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The Washington Post – November 07, 2017

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Democracy Dies in Darkness
Rain 49/43 • Tomorrow: Rain 49/42 B8
U.S. to end
protected
status for
Nicaraguans
M2 V1 V2 V3 V4
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
. $2
Texas shooter was in domestic dispute
SHOULDN’T HAVE BEEN
ABLE TO BUY GUNS
Air Force didn’t submit
his conviction to FBI
2,500 migrants given
14 months to go; decision
on Hondurans deferred
BY E VA R UTH M ORAVEC
AND M ARK B ERMAN
sutherland springs, tex. —
BY
N ICK M IROFF
The Trump administration has
given 2,500 Nicaraguans with provisional residency 14 months to
leave the United States, announcing Monday that it will not renew
the Temporary Protected Status
(TPS) designation that has allowed them to remain in the country for nearly two decades.
But Trump officials deferred a
decision for the much larger group
of 57,000 Hondurans who have
been living in the United States
with the same designation, saying
the Department of Homeland Security needed more time to consider their fate.
The decision was likely to displease immigration hard-liners
who have urged the administration to end the TPS program on
the grounds that it was never intended to bestow long-term residency to those who may have entered the country illegally. The two
groups were shielded from deportation after Hurricane Mitch hit
Central America in 1998, and their
TPS protections have been routinely renewed ever since.
Monday’s announcement was
anxiously awaited by about
200,000 Salvadorans and 50,000
RESIDENCY CONTINUED ON A12
WHITE HOUSE DEBRIEF
Trump likes to
remind sidekick
Abe who’s
the alpha male
BY
CAROLYN VAN HOUTEN/THE WASHINGTON POST
“Most of our church family is gone,” said Sherri Pomeroy. Her daughter died in the shooting at First Baptist in Sutherland Springs, Tex.
United in faith, families now joined by tragedy
BY
S AMANTHA S CHMIDT
Three generations of the Holcombe family had gathered at
First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Tex., on Sunday
morning to worship.
Bryan Holcombe, an associate
pastor at the church, was walking
up to the pulpit, preparing to
address the congregation, when
DEBRIEF CONTINUED ON A13
Modest changes to tax bill
The Ways and Means Committee
approves tweaks related to some
income, school endowments. A3
VICTIMS CONTINUED ON A7
New gun laws unlikely
Congress has yet to address
“bump stocks” in the aftermath
of the Las Vegas massacre. A6
Firearms routinely carried
In this small Texas town, the
shooting seemed unlikely to
change attitudes about guns. A7
In a deep-red state where Trump is popular, they’re copying parts of his playbook
IN TOKYO
resident Trump was
reciting the sort of rote
praise that leaders of
allied nations heap on one
another when he suddenly cut
himself off during a joint news
conference Monday with
Japanese Prime Minister
Shinzo Abe.
“The Japanese people are
thriving, your cities are vibrant,
and you’ve built one of the
world’s most powerful
economies,” Trump said, before
looking up from his prepared
remarks. Turning his head to
face Abe next to him, Trump adlibbed: “I don’t know if it’s as
good as ours. I think not, okay?”
He emphasized the “okay” by
drawing it out leadingly as a
parent might with a child.
“And we’re going to try to
keep it that way,” Trump added,
for good measure. “But you’ll be
second.”
Abe, listening to an
interpreter through an
earpiece, smiled and remained
silent. But his face betrayed a
Another son of Bryan and Karla, John Holcombe, survived, but
his wife, Crystal Holcombe, who
was pregnant, did not.
Crystal had five children.
Three of them — Emily, Megan
and Greg — died.
That’s eight members of the
extended Holcombe family dead,
in addition to the baby Crystal
Okla. Democrats do something unusual: Win
D AVID N AKAMURA
P
Devin Kelley began to spray bullets at the worshipers.
Holcombe was killed in the
gunfire, his parents said. His wife
of about four decades, Karla Holcombe, was killed, too, along with
the couple’s 36-year-old son,
Marc Daniel Holcombe.
Marc Daniel had a 1-year-old
daughter, Noah Holcombe. She is
dead, too.
A violent past
Devin Patrick Kelley had hurt
people and animals years before
the mass shooting. A8
BY
R OBERT S AMUELS
The massacre of more than two
dozen churchgoers — the youngest of whom was just 18 months
old — occurred amid an ongoing
“domestic situation” involving
the gunman and his relatives,
some of whom had attended the
church, law enforcement officials
said Monday.
Also on Monday, the Air Force
launched an
internal review
into why it
failed to provide key information to the
FBI
that
should
have
prevented the
attacker from Devin Patrick
purchasing
Kelley
firearms after
he was discharged from the service. While in the Air Force, the
gunman — Devin Patrick Kelley,
26 — was convicted by a general
court-martial on two charges of
domestic assault, but the conviction wasn’t entered into a national database, meaning he was able
to pass background checks to purchase weapons and obtain jobs
without raising red flags.
While authorities have not
publicly identified a motive for
the attack, they emphasized that
the shooting did not appear to be
fueled by racial or religious issues, as has been the case with
other rampages at U.S. houses of
worship. Instead, they pointed to
the gunman’s issues with his relaSHOOTING CONTINUED ON A6
For Hollywood’s
image defenders,
harassment furor
shreds the script
norman, okla. — The newest
state legislator in Oklahoma
leaned over his bathroom sink,
teasing his tousled hair to get that
John F. Kennedy bouffant. The
blue suit came from J.C. Penney
and fit snugly; the tie was tied
tight.
“My hair keeps standing up because I’m already sweating so
much,” said Jacob Rosecrants, a
39-year-old single father. “When
you go campaigning, no one expects you to look like this. But
when you win, everyone expects
you to look like this.”
A month before, he was a middle school geography teacher driving a Chrysler PT Cruiser with no
air conditioning, knocking on
doors at the end of a hot Oklahoma
summer. Now, he is the poster boy
for a national party desperate to
rebuild its bench.
Rosecrants is a Democrat who
won in a district that is 60 percent
Republican. He is one of three
Democrats who have won GOP legislative districts in Oklahoma special elections in the months since
President Trump won 65 percent of
the vote in one of the country’s
most conservative states.
DEMOCRATS CONTINUED ON A4
BY
NICK OXFORD FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Oklahoma state Rep. Jacob Rosecrants, a Democrat, won a special election in September, in a
district that is 60 percent Republican, by presenting himself as a political outsider.
Donors flood local elections
Candidates, parties and outside
groups test clout and messaging
across the country. A9
IN THE NEWS
THE NATION
HASSAN AMMAR/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Missile fallout Questions about the aims of
Saudi Arabia’s crown prince are raised after
his nation accused Iran of possible “war.” A11
Targeting wildlife protections With a GOP
Congress and president, a lawmaker is poised
to undo the Endangered Species Act. A17
The man accused of
assaulting Sen. Rand
Paul (R-Ky.) in Bowling
Green might face more
serious charges. A2
Carter Page, an adviser
to the Trump campaign,
sent an email to aides
describing “a private
conversation” with a
senior Russian official,
according to records released by congressional
investigators. A3
The Supreme Court
reversed a lower court’s
ruling that said a man’s
lack of memory made
him ineligible for the
death penalty. A4
Administrator Scott
Pruitt named 66 agency
science advisers, including some critics of the
EPA. A17
THE WORLD
As Russia marks the
100th anniversary of the
Bolshevik Revolution,
the Kremlin’s selective
approach to the country’s turbulent history is
evident. A10
A Saudi crown
prince’s apparent consolidation of power risks
exacerbating a catastrophic humanitarian
crisis in Yemen. A11
THE ECONOMY
Disney’s talks with
Doug Jones’s high-wire act
The Democrat facing Roy Moore
in Alabama’s Senate race tries
to lure leery Republicans. A5
21st Century Fox over a
potential sale of Fox assets hint at the size of
the companies’ ambitions and Disney’s plans
for diversification. A14
Despite its progressive facade, Hollywood
has failed to diversify
the ranks of writers
working for network
television shows, a report finds. A14
Chipmaker Broadcom
made a $105 billion bid
to buy Qualcomm in
what would be the largest tech takeover. A15
THE REGION
Officials at three D.C.
colleges are warning
about the spread of
mumps after several
cases were confirmed in
Va. makes a statement
Virginia is electing a governor,
but interest in the race goes far
beyond the commonwealth. B4
recent days. B1
Most Democrats running for Maryland governor say they won’t
seek public matching
funds. B1
Nannies, housekeepers and home healthcare aides met in the
District to discuss strategies for improving
their work lives. B1
Catholic University is
one of several colleges
offering classes in spycraft, with nearly 25 students pursuing a certificate in intelligence studies. B1
A D.C. Council member is pushing a plan to
allow individuals to donate many prescription
drugs for use by needy
patients. B5
S TEVEN Z EITCHIK
When the Harvey Weinstein
scandal reached a fever pitch last
month, Ben Affleck’s handlers
found themselves with a problem.
It wasn’t just that Weinstein had
helped launch Ben Affleck’s career
in the 1990s with “Good Will
Hunting” and “Shakespeare in
Love,” or that the movie star had
his own history of troubled relationships with women, including
an on-camera groping of an MTV
host.
The scandal was also coming
just as Affleck prepared to hit the
circuit for his role as Batman in
one of the biggest movies of the
year — November’s “Justice
League” — which aims to make
$1 billion globally.
So Affleck and his team at the
high-powered public relations
agency Sunshine Sachs came up
with a damage-control strategy,
according to a person familiar
with the matter, speaking on the
condition of anonymity to describe the plan. They posted a
message on Facebook saying Affleck was “saddened,” “angry” and
SCANDAL CONTINUED ON A15
Inside
HEALTH & SCIENCE
In a word: Judged
A woman has been
mocked and insulted
because she stutters. E1
ST YLE
Raising the steaks
As Trump expands his
D.C. dining, our critic
suggests a few spots. C1
BUSINESS NEWS ........................ A14
COMICS........................................C6
OPINION PAGES..........................A18
LOTTERIES ................................... B3
OBITUARIES ................................. B6
TELEVISION..................................C4
WORLD NEWS ............................ A10
CONTENT © 2017
The Washington Post / Year 140, No. 337
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B3
5 7 6 2
A2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
Ohio Republican’s new colleagues should be thankful
Corporations are
people, my friend.
And this is where
they feed.
Room 1100 of the
Longworth
Dana
Building, with its
Milbank
ionic columns, giltWASHINGTON fringed curtains
and eagle-topped
SKETCH
frieze, has for 80
years been the
home of the tax-writing House
Ways and Means Committee. But
perhaps never before have
corporations wielded their power
as openly as they have here this
week.
As the panel moves to approve
the Republican tax plan, this is
the room where it happens —
where the rich will get richer,
where everybody else will be
forced to shoulder a greater share
of the tax burden, and where a
trillion dollars of tax breaks for
corporations are being passed by
lawmakers who work for these
very corporations.
In one case, literally.
On Monday afternoon, as the
committee began its markup of
the tax bill, there on the top level
of the dais, three seats from the
chairman, munching from a bag
of potato chips, was Rep. Patrick
J. Tiberi (R-Ohio). Tiberi
announced last month that he’s
quitting Congress to lead the
Ohio Business Roundtable, a
group of “the CEOs of the state’s
largest and most influential
business enterprises.” Tiberi filed
a notification with the House
Ethics Committee that he was
negotiating terms of employment
with the group.
This isn’t illegal or against
House rules. But a lawmaker
drafting and passing legislation
that benefits the people with
whom he is negotiating the terms
of his employment? That stinks.
It’s almost as bad as if, say, we
had a commerce secretary who
didn’t divulge that he had
business ties to Vladimir Putin’s
family. Or we had a president
who, along with his family, used
the federal government to further
his personal business interests.
So it goes in this new gilded age.
The $1.5 trillion tax cut has
$1 trillion in corporate tax breaks.
The idea was that the corporate tax
rate could be lowered if you
eliminated corporate tax loopholes.
Now corporations will have the
H A P P ENI NG TO D A Y
For the latest updates all day, visit washingtonpost.com.
All day
President Trump participates in a bilateral meeting with
South Korean President Moon Jae-in in Seoul, visits with
U.S. and South Korean military personnel, and addresses
South Korea’s National Assembly. Visit washingtonpost.
com/politics for developments.
All day
Virginia holds its gubernatorial election, between Lt. Gov.
Ralph Northam (D) and former Republican National
Committee chairman Ed Gillespie. For developments, visit
washingtonpost.com/politics.
All day
New Jersey holds its gubernatorial election, between Lt.
Gov. Kim Guadagno (R) and Phil Murphy, the Democratic
nominee and former U.S. ambassador to Germany. Visit
washingtonpost.com/politics for developments.
7 p.m.
The Washington Wizards host the Dallas Mavericks at
Capital One Arena. Follow the game at postsports.com.
KLMNO
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CO R R ECTI O N S
A graphic with a Nov. 5
Business article about
President Trump’s decision
not to reappoint Janet L.
Yellen as Federal Reserve
chair misidentified the Wall
Street investment bank where
Jerome Powell, Trump’s
nominee to succeed Yellen,
worked before he joined the
Treasury Department and
rose to become
undersecretary for domestic
finance. Powell was with
Dillon, Read & Co., not
Salomon Brothers.
In some Nov. 3 editions, a
Style review of the National
Symphony Orchestra’s
“Songfest” misidentified the
singer who performed
Langston Hughes’s “I, Too,
Sing America.” It was
Christopher Kenney, not
Frederick Ballentine.
A photo caption with a Nov. 1
KidsPost article about the
Children’s Africana Book
Awards misidentified one of
the award winners, author
Emily Williamson, as
Elizabeth Williamson.
The Washington Post is committed to
correcting errors that appear in the
newspaper. Those interested in
contacting the paper for that purpose
can:
Email: corrections@washpost.com.
Call: 202-334-6000, and ask to be
connected to the desk involved —
National, Foreign, Metro, Style, Sports,
Business or any of the weekly sections.
Comments can be directed to The
Post’s reader advocate, who can be
reached at 202-334-7582 or
readers@washpost.com.
lower rates and the loopholes.
Individuals lose the ability to
deduct state and local taxes, tax
preparation, moving expenses
and most medical expenses. But
corporations — think of them as
Very Important Persons with
superhuman privileges — can still
deduct these same expenses.
At Monday’s markup, Rep.
Suzan DelBene (D-Wash.) quizzed
a tax expert on this corporate
exceptionalism:
“Will a teacher in my district
who buys pens, pencils and paper
for his students be able to deduct
these costs from his tax returns
under this plan?” He will not.
“Will a corporation that buys
pens, pencils and papers for its
workers be able to deduct those
costs from its tax returns?” It will.
“Will a firefighter in my district
be able to deduct the state and
local sales taxes that she pays
from her tax return?” She will not.
“Will a corporation be able to
deduct sales taxes on business
purchases?” It will.
“If a worker in my district had
to move because his employer
was forcing him to relocate . . .
can he deduct his moving
expenses under this plan?” He
cannot.
“Can a corporation under this
plan deduct outsourcing expenses
incurred in relocating a U.S.
business outside the United States?”
It can.
As the corporate welfare is
doled out, the same bill widens
the gap between the rich and
everybody else. The liberal
Institute on Taxation and
Economic Policy concluded that
the middle fifth of Americans
would get a modest tax cut of
$460 (1.4 percent of their income)
in 2018, while the richest 1
percent would have a cut of
$64,720 (2.5 percent of their
income). Even the conservativeleaning Tax Foundation, using a
more favorable methodology,
acknowledges the plan would
cost the federal government
$989 billion over a decade.
Outnumbered Democrats can’t
do anything but yammer. Rep.
Mike Thompson (D-Calif.)
denounced the “wrongheaded,
cruel, heartless” bill, which
eliminates tax deductions that
would have gone to those who
lost their homes in fires. Rep. Ron
Kind (D-Wis.) has plans to
introduce an amendment adding
J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rep. Patrick J. Tiberi (R-Ohio) on Capitol Hill last month. He’ll be
leaving Congress soon to lead the Ohio Business Roundtable.
“fiscally conservative
Republicans” to the endangeredspecies list.
Corporations have had their
way with Washington before. In
2003, Rep. Billy Tauzin (R-La.)
caused an uproar when he quit
Congress to become the top drugindustry lobbyist right after he
helped to write and pass the
Medicare prescription-drug
expansion. He earned harsh
denunciations as a symbol of
Washington’s revolving door.
What’s different now is the
reaction. Tiberi continues to help
shepherd the corporate tax bill
even after naming his corporate
employer — and he is applauded.
Five hours into Monday’s hearing,
Democrats and Republicans alike
on the panel gave Tiberi a standing
ovation when he noted his
upcoming retirement and thanked
colleagues for their friendship. The
panel’s top Democrat, Rep. Richard
E. Neal (D-Mass.), congratulated
him on “your next endeavor.”
Good for Tiberi that he has
admiring colleagues. If only those
financing his next endeavor
didn’t benefit so handsomely
from his current one.
Twitter: @Milbank
Man could face felony charge in attack on Paul
BY W ESLEY L OWERY
AND E D O ’ K EEFE
The man accused of attacking
Sen. Rand Paul on Friday may
soon face more serious criminal
charges because the Kentucky Republican is suffering from several
rib injuries, law enforcement officials said Monday.
An attorney for the man
charged in the attack, Rene Boucher, also said Monday that the dispute had “absolutely nothing to do
with either’s politics or political
agendas” and was merely “a very
regrettable dispute between two
neighbors over a matter that most
people would regard as trivial.”
But new information about the
extent of Paul’s injuries could
prompt prosecutors to charge
Boucher with a felony, according to
Trooper Jeremy Hodges, a spokesman for the Kentucky State Police.
Paul, a second-term senator
and former GOP presidential candidate, was attacked by Boucher,
59, on Friday outside his home in
Bowling Green, Ky., police said.
Boucher was charged with fourthdegree assault and released on
Saturday on $7,500 bond.
The misdemeanor charge against
Boucher applies to cases in which no
weapon is involved and the victim
receives minor injuries, Hodges said.
At the time of the assault, Paul
had “trouble breathing due to a
potential rib injury,” according to
a criminal complaint filed in Warren County District Court. On Sunday, Paul’s office announced he
was recovering from five rib fractures, including three displaced
fractures, meaning the bones are
partly or completely cracked. He
has lung contusions, or bruises,
caused by the broken ribs, and his
recovery could last several
months, his office said.
Given those injuries, Hodges said
police and prosecutors will consider upgrading the charges.
“It requires serious physical injury in order for someone to be charged
with a felony,” Hodges said. “Our arresting officer will submit his completed case report and then the prosecutors will make a decision about
whether to upgrade those charges.”
The state police investigation
remains open and active and the
formal police report on the incident has not yet been filed with
county officials, Hodges said.
County and state prosecutors
didn’t immediately return requests for comment.
The FBI is assisting state and
local authorities to see whether
there were any violations of federal law, but an FBI spokesman declined to comment Monday on a
possible motive.
Boucher’s attorney, Matthew J.
Baker, said Monday that the two
men have been neighbors for 17
years and are both “prominent
members” of the Bowling Green
medical community and had
worked together in the past. Paul
is an ophthalmologist, and Boucher is a retired anesthesiologist.
What might cause Boucher to attack Paul and break five of his ribs
remained unclear on Monday. Baker
didn’t immediately clarify his statement, and a number listed for Boucher went unanswered on Monday.
“We sincerely hope that Senator
Paul is doing well and that these
two gentlemen can get back to
being neighbors as quickly as possible,” Baker added.
Paul did not return to Washington on Monday as he normally
would for U.S. Senate proceedings, according to his chief of staff,
Doug Stafford.
“It is a pending, serious criminal matter involving state and federal authorities. We won’t have
any further comments at this
time,” Stafford said in an email.
After the incident on Friday, Paul
told police that Boucher had come
onto his property and tackled the
senator from behind, “forcing him to
the ground and causing him pain,”
according to the criminal complaint.
Boucher admitted to “going
onto Paul’s property and tackling
him,” the report said.
In addition to his broken ribs,
Paul suffered small cuts to the
nose and mouth area.
Boucher was released on Saturday on bond and ordered to not
have any contact with Paul, his
family or offices or to obtain any
firearms or weapons of any kind,
according to bond paperwork provided by the county.
Even as local authorities tried
to piece together charges and a
potential motive, there was an effort among some in national conservative media circles to find a
political motive for the attack.
The Daily Caller noted that
Boucher had been a registered
Democrat and shared a post from
his Facebook page “citing leftwing academic Noam Chomsky’s
criticism of the Republican party.”
The Blaze, Glenn Beck’s online
news site, told readers on Sunday
that FBI investigators believed “the
attack, which occurred Friday afternoon, was politically motivated.”
That claim, widely circulated on
Monday, came from a report on
Kentucky’s WNKY-TV, which did
not quote or name a source. As
Paul’s office kept mostly quiet about
the case, speculation ran rampant.
“It appears that Boucher’s assault of the Republican senator is
another instance of political violence prompted by the climate of
hate that has been fostered by the
Democratic Party,” wrote John Hinderaker on the conservative blog
Powerline. “Where will it end?”
wesley.lowery@washpost.com
ed.okeefe@washpost.com
David Weigel and Devlin Barrett
contributed to this report.
DIGEST
WASHINGTON
FLORIDA
Home confinement
for Manafort, Gates
FSU suspends its
fraternities, sororities
Former Trump campaign
chair Paul Manafort and
business associate Rick Gates
will remain under home
confinement and electronic GPS
monitoring until they work out a
deal to disclose assets and secure
a bond package for their release,
a federal judge said at a hearing
Monday.
U.S. District Judge Amy
Berman Jackson of Washington
added that in any deal, she was
inclined to end home
confinement but not to permit
the men to travel internationally
and would await further details
reached in talks between the
parties before issuing a ruling.
“If financial arrangements are
made that are satisfactory to the
government, I am inclined to
impose a less restrictive regime,”
Jackson said, but added that
“we’re going to have to wait for
consideration of further
information.”
Jackson said she was also
considering ordering the men to
stay away from transportation
facilities, meet a curfew and
continue under electronic GPS
monitoring. Jackson set a Dec. 11
hearing to schedule the trial,
which could come as early as April.
Legal teams for Manafort and
special counsel Robert S. Mueller
III sparred in weekend court
pleadings over the full extent
and disclosure of Manafort’s
assets.
Manafort, 68, and Gates, 45,
pleaded not guilty Oct. 31 in the
first criminal allegations in
Mueller’s investigation of
Russian influence in U.S.
political affairs. The pair are
charged with money laundering,
making false statements in
federal lobbying registration
statements and other offenses in
connection with their work
advising a Russia-friendly
Florida State University has
indefinitely suspended its
fraternities and sororities after
the alcohol-related death of a
freshman pledge and cocaine
charges against a member of
another fraternity.
University President John
Thrasher didn’t say Monday how
long the suspensions will last. He
has also banned alcohol at events
of recognized student
organizations.
Andrew Coffey, a pledge at Pi
Kappa Phi, died Friday after he
was found unresponsive
following a party. The university
suspended the fraternity after
Coffey’s death.
On Monday, Phi Delta Theta
member Garrett John Marcy, 20,
was charged with the sale and
trafficking of cocaine.
DREW ANGERER/GETTY IMAGES
Argentine President Mauricio Macri and first lady Juliana Awada lay
flowers Monday in New York City as they attend a tribute for the
victims of last week’s truck attack. Eight people were killed last
Tuesday when a man drove a truck onto a bike path in Lower
Manhattan. Five of the victims were friends from Argentina.
political party in Ukraine.
— Spencer S. Hsu
NEW JERSEY
Robert Menendez trial
now in jury’s hands
A federal jury in Newark
began deliberating Monday on
whether Sen. Robert Menendez
(D-N.J.) misused his office to
help a donor and friend’s
business and personal interests.
In his closing argument
Monday, Menendez attorney
Abbe Lowell said the New Jersey
Democrat’s “deep and abiding
friendship” with co-defendant
Salomon Melgen “destroys every
single one of the charges” against
them.
Over the course of nine weeks,
jurors have heard evidence about
private jet flights, a luxury hotel
stay and other gifts prosecutors
say add up to a corrupt bargain
between the two men. Defense
lawyers have argued the
relationship between the two
men was based on a close
personal friendship, not
influence-peddling.
“Not one document, not one
email hints at a corrupt
agreement,” Lowell told the jury
during his three-hour
presentation. “You should expect
and demand more from the
government when they have the
burden to prove a case beyond a
reasonable doubt.”
Prosecutor Peter Koski argued
in his rebuttal that defense
lawyers have used “sleight of
hand” to get the jury to shift
focus away from “a greedy doctor
and a corrupt politician.”
Menendez allegedly accepted
a Paris hotel stay, political
donations and trips on Melgen’s
private plane in exchange for
helping Melgen get U.S. visas for
his girlfriends, intervening in the
doctor’s $8.9 million dispute
with Medicare, and trying to
preserve Melgen’s port interests
in the Dominican Republic.
Indianapolis’ police chief has
suspended two officers over the
fatal shooting of an unarmed
black motorist and has
recommended they be fired.
Chief Bryan Roach took the
actions Monday against Michal
Dinnsen and Carlton Howard in
connection with the June 29
death of Aaron Bailey. Roach
recommended their dismissals to
the Civilian Police Merit Board.
A special prosecutor
announced last week that the
officers would not face criminal
charges. Authorities have said
Bailey, 45, pulled over for a
traffic stop but suddenly drove
off and later crashed. The officers
approached Bailey’s vehicle and
fired. An autopsy found that four
bullets hit Bailey in the back.
— Alan Maimon
— Associated Press
— Associated Press
INDIANA
Chief wants officers
in June shooting fired
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
SU
Politics & the Nation
Adviser’s email at odds with past comments on Russia
R OSALIND S . H ELDERMAN,
M ATT Z APOTOSKY
AND K AROUN D EMIRJIAN
BY
Carter Page, a foreign policy
adviser to President Trump’s campaign whose visit to Moscow during the election has drawn scrutiny, sent an email to fellow Trump
aides during his trip describing “a
private conversation” with a senior Russian official who spoke favorably of the Republican candidate, according to records released late Monday by congressional investigators.
Page also wrote that he had been
provided “incredible insights and
outreach” by Russian lawmakers
and “senior members” of Russian
President Vladimir Putin’s administration during the trip.
The email appeared to contradict earlier statements by Page,
who had said he had only exchanged brief greetings with the
senior Russian official, Deputy
Prime Minister Arkady Dvorkovich, after he delivered a speech
at a Russian university.
In his July 2016 note, Page wrote
that Dvorkovich had “expressed
strong support for Mr. Trump and a
desire to work together toward devising better solutions in response
to a vast range of current international problems.”
Page’s email was read aloud by
Rep. Adam B. Schiff (D-Calif.)
when Page met behind closed
doors last week with the House
Intelligence Committee, which is
investigating Russian interference in the 2016 president election. The committee released the
transcript of the seven-hour session late Monday.
Confronted with his email, Page
told the committee that he had not
meant that he met with any officials but rather that he had
learned of their views about the
U.S. election from local media and
scholars. He maintained that his
interaction with Dvorkovich consisted of a brief greeting, and that
he had learned his views on the
campaign while listening to
Dvorkovich’s public address. Page
told the committee that he had not
worked with the Russians to hack
emails or otherwise influence the
election.
In a statement Monday, Schiff
said that Page had failed to produce the email to the committee
before his interview, despite receiving a subpoena for documents.
Page is one of a number of Trump
associates whose contacts with Russians before the election are emerging as important factors in investigations by Congress and special
counsel Robert S. Mueller III.
Another adviser, George Papadopoulos, pleaded guilty in October to
lying to federal agents about Russian contacts during the campaign.
The transcript shows Page, a
Navy veteran who worked for a
time in Moscow as an energy consultant, was at times combative
and evasive in response to committee questions.
Asked about his email indicating he had discussed Trump’s campaign in a private conversation
with a Russian official, Page responded to The Washington Post
MARK WILSON/GETTY IMAGES
Congressional investigators released records late Monday involving
Carter Page, a foreign policy adviser to the Trump campaign.
via text message: “That is complete misinformation and/or misinterpretation.”
“I’m working on my lawsuit tonight that will get to the bottom of
the real interference in the 2016
election, by the [United States government]. I’ve played this nonsensical game long enough and am
not interested in this latest round
tonight,” he said.
Page requested that the committee make the transcript of his
remarks public.
Page’s testimony shows that a
number of Trump campaign officials were aware of his plans to
travel to Moscow before he left —
and that he updated others on his
return.
He told the committee that he
informed then-Sen. Jeff Sessions
(R-Ala.), then a key Trump supporter and now attorney general,
and said he “probably” had told
national campaign co-chairman
Sam Clovis before leaving and definitely did so on his return.
A spokeswoman for Sessions
declined to comment; Clovis’s attorney did not immediately respond to a request for comment
Monday night.
In one email to fellow campaign
aides, Page suggested that Trump
perhaps take his place and travel
to Moscow “to raise the temperature a little bit” and, in another, he
asked how campaign officials
would “prefer me to focus” his
remarks.
He said he was unaware at the
time that Papadopoulos was making similar proposals for Trump to
travel to Russia, though he acknowledged he had received some
of Papadopoulos’s emails about
Russia.
Page sent the email describing
his interaction with Dvorkovich in
Moscow to campaign aide J.D.
Gordon, as well as a different campaign aide.
Gordon said he does not recall
the email but that he had discouraged Page from going to Moscow.
“It’s important to remember that
Carter Page and George Papadopoulos were peripheral members
of a relatively peripheral advisory
committee,” he said.
Trump has said he does not
recall ever speaking to Page.
Page’s July 2016 trip to Moscow
drew attention during the campaign,
particularly
after
WikiLeaks released emails that
had been hacked from the Democratic National Committee a few
weeks later and Russia became a
controversial campaign topic.
With his Russia ties under scrutiny, Page said in September 2016
that he was taking a leave from the
campaign.
Later, it emerged that the FBI
had obtained a secret court order
to monitor Page’s communications during the summer of 2016.
In numerous public interviews,
Page has always denied he met
with other Russian officials, notably with Igor Sechin, a Putin associate.
A former British intelligence
agent, working on behalf of Democrats, alleged in a dossier com-
piled before the election and published in January that Page had
met with both men.
Questioned by the committee,
Page again denied meeting Sechin
— but acknowledged he had met
with other officials who work for
Rosneft, the company Sechin
leads, including the head of investor relations.
Page’s Russian contacts did not
end on his return from Moscow. At
the Republican National Convention, Page told the committee that
he spoke with then-Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak and the subject of U.S. sanctions on Russia “may
have briefly come up in some context.” He said he did not recall any
discussion of hacked emails there.
And Page told the committee
about another foreign trip he took
during the campaign, a long weekend he spent in Budapest where he
said he met with Hungary’s ambassador to the United States and other
Hungarian officials. He said he discussed “foreign policy things” with
the ambassador and that he had
some “general” discussions of
U.S.-Russia relations with she and
other Hungarian officials — though
he could recall few specifics.
He also told the committee
about a second trip to Moscow he
took in December 2016 and said
that he met with Russian and Kazakh nationals in London that
same month.
rosalind.helderman@washpost.com
matt.zapotosky@washpost.com
karoun.demirjian@washpost.com
Tom Hamburger and Devlin Barrett
contributed to this report.
Ways and Means session yields small changes to tax bill
New tweaks relate to
investment managers,
school endowments
M IKE D E B ONIS
MELINA MARA/THE WASHINGTON POST
Chairman Kevin Brady, center, is seen at Monday’s House Ways and Means Committee session. He introduced an amendment that would
tweak the taxing of earnings of investment managers, cross-border transactions by multinational corporations and the endowments of
private universities. Republican leaders hope the House passes the full bill by Thanksgiving.
Taxation, testified Monday that
up to 38 million Americans with
annual
incomes
between
$20,000 and $40,000 would, on
average, see a tax increase starting in 2023 under the House
GOP plan.
The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act,
the legislative centerpiece of
President Trump’s economic
agenda, aims to deliver a $1.5
trillion tax cut to stimulate
economic growth, and Republicans have promised an immediate $1,100 tax cut for a family of
four making $59,000. The cliff
in 2023, they argue, is due to
the planned expiration of a tax
credit that Congress will most
likely act to extend. But several
Democrats on the panel quizzed
Barthold, who testified on his
office’s fiscal analysis of the
plan, on the apparent temporary nature of the bill’s benefits
for some middle-class families.
Barthold also testified that the
bill, if passed, would have the
immediate impact of greatly reducing the number of taxpayers
who itemize their deductions —
from the current rate of 29
percent to a projected 6 percent
in 2018.
That reflects the GOP plan’s
substantial increase in the standard deduction, which could
mean simpler filing for tens of
millions of taxpayers — a Republican priority. But the drastic
reduction in itemization could
carry major implications for the
housing and nonprofit sectors,
which have respectively come to
rely on tax deductions to encourage taxpayers to buy homes and
donate to charity.
The debate over the middleclass benefits of the bill came
as House Republican tax writers negotiated behind the
scenes to keep the legislation
on track.
The suite of changes Brady
unveiled Monday included a
change to the way the federal tax
code handles “carried interest,” a
provision allowing investors to
pay tax on some income at the
lower capital-gains rate rather
than the standard rate for earned
income. Among those who take
frequent advantage of the provision are managers of hedge
funds and private equity firms.
Supporters say the provision is
an incentive for better performance by investment managers,
but critics say it’s a loophole for
the super-rich.
The change requires any asset to be held for three years
before a taxpayer could claim
the carried-interest provision.
The change, Brady said in a
Monday morning CNBC interview, would “make sure it really
is focused on those long-term,
traditional real estate partnerships” rather than hedge funds.
But it would stop well short of
the complete repeal long advocated by Democrats who argue
that carried interest allows investors to recast ordinary income earned for services rendered as investment income
subject to a lower rate.
The proposed change comes
as Democrats criticize the bill
as a giveaway to the wealthy — a
charge Republicans deny — and
several nonpartisan analyses
have suggested the very
wealthy would enjoy an outsize
share of the measure’s proposed
$1.5 trillion in tax cuts over a
decade.
Brady rebutted recent studies,
including from the Joint Committee on Taxation, that suggest
that the GOP tax bill is heavily
tilted in favor of businesses and
the wealthy. According to the
JCT’s analysis, more than twothirds of the $1.5 trillion tax cut
would go to businesses and
wealthy families who would
avoid the estate tax.
“We want a dramatically more
pro-growth tax code where our
companies, whether they are local or global, can compete and
win anywhere in the world, including here at home,” Brady
said, adding that the rewrite was
“about flattering the tax code,
making it understandable and
fair.”
The amendment unveiled
Monday also appeared to address
concerns from multinational
firms who opposed a new 20 percent tax on certain transactions
between corporate affiliates
meant to discourage those firms
from shifting profits to lowertaxed countries. It also reduced
the reach of a new 1.4 percent tax
on large university endowments,
applying it only to institutions
with assets of $250,000 per en-
mike.debonis@washpost.com
Damian Paletta contributed to this
report.
HANDMADE HOLIDAYS
Perry
House Republicans on Monday again rejected President
Trump’s push to use their tax bill
to repeal a critical piece of the
Affordable Care Act, instead
making only modest changes to
their legislation as they attempt
to move it closer to a vote on the
House floor.
House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady
(R-Tex.) offered an amendment
that would tweak the way the
bill would tax the earnings of
investment managers, crossborder transactions by multinational corporations and the
endowments of private universities.
The amendment did not make
other, more costly changes to
business taxation or repeal the
Affordable Care Act’s insurance
mandate, which requires most
Americans to obtain some form
of health insurance.
Brady said at a day-long Ways
and Means markup session Monday that “we are not including
various health-tax related measures as part of our tax reform
efforts,” though he did not specifically rule out repealing the
ACA’s individual mandate.
“We will move to these important policies separately and immediately after conclusion of
our tax reform efforts,” Brady
said, referring to bipartisan efforts to repeal ACA taxes on
medical devices, over-the-counter drugs and health insurance
premiums.
Trump
had
personally
pushed Brady to include the
mandate repeal, a change nonpartisan analysts say would
save the government more than
$400 billion over a decade but
would also leave 15 million
more Americans without health
insurance. The plan would give
Republicans more flexibility in
crafting their bill, but it would
complicate the bill’s already
difficult path through the Senate, where internal Republican
divisions and unanimous Democratic opposition have thwarted multiple efforts at repealing
the heath-care law.
Brady’s changes, which were
adopted on a party-line committee vote late Monday, came as
Republicans battled new evidence that their tax plan, which
they are promoting as a middleclass tax cut, will instead deliver
uneven benefits to American
workers while delivering outsize benefits to corporations
and the wealthiest tier of individuals.
Thomas A. Barthold, chief of
staff of the nonpartisan congressional Joint Committee on
By Jam
es
BY
rolled student or more, vs. the
$100,000 threshold in the initial
bill. Also protected is the current
$5,000 per year exclusion for
employer-provided dependentcare savings accounts.
Brady introduced the bill last
week as part of his party’s effort
to make the biggest changes to
the U.S. tax code since the Reagan administration. The Ways
and Means markup session could
stretch into Thursday as committee Republicans and Democrats
propose, debate and vote on
amendments to the measure.
Republican leaders hope to pass
their bill through the House by
Thanksgiving.
The debate turned heated at
times Monday, with several Democrats raising their voices to
accuse Republicans of rushing
the process and misrepresenting
the effects of the bill.
“Why are you doing this?” Rep.
Sander M. Levin (D-Mich.)
shouted to Brady at one point.
“You are desperately looking for
something to pass.”
The Senate Finance Committee is expected to unveil its
version of a tax bill Thursday
once the House committee’s proceedings end, according to multiple aides familiar with the plans,
setting up its own markup next
week.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
Justices won’t stop execution of Ala. man who can’t remember murder
BY
R OBERT B ARNES
The Supreme Court on Monday
unanimously reversed a lower
court that had found an Alabama
death row inmate ineligible for
execution because his declining
health had left him unable to
remember the murder he had
committed.
The justices said that since the
Supreme Court has never found
that a prisoner is incompetent to
be executed because of a failure to
remember his crime — as opposed to being able to comprehend the concepts of crime and
punishment — the U.S. Court of
Appeals for the 11th Circuit had
erred in stopping Vernon Madison’s execution.
Three of the court’s liberal
members said that was a question
worth the court’s time but agreed
that Madison’s case did not provide the proper vehicle for that
examination.
And Justice Stephen G. Breyer
Lower court had ruled
that he was ineligible for
the death penalty
said the case illustrated a different issue: how long waits for the
enforcement of death sentences
have created a class of aging death
row inmates who present new
constitutional questions about
capital punishment.
In April 1985, Madison shot
Mobile, Ala., police officer Julius
Schulte twice in the back of the
head after Schulte responded to a
domestic call. Efforts to execute
Madison, now 67, for the crime
have dragged on for decades.
“He has lived nearly half of his
life on death row,” Breyer wrote.
“During that time, he has suffered
severe strokes, which caused vascular dementia and numerous
other significant physical and
mental problems. He is legally
blind. His speech is slurred. He
cannot walk independently. He is
incontinent. His disability leaves
him without a memory of his
commission of a capital offense.”
Breyer, who in the past has
tried to interest the court in reexamining whether the death penalty can be applied constitutionally, said the average wait on death
row for the 21 people who have
been executed in 2017 is 19 years.
“Given this trend, we may face
ever more instances of state efforts to execute prisoners suffering the diseases and infirmities of
old age,” he said. “And we may well
have to consider the ways in
which lengthy periods of imprisonment between death sentence
and execution can deepen the
cruelty of the death penalty while
at the same time undermining its
penological rationale.”
No other justice joined Breyer’s
concurrence, and no conservative
justice rebutted him. In the past,
they have alleged that it is the
numerous appeals and creativity
of defense lawyers that have postponed the imposition of the death
penalty.
Madison’s case is unusual. As
his execution neared in 2016, his
attorneys said that several recent
strokes had impaired his memory
and that he no longer remembered his crime.
At a hearing, a psychologist for
the state said Madison “suffered a
significant decline post-stroke”
but “certainly” understood that
Alabama was seeking to execute
him for the murder he committed.
But a psychologist testifying on
Madison’s behalf said that although the inmate knew the state
wanted to execute him, he did not
recall “the sequence of events
from the offense to his arrest to
the trial or any of those details.”
A state court denied Madison’s
petition, saying that under Supreme Court precedent, he was
entitled to relief only if he could
show that his mental illness prevents him from “understanding
he is being executed as punishment for a crime.”
A panel of the federal appeals
court disagreed. With no dispute
that Madison does not remember
the crime, the panel said in a
2-to-1 decision, he “does not rationally understand the connection between his crime and his
execution.”
That is the decision that the
Supreme Court said Monday was
wrong. In an unsigned opinion,
the justices said the appeals court
exceeded its authority under the
federal law — the Anti-terrorism
and Effective Death Penalty Act of
1996 — that governs review of
death sentences.
It says federal courts may get
involved only when the lower
court’s decision was contrary to
clearly established federal law or
unreasonably applied it. The justices said there was no precedent
that clearly established that an
inmate must remember the commission of his crime.
“The state court did not unreasonably apply [Supreme Court
precedents] when it determined
that Madison is competent to be
executed because — notwithstanding his memory loss — he
recognizes that he will be put to
death as punishment for the murder he was found to have committed,” the court wrote.
The justices added they “express no view on the merits of the
underlying question.”
Breyer and Justices Ruth Bader
Ginsburg and Sonia Sotomayor
wrote in a concurrence that the
question — whether a state may
execute someone who does not
remember his crime — warrants
“full airing.”
But they agreed that the “restraints imposed” by the AEDPA
preclude that in this case.
The case is Dunn v. Madison.
robert.barnes@washpost.com
Okla. Democrats tap distrust of politics, not dislike of Trump
DEMOCRATS FROM A1
National Democratic Party
leaders have rejoiced over these
victories — along with five other
recent wins in Iowa, New Hampshire and Florida in districts that
had voted for Trump — as evidence that the chaotic presidency
may be creating opportunities for
Democrats to capture more seats
in next year’s state and congressional elections. “A beacon of
hope,” said Jessica Post, executive
director of the Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee, the
party’s strategy arm for legislative
races.
Yet the path to victory still
seems muddy. Internal party tensions have been on display in recent days before the release of an
explosive tell-all book by former
Democratic National Committee
chairwoman Donna Brazile, and
polls have tightened ahead of
Tuesday’s nationally watched gubernatorial election in Virginia,
where the Democrat has waged a
largely anti-Trump campaign.
In Oklahoma, success didn’t
come when candidates simply rejected Trump. These candidates
won after embracing elements of
his playbook, capitalizing on the
widespread distrust of traditional
politics to persuade voters to give
newcomers a chance.
Rosecrants, like Trump, pitched
himself as an anti-politician, an
outsider who could shake up an
old-boy institution filled with
backslapping, privilege and corruption. As Oklahoma struggles to
fund public services and records
some of the worst education statistics in the country, Rosecrants
used his career experience to illustrate how he could help solve the
state’s biggest crisis.
“Elect a Teacher” was his slogan, and the blue signs he staked
in people’s lawns in the Oklahoma
City suburbs had a pencil in the
logo. He knocked on doors and
told of his overcrowded classroom
of 42, so sweaty they called it the
“rhino’s butt,” and how other
teachers have cleared out closets
to find space to educate specialneeds students.
It wasn’t until you read the fine
print that you could tell Rosecrants was, in fact, a Democrat.
For some voters, backing
Trump in 2016 and then supporting a Democratic state House candidate was perfectly logical. “I voted for Trump because he’s an outsider, and I voted for Jacob because he’s an outsider,” said Sean
Keith, 34, a sales manager who
lives in Rosecrants’s district.
“Maybe they’ll get the job done.”
During
President
Barack
Obama’s term, conservatives successfully captured voter dissatisfaction, with Democrats losing
more than 900 state legislative
seats over those eight years.
Oklahoma typifies the GOP
domination. Even after this year’s
special elections, Republicans
have 39 of 48 seats in the Senate
and 71 of 101 in the House. The
governor is a Republican, as well.
But the majority party is drawing scrutiny in the state as it navigates budget problems and political scandal.
In 2014, the state reduced taxes
on oil and gas production — the
main source of government revenue — from 7 percent to 2 percent
in hopes of attracting more companies to drill. The timing wasn’t
great. Oil and gas prices were going down and fewer companies
wanted to drill, Democrats and
Republicans said, resulting in less
money coming into state coffers.
Going into the 2017 budget season, the state was estimated to be
short $868 million. The legislature is still in a special session
because lawmakers can’t agree on
how to balance the budget. And
the results were showing, in Rosecrants’s suburb of Norman and the
PHOTOS BY NICK OXFORD FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
ABOVE: State Rep. Jacob Rosecrants (D) shows off his lucky
University of Oklahoma socks after taking the oath of office at the
state Capitol on Sept. 20.
LEFT: Kathie Darr poses for a photo with cutouts of President
Trump and first lady Melania Trump at the Oklahoma County
Republicans’ booth at the state fair in Oklahoma City in September.
nearby country town of Noble.
Chunks of a local bridge fell off
when a truck zoomed under it,
because the bridge was so old.
Road improvement projects along
the main street were delayed because there wasn’t enough money
to finish them. Potholes went untended because the state couldn’t
hire enough workers to fill them
quickly.
The chief concern among voters
was education. Per-student funding in Oklahoma had decreased by
26 percent since 2008, faster than
in any other state, and teacher pay
ranked among the nation’s lowest.
One out of five counties were so
cash-strapped that they reduced
instruction to four days a week.
Teachers hadn’t received raises
since the Great Recession.
So grave was the concern about
education that close to two dozen
teachers ran for the legislature in
2016, almost all of them Democrats. But Trump’s coattails proved
too much to overcome, and only
one of the teachers won that year.
Greg Treat (R), the state Senate
majority leader, said those results
are more indicative of the national
mood than recent Democratic
wins in special elections — particularly given the circumstances
that led to those victories. Among
them: One state senator was found
in a hotel room with drugs and an
underage sex worker; a state representative was accused of sexually harassing legislative aides.
Treat called the scandals “inexcusable” but added that “we live in
a fallen world with sinful men and
women, regardless of what profession.”
Still, Treat noted, enthusiasm
for Trump remains high. At the
state fair, minutes away from the
Capitol, the county Republican
Party’s booth in the event hall
bustled as fairgoers posed with
cardboard cutouts of Trump and
first lady Melania Trump, and
glad-handed with gubernatorial
candidates. A man in a tie-dyed
shirt walked up to one of the
candidates, Gary Jones, and
asked, “Where are the Democrats?” Tucked in a smaller, quieter section on the other side of the
hall, the booth was so hidden from
view that Jones couldn’t find it.
Considering the scandals, local
Democrats made a larger, more
philosophical argument about the
nature of man and power. The
scandals were about more than
just Republicans behaving badly,
said Karen Gaddis, a retired teacher from Tulsa who won one of the
special elections.
When a single party has all the
power, she said, its members begin
to think they are immune. And the
system becomes corrupted.
“I heard a Republican legislator
say, ‘We have a mandate from the
people,’ and I thought, ‘What people?’ ” Gaddis said. “I didn’t even
get a chance to vote because no
Democrats even filed for any of the
offices. We need voices.”
Of the 2,100 votes cast, Gaddis
beat her Republican opponent by
95 votes. One of the greatest moments of her life, she said, was
attending her election night celebration, which she had called a
“victory party” only because of her
campaign’s quixotic hope.
“I was going to go in and thank
everybody and, you know, give this
wonderful speech,” Gaddis said.
“And I walked in the room, and I
just blurted out, ‘We won!’ And the
room exploded.”
The victory surprised Gaddis,
but the party’s leaders say it was a
product of a fresh focus among
them. Democrats here sought a
new purpose after the 2016 elections and elected 24-year-old
Anna Langthorn as the state’s fulltime party chairwoman. Langthorn said she was heartbroken after
Hillary Clinton’s loss. She said she
thought about joining a militant
protest group but wanted to try a
more old-fashioned way of changing democracy.
“The Democratic Party moved
away from its original purpose
here,” she said. “It became more of
a social club than a place to strategize to win elections. We had to do
it as a way to resist Trump.”
Rosecrants emphasized that he
was just a little guy trying to make
a difference. He wasn’t always an
activist. His first foray into politics
came when he attended a teacher
rally outside the Capitol in 2014.
There were more than 30,000 out
that afternoon, he said, but they
could not get an audience with the
governor or arrange a meeting
with any major GOP leaders.
There was one politician whom
he did grow to admire, though.
Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), who
challenged Clinton for the Democratic presidential nomination,
captured his attention by emphasizing the importance of small
contributions to tackle big problems. “Wouldn’t it be funny if we
ran for office?” a friend of his
joked. But Rosecrants did not
think he was joking.
No Democrat had won a House
seat in the district since 1995, so
Rosecrants started a Facebook
page and began fundraising. He
got fellow supporters of the Sanders campaign to knock on doors
and spread his message. He
thought he got a sign from the
political gods when he received his
first contribution.
“Twenty-seven dollars,” he recalled, an homage to the average
contribution to the Sanders campaign.
He was one of the teachers who
ran in 2016 and lost to the incumbent, by 20 percentage points.
When the incumbent quit the job,
Rosecrants began going door to
door again. The day before his
September election, Rosecrants
said, he and his team knocked on
2,432 doors.
“I started believing in myself
and started believing that we had
a real chance,” he said.
One of those doors belonged to
Keith, the 34-year-old from Noble.
In a community where many longtime residents know one another,
he considered Rosecrants a friend.
Keith said he found Democrats
on the national level to be out of
touch — more concerned about
schools being named after Confederate soldiers than the children
within those halls. He didn’t believe in special treatment, and he
wondered why it was so hard for
Republicans to raise the low taxes
on oil and gas corporations while
parents had to beg companies for
private donations to supply their
children with textbooks.
“The government understands
what’s happening, but I don’t
think they’re working on it,” Keith
said. “People here just hated
Obama. I wasn’t a fan of him,
either, but things were getting better when he left. There was so
much division in the federal government, nothing could get done
— and nothing can get done here,
either.”
He typically voted the party
line, but Keith thought his state,
much like his country, was at a
crossroads.
So this time, he chose a Democrat. He’s not sure he’d do so again.
robert.samuels@washpost.com
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A5
RE
Democrat dances tricky two-step in deep-red Alabama
BY
S EAN S ULLIVAN
auburn, ala. — Doug Jones
looked up at his audience in a
fluorescent-lit university lecture
hall and declared that the choice
for Senate between him and Republican Roy Moore in an upcoming special election couldn’t be
clearer.
Moore, the controversial exjudge, has said that “homosexual
conduct should be illegal” and
Muslims should not serve in Congress. He would continue the “divisive” and “hateful” rhetoric that
has been present in Alabama and
inject “chaos into chaos” in Washington, Jones said.
Jones claims ties to both parties but no blind loyalty to either.
A mild-mannered ex-prosecutor,
he noted that he was nominated
for U.S. attorney by a Democratic
president but confirmed by a Republican-led Senate. He also highlighted his recent meetings with
labor heads and business leaders.
“People are going to look back
at this race and say Alabama
made a choice,” Jones said.
At the same appearance one
evening late last month, a young
man asked Jones why moderate
Republicans such as his parents
should cross party lines and support a Democrat like him. Another man took issue with his
support for abortion rights. A
third told the story of a Republican friend who didn’t like Jones
campaigning with a “national”
Democrat — former vice president Joe Biden.
In an unexpectedly competitive Senate race that both national parties are watching closely,
Jones is trying to pull off a challenging and at times conflicting
two-step. In a state where Democrats make up less than a third of
the electorate, Jones must turn
out as many of them as he can —
and win over enough Republican
voters, too.
The result has been a strategy
that includes criticizing Moore,
casting himself as a pragmatist
and making a direct appeal to the
Democratic base by embracing
some liberal positions — and touting his role prosecuting two Ku
Klux Klan members who bombed
a black church in Birmingham in
1963, killing four girls.
It has also involved a lot of
sidestepping.
Senate candidate Jones
tries to win over
leery Republicans
Would Jones support Sen.
Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) as
Senate minority leader?
“I’m going to make a judgment
once I’m there,” he said in an
interview.
Does he want to campaign with
former president Barack Obama?
He wouldn’t say.
Jones was also careful around
the topic of President Trump, who
won Alabama by more than 28
percentage points. In the interview, he ducked questions about
how good or bad a job the president is doing.
“It doesn’t really matter what
my view is,” he said. “My view is
going to be taking every issue step
by step, because he is the president.”
The Dec. 12 special election for
the seat once held by now-Attorney General Jeff Sessions will
mark the first general Senate election of Trump’s term. At a moment of intensifying partisan rancor, it will test the public’s appetite in the heart of Trump country:
Do the voters of Alabama want a
bridge-builder in Congress or a
rabble-rouser in the president’s
mold?
The outcome will also affect
business in Washington, where
Senate Republicans’ slim advantage, 52 to 48, has presented governing challenges this year.
Moore is a hard-right culture
warrior who has attracted nationwide attention for being removed
twice from the bench — once for
refusing to heed a court order to
remove a Ten Commandments
display from his courthouse and a
second time, after he was again
elected chief judge, for refusing to
follow a Supreme Court ruling
legalizing same-sex marriage.
The Republican has declared a
take-no-prisoners battle against
his political opponents in both
parties. Moore spokesman Brett
Doster said Jones has “declared
war on the Constitution, the military, and the unborn.”
Jones, who was a U.S. attorney
during President Bill Clinton’s
second term, has made his role in
Looking for
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BRYNN ANDERSON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Democrat Doug Jones at an early-October rally in Birmingham, Ala. Jones is facing off against
controversial ex-judge Roy Moore, the Republican nominee for Jeff Sessions’s old Senate seat.
the church bombing case a central feature of his campaign — a
strategy that analysts say is designed to drive up African American participation on Election Day.
Jones has called the Birmingham church bombing case the
“crowning moment” of his career.
He has also shown a willingness to denounce, if gently,
Trump’s comments on the deadly
violence at a white-supremacist
rally in Charlottesville, which
Jones said “disappointed” him.
“We’ve got to denounce the
neo-Nazis. We’ve got to denounce
the white supremacists,” he said.
William Stewart, a professor
emeritus of political science at the
University of Alabama, said a
Democrat can still win in Alabama, but “he has to get a very
large black vote and he needs to
get a substantial number of white,
more liberally inclined people to
vote for him.”
Stewart said that will be difficult with Senate control in the
balance, which probably will
prompt many Republicans to vote
for Moore even if they don’t like
his social views.
“I think they will realize that if
the Republicans lose the Senate,
then they cannot expect the Su-
preme Court” or other courts to be
filled with conservative judges, he
said.
Much of Jones’s pitch for why
he should be elected is rooted in
what he says is an urgent need for
“common ground” in politics. At
the Auburn appearance, he said
he would not merely be a “lap dog
for a particular agenda” or “another Democratic vote.”
“This country is beginning to
see such divisiveness,” the 63year-old drawled. He blamed “not
just the Republicans” but fellow
Democrats.
There has been skepticism
about his middle-of-the-road
platform.
“We all obviously know what
Moore is about,” said a young man
who asked the first question at the
Auburn event. He wanted to know
why his parents, both “moderate
Republicans,” should break from
the GOP this time.
Jones has voiced a willingness
to buck the far right in his state. At
Auburn, he recounted a chat he
had earlier in the day with a
lifelong Republican at a barbecue
restaurant in Montgomery. While
there, he moved from table to
table with his shirt sleeves rolled
up as the scent of pulled pork and
chicken wafted through the air.
“He asked me an interesting
question,” Jones recalled of the
conversation. “He said if it comes
down to what you think the people of Alabama want versus what
you know in your heart is better
for the United States, what would
you do? I said my needle would
have to really go toward what’s
best for the United States and
hope that I can educate the people
of Alabama so that they’ll understand.”
Jones has clearly lost some voters along the way. The voter who
asked about abortion — “That’s
an issue that I do disagree with
you on, and it’s an issue that’s
really, really important to me” —
didn’t stop the candidate from
repeating his position.
“I do believe in a woman’s right
to choose,” Jones said, receiving
applause from the mostly friendly
crowd. He said he supported current laws, not a change some
conservatives have embraced to
ban most abortions after 20
weeks of pregnancy.
Later, Charlie Morris, 72, a retired lawyer, said a moderate Republican friend planned to vote
for Jones but was turned off by
Jones’s appearance with Biden.
“He asked me to deliver the message: Please don’t bring any more
national Democrats to Alabama,”
Morris said.
Jones defended his decision to
stump with Biden, whom he
called “working-class Joe.”
Jones is looking at some of the
issues Congress is debating. In the
interview, he said he was “not
really crazy about” much of what
he’d seen of the emerging tax bill
that congressional Republicans
are crafting, saying it would benefit mainly the wealthiest Americans. He also voiced concerns
about adding to the deficit.
On health care, he said he
would vote for some version of the
compromise bill to restore federal
subsidies ended by Trump in exchange for greater state freedoms
under the Affordable Care Act.
Sens. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.)
and Patty Murray (D-Wash.) negotiated that measure.
Jones described himself as a
“Second Amendment guy” who
owns guns. He said expanded
background checks on firearm
sales, particularly at gun shows,
“would be helpful,” if difficult to
fine-tune in a bill.
Asked which current senator
he looked to as a model for consensus-driven governance, he
named several: Murray, Alexander, John McCain (R-Ariz.) and
Tim Kaine (D-Va.).
Many of Jones’s supporters
speak about Moore with horror
and fear. “I’m scared of the man,”
said Vee Carlton, who came to the
barbecue restaurant to greet
Jones.
Carlton pondered the qualities
the next senator from Alabama
should have, before tucking into a
salad topped with pulled pork.
“I want someone who will support all Americans,” said Carlton,
who wore a shirt emblazoned
with “Nevertheless, she persisted,” a supportive nod to Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.).
Whether Jones will get to join
Warren and the other senators in
Washington will be decided in the
coming weeks. Even some of
Jones’s backers aren’t feeling
great about his odds.
“I think Moore’s going to win,”
said Jeff Damron, 65, a retired
educator who came to Auburn to
cheer Jones on. “And I’m not sure
it’s even going to be close.”
sean.sullivan@washpost.com
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A6
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
Texas Church Shooting
Conviction should have blocked shooter from buying guns
SHOOTING FROM A1
tives, saying Kelley had been
sending “threatening texts” to his
mother-in-law, who was not at the
First Baptist Church when he
opened fire on the congregation
Sunday morning.
“This was not racially motivated, it wasn’t over religious beliefs,” Freeman Martin, a regional
director with the Texas Department of Public Safety, said Monday. “There was a domestic situation going on within the family
and the in-laws.”
Kelley’s anger boiled into what
appeared to be a planned assault
on the tiny church in a tiny town
outside San Antonio, the latest
mass attack to cut down Americans in a seemingly safe public
space. Kelley killed 26 people and
injured 20 others, most of whom
were praying in the pews when
they faced a barrage of bullets
from an assault-style rifle.
The painful stories of lives lost
to a mass shooting have become a
familiar ritual, and this community church in the Texas countryside
is no different. Among the dead
here were eight relatives spanning
three generations in a single family; the victims included toddlers,
teenagers and the elderly. While
authorities initially said the victims ranged in age from 5 to 72,
they said Monday that that was the
age range of the wounded, and
that the death toll encompassed
even younger and older people.
“Inside the church, the deceased actually ranged from 18
months to 77 years of age,” Martin
said.
The family that lost eight relatives said one of them was a 1-yearold girl. Among the 20 wounded
Sunday at the church, 10 remained
hospitalized in critical condition,
Martin said. Almost everyone at
the service was injured.
Texas authorities Monday officially identified Kelley, of New
Braunfels, about 35 miles north of
Sutherland Springs, as the attacker. They said Kelley shot at the
churchgoers with a Ruger assaultstyle rifle before a man who lives
near the church heard what was
happening and began firing his
rifle at the attacker, hitting him at
least once.
Kelley then dropped his rifle,
jumped in his Ford Expedition
SUV and fled, Martin said.
“Our Texas hero” flagged down
another young Texan and hopped
into his vehicle, and they chased
Kelley at high speeds, Martin
said.
It was “act now, ask questions
later,” said the truck’s driver,
Johnnie Langendorff.
During the chase, Kelley called
his father on his cellphone to say
that “he had been shot and didn’t
think he was going to make it,”
Martin said. An autopsy showed
that Kelley was shot twice — once
in the leg and again in the torso —
before shooting himself in the
head, Martin said Monday.
Three guns were recovered
Sunday, according to authorities:
a Ruger rifle and two handguns —
one a Glock and another a Ruger,
inside Kelley’s vehicle. He had
purchased four guns during the
past four years, officials said.
According to the Air Force, he
shouldn’t have been able to buy
any of them. The service acknowledged Monday that Kelley’s do-
“By all of the facts that we seem to know, he was not supposed
to have access to a gun, so how did this happen?”
Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R)
CAROLYN VAN HOUTEN/THE WASHINGTON POST
mestic-assault offense was not entered into a national database,
which meant he was able to pass
routine background checks to purchase weapons. Kelley was convicted on charges of assaulting his
then-wife and stepson and served
12 months in confinement before
being released in 2014 with a badconduct discharge.
“Federal law prohibited him
from buying or possessing firearms after this conviction,” Ann
Stefanek, an Air Force spokeswoman, said in a statement.
After Sunday’s attack, investigators had questioned how Kelley,
who spent a year behind bars, was
able to purchase guns and pass
state background checks for jobs.
The Air Force’s oversight appeared to allow Kelley’s gun purchases to proceed despite a law
meant to prevent them.
According to court-martial
documents made public Monday
evening by the Air Force, Kelley
kicked, choked and struck his
wife in 2011 and 2012. He also
struck her young child “on the
head and body with a force likely
to produce death or grievous
bodily harm,” the documents said.
Texas officials said Kelley had
sought and failed to obtain a permit allowing him to carry a concealed weapon after his release.
He had an “unarmed private security license” akin to what a security guard at a concert would
have, Martin said.
In televised interviews, Texas
Gov. Greg Abbott (R) said that it
appeared the church was targeted, rather than chosen at random,
but that there were “more unknowns than there are knowns” a
TOP: Cellphones light up an evening vigil in Sutherland
Springs, Tex., where people sang and prayed for the victims
of Sunday’s shooting at the First Baptist Church.
ABOVE: Twenty-six crosses, one for each victim,
stand in the small town, which is outside San Antonio.
day after the attack.
“By all of the facts that we seem
to know, he was not supposed to
have access to a gun, so how did
this happen?” Abbott said in an
interview Monday morning on
CNN. “We are in search of answers
to these questions.”
Though Kelley’s in-laws had attended the church, they were not
there during services Sunday and
instead came to the scene after
the shooting, said Joe D. Tackitt
Jr., the Wilson County sheriff.
Some mass shooters lash out
seemingly indiscriminately, while
others target their relatives or
those in their community they
think are working against them.
Peter Blair, a criminal-justice
professor at Texas State University and executive director of the
Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Response Training Center, said
people who open fire in public
places can have “rage welling up,”
and then they lash out.
“What you typically see in active-shooter attackers is an avenger-type mentality,” said Blair, who
co-wrote an FBI study in 2013 that
examined 160 active-shooter incidents. “They’re people who believe they’ve been wronged in
some way. They get angrier and
angrier, and they plan the attack
as a way to get people to recognize
their issue.”
Kelley worked briefly over the
summer as an unarmed night security guard at a Schlitterbahn
water park in New Braunfels, the
company said. He passed a Texas
Department of Public Safety
criminal background check before beginning work there, a
spokeswoman said, though she
added that Kelley was fired in July
— as the season was reaching its
peak — because he was “not a
good fit.”
He also was able to pass a
background check that allowed
him to work for HEB, a Texasbased grocery chain, in New
Braunfels. Company spokeswoman Dya Campos said he worked
there for two months in 2013 and
quit.
The attack on Sunday left a
staggering hole in a Texas town of
fewer than 700 people.
“Nearly everyone had some
type of injury,” Tackitt said of the
churchgoers. “I knew several people in there. It hasn’t really hit yet,
but it will.”
Tackitt said the aftermath was
“a horrific sight,” adding: “You
don’t expect to walk into church
and find mauled bodies.” More
than a dozen of those killed or
injured in the attack were children, he said.
The massacre added Sutherland Springs to the growing roster
of places synonymous with a mass
tragedy, and it came just a month
after 58 people in Las Vegas were
gunned down in the country’s
deadliest modern mass shooting.
President Trump appeared to
try to steer the debate away from
gun control after the Texas slayings. At a news conference in To-
kyo, Trump said he thought “mental health” was a possible motive,
adding that it appeared the shooter was “a very deranged individual,
a lot of problems for a long period
of time.” He did not further explain.
Trump said the incident “isn’t a
guns situation,” and added, “Fortunately someone else had a gun
that was shooting in the opposite
direction” or the rampage “would
have been much worse.”
No one inside the church was
armed, the sheriff said Monday,
saying he was not surprised by
that fact.
“People from this community
would never think this could happen,” he said.
Witnesses and officials said the
gunman, dressed in black and
wearing a tactical vest, began firing an assault rifle as he approached the church. Texas state
officials said Monday that he also
was wearing a black mask with a
white skull face on it.
He killed two people outside
before entering the church and
spraying bullets at the congregation during morning worship, police said. Officials said he was
inside for some time.
The attack tore apart families
in this small community. Joe and
Claryce Holcombe lost children,
grandchildren and great-grandchildren all at once, a total of eight
extended-family members, the
couple said.
Their son, Bryan Holcombe, 60,
and his wife, Karla Holcombe, 58,
were killed. Bryan was associate
pastor for the church and was
walking to preach at the pulpit
when he was shot, Joe Holcombe
said.
Also among the dead was Joe
and Claryce’s granddaughter-inlaw, Crystal Holcombe, who was
pregnant. She and three of her children — Emily, Megan and Greg —
died, according to Joe Holcombe.
She was at church with her husband, John Holcombe, who survived along with two of her other
children. Joe and Claryce’s grandson Marc Daniel Holcombe and his
daughter, who was about a year old,
also died.
Frank Pomeroy, the pastor of
First Baptist, and his wife, Sherri,
spoke to reporters through tears.
Their 14-year-old daughter, Annabelle — known as Belle — was
among those killed in her father’s
church, although both parents
were out of town at the time. But
the couple lost much more than
their daughter, they said.
“We ate together, we laughed
together, we cried together, and we
worshiped together. Now most of
our church family is gone,” Sherri
Pomeroy said. “Our building is
probably beyond repair, and the
few of us that are left behind lost
tragically yesterday. As senseless as
this tragedy was, our sweet Belle
would not have been able to deal
with all the family she lost yesterday.”
She added: “Please don’t forget
Sutherland Springs.”
mark.berman@washpost.com
Berman reported from Washington.
Mary Lee Grant in San Antonio; Peter
Holley in Sutherland Springs; and
Wesley Lowery, Brian Murphy,
Kristine Phillips, Alex Horton,
Samantha Schmidt, Devlin Barrett
and Julie Tate in Washington
contributed to this report.
Latest mass shooting unlikely to result in new legislation regulating guns
BY E D O ’ K EEFE
AND S EAN S ULLIVAN
The massacre that killed
more than two dozen people at
a Texas church on Sunday isn’t
likely to jump-start attempts
on Capitol Hill to enact fresh
legislation addressing gun violence or mental health problems, according to lawmakers
in both parties.
Coming just a month after the
mass shooting in Las Vegas that
killed 58 people, Congress hasn’t
even made good yet on bipartisan resolve to address an obscure
element of that attack. Remember “bump stocks”?
Instead, the shooting at the
First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Tex., seemed to
only further coarsen the tone
surrounding a decades-long fight
over gun rights in the United
States.
“No one is safe so long as
Congress chooses to do absolutely nothing in the face of this
epidemic,” Sen. Chris Murphy
(D-Conn.), a vocal advocate for
gun control, said in a scathing
statement hours after the shooting. “The time is now for Congress to shed its cowardly cover
and do something.”
But just steps from the church
Bipartisan resolve to
address ‘bump stocks’
has yet to bear fruit
crime scene on Monday, Sen. Ted
Cruz (R-Tex.) assailed the news
media and Democrats for immediately seeking legislative solutions to the latest outbreak of
gun violence.
“It is an unfortunate thing that
the immediate place the media
goes after any tragedy, after any
murder, is politicizing it. We
don’t need politics right now,” he
told reporters at a news conference.
Noting that a terrorism suspect used a rented truck last
week to kill eight people along a
New York City bike path, Cruz
added, “Evil is evil is evil and will
use the weaponry that is available.”
Although Democrats and some
Republicans have introduced
dozens of proposals this year to
address gun violence, there is no
bill poised for consideration in a
House or Senate committee or
scheduled for an up-or-down
vote.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch
McConnell (R-Ky.) signaled Monday that there are no immediate
plans to take up legislation to
address gun violence.
“It’s hard to envision a foolproof way to prevent individual
outrages by evil people,” he told
reporters in Kentucky. Echoing
Cruz, McConnell noted that last
week in New York, “you had a
person who figured out he
could kill people by driving his
automobile up on the sidewalk.
It’s a very, very challenging
thing.”
Aides to House Speaker Paul D.
Ryan (R-Wis.) declined to comment, referring reporters to the
House Judiciary Committee. A
senior committee aide would say
only that the panel is in touch
with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives
and the FBI about the shooting.
ATF is also set to brief Judiciary Committee members this
week on the use of bump stocks,
aides said.
Congress seemed to get closer
than it has in many years last
month, when the Las Vegas
shooting brought attention to
bump stocks, an obscure device
used to accelerate the rate of fire
from some weapons used in the
massacre. In subsequent days,
Republicans especially expressed
alarm about how such an unknown accessory could cause
such widespread violence. Lawmakers in both parties quickly
agreed that steps should be taken
to regulate their use.
The National Rifle Association, usually mum in the wake of
mass shootings, said it supported
restricting access to bump
stocks. So did the Trump administration. Sen. Dianne Feinstein
(D-Calif.), a longtime advocate
for gun restrictions, unveiled a
plan to restrict the sale and use of
bump stocks that was quickly
co-sponsored by more than 30
Democratic senators. In the
House, Republicans and Democrats quickly banded around a
similar idea.
“We are continuing to work on
this,” Rep. Seth Moulton (DMass.) said. He co-sponsored a
bipartisan plan to restrict bump
stocks with Rep. Carlos Curbelo
(R-Fla.), who didn’t return requests for comment Monday.
But bump stock legislation has
stalled as ATF is reviewing a 2010
ruling that authorized their sale.
Rep. Tom Cole (R-Okla.), a
close ally of House GOP leaders,
said Monday that lawmakers
should wait for more information on the Texas shooting before
rushing to judgment.
“The first thing we need to
know is know a little bit more
about this,” Cole said in an interview.
“If it turns out he broke existing laws,” Cole added, “adding
new laws” probably would not be
an effective countermeasure.
Rather, he said, focusing on enforcing laws on the books would
be preferable.
Cole said the issue of bump
stocks should be solved in the
executive branch. “The quickest
fix is to reverse the administrative decision” allowing the devices, he said.
But Moulton disputed that,
saying that “any Republican who
tries to put this on the administration is only doing that because
he or she is scared of the NRA.”
Rep. Mike Thompson (D-Calif.), who chairs a gun violence
prevention task force for House
Democrats, said Monday that
he’s hopeful that a bipartisan
background-check bill he unveiled last week with Rep. Peter
T. King (R-N.Y.) could pick up
traction.
The Public Safety and Second
Amendment Rights Protection
Act would expand the existing
background-check system to cover all commercial firearm sales,
including weapons sold at gun
shows, online and in classified
ads. But the bill would leave open
exceptions for transfers between
friends and family.
“There is no single law that can
put an end to mass shootings or
gun violence, but there are certainly proactive steps we can take
to keep guns out of the hands of
felons, domestic abusers, and the
dangerously mentally ill,” King
said in a statement. Background
checks, he added, “keep guns out
of the hands of people we all
agree shouldn’t have guns.”
Thompson noted that a similar
version of his bill with King they
introduced last year had at least
188 co-sponsors in both parties.
He ruled out a new push by
Democrats to use procedural tactics to force votes on such bills or
to stage another sit-in on the
House floor as some Democrats
did last year in a bid to force
votes.
“We need the majority party to
screw up some courage and start
working with these issues,”
Thompson said. The push to
enact changes has been “a solo
effort ever since Sandy Hook” —
the 2012 shooting at a Connecticut elementary school that left 28
people dead.
ed.okeefe@washpost.com
sean.sullivan@washpost.com
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A7
RE
Texas Church Shooting
After massacre, some residents call for more guns
BY P ETER H OLLEY
AND J OEL A CHENBACH
sutherland springs, tex. —
Many of this small town’s residents had just learned, mostly by
word of mouth, the names of the
people slain or wounded at the
First Baptist Church, and the horror unleashed by a gunman was
too fresh for anyone to process
fully. But one thing was emphatically clear Monday: These Texans
weren’t about to embrace gun
control.
This is a place where people
carry firearms as routinely as they
wear boots. They carry them out
of sight, tucked in a waistband or
in a pocket like a billfold. Or they
carry them openly.
“There are lots of guns in the
community. Most people own
guns in Texas,” Wilson County
Sheriff Joe Tackitt said Monday.
“But guns don’t kill people, people
kill people.”
The gun rights community has
long had a favorite saying: The
only thing that stops a bad guy
with a gun is a good guy with a
gun. What happened Sunday offered for that community a resounding echo of their belief. A
local man — described by officials
as “our Texas hero” — who lives
near First Baptist grabbed his own
weapon and shot gunman Devin
Patrick Kelley outside the church,
forcing him to flee.
Then the man, along with another resident, got in a vehicle and
chased Kelley at high speeds. Kelley was found dead in his vehicle
on the side of a road about 10 miles
from the church. He had been hit
twice — in the leg and the torso —
and also had a self-inflected gunshot wound, according to his autopsy. The resident who shot Kelley did not answer his door, and a
sheriff’s deputy said the family did
not want people on the property.
The second resident, Johnnie
Langendorff, described his actions as “act now, ask questions
later.”
What some people were saying
Monday was that the massacre
could have been stopped sooner
had the worshipers in the church
been carrying. The attack could
signal that a change is needed,
said Brandy Johnson, 68, an evangelical minister who moved to
Sutherland Springs a few months
ago. Even in a church service in a
one-stoplight town, someone
should be tapped to be on the
lookout for trouble, she said.
“I think there should be some
designated watchers and some
designated firearm carriers,” she
said.
Johnson said she worked for
many years for the Department of
Homeland Security and was
trained to be observant: “Look for
the weird. Look for twitches. Look
for nervousness.”
Pastor A.T. Tor, 39, brought a
group of worshipers from San Antonio, about 40 minutes away, and
he saw this as a spiritual crisis
rather than one involving powerful firearms.
“I don’t think this is a gun issue.
I think it is a condition-of-the-
CAROLYN VAN HOUTEN/THE WASHINGTON POST
heart issue,” he said. “If this was a
gun issue, you’d have this way
more. Think about how many people around here have guns. It is
the person behind the gun.”
Resident Mike Jordan, 50, has a
tattoo on the right side of his lower
leg that he said embodies everything he stands for: two smoking
1847 Colt Walkers beneath a state
of Texas, colored red white and
blue.
For rural Texans like Jordan,
who grew up around guns, the
weapons are not just symbols of
self-reliance, they’re a way of life.
“At any given time, you might
see me with an AR-15 on my shoulder walking in my neighborhood,”
said Jordan, who estimated that
he owns about 20 guns.
While the majority of Sutherland Springs residents don’t take
advantage of the state’s liberal
open-carry law, residents said,
most people do carry concealed
weapons, and most households
own at least one weapon and usually several more. Seeing high-caliber weapons out in the open,
especially if the muzzle is pointed
down and the gun is strapped to
the owner’s shoulder, doesn’t
cause alarm.
Hearing multiple shots fired in
town is more likely to bring to
mind hunting, rather than a gunman on a killing spree. A day after
the church massacre involving an
assault-style rifle, residents said
their resolve to carry those weapons had only strengthened.
“What happened in that church
should show everybody that it’s
not a gun problem, it’s a people
problem,” said Jordan, whose
grandson was nearly shot by Kelley. “A screwdriver in the hands of
the wrong person can be a deadly
weapon.”
Kevin Langdon doesn’t carry a
screwdriver, but it’s not unusual
to find the retired 62-year-old
teacher carrying multiple guns —
usually small arms he uses to kill
rattlesnakes and copperheads. At
home, on the south side of Sutherland Springs, Langdon owns
about 50 weapons, ranging from
Civil War-era antiques to modern
guns, such as an AK-47, which he
uses to kill wild hogs that wander
onto his 10-acre property and destroy his crops. Without an assault
rifle, a charging hog can be deadly,
he said.
It’s people, however — not
snakes or wild hogs — that locals
worry about most. Langdon’s
neighbors, who have formed an
unofficial watch program, all own
rifles, he said. They use the scopes
to monitor one another’s properties in case a stranger approaches
— a constant concern because of
the traffic that passes through
town along Highway 87, bringing
big-city strangers from nearby
San Antonio, he said.
“If someone were to hit a woman at a gas station, there’d be 20
men on top of him beating a new
lesson into him,” he said. “Everyone has everyone else’s back, and
guns are how we keep one another
safe.”
But it was a man with local ties,
not a stranger, who ended up being the greatest danger to the
community Sunday — a man who
shouldn’t have been allowed to
purchase guns in the first place
because of a domestic-assault conviction while he was in the military. It was the lack of guns in that
church, Langdon and other locals
said, that put Sutherland Springs
residents at risk.
“If everyone was armed with a
gun in that church, how many
people would’ve been killed?” he
said. “Probably zero.”
Sutherland Springs,
Tex., resident Kevin
Langdon owns about 50
guns. In the small town,
he said, “Everyone has
everyone else’s back, and
guns are how we keep
one another safe.”
Authorities revealed that Kelley had been in the midst of a
domestic dispute with relatives,
including his mother-in-law, who
has worshiped at First Baptist but
was not present Sunday. The
method of the attack seemed to
draw inspiration from other recent mass shootings. Kelley
dressed in pseudo-commando
clothes: all-black “tactical” gear
and a mask. He chose a soft target:
people effectively trapped in a
confined space. He used a semiautomatic rifle.
Rick Schultz, 58, who retired
from the military, said: “You pass a
bunch of laws — who is going to
obey those laws? Law-abiding citizens. . . . We just need to harden up
soft targets. Having someone in
there with a concealed weapon.”
Sutherland Springs is a town
nowhere in particular, with a single blinking light at the main
crossroads. The land here is wide
open under a big sky. There’s no
downtown to speak of, just a
string of businesses, including a
Dollar General, a Valero gas station with a convenience store, and
the post office.
Most of the people in town
Monday were strangers — the media, law enforcement personnel,
people from the Red Cross or the
Billy Graham Rapid Response
Team, and so on. A forest of cameras had arisen a block from First
Baptist. Makeshift tents, erected
overnight by authorities, extended from the front of the church,
creating a crime-scene zone out of
sight of overhead helicopters or
drones.
“INCIDENT AHEAD” declared
a road sign at the edge of town.
Religious pilgrims had arrived,
coming from far away to pray at
the scene of the massacre.
The grieving families found
shelter and comfort a mile up a
country road, far from the media
scrum, at a church guarded by
sheriff’s deputies.
peter.holley@washpost.com
joel.achenbach@washpost.com
In one Texas family, members of three generations killed at Sunday service
VICTIMS FROM A1
was expecting.
All at once, Bryan’s parents —
Joe and Claryce Holcombe — lost
children, grandchildren, greatgrandchildren and a future greatgrandchild. The act of violence
that claimed lives from generations of their family took place in
the space that mattered to them
most: their church.
The Holcombes were among
the 26 people authorities say
were killed in Sunday’s mass
shooting, described by Gov. Greg
Abbott (R) as the worst in Texas
history. In many cases, individual
families were struck by multiple
deaths: parents and children,
husbands and wives.
Robert and Shani Corrigan
were high school sweethearts
originally from Clare County,
Mich., who moved to the area to
retire. Both were killed.
Richard Rodriguez and his
wife, Theresa, also had recently
retired — he as foreman for a
railroad, and she as a receptionist
for the same company. If they
weren’t cutting the grass or working in the garden, they were at the
church, their daughter said.
Joann Ward had brought her
children to church. She died with
two of them, Emily Garza, 7, and
Brooke Ward, 5. A son, Ryland
Ward, 5, was injured in the
church.
Tara McNulty, 33, was a single
mother who worked part time at
the Aumont Saloon. Her children
were wounded in the shooting.
Married couple Dennis John-
REUTERS
FAMILY PHOTO
FAMILY PHOTO
FAMILY PHOTO
FAMILY PHOTO
FAMILY PHOTO
Clockwise from top left: Joann Ward, Shani Corrigan, Robert Corrigan, Karla Holcombe, Bryan Holcombe
and Crystal Holcombe were among those killed Sunday at First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Tex.
son, 77, and Sara Johnson, 68,
were also killed in the shooting.
Even the family of the church’s
pastor was affected. Annabelle
Pomeroy, 14, was the daughter of
Pastor Frank Pomeroy. Known as
Belle, she was the youngest of six
children.
Joe and Claryce Holcombe first
heard about the shooting about
an hour after it happened, in a
phone call from a member of
their own church in nearby Floresville, Tex.
“He said there was a big shooting, and he didn’t say much more
than that,” said Joe Holcombe, 86.
Later, they started to hear the
wrenching news. Their son and
daughter-in-law were dead.
As the day went on, they would
learn of their other relatives’
deaths.
John Holcombe, who teaches
Sunday school and runs the audio
for Sunday services at First Baptist Church, told his parents that
he was struck by shrapnel in his
leg. One of his daughters remained hospitalized Sunday
night, mostly for observation, Joe
Holcombe said. She was injured
when someone fell on her,
Claryce Holcombe said.
Their grandparents described
John and Crystal as “fantastic”
parents and a “happy family.”
Crystal Holcombe homeschooled her five children and was
heavily involved in the church,
like the rest of the family. On
Facebook, she reported proudly of
the children’s successes in competitions for their local 4-H club, and
wrote about a recent bake sale in
which the girls participated, benefiting families affected by Hurricane Harvey.
Rojean Staggs, 66, of Floresville, Tex., said she had rented an
apartment to Crystal and described her as a sweet and natural
mother to a large brood.
“Crystal was a breath of fresh
air. She loved children,” Staggs
said, describing a woman who
seemed to navigate easily among
children with different needs
without ever seeming flustered.
“She had a full house and just
seemed to take to it beautifully.”
Staggs said Crystal had lost her
first husband to cancer and had
been married to her husband
John for just a few years.
John Holcombe posts frequently about his lesson plans for Sunday school. For this week, he
planned to focus on Exodus 16, he
wrote in a Facebook post. It describes how God provided the
Israelites with bread from heaven
as they traveled for 40 years in the
desert.
Bryan Holcombe was filling in
Sunday for the church’s lead pastor, who was out of town.
According to his parents, the
associate pastor has been involved
in church work since he was
young.
“We knew when he was born
that he was going to be a preacher,” Joe Holcombe said. “His first
word was ‘God.’ ”
His first sentence? “See the
light.”
On his Facebook page, Bryan
Holcombe is shown hoisting his
grandchildren on his shoulders,
dressing up in costumes for
church events and playing his
ukulele. He would often play the
instrument and sing for prison
inmates, a relative told the Associated Press.
“Grandkids, it doesn’t get any
better!” Bryan Holcombe wrote on
Facebook on one photo of his
many grandchildren. “I’ll wake up
at night and, in prayer, thank God
for each of them . . . it takes a
while:-).”
He and Karla lived near his
parents, between Floresville and
Sutherland Springs. He ran a business on his parents’ farm, making
tarps for cattle trailers, Joe Holcombe said.
Bryan and Karla Holcombe
were high school sweethearts.
One day, their high school was
selling roses, offering to deliver
them to classrooms. So Bryan
Holcombe delivered a rose to each
of Karla’s classes that day.
“He thought she was cute, and
she was,” Joe Holcombe said.
Karla Holcombe had the “gift of
hospitality,” her mother-in-law
said. She had planned to host the
family’s Thanksgiving gathering.
Joe and Claryce Holcombe,
who are retired teachers, hosted a
group of nearby pastors and
churchgoers at their home on
Sunday as they waited for details
about the deceased. They prayed
together.
“It’s of course going to be difficult,” Joe Holcombe said.
But, he said, “we are Christians;
we have read the book. We know
the ending, and it’s good.”
“They’re in heaven,” he added.
“And they’re a lot better off than
we are.”
samantha.schmidt@washpost.com
A8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. TUESDAY,
NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
Texas Church Shooting
Devin Patrick Kelley had a violent past, records indicate
But no hint of trouble
at RV park where he
worked as security guard
BY
AND
E LI R OSENBERG
W ESLEY L OWERY
new braunfels, tex. — Devin
Patrick Kelley’s co-workers didn’t
think much of it when he failed to
show up Sunday for his evening
shift as a security guard at Summit
Vacation and RV Resort.
Kelley had been 35 miles north
in Sutherland Springs, police say,
committing one of the deadliest
mass shootings in modern American history. But to his co-workers,
he was just a new worker on the
job. In his five weeks there, nothing about him set off alarms.
“It’s scary,” said Claudia
Varjabedian, the park’s office
manager, who said Kelley passed
a background check before he
was hired for the full-time job.
Kelley was responsible for afterhours check-ins and making sure
the pools, cafe and clubhouse
were locked at 10 p.m.
“You don’t know who you work
with sometimes,” Varjabedian
said.
Police say that Kelley, 26, was the
gunman whose shooting rampage
at a small Southern Baptist Church
on Sunday left 26 dead and more
than 20 wounded. After fleeing the
scene, he was confronted by at least
one armed resident and took his
own life soon after, police said.
Police and court records in
three states paint the picture of a
young former U.S. airman with a
sometimes violent private life. In
briefings Monday, local officials
— who emphasized that the investigation is ongoing — said
that at least one of Kelley’s relatives attended First Baptist
Church in Sutherland Springs,
and that the shooting was proceeded by a “domestic situation.”
Kelley graduated from New
Braunfels High School in 2009, a
spokeswoman for the school district said. His senior photo was the
only image of him in the yearbook.
“We are shocked to hear that a
graduate of our lone high school is
allegedly responsible for this tragedy,” read a statement from spokeswoman Rebecca Villarreal. “This
senseless act of violence is something that is hard to understand
and has definitely shaken our community. We grieve with those that
suffered a loss and offer our deepest condolences.”
In 2010, Kelley enlisted in the
Air Force, serving as a logistical
readiness airman at Holloman Air
Force Base in New Mexico, according to Air Force spokeswoman Ann
Stefanek.
Kelley’s string of legal problems
began as early as 2012, when he
was court-martialed in New Mexico and sentenced to a year in
military prison for assaulting his
then-wife and her child, making
him part of a long line of mass
attackers or suspects with domestic violence in their pasts.
According to court-martial documents released Monday evening
by the Air Force, Kelley was found
guilty of domestic violence. Prosecutors alleged that on June 21,
2011, and April 27, 2012, he unlawfully struck, choked, kicked and
pulled the hair of his wife and
struck her young child “with a
force likely to produce death or
grievous bodily harm.”
Court records in nearby Alamogordo, N.M., show that in May
2012, Tessa K. Kelley filed for
divorce from her husband, who
she said was in jail at the time.
After his prison sentence, Kelley
JONATHAN BACHMAN/REUTERS
was reduced in rank and released
from the military with a bad-conduct discharge in 2014.
The military sentence raises key
questions for investigators about
how Kelley obtained his weapons.
Officials said they recovered at
least four guns from Kelley’s vehicle, but also said that Kelley had
sought and failed to obtain a
permit allowing him to carry a
concealed weapon. Officials with
the Air Force said Monday that his
conviction — which should have
prevented him from purchasing
weapons — had not been properly
flagged for the FBI and that they
would launch an internal investigation.
In August 2014, Kelley was
charged with a misdemeanor
count of mistreatment, neglect or
cruelty to animals in nearby El
Paso County, Colo., where he lived
at one point, records show. Sheriff’s deputies responded to a call
about a man who was punching a
dog, police records indicate. Four
witnesses told deputies that they
saw a man matching Kelley’s description yelling at and chasing a
white-and-brown husky.
“The suspect then started beating on the dog with both fists,
punching it in the head and chest,”
a deputy wrote in the incident
report. “He could hear the suspect
yelling at the dog and while he was
striking it, the dog was yelping and
whining. The suspect then picked
up the dog by the neck into the air
and threw it onto the ground and
then drug him away to lot 60.”
Kelley was charged with animal
cruelty and the dog was transferred to the Humane Society for a
full medical evaluation.
This summer, Kelley worked
briefly as an unarmed night security guard at a Schlitterbahn water
park in New Braunfels, the company said. He passed a Texas Depart-
ABOVE: The Kelley
family residence in New
Braunfels, Tex. LEFT:
Claudia Varjabedian,
office manager at the
Summit Vacation and RV
Resort, said Devin
Patrick Kelley passed a
background check before
he was hired there.
DAVID J. PHILLIP/ASSOCIATED PRESS
ment of Public Safety criminal
background check before beginning work there, a spokeswoman
said, though she added that Kelley
was fired in July — as the season
was reaching its peak — because
he was “not a good fit.”
He was also able to pass a
background check that allowed
him to work for HEB, a Texas
grocery chain, in New Braunfels.
Company spokeswoman Dya Campos said he worked there for two
months in 2013 and quit; she was
unsure of his position there.
Records indicate that Kelley
lived for some period on a property
valued at about $800,000 owned
by his parents in New Braunfels.
The secluded home sits on 28 acres
of wooded farmland, separated
from the nearest main road by a
long private driveway.
Neighbors told local news media
that Kelley lived in a barn behind
the 3,700-square-foot home with
his current wife and 2-year-old son.
They said the family had lived
there for more than a decade.
Dave Ivey, who identified himself as Kelley’s uncle, apologized to
the shooting victims in an interview with NBC News.
“I never in a million years could
have believed Devin could be capable of this kind of thing,” Ivey said.
“My family will suffer because of
his coward actions.”
Cars lined the highway outside
the house on Monday morning. A
Comal County sheriff’s truck
blocked the property’s gate, which
had a “Beware of dog” sign.
Doug, who lives across the street
and declined to give his last name,
said he didn’t get to know the
family at all, in the 11 years he lived
on the same road.
“The only time I see them is
when they’re going out and they
don’t even look my way,” he said.
He said he didn’t recognize the
shooter.
He said he regularly heard gunshots coming from the property
across the street but thought little
of it. The noise used to rattle his
two small dogs, he said.
Mark Moravitz, who lives across
the street from the Kelley family,
also said he frequently heard gunfire coming from the property,
often at 10 or 11 p.m.
“We hear a lot of gunfire,” he told
KSAT, “but we’re out in the country.”
Moravitz told local media that
the Kelley family traveled frequently, so he would housesit for them.
He described Kelley as a “regular
guy” and said it was “shocking” to
hear about the shooting. “You never think your neighbor is capable of
something like that,” he said. “If he
did that, that kind of worries you,
thinking we’ve been living next
door to the guy.”
A Facebook page bearing Kelley’s name showed a photo of a
Ruger assault-style rifle — the kind
of weapon police say was used in
the shooting. The page was taken
down on Sunday.
Former high school classmates of Kelley took to their
own Facebook pages in shock,
describing him as a social out-
cast whom some had blocked or
deleted from their social networking because he sent inappropriate or aggressive messages.
“I was close with Devin Kelley
from middle school through high
school . . . and I had always known
there was something off about
him,” Courtney Kleiber wrote on
Facebook.
“He use to be happy at one point,
normal, your average kid,” she
wrote. “Over the years we all saw
him change into something that he
wasn’t. To be completely honest,
I’m really not surprised this happened, and I don’t think anyone
who knew him is very surprised
either.”
About a 15-minute drive from
his family’s ranch, Kelley’s coworkers at the RV resort said they
knew little about him. On Monday,
the grounds appeared nearly empty except for a few maintenance
workers driving golf carts and
clearing out trash. Co-workers said
Kelley stood out only because of
how quiet he was, which at times
drew comments from park guests.
It is now a frustratingly familiar
trope: the mysterious inner life of a
quiet stranger at the workplace.
“He didn’t seem like the kind of
person that would do something
like that,” Varjabedian said, adding
that Kelley had done a “fairly good
job” while he worked at the RV
park.
“We don’t know a thing,” she
added. “That’s the problem.”
eli.rosenberg@washpost.com
wesley.lowery@washpost.com
Joel Achenbach in New Braunfels,
Bob Moore in Alamogordo, N.M., and
Sandhya Somashekhar, Alex Horton,
Derek Hawkins, Julie Tate, Scott
Wilson and Travis Andrews in
Washington contributed to this
report.
Air Force says procedural failure let Texas church shooter buy firearms
BY
A LEX H ORTON
The Air Force says it failed to
follow policies for alerting federal
law enforcement about Devin P.
Kelley’s violent past, enabling the
former service member, who
killed at least 26 churchgoers
Sunday in Sutherland Springs,
Tex., to obtain firearms before the
shooting rampage.
Kelley should have been barred
from purchasing firearms and
body armor because of his domestic violence conviction in 2014
while serving at Holloman Air
Force Base in New Mexico. Kelley
was sentenced to a year in prison
and kicked out of the military with
a bad-conduct discharge following two counts of domestic abuse
against his wife and a child, according to Air Force spokeswoman Ann Stefanek.
“Initial information indicates
that Kelley’s domestic violence offense was not entered into the
Attacker was kicked out
of military after 2 counts
of domestic abuse
National Criminal Information
Center database,” Stefanek said in
a statement released Monday. Air
Force Secretary Heather Wilson
and Chief of Staff Gen. David Goldfein have directed an investigation
of Kelley’s case and “relevant policies and procedures,” she said.
Firearms retailer Academy
Sports also confirmed Monday that
Kelley purchased two weapons
from its stores after passing federal
background checks this year and
last. It remains unclear whether
those were the same weapons used
in Sunday’s massacre, but his ability
to purchase guns at all highlights
the Air Force’s failure to follow Pentagon guidelines for ensuring cer-
tain violent offenses are reported to
the FBI.
While military law does not
classify crimes as felonies or misdemeanors, Kelley’s sentence was
a functional felony conviction,
said Geoffrey Corn, a former Army
lawyer and professor at the South
Texas College of Law in Houston. A
separate law prohibits violent offenders from purchasing body armor, which Kelley was seen wearing during the rampage.
Authorities say Kelley, dressed
in all black and wearing a tactical
vest, entered the Sutherland
Springs First Baptist Church and
opened fire with a Ruger semiautomatic rifle. The AR-556 Kelley
used is patterned on the ubiquitous AR-15.
Lawmakers called on Defense
Secretary Jim Mattis to review
military investigative organizations and determine how many
convicted former service members the military has failed to
properly document for the FBI.
“Learning that this senseless
act of violence might have been
prevented if only the proper form
was filled out by military investigators was absolutely devastating,” Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand
(D-N.Y.) said in a statement. Sen.
Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.)
said on Twitter that he would call
on the Pentagon and Department
of Justice to “provide a clear picture of where, why and how this
process failed.”
Corn said it appears there is
confusion within the Air Force,
and other military branches,
about only reporting violent
crimes that result in dishonorable discharges, which are more
severe punishments under military law than the bad-conduct
discharge Kelley received.
“Either the Department of Defense is reporting these convictions, or they’re not,” Corn said.
“How is the federal statute going
to be effectively implemented if
they aren’t reporting these convictions?”
Texas state officials had said
previously that Kelley did not
meet the requirements for obtaining a concealed handgun license, according to a report in
the Houston Chronicle. Kelley
also claimed he had no criminal
background that would have precluded him from buying firearms, the newspaper reported.
In the initial aftermath of Sunday’s tragedy, officials were
searching for answers about how
Kelley obtained his weapons.
“By all of the facts that we seem
to know, he was not supposed to
have access to a gun, so how did
this happen?” Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R) said in an interview Monday morning on CNN.
Sky Gerrond, a former Air Force
security operations officer who
spent seven years in military law
enforcement, said a dishonorable
discharge may have been a more
appropriate punishment for the
severity of Kelley’s crime.
Had the Air Force court system
handed down that punishment,
Gerrond said, it is more likely the
details of Kelley’s conviction
would have reached the FBI’s database.
The Air Force does not operate
prisons and instead sends troops
convicted of crimes to Army or
Navy jails. Kelley served his sentence at a Navy brig in San Diego.
Navy regulations do not require
a fingerprint card and conviction summary to be forwarded to
the FBI following inmate intake
processing.
Corn said inmates are briefed
on the specific restrictions they
face upon returning to society.
Gun ownership, he said, would be
at the top of the list for Kelley.
“What do we tell guys like him
when they leave?” Corn said.
alex.horton@washpost.com
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A9
RE
Local races a test for messaging by candidates, parties
GOP, Democratic donors
have invested in contests
far down the ballot
BY
D AVID W EIGEL
parsippany, n.j. — Halfway into
his Saturday night rally, after telling about 200 fellow Democrats
that Republicans were “crushing
the dreams of the middle class,”
gubernatorial hopeful Phil Murphy did something no nervous
candidate would dare.
He broke into song.
“Come on, come on, now, touch
me, babe!” Murphy warbled, channeling Jim Morrison and shaking
his hips. Democrats were running
a joyful campaign, he explained:
“They’re trying to scare people to
vote for them, and we came from
the school where we’re inspired to
vote for people.”
Come Tuesday, both parties expect Murphy, a 60-year-old former
Goldman Sachs banker and ambassador, to easily defeat Lt. Gov.
Kim Guadagno (R) and put Democrats fully in control of New Jersey.
Outgoing Gov. Chris Christie, once
one of the most popular figures in
Republican politics, is so disliked
that New Jersey’s election has become an afterthought to the barnburner races in Virginia.
But the race here is one of dozens that parties and outside
groups have flooded to test messaging, show off clout, and — for
Democrats — exploit the unpopularity of President Trump.
In Washington, Democrats are
hoping to secure control of the
state Senate, and with it the entire
state government. In Maine, progressives are trying to force the
expansion of Medicaid coverage
with a popular ballot measure. In
New York City, Mayor Bill de Blasio is trying to frame an expected
landslide victory as a rebuke of the
president.
“The best reason to vote on November 7 is because of what happened last year on November 8,” de
Blasio told the congregation at the
First Baptist Church of Crown
Heights on Sunday morning. “Millions of people didn’t vote, and
they woke up that next morning to
a rude awakening. Very rude. I
think you know what I mean.”
JULIO CORTEZ/ASSOCIATED PRESS
N.J. Democratic gubernatorial candidate Phil Murphy answers a question during a debate against Republican Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno.
The New Jersey race is taking
place on favorable Democratic
turf. Just 41 percent of the state
backed Trump for president. Less
than 20 percent of voters say they
view Christie favorably, a fact
Murphy has exploited by slashing
the “Christie-Guadagno administration” in debates and attack ads.
On Saturday, as Guadagno
stumped across the southern part
of the state, even some Republican
voters grimaced at the name of the
president and their governor. At a
campaign office in Burlington
County, volunteers had pasted up
images of Ronald Reagan, the Nixon family and even the villain
from “Ghostbusters 2.” The only
visible evidence of the Republican
governor and president was a
clutch of bumper stickers.
Katherine Colona, 38, a Republican candidate for the township
committee, said that she is proud
of her ticket but working to sepa-
rate herself from the president.
“Let me just say: I’m biracial, and
he’s made some remarks that I
wouldn’t be comfortable repeating
at my family’s dinner table,” she said.
Guadagno, who is closing out
her campaign with a busy bus
tour, has also distanced herself
from the party’s more toxic figures. On Saturday, she stumped
alongside former governor Christie Todd Whitman, who echoed
her attacks on Murphy as an outof-touch banker who would turn
New Jersey into a “sanctuary
state.” At each stop, the Republicans predicted that independents
and Democrats would hear that
message and come around.
“I was down by 17 points with a
week to go,” Whitman told voters
in Burlington County, recalling
her upset 1993 campaign. “Kim’s
only down by 14!”
The New Jersey race is one of
many in which Republicans have
grabbed onto “sanctuary city” status as a way to portray Democrats
as weak on crime. A widely seen
campaign flier on Long Island
warns that a Democratic candidate for Nassau County executive
would kick open the doors to MS13 gang members. In several races,
Republican voters have received
mail urging them to head to the
polls by invoking National Football League players who have protested racial injustice by taking a
knee during the national anthem.
Democrats, who watched Republicans pick off local offices and
state legislative races during Barack Obama’s presidency, have
counterattacked with a combination of Trump bashing and careful
investments. In New York, where
Westchester County Executive Rob
Astorino is seeking a third term,
Democrats have run ads linking
him to Trump, while Trump donor
Robert Mercer has put $1 million
toward an effort to defend him.
The Democratic National Committee, under fire and underfunded because of the lingering bitterness of the 2016 primaries, has
gone for broke by investing hyperlocally. There has been little national investment in Utah, where
voters will elect a replacement for
former congressman Jason Chaffetz, and Republican John Curtis is
favored to win. But an “Every Zip
Code Counts” program, started
this year, has led to investments in
the race for mayor of Charlotte; in
Fayetteville, N.C.; and in Albuquerque, an increasingly Democratic
city where low off-year turnout has
often benefited Republicans.
The Republican National Committee, flush with cash, has been
playing at the same level. The party
has invested more than $500,000
in Pennsylvania’s off-year elections,
where a small electorate will decide
whether to retain and elect a num-
ber of judges and mayors. To local
Democrats’ consternation, the state
and national GOP investments may
end up doubling their own.
But both parties, along with
outside groups, have dumped
money into a battle for one seat in
Washington’s state Senate. As of
Friday, more than $8.5 million had
been spent by Democratic nominee Manka Dhingra, Republican
nominee Jinyoung Lee Englund
and outsiders. Tom Steyer, a
hedge-fund multimillionaire who
is running national TV ads arguing for Trump’s impeachment, has
put $250,000 behind Dhingra;
Koch Industries has given
$25,000 to Englund.
Democrats, nervous about Virginia and eager to reverse their
Obama-era losses, have grown increasingly confident about a Washington state win. A victory there
would put them in charge of every
branch of state government; a win
the same day in New Jersey would
increase the number of Democratic “trifectas” from six to eight. Local
Democrats credit the DNC, which
helped fund a digital adviser, for
helping them find old Englund
tweets that have been pivotal to the
campaign.
“It’s a cautionary tale for candidates,” said Washington State
Democratic Party Chair Tina Podlodowski. “Before you run for office, you might want to strip your
Twitter feed of pro-Trump, antichoice stuff.”
Some of progressives’ mostwatched races are even lower on the
ballot. Democratic Socialists of
America, a left-wing group that has
surged in membership, is working
to elect as many allies as possible in
city council contests from New York
to Minneapolis.
And in Maine, progressives
have thrown themselves into the
passage of Question 2, a measure
that would accept the Affordable
Care Act’s Medicaid expansion after multiple vetoes by Gov. Paul
LePage (R).
“People are seeing that the only
way to get stuff done and put
points on the board while Trump
is president is to take it to the
voters directly,” said Jonathan
Schleifer, the executive director of
the Fairness Project, which helped
put together Maine’s campaign.
“You don’t need control of Congress. You can act.”
david.weigel@washpost.com
A10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
The World
LETTER FROM MOSCOW
Russia marks 100th anniversary of revolution — carefully
BY
D AVID F ILIPOV
A grand parade will make its
way across Red Square on
Tuesday, and that makes sense,
given the momentousness of the
date — the 100th anniversary of
the Bolshevik Revolution, one of
the defining events of the 20th
century.
Only the procession will not
celebrate the 1917 communist
uprising that led to the creation
of the Soviet Union. It is a recreation of a 1941 World War II
military parade held in defiance
of the German forces that had
arrived at the outskirts of
Moscow.
The choice of celebration
encapsulates the Kremlin’s
selective approach to Russia’s
turbulent 20th-century history.
President Vladimir Putin prefers
to emphasize the bits of Soviet
nostalgia that underscore the
accomplishments of a united,
strong state like the one he
wants Russians to believe he is
leading.
The Red Army’s defiant stand
in the World War II Battle of
Moscow is one of them. The
Soviet units that marched from
the Kremlin on Nov. 7, 1941, did
not stop until they reached the
front lines and met the Nazi
invaders in battle.
But Putin, who has spoken
out against the popular “color
revolution” uprisings that have
toppled established regimes in
the nations of the former
U.S.S.R., cannot openly
celebrate the holiday the Soviets
called Red October — essentially
the mother of all color
revolutions.
And he has frequently
touched on the devastating
upheaval wrought by the birth
of the Soviet Union. In an
October speech, he decried its
“cost of destroying our
statehood and the ruthless
fracturing of millions of human
lives.”
At the same time, Putin
cannot publicly condemn the
Bolshevik Revolution, not when
the Communist Party — which
will be holding a rally in
Moscow on Tuesday — remains
one of the two most popular
opposition parties in
Russia. And out of that
revolution grew the strong state
that, however many wrongs it
committed against its people,
succeeded the shamefully
decrepit and deteriorating
Russia of 1917.
So the Kremlin is sitting this
one out.
“We are not planning any
celebrations, and I don’t see any
reason why we should,” Putin’s
spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, told
reporters when he was asked
about the Kremlin’s plans to
mark the Nov. 7 holiday —
which took place Oct. 25 on the
Julian calendar used in imperial
Russia, thus the name.
This does not mean that
Russia is ignoring the
anniversary that marks what the
Soviets called the Great October
Socialist Revolution, one of the
two most sacred holidays of the
U.S.S.R. (The other is the Soviet
victory in World War II, which
Putin has called the greatest
achievement of the 20th
LEFT: RUSSIAN STATE DOCUMENTARY FILM AND PHOTO ARCHIVE/ASSOCIATED PRESS. RIGHT: IVAN SEKRETAREV/ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Kremlin’s Nikolskaya Tower in November 1917 and in October 2017. At left, damage from artillery shelling during the revolution’s fighting in Moscow can be seen.
century.)
On Tuesday, St. Petersburg,
the Russian capital when the
revolution took place, will host a
festival commemorating the
anniversary. In Moscow, the
Russian State Duma, the lower
house of parliament, will have
an exhibition of “young painters
dedicated to the October
Revolution.” The Bolshoi
Theatre had scheduled a concert
Sunday called “Hammer and
Sickle” commemorating the
revolution, but it was
interrupted by a bomb threat.)
And the World War II parade
that will be reenacted Tuesday
was also a celebration of the
Bolshevik Revolution: With
Moscow under attack, Soviet
dictator Joseph Stalin’s decision
to hold the annual parade rather
than cancel the event was a
galvanizing moment in a much
venerated battle that served
Adolf Hitler his first major
defeat.
All in all, though, the
meaning of the day is
RUSSIAN STATE DOCUMENTARY FILM AND PHOTO ARCHIVE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Armed soldiers carrying a banner reading “Communism” march
toward the Kremlin Wall in Moscow, 100 years ago this month.
diminished. Its post-Soviet
name, Day of Accord and
Reconciliation, refers to
something that people thought
would happen in the newly
democratic Russia but never
truly did. Russia never really
faced the worst of its Soviet
past, nor experienced a full
reconciliation with it.
It never laid open the full
archives that detailed the extent
of the murder and repression
carried out by the KGB secret
police and its predecessors in
the years of Stalin’s mass purges,
and it never brought to justice
the living officers who carried
out the suppression of dissent
under later Soviet rulers.
The names were moved
around a bit, but Russia’s first
post-Soviet president, Boris
Yeltsin, kept former KGB
officers in positions of power,
and Putin, a former KGB officer,
brought even more former
colleagues on board. Today,
graduates of the domestic
security service, now called the
FSB, don’t just populate Putin’s
inner circle.
They are part of a
countrywide club of “haves,”
which is how Gennady Gudkov,
a reserve FSB colonel who is
now a prominent member of
Russia’s tiny liberal opposition,
describes them.
That opposition is on the
losing end of the battle over
Russian history, which Andrei
Kolesnikov, a senior fellow at
the Carnegie Moscow Center,
said Putin uses “both as a means
of legitimizing his regime and a
method of governing the
country.”
Some might argue that Putin
tries to twist the national
memory, invoking the
achievements of imperial and
Soviet history, claiming them as
his inheritance, while ignoring
the rest.
In 2007, on the 70th
anniversary of the beginning of
Stalin’s Great Terror, one of
Russia’s oldest human rights
organizations, Memorial, which
for 30 years has sought to
expose Soviet-era crimes,
organized what has become an
annual reading of the names of
people executed.
On Oct. 29, the eve of Russia’s
day of remembrance for the
victims, people stand outside
the former KGB headquarters at
the Solovetsky Stone, a
monument brought from the
island in the White Sea where in
1923 the Soviets set up their first
prison camp.
This year, on Oct. 30, Putin
inaugurated a new monument
to the victims of Stalinist
purges, the Wall of Grief, on a
space along Moscow’s busy
Garden Ring road.
“This terrible past must not
be erased from our national
memory and cannot be justified
by anything,” he said.
A group of Soviet-era
dissidents wrote a letter
accusing Putin of pretending
“that political repression is a
thing long since past.”
Memorial has been
designated a “foreign agent”
according to a Russian law
intended to marginalize
will do it very well because I am
good. I can do a great job.’”
was on vacation, taking her
toddler daughter to visit relatives.
The foundation’s chief
executive, Monique Villa, said
Zaghari-Ratcliffe “is not a
journalist and has never trained
journalists at the Thomson
Reuters Foundation,” where she
works as a project manager.
Villa urged Johnson to correct
his “serious mistake,” saying it
“can only worsen her sentence.”
Britain’s Foreign Office did not
clarify Johnson’s comments but
said his words “provide no
justifiable basis on which to bring
any additional charges.”
nongovernment organizations.
“We can’t take part in
memorial events organized by
the authorities, who say they are
sorry about victims of the Soviet
regime, but continue to practice
political repression and crush
civil freedoms,” the dissidents
said.
The past 100 years have not
been kind to Russia. Maybe they
wouldn’t have been even
without the revolution. But it
happened, and its legacy haunts
Russian memory, inescapable
and confounding.
david.filipov@washpost.com
DIGEST
TURKEY
U.S. missions resume
‘limited’ visa services
U.S. missions in Turkey have
resumed processing visa
applications by Turkish citizens on
a “limited basis” after Ankara
reassured Washington that no
local staff would be detained or
arrested for “performing their
duties,” the U.S. Embassy said
Monday.
Last month, the United States
halted most visa services for
Turkish citizens after Turkish
authorities arrested Metin Topuz,
a Turkish employee at the U.S.
Consulate in Istanbul, deepening
already strained bilateral ties.
Turkey retaliated by halting visa
services in the United States for
Americans who want to travel to
Turkey.
The U.S. Embassy, in
announcing the resumption of
limited visa services, said it had
received “high-level assurances”
that no additional local employees
were under investigation. The
Turkish government also gave
assurances that local staff
members would not be detained
or arrested “for performing their
official duties.”
Later, the Turkish Embassy in
Washington posted a statement
on Twitter announcing that it was
resuming “limited” visa services.
The announcements came a
day before Turkish Prime Minister
Binali Yildirim is to travel to the
United States to meet Vice
President Pence for talks aimed at
mending ties.
— Associated Press
IRAN
Johnson accused of
imperiling jailed Briton
— Associated Press
ZIMBABWE
Mugabe deputy’s firing
clears path for first lady
Zimbabwean President Robert
Mugabe on Monday fired a vice
president who had previously
been seen as a likely successor,
removing an obstacle to the
presidential ambitions of
Mugabe’s wife.
Vice President Emmerson
Mnangagwa was removed from
office “with immediate effect,” the
government said, opening the
way to the possible appointment
of Grace Mugabe to the post.
The 93-year-old president and
his wife have in recent months
accused Mnangagwa of plotting
to oust the Zimbabwean leader,
who has been in power since the
nation’s independence from
KHALED ABDULLAH/REUTERS
A backer of the Houthi rebel group in Yemen is surrounded by a
billowing flag at a rally in Sanaa to show support for Palestinians.
white minority rule in 1980.
Mnangagwa had been vice
president since 2014. He was the
most prominent of two vice
presidents and had been part of
Mugabe’s cabinet since 1980.
Speculation is swirling over
whether Grace Mugabe will be
appointed to the vacant vice
president’s post next month. On
Sunday, she said at a rally that she
was ready to take over from her
husband.
“So I have said to the president:
‘You can also leave me in charge,’ ”
she said. “ ‘Give me the job and I
A charity on Monday accused
British Foreign Secretary Boris
Johnson of leaving a British
Iranian woman facing more
prison time by making an
inaccurate statement about why
she was in Iran.
Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe is
serving a five-year sentence on
charges of plotting the “soft
toppling” of Iran’s government.
Johnson told a parliamentary
committee last week that
Zaghari-Ratcliffe was “simply
teaching people journalism, as I
understand it,” when she was
arrested in Tehran last year.
After the remarks, ZaghariRatcliffe was summoned to an
unscheduled court hearing in
Tehran, where Johnson’s
comments were cited as proof
that she was engaged in
“propaganda against the regime.”
Her employer, Thomson
Reuters Foundation, said she
hadn’t been working in Iran but
— Associated Press
Liberian court halts presidential
runoff: Liberia’s Supreme Court
halted a presidential runoff
scheduled for Tuesday until the
National Elections Commission
investigates allegations of
irregularities and fraud in the
first round. Chief Justice Francis
Saye Korkpor said the electoral
body had been proceeding
“wrongly and illegally” to conduct
the runoff between former soccer
superstar George Weah and Vice
President Joseph Boakai while a
complaint about the October poll
remained unresolved.
— From news services
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A11
SU
Saudis blame Iran for missile, a possible ‘act of war’ Yemen feels fallout of
Charge adds to questions
about crown prince’s
aims and temperament
BY K AREEM F AHIM
AND K AREN D E Y OUNG
istanbul — Questions about the
aims and temperament of Saudi
Arabia’s powerful crown prince
came to the fore Monday after his
country issued a bellicose warning
to Iran, accusing it of carrying out
a missile strike on the Saudi capital that may have constituted an
“act of war.”
The missile was fired from
neighboring Yemen on Saturday
by the Houthis, a rebel group with
ties to Iran that has been battling a
Saudi-led military coalition. The
war has spawned countless crossborder attacks — including
Houthi ballistic missile launches
and thousands of Saudi airstrikes
across Yemen — as well as an
endless string of recriminations
between the Saudi and Iranian
governments.
But several factors seemed to
make the latest Saudi warning
more dire, raising fears of a military escalation between the regional superpowers. Though it
caused no casualties, the missile
strike was among the deepest yet
into Saudi territory during Yemen’s civil war, highlighting the
Saudis’ continued vulnerability to
such attacks despite an overwhelming military advantage
over the rebels.
And it came at a time when the
crown prince, Mohammed bin
Salman, and the rest of the Saudi
leadership appeared to be escalating an offensive against regional
adversaries, such as Iran, as well
as domestic challengers. The Saudi authorities carried out an unexpected and withering purge Saturday that targeted princes, senior
officials and the country’s most
prominent businessmen, shocking seasoned observers of the
kingdom.
The arrests were cast by the
authorities as part of an anticorruption drive but struck many
as the latest attempt by Mohammed to consolidate his power before eventually inheriting the
throne from his father, King Salman.
In recent days, the Saudis have
also stepped up their confrontation with Hezbollah, the Shiite
party in Lebanon that is backed by
Iran. The Saudis appear to have
played a central role in the resignation of Lebanon’s prime minister, Saad Hariri, who sharply criticized Iran during a resignation
speech he delivered Saturday
from the Saudi capital.
The Saudis have clearly been
SAUDI PRESS AGENCY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
King Salman, center, at a swearing-in ceremony with the new chief
of the National Guard, Khaled bin Ayyaf, left, and new Economy
and Planning Minister Mohammad al-Tuwaijri. A swift purge of
Saudi elites Saturday shocked seasoned observers of the kingdom.
emboldened by support from the
Trump administration. President
Trump has repeatedly praised
King Salman as the leader of the
Arab world and a bulwark against
what he has described as Iranian
hegemony.
Currently traveling in Asia,
Trump turned to Twitter on Monday to offer his strong support for
the arrests and firings over the
weekend, tweeting that “some of
those they are harshly treating
have been ‘milking’ their country
for years!” and saying that “I have
great confidence in King Salman
and the Crown Prince of Saudi
Arabia, they know exactly what
they are doing.”
Presidential adviser and Trump
son-in-law Jared Kushner has cultivated a special relationship with
Mohammed, and he has traveled
to the kingdom three times this
year, most recently on an unannounced visit 10 days ago. Kushner, along with negotiator Jason
Greenblatt, is leading the administration’s efforts to jump-start the
moribund
Israeli-Palestinian
peace process. That goal will become more achievable, the administration believes, if the Saudis
and Israel can be brought together
based on their shared antipathy
toward Iran.
In a series of messages posted
Monday on Twitter, Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif said that
the Trump administration’s support for Saudi Arabia has “proved
hazardous to regional health.” Following Trump’s visit to Riyadh in
May, Zarif noted, Saudi ally Bahrain launched a violent crackdown against a Shiite opposition
stronghold, and Saudi Arabia,
Bahrain and the United Arab
Emirates broke relations and
closed their borders with neighboring Qatar.
Trump has also praised Saudi
Arabia for a pledge, made during
his visit there, to spend $110 billion on future U.S. weapons purchases. In a news conference Sunday with Japanese Prime Minister
Shinzo Abe, the president noted
that Japan was “going to be purchasing massive amounts of military equipment” to defend itself
against North Korea. It was U.S.
antimissile defense systems,
Trump said, that “shot something
out of the sky the other day in
Saudi Arabia . . . a needle in the
sky, and it was hit immediately
and exploded without damage.”
In a call to Salman on Saturday,
while Trump was en route from
Hawaii to Tokyo, the president
personally appealed to the Saudi
ruler to list the upcoming sale of
the Saudi Arabian Oil Co., Aramco,
on the New York Stock Exchange.
A White House readout of the
call made no mention of the Saudi
arrests.
They swept up some of the
country’s most influential figures,
including Prince Alwaleed bin Talal, a billionaire investor, as well as
cabinet ministers and the head of
the elite National Guard — a potential rival to the crown prince.
A royal decree named Mohammed the head of a new committee
fighting graft, putting him at the
center of an initiative popular
with many Saudis — a move that
also served to solidify the crown
prince’s hold on power.
In an analysis released Monday,
the Eurasia Group said that “the
dismissal and arrest of dozens of
ministers, royal family members,
officials and senior military officers represents the beginning of a
national purge that will likely succeed in removing the last few obstacles standing between Mohammed bin Salman and the throne.”
Not everyone agreed. A former
U.S. intelligence official said that
Saudi shake-up rattles investors
Arrests could hinder
plans to sell off a slice of
kingdom’s oil company
BY
S TEVEN M UFSON
The Saudi leadership shake-up
and wave of arrests over the
weekend have rattled potential
investors in the kingdom’s ambitious modernization drive to create a new city, diversify the economy and sell off a slice of the
state-owned Saudi Aramco oil
company.
Crown Prince Mohammed bin
Salman has made the modernization drive, dubbed Vision 2030,
the centerpiece of his plan for the
kingdom, combining economic
reforms and modest steps toward
social liberalization.
But the kingdom has pared
back important but painful domestic economic reforms and
been distracted by its blockade of
Qatar and long-running war in
Yemen. Now the abrupt internal
purge — ousting economic technocrats, a billionaire prince and
other members of the royal family
— has left experts wondering
whether it is truly aimed at corruption or at Mohammed’s political rivals.
“The kingdom is at a crossroads,” Bruce Riedel, director of
the intelligence project at the
Brookings Institution and author
of the forthcoming book “Kings
and Presidents,” said in an email.
“Its economy has flatlined with
low oil prices; the war in Yemen is
a quagmire; the blockade of Qatar
is a failure; Iranian influence is
rampant in Lebanon, Syria and
Iraq; and the succession is a
question mark. It is the most
volatile period in Saudi history in
over a half-century.”
One key test will be the
planned initial public offering of
a roughly 5 percent slice of Saudi
Aramco. The crown prince has
promoted the offering as a way of
showing that the kingdom could
be transparent and that it had to
diversify its economy.
The crown prince, who met
President Trump in the Oval Office in March, has been selling his
Vision 2030 plan to leverage the
kingdom’s global oil power into
broader economic development
at home. During Trump’s visit
there in May, Saudi leaders and
the U.S. president highlighted
deals to promote manufacturing
in the kingdom.
Jared Kushner, the president’s
adviser and son-in-law, made an
unannounced visit to Riyadh last
week.
Yet as part of the weekend
shake-up, Adel Fakeih, the minister of economy and planning and
a member of Saudi Arabia’s oversight council, was dismissed.
Gregory Gause, head of the
international affairs department
at the Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas
A&M University, said in an email
that the wave of arrests goes to
the heart of the investment issue
and called the timing “puzzling.”
“If this means a new definition
of ‘corruption’ in the Kingdom, I
think that it will take awhile for
both the domestic private sector
and foreign investors to figure
out what is going on,” he said. “In
the meantime, I think they are
going to be cautious about investment. And investment and private sector growth are what Vision 2030 are all about.”
Investors will be looking carefully at plans for the Aramco IPO.
So far it hasn’t been clear whether
the IPO would be launched in
London or New York.
On Saturday, Trump tweeted:
“Would very much appreciate
Saudi Arabia doing their IPO of
Aramco with the New York Stock
Exchange. Important to the United States!”
But many Saudi experts, who
believe Saudi Aramco’s books
hide large payments to the royal
family, doubt that the king and
crown prince will be able to make
the offering transparent enough
for international investors. Now,
the shake-up will give investors
further pause. Some analysts believe a private placement with
Chinese or Russian companies is
a possibility.
“I think [the shake-up] does to
Aramco what it does to the whole
notion of foreign investment in
the economy — raises red flags,”
Gause said.
For now, the public offering is
on track. “President Trump’s
tweet suggests the IPO may not be
dead as reported,” Robert McNally, president of the Rapidan Energy Group consulting firm, said
in an email.
Some even think that the wave
of arrests is a sign that the IPO
and tough economic reforms
could continue, even if that
means disclosures about wrongdoing at Saudi Aramco.
King Salman on Saturday
named Mohammed head of a
corruption “supreme committee”
in addition to a council that oversees Saudi Aramco, which in the
past had been governed largely by
technocrats.
“In my view the arrests signify
that the Crown Prince has decided to really use the corruption
button to discipline the royal
family,” Jean-François Seznec, a
specialist in Middle East business
and finance, said in an email.
Riedel said the anti-corruption
drive will be discredited if it looks
like a tool for punishing Mohammed’s political opponents.
Investors are also looking for
other signs of domestic reforms.
The International Monetary
Fund said in July that the kingdom would run a deficit of about
9.3 percent of gross domestic
product this year. Unemployment
was running around 12.3 percent.
It said that non-oil growth was
projected to pick up to 1.7 percent
but that relatively weak oil prices
would keep overall GDP growth
“close to zero.”
steven.mufson@washpost.com
the 32-year-old crown prince, who
is often referred to by his initials,
MBS, was out “over his ski tips”
after arresting so many influential
Saudis.
“His arrogation of power and
authority, which is inconsistent
with how the royal family and
monarchy have functioned over
many decades, will inevitably lead
to trouble,” the official said.
The escalating feud with Iran
was emerging as the critical test
for the crown prince, who has
stumbled as the architect of Saudi
Arabia’s increasingly aggressive
foreign policy initiatives, including the boycott of Qatar and the
war in Yemen.
More than two years after the
Saudis began a military campaign
against the Houthi rebels and
their allies, the war is at a stalemate. More than 10,000 Yemeni
civilians have been killed, including a vast number as a result of
Saudi airstrikes. The Saudis have
yet to achieve any of their initial
aims, including the restoration of
the deposed Yemeni government,
or the halting of ballistic missile
strikes into Saudi territory.
The Saudi Press Agency said
that “experts in missile technology” had “confirmed the role of
Iran’s regime in manufacturing
these missiles and smuggling
them to the Houthi militias in
Yemen.” Saudi Foreign Minister
Adel al-Jubeir, in an interview
with CNN, said that his government reserves “the right to respond at the appropriate time.”
In Tehran, Foreign Ministry
spokesman Bahram Qassemi said
the Saudi claims that Tehran had
provided the Houthis with missiles were “false, irresponsible, destructive and provocative.”
IHS Jane’s, which analyzes military matters, noted that reported
interceptions of Iranian arms
shipments have not included
heavy weapons. The Houthis, it
said, appear to have “sustained
their campaign of ballistic missile
attacks at least in part by repurposing” missile systems already in
the Yemeni arsenal and captured
by the rebels, with equipment
from North Korea that has extended their range.
kareem.fahim@washpost.com
karen.deyoung@washpost.com
Erin Cunningham in Istanbul and Greg
Miller in Washington contributed to
this report.
Saudi power struggle
Iran has categorically denied arming the Houthis, who say their
Volcano-variant ballistic missiles
are produced in Yemen. The Saudis brought down the missile fired
toward Riyadh on Sunday, and no
casualties were reported.
Saudi Arabia’s move might simply be a public rebuke to Iran after
Sunday’s attempted rocket attack.
But some humanitarian officials
characterized it as the latest example of Riyadh imposing a collective
punishment on Yemenis while attempting to break the Houthis.
Despite having an arsenal of
weaponry purchased mostly from
the United States, the Saudis are
essentially fighting a war of attrition against the Houthis.
Aid organizations say the port
closures could be a way to pit
Houthi fighters against civilians in
areas they control, forcing a fight
over limited food supplies. Higher
food prices would also force the
Houthis to spend more money on
food than weapons. It could also
conceivably be a way to clear traffic
from Yemen’s most vital seaport,
Hodeida, before a military offensive to wrest it from the Houthis.
Hodeida is the entry point for most
humanitarian aid headed to the
Houthi-controlled north.
Food is available in most Yemeni markets, but the Saudi blockade has made supplying it expensive for importers. As a result,
most Yemenis cannot afford the
food that is available. Humanitarian aid is a lifeline for at least
three-quarters of the country’s
population.
Yemen’s main airport, in Sanaa,
has been closed for more than a
year by the Saudi-led coalition.
Aid organizations say more people
have died because of those restrictions than have been killed by
coalition airstrikes.
“Denial of access to travel has
condemned thousands of Yemenis
with survivable illnesses to death,”
Mutasim Hamdan, the country director for the Norwegian Refugee
Council in Yemen, said in a statement last month. “Beyond airstrikes and cholera, the war in
Yemen is devastating Yemeni lives
on all fronts.”
Crown prince’s move to
close ports hits country
on brink of famine
BY
M AX B EARAK
Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s apparent consolidation of power risks exacerbating an already catastrophic humanitarian crisis in Yemen, where
a Saudi-led coalition has been
fighting a rebel group with ties to
Iran for more than two years.
On Sunday, shortly after carrying out a purge of royal cousins
and other high-ranking officials,
an emboldened crown prince announced that the coalition would
forcibly close all of Yemen’s
ground, air and sea ports.
The move came after the
Houthi militia fired a ballistic missile at the Saudi capital, Riyadh.
The Saudi-led coalition had already restricted access to Yemen’s
ports, but a full closure has long
been feared as a potential trigger
for widespread starvation.
A Saudi-led coalition intervened in Yemen’s civil war in 2015
after the Houthis took control of
the capital city of Sanaa. Since
then, the coalition has destroyed
much of Yemen’s economy and
infrastructure. Mohammed is
widely seen as the architect of the
coalition’s offensive in Yemen.
Around 7 million Yemenis are
now on the brink of famine, according to aid agencies, and
10 million more do not know
where they will get their next
meal. Cholera is spreading uncontrollably, with more than 800,000
cases reported and fears that the
number will cross a million by
year’s end. More than 10,000 civilians have been killed, many by
coalition airstrikes.
“The idea of even more restrictions in Yemen is a cause for major
concern,” said Scott Paul, a senior
humanitarian policy adviser at
Oxfam who has worked in Yemen.
“This could be a blip, but it could
also be a sea change.”
Saudi Arabia says its newest
restrictions are aimed at preventing its archrival Iran from supplying the Houthis with weapons.
max.bearak@washpost.com
Louisa Loveluck in Beirut contributed
to this report.
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A12
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. TUESDAY,
NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
In Japan, Trump talks tough on trade, the ‘menace’ of N. Korea
Abe affirms support
for increased pressure
on Pyongyang
BY
A SHLEY P ARKER
tokyo — President Trump continued his tough line on both
North Korea and trade Monday,
standing alongside Japanese
Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and
promising to work in solidarity
with Japan to confront “the
North Korean menace.”
At an afternoon news conference with Abe here, Trump said
that “the era of strategic patience
is over,” and he promised to
counter “the dangerous aggressions” of a country whose leader
the president has repeatedly
dubbed “Rocket Man.”
“The regime continues development of its unlawful weapons
programs, including its illegal
nuclear tests and outrageous
launches of ballistic missiles directly over Japanese territory,”
Trump said. “We will not stand
for that.”
In his own remarks, Abe affirmed Trump’s stance, saying
Japan supports the president’s
previous comments that “all options are on the table” and similarly favors an approach of increasing pressure on North Korea rather than continuing dialogue with the nation.
Responding to a question —
directed at Abe — about news
reports that Trump had previously suggested to the Japanese
prime minister that the “samurai” nation should have simply
shot down the North Korean
missiles that flew over it before
crashing into the Pacific Ocean
earlier this year, the president
answered instead on Abe’s behalf.
“He will shoot them out of the
sky when he completes the purchase of lots of additional military equipment from the United
States,” Trump said. “The prime
minister is going to be purchasing massive amounts of military
equipment, as he should. And we
make the best military equipment by far.”
Trump’s remarks came during
his second full day in Japan — the
first stop on a five-country, 12-day
swing through Asia that brings
him to Seoul on Tuesday — and
followed events and meetings
designed to underscore the close
personal relationship between
the two leaders.
On Sunday, Abe and Trump
golfed nine holes at a country
club here — jovially exchanging a
fist-bump at one point — and Abe
made sure that Trump, a picky
eater, was served a burger specially made with American beef.
He also designed several golf
caps mimicking Trump’s “Make
America Great Again” hats from
the campaign trail: “Donald &
Shinzo: Make Alliance Even
Greater,” read Abe’s twist on
Trump’s signature slogan.
On Monday, the two men fed
koi in a pond at one of the
nation’s palaces — a quintessential photo opportunity. The leaders spooned out bits of fish food
from wooden boxes until Abe
poured the remainder of the
flakes from his container into the
pond. Trump then did the same.
But despite the warm remarks
on both sides — “Indeed, how
many hours of dialogue did we
have?” Abe asked at one point,
recalling a friendship that dates
back to the prime minister’s trip
to Trump Tower before Trump
was sworn in — Trump took a
hard line on trade earlier in the
day Monday, scolding Japan for
the “massive trade deficits” between the nations.
“For the last many decades,
Japan has been winning, you do
know that,” Trump told a gathering of business leaders here. “We
want fair and open trade, but
right now our trade with Japan is
not fair, and it’s not open. But I
know it will be, soon. We want
free and reciprocal trade, but
right now our trade with Japan is
not free and it’s not reciprocal,
and I know it will be.”
At the news conference, Trump
largely avoided a question about
whether his tough stance on
trade puts him on a collision
course with China. But he did say
that the United States is facing a
“very unfair trade situation” with
China, which he will visit later
this week, and reiterated his be-
lief that “reciprocal” trade between the United States and any
nation is his preference.
Trump, who has more than a
week left on his trip through the
region and appeared in high
spirits when he first arrived in
Japan, seemed to have wilted by
the time he stepped behind his
lectern Monday afternoon. He
spoke in a largely flat monotone
and leaned on the lectern at
points.
Mostly gone were his trademark flourishes, which appeared
only a handful of times, such as
when he took part of Abe’s question to tout U.S. fighter jets and
missiles — “the best military
equipment by far” — and to
promise that Japan would be able
to take on future North Korea
missiles with precision after buying American systems: “He will
shoot them out of the sky.”
ashley.parker@washpost.com
Decision on Honduran immigrants delayed as 2,500 Nicaraguans face deadline
RESIDENCY FROM A1
Haitians whose TPS status is due
to expire early next year. But administration officials did not include those countries in their announcement.
DHS acting secretary Elaine
Duke appeared to deliberate right
up to Monday night’s deadline,
and the six-month extension for
Hondurans will probably leave the
decision to Duke’s successor. President Trump has nominated
Kirstjen Nielsen, the deputy
White House chief of staff, to be
the next DHS secretary, and she
will face Senate confirmation
hearings Wednesday.
According to Monday’s announcement, Nicaraguans will
have until Jan. 5, 2019, to leave the
United States or change their residency status. Duke had determined the adverse conditions in
Nicaragua left by Hurricane Mitch
no longer exist, officials said.
Nicaragua’s government, led by
leftist President Daniel Ortega,
did not formally request a TPS
extension, they noted, whereas
leaders from Honduras and El Salvador have waged a vigorous lobbying campaign to renew it.
Asked why Duke chose to put
off the decision on the Honduran
immigrants, whose protections
expire in January, officials said she
needed more time and more conclusive information.
“Based on the lack of definitive
information regarding conditions
on the ground compared to preHurricane Mitch, the Acting Secretary has not made a determination at this time, thereby automatically extending the current TPS
designation for Honduras for six
months — through July 5, 2018,”
DHS officials said in a statement.
But the statement left open the
possibility of ending the protections for Hondurans, adding, “it is
possible that the TPS designation
for Honduras will be terminated
at the end of the six-month automatic extension with an appropriate delay.”
Administration officials said
Duke was sensitive to the fact that
the Hondurans and Nicaraguans
have lived in the United States for
two decades or more, and she
urged Congress to enact a permanent solution for a program that
was meant to be temporary.
Last week, Secretary of State
Rex Tillerson sent a letter to Duke
essentially giving DHS the green
light to lift protections for Central
Americans and Haitians, telling
her that unauthorized immigrants from those countries no
longer warranted an exemption
from deportation.
TPS was created by Congress in
1990 to avoid sending foreign nationals to countries too damaged
or unstable to receive them because of natural disasters, armed
conflict or health epidemics.
Trump officials say previous administrations have disregarded
immigration laws for too long, and
they said Monday’s decision was
one signal that the era of automatic renewals for TPS recipients has
ended. The administration has
also canceled the Deferred Action
for Childhood Arrivals program
and sharply cut the number of
refugees eligible for resettlement
in the United States, amid other
efforts to limit immigration.
Hegly Barahona, 50, who cleans
homes and buses restaurant tables in the Washington suburbs,
arrived from Honduras in 1996,
and if sent back there she said she
would have no way to financially
support her son. He plays lacrosse
at Ohio Valley University in West
Virginia, she said.
“He’s a good boy,” Barahona
said. “How would I be able to help
him from Honduras? There’s no
work there.” Barahona said she
would probably remain in the
United States illegally and “stay as
long as possible.”
DHS ended TPS for several African nations this year, including
Sudan and Sierra Leone, but Central Americans and Haitians make
up the vast majority of TPS recipients, and they are the longest tenured.
Carmen Paz, 50, has lived in the
United States since 1998, and she
said the TPS program allowed her
to trade a life in the shadows for
one with full-time, formal employment and a driver’s license.
Paz cleans hotel rooms at a
Sheraton in Rockville, Md. She
said she began suffering headaches and insomnia after her
health insurance provider declined to renew her policy beyond
January, pointing out that her legal residency will soon expire.
“I would lose my driver’s license, my health insurance, my
job, everything,” she said.
The announcement was not the
worst-case scenario immigrant
advocates were bracing for after
the State Department report, but
Democratic leaders assailed it
nonetheless.
“The Trump Administration’s
irresponsible decision to end TPS
for Nicaraguans will tear apart
families and upend the lives of
these hard-working individuals,”
Michelle Lujan Grisham (D-N.M.),
chair of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, said in a statement
Monday. “Deporting families who
are contributing to the economic
and social fabric of our nation isn’t
leadership; it’s a reckless and callous abuse of power.”
House Minority Leader Nancy
Pelosi (D-Calif.) called the decision
“a cowardly assault on thousands of
families in communities across the
nation” and denounced the administration’s “senseless prejudice.”
Trump administration officials
acknowledge TPS beneficiaries
are from countries afflicted with
poverty, corruption and crime.
But they say those problems
should be addressed in other
ways, and returning migrants can
help foster development in their
home countries.
DHS has until Thanksgiving
Day to announce its plans for
nearly 50,000 Haitians with protected status. In May, then-DHS
Secretary John F. Kelly renewed
TPS for Haitians, but only for six
months, far short of the 18-month
extensions repeatedly granted by
the Obama administration. They
were allowed to stay in the United
States after a 2010 earthquake
devastated the capital, Port-auPrince, and killed 200,000.
Kelly, now White House chief of
staff, said the purpose of the sixmonth extension was to “allow
Haitian TPS recipients living in
the United States time to attain
travel documents and make other
necessary arrangements for their
ultimate departure from the United States.”
If recipients lose their protections, many are expected to defy
orders to leave, and DHS has their
addresses, phone numbers and
other information on file. But a
senior administration official said
Monday that Citizenship and Immigration Services would not automatically forward their personal information to immigration enforcement agents, and they would
not be a priority for arrest and
deportation.
nick.miroff@washpost.com
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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A13
RE
Trump, Abe find common ground over N. Korea — and golf
DEBRIEF FROM A1
touch of uncertainty as the U.S.
leader returned to his script.
After the Japanese government
had rolled out the red carpet for
Trump and his family for two
days, the patron was being patronized. It is becoming a familiar theme for Abe.
Their relationship can seem
like an oddball mismatch of
global leaders who are thrust
together over their shared dislike of the nuclear-armed tyrant
next door in North Korea but
who somehow hit it off amid golf
course high jinks. Since Trump
took office, Abe has been his
most consistent suitor, courting
him with luxurious gifts (a
$3,800 gold-plated driver) and
constant attention (numerous
phone calls and personal visits
to the White House and Trump’s
Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida).
But as Abe has lavished attention on Trump, their relationship has retained a subtext in
which the U.S. president insists
on asserting his dominance in a
passive-aggressive manner. It
started with Trump’s emasculating 19-second handshake with
Abe in their Oval Office meeting
in February, after which Abe
appeared to grimace as though
his fingers had been crushed.
Trump has let up on the power
grip since then, but in more
subtle ways he has continued to
show who is the alpha — a price
Abe appears willing to pay in his
strategic servitude to keep
Trump supporting the postwar
security alliance that the president had openly questioned in
his election campaign.
As Abe praised their relationship as the best of any two
leaders in the history of U.S.-Japan relations — something
George W. Bush and Junichiro
Koizumi, who visited Graceland
together in 2006, might dispute
— Trump had obvious difficulty
playing along. The two had
played nine holes the day before,
and Abe jokingly said the match
had been “neck and neck.”
“What was the reality? I hope
Mr. Trump can give his evaluation,” Abe said through an interpreter. Trump just smirked and
cast him a skeptical sidelong
JONATHAN ERNST/REUTERS
President Trump and Japanese Minister Shinzo Abe hold a joint news conference Monday after their meetings at Akasaka Palace in Tokyo.
As Abe praised their relationship as the best of any two leaders in the history of U.S.-Japan relations, Trump did not totally play along.
glance.
Before their round of golf
Sunday, when Trump and Abe
signed white hats emblazoned
with the slogan, “Donald & Shinzo, Make Alliance Even Greater”
in gold lettering, Trump wrote
his name in the center of the
brim, in large lines, which
meant that Abe had to curve his
signature off to the side.
The prime minister was the
first foreign leader to visit
Trump after his election victory,
showing up at Trump Tower
after calling the president-elect
and offering to stop by on his
way to a regional economic conference in Peru. At that meeting
— attended by Trump’s daughter, Ivanka, and her husband,
Jared Kushner, now a senior
White House adviser — Abe
presented Trump with the golf
club and suggested they play a
round together.
He even went out of his way to
inform the president-elect about
the Japanese singer Pikotaro,
whose goofy song “Pen Pineapple Apple Pen” was a global viral
hit last year that caught the
attention of Ivanka’s daughter,
Arabella. Ivanka Trump visited
Tokyo last week to speak at a
conference on women in the
workforce, prompting Abe to tell
the president Monday that the
Japanese have a “fever” for Ivanka — even though the conference hall was half-empty for her
speech.
“Japan consistently supports
the position of President Trump
when he says that all options are
on the table,” Abe said of the U.S.
strategy on North Korea. “I once
again strongly reaffirmed that
Japan and the U.S. are 100 percent together.”
The charm offensive has
worked — to a degree. Although
he made good on his campaign
promise to pull the United
States out of the Trans-Pacific
Partnership, a 12-nation trade
deal that included Japan, Trump
has backed off some of his
harshest rhetoric on trade, and
this week he called Japan a
“treasured partner” and a “crucial ally.” Abe was the first
foreign leader Trump invited to
Mar-a-Lago; the president personally drove him around on a
golf cart, weaving around the
course to show off the best
views.
At the same time, Trump’s
embrace has forced Abe into the
role of a sidekick. Photos taken
by Mar-a-Lago guests of Trump
and Abe — in the middle of the
restaurant, coordinating their
response to a North Korean
missile test moments after the
news broke — made it seem as
though the Japanese prime minister was being dragged into an
uncomfortable new reality.
At the news conference Monday, a reporter asked Abe about
his message to Trump regarding
largely pacifist Japan’s role in its
self-defense, amid reports that
Trump was disappointed that
the Japanese Self-Defense Forces did not shoot down a North
Korean test missile. Before Abe
could answer, Trump pulled
rank and cut in.
“If I could just take a piece of
the prime minister’s answer, he
will shoot them out of the sky
when he completes the purchase
of lots of additional military
equipment from the United
States,” Trump declared.
Abe has found himself in an
undeniably better position than
South Korean President Moon
Jae-in, who has not bonded with
Trump. There is great unease in
Seoul as Trump prepares to
arrive there Tuesday. Yet some
Japanese analysts have questioned whether Abe has tied
himself too tightly to a mercurial president who tends to cycle
through close aides, abruptly
banishing those once thought to
be in favor.
As one former Asia policy aide
in the Obama administration
put it last week, Abe could wake
up one day and find himself
“excommunicated by a tweet.”
On Monday evening, Trump
and Abe, along with their wives,
entered a gilded ballroom at the
Akasaka Palace in the middle of
Tokyo for a lavish state dinner.
Abe had invited Pikotaro, the
“Pen Pineapple Apple Pen” performer. Also in attendance was
Japanese golf legend Isao Aoki,
75, whom Trump praised as one
of the greatest golfers he has
ever watched.
But as he turned his attention
to Abe, Trump could not help but
turn the toast into a roast.
He regaled the audience of
high-level diplomats and senior
advisers with a story about how
Abe was so desperate to visit him
at Trump Tower after the election that the Japanese leader
would not take no for an answer
— though Trump’s aides worried
that such a visit would be “inappropriate,” given that Barack
Obama was still president.
Finally, Trump said, he called
Abe to tell him no, but the prime
minister was already flying to
see him.
“I said: ‘You know what?
There’s no way he’s going to land
and I’m not seeing him,’ ” Trump
said. “So I saw him, and it
worked out just fine.”
david.nakamura@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
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. TUESDAY,
NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
Economy & Business
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Fox talks hint at scope
of Disney’s ambitions
Potential sale of assets
shows how company is
gearing up for new war
Television has been
a powerful force
in shaping views about race,
but few shows
have blacks creating
the stories
BY
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Eddie Garcia touches up an Emmy statue before the September awards. The industry often glosses over racial injustice, a report says.
Report: Hollywood ‘whitewashes’ TV
by failing to diversify network writers
BY
T RACY J AN
H
ollywood prides itself
on its progressive politics. Celebrities sported
blue ribbons on the red
carpet at the Emmy
Awards to signal their resistance to
President Trump. Winners mocked
him onstage. They’ve routinely
lambasted a White House that they
view as hostile to immigrants,
women and minorities.
But the self-congratulatory liberal bastion has its own problems
with diversity, particularly in regard to the showrunners — executive producers and head writers
who make hiring decisions — and
TV writers who shape story lines
and characters, according to a report commissioned by the racial
justice organization Color of
Change.
Efforts over two decades to diversify the writers’ rooms at TV
networks have largely failed, the
report found.
Hollywood essentially “whitewashes” the narratives that influence the country, with shows that
ignore or gloss over racial injustice,
said Darnell Hunt, a sociologist and
dean of social sciences at UCLA,
who wrote the report and also
co-authors the annual Hollywood
Diversity Report pegged to the Oscars.
Research has shown that television has a powerful influence in
shaping views about African Americans.
“It’s important that Hollywood
showrunners and writers recognize that many of the narratives
they put out in the world and how
they do business is not in the spirit
of who they claim to be,” Hunt said.
“White men dominate the major
positions, and people of color and
women have a long way to go to
attain any type of equity.”
The 83-page study examined
234 comedy and drama series
across 18 broadcast, cable and digital platforms in the 2016-2017 season. Fewer than 10 percent of the
shows were led by minority showrunners, and only 14 percent of
writers were members of a minority group, even though minorities
represent nearly 40 percent of the
population.
Two-thirds of the shows had no
black writers. Black writers overall
accounted for less than 5 percent of
the 3,817 writers across the shows,
even though black people make up
13 percent of the population.
And more than 90 percent of the
shows on CBS — which aired 25
scripted shows last season, second
only to Netflix, and is the mostwatched network — had either just
one black writer or none at all.
“We need to change that because
television is not just entertainment,” Hunt said. “Media images
do matter, particularly for people
who don’t have a lot of face-to-face
encounters with people who are
not like them. A lot of what they
learn about people is what they see
in these images.”
Representatives of the networks
declined to speak on the record or
did not respond to requests for
comment.
Hunt said some shows that may
employ black writers fell outside of
the time period of the databases
consulted by the study, which he
acknowledged captured only a
“snapshot” of Hollywood. He examined everything categorized as
“currently” streaming, airing or in
production as of December 2016.
Netflix, ABC, Comedy Central
and HBO were the only platforms
that had more than one show headed by a minority showrunner, the
study found. Those platforms, plus
FX and Fox, were also the only ones
that had shows with five or more
black writers. (A typical writers’
room includes between nine and 12
writers.)
The study considered 1,678 episodes to see how the racial makeup
of the writers’ rooms affected story
lines, focusing on depictions of
black families and culture and the
criminal justice system, and how
they acknowledged and dealt with
racial inequality.
Hunt found that shows lead
by black showrunners, such as
FX’s “Atlanta,” a show created by
Donald Glover about three
black millennials, or by white
showrunners who hired diverse
writers were more likely to acknowledge racial inequality and
attribute it to structural racism
rather than to shortcomings of
black culture. White-dominated
writers’ rooms are more likely
to produce shows with stereotypical story lines and one-dimensional black “sidekicks” to
white central characters.
Nearly all of the crime-drama
episodes took for granted the legitimacy of the criminal justice system,
the study said. None of the episodes
acknowledged systemic racial profiling of black Americans, that
black people are more likely to be
pressured into plea bargaining for
crimes they did not commit, or that
they routinely face harsher penalties than whites, it found.
“Shows like ‘Blue Bloods’ rely on
stereotypes that are pretty much
public relations arms for law enforcement,” said Rashad Robinson,
executive director of Color of
Change. “In this era of paying so
much attention to policing and
mass incarceration, we have these
shows depicting the criminal justice system coming from Hollywood with writers’ rooms that look
like [a Republican National Committee] meeting.”
The report argues that Hollywood depictions of policing and the
court and prison systems undermine public support for policies
that could help advance racial equity.
The networks have tried to add
more minorities to writers’ rooms
through diversity initiatives in recent decades. But the “diversity
slot” program, which pays for one
minority writer out of the network’s budget — and not the show’s
— creates its own set of problems,
the report says.
The minority writers are often
seen as “tokens” and are rarely
rehired when the season is over
because the executive producers
know the network will send the
show another minority writer for
“free.”
The report recommended that
networks encourage inclusive hiring by funding “diversity slots” on
shows that already have a track
record in diverse hiring and storytelling.
The industry should also implement a rule similar to one in the
NFL that would mandate minorities be considered throughout the
hiring process. And networks
should track their progress and
make their goals public so they can
be held accountable.
tracy.jan@washpost.com
S TEVEN Z EITCHIK
Tremors shook the entertainment world Monday when CNBC
first reported that 21st Century
Fox had held talks with Disney
over a potential sale of assets,
including the Fox film and television studios and a host of global
satellite channels.
The talks — which would put
properties from “X-Men” to FX,
“This Is Us” to STAR India, under
an already enormous Disney roof
— were quickly pronounced dead
by several outlets. A Fox spokesman declined to comment and a
Disney spokeswoman could not
be reached for comment.
But even if no deal materializes, the very fact of talks is notable
for what it says about the two
companies’ ambitions and the
larger world of entertainment
content circa 2017.
In one word: scale.
In another two words: digital
competition.
First, Disney. The company is
already robust, with Pixar, Lucasfilm and Marvel Studios all part
of its empire on the film side, and
ESPN, ABC and a host of other
networks under its television
umbrella.
So what does it gain by adding
to the lead? For starters, big can
always get bigger. Negotiating
deals with content distributors
requires leverage, and scale
helps. It’s much easier to set fees
with cable operators if you have a
broader suite of channels to
offer, and you can push theater
owners to take and hold your
product much longer if you control the keys to many more
movies.
Scale — and, more specifically,
diversification — also helps
when you’re a company of Disney’s size.
Scale also allows for stronger
in-house creative partnerships.
Already fans have been focusing
on one possibility that is surely
also appealing to Disney executives: the chance to bring Marvel
superheroes controlled by Fox
together with Marvel superheroes controlled by Disney/Marvel.
Indeed, one of Marvel Studios’
biggest remaining hurdles to
dominance is that it doesn’t
control all of its characters.
That’s a function of lending out
existing licenses to other studios
before the comic book giant
launched its own studio. And the
biggest of those licensees is —
you guessed it — Fox, which
counts “X-Men,” “Fantastic Four”
and “Deadpool” in its stable.
All that scale would seem like
a problem for an industry wary
of too much power in one place,
because it produces what appears to be a content oligopoly
and all the disadvantages that
brings to a creative marketplace.
But that’s only when viewed
through the lens of other legacy
companies. As executives in New
York and Los Angeles parsed the
news Monday, what became clear
is that Disney beefing up isn’t
necessarily all about keeping a
lead over its rivals — it’s about
keeping up with Netflix, Amazon, Facebook, Google and Apple. Those Silicon Valley firms
are well-capitalized in their own
right; they control key distribution pipelines and have signaled,
with varying degrees of eagerness, that they want to be in the
content business.
And compared with them, Disney is actually not an elephant
but an underdog. This point is
driven home by the company’s
decision to launch a streaming
service of its own that will compete with Netflix — another reason it would want to stockpile
and control its own content.
What looks from Monday’s news
like a potentially war-ending
takeover of one legacy company
by another may simply be prelude to a larger battle: between a
consolidated group of legacy entertainment companies as a
whole and the Silicon Valley
juggernauts that are its new
competitors.
Then there’s 21st Century Fox.
The news was striking to many
observers because Rupert Murdoch and the family that controls
so much of the company’s stock
have almost always been buyers,
expanding their empire in both
print and screen media. So why,
in this world of scale, would Fox
want to get smaller?
After all, it’s not as though the
studios are faltering — it had
some of the biggest hits in recent
years with “Deadpool” and “Hidden Figures” on the film side and
“Modern Family” and “This Is
Us” on the TV side.
But Fox’s stock price has been
down — more than 20 percent
since the spring. And maybe just
as important is its ability to
compete with Disney. So rather
than try, it can double down on
certain areas — the broadcast
network, the cable-news network
and the sports operation — and
divest the rest. (Wall Street certainly liked that idea — it sent the
Fox stock price up nearly 10
percent following the CNBC report.)
The cash Fox generates from a
potential deal could even be used
by the Murdochs to buy more
entities in the sports and news
space and create its own scale,
albeit in narrower niches.
There’s an ironic tinge to all
this news. For many years, entertainment stocks were seen as
fast-growing and media as the
drag. Now entertainment is generally seen as a riskier bet,
thanks to all the Netflix- and
Amazon-led competition.
This particular deal may not
pan out now, or ever. But the
talks themselves tell of how Hollywood is changing. Mindful of
the digital war to come, some
legacy entertainment companies
really want out.
And others really want to get
big.
steven.zeitchik@washpost.com
DIGEST
FEDERAL RESERVE
RETAIL
N.Y. Fed’s Dudley
to retire next year
CVS to start next-day
delivery in 2018
William Dudley, president of
the Federal Reserve Bank of New
York, will retire in mid-2018, the
bank said Monday, creating
another opening in the top ranks
of the nation’s central bank.
The announcement comes less
than a week after President
Trump nominated Jerome Powell
to replace Janet L. Yellen as Fed
chair and after the departure last
month of Stanley Fischer as vice
chair.
There are three additional
vacancies on the Fed’s board.
Trump hasn’t announced
nominations for those jobs, and
Yellen hasn’t said whether she
will remain on the board once her
term as chair ends Feb. 3.
Dudley joined the New York
Fed in 2007 after more than two
decades at Goldman Sachs. A
close ally of Yellen, Dudley
supported her cautious approach
to raising the Fed’s bench mark
interest rate and the plan the
central bank has begun to
gradually shrink its $4.5 trillion
balance sheet.
Drugstore chain CVS Health
will start next-day delivery from
its stores in 2018, chief executive
Larry Merlo said on a conference
call with analysts Monday.
The pharmacy operator, which
also reported better-thanexpected quarterly earnings
Monday, said it would offer sameday delivery in select
metropolitan areas and free
same-day delivery for drugs in
Manhattan starting Dec. 4.
— Associated Press
investors accused the bank of
misleading them about its
business and culture by touting
its Liquidity Cross, or LX, dark
pool as a safe venue, when it
actually gave high-frequency
traders an unfair advantage.
— Reuters
— Reuters
LUKE SHARRETT/BLOOMBERG NEWS
BANKING
Appeals court allows
suit against Barclays
Barclays has lost its bid to
persuade a U.S. appeals court to
unwind a class-action lawsuit
accusing the British bank of
defrauding shareholders about
its “dark pool” trading platforms.
Monday’s decision by the U.S.
Court of Appeals for the 2nd
Circuit lets investors in
Barclays’s U.S. depository
shares sue as a group despite a
Workers collect metal parts from a conveyor belt at the Nissan
Motor stamping plant in Smyrna, Tenn. Nissan employs more than
8,000 people at the assembly and battery facility in Smyrna. The plant
has a capacity of 640,000 vehicles annually. Nissan is scheduled to
release earnings figures Tuesday.
legal error by the judge who
certified the class action. The
New York-based appeals court
called the error “harmless.”
The defendants include former
chief executives Robert Diamond
and Antony Jenkins, and William
White, former head of equities
electronic trading at Barclays
Capital.
Dark pools were designed to let
people quietly trade shares before
investors in the broader market
could bet against them. The
ALSO IN BUSINESS
Blue Cross-Blue Shield insurer
Anthem said Monday that it has
picked a former top executive
from its biggest competitor to
replace Joseph Swedish as chief
executive. Anthem said Gail K.
Boudreaux, former CEO of
UnitedHealthcare, will start
Nov. 20. Swedish will serve as
executive chairman until May
and then as senior adviser for a
couple of more years. Anthem
gave no reason for his departure.
The state of Kentucky on
Monday accused units of Endo
International of contributing to
drug overdoses by deceptively
marketing its painkiller Opana
ER — the latest lawsuit by state
and local governments against
the drugmaker amid a U.S. opioid
epidemic. Kentucky Attorney
General Steve Beshear said the
lawsuit seeks to hold Endo
responsible for illegally building
a market for the long-term use of
opioids in the state to try to boost
corporate profits.
Target is offering shoppers a
breather after holiday shopping
on Thanksgiving. The discounter
said it will open at 6 p.m. on
Thanksgiving and then close at
midnight local time. Its stores
will reopen at 6 a.m. local time on
“Black Friday” and remain open
until 10 p.m., 11 p.m. or midnight
local time. Last year, the retailer
kept stores open through the
night.
Drugmaker Roche won U.S.
approval to market its skin cancer
drug Zelboraf for a rare type of
blood cancer and to market its
drug Alecensa as a first choice of
treatment for some patients with
non-small cell lung cancer.
— From news reports
COMING TODAY
10 a.m.: Labor Department
releases job openings and labor
turnover survey for September.
3 p.m.: Federal Reserve releases
consumer credit data for
September.
Earnings: Toyota.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A15
M2
In the wake of Weinstein, Hollywood’s
reputation-management machine is in crisis
In unsolicited bid, Broadcom
makes a play for Qualcomm
SCANDAL FROM A1
Chipmaker Broadcom made an
unsolicited bid Monday worth
about $105 billion for Qualcomm,
kicking off an ambitious attempt at
the largest technology takeover ever
in a deal that would rock the electronics industry.
Broadcom offered $70 a share in
cash and stock for Qualcomm, the
world’s largest maker of mobilephone chips. That’s a 28 percent
premium over the stock’s closing
price Thursday, before Bloomberg
News first reported talks of a deal.
The proposed transaction is valued
at about $130 billion on a pro forma
basis, including $25 billion of net
debt.
Buying Qualcomm would make
Broadcom the third-largest chipmaker, behind Intel and Samsung
Electronics. The combined business would instantly become the
default provider of a set of components needed to build each of the
more than 1 billion smartphones
sold every year. The deal would
dwarf Dell’s $67 billion acquisition
of EMC in 2015 — then the biggest in
the technology industry.
“The combination of the two
companies could generate strong
synergies and create a dominant
wireless business and overall powerful global semiconductor leader,”
said Mike Walkley, an analyst at
Canaccord Genuity.
Qualcomm is preparing to fend
off the offer, arguing that it undervalues the company, people familiar
with the plans said. It will argue that
the proposal is an opportunistic
move to buy the chipmaker on the
cheap, they said, and it is likely to
recommend that shareholders re-
Navigating controversy
As recently as last Oscar season,
candor was jostled out by celebrity.
Affleck’s brother, Casey, had an
acclaimed movie in Amazon Studios’ and Roadside Attractions’
“Manchester by the Sea,” in which
he played a troubled janitor looking after his teenage nephew.
(Amazon Studios is part of the
company led by Washington Post
owner Jeffrey P. Bezos.)
But the star also had been the
subject of two sexual-harassment
lawsuits by women who worked
on the 2010 faux-documentary he
directed, “I’m Still Here” — allegations included numerous lewd
comments and climbing into one
woman’s bed in the middle of the
night — both of which had been
settled out of court.
Fearful of jeopardizing his Oscar campaign, handlers from the
firm ID PR steered the dialogue
away from the allegations. In the
five-month run-up to the Oscars —
a period marked by screenings,
festivals and smaller awards
shows courting media and the
8,500 members of the Academy of
Motion Picture Arts & Sciences —
ID PR took numerous steps to
tamp down talk of the lawsuits.
The blue-chip firm sought to
limit its client’s exposure with
journalists interested in the subject, according to a person familiar
with the matter. It also stressed to
reporters who did talk to Affleck
that questions about the incidents
would yield little because the settlement precluded the star from
discussing them, according to two
reporters on the receiving end of
that caveat.
Hanging over ID’s suggestion,
according to the reporters, who
spoke on the condition of anonymity to avoid undermining their relationships with ID: Any sexualharassment questions would not
be relished by ID, also the gatekeeper for many other Oscar contenders.
The strategy proved effective.
Although dozens of outlets interviewed or wished to interview Affleck over months of pre-Oscar
campaigning, he wound up having to answer sexual-harassment
questions in only two major publications, according to a Washington Post review. Even then, he
mostly did so dismissively, noting
in one, “I guess people think if
you’re well known, it’s perfectly
CHRIS PIZZELLO/INVISION/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Casey Affleck, right, at the “Manchester by the Sea” premiere with brother Ben Affleck. Casey Affleck’s
handlers deflected attention from sexual harassment claims against him in the run-up to the Oscars.
Gary Oldman (“The Darkest Hour”), left, Nate Parker (“The Birth
of a Nation”) and Kevin Spacey (“House of Cards”) have navigated
situations in their personal lives with possible professional
repercussions. In Spacey’s case, the effects were felt quickly.
fine to say anything you want.”
“Manchester” became a hit and
Affleck won the best-actor Oscar.
Roadside co-president Howard
Cohen said he didn’t want to comment specifically on Affleck but
felt comfortable with how the
campaign unfolded. ID declined
to provide a comment for this
article.
Handlers faced a similar dilemma with Nate Parker, who
wrote, directed and starred in the
2016 historical drama “The Birth
of a Nation.” Centering on the Nat
Turner slave rebellion, the movie
was an Oscar front-runner
thanks to its frothy reception at
the Sundance Film Festival and
its timely themes of black resistance. But when stories revealed
Parker had faced rape charges
over an incident at Pennsylvania
State University in 1999 — he was
acquitted — and that the alleged
victim had since committed suicide, his Oscar bid looked precarious.
Executives at the Fox Searchlight studio knew Parker was unwilling to apologize — they had
unsuccessfully attempted to coax
a public mea culpa out of him, according to a person familiar with
the effort who spoke on the condition of anonymity to disclose internal discussions. So they tried to
keep him out of sight.
Some sought to stop Parker
from attending the Oscar-oriented Toronto International Film Festival in September, according to
the person present at such meetings. They were outvoted.
At the Toronto news conference, a moderator paid by Searchlight mostly kept the focus on the
movie, asking just one indirect
question about the assault.
“I was conflicted about it,” the
moderator, Essence’s Cori Murray,
told The Post. “I really liked the
film and thought it was important
to talk about it but I also felt I had
to be true to myself as a woman.” (The studio declined to provide a comment for this story, and
Parker’s manager didn’t respond
to a request for comment.)
The approach worked — for 45
minutes. Then one reporter in the
gallery asked about the Penn State
incident, then another, and another. Parker did not apologize.
His movie’s Oscar prospects were
declared dead on the spot, and the
film bombed commercially soon
after.
A new era?
Some experts believe these deflection attempts — successful in
Affleck’s case, futile in Parker’s —
won’t pass muster in the new accountability-minded Hollywood.
“A lot has changed in the last six
months,” said Mara Reinstein, a
former editor at Us Weekly who
follows celebrities and the film
business. “If Casey would campaign in this climate, I don’t think
his reps can keep it out of the
conversation. And I don’t think
he’d win.”
One personality who could test
the theory is Gary Oldman, who
plays Winston Churchill in Focus
Features’ historical drama “The
Darkest Hour” and has been handicapped as a best-actor front-runner by Oscar pundits.
Oldman was accused by his exwife in divorce papers of physically assaulting her as their marriage
dissolved in 2001 and the pair
engaged in a custody battle. He
denied the allegations. A judge
awarded Oldman sole custody of
their two children. In an interview, Oldman’s manager and producing partner, Douglas Urbanski, said that the assault “never
happened and charges were never
filed,” saying this represented a
full vindication.
In an email to The Post via
Focus, Oldman wrote, “This was a
deeply personal and painful time
in my life and I appreciated the
due diligence of all involved. I was
most thankful for the outcome.”
His ex-wife did not respond to a
request seeking comment.
Still, Focus must navigate that
past — and a notorious Playboy
interview in which Oldman appeared to support Mel Gibson’s
racist and anti-Semitic rants (he
later apologized) — as it makes a
case for his portrayal of a great
20th-century leader. A Focus
spokeswoman did not provide a
separate comment for this story.
Other contenders could face
criticism, including Kevin Spacey,
accused by two actors of sexual
misconduct.
Spacey plays J. Paul Getty in
upcoming oil-family drama “All
the Money in the World.” Executives at Sony Pictures have convened meetings over how to promote the film, according to a person familiar with the studio’s
plans who was not authorized to
talk about them publicly.
Spacey won’t appear at the
“Money” premiere in Los Angeles
at the AFI Fest in mid-November,
the person said. Spacey’s publicist
did not respond to a request for
comment, but regarding one of
the allegations, Spacey posted on
Facebook that he did not remember an encounter but if he did
behave as alleged, he offers his
“sincerest apology.” Still, in the
wake of the allegations, Netflix
canceled Spacey’s hit show,
“House of Cards,” before a seventh
season could be shot and suspended production on the sixth season
as it parted ways with the actor.
Several Oscar publicists noted
that while they while they believe
in transparency, it’s not as simple
as encouraging clients to speak
honestly; in the current social-media atmosphere, they said, even
well-intentioned statements can
be misinterpreted.
Complicating the issue is negative campaigning — Hollywood’s
version of mudslinging — in
which consultants call reporters
with unsavory background information about Oscar hopefuls to
boost their own candidate. In the
new environment, a male contender’s questionable reputation
is, some fear, ripe for exploitation.
“I think negative campaigning is
going to be amplified this year because of the climate,” said Fox
Searchlight President Nancy Utley,
adding that she believes merit-wor-
thy allegations should be aired.
Also tricky are award-show appearances: As 2017 best actor, for
instance, Casey Affleck is slated to
present the best actress award at
the 2018 ceremony.
Those are issues the commercial-minded “Justice League”
won’t face. Ben Affleck will probably be sheltered — given a spot
on a softer late-night show, or
grouped with co-stars like
emerging feminist icon Gal Gadot at so-called roundtable interviews, as he was during a recent
Asia junket.
Oscars season is different. It has
a longer run, serious films and
upper-tier journalists. The process could well involve more rigor
— and allegations.
“There are a lot of contenders
who, if you pull the thread, a lot
will unravel,” Reinstein said. “This
season I think you’ll see many
people pulling the thread.”
steven.zeitchik@washpost.com
I AN K ING
ject it. In a statement Monday, Qualcomm said it will “assess the proposal in order to pursue the course of
action that is in the best interests of
Qualcomm shareholders.”
Hock Tan, president and chief
executive of Broadcom, is making a
play for Qualcomm as the once-unstoppable
chipmaker
limps
through a moment of weakness. Its
most profitable unit, which licenses
mobile phone technology, is under
assault from regulatory actions
around the world and a legal challenge from Apple. The lawsuit may
prompt Apple to stop buying Qualcomm chips for the iPhone and other products, which would deal a
major blow to a unit that drives the
bulk of Qualcomm’s revenue. Meanwhile, Broadcom counts Apple
among its largest customers.
The bid values Qualcomm at
about 21.2 times earnings before
interest, tax, depreciation and
amortization, compared with a median multiple of 22.5 for similar
deals in the industry, according to
data compiled by Bloomberg.
Qualcomm shares rose more
than 1 percent Monday. The stock
closed up 13 percent Friday, valuing
the company at $91 billion. Broadcom rose 5.5 percent Friday for a
market value of $112 billion. Its
shares gained about 1.4 percent
Monday.
A Broadcom-Qualcomm tie-up
may face intense regulatory scrutiny. The companies are independently among the top 10 providers
of chips in a rapidly consolidating
industry. Together, they would have
tight control of the supply chain for
WiFi and cellular modem chips, vital components in making phones.
— Bloomberg News
MIKE BLAKE/REUTERS
Chipmaker Qualcomm is said to oppose the $105 billion offer.
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“sick” over the revelations and
that as a father he shared people’s
grave concerns. But when the actress Rose McGowan accused Affleck of knowing about Weinstein’s behavior and lying to cover
it up, and then others accused him
of groping women at the 2014
Golden Globes, the star went the
other way. He stayed silent, reasoning he could only lose by engaging popular anti-harassment
activists.
His team’s next major action, according to the person, was
to provide information to the celebrity news site ETonline.com
about a rather different subject —
Affleck’s adoption of an adorable
husky. But that piece caused its
own social-media snickering. Sunshine Sachs declined to provide a
comment for this article.
Affleck’s inability to adopt an
effective strategy showed how
Hollywood’s reputation-management machine is struggling with
the best way to protect celebrities’
image in a new era of sexual-harassment awareness.
For years, a behind-the-scenes
network of personal publicists, assisted by agents and managers,
sought to divert interest from the
misdeeds of the Hollywood elite.
But the newly hot climate has
thrown the image industry into
crisis, according to nearly a dozen
publicists who spoke anonymously because of the background nature of their work — pitting their
traditional instinct to suppress
negative attention against the
growing demands for candor.
The challenge is particularly
pressing as celebrities begin to get
in front of journalists to hype their
work for upcoming holiday movies and the Oscar campaigns that
run until the March show.
“It’s a no-win situation,” said a
veteran publicist who represents
several high-profile film personalities, speaking on the condition of
anonymity to avoid drawing attention to clients. “Nobody knows what
to react to or what to respond with.”
What path they choose could
determine whether the film-promotion circuit finally begins to
tackle hard truths — or an age-old
system remains in place.
“For far too long sexual trauma
hasn’t been talked about in Hollywood,” said Angela Rose, founder
of PAVE, a Washington-based advocacy group that does outreach
to the entertainment industry.
“We need these questions to shatter the silence.”
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Daily Stock Market Performance
Index
Dow Jones Industrial Average
24,000
Close
YTD
% Chg
23,548.42
0.0
+19.2
22,750
21,500
20,250
19,000
17,750
Nasdaq Composite Index
6800
Commodities
S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot
Daily
% Chg
6786.44
+0.3
+26.1
Daily
% Chg
Industry Group
Energy Equipment & Svcs
Construction & Engineerng
Real Estate Mgmt & Dev
Media
Oil, Gas, Consumable Fuel
Air Freight & Logistics
Food Products
Containers & Packaging
Food & Staples Retailing
Diversified Telecomm
0
–6.0%
+6.0%
5.36
2.92
2.13
2.01
1.73
–1.28
–1.67
–1.73
–1.77
–2.45
5600
5000
2591.13
S&P 500 Index
+0.1
+15.7
2630
2520
2410
2300
2190
2080
N
D
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
Americas
Brazil (Bovespa)
Canada (S&P/TSX Comp.)
Mexico (Bolsa)
Europe
Eurozone (DJ Stoxx 600)
France (CAC 40)
Germany (DAX)
U.K. (FTSE 100)
Asia Pacific
Australia (ASX 200)
China (CSI 300)
Hong Kong (Hang Seng)
Japan (Nikkei)
3M Co
AmExp
Apple Inc
Boeing
Caterpillar
Chevron Corp
Cisco Systems
Coca-Cola
DowDuPont Inc
Exxon Mobil
GE
GoldmnSchs
Home Depot
IBM
Intel Corp
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
230.31
96.29
174.25
264.07
137.71
117.04
34.41
45.47
70.24
83.75
20.13
243.49
164.22
150.84
46.70
–0.8
–0.1
1.0
0.9
0.8
1.8
–0.2
–1.1
–1.3
0.7
0.0
–0.4
–0.1
–0.5
0.8
29.0
30.0
50.4
69.6
48.5
–0.6
13.9
9.7
22.8
–7.2
–36.3
1.7
22.5
–9.1
28.8
Company
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
Microsoft
Nike
P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
United Tech
UnitedHealth
Verizon
Visa Inc
Wal-Mart
Walt Disney
139.76
100.78
170.07
55.88
84.47
56.04
86.05
35.32
133.44
120.39
212.12
45.53
111.92
88.70
100.64
–0.2
–0.6
0.8
–0.3
0.4
0.6
–0.6
–0.6
0.1
–0.6
–0.4
–4.0
0.5
–1.1
2.0
21.3
16.8
39.7
–5.1
35.9
10.2
2.3
8.7
9.0
9.8
32.5
–14.7
43.5
28.3
–3.4
Close
Daily
% Chg
74,310.79
16,092.20
48,979.58
0.5
0.4
0.9
396.59
5507.25
13,468.79
7562.28
0.1
–0.2
–0.1
0.0
5953.78
4020.89
28,596.80
22,548.35
–0.1
0.7
0.0
0.0
YTD % Chg
–30%
0%
+30%
US $
EU € per
0.8612
EU €
Japan ¥
Britain £
Brazil R$
Canada $
1.1612
0.0087
1.3174
0.3078
0.7869
0.0525
0.0076
1.1345
0.2649
0.6776
0.0453
149.8420
35.0070
89.5030
5.9767
0.2336
0.5973
0.0399
Japan ¥ per
113.7400
132.0800
Britain £ per
0.7591
0.8814
Gainers
Denbury Resources
Michael Kors
Chesapeake Energy
Xperi Corp
TwentyFirst-A
Unit Corp
Superior Enrgy Svcs
Twenty-FirstCen Fox
Frontier Comm
Baker Hughes a GE
Aerojet Rocketdyne
Newfield Expl
Gulfport Energy
Adv Micro Devices
Flotek Industries
Lamar Advertising
Apache Corp
Control4 Corp
JC Penney
Myriad Genetics Inc
0.0067
Brazil R$ per
3.2519
3.7741
0.0285
4.2802
Canada $ per
1.2708
1.4756
0.0111
1.6741
0.3911
Mexico $ per
19.0302
22.0986
0.1670
25.0711
5.8570
Mexico $
2.5567
0.1707
0.0668
14.9747
Index
Close
DJ Total Stock Market Index 26,830.60
Russell 2000
1497.96
Post-Bloomberg DC Area Index 528.91
CBOE Volatility (VIX)
9.40
Consumer Rates
Daily % Chg
0.2
0.2
–0.1
2.8
YTD % Chg
15.3
10.4
18.2
–33.0
Orange Juice
Silver
Soybeans
Sugar
Wheat
Close
Daily
% Chg
$1.5990
$17.24
$9.9400
$0.1456
$4.3075
+2.1
+2.4
+0.7
+1.3
+1.2
day
Daily
(Ticker) % Chg
$800
month
$1200
$1000
2.0
1.2
0.4
–0.2
3.3
2.7
0.7
3.6
1.8
Daily
Close % Chg
$1.54
$54.62
$4.18
$19.65
$27.45
$21.82
$9.71
$26.62
$8.07
$33.92
$30.20
$33.07
$14.35
$11.93
$5.23
$74.91
$45.74
$33.69
$2.53
$30.30
16.7
14.7
11.8
10.7
9.9
9.0
9.0
9.0
8.9
8.8
8.0
7.9
7.7
7.3
7.2
7.1
7.0
6.9
6.8
6.5
Losers
Tivity Health Inc
Henry Schein Inc
EW Scripps
Iconix Brand Group
Sotheby's
Big 5 Sprtg Goods
SpartanNash Co
eHealth Inc
Biglari Holdings
Catalent Inc
CBL & Associates
Amphastar Pharma
Cytokinetics Inc
3D Systems Corp
Seneca Foods
Clearwater Paper
Bel Fuse Inc
LA-Pacific
Fossil Group Inc
Papa John's
Daily
Close % Chg
$31.60
$70.04
$14.16
$1.48
$45.50
$6.05
$24.46
$25.63
$338.47
$40.03
$5.56
$17.97
$12.80
$8.48
$32.80
$46.05
$26.90
$25.97
$6.98
$58.68
–34.2
–9.8
–9.4
–8.6
–7.9
–7.6
–6.9
–6.8
–6.3
–6.3
–6.1
–6.0
–5.9
–5.7
–5.2
–5.0
–4.9
–4.8
–4.8
–4.5
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Interest Rates
Other Measures
+1.3
–0.1
+3.1
+1.0
+5.0
Gainers and Losers from the S&P 1500 Index
Cross Currency Rates
US $ per
Daily
% Chg
Exchange-Traded
Coffee (COFF.L)
Copper (COPA.L)
Corn (CORN.L)
Cotton (COTN.L)
Crude Oil (CRUD.L)
Gasoline (UGAS.L)
Gold (BULL.L)
Natural Gas (NGAS.L)
Silver (SLVR.L)
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
Company
Close
$3.1575
$3.4800
$57.35
$1,281.60
$3.13
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
6200
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
0.33
0.45
0.80
1.47
2.71
5.35
4.25%
Bank Prime
1.25%
Federal Funds
1.39%
LIBOR 3-Month
CYBERSECURITY
3.81%
30-Year fixed mortgage
3.11%
10-year note
Yield: 2.32
2-year note
Yield: 1.62
5-year note
Yield: 1.98
6-month bill
Yield: 1.30
15-Year fixed mortgage
3.24%
1-Year ARM
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
Sam Curry
Dante Disparte
Chief Product and
Security Officer, Cybereason
Founder and CEO,
Risk Cooperative
Personal Privacy in a Digital World
Wednesday, November 8
Streamed live from 9:00 - 10:30 a.m. ET
Cybercrimes are estimated to be costing American businesses over
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threatening the personal and financial information of broad swaths
of the American public, the problem seems to be getting worse.
On November 8, The Washington Post will bring together business
executives, leading cybersecurity experts, privacy advocates and
others to discuss detection and prevention strategies for individuals
and corporations. These experts will examine the current and future
cyber threat landscape and the solutions that could help consumers
cope with this urgent problem.
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Executive Vice President
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Symantec
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Protections for wildlife moving closer to extinction
With a GOP Congress,
lawmaker poised to undo
Endangered Species Act
BY
D ARRYL F EARS
The congressman who said he
“would love to invalidate” the Endangered Species Act is closing in
on his goal.
Rep. Rob Bishop (R-Utah) recently shepherded five bills out of
the Natural Resources Committee
he chairs that would dismantle
the law piece by piece. Many Republicans on the panel say the
proposals are necessary changes
that would modernize the 1973
law. Democrats and conservationists say the bills would whittle
away the law’s ability to save wildlife from extinction.
One measure would force the
federal government to consider
the economic impact of saving a
species rather than make a purely
scientific call. Another would require the U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service, which administers the act
along with the National Oceanic
and Atmospheric Administration,
to defer to data collected by states
as the “best scientific and commercial data available,” although
state funding related to the act
accounts for a small fraction of
that supported by the federal government.
Under a third proposal, citizens
and conservation groups would be
stripped of a powerful tool that
allows them to file court claims
against the government when
they believe its protections fall
short. Among other actions, the
remaining bills would also remove
protections for gray wolves in
Midwestern states and block
courts from ruling on the validity
of the government’s decisions.
The legislation is setting up a
titanic clash over a law that forms
the foundation of American wildlife protection and has been copied around the world.
“This will be a battle royal,” said
Bob Dreher, vice president for conservation programs at Defenders
of Wildlife, a nonprofit group in
Washington. “You’re going to see a
strong, strong movement opposing cuts to the ESA. I don’t want to
sound overly confident or cocky
that we’re going to defeat this. It’s
going to be the fight of my conservation career.”
Unlike earlier GOP attempts to
weaken the act, Bishop is poised to
realize his ambition because of
Republicans’ control of both
chambers of Congress and the
White House. A Senate committee
that previously held hearings on
modernizing the act is preparing
companion legislation, and a president who favors oil-and-gas development on federal land is more
LINDA DAVIDSON/THE WASHINGTON POST
The Endangered Species Act has been credited with saving the American bald eagle, among other animals. Legislation by Republicans is
setting up a major clash over a law that forms the foundation of American wildlife protection and has been copied around the world.
Rep. Rob
Bishop (RUtah) says the
law has been
more about
control of
land than
rehabilitation.
likely to sign it into law.
Bishop, who declined requests
to comment for this article, exuded confidence about the bills’
prospects before the committee
acted in July. “Hopefully, working
with our colleagues in the Senate
and the administration, we can lay
a foundation for ESA reform that
will do us well,” he said.
All of the measures, approved
almost completely along partyline votes Oct. 4, are awaiting consideration by the full House.
Their passage would mark
Bishop’s most significant legislative victory since the former high
school teacher and debate coach
entered politics in Utah, where he
served as a charismatic leader of
the state Republican Party and
co-founded the Western States Coalition. The eight-term congressman has long been an opponent of
the law, which is credited with
saving the bald eagle, humpback
whale, grizzly bear, California
condor and the Florida manatee.
“It has never been used for the
rehabilitation of species. It’s been
used for control of the land,” Bishop said this year. “We’ve missed
the entire purpose of the Endangered Species Act. It has been hijacked.”
Bishop’s disdain was clear in
the hearings, Democrats say. On
witness panels, they charge, farmers, dam operators, state wildlife
managers and others opposed to
the act got their say about its
supposed shortcomings, without
comparable opportunities for scientific and federal government experts to check those claims. The
Interior Department even barred
Fish and Wildlife staff members
from meeting with the minority
caucus’s staff members as they
attempted to gather information
for hearing preparations, according to lawmakers such as Rep.
Raúl M. Grijalva (Ariz.).
“The bias and the setup begins
at the hearing,” said Grijalva, the
Natural Resources Committee’s
ranking Democrat. “We get one
witness, they get three or four, and
the drumbeat begins with the
onerous things that are wrong
with the act: It’s too cumbersome,
it allows too many radical lawsuits, the states can do a better job,
let them make the scientific and
biological opinion of when wildlife should be listed.”
The law was essentially 73 years
in the making. It followed the
Lacey Act of 1900, which was
passed to conserve wildlife after
passenger pigeons that once filled
America’s skies went extinct and
bison nearly disappeared. Other
conservation acts that preceded it
were the Migratory Bird Treaty of
1929 and Endangered Species
Preservation Act of 1966.
Seven years later, that preservation act was strengthened to become the Endangered Species Act.
The new legislation was approved
by overwhelming and bipartisan
margins — 355 to 4 in the House
and 92 to 0 in the Senate. President Richard M. Nixon made it
official with his signature that December.
The law gives the federal government control over regulating
use of land that serves as habitat
for endangered species, with assistance from states. It specifies that
decisions should be based on only
science, without consideration of
the economic effect. The law also
helps people sue for the protection
of animals or plants through the
Equal Access to Justice Act, which
pays the attorney fees of individuals and organizations that take the
government to court and win.
Today, more than 2,000 species
are listed as endangered or threatened, including Loggerhead sea
turtles in parts of the Atlantic
Ocean, whooping cranes in the
West and the Texas golden gladecress.
Over time, some lawmakers began to argue against the law’s spe-
Administrator of EPA names 66 science advisers
Slate includes figures
from regulated industries
and critics of agency
BY
J ULIET E ILPERIN
Environmental
Protection
Agency Administrator Scott
Pruitt appointed more than five
dozen new scientific advisers to
the agency Friday, a move that is
likely to shift the EPA’s research
objectives as well as the recommendations that form the basis
for key regulations.
Pruitt has placed 66 new experts on three EPA scientific
committees, and many of the
appointees hail from industry or
state government and espouse
more conservative views than
their predecessors. Two of the
new chairmen — Texas’s top
toxicologist, Michael Honeycutt,
who will helm the Scientific
Advisory Board (SAB), and consultant Louis Anthony “Tony”
Cox, who will head the Clean Air
Scientific Advisory Committee
(CASAC) — have harshly criticized the way the EPA has conducted science in the past.
Honeycutt has accused the
EPA of “overstating” the risks
associated with mercury, a neurotoxin, and of disregarding
“good science which demonstrates a chemical is not as toxic
as it thinks it is.”
Cox wrote that the EPA’s methods for calculating the public
health benefits of stricter national smog standards are “unreli-
able, logically unsound, and inappropriate for drawing causal
inferences.”
Under a policy Pruitt instituted last week, scientists receiving
EPA funding cannot serve as the
agency’s advisers. Seven advisers
stepped down rather than relinquish their grants, agency officials said, while two opted to
forgo the federal money to continue serving.
Robert Johnston, a Clark University economics professor who
had one year left to serve on the
Scientific Advisory Board, said in
a phone interview that he did not
want to give up his portion of a
nearly $800,000 grant he and his
colleagues share with researchers at Virginia Tech and the
University of New Hampshire.
Their project, underway for
more than two years, seeks to
evaluate how water quality is
understood and valued by the
public through a case study of
river quality in New England.
“The research is too important,”
Johnston said.
He added that he is concerned
that the litmus test now in place
will bar some qualified scientists
from helping advise the EPA.
“Until recently, people serving on
the board were the top scientists
in their field, and these are often
the people who were funded by
federal agencies. So by systematically excluding those scientists,
you have effectively knocked out
the top scientists, most of them,
in many fields.”
Johnston said that these panels are different from policymaking bodies, where a diversity of
policy perspectives is critical.
“It’s supposed to be guiding on
the science. Not providing policy
advice, not offering our own
opinions,” he said. “If the board
becomes about something else,
about people’s particular opinions about how they think policy
should be made, that would
really change what the board is
about.”
Pruitt said the appointments
to the Scientific Advisory Board
and its clean air panel, along
with the larger Board of Scientific Counselors (BOSC), would
bring new perspectives to the
agency. He told reporters last
week that he was seeking to
diversify the groups’ geographic
representation to include more
experts from the Midwest and
West.
“To ensure that EPA is receiving the best independent scientific advice, I am appointing
highly-qualified experts and scientists to these important committees,” he said in a statement.
Several of the new appointees
hail from industries that the EPA
regulates, including the French
oil giant Total, Phillips 66, the
utility Southern Co., Dow Chemical and Procter & Gamble. One
current executive from the
American Chemistry Council industry group, Kimberly White,
will join the SAB, while the ACC’s
former senior toxicologist, Richard Becker, will serve on BOSC’s
Chemical Safety for Sustainability Subcommittee.
The ACC’s senior director for
advocacy communications, Scott
Openshaw, praised the appointment of White, Becker and others, saying Pruitt’s new directive
will “help ensure EPA’s scientific
review panels are well balanced
with perspectives from qualified
scientists of diverse backgrounds
and board members . . . free of
any disqualifying conflicts of interest.”
The 44-member SAB has two
representatives from environmental groups: the Environmental Defense Fund and the ClimateWorks Foundation.
Reactions to the appointments split sharply between Republicans and industry officials,
who welcomed the shift, and
environmentalists and academics, who decried it.
Gretchen Goldman, research
director for the Center for Science and Democracy, noted in an
email that Pruitt had “nearly
halved the number of university
scientists and tripled the number of industry and consulting
firm scientists” on the Scientific
Advisory Board.
“With the gutting of key science advisory committees this
week, the EPA has replaced independent scientists with air pollution conspiracy theorists and
industry-tied individuals with
direct conflicts of interest,” Goldman said.
“What was previously a committee of scientific all-stars giving freely of their time to provide
dispassionate science advice is
now dominated by individuals
who are less qualified and in
some cases openly hostile to the
agency’s mission,” she said.
juliet.eilperin@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/energy-environment
cies management and protection.
Protecting animals such as the
spotted owl and blue whale cordoned off enormous chunks of forest, ocean and desert. Private landowners were sometimes restricted
or blocked from certain activities
on their property, from logging
and oil or gas drilling to cattle
grazing and housing development.
This year, Sen. James M. Inhofe
(R-Okla.) noted that of the total
species listed since 1973, only
about 3 percent have been delisted. “As a doctor, if I admit 100
patients to the hospital and only
three recover enough to be discharged, I would deserve to lose
my medical license,” he said.
Peter S. Alagona, author of “After the Grizzly: Endangered Species and the Politics of Place in
Southern California,” says some
concerns about the law have never
been sufficiently addressed. He
thinks it is due for “an update,” but
he disagrees with what he calls
Republicans’ “false pretenses.”
“If the complaint is [that] the
recovery of a species takes too
long, the question is for whom,” he
said. The agencies responsible for
the effort “have lacked resources”
to address critical issues, “and
part of the reason is they have
been starved by the politicians
who are now claiming it takes too
long.”
Republican lawmakers argue
that states better understand species within their borders and
should take a leading role in protecting them. But Alagona and
others say animal populations
have withered over the decades
because of neglect by states.
A 2016 study by the University
of California at Irvine showed that
state spending to protect endangered and threatened wildlife over
the 10 years ended in 2014 was
“negligible” compared with federal spending — a collective $57 million vs. more than $1.1 billion.
Most state regulations cover
fewer species than the federal government does, and 17 states do not
bother to protect plants. West Virginia and Wyoming have no legislation protecting species, the
study said, although Wyoming allocates more than most states on
species management. Half of the
states do not require any scientific
evidence as a basis to list species or
remove them.
Conservationists are worried
about the ESA bills now before the
House, but they are especially concerned about the proposal that
would require federal wildlife officials to consider the “likelihood of
significant, cumulative economic
effects” of listing an animal or
plant. Its author, Rep. Pete Olson
(R-Tex.), who has characterized
the act as “a political weapon for
extreme environmentalists,” said
potential revenue and job losses as
a consequence of species protection can no longer be ignored.
Olson’s bill would demolish a
tenet that historically set U.S. species protections apart from those
of other countries: Science should
be a much stronger factor than
money.
Dan Ashe, a Fish and Wildlife
director under the Obama administration who is now president
and chief executive of the Association of Zoos & Aquariums, warns
that putting economic interests
first would be a serious blow to the
law. The 2008 protection of polar
bears under the George W. Bush
administration, he said, is just one
example of action that probably
would not have happened.
“What a hard decision that
was,” Ashe said. “If [agency officials] were required to consider
the economic impact of the polar
bear listing, would they have listed it? I think not.”
The drive to weaken the Endangered Species Act is coming at a
crucial time, Ashe said. “Wide scientific consensus is that we’re living amid another great extinction
crisis — people are calling it the
sixth mass extinction,” he said.
“Looking at these five bills, I see no
sign that there’s a concern for improving the implementation of
the Endangered Species Act.”
darryl.fears@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/energy-environment
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letters@washpost.com
Time to switch gears on congestion
EDITORIALS
Yes, it’s a guns situation.
This is not an unsolvable problem.
“Y
problem and take meaningful steps to stem the obscene and unfettered access to weapons of war.
The gunman in Sunday’s slaughter at the First
Baptist Church was able to buy a military-style semiautomatic weapon despite a troubled history that
included being kicked out of the Air Force for bad
conduct and being jailed for assaulting his wife and
breaking his infant stepson’s skull. Not “a guns situation” was the rather incredible assessment of President Trump who, taking a page from the diversionary
playbook of the national gun lobby, framed the problem as one of mental illness.
No doubt the angry young man who stormed the
church in a ballistic vest was, as the president said,
“deranged” with “a lot of problems.” But imagine what
would have happened if he had been deranged — and
armed with only a knife? What if, at least, he had had
An increasingly
reckless prince
to stop and reload?
There is no way to prevent all shootings, but steps
can be taken to reduce the carnage, as has been
proved by sensible and effective gun control in other
countries that also must contend with issues of
mental health. After every high-profile mass shooting
— at a movie theater in Colorado, a college campus in
Virginia, a parking lot in Arizona, an elementary
school in Connecticut — Congress is beseeched to
serve the American public rather than the National
Rifle Association. Lawmakers are asked not to prohibit guns but to enact common-sense safeguards:
muscular background checks, keeping guns away
from domestic abusers, banning weapons designed
for battlefields.
So far, Congress has refused. That dereliction is
what is truly unimaginable.
Who benefits under the tax plan?
Regarding the Nov. 3 front-page article “GOP
unveils sweeping tax overhaul”:
The estate tax exempts the first $5.49 million of an
estate’s value. Any business or farm valued at more
than $5.49 million is not hurting. Eliminating the
estate tax would benefit only those whose wealth
exceeds $5.49 million and would increase inequality.
William Thomson, Arlington
M
The repeal of medical deductions in the tax bill
would hurt a lot of people [“The winners and losers
in proposed GOP tax plan,” news, Nov. 5]. This would
have a deeply harmful financial and emotional
impact on poor and middle-class people, older
adults in assisted-living facilities, their caregivers
and beyond. It would affect people in every state —
Republicans, Democrats and independents. This
would result in a significant tax increase for people
who are paying out large sums of after-tax money to
support our loved ones. Caregivers would be devastated. The costs of decreasing taxes for corporations
and the wealthy would once again be borne by
citizens who can ill afford it, emotionally, financially
or otherwise.
Barry Brenner, Westfield, N.J.
and ill-judged adventures could easily undermine
hopes for progressive reform and destabilize the
kingdom. He is arresting not just hidebound Islamic
clerics but liberal journalists and human rights
activists who ought to be his natural allies. His
jailing of globally prominent businessmen such as
Prince Alwaleed bin Talal, a major investor in
companies such as Apple, Twitter and Lyft, could
spook the foreign investors he says he wants to
attract.
Most seriously, the war the young prince launched
in Yemen in 2015 has become a quagmire and fuels
what is probably the worst humanitarian crisis in
the world. The Saudi-led boycott of Qatar has
introduced a rift among Sunni-ruled Persian Gulf
states, to Iran’s advantage, and it too has produced a
stalemate. Mr. Hariri’s resignation will likely have
the effect of strengthening rather than weakening
Hezbollah’s hold over Lebanon.
To the extent it backs Prince Salman’s gambles,
the Trump administration is needlessly risking U.S.
equities in the Middle East. Rather than indulge the
young ruler, it ought to be pushing to curb his
excesses, both at home and abroad.
So, what would Mr. Trump pay?
A self-respecting Congress would inspect his tax returns before voting on reform.
“H
ERE IS everything you need to know
about our plan,” House Speaker Paul D.
Ryan’s (R-Wis.) press office promised
in an email offering links to thousands
of words of material on the House GOP’s new tax-cut
proposal. But it did not contain some crucial
information that we would like to know and that
every lawmaker should have before voting on the
package: how the plan would personally benefit
President Trump.
Figuring this out would be easy for anyone
following the tax-cut debate — if, that is, the public
had access to the president’s tax returns. But
Mr. Trump has broken with decades of bipartisan
tradition and refuses to release his tax forms, past or
present. So Americans can only guess about the
nature and size of his personal stake in the GOP tax
plan.
There’s reason to guess he might do very well by it.
For example, the House GOP tax plan would
eliminate the alternative minimum tax. When
summary information from Mr. Trump’s 2005 tax
return leaked, it showed that the AMT obliged him
to pay $31 million more in federal taxes that year.
The tax worked in that case just as intended,
limiting Mr. Trump’s ability to deduct and loophole
his taxable income far below what would have been
reasonable for someone of his wealth. How many
millions would Mr. Trump stand to save just from
the AMT repeal?
Similarly, the House GOP proposal would cut
rates on “pass-through” income for certain types of
privately held companies — the types that
Mr. Trump frequently used to conduct his business.
Republicans may limit the scale of the break, out of
concern that they would otherwise create a new
loophole for tax dodgers. But they are still debating
how to structure the shift. These details could have
large implications for the president’s bottom line.
Lawmakers also should not ignore the fact that
Mr. Trump’s family would almost certainly benefit
from eliminating the estate tax, another piece of the
GOP plan. Republicans argue that killing the “death
tax” is about preserving family farms and other
heirloom property. In fact, the tax already applies
only to the richest of estates. The Trump family is a
better example of the likely beneficiary. Without
more information on Mr. Trump’s financial situa-
tion, it is hard to know by how much.
Refusing to release tax returns is just one of many
ways in which Mr. Trump represents a distressing
departure from the country’s democratic norms.
Members of Congress should respond by conducting
their own business with the dignity Mr. Trump lacks.
A self-respecting legislature would insist on minimal transparency from the executive branch. The
House Ways and Means Committee on Monday
began several days of formal discussion on the GOP
tax-cut plan. The debate should not have even
started without some basic clarity about the president’s conflicts of interest.
Election Day in Va.
Polls are open in Virginia Tuesday from 6 a.m. to
7 p.m. in races for governor, lieutenant governor,
attorney general and the House of Delegates.
In the statewide races, The Post has endorsed:
Ralph Northam (D) for governor
Justin Fairfax (D) for lieutenant governor
Mark Herring (D) for attorney general
ABCDE
L O CA L O P I N I O N S
Join the debate at washingtonpost.com/local-opinions
We must continue to protect Jamestown
The Oct. 29 Metro article “Will a dead man tell a
tale?,” about recently uncovered remains at the first
permanent English colony in North America, demonstrated the invaluable history that Jamestown, Va.,
and the surrounding landscape hold.
With the remains of Jamestown colonists recently
discovered and explored, this place continues to help
us better understand our nation’s history by providing a glimpse into the daunting challenges the first
English settlers endured, as well as their achievements in industry, agriculture and trade.
For more than 400 years, people have worked to
protect the location and the history it represents to
give visitors the same view and same sense of place
those first explorers had in the 1600s.
Every area resident knows that traffic is the
scourge of our roads. For decades, our roads have
jammed like clockwork every weekday in the same
spots at the same time. Change is needed to cure the
problem. Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan’s (R) suggested improvements are great starts.
The Washington region is the sixth most congested metropolitan area in the country and the
15th most congested in the world. Virginia knows it
has a problem, so the commonwealth has been
rapidly upgrading and constructing highways in its
part of the metro area. Maryland, however, has
lagged on improving the commutes of its citizens.
The cost to the region’s economy is horrifying,
with nearly $2.9 billion lost to the local economy
because of congestion and traffic, costing each
driver on average $1,700 a year in wasted time and
fuel. Drivers spend 61 hours a year in peak traffic
congestion, a total of 2.5 days a year parked on the
highway. That is inexcusable for a region with such
importance to the nation.
Improvements are desperately needed on some
of Maryland’s major roadways. If the roads jam in
the same spots for years, is it not time for the state to
act? The sun must set on the idea that we are
doomed to sit in traffic in Maryland with no hope
for change. Maryland must get its act together and
open the road to change for the state and the region.
Charles Pawling, West Friendship
TOM TOLES
The White House should try to curb
Saudi Arabia’s excesses.
OHAMMED BIN SALMAN, the Saudi
crown prince known for his bold and
sometimes reckless steps to transform his
country and its place in the Middle East,
has staged his biggest coup yet. On Saturday, 11 princes and three dozen other senior officials and big
businessmen were arrested on his orders, including
the commander of the national guard, the economy
minister and Saudi Arabia’s leading international
financier. Though they are reportedly being held in
luxury hotels, Saudi media are describing them as
“traitors,” an ominous sign of what may be in store.
As if that were not enough for one weekend, the
32-year-old prince flexed Saudi muscles across the
region. Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri, a
client, announced his resignation on a Saudi television channel, triggering a crisis with Iranian-backed
Hezbollah, which was part of his coalition. The
Saudis then declared a blockade of Yemeni airspace
and borders after blaming the Tehran-allied Houthi
movement for a missile attack on Riyadh’s airport.
On Monday, Prince Salman abruptly summoned
Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, who has
been negotiating a political pact with the Hamas
movement.
The sweeping initiatives appeared aimed at consolidating the power of an emerging ruler who is
poised to succeed his 81-year-old father, King Salman, and to double down on Saudi Arabia’s challenge to Shiite Iran. The young prince appears to
have the full support of President Trump and senior
advisers such as Jared Kushner, who visited Riyadh
and conferred at length with the crown prince only
days before the crackdown. If so, it’s a risky bet.
His Western supporters imagine that Prince
Salman is concentrating power so as to lead his
deeply conservative, oil-producing country on a
forced march to modernity. Prince Salman has
announced plans to welcome foreign investment to
the country and to sell shares in the state oil
company; Saudi women were recently told they
would soon be allowed to drive. A wave of arrests in
September swept up many conservative clerics.
Yet Prince Salman’s resort to heavy-handed tactics
NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
OU NEVER expect something like this,”
said one official about Sunday’s mass
shooting in the small Texas community
of Sutherland Springs. “Unimaginable,”
said a man whose parents were among the 26 people
killed, along with a pregnant woman, an 18-monthold baby and a 14-year-old girl.
Among the awful truths of what happened Sunday
morning in a place where no one locks their doors is
that gun violence is not unimaginable anywhere in this
country. Mass shootings have become commonplace,
and shootings far more so: Guns kill more than 30,000
people every year and injure roughly 80,000 more. Just
as there was a last time (an outdoor musical festival a
little more than a month ago in Las Vegas) and a this
time (a rural Texas church), there will surely be a next
time unless national lawmakers come to grips with the
. TUESDAY,
Dominion Energy wants to change all of that,
proposing to construct a massive power line that
would include 17 transmission towers — some almost
as tall as the Statue of Liberty — across the James
River near historic Jamestown. This project would
industrialize the landscape, including nearby national parks, and jeopardize important habitat for the
endangered Atlantic sturgeon. Once development of
this magnitude begins, this landscape will forever be
changed. We must continue to fight to ensure that
one of the United States’ most historic sites is not lost
for short-term profit and unnecessary development.
Theresa Pierno, Washington
The writer is president and chief executive of the
National Parks Conservation Association.
FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
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I am somewhere on the spectrum of being
middle class. I am told that I should expect a tax
break with the proposed tax-reform bill now being
engineered through Congress. Well, it turns out that
in its present form, not only will I not get a tax break,
but also I will end up paying a substantially higher
income tax should the proposed tax-reform plan be
enacted.
I am among those who has a family member in
need of full-time care. My wife has Alzheimer’s
disease. My annual costs run well into the $150,000
range. Under the provisions of the tax plan, I would
not be able to claim any medical deductions. I am
not alone here. Those who are responsible for
non-reimbursed annual medical costs for the longterm care of family members suffering with Parkinson’s disease, dementia, Alzheimer’s disease or other
neurological degenerative diseases will find themselves facing higher taxes under the new plan.
This needs to be fixed. Congress should retain the
medical expense deduction.
Robert Tedesco, Gaithersburg
Relatively few articles on the proposed GOP
tax plan have highlighted the terrific break eliminating the alternative minimum tax would give to the
upper brackets [“Mortgage plan would hurt D.C.’s
middle class,” news, Nov. 3]. It was initially installed
to stop the excessive use of tax loopholes. Apparently, President Trump would have saved $31 million on
his 2005 tax return alone. This would be one of the
biggest benefits to the wealthy under this ill-advised
so-called tax reform.
Jerry Samuel, Gaithersburg
Problems with tax cuts are neatly captured in a
quote from Rep. Peter A. DeFazio (D-Ore.), who said,
“Paul [Ryan] believes that if it’s worth doing, the
private sector will do it” [“White House revisits
gas-tax increase,” news, Oct. 27].
People who actually want the economy to grow
are going about it exactly the wrong way if they
support proposals to cut federal taxes and increase
the burden of state and local taxes. Roads and
bridges, Medicare and Medicaid, disaster relief and
adaptation to climate change — these will not be
funded by the private sector without public
revenue instead of increased deficits. More tax cuts
will just impede the development of an economy
that provides services that people actually need
and want.
John Cross, Burke
The Nov. 3 news article “Mortgage plan would
hurt D.C.’s middle class” gave a misleading impression of the hardships that would be created for
middle-income taxpayers by the provision of the
Republican tax proposal that would limit the
deduction of mortgage interest for new mortgages
in excess of $500,000. First, the U.S. household
median income (50 percent of families have higher
income and 50 percent have lower income) is less
than $60,000. Not many people in this middleincome range are going to be able to afford
mortgages that exceed $500,000. Second, people
would still be able to deduct the interest they pay on
the first $500,000 on their mortgage, so high-priced
houses would still be subsidized.
The fact is that this provision of the Republican
proposal (unlike many others) is a progressive
change compared with current policy. The current
write-off of mortgage interest provides the largest
subsidies (paid by other taxpayers) to high-income
people with high marginal tax rates who borrow to
buy expensive houses; not only do they deduct more,
but also a deduction of a given amount is worth
more because their marginal tax rates are higher
than those of lower-income people.
Elliot K. Wicks, Reston
Letters to the editor: letters@washpost.com
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A19
RE
CATHERINE RAMPELL
MICHAEL GERSON
At long last, a tax plan
for the idle rich
Our political
parties are
in crisis
T
he Republican tax bill is often described as being weighted toward
“the rich.” But that’s not the full
story.
It’s actually weighted toward the loafer,
the freeloader, the heir, the passive investor
who spends his time yachting and charityballing.
In short: the idle rich.
Republicans claim the opposite, of course.
For years the GOP has argued that we need to
cut taxes to incentivize work and job creation. If only today’s allegedly sky-high marginal rates were lower, millions of talented,
driven Americans would apply more of their
talent and drive toward growing the economy.
Why? Well, if they got to keep more of their
hard-earned cash, there would be a greater
payoff from clocking that extra hour, taking
on that extra project, seeing that extra patient, scoring that extra client, building that
extra business, and so on. Working would
look more attractive relative to playing an
extra round of golf.
Yet the GOP tax bill offers the biggest
windfall to those who sit on their duffs and
do nothing.
Rich layabouts benefit in multiple ways
from the proposal.
The most obvious way is the repeal of the
estate tax, which currently affects only estates worth at least $5.49 million, or roughly
the wealthiest 0.2 percent of Americans who
die each year.
Eliminating estate taxes paid by the very
wealthy few seems unlikely to improve their
work ethic. If anything, increasing the value
of their bequests will make it less attractive
for heirs and heiresses to hold down a job or
start a company that they actually run.
This is hardly the only way that the Republican tax proposal would reward passively
received income. The big cut in corporate tax
rates and the corporate repatriation holiday
also disproportionately benefit passive owners of capital rather than workers.
But the bill’s differential treatment of
those who work and those who don’t is
starkest in provisions related to “passthrough” entities.
Almost all businesses in the United States
are structured as pass-through businesses,
such as partnerships, sole proprietorships
and S-corporations. This means their incomes are taxed at individual rates, rather
than corporate ones. Despite the usual rhetoric, these businesses are not necessarily
“small”; the Trump Organization, for instance, is organized as a pass-through.
The Republican tax plan would dramatically slash tax rates for pass-through income,
down to no more than 25 percent. This
special pass-through rate is much lower than
the normal top marginal rate for individual
income, which would continue to be
39.6 percent.
As you might imagine, a gap in tax rates is
likely to create a tax-sheltering bonanza.
Lots of high-income people currently working as employees would likely start calling
themselves “companies” — by working as
sole-proprietor “consultancies,” for instance
— to take advantage of the lower rate.
The bill also includes some “guardrails” to
discourage people from gaming this system.
At least in theory.
Among them is a rule that says if you’re
actively involved in your business, typically
only a portion (30 percent) of your earnings
would qualify for the special pass-through
rate. The rest of your earnings (70 percent)
would be considered equivalent to the wages
you’d pay yourself for your work at the firm.
Accordingly, these would be taxed at regular
individual income-tax rates.
But here’s the rub. This 70-30 rule would
apply only if you’re “actively” working for the
company you own. If instead you’re considered a “passive” owner — determined by, for
example, how many hours you log working
for it — then you inexplicably qualify for the
special pass-through rate on 100 percent of
your earnings.
Consider a hypothetical, similar to one
New York University School of Law’s Lily
Batchelder suggested to me recently: A family business has been passed down to several
siblings with varying levels of industriousness and IQ.
The most competent sibling works for her
family’s company full-time. The least competent sibling kicks in a few hours of work each
year, but otherwise spends his time popping
bottles of champagne and hunting endangered wildlife.
Under the Republican tax bill, the lowest
tax rate is paid by the ne’er-do-well brother,
rather than by the worker-bee sister who
actually grew the business. Although, with a
good enough accountant, she might be able
to convince the Internal Revenue Service
that she’s just as lazy and uninvolved as her
brother.
This is a strange way to design tax incentives. As New York University law school
professor Daniel Shaviro has noted, our existing tax code typically incentivizes people
to avoid being classified as passive and instead to prove that they’re “materially participating” in running their business. This bill
encourages rich people to do the opposite.
So much for the dignity of work.
crampell@washpost.com
FRED HIATT
Don’t declare victory yet
S
ome viewers may emerge from the
gripping new courtroom drama
“Marshall” shaking their heads at the
racism of their great-grandparents’
generation. The movie, set in 1941, features
infuriatingly bigoted villains, from a contemptuous judge to a roughneck mob bent
on street violence — and in suburban Connecticut, no less.
Unfortunately, current events (Donald
Trump, Charlottesville, Ed Gillespie’s advertisements) offer an instant rebuke to anyone
inclined toward generational smugness.
And if recent headlines aren’t enough, I
submit two books — equally gripping, if
painful, legal dramas that tell more modern
tales.
One is Bryan Stevenson’s “Just Mercy,”
published three years ago, about a black
man railroaded onto death row for a 1986
murder he did not commit.
The other is Danielle Allen’s newly published “Cuz,” which describes how today’s
criminal-justice system destroyed a talented
but troubled African American youth.
“Marshall” recounts an episode from the
early career of Thurgood Marshall, before he
took on the cases that would end segregation in public schools, long before he became
the first black justice on the Supreme Court.
Working for the NAACP as a roving defense
lawyer for the unjustly accused, Marshall
was deployed to represent a black chauffeur
accused of raping the Connecticut socialite
who employed him. The movie presents the
Connecticut legal establishment as racist —
but a bit more subtly so than the truncheonwielding sheriffs in the Jim Crow South
where Marshall was used to working.
That was a South that was supposed to no
longer exist when Stevenson, just out of law
school, opened a nonprofit law center in
Tuscaloosa, Ala., in 1989. But Stevenson
soon started hearing of the strange case of
Walter McMillian, a well-liked lumberjack
sitting on Alabama’s death row for a murder
he had nothing to do with.
In McMillian’s home Monroe County, everyone liked to brag about being the real
location of the fictional “To Kill a Mockingbird.” But the facts that Stevenson uncovered suggested not much had changed since
Harper Lee wrote her novel: Lawenforcement officials embarrassed by a
murder they couldn’t solve. An establishment angered by a black man who’d had an
affair with a white woman. A watertight
alibi ignored, exculpatory evidence hidden
from the defense, prosecution witnesses
paid off.
Stevenson took on McMillian’s case,
against tall odds. The first exculpatory witness he found was instantly charged with
perjury and scared off. Eventually, amazingly, Stevenson got McMillian freed, and how
he does so makes for suspenseful reading.
But not exactly for a happy ending. McMillian spent six years on death row. He lost
his business, his marriage and his health.
And it wasn’t just one man who suffered.
McMillian’s friends and neighbors knew he
was innocent; they’d been with him at a fish
fry at the time of the murder; they all saw the
unbridled, corrupt power of the white establishment. And, Stevenson writes, “This one
massive miscarriage of justice had afflicted
the whole community with despair.”
Which brings us even closer to today, and
to Allen’s sad, honest reconstruction of her
cousin’s short life. Michael was arrested at
age 15 for a failed carjacking in Los Angeles
in which only he was injured. On his way to
the hospital, he also confessed to several
robberies in the previous days.
For that, he faced a sentence of 25 years to
life — “one of the purest expressions of
hatred I can imagine,” Allen writes. He
pleaded guilty, was sentenced to 12 years and
eight months, served 11 years — and was
murdered not long after regaining his freedom.
“The years between ages fifteen and twenty-six are structured with recognizable milestones: high school, driver’s license, college,
first love, first job, first serious relationship,
perhaps marriage, possibly a child,” Allen
writes. “For those who pass adolescence in
prison, none of these rites of passage go
away; it’s just that they take on a massively
distorted shape. . . . First long-term separation from family. First racial melee. First
administrative segregation, also known as
first solitary confinement. First sodomization.”
Allen, a Harvard University professor
(and contributing Post columnist), does not
dwell on race in her book. She has other
purposes: to confront whether she could
have done more for Michael; to celebrate his
vibrancy and his talent as a “compulsively
good and imaginative writer”; above all, to
explain how the war on drugs has proved so
immeasurably self-destructive.
But it’s also impossible to read this account, especially of the thoughtlessly stupid
obstacles put in Michael’s way when he is
released, and believe we would tolerate it if
primarily white children were treated so. As
with the opioid crisis, it might take us too
long to awaken, but awaken we eventually
would.
About the time Michael got into trouble,
Allen writes, the Los Angeles police “had
47 percent of African American men between the ages of 21 and 24 in their gang
database.”
“Survival would have required Michael to
stay indoors, alone every day,” she writes of
young men in his neighborhood. “Some do
survive, and you will find, I think, that they
have often stayed indoors.”
Not something any parent should have to
ask of their 15-year-old.
Not something we would accept as normal for white children.
Go see “Marshall.” But think twice before
celebrating how far we have come.
fredhiatt@washpost.com
P
ERIC GAY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Pastor Frank Pomeroy and his wife, Sherri, join a news conference near
the First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs, Tex., on Monday.
EUGENE ROBINSON
Blood on our hands
“T
houghts and prayers”
are fine. Locking arms
“through the tears and
the sadness,” as President Trump prescribed, is all well
and good. But none of this does a
damn thing to stop, or even slow, the
carnage.
On Sunday, in Sutherland
Springs, Tex., a disturbed and angry
man with a military-style semiautomatic assault rifle opened fire at the
First Baptist Church during services, killing 26 people. It was the
worst church shooting in modern
U.S. history. Think about that: We’ve
seen enough mass killings at houses
of worship that we can rank them in
order.
Why did he do it? We may never
be certain; the assailant, 26-year-old
Devin Patrick Kelley, is dead. But we
can say with certainty how he did
such an unspeakable thing: with a
gun designed for warfare, a weapon
that has no business in civilian
hands.
I’ve written this column before,
and I will have tragic occasion to
write it again. I don’t care about
that. I’ll keep writing it because we
cannot become inured to this horrific gun violence. We cannot allow
mass killings to become normalized,
even though they happen with increasing and numbing frequency.
We can accept the loss of life on the
battlefield as the price of freedom
but not senseless murder in the
church pews.
Now begins the sophistry from
apologists for the gun lobby. First
they will feign outrage that anyone
would “politicize” such a tragedy by
seeking ways to prevent such a thing
from happening again. Then the
National Rifle Association’s water
carriers will choose some guncontrol proposal and crow about
how that specific measure could not
have prevented this specific massacre. Therefore, they will argue, we
must do nothing at all.
If all else fails, the complicit enablers of horrific gun violence — and
that’s what they are — will rush to
get in front of the discussion and
lead it astray, as the NRA did after
Las Vegas by encouraging debate
about bump stocks. Yes, those accessories allow a gunman to fire more
rapidly. But a standard AR-15-style
rifle is plenty rapid enough. What
kills are the high-speed, largecaliber rounds that tear through
flesh, bone and brain as if they were
tissue paper. But the NRA doesn’t
want us to focus on the gun or the
ammunition, because then even
strong supporters of the Second
Amendment might begin asking inconvenient questions.
Chief among them: Why do we
make it easier to amass an arsenal of
weapons of war than to get a driver’s
license or register to vote?
The guns most often used in these
mass shootings are variations on
rifles designed for soldiers to carry
into combat. They are not optimized
for killing rabbits or deer, but for
killing people. They have no business in civilian hands.
The gun lobby claims it is impossible to distinguish between assault
weapons and other firearms, but
that is preposterous. Of course a
distinction can be made. Perhaps
Kelley would have embarked on his
rampage anyway wielding a shotgun, but he would have had to reload
frequently and likely would have
been able to kill far fewer people.
Large-capacity magazines are
also unnecessary for hunting or target shooting. How do you define
what’s large-capacity and what
isn’t? Just do it. Pick a reasonable
number and write it into the law.
It goes without saying that there
should be universal background
checks for purchasing firearms. But
there should also be enforcement
mechanisms, with teeth, to make
sure that dealers do not sell weapons to individuals banned from obtaining them. And just as there is a
mandatory, comprehensive registry
of automobiles, there should be
such a registry for firearms and
ammunition.
To those who spend part of each
day scanning the skies for black
helicopters, I say relax; the government already knows who you are,
where you live, what you drive and
how much money you earn. If you’re
on Facebook, you’re probably telling
the whole world much more. A week
ago, Kelley posted a photo of his
assault rifle.
I hear you sighing that none of
this, realistically, is going to happen.
I respond: But it should.
The United States is alone among
advanced countries in having gun
policies that facilitate, rather than
obstruct, deadly rampages such as
Kelley’s. The Supreme Court has
made clear in its rulings that the
Second Amendment permits reasonable gun-control measures. This
crisis is political, not constitutional.
You and I have the power to elect
leaders who will reduce gun violence. The blood of innocents is on
our hands.
in military prison after he was
charged with assaulting his wife and
stepson. Yet he was still able to get
his hands on a weapon. A number of
perpetrators in recent cases of mass
violence had histories of abusing
women in their lives.
According to Everytown for Gun
Safety, 54 percent of mass shootings
involve a partner or another family
member being killed. Male violence
is an acute threat to American women: The Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention reports that homicide is the fifth leading cause of
death for women ages 18 to 44, and
more than half of these killings were
carried out by men they knew —
husbands, boyfriends, exes or other
intimate partners. Women in the
United States are 16 times more
likely to be killed with a gun than in
other developed nations. How many
Americans must be felled by bullets
before we understand that the safety
of women and children at home is
not just a private matter but also
essential to public safety?
Instead of subjecting immigrants
and refugees to “extreme vetting,” or
lazily stigmatizing the mentally ill
for our gun violence problem, it’s
beyond time to treat violence
against women as a serious threat to
our national security.
— Karen Attiah
michaelgerson@washpost.com
eugenerobinson@washpost.com
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/blogs/post-partisan
The United States can barely go a full
month without having to cope with a
horrific act of mass violence committed
at the hands of a man with a gun.
We obsess over the shooter’s race, his
religion, whether he had mental illness.
We wring our hands over our lax gun
laws. Our lawmakers offer inane promises of “thoughts and prayers.” We think
there is no fathomable way to predict or
prevent the gun carnage like that in
Sutherland Springs, Tex.; Las Vegas; San
Bernardino, Calif.; Orlando; and, well,
the list goes on.
But there is one disturbing, underreported pattern that is painfully clear
when it comes to mass violence and
terrorism: domestic violence. Many of
the men who commit mass public attacks
had been accused of abusing the women
and children in their lives.
Investigators now say that 26-year-old
Devin Patrick Kelley was involved in an
ongoing “domestic situation” when he
opened fire at the First Baptist Church in
Sutherland Springs, killing 26 and
wounding 20 more. Reportedly, he sent
“threatening texts” to his mother-in-law,
who was not at the church at the time but
was a member.
Before the massacre, Kelley was courtmartialed by the Air Force and spent time
We have reached a moment
of intellectual and moral
exhaustion for both parties.
We have reached a moment of intellectual and moral exhaustion for both
major political parties. One is dominated by ethnic politics — which a disturbingly strong majority of Republican
regulars have found appealing or acceptable. The other is dominated by
identity politics — a movement that
counts a growing number of Robespierres. Both seem united only in their
resentment of the international economic order that the United States has
built and led for 70 years.
Normally, a political party would
succeed by taking the best of populist
passion and giving it more mainstream
expression. But in this particular, polarized environment, how is that possible?
Do mainstream Republicans take a
dollop of nativism and a dash of racism
and add them to their tax cuts? That
seemed to be the approach that Ed
Gillespie took in the Virginia governor’s
race. But this is morally poisonous —
like taking a little ricin in your tea. Do
mainstream Democrats just take some
angry identity politics and a serving of
socialism — some extreme pro-choice
rhetoric and single-payer health care —
and add them to job-training programs?
The lead ideology of the Republican
Party at the national level is now immoral and must be overturned — a task that
only a smattering of retiring officeholders has undertaken. The lead ideology of
the Democratic Party is likely to be
overturned — by radicals with little to
offer the country save anger and bad
economics.
Where does this leave us at Year One
of the Trump era? With two very sick
political parties that have a monopoly
on political power and little prospect for
reform and recovery. The stakes are
quite high. If America really develops a
political competition between ethnonationalism and identity socialism, it
will mean we are a nation in decline —
likely to leave pressing problems (educational failure, unconstrained debt, a
flawed criminal-justice system) unconfronted. Likely to forfeit global leadership, undermine world markets and
cede to others the mantle of stability
and firm purpose.
There is a serious prospect that the
president will truly crash and burn in a
colossal fiasco so disastrous as to be
undeniable proof against all things
Trump. But that would be so bad for the
country that it is hard to wish for.
So what should we wish for? It is a
measure of our moment that this is not
obvious. It is quite possible that moderate conservatism and moderate liberalism are inadequate to explain and tame
the convulsive economic and social
changes of our time. Which places
America’s future — uncertain, maybe
unknowable — on the other side of an
earthquake.
POSTPARTISAN
Domestic violence is a
national security issue
olitical commentators are supposed to be somewhat objective
and analytical when it comes to
tracking trends. In that spirit, I
find the polling snapshot of President
Trump at one year since his election to
be interesting — if “interesting” is defined as a downward spiral of polarization, pettiness and prejudice that
threatens the daily functioning and
moral standing of the American republic.
Our times are not normal — and it is a
disservice to the country to normalize
them. In a recent Post-ABC News survey, Trump’s approval rating is worse —
far worse — than any president at this
stage in seven decades of polling. About
half of those surveyed strongly disapprove. The public assessment of
Trump’s leadership, character and competence has grown harsher in every
category.
All this is true following two quarters
of more than 3 percent economic
growth, with the stock market booming
and unemployment at 4.1 percent. Practically, this means that Trump has no
cushion or margin of public support
when economic circumstances worsen.
At a time of (relative) peace and prosperity, Trump is still broadly viewed as
divisive and ineffective. The ship of
Trump has strong winds at its back —
but is sinking too fast to take advantage
of them.
And yet. The Post-ABC News poll
shows that if the Trump/Clinton presidential race were re-held today, it would
be a tie. Think on that. Arguably the
worst president in modern history
might still beat one of the most prominent Democrats in the United States.
This indicates a Democratic Party in the
midst of its own profound crisis. During
the Obama years, it collapsed in large
portions of the country. Its national
establishment has been revealed — with
extensive footnotes provided by Donna
Brazile — as arrogant, complacent and
corrupt. But the only serious ideological
alternative to that establishment is
frankly socialist — the fatuous and
shallow sort of socialism held by college
freshmen and Bernie Sanders.
A20
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SU
JOHN KELLY’S WASHINGTON
VIRGINIA
OBITUARIES
Et tu, Cheerios? The
breakfast cereal now
comes in chocolate
peanut butter flavor. B3
Voters go to the polls
to select the state’s next
governor in a race stirring
national interest. B4
Nancy Friday, the author
of “My Secret Garden,”
chronicled women’s erotic
fantasies. B6
A woman hailed the chief, resist-style — and lost her job
UMC
operator
criticized
pre-vote
High today at
approx. 12 a.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
49°
8 p.m.
47 48 45 45°
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°
°
It was the middlefinger salute seen
around the world.
Juli Briskman’s
protest aimed at
the presidential
Petula
motorcade that
Dvorak
roared past her
while she was on
her cycling path in Northern
Virginia late last month became
an instantly viral photo.
Turns out it has now cost the
50-year-old marketing executive
her job.
On Halloween, after Briskman
gave her bosses at Akima, a
government contracting firm, a
heads-up that she was the
unidentified cyclist in the photo,
they took her into a room and
fired her, she said, escorting her
Precip: 65%
Wind: NNE
7-14 mph
out of the building with a box of
her things.
“I wasn’t even at work when I
did that,” Briskman said. “But
they told me I violated the codeof-conduct policy.”
Her bosses at Akima, who
have not returned emails and
calls requesting comment,
showed her the blue-highlighted
Section 4.3 of the firm’s socialmedia policy when they canned
her.
“Covered Social Media Activity
that contains discriminatory,
obscene malicious or
threatening content, is
knowingly false, create [sic] a
hostile work environment, or
similar inappropriate or
unlawful conduct will not be
tolerated and will be subject to
BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Juli Briskman was observed flipping off President Trump’s
motorcade outside his golf course in Sterling, Va., on Oct. 28.
discipline up to an [sic]
including termination of
employment.”
But Briskman wasn’t wearing
anything that connected her to
the company when she was on
her ride, nor is there anything on
her personal social-media
accounts — where she wordlessly
posted the photo without
identifying herself — to link her
to the firm.
She identifies herself as an
Akima employee on her
LinkedIn account but makes no
mention of the middle-finger
photo there.
Wait. It gets even more
obscene.
Because Briskman was in
charge of the firm’s social-media
D.C. COUNCIL WEIGHS
CONTRACT RENEWAL
Past hospital executives
blast firm’s management
DVORAK CONTINUED ON B3
BY
PETER JAMISON
Two more high-ranking former
employees of the District’s only
public hospital stepped forward
Monday to criticize the firm running the facility, even as the company’s owner fought back on the
eve of a high-stakes D.C. Council
vote on whether it should continue to manage United Medical
Center.
Pamela Lee, the hospital’s former chief operating officer, and
Stanley Pierre, its former quality
director, said the consulting firm,
Veritas of Washington, had taken
steps to remove critical safeguards for patients — particularly
by understaffing the department
that ensures quality of care and
compliance with state and federal
laws.
Their assertions echo those
made in public testimony before a
D.C. Council committee Friday by
another former UMC quality director, Maria Costino, and by Julian Craig, the hospital’s current
chief medical officer.
The D.C. Council is set to vote
Tuesday on whether to cancel the
Veritas contract after a string of
high-profile lapses in medical
care at UMC, which is owned by
the District and serves some of the
UMC CONTINUED ON B4
PHOTOS BY MICHAEL ALISON CHANDLER/THE WASHINGTON POST
Uniting on the home front
Domestic workers meet in D.C. to discuss rights and wages — and strategies to boost both
BY
M ICHAEL A LISON C HANDLER
was often frustrated by what she called
“unhealthy competition” with other nannies, who were willing to work for less.
“When you sell yourself for so cheap,
the life you give to your family is cheap,”
she said. “Some people make do with very
little. They live all together in one room,
or multiple families in a room. It’s not a
healthy life.”
Recently, she saw an ad on Facebook
for a gathering of domestic workers to
learn about their rights, and improve
training and standards for the profes-
V
ivian Calatayud was an architect
in her home country of Bolivia.
When she immigrated to the
United States, she took what jobs
she could find — she cleaned offices and
cared for seniors and eventually became
a nanny.
As a single mother, she struggled to
support her daughter, she said. Hoping to
increase her pay, she took classes in earlychildhood development and got certified
in CPR. But when searching for work, she
Mumps, an infectious disease
carried on a sneeze or a cup, appears to be spreading among D.C.
universities, with cases reported at
three schools.
Catholic University recently
identified a cluster of mumps, with
four cases confirmed and three suspected cases under investigation, a
school spokeswoman said Monday.
On Friday, a message sent to the
American, Catholic,
Georgetown reported
cases in recent days
Georgetown University community said that two undergraduates
had been diagnosed with the disease. The cases at Georgetown have
MUMPS CONTINUED ON B5
Joe Colucci wasn’t completely
in the dark. He had a friend
whose father worked for the FBI,
after all. That gave Colucci a peek
into the world of intelligence and
law enforcement. Plus, he’s seen
spy movies. (Actually, that
doesn’t really help at all, but
more on that later.)
When the 19-year-old Colucci
realized Catholic University was
starting an intelligence studies
certificate program, he thought
it would be a great opportunity.
is the latest school
to offer spycraft studies
Even if there was still mystery
surrounding the whole thing.
“It was sort of foreign to me,”
he said. “I had some idea of what
they did, and what their job
entailed.”
At Catholic, he began to figure
it out. “That’s when I really,
O VETTA W IGGINS
ESPIONAGE CONTINUED ON B5
FUNDS CONTINUED ON B4
3 D.C. universities warn Classes in espionage at Catholic U.?
about spread of mumps
Vatican’s U.S. college
BY SARAH LARIMER
BY
really knew that this was something I wanted to pursue,” said
Colucci, a sophomore from
White Plains, N.Y.
The first intelligence program
at a civilian university emerged
25 years ago, and since then, they
have spread to other schools
across the nation. That expansion accelerated in the wake of
the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, experts said, with one study finding a further surge since 2009.
Students discover what goes
into collection, analysis, covert
WORKERS CONTINUED ON B2
S ARAH L ARIMER
Only 2 of 8 Democrats
vying for governor may
seek public money
Only two of the eight Democrats vying to replace Maryland
Gov. Larry Hogan (R) in 2018 say
they might seek public matching
funds for their primaries, which
Hogan did during his underdog
run nearly four years ago.
Most of the candidates, who are
scrambling to raise money, said
the state’s public financing system
comes with too many restrictions
and would not provide enough
money for a competitive bid.
Krishanti Vignarajah, a former
policy aide to Michelle Obama,
and Sen. Richard S. Madaleno Jr.
(D-Montgomery) said they are
considering participating in the
program, which provides a dollarfor-dollar match for donations of
$250 or less, until available funds
are exhausted.
To qualify, candidates must
agree not to exceed an expenditure limit in the primary and the
general election that is equal to
47 cents for every resident of the
state — about $2.8 million next
year. They also must raise a minimum of about one-tenth that, or
$280,000, in small-dollar donations.
Proponents say the public financing system makes it possible
for lesser-known candidates to
fund a campaign and reduces the
importance of large corporate do-
Organizers Ingrid Vaca and Adelaide Tembe, holding baby Hawa, visit a playground in the Friendship Heights area of Northwest Washington last
month to encourage nannies to attend the domestic worker gathering. The playground is a lifeline for nannies, Vaca said. It’s where they learn how
others are being paid and treated. Nearly 100 people participated in the gathering, part of a broad effort to organize domestic workers. The meeting
was led by the New York-based National Domestic Workers Alliance, which distributed fliers for its event.
BY
Matching
funds in
Md. race
eschewed
B2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
Advocates try to empower domestic workers in D.C.
WORKERS FROM B1
sions. So on a Saturday afternoon, she joined nearly 100 domestic workers and advocates at
St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church
in Columbia Heights. The D.C.
meeting was part of broad effort
to organize domestic workers in
the nation’s capital and beyond
by the National Domestic Workers Alliance.
Over two months, organizers
for the alliance visited bus stops,
Metro stations, playgrounds and
public libraries to recruit and
train nannies, housekeepers and
other domestic workers on their
rights and how to negotiate on
their own behalf. They stood
outside an Ethiopian evangelical
church and a Polish Catholic
church after busy Sunday services. And they posted ads
through social media.
There are more than 2 million
nannies, house cleaners and
home-based care workers for the
elderly and disabled in the United States, including more than
100,000 in the Washington region. They are among the fastest
growing workforces, economists
say, but they labor in relative
isolation and with few legal protections.
A 2012 survey of more than
2,000 domestic workers in 14
metropolitan areas by the New
York-based alliance found that
23 percent are paid less than
minimum wage, 65 percent have
no health insurance, and most
have little control over their
working conditions.
Domestic workers historically
have been excluded from important labor protections in the
United States.
When fair labor laws in the
1930s gave workers the right to
organize as unions and to earn
minimum wage and overtime
pay, lawmakers left out domestic
workers. Their work was associated with the unpaid labor of
women and a largely African
American workforce that was
descended from slaves.
Congress extended minimum
wage and overtime protections
to some domestic workers in the
1970s, but it added an exemption
for workers who provide inhome “companionship services”
— a loophole that was broadly
MICHAEL CHANDLER/THE WASHINGTON POST
Leydis Munoz, a New York-based organizer for domestic workers, conducts salary negotiation training during a recent gathering in the
District. Over two months, organizers visited bus stops, Metro stations, playgrounds and libraries to reach the workers they aim to help.
interpreted. In 2015, that loophole was closed.
But many domestic workers
remain invisible in the law when
it comes to discrimination protections from Title VII of the
Civil Rights Act, safety protections from the Occupational
Safety and Health Act, and the
right to maternity or sick leave
found in the Family and Medical
Leave Act.
Over the past century, domestic workers have organized
through cooperatives or labor
centers, or, increasingly through
immigrant rights groups. The
alliance represents a network of
more than 60 affiliated groups.
In the past decade, they have
made gains.
A growing number of states,
including New York, California,
Hawaii, Massachusetts, Oregon,
Connecticut, Illinois and Nevada, have passed domestic
workers’ bills of rights, which
extend federal labor laws to provide additional protections. They
vary, but some provide protection from discrimination and
sexual harassment or benefits
such as overtime pay, maternity
leave and paid days off.
“These bills are aspirational
and they are important because
they say that these are workers
who deserve decent work.,” said
Eileen Boris, a scholar of the
domestic workers rights movement at the University of California at Santa Barbara. But she
said their impact is limited because there are few built-in
mechanisms for enforcement.
Lacking enforcement, domestic workers do best when they
band together so they can make
each other aware of their rights,
and so they can police the standards themselves, she said.
Organizing workers who
spend their days in private
homes is not easy.
On an October afternoon, lead
organizer Antonia Peña went to a
playground
in
Friendship
Heights with two other organizers. The park was crowded with
children fresh from afternoon
naps — and their caregivers.
“Are you a mommy or are you a
nanny?” asked Ingrid Vaca, a
house cleaner and former nanny
who volunteers with the alliance.
She handed the woman a flier
advertising the October gathering for domestic workers.
The playground is a lifeline for
nannies, she said. That’s where
they learn how others are being
paid and treated and how their
own situations compare.
Adelaide Tembe also came to
recruit women for the event. She
got involved in domestic workers
right after she came to the United States with a diplomatic family from Mozambique and found
herself in an abusive relationship.
“They said I was coming to
take care of the children, but
then I had to clean the house, do
the gardening, cook the meals —
and for much less pay,” Tembe
said.
Some advocates from Casa de
Maryland, an immigrant rights
group, eventually confronted her
employer and helped Tembe find
another place to live and work.
At the gathering in Columbia
Heights, Peña, the lead organizer
for the alliance in the District,
stood before a room full of
women she had worked hard to
find and invite.
“There are many injustices
that exist in this work and in this
country for immigrants. That’s
why we are here to get to know
each other,” she said. “Laws are
made by people and laws can
change.”
During the afternoon, the
women talked about the parts of
their work that make them
proud and the parts that bring
them stress.
A team of organizers from
New York led a training session
on how to negotiate contracts,
whether verbally for house
cleaners or on paper for nannies.
They advised them to renegotiate when their job duties
change, when their employer has
another child, for example, or
gets a new dog that they are
expected to manage.
Anna Janiak, 62, a home
health-care worker who is new to
the field after a career as a
research scientist, traveled from
Baltimore for the event.
She said she knows her work is
important: “People will live longer because of my help,” she said.
But she also knows that her
work is underpaid and underappreciated. She is interested in
being part of a social movement
to change that, she said.
“It is always better to be in a
group than to be facing a problem by yourself,” she said.
michael.chandler@washpost.com
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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B3
M2
There’s endless choice in the cereal aisle — as long as you’re partial to Cheerios
I couldn’t bring
myself to just
come out and ask
the General Mills
spokesman the
question that was
John
really on my
Kelly's
mind: Aren’t
Washington Chocolate Peanut
Butter Cheerios —
introduced to U.S.
consumers barely a month ago —
a freakish abomination?
I mean, come on. Et tu,
Cheerios? I thought Cheerios
had always resisted the
tartification of the American
breakfast cereal, and here it was,
the matron in the tasteful
double-knit twin set and sensible
shoes forced to prance around in
chocolate stilettos and a peanut
butter miniskirt.
It’s cognitive dissonance in a
bowl, as if Quaker Oats were to
come out with Quinoa Cap’n
Crunch.
“We’re big on consumer
choice, meeting just about
everyone’s individual needs,
from yellow box Cheerios being a
first finger food for toddlers to
people who love their Lucky
Charms,” General Mills
spokesman Mike Siemienas said
from his office in Minneapolis.
But, Mike, you’ve already got
Reese’s Puffs! That’s the original
chocolate and peanut butter
cereal, forged in the great Reese’s
Peanut Butter Cups crucible.
“Reese’s Puffs are corn-based,”
Mike patiently explained.
“Cheerios are oats.”
And then Mike schooled me in
the history of Cheerios. When
they were created in 1941, they
were called Cheerioats. Another
cereal company protested, saying
the name was too similar to that
of one of its products. In 1945,
the name was changed to
Cheerios.
“It wasn’t until 1979, after a lot
of consideration and discussion,
that the decision was made to
launch an additional flavor,
which was Honey Nut Cheerios,”
Mike said. “That’s when we
started to realize: Hey, people
love Cheerios and they love
having some flavor options.”
Some of those options are
seasonal, such as autumn’s
Pumpkin Spice Cheerios (of
course) and Banana Nut
Cheerios (rolled out each
winter). Others have joined the
permanent ranks of the Cheerios
army: Multi-Grain Cheerios,
Very Berry Cheerios, Apple
Cinnamon Cheerios . . .
Cheerios is the No. 1-selling
cereal brand in the United
States, Mike said, with Honey
Nut Cheerios the top-selling
PETULA DVORAK
Cyclist in viral photo lost
job after heads-up to boss
DVORAK FROM B1
presence during her six-month
tenure there, she recently
flagged something that did link
her company to some pretty ugly
stuff.
As she was monitoring
Facebook this summer, she
found a public comment by a
senior director at the company in
an otherwise civil discussion by
one of his employees about the
Black Lives Matter movement.
“You’re a f------ Libtard a------,”
the director injected, using his
profile that clearly and
repeatedly identifies himself as
an employee of the firm.
In fact, the person he aimed
that comment at was so offended
by the intrusion into the
conversation and the coarse
nature of it that he challenged
the director on representing
Akima that way.
So Briskman flagged the
exchange to senior management.
Did the man, a middle-aged
executive who had been with the
company for seven years, get the
old “Section 4.3” boot?
Nope. He cleaned up the
comment, spit-shined his public
profile and kept on trucking at
work.
But the single mother of two
teens who made an impulsive
gesture while on her bike on her
day off ?
Adios, amiga.
Her mistake, said Bethesda
lawyer Bradley Shear, who
specializes in social-media
issues, was her honesty.
“You can’t see her face; she is
totally unidentified in that
picture,” he said. “But once she
identified herself to her
employer, they had to consider
that information.”
The company takes into
account how the image of an
employee flipping off the
president looks and whether it
may draw negative attention or
cereal.
Today, there are 16 varieties of
Cheerios, including Chocolate
Cheerios, which were introduced
in 2010. More flavors are on the
way, Mike said, though he was
mum on specifics. (“I’m not
going to give any away now,” he
said.)
What does this all mean? I
asked Marty Gitlin, co-author,
with Topher Ellis, of 2012’s “The
Great American Cereal Book:
How Breakfast Got Its Crunch.”
Marty pointed out that there
are actually fewer brands of
cereal now than there were in
the cereal heyday of the 1960s
and 1970s. “I’m 60,” he said, “and
when I was a kid there were
more cereals out.”
Some brands, he said, lasted
only a few years before
vanishing. “One that I remember
very, very well was called Puffa
Puffa Rice,” he said. “It was a
brown sugar cereal. I don’t
believe there has been another
one since. It was really delicious.”
Another cereal that Marty
remembered: Sugar Jets.
“So many of the cereals back
then for baby boomers had
‘sugar’ in the name: Sugar Pops,
Sugar Frosted Flakes, Sugar This
and Sugar That,” he said. “At a
certain point, they took ‘sugar’
off it. They didn’t take the sugar
out of the cereal, but they took
the word out. A lot of parents
were freaking out about sugar
content.”
I remember when Sugar Pops
suddenly became Corn Pops, a
bit of marketing legerdemain
that struck me as positively
Orwellian. Sugar had gone down
the Memory Bowl, er, Hole.
Then, said Marty, “in the ’70s,
all the healthful cereals started
coming out.”
That’s when flannel-shirtwearing nature enthusiast Euell
Gibbons appeared in TV ads
shilling for Grape-Nuts, a cereal
that has all the visual appeal of a
bowl of grass clippings.
More recently, cereal
manufacturers started taking
existing brands and playing with
those, Marty said. Rather than
introduce a new type of cereal,
threats, said Shear, who has a
blog devoted to such matters.
But what about the First
Amendment?
That will save you from being
punished by the government for
your words, but it doesn’t protect
your paycheck, he said. “You can
say whatever you want,” he said.
“You might not get jailed for
what you say, but you might not
get the job you want.”
Briskman is not a strident
activist.
In fact, after years of working
all over the world as part of the
nation’s diplomatic corps, she’s
usually pretty reserved.
“I think I gave money for clean
water once,” she said.
During the Women’s March
the day after Trump’s
inauguration, she couldn’t
make it into Washington.
Instead, she said, she stood in
somber protest outside the CIA
headquarters with a “Not My
President” sign.
That day on her bike, she
wasn’t planning to make a
statement.
She was feeling much like
many other Americans who are
frustrated with Trump’s behavior
and the way he has performed as
president.
“Here’s what was going
through my head that day:
‘Really? You’re golfing again?’ ”
Briskman said.
She had been pounding out
her daily exercise, a little shorter
than usual because she was still
recovering from running the
Marine Corps Marathon, when
the phalanx of black cars passed
her.
She’d been chewing on the
state of the nation during her
ride — imagining the
devastation in Puerto Rico,
furious that young immigrants
brought to the United States as
children could be deported,
despondent over the deaths and
devastation in Las Vegas,
concerned about her friends in
the diplomatic corps who said
their daily job is now being the
laughingstock of the world —
when the presidential golfing
procession interrupted her
meditation.
“I was thinking about all this,
tooling along, when I see the
black cars come and I remember,
oh, yeah, he was back on the golf
course,” she said.
So she did what millions of
Americans do on the road every
day.
Hail to the chief, resist-style.
But she couldn’t just ride off.
Or watch it whoosh away. The
motorcade stopped, bisecting
her usual route. She knew it
wouldn’t be wise to cut between
the cars. And she didn’t want to
stay with her routine and look
like she was stalking the
motorcade when it turned where
she usually turned. So she
decided to change her route, and
punctuated the final insult with
another one-fingered salute.
She had no idea the sentiment
had been snapped by
photographer Brendan
Smialowski for Agence FrancePresse and Getty Images. And
that night, it started popping up
all over.
A few of her friends thought
they recognized her, tagged her
on the photo and asked.
“I said, ‘Yeah, that’s me. Isn’t it
funny?’ ” she said. Ha ha. And
she posted it as her Facebook
cover photo and her Twitter
profile picture, so now her 24
Twitter followers could guess
that it was her.
The next few days, though, it
started getting nasty at the yoga
studio, where she is a part-time
instructor — something she does
mention on Facebook. Some
threatening emails came,
Briskman said.
“They told the owner of the
studio she should fire me,” she
JOHN KELLY/THE WASHINGTON POST
A box of Chocolate Peanut Butter Cheerios, introduced in
September, isn’t welcome on the breakfast table of one columnist.
they introduced a new iteration
of an existing one.
“Frosted Flakes now has
marshmallows on it,” Marty said.
Or consider the doughnutthemed cereal from Quaker Oats,
which is described as “vanilla
donut-flavored piece[s]” that are
“topped with colorful sprinkles
and the stuff of dreams.”
In the past, this might have
been a stand-alone cereal, with a
name like Donutios or Sugar
Circles or Dream Disks. Instead,
it’s called Cap’n Crunch’s
Sprinkled Donut Crunch, even
though it doesn’t have a single
one of the Cap’n’s signature
abrasive pillows.
Said Marty: “I think what
happened was the whole thing
got played out. There was
nothing else the manufacturers
could do. How many different
things can you do with cereal?”
I guess he’s right, though I
miss the days of near-infinite
cereal, with each scrappy brand
displaying its unique charms.
Cereal manufacturers have
become like risk-averse
Hollywood studios. Everything is
a sequel.
said. So Briskman quickly
removed mention of the studio
and it was all back to ommm at
the yoga place and in her life.
She wasn’t a celebrity. Only the
back of her head and her hand
were.
But knowing that connection
had been made, Briskman
wanted to make her bosses at
Akima aware of the situation.
“It was just a heads-up,” she
said.
It didn’t take long for her head
to roll.
And now, heads are shaking.
Briskman has contacted the
American Civil Liberties Union
about the case.
Her bosses told her that they
do support her First Amendment
rights. But they wanted her to
“be professional,” she said.
Does Briskman regret that
middle finger, that reflexive
moment that wasn’t all
pussyhats and protest signs, that
wasn’t calculated resistance, but
rather a totally relatable plainold, working-woman, living-mylife, what-the-heck-is-going-onin-our-world reaction?
Nope. “I’d do it again,” she
said.
Resist, sister.
john.kelly@washpost.com
Twitter: @johnkelly
For previous columns, visit
washingtonpost.com/johnkelly.
petula.dvorak@washpost.com
Twitter: @petulad
L O C A L DIG ES T
THE DISTRICT
Infant found unhurt
in stolen vehicle
D.C. police are looking for a
young man who stole a car with a
1-year-old child inside Monday
morning. Police said that the car
was abandoned about a mile
away and that the baby was
found safe inside.
The incident occurred about
10:30 a.m. in the 1800 block of
Monroe Street NE in the
Brookland neighborhood.
Dustin Sternbeck, a police
spokesman, said the adult driver
parked and went inside a store to
cash a check. Sternbeck said the
woman left the car running and
the baby inside.
Police said a male teenager
stole the car and apparently left
it in the 1600 block of W Street
NE.
Sternbeck said police suspect
the thief did not realize a baby
was in the car.
— Peter Hermann
Police: Man said he’ll
kill all white officers
A man who reportedly came to
Washington to kill “all white
police” at the White House was
taken into custody Monday
across the street from the heavily
guarded compound, the Secret
Service said.
According to the Secret
Service, Michael Arega, of Dallas,
was found about 4:05 p.m. on the
north side of Pennsylvania
Avenue, near Lafayette Square.
He was arrested and charged
with making threats, the Secret
Service said, and he was not
armed.
The Secret Service said it was
notified about 2:55 p.m. to be on
the lookout for Arega, and it
began searching for him.
The president is on a trip
around Asia and is not in the
White House.
A spokesman for the
Montgomery County police said
they were told by Arega’s former
wife that his Facebook page said
he was going to Washington with
the intention of killing all white
police at the White House.
— Martin Weil
Marcus Moore, 44, of Crofton
died in the crash Friday. The
incident happened about
8:10 p.m. in the 400 block of
Ritchie Road, not far from
Central Avenue in Capitol
Heights.
— Dana Hedgpeth
VIRGINIA
Loaded gun found
in carry-on bag
Travelers still try to board
aircraft with loaded weapons in
their carry-on bags.
On Thursday, a Manassas man
was charged with trying to bring
a loaded gun through a security
Northeast man
is slain in Petworth
A 35-year-old man was fatally
shot Sunday evening in
Northwest Washington’s
Petworth neighborhood,
according to D.C. police.
Juan Nelson Roberts of
Northeast Washington was
pronounced dead at the scene of
the shooting about 6:10 p.m. in
the 900 block of Shepherd
Street NW.
— Peter Hermann
A Maryland man was killed
when he drove his car across the
centerline of a road in Prince
George’s County and hit a bus
head-on, authorities said.
— Dana Hedgpeth
LOTTERIES
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DISTRICT
Mid-Day Lucky Numbers:
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Lucky Numbers (Sun.):
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1-0-9-3-9
MARYLAND
Driver is killed after
car hits bus head-on
checkpoint at Reagan National
Airport.
Carl H. Berry II, 36, tried to go
through the security checkpoint
at Terminal A with a loaded
9mm handgun in his carry-on
bag, according to the
Metropolitan Washington
Airports Authority.
A TSA officer spotted the gun
as it passed through an X-ray
machine. TSA contacted MWAA
police, who confiscated the gun.
TSA said the gun was loaded
with seven bullets, including one
in the chamber.
Berry was charged with
carrying a dangerous weapon in
an airport terminal.
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THE DAILY QUIZ
Which trendy “toy” is helping
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fidgeting?
(Hint: The answer is in today’s Health and Science
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2017 PostPoints Scavenger Hunt
For the Lipstick Pistol and The Great Seal
And the Rectal Tool Kit, a very big deal
Head to Spy Museum in downtown DC
A playground for the James Bond wannabe.
On what day can you hear celebrated intelligence historian John Prados
speak about his new book Ghosts of Langley on spy chief legends?
Take in Handel’s Alcina, a sumptuous show
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Reserve your seat now, tickets won’t last.
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B4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
VIRGINIA
Election drama draws wide audience
Close race for governor
stirs national interest
BY
FENIT NIRAPPIL
Voters go to the polls Tuesday
to select the next governor of
Virginia, a decision that observers
around the country are closely
watching for larger meaning
about the political landscape in
the era of President Trump.
Republican Ed Gillespie faces
off against Democrat Ralph
Northam in a neck-and-neck race
to the governor’s mansion.
Gillespie, a former lobbyist and
longtime GOP strategist, and
Northam, a pediatric neurologist
who is the sitting lieutenant gov-
ernor, both said they were focused
on state issues. But Trump and
national divides over culture and
racism deeply permeated their
campaigns.
A win by Northam would be a
major boost nationally for Democrats eager to be seen as rebuilding their party and charting a
course back to power.
A victory by Gillespie, on the
other hand, would demoralize
Democrats, show that Trump is
not a liability in swing states and
provide a template for other Republicans in 2018. A win would
almost certainly give Republicans
full control of the state government, and the next governor will
oversee redistricting, which could
cement that control for years.
Libertarian Cliff Hyra is also on
the ballot but is drawing in the
low single digits in polls.
Several fundamentals are in
Northam’s favor: Virginia almost
always elects a governor of the
opposite party from the president, and Trump is deeply unpopular in the state.
But Gillespie, an establishment
Republican of the stripe typically
reviled by populists who support
Trump, has made inroads among
Trump voters by attacking illegal
immigration and vowing to protect Confederate monuments.
From Asia on Monday, the president tweeted, “The state of Virginia economy, under Democrat
rule, has been terrible. If you vote
Ed Gillespie tomorrow, it will
come roaring back!”
Virginia has a 3.7 percent unemployment rate, one of the lowest in the country. But the state’s
recovery from the 2008 recession
has been uneven.
Management criticism precedes vote
UMC FROM B1
city’s poorest neighborhoods in
Southeast Washington. Most
members of the 13-member council said Monday that they were
still undecided.
“It is really a damned-if-you-do,
damned-if-you-don’t situation,”
said council member Robert C.
White Jr. (D-At Large). He said he
worried quality of care could further suffer in the tumult accompanying another turnover in hospital leadership if the Veritas contract is canceled but has nevertheless decided to vote against
extending the contract because of
his concerns about patient safety
under the management.
“To approve this contract could
be seen by residents as approving
the damning information we’ve
seen in the newspapers,” he said.
In August, regulators closed the
UMC obstetrics ward without disclosing why. The Washington Post
later reported the closure came
after dangerous medical errors
involving pregnant women and
newborns. Last week, the newspaper reported on the case of Warren Webb, a UMC nursing-home
resident who died of a heart attack after crying out for help and
being left on the floor by his nurse.
In his testimony Friday, Craig
said Veritas’s tenure “has included both mismanagement and
malfeasance that have adversely
affected patient safety and quality
of care.”
In a letter to hospital board
chair LaRuby May on Sunday, Veritas owner Chrystie Boucrée
pushed back against Craig’s allegations, calling them “egregious”
and part of a “remarkably selfserving and false narrative.”
Boucrée’s husband, Corbett
Price, is a longtime health-care
executive who, along with his relatives and companies, made more
than $35,000 in political contributions to D.C. Mayor Muriel E.
Bowser (D) in 2014. Boucrée’s
cousin, David Boucrée, is UMC’s
interim chief executive despite
never having worked in a hospital
before the Veritas contract.
Among other things, Chrystie
Boucrée disputed Craig’s claim
that Veritas employee Luis Hernandez had encouraged doctors
to admit patients to the hospital
who did not need treatment to
drive up revenue, a tactic Craig
said put the hospital “at serious
federal regulatory and financial
risk” and put “the medical staff’s
careers and medical licenses in
jeopardy.”
Boucrée said the UMC board
had “hired an independent legal
team” to investigate those claims,
Medical Center in Missouri, said
in an interview that he found it
deeply troubling that the hospital
did not hire a new quality director
— an official independent of the
doctors and nursing staff to assess
patient care — after that until
December 2016, when Costino
came on board.
Veritas spokeswoman Jennifer
Devlin said Veritas “had been in
the hospital for two and a half
weeks” in May 2016 and was not
making personnel decisions. She
said between July and December
2016 a consultant served as interim quality director.
Lee, the hospital’s former COO,
“After Veritas became UMC’s operator, the quality
department was taken apart in a number of ways.”
Pamela Lee, UMC’s former chief operating officer
adding, “While Veritas has not
seen the report of the results of
this investigation, Mr. Hernandez
was informed by the hospital’s
counsel in June 2017 that the findings indicated no wrongdoing on
his part.”
Boucrée also said Craig’s assertion that Veritas had cut safety
oversight positions, including
Pierre’s quality director job, was
“false” and that those cuts were
made by the hospital’s former
chief executive, whose tenure predated Veritas.
In a written statement to The
Washington Post, Pierre said the
Veritas consultants had been responsible for the elimination of
his position during layoffs at the
hospital in May 2016. After his job
was targeted, Pierre said, the hospital’s former chief executive
made “an 11th-hour request” to
Veritas “asking them to reconsider eliminating the director of
quality position and the answer
came back negative.”
Pierre, now assistant director
of population health at Ozarks
Enjoy the Breeze
in Your New
Screen Room
said in a signed declaration submitted to the council by Craig’s
attorneys that “after Veritas became UMC’s operator, the quality
department was taken apart in a
number of ways,” including the
removal of key personnel such as
Pierre.
“To dismantle the quality and
patient safety departments, as
what was done at United Medical
Center by Veritas was to commit
organizational suicide,” she wrote
in her declaration, which was attached to a second letter Craig
sent to the council Monday rebutting the Veritas response to his
allegations.
In response to questions about
Lee’s declaration, Devlin sent The
Post a statement from Wayne Turnage, director of the D.C. Department of Healthcare Finance, saying Lee’s “recollection is inaccurate.” Turnage, who confirmed
over the phone that he made the
statement, said the layoffs Lee
referred to were “initiated prior to
Veritas coming on.”
peter.jamison@washpost.com
FUNDS FROM B1
nations. But advocates and several
people involved in this year’s campaigns say statewide races have
grown so expensive — and Hogan
has stockpiled so much money for
his reelection bid — that the restrictions that accompany the
matching funds are untenable.
“We’re disappointed that the
funds are essentially not available
for the program to be successful,
because we know it can be,” said
Emily Scarr, director of Maryland
Public Interest Research Group.
“There just isn’t enough there to
remain competitive with those
who aren’t using it.”
Mike Morrill, a Democratic
strategist, said he was not surprised most of the candidates are
shunning the fund, especially
since the race has no front-runner.
“Every single one of them looks
at the race and says, ‘I have a
chance to be in the final sprint,’ ”
Morrill said. “Public financing is
like tying one of your legs off in the
final sprint. If you are in the sprint,
you need to go full throttle.”
Several campaigns have asked
the State Board of Elections about
the program, said Jared DeMarinis, the board’s director of campaign finance.
But officials from the campaigns of Prince George’s County
Executive Rushern L. Baker III,
former NAACP president Ben
Jealous, Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, policy consultant Maya Rockeymoore Cummings, tech entrepreneur Alec
Ross and attorney Jim Shea said
they have no plans to use state
funding.
A spokesman for Vignarajah
said she is considering public financing. Her campaign got off to a
shaky start amid questions about
her eligibility to run and her voter
and residency history.
Madaleno said he might seek
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In addition, all 100 House of
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Polls are open from 6 a.m. to 7
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NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
MARYLAND
Krasnow
enters race
to succeed
Leggett
BY RACHEL SIEGEL
public matching funds because if
he does, he would be exempt from
a prohibition on state lawmakers
fundraising during their 90-day
session that begins in January.
“I have a different circumstance
than everyone else,” said Madaleno, the only state elected official in
the Democratic primary race. “As
the only candidate who is impacted by the fundraising ban . . . we’re
taking a look at how the ability to
fundraise during session would
impact the campaign.”
The $2.8 million available for
the June primary and November’s
general election comes from optional donations made by taxpayers when they file their tax returns
and some money allocated from
the state’s general fund. Half is
available for the primary, half for
the general.
If more than one candidate participates, DeMarinis said, the
funding would be split.
Hogan, the first candidate to
win an election using the state’s
public financing system, last year
proposed diverting $1.8 million
from the general fund to help replenish the program. The legislature reduced the amount to
$1 million.
Earlier this year, Del. Eric Luedtke (D-Montgomery) introduced a bill that would allocate
$5 million to the fund in fiscal
2022. The bill died in committee.
Common Cause of Maryland
has been pushing the General Assembly to replenish the fund, said
Damon Effingham, the group’s legal and policy director. He noted
that Montgomery County recently
launched its own matching-funds
program, Howard County is moving toward organizing one, and
Prince George’s is discussing it.
“We’d like to make sure the fund
is viable in the future” for state
races, Effingham said.
The state program, which was
set up in the 1970s, was originally
funded through the tax form
checkoff box, which allowed taxpayers to contribute up to $500.
The box was removed in 2010 because candidates were not participating in the program, and the
money from the fund was being
used for other election-related
purposes.
In 2014, Hogan and then-Del.
Heather Mizeur became the first
candidates in 20 years to tap the
fund. The governor received a total of $2.9 million for the primary
and general election, while Mizeur
received $780,000 from the fund
in her failed bid for the Democratic nomination. Both were facing
better-known,
better-financed
challengers.
The legislature restored the income tax checkoff box the next
year to replenish the fund.
Andrew Mallinoff, Baker’s campaign manager, said he looked
into the program when he started
working on Baker’s campaign but
decided the spending limits would
tie the campaign’s hands.
“We were putting the budget
together and wanted to look at all
the options on the table,” he said.
A fifth Democrat has entered the
wide-open race for Montgomery
County executive — Rose Krasnow,
deputy director of the county’s
planning department and a former
three-term mayor of Rockville.
Krasnow, 66, filed a notice of
intent to run under the county’s
public financing program on Friday and plans to formally announce her candidacy to lead
Maryland’s largest jurisdiction on
Thursday.
She is the first woman to enter
the race to succeed three-term incumbent Isiah Leggett (D), who is
retiring at the end of next year, and
she would be the first female county executive since the position was
created five decades ago.
Krasnow, a 37-year resident of
Rockville, said she brings executive
experience and geographic diversity to a Democratic primary race
whose other candidates — state
Del. C. William Frick and termlimited County Council members
George L. Leventhal (At Large),
Marc Elrich (At Large) and Roger
Berliner (Potomac-Bethesda) —
live in more affluent and educated
parts of Mongtomery County, including Bethesda and Takoma
Park.
She described Rockville, Germantown and Clarksburg as home
to large pockets of ethnic diversity
“that I sometimes feel like aren’t
being heard,” particularly given
consistently strong voter turnout
further downcounty.
“I really do feel that people are
looking for a new voice,” Krasnow
said. “The fact that three incumbent council members are running
— to me, that doesn’t represent a
new voice.”
Robin Ficker, of Boyds, is the
only Republican in the race so far.
Potomac businessman David Blair
is expected to announce his candidacy for the Democratic primary
soon. The filing deadline is in February, and the primary is June 26.
Krasnow spent three terms as
Rockville mayor from 1995 to 2001
after two terms on the Rockville
City Council. She led efforts to
redevelop downtown through
creation of the bustling Rockville
Town Center and obtained approvals for the King Farm and Fallsgrove subdivisions.
She will leave her position at the
planning department at the end of
this year to focus on her campaign.
Krasnow said she decided to
participate in the county’s new
public financing system, which
prohibits corporate or PAC donations as well as individual donations above $150, so she could
better reach voters and push back
on any critics who might use her
record as mayor and with the planning office to label her as “in the
developers’ pockets.”
Among her Democratic opponents, Elrich and Leventhal are
seeking matching funds; Berliner
and Frick are not. Ficker is seeking
matching funds.
Krasnow described an “age-old
struggle” between supporters of
“slow growth” and “pro-growth,”
saying Montgomery needs to attract businesses to expand the tax
base and avoid residential property tax increases, such as the 9 percent hike the council approved last
year.
“ ‘No growth’ does not help this
county. I think it takes it in the
wrong direction,” Krasnow said.
Krasnow is the president of
Montgomery Women, which aims
to help elect women to positions of
leadership. “I am well aware of the
need to get women at the table,”
she said.
She’s been endorsed by council
member Nancy Floreen (D-At
Large), the first sitting county lawmaker to make an endorsement in
the race. “She doesn’t pull
punches,” Floreen said. “She’s not
going to say things just to make you
happy. She’s going to speak the
truth.”
ovetta.wiggins@washpost.com
rachel.siegel@washpost.com
fenit.nirappil@washpost.com
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The results Tuesday will hinge
on turnout, which has been slipping steadily in Virginia’s off-year
gubernatorial elections from a
high of 61.1 percent in 1993 to just
43 percent in 2013.
But this year may be different.
The contest has set a record for
absentee voting, with more than
147,000 absentee votes cast as of
Friday night.
Both Republicans and Democrats report a doubling or tripling
of the efforts of campaign workers
to reach voters and urge them to
cast ballots, when compared
against four years ago.
The campaigns are also on
track to spend a record amount of
money in the statewide races for
governor, lieutenant governor
and attorney general, much of it
coming from groups outside Virginia battling for a win with national implications.
Voters will also choose between
Republican state Sen. Jill Holtzman Vogel and Democrat Justin
Fairfax for lieutenant governor
and between Republican John
. TUESDAY,
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B5
SU
THE DISTRICT
Council member proposes program to get donated, unused drugs to needy
Maryland and Virginia
have such systems, but
they aren’t widely used
BY
DREW GERBER
A D.C. Council member is pushing a plan to allow individuals to
donate many prescription drugs
for use by needy patients.
The proposal sponsored by
Brandon T. Todd (D-Ward 4) is for
a two-year pilot program in which
individuals, health-care facilities
and pharmaceutical companies
would be permitted to donate unused but unexpired prescription
drugs that the D.C. Department of
Health would store and redistribute based on requests from healthcare workers.
Narcotics would not be eligible
for donations under Todd’s bill.
“I meet with about 400 seniors
every month, and I’ve heard from
a number of them about the fact
that prescription drugs can be a
huge financial burden for them”
because of the co-pays required
even of those who have Medicare,
Medicaid or private health coverage, Todd said.
As the bill is written, it is unclear whether donors would be
able to take a tax deduction for
their donations, but Todd’s office
said that provision may be considered later. A person receiving the
donated drugs also may be
charged a small fee to offset the
Health Department’s costs for
managing the program.
Maryland, Virginia and approximately 36 other states have enacted laws to establish drug donation
programs, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. However, nearly half of
those states’ programs are not operational, and many that are up
and running remain small, according to a March report by the
group.
After a decade, the programs in
Virginia have few participating
clinics, and Maryland’s program
runs through only three pharmacies in poor, rural areas, according
to state health providers.
The proposal from Todd, which
would have to be voted out of the
council’s Committee on Health to
get to the full council, faces some
opposition from the city’s pharmacy and health experts.
At an Oct. 25 committee hearing, they testified the program
could be burdensome and perhaps
more expensive than existing free
and discounted District programs,
if the fees associated with managing donations drove up costs.
Todd and the other council
member at the hearing, committee chairman Vincent C. Gray (DWard 7), appeared skeptical of the
claims by D.C. Pharmacy Board
Chair Daphne Bernard and Shauna White, a program manager in
pharmaceutical control within the
Health Department.
Gray asked several times about
the potential safety concerns
about the program. But Todd said
after the hearing that the committee plans to work closely with both
agencies to design a pilot program
that addresses their concerns.
Deena Speights-Napata, the executive director of Maryland’s
Board of Pharmacy, oversees that
state’s decade-old program, which
she said serves a low-income, rural
population that greatly needs assistance.
In about the last two years, the
program has refocused from 13
pharmacies to three locally owned
pharmacies in Aberdeen, Arnold
and Cambridge.
Several years’ worth of reports
on the program show it has faced
challenges enrolling participating
pharmacies because of shortages
in pharmacy staff to oversee donations and the absence of tax incentives.
But while the program has constricted, local pharmacies have
been better at building the close
relationships needed to provide
care to the communities,
Speights-Napata said, especially
now that the Maryland system
allows for redistribution of donated controlled substances.
Speights-Napata said the board
hasn’t seen a reduction in use of
the program despite the recent
changes and that it remains effective in serving rural areas. One of
the three pharmacies saw about
250 people benefit in 2016, and
about $50,000 in prescription
drugs were donated, she said.
Virginia’s drug donation program, by comparison, is largely
without a pulse.
The Virginia Board of Pharmacy is responsible for licensing
pharmacies in the state but does
not collect data on the drug donation program, said a spokesman
for the Virginia Department of
Health Professions.
The program is in limited use
among the state’s free clinics, said
Linda Wilkinson, the executive director for the Virginia Association
of Free Clinics.
One participating outlet is the
Arlington Free Clinic. Donated
drugs represent less than 0.5 percent of inventory there, and are
usually drugs that the clinic can
find elsewhere, said Jody Steiner
Kelly, the director of clinical administration.
Of the 60 free clinics that make
up her network, there are eight
that participate to any extent with
the state program, Wilkinson said.
With 99 percent of the network’s patients uninsured and suffering from chronic illnesses,
Wilkinson said that donations —
which can’t guarantee a clinic gets
a consistent supply of the medications it needs — can only help in
providing a “bridge dose,” to support a patient just long enough to
be able to find a steady source.
Cross Over Healthcare Ministry, a free clinic in Richmond, sees
about six donations a week, said
chief executive Julie Bilodeau. The
drugs typically donated are insulin and anticoagulants that treat
blood clots, and they can be useful,
Bilodeau said.
“It doesn’t take a lot of donations to save a lot, especially if it is
[a drug] they can’t afford,” she
said. But she agreed with other
Virginia health-care workers that
donated drugs they receive and
dispense are essentially negligible
in their overall operation.
But gauging benefits to patients
is only way to look at the impact.
Medications often are donated by
families who have had loved ones
pass away, and it makes them feel
good to do something positive,
several clinic workers said.
The fact that so many states
have set up programs shows that
barriers to creating one in the
District are not insurmountable,
Todd said.
Anita Bonds (D-At Large), who
joined Todd in sponsoring the bill,
said she, too, backs a pilot program and believes “it can help us
to serve residents who often have
to choose between purchasing
prescription drugs and purchasing other necessities.” She said it
could be done with accurate labeling and sealing of medications
and proper safeguards.
If the pilot program shows the
idea isn’t feasible in the District,
Todd said, that’s fine, but he said
he wants the information from a
test-run of a program to drive that
decision.
“I don’t buy that we can’t institute something,” he said.
drew.gerber@washpost.com
Catholic U.’s spy studies program covers moral dilemmas
action, counterintelligence —
and that’s what really draws in
students at Catholic, including
Ben Hewitt.
“I liked it, because it made you
use your mind, you know?” he
said. “It made you really need to
think.”
In fall 2016, Catholic introduced its intelligence studies
certificate program, directed by
Nicholas Dujmovic, a former
staff historian for the CIA who
came to the school after more
than 20 years with the agency.
In the classroom, Dujmovic
corrects misconceptions forged
by pop culture, offers real-life
perspective and a chance to learn
about a world shrouded in mystery, one that students may have
grown interested in without truly knowing what it was.
It might seem curious, teaching this craft at the Vatican’s
university in America. But Dujmovic said he has found no
constraints applied to the curriculum and has covered tensions
inherent to this type of work,
moral dilemmas and “nasty
stuff ” that has happened.
“Here, you have a search for
truth in goodwill, and wherever
we go, it’s legitimate,” Dujmovic
said.
Catholic University spokeswoman Elise Italiano said in a
statement that the university
was founded to educate students
who would serve the church and
country, and throughout its history has responded to changing
needs.
“Today, many of our students
aspire to work in politics, security and law — intelligence is an
increasingly important field of
study to offer for those pursuing
careers in these areas,” she said.
At Catholic, nearly 25 students
are pursuing a certificate in
intelligence studies.
“We all believe there’s a genuine need for more intelligence
people,” Colucci said, “for the
younger generation to step up
and take the reins and learn
about this stuff.”
Another voice of support for
the program — offered at Catho-
lic as a minor, not a major —
comes from retired Gen. Michael
V. Hayden, former director of the
CIA and the National Security
Agency and a visiting professor
at George Mason University.
“I am Catholic by my own
religious tradition, and I love to
see my faith’s premier university
in this country embrace this as a
field of academic study, so that
Catholic U.’s philosophical approach, ethical approach, historical approach, and so on, gets
applied to this part of American
life, which I think is understudied,” said Hayden, who is scheduled to visit the school Wednesday.
The first intelligence program
at a civilian school popped up at
Mercyhurst College, now known
as Mercyhurst University, in the
early 1990s. People pursuing
analyst positions in intelligence
fields had come out of political
science departments or related
disciplines, said Mercyhurst Provost David Dausey, but needed to
learn the basics of intelligence
work.
“To be quite honest, when we
first started the program people
thought it was unusual that what
at the time was a small liberal
arts college would be offering a
degree in intelligence studies,”
Dausey said. “Our emphasis really was on recognizing the need to
train entry-level analysts for the
intelligence community.”
In the years since the program
at the Erie, Pa., school started,
there has been a rapid growth in
national security and intelligence-related programs, said
Duncan McGill, dean of the
Ridge College of Intelligence
Studies and Applied Sciences at
Mercyhurst.
Dausey said students are often
attracted by what they’ve seen in
movies or on TV. When they
arrive, Mercyhurst introduces
them to “the reality,” he said.
“Sometimes those things overlap, and sometimes they don’t,”
he said.
There are other Washingtonarea universities in addition to
Catholic for students seeking
intelligence or security coursework, or instruction from former
intelligence
professionals.
Georgetown has a master’s in
applied intelligence, and Georgetown’s law school offers national
security as an area of study. And
George Mason has started a
center for intelligence, policy
and international security that
bears Hayden’s name.
“There’s a lot of interest in the
subject area, but I think generally, in the public, there’s a low
level of understanding of what
intelligence does, what value it
has to the country,” said Mark
Rozell, dean of the Schar School
of Policy and Government at
George Mason.
In his role at the university,
Hayden tries to demystify the
work, so that students’ image of
intelligence isn’t exclusively
from TV shows starring Kiefer
Sutherland (no offense, Kiefer
Sutherland).
“I think what [Dujmovic is]
trying to do, and I know certainly
I’m trying to do, is to raise the
level of public understanding of
American espionage, or espionage in a Democratic society,”
Hayden said.
Hewitt is familiar with Dujmovic and his curriculum. A
sophomore at Catholic, he described himself as a “West Wing”
guy, the type of person who
thought he’d wind up on Capitol
Hill someday. He grew interested
in intelligence and was looking
for a minor when he met with
Dujmovic. Then, Hewitt took the
introductory intelligence class.
“That really just changed me,”
he said.
Hewitt, 19, is president of
Catholic University intelligence
club, a fledgling effort that has
been around only a few months.
He is from Prince William County and has enjoyed learning what
happens in his back yard. He sees
a future in this field.
“Everybody thinks intelligence is this dangerous, very
almost evil kind of business,”
Hewitt said. “That’s not what I
get from it anymore.
“Learning about it, it seems
like almost a necessity right
now.”
been confirmed, according to a letter from the D.C. Health Department.
American University has two
confirmed mumps cases as well as
four suspected cases, school
spokesman Mark Story said Monday.
The mumps cases at D.C. universities appear to be connected, although officials are still investigating, D.C. Health Department
spokeswoman Jasmine Gossett
said.
“We are monitoring them and
are working with the universities
and their student health centers,
just to inform them and then educate those who may be at risk,”
Gossett said.
At Catholic, the school has adjusted Communion distribution
during Mass to help combat the
illness, university spokeswoman
Elise Italiano said.
“Normally, we offer Communion
through the host and what we call
the chalice, or the cup with wine,”
Italiano said. “And we suspended
the second practice . . . because of
the possible spread through saliva.
So, we’ve just taken that extra precaution.”
Mumps spreads through saliva
or mucus, according to the Centers
for Disease Control and Prevention. Symptoms include fever,
headaches and swollen and tender
glands under the ears, the CDC’s
website says.
Georgetown officials asked infected students to cloister themselves for five days after the appearance of initial symptoms, said a
note to the campus from Vince
WinklerPrins, assistant vice president for student health.
“We will continue to monitor
and support these students,”
WinklerPrins said.
In an email to the campus community, Catholic said that residential students who reported mumps
symptoms have been moved to an
unoccupied space, in an attempt to
limit exposure.
MICHAEL ROBINSON CHAVEZ/THE WASHINGTON POST
“Students are able to return to
rooms and classes after a five-day
period,” the email said.
Catholic’s students were also
briefed on how someone infected
with mumps can spread the virus:
by coughing or sharing a drink, for
example. Students were advised to
keep their hands clean and to not
share their utensils.
The University of Virginia has
also recently urged students to take
precautions after two suspected
cases were identified. A U-Va.
spokesman did not immediately
return an email seeking an update
Monday.
From Jan. 1 through Oct. 7,
47 states and the District had reported nearly 4,700 mumps cases,
according to the CDC. In recent
years, mumps has beset college
campuses, with major outbreaks
reported at schools in Illinois, Iowa
and Ohio. The infections at Ohio
State University migrated to the
surrounding community, causing
further illness.
sarah.larimer@washpost.com
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sarah.larimer@washpost.com
Colleges try to limit spread of mumps
MUMPS FROM B1
Former CIA staff
historian Nicholas
Dujmovic teaches
Introduction to
American
Intelligence at
Catholic University.
The course has been
offered for the past
two years. Dujmovic
said he has found no
constraints applied
to the curriculum
and has covered
tensions inherent to
this type of work.
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ESPIONAGE FROM B1
B6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
IN MEMORIAM
MILLER
THE DISTRICT
Police seek third suspect in killing of student caught in gunfire
BY KEITH L. ALEXANDER
D.C. prosecutors investigating
the fatal shooting in August of a
17-year-old college-bound student
said they are confident that two
men arrested in the case were involved in the incident, but that a
third suspect, who remains at large,
fired the deadly shot.
Jamahri Sydnor was shot in the
head as she drove through Northeast Washington on Aug. 10. Authorities said she was an unintended target, caught in gunfire sparked
by a neighborhood dispute.
Police have arrested two men in
connection with the shooting, 21year-old Philip Carlos McDaniel
and 18-year-old Robert Moses, and
in the head by a bullet from a .45are looking for a third suspect.
caliber handgun.
McDaniel, who is charged with
Sines argued that Moses, who
assault with intent to kill, told aushe said fired at least six rounds, is
thorities that on Aug. 10 he drove
also responsible for the teenager’s
his friends to confront a
death.
man they were angry
“The fact that his bullets did not kill Jamahri
with, but that he did not
fire a weapon, according
does not excuse him from
her murder. He is still
to court papers.
At a hearing Monday,
guilty,” Sines said.
Jamahri, the daughter
Assistant U.S. Attorney
Deborah Sines told a
of a longtime D.C. police
judge that, according to
detective, was a graduate
McDaniel’s account, Mo- Jamahri
of Wilson High School
ses fired a .40-caliber Sydnor
and was 10 days away
handgun and the third
from enrolling as a freshman fired a .45-caliber weapon. Jaman at Florida A&M University in
mahri, authorities said, was struck
Tallahassee when she was shot
about 3:30 p.m. in the 1400 block of
Saratoga Avenue NE while driving
a younger relative home.
McDaniel told prosecutors that
he and his two friends had gotten
into a beef with a member of a rival
neighborhood gang the day before
and decided to return to the area to
retaliate, court papers say.
After testimony from D.C. police
homicide detective Philip McHugh
about the shooting, Judge Hiram
Puig-Lugo determined that there
was enough evidence linking
Moses to the shooting and ordered
him to remain in the D.C. jail until
trial. Moses is charged with firstdegree murder.
McDaniel, who also remains in
the D.C. jail, was not at the hearing.
Jamahri’s family, including her
parents, wiped away tears during
the proceeding. On the other side of
the courtroom were about three
rows of Moses’s friends and family
members.
Moses’s attorney, Kevin McCants, stressed that McDaniel was
the only witness who linked Moses
to the incident. McCants also asked
the judge to release his client to
home detention in the care of his
father, who McCants said was a
federal police officer in Maryland.
The judge declined to do so.
The next hearing is set for
Dec. 20.
keith.alexander@washpost.com
HERBERT J. MILLER, SR.
In Loving Memory
From, Your Wife Shirley Ballard Miller;
sons, Rick and Herbert Miller, Jr.
DEATH NOTICE
BENOIT
HAZEL DELORES (BUCKMAN)
BENOIT (Age 80)
Entered into eternal rest on Friday, November 3, 2017. Hazel was born in Whitman,
MA, to the late Ralph and Ella Buckman;
sister of the late Dorothy (Buckman)
Stoddard and had resided in Brookeville,
MD, for the past 55 years. She is survived by
her husband, Richard A. Benoit; and mother
of four sons, William, Joseph, Christopher,
and Peter. A grandmother to 12 and a
great-grandmother to three, Hazel was a
wonderful wife, mother, grandmother and
friend and will be greatly missed by all. A
memorial service for friends and family will
be held November 9 at 11 a.m. at Saint
Luke's Church, 1001 Brighton Dam Road,
Brookeville, MD. Should friends desire, contributions may be sent to the Wednesday
Club of Sandy Spring, 600-B East Gude Dr.,
Rockville, MD 20850, Saint Luke's Church,
P.O. Box 131, Brookeville, MD 20833 or the
Casey House, 1355 Piccard Dr., Suite 100,
Rockville, MD 20850.
BYRNE
obituaries
JAMES SEXTON BYRNE
NANCY FRIDAY, 84
Recorder of female erotic fantasies, issues of gender and sex
BY HARRISON SMITH
Nancy Friday, a dissatisfied
daughter of the sexual revolution
whose best-selling books aimed to
liberate women from embarrassment over their erotic fantasies and
from fraught relationships with
their mothers, died Nov. 5 at her
home in Manhattan. She was 84.
The cause was complications
from Alzheimer’s disease, said her
friend Eric Krebs, who produced
an off-Broadway theatrical adaptation of her 1973 debut, “My Secret
Garden.”
Ms. Friday was living in London,
penning sex and courtship columns for Cosmopolitan magazine,
when she decided to follow in the
footsteps of writers such as David
Reuben and the pseudonymous
“J.,” whose 1969 sex manuals
“Everything You Always Wanted to
Know About Sex (But Were Afraid
to Ask)” and “The Sensuous Woman” had become nightstand staples
for millions of Americans.
Placing an anonymous advertisement in newspapers and magazines, she received hundreds of letters and conducted scores of interviews that formed the basis of “My
1996 PHOTO BY BOB BERG/GETTY IMAGES
Nancy Friday had a strained relationship with feminist leaders.
Secret Garden,” a survey of female
sexual fantasies that aimed to show
women that there was nothing
shameful or embarrassing about
such daydreams — and to show
men that women’s sexual imaginations existed.
“I’ve always suspected that
women have richer, wilder fantasies than men,” novelist Henry Mil-
ler wrote in an assessment of the
book, which featured chapters
such as “The Sexuality of Terror, or,
‘Help, I’m Out of Control, Thank
God!’ ” The fantasies Ms. Friday
cited ranged from violent rape
dreams and visions of bestiality
(too many, psychologists and sex
therapists said) to imaginative
chronicles of “group gropes” and
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adventures with vacuum-cleaner
nozzles.
The book sold more than 2 million copies and established Ms. Friday “as the liberator of the female
libido,” Newsday wrote, and a frequent talk-show guest.
She developed as indelible an
association with sexual fantasies as
sex educator Betty Dodson was
with masturbation, writing followup works of pop psychology that
included “Forbidden Flowers”
(1975); “Men in Love” (1980) about
male fantasies; and the volumes
“Women on Top” (1991) and “Beyond My Control” (2009), which
charted the daydreams of younger
generations.
But she also branched into new
issues of gender and sexuality with
“My Mother/My Self” (1977), a
semi-autobiographical work in
which she argued that women inherit many of their anxieties and
insecurities from their mothers;
“Jealousy” (1985), a study of the
emotion; and “The Power of Beauty” (1996), which implored women
to acknowledge the sway that looks
can hold in their relationships.
Although the reception to her
work slipped over the years — “Rigorous thought is obviously not her
strength,” the New York Times arts
critic Caryn James wrote in a review of “Beauty” — Ms. Friday
maintained a reputation as a lively
force of sexual liberation for decades, living by the motto “more
sauce and bigger drinks.”
She split her time between
apartments in Key West, Fla., and
New York, browsed the Sotheby
Parke-Bernet auction house whenever she found herself with writer’s
block and flaunted the birth-control pill that she carried inside a
gold bracelet.
Yet she also maintained a
strained relationship with women’s movement leaders such as Gloria Steinem, whose publication Ms.
magazine excoriated Ms. Friday in
a review of “My Secret Garden.”
“This woman is not a feminist,” the
reviewer wrote, joining a group of
critics who argued that Ms. Friday
focused on women’s sexual growth
at the expense of their political or
economic advancement.
Ms. Friday, in turn, lamented
what she described as “anti-men,
anti-sex matriarchal feminists,” in-
sisting that her work was addressing far more than fantasies or daydreams.
“After I wrote ‘My Secret Garden,’ ” she told People magazine in
1980, “I began getting letters from
women expressing gratitude.
‘Thank God you wrote that book,’
they said. ‘I thought I was the only
one.’ Your sexual fantasies are one
of the most valuable X-rays you’ll
ever have.”
Nancy Colbert Friday was born
to a teenage mother in Pittsburgh
on Aug. 27, 1933. Her parents divorced when she was a child, and
Nancy was raised in part by her
grandfather, a steel tycoon, in
Charleston, S.C. “There is nothing
like the mystery of an absent father
to addict you to the loving gaze of
men,” she later wrote.
Ms. Friday graduated from
Wellesley College in 1955 and
worked as a reporter in Puerto
Rico, where her work drew the
attention of publisher Michael Butler. Butler, who later produced the
countercultural Broadway musical
“Hair,” gave Ms. Friday a position as
the editor of a travel magazine. She
described him as her “sexual emancipator.” She eventually moved to
New York, searching for a job that
would give her the “freedom to
pursue men at a moment’s notice.”
She did public-relations work
and in 1967 married Bill Manville, a
novelist and Village Voice columnist. The couple moved to Europe,
where Ms. Friday began work on
“My Secret Garden.” The marriage
ended in divorce; according to a
1995 story in Esquire, it fractured
over the question of the authorship
of Ms. Friday’s books, with Manville eventually acknowledging
that Ms. Friday was their sole author.
A marriage to then-Wall Street
Journal Managing Editor Norman
Pearlstine in 1988, at a star-studded wedding that included future
president Donald Trump and investor Ronald Perelman, also ended in divorce.
Ms. Friday had no children and
leaves no immediate survivors. “I
couldn’t write the books I have if I
were a mother,” she told Newsday
in 1991. “Then ‘Good Nancy’ would
be in charge. The one who’s less
comfortable talking about sex.”
harrison.smith@washpost.com
JEAN GOLD, 98
Co-founder of Middleburg
community theater group
BY
B ART B ARNES
New York theater producer, director and actor, and they soon
settled in Middleburg.
Jean Gold, a founder and diThey established the Middlerector of the Middleburg Players
community theater company, burg Players in 1969, and she
became director of the company
died Oct. 16 at her home in
after he died in 1976. She retired
Middleburg, Va. She was 98.
in 1998 but continued her activiThe cause was a stroke, said a
ties with the company until
son, William Snow.
shortly before her death.
Mrs. Gold was a former staffer
In 1980, she married William
with Time Life in New York and
Jay Gold, a former Time Life
an antiques dealer on Long Iseditor. He died in 1989.
land, where she also wrote for
Survivors
include
community newspapers.
three children from her
There, in the 1960s, she
first marriage, Jonathan
interviewed author John
W. Snow of Sagaponack,
Steinbeck, quoting him
N.Y., Julie K. Snow of
as saying, “When I’m
East Hampton, N.Y., and
writing, the book beWilliam S. Snow of Paris;
comes reality, and my
two stepsons, Blackeveryday life becomes
burne Costin of Hununreal.”
Jean Erwin Whitney Jean Gold, co- tington Beach, Calif.,
was born in Tulsa on founder of the and Brackenridge Costin
of Los Angeles; 17 grandApril 29, 1919, graduated Middleburg
children; and 10 greatfrom the University of Players, was
grandchildren.
Tulsa in 1941 and then director from
A son from her first
moved to New York, 1976 to 1998.
marriage, Christopher
where she studied actK. Snow, died in 2013. Two steping. In 1954, she moved to Sag
sons also preceded her in death,
Harbor, on Long Island, to raise
McKelvy Costin in 2000 and
her four children.
William G. “Gil” Costin III in
Her marriage to John K. Snow
2003.
ended in divorce. In 1965, she
married William G. Costin Jr., a
newsobits@washpost.com
A public policy journalist in Washington, DC for
almost 50 years, was killed on November 1,
2017 when he was struck by a vehicle while
crossing New Hampshire Avenue on his way
to mass. Jim covered tax reform, economic
development, banking, transportation policy,
and minority business contracts for publications including Congressional Quarterly,
Forbes, American Banking, and Jobs Watch.
Jim was preceded in death by his parents,
James and Helen Byrne, and stepmother Ann
Byrne. He is survived by his children, James
L. Byrne (Mirabel Molina Byrne) and Annie Jay,
and grandchildren, Jessica and Madison Byrne
and Melannie Jay, as well as his brother Patrick
Byrne (Deborah Byrne), and his children, Sean
and Kathleen Byrne. A Memorial Mass will be
held on Friday, November 10, 2017 at 11 a.m.
at Our Lady of Sorrows Church, 1006 Larch
Ave, Takoma Park, Maryland. In lieu of flowers,
please donate to National Public Radio or Our
Lady of Sorrows parish.
CHRISMAN
KENNETH LEROY CHRISMAN (Age 81)
Of Ocean View, DE formerly of Silver Spring,
MD passed away on Friday, November 3, 2017.
He retired from the Air Force in 1979 with
the rank of Major and retired in 1996 as an
instructional engineer from Raytheon.
He is survived by his loving wife of 30 years,
Venita M. (Liotti) Chrisman; five children; a
brother; 10 grandchildren; eight great grandchildren and several nieces and nephews.
A visitation will be held from 10 a.m. to
12 Noon on Thursday, November 9, 2017 at
the Ocean View Chapel of Melson Funeral
Services, 38040 Muddy Neck Rd., Ocean View,
DE 19970. A funeral service will be held at
1 p.m. on Thursday, November 9, 2017 at
Mariner’s Bethel United Methodist Church, 81
Central Ave., Ocean View, DE 19970. Interment
with full military honors will be held at a later
date at Arlington National Cemetery.
Online condolences may be sent by visiting
www.melsonfuneralservices.com
COLE
WILLIE A. COLE
On Sunday, October 29, 2017, Willie A. Cole of
Lanham, MD departed his life at his residence.
Husband to Vivian Cole for 31 years, father
of daughters Iiasha and Rashon, and son,
Richard; daughter-in-law, Crystal; five grandchildren, Aaron, Jayden, Camden, Kendall and
Kennedi. He is survived by his mother, Genell
Hughes; grandmother, Mittie Cole; five sisters,
one brother and a host of other relatives and
friends.
Visitation on Thursday November 9, 2017 9:30
a.m. until service time at 10:30 a.m. at J.B.
Jenkins Funeral Home, 7474 Landover Rd.,
Hyattsville, MD 20785. Interment Tuesday,
November 14, 2017 at Cheltenham Veterans
Cemetery at 10:15 a.m.
PAID DEATH NOTICES
MONDAY- FRIDAY 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
To place a notice, call:
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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
EZ
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
BULLOCK
JACKSON
MOIZE
DREISBACH
HYDE
NEWMAN
RUFINA RABANAL TAGUDING
DREISBACH "Penny"
RAYMOND G. HYDE
BURTON NEWMAN
Raymond G. Hyde of Delaplane, Virginia, passwed away on October 30, 2017, in Boston,
Massachusetts. He is survived by wife Margaret; and siblings, Beth, Robert Ken, Paul. He
was employed at a Washington area aerospace
and defense technology company. He lived
at Ashby Glen Farm in Delaplane, and previously in Alexandria, Virginia. He was an
avid sailor. He traveled from Norfolk to the
Caribbean in 2013, aboard vessel 'Solstice',
and had navigated for an Atlantic crossing to
the Mediterranean region previously. A memorial service in Massaschusetts is being planned.
On Sunday, November 5, 2017. Beloved husband of the late Ethel Newman; loving
father of Sherry (Gary) Cohen, Jeff (Debbie)
Newman, and the late Glenn Newman; grandfather of Jeremy, Jordan, Jason (Conchita),
Ashleigh (Michael), Jesse, and the late Jared;
great-grandfather of Paige, Alexavier, Abigail,
and Matthew. Uncle of Stuart (Esther), and Jan
(Sandy). Survived by many nieces, nephews,
and other family. Graveside service will be held
at Judean Memorial Gardens on Wednesday,
November 8, 2017 at 2 p.m.
Contributions may be made to Montgomery
Hospice Casey House, www.montgomeryhospice.org or Children’s National Health System,
www.childrensnational.org
www.borgwardtfuneralhome.com
Passed away on November 3, 2017. On November 9, viewing starts 10 a.m.; Memorial Service
11:30 a.m. at Lee Funeral Home, 6633 Old
Alexandria Ferry Rd., Clinton, MD. For more
information, www.leefuneralhomes.com.
ESKOW
THEODOSIA ESKOW
Of Perth Amboy, NJ passed away November 5,
2017 after 107 wonderful years. Beloved wife
of the late Dr. Jack Eskow; devoted mother of
Dr. Robert (Nancy) Eskow and Dr. Roy (Julie)
Eskow; cherished grandmother of Renee, Darren (Heather), Shawn (Rebecca), Drs. Adam
(Caroline) and Kim Sobel (Aaron); as well as
seven great grandchildren. Shiva will be held
at the residence of Roy and Julie Eskow on
November 7 at 7:30 p.m. Memorial contributions may be made to Mazon or the University
of MD School of Dentistry.
GELL
SUZANNE BELZ GELL
Born October 11, 1929 to Carl and Elizabeth
Belz. Suzanne graduated from Ohio University
and was a member of the Kappa Phi National
Methodist Women’s Club. She served as
a missionary for the Methodist Church in
Nebraska. Suzanne returned to school and
obtained her degree in Human Resources. She
worked as a Secretary at Prince George’s
Community College among her other jobs
and retired from the National Academy of
Science. She enjoyed reading, knitting, crossword puzzles, watching the Nationals baseball
and traveling through New England with
friends. She passed away on November 2,
2017. Suzanne is survived by her two daughters, Kim Dorman (Bob) and Diane Henson
(Tim), two grandsons, Christopher Lee Henson
(Angie) and Bryan Matthew Henson (Elise) and
their families.
A gathering of family and friends will be held at
Beall Funeral Home, 6512 NW Crain Hwy.,(Rt.
3 South) Bowie, MD on Tuesday, November
7 from 6 to 8 p.m. A graveside service will
be held at the Lakemont Memorial Gardens,
900 W. Central Ave. Davidsonville, MD on
Wednesday, November 8 at 11 a.m. Please
view and sign the family’s guestbook at:
www.beallfuneral.com
GIES
EUGENE CALLOW GIES (Age 90)
On Friday, November 3, 2017 of
Annandale, VA. Beloved husband
of Rita E. Gies and loving father of
Gretchen G. Kirtley, Gary R. Gies,
Karen G. Shoemaker, William R.
Gies and John R. Gies. Eugene is
also survived by 10 grandchildren
and three great-grandchildren. Friends will be
received at Fairfax Memorial Funeral Home,
9902 Braddock Rd., Fairfax, VA on Thursday,
November 9, 2017 for a visitation from 4 to
8 p.m. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held
at Holy Spirit Catholic Church, 5121 Woodland
Way, Annandale, VA on Friday, November 10,
2017 at 11 a.m. Interment will follow at Our
Lady of the Fields Catholic Church Cemetery,
1070 Cecil Ave, Millersville, MD at 1:30 p.m.
Please view and sign the family guestbook at
www.fmfh.com
GRANGER
DAVID IRELAND GRANGER
Of Chevy Chase, MD and Oxford, MD died
peacefully in his sleep at home on Thursday
November 2, 2017. He had been diagnosed
with pancreatic cancer in August. He was
predeceased by his first wife, Deborah Wildes
Granger. He is survived by his wife of nearly fifty
years, Bean Reynolds Granger, and children,
Ann Null (Dan), Genevieve Vayda, Reyn Vayda
(Betsy Czark), Margaret Carver (David Ray),
Whit Granger (Anna), Randy Granger (Natalie).
He also lost two sons when they were far too
young, Michael Granger age 8, and David Jr.
43. He is survived also by eight grandchildren
and by his sister Paula Atkeson, and brother
Christopher Granger and was predeceased by
his brother Stephen Granger. David was born
in Washington, DC on September 4, 1932.
He was a graduate of Princeton University,
Class of 1954, and Harvard Law School, 1959.
From 1954 to 1956 he served in the U.S.
Army. He worked as an attorney in the Justice
Department during the Kennedy Administration, which was a highlight for David. David
was then a partner at the Clifford & Warnke law
firm for many years (later Clifford & Altman). He
spent the remaining 15 years of his career in
his own private practice. For many years David
was active with the Potomac School where he
was chairman of the Board. He was a member
of the Chevy Chase Club and the Metropolitan
Club and an emeritus member of the White
House Historical Society. David was an avid
outdoorsman. He introduced his children to
camping and skiing when they were young,
a legacy they treasure. There was no happier
place for David than sailing his boat, Retriever
III. It was docked in view at Loon PT, in Oxford,
where he spent much of his retirement. A
memorial service to celebrate David’s life will
be held at the River Road Unitarian Universalist
Church, Bethesda, MD on Sunday, November
12, 2017 at 3 p.m. Donations may be made in
David’s name to The Conservation Fund, 1655
North Fort Meyer Drive, Suite 1300, Arlington,
VA 22209 or at conservationfund.org.
KAUFMAN
HERBERT GERALD KAUFMAN
On Monday, November 6, 2017,
Herbert Gerald Kaufman of Silver
Spring, MD. Beloved husband of
Gerry Kaufman; devoted father of
Martin (Ellyn Becker), Stephen
(Maureen), Robin (Howard Tash)
and Jill (Ronald Lyons); cherished
grandfather of nine grandchildren and six
great-grandchildren. Funeral Service will be
held at HINES-RINALDI FUNERAL HOME, 11800
New Hampshire Ave., Silver Spring, MD 20904.
Interment to follow at King David Memorial
Gardens, 7400 Lee Hwy, Falls Church, VA
22042. Shiva will be held in Leisure World
Overlook party-room following the interment.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to
JDRF (Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation)
or the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society.
Arrangements by Hines-Rinaldi Funeral home,
LLC. under Jewish Funeral Practices Committee of Greater Washington Contract.
O'CONNOR
JUNE BARRY O'CONNOR
Of Centreville, VA, passed peacefully Friday,
November 3, 2017. Born in Washington, DC,
she was preceded in death by her husband,
John J. O’Connor Jr. and two daughters,
Cathleen and Lauren. She is survived by her
daughter, Sharon Stevens; a son, John J.
O’Connor III, and many grandchildren, great
grandchildren and a great, great grandson.
A Mass of the Christian Burial will be celebrated at 12 Noon on Friday, November 10,
2017 at The Church of the Little Flower in
Bethesda, MD.
CECILE D. HOES
Entered into eternal rest on Thursday, October
26, 2017. Ms. Hoes may be viewed at STEWART
FUNERAL HOME, 4001 Benning Rd., NE on
Thursday, November 9, from 1 p.m. until service at 2 p.m. Interment private.
Debbie was born July 14, 1953 in Reading,
Pennsylvania. She graduated from Holy
Name High School in Reading, Penn. in 1971.
After high school, she attended Catholic
University where she graduated with a B.A.
in Economics followed by her J.D. As she
finished law school, she became a mother to
her son, Brendon Johnston. Debbie served
as a judicial law clerk in the Circuit Court
for Prince George’s County. Subsequently,
she was appointed as an Assistant State’s
Attorney for Prince George’s County, MD.
Debbie rose through the ranks culminating
with her being named Deputy State’s Attorney for Prince George’s County. In 1994,
LEWIS
FORTUNE
KRACOV
On Sunday, November 5,
2017 of Rockville, MD.
Beloved husband of the late
Marion (Yudelowitz) Kracov.
Devoted father of Eric (Karen)
and Daniel (Ilene) Kracov.
Also survived by his grandchildren Alex, Madeline,
Nicholas, Julie and Katherine. William
Kracov, a native New Yorker, was a World
War II veteran who received the Bronze Star
for his service in the 42nd Infantry "Rainbow
Division" in France and Germany. Graveside
services will be held Wednesday, November
8, 2017, 12 p.m. at Judean Memorial Gardens 16225 Batchellors Forest Rd., Olney,
MD 20832. Family will be receiving friends
on Wednesday, November 8 following services at the home of Daniel and Ilene
Kracov. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to a charity of your
choice.
www.sagelbloomfield.com
LECHLIDER
THEODORE LECHLIDER "Teddy"
On Monday, October 30, 2017 of Wheaton,
MD. A memorial service will be held at Hines
Rinaldi Funeral Home, 11800 New Hampshire
Ave. Silver Spring, MD. on Friday, November 10
at 10 a.m.
LEWIS
HARRY LEWIS
Harry Lewis departed this life
on October 31, 2017 in Ft.
Lauderdale, Florida. Harry
was born in Poland in 1926,
immigrating to the United
States with his parents,
Phillip and Sarah Cholkofsky;
older sister Jeanette and
younger brother Irwin. He attended Brooklyn City College, graduating with a degree
in physics at the age of 18. Drafted into the
Army, Harry was assigned to engineering
at the University of West Virginia. After
his service, Harry attended the University
of Missouri Law School on the GI Bill.
Ever grateful for his legal education, Harry
moved to Washington, DC, opening his own
legal practice, which continues to this day.
Harry loved tennis, reading and discussing
impossibly difficult subjects like quantum
mechanics and philosophy of the mind, and
his family. Harry was a member of Kenwood
Country Club, Indian Springs Country Club,
and The Progress Club. Harry is survived
by his brother, Irwin Lewis, of Cleveland,
Ohio, his daughter Schara Lewis Tompkins
of Bethesda, Maryland, and four grandchildren. Harry was buried at Judean Memorial
Gardens on November 2, 2017.
www.sagelbloomfield.com
MILLER
DENNIS J. LEWIS
GWENDOLYN SPRIGGS WALKER
FORTUNE (Age 81)
JAMES W. QUIGGLE, III.
Of Bethesda, MD, passed away peacefully on
October 31, 2017 at age 93. He joins his wife
Jacqueline W. Quiggle and first wife Isabel C.
Quiggle. A Washington, DC native, Mr. Quiggle
is survived by two sons, James W. Quiggle IV
and Thomas E. Quiggle and extended family
by his second marriage. A memorial service
will be held at the Little Sanctuary, St. Albans
School, on Saturday, November 18 at 11 a.m.
Contributions in lieu of flowers may be made to
Westmorland Congregational Church, Bethesda, MD.
SATTERFIELD
On Tuesday, October 31, 2017 of Capitol
Heights, MD, passed away surrounded by her
loving children, Stanley O'Banion, Karen, John,
James Walker, Arlene Paige and Renee Fortune.
Also survived by brother, Jerome Spriggs (Vera)
and a host of relatives and friends. Mass of
Chrisitan Burial will be held on Wednesday,
November 8, 2017 at St. Luke Catholic Church,
4925 East Capitol St., SE, Washington, DC
20019, Visitation 10 a.m., Mass of Christian
Burial 11 a.m. Interment Fort Lincoln Cemetery,
Brentwood, MD.
GANGI
LOUISE SATTERFIELD
Passed away on Tuesday, October 31, 2017.
Visitation 10 a.m. until time of service 11
a.m., on Thursday, November 9 at First Baptist
Church, 3440 Minnesota Ave., SE, Washington,
DC 20019. Interment Heritage Memorial Park.
Services by HENRY S. Washington & Sons.
THOMAS
CHARLENE C. THOMAS
Entered into eternal rest on November 1,
2017. She leaves to cherish her memory two
brothers, Philip (Nancy) Thomas and John
(Alfreda) Thomas and two sisters, Karen
Thomas-Mitchell (Patrick) and Carla ThomasSpells (Karl); three nieces, Miya Thomas-Brevard (Brian), Melissa Coleman and Julie Anne
Coleman; and two nephews, Marcus Thomas
and Cahli Thomas; two great-nephews, Brian
Brevard Jr. and Caprice Gunter; and, one greatniece, Nova Dobson. Family will receive friends
on Thursday, November 9, viewing 9 a.m. until
time of Mass of Christian Burial at 12 Noon at
Holy Comforter-Saint Cyprian Catholic Church,
1357 East Capitol Street, S.E., Washington, DC.
Interment at Cedar Hill Cemetery.
www.thorntonfuneralhomepa.com
WAITES
RONALD WAITES (Age 71)
Entered into eternal rest on Thursday, November 2, 2017. Beloved
husband of Marilyn Hill. Also survived by five sons, Russell Jackson
(LaToya), Andre Hembry, Ronald
Waites, Jr.,Brad Evans and Vernon
Waites; two daughters, Michelle
Morris (Mark) and Nicole Waites; and a host
of grandchildren; great-grandchildren; other
relatives and friends. Friends may visit with
the family on Thursday, November 9 from 10
a.m. until time of service 11 a.m. at Andrew
Rankin Memorial Chapel, 6 Street & Howard
Place, NW, Washington, DC Interment Hope Hill
United Methodist Church Cemetery, Frederick
MD. Sservices by Hodges and Edwards
DORIS A. GANGI
Passed away on November 3, 2017. A long time
resident of Fairfax County, beloved mother,
grandmother, aunt. A past realtor and working
supporter of her husband’s business ventures.
She is survived by her son, Edward Gangi
(Jr.), and her daughter, Monique Gangi DowdKovach and son-in-law, Mark Kovach. She is
also survived by six grandchildren she worshipped: Ashley Dowd, Mitch Dowd, Jessica
Dowd, Marissa Kovach, Julianna Kovach and
Allyson Czarnaski, and by a myriad of nieces
and nephews all over the globe, who loved
their “Taunte Dodo/Auntie Doris.” Predeceased
by husband, Edward N. Gangi, and son, Steven
Michael Gangi. Visitation on Wednesday,
November 8 from 6 to 8 p.m, and on Thursday,
November 9 at 10 a.m.; service at 10:30 a.m.,
at Demaines Funeral Home, Fairfax City, VA.
MILDRED K. MILLER
On Thursday, November 2,
2017 of Washington, DC.
Beloved wife of the late Dr.
William S. Miller. Devoted
mother of Marcy Miller and
Sherry (Bruce) Goodman.
Also survived by treasured
granddaughter Jamie (Aaron)
Solak and beloved great-grandchildren
Sage and Saffron. Interment was private.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions
may be made to the Community Hospice
of DC, JSSA Hospice, or the Washington
Hebrew Congregation Music Fund.
IN MEMORIAM
D'SOUZA
NASH
Entered into eternal rest on Wednesday,
November 1, 2017. She is survived by
nephew, William Best, two nieces, Marlene
Shaw and Magalene McKay and a host
of other relatives and friends. Memorial
service for Mrs. Nash will be held at STEWART FUNERAL HOME, 4001 Benning Rd., NE
on Wednesday, November 8 from 1 p.m.
until service at 2 p.m. Interment private.
Highly decorated and honored, during her
23 years in federal service she served as
Chief of the United States Attorneys Office
- Southern Division, as Associate Deputy
Attorney General in the United States Department of Justice. Most recently, she was
appointed as Senior Litigation Counsel in the
United States Attorneys Office. Debbie was
the first active prosecutor and the second
female trial lawyer in Maryland to be offered
fellowship in the Maryland Chapter of the
American College of Trial Lawyers. Debbie
spent decades with her best friend, soulmate,
and husband, Bruce L. Marcus. An avid skier,
biker, sailor, traveler, culinary wizard and
hostess, Debbie truly enjoyed life spent with
her husband, Bruce; in being “Grammie” to
her three grandsons; spending time with
her mother and family from both Reading
and Suburban Washington; at her home in
Rehoboth; in travels round the globe; and in
the company of a tightly knit group of friends
who were in truth, her family.
The Viewing will be held on Monday, November 6, 2017 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at HinesRinaldi, 11800 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver
Spring, MD. The Funeral Mass will be held
on Tuesday, November 7, 2017 at 11 a.m.
at Our Lady of Mercy Catholic Church, 9200
Kentsdale Drive, Potomac, MD. The Interment will be immediately following the Mass
at Gate of Heaven Cemetery, 13801 Georgia
Avenue, Silver Spring, MD. Following the
Interment, guests are invited to join the
family for a gathering at Manor Country Club,
14901 Carrollton Road,
Shiva will be observed at her home on
Wednesday, November 8, and Thursday
November 9, 2017 beginning at 7 p.m.
In lieu of flowers, donations can be made
to S.O.M.E (So Others May Eat) 71 O Street
NW, Washington, DC 20001, www.some.org.
Rockville, MD.
Mr. Lewis is survived by Three Brothers, John T.
Kennedy of Collegeville, PA, Lew H. Hertzog of
Limerick, PA, Robert S. Hertzog of Norristown,
PA; He was pre-deceased by Sister, Bonnie J.
Kennedy.
Relatives and friends are invited to attend the
Funeral Ceremony at Cattermole - Klotzbach
Funeral Home, 600 Washington Street, Royersford, PA on Thursday, November 9, 2017 at
10:30 a.m. Burial will be held in the Riverside
Cemetery, Norristown, PA. Friends will be
received from 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Thursday
at the funeral home. Condolences may be
made by visiting
www.RoyersfordFuneralHome.com
Tommy did a lot of custom painting during
the 1970's, especially for the bi-centential
year. Tommy also used his talent on canvas,
painting portraits and landscapes. After retiring from auto refinishing, Tommy learned to
create stained glass windows, and he loved
repairing old stained glass lampshades. He
also enjoyed day trips and shopping for
antiques with his wife.
WILKINS
Officers and members of The
Ladies First Aid Union of Churches,
Inc. are notified of the passing
of Nurse Pauline Wilkins. Viewing
12:30 p.m. until funeral time 1:30
p.m. on Wednesday, November 8,
2017 at Fort Lincoln Chapel, 3401
Bladensburg Rd., Brentwood, MD 20726.
Yoshiko Johnson, President
Bobbie Best and Emma Salter,
Chairpersons of Condolences
A former Washington journalist, union activist
and a veteran, died peacefully November 2,
2017, of apparent heart failure at the Potomac
Manor nursing home in Potomac Md. He was
78. Lewis, a native of Norristown, Pa., worked
as a columnist at both the “Washington Star”
and the “Washington Times” during the 1970s
and 1980s, writing about local radio and television news and personalities. He later worked
15 years as a production editor at the Bureau of
National Affairs (BNA), a newsletter publishing
company now owned by Bloomberg Inc. and
headquartered in Arlington, Va. While working
as a radio-television columnist, Lewis frequently interviewed Howard Stern and Larry King,
who were then working in Washington in the
early stages of their careers. While at the
“Washington Star” and BNA, Lewis was an
activist with the Washington-Baltimore Newspaper Guild (WBNG), the union which represented employees at both companies. He was
a co-chairman of the BNA unit for a number of
years, served on the WBNG Executive Council,
and participated in several Newspaper Guild
national conventions. Lewis was a member of
St. Mark’s Episcopal Church on Capitol Hill, and
an active participant with the St. Mark’s Players
theater group, performing in various roles and
writing program articles. Lewis, whose original
name was Richard Dennis Kennedy, changed
his name as an adult after researching his
family history. A few years after graduating
from Norristown High School in 1957, he enlisted in the U.S. Army and received journalism
training at the Defense Information School
(DINFOS) at Fort Slocum in New York State.
He served at a post in Saudi Arabia during
part of his enlistment. As a teenager Dennis
become very interested in politics and was
an avid member of the "Young Democrats of
America." This led him to a lifelong passion
and involvement with the party and the issues
of the day. Lewis was born July 27, 1939.
OSBORN
ELIZABETH AVERY MOIZE "Betsy"
Betsy Moize of Falls Church, Virginia, passed
away on October 28, 2017. Her beloved partner
of 30 years, Janice L. Moody, was at her side.
Betsy was 82.
Betsy was born on November 2, 1934, in
Farmville, Virginia. She grew up and attended
schools in Virginia and Dallas, Texas, before
graduating in 1954 from Stephens College, in
Columbia, Missouri. In 1959 Betsy arrived in
the Washington, DC, area where she took a job
answering letters and phones at the National
Geographic Society. Within months her writing
and editing smarts won her a position crafting
legends (captions in NG parlance) for National
Geographic Magazine. In time she would head
the Legends staff of more than a dozen writers,
whose words filled much of the magazine’s
monthly content. In 1990 she capped her
storied 38-year career by being named Associate Editor, becoming the first woman in
the magazine’s history to hold the position.
By example and leadership, she created a
path for many to follow, mentoring successive
generations of writers and editors. She retired
in 1997. Her feature articles for the magazine
ranged in topics from Daniel Boone and Austin,
Texas, to tulips, immigrants in Australia, the
Canadian Rockies, and the wonders of West
Virginia.
Betsy spent her retirement doing her favorite
things—traveling with Janice, cooking, dining
out, playing golf, fishing fast streams, joining
book clubs, and spending treasured time with
family and friends. She will be missed by all
who knew her, for her wit, strength, generosity,
and guidance.
Betsy is survived by her spouse Janice Moody,
whom she married on January 15, 2015; by
sister Ann Moize Parkinson, of Little Rock,
Arkansas; brothers William Gould Moize, of
Lake Fork, Texas, and Norman Scott Moize, of
Dallas, Texas; six nieces, seven nephews, and
many grand-nieces and nephews.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may
be
made
to
Planned
Parenthood
(www.plannedparenthood.org) or Doctors
Without Borders (www.doctorswithoutborders.org[).
A Celebration of Betsy’s amazing life is planned
for a later date. The Murphy Funeral Home –
Falls Church entrusted with all arrangements.
For additional information and details visit:
www.murphyfuneralhomes.com
SEIFART
BENEFRIDA LAUW SEIFART
On Wednesday, November 1, 2017, Benefrida
Lauw Seifart of Ashburn, VA, formerly of Arlington and McLean, VA passed away peacefully at
home. She leaves to cherish her memory three
brothers, four children and three grandchildren
and a host of other family. Family and friends
are invited to share their memories between
10 to 11 a.m. on Saturday, November 11, 2017
at the Colonial Funeral Home in Leesburg, VA
with services to immediately follow at 11 a.m.
Interment at 1:30 p.m. in the Columbia Gardens
Cemetery in Arlington, VA. Arrangements by
www.colonialfuneralhome.com
SPEARMAN
Tommy loved his family. He had his family
of older brothers and sisters, and when he
married he had a new family of younger
brothers and sisters. Tommy loved a good
story and a good joke, which lead to wonderful relationships with his father and motherin-law. He was a true friend, accepting you
as you are with no judging. Tommy's passing
has left a huge hole in many hearts.
PAULINE WILKINS
Debbie was appointed to serve as an Assistant United States Attorney in the United
State’s Attorney’s Office for the Southern
Division of Maryland.
DEBORAH ANN JOHNSTON
Passed on Tuesday, October 31, 2017. She is
survived by her two daughters, Toya Geddie
and Krystal Jackson. Visitation 9 a.m. Service
11 a.m. on Thursday, November 9 at Kettering
Baptist Church, 6909 Crain Hwy, Upper Marlboro, MD. Interment Harmony Memorial Park.
Services by HS Washington & Sons.
WILLIAM KRACOV
JOHNSTON
On November 1, 2017 of Silver Spring, MD.
Beloved wife of Bruce L. Marcus. Loving
mother of Brendon J. Johnston (Amanda).
Cherished grandmother of Dylan, Bryce, and
Colton Johnston. Loving sister of Donna Giardiello (John), Kasey O’Neill-Bowers (Todd),
Francis O’Neill (Cindy), Shawn O’Neill (Lisa)
Dear daughter of Mildred E. O’Neill and James
J. O’Neill (dec.); dear daughter-in-law of Barbara F. and Charles H. Marcus. She is also
survived by her brother-in-law, J. “Otis” Marcus (Pamela), sister-in-law, Rebecca Marcus,
and numerous nieces and nephews.
JESSICA M. JACKSON
ELLA M. BULLOCK (Age 82)
A resident of Bowie, MD, died on Monday,
October 30, 2017. Retired from the Department
of Treasury for the Bureau of Engraving and
Printing, later serviced faithfully as a Deacon
at Evangel Cathedral. She is survived by her
daughter Sharon; nieces Helen Jackson and
Gwendolyn Murphy; a great niece and great
nephews; other relatives, and friends. Funeral
will be at The Bishop's Chapel at Evangel
Cathedral, 13901 Central Avenue, Upper Marlboro, MD 20774 on Wednesday, November 8,
2017 at 10 a.m. and the viewing is at 9 a.m.
QUIGGLE
LUVENIA B. NASH
HOES
B7
RE
THOMAS H. OSBORN, III "Tommy"
Went home to be with our Lord on October
30, 2017. He was born in Washington, D.
C., but traveled to every state in the United
States during his lifetime. Tommy was a
Vietnam Veteran, serving proudly with the U
S Army 82nd Airborne. He owned a large
collection of Airborne shirts and hats which
he wore proudly. Tommy always stopped to
talk to anyone he saw with service related
apparel and thanked them for their service.
He loved history, specifically WW I, WW II, and
Vietnam eras. He used his artistic talents
to paint military miniatures, and competed
in shows with them, winning numerous 1st
place awards. Tommy was a member of
the National Capitol Model Soldier Society in
Washington, DC, and of the Tidewater Plastic
Model Society for many years.
After traveling our country, Tommy became
an auto refinisher. He painted cars, trucks
and tractor trailers for many auto body shops
in the D C Metro area. He was one of the first
painters in the area to use Dupont's Imron
paint and helped promote its use in the 70's.
Tommy was preceded in death by his mother
and father, Thelma and William Osborn;
brothers Buddy and Billy; father-in-law Ernest
Harvey. He leaves to cherish his memory his
wife, Stephanie; sisters and brothers Pennie
Digiustino, Joann and Archie Doyle, Carol
Smith, Vicki and Steve Hoffman, Moody and
Rose Harvey, Doug and Denise Harvey, Laura
and Mark Kincaid, Vanda and Brian Canady;
18 nieces and nephews; 13 great nieces and
great nephews; special friends Dick Perry,
Ray Slemmer and Mike Owings.
Tommy requested no funeral service. Cremation is being handled by Tetrick Funeral
Home, and his cremains will be interred
with his beloved dachshund, Max, in the
family cemetery in West Virginia. Donations
in Tommy's honor can be made to his favorite
charities, Paralyzed Veterans of America and
St. Jude Children's Hospital. May God bless
and keep you.
Memories and condolences may be shared
at www.tetrickfuneralhome.com. Tetrick
Funeral and Cremation Services 3001 Peoples Street Johnson City TN 37604 (423-6107171) is honored to serve the Osborn family.
QUINCY LEE SPEARMAN
On Sunday, October 29, 2017. Quincy Lee
Spearman of Columbia, MD. Beloved wife of
the late Oscar C. Spearman and the mother of
Shari Spearman, Stephen Spearman and Ann
Marie Spearman; grandmother of Leigh and
Juan Spearman; great-grandmother of Marcus
Vadilla; sister of Betty Anderson of Hyattsville
MD, David Fryar of Mt. Rainier, MD and Walter
Fryer of Washington, DC. Visitation Thursday,
November 7, 9:30 a.m. services 10:30 a.m.
at JB Jenkins Funeral Home, 7474 Landover
Rd, Hyattsville, MD. In lieu of flowers the
family request that donations be sent to the
Alzheimer's Association in the name of Quincy
Lee Spearman. Interment at Maryland Veterans
Cemetery at 2:30 p.m.
TURNER
VICTORIA LYNN D’SOUZA
January 12, 2005 – November 7, 2009
No one knows the deep pain in our hearts
returning you to God eight years ago, and how
much we miss you Victoria! We miss your
loud laughter, your beautiful singing, your silly
faces, and your tight hugs and kisses. Just
look at that beautiful smile and that crazy hair
of yours, getting ready to ride that horsey.
Say hello to Pop-Pop in heaven for us. Our
sweet baby girl, we miss you with all of our
hearts, and miss you to infinity… and beyond!
Mommy, Daddy, Maryanne, Rebecca, Elizabeth,
Grammy, Grandma and Grandpa, and all of your
beloved aunts, uncles, cousins and dear friends
REMEMBER
YOUR LOVED ONES
December 17, 2017
DEATH NOTICE
AUGUSTUS
TheWashington Post Magazine will publish
an Annual Commemorative Section.
Plan to be a part of this annual tradition!
RATES
$11.10 per Line
$150 B&W Photo
$200 Color Photo
JOHNNY L. AUGUSTUS
Entered into eternal rest on Monday, October
30, 2017. He is survived by his son, Donnell
R. Petite (Johnsie); grandson, Donnell Petite Jr;
sister, Ida Mae Allen (Herbert); and a host of
other relatives and friends. Mr. Augustus will
lie in state at Temple of Praise, 700 Southern
Ave. SE. on Thursday, November 9, from 10
a.m. until service 11 a.m. Officiating Minister,
Bishop Glenn Staples. Interment Ft. Lincoln
Cemetery.
www.stewartfuneralhome.com
DEADLINE
5 p.m.
Friday, November 17, 2017
For more information, please call:
202-334-4122 or 1-800-627-1150, ext. 4-4122
E-mail:
deathnotices@washpost.com
REGINA C. TURNER
December 21, 1951 ~ October 28, 2017
Services Wednesday, November 8, 2017 9:30
to 10:30 a.m. viewing 10:30 a.m. service at
JB Jenkins Funeral Home, 7474 Landover, RD,
Landover, MD 20785.
When the
need arises,
let families
find you in the
Funeral Services
Directory.
To be seen in the
Funeral Services
Directory, please call
paid Death Notices at
202-334-4122.
B8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
A good soaking
It might not be raining for the
commute, but more will be inbound
if it’s not. Rain odds trend toward
likely by midday, and then light to
occasionally moderate rain probably
continues into the evening. It’s not a deluge, but
it’s another good soaking. We can still use it. High
temperatures may perhaps reach only the mid40s to low 50s, if indeed rain is in early enough.
Overnight, lows settle in the 40s.
Today
Rain
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Wednesday
Rain
Thursday
Partly sunny
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Friday
Mostly sunny
Saturday
Partly sunny
Sunday
Partly sunny
49° 43
49° 42
56° 37
46° 29
45° 37
55° 43
FEELS*: 46°
FEELS: 45°
FEELS: 55°
FEELS: 41°
FEELS: 45°
FEELS: 53°
CHNCE PRECIP: 65%
P: 65%
P: 25%
P: 5%
P: 5%
P: 20%
WIND: NNE 7–14 mph
W: N 7–14 mph
W: NNE 6–12 mph
W: NW 8–16 mph
W: N 6–12 mph
W: SE 6–12 mph
°
°
°
°
°
OFFICIAL RECORD
Temperatures
NATION
Harrisburg
47/37
Hagerstown
45/37
F
Sa
High
Low
Weather map features for noon today.
Normal
Philadelphia
51/41
Record high
Record low
Baltimore
49/39
Dover
52/41
Washington
49/43
FORECAST
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
70° 2:00 p.m.
60° 3:00 a.m.
62°/44°
80° 2015
26° 1967
72° 4:00 p.m.
59° 5:00 a.m.
61°/38°
80° 2015
16° 1991
72° 3:43 p.m.
61° 2:00 a.m.
60°/39°
80° 2015
22° 1991
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: +7.2° yr. to date: +3.2°
Precipitation
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
OCEAN: 67°
Ocean City
57/50
OCEAN: 62°
Lexington
50/40
Richmond
51/42
Norfolk
61/51
Virginia Beach
61/54
Past 24 hours
OCEAN: 64°
Total this month
Normal
Total this year
Kitty Hawk
66/57
OCEAN: 65°
Normal
Pollen: Low
Air Quality: Good
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
Low
Low
Moderate
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
Trace
0.67"
0.67"
33.77"
34.19"
0.00"
0.70"
0.71"
38.60"
35.88"
Trace
0.68"
0.68"
35.86"
35.89"
Moon Phases
UV: Low
Solar system
1 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, cloudy, rain. High 43–47. Wind
northeast 4–8 mph. Tonight, cloudy, rain. Low 33–37. Wind
north 4–8 mph. Wednesday, mostly cloudy, rain early. High
38–42. Wind northeast 3–6 mph. Thursday, partly sunny.
High 41–45. Wind north 4–8 mph.
Atlantic beaches: Today, cloudy, rain. High 54–61. Wind
north–northeast 7–14 mph. Tonight, cloudy, rain. Low
46–52. Wind north–northeast 8–16 mph. Wednesday,
cloudy, rain, drizzle. High 54–58. Wind northeast 10–20
mph. Thursday, partly sunny. High 59–63.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, cloudy, rain. Wind north
4–8 knots. Waves a foot or less. Visibility under 2 miles in rain. •
Lower Potomac and Chesapeake Bay: Today, cloudy, rain. Wind north–
northeast 7–14 knots. Waves around 1 foot on the lower Potomac,
2 feet on Chesapeake Bay.• River Stages: Today, the stage at Little
Falls will be 3.4 feet, rising to 3.6 feet on Wednesday. Flood stage at
Little Falls is 10 feet.
(High tides in Bold)
Washington
5:03 a.m.
10:01 a.m.
4:59 p.m.
10:14 p.m.
Annapolis
1:28 a.m.
6:46 a.m.
1:07 p.m.
7:58 p.m.
Ocean City
ACTUAL
Cape May
56/48
Annapolis
49/44
Charlottesville
49/40
Today’s tides
RECORD
°
Th
REGION
AVERAGE
3:09 a.m.
9:33 a.m.
Norfolk
5:09 a.m.
11:35 a.m.
6:03 p.m.
none
Point Lookout
2:59 a.m.
8:49 a.m.
3:43 p.m.
4:03 p.m.
10:56 p.m.
9:57 p.m.
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Kingsville, TX 96°
Low: Rudyard, MT –4°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
Tomorrow
45/28/pc
68/42/pc
30/23/s
79/58/c
83/50/pc
49/39/r
32/19/s
78/56/c
33/11/s
45/29/s
49/40/pc
46/29/pc
43/27/pc
82/63/pc
50/37/r
72/48/r
31/18/sn
46/28/pc
47/36/r
49/37/c
65/45/c
34/21/sn
48/29/s
61/38/s
29/20/pc
66/51/t
54/43/sh
50/36/r
33/17/pc
61/49/r
26/6/pc
51/38/c
48/38/pc
47/31/s
48/30/pc
71/52/c
51/35/r
56/43/t
50/22/s
46/31/s
50/30/pc
51/32/pc
53/40/r
56/27/s
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
43/26/c
47/30/pc
80/56/pc
24/11/pc
29/12/s
51/33/pc
86/75/c
86/60/pc
48/33/c
81/57/c
87/63/pc
44/25/pc
73/48/pc
64/45/t
73/57/pc
51/40/r
63/48/r
86/72/pc
44/28/pc
35/23/s
62/45/r
83/65/s
52/40/r
61/51/r
49/28/s
48/31/s
73/45/pc
25/17/c
26/6/pc
52/31/s
87/74/pc
67/51/sh
49/30/s
64/49/sh
85/64/pc
49/28/s
71/50/s
52/38/c
74/57/s
54/35/pc
55/42/c
86/72/s
45/34/s
40/18/s
55/41/c
77/57/pc
52/44/pc
58/52/r
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
50/34/c
42/24/c
84/65/pc
51/41/r
82/60/pc
45/31/r
48/29/pc
50/39/c
53/37/pc
60/43/r
56/29/s
51/42/r
65/44/s
50/34/c
85/76/t
47/26/pc
72/60/pc
65/52/s
85/75/t
48/40/c
34/27/pc
43/26/pc
85/67/pc
45/28/c
45/28/r
50/27/s
84/66/pc
53/40/c
83/61/s
49/30/s
46/27/s
48/42/r
52/34/c
51/42/r
62/43/c
48/42/r
64/53/r
52/33/s
84/76/t
53/34/pc
73/61/s
66/57/r
84/77/t
50/43/r
41/33/c
48/28/pc
84/67/s
49/27/pc
World
High: Vioolsdrif, South Africa 109°
Low: Verkhoyansk, Russia –39°
Nov 10
Last
Quarter
Nov 18
New
Nov 26
First
Quarter
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Dec 3
Full
Set
5:01 p.m.
10:17 a.m.
4:24 p.m.
3:32 p.m.
4:38 p.m.
7:25 p.m.
excludes Antarctica
WORLD
Today
Addis Ababa
72/47/pc
Amsterdam
47/33/pc
Athens
67/58/pc
Auckland
65/60/pc
Baghdad
92/65/pc
Bangkok
87/77/c
Beijing
65/33/s
Berlin
47/40/pc
Bogota
66/50/r
Brussels
46/33/s
Buenos Aires
72/62/c
Cairo
77/60/s
Caracas
76/67/pc
Copenhagen
48/41/pc
Dakar
87/76/c
Dublin
49/34/pc
Edinburgh
48/34/r
Frankfurt
48/39/c
Geneva
47/38/r
Ham., Bermuda 77/70/s
Helsinki
42/36/pc
Ho Chi Minh City 89/75/t
Tomorrow
74/46/pc
46/38/sh
69/55/t
65/54/sh
89/65/c
87/77/pc
57/37/s
48/37/c
66/50/r
43/36/sh
78/58/pc
78/61/s
76/68/pc
49/41/pc
87/77/pc
51/48/pc
50/45/pc
48/37/sh
45/37/sh
76/71/pc
43/37/c
88/76/t
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
81/72/sh
83/57/s
62/51/s
69/55/pc
89/55/s
74/37/c
85/76/pc
88/68/pc
88/77/t
69/59/c
67/52/s
53/36/r
63/41/s
88/77/s
80/48/s
42/27/pc
40/30/c
96/76/pc
74/59/c
86/62/pc
46/37/c
42/27/pc
48/36/pc
47/37/pc
83/74/pc
82/57/s
66/54/s
66/53/s
86/50/s
69/35/s
85/75/pc
89/67/pc
88/77/pc
69/60/pc
67/50/s
50/37/s
60/40/pc
88/77/s
80/48/pc
46/33/pc
38/28/s
94/77/pc
74/60/pc
86/61/pc
42/39/c
45/28/pc
46/37/sh
45/40/sh
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
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76/67/r
86/59/s
59/44/t
86/66/pc
77/54/c
57/39/r
64/49/c
71/57/c
86/77/c
43/32/pc
68/58/s
88/73/pc
75/56/s
70/60/pc
47/30/pc
52/43/pc
50/38/c
78/68/pc
86/59/s
62/48/pc
87/66/pc
81/55/s
55/38/sh
59/36/s
70/55/s
87/75/t
43/37/c
68/56/c
79/72/r
74/57/pc
69/57/r
46/31/s
46/42/r
48/38/pc
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
sh- showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
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Rise
6:42 a.m.
8:29 p.m.
5:25 a.m.
3:45 a.m.
5:55 a.m.
9:54 a.m.
KLMNO
Style
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
.
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MUSIC REVIEW
MUSIC REVIEW
It was a weekend of the
‘Naughty Nineties’ in D.C.
as Vanity Fair’s editor
celebrated new book. C2
A couple adopted their
nephew and refer to their
sons as twins, which
confuses nosy adults. C3
Violinist Joshua Bell
provides a much-needed
Romantic escape on an
otherwise grim day. C5
Two young French artists
show talent, but a lack of
balance, at a Phillips
Collection performance. C4
RECORDINGS
Sam Smith:
Sadness
with a lot of
emptiness
BY
WASHINGTON POST ILLUSTRATION; ISTOCK
Can eateries in
D.C. sell Trump
on their sizzle?
The president, known for his narrow culinary
tastes, says he wants to sample the local fare
BY
T OM S IETSEMA
W
ashington chefs were put on notice last
week with the news that President Trump, a
creature of habit with a penchant for fast
food and steak cooked well done, might be
coming to dinner.
“In Washington, you have some great restaurants, and
I’m going to start going to them,” the president said
during an interview with “The Larry O’Connor Show” on
Thursday. Ten months into his administration, Trump has
dined in only one restaurant, BLT Prime, the steakhouse
ensconced in Trump International Hotel.
In an uncommon stroke of comity, the president also
revealed on the radio show that the White House was his
No. 1 place to eat in a city he has derided as the Swamp.
“I’ll tell you, my favorite restaurant . . . rather than
insulting anyone, I will say: I love the food at the White
House. The White House is the greatest restaurant.”
Of recent Oval Office occupants, the teetotaling 45th
president, who has yet to host a state dinner, has
expressed little interest in food beyond the occasional
shout-out to meatloaf, a dish he offers on the menu of his
club at Mar-a-Lago, has enjoyed at the White House and
has foisted on dining companions, including New Jersey
Gov. Chris Christie (R).
His longtime butler in Palm Beach, Fla., told the New
York Times that Trump prefers his steak cooked so
thoroughly that “it would rock on the plate.”
TRUMP CONTINUED ON C2
A LLISON S TEWART
Earlier this year, there was a
half-serious conspiracy theory
floated by fans on Twitter that
Adele and Sam Smith were the
same person.
Hear them out: Both are white
20-something Brits who use the
musical conventions of the American South in the ’60s to craft sad,
swingy ballads for people twice
their age. Both have won many
Grammys, and an Oscar each for
singing a Bond theme. When
Adele is on an album cycle, Smith
— whose second album, “The
Thrill of It All,” was released
Friday — lies low, and vice versa.
No one remembers seeing them
in the same place at the same
time.
But Adele is one of the only
subjects that can be agreed upon
in 2017, a Teflon-wrapped unicorn who can put across very
tepid pop songs through the
sheer force of her personality,
something Smith is unable to do.
She can get away with anything;
Smith has made a side career out
of stepping in it.
Ever since his breakout feature
turn on Disclosure’s 2012 hit
“Latch,” Sam Smith and fame
have uncomfortably coexisted.
He sold more than 12 million
copies of “In the Lonely Hour,” his
2014 debut. He came out as gay
around the time of its release and
took extreme care to avoid alienMUSIC CONTINUED ON C3
CAPITOL RECORDS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sam Smith’s new record, “The
Thrill of It All,” lacks thrill.
CMA
retracts
media rules
after outcry
BOOK WORLD
On the way to invading North Africa, Patton did a lot of reading
BY
M EREDITH H INDLEY
George S. Patton was bored.
Seventy-five years ago, the roughand-tumble U.S. Army general
was stuck on the USS Augusta in
the middle of the Atlantic Ocean.
At the end of a two-week journey, Patton and his 33,000 men
would storm the beaches and
secure their target: Casablanca,
the white city of postcards and
travelogues, which also happened
to be Africa’s largest port on the
Atlantic. The assault was part of
Operation Torch, the United
States’ first foray into the European theater in World War II.
The invasion wasn’t scheduled
to start for more than a week,
which left Patton with plenty of
idle time. “It is hard to realize that
in 10 days I shall be up to my neck
in work,” he wrote in his diary on
Oct. 28, 1942. “At the moment, I
have nothing at all to do.”
To fill his day, Patton read
books. After all, there were only
so many meetings to attend and
letters to write. As the commanding officer, Patton couldn’t play
cards or dice with his soldiers, but
he could trade or borrow books.
Disappearing into a good story
also offered a chance to escape
the self-doubt that often haunted
him, despite the brash confidence
he freely brandished.
“So far I have read part of the
Koran, finished ‘Three Harbors,’
and ‘The Raft,’ ” noted Patton. He
read the Koran to better understand French Morocco, a Muslim
nation. Beyond that piece of reconnaissance work, Patton’s reading on the voyage provides a
glimpse of the era’s bestsellers —
all but forgotten now — and a hint
of what entertained the general
who would help save the free
world from fascism.
“Three Harbours” (1938), by F.
Van Wyck Mason, tells the story of
the
American
Revolution
through the eyes of a family of
merchants navigating the tricky
politics of the era while sustaining their business in Boston, Norfolk and Bermuda. It was a very
navy-centric novel for landlubber
Patton to be reading, and at almost 700 pages, it could provide
many hours of diversion. The
general was a fast and dedicated
reader.
BOOK WORLD CONTINUED ON C3
NAVAL HISTORY AND HERITAGE COMMAND
Maj. Gen. George S. Patton, left, and Rear Adm. H. Kent Hewitt share a laugh aboard the USS
Augusta. Patton had plenty of time to read during the two-week voyage to Casablanca.
BY
E MILY Y AHR
The Country Music Association Awards, airing Wednesday
night on ABC, have already generated plenty of publicity in advance of the show — but probably
not the type that the telecast’s
executives had in mind.
Controversy erupted late last
week when CMA organizers released guidelines for the media
covering the event, which is taking place a month after the Las
Vegas massacre, when 58 people
were shot and killed and hundreds were injured during a country music festival.
“In light of recent events, and
out of respect for the artists directly or indirectly involved,
please refrain from focusing your
coverage of the CMA Awards Red
Carpet and Backstage Media Center on the Las Vegas tragedy, gun
rights, political affiliations or topics of the like,” the guidelines said.
“It’s vital . . . due to the sensitivities at hand, that the CMA Awards
be a celebration of Country Music
and the artists that make this
genre so great. . . . We want everyone to feel comfortable talking to
press about this exciting time.”
The memo added, “If you are
reported as straying from these
guidelines, your credential will be
AWARDS CONTINUED ON C2
C2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
The Reliable Source
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
Alec Baldwin says Melania Trump
loves his impression of her husband
Lorena Bobbitt and the ‘Naughty Nineties’
F
orget the 1960s; the ’90s is now the raciest decade in
recent memory. At least according to Vanity Fair
editor David Friend’s new book “The Naughty
Nineties: The Triumph of the American Libido,” a chronicle
of the sex, lies and reality TV that shaped the country that
would eventually vote Donald Trump into the White
House.
“The reason we’re stuck with Trump relates to the
dumbing down of the culture and the decay of public
discourse” that began in the ’90s, according to Friend, who
was on his way back to New York after a whirlwind
weekend in the District celebrating the new book with
some of the Washingtonians with a front-row seat to the
decade under Friend’s microscope.
First, the Friends of Soho House DC, a group of the
exclusive club’s members in the area, hosted a party for the
under-35 set for the author at the Helicopter Factory
condos near Columbia Heights. Then it was off to the tony
Northwest Washington townhouse of Republican
consultant Juleanna Glover. That party, co-hosted by
Carol Blue, widow of Vanity Fair writer Christopher
Hitchens, and Gerald Rafshoon, Jimmy Carter’s White
House communications director, was bipartisan.
“There was a great mix of people on the left and right, all
political shades,” said Friend, who found himself chatting
in Glover’s kitchen with Trump staffer Christopher Liddell
about his boss and later in the living room with Reggie
Love, former special assistant and personal aide to Barack
Obama, about his ex-boss. Also in attendance were local
Georgetown A-listers Sally Quinn and Chris Murray.
Afterward, Friend and crew headed to Madam’s Organ.
But the biggest throwback cameo happened Sunday
night when Lorena Bobbitt, who became a national
celebrity in 1993 after cutting off her husband’s penis (she
was found not guilty in 1994 because of temporary
insanity), showed up. Bobbitt, who lives in Virginia, is
featured in the chapter about watershed moments that
defined “the new etiquette governing American standards
of behavior — and reactions to misbehavior.”
DAVID FRIEND
Lorena Bobbitt showed up at an event promoting David Friend’s
new book, “The Naughty Nineties,” at Politics and Prose.
President Trump is not a fan
of Alec Baldwin’s “Saturday
Night Live” impression of him.
But in a recent interview,
Baldwin claims there is someone
in the White House tuning in for
his pouty-mouthed Trump on
Saturday nights. That would be
one Melania Trump.
“Someone told me — who’s
friends with someone in the
White House, or formerly in the
White House — that Melania
Trump loves SNL and she loves
my impersonation,” Baldwin
announced somewhat cryptically
Monday on WNYC’s “The Brian
Lehrer Show.”
The actor’s portrayal of the
president may have earned him
an Emmy, but the president’s
disdain for Baldwin’s version of
him is official record.
“Time to retire the boring and
unfunny show. Alec Baldwin
portrayal stinks!” Trump tweeted
in October 2016 in response to
the comedy show’s skit about the
second presidential debate. Two
months later, a newly elected
Trump had more to say about his
allegedly unfunny doppelganger.
He ruled the show
“unwatchable” and tweeted that
Baldwin’s impression couldn’t
“get any worse.”
So why would POTUS’s better
half enjoy watching a show that
pokes fun at her husband?
According to Baldwin, because
it’s realistic. The actor claimed
WILL HEATH/NBC
President Trump is no fan of
Alec Baldwin’s impersonation.
that the first lady said of his
version of Trump, “That’s exactly
what he’s like!”
But the East Wing was quick
to deny Baldwin’s story.
Stephanie Grisham, Melania
Trump’s press secretary, emailed
Newsweek on Monday: “That is
not true, which is why Mr.
Baldwin has no actual names to
go with his bizarre assertion.”
— Sarah Polus
Gridiron Club dinner will again feature 2 female lawmakers as speakers
The times, they are a-changing.
On Monday, Gridiron Club and
Foundation president Lynn
Sweet announced via Twitter
that Sen. Tammy Duckworth (DIll.) and Rep. Cathy McMorris
Rodgers (R-Wash.) will both take
the stage for the 132-year-old
club’s black-tie dinner in
December (not to be confused
with its splashier white-tie
dinner held in the spring). This
marks the first time that the
speakers at both club dinners
have been women.
The club is an iconic D.C.
institution that attracts the
capital’s media elite. The
previous dinner, in March,
marked a first for its annual night
of jokey speeches and musical
skits when House Minority
Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.)
and Sen. Joni Ernst (R-Iowa)
headlined the off-the-record
evening at the Renaissance
Washington Hotel.
The winter dinner — also held
at the Renaissance — is a smaller
affair that doesn’t star costumed
Gridiron members on stage in
elaborate musical numbers. But
there will be fun. “The Mighty
Gridiron Chorus” will perform a
song lampooning political
newsmakers.
SETH PERLMAN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sen. Tammy Duckworth
GOT A TIP? EMAIL US AT RELIABLESOURCE@WASHPOST.COM. FOR THE LATEST SCOOPS, VISIT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RELIABLESOURCE
D.C. has
wide array
of options
for steak
TRUMP FROM C1
On the campaign trail, Trump
was famous for dispatching Big
Macs and Filet-O-Fish sandwiches, washed back with oceans of
Diet Coke, and for calling Oreos
the “craziest” thing he ate on the
road. Donald Trump Jr. refers to
his father as “a burgers-and-pizza kind of guy.” Daughter Ivanka
Trump worries about her dad’s
tendency to treat a meal like a
race, “but it’s the only speed he
knows,” she told Barbara Walters.
President Trump’s sudden,
positive attention to the local
food scene is curious. This is a
man who once denied the quality
of the dining establishments in a
deposition against New York restaurateur Geoffrey Zakarian,
who pulled out of a project at the
Trump hotel. Said Trump in the
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summer of 2016: “There aren’t
many in Washington, believe
me.”
Maybe POTUS was tired of
hearing how much fun his predecessor was having around town,
at such hot spots as Rasika West
End. Perhaps Ivanka Trump’s
excursions to Fiola Mare, Le
Diplomate and other popular
restaurants planted seeds of interest.
Whatever the cause, Trump
sounds ready to pounce following his return from his state
visits to Asia, which began Sunday in Tokyo (and included a
pre-golf hamburger made with
American beef ).
On “The Larry O’Connor
Show,” he said, “I was accused the
other day, well, when I leave the
White House, which is seldom, I
always go to my hotel on Pennsylvania Avenue, and they say, ‘He
should go to other places.’ And I
never thought of it, and I’m going
to start doing it.”
Where his motorcade ends up
is TBD, but the dining destination is likely to speak volumes
about the state of his taste. The
big question: Can you take the
teenager out of the man?
Should Trump decide to take
baby steps from his routine and
select a steakhouse other than
his own, he’ll have the benefit of
a herd of choices.
BLT? Noisy.
Prime Rib? A bit old-fashioned, especially if the style-con-
Journalists
and country
stars spoke
against policy
AWARDS FROM C1
reviewed and potentially revoked
via security escort.”
Such strict rules — with a
warning that reporters will be
kicked out if they don’t adhere —
might sound surprising, but
country stars tried hard this year
to stay politically neutral.
Only a handful of Nashville
singers endorsed a presidential
candidate or talked about the
election. And in the wake of Las
Vegas, when the genre was suddenly linked to the topic of gun
control, most artists have stayed
very quiet.
SUSAN WALSH/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers
@helena_andrews @emilyaheil
ALEX BRANDON/ASSSOCIATED PRESS
During his time in office, President Trump has dined out only at
BLT Prime, the steakhouse inside the Trump International Hotel.
scious first lady tags along.
Closest to 1600 Pennsylvania
Ave., and among the best at what
they deliver, are the contemporary Bourbon Steak in the Four
Seasons hotel in Georgetown and
the softly lighted Mastro’s downtown, which comes with the
bonus of live music and a Key
lime pie that might put Trump in
a Florida state of mind.
The president might also consider the expansive new Rare
Steakhouse on I Street NW,
where he can presumably get his
choice of entree cooked shades
darker than the title suggests. A
reservation at Rare, an import
from Wisconsin, could be seen as
a sign of gratitude to a state that
helped put him in office.
Come to think of it, Trump
could engender some goodwill
with Congress and invite Paul D.
Ryan, speaker of the House of
Representatives and from “America’s Dairyland,” along for the
ride! (Then follow up with Kentuckian Mitch McConnell, the
Senate majority leader, with a
visit to Succotash downtown,
whose chef, Edward Lee, recently
That policy struck a nerve not
only with members of the media,
who were predictably not pleased
with coverage restrictions, but
also country singers.
“I’m sure the CMA will do the
right thing and rescind these ridiculous and unfair press guidelines,” tweeted Brad Paisley, who
will co-host the awards with Carrie Underwood for the 10th consecutive year.
“Country music has always
been about the truth. Out of respect for the Las Vegas victims,
let’s keep it that way,” wrote Maren Morris, nominated for three
CMAs this year.
“This is embarrassing and has
been taken way too far,” tweeted
Cam, a previous CMA nominee.
“You can encourage respect without silencing people.”
After hours of backlash Friday,
the CMA released a statement
apologizing for the rules and retracted its policy.
“CMA apologizes for the recently distributed restrictions in
the CMA Awards media guidelines, which have since been lifted,” the organization said in the
statement. “The sentiment was
not to infringe and was created
with the best of intentions to
honor and celebrate Country Music.”
Paisley tweeted back in response: “Bravo CMA awards for
doing the right thing & apologizing for this mistake. All are welcome, let’s have a great show.”
Industry insiders still cite the
Dixie Chicks (who criticized President George W. Bush in 2003 and
were basically blacklisted) as the
reason country artists are fearful
of speaking up about divisive
subjects, particularly given that
much of their fan base leans
conservative. The genre also has
close ties to the National Rifle
Association through its lifestyle
brand, NRA Country, which partners with lots of Nashville singers.
Plus, many country artists feel
they don’t have the authority to
relocated from Louisville. And so
on across the power lines.)
If he wants to score food
points among the electorate,
however, he needs the Secret
Service to stop traffic and wand
restaurantgoers in such worldly
parts of the city as Shaw, Penn
Quarter, 14th Street NW, H Street
NE or — freshest of all — the epic
and evolving Wharf.
On Sunday, the president got
some experience eating (slightly)
outside the box when Japanese
Prime Minister Shinzo Abe hosted him at a teppanyaki grill in
Tokyo, the glitzy Ginza Ukai Tei,
for a salad of scallops and white
truffles, steak and a chocolate
sundae. (POTUS is partial to ice
cream; two scoops are better
than one.)
The dinner was heavy on designer labels, with the beef coming from prized Tajima cows and
the scallops, revered for their
sweetness, from Hokkaido.
Trump’s willingness to venture
out of his house for a meal back
in the District is music to the ears
of anyone who believes in the
power of food to effect change.
Better late than never, right?
But he should be prepared for
muted, if any, applause in whatever dining rooms he eventually
holds court.
Ninety percent of voters in
Washington, after all, looked at
the menu last November and
asked for Hillary Clinton.
tom.sietsema@washpost.com
say anything about a topic as
complicated as gun rights or politics — or they believe that their
job is to provide an escape for
fans, who have no desire to hear
about politics from entertainers.
After Las Vegas, the country
music community was horrified,
and the reaction was largely singers urging Americans to come
together after such a violent tragedy.
Leading up to the CMA
Awards, Paisley confirmed that
there will be a tribute to the Las
Vegas victims during the show.
“We’re not going to ignore it,
but we’re not going to also dwell
on that,” he told Rolling Stone.
“We have to make sure we honor
those we’ve lost, but we also [have
to] celebrate this music, which
lives on, and do a good job having
the heart we need to have on that
night. And also the theme of the
show this year is very much about
unity and coming together as a
format.”
emily.yahr@washpost.com
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C3
RE
New album
lacks thrills
but shows
promise
MUSIC FROM C1
ating mainstream fans with overt
references to a male love interest,
even scrubbing the gender pronouns from a cover of Whitney
Houston’s “How Will I Know.”
He has in turn suffered the
affections of a fickle Internet,
been criticized for things other
people would get away with, for
incorrectly proclaiming himself
the first openly gay person to win
an Academy Award (for his Bond
theme, “Writing’s on the Wall”),
for saying he didn’t like Tinder,
for gaining weight, for losing it.
Nevertheless, he persisted.
“The Thrill of It All,” like its
predecessor, is a mournful retro
soul album that relies on Smith’s
otherworldly voice to carry the
load. Almost every song is sad,
but that voice was built for sadness. Heartbreak is where Sam
Smith lives. He’s in love not with
love itself but with its endless
opportunities for self-abasement
and misery. He is love’s most
ardent seeker, its most bereft
mourner. He will bludgeon you
KEVIN WINTER/GETTY IMAGES FOR CBS RADIO
Sam Smith’s new release, “The Thrill of It All,” isn’t stellar, but it shows a pop singer coming into his own.
with it (“Burning,” with its beautifully over-the-top gospel choir),
suffocate you with its earnestness
(“Midnight Train,” with its Radiohead circa “Creep” guitars).
No house built on such a sublime foundation, buttressed by
the horns and gospel choirs of a
hundred classic midcentury R&B
albums, should be this empty
inside. But “The Thrill of It All” is
so much of a piece, such a beautiful but monotonous sadgasm,
you might not be able to resist
building a better Sam Smith album in your head, to wonder
what would have happened if he
had had more contemporary reference points.
Smith works mostly with his
longtime collaborator Jimmy
Napes and a handful of songwriting and production vets such as
Stargate and Timbaland (the latter on the raise-the-rafters,
gospel-inspired ballad “Pray”)
and, for better or ill, seems mostly
unmoved by their influence.
But what if he had made a
buzzy ’80s pop album, like Taylor
Swift without the score settling,
or returned to the languorous
electro-pop of his Disclosure period? Even some of pop music’s
more unhappily ubiquitous characters start to seem like good
ideas: Jack Antonoff probably
couldn’t have made the dirge-y
piano ballad “Too Good at Goodbyes” any worse. Is Ed Sheeran
busy?
It’s only on the slow-burning
ballad “HIM” that the album
delivers on the promise implicit
in Smith’s voice. Written from the
point of view of a young man in
Mississippi defending his love for
another man to his father, and to
his Father (“Don’t you try and tell
me that God doesn’t care for us/It
is him I love”), it’s a moving and a
novel exploration of the intersection of religion and LGBT issues.
It’s a promising indication that
Smith is coming into his own and
is more than the male version of
Adele, with worse producers and
social skills. He’s one of the only
contemporary pop artists in 2017
who hasn’t abdicated their responsibility to tell the truth about
the state of the world. That “The
Thrill of It All,” with its tentative
but moving use of male pronouns, its quietly defiant songs
about faithless boyfriends, its judicious use of the word “he,” even
exists inside the pop mainstream
is a small miracle, even if, for
now, at least, its miracles end
there.
style@washpost.com
Murder mystery, survival tale and historical novel were among Patton’s reads
BOOK WORLD FROM C1
As the waiting and anticipation bedeviled Patton, he borrowed another Mason novel, one
of the popular Hugh North mysteries called “The Cairo Garter
Murders.” Maj. Hugh North was a
suave army intelligence officer
with a knack for solving crimes.
In “Cairo Garter,” North hunts for
a killer who decorates his victims
with women’s garters. “I have just
finished and will start to worry, or
should I feel utterly confident?”
wrote Patton, perhaps feeling encouraged by North’s assured success.
For Patton, who valued stami-
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ACROSS
Like dorms for
both men and
women
Military sch.
Fall in folds
Chomp
Swimmer’s path
More cold
and wet,
weatherwise
Serb or Croat
“Liberal”
pursuits
Can’t stop
loving
Three Stooges
movie, e.g.
Michigan
or Mead
Update from a
pilot, for short
Induction cooktop alternative
Double-reed
woodwinds
“What did
you say?”
Key with one
sharp: abbr.
Light brown
Driver’s license
test
Post-OR area
Three-pronged
Greek letters
Buffet table coffee server
River mammal
Fluffy dessert
Eisenhower’s
nickname
Hip ’60s Brits
Eco-friendly
request ... and a
hint to sorting
out the aptly
circled letters
Vonnegut
literary
device
Enterprise
captain born
3/22/2233
Puts on TV
Low card
Lawn border
Finger or toe
part
Chose (to)
Evidence of
ownership
Community org.
known by its
first letter
na and men doing manly things,
Robert Trumbull’s “The Raft” was
another natural choice. Based on
a sensational true-life adventure,
“The Raft” describes the ordeal of
three American naval aviators
who ran out of fuel while searching for Japanese submarines.
Forced to ditch their plane, they
spent 34 days in the South Pacific
aboard an eight-by-four-foot life
raft. Despite having no sail or
rudder, they sailed 1,000 miles
until they reached an atoll, which
provided food and water until
they were rescued. In the wake of
the Japanese assault on Pearl
Harbor and the full plunge into
World War II, the trio’s story
became front-page news, providing the American public and the
U.S. Navy with a much-needed
heroic story.
Patton also picked up another
historical novel during the voyage: Marguerite Steen’s “The Sun
Is My Undoing,” one of the most
popular and critically successful
novels of the early 1940s. This
epic account of the transatlantic
slave trade in the 18th century
clocked in at 1,176 pages, bouncing from Bristol, England, to the
African Gold Coast to Havana.
“The Sun” charts the fortunes of
the larger-than-life Matthew
Flood and his offspring. It borrows plot points from 18th-centu-
ry novels — upstart families, broken engagements, virtue besmirched, a hint of the gothic —
but the focus on slavery adds a
rawness to the book. Making note
of it in his diary, Patton declared
the book to be “pretty sticky.”
As Patton flew through these
engrossing books, the convoy carrying American soldiers continued toward French Morocco. In a
stroke of luck, the ships avoided
detection by the German submarines hunting the blue waters of
the Atlantic. On Nov. 7, the American task force split to take up
positions at three points along
the Moroccan coast. The invasion
was scheduled to start the follow-
ing day. “This morning it is very
quiet and cool, almost too good to
be true. Thank God. I hope He
stays on our side,” Patton wrote.
On Nov. 8, the invasion began,
and the carefully crafted adventure of novels gave way to the very
real chaos of war. “Woke at 0200,
dressed and went on deck,” Patton wrote. From the deck of the
Augusta, he could see the lights of
Casablanca burning through the
night. “Sea dead calm — God is
with us.” It was another piece of
luck, as calm seas only occurred
off the Moroccan coast every five
or six days during autumn. Over
the next few hours, the men of the
Western Task Force began shoul-
dering 60-pound packs and descending rope ladders into the
landing craft below. As dawn approached, they rode the waves to
the rocky beaches.
Seventy-four hours later, on
Nov. 11, the Americans controlled
Casablanca and French Morocco.
The man who enjoyed best-selling adventures was well on his
way to becoming one of the great
characters of 20th-century history.
bookworld@washpost.com
Meredith Hindley is the author of
“Destination Casablanca: Exile,
Espionage, and the Battle for North
Africa.” She lives in Washington, D.C.
Biology shmiology. They’re brothers.
By Andrew Sand
Adapted from a
recent online discussion.
Dear Carolyn: My
wife and her sister
gave birth two
days apart. Six
months later, my
wife’s sister and
her husband were killed in a car
accident, and we adopted their
son and have raised the two boys
as “twin brothers” even though
biologically they’re cousins.
My wife’s sister’s husband was
a different race than us, so it’s
obvious from looking at the two
boys that they’re biologically not
twins. The boys never seem to
give it any thought, until adults
ask nosy questions like, “Why do
you boys say you’re brothers
when you’re not?” Our family
hasn’t come up with the right
answer to that question, and I’m
wondering if you could help us.
Thanks.
— Anonymous
Carolyn
Hax
© 2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
21
22
25
26
27
DOWN
“Kevin Can
Wait” network
Lubricates
Bibliography
list shortener:
abbr.
Reduce
monetarily
Denali National
Park state
Price-fixing
syndicate
Against
Fam. tree
member
NFL player
selection
events
Give off
GI on the run
Curly salon job
Before, in verse
Analyze
grammatically
One-named
“We R Who
We R” singer
Offensive
to some,
for short
Embarrass
“Pagliacci”
clown
11/7/17
28 Treaty of __:
War of 1812
ender
29 “La Cage __
Folles”
30 Fails to include
31 Bad habits
32 Accustom (to)
38 Winter holidays
39 __ of Good
Feelings
40 In a funk
43 Bill Nye’s
field
46 Florence’s
region
48 Approved
49 Come to
light
50 Made fun of
53 Practice for the
GMAT, e.g.
54 Ill-mannered
sort
55 Struggled to
make, with
“out”
56 Taxi trip
57 Neeson of
“Kinsey”
58 Idle of Monty
Python
59 Wedding vow
words
62 Patty Hearst’s
abductors: abbr.
MONDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
Anonymous: What a beautiful
way to deal with a terrible loss.
I can see kids being nosy about
it, but adults? Really, people?
I suggest you settle on one or
two non-answer answers that
mark the end of the discussion
(adapt as needed for your
responses or the boys’):
“Because it works for us.”
“Who says we aren’t
brothers?”
“We’re not hung up on
biology.”
“Biology shmiology.”
[beat] “Sorry, it always throws
me that people still ask this.”
“It’s always the adults who
ask.”
“Is it important?”
“Is it important to you?”
“I’m touched that you care.”
“The boys never seem to give it
any thought/We don’t even think
about it.”
“Oh, you noticed.”
“Thank you for the teaching
moment.”
Seriously — deflect all you
want, as you want, in as few
syllables as you want. It’s
nobody’s business, at all. Any
follow-ups by the particularly
clueless can be shut down more
explicitly.
Readers also suggest:
“Because that is how adoption
works.” You can stand up for your
sons and adoption all in one
breath.
Give them the “think about it,
genius” look. If the 5-year-olds
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
delivered the look, that would be
perfect.
“The Doobies weren’t really
brothers, either.”
Dear Carolyn: Most of my kids’
friends are going to summer
camp. They feel inferior because
we can’t afford it. Is there
something to be said for living in
a neighborhood where everyone
has similar incomes?
— Money Troubled
Money Troubled: I suppose, but
I think there’s a lot more to be
said for living in a neighborhood
with a big range of incomes. I
think economic diversity is
underappreciated and often
ignored for the more-talkedabout diversity in ethnicity and
race.
I know exactly how your kids
feel, so I’m not discounting it.
However, obstacles are what
spur creativity, growth,
resiliency, compassion and self-
knowledge. Plus, it’s not even a
universal obstacle but one of
proximity; they only care about
summer camps because they’re
in a community of summercampers.
So their summertime limits
are a bummer they can spin into
the gold of resourcefulness as
they fill their own time —
exploration, free play, developing
a lot more independence than
campers get, earning money,
perfecting a skill or sport,
reading? Or it can fuel a
motivating fire to be able to
afford someday what their
friends have now. Again, no fun
for any of you in the moment,
but not the worst thing.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her
column delivered to your inbox each
morning at wapo.st/haxpost.
Join the discussion live at noon
Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com
C4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
Television
TV HIGHLIGHTS
11/7/17
7:00
7:30
BROADCAST CHANNELS
8:30
9:00
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8:00
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◆
ET
9.1 WUSA (CBS) Off Script
14.1 WFDC (UNI) Enamorándome
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20.1 WDCA (MNTV)
22.1 WMPT (PBS) Farm-Harvest Outdoors
26.4 WETA (PBS) PBS NewsHour
30.1 WNVC (MHz) France 24 Programming
32.1 WHUT (PBS) Tavis Smiley ◆ Old House
50.1 WDCW (CW) Mike & Molly Goldbergs
66.1 WPXW (ION) Criminal Minds
The Voice
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◆
10:00
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Caer en tentación
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11:00
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CABLE CHANNELS
VAN REDIN/NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
The Long Road Home (National Geographic at 9) Jason Ritter and Kate
Bosworth star in this seven-episode miniseries, based on Martha
Raddatz’s book about a deadly ambush during the Iraq War.
by any means necessary.
The Voice (NBC at 8) The
knockout rounds continue.
DOCUMENTARY
Finding Your Roots (WETA and
MPT at 8) Veteran journalists
Bryant Gumbel and Suzanne
Malveaux learn about their family
histories. Producer Tonya Lewis
Lee is also featured.
30 for 30: Nature Boy
(ESPN at 10) ESPN’s documentary
series looks at the life and career
of professional wrestler Ric Flair.
RETURNING
This Is Us (NBC at 9) Kate and
Toby take a major step in their
relationship. In a flashback, Jack
and Rebecca finalize Randall’s
adoption.
Teachers (TV Land at 10) Season
2 returns with new episodes.
Blackish (ABC at 9) The Johnson
women support Diane when she
reaches a life milestone.
LATE NIGHT
The Curse of Oak Island (History
at 9) Season 5.
Conan (TBS at 11) Keegan-Michael
Key, Jon Dore.
Bull (CBS at 9) Bull helps
represent a teacher involved in a
cheating scandal.
Daily Show (Comedy Central at
11) Jeff Ross.
Colbert (CBS at 11:35) Jason
Segel, Jeff Fager, Lesley Stahl,
Mavis Staples.
Drop the Mic (TBS at 10:30) Niecy
Nash battles Cedric the
Entertainer, while singers Jason
Derulo and Liam Payne put their
rap skills to the test.
Kimmel (ABC at 11:35) Carey
Mulligan, Gael García Bernal,
Darius Rucker.
PREMIERE
Damnation(USA at 10) This period
drama, set in Iowa during the Great
Depression, follows an imposter
preacher (Killian Scott) planning an
uprising against capitalist
interests. Logan Marshall-Green of
“Quarry” plays the strikebreaker
hired to discourage an insurrection
Corden (CBS at 12:37) Rainn
Wilson, Jack Whitehall
Meyers (NBC at 12:37) John
Lithgow, Jonathan Groff, Michael
Lewis.
— Bethonie Butler
Leah Remini: Scientology
Leah Remini: Scientology
Scientology
Leah Remini
(11:10) Intervention
A&E
(5:30) Movie: Invincible ★★ Movie: Moneyball ★★★ (2011)
Movie: Walking Tall ★★
AMC
River Monsters
The Great Barrier Reef
Mystery of the
River Monsters
Animal Planet
(4:30) Life
Movie: First Sunday ★★ (2008)
Gucci Mane
Gucci Mane & Keyshia Ka’.
BET
Housewives/OC
Below Deck
Below Deck
Housewives/Atl.
Watch
Below Deck
Bravo
Gumball
King of Hill
Amer. Dad
Cleveland
Amer. Dad
Burgers
Burgers
Family Guy
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Cartoon Network Gumball
Erin Burnett OutFront
Anderson Cooper 360
Anderson Cooper 360
CNN Tonight
CNN Tonight
CNN
Tosh.0
Tosh.0
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Jefferies
Daily
Opposition
Comedy Central (6:50) Tosh.0 (7:25) Tosh.0 Tosh.0
Moonshiners: Art of ’Shine Moonshiners: Boatload
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(10:02) Moonshiners
(11:01) Moonshiners
Discovery
Bunk’d
Raven
Andi Mack
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Bizaardvark Raven
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Movie: The Wedding Planner ★★ (2001)
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(6:30) Movie: Just Go With It ★★ (2011)
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American Horror Story
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Christmas Under Wraps
Movie: Christmas Land (2015)
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Movie: A Princess for Christmas ★★ (2011)
The Christmas Ornament
Hallmark M&M Movie: Home for Christmas Day (2017)
Erin Brock
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REAL Sports Bryant Gumbel Rolling Stone: Stories From the Edge
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Fixer Upper
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The Curse of Oak Island
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History
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(11:02) Little Women: Dallas
Lifetime
MASN College Classics
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Touch.
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MUSIC REVIEW
Musicians’ talent overshadowed by
lack of balance as piano engulfs cello
BY
R OBERT B ATTEY
Two young French artists —
cellist Victor Julien-Laferrière
and pianist Guillaume Bellom
— made their local debuts at the
Phillips Collection on Sunday,
their manifest talent marred by
poor balances.
Bellom shone in the opening
set of Beethoven variations, the
hands singing sensitively and
independently, all while allowing Julien-Laferrière sonic
space. Thereafter, it was as if he
forgot where he was and the
instrument he was partnering.
In vast swaths of the Brahms
Sonata No. 1 and the Shostakovich Sonata, Bellom simply en-
gulfed the poor cellist.
The fault lay, of course, with
the player, but it was exacerbated by having the piano lid fully
raised, the sound blasting out.
When you could hear JulienLaferrière, it was clear that this
was an artist of real substance.
In the Martinu “Variations on
a Theme of Rossini,” his bow
technique was dazzling, and
throughout the program his
upper register was particularly
rich and sensuous.
Too often, his sound would
lose color at lower volumes;
with more experience, he
should gain a wider palette.
But his Brahms was, musically, quite wonderful, a true “ro-
mantic” interpretation — a
surging rush of ardor, extreme
plasticity of tempo and long,
yearning lines.
“Nocturne” by Thierry Escaich alternated between static
music with otherworldly harmonies reminiscent of Olivier
Messiaen and bustling folklike
sections in the mode of Martinu.
Bellom flashed his own virtuosity in the octave runs in the
finale of the Shostakovich, but
he has much to atone for. One
can only hope that if these
artists perform more together,
they will completely rethink the
sound picture.
style@washpost.com
JULIEN-LAFERRIÈRE
Cellist Victor Julien-Laferrière, center, showed his artistry Sunday — when you could hear him.
B FEATURED LISTING B
Pinchas Zukerman
Performs Bach
Thu, Nov 9, 8 pm
A phenomenon in the world of music as both
violinist and conductor, the legendary Pinchas Zukerman
performs Bach’s vibrant A Minor Concerto. The program
also includes Beethoven's Symphony No. 2
The Music Center at Strathmore
5301 Tuckerman Lane
North Bethesda, MD 20852
Free Parking
Tickets from
$35
1.877.BSO.1444
BSOmusic.org
GrosvenorStrathmore Station
on the Red Line
THEATRE
Shear Madness
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Regular Schedule:
Tuesday–Friday at 8
Saturday at 6 & 9
Sunday at 3 & 7
After the turkey and stuffing, explode with laughter
Thanksgiving weekend at this wildly popular interactive
comedy whodunit. New clues and up to the minute
improvisation deliver “shrieks of laughter night after night.”
(Washington Post)
Reserve now, holiday shows sell out early!
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Student Rush
Tickets Available
Tickets: 202-467-4600
Groups: 202-416-8400
www.shearmadness.com
Added Show:
Fri, Nov 24 at 5PM
Tickets
Available
at the
Box Office
Great Group Rates
for 15 or More
Tickets
available
at the
Box Office
AfterWords postconcert discussion
immediately
following the Thu.,
Nov. 9 performance.
MUSIC - ORCHESTRAL
National Symphony
Orchestra:
Gianandrea
Noseda conducts
Beethoven’s
“Eroica”
Thursday at 7
Saturday at 8
No one would argue Beethoven loved drama. Case in point:
When Napoleon crowned himself emperor, Beethoven
immediately ripped out the title for his new score Bonaparte
and renamed it “Eroica.” And with the music itself, he swept
away all previous notions of what a symphony could be.
Kennedy Center
Concert Hall
nationalsymphony.org
or call (202) 467-4600
ForeWords, with Deb Lamberton. Beginning at 6:45 p.m.
before the Sat., Nov. 11 performance
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
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For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
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16-2898
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
MUSIC REVIEW
Much-needed Romantic
getaway with Joshua Bell
BY
S IMON C HIN
Some days, you just need escapism. On Sunday afternoon, as
news broke of yet another horrific
mass shooting in America, I found
myself at the Music Center at
Strathmore, awaiting the start of a
recital from Joshua Bell and won-
dering how the American violinist’s affable, crowd-pleasing musicianship would speak to my feelings of helplessness and despair.
By the end of Bell’s program,
centered on three big Romanticera sonatas, I felt little consolation
or profound meaning. But in the
moment, courtesy of Bell’s effusive
EZ
lyricism, I experienced something
perhaps even more valuable:
transport through hedonic pleasure.
Particularly in the recital’s first
half, featuring Mendelssohn’s Violin Sonata in F from 1838 and
Grieg’s Third Violin Sonata, Bell’s
opulent and rhapsodic playing
proved utterly disarming. Every
sharply etched phrase, and every
whispered aside, exuded musicality. Bell was sensitively partnered
by the Italian pianist Alessio Bax,
who offered limpid but never selfeffacing accompaniment.
After intermission, Bell and Bax
took a more mellow and relaxed
approach to Brahms’s First Violin
Sonata in G (Op. 78), which made
sense for such a serenely lyrical
work. Yet this Apollonian restraint
felt somewhat unnatural for Bell,
and the duo’s honeyed tones could
not quite keep their reading from
sounding a little meandering.
Bell’s entertainer’s streak resurfaced with a vengeance, though, in
the three closing pieces announced from the stage: Brahms’s
Hungarian Dance No. 1, with its
playfulness and heart-on-sleeve
emotions; the beguiling loveliness
of “Meditation” from Massenet’s
“Thaïs”; and the shameless pyrotechnics of Sarasate’s “Zigeuner-
MOVIE DIRECTORY
DISTRICT
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
3111 K Street N.W.
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 4:00-9:50
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
1:15-4:30-7:45
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
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Thor: Ragnarok An IMAX 3D
Experience (PG-13) CC: 12:303:45-7:00-10:15
American Made (R) CC: 2:10-4:557:40-10:25
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
CC: 12:35-3:45-6:55-10:10
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
3:30-9:35
It (R) CC: 4:00-9:50
Only the Brave (PG-13) CC:
12:40-6:45
Jigsaw (R) CC: 1:00-4:15-7:1010:30
Suburbicon (R) CC: 1:10-7:15
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
1:45-4:35-7:20-9:55
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 1:20-4:207:15-10:05
Thank You For Your Service (R)
CC: 2:00-4:40-7:25-10:05
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) CC: 2:15-5:007:35-10:10
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC:
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Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 2:005:15-8:30
AMC Loews Uptown 1
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Thor: Ragnarok The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 4:20-9:40
MARYLAND
AFI Silver Theatre
Cultural Center
8633 Colesville Road
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 3:20-5:207:20-9:20
Goodbye Christopher Robin 1:05
Faces, Places (Visages, villages)
(PG) 3:00
Jane 1:00-5:00
Suspiria (R) 9:15
Suspicion (1941) (NR) 7:00
AMC Academy 8
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Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 12:15-3:055:45-8:25
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: (!)
11:30-3:15-6:15-9:15
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) CC: (!) 2:30-5:30-8:30
Jigsaw (R) CC: 12:45-3:05-5:257:45-10:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
1:30-4:00-6:30-9:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: (!)
11:35-2:10-4:45-7:20-10:00
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 12:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) (!) 1:004:00-7:00-10:00
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:452:15-4:45-7:15-9:45
AMC Center Park 8
4001 Powder Mill Rd.
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 3:50-9:15
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) CC:
1:15-6:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: (!)
12:00-1:00-4:00-6:00-7:00-10:00
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
AMC Mazza Gallerie
3D (PG-13) CC: 2:00-5:00-8:00
5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW
The Foreigner (R) CC: 3:15-9:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: (!)
Jigsaw (R) CC: 12:00-2:30-4:501:30-2:00-5:00-7:30-8:00
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital 7:30-9:45
Suburbicon (R) CC: (!) 12:45-6:00
3D (PG-13) CC: (!) 4:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: (!)
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
12:15-2:45-5:15-7:45-10:15
12:00-3:30
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Suburbicon (R) CC: 12:05
Halloween
(PG-13) CC: 12:45-3:30A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: (!)
6:15-9:00
12:20-2:50-5:20-7:50
Thor:
Ragnarok
in Disney Digital
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 1:20-4:203D (PG-13) (!) 3:00-9:00
7:10
Thank You For Your Service (R)
AMC Columbia 14
CC: 2:00-4:40-7:20
10300 Little Patuxent Parkway
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 7:00
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 1:35
Albert Einstein Planetarium - Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 9:40
National Air & Space Museum The Price of Fame (La rancon de
6th Street and Independence Ave SW la gloire) (NR) 7:00
To Space and Back 11:00AM
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: (!)
Dark Universe Space Show (NR) 11:30-2:30-5:30-8:30
11:30-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
Journey to the Stars (NR) 12:00- 3D (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:00-7:00
1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00-5:00
Thor: Ragnarok An IMAX 3D
The Stars Tonight (NR) 10:30AM Experience (PG-13) (!) 12:30-3:306:30-9:30
Angelika
The Snowman (R) CC: 1:25
Pop-Up at Union Market
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
550 Penn Street NE - Unit E
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 11:15- 11:10AM
It (R) CC: 2:50-9:40
1:30-3:45-4:45-6:00-8:15
The Foreigner (R) CC: 11:05The Departure 2:40-7:00
Suburbicon (R) 11:45-2:00-4:30-7:15 4:30-10:15
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
Avalon Theatre
11:05-1:50-4:35-7:20-10:10
5612 Connecticut Avenue
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) 1:30- 10:55-4:10-6:40-9:20
4:30-7:30
Suburbicon (R) CC: 1:45
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 12:00A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
2:30-5:00-7:45
10:50-12:30-1:30-3:20-4:20-6:107:10-9:00-10:00
Landmark
Atlantic Plumbing Cinema
Thank You For Your Service (R)
807 V Street, NW
CC: (!) 11:20-2:10-5:00-7:40-10:20
Marshall (PG-13) 10:50-4:10
Suburbicon (R) CC: 3:05-10:15
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) (!) 10:401:40-4:40-7:40-10:35
12:10-2:35-5:00-7:30-10:00
Jigsaw (R) 11:00-1:30-4:05Marshall (PG-13) CC: 12:406:30-9:00
5:15-7:50
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 12:15- Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) 11:00-1:403:30-7:00-10:15
Blade of the Immortal (Mugen no 4:15-7:05-9:50
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) (!)
jûnin) (R) 12:25-3:25-6:50-9:50
4:05-10:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
12:00-1:00-2:30-3:45-5:00-7:15AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18
7:40-9:55-10:10
9811 Washingtonian Ctr.
Landmark E Street Cinema
Seven Sundays (NR) 11:40-1:25555 11th Street NW
4:25-7:25-10:20
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: 1:10- Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 8:40
4:10-7:10-9:30
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) CC: 6:00
The Square (R) CC: 1:45-5:00-8:15 The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC:
The Florida Project (R) CC: 1:05- 11:35-1:00-3:30
4:05-7:05-9:35
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: (!)
Novitiate (R) CC: 1:20-4:20-7:00-9:40 11:50-1:50-2:50-3:20-4:50-5:50Wonderstruck (PG) OC: 1:00-4:00- 6:20-7:50-8:50-9:20-10:50
7:00-9:30
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
The Killing of a Sacred Deer (R) 3D (PG-13) CC: (!) 12:20-2:205:20-8:20
CC: 1:15-4:15-7:15-9:45
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
Jane 12:45-3:00-5:15-7:30-9:45
Landmark West End Cinema 2:10-8:30
The Foreigner (R) CC: 11:30-5:45
2301 M Street NW
Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Jigsaw (R) CC: 12:25-2:45-5:107:35-9:55
Down The White House (PG-13)
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: 1:40CC: 2:15-4:45
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC: 4:40-7:15-9:50
LBJ (R) 11:50-2:35-5:15-7:40-10:05
2:00-4:30-7:05
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
Human Flow (PG-13) CC: 1:3011:45-2:15-4:45-7:10-9:35
4:25-7:20
Suburbicon (R) CC: 2:55-8:10
Royal Shakespeare Company:
Superstar (NR) 12:00-3:15Secret
Coriolanus 7:00
6:30-9:45
Medal of Honor Theater A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
NMMC
(!) 11:45-1:30-2:40-4:05-5:25-6:4018900 Jefferson Davis Highway
7:55-9:15-10:25
We, the Marines (NR) 10:00-11:00- Thank You For Your Service (R)
12:00-1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00
CC: 12:15-5:30
Regal Gallery Place
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Stadium 14
Halloween (PG-13) CC: 2:25-5:05701 Seventh Street NW
7:45-10:15
Geostorm (PG-13) 12:00-2:45-5:25- Thor: Ragnarok The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:208:05-10:45
4:20-7:20-10:20
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:00Let There Be Light (PG-13) 11:304:00-6:10-7:05-9:20
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital 2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
3D (PG-13) 1:00-3:10-10:20
AMC Loews
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:15-3:40St. Charles Town Ctr. 9
7:10-10:45
11115 Mall Circle
Jigsaw (R) 12:45-3:10-5:35-8:00- Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 7:30
10:45
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) CC:
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 1:30-4:10 11:15-2:00
Suburbicon (R) 10:10
The Price of Fame (La rancon de
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 12:00- la gloire) (NR) (!) 7:00
2:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: (!)
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea Hal- 10:30-1:30-4:30-6:45-7:30-10:30
loween (PG-13) 1:35-4:05-9:25
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital 3D
The Price of Fame 7:00
(PG-13) CC: (!) 10:00-11:45-12:30Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 7:00
1:00-3:30-4:00-7:00-9:15-10:00
Smithsonian - Lockheed Martin Jigsaw (R) CC: (!) 11:15-3:00-5:30IMAX Theater
8:00-10:30
601 Independence Avenue SW
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR) 11:30-2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
Suburbicon (R) CC: (!) 4:45-10:15
2:40
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: (!)
Thor: Ragnarok An IMAX 3D
11:45-2:30-5:15-7:45-10:15
Experience (PG-13) 7:00
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the Marshall (PG-13) CC: 4:00
Sea 3D (NR) 11:00-1:15-3:30
Thank You For Your Service (R)
Dream Big: Engineering Our World: CC: (!) 10:15-1:15-9:30
An IMAX 3D Experience 12:25
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 10:25- Halloween (PG-13) CC: 9:45-1:4511:50-2:05
4:15-6:30-9:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
12:30-7:00
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) CC: 3:40
C5
RE
weisen.”
Bell has been wearing different
hats lately: ambivalent conductor,
collaborator with a celebrity chef
and subject of a children’s book
turned musical work. But in this
recital, presented by Washington
Performing Arts, the star soloist
returned to surer ground, making
glorious sounds from his violin in
his favorite Romantic repertoire.
And some days, that is enough.
Some days, all one wants to do —
all one can do, really — is to take a
brief respite from reality and listen to some beautiful fiddle music
while the world burns.
style@washpost.com
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
11:30-12:30-2:00-3:00-4:30-5:307:00-8:00-9:30-10:30
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 1:15-4:10- Marshall (PG-13) CC: 1:25-4:106:55-9:40
6:45-9:25
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: 2:00- Thank You For Your Service (R)
CC: 1:00-4:05-6:40-9:15
3:30-5:00-6:30-8:00-9:30
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) CC: 1:35-4:203D (PG-13) CC: 3:00-6:00-9:00
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) 6:50-9:20
Let There Be Light (PG-13) CC:
CC: 4:15-9:35
11:00-1:45-4:15-6:45-9:10
The Snowman (R) CC: 3:45
The Foreigner (R) CC: 1:45-7:10
Landmark
Jigsaw (R) CC: 2:45-5:15-7:30Bethesda Row Cinema
10:00
7235 Woodmont Avenue
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
Faces, Places (Visages, villages)
1:20-6:35-9:10
(PG) 1:20-3:30-5:40-7:50-10:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought
2:15-4:45-7:15-9:45
Down The White House (PG-13)
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 1:10-4:05- CC: 4:40-10:05
6:50-9:40
The Square (R) CC: 1:10-4:20Thank You For Your Service (R)
7:10-9:30
CC: 1:30-7:05
Wonderstruck (PG) Open Caption:
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
1:00-4:10-7:00-9:55
Halloween (PG-13) CC: 2:30-4:30- Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
5:25-7:45-10:00-10:30
12:55-3:50-9:55
Thor: Ragnarok The IMAX 2D
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 12:50Experience (PG-13) CC: 1:00-4:00- 3:40-6:40
7:00-10:00
Novitiate (R) CC: 1:40-4:307:20-9:40
ArcLight Bethesda
Royal Shakespeare Company:
7101 Democracy Boulevard
Coriolanus 7:00
Geostorm (PG-13) 12:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:05-4:05- Suburbicon (R) CC: 1:50-6:50
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: 1:307:20-9:05
LBJ (R) CC: 11:20-1:45-3:25-4:50- 4:00-7:30-10:05
7:10-9:00
Old Greenbelt Theatre
Jigsaw (R) 11:05-2:30-5:35-8:15129 Centerway
10:20
Human Flow (PG-13) 7:45
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 11:05- Jane 5:15
1:10-2:50-4:00-5:15-6:15-7:45-9:30
Paragon Kentlands
Thank You For Your Service (R)
Stadium 10
11:35-2:20-5:50-7:40-10:25
629 Center Point Way
Marshall (PG-13) 11:10-1:20-3:00Geostorm
(PG-13)
12:25-2:50-5:155:25-7:50-10:15
7:40-10:10
The Killing of a Sacred Deer (R)
The
LEGO
Ninjago
Movie
(PG)
CC: 11:40-2:25-5:30-8:05-10:35
12:40-2:55-5:10
The Florida Project (R) 11:55-2:40Thor:
Ragnarok
(PG-13)
12:154:50-7:35-10:05
1:45-3:00-4:30-5:45-7:15-8:30Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:30-10:00 10:00
Suburbicon (R) 12:05-1:40-4:55- American Made (R) 11:55-2:207:30-10:10
4:50-7:20-9:50
Wonderstruck (PG) CC: 11:15Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-3:202:10-4:30-7:25-9:55
6:40-10:00
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 11:50It (R) 1:30-4:20-7:10-10:00
1:00-3:50-4:45-7:00-9:50
Only the Brave (PG-13) 1:20-4:10Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:007:00-9:50
5:00-8:00-10:45
Jigsaw (R) 11:50-1:50-3:50-5:50Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital 7:55-9:55
3D (PG-13) 4:15-7:15
Suburbicon (R) 7:25-9:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13)
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 12:3011:45-12:30-2:45-3:30-5:45-6:25- 2:50-5:10-7:30-9:55
8:30-9:15
Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
3899 Branch Avenue
3D (PG-13) 2:00
Thor:
Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:00Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
12:45-1:55-2:55-3:45-5:50-6:451020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
7:45-8:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:00Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
3:00-6:00-8:00
3D (PG-13) 4:50
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital Jigsaw (R) 12:50-3:00-5:30-8:00
3D (PG-13) 1:00-7:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 12:45Jigsaw (R) 11:50-2:30-4:50-7:30- 3:00-5:25-7:50
10:10
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea HalHappy Death Day (PG-13) 11:10- loween (PG-13) 2:00-4:30-7:30
1:30-4:10-6:40-9:30
Regal Bowie Stadium 14
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
15200 Major Lansdale Boulevard
Halloween (PG-13) 11:30-2:10Geostorm (PG-13) 1:25-4:204:40-7:10-9:50
7:20-10:20
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 4:00-10:00
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 2:153D (PG-13) 11:00-2:00-5:00-9:00 3:45-5:15-6:00-6:45-7:25-8:159:45-10:30
Thank You For Your Service (R)
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
11:20-2:20-5:10-7:50-10:20
3D (PG-13) 3:00-9:00
Bow Tie Harbour 9
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
2474 Solomons Island Road
3:10-6:10-9:10
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 10:40The Foreigner (R) 1:00-3:551:10-4:10-7:30-10:10
7:00-9:50
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 12:30- Jigsaw (R) 2:50-5:30-8:00-10:35
3:00-5:30-7:50-10:30
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 3:05Let There Be Light (PG-13) 10:30- 5:40-8:10-10:30
1:00-3:40-7:00-10:20
Suburbicon (R) 1:40-4:30
Geostorm (PG-13) 1:50-4:30-9:50 A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 2:30Only the Brave (PG-13) 1:20-9:30 5:10-7:50-10:25
Suburbicon (R) 11:20-2:00-4:40- Marshall (PG-13) 1:15-4:15-7:157:20-10:00
10:05
Goodbye Christopher Robin 10:50- Thank You For Your Service (R)
4:20-6:50
1:10-3:50-6:30-9:20
The Florida Project (R) 11:10-7:10 Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea HalA Bad Moms Christmas (R) 11:00- loween (PG-13) 2:45-10:15
1:30-4:00-6:30-9:00
A Question of Faith (PG) 1:20-4:05Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD 6:55-9:55
7000 Arundel Mills Circle
The Price of Fame 7:00
Seven Sundays (NR) 12:10Regal Cinemas Majestic
3:35-9:45
Stadium 20 & IMAX
Geostorm (PG-13) 11:25-2:05
900 Ellsworth Drive
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 8:40
Geostorm (PG-13) 12:30-3:35Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:30-2:05- 6:45-9:45
4:45-8:00-8:35
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:00Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital 3:05-6:15-9:15-10:55
3D (PG-13) XD: 4:00-10:20
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
The Snowman (R) 1:45
3D (PG-13) 8:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 5:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-6:55
The Foreigner (R) 11:05-1:55-4:40- The Foreigner (R) 12:45-6:35
7:25-10:10
Jigsaw (R) 12:45-3:20-5:55-8:30Jigsaw (R) 11:30-12:40-2:00-3:15- 11:00
5:45-8:15-9:30
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 3:00Happy Death Day (PG-13) 11:15- 5:40-8:20-10:50
4:05-9:45
Suburbicon (R) 3:25-9:40
Suburbicon (R) 7:15
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 12:00A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
2:40-5:20-8:00-10:40
11:45-1:00-2:20-3:40-4:55-6:15Marshall (PG-13) 4:05-10:45
7:30-8:50-10:10
Tragedy Girls (R) 12:10-2:35-5:20Thank You For Your Service
7:50-10:20
(R) 4:20
Thank You For Your Service (R)
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
12:10
Halloween (PG-13) 11:15-1:50Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
4:25-7:00-9:40
Halloween (PG-13) 1:10-4:00The Price of Fame 7:00
6:30-9:00
Seven Sundays (NR) 6:35
Thor: Ragnarok The IMAX 2D
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:30Experience (PG-13) 12:25-3:354:45-8:00
6:45-9:55
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:503D (PG-13) 10:55-5:20
1:55-3:55-5:00-7:00-10:05
Suburbicon (R) 1:40
Regal Germantown
Thank You For Your Service (R)
Stadium 14
10:55-10:20
20000 Century Boulevard
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:30Geostorm (PG-13) 1:00-3:452:05-2:45-3:30-6:00-8:35-10:00
6:30-9:15
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:003D (PG-13) 10:55-12:15-5:2012:45-2:30-3:15-5:30-6:15-7:006:45-9:15
8:30-9:15-10:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) XD:
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
12:40-7:10
3D (PG-13) 4:00-10:00
Hoyt's West Nursery
It (R) 2:30-5:45-9:00
Cinema 14
The Foreigner (R) 2:15-5:15-8:15
1591 West Nursery Road
Jigsaw (R) 12:15-2:45-5:30-8:00Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 1:15-4:00 10:30
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:45Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
11:00-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30- 3:15-5:45-8:15-10:45
6:30-7:30-8:30-9:25-10:25
Suburbicon (R) 2:15-10:45
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 2:003D (PG-13) CC: 5:30
4:45-7:30-10:15
The Snowman (R) CC: 1:50-4:45- Thank You For Your Service (R)
7:35-10:20
1:15-4:00-6:45-9:30
It (R) CC: 7:15-10:15
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
The Foreigner (R) CC: 11:00-1:40- Halloween (PG-13) 2:00-4:307:15-10:00
4:25-7:10-9:55
Jigsaw (R) CC: 11:15-12:45-3:10- The Price of Fame 7:00
5:25-7:50-10:10
Next Nuvve (NR) 12:00-4:00-8:00
Suburbicon (R) CC: 2:15-4:50PSV Garuda Vega (NR) 3:007:20-9:50
6:15-9:45
AMC Magic Johnson
Capital Center 12
800 Shoppers Way
Jigsaw (R) 11:45-2:30-5:20-7:5010:15
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 11:50Geostorm (PG-13) 12:30-3:152:45-5:30
6:00-8:45
Suburbicon (R) 5:10-10:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:00-1:30- A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
3:30-4:00-7:00-7:30-10:00-10:30
11:30-1:00-2:10-3:30-5:00-6:15Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital 7:45-9:00-10:20
3D (PG-13) 12:30-4:30-6:30-9:30 Ittefaq (NR) 12:15-3:00-6:00-8:50
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 2:00Marshall (PG-13) 2:20-7:40
6:00-9:45
Thank You For Your Service (R)
The Foreigner (R) 1:45-4:2012:40-3:20-6:00-8:45
7:00-9:45
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Jigsaw (R) 1:00-3:45-6:45-9:30
Halloween (PG-13) 11:20-1:50Happy Death Day (PG-13) 1:454:30-7:15-9:45
4:15-7:00-9:45
The Price of Fame 7:00
Suburbicon (R) 12:30-3:15-6:00Xscape Theatres
9:15
Brandywine 14
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
7710 Matapeake Business Drive
12:45-2:00-3:15-4:30-6:00-7:30Geostorm
(PG-13) CC: (!) 10:308:45-10:00
1:30-4:20-7:00-9:50
Marshall (PG-13) 2:00-5:00-8:00- Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: (!)
11:00
10:10-10:50-1:10-4:10-4:50-7:10Thank You For Your Service (R)
7:50-10:10
1:15-4:00-6:45-9:30
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
3D (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:50-10:50
Halloween (PG-13) 1:30-4:15The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
7:15-10:00
CC: 10:05-6:20
Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12 The Snowman (R) CC: (!) 3:10
14716 Baltimore Avenue
The Foreigner (R) Open Caption;
Geostorm (PG-13) 11:50-2:45CC: 9:50-3:40
6:00-8:30
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:1512:40-5:40-8:20-11:10
1:15-2:45-4:15-6:30-7:00-7:30Suburbicon (R) CC: 12:50-9:00
9:30-10:30
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 11:50-3:20Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital 6:10-9:10
3D (PG-13) 11:30-12:45-3:40-3:45- Thank You For Your Service (R)
6:45-9:45-10:15
CC: 11:40-3:00-6:40-9:45
The Mountain Between Us (PG- Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: (!)
13) 9:55
11:30-12:30-2:30-3:30-5:30-6:30The Foreigner (R) 1:55-4:35-7:10 8:30-9:30
Jigsaw (R) 11:35-3:00-5:30-8:05- Jigsaw (R) CC: (!) 12:20-2:50-5:2010:30
8:00-11:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 1:30A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: (!)
4:30-6:55-9:45
10:00-10:40-1:00-1:40-3:50-4:40Suburbicon (R) 12:00-2:45-5:30- 6:50-7:30-9:50-10:30
8:00
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 11:45- Halloween (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:202:30-5:15-8:00-10:35
11:20-12:10-2:00-2:40-4:30-5:10Thank You For Your Service (R)
7:20-8:10-10:00-10:40
1:05-3:50-7:20-10:25
iPic Pike & Rose
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
11830 Grand Park Avenue
Halloween (PG-13) 12:30-3:00Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) (!) 11:455:45-8:15-10:35
12:00-12:30-3:00-3:30-4:00-6:30Regal Rockville Center
7:00-7:30-10:00-10:30-11:00
Stadium 13
Jigsaw (R) 2:00-5:00-8:00-11:15
199 East Montgomery Avenue
Suburbicon (R) (!) 11:45-6:15
Geostorm (PG-13) 1:00-4:00-9:30 A Bad Moms Christmas (R) (!)
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
1:15-4:15-4:45-7:15-7:45-10:101:30-4:15-7:00-9:45
10:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:00Marshall (PG-13) 12:15-3:301:00-2:45-3:15-3:45-4:15-6:006:45-10:20
6:30-7:30-9:00-9:30-10:00-10:30
Okja (!) 1:45
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea Hal3D (PG-13) 12:30-7:00
loween (PG-13) 3:00-9:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-2:306:15-10:00
The Foreigner (R) 12:30-3:15-9:15
AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
Jigsaw (R) 12:00-2:45-5:15-7:452150 Clarendon Blvd.
10:15
A Silent Voice: The Movie (Koe no Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 4:30-10:15
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: 1:00katachi) (NR) 6:45
Suburbicon (R) 12:00-2:30-5:00- 4:00-7:00-9:00-10:00
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
7:45-10:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 12:00- 3D (PG-13) CC: 2:30-3:00-5:306:00-8:30
1:15-4:00-6:45-10:00
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
Thank You For Your Service (R)
CC: 3:40-9:15
1:00-4:00-7:15-10:00
Only the Brave (PG-13) CC:
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
1:30-7:15
Halloween (PG-13) 12:00-3:45Jigsaw (R) CC: 2:15-4:45-7:15-9:30
7:00-9:30
Suburbicon (R) CC: 1:10-6:45
The Price of Fame 7:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
Regal Waugh Chapel
2:45-5:15-7:45-10:15
Stadium 12 & IMAX
Thank You For Your Service (R)
1419 South Main Chapel Way
CC:
2:30-5:00-7:40-10:10
Geostorm (PG-13) 7:35-10:10
AMC Hoffman Center 22
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:00206 Swamp Fox Rd.
1:30-3:30-4:30-6:00-7:30-9:3010:30
Seven Sundays (NR) 12:45-3:45Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital 6:45-9:40
3D (PG-13) 12:30-3:00-6:30-9:00 Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 11:40-2:25Thor: Ragnarok An IMAX 3D
5:00-7:40-10:20
Experience (PG-13) 4:00-10:00
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC:
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
12:15-2:45-5:15
12:15-2:45
The Price of Fame (La rancon de
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:25-4:00- la gloire) (NR) 7:00
6:00-9:35
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: 10:45Jigsaw (R) 12:40-3:00-5:20-7:40- 2:00-5:15-8:30
10:15
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:10- 3D (PG-13) CC: 1:15-4:30-7:45
2:30-4:50-7:10-9:40
Thor: Ragnarok An IMAX 3D
Suburbicon (R) 1:40-4:40-7:20Experience (PG-13) CC: 11:3010:05
2:45-6:15-9:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 12:05- American Made (R) CC: 12:152:35-5:10-7:45-10:20
3:25-6:20-9:15
Thank You For Your Service (R)
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
1:00-3:40-10:30
CC: 12:30-3:50-6:55-10:00
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
The Snowman (R) CC: 9:50
Halloween (PG-13) 1:10-3:45Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 11:106:15-9:00
2:40-6:10-9:40
Thor: Ragnarok The IMAX 2D
It (R) CC: 8:00
Experience (PG-13) 1:00-7:00
Only the Brave (PG-13) CC:
3:00-10:05
Regal Westview
The Foreigner (R) CC: 11:35-2:15Stadium 16 & IMAX
5:10-7:50-10:25
5243 Buckeystown Pike
Geostorm (PG-13) 12:15-3:00-5:45- Jigsaw (R) CC: 1:00-3:20-5:408:00-10:30
8:30-11:15
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) 3:15 LBJ (R) 11:45-2:15-4:45-7:15-9:45
All I See Is You (R) CC: 12:20
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:00Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
12:30-1:30-2:00-3:30-5:00-6:301:00-3:20-6:00-9:00
7:30-8:00-9:30-11:00
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital Suburbicon (R) CC: 11:15-1:454:20-7:15
3D (PG-13) 4:30-10:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
Thor: Ragnarok An IMAX 3D
11:00-12:00-1:30-2:30-4:00-5:00Experience (PG-13) 4:00-10:00
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) 6:30-7:30-9:00-10:00
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 11:05-2:051:00-7:00
4:50-7:40-10:25
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:30Thank You For Your Service (R)
6:00-9:45
CC: 11:20-2:00-4:40-7:25-10:15
It (R) 12:45-4:00-7:15-10:45
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:00-3:30- Suh-Suh Pyoung, Slowly and
Peacefully 12:40-2:50-5:056:45-10:00
Jigsaw (R) 12:30-3:00-5:30-8:00- 7:20-9:35
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
10:30
LBJ (R) 12:15-2:45-5:15-7:45-10:15 Halloween (PG-13) CC: 10:50-1:30Happy Death Day (PG-13) 11:15- 4:00-6:30-9:10
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:301:45-4:15-6:45-9:15
3:45-7:00-10:15
Suburbicon (R) 4:15-10:15
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
AMC Potomac Mills 18
12:00-1:15-2:45-4:30-5:30-7:152700 Potomac Mills Circle
8:15-9:45-11:00
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 12:30-3:20Thank You For Your Service (R)
6:10-9:00
11:15-2:15-5:15-8:30-11:15
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC:
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
11:00-1:30-4:00
Halloween (PG-13) 1:15-3:45Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: 11:456:15-9:00
12:30-12:45-3:30-4:00-6:30-9:30
Thor: Ragnarok The IMAX 2D
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
Experience (PG-13) 1:00-7:00
3D (PG-13) 3:00-6:00-7:00-9:0010:00
UA Snowden Square
Stadium 14
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
9161 Commerce Center Drive
CC: 6:35-9:15
Thor: Ragnarok An IMAX 3D
Geostorm (PG-13) 3:30-9:15
Experience (PG-13) CC: 11:00Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:1512:00-12:30-1:00-1:30-3:15-4:15- 2:00-5:00-8:00
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
4:45-6:30-7:00-7:30-7:45-9:30CC: 2:40-8:40
10:30-10:45
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
CC: 2:00-4:35
3D (PG-13) 3:45-10:00
The Snowman (R) CC: 12:00
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
11:15-1:45-4:15
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 8:10-10:10 11:25-6:00
The Foreigner (R) 12:45-6:15
It (R) CC: 10:20
Regal Hyattsville Royale
Stadium 14
6505 America Blvd.
VIRGINIA
Only the Brave (PG-13) CC:
3:00-9:40
The Foreigner (R) CC: 11:20-2:054:50-7:40
Jigsaw (R) CC: 12:45-3:05-5:308:00-10:25
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
2:50-5:15-7:35-10:00
Suburbicon (R) CC: 11:25-7:109:45
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
11:30-12:40-2:10-3:10-4:45-5:407:35-8:10-10:15-10:40
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 11:50-5:50
Thank You For Your Service (R)
CC: 11:35-2:10-5:10-7:50-10:30
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) CC: 11:15-1:504:20-6:50-9:20
Let There Be Light (PG-13) 11:402:15-5:05-7:30-10:05
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:15-4:307:45-10:45
Bow Tie
Reston Town Center 11 & BTX
11940 Market Street
Geostorm (PG-13) 11:10-2:10-5:108:10-10:55
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:501:40-2:20-4:40-6:00-9:00-10:40
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 1:00-10:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 10:25-5:20
Only the Brave (PG-13) 2:50-9:10
The Foreigner (R) 2:00-5:00-10:50
LBJ (R) 10:10-1:10-4:10-7:10-9:50
Suburbicon (R) 10:30-1:30-4:307:30-10:30
Let There Be Light (PG-13) 10:501:50-4:50-7:50-10:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:004:00-7:00
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 10:40-7:40
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 10:2011:20-1:20-4:20-7:20-8:20-10:10
Thank You For Your Service (R)
11:20-2:30-5:30-8:05-10:35
CHRIS LEE
Joshua Bell performed at the
Music Center at Strathmore on
Sunday afternoon.
Tuesday, November 7, 2017
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
Regal Countryside
Stadium 20
45980 Regal Plaza
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
12:00-2:35-5:15-8:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:4512:45-2:45-6:00-7:00-9:15
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 4:00-10:25
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
1:00-3:45-6:30-9:20
American Made (R) 11:00-1:454:50-7:50-10:30
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
12:30-3:05-5:45
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:05-2:506:20-9:50
Battlecreek (R) 11:30-2:15-5:057:45
Golmaal Again (NR) 11:35-3:206:45-10:00
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 12:353:25-6:05-9:05
LBJ (R) 11:25-2:05-4:45-7:30-10:00
AMC Shirlington 7
2772 South Randolph St.
Secret Superstar (NR) 11:20-2:20Cinema Arts Theatre
5:30-8:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: (!)
9650 Main St
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 1:304:20-10:10
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC: 4:00-6:45-9:15
2:25-7:40
Judwaa 2 (NR) 9:00
3D (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:30-7:15
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: (!) 9:30 Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: 9:50- Ittefaq (NR) 12:20-2:40-5:00-7:25
Raja The Great (NR) 11:50-3:15Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: 1:35- 12:10-2:30-7:20-9:35
Suburbicon (R) CC: 2:10-8:00
6:15-9:30
4:15-7:00-9:30
The Square (R) CC: 10:00-1:00Mersal (NR) 11:10-2:30-5:50-9:35
Suburbicon (R) CC: (!) 4:00-6:45
4:00-7:10-9:55
Vunnadhi
Okate Zindagi (Unnadi
Novitiate (R) CC: (!) 2:00-4:45Goodbye Christopher Robin CC:
Okate Zindagi) (NR) 12:05-3:407:35-10:20
9:45-12:10-4:55
6:50-9:55
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
Faces, Places (Visages, villages) Next Nuvve (NR) 9:45
1:45-4:15-7:00-10:25
(PG) CC: 12:05-4:15-6:15-10:05
Wonderstruck (PG) CC: (!)
PSV Garuda Vega (NR) 12:55-3:55The Florida Project (R) CC: 9:45- 6:55-9:55
1:10-9:30
The Florida Project (R) 1:30-4:25- 12:00-2:35-5:00-7:30-9:45
Sardar Mohammad (NR) 12:15Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought 3:30-6:35-9:40
7:15-10:00
Goodbye Christopher Robin 4:15 Down The White House (PG-13) Next Nuvve (NR) 12:50-4:30-8:15
CC:
5:05-10:00
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC:
Regal Dulles Town Center 10
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 10:051:00-7:00
21100 Dulles Town Circle
12:20-2:20-4:35-7:00-9:15
AMC Tysons Corner 16
Geostorm (PG-13) 12:45-2:30-5:30Cobb
Village
12
Leesburg
7850e Tysons Corner Center
8:15-10:50
1600 Village Market Boulevard
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 10:45-1:30Geostorm (PG-13) 11:45-2:15-4:55 Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:004:25-7:05
1:00-2:00-4:00-5:00-6:00-7:00Blade
Runner 2049 (R) 7:30
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC:
8:00-10:00-11:00
Jigsaw (R) 12:10-2:50-5:20-7:40
10:20-1:05
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
The Price of Fame (La rancon de Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:20- 3D (PG-13) 10:00-11:30-12:002:40-5:10-7:50
la gloire) (NR) (!) 7:00
3:00-9:00
Suburbicon (R) 12:05-5:15
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: (!)
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:4010:35-12:20-1:35-3:25-4:35-6:25- A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 11:20- 3:15-6:45
2:00-2:45-4:30-7:15-8:00
7:35-9:25
It (R) 10:15
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital Thank You For Your Service (R)
Jigsaw (R) 10:15-3:30-5:45-8:303D (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:40-2:50-5:50- 11:50-2:20-5:00-7:35
10:45
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
8:50-10:35
Suburbicon (R) 11:10-1:45-4:30Halloween
(PG-13)
12:00-2:25Thor: Ragnarok An IMAX 3D
7:30-10:30
Experience (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:00- 4:50-7:25
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 12:15Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:301:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
2:45-5:15-7:45-10:20
American Made (R) CC: 10:10-4:10 12:15-1:00-1:45-2:30-3:15-4:00Thank You For Your Service (R)
4:45-6:15-7:00-7:45
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
10:45-1:30-4:15-7:15-10:10
The Price of Fame 7:00
CC: 12:55-9:15
Let There Be Light (PG-13) 11:40- Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Halloween (PG-13) 10:30-1:152:10-4:40-7:20
CC: 10:15-10:40-1:15
3:45-6:15-8:45
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 3:35- Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:00-7:00
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
Regal
7:20-10:50
4:00
3D
(PG-13)
Fairfax Towne Center 10
It (R) CC: 9:55
4110 West Ox Road
Manassas 4 Cinemas
Only the Brave (PG-13) CC: 9:35
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
8890 Mathis Ave.
The Foreigner (R) CC: 10:25-1:10A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 2:05- 1:10-3:55
4:15-6:55-9:40
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:50Jigsaw (R) CC: 10:00-12:50-3:10- 4:10-6:25-8:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 2:10-2:40- 3:10-7:15
5:30-7:55-10:15
The Foreigner (R) 6:55-9:40
4:50-5:20-7:30-8:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
10:10-12:35-3:00-5:35-8:20-10:45 Let There Be Light (PG-13) 2:00- LBJ (R) 12:00-2:30-5:00-7:35-10:10
Suburbicon (R) 4:40-10:20
4:00-6:00-8:00
Suburbicon (R) CC: 2:35-7:50
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: (!) Rave Cinemas Centreville 12 A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
12:10-1:40-2:40-4:10-5:10-7:0010:05-11:15-12:40-1:50-3:20-4:406201 Multiplex Drive
7:45-9:40-10:20
5:55-7:15-8:25-9:50-10:55
Geostorm (PG-13) 10:20-4:25Wonderstruck (PG) 12:30-1:30Marshall (PG-13) CC: 4:05
10:05
3:30-6:30-7:25-9:20
Thank You For Your Service (R)
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:00Thank You For Your Service (R)
CC: 5:10-10:25
12:00-1:05-3:05-4:10-6:20-7:0012:20-4:30-10:50
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
7:15-10:20
Halloween (PG-13) CC: 10:50-1:25- Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
4:20-6:50-9:20
3D (PG-13) 11:00-2:05-5:10-8:15- Halloween (PG-13) 12:40-3:105:40-8:10-10:40
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) (!) 11:05- 9:25
The Price of Fame 7:00
2:05-5:05-8:05-11:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:55
Jigsaw (R) 10:10-12:35-2:55-5:30- The Fortress (nam-han-sanAMC Worldgate 9
seong) (NR) 9:45
7:55-10:50
13025 Worldgate Drive
Let There Be Light (PG-13) 12:05Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 1:55-7:15 Golmaal Again (NR) 11:55-6:50
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 10:05- 2:45-5:20-8:00-10:35
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) CC:
12:40-3:10-5:35-8:00-10:45
Regal Fox Stadium 16 & IMAX
4:35-9:55
Suburbicon (R) 11:35-5:00-10:30
22875 Brambleton Plaza
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: (!)
Secret
Superstar
(NR)
3:15-10:15
Despicable Me 3 (PG) 11:00-1:001:00-3:30-4:00-7:00-9:35-10:00
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 11:45- 3:30-6:00-8:15-10:30
2:20-4:50-7:20-10:05
Geostorm (PG-13) 12:15-3:003D (PG-13) CC: (!) 12:30-6:35
5:45-8:30
American Made (R) CC: 12:45-6:30 Ittefaq (NR) 11:20-1:50-4:45The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 3:05- 7:35-10:35
Thank You For Your Service (R)
11:30-2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
6:45-10:15
2:25-7:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:00The Foreigner (R) CC: 3:45-9:15
11:30-1:00-2:45-4:15-6:00-7:30Jigsaw (R) CC: (!) 12:05-2:25-4:45- Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) 11:30-2:009:15-10:45
7:25-9:50
4:30-7:00-9:30
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: (!)
Next Nuvve (NR) 12:15-6:45
3D (PG-13) 4:45-8:00
12:15-2:45-5:15-7:45-10:15
PSV Garuda Vega (NR) 3:30-10:00 Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Rave Cinemas
12:00-3:15-6:30-9:45
Halloween (PG-13) CC: 12:50-3:35Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme Thor: Ragnarok An IMAX 3D
6:15-9:05
11900 Palace Way
Experience (PG-13) 3:45-10:15
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) (!) 12:00-3:00-6:00-9:00 Geostorm (PG-13) 11:30-2:15-5:00- My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
7:35-10:10
11:00-1:45
Alamo Drafthouse Cinema Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:40Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:45-3:15One Loudoun
2:40-5:20-8:40-11:45
6:45-10:15
20575 East Hampton Plaza
Thor:
Ragnarok
in
Disney
Digital
Jigsaw (R) 12:15-2:45-5:15-7:45The Shining (R) 7:30
3D (PG-13) XD: 9:30-4:05-11:15
10:15
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:25Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 12:4512:00-12:30-1:00
9:45-12:55-4:10-7:10-10:15
4:00-7:15-10:30
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital It (R) 10:15-4:15-10:20
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 11:453D (PG-13) 11:15AM
Jigsaw (R) 9:55-10:50-12:152:15-4:45-7:30-10:00
Suburbicon (R) 11:40AM
1:15-2:35-3:35-4:45-6:25-8:45Suburbicon (R) 1:15-3:45-6:15-8:45
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 10:50- 10:05-11:05
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
12:45-1:40
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 1:30-7:25 11:45-1:15-2:30-4:00-5:15-6:45Thank You For Your Service (R)
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 9:358:00-9:30-10:45
12:15
12:00-2:25-4:50-7:15-9:50
Thank You For Your Service (R)
Rebel Without a Cause (PG-13)
Suburbicon (R) 12:25-5:30-10:35 2:15-5:00-7:45-10:30
8:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 9:40Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 2:00-2:30- 10:30-12:10-1:10-2:45-3:40-5:10- Thor: Ragnarok The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 12:30-7:00
4:00-4:50-5:30-8:20-9:40
6:20-7:55-8:50-10:45-11:30
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital Thank You For Your Service (R)
Regal Kingstowne
3D (PG-13) 6:00
Stadium 16 & RPX
9:50-2:55-8:05
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 2:45-9:50 Next Nuvve (NR) 11:25-6:10
5910 Kingstowne Towne Center
Suburbicon (R) 6:40
PSV Garuda Vega (NR) 2:50-9:35 Geostorm (PG-13) 12:20-3:30A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 3:45- Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) XD: 10:00- 6:25-9:20
5:00-6:40-9:00-9:20
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:30-7:00
12:40-1:20-4:40-7:20-8:00-10:40
Thank You For Your Service (R)
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
3:10-6:20-9:25
3D (PG-13) 11:20-2:00-6:05-9:20 3D (PG-13) 3:45-10:20
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 3:30Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:40Regal Ballston Common
7:00-10:30
4:30-8:00
Stadium 12
The Foreigner (R) 12:05-2:50Angelika Film Center Mosaic
671 N. Glebe Road
2911 District Ave
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:00-1:45- 5:40-8:30
Jigsaw (R) 12:20-1:50-3:00-4:25A Bad Moms Christmas (R) (!)
4:15-5:15-6:45-7:30-8:30-10:25
11:30-2:00-4:30-7:30-10:30
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital 5:30-6:55-8:00-9:30-10:30
The Square (R) (!) 10:40-1:40-4:40- 3D (PG-13) 12:30-2:45-3:30-6:00- Golmaal Again (NR) 9:00
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 12:107:45-10:45
9:15-10:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:00Blade Runner 2049 (R) 2:30-6:30 3:15-6:00
Suburbicon (R) 12:15-3:00-5:407:00-10:00
Battlecreek (R) 2:25-7:35
8:15
Novitiate (R) (!) 11:20-2:15-5:05- It (R) 10:15
8:00-10:40
Jigsaw (R) 12:45-3:10-5:35-8:00- A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
12:15-1:15-2:40-4:00-5:20-6:45Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:45-3:10- 10:25
8:00-9:40-10:40
7:15-10:45
LBJ (R) 1:15-4:00-7:15-9:45
Ittefaq (NR) 1:05-3:40-6:10-8:50
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 10:05Suburbicon (R) 5:00-10:05
12:35-2:55-5:25-7:55
Thank You For Your Service (R)
Secret Superstar (NR) 2:201:40-4:40-7:15-10:05
Wonderstruck (PG) 10:00-5:20
6:15-9:50
The Killing of a Sacred Deer (R) (!) A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 2:00- Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
10:45-1:30-4:15-7:20-10:10
Halloween (PG-13) 12:00-2:304:30-7:00-9:30
5:00-7:30-10:00
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital Thank You For Your Service (R)
3D (PG-13) 10:00-4:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:15-1:501:20-4:05-7:10-10:10
4:30-5:10-7:45-8:30-9:50
The Florida Project (R) 2:50Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
7:50-10:20
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
Halloween (PG-13) 1:30-4:45Suburbicon (R) (!) 12:30-10:20
7:20-9:55
3D (PG-13) 12:00-3:05-6:30
Regal Manassas
Stadium 14 & IMAX
11380 Bulloch Drive
Geostorm (PG-13) 1:30-4:307:15-9:50
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:001:45-2:30-4:45-5:30-6:15-7:458:30-10:45
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 3:15-9:15
Thor: Ragnarok An IMAX 3D
Experience (PG-13) 4:00-10:00
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
11:30-4:20-6:50-9:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:45-3:106:45-10:15
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:30-3:306:30-9:40
The Foreigner (R) 1:10-4:107:20-10:20
Jigsaw (R) 11:50-2:20-5:10-7:5010:40
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:503:20-5:50-8:10-10:50
Suburbicon (R) 12:15-2:45
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 12:102:40-5:20-8:00-10:30
Thank You For Your Service (R)
11:30-2:10-4:50-7:30-10:10
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) 11:40-1:205:40-8:15-11:00
Thor: Ragnarok The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 1:00-7:00
Regal Potomac Yard
Stadium 16
3575 Potomac Avenue
Geostorm (PG-13) 1:05-3:55-9:40
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
1:15-3:50-6:30-9:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:0012:30-3:00-3:40-4:20-6:10-6:509:20-10:00
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 1:10-7:30-10:30
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
12:15-3:25-6:35-9:55
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
12:00-3:30-6:30-9:40
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-2:306:00-9:45
Battlecreek (R) 12:00-2:25-4:507:20-9:45
The Foreigner (R) 12:20-6:00
Jigsaw (R) 12:15-2:45-5:15-7:5010:15
Suburbicon (R) 3:15-8:55
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
12:05-2:00-2:40-4:35-5:20-7:158:00-9:50-10:30
Marshall (PG-13) 12:40-3:356:25-9:25
Thank You For Your Service (R)
12:10-2:45-5:20-7:55-10:30
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) 12:00-2:305:05-7:45-10:15
The Price of Fame 7:00
Regal
Springfield Town Center 12
6500 Springfield Town Center
Geostorm (PG-13) 12:40-3:306:20-9:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:2012:20-12:50-2:40-3:40-4:10-6:007:00-9:10-10:20
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 11:50-3:10-6:30-7:309:40-10:50
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 3:20-10:00
The Foreigner (R) 12:10-7:10
Jigsaw (R) 12:30-3:00-5:30-8:0010:30
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 1:204:00-6:40-9:20
Suburbicon (R) 12:00-2:30-5:208:10-11:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 1:304:30-7:40-10:40
Thank You For Your Service (R)
11:05-1:50-4:40-7:20-10:10
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) 11:10-1:404:20-6:50-9:30
Regal Virginia Gateway
Stadium 14 & RPX
8001 Gateway Promenade Place
Geostorm (PG-13) 10:10-12:503:45-6:40-9:30
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
12:15-1:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:005:00-8:00
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 2:00-11:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:30-6:15
Only the Brave (PG-13) 10:15-1:154:15-7:20-10:20
The Foreigner (R) 3:30-9:50
Jigsaw (R) 11:15-2:45-4:30-5:307:10-8:10-9:40-10:40
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 10:451:40-4:10-6:45-9:10
Suburbicon (R) 10:05-1:30-4:507:30-10:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 11:4512:45-2:15-3:15-4:45-5:45-7:158:15-9:45-10:45
Thank You For Your Service (R)
10:20-1:10-3:50-6:30-9:15
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) 11:20-2:305:15-7:45-10:15
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13)
10:30-12:00-1:00-3:00-4:00-6:007:00-9:00
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 10:00-10:00
Smithsonian - Airbus
IMAX Theater
14390 Air and Space Museum Parkway
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
11:10AM
Thor: Ragnarok An IMAX 3D
Experience (PG-13) 4:20-9:40
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 12:35
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
Sea 3D (NR) 10:20-1:30-3:10
Dream Big: Engineering Our
World: An IMAX 3D Experience
2:20
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 12:00
Thor: Ragnarok The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 7:00
University Mall Theatre
10659 Braddock Road
Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC: 12:202:35-4:35
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC:
12:00-2:15-4:30
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
CC: 7:30-9:50
American Made (R) CC: 7:15-9:35
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
CC: 7:00-9:45
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 12:102:20-4:20
The Rocky Horror Picture Show
(R) Please Call
C6
EZ
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
PICKLES
. TUESDAY,
NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
BOTH SIDES VULNERABLE
NORTH
QJ98
Q98
A 10 9 3 2
2
EAST (D)
K652
4
K64
K9654
WEST
74
A K J 10 7 6 5 3
J
87
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH
A 10 3
2
Q875
A Q J 10 3
The bidding:
EAST
SOUTH
WEST
Pass
1
4
Pass
4 NT
Pass
All Pass
Opening lead — K
NORTH
Dbl
5
CLASSIC PEANUTS
CHARLES SCHULZ
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
N
ear the end of the
Spingold final, Diamond
(Platnick-Brogeland-Lindqvist)
had cut into the big lead
held by Lavazza. At one table
in today’s deal, South for
Lavazza opened one club,
and West bid four hearts. All
passed, and West went down
two. Lavazza was plus 200.
In the replay, South for
Diamond opened one diamond (as his system dictated). West bid four hearts
again, but North doubled.
Apparently, the double’s
meaning was ambiguous
since South took out to 4NT,
asking his partner to choose
a minor suit.
Against five diamonds,
West cashed a heart and
shifted to a spade. Dummy’s
queen won, and South led
a club to his queen and a
trump to dummy’s ace. He
could lead a spade to his
10, take the black aces and
crossruff for plus 600.
At the first table, North’s
pass to four hearts was
timid. If West plays at
four hearts doubled, best
defense nets plus 800, and
Lavazza gains five IMPs.
As it was, they lost nine ...
and Diamond trailed by only
three!
Tomorrow: last deal.
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
LIO
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
K6524
K64K9654
Your partner opens one
heart, you bid one spade and
he rebids two hearts. The
opponents pass. What do
you say?
ANSWER: Partner has six
BLONDIE
or more hearts (he would
never be obliged to rebid a
five-card suit here), but since
his values are minimum, your
chances for game are nil.
Pass. Your hand is too weak
to try for game by bidding
2NT and wouldn’t merit that
call even if you had a point
more.
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2017, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
MUTTS
EZ
PATRICK McDONNELL
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
C7
RE
ZITS
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
BIRTHDAY | NOVEMBER 7
This year you impress
others by being
exceptionally intuitive.
This gift will come
forward more and more. You
find that you become more
in tune with your energy as
well. If you are single, you
attract many admirers. You
could meet Mr. or Ms. Right
this year, but don’t commit
unless you are 100 percent
sure of this bond. If you are
attached, you seem to bring
joy to your significant other,
yet sometimes he or she
could become frustrated,
as you often seem distant.
Plan a special vacation
together. Cancer feeds your
imagination.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
Emotions run high, and
people could have difficulty
understanding where you
are coming from. One-on-one
relating might be the most
effective way of helping others
hear what you’re trying to say.
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
You might be tired of saying
the same thing over and
over again. Know that
your message is getting
through, even if others don’t
acknowledge it. Remain caring
and upbeat.
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
BARNEY AND CLYDE
WEINGARTENS & CLARK
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
Be aware of your fiscal
responsibility in a joint
business or entertainment
venture. Make sure that you
and the other party are on
the same page; otherwise,
the agreement might fall to
the wayside and cause a
problem that could have been
prevented.
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
Reach out to someone at a
distance who cares about you.
You might need to do some
reflecting before you make the
call, especially if you are going
to make a proposition of sorts.
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
Step back and try to bypass
the momentary hassles and
demands of the day. If you
have a project or a matter that
you can deal with solo, do just
that. The fewer interactions
you have — except with,
perhaps, your roommates or
relatives — the better.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
You might believe that
your hands are too full to
successfully carry out an
important meeting. You are
heading down the winning
path, even if you have a bout
of insecurity.
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
Tension builds, which adds
to your stress level. You can’t
deny what is happening and
that you need to take a stand.
You might feel as if you need to
spend more money in order to
make a deal happen or handle
an important issue.
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
Venus moves into your sign
and gives you even more
allure. If you have a vision for
the long term, start heading
down the appropriate path.
You have the ability to see the
big picture.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
Someone comes forward with
an offer that seems too good
to be true. Don’t hold in your
feelings, as they probably
are right-on. You could be
uncomfortable with a decision
you made at work that involves
a key person.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
Others seem determined
to get together with you.
Hopefully you have the time to
handle the many requests that
come your way. Choose which
invitation you’d like to accept
by considering the company.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
Your sunny personality
emerges, and you feel much
better than you have in a
while. A boss lets you know
how impressed he or she
is with your behavior and
choices.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
You might be concerned about
a personal matter that keeps
emerging. You seem to keep
thinking about someone at a
distance. You often imagine
what this person is doing. If
you’re learning a new belief
system, you will detach.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2017, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
C8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
kidspost
CHIP SAYS
TODAY
KIDSPOST.COM
Amblyopia is the most common cause of vision
problems for kids. A widely used treatment is
putting a patch over the stronger eye and forcing
the weaker eye to strengthen.
It might not be raining yet, but
there’s a high chance that it will by
late afternoon. Take an umbrella.
Find more stories on current
events, history, science,
arts, books and sports
on our website.
ILLUSTRATION BY EZRA LEE, 7, ARLINGTON
One pair of twins and many pairs of glasses
BY
TOD AY ’ S NE WS
H AU C HU
A
diagnosis of a scary-sounding
disorder at a young age can
cause fear and panic, but for a
pair of twins, it inspired them
to help others.
Matthew Denchfield, 12, of Potomac
was diagnosed at age 4 with amblyopia
(pronounced am-blee-OH-pea-uh), also
known as lazy eye. The disorder causes a
miscommunication between the brain
and the eyes, resulting in decreased vision
in one eye. Symptoms are sometimes noticeable: One eye can wander off-center.
But other people don’t show any obvious
symptoms.
Matthew’s amblyopia was so severe
that he was found to be legally blind after a
routine vision screening at his school.
Matthew followed a treatment plan to
correct his vision to near-perfect while
wearing glasses. After that experience, he
and his family wanted to help other kids in
need of vision care.
“I was lucky that my parents could
afford to buy glasses and treatment because most people don’t have that ability,”
Matthew said.
Matthew and his twin sister, Madison,
set out to work with the Prevention of
Blindness Society of Metropolitan Washington (POB).
POB performed the vision screening at
Matthew’s school and provides free services
in many other Washington-area schools.
Vision problems often must be spotted
and corrected early in life — otherwise the
damage can last a lifetime.
The twins decided to create a simple
project: a donation box where people of all
ages could drop off their old or unwanted
glasses.
What started as a small box in their
father’s office has turned into a network of
boxes in Washington-area schools and
businesses. The program is estimated to
have collected more than 700 pairs of
glasses in the past nine months, according
to the POB.
“The two of them, good and bad, are
SEAN GALLUP/GETTY IMAGES
“Climate Planet,” an art exhibit and
film venue in the shape of a giant
globe, overlooks the conference.
Climate talks feature
urgent call to action
able to play basketball and run track well
enough without the proper eyewear, but
in school he was having trouble reading
and seeing the whiteboard.
Weldon had been wearing glasses with
too weak a prescription before POB
screened him. The organization provided
a proper pair of lenses, and it has made all
the difference.
“I thought my vision in my old glasses
was pretty good, but I wasn’t able to
realize I could see better with better glasses,” Weldon said. “Once I had [the new
glasses], I was very satisfied and very
thankful that the school had this program
because they were very good and very
kind throughout the process.”
Fiji’s prime minister called for a
sense of urgency in the fight against
global warming Monday, telling negotiators at climate change talks in
Bonn, Germany, that “we must not fail
our people.”
The talks are the first major global
climate conference since President
Trump announced that the United
States will pull out of the 2015 Paris
accord unless he can get a better deal.
Negotiators will focus on working
out details of the Paris accord, which
aims to limit global warming to 2.7 degrees Fahrenheit above the planet’s
temperature in “pre-industrial times”
(generally 1850-1900).
“The need for urgency is obvious,”
said Fiji Prime Minister Voreqe
“Frank” Bainimarama, the meeting’s
chairman. “Our world is in distress
from the extreme weather events
caused by climate change.”
Diplomat Trigg Talley said that the U.S.
position hasn’t changed since Trump’s
announcement but that the nation will
“continue to participate in international
climate change negotiations.”
Diplomats from 195 nations, as well
as scientists, lobbyists and environmentalists, are attending the talks.
kidspost@washpost.com
— Associated Press
NICK FARANO/PREVENTION OF BLINDNESS SOCIETY OF METROPOLITAN WASHINGTON
Madison and Matthew
Denchfield, whose program has
collected more than 700 pairs
of glasses for those in need.
You can help
To find out where you can donate a
pair of glasses, visit youreyes.org/
services/eyeglasses-needy/
eyeglasses-recycling.
unstoppable when they have their minds
set up,” said Heather Denchfield, Matthew
and Madison’s mom.
“Even when we were talking about
[deciding] the number of boxes, initially,
we said, ‘Don’t you want to set it a little
lower?’ They said, ‘No, we’ll get it done,’ so
we don’t doubt them anymore,” she said.
The glasses the Denchfields collect for
POB are distributed to local kids and
adults, used for parts or given to an organization in New Jersey called New Eyes
for the Needy, which then gives POB
vouchers for new glasses.
One of the schools POB serves is the
Washington Jesuit Academy in Northeast
Washington. The all-boys middle school is
made up of children from low-income
families. The free screenings provided in
school are essential to the long-term
health of kids who might go without annual vision checkups.
Weldon Genies, 12, of Washington was
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SPORTS
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
M2
D
PRO FOOTBALL
PRO BASKETBALL
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
HIGH SCHOOLS
Buccaneers WR Mike Evans is banned
one game for his violent hit Sunday. D3
Marcin Gortat says the Wizards need to
talk less and work more. D5
A look at GW and George Mason as our
season preview continues. D6
Our weekly area football roundup has a
new top 20 as the playoffs approach. D9
When left for dead, this team just finds new life Aching Redskins get a shot of momentum
Tell the
Washington
Redskins they
stink. Tell them
it’s hopeless.
Remind them
Dan
that the
Steinberg alternative to the
injured backup’s
injured backup is also an
injured backup. Show them
those little TV graphics of
everyone picking against them.
Tell them to give up. Tell them to
tank.
Because the best moments
from this odd era of Redskins
football have virtually all come
in games Washington was
supposed to lose.
About the only highlight of
Jay Gruden’s first season was
that Monday night miracle in
Dallas, when Colt McCoy
engineered a magical overtime
win as a nearly 10-point
underdog. The 2015 playoff run
arrived after a they’ll-probably-
lose-this-one streak in which the
Redskins never lost, rattling off
four straight wins to end the
season, all as underdogs. This
season’s best showings were
unexpected: when the Redskins
won as underdogs to the Los
Angeles Rams, as underdogs to
the Oakland Raiders — and as
massive underdogs Sunday
against the Seattle Seahawks,
who were not going to lose to
that dilapidated burgundy-andSTEINBERG CONTINUED ON D4
BY
R ICK M AESE
The bumps and bruises,
sprains and strains are still present and still painful. But as an
organization, the Washington
Redskins returned home with a
spring in their step, having
evened their record at the season’s midway point and, more
importantly, in possession of a
signature win, the kind where the
takeaway message resonates
both inside and outside the lock-
er room.
“It shows we can play in this
league and play with any other
team,” running back Rob Kelley
said following the Redskins’ 17-14
win at Seattle on Sunday.
They will hope the momentum
carries over and that wind in
their sails helps stir some healing
powers as well. The Redskins are
still a beaten and battered bunch
and will likely be relying on some
key reserves when they host Minnesota and one of the league’s top
defenses this weekend. But for
now they can take comfort knowing that Vikings game won’t be
played with a backdrop of desperation. Certainly Redskins
Coach Jay Gruden knew the
stakes before kickoff in Seattle.
“You always try to weigh out
the results before the game, what
could happen, 3-5, long trip
REDSKINS CONTINUED ON D3
Vikings at Redskins
Sunday, 1 p.m., Fox
PHOTOS BY JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
Padgett is
Louisville’s
calm after
Pitino storm
BY
C HUCK C ULPEPPER
louisville — He reckons he
might be the tallest head coach in
Division I men’s basketball unless
his 6-foot-11 perch rates second to
Patrick Ewing. His low, measured
voice might qualify as soothing, as
if he should speak on radio in wee
hours. He keeps cherry cough
drops on his desk because his new
job has vexed his dulcet larynx.
His keel is, like his mother’s,
even, such that his father said,
“Boy, if you would see him an hour
after a game, a lot of times you’re
not sure which way it went.” His
former teammate, fellow big man
and longtime friend, Ellis Myles,
said, “He’s definitely shy; he’s still a
shy guy now.”
Here he is, the relative calm after
16 years of brilliant storm, and here
he is after one of the odder promotions in the zany annals of coach
promotions. You find David
Padgett, 32, in Louisville’s basketball facility, in the upstairs office of
the head coach, beyond the lobby
and its two — two! — posters detailing Rick Pitino’s rarefied knack for
winning. You find Padgett five
weeks after this whole place was
inconceivably rocked, when the
U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York issued its
report about college basketball
skulduggery, and Louisville and
Pitino turned up in that report, and
Louisville fired Pitino at the dawn
of a 17th season that did not come.
LOUISVILLE CONTINUED ON D5
sav i n g a s p o rt
f r o m e x t i n c t i on
‘There’s no place to go after eight-man’: Small towns seek to preserve football
BY
J ACOB B OGAGE IN
FELCH, MICH.
T
eachers, timber truck drivers and lumber salesmen gather before sunrise at the
Nordic Trading Post to sip black coffee and eat fried eggs alongside former miners who call themselves “semi-retired,” given that the mine was shuttered more
than three decades ago. They wear Carhartt jackets and worn-in jeans, work
boots and camouflage hats. Old lumber saws hang on the walls. “Fox & Friends” plays on
a small television in the corner. ¶ And because rifle season for white-tailed deer doesn’t
open for a month, the main topic of conversation is high school football. It’s senior night,
when North Dickinson County School will honor the team’s four seniors, and while the
ceremonial flourishes may distract from the central attraction of the game, these fathers
and uncles — some grandfathers, too — promise to be there to watch it all, even if this
season is a bit different. ¶ North Dickinson County School, 254 students combined in
grades K through 12 in one building, held on to football as most of the country knows it
for years. But thanks to declining participation in an aging town, the Nordics will soon
finish their first season of eight-player football in decades.
EIGHT-MAN CONTINUED ON D8
North Dickinson players Jacob Butterfield, above left, Michael Miller, center, and Matthew Bruette
gather as defensive coordinator Chris Mattson draws up plays for the eight-man football game.
Carlson’s
first goal
lifts Caps to
3rd straight
CAPITALS 3,
COYOTES 2 (OT)
BY
I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN
Just moments after the publicaddress announcer at Capital
One Arena declared one minute
left in overtime, Capitals winger
T.J. Oshie whiffed on a shot from
the high slot. The puck bounced
to the goal line, where defenseman John Carlson just happened
to be waiting. He fired Washington’s 40th shot of the game and
his 50th shot of the season, and
the team and the player were
simultaneously rewarded for
their patience.
After storming back from an
early two-goal hole to force overtime, the Capitals beat the Arizona Coyotes, 3-2, on Monday to
record their first three-game
winning streak of the season
thanks to Carlson’s first goal of
the campaign. The NHL’s worst
team gave Washington (8-6-1) all
it could handle through 64-plus
minutes but, considering the
abundance of opportunities the
Capitals had, this was a game the
team deserved to win.
“I think we’re just kind of
finding our way and figuring out
what’s working for us,” Carlson
CAPITALS CONTINUED ON D12
Capitals at Sabres
Today, 7 p.m., NBCSW Plus, NBCSN
D2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
washingtonpost.com/sports
ASK BOSWELL
EARLY LEAD
Nationals
are setting
themselves
up to fail
Trading
for Brady?
It doesn’t
hurt to ask.
D.C. SPORTS BOG
Washington Post columnist
Thomas Boswell answered your
questions about the Redskins,
Capitals, Nationals, Wizards, the
NFL and more in his weekly online chat. Here is an excerpt.
BY
Q: Boz, I’ve lived here since
1984 and if the Nats make the
playoffs with a rookie manager
and a lame-duck general manager, it will be amazing. Win a
round, staggering! World Series, stupifying! Your thoughts?
A: By firing Dusty Baker, in my
opinion, they did not improve
their chances of winning the
World Series in 2018. I doubt that
they will. Right now, Las Vegas
has them as the fourth pick to win
the World Series. When Vegas
money says you are fourth and
you come out and say, in effect, we
will be unhappy if we don’t win
the 2018 World Series, it just
makes you look like an idiot.
Let me repeat: It makes you
look like an idiot.
Davey Johnson probably wishes he never said, “World Series or
Bust,” though he was kind of
joking. Bryce Harper has presumably grown up enough to know it
was foolish to say, “Where’s my
ring?”
But the Lerners have couched
this whole managerial change in
terms of “Win in 2018.” And those
were the words coming out of
General Manager Mike Rizzo’s
mouth on the conference call to
explain the Baker non-rehiring.
So did Baker have to win it all in
2017 to stay? And does Rizzo have
to win it all to stay after 2018?
And what kind of amateurish
ownership would set itself up to
fail that way? With three generations of Lerners now contributing
to the Nats’ internal discussions,
the whole thing must sound like
the Tower of Babel. Except the
language the Lerners apparently
still don’t speak fluently is “baseball.”
One note: The only World Series ever won by Washington was
won in 1924 with a rookie manager: Bucky Harris.
I email with one of his grandsons sometimes. So any “Bucky
mention” is deserved.
thomas.boswell@washpost.com
Excerpted from
live.washingtonpost.com
QUOTABLE
“I tried to take the high
road, but I don’t know
the address.”
DEION SANDERS
Hall of Famer and NFL Network
analyst on his disparaging comments
about Tony Romo, who, while calling a
game Sunday for CBS, said Chiefs
cornerback Marcus Peters “makes
Deion Sanders look good at tackling
sometimes.” (Via Early Lead)
RON JENKINS/FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM
In 1987, Tony Robinson led a team of replacement players to a 13-7 win over the Cowboys, who had many regulars active.
Win in Seattle among unlikeliest
action the following week.
Recounting a Dallas-heavy list
of the Redskins’ five most
improbable victories ever
BY
S COTT A LLEN
Washington’s stunning 17-14 win in
Seattle on Sunday marked the 12th time
since the 1970 merger that the Redskins
won a game as at least an eight-point
underdog. All but one of those wins
came on the road. Given the state of the
Redskins’ injury-ravaged offensive line
and how well the Seahawks play at
home, virtually no one gave Washington
a shot to leave CenturyLink Field with a
W. The Redskins’ heart-stopping win
was unbelievable in every way, but it
wasn’t their most improbable win since
the merger. It did crack the top five,
however.
1. Oct. 19, 1987, at Dallas
Line: Cowboys by 8
Final score: Redskins 13, Cowboys 7
The Scabskins’ win over the Cowboys
on “Monday Night Football” during the
1987 players’ strike remains the
burgundy and gold standard for upsets.
The Redskins’ replacements were heavy
underdogs against a Cowboys unit that
featured several picket-line-crossing
stars, including defensive tackle Randy
White, quarterback Danny White and
running back Tony Dorsett.
Washington’s slim hopes seemingly
took another hit when quarterback Ed
Rubbert left the game with a bruised
shoulder late in the first quarter. Enter
Tony Robinson, who was signed as a
replacement player while on workrelease from a prison sentence.
Robinson completed 11 of 18 passes for
152 yards and two interceptions in his
NFL debut, which was good enough to
win.
Redskins players carried Coach Joe
Gibbs off the field on their shoulders.
The Redskins’ regulars returned to
2. Nov. 5, 2017, at Seattle
Line: Seahawks by 8
Final score: Redskins 17, Seahawks 14
The Redskins were without four of
their five starting offensive linemen, as
well as two of Kirk Cousins’s top
receiving targets in Jordan Reed and
Jamison Crowder. The Seahawks had
won four straight and scored 41 points
the previous week against Houston.
Where would the offense come from?
How could the defense possibly hold up
in a hostile environment?
“We found a way,” Cousins said after
leading the game-winning touchdown
drive in the final minute.
The Redskins became the seventh
visiting team to win at CenturyLink
Field since 2012 and improved to 4-0 at
Seattle in the regular season since the
stadium opened in 2002.
3. Oct. 27, 2014, at Dallas
Line: Cowboys by 91/2.
Final score: Redskins 20, Cowboys 17
(OT)
Sunday’s win was the Redskins’ most
unlikely since they snapped the
Cowboys’ six-game winning streak with
an overtime triumph on “Monday Night
Football” three years ago.
Third-string quarterback Colt McCoy,
who passed for 299 yards and scrambled
for a touchdown, was the unlikely hero
for Washington that night. Playing in
front of a large group of family and
friends, the former University of Texas
star was perfect in overtime, setting up
Kai Forbath’s go-ahead 40-yard field
goal with five completions.
Rookie
cornerback
Bashaud
Breeland, who helped limit Dez Bryant
to three catches for 30 yards, batted
down Tony Romo’s fourth-down throw
on the Cowboys’ ensuing drive to seal
Washington’s win.
4. Dec. 3, 1995, at Dallas
Line: Cowboys by 17
Final score: Redskins 24, Cowboys 17
“Who knew the snow that hit
Washington early last week was the first
sign that hell would figuratively freeze
over and the down-in-the-mouth
Washington Redskins would upset the
overconfident Dallas Cowboys for the
second time this season?” The
Washington Post’s Dave Sell wrote after
Washington won as 17-point underdogs
at Texas Stadium. By point spread, this
was the biggest upset win in franchise
history.
The Redskins had lost six of seven
since upsetting Dallas at RFK Stadium
in October, but they overcame a 10-7
halftime deficit with 17 second-half
points. Terry Allen rushed for 98 yards
and two touchdowns, and Heath Shuler
completed 11 of 24 passes for 154 yards.
The Redskins’ first regular season
sweep of Dallas since 1987 dropped the
Cowboys to 10-3 and delayed them from
clinching a playoff spot. Dallas went on
to win the Super Bowl.
“This is my Super Bowl,” Redskins
safety James Washington said after
Washington improved to 4-9.
5. Oct. 1, 1995, vs. Dallas
Line: Cowboys by 13
Final score: Redskins 27, Cowboys 23
Allen paved the way for Washington’s
first upset of the Cowboys during the
1995 season as well, rushing for 121
yards and a touchdown on 30 carries,
and also catching a pass for a score. The
Redskins were 13-point underdogs at
home, and for good reason. Dallas had
won the previous three games in the
series by a combined score of 107-17.
“There’s a lot of guys with a lot of
pride in that locker room,” Redskins
Coach Norv Turner said. “It may not
have been a great rivalry over the last
three games, but it is a great rivalry, and
I think that was proven today.”
Gus Frerotte passed for 192 yards and
two touchdowns, and Washington
caught a break when Dallas quarterback
Troy Aikman suffered a strained right
calf on the Cowboys’ opening series and
did not return.
scott.allen@washpost.com
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/
dcsportsbog
Garvey, Morris, John
on Hall of Fame ballot
Former stars Steve Garvey,
Jack Morris and Tommy John
and longtime players’ union chief
Marvin Miller are among the 10
names on the ballot for a Hall of
Fame election next month.
The candidates were
announced Monday. Results will
be released Dec. 10 at the
baseball winter meetings in Lake
Buena Vista, Fla.
Don Mattingly, Dale Murphy,
Dave Parker, Ted Simmons,
Luis Tiant and Alan Trammell
also are eligible on the Modern
Baseball Era ballot, which
recognizes those whose biggest
contributions came from 1970 to
1987.
A 16-person committee will
vote, and it takes 75 percent —
12 votes — for election. The
committee members will be
announced later.
Garvey was a 10-time all-star
first baseman and Morris won
254 games, plus pitched a 10inning shutout in Game 7 of the
1991 World Series for Minnesota.
John won 288 games over 26
seasons, a career extended by the
pioneering elbow surgery that
The question was patently absurd and yet San Francisco 49ers
General Manager John Lynch reportedly could not help but ask
because it almost never, ever
hurts to ask.
According to Fox Sports’s Jay
Glazer, Lynch spoke with the New
England Patriots representatives
in the offseason about trading for
quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo.
At the time, the Patriots told
Lynch that Garoppolo was off limits. Lynch called back and inquired of Coach Bill Belichick:
What about Tom Brady? Might
you trade him and keep Garoppolo?
“Belichick just said, ‘What did
you just ask me?’ ” Glazer reported. “[Lynch] said, ‘I’m asking if
you’d trade us Tom Brady, [since]
you said Garoppolo is off-limits.
[Belichick] said, ‘Did you just ask
me if I’d trade Tom Brady? . . . Did
you just ask if I’d trade the greatest quarterback of all time?’ And
John said, ‘So is that a no?’ ”
Evidently, because Garoppolo
ended up in San Francisco, traded
for a second-round draft pick last
week, and Brady was lounging on
a Bahamian beach during the bye
week.
The Patriots, who are 6-2 and
winning with mirrors, duct tape,
Brady and Gronk, returned from
their break and Brady was left to
address the surprising trade of the
future quarterback and a report
that owner Robert Kraft had
stepped in to ensure that Brady
finished his career in New England. Something had to give, and
it was clear that the Patriots were
willing to take a short-term gamble on a 40-year-old and a longrange one on losing Garoppolo.
“I think it’s the way it has always been,” Brady told WEEI’s
“Kirk and Callahan” show Monday. “I think he is a great coach,
and there is obviously no coach I
would rather play for. I love playing for this team and I’ve tried to
do it for a long time and I have
done it for a long time. I enjoy
doing it and hopefully I can do it
for a long time.”
Last week, Belichick hinted on
a conference call that he considered Brady, who is in his 17th
season, as year-to-year. Although
only a breakup with Gisele Bündchen might be more a more stunning possibility, Brady said he was
fine with that approach.
“I think every player is year-toyear in the NFL,” he said. “Any
player, any coach. I don’t know.
Anything changes year-to-year. I
think we have learned that about
the NFL. Something seems great
and maybe it’s not. Someone is
gone and someone is there. Referees change. Training staffs
change. Everything changes in
the NFL all the time. I don’t think
change is out of order. If any player or coach — it’s just the NFL.”
cindy.boren@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
TELEVISION AND RADIO
NBA
DIG ES T
BASEBALL
C INDY B OREN
bears his name.
Miller headed the players’
union from 1966 to 1982 and will
be on the ballot for the seventh
time. He died in 2012. . . .
Houston Astros first base
coach Rich Dauer is recovering
after surgery on a blood clot in
his brain.
The 65-year-old Dauer was
rushed to a hospital Friday
immediately after Houston’s
parade to celebrate its first World
Series title. The emergency
surgery was performed at
Houston Methodist hospital,
where he is now recovering.
Dauer played for the Baltimore
Orioles from 1976 to 1985,
winning a World Series with
them in 1983. Dauer was hired by
the Astros following the 2014
season. . . .
Kansas City Royals first
baseman Eric Hosmer, third
baseman Mike Moustakas and
outfielder Lorenzo Cain were
among nine free agents who have
received $17.4 million qualifying
offers from their teams.
Chicago Cubs pitchers Jake
Arrieta and Wade Davis also
received the offers, as did Tampa
Bay pitcher Alex Cobb, Colorado
closer Greg Holland, St. Louis
pitcher Lance Lynn and
Cleveland catcher Carlos
Santana.
Players have until Nov. 16 to
accept. If they sign with new
teams, their old clubs would get
an extra draft pick as
compensation — possibly a much
lower selection than in the past
under the rules in baseball’s new
labor contract. . . .
The Baltimore Orioles
declined a $14 million option on
shortstop J.J. Hardy, who
receives a $2 million buyout, and
a $12 million option on lefthander Wade Miley, who gets a
$500,000 buyout. Orioles catcher
Welington Castillo declined his
$7 million player option. . . .
Madison Bumgarner’s
$12 million option for the 2018
season was exercised by the San
Francisco Giants, who are
determined to keep a talented
rotation intact as the club looks
to bounce back from a last-place
season.
The Giants locked up
Bumgarner long-term in April
2012 on a six-year, $35.56 million,
contract through this year. The
deal includes another $12 million
option for 2019.
Bumgarner missed nearly
three months this past season
following a dirt bike accident
during an off day in Colorado on
April 20.
SOCCER
Former U.S. national team
forward Paul Caligiuri and
midfielder Kyle Martino are the
latest candidates for U.S. Soccer
Federation president in the wake
of the Americans’ failure to
qualify for next year’s World Cup.
USSF President Sunil Gulati
has not announced whether he
will seek a fourth four-year term
at the election in February.
Announced candidates include
USSF vice president Carlos
Cordeiro; former U.S. forward
Eric Wynalda, who has taken a
leave from Fox Sports; Boston
lawyer Steve Gans; and Paul
LaPointe, Northeast Conference
manager of the United Premier
Soccer League.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Alabama linebackers Shaun
Dion Hamilton and Mack
Wilson are out for at least the
rest of the regular season.
Both were hurt in Saturday’s
24-10 win over LSU.
Crimson Tide Coach Nick
Saban said Hamilton had
surgery on his right knee.
He said Wilson is out four to
six weeks with a foot injury and
could return for Alabama’s
postseason games.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
10 p.m.
Dallas at Washington » NBC Sports Washington, WFED (1500 AM)
Milwaukee at Cleveland » NBA TV
Oklahoma City at Sacramento » NBA TV
NHL
7 p.m.
10 p.m.
Washington at Buffalo » NBC Sports Network, NBCSW Plus, WJFK (106.7 FM)
Los Angeles at Anaheim » NBC Sports Network
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
Akron at Miami (Ohio) » ESPN2
Bowling Green at Buffalo » ESPNU
GOLF
11 p.m.
LPGA Tour: Blue Bay LPGA, first round » Golf Channel
GOLF
Sung Hyun Park of South
Korea became the first LPGA
Tour rookie to reach No. 1 in the
world.
Park replaced So Yeon Ryu
atop the women’s world ranking
without playing last week. Ryu
lost the No. 1 ranking after 19
weeks when she failed to finish in
a tie for sixth at the Japan
Classic.
The 24-year-old Park posted 10
victories on the Korean LPGA
Tour.
Park won the U.S. Women’s
Open and already has clinched
LPGA rookie of the year.
She has a chance to become
the first player since Nancy
Lopez to win rookie of the year
and player of the year in the same
season.
MISC.
West Virginia men’s basketball
Coach Bob Huggins agreed to a
four-year contract extension.
WVU Athletic Director Shane
Lyons announced the extension,
which runs through the 2021-22
season. The 64-year-old Huggins
will earn $3.75 million this
season. . . .
Vermont is the first state in the
United States to recognize
ultimate — the game that started
as Ultimate Frisbee — as a high
school varsity sport.
A committee that oversees
high school sports in the state,
the Vermont Principals
Association, unanimously
approved ultimate last week as a
varsity sport starting in the
spring of 2019.
— From news services
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
SU
professional Football
Redskins
exit Seattle
with a jolt
of optimism
NFL NOTES
Bucs’ Evans hit with
one-game suspension
Tampa Bay also plans
to shut down Winston
for at least two weeks
REDSKINS FROM D1
home, it wouldn’t mean the end
of our season but it would make it
a lot tougher,” he said Monday.
“We’re still in a tough spot at 4-4.
We still have a long way to go, but
we have a whole second half of
the season still to play and we’re
in position to at least control
what we can control and get
ourselves back in the race.”
The Redskins have plenty of
work to do, but at the season’s
midway point, they know where
they stand. They’re a team that
right now is hunting for a playoff
spot, not a high draft pick. If the
season ended today, the Redskins
would be the NFC’s 10th-best
team, which means that over the
course of the season’s final eight
games, they need to catch at least
one of the two wild-card frontrunners (Carolina Panthers, Dallas Cowboys) and three other
wild-card hopefuls (Seahawks,
Green Bay Packers and Atlanta
Falcons).
“We have to try to somehow
keep pace,” Gruden said. “We
can’t get too far behind, or the
season will leak out on us. It’s
good to get back to .500.”
Gruden knew his team didn’t
have much time to celebrate
Sunday’s upset. They’re about to
face two of their toughest opponents of the year, the 6-2 Vikings
on Sunday, followed by the 6-2
New Orleans Saints, both division leaders. And there’s zero
guarantees they will suddenly be
healthier.
Gruden said that two of quarterback Kirk Cousins’s favorite
targets have been making progress. Tight end Jordan Reed and
wide receiver Jamison Crowder
both missed Sunday’s game, but
Gruden says the players are improving and he considers them
day-to-day. The team infirmary
did add a couple of players: Wide
receiver Brian Quick entered the
league’s concussion protocol, and
defensive tackle Arthur Jones
A SSOCIATED P RESS
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Seattle’s three missed field goals gave Josh Norman (24) and the Redskins reason to celebrate Sunday.
could miss some time with a
dislocated shoulder.
The coaching staff will also be
paying plenty of attention this
week to the offensive line, which
featured only one regular starter
on Sunday. Gruden said he is
hopeful center Spencer Long,
guard Brandon Scherff and tackle Ty Nsekhe can increase their
workloads this week. Guard
Shaun Lauvao is improving, and
tackle Trent Williams will still be
day-to-day.
“It’ll be great to get at least one
back,” he said. “Maybe two, maybe three would be outstanding.”
While much of the attention
focused on the offensive injuries,
the defense was also beat-up —
and yet somehow managed to
turn in one of its best performances of the year against a team
that had posted 479 yards and 41
points one week earlier against
Houston.
The shorthanded bunch relentlessly attacked Seattle quarterback Russell Wilson, sacking
him twice and hauling in two
picks. It saw standout performances from linebacker Zach
Brown, who had a hand in 11
tackles and posted a sack, Will
Compton, who had seven solo
tackles and an interception, and
Terrell McClain, who had five
tackles and a sack. In the first
half, the Seahawks barely managed to convert 1 of 7 third-down
tries.
Gruden knew it would take
that kind of defensive effort for
the beleaguered Redskins to
compete.
“Basically I told them, we’re
going to have to lean on you guys
for a little while until we get our
guns back,” Gruden said. “And
even then, we’re still going to
need to lean on you later in the
year.”
For the Redskins, it felt like the
type of game that forges an
identity, something that carries
over into the second half of the
season. Cornerback Josh Norman
credits the win to the team’s
physical style of play.
“There’s no substitute for it.
We got guys out there buying into
that,” he said. “You see what
happens when you play that type
of ball all the way down to the last
second of the game, man, you
[are] going to come up with
something.”
The surprising win gives the
Redskins a blank slate of sorts, a
chance to redirect the season and
allow the final eight games to
define this team, rather than the
first eight. For now, at least, that
story will likely be written by
both starters and reserves.
“We’re minus some good offensive players,” Gruden said, “without a doubt. But we still have
some good offensive players. We
still have Kirk and Vernon [Davis] and Ryan Grant and Josh
Doctson and Terrelle Pryor and
Morgan Moses. We still have
some good players on offense. It’s
not like we’re totally inept.
“We have a good football team.
Still, our depth is challenged a
little bit and special teams a little
bit. But we feel like we go out
there and can compete with anybody with the talent we have still
available.”
rick.maese@washpost.com
Master Tesfatsion and Liz Clarke
contributed to this report.
Saints’ Brees stays cool
with help from his defense
For the past three
seasons, the NFL
playoffs have been
incomplete, made
ADAM
less than whole by
KILGORE
a subtle yet
blatant absence.
Drew Brees has been a January
observer despite continued
brilliance, robbing the
postseason of one of the NFL’s
eminent quarterbacks. The fault
belonged to his own teammates,
who formed a perennial hurdle
for the marvel of an offense
Sean Payton concocted and
Brees orchestrated. The New
Orleans Saints’ defense, it
seemed, was destined to prevent
Brees from contending for a
second Super Bowl.
This season, then, a window
of contention has cracked open
for Brees in ironic fashion. The
Saints are the hottest team in
the NFL this side of the
Philadelphia Eagles, and the
credit, improbably, belongs to
their defense. Brees remains
great, an all-timer playing at an
elite level into his late 30s. But
the ascendance of the Saints’
defense, after years of miserable
performance, has pushed the
team to a six-game winning
streak and the top of the NFC
South.
The Saints demolished the
Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 30-10,
on Sunday, holding the Bucs to
three points before a late,
cosmetic touchdown. New
Orleans scored another
defensive touchdown when it
blocked a punt and scooped the
ball for a score. Once a liability,
the Saints’ defense has become a
weapon.
During their winning streak,
the Saints have surrendered 15
points per game. Remove the 38
points the Lions scored on them
in a crazy, 52-38 Saints victory
in Week 5, and New Orleans has
not allowed more than 17 points
since Week 2. For years, it has
been Brees against the world.
Now, the Saints have a defense
he can trust.
The Saints began building
their defense two years ago,
when they took three defensive
players in the draft, including
defensive tackle Sheldon
Rankins with their first pick,
On the
NFL
No. 12 overall. They accelerated
the process in this year’s draft,
using five of their seven picks
on defense. The most important
came when the Saints used the
11th overall pick on cornerback
Marshon Lattimore.
While defensive end Cameron
Jordan has become one of the
most consistent pass rushers in
football, Lattimore has been at
the forefront of New Orleans’s
defensive renaissance. Entering
Sunday, Lattimore was the No. 1
rated cornerback by Pro
Football Focus. His ability to
shut down half the field has
allowed the rest of the Saints’
pass defense, so bad for so long,
to excel.
Lattimore found himself in
the middle of a fracas Sunday.
Tampa Bay quarterback Jameis
Winston, injured and on the
sideline, tapped Lattimore on
the shoulder after a play.
Lattimore shoved him. Wide
receiver Mike Evans came flying
from behind and decked
Lattimore in the back, starting a
brawl. Somehow, Evans was
flagged but not ejected before
he was handed a one-game
suspension by the NFL on
Monday.
“If there’s not an ejection in
that situation, I don’t know
when there’s supposed to be
one,” Payton said.
But the aftermath, in a way,
pleased Payton. After Evans’s
cheap shot, the entire defense
rushed to defend Lattimore.
“When you start winning
some games,” Payton said, “you
start wanting to play more for
each other more than yourself.”
The rest of the league is
taking notice. “I never thought I
would mention defense and the
Saints in the same sentence,”
Rodney Harrison said on
“Football Night in America”
after calling them the most
impressive team of the day.
Harrison had a point. In 2013,
the last season the Saints made
the playoffs, their defense
ranked 13th in the NFL,
according to Pro Football Focus.
In the other six seasons since
the Saints won the Super Bowl,
their defense has ranked 29th,
31st, 32nd, 31st, 30th and 28th.
Those performances have
SCOTT CLAUSE/DAILY ADVERTISER VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS
Saints cornerback Marshon Lattimore and Buccaneers wide
receiver Mike Evans tussled during Sunday’s game in New Orleans.
limited Brees’s playoff career.
Since winning Super Bowl XLIV,
the Saints are just 2-3 in the
playoffs, even as Brees has
cultivated an unimpeachable
Hall of Fame résumé. Brees, 38,
led the NFL in passing yardage
the past three seasons, while the
Saints finished 7-9 each year.
Brees also led the NFL in
passing in 2011, another season
the Saints sat home in January.
The improved defense has
taken pressure off Brees. He is
throwing for 276.7 yards per
game, his lowest mark since
2007, Brees’s second year in New
Orleans. But it doesn’t mean he
is less effective. He is still
completing 70 percent of his
passes. He just doesn’t have to
wing the ball wildly in a
desperate attempt to stay in the
game or come back. He can
hand off to Mark Ingram, who is
having his best season, or
sensational rookie Alvin
Kamara.
There is irony in the Saints
being in position to return to
the playoffs because of their
defense. Brees does not need
anybody, or any unit, to carry
him. But New Orleans’s defense
is finally pulling its weight, and
it may allow Brees to perform
again on a stage worthy of his
accomplishments.
adam.kilgore@washpost.com
The NFL suspended Tampa
Bay wide receiver Mike Evans for
one game Monday for unsportsmanlike conduct and unnecessary roughness in the Buccaneers’ loss at New Orleans.
Evans ran up from behind and
knocked over Saints rookie cornerback Marshon Lattimore after a confrontation between Bucs
quarterback Jameis Winston,
who was on the sideline because
of a sore shoulder, and Lattimore.
Evans was penalized but not
ejected from the Saints’ 30-10
victory. He will miss the Bucs’
home game against the Jets on
Sunday and can return to the
active roster next Monday. But he
can appeal the suspension within
three days.
Meanwhile, the Buccaneers
are shutting down quarterback
Jameis Winston for at least two
weeks in hopes the condition of
his injured throwing shoulder
improves.
The third-year quarterback sat
out the second half of Sunday’s
30-10 loss to the New Orleans
Saints after being sacked late in
the second quarter and landing
on the shoulder he initially hurt
at Arizona on Oct. 15.
BENGALS: Wide receiver
A.J. Green faces a fine but no
suspension from his on-field
fight with Jaguars cornerback
Jalen Ramsey, the defining moment of the Bengals’ biggest
meltdown of the season.
Green
grabbed
Ramsey
around the neck, threw him to
the ground and punched him in
the helmet late in the first half of
a 23-7 loss in Jacksonville on
Sunday. He and Ramsey — who
started the altercation by pushing Green to the ground — were
ejected from the game.
Green is known as one of the
Bengals’ most even-tempered
players. He apologized after the
game for his outburst, prompted
by Ramsey’s trash-talking and
his shove. Both sat out the second
half of the game, and neither was
suspended on Monday.
Coach Marvin Lewis declined
to discuss Green’s actions after
the game and then again on
Monday, after he’d had a chance
to watch the video.
“He’s disappointed,” Lewis
said. “He’s apologized for his
actions.”
COWBOYS: A federal appeals court has set a Thursday
hearing as attorneys for Dallas
Cowboys running back Ezekiel
Elliott seek a longer-lasting injunction to stop his six-game
suspension over domestic violence allegations.
The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of
Appeals on Friday issued an
emergency stay of the NFL’s punishment, the third legal reprieve
for Elliott. It cleared last year’s
league rushing leader to play in
Sunday’s game against Kansas
City. Elliott scored the go-ahead
touchdown in the Cowboy’s 28-17
win over the Chiefs.
It is possible, if not likely, that
the three-judge panel in New
York will rule as early as Thursday, after oral arguments, on
whether Elliott can play Sunday
at Atlanta.
None of the judges assigned to
Elliott’s case presided over the
NFL’s winning appeal in Patriots
quarterback Tom Brady’s fourgame suspension in the Deflategate case.
BROWNS: One day before
the start of his latest comeback,
wide receiver Josh Gordon revealed he used drugs or alcohol
before every game of his NFL
career.
Gordon, who was reinstated
on a conditional basis last week
by Commissioner Roger Goodell,
told GQ Magazine he drank or
smoked marijuana before “every
game. Probably every game of my
career.”
The 26-year-old Gordon did
the interview before meeting
with Goodell in New York.
Gordon outlined a pregame
routine where he would do shots
of alcohol to “get the motor
running.”
“If I had already been drug
tested that week, or the day
before the game, I knew I had a
couple days to buy to clean my
system,” he said in the interview.
“Even before I was getting
tested for alcohol, prior to my
DWI in 2014, I would take the
biggest bong rip I could. And try
to conceal all the smell off all my
clothes. I’d be dressed up to go to
the game. A bunch of guys smoke
weed before the game. But we’re
not talking about them.”
TEXANS: Houston Coach
Bill O’Brien said he and General
Manager Rick Smith have discussed signing Colin Kaepernick
in the wake of last week’s seasonending injury to Deshaun Watson.
When asked about Kaepernick
a day after Tom Savage struggled
in a 20-14 loss to the Colts,
O’Brien said: “We talk about the
roster and what’s out there every
day Rick and I.”
O’Brien was then pressed on
whether they have specifically
discussed about adding Kaepernick.
“Oh yeah, everybody gets discussed,” he said. “Is that a problem? Isn’t that the way most
teams do it. People seem shocked
by that.”
JETS: Jeremy Kerley insists
he did nothing wrong to warrant
a four-game suspension.
The New York wide receiverpunt returner was banned from
the team without pay by the NFL
after the league said Kerley violated its policy on performanceenhancing substances. His suspension begins immediately.
“I was shocked by a positive
test for Turinabol, as I have never
knowingly taken any banned
substances,” Kerley said in a
statement issued by his representatives .
FALCONS: Kicker Matt Bryant’s status for this week’s game
against Dallas is uncertain after
he hurt his right calf during
warmups before the team’s loss
at Carolina.
Bryant’s availability for longer
field goals was uncertain after he
felt pain in the calf while kicking
a 53-yard field goal in the first
quarter of the 20-17 loss to the
Panthers on Sunday.
D4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. TUESDAY,
NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
DAN STEINBERG
Seattle win is latest evidence: All bets are off with Redskins
STEINBERG FROM D1
MATT LUDTKE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lions wide receiver Marvin Jones caught two touchdown passes
Monday night from Matthew Stafford, who threw for 361 yards.
Stafford, Detroit add
to Green Bay’s struggles
LIONS 30,
PACKERS 17
BY
G ENARO C . A RMAS
green bay, wis. — Matthew
Stafford passed for 361 yards and
two touchdowns to Marvin Jones,
and the Detroit Lions snapped a
three-game losing streak with a
30-17 win Monday night over the
offensively challenged Green Bay
Packers.
Stafford was 26 of 33, including
12 of 14 in the first half with a
25-yard touchdown pass to Jones.
Ameer Abdullah added a fouryard scoring run for Detroit (4-4).
Green Bay (4-4) finally got in
the end zone on Brett Hundley’s
one-yard quarterback sneak with
9:52 left.
The Lions answered with
Stafford’s 11-yard touchdown
pass to Jones with 8:06 remaining, putting the game out of reach
with a 17-point lead. Jones had
seven catches for 107 yards.
The Packers have lost three
straight games. Their once-potent offense has struggled since
star quarterback Aaron Rodgers
broke his right collarbone on Oct.
15 at Minnesota.
Brett Hundley finished 26 of 38
for 245 yards. Cornerback Darius
Slay blanketed Jordy Nelson
when the Packers did try to throw
long while the game was still
competitive.
Abdullah fumbled the ball
away in the third quarter, but the
Packers went three-and-out on
the ensuing drive. Familiar problems in the red zone popped up
for the Lions when they were
stopped on three plays at the
Packers 1, forced to settle for a
field goal for a 17-point lead with
12:25 left.
But without Rodgers, the Packers couldn’t keep up with the
accurate, rocket-armed Stafford.
The Lions’ opening score was
set up by an unnecessary roughness penalty on Mike Daniels,
after the defensive lineman appeared to head-butt Detroit center Travis Swanson. The flag negated an incompletion on third
and 15 that would have forced the
Lions to punt from their 25.
Stafford connected with Jones for
the touchdown pass five plays
later.
The first scoring strike to Jones
was the 200th touchdown pass in
117 career games for Stafford, the
sixth quickest in NFL history to
reach the milestone. Stafford,
who turns 30 in February, is also
fourth in NFL history for career
touchdown passes before age 30
behind Dan Marino, Peyton Manning and Brett Favre.
Special teams, meanwhile,
didn’t help the Packers.
Working in their third long
snapper of the season because of
injuries, Green Bay had a 38-yard
field goal blocked in the first
quarter on a play that started
with a low snap. Trevor Davis
didn’t get past the 22 on three
kickoff returns in the first half.
Notes: Lions wide receiver
Golden Tate joined Jones over the
100-yard mark with seven receptions for 113 yards. . . . Abdullah
had 21 carries for 48 yards. . . .
Green Bay’s playmaking receivers did have more opportunities, though most came on short
passes. Randall Cobb finished
with 58 yards on five receptions,
including a catch-and-run for a
46-yard gain that set up Hundley’s touchdown run. Davante Adams had seven catches for 53
yards. . . .
Packers safety Morgan Burnett
left in the third quarter with a
groin injury. He had returned
from a two-game absence with a
hamstring injury. Right tackle
Bryan Bulaga left in the fourth
quarter with a knee injury.
— Associated Press
gold hospital ward
masquerading as an NFL team.
This being the Redskins,
though, the reverse is also true.
The two worst blotches on the
now-substantial Gruden/Kirk
Cousins tableau came when they
were favored by at least a
touchdown: last year’s home
losses to the Carolina Panthers
and New York Giants. Maybe
they needed more players to be
injured. Or a midweek bout of
food poisoning. Or a yukking
studio analyst planted on the
sideline, reminding them that
they had no chance.
“Does everybody really expect
us to lose all the time or what?”
Gruden asked Monday
afternoon.
Um, sort of, Coach!
Washington has been an
underdog seven times in eight
games this season, a ratio up
there in Browns and Colts
territory.
The worst odds arrived
Sunday, when the Redskins
nevertheless went toe-to-toe
with one of the NFC’s presumed
favorites, in one of the NFL’s
scariest venues, and came out
on top.
Fans of every team, in every
town, in every sport, believe that
their team plays both down and
up to the competition. It’s a
pillar of fandom, like hating
local radio hosts, cursing out
biased officials and believing
hometown players to be
uniquely charming men of great
sophistication.
Still, I’m not about to tell
Redskins fans they’re wrong.
Since Gruden and Cousins took
over, this team is 16-22-1 as an
underdog, which actually ranks
in the top half of the league. But
they’re only 9-8 when they’re
not an underdog — in the NFL’s
bottom third. The trend gets
more pronounced at the
extremes: In those four seasons,
the Redskins are the league’s
only team to win at least
30 percent of the time as a
touchdown underdog while also
failing to win even half their
games as seven-point favorites.
Some of this is just the
modern NFL which, for all its
faults, remains compelling in its
utter unpredictability. And some
of this is fun with sample sizes.
Washington has been a big
favorite just five times under
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
Somehow, quarterback Kirk Cousins and the Redskins found a way
to get it done in the final minutes Sunday against the Seahawks.
Gruden, winning twice.
But some of this seems
emblematic of what this team
has become: scrappy,
competitive and unwilling ever
to roll over — led by a
quarterback and a cornerback of
substantial courage — but not
remarkable enough to make
anything easy.
When seasons are slipping
away — down 24 to the
Buccaneers in 2015, or down 12
in the Meadowlands last
September and staring at an 0-3
start, or trailing Sunday in
Seattle with a roster wrapped in
gauze — they display an
improbable and impressive
backbone. When seasons are
presented on a platter — as
massive home favorites against
the Panthers and Giants last
winter — systems fizzle.
Look at what happened
Sunday. The injury-ravaged
defense more effectively
controlled Russell Wilson than
it had San Francisco 49ers
rookie C.J. Beathard in his first
NFL action. And Cousins —
without 80 percent of his
offensive line and his two most
reliable pass catchers, in a
building where the Seahawks
have been almost untouchable
— did what he failed to do at
home against the Giants
reserves last January: drive the
length of the field inside two
minutes for a winning score.
How does any of that make
sense?
Gruden professed innocence
of the odds after the win, but it’s
hard not to give the coach credit
for keeping his team afloat in a
week when fans were earnestly
suggesting the Redskins rest
everyone against Seattle and try
to heal in time for the Vikings.
(Or just rest everyone until
2018.)
“My job is to instill
confidence in these guys, to
make sure they understand that
we can go out and compete
against anybody, [with]
whoever’s playing on our
football team,” Gruden said
Monday. “We still have some
good players on offense. It’s not
like we’re totally inept. . . . I
mean, we have a good football
team. Our depth is challenged a
little bit, and special teams [is
limited] a little bit, but we feel
like we can go out there and
compete with anybody with the
talent that we have still
available.”
Apparently so, at least with
the benefit of three missed field
goal attempts and 16 penalties.
Sunday’s victory pushed Gruden
past Mike Shanahan’s win total
in Washington, and in eight
fewer games, too. And his public
posture — the friendly, selfdeprecating guy-next-door, such
a refreshing novelty in the dour
NFL — seems to play well in his
locker room, which has
remained upbeat under the
deluge of daily diagnoses.
“Great football mind but even
better person,” already-out-forthe-season linebacker Mason
Foster wrote of Gruden on
Twitter on Monday. “Guys on
this team will run through brick
walls for him.”
The thing is, they might not
have to if the Redskins can take
care of the other part of their
personality: winning when they
should. Six of their first eight
opponents currently have
winning records. They survived
that stretch with a .500 record,
encyclopedic injury list and all.
At this moment, the second-half
schedule seems far more
forgiving, with just three of the
final eight opponents above
.500. Washington figures to be
favored in many of those games.
Can it stand that prosperity?
Just in case, someone better
start telling them they have no
chance.
dan.steinberg@washpost.com
For more by Dan Steinberg, visit
washingtonpost.com/dcsportsbog.
Scherzer, Strasburg are finalists for NL Cy Young
BY
C HELSEA J ANES
A year after yielding a finalist
for all four of Major League Baseball’s major postseason awards,
the Washington Nationals have
finalists for just one such honor
this season: the National League
Cy Young Award. Reigning winner Max Scherzer and first-time
finalist Stephen Strasburg join
the Los Angeles Dodgers’ Clayton
Kershaw as finalists for the pitching award, which will be announced next week along with the
MVP, rookie of the year and manager of the year honors.
Scherzer is a finalist for the
second straight season. He started
the All-Star Game, finished second in the NL in ERA (2.51 to
Kershaw’s 2.31) and led the league
with 268 strikeouts — 29 more
than the closest National League
starter, the New York Mets’ Jacob
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DeGrom. He held opponents to a
major league low .178 batting average — 15 points better than the
next closest starter (Cleveland Indians ace Corey Kluber) and 20
points fewer than the next National Leaguer (Arizona Diamondbacks starter Robbie Ray). His
0.90 walks-plus-hits-per-inningpitched bested Kershaw’s 0.95
mark, and Scherzer threw 2002/3
innings to Kershaw’s 175. If Scherzer were to win, it would be his
third Cy Young Award. Only nine
pitchers have won so many, and
all but two — Kershaw and Roger
Clemens — are in the Hall of
Fame.
Strasburg, meanwhile, foretold
his dominant National League Division Series outings with a 2.52
ERA this season — a point behind
Scherzer. He held batters to a .204
average, fourth lowest in baseball.
His 10.47 strikeouts per nine innings ranked fourth in the National League, and his 1.02 WHIP
was third behind Scherzer and
Kershaw. For those concerned
with wins — and most voters are
adamant they are not — Scherzer’s 16 tied for 10th in baseball;
Strasburg’s 15 were tied for 13th.
Writers cast their votes for these
awards before the postseason, so
nothing Scherzer, Strasburg or
Kershaw did in October factors
into the decision.
The Nationals were shut out of
the MVP race by NL finalists Joey
Votto of the Cincinnati Reds, Paul
Goldschmidt of the Diamondbacks and Giancarlo Stanton of
the Miami Marlins, after Washington provided the unanimous
winner in 2015 and a finalist in
2016.
Bryce Harper played only 111
games because of a late-season
knee injury, one that likely cost
him any chance at a second MVP
award. Harper’s numbers — a .319
average and 1.008 on-base-plusslugging percentage — placed him
among the league’s elite offensive
performers. But much like Los
Angeles Angels outfielder Mike
Trout, who was not a finalist in the
American League for the first
time in his career, the injury left
him with a smaller body of work to
compare to the others, and Harper did not make the final three.
He was not the only National to
make a case for the award. Antho-
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Max Scherzer, right, is taking aim at his third Cy Young Award and
second in a row, while Stephen Strasburg is looking for his first.
ny Rendon finished the season
leading the National League in
FanGraphs Wins Above Replacement (6.9) after hitting .301 with
25 homers and 100 RBI. He
ranked among the league’s best
defensive third basemen, with the
best UZR (ultimate zone rating) at
the position. Often overlooked on
the star-studded Nationals, Rendon was a final vote candidate but
did not earn an all-star nod. Still,
many in the Nationals’ clubhouse
would have argued his case as the
most valuable National, which is,
of course, saying something.
Daniel Murphy finished second
on the team to Rendon in FanGraphs WAR despite dropping off
in production somewhat from his
monstrous 2016. His 4.3 WAR
ranked 27th in the majors, though
his .322 average was second only
to the Colorado Rockies’ Charlie
Blackmon
among
National
League hitters. His .928 OPS was
14th best in the National League.
Ryan Zimmerman, meanwhile,
compiled arguably the most impressive offensive season of the
group with a .303 average and 36
homers that tied him for sixth in
the National League. A season
after hitting .218 and looking like
a man whose career could be sliding into its twilight, Zimmerman
marched back with a season that
did not qualify him for the National League MVP, but should earn
him serious consideration for
comeback player of the year. That
award is announced later, and
fellow rejuvenated National Gio
Gonzalez could also contend.
No Nationals were expected to
contend for the National League
rookie of the year award, and none
of them did. Josh Bell of the Pittsburgh Pirates, Cody Bellinger of
the Dodgers and Paul DeJong of
the St. Louis Cardinals are the
finalists for that award.
Dusty Baker, who led the Nationals to 97 wins and a second
straight division title, was not a
finalist for National League manager of the year. The Dodgers’
Dave Roberts, the Rockies’ Bud
Black and the Diamondbacks’ Torey Lovullo — three of the five NL
West managers — are still in the
running for that title.
In the American League, Jose
Altuve of the Houston Astros, Aaron Judge of the New York Yankees
and Jose Ramirez of the Indians
are the MVP finalists. Kluber,
Chris Sale of the Boston Red Sox
and the Yankees’ Luis Severino
are the Cy Young finalists. Judge,
Boston’s Andrew Benintendi and
the Baltimore Orioles’ Trey Mancini are still in the running for the
rookie of the year award. Cleveland’s Terry Francona, Houston’s
A.J. Hinch and the Minnesota
Twins’ Paul Molitor are the manager of the year finalists.
chelsea.janes@washpost.com
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D5
M2
NBA ROUNDUP
Boston gets
by Atlanta
for ninth
straight win
CELTICS 110,
HAWKS 107
A SSOCIATED P RESS
FRANK GUNN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Wizards center Marcin Gortat, shown during Sunday night’s victory over the Raptors in Toronto, is preaching humility and says his team still “has a lot of things to work on.”
Gortat among those saying Wizards should be ‘more humble’
BY
C ANDACE B UCKNER
toronto — The Washington
Wizards have no problems expressing themselves. Their candor plays well on the Internet, and
their confidence has garnered
attention beyond the Beltway. Before their prime-time game this
past Friday against the Cleveland
Cavaliers, interview clips featuring Bradley Beal and John Wall —
the latter suggesting that Cleveland had dodged the Wizards in
last season’s playoff seedings —
circulated on social media, to the
delight of basketball Twitter.
Then the struggling Cavaliers
won, 130-122. And though the
Wizards’ locker room does not
lack for colorful characters, they
may need to try something new:
modesty.
On Sunday night, following a
107-96 road win over the Toronto
Raptors, starting center Marcin
Gortat suggested the team needs
to bind its unfettered confidence.
“Just because we won this
game today here, it doesn’t mean
that everything is fine and we
[are] back on the right track.
There’s a lot of things we’ve got
to work on,” Gortat said. “First of
all, we’ve got to become a more
humble team and we just got to
work harder.”
Gortat’s message: less talk and
more action.
Despite Gortat’s supersized
personality — the man once
walked a pig on a leash through a
shopping mall in Poland — as the
graybeard among the Wizards,
he tends to be more pragmatic.
And when Gortat’s comments
were shared with teammates,
they agreed with the suggestion.
“He’s not wrong in this instance,” Kelly Oubre Jr said.
“We’ve got to be humble. We’ve
got to stop going to the media
and doing things and saying
things. We kind of got to let our
game do the talking.”
Said Beal, who led the Wizards
with 38 points on Sunday: “For
sure. We definitely need to feed
off this energy but at the same
time we got to realize we’re not
the team we want to be or that we
need to be. So we’ve got a long
ways to go. It definitely starts
with humility, you know, realizing what’s at stake and what’s
ahead of us and taking it game by
game.”
The genesis of the Wizards’
self-assurance was well before
this season. Back in 2014, Beal
proclaimed that he and Wall
ranked as the best backcourt in
the NBA. However, Beal believes
the team’s fast start to the 2017-18
season provided false confidence.
“I would say early on, probably
when we were 3-0,” Beal said.
“Then we played the Lakers. I
think that kind of started it. We
kind of thought we were going to
be better than we were. We had
three great wins but at the same
time, we got to be able to win on
the road to be a great team.”
Not only did the Wizards lose
to the Lakers, a young team likely
to miss the playoffs, but they lost
after falling into LaVar Ball’s web
of nonsense.
Ahead of the matchup, Ball,
the father of Lakers rookie point
guard Lonzo Ball, had predicted
his son wouldn’t lose and that
the Wizards better “beware.”
Gortat responded by scoffing at
Ball on Twitter and when asked
directly how he would treat Lonzo Ball on the court, Wall responded with “no mercy.” Forthright, but the words were flipped
against Washington after its 10299 loss in overtime.
And yet, this didn’t stop Wall
and Beal from making bold comments before the Cleveland
game, their first big matchup of
the season, on ESPN’s “The
Jump.”
“I feel like we’re the best
team,” Beal said about the East-
WIZ ARDS’ NEX T THREE
vs. Dallas Mavericks
Today
7 NBCSW
vs. Los Angeles Lakers
Thursday
7 NBCSW
vs. Atlanta Hawks
Saturday
7 NBCSW
Radio: WFED (1500 AM)
“We’ve got to stop
going to the media
and doing things
and saying things.
We kind of got to
let our game do
the talking.”
Wizards forward Kelly Oubre Jr.
ern Conference, repeating a
statement he has shared since
training camp. “I always stand by
it. Why would I sit here and say
another team is better than my
team? I’m not going to sit here
and do that. I’ve got confidence
in myself and my teammates and
what we can bring to our team.”
By Sunday, however, no reporter was asking whether the
Wizards are the best team in the
East. Rather, questions focused
on more practical matters, such
as how the team built and almost
gave back a big lead again.
Though Oubre is the youngest
in the locker room, he has become one of the Wizards’ main
spokesmen. Much like his expressive teammates, Oubre has
immersed himself in the spotlight — before coming to work on
Friday, he wore a faux fur coat
with a not-safe-for-work message on the back. Even so, Oubre
backs Gortat’s advice for the
team to be more humble.
“We believe everything what
we’re saying. We believe it 100
percent. We just got to let it
happen. We can’t force issues,”
Oubre said. “We got to kind of let
success come to us throughout
our work. We just got to continue
to work, but he’s right.”
candace.buckner@washpost.com
Kyrie Irving took charge in a
fashion only he can.
Dribbling
and
weaving
through the lane and around the
perimeter, Irving scored from all
over and kept his teammates involved all night.
“It’s a beautiful game when it’s
played the right way,” the fourtime all-star said. “It’s not going
to look good every possession, but
you’ve got to be able to move on to
the next play. I understand that
better than most.”
Irving scored 35 points, Jayson
Tatum added 21 and the Boston
Celtics held off the Atlanta
Hawks, 110-107, on Monday night
for their ninth straight victory.
Irving’s three-pointer from the
right wing put the Celtics up
104-103 — the game’s 25th lead
change — with 1:37 remaining,
and Boston led the rest of the way.
Boston improved to 9-2, best in
the NBA, and has its longest
winning streak in seven years.
Al Horford had 15 points, 10
rebounds and nine assists in his
best game against his former
team.
Irving had his first 30-point
game as a Celtic on a night packed
with highlights. He either scored
or assisted on every basket of a
16-2 run in the third that put the
Celtics up by seven. He finished
with seven assists.
“He’s just very unique,” Horford said. “He has a good sense of
how teams are playing him.”
NETS 98, SUNS 92: D’Angelo Russell had 23 points and nine
assists, Joe Harris scored a season-high 18 points and Brooklyn
won in Phoenix.
The Suns rallied from a 15point first-half deficit to lead 7574 after Jared Dudley’s layup with
9:17 to play, but the Nets went
back ahead moments later and
held on to end a four-game skid.
Russell scored 13 points in the
fourth quarter. DeMarre Carroll
added 14 points and 11 rebounds.
T.J. Warren had 20 points as
the Suns lost their third straight.
Devin Booker scored 18 points
before fouling out late in the
game.
The Suns made just 34.9 percent of their field goal attempts
despite starting well, with Booker
scoring 11 points in the first seven
minutes. The Nets used a 16-0 run
to go up 28-16.
Seeking calm, Louisville tabs Padgett
LOUISVILLE FROM D1
You find Padgett after his do-Istill-have-a-job phase of that unforeseeable week of late September, which preceded his I-don’thave-any-assistants phase, just
after Louisville named him interim head coach following four
seasons assisting Pitino, and nine
years after five seasons playing
for Pitino. (He named Trent Johnson, the former head coach at
Nevada, Stanford, LSU and TCU,
as a top assistant.)
You find him after his parents
had flown a red-eye to Indianapolis upon his appointment, and
after that exchange on Interstate
65 southbound when his father,
Pete, a former 27-season high
school coach in Reno, Nev.,
looked at his wife and David’s
mother, Debbie, and said, “What
in the world?”
This is weeks after Pete Padgett
said to David, again in a car,
“What do you think,” and after
David Padgett said, “Hey, I don’t
have time to think.”
Now that one storm system has
cleared, there are three things
about this situation that one could
construe as evocative, curious or
funny. The first involves an organized Walk To Defeat ALS, in San
Diego, on Oct. 15. The second
involves the state — er, commonwealth — of Kentucky, and its
exhaustive basketball history, particularly that part in March 1998.
The third is that Louisville, a program about which the term “death
penalty” has gotten uttered of late,
might be really, really good.
Mention that, and Coach
Padgett might even laugh.
“As long as I don’t screw it up,”
he said.
Another odd turnover
At the Walk To Defeat ALS, Pete
and Debbie Padgett spotted Steve
Fisher, the retired former San
Diego State coach, and boy, was
that some coincidence. In all the
colorful and checkered history of
college basketball, Fisher’s plight
from March 1989 might bear the
closest resemblance to this situation. Back then, as a 24-7 Michigan prepared to take its No. 3 seed
into the NCAA tournament, Bill
Frieder, its head coach, prepared
to coach Michigan in March and
then relocate to Arizona State in
April.
Bo Schembechler, the Michigan athletic director with the distinctive disdain for nonsense, did
not cotton to the coach-Michigan
phase of Frieder’s equation. Uttering his deathless line, “A Michigan
man is going to coach Michigan,”
Schembechler suggested that
Frieder relocate straightway and
elevated the assistant Fisher who,
six games later, had a national
championship and an extension.
In conversation with Pete
Padgett, Fisher offered his counsel, and David Padgett intends to
accept. The towering similarity:
Both inherited well-built programs in weird circumstances.
“Most coaching changes are
situations where somebody either takes another job somewhere else or they didn’t win
enough games, so they get fired
because of that,” David Padgett
said. “This coaching change was
so unique because it wasn’t a
situation where we won six games
last year and all of a sudden they
wanted to make a change. We
know the circumstances. But
look, there’s going to be a personality difference. There’s no question about that.
“I mean, Coach Pitino’s one of a
kind. And his style” — one might
call it loud — “was obviously extremely successful, but with that
being said, there’s more than one
way to coach a basketball team,
and I just need to coach this team
the best way I see fit. Now, does
that mean I’m going to be their
best friend and Mr. Nice Guy every
day? No, not even close. If I don’t
think they’re doing what I expect
or I demand, I’m going to let them
know about it. And that’s been the
biggest transition so far, is me just
going from the assistant coach,
good-guy role to all of a sudden
now, you know, and I don’t like the
cliche ‘good-cop, bad-cop,’ but now,
I’m not going to be their best friend
every day anymore, because that’s
what the assistant coaches are for.”
“I don’t think it’s hard at all,”
Myles said, “because the kids respect him.”
“This is a situation,” Pete
Padgett said, “I don’t know if
anybody would ever be prepared
for this.”
Rich enough is the basketball
lore of Kentucky that the commonwealth has a post-Pitino precedent. In May 1997, Pitino, then 44,
left the University of Kentucky
after seven seasons, three Final
Fours and one national title, for
the Boston Celtics. Even the people who appreciated his work —
and that would be all of the people
— sometimes exhaled, especially
those who worked around the program. He was both great and exhausting.
From there, Athletic Director
C.M. Newton hired, from Georgia,
Tubby Smith, who steered the
Wildcats into uncertain February
waters, and then to one luminous,
lovable 1998 national title. Similarity: a transition to a voice somewhat quieter, which went reflected
in Louisville players’ comments at
the recent ACC media days. Differences: Kentucky then had voluminous NCAA tournament experience, and Louisville now doesn’t
have to embrace a new system.
Cameron Mills, who played for
Kentucky and is a radio host in
CHUCK BURTON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
After 16 years with Rick Pitino at the helm, Louisville is now coached by former player David Padgett.
Lexington, recalls some sort of
players’ meeting from around
February. “Up until that point, we
had not sold out to Tubby’s system,” Mills said. “We had kind of
reluctantly bought in bit by bit,
and we had never said, ‘Okay, this
guy knows what he’s doing,’ because we didn’t know that. Because we had no proof that he did,
and he did it differently than a
coach who did know what he was
doing, so how could this be the
right way, too? . . . I don’t remember, but I remember there was a
decision that was made, kind of a
conscious decision that was
made, and this was mentioned,
this, verbatim, was mentioned:
‘Look, if we don’t play within his
system, we don’t believe in our
head coach, we can’t do anything
special. There’s no way. We’re a
house divided.’ If we sell out completely to what he’s saying and
doing, then we’ve at least got a
chance, if he happens to know
what he’s saying and doing, and
he turns out he did.”
Talent on board
If there’s a science to what a
fresh coach can do in a first season, the Cardinals could serve as a
test case. With senior leadership
(guard Quentin Snider, 7-footer
Anas Mahmoud), junior leadership (6-10 Ray Spalding, 6-7 Deng
Adel), and four good freshmen,
Louisville seems exquisitely constructed. Myles sees “a lot of interchangeable guys,” and that “the
sky’s the limit.” Pete Padgett sees
his nerve endings quaking because, in one of those strange
realities of sports, it’s apparently
harder to watch an offspring
coach than an offspring player.
They refer to an understated
giant whom Roy Williams recruited to Kansas, who then
transferred quietly to Louisville
after Williams left for North
Carolina, who considers his sitout, 2004-05 season his most
valuable, toiling with Myles and
learning from a Final Four team.
He played two seasons in Spain’s
Canary Islands (2008-10) and,
with his then-fiancee and nowwife, Megan, often spent Saturdays at beachfront restaurants
sipping midday red, before they
lost their minds and returned.
He’s a way-of-life basketballer
who played for his father in high
school, after his father played for
his grandfather in college (at Nevada). Said Pete Padgett, “I started sitting on the bench with my
dad when he was a junior-college
coach in California when I was 5.
And I’m 63. This is kind of what
we’ve always done.”
Said David Padgett, upstairs in
the building with the Pitino posters in the lobby: Pitino always did
demand intricate involvement
from assistants. “Now obviously,
when you’re in charge, it’s a different feel,” the acting head coach
said, “but inadvertently, he really
prepared me for this position.
Obviously, we didn’t expect it or
hope for it to be this way, but with
that being said, I think he prepared me as best he could.”
chuck.culpepper@washpost.com
D6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
Four years at Harvard plus two at GW equals . . . ?
For Steeves, it adds up to an Ivy League degree, a pending master’s and a chance to continue an injury-plagued basketball career.
BY
S TEVEN G OFF
George Washington schedule
November
Because his Harvard-educated
mind is a little different than the
rest of ours, George Washington
graduate student Patrick Steeves
often watches basketball not as
sport but a series of expected
returns and probabilities.
He gives this example: While a
member of the Crimson during
an injury-plagued career, he
watched a teammate bolt to the
basket for an open layup. The
team’s best three-point shooter,
however, stood alone behind the
arc.
Take the easy two points or
pass the ball?
“Pass it,” Steeves thought to
himself.
The player passed.
“Everyone was yelling, ‘What
are you doing? Take the layup!’ ”
Steeves recalled.
“Our best three-point shooter
wide open in the corner has a
better than a two-thirds chance of
making that shot,” he said, meaning the expected value of points
would be higher for that three
attempt than an easy layup. “It’s a
different way of seeing things that
are sometimes counterintuitive
and that you wouldn’t necessarily
pick up just playing basketball.
“The math definitely helps.”
The open shooter made the
shot, by the way.
Steeves has his own digits worthy of consideration:
Six, as in six seasons of
college basketball.
3.75, his grade-point average
in earning a Harvard degree in
applied mathematics and economics.
Three, the number of Ivy
League seasons he missed with
injuries.
Two, the years of additional
eligibility granted by the NCAA.
Instead of entering the workforce after Harvard’s commencement, he decided to pursue a
master’s degree in business analytics at GW and continue playing
basketball on scholarship.
After starting 10 games and
averaging 6.6 points and 2.9 rebounds for the Colonials in 201617, the 6-foot-8 Canadian forward
will play a greater role with a
young squad this season.
GW welcomed nine newcomers and will try to compensate
for the graduation of Tyler Cavanaugh (18.3 points, 8.4 rebounds per game) and the departure of Jaren Sina (9.0 points per
10
Howard
7:30
14
at Florida St.
7
18
Hampton
2
20
Rider
7
23
vs. Xavier*
5 (FS1)
24
vs. Kan. St. or Ariz. St.* TBD
29
Morgan St.
7
December
3
2:30
(MASN)
vs. Temple**
6
Princeton
7
9
at Penn St.
4 (BTN)
16
Miami (Fla.)
noon
(CBSSN)
20
New Hampshire
7
23
Harvard
noon
30
St. Joseph’s
4
January
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Patrick Steeves averaged 6.6 points last year for the Colonials, who need his experience after adding nine new players this season.
3
at Duquesne
7
6
Rhode Island
4
10
at Davidson
7
13
at Richmond
4:30
(NBCSN)
17
George Mason
7
20
at VCU
12:30
(NBCSN)
28
at St. Bonaventure
noon
(NBCSN)
31
Duquesne
7
February
3
game), who left a year early to
pursue pro opportunities overseas. The only returning regular
with more than two years of
experience is senior guard Yuta
Watanabe (12.2 points per
game).
“I’ve seen enough things to
communicate and have a strong
voice for some of the new guys on
the team,” said Steeves, who will
turn 23 in January.
The Colonials, who were 20-15
and finished sixth in the Atlantic
10 in 2016-17, were picked for 11th
place out of 14 teams in the
league’s preseason poll last
month. They will open the campaign Friday at home against
Howard.
When not at Smith Center this
fall, Steeves is handling three
graduate courses — optimization
methods, stochastic foundations
and sports analytics — while conducting an independent study on
how machines interact with human language.
“Some book-smart students are not as savvy on the
court . . . but he also has a good feel for the game.”
George Washington Coach Maurice Joseph on forward Patrick Steeves
His long-term goal is to work in
artificial intelligence perhaps in
Silicon Valley, New York or Montreal, his home town.
Over the summer, Steeves interned at the Boston branch of
Analysis Group, an economic, financial and strategic consulting
firm. A year earlier, he turned
down a full-time job offer from
that company in order to continue his education and basketball.
He also passed up work in investment banking in Manhattan.
The thought of staying in
school didn’t strike him until his
senior season was ending. Ivy
League schools do not allow graduate students to play, so if he
wanted to stay with basketball, he
would have to enroll elsewhere.
“Why not?” he said. “It was
always my dream to play Division
I basketball, and I thought it had
been crushed at Harvard. It
would’ve been a waste not to use
those extra years and get a free
master’s.”
At Harvard, Steeves sat out his
freshman year with a stress fracture in his left foot. About a week
before the first game of sophomore season, he tore the anterior
cruciate ligament in his right
knee. Complications and additional surgeries shelved his junior
campaign.
Until preseason of his senior
year, he doubted he would ever
play. But the knee began to re-
spond and he was able to play 26
games (four starts) and average
9.1 points, 3.8 rebounds and 2.4
assists while shooting 46 percent
on three-pointers.
Maurice Joseph, GW’s secondyear head coach, has known
Steeves for many years — they’re
both from Montreal — and kept
tabs on his college career.
“When he finally got a chance
to play, I was ecstatic for him but I
thought that would be it,” Joseph
said. “I thought he would cash in
his chips, go on with his Harvard
degree and take over the world.”
GW met Steeves’s academic
and athletic needs. And before
last season the Colonials acquired
a player with experience around,
if not in, games.
This isn’t the first time an Ivy
League graduate has joined the
squad. Two years ago, Alex Mitola arrived with a Dartmouth
diploma and, as a graduate student in international trade and
investment policy with one year
4
(NBCSW)
Davidson
7
La Salle
7
10
at George Mason
4
14
at U-Mass.
7
17
VCU
4
21
Richmond
7
24
at St. Louis
8
28
Fordham
7
March
3
12:30
(NBCSN)
at Dayton
7-11 A-10 tournament**
*- in Las Vegas
** - at Capital One Arena
of eligibility, provided a spark off
the bench.
“He’s a high IQ guy,” Joseph
said of Steeves. “Some book-smart
students are not as savvy on the
court and some students who
have trouble in the classroom are
savants on the court. With Pat,
he’s an intelligent student, but he
also has a good feel for the game.”
steven.goff@washpost.com
Guard from Flint takes on feature role for Mason
Grayer had to grow up quickly because of his home town’s water crisis. That maturity could also help him on the court.
BY
S TEVEN G OFF
water crisis exposed many in the
city of 100,000 to disease and lead
poisoning.
Grayer, now a junior guard at
George Mason, remembers crates
of bottled water at his mother’s
house and the daily routine of
boiling whatever discolored liquid flowed from the tap. He remembers traveling 20 minutes to
the suburban home of his father,
nine-year NBA player Jeff Grayer,
to shower.
Problems began in 2014 when
the city, for financial reasons,
switched its water supply from
Lake Huron via Detroit to the
notoriously polluted Flint River.
“It went downhill from there,”
Jaire Grayer said. “Everybody
would be talking about how bad it
was. It was a bad situation.”
A 2015 study revealed the number of children with elevated lead
levels in their blood almost dou-
For Jaire Grayer and his boyhood friends, adolescence in
Flint, Mich., meant being from
the same city as Michigan State’s
“Flintstones,” the local trio that
propelled the Spartans to the
2000 NCAA basketball championship.
Idols rose not from distant cities but from local neighborhoods
and schools.
The city had seen better days,
before the nation’s largest General Motors plant shut down and
the economy tanked and the
crime rate soared. But, as Grayer
described last week, Flint is “a
great city, too. It builds character,
it builds toughness and all the
characteristics you need to be
strong in life.”
In recent years, Flint suffered
another major setback when a
bled after the city switched water
sources. Lawsuits were filed, a
state of emergency called and a
political firestorm raged.
“Jaire got to see firsthand from
family members discussing issues
and concerns,” said Jeff Grayer, a
Flint native. “He was really taken
aback. He would say: ‘Okay, are
you really telling me I can’t take a
shower if I am over at my auntie’s
house or I can’t go here or there
and drink the water? Is this really
happening?’ We had some deep
conversations about it.”
Those experiences strengthened Jaire’s bonds to his home
town. And each of the past two
springs, he has volunteered at the
Fresh Flint Festival, a day of activities promoting fitness and
healthy living in the wake of the
water fiasco.
His father’s mentoring program, Flint Athletes for Better
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George Mason schedule
November
10
Lafayette
7
12
at Louisville
2
16
Binghamton
7
18
CS-Northridge
6
21
vs. La. Tech*
6 (CBSSN)
22
vs. Fresno St. or
Evansville*
TBD
29
at J. Madison
7
December
RAFAEL SUANES FOR GEORGE MASON ATHLETICS
Jaire Grayer, the son of ex-NBA player Jeff Grayer, averaged
11.4 points and 5.4 rebounds last season for the Patriots.
Education, is a sponsor. Several
former athletes with local ties
have gotten involved, including
Mateen Cleaves (one of Michigan
State’s “Flintstones”) and ex-NFL
wide receiver Andre Rison.
This year’s event included
Grayer’s high school teammate,
Miles Bridges, the Big Ten freshman of the year last season at
Michigan State.
“Sports has always been the
candy to make people feel good
and feel good about themselves,”
Jeff Grayer said. “So when Jaire
heard about the festival, he wanted to be a part of it.”
Besides his community outreach, Jeff Grayer is project manager for a construction company
hired to replace 18,000 corroded
residential water pipes in Flint.
The job will take three to five
years.
To the younger Grayer, it was
important to give back and set
examples for children, just as
elders had done for him growing
up during rough times in Flint.
“The kids were having a great
time, smiling and having fun and
taking their minds off the things
that kids in other areas don’t have
to worry about,” he said. “I feel
like it’s a duty of mine to go back
and help my city through this
tough time.
“I have a small platform to help
and, hopefully, if my career goes
like the way I want it to, I can go
back and help even further.”
Grayer will enter his third sea-
son as a George Mason starter.
The guard-oriented Patriots, who
are picked to finish 10th in the
Atlantic 10 and seem a year away
from contending in the 14-team
conference, will open Friday
against Lafayette at EagleBank
Arena in Fairfax before visiting
No. 16 Louisville on Sunday.
With star guard Marquise
Moore gone, Grayer will step into
a featured role on a team without
any scholarship seniors. Last season, he averaged 11.4 points and
5.4 rebounds while making a
team-high 59 three-pointers and
improving his free throw accuracy to 83.3 from 53.6 as a freshman.
Moore wasn’t just George Mason’s leading scorer (16.9 points
per game); despite being 6 feet 2,
he led the Atlantic 10 in rebounding with 10.9 per game. The Patriots also lost their second-leading
rebounder, Jalen Jenkins (6.1).
In five weeks of preseason
workouts, the 6-5, 200-pound
Grayer has led the team in rebounding at both the offensive
and defensive ends.
Coach Dave Paulsen sees a
player who has evolved both on
and off the court, in part because
of life experiences.
“Those two go hand in hand:
You don’t live and die with one
jump shot you take, and the world
doesn’t revolve around you,”
Paulsen said. “His growth and
maturity over two years has been
fun to watch.”
steven.goff@washpost.com
3
at Auburn
6
William & Mary
3 (SECN)
7
9
N.C. Central
4
12
Ga. Southern
7
17
Penn St.
4
22
Morgan St.
7
30
at Rhode Island
4
January
3
at U-Mass.
7
7
Davidson
noon
(NBCSN)
10
St. Joseph’s
7
13
St. Louis
2:30
(NBCSN)
17
at G. Washington
7
20
at Duquesne
4:30
(NBCSN)
27
VCU
2 (CBSSN)
31
St. Bonaventure
7
February
at Richmond
4:30
(NBCSN)
7
at Fordham
7
10
G. Washington
4
14
Dayton
7
17
at La Salle
2
21
at St. Joseph’s
7
24
U-Mass.
6
28
at VCU
7 (MASN)
3
March
3
Richmond
A-10
7-11
tournament**
*- in Cancun, Mexico
** - at Capital One Arena
7
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D7
M2
scoreboard
FO O T B A LL
B A S K ET B A L L
NFL
NBA
NBA leaders
NFC
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Entering Monday’s games
EAST
W
Philadelphia .................. 8
Dallas ............................ 5
Washington .................. 4
N.Y. Giants .................... 1
L
1
3
4
7
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.889
.625
.500
.125
PF
283
226
177
129
PA
179
178
194
207
SOUTH
W
New Orleans ................. 6
Carolina ......................... 6
Atlanta .......................... 4
Tampa Bay .................... 2
L
2
3
4
6
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.750
.667
.500
.250
PF
221
168
170
158
PA
155
159
172
198
NORTH
W
Minnesota ..................... 6
Detroit .......................... 4
Green Bay ..................... 4
Chicago ......................... 3
L
2
4
4
5
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.750
.500
.500
.375
PF
179
206
181
134
PA
135
186
191
171
WEST
W
L.A. Rams ...................... 6
Seattle .......................... 5
Arizona ......................... 4
San Francisco ................ 0
L
2
3
4
9
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.750
.625
.500
.000
PF
263
189
139
143
PA
155
149
201
239
AFC
EAST
W
New England ................. 6
Buffalo .......................... 5
Miami ............................ 4
N.Y. Jets ....................... 4
L
2
3
4
5
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.750
.625
.500
.444
PF
216
174
116
191
PA
179
149
179
207
SOUTH
W
Tennessee ..................... 5
Jacksonville .................. 5
Houston ........................ 3
Indianapolis .................. 3
L
3
3
5
6
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.625
.625
.375
.333
PF
181
206
229
162
PA
193
117
208
260
NORTH
W
Pittsburgh ..................... 6
Baltimore ...................... 4
Cincinnati ...................... 3
Cleveland ...................... 0
L
2
5
5
8
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.750
.444
.375
.000
PF
167
190
129
119
PA
131
171
158
202
WEST
W
Kansas City ................... 6
Oakland ......................... 4
Denver ........................... 3
L.A. Chargers ................ 3
L
3
5
5
5
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.667
.444
.375
.375
PF
253
196
150
150
PA
208
214
198
152
THURSDAY’S RESULT
at N.Y. Jets 34, Buffalo 21
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
Washington 17, at Seattle 14
at Tennessee 23, Baltimore 20
at Jacksonville 23, Cincinnati 7
L.A. Rams 51, at N.Y. Giants 17
at New Orleans 30, Tampa Bay 10
at Carolina 20, Atlanta 17
Indianapolis 20, at Houston 14
at Philadelphia 51, Denver 23
at Dallas 28, Kansas City 17
Arizona 20, at San Francisco 10
Oakland 27, at Miami 24
ATLANTIC
W
Boston..........................................9
Toronto ........................................5
New York .....................................5
Philadelphia .................................5
Brooklyn.......................................4
L
2
4
4
4
6
Pct
.818
.556
.556
.556
.400
GB
—
3
3
3
41/2
SOUTHEAST
W
Orlando ........................................6
Washington .................................5
Charlotte......................................5
x-Miami........................................4
Atlanta.........................................2
L
4
4
5
5
9
Pct
.600
.556
.500
.444
.182
GB
—
CENTRAL
W
Detroit .........................................7
Indiana .........................................5
Milwaukee ...................................4
Cleveland .....................................4
Chicago ........................................2
1/
2
1
11/2
41/2
L
3
5
5
6
6
Pct
.700
.500
.444
.400
.250
GB
—
2
21/2
3
4
SOUTHWEST
W
Houston .......................................8
Memphis ......................................6
San Antonio .................................6
New Orleans ................................5
Dallas ...........................................1
L
3
4
4
5
10
Pct
.727
.600
.600
.500
.091
GB
—
11/2
11/2
21/2
7
NORTHWEST
W
Minnesota....................................7
Portland .......................................6
Utah .............................................5
Denver..........................................5
Oklahoma City .............................4
L
3
4
5
5
5
Pct
.700
.600
.500
.500
.444
GB
—
1
2
2
21/2
PACIFIC
W
x-Golden State.............................7
L.A. Clippers.................................5
L.A. Lakers ...................................5
Phoenix ........................................4
Sacramento .................................1
L
3
4
5
7
8
Pct
.700
.556
.500
.364
.111
GB
—
11/2
2
31/2
51/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
x-late game
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
Washington 107, at Toronto 96
Atlanta 117, at Cleveland 115
Miami 104, at L.A. Clippers 101
Boston 104, at Orlando 88
at Houston 137, Utah 110
at San Antonio 112, Phoenix 95
at New York 108, Indiana 101
at Minnesota 112, Charlotte 94
at Portland 103, Oklahoma City 99
at L.A. Lakers 107, Memphis 102
MONDAY’S RESULTS
Boston 110, at Atlanta, 107
Brooklyn 98, at Phoenix 92
Miami at Golden State, Late
TUESDAY’S GAMES
Dallas at Washington, 7
Milwaukee at Cleveland, 7
New Orleans at Indiana, 7
Charlotte at New York, 7:30
Chicago at Toronto, 7:30
L.A. Clippers at San Antonio, 8:30
Brooklyn at Denver, 9
Philadelphia at Utah, 9
Memphis at Portland, 10
Oklahoma City at Sacramento, 10
MONDAY’S RESULT
Detroit at Green Bay, Late
THURSDAY’S GAME
Seattle at Arizona, 8:25
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Minnesota at Washington, 1
Pittsburgh at Indianapolis, 1
L.A. Chargers at Jacksonville, 1
New Orleans at Buffalo, 1
Green Bay at Chicago, 1
Cincinnati at Tennessee, 1
N.Y. Jets at Tampa Bay, 1
Cleveland at Detroit, 1
Houston at L.A. Rams, 4:05
N.Y. Giants at San Francisco, 4:25
Dallas at Atlanta, 4:25
New England at Denver, 8:30
Indiana at Detroit, 7
New York at Orlando, 7
L.A. Lakers at Boston, 8
Miami at Phoenix, 9
Minnesota at Golden State, 10:30
THURSDAY’S GAMES
L.A. Lakers at Washington, 7
New Orleans at Toronto, 7:30
Cleveland at Houston, 8
Philadelphia at Sacramento, 10
Oklahoma City at Denver, 10:30
Miami at Carolina, 8:30
Celtics 110, Hawks 107
Lions 30, Packers 17
Lions ......................................... 7 7
Packers ..................................... 0 3
3
0
13 — 30
14 — 17
FIRST QUARTER
Detroit: M.Jones 25 pass from Stafford (Prater kick),
1:45.
SECOND QUARTER
Detroit: Abdullah 4 run (Prater kick), 2:47.
GB: FG Crosby 35, :00.
THIRD QUARTER
Detroit: FG Prater 44, 9:06.
FOURTH QUARTER
Detroit: FG Prater 19, 12:31.
GB: Hundley 1 run (Crosby kick), 9:52.
Detroit: M.Jones 11 pass from Stafford (Prater kick),
8:06.
Detroit: FG Prater 31, 1:42.
GB: Williams 1 run (Crosby kick), :00.
Attendance: 77,575.
Lions
Packers
First Downs .......................................... 24
21
Total Net Yards ................................... 417
311
Rushes-Yards ................................. 33-64
17-78
Passing ................................................ 353
233
Punt Returns ....................................... 2-9
0-0
Kickoff Returns ................................. 1-12
7-140
Interceptions Ret. ............................... 0-0
0-0
Comp-Att-Int ............................... 26-33-0 26-38-0
Sacked-Yards Lost .............................. 1-8
3-12
Punts ................................................ 0-0.0
3-42.7
Fumbles-Lost ...................................... 2-1
0-0
Penalties-Yards ................................ 2-19
2-20
Time Of Possession ......................... 36:55
23:05
RUSHING
Detroit: Abdullah 21-48, Riddick 5-11, Agnew 1-4,
D.Washington 5-1, Stafford 1-0.
Green Bay: Montgomery 5-33, Hundley 4-22, A.Jones
5-12, T.Davis 1-9, Williams 1-1, Cobb 1-1.
PASSING
Detroit: Stafford 26-33-0-361.
Green Bay: Hundley 26-38-0-245.
Boston ................................ 26
Atlanta ............................... 25
BOSTON
Brown
Horford
Baynes
Irving
Tatum
Smart
Rozier
Ojeleye
Theis
Larkin
Nader
TOTALS
28
29
28
21
28 — 110
32 — 107
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
30:34 4-10 2-2 1-4 1 4 11
33:13 5-13 4-4 2-10 9 1 15
14:37
1-5 0-0 0-3 0 0
2
36:57 14-22 3-4 0-3 7 3 35
32:27 7-13 4-4 0-8 1 1 21
28:49
2-5 4-5 2-4 5 4
9
19:45
3-8 0-0 0-5 3 1
8
16:09
2-3 0-0 0-2 0 3
6
13:59
1-1 1-3 2-2 2 3
3
6:31
0-1 0-0 0-0 0 0
0
5:14
0-0 0-0 0-1 0 1
0
240 39-81 18-22 7-42 28 21 110
Percentages: FG .481, FT .818. 3-Point Goals: 14-36, .389
(Irving 4-10, Tatum 3-5, Ojeleye 2-3, Rozier 2-5, Smart
1-2, Brown 1-5, Horford 1-5, Baynes 0-1). Team Rebounds: 8. Team Turnovers: 13 (22 PTS). Blocked Shots:
3 (Tatum 2, Horford). Turnovers: 13 (Smart 4, Brown 2,
Irving 2, Rozier 2, Theis 2, Horford). Steals: 3 (Smart 2,
Tatum). Technical Fouls: None.
ATLANTA
Babbitt
Prince
Dedmon
Bazemore
Schroder
Delaney
Belinelli
Taylor
Collins
Cavanaugh
TOTALS
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
24:30
3-4 1-2 0-5 1 4
9
27:55 3-10 0-1 0-2 4 1
7
35:38 8-14 2-2 3-12 2 3 19
26:04
1-7 2-2 0-8 3 3
5
35:33 9-20 2-2 0-2 6 1 23
27:52
4-7 2-3 1-4 1 2 13
26:03 6-10 5-5 0-0 3 2 19
20:23
2-5 0-1 0-2 4 0
4
15:46
3-4 2-2 1-1 0 5
8
0:12
0-0 0-0 0-0 0 1
0
240 39-81 16-20 5-36 24 22 107
Percentages: FG .481, FT .800. 3-Point Goals: 13-26, .500
(Delaney 3-3, Schroder 3-7, Babbitt 2-2, Belinelli 2-5,
Dedmon 1-1, Bazemore 1-3, Prince 1-5). Team Rebounds:
6. Team Turnovers: 14 (7 PTS). Blocked Shots: 4
(Dedmon 2, Babbitt, Prince). Turnovers: 14 (Bazemore 5,
Dedmon 2, Delaney 2, Schroder 2, Babbitt, Collins,
Prince). Steals: 8 (Belinelli 3, Delaney 2, Schroder 2,
Bazemore). Technical Fouls: Bazemore, 11:35 second.
A: 13,215 (19,049).
RECEIVING
Detroit: Tate 7-113, M.Jones 7-107, Riddick 4-62, Ebron
3-35, T.Jones 2-29, Fells 1-10, Abdullah 1-9, Mihalik
1-(minus 4).
Green Bay: D.Adams 7-53, Cobb 5-58, Nelson 4-35,
Kendricks 2-32, Williams 2-31, A.Jones 2-(minus 1),
Montgomery 1-18, Ripkowski 1-9, Rodgers 1-5, T.Davis
1-5.
MISSED FIELD GOALS
Detroit: Prater 55.
REDSKINS LEADERS
Passing
Cmp
Cousins ............... 182
Team ................... 182
Opp ...................... 165
Att Yds
268 2147
268 2147
271 1952
Rushing
Att
Thompson ............................... 51
Kelley ...................................... 58
Perine ...................................... 57
Cousins .................................... 26
M.Brown ................................... 8
Crowder ..................................... 4
Paul ........................................... 1
Team ..................................... 205
Opp. ....................................... 210
TD
13
13
12
Int Rtg
4 102.0
4 102.0
8 85.0
Yds Avg Lg
251 4.9 61t
184 3.2 21
175 3.1 12
125 4.8 18
29 3.6 11
26 6.5 11
-1 -1.0 -1
789 3.8 61t
884 4.2 32
Receiving
No. Yds
Thompson ............................... 35 453
Crowder ................................... 28 272
Reed ........................................ 27 211
Grant ....................................... 24 254
Davis ....................................... 23 384
Pryor ........................................ 20 240
Doctson ................................... 11 189
Perine ........................................ 5 30
Quick ......................................... 4 60
Paul ........................................... 2 29
Kelley ........................................ 2 14
M.Brown ................................... 1 11
Sprinkle ..................................... 0
0
Team ..................................... 182 2147
Opp. ....................................... 165 1952
Avg Lg
12.9 74
9.7 41
7.8 20
10.6 34
16.7 69
12.0 44t
17.2 52t
6.0 16
15.0 31
14.5 32
7.0
9
11.0 11
0.0
0
11.8 74
11.8 69
TD
2
3
0
1
0
0
0
6
6
TD
3
0
2
2
1
1
3
1
0
0
0
0
0
13
12
INTs
No. Yds TD Sacks
Fuller ....................... 3
3 0 Kerrigan
Kerrigan .................. 1 24 1 Smith
Foster ...................... 1 10 0 Ioannidis
Compton ................. 1
2 0 Z.Brown
Dunbar .................... 1
0 0 McClain
Nicholson ................ 1
0 0 Allen
Galette
Foster
Hood
Swearinger
Team
8 39 1 Team
Opp.
4 50 1 Opp.
No.
6.0
4.5
3.5
2.5
2.0
1.0
1.0
0.5
0.5
0.5
22.0
22.0
Punting
No.
Way .................................... 37
Team .................................. 37
Opp. .................................... 36
In20
14
14
14
Avg.
44.2
44.2
45.4
Net
38.5
38.5
42.2
Scoring
TD XP-Att FG-Att
Hopkins .......................... 0 12-13
9-11
Thompson ...................... 5
0-0
0-0
Doctson .......................... 3
0-0
0-0
Kelley ............................. 3
0-0
0-0
Rose ............................... 0
6-7
4-5
Grant .............................. 2
0-0
0-0
Reed ............................... 2
0-0
0-0
Cousins ........................... 1
0-0
0-0
Davis .............................. 1
0-0
0-0
Kerrigan ......................... 1
0-0
0-0
Perine ............................. 1
0-0
0-0
Pryor ............................... 1
0-0
0-0
Team ............................ 20 18-20 13-16
Opp. .............................. 21 16-17 16-23
S
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
Pts
39
30
18
18
18
12
12
6
6
6
6
6
177
194
Nets 98, Suns 92
Brooklyn ............................. 28
Phoenix ............................... 19
BROOKLYN
Carroll
Hollis-Jefferson
Mozgov
Crabbe
Russell
Dinwiddie
Harris
LeVert
Acy
Zeller
Kilpatrick
TOTALS
19
22
25
27
26 — 98
24 — 92
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
33:25 5-12 3-4 3-11 0 4 14
16:33
1-3 2-2 0-2 0 0
4
16:27
1-3 0-0 1-2 0 6
2
22:49
5-9 2-3 1-4 0 4 15
30:06 8-13 7-12 0-6 8 3 23
26:37
1-8 1-1 2-4 7 3
4
25:18 7-13 1-1 0-3 1 3 18
22:55
2-8 0-0 1-4 0 4
4
20:53
0-8 2-2 0-7 3 3
2
17:21
5-7 2-4 3-3 0 0 12
7:34
0-3 0-0 0-2 1 0
0
240 35-87 20-29 11-48 20 30 98
Percentages: FG .402, FT .690. 3-Point Goals: 8-32, .250
(Crabbe 3-4, Harris 3-7, Dinwiddie 1-3, Carroll 1-5,
Kilpatrick 0-2, LeVert 0-2, Russell 0-2, Acy 0-7). Team
Rebounds: 13. Team Turnovers: 16 (14 PTS). Blocked
Shots: 4 (Crabbe, Harris, Russell, Zeller). Turnovers: 16
(Russell 5, LeVert 3, Carroll 2, Harris 2, Mozgov 2,
Kilpatrick, Zeller). Steals: 10 (LeVert 5, Russell 2,
Crabbe, Harris, Mozgov). Technical Fouls: Acy, 6:22
second.
PHOENIX
Chriss
Warren
Chandler
D.Booker
James
Ulis
Len
Dudley
Jackson
Daniels
Bender
TOTALS
FG
109
100
104
115
94
87
82
81
82
91
70
82
71
72
69
85
72
77
68
82
63
70
79
85
67
63
56
75
68
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
15:12
1-4 2-2 0-4 2 2
4
36:08 8-19 4-6 1-9 2 2 20
23:24
1-2 1-2 2-7 0 1
3
34:44 6-15 5-5 1-2 1 6 18
25:48 5-13 4-5 0-3 2 3 16
24:49 4-11 2-2 0-1 3 3 11
24:36
1-6 5-7 6-14 1 4
7
20:38
2-3 1-2 2-5 1 4
6
13:20
1-6 2-4 1-3 0 3
4
11:02
1-5 0-0 0-0 1 1
3
10:18
0-2 0-0 1-4 0 0
0
240 30-86 26-35 14-52 13 29 92
Percentages: FG .349, FT .743. 3-Point Goals: 6-25, .240
(James 2-6, Dudley 1-1, D.Booker 1-4, Daniels 1-4, Ulis
1-5, Bender 0-1, Chriss 0-1, Jackson 0-1, Warren 0-2).
Team Rebounds: 13. Team Turnovers: 17 (17 PTS).
Blocked Shots: 7 (Warren 3, Len 2, Dudley, Jackson).
Turnovers: 17 (D.Booker 4, Chandler 3, Jackson 2, Len 2,
Ulis 2, Chriss, Dudley, James, Warren). Steals: 8
(D.Booker 2, James 2, Warren 2, Jackson, Len). Technical
Fouls: coach Suns (Defensive three second), 7:50 second.
A: 15,905 (18,055).
WIZARDS LEADERS
GM FGM-FGA PCT REB AST
Beal .................... 9
82-163 .503 4.7 3.1
Wall.................... 8
56-138 .406 3.4 10.4
Porter Jr............. 8
58-102 .569 6.9 1.8
Gortat ................ 9
44-76 .579 9.8 1.7
Oubre Jr. ............ 9
38-82 .463 5.6
.7
Scott .................. 9
31-63 .492 4.0
.4
Meeks ................ 9
23-62 .371 1.3
.3
Morris ................ 2
3-14 .214 4.0 1.5
McCullough ........ 1
2-4 .500 3.0
.0
Mahinmi............. 9
14-30 .467 4.2
.6
Smith ................. 4
3-16 .188 2.2
.3
Satoransky......... 5
5-15 .333 1.6 1.8
Frazier................ 9
8-29 .276 1.6 4.6
TEAM ................. 9 367-794 .462 43.3 23.6
OPP .................... 9 368-774 .475 43.2 22.7
PTS
25.7
20.5
18.3
12.1
12.0
8.6
8.3
6.0
5.0
3.9
3.3
3.0
2.8
112.8
109.2
FT PTS. AVG.
54 279 31.0
57 272 30.2
70 324 29.5
44 288 28.8
74 286 28.6
65 247 27.4
82 271 27.1
65 267 26.7
50 231 25.7
39 252 25.2
70 215 23.9
49 238 23.8
52 213 23.7
48 231 23.1
31 180 22.5
47 224 22.4
26 199 22.1
43 220 22.0
64 219 21.9
43 218 21.8
30 169 21.1
21 189 21.0
30 210 21.0
5 210 21.0
32 185 20.6
32 164 20.5
42 164 20.5
26 203 20.3
30 181 20.1
FG PERCENTAGE
FG
Capela, HOU .................................... 61
Adams, OKC .................................... 50
Gobert, UTA .................................... 54
Sabonis, IND ................................... 54
Randle, L.A.L. .................................. 46
Kanter, NYK .................................... 53
James, CLE .................................... 115
Antetokounmpo, MIL .................... 109
Gortat, WAS ................................... 44
Jordan, L.A.C. .................................. 35
Porter Jr., WAS ............................... 58
Howard, CHA ................................... 55
Kuzma, L.A.L. .................................. 63
Snell, MIL ........................................ 34
Towns, MIN ..................................... 82
Horford, BOS ................................... 55
Favors, UTA ..................................... 50
Gibson, MIN .................................... 40
Drummond, DET .............................. 55
Davis, NOR ...................................... 87
Durant, GOL .................................... 91
Johnson, MIA .................................. 39
Korver, CLE ...................................... 39
FGA
89
74
84
86
74
87
189
187
76
61
102
97
112
61
148
100
91
73
101
160
168
73
73
PCT.
.685
.676
.643
.628
.622
.609
.608
.583
.579
.574
.569
.567
.562
.557
.554
.550
.549
.548
.545
.544
.542
.534
.534
THREE-POINT PERCENTAGE
3FG
Bjelica, MIN ..................................... 15
Joseph, IND ..................................... 14
Gordon, ORL .................................... 19
McCollum, POR ............................... 29
Felton, OKC ..................................... 12
Porter Jr., WAS ............................... 21
Acy, Bro ........................................... 11
Tatum, BOS ..................................... 15
Horford, BOS ................................... 17
Snell, MIL ........................................ 19
Olynyk, MIA .................................... 13
Parsons, MEM ................................. 14
3FGA
24
23
34
53
22
40
21
29
33
37
26
28
PCT.
.625
.609
.559
.547
.545
.525
.524
.517
.515
.514
.500
.500
FTA
22
27
27
24
22
20
69
88
50
PCT.
1.000
.963
.963
.958
.955
.950
.942
.932
.920
FT
22
26
26
23
21
19
65
82
46
REBOUNDS PER GAME
G OFF. DEF. TOT. AVG.
Jordan, L.A.C. ...................... 9
52
84 136 15.1
Drummond, DET ............... 10
51
96 147 14.7
Howard, CHA .................... 10
43
95 138 13.8
Cousins, NOR .................... 10
21 116 137 13.7
Davis, NOR .......................... 9
28
86 114 12.7
Jokic, DEN ......................... 10
25
91 116 11.6
Kanter, NYK ........................ 9
40
62 102 11.3
Towns, MIN ....................... 10
25
84 109 10.9
Capela, HOU ...................... 11
33
84 117 10.6
Love, CLE ........................... 10
24
79 103 10.3
Sabonis, IND ..................... 10
28
75 103 10.3
Embiid, PHL ........................ 8
12
69
81 10.1
Gobert, UTA ...................... 10
27
72
99 9.9
Antetokounmpo, MIL ......... 9
12
77
89 9.9
Gortat, WAS ....................... 9
21
67
88 9.8
Simmons, PHL .................... 9
20
68
88 9.8
Chandler, PHX ................... 10
32
63
95 9.5
ASSISTS PER GAME
G
Westbrook, OKC ................................ 9
Wall, WAS ......................................... 8
Harden, HOU ................................... 11
James, CLE ...................................... 10
Teague, MIN .................................... 10
Simmons, PHL ................................... 9
Collison, IND ................................... 10
Green, GOL ...................................... 10
Grant, CHI .......................................... 8
Ball, L.A.L. ....................................... 10
Schroder, ATL ................................... 8
Lillard, POR ..................................... 10
Lowry, TOR ........................................ 9
Curry, GOL ....................................... 10
AST.
102
83
107
91
84
74
73
73
56
69
53
66
59
65
AVG.
11.3
10.4
9.7
9.1
8.4
8.2
7.3
7.3
7.0
6.9
6.6
6.6
6.6
6.5
STEALS PER GAME
G
Irving, BOS ...................................... 10
George, OKC ...................................... 9
Porter Jr., WAS ................................. 8
Beverley, L.A.C. ................................. 9
Rivers, L.A.C. ..................................... 9
Drummond, DET .............................. 10
Bazemore, ATL ................................ 10
Cousins, NOR .................................. 10
Ingles, UTA ...................................... 10
Carroll, Bro ........................................ 8
Ntilikina, NYK ................................... 7
Curry, GOL ....................................... 10
Rubio, UTA ...................................... 10
STL.
24
21
18
20
19
21
19
19
19
15
13
18
18
AVG.
2.40
2.33
2.25
2.22
2.11
2.10
1.90
1.90
1.90
1.88
1.86
1.80
1.80
STEALS PER GAME
G
Gobert, UTA .................................... 10
Durant, GOL .................................... 10
Porzingis, NYK .................................. 9
Davis, NOR ........................................ 9
Towns, MIN ..................................... 10
Cousins, NOR .................................. 10
Gasol, SAN ...................................... 10
Udoh, UTA ....................................... 10
Capela, HOU .................................... 11
Gasol, MEM ..................................... 10
Lopez, L.A.L. .................................... 10
Henson, MIL ...................................... 9
West, GOL ....................................... 10
Antetokounmpo, MIL ........................ 9
Embiid, PHL ....................................... 8
Adams, OKC ...................................... 9
Jordan, L.A.C. .................................... 9
O'Quinn, NYK .................................... 9
STL.
25
24
20
19
20
19
17
17
18
16
16
14
15
13
11
12
12
12
AVG.
2.50
2.40
2.22
2.11
2.00
1.90
1.70
1.70
1.64
1.60
1.60
1.56
1.50
1.44
1.38
1.33
1.33
1.33
NCAA
MEN’S AP TOP 25
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
Duke (33)
Michigan St. (13)
Arizona (18)
Kansas (1)
Kentucky
Villanova
Wichita St.
Florida
North Carolina
Southern Cal
West Virginia
Cincinnati
Miami
Notre Dame
Minnesota
Louisville
Xavier
Gonzaga
Northwestern
Purdue
UCLA
Saint Mary's (Calif.)
Seton Hall
Baylor
Texas A&M
RECORD
28-9
20-15
32-5
31-5
32-6
32-4
31-5
27-9
33-7
26-10
28-9
30-6
21-12
26-10
24-10
25-9
24-14
37-2
24-12
27-8
31-5
29-5
21-12
27-8
16-15
PTS
1572
1520
1506
1439
1340
1284
1270
1100
1047
995
840
837
836
814
642
570
544
500
473
362
340
333
274
167
130
PVS
7
—
4
3
6
1
19
20
5
—
13
18
—
14
—
10
—
2
—
15
8
22
—
12
—
Others receiving votes: Alabama 86, Virginia 57, Rhode
Island 49, TCU 46, Providence 34, Missouri 19, Virginia
Tech 16, Wisconsin 14, Butler 13, Texas 10, Maryland 7,
Oklahoma 7, Nevada 7, Michigan 6, Dayton 5, Middle
Tennessee 4, SMU 3, Oakland 2, Oregon 2, South
Carolina 1, Harvard 1, UCF 1.
WOMEN’S AP TOP 25
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
20.
22.
23.
24.
25.
U-Conn. (32)
Texas
Baylor
South Carolina
Ohio St.
Notre Dame
Mississippi St.
UCLA
Louisville
Stanford
Oregon
Duke
West Virginia
Tennessee
Maryland
Missouri
Marquette
Florida St.
Oregon St.
California
Texas A&M
Oklahoma
South Florida
Michigan
DePaul
RECORD
36-1
25-9
33-4
33-4
28-7
33-4
34-5
25-9
29-8
32-6
23-14
28-6
24-11
20-12
32-3
22-11
25-8
28-7
31-5
20-14
22-12
23-10
24-9
28-9
27-8
PTS
800
722
709
674
635
629
619
612
546
527
485
435
359
344
325
315
264
234
201
169
169
143
117
113
65
PVS
1
14
5
3
11
2
7
15
13
6
—
9
22
—
4
25
—
10
8
—
—
23
—
—
19
Others receiving votes: Kentucky 42, Arizona St. 25,
Virginia 23, Miami 21, LSU 11, North Carolina 9, Gonzaga
9, Florida 8, Quinnipiac 6, N.C. State 6, Washington 4,
Drake 4, Purdue 4, Michigan St. 4, Georgia Tech 3, Kansas
St 3, Syracuse 2, Alabama 2, Washington St 1, Indiana 1,
Oklahoma St. 1.
H I GH S C HOOLS
Jets 4, Stars 1
EASTERN CONFERENCE
FT PERCENTAGE
Johnson, MIA ..................................
Fournier, ORL ..................................
Gallinari, L.A.C. ...............................
Wright, TOR ....................................
Crawford, MIN .................................
Murray, DEN ....................................
Curry, GOL .......................................
Lillard, POR .....................................
Rubio, UTA ......................................
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
MONDAY’S GAME
SCORING AVERAGE
G
Antetokounmpo, MIL ......... 9
Porzingis, NYK .................... 9
Harden, HOU ..................... 11
James, CLE ........................ 10
Cousins, NOR .................... 10
Davis, NOR .......................... 9
Lillard, POR ....................... 10
Curry, GOL ......................... 10
Beal, WAS ........................... 9
Durant, GOL ...................... 10
DeRozan, TOR ..................... 9
Oladipo, IND ...................... 10
Griffin, L.A.C. ...................... 9
Gordon, HOU ..................... 10
Schroder, ATL ..................... 8
Aldridge, SAN ................... 10
McCollum, POR ................... 9
Booker, PHX ...................... 10
Walker, CHA ..................... 10
Towns, MIN ....................... 10
Russell, Bro ......................... 8
George, OKC ........................ 9
Irving, BOS ........................ 10
Thompson, GOL ................ 10
Anthony, OKC ..................... 9
Embiid, PHL ........................ 8
Wall, WAS .......................... 8
Fournier, ORL .................... 10
Westbrook, OKC ................. 9
HOCKEY
METROPOLITAN
W
New Jersey ..................... 9
Columbus ........................ 9
Pittsburgh ....................... 8
N.Y. Islanders ................. 8
Washington .................... 8
Philadelphia .................... 7
N.Y. Rangers ................... 7
Carolina ........................... 4
L
3
5
6
5
6
6
7
5
OL PTS.
1
19
1
19
2
18
1
17
1
17
2
16
2
16
3
11
GF
49
51
42
54
46
47
52
32
GA
42
43
58
46
48
43
55
37
ATLANTIC
W
Tampa Bay .................... 11
Toronto ........................... 9
Ottawa ............................ 6
Boston ............................. 6
x-Detroit ......................... 7
Montreal ......................... 6
Florida ............................. 4
Buffalo ............................ 4
L
2
7
3
4
7
8
7
8
OL PTS.
2
24
0
18
5
17
3
15
1
15
1
13
2
10
2
10
GF
59
61
51
39
42
41
47
35
GA
42
58
47
40
41
55
56
53
CENTRAL
W
St. Louis ........................ 11
Winnipeg ........................ 8
Colorado .......................... 8
Nashville ......................... 7
Dallas .............................. 8
Chicago ........................... 7
Minnesota ....................... 5
L
3
3
6
5
7
6
5
OL PTS.
1
23
3
19
0
16
2
16
0
16
2
16
2
12
GF
50
46
48
37
42
43
37
GA
36
40
47
41
43
36
35
PACIFIC
W
Los Angeles .................. 10
Vegas .............................. 9
San Jose .......................... 8
x-Vancouver .................... 7
Calgary ............................ 8
Anaheim ......................... 6
Edmonton ....................... 4
Arizona ........................... 2
L
2
4
5
4
6
6
8
12
OL PTS.
2
22
1
19
0
16
2
16
0
16
2
14
1
9
2
6
GF
48
50
36
35
35
40
30
41
GA
31
41
30
31
38
43
43
65
WESTERN CONFERENCE
WINNIPEG ............................... 3
DALLAS .................................... 0
Results
0
1
1 —
0 —
4
1
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Winnipeg, Scheifele 8 (Wheeler, Connor),
0:26. 2, Winnipeg, Laine 7 (Scheifele, Wheeler), 5:12
(pp). 3, Winnipeg, Connor 3 (Wheeler), 19:03.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Dallas, Benn 8 (Klingberg, Radulov), 4:13
(pp).
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 5, Winnipeg, Scheifele 9 (Trouba, Wheeler),
19:47 (sh).
SHOTS ON GOAL
WINNIPEG ............................. 13
7
6 — 26
DALLAS .................................. 11
14
9 — 34
Power-play opportunities: Winnipeg 1 of 3; Dallas 1 of 4.
Goalies: Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 8-0-2 (34 shots-33
saves). Dallas, Bishop 6-4-0 (25-22). A: 17,895 (18,532).
T: 2:31.
Detroit 4, at Edmonton 0
at N.Y. Islanders 6, Colorado 4
Montreal 2, at Chicago 0
at Calgary 5, New Jersey 4 (SO)
MONDAY’S GAMES
at Washington 3, Arizona 2 (OT)
at N.Y. Rangers 5, Columbus 3
at Boston 5, Minnesota 3
at Toronto 4, Vegas 3 (SO)
Winnipeg 4, at Dallas 1
Detroit at Vancouver, Late
PLAYER
GP G A PTS
Steven Stamkos, Tampa Bay ............... 15 7 18 25
Nikita Kucherov, Tampa Bay ................ 15 14 9 23
Jaden Schwartz, St. Louis .................... 15 8 12 20
John Tavares, N.Y. Islanders ................ 14 12 6 18
Auston Matthews, Toronto ................. 15 10 8 18
Sean Couturier, Philadelphia ................ 15 9 9 18
Jakub Voracek, Philadelphia ................ 15 3 15 18
Josh Bailey, N.Y. Islanders ................... 14 3 15 18
Johnny Gaudreau, Calgary .................... 14 3 15 18
PLAYER
GP
Steven Stamkos, Tampa Bay ........................... 15
Josh Bailey N.Y. Islanders
... 14
Johnny Gaudreau, Calgary ............................... 14
Jakub Voracek, Philadelphia ............................ 15
Shayne Gostisbehere, Philadelphia ................. 12
Evgeny Kuznetsov, Washington ...................... 14
Washington at Buffalo, 7
Edmonton at N.Y. Islanders, 7
St. Louis at New Jersey, 7
Florida at Carolina, 7
Nashville at Columbus, 7
Arizona at Pittsburgh, 7
Vegas at Montreal, 7:30
Vancouver at Calgary, 9
Los Angeles at Anaheim, 10
PLAYER
GP
Filip Forsberg, Nashville .................................. 14
Tyler Seguin, Dallas ......................................... 14
Steven Stamkos, Tampa Bay ........................... 15
Mika Zibanejad N.Y. Rangers
... 15
Evgeni Malkin, Pittsburgh ............................... 16
T.J. Oshie, Washington .................................... 14
Mikko Rantanen, Colorado ............................... 14
G
14
12
11
10
10
9
9
PRIVATE
Potomac School 8, Episcopal 1
EASTERN CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Monday’s result: Toronto 2, New York 1
Tuesday’s result: Columbus 4, New York City FC 1
Sunday’s result: New York 1, Toronto 0, Toronto
advances on away goals
Sunday’s result: New York City FC 2, Columbus 0,
Columbus advances on aggregate 4-3
WESTERN CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Sunday, Oct. 29: Vancouver 0, Seattle 0, tie
Monday’s result: Portland 0, Houston 0, tie
Thursday’s result: Seattle 2, Vancouver 0, Seattle
advances 2-0
Sunday’s result: Houston 2, Portland 1, Houston advances on aggregate 2-1
EASTERN CONFERENCE FINAL
FIRST LEG
Tuesday, Nov. 21: Toronto at Columbus, 8
SECOND LEG
Tuesday, Nov. 28 or Wednesday, Nov. 29: Columbus at
Toronto, TBD
A
18
15
15
15
13
13
WESTERN CONFERENCE FINAL
PP
5
5
5
5
4
4
4
ATP
FIRST LEG
Tuesday, Nov. 21: Seattle at Houston, 10
SECOND LEG
Thursday, Nov. 30: Houston at Seattle, 10
TE NNI S
PLAYER
GP
Steven Stamkos, Tampa Bay ........................... 15
Phil Kessel, Pittsburgh .................................... 16
Shayne Gostisbehere, Philadelphia ................. 12
Nikita Kucherov, Tampa Bay ............................ 15
Kris Letang, Pittsburgh .................................... 16
Evgeni Malkin, Pittsburgh ............................... 16
Mikko Rantanen, Colorado ............................... 14
Bruins 5, Wild 3
MINNESOTA ............................ 1
BOSTON ................................... 2
0
2
2 —
1 —
3
5
Scoring: 1, Minnesota, Niederreiter 2 (Spurgeon, Suter),
4:53. 2, Boston, DeBrusk 3 (Chara, Szwarz), 10:23. 3,
Boston, Vatrano 1 (Szwarz, Chara), 12:42.
SECOND PERIOD
SHOOTING PERCENTAGE
Scoring: 4, Boston, Kuraly 2 (Heinen, Schaller), 5:34. 5,
Boston, Krug 3 (Pastrnak, Bergeron), 7:43.
PLAYER
Nikita Kucherov, Tampa Bay ............
Auston Matthews, Toronto ..............
Clayton Keller Arizona
Alex Ovechkin, Washington .............
Mika Zibanejad N.Y. Rangers
Tyler Seguin, Dallas ..........................
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 6, Minnesota, Granlund 1 (Dumba), 1:33. 7,
Minnesota, Staal 5 (Zucker), 15:56 (sh). 8, Boston,
Schaller 3, 19:03.
SHOTS ON GOAL
MINNESOTA .......................... 11
4
12 — 27
BOSTON ................................... 9
15
10 — 34
Power-play opportunities: Minnesota 0 of 1; Boston 0 of
4. Goalies: Minnesota, Stalock 1-1-1 (9 shots-9 saves),
Dubnyk 4-4-1 (24-20). Boston, Rask 2-4-2 (27-24).
PPP
11
10
9
9
8
8
8
G
14
10
10
11
8
8
S
58
50
56
67
50
60
S
69
68
67
65
PCT
24.13
20.0
17.85
16.41
16.0
13.33
PLUS/MINUS
PLAYER
GP
Auston Matthews, Toronto ............................. 15
Mark Stone, Ottawa ......................................... 14
Anton Stralman, Tampa Bay ............................ 15
Vladimir Tarasenko St. Louis
... 15
+/14
12
12
12
AU TO R AC I NG
Maple Leafs 4,
Golden Knights 3 (OT)
NASCAR cup series
1
0
1
0
0 — 3
0 — 4
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Toronto, Kadri 7 (Rielly, Marner), 4:14 (pp). 2,
Vegas, Neal 8 (Perron, Haula), 4:52. 3, Toronto, van
Riemsdyk 6 (Nylander, Matthews), 9:31. 4, Toronto,
Kadri 8 (Marleau), 15:03.
SECOND PERIOD
POINTS LEADERS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Martin Truex Jr. ................................................ 4168
Kyle Busch ........................................................ 4118
Kevin Harvick .................................................... 4112
Brad Keselowski ............................................... 4111
Denny Hamlin ................................................... 4092
Ryan Blaney ...................................................... 4089
Chase Elliott ..................................................... 4062
Jimmie Johnson ................................................ 4060
Scoring: 5, Vegas, Smith 5 (Miller, Karlsson), 18:50 (pp).
SCHEDULE
THIRD PERIOD
Winners in parentheses
Feb. 19: x-Advance Auto Parts Clash (Joey Logano)
Feb. 23: x-Can-Am Duel at Daytona 1 (Chase Elliott)
Feb. 23: x-Can-Am Duel at Daytona 2 (Denny Hamlin)
Feb. 26: Daytona 500 (Kurt Busch)
March 5: Folds of Honor QuikTrip 500 (Brad Keselowski)
March 12: Kobalt 400 (Martin Truex Jr.)
March 19: Camping World 500 (Ryan Newman)
March 26: Auto Club 400 (Kyle Larson)
April 2: STP 500 (Brad Keselowski)
April 9: O’Reilly Auto Parts 500 (Jimmie Johnson)
April 24: Food City 500 (Jimmie Johnson)
April 30: Toyota Owners 400 (Joey Logano)
May 7: GEICO 500 (Ricky Stenhouse Jr.)
May 13: Go Bowling 400 (Martin Truex Jr.)
May 20: x-Monster Energy Open (Daniel Suarez)
May 20: x-Monster Energy NASCAR All-Star Race (Kyle
Busch)
May 28: Coca-Cola 600 (Austin Dillon)
June 4: AAA 400 Drive for Autism (Jimmie Johnson)
June 11: Pocono 400 (Ryan Blaney)
June 18: FireKeepers Casino 400 (Kyle Larson)
June 25: Toyota/Save Mart 350 (Kevin Harvick)
July 1: Coke Zero 400 (Ricky Stenhouse Jr.)
July 8: Quaker State 400 (Martin Truex Jr.)
July 16: New Hampshire 301 (Denny Hamlin)
July 23: Brickyard 400 (Kasey Kahne)
July 30: Overton’s 400 (Kyle Busch)
Aug. 6: Love New York 355 at The Glen (Martin Truex Jr.)
Aug. 13: Pure Michigan 400 (Kyle Larson)
Aug. 19: Bass Pro Shops NRA Night Race (Kyle Busch)
Sept. 3: Bojangles’ Southern 500 (Denny Hamlin)
Sept. 9: Federated Auto Parts 400 (Kyle Larson)
Sept. 17: Tales of the Turtles 400 (Martin Truex Jr.)
Sept. 24: ISM Connect 300 (Kyle Busch)
Oct. 1: Apache Warrior 400 (Kyle Busch)
Oct. 8: Bank of America 500 (Martin Truex Jr.)
Oct. 15: Alabama 500 (Brad Keselowski)
Oct. 22: Hollywood Casino 400 (Martin Truex Jr.)
Oct. 29: First Data 500 (Kyle Busch)
Nov. 5: AAA Texas 500 (Jimmie Johnson)
Nov. 12: Can-Am 500, Avondale, Ariz.
Nov. 19: Ford Ecoboost 400, Homestead, Fla.
x-non-points race
Scoring: 6, Vegas, Engelland 2 (Theodore), 6:16.
SHOOTOUT
Vegas 0 (Smith NG, Neal NG, Perron NG), Toronto 1
(Marner G, Matthews NG, Marleau NG).
SHOTS ON GOAL
VEGAS ............................. 10
6
7
5 — 28
TORONTO .......................... 9
6
8
2 — 25
Power-play opportunities: Vegas 1 of 3; Toronto 1 of 4.
Goalies: Vegas, Lagace 1-3-0 (25 shots-22 saves).
Toronto, Andersen 7-6-0 (28-25). T: 2:43.
Rangers 5, Blue Jackets 3
2
1
1 —
4 —
3
5
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Columbus, Panarin 2 (Werenski, Jones), 0:38.
2, Columbus, Anderson 6 (Murray), 4:24. 3, N.Y. Rangers,
Grabner 6 (Holden, Miller), 12:41.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 4, N.Y. Rangers, Shattenkirk 5 (Zibanejad,
Zuccarello), 5:10 (pp). 5, Columbus, Bjorkstrand 5
(Jenner, Dubinsky), 8:01. 6, N.Y. Rangers, Kreider 5
(Buchnevich, Zibanejad), 9:40 (pp). 7, N.Y. Rangers,
Buchnevich 6 (Shattenkirk, Zibanejad), 11:27 (pp). 8,
N.Y. Rangers, Grabner 7 (Fast, McDonagh), 19:11.
SHOTS ON GOAL
COLUMBUS .............................. 4
10
11 — 25
N.Y. RANGERS ....................... 10
7
9 — 26
Power-play opportunities: Columbus 0 of 1; N.Y. Rangers
3 of 5. Goalies: Columbus, Bobrovsky 8-3-1 (25 shots-21
saves). N.Y. Rangers, Lundqvist 6-4-2 (25-22). A: 17,348
(18,006). T: 2:29.
1. Rafael Nadal, Spain, 10645
2. Roger Federer, Switzerland, 9005
3. Alexander Zverev, Germany, 4410
4. Dominic Thiem, Austria, 3815
5. Marin Cilic, Croatia, 3805
WORLD RANKINGS
1. Simona Halep, Romania, 6175
2. Garbine Muguruza, Spain, 6135
3. Caroline Wozniacki, Denmark, 6015
4. Karolina Pliskova, Czech Republic, 5730
5. Venus Williams, United States, 5597
TR ANS AC TI ONS
SHOTS
PLAYER
GP
Evander Kane, Buffalo ..................................... 14
Phil Kessel, Pittsburgh .................................... 16
Alex Ovechkin, Washington ............................. 14
Max Pacioretty, Montreal ................................ 15
FIRST PERIOD
WORLD TOUR RANKINGS
WTA
POWER-PLAY POINTS
Minnesota at Toronto, 7:30
Boston at N.Y. Rangers, 8
Tampa Bay at San Jose, 10:30
COLUMBUS .............................. 0
N.Y. RANGERS ......................... 0
GIRLS’ FALL TENNIS
POWER-PLAY GOALS
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
VEGAS ............................... 1
TORONTO .......................... 3
PRIVATE
Georgetown Day 4, Washington Latin 0
Potomac School 2, O’Connell 1
MLS playoffs
POINTS
ASSISTS
TUESDAY’S GAMES
BOYS’ FALL SOCCER
S OC C E R
Entering Monday’s games
PLAYER
GP
Nikita Kucherov, Tampa Bay ............................ 15
John Tavares N.Y. Islanders
... 14
Alex Ovechkin, Washington ............................. 14
Clayton Keller Arizona
... 15
Auston Matthews, Toronto ............................. 15
Sean Couturier, Philadelphia ........................... 15
Mark Stone, Ottawa ......................................... 14
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
MARYLAND
Atholton def. Mount Hebron (25-20, 20-25, 25-19,
25-18)
Bowie def. C.H. Flowers (18-25, 25-12, 25-13, 25-14)
Glenelg def. Marriotts Ridge (21-25, 25-13, 25-17, 25-8)
Eleanor Roosevelt def. Wise (25-11, 25-13, 25-11)
Northwestern def. Laurel
VIRGINIA
T.C. Williams def. Forest Park (19-25, 25-17, 25-14,
23-25, 15-8)
Langley def. Chantilly (25-16, 25-21, 19-25, 25-17)
NHL LEADERS
GOALS
x- late game
VOLLEYBALL
MLB
MLB: Announced president, business & media Bob
Bowman he will leave the commissioner’s office when
his contract expires in December.
Baltimore Orioles: Declined 2018 options on LHP Wade
Miley and SS J.J. Hardy.
Boston Red Sox: Named Tim Hyers hitting coach and
Andy Barkett assisting hitting coach.
Cleveland Indians: Declined their 2018 option on LHP
Boone Logan. Activated RHP Cody Anderson and RHP
Dylan Baker from the 60-day DL. Purchased the contract
of C Eric Haase from Columbus (IL).
Minnesota Twins: Named Derek Shelton bench coach.
New York Yankees: Selected the contracts of OF Jake
Cave and RHP Nick Rumbleow from Scranton/WilkesBarre (IL).
Oakland Athletics: Assigned RHPs Michael Brady, Simon
Castro and Josh Smith outright to Nashville (PCL).
Reinstated RHPs Paul Blackburn, Andrew Triggs and
Bobby Wahl and OF Dustin Fowler from the 60-day DL.
Tampa Bay Rays: Exercised their 2018 option on RHP
Nathan Eovaldi.
Texas Rangers: Exercised their 2018 option on LHP
Martin Perez. Declined to exercise options on RHP Tony
Barnette and 1B/DH Mike Napoli. Assigned RHP Austin
Bibens-Dirkxand C A.J. Jimenez outright to Round Rock
(TL). Reinstated INF Hanser Alberto and RHP Chi Chi
Gonzalez from the 60-day DL. Named Don Wakamatsu
bench coach, Dan Warthen assistant pitching coach and
Colby Lewis special assistant to the general manager.
Promoted Ross Fenstermaker to director of pro scouting.
Toronto Blue Jays: Declined 2018 option on OF Jose
Bautista.
Arizona Diamondbacks: Exercised the 2018 option on INF
Daniel Descalso
Colorado Rockies: Declined the 2018 option on INF Alexi
Amarista. RHP Greg Holland declined his 2018 option.
Los Angeles Dodgers: Declined the 2018 option on OF
Andre Ethier. Exercised the 2018 option on INF Logan
Forsythe. Assigned INF/OF O’Koyea Dickson outright to
Oklahoma City (PCL). Reinstated LHP Grant Dayton,
RHP Yimi Garcia, LHP Scott Kazmir, LHP Adam Liberatore, RHP Josh Ravin and OF Andrew Toles from the
60-day DL.
Pittsburgh Pirates: Claimed LHP Nik Turley off waivers
from Minnesota.
San Francisco Giants: Exercised their 2018s option on
LHPs Madison Bumgarner and Matt Moore and 3B Pablo
Sandoval. Named Curt Young pitching coach and Alonzo
Powell hitting coach.
Washington Nationals: C Matt Wieters exercised his
2018 option.
NFL
NFL: Suspended Tampa Bay WR Mike Evans one game
for violations of unsportsmanlike conduct and unnecessary roughness rules during a Nov. 5 game against New
Orleans. Suspended N.Y. Jets WR Jeremy Kerley four
games for violating the league’s policy on performance
enhancing substances.
Arizona Cardinals: Placed C Daniel Munyer on injured
reserve. Released OT Javarius Leamon from the practice
squad. Signed C Max Tuerk from the L.A. Chargers
practice squad and OT Storm Norton to the practice
squad.
Indianapolis Colts: Claimed CB D.J. White off waivers
from Kansas City. Signed CB Denzel Rice to the practice
squad. Waived C Dillon Day. Released CB Channing
Stribling from the practice squad.
ARENA FOOTBALL LEAGUE
Albany AFL: Named George Manias vice president/business operations.
COLLEGES
George Mason: Announced men’s sophomore basketball
F Daniel Relvao is leaving the program.
Seton Hall: Announced the resignation of men’s soccer
coach Gerson Echeverry.
South Carolina Upstate: Named Jon Cremmins assistant
men’s basketball coach.
D8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
PHOTOS BY JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
Football lives on in a small town
EIGHT-MAN FROM D1
As the game of football faces
challenges nationally — head injury concerns, rising costs, sport
specialization — the effects are
being felt first and most acutely in
small towns such as this outpost
in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.
“Your football team is really on
life support when you’re on eightman, because there’s no place to
go after eight-man,” North Dickinson Athletic Director Michael
Roell says. “We’re hoping we can
still have a football team for
school pride, for homecoming, for
all the things that should stay in
high school.”
The eight-man version of the
game is played on a narrower
field. Offenses typically eliminate
two linemen and a fullback or
tight end. Defenses drop two defensive backs and a lineman. The
rules and fundamentals are mostly the same as the 11-player version; you still have to block and
tackle.
Michigan has lost 57 11-man
high school football teams in the
past five years, but most, state
officials say, moved to the eightplayer ranks. The state has poured
resources into creating separate
junior varsity leagues, varsity conferences and playoffs for eightplayer teams.
Proud football towns in the
Upper Peninsula resisted the
adapted version of the game as
long as they could. Now they embrace it in much the same way
residents
did
the
Louisiana-Pacific lumber mill after
the iron ore mine closed: with
resignation over how times
change and determination to preserve what matters most.
Shifting landscape
Michael Miller studies a geometry work sheet while bouncing
his leg up and down and reaching
for his right hip pocket as if his
phone is soon to buzz. He is a
senior guard and the Nordics’
kicker, and he is waiting for the
all-clear to play in his final home
game.
A week ago, he left the second
half of North Dickinson’s loss to
Superior Central because of a concussion. He looked ready to return for senior night, then took a
turn midweek when he couldn’t
remember some of what showed
up on the game film of Phillips
High, this week’s opponent.
North Dickinson’s trainer is
scheduled to make his final decision at 4 p.m., and then Coach
Mike Christian will decide whether Miller should start in his final
home game.
Miller’s leg keeps bouncing. It
is 8 a.m.
If he is able to play, Miller will
replace his usual No. 50 jersey —
maroon with plain white numbers, no logos or stripes — with a
No. 35 to honor his father, a linebacker from the Nordics’ Class of
1995, who has said he will be in the
stands for his son’s last home
game.
Miller is expecting a girl from a
town over to attend the game, too.
Of course, none of it matters if he
isn’t able to play.
Down the hall, Christian, the
coach and kindergarten teacher,
is working with two dozen 5- and
6-year-olds on handwriting and
With 15 players, the
North Dickinson
Nordics are in their first
season of eight-man
football. Coach Mike
Christian, right, also
teaches kindergarten
and keeps track of the
number of elementaryage boys with an eye on
the future.
“Your football
team is really
on life support
when you’re on
eight-man,
because there’s
no place to go
after eightman.”
Michael Roell,
North Dickinson County
School athletic director
sight reading. While students eat
snacks or go outside for recess, the
coach has taken to counting the
number of boys in each class in
the middle and elementary
schools: seven in eighth grade,
seven in seventh grade, but just
three play sports.
His kindergarten class last year
had 13 students and three boys. In
2015, he had 26 kids and four boys.
This year’s football team has just
15 players.
“It is a numbers game,” he says.
Felch hasn’t gotten smaller;
since 1990, the town has had
around 700 residents. But it has
gotten older. High school graduates have left town, and they haven’t come back. The median age
is 42.7 years old, compared with
37.9 in the rest of the country,
according to census data.
The bell rings, and it’s time for
Miller to take a bus to a nearby
vocational school, where a third of
the high school learns trade skills.
Business is good in Felch for carpenters and plumbers and electricians, the men at Trading Post say.
There are car repair shops in Iron
Mountain, 30 miles south, that
could use another mechanic.
But Miller wants to study computer science, and there’s not
much in Felch to accommodate
that. Learning a trade could help,
he reasons, if that goal doesn’t pan
out. He weaves through the middle school by hanging on the left
side of the hallway, where the
lockers go unused.
Practical problems
A quarter of the Nordics’ football team is in Chris Mattson’s
1 p.m. physics class on Fridays.
Most players already have started
their game preparation. They bob
their heads as Mattson speaks,
staring into empty space, filling
the moments before class starts.
Mattson, the defensive coordinator, sketches a problem on the
projector as the bell rings.
There is a 20-point white-tailed
deer 400 yards away. The bullet
from the rifle you are shooting
travels 2,500 feet per second. The
deer is running perpendicular to
you at 20 miles per hour. How far
in front of the deer do you have to
shoot to kill it?
This is not a problem out of a
textbook. It is a practical skill.
North Dickinson thought it
could be pretty good at eight-player football entering the season,
but the new game has its own
calculus.
Christian began the season attempting to implement the run-
heavy wing-T offense, which the
Nordics have used for decades,
but there were no offensive tackles to open up gaps. He tried
throwing the ball but realized the
field was too narrow for the Nordics’ usual passing game.
The coaching staff revamped it
all, but half the team had never
played organized football before
and needed more coaching on the
fundamentals of blocking and
tackling than on how to read a
defense. In its first game, North
Dickinson lost, 60-0, to PowersNorth Central, a team coming off
back-to-back eight-player state
championships.
North Dickinson, which made
the state playoffs for 23 years
running from 1991 to 2013, realized it had work to do before it
could become an eight-man competitor.
“Every week we learn something new,” Christian says.
Fewer players on either side of
the ball opens up broad swaths of
space on the 100-yard (plus 10yard end zones) by 40-yard field.
Some states play instead on an
80-yard (plus 10-yard end zones)
by 40-yard surface.
Eight-player football team enrollment is up 12 percent since
2009, according to data from the
National Federation of State High
School Associations, the national
governing body of high school
sports, as more states encounter
declining football participation. Washington, Wisconsin and
Hawaii have added eight-player
football leagues since then.
Players and coaches from the
Upper Peninsula still pine for the
11-man game, though. North
Dickinson administrators waited
until a large, talented senior class
graduated in 2017 to change over.
“Nobody wanted to go, but nobody said anything bad about it,”
North Dickinson senior tight end
Jared Miller says. “It was this or
nothing. We only would have had
eight players on varsity.”
To hit that whitetail, Mattson
solves, aim 14 feet ahead.
The next problem, calculating a
football punt’s hang time, will be
on the upcoming test.
Michael Miller, back from vocational school, pops his head into
the classroom.
“I’m clear,” he shouts at Mattson.
“Good,” Mattson shouts back.
“Now get your mind right.”
Game night
Jon Jungwirth, the school’s
athletic trainer, arrives at 3 p.m.
to Mattson’s physics room and
cleans off a lab table with a bleach
wipe. He unloads the contents of
his morning shopping spree:
whole wheat bread, peanut butter, strawberry jam, bananas,
cheese sticks and mini Gatorades. Soon, the players are
watching game film while
munching PB&Js and downing
bananas in three quick chomps.
In the locker room, they put in
earphones and dress silently until
it’s time to pull those maroon
jerseys over tight shoulder pads.
“Thirty-five?” defensive lineman Jacob Butterfield says as he
helps Michael Miller with his
gear.
“My dad is coming,” Miller says.
“He wore 35 in high school.”
Jungwirth tapes ankles and
wrists. Christian scribbles reminders on the whiteboard. Seated players bounce their legs up
and down. Then, 30 cleats clack
on tile floors as the Nordics rush
out the door, around a corner,
through an alleyway and toward
the stadium.
When they reach the field, they
hold hands in a circle and pray,
then break into warmups that
don’t last very long.
The Nordics receive the ball to
start the game, and on the first
play from scrimmage, a Phillips
defensive tackle bursts through
their undersized offensive line
and forces a fumble. The Loggers
recover and score on the next
play.
North Dickinson fires back.
John Nelson, the senior quarterback, hits tight end Jared Miller
on a deep play-action pass, then a
rotation of running backs hammers away at the Loggers’ defensive front. Nelson drops back on
third and long and lobs another
pass to Miller, who catches it in
the end zone.
A substitute teacher in the
stands rattles a cowbell as five
cheerleaders sing the fight song
in praise of “Nordic High.”
But Phillips goes on a tear on
offense and wins, 48-18. In its first
season with eight-player football,
North Dickinson won only one
game. It will not make the playoffs.
Parents and classmates and
girlfriends meet the teams’ seniors on the field and take enough
pictures and make postgame
plans until they all smile again
and trudge into the locker room
cold and wet.
Michael Miller peels off his
No. 35 uniform and stares at his
phone in his locker.
His father did not make it to
the game. He couldn’t get off
work.
The girl who came to see him
had sent him a message on Snapchat from the stands.
He smirked and showered,
then walked out of the locker
room last.
There is only one business in
Felch open late on Friday nights: a
coffee shop named Alex’s Place, in
the back of an old church. Almost
all of North Dickinson’s senior
class was waiting there, sipping
hot chocolate and eating brownies and wondering what to do
next.
jacob.bogage@washpost.com
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D9
SU
high schools
METRO CITY VOLLEYBALL CHAMPIONSHIP
Huskies withstand challenge from Tartans to claim sixth consecutive title
FLINT HILL 3,
HOLY CROSS 1
BY
M ICHAEL E RRIGO
Late in the first set of the Metro
City volleyball championship,
Flint Hill found itself in an unfamiliar spot. The Huskies, on the
verge of completing a dominant
undefeated season and winners of
the past five Metros, were a point
away from taking the set but
couldn’t find a way to finish. Holy
Cross had mounted a comeback,
winning four straight set points to
cut the lead to two.
But on the next point, the Huskies controlled the ball and passed
it softly to the sideline, where senior outside hitter Siron Hardy was
waiting. With a swing of her right
arm, Hardy ended the set.
The Huskies would go on to win
the match, 25-22, 23-25, 25-18, 2510, taking down the Tartans (27-3)
to win the city title for the sixth
straight year. All night, when the
Independent School League
champion Huskies (32-0) were
tested by the Washington Catholic
Athletic Conference champions, it
seemed that Hardy was there to
calm her team with a thunderous
kill.
“I can just see it in the setter’s
eyes when they’re going to give it
to me and I know I’m going to put
it away for my team,” Hardy said.
“A rush goes through me every
time.”
And her teammates? How do
they feel when they see a pass
floating toward Hardy?
“Oh, we know,” sophomore middle blocker Laila Ricks said. “We
know what’s coming.”
While Hardy shined on offense,
Ricks led the defensive effort at
the net. With outstretched arms
Ricks skied high above the tape to
deflect or distract the Tartans’ hitters, especially star senior Jade
Parchment.
“I just kept thinking ‘get up,’ ”
Ricks said. “My main focus was
blocking Jade as best I could.”
At setter, an injury to junior
Krissy O’Malley meant that sophomore Reagan Carlton got the
start.
“What a spotlight for her to step
into,” Flint Hill Coach Carrol DeNure said. “She kept the offense
going, and her teammates rallied
around her.”
The Tartans’ best shot to make
this year different came after they
won the second set, 25-23. In the
third, they built an early lead but
couldn’t sustain it. Flint Hill
showed why there is a zero in its
loss column, serving aggressively
and executing at the net to regain
control of the match.
“I felt like we got back to what
we needed to do at the end of that
set, even though we lost it. We got
it back and showed a lot of heart,
and that comes from experience,”
DeNure said. “This is a team that
knew it’s not a 50-yard dash — it’s a
marathon — and we could come
back in Game 3.”
In the fourth and final set, the
Huskies forced a Holy Cross timeout at 9-3 and cruised from there.
Hardy, Ricks and sophomore hitter Sydney Reed took turns sending their bench into a frenzy with
textbook slams that brought Flint
Hill closer and closer to a six-peat.
With one point standing between the Huskies and the title,
their bench all held a single finger
in the air. Minutes later, after a
final kill and a joyous huddle, they
held up five more to show that a
tradition had continued.
michael.errigo@washpost.com
FOOTBALL NOTES
For St. John’s, this could be the start of something big
LE AD E R S
Cadets will open
WCAC playoffs with
rematch vs. DeMatha
Top rushers
A. Margiotta, Marshall
T. Rush, Annandale
D. Marshall, Falls Church
A. Squire, Suitland
J. Houston, Flint Hill
C. Garmon III, Champe
J. Mulatu, Lee
L. Djieya, Wheaton
E. Asante, Westfield
S. Alston, South Lakes
J. Johnson, Woodgrove
T. Baldwin, Broad Run
C. Oberman, Poolesville
J. Hampton, Georgetown Prep
M. Salahuddin, H.D. Woodson
D. Dupree, DuVal
D. Cleveland, West Potomac
D. Harris, Loudoun County
B. Gonzales-Pinto, Marshall
B. Mondestin, Northwestern
FROM STAFF REPORTS
After St. John’s scored an impressive 32-14 win over Gonzaga
on Saturday, Cadets Coach Joe
Casamento reminded his players
what they have left to accomplish.
This St. John’s team is the first
in 23 years to beat rival DeMatha.
It’s the first to go unbeaten in
regular season conference play in
decades, too.
This week, the Cadets host No.
4 seed DeMatha in the first round
of the WCAC playoffs, meaning
they have a chance to beat the
Stags twice in the same season.
Coaches can’t remember how
many years it has been since that
happened.
To top it all off, St. John’s is the
front-runner to win a conference
title for the first time in the
WCAC’s modern history. The last
time the Cadets won the league, in
1989, the WCAC was known as the
Metro Conference.
The message behind such a
string of accomplishments has
been a drive to reshape the
league’s football power structure,
long dominated by DeMatha and
Good Counsel. At least one of
those teams has appeared in the
championship game each of the
past 20 years. Ten years, they
played each other.
But St. John’s didn’t just beat
both of those teams this year. It
dominated them. The Cadets outscored the WCAC’s other playoff
teams, 101-45.
DeMatha has shuffled through
two starting quarterbacks and endured its first three-game losing
streak in 23 years. Good Counsel,
the league’s surprise No. 2 seed,
gave first-year Coach Andy Stefanelli a pair of early-season losses. This was the year for St. John’s,
the players and coaches said,
thanks to a highly touted senior
class bolstered by transfer quarterback Kevin Doyle.
And now the Cadets are two
wins away from turning that
promise into reality, Casamento
said after beating Gonzaga on Saturday. It’s not just a championship; it’s the start of a new era.
“This,” he said, “is what we’ve
been dreaming about.”
— Jacob Bogage
Expectations at River Hill
In the four seasons after River
Hill last won a state championship, Coach Brian Van Deusen
said the Hawks did well just to
make the playoffs.
This year, though, he said his
team has similar dedication to his
title-winning squads of 2007,
2008, 2011 and 2012, and he expects “a much deeper run.”
The Hawks, who moved from
Maryland 3A to 2A this season,
just finished their first undefeated
season since their most recent
state title.
“This group has probably been
a little overlooked,” Van Deusen
said. “It might not be the flashiest
group, but it’s a solid group.”
After sharing the county championship with Howard, the No. 2
seed in the 4A North, the Hawks
occupy the top seed in the 2A
South. On Friday, they’ll host Glenelg, which River Hill beat, 20-0,
two weeks ago but lost to by 31 in
the 3A East region final last year.
Yds
1,829
1,811
1,787
1,768
1,689
1,658
1,632
1,400
1,349
1,311
1,262
1,231
1,197
1,173
1,134
1,120
1,112
1,104
1,045
995
TD
25
12
15
19
21
22
19
11
10
20
10
21
11
12
11
13
12
3
7
9
Top passers
PETE MAROVICH FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Bulldogs took a bite out of them all
Stone Bridge’s Nick Mell looks for running room against Broad Run on Friday. The Bulldogs won, 21-13, to finish the regular season 10-0.
THE POST TOP 20
BY
D ILLON M ULLAN
It’s playoff time across the area, and eight ranked teams enter the postseason unbeaten. Wise, Damascus, Stone Bridge and Westfield are all
favorites to return to a state final after undefeated regular seasons.
North Point and C.H. Flowers both move up in this week’s rankings after Gonzaga’s 32-14 loss to St. John’s on Saturday. The Eagles slid to No.
9 ahead of their rematch with Good Counsel on Friday in the WCAC semifinals.
Freedom-Woodbridge is in the top 10 after another big performance from senior quarterback A.J. Felton helped the Eagles lock up the top
seed in the Virginia Region 6C playoffs. DeMatha is up to No. 13 after clinching a WCAC playoff spot with a big win over Carroll.
Broad Run drops from the rankings with a loss to Ashburn rival Stone Bridge. Howard joins the rankings at No. 20 after a dominant run
through the regular season in Howard County. One-loss Woodbridge joins the bubble after securing the second seed in Virginia Region 6C.
1. Wise (10-0) LW: 1
8. C.H. Flowers (10-0) LW: 9
After a 39-6 win over DuVal, the Pumas are
four wins away from a third consecutive
undefeated season and state championship.
Next: Md. 4A South semifinal vs. Suitland,
Friday, 7
Entering the playoffs, the Jaguars are two
wins away from doubling their win total from
last season.
Next: Md. 4A South semifinal vs. Eleanor
Roosevelt, Friday, 7
15. Spalding (5-4) LW: 14
2. St. John’s (7-2) LW: 2
9. Gonzaga (7-3) LW: 7
16. Friendship Collegiate (5-3) LW: 16
Tre’Mon Morris-Brash finished with 41/2
sacks as the Cadets dominated the second
half of a 32-14 win over Gonzaga.
Next: WCAC semifinal vs. DeMatha, Saturday, 1
The Eagles led 14-9 at halftime but surrendered 23 unanswered points in the second half
of a 32-14 loss to St. John’s on Saturday.
Next: WCAC semifinal at Good Counsel, Friday, 7
The Knights enjoyed their second straight
bye week.
Next: at Silver Oak Academy, Saturday, 1
3. Damascus (10-0) LW: 3
10. Freedom-Woodbridge (10-0) LW: 11
Junior running back TD Ayo-Durojaiye rushed 14 times for 123 yards and four
touchdowns as the Swarmin’ Hornets secured their fourth straight undefeated regular season with a 49-7 win over Wootton.
Next: Md. 2A West semifinal vs. Liberty,
Thursday, 7
Senior quarterback A.J. Felton threw for four
touchdowns and ran for two more as the
Eagles beat Colgan, 64-34.
Next: Va. Region 6C quarterfinal vs. South
County, Friday, 7
4. Stone Bridge (10-0) LW: 4
Junior Nick Mell rushed 31 times for 181
yards as the Bulldogs kept the ball for the
final nine minutes of a 21-13 win over
Ashburn rival Broad Run.
Next: Va. Region 5C quarterfinal vs. Lee,
Friday, 7
5. Westfield (10-0) LW: 5
The Bulldogs completed an undefeated regular season by using a 19-point first quarter
to roll over Chantilly, 46-7.
Next: Va. Region 6D quarterfinal vs. Battlefield, Friday, 7
6. Good Counsel (8-2) LW: 6
Running backs Sy’Veon Wilkerson and Mehki Smith combined to rush 21 times for 212
yards and four touchdowns as the Falcons
closed the regular season with a 41-14 win
over McNamara.
Next: WCAC semifinal vs. Gonzaga, Friday, 7
7. North Point (10-0) LW: 8
Eagles completed second undefeated season
in three years in 39-14 win over Chopticon.
Next: Md. 4A East semifinal vs. Arundel,
Friday, 7
The Cavaliers missed out on the MIAA
playoffs following a 22-7 loss to Mount St.
Joseph’s on Saturday.
Next: Season complete
17. H.D. Woodson (8-2) LW: 17
The Warriors and Ballou were tied at 7 after
the first quarter before H.D. Woodson
scored four unanswered touchdowns in the
second quarter of a 41-13 win.
Next: DCIAA Stars semifinal at Eastern,
Saturday, 2
18. Quince Orchard (9-1) LW: 18
11. Centreville (8-2) LW: 12
In the first of back-to-back games against
Madison, the Wildcats scored a 31-7 win
thanks in part to a 55-yard interception return
for a touchdown by senior Keenan Anunay.
Next: Va. Region 6D quarterfinal vs. Madison,
Friday, 7
Senior quarterback Doc Bonner completed
12 of 16 passes for 292 yards and five
touchdowns as the Cougars trounced Gaithersburg on Friday, 60-21.
Next: Md. 4A West semifinal vs. Einstein,
Friday, 7
19. Eleanor Roosevelt (8-2) LW: 20
The Seahawks ended the regular season with a
42-6 win over Herndon, their fifth straight
victory.
Next: Friday Va. Region 6D quarterfinals vs.
Yorktown, 7
The Raiders edged Potomac, 14-12, in their
regular season finale behind 145 rushing
yards and two touchdowns from quarterback Jaden Faulkner.
Next: Md. 4A South semifinal at C.H. Flowers, Friday, 7
13. DeMatha (6-4) LW: 15
20. Howard (10-0) LW: NR
Junior quarterback Eric Najarian completed 9
of 10 passes for 126 yards and two touchdowns
as the Stags clinched a playoff spot with a 50-0
win over Carroll.
Next: WCAC semifinal at St. John’s, Saturday, 1
The Lions won all of their regular season
games by double digits.
Next: Md. 4A North semifinal vs. Sherwood,
Friday, 7
12. South Lakes (9-1) LW: 13
Dropped out: No. 19 Broad Run (9-1)
On the bubble: National Collegiate
14. Madison (7-3) LW: 10
The Warhawks fell to Centreville, 31-7, but can
exact revenge against the Wildcats in their
first-round rematch.
Next: Va. Region 6D quarterfinal at Centreville, Friday, 7
(10-0), Broadneck (10-0), Flint Hill
(9-0), Tuscarora (8-2), Woodbridge (9-1)
dillon.mullan@washpost.com
— Callie Caplan
A playoff rematch
The premier matchup of the
Virginia 6D region’s first round
just happened Friday night: Centreville (8-2) faced Madison (7-3).
The teams met to finish the
regular season and will have a
rematch to open the playoffs. Both
teams knew heading into last
game a rematch was possible and
Att
148
325
231
203
135
229
193
203
203
86
193
178
196
161
109
189
180
167
139
114
that they were essentially playing
to determine home-field advantage. After a 31-7 Centreville win,
Wildcats Coach Chris Haddock
said he was encouraged by his
team’s muted reaction.
“They knew not to celebrate
that one too much, because we’d
be right back in it next week,”
Haddock said. “And we told them,
‘If you think this is going to be
easy, you’re crazy.’ ”
Haddock said, once the Wildcats built a lead Friday, they decided to hold back some strategy and
plays for the rematch. He believes
the Warhawks probably did the
same thing. But this week, when
it’s win or go home, that won’t
happen again.
“It’s the playoffs, and every
team is going to throw the kitchen
sink at you every week,” he said.
“We’re going to do everything we
have to do to play another week.”
— Michael Errigo
Dominion returns
Last year, Dominion reached
the state semifinals on the back of
five seniors who are now playing
college football. Without those
core contributors, the Titans still
looked poised to repeat as Dulles
District champions through the
first six weeks this season.
Then senior quarterback
Thomas Jarman tore his anterior
cruciate ligament in a loss to
Woodgrove that dropped Domin-
G. Saylor, Wootton
K. Doyle, St. John's
N. Barts, Loudoun County
T. Heltzel, Mount Vernon
A. Yenican, Stuart
J. Darcy, Lake Braddock
M. Grant, Watkins Mill
M. Janis, Churchill
B. Johnson, Heritage
D. Bonner, Quince Orchard
J. Allen, Tuscarora
M. Tatum, Stone Bridge
T. Marchiando, Fairfax
T. Jarman, Dominion
B. Burton, Woodgrove
N. Kim, Westfield
M. Griffis, Broad Run
M. Thompson, Flint Hill
C. Parson, Champe
P. Jones, Edison
Cmp-Att
201-330
149-234
162-286
112-217
133-226
176-285
128-224
131-207
120-235
85-120
112-166
73-130
166-260
90-136
113-183
92-144
101-159
67-105
96-166
78-139
Yds
3,100
2,282
2,190
2,155
2,113
2,101
1,697
1,697
1,695
1,659
1,613
1,600
1,556
1,468
1,460
1,453
1,439
1,372
1,329
1,323
TD
32
20
33
22
20
18
22
13
17
20
14
20
9
16
15
18
13
19
17
14
Rec
74
76
58
49
43
29
61
Yds
1,266
1,203
1,008
927
916
837
804
TD
14
12
7
9
14
12
9
33
790
11
48
39
47
27
45
27
33
29
32
31
24
31
767
755
733
693
670
670
646
645
621
612
602
592
10
8
7
8
7
12
9
11
13
7
9
4
Top receivers
N. Miller, Wootton
E. Trent, Wootton
E. Jeffries, Stuart
D. Newton, Mount Vernon
D. Spalding, South County
D. Thompson, Stone Bridge
B. Castellano, Woodgrove
D. Alexander, Richard Montgomery
T. Wall, Yorktown
D. Easley, Stuart
D. Rush, Watkins Mill
D. Webb, West Potomac
N. Datis, Blair
D. Patterson, Yorktown
Z. Beal, Loudoun County
S. Alston, South Lakes
A. Ross, National Collegiate
A. Abu-Jamous, Edison
G. Richardson, Dominion
G. Wooten, Heritage
ion to 4-3.
The next morning, offensive coordinator Robert Holland made a
call to save the Titans’ season.
“He told me that I had to play
quarterback,” sophomore Trey
Hayes said. “I was surprised. I was
nervous. I hadn’t played quarterback since eighth-grade Little
League. But our whole program
has that next-man-up mentality.”
The 5-foot-9 Hayes guided the
Titans to wins in their final three
games to secure a playoff spot.
Friday night, the Titans, the fifth
seed in the Virginia 4C region,
visit No. 4 seed Sherando (8-2) in
Frederick County.
— Dillon Mullan
Woodson earns top seed
After closing the regular season
with a resounding victory over
Ballou on Thursday, H.D. Woodson linebacker Reggie White was
short and to the point regarding
what he expects from his team the
rest of the way.
“Victories,” the senior said.
H.D. Woodson holds the No. 1
seed in the DCIAA Stars division
and will face No. 4 Eastern in the
first round.
The Warriors will look to replicate their success from the teams’
regular season matchup, when
the defense scored a pair of touchdowns and senior running back
Mychale Salahuddin turned 10
carries into 155 yards and a touchdown en route to a 32-0 victory.
No. 2 Ballou will face No. 3
Wilson.
In the Stripes division, No. 1
Roosevelt will face No. 4 Cardozo
in the first round after the Rough
Riders closed the regular season
with a 44-8 victory over the Clerks.
No. 2 Bell will face No. 3 McKinley.
— Dan Roth
hss@washpost.com
EFGHI
washingtonpost.com/classifieds
CLASSIFIED
D10
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2017
EZ
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on local jobs
new and pre-owned
cars, trucks and suvs
homes for sale,
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sales, auctions, tickets
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washingtonpost.com/jobs
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815
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by calling 202-334-6200
850
Legal Notices
Take notice that the United States has filed a proposed Final
Judgment in a civil antitrust case in the United States District Court
for the District of Columbia, United States of America v. Entercom
Communications Corp., Civil Action No. 1:17-cv-02268. On November
1, 2017, the United States filed a Complaint alleging that Entercom
Communications Corp.’s acquisition of CBS Radio, Inc. would violate
Section 7 of the Clayton Act, 15 U.S.C. §18. The Complaint alleges
that the acquisition would likely substantially lessen competition
in the sale of spot advertising on broadcast radio stations in the
following designated market areas (“DMAs”): Boston, Massachusetts;
San Francisco, California; and Sacramento, California. The proposed
Final Judgment, filed at the same time as the Complaint, requires
Entercom to divest certain broadcast radio stations in each of those
DMAs. A Competitive Impact Statement filed by the United States
describes the Complaint, the proposed Final Judgment, the industry,
and the remedies available to private litigants who may have been
injured by the alleged violation.
Copies of the Complaint, proposed Final Judgment, and Competitive
Impact Statement are available for inspection on the Antitrust Division’s website at http://www.justice.gov/atr and at the Office of the
Clerk of the United States District Court for the District of Columbia.
Interested persons may address comments to Owen M. Kendler, Chief,
Media, Entertainment, and Professional Services Section, Antitrust
Division, Department of Justice, 450 Fifth Street NW, Suite 4000,
Washington, DC 20530 (telephone: 202-305-8376) within 60 days
of the date of this notice. Such comments, including the name
of the submitter, and responses thereto, will be posted on the
Antitrust Division’s website, filed with the Court, and, under certain
circumstances, published in the Federal Register.
Trustees Sale - DC
840
OCTOBER 24, 31, NOVEMBER 7, 2017
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851
Montgomery County
Law Offices
GOOZMAN, BERNSTEIN & MARKUSKI
9101 Cherry Lane, Suite 207
Laurel, Maryland 20708
(301) 953-7480
(410) 792-0075
TRUSTEES' SALE
Case No. 435919V
Of Valuable Improved Real Estate
located in Montgomery County, MD
at 13112 Briarcliff Terrace, Unit #5-101
Germantown, MD 20874
Under and by virtue of a Power Of Sale contained in a certain
Deed Of Trust from John G. Markle and Linda D. Markle to Ronda
McDowell and Steve Anderson, Trustees, dated January 20, 2004,
and duly recorded among the Land Records of Montgomery County,
Maryland, in Liber 26692, at Folio 065, as modified, docketed for
foreclosure in Civil No 435919V, the holder of the indebtedness
secured by the Deed Of Trust having appointed Martin L. Goozman
and Jeffrey W. Bernstein as Substitute Trustees by instrument duly
executed, acknowledged and recorded among the Land Records of
the said County, default having occurred under the terms thereof
and at the request of the holder of the Note secured thereby, the
undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at public auction
at the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, at the Court House
Door, 50 Maryland Avenue, Rockville, Maryland 20850 on:
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2017 AT 12:00 PM (NOON)
all that Property described in the said Deed Of Trust as follows:
Being known and designated as Unit 5-101, Building No. 5,
Phase 3 in the horizontal property regime known as “SENECA
KNOLLS CONDOMINIUM”, as being part of all that property more
particularly described in a certain Declaration of Condominium,
dated February 27, 1992, and recorded among the Land Records
of Montgomery County, Maryland in Liber 10201, Folio 494,
and any amendments or supplements thereafter, by the Ryland
Group, Inc. a Maryland Corporation the Declarant thereof, and
as shown on plats entitled, “2nd Expansion, Phase 3, Building
No. 5, Plat of Condominium Subdivision, SENECA KNOLLS
CONDOMINIUM, Plat No. 174, Parcel E, Block 19, Section 11,
Churchill Town Sector”, which plats are recorded among the
Land Records of Montgomery County, Maryland in Condominium
Plat Book 62, at Plat Nos. 6352, 6353 and 6355.
Trustees Sale - DC
1324 Q Street, N.W., Unit A,
Washington, DC 20009.
Pursuant to the District of Columbia Condominium Act and
the Declaration of Condominium and the
By-Laws of
Condominium recorded on October 22, 2002 as Instrument
Nos. 2002122239 and 2022122240, respectively, among the
Land Records of the District of Columbia, according to the Notice
of Foreclosure Sale of Condominium Unit for Assessments Due
filed September 26, 2017, and at the request of the Board
of Directors of the Condominium, the following real property
shall be sold at public auction On November 14, 2017 at
10:45 A.M. within the office of: HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS,
INC., 5335 Wisconsin Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington,
DC 20015: Unit No. A in 1324 Q Street Condominium as
described in the aforementioned Declaration and By-Laws of
Condominium and as per Plat of Condominium Subdivision
recorded in the Condominium Book 46 at Page 31 in the office
of the Surveyor for the District Of Columbia, together with all
of the appurtenances incident to said unit as contained in the
aforementioned Declaration of Condominium and any and all
amendments thereto, subject, however, to all the provisions,
restrictions, easements and conditions as set forth in the
Declarations of Condominium, the By-Laws relating thereto, and
any and all amendments thereto. The Unit is known for taxation
and assessment purposes as Lot No. 2066 in Square No. 0241
and having a mailing address of 1324 Q Street, N.W., Unit A,
Washington, DC 20009.
TERMS OF SALE: The purchase price must be paid in cash.
Unit A shall be sold subject to real estate taxes, if any, and shall
also be sold subject to any other superior liens, encumbrances,
and municipal assessments if any, the further particulars of
which may be announced at the time of sale. Other oral
information regarding Unit A may be disclosed at the time of
sale. A deposit of $10,000 will be required at time of sale,
such deposit to be in cash, certified check, or in such other
form, as the Board of Directors of the Condominium, in its sole
discretion, requires. All conveyance, recording, recordation tax,
transfer taxes, etc., shall be at purchaser’s cost. The balance
of the purchase price, together with interest at the rate of ten
(10)% per annum from date of sale to date of receipt of the
balance of the purchase price, must be paid in cash or by
cashier’s certified check and all other terms to be complied
with within 30 days. Otherwise deposit is forfeited and the
property may be re-advertised and sold at the discretion of the
Board of Directors of the Condominium at the risk and cost of
the defaulting purchaser. The Condominium Association shall
convey a deed pursuant to 42 D.C., Code Section 1903.13,
and makes no further representations of warranties as to title.
The Condominium association cannot guarantee clear title or the
purchaser's ability to obtain title insurance. For this reason,
the purchaser may not be able to obtain financing and therefore
must be able to pay the entire purchase price balance, in any
case, within 30 days. In the event of the failure on the part of the
Condominium association to convey such deed, the purchaser's
sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit.
Contact Brian D. Bichy 301-961-5253
Attorney for the 1324 Q Street Condominium
850
Montgomery County
Department of Justice
Antitrust Division
840
Legal Notices - 202-334-7007
Auctions, Estate Sales, Furniture 202-334-7029
Biz Ops/Services - 202-334-5787
or call 202-334-6200
Together with a prorated undivided percentage interest in the
common elements thereof, common with the other owners, as
established for this unit pursuant to the aforesaid Declaration
and the By-Laws attached thereto, and any amendments or
supplements thereof.
Parcel Identifier:
02-03003317
The property is believed to be improved by a 953 ± square foot
condominium unit that contains 2 bedrooms and 2 full baths.
The Property will be sold in "AS-IS" condition, subject to all
conditions, restrictions, easements, covenants, rights-of-way and
agreements of record affecting the Property, and subject to whatever an accurate survey or inspection of the Property would disclose,
without any express or implied warranty of any kind.
A deposit of $10,000.00 cash, certified or cashier's check, payable
to the undersigned Trustees, shall be required at the time and place
of sale. The balance of the purchase price shall bear interest at the
rate of 3.75% per annum from the date of sale to the date of delivery
of payment to the Substitute Trustees. No deposit shall be required
of the noteholder where the noteholder bids on the Property at
sale and payment of the purchase price by the noteholder shall be
made by crediting the purchase price against the foreclosure costs
and expenses and the indebtedness secured by said Deed Of Trust.
In the event that settlement is delayed for any reason, including,
but not limited to, exceptions to the sale, bankruptcy filings by
interested parties, court administration of the foreclosure sale or
unknown title defects, there shall be no abatement of interest.
Adjustment of all taxes, public charges and special or regular
assessments, annual front foot benefit charges and deferred
connection fees, if any, shall be made as of the date of sale and
thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Condominium fees and/or
homeowner's association fees, if any, shall be assumed by the
purchaser from the date of sale. Title examination, conveyancing,
transfer taxes, recordation tax and all other costs of conveyance
and settlement shall be paid by the purchaser.
The Property is sold subject to the right of any persons in possession
of all or any part of the Property under recorded or unrecorded
leases or rights of occupancy, if any. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining possession of the Property.
Compliance with the terms of sale shall be made and the balance
of the purchase price shall be paid within ten (10) days after final
ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County,
Maryland, unless said time is extended by the undersigned Trustees
in their sole and absolute discretion for good cause shown, time
being of the essence; otherwise the deposit shall be forfeited and
the Property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting
purchaser. In the event of resale, the defaulting purchaser shall not
be entitled to any benefit, surplus proceeds or profits resulting from
such resale.
The Trustees and Auctioneers are not liable, individually or otherwise, for any reason. If title to the Property is not or cannot be
transferred consistent with the terms hereof for any reason, the
Trustees' liability is limited, at its sole discretion, to return any
deposit, without interest, thereby rescinding the sale, and there
is no other right or remedy against the Trustees at law or in
equity. The Trustee, Auctioneer and Secured Party do not make any
representations or warranties with respect to the accuracy of this
information
Martin L. Goozman and
Jeffrey W. Bernstein
Substitute Trustees
October 24, 31, November 7, 2017
C
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Montgomery County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
MARYLAND
ROBERT E. FRAZIER, et al.
Substitute Trustees,
Plaintiffs,
V.
DALE CURTIS BURDETTE,
Defendant(s).
CASE NO. 422231V
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this 17th
day of OCTOBER, 2017, that the
sale of the property in this case,
9911 WATKINS ROAD, GAITHERSBURG, MARYLAND 20882, reported
by Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung,
Laura D. Harris, Thomas W. Hodge,
Thomas J. Gartner, Robert M. Oliveri, David M. Williamson and Keith
M. Yacko, Substitute Trustees, be
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary be shown on
or before the 16th day of NOVEMBER 2017, provided a copy of this
Notice be inserted in The Washington Post, a newspaper published
in Montgomery County, Maryland,
once in each of three (3) successive weeks on or before the 16th
day of NOVEMBER 2017 .
The report states the amount of
sale to be $263,000.00.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court
for Montgomery County, MD
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIking Drive, Suite 203
Virginia Beach, VA 23452
(757) 213-2959
Oct 31, Nov 7, 14, 2017 12137377
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Prince Georges County
851
FREE UNDER $250
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 31, NOVEMBER 7, 14, 2017
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
Shannon D. Sweeney
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF14-24125
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 27th day of October 2017, that
the foreclosure sale of the property described in the deed of trust
docketed herein and located at
3019 Tyson Lane, Bowie, Maryland
20715, made and reported by
James E. Clarke, and Renee Dyson,
Substitute Trustees, be RATIFIED
and CONFIRMED, unless cause to
the contrary be shown on or
before the 27th day of November,
2017, provided a copy of this Order
be inserted in The Washington Post
once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 27th day of
November, 2017.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
SF
851
Nov 7, 14, 21, 2017
12140764
851
12140132
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
v.
JAMES BRANDON
SHARON BRANDON
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-17808
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 27th
day of October 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 10311 King
Richard Place, Upper Marlboro, MD
20772, will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 27th day of November, 2017, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive
weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said
County before the 27th day of
November, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$182,500.00.
851
Prince Georges County
STEPHEN B. JACKSON and
STEVEN P. HENNE
Substituted Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
AYANNA S. McSEARS and
CURTIS L. McSEARS
Defendants
Civil Action No. CAEF16-10644
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 30th
day of October, 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, that the sale of the
property identified as 2417 Pittland
Lane, Bowie, Maryland 20716,
made by Stephen B. Jackson and
Steven P. Henne, Substituted
Trustees, to: The Community
Development Administration of
the Department of Housing and
Community Development for the
State of Maryland and reported in
the above-entitled cause be ratified and confirmed unless cause to
the contrary thereof be shown on
or before the 30th day of November, 2017, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be inserted in some newspaper published in said Prince
George's County once a week for
three consecutive weeks on or
before the said 30th day of November, 2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $251,100.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
JERON E SKERRITT-RYAN A/K/A
JERON E SKERRITT A/K/A JERON E
RYAN
LESHAWN M RYAN
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-11049
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 27th
day of October, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 11910
Mary Catherine Drive, Clinton, MD
20735, and reported in the above
entitled cause, will be finally
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 27th day
of November, 2017 next; provided
a copy of this Order be inserted
in The Washington Post, 1150 15th
Street, Washington, DC, MD in said
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S
once a week for three successive
weeks before the 27th day of
November, 2017.
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OCTOBER 31, NOVEMBER 7, 14, 2017
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12135967
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BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
3837 SAINT BARNABAS ROAD UNIT T203
Suitland , MD 20746
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to LESLIE J. KEIDEL, Trustee(s), dated November
9, 2007, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 29145, folio 194, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
NOVEMBER 15, 2017 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
CONDOMINIUM UNIT NUMBERED AND LETTERED 3837-T203, IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "MARLOW TOWERS
CONDOMINIUM", AS ESTABLISHED PURSUANT TO THE CONDOMINIUM MASTER DEED MADE BY MARLOW MADISON
CONDOMINIUM LIMITED PARTNERSHIP, A LIMITED PARTNERSHIP, ORGANIZED AND EXISTING UNDER THE LAWS OF
THE STATE OF MARYLAND, DATED SEPTEMBER 15, 1972
AND RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND IN LIBER 4127 AT FOLIO
366, AND PURSUANT TO THE PLATE AND PLANS FOR
MARLOW TOWERS CONDOMINIUM, DESCRIBED IN SAID
MASTER DEED, RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
SAID COUNTY AND STATE, IN CONDOMINIUM PLAN BOOK
79 AT PLATS NUMBERED 83 THROUGH 100 INCLUSIVE,
AND CONDOMINIUM PLAT BOOK 81 AS PLATS NUMBERED 1
THROUGH 15 INCLUSIVE.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $7,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-09173)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris,
Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson, Scot Robinson,
Louis Gingher, and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Nov 7, 14, 21, 2017
12140765
Nov 7, 14, 21, 2017
851
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $237,000.00.
Attorney Louis S.Pettey, Esq
Heise Jorgensen & Stefanelli P.A.
18310 Montgomery Village
Avenue, Suite 400
Gaithersburg, MD 20879
(301) 977-8400
Nov 7, 14, 21, 2017
12140769
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
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If the merchandise you’re selling is priced under $250, your 3-line, 3-day ad is FREE!
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BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE,
MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
KNOWN AS
10002 CARNOT DRIVE
Cheltenham, MD 20623
7105 Mad Anthony Court
Brandywine,
MD 20613
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to THOMAS P. DORE, Trustee(s), dated February Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
18, 2015, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE Deed of Trust to RECONTRUST COMPANY, Trustee(s), dated
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 36798, folio 333, the April 22, 2008, and recorded among the Land Records of
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 29680, folio
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument 293, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
NOVEMBER 15, 2017 at 3:00PM
NOVEMBER 16, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
described as follows:
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
LOT NUMBERED FIVE (5), BLOCK LETTERED "E", IN THE described as follows:
SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "ROLLING ACRES", AS PER PLAT LOT NUMBERED ELEVEN (11), IN BLOCK LETTERED "F",
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK WWW-64, PLAT NO. 19 AMONG IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT OF CORRECTION,
THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARY- PLAT SIX, MCKENDREE VILLAGE", AS PER PLAT THEREOF
LAND.
RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK REP 197,
without either express or implied warranty or representation, AT PLAT 16.
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, without either express or implied warranty or representation,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mersubject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $17,500.00 payable in certified record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.75% on NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. the purchase price with interest at 3.875% per annum from
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be association dues and assessments that may become due after
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments, Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, Trustee's File No. (41818)
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (16-13491)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris,
www.hwestauctions.com
Thomas W. Hodge, Robert M. Oliveri,
OCTOBER 31, NOVEMBER 7, 14, 2017
12138856
Erin M. August, and Gene Jung,
851
Prince Georges County 851 Prince Georges County
Substitute Trustees
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $258,400.00.
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
Prince Georges County
Trustee Sales
202-334-5782
e-mail:
legalnotices@washpost.com
SF
WP 2x2
IS YOUR OLD CAR HOLDING UP?
YES
NO
NO
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YES
CLASSIFIED
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Source: Scarborough 2012, Release 2. Washington Post newspaper 7-day cumulative reach; Express 5-day reach.
C054E 10x2
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2017
851
Prince Georges County
851
OPQRS
EZ
Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
8704 Dorian Lane
Clinton, MD 20735
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to JOHN J. ROMANO, Trustee(s), dated June
23, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 25712, folio 337, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
NOVEMBER 16, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED SIXTEEN (16) IN BLOCK NUMBERED TWO
(2) IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT ONE, PLAT OF
CORRECTION, CHELTENHAM KNOLLS CLUSTERS" AS PER
PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK REP 209 AT PLAT
99
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 2% per annum from the
date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on
all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (45078)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 31, NOVEMBER 7, 14, 2017
872
873
Fairfax County
12138855
Prince William County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
8019 PANTANO PL UNIT 20,
ALEXANDRIA, VA 22309
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
12052 John Hancock Court
Woodbridge, VA 22192
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $179,870.00, with an annual
interest rate of 4.500000% dated
March 26, 2014, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX
as Deed Book 23603, Page 1700,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at
the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road,
Fairfax, Virginia on December 6,
2017 at 2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 1012-104B0020
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $432,000.00, dated January 17,
2006, recorded among the land
records of the Circuit Court for
Prince William County on January
18, 2006, as Instrument Number
200601180008730, the undersigned
appointed
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction, at the main entrance of
the courthouse for the Circuit Court
of Prince William County, 9311 Lee
Ave, Manassas, VA on December
8, 2017 at 9:00 AM, the property
described in said deed of trust,
located at the above address and
briefly described as: LOT 115-A, OF
A RESUBDIVISION OF LOTS 86, 87,
88, 89, 90, 91A, 115, 163 AND PARCEL B-1, OF THE SUBDIVISION OF
SECTION 9-B, LAKE RIDGE, AS THE
SAME APPEARS DULY DEDICATED,
PLATTED AND RECORDED IN DEED
BOOK 824, AT PAGE 487, AMONG
THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE
WILLIAM COUNTY, VIRGINIA. Tax
ID: 8293-87-5627.
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-267628.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Nov 7, 14, 2017
873
12141731
Prince William County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
11808 Troika Court
Woodbridge, VA 22192
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$215,000.00, dated November 15,
2005, recorded among the land
records of the Circuit Court for
Prince William County on December 12, 2005, as Instrument Number 200512120210714, the undersigned
appointed
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction, at the main entrance of
the courthouse for the Circuit Court
of Prince William County, 9311 Lee
Ave, Manassas, VA on December
15, 2017 at 9:00 AM, the property
described in said deed of trust,
located at the above address and
briefly described as: Lot 25, Section 15-J, LAKE RIDGE, as the same
appears duly dedicated, platted
and recorded in Deed Book 1697 at
Page 625 and re-recorded in Deed
Book 1712 at Page 26, among
the land records of Prince William
County, Virginia. Tax ID: 8193-892610.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $11,000.00 or 10%
of the sale price, whichever is
lower, will be required in the form
of a certified or cashier’s check.
Cash will not be accepted as a
deposit. Settlement within fifteen
(15) days of sale, otherwise Trustee
may forfeit deposit. Additional
terms to be announced at sale.
This is a communication from a
debt collector. This notice is an
attempt to collect on a debt and
any information obtained will be
used for that purpose.
Loan Type: Conv/Conv (Trustee #
526882)
Substitute Trustee: ALG Trustee,
LLC, C/O Orlans PC PO Box 2548,
Leesburg, VA 20177, (703) 7777101,
website:
http://www.orlans.com
Towne #: 5000.0543
November 7, 14, 21, 28, 2017
12141546
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $13,000.00 or 10%
of the sale price, whichever is
lower, will be required in the form
of a certified or cashier’s check.
Cash will not be accepted as a
deposit. Settlement within fifteen
(15) days of sale, otherwise Trustee
may forfeit deposit. Additional
terms to be announced at sale.
This is a communication from a
debt collector. This notice is an
attempt to collect on a debt and
any information obtained will be
used for that purpose.
Loan Type: Conv/Conv (Trustee #
575446)
Substitute Trustee: ALG Trustee,
LLC, C/O Orlans PC PO Box 2548,
Leesburg, VA 20177, (703) 7777101,
website:
http://www.orlans.com
Towne #: 5000.0545
11/7/2017, 11/14/2017 12141593
Wake up
to home
delivery.
1-800-753-POST
Prince Georges County
SF
852
Prince Georges County
Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
2000 CROSBYSIDE COURT
Odenton, MD 21113
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to MICHAEL N. SCHLEUPNER JR, Trustee(s),
dated November 16, 2011, and recorded among the Land
Records of ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber
24080, folio 252, the holder of the indebtedness secured by
this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8
CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401 ON,
NOVEMBER 9, 2017 at 10:00AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NUMBERED SEVENTY-EIGHT (78), AS SHOWN ON PLATS ENTITLED, "SEVEN
OAKS, SECOND REVISION PARCEL 13-SECTION ONE, RESIDENTIAL TOWNHOUSE SUBDIVISION" WHICH PLATS ARE
RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF ANNE ARUNDEL
COUNTY IN PLAT BOOK 195, PAGES 22, 23 AND 24, PLAT
NOS. 10297, 10298 AND 10299.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $19,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of ANNE ARUNDEL
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.5% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (15-13402)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris
Thomas W. Hodge, Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
Scott Robinson, and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
852
Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
4957 ELM STREET
Shady Side, MD 20764
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to LESLIE J. KEIDEL, Trustee(s), dated January
24, 2011, and recorded among the Land Records of ANNE
ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 23160, folio 355, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction at THE ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8 CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD
21401 ON,
NOVEMBER 9, 2017 at 10:00AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOTS NUMBERED
THIRTY-SIX (36), THIRTY-EIGHT (38) AND FORTY (40) IN
BLOCK NUMBERED EIGHTEEN (18) IN A SUBDIVISION
KNOWN AS "SECTION A, AVALON SHORES", AS PER PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8 AT PLAT 36 AMONG
THE LAND RECORDS OF ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $24,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of ANNE ARUNDEL
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.5% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-04202)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris
Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher, and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
870
Arlington County
CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION’S SALE OF
2900 16TH ROAD SOUTH #A
ARLINGTON, VA 22204
By the main entrance of the Arlington County Courthouse,
located at 1425 North Courthouse Road, Arlington, VA 22201
ALL OF THAT UNIT together with all improvements located therein,
situated in Arlington County, Virginia and more particularly described as:
Condominium Unit No. 2900A, Arlington County Condominium, Inc.,
Arlington County, Virginia, and the Limited Common Elements appurtenant thereto, pursuant to the Condominium Instruments recorded in
the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of the County of Arlington,
Virginia in Deed Book 2736, page 1928.
R.P.C.#:32-001-659
TERMS OF SALE: This property will be sold in an “AS IS” condition and
without any warranty, either expressed or implied, and subject to all
restrictions, covenants, conditions, rights of ways, easements, violations,
filed or unfiled mechanics’ and/or materialmen’s liens, if any, to the
extent any of the foregoing may lawfully apply to the property being sold.
The satisfaction of all statutory prior liens set forth in Section 55-79.84(A)
of the Code of Virginia, as amended, shall be a condition of sale. Upon
information and belief, as of September 26, 2017, no such statutory prior
liens exist. Assessment liens filed by the Association are recorded at
Instrument No. 20150100026259 and Instrument No. 20160100020093
among the Land Records; it is the aforementioned assessment liens upon
which this foreclosure is based.
A bidder's deposit of $3,400.00 in cash, certified check, wire transfer, or
cashier's check payable to the Association shall be required to qualify as a
bidder before the sale, except from the Association. Notwithstanding the
foregoing, the Association reserves the right to waive the requirements
of the deposit. The balance of the purchase price shall be in cash or its
equivalent and shall be due within fifteen (15) days from the date of the
sale; otherwise the deposit shall be forfeited and the property may be
resold at the discretion of the Association and at the risk and cost of the
defaulting purchaser. Time is of the essence. The successful bidder shall
assume all loss or damage to the property from and after the time of the
sale. If the Association or trustee cancels or rescinds the sale prior to
settlement due to a bankruptcy filing or other cause, the purchaser's sole
remedy shall be the refund of the deposit, plus interest.
Interest to be paid by the purchaser at a rate of 12% per annum from
the date of the sale to the date of the settlement. Settlement shall be
at the offices of the Association's legal counsel or appointed Trustee or
other mutually agreed location. Real estate taxes pro-rated to the date
of sale. All costs of conveyance, which shall be by special warranty
deed, including, but not limited to, recordation charges, notary fees and
settlement fees shall be at the cost of the purchaser. The sale is subject
to such additional terms as the Association may announce at the time of
sale. At the time of sale, the successful bidder shall be required to sign a
Memorandum of Sale incorporating all the terms of the sale.
The information contained herein was obtained by sources deemed to be
reliable but is offered for informational purposes only. The Association
cannot make any representations or warranties with respect to the
accuracy of this information. It is the responsibility of the potential
bidders to confirm the chain of title for the subject unit.
For information, contact:
Chadwick, Washington,
Moriarty, Elmore & Bunn, P.C.
Attorneys for Arlington Court
Condominium Inc.
3201 Jermantown Road Ste. 600
Fairfax, Virginia 22030
(703) 352-1900/telephone
Gelber and Associates, PLLC, Trustee
201 Park Washington Court, First Floor
Falls Church, VA 22046
(703) 237-1200/telephone
October 24, 31, November 7, 13, 2017
878
Stafford County
OCTOBER 31, NOVEMBER 7, 14, 2017
875
877
Fauquier County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
9373 WALDEN LANE,
MARSHALL, VA 20115
In execution of a certain Deed of
Trust dated March 29, 2006, in
the original principal amount of
$75,000.00 recorded in the Clerk’s
Office, Circuit Court for Fauquier
County, Virginia, in Book 1211 at
Page 1625 as Instrument No. 200600005710. The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at
public auction in the front of the
Circuit Court building for Fauquier
County, 40 Culpeper Street, Warrenton, Virginia on December 7,
2017, at 12:00 PM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT OR
PARCEL OF LAND SITUATE, LYING
AND BEING ON MARSHALL MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT, FAUQUIER, VIRGINIA,
MORE
PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: LOT 2,
CONTAINING
3,7586
ACRES,
"PROPERTY OF PEGGY CAVETT
WALDEN", BY PLAT OF SURVEY
BY JAMES H. HARRIS AND ASSOCIATES, INC., DATED JULY 31,
1992, AND RECORDED IN DEED
BOOK 692, PAGE 1015, AMONG
THE LAND RECORDS OF FAUQUIER
COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
Substitute Trustee has identified
an unreleased security instrument
which may be superior to the subject deed of trust. Substitute
Trustee disclaims any implication
that the Property will be sold free
and clear of all liens. If the sale
is set aside for any reason, the
Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled to a return of the deposit paid.
The Purchaser may, if provided by
the terms of the Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be
entitled to a $50 cancellation fee
from the Substitute Trustee, but
shall have no further recourse
against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney.
Additional terms to be announced
at the sale. A form copy of the
Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and contract to purchase real property is available for
viewing at www.bwwsales.com.
This is a communication from a
debt collector and any information
obtained will be used for that purpose. The sale is subject to seller
confirmation. Substitute Trustee:
Equity Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson
Blvd., Suite 1004, Arlington, VA
22201. For more information contact: BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003
Executive
Blvd, Suite
101,
Rockville, MD 20852, 301-9616555,
website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3214461.
12132104
www.hwestauctions.com
Spotsylvania County
TRUSTEE SALE
6044 Battlefield Green Drive,
Fredericksburg, VA 22407-6402
Spotsylvania County
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $157,325.00, dated February 22,
2007 recorded in the Clerk's
Office of the Circuit Court of the
Spotsylvania County, Virginia, in
Document No. LR200700006034
and modified in Document No.
150001565,
default
having
occurred in the payment of the
Note thereby secured and at the
request of the holder of said Note,
the
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at the entrance to the
Spotsylvania County Judicial Center, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, on December 5, 2017
at 12:00 PM the property
described in said deed, located
at the above address and briefly
described as:
Lot 68, Section 3, Battlefield Green,
with improvements thereon
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust, if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (57400)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Oct 31, Nov 7, 2017
12138895
SF
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $183,571.00, dated December
26, 2013 recorded in the Clerk's
Office of the Circuit Court of the
Spotsylvania County, Virginia, in
Document No. 130028413, default
having occurred in the payment of
the Note thereby secured and at
the request of the holder of said
Note, the undersigned Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at
the entrance to the Spotsylvania
County Judicial Center, 9107 Judicial Center Lane, Spotsylvania, on
December 12, 2017 at 12:00 PM
the property described in said
deed, located at the above
address and briefly described as:
Lot 103, Parkevue, Section 7A,
Salem Fields, with improvements
thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust, if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (58013)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Nov 7, 14, 2017
12141173
TRUSTEE SALE
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated June 11, 2012, in
the original principal amount of
$235,000.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Stafford County, Virginia as Instrument No. 120011819 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Stafford County, 1300 Courthouse Road, Stafford, Virginia on
December 7, 2017 , at 2:00 PM, the
property described in said Deed
of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL THAT
CERTAIN LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND
WITH ALL IMPROVEMENTS THEREON AND APPURTENANCES THERETO BELONGING, LYING AND BEING
IN ROCK HILL MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT, STAFFORD COUNTY, VIRGINIA, DESIGNATED AS LOT 30,
SECTION 9, PHASE 2, VISTA
WOODS SUBDIVISION, AS SHOWN
ON PLAT OF SURVEY MADE BY
GILBERT W. CLIFFORD AND ASSOCIATES, INC., DATED DECEMBER
9,1986 AND RECORDED IN THE
CLERK‘S OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF STAFFORD COUNTY,
VIRGINIA, IN PLAT BOOK 14 AT
PAGES 197 AND 198.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3227671.
12141236
You, too, could have
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Stafford County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
11 BOYD DRIVE,
STAFFORD, VA 22556.
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
Stafford County
TRUSTEE SALE
7126 Wytheville Circle,
Fredericksburg, VA 22407
Spotsylvania County
Nov. 7, 14, 2017
Home delivery
is convenient.
www.hwestauctions.com
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
OCTOBER 24, 31, NOVEMBER 7, 2017
12136470 OCTOBER 24, 31, NOVEMBER 7, 2017
12134398
877
878
878
MARYLAND
Spotsylvania County
SF
1-800-753-POST
SF
12 Idlebrook Way,
Fredericksburg, VA 22406
Stafford County
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $414,968.00, dated February 11,
2008 recorded in the Clerk's
Office of the Circuit Court of the
Stafford County, Virginia, in Document No. LR080002897, default
having occurred in the payment
of the Note thereby secured and
at the request of the holder of said
Note, the undersigned Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
at the entrance to the Judicial
Center, 1300 Courthouse Road,
Stafford, on December 5, 2017 at
11:00 AM the property described
in said deed, located at the above
address and briefly described as:
Lot 717, Section 11-B, Stafford
Lakes Village, with improvements
thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust, if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of All that
certain lot, parcel or tract of land, with all buildings and improvements
thereon, with all rights and privileges thereto appurtenant, situate, lying
and being in Stafford County, Virginia, known and designated as Lot 53,
Section Two, Winslow Heights Subdivision, containing 4.678 acres, more or
less, as shown on a plat of survey duly recorded in the Clerk’s office of the
Circuit Court of Stafford County, Virginia, in Plat Book 6, pages 283-294,
and as more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
November 7, 14, 2017
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (26133)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Oct 31, Nov 7, 2017
12139645
MARYLAND
Roommates
ANDREWS AFB Area- Nice furn room,
nice area, kit privs. w/w. $550/mo
+ $50 sec dep. Call 301-395-6738
CAPITAL HEIGHTS- House to share,
Near Metro, $165-$185/wkly, male
pref. 301-537-5433 or 202-251-5441
TEMPLE HILLS- Furnished room for
rent, Shared BA, near subway. Utils
& Cable incl. $180/wk. 301-919-5150
SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH
FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS.
Call Al, 301-807-3266.
Will Come to you!
VIRGINIA
COLLEGE PARK - Furn room in pvt
home. $565/mo, sec dep req. No
smoking. Pref male. 240-423-7923
Out-of-Town
Real Estate
DELAWARE
New Move-In Ready Homes!
Low Taxes! Close to Beaches,
Gated, Olympic pool. New Homes
from low $100’s. No HOA Fees.
Brochures Available.
1-866-629-0770 or
www.coolbranch.com
Ft. Meade— $800, 1 bedrm, 1 ba,
3573 Fort Meade Rd, 240-486-7606, 229
Balc, DW, Form DR, Form LR, new
carpet, WW Carpet, HSI, Elev, Hlth
Fac, Nr Pub Transp, pkg, Pool, AC,
Elec, garbage, Heat
HYATTSVILLE- 1 bedroom in Sunny
TH, $500, Util. incl. Close to Ft. Totten Metro.Qn bd incl. 202-787-8286
LARGO - Across from PG College,
$700/month incl elect + water.
Call: 301-523-4772
Oxon Hill— $525.00, 1 bedrm, 1 ba, 1
1/2ba, 5100 Glassmanor Drive, 240486-1948
OXON HILL /TEMPLE HILLS-Rooms.
$600 - $675. NICE home. Utilities incl.
No smoking. 1 person. 301-848-0418
Clothing, Shoes
& Accessories
FULL MINK COAT- Perfect condition, still in the wrapping, cert. of
authenticity, $4000.
Call 301-864-2685 or 240-350-5053
237
Merchandise Wanted
610
Springfield— $850, 1 bedrm, 1 ba,
703-912-5616, Verizon Television,
pkg
HYATTSVILLE- Furn room $175/wk +
security. Includes all utils inc cable.
Near Metro. No pets. 301-675-2016
Home & Garden
Solid
Hardwood
Brazilian
Cherry Flooring - 3600 S.F.,
$2.50 per SF. 301-860-1190
275
CAPITAL HEIGHTS / SEAT PLEASANTM pref to share house. $160 and up/
week. Good transp. 301-499-6323
G’BURG – Private Ent, 1BR,1BA, bsmt
apartment, SFH, 3 acre land, free
util/CATV, $1175/mo 240-643-8842
12140152
265
SILVER SPRING - Room to rent.
W/D, shrd kit & BA. Nr Holy Cross
Hosp. 240-988-9316/ 301-593-3983
Roommates
FT. WASHINGTON - Large furnished
room, carpet, cable TV/wifi, N/S.
$170/wk + $100 dep. 301-919-5150
Stafford County
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
February 18, 2008, and recorded at Instrument Number 090001202 in the
Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Stafford County, VA, securing a loan
which was originally $235,000.00. The appointed SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE,
Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at public auction at the
front steps of the Judicial Bldg, Circuit Court for Stafford County, 1300
Courthouse Road, Stafford, VA on:
November 27, 2017 at 10:00 AM
Roommates
FORT WASHINGTON - Rooms with
pvt BA. Kitn. Vets welcome. 5 min
to Nat'l Harbor. Inc cable/internet.
Starts @ $850. Call 301-292-6147
12137451
878
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
94 Richland Road,
Fredericksburg, VA 22406
MARYLAND
www.hwestauctions.com
D11
Arlington County
870
Under and by virtue of the power of sale granted it in the Virginia
Condominium Act and the condominium instruments for Arlington Court
Condominium, Inc. (“Association”), the Association will offer for sale at
public auction to the highest bidder on:
Tuesday, November 14, 2017 at 11:00 a.m.
Roommates
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
851
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
4909 Sharon Road
Temple Hills, MD 20748
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to COLLEEN SCHOFIELD AND CAROLYN
CARI, Trustee(s), dated May 1, 2009, and recorded among
the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
in Liber 30640, folio 211, the holder of the indebtedness
secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned
Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the
aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby,
the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
ON,
NOVEMBER 15, 2017 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT 5 IN BLOCK E, PLAT 2, STAN HAVEN, AS PER PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK W.W.W. 24 AT PLAT
4 OF THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $28,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 5.5% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-07737)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris, Robert M.
Oliveri, Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher, and
Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
Oct. 24, 31, Nov. 7, 14, 2017
12138184
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EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
Carlson’s
OT goal
gives Caps
another win
NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
NHL ROUNDUP
With third-period surge,
Rangers’ streak hits four
RANGERS 5,
BLUE JACKETS 3
CAPITALS FROM D1
said. “We’ve got to put a couple of
these together. We didn’t start
[the season] like we wanted to, so
we’ve got a lot of work to do, but
just keep finding ways to win.”
The Capitals have played just
six games at home this season,
and they have struggled in that
small sample size. The power
play has been especially miserable here, entering the game as
the worst in the league on home
ice, scoring on just 1 of 19
opportunities.
With Washington down 2-1 in
the second period Monday, the
team’s man-advantage got plenty
of practice with the Coyotes
playing undisciplined and gifting the Capitals one power play
after another. On Washington’s
fourth power play of the period,
Mario Kempe’s stick broke and
Alex Ovechkin capitalized with a
signature one-timer from the left
faceoff circle that made it a tie
game entering intermission. The
goal was Ovechkin’s 12th of the
season and his second in as many
games. It also snapped a sixgame drought for the Capitals’
power play.
“Sometimes it’s working,
sometimes it’s not,” Ovechkin
said. “Finally it’s nice to get a
goal. It was a big goal for us.”
Before the game, Capitals
Coach Barry Trotz warned that
this could be a “trap game.”
Arizona entered the matchup
having not won a game in regulation this season, and with Washington playing the Sabres in
Buffalo on Tuesday night and the
Pittsburgh Penguins on Friday
night, it would have been easy to
overlook the Coyotes. But Trotz
cautioned that while Arizona’s
record may not be impressive,
some of the team’s young talent
is.
Any notion that the Capitals
should not take the Coyotes seriously went away in the first
minute of the game. Lars Eller’s
shot went off rookie Clayton
. TUESDAY,
A SSOCIATED P RESS
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
As Coyotes goalie Scott Wedgewood skates away, the Capitals celebrate John Carlson’s winner Monday.
C A P I TA L S ’ N EX T TH R EE
Capitals 3, Coyotes 2 (OT)
ARIZONA ........................... 2
WASHINGTON ................... 1
0
1
0
0
0 — 2
1 — 3
at Buffalo Sabres
FIRST PERIOD
Today
Scoring: 1, Arizona, Keller 11, 1:00. 2, Arizona, Fischer 4
(Dvorak, Ekman-Larsson), 6:42. 3, Washington, SmithPelly 2 (Eller), 8:41.
7 NBCSW Plus,
NBCSN
SECOND PERIOD
vs. Pittsburgh Penguins
Scoring: 4, Washington, Ovechkin 12 (Carlson, Kuznetsov), 14:23 (pp).
Friday
THIRD PERIOD
7 NBCSW,
NHLN
Scoring: None.
OVERTIME
vs. Edmonton Oilers
Scoring: 5, Washington, Carlson 1 (Kuznetsov, Oshie),
4:14.
Sunday
SHOTS ON GOAL
7 NBCSW,
NHLN
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM),
WFED (1500 AM)
Keller, who raced down the ice
with the puck. On a two-on-one,
Keller scored his 11th goal of the
season, bolstering his case as an
early favorite for NHL rookie of
the year. Less than six minutes
later, Arizona made it 2-0 when
Christian Dvorak’s centering
pass was deflected in by Christian Fischer.
That gave the Coyotes an effi-
ARIZONA ........................... 6
12
6
2 — 26
WASHINGTON ................. 13
13
11
3 — 40
Power-play opportunities: Arizona 0 of 3 Goalies:
Arizona, Wedgewood 1-1-0 (40 shots-37 saves). Washington, Holtby 7-3-0 (26-24). T: 2:39.
cient two goals on their first two
shots. They didn’t get their third
shot of the game until there was
7:40 left in the first period, and
Capitals goaltender Braden Holtby made his first save of the
night, stopping Brad Richardson’s attempt in front. Had Holtby not made that save, Trotz
admitted he probably would
have pulled him at that point.
“I felt like he was going to mix
in a save or two, and I wanted
him to fight through that,” Trotz
said. “. . . It’s a trust thing. They
got two, and I got a couple looks
on the bench, ‘Are you going to
pull him or not?’ I said, ‘No, he’s
going to mix in a save here and
let him battle through this.’ ”
Two minutes after Fischer’s
goal, Capitals forward Devante
Smith-Pelly cut the deficit in
half. Eller’s shot was blocked,
and Smith-Pelly collected the
rebound, backhanding it into the
net, as the Capitals began to
navigate their way to a win.
“You’re sitting there, you’re
playing pretty well, and you’re
down 2-0,” Trotz said. “I’m looking up and I’m going, ‘Just stay
the course.’ I thought we did.
Sometimes when you give up two
goals as quickly as we did with
the first two shots that they had,
sometimes you get away from
how you have to play. I don’t
think we did. . . . That was the
thing that impressed me the
most — that there was no panic
on our bench.”
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
Michael Grabner had two goals,
and the host New York Rangers
scored four times in the third period to rally past the Columbus Blue
Jackets, 5-3, on Monday night for
their fourth straight victory.
Kevin
Shattenkirk,
Chris
Kreider and Pavel Buchnevich
scored in the third for the Rangers,
with Mika Zibanejad getting an
assist on all three goals. New York
trailed 2-0 before Grabner scored
his first of the game at 12:41 of the
second period. He sealed it on an
empty-netter with 49 seconds left.
Shattenkirk and Buchnevich
each had a goal and an assist.
Henrik Lundqvist made 22 saves
as the Rangers improved to 7-7-2.
Artemi Panarin, Josh Anderson
and Oliver Bjorkstrand scored for
the Blue Jackets.
Columbus struck twice early in
the second period. Panarin was
left alone in the slot and scored 38
seconds into the period. Anderson
beat Lundqvist with a nifty wrist
shot to the far side at 4:24.
New York cut the deficit to 2-1
when Grabner scored his sixth of
the season. J.T. Miller entered the
zone and tried to pull up short and
spin to his backhand. In the process, he slipped but still managed to
slide the puck from his knees to
the front of the net, where Grabner did the rest.
Shattenkirk tied it at 2 at 5:10 of
the third when his wrist shot beat
Sergei Bobrovsky.
Less than three minutes later,
Bjorkstrand gave Columbus a 3-2
lead. Boone Jenner was able to
drive the puck to the net, and
Shattenkirk was unable to slow
down the power forward. Lundqvist proceeded to lose his stick,
and Brandon Dubinsky found
Bjorkstrand alone in front to give
the Blue Jackets the lead at 8:01.
But just 1:39 later, Kreider
scored a power-play goal to tie it
again. Buchnevich picked up an
assist on the play.
Only 1:47 after that, Zibanejad
slid a backhand pass across the ice
to Buchnevich as the Rangers took
a 4-3 lead at 11:27.
MAPLE LEAFS 4, GOLDEN
KNIGHTS 3 (SO): Mitch Marner
scored in the shootout to lift host
Toronto after the Maple Leafs
blew a two-goal lead.
Marner was the first skater in
the tiebreaker and went out wide
to the left before cutting in toward
the net, forcing Maxime Lagace to
commit with a deke before tucking the puck past him.
Nazem Kadri had two goals and
James van Riemsdyk also scored
for Toronto, which led 3-1 after one
period. Frederik Andersen made
22 saves and stopped three skaters
in the shootout.
Deryk Engelland’s third-period
goal for Vegas forced overtime.
James Neal and Reilly Smith also
scored for the Golden Knights.
BRUINS 5, WILD 3: Jake
DeBrusk and Frank Vatrano each
scored a first-period goal, and host
Boston held off Minnesota.
Sean Kuraly and Torey Krug
scored in the second for the Bruins, who were shut out in two
matchups with Wild goalie Devan
Dubnyk last season. Zdeno Chara
and Jordan Szwarz each had two
assists as Boston solved Dubnyk
early. Minnesota’s netminder was
pulled after two periods.
Tuukka Rask stopped 24 shots
for Boston, including a right-pad
save on Mikael Granlund’s penalty
shot with 13:05 to play.
Eric Staal, Nino Niederreiter
and Granlund each had a goal and
assist for the Wild. Staal scored a
shorthanded goal on a breakaway
with 4:04 left to cut it to 4-3, but
the Bruins held on for their second
win in five games.
JETS 4, STARS 1: Winnipeg
scored three times in the first period and held on from there to post a
win in Dallas.
Blake Wheeler had the primary
assist on all four Winnipeg goals.
Mark Scheifele, Patrik Laine and
Kyle Connor tallied in the first
19:03 for the Jets, who got 33 saves
from Connor Hellebuyck. Scheifele scored into an empty net in the
game’s final minute.
Jamie Benn scored for the Stars
in the second period.
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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2017
.
SECTION E
EZ
EE
Don’t judge me
by my words
My stutter is a physical disability,
not a sign that I shouldn’t be trusted
ZACH MEYER FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Tom Brady’s
a winner, but
what about
his diet?
Tom Brady says
the secret to his
success includes
EMILY SOHN
avoiding
mushrooms,
tomatoes and eggplants. The
New England Patriots
quarterback also limits dairy,
gluten, white sugar, white flour,
processed sweets, condiments,
alcohol and salt.
Instead, Brady eats mostly
fresh, local and organic fruit and
vegetables, according to his new
book, “The TB12 Method: How to
Achieve a Lifetime of Sustained
Peak Performance.” His staples
also include wild fish and freerange, hormone-free meat, along
with whole grains, nuts and
products from his line of snacks
and protein bars.
A major motivator for his
choices about food as well as
about exercise, hydration,
sleepwear and mental training,
he writes — in sweeping
AnyBODY
DIET CONTINUED ON E5
ADHD
mom relies
on her fidget
spinners
BY
MEDICINE
Critically ill babies survive,
thanks to gene therapy. E2
E LIZABETH B ROADBENT
“You have a spinner? I have a
spinner, too!” says the 10-year-old
boy in front of me. We’ve just met
him here at the creek, where I’ve
brought my sons to catch minnows. With my 3-year-old beside
me, I am sitting on a picnic blanket spinning, flicking, stopping,
spinning, flicking, stopping the
three-pronged thing.
“Yeah, mine is because I have
something called ADHD,” I explain. “It helps me concentrate.”
“I have a spinner, too! You wanna trade?”
I shake my head. But he insists
that I try his spinner while he tries
mine. He offers to trade again.
“No,” I tell him, playing regret. “I
have to have mine. It stops me
from doing things like getting on
my phone all the time.”
His laugh echoes under the latesummer sweet gums. “I know the
answer to that. Just don’t bring
SPINNER CONTINUED ON E6
QUICK STUDY
A high-fiber diet may fight
colorectal cancer. E3
DISEASE
Why Zika cases have
faded, for now. E3
PERSPECTIVE
How to address sexual
assault, harassment. E4
AUTISM
Easing the difficult
transition to college. E5
BY
I
R ACHEL H OGE
was waiting in line at my bank’s drive-up service,
hoping to make a quick withdrawal. I debated my
options: two vacant service lines and one busy one for
the ATM. ¶The decision was easy: Wait in the line and
deal with a machine. ¶ I have a speech disability — a
stutter — and interactions with strangers have the potential
to be, at the very least, extremely awkward; at worst, I have
been mocked, insulted, misjudged or refused service. I avoid
interacting with new people, fearful of their judgment. Using
the ATM offered me more than just convenience. ¶ But the
ATM, I soon discovered, was going down for maintenance. I
could either leave, returning on a day when the machine was
back in service, or speak with a bank teller. Once again, I
debated my options. I needed the cash and was feeling
optimistic, so I pulled into the service line. ¶ I quickly
rehearsed all acceptable variations of what I had to say: I
need to withdraw some money from my checking account.
Or maybe, to use fewer words: Could I have a withdrawal
slip? Or straight to the point: Withdraw, please. ¶ I pulled
my car forward. Glancing at the teller, I took a deep breath
and managed to blurt out: “Can I p-p-p-p-please make a
wi-wi-with-with-withdrawal?” ¶ The teller smiled on the
other side of the glass. “Sure,” she said. ¶ I wasn’t sure if she
had noticed my stutter or simply believed my repetitions
(rep-rep-repetitions) and prolongations (p-p-p-p-prolongations)
were just indications of being tongue-tied rather than
manifestations of a persistent stutter. I eased back in my seat,
trying to relax.
STUTTERING CONTINUED ON E6
E2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
. TUESDAY,
NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
S C I E NC E NE WS
USDA will stop using helicopters and planes
to hunt down coyotes in portions of California
ROSHAN PATEL/SMITHSONIAN CONSERVATION BIOLOGY INSTITUTE
What’s her name? We’ll find out soon.
This female brown kiwi was born in late July at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, Va. Possible
names for the chick have been solicited from the public, and three choices will be voted on via the Smithsonian’s Twitter account
between Nov. 13 and Nov. 16. Native to New Zealand and sacred to its Maori people, the species is endangered in the wild by
predators introduced by humans. This young one weighs about two pounds and has shown a particular appetite for mealworms.
Gene therapy o≠ers hope for babies with fatal illness
BY
L AURAN N EERGAARD
A first attempt at gene therapy
for a disease that leaves babies unable to move, swallow and, eventually, breathe has extended the
tots’ lives, and some began to roll
over, sit and stand on their own,
researchers have reported.
Only 15 babies with spinal muscular atrophy received the experimental therapy, but researchers in
Columbus, Ohio, credited the preliminary and promising results to
replacing the infants’ defective gene
early — in the first few months of
life, before the neuromuscular disease destroyed too many key nerve
cells.
“They all should have died by
now,” said Jerry Mendell of Nationwide Children’s Hospital, who led
the work published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Yet “those
babies are still improving.”
Mendell cautioned that much
more study is needed to prove the
gene therapy works and is safe.
Also, it is not clear whether the
replacement gene’s effects would
wane over time.
Spinal muscular atrophy occurs in about 1 in 10,000 births,
and those with the most severe
form, called SMA Type 1, rarely
reach their second birthday. They
can be born looking healthy but
rapidly decline. One study found
just 8 percent of the most severely
affected
survived
to
age
20 months without needing permanent mechanical ventilation to
breathe.
There is no cure. The first treatment — Spinraza, a drug that requires spinal injections every few
months — wasn’t approved until
last December.
The experimental gene therapy
BARB CONSIGLIO/NATIONWIDE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jerry Mendell led a small study of gene therapy in babies with a
usually fatal neuromuscular disease. All of them are alive, he said.
“They all should have
died by now.” Yet “those
babies are still
improving.”
Jerry Mendell, whose team gave
injections to 15 infants with spinal
muscular atrophy
approach aims for a one-time fix.
What goes wrong
Spinal muscular atrophy is
caused when a mutated gene can’t
produce a protein crucial for survival of motor neurons, nerve cells in
the spinal cord that control muscles.
Some children carry extra copies
of a backup gene that produces
small amounts of the vital protein,
and thus have much milder forms of
the disease.
Gene replacement
Scientists loaded a healthy version
of the gene into a virus modified so it
couldn’t cause illness. Then 15 babies
got a one-time intravenous injection.
The virus carried the healthy gene
into motor neurons, where it got to
work producing the protein those
nerve cells require to live.
Three babies received a low dose
of the gene therapy, as a first-step
safety precaution. The remaining 12
got a high dose.
Results
About two years after treatment,
Mendell said, all of the children are
alive. And all beat the odds of needing permanent machine help to
breathe by age 20 months.
But only the high-dose recipients
saw better motor control, reaching
some developmental milestones
usually unthinkable for such patients. Eleven could sit unassisted at
least briefly; nine could roll over.
Eleven are speaking and able to
swallow. Two were able to crawl,
stand and then walk, Mendell’s
team reported.
Those results are “very striking,”
said Basil Darras, who directs Boston Children’s Hospital’s neuromuscular center and wasn’t involved in the new research.
While the treatment needs testing on far more babies, usually
“there are no further developmental gains” after diagnosis, Darras
said. “They stagnate for a while and
they go downhill very fast and die.”
The only serious side effect attributed to the gene therapy so far
involved possible signs of a liver
problem that eased with treatment.
Next steps
Avexis, which is developing the
gene therapy and helped fund the
study, has opened a second small
trial at seven hospitals.
Meanwhile, doctors are prescribing Spinraza, which works by increasing that backup gene’s protein
production and, according to a separate study, had some benefit in
about half of patients. The first year
of treatment costs about $750,000,
an accompanying editorial noted.
With the drug’s availability, some
health groups are urging that SMA
be added to the list of diseases that
all newborns are screened for, so
parents can seek early treatment.
— Associated Press
This article was produced in partnership
with the Howard Hughes Medical
Institute’s Department of Science
Education. The Associated Press is solely
responsible for all content.
Colorblind viewers find new way to enjoy fall foliage
BY
J ONATHAN M ATTISE
Even when the rugged expanses
of the Great Smoky Mountains
were bursting with their famous
fall colors, they always looked dull
black and tawny to Lauren Van
Lew from the 3,590-foot-high
perch of Mount Harrison near
Gatlinburg, Tenn.
For the 20-year-old Van Lew,
who has been colorblind her
whole life, some colors have just
been left to the imagination. She
loves painting, but her wife, Molly,
has to help her pick and mix colors.
Several days ago, however,
when Van Lew visited the scenic
mountaintop again and looked
through a special viewfinder, she
saw yellows, oranges and reds exploding across the landscape for
the first time.
“Red was the biggest difference.
I mean, I can’t describe it,” said
Van Lew, who lives in Sevierville,
Tenn. “It’s the most beautiful thing
I’ve ever seen in my life. That red,
it’s just gorgeous. It’s incredible.”
She wondered, “How do you see
like that all of the time?”
The colorblind viewfinder installed atop the Ober Gatlinburg
resort by the Tennessee Department of Tourist Development will
be one of three in the state, letting
people gaze upon colors that they
may have never seen.
Although the technology isn’t
new — eyeglasses that let colorblind people see colors are already
available — state officials say this
is the first time it has been incorporated into a viewfinder, at a cost
of $2,000, to help people with
red-green color deficiencies. How
JONATHAN MATTISE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
At Tennessee’s Mount Harrison, Amber McCarter looks through a viewfinder designed to allow people
who are colorblind to see the tints and hues of nature in scenic spots.
crisply the viewfinders display
new colors can vary among the 13
million or so Americans with color
deficiencies.
State tourism officials recently
invited people to try it out at Ober
Gatlinburg, taking them up by ski
lift but leaving the details somewhat vague to maintain the element of surprise. A crew filmed
their reactions for marketing material.
Their first glimpses drew tears,
smiles and faces stunned by wonder and awe.
“My heart just started beating
fast,” said Todd Heil, who generally sees a lot of green. “I felt like
crying, man. Too many people
around.”
Amber McCarter works in real
estate, so part of her pitch is the
fall foliage that drapes the Great
Smoky Mountains, even though
she can’t entirely see it herself. The
viewfinder gave her a firsthand
look of the views she’s been selling.
“It’s like, if you want to go see a
show somewhere, you don’t want
to hear from somebody whose
family went. You want to hear
from somebody who actually
went,” the 22-year-old said.
For Van Lew, nothing looks the
same now. It can be a little disheartening to know what she’s
been missing. But the possibility
of tapping into a long-unseen
world of vibrant color is uplifting,
she added.
“It’s going to enable more people to experience the beauty that
we live in, that I didn’t know we
lived in,” she said.
— Associated Press
In a deal hailed by activists as
a first, a federal judge last week
approved an agreement between
conservationists and the U.S.
government halting controversial methods such as aerial gunning to kill “nuisance animals” in
northern California.
Under terms of the accord,
Wildlife Services, a branch of the
Department of Agriculture, will
suspend for at least six years its
practice of gunning down coyotes from helicopters and airplanes and using traps to kill
creatures in wilderness areas in
16 counties in California.
The agreement stems from a
June lawsuit filed by WildEarth
Guardians and other conservation
groups alleging that Wildlife Services had violated federal law by
failing to analyze the environmental impact of killing hundreds of
wild animals in Shasta, Sierra and
14 other California counties.
“We are working to put Wildlife Services out of the cruelty
business by dragging its archaic
practices out of the shadows and
pushing the program to embrace
modern ethics and science in
wildlife management,” said Michelle Lute, wildlife coexistence
campaigner
for
WildEarth
Guardians.
Wildlife Services is to complete an extensive study of its
activities in those areas by 2023,
including its use of M-44s,
spring-loaded devices that emit
sodium cyanide and have been
called “cyanide bombs.”
Wildlife Services is at the center of several lawsuits across the
West, including some linked to
those sodium devices after one
placed in Idaho this year to kill
coyotes instead temporarily
blinded a boy and killed his dog.
Lute said the settlement in
California was the first of its kind
and would be used as a template
in cases in other states.
Tanya Espinosa, a spokeswoman for the USDA program, said
the deal was struck in the spirit
of compromise and settlement,
and did not constitute an admission of any kind to claims or facts
relating to issues in the legal
dispute.
“While the settlement conditions may affect the use of certain tools in some areas of the
state,” she said in an email, the
government “believes the changes do not restrict our ability to
protect agriculture, property,
natural resources or public
health and safety in California.”
—Reuters
S C I E NC E S C AN
EXHIBITION
NIKKI BOUDREAU
The Great Pacific Flyway isn’t just a vital asset for birds.
Artists flock to California museum to explore
the many dimensions of a natural superhighway
Every year, millions of migratory birds head south, then north
using a 4,000-mile-long superhighway of sorts. It’s called the
Pacific Flyway, and it’s the route of
choice for more than 350 bird
species in search of places to breed,
feed and hunker down for winter.
Now, the diversity and necessity of the flyway is the focus of an
art and design exhibition at the
University of California at Davis.
“Instinct Extinct: The Great
Pacific Flyway,” a free exhibition
at the UC Davis Design Museum,
celebrates birds on the move. But
the multidisciplinary display
doesn’t look just at flight. It also
views the flyway in its many
guises — habitat, human home,
recreational hotbed and swath of
land worth conserving. And it
does so with art that, curators
hope, might inspire action and
increase awareness.
Visual artists from UC Davis
and Sacramento State University
partnered to create the art and
brought the community — including students, scientists and
organizations devoted to the
birds and their habitats — along
for the flight.
Instinct Extinct: The Great Pacific
Flyway
UC Davis Design Museum
You’d think that an exhibition
devoted to migrating birds
would focus solely on the animals, but that’s not the case. Part
of the point is to consider how
the existence of all those flying
birds affects art and creativity
along the West Coast. History is
covered, too, as are unexpected
allies such as the hunting clubs
that help fight to preserve bird
habitats.
The great migrations that
shape the Pacific Flyway are
group achievements, and so is
one of the exhibition’s standout
pieces. It’s a wall covered with
blue feather prints, the handiwork of several university students, each one a slight variation
on a soaring theme.
See “Instinct Extinct” through
Nov. 12. Can’t make it in person?
Search online for “Instinct Extinct photo gallery” for a glimpse
at some of the art.
— Erin Blakemore
H E ALTH & S C I E NC E
Editor: Laura Helmuth • Assistant Editors: Kathy Lally, Margaret Shapiro
• Art Director: Alla Dreyvitser • Advertising Information: Ron Ulrich,
202-334-5289, ronald.ulrich@washpost.com • To contact us: Email:
health-science@washpost.com Telephone: 202-334-5031 Mail: The
Washington Post, Health, 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20071
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FROM CONSUMER REPORTS
QUI CK S TUD Y
Fiber-rich diet may help fight colorectal cancer
The question
Eating foods high in fiber is
believed to help protect against
colorectal cancer. Might fiber
consumption also help those who
already have this cancer?
such as Crohn’s or ulcerative colitis, is a risk factor for this cancer,
as is having a family history of
colorectal cancer or colorectal
polyps. A low-fiber, high-fat diet
is among lifestyle factors believed
to contribute to the development
of the cancer. Others include being inactive, being overweight,
smoking and drinking alcohol.
Colorectal cancer, the secondleading cause of death from cancer in the United States, is most
common among people 75 and
older.
This study
The researchers analyzed data
on 1,575 adults (average age, 67)
who had stage 1, 2 or 3 colorectal
cancer, meaning it had not spread
(metastasized) to distant sites in
the body. In the next eight years,
773 people died, including 174
people whose death was attributed to colorectal cancer. Comparing the amount of fiber in the
participants’ diets, those with
higher consumption of fiber were
less likely to have died, especially
from colorectal cancer. Among
people who had increased their
dietary fiber intake after their
cancer diagnosis, each increase of
five grams of fiber a day lowered
their odds of dying from colorectal cancer by 18 percent and of
dying from any cause by 14 percent. Results varied somewhat by
the source of the fiber, with fiber
from cereal showing the strongest link to risk reduction and
fiber from fruit the weakest.
Learn more
To determine the amount of
fiber in common foods, go to
nationalfibercouncil.org (under
“About Fiber,” click “Fiber and
You,” then “Fiber Food Chart”).
Information on colorectal cancer
is available at cancer.org (click on
“Cancer A-Z”).
Who may be affected?
People with colorectal cancer
that has not metastasized. Having
an inflammatory bowel disease,
The research described in Quick
Study comes from credible, peerreviewed journals.
Caveats
Dietary data came from the
participants’ responses on periodic questionnaires.
Find this study
Online Nov. 2 in JAMA Oncology (jamaoncology.com; click on
“New Online”)
— Linda Searing
Plenty of ways to cut back on sodium
M
ost Americans consume too much salt
— or, more accurately, sodium. A recent
report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that those 51 and
older average about 3,000 milligrams of sodium per day, twice
what the American Heart Association recommends and about
30 percent more than the Department of Agriculture dietary
guidelines of fewer than
2,300 mg per day.
A steady stream of studies over
decades has linked too much
dietary sodium to high blood
pressure and other heart disease
risk factors. “There’s consistent
evidence that in countries with
high levels of salt intake, blood
pressure rises more steeply with
the aging of the population,” says
Dariush Mozaffarian, dean of the
Friedman School of Nutrition
Science and Policy at Tufts University. “In countries with low
salt intake, blood pressure rates
do not rise as much with age.”
important for people with hypertension. “A high sodium intake
makes it harder to regulate your
blood pressure even with medication,” says Lisa J. Harnack, a
professor of epidemiology and
community health at the University of Minnesota. Research has
also shown a connection between high-sodium diets and
health problems such as kidney
stones and stomach cancer.
Weight gain might be a consequence of a high-sodium diet,
too.
Negative health effects
When you consume excess sodium regularly, the kidneys can’t
keep up with the need to excrete
it. It gets stored in the blood,
increasing water retention and
blood volume. “The heart then
has to work harder to pump the
blood, which increases pressure
on your arteries,” says Brigid
Titgemeier, a nutritionist at the
Cleveland Clinic Center for Functional Medicine. “Over time, the
arteries stiffen, causing your
blood pressure to go up.”
Reducing sodium is especially
Sleuthing out sodium
According to a study published this year in Circulation, a
mere 5 percent of Americans’
sodium intake comes from salt
added at the table; only 6 percent
comes from salt added during
cooking. By contrast, 71 percent
comes from packaged and restaurant foods.
The 10 top sodium-laden food
categories are breads, pizza,
sandwiches, cold cuts and cured
meats, soups, burritos and tacos,
savory snacks (including chips,
popcorn, pretzels and crackers),
GETTY IMAGES
chicken, cheese, and eggs and
omelets. These categories make
up 44 percent of Americans’
overall sodium intake.
Cut your sodium intake
Anyone diagnosed with high
blood pressure is probably familiar with the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension)
diet, which reduces your intake
of sodium and increases that of
calcium, magnesium and potassium. That means plenty of fruit,
vegetables, whole grains and
low-fat dairy, and less sodium,
saturated fat, sugars and processed food.
Over the past two decades,
researchers have consistently
found that following DASH lowers blood pressure by as much as
12 points for the systolic or upper,
number, and six points for the
diastolic (lower) number.
Even if you don’t strictly adhere to the DASH diet, follow its
basic tenets, which include eating more whole, unprocessed
foods and produce. “The most
important change you can make
is to cook whole foods and eat at
home,” Titgemeier says.
When cooking, experiment
with different herbs and spices.
Titgemeier also recommends using vinegars and citrus for marinades and cooking: “They are
acidic, which works as a natural
flavor enhancer.”
If you aim for a 10 to 15 percent
reduction in the amount of
sodium you eat, chances are you
won’t be able to tell the difference. “Sodium receptors on the
tongue recalibrate over time,”
Mozaffarian says. “So if you reduce your intake gradually, you
won’t even notice.”
When buying packaged foods,
look for those labeled “low sodium.” According to the Food and
Drug
Administration,
that
means a product can’t have more
than 140 mg of sodium per serving. Cut the sodium in canned
foods by rinsing canned beans,
vegetables and fish. Because restaurant foods are often very high
in sodium, have your server point
out low-sodium options or ask
whether the chef can limit salt in
your dish.
© Copyright 2017, Consumer Reports Inc.
Consumer Reports is an
independent, nonprofit organization
that works side by side with
consumers to create a fairer, safer,
and healthier world. CR does not
endorse products or services, and
does not accept advertising. CR has
no financial relationship with
advertisers in this publication. Read
more at ConsumerReports.org.
The Zika virus has faded, but it won’t disappear
BY
ISTOCK
Eating foods high in fiber is believed to help protect against
colorectal cancer. Might it also help those who have this cancer?
H EA LTH S CA N
AIR QUALITY
Before installing that drywall, you may want
to consider how doing so might affect your lungs
Tackling a home improvement
project? Your next remodel may
pretty up your home, but it could
befoul the air you breathe. Now,
the Healthy Living Home Guide
makes it easier to choose products that won’t contribute to
indoor air pollution.
The online guide was prepared
by the Environmental Working
Group, an advocacy organization
that focuses on chemicals in consumer products.
The guide looks at health risks
in every room of the house and
gives suggestions on what to do
about them. In the bathroom, for
example, caulks and adhesives
can emit high concentrations of
VOCs, or volatile organic compounds. Drywall in your new
bedroom can damage unprotected lungs or trap moisture and
mold. And houses without the
proper ventilation systems can
circulate such gases as radon, a
naturally occurring radioactive
gas that can damage DNA and
cause cancer.
Air quality is the guide’s main
concern — and because people
spend most of their time indoors,
it makes sense to home in on the
Healthy Living Home Guide
Environmental Working Group
air they breathe. According to the
Environmental Protection Agency, the air inside homes and other
buildings can be more polluted
than outside air in large cities.
The guide suggests quick
changes, such as using waterbased latex paint that’s low or no
VOC and using air filters that
carry a minimum efficiency reporting value (MERV) rating of
10 or higher. Although most of
the recommendations are aimed
at homeowners, renters can
adopt some of them, too, like
using a HEPA-filtered vacuum
and a mattress made with waterbased glue instead of one that
emits VOCs.
True to its name, the EWG also
mixes in its sustainability message with a healthy one. As a
result, the Healthy Living Home
Guide is kind of a twofer, offering
quick consumer advice that can
both improve indoor air quality
and help save nonrenewable resources outside the home.
—Erin Blakemore
ISTOCK
The Healthy Living Home Guide makes it easier to choose products
that won’t contribute to indoor air pollution.
A IMEE C UNNINGHAM
Less than a year after the World
Health Organization declared
that Zika is no longer a public
health emergency, the virus seems
to have fallen from public consciousness, at least outside heavily
affected
areas.
The
mosquito-borne virus staged a
massive assault on the Western
Hemisphere in 2015 and 2016, but
this year, Zika appears to be in
retreat.
In the hardest-hit nations, data
from each country’s department
of health shows a striking drop in
locally acquired cases — that is,
ones caused by bites from local,
infected mosquitoes. For instance:
Brazil had more than 216,000
probable cases in 2016; as of early
September, the new cases for 2017
were around 15,500.
Colombia tallied more than
106,000 suspected and confirmed
cases from 2015 to the end of 2016.
This year, new cases have plummeted, with around 1,700 by midOctober.
Mexico went from about 8,500
confirmed cases in 2015 and 2016
combined to around 1,800 by early
October of this year.
The numbers have also
dropped in the United States and
its territories. In Puerto Rico, Zika
cases hit nearly 35,000 in 2016, the
Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention reports. But this year,
fewer than 500 cases had been
tallied as of the middle of October.
In the 50 states, the CDC counted
about 5,100 cases in 2016. Most
were in travelers who had been to
places where Zika was active, although 224 were locally acquired
in Florida and Texas. So far in 2017,
only about 300 cases had been
reported as of mid-October, mostly from travelers. Local transmission seems to have come to a
standstill, with one suspected case
in Texas and one case confirmed in
Florida.
That doesn’t mean Zika’s days
are numbered. If Zika behaves like
other arboviruses, such as chikungunya and dengue, it will probably
stick around. Arbovirus diseases
tend to be cyclical, says public
health
researcher
Ernesto
Marques of the University of Pittsburgh. “You have big booms, then
they drop. Then a few years later,
they come back again,” he said.
Why the dramatic rise and fall?
The likely answer is herd immunity, said epidemiologist Albert Ko
of the Yale School of Public Health.
“Zika came in like a bulldozer,” he
said, and many people in the
Americas who coexist with Aedes
mosquitoes, which transmit Zika,
were infected. Now that “there are
so many people who’ve already
been exposed to the virus and are
presumably immune, it kind of
protects indirectly the people who
haven’t been infected. So that’s
probably happened.”
For every virus, a certain portion of the population must be
infected before herd immunity
takes hold, said David Morens,
senior scientific adviser to the director of the National Institute of
Allergy and Infectious Diseases. It
depends on how transmissible the
pathogen is. For example, the
measles virus easily leaps from
person to person, so at least 92 to
95 percent of a community must
have immunity (typically through
vaccination) to prevent outbreaks.
Zika transmission is more complicated because mosquitoes are
involved, Morens said. Other factors — such as how dense the
human population is in an area,
mosquito abundance and climate
— also play a part. “But it’s clear
there is some level of herd immunity,” he added. “We see it with all
of these arboviruses that cause
epidemics. They burn out because
the virus can’t find enough people
to infect.”
It’s difficult to assess what percentages of populations across the
Americas have been exposed to
Zika. While the virus is linked to
birth defects and to neurological
problems in adults, most cases
lead to mild or no symptoms.
Some infected people probably
don’t get medical assistance, leading to missed cases. And diagnostic tests looking for antibodies
against Zika can’t always tell the
difference between Zika and dengue infections.
It’s also unclear for mosquito-
PHILIPPE HUGUEN/
AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
The mosquito-borne Zika virus
is on the wane in many places.
“Zika came in like a
bulldozer.”
epidemiologist Albert Ko
of the Yale School of Public Health
borne diseases how widespread
infection needs to be before herd
immunity kicks in. Scott Weaver, a
virologist at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston,
noted that in places where chikungunya immunity was measured,
“typically from 20 to 50 percent of
the population became infected as
the outbreak swept through a given region.” At those levels, “we
don’t see very efficient transmission.”
Although the downtick in Zika
cases is evidence of herd immunity, whether a person’s past infection leads to lifelong immunity is
unknown. The general understanding of Zika’s close relative
dengue is that, once someone has
had an infection with one type of
dengue virus, that person is protected from further infections
from that type. But a 2016 study
found that reinfections are possible. So Zika immunity might wane
over time, perhaps leading to reinfections, said pediatrician and microbiologist Peter Hotez of Baylor
College of Medicine in Houston.
It’s also possible that Zika will
find an animal host in the Western
Hemisphere, providing the virus a
way station of sorts until the human population is more susceptible again. Researchers have detected Zika in capuchin monkeys
and common marmosets, which
both reside near humans in Brazil.
All of the unknowns make it hard
to predict when Zika will reemerge.
There may be epidemics here and
there, and then years later it pops up
“in a place, in a time you can’t predict,” Morens said. “The Zika virus
will be around indefinitely.”
— Science News
free educational seminar
A Patient’s Guide to Minimally Invasive Spine Care
The Sibley Division of
Neurological Surgery is pleased to
present an informative, free seminar
on A Patient’s Guide to Minimally
Invasive Spine Care.
Speakers and topics:
• Minimally Invasive Approaches to Spinal Reconstruction
Joshua Ammerman, M.D., chief of neurosurgery and the chairman
of the department of surgery at Sibley
• Spinal Stenosis,A Less Invasive Approach to Surgical Care
Matthew Ammerman, M.D., neurosurgeon
• Image-guided Spine Surgery
Joshua Wind, M.D., neurosurgeon
Wednesday, Nov. 15, from 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Sibley Memorial Hospital
Building A, Floor 1, Conference Room 2
5215 Loughboro Road, NW
For a campus map,
visit Sibley.org and
click on Maps &
Directions.
Space is limited. Light refreshments will be served and parking is free in
the visitor parking garage next to Building A.
Make your reservation today at:
Sibley.org or 202-660-6789
SIBLEY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL | 5255 LOUGHBORO ROAD, N.W. | WASHINGTON, D.C. 20016 | SIBLEY.ORG
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PERSPECTIVE
Anti-harassment steps should target potential perpetrators
BY P OCO K ERNSMITH,
J OANNE S MITH- D ARDEN AND
M EGAN H ICKS
In the wake of sexual assault
and harassment allegations involving Harvey Weinstein and
Bill O’Reilly, Americans may be
learning just how prevalent sexual violence is in our society.
So, what can be done to prevent
it?
We have studied how family,
school and neighborhood environments influence violent youth
behavior. Building from this
knowledge, we are working with
schools to develop prevention
programs.
Here’s what we’ve learned.
Decreasing sexual violence
means investing in prevention
programs that address the causes
of sexually abusive behavior. The
majority of prevention programs
aimed at teens and young adults
often focus on teaching girls and
women how to decrease their risk
of being assaulted, with strategies
such as watching out for each
other at parties or being aware of
their surroundings. Some include
self-defense strategies.
Programs like these are generally found to be ineffective because they fail to address the
realities that most assaults are
committed by someone known
and trusted. Harassment is commonly committed by someone in
power, such as a teacher or supervisor. These types of programs
may be able to reduce some risks,
but real prevention needs to focus
on the only person who can actually prevent harassment: the po-
tential perpetrator.
It’s everyone’s problem
Increasingly, programs address this shortcoming by encouraging bystanders to challenge harassing behavior and jokes to help
promote healthy, positive norms.
For example, programs like Green
Dot and Bringing in the Bystander help teach high school and
college students to step in to prevent violence or help someone
who has been assaulted. In 2014,
President Barack Obama and Vice
President Joe Biden launched the
It’s On Us campaign to encourage
bystanders to get involved. It provided real actions for college students to help protect their friends
and neighbors, such as intervening when someone is harassing
another person, providing support to someone who has been
victimized or refusing to laugh at
hurtful jokes or comments.
However, programs such as
these face an uphill battle. Youth
are exposed daily to the pervasive
and nearly invisible ways that our
society accepts and even condones sexually abusive behavior.
For example, as toddlers and
preschoolers, young children are
taught to ignore the personal
boundaries of their bodies. Parents might pressure their children to hug a family member
when they don’t want to. Instead,
family members should teach
children to talk honestly and assertively about how they do or do
not want to be touched.
Fathers commonly joke about
protecting our daughters from
predatory boys who want to date
Youth are exposed
daily to the pervasive
. . . ways that our
society accepts and
even condones sexually
abusive behavior.
ISTOCK
them, because “we know how
boys are.” This teaches both sons
and daughters that boys are
mindless aggressors and girls are
helpless victims.
Parents are an important part
of teaching positive attitudes and
skills for healthy relationships,
but few programs exist to teach
them how to talk about these
difficult subjects.
What about men?
Some programs,
such
as
How to fight stereotypes about aging
What can be done
about negative
stereotypes that
portray older
JUDITH
adults as out of
GRAHAM
touch, useless,
feeble,
incompetent, pitiful and
irrelevant?
With late-night TV comedy
shows where supposedly clueless
older people are the butt of jokes
and with ads for anti-aging
creams equating youth with
beauty and wrinkles with decay,
harsh and unflattering images
shape assumptions about aging.
Although people may hope for
good health and happiness, they
tend to believe that growing older
involves deterioration and
decline, according to reports from
the Reframing Aging Initiative.
Dismal expectations can
become self-fulfilling as people
start experiencing changes
associated with growing older —
aching knees or problems with
hearing, for instance. If a person
has internalized negative
stereotypes, his or her confidence
may be eroded, stress responses
activated, motivation diminished
(“I’m old, and it’s too late to
change things”) and sense of
efficacy (“I can do that”)
impaired.
Health often suffers as a result,
according to studies showing that
older adults who hold negative
stereotypes tend to walk slowly,
experience memory problems
and recover less fully from a fall
or fracture, among other
ramifications. By contrast,
seniors whose view of aging is
primarily positive live 7.5 years
longer than other seniors.
Can positive images of aging be
enhanced and the effects of
negative stereotypes reduced? At
a recent meeting of the National
Academies of Sciences’ Forum on
Aging, Disability and
Independence, experts embraced
such steps and offered several
suggestions for how they can be
advanced:
Navigating
Aging
Become aware of implicit
biases, which are automatic,
unexamined thoughts. An
example: The sight of an older
person using a cane might trigger
associations with dependency
and incompetence.
Forum attendee Charlotte Yeh,
chief medical officer for AARP
Services, spoke of her experience
after being struck by a car and
undergoing a lengthy, painful
rehabilitation. Limping and using
a cane, she routinely found
strangers treating her as if she
were helpless.
“I would come home feeling
terrible about myself,” she said.
Decorating her cane with ribbons
and flowers turned things
around. “People were, like, ‘Oh,
my God, that’s so cool,’ ” said Yeh,
who noted that the decorations
evoked the positivity associated
with creativity instead of the
negativity associated with
disability.
Implicit biases can be difficult
to discover because they coexist
with thoughts that seem to clash
with them. For example, someone
may implicitly feel that “being old
is terrible,” while explicitly that
person may think, “We need to do
more, as a society, to value older
people.” Yet this kind of conflict
may go unrecognized.
To identify implicit bias, pay
attention to your automatic
responses. If you find yourself
flinching at the sight of wrinkles
when you look in the bathroom
mirror, for instance, acknowledge
this reaction and then ask
yourself, “Why is this upsetting?”
Use strategies to challenge
biases. Patricia Devine, a
professor of psychology at the
University of Wisconsin at
Madison who studies ways to
ISTOCK
“We need more older
people talking publicly
about themselves and
their lives.”
Kathy Greenlee, vice president of
aging and health policy at the Center
for Practical Bioethics
involves imagining yourself as a
member of the group you’ve been
stereotyping. What would it be
like if strangers patronized you
and called you “sweetie” or “dear,”
for example?
Make contact. Interact with
the people you’ve been
stereotyping. Visit and talk with
that friend who’s now living in a
retirement community.
Another strategy —
strengthening implicit positive
stereotypes — comes from Becca
Levy, a professor of epidemiology
and psychology at Yale University
and a leading researcher in this
field.
In a 2016 study, she and several
colleagues demonstrated that
exposing older adults to
subliminal positive messages
about aging several times over a
month improved their mobility
and balance — crucial measures
of physical function.
The messages were embedded
in word blocks that flashed
quickly across a computer screen,
including descriptors such as
“wise,” “creative,” “spry” and “fit.”
The weekly sessions were about
15 minutes long, proving that
even a relatively short exposure to
positive images of aging can make
a difference.
At the forum, Levy noted that
196 countries have committed to
support the World Health
Organization’s fledgling
campaign to end discrimination
against people because they are
old. Bolstering positive images of
aging and countering the effect of
negative stereotypes need to be
central parts of that endeavor, she
remarked. It’s also something
older adults can do, individually,
by choosing to focus on what’s
going well in their lives rather
than on what’s going wrong.
Claim a seat at the table.
reduce racial prejudice, calls this
“tuning in” to habits of mind that
usually go unexamined.
Resolving to change these
habits isn’t enough, she said at
the NAS forum: “You need
strategies.” Her research shows
that these strategies are effective:
Replace stereotypes. This
entails becoming aware of and
then altering responses informed
by stereotypes. Instead of
assuming a senior with a cane
needs your help, for instance, you
might ask, “Would you like
assistance?” — a question that
respects an individual’s
autonomy.
Embrace new images. This
involves thinking about people
who don’t fit the stereotype
you’ve acknowledged. This could
be a group of people (older
athletes), a famous person (TV
producer Norman Lear, now 95,
who just sold a show on aging to
NBC) or someone you know (a
cherished older friend).
Individualize it. The more
we know about people, the less
we’re likely to think of them as a
group characterized by
stereotypes. Delve into specifics.
What unique challenges does an
older person face? How does that
person cope day-to-day?
Switch perspectives. This
“Nothing about us without us” is
a clarion call of disability
activists, who have demanded
that their right to participate fully
in society be recognized and
made possible by adequate
accommodations such as
wheelchair ramps. So far,
however, seniors haven’t similarly
insisted on inclusion, making it
easier to overlook the ways in
which they’re marginalized.
At the forum, Kathy Greenlee,
vice president of aging and health
policy at the Center for Practical
Bioethics in Kansas City and a
former assistant secretary for
aging in the Department of
Health and Human Services,
called for a new wave of advocacy
by and for seniors, saying, “We
need more older people talking
publicly about themselves and
their lives.”
“Everybody is battling aging by
themselves, reinforcing the
notion that how someone ages is
that individual’s responsibility”
rather than a collective
responsibility, she explained.
health-science@washpost.com
This column is produced by Kaiser
Health News, an editorially
independent news service and
program of the Kaiser Family
Foundation.
Coaching Boys Into Men, seek to
engage men to see sexual violence
as more than a “women’s problem” and understand their role in
preventing violence. Programs
for men build on bystander interventions and encourage youth to
challenge traditional expectations of masculinity that accept or
even promote violence. As men’s
perception that they are not masculine enough has been associated with increased rates of sexual
violence, it is essential to provide
role models of nonviolent masculinity.
However, prevention programs cannot ignore that 23 percent of boys and men experience
sexual violence or harassment
over their lifetime. Although rates
of being raped or sexually assaulted are lower for men, men report
experiencing sexual coercion, in
which they are pressured or manipulated into sexual activity they
don’t want, at rates that are nearly
equal to women.
What’s next?
Prevention needs to begin in
early childhood and continue for
life. Teaching skills to prevent
violence starts with learning empathy for others, communication
skills and problem solving. It involves promoting healthy sexual
behavior through sex education
focused on respect for self and
others, communication and consent. Programs that empower
youth to make positive changes in
their communities show promise
for preventing sexual violence.
School boards, employers and
politicians have the power to
strengthen and consistently apply policies to keep schools, workplaces and communities safe by
holding abusers accountable for
their actions. Leaders, and all
bystanders, can refuse to hide or
tolerate abusive behavior. Last,
we can support services for both
male and female victims that reduce the harm of these traumatic
experiences.
Sexual abuse is not just a
“women’s issue.” Men and women
play a significant role in prevention. Acknowledging sexual assault as a community-wide problem that impacts all persons regardless of gender is vital to preventing sexual assault.
health-science@washpost.com
Kernsmith is a professor of social
work at Wayne State University,
where Smith-Darden is an associate
professor and sexual violence
researcher, and Hicks is a
postdoctoral fellow. This article was
originally published on
theconversation.com.
PERSPECTIVE
Medications to prevent preterm births
are not getting to poor black women
BY
J ODI F RANCES A BBOTT
There are two medications that
prevent preterm birth, the most
common cause of perinatal death
in the United States. One costs
16 cents a week, one $285 a week.
Poor black women aren’t getting
either. Why?
In 2015, for the first time in
eight years, the rate of preterm
birth in the United States rose,
despite increased understanding
of preventive measures. Preterm
births cost Americans an estimated $26 billion per year.
Additionally, U.S. maternal
death rates are among the worst
for economically similar countries
— twice those of Canada and Spain
and almost three times as high as
in Japan.
When the rates are examined
more closely, they reveal an alarming narrative about differences in
health outcomes that are systemic, avoidable and unjust. The increased burden of preterm birth
on low-income, urban and black
women in America is 48 percent
higher than that of women of other races.
As an obstetric provider for
women with high-risk pregnancies at Boston Medical Center, the
largest safety-net hospital in New
England, I witness the tragic outcomes of these health inequities
every day. As an investigator
tasked with reducing them, I lead
teams that have identified several
important barriers to access.
Preventing spontaneous
preterm birth
One potentially preventable
cause of preterm birth is recurrent
spontaneous preterm birth. That’s
when babies deliver early, despite
attempts to prevent it, to mothers
who have a history of early deliveries from the same cause.
Both the Society of MaternalFetal Medicine and the American
College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommend a specific
progesterone preparation called
17P. This medication can reduce
recurrent preterm birth in women
with a history of spontaneous preterm birth.
Currently, it’s available only at
high cost, between $225 and $385
per week. The cost has profoundly
affected obstetric providers’ ability to obtain 17P for all eligible
women, and it contributes to the
increased incidence of spontaneous preterm birth in black
women.
Most health insurers who enroll low-income and urban women require prior authorization or
numerous additional communications. These hurdles can be
daunting, especially for anyone
with competing financial needs
and language or literacy challenges.
In Louisiana, a state with one of
the highest rates of preterm birth,
only 5 percent of women who
should be getting this medication
are able to obtain it.
When we started a study at
Boston Medical Center, we found
that only 37 percent of our eligible
patients received 17P. Our patients
were not routinely informed that
they had delivered preterm and
were at risk of recurrence.
In fact, we found that none of
our patients delivering preterm
had documented counseling
about their diagnosis or recommendations for future pregnancy
during their hospitalization for
that first preterm baby. Without
this information, they were unaware of the risk to their next
pregnancy or that they could reduce risk by asking in prenatal
care for 17P.
A cheaper treatment
17P is expensive, so perhaps it
seems reasonable for insurers to
restrict it, even from those who
qualify for its benefit.
But what about other preventable causes of preterm birth? Maternal complications of high blood
pressure, also known as preeclampsia, can also induce preterm birth.
Preeclampsia, a disease of constriction of small blood vessels,
costs an estimated $2.1 billion per
year in the United States. This is at
a time when the poorest women in
the country are at rising risk of
maternal death, of which preeclampsia is a leading contributor.
The population at highest risk
for preterm birth because of hypertensive disorders or placental
insufficiency? Black women, especially those with a personal or
family history of high blood pressure; first-time mothers; and
obese women with low socioeconomic status.
A medication that costs 16 cents
a week is also unavailable to many
of the women most likely to benefit. This magical treatment is lowdose, or “baby,” aspirin.
In 2014, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, a congressionally
authorized independent group of
national experts, officially recommended low-dose aspirin for pregnant women at high risk of preeclampsia.
Aspirin in highest-risk women
may reduce preterm birth by
62 percent. It can also cut the
overall incidence of hypertensive
pregnancy complications in half.
Low-dose aspirin has been used
safely for both mothers and babies
for more than 80,000 pregnancies
over 30 years. But our study
showed that only 11 percent of
high-risk pregnant women at Boston Medical Center received lowdose aspirin, when our goal is for
90 percent of qualified women to
get this benefit.
Why aren’t women, especially
high-risk women, getting this
medication?
At Boston Medical Center, we
are working to address our three
specific identified barriers to access: Providers are reluctant to
prescribe low-dose aspirin, pharmacists are reluctant to fill it, and,
when prescribed, women are
afraid to take it.
Though it hasn’t been fully
studied, reluctance on the part of
providers and pharmacists probably stems from a lack of knowledge or acceptance about risk factors. Meanwhile, women, eager to
have a safe pregnancy, are bombarded by mixed messaging when
searching online for information
about aspirin in pregnancy.
Changing the narrative
The medical community can do
better to reduce this racial disparity, but doing so requires focused
interventions directed toward
those women most likely to benefit.
At our hospital, we were able to
increase our patients’ access rate
to 17P to almost 90 percent. We
focused on four specific barriers:
lack of patient knowledge, lack of
provider awareness, suboptimal
communication in the electronic
health record, and insurance challenges in obtaining the medication. This subsequently reduced
our preterm birthrate by 62 percent.
At a time when reproductivehealth-care sites are being closed
and preventive-care restrictions
on poor women are implemented
daily, we need to prioritize every
woman’s access to interventions
that reach high-risk women to
prevent infant mortality and preterm birth.
health-science@washpost.com
This article was originally published on
theconversation.com.
ISTOCK
Low-dose aspirin has been used safely for both mothers and babies
for more than 80,000 pregnancies over 30 years.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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PERSPECTIVE
Colleges should o≠er more help to students with autism
BY J ONATHAN C OX
AND M IKLE S OUTH
For a time, Nikki Lower had all
the help she needed. Although she
said she often felt she “didn’t quite
fit in” during high school, she
worked hard and excelled academically. After graduation, Lower did some volunteer work, but
the stress of that work, and some
social difficulties, led her to a
therapist, who diagnosed her with
depression and anxiety. The therapist also saw signs of attentiondeficit/hyperactivity disorder.
When Lower gained admission
to Brigham Young University in
Utah, the university made accommodations, such as reserved seating in classes, audio texts and an
electronic notebook for taking
notes. For a few semesters, Lower
did well. But as her classes became more difficult, she struggled
with time management, motivation and severe anxiety, and her
grades dropped.
She also noticed that her roommates were much better at making friends than she was, and she
felt left out. She wondered if there
might be another explanation for
her difficulties. After an evaluation, we diagnosed her with autism. Lower began attending
group therapy sessions for students with autism — and she
finally began to feel confident that
she could succeed at the university.
challenges.
As a result of these obstacles,
the graduation rate of U.S. students with autism or another disability is 41 percent, compared
with 59 percent in the general
population. An understanding of
the needs of students with autism,
along with support for their difficulties, can go a long way toward
helping them succeed in institutions of higher education.
Adapting to college
More than 44 percent of students with autism receive some
type of postsecondary education
in the United States; people with
autism make up 1 to 2 percent of
students in universities. This
number includes many cognitively able students, such as Lower,
who find it difficult to adapt to
university life because of social,
emotional and organizational
Classroom concerns
Expert panels have identified
mental health as a top priority for
helping adults with autism. In an
ongoing survey by researchers at
Durham University in Britain,
university students with autism
report that mental-health concerns and social isolation are the
biggest challenges they face. Both
issues are also risk factors for
suicide.
MARIA HERGUETA FOR SPECTRUM
Like Lower, many adults with
autism struggle with the organizational and planning skills that
fall under the umbrella of “executive function.” These struggles become more problematic when
young adults begin living apart
from their parents and when they
or socialize in these environments.
In large institutions, these
problems can easily be missed by
everyone, including the parents of
these students.
Fortunately, solutions may be
at hand. In August, we published
The graduation rate of U.S. students with autism
or another disability is 41 percent, compared with
59 percent in the general population.
need to adapt to classes with less
structure than in high school. The
sights and sounds of university
dining halls, parties in the dormitories and crowded campuses can
overstimulate and overwhelm
them. Those who have sensory
difficulties may struggle to study
an analysis of two decades of
client records from the Counseling and Psychological Services
Center at Brigham Young University. Among those records are
questionnaires that students
filled out before and after therapy.
The center follows standard
evidence-based counseling approaches but has no unique protocol for students with autism. The
records suggest that before treatment, students with and without
autism show comparable levels of
psychological distress. They also
report a similar degree of improvement after treatment.
But to achieve such gains, those
in the autism group take about
twice as long, including significantly more therapy sessions,
than do their peers without autism. So students with autism can
benefit from standard counseling
but may require more of it.
Safe spaces
Many higher-education providers offer support networks intended for people with autism,
such as the therapy group that
Lower attended. There are also a
growing number of programs that
help young adults with the condition transition from high school
to vocational training or a university.
For example, Utah Valley University, the state’s largest
higher-education institution, received a grant to jump-start a
program for students with autism
that includes weekly meetings to
build skills, recreational and social activities, and regular workshops for families.
Universities can also adapt existing services to meet the needs
of adults with autism. For instance, many institutions already
provide aides for students with
learning challenges. Some of
these aides could be trained to be
executive-function coaches. Student mentors also can provide
excellent support for adults on the
spectrum.
It may be possible to create safe
spaces — areas with minimal sensory stimulation — for taking exams and other activities. And our
data suggest that extending treatment for people with autism can
lead to substantial improvements
in well-being while decreasing
costs associated with student failure.
Generating the institutional
willpower to improve support for
students on the spectrum requires advocacy, creativity and
flexibility. Administrators and
others should take the time to
learn about autism and push for
change. Autism is not rare; every
college has many students with
autism who can succeed with a
little help.
Cox is an associate clinical professor
of counseling and psychological
services at Brigham Young University,
where South is an associate professor
of psychology and neuroscience. This
article is excerpted from one
originally published on Spectrum,
which focuses on autism research.
ANYBODY
FDA tells online retailers Does Tom Brady know which foods are best for you?
not to market marijuana
as a treatment for cancer
DIET FROM E1
BY A NNA E DNEY
AND J ENNIFER K APLAN
U.S. officials have sent a warning to the marijuana industry,
alerting online sellers they cannot market their products as a
treatment for cancer.
The Food and Drug Administration sent letters to four companies last week, warning them
about unsubstantiated claims
that their marijuana-derived
products can combat tumors and
kill cancer cells. The firms sell
products including oils and capsules made from cannabidiol, also
known as CBD, a component of
the marijuana plant that doesn’t
cause the mind-altering effects of
the other main component, tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC.
The agency told the companies
they cannot make claims to treat
or cure a disease when a product
has never been studied as a treatment. Curbing the sale of CBD
products with health claims
could put a damper on the market
for medical marijuana. Producers
that are required to nix references
to medical ailments may move
toward the recreational side of
the legal cannabis industry.
In a Nov. 1 news release, the
FDA said the warned companies
have made such “unfounded
claims” on various Web pages as
“Combats tumor and cancer
cells,” “CBD makes cancer cells
commit ‘suicide’ without killing
other cells” and CBD “may be
effective in treating tumors from
cancer — including breast cancer.”
“We don’t let companies mar-
ket products that deliberately
prey on sick people with baseless
claims that their substance can
shrink or cure cancer and we’re
not going to look the other way on
enforcing these principles when
it comes to marijuana-containing
products,” FDA Commissioner
Scott Gottlieb said in a statement.
Eight states and the District
have legalized pot for recreational
use. Twenty-one additional states
have legalized it for medical purposes.
The crackdown could also have
a wider impact on the pharmaceutical industry. CBD is being
researched in labs as a potential
treatment for certain diseases.
Biotech company GW Pharmaceuticals, for instance, is testing
the component to treat certain
forms of epilepsy.
Gottlieb hinted almost a
month ago at a congressional
hearing that the FDA may get
tough on unproven marijuana
claims.
The companies that received
warning letters are Greenroads
Health, Natural Alchemist, That’s
Natural and Stanley Brothers Social Enterprises. The companies
have 15 working days to tell the
FDA what corrective steps they
will take.
Stanley Brothers runs CW
Hemp, a company that said in an
emailed statement that it takes
“regulatory compliance very seriously” and will work with the FDA
to better monitor the information
on its website. The other companies didn’t return requests for
comment.
— Bloomberg News
MATTHEW STAVER/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Eight states and the District have legalized pot for recreational use.
Twenty-one additional states have legalized it for medical purposes.
statements without references or
citations — is to fight
inflammation and help his body
absorb nutrients.
“The type of nutrition regimen
you choose will either promote
or reduce inflammation,” he
writes. (That explains his
avoidance of mushrooms and
nightshades, which some people
consider inflammatory.) “If I
know my body will experience
inflammation every Sunday
during the season, the last thing I
want to do is stack on more
inflammation on top of it — not if
I want to feel great every time I
take the field.”
Could food choices actually
lower inflammation and make
the rest of us as strong and
healthy as Brady, who has won
five Super Bowls and is still
starting as quarterback at age
40?
Science has yet to connect
those dots, experts say, and there
are reasons to be skeptical.
Despite a growing body of
evidence linking inflammation
with a variety of illnesses,
inflammation isn’t always bad.
And even though the literature
on food and inflammation is
suggestive, the details remain
murky.
“I think everyone wishes that
there was one secret or a couple
of secrets for making dietary
changes and improving health
outcomes,” says Laura Cappelli, a
rheumatologist at the Johns
Hopkins School of Medicine in
Baltimore. “It’s not that simple.”
Inflammation is a useful
immune-system reaction that
helps fight infections.
Inflammation also follows
injuries and athletic exertion,
like the kind Brady endures
every football Sunday, leading to
muscle soreness and, eventually,
stronger muscles. But chronic
inflammation has been linked to
such illnesses as heart disease,
Alzheimer’s, cancer and
autoimmune conditions
including arthritis.
That link has fueled the
appealing idea that dietary
choices might fight
inflammation and reduce
symptoms of disease or help us
avoid getting ill altogether.
In theory, the concept of eating
to reduce inflammation makes
sense, says Cappelli, especially as
research builds about the
influence of gut microbes on the
immune system. And, to be fair,
there is some evidence to back up
parts of Brady’s diet.
In many ways, his meal plan
resembles the Mediterranean
diet, which has been linked with
lower rates of heart disease and
death from all causes. Like
JIM ROGASH/GETTY IMAGES
It’s impossible to know whether Tom Brady’s diet will be beneficial
for other people or even whether it helps him.
Brady’s diet, the Mediterranean
diet is plant-based. Less
restrictive than Brady’s diet, it
also emphasizes fish and whole
grains over red meat and butter,
and it has been associated with
reduced risks of cancer,
Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s
disease.
Inflammation may even have
something to do with the
Mediterranean diet’s benefits,
according to studies that have
found lower levels of
inflammation-related
“Everyone wishes that
there was one secret . . .
for making dietary
changes and improving
health outcomes. It’s not
that simple.”
Laura Cappelli, a rheumatologist at
the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
compounds in the blood of
people who follow that kind of
eating plan.
But science is far less clear
about which foods matter or why
— despite Brady’s confident yet
vague statements about the
relative benefits of “alkalizing”
foods over “acidifying” foods.
Nutrition is difficult to study,
Cappelli says. The only definitive
way to link foods with health
outcomes would be with
expensive, long-term studies that
randomly assign large numbers
of people to eat specifically
designated menus in highly
controlled environments. Studies
more often look for associations
in people’s recollections of what
they eat.
Meanwhile, nobody eats in a
vacuum. Sleep, exercise, stress,
genetics and other factors can
get in the way of interpreting
nutrition findings. And scientists
have yet to come to consensus
about the most reliable and
meaningful markers of
inflammation.
Websites and books that
promote anti-inflammation
diets, including Brady’s, tend to
mention some key foods, though
a deeper look often reveals mixed
results and lingering unknowns.
Omega-3 fatty acids are a good
example. Abundant in certain
fish, omega-3s get Brady’s
thumbs-up as “natural antiinflammatories.”
Although he mentions no
specific studies, that reputation
has emerged from research
linking fish and omega-3
supplements with lower risks of
heart disease as well as less pain
and a reduced need for antiinflammatory medications in
people with rheumatoid
arthritis.
But other studies have failed
to connect omega-3s with
positive results, Cappelli says.
And many questions remain
about whether benefits come
solely from omega-3s or from
interactions among nutrients in
certain foods.
The same kinds of
complexities surround other
foods and food components that
often get linked with
inflammation, including
turmeric, cherry juice,
resveratrol and gluten.
“We might find one study that
says something, but can you find
another to back it up? Not
usually,” says Katherine Zeratsky,
a registered dietitian and
nutritionist at the Mayo Clinic in
Rochester, Minn. “I don’t mean
to imply it’s bad science. It’s
science that doesn’t necessarily
have the rigor behind it to say
this is an absolute conclusion.”
Brady’s restrictive advice
could even backfire for some
people. Strict diets tend to fail,
Zeratsky says. And some of the
foods he avoids are full of
vitamins and antioxidants. One
recent study found lower levels
of 12 inflammatory markers in
people who ate more
anthocyanins (found in
eggplants, blueberries and other
purple foods) and lower levels of
two inflammatory markers in
people who ate more flavonols
(in cherry tomatoes, apples,
cherries and other foods).
(The recipes in Brady’s book
actually include tomatoes,
peppers and potatoes, which he
says are okay on occasion.)
It’s worth thinking twice
before taking advice from
celebrities, says Steven Hoffman,
scientific director of the
Canadian Institute of Health
Research’s Institute of
Population & Public Health.
In a review of published
research, he and colleagues
discovered a web of
psychological processes that
make people vulnerable to the
influence of famous people, who
often impart a “golden glow” on
the products they support. With
so many choices available, this
halo effect can help people make
decisions.
Celebrity declarations about
health can also spread harmful
or misleading information,
Hoffman says. Actress Jenny
McCarthy, for example, made
influential statements against
vaccines as a cause of autism,
even though a study purporting
to show such a link has been
debunked. Also, Gwyneth
Paltrow’s popular website has
come under fire for promoting
unsupported and potentially
dangerous advice, such as
inserting jade eggs into the
vagina. And Angelina Jolie’s
double mastectomy has been
linked to a spike in preventive
breast-cancer surgeries even
though the practice remains
controversial and can lead to
complications.
As for Brady’s eating plan, it’s
impossible to know whether his
diet will be beneficial for other
people or even whether it helps
him. As a professional athlete, he
is probably exceptional in a
variety of ways. And his
experience is an anecdote, not an
experiment.
“It’s crazy to think,” Hoffman
says, “that in societies like ours,
where most people have access to
primary-care providers, that we
would instead take health advice
from famous people who often
don’t know what they’re talking
about and certainly don’t know
our health contexts.”
health-science@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
3 kids, 4 spinners:
It works for me.
SPINNER FROM E1
your phone with you!” He scampers off, fidget spinner clutched
tight.
If only it were that easy.
I’m a 36-year-old mother of
three, and I have four fidget spinners. I try to keep them in convenient places: one on my dresser,
one in my purse, two in the living
room. These are the places I’m
most likely to need to pick them
up. I use them for many things —
the basic need to fidget, for one.
“Fidgeting science is not the
strongest, but initial observations
suggest that fidgeting has a purpose and potential benefits,”
Bruce Y. Lee, an associate professor of international health at the
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School
of Public Health, wrote in a Forbes
article in May. One of those purposes and potential benefits, according to Lee, is that fidgeting
can be a useful ritual, which is
what the fidget spinner has become for me.
Before the spinner, my ritual for
coping with being nervous was
peeling and picking at my cuticles,
a painful but bizarrely comforting
habit. Behavioral scientists Francesca Gino and Michael I. Norton,
writing in Scientific American in
2013, said that “even simple rituals can be extremely effective,” and
“despite the absence of a direct
causal connection between the ritual and the desired outcome . . .
many everyday rituals make a lot
of sense and are surprisingly effective.” I’ve just replaced my picking
ritual with a fidget spinner.
I have also found that the spinner helps me focus. It helps me
concentrate on the people I’m talking to, for example, not the wallpaper behind them or the mirror to
their left. I can think more clearly
and assess situations better when
I’m twiddling one of the toys. I
think ADHD gives me a tendency
to lose my temper, and the fidget
spinner helps me calm down, giving me a crucial second before I
yell at my kids to clean up these
toys or they are losing them to the
Great Big Black Garbage Bag.
“Fidgeting didn’t start with the
spinner craze,” Katherine Isbister,
ALAMY STOCK PHOTO
Biases against people who stutter are wrong
STUTTERING FROM E1
“What’s your name?” she
asked, holding a withdrawal slip.
I felt sweat form on my forehead.
Nearly every person who stutters
has difficulty saying their own
name. No definite reason for this
obstacle has been found, though
most assume it’s because names
don’t have substitutions you can
reach for. When I’m explaining
my vocation, for instance, I can
call myself a writer, a freelancer,
an essayist, a journalist or an
author. A parade of synonyms to
turn to.
But I have only one first and
last name — especially at the
bank, where there is no room for
improvisation. I balled my hands
into fists, ready to face the challenge: “Rachel Hoge,” I told myself. Just say, “Rachel Hoge.”
“RRRRRRRRRR. . .RRRRR . . .
RRRRRR . . .,” I began, hoping I
could power through, could force
myself to make the word come
out of my mouth. The teller
seemed confused, squinting her
eyes, leaning forward to better
hear me.
“RRRRRRRR . . . RRRRRR . . .
RRRRRRRRRR. . . RRRRRRRR.”
I felt my cheeks, my neck, grow
red with shame. My jaw felt
locked. Now that I was stuck on a
sound indefinitely — stuttering
on my name, of all things — the
teller crossed her arms. She
looked at me suspiciously.
“I’m sorry,” she interrupted,
“but before any transaction can
occur, you’ll need to come inside
and provide a legal ID and Social
Security number.”
Breathless and surprised, I
managed to ask her why.
“For security purposes,” she said
dismissively, straightening her
KATY NASH
Rachel Hoge wants to be
treated with patience, not pity.
back, still eyeing me. Slowly I
pulled my car through. I didn’t go
inside. Halfway home, I pulled
into an empty parking lot and
cried.
A lifetime of suspicion
I’ve stuttered most of my life.
At the age of 4 or 5, my mother
brought me to the pediatrician
and was told not to worry, I would
outgrow the stutter. In hindsight,
that advice might seem careless,
but the pediatrician was right to
make that assumption: Only
5 percent of children acquire a
stutter, and three-quarters of
those recover by late childhood.
What made my situation unusual was that my stutter was
already severe when I was a
young child, dominating my
speech and causing me distress.
And even though I received
speech therapy in elementary
school and, years later, in high
school, I never recovered. I developed a lifelong disability and
became one of the estimated 3
million Americans with a persistent stutter.
People who stutter experience
an excessive amount of disfluency, or involuntary speech disruptions, stumbling over at least
10 percent of their words. (My
percentage is much higher.)
My stutter can be mild to
severe, depending on the environment, but it will never vanish.
Most scientists believe that persistent stuttering is rooted in
neurological defects and genetic
disposition. Neither of these
causes is something a person can
change.
By my mid-20s, I had already
experienced a lifetime of suspicion because of my stutter. Once,
as a high school senior driving to
speech therapy, a police officer
pulled me over for speeding. After handing him my license and
registration, he asked where I
was headed. I took a deep breath,
hoping to say: “I’m headed to my
speech therapy appointment.”
But all I could manage was 30
dreadful seconds of “I-I-I-I-I-I-I
. . . ” The officer leaned into my
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car window and asked whether I
was drunk. Surprised, I assured
him that I wasn’t. He returned
later holding a speeding citation,
his eyes scanning my car’s interior, seeming to expect a can of beer
to appear inside my cup holder.
Years later, at a wedding, my
best friend and I were getting
drinks. The bartender had already poured my friend’s drink
before turning to me, asking my
selection.
“Mmmmmmmm . . . mmmoscato,” I said. The bartender
peered at us, her arms going stiff.
“I’ll need to see both of your IDs,”
she said loudly. Although we were
25 and accustomed to being carded, we both knew it wasn’t our
youthful appearance that set the
bartender on edge. It was my
stutter.
I have an idea where this
mistrust toward me and my disability comes from: There’s a
myth that stuttering is a reflection of poor personal integrity. A
writer in Psychology Today
claimed that you can detect a liar
by identifying variations in “tone,
cadence, and sentence structure.”
According to a listicle by the
online site Thought Catalog, primary signs of lying include “stuttering and inconsistencies,” “not
answering right away” and “repeating sentences.”
Both articles mention body
language — such as facial expressions, head movements and eye
contact — as clues about a person’s reliability and character.
What these generalizations fail to
recognize is that a variety of
disabilities — stuttering among
them — can affect a person’s
vocalizations and physical movements. And although stuttering
affects only 1 percent of the U.S.
population, 19 percent of Americans are considered disabled and
might have speech patterns or
physical movements that others
could consider odd. This means
that if you judge a person’s personal integrity based on their
spoken or physical language
alone, you might be misjudging
dramatically.
Thankfully, not all strangers are
quick to judge. Sometimes I’ll
meet someone who regards me
with patience and not pity, with
respect and not condemnation. I
have found that this is a small
group and usually the person
knows someone else who stutters
— an uncle, a cousin, a husband, a
friend. These strangers are kind
and uplifting to me, but ultimately
they are too few and far between.
Lately, I’ve found solace in
imagining a world where there is
no longer a constant misreading
of my stutter. I have faith this
world is coming as more disability perspectives are read and
shared widely. But awareness will
be achieved only if people who
stutter are willing to advocate for
themselves, dispelling misconceptions in conversation, writing
their unique perspectives and
educating loved ones.
Meanwhile,
fluent
and
able-bodied listeners need to acknowledge the misconceptions
they’ve been exposed to, then discard them. It’s unacceptable to
meet a stranger and automatically
assume their spoken and physical
attributes reveal something about
their character, especially if that
assumption is destructive or untrue.
For those of us living with
speech disabilities, stuttering is
not an indication of dishonesty.
It’s an incurable disorder, and we
have little power to control it.
health-science@washpost.com
a professor of computational media at the University of California
at Santa Cruz, wrote on the Conversation, a news and opinion
website. “If you’ve ever clicked a
ballpoint pen again and again,
you’ve used a fidget item.”
Isbister, who has been collecting information about people and
their fidgeting, said that some
people report that “fidgeting with
an object in the hand helps them
to stay focused when doing a long
task or sitting still and attentive in
a long meeting.”
A long meeting — where a normal person might find it difficult
to remain attentive — is the equivalent of a routine conversation for
someone with ADHD. We find it
difficult to stay focused. A small
study done with sixth-grade students using a stress ball found
that their attention spans increased when they used the balls
and that their achievement improved: They wrote better paragraphs.
I feel less bored if I’ve got a
spinner to engage me. When I’m
bored, I take out my phone, even
when I’m talking with someone
right in front of me. And pretty
soon I’ve slipped off to eBay or an
article on hair care, annoying
those around me.
But if I have my spinner, my
hands are occupied. It’s easier to
put down the phone, pick up the
toy and satisfyingly spin, stop,
. TUESDAY,
NOVEMBER 7 , 2017
flick, spin, stop, flick.
Because of the spinner, I can
have real conversations without
my hand itching for my iPhone. It
lets me, for the first time, actually
watch my kids play in the park
instead of pecking away at someone’s Facebook page. I can call
out, “Wow, great swing on the
bars!” or “Nice slide!” like all the
other moms. And my kids hear it,
just as all the other kids hear their
parents.
Like many with ADHD, I have
several comorbid mental health
conditions. One of them is anxiety. The fidget spinner calms me
down. When I’m worrying, which
is almost all the time, it soothes
me. When I’m freaking out, the
swish and flick, the soft whir,
calms me down enough to think
more clearly, to break through the
intrusive, obsessive thoughts. It’s
been a godsend.
It does, however, make me look
like a weirdo in public, like one of
those adults who never grew up,
who remain pathetically into the
latest kid fads. I refuse to care
what others think. I need this
thing.
It’s a lifeline. It’s therapy. I need
this support to get things done.
Next time you see someone fiddling with one of these things,
please, don’t judge. That spinner
may be something more than the
latest silly fad.
health-science@washpost.com
EpiPen failures cited in 7
deaths reported to FDA
BY
A NNA E DNEY
Paulette saw it happen at the
playground from several feet
away, the panic-inducing moment
in 2014 when her 3-year-old son
Charlie, who has a life-threatening
allergy to milk, grabbed a playmate’s sippy cup and took a gulp.
Thankfully, Paulette had the
anaphylaxis-stopping EpiPen and
was able to quickly use the autoinjector on her son. But when she
pulled the needle from his thigh, it
was sticking out of the device at an
angle instead of being under an
orange cover, leaving her unsure
whether the lifesaving medicine
had been administered. Not wanting to take a chance, Paulette (who
asked that her last name not be
used to protect her son’s identity)
called 911, and Charlie was rushed
to a hospital where he remained
for several hours until doctors
were sure he was all right.
“He was okay, but it was nerveracking to say the least, not knowing if the EpiPen had worked or
not,” she said.
Not everyone has been as lucky.
EpiPens, which contain the hormone epinephrine (also known as
adrenaline), are used to stave
off allergic reactions that can be
fatal. Failure of EpiPens to deploy
correctly have been cited in seven
deaths this year through mid-September, according to patient and
physician reports made to the
Food and Drug Administration
and obtained by Bloomberg News.
The FDA received 228 reports of
EpiPen or EpiPen Jr. failures during that period, according to documents made available as a result of
a Freedom of Information Act request. In addition to the deaths, 35
people were hospitalized, according to the reports.
The medical device has been
the subject of attention for a different reason before this. EpiPen is
sold by Mylan, which came under
fire last year for significantly raising the price of the fast-acting
allergy shot, from about $50 for a
single pen to more than $600 for a
two-pack. Congress held hearings,
government agencies began inquiries, and rival Sanofi sued,
claiming that Mylan had sought
“to preserve the monopoly position of their $1 billion crown jewel” by engaging in conduct that
was anti-competitive. Mylan has
denied any wrongdoing.
Failures of the EpiPen and
EpiPen Jr., meanwhile, resulted in
a recall of some units in March by
Meridian Medical Technologies.
Mylan, which sells the drug-device
combo
using
Meridian’s
“pens,” called the defect “extremely rare.”
Reports submitted by users to
the FDA, however, show broadening accounts of malfunctions dating as far back as 2014.
In 2012, there were four reports
to the FDA of EpiPen and EpiPen
Jr. failures, followed by 12 in 2013,
according to an agency database.
(The EpiPen Jr. contains a dose of
epinephrine intended for small
children.) In 2014, there were 67,
according to the reports obtained
by Bloomberg News.
It’s important to note that these
reports — called adverse event
complaints — don’t confirm that a
product caused the incident. At
the same time, such reports typically don’t depict the full extent of
a problem, given that most people
don’t know they can submit them.
Pfizer, the parent company of
Meridian, has previously said consumer complaints aren’t unusual
when a product “is frequently administered by non-medically
trained individuals.” In an
emailed statement last week, the
company said it’s “confident in the
quality, safety and efficacy of
EpiPens manufactured by” Meridian. Pfizer noted, however, that
“in the case of EpiPen, adverse
events can also be due to epinephrine itself, for a variety of reasons
as reflected in the product label.”
For its part, Mylan said it was
“confident in the safety” of the
EpiPen product “being produced
at Pfizer’s manufacturing site.
Testing and analysis across lots
impacted by the recall have not
identified any units with a defect.”
Although the reports provided
by the FDA don’t explain how the
EpiPens failed, FDA investigators
who inspected Meridian’s Missouri plant this year said
in a warning letter sent in September that epinephrine had in some
cases leaked out of the pens. In
other cases, the injectors didn’t
work properly, the regulator said.
“We are not aware of defective
EpiPens currently on the market
and recommend that consumers
use their prescribed epinephrine
auto injector,” the FDA said in an
emailed statement. “We have seen
circumstances in which adverse
events reports increase once a
safety issue is publicized, like a
recall. We continue to monitor
and investigate the adverse event
reports we receive.”
The auto-injecting pen was developed by Survival Technology,
which ended up becoming Meridian. The device was originally used
to administer the drug lidocaine
for people with irregular heartbeats. Around the same time, the
U.S. military approached Survival about using the device to administer treatments for chemical
warfare, and NASA astronauts reportedly used a similar approach
for nutrition delivery.
Mylan bought the right to sell
and market the EpiPen in 2007
from Merck KGaA. Meridian has
made the auto-injector for Mylan
the entire time and has primary
manufacturing responsibilities,
Mylan
spokeswoman
Julie
Knell said in an email.
The EpiPen’s design has
changed in recent years, including
tweaks to the orange cap where the
needle in Paulette’s device should
have been after she injected her
son. Mylan said the advances are
crucial to the pen’s safety and functionality, but the changes also protect it from competition by generic
device makers until 2025.
In its warning letter, the FDA
noted that Meridian staff had said
the company initiated a recall of
some EpiPens only after government prodding. The agency said
inspectors found the device maker
had “failed to thoroughly investigate multiple serious component
and product failures” for EpiPen
products, “including failures associated with patient deaths and severe illness.” The FDA at the time
didn’t specify how many had been
hurt or had died.
But even before the recall, the
FDA received 105 complaints of
EpiPen failures in 2016.
“This is a lifesaving product,”
Diana Zuckerman, president of
the National Center for Health
Research, said. “If it fails 105
times, that’s significant.”
Almost 4 million prescriptions were dispensed last year for
EpiPens, according to data compiled by Bloomberg News.
— Bloomberg News
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