2 Chainz song
on the gym’s stereo system.
At Middleburg, efficiency is
everything. In her six years at
the school, DiClementi has built
the Dragons into a powerhouse
by running an aggressive offense
and controlling the pace of
matches. Last year, her team did
that successfully, compiling a
40-3 record. The win total is
even more impressive considering Middleburg had only 10
active players in the volleyball
program.
This year, DiClementi again
has 10 players, a few of whom
have little volleyball experience.
The school, with 125 students,
uses a “no cut” policy for all of its
teams. Every girl who shows up
for volleyball tryouts at Middleburg earns a spot on one of the
best squads in Northern Virginia.
“I don’t guarantee playing
time to anyone,” DiClementi
said. “But you can come and be
part of something. You have a
commitment, you have a place to
be, and you have immediate
friends.”
The varied skill levels mean
that DiClementi uses a small
rotation of players, often employing only one or two substitutes, if any. That’s where the
efficiency comes in. In every
match, the Dragons aim to serve
aggressively, side out as fast as
possible and pass to perfection.
If all of this comes together, the
result is the volleyball equiva-
THE TOP 10
THE TOP 10
VOLLEYBALL
FIELD HOCKEY
Flint Hill finished its regular season with 3-0 wins over
Sidwell Friends, Episcopal and Trinity Christian. . . .
Northwest scored an impressive 3-0 victory over Wootton to end the season and will be a No. 1 seed in the
Maryland 4A playoffs. . . . Loudoun County avenged its
Oct. 3 loss to Heritage by beating the Pride, 3-2, to end
the regular season. . . . After losing the first match of
the year to Loudoun County, Stone Bridge dominated the
rest of its schedule to finish 22-1. . . . The fast-paced
Middleburg Academy offense needed a rare fourth set to
take down WCAC contender Paul VI. . . . Atholton went
11-0 in Howard County play to win the county title and
earn a top seed in the Maryland 3A bracket.
After a physical 3-0 victory over Osbourn Park, Westfield scored two second-half goals to advance past
Langley and into the Virginia Northern Region championship. . . . With a 3-0 defeat of Arundel, Severna Park
earned a berth in the Maryland 4A East region championship against South River, a rematch of last year. . . .
Spalding ended the regular season with a 3-0 win over
Stone Ridge and a 5-1 win over Roland Park. . . . With
junior Clara Morrison leading the charge, St. John's
avenged its lone regular season loss and beat Good
Counsel in the WCAC championship. . . . St. Stephen's/
St.Agnes closed the regular season with a dominant 5-0
victory over Georgetown Visitation. . . . Chesapeake
rolled past J.M. Bennett, 4-1, to advance to the Maryland
3A East region championship against Mt. Hebron.
Rank
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
SISSY HESSENIUS/COURTESY PHOTO
Senior libero Lauren Greminger, right, and the Dragons (26-4)
play an aggressive style to help make up for their small roster size.
lent of a blitz. Before an opponent has finished wondering
when the rest of the Dragons are
going to arrive, Middleburg is up
a set.
“When you face Middleburg,
you know you’re going to face a
great team and a team with a
plan,” Flint Hill Coach Carrol
DeNure said. “Our goal against
them is to always serve tough
and try to keep them out of their
rhythm.”
Flint Hill, a school with 58
volleyball players spread across
four rosters, is the only area
team to beat Middleburg (26-4).
The Dragons have overcome
obstacles unique to a shorthanded team. Against Highland, the
team’s libero was out of town,
and no one else on the roster
plays the position. After two
players collided in a match
against Patrick Henry, DiClementi thought she would have to
forfeit. A four-set win over Paul
VI tested the team’s endurance.
“There’s really no margin for
error,” DiClementi said.
DiClementi demands, and receives, a special type of commitment from her players. At the
aforementioned practice, on a
Wednesday afternoon, senior defensive specialist Lilly Reilly, a
four-year contributor and one of
Middleburg’s stars, had flown
back from a college visit. She
arrived in Virginia around the
same time her team started
practicing and came straight to
the gym.
“It can be hard to practice
with eight or nine people, but it’s
harder with seven,” Reilly said.
Team
Flint Hill
Northwest
Loudoun County
Stone Bridge
Middleburg Academy
Holy Cross
Arundel
Atholton
Langley
Calvert
Record
28-0
14-0
19-2
23-1
26-4
26-2
15-0
13-1
20-3
13-1
Rank
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Team
Westfield
Severna Park
Spalding
St. John's
St. Stephen's/St. Agnes
Chesapeake
Good Counsel
Fairfax
River Hill
Madison
Record
20-0
13-1
10-5-1
14-1
12-4
11-4
11-4
13-6
11-3-1
12-8
THE TOP 10
THE TOP 10
GIRLS’ SOCCER
BOYS’ SOCCER
Last week marked the beginning of the playoffs for
many Maryland public schools and the end of the regular
season for most private school programs. In the coming
days, WCAC, ISL, IAAM and D.C. public schools will all
compete for conference and league championships,
while Maryland public schools will conclude their sectional playoffs and move on to next week’s region finals.
. . . St. John’s finished 8-0 in the WCAC with a 5-1 win
over Bishop Ireton last Tuesday and then rolled past
National Cathedral, 5-2, on Thursday to conclude its
regular season. . . . Spalding fell to nonconference
opponent Good Counsel, 2-1, in its final game of the
regular season. It will face the winner of Mercy and John
Carroll in Thursday’s IAAM semifinals. . . . Having
already clinched the ISL AA regular season title,
Potomac finished off its schedule with a 1-1 tie against
Flint Hill and a 3-0 win over O’Connell. The Panthers will
now turn their attention to the ISL tournament.
In last week's Anne Arundel County championship,
Severna Park beat Meade, 2-1, in overtime for the second
time this season. The rivals could meet again Friday in a
Maryland 4A East semifinal. . . . Natan Rosen’s hat trick
powered Whitman past Wheaton, 4-0, on Thursday. The
Vikings have won nine boys’ soccer state championships
(1979, 1981, 1989, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2009 and
2014) and were looking to move closer to their 10th title
against Bethesda-Chevy Chase on Tuesday. . . . Churchill
faced Einstein on Tuesday. Barring an upset, the Bulldogs and Whitman would meet in a Maryland 4A West
semifinal Friday. Churchill lost the regular season
matchup, 2-1. . . . Leonardtown thumped North Point,
4-0, to win the SMAC title Oct. 25. The Raiders would
need to handle a tough Broadneck team Tuesday and
either North Point or South River on Friday to reach the
Maryland 4A East region final, where they lost, 1-0, to
Severna Park last year.
Rank
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Rank
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Team
St. John’s
Whitman
Bethesda-Chevy Chase
River Hill
Spalding
South River
Broadneck
Potomac School
Northern
Good Counsel
Record
13-1-1
11-1
11-1-1
12-1
10-2-2
11-2-1
11-2-1
11-1-2
11-1
12-4-3
Freshman defensive specialist
Allie Hessenius has already
bought in to her coach’s direct
style and sees how it has been
effective for Reilly and the other
senior leaders.
“It’s intense, it’s efficient, it
gets it done — that’s the style. I
like it,” Hessenius said.
But there’s another side to her
job that DiClementi must face as
the leader of a program such as
Middleburg. She has to combine
the strategic coaching it takes to
compete with the best teams in
the area with the patient approach necessary to teach the
Team
Severna Park
Whitman
Churchill
Meade
Wilson
Leonardtown
Landon
Gonzaga
Mount Hebron
River Hill
Record
14-0-1
11-1-2
11-2
12-2
14-0-1
13-2
13-2-2
11-6-3
10-2-2
11-1-2
game to a newcomer. It’s that
kind of skill, that careful navigation, that defines her tenure and
her team.
But how long can it continue?
With three seniors graduating
this spring, Middleburg’s roster
will be down to seven and DiClementi will be dependent on a
new freshman class for talent.
When asked whether she expects
an influx of new players next
year, regardless of their talent
level, the coach laughs.
“I don’t,” she said. “But we
always figure it out.”
michael.errigo@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D9
M2
scoreboard
FOOTBA LL
BASKETBALL
H OC K E Y
NFL
NCAA
NBA
Hornets 104, Grizzlies 99
NHL
NFC
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Late Monday
EASTERN CONFERENCE
EAST
W
Philadelphia .................. 7
Dallas ............................ 4
Washington .................. 3
N.Y. Giants .................... 1
L
1
3
4
6
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.875
.571
.429
.143
PF
232
198
160
112
PA
156
161
180
156
SOUTH
W
New Orleans ................. 5
Carolina ......................... 5
Atlanta .......................... 4
Tampa Bay .................... 2
L
2
3
3
5
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.714
.625
.571
.286
PF
191
148
153
148
PA
145
142
152
168
NORTH
W
Minnesota ..................... 6
Green Bay ..................... 4
Detroit .......................... 3
Chicago ......................... 3
L
2
3
4
5
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.750
.571
.429
.375
PF
179
164
176
134
PA
135
161
169
171
WEST
W
Seattle .......................... 5
L.A. Rams ...................... 5
Arizona ......................... 3
San Francisco ................ 0
L
2
2
4
8
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.714
.714
.429
.000
PF
175
212
119
133
PA
132
138
191
219
AFC
EAST
W
New England ................. 6
Buffalo .......................... 5
Miami ............................ 4
N.Y. Jets ....................... 3
L
2
2
3
5
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.750
.714
.571
.375
PF
216
153
92
157
PA
179
115
152
186
SOUTH
W
Jacksonville .................. 4
Tennessee ..................... 4
Houston ........................ 3
Indianapolis .................. 2
L
3
3
4
6
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.571
.571
.429
.250
PF
183
158
215
142
PA
110
173
188
246
NORTH
W
Pittsburgh ..................... 6
Baltimore ...................... 4
Cincinnati ...................... 3
Cleveland ...................... 0
L
2
4
4
8
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.750
.500
.429
.000
PF
167
170
122
119
PA
131
148
135
202
WEST
W
Kansas City ................... 6
Denver ........................... 3
L.A. Chargers ................ 3
Oakland ......................... 3
L
2
4
5
5
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.750
.429
.375
.375
PF
236
127
150
169
PA
180
147
152
190
WEEK 8
THURSDAY’S RESULT
at Baltimore 40, Miami 0
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
Dallas 33, AT Washington 19
Minnesota 33, Cleveland 16, in London
Carolina 17, at Tampa Bay 3
at New England 21, L.A. Chargers 13
at Buffalo 34, Oakland 14
Atlanta 25, at N.Y. Jets 20
at Philadelphia 33, San Francisco 10
at New Orleans 20, Chicago 12
at Cincinnati 24, Indianapolis 23
at Seattle 41, Houston 38
Pittsburgh 20, at Detroit 15
BYE: L.A. Rams, Arizona, N.Y. Giants, Jacksonville,
Tennessee, Green Bay
MONDAY’S RESULT
at Kansas City 29, Denver 19
WEEK 9
THURSDAY’S GAME
Buffalo (-31/2) at N.Y. Jets, 8:25
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Washington at Seattle (-71/2), 4:05
Baltimore at Tennessee (OFF), 1
Tampa Bay at New Orleans (-7), 1
L.A. Rams (-31/2) at N.Y. Giants, 1
Cincinnati at Jacksonville (-51/2), 1
Indianapolis at Houston (-13), 1
Atlanta at Carolina (-11/2), 1
Denver at Philadelphia (-8), 1
Arizona (-11/2) at San Francisco, 4:05
Kansas City at Dallas (PK), 4:25
Oakland (-3) at Miami, 8:30
BYE: Chicago, Minnesota, New England, L.A. Chargers,
Cleveland, Pittsburgh
MONDAY’S GAME
Detroit (-21/2) at Green Bay, 8:30
B A SE B A LL
MLB postseason
WORLD SERIES
Best of seven
All Games Televised by Fox
DODGERS AND ASTROS TIED, 3-3
Game 1: at Los Angeles 3, Houston 1
Game 2: Houston 7, at Los Angeles 6, 11 innings
Game 3: at Houston 5, Los Angeles 3
Game 4: Los Angeles 6, at Houston 2
Game 5: at Houston 13, Los Angeles 12, 10 innings
Game 6: at Los Angeles 3, Houston 1
Game 7: Wednesday: Houston at Los Angeles, 8:20
WORLD SERIES GAME 6
Dodgers 3, Astros 1
HOUSTON
AB
Springer cf......................3
Bregman 3b ....................4
Altuve 2b........................4
Correa ss ........................4
Gurriel 1b .......................4
McCann c ........................3
Gonzalez lf .....................4
Reddick rf .......................3
Verlander p.....................2
Gattis ph ........................1
Beltran ph ......................1
TOTALS
33
R
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
H
2
1
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
6
BI BB SO AVG
1 1 1 .375
0 0 0 .269
0 0 1 .214
0 0 1 .280
0 0 0 .250
0 0 1 .227
0 0 0 .143
0 1 2 .182
0 0 2 .000
0 0 0 .300
0 0 1 .000
1 2 9
—
L.A.
AB
Taylor cf .........................4
Seager ss........................3
Turner 3b........................3
Bellinger 1b ....................4
Puig rf.............................3
Pederson lf .....................3
Forsythe 2b ....................2
Ethier ph.........................1
Barnes c..........................3
Hill p ...............................1
Utley 2b ..........................0
Culberson 2b ..................1
TOTALS
28
R
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
1
0
3
H
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
1
5
BI BB SO AVG
1 0 1 .227
1 0 2 .217
0 1 1 .130
0 0 4 .167
0 0 0 .167
1 0 1 .357
0 0 1 .267
0 0 0 .250
0 0 1 .211
0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 .600
3 1 12
—
HOUSTON ...................001
L.A...............................000
000 000 —
002 10X —
1
3
6
5
0
0
LOB: Houston 8, Los Angeles 4. 2B: Gonzalez (1), Taylor
(1). HR: Springer (4), off Hill; Pederson (3), off Musgrove.
HOUSTON
IP
H R ER BB SO ERA
Verlander .........................6 3 2 2 0 9 3.75
Musgrove.........................1 1 1 1 0 1 6.75
Gregerson .....................0.2 1 0 0 1 1 0.00
Liriano...........................0.1 0 0 0 0 1 0.00
L.A.
IP
Hill.................................4.2
Morrow ............................1
Watson .........................0.1
Maeda ..............................1
Jansen..............................2
H
4
1
0
1
0
R ER BB SO ERA
1 1 1 5 2.08
0 0 0 1 9.00
0 0 1 0 0.00
0 0 0 0 1.59
0 0 0 3 3.52
WP: Watson (2-0); LP: Verlander (0-1); S: Jansen (2).
Watson pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Liriano 2-0, Morrow 3-0, Watson 1-0, Maeda 1-0. HBP: Watson (McCann), Verlander (Utley). T:
3:22. A: 54,128 (56,000).
GO L F
World golf ranking
MIDWEST
Bowling Green 44, at Kent St. 16
at Ohio 45, Miami (Ohio) 28
WEDNESDAY‘S GAME
MIDWEST
Cent. Michigan (3-5) at W. Michigan (5-3), 8
THURSDAY‘S GAMES
EAST
Navy (5-2) at Temple (3-5), 8
SOUTH
Idaho (3-5) at Troy (6-2), 9:15
MIDWEST
Ball St. (2-6) at E. Michigan (2-6), 6
N. Illinois (6-2) at Toledo (7-1), 6
FRIDAY‘S GAMES
EAST
Brown (2-5) at Yale (6-1), 8
SOUTH
Marshall (6-2) at FAU (5-3), 6
SOUTHWEST
Memphis (7-1) at Tulsa (2-7), 8
FAR WEST
UCLA (4-4) at Utah (4-4), 9:30
SATURDAY‘S GAMES
EAST
Sacred Heart (3-5) at Bryant (3-5), Noon
Lehigh (2-6) at Bucknell (4-4), Noon
James Madison (8-0) at Rhode Island (3-5), Noon
Robert Morris (2-6) at Wagner (2-6), Noon
Harvard (4-3) at Columbia (6-1), 1
Holy Cross (3-6) at Fordham (3-6), 1
Presbyterian (3-5) at Monmouth (NJ) (7-1), 1
Princeton (5-2) at Penn (3-4), 1
Albany (NY) (3-5) at Stony Brook (6-2), 1
Richmond (4-4) at Villanova (4-4), 1
Cornell (3-4) at Dartmouth (5-2), 1:30
Lafayette (2-6) at Georgetown (1-7), 2
Delaware (5-3) vs. Maine (4-3) at Portland, Maine, 2
Maryland (4-4) at Rutgers (3-5), 3:30
South Florida (7-1) at U-Conn. (3-5), 3:30
Iowa St. (6-2) at West Virginia (5-3), 3:30
SOUTH
Valparaiso (4-4) at Jacksonville (5-3), Noon
U-Mass. (2-6) at Mississippi St. (6-2), Noon
W. Kentucky (5-3) at Vanderbilt (3-5), Noon
Syracuse (4-4) at Florida St. (2-5), 12:20
Campbell (5-4) at Davidson (2-6), 1
NC Central (6-2) at Hampton (5-3), 1
NC A&T (8-0) at Norfolk St. (3-5), 1
Towson (3-5) at Elon (7-1), 2
Murray St. (2-6) at Jacksonville St. (7-1), 2
W. Carolina (6-3) at The Citadel (5-3), 2
New Hampshire (5-3) at William & Mary (2-6), 2
Austin Peay (5-4) at Tennessee Tech (1-7), 2:30
Alabama A&M (3-5) at Alcorn St. (5-3), 3
VMI (0-9) at ETSU (3-5), 3
Georgia St. (4-3) at Georgia Southern (0-7), 3
Alabama St. (2-5) at Jackson St. (1-7), 3
Appalachian St. (5-3) at Louisiana-Monroe (3-5), 3
Va. Lynchburg (0-7) at Tennessee St. (4-4), 3
Rice (1-7) at UAB (5-3), 3
Georgia Tech (4-3) at Virginia (5-3), 3
South Carolina (6-2) at Georgia (8-0), 3:30
Duquesne (7-1) at Liberty (4-4), 3:30
North Texas (5-3) at Louisiana Tech (4-4), 3:30
Clemson (7-1) at NC State (6-2), 3:30
Charlotte (1-7) at Old Dominion (2-6), 3:30
Morgan St. (1-7) at Bethune-Cookman (4-4), 4
Howard (5-3) at Florida A&M (3-6), 4
Mississippi (3-5) at Kentucky (6-2), 4
Louisiana-Lafayette (3-4) at South Alabama (3-5), 4
Butler (5-4) at Stetson (2-7), 4
Cincinnati (2-6) at Tulane (3-5), 4
Houston Baptist (1-7) at Nicholls (6-2), 4:30
Delaware St. (1-7) at Savannah St. (1-7), 5
Prairie View (3-4) at Southern U. (5-3), 5
UTSA (5-2) at FIU (5-2), 7
SE Louisiana (5-4) at McNeese St. (6-2), 7
UTEP (0-8) at Middle Tennessee (3-5), 7:30
Southern Miss. (5-3) at Tennessee (3-5), 7:30
LSU (6-2) at Alabama (8-0), 8
Virginia Tech (7-1) at Miami (7-0), 8
MIDWEST
Wisconsin (8-0) at Indiana (3-5), Noon
Baylor (0-8) at Kansas (1-7), Noon
Penn St. (7-1) at Michigan St. (6-2), Noon
Florida (3-4) at Missouri (3-5), Noon
Illinois (2-6) at Purdue (3-5), Noon
Marist (3-5) at Dayton (4-5), 1
W. Illinois (5-3) at Illinois St. (6-2), 1
Youngstown St. (3-5) at Indiana St. (0-8), 1
E. Kentucky (3-5) at E. Illinois (5-4), 2
South Dakota (7-1) at N. Iowa (4-4), 2
Missouri St. (2-6) at S. Illinois (4-4), 2
UT Martin (4-4) at SE Missouri (2-6), 2
N. Dakota St. (8-0) at S. Dakota St. (6-2), 3
Ohio St. (7-1) at Iowa (5-3), 3:30
Northwestern (5-3) at Nebraska (4-4), 3:30
Wake Forest (5-3) at Notre Dame (7-1), 3:30
Minnesota (4-4) at Michigan (6-2), 7:30
SOUTHWEST
East Carolina (2-6) at Houston (5-3), Noon
Auburn (6-2) at Texas A&M (5-3), Noon
Kansas St. (4-4) at Texas Tech (4-4), Noon
Incarnate Word (1-7) at Sam Houston St. (7-1), 2
New Mexico St. (3-5) at Texas St. (2-6), 3
Grambling St. (7-1) at Ark.-Pine Bluff (2-6), 3:30
Coastal Carolina (1-7) at Arkansas (3-5), 4
Oklahoma (7-1) at Oklahoma St. (7-1), 4
Cent. Arkansas (7-1) at Lamar (1-7), 7
UCF (7-0) at SMU (6-2), 7:15
Texas (4-4) at TCU (7-1), 7:15
FAR WEST
Kennesaw St. (7-1) at Montana St. (4-4), 2
Army (6-2) at Air Force (4-4), 3:30
Stanford (6-2) at Washington St. (7-2), 3:30
Weber St. (6-2) at E. Washington (5-3), 4:05
UC Davis (4-4) at Idaho St. (4-5), 4:30
N. Arizona (6-2) at Montana (5-3), 4:30
Oregon St. (1-7) at California (4-5), 5
Drake (5-3) at San Diego (6-2), 5
Utah St. (4-5) at New Mexico (3-5), 5:30
Hawaii (3-5) at UNLV (3-5), 6
Nevada (1-7) at Boise St. (6-2), 7
Colorado St. (6-3) at Wyoming (5-3), 7
North Dakota (3-6) at S. Utah (6-2), 8
Colorado (5-4) at Arizona St. (4-4), 9
N. Colorado (2-5) at Sacramento St. (4-4), 9
Portland St. (0-8) at Cal Poly (0-8), 9:05
Oregon (5-4) at Washington (7-1), 10
San Diego St. (7-2) at San Jose St. (1-8), 10:30
BYU (2-7) at Fresno St. (5-3), 10:45
Arizona (6-2) at Southern Cal (7-2), 10:45
TEN N I S
ATP
PARIS MASTERS
At Palais Omnisports de Paris-Bercy; In Paris
Purse: $4.96 million (Masters 1000)
Surface: Hard-Indoor
SINGLES — FIRST ROUND
Kyle Edmund, Britain, def. Evgeny Donskoy, Russia, 5-7,
7-6 (9-7), 6-3; Diego Schwartzman, Argentina, def.
Viktor Troicki, Serbia, 6-3, 6-4; Joao Sousa, Portugal,
def. Paolo Lorenzi, Italy, 6-4, 7-5; Feliciano Lopez, Spain,
def. Pierre-Hugues Herbert, France, 7-6 (7-4), 6-3; Pablo
Cuevas, Uruguay, def. Karen Khachanov, Russia, 6-4,
6-2; Borna Coric, Croatia, def. Jan-Lennard Struff,
Germany, 6-3, 6-4; Fernando Verdasco, Spain, def.
Andrey Rublev, Russia, 7-6 (7-1), 7-6 (8-6); Adrian
Mannarino, France, def. David Ferrer, Spain, 6-2, 6-4.
SINGLES — SECOND ROUND
Filip Krajinovic, Serbia, def. Sam Querrey (10), United
States, 6-4, 6-4; Nicolas Mahut, France, def. Pablo
Carreno Busta, Spain, 6-4, 6-1; Dominic Thiem (5),
Austria, def. Peter Gojowczyk, Germany, 6-4, 6-7 (7-3),
6-4.
DOUBLES — FIRST ROUND
Nicholas Monroe and Jack Sock, United States, def.
Paul-Henri Mathieu and Benoit Paire, France, 6-3, 6-4;
Julien Benneteau and Edouard Roger-Vasselin, France,
def. Fabrice Martin, France, and Albert Ramos-Vinolas,
Spain, 2-6, 6-2, 10-6; Juan Sebastian Cabal and Robert
Farah, Colombia, def. Rohan Bopanna, India, and Pablo
Cuevas, Uruguay, 6-2, 7-6 (9-7); Richard Gasquet and
Lucas Pouille, France, def. Mate Pavic, Croatia, and
Nenad Zimonjic, Serbia, 3-6, 6-4, 10-5; Ryan Harrison,
United States, and Michael Venus, New Zealand, def.
Nikola Mektic, Croatia, and Matwe Middelkoop, Netherlands, 6-4, 6-3.
Through Sunday
1. Dustin Johnson .......................... USA
2. Jordan Spieth............................. USA
3. Justin Thomas ........................... USA
4. Hideki Matsuyama...................... JPN
5. Jon Rahm .................................... ESP
6. Justin Rose .................................ENG
7. Brooks Koepka ........................... USA
8. Henrik Stenson ..........................SWE
9. Rory McIlroy.................................NIR
10. Rickie Fowler ........................... USA
11. Jason Day................................. AUS
12. Sergio Garcia............................. ESP
13. Marc Leishman ........................ AUS
14. Matt Kuchar............................. USA
15. Paul Casey.................................ENG
16. Alex Noren ...............................SWE
17. Tyrrell Hatton ...........................ENG
18. Pat Perez.................................. USA
19. Tommy Fleetwood ....................ENG
20. Rafael Cabrera Bello ................. ESP
21. Francesco Molinari ....................ITA
22. Patrick Reed............................. USA
23. Louis Oosthuizen ...................... SAF
24. Charley Hoffman...................... USA
25. Kevin Kisner............................. USA
26. Brian Harman........................... USA
27. Daniel Berger ........................... USA
28. Adam Scott .............................. AUS
29. Xander Schauffele ................... USA
30. Kevin Chappell ......................... USA
31. Phil Mickelson.......................... USA
32. Charl Schwartzel....................... SAF
33. Matthew Fitzpatrick.................ENG
34. Ross Fisher ...............................ENG
35. Thomas Pieters......................... BEL
36. Bernd Wiesberger.....................AUT
37. Webb Simpson......................... USA
38. Jason Dufner............................ USA
39. Jhonattan Vegas.......................VEN
40. Yuta Ikeda................................. JPN
11.88
10.00
9.16
8.55
7.63
6.86
6.58
6.49
6.44
6.34
6.14
6.00
5.54
5.33
5.20
4.89
4.79
4.59
4.43
4.31
4.22
4.04
3.95
3.71
3.60
3.59
3.57
3.55
3.42
3.39
3.25
3.19
3.18
3.01
2.97
2.95
2.91
2.88
2.88
2.87
WTA
ELITE TROPHY
At Hengqin International Tennis Center; In Zhuhai, China
Purse: $2.28 million (Premier)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
ROUND ROBIN
SINGLES
AZALEA GROUP
Julia Goerges (7), Germany, def. Magdalena Rybarikova
(10), Slovakia, 6-1, 7-6 (7-5); Standings: Georges 1-0
(sets 2-0, games 13-7), Kristina Mladenovic 0-0 (0-0,
0-0), Rybarikova 0-1 (0-2, 7-13).
BOUGAINVILLEA GROUP
CoCo Vandeweghe (2), United States, def. Peng Shuai
(12), China, 3-6, 6-3, 6-2; Standings: Vandeweghe 1-0
(2-1, 15-11), Elena Vesnina 0-0 (0-0, 0-0), Peng 0-1 (1-2,
11-15).
CAMELLIA GROUP
Standings: Sloane Stephens 0-0 (0-0, 0-0), Anastasija
Sevastova 0-0 (0-0, 0-0), Barbora Strycova 0-0 (0-0, 0-0).
ROSE GROUP
Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (4), Russia, def. Angelique
Kerber (8), Germany, 6-3, 3-6, 6-2; Standings: Pavlyuchekova 1-0 (2-1, 15-11), Ashleigh Barty 0-0 (0-0, 0-0),
Kerber 0-1 (1-2, 11-15).
DOUBLES
LOTUS GROUP
Raluca Olaru, Romania, and Olga Savchuk (1), Ukraine,
def. Liang Chen and Yang Zhaoxuan (3), China, 6-3, 7-6
(7-3); Standings: Olaru-Savchuk 1-0 (2-0, 13-9), Duan
Ying-Ying-Han Xinyun 0-0 (0-0, 0-0), Liang-Yang 0-1
(0-2, 9-13).
ORCHID GROUP
Standings: Alicja Rosolska-Anna Smith 0-0 (0-0, 0-0), Lu
Jing-Jing-Zhang Shuai 0-0 (0-0, 0-0), Jiang Xinyu-Tang
Qianhui 0-0 (0-0, 0-0).
ATLANTIC
W
Boston..........................................5
Toronto ........................................4
New York .....................................3
Philadelphia .................................3
Brooklyn.......................................3
L
2
2
3
4
5
Pct
.714
.667
.500
.429
.375
GB
—
SOUTHEAST
W
Orlando ........................................5
Washington .................................4
Charlotte......................................4
Miami...........................................2
Atlanta.........................................1
L
2
2
3
4
6
Pct
.714
.667
.571
.333
.143
GB
—
CENTRAL
W
x-Detroit ......................................5
Milwaukee ...................................4
Indiana .........................................4
Cleveland .....................................3
Chicago ........................................1
1/
2
11/2
2
21/2
1/
2
1
21/2
4
L
2
3
3
4
4
Pct
.714
.571
.571
.429
.200
GB
—
1
1
2
3
L
2
3
3
4
7
Pct
.714
.625
.571
.429
.125
GB
—
WESTERN CONFERENCE
SOUTHWEST
W
Memphis ......................................5
Houston .......................................5
San Antonio .................................4
New Orleans ................................3
Dallas ...........................................1
1/
2
1
2
41/2
NORTHWEST
W
Minnesota....................................4
Utah .............................................4
Portland .......................................4
Oklahoma City .............................4
Denver..........................................3
L
3
3
3
3
4
Pct
.571
.571
.571
.571
.429
GB
—
—
—
—
1
PACIFIC
W
L.A. Clippers.................................4
Golden State................................5
Phoenix ........................................3
x-L.A. Lakers................................2
Sacramento .................................1
L
2
3
4
4
6
Pct
.667
.625
.429
.333
.143
GB
—
—
11/2
2
31/2
x-Late game
22
25
31 — 104
17 — 99
CHARLOTTE: Kidd-Gilchrist 5-5 0-0 10, Williams 3-6 2-2
9, Howard 1-9 0-2 2, Walker 7-15 12-13 27, Lamb 6-13
4-6 17, Zeller 4-7 3-3 11, Kaminsky 4-9 0-1 9, Monk 5-15
0-0 13, Graham 1-3 2-2 4, Bacon 1-7 0-0 2. Totals 37-89
23-29 104.
MEMPHIS: Ennis III 4-7 2-2 11, Martin 1-5 2-4 4, Gasol
4-15 0-1 10, Conley 4-18 8-10 16, Harrison 2-4 2-2 7,
Brooks 4-7 2-3 11, Parsons 3-7 2-2 9, Wright 3-6 2-2 8,
Chalmers 1-7 2-2 4, Evans 6-17 5-5 19. Totals 32-93
27-33 99.
Three-point Goals: Charlotte 7-17 (Monk 3-7, Kaminsky
1-1, Lamb 1-1, Williams 1-2, Walker 1-5, Graham 0-1),
Memphis 8-35 (Evans 2-6, Gasol 2-8, Brooks 1-2, Ennis
III 1-2, Harrison 1-2, Parsons 1-4, Chalmers 0-2, Martin
0-2, Conley 0-7). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Charlotte
56 (Williams, Zeller, Lamb 8), Memphis 48 (Evans 10).
Assists: Charlotte 15 (Walker 6), Memphis 17 (Conley
6). Total Fouls: Charlotte 22, Memphis 22. Technicals:
Walker, Kaminsky, Gasol. A: 15,771 (18,119).
Warriors 141, Clippers 113
Late Monday
GOLDEN STATE .................. 34
L.A. CLIPPERS .................... 28
40
29
33
29
34 — 141
27 — 113
GOLDEN STATE: Durant 7-11 3-3 19, Green 5-8 5-8 16,
Pachulia 3-4 0-0 6, Curry 9-14 6-8 31, Thompson 6-14 2-2
15, Young 1-3 0-0 3, Casspi 1-3 4-4 6, West 3-5 0-0 7, Bell
4-4 0-0 8, McGee 5-8 0-1 10, Livingston 4-6 0-0 8,
Iguodala 1-2 3-4 5, McCaw 3-7 0-0 7. Totals 52-89 23-30
141.
L.A. CLIPPERS: Gallinari 8-15 1-1 19, Griffin 4-10 6-8 16,
Jordan 4-6 2-2 10, Beverley 5-11 0-0 14, Rivers 2-10 0-0
5, Dekker 2-4 1-2 5, W.Johnson 3-7 2-2 8, Reed 2-4 2-2 6,
B.Johnson 2-3 0-0 4, Harrell 0-0 1-2 1, Evans 3-5 0-0 6,
L.Williams 3-8 10-11 17, Thornwell 1-3 0-0 2. Totals
39-86 25-30 113.
NASCAR Cup
SCHEDULE-WINNERS
18
14
35 — 83
32 — 101
SACRAMENTO: Bog.Bogdanovic 3-7 0-0 7, Randolph
6-10 0-0 12, Cauley-Stein 1-3 2-2 4, Hill 4-12 0-0 8, Hield
2-9 0-0 4, Jackson 2-5 0-0 5, Labissiere 3-8 2-5 8, Koufos
2-4 1-2 5, Papagiannis 2-2 0-0 4, Mason 2-4 2-4 6, Fox
9-18 0-1 18, Richardson 1-6 0-0 2. Totals 37-88 7-14 83.
INDIANA: Boj.Bogdanovic 6-13 2-2 17, T.Young 6-12 1-2
15, Sabonis 5-6 2-3 12, Collison 0-4 3-3 3, Oladipo 4-10
5-6 14, Wilkins 0-1 0-0 0, Poythress 2-2 0-0 6, Anigbogu
1-2 2-2 4, Leaf 3-8 0-1 7, Jefferson 2-8 0-0 4, Joseph 5-8
0-0 13, J.Young 0-5 0-0 0, Stephenson 2-6 2-3 6. Totals
36-85 17-22 101.
Three-point Goals: Sacramento 2-14 (Jackson 1-2,
Bog.Bogdanovic 1-3, Hill 0-1, Richardson 0-1, Randolph
0-2, Fox 0-2, Hield 0-3), Indiana 12-29 (Joseph 3-4,
Boj.Bogdanovic 3-6, Poythress 2-2, T.Young 2-5, Leaf
1-2, Oladipo 1-3, Wilkins 0-1, J.Young 0-2, Collison 0-2,
Stephenson 0-2). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Sacramento 46 (Labissiere 8), Indiana 53 (Sabonis 16).
Assists: Sacramento 15 (Fox 5), Indiana 25 (Sabonis,
Stephenson 5). Total Fouls: Sacramento 18, Indiana 17.
Technicals: Sacramento coach Kings (Defensive three
second). A: 12,245 (18,500).
Feb. 19: x-Advance Auto Parts Clash (Joey Logano)
Feb. 23: x-Can-Am Duel at Daytona 1 (Chase Elliott)
Feb. 23: x-Can-Am Duel at Daytona 2 (Denny Hamlin)
Feb. 26: Daytona 500 (Kurt Busch)
March 5: Folds of Honor QuikTrip 500 (Brad Keselowski)
March 12: Kobalt 400 (Martin Truex Jr.)
March 19: Camping World 500 (Ryan Newman)
March 26: Auto Club 400 (Kyle Larson)
April 2: STP 500 (Brad Keselowski)
April 9: O’Reilly Auto Parts 500 (Jimmie Johnson)
April 24: Food City 500 (Jimmie Johnson)
April 30: Toyota Owners 400 (Joey Logano)
May 7: GEICO 500 (Ricky Stenhouse Jr.)
May 13: Go Bowling 400 (Martin Truex Jr.)
May 20: x-Monster Energy Open (Daniel Suarez)
May 20: x-Monster Energy NASCAR All-Star Race (Kyle
Busch)
May 28: Coca-Cola 600 (Austin Dillon)
June 4: AAA 400 Drive for Autism (Jimmie Johnson)
June 11: Pocono 400 (Ryan Blaney)
June 18: FireKeepers Casino 400 (Kyle Larson)
June 25: Toyota/Save Mart 350 (Kevin Harvick)
July 1: Coke Zero 400 (Ricky Stenhouse Jr.)
July 8: Quaker State 400 (Martin Truex Jr.)
July 16: New Hampshire 301 (Denny Hamlin)
July 23: Brickyard 400 (Kasey Kahne)
July 30: Overton’s 400 (Kyle Busch)
Aug. 6: I Love New York 355 at The Glen (Martin Truex
Jr.)
Aug. 13: Pure Michigan 400 (Kyle Larson)
Aug. 19: Bass Pro Shops NRA Night Race (Kyle Busch)
Sept. 3: Bojangles’ Southern 500 (Denny Hamlin)
Sept. 9: Federated Auto Parts 400 (Kyle Larson)
Sept. 17: Tales of the Turtles 400 (Martin Truex Jr.)
Sept. 24: ISM Connect 300 (Kyle Busch)
Oct. 1: Apache Warrior 400 (Kyle Busch)
Oct. 8: Bank of America 500 (Martin Truex Jr.)
Oct. 15: Alabama 500 (Brad Keselowski)
Oct. 22: Hollywood Casino 400 (Martin Truex Jr.)
Oct. 29: First Data 500 (Kyle Busch)
Nov. 5: AAA Texas 500, Fort Worth
Nov. 12: Can-Am 500, Avondale, Ariz.
Nov. 19: Ford Ecoboost 400, Homestead, Fla.
x-non-points race
NASCAR XFINITY Series
SCHEDULE-WINNERS
Suns 122, Nets 114
PHOENIX ............................ 30
BROOKLYN ......................... 24
29
29
28
35
35 — 122
26 — 114
PHOENIX: Warren 7-12 6-7 20, Chriss 0-2 5-6 5, Chandler
1-4 0-0 2, James 9-16 3-3 24, D.Booker 11-22 5-5 32,
Jackson 4-14 0-0 8, Bender 4-8 0-0 10, Len 2-5 2-2 6, Ulis
5-10 1-1 11, Daniels 2-3 0-0 4. Totals 45-96 22-24 122.
BROOKLYN: Carroll 4-11 3-6 13, Hollis-Jefferson 8-16
5-7 21, Mozgov 1-5 0-0 2, Russell 11-21 9-11 33, LeVert
4-9 2-3 11, T.Booker 2-7 0-0 4, Zeller 2-7 0-0 4, Dinwiddie
5-10 2-2 15, Harris 3-6 0-1 6, Crabbe 2-10 0-0 5. Totals
42-102 21-30 114.
Three-point Goals: Phoenix 10-22 (D.Booker 5-8, James
3-4, Bender 2-4, Warren 0-1, Daniels 0-1, Chriss 0-2,
Jackson 0-2), Brooklyn 9-31 (Dinwiddie 3-4, Carroll 2-4,
Russell 2-5, LeVert 1-5, Crabbe 1-7, Hollis-Jefferson 0-1,
Zeller 0-1, Harris 0-2, Mozgov 0-2). Fouled Out: None.
Rebounds: Phoenix 66 (Len 15), Brooklyn 44 (Hollis-Jefferson 7). Assists: Phoenix 18 (James 5), Brooklyn 15
(Dinwiddie, Russell 4). Total Fouls: Phoenix 26, Brooklyn
22. Technicals: Jackson, T.Booker. A: 12,936 (17,732).
Thunder 110, Bucks 91
OKLAHOMA CITY ............... 31
MILWAUKEE ...................... 23
29
19
25
22
25 — 110
27 — 91
OKLAHOMA CITY: George 8-17 0-0 20, Anthony 6-14 4-5
17, Adams 7-10 0-0 14, Westbrook 5-12 2-3 12, Roberson
3-7 2-2 9, Grant 5-9 7-7 17, Huestis 0-1 0-0 0, Patterson
2-2 0-0 6, Johnson 0-0 0-0 0, Felton 2-5 3-4 9, Ferguson
0-0 0-0 0, Abrines 2-4 0-0 6. Totals 40-81 18-21 110.
MILWAUKEE: Middleton 3-13 3-3 9, Antetokounmpo
9-14 8-9 28, Maker 3-9 1-1 8, Brogdon 1-4 2-2 4, Snell 2-5
0-0 5, Henson 0-2 1-4 1, Wilson 2-4 0-0 4, Teletovic 3-9
0-0 8, Dellavedova 2-3 2-2 7, Vaughn 4-9 0-0 9, Liggins
2-2 1-1 6, Brown 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 32-76 18-22 91.
Three-point Goals: Oklahoma City 12-28 (George 4-8,
Patterson 2-2, Abrines 2-2, Felton 2-3, Anthony 1-3,
Roberson 1-5, Huestis 0-1, Grant 0-2, Westbrook 0-2),
Milwaukee 9-30 (Antetokounmpo 2-3, Teletovic 2-6,
Dellavedova 1-1, Liggins 1-1, Snell 1-2, Vaughn 1-3,
Maker 1-4, Wilson 0-1, Brown 0-1, Brogdon 0-3, Middleton 0-5). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Oklahoma City 46
(Adams 11), Milwaukee 31 (Antetokounmpo 8). Assists:
Oklahoma City 23 (Westbrook 9), Milwaukee 24 (Snell
5). Total Fouls: Oklahoma City 20, Milwaukee 22.
Technicals: Oklahoma City coach Billy Donovan, Oklahoma City coach Thunder (Defensive three second) 2,
Adams, Middleton. A: 16,713 (18,717).
Jazz 104, Mavericks 89
Late Monday
DALLAS .............................. 27
UTAH .................................. 21
26
23
15
32
21 — 89
28 — 104
Feb. 25: PowerShares QQQ 300 (Ryan Reed)
March 4: Rinnai 250 (Kyle Busch)
March 11: Boyd Gaming 300 (Joey Logano)
March 18: DC Solar 200 (Justin Allgaier)
March 25: Service King 300 (Kyle Larson)
April 8: My Bariatric Solutions 300 (Erik Jones)
April 22: Fitzgerald Glider Kits 300 (Erik Jones)
April 29: ToyotaCare 250 (Kyle Larson)
May 6: Sparks Energy 300 (Aric Almirola)
May 27: Hisense 4K TV 300 (Ryan Blaney)
June 3: OneMain Financial 200 (Kyle Larson)
June 10: Pocono Green 250 (Brad Keselowski)
June 17: Irish Hills 250 (Denny Hamlin)
June 24: American Ethanol E15 250 (William Byron)
July 1: Firecracker 250 (William Byron)
July 8: Alsco 300 (Kyle Busch)
July 15: Overton’s 200 (Kyle Busch)
July 22: Lilly Diabetes 250 (William Byron)
July 29: US Cellular 250 (Ryan Preece)
Aug. 5: Zippo 200 at The Glen (Kyle Busch)
Aug. 12: Mid-Ohio Challenge (Sam Hornish Jr.)
Aug. 18: Food City 300 (Kyle Busch)
Aug. 27: Johnsonville 180 (Jeremy Clements)
Sept. 2: Sport Clips Haircuts VFW 200 (Denny Hamlin)
Sept. 8: Virginia529 College Savings 250 (Brad Keselowski)
Sept. 16: TheHouse.com 300 (Justin Allgaier)
Sept. 23: VisitMyrtleBeach.com 300 (Tyler Reddic)
Sept. 30: Use Your Melon. Drive Sober 200 (Ryan Blaney)
Oct. 7: Drive for the Cure 300 (Alex Bowman)
Oct. 21: Kansas Lottery 300 (Christopher Bell)
Nov. 4: O’Reilly Auto Parts 300, Fort Worth, Texas
Nov. 11: Ticket Galaxy 200, Avondale, Ariz.
Nov. 18: Ford EcoBoost 300, Homestead, Fla.
IndyCar
SCHEDULE-WINNERS
March 12: Firestone Grand Prix of St. Petersburg
(Sebastien Bourdais)
April 9: Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach (James
Hinchcliffe)
April 23: Grand Prix of Alabama (Josef Newgarden)
April 29: Phoenix Grand Prix (Simon Pagenaud)
May 13: Grand Prix of Indianapolis (Will Power)
May 28: Indianapolis 500 (Takuma Sato)
June 3: Chevrolet Detroit Grand Prix (Race 1) (Graham
Rahal)
June 4: Chevrolet Detroit Grand Prix (Race 2) (Graham
Rahal)
June 10: Rainguard Water Sealers 600 (Will Power)
June 25: Kohler Grand Prix (Scott Dixon)
July 9: Iowa Corn 300 (Helio Castroneves)
July 16: Honda Indy Toronto (Josef Newgarden)
July 30: Honda Indy 200 at Mid-Ohio (Josef Newgarden)
Aug. 20: ABC Supply 500 (Will Power)
Aug. 26: Bommarito Automotive Group 500 (Josef
Newgarden)
Sept. 3: Grand Prix at The Glen (Alexander Rossi)
Sept. 17: GoPro Grand Prix of Sonoma (Simon Pagenaud)
TRANSACTIONS
OL PTS.
0
16
0
16
1
15
1
15
1
13
1
11
2
10
2
10
GF
40
37
45
36
41
36
28
40
GA
31
30
38
50
35
41
30
47
ATLANTIC
W
Tampa Bay .................... 10
Ottawa ............................ 5
Toronto ........................... 7
Detroit ............................ 6
Boston ............................. 4
Florida ............................. 4
Montreal ......................... 4
Buffalo ............................ 3
L
2
2
5
6
3
6
7
7
OL PTS.
1
21
5
15
0
14
1
13
3
11
1
9
1
9
2
8
GF
53
44
47
37
30
40
31
29
GA
36
41
43
38
33
44
45
44
CENTRAL
W
St. Louis ........................ 10
Winnipeg ........................ 6
Dallas .............................. 7
Colorado .......................... 6
Nashville ......................... 5
Chicago ........................... 5
Minnesota ....................... 4
L
2
3
5
5
4
5
4
OL PTS.
1
21
2
14
0
14
0
12
2
12
2
12
2
10
GF
44
33
34
34
27
38
31
GA
30
32
33
34
31
34
30
PACIFIC
W
Los Angeles .................... 9
Vegas .............................. 8
Vancouver ....................... 6
Anaheim ......................... 6
San Jose .......................... 6
Calgary ............................ 6
Edmonton ....................... 3
Arizona ........................... 1
L
2
3
3
4
5
6
6
11
OL PTS.
1
19
0
16
2
14
1
13
0
12
0
12
1
7
1
3
GF
40
41
31
35
30
28
22
33
GA
24
31
27
33
28
33
33
56
WESTERN CONFERENCE
MONDAY’S RESULTS
Arizona 4, at Philadelphia 3 (OT)
at N.Y. Islanders 6, Vegas 3
at Columbus 4, Boston 3 (SO)
Tampa Bay 8, at Florida 5
Montreal 8, at Ottawa 3
at St. Louis 4, Los Angeles 2
Dallas 2, at Vancouver 1 (OT)
at San Jose 3, Toronto 2
NBA
Three-point Goals: Dallas 12-24 (Nowitzki 4-5, Barea 3-6,
Matthews 2-2, Powell 1-1, Ferrell 1-2, Harris 1-4, Smith Jr.
0-1, Withey 0-1, Barnes 0-2), Utah 16-35 (Hood 5-9, Rubio
4-8, Burks 2-2, Mitchell 2-4, Sefolosha 1-2, Favors 1-3,
Ingles 1-4, Johnson 0-3). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds:
Dallas 42 (Powell 10), Utah 34 (Gobert 12). Assists: Dallas
17 (Harris 6), Utah 25 (Rubio, Gobert, Ingles 6). Total
Fouls: Dallas 16, Utah 17. A: 16,221 (19,911).
Carolina Panthers: Traded WR Kelvin Benjamin to
Buffalo for 2018 third- and seventh-round draft picks.
Detroit Lions: Signed G Don Barclay. Waived T Dan
Skipper. Released T Storm Norton from the practice
squad.
Miami Dolphins: Traded RB Jay Ajayi to Philadelphia for
a 2018 fourth-round draft pick. Placed G Anthony Steen
and S Nate Allen on injured reserve. Activated WR
Rashawn Scott from the PUP list.
New England Patriots: Traded QB Jimmy Garoppolo to
San Francisco for a 2018 second-round draft pick.
New York Giants: Suspended CB Janoris Jenkins indefinitely for a violation of team rules. Placed DE Nordly Capi
on injured reserve. Terminated the contract of WR Kalif
Raymond. Signed DE Devin Taylor. Signed LB Trevor
Bates to the practice squad.
New York Jets: Placed TE Jordan Leggett on injured
reserve. Signed DL Xavier Cooper.
San Francisco 49ers: Traded CB Rashard Robinson to the
N.Y. Jets for a 2018 fifth-round draft pick.
Washington Redskins: Signed OL Givens Price. Released
OL Andreas Knappe.
Raptors 99, Trail Blazers 85
Late Monday
27
26
18 — 99
24 — 85
TORONTO: Powell 3-9 0-0 8, Siakam 3-6 0-0 6, Nogueira
7-8 2-4 17, Lowry 6-14 4-4 19, DeRozan 10-20 5-7 25,
Caboclo 0-0 0-0 0, McKinnie 0-0 0-0 0, Anunoby 2-8 0-0 4,
Miles 2-5 0-0 5, Poeltl 3-5 0-0 6, Wright 2-9 2-2 7,
VanVleet 1-3 0-0 2. Totals 39-87 13-17 99.
PORTLAND: Harkless 2-5 0-2 4, Aminu 2-8 0-0 4, Nurkic
4-9 0-0 8, Lillard 12-23 9-10 36, McCollum 5-16 3-3 16,
Davis 2-3 3-4 7, Swanigan 0-4 0-0 0, Napier 0-1 0-0 0,
Turner 2-5 0-0 4, Connaughton 2-6 0-0 6. Totals 31-80
15-19 85.
Three-point Goals: Toronto 8-24 (Lowry 3-6, Powell 2-4,
Nogueira 1-1, Wright 1-3, Miles 1-3, Siakam 0-2,
Anunoby 0-5), Portland 8-26 (McCollum 3-5, Lillard 3-8,
Connaughton 2-5, Turner 0-1, Napier 0-1, Swanigan 0-1,
Aminu 0-5). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Toronto 47
(Lowry 10), Portland 38 (Davis 8). Assists: Toronto 17
(Lowry 6), Portland 13 (Turner, Aminu 3). Total Fouls:
Toronto 14, Portland 15. Technicals: Toronto coach
Raptors (Defensive three second). A: 18,505 (19,393).
Memphis Grizzlies: Exercised their fourth-year option on
F Jarell Martin.
NFL
TORONTO ................................ 1
SAN JOSE ................................ 0
0
1
1 —
2 —
2
3
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Toronto, Matthews 9 (Zaitsev, Nylander),
12:14.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, San Jose, Pavelski 3 (Heed, Thornton), 7:58.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 3, San Jose, Heed 2 (Burns, Couture), 4:11 (pp).
4, San Jose, Ward 1 (Karlsson, Tierney), 17:47. 5,
Toronto, Kadri 7 (Borgman, Rielly), 18:50.
SHOTS ON GOAL
TORONTO ................................ 9
2
7 — 18
SAN JOSE .............................. 14
11
14 — 39
Power-play opportunities: Toronto 0 of 0; San Jose 1 of 4.
Goalies: Toronto, Andersen 6-5-0 (38 shots-36 saves).
San Jose, Jones 5-3-0 (18-16). A: 17,562 (17,562). T: 2:25.
S OC C E R
MLS playoffs
KNOCKOUT ROUND
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Wednesday’s result: New York 4, at Chicago 0
Thursday’s result: Columbus 0, at Atlanta 0, Columbus
wins shootout 3-1
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Wednesday’s result: at Vancouver 5, San Jose 0
Thursday’s result: at Houston 1, Sporting KC 0, OT
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Home-and-home
FIRST LEG
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Monday’s result: Toronto 2, at New York 1
Tuesday’s result: at Columbus 4, New York City FC 1
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Sunday’s result: at Vancouver 0, Seattle 0, tie
Monday’s result: Portland 0, at Houston 0, tie
SECOND LEG
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Sunday’s match: New York at Toronto, 3
Sunday’s match: Columbus at New York City FC, 5
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Thursday’s match: Vancouver at Seattle, 10:30
Sunday’s match: Houston at Portland, 7:30
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
at N.Y. Rangers 6, Vegas 4
at Detroit 5, Arizona 3
Winnipeg 2, at Minnesota 1
CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS
Home-and-home
EASTERN CONFERENCE
FIRST LEG
Tuesday, Nov. 21: TBD, 8
SECOND LEG
Tuesday, Nov. 28 or Wednesday, Nov. 29: TBA
WESTERN CONFERENCE
FIRST LEG
Tuesday, Nov. 21: 10
SECOND LEG
Thursday, Nov. 30: 10
Philadelphia at Chicago, 8
Pittsburgh at Edmonton, 8:30
Toronto at Anaheim, 10
New Jersey at Vancouver, 10
Nashville at San Jose, 10:30
THURSDAY’S GAMES
N.Y. Islanders at Washington, 7
Vegas at Boston, 7
N.Y. Rangers at Tampa Bay, 7:30
Columbus at Florida, 7:30
Detroit at Ottawa, 7:30
Dallas at Winnipeg, 8
Montreal at Minnesota, 8
Philadelphia at St. Louis, 8
Carolina at Colorado, 9
Pittsburgh at Calgary, 9
Buffalo at Arizona, 10
Toronto at Los Angeles, 10:30
MLS CUP
Saturday, Dec. 9: at highest seed, 4
Crew 4, New York City FC 1
FRIDAY’S GAMES
New Jersey at Edmonton, 9
Nashville at Anaheim, 10
Rangers 6, Golden Knights 4
VEGAS ..................................... 2
N.Y. RANGERS ......................... 1
2
1
0 —
4 —
4
6
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, N.Y. Rangers, Vesey 2 (McDonagh, Desharnais), 2:45. 2, Vegas, Lindberg 5 (Tuch, Engelland), 5:22.
3, Vegas, R.Smith 3 (C.Miller, Marchessault), 19:21.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 4, N.Y. Rangers, Zuccarello 3 (Hayes, Nash),
1:29. 5, Vegas, R.Smith 4 (Marchessault, Karlsson),
7:06. 6, Vegas, Perron 4, 18:59.
NEW YORK
0
1
1
COLUMBUS
1
3
4
First half: 1, Columbus, Kamara 19, 6th minute.
Second half: 2, Columbus, Artur 1 (Higuain), 58th. 3,
Columbus, Meram 14 (Kamara, Higuain), 69th. 4, New
York, Villa 23, 78th. 5, Columbus, Afful 1 (Meram), 93rd.
Goalies: New York, Sean Johnson; Columbus, Zack
Steffen.
Yellow Cards: Matarrita, New York, 64th.
Red Cards: Callens, New York, 52nd.
A: 14,416 (19,968)
New York, Sean Johnson; Ethan White (Andraz Struna,
74th), Frederic Brillant, Alexander Callens, Ben Sweat;
Yangel Herrera, Alexander Ring, Maximiliano Moralez;
Jack Harrison (Sean Okoli, 79th), David Vila, Rodney
Wallace (Ronald Matarrita, 56th).
Columbus, Zack Steffen; Harrison Afful, Jonathan Mensah, Josh Williams, Hector Jimenez; Wil Trapp, Artur
(Mohammed Abu, 91st), Pedro Santos (Kekuta Manneh,
75th), Federico Higuain (Lalas Abubakar, 88th), Justin
Meram; Ola Kamara.
THIRD PERIOD
Timbers 0, Dynamo 0
Scoring: 7, N.Y. Rangers, Kreider 3 (Zibanejad, Zuccarello), 5:31 (pp). 8, N.Y. Rangers, Buchnevich 5 (Zibanejad),
9:26. 9, N.Y. Rangers, Zibanejad 8 (Shattenkirk, Buchnevich), 14:11 (pp). 10, N.Y. Rangers, Grabner 4 (Fast),
18:46.
Late Monday
SHOTS ON GOAL
VEGAS ................................... 14
15
5 — 34
N.Y. RANGERS ......................... 9
18
11 — 38
Power-play opportunities: Vegas 0 of 3; N.Y. Rangers 2
of 5. Goalies: Vegas, Lagace 0-2-0 (37 shots-32 saves).
N.Y. Rangers, Lundqvist 3-4-2 (34-30). A: 17,294
(18,006). T: 2:33.
Red Wings 5, Coyotes 3
ARIZONA ................................. 0
DETROIT .................................. 2
1
2
2 —
1 —
3
5
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Detroit, Nyquist 4, 1:29. 2, Detroit, Glendening 3 (Kronwall, Frk), 2:37.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Arizona, Demers 2 (Fischer, Keller), 11:36. 4,
Detroit, Mantha 5 (Athanasiou, Larkin), 13:03. 5, Detroit, Larkin 2 (Helm), 19:03.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 6, Arizona, Cousins 2 (Clendening, Kempe),
2:00. 7, Arizona, Keller 9, 16:43. 8, Detroit, Helm 2
(Zetterberg, Abdelkader), 18:38.
SHOTS ON GOAL
ARIZONA ................................. 7
12
14 — 33
DETROIT ................................ 18
10
12 — 40
Power-play opportunities: Arizona 0 of 2; Detroit 0 of 1.
Goalies: Arizona, Wedgewood 1-1-0 (39 shots-35
saves). Detroit, Howard 5-4-0 (33-30). A: 19,515
(20,000). T: 2:31.
PORTLAND
0
0
0
HOUSTON
0
0
0
First half: None.
Second half: None.
Goalies: Portland, Jeff Attinella; Houston, Tyler Deric.
Yellow Cards: Powell, Portland, 24th; Mabiala, Portland,
45th.
Portland, Jeff Attinella; Vytautas Andriuskevicius, Larrys Mabiala (Roy Miller, 46th), Alvas Powell, Liam
Ridgewell; Diego Chara (Amobi Okugo, 46th), Darlington
Nagbe (Jeremy Ebobisse, 59th), Lawrence Olum, Diego
Valeri; Dairon Asprilla, Darren Mattocks.
Houston, Tyler Deric; Jalil Anibaba, DaMarcus Beasley,
Adolfo Machado, Philippe Senderos; Eric Alexander,
Juan Cabezas, Tomas Martinez (Vicente Sanchez, 60th);
Alberth Elis, Mauro Manotas (Erick Torres, 77th),
Romell Quioto (Alex, 71st).
Toronto FC 2 , Red Bulls 1
Late Monday
TORONTO
1
1
2
NEW YORK
1
0
1
First half: 1, Toronto, Vazquez, 9, 8th minute. 2, New
York, Royer, 13 (penalty kick), 49th.
Second half: 3, Toronto, Giovinco, 17, 72nd.
Goalies: Toronto, Alex Bono; New York, Luis Robles.
Yellow Cards: Perrinelle, New York, 80th; Giovinco,
Toronto, 82nd.
A: 18,107 (25,000)
Toronto, Alex Bono; Steven Beitashour, Chris Mavinga,
Drew Moor (Nick Hagglund, 45th), Justin Morrow, Eriq
Zavaleta; Michael Bradley, Marky Delgado, Victor
Vazquez (Jonathan Osorio, 66th); Jozy Altidore (Armando Cooper, 86th), Sebastian Giovinco.
New York, Luis Robles; Kemar Lawrence, Michael
Murillo, Damien Perrinelle (Vincent Bezecourt, 82nd);
Tyler Adams, Sean Akira Davis (Gonzalo Veron, 63rd),
Sacha Kljestan, Aaron Long, Felipe Martins, Daniel
Royer; Bradley Wright-Phillips.
Jets 2, Wild 1
0
0
1 —
1 —
2
1
H I GH S C HOOLS
FIRST PERIOD
GIRLS' TENNIS
Scoring: 1, Winnipeg, Connor 2 (Scheifele, Myers), 7:10.
PRIVATE
Maret 5, Holy Child 2
Potomac School 4, Bullis 3
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Winnipeg, Ehlers 7, 0:43. 3, Minnesota, Kunin
2 (Niederreiter, Staal), 5:36.
SHOTS ON GOAL
WINNIPEG ............................. 11
6
2 — 19
MINNESOTA ............................ 7
10
12 — 29
Power-play opportunities: Winnipeg 0 of 3; Minnesota 0
of 5. Goalies: Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 6-0-1 (29 shots-28
saves). Minnesota, Stalock 1-1-1 (19-17). A: 18,814
(18,064). T: 2:30.
Canadiens 8, Senators 3
Late Monday
2
1
2 —
0 —
8
3
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Ottawa, Pyatt 3, 0:21. 2, Montreal, Hudon 1
(Montoya, Petry), 4:27 (pp). 3, Montreal, Pacioretty 4,
7:20 (sh). 4, Ottawa, Dzingel 4 (Hoffman, DiDomenico),
8:15 (pp). 5, Montreal, Lehkonen 1 (Weber, Drouin),
13:17. 6, Montreal, Hudon 2 (Weber, Plekanec), 16:00.
Scoring: 7, Ottawa, DiDomenico 2 (Karlsson, Hoffman),
10:34 (pp). 8, Montreal, Galchenyuk 4 (Benn), 17:41. 9,
Montreal, Gallagher 4 (Danault), 19:29.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 10, Montreal, Plekanec 2 (Hudon, Gallagher),
5:10. 11, Montreal, Lehkonen 2 (Byron, Weber), 13:24.
SHOTS ON GOAL
MONTREAL .............................. 7
8
14 — 29
OTTAWA ................................ 11
8
9 — 28
Power-play opportunities: Montreal 1 of 4; Ottawa 2 of
5. Goalies: Montreal, Montoya 1-1-0 (28 shots-25
saves). Ottawa, Anderson 4-2-3 (15-9), Condon 1-0-2
(14-12). A: 15,069 (18,572). T: 2:36.
Stars 2, Canucks 1 (OT)
Late Monday
DALLAS .............................. 0
VANCOUVER ..................... 0
VOLLEYBALL
DISTRICT
School Without Walls def. H.D. Woodson (25-7, 25-8,
0-0)
PRIVATE
Eleanor Roosevelt def. Georgetown Day (25-20, 25-22,
25-16)
Holy Cross def. St. Mary's Ryken (25-11, 25-15, 25-18)
Maret def. Bullis (25-13, 25-22, 25-10)
St. John's def. Good Counsel (25-22, 25-22, 25-14)
Paul VI def. O'Connell (25-20, 25-15, 25-20)
WCAC
Bishop Ireton def. McNamara (25-13, 25-9, 25-19)
BOYS' SOCCER
MONTREAL .............................. 4
OTTAWA .................................. 2
SECOND PERIOD
UTAH: Ingles 1-5 0-0 3, Favors 4-12 1-1 10, Gobert 4-5
9-12 17, Rubio 8-15 0-0 20, Hood 9-15 2-2 25, O’Neale 1-2
0-0 2, Sefolosha 5-9 0-0 11, Johnson 1-4 0-0 2, Udoh 0-1
0-0 0, Jerebko 0-1 0-0 0, Neto 0-0 0-0 0, Mitchell 3-8 0-0
8, Burks 2-3 0-0 6. Totals 38-80 12-15 104.
25
6
L
2
4
4
5
5
6
4
7
WINNIPEG ............................... 1
MINNESOTA ............................ 0
DALLAS: Barnes 3-11 0-0 6, Nowitzki 7-11 0-1 18, Noel
3-7 0-0 6, Smith Jr. 1-7 0-0 2, Matthews 3-8 0-0 8, Kleber
0-0 1-2 1, Powell 3-6 0-0 7, Mejri 0-0 0-0 0, Withey 0-1
0-0 0, Ferrell 3-4 2-2 9, Barea 7-11 0-0 17, Harris 4-10 6-6
15, Clavell 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 34-76 9-11 89.
TORONTO ........................... 29
PORTLAND ......................... 29
Late Monday
METROPOLITAN
W
New Jersey ..................... 8
Columbus ........................ 8
N.Y. Islanders ................. 7
Pittsburgh ....................... 7
Philadelphia .................... 6
Washington .................... 5
Carolina ........................... 4
N.Y. Rangers ................... 4
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
AUTO RACING
Pacers 101, Kings 83
17
31
20
26
Three-point Goals: Golden State 14-29 (Curry 7-11,
Durant 2-3, West 1-1, Green 1-2, Young 1-3, McCaw 1-3,
Thompson 1-4, Livingston 0-1, McGee 0-1), L.A. Clippers
10-25 (Beverley 4-6, Griffin 2-4, Gallinari 2-6, L.Williams
1-3, Rivers 1-3, Dekker 0-1, W.Johnson 0-2). Fouled Out:
None. Rebounds: Golden State 46 (Green 9), L.A.
Clippers 35 (Jordan 11). Assists: Golden State 37 (Curry,
Green, Thompson 6), L.A. Clippers 21 (Griffin, Gallinari,
Beverley 4). Total Fouls: Golden State 23, L.A. Clippers
20. Technicals: Golden State coach Warriors (Defensive
three second) 2. A: 19,068 (19,060).
MONDAY’S RESULTS
at Boston 108, San Antonio 94
Minnesota 125, at Miami 122, OT
at New York 116, Denver 110
Charlotte 104, at Memphis 99
Orlando 115, at New Orleans 99
Philadelphia 115, at Houston 107
at Utah 104, Dallas 89
Toronto 99, at Portland 85
Golden State 141, at L.A. Clippers 113
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
at Indiana 101, Sacramento 83
Phoenix 122, at Brooklyn 114
Oklahoma City 110, at Milwaukee 91
Detroit at L.A. Lakers, Late
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
Phoenix at Washington, 7
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7
Indiana at Cleveland, 7
Milwaukee at Charlotte, 7
Chicago at Miami, 7:30
Sacramento at Boston, 7:30
Houston at New York, 8
Minnesota at New Orleans, 8
Orlando at Memphis, 8
Portland at Utah, 9
Toronto at Denver, 9
Dallas at L.A. Clippers, 10:30
THURSDAY’S GAMES
Golden State at San Antonio, 8
L.A. Lakers at Portland, 10:30
SACRAMENTO ................... 13
INDIANA ............................. 24
CHARLOTTE ....................... 31
MEMPHIS ........................... 31
Sharks 3, Maple Leafs 2
1
0
0
1
1 — 2
0 — 1
MARYLAND
Churchill 8, Einstein 1
Huntingtown 3, Northern 1
Lackey 7, Friendly 1
MARYLAND 3A SOUTH
Great Mills 9, St. Charles 1
MARYLAND 4A SOUTH
Bethesda-Chevy Chase 2, Whitman 0
Bowie 7, C.H. Flowers 0
River Hill 2, Wilde Lake 0
PRIVATE
Good Counsel 1, O'Connell 1 (5-4 PK)
Landon 1, St. Stephen's/St. Agnes 0
Sidwell Friends 1, Georgetown Day 1 (5-4 PK)
WCAC
DeMatha 2, St. John's 1
Gonzaga 3, St. Mary's Ryken 0
FIELD HOCKEY
VIRGINIA 5A NORTH
Potomac Falls 7, Lee-Huntsville 0
VIRGINIA 4A
Riverside 4, Fauquier 3
GIRLS' SOCCER
MARYLAND
Bethesda-Chevy Chase 1, Churchill 1 (4-2 PK)
Calvert 5, Patuxent 0
Centennial 0, Atholton 0
Northwest 3, Wootton 2
PRIVATE
Elizabeth Seton 3, McNamara 2
St. John's 2, Holy Cross 0
Good Counsel 3, St. Mary's Ryken 0
Paul VI 2, O'Connell 1
SECOND PERIOD
BOXI NG
Scoring: 1, Dallas, Seguin 7 (Benn, Radulov), 3:11 (pp).
NHL
THIRD PERIOD
FIGHT SCHEDULE
Anaheim Ducks: Recalled C Kalle Kossila from San Diego
(AHL).
Buffalo Sabres: Assigned D Devante Stephens from
Rochester (AHL) to Cincinnati (ECHL).
Carolina Hurricanes: Recalled F Patrick Brown from
Charlotte (AHL).
Dallas Stars: Loaned D Julius Honka to Texas (AHL).
Vegas Golden Knights: Placed G Oscar Dansk on injured
reserve. Recalled G Dylan Ferguson from Kamloops
(WHL) on a emergency basis.
Washigton Capitals: Assigned D Kristofers Bindulis
from Hershey (AHL) to South Carolina (ECHL).
Scoring: 2, Vancouver, Gagner 1 (D.Sedin, Vanek), 6:00
(pp).
SATURDAY
At Monte Carlo (HBO), Dmitry Bivol vs. Trent Broadhurst, 12, for Bivol’s WBA light heavyweight title; Jamie
McDonnell vs. Liborio Solis, 12, for McDonnell’s WBA
World bantamweight title; Scott Quigg vs. Oleg Yefimovich, 12, featherweights; Agit Kabayel vs. Dereck
Chisora, 12, for Kabayel’s European heavyweight title.
At Barclays Center, Brooklyn, N.Y. (SHO), Deontay
Wilder vs. Bermane Stiverne, 12, for Wilder’s WBC
World heavyweight title; Sergey Lipinets vs. Akihiro
Kondo, 12, for the vacant IBF super lightweight title;
Dominic Breazeale vs. Eric Molina, 12, heavyweights;
Shawn Porter vs. Adrian Granados, 10, welterweights.
OVERTIME
Scoring: 3, Dallas, Radulov 3 (Hamhuis, Hamhuis), 2:32.
SHOTS ON GOAL
DALLAS .............................. 9
10
7
3 — 29
VANCOUVER ................... 16
11
11
1 — 39
Power-play opportunities: Dallas 1 of 5; Vancouver 1 of
4. Goalies: Dallas, Bishop 6-2-0 (40 shots-39 saves).
Vancouver, Markstrom 3-2-2 (29-27). A: 17,109
(18,910).
EFGHI
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Official Notices
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
WASHINGTON SUBURBAN SANITARY COMMISSION
November 15, 2017
Pursuant to the Potomac River Compact of 1958, as duly
enacted into law by the General Assemblies of the States of
Maryland and Virginia and duly ratified by the Congress of
the United States of America, the Potomac River Fisheries
Commission hereby proposes to amend and/or adopt regulations as follows, so as:
A public hearing will be held November 15, 2017, at 2:30 P.M. at 14501 Sweitzer Lane, Laurel, Maryland
20707, in the WSSC Lobby Auditorium, to receive citizen testimony, both orally and in writing, pertaining to
the following proposed rates and charges to become effective January 1, 2018.
1. FRONT FOOT BENEFIT RATES
Base rate per foot, per year, 20 years: water $4.80, sewer $7.18.
2.HOUSE CONNECTION CHARGES
1.Amend Reg. I, Sec. 1(a) – Application/Eligibility for
License – to clarify who is eligible for a commercial license
2.Amend Reg. I, Sec. 1(d)(1) – Obtaining a Limited entry
Fishery License – to increase the registration fee for a public
random drawing from $25 to $100.
3.Amend Reg. I, Sec. 2(d)(6) – Two Crab Pot License on One
Boat – to clarify the criteria for qualifying for the permit.
4.Adopt Reg. I, Sec. 2(d)(7) – Assigned User of Crab Pot
License – to establish the assigned user and charge a $50
fee each time the assigned user is changed.
5.Amend Reg. I, Sec. 2(l)(2) – Hook and Line – to clarify who
can be aboard a hook & line vessel.
6.Amend Reg. I, Sec. 2(s)(2) – Removal of Stakes – to allow
pound net poles to remain in the water between the winter
seasons.
7.Amend Reg. VI, Sec. 5(b) – License Fees – to eliminate
Non MD/VA Resident licenses and change MD/VA Resident
to Individual licenses with no residency restriction.
8.Adopt Reg. VIII, Sec. 4(e) – OMR License Planting Surcharge – to establish a planting surcharge for the OMR
Program for the purpose of planting spat on shell.
IMPROVED RESIDENTIAL SMALL SIZE
IMPROVED
CURRENT
PROPOSED
CHARGES
CHARGES
Water (inside and outside meters):
1” & 1 ½”
2”
$ 7,250
7,750
$ 7,750
8,250
Sewer:
1 ¼” & 1 ½” pressure sewer
4" & 6"
$ 13,000
13,000
$ 14,500
14,500
Deferral option connection, residential only, where allowed:
Water (inside and outside meters):
1” & 1 ½”
2”
$ 7,625
8,150
$ 8,150
8,650
Sewer:
1 ¼” & 1 ½” pressure sewer
4” & 6”
$ 13,650
13,650
$ 15,225
15,225
No changes are proposed for the following house connection charges:
Water and Sewer Unimproved Residential Small Size
Non-Residential Small and Large Size
Rights of Way (Connection Built By Plumber)
NOTICE OF HEARING
December 1, 2017
Notice is hereby given to all interested persons that a
public hearing will be held by the Potomac River Fisheries
Commission on adoption of the foregoing proposed regulations or amendments to the regulations of the Commission
on Friday, December 1, 2017 at 8:30 a.m. in the John
Thomas Parran Hearing Room of the Potomac River Fisheries
Commission Building, 222 Taylor Street, Colonial Beach,
Virginia. The precise text of the proposed amendments is
available at the Commission office or by calling (800) 2663904 or (804) 224-7148 or visiting our website – www.prfc.us.
820
820
Official Notices
Official Notices
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
ON PROPOSED REVENUE BOND OR NOTE FINANCING
Notice is hereby given that the Fairfax County Economic
Development Authority (the “Authority”) will hold a public
hearing on the application of GMUF Potomac Heights, LLC
(the “Applicant”), a Virginia limited liability company whose
sole member, George Mason University Foundation, Inc., is
an organization that is not organized exclusively for religious
purposes and is described in Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal
Revenue Code of 1986, as amended. The address of the
Applicant and its sole member is 4400 University Drive, MSN
1A3, Fairfax, Virginia 22030. The Applicant has requested
the Authority to issue up to $18,500,000 of its revenue bonds
or notes, at one time or from time to time in one or more
tax-exempt or taxable series, to assist the Applicant and its
sole member in (a) refunding certain prior bonds (the “2013
Bonds”) issued by the Authority to finance or refinance the
cost of certain capital improvements owned by the Applicant
or its sole member, including (i) an approximately 504 bed
student apartment complex consisting of approximately
183,000 square feet located at 10350 York River Road, in
the County of Fairfax, Virginia, and (ii) an approximately
36,000 square foot residential and office facility known as
University Park and located at 4260 Chain Bridge Road, 4262
Chain Bridge Road, 4264 Chain Bridge Road and 4266 Chain
Bridge Road, in the City of Fairfax, Virginia; (b) funding swap
breakage costs in connection with the 2013 Bonds; and (c)
funding certain costs of the issuance of the proposed bonds
or notes.
The issuance of revenue bonds or notes as requested by
the Applicant will not constitute a debt or pledge of the
faith and credit of the Commonwealth of Virginia or the
County of Fairfax, Virginia, and neither the faith and credit
nor the taxing power of the Commonwealth of Virginia or any
political subdivision thereof, including the County of Fairfax,
Virginia, will be pledged to the payment of such bonds or
notes.
The public hearing, which may be continued or adjourned,
will be held at 6:00 p.m. on November 8, 2017, before
the Authority at its offices at 8300 Boone Boulevard, Suite
450, Vienna, Virginia 22182. Any person interested in the
issuance of the bonds or notes or the proposed refinancing
may appear at the hearing and present his or her views. A
copy of the Applicant’s application is on file and is available
for inspection at the office of the Authority’s counsel,
Thomas O. Lawson, Esquire at 10805 Main Street, Suite
200, Fairfax, Virginia 22030 during normal business hours.
FAIRFAX COUNTY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY
1405
C
Cars
FORD
2007
7
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MERCEDES-BENZ
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NISSAN
NISSAN 2010 Maxima SV, fully
loaded w/premium & tech packages, spoiler, panoramic roof,
flash quards, 5 piece flr/trunk
mats, 91,000 mi. Mystic Jade,
Charcoal leather int. Original
owner, excl. cond. $11,000. 202262-4355
TOYOTA
TOYOTA 2004 AVALON XLS,
91,000 miles, silver, MD
inspected, $4800. 301-908-8188
Antiques & Classics
MERCEDES-BENZ 1987 560SL
$15,000. Excellent condition.
Beautiful. Must see to appreciate.
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OLDSMOBILE 1972 Cutlass Supreme,
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mi, $12,000 call 240-876-0494
ATTEST: Sheila Finlayson, Corporate Secretary
Thomasina V. Rogers, Chair; T. Eloise Foster, Vice Chair
Commissioners: Fausto R. Bayonet, Omar M. Boulware, Howard A. Denis, Chris Lawson
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815
Legal Notices
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
HSBC Bank USA, National
Association as Trustee for
Luminent Mortgage Trust 2007-2
Plaintiff
v.
Gloria Gaskins
Defendant
Case No. 2015 CA 001564 R(RP)
Pursuant to Order for Service of
Process by Publication entered in
the above referenced case on
October 4, 2017 the Plaintiff, by
undersigned counsel, hereby
inform interested parties as follows:
There now is pending before the
Superior Court of the District of
Columbia an action, case number
2015 CA 001564 R(RP), HSBC Bank
USA, National Association as
Trustee for Luminent Mortgage
Trust 2007-2 v. Gloria Gaskins,
seeking to affect title to the property now or formerly owned by Gloria
Gaskins located at 4217 Edison
Place NE, Washington, DC 20019.
A copy of the action is available
in the Civil Actions Clerk’s Office
of the Court. A written answer,
including any claims or defenses,
must be filed in the Civil Action’s
Clerk’s Office, Room 5000, Superior Court of the District of Columbia, 500 Indiana Avenue, NW,
Washington, D.C. 20001, on or
before the fortieth (40th) day,
exclusive of Sundays and legal holidays, occurring after the day of
the first publication of this order;
otherwise the cause will be proceeded with as in cause of default.
Samuel I White PC
600 Rockville Pike, Suite 100
Rockville MD 20852
Attorney for Plaintiff
301-804-3400
Oct 25, Nov 1, 8, 2017 12138457
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840
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Trustees Sale - DC
ALEX COOPER AUCTIONEERS, INC.
5301 WISCONSIN AVE. NW, #750
WASH., DC 202-364-0306
WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM
UNIT OWNERS’ ASSOCIATION SALE OF VALUABLE CONDOMINIUM
UNIT CONTAINED WITHIN PREMISES at 1920 Naylor Road, S.E.,
Unit #T-6, WASHINGTON, D.C. 20020. Pursuant to District of
Columbia Condominium Act of 1976, Section 313 and under
the power of sale contained in the Declaration and Bylaws
of the Condominium, recorded on September 26, 1984 as
Instrument Number 35170 and recorded on September 26,
1984 as Instrument Number 35171, and as amended, and in
accordance with Public Law 90-566 and D.C. Code Section 421903.13, as amended, notice filed September 29, 2017, and at
the request of the Attorney for the Unit Owners’ Association, we
shall sell at public auction on Thursday the 2nd day of November
2017, at 11:02 AM, within the office of Alex Cooper Auctioneers,
5301 Wisconsin Avenue NW, Suite 750, Washington, DC 20005.
Unit T-6 of the Pannell House Condominium Unit Owners’ Association designated on the Records of the Assessor of the District
of Columbia for assessment and taxation purposes as Lot 2058 in
Square 5565.
Terms of sale: Sold Subject to the provisions, restrictions,
easements and conditions as set forth in the Declaration of
Condominium, the By-laws relating thereto, and any and all
amendments thereto existing deed(s) of trust and real estate
taxes, as applicable; the purchase price above said trust(s) to
be paid in cash. Also sold subject to any other prior liens,
encumbrances and municipal assessments, if any, as applicable,
further particulars of which may be announced at time of sale.
A deposit of $1,500.00 will be required at time of sale, such
deposit to be in cash, certified check, or in such other form
as the attorney for the Owners’ Association may require in her
sole discretion. All conveyancing, recording, recordation tax,
transfer tax, etc. at purchaser’s cost. All adjustments made as
of date of sale. The balance of the purchase price, together
with interest at the rate of 10% per annum from date of sale
to date of receipt of the balance of the purchase price, must
be paid in cash or by cashier’s or certified check and all other
terms to be complied with within 30 days, otherwise deposit
is forfeited and the property may be re-advertised and sold at
the discretion of the Owners’ Association and at the risk and
cost of the defaulting purchaser. Association shall convey a
deed pursuant to D. C. Code Section 42-1903.13 (c) (1) and (3) as
amended, and make no further representations or warranties as
to title. The Association reserves the right in its sole discretion
to rescind the sale at any time until conveyance of the deed. In
the event of failure on the part of the Association to convey such
deed, the purchaser’s sole remedy shall be return of deposit.
Anthony R. Champ, Esq.
Attorney for Owner’s Association
Kass Legal Group, PLLC
Washington Post
Oct. 23, 27, Nov. 1, 2017
12138373
ALEX COOPER AUCTIONEERS, INC.
5301 WISCONSIN AVE. NW, #750
WASH., DC 202-364-0306
WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM
UNIT OWNERS’ ASSOCIATION SALE OF VALUABLE CONDOMINIUM
UNIT CONTAINED WITHIN PREMISES at 1920 Naylor Road, S.E.,
Unit #T-4, WASHINGTON, D.C. 20020. Pursuant to District of
Columbia Condominium Act of 1976, Section 313 and under
the power of sale contained in the Declaration and Bylaws
of the Condominium, recorded on September 26, 1984 as
Instrument Number 35170 and recorded on September 26,
1984 as Instrument Number 35171, and as amended, and in
accordance with Public Law 90-566 and D.C. Code Section 421903.13, as amended, notice filed September 29, 2017, and at
the request of the Attorney for the Unit Owners’ Association, we
shall sell at public auction on Thursday the 2nd day of November
2017, at 11:00 AM, within the office of Alex Cooper Auctioneers,
5301 Wisconsin Avenue NW, Suite 750, Washington, DC 20005.
Unit T-4 of the Pannell House Condominium Unit Owners’ Association designated on the Records of the Assessor of the District
of Columbia for assessment and taxation purposes as Lot 2056 in
Square 5565.
Terms of sale: Sold Subject to the provisions, restrictions,
easements and conditions as set forth in the Declaration of
Condominium, the By-laws relating thereto, and any and all
amendments thereto existing deed(s) of trust and real estate
taxes, as applicable; the purchase price above said trust(s) to
be paid in cash. Also sold subject to any other prior liens,
encumbrances and municipal assessments, if any, as applicable,
further particulars of which may be announced at time of sale.
A deposit of $1,500.00 will be required at time of sale, such
deposit to be in cash, certified check, or in such other form
as the attorney for the Owners’ Association may require in her
sole discretion. All conveyancing, recording, recordation tax,
transfer tax, etc. at purchaser’s cost. All adjustments made as
of date of sale. The balance of the purchase price, together
with interest at the rate of 10% per annum from date of sale
to date of receipt of the balance of the purchase price, must
be paid in cash or by cashier’s or certified check and all other
terms to be complied with within 30 days, otherwise deposit
is forfeited and the property may be re-advertised and sold at
the discretion of the Owners’ Association and at the risk and
cost of the defaulting purchaser. Association shall convey a
deed pursuant to D. C. Code Section 42-1903.13 (c) (1) and (3) as
amended, and make no further representations or warranties as
to title. The Association reserves the right in its sole discretion
to rescind the sale at any time until conveyance of the deed. In
the event of failure on the part of the Association to convey such
deed, the purchaser’s sole remedy shall be return of deposit.
Anthony R. Champ, Esq.
Attorney for Owner’s Association
Kass Legal Group, PLLC
Washington Post
Oct. 23, 27, Nov. 1, 2017
12138372
820
820
Official Notices
Official Notices
ABC LICENSE: West Springfield Ledo
Pizza trading as West Springfield
Ledo Pizza, 8324 Old Keene Mill
Rd, West Springfield (Fairfax County) Virginia 22152-1640. The above
establishment is applying to the
VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL (ABC)
for a Wine and Beer On Premises,
Mixed
Beverages
Restaurant
license to sell or manufacture alcoholic beverages. Joseph Pearson
President NOTE: Objections to the
issuance of this license must be
submitted to ABC no later than 30
days from the publishing date of the
first of two required newspaper
legal notices. Objections should be
registered at www.abc.virginia.gov
or 800-552-3200.
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PUBLIC NOTICE
Sibley Memorial Hospital is applying
for a Certificate of Need to establish
a Proton Therapy Service in the
District of Columbia. The Letter of
Intent will be filed with the District
of Columbia State Health Planning
and
Development
Agency
(“SHPDA”). The facility will be located at 5255 Loughboro Road, N.W.,
Washington, DC 20016. For additional information contact the
SHPDA at (202) 442-5875.
825
Bids & Proposals
Capitol Paving of D.C., Inc.
Capitol Paving is soliciting qualified
MBE/WBE subcontractors to perform DC Water Sol # 150180 – Small
Diameter Water Main Replacement
12B.
email
–
bids@capitolpaving.com ; call – 571.277.1022
or fax – 202.832.5126 – Bid Opening
11/01/2017
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840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
825
Bids & Proposals
The District of Columbia
Water
and
Sewer
Authority
is
soliciting
REQUEST FOR INFORMATION
(RFI) for Energy Partnership.
The RFI Number is: 18-PRDWT-05. The proposal will
be available on November
1, 2017 on the District of
Columbia Water and Sewer
Authority vendor portal. Go
to www.dcwater.com to
download from the vendor
portal. The closing date is
December 8, 2017 at 2:00
p.m. Please contact Scott
Kang at 202-787-7058 or email:
scott.kang@dcwater.com with any questions
regarding this solicitation.
830
Special Notices
The MD Standardbred Race Fund
Advisory Committee will hold a
public meeting on 11-15-17 at 1:30
p.m., at Holiday Inn Express, Grasonville, MD. For more info, call 410775-0152.
850
Montgomery County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
ESTATE OF BARBARA J. DOXIE
RIKKI DRYKERMAN,
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. 431938V
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 11th
day of OCTOBER, 2017, by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, Maryland, that the sale of the
property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 3501
Forest Edge Drive Apt. 1F, Silver
Spring, MD 20906 will be ratified
and confirmed unless cause to
the contrary thereof be shown on
or before the 13th day of NOVEMBER, 2017, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive weeks in some newspaper
of general circulation published in
said County before the 13th day
of NOVEMBER, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$74,480.00.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Montgomery County, Maryland
Oct 18, 25, Nov 1, 2017
12136592
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851
Trustees Sale - DC
12135964
Montgomery County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
NSOUGAN A. AMEH
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. 420230V
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 12th
day of OCTOBER, 2017, by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, Maryland, that the sale of the
property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 13025
Brahms Terrace, Silver Spring, MD
20904 will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 13th day of NOVEMBER, 2017, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive weeks in some newspaper
of general circulation published in
said County before the 13th day
of NOVEMBER, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$280,700.00.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Montgomery County, Maryland
Oct 18, 25, Nov 1, 2017
12136600
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
LEKISHIA STEWART
DAVID STEWART
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. 420017V
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 6th
day of OCTOBER, 2017, by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, Maryland, that the sale of the
property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 1240
Kathryn Road, Silver Spring, MD
20904 will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 6th day of NOVEMBER, 2017, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive weeks in some newspaper
of general circulation published in
said County before the 6th day of
NOVEMBER, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$297,000.00.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Montgomery County, Maryland
Oct 18, 25, Nov 1, 2017 12136598
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1206 INGRAHAM STREET, NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20011
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia’s
Decree of Sale in Case # 2015 CA 006237 R (RP), the
undersigned Trustee will offer for sale the property known as
1206 INGRAHAM STREET, NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20011
at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On NOVEMBER 21,
2017 AT 11:00 AM, the land and premises situated in the
District of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0073 in
Square 2930, and more particularly described in the Deed of
Trust recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia,
on July 6, 2007 as Instrument Number 2007089216.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court.
Property is subject to a prior mortgage of $108,097.07 as
of December 29, 2016 plus interest, costs and fees that
may accrue, and conditions.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $25,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in cash
or certified funds. The deposit required to bid at the auction is
waived for the Noteholder and any of its successors or assigns.
The Noteholder may bid up to the total debt on credit and may
submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be announced
at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be paid in
cash within 60 days of final ratification of the sale by the Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid sixty (60) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Trustee
reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court, plus all costs
incurred, if the Trustee have filed the appropriate motion with
the Court to resell the property. Purchaser waives personal
service of any paper filed with the Court in connection with
such motion and any Show Cause Order issued by the Court
and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper or
Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to the address
provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the documents
executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale. Service
shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days after
postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified
mail is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser
fails to go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the
Trustee and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale)
shall be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit.
In the event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any
resale of the property regardless of any improvements made
to the real property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate of 12% from the date of sale to
the date the funds are received in the office of the Trustee.
In the event that the settlement is delayed for ANY REASON
WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of interest. Taxes,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges,
if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date of
sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder to
determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered into
any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid off
prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees that
upon notification by the Trustees of such event the sale is null
and void and of no legal effect and the deposit returned without
interest.
Trustee File No. (15-0056 )
Allan P. Feigelson, P.A.
8337 Cherry Lane
Laurel Lakes Executive Park
Laurel, Md 20707
301-362-2900
OCTOBER 25, NOVEMBER 1, 8, 15, 2017
Trustee Sales
202-334-5782
SF
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
SHIRLEY M. BELCHER
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF13-37691
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 11th
day of October 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, that the sale of the
property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 12416
Parker Lane, Clinton, MD 20735,
will be ratified and confirmed
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 13th
day of November, 2017, provided a
copy of this NOTICE be published
at least once a week in each of
three successive weeks in some
newspaper of general circulation
published in said County before
the 13th day of November, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$173,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Oct 18, 25, Nov 1, 2017 12136585
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
TOYIN MBANAJA
AMBROSE A AKINRINMADE
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAE13-12277
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 11th
day of October 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, that the sale of the
property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 3705
Pogonia Court Unit 4C, Hyattsville,
MD 20784, will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 13th day of November, 2017, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive
weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said
County before the 13th day of
November, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$116,328.79.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Oct 18, 25, Nov 1, 2017 12136588
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
ESTATE OF JOHN M. MORTON
KIM MORTON PRADD,
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
KIM MORTON PRADD
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-09957
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 6th
day of October 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 6711 Seat
Pleasant Drive, Capitol Heights, MD
20743 will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 6th day of November,
2017, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive
weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said
County before the 6th day of
November, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$212,275.62.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Oct 18, 25, Nov 1, 2017 12136583
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
MELISSA R. RICHARDSON
ERICA A. RICHARDSON
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF15-25552
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 5th
day of October 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, that the sale of the
property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 7014
East Forest Road, Hyattsville, MD
20785 will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 6th day of November,
2017, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive
weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said
County before the 6th day of
November, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$129,500.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Oct 18, 25, Nov 1, 2017 12136582
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
DERRICK C DEFREITAS
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-10999
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 3rd
day of October, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner,
Phillip S. Shriver, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 1903
Beecham Ct, Bowie, MD 20721, and
reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 3rd day of November ,
2017 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in The Washington Post, 1150 15th Street, Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S once a week for
three successive weeks before the
3rd day of November, 2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $283,981.35.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Oct 18, 25, Nov 1, 2017 12136927
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1-800-753-POST SF
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851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
14201 DAWN WHISTLE WAY
BOWIE, MD 20721
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Fairview
Manor, LLC dated November 9, 2011 and recorded in Liber 33137, folio
551 among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at
public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main
St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.),
on
NOVEMBER 7, 2017 AT 10:55 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and
described as follows: Lot 22, Block B, as shown on "Plat 5 Collingbrook",
said Plat recorded among the Land Records of Prince George's County,
Maryland at Plat Book REP 197 at Plat No. 92. Tax ID #07-3560323.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $49,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 68301.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Oct 18, Oct 25 & Nov 1
12136025
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTIES
3202 BRINKLEY RD., UNIT #1
AND 3204 BRINKLEY RD., UNIT #2
TEMPLE HILLS, MD 20748
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Madison
Street LLC dated July 22, 2016 and recorded in Liber 38513, folio 61 among
the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro,
MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
NOVEMBER 21, 2017 AT 10:53 AM
ALL THOSE FEE SIMPLE LOTS OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and
described as Unit 1 and Unit 2 in the condominium known as "Brinkley
Terrace Office Condominiums" and more fully described in the aforesaid
Deed of Trust. Tax ID #12-1334465 and Tax ID #12-1334473.
The properties, which are improved by an office condominium, will be
sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and
agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of
any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $17,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the properties. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss
or damage to the properties from the date of sale forward. Additional
terms to be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses
of this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the
gross sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of
the forfeited deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the
properties at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may
avail themselves of any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting
purchaser without reselling the properties. In the event of a resale, the
defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any,
even if such surplus results from improvements to the properties by said
defaulting purchaser and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the
Trustees and secured party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses
incurred in connection with all litigation involving the Properties or the
proceeds of the resale. Trustees' file number 69122.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 1, Nov 8 & Nov 15
12137917
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
8467 GREENBELT RD., UNIT #102
GREENBELT, MD 20770
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Nicole
Marshall dated June 6, 2006 and recorded in Liber 25473, folio 606 among
the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro,
MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
NOVEMBER 21, 2017 AT 10:54 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and
described as Unit numbered 8467-102 Greenbelt Road of a plan of
condominium entitled "Chelsea Wood Condominium" and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #21-2303600.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $18,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 63883.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 1, Nov 8 & Nov 15
12137758
WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER
851
Prince Georges County
OPQRS
20 7
851
Prince Georges County
852
Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
852
D11
Anne Arundel County
855
855
Charles County
873
Charles County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1409 ARAGONA BLVD.
FORT WASHINGTON, MD 20744
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1714 FOXDALE CT., UNIT #187
CROFTON, MD 21114
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
4607 RITCHIE HWY.
BROOKLYN, MD 21225
328 WOODSIDE PL.
WALDORF, MD 20601
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Alphonzo
W. Johns and Eloise K. Johns dated February 1, 2008 and recorded in
Liber 29841, folio 28 among the Land Records of Prince George's County,
MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees
will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County,
14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located
on Main St.), on
NOVEMBER 7, 2017 AT 10:54 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Robin Y.
Graham dated May 31, 2006 and recorded in Liber 17905, folio 709 and
re-recorded in Liber 18636, Folio 241 among the Land Records of Anne
Arundel County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof,
the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Anne
Arundel County, at the Court House Door, 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, MD
21401, on
NOVEMBER 14, 2017 AT 9:30 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Jeffery
G. Burns a/k/a Jeffery G. Burns, M and Dyanne Popescu dated August 25,
2011 and recorded in Liber 23757, folio 174 among the Land Records
of Anne Arundel County, MD, default having occurred under the terms
thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for
Anne Arundel County, at the Court House Door, 8 Church Circle, Annapolis,
MD 21401, on
NOVEMBER 21, 2017 AT 9:30 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Timothy A.
Cross and Christine D. Cross dated August 1, 2008 and recorded in Liber
6680, folio 549 among the Land Records of Charles County, MD, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at
public auction at the Circuit Court for Charles County, 200 Charles St., La
Plata, MD 20646, (Sale will be held in the breezeway between the Circuit
Court and the District Court), on
NOVEMBER 7, 2017 AT 1:07 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #05-0269886.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $65,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and
described as Unit No. 187 in "Crofton Square Condominium No. 3" and
more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #02-21090029360.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #05-046-12262550.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $21,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Charles County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #06-127789.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $20,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Charles County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 67025.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Oct 18, Oct 25 & Nov 1
12134290
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 67875.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Oct 25, Nov 1 & Nov 8
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #06-0549360.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $24,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 68919.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Oct 25, Nov 1 & Nov 8
12137750
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #12-1248137.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $40,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 66887.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Oct 25, Nov 1 & Nov 8
12137752
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
3419 CHERRY HILL CT.
BELTSVILLE, MD 20705
916 PENOBSCOT HARBOUR
PASADENA, MD 21122
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #03-244-90025094.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $24,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 55584.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
Nov 1, Nov 8 & Nov 15
12138331
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
458 WATSON CT.
MILLERSVILLE, MD 21108
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Elizabeth
Ramirez dated November 5, 2013 and recorded in Liber 35439, folio 528
among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St.,
Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
NOVEMBER 21, 2017 AT 10:52 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #01-0064584.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $17,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 67193.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 1, Nov 8 & Nov 15
12137979
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and
described as Unit No. 20, as shown on a Plat entitled, "Plat 1 of 2,
Condominium Phase 3, Watson Place Condominium, (Phase II, Olde Mill
Shopping Center)" and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
Tax ID #03-930-90059906.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $26,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 56366.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
Nov 1, Nov 8 & Nov 15
12137760
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
ESTATE OF SYLVESTER FOSTER
THOMAS J. KOKOLIS,
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-11722
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 11th
day of October 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, that the sale of the
property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 11006
Trafton Court, Upper Marlboro, MD
20774, will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 13th day of November, 2017, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive
weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said
County before the 13th day of
November, 2017.
Oct 18, 25, Nov 1, 2017 12136589
Wake up
to home
delivery.
Charles County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Bernice H.
Schulz dated March 19, 2007 and recorded in Liber 6297, folio 187 among
the Land Records of Charles County, MD, default having occurred under
the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit
Court for Charles County, 200 Charles St., La Plata, MD 20646, (Sale will be
held in the breezeway between the Circuit Court and the District Court), on
12637 WILLOW VIEW PL.
WALDORF, MD 20602
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Charles County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #08-041792.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $34,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Charles County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 66958.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
NOVEMBER 14, 2017 AT 1:05 PM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Tanya
L. G. Kelly dated November 2, 2006 and recorded in Liber 6082, folio 514
among the Land Records of Charles County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Charles County, 200 Charles St., La Plata, MD 20646, (Sale
will be held in the breezeway between the Circuit Court and the District
Court), on
NOVEMBER 21, 2017 AT 1:06 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Charles County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #06-231179.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $30,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Charles County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 68133.
1-800-753-POST
857
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
August 2, 2006, and recorded at Instrument Number 200608030115242
in the Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Prince William County,
VA, securing a loan which was originally $240,000.00. The appointed
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at
public auction at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince William
County, 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas, VA 20110 on:
November 17, 2017 at 1:00 PM
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of All of Lot
Fourteen (14), Section One (1), Bannerwood, as the same appears duly
dedicated, platted and recorded in Deed Book 1258, Page 1247, among
the Land Records of Prince William County, Virginia.
Together with an easement of way over and across the “Common Greens”,
shown on the aforesaid plat plan or shown on any other plat plans, deed
and/or other instruments of conveyance presently duly recorded or duly
recorded hereafter among the Land Records of Prince William County,
Virginia, whereby Bannerwood Homeowners Association, Inc. derives
ownership of said Common Greens in common with the owners of other
lots in said Community subject to such rules and regulations with respect
thereto as may from time to time be prescribed by the said Bannerwood
Homeowners Association Inc., a non-profit Virginia Corporation. Said
Easement shall title appurtenant to and pass with fee simple title to the
above described lot. The above described lot is conveyed with party wall
rights in the existing improvements on the lot or lots adjacent to said lot,
and, likewise, improvements on the lot hereby conveyed are conveyed
subject to existing party wall rights for the portion of the improvements
on the adjoining lot or lots, subject however, to all easements, conditions
and restrictions of record applicable to said land in so far as they legally
apply thereto, and as more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
October 25, November 1, 2017
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Michael
Mann, Jr. dated March 29, 2010 and recorded in Liber 7120, folio 142
among the Land Records of Charles County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Charles County, 200 Charles St., La Plata, MD 20646, (Sale
will be held in the breezeway between the Circuit Court and the District
Court), on
NOVEMBER 21, 2017 AT 1:05 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Charles County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #01-059831.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $22,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Charles County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 67609.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust
dated September 30, 2016, and recorded at Instrument Number
201610040081189 in the Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Prince
William County, VA, securing a loan which was originally $528,942.00. The
appointed SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer
for sale at public auction at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince
William County, 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas, VA 20110 on:
December 1, 2017 at 1:00 PM
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of All that
certain lot, piece or parcel of land, with all improvements thereon and
all appurtenances thereto belonging, located and being in the County
of Prince William, Commonwealth of Virginia, and being designated as
follows:
Lot 48, Section 1, Cardinal Grove at Eagles Pointe, as the same is duly
dedicated in Instrument Number 201307170072975, and shown on plat at
Instrument Number 201307170072976, recorded among the Land Records
of Prince William County, Virginia, and as more fully described in the
aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold subject to a 120 day right of
redemption by the Internal Revenue Service. The property will be sold
“AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND
SUBJECT TO conditions, restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of
way, and all other matters of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust
to be announced at the time of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of
the sale price, whichever is lower, in cash or cashie
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Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
12138565
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Arlington County
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TRUSTEE'S SALE
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4500 S Four Mile Run Drive, Unit 105
Arlington, VA 22204
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In execution of the Deed of Trust dated February 14, 2006, and recorded
in Book 3950 at Page 1751 as Instrument Number 2006046075, of
the Arlington County land records the undersigned Substitute Trustees,
will offer for sale at public auction on November 9, 2017 at 10:00 AM
immediately in front of the entrance doors to the Circuit Court, Arlington
County Justice Center, 1425 North Courthouse Road, Arlington, Virginia,
the following property:
Unit 105, of the CENTURY SOUTH CONDOMINIUM, together with all
undivided interest in the common elements of such condominium allocated
thereto, as more fully set forth in the Master Deed dated June 12, 1974
and recorded among the land records of Arlington County, Virginia, in Deed
Book 1862 at page 304 and associated plats and plans related thereto as
amended by First Amendment to Century South Condominium Master Deed
dated July 29, 1987 and recorded July 30, 1987 in Deed Book 2288 at page
1255, as further amended by Second Amendment recorded in Deed Book
2572 at page 1358 and amended by Amendment recorded in Deed Book
3911 at page 1826.
LEGAL NOTICES
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The property and improvements will be sold in "as is" physical condition
without warranty of any kind.
TERMS OF SALE: A non-refundable bidder's deposit in the amount of ten
percent (10%) of the successful bid payable by cashier's/certified check
required at time of sale except for the party secured by the Deed of Trust.
Risk of loss on purchaser from date and time of auction. Balance of the
purchase price must be paid by cashier's check within 14 days from sale
date. Except for Virginia Grantor tax, all settlement costs and expenses
are purchaser's responsibility. Real estate taxes will be pro-rated to the
date of sale. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining possession of the
property. If purchaser defaults, deposit will be forfeited and property
resold at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser who shall be
liable for any deficiency in the purchase price and all costs, expenses
and attorney’s fees of both sales. If Trustees do not convey title for any
reason, purchaser's sole remedy is return of deposit without interest. This
sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan secured by the
Deed of Trust including, but not limited to, determining whether prior to
sale a bankruptcy was filed; a forbearance, repayment or other agreement
was entered into; or the loan was reinstated or paid off. In any such event
this sale shall be null and void and purchaser’s sole remedy shall be return
of deposit without interest. This communication is from a debt collector.
e-mail: legalnotices@washpost.com
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If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 41901.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
870
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ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Howard County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #16-086568.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $35,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Howard County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Oct 18, Oct 25 & Nov 1
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Howard County
To place your legal notice in
the Classified section:
Call: 202-334-7007
S2931 2x4
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Old Dominion Trustees, Inc., Substitute Trustees
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
BUONASSISSI, HENNING & LASH, P.C.
1861 Wiehle Avenue, Suite 300
Reston, Virginia 20190
(703) 796-1723
File No. 8207.81533
November 1, 8, 2017
12139636
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Tax No.: 28-035-005
Not a member? It’s free! JOIN TODAY.
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TOGETHER WITH Limited Common Element Garage Space No 55.
From dinosaur bones and
space shuttles to panda
bears and modern art,
discover great ways to
save money, win tickets
and have fun at museums.
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7172 TALISMAN LA.
COLUMBIA, MD 21045
Arlington County
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12137754
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
870
12137444
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
3444 Soaring Circle,
Woodbridge, VA 22193
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Olumide
Ashiru-Balogun dated November 12, 2009 and recorded in Liber 12179,
folio 359 among the Land Records of Howard County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction, AUCTION SALE TO BE HELD AT THE THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING,
9250 BENDIX ROAD, COLUMBIA, MD 21045, on
NOVEMBER 6, 2017 AT 9:30 AM
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
105 SPANISH MOSS DR.
LA PLATA, MD 20646
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Howard County
12138568
washingtonpost.com/postpoints
SF
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Oct 25, Nov 1 & Nov 8
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
PostPoints takes you
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855
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Charles County
Nov 1, Nov 8 & Nov 15
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$285,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
855
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
12134288
Nov 1, Nov 8 & Nov 15
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Stephen
Karas dated July 11, 2007 and recorded in Liber 19320, folio 630 among
the Land Records of Anne Arundel County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County, at the Court House Door, 8 Church
Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
NOVEMBER 21, 2017 AT 9:29 AM
851
Nov 1, Nov 8 & Nov 15
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Oct 18, Oct 25 & Nov 1
12136169
2982 HICKORY VALLEY DR.
WALDORF, MD 20601
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Rhonie
Bauer dated August 26, 2006 and recorded in Liber 18393, folio 613
among the Land Records of Anne Arundel County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County, at the Court House
Door, 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
NOVEMBER 21, 2017 AT 9:28 AM
10044 EDGEWATER TERR.
FORT WASHINGTON, MD 20744
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Bradley A.
Fulton dated July 17, 2013 and recorded in Liber 35608, folio 429 among
the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro,
MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
NOVEMBER 14, 2017 AT 10:38 AM
12136098
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
2519 AFTON ST.
TEMPLE HILLS, MD 20748
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Alice V.
Bates dated January 7, 2008 and recorded in Liber 29440, folio 66 among
the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro,
MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
NOVEMBER 14, 2017 AT 10:37 AM
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 56304.
P
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
10158 Asheville Street,
Manassas, VA 20109
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1 800 753 POST
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If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 55530.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $29,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
Prince William County
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1 800 753 POST
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1 800 753 POST
D12
876
Loudoun County
OPQRS
876
877
Loudoun County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
12824 PLANTATION DRIVE,
SPOTSYLVANIA, VA 22551.
TRUSTEES' SALE
Valuable Real Estate located in Loudoun County, Virginia
known as
21586 Atlantic Boulevard, Suite 110, Sterling, VA 20166
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust
from Loudoun Gymnastics Center, Inc. to David P. Summers, Charles C.
Brockett and Christopher D. Mortensen, Trustees, bearing the date of
December 21, 2012, and recorded among the Land Records of Loudoun
County, Virginia, as Instrument No. 20121227-0102495 as modified or
amended (the "Deed of Trust") and at the request of the party secured
thereby, default having occurred in the terms and conditions thereof, the
undersigned, as Substitute Trustee for the Trustees named in said Deed of
Trust by Deed of Appointment dated August 21, 2017, will sell at public
auction in front of the Circuit Court for Loudoun County, Virginia, located
at Loudoun County Courthouse (Market Street doorway), Market and King
Street, Leesburg, Virginia on November 16, 2017 at 2:00 p.m., some or all
of the property described in said Deed of Trust.
The property, which includes all of the right, title and interest, if any, of
Loudoun Gymnastics Center, Inc., or those claiming under the aforesaid
grantor(s), in and to the land and all buildings and improvements that are
subject to the Deed of Trust (the "Property").
The Property being offered for sale is further described as follows:
21586 Atlantic Boulevard, Suite 110, Sterling, VA 20166
Unit 110, Building A, Steeplechase Center Condominium
Tax Account No. 031-46-6058-002
Terms of Sale
The Property will be sold in "AS IS, WHERE IS" condition, without recourse.
Neither the Trustee, the noteholder secured by the Deed of Trust, the
Auctioneer, nor any of their respective agents, successors or assigns
(collectively, the "Selling Parties") make any representations or warranties,
express or implied, with respect to the Property, or any tenancies
or parties in possession, including without limitation, the description,
use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of
construction, workmanship, materials, habitability, marketability, insurability (hazard or title), subdivision, zoning, environmental condition,
compliance with building codes or other laws (such as Americans with
Disabilities Act), ordinances or regulations, fitness for a particular purpose,
or merchantability of all or any part of the Property. The purchaser waives
and releases the Selling Parties from any and all claims the purchaser
and/or the purchaser's successors and assigns may now have or may
have in the future relating to the condition of the Property, including but
not limited to the environmental condition thereof. The purchaser shall
assume the risk of loss or damage to the Property after the time of the
foreclosure sale. The Property will be sold subject to any building or
housing violations, easements, agreements, restrictions, terms, rights of
way, filed and unfiled mechanics' and materialmen's liens, covenants,
conditions, rights of redemption, and all other encumbrances having
priority over the Deed of Trust, if any, lawfully affecting the Property,
whether or not of record, including but not limited to environmental
conditions (including without limitation possible wetlands, riparian rights,
critical or protected areas, and the presence of protected or endangered
species) and all applicable federal, state and local laws, ordinances and
regulations lawfully affecting the Property. The Property is sold subject
to the rights of existing tenants, if any. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the Property. All interested bidders
are encouraged to contact the appropriate governmental authorities
prior to the sale date regarding, without limitation, encumbrances, liens,
violations, permitted uses of the Property and the requirements, if any, for
cure, construction, completion or development.
A deposit will be required at the time of sale in the amount of One Hundred
Twenty Thousand and No/00 Dollars ($120,000.00), or ten percent (10%)
of the successful bid(s), whichever is less, such deposit(s) to be in
cashier's check, certified check, or in such other form as the Trustee
may determine, in its sole discretion. Whenever the purchaser is also
the noteholder secured by the Deed of Trust, payment of the required
deposit(s) and the purchase price is made by crediting the amount thereof
to the indebtedness. The Trustee reserves the right, in its sole discretion,
to reject any or all bids, withdraw the Property from sale, waive the
deposit requirement, in whole or in part, and extend the period of time
in which the purchaser is to complete settlement. The balance in cash
or immediately available funds, with interest at eight percent (8%) per
annum from the date of sale to the date of settlement or the balance
of the proceeds are received by the Trustee, whichever is later, payable
within ten (10) days after the date of sale. In the event that settlement
does not occur within ten (10) days of the date of sale the purchaser
shall be in default. There will be no abatement of interest due from the
purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER.
Adjustment of current year base real property taxes will be made as
of the date of sale and thereafter be assumed by the purchaser. Title
examination, conveyancing, recording charges, notary fees, Grantor's tax,
Regional congestion relief fee, Deed preparation, state and county/city
transfer taxes, recordation taxes, specifically including without limitation,
any recapture tax, agricultural transfer tax, all other taxes, public charges
and special or regular assessments, water and sewer charges, including
penalties and interest, if any, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Conveyance of the Property shall be
by Trustee's Deed, without covenant or warranty, express or implied,
specifically including marketability or insurability (hazard or title), unless
otherwise required by statute, court rule or the Deed of Trust. In the event
the Trustee is unable for any reason to convey title, the purchaser's sole
remedy at law or in equity shall be to request and to receive a return of
the deposit. Upon return of the deposit, this sale shall be void and of no
effect and the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Selling
Parties.
Compliance with terms of sale shall be made within ten (10) days after
the date of sale at the office of the Trustee or such other place mutually
agreed upon or the deposit shall be forfeited to the Trustee for application
against all expenses, attorney's fees and the full commission on the sale
price of the above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all
expenses of this sale (including attorney's fees and the full commission
on the gross sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out
of the forfeited deposit as authorized by the Deed of Trust and the law
in such cases. The Trustee may then readvertise and resell the Property
at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser; or, without reselling the
Property, the Trustee may avail itself of any legal or equitable remedies
against the defaulting purchaser. In the event of a resale, the defaulting
purchaser shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any.
Additional terms of sale may be announced at the time of sale.
SR AGENTS, LLC
Trustee
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
Benjamin P. Smith, Esquire
Shulman, Rogers, Gandal, Pordy & Ecker, P.A.
12505 Park Potomac Avenue, Sixth Floor
Potomac, MD 20854
(301) 230-5241
November 1, 8, 15, 2017
877
12138886
Spotsylvania County
877
Spotsylvania County
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
5910 Chadwick Court,
Fredericksburg, VA 22407
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
December 2, 2004, and recorded at Instrument Number 200400047958 in
the Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Spotsylvania County, VA, securing
a loan which was originally $196,000.00. The appointed SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at public auction
at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Spotsylvania County, 9107 Judicial
Center Lane, Spotsylvania, Virginia 22553 on:
November 13, 2017 at 11:30 AM
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of All that
certain lot or parcel of land with all buildings and improvements thereon
and all rights and privileges appurtenant thereto, situate, lying, and being in
Courtland Magisterial District, Spotsylvania County, Virginia, known as Lot
116, Section One, Stonemill Subdivision, as shown on plat of subdivision
dated April 13, 1988, revised August 15, 1988, revised September 7,
1988, and revised January 16, 1989, by Rinker-Detwiler and Associates,
P.C., which plat is recorded in the Clerk’s Office of the Circuit Court of
Spotsylvania County, Virginia, in Plat File 2, pages 114-119, and as more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
October 25, November 1, 2017
877
Spotsylvania County
12137443
TRUSTEE SALE
11911 Old Elm Court,
Spotsylvania, VA 22551
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated June 30, 2015, in
the original principal amount of
$166,871.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Spotsylvania County, Virginia as
Instrument No. 150011139 . The
undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction
in the front of the Circuit Court
building for Spotsylvania County,
9107 Judicial Center Lane, Spotsylvania, Virginia on December 7,
2017, at 4:00 PM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: ALL THOSE CERTAIN LOTS
OR PARCELS OF LAND TOGETHER
WITH ALL IMPROVEMENTS THEREON AND ALL RIGHTS AND PRIVILEGES
THEREUNTO
APPURTENANT, SITUATE, LYING AND
BEING IN THE CHANCELLOR MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT, SPOTSYLVANIA
COUNTY, VIRGINIA, KNOWN AND
DESCRIBED AS LOTS 126 AND 127
IN SECTION 16, LAKE WILDERNESS
SUBDIVISION, AS SHOWN ON PLAT
OF ELLIOT AND ASSOCIATES,
DATED APRIL 1971, AND RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9 AT PAGES 109
ET SEQ., AND REVISED SEPTEMBER
1971, AND RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 9, AT PAGE 117, ALL IN THE
CLERK‘S OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3122721.
Nov 1, 8, 2017
12135138
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
6200 TAVERNEER LANE,
SPOTSYLVANIA, VA 22551
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated October 1, 2010,
in the original principal amount
of $138,040.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Spotsylvania County, Virginia as
Instrument No. 201000017484 .
The
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction in the front of the Circuit
Court building for Spotsylvania
County, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, Virginia on December
7, 2017, at 4:00 PM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT,
PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND,
TOGETHER WITH ALL BUILDINGS
AND IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
AND PRIVILEGES AND APPURTENANCES THEREUNTO BELONGING,
SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN THE
BERKELEY MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT
OF SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA, BEING DESIGNATED AS LOT
52, SECTION 2, TAVERNEER SUBDIVISION, SHOWN ON A PLAT OF
SECTION TWO, TAVERNEER, DATED
MARCH 25, 1993, MADE BY SULLIVAN, DONAHOE & INGALLS,
RECORDED IN THE CLERK‘S
OFFICE, CIRCUIT COURT, SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA IN PLAT
FILE NO.5, PAGES 77-78, AND TO
WHICH PLAT REFERENCE IS HEREBY MADE FOR A MORE PARTICULAR DESCRIPTION.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence. If
the sale is set aside for any reason,
the Purchaser at the sale shall be
entitled to a return of the deposit
paid. The Purchaser may, if provided by the terms of the Trustee’s
Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale,
be entitled to a $50 cancellation
fee from the Substitute Trustee,
but shall have no further recourse
against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney.
Additional terms to be announced
at the sale. A form copy of the
Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and contract to purchase
real property is available for viewing at www.bwwsales.com. This
is a communication from a debt
collector and any information
obtained will be used for that purpose. The sale is subject to seller
confirmation. Substitute Trustee:
Equity Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson
Blvd., Suite 1004, Arlington, VA
22201. For more information contact: BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003
Executive
Blvd, Suite
101,
Rockville, MD 20852, 301-9616555,
website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3130662.
Nov. 1, 8, 2017
12138180
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
879
Spotsylvania County
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $471,800.00, dated January 6,
2006 recorded in the Clerk's
Office of the Circuit Court of the
Spotsylvania County, Virginia, in
Document No. LR 200600001125,
default having occurred in the
payment of the Note thereby
secured and at the request of
the holder of said Note, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at
the entrance to the Spotsylvania
County Judicial Center, 9107 Judicial Center Lane, Spotsylvania, on
December 5, 2017 at 12:00 PM the
property described in said deed,
located at the above address and
briefly described as:
Lot 569, Section 9B, Fawn Lake,
with improvements thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust, if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (19234)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Nov 1, 8, 2017
12140502
878
Stafford County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
31 PERSEVERE DRIVE,
STAFFORD, VA 22554.
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated May 26, 2006, in
the original principal amount of
$400,000.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Stafford County, Virginia as Instrument No. 060017676 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Stafford County, 1300 Courthouse Road, Stafford, Virginia on
December 7, 2017 , at 2:00 PM, the
property described in said Deed
of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL OF THAT
CERTAIN LOT, PIECE OR PARCEL
OF LAND, TOGETHER WITH ALL
IMPROVEMENTS THEREON, SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN AQUIA
MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT, STAFFORD
COUNTY, VIRGINIA AND KNOWN,
NUMBERED AND DESIGNATED AS
LOT NUMBER 26, SECTION 1, SOMERSET LANDING SUBDIVISION, AS
SHOWN ON SUBDIVISION PLAT
RECORDED IN THE CLERK‘S OFFICE
OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
STAFFORD COUNTY, VIRGINIA, IN
PLAT BOOK PM040000226
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3222051.
Nov. 1, 8, 2017
879
Culpeper County
EZ
879
Culpeper County
881
Culpeper County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
19318 YORK ROAD,
STEVENSBURG, VA 22741
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
18321 CARRICO MILLS ROAD,
STEVENSBURG, VA 22741.
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
12229 SALT CEDAR LANE,
CULPEPER, VA 22701.
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
21482 LAHORE ROAD,
ORANGE, VA 22960.
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated August 27, 2004,
in the original principal amount
of $210,000.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Culpeper County, Virginia as Instrument No. 040011796 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Culpeper County, at the corner
of West Davis Street and North
West Street in the Town of
Culpeper on December 7, 2017 , at
11:00 AM, the property described
in said Deed of Trust, located at
the above address, and more particularly described as follows: ALL
THAT CERTAIN TRACT OR PARCEL
OF LAND, TOGETHER WITH ALL
BUILDINGS AND IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON AND PRIVILEGES AND
APPURTENANCES
THEREUNTO
BELONGING, SITUATED, LYING AND
BEING ON THE SOUTH SIDE OF
STATE ROUTE 600 IN STEVENSBURG MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT,
CULPEPER COUNTY, VIRGINIA AND
BEING
MORE
PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED BY PLAT OF BRIAN
THROSSELL, LAND SURVEYOR,
DATED MAY 28, 1989, ATTACHED
TO AND MADE A PART OF THAT
CERTAIN DEED RECORDED IN DEED
BOOK 423 AT PAGE 450, AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT A POINT IN
THE SOUTHERLY LINE OF ROUTE
600, SAID POINT BEING THE
NORTHWESTERLY CORNER OF THE
LAND OF BROWN; THENCE
DEPARTING ROUTE 600 AND RUNNING WITH THE WESTERLY LINE OF
BROWN, S 06 DEGREES 11‘30" W.
441.6 FEET TO A POINT IN THE
NORTH SIDE OF AN OLD ROADBED;
THENCE DEPARTING BROWN AND
RUNNING WITH THE NORTHERLY
LINE OF THE ROADBED, N. 89
DEGREES 40‘ 11" W. 123.68 FEET
AND N. 82 DEGREES 07‘20" W.
141.08 FEET TO A POINT, THE
SOUTHEASTERLY CORNER OF A 30
FEET STREET (UNIMPROVED);
THENCE RUNNING WITH THE EASTERLY LINE OF THE 30‘ ROAD, N. 08
DEGREES 29‘00" E. 454.99 FEET TO
A POINT IN THE SOUTHERLY LINE,
S. 82 DEGREES 45‘00" E. 245.89
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING,
CONTAINING 2.65 ACRES, MORE
OR LESS.
In execution of a certain Deed of
Trust dated December 22, 2003,
in the original principal amount
of $148,000.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Culpeper County, Virginia as Instrument No. 030014625 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Culpeper County, at the corner
of West Davis Street and North
West Street in the Town of
Culpeper on December 7, 2017 , at
11:00 AM, the property described
in said Deed of Trust, located at
the above address, and more particularly described as follows: ALL
THAT CERTAIN LOT OR PARCEL OF
LAND IN STEVENSBURG MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT NEAR CARRICO
MILLS, CULPEPER COUNTY, VIRGINIA, AND BEGINNING AT A POINT
IN THE EAST LINE OF STATE ROUTE
669 AT A BOARD FENCE CORNER,
SAID POINT BEING 25‘ EAST OF
THE PRESENT CENTER LINE OF THE
ROAD, A NEW CORNER WITH THE
REMAINDER OF THE TRACT;
THENCE WITH THE EAST LINE OF
THE ROAD, 25‘ FROM AND PARALLEL TO THE PRESENT CENTERLINE, N. 14 DEG 43‘ W. 522.56‘
TO A FENCE CORNER, ANOTHER
NEW CORNER WITH THE REMAINDER THENCE NEW LINES WITH
LAKE, A FENCE LINE, N. 85 DEG
30‘ E. 35.00‘, N. 88 DEG 56‘ E.
238.00‘ TO A STAKE, A NEW CORNER; THENCE CONTINUING NEW
LINES WITH LAKE S. 15 DEG 23‘ E.
453.22‘ TO A STAKE; THENCE IN
PART WITH A BOARD FENCES. 73
DEG 50‘ W. 271.00‘ TO THE BEGINNING. THIS LOT CONTAINS 3.01
ACRES, MORE OR LESS.
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated August 22, 2013,
in the original principal amount
of $238,830.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Culpeper County, Virginia as Instrument No. 130005832 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Culpeper County, at the corner
of West Davis Street and North
West Street in the Town of
Culpeper on December 7, 2017 , at
11:00 AM, the property described
in said Deed of Trust, located at
the above address, and more particularly described as follows: ALL
THAT CERTAIN LOT, PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND, WITH ALL IMPROVEMENTS THEREON AND ALL APPURTENANCES THERETO BELONGING,
LOCATED AND BEING IN THE
COUNTY OF CULPEPER, COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA, AND BEING
DESIGNATED AS FOLLOWS: LOT
135, PHASE L, THREE FLAGS, AS
THE SAME IS DULY DEDICATED
INSTRUMENT NUMBER 050006735
AND AS SHOWN ON A PLAT IN
PLAT CABINET 8, SLIDE(S) 571-587 ,
ALL RECORDED AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF CULPEPER COUNTY,
VIRGINIA.
In execution of a certain Deed of
Trust dated October 16, 2002, in
the original principal amount of
$71,500.00 recorded in the Clerk’s
Office, Circuit Court for Orange
County, Virginia as Instrument No.
020009540 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at
public auction in the front of the
Circuit Court building for Orange
County, 109 W. Main Street,
Orange, Virginia on December 7,
2017 , at 10:00 AM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT OR
PARCEL OF LAND WITH APPURTENANCES THEREUNTO BELONGING LOCATED IN TAYLOR MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT, ORANGE COUNTY, VIRGINIA, CONTAINING 3.552
ACRES MORE OR LESS, NEAR
NORTH PAMUNKEY CHURCH OFF
OF THE SOUTHWEST SIDE OF THE
LAHORE ROAD, WHICH LOT OR
PARCEL OF LAND IS MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED ON A PLAT
OF SURVEY MADE BY MILTON T.
ESTES, C.L.S. DATED MAY 2, 1997,
ATTACHED HERETO AND RECORDED HEREWITH.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-2052721.
Nov. 1, 8, 2017
12140062
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3225931.
Nov. 1, 8, 2017
12138866
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3171103.
Nov. 1, 8, 2017
12138898
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delivery
makes good
sense.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3114083.
Nov. 1, 8, 2017
12138897
MARYLAND
Roommates
ADELPHI - Nice bsmt room for rent,
pvt ent., $550/mo. all util incl., nr
metro.
301-906-5681
CAPITAL HEIGHTS - Furn room for
rent, share bath & kitchen.
$650 +utilities. 301-502-6581
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2017
260
MARYLAND
Furniture
Roommates
HYATTSVILLE- Furn room $175/wk +
security. Includes all utils inc cable.
Near Metro. No pets. 301-675-2016
SILVER SPRING- Lrg rm, priv BA, off st
parking, kit privileges, close to DT Sil
Spr, NS $550/m+ utils. 301-526-8204
Federal Mahogany Sideboard - 7'
scale
Federal
long!—Large
Mahogany sideboard, 7' X 32" D
X 45" H 2 Tiers of serving surfaces
with custom cut tempered glass, just
$1950, worth much more Sykesville,
MD, 410-440-6291
Stickley Mahogany Breakfront China
Cabinet—Beautiful quality, sold
mahog paid $11k new, just $1950,
Sykesville, MD, 410-440-6291
SUITLAND- 1 room available, 275
$550/mo includes utilities, $300 SD,
close to metro. Call 202-340-6959
SUITLAND - Share house. Rooms for
rent. 2 blocks from Suitland Metro.
$190/week + dep. Call 301-537-5032
Wheaton— $725, Shared SFH, 1 BR,
Cable Wifi, AC, util incl, nr pub trans,
furn avail, 301-503-1753. Avail Now
VIRGINIA
SPRINGFIELD / FT. BELVOIR /
WOODBRIDGE - Responsible person
to share 3 bedroom house.
$700 util & cable incl. 703-919-4381
Anne Arundel Co.
MD
MD Real Estate
Auctions
ESTATE AUCTION
Annapolis Area Nov 3 & 4
Lux Home; 1937 Cadillac
V-12; Harley Ultra Classic;
antiques; tools; art; jewelry
& much more. See full list @
AuctionCompanyOfAmerica.com/
Maryland
Waterfront, Sale
Northern Neck Waterfront
Extraordinary Waterfront Home,
“Phillips Landing” located in Richmond County, VA. Only 5 miles from
Warsaw, this Hidden Gem encompasses 5.8 acres near the confluence of Totuskey Creek and the
Rappahannock River with vistas in
excess of one mile. This lovely property includes a 4 bdrm/3.5 BA Colonial home, boat house and dock. For
additional details, photos & video,
visit www.rice-packett.com. Offered
at $595,000 by Rice-Packett Real
Estate Agency, 804-761-8357; 804333-4933; mjpackett2@verizon.net.
Firewood
FIREWOOD SALES, seasoned Oak,
$350/full cord. Delivered. NOVA.
Robert 703-424-4064 or 703-855-4691
Seasoned Hardwood 1/2 cord $110,
1 cord $200, 2 cord $380 Free
Delivery Call 7035203869
Electronics
HP2g
110mpg
V-8
Hybrid
CAPITAL HEIGHTS - Senior home to Engine—The HP2g V-8 Hybrid engine
share. Furn rooms. $600. + $300 uses two energy sources within the
SD W/D.Privacy sence. All utils incl. same power plant, achieving over
Near Metro. N/S inside. 1 wk free. 110 miles per gallon, producing up to
Text/Call
202-568-0792 400 horsepower. The patented HP2g
Skip-Fire Variable Displacement SysFORT WASHINGTON - Furn BR $550. tem and patented HP2g ElectromagShr kitchen, dining area & BA. Close net Pulse Motor built inside the
to 495 & VA. Call 240-441-6773 engine. HP2g delivers record setting
fuel economy and EPA tested emissions far below the 2022 standards.US and International Patents
Issued. As Seen at NAIAS Detroit
FORT WASHINGTON - Rooms with
Auto Show 2008, 2009 and Washpvt BA. Kitn. Vets welcome. 5 min
ington DC Auto Show 2010.
to Nat'l Harbor. Inc cable/internet.
Looking to stay in the USA
Starts @ $850. Call 301-292-6147
For more info: www.hp2g.com
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
RECORDS - I pay cash for
50s, 60s, & 70s .
Categories: Jazz, Soul, R&R, R&B.
Call 703-865-6050.
345
Garage Sales, D.C.
UNITED METHODIST WOMEN'S
ANNUAL BAZAAR with new-to-you
items for sale, Sat Nov 4 8am- 3pm,
National united mehtodiist church
(Metropolitan Memoral Campus)
3401 Nebraska Ave. NW
202-363-4900 metroumw@gmail.com
350
LUXURY HOME AUCTION
Annapolis / Harwood Nov 3 & 4
6,843 Sq. ft home on 2.36
manicured acres. Large
climate controlled garage for
RV's, Truck/car collection. 100%
Geothermal, auto back-up gen &
much more. For info: go to
AuctionCompanyOfAmerica.com/
Maryland
245
PAYING CASH!
Antiques & collectibles.
Carl 312-316-7553
SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH
FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS.
Call Al, 301-807-3266.
Will Come to you!
Roommates
237
Merchandise Wanted
Garage Sales, MD
Bethesda—Huge Rummage
Sale & Silent Auction. Saturday
November 4, 8am-3pm, RRUUC,
6310 River Rd. 301-229-0400,
rruuc.org; bazaar2017@rruuc.org
ROCKVILLE- Latvian Lutheran
Church, 400 Hurley Ave. Huge
rummage sale. Saturday November 4th, 8:30am-1pm. Rain or
Shine. Good quality items. Bargain
prices. Cash only.
355
Garage Sales, VA
Annandale—45+ Craft Bazaar
& Used Book Sale, fresh pecans
off the farm, free tours Historic
Little White Church, 6935
Columbia Pike, VA,11/04, 10am
- 3 pm
610
Dogs for Sale
ACA COCKER SPANIEL PUPPIES ready 11/4, cute, friendly and
playful! vet checked and first shots.
beautiful colors. 814-793-4920
BOXERS - AKC, M + F, fawn/brindle,
tails and declaws done, vaccinated &
wormed, 12 weeks 301-639-8636
GERMAN SHEPHERD WORKING
LINE PUPPIES- 6 F's, blk & sable,
ready 10/16. vt chkd, UTD shts,
hlth guar., $1,800. World class
ped., AKC reg. 301-956-4635
Giant Schnauzer Pups- show quality
at pet prices, 9 weeks old $900 Mother and father on prem Call Ray 301752-9135
golden retriever puppies—$1800,
Males & female, 8-9 weeks yrs old,
301-325-1296, AKC, champion lines,
genetic clearances for both parents
Min Shcnauzer—$1,200-$1,500, 443684-0664 Puppies come dewormed
current Vaccine tails docked dewclaws removed puppy kit hair cut
Yorkies Maltese—304-904-6289
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12140071
Wake up
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S0833-1 5x5
FOOD ALLOWED."
TO "HOW OLD ARE THESE
FRIES?"
You know us for shopping, and
now Cars.com is the site for the
entire life of your car. So for
every turn, turn to Cars.com.
C3748 10x5.25
FROM "NO
IS YOUR OLD CAR HOLDING UP?
YES
NO
NO
8"/5504&--*5
)&.&"/4
YES
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
NJMMJPOSFBEFSTDBSTIPQQFSTJODMVEFEttXBTIJOHUPOQPTUDPNDMBTTJmFEt0QFO0SQMBDFZPVSBEJO&YQSFTTPVSEBJMZDPNNVUFSSFBEBOESFBDISFBEFST
Source: Scarborough 2012, Release 2. Washington Post newspaper 7-day cumulative reach; Express 5-day reach.
C054E 10x2
KLMNO
Food
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
1
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/FOOD
2
MG VA PG
E
EE
3
4
5
We’re
boiling
it down
for you
How to up your coffee game
at home — without spending
a lot of time or money
PHOTOS BY DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
BY
T IM C ARMAN
For the sake of argument, let’s say you spend $2 every
morning for a small — or to use the company’s Orwellian
Doublespeak, a “tall” — cup of coffee at Starbucks. Without
blinking an eye, you’ve spent $60 a month on your caffeine
fix.
And that doesn’t even take into account the travel costs, the
tips and the potential lack of willpower to resist the caramel
macchiato with extra whip, which will double your cost to $4 a
day. This is real money, the kind that could be invested into
your nonexistent retirement accounts or, more realistically,
rolled into a better coffee ritual at home.
Two things will happen when you brew your own joe at
home: You’ll save a little cash, and you’ll expand your options
beyond the blends and the handful of single-origin coffees
available at most chain shops. Over time, you might even find
that your home brew is better, and more consistent, than
anything found at Starbucks, Peet’s or other national chains.
Now, I can already hear you balking at this idea, dropping
one of two standard arguments:
“But I don’t have the time to make my own coffee!”
“But I can’t afford the equipment needed to brew good
coffee at home!”
Like many rationalizations in life — all, essentially, variations on the dog-ate-my-homework plea from childhood —
these are little lies we tell ourselves to justify our behavior. I
plan to bust down these myths and show you the simplest,
cheapest way to improve your coffee game at home, one
element at a time.
COFFEE CONTINUED ON E4
VIDEO Watch Tim Carman make a better cup of coffee.
washingtonpost.com/food
Five steps to a better brew at home: 1. Buy freshly roasted coffee beans. 2. Use filtered water. 3. Measure the beans to get the coffee-water
ratio close. 4. Use the right kind of grinder. 5. Try a foolproof brewing device, such as the Clever dripper, shown above.
UNEARTHED
INSIDE
Fight the ‘ick’: Can the idea of eating bugs grow legs?
BRING IT!
BY
T AMAR H ASPEL
Special to The Washington Post
Will people eat insects?
They’re not exactly the new kale, but insects are definitely having a moment aboveground.
Insect protein is catching the attention of
environmentally minded consumers because
it treads more lightly on the planet than protein from the animals we’re more accustomed
to eating — cows and pigs and chickens. Tally
up the feed required, water used or
greenhouse gases emitted, and insects look
better than a lot of other protein sources (although there is, naturally, some disagreement about the extent of the advantage). But
no matter how green insects are, there are
some obstacles to getting Americans to eat
them.
The first is simply the ick. Most of us (me
included) have a sense that eating insects is
kind of disgusting. This has nothing to do
with the eating quality of insects; it’s simply a
cultural norm. We eat pigs and chickens. We
don’t eat worms or dogs, but there’s no reason we shouldn’t. Lots of people do. It’s just
that most of them are in Asia, Latin America
and Africa.
According to food historian Rachel Laudan, author of “Cuisine and Empire,” the
Western reluctance to go where billions of
others have gone before has very deep roots.
Of eating insects, she says, “There’s been a
Let’s Talk Turkey.
We have everything you need
for your Thanksgiving feast!
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taboo since about 500 B.C. Judaism and
Christianity have strong disgust conditions
against insects.”
One of the reasons the taboo is hard to get
over is that insects aren’t always delicious. I
haven’t eaten enough to pass judgment —
just the occasional crunchy grasshopper — so
I checked in with Bret Thorn, senior food
editor at Nation’s Restaurant News, whose
eating adventures have taken him deep into
insect territory. Beetles that were crunchy on
the outside were “disagreeably mushy” on the
inside, he wrote in an email, and “the tobacco
worm was kind of acrid,” but other insects
tasted like what they were seasoned with.
The deep-fried tarantula (technically not an
UNEARTHED CONTINUED ON E6
Make a savory pie
that shows off the
best of fall’s flavors
and colors. E8
TOM SIETSEMA
Kith and Kin at District Wharf shows promise and
the value of lessons well learned. E3
FEATURED RECIPES
Mediterranean Barlotto E2
Roasted Red Pepper Stuffed Chicken
Breasts E8
Quinoa Cakes With Spinach
and Sun-Dried Tomatoes E2
Stewed Green Beans With Tomato
and Mint ONLINE
Savory Sesame Butternut Squash
Pie E8
Greek-Style Roast Chicken ONLINE
CHAT AT NOON live.washingtonpost.com
Join Us for
a Taste of
Whole Foods
Market
Stop by your local
store to sample our
Thanksgiving favorites!
November 4 & 5 and
11 & 12 from 12-4 pm
E2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
A quinoa
recipe that
can win
skeptics over
A funny thing
happens every
time I see a new
quinoa recipe. I
think: Maybe this
will be the one!
Joe Yonan
You know, the
one that
WEEKNIGHT
VEGETARIAN
ultimately
persuades me to
make this proteinrich grain (technically a seed)
part of my weeknight rotation.
Sure, I’ve dabbled here and there,
and as a self-confessed quinoa
skeptic, I’ve come to know which
ways work best for me and my
palate. Mostly, that has consisted
of combining the quinoa with a
larger grain, toasting it for a
topping or putting it in soups and
stews.
Previously, one of my favorite
recipes was a quinoa and barley
cake; the presence of that larger
grain made up for the little stickin-your-teeth quality that
sometimes bugs me so much
about quinoa. But when I saw
another recipe for quinoa cakes
in the new America’s Test Kitchen
book, “Cooking at Home With
Bridget and Julia,” I knew I had
to try it, because I was confident
that Bridget Lancaster and Julia
Collin Davison wouldn’t possibly
steer me wrong.
This is one of Davison’s
recipes, and the secret is all the
good stuff she adds to the cooked
quinoa, not only to hold it
together (there’s bread and egg
for that), but also to flavor it: sundried tomatoes, lemon zest and
juice, Parmesan and more.
There’s a good dose of chopped
baby spinach leaves to give it
more color and heft, too.
After forming the mixture into
patties, you refrigerate them for
at least an hour to help them firm
up, making them easier to panfry. They’re still a little delicate to
flip, but it’s nothing a flexible
spatula and a little room in the
4 servings
MAKE AHEAD: The cooked quinoa can be refrigerated for up to 5
days before making the cakes. The assembled cakes need to be
refrigerated for at least 1 hour or up to 1 day in advance (to firm up).
Cooked, they can be refrigerated for up to 1 week; reheat them in a
low-temperature skillet or oven, if desired.
Adapted from “Cooking at Home With Bridget and Julia,” by Bridget
Lancaster, Julia Collin Davison and the editors at America’s Test
Kitchen (America’s Test Kitchen, 2017).
Ingredients
/ cup oil-packed sun-dried
tomatoes, drained and coarsely
chopped, plus 1 tablespoon of
their oil
4 scallions, trimmed and finely
chopped (white and green
parts)
4 cloves garlic, finely chopped
2 cups water
1 cup pre-rinsed quinoa
1 teaspoon sea salt
2 slices hearty white sandwich
bread
1 large egg plus 1 large yolk,
beaten together
1/2 teaspoon finely grated lemon
zest plus 2 teaspoons juice
(from 1 lemon)
2 ounces (2 cups) baby spinach,
chopped
2 ounces Parmigiano-Reggiano
cheese, grated (1 cup)
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1/2 cup regular, low-fat or
nonfat plain Greek-style
yogurt, for serving
12
DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
skillet can’t manage, and the
result is that they get nice and
crisp on the outside.
Davison includes a recipe for a
cucumber-yogurt sauce to go
with them, but I took an easier
route and just dolloped plain
Greek yogurt on top. The next
day, when I went back for
leftovers, I realized just how good
a recipe this is: The cakes are
even better cold, which makes
them that much more versatile. I
think I found the one.
Bonnie S. Benwick tested this
recipe. Questions? Email her:
food@washpost.com. Have a quick
dinner recipe that works for you?
Send it along, too.
Find other quick meals with The
Post’s Recipe Finder:
washingtonpost.com/recipes
Ingredients
/ large red onion
3 cloves garlic
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive
oil
Sea salt
1/2 medium zucchini
1/2 medium yellow squash
1 whole roasted red pepper
(from a jar)
8 sun-dried tomatoes
(vacuum-packed, preferably)
11/2 cups pearl barley (see
headnote)
41/2 cups no-salt-added
vegetable broth
2 cups no-salt-added canned
crushed tomatoes and their
juices
Shavings of ParmigianoReggiano cheese, for serving
(optional)
Steps
Mince the onion (about 3/4 cup)
and garlic; together is okay.
Heat the oil in a large nonstick
skillet or saute pan over medium heat. Once the oil shimmers, stir in the onion and
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Nutrition | Per serving: 350 calories, 10 g
protein, 36 g carbohydrates, 20 g fat, 5 g
saturated fat, 100 mg cholesterol, 690 mg
sodium, 4 g dietary fiber, 3 g sugar
Recipe tested by Joe Yonan; email questions
to food@washpost.com
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garlic. Add a three-fingered
pinch of the salt and cook for 6
to 8 minutes, until softened,
stirring as needed.
Meanwhile, trim the zucchini
and squash halves, then cut
them each into thin rounds.
Coarsely chop the roasted red
pepper. Cut each sun-dried tomato in half lengthwise.
Stir the pearl barley into the
skillet; cook for a minute or
two, then add the zucchini,
squash, roasted red pepper and
sun-dried tomatoes, stirring to
incorporate.
Add about one-quarter of the
broth; cook for a few minutes,
then stir in a half cup. Continue
in the same gradual cook-andadd manner to use a total of 21/2
cups of the broth.
Add the canned tomatoes and
their juices; once the liquid
returns to bubbling at the edges, taste the barley to check for
doneness. If it seems a little
chewy or firm, gradually add
some or all the remaining
broth, cooking until the pearl
barley plumps and thickens the
mixture like a risotto. Taste and
season with more salt, as needed.
Divide among warmed bowls;
top with the cheese, if using,
and serve right away.
Nutrition | Per serving (using 1/4 teaspoon
salt): 540 calories, 14 g protein, 103 g
carbohydrates, 6 g fat, 1 g saturated fat, 0
mg cholesterol, 370 mg sodium, 16 g
dietary fiber, 20 g sugar
How do you make Thanksgiving yours?
CHILD
(301) 965-4000
Located in National Harbor, MD – Conveniently located minutes from Washington, D.C. and across the river from
Old Town Alexandria. *Subject to 10% entertainment tax and transaction fee per ticket. **Per room plus tax, resort fee and
parking. Package pricing, components, show schedules and entertainment subject to change without notice. See website for
restrictions. PEPSI, PEPSI-COLA and the Pepsi Globe are registered trademarks of PepsiCo, Inc. Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer and
all related elements © & ™ under license to Character Arts, LLC. FUJIFILM and INSTAX are trademarks of FUJIFILM Corporation and
its affiliates. © 2017 FUJIFILM North America Corporation. All rights reserved.
DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
To contact us: Email: food@washpost.com Telephone: 202334-7575 Mail: The Washington Post, Food, 1301 K St.
NW, Washington, D.C. 20071
ICE! is an indoor winter wonderland featuring:
joe.yonan@washpost.com
Whether it’s called pearl barley
or pearled barley or 365 Brand’s
“organic Italian barley” that
cooks in 10 minutes, what you
need for this recipe is barley
without its bran and/or endosperm — it will be lighter in
color and faster cooking than
barley that is simply labeled as
“hulled.” And it will thicken, like
risotto rice, in this easy mix;
hence, the name “barlotto.”
The original recipe called for a
whole zucchini and a whole
squash; if you went with that
instead of the halves we are using
here, this dish could serve 4. This
reheats well; add water or more
broth, as needed.
Serve with warm garlic bread.
Adapted from “Eat Your Way to
a Healthy Gut: Tackle Digestive
Complaints by Changing the Way
You Eat, in 50 Recipes,” by Dale
Pinnock (Quadrille, 2017).
bonnie.benwick@washpost.com
November 18, 2017 – January 1, 2018
3 servings
up the red flavor, and the
squash cooks just long enough
in the one-pot mix to become
tender.
You could toss in fresh or
dried herbs, but I like the
simplicity of the dish’s onion
and garlic.
Should you find yourself with
chilled leftovers, dig in with a
spoon before you warm them up
with a slosh of water or more
vegetable broth.
The Washington, D.C. Region’s
Must-See Holiday Attraction Returns!
Steps
Line a rimmed baking sheet
with parchment paper.
Heat the tablespoon of oil from
the sun-dried tomatoes in a
large saucepan over medium
heat. Once the oil shimmers,
add the scallions and cook until
softened, 3 to 5 minutes. Stir in
the garlic and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Stir in
the water, quinoa and salt. Once
the water starts bubbling, cover,
reduce the heat to medium-low
and cook until the quinoa is
tender, 16 to 18 minutes.
Remove from the heat and let
the quinoa sit, covered, until the
liquid is fully absorbed, about
10 minutes. Transfer the quinoa
to a large bowl and let it cool for
at least 15 minutes.
Meanwhile, tear the bread into
large pieces. Pulse them in a
food processor about 10 times,
or until coarsely ground. Add
the beaten egg/yolk and the
lemon zest; pulse about 5 times,
or just until the mixture comes
together. Transfer to the bowl
with the cooled quinoa and stir
it in, along with the sun-dried
tomatoes, lemon juice, spinach
and cheese, until thoroughly
combined.
To divide the mixture into 8
equal portions, use a spatula to
first press it evenly into the
bowl, then “cut” it into 8 wedges, scooping each one out as you
work.) Pack each portion firmly
to form a 1/2-inch-thick cake
that’s about 31/2 inches wide.
Arrange them on the lined baking sheet as you work. Cover
and refrigerate the cakes for at
least 1 hour, and up to 24 hours.
Heat 1 tablespoon of the vegetable oil in a large nonstick skillet
over medium-low heat. Gently
lay in 4 of the cakes and cook
until well-browned on the first
sides, 5 to 7 minutes. Use a
flexible spatula to gently turn
them over; cook until golden
brown on the second sides, 5 to
7 minutes.
Transfer them to a serving platter and tent with aluminum foil
(to keep them warm). Return
the skillet to medium-low heat
and repeat with the remaining 1
tablespoon vegetable oil and
remaining 4 cakes.
Serve with yogurt dolloped on
top, or on the side.
Mediterranean
Barlotto
12
FO O D
NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
Quinoa Cakes With Spinach
and Sun-Dried Tomatoes
In one pot, barley gets
the risotto treatment
A warm and
slithery slurp of
minestrone is all
well and good,
but I’m even
more partial to
Bonnie S. the next-day
Benwick
thickening that
occurs when the
DINNER IN
soup’s pasta or
30 MINUTES
grains have been
refrigerated in
tomato-y broth. The effect is
risotto-like, encouraging recipe
developers to affix “-otto” to the
tail end of such dish names.
This barlotto is my new
favorite of that genre, made
with pearl barley. What the
grain loses in fiber — vs. its
hulled counterpart — it makes
up for by cooking faster while
retaining a characteristic chew.
Here, sun-dried tomatoes amp
. WEDNESDAY,
PRESENTED BY
Thanksgiving is about more
than giving thanks. It’s also about
sharing stories, traditions, and, of
course, food. The dishes that
stand out in the day’s feast often
tell a story about our own heritage, beyond turkey and mashed
potatoes.
Please share with us the
Thanksgiving recipe that has
been in your family or at your
table for years — the one that tells
a story about who you are.
Material can be submitted online at wapo.st/foodheritage,
through Nov. 6.
JENNIFER CHASE FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
MG
E3
EE
At Kith and Kin, ‘Top Chef’ alumnus’s second act opens without drama of the first
Sorry to bring it
up, chef, but
what’s the
difference
between your new
place and your
Tom
Sietsema
FIRST BITE
last?
“Everything,” says 27-year-old
Kwame Onwuachi of Kith and
Kin, the first major dining
destination to debut in the 25acre District Wharf on the
Southwest waterfront. “The
concept, the look, the
accessibility — my whole
approach is different.”
It almost had to be. Even
infrequent restaurant followers
know the story about how the
“Top Chef ” alumnus took forever
to open Shaw Bijou only to see
one of Washington’s highly
anticipated restaurants shutter
after just three months, a victim
of tough love and tabs that
mirrored those of the area’s
priciest culinary attractions.
As at Shaw Bijou, Kith and
Kin still tells the story of the
Bronx-born chef ’s life, but the
narrative is shared via the
printed menu rather than the
lips of overly earnest waiters.
Sprinkled throughout the list,
and present in most dishes, are
markers of where he’s been and
what he’s done. Childhood in
Nigeria with his grandparents.
Later years aboard a ship off the
coast of Louisiana, where he
cooked Creole dishes. A family
tree whose branches embrace
Trinidad and Jamaica. Knowing
this explains the fluffy, lightly
sweet coco bread brought to the
table.
So much sunlight pours into
the window-fronted, 96-seat
dining room ensconced in the
InterContinental hotel that I
leave my sunglasses on for the
first part of a recent early
dinner. The drinks, created by
PHOTOS BY DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
veteran barman Zachary
Hoffman, are delicious (as they
ought to be, considering their
$17 average price). Given the
theme of the restaurant, Gin &
Reggae feels like an appropriate
launch. A glass act, the fetching
cocktail brings together
Plymouth gin, Jamaican rum,
mango tea and garnishes
including star fruit.
The interior, awash in
soothing sand and coffee colors,
is interesting yet understated.
Eyes are drawn to wine displays
and rippled, brushed brass walls,
but only until the food starts
showing up. Crudités arranged
on a platter of crushed ice —
daikon hit with stinging periperi, charred broccoli lit up with
jerk seasonings, lime-kissed
avocado mousse — steers
attention from the setting, as do
a trio of elegant, turmeric-tinted
turnovers, whose flaky wrappers
hide centers of zesty ground
beef. Just as swell: Silvery
fingers of singed mackerel,
staged around orange jollof rice
with petals of vinegary pearl
onion and dots of Nigerian red
sauce coaxed from habanero,
ginger and palm oil.
African and Caribbean
outposts are few around the city;
Onwuachi helps fill the gap with
refined versions of gutsy fare,
presentations no doubt
influenced by his time at
restaurants including the
esteemed Eleven Madison Park
in New York. Allspice-seasoned
oxtail, braised in chicken stock
so the meat falls from the bones,
picks up welcome color via
LEFT: Kith and Kin’s dramatic trompe l’oeil dessert looks like it’s spicy-hot, but it’s not.
ABOVE: At the District Wharf ’s first major dining destination, chef Kwame Onwuachi tends to a table.
tender carrots glossed with
butter and orange juice. The
entree that found me most
excited to be at Kith and Kin was
a bowl of goat and fried potatoes
in a cloak of green curry
seasoned with culantro, thyme
and garlic, and destined to
disappear with the help of the
accompanying warm roti. If the
looks of his dishes are citified,
the flavors are true to the source.
The most dramatic dessert —
a trio of what appears to be
habanero peppers on ice —
resembles an appetizer. But a
bite of the confection reveals
(surprise!) sweet instead of heat.
To create the illusion, Onwuachi
cooks the fire-free pepper known
as habanada down to a paste,
which he turns into a mousse
with the aid of white grapes and
sudachi, a Japanese lime. The
mousse is then glazed with
colored gelatin and presented as
“peppers” over snowy granita
sweetened with elderflower.
It’s early in the restaurant’s
life, but this much is already
true: Kith and Kin represents a
promising development in an
evolving slice of town and a
compelling new chapter for its
chef.
The elephant, you should
know, has left the building.
tom.sietsema@washpost.com
801 Wharf St. SW. 202-878-8600.
kithandkindc.com. Dinner entrees,
$17 to $21.
Chinese scientists genetically engineered a low-fat pig. But for whose benefit?
BY
T IM C ARMAN
pigs, surrogates that ultimately
gave birth to 12 male piglets.
The researchers noted that all
12 pigs were able to better regulate their body temperatures,
while also decreasing their fat
levels “without altering physical
activity or daily energy demands,” said a report published
in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. “This
study highlights the potential for
biotechnology use in pig breeding to improve cold resistance
and lean pork production.”
One of the study’s researchers,
Jianguo Zhao, told NPR that the
animals, slaughtered at six
months, showed no sign of abnormalities from the DNA editing. He pronounced them
healthy and normal. He even
predicted the meat from these
Bama pigs, a small to medium
breed native to southern China,
would taste the same as the flesh
from non- modified pigs, even
though the former have 24 percent less fat than the latter.
Small pig farmers sigh when
they hear the argument that lean
pork tastes just as good as the
fattier stuff. To them, it’s merely
the latest hype from a hog industry that, for decades, has been
obsessed with producing leaner
meat — and then persuading
Americans to buy more pork
with marketing campaigns such
as the Other White Meat ads.
These smaller farmers have embraced old heritage breeds, such
as Berkshires and Gloucestershire Old Spots, which are rich
with fat and flavor. And they’ve
pigs, whose DNA has been altered to include a gene that helps
regulate the animal’s body temperature. The farmers said GE
pigs would mostly serve such
multinational companies as
Smithfield Foods, the world’s
largest hog producer, which
slaughters millions of pigs annually. The Chinese-owned Smithfield produces hogs bred to be
leaner than pasture-raised pigs,
and these lean hogs, specifically
their piglets, require barns with
heat lamps and heated floors to
keep the newborns alive in their
fragile first days.
The heating costs are not insignificant in large hog operations, where 5,000 animals may
be confined under one barn roof.
But just as important is the piglet
mortality rate, which can range
from 10 to 20 percent of newborns, some caused by cold barn
conditions, said Todd See, head
of the department of animal
science at North Carolina State
University. A pig with the ability
to better regulate its body temperature might cut down on the
mortality rates, See said.
Pigs are one of the few mammals without a gene to regulate
body temperature, which is why
pigs will burrow in hay during
the winter months. To alter the
animal’s DNA, researchers from
the Chinese Academy of Sciences
in Beijing used a laboratory tool
known as CRISPR to edit a
mouse gene into pig cells, which
were then used to create more
than 2,500 embryos. The embryos were inserted into 13 female
In days since the paper was
published, media outlets from
New York to London have trumpeted the news that Chinese
scientists have genetically engineered a pig that can better
regulate its body temperature by
burning fat in cold months. The
side benefit? The hog ends up
with leaner meat.
The genetic breakthrough has
been heralded as something of a
win-win for farmers and consumers: The former could lower
the costs of raising their pigs,
and the latter could get their
pork fix without as many calories
from fat. All of this, of course,
assumes that a genetically engineered pig from China could be
approved for human consumption in the United States, no easy
feat considering that it took the
Food and Drug Administration
nearly two decades to give the
green light to GE Atlantic salmon.
The fast-growing salmon still
remains the only genetically engineered animal approved for
human consumption in the United States, though the FDA did
approve a drug produced in goats
genetically engineered to secrete
the compound in their milk,
noted Gregory Jaffe, biotechnology project director for the Center for Science in the Public
Interest.
Regardless of the regulatory
hurdles ahead, small hog farmers
are cynical about who would
benefit most from these Chinese
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ammonium nitrate fertilizer that
salesmen persuaded his ancestors to spread across White Oak
farm following World War II. At
first, Harris said, the fertilizer
produced lush, green grass. But
by the 2000s, the soil at White
Oak was depleted, robbed of the
nutrients needed to produce
crops or grass.
“So many scientific breakthroughs that we’ve seen have
undesirable consequences,” Harris said.
Then again, these concerns
could be moot. North Carolina
State University’s See isn’t sure
U.S. consumers are ready to chow
down on GE pork.
“It’s probably got a bigger FDA
hurdle and a bigger marketing
hurdle than it may be worth” to
introduce the pig to the American market, he said.
tim.carman@washpost.com
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breeds tend to have a lot of
backfat, which naturally protects
them in cold weather. “They’re
walruses,” Eggleston said.
On Wednesday, the Dimlings
helped a sow named Dottie give
birth to, as Gretchen Dimling
said, 14 “non-genetically modified, healthy piglets.” The barn at
Whistle Pig Hollow is not heated,
but a corner of the farrowing
area is accessible only to piglets.
A single heat lamp is trained on
the corner to help keep the pigs
warm. The electricity needed is
negligible, Gretchen Dimling
said. “I don’t think we’ve ever
had one freeze to death,” she said.
Will Harris III, the fourthgeneration owner of White Oak
Pastures in Bluffton, Ga., worried
about the potential effects of a
genetically modified pig, the
kind that may not appear for
years. He equates GE pigs to the
Save the date
Thanksgiving win
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“Making them leaner is going
to make them taste worse,” said
Gretchen Dimling, who co-owns
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John. Lean pork, she said, “already tastes like wet cardboard.”
Bev Eggleston, co-founder of
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“It’s going to be a terrible-tasting
pig,” he said. “I don’t know about
Chinese cultures, but I bet they
like their old-timey pork that
they’ve been eating for thousands of years.”
These small hog farmers say
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Keep the slow cooker
vegetarian with beans
Q: Do you have any good vege-
tarian slow-cooker recipes?
Most of the ones I see online use
meat.
A: Of course! My favorite use for
a slow cooker is to cook beans.
Slow-Cooker Chickpeas With
Sunchokes and Chorizo is a
recipe from several years ago,
back when I was eating meat,
but it’s still something that I
make from time to time, without that chorizo (or with a soy
chorizo). Use other root vegetables if you can’t find sunchokes.
Another favorite that would be
adaptable to a slow cooker is
the Smoky Black Bean and
Sweet Potato Chili — you might
need to cut down on the liquid
by a quarter or so, given that
slow cooking creates no evaporation.
— Joe Yonan
A: Red Lentil Chili can be made
in the slow cooker, and I love
the Orange Black Beans With
Cumin, too.
— Bonnie S. Benwick
Q: I bought a dozen poblanos at
a farmers market last weekend.
I charred six and succeeded in
peeling only half of one. If this
step is really necessary, what’s
the secret?
A: I had to roast a bunch recently and found great peeling success by tossing them into a deep
stainless steel bowl and covering it tightly with plastic wrap.
You need to char them enough
for the thin skin to be encouraged to separate from the flesh,
and then you need to peel them
1. Buy freshly roasted coffee
beans.
Q: I loved the Spirits column on
vermouth and sherry. If one
chooses to drink vermouth on
its own, what is your preferred
way and/or the typical way?
What kind of glass and what
size glass? Chilled? With or
without ice? With a lemon
twist? Other?
A: It is really up to you. I frequently have vermouth over ice
with a twist of lemon or orange
in a rocks glass. In Spain and Italy, it is frequently served in a
big wine goblet with ice, garnished with a few olives as well
— even the sweeter varieties,
which seemed weird to me until
I tried it. It’s delicious if you get
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of them contrasts nicely with
the sweetness of the vermouth
and the savory notes of some of
the herbs/spices in it.
Laura Chenel Chevre
Goat Logs –
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you have a favorite tomato soup
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A: Try Tomato and Rice Soup;
Tomato Egg Drop Soup (you
could use canned tomatoes in
the winter); or Tomato Soup
With Grilled Havarti Cheese
Croutons.
As for chicken noodle without
the chicken, you could take a
cue from the recipe for Creamy
Greek Noodle Soup, but use vegetable broth instead of chicken
and stir in some cooked beans
or lentils instead of the meat.
(Or use other vegetables —
roasted potatoes or sweet potatoes, perhaps.)
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6oz
$1.99
Each
DANIELE
Sliced Italian
Style Meats
3oz
$1.69 - $2.99
BISCOFF
SHARWOOD’S
Curry Sauces
AssortedTypes
8.75oz
2/$5.00
14.1oz
HALLS
AssortedBags
Computer Repair
Money Transfers
CELL Phone Repair
301-328-2469
Cough
Drops
$2.99
2/$3.00
PRICES FOR
DC STORE ONLY
2/$4.00
Belgian
Cookies
placement filters. A filtration
pitcher is the most cost-effective
method to ensure you have the
water quality necessary to produce a great cup of coffee.
Price for a PUR pitcher and
four extra filters: about $43.
RandolphStoreOnly
DC WINE & BEER SPECIALS
All Natural
Cooking Stocks
Chicken, Beef,
Vegetable or Turkey
32oz
DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
The last step: Let the coffee steep for 4 minutes, and that’s it.
AssortedTypes
$3.99
MEDFORD FARMS
ANNA’S
“Chef’s Cut” or
Swedish
Thins
All-In-One
AssortedTypes
Ground Tomatoes
5.25oz
14oz
Coffee is, as experts will tell
you, 98 to 99 percent water. You
know what that means, right?
Water quality is paramount to a
good cup. You could use tap
water. Then again, you could use
ketchup as a pizza sauce.
But in both cases, the tap water
and the ketchup will contain
elements/ingredients that you
don’t want in the final product.
With tap water, it can include
chlorine and minerals that will
affect the taste of your coffee. You
could use bottled water instead of
tap, but that would be expensive,
not to mention ecologically irresponsible.
I recommend buying a water
filtration pitcher — such as the
basic one from PUR, which filters
out many of the chemicals that
degrade municipal tap water
without removing the magnesium that helps with coffee extraction — as well as some re-
Q: Soup season is upon us. Do
Digestive
Biscuits
5. Try this foolproof brewing
device.
2. Use filtered water.
— M. Carrie Allan
MCVITIE’S
GOURMET
CHEESE
SPECIALS
Computer scientists have long
used an expression that applies to
almost everything in life: garbage
in, garbage out. Inferior beans
will lead to inferior coffee. So,
how do you define inferior beans?
One way is to look at their roast
date. Buy only freshly roasted
beans and use them, ideally, within two weeks of the roast date,
three weeks at the latest. Otherwise, oxygen will degrade the
beans, affecting their flavors.
Be suspicious of packaging
with “use by” dates that promise
fresh beans six months down the
road. These bags and canisters
are probably nitrogen-flushed,
which will indeed extend the
shelf life of beans.
But once you open the package, you will probably have to
brew those beans fast. Really fast.
Once open, the beans are thought
to degrade quickly. Another
thing: Never buy pre-ground
beans. Ever.
Price range for freshly roasted
beans: $11 to $18 for 12 ounces.
— B.S.B.
Shop Online! www.rodmans.com
$2.99
ALL WINES 750 ML
UNLESS NOTED
BLOCKBUSTERS
Mondavi Napa Chard..................$12.99
Chalk Hill SB & Chard.................$14.99
Estancia Meritage.......................$19.99
Mirassou PN...................................$6.99
Ferraton CDRR................................$7.99
Newton Claret & Chard ..............$14.99
Defaix Petit Chablis.....................$11.99
La Crema PN...............................$19.99
Chard..............................................$15.99
La Vieille Ferme Red,White,Rosé....$5.99
Colosi Grillo & Rosso......................$8.99
Vaugelas Corbieres.......................$7.99
La Mothe du Barry Rouge.........$8.99
Hugl Zweigelt..................................$7.99
Benziger SB....................................$8.99
Ruffino Aziano...............................$9.99
Modus & Tan................................$19.99
Jadot Beaujolais Villages...............$8.99
Clos Du Bois Asst Types...............$7.99
Bernier Chardonnay......................$6.99
The Prisoner ..............................$37.99
Thorn $29.99 Blindfold..........$19.99
Chat. St. Jean Chard & SB...........$7.99
BV Coastals Asst Types...............$4.99
Sonoma Cutrer .........................$19.99
Franciscan Chard........................$10.99
Magnificat.....................................$39.99
Campo Viejo Reserve..................$8.99
$3.99
AssortedTypes
3. Measure to get the ratio close.
Don’t worry. You don’t need to
buy a Japanese scale with a builtin timer, which can set you back
$40 or more, depending on your
affection for gadgetry. A scale
basically does one thing: It helps
a barista dial in the proper ratio
of beans to water, which can vary
from coffee to coffee. But generally speaking, the ratio is 16:1 when
brewing coffee. That is, 16 parts
water to one part ground coffee
beans.
I’ll spare you my math and just
say that you’ll need 4 tablespoons
of beans to produce one wellextracted cup of coffee. This
shortcut is terribly imperfect, but
for those who don’t want to weigh
their beans, it’ll suffice. In some
cases, you’ll probably have more
beans than necessary and, in
other cases, fewer. But you’ll be in
the ballpark.
As for water, you’ll need 1 1/2
cups — plus a little more to
compensate for the loss in liquid
while heating.
Price for measuring your
beans and water: Zero, assuming
you already have a tablespoon
and a measuring cup.
4. Use the right kind of grinder.
Sure, a $140 Baratza burr
grinder is great, but you don’t
need one. You do need something
$4.99
DISCOUNT FABRICS USA
• DC STORE & PHARMACY
DISCOUNT GOURMET
All Locations
O E D�!
WASHINGTON, DC
DISCOVER OUR
PHONE (202) 363-3466 Lower Level Pharmacy,
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24-HOUR REFILL LINE
and Many More Values!
(202) 363-1041
INDEPENDENCE CARDS
ACCEPTED AT
WISCONSIN AVE &
RANDOLPH ROAD
WE ACCEPT ALL
FLEX SPENDING
& HEALTH
SAVINGS PLANS
The upshot: The start-up
equipment costs for this ritual
will run about $100, plus another
$16 or so per bag of coffee. Not
cheap, right? For the first month,
a single cup per day will run you
about $4.40. But hold on! Over a
full year, your price per cup will
drop significantly, to about $1.50,
assuming you go through a bag of
$16 coffee every two weeks. (And,
naturally, the price per cup will
continue to drop every year after.)
In the first year, you’ll save
about $180 vs. a $2 cup of Starbucks mud. You won’t get rich,
but you may get a richer cup of
coffee out of the process.
tim.carman@washpost.com
“Like” us on
RODMAN’S FOOD &
DRUG STORE
• WHEATON, MD
4301 RANDOLPH RD (AT VEIRS MILL RD)
PHONE 301.946.3100
FREE PARKING
AT ALL LOCATIONS
SALE DATES
11/01/17 THRU 11/14/17
• WHITE FLINT PLAZA
IMAGES SHOWN ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION
Follow Us 5148 NICHOLSON LA. N. KENSINGTON, MD PURPOSES ONLY. ACTUAL PRODUCTS
MAY DIFFER - NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR
@rodmansdc
TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS
PHONE 301.881.6253
40% OFF
ANNUAL SALE!
All In Stock Fabrics, Trim and Leather! November 1-November 30.
Many fabrics will be sold below cost! Excludes Remnants
DISCOUNT FABRICS USA
9:30 - 5:00 6 Days, Closed Sundays
108 N. Carroll Street, Thurmont, MD 21788
301-271-2266 • www.discountfabricsusacorp.com
MARYLAND
WINE & BEER
SPECIALS
$6.99
5100 WISCONSIN AVE., NW
Coffee pots. Moka pots. Siphons. French presses. Pour-over
drippers (not to mention the tiny
variations among the devices
sold as pour-over drippers).
There must be 101 methods for
brewing coffee. Some require
more practice and patience than
others.
Then there’s the Clever dripper, which is a cross between a
French press and a pour-over
dripper. It takes no skill to prepare coffee on this device. The
process is ridiculously easy:
Bring your kettle, filled with
the pre-measured amount of water, to a boil. Pull it off the heat
and let it sit about 30 to 45
seconds; the temperature should
be in the ideal range, between 195
and 205 degrees, depending on
your kettle and how well it retains heats.
Place a No. 4 size paper filter
in the dripper. Add your 4 tablespoons of coarsely ground coffee
into the filter.
Pour your 1 1/2 cups of hot
water over the grounds and lightly stir the mixture.
Cover the dripper with the
plastic lid and let it sit for 4
minutes. Eat your breakfast while
your coffee steeps. After 4 minutes, place the dripper atop your
favorite coffee cup — I’ll assume
it’s a travel mug because you’re in
a hurry, right? — and the Clever
will automatically release the liquid into your cup.
You can have a good coffee in
your hands in about 15 minutes,
depending on how fast your water boils. Just as important: You
can do other things while waiting
for the water to heat and the
coffee to steep.
Price for Clever dripper and
filters: about $28. (I’m assuming
you have a kettle, or at least a
simple pot to boil water.)
CABERNET SALE
Tahuan .........................................$10.99 Dark Horse ....................................$6.99
ALEXIAN
Alexander Valley Vineyard ....$18.99 Menage a Trois Decadence........$8.99
Patés
Avalon .............................................$7.99 Kenwood Jack London................$25.99
Real Greek
26oz $3.99
AssortedTypes
Grayson ..........................................$8.99 Chat. St. Michelle IndianWells...$13.99
Feta Cheese
Crios ..............................................$10.99 Artemis........................................$49.99
MAURIZIO
FERRARA
Josh ...............................................$10.99 Simi................................................$16.99
7 oz $4.99
5oz
Decoy ............................................$14.99 BR Cohn .......................................$16.99
Artisan
Instant
Espresso
Federalist ....................................$10.99 Wild Horse ..................................$13.99
Rondele Pub
FAMILIA
Pasta
Rodney Strong ..........................$13.99 Alamos ............................................$7.99
Cheese Spread ImportedFromItaly
2oz 2/$5.00
Swiss
Muesli
Joseph Carr ................................$17.99 Jordan ..........................................$46.99
AssortedTypes
17.6oz
Sterling “Vintners Collection”.......$8.99 Edna Valley ................................$11.99
Cereal
C
ARIBOU
Franciscan ...................................$19.99 14 Hands ........................................$8.99
Regularor
8 oz $3.99
$3.99
NoSugarAdded
Mt. Veeder..................................$29.99 Columbia Crest H3...................$10.99
Coffee
Kenwood.........................................$9.99 Excelsior .........................................$6.99
AssortedTypes|12oz
32oz
BAUDUCCO
Liberty School ...........................$11.99 Game Reserve.............................$13.99
$5.99
$5.99
Clos Du Bois ..................................$7.99 Ken Forester .................................$8.99
Panettone
Substance....................................$12.99 Warwick 1st Lady..........................$9.99
Not at White Flint
Mondavi Napa.............................$19.99 Angeline Reserve.......................$12.99
P
RODUCE
S
PECIALS
Sale
Dates
11-01
thru
11-14-2017
26oz
Estancia .......................................$10.99 Cousino Macul Antiguas.............$9.99
Jacob’s Creek Double Barrel....$11.99 Catena..........................................$14.99
Blueberries 6 oz... $2.59 Ea Red or Yellow
Peppers...............
$1.39
Lb
Mondavi PS Bourbon Barrel..........$8.99 Root 1 ..............................................$7.99
Cranberries12oz... $1.99 Ea
FINN CRISP
L. Martini Sonoma.....................$12.99 Rubus...............................................$7.99
Gala Apples...........$1.39 Lb Green or Yellow
Crispbreads
Mangos................. $1.00 Ea Squash......................99¢ Lb Ravage ............................................$8.99 La Villette......................................$7.99
AssortedTypes
William Hill North Coast...........$10.99 Goldschmidt...............................$17.99
Bartlett Pears.......$1.29 Lb Grape Tomatoes
1 Pt..................... $1.79 Ea
Baby Peeled
NEW ZEALAND SB SALE
7oz 2/$5.00
Carrots 1 Lb........ $1.29 Ea Yams.......................... 69¢ Ea
Cloudy Bay .................................$19.99 Villa Maria ....................................$8.99
Mohua ..........................................$10.99 Infamous Goose.......................$11.99
Matua ..............................................$8.99 Allan Scott ..................................$10.99
DC BEER SPECIALS
Kim Crawford............................$11.99 Old Coach ....................................$11.99
Avery, Evolution, Great Lakes, Port City
Kirin Ichiban, Sapporo 12 Pk.........................$11.99 Nobilo $8.99 Icon....................$12.99 Kennedy Point ..........................$13.99
Drylands ......................................$11.99 13 Celsius.......................................$9.99
6 Pk…$9.99 Case............................................$34.99, Sierra Nevada & New Belgium,
..................................$8.99 Cupcake ..........................................$7.99
Czechvar 6 Pk… $7.99, Case..........................$27.99 Sam Adams 6 Pk …$9.99 Case..................$34.99 Starborough
..........................................$7.99 Monkey Bay ..................................$5.99
Schlafly*, Eggenberg, Goose Island, Leffe &
Stella, Heineken & Heineken Light 12 Pk...$17.99 Brancott
White Haven ..............................$13.99
Hoegaarden 6 Pk…$8.99 Case..................$29.99 Stella, Corona, Corona Light,
Kronenbourg 1664, Carlsberg,
Heineken & Amstel Loose Case..................$27.99
CHAMPAGNE & SPARKLING SALE
Carlsberg Elephant, Pilsner Urquell, Peroni,
Yuengling Suitcase Can…$17.99 Bottles...$20.99
..........................................$31.99 1+1 Cava......................................$11.99
Redhook 6 Pk…$8.99 Case..........................$29.99 Beck’s 16oz Can Case...........................................$23.99 Lanson
Taittinger ....................................$37.99 Mumm Napa Brut & Rosé...........$14.99
Paulaner, Starr Hill, Bold Rock Ciders,
*Certain 6 Pk/Case do not apply*
Veuve Clicquot ..........................$45.99 Roederer Estate .......................$18.99
Jack’s Ciders, 6 Pk …$9.99 Case..............$34.99
Laurent Perrier.........................$35.99 Bouvet Brut..................................$11.99
21st Amendment, Founders, SweetWater15 Pk Can....$17.99
Bud, Bud Light, Miller Lite, 24 Pack Cans
Piper Heidsieck.........................$35.99 Graham Beck
Bitburger German Pils, Kostritzer
Coors Light, MGD, Rolling
Perrier Jouet .............................$33.99 Brut & Rosé..................................$13.99
$16.99
Schwarzbier, Benedictiner Helles
GH Mumm Cordon Rouge..........$33.99 Campo Viejo Brut.........................$7.99
Rock, & Michelob Ultra
16oz Can Case…$27.99, 4 Pk..........................$6.99
Trouillard ....................................$23.99 Segura Viudas..............................$6.99
7.6 oz
NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
better than a cheap blade grinder,
which butchers your beans and
leaves you with grounds of varying sizes. That, in turn, leaves you
with poorly extracted coffee.
The solution? A hand grinder
such as the miniature device
from Hario. I have one, and it
does a terrific job with a minimal
amount of work. I can handcrank 4 tablespoons of beans in
less than a minute. Make sure to
adjust the grinder to a coarse
setting before you crank out the
grounds.
Price for a Hario Mini Coffee
Mill Slim Grinder: about $28.
COFFEE FROM E1
while they are still somewhat
warm, or the skin may re-stick,
sort of, to the flesh.
DISCOUNT GOURMET
. WEDNESDAY,
Five easy steps that will let you be your own barista
FREE RANGE EXCERPTS
Wednesdays at noon, we field
questions about all things food
for one hour at live.
washingtonpost.com. This
week’s guests included Tamar
Haspel. Here are edited excerpts
from that chat. Recipes whose
names are capitalized can be
found in our Recipe Finder at
washingtonpost.com/recipes.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
BLOCKBUSTERS
WINES ARE 750ML UNLESS NOTED
WINE & CHEESE TASTING EVERY
SATURDAY 1- 4 PM AT ALL STORES
SALES DATES 11-01 THRU 11-14-2017
NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS
BEER SALE
Franzia 5.0L Box Chillable Red, Blush, Sangria.... $12.99 Miller Lite Suitcase..... $19.99
Chablis & Burgundy.......................................... $14.99 Coors Original & Light
Chat. St. Michelle Riesling...................................$6.99
30 Pk ................... $24.99
H. Beaulieu Picpoul De Pinet ...............................$7.99
Budweiser Reg & Light
Lamarca Prosecco ............................................ $12.99
18 Pk Can ............. $14.99
Sutter Home White Zinf & Moscato.......................$5.55
Corona Extra & Light
AMERICAN WINE SALE
12 Pk Bottle .......... $15.49
Woodbridge 1.5L Chard, Cab, Merlot, PN............ $10.99
Beck’s 12 Pk Bottle .... $14.59
Rex Goliath Chard, Cab, Merlot............................$5.99
Ravenswood “Vintners Blend” Asst Types .............$8.99 Guinness Stout
6 Pk Bottle ..............$7.59
14 Hands Chard & Cab........................................$8.99
Case ..................... $28.99
Avalon Cab........................................................$9.99
Kenwood Chard & SB .......... $11.99 Cab & PN .... $13.99 Presidente 12 Pk
Bottle.................... $14.59
ITALIAN WINE SALE
Piccini Chianti....................................................$6.49 Tecate 30 Pk Can........ $23.99
Ruffino Chianti & Orvieto ....................................$7.99 Pabst & National Bohemian
30 Pk ................... $18.99
Kris PG .............................................................$9.59
Davinci Chianti & PG...........................................$9.99 Strong Bow 6 Pk Bottle
Bella Sera 1.5L Asst Types................................. $10.99
Asst Types ...............$7.49
Heineken 18 Pk Bottle... $20.99
NEW ZEALAND & AUSTRALIAN WINE SALE
Nobilo SB..........................................................$8.99
CRAFT BEER 6PK & 12PK SALE
Starborough SB..................................................$9.99 Shock Top 12 Pk
Kim Crawford SB.............................................. $14.99
Bottle.................... $14.49
Jacob’s Creek Chard, Cab, Merlot, Shiraz...............$6.99
19 Crimes Red Blend & Cab .................................$7.99 Yuengling Lager, Black &
Tan 12 Pk Bottle .... $10.99
Lindeman’s 1.5L Asst Types .................................$8.99
Sierra Nevada 6 Pk Bottle
Our Maryland Locations
Asst Types ...............$8.59
• 4301 Randolph Rd, Wheaton MD, 301-946-3100 Kona 6 Pk Bottle
• 5148 Nicholson Ln, Kensington MD, 301-881-6253 Asst Types ...............$8.49
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
MG
E5
EE
Over 8,000 Wines
Alamos Malbec
Argentina. 750ml
$
6.97
Korbel Brut
California. 750ml
$
10.97
FAVORITES FOR
EVERY FESTIVITY
Wine Favorites 750ml
14 Hands-Cabernett ...................................................................7.97
14 Hands-Hot to Trot Red..........................................................7.97
14 Hands-Merlot........................................................................
t
7.97
7-Deadly Zins...........................................................................11.97
Apothic-Dark Red ......................................................................7.97
Blackstone-Merlot Californiaa ................................................... 6.27
Bogle-Cabernett ........................................................................ 9.97
Bogle-Chardonnay....................................................................
y
8.97
Bogle-Merlot.............................................................................
t
8.97
Ch Ste Michelle-Cabernet......................................................
t
10.97
Ch Ste Michelle-Chardonnayy ................................................... 6.97
Ch Ste Michelle-Riesling .......................................................... 6.47
Clos du Bois-Chardonnay.........................................................
y
8.77
Columbia Crest Grand Estate-Cabernet..................................
t
6.97
Columbia Crest Grand Estate-Chardonnayy ............................. 6.97
Coppola Diamond-Claret........................................................
t
12.97
Cupcake-Sauvignon Blanc Marlborough..................................7.27
Dom Perignon .......................................................................149.97
Ecco Domani-Pinot Grigio .........................................................7.97
Freixenet-Cordon Negro Brut....................................................
t
7.97
J Lohr-Chardonnay Riverstone ................................................ 8.77
Joel Gott-Cabernet.................................................................
t
12.97
Kendall Jackson-Chardonnay Grand Reserve....................... 13.97
La Crema-Chardonnay Sonoma Coast..................................
t
14.97
Mark West-Pinot Noirr ................................................................7.97
Mirassou-Pinot Noir.................................................................. 6.97
Moet & Chandon-Imperial Brut..............................................
t
43.97
Rodney Strong-Cabernet Sonoma.........................................
a
13.97
Sonoma-Cutrer Chardonnay Sonomaa ................................... 18.97
Toasted Head-Chardonnayy ...................................................... 8.97
Pay less for the labels they’ll love
1.5L Wines
Barefoot Cellars--Chardonnay.................................................
y
8.97
Beringer--White Zinfandel........................................................ 8.47
Cavit--Pinot Grigio.................................................................... 9.97
Clos du Bois--Chardonnay.....................................................
y
13.97
Woodbridge--Mondavi Cabernett ............................................. 8.97
Woodbridge--Mondavi Chardonnayy ........................................ 8.97
Yellow Tail--Chardonnayy .......................................................... 8.97
Value Wines
Almaden-Cabernet 5L Box.....................................................
x
15.29
Almaden-Chardonnay 5L Boxx ................................................ 15.29
Black Box-Cabernet 3L Boxx ................................................... 15.99
Black Box-Chardonnay 3L Box...............................................
x
15.99
Black Box-Malbec 3L Boxx ...................................................... 15.99
Black Box-Merlot 3L Box........................................................
x
15.99
Black Box-Pinot Grigio 3L Boxx ............................................... 15.99
Carlo Rossi-Paisano 4L..........................................................
L
12.49
Franzia-Cabernet 5L Boxx ....................................................... 14.99
Franzia-Chardonnay 5L Box...................................................
x
14.99
Franzia-Fruity Red Sangria 5L Box.........................................
x
11.99
Franzia-Merlot 5L Box............................................................
x
14.99
Franzia-Sunset Blush 5L Box..................................................
x
11.99
Over 3,000 Spirits
Jameson
1.75L
$
Menage a Trois Red
Apothic Red
19 Crimes Red Blend
California. 750ml
California. 750ml
Australia. 750ml
$7.47
39.99
$7.97
$7.99
Nobilo Sauvignon
Blanc
Kendall Jackson
Vintner’s Reserve
Chardonnay
Santa Margherita Pinot
Grigio
Veuve Clicquot Brut
NV
$9.97
1.75L
$
Italy. 750ml
California. 750ml
$8.97
8 97
Baileys Irish Cream
La Marca Prosecco
$10.97
New Zealand. 750ml
39.99
Vodka
Absolut 1.75L................................................................... 27.99
Ketel One 1.75L ...............................................................35.99
New Amsterdam Vodka 1.75L.......................................... 16.99
Pinnacle-Vodka 1.75L...................................................... 14.99
Skyy 1.75L....................................................................... 19.99
Smirnoff 1.75L................................................................. 18.99
Stolichnaya 1.75L ............................................................25.99
Svedka 1.75L ................................................................... 17.99
Rum
Bacardi-Gold 1.75L.......................................................... 18.99
Bacardi-Superior 1.75L ................................................... 18.99
Captain Morgan-Spiced Rum 1.75L................................. 24.49
Malibu-Coconut Rum 1.75L............................................. 18.99
Bourbon
Bulleit-Bourbon 1.75L......................................................35.99
Bulleit-Bourbon 750ml ....................................................22.99
Evan Williams 1.75L......................................................... 19.99
Jack Daniel’s-Black 750ml.............................................. 19.99
Jim Beam 1.75L............................................................... 24.99
Maker’s Mark 1.75L......................................................... 51.99
Maker’s Mark 750ml ....................................................... 24.99
Woodford Reserve 750ml ................................................29.99
Whiskey/Whisky
Bulleit-Rye Whiskey 1.75L...............................................39.99
Canadian-Club 1.75L ....................................................... 16.99
Crown Royal 1.75L...........................................................42.99
Crown Royal 750ml .........................................................22.99
Fireball Cinnamon Whisky 1.75L ..................................... 27.99
Fireball Cinnamon Whisky 750ml .................................... 15.99
Jameson 750ml............................................................... 19.99
Scotch
Josh Cellars Cabernet
Chivas-Regal 1.75L .........................................................56.99
Dewar’s 1.75L..................................................................30.99
Glenlivet 12 Yr 750ml.......................................................39.99
Johnnie Walker-Black 750ml...........................................29.99
Johnnie Walker-Double Black 750ml...............................34.99
Johnnie Walker-Red 1.75L............................................... 31.99
Macallan-12 Yr Single Malt 750ml...................................58.99
California. 750ml
$10.97
Kim Crawford
Sauvignon Blanc
J Lohr Cabernet Seven
Oaks
New Zealand. 750ml
California. 750ml
$10.97
Meiomi Pinot Noir
$11.97
California. 750ml
$16.97
Italy. 750ml
France. 750ml
$17.97
$46.97
Tequila
Jose Cuervo-Especial Silver 1.75L .................................. 27.99
Jose Cuervo-Gold 1.75L .................................................. 27.99
Patron-Silver 1.75L..........................................................84.99
Patron-Silver 750ml ........................................................ 41.99
Over 3,000 Spirits
Over 2,500 Beers
Gin
Beefeater 1.75L ...............................................................25.99
Bombay Sapphire 1.75L...................................................33.99
Gordon’s-Gin 1.75L.......................................................... 11.99
Cordials, etc.
Baileys-Irish Cream 750ml .............................................. 19.99
Courvoisier-VS 750ml......................................................22.99
Grand Marnier 750ml ......................................................32.99
Remy Martin-VSOP 750ml............................................... 37.99
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Blue Moon Belgian White 12-12oz btls ................................... 14.99
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Corona Extra 12-12oz btls....................................................... 13.99
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THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
Agriculture can fix our
food system, but we’ll
have to reimagine it
Innovations are there,
and it’s not just about
‘buy fresh, buy local’
R ANDY J ACKSON,
M ICHELLE M ILLER,
P AM P ORTER AND
L INDSEY D AY- F ARNSWORTH
BY
A recent article by Tamar Haspel (“A growing divide,” Sept. 27)
argues that the local and organic
food movement can’t fix our food
system. If this movement were
solely focused on “buy fresh, buy
local” at farmers markets and
upscale restaurants, we would
agree. However, bigger changes
are underway for sustainable
agriculture. Farmers and others
in the sustainable food movement pursue a broader vision of
change in agriculture.
Fresh market vegetable production in the United States
takes up about 1.63 million acres
of land. This pales in comparison
to the 218 million acres dedicated to corn, soybeans and wheat.
As Haspel points out, we need to
think beyond locally grown produce to protect the environment
and provide good jobs. Our vision for sustainable agriculture
and the food system includes
crops and livestock, as well as
farmers, processors, distributors
and markets, so more consumers
can access sustainable food yearround. What does this look like?
More grass-fed meat, milk
and cheese: Grass-fed dairy and
meat isn’t just a hipster thing.
Pasture-based livestock production is a key ingredient in a
sustainable food system. Nearly
half the corn we grow feeds
livestock that could graze. Perennial pasture protects water by
holding soil in place year-round,
unlike corn and other annual
crops. Grass-based farming is a
great start-up strategy for farm
businesses, because it requires
lower investments in equipment
and facilities.
More-diverse crop rotation:
By feeding livestock more grass
and less grain, farmers can diversify crop production to include
pasture, small grains such as
wheat and oats, and such cover
crops as clover. Rotating many
different crops in a field builds
soil and naturally disrupts the
pests and diseases that strike
when a farmer grows only one or
two crops.
More-diverse crop rotations
and perennial crops reduce pollution from soil erosion and
fertilizer runoff that mucks up
lakes and rivers, and leads to
“dead zones” in the Gulf of
Mexico and elsewhere. Diverse
crop rotations also help farmers
cope with extreme weather and
erratic markets. Thanks to new
tools and technology, it’s easier
than ever to implement complex
crop rotations on large farms.
Reclaimed forest and wild
lands: U.S. farmers grow far
more grain than we need. Landowners can convert some agricultural land to a more natural
state without affecting our food
supply. Forests, grasslands and
wetlands can reduce runoff into
lakes and streams, provide wildlife habitat and harbor biodiversity. That said, restoring wild
lands must be done in a way that
respects farmers and the public.
Good jobs, from farm to table: Scaling up local food sys-
tems through regional processing, distribution and marketing
can achieve economies of scale
without sacrificing the environmental benefits of diverse farming systems. Regional food systems can provide consumers
with organic and sustainable
food year-round, and create jobs.
Farmer, farm worker and food
RACHEL MUMMEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
worker livelihoods are part of
our food system. Farmers receive, on average, 15.6 cents of
the consumer food dollar. Small
farms that sell directly to customers may earn more by eliminating distributors and marketers. However, larger farms may
provide more stable employment, better working conditions
and higher compensation for
farmers and their employees. As
Haspel observes, a healthy food
system operates at a variety of
scales.
Cities that encourage local and
regional food processing and distribution may also create a food
culture that supports locally
owned groceries and restaurants, improving access to good
Grass-fed dairy cattle roam a section of pasture on a farm in
Kalona, Iowa. Grass-fed dairy and meat isn’t just a hipster thing.
Pasture-based livestock production is a key ingredient in a
sustainable food system.
food and good jobs.
More
engagement
with
policy: Consumer buying power
alone won’t fix our food system.
Public and private policies
influence how our food is grown,
processed, transported and sold.
The Farm Bill sets the agenda for
U.S. agriculture. But health care,
labor, transportation, energy,
immigration, banking and other
policies
influence
farmers’
decisions on what to plant, how
to manage the farm, whom to
hire and whether to take an
off-farm job.
When we engage with food
policy, whether by serving on the
board of a local food co-op or
contributing to the work of
national policy organizations, we
amplify the impact of conscientious food purchasing and pave
the way for a better food system.
Policies that support a diverse
landscape and multiple scales of
agriculture through more sustainable farming systems and
land management, fair pricing
and wages, and strategic eco-
nomic development will ultimately improve the health and
well-being of people, communities and the environment.
Let’s make food policy work
and put research into practice.
The innovations necessary for a
more sustainable food system
exist. The challenge lies in scaling them up and expanding their
reach.
food@washpost.com
Jackson is faculty associate at the
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Center for Integrated Agricultural
Systems (CIAS). Miller is associate
director, Porter is research program
manager and Day-Farnsworth is a
postdoctoral researcher at CIAS.
Eating bugs can help the environment, but it’s going to take some convincing
UNEARTHED FROM E1
insect, but I think for these purposes we can group the eightleggers with the six-leggers)
“tasted like battered and fried
food. I got a little bit of the leg
stuck in my teeth.”
The findings of my wholly unscientific survey of the insect eaters I know are unremarkable:
Some insects are tasty, some
aren’t. But I’ve heard few rave
reviews. No doubt some of the
reason goes back to that first icky
obstacle. If you think something’s gross, it may be hard to
enjoy it. Thorn acknowledges
that, though he’s eaten a lot of insects, he always has to force himself.
Which brings us to what is
probably (it’s hard to know; I
found no data) the most successful segment of edible insects:
cricket flour. There are at least a
few cricket farm start-ups in the
United States, and more than a
few companies using cricket
flour in processed foods. One is
San Francisco-based Chirps
Chips, co-founded by Laura
D’Asaro and Rose Wang, who set
out to normalize insect eating.
The way they did it, D’Asaro
told me, was “to find a place to
introduce insects, and it was important that people like the
taste.” They tried serving mealworm tacos to their friends, and
“a lot of them were pretty
grossed out,” she said. So, to meet
mainstream tastes where they
lived, they went with the
familiar, a product already
beloved: corn chips, but made
with about 10 percent cricket
flour.
Chips had something going for
them besides deliciousness.
They’re a party food; you eat
them with friends, at social occasions. And that dynamic —
people eating together in public
— is part of how D’Asaro thinks
norms change. “You’re not going
to go eat insects alone in your
room,” she said. You’re willing to
try them because your friend
tried them, because it becomes a
social dynamic: Try the cricket
chips!
She points to the Seattle Mariners, who started selling chapulines, or toasted grasshoppers, at
home games (with chile lime salt,
$4 for a serving of about 20) after
team executives tasted the traditional Oaxacan snack at Poquitos, the Seattle restaurant that
runs Safeco Field’s Edgar’s Cantina. Soon, they were all the rage,
selling out at game after game.
Why did toasted grasshoppers
catch fire at the ballpark? Why
does any new eating trend get
SAEED KHAN/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Skye Blackburn, an entomologist and owner of the Edible Bug Shop, holds a cricket at her workplace in Sydney. Her business, the largest
insect supplier in Australia, offers roasted cockroach, honey-flavored ants and other items.
PAUL J. RICHARDS/AGENCE FRANCE PRESSE VIA GETTY IMAGES
DAN KITWOOD/GETTY IMAGES
Kyle Morgan of MOM’s Organic Market in the District, with
mealworm products available on store shelves now.
A customer digs into a a pigeon-and-mealworm burger from a stand
in London. Mealworm may prove to be a tough sell for a while.
traction? Somehow, some food
catches people’s attention. And,
once the cool kids are eating
grasshoppers, well . . . .
The key question, though, is
whether grasshoppers have legs.
Do bugs have the potential to go
mainstream? If you check that
crudest of measurements,
Google trends, cricket flour
sparked some interest back in
2014 but has been on the decline
delicious, something that doesn’t
look like a bug. Lempert thinks
millennials, with their sustainability concerns, will lead the
charge. And, once the cool kids
are eating cricket chips, well . . .
It’s important to note that the
cool kids aren’t doing much of it
yet. Colleen McClellan, director
at market research firm
Datassential, estimates that consumer awareness of edible in-
since. Nevertheless, according to
supermarket expert Phil Lempert, “there’s a huge opportunity,” which he pegs to products
like cricket chips. When the bugs
actually look like bugs, he says,
“that’s a novelty and it makes
great headlines, but I don’t think
that’s what people are looking
for.”
What they’re looking for is
something familiar, something
sects is only about 9 percent. It’s
highest among the under-30
demographic, but it’s still not
close to mainstream.
But there’s reason to think it’ll
catch on, at least a little, so it’s
important to ask what the implications are when it does. If insects will be popular as an ingredient, we need to pay attention to
what they’re an ingredient of.
Cricket chips are, after all, chips.
They have a bit more protein, but
otherwise the nutritional profile
is similar to other chips — those
other chips that we’re supposed
to be limiting our consumption
of. If cricket flour is a minor
ingredient in baked goods and
protein bars and chips, are we
doing either our diet or our environment any real good?
D’Asaro says crickets are a
gateway insect. Right now, Americans just aren’t ready to make a
meal out of mealworms, but once
we get used to the idea that
insects are food, those tacos will
go over better.
I think one more obstacle for
insects is the fast-growing fakemeat sector. There are some very
convincing plant-based meat
substitutes, and lab-based meats,
grown from actual animal cells
but without the actual animal,
are also getting both better and
cheaper — and the enthusiasm
for products like the Impossible
Burger, which bleeds like the real
thing, may point to a future
brighter than that of mealworm
tacos. Although it’s early to say
for sure whether those alternatives will tread more lightly on
the planet than, say, pigs, it’s a
safe bet that their footprint will
get better and better as the technology improves, and they don’t
seem to elicit the kind of disgust
that insects do.
Which brings us full circle to
the ick factor. Once the idea that
something is disgusting takes up
residence in the human brain,
it’s hard to get rid of it. It’s easier
to make sure it doesn’t move in
at all. It’s too late for me, and for
Bret Thorn, and for anyone else
who’s reached adulthood with
that idea intact. Kids, though, are
where change happens. If we can
collectively raise a generation of
children who think bugs are cool
and yummy, it’ll be easier to
move beyond the cricket flour
phase and on to the worms and
caterpillars starring in dishes
where they replace animal protein, which is the whole point.
So if you don’t want to eat
insects, don’t eat insects! But if
we’re going to feed a planet
responsibly, we need all the tools
at our disposal. If you’d like to
see widespread acceptance of a
more sustainable protein source,
you don’t have to order the mealworm tacos, but it might help if
you feed them to your kids.
food@washpost.com
Haspel writes about food and science
and farms oysters on Cape Cod. On
Twitter: @TamarHaspel. She will join
Wednesday’s Free Range chat at
noon: live.washingtonpost.com.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
E7
EE
R EC O M M E N D A T I O N S
Exceptional
Very Good
Excellent
A Tuscan Sangiovese and a Loire
Valley chenin blanc highlight the
Old World this week, with their
savory minerality and understated
sophistication. Three U.S. wines
show exuberance and vitality, as if
they were auditioning for
“America’s Got Talent.” But there’s
a common theme here: These
wines are all impeccably balanced
and delicious, ready to bring your
dinner to a new level.
— D.M.
DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
rich and supple, with spicy fruit
flavors and just enough wood tannin
from two years in barrel. ABV:
14.5 percent.
Pietroso Rosso di Montalcino
2015
UNION DES SYNDICATS DE ST.EMILION-POMEROL-FRONSAC
Several Bordeaux appellations are moving toward more
environmentally friendly viticulture, including St. Emilion, above.
Is the wine you’re sipping
environmentally friendly?
More and more of
us are looking
beyond the wine
in our glass and
demanding to
know how the
Wine
wine is made.
Whether we want
DAVE
MCINTYRE
wines that are
“natural,”
biodynamic,
organic or sustainable,
increasingly we want to know
that winemakers are doing their
best to protect the environment
and not relying on chemicals to
ripen their grapes.
And the wine industry is
listening. The Wine Institute in
California has developed
standards for sustainable
winegrowing, defining
environmentally friendly
practices that leave growers
maximum flexibility to deal
with the vagaries of the weather.
Industry associations in Napa
and Sonoma counties, the areas
most affected by the recent
wildfires, have declared their
goal for 100 percent of their
members to be practicing
sustainable viticulture.
In the Pacific Northwest, a
hotbed of environmentalism,
regional certifications for
wineries in Oregon,
Washington, Idaho and British
Columbia include LIVE, or LowImpact Viticulture Enology, and
Salmon-Safe, which focuses on
maintaining the health of rivers
around vineyards. Organic and
biodynamic practices are also
popular.
This year, the wine growers
of St. Emilion and its satellite
appellations in France’s
Bordeaux region voted to
require environmental
certification for wineries
seeking to put the prestigious
appellation names on their
labels. Starting with the 2019
vintage, all wineries in the
appellations of St. Emilion, St.
Emilion Grand Cru, Lussac St.
Emilion and Puisseguin St.
Emilion will be required to be
certified or in the process of
being certified as sustainable,
organic or biodynamic, a sort
of uber-organic farming
philosophy. Otherwise, they
will be labeled simply as
Bordeaux, a less-prestigious
designation that commands
lower prices.
Wine lovers and winemakers
quibble over the merits of these
respective certifications and
their restrictions on vineyard
and winery practices.
Governmental regulations in
the United States and the
European Union confuse the
subject enough to fuel several
dissertations. At least a
certification on the label shows
the winery makes an effort to
have some third-party
organization evaluate and
approve its environmental
practices.
It may not matter what
certification is on the label, as
long as something is. As
consumers increasingly look for
foods produced without
pesticides and herbicides, they
also want to know their wines
were made with the
environment in mind. And that
concern for the environment
doesn’t stop when the grapes
are harvested: St. Emilion’s
program, for example, includes
responsible water usage and
composting.
“No one can ignore anymore
the impact of their
environmental behavior,” says
Franck Binard, director of the
St. Emilion Wine Council, which
voted in May to require its
members to be environmentally
certified. “And the market is
ready.”
In St. Emilion, a picturesque
UNESCO World Heritage site at
the heart of Bordeaux’s Right
Bank region, about 180,000
people each year visit the wine
council’s store, the Maison du
Vin. Over the past three years,
“interest in organic wines has
increased dramatically,” Binard
said during a recent visit to
Washington.
Important Bordeaux markets,
such as Norway, Finland and
Quebec, where government
agencies approve which wines
can enter the market, have
started favoring wines with
environmental certification.
And Carrefour, France’s leading
supermarket chain, is
considering a similar
requirement, Binard said.
“There is a real demand, not
just for organic vineyard
practices, but also many
questions on what you are doing
to protect the environment,” he
says.
When the St. Emilion Wine
Council polled its members, it
found about 45 percent were
already certified or using
environmentally friendly
vineyard practices. Many of the
rest confessed a lack of
knowledge about sustainability,
so the council added education
to its program. The commission
drafted several proposals, and
the membership voted in May to
require certifications. The new
requirements ban herbicides
and many fungicides in the
vineyard, while requiring
wineries to control water usage
and limit their carbon footprint
through energy conservation
and measures, such as solar
power.
Other wine regions, especially
in the New World, have been
trying to reduce their carbon
footprint for years. The
California Sustainable
Winegrowing Alliance,
sponsored by the Wine Institute,
a trade association, helps
wineries reduce their
greenhouse gas emissions by
limiting use of pesticides and
fertilizers, especially nitrogen.
The alliance’s efforts also focus
on conserving electricity in the
winery and limiting
environmental impacts from
packaging and shipping wines.
St. Emilion’s new rules do
allow flexibility. “There are
many levels, depending on your
commitment,” Binard says. “The
aim is to ensure everyone
begins” on the path to
certification of some sort.
He said the vote to require
certification took some courage,
coming shortly after a
devastating frost decimated
much of Bordeaux’s vineyards
just as the new buds were most
vulnerable. It was the worst
frost for Bordeaux since 1991.
Environmental certification will
not protect against nature’s
wrath, such as frost or hail, of
course, or the wildfires that
recently devastated Northern
California. But this year’s frost
throughout Europe reminded
St. Emilion’s growers how
fragile and unreliable their
changing climate can be, and
the importance of protecting
their environment.
In 2019, St. Emilion will be
celebrating 20 years since
UNESCO’s designation. By
requiring environmental
certification now, its wine
growers will also be taking an
important step toward ensuring
their future.
food@washpost.com
McIntyre blogs at dmwineline.com.
On Twitter: @dmwine.
Distributed by Washburn: Available in
Maryland at Crescent Beer & Wine in Bowie,
State Line Liquors in Elkton, Wells Discount
Liquors in Baltimore.
Tuscany, Italy, $28
Savory and rich, with textbook
Sangiovese flavors of dried
cherries, herbs and cocoa, this
wine asks for roast meats or hearty
autumn stews. Alcohol by volume:
14.5 percent.
GREAT VALUE
Saint Gregory Pinot Blanc 2015
Mendocino County, Calif., $15
Saint Gregory is also made by the
Graziano family. This scintillating
white wine bursts with berry and
currant flavors, backed by just
enough acidity to keep the energy
going while playing a supportive
role to the fruit. ABV: 13.5 percent.
Distributed by Dionysus: Available in the
District at Rodman’s, Whole Foods Market
(Foggy Bottom, P Street, Tenleytown).
Available in Maryland at Balducci’s and
Bradley Food & Beverage in Bethesda, Wine
Source in Baltimore. Available in Virginia at
Balducci’s in McLean, Unwined (Alexandria,
Belleview), Whole Foods Market (Arlington,
Ashburn, Fairlakes, Vienna).
Distributed by Washburn: Available in the
District at Wagshal’s Deli. Available in
Maryland at Angel’s Food Market in
Pasadena, Crescent Beer & Wine in Bowie,
Friendship Wine & Liquor in Abingdon, State
Line Liquors in Elkton.
Graziano Old Vine Carignane
2013
Mendocino County, Calif., $19
This is a lovely Rhone-style red wine
from Northern California. The
vineyard is about 60 years old, but
the Graziano family has been
making wine in Mendocino County’s
Redwood Valley since 1918. This is
Galen Glen Grüner Veltliner
2016
Lehigh Valley, Pa., $20
Galen Glen produces delicious
Austrian-style wines, including
Riesling, grüner veltliner and
zweigelt. The grüner features the
citrus, white flowers and talcum
mineral quality the grape shows on
the banks of the Danube. A
delicious and worthy partner to a
wide variety of foods. ABV:
12.5 percent.
Distributed by Siema: Available in the
District at Cleveland Park Wine and Spirits,
Glen’s Garden Market (Dupont Circle,
Shaw), Good Food Markets, Wagshal’s Deli;
on the list at Eno Wine Bar, Maxwell Park,
Tabard Inn. Available in Maryland at
Cranberry Liquors in Westminster, Pinky &
Pepe’s Grape Escape in Gaithersburg,
Wooden Keg Liquors in Hagerstown.
Available in Virginia at the Bottle Stop in
Occoquan, Unwined (Alexandria, Belleview);
on the list at Columbia Firehouse in
Alexandria.
Famille Duveau Saumur Chenin
Blanc 2016
Loire Valley, France, $18
Chenin blanc is an underrated
grape. It rarely soars to the heights
of chardonnay in Chablis or
Meursault. Chenin is happy with its
own identity. It’s the shy person
with the love handles you might
ignore when you first arrive at a
party. But when you’re bored with
all the others, you discover
someone with depth — perhaps a
sweet personality, or a dry wit.
Someone who deep down is
adventurous, especially with
cuisine. The Famille Duveau
Saumur is ripe but dry, expansive
with orchard fruit flavors and an
underlying acidity that keeps the
flavors alive after you’ve
swallowed. The family also makes a
delicious Saumur-Champigny red
from cabernet franc, available
mostly in restaurants. ABV:
13 percent.
Distributed by Lanterna: Available in the
District at Ace Beverage, Cleveland Park
Wine and Spirits, Cork & Fork, Rodman’s.
Available in Maryland at Bay Ridge Wine &
Spirits in Annapolis, Viniferous in Frederick,
Wells Discount Liquors in Baltimore.
Availability information is based on
distributor records. Wines might not
be in stock at every listed store and
might be sold at additional stores.
Prices are approximate. Check
Winesearcher.com to verify
availability, or ask a favorite wine
store to order through a distributor.
★ ★ ★ ★ PARK FREE ON OUR LOT ★ ★ ★ ★
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E8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 1 , 2017
BRING IT!
Winter squash is coming, but you have nothing to fear with this slab pie
BY
C ATHY B ARROW
When I plan my Thanksgiving
menu, I keep its complementary
fall colors in mind — the russet
and bronze of a roast turkey, the
distinct greens of string beans,
Brussels sprouts and kale, and
the flame oranges and golds of
winter squash.
There is great variety in
squashes, my favorite fall shape
shifter. They pair with curry in
one dish and cinnamon streusel
in another. For the holiday, I have
transformed winter squash into
soups, souffles and stews, but this
year I will use it to fill a savory
slab pie. It can feed a crowd, be
made a day in advance and is
served at room temperature. In
other words, it is a formidable
addition to the side-dish arsenal.
While this vegetarian pie could
be made with kabocha or Cinderella or Hubbard squash, I choose
the humble butternut. Look for
heavy, unblemished specimens,
seeking out those with long necks
and bulbous ends that are on the
small side, because the bulb’s
flesh surrounding the seeds
tends to be watery and/or stringy.
The cylindrical, seedless neck is
denser and easier to peel and
cube. Because this recipe calls for
a quantity of puree, the smaller
and adorably named buttercup
squash is too petite to fuss with
for this pie.
I am aware that some cooks
avoid working with winter
squash because its prep can be
daunting. Rather than succumb
to the pre-cut and often tasteless
shrink-wrapped cubes at the
store, I have a solution: Poke the
squash with a sharp knife in a
dozen spots then microwave it
until it is fork-tender. Let it cool
for a few minutes, and the skin
will be easy to remove. The flesh
emerges ready to mash and tuck
into a pie.
There’s no need to make pie
dough and wrestle with a rolling
pin here. I press in a quick
cookie-crumb crust instead. I like
gingersnaps for this purpose, but
graham crackers work well, too.
The crust can be baked and
refrigerated for a few days before
you fill it.
Because savory is the intention, I was determined to veer
away from any filling that
smacked of pumpkin pie spice.
Instead, I turned to miso to add a
rich, sultry undertone. Maple syrup balances the salty with sweet,
woodsy notes, and the flavor
profile is finished with a whisper
of toasted sesame oil and a generous amount of black pepper. This
will not be mistaken for your
great aunt’s pumpkin creation —
especially with a tangy topping of
plain yogurt.
I’ve scaled this pie to fit in a
9-by-13-inch rimmed baking
sheet, otherwise known as a
quarter-sheet pan. It is shallower
than a brownie pan, which makes
it a breeze to serve from, and its
size makes it handy for transport
and refrigerator storage. There is
Savory Sesame
Butternut Squash Pie
12 to 15 servings
For a big crowd, this pie may be
made in an 18-by-13-inch baking
sheet by doubling the recipe.
MAKE AHEAD: Microwave or
steam the squash up to 3 days in
advance. Bake the gingersnap
crust up to 1 day in advance. Both
should be kept refrigerated.
From Bring It! columnist and
cookbook author Cathy Barrow.
Ingredients
For the crust
10 ounces (about fifty 11/4-inch
cookies) gingersnap cookies,
crushed into crumbs (about 2
cups)
5 tablespoons unsalted butter,
melted
1/ teaspoon kosher salt
4
For the filling
3 large eggs, separated into
whites and yolks
11/2 cups canned or homecooked butternut squash puree
from one 15-ounce can or a
3-pound squash (see NOTE)
1 cup full-fat coconut milk
1/ cup maple syrup
4
2 tablespoons unsalted butter,
melted
2 tablespoons white miso
1 tablespoon peeled, grated
fresh ginger root
2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil
3/ teaspoon freshly ground
4
black pepper
1/ teaspoon kosher salt
2
PHOTOS BY DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
For the topping
1 cup plain full-fat or Greekstyle yogurt
2 tablespoons toasted/roasted
sesame seeds
Steps
For the crust: Preheat the oven
to 350 degrees. Have a 9-by-13inch rimmed baking sheet
(a.k.a. quarter sheet pan) at
hand.
Stir
together the cookie
crumbs, melted butter and salt
in a mixing bowl until the
crumbs are thoroughly coated.
Press them across the bottom of
the baking sheet and slightly up
the sides using a metal cup
measure or the flat bottom of a
glass. Bake for 17 minutes to
no need to line or spray the pan;
the crust is buttery enough to
release intact.
To round out my Thanksgiving
color wheel, I’ll add the crimson
of cranberry sauce and the earthy
browns of rolls, stuffing and gravy. The tricolor hues of this savory slab pie fit right in.
food@washpost.com
Barrow is a Washington cookbook
author. She’ll join Wednesday’s Free
Range chat at noon:
live.washingtonpost.com.
form the crust, which will darken a bit. Let cool.
For the filling: Increase the
oven temperature to 400 degrees.
Place the egg whites in the bowl
of a stand mixer (or use a hand
mixer, or a balloon whisk and
some elbow grease); beat the
egg whites on high speed long
enough to form stiff, tall, somewhat dry peaks.
Whisk together the egg yolks,
butternut squash puree, coconut milk, maple syrup, butter,
miso, ginger, toasted sesame
oil, pepper and salt in a large,
deep bowl, until smooth. Stir in
one-third of the beaten egg
whites to lighten the mixture,
then swiftly and gently fold in
the remaining egg whites; it’s
okay if some white streaks remain.
Use a light touch to spoon the
filling evenly over the crust,
encouraging it into the corners.
It will just fit. Bake (middle
rack) for 40 to 45 minutes, until
the filling has browned in spots
and a knife inserted into the
center of the pie comes out
clean. Let cool for 10 minutes.
For the topping: Use an offset
spatula to gently spread the
yogurt over the pie, from corner
to corner. Sprinkle the sesame
seeds generously across the surface.
Make a
pocket, and
fill it with
flavor
Stuffing a chicken
breast might seem
like a fussy thing
to do —
something
reserved for a
Ellie
weekend project.
Krieger
But it is really an
easy way to
NOURISH
elevate a rushhour dinner. This
recipe is case in point, as a
mixture of roasted red peppers,
green olives, fresh basil and
mozzarella add punchy antipasto
flavors and oozy, melted-cheese
appeal to a simple chicken-andgreens meal.
After cutting a three-inchlong slice into the thick part of
the breast to form a pocket, you
pack it with the four-ingredient
filling, season the chicken and
cook it in a skillet for a few
minutes per side. Then, while
the breast pieces rest on a plate,
you take advantage of the
browned bits left in the skillet
by making a fast pan sauce.
Some garlic is sauteed in olive
oil in the same skillet first, then
a half cup of chicken broth is
added to dissolve that deeply
flavorful fond left from the
chicken. A finishing splash of
easily into the neck of the
squash. Let the squash cool,
then peel away the skin and
scoop out the seeds and strings.
Mash the squash until smooth
using a potato masher or a
sturdy fork. There may be more
than what is needed for this
recipe; the extra may be stored
in the refrigerator for 3 days.
Mix it with ricotta and stuff
pasta shells, stir it into soups, or
Serve warm or at room temperature. Cover and refrigerate any
leftovers, then allow them to
return to room temperature
before serving.
NOTE: To make the butternut
squash puree, pierce the entire
squash with a sharp paring
knife in a dozen places. Place in
a microwave-safe dish and microwave on HIGH for 20 to 25
minutes, until a knife plunges
add to muffins or scones. No
microwave? Roast at 375 degrees on an aluminum-foillined baking sheet until fork
tender, about 1 hour; then peel,
scoop out the seeds and mash.
Nutrition | Per serving (based on 15): 230
calories, 4 g protein, 25 g carbohydrates, 13
g fat, 8 g saturated fat, 55 mg cholesterol,
250 mg sodium, 1 g dietary fiber, 9 g sugar
Recipe tested by Cathy Barrow; email
questions to food@washpost.com
Roasted Red Pepper Stuffed Chicken Breasts
4 servings, Healthy
Choose chicken breast halves that are about the same size, for ease of
cooking.
From nutritionist and cookbook author Ellie Krieger.
Ingredients
4 boneless, skinless chicken
breast halves (13/4 pounds total,
not thin-cut; without
tenderloins)
1/2 cup shredded part-skim
mozzarella cheese
1/4 cup finely chopped roasted
red pepper
2 tablespoons pitted, chopped
green olives
1 tablespoon chopped fresh
basil leaves (may substitute 1
teaspoon dried basil)
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground
black pepper
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 cup no-salt-added chicken
broth
1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
4 cups baby arugula leaves
Steps
Cut a 3-inch long pocket into
the thick side of each chicken
breast (without cutting all the
way through to the other side).
Combine the cheese, roasted
red pepper, olives and basil in a
medium bowl, to form the filling. Stuff some into the pocket
of each chicken breast, using all
of it. Season the outside of the
chicken with 1/8 teaspoon each
salt and pepper.
Heat 1 tablespoon of oil in a large
skillet over medium heat. Once
the oil shimmers, add the stuffed
chicken breasts and cook for 4 to
5 minutes per side, until the
cheese has melted, then transfer
to a plate. The chicken should be
cooked through.
Add the remaining tablespoon
of oil to the same skillet. Once
it’s hot, add the garlic and cook,
stirring, for 30 seconds, then
pour in the broth. Once the
liquid begins to bubble at the
edges, stir to dissolve any
browned bits in the pan. Add
the vinegar and the remaining
1/ teaspoon each salt and pep8
per, stirring to incorporate.
To serve, divide the arugula
among individual plates. Top
each portion with a stuffed
chicken breast, then drizzle
with the pan juices. Serve
warm.
Nutrition | Per serving: 360 calories, 49 g
protein, 2 g carbohydrates, 15 g fat, 4 g
saturated fat, 150 mg cholesterol, 400 mg
sodium, 0 g dietary fiber, 1 g sugar
Recipe tested by Carolyn Stanek Lucy; email
questions to food@washpost.com
DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
red wine vinegar wakes it with a
subtle tang.
The chicken breast, golden
brown with bits of the bountiful
stuffing visible, is served on top
RECIPE FINDER
.
of arugula leaves (baby spinach
would work as well) and the pan
sauce is drizzled over the plate,
wilting the leaves slightly and
making for a luscious, warm
dressing. The result is a quick,
easy and healthful dinner that is
far from basic.
food@washpost.com
SEARCH MORE THAN 7,700 POST-TESTED RECIPES AT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RECIPES
.
Krieger is a registered dietitian, nutritionist and author who hosts public
television’s “Ellie’s Real Good Food.” She blogs and offers a weekly
newsletter at www.elliekrieger.com.
RECIPE QUESTIONS? EMAIL FOOD@WASHPOST.COM
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